Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
LS 1 4

TRY OUR
McFLURRY
TWIX MIX

Pim blowin’ it

SOF
72F

MOSTLY
SUNNY

Volume: 105 No.117

HIGH ANY

LOW
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Ss Pe trash into
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Injured i

Third homicide in
less than 36 hours

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

“A female who was in the
vicinity received graze wounds
and was also taken to hospital
for treatment where she was

A 27-YEAR-OLD Nassau _ treated and discharged,” said

The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=USA TODAY.



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009
ge
TRL

SEE PAGE SIX

WOmall



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



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ah
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STE re =



Police suspect
arsonist behind
massive fire

Map appears courtesy
of Damianos Realty

THE RED LINE shows the area of ania Re affected by the fire

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

ing the blaze, and two oth-
ers, which continued to
burn throughout southwest
New Providence yesterday.

Director of Fire Services
Superintendent Jeffrey
Deleveaux said it was
POLICE believe a mas-

Village man was killed and a
woman injured following an
altercation on West Bay Street
yesterday. This brings the total
number of homicides to three
in less than 36 hours.

The man died in hospital,
where he had been taken for
treatment for multiple gunshot
wounds received near St Albans
Drive at around midnight.

police.

A “dark, thick-built man”
seen leaving the area shortly
after the incident in a white
Honda Accord through St
Albans Drive is a person of
interest in the inquiry into the
man’s death.

The Nassau Village resident’s
killing comes a day and a half
after that of an 18-year-old

Pinewood Gardens man,
Richard Bremmer, who was

SEE page eight

According to police, he had
been involved in an argument
with a group of men when gun-
shots were fired.

Anglican Archdeacon charged
with assault of 15-year-old girl

A LEADING local clergyman accused of assaulting a 15-year-old
girl was formally arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Anglican Archdeacon Ivan Ranfurly Brown, rector of St Agnes
Anglican Church, was arraigned before Magistrate Ancella Evans-
Williams in Court 6, Parliament Street.

It is alleged that Archdeacon Brown assaulted the girl on Mon-
day, October 13, 2008, while at a church picnic at Nirvana Beach.

Archdeacon Brown, represented by lawyer Anthony McKinney,
pleaded not guilty to the assault charge. The case was adjourned to
June 23. He remains on police bail.

Archdeacon Brown, wearing his clerical collar,
appeared undaunted by the proceedings, stopping to chat
briefly with reporters outside the courtroom amid a handful of
supporters.

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JEROME THOMPSON, who is blind, is learning to captain a 21ft
powerboat to drive around New Providence and Paradise Island in
July. Jerome, 45, lost his sight at the age of 11 but says, ‘Nothing is
impossible, it can be done, it has been done’.

e SEE PAGE FIVE

Bahamians ‘won’t
lose EPA benefits’

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

NO BENEFITS currently
enjoyed by Bahamians
under its economic partner-
ship agreement with the
European Commission will

be removed, representatives
from the EC confirmed to a
Bahamian delegation that
met in Belgium last week to
address questions raised by
the EC over the services
schedule submitted by the
Bahamas.

This was communicated

SEE page eight



new printed
tees & tanks



Located on Ernest & Mackey Streets # Mon-Fri 10am-4pm - Sat 10am-2p

sive fire that spread across
several acres of forest in
the Carmichael Road area
was Started by an arsonist
near the area's well-fields.
Fire units were still fight-

unlikely that hot weather
conditions sparked the fires
in Carmichael Road,
adding "We suspect it was
started out in the well fields

SEE page two



Visitor satisfaction at
Atlantis ‘off the charts’

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SURVEYS reveal that visitor satisfaction at Atlantis is now “off the
charts” compared with previous years, Kerzner executives said yes-
terday.

Praising employees, its Managing Director said statistics show the lev-
el of service they are providing since last year’s mass lay-off exercise has
hit “new records.”

Meanwhile, the company claims to have been flooded with long
letters and e-mails in recent months from happy customers compli-
menting staff on their attitude and service.

The improvements also coincided with a slight increase in visitor
numbers at the resort over its projections last year, with occupancy lev-
els standing at 64.5 per cent — two per cent higher than the 62.5 per

SEE page eight

Customs Acting Comptroller
is taking oy retirement

AFTER 44 years
at the Customs
Department, Acting L
Comptroller Antho-
ny Adderley has
accepted governmen-
t’s severance packet
and taken early
retirement.

The new head,
Glen Gomez, a for-
mer customs officer
and most recently an official in
the Ministry of Finance will
take over from Mr Adderley
as early as today.

In a letter
j addressed to the
entire staff of the
Customs Depart-
ment, Mr Adderley
advised them on
April 6th that his ser-
vice of 44 years and
six months at the
PT Department will
UICC Come to an end on
April 14th.

“T consider those years very

rewarding and enjoyed work-



SEE page eight

Peele at: belated elie pa



NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS
= ea ; 7 ha hi Tr ‘a

Police suspect arsonist
behind massive fire

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maybe by some unscrupulous
person."

He said heavy wind blew
the fire north from well-
fields into the Carmichael
Road area which posed a
threat to neighbouring
properties — including the
gas company — over the
holiday weekend.

However, the official said
although the area was
affected by moderate levels
of smoke, the fires were
under control.

He said he expects the
fire to smoulder out some-
time today.

"By tomorrow that will be
history — maybe a few
smouldering stumps in the
centre of the forest," said
Mr Deleveaux.

The main blaze was said
to be a huge bush fire that
police said started around
11 am Sunday and burned
across several acres adjacent
to Carmichael Road, west
of Barcardi Road and east
of Coral Harbour.

A separate fire — oppo-

FLAMES near the road in the Carmichael Road area.

site the main blaze — also
burned near the Bahamas
Gas Limited's Carmichael
Road plant.

Another fire, which struck
the western area of the City
Dump early Saturday morn-
ing, was still being fought
by fire units.

Firemen, who were fight-



ing the flames since the
weekend, were able to get
the fires under considerable
control. Mr Deleveaux said
that the fires were no longer
a threat to residents and
businesses in the area and
up to press time yesterday,
there was no reported dam-
age to persons or property
due to the fires.

"The fire is still burning
in some areas, in spots, but
we are not able to reach all
those areas. Some are inac-
cessible to us, however, the
areas that are accessible we
are extinguishing those
fires.

"We were able to beat the
flames back and no damage
was incurred by those
flames,” he said in reference
to the two fires in the
Carmichael Road area. "We
still have a lot of smoke in

‘



the area, but it is down toa
(lower) level (so) it's no
threat to residents and busi-
nesses in the area."

One unit working in shifts
battled the fire at the City
Dump yesterday, which has
been plagued by a numbers
of fires over the past few
years, Mr Deleveaux said.
With additional help from
the Department of Envi-
ronmental Health, firefight-
ers were able “to get the
upper hand on that."

"It was a large fire but we
have extinguished a large
area of it with the assistance
of Environmental Health,"
he said.

Two units were dis-
patched to extinguish the
Carmichael Road fires on
Tuesday, Mr Deleveaux
said, while one unit fought
the fires yesterday.



Fj

(L-R) BERND SCHNEIDER, chairman of Schneider Power; Kevin
Ingraham, vice-president of finance for BREC; Fernando Mimiaga-
Sosa, director of strategic projects and sustainable energy for the
state of Oaxaca in Mexico; Vincent McDonald, Chief Executive Offi-
cer of BREC; Isabel Ovando, administrative assistant for the Foun-

dation of Wind Power in Istmo.

BREC takes steps to

transfer knowledge

of renewable energy
development to Bahamas

THE management team of
the Bahamas Renewable
Energy Corporation (BREC)
recently attended the Latin
Wind Energy Association
(LAWEA) conference in
Huatulco, Mexico on invita-
tion by the chairman of the
Toronto-based Schneider
Power company.

The trip formed part of
BREC’s key mandate to
transfer knowledge to the
Bahamas to further renewable
energy development in the
country.

“In order for us to create
jobs in the Bahamas we need
to transfer knowledge from
other countries so that we can
take full advantage of this
exciting and high-growth
industry,” said Vincent
McDonald, Chief Executive
Officer of BREC.

“As a company we are com-
mitted to bringing leading-
edge knowledge and techni-
cal expertise to the Bahamas
for dissemination amongst
government and private busi-
nesses.”

Mexico is a leader in the
development of renewable
energy in Latin America with
85.3 MW (megawatt) of wind
projects in operation and 356.4
MW under construction. Cur-
rent plans anticipate growing
Mexico’s wind capacity to
7,500 MW by 2020.

Key knowledge transfer
topics discussed at the confer-
ence were principals of wind
resource assessment, produc-
tion analysis, designing and
performance of wind farms,
financial modelling, operation
and maintenance, and struc-
tural safety. Concurrent with
the conference, the BREC
team was invited on a tour of
Acciona Energy’s 250 MW
Eurus wind farm in La Ven-
tosa by Mr Fernando Mimia-
ga, director of strategic devel-
opment and sustainable ener-
gy for the state of Oaxaca in
Mexico.

BREC is a joint-venture
between the Nassau-based
WINSO company and Schnei-
der Power Caribbean, a whol-
ly owned subsidiary of Toron-
to-based Schneider Power.

BREC is a developer, own-
er, and operator of three con-
templated renewable power
generation facilities totaling
24 MW, enough to power over
25,000 homes. The renewable
generation portfolio is diver-
sified across two technologies
(wind and solar) and three
islands — New Providence,
Abaco and Harbour Island.

BREC is a combination of
Bahamian entrepreneurship,
backed by knowledge and
experience of the Schneider
family’s 115-year history in
renewable energy.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Pride seen to deter jobless [fF
benefits scheme registration

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PRIDE is thought to be holding many
Bahamians back from registering for NIB’s
newly instituted unemployment benefits
scheme, Labour and NIB officials said yes-
terday.

Around 600 people signed up for the
scheme by midday in the second wave of
applications yesterday, following 774 who reg-
istered on Saturday, and with 12,000 potential
claimants out there, it was far less than officials
had expected.

Those among the estimated 1,500 who have
not been ashamed to register their unem-
ployment with the Department of Labour and
apply for financial support from the National
Insurance Board (NIB) told The Tribune they
welcomed the government’s move to provide
much needed support in tough economic
times. The majority of those signing on at CR
Walker and SC McPherson, two of the four
New Providence centres where people can
apply for benefits this week, were blue-collar
workers whose positions were made redun-
dant as businesses started to feel the pressure
of the global financial crisis, Labour Depart-
ment staff said. They would have received
smaller severance packages than white-collar
workers, if any at all. At SC McPherson, the
bulk of applicants were former employees of
Atlantis, as well as staff made redundant from
Sandals, the Wyndham in Cable Beach, small
businesses and construction workers who have
suffered job losses in recent months.

A 59-year-old Cowpen Road resident who
worked at the Wyndham for 23 years before
she lost her job just over a year ago said she
hopes the benefits will help her get back on
her feet. “It’s been really tight,” she said.
“This should be able to help a lot with the
light bill and all. And I’m hoping to find work
as well.”

Applicants must register their status as an
unemployed job seeker with the Department




. 7
PEOPLE REGISTER with the Department of Labour
and sign up for unemployment benefits from the
National Insurance Board at SC McPherson Junior
High School yesterday.

of Labour before applying for benefits from
NIB, so they can improve their chance of find-
ing employment while receiving financial
relief. However, Renaud Bethel, a NIB rep-
resentative said: “I think most people don’t
want to be seen as claiming benefits and feel
they don’t need the money, but if they aren’t
working the Labour Department can help
find them a job.”

Azella Major, NIB director in charge of
the Family Islands at SC McPherson said:
“Some of us still have a little pride so they
don’t want to be seen in the crowd.

“We try to tell them this is something you
need not be embarrassed about, this unem-
ployment is international, it’s worldwide, and
we have very little control over what is hap-
pening to us. Businesses are here to make a
profit and if things are slow they will cut down,
so you are entitled to these benefits once you
qualify, so there is no shame in this, it could
happen to any one of us.”

The low turnout has driven Department of
Labour and NIB staff to abolish the alpha-
betical system to make all welcome to register
between 9am and 4pm at the centres today,

vineya rd yines
|

martha e simeyard












































Thursday, Friday and Saturday, before regis-
tration moves to NIB and Labour Depart-
ment offices on Monday. Family Island resi-
dents will be able to register from today.

Applicants must take their National Insur-
ance card, identification and job termination
letter with them for a swift registration process
and can expect to pick up their first cheque in
two weeks. Miss Major said: “If you can’t
read, we have staff here to help you, and we
are really here to encourage people to under-
stand what is happening and ensure they can
qualify, so we treat them with the greatest
compassion possible and most persons seem
happy, everything just flows and I think that is
the good thing about it.”

Many applicants signing up yesterday lost
their jobs in the last six months and were reg-
istering with the Department of Labour for
the first time. Department of Labour repre-
sentative at SC McPherson Barbara McCart-
ney said: “The benefits have drawn more peo-
ple out to register, so that is a very good
thing.”

A 24-year-old mother-of-three who worked
in the purchasing department at Breezes hotel
in Cable Beach for seven years before she
was made redundant in August said: “I’m
here to try to get some sort of benefit to help
with my utility bills and stuff.

“Things have been very difficult. My hus-
band is bringing in a little income to keep the
rent going and pay the light bill, but this will
really help me for true, not just financially, but
to find work.” A 48-year-old former jeweller Lh)
store saleswoman ae with ie Dene MEN
ment of Labour at SC McPherson said finding
work is her top priority.

“This is a great help and I think they are
doing a good thing,” the Carmichael Road
resident said. “But I am hoping more than
anything for a job. The contribution is good,
but a job is a continuous income.”

For more information contact NIB’s public
relations department on 356-2070 extension
236/234/232, e-mail info@nib-bahamas.com, or
log on to www.nib-bahamas.com.

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 ¢ Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

oO ln brief Coes ai Ors Customs
officers’ qualifications

Man accused
of raping
teenage girl
is arraigned

e A 29-year-old man accused
of raping a teenage girl was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

It is alleged that Randy
Neeroy Bain, of Free Town
Lane, raped a 17-year-old girl
on Sunday, April 12.

Bain, who appeared before
Magistrate Guillimena Archer
in Court 10, Nassau Street, was
not required to plead to the
charge. He was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison. The case
was adjourned to July 3.

Alleged arsonist
appears in court

¢ A 30-year-old man accused
of arson was arraigned in a
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Cohen Lightbourne of
Sequoia Street, Pinewood Gar-
dens, was arraigned before
Magistrate Guillimena Archer
in Court 10, Nassau Street,
charged with arson of a dwelling
house.

Court dockets allege that
Lightbourne on Friday, April 3,
intentionally set fire to the
dwelling home of Vernessa
Strachan at Pride Estates.
According to police,

Strachan’s home was exten-
sively damaged by the blaze
which began at 11am on April 3.
Lightbourne pleaded not guilty
to the charge and was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison.

The case was adjourned to
July 22.

Maderia Sti. ONLY

ENTIRE STOC
Waverly
Fabrics

CONCERNS were raised yes-
terday that several Customs offi-
cers up for promotion may lack
the proper qualifications.

This follows angry reactions by
some senior officers to the
announcement that they will be
overlooked and end up working
for their subordinates.

According unconfirmed reports
from a source close to the depart-
ment, of the five Customs officers
that the government is proposing
to promote to the executive ranks,
"only one has tertiary education”.

The source further claimed that
the other four officers are without
BGCSE qualifications or equiv-
alent credentials. “Can you imag-
ine the majority of the executive
staff of the Customs Department
lacking a tertiary education in
2009? This clearly shows that the
government is looking at this issue
from a political and personal issue
rather than an issue that faces the
entire nation,” he said.

During a brief interview yes-
terday, Minister of State for
Finance Zhivargo Laing — whose
portfolio includes the Department
of Customs — said he was not pre-
pared to make any statements
regarding the agency. Mr Laing,
who spoke between Cabinet
meetings yesterday, offered no
further comment.

The source also argued that rel-
atively young officers are being
removed as part of the govern-
ment’s ongoing restructuring exer-
cise, only to be replaced by older
candidates. Last week, several
senior Customs officers threat-
ened legal action against an
“unprecedented” and “irrational”
announcement that they will be
superseded by more junior offi-
cers as the department is restruc-
tured. They claimed that more
than 40 officers, mainly in their
late 40s and 50s with decades of
service behind them, were sur-
prised to find themselves called

Candleholders,
Vases etc.




Zhivargo Tae}

to the office of the Comptroller of
Customs last week only to be giv-
en a letter informing them of the
promotion decision. The brief let-
ter to the officers is said to have
read that while “promotions of
officers will be necessary” under
the restructuring, they will not be
among those considered “for
advancement to the next level.”

“This would therefore result in
your being superseded by your
peers at this time,” it is said to
have added. The latest informa-
tion reaching The Tribune sug-
gests the officers have not signed
and returned the letters, as had
been requested. It is not clear if
this decision will result in any
repercussions.

This new controversy comes
after 24 senior Customs officers
were offered early retirement
packages earlier this year. The
department, also the centre of
rampant corruption allegations in
recent months, is responsible for
collecting 60 per cent of the gov-
ernment’s total revenue.

Attempts to reach Comptrol-
ler of Customs Anthony Adderley
for comment were unsuccessful
up to press time yesterday.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Hotel staff keep visitors coming

ATLANTIS EXECUTIVES are ecstatic that
visitor satisfaction is “off the charts” as staff

er than the company had predicted for this time
of year.

now realise that advertising can attract the first
visitor, but it is their responsibility to keep that
visitor returning.

Visitors have also commented to us on how
impressed they have been with the friendliness
and level of service provided by Breezes’ all
inclusive resort on Cable Beach. We assume
that it must be the same at all of our resorts as
Bahamians suddenly realise that their job
depends on them playing their part in keeping
guests happy.

For years this message has been preached by
industry leaders, but it seemed that executives
were knocking on empty doors as few in the ser-
vice industry seemed to be getting the message.
However, this message also has to be under-
stood by the general public. Only last week a
visiting couple complained about taxi drivers
who did not follow the fare rates given them by
their hotel. They felt that they had been taken
advantage of. They were happy with their hotel,
but they were not impressed by their first con-
tact with a Bahamian taxi driver. Did they com-
plain? A disgusted shrug of the shoulder indi-
cated that they had not. How will this breach of
the taxi rates be factored in when they plan
their next vacation? Will it be the Bahamas, or
will they go further afield? In other words every
Bahamian, in one way or another, benefits from
these visitors. Their courtesy and honesty will
depend upon whether or not a visitor buys a
return ticket.

Resorts should encourage their guests to
bring such complaints to their attention to make
certain that those who are letting the industry
down can be removed.

Some of the Bahamas’ leading resorts have
invested heavily in accommodating corporate
business with large conference centres and
meeting rooms. When the economic crash came
with business being hit hardest, overseas con-
ferences were the first to go under. Of course,
Atlantis was one of those hit hardest with mass
cancellations. Beyond Easter the horizon
showed a blank. Staff had to be laid off.

As soon as this happened there was a trans-
formation at Atlantis. The remaining staff
seemed energised to move to a higher stan-
dard. They were almost stumbling over each
other in their anxiety to serve. One would have
had to have been blind not to have seen the
change.

This has obviously paid off. The large con-
ventions might have disappeared, but leisure
travellers now make up the majority of visitors
— and letters and e-mails of visitor satisfaction
are arriving on Atlantis’ managing director’s
desk. Visitor arrivals are now two per cent high-



“The graphs for this year, for January, Feb-
ruary and March, are through the roof com-
pared to the same months last year. Forget
about ‘improved’ - we’re talking new records! If
we published them you wouldn’t believe it,”
said senior executive George Markantonis.

Mr Markantonis said employees certainly
appear to have recognised that “everyone has a
responsibility” when it comes to the health of
this country’s tourism industry.

“There’s a huge awareness on property that
this isn’t management’s responsibility alone
anymore — that survival depends on getting
customers who are travelling to come back and
that responsibility belongs to every single person
who works here.”

Bahamians must remember that the
Bahamas is not the only country trying to out
smile their competition for that tourist dollar.

We have seen the same happen to a hotel
where we stay in Miami. When staff were being
laid off here, they were also being laid off in
Miami hotels. Earlier this year we could have
had any room that we wanted in this particular
hotel. Many of the staff in the dining room had
been made redundant, and those remaining —
like in the Bahamas — were breaking their
backs to serve. A perpetual smile lighted their
faces. The next time we went to Miami we did-
n’t bother to make a reservation, and we almost
did not get a room. A large convention of
lawyers had filled the hotel. Since then this
hotel has been fairly busy, but still operating on
a skeleton staff in the dining room — as though
unsure of when their luck might run out.

Editorial corrections: In this column yester-
day we explained why individual Americans
200 years ago carried arms, but commented
that with today’s army and police force, an
American’s right to bear arms is no longer a rea-
sonable argument. Of the American militia of
200 years ago we wrote: “Those were the days
when if the state were threatened the farmer
had to hitch up his britches, drop his pitch fork,
grab his fire arm and defend his neighours.”
Maybe Huck Finn would have been hitching
up his “britches”, but The Tribune should have
had the farmer hitching his breeches. Sorry
folks!

And thanks to our reader who brought to our
attention an error in a recent article in which we
reported a PLP MP suggesting that Tribune
Managing Editor John Marquis should be run
out of town and The Tribune burned down.
That statement was made at a meeting of the
Shirlea-Twynam Crime Watch committee, not
the “Shirley Street-Twynam Avenue area” as
reported in this column.



CTE mics tom

How small and
medium business
suffer in silence

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To bring relief to recently
unemployed persons the gov-
ernment has initiated an unem-
ployment benefit programme,
which is imminent.

The government has also
articulated plans to make this
programme a permanent fixture
by 2010 with both employers
and employees alike contribut-
ing to a National Insurance
Unemployment Benefit Fund.

Additionally, there are opin-
ions held by some that given
the paltry savings of Bahami-
ans and the lack of discipline in
that regard, it may be necessary
to initiate a retirement fund that
would supplement the National
Insurance Board Benefits.

Naturally, whatever formula
is derived, small and medium
business (SMB) will be taxed

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



further for that programme.
Furthermore, the opposition
has indicated that should it be
successful in the next general
elections, the National Health
Insurance Scheme will be
placed on the table once again,
naturally, SMB will be required
to carry the lion’s share of this
health care tax initiative.
Given the government of the
day’s reliance on SMB to fund
substantially all of its social ini-
tiatives, it would appear rea-
sonable that given this global
economical crisis greater
emphasis on SMB would be
reflected in the stimulus agenda.

To date, making credit avail-
able to SMB or other necessary
proposals to ensure viability
have been virtually deficient.
Notwithstanding, SMB’s are
being required to bear the
heavy lifting for all national tax-
ation proposed.

It is said that a sound eco-
nomic stimulus policy requires
that all long-run effects and all
stakeholders, not simply short-
run effects and a few people be
considered.

IT remain hopeful the govern-
ment would revisit its position
on stimulating the economy by
giving thoughtful consideration
and action to likewise address
the plight of SMB forthwith.

R McKENZIE
Nassau,
April, 2009.

Cleaning up the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As Bahamians, change begins in the hearts and
minds of every person and then manifests itself in the
actions of individuals; one person possibly influ-
encing another.

There is good charge and not so good.

Since we have homes, these are our castles with-
out regard to location, let’s have a heart and mind to
maintain a clean home in and out doing a little work
each week at least. Keep one or two gallons of paint
around to touch up now and then. Place some bright
and colourful flowers in your yard area. Do some-
thing to improve your castle (home) every now and
then. And then “maintain” what you’re done.

Since we have offices, jobs and businesses keep
those places looking sharp always, touch up areas
which need a little painting, place some flowering
plants out front which helps to create an attractive
entrance for potential customers and you yourself.

All of us in this country who are citizens and res-
idents let’s get involved and clean up right where we
are and stop leaving it for the next person to do.

All of us merchants/business people downtown,
paint up those walls right in front of your store;
wash down your signage and tiling, place, clean up
that portion of sidewalk in front of your business.
Most importantly “maintain: all these things and

be consistent with keeping right where you are clean
and tidy always.

We'll all be pleased with the mark we’ve all made
on maintaining a clean environment downtown Bay
Street.

Homeowners! Don’t wait on a government agency
to initiate cleaning in your neighbourhood. Rather
clean up right in your own yard and maintain it
beautifully.

Apartment dwellers! In spite of you not owning
the place where you live, keep it clean in and out.

Maybe, just maybe that home, apartment, condo
or business place that you cleaned up would influ-
ence another person to clean and maintain the same
throughout the Bahamas.

Interesting if all businesses downtown Nassau
and throughout the Bahamas were to clean right in
front of their stores on Bay Street and all other
areas throughout our country would be more attrac-
tive. Finally for you yourself, your Bahamian cus-
tomers and our tourists.

So let’s have that good change of heart and mind
to clean and maintain right where we are through-
out our Bahamaland...

GREGORY W STRACHAN
Nassau,
April, 2009.

Please research your facts, Mr Allen

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have been following the
exchange between Kim Aranha
and young Allen. I should like
you to print an open letter to
that young man.

Mr Allen, when I was your
age my uncle and my father
owned fishing vessels and a
barge docked at Potter’s Cay.
It was common practice then,
as it is now, for fishermen to
leave turtles on their back for
days in the scorching sun with-
out water and food until they
were slaughtered. My uncle and
father did it an so did everyone
who sold turtle meat at Potter’s

Cay. I found it so cruel and
inhumane that I stopped eating
turtle.

Turtle meat is delicious and
turtle soup was one of my
favourite meals, but taste could
not justify the torture.

Thaven’t eaten turtle meat in
thirty years, but turtles are still
tortured in this fashion, and
finally someone is trying to do
something about it.

Mrs Aranha was wrong,
however, when she said turtles
were the only animals torment-
ed in this way (ie made help-
less and left to suffer).

In the Philippines, China and
others parts of Asia, dogs are
stuffed in cages with their legs
broken and then bound behind



their backs. It is a practice out-
lawed, but still continues as an
underground trade.

Now, young Allen would you
like us to tie up and eat our pot-
cakes?

According to your rational
that would be a totally utilitari-
an means of ridding ourselves of
our potcake problem.

Mr Allen, with your cavalier
attitude, you come across as a
pompous, self-serving young
man.

You'll make a good politician
some day, but until then, please
research your facts.

PAMELA E HEASTIE
Nassau,
April, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas Girl Guiles
Association holts
opening ceremony
for regional camp

THE Bahamas Girl
Guides Association
held its official open-
ing ceremony fora
regional camp cele-
brating the 50th
anniversary of the
Caribbean Link of
Guiding at Xavier’s
Lower School on East-
er Monday.

Under the theme,
“Guiding for
Caribbean Unity,” the
Girl Guides of the
Bahamas welcomed
some 30 guides and 12
world leaders from
CARICOM countries
during Camp Lukku
Kairi (Lucayan for
island people).

Joining the 40 guides
and rangers from New
Providence, Grand
Bahama, Exuma and
Eleuthera were guides
from Antigua, Belize,
the British Virgin
Islands, the Cayman
Islands, Guyana and
Montserrat.

Rev Beryl Higgs,
president of the
Bahamas Girl Guides
Association, welcomed
the excited participants
to the week-long camp
of environmental activ-
ities, challenges and
exploration of New
Providence.

Senator Dr Jacinta
Higgs, the keynote
speaker, challenged
the girls to be cog-
nisant of their common
heritage, the unifying
principles of guiding
and their role in the
preservation of the
regional Girl Guides.

The camp closes with
a rally on Friday, April
17 at the Girl Guides
site on Marshall Road.

~ Blind man aims to captain

boat around New Providence

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A BLIND man who aspires
to sail the open sea is learn-
ing to captain a 21ft power-
boat to drive around New
Providence and Paradise
Island in July.

Jerome Thompson, 45, fell
in love with the sea as a child
and had dreamed of driving a
boat even after he lost his sight
at age 11.

But Mr Thompson, of
Coconut Grove, Nassau, never
believed his dream could come
true until he heard the far-
fetched tales of the remark-
able visually impaired people
who drove cars and piloted
planes in other parts of the
world.

The unmarried entrepreneur
was inspired to set up non-
profit organisation Adventures
Unlimited Bahamas, regis-
tered in January, to help dis-
abled people in the Bahamas
and around the world bring
their dreams to life by sup-
porting them in their adven-
turous endeavors cither finan-
cially or by providing equip-
ment and training.

As president of the organi-
sation, Mr Thompson is lead-
ing the way for other daredev-
ils with disabilities, as he
intends to steer a three hour
course from Potters Cay
around New Providence and
Paradise Island on July 11 to
promote his organisation and
prove it is possible to conquer
any challenge, regardless of a
person’s limitations.

The brave captain said: “It’s
a daring thing, I must admit.
Persons might think I am a lit-
tle crazy, but when the Wright
brothers invented the aero-
plane, people thought they

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

PREPARING TO SET SAIL: Jerome Thompson

were crazy too.

“Nothing is impossible, it
can be done, it has been done,
and hopefully more people will
realise that if a blind person
can drive a boat, then so can
they.”

Mr Thompson took his third
lesson from former Royal
Bahamas Defence Force
(RBDF) Captain Glenward
Bain at the Bayshore Marina
in Nassau Harbour yesterday
afternoon, and was taught how
to follow the compass to steer

CED aCe eM eRe |

Tim Clark/Tribune staff

CONTESTANTS take part in the “Pull d’ Engine” competition at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre on Easter Mon-

day. The event was hosted by TaekwondoBahamas and TEAMProcure and featured fire safety demonstrations,
car extrication demonstrations, a Taekwondo exhibition and a junior firefighter challenge. Proceeds of the event

will benefit TaekwondoBahamas.

Distinguished Lecture Series



his course for the first time.

Captain Bain, who drove a
RBDF boat for 13 years, has
already helped Mr Thompson
become familiar with the cock-
pit of the 21ft Wellcraft speed-
boat loaned to him through
dock master Lundy Robinson.

The Captain has been teach-
ing him how to turn the wheel,
adjust the throttle and most
importantly, follow orders, as
he will act as Mr Thompson’s
eyes at sea in the July chal-
lenge.

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OPEN BalOu. im. - MOp.in. DALY
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“Nothing is impossible, it can
be done, it has been done, and
hopefully more people will
realise that if a blind person can
drive a boat, then so can they.”



Mr Thompson said: “I want
to drive around the course
completely under my own
power, with Capt Bain on the
boat only for safety reasons,
and I don’t want this event to
be the only thing done.

“T want to help others to
think outside the box, to dare
to dream, and to realise that
despite of their disabilities,
there are abilities they can tap
into.”

Once he has mastered the
course in three months time,
Mr Thompson hopes to cap-
tain a boat entirely on his own
by means of a $5,000 audio
GPS system.

Capt Bain said: “Once he
understands compass orders I
will not need to be in the boat
with him anymore; the GPS
system will tell him where to
go and he will be able to find
his own way around the island
and the coral reefs.

“It’s very doable, and quite
straightforward.

“T will be his lookout for
oncoming vessels, but his
entire track would be ona
GPS system.”

Mr Thompson, who said he
has never been plagued by
fear, was thrilled by his first
experience driving a boat.

“It was quite exhilarating
when I stepped on board to
drive the boat for the first time
on March 14,” he said.

“I was still in the planning,
thinking, theoretical stage
while onboard, but after I

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came off the awesomeness
actually hit me, that I
actually did that. It was exhil-
arating.”

Workshop
AP EOOU DOTS
to ‘Tame
the Time
Monster’

THE host and creator of
the motivational television
show “Dare To Be Great”,
Spence Finlayson, will be
conducting a time manage-
ment workshop titled
“Taming The Time Mon-
ster.”

Mr Finlayson, motiva-
tional speaker and corpo-
rate trainer with over 20
years experience, claims
persons participating in his
workshop will learn to get
more done in fewer hours.

The workshop will take
place at the British Colo-
nial Hilton on Wednesday,
April 29 from 9am to 4pm.

ua He
Us)
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To our valued customers. Please
be advised that The People’s
Pharmacy, Carmichael Road

Branch has been relocated across

the street in Anne’s Plaza

Date: Thursday, April 16, 2009

Time: 7:30 pm

Venue: St. Mary’s Hall, Bernard Road
Cost: FREE of charge

NS) eer co

Topic:

Mr. James Smith

President of CFAL Investments,

Former Governor of The Central Bank of The Bahamas and
Former Minister of State for Finance.

"The Current Economic Crisis and Implications for the Future".

Open to all members of the Public. Refreshments will be provided.





opposite, Turtle Drive.

Your Health iy Our Concerw



PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Health education is
critical for the Bahamas

Accor to
Health Minister

Hubert Minnis, the government
will soon propose major medical
reforms that can be expected to
spark a huge debate in parlia-
ment.

A centrepiece of the proposals
will be a nation-wide prescrip-
tion drug plan that will feature a
computer database of patients,
as well as an education and fol-
low-up programme to ensure
that people take their medica-
tions and make necessary
lifestyle changes.

The reason is that we are fac-
ing a healthcare crunch similar

i

To the Shareholder of

to that faced by the US — costs
are skyrocketing and resources
are running out. The big chal-
lenge today is to find a sustain-
able solution, something that
requires a "paradigm shift" in
the healthcare industry, experts
say.

In other words, we will have
to change our frame of reference

2l] ERNST & YOUNG

Colinalmperial Insurance Limited



from over-reliance on tertiary
medicine, which focuses on
expensive hospital care, to lower-
cost preventive medicine that is
more patient-driven. What does
this mean? Well, it costs $60,000
a year for the Princess Margaret
Hospital to keep a patient with
kidney failure alive — and there
are more than 200 patients

Ernst & Young
, ee PRICE

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of Colinalmperial Insurance Limited (the Company)

as at December 31, 2008.

Management's Responsibility for the Balance Sheet
Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the balance sheet in accordance with
International Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes: designing, implementing and maintaining
internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of a balance sheet that is free from material
misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; selecting and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making
accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances.

Auditors’ Responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the balance sheet based on our audit. We did not audit the financial
statements of Goodman’s Bay Development Company Limited (“GBDC”), a subsidiary of which the Company
owns a 67% interest in, which statements reflect total assets of $28,547,474 as of December 31, 2008 and total
revenues of $2,584,125 for the year then ended. Those statements were audited by other auditors whose report has
been furnished to us, and our opinion, insofar as it relates to the amounts included for GBDC, is based solely on the

report of the other auditors.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we
comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the balance
sheet is free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the balance
sheet. The procedures selected depend on the auditor's judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material
misstatement of the balance sheet, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor
considers internal control relevant to the entity's preparation and fair presentation of the balance sheet in order to
design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion

on the effectiveness of the entity's internal control.

An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of

accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating
the overall presentation of the balance sheet.

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained and the report of other auditors is sufficient and appropriate to
provide a basis for our audit opinion.

Opinion

In our opinion, based on our audit and the report of other auditors, the consolidated balance sheet give a true and fair
view of the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2008, in accordance with International Financial

Reporting Standards.

April 8, 2009

Cormety Young

A member firm of Emst & Young Global Limited

DULINAIMPERIAL INSURANCE LTD,

Consolidated Ralance Sheet

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(Expressed im Bahamian dallars)

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Exceutive Vice-Chairman

undergoing dialysis as we speak.

And almost every one of
them is in that unfortunate posi-
tion due to complications from
high blood pressure or diabetes,
which are easily preventable and
controllable diseases. In fact,
about two thirds of the govern-
ment’'s healthcare spending goes
to treat diseases that are caused
by poor lifestyle choices. And
half of all deaths in the Bahamas
are attributed to these illnesses.

"Everyone is entitled to
healthcare," Dr Minnis said at a
recent College of The Bahamas
presentation, "but as former
president Bill Clinton said
recently, the financial meltdown
will be a joke compared to what
healthcare will cost if we contin-
ue on our present path. When
you need more and more hospi-
tal beds, you know that health-
care has failed. And if we con-
tinue on this road we will never
have enough money or facilities.”

In fact, the Bahamas seems
to have come full circle from the
early days of the 20th century,
when there were only three doc-
tors outside of Nassau — at
Inagua, Harbour Island and
Green Turtle Cay — to serve
42,000 people living in the wide-
ly scattered out islands.

Back then, according to Dr
Harold Munnings in his 2005 his-
tory of the Princess Margaret
Hospital, out islanders "obtained
what care they could from
untrained midwives, clergymen
and herbalists." And commis-
sioners "were provided with a
chest that contained bottles of
medicines and jars of pastes and
lotions” with accompanying
instructions.

The Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal began life as a poorhouse in
1809 and entered the 20th cen-
tury as a place of last resort for
those in need of medical care.
According to a 1905 account it
had four sections — for the sick,
indigent, lepers and insane.
Treatment was free, but patients
were referred to as "inmates"
and those who could afford it
arranged for medical care at
home.

In 1925 several American vis-
itors contracted typhoid fever in
Nassau — a killer disease trans-
mitted by dirty food and water,
so the British authorities dis-
patched a senior public health
expert to investigate.

He deplored the filth of heav-
ily populated communities not
included in the city's new water-
works and sewerage system, then
under construction. He also not-
ed the prevalence of tuberculosis,
venereal disease, gastroenteritis
and tetanus, and strongly criti-
cised public indifference to Nas-
sau's dreadful sanitary and hous-
ing conditions.

Unfortunately, these condi-
tions did not begin to change
until the middle of the century,
when a British official was still
able to write that "behind Nas-
sau's picturesque old-world
streets and the princely mansions
along the East and West shores
are slums as bad as any West
Indian Colony, and far worse
than anything Bermuda can
show."

In 1953, two thirds of the
homes on New Providence still
had no running water. And pre-
ventable diseases were due most-
ly to overcrowding, ignorance,
poor nutrition, and lack of public
hygiene.

There was no regular garbage
collection, so people took little
notice of trash or litter during
their daily lives.

While researching these issues
I came across an interesting med-
ical memoir written by Dr Mal-
colm Hale a little more than a
year before his death in 2003 at
the age of 77. He had arrived in
Nassau in 1954 on a three-year
contract as a medical officer for
the new Bahamas General Hos-
pital (which was renamed after a
visit by Princess Margaret in
1955), and stayed on in private
practice.

"TL arrived by boat from Eng-
land on December 16," Dr Hale
recalled. "We anchored outside
the bar and a tender came out
to carry us in. On it was a
reporter from the Guardian to
interview the new doctor, and a
photographer to take his pic-
ture...the effort hinted at the state
of medical needs of the commu-
nity."

He identified the new Emer-
ald Beach Hotel on Cable Beach,
the redeveloped Bahamas Gen-
eral Hospital and the first City
Market food store as emblems
of changing times for Bahami-
ans. They represented a dramat-
ic break with the economy of the
past, he said, and were a sign that



MINISTER OF HEALTH
Dr Hubert Minnis

prosperity was beginning to trick-
le into the general population.

Shortly after his arrival Dr
Hale was put in charge of the
TB and geriatric wards at the
Prospect Hospital, as well as the
Lazaretto off Carmichael Road,
which was no more than a nar-
row dirt track. This was in addi-
tion to his out-patient and casu-
alty duties, as well as occasional
out island clinics.

Prospect Hospital was a col-
lection of wooden buildings on
Prospect Ridge built for the
American and British air forces
who trained in the Bahamas dur-
ing the Second World War. Like
Windsor airfield it was handed
over to the Bahamian govern-
ment in 1945.

"The general health of the
population was poor,” Dr Hale
recalled.

"Tuberculosis was rife; new
cases were discovered almost dai-
ly, many from out island settle-
ments, some of which like
Rolleville (Exuma) and Moores
Island (Abaco), were heavily
infected. Fortunately, my entry to
the medical profession coincided
with the discovery and availabil-
ity of a whole range of effective
medications...Now patients came
to be cured, not to die."

He described the geriatric
wards as pathological museums.
"Especially impressive were cas-
es of elephantiasis and the whole
spectrum of tertiary syphilis. The
leprosarium was a collection of
small wooden cottages (with)
about 20 patients when I took
over, most in advanced stages of
disfigurement, especially of
hands and face.

"The few new cases I admitted
were diagnosed in the early
stages and so far as I know all
were cured and returned undis-
figured to society. The old cases
stayed at the Lazaretto and died
off over a period of several years.
Most of the cases were white."

In the out-patient clinics, Dr
Hale treated many malnourished
children with intestines bloated
with Ascaris worms. Vermicide
was probably the most heavily
prescribed drug at the time, and
he credited it with making the
greatest single contribution
(except for penicillin) to the
health of the community.

He also described cases of pel-
lagra in adult men — "the only
clear-cut vitamin deficiency dis-
ease we encountered despite the
widespread malnutrition. Most
cases were alcoholics and they
responded miraculously to
niacin."

Dysentery was also common,
as were sexually transmitted dis-
eases like gonorrhea and syphilis.
But the popular remedy for VD
at the time, Dr Hale noted, was
to have sex with female infants.
"It took a major educational
effort by the profession to dis-
abuse the population of this idea,
and I wonder today if we fully
succeeded."

Although HIV-AIDS was
unknown at the time, Hale sus-
pected that "the occasional cases
of multipathology which
responded to no treatment, and
which were unsolved diagnostic
puzzles, and which were invari-
ably fatal, may have been AIDS.
Interestingly, as AIDS increased,
the other STD’s declined and
have become rare."

Epidemics of whooping cough
were devastating, Hale said. "I
remember Kenneth Eardley, an
older private physician, telling
me he had signed two or three
hundred death certificates due
to this illness in one outbreak
just a few years previously. And
how many times have I heard
older women say ‘I born 13 but I
bring up three’?"

In the 1950s there was rela-
tively little obesity and much less
diabetes than now, Dr Hale
reported. But one serious health
condition that has remained con-

stant is hypertension. High blood
pressure was, and is, a common
problem amongst Bahamians of
all ages, together with its deadly
complications of stroke and heart
disease.

In fact, while he was a resident
at the PMH, Dr Hale and others
contributed data to a US hyper-
tension study. In their 1958
report, the American researchers
noted that: "Almost everyone on
the Islands has a relative that has
‘the high blood,’ died of hyper-
tension, or has had a stroke...An
analysis of the water supply in
Nassau and several of the outer
island groups revealed that the
well water was significantly high
in sodium content."

The study reported salt lev-
els of less than a milligram per
millilitre in the drinking water of
major US cities, whereas drink-
ing water at the PMH contained
129 milligrams and on Eleuthera
210 milligrams. This meant that
Bahamians were ingesting up to
10 grams of salt per day from
water alone. And that was in
addition to the sodium found
naturally in foods, or added at
the table. Nor did it account for
the fact that salt pork was a com-
mon ingredient in most dishes at
the time.

Currently, the American
Heart Association recommends
an intake of less than 2.5 grams
of salt per day for the general
population — that's about a tea-
spoon — and even less for high-
risk individuals. I can testify from
personal experience that this
guideline is as difficult to achieve
in today's fast food-dominated
diet as it was back in the 1950s
when we all drank salt water.

Hale was one of a growing
band of doctors who participated
in the vast expansion of medical
skills and services in the
Bahamas over the past half cen-
tury. His assessment of how
things had changed over that
time?

"Today the general health of
the population is excellent," he
wrote in 2002, "except for self-
inflicted conditions, principally
obesity (and its complications),
HIV-AIDS, and gunshot
wounds."

This brings us back to Minis-
ter Minnis, who says the govern-
ment wants to realign medical
spending and priorities to pro-
mote healthy lifestyles. In addi-
tion to more emphasis on pre-
ventive medicine and health edu-
cation, the government will
invest in sophisticated informa-
tion technology systems that will
enable doctors to treat patients
remotely via online facilities.

It is a fact that 60 per cent of
patients admitted to the over-
crowded PMH emergency room
don't need to be there, but they
don't know any better. Afford-
able drugs are important, but
education to improve compliance
or avoid problems in the first
place is just as critical.

And it is this realisation that
has complicated recent debates
over the introduction of national
health insurance.

The proposed paradigm shift
indicates a growing awareness in
government that traditional
approaches will never solve our
healthcare challenges. Cancer,
AIDS, diabetes, uncontrolled
hypertension with stroke, heart
attack and kidney failure top the
list of modern medical problems,
and they all are preventable with
education, diet and medication.

"T would love to work in a
new, state-of-the-art facility,” Dr
Munnings told me, "but a prop-
erly funded programme to pre-
vent disease has to be the prior-
ity. Removing the excuse of med-
icine cost with a national drug
plan is a step in the right direc-
tion, but until education
improves and lifestyles change,
kidneys pummeled by out-of-
control pressure will continue to
fail and diabetes will continue to
cripple and blind."

There are still plans for a new
multi-million-dollar government
hospital — surveyors are stak-
ing out acres of prime forested
land at Prospect Ridge right now,
in fact. But dismay at the enor-
mous cost and effort has led suc-
cessive governments to content
themselves with refurbishing the
PMH at its present location. We
will have to see what the gov-
ernment brings to parliament in
the next few weeks.

As Dr Minnis said, "Preven-
tion is the key, but we have a
long way to go."

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Workshop
to focus on
money skills
for youth

MANY parents affected by
the present economic slump are
finding themselves answering
questions like “why can’t we
have fast food,” “why can’t I
have that new gadget,” and
even “why are you taking me
out of private school.”

These are the questions of
an generation that seemingly
does not understand the value
of a dollar these days.

Those questions and more
can be answered on April 18
and April 25 in a “Providing
Money Skills Youth Need For
Life” workshop at the British
American Financial Centre on
Independence Drive.

The two sessions - from
10am to 2pm and 3pm to 7pm —
will be hosted by Creative
Wealth Bahamas, organisers of
Camp Millionaire and the Mon-
ey Game.

The workshop is the brain-
child of former banker Keshelle
Kerr, founder and CEO of Cre-
ative Wealth Bahamas.

She is also the founder and
vice-president of a woman’s
investment group called FFL
Investments.

Trained in Santa Barbara,
California, Ms Kerr is the only
certified creative wealth coach
in her native Bahamas.

“April is financial literacy for
youth month and in these times
it is essential for us to talk to
our kids about the changes in
our lifestyle due to the down-
turn in the economy,” she said.

“T have a nine-year-old
daughter and until I sat down
and explained how money
works to her, she did not fully
appreciate the sacrifices that
have been made for her to go to
school, get tech toys or even go
to her favourite restaurant.
Many parents whose children
enter our programmes thank
us all the time because their
kids are suddenly more mon-
ey wise and aware of how much
it costs to raise them and as a
result, pressure their parents
less.”

A part of the upcoming pro-
gramme includes teenagers
experiencing the proverbial “rat
race” by working to receive a
set salary and paying their
monthly expenses.

They are also given a choice
whether to save any extra cash
or purchase pleasure items.

“At the end of the day, teens
realise what it feels like to pay
rent and that a credit card does
have to be paid off. They then
learn about passive income,
assets and liabilities, how and
why to save and so much more,
she said.

Despite being a former
banker, Ms Kerr said the work-
shop is not about encouraging
children to get into banking,
but about empowering young
people to follow their passions
and to achieve financial free-
dom in their lives.

“The workshop is focused on
making sure the next genera-
tion doesn’t make the mistakes
of their parents by not
being properly prepared,” she
said.

“Tt’s about making sure they
are able to spend wisely, save
for their futures, not have to
deal with financial difficulties
and know how to enter their
adulthood as responsible indi-
viduals. All and all it’s about
making sure they understand
dollars and sense.”

For the

Golfers on
course to
help Sister

‘Sister charity

THE Bahamas Golf Fed-
eration Central Ladies Divi-
sion and the Blue Shark Golf
Club are hosting a golf tour-
nament in support of the Sis-
ter Sister breast cancer char-
ity.

The Golf Federation has
always supported the Cancer
Society in the Bahamas
through its ladies division
golf tournaments.

This year, the Federation
made a conscious decision to
target a special group of
women who work hard to
support those diagnosed with
breast cancer, the organisers
of the event said in a press
statement.

Medication

The Sister Sister organisa-
tion not only supports
women financially by sup-
plying needed “port-a-caths”,
which are inserted in the
chest for them to receive
medication, but also offers
emotional support and hope
by example.

The non-profit organisa-
tion purchases and donates
these very expensive port-a-
caths to women in need and

try to do this for a least five
persons per month.

This venture in itself is
costly as each device costs
about $770 and literally
depletes the funds being held
by the organisation.

Most of the volunteers
working in the organisation
are breast cancer survivors
and use their personal expe-
riences to encourage women
to not despair and show them
that they can still have a pro-
ductive meaningful life.

“We are asking the public
to join with the Bahamas
Golf Federation Central
Ladies Division and the Blue
Shark Golf Club to not only
play in the upcoming Sister
Sister Breast Cancer Chari-
ty Golf Tournament on May
9, 2009, but also send dona-
tions to help support the
event and thereby support
the Sister Sister organisa-
tion,” the Federation said.

To sign up for the tourna-
ment interested persons can
contact Yvonne Shaw, chair-
man of the Central Ladies
Division, or download a
sponsor form and player reg-
istration form from the BGF
website at www.bgfnet.com.

REAL TALK YOUTH FORUM



SCOTIA Bank in partnership with the Zonta Club of Nassau host-
eda “Real Talk Youth Forum” in March at the Mount Tabor Full
Gospel Baptist Church in Pinewood Gardens. The event was
geared toward addressing the topic of sexual health among Bahami-
an youth. Some 300 tenth graders were engaged in discussions
sparked by the student presenters from the College of the Bahamas

(COB).

These presenters included Jonique Webb, Krista Nottage,
Camille Smith, Renbert Mortimer, Adrian Wildgoose and Brooke
Sherman, hospitality management student at COB.

Scotia Bank and Zonta Club of Nassau are of the view that the
general health of the country’s young people is extremely important
to their current well-being and to the future of the Bahamas.

Indira Rolle, assistant marketing and public relations manager of
Scotia Bank, presented the president of the Zonta Club of Nassau
with a cheque to show the bank’s commitment to the cause.

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Tornadoes
Spotted as storm
line rumbles
over Florida

MTAMPA,Fla,

A STRONG line of storms
spawned at least three torna-
does Tuesday as it tore across
central Florida, scattering
roof shingles, uprooting trees
and forcing schools to evacu-
ate children from trailer class-
rooms, according to Associ-
ated Press.

No injuries were immedi-
ately reported and the storms
eventually moved off Flori-
da’s Atlantic coast. It was the
latest round of bad weather to
hammer the South after
heavy rain and strong winds
Monday that hit Alabama,
Tennessee, Georgia, Ken-
tucky and northern Florida,
already reeling from storms
and tornadoes last week.

The National Weather Ser-
vice was still tallying damage
information, but initial
reports were that three tor-
nadoes had touched down
north of Tampa and two oth-
ers may have struck in cen-
tral and east Florida.

Twenty Florida counties
were under a tornado watch
for much of the day.

“To our knowledge, there’s
been no true structure dam-
age and no injuries,” said Jim
Martin, Emergency Manage-
ment Director for Pasco
County north of Tampa,
where at least one twister was
spotted Tuesday morning,

Martin said high winds
damaged about 25 homes and
flipped over one car. Students
were evacuated from trailer
classrooms at some Tampa-
area schools.

In central Florida, authori-
ties reported no injuries but
said the some homes were
damaged, trees were toppled,
roofing was blown off and

power lines were downed. A }

train also struck a fallen tree

on tracks in Marion County
but did not derail, though

some of its windows shat-
tered.

Randi Cecil, 24, was on her
porch in the town of Sparr,

about 90 miles north of

Orlando, when the wind
turned gusty and trees started
swaying. Then a tree cracked

so loud that it sounded like a

car crash and smashed into

Bahamians ‘won’t
lose EPA benefits’

FROM page one

to the Caribbean Regional Negotiating
Machinery (CRNM) — a negotiating
arm of CARICOM — in writing, offi-
cials said.

Furthermore, the EC said that “in
conformity with the EC-Cariforum
EPA, the Bahamian services and
investment offer has to be accepted
by the Cariform-EC Trade and Devel-
opment Committee,” according to a
press release issued by the Ministry of
Finance late yesterday.

While noting that the Bahamian
delegation had “fruitful discussions”
with officials from the EC on April 9,
the statement did not say whether
today’s deadline — which was given a
six months extension last year — will
be met.

However, the statement revealed

Visitor satisfaction at
Atlantis ‘off the charts’

FROM page one

cent which the company had
expected.

Despite consumer confidence
in the U.S. dropping to near
record lows, leisure travellers
made up the majority of visitors,
as the company saw mass cancel-
lations of corporate group book-
ings, equivalent to a loss of 18,000
room nights (a week’s stay by one
visitor would amount to seven
room nights).

Admitting that “unfortunate-
ly” the first uptick in reported vis-
itor satisfaction levels occurred
in the very same month that 800
workers were laid off — Novem-
ber 2008 — Managing Director
George Markantonis said Decem-
ber was “high” while the suc-
ceeding three months in 2009
were most impressive.

“The graphs for this year, for
January, February and March, are
through the roof compared to the

that the committee is likely to hold its
inaugural meeting this summer and
“at that time the Bahamian services
and investment offer is expected to be
formally presented to that body.”

The statement comes after much
speculation and controversy sur-
rounding the fate of the submitted ser-
vices offer.

The furor erupted when it was
reported that the EU was asking for
more areas in the schedule to be lib-
eralised, or opened up for trade.

Observers — notably former for-
eign affairs minister Fred Mitchell —
questioned if local crawfishermen's
duty free access to European markets
would be jeopardised if government
missed the nearing deadline.

The Europeans were said to be lob-
bying the Bahamas to offer more
allowances in areas of retail, construc-
tion, computer systems, advisory ser-



vices and foreign/international law to
enable European companies to build a
commercial presence in the Bahamas to
provide these services.

This prompted senior finance offi-
cials, led by Director of Trade Simon
Wilson, to fly to Brussels for a last
minute meeting to “address queries
raised by the EC regarding the scope
and coverage of the Bahamian Ser-
vices Offer under the EPA.”

According to the Ministry of
Finance, the EC specifically had con-
cerns at last week’s meeting regard-
ing “the approval of inward invest-
ment in the Bahamas, which is sum-
marised in the horizontal and sectoral
commitments of the Services and
Investment Offer.”

Horizontal commitments are areas
of universal application that apply to
all service sectors such as exchange
controls and national immigration law,

according to officials.

A representative of the CRNM
attended last week’s meeting as an
observer.

Speaking to The Tribune before the
Ministry of Finance issued the state-
ment, Paul Moss, head of Bahamians
Agitating for a Referendum on Free
Trade (BARF), said he hoped finance
officials “stuck to their guns” during
the meeting.

"We expect the minister (Zhirvargo
Laing) to say that they stuck to their
guns with respect to the services offer
that they had made because that offer
purportedly reserved and preserved
areas of the economy for Bahamians.
If they did not then it only serves to
prove the point that they did the wrong
thing in signing onto an agreement
that they clearly did not understand
and put at risk the economy of this
country,” he said.

Man dies, woman
injured in shooting

FROM page one

day.

i

i

=
r
ee
e
r
r

aia.

19, 20 and 23.

stabbed multiple times near Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre at
around Spm on Easter Sunday, and just over 16 hours after the
discovery of another man — yesterday identified as 32-year-old
Edward George Emmanuel, also known as “Edward Rolle” —
with a gunshot wound to the neck on Watling Street on Mon-

A 21-year-old is in police custody in connection with the
killing of Mr Bremmer.

Meanwhile, four young Soldier Road residents were also in
policy custody yesterday after being picked up by police who
searched their car — also at around midnight on Tuesday.

Police officers were on patrol on Wulff Road, near Lincoln
Boulevard, when they discovered a small amount of marijuana,
$700 in cash, and a .40 handgun with six live rounds of ammu-
nition in the grey Nissan Altima occupied by the men, aged 18,

Customs Acting
Comptroller is taking
early retirement

same months last year. Forget
about ‘improved’ — we’re talking
new records! If we published
them you wouldn’t believe it,”
said the senior executive.

Suggesting a silver lining to the
downturn in economic conditions,
Mr Markantonis said employees
certainly appear to have recog-
nised that “everyone has a
responsibility” when it comes to
the health of this country’s
tourism industry.

“There’s a huge awareness on
property that this isn’t manage-

her neighbor’s bedroom.

“It was the most horrible
feeling I ever went through,”
Cecil said. :

Progress Energy i
spokesman Tim Leljedal said
more 70,000 customers expe-
rienced a power outage,
mostly in the Ocala area in
central Florida and in south-
ern Pasco County, just north
of Tampa. About 14,500 were
still without power by late
Tuesday afternoon.

reach

a CRUISE
C rT

Ro Miura cy)! Pe ae teen
By st

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WC aE ie)
ee Go cel aa

SPRING SPECIAL Waitin eRe weep
ah restuarants, 65)-seat nightelub, spacious
5 Pieces ine casino, complete spa, fitness room, three

Hela ac Me Tc Re esta ons
Bir se ya sate ER ha Be be
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242-326-7626 ot 71627

bee aed ae] Bo er ee Ree ee EE te Sag’ repair neon



ment’s responsibility alone any-
more — that survival depends on
getting customers who are trav-
elling to come back and that
responsibility belongs to every
single person who works here,”
he said.

The company receives regular
reports from an international
company that surveys thousands
of its recent customers on a
monthly basis as to how they
found their visit to the Paradise
Island resort.

Having built up data based on
these reports over several years,
Kerzner was shocked to compare
the figures for the first three
months of 2009 with those from
previous years.

While the survey covers all
aspect of the visitor experience,
from staff to bath towels, the
senior executive said that it is well
known that interaction with
Atlantis employees is a critical

factor in overall visitor satisfac-
tion and therefore that the results
speak volumes about the efforts
of the resort’s thousands of work-
ers.

“90 per cent of that (a visitor’s
experience) is made up of inter-
actions,” said Mr Markantonis.

Meanwhile, he said that letters
received from visitors expressing
their happiness with their stay
have increased in both “length
and frequency.”

“If someone writes you a three
page letter telling you how great
the place is, there’s a lot of pas-
sion in that, and interestingly ’m
getting — and as President it’s
not easy to find my e-mails —
I’m getting a lot of e-mails,’ he
added.

The Managing Director said
the surveys indicate that every
hotel tower on the property has
“without exception” been subject
to the same effect.

FROM page one

ing with each of you,” Mr
Adderley said in his letter.
“However, it is often said all
good things must come to
an end and I consider my
tenure no exception.

“As I bid farewell, I do so
with fond memories of the
Bahamas Customs Depart-
ment, and will cherish each
memory dearly. To those I
leave to continue the noble
cause, I wish you absolute
success and may God’s
blessings be upon you
always.”

Although Mr Adderley’s
departure was well known
from at least April 6 to all
Customs officers, the news
of his departure had appar-
ently not reached the minis-

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ter responsible.

When contacted yester-
day for comment on the
matter, Minister of State for
Finance, Zhivargo Laing,
informed The Tribune that
there was no truth to the
reports that Mr Adderley
would be demitting office.

In fact, Mr Laing went as
far as describing these
reports as utter “nonsense.”

Mr Adderley’s removal
from the department follows
a recent demonstration by
senior officers who were
informed that despite their
years of service, they would
not be promoted in the
department’s pending staff
shuffle.

It is hoped, sources said,
that Mr Gomez can bring
some “new blood” and ideas
to this long suffering agency
which has been the subject
of discussion for many years.

However, a number of
Customs officers have
already expressed concerns
about Mr Gomez’s appoint-
ment, as it is understood
that his wife currently holds
a senior post in the Depart-
ment. According to these
officers, this apparent “con-
flict of interest” could pose a
serious problem for the new
comptroller should admin-
istrative conflicts arise with-
in the department.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



ABOVE AND BELOW: The Bahamas
Judo Federation has launched its sport
ambassador programme. On this page,
members of the federation display their

moves...



Bahamas Judo Federation launches
sport ambassador programme

THE Bahamas Judo Federa-
tion has launched its sport
ambassador programme. Mem-
bers of the junior and senior
national teams are scheduled to
travel to various countries to
train with elite level coaches on
a series of cross cultural
exchanges.

Each team member is trained
to be an ambassador by exhibit-
ing good sportsmanship and
manners while staying in the
homes of students of the coun-
try. Then teams from the coun-
tries visited will come and train
and compete in the Bahamas
while staying with Bahamian
families.

"The goal of the programme
is to promote the Bahamas on a
grass roots level by having
sporting families want to visit
and attend our major tourna-
ments, such as the Bahamas
Junior Open. We will also raise
the level of our judo by being
exposed to the training meth-
ods of the world's best coach-
es," explained D'Arcy Rah-
ming, president.

"T believe it is critical that
each athlete in our country real-
izes that his or her behaviour
can directly impact the impres-
sion of the entire country."

To kick off the programme, a
seven person junior team trav-
eled to the New England area
this past week.

The team trained under the
direction of top US coach Ron
Landry while visiting and train-
ing at other area schools with
their elite coaches.

"We were pleased to invite
the Bahamian team into our
schools and homes particularly
after the reception we received
at the Bahamas Open in Feb-
ruary. The behaviour of the ath-
letes, their willingness to learn,
their work ethic and their man-
ners are a testament to the
Bahamian people and their
families. We will be bringing at
least 30 athletes to the next



Bahamian Judo tournament”
said coach Landry.

The team members were all
excited by the trip. “I increased
my speed and throwing abili-
ty,” said 14-year-old Alex Mar-
tinborough. “By the end of the
week I was able to win a match
against a US national champi-
on,” said 10-year-old Kameron
Knowles.

“T enjoyed the visits to the
Boston Aquarium, the Muse-
um of Science and the site see-
ing. But the ice skating was too
cold for me,” said 11- year-old
Tajaro Hudson. Other team
members included 11-year-old
Keanu Pennerman, 14-year- old
Cynthia Rahming and 14-year-
old Kristoph Knowles.

"Every athlete improved sig-
nificantly in one week. We had

over 30 hours of judo training. It
was tough for the kids but they
really represented the Bahamas
well,” said Rahming.

"T will be talking to my
Caribbean and Pan American
counterparts about similar cross
cultural trips. In order for this
area to develop in judo to the
standard of our European and
Asian friends, we will have to
give our athletes the exposure
and competition they need.
With this in mind the Bahamas
will be hosting a summer train-
ing camp and tournament
directed at juniors, ages eight
to 19."

e Anyone interested in
Bahamas Judo can contact 364-
6773 or e-mail

daishihan@gmail.com



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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

‘O9 cricket
season open

THE Bahamas Cricket Asso-
ciation opened its 2009 cricket
season on the turf wicket at
Haynes Oval on Saturday with
a match between the 2008
champions “Dockendale” and
Scotiabank Paradise.

There was also the presenta-
tion of awards for the 2008 sea-
son.

In Saturday’s game, Dock-
endale, batting first, scored 279
runs with Rudolph Parks scor-
ing 46 runs.

Paradise’s top bowlers were
Lance Liston with three wickets
and Gary Bell and Dr Mark
Nutler with two apiece.

Paradise batted and scored
289 runs for the loss of eight
wickets to win the match by two
wickets.

Andrew Nash scored 86 runs
and Aean Lewin had 51 runs to
help out the winners.

Shiek Sharnaz and Dwight
Weakley took three wickets
each for the losers.

Dockendale was without their
dynamic captain Naraendra
Ekanayake.

On Sunday, the Police played
St Agnes in an exciting match,
which the Police lost by three
wickets.

Batting first, the Police were
bowled out for 153 runs. Youth

player Rudolph Fox was the top
scorer with 46 runs.

Earl Thomas and Orville
Grant took three and two wick-
ets each for St Agnes. At Bat, St
Agnes scored 157 for the loss
of seven wickets. Earl Thomas
scored 34 runs not out.

Youth player Odain Tucker
and Gary Armstrong took three
and two wickets respectively.

On Monday, the BCA under-
19 youth team played the pres-
ident’s select team. The senior
team was bowled out for 182
runs by the youths.

The top scorers were Kevin
Surujlal with 40 runs and Clif-
ford Atkinson with 35 runs.

Bowling for the youths were
Rudolph Fox with three wickets
and Mark Taylor and Ken Shar-
ma with two apiece.

The youths, at bat, scored 185
for the loss of only six wickets
for the surprise win by four
wickets. Odain Tucker led the
batting for the youths with a
score of 63 runs.

Orville James was the best
bowler for the president’s team,
taking three wickets in a losing
effort.

The Bahamas under-19 team
is preparing for the ICC Inter-
national Under-19 tournament
in Toronto, Canada, in July.







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THE TRIBUNE





MARK KNOWLES and MAHESH
BHUPATHI in action at the ‘09 Aus-
tralian Open in Melbourne...

Knowles,
Bhupathi

go after
Rolex title

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK _ Knowles’ and
Mahesh Bhupathi, still seeking
their first tournament victory
for the year, are hoping that
they can get their break through
this week as they go after the
title that slipped out of their
hands last year at the Monte-
Carlo Rolex Masters in Mona-
co.

Having been dropped from
the number two spot on the
ATP computer rankings
released on Monday, the
Bahamian-Indian duo are seed-
ed at number four in the field of
32.

They are scheduled to play
their first match in the second
round on Thursday against the
Spanish team of Feliciano
Lopez and Fernando Verdas-
co, having being given a bye in
the first round.

The Spaniards pulled off a 7-
6 (3), 6-4 win over the Russian
team of Igor Andreev and Safin
Marat in the first round.

Going into the tournament,
Knowles and Bhupathi have
slipped to number three in the
team rankings with 1515 points.
They have been passed by the
team of Belarus’ Max Mirnyi
and Andy Ram of Israel, who
have 1735 points.

The American identical twin
brothers of Bob and Mike
Bryan are controlling the
leaderboard with 3515.

The Bryans are also the top
seeds in Monte-Carlo. They are
followed by the team of Daniel
Nestor of Canada and Nenad
Zimonjic of Serbia.

Last year, Knowles and Bhu-
pathi, seeded at No.4 as well,
played in the final where they
lost in identical set scores of 6-3,
6-3 to the Spanish/American
team of Radal Nadel and Tom-
my Roberto.

This year, Roberto will
defend his title with Spain’s
Albert Montanes. They were
scheduled to play today against
the No.3 seeded team of Lukas
Dlouhy of the Czech Republic
and Leander Paes of India.

Knowles and Bhupathi have
played in the final of the Aus-
tralian Open, the first Grand
Slam tournament for the year
and in the semifinal in Sydney,
but they have yet to record their
first victory together.

Knowles, however, teamed
up with American Mardy Fish
to win the title in Memphis,
Tennessee.



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

PAGE 11 - th
- =
a
oo r —
t q




Vv



Judo Federation
launches sport
ambassador

programme...
See page 9

Carifta team returns

SPORTS MINISTER DESMOND BANNISTER
greets 2009 Carifta team members as they
arrive in New Providence yesterday from St
Lucia. The 61-member team finished third with
28 medals...








SPORTS MINISTER Desmond Bannister speaks to members of the 2009 Carifta team in the VIP lounge after their arrival at Sir Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport yesterday afternoon. Also shown are BAAA executives, coaches and members of the management team...



CARIFTA team members are shown in the VIP lounge after their arrival at Sir Lynden Pindling International Airport Tuesday afternoon...

from St Lucia



Photos: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



at
a

SWIMMING
CARIFTA TEAM

THE Bahamas’ 36-mem-
ber team to the Carifta
Swimming Championships
left town yesterday for Aru-
ba. Like the Carifta track
and field team, the swimmers
flew to the championships
on a chartered Bahamasair
flight.

The team, led by head
coach Geoffrey Eneas, will
be out to improve on its third
place finish at last year’s
championship in Aruba. The
French Antilles won the
meet, followed by Trinidad
& Tobago.

Last year, the Bahamas
collected a total of 50
medals, inclusive of 22 gold,
18 silver and 10 bronze. The
French Antilles posted a
total of 91 (29, 38 and 24)
and Trinidad and Tobago
had 61 (24, 15 and 22).

In the points scored, the
French Antilles accumulat-
ed 1,107, followed by
Trinidad & Tobago with 801
and the Bahamas with 721.

BASKETBALL

NPBA CHAMPI-
ONSHIPS

THE New Providence
Basketball Association
men’s best-of-five champi-
onship series will continue
8pm tonight at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

The series is dead even at
1-1 between the defending
champions Commonwealth
Bank Giants and last year’s
runners-up Electro Telecom
Cybots.

Game four will be played
on Friday with the fifth
game, if necessary, scheduled
for Saturday.

The winner of the series
will represent New Provi-
dence in the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Federation’s Nation-
al Round Robin Tourna-
ment that will be played in
Bimini next weekend.



PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

JUSTICE ANITA ALLEN SWORN IN AS ACTING CHIEF JUSTICE

Product Recall



JUSTICE ANITA ALLEN, left, is sworn in as Acting Chief Justice of the Supreme Court by Governor
General Arthur Hanna at Government House on Wednesday, April 8.

Please be advised that Fisher-Price has recalled its Simplicity’s
Rainforest portable play yard, model number 5310RNF. Therefore,
if you are the owner of this product, purchased from Solomon's
super Center or CostRight, Nassau or Freeport stores we would
like to assist in replacing your play yard, Proof of purchase is
required along with the actual play yard for replacement. The
model number can be found on a sticker located on one of the legs
underneath the play yard.

For further official information regarding this announcement, you

may visit www.service.mattel.com.

We apologize for any inconvenience.

Patrick Hanna/BIS





MEMBERS OF THE NASSAU MUSIC SOCIETY paid a courtesy call on Governor General Arthur Hanna
on Tuesday, April 7 at Government House. Pictured from left are Italia Watkins-Jan, vice-president of
Ser Get Far cena the Society; Patrick Thompson, president; Polina Leschenko, guest pianist; Governor General Arthur

— . Hanna; Linda Thompson, and Marc Drobinsky, guest cellist.

IN UNCERTAIN TIMES,
YOU NEED A CERTAIN BANK.

A certain bank’s strong and diversified balance sheet continues to drive its solid financial
performance, achieved on a firm financial bedrock: over US$10 billion in assets, a return
on equity of 18% and a strong regulatory capital base.

That bank is majority-owned by CIBC, one of the largest and best capitalized financial
institutions in North America.

That bank is FirstCaribbean International Bank.







ul



THE TRIBUNE



ine

WEDNESDAY,

APRIL

Tess



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Yacht registry’s (glgQmon’s Mines sees

‘great synergy
opportunities

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Maritime
Authority (BMA) believes the
creation of a Bahamian yacht
registry would create “an
opportunity for great synergies”
between this sector, the second
home market and private plane
owners, a government minister
told Tribune Business yester-
day.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, confirmed
that the issue of establishing a
Bahamian registry for mega
yachts was “a matter before the
[BMA] Board now”.

“Tt’s on their agenda to dis-
cuss what amendments, if any,
would have to be made to the
legislation, and which market
we would go to,” Dr Deveaux
said.

Tribune Business revealed
late last year that the BMA and
the Government were working
on the creation of a Bahamian
yacht registry, the two parties

ae
CAM DIN sr U4



involved believing the sector
held as much potential for the
Bahamas as its existing bulk
shipping registry - the world’s
third largest.

When asked what legislation
would need to be amended, Dr

SEE page 5B

ROYAL @FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

30-50% sales declines

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

uxury goods retail-

er Solomon’s

Mines has seen

year-over-year

sales declines of
between 30-50 per cent depend-
ing on the monthly compara-
tives, its president told Tribune
Business yesterday, but he said
the firm was performing “no
worse than anyone else” on Bay
Street.

Mark Finlayson said that
while Solomon’s Mines’ was
going through “a difficult time”,
the problems facing the retailer
were “a joke” compared to
what his father, Sir Garet ‘Tiger’
Finlayson’, had gone through
in the 1990s with ABC Motors
and the constant speculation
that liquor merchant Burns
House was “going to fall”.

Denying reports that the
Supreme Court had given per-
mission to two Solomon’s Mines
suppliers to repossess more than

* President says luxury goods retailer going through
‘tough time’ but doing ‘no worse’ than rivals

* Situation ‘a joke’ compared to what he and Sir Tiger
went through in 1990s with Burns House, ABC Motors

$200,000 worth of goods for
non-payment, Mr Finlayson
said: “The true position of the
company is that like everyone
else, the company is going
through a difficult time.

“But we’re no worse than
anyone else; any of our com-
petitors on Bay Street. That’s
really the truth.”

When asked whether
Solomon’s Mines planned any
further downsizing in terms of
store or staff numbers, Mr Fin-
layson replied: “I’m not dis-
missing any possibilities. It
depends on what the economic
climate is like.

“We are proactive people, so
if we see the economy is not
going in a direction that makes

Bahamian firm wins dismissal of ‘insolvent’ insurer case

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE liquidators of an “insol-
vent” insurance company have
filed a second appeal in their
efforts to recover assets they
allege were “fraudulently trans-
ferred” to a Bahamian compa-
ny, after a US district court
reaffirmed the bankruptcy
court’s decision they did not
have jurisdiction over the pro-
ceedings.

Richard Fogerty and William
Tacon, the liquidators for
Nevis-domiciled Condor Insur-
ance, had appealed the bank-
ruptcy court’s decision to the
US District Court for the south-
ern district of Mississippi over
the alleged transfer of that com-
pany’s assets to Bahamian-reg-
istered Condor Guaranty. How-

ever, their appeal was rejected,
forcing them to now head to
the US Fifth Circuit Appeals
Court.

In his judgment, US district
judge Louis Guirola recalled
how Messrs Fogerty and Tacon
were appointed as Condor
Insurance’s liquidators on May
18, 2007, after one of the com-
pany’s creditors, Infineon Tech-
nologies, filed a winding-up
petition with the Nevis courts.

The judgment said: “The [liq-
uidators] contend that over
$313 million in assets that
belonged to Condor Insurance
were fraudulently transferred
to and/or by Condor Guaranty
and the other appellees, and
that many of the assets are now
located in the US.

“The [liquidators] allege that
many of the officers and

‘Urgent action’ needed
on S8bn NIB shortfall

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president yester-
day called for “urgent action” to
close the projected $8 billion
solvency deficiency that the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) will face within the next
60 years, but acknowledged that
the percentage of wages upon
which contributions were based
was “admittedly low”.

Dionisio D’Aguilar told Tri-
bune Business that it was vital
to immediately start addressing
the projected multi-billion dol-
lar shortfall in NIB’s reserve
fund because the national social
security system represented the
only vehicle that forced most
Bahamians to save for retire-
ment.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



However, he said NIB’s cur-
rent insurable wage ceiling of
$400 per week was relatively
low compared to those set in
other nations, especially the US.

In the Bahamas, this ceiling
meant that NIB contributions -
split 5.4 per cent/3.4 per cent
between employer and employ-
ee - were only paid on the first
$20,800 of per annum salaries,
Mr D’ Aguilar explained.

This figure was just about
equivalent to the Bahamas’
average per capita income, but
excluded a significant portion
of the incomes earned by high-
er wage earners.

Mr D’ Aguilar contrasted this
with the US social security sys-
tem, where contribution rates
were 15 per cent - split evenly at
7.5 per cent between employ-
er/employee - on the first
$90,000 of income, which gen-
erated a much higher contribu-
tion rate and amount.

“The fact we only contribute
on $400 is admittedly low,” Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We only pay NIB contri-
butions at 8.8 per cent on
$20,800, whereas in the US if
you're going to retire you’re
paying 15 per cent on the first
$90,000 of salary.”

While the Bahamas “clearly
can’t jump to 15 per cent” con-
tribution rates to solve the
impending solvency deficiency
within its own social security
system, Mr D’Aguilar said this
nation needed to determine
what it wanted from NIB, what
it wanted the scheme to do, and
how its problems were going to
be resolved.

“That is the writing on the
wall,” the Chamber president

SEE page 6B

employees of Condor Insurance
were also officers of Condor
Guaranty and other companies
to which the assets were
allegedly transferred.”

Messrs Fogerty and Tacon
had alleged that Condor Guar-
anty, while a Bahamian com-
pany, had the same president,
Harvey Milam, as Condor
Insurance. Both he and the
Bahamian company enjoyed
the same address in Ocean
Springs, Mississippi.

The judgment recorded that
while the two sides were dis-
puting whether the assets had
been transferred before or after
the winding-up petition was
filed, Messrs Fogerty and Tacon
were alleging that “the assets
were transferred in an attempt
to prevent creditors from recov-
ering debts owed by Condor

Insurance in the winding-up
proceeding”.

As a result, the liquidators
had filed an adversary pro-
ceeding under the Chapter 15
bankruptcy action in a bid to
“recover the assets that were
allegedly fraudulently trans-
ferred to the United States”.

Condor Guaranty, though,
filed a motion to dismiss, and
succeeded in both courts, with
the district court upholding the
bankruptcy court’s findings that
it did not have the power to
adjudicate the adversary pro-
ceeding because it was filed
under Chapter 15, not a Chap-
ter 7 or Chapter 11 bankruptcy
case.

The legal battle has also
embroiled the chairman of the

SEE page 6B

Make it a reality.

e ea pee

sense, we will take proactive
measures.”

Adding that almost every
Bahamian business was experi-
encing a decline in sales, Mr
Finlayson said that, as far as
Solomon’s Mines was con-
cerned: “It depends on the
month. We’ve experienced
drops in sales from 30-50 per
cent, compared to where we
were last year. The environment
is tough.

“Everyone has to put their
best foot forward and ride out
these tough times. We’re a pret-
ty hardy people, and in a few
years we'll be reminiscing, look-
ing back at these days.”

Sir Garet’s family company,
the Associated Bahamian

Brewers and _ Distillers
(ABDAB), acquired Solomon’s
Mines in 2004 from Martin
Solomon, the company having
formerly been a division of
Solomon’s Brothers.

The acquisition, thought to
have cost more than $30 mil-
lion, was financed via a syndi-
cated bank loan put together
by Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national, with extra financing
provided by Scotiabank and the
proceeds from a boardroom
restructuring at Burns House
that saw Heineken/Common-
wealth Brewery take over day-
to-day management responsi-
bility.

SEE page 5B

Moody’s: Bahamas
fiscal deficit doubles

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

But former finance minister
says no chance of imminent

T H E sovereign rating downgrade

Bahamas
has one of

the highest government debt to gross
domestic product (GDP) ratios in its sov-
ereign credit rating peer group, standing at
180 per cent, but a former finance minister
said yesterday there was no little danger
that this nation would be subject to an
immediate downgrade.

James Smith, minister of state for finance
in the former Christie government, told
Tribune Business that the likes of Moody’s
and Standard & Poor’s (S&P) would give
the Bahamas some room to manoevere,

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THE TRIBUNE





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OVER the past several
weeks, I along with other local
pundits have been warning
Bahamians that we face our
most difficult economic chal-
lenge to date. For those in their
mid-40s (and above), I often say
it’s probably the most difficult
economic period that they will
encounter in their lifetime.

Great Depression

During current public discus-
sions, comparisons to the ‘Great
Depression’ (1930s) are com-
monplace. The Great Depres-
sion was a worldwide economic
downturn, starting in most
places in 1929 and ending at dif-
ferent times in the late 1930s
for most countries.

It was the largest and most
important economic depression
in the 20th century, and is used
in the 21st century as an exam-
ple of how far the world's econ-
omy can fall. The Great
Depression originated in the
US, with historians citing “Black
Tuesday’, which was the stock
market crash on October 29,
1929, as its beginning. During
the course of the depression,
international trade declined by
about 70 per cent, heavy indus-
try and construction came to a
‘near halt’ and credit dried up.

While there are similarities
between the 1930s and the con-
ditions we now face, there are
important differences that exist
today which are worthy of not-
ing. They will be explored in
today’s column.

Great Recession

This current downturn is now
more frequently being dubbed
the ‘great recession’ because it
is expected to last longer than
any ‘post war’ downturn.
According to Chris Isidore,
CNNMoney.com’s senior
writer: “In terms of length, the
longest post-Depression eco-
nomic decline was 16 months,
which occurred in both the
1973-75 and 1981-82 recessions.
(This recession began in
December 2007, is currently in
its 17th month, and the consen-
sus is that it could be some 24 to
30 months in duration.)

“The current recession is also
more widespread than any oth-
er since the Depression. The
Federal Reserve's readings
show that 86 per cent of indus-
tries have cut back production
since November (2008), the
most widespread reduction in
the 42 years the Fed has tracked
this figure.

“What's more, every state
reported an increase in unem-

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|_ .) Financial

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eS lo



ployment this past December,
the first time that has happened
in the 32 years that records for
unemployment in each state
have been kept.”

Differences between
the 1930s and now

Depth of Contraction

Once again, referring to
Isidore’s article, so far during
this recession, the US gross
domestic product, the broadest
measure of economic activity,
has dropped about 1.7 per cent
thus far, measured from the top
of the last economic cycle to the
current position.

According to surveys con-
ducted by the National Associ-
ation for Business Economics,
the consensus suggests a 3.4 per
cent decline in GDP over the
life of this recession. While a
3.4 per cent drop in GDP would
be the worst since World War
II, and far worse than the aver-
age ‘post war’ recession.

This contrasts with the expe-
rience of the US economy dur-
ing 1929 to 1933, when the
economy shrank by more than
26 per cent. Therefore, in terms
of magnitude, this downturn is
not expected to be anywhere as
deep as the ‘great one’.

Social safety nets

Since the 1930s, significant
‘safety nets’ such as Unemploy-
ment Insurance and Social
Security payments have been
instituted. Also, the size of the
US government at the federal,
state and local level is far larg-
er than during the 1930s. While
I am not a proponent of large
governments, the fact of the
matter is that in times of eco-
nomic crisis the US government
will try to maintain employment
levels and create ‘make work’
programmes. While it is not
good long-term economic poli-
cy, it could serve to shorten the
negative impact of the current
economic downturn.

Stimulus Spending

The massive stimulus pro-
gramme thus far will pump tril-
lions of dollars into the US
economy, with many of those
dollars being earmarked for
programmes never tried before.
The end result is that this will
swell the supply of money in
the system. By way of contrast,
the money supply tightened
during the Great Depression.

For the sake of balance, the
stimulus spending (borrowed
money) will cause higher levels
of inflation in the future, but
that is a discussion for another
day.

International Coordination

Finally, what is most note-
worthy is the unprecedented
degree of international coordi-
nation of economic policies, and
the global resolve to work
through this recession. Two of
the greatest ‘policy mistakes’ of
the 1930s were the imposition of





Real Estate

Oa eat U MTU cate er

Taw Look beyond challenges
to fix internal problems

e Special "

a

stiff tariffs on international
trade and government-imposed
limits on prices and production.
Both of these mistakes are
unlikely to be repeated in the
current environment.

Economic challenges yes,

economic meltdown no

I wish to categorically state
that the current downturn will
not last indefinitely, and that
there will be economic recov-
ery. Recessions (economic
downturns) are normal compo-
nents of economic cycles. The
capitalist system, historically,
goes through a period of (what
I call) rebalancing, which
enables it to commence a new
cycle of growth and prosperity.
It is during this period of rebal-
ancing, such as what we are cur-
rently facing, that we have to
retool and refocus our econo-
my to succeed in the new period
ahead.

However, if we do not retool
or refocus, then we will not reap
maximum benefits from the
recovery phase. For instance,
low productivity levels within
the Bahamian workforce is a
perpetual problem that we
‘sweep under the rug’ at every
opportunity.

This productivity shortfall has
its roots in our broken educa-
tional system, dysfunctional
family structure, misplaced val-
ue system and declining work
ethic...all of which are very
complex social issues with no
quick fixes. Crime is another
problem that is slowly strangling
our society. Crime, and the per-
ception of uncontrolled levels
of crime, will increasingly
become a major disincentive to
new foreign and domestic
investment. Policymakers, you’d
better “smell the coffee’.

However, in the absence of
“quick fixes’ there must be the
political resolve to systemati-
cally address these issues and
effect positive, sustainable
change.

We need to be ever mindful
that when good times return,
we must save more and invest
more for our long-term financial
stability. The challenge is to
start with a realistic assessment
of where we are, then to for-
mulate a bipartisan action plan
to reposition the economy for
the benefit of all Bahamians.

In conclusion, within the con-
text of our reality, we must be
positive about the future but
honest about the changes need-
ed to ensure that the future is a
bright one. Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas),
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Colo-
nial Group International or
any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs



at

an

Everywhere The Buyers Are!





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 3B



Rescuing your clients from ‘The Black Hole’

BY leveraging one or more
of the following marketing
strategies, you'll often be able to
re-engage a potential client or
customer who has disappeared
into ‘The Black Hole’. Not
always, but often. And, if you’ve
continually provided value and
focused on the impact you’re
offering, they’ll likely be ready
to implement your solution
today!

What You Can Do

When you don’t know what’s
behind a potential client or cus-
tomer’s silence, figuring out
how to respond can be a dilem-
ma — especially since you don’t
want to be a pest. Here are
some strategies you can use in

Financial
sector to
examine Key
pillars of
business
model

THE Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) is set to
host a seminar to obtain the
industry’s views on how the
Bahamas should implement the
OECD’s tax standards, and
whether this nation could
exploit double taxation and
bilateral investment treaties as
alternatives to Tax Information
Exchange Agreements
(TIEAs).

The BFSB said that follow-
ing dialogue begun in the 2009
first quarter, and the recent shift
in positions adopted towards
the OECD by major interna-
tional financial centres, the
Bahamian financial services
agreed that the sector’s exist-
ing model - and the ‘status quo’
- was no longer viable.

As a result, it was critical that
two key pillars of the current
business model - confidentiality
and ‘no direct tax’ - be exam-
ined.

The BFSB said: “It was on
this premise that last year BFSB
commissioned an Information
and Tax Review, with a man-
date to consider in a compre-
hensive manner how confiden-
tiality and national taxation pol-
icy impact the growth and
nature of financial services in
the Bahamas. Such an under-
standing is essential as we seek
to sustain and expand our inter-
national financial services sec-
tor.

“The need for a holistic
approach and discussions con-
cerning the Bahamas tax model
is even more critical now, recog-
nising that undoubted change
is underway.

“A primary objective of the
current review is to obtain
broad industry agreement on
whether we should maintain the
status quo, expand our tax
information exchange agree-
ment network, or introduce a
resident corporate taxation
regime supported by interna-
tional agreements. We also wish
to identify other options for a
sustainable financial services
sector.

“In a wide-ranging industry
report published in 2003, BFSB
recognised the landscape for the
financial services sector was
changing, and its programme of
work in ensuing years has, in
part, been guided by this fact. In
2004 and in each ensuing year,
trade and taxation issues -
including how leading
economies interact with low and
no tax jurisdictions, the impact
of trade agreements, Bilateral
Investment Treaties and the EU
Savings Directive - have been
discussed at the Bahamas
Financial Services Retreat and
many seminars.”

PTT eT AT
The Tribune - the
A Ea

aT CT
rT Para
TI



dealing with “The Black Hole’.

Just keep trying. Realise that
prospects expect you to carry
the “keep in touch” burden —
so do it. It can often take eight
to 10 contacts before you are
actually successful. Don’t panic.
This is normal in today’s busi-
ness environment.

Make each connection valu-
able. Don’t just say: "Hi Eric.
Just getting back to you as I
promised about your xxx deci-
sion. If you have any questions,
give me a call.” Instead, you
might say: “Eric, based on our
conversation last week, I know
how important it is to you to
shorten your sales cycle. There’s
a white paper on our website
that addresses this issue. [ll be

Promotional

Marketing



sending you a link via e-mail
shortly.”

Have a sense of humor. After
four to five contacts, leave a
funny message such as: “Eric, I
know you’re swamped. But I
also know that shortening your
sales cycle is important to you.
That’s why I keep bugging you.
I’m looking forward to FINAL-
LY reconnecting.”

Leverage a variety of medi-
ums. Mix up phone calls with

e-mails, mailings, invitations to
upcoming events, sending arti-
cles, etc. To position yourself
as a resource, makes sure each
connection educates, informs or
adds insights.

Create multiple entry points.
Never let one person be your
total gateway to a company.
Identify and nurture multiple
relationships concurrently.
When appropriate, reference
others you’re talking to in your
messages/e-mails.

Jill Konrath, author of Selling
to Big Companies and founder
of the Sales Shebang, is a fre-
quent speaker at national sales
meetings.

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your



THE WORKSHOP will be held on Saturdays at the British American Financial Centre, Independence Drive...

Workshop to give
teens finance skills

A WORKSHOP to provide
young Bahamians with much-
needed financial skills will be
held on Saturdays April and
April 25, 2009, at the British
American Financial Centre on
Independence Drive.

The Providing Money Skills
Youth Need For Life work-
shop, featuring sessions from
10am to 2pm and 3pm to 7pm,
will be hosted by Creative
Wealth Bahamas, organisers of
Camp Millionaire and The
Money Game.

The workshop’s main organ-
iser is former banker Keshelle
Kerr, founder and chief execu-
tive of Creative Wealth
Bahamas. She is also the
founder and vice-president of a
woman’s investment group
called FFL Investments.
Trained in Santa Barbara, Cal-
ifornia, she is a certified cre-
ative wealth coach.

“April is financial literacy
for youth month, and in these
times it is essential for us to
talk to our kids about the

changes in our lifestyle due to
the downturn in the economy,”
said Ms Kerr.

“T have a nine year-old
daughter, and until I sat down
and explained how money
works to her, she did not fully
appreciate the sacrifices that
have been made for her to go
to school, get tech toys or even
go to her favourite restaurant.
Many parents whose children
enter our programmes thank
us all the time because their
kids are suddenly more money
wise and aware of how much it
costs to raise them and, as a
result, pressure their parents
less.”

A part of the upcoming pro-
gramme includes teens expe-
riencing the proverbial ‘rat
race’ of working to receive a
set salary and paying their
monthly expenses. They are
also given a choice of whether
to save any extra cash or pur-
chase pleasure items.

“At the end of the day, teens
realise what it feels like to pay

rent, and that a credit card
does have to be paid off. They
then learn about passive
income, assets and liabilities,
how and why to save and so
much more. We have a vast
demographic taking part in the
course,” says Ms Kerr

Despite being a former
banker, Ms Kerr said the work-
shop is not about encouraging
children to get into banking
but about empowering them
to follow their passion and to
create financial freedom in
their lives.

“The workshop is focused on
making sure the next genera-
tion doesn’t make the mistakes
of their parents by not being
properly prepared,” she says.
“Tt’s about making sure they
are able to spend wisely, save
for their futures, not have to
deal with financial difficulties
and know how to enter their
adulthood as responsible indi-
viduals. All in all, it’s about
making sure they understand
dollars and sense.”

business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week. Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT!”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses from var-
ious industries - ranging from
tourism and banking to
telecommunications - in mar-
keting themselves. Readers can
contact Mr Farrington at Sun-
Tee EmbroidMe on East



Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
este Maral? lad
on Mondays

Notice

Notice is hereby given of loss of Bahamas Government Registered

Stock Certificate as follows:

Interest Certificate
Stock Rate No.
2015-2017 1.2500APR 52.141

Maturity
Date
15/10/2017

Amount
$10,000.00

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement
certificate. If this certificate is found, please write to
PO. Box CB-12604, Nassau Bahamas.

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PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





To advertise in The Tribune -
ea BNA
MIR) rere ya TEL

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ADMIRAL ASSOCIATES S.A. is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on April 14, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.



(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 13th day of May, 2009 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.
APRIL 15, 2009
LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY
































Legal Notice

NOTICE
BBM FUND, LTD.

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Companies, Act 2000, Notice is hereby
given that the dissolution of the BBM Fund, Ltd. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued as of March 27, 2009 and the Company has
therefore been stuck off the Register.

Claudio Carvalho de Queiroz Mello
(Liquidator)

> GENERAL

re

om Worldwide

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE



Moody’s:
Bahamas fiscal
deficit doubles

FROM page 1B

same boat’ given the tough
international economy.

Credit

In fact, Moody’s latest credit
opinion on the Bahamas’ sov-
ereign credit rating, painted an
optimistic picture of this
nation’s 2009 economic
prospects, predicting it would
enjoy | per cent GDP growth.

However, the international
credit rating acknowledged that
a contraction in the Bahamian

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Generali Worldwide/Europ Assistance is looking to recruit an experienced Business Development
Associate for its medical surance operations in the Bahamas and in the Caribbean area

We are committed to growing our business based on quality of products and service and require a
highly motivated individual to develop business with our partners, This will involve group sales and
renewals, , marketing and liaising with our various partners and with the broker community in the

bahamas and throughout the wider Caribbean area

Minimum Requirements:

Minimum (4) three years experience in the medical insurance market,

* Experienced in sales and marketing, a3 well as extremely well organized.

‘Strategic thinker with the ability to tackle and solve problems,
* Attentive to detail with a strong track record of team building.

Must possess thea bility to communicate effectively bath verbally and in writing

Must be high energy, driven and self motivated,
Committed Customer Service Advocate,

If you believe you have these attributes and want to join a dynamic and progressive team, please

apply by sending your CV and a covering letter to:

RE: Business Development Associate

Generali Worldwide
P.O, Box AP - 59225, Slot 36l

Nassau, Bahamas

You may also email your resume, RE; Business Development Associate to:

perspective. trl aerial com

If you have the qualities we are looking for, we offer a competitive remuneration package for the role,
with all the associated benefits you would expect of our company, and one that reflects your
qualifications and experience, For those with the desire to develop a long-term career with a

progressive and dynamic company, we Leslie: ie Nave he opportunities to thateh your bec plex talians.

Generali Worldwide is a wholly owned subsidiary of Assicurazioni Generali 5.p.A (the Generali
Group). The Generali Group was founded in Trieste, Italy, in 1831. The Generali Group, ane of the
largest insurers in the world, has an international presence actos five continents, employs over 61,000

people and operates ln some 40 markets. Its success is reflected in it being ranked a top 4M) company by
the 2007 Fortune Global SQ, with assets under management in excess of €330 billion (as at June 2008}

and has an S&P rating of AA, a Moody's rating of Aa3, AM Best of A+ and a Fitch rating of AA,

Www, generali-gw.com

economy, or negative growth,
was “possible if the [interna-
tional] crisis continues to deep-
en”.

Moody’s said: “The fiscal
numbers show slippage, mainly
due to higher expenditures. In
the first six months of the 2008-
2009 fiscal year, the central gov-
ernment deficit amounted to
$135 million, 36 per cent higher
than the same period in 2007-
2008. On a yearly basis, gov-
ernment revenues and expen-
ditures increased 6.7 per cent
and 1.9 per cent, respectively.

Debt

And Moody’s added:
“Although government debt as
a percentage of revenues is
trending downwards since 2003,
at an estimated 180 per cent for
2008 it is one of the highest in its
peer group. This condition exac-
erbates fiscal spending rigidi-
ties, and is potentially trouble-
some given [the Bahamas]
exposure to natural disasters
and external shocks.

“Susceptibility to event risks
that could suddenly lead to a
multiple-notch adjustment in
the country's ratings, however,
is judged to be low relative to
the universe of rated countries.”

But Mr Smith said there was
no immediate likelihood of a
downgrade to the Bahamas’
sovereign credit rating, or the
outlook for this nation.

He explained: “I think they
would watch it for a longer peri-
od of time, because the feeling
is that the recession will not last
forever and some extraordinary
measures have to be taken.

“But if it trends in a way

Pn
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

where we’re unable to reduce
the rate of increase in the debt,
we may have to take a second
look, but I don’t think they'll
do that for at least six months.

“They will look at tourism
expenditure and see whether
we’re creating sufficient foreign
exchange earnings to settle the
external debt. They’ll be keep-
ing a close eye on what we’re
doing here, and if the foreign
debt increases to a point where
it eats up too much of the for-
eign reserves.”

Still, Mr Smith said foreign
currency-denominated debt -
that which the Government and
its corporations owe to foreign
investors and financiers - was
“a very small component” of
this nation’s $3 billion-plus
national debt/

With most of the national
debt held domestically, the
Bahamas had created sufficient
room to enable it to take on
additional foreign currency bor-
rowing if circumstances war-
ranted.

Given the economic down-
turn, and its impact on govern-
ment revenues and spending
plans, Mr Smith said the GFS
fiscal deficit for 2008-2009, ini-
tially projected to be around 2
per cent, was likely to come in
around 3-4 per cent. That mea-
surement strips out the cost of
debt redemption.

Eye

“One thing we’ve got to keep
an eye on is the slowdown in
foreign direct investment,” Mr
Smith told Tribune Business.
“We’ve traditionally used that
to bridge the gap on the bal-

ance of payments, and if that
slows down, it could cause the
balance of payments gap to
grow.”

While the generally perceived
wisdom was that a turnaround
in the US economy would spark
a recovery in the Bahamas, Mr
Smith said the effect might not
be “one-to-one”, and cautioned
that matters might not be the
same as they once were.

Minister

The former finance minister
said it was possible that Amer-
icans might choose to vacation
at home, or in other foreign
countries, more and not come
as frequently - or in the same
numbers - to the Bahamas.

As for foreign direct invest-
ment, Mr Smith said this might
not return in the same volume
as before the credit crunch, as
lenders and investors would
take into account sovereign and
cross-border risks.

“T don’t know if it’s going to
come back to the Bahamas or
the Caribbean area in the same
fashion, for the simple reason
that in earlier years, prior to the
fallout, little attention was paid
to sovereign risk or cross-border
risk,” Mr Smith said. “They will
pay more attention to that.”

He pointed out that prior to
the downturn, Bahamas-based
banks and financial institutions
had been reluctant to lend to
Family Island-based investment
projects, because of the diffi-
culty in obtaining a return on
the funds sunk into the ground.
That attitude was now likely to
be shared by foreign investors
and lenders.

PART-TIME ASSISTANT

To The Capital & Development Committee

The Board of the Nassau Airport
Development Company (NAD) is
seeking candidates for the part-
time position of Assistant to The
Capital & Development Committee.
The duties and responsibilities of
the successful applicant will
include:

+ Time requirement of

approx. two days per week

« Attending monthly meetings for
approx. four hours

» Assisting the Committee on
matters to be recommended to the
Board for approval

» Attending meetings requested
by the Committee in order to
report on the proceedings of the
meetings attended

«Commenting on the reports,
minutes, and other matters that
may arise at monthly committee
meetings.

Potential candidate will
possess the following skills
and experience:

« Effective communicator,
proficient in both report
writing and oral
presentations

+ Intuitive and insightful with
the confidence to question
decisions and processes

« Familiar with infrastructure
development

« Familiar with the process of
reviewing tenders and RFP
proposals for construction
and procurement

» Understanding of project
management processes

« Understanding of financial
management processes

» Must have substantial
experience in the areas
outlined above.

If you are qualified and interested, please submit your
resume by April 30, 2009 to:

Manager, People

Nassau Airport Development Co.

P.O. Box AP 59229
Nassau, Bahamas

Only those applicants short listed will be contacted.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 5B





Solomon’s
Mines sees

Yacht registry’s ‘great
synergy’ opportunities

FROM page 1B

Deveaux replied: “Based on the preliminary infor-
mation I have, we would need to amend the BMA
Act to accommodate this class of ships, and may
have to look at other Acts to provide incentives to
get these ships here.”

The mega yacht market has obvious links to the
Bahamas high-end second home real estate indus-
try, given that these property owners are likely to

“The [BMA] Board feels that between mega
yachts, wealthy second home owners and per-
sons with planes, there’s an opportunity for great
synergies in having the means to attract this class
of business,” Dr Deveaux said of the yacht reg-
istry plans.

“We have a number of proposals from the pri-
vate sector expressing interest in it, and they’re
willing to assist the Board in looking at it. Once
they make a strategic determination as to which

30-50% sales
declines

FROM page 1B

Post-acquisition, the luxury
retail group embarked on a
period of rapid store expansion,
but was soon forced to scale
back with the closure of outlets
at Caves Village, Blue Lagoon,
Hurricane Hole and four Bay
Street stores.

The number of store brands
was also rationalised, and The
Tribune reported earlier this
year that Solomon’s Mines staff

colleagues on Bay Street, they
say these are the worst times
they have seen. I’ve not been
in the luxury goods business
[long enough to make that judg-
ment], but these are tough
times, no two ways about it.”

Mr Finlayson, though, drew
parallels with the early 1990s,
when his father’s ABC Motors
was “going under”, and there
was speculation Burns House
was failing.

“Today, Burns House is one
of the strongest companies in

the country,” he said, adding
that shareholders in ABDAB,
which holds a 60 per cent stake
in that firm and 47 per cent in
Commonwealth Brewery, had
done well.

As for Solomon’s Mines, Mr
Finlayson said: “This is a turn-
around process. This is not the
first time we’ve been through
this. This is a joke in compari-
son to what we went through
with Burns House. We are
focused on what will happen at
the end.”

own such vessels. They are also likely to own pri-
vate planes, and represent the sort of clients the
Bahamian financial services industry is looking to
encourage to domicile here as their primary res-
idence, following their assets here.

direction to go in, we will do our part.

to look at it.”

THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 20097

IN THE SUPREME COURT OOM /COMYNO. 000024
Commercial Division

IN THE MATTER of THE COMPANIES ACT, CH. 708
Laws of The Bahamas, 2000 Edition

AND

IN THE MATTER of RB. 8. INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(in Liquidation)

PETITION

“We have a strong interest from the Govern-
ment side, and the Board has set up a small group

were complaining that the com-
pany was late in meeting its pay-
roll - adding to business com-
munity speculation that the
company was a troubled busi-
ness.

Mr Finlayson yesterday said
that when he and his father
acquired Solomon’s Mines, the
group had 28 stores. This num-
ber expanded to a peak of 45,
but had since been reduced to
29 stores as the company
“closed locations that did not
make sense”.

He added: “We had to close
the location at Caves Village.
The timing was wrong. Caves
Village was beautiful, Sandy-
port, too, but the timing was
wrong. Five years from now, it
will be a nice spot for Bahami-
ans as well as tourists.”

Mr Finlayson said Solomon’s re
Mines currently employed 230- E 7
240 staff, having reduced this
number by a third from the 350-
360 it inherited when acquiring
the business.

He added: “In talking to our

Notice [s hereby given that a Petition for the winding up of the above-named
Company was on the 10“ day of March, A.D., 2009 presented to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas having io regiwered office situate at Cash Fountain & Co, of
Aumstrong Street in the City of Nassau In the bland of New Providence.

VE ETETCR






And that the sald Petition & directed to be heard before the Honourable Mire, Justice
Hepburn a Justice ef the Supreme Court sitting at Nassau on 24" day of June, A.D, 2009
at 10:00 oftlock in the forenoon and any creditor or contributory of the sald Company
desirous to support or oppose the making of Order on the sald Petition may appear at the time
of hearing in person or by his Counsel for that purpose; and 3 copy of the Petition will be
furnished by the undersigned to any creditor or contributory of the sald Company requiring
such copy on payment of the regulated charge for the same,



| =
' ee

Date the 1¢t day of April, 4.0.,2009

Anny person who intends to appear on the hearing of the said Petition elther to
oppes OF support, must serve on or send by post to the above-named, notice
In writing of his Intentlon te do se, The motlee muse state dhe name and address
of the person, or, Wa firm, the name and address of the firm and must be
signed by the person or firm or his or their attormey {if any) and must be served
or if posted must be sent by post in sufficient time to reach the above-named
not later than 4:00 o'clock in the afternoon of the 23 day of June, A.D.,
200F,

yo Ss Tel: 502 2356 MACKAY at MOXEY
4 ad rates 2 Attorneys for the Petitioner



Vacation in Paradise.

Only $69"

=

— per person double occupancy.

Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only.

MINISTRY OF HOUSING
ENGINEERING SERVICES FOR THE DESIGN OF
ROADS AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM
IN ARDASTRA ESTATE

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP

The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas through the Ministry of
Housing is requesting proposals from qualified Consulting Engineering firms to
provide Engineering Design, Supervision of the Construction Tender Process,
and Contract Administration Services for the development of the following
housing subdivision:

i) Ardastra Estate, New Providence - Roads and drainage syitem design.

Interested parhes may obtain further infomation and a copy of the Request for
Proposal fron:

\ » Cs
Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus:
: Complimentary continental breakfast datly
* Junior Suites with King-size or two double beds
+ Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,

coffee maker, hair dryer

* Kids 15 and under, jree
¢ Pool with swim-up har

The Office of the Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Housing
Cloughion House
Shirley and Chartotte Sis,
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel, | 242-372-4005 / 6006

The documents will be ready for collection on Tuesday 14" Apri, 2009. An information
meeting wil be hetd on Tuesday 21" Apnl at 10000 om in the conference roam at the
Minéiry of Housing, Claughton House.

Tenders are to bé submitted in o sealed envelope morked af indicated in the RFP
document to:
The Office of the Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Housing
Claughton House
Shirley and Charlotte Sts,

Nassau, Bohomas fe .
Limtted-time offer! Reserve today /

Call 242-363-3680

*$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. - Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. - Sat. Maximum
four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on
standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.

No boter than 12 noon on Tuesday 28", Apnl, 2007. Tenders wil be opened af 12:01 pm
on Tuesday 26", April, 2009 in the conference room at the Ministry of Housing,
Claughton House. The Government reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE is hereby given that MYRIAME BELLUNE
of COLONY VILLAGE, P.O. BOX N-d278, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, & applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalizatian
a8 a citizen of The Bahamas, and thal any persan
whe knows any reason why registration/naturalizatan
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15" day of April, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-f147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is herby given that GESILIA SIMILIEN of MACKEY
STREET, HILLSIDE ESTATE, P.O. BOX N-Tr2, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS. & appying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citzensivp, for registration/naburalization a3 a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registrabon'naturalization should mot be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within fwenty-aight days from the 8" day of April, 200 to the
Minister rasmoneabée for nationality and Citizanship, PO. Box

NOTICE is hereby given thal CATHRYN ELIZABETH
BURNETT EVANS of LYFORD CAY, P.O. BOX W-65,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, i apotying ta the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Baharnas, and ihat any person who knows any
reason why regisirabon’naturalization should mot be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within fwenty-aight days from the Bday of April, 2008 to the
Minister responsable for nationality and Citizanship. P.O. Box
N-?i4?, Nassau, Baharnas

Pave

NOTICE is heraby given that KADIAN BECKFORD of
#23 SAN SOUCI DRIVE, P.O. BOX EE-15368, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, & applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who Knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15" day of April, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O, Box
N-f14?, Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE @ hereby given that RODLIN FLORESTAL of
EAST 5T., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
response for Nationality and Cit@enship, tor registraton’
naturalization 2 4 citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
WhO KNOWS aint FeaSson why recqestration'naburaization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 15°" day of April, 2009 to
the Minister rasponsiite for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-? 147, Nassau, Bahamas

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, CRYSTAL LEWIS

of #17 Windward Isle Way. intend to change my name to
AVONTJERVAR SAUNDERS If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.

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Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or jalightbourne@ kpmg.com.bs no later than Friday 24 April, 2009.

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© 2009. KPMG, a Bahamas partnership, and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a

Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.



ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAG!

—

clay Leon? &

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
WEDNESDAY, 8 APRIL 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,623.20 | CHG 0.63 | %CHG 0.04 | YTD -89.16 | YTD % -5.21
FINDEX: CLOSE 805.27 | YTD -3.55% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit _y
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.28
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00
6.95 Bank of Bahamas 6.95
0.63 Benchmark 0.63
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37
11.31 Cable Bahamas 11.31
2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83
6.45 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6A5
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.36
2.09 Doctor's Hospital 2.09
6.02 Famguard 7.76
11.00 Finco 11.00
10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.40
5.00 Focol (S) 5.07
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.59
8.60 J. S. Johnson 10.50
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 0.00 0.127 10.1
11.00 0.00 0.992 11.1
6.95 0.00 0.244 28.5
0.63 0.00 -0.877 N/M
3.15 0.00 0.105 30.0
2.37 0.00 0.055 43.1
11.31 0.00 1.309 8.6
2.83 0.00 0.249 11.4
6.45 0.00 0.438 14.7
2.45 0.09 0.099 24.7
2.09 0.00 0.240 8.7
7.76 0.00 0.420 18.5
11.00 0.00 0.322 34.2
10.40 0.00 0.794 13.1
5.10 0.03 0.337 15.1
1.00 0.00 0.000 N/M
0.30 0.00 0.035 8.6
5.59 0.00 0.407 13.7
10.50 0.00 0.952 11.0
10.00 0.00 0.180 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

52wk-Hi _S52wk-Low Security Symbol
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17

Change Daily Vol. Interest

0.00 7%

Maturity
19 October 2017

‘Urgent
action’

needed on
$8bn NIB
shortfall

FROM page 1B

said of a likely increase in the
insurable wage ceiling, which
has already been flagged as a
likely reform by NIB director,
Algernon Cargill.

“The huge deficit can only be
plugged by increasing the con-
tribution rate or increasing the
[insurable wage] threshold,” Mr
D’ Aguilar said. “The easy way
to do it is by increasing the
threshold, because people earn-
ing more will then be con-
tributing more.”

Laying out what he perceived
to be the main options facing
the NIB scheme, Mr D’ Aguilar
said they were to either increase
the insurable wage ceiling
beyond the current $400 per
month; increase the contribu-
tion rate; reduce the amount of
benefits paid out; or increase
the retirement age. A combina-
tion of some of these measures,
or perhaps all, might be imple-
mented, although increasing the
retirement age beyond 65 years-
old is likely to be difficult.

Tribune Business reported
previously that Mr Cargill, in
an address to the Rotary Club
of West Nassau, said that NIB
had recommended to the Gov-
ernment increasing the insur-
able wage ceiling from $400 to
$600 per month immediately,
with annual increases thereafter
that were linked to average
wage rises.

This newspaper revealed last
week how the eighth actuarial
review of the NIB fund, which
has yet to be officially pub-
lished, had projected that the
social security system would suf-
fer from a $7.868 billion sol-
vency deficiency/shortfall in the
next 60 years if reforms were
not enacted.

The NIB Reserve Fund was
expected to deplete rapidly over
this timespan, and the actuarial
review’s findings, contained in
the financial statements to
NIB’s 2007 annual report, said:
“The projections were extended
for a 60-year period, and indi-
cate that the present value of
future expenditure will exceed
the opening reserves and the

present value of future contri-
butions by $7.868 billion.

“The report further indicates
that the current contribution
rate would be insufficient to pay
benefits in the long-term.”

However, in a statement
issued in response to Tribune
Business’s revelations, NIB’s in-
house actuary, Derek Osborne,
said rate increases would be
needed as the social security
scheme matures, with the
reserve fund currently possess-
ing $1.6 billion in total assets.

He added that the full fund-
ing of public social security
schemes, such as NIB, was not
essential, especially given the
economic, political and invest-
ment risks associated with the
build-up of a massive asset pool.

If the NIB plan was fully
funded, Mr Osborne said, it
would have assets more than
five times its current size, with
no opportunity to invest them
prudently. Accordingly, the
NIB contribution rate was ini-
tially set well below the pro-
jected benefits costs.

The NIB actuary insisted that
the Government would never
allow the scheme to go broke,
and would enact the necessary
reforms in time. The shortfall
identified in the eighth actuari-
al review, Mr Osborne added,
“does not infer in any way that
the National Insurance Fund is
currently in crisis or needs to
make drastic changes to benefit
provisions or the contribution
rate to reduce this projected
deficit”.

Meanwhile, describing NIB
as “a very important entity”, Mr
D’ Aguilar said: “This is the only
vehicle most Bahamians use to
save for the future, and we as a
people don’t do that. It’s impor-
tant to get that to work.

“Urgent action is needed if
that number [$8 billion] is true,
and, obviously, a plan. How are
we going to get there? How are
we going to solve this prob-
lem?”

Mr D’Aguilar added that the
actuarial projections were far
enough away to make Bahami-
ans think the issue would not
affect them, or that 1t would be
solved well in advance.

Bahamian firm
wins dismissal
of ‘insolvent’
insurer case

Grand Bahama-based Bahamas
Film Studios, Ross Fuller, a
defendant in the liquidators’
action, having allegedly acted
as “consultant and/or broker”
to Condor Guaranty and Con-
dor Insurance. Mr Fuller has
strenuously denied the allega-
tions against him.

Among the assets allegedly

want returned from Condor
Guaranty, is a $650,000 note
receivable from Gold Rock
Creek and Stockton, Fuller &
Co.

Gold Rock Creek was the
immediate holding company for
the Bahamas Film Studios,
while Stockton, Fuller & Co is
the investment banking firm of

1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8AS 14.60 -0.041 0.300
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 N/M
0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35 0.001 0.000 256.6
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 9.03
0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261.90
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
52wk-Low Fund Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $
1.3041 Colina Bond Fund 1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.9230 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.3847 Colina Money Market Fund 1.4489 1.06 4.63
3.1964 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.1564 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.0950 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.1599 0.71 -12.76
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0440 0.80 4.40
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0364 0.33 3.64
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0452 0.76 4.40
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Mr Fuller.

Condor Guaranty was
alleged to have been incorpo-
rated in the Bahamas as an
International Business Compa-
ny (IBC) on November 8, 2007,
operating in the reinsurance
business and offering financial
guarantees and surety bonds.

“wrongfully transferred to Con-
dor Guaranty”, the Bahamian
company, were some 18 million
shares in Ashby Corporation.
Ashby was the ultimate
Bermuda-domiciled parent for
the Bahamas Film Studios. Also
named as a Condor Insurance
asset, and which the liquidators

PUBLIC NOTICE

eS a a ea od)
The Public is hereby advised that |, DAVID JARED

DUTTON. of Nassau, Bahamas intends to change my name

Yield % NAV Date
28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
27-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
iS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

to |AHMIN PAU ARMSTRONG, If there are any objections
fo this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-T42,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009





The Tribune

eS

THE TRIBUNE

FROM left to right
Shona Knowles,
Principal at Aquinas
College Deandra
Rolle, Winner of the
Keizer cooking com-
petition Margaret
Bennet, Deandra’s
cooking coach and
culinary instructor at
Aquinas College.

A taste

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

FOR one very ambitious and talent-
ed teen, hard work and hours of train-
ing have paid off as she was fortu-
nate in winning the recent Keizer Uni-
versity cooking challenge held at the

Adastra Gardens last month.

Walking away with the top prize of a $10,000
scholarship to Keizer’s Miami campus, is
Aquinas College senior Deandra Rolle who
explained that her road to cooking and being an
all around model student started from early on,
with her parents being a driving force in her
commitment.

Deandra said from since she could remember,
she recalls watching her mother and father
Shena and Michael Rolle in the family kitchen
putting together cakes, cookies, and other dishes
from scratch.

Her interest in the culinary arts was seriously
triggered after making a cheese cake with her
father, which before had seemed like a major
challenge, but proved to her that she had what it
took to become a professional chef.

She said: “When I started at Aquinas, my
mother used to let me cook a lot, which at first
used to be a chore for me, but then after a while

I realised the joy in it because my family
would tell me how good the food was, and
that was another real boost for me.”

Another major influence in honing her
culinary talents came through her cooking
instructor Margaret Bennet, who
explained that Deandra’s passion for the
art of cooking has remained consistent
over the past three years she has known
her.

Mrs Bennett said: “When she came to
grade ten, her goal of becoming a chef
from then to now has not wavered, so
because of that I have continued to work
with her.”

Mrs Bennet entered Deandra in her first
cooking competition in February (Ministry
of Agriculture Culinary and Bread making
competition) 2009, and said although
Deandra did not win she saw that Deandra
was ready to compete with others in her
level, which meant entering her in the
upcoming Keizer competition.

Deandra said: “I happened to discover
that the competition was offering a schol-
arship, so I went to Mrs Bennett and told
her that she might as well enter my name,
and told her that I felt like I had a good
chance." What she did not not know was
that she had already been selected by her
instructor to take part in the competition.

“At first I wasn’t expecting to win
because I saw the judges were picking the

for greatness

top seven finalists, and I was sure plenty
others were going to enter.”

Although apprehensive, Deandra said
she told her parents about the competition
and its challenge of creating a unique dish.
As they were just as excited about the
competition as she was, the decision was
then made for her to commit to victory.

As the competition required participants
to present an all Bahamian dish, for her
the inclusion of conch and grouper seemed
an obvious choice.

She said coming up with a name for her
dish was somewhat of a challenge, but with
the help of her father she was able to settle
on Crazy Cabbage Fiesta, with Carmichael
Seafood Surprise with Cultural rice. This
was a mix of a cabbage salad with grouper,
conch, lobster, and rice blended with broc-
coli, corn, and other vegetables.

After winning the competition, Deandra
said never did she imagine achieving her
dreams would feel so rewarding.

Deandra said her school and church life
adds much more activities to her days and
weekends than most other teens. Apart
from being a member of her schools choir,
she is also a band member, an usher at her
church, a youth choir member, and a
young Christian.

Hoping to be a role model at her school
and community, Deandra said she hopes
that this latest achievement will inspire













other young girls and boys to also strive for
greatness and to work on becoming all
they can.

Principal for Aquinas Shona Knowles
said, Deandra's recent accomplishment is
important to not only her and the school,
but to others in the community because it
proves that believing in one’s self with
added determination can go a long way.

Ms Knowles added: "In the case of
Deandra, there will be a feature of her in
our next memory book and also a feature
on the school's website and the Catholic
Newspaper ‘The Bahamas Catholic.'"

Ms Knowles said while working with
Deandra over the last six years, she has
identified her student’s leadership and
role model abilities from the start, and
said that she is one to be depended on and
expressed high hopes for Deandra’s
future.

Ms Knowles said: "She is very focused
and has always been, not just as a 12 grad-
er but since she came here in grade seven.

"Even before she came to this school, I
know about her and how dedicated she
was, and she has blossomed into a beauti-
ful young lady.”

Deandra who intends to attend Keizer
in the fall said she looks forward to pursu-
ing her calling in the culinary arts, and
hopes to one day start her own restaurant
made for and operated by Bahamians.

A healthier choice

= els fied = â„¢~,_ =
MUCH has changed over the past few decades in the quality of fruits
and vegetables produced in the country and around the world causing

concerns that fruits and vegetables might not be as healthy as we all
thought.



@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

FROM the day we are born most of our
parents try to give us the best in healthy
foods, especially fruits and vegetables. How-
ever, much has changed over the past few
decades in the quality of fruits and vegetables
produced in the country and around the
world causing concerns that fruits and veg-
etables might not be as healthy as we all
thought.

Published in the February issue of the Jour-
nal of HortScience, a new study reports that
non-organic American produce contains
between 5 per cent and 40 per cent fewer
nutrients and minerals (including magne-
sium, iron, calcium and zinc) than it did just
50 years ago.

That is because chemical fertilisers and
pesticides make modern crops grow faster.
Early harvest times, while increasing pro-
ductivity, deny fruits and vegetables the time
they need to absorb nutrients.

As most of our produce is imported, Doc-
tor of Natural Health, Joyce Adderley, said
Bahamians should be concerned about the
kinds of fruits and veggies they eat.

“Tt is evident that nonorganic foods are
grown with chemicals for obvious reasons,
and that is to increase crop yield. The Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency says pesticides
may block the body’s uptake of important
food nutrients which are critical for proper
growth and wreak havoc on development by
permanently altering the way a child’s system
functions,” Mrs Adderley said.

Moreover, while fertilisers are used to
make plants bigger and better, the two do not
necessarily go together.

“Jumbo-sized produce actually contains
more ‘dry matter,’ or carbohydrates than
anything else, diluting the mineral content
and health benefit of eating down on your
favorite fruit,” Mrs Adderley said.

To get the minerals you need from your
produce, the study suggests buying organic
fruits and vegetables, or even growing your
own.

This is exactly what Mrs Adderley is urging
Bahamians to do.

“For one to get the most nutrients from
eating fruits and vegetables I recommend
eating organically grown produce whenever
possible. Recently a symposium was held by
the American Association for Advancement
of Science (AAAS) entitled “Living Soil,
Food Quality, and the Future of Food” on
February 13. Scientists agree that organic
farming delivers healthier, richer soil and
nutritionally enhanced food. The term organ-
ic refers to food that is grown without pesti-
cides, synthetic nitrogen fertilisers, fungi-
cides, or herbicides. Organic foods are mini-
mally processed, with no artificial ingredi-
ents, preservatives, or irradiation,” Mrs
Adderley said.

Mrs Adderley said she believes that farm-
ers should improve the soil by using natural
organic fertilisers.

“There are many natural fertilisers on the
market that increases the taste, color, size,
and the nutritional contents of fruits and veg-
etables. One such fertiliser is Natural Fer-
tiiser Plus, which comes from very cold ocean
water. Specifically the North Atlantic, the
main ingredient is Ascophyllum Nodosum
which is the most nutrient dense seaweed
variety available. The special seaweed is
blended in a proprietary process with emul-
sified ocean fish providing the macronutrients
in the formula which are a source of organic
nitrogen, potash and phosphorus,” Mrs
Adderley said.

Doctor Adderley said organic foods also
have a higher nutritional value which is
important for growing children and adults.

“According to Supernatual Home, an
organically grown apple can have as much as
300 per cent more vitamin C and 61 per cent
greater calcium content than a conventional

or non organic apple. The amount of calcium
in organic spinach is seven times greater than
nonorganic spinach and potassium is an
astounding 117 times greater in the organic.
This is time to start eating our local spinach
that is 100 per cent organic,” Mrs Adderley
said.

In the New York Times, March 16 edi-
tion, nutritionist and author Jonny Bowden
has created a list of 11 best foods that are
loaded with nutrients (and are readily avail-
able here in the Bahamas):

BEETS — rich source of folate as well as
natural red pigments that may be cancer
fighters.

CABBAGE — loaded with nutrients like
sulforaphane, a chemical that may boost
cancer-fighting enzymes.
POMEGRANATE JUICE — may lower
blood pressure and loaded with
antioxidants

DRIED PLUMS -— they are packed with
antioxidants

PUMPKIN SEEDS — the most nutritious part
of the pumpkin and packed with
magnesium: high levels of these minerals
are associated with lower risk of early death.
SARDINES —are high in omega-3, and
calcium. They also contain iron,
magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc,
copper and manganese as well as a full
complement of B vitamins.

PUMPKIN — a low calorie vegetable that is
high in fiber and immune-stimulating
vitamin A.

FROZEN BLUEBERRIES — associated with
better memory in animal studies.

SWISS CHARD —a leafy green vegetable
packed with caroteniods that protect
aging eyes.

CINNAMON — may help control blood
sugar and cholesterol

TURMERIC — the “superstar of spices,” it
may have anti-inflammatory and anti
cancer properties.















THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 9B
SI

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@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

IT seems the spring sea-
son has ushered a non-stop
spirit of life and entertain-
ment to our shores, with a
never ending flow of parties,
high profile events, and a
host of activities to excite
every flavor. Included this
week in our Things 2 Do
countdown, are a range of
events from jazz concerts
and comedy shows, to VIP
parties and music videos.

41. Kappa Alpha Psi frater-
nity is hosting its fourth
annual Impromptu, which is
an evening of jazz, wine, art,
and soul. Set to kick-off this
Saturday at 7.30pm at the
Marley Resort, the event will
feature music by Tingum
Dem, Philip Bowe, and the
re-launch of the Kenesis art
experience by Scharad
Lightbourne. Tickets are
priced at $25 general admis-
sion, and $300 for VIP pre-
ferred seating (for four) with
one bottle of wine comple-
mentary, and are available at
the Marley Resort or from
fraternity members. Pro-
ceeds for the event will go to
the Guide Right programme.

2. Phat Groove and Fan-
tasy entertainment are bring-
ing to the stage popular
comedian Eddie Griffin, who
is best known for his sitcom
Malcolm and Eddie, and his
2002 film Undercover Broth-
er. The show which is set for
this Saturday at the Sheraton
Ballroom for 9pm, will be
preceded by a party on Fri-
day at the Uptown nightclub
and then an after party-the
details for that event to be
announced later. Tickets for
the comedy show start at
$45 general admission, and
$2000 VIP which includes
free valet, express seating,
after party access, 2 bottles
of wines, and back stage
access for up to ten people.

3. Budding Freeport cul-
ture artist Jah Doctrine is
hosting a special party
recording for his newest sin-
gle Nuff Gal at the “White
House” in Stapleton Gardens
opposite the park on Mckin-
ney Avenue this Saturday.
The event which starts at
9.30pm, will also feature
models from Renaissance
Models, Massyka, Vicky
Pepp, and DJs from Quality
Sounds. Free admittance for
ladies up to midnight, and
drinks free all night, so
ladies and gents come out to
show some love for this
local artist.

4, For all swimming
lovers, the much anticipated
annual Caribbean Free Trade
Association (CARIFTA)
Swimming Championships
iis set to run April 16 to 19
in Saventa, Aruba. From the
Bahamas, there are 36
swimmers participating, with
many of the events high-
lights and updates available
on local networks. The event
which also involves cultural
exhibitions, foods, and activ-
ities is regionally supported
and a great opportunity to
see the talents, skills, and
abilities of Caribbean Junior
swimmers.

5. Last but certainly not
least is the ultimate VIP
affair set to unfold at the
Bambu nightclub this Thurs-
day at 10pm. Champagne
Dreams which is being pro-
duced by Alpha-Male Enter-
tainment and Prezidential
Promotions, will feature
music from Canada’s own
DJ Tilt, and is priced at $10
for men, and free until 11pm
for ladies. The dress code
for the event is “smart and
sexy”, and security will be
on site.

@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

ADORNING white gowns and sparkling tiaras,
thirty two young ladies from various upbringings
assembled at the Whyndam Nassau Resort on
April 4 for their official coming out ceremony at
the Bahamas Debutante Foundations 2009

Debutante Ball.

According to the Bahamas
Debutante Foundation, the
word “debutante” was formed
from the word debut “mean-
ing first appearance”. A debu-
tante is one who is making
their first appearance and
thus, the word debutante is a
young lady entering society
filled with social graces.

This year the ball was held
under the patronage of Minis-
ter of State for Labour and
Social Development, Loretta
Butler -Turner. In her mes-
sage to the debutantes, Mrs
Butler- Turner congratulated
the girls on their entrance into
womanhood.

“T believe that the molding
of the next generation of
Bahamian women is both too
large and too important to be
left solely in the hands of any
one entity. We as a nation

need to be involved in church,
government and civic organi-
sations if our young women
are to flourish and advance,”
Mrs Turner said.

The distinguished debu-
tante of the year 2009 title
went to Shaynora Brown. Ms
Brown, who aspires to
become a neonatal nurse, is a
17- year -old student of St
Johns College and is the
daughter of Lenora and
Shayne Brown. Ms Brown’s
hobbies include traveling,
reading books and magazines,
and dancing.

The Bahamas Debutante
foundation is a non profit
organisation that aims for
social transformation and
engages in education to train,
support and collaborate with
women for social change
locally and globally.

From trash to treasure

FROM page 12

Mrs Foxton, began her jour-
ney from corporate life at Sara
Lee in the United States to the
secluded Adagio Beach Cot-
tage Studio and Gallery on
Grand Bahama where she now
calls home.

“T have been a full time
artist for 5 years now. It is
really quite out island-ish here
in East End Grand Bahama.
I had a career in business and
I was receiving all kinds of fax-
es and product sheets so I had
piles of paper. We had to take
that to the local dump and we
didn’t want to add to that
garbage that you see at the
dump. I found out about all
the places around the world
that specialised in handmade
paper. I saw the opportunity
not only to use discards from
our environment but to create
practical works of art not just
wall art,” Mrs Foxton said.

As Mrs Foxton learned
more about the paper making
technique, she started adding
fibers from natural leaves and
recycled papers.

“From the paper we recycle
flowers, leaves and seaweed
that we collect from our land-
scape, I try to show my devo-
tion to tapping into that which
is around me for my artistry,”
Mrs Foxton said.

Mrs Foxton’s first exhibit
was in the 2004 with the
Grand Bahama Artists Asso-
ciation (GBAA). She has had
several solo exhibitions in Nas-
sau and Abaco and is current-
ly showing at the GBAA
group Exhibition at the Glory
Banks Art Gallery in Grand
Bahama.

The process that Mrs Fox-
ton uses to create her hand
made pieces is the same as the
Chinese who invented hand
papermaking in 105 AD.

“My artwork is not only tru-
ly ‘Made in the Bahamas’ in






that my canvas and medium
are created from local leaves,
flowers and gifts from the sea,
but are also environmentally
conscious. One of the won-
derful pleasures for me is get-
ting in there with your hands
and really working the piece.
Handmade paper allows won-
derful textures. It can go from
very thin pieces of paper to
very thick pieces. I make 3D
pieces also that I call Buoys.
These Buoys are usually 6ft by
4ft. I also do large baskets
which are made from banana
leaves or hibiscus leaves,” Mrs
Foxton said.

Mrs Foxton said the before
process in creating a piece is
very long and tedious, causing
one of her completed pieces
to cost between $100 to $2,000.

“The process is long.
Depending on which leaf is
used, it takes a long time to
break down. They may be in
my back yard breaking down
for two to three months. They
are very smelly and I use a lot
of water to keep it fresh. After
that I cook them for between
an hour to a whole day. It is a
very time consuming process,”
Mrs Foxton said.

One of Mrs Foxton’s biggest
inspirations for her art she
said is the turquoise waters of
the Bahamas and the vibrant
earth tones of the beaches.

“T had a piece called ‘chang-
ing water’ that represented
our changing turquoise waters
here in the Bahamas. I love
earth tones as well, which was
displayed in my ‘Tred Care-
fully’ piece. Those tones rep-
resent walking on the beach
and the changing colours of
the sand when it is wet or
dry,” Mrs Foxton.

When it comes to the
colours and textures of her art
work, Mrs Foxton said she
enjoys giving her pieces
“touchability” for the clients.

“The sea grape, hibiscus,
banana leaf, every leaf makes
a different colour. I may mix a
little colour in a few but not
all of them,” Mrs Foxton said.

Mts Foxton said the art
scene in the Grand Bahama
has been stepping up a lot
from the early years than
when she first started. She
said she will continue her
artistic development with
international teachers in a
variety of mediums to show
her work.

“T am delighted that the

, journey continues every day

with nature, actually reusing
nature, being the source for
my artistic inspiration. My
creative energies are stirred
when I experiment with that
which may he considered dis-

DEL FOXTON

cards from the environment,
seaweed washed on the shore,
clippings from the garden
hedge or leaves and flowers
on the ground. I attempt with




He
peril)
Olea

Sa eset 3






a ESRI BRO

my artworks to bring pleasure
and a feeling that all is well
with the world. This may not
be the reality but just the
process of making the paper
artistry and being in the
moment makes it so for me
and I want to share that feel-
ing through my art,” Ms Fox-



SMART P

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Mrs Foxton is a member of
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the National Art Gallery of
the Bahamas and the Grand
Bahama Artists Association.

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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS



4
¢

‘

Celebrating a distinguished past

m@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

MEMBERS of Parliament serve their country
and the community in which they grew up in or
have come to love. Many times these persons
leave the lime light of politics and slip into the
background of a vastly changing society. Howev-
er, six former Members of Parliament for the
Montagu constituency were recently honoured
for their years of service to the country during a
special dinner held at Montagu Gardens.

The Montagu Constituency
Association paid tribute to Sir
Kendal Isaacs, Sir William
Allan, Sir Geoffrey Johnstone,
J Henry Bostwick and Brent
Symonette.

These distinguished hon-
ourees were treated to an
evening of refined music and
entertainment by Donald But-
ler and the Montagu Quartet
to dance the night away along
with delectable dishes named
in their honour during the
event. The cleverly designed
menu featured: Sir Geoffery’s
mixed salad greens, Sir
Kendal’s roasted beef in
mushroom gravy, Hon Hen-
ry’s Golden Grouper Fingers,
Sir Orville’s oven roasted
stuffed turkey,Sir William’s
Bahamian peas and rice, Hon
Brent’s potatoes, broccoli and
carrots and Montagu vanilla
ice cream.

Current Montagu MP
Loretta Butler-Turner, in her
message to the honourees,
described the event as an
evening to pause, celebrate,
and pay homage to a very dis-
tinguished group of Bahami-
ans.

“Montagu’s former Mem-
bers of Parliament are six out-
standing men who have exem-
plified the principles of repre-
sentation of the people and
devoted their lives to the
deepening of the democratic
process in our beloved
Bahamas. Their services, both
singularly and collectively
have spanned far beyond the
geographical and physical
boundaries of any one con-
stituency despite the fact that
it was the great constituency



MONTAGUE Constituency Association Chairman,Tim Lightbourn.



LORRAINE Lightbourn presents award to former Montague MP
Brent Symonette.



of Montagu that elected each
of them to the historical and
hallowed chambers of Parlia-
ment,” Mrs Butler- Turner
said.

Sir Geoffrey Johnstone
served as an MP for Montagu
from 1967 to 1972, Sir Kendal
Isaccs served from 1972 to
1977, Henry Bostwick served
from 1977 to 1982, Sir Orville
Turnquest served from 1982 to
1994, Sir William Allen served
from 1995 to 2002 and Brent
Symonette served from 2002
to 2007. Mr Symonette is cur-
rently the Member of Parlia-
ment for the St Anne’s con-
stituency and the deputy
prime minister and minister of
foreign affairs.

In his message to the hon-
ourees, chairman of the Mon-
tagu Constituency Associa-
tion, Tim Lightbourn, said the
examples that each honouree
has set, if continued by future
generations, will result in
Montagu and the Bahamas
going from strength to
strength.

“Our wonderful constituen-
cy has existed under the name
Montagu since 1967 and from
that time to the present, our
former members of parlia-
ment have each given their all
to ensure the best representa-
tion of it’s people and to guar-
antee that the area maintained
its charm, prestige and vibran-
cy. It is with gratitude that we
thank them for their service,
not only to Montagu, but to
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas in shaping what has
become the best little country
in the world,” Mr Lightbourn
said.



THE PRITCHARDS greet Lady Ann Johnstone.





FORMER MP Sir William Allen accepts his Caricature.






= Motagu Memoirs: Celebrating
A taste for a distinguished past PN

| greatness Pig sy 8 Fae 107
See page eight ! \







WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

———- §6=—6tl

Turning

TRE

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

AS the globe continues to go
green, many Bahamians are learn-
ing that the environment has its
place in the world. Self taught
artist Del Foxton, decided to take
the concept of helping the environ-
ment to another level through her

unique handmade, practical, func- he
tional paper art. =. ae
ee Leet
SEE page nine 2 -
— = a, , Np.
oj c a
= os an?
a pia ki :
~— z
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DEL FOXTON’S hand made paper art is a truly environmentally friendly way of decorating your home with an array of
i — — . colors, textures and items from the earth.



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Injured i

Third homicide in
less than 36 hours

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

“A female who was in the
vicinity received graze wounds
and was also taken to hospital
for treatment where she was

A 27-YEAR-OLD Nassau _ treated and discharged,” said

The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=USA TODAY.



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009
ge
TRL

SEE PAGE SIX

WOmall



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



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Police suspect
arsonist behind
massive fire

Map appears courtesy
of Damianos Realty

THE RED LINE shows the area of ania Re affected by the fire

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

ing the blaze, and two oth-
ers, which continued to
burn throughout southwest
New Providence yesterday.

Director of Fire Services
Superintendent Jeffrey
Deleveaux said it was
POLICE believe a mas-

Village man was killed and a
woman injured following an
altercation on West Bay Street
yesterday. This brings the total
number of homicides to three
in less than 36 hours.

The man died in hospital,
where he had been taken for
treatment for multiple gunshot
wounds received near St Albans
Drive at around midnight.

police.

A “dark, thick-built man”
seen leaving the area shortly
after the incident in a white
Honda Accord through St
Albans Drive is a person of
interest in the inquiry into the
man’s death.

The Nassau Village resident’s
killing comes a day and a half
after that of an 18-year-old

Pinewood Gardens man,
Richard Bremmer, who was

SEE page eight

According to police, he had
been involved in an argument
with a group of men when gun-
shots were fired.

Anglican Archdeacon charged
with assault of 15-year-old girl

A LEADING local clergyman accused of assaulting a 15-year-old
girl was formally arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Anglican Archdeacon Ivan Ranfurly Brown, rector of St Agnes
Anglican Church, was arraigned before Magistrate Ancella Evans-
Williams in Court 6, Parliament Street.

It is alleged that Archdeacon Brown assaulted the girl on Mon-
day, October 13, 2008, while at a church picnic at Nirvana Beach.

Archdeacon Brown, represented by lawyer Anthony McKinney,
pleaded not guilty to the assault charge. The case was adjourned to
June 23. He remains on police bail.

Archdeacon Brown, wearing his clerical collar,
appeared undaunted by the proceedings, stopping to chat
briefly with reporters outside the courtroom amid a handful of
supporters.

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JEROME THOMPSON, who is blind, is learning to captain a 21ft
powerboat to drive around New Providence and Paradise Island in
July. Jerome, 45, lost his sight at the age of 11 but says, ‘Nothing is
impossible, it can be done, it has been done’.

e SEE PAGE FIVE

Bahamians ‘won’t
lose EPA benefits’

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

NO BENEFITS currently
enjoyed by Bahamians
under its economic partner-
ship agreement with the
European Commission will

be removed, representatives
from the EC confirmed to a
Bahamian delegation that
met in Belgium last week to
address questions raised by
the EC over the services
schedule submitted by the
Bahamas.

This was communicated

SEE page eight



new printed
tees & tanks



Located on Ernest & Mackey Streets # Mon-Fri 10am-4pm - Sat 10am-2p

sive fire that spread across
several acres of forest in
the Carmichael Road area
was Started by an arsonist
near the area's well-fields.
Fire units were still fight-

unlikely that hot weather
conditions sparked the fires
in Carmichael Road,
adding "We suspect it was
started out in the well fields

SEE page two



Visitor satisfaction at
Atlantis ‘off the charts’

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SURVEYS reveal that visitor satisfaction at Atlantis is now “off the
charts” compared with previous years, Kerzner executives said yes-
terday.

Praising employees, its Managing Director said statistics show the lev-
el of service they are providing since last year’s mass lay-off exercise has
hit “new records.”

Meanwhile, the company claims to have been flooded with long
letters and e-mails in recent months from happy customers compli-
menting staff on their attitude and service.

The improvements also coincided with a slight increase in visitor
numbers at the resort over its projections last year, with occupancy lev-
els standing at 64.5 per cent — two per cent higher than the 62.5 per

SEE page eight

Customs Acting Comptroller
is taking oy retirement

AFTER 44 years
at the Customs
Department, Acting L
Comptroller Antho-
ny Adderley has
accepted governmen-
t’s severance packet
and taken early
retirement.

The new head,
Glen Gomez, a for-
mer customs officer
and most recently an official in
the Ministry of Finance will
take over from Mr Adderley
as early as today.

In a letter
j addressed to the
entire staff of the
Customs Depart-
ment, Mr Adderley
advised them on
April 6th that his ser-
vice of 44 years and
six months at the
PT Department will
UICC Come to an end on
April 14th.

“T consider those years very

rewarding and enjoyed work-



SEE page eight

Peele at: belated elie pa



NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS
= ea ; 7 ha hi Tr ‘a

Police suspect arsonist
behind massive fire

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maybe by some unscrupulous
person."

He said heavy wind blew
the fire north from well-
fields into the Carmichael
Road area which posed a
threat to neighbouring
properties — including the
gas company — over the
holiday weekend.

However, the official said
although the area was
affected by moderate levels
of smoke, the fires were
under control.

He said he expects the
fire to smoulder out some-
time today.

"By tomorrow that will be
history — maybe a few
smouldering stumps in the
centre of the forest," said
Mr Deleveaux.

The main blaze was said
to be a huge bush fire that
police said started around
11 am Sunday and burned
across several acres adjacent
to Carmichael Road, west
of Barcardi Road and east
of Coral Harbour.

A separate fire — oppo-

FLAMES near the road in the Carmichael Road area.

site the main blaze — also
burned near the Bahamas
Gas Limited's Carmichael
Road plant.

Another fire, which struck
the western area of the City
Dump early Saturday morn-
ing, was still being fought
by fire units.

Firemen, who were fight-



ing the flames since the
weekend, were able to get
the fires under considerable
control. Mr Deleveaux said
that the fires were no longer
a threat to residents and
businesses in the area and
up to press time yesterday,
there was no reported dam-
age to persons or property
due to the fires.

"The fire is still burning
in some areas, in spots, but
we are not able to reach all
those areas. Some are inac-
cessible to us, however, the
areas that are accessible we
are extinguishing those
fires.

"We were able to beat the
flames back and no damage
was incurred by those
flames,” he said in reference
to the two fires in the
Carmichael Road area. "We
still have a lot of smoke in

‘



the area, but it is down toa
(lower) level (so) it's no
threat to residents and busi-
nesses in the area."

One unit working in shifts
battled the fire at the City
Dump yesterday, which has
been plagued by a numbers
of fires over the past few
years, Mr Deleveaux said.
With additional help from
the Department of Envi-
ronmental Health, firefight-
ers were able “to get the
upper hand on that."

"It was a large fire but we
have extinguished a large
area of it with the assistance
of Environmental Health,"
he said.

Two units were dis-
patched to extinguish the
Carmichael Road fires on
Tuesday, Mr Deleveaux
said, while one unit fought
the fires yesterday.



Fj

(L-R) BERND SCHNEIDER, chairman of Schneider Power; Kevin
Ingraham, vice-president of finance for BREC; Fernando Mimiaga-
Sosa, director of strategic projects and sustainable energy for the
state of Oaxaca in Mexico; Vincent McDonald, Chief Executive Offi-
cer of BREC; Isabel Ovando, administrative assistant for the Foun-

dation of Wind Power in Istmo.

BREC takes steps to

transfer knowledge

of renewable energy
development to Bahamas

THE management team of
the Bahamas Renewable
Energy Corporation (BREC)
recently attended the Latin
Wind Energy Association
(LAWEA) conference in
Huatulco, Mexico on invita-
tion by the chairman of the
Toronto-based Schneider
Power company.

The trip formed part of
BREC’s key mandate to
transfer knowledge to the
Bahamas to further renewable
energy development in the
country.

“In order for us to create
jobs in the Bahamas we need
to transfer knowledge from
other countries so that we can
take full advantage of this
exciting and high-growth
industry,” said Vincent
McDonald, Chief Executive
Officer of BREC.

“As a company we are com-
mitted to bringing leading-
edge knowledge and techni-
cal expertise to the Bahamas
for dissemination amongst
government and private busi-
nesses.”

Mexico is a leader in the
development of renewable
energy in Latin America with
85.3 MW (megawatt) of wind
projects in operation and 356.4
MW under construction. Cur-
rent plans anticipate growing
Mexico’s wind capacity to
7,500 MW by 2020.

Key knowledge transfer
topics discussed at the confer-
ence were principals of wind
resource assessment, produc-
tion analysis, designing and
performance of wind farms,
financial modelling, operation
and maintenance, and struc-
tural safety. Concurrent with
the conference, the BREC
team was invited on a tour of
Acciona Energy’s 250 MW
Eurus wind farm in La Ven-
tosa by Mr Fernando Mimia-
ga, director of strategic devel-
opment and sustainable ener-
gy for the state of Oaxaca in
Mexico.

BREC is a joint-venture
between the Nassau-based
WINSO company and Schnei-
der Power Caribbean, a whol-
ly owned subsidiary of Toron-
to-based Schneider Power.

BREC is a developer, own-
er, and operator of three con-
templated renewable power
generation facilities totaling
24 MW, enough to power over
25,000 homes. The renewable
generation portfolio is diver-
sified across two technologies
(wind and solar) and three
islands — New Providence,
Abaco and Harbour Island.

BREC is a combination of
Bahamian entrepreneurship,
backed by knowledge and
experience of the Schneider
family’s 115-year history in
renewable energy.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Pride seen to deter jobless [fF
benefits scheme registration

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PRIDE is thought to be holding many
Bahamians back from registering for NIB’s
newly instituted unemployment benefits
scheme, Labour and NIB officials said yes-
terday.

Around 600 people signed up for the
scheme by midday in the second wave of
applications yesterday, following 774 who reg-
istered on Saturday, and with 12,000 potential
claimants out there, it was far less than officials
had expected.

Those among the estimated 1,500 who have
not been ashamed to register their unem-
ployment with the Department of Labour and
apply for financial support from the National
Insurance Board (NIB) told The Tribune they
welcomed the government’s move to provide
much needed support in tough economic
times. The majority of those signing on at CR
Walker and SC McPherson, two of the four
New Providence centres where people can
apply for benefits this week, were blue-collar
workers whose positions were made redun-
dant as businesses started to feel the pressure
of the global financial crisis, Labour Depart-
ment staff said. They would have received
smaller severance packages than white-collar
workers, if any at all. At SC McPherson, the
bulk of applicants were former employees of
Atlantis, as well as staff made redundant from
Sandals, the Wyndham in Cable Beach, small
businesses and construction workers who have
suffered job losses in recent months.

A 59-year-old Cowpen Road resident who
worked at the Wyndham for 23 years before
she lost her job just over a year ago said she
hopes the benefits will help her get back on
her feet. “It’s been really tight,” she said.
“This should be able to help a lot with the
light bill and all. And I’m hoping to find work
as well.”

Applicants must register their status as an
unemployed job seeker with the Department




. 7
PEOPLE REGISTER with the Department of Labour
and sign up for unemployment benefits from the
National Insurance Board at SC McPherson Junior
High School yesterday.

of Labour before applying for benefits from
NIB, so they can improve their chance of find-
ing employment while receiving financial
relief. However, Renaud Bethel, a NIB rep-
resentative said: “I think most people don’t
want to be seen as claiming benefits and feel
they don’t need the money, but if they aren’t
working the Labour Department can help
find them a job.”

Azella Major, NIB director in charge of
the Family Islands at SC McPherson said:
“Some of us still have a little pride so they
don’t want to be seen in the crowd.

“We try to tell them this is something you
need not be embarrassed about, this unem-
ployment is international, it’s worldwide, and
we have very little control over what is hap-
pening to us. Businesses are here to make a
profit and if things are slow they will cut down,
so you are entitled to these benefits once you
qualify, so there is no shame in this, it could
happen to any one of us.”

The low turnout has driven Department of
Labour and NIB staff to abolish the alpha-
betical system to make all welcome to register
between 9am and 4pm at the centres today,

vineya rd yines
|

martha e simeyard












































Thursday, Friday and Saturday, before regis-
tration moves to NIB and Labour Depart-
ment offices on Monday. Family Island resi-
dents will be able to register from today.

Applicants must take their National Insur-
ance card, identification and job termination
letter with them for a swift registration process
and can expect to pick up their first cheque in
two weeks. Miss Major said: “If you can’t
read, we have staff here to help you, and we
are really here to encourage people to under-
stand what is happening and ensure they can
qualify, so we treat them with the greatest
compassion possible and most persons seem
happy, everything just flows and I think that is
the good thing about it.”

Many applicants signing up yesterday lost
their jobs in the last six months and were reg-
istering with the Department of Labour for
the first time. Department of Labour repre-
sentative at SC McPherson Barbara McCart-
ney said: “The benefits have drawn more peo-
ple out to register, so that is a very good
thing.”

A 24-year-old mother-of-three who worked
in the purchasing department at Breezes hotel
in Cable Beach for seven years before she
was made redundant in August said: “I’m
here to try to get some sort of benefit to help
with my utility bills and stuff.

“Things have been very difficult. My hus-
band is bringing in a little income to keep the
rent going and pay the light bill, but this will
really help me for true, not just financially, but
to find work.” A 48-year-old former jeweller Lh)
store saleswoman ae with ie Dene MEN
ment of Labour at SC McPherson said finding
work is her top priority.

“This is a great help and I think they are
doing a good thing,” the Carmichael Road
resident said. “But I am hoping more than
anything for a job. The contribution is good,
but a job is a continuous income.”

For more information contact NIB’s public
relations department on 356-2070 extension
236/234/232, e-mail info@nib-bahamas.com, or
log on to www.nib-bahamas.com.

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 ¢ Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

oO ln brief Coes ai Ors Customs
officers’ qualifications

Man accused
of raping
teenage girl
is arraigned

e A 29-year-old man accused
of raping a teenage girl was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

It is alleged that Randy
Neeroy Bain, of Free Town
Lane, raped a 17-year-old girl
on Sunday, April 12.

Bain, who appeared before
Magistrate Guillimena Archer
in Court 10, Nassau Street, was
not required to plead to the
charge. He was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison. The case
was adjourned to July 3.

Alleged arsonist
appears in court

¢ A 30-year-old man accused
of arson was arraigned in a
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Cohen Lightbourne of
Sequoia Street, Pinewood Gar-
dens, was arraigned before
Magistrate Guillimena Archer
in Court 10, Nassau Street,
charged with arson of a dwelling
house.

Court dockets allege that
Lightbourne on Friday, April 3,
intentionally set fire to the
dwelling home of Vernessa
Strachan at Pride Estates.
According to police,

Strachan’s home was exten-
sively damaged by the blaze
which began at 11am on April 3.
Lightbourne pleaded not guilty
to the charge and was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison.

The case was adjourned to
July 22.

Maderia Sti. ONLY

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Waverly
Fabrics

CONCERNS were raised yes-
terday that several Customs offi-
cers up for promotion may lack
the proper qualifications.

This follows angry reactions by
some senior officers to the
announcement that they will be
overlooked and end up working
for their subordinates.

According unconfirmed reports
from a source close to the depart-
ment, of the five Customs officers
that the government is proposing
to promote to the executive ranks,
"only one has tertiary education”.

The source further claimed that
the other four officers are without
BGCSE qualifications or equiv-
alent credentials. “Can you imag-
ine the majority of the executive
staff of the Customs Department
lacking a tertiary education in
2009? This clearly shows that the
government is looking at this issue
from a political and personal issue
rather than an issue that faces the
entire nation,” he said.

During a brief interview yes-
terday, Minister of State for
Finance Zhivargo Laing — whose
portfolio includes the Department
of Customs — said he was not pre-
pared to make any statements
regarding the agency. Mr Laing,
who spoke between Cabinet
meetings yesterday, offered no
further comment.

The source also argued that rel-
atively young officers are being
removed as part of the govern-
ment’s ongoing restructuring exer-
cise, only to be replaced by older
candidates. Last week, several
senior Customs officers threat-
ened legal action against an
“unprecedented” and “irrational”
announcement that they will be
superseded by more junior offi-
cers as the department is restruc-
tured. They claimed that more
than 40 officers, mainly in their
late 40s and 50s with decades of
service behind them, were sur-
prised to find themselves called

Candleholders,
Vases etc.




Zhivargo Tae}

to the office of the Comptroller of
Customs last week only to be giv-
en a letter informing them of the
promotion decision. The brief let-
ter to the officers is said to have
read that while “promotions of
officers will be necessary” under
the restructuring, they will not be
among those considered “for
advancement to the next level.”

“This would therefore result in
your being superseded by your
peers at this time,” it is said to
have added. The latest informa-
tion reaching The Tribune sug-
gests the officers have not signed
and returned the letters, as had
been requested. It is not clear if
this decision will result in any
repercussions.

This new controversy comes
after 24 senior Customs officers
were offered early retirement
packages earlier this year. The
department, also the centre of
rampant corruption allegations in
recent months, is responsible for
collecting 60 per cent of the gov-
ernment’s total revenue.

Attempts to reach Comptrol-
ler of Customs Anthony Adderley
for comment were unsuccessful
up to press time yesterday.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Hotel staff keep visitors coming

ATLANTIS EXECUTIVES are ecstatic that
visitor satisfaction is “off the charts” as staff

er than the company had predicted for this time
of year.

now realise that advertising can attract the first
visitor, but it is their responsibility to keep that
visitor returning.

Visitors have also commented to us on how
impressed they have been with the friendliness
and level of service provided by Breezes’ all
inclusive resort on Cable Beach. We assume
that it must be the same at all of our resorts as
Bahamians suddenly realise that their job
depends on them playing their part in keeping
guests happy.

For years this message has been preached by
industry leaders, but it seemed that executives
were knocking on empty doors as few in the ser-
vice industry seemed to be getting the message.
However, this message also has to be under-
stood by the general public. Only last week a
visiting couple complained about taxi drivers
who did not follow the fare rates given them by
their hotel. They felt that they had been taken
advantage of. They were happy with their hotel,
but they were not impressed by their first con-
tact with a Bahamian taxi driver. Did they com-
plain? A disgusted shrug of the shoulder indi-
cated that they had not. How will this breach of
the taxi rates be factored in when they plan
their next vacation? Will it be the Bahamas, or
will they go further afield? In other words every
Bahamian, in one way or another, benefits from
these visitors. Their courtesy and honesty will
depend upon whether or not a visitor buys a
return ticket.

Resorts should encourage their guests to
bring such complaints to their attention to make
certain that those who are letting the industry
down can be removed.

Some of the Bahamas’ leading resorts have
invested heavily in accommodating corporate
business with large conference centres and
meeting rooms. When the economic crash came
with business being hit hardest, overseas con-
ferences were the first to go under. Of course,
Atlantis was one of those hit hardest with mass
cancellations. Beyond Easter the horizon
showed a blank. Staff had to be laid off.

As soon as this happened there was a trans-
formation at Atlantis. The remaining staff
seemed energised to move to a higher stan-
dard. They were almost stumbling over each
other in their anxiety to serve. One would have
had to have been blind not to have seen the
change.

This has obviously paid off. The large con-
ventions might have disappeared, but leisure
travellers now make up the majority of visitors
— and letters and e-mails of visitor satisfaction
are arriving on Atlantis’ managing director’s
desk. Visitor arrivals are now two per cent high-



“The graphs for this year, for January, Feb-
ruary and March, are through the roof com-
pared to the same months last year. Forget
about ‘improved’ - we’re talking new records! If
we published them you wouldn’t believe it,”
said senior executive George Markantonis.

Mr Markantonis said employees certainly
appear to have recognised that “everyone has a
responsibility” when it comes to the health of
this country’s tourism industry.

“There’s a huge awareness on property that
this isn’t management’s responsibility alone
anymore — that survival depends on getting
customers who are travelling to come back and
that responsibility belongs to every single person
who works here.”

Bahamians must remember that the
Bahamas is not the only country trying to out
smile their competition for that tourist dollar.

We have seen the same happen to a hotel
where we stay in Miami. When staff were being
laid off here, they were also being laid off in
Miami hotels. Earlier this year we could have
had any room that we wanted in this particular
hotel. Many of the staff in the dining room had
been made redundant, and those remaining —
like in the Bahamas — were breaking their
backs to serve. A perpetual smile lighted their
faces. The next time we went to Miami we did-
n’t bother to make a reservation, and we almost
did not get a room. A large convention of
lawyers had filled the hotel. Since then this
hotel has been fairly busy, but still operating on
a skeleton staff in the dining room — as though
unsure of when their luck might run out.

Editorial corrections: In this column yester-
day we explained why individual Americans
200 years ago carried arms, but commented
that with today’s army and police force, an
American’s right to bear arms is no longer a rea-
sonable argument. Of the American militia of
200 years ago we wrote: “Those were the days
when if the state were threatened the farmer
had to hitch up his britches, drop his pitch fork,
grab his fire arm and defend his neighours.”
Maybe Huck Finn would have been hitching
up his “britches”, but The Tribune should have
had the farmer hitching his breeches. Sorry
folks!

And thanks to our reader who brought to our
attention an error in a recent article in which we
reported a PLP MP suggesting that Tribune
Managing Editor John Marquis should be run
out of town and The Tribune burned down.
That statement was made at a meeting of the
Shirlea-Twynam Crime Watch committee, not
the “Shirley Street-Twynam Avenue area” as
reported in this column.



CTE mics tom

How small and
medium business
suffer in silence

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To bring relief to recently
unemployed persons the gov-
ernment has initiated an unem-
ployment benefit programme,
which is imminent.

The government has also
articulated plans to make this
programme a permanent fixture
by 2010 with both employers
and employees alike contribut-
ing to a National Insurance
Unemployment Benefit Fund.

Additionally, there are opin-
ions held by some that given
the paltry savings of Bahami-
ans and the lack of discipline in
that regard, it may be necessary
to initiate a retirement fund that
would supplement the National
Insurance Board Benefits.

Naturally, whatever formula
is derived, small and medium
business (SMB) will be taxed

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



further for that programme.
Furthermore, the opposition
has indicated that should it be
successful in the next general
elections, the National Health
Insurance Scheme will be
placed on the table once again,
naturally, SMB will be required
to carry the lion’s share of this
health care tax initiative.
Given the government of the
day’s reliance on SMB to fund
substantially all of its social ini-
tiatives, it would appear rea-
sonable that given this global
economical crisis greater
emphasis on SMB would be
reflected in the stimulus agenda.

To date, making credit avail-
able to SMB or other necessary
proposals to ensure viability
have been virtually deficient.
Notwithstanding, SMB’s are
being required to bear the
heavy lifting for all national tax-
ation proposed.

It is said that a sound eco-
nomic stimulus policy requires
that all long-run effects and all
stakeholders, not simply short-
run effects and a few people be
considered.

IT remain hopeful the govern-
ment would revisit its position
on stimulating the economy by
giving thoughtful consideration
and action to likewise address
the plight of SMB forthwith.

R McKENZIE
Nassau,
April, 2009.

Cleaning up the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As Bahamians, change begins in the hearts and
minds of every person and then manifests itself in the
actions of individuals; one person possibly influ-
encing another.

There is good charge and not so good.

Since we have homes, these are our castles with-
out regard to location, let’s have a heart and mind to
maintain a clean home in and out doing a little work
each week at least. Keep one or two gallons of paint
around to touch up now and then. Place some bright
and colourful flowers in your yard area. Do some-
thing to improve your castle (home) every now and
then. And then “maintain” what you’re done.

Since we have offices, jobs and businesses keep
those places looking sharp always, touch up areas
which need a little painting, place some flowering
plants out front which helps to create an attractive
entrance for potential customers and you yourself.

All of us in this country who are citizens and res-
idents let’s get involved and clean up right where we
are and stop leaving it for the next person to do.

All of us merchants/business people downtown,
paint up those walls right in front of your store;
wash down your signage and tiling, place, clean up
that portion of sidewalk in front of your business.
Most importantly “maintain: all these things and

be consistent with keeping right where you are clean
and tidy always.

We'll all be pleased with the mark we’ve all made
on maintaining a clean environment downtown Bay
Street.

Homeowners! Don’t wait on a government agency
to initiate cleaning in your neighbourhood. Rather
clean up right in your own yard and maintain it
beautifully.

Apartment dwellers! In spite of you not owning
the place where you live, keep it clean in and out.

Maybe, just maybe that home, apartment, condo
or business place that you cleaned up would influ-
ence another person to clean and maintain the same
throughout the Bahamas.

Interesting if all businesses downtown Nassau
and throughout the Bahamas were to clean right in
front of their stores on Bay Street and all other
areas throughout our country would be more attrac-
tive. Finally for you yourself, your Bahamian cus-
tomers and our tourists.

So let’s have that good change of heart and mind
to clean and maintain right where we are through-
out our Bahamaland...

GREGORY W STRACHAN
Nassau,
April, 2009.

Please research your facts, Mr Allen

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have been following the
exchange between Kim Aranha
and young Allen. I should like
you to print an open letter to
that young man.

Mr Allen, when I was your
age my uncle and my father
owned fishing vessels and a
barge docked at Potter’s Cay.
It was common practice then,
as it is now, for fishermen to
leave turtles on their back for
days in the scorching sun with-
out water and food until they
were slaughtered. My uncle and
father did it an so did everyone
who sold turtle meat at Potter’s

Cay. I found it so cruel and
inhumane that I stopped eating
turtle.

Turtle meat is delicious and
turtle soup was one of my
favourite meals, but taste could
not justify the torture.

Thaven’t eaten turtle meat in
thirty years, but turtles are still
tortured in this fashion, and
finally someone is trying to do
something about it.

Mrs Aranha was wrong,
however, when she said turtles
were the only animals torment-
ed in this way (ie made help-
less and left to suffer).

In the Philippines, China and
others parts of Asia, dogs are
stuffed in cages with their legs
broken and then bound behind



their backs. It is a practice out-
lawed, but still continues as an
underground trade.

Now, young Allen would you
like us to tie up and eat our pot-
cakes?

According to your rational
that would be a totally utilitari-
an means of ridding ourselves of
our potcake problem.

Mr Allen, with your cavalier
attitude, you come across as a
pompous, self-serving young
man.

You'll make a good politician
some day, but until then, please
research your facts.

PAMELA E HEASTIE
Nassau,
April, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas Girl Guiles
Association holts
opening ceremony
for regional camp

THE Bahamas Girl
Guides Association
held its official open-
ing ceremony fora
regional camp cele-
brating the 50th
anniversary of the
Caribbean Link of
Guiding at Xavier’s
Lower School on East-
er Monday.

Under the theme,
“Guiding for
Caribbean Unity,” the
Girl Guides of the
Bahamas welcomed
some 30 guides and 12
world leaders from
CARICOM countries
during Camp Lukku
Kairi (Lucayan for
island people).

Joining the 40 guides
and rangers from New
Providence, Grand
Bahama, Exuma and
Eleuthera were guides
from Antigua, Belize,
the British Virgin
Islands, the Cayman
Islands, Guyana and
Montserrat.

Rev Beryl Higgs,
president of the
Bahamas Girl Guides
Association, welcomed
the excited participants
to the week-long camp
of environmental activ-
ities, challenges and
exploration of New
Providence.

Senator Dr Jacinta
Higgs, the keynote
speaker, challenged
the girls to be cog-
nisant of their common
heritage, the unifying
principles of guiding
and their role in the
preservation of the
regional Girl Guides.

The camp closes with
a rally on Friday, April
17 at the Girl Guides
site on Marshall Road.

~ Blind man aims to captain

boat around New Providence

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A BLIND man who aspires
to sail the open sea is learn-
ing to captain a 21ft power-
boat to drive around New
Providence and Paradise
Island in July.

Jerome Thompson, 45, fell
in love with the sea as a child
and had dreamed of driving a
boat even after he lost his sight
at age 11.

But Mr Thompson, of
Coconut Grove, Nassau, never
believed his dream could come
true until he heard the far-
fetched tales of the remark-
able visually impaired people
who drove cars and piloted
planes in other parts of the
world.

The unmarried entrepreneur
was inspired to set up non-
profit organisation Adventures
Unlimited Bahamas, regis-
tered in January, to help dis-
abled people in the Bahamas
and around the world bring
their dreams to life by sup-
porting them in their adven-
turous endeavors cither finan-
cially or by providing equip-
ment and training.

As president of the organi-
sation, Mr Thompson is lead-
ing the way for other daredev-
ils with disabilities, as he
intends to steer a three hour
course from Potters Cay
around New Providence and
Paradise Island on July 11 to
promote his organisation and
prove it is possible to conquer
any challenge, regardless of a
person’s limitations.

The brave captain said: “It’s
a daring thing, I must admit.
Persons might think I am a lit-
tle crazy, but when the Wright
brothers invented the aero-
plane, people thought they

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

PREPARING TO SET SAIL: Jerome Thompson

were crazy too.

“Nothing is impossible, it
can be done, it has been done,
and hopefully more people will
realise that if a blind person
can drive a boat, then so can
they.”

Mr Thompson took his third
lesson from former Royal
Bahamas Defence Force
(RBDF) Captain Glenward
Bain at the Bayshore Marina
in Nassau Harbour yesterday
afternoon, and was taught how
to follow the compass to steer

CED aCe eM eRe |

Tim Clark/Tribune staff

CONTESTANTS take part in the “Pull d’ Engine” competition at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre on Easter Mon-

day. The event was hosted by TaekwondoBahamas and TEAMProcure and featured fire safety demonstrations,
car extrication demonstrations, a Taekwondo exhibition and a junior firefighter challenge. Proceeds of the event

will benefit TaekwondoBahamas.

Distinguished Lecture Series



his course for the first time.

Captain Bain, who drove a
RBDF boat for 13 years, has
already helped Mr Thompson
become familiar with the cock-
pit of the 21ft Wellcraft speed-
boat loaned to him through
dock master Lundy Robinson.

The Captain has been teach-
ing him how to turn the wheel,
adjust the throttle and most
importantly, follow orders, as
he will act as Mr Thompson’s
eyes at sea in the July chal-
lenge.

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“Nothing is impossible, it can
be done, it has been done, and
hopefully more people will
realise that if a blind person can
drive a boat, then so can they.”



Mr Thompson said: “I want
to drive around the course
completely under my own
power, with Capt Bain on the
boat only for safety reasons,
and I don’t want this event to
be the only thing done.

“T want to help others to
think outside the box, to dare
to dream, and to realise that
despite of their disabilities,
there are abilities they can tap
into.”

Once he has mastered the
course in three months time,
Mr Thompson hopes to cap-
tain a boat entirely on his own
by means of a $5,000 audio
GPS system.

Capt Bain said: “Once he
understands compass orders I
will not need to be in the boat
with him anymore; the GPS
system will tell him where to
go and he will be able to find
his own way around the island
and the coral reefs.

“It’s very doable, and quite
straightforward.

“T will be his lookout for
oncoming vessels, but his
entire track would be ona
GPS system.”

Mr Thompson, who said he
has never been plagued by
fear, was thrilled by his first
experience driving a boat.

“It was quite exhilarating
when I stepped on board to
drive the boat for the first time
on March 14,” he said.

“I was still in the planning,
thinking, theoretical stage
while onboard, but after I

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came off the awesomeness
actually hit me, that I
actually did that. It was exhil-
arating.”

Workshop
AP EOOU DOTS
to ‘Tame
the Time
Monster’

THE host and creator of
the motivational television
show “Dare To Be Great”,
Spence Finlayson, will be
conducting a time manage-
ment workshop titled
“Taming The Time Mon-
ster.”

Mr Finlayson, motiva-
tional speaker and corpo-
rate trainer with over 20
years experience, claims
persons participating in his
workshop will learn to get
more done in fewer hours.

The workshop will take
place at the British Colo-
nial Hilton on Wednesday,
April 29 from 9am to 4pm.

ua He
Us)
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IKCLUGIEG DUNIMTS & HOLIDAYS

To our valued customers. Please
be advised that The People’s
Pharmacy, Carmichael Road

Branch has been relocated across

the street in Anne’s Plaza

Date: Thursday, April 16, 2009

Time: 7:30 pm

Venue: St. Mary’s Hall, Bernard Road
Cost: FREE of charge

NS) eer co

Topic:

Mr. James Smith

President of CFAL Investments,

Former Governor of The Central Bank of The Bahamas and
Former Minister of State for Finance.

"The Current Economic Crisis and Implications for the Future".

Open to all members of the Public. Refreshments will be provided.





opposite, Turtle Drive.

Your Health iy Our Concerw
PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Health education is
critical for the Bahamas

Accor to
Health Minister

Hubert Minnis, the government
will soon propose major medical
reforms that can be expected to
spark a huge debate in parlia-
ment.

A centrepiece of the proposals
will be a nation-wide prescrip-
tion drug plan that will feature a
computer database of patients,
as well as an education and fol-
low-up programme to ensure
that people take their medica-
tions and make necessary
lifestyle changes.

The reason is that we are fac-
ing a healthcare crunch similar

i

To the Shareholder of

to that faced by the US — costs
are skyrocketing and resources
are running out. The big chal-
lenge today is to find a sustain-
able solution, something that
requires a "paradigm shift" in
the healthcare industry, experts
say.

In other words, we will have
to change our frame of reference

2l] ERNST & YOUNG

Colinalmperial Insurance Limited



from over-reliance on tertiary
medicine, which focuses on
expensive hospital care, to lower-
cost preventive medicine that is
more patient-driven. What does
this mean? Well, it costs $60,000
a year for the Princess Margaret
Hospital to keep a patient with
kidney failure alive — and there
are more than 200 patients

Ernst & Young
, ee PRICE

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of Colinalmperial Insurance Limited (the Company)

as at December 31, 2008.

Management's Responsibility for the Balance Sheet
Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the balance sheet in accordance with
International Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes: designing, implementing and maintaining
internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of a balance sheet that is free from material
misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; selecting and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making
accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances.

Auditors’ Responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the balance sheet based on our audit. We did not audit the financial
statements of Goodman’s Bay Development Company Limited (“GBDC”), a subsidiary of which the Company
owns a 67% interest in, which statements reflect total assets of $28,547,474 as of December 31, 2008 and total
revenues of $2,584,125 for the year then ended. Those statements were audited by other auditors whose report has
been furnished to us, and our opinion, insofar as it relates to the amounts included for GBDC, is based solely on the

report of the other auditors.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we
comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the balance
sheet is free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the balance
sheet. The procedures selected depend on the auditor's judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material
misstatement of the balance sheet, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor
considers internal control relevant to the entity's preparation and fair presentation of the balance sheet in order to
design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion

on the effectiveness of the entity's internal control.

An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of

accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating
the overall presentation of the balance sheet.

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained and the report of other auditors is sufficient and appropriate to
provide a basis for our audit opinion.

Opinion

In our opinion, based on our audit and the report of other auditors, the consolidated balance sheet give a true and fair
view of the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2008, in accordance with International Financial

Reporting Standards.

April 8, 2009

Cormety Young

A member firm of Emst & Young Global Limited

DULINAIMPERIAL INSURANCE LTD,

Consolidated Ralance Sheet

ii December 31, JUNK

(Expressed im Bahamian dallars)

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Exceutive Vice-Chairman

undergoing dialysis as we speak.

And almost every one of
them is in that unfortunate posi-
tion due to complications from
high blood pressure or diabetes,
which are easily preventable and
controllable diseases. In fact,
about two thirds of the govern-
ment’'s healthcare spending goes
to treat diseases that are caused
by poor lifestyle choices. And
half of all deaths in the Bahamas
are attributed to these illnesses.

"Everyone is entitled to
healthcare," Dr Minnis said at a
recent College of The Bahamas
presentation, "but as former
president Bill Clinton said
recently, the financial meltdown
will be a joke compared to what
healthcare will cost if we contin-
ue on our present path. When
you need more and more hospi-
tal beds, you know that health-
care has failed. And if we con-
tinue on this road we will never
have enough money or facilities.”

In fact, the Bahamas seems
to have come full circle from the
early days of the 20th century,
when there were only three doc-
tors outside of Nassau — at
Inagua, Harbour Island and
Green Turtle Cay — to serve
42,000 people living in the wide-
ly scattered out islands.

Back then, according to Dr
Harold Munnings in his 2005 his-
tory of the Princess Margaret
Hospital, out islanders "obtained
what care they could from
untrained midwives, clergymen
and herbalists." And commis-
sioners "were provided with a
chest that contained bottles of
medicines and jars of pastes and
lotions” with accompanying
instructions.

The Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal began life as a poorhouse in
1809 and entered the 20th cen-
tury as a place of last resort for
those in need of medical care.
According to a 1905 account it
had four sections — for the sick,
indigent, lepers and insane.
Treatment was free, but patients
were referred to as "inmates"
and those who could afford it
arranged for medical care at
home.

In 1925 several American vis-
itors contracted typhoid fever in
Nassau — a killer disease trans-
mitted by dirty food and water,
so the British authorities dis-
patched a senior public health
expert to investigate.

He deplored the filth of heav-
ily populated communities not
included in the city's new water-
works and sewerage system, then
under construction. He also not-
ed the prevalence of tuberculosis,
venereal disease, gastroenteritis
and tetanus, and strongly criti-
cised public indifference to Nas-
sau's dreadful sanitary and hous-
ing conditions.

Unfortunately, these condi-
tions did not begin to change
until the middle of the century,
when a British official was still
able to write that "behind Nas-
sau's picturesque old-world
streets and the princely mansions
along the East and West shores
are slums as bad as any West
Indian Colony, and far worse
than anything Bermuda can
show."

In 1953, two thirds of the
homes on New Providence still
had no running water. And pre-
ventable diseases were due most-
ly to overcrowding, ignorance,
poor nutrition, and lack of public
hygiene.

There was no regular garbage
collection, so people took little
notice of trash or litter during
their daily lives.

While researching these issues
I came across an interesting med-
ical memoir written by Dr Mal-
colm Hale a little more than a
year before his death in 2003 at
the age of 77. He had arrived in
Nassau in 1954 on a three-year
contract as a medical officer for
the new Bahamas General Hos-
pital (which was renamed after a
visit by Princess Margaret in
1955), and stayed on in private
practice.

"TL arrived by boat from Eng-
land on December 16," Dr Hale
recalled. "We anchored outside
the bar and a tender came out
to carry us in. On it was a
reporter from the Guardian to
interview the new doctor, and a
photographer to take his pic-
ture...the effort hinted at the state
of medical needs of the commu-
nity."

He identified the new Emer-
ald Beach Hotel on Cable Beach,
the redeveloped Bahamas Gen-
eral Hospital and the first City
Market food store as emblems
of changing times for Bahami-
ans. They represented a dramat-
ic break with the economy of the
past, he said, and were a sign that



MINISTER OF HEALTH
Dr Hubert Minnis

prosperity was beginning to trick-
le into the general population.

Shortly after his arrival Dr
Hale was put in charge of the
TB and geriatric wards at the
Prospect Hospital, as well as the
Lazaretto off Carmichael Road,
which was no more than a nar-
row dirt track. This was in addi-
tion to his out-patient and casu-
alty duties, as well as occasional
out island clinics.

Prospect Hospital was a col-
lection of wooden buildings on
Prospect Ridge built for the
American and British air forces
who trained in the Bahamas dur-
ing the Second World War. Like
Windsor airfield it was handed
over to the Bahamian govern-
ment in 1945.

"The general health of the
population was poor,” Dr Hale
recalled.

"Tuberculosis was rife; new
cases were discovered almost dai-
ly, many from out island settle-
ments, some of which like
Rolleville (Exuma) and Moores
Island (Abaco), were heavily
infected. Fortunately, my entry to
the medical profession coincided
with the discovery and availabil-
ity of a whole range of effective
medications...Now patients came
to be cured, not to die."

He described the geriatric
wards as pathological museums.
"Especially impressive were cas-
es of elephantiasis and the whole
spectrum of tertiary syphilis. The
leprosarium was a collection of
small wooden cottages (with)
about 20 patients when I took
over, most in advanced stages of
disfigurement, especially of
hands and face.

"The few new cases I admitted
were diagnosed in the early
stages and so far as I know all
were cured and returned undis-
figured to society. The old cases
stayed at the Lazaretto and died
off over a period of several years.
Most of the cases were white."

In the out-patient clinics, Dr
Hale treated many malnourished
children with intestines bloated
with Ascaris worms. Vermicide
was probably the most heavily
prescribed drug at the time, and
he credited it with making the
greatest single contribution
(except for penicillin) to the
health of the community.

He also described cases of pel-
lagra in adult men — "the only
clear-cut vitamin deficiency dis-
ease we encountered despite the
widespread malnutrition. Most
cases were alcoholics and they
responded miraculously to
niacin."

Dysentery was also common,
as were sexually transmitted dis-
eases like gonorrhea and syphilis.
But the popular remedy for VD
at the time, Dr Hale noted, was
to have sex with female infants.
"It took a major educational
effort by the profession to dis-
abuse the population of this idea,
and I wonder today if we fully
succeeded."

Although HIV-AIDS was
unknown at the time, Hale sus-
pected that "the occasional cases
of multipathology which
responded to no treatment, and
which were unsolved diagnostic
puzzles, and which were invari-
ably fatal, may have been AIDS.
Interestingly, as AIDS increased,
the other STD’s declined and
have become rare."

Epidemics of whooping cough
were devastating, Hale said. "I
remember Kenneth Eardley, an
older private physician, telling
me he had signed two or three
hundred death certificates due
to this illness in one outbreak
just a few years previously. And
how many times have I heard
older women say ‘I born 13 but I
bring up three’?"

In the 1950s there was rela-
tively little obesity and much less
diabetes than now, Dr Hale
reported. But one serious health
condition that has remained con-

stant is hypertension. High blood
pressure was, and is, a common
problem amongst Bahamians of
all ages, together with its deadly
complications of stroke and heart
disease.

In fact, while he was a resident
at the PMH, Dr Hale and others
contributed data to a US hyper-
tension study. In their 1958
report, the American researchers
noted that: "Almost everyone on
the Islands has a relative that has
‘the high blood,’ died of hyper-
tension, or has had a stroke...An
analysis of the water supply in
Nassau and several of the outer
island groups revealed that the
well water was significantly high
in sodium content."

The study reported salt lev-
els of less than a milligram per
millilitre in the drinking water of
major US cities, whereas drink-
ing water at the PMH contained
129 milligrams and on Eleuthera
210 milligrams. This meant that
Bahamians were ingesting up to
10 grams of salt per day from
water alone. And that was in
addition to the sodium found
naturally in foods, or added at
the table. Nor did it account for
the fact that salt pork was a com-
mon ingredient in most dishes at
the time.

Currently, the American
Heart Association recommends
an intake of less than 2.5 grams
of salt per day for the general
population — that's about a tea-
spoon — and even less for high-
risk individuals. I can testify from
personal experience that this
guideline is as difficult to achieve
in today's fast food-dominated
diet as it was back in the 1950s
when we all drank salt water.

Hale was one of a growing
band of doctors who participated
in the vast expansion of medical
skills and services in the
Bahamas over the past half cen-
tury. His assessment of how
things had changed over that
time?

"Today the general health of
the population is excellent," he
wrote in 2002, "except for self-
inflicted conditions, principally
obesity (and its complications),
HIV-AIDS, and gunshot
wounds."

This brings us back to Minis-
ter Minnis, who says the govern-
ment wants to realign medical
spending and priorities to pro-
mote healthy lifestyles. In addi-
tion to more emphasis on pre-
ventive medicine and health edu-
cation, the government will
invest in sophisticated informa-
tion technology systems that will
enable doctors to treat patients
remotely via online facilities.

It is a fact that 60 per cent of
patients admitted to the over-
crowded PMH emergency room
don't need to be there, but they
don't know any better. Afford-
able drugs are important, but
education to improve compliance
or avoid problems in the first
place is just as critical.

And it is this realisation that
has complicated recent debates
over the introduction of national
health insurance.

The proposed paradigm shift
indicates a growing awareness in
government that traditional
approaches will never solve our
healthcare challenges. Cancer,
AIDS, diabetes, uncontrolled
hypertension with stroke, heart
attack and kidney failure top the
list of modern medical problems,
and they all are preventable with
education, diet and medication.

"T would love to work in a
new, state-of-the-art facility,” Dr
Munnings told me, "but a prop-
erly funded programme to pre-
vent disease has to be the prior-
ity. Removing the excuse of med-
icine cost with a national drug
plan is a step in the right direc-
tion, but until education
improves and lifestyles change,
kidneys pummeled by out-of-
control pressure will continue to
fail and diabetes will continue to
cripple and blind."

There are still plans for a new
multi-million-dollar government
hospital — surveyors are stak-
ing out acres of prime forested
land at Prospect Ridge right now,
in fact. But dismay at the enor-
mous cost and effort has led suc-
cessive governments to content
themselves with refurbishing the
PMH at its present location. We
will have to see what the gov-
ernment brings to parliament in
the next few weeks.

As Dr Minnis said, "Preven-
tion is the key, but we have a
long way to go."

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Workshop
to focus on
money skills
for youth

MANY parents affected by
the present economic slump are
finding themselves answering
questions like “why can’t we
have fast food,” “why can’t I
have that new gadget,” and
even “why are you taking me
out of private school.”

These are the questions of
an generation that seemingly
does not understand the value
of a dollar these days.

Those questions and more
can be answered on April 18
and April 25 in a “Providing
Money Skills Youth Need For
Life” workshop at the British
American Financial Centre on
Independence Drive.

The two sessions - from
10am to 2pm and 3pm to 7pm —
will be hosted by Creative
Wealth Bahamas, organisers of
Camp Millionaire and the Mon-
ey Game.

The workshop is the brain-
child of former banker Keshelle
Kerr, founder and CEO of Cre-
ative Wealth Bahamas.

She is also the founder and
vice-president of a woman’s
investment group called FFL
Investments.

Trained in Santa Barbara,
California, Ms Kerr is the only
certified creative wealth coach
in her native Bahamas.

“April is financial literacy for
youth month and in these times
it is essential for us to talk to
our kids about the changes in
our lifestyle due to the down-
turn in the economy,” she said.

“T have a nine-year-old
daughter and until I sat down
and explained how money
works to her, she did not fully
appreciate the sacrifices that
have been made for her to go to
school, get tech toys or even go
to her favourite restaurant.
Many parents whose children
enter our programmes thank
us all the time because their
kids are suddenly more mon-
ey wise and aware of how much
it costs to raise them and as a
result, pressure their parents
less.”

A part of the upcoming pro-
gramme includes teenagers
experiencing the proverbial “rat
race” by working to receive a
set salary and paying their
monthly expenses.

They are also given a choice
whether to save any extra cash
or purchase pleasure items.

“At the end of the day, teens
realise what it feels like to pay
rent and that a credit card does
have to be paid off. They then
learn about passive income,
assets and liabilities, how and
why to save and so much more,
she said.

Despite being a former
banker, Ms Kerr said the work-
shop is not about encouraging
children to get into banking,
but about empowering young
people to follow their passions
and to achieve financial free-
dom in their lives.

“The workshop is focused on
making sure the next genera-
tion doesn’t make the mistakes
of their parents by not
being properly prepared,” she
said.

“Tt’s about making sure they
are able to spend wisely, save
for their futures, not have to
deal with financial difficulties
and know how to enter their
adulthood as responsible indi-
viduals. All and all it’s about
making sure they understand
dollars and sense.”

For the

Golfers on
course to
help Sister

‘Sister charity

THE Bahamas Golf Fed-
eration Central Ladies Divi-
sion and the Blue Shark Golf
Club are hosting a golf tour-
nament in support of the Sis-
ter Sister breast cancer char-
ity.

The Golf Federation has
always supported the Cancer
Society in the Bahamas
through its ladies division
golf tournaments.

This year, the Federation
made a conscious decision to
target a special group of
women who work hard to
support those diagnosed with
breast cancer, the organisers
of the event said in a press
statement.

Medication

The Sister Sister organisa-
tion not only supports
women financially by sup-
plying needed “port-a-caths”,
which are inserted in the
chest for them to receive
medication, but also offers
emotional support and hope
by example.

The non-profit organisa-
tion purchases and donates
these very expensive port-a-
caths to women in need and

try to do this for a least five
persons per month.

This venture in itself is
costly as each device costs
about $770 and literally
depletes the funds being held
by the organisation.

Most of the volunteers
working in the organisation
are breast cancer survivors
and use their personal expe-
riences to encourage women
to not despair and show them
that they can still have a pro-
ductive meaningful life.

“We are asking the public
to join with the Bahamas
Golf Federation Central
Ladies Division and the Blue
Shark Golf Club to not only
play in the upcoming Sister
Sister Breast Cancer Chari-
ty Golf Tournament on May
9, 2009, but also send dona-
tions to help support the
event and thereby support
the Sister Sister organisa-
tion,” the Federation said.

To sign up for the tourna-
ment interested persons can
contact Yvonne Shaw, chair-
man of the Central Ladies
Division, or download a
sponsor form and player reg-
istration form from the BGF
website at www.bgfnet.com.

REAL TALK YOUTH FORUM



SCOTIA Bank in partnership with the Zonta Club of Nassau host-
eda “Real Talk Youth Forum” in March at the Mount Tabor Full
Gospel Baptist Church in Pinewood Gardens. The event was
geared toward addressing the topic of sexual health among Bahami-
an youth. Some 300 tenth graders were engaged in discussions
sparked by the student presenters from the College of the Bahamas

(COB).

These presenters included Jonique Webb, Krista Nottage,
Camille Smith, Renbert Mortimer, Adrian Wildgoose and Brooke
Sherman, hospitality management student at COB.

Scotia Bank and Zonta Club of Nassau are of the view that the
general health of the country’s young people is extremely important
to their current well-being and to the future of the Bahamas.

Indira Rolle, assistant marketing and public relations manager of
Scotia Bank, presented the president of the Zonta Club of Nassau
with a cheque to show the bank’s commitment to the cause.

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Tornadoes
Spotted as storm
line rumbles
over Florida

MTAMPA,Fla,

A STRONG line of storms
spawned at least three torna-
does Tuesday as it tore across
central Florida, scattering
roof shingles, uprooting trees
and forcing schools to evacu-
ate children from trailer class-
rooms, according to Associ-
ated Press.

No injuries were immedi-
ately reported and the storms
eventually moved off Flori-
da’s Atlantic coast. It was the
latest round of bad weather to
hammer the South after
heavy rain and strong winds
Monday that hit Alabama,
Tennessee, Georgia, Ken-
tucky and northern Florida,
already reeling from storms
and tornadoes last week.

The National Weather Ser-
vice was still tallying damage
information, but initial
reports were that three tor-
nadoes had touched down
north of Tampa and two oth-
ers may have struck in cen-
tral and east Florida.

Twenty Florida counties
were under a tornado watch
for much of the day.

“To our knowledge, there’s
been no true structure dam-
age and no injuries,” said Jim
Martin, Emergency Manage-
ment Director for Pasco
County north of Tampa,
where at least one twister was
spotted Tuesday morning,

Martin said high winds
damaged about 25 homes and
flipped over one car. Students
were evacuated from trailer
classrooms at some Tampa-
area schools.

In central Florida, authori-
ties reported no injuries but
said the some homes were
damaged, trees were toppled,
roofing was blown off and

power lines were downed. A }

train also struck a fallen tree

on tracks in Marion County
but did not derail, though

some of its windows shat-
tered.

Randi Cecil, 24, was on her
porch in the town of Sparr,

about 90 miles north of

Orlando, when the wind
turned gusty and trees started
swaying. Then a tree cracked

so loud that it sounded like a

car crash and smashed into

Bahamians ‘won’t
lose EPA benefits’

FROM page one

to the Caribbean Regional Negotiating
Machinery (CRNM) — a negotiating
arm of CARICOM — in writing, offi-
cials said.

Furthermore, the EC said that “in
conformity with the EC-Cariforum
EPA, the Bahamian services and
investment offer has to be accepted
by the Cariform-EC Trade and Devel-
opment Committee,” according to a
press release issued by the Ministry of
Finance late yesterday.

While noting that the Bahamian
delegation had “fruitful discussions”
with officials from the EC on April 9,
the statement did not say whether
today’s deadline — which was given a
six months extension last year — will
be met.

However, the statement revealed

Visitor satisfaction at
Atlantis ‘off the charts’

FROM page one

cent which the company had
expected.

Despite consumer confidence
in the U.S. dropping to near
record lows, leisure travellers
made up the majority of visitors,
as the company saw mass cancel-
lations of corporate group book-
ings, equivalent to a loss of 18,000
room nights (a week’s stay by one
visitor would amount to seven
room nights).

Admitting that “unfortunate-
ly” the first uptick in reported vis-
itor satisfaction levels occurred
in the very same month that 800
workers were laid off — Novem-
ber 2008 — Managing Director
George Markantonis said Decem-
ber was “high” while the suc-
ceeding three months in 2009
were most impressive.

“The graphs for this year, for
January, February and March, are
through the roof compared to the

that the committee is likely to hold its
inaugural meeting this summer and
“at that time the Bahamian services
and investment offer is expected to be
formally presented to that body.”

The statement comes after much
speculation and controversy sur-
rounding the fate of the submitted ser-
vices offer.

The furor erupted when it was
reported that the EU was asking for
more areas in the schedule to be lib-
eralised, or opened up for trade.

Observers — notably former for-
eign affairs minister Fred Mitchell —
questioned if local crawfishermen's
duty free access to European markets
would be jeopardised if government
missed the nearing deadline.

The Europeans were said to be lob-
bying the Bahamas to offer more
allowances in areas of retail, construc-
tion, computer systems, advisory ser-



vices and foreign/international law to
enable European companies to build a
commercial presence in the Bahamas to
provide these services.

This prompted senior finance offi-
cials, led by Director of Trade Simon
Wilson, to fly to Brussels for a last
minute meeting to “address queries
raised by the EC regarding the scope
and coverage of the Bahamian Ser-
vices Offer under the EPA.”

According to the Ministry of
Finance, the EC specifically had con-
cerns at last week’s meeting regard-
ing “the approval of inward invest-
ment in the Bahamas, which is sum-
marised in the horizontal and sectoral
commitments of the Services and
Investment Offer.”

Horizontal commitments are areas
of universal application that apply to
all service sectors such as exchange
controls and national immigration law,

according to officials.

A representative of the CRNM
attended last week’s meeting as an
observer.

Speaking to The Tribune before the
Ministry of Finance issued the state-
ment, Paul Moss, head of Bahamians
Agitating for a Referendum on Free
Trade (BARF), said he hoped finance
officials “stuck to their guns” during
the meeting.

"We expect the minister (Zhirvargo
Laing) to say that they stuck to their
guns with respect to the services offer
that they had made because that offer
purportedly reserved and preserved
areas of the economy for Bahamians.
If they did not then it only serves to
prove the point that they did the wrong
thing in signing onto an agreement
that they clearly did not understand
and put at risk the economy of this
country,” he said.

Man dies, woman
injured in shooting

FROM page one

day.

i

i

=
r
ee
e
r
r

aia.

19, 20 and 23.

stabbed multiple times near Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre at
around Spm on Easter Sunday, and just over 16 hours after the
discovery of another man — yesterday identified as 32-year-old
Edward George Emmanuel, also known as “Edward Rolle” —
with a gunshot wound to the neck on Watling Street on Mon-

A 21-year-old is in police custody in connection with the
killing of Mr Bremmer.

Meanwhile, four young Soldier Road residents were also in
policy custody yesterday after being picked up by police who
searched their car — also at around midnight on Tuesday.

Police officers were on patrol on Wulff Road, near Lincoln
Boulevard, when they discovered a small amount of marijuana,
$700 in cash, and a .40 handgun with six live rounds of ammu-
nition in the grey Nissan Altima occupied by the men, aged 18,

Customs Acting
Comptroller is taking
early retirement

same months last year. Forget
about ‘improved’ — we’re talking
new records! If we published
them you wouldn’t believe it,”
said the senior executive.

Suggesting a silver lining to the
downturn in economic conditions,
Mr Markantonis said employees
certainly appear to have recog-
nised that “everyone has a
responsibility” when it comes to
the health of this country’s
tourism industry.

“There’s a huge awareness on
property that this isn’t manage-

her neighbor’s bedroom.

“It was the most horrible
feeling I ever went through,”
Cecil said. :

Progress Energy i
spokesman Tim Leljedal said
more 70,000 customers expe-
rienced a power outage,
mostly in the Ocala area in
central Florida and in south-
ern Pasco County, just north
of Tampa. About 14,500 were
still without power by late
Tuesday afternoon.

reach

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ment’s responsibility alone any-
more — that survival depends on
getting customers who are trav-
elling to come back and that
responsibility belongs to every
single person who works here,”
he said.

The company receives regular
reports from an international
company that surveys thousands
of its recent customers on a
monthly basis as to how they
found their visit to the Paradise
Island resort.

Having built up data based on
these reports over several years,
Kerzner was shocked to compare
the figures for the first three
months of 2009 with those from
previous years.

While the survey covers all
aspect of the visitor experience,
from staff to bath towels, the
senior executive said that it is well
known that interaction with
Atlantis employees is a critical

factor in overall visitor satisfac-
tion and therefore that the results
speak volumes about the efforts
of the resort’s thousands of work-
ers.

“90 per cent of that (a visitor’s
experience) is made up of inter-
actions,” said Mr Markantonis.

Meanwhile, he said that letters
received from visitors expressing
their happiness with their stay
have increased in both “length
and frequency.”

“If someone writes you a three
page letter telling you how great
the place is, there’s a lot of pas-
sion in that, and interestingly ’m
getting — and as President it’s
not easy to find my e-mails —
I’m getting a lot of e-mails,’ he
added.

The Managing Director said
the surveys indicate that every
hotel tower on the property has
“without exception” been subject
to the same effect.

FROM page one

ing with each of you,” Mr
Adderley said in his letter.
“However, it is often said all
good things must come to
an end and I consider my
tenure no exception.

“As I bid farewell, I do so
with fond memories of the
Bahamas Customs Depart-
ment, and will cherish each
memory dearly. To those I
leave to continue the noble
cause, I wish you absolute
success and may God’s
blessings be upon you
always.”

Although Mr Adderley’s
departure was well known
from at least April 6 to all
Customs officers, the news
of his departure had appar-
ently not reached the minis-

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ter responsible.

When contacted yester-
day for comment on the
matter, Minister of State for
Finance, Zhivargo Laing,
informed The Tribune that
there was no truth to the
reports that Mr Adderley
would be demitting office.

In fact, Mr Laing went as
far as describing these
reports as utter “nonsense.”

Mr Adderley’s removal
from the department follows
a recent demonstration by
senior officers who were
informed that despite their
years of service, they would
not be promoted in the
department’s pending staff
shuffle.

It is hoped, sources said,
that Mr Gomez can bring
some “new blood” and ideas
to this long suffering agency
which has been the subject
of discussion for many years.

However, a number of
Customs officers have
already expressed concerns
about Mr Gomez’s appoint-
ment, as it is understood
that his wife currently holds
a senior post in the Depart-
ment. According to these
officers, this apparent “con-
flict of interest” could pose a
serious problem for the new
comptroller should admin-
istrative conflicts arise with-
in the department.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



ABOVE AND BELOW: The Bahamas
Judo Federation has launched its sport
ambassador programme. On this page,
members of the federation display their

moves...



Bahamas Judo Federation launches
sport ambassador programme

THE Bahamas Judo Federa-
tion has launched its sport
ambassador programme. Mem-
bers of the junior and senior
national teams are scheduled to
travel to various countries to
train with elite level coaches on
a series of cross cultural
exchanges.

Each team member is trained
to be an ambassador by exhibit-
ing good sportsmanship and
manners while staying in the
homes of students of the coun-
try. Then teams from the coun-
tries visited will come and train
and compete in the Bahamas
while staying with Bahamian
families.

"The goal of the programme
is to promote the Bahamas on a
grass roots level by having
sporting families want to visit
and attend our major tourna-
ments, such as the Bahamas
Junior Open. We will also raise
the level of our judo by being
exposed to the training meth-
ods of the world's best coach-
es," explained D'Arcy Rah-
ming, president.

"T believe it is critical that
each athlete in our country real-
izes that his or her behaviour
can directly impact the impres-
sion of the entire country."

To kick off the programme, a
seven person junior team trav-
eled to the New England area
this past week.

The team trained under the
direction of top US coach Ron
Landry while visiting and train-
ing at other area schools with
their elite coaches.

"We were pleased to invite
the Bahamian team into our
schools and homes particularly
after the reception we received
at the Bahamas Open in Feb-
ruary. The behaviour of the ath-
letes, their willingness to learn,
their work ethic and their man-
ners are a testament to the
Bahamian people and their
families. We will be bringing at
least 30 athletes to the next



Bahamian Judo tournament”
said coach Landry.

The team members were all
excited by the trip. “I increased
my speed and throwing abili-
ty,” said 14-year-old Alex Mar-
tinborough. “By the end of the
week I was able to win a match
against a US national champi-
on,” said 10-year-old Kameron
Knowles.

“T enjoyed the visits to the
Boston Aquarium, the Muse-
um of Science and the site see-
ing. But the ice skating was too
cold for me,” said 11- year-old
Tajaro Hudson. Other team
members included 11-year-old
Keanu Pennerman, 14-year- old
Cynthia Rahming and 14-year-
old Kristoph Knowles.

"Every athlete improved sig-
nificantly in one week. We had

over 30 hours of judo training. It
was tough for the kids but they
really represented the Bahamas
well,” said Rahming.

"T will be talking to my
Caribbean and Pan American
counterparts about similar cross
cultural trips. In order for this
area to develop in judo to the
standard of our European and
Asian friends, we will have to
give our athletes the exposure
and competition they need.
With this in mind the Bahamas
will be hosting a summer train-
ing camp and tournament
directed at juniors, ages eight
to 19."

e Anyone interested in
Bahamas Judo can contact 364-
6773 or e-mail

daishihan@gmail.com



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TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

‘O9 cricket
season open

THE Bahamas Cricket Asso-
ciation opened its 2009 cricket
season on the turf wicket at
Haynes Oval on Saturday with
a match between the 2008
champions “Dockendale” and
Scotiabank Paradise.

There was also the presenta-
tion of awards for the 2008 sea-
son.

In Saturday’s game, Dock-
endale, batting first, scored 279
runs with Rudolph Parks scor-
ing 46 runs.

Paradise’s top bowlers were
Lance Liston with three wickets
and Gary Bell and Dr Mark
Nutler with two apiece.

Paradise batted and scored
289 runs for the loss of eight
wickets to win the match by two
wickets.

Andrew Nash scored 86 runs
and Aean Lewin had 51 runs to
help out the winners.

Shiek Sharnaz and Dwight
Weakley took three wickets
each for the losers.

Dockendale was without their
dynamic captain Naraendra
Ekanayake.

On Sunday, the Police played
St Agnes in an exciting match,
which the Police lost by three
wickets.

Batting first, the Police were
bowled out for 153 runs. Youth

player Rudolph Fox was the top
scorer with 46 runs.

Earl Thomas and Orville
Grant took three and two wick-
ets each for St Agnes. At Bat, St
Agnes scored 157 for the loss
of seven wickets. Earl Thomas
scored 34 runs not out.

Youth player Odain Tucker
and Gary Armstrong took three
and two wickets respectively.

On Monday, the BCA under-
19 youth team played the pres-
ident’s select team. The senior
team was bowled out for 182
runs by the youths.

The top scorers were Kevin
Surujlal with 40 runs and Clif-
ford Atkinson with 35 runs.

Bowling for the youths were
Rudolph Fox with three wickets
and Mark Taylor and Ken Shar-
ma with two apiece.

The youths, at bat, scored 185
for the loss of only six wickets
for the surprise win by four
wickets. Odain Tucker led the
batting for the youths with a
score of 63 runs.

Orville James was the best
bowler for the president’s team,
taking three wickets in a losing
effort.

The Bahamas under-19 team
is preparing for the ICC Inter-
national Under-19 tournament
in Toronto, Canada, in July.







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FirstCaribbean’s associate director of capital markets Catherine Gibson is pictured (centre) presenting
cheques to Andrew Thompson, of JBLN, and Basil Christie, of Special Olympics.

Bank makes
donations

FIRSTCaribbean International Bank has past several years because of the positive skills
donated to Special Olympics Bahamas and the and qualities that the sport instills in the nation’s

Junior Baseball League of Nassau (JBLN) to — youth.
help both organisations defray the costs of their In addition, sponsoring such events is one way

annual events. in which the bank demonstrates its commitment
The bank has sponsored the JBLN for the — to: “Enriching our Communities. Together.”

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THE TRIBUNE





MARK KNOWLES and MAHESH
BHUPATHI in action at the ‘09 Aus-
tralian Open in Melbourne...

Knowles,
Bhupathi

go after
Rolex title

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK _ Knowles’ and
Mahesh Bhupathi, still seeking
their first tournament victory
for the year, are hoping that
they can get their break through
this week as they go after the
title that slipped out of their
hands last year at the Monte-
Carlo Rolex Masters in Mona-
co.

Having been dropped from
the number two spot on the
ATP computer rankings
released on Monday, the
Bahamian-Indian duo are seed-
ed at number four in the field of
32.

They are scheduled to play
their first match in the second
round on Thursday against the
Spanish team of Feliciano
Lopez and Fernando Verdas-
co, having being given a bye in
the first round.

The Spaniards pulled off a 7-
6 (3), 6-4 win over the Russian
team of Igor Andreev and Safin
Marat in the first round.

Going into the tournament,
Knowles and Bhupathi have
slipped to number three in the
team rankings with 1515 points.
They have been passed by the
team of Belarus’ Max Mirnyi
and Andy Ram of Israel, who
have 1735 points.

The American identical twin
brothers of Bob and Mike
Bryan are controlling the
leaderboard with 3515.

The Bryans are also the top
seeds in Monte-Carlo. They are
followed by the team of Daniel
Nestor of Canada and Nenad
Zimonjic of Serbia.

Last year, Knowles and Bhu-
pathi, seeded at No.4 as well,
played in the final where they
lost in identical set scores of 6-3,
6-3 to the Spanish/American
team of Radal Nadel and Tom-
my Roberto.

This year, Roberto will
defend his title with Spain’s
Albert Montanes. They were
scheduled to play today against
the No.3 seeded team of Lukas
Dlouhy of the Czech Republic
and Leander Paes of India.

Knowles and Bhupathi have
played in the final of the Aus-
tralian Open, the first Grand
Slam tournament for the year
and in the semifinal in Sydney,
but they have yet to record their
first victory together.

Knowles, however, teamed
up with American Mardy Fish
to win the title in Memphis,
Tennessee.



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

PAGE 11 - th
- =
a
oo r —
t q




Vv



Judo Federation
launches sport
ambassador

programme...
See page 9

Carifta team returns

SPORTS MINISTER DESMOND BANNISTER
greets 2009 Carifta team members as they
arrive in New Providence yesterday from St
Lucia. The 61-member team finished third with
28 medals...








SPORTS MINISTER Desmond Bannister speaks to members of the 2009 Carifta team in the VIP lounge after their arrival at Sir Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport yesterday afternoon. Also shown are BAAA executives, coaches and members of the management team...



CARIFTA team members are shown in the VIP lounge after their arrival at Sir Lynden Pindling International Airport Tuesday afternoon...

from St Lucia



Photos: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



at
a

SWIMMING
CARIFTA TEAM

THE Bahamas’ 36-mem-
ber team to the Carifta
Swimming Championships
left town yesterday for Aru-
ba. Like the Carifta track
and field team, the swimmers
flew to the championships
on a chartered Bahamasair
flight.

The team, led by head
coach Geoffrey Eneas, will
be out to improve on its third
place finish at last year’s
championship in Aruba. The
French Antilles won the
meet, followed by Trinidad
& Tobago.

Last year, the Bahamas
collected a total of 50
medals, inclusive of 22 gold,
18 silver and 10 bronze. The
French Antilles posted a
total of 91 (29, 38 and 24)
and Trinidad and Tobago
had 61 (24, 15 and 22).

In the points scored, the
French Antilles accumulat-
ed 1,107, followed by
Trinidad & Tobago with 801
and the Bahamas with 721.

BASKETBALL

NPBA CHAMPI-
ONSHIPS

THE New Providence
Basketball Association
men’s best-of-five champi-
onship series will continue
8pm tonight at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

The series is dead even at
1-1 between the defending
champions Commonwealth
Bank Giants and last year’s
runners-up Electro Telecom
Cybots.

Game four will be played
on Friday with the fifth
game, if necessary, scheduled
for Saturday.

The winner of the series
will represent New Provi-
dence in the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Federation’s Nation-
al Round Robin Tourna-
ment that will be played in
Bimini next weekend.
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

JUSTICE ANITA ALLEN SWORN IN AS ACTING CHIEF JUSTICE

Product Recall



JUSTICE ANITA ALLEN, left, is sworn in as Acting Chief Justice of the Supreme Court by Governor
General Arthur Hanna at Government House on Wednesday, April 8.

Please be advised that Fisher-Price has recalled its Simplicity’s
Rainforest portable play yard, model number 5310RNF. Therefore,
if you are the owner of this product, purchased from Solomon's
super Center or CostRight, Nassau or Freeport stores we would
like to assist in replacing your play yard, Proof of purchase is
required along with the actual play yard for replacement. The
model number can be found on a sticker located on one of the legs
underneath the play yard.

For further official information regarding this announcement, you

may visit www.service.mattel.com.

We apologize for any inconvenience.

Patrick Hanna/BIS





MEMBERS OF THE NASSAU MUSIC SOCIETY paid a courtesy call on Governor General Arthur Hanna
on Tuesday, April 7 at Government House. Pictured from left are Italia Watkins-Jan, vice-president of
Ser Get Far cena the Society; Patrick Thompson, president; Polina Leschenko, guest pianist; Governor General Arthur

— . Hanna; Linda Thompson, and Marc Drobinsky, guest cellist.

IN UNCERTAIN TIMES,
YOU NEED A CERTAIN BANK.

A certain bank’s strong and diversified balance sheet continues to drive its solid financial
performance, achieved on a firm financial bedrock: over US$10 billion in assets, a return
on equity of 18% and a strong regulatory capital base.

That bank is majority-owned by CIBC, one of the largest and best capitalized financial
institutions in North America.

That bank is FirstCaribbean International Bank.




ul



THE TRIBUNE



ine

WEDNESDAY,

APRIL

Tess



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Yacht registry’s (glgQmon’s Mines sees

‘great synergy
opportunities

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Maritime
Authority (BMA) believes the
creation of a Bahamian yacht
registry would create “an
opportunity for great synergies”
between this sector, the second
home market and private plane
owners, a government minister
told Tribune Business yester-
day.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, confirmed
that the issue of establishing a
Bahamian registry for mega
yachts was “a matter before the
[BMA] Board now”.

“Tt’s on their agenda to dis-
cuss what amendments, if any,
would have to be made to the
legislation, and which market
we would go to,” Dr Deveaux
said.

Tribune Business revealed
late last year that the BMA and
the Government were working
on the creation of a Bahamian
yacht registry, the two parties

ae
CAM DIN sr U4



involved believing the sector
held as much potential for the
Bahamas as its existing bulk
shipping registry - the world’s
third largest.

When asked what legislation
would need to be amended, Dr

SEE page 5B

ROYAL @FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

30-50% sales declines

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

uxury goods retail-

er Solomon’s

Mines has seen

year-over-year

sales declines of
between 30-50 per cent depend-
ing on the monthly compara-
tives, its president told Tribune
Business yesterday, but he said
the firm was performing “no
worse than anyone else” on Bay
Street.

Mark Finlayson said that
while Solomon’s Mines’ was
going through “a difficult time”,
the problems facing the retailer
were “a joke” compared to
what his father, Sir Garet ‘Tiger’
Finlayson’, had gone through
in the 1990s with ABC Motors
and the constant speculation
that liquor merchant Burns
House was “going to fall”.

Denying reports that the
Supreme Court had given per-
mission to two Solomon’s Mines
suppliers to repossess more than

* President says luxury goods retailer going through
‘tough time’ but doing ‘no worse’ than rivals

* Situation ‘a joke’ compared to what he and Sir Tiger
went through in 1990s with Burns House, ABC Motors

$200,000 worth of goods for
non-payment, Mr Finlayson
said: “The true position of the
company is that like everyone
else, the company is going
through a difficult time.

“But we’re no worse than
anyone else; any of our com-
petitors on Bay Street. That’s
really the truth.”

When asked whether
Solomon’s Mines planned any
further downsizing in terms of
store or staff numbers, Mr Fin-
layson replied: “I’m not dis-
missing any possibilities. It
depends on what the economic
climate is like.

“We are proactive people, so
if we see the economy is not
going in a direction that makes

Bahamian firm wins dismissal of ‘insolvent’ insurer case

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE liquidators of an “insol-
vent” insurance company have
filed a second appeal in their
efforts to recover assets they
allege were “fraudulently trans-
ferred” to a Bahamian compa-
ny, after a US district court
reaffirmed the bankruptcy
court’s decision they did not
have jurisdiction over the pro-
ceedings.

Richard Fogerty and William
Tacon, the liquidators for
Nevis-domiciled Condor Insur-
ance, had appealed the bank-
ruptcy court’s decision to the
US District Court for the south-
ern district of Mississippi over
the alleged transfer of that com-
pany’s assets to Bahamian-reg-
istered Condor Guaranty. How-

ever, their appeal was rejected,
forcing them to now head to
the US Fifth Circuit Appeals
Court.

In his judgment, US district
judge Louis Guirola recalled
how Messrs Fogerty and Tacon
were appointed as Condor
Insurance’s liquidators on May
18, 2007, after one of the com-
pany’s creditors, Infineon Tech-
nologies, filed a winding-up
petition with the Nevis courts.

The judgment said: “The [liq-
uidators] contend that over
$313 million in assets that
belonged to Condor Insurance
were fraudulently transferred
to and/or by Condor Guaranty
and the other appellees, and
that many of the assets are now
located in the US.

“The [liquidators] allege that
many of the officers and

‘Urgent action’ needed
on S8bn NIB shortfall

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president yester-
day called for “urgent action” to
close the projected $8 billion
solvency deficiency that the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) will face within the next
60 years, but acknowledged that
the percentage of wages upon
which contributions were based
was “admittedly low”.

Dionisio D’Aguilar told Tri-
bune Business that it was vital
to immediately start addressing
the projected multi-billion dol-
lar shortfall in NIB’s reserve
fund because the national social
security system represented the
only vehicle that forced most
Bahamians to save for retire-
ment.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



However, he said NIB’s cur-
rent insurable wage ceiling of
$400 per week was relatively
low compared to those set in
other nations, especially the US.

In the Bahamas, this ceiling
meant that NIB contributions -
split 5.4 per cent/3.4 per cent
between employer and employ-
ee - were only paid on the first
$20,800 of per annum salaries,
Mr D’ Aguilar explained.

This figure was just about
equivalent to the Bahamas’
average per capita income, but
excluded a significant portion
of the incomes earned by high-
er wage earners.

Mr D’ Aguilar contrasted this
with the US social security sys-
tem, where contribution rates
were 15 per cent - split evenly at
7.5 per cent between employ-
er/employee - on the first
$90,000 of income, which gen-
erated a much higher contribu-
tion rate and amount.

“The fact we only contribute
on $400 is admittedly low,” Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We only pay NIB contri-
butions at 8.8 per cent on
$20,800, whereas in the US if
you're going to retire you’re
paying 15 per cent on the first
$90,000 of salary.”

While the Bahamas “clearly
can’t jump to 15 per cent” con-
tribution rates to solve the
impending solvency deficiency
within its own social security
system, Mr D’Aguilar said this
nation needed to determine
what it wanted from NIB, what
it wanted the scheme to do, and
how its problems were going to
be resolved.

“That is the writing on the
wall,” the Chamber president

SEE page 6B

employees of Condor Insurance
were also officers of Condor
Guaranty and other companies
to which the assets were
allegedly transferred.”

Messrs Fogerty and Tacon
had alleged that Condor Guar-
anty, while a Bahamian com-
pany, had the same president,
Harvey Milam, as Condor
Insurance. Both he and the
Bahamian company enjoyed
the same address in Ocean
Springs, Mississippi.

The judgment recorded that
while the two sides were dis-
puting whether the assets had
been transferred before or after
the winding-up petition was
filed, Messrs Fogerty and Tacon
were alleging that “the assets
were transferred in an attempt
to prevent creditors from recov-
ering debts owed by Condor

Insurance in the winding-up
proceeding”.

As a result, the liquidators
had filed an adversary pro-
ceeding under the Chapter 15
bankruptcy action in a bid to
“recover the assets that were
allegedly fraudulently trans-
ferred to the United States”.

Condor Guaranty, though,
filed a motion to dismiss, and
succeeded in both courts, with
the district court upholding the
bankruptcy court’s findings that
it did not have the power to
adjudicate the adversary pro-
ceeding because it was filed
under Chapter 15, not a Chap-
ter 7 or Chapter 11 bankruptcy
case.

The legal battle has also
embroiled the chairman of the

SEE page 6B

Make it a reality.

e ea pee

sense, we will take proactive
measures.”

Adding that almost every
Bahamian business was experi-
encing a decline in sales, Mr
Finlayson said that, as far as
Solomon’s Mines was con-
cerned: “It depends on the
month. We’ve experienced
drops in sales from 30-50 per
cent, compared to where we
were last year. The environment
is tough.

“Everyone has to put their
best foot forward and ride out
these tough times. We’re a pret-
ty hardy people, and in a few
years we'll be reminiscing, look-
ing back at these days.”

Sir Garet’s family company,
the Associated Bahamian

Brewers and _ Distillers
(ABDAB), acquired Solomon’s
Mines in 2004 from Martin
Solomon, the company having
formerly been a division of
Solomon’s Brothers.

The acquisition, thought to
have cost more than $30 mil-
lion, was financed via a syndi-
cated bank loan put together
by Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national, with extra financing
provided by Scotiabank and the
proceeds from a boardroom
restructuring at Burns House
that saw Heineken/Common-
wealth Brewery take over day-
to-day management responsi-
bility.

SEE page 5B

Moody’s: Bahamas
fiscal deficit doubles

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

But former finance minister
says no chance of imminent

T H E sovereign rating downgrade

Bahamas
has one of

the highest government debt to gross
domestic product (GDP) ratios in its sov-
ereign credit rating peer group, standing at
180 per cent, but a former finance minister
said yesterday there was no little danger
that this nation would be subject to an
immediate downgrade.

James Smith, minister of state for finance
in the former Christie government, told
Tribune Business that the likes of Moody’s
and Standard & Poor’s (S&P) would give
the Bahamas some room to manoevere,

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight



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OVER the past several
weeks, I along with other local
pundits have been warning
Bahamians that we face our
most difficult economic chal-
lenge to date. For those in their
mid-40s (and above), I often say
it’s probably the most difficult
economic period that they will
encounter in their lifetime.

Great Depression

During current public discus-
sions, comparisons to the ‘Great
Depression’ (1930s) are com-
monplace. The Great Depres-
sion was a worldwide economic
downturn, starting in most
places in 1929 and ending at dif-
ferent times in the late 1930s
for most countries.

It was the largest and most
important economic depression
in the 20th century, and is used
in the 21st century as an exam-
ple of how far the world's econ-
omy can fall. The Great
Depression originated in the
US, with historians citing “Black
Tuesday’, which was the stock
market crash on October 29,
1929, as its beginning. During
the course of the depression,
international trade declined by
about 70 per cent, heavy indus-
try and construction came to a
‘near halt’ and credit dried up.

While there are similarities
between the 1930s and the con-
ditions we now face, there are
important differences that exist
today which are worthy of not-
ing. They will be explored in
today’s column.

Great Recession

This current downturn is now
more frequently being dubbed
the ‘great recession’ because it
is expected to last longer than
any ‘post war’ downturn.
According to Chris Isidore,
CNNMoney.com’s senior
writer: “In terms of length, the
longest post-Depression eco-
nomic decline was 16 months,
which occurred in both the
1973-75 and 1981-82 recessions.
(This recession began in
December 2007, is currently in
its 17th month, and the consen-
sus is that it could be some 24 to
30 months in duration.)

“The current recession is also
more widespread than any oth-
er since the Depression. The
Federal Reserve's readings
show that 86 per cent of indus-
tries have cut back production
since November (2008), the
most widespread reduction in
the 42 years the Fed has tracked
this figure.

“What's more, every state
reported an increase in unem-

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“Fope mie perscatanlp, | Yoana pr] Must ie chenk wa
Ra educational and an cepeliest apenence
dae orb a Lee a ete at. | le eopepted pout
Perioraltty rps teaching ue. Phe et
ipa ant iting | heared was fo pay mel!
Hie, ard be Geracken: wey reiaal im ioarving abenrl
the thren pillars of wealth.
(Ores again, Cath ytu,” - Shap, 16

"iia | ete Dead ats wei be mena y bv
pin Percial freeciern, | bp ike] brew
“paving Fournet fest” aan ich a wid
principle, Tha proanetarban aaa viry goad andl
as Ge Ba very ten atmaaphere atech
eriabsben! cree 1 levees frmsely." ~ Apa, 15.

* Thai thir thant wbtoeed coat fat rm na tha the
rer of roxeney anal etry | ubcvabd pay arya
Tievi. | hnwed! thes pengrarn. (sas Area”
(Ceriwtof, 14



|_ .) Financial

, Focus
eS lo



ployment this past December,
the first time that has happened
in the 32 years that records for
unemployment in each state
have been kept.”

Differences between
the 1930s and now

Depth of Contraction

Once again, referring to
Isidore’s article, so far during
this recession, the US gross
domestic product, the broadest
measure of economic activity,
has dropped about 1.7 per cent
thus far, measured from the top
of the last economic cycle to the
current position.

According to surveys con-
ducted by the National Associ-
ation for Business Economics,
the consensus suggests a 3.4 per
cent decline in GDP over the
life of this recession. While a
3.4 per cent drop in GDP would
be the worst since World War
II, and far worse than the aver-
age ‘post war’ recession.

This contrasts with the expe-
rience of the US economy dur-
ing 1929 to 1933, when the
economy shrank by more than
26 per cent. Therefore, in terms
of magnitude, this downturn is
not expected to be anywhere as
deep as the ‘great one’.

Social safety nets

Since the 1930s, significant
‘safety nets’ such as Unemploy-
ment Insurance and Social
Security payments have been
instituted. Also, the size of the
US government at the federal,
state and local level is far larg-
er than during the 1930s. While
I am not a proponent of large
governments, the fact of the
matter is that in times of eco-
nomic crisis the US government
will try to maintain employment
levels and create ‘make work’
programmes. While it is not
good long-term economic poli-
cy, it could serve to shorten the
negative impact of the current
economic downturn.

Stimulus Spending

The massive stimulus pro-
gramme thus far will pump tril-
lions of dollars into the US
economy, with many of those
dollars being earmarked for
programmes never tried before.
The end result is that this will
swell the supply of money in
the system. By way of contrast,
the money supply tightened
during the Great Depression.

For the sake of balance, the
stimulus spending (borrowed
money) will cause higher levels
of inflation in the future, but
that is a discussion for another
day.

International Coordination

Finally, what is most note-
worthy is the unprecedented
degree of international coordi-
nation of economic policies, and
the global resolve to work
through this recession. Two of
the greatest ‘policy mistakes’ of
the 1930s were the imposition of





Real Estate

Oa eat U MTU cate er

Taw Look beyond challenges
to fix internal problems

e Special "

a

stiff tariffs on international
trade and government-imposed
limits on prices and production.
Both of these mistakes are
unlikely to be repeated in the
current environment.

Economic challenges yes,

economic meltdown no

I wish to categorically state
that the current downturn will
not last indefinitely, and that
there will be economic recov-
ery. Recessions (economic
downturns) are normal compo-
nents of economic cycles. The
capitalist system, historically,
goes through a period of (what
I call) rebalancing, which
enables it to commence a new
cycle of growth and prosperity.
It is during this period of rebal-
ancing, such as what we are cur-
rently facing, that we have to
retool and refocus our econo-
my to succeed in the new period
ahead.

However, if we do not retool
or refocus, then we will not reap
maximum benefits from the
recovery phase. For instance,
low productivity levels within
the Bahamian workforce is a
perpetual problem that we
‘sweep under the rug’ at every
opportunity.

This productivity shortfall has
its roots in our broken educa-
tional system, dysfunctional
family structure, misplaced val-
ue system and declining work
ethic...all of which are very
complex social issues with no
quick fixes. Crime is another
problem that is slowly strangling
our society. Crime, and the per-
ception of uncontrolled levels
of crime, will increasingly
become a major disincentive to
new foreign and domestic
investment. Policymakers, you’d
better “smell the coffee’.

However, in the absence of
“quick fixes’ there must be the
political resolve to systemati-
cally address these issues and
effect positive, sustainable
change.

We need to be ever mindful
that when good times return,
we must save more and invest
more for our long-term financial
stability. The challenge is to
start with a realistic assessment
of where we are, then to for-
mulate a bipartisan action plan
to reposition the economy for
the benefit of all Bahamians.

In conclusion, within the con-
text of our reality, we must be
positive about the future but
honest about the changes need-
ed to ensure that the future is a
bright one. Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas),
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Colo-
nial Group International or
any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs



at

an

Everywhere The Buyers Are!


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 3B



Rescuing your clients from ‘The Black Hole’

BY leveraging one or more
of the following marketing
strategies, you'll often be able to
re-engage a potential client or
customer who has disappeared
into ‘The Black Hole’. Not
always, but often. And, if you’ve
continually provided value and
focused on the impact you’re
offering, they’ll likely be ready
to implement your solution
today!

What You Can Do

When you don’t know what’s
behind a potential client or cus-
tomer’s silence, figuring out
how to respond can be a dilem-
ma — especially since you don’t
want to be a pest. Here are
some strategies you can use in

Financial
sector to
examine Key
pillars of
business
model

THE Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) is set to
host a seminar to obtain the
industry’s views on how the
Bahamas should implement the
OECD’s tax standards, and
whether this nation could
exploit double taxation and
bilateral investment treaties as
alternatives to Tax Information
Exchange Agreements
(TIEAs).

The BFSB said that follow-
ing dialogue begun in the 2009
first quarter, and the recent shift
in positions adopted towards
the OECD by major interna-
tional financial centres, the
Bahamian financial services
agreed that the sector’s exist-
ing model - and the ‘status quo’
- was no longer viable.

As a result, it was critical that
two key pillars of the current
business model - confidentiality
and ‘no direct tax’ - be exam-
ined.

The BFSB said: “It was on
this premise that last year BFSB
commissioned an Information
and Tax Review, with a man-
date to consider in a compre-
hensive manner how confiden-
tiality and national taxation pol-
icy impact the growth and
nature of financial services in
the Bahamas. Such an under-
standing is essential as we seek
to sustain and expand our inter-
national financial services sec-
tor.

“The need for a holistic
approach and discussions con-
cerning the Bahamas tax model
is even more critical now, recog-
nising that undoubted change
is underway.

“A primary objective of the
current review is to obtain
broad industry agreement on
whether we should maintain the
status quo, expand our tax
information exchange agree-
ment network, or introduce a
resident corporate taxation
regime supported by interna-
tional agreements. We also wish
to identify other options for a
sustainable financial services
sector.

“In a wide-ranging industry
report published in 2003, BFSB
recognised the landscape for the
financial services sector was
changing, and its programme of
work in ensuing years has, in
part, been guided by this fact. In
2004 and in each ensuing year,
trade and taxation issues -
including how leading
economies interact with low and
no tax jurisdictions, the impact
of trade agreements, Bilateral
Investment Treaties and the EU
Savings Directive - have been
discussed at the Bahamas
Financial Services Retreat and
many seminars.”

PTT eT AT
The Tribune - the
A Ea

aT CT
rT Para
TI



dealing with “The Black Hole’.

Just keep trying. Realise that
prospects expect you to carry
the “keep in touch” burden —
so do it. It can often take eight
to 10 contacts before you are
actually successful. Don’t panic.
This is normal in today’s busi-
ness environment.

Make each connection valu-
able. Don’t just say: "Hi Eric.
Just getting back to you as I
promised about your xxx deci-
sion. If you have any questions,
give me a call.” Instead, you
might say: “Eric, based on our
conversation last week, I know
how important it is to you to
shorten your sales cycle. There’s
a white paper on our website
that addresses this issue. [ll be

Promotional

Marketing



sending you a link via e-mail
shortly.”

Have a sense of humor. After
four to five contacts, leave a
funny message such as: “Eric, I
know you’re swamped. But I
also know that shortening your
sales cycle is important to you.
That’s why I keep bugging you.
I’m looking forward to FINAL-
LY reconnecting.”

Leverage a variety of medi-
ums. Mix up phone calls with

e-mails, mailings, invitations to
upcoming events, sending arti-
cles, etc. To position yourself
as a resource, makes sure each
connection educates, informs or
adds insights.

Create multiple entry points.
Never let one person be your
total gateway to a company.
Identify and nurture multiple
relationships concurrently.
When appropriate, reference
others you’re talking to in your
messages/e-mails.

Jill Konrath, author of Selling
to Big Companies and founder
of the Sales Shebang, is a fre-
quent speaker at national sales
meetings.

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your



THE WORKSHOP will be held on Saturdays at the British American Financial Centre, Independence Drive...

Workshop to give
teens finance skills

A WORKSHOP to provide
young Bahamians with much-
needed financial skills will be
held on Saturdays April and
April 25, 2009, at the British
American Financial Centre on
Independence Drive.

The Providing Money Skills
Youth Need For Life work-
shop, featuring sessions from
10am to 2pm and 3pm to 7pm,
will be hosted by Creative
Wealth Bahamas, organisers of
Camp Millionaire and The
Money Game.

The workshop’s main organ-
iser is former banker Keshelle
Kerr, founder and chief execu-
tive of Creative Wealth
Bahamas. She is also the
founder and vice-president of a
woman’s investment group
called FFL Investments.
Trained in Santa Barbara, Cal-
ifornia, she is a certified cre-
ative wealth coach.

“April is financial literacy
for youth month, and in these
times it is essential for us to
talk to our kids about the

changes in our lifestyle due to
the downturn in the economy,”
said Ms Kerr.

“T have a nine year-old
daughter, and until I sat down
and explained how money
works to her, she did not fully
appreciate the sacrifices that
have been made for her to go
to school, get tech toys or even
go to her favourite restaurant.
Many parents whose children
enter our programmes thank
us all the time because their
kids are suddenly more money
wise and aware of how much it
costs to raise them and, as a
result, pressure their parents
less.”

A part of the upcoming pro-
gramme includes teens expe-
riencing the proverbial ‘rat
race’ of working to receive a
set salary and paying their
monthly expenses. They are
also given a choice of whether
to save any extra cash or pur-
chase pleasure items.

“At the end of the day, teens
realise what it feels like to pay

rent, and that a credit card
does have to be paid off. They
then learn about passive
income, assets and liabilities,
how and why to save and so
much more. We have a vast
demographic taking part in the
course,” says Ms Kerr

Despite being a former
banker, Ms Kerr said the work-
shop is not about encouraging
children to get into banking
but about empowering them
to follow their passion and to
create financial freedom in
their lives.

“The workshop is focused on
making sure the next genera-
tion doesn’t make the mistakes
of their parents by not being
properly prepared,” she says.
“Tt’s about making sure they
are able to spend wisely, save
for their futures, not have to
deal with financial difficulties
and know how to enter their
adulthood as responsible indi-
viduals. All in all, it’s about
making sure they understand
dollars and sense.”

business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week. Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT!”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses from var-
ious industries - ranging from
tourism and banking to
telecommunications - in mar-
keting themselves. Readers can
contact Mr Farrington at Sun-
Tee EmbroidMe on East



Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
este Maral? lad
on Mondays

Notice

Notice is hereby given of loss of Bahamas Government Registered

Stock Certificate as follows:

Interest Certificate
Stock Rate No.
2015-2017 1.2500APR 52.141

Maturity
Date
15/10/2017

Amount
$10,000.00

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement
certificate. If this certificate is found, please write to
PO. Box CB-12604, Nassau Bahamas.

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PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





To advertise in The Tribune -
ea BNA
MIR) rere ya TEL

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ADMIRAL ASSOCIATES S.A. is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on April 14, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.



(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 13th day of May, 2009 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.
APRIL 15, 2009
LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY
































Legal Notice

NOTICE
BBM FUND, LTD.

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Companies, Act 2000, Notice is hereby
given that the dissolution of the BBM Fund, Ltd. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued as of March 27, 2009 and the Company has
therefore been stuck off the Register.

Claudio Carvalho de Queiroz Mello
(Liquidator)

> GENERAL

re

om Worldwide

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE



Moody’s:
Bahamas fiscal
deficit doubles

FROM page 1B

same boat’ given the tough
international economy.

Credit

In fact, Moody’s latest credit
opinion on the Bahamas’ sov-
ereign credit rating, painted an
optimistic picture of this
nation’s 2009 economic
prospects, predicting it would
enjoy | per cent GDP growth.

However, the international
credit rating acknowledged that
a contraction in the Bahamian

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Generali Worldwide/Europ Assistance is looking to recruit an experienced Business Development
Associate for its medical surance operations in the Bahamas and in the Caribbean area

We are committed to growing our business based on quality of products and service and require a
highly motivated individual to develop business with our partners, This will involve group sales and
renewals, , marketing and liaising with our various partners and with the broker community in the

bahamas and throughout the wider Caribbean area

Minimum Requirements:

Minimum (4) three years experience in the medical insurance market,

* Experienced in sales and marketing, a3 well as extremely well organized.

‘Strategic thinker with the ability to tackle and solve problems,
* Attentive to detail with a strong track record of team building.

Must possess thea bility to communicate effectively bath verbally and in writing

Must be high energy, driven and self motivated,
Committed Customer Service Advocate,

If you believe you have these attributes and want to join a dynamic and progressive team, please

apply by sending your CV and a covering letter to:

RE: Business Development Associate

Generali Worldwide
P.O, Box AP - 59225, Slot 36l

Nassau, Bahamas

You may also email your resume, RE; Business Development Associate to:

perspective. trl aerial com

If you have the qualities we are looking for, we offer a competitive remuneration package for the role,
with all the associated benefits you would expect of our company, and one that reflects your
qualifications and experience, For those with the desire to develop a long-term career with a

progressive and dynamic company, we Leslie: ie Nave he opportunities to thateh your bec plex talians.

Generali Worldwide is a wholly owned subsidiary of Assicurazioni Generali 5.p.A (the Generali
Group). The Generali Group was founded in Trieste, Italy, in 1831. The Generali Group, ane of the
largest insurers in the world, has an international presence actos five continents, employs over 61,000

people and operates ln some 40 markets. Its success is reflected in it being ranked a top 4M) company by
the 2007 Fortune Global SQ, with assets under management in excess of €330 billion (as at June 2008}

and has an S&P rating of AA, a Moody's rating of Aa3, AM Best of A+ and a Fitch rating of AA,

Www, generali-gw.com

economy, or negative growth,
was “possible if the [interna-
tional] crisis continues to deep-
en”.

Moody’s said: “The fiscal
numbers show slippage, mainly
due to higher expenditures. In
the first six months of the 2008-
2009 fiscal year, the central gov-
ernment deficit amounted to
$135 million, 36 per cent higher
than the same period in 2007-
2008. On a yearly basis, gov-
ernment revenues and expen-
ditures increased 6.7 per cent
and 1.9 per cent, respectively.

Debt

And Moody’s added:
“Although government debt as
a percentage of revenues is
trending downwards since 2003,
at an estimated 180 per cent for
2008 it is one of the highest in its
peer group. This condition exac-
erbates fiscal spending rigidi-
ties, and is potentially trouble-
some given [the Bahamas]
exposure to natural disasters
and external shocks.

“Susceptibility to event risks
that could suddenly lead to a
multiple-notch adjustment in
the country's ratings, however,
is judged to be low relative to
the universe of rated countries.”

But Mr Smith said there was
no immediate likelihood of a
downgrade to the Bahamas’
sovereign credit rating, or the
outlook for this nation.

He explained: “I think they
would watch it for a longer peri-
od of time, because the feeling
is that the recession will not last
forever and some extraordinary
measures have to be taken.

“But if it trends in a way

Pn
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

where we’re unable to reduce
the rate of increase in the debt,
we may have to take a second
look, but I don’t think they'll
do that for at least six months.

“They will look at tourism
expenditure and see whether
we’re creating sufficient foreign
exchange earnings to settle the
external debt. They’ll be keep-
ing a close eye on what we’re
doing here, and if the foreign
debt increases to a point where
it eats up too much of the for-
eign reserves.”

Still, Mr Smith said foreign
currency-denominated debt -
that which the Government and
its corporations owe to foreign
investors and financiers - was
“a very small component” of
this nation’s $3 billion-plus
national debt/

With most of the national
debt held domestically, the
Bahamas had created sufficient
room to enable it to take on
additional foreign currency bor-
rowing if circumstances war-
ranted.

Given the economic down-
turn, and its impact on govern-
ment revenues and spending
plans, Mr Smith said the GFS
fiscal deficit for 2008-2009, ini-
tially projected to be around 2
per cent, was likely to come in
around 3-4 per cent. That mea-
surement strips out the cost of
debt redemption.

Eye

“One thing we’ve got to keep
an eye on is the slowdown in
foreign direct investment,” Mr
Smith told Tribune Business.
“We’ve traditionally used that
to bridge the gap on the bal-

ance of payments, and if that
slows down, it could cause the
balance of payments gap to
grow.”

While the generally perceived
wisdom was that a turnaround
in the US economy would spark
a recovery in the Bahamas, Mr
Smith said the effect might not
be “one-to-one”, and cautioned
that matters might not be the
same as they once were.

Minister

The former finance minister
said it was possible that Amer-
icans might choose to vacation
at home, or in other foreign
countries, more and not come
as frequently - or in the same
numbers - to the Bahamas.

As for foreign direct invest-
ment, Mr Smith said this might
not return in the same volume
as before the credit crunch, as
lenders and investors would
take into account sovereign and
cross-border risks.

“T don’t know if it’s going to
come back to the Bahamas or
the Caribbean area in the same
fashion, for the simple reason
that in earlier years, prior to the
fallout, little attention was paid
to sovereign risk or cross-border
risk,” Mr Smith said. “They will
pay more attention to that.”

He pointed out that prior to
the downturn, Bahamas-based
banks and financial institutions
had been reluctant to lend to
Family Island-based investment
projects, because of the diffi-
culty in obtaining a return on
the funds sunk into the ground.
That attitude was now likely to
be shared by foreign investors
and lenders.

PART-TIME ASSISTANT

To The Capital & Development Committee

The Board of the Nassau Airport
Development Company (NAD) is
seeking candidates for the part-
time position of Assistant to The
Capital & Development Committee.
The duties and responsibilities of
the successful applicant will
include:

+ Time requirement of

approx. two days per week

« Attending monthly meetings for
approx. four hours

» Assisting the Committee on
matters to be recommended to the
Board for approval

» Attending meetings requested
by the Committee in order to
report on the proceedings of the
meetings attended

«Commenting on the reports,
minutes, and other matters that
may arise at monthly committee
meetings.

Potential candidate will
possess the following skills
and experience:

« Effective communicator,
proficient in both report
writing and oral
presentations

+ Intuitive and insightful with
the confidence to question
decisions and processes

« Familiar with infrastructure
development

« Familiar with the process of
reviewing tenders and RFP
proposals for construction
and procurement

» Understanding of project
management processes

« Understanding of financial
management processes

» Must have substantial
experience in the areas
outlined above.

If you are qualified and interested, please submit your
resume by April 30, 2009 to:

Manager, People

Nassau Airport Development Co.

P.O. Box AP 59229
Nassau, Bahamas

Only those applicants short listed will be contacted.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 5B





Solomon’s
Mines sees

Yacht registry’s ‘great
synergy’ opportunities

FROM page 1B

Deveaux replied: “Based on the preliminary infor-
mation I have, we would need to amend the BMA
Act to accommodate this class of ships, and may
have to look at other Acts to provide incentives to
get these ships here.”

The mega yacht market has obvious links to the
Bahamas high-end second home real estate indus-
try, given that these property owners are likely to

“The [BMA] Board feels that between mega
yachts, wealthy second home owners and per-
sons with planes, there’s an opportunity for great
synergies in having the means to attract this class
of business,” Dr Deveaux said of the yacht reg-
istry plans.

“We have a number of proposals from the pri-
vate sector expressing interest in it, and they’re
willing to assist the Board in looking at it. Once
they make a strategic determination as to which

30-50% sales
declines

FROM page 1B

Post-acquisition, the luxury
retail group embarked on a
period of rapid store expansion,
but was soon forced to scale
back with the closure of outlets
at Caves Village, Blue Lagoon,
Hurricane Hole and four Bay
Street stores.

The number of store brands
was also rationalised, and The
Tribune reported earlier this
year that Solomon’s Mines staff

colleagues on Bay Street, they
say these are the worst times
they have seen. I’ve not been
in the luxury goods business
[long enough to make that judg-
ment], but these are tough
times, no two ways about it.”

Mr Finlayson, though, drew
parallels with the early 1990s,
when his father’s ABC Motors
was “going under”, and there
was speculation Burns House
was failing.

“Today, Burns House is one
of the strongest companies in

the country,” he said, adding
that shareholders in ABDAB,
which holds a 60 per cent stake
in that firm and 47 per cent in
Commonwealth Brewery, had
done well.

As for Solomon’s Mines, Mr
Finlayson said: “This is a turn-
around process. This is not the
first time we’ve been through
this. This is a joke in compari-
son to what we went through
with Burns House. We are
focused on what will happen at
the end.”

own such vessels. They are also likely to own pri-
vate planes, and represent the sort of clients the
Bahamian financial services industry is looking to
encourage to domicile here as their primary res-
idence, following their assets here.

direction to go in, we will do our part.

to look at it.”

THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 20097

IN THE SUPREME COURT OOM /COMYNO. 000024
Commercial Division

IN THE MATTER of THE COMPANIES ACT, CH. 708
Laws of The Bahamas, 2000 Edition

AND

IN THE MATTER of RB. 8. INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(in Liquidation)

PETITION

“We have a strong interest from the Govern-
ment side, and the Board has set up a small group

were complaining that the com-
pany was late in meeting its pay-
roll - adding to business com-
munity speculation that the
company was a troubled busi-
ness.

Mr Finlayson yesterday said
that when he and his father
acquired Solomon’s Mines, the
group had 28 stores. This num-
ber expanded to a peak of 45,
but had since been reduced to
29 stores as the company
“closed locations that did not
make sense”.

He added: “We had to close
the location at Caves Village.
The timing was wrong. Caves
Village was beautiful, Sandy-
port, too, but the timing was
wrong. Five years from now, it
will be a nice spot for Bahami-
ans as well as tourists.”

Mr Finlayson said Solomon’s re
Mines currently employed 230- E 7
240 staff, having reduced this
number by a third from the 350-
360 it inherited when acquiring
the business.

He added: “In talking to our

Notice [s hereby given that a Petition for the winding up of the above-named
Company was on the 10“ day of March, A.D., 2009 presented to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas having io regiwered office situate at Cash Fountain & Co, of
Aumstrong Street in the City of Nassau In the bland of New Providence.

VE ETETCR






And that the sald Petition & directed to be heard before the Honourable Mire, Justice
Hepburn a Justice ef the Supreme Court sitting at Nassau on 24" day of June, A.D, 2009
at 10:00 oftlock in the forenoon and any creditor or contributory of the sald Company
desirous to support or oppose the making of Order on the sald Petition may appear at the time
of hearing in person or by his Counsel for that purpose; and 3 copy of the Petition will be
furnished by the undersigned to any creditor or contributory of the sald Company requiring
such copy on payment of the regulated charge for the same,



| =
' ee

Date the 1¢t day of April, 4.0.,2009

Anny person who intends to appear on the hearing of the said Petition elther to
oppes OF support, must serve on or send by post to the above-named, notice
In writing of his Intentlon te do se, The motlee muse state dhe name and address
of the person, or, Wa firm, the name and address of the firm and must be
signed by the person or firm or his or their attormey {if any) and must be served
or if posted must be sent by post in sufficient time to reach the above-named
not later than 4:00 o'clock in the afternoon of the 23 day of June, A.D.,
200F,

yo Ss Tel: 502 2356 MACKAY at MOXEY
4 ad rates 2 Attorneys for the Petitioner



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taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on
standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.

No boter than 12 noon on Tuesday 28", Apnl, 2007. Tenders wil be opened af 12:01 pm
on Tuesday 26", April, 2009 in the conference room at the Ministry of Housing,
Claughton House. The Government reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE is hereby given that MYRIAME BELLUNE
of COLONY VILLAGE, P.O. BOX N-d278, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, & applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalizatian
a8 a citizen of The Bahamas, and thal any persan
whe knows any reason why registration/naturalizatan
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15" day of April, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-f147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is herby given that GESILIA SIMILIEN of MACKEY
STREET, HILLSIDE ESTATE, P.O. BOX N-Tr2, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS. & appying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citzensivp, for registration/naburalization a3 a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registrabon'naturalization should mot be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within fwenty-aight days from the 8" day of April, 200 to the
Minister rasmoneabée for nationality and Citizanship, PO. Box

NOTICE is hereby given thal CATHRYN ELIZABETH
BURNETT EVANS of LYFORD CAY, P.O. BOX W-65,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, i apotying ta the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Baharnas, and ihat any person who knows any
reason why regisirabon’naturalization should mot be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within fwenty-aight days from the Bday of April, 2008 to the
Minister responsable for nationality and Citizanship. P.O. Box
N-?i4?, Nassau, Baharnas

Pave

NOTICE is heraby given that KADIAN BECKFORD of
#23 SAN SOUCI DRIVE, P.O. BOX EE-15368, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, & applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who Knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15" day of April, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O, Box
N-f14?, Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE @ hereby given that RODLIN FLORESTAL of
EAST 5T., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
response for Nationality and Cit@enship, tor registraton’
naturalization 2 4 citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
WhO KNOWS aint FeaSson why recqestration'naburaization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 15°" day of April, 2009 to
the Minister rasponsiite for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-? 147, Nassau, Bahamas

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, CRYSTAL LEWIS

of #17 Windward Isle Way. intend to change my name to
AVONTJERVAR SAUNDERS If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.

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Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or jalightbourne@ kpmg.com.bs no later than Friday 24 April, 2009.

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© 2009. KPMG, a Bahamas partnership, and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a

Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.



ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAG!

—

clay Leon? &

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
WEDNESDAY, 8 APRIL 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,623.20 | CHG 0.63 | %CHG 0.04 | YTD -89.16 | YTD % -5.21
FINDEX: CLOSE 805.27 | YTD -3.55% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit _y
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.28
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00
6.95 Bank of Bahamas 6.95
0.63 Benchmark 0.63
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37
11.31 Cable Bahamas 11.31
2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83
6.45 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6A5
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.36
2.09 Doctor's Hospital 2.09
6.02 Famguard 7.76
11.00 Finco 11.00
10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.40
5.00 Focol (S) 5.07
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.59
8.60 J. S. Johnson 10.50
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 0.00 0.127 10.1
11.00 0.00 0.992 11.1
6.95 0.00 0.244 28.5
0.63 0.00 -0.877 N/M
3.15 0.00 0.105 30.0
2.37 0.00 0.055 43.1
11.31 0.00 1.309 8.6
2.83 0.00 0.249 11.4
6.45 0.00 0.438 14.7
2.45 0.09 0.099 24.7
2.09 0.00 0.240 8.7
7.76 0.00 0.420 18.5
11.00 0.00 0.322 34.2
10.40 0.00 0.794 13.1
5.10 0.03 0.337 15.1
1.00 0.00 0.000 N/M
0.30 0.00 0.035 8.6
5.59 0.00 0.407 13.7
10.50 0.00 0.952 11.0
10.00 0.00 0.180 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

52wk-Hi _S52wk-Low Security Symbol
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17

Change Daily Vol. Interest

0.00 7%

Maturity
19 October 2017

‘Urgent
action’

needed on
$8bn NIB
shortfall

FROM page 1B

said of a likely increase in the
insurable wage ceiling, which
has already been flagged as a
likely reform by NIB director,
Algernon Cargill.

“The huge deficit can only be
plugged by increasing the con-
tribution rate or increasing the
[insurable wage] threshold,” Mr
D’ Aguilar said. “The easy way
to do it is by increasing the
threshold, because people earn-
ing more will then be con-
tributing more.”

Laying out what he perceived
to be the main options facing
the NIB scheme, Mr D’ Aguilar
said they were to either increase
the insurable wage ceiling
beyond the current $400 per
month; increase the contribu-
tion rate; reduce the amount of
benefits paid out; or increase
the retirement age. A combina-
tion of some of these measures,
or perhaps all, might be imple-
mented, although increasing the
retirement age beyond 65 years-
old is likely to be difficult.

Tribune Business reported
previously that Mr Cargill, in
an address to the Rotary Club
of West Nassau, said that NIB
had recommended to the Gov-
ernment increasing the insur-
able wage ceiling from $400 to
$600 per month immediately,
with annual increases thereafter
that were linked to average
wage rises.

This newspaper revealed last
week how the eighth actuarial
review of the NIB fund, which
has yet to be officially pub-
lished, had projected that the
social security system would suf-
fer from a $7.868 billion sol-
vency deficiency/shortfall in the
next 60 years if reforms were
not enacted.

The NIB Reserve Fund was
expected to deplete rapidly over
this timespan, and the actuarial
review’s findings, contained in
the financial statements to
NIB’s 2007 annual report, said:
“The projections were extended
for a 60-year period, and indi-
cate that the present value of
future expenditure will exceed
the opening reserves and the

present value of future contri-
butions by $7.868 billion.

“The report further indicates
that the current contribution
rate would be insufficient to pay
benefits in the long-term.”

However, in a statement
issued in response to Tribune
Business’s revelations, NIB’s in-
house actuary, Derek Osborne,
said rate increases would be
needed as the social security
scheme matures, with the
reserve fund currently possess-
ing $1.6 billion in total assets.

He added that the full fund-
ing of public social security
schemes, such as NIB, was not
essential, especially given the
economic, political and invest-
ment risks associated with the
build-up of a massive asset pool.

If the NIB plan was fully
funded, Mr Osborne said, it
would have assets more than
five times its current size, with
no opportunity to invest them
prudently. Accordingly, the
NIB contribution rate was ini-
tially set well below the pro-
jected benefits costs.

The NIB actuary insisted that
the Government would never
allow the scheme to go broke,
and would enact the necessary
reforms in time. The shortfall
identified in the eighth actuari-
al review, Mr Osborne added,
“does not infer in any way that
the National Insurance Fund is
currently in crisis or needs to
make drastic changes to benefit
provisions or the contribution
rate to reduce this projected
deficit”.

Meanwhile, describing NIB
as “a very important entity”, Mr
D’ Aguilar said: “This is the only
vehicle most Bahamians use to
save for the future, and we as a
people don’t do that. It’s impor-
tant to get that to work.

“Urgent action is needed if
that number [$8 billion] is true,
and, obviously, a plan. How are
we going to get there? How are
we going to solve this prob-
lem?”

Mr D’Aguilar added that the
actuarial projections were far
enough away to make Bahami-
ans think the issue would not
affect them, or that 1t would be
solved well in advance.

Bahamian firm
wins dismissal
of ‘insolvent’
insurer case

Grand Bahama-based Bahamas
Film Studios, Ross Fuller, a
defendant in the liquidators’
action, having allegedly acted
as “consultant and/or broker”
to Condor Guaranty and Con-
dor Insurance. Mr Fuller has
strenuously denied the allega-
tions against him.

Among the assets allegedly

want returned from Condor
Guaranty, is a $650,000 note
receivable from Gold Rock
Creek and Stockton, Fuller &
Co.

Gold Rock Creek was the
immediate holding company for
the Bahamas Film Studios,
while Stockton, Fuller & Co is
the investment banking firm of

1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8AS 14.60 -0.041 0.300
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 N/M
0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35 0.001 0.000 256.6
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 9.03
0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261.90
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
52wk-Low Fund Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $
1.3041 Colina Bond Fund 1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.9230 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.3847 Colina Money Market Fund 1.4489 1.06 4.63
3.1964 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.1564 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.0950 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.1599 0.71 -12.76
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0440 0.80 4.40
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0364 0.33 3.64
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0452 0.76 4.40
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Mr Fuller.

Condor Guaranty was
alleged to have been incorpo-
rated in the Bahamas as an
International Business Compa-
ny (IBC) on November 8, 2007,
operating in the reinsurance
business and offering financial
guarantees and surety bonds.

“wrongfully transferred to Con-
dor Guaranty”, the Bahamian
company, were some 18 million
shares in Ashby Corporation.
Ashby was the ultimate
Bermuda-domiciled parent for
the Bahamas Film Studios. Also
named as a Condor Insurance
asset, and which the liquidators

PUBLIC NOTICE

eS a a ea od)
The Public is hereby advised that |, DAVID JARED

DUTTON. of Nassau, Bahamas intends to change my name

Yield % NAV Date
28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
27-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
iS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

to |AHMIN PAU ARMSTRONG, If there are any objections
fo this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-T42,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009





The Tribune

eS

THE TRIBUNE

FROM left to right
Shona Knowles,
Principal at Aquinas
College Deandra
Rolle, Winner of the
Keizer cooking com-
petition Margaret
Bennet, Deandra’s
cooking coach and
culinary instructor at
Aquinas College.

A taste

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

FOR one very ambitious and talent-
ed teen, hard work and hours of train-
ing have paid off as she was fortu-
nate in winning the recent Keizer Uni-
versity cooking challenge held at the

Adastra Gardens last month.

Walking away with the top prize of a $10,000
scholarship to Keizer’s Miami campus, is
Aquinas College senior Deandra Rolle who
explained that her road to cooking and being an
all around model student started from early on,
with her parents being a driving force in her
commitment.

Deandra said from since she could remember,
she recalls watching her mother and father
Shena and Michael Rolle in the family kitchen
putting together cakes, cookies, and other dishes
from scratch.

Her interest in the culinary arts was seriously
triggered after making a cheese cake with her
father, which before had seemed like a major
challenge, but proved to her that she had what it
took to become a professional chef.

She said: “When I started at Aquinas, my
mother used to let me cook a lot, which at first
used to be a chore for me, but then after a while

I realised the joy in it because my family
would tell me how good the food was, and
that was another real boost for me.”

Another major influence in honing her
culinary talents came through her cooking
instructor Margaret Bennet, who
explained that Deandra’s passion for the
art of cooking has remained consistent
over the past three years she has known
her.

Mrs Bennett said: “When she came to
grade ten, her goal of becoming a chef
from then to now has not wavered, so
because of that I have continued to work
with her.”

Mrs Bennet entered Deandra in her first
cooking competition in February (Ministry
of Agriculture Culinary and Bread making
competition) 2009, and said although
Deandra did not win she saw that Deandra
was ready to compete with others in her
level, which meant entering her in the
upcoming Keizer competition.

Deandra said: “I happened to discover
that the competition was offering a schol-
arship, so I went to Mrs Bennett and told
her that she might as well enter my name,
and told her that I felt like I had a good
chance." What she did not not know was
that she had already been selected by her
instructor to take part in the competition.

“At first I wasn’t expecting to win
because I saw the judges were picking the

for greatness

top seven finalists, and I was sure plenty
others were going to enter.”

Although apprehensive, Deandra said
she told her parents about the competition
and its challenge of creating a unique dish.
As they were just as excited about the
competition as she was, the decision was
then made for her to commit to victory.

As the competition required participants
to present an all Bahamian dish, for her
the inclusion of conch and grouper seemed
an obvious choice.

She said coming up with a name for her
dish was somewhat of a challenge, but with
the help of her father she was able to settle
on Crazy Cabbage Fiesta, with Carmichael
Seafood Surprise with Cultural rice. This
was a mix of a cabbage salad with grouper,
conch, lobster, and rice blended with broc-
coli, corn, and other vegetables.

After winning the competition, Deandra
said never did she imagine achieving her
dreams would feel so rewarding.

Deandra said her school and church life
adds much more activities to her days and
weekends than most other teens. Apart
from being a member of her schools choir,
she is also a band member, an usher at her
church, a youth choir member, and a
young Christian.

Hoping to be a role model at her school
and community, Deandra said she hopes
that this latest achievement will inspire













other young girls and boys to also strive for
greatness and to work on becoming all
they can.

Principal for Aquinas Shona Knowles
said, Deandra's recent accomplishment is
important to not only her and the school,
but to others in the community because it
proves that believing in one’s self with
added determination can go a long way.

Ms Knowles added: "In the case of
Deandra, there will be a feature of her in
our next memory book and also a feature
on the school's website and the Catholic
Newspaper ‘The Bahamas Catholic.'"

Ms Knowles said while working with
Deandra over the last six years, she has
identified her student’s leadership and
role model abilities from the start, and
said that she is one to be depended on and
expressed high hopes for Deandra’s
future.

Ms Knowles said: "She is very focused
and has always been, not just as a 12 grad-
er but since she came here in grade seven.

"Even before she came to this school, I
know about her and how dedicated she
was, and she has blossomed into a beauti-
ful young lady.”

Deandra who intends to attend Keizer
in the fall said she looks forward to pursu-
ing her calling in the culinary arts, and
hopes to one day start her own restaurant
made for and operated by Bahamians.

A healthier choice

= els fied = â„¢~,_ =
MUCH has changed over the past few decades in the quality of fruits
and vegetables produced in the country and around the world causing

concerns that fruits and vegetables might not be as healthy as we all
thought.



@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

FROM the day we are born most of our
parents try to give us the best in healthy
foods, especially fruits and vegetables. How-
ever, much has changed over the past few
decades in the quality of fruits and vegetables
produced in the country and around the
world causing concerns that fruits and veg-
etables might not be as healthy as we all
thought.

Published in the February issue of the Jour-
nal of HortScience, a new study reports that
non-organic American produce contains
between 5 per cent and 40 per cent fewer
nutrients and minerals (including magne-
sium, iron, calcium and zinc) than it did just
50 years ago.

That is because chemical fertilisers and
pesticides make modern crops grow faster.
Early harvest times, while increasing pro-
ductivity, deny fruits and vegetables the time
they need to absorb nutrients.

As most of our produce is imported, Doc-
tor of Natural Health, Joyce Adderley, said
Bahamians should be concerned about the
kinds of fruits and veggies they eat.

“Tt is evident that nonorganic foods are
grown with chemicals for obvious reasons,
and that is to increase crop yield. The Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency says pesticides
may block the body’s uptake of important
food nutrients which are critical for proper
growth and wreak havoc on development by
permanently altering the way a child’s system
functions,” Mrs Adderley said.

Moreover, while fertilisers are used to
make plants bigger and better, the two do not
necessarily go together.

“Jumbo-sized produce actually contains
more ‘dry matter,’ or carbohydrates than
anything else, diluting the mineral content
and health benefit of eating down on your
favorite fruit,” Mrs Adderley said.

To get the minerals you need from your
produce, the study suggests buying organic
fruits and vegetables, or even growing your
own.

This is exactly what Mrs Adderley is urging
Bahamians to do.

“For one to get the most nutrients from
eating fruits and vegetables I recommend
eating organically grown produce whenever
possible. Recently a symposium was held by
the American Association for Advancement
of Science (AAAS) entitled “Living Soil,
Food Quality, and the Future of Food” on
February 13. Scientists agree that organic
farming delivers healthier, richer soil and
nutritionally enhanced food. The term organ-
ic refers to food that is grown without pesti-
cides, synthetic nitrogen fertilisers, fungi-
cides, or herbicides. Organic foods are mini-
mally processed, with no artificial ingredi-
ents, preservatives, or irradiation,” Mrs
Adderley said.

Mrs Adderley said she believes that farm-
ers should improve the soil by using natural
organic fertilisers.

“There are many natural fertilisers on the
market that increases the taste, color, size,
and the nutritional contents of fruits and veg-
etables. One such fertiliser is Natural Fer-
tiiser Plus, which comes from very cold ocean
water. Specifically the North Atlantic, the
main ingredient is Ascophyllum Nodosum
which is the most nutrient dense seaweed
variety available. The special seaweed is
blended in a proprietary process with emul-
sified ocean fish providing the macronutrients
in the formula which are a source of organic
nitrogen, potash and phosphorus,” Mrs
Adderley said.

Doctor Adderley said organic foods also
have a higher nutritional value which is
important for growing children and adults.

“According to Supernatual Home, an
organically grown apple can have as much as
300 per cent more vitamin C and 61 per cent
greater calcium content than a conventional

or non organic apple. The amount of calcium
in organic spinach is seven times greater than
nonorganic spinach and potassium is an
astounding 117 times greater in the organic.
This is time to start eating our local spinach
that is 100 per cent organic,” Mrs Adderley
said.

In the New York Times, March 16 edi-
tion, nutritionist and author Jonny Bowden
has created a list of 11 best foods that are
loaded with nutrients (and are readily avail-
able here in the Bahamas):

BEETS — rich source of folate as well as
natural red pigments that may be cancer
fighters.

CABBAGE — loaded with nutrients like
sulforaphane, a chemical that may boost
cancer-fighting enzymes.
POMEGRANATE JUICE — may lower
blood pressure and loaded with
antioxidants

DRIED PLUMS -— they are packed with
antioxidants

PUMPKIN SEEDS — the most nutritious part
of the pumpkin and packed with
magnesium: high levels of these minerals
are associated with lower risk of early death.
SARDINES —are high in omega-3, and
calcium. They also contain iron,
magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc,
copper and manganese as well as a full
complement of B vitamins.

PUMPKIN — a low calorie vegetable that is
high in fiber and immune-stimulating
vitamin A.

FROZEN BLUEBERRIES — associated with
better memory in animal studies.

SWISS CHARD —a leafy green vegetable
packed with caroteniods that protect
aging eyes.

CINNAMON — may help control blood
sugar and cholesterol

TURMERIC — the “superstar of spices,” it
may have anti-inflammatory and anti
cancer properties.












THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 9B
SI

o

5 | mi

= | : = 4

= re | az =" a i ft

o | |

= : : | |

fom —_— — = = ——— ae — — — = —_— — — —_—> — ———







@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

IT seems the spring sea-
son has ushered a non-stop
spirit of life and entertain-
ment to our shores, with a
never ending flow of parties,
high profile events, and a
host of activities to excite
every flavor. Included this
week in our Things 2 Do
countdown, are a range of
events from jazz concerts
and comedy shows, to VIP
parties and music videos.

41. Kappa Alpha Psi frater-
nity is hosting its fourth
annual Impromptu, which is
an evening of jazz, wine, art,
and soul. Set to kick-off this
Saturday at 7.30pm at the
Marley Resort, the event will
feature music by Tingum
Dem, Philip Bowe, and the
re-launch of the Kenesis art
experience by Scharad
Lightbourne. Tickets are
priced at $25 general admis-
sion, and $300 for VIP pre-
ferred seating (for four) with
one bottle of wine comple-
mentary, and are available at
the Marley Resort or from
fraternity members. Pro-
ceeds for the event will go to
the Guide Right programme.

2. Phat Groove and Fan-
tasy entertainment are bring-
ing to the stage popular
comedian Eddie Griffin, who
is best known for his sitcom
Malcolm and Eddie, and his
2002 film Undercover Broth-
er. The show which is set for
this Saturday at the Sheraton
Ballroom for 9pm, will be
preceded by a party on Fri-
day at the Uptown nightclub
and then an after party-the
details for that event to be
announced later. Tickets for
the comedy show start at
$45 general admission, and
$2000 VIP which includes
free valet, express seating,
after party access, 2 bottles
of wines, and back stage
access for up to ten people.

3. Budding Freeport cul-
ture artist Jah Doctrine is
hosting a special party
recording for his newest sin-
gle Nuff Gal at the “White
House” in Stapleton Gardens
opposite the park on Mckin-
ney Avenue this Saturday.
The event which starts at
9.30pm, will also feature
models from Renaissance
Models, Massyka, Vicky
Pepp, and DJs from Quality
Sounds. Free admittance for
ladies up to midnight, and
drinks free all night, so
ladies and gents come out to
show some love for this
local artist.

4, For all swimming
lovers, the much anticipated
annual Caribbean Free Trade
Association (CARIFTA)
Swimming Championships
iis set to run April 16 to 19
in Saventa, Aruba. From the
Bahamas, there are 36
swimmers participating, with
many of the events high-
lights and updates available
on local networks. The event
which also involves cultural
exhibitions, foods, and activ-
ities is regionally supported
and a great opportunity to
see the talents, skills, and
abilities of Caribbean Junior
swimmers.

5. Last but certainly not
least is the ultimate VIP
affair set to unfold at the
Bambu nightclub this Thurs-
day at 10pm. Champagne
Dreams which is being pro-
duced by Alpha-Male Enter-
tainment and Prezidential
Promotions, will feature
music from Canada’s own
DJ Tilt, and is priced at $10
for men, and free until 11pm
for ladies. The dress code
for the event is “smart and
sexy”, and security will be
on site.

@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

ADORNING white gowns and sparkling tiaras,
thirty two young ladies from various upbringings
assembled at the Whyndam Nassau Resort on
April 4 for their official coming out ceremony at
the Bahamas Debutante Foundations 2009

Debutante Ball.

According to the Bahamas
Debutante Foundation, the
word “debutante” was formed
from the word debut “mean-
ing first appearance”. A debu-
tante is one who is making
their first appearance and
thus, the word debutante is a
young lady entering society
filled with social graces.

This year the ball was held
under the patronage of Minis-
ter of State for Labour and
Social Development, Loretta
Butler -Turner. In her mes-
sage to the debutantes, Mrs
Butler- Turner congratulated
the girls on their entrance into
womanhood.

“T believe that the molding
of the next generation of
Bahamian women is both too
large and too important to be
left solely in the hands of any
one entity. We as a nation

need to be involved in church,
government and civic organi-
sations if our young women
are to flourish and advance,”
Mrs Turner said.

The distinguished debu-
tante of the year 2009 title
went to Shaynora Brown. Ms
Brown, who aspires to
become a neonatal nurse, is a
17- year -old student of St
Johns College and is the
daughter of Lenora and
Shayne Brown. Ms Brown’s
hobbies include traveling,
reading books and magazines,
and dancing.

The Bahamas Debutante
foundation is a non profit
organisation that aims for
social transformation and
engages in education to train,
support and collaborate with
women for social change
locally and globally.

From trash to treasure

FROM page 12

Mrs Foxton, began her jour-
ney from corporate life at Sara
Lee in the United States to the
secluded Adagio Beach Cot-
tage Studio and Gallery on
Grand Bahama where she now
calls home.

“T have been a full time
artist for 5 years now. It is
really quite out island-ish here
in East End Grand Bahama.
I had a career in business and
I was receiving all kinds of fax-
es and product sheets so I had
piles of paper. We had to take
that to the local dump and we
didn’t want to add to that
garbage that you see at the
dump. I found out about all
the places around the world
that specialised in handmade
paper. I saw the opportunity
not only to use discards from
our environment but to create
practical works of art not just
wall art,” Mrs Foxton said.

As Mrs Foxton learned
more about the paper making
technique, she started adding
fibers from natural leaves and
recycled papers.

“From the paper we recycle
flowers, leaves and seaweed
that we collect from our land-
scape, I try to show my devo-
tion to tapping into that which
is around me for my artistry,”
Mrs Foxton said.

Mrs Foxton’s first exhibit
was in the 2004 with the
Grand Bahama Artists Asso-
ciation (GBAA). She has had
several solo exhibitions in Nas-
sau and Abaco and is current-
ly showing at the GBAA
group Exhibition at the Glory
Banks Art Gallery in Grand
Bahama.

The process that Mrs Fox-
ton uses to create her hand
made pieces is the same as the
Chinese who invented hand
papermaking in 105 AD.

“My artwork is not only tru-
ly ‘Made in the Bahamas’ in






that my canvas and medium
are created from local leaves,
flowers and gifts from the sea,
but are also environmentally
conscious. One of the won-
derful pleasures for me is get-
ting in there with your hands
and really working the piece.
Handmade paper allows won-
derful textures. It can go from
very thin pieces of paper to
very thick pieces. I make 3D
pieces also that I call Buoys.
These Buoys are usually 6ft by
4ft. I also do large baskets
which are made from banana
leaves or hibiscus leaves,” Mrs
Foxton said.

Mrs Foxton said the before
process in creating a piece is
very long and tedious, causing
one of her completed pieces
to cost between $100 to $2,000.

“The process is long.
Depending on which leaf is
used, it takes a long time to
break down. They may be in
my back yard breaking down
for two to three months. They
are very smelly and I use a lot
of water to keep it fresh. After
that I cook them for between
an hour to a whole day. It is a
very time consuming process,”
Mrs Foxton said.

One of Mrs Foxton’s biggest
inspirations for her art she
said is the turquoise waters of
the Bahamas and the vibrant
earth tones of the beaches.

“T had a piece called ‘chang-
ing water’ that represented
our changing turquoise waters
here in the Bahamas. I love
earth tones as well, which was
displayed in my ‘Tred Care-
fully’ piece. Those tones rep-
resent walking on the beach
and the changing colours of
the sand when it is wet or
dry,” Mrs Foxton.

When it comes to the
colours and textures of her art
work, Mrs Foxton said she
enjoys giving her pieces
“touchability” for the clients.

“The sea grape, hibiscus,
banana leaf, every leaf makes
a different colour. I may mix a
little colour in a few but not
all of them,” Mrs Foxton said.

Mts Foxton said the art
scene in the Grand Bahama
has been stepping up a lot
from the early years than
when she first started. She
said she will continue her
artistic development with
international teachers in a
variety of mediums to show
her work.

“T am delighted that the

, journey continues every day

with nature, actually reusing
nature, being the source for
my artistic inspiration. My
creative energies are stirred
when I experiment with that
which may he considered dis-

DEL FOXTON

cards from the environment,
seaweed washed on the shore,
clippings from the garden
hedge or leaves and flowers
on the ground. I attempt with




He
peril)
Olea

Sa eset 3






a ESRI BRO

my artworks to bring pleasure
and a feeling that all is well
with the world. This may not
be the reality but just the
process of making the paper
artistry and being in the
moment makes it so for me
and I want to share that feel-
ing through my art,” Ms Fox-



SMART P

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() Young ladies make their debut



ton said.

Mrs Foxton is a member of
the Bahamas National Trust,
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of Papermakers, the Ameri-
can Papermakers Association,
the National Art Gallery of
the Bahamas and the Grand
Bahama Artists Association.

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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS



4
¢

‘

Celebrating a distinguished past

m@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

MEMBERS of Parliament serve their country
and the community in which they grew up in or
have come to love. Many times these persons
leave the lime light of politics and slip into the
background of a vastly changing society. Howev-
er, six former Members of Parliament for the
Montagu constituency were recently honoured
for their years of service to the country during a
special dinner held at Montagu Gardens.

The Montagu Constituency
Association paid tribute to Sir
Kendal Isaacs, Sir William
Allan, Sir Geoffrey Johnstone,
J Henry Bostwick and Brent
Symonette.

These distinguished hon-
ourees were treated to an
evening of refined music and
entertainment by Donald But-
ler and the Montagu Quartet
to dance the night away along
with delectable dishes named
in their honour during the
event. The cleverly designed
menu featured: Sir Geoffery’s
mixed salad greens, Sir
Kendal’s roasted beef in
mushroom gravy, Hon Hen-
ry’s Golden Grouper Fingers,
Sir Orville’s oven roasted
stuffed turkey,Sir William’s
Bahamian peas and rice, Hon
Brent’s potatoes, broccoli and
carrots and Montagu vanilla
ice cream.

Current Montagu MP
Loretta Butler-Turner, in her
message to the honourees,
described the event as an
evening to pause, celebrate,
and pay homage to a very dis-
tinguished group of Bahami-
ans.

“Montagu’s former Mem-
bers of Parliament are six out-
standing men who have exem-
plified the principles of repre-
sentation of the people and
devoted their lives to the
deepening of the democratic
process in our beloved
Bahamas. Their services, both
singularly and collectively
have spanned far beyond the
geographical and physical
boundaries of any one con-
stituency despite the fact that
it was the great constituency



MONTAGUE Constituency Association Chairman,Tim Lightbourn.



LORRAINE Lightbourn presents award to former Montague MP
Brent Symonette.



of Montagu that elected each
of them to the historical and
hallowed chambers of Parlia-
ment,” Mrs Butler- Turner
said.

Sir Geoffrey Johnstone
served as an MP for Montagu
from 1967 to 1972, Sir Kendal
Isaccs served from 1972 to
1977, Henry Bostwick served
from 1977 to 1982, Sir Orville
Turnquest served from 1982 to
1994, Sir William Allen served
from 1995 to 2002 and Brent
Symonette served from 2002
to 2007. Mr Symonette is cur-
rently the Member of Parlia-
ment for the St Anne’s con-
stituency and the deputy
prime minister and minister of
foreign affairs.

In his message to the hon-
ourees, chairman of the Mon-
tagu Constituency Associa-
tion, Tim Lightbourn, said the
examples that each honouree
has set, if continued by future
generations, will result in
Montagu and the Bahamas
going from strength to
strength.

“Our wonderful constituen-
cy has existed under the name
Montagu since 1967 and from
that time to the present, our
former members of parlia-
ment have each given their all
to ensure the best representa-
tion of it’s people and to guar-
antee that the area maintained
its charm, prestige and vibran-
cy. It is with gratitude that we
thank them for their service,
not only to Montagu, but to
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas in shaping what has
become the best little country
in the world,” Mr Lightbourn
said.



THE PRITCHARDS greet Lady Ann Johnstone.





FORMER MP Sir William Allen accepts his Caricature.



= Motagu Memoirs: Celebrating
A taste for a distinguished past PN

| greatness Pig sy 8 Fae 107
See page eight ! \







WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009

———- §6=—6tl

Turning

TRE

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

AS the globe continues to go
green, many Bahamians are learn-
ing that the environment has its
place in the world. Self taught
artist Del Foxton, decided to take
the concept of helping the environ-
ment to another level through her

unique handmade, practical, func- he
tional paper art. =. ae
ee Leet
SEE page nine 2 -
— = a, , Np.
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DEL FOXTON’S hand made paper art is a truly environmentally friendly way of decorating your home with an array of
i — — . colors, textures and items from the earth.




PAGE 1

Man dies, woman injured in shooting N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K WEATHER MOSTLY SUNNY HIGH 89F LOW 72F F E A T U R E S I N S I D E SEEPAGESIX Larry Smith’s Tough Call n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A 27-YEAR-OLDNassau Village man was killed and a woman injured following an altercation on West Bay Street yesterday. This brings the total number of homicides to three in less than 36 hours. The man died in hospital, where he had been taken for treatment for multiple gunshot wounds received near St Albans Drive at around midnight. According to police, he had been involved in an argument with a group of men when gun shots were fired. “A female who was in the vicinity received graze wounds and was also taken to hospital for treatment where she was treated and discharged,” said police. A “dark, thick-built man” seen leaving the area shortly after the incident in a white Honda Accord through St Albans Drive is a person of interest in the inquiry into the man’s death. The Nassau Village resident’s killing comes a day and a half after that of an 18-year-old Pinewood Gardens man, Richard Bremmer, who was Thir d homicide in less than 36 hours The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR McFLURRY TWIX MIX www.tribune242.com Volume: 105 No.117WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 Turning trash into treasure SEE‘THEARTS’ SECTION BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Police suspect arsonist behind massive fire n By TANEKA T HOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net POLICE believe a mas sive fire that spread across several acres of forest in the Carmichael Road areaw as started by an arsonist near the area's well-fields. Fire units were still fighting the blaze, and two others, which continued to burn throughout southwest New Providence yesterday. D irector of Fire Services Superintendent Jeffrey Deleveaux said it was unlikely that hot weather conditions sparked the firesi n Carmichael Road, adding "We suspect it was started out in the well fields Map appears courtesy of Damianos Realty T HERED LINE s hows the area of Carmichael Road affected by the fire SEE page two BLINDMANAIMSTOTAKETOTHE WAVES n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net SURVEYS reveal that visitor satisfaction at Atlantis is now “off the charts” compared with previous years, Kerzner executives said yes terday. Praising employees, its Managing Director said statistics show the level of service they are providing since last year’s mass lay-off exercise has hit “new records.” Meanwhile, the company claims to have been flooded with long letters and e-mails in recent months from happy customers compli menting staff on their attitude and service. The improvements also coincided with a slight increase in visitor numbers at the resort over its projections last year, with occupancy lev els standing at 64.5 per cent two per cent higher than the 62.5 per Visitor satisfaction at Atlantis ‘off the charts’ SEE page eight JEROME THOMPSON , who is blind, is learning to captain a 21ft powerboat to drive around New Providence and Paradise Island in July. Jerome, 45, lost his sight at the age of 11 but says, ‘Nothing is impossible, it can be done, it has been done’. SEEPAGEFIVE T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f AFTER 44 years attheCustoms Department, Acting ComptrollerAnthony Adderley has accepted government’s severance packet and taken early retirement. The new head, Glen Gomez, a former customs officer and most recently an official in the Ministry of Finance will take over from Mr Adderley as early as today. Inaletter addressed to the entire staff of the Customs Department,Mr Adderley advised them on April 6th that his service of 44 years and six months at the Department will come to an end on April 14th . “I consider those years very rewarding and enjoyed workCustoms Acting Comptroller is taking early retirement Anthony Adderley SEE page eight n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net NO BENEFITS currently enjoyed by Bahamians under its economic partner ship agreement with the European Commission will be removed, representatives from the EC confirmed to a Bahamian delegation that met in Belgium last week to address questions raised by the EC over the services schedule submitted by the Bahamas. This was communicated Bahamians ‘won’t lose EP A benefits’ SEE page eight A LEADING local clergyman accused of assaulting a 15-year-old girl was formally arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Anglican Archdeacon Ivan Ranfurly Brown, rector of St Agnes Anglican Church, was arraigned before Magistrate Ancella EvansWilliams in Court 6, Parliament Street. It is alleged that Archdeacon Brown assaulted the girl on Monday, October 13, 2008, while at a church picnic at Nirvana Beach. Archdeacon Brown, represented by lawyer Anthony McKinney, pleaded not guilty to the assault charge. The case was adjourned to June 23. He remains on police bail. Archdeacon Brown, wearing his clerical collar, appeared undaunted by the proceedings, stopping to chat briefly with reporters outside the courtroom amid a handful of supporters. Anglican Archdeacon charged with assault of 15-year-old girl SEE page eight

PAGE 2

maybe by some unscrupulous person." He said heavy wind blew t he fire north from wellfields into the Carmichael Road area which posed a threat to neighbouring properties including theg as company over the holiday weekend. H owever, the official said although the area was a ffected by moderate levels of smoke, the fires were under control. H e said he expects the fire to smoulder out somet ime today. "By tomorrow that will be history maybe a fews mouldering stumps in the centre of the forest," said M r Deleveaux. The main blaze was said to be a huge bush fire thatp olice said started around 11 am Sunday and burned across several acres adjacent to Carmichael Road, west of Barcardi Road and easto f Coral Harbour. A separate fire oppos ite the main blaze also burned near the Bahamas Gas Limited's CarmichaelR oad plant. Another fire, which struck t he western area of the City Dump early Saturday morning, was still being foughtb y fire units. Firemen, who were fighti ng the flames since the weekend, were able to get the fires under considerablec ontrol. Mr Deleveaux said that the fires were no longer a threat to residents and businesses in the area and up to press time yesterday,t here was no reported damage to persons or property due to the fires. "The fire is still burning in some areas, in spots, butw e are not able to reach all those areas. Some are inaccessible to us, however, thea reas that are accessible we are extinguishing those f ires. "We were able to beat the flames back and no damagew as incurred by those flames," he said in reference t o the two fires in the Carmichael Road area. "We still have a lot of smoke in t he area, but it is down to a (lowerso threat to residents and busi-n esses in the area." One unit working in shifts b attled the fire at the City Dump yesterday, which has been plagued by a numberso f fires over the past few years, Mr Deleveaux said. With additional help from the Department of Environmental Health, firefight-e rs were able "to get the upper hand on that." "It was a large fire but we h ave extinguished a large area of it with the assistance o f Environmental Health," he said. Two units were disp atched to extinguish the Carmichael Road fires on T uesday, Mr Deleveaux said, while one unit fought the fires yesterday. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 677 1111 nassau 688 1111 freeport www.indigonetworks.com Pay $100 deposit & take your phone homeGet 1st month’s package FREE Get FREE local ’ number Get FREE long distance numberPlans from$1995per monthCalling plans to Family Islands, US, Canada, Europe & Caribbeanneed a home phone? THE management team of the Bahamas Renewable Energy Corporation (BREC recently attended the Latin Wind Energy Association (LAWEA Huatulco, Mexico on invitation by the chairman of the Toronto-based Schneider Power company. The trip formed part of BREC’s key mandate to transfer knowledge to the Bahamas to further renewable energy development in the country. “In order for us to create jobs in the Bahamas we need to transfer knowledge from other countries so that we can take full advantage of this exciting and high-growth industry,” said Vincent McDonald, Chief Executive Officer of BREC. “As a company we are committed to bringing leadingedge knowledge and technical expertise to the Bahamas for dissemination amongst government and private busi nesses.” Mexico is a leader in the development of renewable energy in Latin America with 85.3 MW (megawatt projects in operation and 356.4 MW under construction. Current plans anticipate growing Mexico’s wind capacity to 7,500 MW by 2020. Key knowledge transfer topics discussed at the conference were principals of wind resource assessment, production analysis, designing and performance of wind farms, financial modelling, operation and maintenance, and structural safety. Concurrent with the conference, the BREC team was invited on a tour of Acciona Energy’s 250 MW Eurus wind farm in La Ventosa by Mr Fernando Mimiaga, director of strategic devel opment and sustainable energy for the state of Oaxaca in Mexico. BREC is a joint-venture between the Nassau-based WINSO company and Schnei der Power Caribbean, a wholly owned subsidiary of Toronto-based Schneider Power. BREC is a developer, owner, and operator of three contemplated renewable power generation facilities totaling 24 MW, enough to power over 25,000 homes. The renewable generation portfolio is diver sified across two technologies (wind and solar islands – New Providence, Abaco and Harbour Island. BREC is a combination of Bahamian entrepreneurship, backed by knowledge and experience of the Schneider family’s 115-year history in renewable energy. (L-R , chairman of Schneider Power; Kevin Ingraham, vice-president of finance for BREC; Fernando MimiagaSosa, director of strategic projects and sustainable energy for the state of Oaxaca in Mexico; Vincent McDonald, Chief Executive Offi cer of BREC; Isabel Ovando, administrative assistant for the Foundation of Wind Power in Istmo. BREC takes steps to transfer knowledge of renewable energy development to Bahamas Police suspect arsonist behind massive fire F ROM page one T HEFIRE b urns in the Carmichael Road area. F LAMES n ear the road in the Carmichael Road area.

PAGE 3

CONCERNS were raised yes terday that several Customs offi cers up for promotion may lack the proper qualifications. This follows angry reactions by some senior officers to the a nnouncement that they will be overlooked and end up workingf or their subordinates. According unconfirmed reports f rom a source close to the depart ment, of the five Customs officers that the government is proposing to promote to the executive ranks, "only one has tertiary education". T he source further claimed that the other four officers are withoutB GCSE qualifications or equiv alent credentials. “Can you imagi ne the majority of the executive staff of the Customs Department lacking a tertiary education in 2009? This clearly shows that the government is looking at this issue f rom a political and personal issue rather than an issue that faces the e ntire nation,” he said. During a brief interview yes terday, Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing – whose portfolio includes the Departmento f Customs – said he was not pre pared to make any statements r egarding the agency. Mr Laing, who spoke between Cabinet m eetings yesterday, offered no further comment. The source also argued that relatively young officers are being removed as part of the government’s ongoing restructuring exercise, only to be replaced by older candidates. Last week, several senior Customs officers threatened legal action against an “unprecedented” and “irrational” announcement that they will be superseded by more junior officers as the department is restructured. They claimed that more than 40 officers, mainly in their late 40s and 50s with decades of service behind them, were surprised to find themselves called to the office of the Comptroller of Customs last week only to be giv e n a letter informing them of the promotion decision. The brief let t er to the officers is said to have read that while “promotions of o fficers will be necessary” under the restructuring, they will not be among those considered “for advancement to the next level.” “This would therefore result in y our being superseded by your peers at this time,” it is said to h ave added. The latest informa tion reaching The Tribune sugg ests the officers have not signed and returned the letters, as had been requested. It is not clear if this decision will result in any repercussions. T his new controversy comes after 24 senior Customs officers w ere offered early retirement packages earlier this year. The department, also the centre of rampant corruption allegations in recent months, is responsible for collecting 60 per cent of the government’s total revenue. Attempts to reach Comptroller of Customs Anthony Adderley for comment were unsuccessful up to press time yesterday. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $4,210 $4,210 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,410 $4,410Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n Man accused of raping teenage girl is arraigned In br ief A 29-year-old man accused o f raping a teenage girl was arraigned in a Magistrate’s C ourt yesterday. It is alleged that Randy Neeroy Bain, of Free Town Lane, raped a 17-year-old girl on Sunday, April 12. B ain, who appeared before Magistrate Guillimena Archer i n Court 10, Nassau Street, was not required to plead to the c harge. He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case was adjourned to July 3. Alleged arsonist appears in cour t A 30-year-old man accused o f arson was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday. C ohen Lightbourne of Sequoia Street, Pinewood Gardens, was arraigned before Magistrate Guillimena Archer in Court 10, Nassau Street, charged with arson of a dwelling house. Court dockets allege that Lightbourne on Friday, April 3, intentionally set fire to the dwelling home of Vernessa Strachan at Pride Estates. According to police, Strachan’s home was extensively damaged by the blaze which began at 11am on April 3. Lightbourne pleaded not guiltyto the charge and was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case was adjourned to July 22. Concerns over Customs officers’ qualifications Zhivargo Laing n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net P RIDE is thought to be holding many Bahamians back from registering for NIB’s newly instituted unemployment benefits scheme, Labour and NIB officials said yesterday. Around 600 people signed up for the scheme by midday in the second wave of applications yesterday, following 774 who registered on Saturday, and with 12,000 potential c laimants out there, it was far less than officials had expected. Those among the estimated 1,500 who have not been ashamed to register their unemployment with the Department of Labour and apply for financial support from the National Insurance Board (NIB The Tribune they welcomed the government’s move to provide much needed support in tough economic t imes. The majority of those signing on at CR Walker and SC McPherson, two of the four New Providence centres where people can apply for benefits this week, were blue-collar w orkers whose positions were made redundant as businesses started to feel the pressure of the global financial crisis, Labour Department staff said. They would have received s maller severance packages than white-collar workers, if any at all. At SC McPherson, the bulk of applicants were former employees of Atlantis, as well as staff made redundant from S andals, the Wyndham in Cable Beach, small businesses and construction workers who have suffered job losses in recent months. A 59-year-old Cowpen Road resident who w orked at the Wyndham for 23 years before she lost her job just over a year ago said she hopes the benefits will help her get back on her feet. “It’s been really tight,” she said. “This should be able to help a lot with thel ight bill and all. And I’m hoping to find work as well.” A pplicants must register their status as an unemployed job seeker with the Department of Labour before applying for benefits from NIB, so they can improve their chance of find-i ng employment while receiving financial relief. However, Renaud Bethel, a NIB representative said: “I think most people don’t want to be seen as claiming benefits and feel t hey don’t need the money, but if they aren’t working the Labour Department can help find them a job.” A zella Major, NIB director in charge of t he Family Islands at SC McPherson said: “Some of us still have a little pride so they d on’t want to be seen in the crowd. “We try to tell them this is something you n eed not be embarrassed about, this unemployment is international, it’s worldwide, andw e have very little control over what is happ ening to us. Businesses are here to make a p rofit and if things are slow they will cut down, s o you are entitled to these benefits once you qualify, so there is no shame in this, it could h appen to any one of us.” The low turnout has driven Department of L abour and NIB staff to abolish the alphabetical system to make all welcome to registerb etween 9am and 4pm at the centres today, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, before registration moves to NIB and Labour Depart-m ent offices on Monday. Family Island residents will be able to register from today. Applicants must take their National Insurance card, identification and job termination l etter with them for a swift registration process and can expect to pick up their first cheque in two weeks. Miss Major said: “If you can’t read, we have staff here to help you, and we are really here to encourage people to under-s tand what is happening and ensure they can qualify, so we treat them with the greatest compassion possible and most persons seem happy, everything just flows and I think that is t he good thing about it.” Many applicants signing up yesterday lost their jobs in the last six months and were registering with the Department of Labour for the first time. Department of Labour repre-s entative at SC McPherson Barbara McCartney said: “The benefits have drawn more people out to register, so that is a very good thing.” A 24-year-old mother-of-three who worked in the purchasing department at Breezes hotel in Cable Beach for seven years before she was made redundant in August said: “I’m here to try to get some sort of benefit to helpw ith my utility bills and stuff. Things have been very difficult. My husband is bringing in a little income to keep the r ent going and pay the light bill, but this will really help me for true, not just financially, but to find work.” A 48-year-old former jewellerys tore saleswoman registering with the Department of Labour at SC McPherson said findingw ork is her top priority. “This is a great help and I think they are d oing a good thing,” the Carmichael Road resident said. “But I am hoping more than a nything for a job. The contribution is good, but a job is a continuous income.” For more information contact NIB’s public r elations department on 356-2070 extension 236/234/232, e-mail info@nib-bahamas.com, orl og on to www.nib-bahamas.com. Pride seen to deter jobless benefits scheme registration P EOPLE REGISTER w ith the Department of Labour and sign up for unemployment benefits from the National Insurance Board at SC McPherson Junior High School yesterday.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I have been following the exchange between Kim Aranha and young Allen. I should like you to print an open letter to that young man. Mr Allen, when I was your age my uncle and my father owned fishing vessels and a barge docked at Potter’s Cay. It was common practice then, as it is now, for fishermen to leave turtles on their back for days in the scorching sun without water and food until they were slaughtered. My uncle and father did it an so did everyone who sold turtle meat at Potter’s Cay. I found it so cruel and inhumane that I stopped eating turtle. Turtle meat is delicious and turtle soup was one of my favourite meals, but taste could not justify the torture. I haven’t eaten turtle meat in thirty years, but turtles are still t ortured in this fashion, and finally someone is trying to do something about it. Mrs Aranha was wrong, however, when she said turtles were the only animals tormented in this way (ie made helpless and left to suffer). In the Philippines, China and others parts of Asia, dogs are stuffed in cages with their legs broken and then bound behind their backs. It is a practice out lawed, but still continues as an underground trade. Now, young Allen would you like us to tie up and eat our pot cakes? According to your rational that would be a totally utilitari an means of ridding ourselves ofo ur potcake problem. Mr Allen, with your cavalier attitude, you come across as a pompous, self-serving young man. You’ll make a good politician some day, but until then, please research your facts. PAMELA E HEASTIE Nassau, April, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. To bring relief to recently unemployed persons the gov-e rnment has initiated an unemployment benefit programme, which is imminent. The government has also articulated plans to make this programme a permanent fixture by 2010 with both employers and employees alike contributing to a National Insurance Unemployment Benefit Fund. Additionally, there are opinions held by some that given the paltry savings of Bahamia ns and the lack of discipline in that regard, it may be necessary to initiate a retirement fund that would supplement the National Insurance Board Benefits. Naturally, whatever formula is derived, small and medium business (SMB further for that programme. Furthermore, the opposition has indicated that should it be successful in the next general elections, the National Health Insurance Scheme will be placed on the table once again, naturally, SMB will be required to carry the lion’s share of this health care tax initiative. Given the government of the day’s reliance on SMB to fund substantially all of its social initiatives, it would appear reasonable that given this global economical crisis greater emphasis on SMB would be reflected in the stimulus agenda. To date, making credit available to SMB or other necessary proposals to ensure viability have been virtually deficient. Notwithstanding, SMB’s are being required to bear the heavy lifting for all national taxation proposed. I t is said that a sound economic stimulus policy requires that all long-run effects and all stakeholders, not simply shortrun effects and a few people be considered. I remain hopeful the government would revisit its position on stimulating the economy by giving thoughtful consideration and action to likewise address the plight of SMB forthwith. R McKENZIE Nassau, April, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm ATLANTIS EXECUTIVES are ecstatic that v isitor satisfaction is “off the charts” as staff now realise that advertising can attract the first visitor, but it is their responsibility to keep that visitor returning. V isitors have also commented to us on how impressed they have been with the friendliness a nd level of service provided by Breezes’ all inclusive resort on Cable Beach. We assume t hat it must be the same at all of our resorts as B ahamians suddenly realise that their job depends on them playing their part in keeping guests happy. F or years this message has been preached by industry leaders, but it seemed that executivesw ere knocking on empty doors as few in the ser vice industry seemed to be getting the message. However, this message also has to be understood by the general public. Only last week a visiting couple complained about taxi drivers who did not follow the fare rates given them by their hotel. They felt that they had been takena dvantage of. They were happy with their hotel, but they were not impressed by their first cont act with a Bahamian taxi driver. Did they com p lain? A disgusted shrug of the shoulder indicated that they had not. How will this breach of the taxi rates be factored in when they plan their next vacation? Will it be the Bahamas, or will they go further afield? In other words every Bahamian, in one way or another, benefits from these visitors. Their courtesy and honesty will depend upon whether or not a visitor buys a return ticket. Resorts should encourage their guests to bring such complaints to their attention to make certain that those who are letting the industry down can be removed. S ome of the Bahamas’ leading resorts have i nvested heavily in accommodating corporate b usiness with large conference centres and meeting rooms. When the economic crash came with business being hit hardest, overseas conferences were the first to go under. Of course, Atlantis was one of those hit hardest with mass cancellations. Beyond Easter the horizon showed a blank. Staff had to be laid off. As soon as this happened there was a transformation at Atlantis. The remaining staff seemed energised to move to a higher standard. They were almost stumbling over each o ther in their anxiety to serve. One would have h ad to have been blind not to have seen the c hange. This has obviously paid off. The large conv entions might have disappeared, but leisure travellers now make up the majority of visitors and letters and e-mails of visitor satisfaction are arriving on Atlantis’ managing director’s desk. Visitor arrivals are now two per cent higher than the company had predicted for this time o f year. “The graphs for this year, for January, Feb ruary and March, are through the roof compared to the same months last year. Forget a bout ‘improved’ we’re talking new records! If we published them you wouldn’t believe it,” s aid senior executive George Markantonis. Mr Markantonis said employees certainly a ppear to have recognised that “everyone has a r esponsibility” when it comes to the health of this country’s tourism industry. “There’s a huge awareness on property that t his isn’t management’s responsibility alone anymore that survival depends on gettingc ustomers who are travelling to come back and that responsibility belongs to every single person who works here.” Bahamians must remember that the Bahamas is not the only country trying to out smile their competition for that tourist dollar. We have seen the same happen to a hotel w here we stay in Miami. When staff were being laid off here, they were also being laid off in M iami hotels. Earlier this year we could have h ad any room that we wanted in this particular hotel. Many of the staff in the dining room had been made redundant, and those remaining like in the Bahamas were breaking their backs to serve. A perpetual smile lighted their faces. The next time we went to Miami we didn’t bother to make a reservation, and we almost did not get a room. A large convention of lawyers had filled the hotel. Since then this hotel has been fairly busy, but still operating on a skeleton staff in the dining room as though unsure of when their luck might run out. Editorial corrections : In this column yesterd ay we explained why individual Americans 2 00 years ago carried arms, but commented t hat with today’s army and police force, an American’s right to bear arms is no longer a reasonable argument. Of the American militia of 200 years ago we wrote: “Those were the days when if the state were threatened the farmer had to hitch up his britches , drop his pitch fork, grab his fire arm and defend his neighours.” Maybe Huck Finn would have been hitching up his “britches”, but The Tribune should have had the farmer hitching his breeches . Sorry folks! A nd thanks to our reader who brought to our a ttention an error in a recent article in which we r eported a PLP MP suggesting that Tribune Managing Editor John Marquis should be runo ut of town and The Tribune burned down. That statement was made at a meeting of the Shirlea-Twynam Crime Watch committee, not the “Shirley Street-Twynam Avenue area” as reported in this column. How small and medium business suffer in silence LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Hotel staff keep visitors coming 7KHXEOLF,V&RUGLDOO\,QYLWHG$WWHQG 7+(+/
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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A BLIND man who aspires to sail the open sea is learning to captain a 21ft powerboat to drive around New Providence and Paradise Island in July. J erome Thompson, 45, fell in love with the sea as a child and had dreamed of driving a boat even after he lost his sight a t age 11. But Mr Thompson, of Coconut Grove, Nassau, never b elieved his dream could come true until he heard the farf etched tales of the remarkable visually impaired peoplew ho drove cars and piloted p lanes in other parts of the world. The unmarried entrepreneur was inspired to set up nonprofit organisation Adventures Unlimited Bahamas, registered in January, to help disa bled people in the Bahamas a nd around the world bring their dreams to life by supp orting them in their advent urous endeavors either finan c ially or by providing equipment and training. As president of the organi sation, Mr Thompson is leading the way for other daredevils with disabilities, as he intends to steer a three hour c ourse from Potters Cay around New Providence and Paradise Island on July 11 to p romote his organisation and p rove it is possible to conquer any challenge, regardless of a person’s limitations. The brave captain said: “It’s a daring thing, I must admit. Persons might think I am a little crazy, but when the Wrightb rothers invented the aero plane, people thought they were crazy too. Nothing is impossible, it c an be done, it has been done, and hopefully more people will realise that if a blind person can drive a boat, then so cant hey.” Mr Thompson took his third lesson from former RoyalB ahamas Defence Force (RBDF Bain at the Bayshore Marina in Nassau Harbour yesterdaya fternoon, and was taught how t o follow the compass to steer his course for the first time. C aptain Bain, who drove a R BDF boat for 13 years, has already helped Mr Thompson become familiar with the cockpit of the 21ft Wellcraft speed b oat loaned to him through dock master Lundy Robinson. The Captain has been teach i ng him how to turn the wheel, adjust the throttle and most importantly, follow orders, as he will act as Mr Thompson’se yes at sea in the July chal l enge. M r Thompson said: “I want t o drive around the course completely under my own power, with Capt Bain on the boat only for safety reasons, a nd I don’t want this event to be the only thing done. “I want to help others to t hink outside the box, to dare t o dream, and to realise that d espite of their disabilities, t here are abilities they can tap i nto.” O nce he has mastered the course in three months time, Mr Thompson hopes to captain a boat entirely on his own by means of a $5,000 audio GPS system. Capt Bain said: “Once he u nderstands compass orders I w ill not need to be in the boat with him anymore; the GPS s ystem will tell him where to g o and he will be able to find h is own way around the island and the coral reefs. “It’s very doable, and quite s traightforward. “I will be his lookout for oncoming vessels, but his entire track would be on a GPS system.” Mr Thompson, who said he has never been plagued byf ear, was thrilled by his first e xperience driving a boat. “It was quite exhilarating when I stepped on board tod rive the boat for the first time on March 14,” he said. “I was still in the planning, thinking, theoretical stagew hile onboard, but after I c ame off the awesomeness a ctually hit me, that I actually did that. It was exhilarating.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 5 OMEGA COLLEGEIn association with Distinguished Lecture Series D D a a t t e e : : T T h h u u r r s s d d a a y y , , A A p p r r i i l l 1 1 6 6 , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 9 9 T T i i m m e e : : 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m V V e e n n u u e e : : S S t t . . M M a a r r y y s s H H a a l l l l , , B B e e r r n n a a r r d d R R o o a a d d C C o o s s t t : : F F R R E E E E o o f f c c h h a a r r g g e eSpeaker: Mr. James Smith President of CFAL Investments, Former Governor o f The Central Bank of The Bahamas a nd Former Minister of State f or Finance. Topic: "The Current Economic Crisis and Implications for the Future". Open to all members of the Public. Refreshments will be provided. THE host and creator of the motivational television show “Dare To Be Great”,S pence Finlayson, will be conducting a time managem ent workshop titled “Taming The Time Monster.” Mr Finlayson, motivational speaker and corpor ate trainer with over 20 years experience, claims persons participating in hisw orkshop will learn to get more done in fewer hours. The workshop will take p lace at the British Colonial Hilton on Wednesday, April 29 from 9am to 4pm. T HE Bahamas Girl Guides Associationheld its official opening ceremony for a regional camp celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Caribbean Link of Guiding at Xavier’s Lower School on Easter Monday. Under the theme, Guiding for Caribbean Unity,” the Girl Guides of the Bahamas welcomed some 30 guides and 12 w orld leaders from CARICOM countries during Camp Lukku Kairi (Lucayan for i sland people). Joining the 40 guides and rangers from New P rovidence, Grand B ahama, Exuma and E leuthera were guides from Antigua, Belize, the British VirginI slands, the Cayman Islands, Guyana and Montserrat. Rev Beryl Higgs, p resident of the Bahamas Girl Guides Association, welcomed t he excited participants t o the week-long camp o f environmental activities, challenges ande xploration of New P rovidence. Senator Dr Jacinta Higgs, the keynote speaker, challengedt he girls to be cog nisant of their common heritage, the unifying principles of guidinga nd their role in the preservation of the regional Girl Guides. T he camp closes with a rally on Friday, April 17 at the Girl Guides site on Marshall Road. Bahamas Girl Guides A ssociation holds opening ceremony for regional camp In brief CONTESTANTS take part in the “Pull d’ Engine” competition at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre on Easter Monday. The event was hosted by TaekwondoBahamas and TEAMProcure and featured fire safety demonstrations,car extrication demonstrations, a Taekwondo exhibition and a junior firefighter challenge. Proceeds of the event will benefit TaekwondoBahamas. Tim Clark /Tribune staff C ONTESTANTSROPEDINTOENGINEPULLINGCONTEST Blind man aims to captain boat around New Providence Workshop aiming to ‘Tame the Time Monster’ N N o o t t h h i i n n g g i i s s i i m m p p o o s s s s i i b b l l e e , , i i t t c c a a n n b b e e d d o o n n e e , , i i t t h h a a s s b b e e e e n n d d o o n n e e , , a a n n d d h h o o p p e e f f u u l l l l y y m m o o r r e e p p e e o o p p l l e e w w i i l l l l r r e e a a l l i i s s e e t t h h a a t t i i f f a a b b l l i i n n d d p p e e r r s s o o n n c c a a n n d d r r i i v v e e a a b b o o a a t t , , t t h h e e n n s s o o c c a a n n t t h h e e y y . . T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f PREPARING TO SET SAIL: Jerome Thompson

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A CCORDING to H ealth Minister Hubert Minnis, the government will soon propose major medical reforms that can be expected to spark a huge debate in parliament. A centrepiece of the proposals w ill be a nation-wide prescription drug plan that will feature a computer database of patients, as well as an education and follow-up programme to ensure that people take their medicat ions and make necessary l ifestyle changes. The reason is that we are faci ng a healthcare crunch similar t o that faced by the US costs a re skyrocketing and resources are running out. The big challenge today is to find a sustainable solution, something that requires a "paradigm shift" int he healthcare industry, experts s ay. I n other words, we will have to change our frame of reference f rom over-reliance on tertiary m edicine, which focuses on expensive hospital care, to lowercost preventive medicine that is more patient-driven. What does this mean? Well, it costs $60,000a year for the Princess Margaret H ospital to keep a patient with k idney failure alive and there are more than 200 patients u ndergoing dialysis as we speak. A nd almost every one of t hem is in that unfortunate position due to complications from high blood pressure or diabetes, which are easily preventable and controllable diseases. In fact,a bout two thirds of the governm ent's healthcare spending goes to treat diseases that are caused by poor lifestyle choices. And half of all deaths in the Bahamas are attributed to these illnesses. "Everyone is entitled to h ealthcare," Dr Minnis said at a r ecent College of The Bahamas presentation, "but as former president Bill Clinton said recently, the financial meltdownw ill be a joke compared to what h ealthcare will cost if we continue on our present path. When you need more and more hospit al beds, you know that healthcare has failed. And if we con-t inue on this road we will never h ave enough money or facilities." I n fact, the Bahamas seems to have come full circle from the early days of the 20th century, w hen there were only three doc tors outside of Nassau at Inagua, Harbour Island andG reen Turtle Cay to serve 42,000 people living in the widely scattered out islands. Back then, according to Dr Harold Munnings in his 2005 hist ory of the Princess Margaret Hospital, out islanders "obtained w hat care they could from untrained midwives, clergymen and herbalists." And commissioners "were provided with a chest that contained bottles of m edicines and jars of pastes and lotions" with accompanying i nstructions. The Princess Margaret Hospi tal began life as a poorhouse in 1 809 and entered the 20th cent ury as a place of last resort for those in need of medical care. According to a 1905 account ith ad four sections for the sick, i ndigent, lepers and insane. Treatment was free, but patients were referred to as "inmates" and those who could afford it arranged for medical care at home. I n 1925 several American vis itors contracted typhoid fever in Nassau a killer disease trans mitted by dirty food and water, so the British authorities dis patched a senior public health expert to investigate. He deplored the filth of heavily populated communities noti ncluded in the city's new waterworks and sewerage system, then u nder construction. He also noted the prevalence of tuberculosis, venereal disease, gastroenteritis and tetanus, and strongly criti cised public indifference to Nassau's dreadful sanitary and housing conditions. Unfortunately, these conditions did not begin to change until the middle of the century, when a British official was still able to write that "behind Nas sau's picturesque old-world streets and the princely mansions along the East and West shores are slums as bad as any West Indian Colony, and far worse than anything Bermuda can show." In 1953, two thirds of the homes on New Providence still had no running water. And preventable diseases were due mostly to overcrowding, ignorance, poor nutrition, and lack of public hygiene. There was no regular garbage collection, so people took little notice of trash or litter during their daily lives. While researching these issues I came across an interesting medical memoir written by Dr Malcolm Hale a little more than a year before his death in 2003 at the age of 77. He had arrived in Nassau in 1954 on a three-year contract as a medical officer for the new Bahamas General Hospital (which was renamed after a visit by Princess Margaret in 1955), and stayed on in private practice. "I arrived by boat from Eng land on December 16," Dr Hale recalled. "We anchored outside the bar and a tender came out to carry us in. On it was a reporter from the Guardian to interview the new doctor, and a photographer to take his picture...the effort hinted at the state of medical needs of the commu nity." He identified the new Emerald Beach Hotel on Cable Beach, the redeveloped Bahamas Gen eral Hospital and the first City Market food store as emblems of changing times for Bahamians. They represented a dramatic break with the economy of the past, he said, and were a sign that prosperity was beginning to trickl e into the general population. S hortly after his arrival Dr Hale was put in charge of the TB and geriatric wards at the P rospect Hospital, as well as the L azaretto off Carmichael Road, which was no more than a nar r ow dirt track. This was in addition to his out-patient and casualty duties, as well as occasional out island clinics. Prospect Hospital was a coll ection of wooden buildings on Prospect Ridge built for the A merican and British air forces w ho trained in the Bahamas during the Second World War. Like Windsor airfield it was handed over to the Bahamian governm ent in 1945. " The general health of the p opulation was poor," Dr Hale r ecalled. "Tuberculosis was rife; new c ases were discovered almost daily, many from out island settlements, some of which like Rolleville (ExumaI sland (Abaco infected. Fortunately, my entry to the medical profession coincided with the discovery and availabil i ty of a whole range of effective medications...Now patients came to be cured, not to die." H e described the geriatric wards as pathological museums. "Especially impressive were cas e s of elephantiasis and the whole s pectrum of tertiary syphilis. The leprosarium was a collection of small wooden cottages (witha bout 20 patients when I took over, most in advanced stages of disfigurement, especially of hands and face. " The few new cases I admitted were diagnosed in the early stages and so far as I know allw ere cured and returned undis figured to society. The old cases stayed at the Lazaretto and died off over a period of several years. Most of the cases were white." In the out-patient clinics, Dr Hale treated many malnourished children with intestines bloated with Ascaris worms. Vermicide was probably the most heavily prescribed drug at the time, and he credited it with making the greatest single contribution (except for penicillin health of the community. He also described cases of pel lagra in adult men "the only clear-cut vitamin deficiency disease we encountered despite the widespread malnutrition. Most cases were alcoholics and they responded miraculously to niacin." Dysentery was also common, as were sexually transmitted diseases like gonorrhea and syphilis. But the popular remedy for VD at the time, Dr Hale noted, was to have sex with female infants. "It took a major educational effort by the profession to dis abuse the population of this idea, and I wonder today if we fully succeeded." Although HIV-AIDS was unknown at the time, Hale suspected that "the occasional cases of multipathology which responded to no treatment, and which were unsolved diagnostic puzzles, and which were invariably fatal, may have been AIDS. Interestingly, as AIDS increased, the other STD’s declined and have become rare." Epidemics of whooping cough were devastating, Hale said. "I remember Kenneth Eardley, an older private physician, telling me he had signed two or three hundred death certificates due to this illness in one outbreak just a few years previously. And how many times have I heard older women say 'I born 13 but I bring up three'?" In the 1950s there was rela tively little obesity and much less diabetes than now, Dr Hale reported. But one serious health condition that has remained con s tant is hypertension. High blood p ressure was, and is, a common p roblem amongst Bahamians of all ages, together with its deadly complications of stroke and heart disease. In fact, while he was a resident a t the PMH, Dr Hale and others c ontributed data to a US hypertension study. In their 1958 report, the American researchers noted that: "Almost everyone on the Islands has a relative that has 't'he high blood,' died of hyper-t ension, or has had a stroke...An a nalysis of the water supply in Nassau and several of the outer island groups revealed that the well water was significantly highi n sodium content." T he study reported salt levels of less than a milligram per millilitre in the drinking water of m ajor US cities, whereas drinking water at the PMH contained1 29 milligrams and on Eleuthera 2 10 milligrams. This meant that B ahamians were ingesting up to 10 grams of salt per day from water alone. And that was in a ddition to the sodium found naturally in foods, or added at the table. Nor did it account fort he fact that salt pork was a common ingredient in most dishes at the time. Currently, the American Heart Association recommends a n intake of less than 2.5 grams of salt per day for the general p opulation that's about a teaspoon and even less for highrisk individuals. I can testify from personal experience that this guideline is as difficult to achieve i n today's fast food-dominated diet as it was back in the 1950s w hen we all drank salt water. Hale was one of a growing band of doctors who participatedi n the vast expansion of medical s kills and services in the Bahamas over the past half cen tury. His assessment of how t hings had changed over that t ime? "Today the general health of the population is excellent," he wrote in 2002, "except for selfinflicted conditions, principally obesity (and its complications H IV-AIDS, and gunshot wounds." This brings us back to Minis ter Minnis, who says the govern ment wants to realign medical spending and priorities to promote healthy lifestyles. In addi tion to more emphasis on preventive medicine and health edu-c ation, the government will invest in sophisticated informat ion technology systems that will enable doctors to treat patients remotely via online facilities. It is a fact that 60 per cent of patients admitted to the overcrowded PMH emergency room don't need to be there, but they don't know any better. Affordable drugs are important, but education to improve compliance or avoid problems in the first place is just as critical. And it is this realisation that has complicated recent debates over the introduction of national health insurance. The proposed paradigm shift indicates a growing awareness in government that traditional approaches will never solve our healthcare challenges. Cancer, AIDS, diabetes, uncontrolled hypertension with stroke, heart attack and kidney failure top the list of modern medical problems, and they all are preventable with education, diet and medication. "I would love to work in a new, state-of-the-art facility," Dr Munnings told me, "but a prop erly funded programme to prevent disease has to be the priority. Removing the excuse of medicine cost with a national drug plan is a step in the right direc tion, but until education improves and lifestyles change, kidneys pummeled by out-ofcontrol pressure will continue to fail and diabetes will continue to cripple and blind." There are still plans for a new multi-million-dollar government hospital surveyors are stak ing out acres of prime forested land at Prospect Ridge right now, in fact. But dismay at the enormous cost and effort has led successive governments to content themselves with refurbishing the PMH at its present location. We will have to see what the government brings to parliament in the next few weeks. As Dr Minnis said, "Prevention is the key, but we have a long way to go." What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Health education is critical for the Bahamas M INISTEROFHEALTH D r Hubert Minnis

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T HE Bahamas Golf Federation Central Ladies Division and the Blue Shark Golf Club are hosting a golf tournament in support of the Sis-t er Sister breast cancer charity. The Golf Federation has a lways supported the Cancer Society in the Bahamas through its ladies division golf tournaments. This year, the Federation made a conscious decision to target a special group of women who work hard to support those diagnosed withb reast cancer, the organisers of the event said in a press statement. Medication The Sister Sister organisat ion not only supports women financially by supplying needed “port-a-caths”, w hich are inserted in the c hest for them to receive medication, but also offers e motional support and hope b y example. T he non-profit organisa t ion purchases and donates these very expensive port-acaths to women in need and t ry to do this for a least five persons per month. This venture in itself is c ostly as each device costs about $770 and literally depletes the funds being held b y the organisation. M ost of the volunteers working in the organisation are breast cancer survivors and use their personal experiences to encourage women t o not despair and show them t hat they can still have a prod uctive meaningful life. We are asking the public t o join with the Bahamas G olf Federation Central L adies Division and the Blue Shark Golf Club to not only p lay in the upcoming Sister Sister Breast Cancer Chari ty Golf Tournament on May 9 , 2009, but also send donat ions to help support the e vent and thereby support t he Sister Sister organisation,” the Federation said. To sign up for the tournament interested persons can contact Yvonne Shaw, chairman of the Central Ladies Division, or download a sponsor form and player registration form from the BGF w ebsite at www.bgfnet.com. 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MANY parents affected by the present economic slump are finding themselves answering questions like “why can’t we have fast food,” “why can’t I h ave that new gadget,” and even “why are you taking me out of private school.” These are the questions of an generation that seemingly does not understand the value of a dollar these days. Those questions and more can be answered on April 18 and April 25 in a “Providing Money Skills Youth Need For Life”workshop at the British American Financial Centre on Independence Drive. The two sessions – from 10am to 2pm and 3pm to 7pm – will be hosted by Creative Wealth Bahamas, organisers of Camp Millionaire and the Money Game. The workshop is the brain child of former banker Keshelle Kerr, founder and CEO of Creative Wealth Bahamas. She is also the founder and vice-president of a woman’s investment group called FFL Investments. Trained in Santa Barbara, California, Ms Kerr is the only certified creative wealth coach in her native Bahamas. “April is financial literacy for youth month and in these times it is essential for us to talk to our kids about the changes in our lifestyle due to the downturn in the economy,” she said. “I have a nine-year-old daughter and until I sat down and explained how money works to her, she did not fully appreciate the sacrifices that have been made for her to go to school, get tech toys or even goto her favourite restaurant. Many parents whose children enter our programmes thankus all the time because their kids are suddenly more mon ey wise and aware of how much it costs to raise them and as a result, pressure their parents less.” A part of the upcoming programme includes teenagers experiencing the proverbial “rat race” by working to receive a set salary and paying their monthly expenses. They are also given a choice whether to save any extra cashor purchase pleasure items. “At the end of the day, teens realise what it feels like to pay rent and that a credit card does have to be paid off. They then learn about passive income, assets and liabilities, how and why to save and so much more, she said. Despite being a former banker, Ms Kerr said the workshop is not about encouraging children to get into banking, but about empowering young people to follow their passions and to achieve financial free dom in their lives. “The workshop is focused on making sure the next genera tion doesn’t make the mistakes of their parents by not being properly prepared,” she said. “It’s about making sure they are able to spend wisely, save for their futures, not have to deal with financial difficulties and know how to enter their adulthood as responsible individuals. All and all it’s about making sure they understand dollars and sense.” Workshop to focus on money skills for youth SCOTIA Bank in partnership with the Zonta Club of Nassau hosted a “Real Talk Youth Forum” in March at the Mount Tabor Full Gospel Baptist Church in Pinewood Gardens. The event was geared toward addressing the topic of sexual health among Bahami an youth. Some 300 tenth graders were engaged in discussions sparked by the student presenters from the College of the Bahamas (COB These presenters included Jonique Webb, Krista Nottage, Camille Smith, Renbert Mortimer, Adrian Wildgoose and Brooke Sherman, hospitality management student at COB. Scotia Bank and Zonta Club of Nassau are of the view that the general health of the country’s young people is extremely important to their current well-being and to the future of the Bahamas. Indira Rolle, assistant marketing and public relations manager of Scotia Bank, presented the president of the Zonta Club of Nassau with a cheque to show the bank’s commitment to the cause. REAL TALK YOUTH FORUM ( L-R) GLENN ARCHER , president of the Bahamas Golf Federation; Yvonne Shaw, chairman of the Central Ladies Division and assistant secretary of Bahamas Golf Federation; Andrea Sweeting, president of the Sister Sister breast cancer arm of the Cancer Society of the Bahamas; Sandra Ferguson-Rolle, vice-president of the Sister Sister organisation and Gennie Dean, treasurer of Sister Sister. Golfers on course to help Sister Sister charity TCL Photo/ Terrance Strachan

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ing with each of you,” Mr Adderley said in his letter. “However, it is often said all good things must come toa n end and I consider my tenure no exception. “As I bid farewell, I do so with fond memories of the Bahamas Customs Depart-m ent, and will cherish each memory dearly. To those I leave to continue the noble cause, I wish you absolute success and may God’s blessings be upon you always.” Although Mr Adderley’s departure was well known from at least April 6 to all Customs officers, the news of his departure had apparently not reached the minister responsible. When contacted yesterd ay for comment on the matter, Minister of State for Finance, Zhivargo Laing, informed The Tribune that there was no truth to ther eports that Mr Adderley would be demitting office. In fact, Mr Laing went as f ar as describing these reports as utter “nonsense.” Mr Adderley’s removal from the department followsa recent demonstration by senior officers who were informed that despite their years of service, they would not be promoted in the department’s pending staff shuffle. It is hoped, sources said, that Mr Gomez can bring some “new blood” and ideas to this long suffering agency which has been the subject of discussion for many years. However, a number of Customs officers have already expressed concerns about Mr Gomez’s appointment, as it is understood that his wife currently holdsa senior post in the Department. According to these officers, this apparent “con flict of interest” could pose a serious problem for the new comptroller should admin istrative conflicts arise within the department. c ent which the company had expected. D espite consumer confidence in the U.S. dropping to near r ecord lows, leisure travellers made up the majority of visitors, a s the company saw mass cancellations of corporate group book ings, equivalent to a loss of 18,000 room nights (a week’s stay by one visitor would amount to seven r oom nights). Admitting that “unfortunatel y” the first uptick in reported visitor satisfaction levels occurredi n the very same month that 800 workers were laid off Novem b er 2008 Managing Director George Markantonis said December was “high” while the succeeding three months in 2009 were most impressive. The graphs for this year, for January, February and March, aret hrough the roof compared to the same months last year. Forget a bout ‘improved’ we’re talking new records! If we published them you wouldn’t believe it,” said the senior executive. Suggesting a silver lining to the d ownturn in economic conditions, Mr Markantonis said employees c ertainly appear to have recog nised that “everyone has a responsibility” when it comes to the health of this country’s tourism industry. There’s a huge awareness on property that this isn’t manage m ent’s responsibility alone anymore that survival depends on getting customers who are travelling to come back and that responsibility belongs to every single person who works here,” he said. The company receives regular reports from an international company that surveys thousands of its recent customers on a monthly basis as to how they found their visit to the Paradise Island resort. Having built up data based on these reports over several years, Kerzner was shocked to compare the figures for the first three months of 2009 with those from previous years. While the survey covers all aspect of the visitor experience, from staff to bath towels, the senior executive said that it is well known that interaction with Atlantis employees is a critical f actor in overall visitor satisfaction and therefore that the results speak volumes about the efforts of the resort’s thousands of work ers. per cent of that (a visitor’s experience) is made up of interactions,” said Mr Markantonis. Meanwhile, he said that letters received from visitors expressing their happiness with their stay have increased in both “length and frequency.” “If someone writes you a three page letter telling you how great the place is, there’s a lot of pas sion in that, and interestingly I’m getting and as President it’s not easy to find my e-mails I’m getting a lot of e-mails,’ he added. The Managing Director said the surveys indicate that every hotel tower on the property has “without exception” been subject to the same effect. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE stabbed multiple times near Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre at around 5pm on Easter Sunday, and just over 16 hours after the discovery of another man yesterday identified as 32-year-old Edward George Emmanuel, also known as “Edward Rolle” with a gunshot wound to the neck on Watling Street on Monday. A 21-year-old is in police custody in connection with the killing of Mr Bremmer. Meanwhile, four young Soldier Road residents were also in policy custody yesterday after being picked up by police who searched their car also at around midnight on Tuesday. Police officers were on patrol on Wulff Road, near Lincoln Boulevard, when they discovered a small amount of marijuana, $700 in cash, and a .40 handgun with six live rounds of ammunition in the grey Nissan Altima occupied by the men, aged 18, 19, 20 and 23. t o the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM arm of CARICOM in writing, officials said. Furthermore, the EC said that “in c onformity with the EC-Cariforum EPA, the Bahamian services and investment offer has to be accepted by the Cariform-EC Trade and Devel-o pment Committee,” according to a press release issued by the Ministry of F inance late yesterday. While noting that the Bahamian delegation had “fruitful discussions”w ith officials from the EC on April 9, the statement did not say whether today’s deadline which was given as ix months extension last year will be met. H owever, the statement revealed that the committee is likely to hold its inaugural meeting this summer and “at that time the Bahamian servicesa nd investment offer is expected to be f ormally presented to that body.” The statement comes after much speculation and controversy surrounding the fate of the submitted services offer. T he furor erupted when it was r eported that the EU was asking for more areas in the schedule to be libe ralised, or opened up for trade. Observers notably former foreign affairs minister Fred Mitchell q uestioned if local crawfishermen's duty free access to European markets would be jeopardised if governmentm issed the nearing deadline. The Europeans were said to be lobb ying the Bahamas to offer more allowances in areas of retail, construction, computer systems, advisory services and foreign/international law to enable European companies to build a commercial presence in the Bahamas top rovide these services. T his prompted senior finance officials, led by Director of Trade Simon Wilson, to fly to Brussels for a last minute meeting to “address queries raised by the EC regarding the scopea nd coverage of the Bahamian Serv ices Offer under the EPA.” According to the Ministry of F inance, the EC specifically had concerns at last week’s meeting regarding “the approval of inward invest-m ent in the Bahamas, which is summarised in the horizontal and sectoral commitments of the Services andI nvestment Offer.” Horizontal commitments are areas o f universal application that apply to all service sectors such as exchange controls and national immigration law, according to officials. A representative of the CRNM attended last week’s meeting as ano bserver. S peaking to The Tribune before the Ministry of Finance issued the statement, Paul Moss, head of Bahamians Agitating for a Referendum on Free Trade (BARFo fficials “stuck to their guns” during t he meeting. "We expect the minister (Zhirvargo L aing) to say that they stuck to their guns with respect to the services offer that they had made because that offerp urportedly reserved and preserved areas of the economy for Bahamians. If they did not then it only serves top rove the point that they did the wrong thing in signing onto an agreement t hat they clearly did not understand and put at risk the economy of this country,” he said. Bahamians ‘won’t lose EPA benefits’ F ROM page one Visitor satisfaction at Atlantis ‘off the charts’ F ROM page one Man dies, woman injured in shooting F ROM page one Customs Acting Comptroller is taking earl y r etirement Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . n TAMPA, Fla. A STRONGline of storms spawned at least three tornadoes Tuesday as it tore across central Florida, scattering roof shingles, uprooting trees and forcing schools to evacuate children from trailer classrooms, according to Associated Press. No injuries were immediately reported and the storms eventually moved off Florida’s Atlantic coast. It was the latest round of bad weather to hammer the South after heavy rain and strong winds Monday that hit Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky and northern Florida, already reeling from storms and tornadoes last week. The National Weather Service was still tallying damage information, but initial reports were that three tornadoes had touched down north of Tampa and two others may have struck in cen tral and east Florida. Twenty Florida counties were under a tornado watch for much of the day. “To our knowledge, there’s been no true structure dam age and no injuries,” said Jim Martin, Emergency Management Director for Pasco County north of Tampa, where at least one twister was spotted Tuesday morning, Martin said high winds damaged about 25 homes and flipped over one car. Students were evacuated from trailer classrooms at some Tampaarea schools. In central Florida, authori ties reported no injuries but said the some homes were damaged, trees were toppled, roofing was blown off and power lines were downed. A train also struck a fallen tree on tracks in Marion County but did not derail, though some of its windows shat tered. Randi Cecil, 24, was on her porch in the town of Sparr,a bout 90 miles north of Orlando, when the wind turned gusty and trees started swaying. Then a tree cracked so loud that it sounded like a car crash and smashed into her neighbor’s bedroom. It was the most horrible feeling I ever went through,” Cecil said. ProgressEnergy spokesman Tim Leljedal said more 70,000 customers expe rienced a power outage, m ostly in the Ocala area in central Florida and in southern Pasco County, just north of Tampa. About 14,500 were still without power by late Tuesday afternoon. Tornadoes spotted as storm line rumbles over Florida FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 9 THE Bahamas Judo Federation has launched its sport ambassador programme. Mem bers of the junior and senior national teams are scheduled to travel to various countries to train with elite level coaches ona series of cross cultural exchanges. Each team member is trained to be an ambassador by exhibiting good sportsmanship and manners while staying in the homes of students of the country. Then teams from the coun tries visited will come and train and compete in the Bahamas while staying with Bahamian families. "The goal of the programme is to promote the Bahamas on a grass roots level by having sporting families want to visit and attend our major tourna-ments, such as the Bahamas Junior Open. We will also raise the level of our judo by being exposed to the training meth ods of the world's best coaches," explained D'Arcy Rah ming, president. "I believe it is critical that each athlete in our country realizes that his or her behaviour can directly impact the impres-sion of the entire country." To kick off the programme, a seven person junior team traveled to the New England area this past week. The team trained under the direction of top US coach Ron Landry while visiting and training at other area schools with their elite coaches. "We were pleased to invite the Bahamian team into our schools and homes particularly after the reception we received at the Bahamas Open in February. The behaviour of the athletes, their willingness to learn, their work ethic and their manners are a testament to the Bahamian people and their families. We will be bringing at least 30 athletes to the next Bahamian Judo tournament" said coach Landry. The team members were all excited by the trip. “I increased my speed and throwing ability,” said 14-year-old Alex Martinborough. “By the end of the week I was able to win a match against a US national champi on,” said 10-year-old Kameron Knowles. “I enjoyed the visits to the Boston Aquarium, the Muse um of Science and the site seeing. But the ice skating was too cold for me,” said 11year-old Tajaro Hudson. Other team members included 11-year-old Keanu Pennerman, 14-yearold Cynthia Rahming and 14-yearold Kristoph Knowles. "Every athlete improved significantly in one week. We had over 30 hours of judo training. It was tough for the kids but they really represented the Bahamas well," said Rahming. "I will be talking to my Caribbean and Pan American counterparts about similar cross cultural trips. In order for this area to develop in judo to the standard of our European and Asian friends, we will have to give our athletes the exposure and competition they need. With this in mind the Bahamas will be hosting a summer training camp and tournament directed at juniors, ages eight to 19." Anyone interested in Bahamas Judo can contact 3646773 or e-mail daishihan@gmail.com Bahamas Judo Federation launches sport ambassador programme ABOVE AND BELOW : The Bahamas Judo Federation has launched its sport ambassador programme. On this page,m embers of the federation display their moves...

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Bank makes donations FIRSTCaribbean International Bank has donated to Special Olympics Bahamas and the Junior Baseball League of Nassau (JBLN help both organisations defray the costs of their annual events. The bank has sponsored the JBLN for the past several years because of the positive skills and qualities that the sport instills in the nation’s youth. In addition, sponsoring such events is one way in which the bank demonstrates its commitment to: “Enriching our Communities. Together.” C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS THE Bahamas Cricket Association opened its 2009 cricket season on the turf wicket at Haynes Oval on Saturday with a match between the 2008 champions “Dockendale” and Scotiabank Paradise. There was also the presentation of awards for the 2008 season. In Saturday’s game, Dockendale, batting first, scored 279 runs with Rudolph Parks scoring 46 runs. Paradise’s top bowlers were Lance Liston with three wickets and Gary Bell and Dr Mark Nutler with two apiece. Paradise batted and scored 289 runs for the loss of eight wickets to win the match by two wickets. Andrew Nash scored 86 runs a nd Aean Lewin had 51 runs to help out the winners. Shiek Sharnaz and Dwight Weakley took three wickets each for the losers. Dockendale was without their dynamic captain Naraendra Ekanayake. On Sunday, the Police played St Agnes in an exciting match, which the Police lost by three wickets. Batting first, the Police were bowled out for 153 runs. Youth player Rudolph Fox was the top scorer with 46 runs. Earl Thomas and Orville Grant took three and two wickets each for St Agnes. At Bat, St Agnes scored 157 for the loss of seven wickets. Earl Thomas scored 34 runs not out. Youth player Odain Tucker and Gary Armstrong took three and two wickets respectively. On Monday, the BCA under19 youth team played the president’s select team. The senior team was bowled out for 182 runs by the youths. The top scorers were Kevin Surujlal with 40 runs and Clifford Atkinson with 35 runs. Bowling for the youths were Rudolph Fox with three wickets and Mark Taylor and Ken Sharma with two apiece. T he youths, at bat, scored 185 for the loss of only six wickets for the surprise win by four wickets. Odain Tucker led the batting for the youths with a score of 63 runs. Orville James was the best bowler for the president’s team, taking three wickets in a losing effort. The Bahamas under-19 team is preparing for the ICC International Under-19 tournament in Toronto, Canada, in July. cricket season open FirstCaribbean’s associate director of capital markets Catherine Gibson is pictured (centre cheques to Andrew Thompson, of JBLN, and Basil Christie, of Special Olympics.

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C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 J udo Federation l aunches sport ambassador programme... S ee page 9 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net MARK Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi, still seekingt heir first tournament victory f or the year, are hoping that they can get their break through this week as they go after thet itle that slipped out of their hands last year at the MonteCarlo Rolex Masters in Mona c o. Having been dropped from the number two spot on the ATP computer rankings released on Monday, the Bahamian-Indian duo are seeded at number four in the field of 32. They are scheduled to play their first match in the second round on Thursday against the Spanish team of Feliciano Lopez and Fernando Verdas co, having being given a bye in the first round. The Spaniards pulled off a 76 (3 team of Igor Andreev and Safin Marat in the first round. Going into the tournament, Knowles and Bhupathi have slipped to number three in the team rankings with 1515 points. They have been passed by the team of Belarus’ Max Mirnyi and Andy Ram of Israel, who have 1735 points. The American identical twin brothers of Bob and Mike Bryan are controlling the leaderboard with 3515. The Bryans are also the top seeds in Monte-Carlo. They are followed by the team of Daniel Nestor of Canada and Nenad Zimonjic of Serbia. Last year, Knowles and Bhu pathi, seeded at No.4 as well, played in the final where they lost in identical set scores of 6-3, 6-3 to the Spanish/American team of Radal Nadel and Tommy Roberto. This year, Roberto will defend his title with Spain’s Albert Montanes. They were scheduled to play today against the No.3 seeded team of Lukas Dlouhy of the Czech Republicand Leander Paes of India. Knowles and Bhupathi have played in the final of the Aus tralian Open, the first Grand Slam tournament for the year and in the semifinal in Sydney,but they have yet to record their first victory together. Knowles, however, teamed up with American Mardy Fish to win the title in Memphis, Tennessee. Knowles, Bhupathi go after Rolex title S S W W I I M M M M I I N N G G C C A A R R I I F F T T A A T T E E A A M M THE Bahamas’ 36-member team to the Carifta Swimming Championships left town yesterday for Aruba. Like the Carifta track and field team, the swimmers flew to the championships on a chartered Bahamasair flight. The team, led by head coach Geoffrey Eneas, will be out to improve on its third place finish at last year’s championship in Aruba. The French Antilles won the meet, followed by Trinidad & Tobago. Last year, the Bahamas collected a total of 50 medals, inclusive of 22 gold, 18 silver and 10 bronze. The French Antilles posted a total of 91 (29, 38 and 24 and Trinidad and Tobago had 61 (24, 15 and 22 In the points scored, the French Antilles accumulat ed 1,107, followed by Trinidad & Tobago with 801 and the Bahamas with 721. B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L N N P P B B A A C C H H A A M M P P I I O O N N S S H H I I P P S S THE New Providence Basketball Association men’s best-of-five champi onship series will continue 8pm tonight at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. The series is dead even at 1-1 between the defending champions Commonwealth Bank Giants and last year’s runners-up Electro Telecom Cybots. Game four will be played on Friday with the fifth game, if necessary, scheduled for Saturday. The winner of the series will represent New Provi dence in the Bahamas Bas ketball Federation’s National Round Robin Tournament that will be played in Bimini next weekend. SPORTS IN BRIEF MARK KNOWLES and MAHESH BHUPATHI in action at the Aus tralian Open in Melbourne... CARIFTA team members are shown in the VIP lounge after their arrival at Sir Lynden Pindling International Airport Tuesday afternoon... SPORTS MINISTER Desmond Bannister speaks to members of the 2009 Carifta team in the VIP lounge after their arrival at Sir Lynden Pindling Inter national Airport yesterday afternoon. Also shown are BAAA executives, coaches and members of the management team... S PORTS MINISTER D ESMOND BANNISTER greets 2009 Carifta team members as they a rrive in New Providence yesterday from St Lucia. The 61-member team finished third with 2 8 medals... Carifta team returns home from St Lucia P h o t o s : T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE J USTICE ANITA ALLEN , left, is sworn in as Acting Chief Justice of the Supreme Court by Governor General Arthur Hanna at Government House on Wednesday, April 8. JUSTICEANITAALLEN SWORN IN ASACTING CHIEF JUSTICE MEMBERS OF THE NASSAU MUSIC SOCIETY paid a courtesy call on Governor General Arthur Hanna on Tuesday, April 7 at Government House. Pictured from left are Italia Watkins-Jan, vice-president oft he Society; Patrick Thompson, president; Polina Leschenko, guest pianist; Governor General Arthur Hanna; Linda Thompson, and Marc Drobinsky, guest cellist. P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S P atrick Hanna / BIS

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Maritime Authority (BMA creation of a Bahamian yacht registry would create “an opportunity for great synergies” between this sector, the secondhome market and private plane owners, a government minister told Tribune Business yesterday. Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of the environment, confirmed that the issue of establishing a Bahamian registry for mega yachts was “a matter before the [BMA] Board now”. “It’s on their agenda to discuss what amendments, if any, w ould have to be made to the legislation, and which marketwe would go to,” Dr Deveaux said. Tribune Business revealed late last year that the BMA andt he Government were working o n the creation of a Bahamian yacht registry, the two parties involved believing the sector held as much potential for the Bahamas as its existing bulk shipping registry the world’s third largest. When asked what legislation would need to be amended, Dr M M o o o o d d y y s s : : B B a a h h a a m m a a s s f f i i s s c c a a l l d d e e f f i i c c i i t t d d o o u u b b l l e e s s n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE liquidators of an “insolv ent” insurance company have filed a second appeal in their efforts to recover assets theya llege were “fraudulently transferred” to a Bahamian company, after a US district courtr eaffirmed the bankruptcy court’s decision they did not have jurisdiction over the pro c eedings. Richard Fogerty and William Tacon, the liquidators for Nevis-domiciled Condor Insurance, had appealed the bankruptcy court’s decision to the US District Court for the southern district of Mississippi over the alleged transfer of that company’s assets to Bahamian-regi stered Condor Guaranty. How ever, their appeal was rejected, f orcing them to now head to the US Fifth Circuit Appeals Court. I n his judgment, US district judge Louis Guirola recalled how Messrs Fogerty and Tacon were appointed as Condor Insurance’s liquidators on May 18, 2007, after one of the com pany’s creditors, Infineon Tech nologies, filed a winding-up petition with the Nevis courts. The judgment said: “The [liqu idators] contend that over $313 million in assets that belonged to Condor Insurancew ere fraudulently transferred to and/or by Condor Guaranty and the other appellees, and that many of the assets are now located in the US. “The [liquidators] allege that many of the officers and employees of Condor Insurance w ere also officers of Condor Guaranty and other companies to which the assets werea llegedly transferred.” Messrs Fogerty and Tacon had alleged that Condor Guar anty, while a Bahamian company, had the same president, Harvey Milam, as Condor Insurance. Both he and the Bahamian company enjoyed the same address in Ocean Springs, Mississippi. T he judgment recorded that while the two sides were dis puting whether the assets had b een transferred before or after the winding-up petition was filed, Messrs Fogerty and Tacon were alleging that “the assets were transferred in an attempt to prevent creditors from recov ering debts owed by Condor Insurance in the winding-up p roceeding”. As a result, the liquidators had filed an adversary pro c eeding under the Chapter 15 bankruptcy action in a bid to “recover the assets that were allegedly fraudulently transferred to the United States”. Condor Guaranty, though, filed a motion to dismiss, and succeeded in both courts, with the district court upholding the bankruptcy court’s findings thati t did not have the power to adjudicate the adversary pro ceeding because it was filed u nder Chapter 15, not a Chapter 7 or Chapter 11 bankruptcy case. The legal battle has also embroiled the chairman of the n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s president yesterday called for “urgent action” to close the projected $8 billion solvency deficiency that the National Insurance Board (NIB 60 years, but acknowledged that the percentage of wages upon which contributions were based was “admittedly low”. Dionisio D’Aguilar told Tri bune Business that it was vital to immediately start addressing the projected multi-billion dol lar shortfall in NIB’s reserve fund because the national social security system represented the only vehicle that forced most Bahamians to save for retirement. However, he said NIB’s current insurable wage ceiling of $400 per week was relatively low compared to those set in other nations, especially the US. In the Bahamas, this ceiling meant that NIB contributions split 5.4 per cent/3.4 per cent between employer and employee were only paid on the first $20,800 of per annum salaries, Mr D’Aguilar explained. This figure was just about equivalent to the Bahamas’ average per capita income, but excluded a significant portion of the incomes earned by higher wage earners. Mr D’Aguilar contrasted this with the US social security system, where contribution rates were 15 per cent split evenly at 7.5 per cent between employer/employee on the first $90,000 of income, which generated a much higher contribution rate and amount. “The fact we only contribute on $400 is admittedly low,” Mr D’Aguilar told Tribune Business. “We only pay NIB contri butions at 8.8 per cent on $20,800, whereas in the US if you’re going to retire you’re paying 15 per cent on the first $90,000 of salary.” While the Bahamas “clearly can’t jump to 15 per cent” contribution rates to solve the impending solvency deficiency within its own social security system, Mr D’Aguilar said this nation needed to determine what it wanted from NIB, what it wanted the scheme to do, and how its problems were going to be resolved. “That is the writing on the wall,” the Chamber president C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.48 $3.49 $3.49 ‘Ur gent action’ needed on $8bn NIB shortfall S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B Bahamian firm wins dismissal of ‘insolvent’ insurer case n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas has one of the highest government debt to gross domestic product (GDP ereign credit rating peer group, standing at 180 per cent, but a former finance minister said yesterday there was no little danger that this nation would be subject to an immediate downgrade. James Smith, minister of state for finance in the former Christie government, told Tribune Business that the likes of Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s (S&P the Bahamas some room to manoevere, given that every nation was ‘in the But former finance minister says no chance of imminent s overeign rating downgrade S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B J AMES SMITH Yacht registrs reat synerg opportunities Earl Deveaux n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor L uxury goods retailer Solomon’s Mines has seen year-over-year sales declines of between 30-50 per cent depending on the monthly comparatives, its president told Tribune Business yesterday, but he said the firm was performing “no worse than anyone else” on Bay Street. Mark Finlayson said that while Solomon’s Mines’ was going through “a difficult time”, the problems facing the retailer were “a joke” compared to what his father, Sir Garet ‘Tiger’F inlayson’, had gone through in the 1990s with ABC Motors and the constant speculation that liquor merchant Burns House was “going to fall”. Denying reports that the S upreme Court had given perm ission to two Solomon’s Mines suppliers to repossess more than $200,000 worth of goods for non-payment, Mr Finlayson said: “The true position of the company is that like everyone else, the company is going through a difficult time. “But we’re no worse than anyone else; any of our competitors on Bay Street. That’s really the truth.” When asked whether Solomon’s Mines planned any further downsizing in terms of store or staff numbers, Mr Finlayson replied: “I’m not dismissing any possibilities. It depends on what the economic climate is like. “We are proactive people, so if we see the economy is not going in a direction that makes sense, we will take proactive measures.” Adding that almost every Bahamian business was experiencing a decline in sales, Mr Finlayson said that, as far as Solomon’s Mines was concerned: “It depends on the month. We’ve experienced drops in sales from 30-50 per cent, compared to where we were last year. The environment is tough. “Everyone has to put their best foot forward and ride out these tough times. We’re a pretty hardy people, and in a few years we’ll be reminiscing, look ing back at these days.” Sir Garet’s family company, the Associated Bahamian Brewers and Distillers (ABDAB Mines in 2004 from Martin Solomon, the company having formerly been a division of Solomon’s Brothers. The acquisition, thought to have cost more than $30 million, was financed via a syndicated bank loan put together by Bank of the Bahamas International, with extra financing provided by Scotiabank and the proceeds from a boardroom restructuring at Burns House that saw Heineken/Commonwealth Brewery take over dayto-day management responsi bility. Solomon’s Mines sees 30-50% sales declines * President says luxury goods retailer going through ‘tough time’ but doing ‘no worse’ than rivals * Situation ‘a joke’ compared to what he and Sir Tiger went through in 1990s with Burns House, ABC Motors S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B

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OVER the past several weeks, I along with other local pundits have been warning Bahamians that we face our most difficult economic challenge to date. For those in their mid-40s (and above it’s probably the most difficult economic period that they will encounter in their lifetime. G G r r e e a a t t D D e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n During current public discussions, comparisons to the ‘Great Depression’ (1930s monplace. The Great Depression was a worldwide economic downturn, starting in most places in 1929 and ending at different times in the late 1930s for most countries. It was the largest and most important economic depression in the 20th century, and is used in the 21st century as an example of how far the world's economy can fall. The Great D epression originated in the U S, with historians citing ‘Black T uesday’, which was the stock market crash on October 29, 1929, as its beginning. During the course of the depression, international trade declined by about 70 per cent, heavy industry and construction came to a ‘near halt’ and credit dried up. While there are similarities between the 1930s and the conditions we now face, there are important differences that exist today which are worthy of not ing. They will be explored in today’s column. G G r r e e a a t t R R e e c c e e s s s s i i o o n n This current downturn is now more frequently being dubbed the ‘great recession’ because it is expected to last longer than any ‘post war’ downturn. According to Chris Isidore, CNNMoney.com’s senior writer: “In terms of length, the longest post-Depression eco nomic decline was 16 months, which occurred in both the 1973-75 and 1981-82 recessions. (This recession began in December 2007, is currently in its 17th month, and the consensus is that it could be some 24 to 30 months in duration.) “The current recession is also more widespread than any other since the Depression. The Federal Reserve's readings show that 86 per cent of industries have cut back production since November (2008 most widespread reduction in the 42 years the Fed has tracked this figure. “What's more, every state reported an increase in unemployment this past December, the first time that has happened in the 32 years that records for unemployment in each state have been kept.” D D i i f f f f e e r r e e n n c c e e s s b b e e t t w w e e e e n n t t h h e e 1 1 9 9 3 3 0 0 s s a a n n d d n n o o w w Depth of Contraction Once again, referring to Isidore’s article, so far during this recession, the US gross domestic product, the broadest measure of economic activity, has dropped about 1.7 per cent thus far, measured from the top of the last economic cycle to the current position. According to surveys conducted by the National Association for Business Economics, the consensus suggests a 3.4 per cent decline in GDP over the life of this recession. While a 3.4 per cent drop in GDP would be the worst since World War II, and far worse than the average ‘post war’ recession. This contrasts with the exper ience of the US economy duri ng 1929 to 1933, when the economy shrank by more than 26 per cent. Therefore, in terms of magnitude, this downturn is not expected to be anywhere as deep as the ‘great one’. S ocial safety nets Since the 1930s, significant ‘safety nets’ such as Unemployment Insurance and Social Security payments have been instituted. Also, the size of the US government at the federal,s tate and local level is far larg er than during the 1930s. While I am not a proponent of large governments, the fact of the matter is that in times of economic crisis the US government will try to maintain employment levels and create ‘make work’ programmes. While it is not good long-term economic poli cy, it could serve to shorten the negative impact of the current economic downturn. Stimulus Spending The massive stimulus programme thus far will pump trillions of dollars into the US economy, with many of those dollars being earmarked for programmes never tried before. The end result is that this will swell the supply of money in the system. By way of contrast, the money supply tightened during the Great Depression. For the sake of balance, the stimulus spending (borrowed money) will cause higher levels of inflation in the future, but that is a discussion for another day. International Coordination Finally, what is most note worthy is the unprecedented degree of international coordination of economic policies, and the global resolve to work through this recession. Two of the greatest ‘policy mistakes’ of the 1930s were the imposition of stiff tariffs on international trade and government-imposed limits on prices and production. Both of these mistakes are unlikely to be repeated in the current environment. E E c c o o n n o o m m i i c c c c h h a a l l l l e e n n g g e e s s y y e e s s , , e e c c o o n n o o m m i i c c m m e e l l t t d d o o w w n n n n o o I wish to categorically state that the current downturn will not last indefinitely, and that there will be economic recovery. Recessions (economic downturns) are normal components of economic cycles. The capitalist system, historically, goes through a period of (what I call) rebalancing, which enables it to commence a new cycle of growth and prosperity. It is during this period of rebalancing, such as what we are currently facing, that we have to retool and refocus our economy to succeed in the new period ahead. H owever, if we do not retool o r refocus, then we will not reap m aximum benefits from the recovery phase. For instance, low productivity levels within the Bahamian workforce is a perpetual problem that we ‘sweep under the rug’ at every opportunity. This productivity shortfall has its roots in our broken educational system, dysfunctional family structure, misplaced value system and declining work ethicall of which are very complex social issues with no quick fixes. Crime is another problem that is slowly strangling our society. Crime, and the per ception of uncontrolled levels of crime, will increasingly become a major disincentive to new foreign and domestic investment. Policymakers, you’d better ‘smell the coffee’. However, in the absence of ‘quick fixes’ there must be the political resolve to systemati cally address these issues and effect positive, sustainable change. We need to be ever mindful that when good times return, we must save more and invest more for our long-term financial stability. The challenge is to start with a realistic assessment of where we are, then to formulate a bipartisan action plan to reposition the economy for the benefit of all Bahamians. In conclusion, within the con text of our reality, we must be positive about the future but honest about the changes needed to ensure that the future is a bright one. Until next week N N B B : : L L a a r r r r y y R R . . G G i i b b s s o o n n , , a a C C h h a a r r t t e e r r e e d d F F i i n n a a n n c c i i a a l l A A n n a a l l y y s s t t , , i i s s v v i i c c e e p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t p p e e n n s s i i o o n n s s , , C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l P P e e n n s s i i o o n n s s S S e e r r v v i i c c e e s s ( ( B B a a h h a a m m a a s s ) ) , , a a w w h h o o l l l l y y o o w w n n e e d d s s u u b b s s i i d d i i a a r r y y o o f f C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l G G r r o o u u p p I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l , , w w h h i i c c h h o o w w n n s s A A t t l l a a n n t t i i c c M M e e d d i i c c a a l l I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e a a n n d d i i s s a a m m a a j j o o r r s s h h a a r r e e h h o o l l d d e e r r o o f f S S e e c c u u r r i i t t y y & & G G e e n n e e r r a a l l I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e C C o o m m p p a a n n y y i i n n t t h h e e B B a a h h a a m m a a s s . . T T h h e e v v i i e e w w s s e e x x p p r r e e s s s s e e d d a a r r e e t t h h o o s s e e o o f f t t h h e e a a u u t t h h o o r r a a n n d d d d o o n n o o t t n n e e c c e e s s s s a a r r i i l l y y r r e e p p r r e e s s e e n n t t t t h h o o s s e e o o f f C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l G G r r o o u u p p I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l o o r r a a n n y y o o f f i i t t s s s s u u b b s s i i d d i i a a r r y y a a n n d d / / o o r r a a f f f f i i l l i i a a t t e e d d c c o o m m p p a a n n i i e e s s . . P P l l e e a a s s e e d d i i r r e e c c t t a a n n y y q q u u e e s s t t i i o o n n s s o o r r c c o o m m m m e e n n t t s s t t o o r r l l g g i i b b s s o o n n @ @ a a t t l l a a n n t t i i c c h h o o u u s s e e . . c c o o m m . . b b s s C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Look beyond challenges to fix internal problems I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s Financial Focus By Larry Gibson

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 3B :$17(' %DKDPDV)RRGHUYLFHVKDVDDFDQF\IRUD 3URIHVVLRQDO)RRGHUYLFHHSUHVHQWDWLYH 5HTXLUHPHQWV 0LQLPXPRIKUHHf
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same boat’ given the tough international economy. Credit In fact, Moody’s latest credit opinion on the Bahamas’ sovereign credit rating, painted an optimistic picture of this nation’s 2009 economic prospects, predicting it would enjoy 1 per cent GDP growth. However, the international credit rating acknowledged that a contraction in the Bahamian economy, or negative growth, was “possible if the [international] crisis continues to deepen”. Moody’s said: “The fiscal numbers show slippage, mainly due to higher expenditures. In the first six months of the 20082009 fiscal year, the central government deficit amounted to $135 million, 36 per cent higher than the same period in 20072008. On a yearly basis, government revenues and expen ditures increased 6.7 per cent and 1.9 per cent, respectively. Debt And Moody’s added: “Although government debt as a percentage of revenues is trending downwards since 2003, at an estimated 180 per cent for 2008 it is one of the highest in its peer group. This condition exacerbates fiscal spending rigidities, and is potentially troublesome given [the Bahamas] exposure to natural disasters and external shocks. “Susceptibility to event risks that could suddenly lead to a multiple-notch adjustment in the country's ratings, however, is judged to be low relative to the universe of rated countries.” But Mr Smith said there was no immediate likelihood of ad owngrade to the Bahamas’ sovereign credit rating, or the outlook for this nation. He explained: “I think they would watch it for a longer period of time, because the feeling is that the recession will not lastf orever and some extraordinary m easures have to be taken. “But if it trends in a way where we’re unable to reduce the rate of increase in the debt, we may have to take a second look, but I don’t think they’ll do that for at least six months. “They will look at tourism expenditure and see whether we’re creating sufficient foreign exchange earnings to settle the external debt. They’ll be keeping a close eye on what we’re doing here, and if the foreign debt increases to a point where it eats up too much of the for eign reserves.” Still, Mr Smith said foreign currency-denominated debt that which the Government and its corporations owe to foreign investors and financiers was “a very small component” of this nation’s $3 billion-plus national debt/ With most of the national debt held domestically, the Bahamas had created sufficient room to enable it to take on additional foreign currency borrowing if circumstances warranted. Given the economic downturn, and its impact on government revenues and spending plans, Mr Smith said the GFS fiscal deficit for 2008-2009, initially projected to be around 2 per cent, was likely to come in around 3-4 per cent. That measurement strips out the cost ofd ebt redemption. Eye “One thing we’ve got to keep an eye on is the slowdown in foreign direct investment,” MrS mith told Tribune Business. We’ve traditionally used that to bridge the gap on the balance of payments, and if that slows down, it could cause the balance of payments gap to grow.” While the generally perceived wisdom was that a turnaround in the US economy would spark a recovery in the Bahamas, Mr Smith said the effect might not be “one-to-one”, and cautioned that matters might not be the same as they once were. M inister The former finance minister said it was possible that Americans might choose to vacation at home, or in other foreign countries, more and not come as frequently or in the same numbers to the Bahamas. As for foreign direct investment, Mr Smith said this might not return in the same volume as before the credit crunch, as lenders and investors would take into account sovereign and cross-border risks. “I don’t know if it’s going to come back to the Bahamas or the Caribbean area in the same fashion, for the simple reason that in earlier years, prior to the fallout, little attention was paid to sovereign risk or cross-border risk,” Mr Smith said. “They will pay more attention to that.” He pointed out that prior to t he downturn, Bahamas-based banks and financial institutions had been reluctant to lend to Family Island-based investment projects, because of the difficulty in obtaining a return on the funds sunk into the ground.T hat attitude was now likely to b e shared by foreign investors and lenders. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Moody’s: Bahamas fiscal deficit doubles To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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Post-acquisition, the luxury retail group embarked on a period of rapid store expansion, but was soon forced to scale back with the closure of outlets at Caves Village, Blue Lagoon, Hurricane Hole and four Bay S treet stores. The number of store brands w as also rationalised, and The Tribune reported earlier this y ear that Solomon’s Mines staff were complaining that the company was late in meeting its payroll adding to business community speculation that the company was a troubled business. Mr Finlayson yesterday said that when he and his father acquired Solomon’s Mines, the group had 28 stores. This num-b er expanded to a peak of 45, but had since been reduced to 29 stores as the company “closed locations that did not make sense”. He added: “We had to close the location at Caves Village. The timing was wrong. Caves Village was beautiful, Sandyport, too, but the timing was wrong. Five years from now, it will be a nice spot for Bahamians as well as tourists.” Mr Finlayson said Solomon’s Mines currently employed 230240 staff, having reduced this number by a third from the 350360 it inherited when acquiring the business. He added: “In talking to our colleagues on Bay Street, they say these are the worst times they have seen. I’ve not been in the luxury goods business [long enough to make that judgment], but these are tough times, no two ways about it.” Mr Finlayson, though, drew parallels with the early 1990s, when his father’s ABC Motors was “going under”, and there was speculation Burns House was failing. “Today, Burns House is one of the strongest companies in the country,” he said, adding that shareholders in ABDAB, which holds a 60 per cent stake in that firm and 47 per cent in Commonwealth Brewery, had done well. As for Solomon’s Mines, Mr Finlayson said: “This is a turnaround process. This is not the first time we’ve been through this. This is a joke in comparison to what we went through with Burns House. We are focused on what will happen at the end.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 5B Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today !BSP Job #: CTS-9-N003 JM# 8634 Client: Comfort Suites Description: Stay In Paradise 1/4 pg Bleed: non Color: 1C Black Specs: PDFX1A Mech #3 Date: 2/25/2009 Time: 1:30 Mech Person: GUDimensions: 5.75in x 10.5 in Issue: Nassau Tribune 3/2/2009 Closing: 2/26/09 *$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. G u s U g a r t e 2 / 2 5 4 p m CTS-9-N003_NassauGuardian.indd 2 2/25/09 4:14:07 PM Yacht registry’s ‘great synergy’ opportunities Deveaux replied: “Based on the preliminary information I have, we would need to amend the BMA Act to accommodate this class of ships, and may have to look at other Acts to provide incentives to get these ships here.” The mega yacht market has obvious links to the Bahamas high-end second home real estate industry, given that these property owners are likely to own such vessels. They are also likely to own private planes, and represent the sort of clients the Bahamian financial services industry is looking to encourage to domicile here as their primary residence, following their assets here. “The [BMA] Board feels that between mega yachts, wealthy second home owners and persons with planes, there’s an opportunity for great synergies in having the means to attract this class of business,” Dr Deveaux said of the yacht registry plans. “We have a number of proposals from the private sector expressing interest in it, and they’re willing to assist the Board in looking at it. Once they make a strategic determination as to which direction to go in, we will do our part. “We have a strong interest from the Government side, and the Board has set up a small group to look at it.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Solomon’s Mines sees 30-50% sales declines F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .951.28Abaco Markets1.281.280.002000.1270.00010.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1511.31Cable Bahamas11.3111.310.001.3090.2508.62.21% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7 .446.45Commonwealth Bank (S16.456.450.000.4380.05014.70.78% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.362.450.090.0990.05224.72.12% 3.002.09Doctor's Hospital2.092.090.000.2400.0408.71.91% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.24018.53.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.100.031,6640.3370.15015.12.94% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.44891.3847Colina Money Market Fund1.44891.064.63 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S19-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 24 42 2 -3 32 2 3 3 2 23 3 2 20 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 27-Mar-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 27 70 0 1 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 24 4 2 2-3 35 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 6 6 4 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K KE E T T S S 2 2 4 4 2 23 3 9 9 6 6-4 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O O N N I I A A L L 2 24 4 2 2 5 50 02 2 7 7 5 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 805.27 | YTD -3.55% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSWEDNESDAY, 8 APRIL 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,623.20 | CHG 0.63 | %CHG 0.04 | YTD -89.16 | YTD % -5.21BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases A global leader in audit, tax and advisory services A ssistant Manager/Manager, Restructuring The Assistant Manager/Manager will report to the Dir e ctors of KPMG Restructur ing Ltd.. The role has p rimary responsibility for managing a portfolio of liquidation and corpor ate restructuring clients. Specific duties include managing: xliquidation cases, including both voluntary liquidations and court appointments xrestructuring engagements for lenders, providi ng independent business reviews of borrowers’ businesses, and assisting lenders in developing and implemen ting options with respect to their financial exposure to such borrowers xrestructuring advisory services to companies with financial issues xcomplex and lengthy litigation issues in several jurisdictions xa portfolio of restructuring clients, including financial matters su ch as work in progress, and a ccounts receivable xrestructuring professionals in their work, and i nvolvement in the internal performance appraisal process xbusiness development initiatives Applicants must be a university graduate and a memb er of a recognized accountan cy or insolvency body in addition to holding a minimum of five to seven years re levant work experience, with preferably three or m ore of those in a restructuring role at a comparable level. This position requires attention to detail, strong financial and writing skills, the ability to work at one's own initiative, and th e ability to meet tight deadlines. KPMG offers a competitive compensation and benefits package inclusive of medical and pension plans. _______________________________________Applicants should submita cover letter, resume,a copy of their degree and professional certifications and a copy of theirtranscripts to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or jalightbourne@kpmg.com.bs no later than Friday 24 April, 2009 . 2009. KPMG, aBahamas partnership, and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a S wiss cooperative.All rights reserved. ‘Urgent action’ needed on $8bn NIB shortfall said of a likely increase in the insurable wage ceiling, which has already been flagged as a likely reform by NIB director,A lgernon Cargill. “The huge deficit can only be p lugged by increasing the contribution rate or increasing the [insurable wage] threshold,” Mr D’Aguilar said. “The easy way to do it is by increasing the threshold, because people earning more will then be contributing more.” Laying out what he perceived to be the main options facing the NIB scheme, Mr D’Aguilar said they were to either increase the insurable wage ceiling beyond the current $400 per month; increase the contribution rate; reduce the amount of benefits paid out; or increase the retirement age. A combina tion of some of these measures, or perhaps all, might be imple mented, although increasing the retirement age beyond 65 yearsold is likely to be difficult. Tribune Business reported previously that Mr Cargill, in an address to the Rotary Club of West Nassau, said that NIB had recommended to the Government increasing the insur able wage ceiling from $400 to $600 per month immediately, with annual increases thereafter that were linked to average wage rises. This newspaper revealed last week how the eighth actuarial review of the NIB fund, which has yet to be officially pub lished, had projected that the social security system would suf fer from a $7.868 billion solvency deficiency/shortfall in the next 60 years if reforms were not enacted. The NIB Reserve Fund was expected to deplete rapidly over this timespan, and the actuarial review’s findings, contained in the financial statements to NIB’s 2007 annual report, said: “The projections were extended for a 60-year period, and indicate that the present value of future expenditure will exceed the opening reserves and the present value of future contributions by $7.868 billion. “The report further indicates that the current contribution rate would be insufficient to pay benefits in the long-term.” However, in a statement issued in response to Tribune Business’s revelations, NIB’s inhouse actuary, Derek Osborne, said rate increases would be needed as the social security s cheme matures, with the r eserve fund currently possessi ng $1.6 billion in total assets. He added that the full funding of public social security schemes, such as NIB, was not essential, especially given the economic, political and investment risks associated with the build-up of a massive asset pool. If the NIB plan was fully funded, Mr Osborne said, it would have assets more than five times its current size, with no opportunity to invest them prudently. Accordingly, the NIB contribution rate was initially set well below the pro jected benefits costs. The NIB actuary insisted that the Government would never allow the scheme to go broke, and would enact the necessary reforms in time. The shortfall identified in the eighth actuarial review, Mr Osborne added, “does not infer in any way that the National Insurance Fund is currently in crisis or needs to make drastic changes to benefit provisions or the contribution rate to reduce this projected deficit”. Meanwhile, describing NIB as “a very important entity”, Mr D’Aguilar said: “This is the only vehicle most Bahamians use to save for the future, and we as a people don’t do that. It’s impor tant to get that to work. “Urgent action is needed if that number [$8 billion] is true, and, obviously, a plan. How are we going to get there? How are we going to solve this problem?” Mr D’Aguilar added that the actuarial projections were far enough away to make Bahamians think the issue would not affect them, or that it would be solved well in advance. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Bahamian fir m wins dismissal of ‘insolvent’ insur er case Grand Bahama-based Bahamas Film Studios, Ross Fuller, a defendant in the liquidators’ action, having allegedly acted as “consultant and/or broker” to Condor Guaranty and Condor Insurance. Mr Fuller has strenuously denied the allega tions against him. Among the assets allegedly “wrongfully transferred to Condor Guaranty”, the Bahamian company, were some 18 million shares in Ashby Corporation. Ashby was the ultimate Bermuda-domiciled parent for the Bahamas Film Studios. Also named as a Condor Insurance asset, and which the liquidators want returned from Condor Guaranty, is a $650,000 note receivable from Gold Rock Creek and Stockton, Fuller & Co. Gold Rock Creek was the immediate holding company for the Bahamas Film Studios, while Stockton, Fuller & Co is the investment banking firm of Mr Fuller. Condor Guaranty was alleged to have been incorporated in the Bahamas as an International Business Company (IBC operating in the reinsurance business and offering financial guarantees and surety bonds.

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net FROM the day we are born most of our parents try to give us the best in healthy foods, especially fruits and vegetables. How ever, much has changed over the past few decades in the quality of fruits and vegetables produced in the country and around the world causing concerns that fruits and veg etables might not be as healthy as we all thought. Published in the February issue of the Jour nal of HortScience, a new study reports that non-organic American produce contains between 5 per cent and 40 per cent fewer nutrients and m`inerals (including magnesium, iron, calcium and zinc) than it did just 50 years ago. That is because chemical fertilisers and pesticides make modern crops grow faster. Early harvest times, while increasing pro ductivity, deny fruits and vegetables the time they need to absorb nutrients. As most of our produce is imported, Doctor of Natural Health, Joyce Adderley, said Bahamians should be concerned about the kinds of fruits and veggies they eat. “It is evident that nonorganic foods are grown with chemicals for obvious reasons, and that is to increase crop yield. The Envi ronmental Protection Agency says pesticides may block the body’s uptake of important food nutrients which are critical for proper growth and wreak havoc on development by permanently altering the way a child’s system functions,” Mrs Adderley said. Moreover, while fertilisers are used to make plants bigger and better, the two do not necessarily go together. “Jumbo-sized produce actually contains more ‘dry matter,’ or carbohydrates than anything else, diluting the mineral content and health benefit of eating down on your favorite fruit,” Mrs Adderley said. To get the minerals you need from your produce, the study suggests buying organic fruits and vegetables, or even growing your own. This is exactly what Mrs Adderley is urging Bahamians to do. “For one to get the most nutrients from eating fruits and vegetables I recommend eating organically grown produce whenever possible. Recently a symposium was held by the American Association for Advancement of Science (AAAS Food Quality, and the Future of Food” on February 13. Scientists agree that organic farming delivers healthier, richer soil and nutritionally enhanced food. The term organic refers to food that is grown without pesti cides, synthetic nitrogen fertilisers, fungicides, or herbicides. Organic foods are mini mally processed, with no artificial ingredients, preservatives, or irradiation,” Mrs Adderley said. Mrs Adderley said she believes that farm ers should improve the soil by using natural organic fertilisers. “There are many natural fertilisers on the market that increases the taste, color, size, and the nutritional contents of fruits and vegetables. One such fertiliser is Natural Fertiliser Plus, which comes from very cold ocean water. Specifically the North Atlantic, the main ingredient is Ascophyllum Nodosum which is the most nutrient dense seaweed variety available. The special seaweed is blended in a proprietary process with emul sified ocean fish providing the macronutrients in the formula which are a source of organic nitrogen, potash and phosphorus,” Mrs Adderley said. Doctor Adderley said organic foods also have a higher nutritional value which is important for growing children and adults. “According to Supernatual Home, an organically grown apple can have as much as 300 per cent more vitamin C and 61 per cent greater calcium content than a conventional or non organic apple. The amount of calcium in organic spinach is seven times greater than nonorganic spinach and potassium is an astounding 117 times greater in the organic. This is time to start eating our local spinach that is 100 per cent organic,” Mrs Adderley said. In the New York Times, March 16 edi tion, nutritionist and author Jonny Bowden has created a list of 11 best foods that are loaded with nutrients (and are readily available here in the Bahamas): BEETS – rich source of folate as well as natural red pigments that may be cancer fighters. CABBAGE – loaded with nutrients like sulforaphane, a chemical that may boost cancer-fighting enzymes. POMEGRANATE JUICE – may lower blood pressure and loaded with antioxidants DRIED PLUMS – they are packed with antioxidants PUMPKIN SEEDS – the most nutritious part of the pumpkin and packed with magnesium; high levels of these minerals are associated with lower risk of early death. SARDINES – are high in omega-3, and calcium. They also contain iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper and manganese as well as a full complement of B vitamins. PUMPKIN – a low calorie vegetable that is high in fiber and immune-stimulating vitamin A. FROZEN BLUEBERRIES – associated with better memory in animal studies. SWISS CHARD – a leafy green vegetable packed with caroteniods that protect aging eyes. CINNAMON – may help control blood sugar and cholesterol TURMERIC – the “superstar of spices,” it may have anti-inflammatory and anti cancer properties. A taste for greatness n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net F OR one very ambitious and talente d t een, hard work and hours of training have paid off as she was fortunat e in winning t he r ecent K e izer U ni versity cooking challenge held at the Adastra Gardens last month. Walking away with the top prize of a $10,000 scholarship to Keizer’s Miami campus, is Aquinas College senior Deandra Rolle who explained that her road to cooking and being an all around model student started from early on, with her parents being a driving force in her commitment. Deandra said from since she could remember, s he recalls watching her mother and father Shena and Michael Rolle in the family kitchen putting together cakes, cookies, and other dishes from scratch. Her interest in the culinary arts was seriously triggered after making a cheese cake with her father, which before had seemed like a major challenge, but proved to her that she had what itt ook to become a professional chef. She said: “When I started at Aquinas, my mother used to let me cook a lot, which at first used to be a chore for me, but then after a while I realised the joy in it because my family would tell me how good the food was, and that was another real boost for me.” Another major influence in honing her culinary talents came through her cooking instructor Margaret Bennet, who explained that Deandra’s passion for the art of cooking has remained consistent over the past three years she has known her. Mrs Bennett said: “When she came to grade ten, her goal of becoming a chef from then to now has not wavered, so because of that I have continued to work with her.” M rs Bennet entered Deandra in her first c ooking competition in February (Ministry of Agriculture Culinary and Bread making competition) 2009, and said although Deandra did not win she saw that Deandra was ready to compete with others in her level, which meant entering her in the upcoming Keizer competition. D eandra said: “I happened to discover that the competition was offering a scholarship, so I went to Mrs Bennett and told her that she might as well enter my name, and told her that I felt like I had a good chance." What she did not not know was that she had already been selected by her instructor to take part in the competition. “At first I wasn’t expecting to win because I saw the judges were picking the top seven finalists, and I was sure plenty others were going to enter.” Although apprehensive, Deandra said she told her parents about the competition and its challenge of creating a unique dish. As they were just as excited about the competition as she was, the decision was then made for her to commit to victory. As the competition required participants to present an all Bahamian dish, for her the inclusion of conch and grouper seemed an obvious choice. She said coming up with a name for her dish was somewhat of a challenge, but with the help of her father she was able to settleo n C razy Cabbage Fiesta, with Carmichael S eafood Surprise with Cultural rice. T his was a mix of a cabbage salad with grouper, conch, lobster, and rice blended with broccoli, corn, and other vegetables. After winning the competition, Deandra said never did she imagine achieving her dreams would feel so rewarding. D eandra said her school and church life adds much more activities to her days and weekends than most other teens. Apart from being a member of her schools choir, she is also a band member, an usher at her church, a youth choir member, and a young Christian. Hoping to be a role model at her school and community, Deandra said she hopes that this latest achievement will inspire other young girls and boys to also strive for greatness and to work on becoming all they can. Principal for Aquinas Shona Knowles said, Deandra's recent accomplishment is important to not only her and the school, but to others in the community because it proves that believing in one's self with added determination can go a long way. Ms Knowles added: "In the case of Deandra, there will be a feature of her in our next memory book and also a feature on the school's website and the Catholic Newspaper 'The Bahamas Catholic.'" Ms Knowles said while working with D eandra over the last six years, she has i dentified her student’s leadership and role model abilities from the start, and said that she is one to be depended on and expressed high hopes for Deandra’s future. Ms Knowles said: "She is very focused and has always been, not just as a 12 grad e r but since she came here in grade seven. "Even before she came to this school, I know about her and how dedicated she was, and she has blossomed into a beautiful young lady." Deandra who intends to attend Keizer in the fall said she looks forward to pursuing her calling in the culinary arts, and hopes to one day start her own restaurant made for and operated by Bahamians. T h e T r i b u n e OR GANIC FRUITS AND VEGGIES: A healthier choice FROM left to right Shona Knowles, Principal at Aquinas College DeandraR olle, Winner of the K eizer cooking competition Margaret Bennet, Deandra’s cooking coach and culinary instructor at Aquinas College. MUCH has changed over the past few decades in the quality of fruits and vegetables produced in the country and around the world causing concerns that fruits and vegetables might not be as healthy as we all thought.

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M rs Foxton, began her jour ney from corporate life at Sara Lee in the United States to the secluded Adagio Beach Cot-t age Studio and Gallery on Grand Bahama where she now calls home. “I have been a full time artist for 5 years now. It is really quite out island-ish here i n East End Grand Bahama. I had a career in business and I was receiving all kinds of faxes and product sheets so I hadp iles of paper. We had to take that to the local dump and we didn’t want to add to that garbage that you see at the dump. I found out about all the places around the world that specialised in handmade paper. I saw the opportunity not only to use discards from our environment but to create practical works of art not just wall art,” Mrs Foxton said. As Mrs Foxton learned more about the paper making technique, she started adding fibers from natural leaves and recycled papers. “From the paper we recycle flowers, leaves and seaweed that we collect from our landscape, I try to show my devo tion to tapping into that which is around me for my artistry,” Mrs Foxton said. Mrs Foxton’s first exhibit was in the 2004 with the Grand Bahama Artists Association (GBAA several solo exhibitions in Nassau and Abaco and is current ly showing at the GBAA group Exhibition at the Glory Banks Art Gallery in Grand Bahama. The process that Mrs Foxton uses to create her hand made pieces is the same as the Chinese who invented hand papermaking in 105 AD. “My artwork is not only tru ly ‘Made in the Bahamas’ in that my canvas and medium a re created from local leaves, flowers and gifts from the sea, but are also environmentally conscious. One of the wonderful pleasures for me is get ting in there with your hands and really working the piece. Handmade paper allows won derful textures. It can go from very thin pieces of paper to very thick pieces. I make 3D pieces also that I call Buoys.T hese Buoys are usually 6ft by 4ft. I also do large baskets which are made from banana leaves or hibiscus leaves,” Mrs Foxton said. Mrs Foxton said the before process in creating a piece is very long and tedious, causing one of her completed pieces to cost between $100 to $2,000. “The process is long. Depending on which leaf is used, it takes a long time to break down. They may be in my back yard breaking down for two to three months. They are very smelly and I use a lot of water to keep it fresh. After that I cook them for between an hour to a whole day. It is a very time consuming process,” Mrs Foxton said. One of Mrs Foxton’s biggest inspirations for her art she said is the turquoise waters of the Bahamas and the vibrant earth tones of the beaches. “I had a piece called ‘changing water’ that represented our changing turquoise waters here in the Bahamas. I love earth tones as well, which was displayed in my ‘Tred Carefully’ piece. Those tones represent walking on the beach and the changing colours of the sand when it is wet or dry,” Mrs Foxton. When it comes to the colours and textures of her art work, Mrs Foxton said she enjoys giving her pieces “touchability” for the clients. “The sea grape, hibiscus, banana leaf, every leaf makesa different colour. I may mix a little colour in a few but not all of them,” Mrs Foxton said. Mrs Foxton said the art scene in the Grand Bahama has been stepping up a lot from the early years than when she first started. She said she will continue her artistic development with international teachers in a variety of mediums to show her work. “I am delighted that the journey continues every day with nature, actually reusing nature, being the source for my artistic inspiration. My creative energies are stirred when I experiment with that which may be considered discards from the environment, s eaweed washed on the shore, clippings from the garden hedge or leaves and flowers on the ground. I attempt with my artworks to bring pleasure and a feeling that all is well with the world. This may not be the reality but just the process of making the paper a rtistry and being in the moment makes it so for me and I want to share that feel ing through my art,” Ms Foxton said. Mrs Foxton is a member of the Bahamas National Trust, the International Association of Papermakers, the Americ an Papermakers Association, the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas and the Grand Bahama Artists Association. According to the Bahamas Debutante Foundation, the word “debutante” was formed from the word debut “meaning first appearance”. A debutante is one who is making their first appearance and thus, the word debutante is a young lady entering society filled with social graces. This year the ball was held under the patronage of Minister of State for Labour and Social Development, Loretta Butler -Turner. In her message to the debutantes, Mrs ButlerTurner congratulated the girls on their entrance into womanhood. “I believe that the molding of the next generation of Bahamian women is both too large and too important to be left solely in the hands of any one entity. We as a nation need to be involved in church, government and civic organisations if our young women are to flourish and advance,” Mrs Turner said. The distinguished debutante of the year 2009 title went to Shaynora Brown. Ms Brown, who aspires to become a neonatal nurse, is a 17year -old student of St Johns College and is the daughter of Lenora and Shayne Brown. Ms Brown’s hobbies include traveling, reading books and magazines, and dancing. The Bahamas Debutante foundation is a non profit organisation that aims for social transformation and engages in education to train, support and collaborate with women for social change locally and globally. C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009, PAGE 9B n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net IT seems the spring seas on has ushered a non-stop s pirit of life and entertainm ent to our shores, with a never ending flow of parties, high profile events, and a host of activities to excite every flavor. Included thisw eek in our T hings 2 Do c ountdown, are a range of events from jazz concerts and comedy shows, to VIP parties and music videos. 1 . K appa Alpha Psi fratern ity is hosting its fourth annual Impromptu, which is a n evening of jazz, wine, art, and soul. Set to kick-off this Saturday at 7.30pm at the Marley Resort, the event will feature music by TingumD em, Philip Bowe, and the r e-launch of the Kenesis art experience by Scharad Lightbourne. Tickets are priced at $25 general admiss ion, and $300 for VIP pre ferred seating (for four o ne bottle of wine complementary, and are available att he Marley Resort or from fraternity members. Pro c eeds for the event will go to the Guide Right programme. 2. Phat Groove and Fan tasy entertainment are bringing to the stage popular c omedian Eddie Griffin, who is best known for his sitcom Malcolm and Eddie , and his 2002 film Undercover Brothe r . The show which is set for this Saturday at the SheratonB allroom for 9pm, will be preceded by a party on Frid ay at the Uptown nightclub and then an after party-the d etails for that event to be announced later. Tickets for t he comedy show start at $45 general admission, and $2000 VIP which includes free valet, express seating, a fter party access, 2 bottles of wines, and back stage access for up to ten people. 3. Budding Freeport cul ture artist Jah Doctrine is hosting a special party recording for his newest single Nuff Gal at the “White House” in Stapleton Gardens opposite the park on Mckin ney Avenue this Saturday. The event which starts at 9.30pm, will also feature models from Renaissance Models, Massyka, Vicky Pepp, and DJs from Quality Sounds. Free admittance for ladies up to midnight, and drinks free all night, so ladies and gents come out to show some love for this local artist. 4. For all swimming lovers, the much anticipated annual Caribbean Free Trade Association (CARIFTA Swimming Championships iis set to run April 16 to 19 in Saventa, Aruba. From the Bahamas, there are 36 swimmers participating, with many of the events high lights and updates available on local networks. The event which also involves cultural exhibitions, foods, and activ ities is regionally supported and a great opportunity to see the talents, skills, and abilities of Caribbean Junior swimmers. 5. Last but certainly not least is the ultimate VIP affair set to unfold at the Bambu nightclub this Thurs day at 10pm. Champagne Dreams which is being produced by Alpha-Male Entertainment and Prezidential Promotions, will feature music from Canada’s own DJ Tilt, and is priced at $10 for men, and free until 11pm for ladies. The dress code for the event is “smart and sexy”, and security will be on site. T h e T r i b u n e THINGS 2 DO n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net ADORNING white gowns and sparkling tiaras, thirty two young ladies from various upbringings a ssembled at the Whyndam Nassau Resort on April 4 for their official coming out ceremony at the Bahamas Debutante Foundations 2009 Debutante Ball. Young ladies make their debut S HAYNORA BROWN D EBUTANTE OF THE YEAR FROM page 12 From trash to treasure DEL FOXTON

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By ALEX MISSICK T ribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net M EMBERS of Parliament serve their country and the community in which they grew up in or have come to love. Many times these personsl eave the lime light of politics and slip into the background of a vastly changing society. However, six former Members of Parliament for theM ontagu constituency were recently honoured for their years of service to the country during a s pecial dinner held at Montagu Gardens. ontagu emoirs The Montagu Constituency A ssociation paid tribute to Sir Kendal Isaacs, Sir William Allan, Sir Geoffrey Johnstone, J Henry Bostwick and Brent Symonette. These distinguished honourees were treated to an evening of refined music and entertainment by Donald Butler and the Montagu Quartet to dance the night away along with delectable dishes named in their honour during the event. The cleverly designed menu featured: Sir Geoffery’s mixed salad greens, Sir Kendal’s roasted beef in mushroom gravy, Hon Henry’s Golden Grouper Fingers, Sir Orville’s oven roasted stuffed turkey,Sir William’s Bahamian peas and rice, Hon Brent’s potatoes, broccoli and carrots and Montagu vanilla ice cream. Current Montagu MP Loretta Butler-Turner, in her message to the honourees, described the event as an evening to pause, celebrate, and pay homage to a very distinguished group of Bahamians. “Montagu’s former Members of Parliament are six outstanding men who have exem plified the principles of repre sentation of the people and devoted their lives to the deepening of the democratic process in our beloved Bahamas. Their services, both singularly and collectively have spanned far beyond the geographical and physical boundaries of any one con stituency despite the fact that it was the great constituency of Montagu that elected each o f them to the historical and hallowed chambers of Parliament,” Mrs ButlerTurner said. Sir Geoffrey Johnstone served as an MP for Montagu from 1967 to 1972, Sir Kendal Isaccs served from 1972 to 1977, Henry Bostwick served from 1977 to 1982, Sir Orville Turnquest served from 1982 to 1994, Sir William Allen served from 1995 to 2002 and Brent Symonette served from 2002 to 2007. Mr Symonette is currently the Member of Parliament for the St Anne’s constituency and the deputy prime minister and minister of foreign affairs. In his message to the honourees, chairman of the Montagu Constituency Association, Tim Lightbourn, said the examples that each honouree has set, if continued by future generations, will result in Montagu and the Bahamas going from strength to strength. “Our wonderful constituency has existed under the name Montagu since 1967 and from that time to the present, our former members of parliament have each given their all to ensure the best representa tion of it’s people and to guarantee that the area maintained its charm, prestige and vibrancy. It is with gratitude that we thank them for their service, not only to Montagu, but to the Commonwealth of the Bahamas in shaping what has become the best little country in the world,” Mr Lightbourn said. Celebrating a distinguished past M MONTAGUE Constituency Association Chairman,Tim Lightbourn. LORRAINE Lightbourn presents award to former Montague MP Brent Symonette. FORMER MP Sir William Allen accepts his Caricature. FORMER MP J Henry Bostwick accepts Award. THE PRITCHARDS greet Lady Ann Johnstone. F ORMER MP’S ( left to right) J Henry Bostwick, DPM Brent Symonette, Sir Orville Turnquest, Sir Geoffrey Johnstone and Sir William Allen.

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TREASURE C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E A taste for greatness See page eight WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2009 Motagu Memoirs: Celebrating a distinguished past See page 10 n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net AS the globe continues to go gr een, man y Bahamians ar e lear ning t hat t he en vir onment has its place in the world. Self taught ar tist Del F oxton, decided to take t he concept of helping the environment t o another level through her unique handmade, practical, functional paper art. Turning TRASH to SEE page nine DEL FOXTON’S hand made paper art is a truly environmentally friendly way of decorating your home with an array of colors, textures and items from the earth.