Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.116



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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com




SPORTS

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

Two men dead in
violenc

weekend



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE | CAR in which the stabbing aici tried foi escape sat ihe Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre.

Stabbing and shooting

aye)



BAHAMAS THIRD IN Ta TOG

NOW OPEN

Lynden Pindling

International Airport





gall

Homes are
threatened

by enormous
bush fire

Firefighters tackling
blazes over the weekend

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SEVERAL fires threatened
homes throughout New Provi-
dence yesterday despite the
efforts of firemen who have
been fighting them all week-
end.

According to fire officials,
one of them — an enormous
bush fire — was burning across



several hundred acres adjacent
to Carmichael Road, west of
Bacardi Road and east of
Coral Harbour.

Yesterday firefighters were “
prioritising” the protection of
threatened residences on the
southern side of Carmichael
Road.

“Two fire units and their
respective crews have been

SEE page 10

incidents claim lives

m@ By ALISON LOWE
and MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporters

VIOLENCE claimed the
lives of two men over the East-
er weekend prompting murder
inquiries into the fatal stabbing
of an 18-year-old man at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-
tre and the shooting of an
unidentified man found dead in
a car.

Richard Bremmer, 18, of

Pinewood Gardens, New Prov-
idence, was stabbed multiple
times in the chest after attend-
ing a car rally at the Queen Eliz-
abeth Sports Centre race track
on Sunday, prompting witness-
es to call for more vigilant polic-
ing of the popular sports arena.

Police maintain that the
teenager was attacked by a
group of men and stabbed sev-
eral times when he accidentally

SEE page eight

Relief for redundant hotel workers

Hundreds sign up for national

unemployment benefit scheme

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

HUNDREDS of unemployed persons signed up
for financial assistance from the first national unem-
ployment benefit scheme when registration opened
to the first wave of applicants on Saturday.

A total of 774 job seekers put their names down to
claim a share of the $20 million National Insurance
Unemployment Benefit Fund, as 489 made their
applications at four venues in New Providence and
285 attended two application centres in Grand
Bahama.

Labour Minister Dion Foulkes and National Insurance Board (NIB)
consultant actuary Derek Osborne said they had expected more to
attend the first registration day after the scheme was rushed through Par-
liament in recent months, but believe some may have been held back by



Dion Foulkes

m By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REDUNDANT hotel workers who lost their jobs in the economic slump
can claim up to $1,500 in benefits from a major relief programme launched
on Thursday.

The Bahamas Hotel and Allied Industries (BHAI) Health and Welfare

Benefits Fund announced the largest individual benefits assistance pay-
out in its history, as it will cover the mortgage payments, loans, utilities and

SEE page 10

The Taste
on
Tuesdays!!

Bovsa ny;

Ba witng
eyefelures 1 JS a
lEtoppinale

large
eaKele=s
medium.

oPeaG| absolutely)



tel ite Mey ime] Mitts lehtes

eis NESE? i)

a



CHILDREN meet the Easter Bunny at the weekend as the holiday was

celebrated at Ardastra Gardens.

e SEE PAGE SIX FOR MORE PHOTOS

Obama lifts several
key Cuba restrictions

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FULFILLING an election
promise on Cuba, President Oba-
ma yesterday lifted several key
restrictions to allow more travel,
telecommunication linkages and
remittances from the United
States to the island.

Signalling what some see as a
significant chink in the United
States policy hindering interac-

tion between Americans and
companies with the Communist-
run island, the decision rolls back
stricter rules established under
former President George W.
Bush. At present it applies only to
Cuban-Americans with families
in Cuba.

However, the President’s
announcement does not disman-
tle the broader, decades-long
trade embargo or general ban on

SEE page eight

SEE page 10

Easter holiday
bookings ‘far
atta mm ETT
expected’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

STAKEHOLDERS are
optimistic that the threatened
tourism industry is “beginning
to turn around a little bit”,
according to the Minister of
Tourism — with Easter holi-
day bookings having been “far
better than expected”.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
yesterday that there is “no
question” that Easter saw
much greater tourism arrival
numbers than those in the
industry had expected based
on what they were seeing ear-

SEE page eight



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NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

American visitor
dies after falling
off golf cart

A YOUNG American visitor
has died in Harbour Island as a
result of injuries suffered when
she fell off a golf cart.

Adela Holmes Cooke, 18, of
North Carolina was taken to a
local clinic where she was pro-
nounced dead, according to a
police report.

She had been vacationing with
friends at a private residence on
the Eleutheran island, a North
Carolina newspaper, The Post
and Courier, reported.

There was some discrepancy
over the date and time that the
incident occurred, with Bahamian
police stating that the 18 year old
fell off the cart, the most popular
form of transportation for tourists
on the island, at around 2am Fri-
day.

SEE page eight





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





















































@R | Appointment

Mr. T. Baswell Donaldson, CBE,
Chairman of Commonwealth Bank Limited, is pleased to
announce the following appointment:

Mrs. Mavis A. Burrows, MBA
Vice-President, Operations

Mrs. Mavis A. Burrows was appointed
to the position of Vice-President,
Operations on March 1, 2009.

Mrs. Burrows has over thirty-five years

of banking experience and has been

with Commonwealth Bank since 1987.

During her tenure with the bank, she

has held various management positions,
the most recent being the Assistant Vice-President, Operations.

Mrs.
management and leadership both locally and abroad, and achieved

Burrows has attended numerous courses and seminars in
a Masters of Business Administration Degree in 2004 from the
University of Miami. In 2008, she completed the Richard Ivey School

of Business Program for Executives in London Ontario, Canada.

Mrs. Burrows is married to Mr. E. K. Burrows and they have three
children and three grandchildren.

ee SN

3} AN 4 | ag RNC re eee CNET arta ae ee

www.combanklitd.com

BUT voices concern over

complaints of alleged
molestation of students

mg By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The removal
of three Grand Bahama teach-
ers over complaints of alleged
molestation of students is of
great concern for officials at the
Bahamas Union of Teachers in
Freeport.

Quentin LaRhoda, BUT area
vice president, said the union
does not support sexual conduct
between teachers and students,
but is also worried that its mem-
bers may be subject to false
accusations.

“The children are precious
and should be protected against
predators, but we have concerns
also about teachers being
accused falsely and having their
reputation tarnished,” he
said.

In view of this, Ministry of
Education officials recently
warned educators about ensur-
ing that their interactions with
students do not cause their



“The children
are precious
and should be
protected against
predators, but we
have concerns also
about teachers
being accused
falsely and having
their reputation
tarnished.”



Quentin LaRhoda,
BUT area vice president

integrity to be called into ques-
tion.

This comes after allegations
of molestation at Eight Mile
Rock High School surfaced in
January when two former male

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students made a complaint to
police, accusing a male teacher
of sexually molesting them for a
period eight years, which they
claim started when they were in
seventh grade.

Andre Birbal, the Trinidadian
teacher, accused of molesting
the two male students, fled the
country after submitting his res-
ignation in February.

He is currently being sought
by Bahamian police to be ques-
tioned in connection with accu-
sations of committing acts of
unnatural sexual intercourse.

In the meantime, Police have
also launched investigations into
alleged molestation complaints
against two other teachers at the
school. The teachers — a female
and another male — have been
removed from the school.

Mr LaRhoda said Education
Minister Carl Bethel, with psy-
chologist Dr David Allen, met
with Grand Bahama teachers to
give them proper guidelines
concerning their conduct with
students.

“Teachers were told to modi-
fy their behaviour so as not to
put themselves in a position
where their integrity will be put
in question,” he said.

Mr LaRhoda said that the
issue of molestation in the
schools is “new territory for
everyone” in the education sys-
tem.

“We need to try and find a
way to address this. We never
had circumstances where alle-
gations are so outlandish.

“We need all stakeholders
working together with the Min-
istry of Education to come up
with a plan or system to remove
predators from the system, but
at the same time protect people
who are being falsely accused,”
he said.

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PHONE: 322-2157



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



o mbrief Visiting US congressman _——~s

Three held after:
hoat chase and —
tirug seizure

THREE men are in custody i
today after a high speed boat :
chase in Exuma ended with }
police seizing cocaine and mar- }
ijuana stashed inside an 18-foot }

vessel.

A 48-year-old Jamaican, a 32 }
year-old Androsian and a 32- }
year-old Nassauvian travelling :
on board the boat were all }
picked up by police in connec- }
tion with the find while a fourth }
man escaped by jumping over- }

board.

The boat contained four :
taped packages of cocaine and }

20 bails of marijuana.

Police said the chase took

place in Barretarre, Exuma,

shortly after midnight on Sat-

urday.

Exuma officers and members i
of the Drug Enforcement Unit }

spotted the vessel.

Police are actively seeking :

the fourth man.

Fire in West End

destroys buildings

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A fire in }
West End destroyed two }
wooden structures and caused
extensive damage to a third }

on Easter Friday.

Supt Clyde Nixon reported

that no one was hurt.

He said one of the struc- }
tures was an abandoned :
building. The other two struc- }
tures were owned by Sherry-
mae Hield and Dimonique

Bannister.

Supt Nixon said firemen :

were dispatched to the scene,

where they saw three wooden }

structures on fire.

He said no electricity had }
been supplied to the aban- }
doned building or to the }
building owned by Mr Ban- :
nister at the time of the fire. ;
Both buildings were com- }

pletely destroyed.

He noted that Ms Hield’s
home, which had electricity, :

was extensively damaged.

Police are investigating the i

cause of the fire.

Armed robhery

is investigated

POLICE are investigating i
an armed robbery that
occurred in the Hunters area }

of Freeport on Sunday.

According to police,a man
reported that sometime }
around 12.30am he was held :
up by two men armed witha }
handgun. The culprits robbed }

him of $65 cash.

He said one of the suspects :

was of medium complexion,

and the other of dark com-

plexion.

Investigations are continu- }

ing into the matter.

says his country is
not winning drugs war

Democrat John Conyers Jr speaks out in Nassau

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A VISITING United States
Congressman admitted in Nas-
sau Thursday that his country is
not “winning” the war on drugs
— into which it has poured bil-
lions of dollars — and needs a
fresh approach if it is to reverse
“flatlining, if not diminishing”
successes.

Democrat John Conyers Jr, in
the Bahamas since Tuesday, indi-
cated that with a new adminis-
tration in Washington the time
seemed right for members of the
Judiciary Committee, which he
chairs, to initiate a “critical exam-
ination” of how the country’s
anti-drug efforts may be
enhanced in the face of unabated
consumer demand for the illicit
products in the United States.

“The problem and the truth
is that we are not winning the
drug war. The United States has
put hundreds of billions of dollars
in over the years...and it doesn’t
amount to what we can come
before you with a straight face
and say we are winning,” said Mr
Conyers.

With this in mind he and sev-
eral other members of Congress
came to this country and Haiti,
both considered “major transit
points” on a “fact finding mis-
sion” and intend to go back to
Washington to try to shape the
counter-narcotics strategy of the
new administration headed by
President Barack Obama.

The group, which also includ-
ed Congresswomen Jan
Schakowsky, Donna Christensen
and Congressman Lamar Smith,
met last week with Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham, as well as
other elected officials, the police
and prosecutors in both countries
to discuss issues that exacerbate
the drug scourge.

“Notwithstanding the very
good relations that we enjoy
between our two countries we
have to get to know each other
better so we can become more
intimately aware of the kind of
problems that we’ve got to be
able to overcome,” said Mr
Conyers.

The Congressman spoke with
The Tribune at a luncheon with
Deputy Prime Minister and Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette, as well as National
Security Minister Tommy Turn-
quest, Attorney General Michael
Barnett and other Bahamian and
US Government officials on
Thursday before leaving to return
to Washington, DC.

The second most senior mem-
ber in the House of Representa-
tives and a founding member of
the Congressional Black Caucus,
Mr Conyers admitted that drug
trafficking through the Bahamas
and Haiti still constitutes a
“tremendous problem — creat-
ed and exaggerated by the con-
sumer demand in the United
States.”

Calling Haiti the “most
wretched nation” Mr Conyers,
who has a history of promoting



“The problem
and the truth is
that we are not

The United
States has put
hundreds of
billions of
dollars in over
the years...and it
doesn’t amount
to what we can
come before
you with a
straight face
and say we are
winning.”



Haitian development in Con-
gress, noted that the group’s lat-
est visit to the impoverished
island state was an opportunity to
appreciate the “enormity of the
challenge that’s in front of us
there” in terms of reducing the
flow of illegal narcotics.

“We have (in Haiti) a literally
broken system of justice and law
enforcement and penitentiaries.
It’s hard to even talk about where
we begin, but you’ve got to
understand where you are before
you can determine how you’re
going to fix things,” said the Con-
gressman.

Meanwhile, in the Bahamas,
Congress members found the
issues that feed into the drug
problem “are of a completely dif-
ferent dimension to those in
Haiti” but also complex, he said,
referring to this country’s struggle
with illegal migration and
effectively policing its vast
waters.

He said that all countries
affected must “pull together” in a
systemic way if any dent is to be
made in drug flows — with erad-
ication at the source, for example
in Colombia, interdiction in the
transit points, such as the
Bahamas and Haiti, and reduc-

te Tole nh 2) aoe Cea)

tion in demand in the United
States all key.

“All of this is hooked up
together so you can’t just take
one little piece of it and show
some successes and say ‘Boy, this
is really great’ when really it
doesn’t matter much one way or
the other unless you can create a
systemic overall strategy so that
you’re going at everything as
much as you can at the same
time.”

According to Mr Conyers, the
group expects to coordinate fur-
ther “extensive discussions and
conferences” both in the
Caribbean and Washington to
further refine its approach to
assisting the countries in fighting
the scourge.

Speaking at the luncheon, Mr
Symonette emphasised the
Bahamas’ appreciation for the
US Government’s stated com-
mitment to promoting stability
in Haiti, which has knock on
effects for the Bahamas, and to
drug interdiction efforts.

His comments echoed those
of Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, who addressed the Con-
gressional delegation at a dinner
in their honour on Wednesday.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

America’s right to arms a threat

CONGRESSMAN John Conyers, Jr. chair-
man of the Judiciary Committee in Washington,
was in Nassau last week on a fact-finding mis-
sion to formulate a new policy for his country’s
fight against drugs.

While in Nassau — he also visited Haiti,
another transshipment island from which drugs
are siphoned into the US — he admitted that
the US is not winning the drug war. Faced with
the “unabated consumer demand” in the US
for illicit drugs, his committee wants to develop
new Strategies to turn around a defeat that has
already cost America billions of dollars.

Not only is America losing the war on drugs,
it is also losing the war on gun trafficking, which
is contributing to crime on our streets and aid-
ing the escalation of violent crime throughout
the Caribbean. Not only is America’s belief in its
constitutional right to bear arms a menace to
our islands, but it is a monumental problem
even for the United States. Yet that country’s
gun lobby, which must have its ammunition,
seems to have the nation in a headlock from
which it can’t free itself.

One only has to switch on the TV to see the
problem the US is having on its borders with
Mexicans trafficking guns and drugs.

William Hoover, assistant director for field
operations at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives, testified in the House
of Representatives that "there is more than
enough evidence to indicate that over 90 per
cent of the firearms that have either been recov-
ered in, or interdicted in transport to Mexico,
originated from various sources within the Unit-
ed States."

Yet the drug and gun wars continue, the first
because of Americans inordinate thirst for
drugs, the second because Americans seem to
think they have a God-given right to carry arms.
Not only are Americans suffering, but we are all
injured by the fall-out.

Recently 13 people were killed in Bingham-
ton, New York, by a man who collected guns —
the US constitution gave him that right — but
one only had to look at a photograph of his
troubled face to question the sanity of the per-
son or persons who sold him those guns. This
year marks 10 years since a high school student
with a gun killed fellow students at Columbine
High School and only two years ago when the
massacre was mimicked at Virginia Tech.
According to The New York Times “‘in the last
month, shootings have claimed the lives of more
than 50 Americans.” Forty-six years ago Presi-

dent John F Kennedy was assassinated, fol-
lowed four years later by his attorney general
brother.

In 1981 President Ronald Reagan was the
first US president to survive an assassination
attempt, which left his Press Secretary James
Brady crippled for life.

A move was made at that time to change
America’s gun laws, but the gun lobby would
not be budged from its belief in an American’s
right to bear arms. This right is claimed from a
clause written more than 200 years ago into the
US Constitution by the Founding Fathers to
take care of a young country in which there
was no standing army.

Those were the days when if the state were
threatened the farmer had to hitch up his britch-
es, drop his pitch fork, grab his fire arm and
defend his neighbours. In that situation every
man had to be armed and on the ready to meet
the foe. That situation does not exist today.

The nation not only has a standing army, but
a well armed national guard, police force and
various other armed services.

Mr Joe Blow citizen, and his fusillade is no
longer needed. It is more than likely that if the
Founding Fathers were drafting the Constitution
in the context of today, that clause would not
even have been considered.

On March 30 Mr Darwin Dottin, chairman of
the Association of Caribbean Commissioners of
Police, and Commissioner of Police in Barbados,
signed a Memorandum of Understanding with
US Charges d’ Affaires Brent Hardt, formerly
Charges d’ Affaires in the Bahamas, with a US
law enforcement agency — eTrace — that will
greatly improve that country’s ability to trace
and fight firearms trafficking. According to Mr
Dottin there is a direct link between the rise in
violent crime in the Caribbean and gun traf-
ficking.

The Caribbean is now catching up with the
Bahamas, which three to four years ago signed
on to eTrace. Not only does Commissioner of
Police Reginald Ferguson find the system ben-
eficial, but there have been occasions when per-
sons attempting to ship high powered guns into
our islands have been intercepted, and their
plans thwarted.

However, everyone’s existence would be
made that much safer if America would put its
constitution into the context of 200 years ago
and realise that today all of us — themselves
included — would be better off it their citizens
were disarmed.

Our country 1s
being run by
sorry misfits

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Yesterday’s Nassau
Guardian, (6th April) carried
an article, reporting on the most
recent, Standard & Poor’s eco-
nomic projections for the
Bahamas and the Caribbean,
through to the year 2010; the
report is consistently bleak.
They rated Jamaica as the worst
and the Bahamas only slightly
ahead of Jamaica, in terms of
improved and projected eco-
nomic conditions, with all the
others doing, and projected to
do, far better than us. I ask then:
How and why did we get in this
position? We have always led
the Caribbean, in all facets of
advanced and improved eco-
nomic development and have
always boasted of a better
tourism and development prod-
uct; a far higher than average,
per capita income and general-
ly a far better way of life than all
our Caribbean neighbours;
including many parts of the
great United States of America.
Pray tell me then, what has hap-
pened to us? [ll tell you what
happened to us, the FNM came
to power in 2007, when it was
projected, by the same S & P
and the IMF that we would
experience a GDP growth of
almost five per cent and they
blew it; that is what happened
to us.

The projections, in the report
in question, are that we will
have negative growth of at least
two per cent in this current year,
of 2009 and one per cent next
year, 2010. This spells —
whether we wish to hear it or
not — doom and gloom for the
next two years in our growth,
and with prices of essentials and
other services skyrocketing
everyday, I won’t hold out
much hope for many of our
brothers and sisters, surviving.
The misery index is already at

letters@tribunemedia net



an all time high and climbing
every day, as friends and neigh-
bours fall through the cracks;
much of it deserved, because of
the many reckless decisions they
have made, but many, unfortu-
nately, are and will be the vic-
tims of circumstances.

In its last report on the
Bahamas, S & P had to defend
itself against the scurrilous
attacks and charges of “bias”
levelled against them by, the
FNM’s, Ingraham and Laing. I
am just wondering what will
they have to say about this most
recent bleak report?

S & P, whether they realised
it or not, accused the FNM and
its policies, adopted just after
winning the elections in 2007,
of causing the erosion of
investor confidence and of
steam rolling the growth
momentum, which was carried
over and which they inherited,
from the Christie administra-
tion. Their “stop; amend; review
and cancel” policy destroyed
our economy and took it into a
tail spin from which we will
probably not recover until they
are removed from power and
the PLP takes over again.

Lest we forget, the PLP had
to bail the country out of the
economic doldrums after they
defeated the FNM in the gen-
eral elections, of 2002. The
FNM left us with nothing but a
huge national debt, which they
ran up in their 10 years in pow-
er-between 1992 and 2002 —
by their reckless borrowing and
spending of $1.255 billion, and
it seems we (PLP) will have to
do it again, come 2012 or
before.

What can I say? The country
is saddled with a bunch of sorry
misfits running its affairs and
every day the hole they are dig-
ging for us is getting deeper and
deeper. We seem to be headed
nowhere in particular. The
country is like a sailing schooner
with its sails all hoisted but not
trimmed, the wind blowing
fiercely but it has no rudder and
she is just left there, flapping in
the wind and going nowhere.
The only thing this FNM gov-
ernment seems to know how to
do well is borrow money and
spend it; increase taxes on the
Bahamian poor and fire public
sector workers and call it
restructuring.

Obama has ordered pay cuts
and freezes for his cabinet;
Turks & Caicos Islands ordered
a 15 per cent cut in pay for its
cabinet just before Britain fired
all of them; Jamaica’s prime
minister has just ordered a
salary freeze, took a 15 per cent
pay cut himself and a 10 per
cent cut for the remaining cab-
inet personnel, but Ingraham
and Laing? What have they
done? Nothing, of course; they
continue to collect their $8000-
$10,000 per month salaries as if
the bad times are only for the
poor and needy in the country.
They should have led the way in
taking a 50 per cent cut in their
pay. None of them know what
to do with $8000 per month
anyway, except to hoard it.
Their life styles leave much to
be desired and besides, on a
scale of one to 10, their perfor-
mance, in my view, is about one
and one half. If there was ever a
good example of “dumb and
dumber”: well you are the
judge.

FORRESTER J CARROLL
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,

April 8, 2009.

Traffic light problem needs addressing

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I'd like to bring the following matter to the
attention of the Ministry of Transport, Road
Traffic Department or whoever is responsible
for the horrible traffic light situation around the
island. I, unfortunately, cannot attest to the major-
ity of stop lights on New Providence, as I live
near Montagu Beach, but I have seen similar let-
ters in your newspaper in times past from dis-
gruntled drivers who move through our streets.

Tam a frequent traveller in the East Bay/Shirley
Street/Village Road area. The stop lights, when
they work, are terribly out of sync and because of
this, traffic from three onwards absolutely crawls
from the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre and

that have been backed up on East Bay to move

ahead.

Mackey.

sometimes beyond that point. When one finally

manages to make a right hand turn onto the Vil-
lage Road extension and the green signal is in
sight, immediately the light at Village Road and

Nassau,
Nassau,

G PINDER

Similarly frustrating are the lights at Bar 20
Corner and Mackey Street and Madeira and

These have not been working for as long as I
can remember, and you truly do take your life in
your hands when you try to join the traffic flow
onto Mackey Street from either of those side
streets. I would think Mackey Street is considered
a major thoroughfare, so why haven’t those lights
been repaired?

If government has money to renovate the inter-
national airport, carry out major road works, etc,
why can’t they find some to address the traffic
light problem?



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



WSC unionists claim
they acted ‘after govt

Last minute meeting over services component of EPA

: THE outcome of a last minute
: meeting called to finalise the
: Bahamas’ offer to Europe under the
? services component of the Econom-
i ic Partnership Agreement was
? unknown yesterday, as Minister of
? State for Finance Zhivargo Laing said

he had not spoken to officials who

8
9 ? attended the meeting in Belgium.
U : Senior Ministry of Finance offi-
: clals flew to Brussels to meet with

European trade officials on Thurs-
: day to discuss the Bahamas’ offer to
: the European Commission under the

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

WATER and Sewerage Corpora-
tion unionists angered by Minister of
State Phenton Neymour’s “malicious
and unwarranted attack” maintain
they were forced to act when govern-
ment refused to listen to their pleas.

Bahamas Utility Service and Allied
Worker’s Union (BUSAWUV) presi-
dent Carmen Munnings-Kemp main-
tains her union made every attempt to
negotiate with government and Water
and Sewerage Corporation (WSC)
executives before taking action last

Monday.

Ms Munnings-Kemp and Water ,
and Sewerage Management Union PHENTON NEYMOUR condemned



(WSMU) leader Ednel Rolle gath- unionists for holding ‘an illegal
ered around 200 WSC employees to strike under the guise of a press
attend a press conference outside the conference’.

WSC headquarters on Thompson

Boulevard on Monday morning last week to demand
better services, better treatment of staff and higher

salaries.

Mr Neymour condemned unionists for holding an
illegal strike under the guise of a press conference,
maintaining the unions’ demands are unrealistic in a

struggling economy.

But Ms Munnings-Kemp says BUSAWU has
made every effort to negotiate with government
and members’ patience has worn thin.

“As we have repeatedly said, we have extended
every courtesy and attempted to negotiate in
absolute good faith with the government and exec-
utive management of the corporation, but to no

avail,” she said.

“Tt is amazing that the Junior Minister only now
chooses to respond to our pleas and has chosen to
attempt to win the public’s sentiment by stating
what amounts to hot air and inaccuracies.”

The BUSAWU president hit back at Mr Ney-
mour’s call for the unions to use their skills to
address challenges faced by the corporation instead,

claiming union members have yet to
see any proposed solutions, mean-
ingful or otherwise, coming from the
Minister’s desk.

Ms Munnings-Kemp said: “In fact
his actions, or inaction at BEC, name-
ly not being able to properly address
the electricity costs, has increased the
power costs to produce and transmit
our water. This has caused a signifi-
cant jump in our subsidy require-
ment.”

WSC is the only utility company to
receive a government subsidy. It was
allocated $30 million last year.

Ms Munnings-Kemp argued WSC
should be able to increase rates as
the Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) increases surcharges as there
is a direct correlation between the
two.

Ms Munnings-Kemp also main-

tains that Mr Neymour made ill-
founded remarks regarding WSC
staff salaries, claiming he provided the inaccurate
salary of $37,000 per annum paid to senior janitors

when in fact the only permanent WSC janitor earns

less than half of that.
She said: “BUSAWU is extremely disappointed,
as I am certain is the manager’s union, that Mr Ney-

mour chooses to forget the fact the very unions in

years.

mix.

this corporation are responsible for most of, if not all,
the successes he has enjoyed over the past several

“He came from the bowels of the union and even
served as president — long after he had left our

“He benefited more from our various industrial

agreements than anybody else.”

She added: “BUSAWU is very much interested
in restoring the luster of this corporation and taking
it to higher heights.

“We found ourselves in this position, as a result of
the lack of focus and direction given to this corpo-
ration. We want to do the right thing and encourage
government to do the same.”

Bahamas’ financial services
model ‘is unsustainable’

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas’ current finan-
cial services model is unsustain-
able and must immediately be
reformed as it faces threats of pos-
sible sanctions from the Organi-
sation for Economic Co-opera-
tion and Development stemming
from its placement on the group's
“grey list”, president of Bahami-
ans Agitating for a Referendum
on Free Trade (BARF), Paul
Moss said.

Mr Moss, a lawyer and manag-
ing director of local financial ser-
vices company Dominion Man-
agement Services, chastised gov-
ernment for what he thinks is a
lackadaisical approach to ensuring
that the country's second industry
is protected from potential attack
from the international communi-
ty.
He argued that to avoid any
sanctions government should dis-
mantle its "tax haven" image by
introducing a tax system for for-
eign companies operating in the
Bahamas. This system should be
no more than two per cent of a
company's gross profit, 3.5 per
cent of its net profit or one per
cent of funds under management,
he proposed, adding this could
inject billions into the economy.

The PLP political hopeful said
this initiative should be imple-
mented over the next two to four
years for existing clients and Jan-
uary 2010 for new clients.

He also suggested, like several
others in the financial arena, that
government enter into double tax-

_

oe

c
l~
te
a
yt
:
r
|
'
F
|
i
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i
\

j

ation agreements — a treaty that
would allow citizens of OECD
nations and developed nations to
be taxed in the Bahamas at a low-
er rate.

"I think that it's offensive that
persons can come into this coun-
try, make the money that they
make, and then walk away with it
while Bahamians are left holding
the bag.

"We must be seen to be taxing,
because if we are taxing, the
OECD cannot say the Bahamas is
a tax haven," he said, adding that
the additional revenue could inject
millions into needy areas such as
educational, healthcare and infra-
structure.

Lawmakers

Mr Moss’ comments came days
after Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham told The Tribune that
government was where he expect-
ed it would be at this stage regard-
ing the OECD's standards, adding
that lawmakers will do what is
necessary "in a timely manner”
to ensure the country meets the
remaining criterion.

But Mr Moss charged that the
nation's chief "does not realise
how serious the situation is.”

He said: "That's how we got on
the blacklist — governments did
not realise — and how come we're
on the grey list today. He should
be very concerned because if the
Bahamas is not in the business of
financial services we recognise
that it accounts for a significant
amount of the (gross domestic
product) GDP, well past 20 per
cent, and that means that if we

take that away one can see that
our country and economy is floun-
dering now, it would be cata-
strophic if it's not there."

"The reality is the present mod-
el of financial services is unsus-
tainable. The approach has to be
holistic and forward thinking and
a part of that has to be we must
begin to tax these people in our
jurisdiction."

"We must begin to take hold
of this country and make sure that
people who make money from it
leave a stake in it, because other-
wise the generations to come will
look at this generation and say
what a useless lot."

Two weeks ago the Bahamas
was named by the OECD on a
list of "tax havens” that have com-
mitted to international tax stan-
dards, but have yet to implement
them.

The list was published after the
high-profile meeting of the G-20
Summit in London, where sever-
al world leaders pledged to crack-
down on so-called tax havens and
offshore jurisdictions.

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trade in services component of the
EPA.

Tt was understood that the Euro-
peans were not satisfied with the
extent to which Bahamian services
industries were being protected from
foreign participation under the ini-
tial offer and were looking for the
Bahamas to offer further concessions
in the retail, construction, computer
systems, advisory services and for-
eign/international law sectors —
allowing European companies to
establish a commercial presence in

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the Bahamas to sell these services
should they choose to do so.

Last week Mr Laing told Tribune
Business that any further liberalisa-
tion of the retail sector “will not hap-
pen” under the EPA, notwithstand-
ing the European’s alleged demands.

With only a day to go before the
six-month extension —to April 15 —
given to the Bahamas to conclude
the offer it is to make to the Euro-
pean Commission, Mr Laing told The
Tribune he expects to be briefed on
the outcome of the meeting today.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Man appears
In court over
shooting death

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

A 32-YEAR-OLD
Carmichael Road man
charged in the shooting
death of Reno Burrows
who was gunned down
near a laundromat on
Carmichael Road last
year, was arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court on Fri-
day .

Police have charged
Philip Charlow with the
January 2008 murder of
Reno Burrows. According
to police, Burrows, a resi-
dent of East Avenue,
Carmichael Road was
with a group of men near
the Pondwash Laundro-
mat on Carmichael Road,
around 8 pm when a gun-
man cloaked in a hood
approached and fired sev-
eral shots. Burrows, who
was working under the
hood of a vehicle at the
time, was reportedly shot
in the back five times.
Burrows, who had just
turned 30 two weeks
before he was gunned
down became the coun-
try’s fourth murder vic-
tim for 2008.

According to court
dockets, Charlow on Fri-
day, January 11, 2008,
intentionally caused Bur-
rows’ death. Thirteen wit-
nesses are listed on court
dockets. Charlow, who
was represented by lawyer
Ian Cargill, was arraigned
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court 1,
Bank Lane on the murder
charge.

Charlow was not
required to enter a plea to
the charge and was denied
bail. The case was
adjourned to July 27.

Mexican Congress:

(lebates legalising
marijuana

@ MEXICO CITY

MEXICO'S Congress
opened a three-day debate
Monday on the merits of
legalizing marijuana for per-
sonal use, a policy backed by
three former Latin American
presidents who warned that a
crackdown on drug cartels is
not working, according to
Associated Press.

Although President Felipe
Calderon has opposed the
idea, the unprecedented
forum shows legalizing mari-
juana is gaining support in
Mexico amid brutal drug vio-
lence.

Such a measure would be
sure to strain relations with
the United States at a time
when the two countries are
stepping up cooperation in
the fight against drug traffick-
ing. The congressional debate
— open to academics, experts
and government officials —
ends a day before President
Barack Obama arrives in
Mexico for talks on the drug
war.

Proponents had a boost in
February when three former
presidents — Cesar Gaviria
of Colombia, Ernesto Zedillo
of Mexico and Fernando Car-
doso of Brazil — urged Latin
American countries to con-
sider legalizing the drug to
undermine a major source of
income for cartels.

The congressional discus-
sion takes on a subject "that
had been taboo" in our coun-
try, said opposition lawmaker
Javier Gonzalez, adding that
his Democratic Revolution
Party supports legalizing per-

sonal marijuana consumption. }

"What we don't want is to
criminalize youths for con-
suming Or possessing marijua-
na," he said.

Calderon, whose six-year
terms ends in 2012, has pro-
posed legislation that would
offer users treatment instead
of jail time but stop short of
legalizing or decriminalizing
possession.

In 2006, Mexico backed off
a law that would have abol-
ished prison sentences for
drug possession in small
amounts after the U.S.
protested.

"It's clear that a totally
prohibitive policy has not
been a solution for all ills,"

said Interior Department offi- ;

cial Blanca Heredia. "At the
same time, it's illusory to
imagine that complete legal-
ization of marijuana would be
a panacea."

Government aims to provide
greater access to

m@ By MATT MAURA
Bahamas Information
Services

GOVERNMENT is push-
ing ahead with its initiative to
provide even greater access to
healthcare and health institu-
tions for all Bahamians,
Health Minister Dr Hubert
Minnis said in his address to
the monthly meeting of the
Nurses Association of the
Bahamas last week.

This initiative, he said, is in
anticipation of any “unex-
pected challenges” the current
worldwide financial crisis and
credit crunch could have on
healthcare locally.

Dr Minnis said it is the gov-
ernment’s belief that equitable
access to healthcare and
greater equity in health out-
comes, are fundamental to a
well-functioning economy.

“It may also be a measure
of how a civilised society is
making progress,” he said.

Impact

Dr Minnis said countries at
all levels of development — the
Bahamas included — are con-
cerned about the impact the
current financial crisis can pos-
sibly have on healthcare.

He said some of those con-
cerns relate to mental illness-
es such as depression and anx-
iety, in addition to possible
increases in the use of harmful
substances such as tobacco
and alcohol as well as increas-
es in the ingestion of
processed foods.

“In these financially
depressed times, consumers
may increase their intake of
processed foods that are high
in fats and sugar and low in
essential nutrients, leading to
more health related diseases,”

Dr Minnis said.

“It is an accepted fact that
such foods contribute to obe-
sity and chronic diseases such
as diabetes and hypertension.”

Dr Minnis said healthcare
professionals are already
experiencing, or can expect to
experience, increases in public
and private patients seeking
medical attention at the Acci-
dent and Emergency Depart-
ment of the Princess Margaret
Hospital and the community
clinics.

Health insurance coverage
being lost due to an inability
to pay, increases in chronic,
non-communicable diseases
(CNCDs), increased demand
for bed space, increased
demand for public sector sup-
plied medication and increas-
es in the number of persons
experiencing the “burn out”
syndrome can also be expect-
ed, he said.

The minister said he met
with health management
teams to devise plans that will
effectively respond to the chal-
lenging economic times.

Dr Minnis said the World
Health Organisation (WHO)
estimates that each year,
healthcare costs have risen
and that in some instances
those rising costs have led to
individuals and groups not
only losing medical coverage,
but also losing their status as
middle-class citizens.

Dr Minnis said the World
Bank issued an assessment of
the impact the financial crisis
is having on many of the
developed and developing
countries. This assessment

showed that many people are
losing their jobs, homes and
savings and their lives.

He said it is against this
backdrop that the govern-
ment, through the Ministry of
Health, has undertaken the




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“ambitious drive” to improve
access to healthcare and
health institutions for Bahami-
ans.

Funded

“In the interim, budgets
must be funded and health
programmes must be contin-
ued,” Dr Minnis said. “At my
ministry there is a renewed
focus and concern relating to
ensuring that resources,
including staff and medical
equipment are available and
functioning.”

“In spite of the financial cri-
sis affecting health, we must
ensure that we continue to
provide the best possible
healthcare system while main-
taining the highest standards,”
Dr Minnis said.

DAIHATSU

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MINISTER OF HEALTH

Dr Hubert Minnis addressed
members of the Nurses
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during the Association’s
monthly meeting held at
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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

travel to the island by other
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Yesterday, former President of
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warned that its impact and suc-

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the move will shortly be followed
by a further decision to lift all
restrictions on travel from the
USS. to Cuba — allowing not just
Cuban Americans but all Ameri-
cans to travel to the island — Mr
Cutillas, like several tourism lead-
ers in the Bahamas, said he does
not think Bahamians should view
it as an “immediate threat.”

“Certainly, the second step that
Obama could take is the lifting
of restrictions for Americans and
not just Cuban Americans to trav-
el to Cuba. That doesn’t require
congressional action, he could do
that with an executive order and
that could create some problems
for the Bahamian economy but
I’ve always said that Cuba is not
really prepared yet to receive a
big influx of tourism — the ser-
vices, the hotels, are rather limit-
ed,” said the 77-year-old execu-
tive, who fled Cuba with his
mother, father and brother in
1960, a year after Fidel Castro’s
revolution.

According to a White House
fact sheet outlining the extent of
Mr Obama’s directive, the move
will see limits on the frequency
and duration of visits by Cuban
Americans to Cuba removed, as
well as limits on baggage weight
and expenditure.

A family member will be
defined as anyone “within three
degrees of a family relationship”
— for example, second cousins
— to travel, while anyone who
lives with an authorised traveller
can accompany them, such as a
girlfriend or boyfriend.

Limits on the frequency and
amount of remittances that can
be sent and carried by travellers
have also been lifted, and U.S.
banks will be allowed to apply
for licenses to forward remit-
tances.

Meanwhile, in a slightly more
surprising aspect of the announce-
ment, the President also indicated
that he would authorise U.S. com-
panies to establish greater
telecommunications links with
Cuba.

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enter into agreements to estab-
lish fiber-optic cable and satellite
telecommunications facilities link-
ing the United States and Cuba,
and into roaming service agree-
ments with Cuba's telecommuni-
cations service providers.

US. satellite radio and satellite
television service providers will
be permitted to engage in trans-
actions necessary to provide ser-
vices to customers in Cuba.

The White House said the
intended purpose of this was to
“advance people-to-people inter-
action at no cost to the USS. gov-
ernment (and) increase the means
through which Cubans on the
island can communicate with each
other and with persons outside
of Cuba.”

Cuban born Mr Cutillas said:
“T think it’s a good move on the
part of the United States but it’s
to be seen if (the Cuban Govern-
ment) will accept something like
that. They are not very keen on
having free communications
among people.”

“But more communications is
always good, especially when peo-
ple live in a society like Cuba
which is quite closed, where peo-
ple can’t really receive interna-
tional news freely or things like
that, where everything is con-
trolled by the government. The

fact that people can freely travel,
exchange views, is positive,” he
said.

Meanwhile, the former Bacar-
di President, who retired from his
post in 1994, said that he is scep-
tical as to whether the Govern-
ment will allow remittances to
“reach their destination”, partic-
ularly if they are being sent to
people considered political dissi-
dents by the Cuban government.

“It’s one thing to send money
to your brother or sister, but
another thing that many, many
people in Cuba need is to help
those who are in jail or who have
families who are in jail and are
really controlled by government,
they can’t get a job in Cuba, or
are really controlled by the gov-
ernment,” he added.

As for whether increased
access to communication oppor-
tunities and financial resources
will improve the likelihood of a
transition to democracy on the
island, Mr Cutillas said he sees
yesterday’s changes as “‘a step in
the right direction,” but
added: “It’s not going to be that
easy.”

Mr Cutillas expressed hope the
Cuban government “follows the
example” of Mr Obama in reduc-
ing the restrictions it imposes on
its population.

Two men dead in weekend violence

FROM page one

hit and seriously injured a 31-year-old Wilson Tract man while
driving away from the sports centre on Thompson Boulevard at

around 5pm.

However, an eyewitness told The Tribune that Mr Bremmer
was stabbed before he got into the driver’s seat of an orange 1994
Honda Prelude and hit the pedestrian as he was trying to escape his

attackers.

The collision gave Mr Bremmer’s attackers an opportunity to
“finish him off” and then steal the car stereo and speakers before
fleeing the scene, the eyewitness claimed.

Mr Bremmer was rushed to Princess Margaret Hospital where he
died of his injuries, while the 31-year-old is in serious, but stable con-

dition.

The brutal violence drove witnesses to call on the police to show
a greater presence at the sports centre and offer better protection

to spectators.

But Assistant Superintendent and police press liaison officer
Walter Evans defended police, maintaining the brutal killing was
an isolated incident and there is a strategy in place for policing the

track.

He said: “Bear in mind it was a holiday weekend and police
officers were deployed all over New Providence... Police can’t be

everywhere all the time.”

A 21-year-old is being questioned in connection with Mr Brem-

mer’s killing.

However, no one has yet been arrested in connection with the
suspicious death of a man found dead in a car yesterday.

The man, who has not yet been identified by police, was discov-
ered with a gunshot wound in his neck in a Nissan Sentra parked in
Watlings Street at around 8am Easter Monday, prompting an

intensive murder investigation.

Police are appealing to the public for assistance, and anyone
who may have information which may assist investigations should
call police on 911, 919 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on

328-TIPS (8477).

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How Do We Deal With The Learning Crisis?

Join us for an important perspective on our education crisis, presented by economist Ralph Massey

based on his recent publication, The Learning Crisis: A Bahamian Public Policy Essay. Mr Massey

identifies the factors that created the ‘perfect storm’ in education and outlines the monumental reforms that
are required to rescue our schools. This is the critical issue of our age - bar none. Be a part of the solution.

Wednesday, April 15, 6:30pm. The Nassau Yacht Club on East Bay Street.

Easter holiday

FROM page one

: lier in the year.

Meanwhile, explaining that

i those in the sector are in close
? contact with airlines about their
i seat bookings - a “good barome-
? ter” of likely arrivals to the coun-
i try in coming months - Mr Van-
i derpool Wallace added that based
? on what such carriers are report-
i ing conditions beyond the holi-
i day season are also looking up.

“From everything we see we

i are optimistic that things are
i beginning to turn around a little
i bit - even while we try to put in
: place some of these initiatives that
i we think will accelerate the pace,”
i said the tourism minister.

He puts the change down to a

i combination of external factors
i and efforts on the part of the Min-
iistry and private sector in this
i country.

On the Ministry’s part, he said

ithe private sector has been
i expressing their support for its
i advertising strategy, which has
iseen adverts running over a
i longer period of time than ever
i before.

“Our team has been buying

i better than we have ever done
i and making sure that we are
i advertising during those times
i that people are likely most recep-
i tive,” added Mr Vanderpool Wal-
? lace.

His comments come on the

: heels of what Bahamas Hotel
i Association President Robert
i Sands told The Tribune was a
i“very frank and productive”
i meeting between industry stake-
: holders and Tourism Ministry
i officials last week covering a
i broad range of issues such as the
i need for reform of the Bahamas
? gaming industry and other rec-
? ommendations as to how the sec-
i tor can be made more competi-
i tive in a number of areas.

Mr Sands, along with BHA

i Executive Director Frank Comi-
? to and Senior Vice President of
i Bahamar Eddy Cambridge, met
? with the Minister, Director Gen-
i eral, Permanent and Under Sec-
i retary in the Ministry of Tourism
i last Tuesday.

The meeting was an opportu-

i nity for them to present recom-
i mendations as to what the Casino
i industry in the Bahamas should
? do to keep up with new competi-
i tive threats - including proposed
i overhauls of gambling in Florida
? which have been identified as a
i major potential challenge to this
i country’s desirability as a gaming
i destination.

Two weeks ago Mr Sands told

i this newspaper that the industry is
i“in the dark ages” and may
i require “radical change” if it is
i to maintain its attractiveness.

Meanwhile the “two plus hour”

i meeting also covered a broad
irange of other matters coming
: out of a months-long dialogue
i between the private and public
i sector about how the industry can
i better its market share.

Yesterday Mr Vanderpool

i Wallace said that all of the sug-
i gestions made by the hotel lead-
i ers will now be discussed to deter-
? mine their feasibility.

“Very clearly we want to, par-

i ticularly with what was rcom-
i mended in the casino sector, to
i have some comment from mem-
? bers of the Gaming Board on the
i changes to the regulations that
i would be required to be changed,
: and then secondly there’s always
i the discussions we need to have
ion what the likely economic
i impact is going to be on the over-
: all economy, government taxes
i etcera,” said the Minister.

Mr Sands told The Tribune

: that the Casino Association was
? interested in seeing new types of
i games introduced, as well as
i changing the law to allow for
imore people in the country to
: gamble - such as foreign residents.

“We will see if we have any

i particular difficulties that we will
i discuss internally before we make
i any recommendations on any
i changes to be made,” said Mr
i Vanderpool Wallace yesterday.

American
visitor

FROM page one

Meanwhile, The Post and

i Courier, in an article published
i Saturday, quoted the principal
: at her high school as stating that
i the accident in fact occurred at
i around 10pm Wednesday.

Principal David Held said:

i“This is a tremendous loss for
our community. She was one of
i those great kids. Hard workers.
i Good student. Extremely well
i loved by her peers and teach-
i ers.”

Local police are investigating

: the incident.







THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 9

© mbrief FirstCaribbean branch helps to beautify

part of Palmdale Primary school campus

Kingdor National
Parkinson Foundation
set for walk/run event

APRIL is “Parkinson
Awareness Month” and in
the Bahamas the Kingdor
National Parkinson Founda-
tion has planned several
activities to commemorate
the occasion, including the
organisation’s eighth annual

walk/run competition, which

will commence at Montagu
Beach Park on Saturday,
April 25.

The Foundation is asking
Bahamians to support the
fundraising event by provid-
ing fruit for the 700 partici-
pants.

petition is used to raise

funds for research, which the

Foundation’s parent organi-
sation makes available to

many countries of the world.
Additionally, Kingdor sup- :

plies seed funds to persons

with neurological conditions.

The Foundation said it is
because the ongoing dedica-
tion and assistance by the
Bahamian people that it is

able to continue with its mis-

sion to improve the quality
of life for persons with
Parkinson’s disease and
allied conditions.












The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.








This annual walk/run com- }

MANAGEMENT staff of
FirstCaribbean International
Bank’s Palmdale Branch part-
nered with teachers of its adopt-
ed school - Palmdale Primary
School — to beautify a section
of the school campus.

The team gave the gardens a
splash of colour, enhancing the
environment and creating an
atmosphere that would make
students and visitors to the
school proud.

The bank’s Palmdale branch
manager Paul Bartlett said:
“The turn-out of both First-
Caribbean and Palmdale pri-
mary staff was a great indicator
as to the emphasis placed on the
students’ well-being. The hard
work and camaraderie was
infectious, with everyone get-
ting their hands dirty, from the
skilled gardeners in the crew to
the novices. The result was
absolutely amazing. It was well

ae
T

worth the time and effort put
into the project.”

The FirstCaribbean Palmdale
branch adopted the school in
2005 and has since made quite a
difference, including keeping
their Wednesday afternoon

Police: Iraq a factor in
PR soldier’s suicide

m@ SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

A SOLDIER who had told his family he did not want to return
to Iraq apparently killed himself in a Puerto Rican motel days
before he was to join his unit and head back to the war zone,
police in the U.S. territory said Monday, according to Associated

Press.

Army Spc. Nokware Rosado Munoz, 28, had been arguing with

again,” Rivera said.

129 confirmed cases.

Break away from the ordinary
and discover how to experience

his pregnant wife about his upcoming redeployment before hang-
ing himself Sunday, said Lt. Edilberto Rivera Santiago, director of
the police homicide division in the San Juan suburb of Bayamon.

"They were having problems because he had been activated

Rosado was scheduled to rejoin his unit at Fort Bliss, Texas, this
week, before moving on to Iraq.

The soldier's mother-in-law, Migdalia Estrada, was quoted by
newspaper El Nuevo Dia as saying that Rosado was receiving psy-
chiatric treatment stemming from a previous Iraq deployment.

"He had said to my daughter that he didn't want to go back to
Iraq," Estrada said. "I don't understand how they can order him
back if he was having problems.”

An Army official in San Juan, Felix Santiago, said the military
was cooperating with Puerto Rican authorities in an investigation.
Officials in Fort Bliss had no immediate comment.

Suicides in the Army have increased yearly since 2004 as soldiers
deal with longer and repeated tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. The
Army had its highest rate of suicide on record in 2008 with at least

i: al oe

als GARDENS were given a splash ai colour by the team.



appointment to read to students
in the school’s upper grades —
an initiative done in conjunc-
tion with the Ministry of Edu-
cation and the American
Embassy.

FirstCaribbean Palmdale
remains committed to Palmdale
Primary and to doing its part to
keep the Bahamas “clean, green
and pristine,” while living the

bank’s commitment to “enrich-
ing our communities - togeth-
er,” the bank said.







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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

school fees for an estimated 700 peo-
ple who lost their jobs at Atlantis,
the British Colonial Hilton and Our
Lucaya in Grand Bahama between
November 2008 and February this
year.

Tt is the second time in six months
the fund has moved to provide
financial assistance to hotel work-
ers affected by the severe economic
downturn as an estimated 6,000
workers whose hours were reduced
to three days a week or less in Sep-
tember and October were called up
to claim $1,000 to be paid directly to
creditors in October, and now hun-
dreds more who have been made
redundant are invited to come for-
ward for financial support.

It is estimated that around 300
people are still eligible to apply for
the first wave of benefits, and anoth-
er 700 are potentially eligible for
the new benefits package, expect-
ed to draw just over $1 million from
the fund.

BHAI Health and Welfare Ben-
efits Fund trustee and president of
the Bahamas Hotel Employers
Association J Barrie Farrington said

Hotel workers

the decision to provide further ben-
efits was based on considered review
of the continuing economic crisis
affecting the hotel industry.

He said: “We didn’t expect to be
doing it so quickly, we hoped there
would have been a rebound since
the last benefits were launched, but
there are things happening within
the industry that we think will create
some excitement and hopefully pro-
duce an increased volume of busi-
ness in the country.”

Mr Farrington hopes hosting the
Miss Universe and Miss Teen USA
pageants as well as the internation-
al FIFA conference at Atlantis this
year will bring international atten-
tion to the Bahamas and help boost
tourism.

“We are looking forward with
optimism,” Mr Farrington said.

“But the important thing we are
doing now is responding to the cry
of a lot of workers in the industry
who have been displaced.”

He spoke during a press confer-
ence at Workers House on Harrold
Road with Bahamas Hotel, Catering

Unemployment benefit

FROM page one

Easter holiday plans.

Around 15,000 people who have been out of work for up to four
years are expected to apply for benefits throughout the week, and those
who fit the broad criteria set out for the first phase of the scheme can
expect to collect their cheques in about two weeks.

They will receive half of their average insurable weekly wage for 13
weeks, and as the current ceiling on insurable wages is $400, the maximum
amount anyone can receive is $200 per week.

Mr Foulkes visited all four of the New Providence venues on Saturday
as job seekers gave details of when they became unemployed to Depart-
ment of Labour staff and were then issued certificates to register with NIB.

The minister said: “ I must compliment National Insurance Board
staff and the Department of Labour staff for their hard work.

“Tt was the first time we have done such an exercise between both the

and Allied Workers Union presi-
dent Roy Colebrook, Bahamas
Hotel and Allied Industries Pension
Fund executive director Louis
Dames and Bahamar and Cable
Beach Resorts vice president Robert
“Sandy” Sands to launch the scheme
on Thursday.

Mr Sands said he too is hopeful
the hotel industry will bounce back,
but did not shy away from the harsh
reality facing hundreds of workers.

He said: “The reality is things
continue to deteriorate. Hotels are
receiving respectable levels of busi-
ness, but the spend of those cus-
tomers has not materialised to the
spend we would anticipate.

“The waters are still murky...
And we do expect more downward
trend after the Easter period and
into May and June.

“T don’t think we have hit bottom
as yet, but hotels are doing things to
mitigate against unemployment...
We all recognise that compounding
the situation by adding more to the
unemployment at this time helps no
one in this period.”

Major hotels are doing their best
to retain staff by cutting costs in oth-
er areas, such as by reducing work-
ing hours and paid annual leave, Mr
Sands said.

Hotel workers made redundant
from Atlantis, British Colonial
Hilton and Our Lucaya between
November and February can apply
for the new benefits package at the
pension fund offices at Workers
House in Nassau and Freeport from
10am on Monday, April 20.

Applications will be taken in
alphabetical order of surnames in
the first two weeks with letters A
to E processed on Mondays, F to L

Oless td

on Tuesdays, M to R on Wednes-
days and S to Z on Thursdays in
New Providence, and in Grand
Bahama A to L will be handled on
Mondays and Wednesdays, and M
to Z on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Applicants must have their
National Insurance card and docu-
mentation for bills and mortgage
payments with them.

The application process will con-
tinue until June 30.

For more information call Work-
ers House in Nassau at 322-5123,
and Workers House on Settlers
Way, Freeport, on 351-7832 from
9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday.

Bush fire

FROM page one

assigned to extinguish this mas-
sive blaze,” said Fire chief Walter
Evans.

Meanwhile, another fire, which
started near the Bahamas Gas
Company, and a blaze at the City
Dump were also being taken care
of by separate fire units.

Fire services were called to the
City Dump fire at around lam on
Saturday, and have been working
to put out the flames since then.
The fire was still burning yesterday
with the blaze confined to a west-
ern portion of the landfill.

“Tn all of these matters, home
owners are affected by the pres-
ence of smoke. They are to be
reminded that efforts are being
made to suppress these fires in the
shortest possible time,” said press
liaison officer Walter Evans.

i
“=

Ga ren

National Insurance Board and the Department of Labour and it’s a new
benefit that we are introducing so we didn’t really know what to expect,
but we were properly organised and are happy things went extremely
well.”

Applicants are asked to sign up on particular days throughout the
week according to their surname. Those whose surnames begin with
letters A to D were invited to register on Saturday, while those with sur-
names beginning with the letters E to L can sign up today, M to R can
attend tomorrow, and S to Z on Thursday.

Friday and Saturday will be open to people of any name, however Mr
Foulkes encourages all applicants to register within their specified group
to keep the application process under control.

The minister also thanked the media for showing sensitivity and pro-
fessionalism in covering the registration process.

The Unemployment Benefits scheme was signed into law by Gover-
nor General Arthur Hanna last week following Parliament’s enactment
of a bill to amend the National Insurance Act on March 25 and subsequent
passing of amendments to the contributions regulations, benefits and assis-
tance regulations, and financial and accounting regulations.

Registration venues include CC Sweeting Jr School in Oakes Field,
Doris Johnson in Prince Charles Drive, CR Walker in Blue Hill Road
north, and SC McPherson in Blue Hill Road South and two venues in
Grand Bahama. All are open from 9am to 4pm daily.

For more information contact NIB’s public relations department on
356-2070 extension 236/234/232, e-mail info@nib-bahamas.com, or log on

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JOYCE MINUS

BASKETBALL CLASSIC

line.
¢ Here's a look at those
games played:

EVANGELISTIC CENTER 49, :
CALVARY BIBLE 45 (OT): :
Sherman Bowe scored 14 }
and Tyrone Sands had 12 for ;
Evangelistic Center, who }

"Team Bahamas achieves

in the loss for Calvary Bible, :
who are not eligible for the ;

will now have to play idled
undefeated Christian Taber-
nacle for the men's vice
president pennant on Satur-
day.

Harcourt McCoy had 17

playofts.

EVANGELISTIC CENTER 39, :
GOLDEN GATES 38: Tyrone :
Sands and R Ferguson both }
scored 13 points in the win :
for Evangelistic Center as }
they kept their pennant :
hopes alive in the men's vice i

president division.

Daniel Johnson had a :
game high 14 in a losing :
effort for Golden Gates, }
who have been eliminated :

from the playoff picture.

FIRST BAPTIST 37, LATTER- :
Noel }
Richardson had a side high :
13 points and Eddie Miller :
added nine as First Baptist }
stayed undefeated in the :
men's president division }
heading into their match-up }
against Temple Fellowship }
for the pennant o Saturday. :
Thompson ;}
matched the game high hon- }
ors with 13 for Latter-Day, }
who still earned a playoff :

DAY SAINTS 32:

Cordero

berth.

NEW BETHLEHEM 28,

New Bethlehem clinched a

playoff spot in the men's ;

vice president division.

Roibinson Estorcica had :
nine in the loss for Church
of the Nazarene, whose :
playoff spot has been ruined.

CITY OF PRAISE 78, :
EBENEZER 16:R Edgecombe :
scored 16 and T Rolle andJ }
Rolle both had 13 as Cirty of }
Praise clinched their playoff :
spot in the men's president :

division.

Dane Stuat had 12 in the
loss for the hapless Ebenez- :
er, who will not make the }

playoff.

TEMPLE FELLOWSHIP 52, :
MACEDONIA 23: Gabbic
Laurant had a game high 17 :
points and Najee Bethell :
had nine as Temple Fellow- }
ship kept their playoff hopes ;
alive in the 19-and-under }

division.

Prince Pinder led Mace- }
donia with six as they await :
for the final outcome to see }
if they will make the play- }

offs.

FIRST BAPTIST 46, FAITH

UNITED 24: Noel Richard- }
son exploded for a game
high 17 points and Kirby }
Thergelus added nine as }
First Baptist moved on top }
of the 19-and-under stand- :
ings for a shot at winning ;

the pennant.

GOLDEN GATES 18, MIRA- :
CLE WORKING COG 16: :
Dustin McKenzie scored 11
to lead Golden Gates as i

SEE page 12

TUESDAY, APRIL 14,

IT will come down to one }
last chance as both the pen-
nants and playoff positions }
that haven't been decided :
are completed as the Bap- }
tist Sports Council wrap up :
the 2009 Joyce Minus Bas- :
ketball Classic's regular sea- :
son on Saturday at the Bail- :
lou Hills Sporting Complex. :

On Saturday past, the ;
BSC hosted a series of :
games with pennant and :
playoff implications on the :

2009






INSIDE ¢ Local sports news



| THE UNDER 20

‘| Girls 400m relay
| team of V'Alonee
Robinson,
Ivanique Kemp,
Gortia Ferguson
and Nivea Smith
pose with their
silver medals.

metal count in three years

VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA: For
Team Bahamas, the 2009 Carifta Games
produced a new record, the highest
medal total since 2006 and an impressive
showing at the most populated meet in
Carifta history.

At the conclusion of the four day
meet, the Bahamas placed third in the
total medal count with 28.

The 61-member team collected three
gold, 17 silver and eight bronze.

Jamaica again topped the medal table
with a total of 67 medals, 39 gold, 15 sil-
ver and 13 bronze.

Trinidad and Tobago finished second
with a total of 29 medals, nine gold, 10
silver and 10 bronze and Barbados was
fourth with a total of 21 medals, four
gold, nine silver and eight bronze and
host country St. Lucia rounded out the
top five as they finished with the most
medals in their country’s history, four
gold and two silver.

Although they fell short of the gold
medal total of previous years, The
Bahamas won more silver medals than

DAY ONE

VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA: The
Bahamas got off to a quick start on day
one of the 38th Carifta Track and Field
Championships with a medal in the first
contested event and concluding with a
pair of medals in the field.

MEDALLISTS

POLE VAULT

Vernal McIntosh, Bronze, 3.20m

e Despite a broken, unfamiliar pole
and finishing well short of his personal
best, McIntosh performed well enough
to claim the Bahamas’ first medal of
these Carifta Games.

McIntosh cleared 3.20 on his first
attempt, but missed three opportunities
to stay in the competition at 3.30m.

A pair of native St. Lucians took the
top two spots in the field, Shem Edwards
took first with a jump of 3.60m and Rick
Valcin finished second in 3.50m.

Although it was the first medal won at
the meet, it failed to qualify as an official
event in overall medal standings with
just three competitors from two coun-
tries.

Events which do not meet the stan-
dard of five competitors from three





VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA: The
Bahamas captured its first gold medal
of the meet on day two and the Bahami-
an faithful was re-energized by the most
decorated jumper in Carifta history after
a pair of untimely injuries and disquali-
fications.

MEDALS

U-17 GIRLS SHOT PUT
Raquel Williams — Gold, 11.93m
e It took just one throw for the top



any other country in the field.

The team posted back to back 30
medal performances in 2005 and 2006,
but since has yet to reach the 30 medal
mark.

Team Bahamas was once again led by
Raymond Higgs who finished with a
new Carifta record in the Under 20
Boys’ High Jump and came within a
centimetre of claiming another gold
medal in the long jump, reminiscent of
his hallowed 2006 performance.

Other outstanding performances
included Patrick Bodie who medalled in
both the 400m hurdles (silver) and 100m
hurdles (bronze) in the Under 17 Boys
division and Rashan Brown who cap-
tured three medals, silvers in the Under
17 Girls 400m and 4x400m relay, and a
bronze in the 200m.

Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations President Curt
Hollingsworth said the effort from the
entire team and the coaching staff was
one to be commended.

“Tt was exciting, this team was picked




countries officially qualify as an exhibi-
tion.

McIntosh, a relative newcomer to the
sport said although he was unable to
reach a personal best and the gold
medal, he was pleased with his effort.

“Tt feels pretty good, I knew I could
have done better and probably have the
gold medal but I am happy with what
God gave me. I came out here, I did not
perform to the best of my ability but I
made the best of what equipment I had,”
he said. “The pole was not mine and it
was broken so J had to improvise with it.
My personal best is way higher than
what I jumped out there but hopefully I
will continue at my next meet and
improve. I am quite confident in my abil-
ities and in my other meets I will con-
tinue to do my best to make the country
proud.”

U-20 GIRLS 1500M
Hughnique Rolle, Silver, 4:44.16s

e With the new Carifta record holder
nearly 200 metres ahead of the remain-
der of the field, Rolle secured her berth
atop the medal stand with a brillantly
executed race en route to a second place
finish.

Rolle captured the country’s first
medal on the track behind the eventual
gold medal winner and new Carifta
record holder, Natoya Goule of Jamaica
who finished more than 17 seconds

high school thrower in the country to
solidify her claim as the best in the region
and simultaneously capture the
Bahamas’ first gold medal of the meet.

Raquel Williams had the top two
throws of the competition, 11.80m on
her first attempt and the winning of 11.93
on her final effort to end the event in
dominating fashion.

Sasha-Gaye Marston of Jamaica was
second with a throw of 11.80m and
Catherine Mastail of Martinique was
third with her throw of 11.09m.

Williams surpassed the 11m mark on
three attempts and her shortest throw
of the competition, 10.87m on her third
attempt, would have still been good
enough to finish in fourth place.

based on qualifications and we are quite
satisfied and the children gave 100 per-
cent. They went out there, they left it on
the track and as a result we able to
accomplish most of the objectives that
we set out to accomplish as a team,” he
said. “The coaching staff, I think a lot of
people underestimated their ability but I
think this coaching team did a tremen-
dous job and their effort will be vilified
in the medal count. We have a whole lot
of work to do, but I think once we get
ourselves organised and we move in that
direction we will get where we need to
go. 2?
Hollingsworth said one of the main
topics of the 38th Carifta Congress was
the manner in which the gap between
Jamaica and the other Cariibean coun-
tries is closing and with a full effort
from all entities involved in the
Bahamas’ national programme the
BAAAs will continue to progress
towards the ultimate goal of a Carifta
championship.

“Tt is a credit to the RDC which pro-

ahead of the field in 4:27.48s.

Goule successfully defended her U-
20 title, while Rolle reached the medal
stand in just her first year contesting the
division.

She shaved more than 25 seconds off
her time in last year’s U-17 1500m final
when she finished Sth in 5:10.61s.

Rolle said although she felt ill-pre-
pared for the race due to a change in
schedule, faith kept her grounded and en
route to victory.

“T decided just to stay with the pack
instead of going out there and rushing
and chasing after her and going out fast
like I do in Nassau. Basically I did not
think I was ready but I prayed hard and
God came through. When I was in sec-
ond place and she went out in frst I
decided I was going to keep up with her
because I wanted to medal,” she said.
“This shows all the people back home
who probably did not believe in distance
runners that we do have what it takes to
win.”

U-17 BOYS HIGH JUMP
Ryan Ingraham, Silver, 1.95m
Jabari Wilmott, Bronze, 1.95m

e A duo of basketball players turned
high jumpers continued the Bahamas’
recent history of success in the high jump
concluding an exciting day one with pair
of medals.

While Wilmott improved on last year’s

Marston was the only other competitor
to pass the 11m mark on more than one
attempt.

In a single year, Williams improved
her performance by nearly two metres
from a last year’s Carifta Championships
in St Kitts.

Behind a veteran field, in her first
Carifta performance she threw just
10.51m in 2008 to finish in 5th place.

Williams said: “It feels good, I have
been practising hard for the past couple
months and I was able to come out here
on top.”

U-17 GIRLS 400M
Rashan Brown, Silver, 53.93s

vides all of the regional members with
the certification programme for coaches.
Many coaches in the region are taking
full advantage of it, our coaches are tak-
ing full advantage of it and they are also
becoming more knowledgeable so the
gap is closing,” he said. “It is exciting to
note that the gap is narrowing we just
need to take another step up, our coach-
es have to pick up their programmes,
our kids have to make more sacrifices,
we as an administration need to do our
part and everything will fall into place.”

Kerani James, of Grenada, was
named the Most Outstanding partici-
pant of the meet after setting a new
record in the Under 20 boys 400m, a
mark previously held by Usain Bolt of
Jamaica.

At the 38th Carifta Congress, dele-
gates decided that the 39th edition of
the games will be hosted by the Cayman
Islands in 2010.

Full results of all Bahamian competi-
tors will be published in tomorrow’s
edition of the Tribune.

ES ea EO

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE :
20: Theo Cleare scored 10
and Amon Baker had 10 as :

ninth place performance of 1.90m, Ingra-
ham reached the medal stand in his
debut Carifta appearance.

Both jumpers passed on the initial
heights of 1.70m and 1.75m and entered
the contest at 1.80m, clearing on their
first attempt.

Ingraham was stellar over the course
of the next three heights, clearing 1.85,
1.90, and 1.95 each n his first attempt.

Wilmott cleared 1.85 and 1.90 on his
second attempt but cleared 1.95 on his
initial effort.

In showdown for the gold medal, both
Wilmott and Ingraham failed on all three
attempts to clear 2.00, however Barba-
dian jumper Kemar Jones bypassed the
bar on his third and final attempt.

Both players, stars on the hardwood at
C.I Gibson (Ingraham) and St.
Augustine’s College (Wilmott) respec-
tively, said they did not give their best
effort despite reaching the medal stand.

“T feel that 2.00m I could have
jumped it but it just was not there
tonight,” Wilmott said.

Ingraham echoed the sentiments but
said he was thankful for the silver medal
in his frst Carifta games.

“T feel like I could have done way bet-
ter,” he said.

Both athletes said with basketball and
the high jump in their future athletic
plans, they will continue to pursue both
sports.

Katrina Seymour, DQ-lane infraction
A bittersweet finish for the Bahamas
in the first of four quartermile finals as
we witnessed the progression of one ath-
lete net a silver medal and flirt with the
meet record, while the other in her first
Carifta appearance lost a bronze medal
performance due to disqualification.
Brown willed herself to a second place
finish behind Shericka Jackson of Jamaica,
who set a new Carifta record of 43.48s.
Brown kept pace with Jackson on the
final curve and held on to second place
from a charging Seymour who finished in
third.
The two time Carifta medallist came

SEE page 12



PAGE 12, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

NGC



FROM page 11

into the final with the fastest
qualifying time in the field, as
she took her heat in 55.53s while
Seymout’s time of 56.03s was the
fourth fastest qualifying time.

In her debut Carifta Games
appearance, 2007 in Turks and
Caicos, Brown finished eight in
the 400m final, and improved to
a bronze medal performance last
year in St. Kitts.

Seymour nearly came away
with a medal performance in her
debut Carifta appearance before
learining of the disqualification

Brown said she was pleased
with her execution but fell short
of her ultimate goal

“Treally wanted to execute my
curve, pick up the stagger and
maintain my speed. I am a little
disappointed because my mind
was set on the gold and I came
up a little short but I thank God
that I have no injuries and I am
happy I came up with the silver.”

U-17 BOYS 100M
Jonathan Farquharson, Silver,
10.59s

e For the third consecutive
year, the Bahamas fielded a
medal winner in this division,
with a gritty performance
from Farquharson in the final
20m who just missing out on a
gold medal performance by a
few tenths of a second.

Farquharson came into the
final with just the fourth
fastest time of the field, but
nearly pulled off the upset
over gold medalist Jahazeel



VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA:
Triumphs in the field and from
the relay teams lead the charge
for the Bahamas on day three
highlighted by a pair of triple
jumpers who claimed silver
medals in their respective divi-
sions.

MEDALS

U-17 BOYS 400MH
Patrick Bodie, Silver, 55.48s

e Training with event record
holder, Nejmi Burnside paid
great dividends for Bodie as he
claimed the Bahamas’ first medal
on the track on day three.



Murphy of Jamaica who won
in 10.41s.

“T thought I had it from
start but the last 10 meters but
the Jamaican came through
and took it,” he said. “I think I
ran my best because he pretty
much pushed me to the limit.”

U-20 BOYS 100M
Warren Fraser, Silver, 10.26s
(wind aided)

e Tragedy was followed close-
ly by triumph for the Bahamas in
the contest to decide the
Caribbean’s fastest junior ath-
lete.

After witnessing his teammate
go down with an injury before a
somber and stunned George
Oldham stadium, Fraser pow-
ered home to a second place fin-
ish, just three tenths of a second
behind the eventual winner,
Shakiel Graves of Barbados.

While going through routine
warm-ups just seconds before
the start of the final, Marcus
Thompson suffered an ankle
injury and was forced to leave
the track under medical assis-
tance.

With Fraser the lone Bahami-
an competitior remaining, he
came within three tenths of a
second within being named the
fastest man at the Carifta level.

Fraser improved on the 10.56s
he posted in the preliminaries,
which seeded him third for the
final.

Thompson’s time of 10.60
after winning his opening round
heat seeded him fourth.

Two years removed from his

Bodie took an early lead and
maintained an advantage for
much of the race until tramaine
Maloney of Barbados surpassed
him him to take the final in
54.88s.

He said training alongside
Burnside provided excellent
competition and said holding on
to a medal positioning in the final
moments of the race was due to
pure will and effort

“T tried to maintain and hold
like my coach said I knew [had it
almost the whole lap. I was not
expecting the guy from Barba-
dos to come I was trying my best
to hold him off but I guess I lost

silver medal performance in the
Turks and Caicos, Fraser
returned to the marquee event
of the games to repeat his feat.

Just crossing the finish line,
Fraser tripped and fell injuring
both wrists and twisting his ankle
in the process.

“T was trying to come back I
was catching him, I felt myself
right there gaining on him and I
dipped and I sort of lost balance
in stride,” he said. “I was very
confident, I just wanted to PR,
which I did. It was a good race. I
got out the blocks, I drove, exe-
cuted, coming down the stretch
he sort of passed me but I came
back and it was a good race in
all,” he said.

U-20 BOYS HIGH JUMP
Raymond Higgs, Gold, 2.21m,
Carifta Record

e During his Carifta tenure,
Raymond Higgs has completely
re-written the Carifta record
books making him arguably the
most dominant athlete in his
respective discipline through-
out the history of the meet.

Higgs set a new record in the
Under 20 Men’s High Jump
with a leap of 2.21m, surpass-
ing the previous mark of 2.20m
set by Jamal Wilson in 2007.

The three time Carifta Cham-
pion took the gold medal in just
three jumps, passing on five
heights while his competitors
struggled throughout

He entered the competition
at 1.80m with the field, cleared
easily on his first attempt,
passed on 1.85m, 1.90m, 1.95m,
cleared 2.00m on his first
attempt, and with the remainder
of the field eliminated, cleared
2.09 on his first attempt for the

a little at the last hurdle,” he said.
“T gave it all I had, I knew I had
the heart of a lion so I just gave it
all I had. He’s a good training
partner and I wanted to at least
try and challenge the record,
maybe I did not but it was a good
race nonetheless.”

U-20 BOYS TRIPLE JUMP
J’Vente Deveaux, Silver,
15.47m

e It took five rounds for
Deveaux to solidify himself in
medal contention, but after the
dust settled he improved on an
eigth place performance from
the 2008 games.

Deveuax landed the silver
medal winning jump in the fifth
of six rounds finishing second
to Elton Walcott of Trinidad

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2009

Here’s a look at the final medal count from the Carifta Games:



wei)

AP Pe

TRINIDAD & TOBAGO
yn sy: U0L Obs)

ST. LUCIA

BAHAMAS

EME eles

lita Uy

LUN AAT

DONMINICA

ita HClO es

dea LOLDELY

LU DMUs

U. S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
Ue ae eh
PUL Remy ate.)
ST.VINCENT & GRENEDINES
ST. KITTS & NEVIS
CAYMAN ISLANDS
ae Tt)
PVCU a

gold medal.

Gold Medal well in hand,
Higgs passed on 2.12m, and set
a new Carifta record of 2.21m,
which he cleared on his second
attempt.

Higgs now holds both Carifta
records in the Under 17 Boys
(2.13m) and Under 20 Men’s
divisions.

Higgs said the gold medal was
an afterthought, his primary
goal was setting a new Carifta

and Tobago who leapt 15.61m
in the secnd round.

U-17 GIRLS TRIPLE JUMP
Tamara Myers, Silver, 11.70m

e Myers set a new personal
best and became a two time
Carifa medallist on day two,
continuing her progression in
the event.

The Exumian’s unorthodox
style landed her on the medal
podium on her third jump of
the competition.

“T jumped 11.70m which was
a personal best for me so ’'m
happy about that,” she said.

U-17 BOYS JAVELIN
Byron Ferguson, Bronze,
52.99m

e Although he fell short of
his personal best, in just two
years in the sport, Ferguson
has transformed himself from
a talented pitcher to one of
the best javelin throwers in
the region.

“It feels great to get the
bronze medal but I know I
really could have had the sil-
ver or even the gold, my best
throw would have put me on
that level,” he said. “I do not
feel like it was my best perfor-
mance but it went well. One
throw that I got everthing into
the wind carried it back a little
but all in all Iam very pleased
with what I have.”

Ferguson who has only been
competing at the sport for two
years, finished fourth at the
2008 championships and said
he continues to be encouraged
by his performances which get
“better and better everytime.”

Gold

Silver Bronze Total
15 as)
10 10
je)

ine)
a

ee Nom EE = I ooo SE om SO o> PE

C—O) > nO Gn
|= 32 42M = HA wR WODMHDY WON oO

record.

“JT just came set to break the
record that was the mindset I
had. I felt comfortable jumping
so I was just taking my time and
going through my jumps. I was
trying to PR but I just will have
to do it next time I guess,” he
said. “I probably would have
made it if I had competition,
more people jumping with me
but I will have to be sure to do it
next time.”

U-17 GIRLS 4X100
Anthonique Strachan, Shau-
nae Miller, Sparkyl Cash,
Printassia Johnson, Bronze

e For Johnson, redemption
from a disappointing 100m
came on the anchor leg of he
400m relay when she powered
down the track, surpassing two
competitiors to claim the bronze
for team Bahamas.

U-20 GIRLS 4X100

V’Alonee Robinson, Ivanique
Kemp, Ortia Ferguson, Nivea
Smith; Silver, 45.43s

e Smith delivered a remark-
able come from behind perfor-
mance to gain the Bahamas
spot atop the medal podium,
nearly nipping Jamaiacan
anchor Carrie Russell at the
line.

“These girls ran their heart
out, they ran their hardest so I
am not disappointed at all,” she
said. “This is a young team so in
Cariftas to come I know they
will continue to do better.”

U-17 BOYS 4X100

Rashad Armbrister, Harold
Carter, Blake Barrett,
Johnathan Farquharson; Sil-
ver, 41.89s

e With the backdrop of the
Jamaican team setting a new
Carifta record in 40.76s, the
Bahamas outclassed the remain-
der of the field after a blistering
start from 100m finalst Arm-
brister.

I tried to get a good start
because I know in the relay it is
important to get that start,” he
said. “We had our prayer before
the race and God came through
for us.”

DAY FOUR

¢ VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA:
The final day of competition
proved to be the most lucrative
for Team Bahamas with a total
of 11 medals on day four.

U-20 BOYS LONG JUMP
Raymond Higgs, Silver, 7.35m
e Just one centimetre sepa-
rated Raymond Higgs from a
double gold medal performance
on the final day of competition
at the 2009 Carifta Games.
Higgs duelled with native St.
Lucian Lenyn Leonce for six
rounds and despite digging deep
on his final attempt for his best
jump of the contest was unable
to surpass the mark of 7.36 set
by Leonce in the fourth round.

U-17 BOYS 100M HURDLES
Patrick Bodie, Bronze, 13.45s

e Bodie’s dip at the line
forced a photo finish before the
final placement was decided
and he edged out his competitor
by one thousandth of a second
to claim his second medal of the
meet.

U-20 GIRLS 100M HURDLES
Ivanique Kemp, Silver, 13.78s

e An exuberant Kemp wore
her emotions on her sleeve after
she shocked herself and the
crowd with her come from
behind performance to claim
the silver medal.

U-20 BOYS 110M HURDLES
Dennis Bain, Silver, 13.93s
e Despite hitting the third hur-
dle, Bain was able to recover



and take the silver medal for
the Bahamas’ third consecutive
triumph in the sprint hurdles.

U-17 GIRLS 200M

Antonique Strachan, Silver,
23.95s

Rashan Brown, Bronze, 23.97s
e Both athletes claimed their
second medals of the meet
simultaneously giving their
Bahamas their first dual medal
finish on the track.

U-20 GIRLS 200M

Nivea Smith, Silver, 23.36s

e After a gruelling indoor sea-
son after her freshman year at
Auburn University, Nivea
Smith was unable to extend her
Carifta championship streak to
three in the 200m.

U-17 BOYS TRIPLE JUMP
Lathone Minns, Silver, 14.58m
Lathario Minns, Bronze,
14.49m

¢ It was double trouble for the
remainder of the field in the
triple jump as the duo of broth-
ers ensured the Bahamas
claimed two positions atop the
medal stand.

U-17 GIRLS 4X400M RELAY
Teshon Adderley, Rashan
Brown, Bianca Farrington,
Katrina Seymour; Silver

U-20 GIRLS 4X400M RELAY
Katherina Smith, Devanique
Dean, Shaunte Miller,
Deshana Burnside; Bronze,
3:45.99s

JOYCE MINUS

BASKETBALL CLASSIC

FROM page 11

: they hold onto a shot at
? making the 19-and-under
? playoffs.

: Omal Deveaux had six in
i the loss for Miracle Working
? Church of God.

? Avery Armbrister had six
? for Faith United, who have
: been eliminated from the
: postseason.

: GOLDEN GATES 34, FIRST
: BAPTIST 30: Neil Sands
} scored eight and Lavandre
? Rubins seven for Golden
? Gates, who clinched the sec-
i ond spot in the 15-and-
: under playoffs behind pen-
? nant winning Temple Fel-
? lowship.

? Leon Saunders had eight
: in a losing effort for First
? Baptist, who have been
? eliminated from the post-
: season.

: FAITH UNITED 25, MIRA-
i: CLE WORKING COG 24:
? Delano Forbes scored nine,
? including the winning bas-
i ket, to push Faith United
? into the 15-and-under play-
? offs.
? Oscar Lenny had seven in
i the loss for Miracle Working
? Church of God, who won't
? make te playoffs.
: ¢@ Here's the last week of
: play coming up on Saturday:
: Court One
? 10am First Baptist vs Mir-
? acle Working COG (15).
: 11am First Baptist vs
? Golden Gates (19).
? Noon New Bethlehem vs
? Bahamas Harvest (M)
: 1pm First Baptist vs Tem-
? ple Fellowship (M)
i 2pm Bahamas Harvest vs
? Golden Gates (M).
: Court Two
? 10am Mercy Seat vs Lat-
? ter-Day Saints (19).
i? 11am Golden Gates No.2
: vs Temple Fellowship (19).
: Noon Evangelistic Center
i? vs Christian Tabernacle (M).
i: 1pm Faith United vs
} Golden Gates No.2 (19).
: 2 pm Church of the
? Nazarene vs Calvary Bible
i: (M).
: © Here's a look at the
: team standings:
i: Teams WL Pct. GB

Men's President

X — First Baptist 5 0 1,000

i X-— Temple Fellowship 4

i 1.8001

i X- City of Praise 42 .666

P 112

i? X- Latter-Day Saints 3 3

i 500 21/2

i? BIBA33 .500 21/2
Ebenezer 1 5 .000 4
Pilgrim 0 6 .000 51/2
Men's Vice-President

i X- Christian Tabernacle

: 50 1,000 -

: X-— New Bethlehem 4 1

? .8001

i X-Evangelistic Center 4

: 1.8001

: Bahamas Harvest 2 2 500

? 21/2

? Church of the Nazarene 1

: 4.2004

Golden Gates 1 4 .200 4

Calvary Bible 05 .0005

19-And-Under

X - First Baptist 5 2 .714 -

Miracle Working COG 5

625 1/2

Latter-Day Saints 43 571 1

Temple Fellowship 43 5711

Golden Gates 43 .571 1

Macedonia 4 4 .500 11/2

Golden Gates No2 33 5002

Faith United 3 4 .428 2

Mercy Seat 1 6 .142 4

15-And-Under

i Y-— Temple Fellowship 7

i 1.875 -

i X-—Golden Gates 62 .7501
X — Macedonia 5 3 .625 2
X — Faith United 5 3 .625 2
First Baptist 3 4 .428 31/2

i Miracle Working COG 3

? 4 428 31/2

: Latter-Day No.2 35 3754
Latter-Day 2 6 .2505
Zion South Beach 17 1256

? Y — denotes clinch pen-

? nant.

: X - denotes clinch play-

: off berth.

wo

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
este Mato le lid
on Mondays





TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



Giants even
series 1-1

@ By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net_ :

THE Commonwealth
Bank Giants avoided falling
into a hole by levelling their
New Providence Basketball
Association's best-of-five
championship series against
the Electro Telecom Cybots
at 1-1.

Last Wednesday at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
before taking a break for the
Easter holiday weekend, the
defending champions Giants
stomped last year's runners-
up Cybots 89-77 to stage up
the remainder of the series
that will continue on
Wednesday night.

"We needed to tie the
series because going down 2-
Ois a difficult position to be
in,” said Commonwealth
Bank's coach Perry Thomp-
son. "In the first game, we
made a lot of mistakes in the
latter part of the game, but
we weren't too concerned
about that.

"We knew that if we came
back and concentrated on
controlling the ball and play
good defensively, we would
be back in the series. We did
a wonderful job of that
tonight."

While the Giants had to
play the second half without
point guard Adrian Miller,
who got ejected afer he
picked up his second techni-
cal foul, Garvin Lightbourne
came off the bench and was
almost a one-man wrecking
crew.

Lightbourne, who didn't
play in game one because of
an injury, pumped in a game
high 28 points as he made up
for the absence as well of
Mark Hanna, who didn't
play in game two. Three oth-
er Commonwealth Bank
playters were in double fig-
ures with Michael 'Fernley’
Bain adding 21, Jeremy
Huthinson 11 and Lamar
Gilbert contributing 10.

Before fouling out, Miller,
along with Creto Kowles
both scored nine.

The Giants’ defensive

66 The Cybots is a

very good team, but
the whole idea is to

keep them off balance.

So from game to }
game, we will throw }
different things at
them that we have }
been working on }
from last year. 99.

PERRY THOMPSON

effort resulted in only two
Cybots making any signifi-
cant impact. They were Bri-
an "Tucker' Bain with 26 and
Nelson 'Mandella’ Joseph
with 21. Cecil Mackey and
Billy Sands were the next
two high scorers with six
apeice. Dereck Cummings
and Dereck Sands both had
five.

Electro Telecom's coach

Wayde Watson said tey were

just simply flat.
"They were at a disadvan-
tage when one of their play-

ers gone and we just couldn't i

stop them,” Watson said.
"We should have been able
to play Cybots basketball
and we didn't."

As they look ahead to
game three, Thompson said
they will continue to focus
on their defense.

"The Cybots is a very
good team, but the whole
idea is to keep them off bal-
ance," he said. "So from
game to game, we will throw
different things at them that
we have been working on
from last year."

Watson said they will try to

get in a practice before game
three and hopefully they will
get back to playing the way
they did in game one.

"We know we can play
better than we did," he said.
"We just have t come out

and prove it. It's not going to }

be easy because they are the
defending champions and
they are going to defend
their title. If we want the
title, we have to go out and
take it from them."

The series so far has been
a keenly contested one with
some interesting match-ups
in just about every position.
It will probably come down
to who play the better
defense as both teams are
capable of lighting the nets
up offensively.

Relay teams ‘got their
first crack’ in Miami

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations got
their first crack at the relay
teams qualifying for the 12th
International Amateur Athlet-
ic Federation's World Champi-
onships in Athletics.

But both the women's 4 x 100
and 4 x 400 and the men's 4 x
100 metre relay teams fell short
at the Miami Elite Track Meet
held on Saturday at the Uni-
versity of Miami.

Fritz Grant, one of the relay
coordinators, said all three of
the teams performed excep-
tionally well and based on their
performances, the Bahamas

could definitely end up having
all four teams qualified for the
World Championships for the
first time.

“T think it was a good start
for the relay teams,” Grant said.
“T expect that when they go to
the Penn Relays next weekend,
they will all qualify for the
World Championships with the
men’s 4 x 4 team.”

The team of Sasha Rolle,
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie,
Christine Amertil and Shakei-
tha Henfield needed to run
three minutes and 31 seconds
to qualify for their spot in
Berlin, Germany in August.

However, they missed the cut
in winning the race in 3:32.50
that was established as a new
Bahamian record, improving on

‘Showtime’
real corsmly bee

Week Classic




Baillou Sporting Complex.

Sweeting took the senior divisional four-lap or one-
mile race in two minutes and 35.76 seconds. Kevin
‘Kilo-man' Ingraham came in second in 2.41, followed
by Anthony ‘Biggie’ Colebrooke in 2.44.25, Robert
‘Penatrator’ Bethell in 2.44.53 and Henry Kline in

2.51.38.

In the junior's four-lapper, Justin ‘Jet’ Minnis won in
3.07, Antinece 'Little' Simmons was second in 3.12,
Carlano 'Car' Bain was third in 3.37 and Oman Cole-

brooke got fourth in 3.48.

The Cadets or pee wee competitors had a one-lap
sprint with Felix Neely crossing the line first, followed
by Leonard Richardson and Ashley Colebrook.

Another Wednesday series will be staged on

Wednesday at 6 pm at Baillou.

WESTERN NEW PROVIDENCE SERIES: THE
New Providence Cycling Association hosted its West-
ern New Providence series on Saturday around a six-
mile loop around the western end of the island.

In the seven-lap race, Barron 'Turbo' Musgrove
clocked one hour, 52 minutes and 44.66 seconds to win.
He was followed by Tracy ‘Showtime’ Sweeting in
1:53:56.41. John Cox was third in 1:53:57.25.

Coming in fourth was Anthony ‘Biggie’ Colebrook in
1:54:05.32. Tim Huber got fifth in 1:54:05.32; Jamie
Nottage was sixth in 1:54:13.06; Van Demeritte seventh
in 1:59:33.53 and Tony Mackey eighth in 212:15.72.

There was also a four-lapper with Shawn 'the Beast’
Fox taking the victory in 1:09, followed by Edmund

Butler in 1:11.

And in a three-lapper, Justin Minnis won in 50 min-
utes, followed by Lashane Dean, Henry Kline and

Antinece Simmons.

This weekend, the majority of the cyclists will be
heading to Grand Bahama to compete in their road

race and timed trials.

MID-WEEK CLASSIC: TRACY 'Showtime' Sweeting
clinched the victory in the New Providence Cycling
Association's Mid-Week Classic series that was staged
last Wednesday at the one-mile cycling track at the

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the old mark of 3:33.14 that was
set by the team of Rolle, Amer-
til, Hernfield and Tonique
Williams-Darling in Nassau at
the Central American and
Caribbean Championships in
12005.

It was also a stadium record
that surpassed the mark of
3:30.72 that was held by South
Carolina from 2004.

“Debbie seemed to be com-
mitted to the relay team,” Grant
said. “She went out and ran a 52
split and Christine did 50. The
other girls ran 54. So they are
right there.”

Not to be outdone was the
men's 4 x 100 relay team of
Rodney Green, Adrian Griffith,
Michael Mathieu and Dereck
Carey. They had to run 39.10

ce

to qualify for Berlin, but was
shy of the mark in winning in
39.77. However, they too posted
a stadium record, shattering the
old mark of 38.89 by Louisiana
State University in 2006.

“Dereck competed with a
slight injury, but I think if he
was 100 percent, they would
have ran much faster,” Grant
said. “But it was the fastest
opener that the Bahamas has
ever ran, so they are looking
good.”

The women's 4 x 1 team of
Sasha Rolle, Chandra Sturrup,
Christine Amertil and Debbie
Fergusn-McKenzie ran 43.96 for
second place. But they needed
to run 43.90 to qualify for
Berlin.

South Florida Elite won in

43.16.

“We didn’t have all of our
sprinters, but the team went out
and perform their best,” Grant
said. “They are just as excited
about the women’s 4 x 4 team
and by the Penn Relays, they
should qualify as well.”

Individually, the Bahamas
also got two victories from vet-
eran Lavern Eve and Michael
Mathieu.

Eve, who is vying for another
appearance at the World Cham-
pionships, took just one throw
and dominated the women's
javelin with 188-feet, 5-inches
(57.44). Her nearest rival was
Erin Zampell, a freshman from
Nova Southeastern, with 117-

SEE page 14



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PAGE 14, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



GOLF JR |

TEAM TRIALS

THE Bahamas Golf
Federation will hold
its final trials for the
junior national team
this week in Grand
Bahama. The players
will be vying for
spots on the team
that will travel to the
Caribbean Junior
Golf Championships.

The federation
hosted its Central
Divisional trials last
month at the Cable
Beach Golf Club and
the golfers pictured
are some of the qual-
ifiers who will make
the trip to Grand
Bahama for the final
trials, scheduled for
April 14-16.

www.atlanticmedicalfunwalk.com





=) =) Relay teams ‘got their
===" first crack’ in Miami

FROM page 13

? 07 (35.83).
? Mathieu, the member of the men's
: silver medal relay team at the Olympic
? Games in Beijing, China last August,
.| } won the men's 400 in 46.45. But it was-
«| : n'tast enough for him to qualify for
? Berlin.

Also in the event was Ravanno Fer-
? guson, who was fourth in heat two and
? 18th overal in 49.98.
? Mathieu took part in the 200 as well,
? coming in second in 21.02 after he won
i heat two. Adrian Griffith competed in te
? heat, oming in third in 21.34 for eighth
? place. Rodney Green, winning heat five,
? clocked 21.88 for 11th. Leon Covington
? won heat one in the fastest time of 20.99.
? In the 100, Rodney Green clocked
? 10.43 for secxond in heat two and sixth
? place oveall, while Adrian Griffith was
: eighth overall after he got sixth in heat
? one in 10.50.
i Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie was the
? only athlete to attain a qualifying stan-
: dard for Berlin at the meet. She did the
? B mark in the women's 200 after she
? won heat two in 23.01 for second overall.
? The B standard was 23.30. Rosemary
â„¢| } Whyte won heat one in 22.95.
: Chandra Sturrup got sixth in the wom-
? en's century in 11.52. American Lauryn
? Williams won the race in 11.11.
: In the women's 400, Sasha Rolle
? turned in a seventh place finish in heat
? one 54.30. Shakeitha Henfield was sec-
? ond in heat two in 54.51 for ninth over-
? all.

And in the women's 100 hurdles, 'Tia-
? vannia "Tia' Thompson got seventh in
? 13.72.

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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

()

Two-Way Radios

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IT’S STORE number eight
for Wendy's Bahamas and the
newest location at the Lyn-
den Pindling International
Airport is targeting a diverse,
new market segment — inter-
national and domestic pas-
sengers and airport employ-
ees,

Since the new location
opened in the Domestic Ter-
minal on March 31 at 5 a.m.,
customers have been bustling
through to enjoy the conve-
nience of fresh, hot hamburg-
ers, crisp salads and refreshing
desserts.

Late last year, the Nassau
Airport Development Com-
pany awarded the contract to
Aetos Holdings Ltd., parent
company of Wendy's
Bahamas.

The resulting renovations
brought about a buzz of
excitement in the terminal, as
people anticipated the speedy
arrival of this international
quick-serve icon.

Chris Tsavoussis, President
of Wendy's Bahamas, believes
the move to the airport makes
good business sense despite
challenging economic times.
“We are happy to be the lat-
est food and beverage outlet

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LPIA annually, we are confi-
dent that our newest store will
do well, and we consider it an
honour to be a part of the
dynamic changes taking place
at LPIA.”

Customers

The store anticipates high
traffic from local and interna-
tional travellers and Wendy's
hopes to attract additional
customers from the Family
Islands to the world recog-
nised brand.

Wendy's LPIA location
represents 35 new jobs for
Bahamians, adding to the cur-
rent team of 400 employees.

With more than 6,600
stores worldwide and 199
stores in the Latin Ameri-
ca/Caribbean region, the
brand offers a variety of deli-
cious, signature hamburgers,
healthy salads and made-to-
order menu items that allow
customers to customize

New Wendy’s targets
diverse market segment





ZHIVARGO LAING and Miss Bahamas Universe Sacha Scott perform
the ribbon cutting to launch Wendy’s LPIA.

their meals.

Wendy's is the second
international franchise to
open at the airport. Just last
month, the Dunkin' Donuts
brand opened two outlets at
LPIA.

“We are excited that
Wendy's is the second inter-
national brand at LPIA and
we are looking forward to
growing our relationship with

Whopper Jr.

Double
Cheeseburger

BLT & Cheese

all of our vendors as we move
forward with the airport rede-
velopment,” said John Spinks,
Vice President, Commercial
Development for NAD. “Our
goal is to improve the passen-
ger experience at the airport.
Providing them with a variety
of food and beverage options
is a big part of that. We look
forward to working with the
Wendy's team.”

Includes Fries &

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Village Rd. Roundabout + Harold Rd. + Prince Charles + Frederick Street North * Cable Beach





u



G-20/OECD

assault could
eri Cyr



Former trade union
leader says Bahamas
may be forced to finally
bring in more equitable
income tax structure,
which could also save
financial industry

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A former trade union leader
has described the G-
20/OECD assault on interna-
tional financial centres as a
potential “blessing in disguise”
for the Bahamas, as it could
finally force this nation to
adopt a more equitable tax
structure via an income tax.

Huedley Moss, who previ-
ously headed the union rep-
resenting Water & Sewerage
Corporation workers, told Tri-
bune Business that “if the
Bahamas uses its brain”, it can
still preserve its existing finan-
cial services industry via the
imposition of low income tax
rates, and the subsequent con-
clusion of bilateral double tax-
ation and investment treaties
that will benefit international
clients.

Arguing that the G-
20/OECD initiatives will
inevitably mean that the
Bahamas has to alter its finan-
cial services model, Mr Moss
told Tribune Business that this
nation needed to move away
from regressive taxes as its pri-
mary revenue source.

Regressive taxes are those
that are unrelated to ability to
pay. The Bahamas’ main rev-
enue source, import duties,
are a form of regressive tax

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



THE TRIBUNE



TUE S21 A %s

Ine



APRIL

14,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Court dimisses hotel
marina docks seizure foreign-owned licensees

@ Ruling in favour of Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort's holding company due to 'complete lack
of evidence’ in multi-million dollar dispute

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

| he Supreme Court has

refused to grant an
order allowing a Florida-based
contractor to repossess docks
at the Four Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort’s marina, finding
“there was a complete lack of
proper evidence” to support its
assertions in a payments dis-
pute.

Senior Justice John Lyons, in
his interlocutory ruling on the
summons filed by Florida
Floats, which was doing busi-
ness as Bellingham Marine, crit-
icised attorneys representing
both parties for failing to put
solid evidence before the
Supreme Court, instead relying
on affidavits produced by asso-
ciates in their firms.

The ruling recounted how
Florida Floats initiated its action
against the Exuma-based resort
via summons on September 12,



66

As the application of
a Romalpa Clause is a
question of fact, I am
totally unable, due to
the complete lack of
appropriate evidence,
to come to any con-
clusion as to when
title to any portion of
those floating docks
passed, if at all.”

Sentor Justice John Lyons

2008. This sought a Supreme
Court declaration confirming
that it owned the portion of
concrete floating docks for
which payment had not been

received from the hotel’s ulti-
mate ownership company,
Emerald Bay Resort Holdings.

The contractor also sought a
declaration that it was “entitled
to remove the said docks imme-
diately from the premises”, in
line with a February 14, 2008,
judgment in its favour. Finally,
it wanted a Supreme Court
order requiring the Four Sea-
sons Emerald Bay resort to give
it access to its property so it
could remove the docks.

Docks

“By agreement dated March
8, 2006, the plaintiff contracted
with the defendants [Emerald
Bay Resort Holdings] to pro-
vide a system of floating docks
for the defendant’s resort at
Emerald Bay,” Justice Lyons
found.

“The construction and provi-

SEE page 6B

Dispute over ex-governor general's $10m
life policy sent into arbitration mode

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A dispute involving a $10 mil-
lion life insurance policy taken
out on ex-Governor-General,
Sir Orville Turnquest, and an
associated $1.507 million loan
has been ordered into arbitra-
tion proceedings by the Flori-
da courts, Tribune Business can
reveal.

US District Judge Federico
Moreno, sitting in the Miami
division of the south Florida dis-
trict court, in late 2008 ordered
that the action initiated by
Dulaw Management, a Bahami-
an firm acting as the successor
trustee for the Sir Orville Turn-
quest Irrevocable Insurance
Trust, against four US compa-
nies be placed into arbitration.

Judge Moreno ordered that
the case be stayed pending the
arbitration’s outcome. The
terms of the order state that the
dispute can come back before
the US court “if circumstances
change”, but research by Tri-
bune Business shows that this
has not happened.

Dulaw Management had ini-
tiated its action against life
insurer, PHL (Phoenix) Vari-
able Insurance Company, plus
LaSalle Bank, Coventry Capital
and Boundless Solutions, in July
2008.

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It was seeking the rescission
of PHL’s life insurance policy
numbered 97516352, which was
a $10 million life insurance pol-
icy issued on Sir Orville’s life
and held by the Sir Orville
Turnquest Irrevocable Trust.

Dulaw was also alleging
“breach of agreement, misrep-
resentation and conversion
based on their converting of
both the insurance policy in
question, and the asset of Sir
Orville Turnquest of his insura-
bility”, to their own.

As the US district court
summed up so succinctly in its
arbitration order: “The trust

acquired a life insurance poli-
cy from PHL Variable Insur-
ance for the former governor-
general of the Bahamas, Sir
Orville Turnquest.

“To finance payment of the
premiums due on the policy, the
trust obtained a loan from
LaSalle Bank. The loan was
secured by the policy itself. Co-
defendant Coventry Capital
served as the agent servicing the
loan on behalf of LaSalle Bank,
and co-defendant Boundless
Solutions served as the agent

SEE page 10B

Make it a reality.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



Freeport needs
‘thousands’ of small,

* Attorney urges Bahamas to ‘open Immigration
doors’ and give foreign investors confidence to
increase investments via permanent status

* Touts benefits of economic diversification for
keeping city's economy afloat

* Without industrial sector, Freeport economy
would be ‘in a state of complete meltdown’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A prominent attorney has
urged the Bahamas to “open
the Immigration doors” and
permit “hundreds, if not
thousands” of small foreign-
owned licensees to base
themselves in Freeport, in
order to build a stronger eco-
nomic base.

Fred Smith, a Freeport-
based partner in Callender’s
& Co, told Tribune Business
that citizenship or permanent
residency status for both for-
eign investors in Freeport
and their families would give
them the confidence to ulti-

SEE page 7B



Rules must be enforced
for capital market integrity

“TRIBUNE BUSINESS OPINION’



B etter late than never. Finally, finally, Bahamas Supermar-
kets published its unaudited fiscal 2008 financial statements,
around nine months after year-end and with no little public and Secu-
rities Commission prodding to make it happen. Reaction was relatively
muted, no doubt because most minority shareholders were anticipat-
ing the worst. The worst was what they got, with the whole episode pro-
viding another black eye for Bahamian capital markets integrity.
Quite apart from the $13.4 million net loss is the length of time it
actually took for Bahamas Supermarkets to publish those figures.
Public companies have four months, or 120 days, from year-end to pub-
lish their audited financials, meaning that, by rights, a June 30 fiscal peri-

SEE page 8B

Brokerage Accounts

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THE TRIBUNE

Accounting firm is
‘International Star’

PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

ZS

Colinalmperial





CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Business Analyst

We are looking for a Business Analyst to develop and document detailed
business procedures and test plans. The Business Analyst should have a strong
technical background but will be primarily focused on business process
improvement.



Specific duties:
e Develop, document and execute test plans and business procedures
Resolve user issues related to business software applications
Liaise between end-users and technical staff
Maintain a project issues list
Coordinate small software development projects

Qualifications:
Bachelors degree in Business Administration/Management or Computer
Information Systems
3-5 years experience in the Financial Industry with exposure to multiple
departments within an organization

Insurance software experience a plus

Proficient using Microsoft office products (i.e. Word, Excel, Access,
Outlook and PowerPoint)

Knowledge of basic Project Management concepts

Understanding of basic relational database concepts and simple SQL
queries, HTML

Proficient in using a computer and able to learn new software
applications with minimal guidance

Excellent written and oral communication skills

The successful candidate will:
Exercise a professional attitude and excellent communication skills
Be inquisitive and a problem solver
Possess time management skills to ensure comfortable working rela-
tionship with several internal customers to meet project requirements
and deadlines
Be dependable, organized, and detail oriented

To apply:

Send electronic résumé via email to careers@colinaimperial.com

Subject: Business Analyst
or

Send résumé to:

Human Resources Department
308 East Bay Street

P.O. Box N-4728

Nassau, Bahamas

Applications must be received by 20 April 2009.

Bahamian accounting firm BDO
Mann Judd has received the Interna-
tional Star for Leadership in Quality
award from Business Initiative Direc-
tions (BID), a major private business
entity. BDO Mann Judd received the
award in the Gold category, recogniz-
ing its commitment to quality, leader-
ship, technology and innovation. It was
presented in Paris on March 23, 2009,
at the International BID Quality con-
vention, with companies from 54 coun-
tries receiving awards.

BDO Mann Judd was founded in
Nassau in 1977 by G. Clifford Culmer,

and provides accounting, auditing,
insolvency, corporate finance, corpo-
rate recovery and restructuring, foren-
sic investigations and business con-
sulting to multinational companies,
public sector entities and owner-man-
aged businesses,

The company is a member of BDO
International, the world’s fifth largest
accounting organisation.

Mr Culmer is pictured here with Jose
Prieto, executive president of BID,
receiving the International Star for
Leadership in Quality Award in the
Gold category

UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES, THE BAHAMAS
3rd Annual Research Day

RAND MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2009
7:0 am — 1:00 pm

7:30 am Regitration—hs Charge
8:00 am—lO35 arn
Official Opening Ceremomes

Grashoppers, Rabbits, Cerin ated Canes
Prof. Sond Fao
Pro View Chancellor, Graduate Stadia IAT

Targedng the Genes: The New Eroin Concer Therapy
Or, Korat Stern, Professor ay Concer ideation
Tregetial College Hammersmith Hospital TE.

Cenical Cancer in Grond Bahoma - A 3 yr Review:
Or, Eagar Qoiggler, Registrar Deparmes GaGa TA Rava dence
Flagp iad

Chronic Renal Disease in Grom Boheme
Or, fev Balle, Senior Houwre Gifleer Depeterent Intern Medicine
ord Memonal Hoses

Enviromental Impacts on Child Development
in Developing Countries

Dr, Adie Meeks Gonder

Professor of Child Development

Darector, Consortium for Social Developroeent and Research
Head, Caribbean Child Development Centre

LO 25 ae Cape Break
150 am —1900 pon

Breast Concer - The Grond Balhome Experience
Or, Wilmnna Mesie, Senta House Oyficer
Departeent Surgery Aone Mdemranet Hospi

(Genetic Mobations in the Breast Cancer
Oneagenes in Bahamian Females
Or, Theadore

The International Campaign against Gastro-Enteritie: Advancing
the Rotavirus Vaccine

(infections Disease, Epidemio kigy aod Public Health)

Marija Inaced Gastritis
Dr, Mofoweed Shang? Beg ccpror Oeste DIetemat iedicom
aha Afenortal Hospital

Ethok: Tiifferences in Cardiovascalay Diseases:
Genetic Variations are Undilkely.

Profesor Kennedy Craichferit

University of Manchester, United Ringo

CENTRE FOR HOTEL & TOURISM MANAGEMENT
AND THE OPEN CAMPUS, BAHAMAS.

NASSAU, BAHAMAS
THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2009
3.30 pam — 9300 pon

3:30pm Registration and Retreshments
000 pm — S500 pm.
Official Opening Ceremony
Key Hote Address:
Sustainabit Tourist in the Bahamas baking it a Realty

Senator, Hon Vincent Vanderpool Wallace
Minister of Tourism.

‘(Grosshoppers, Rabbits, Gens ond Genes
Professor Ronald Young
Pro View Chancellor Graduates studies

‘Children and Wiokence in the Caribbean

Dr. Julie Meeks Gardner

Professor af Child Development

Director, Consortium for Bocial Development and Research
Head, Caribbean Child Development Centre

TAT Open Campas

Preliminary Report on the Concerns of Bahomdan Applicants to the
University of the West Indies"

Tiets in the Chronic Mon Comin cade Diseases
Students of the Centra for Hotel & Touriem Management

REFRESHMENTS



SCHOOL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE AND
RESEARCH, THE BAHAMAS
SCHOOL OF NURSING AUDITORIUM
GROSVENOR CLOSE, NASSAU BAHAMAS
FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

7:30 am Registration - Ho Charge

8:13 om - 100 om.
‘Official Opening Cerenuinies
The APC Ror! Bark of Comada Oretare:
Targeting the Genes The New Erain Cancer Therapy
Dr. Karol] Sikora, Professor of Cancer Medicine, Imperial
College Haromersmith Hospital UE

Cervical Cancer Trends in the Bahamas
Dr. Ealeigh Butler Consultant Gynecologic Oncology, FR

‘Genetic Mbutations in the Breast Cancer Onoogenes

in Beahamian Females
Dr. Theodore Tumnquest, Consultant Medical Oncology, PRX

1200 aa -L0:30 am Goyer Bak oad Wiel Porter Eiriaos
130 am 1200 pm

Insulin Antibodies in Type 1 Deabetes
Dr. Omala Ablack DM Internal Madicine (24 Bahanae

The International Campaign against Gastro-Enteritic
Advancing The Rotavirus Vaccine
Dr. Celia Christie, Professor and. Chair of Pediatrics LW, Jamsica

HIÂ¥ FPrevaleme & CW in Retroviral Disease
Dr. Dicone Danes DM Internal Medicine (LWT) Babarmas

Feasibility of Triage PAP with HFY in Low Resource Settings
Dr. Darron Halliday: DM OBNGYH COnWT) Baba

Teenage Pregnancy amd HIV Risk Reduction in the Baheasress
Dr. Veunds Sakharker Lecturer OBSGYH UWL, Bahanias

1215 pm- 1:00 pm Sere Bog Cock dt Fisit Poster Eociribite
1:00 pm— 3:00 pm

BMI & Pregnancy Outonmes
Dor. Andres Griftths Poet Grad Resident ORGY (OWT) Bahamas

Ethnics Ditterences in Cardiovascular Diseases
‘Genetic Variations are Ualikety

Dr. Kennedy Cruickshank, Prof. Internal Medicine
Tiniversity of Manchester, United Kingdom

Effects of Sedlentary Activity on Obesity in Adolescents
Dr. Francis Willams, DM Family Practice (01) Bahairas

Wocwum Extraction in the Boharnes
Dr LixioPedeo: DM OBIGYH COAT Babaras



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 3B



RoyalFidelity plans kiosk expansion

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

RoyalFidelity Merchant
Bank & Trust is looking to
expand its commercial bank
reach by setting up a kiosk
within at least two other
branches, an investment advi-
sor with the company telling
Tribune Business that the ini-
tiative has given one share-
holder greater differentiation
from its rivals and the other
greater market reach.

Philip Dorset, who mans
RoyalFidelity’s prototype
kiosk inside Royal Bank of
Canada’s main branch on Bay
Street, told Tribune Business
that the initiative had gener-
ated “a really good response”
from the latter’s branch
clients, who were now inquir-
ing about the merchant bank’s
investment-related products.

Mr Dorset said the Royal-
Fidelity kiosk had been oper-
ational for about four months,
and added: “We did it to make
ourselves more visible. We
want to let Royal Bank clients
know we’re here, and there’s
no better way to do that than
situate ourselves in Royal
Bank’s main branch.

“We're right in the middle
of the floor. It gives me an
opportunity to talk about our
investment products and ser-
vices. That’s why we’re here.”

Mr Dorset explained that
the kiosk was one of the visi-
ble developments in the joint
venture between Royal Bank
and Fidelity. That has already
resulted in Royal Bank tak-
ing a 50 per cent stake in Roy-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that



UTE em at

ROYAL FIDELITY

|



PICTURED (left to right): Back: Michael Anderson, president of Royal Fidelity; Alden Gibson, manager of
mutual funds, Royal Fidelity. Front Row: Velma Miller, manager of investments, Royal Fidelity; Debbie Zon-
icle marketing manager, RBC; Quincy Fisher, Manager of personal financial RBC; Phillip Dorset, Royal Fideli-
ty financial investment advisor; Jan Knowles, public relations, RBC; James Graham vice-president, Roy-
al Fidelity.

alFidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust, becoming an equal
50/50 partner in the institution
with Fidelity Bank & Trust
International.

The kiosk initiative, Mr
Dorset said, was already being
eyed for expansion, with pos-
sible locations at Royal Bank’s
Palmdale branch and Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Cable Beach

branch being explored.

“The advantage to Royal
Bank of Canada is that they
can now offer pensions and
investments products to their
clients, because they can go
to a bank providing them with
access to those products,” Mr
Dorset explained. “So Royal
Bank can differentiate itself
from other commercial banks

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DNA TESTING

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by providing these services.”

He added that the main
products his kiosk was offer-
ing were brokerage accounts,
investment accounts, individ-
ual retirement accounts and
mutual funds. “We’ve had a
really good response,” Mr
Dorset said. “A lot of persons
have come up to me, asking
me what it’s all about.

“It’s one of those areas peo-
ple have an interest in, but
they don’t know how to go
about finding the information,

LAURETTE DERISIER of

PALMETTO AVE., P.O. BOX N-9426 NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

No Blood NoID
376-2810 326-7414

INSIGHT

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why

registration/naturalization

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7 day of April,
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

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and finding the information
on products and services.” He
added that another key was
explaining to Royal Bank cus-
tomers that investing was “not
for the rich, not for the elite,
but for everybody”.

Able to open accounts from
his kiosk, Mr Dorset said the
kiosk had both a sales and
marketing function. “On aver-
age, I probably see on some




days two to three people, on
others I serve 10 people.

“It goes with the ebb and
flow of customers coming into
the bank,” he explained.

Mr Dorset said the partner-
ship with Royal Bank of
Canada had given RoyalFi-
delity extra leverage, as it pro-
vided extra reassurance to
Bahamians unsure about get-
ting into investment activities.

Notice

Notice is hereby given of loss of Bahamas Government Registered










Stock Certificate as follows:

Interest Certificate
Stock Rate No.
2015-2017 1.2500APR 52.141

Maturity
Date
15/10/2017

Amount
$10,000.00

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement
certificate. If this certificate is found, please write to
PO. Box CB-12604, Nassau Bahamas.











Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs








Job vacancies:

CAMPUS NURSE COUNSELLOR
FINANCIAL CONTROLLER
FINANCIAL ANALYST








Further details can be found at the College of The
Bahamas website, www.cob.edu.bs




Interested applicants should submit:






Completed Application with supplemental documentation




requested attached

(inclusive of passport photo)
Cover letter of interest




Current Resume’




This package should be forwarded to the following address



by Monday, April 20, 2009:

The Director

Human Resources Department
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus

P.O. Box N-4912

Nassau, Bahamas OR hrapply @cob.edu.bs

(ENERAL

Worldwide

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE

General Worldwide) Europ Assistance ts lnoking to recruit an experienced Business Development
Assoclate for its medical insurance operations in the Bahamas and in the Caribbean area.

We are committed to growing our business based on quality of products and service and require a
highly motivated individual to develop business with our partners. This will involve proup sales and
renewals, , marketing and liaising with our various partners and with the broker community in the
Bahamas and throughout the wider Caribbean ares,

Minimum Requirements:

* Minimum (3) three years experience in the medical insurance market
* Experienced in sales and marketing, aé well as extremely well organized.
Strategic thinker with the ability to tackle and solve problems

Attentive to detail with a strong track record of team building,

Must possess the ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing,
Must be high energy, driven and self motivated,
Committed Customer Service Advocate,

li you believe you have these attributes and want to join a dynamic and progressive team, please

apply by sending your CV and a covering letter to:

RE: Business Development Associate

Generali Worldwide
P.O, Bow AP = 59223, Slot 361
Nassau, Bahamas

You may also email your resume, RE; Business Development Associate to:

perspective, hr] Memailco

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Generali Worldwide is a wholly owned subsidiary of Assicurazioni Generali S.p.A (the Generali
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largest insurers in the world, has an international presence across five continents, employs over 61,000
people and operates in some 40 markets, Its success is reflected in it being ranked a top 30 company by
the 2007 Fortune Global 500, with assets under management in excess of €330 billion (as at June 7008)
and has an S&P rating of AA, a Moody's rating of Aa3, AM Best of A+ and a Fitch rating of AA,





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





TTT IM G-20/OECD assault
could be a ‘blessing’





















Bahamas Food Services
has a Vacancy for a
Professional Food Service Representative

Requirements:

Minimum of Three (3) Years
Experience in the food service Industry

Excellent Communication Skills

Excellent Customer Service

Applicants are Requirements to Submit their
resumes via email ONLY to:
humanresources@bahamafood.com

All Applications will be Treated in the
Strictest Confidence

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NEVILLE BOWE, late
of Sir Lynden Pindling Estates, New Providence,
The Bahamas, DECEASED.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims
against the above-named Estate are required, on or before
the 24th April, A.D. 2009 to send their names and addresses
along with proof of their debts or claims, to the undersigned,
and if so required by notice in writing from the undersigned,
to come in and prove such debts or claims, or in default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution AND all persons indebted to the said Estate are
asked to pay their respective debts to the undersigned
immediately.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that at the expiration of the
date mentioned above, the assets of the late NEVILLE
BOWE will be distributed among persons entitled thereto
having regard only to the claims of which the Personal
Representatives shall have had notice.

Dated this 2nd day of April, A.D., 2009

C/O Turnquest & Co.
Attorneys for the Administrators
94 Nassau Street
P. O. Box N-9311
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

MINISTRY OF HOUSING

FROM page 1B

because, when imported
goods are sold to the end-con-
sumer, the price paid is the
same regardless of whether
you are rich or poor.

Mr Moss said: For years”,
the Trade Union Congress
(TUC) has advocated for a
fair form of taxation for the
Bahamas. We were like John
the Baptist in the wilderness,
calling for an end to the
regressive form of current tax-
ation in the Bahamas.

“We were not successful in
convincing any government to
adopt our view on a fair form
of taxation, namely income
tax. However, a number of
cabinet ministers - both cur-
rent and former - have all
agreed privately that the
Bahamas is in dire need of a
fair form of taxation.”

Mr Moss said the most-dis-
cussed alternatives to the pre-
sent import duty regime,
namely a sales tax or value-
added tax (VAT), still repre-
sented indirect and regressive
forms of taxation. Both were
unrelated to ability to pay,
which meant that poor and
rich Bahamians would pay the

“We were not
successful in
convincing any
government to
adopt our view
on a fair form
of taxation,
namely income
tax.”

\VHuedley Moss

same amount. Yet the former
would be paying a far greater
proportion of their income in
tax.

“This is why the World
Trade Organisation (WTO)),
Organisation for Economic
Co-Operation and Develop-
ment (OECD), and Tax Infor-
mation Exchange Agreements
(TIEAs) are blessings to those
of us who are advocating for
an equitable form of taxation
for the Bahamas,” Mr Moss
said. “Just maybe these global
agencies will assist the

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and share your story.

ENGINEERING SERVICES FOR THE DESIGN OF
ROADS AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM

IN ARDASTRA ESTATE

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP

The Goverment of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas through the Ministry of
Housing & requesting proposals from qualified Consulting Engineering finms to
provide Engineering Design, Supervision of the Construction Tender Process,
ond Contract Administration Services for the development of the following

housing subdivision:

i] Ardasira Estate, New Providence — Roads and dranage sytem design,

Interested parties may obtain further infomation and a copy of the Request for

Proposal from:

The Office of the Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Housing

Bahamas in accomplishing this
necessary task.

“I fully support the
Bahamas liberalising its tax
haven policies so that our
country will no longer be per-
ceived as a haven for tax
dodgers, and persons and enti-
ties with questionable back-
ground and character. As a
matter of fact, by complying
with the minimum request of
the OECD, we will be well on
our way towards implement-
ing an equitable form of direct
taxation for the Bahamas, and
thus eliminate the skewed
indirect taxation that current-
ly favors the rich.”

And the former union
leader added: “If the Bahamas
uses its brain, it can very much
capitalise on what it perceives
as a threat, and use this threat
to our advantage by coming

up with a single digit form of
income tax, thus attracting
new customers to our finan-
cial industry. And, at the same
time, stop a possible signifi-
cant defection of clients from
this industry. This is quite
probable because most of the
G-20 countries have high rates
of double digit income taxa-
tion.”

Mr Moss argued that there
was nothing the Bahamas can
do to persuade the G-20 coun-
tries not to pursue the collec-
tive $7.3 trillion in tax dollars
they alleged they were losing
annually.

This, he added, threatened
the whole structure and foun-
dation of the Bahamian finan-
cial services industry, as it was
clear the existing model was
on borrowed time.

JOB OPENING

Needed immediatel, expereinced Nurses
to work in Operating Theatre. Must have a
good employment background, must posses
a Bachelors Degree in Nursing, must have
Operating Theatre expereince and must
be licensed in the Commonwealth of the

ISy-lereveaehsn

For immediate consideration,

please send your resume to:

PHYSICIANS ALLIANCE LTD.
P.O.BOX EE 17022
#3 GROSVENOR CLOSE OFFICE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
FAX: (242) 326-8874

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

THIS MONTHS TOPIC:

SPEAKER:

Julia Lee - Dietitian

Purpose:

Nutrition

LECTURE DATE

Thursday, April 16th ‘09 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP ¢ Seating is Limited * 302-4603

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

LECTURE SERIES

Cloughion House
Shirley and Chartotte Sis,
Nassau, Bahamas

To educate the public about
the important health issues,
presented by distinguished

pays: Nutrition

Tet | 2a -4005 6006 : Pees:
aie Julia Lee-Dietitian

Screenings:

Get your Free Blood
Pressure Cholesterol, and
Glucose testing between

Spm & 6pm.

meeting wil be held on Tuesday 21? Apnl at 10000 om in the conference room aft the
Ministry of Housing, Claughton House. Breast Reduction & Lift

Dr. Colleen Fitzcharles Bowe
lenders aré fo be submited ma feoled anvelbooe marked a indicated in ihe RFP

document to:

RSVP:

To ensure available seating

Phone: 302-4603

The Office of the Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Housing
Clavghion House
Shirley and Charlotte Sts,
Nossou, Bohomas

Urinary Incontinence
Dr. Robin Roberts

Womens Health
Dr. Madelene Sawyer

4" DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

No boter than 12 noon on Tuesday 28", Apr, 2007, Tenders wil be opened :
on Tuesday 28", April, 2009 in the conference room ait the Ministry

Claughton House, The Government reserves the right to raject any or oll Tenders





THE TRIBUNE





Economy dampens hope of
a comfortable retirement

@ DAVID PITT
AP Personal
Finance Writer

DES MOINES, lowa

Rising costs and uncertainty
about the economy have work-
ers less confident in their abili-
ty to save enough money to
retire comfortably, say the
authors of a new study released
Tuesday, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

Even though workers are sav-
ing more and expecting to work
longer to improve their chances
of a happy retirement, there's
still a disconnect. The survey
shows many are failing to plan
appropriately and making incor-
rect assumptions about retire-
ment income. The new survey
by the nonpartisan Employee
Benefit Research Institute
reveals only 13 percent of U.S.
workers say they're very confi-
dent they'll have enough money
to retire comfortably.

"Concerns about the poor
economy coupled with the loss-
es that have recently been expe-
rienced in the stock market

have resulted in the lowest per-
centage (of a confident outlook)
since the start of the survey 19
years ago,” said Jack VanDer-
hei, one of the survey's authors
and the EBRI research direc-
tor. "But the good news is, I
really do think this will be a
wake up call for many people
who had false optimism in the
past.”

Another 41 percent of work-
ers said they're somewhat con-
fident of having enough savings
for retirement, down two per-
centage points from the year
before. Only 20 percent of peo-
ple already retired say they're
very confident they'll be finan-
cially secure. That's just half of
the 40 percent from the survey a
year earlier. It's no surprise that
most survey respondents said
the economy was largely behind
their pessimism.

Change in
behaviour

With the dour mood about
retirement prospects comes

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) TONOSHA S.A. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 30th day of March, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR



Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham

some behavioral changes that
advisers and retirement plan-
ners say may be one of the pos-
itives coming out of the eco-
nomic downturn.

The survey shows 81 percent
of those who have lost confi-
dence in having enough money
to retire say they are spending
less. The survey also shows 65
percent of workers say they are
currently saving money for
retirement.

"One strategy would have
been to roll up into a ball and
somehow put your head in the
sand and ignore this is happen-
ing,” said Dan Houston, presi-
dent of retirement and investor
services at Principal Financial
Group Inc., an underwriter of
the survey. Workers have not
done that, however. He said
people are beginning to under-
stand a secure retirement means
saving much more than they
have been.

The average worker with an
employer-sponsored retirement
plan puts aside 7 percent, which
is about half of what today's
worker would need to live a
comparable lifestyle in retire-
ment, Houston said.

Estimating how much mon-
ey it will take to live a good
retirement is one of the largest
miscalculations among workers,
VanDerhei said.

About half the workers in the
survey say their household sav-
ings and investments total less
than $25,000, excluding the val-
ue of their home. A surprising
20 percent say they have less
than $1,000 in savings.

This signals a tremendous
problem ahead. Consider that
a woman earning $40,000 at
retirement would need to have
$203,134 in savings by age 65 to
ensure she could replace 80 per-
cent of her income in retire-
ment, VanDerhei said. The cal-
culation assumes she has pur-
chased an annuity with a nomi-
nal guaranteed income and
receives Social Security. A man
under the same circumstances
would need $190,138.

PROCLAMATION
COASTAL AWARENESS MONTH

WHEREAS, The Bahamas Coastal Awareness Committee, which is populated

Sources of
retirement income

Another point of confusion
for many workers is the source
of their retirement income.

Among workers without a
defined benefit retirement plan
at work, 41 percent believe they
have such a pension plan. A
defined benefit plan is one in
which an employer pays into
but the worker does not.

"I'm just afraid you still have
a situation where these are peo-
ple who don't understand the
difference between defined ben-
efit and defined contribution
plans," VanDerhei said. "They
think they'll magically end up
with what mom and dad had.”

The U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics said in a March report
that just 20 percent of private
industry workers have a defined
benefit plan. About 43 percent
have a defined contribution
plan such as a 401(k).

A disturbing factor for many
investment advisers and retire-
ment planners from the EBRI
survey is that only 44 percent
of workers say they have tried
to calculate how much money
they'll need to have saved for
retirement. Another 44 percent
said they simply guess at how
much they'll need.

Fewer than a quarter say
they've tried to approximate
how much they'll need and few-
er than a fifth say they've
checked with a financial adviser.
Nine percent say they read or
heard about how much they
should have, 7 percent have
used an Internet calculator and
5 percent filled out a worksheet.

The survey is based on ran-
dom telephone calls to 1,257
people age 25 and older in Jan-
uary. It included a cell phone
supplement to encompass a
broader selection of people.
The survey's statistical margin
of error is plus or minus 3 per-
centage points.

The was sponsored by EBRI
and Washington-based market
research company Mathew
Greenwald & Associates Inc.

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 5B

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LASHAN MARIE MOSS of JOAN
HEIGHT’S, P.O. BOX CB-13475, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

VACANCY NOTICE

Associate Attorney Required

For growing Law Practice
Qualifications:

‘Called to the Bahamas Bar for a minimum of
three years

‘Successful candidate must have knowledge and
experience and intrest in Litigation, Conveyances
and Mortgages, Family Law, and Corporate
matters

Please e-mail resume to

positionforattorney@gmail.com
on or before April 17, 2009.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

TECH STREAM
INVESTMENTS LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000). TECH STREAM INVESTMENTS
LIMITED is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 25th
day of March, 2009.

Michael Charles Russell
Waterloo House
Don Street
St. Helier, Jersey
Liquidator



MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

by stakeholders from the private and public sectors, was formed and mandated to heighten
the public’s awareness of the importance of protecting and preserving our coastline, and to
monitor the extent to which the country is in conformity with its obligations as signatory
to several international marine Conventions;

NOTICE OF
EXTENSION

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in
New Providence and the Family Islands including
Grand Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

AND WHEREAS, in 1986 the international community took measures to
mobilize both human and material resources in an effort to direct attention to the need
for coastal areas, comprising sea, beach and the land surrounding the wider Caribbean,
to be managed and protected for the economic and social well-being of their respective
inhabitants;

AND WHEREAS, in June 1992, The Bahamas became signatory to the
Convention of Biological Diversity, agreeing thereby to recognize the importance of
marine biodiversity and the need to develop mechanisms to ensure the sustainable use of
coastal and marine biological diversity;

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser”) has
EXTENDED the date to receive sealed bids, from persons to provide
transportation to and from schools in accordance with the provision
of the Education Act. Bid forms can be collected from the Ministry
of Education and the office of Family Island Administrators between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

AND WHEREAS, in June 1997, the Government of The Bahamas became
signatory of the Ramsar Convention;

AND WHEREAS, as a country whose revenue generation is almost wholly
reliant on the Tourism Industry, The Bahamas recognizes the importance of its coastal
zones to its vital industry and by extension the socio-economic development of the

county Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed

envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the

AND WHEREAS, policy makers and programme planners in The Bahamas are subject bided on.

keenly aware of their obligations to educate stakeholders about the value of the country’s
natural resources and the devastating effect which natural and man-made disasters, such
as climate change and human activities, can have on the coastal environment if long-range
planning and mitigation efforts are not undertaken;

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Monday, 13th April, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they

AND WHEREAS, the Ministry of Tourism, in collaboration with partners in may be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

the public and private sectors, has designated the month of April 2009 as the month to
implement a schedule of activities and events to heighten the awareness of the importance

f th try’ tal ; . . ; .
lilies alae Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those

Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.

NOW, THEREFORE, | Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of The Common- L
on Tuesday, 14th April, 2009 at the address below:

wealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim April, 2009 “COASTAL AWARENESS
MONTH.”

The Chairman, Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel: (242) 327-1530

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
I have hereunto set my Hand
and Seal this Ist day of April, 2009

Hhesdel Faade

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Court dimisses hotel marina docks seizure

contract.

“The payments were to be
made progressively throughout
the history of the agreement.

“Some progressive payments

FROM page 1B

sion of the floating docks was to

be done in several stages.
“The schedule of payments

is set out in Exhibit A in the






















COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

2009
No.0020

Equity Side

IN THE MATTER OF a piece parcel or lot of land contained
by measurements one and two hundred and ninety four
hundredths (1.294) acres and situate on the northeastern side of
the Queen's Highway in the vicinity of Palestine Baptist Church
in the settlement of Deadman’s Cay in the Island of Long Island,

The Bahamas.
AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Alvin S. Turnquest.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act 1959
NOTICE

The Petitioner in this matter claims to be the owner in fee simple
possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described and the
Petitioner has made an application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and
the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in the
Certificate of Title granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal office
hours at:

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court.
(2) The Administrators Office at Clarence Town, Long Island.
(3) The Chambers of the undersigned.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or
right to dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall before the 30th day of April, A.D., 2009
from the publication of the notice inclusive of the day of such
publication file Notice in the Supreme Court in the City of
Nassau in the Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve
on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his or her
claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. The failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his or her claim within the time fixed by the Notice
aforesaid shall operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 25th day of February, A.D., 2009

PYFROM & CO,
Chambers
No.58, Shirley Street,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner.

have been made. A balance
remains due and owing.”

A dispute arose between
Florida Floats and Emerald Bay
Resort Holdings, which is cur-
rently in receivership, over pay-
ment of the outstanding bal-
ance. Arbitration proceedings
found in the contractor’s favour,
and awarded it a sum of money,
which it was now looking to the
Bahamian Supreme Court to
enforce.

“Tn its summons, the plaintiff
[Florida Floats] seeks to have
the court grant it access to the
defendant’s premises for the
purpose of securing and remov-
ing that portion of the docks as
would presumably represent an
amount sufficient to cover the
amount awarded it in arbitra-
tion,” Justice Lyons ruled.

He added that the corner-

stone of Florida Floats’ claim
was that “title to the docks it
wishes to take possession of has
not passed, and those docks
remain its property”.

This was dealt with in the
Emerald Bay contract by what
Justice Lyons described as a
Romalpa Clause.

“Title to the docks passes
when payment is made and not
before,” he explained of its
meaning. “Thus, in a contract
of this nature, where there is a
schedule of progressive pay-
ments, the title to the docks,
which the progressive payments
represent, passes when that pay-
ment is made.”

However, Justice Lyons said
that despite being told that the
Emerald Bay marina contract
required payment in eight
stages, and that some payments

had been made, no evidence
was placed before him to prove
that assertion. Nor did the con-
tract itself provide any help.

The main document relied on
by Florida Floats was an affi-
davit from Kendal Nottage, an
associate with the law firm rep-
resenting the company. His affi-
davit stated that Docks B and D
in the Emerald Bay marina
equated to 9,480 square feet of
total dock space, and were con-
structed at a cost of $1.176 mil-
lion.

This, Mr Nottage alleged,
meant that repossessing both
these docks would satisfy the
amount awarded to Florida
Floats by the courts. But Jus-
tice Lyons ruled: “I have no
idea of Mr Nottage’s expertise
in coming to the mathematical
calculation that he does.

“T have no idea as to whether

not paid for.” Dismissing Flori-
da Floats’ claim for lack of evi-
dence, the judge found: “As the
application of a Romalpa
Clause is a question of fact, I
am totally unable, due to the
complete lack of appropriate
evidence, to come to any con-
clusion as to when title to any
portion of those floating docks
passed, if at all.

“Tam thus unable to come to
the conclusion sought as to
whether title has not passed,
and thus grant the orders
sought.”

Justice Lyons also gave short
shrift to the arguments by
Emerald Bay Resort Holdings’
attorneys that the docks had
become fixtures, and it was thus
not right for the Supreme Court
to order their removal.

This again, he said, was not
supported by evidence placed

NOTICE is hereby given that BRIAN RAMAISH SARJUDAS
of SEABREEZE ESTATES, P.O. BOX N-9505, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RODLIN FLORESTOL of
EAST ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 14" day of April, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSETTE DORSAINVIL
of MOUNT TABOUR ESTATE OFF NASSAU VILLAGE,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7" day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

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Docks B and D were or were _ before the court.

NOTICE

HORSESTAR LIMITED
N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) HORSESTAR LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 8th April, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse

Trust Limited, Nassau Bahamas.

Dated this 9th day of April, A.D. 2009



Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

2008/CLE/qui/1871

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
parcel or lot of land being Lot 215, Stella
Maris Subdivision Phase Three, Section Two,
Stella Maris, situate between the settlements
of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown on
a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles
Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Warren Robert Boli

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act 1959
The Petition of Warren Robert Bolt
of the city of Canton, in the State of Ohio, one
of the states in the United States of America
in respect of: - ALL THAT piece parcel
or lot of land being Lot 215, Stella Maris
Subdivision Phase Three, Section Two, Stella
Maris, situate between the settlements of
Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
which said piece parcel or lot of land has
such position shape boundaries marks and
dimensions as are shown on a plan filed
herein and thereon coloured yellow

Warren Robert Boli claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the
said tract of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons
having Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a
claim not recognized in the petition shall on or before the 23"
of May A.D., 2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a statement of his
claim on or before the 23" of May A.D., 2009 will operate as a
bar to such claim.

Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:

1.The Registry of the Supreme Court;

2.The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for
the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria
Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;

3.The Notice Board of the Administrator at Stella Maris, Long

Island; and
4.The Local Constable at Stella Maris, Long Island

Dated the 23" day of March A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 7B



a |S
Freeport needs 'thousands' of

small, foreign- owned licensees

FROM page 1B

mately increase their Bahamas-
based investments, and elimi-
nate the “shifting sands” upon
which the city’s economy was
relying.

He told Tribune Business:
“My thought is that we should
not always look at big, huge
developments. What Freeport
needs is hundreds, if not thou-
sands, of small licensees as well.

“Tt should not be limited to
Bahamians. It is my view that
the more foreigners we can
entice to invest in Freeport, and
at the same time give those for-
eigners and their families per-
manent residence and citizen-
ship status, so they become part
of the community — not just
temporary extra for the com-
munity — then we will see some
sustained, long-term founda-
tions for growth.”

Mr Smith added: “We can-
not do it all ourselves, and
unless we give foreign investors
confidence about the long-term
continuity of their investments,
be it large or small, and give
them confidence about their
long-term Immigration status,
so that they become permanent
fixtures in the community, we
will still be building on shifting
sands.

Immigration

“T would again encourage
opening our Immigration doors
to give people long-term Immi-
gration rights. We need immi-
gration, and should use it as a
tool of development, not one
of restriction and protection-
ism.”

Mr Smith’s comments are
similar to those uttered earlier
this year by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, who indicat-
ed that Bahamians’ general
aversion to essential expatriate
workers being brought into this
country was hampering eco-
nomic development. It was, the
Prime Minister hinted, deter-
ring both potential new
investors and current ones from
expanding their existing facili-
ties. Meanwhile, Mr Smith told
Tribune Business that he did
not subscribe to “the doom and
gloom vision of Freeport, and
Freeport’s current economic sit-
uation” that many seemed to
have bought into.

While the tourism sector was
admittedly not performing well,
Mr Smith said this was true for
all parts of the world. Freeport,
though, was reaping the benefits
from a diversified economy,
with its industrial sector help-
ing to compensate for some of
the tourism-related downturn.

Without that diversification,
and the existence of its indus-



“It would be
fantastic if all
these three pistons
were humming at
once in Freeport.
But at least two of
the three are
humming, in some
health and in
some vigour.”

Fred Smith

trial sector, the Freeport econ-
omy would be in “complete
meltdown”.

“Although we have seen a
dramatic downturn in the
tourism sector, the truth of the
matter is that Freeport’s diver-
sified economic base is still sus-
taining quite a strong economy.
Everything is not as bad as
many perceive,” Mr Smith told
Tribune Business. "A diversi-
fied economy helps to sustain
a community in good and bad
times.

“The Container Port is still

growing strong, although it
recently laid-off a number of
employees. The Grand
Bahamas Shipyard has seen a
dramatic expansion with the
addition of a third dry dock, the
Sands Brewery is doing quite
well, the new glass window fac-
tory has just opened. Vopak has
plans for expansion, and Brad-
ford Marine is doing well. There
is a tremendous amount of low
and middle income housing in
various stages of construction
in the Lucaya area. Devco has
been doing a lot of infrastruc-
ture and development improve-
ments.”

Mr Smith added that a fur-
ther injection of fresh capital
into Freeport’s economy had
been provided by the initial
phase of Ross University’s
investment in its Grand
Bahama-based medical school.
This, he said, had already cre-
ated additional demand for
housing, plus retail and restau-
rant services.

“Freeport has, over the
decades, experienced ups and
downs,” Mr Smith told Tribune
Business. “Unfortunately, since
Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne,
Freeport has been quite chal-
lenged. But the economy has

EXPERIENCED COOK WANTED

Looking for person with experience in preparing
international and native dishes. Persons must posses at least (3)
years experience, also must be an aggressive worker. Able to
work shifts and willing to work on Sunday's.

All interested persons please hand deliver a copy of your resumé,
a passport photo, police record and health certificate to the
Nassau Yatch Club, Attention Manager

WANTED
SALES MANAGER

for a manufacturing concern.

Job requirements:

Bahamian - 35 years or older

College Graduate

Strong communication skills (oral & verbal)

Computer literate

Capable of motivating 20 + staff to achieve

company's goals.

Willing to work bong hours.

Excellent personal skills necessary for promoting
customer and employee relations.

Salary commensurate with experience and

performance

All applications will be treated in the strictest of confidence,
Send applications to P.O. Box CB-11392.

UBS ANNEX

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

LEASING
OPPORTUNITY

For infomation, contact:

W, Larry Roberts
T; 242 376.0026
robe sebonorarealty bs

Donald Martinborough
T: 242 396.0028

dmorfinboroughs bahoamasre altybs

Bahar Reevalhy Limited
P.O. Box M-1 1a
Nosou, Bahar

Wate DOMOMosCommearciat

—} —



elie a

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TOTAL REMTABLE AREA: 11,427 SF

PREMISES: First lavel

AVAILABILITY: september 2009

TERM: Negotiable

Closs 4 Building

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REALTY un
ScOMMBFET IAL
? meson wit

CBRE

CO ACAASD ELLE

been able to sustain itself with
the industrial sector, housing,
construction and sales to for-
eign real estate buyers.

“If the industrial sector was
not here, Freeport would be in a
state of complete meltdown. It
is a reflection of the vision
inherent in the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement that there is the for-
eign residential economy, there
is the tourism economy, and
there is the industrial and com-
mercial economy.

“It would be fantastic if all
these three pistons were hum-
ming at once in Freeport. But at
least two of the three are hum-
ming, in some health and in
some vigour.”

Mr Smith added that
Freeport needed “continued
foreign and local investment”
if its economy was to grow and
thrive, with the industrial sector
having picked up the slack from
tourism when it came to pro-
viding employment and invest-
ment opportunities.

“Speaking to the continued
shareholder dispute at the Port
Authority, that is possibly a fac-
tor in discouraging inward
development, and the sooner
the parties can settle their dis-
pute, the better the investment
environment will become,” Mr
Smith said.



Commercial Space

a

GROSVENOR SUITES - WEST

#3 Grosvenor Close - off Shirley Street

Phone 242-328-5550
for viewing.

First month free with renovations

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
SABLEDOR HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution. Salwa
Bahey EJ-Din Mounib El-Sayed is the Liquidator and can
be contacted at Zahran Plaza, 3rd Floor, 7th Circle, P.O. Box
140825, Amman 11814, Jordan. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before the 10th day of May, 2009.

Si
fet

et ie

Sabet Bahey El-Din Mounib El-Sayed
Liquidana



PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL

VACANCY NOTICE

COORDINATOR PATIENT RELATIONS SERVICES

Applications are

Invited from suitably qualified individuals for
of Coordinator Patient Relation Services,
Public Hospitals Authority.

the post

Princess Margaret Hospital,

Applicant must possess the following qualifications:-

Bachelors Degree in Psychology, one of the Social Sciences, Human
Relations or related field and five (5) years relevant experience three (3)
of which must be at the supervisory level.

DUTIES

Establishes annual goals and objectives for the Patient Relation Services
and chairs the Patient Relation Management Team.

Coordinates the development of policies and procedures for the

effective functioning of the Patient Relation Services and supports

the Hospital’s quality improvement.

Keeps abreast of developments in the hospital and provides suggestions,
assistance and counsel to the Hospital Executive Management Committee
as to how services can be improved to further the mission and goals of the

hospital

Advises the Hospital Administrator/designate Administrative Officer on the
general operation of the Patient Relation Services, changing trends of
problems/concerns addressed and appropriate/alternate plans/strategies
to meet the objectives of the Patient Relations.

Implements management policies and ensures compliance.

Coordinates the preparation of the budget for the service, identifying
human and material resources required for the effective operation of

the department, with appropriate justification.

Selects qualified personnel following the established guidelines in
accordance with the Public Hospitals Authority’s hiring practices,
Employee Relation Policies and procedures and hospital established
positions for Patient Relations Services.

Assists with educational in-service programmes, special projects and
studies assigned by the Hospital Administrator and submits reports as

required.

Conducts informal and formal performance enhancement coaching
on an ongoing basis, utilizing the Criteria Based Job Description/
Evaluation as a reference tool and documenting results.

. Annually completes Employee Performance Evaluation prior to
established evaluation date in accordance with the Public Hospitals.
Authority policies and procedures.

. Coordinates and conducts staff meetings regularly and maintains
ongoing dialogue with Patient Representatives and Trainees to
provide information, interpret policies, procedures and standards
and to foster open communication in the department

. Supervises the Patient Relation activities to ensure that acceptable
standards are being maintained at all times and that such standards
are consistent of those approved by the Executive Management

Committee.

. Provides leadership, support, advice and guidance to Patient Relation staff
and maintains a monthly updated list of staff telephone/fax contacts.

. Collaborates with unit staff In coordinating a planned and systematic
process for monitoring/evaluating Patient Relation Services and for
problem solving activities, ensuring that they meet the obiective and

required standards.

15. Prepares monthly reports of activities of Patient Relation Services for
submission to the Hospital Administrator.

16. Responds to queries addressed to the hospital concerning Patient Relation
activities as directed and approved by the Hospital Administrator.

17. Approves requests for routine and non-stock supplies for the Patient
Relation Services and assists with the establishment of an inventory list
and procuring of materials as needed on a timely basis for the service.

18. Deploys Patient Relation Services staff to meet inpatient and outpatient
service needs ensuring adequate coverage for absenteeism, vacation and

special leave.

19. Monitors attendance, overtime, and disciplinary matters as it relates
to staff within the department.

20. Assists with arranging the airlifting of patients.

21. Liaises with volunteer groups to coordinate their efforts to assist for the
benefit of patients/guests of Princess Margaret Hospital.

22. Provides information and consultation as requested by colleagues in the
broad professional community.

23. Performs other related duties.

The salary for the post is In Scale HAA$7 ($28,650 x 700 - $32,850)

Letters of application and curricula vitae should be submitted through your
Head of Department to the Chief Hospital Administrator. Princess Margaret
Hospital or 3rd Terrace Centerville (West), no later than 24th April, 2009.





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



NTS SS
Rules must be enforced for capital market integrity

FROM page 1B

od close or thereabouts for
Bahamas Supermarkets should
have seen those statements pub-
lished by end-October 2008.
What everyone got was unau-
dited accounts some five months
late, and seemingly not even a
slap on the wrist for the City Mar-
kets holding company from the
Securities Commission for its tar-
diness and the information vacu-
um that has existed since the 2007
annual general meeting (AGM).
Transparency and full disclosure,
especially where the 22 per cent
minority investors are concerned,
have been sadly lacking, as evi-

denced by no formal public state-
ment on why external auditors
KPMG are finding it so hard to
sign off on the 2008 audit.

But there is a much wider issue
than Bahamas Supermarkets’
well-being here, and it goes to the
heart of Bahamian capital mar-
kets integrity and regulation. If a
high-profile company such as this
can apparently get away with
missing statutory requirements,
with no explanation and without
so much as a public reprimand,
what does that say to all other
listed firms and Securities Com-
mission registrants? In Tribune
Business’s opinion, it sends the
message: “Don’t worry about
playing by the strict letter of the

Legal Notice

NOTICE

regulations, because they are nev-
er enforced.” Surely that is the
wrong message to send. What will
it do to investor confidence in
market integrity?

To be fair to the Securities
Commission, it is widely recog-
nised that the existing legislation
is wholly inadequate in terms of
enforcement and sanctions pow-
ers. Yet it admitted earlier this
year that it had failed to enforce
the rules in other areas, namely
broker/dealer capital require-
ments and investment funds
meeting the statutory deadlines
for filing their annual figures.

With all due respect to the
Securities Commission, if there
is much more of this it will come
to be seen as a relatively ‘tooth-
less tiger’ that refuses to bite
when the going gets tough. Not
that it is alone in this respect.
Many of the Bahamas’ problems
stem from just that — enforce-
ment. This nation has all the laws
it needs on the books, but they’re
never enforced. If you’re not
going to enforce the rules, get rid
of them!

Back in the City Markets’ aisle,
it is obvious that its parent — and
all others on the so-called over-
the-counter market — need to be
brought on to the Bahamas Inter-
national Securities Exchange

Legal Notice

(BISX). There, they would also
have to comply with BISX Rules,
an extra set of regulatory stan-
dards, and there would be no
debate as to whether they are tru-
ly ‘public companies’. Enforcing
the rules would also go a long
way.

As for the operational side, it is
apparent that the road to recov-
ery for City Markets may be one
that lasts for several years, and it
will not be painless. Despite neg-
ative equity of more than $2 mil-
lion, which makes its parent tech-
nically insolvent, the 12-store
supermarket chain has been able
to meet all operational expenses
and supplier payments. The main
question mark is the ability of its
major 78 per cent shareholder,
BSL Holdings, to service the $24
million debt load it took on from
Royal Bank of Canada in the

However, it appears the bank is
holding off, at least for now.

In many respects, Bahamas
Supermarkets is a mirror image of
where its rival Abaco Markets
was some six years ago. Back
then, the Solomon’s SuperCentre
and Cost Right owner was bur-
dened by a similar level of Royal
Bank debt, and strained cash flow
and liquidity, which all resulted
in a $24 million-plus loss for fiscal
2003. As with City Markets now,
a team from Royal Bank’s Cana-
dian head office had already been
in to run the rule over the com-
pany’s internal operations.

My, my. How the tables have
turned. It is now Bahamas Super-
markets that has gone from
churning out a consistent $6-$8
million per annum profit, with
regular dividends, under Winn-
Dixie, to a supermarket chain

NOTICE
UTRECHT
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— f,—

absence of dividends upstreamed
from Bahamas Supermarkets.

HAWKINSHILL ACRE LTD. SEE page 9B

(In Voluntary Liquidation) "
Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAPHIRE & DIAMONDS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of UTRECHT INVESTMENTS LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is- Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Bahamas.
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Fae

A global leader in audit, tax and advisory services
Legal Notice

NOTICE
SEB FAMILY LTD.

Assistant Manager/Manager, Restructuring

The Assistant Manager/Manager will report to the Déctors of KPMG Restructuing Ltd... The role has
primary responsibility for managing qmortfolio of liquidation and corpoate restructuring clients.
—_ —>, ___.
Specific duties include managing: ‘
© liquidation cases, including both voluntary liquidationand court appointments
e restructuring engagements for lenders, providig independent business reviews of borrowers’
businesses, and assisting lenders in developing and implemeting options with respect to their
financial exposure to such borrowers
restructuring advisory services tocompanies with financial issues
complex and lengthy litigation issuesin several jurisdictions
a portfolio of restructuring clients, including financial matters sl as work in progress, and
accounts receivable
restructuring professionals in their work, andnvolvement in the internal performance appraisal
process
business development initiatives

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SEB FAMILY LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Applicants must be a university graduate and a memér of a recognized accountary or insolvency body in
addition to holding a minimum of five to seven years rlevant work experience, with preferably three or
more of those in a restructuring role at a comparablevel. This position requires attention to detail, strong
financial and writing skills, the ability to work at one's own initiative, and thability to meet tight

deadlines.
Legal Notice

NOTICE
NUILITE INC.

—_— f—

KPMG offers a competitive compensation and benefitspackage inclusive of medical and pension plans.



Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, a copy of their degree and professional certifications and a copy of their transcripts to: KPMG,
Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or jalightbourne@ kpmg.com.bs no later than Friday 24 April, 2009.

AUDIT = TAX «© ADVISORY

© 2009. KPMG, a Bahamas partnership, and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Notice is hereby given that m accordance with Section 138

Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NUILITE INC. has been completed; a Cer-

tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

ROYAL = FIDELITY

has therefore been struck off the Register.
Morey 21 Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 7 APRIL 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,622.57 | CHG -15.99 | %CHG -0.98 | YTD -89.79 | YTD % -5.24
FINDEX: CLOSE 805.27 | YTD -3.55% | 2008 -12.31%

WWwWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.28 1.28 0.00 0.127 10.1
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992 11.1
6.95 Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95 0.00 0.244 28.5
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877 N/M
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.105 30.0
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 43.1
11.31 Cable Bahamas 12.55 11.31 -1.24 1.309 8.6
2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83 0.00 0.249 11.4
6.45 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 0.438 14.7
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs 0.099 23.8
2.09 Doctor's Hospital 0.240 8.7
6.02 Famguard 0.598 13.0
11.00 Finco 0.322 34.2
0.794 13.1
0.337 15.0
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6
0.407 13.7
0.952 11.0
0.180 55.6

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

6.45
2.42
2.09
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.59

6.45
2.36
2.09
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.59

0.00
-0.06
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.05
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW CAPSTONES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

10.40
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60

10.00

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 TY%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
£.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA _ Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664
2.8962
1.4489
3.3201
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0440
1.0364
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund

Div $
1.3041
2.9230
1.3847
3.3201
12.1564

100.0000

96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investrnent Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund 4.40
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S81) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany‘s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE



CLICO's foreign liabilities could he asset for liquidator

( LICO (Bahamas) poli-
cyholders will not have
had too much to celebrate this
Easter, and understandably so.
Their long-term life savings, pen-
sions and healthcare coverage are
all inaccessible, and how much
they get back is in the hands of
court-appointed liquidator Craig
‘Tony’ Gomez. It is, as Tribune
Business said, likely to be less
than the full dollar invested.
Yet there is finally a first glim-
mer of light for Bahamian insur-
ance policyholders and annuity
depositors, but not for their coun-
terparts in Guyana and Suriname.
The hint is contained in Mr
Gomez’s first report to the
Supreme Court as provisional liq-
uidator, where he states that $49
million worth of funds ($34 mil-
lion from Guyana, $15 million
from Suriname) that flowed into

Rules must be enforced for
capital market integrity

FROM page 8B

now embarking on the long road to recovery. Abaco Markets, fol-
lowing four to five years of downsizing, cost cutting and hard deci-
sions, is by contrast starting to churn out regular annual profits
and getting investors salivating over the prospect of dividend pay-
ments.

And that is why Bahamas Supermarkets shareholders should
not lose hope. Yes, much will depend on Trinidadian operating
partner Neal & Massey, and the new business plan put together for
City Markets. But the way forward has been shown by Abaco Mar-
kets, granted that it may be an arduous one.



policy contracts.

As a result, if this line of think-
ing and treatment is upheld by
the Supreme Court, it would
mean that $49 million worth of
liabilities would drop down the

(Bahamas). That would mean
Bahamian institutions and poli-
cyholders would get first call on
the assets, with Guyana and Suri-
name left to fight over what is left
and be the ones most out of pock-

Removing those $49 million
worth of liabilities would result
in a far healthier balance sheet
facing Mr Gomez, with some
$116.965 million in assets playing
$86 million in liabilities. Even if
$40-million plus is knocked off
the value of CLICO (Bahamas)
Florida real estate investments,
reducing assets to around $66 mil-
lion, the situation facing the lig-
uidator will look far healthier.

On another note, CLICO
(Bahamas) balance sheet shows
just how much of a deposit-taking
(banking) institution it was, as
opposed to an insurance compa-
ny. Some $98.524 million — almost
$100 million — of its $135 million
liabilities are to Executive Flexi-
ble Premium Annuity (EFPA)
clients, representing those who
piled into it above-average inter-
est return annuity products. They

CLICO (Bahamas) were trans-
fers of funds that amounted to
related-party loans, not standard

pecking order, and be ranked
below the liabilities owed to
Bahamian clients of CLICO

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ALIANZA SLOPES INC.

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ALIANZA SLOPES INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FLORIDORO INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BOLLINGEN HOLDINGS LTD.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BOLLINGEN HOLDINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KK COWBOYS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

did not equate risk with return.
Lesson learned for the future, we
hope, ladies and gentlemen.

et. Could mean some tricky
CARICOM meetings for Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JEVER CLIVER LTD.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of JEVER CLIVER LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KBOTO LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 18th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MONTAQUE ALPS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WIDONWIDE LTD.

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of WINDONWIDE LID. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 9B

Legal Notice



























NOTICE
EOLO GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KLAGEN LTD.

— f,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KLAGEN LTD. has been completed; a Cer-
tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAN MARTIN S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VILNIUS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CRANBERYANNE INC.

— + /_—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CRANBERYANNE INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

rr =<). | =<<—
Dispute over ex-governor general's $10m life policy sent into arbitration mode

FROM page 1B

for PHL Variable Insurance
Company.”

In its initial complaint, Dulaw
Management alleged that for a
life insurance policy to be valid
under Florida law, the policy
owner must have an “insurable
interest in the life of the pro-

posed insured”.

It alleged that this was not
the case with the policy taken
out on Sir Orville’s life, as the
defendants had obtained an
insurance policy on the former
governor-general’s life without
having an insurable interest in
it.

Dulaw alleged that Bound-

less Solutions, acting as a PHL
agent, had approached Sir
Orville in early 2006, propos-
ing that it would obtain free life
insurance for two years on his
life.

It also claimed that the policy
was represented as a vehicle for
Sir Orville to “market his insur-
ability in a way that would

obtain for him a substantial
profit”.

Scheme

However, Dulaw alleged that
the transaction was nothing
more than a scheme that would
enable LaSalle Bank, Coventry
Capital and Boundless Solu-

Our youth will be responsible for their financial futures one day. Will they be ready?

tions to obtain large fees, con-
vert Sir Orville’s insurability to
themselves and end up with a
$10 million policy on the for-
mer governor-general’s life.
Dulaw also alleged that the
$1.507 million loan that LaSalle
advanced to pay the premiums
for two years was a “sham
transaction”, and a non-
recourse loan that restricted its
ability to sell the life insurance
policy even if it were able to
obtain financing that exceeded
the loan amount. Annual pre-
miums were said to be $540,000.
Ultimately, Dulaw alleged

THE TRIBUNE

that the policy was an “illegal
wagering contract” that need-
ed to be rescinded.

In response, all four US com-
panies vehemently denied
Dulaw Management’s allega-
tions. In its defence, Boundless
Solutions alleged that the con-
tracts contained all the required
details that fully disclosed the
terms of the deal. It added that
the coverage remained in force
until an alleged default on the
loan, at which point LaSalle and
Coventry converted the policy
to their own interest.

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cs THE TRIBUNE

f 4 tf
man TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009





S

ECTION C © HEALTH: Body and mind



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iia eel i oLiciritirivitit tat ttiet tt rir

iii eee! Cer ecre cece rre pf eee

Peta te a eT

a



‘>. oe





@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

MOST people assume
the choice of deciding
who to marry, which
college to attend, or
deciding one of the
many major decisions
we are faced with dur-
ing life, should be per-
sonal decisions.

However many fail to give as much thought
to post-mortem decisions, in many cases leay-
ing family or doctors to decide what’s best for
them.

According to one medical professional,
detailing your last wishes when it comes to
deciding whether or not to donate your
organs after your death, determining whether
or not to pull the plug should you end up ina
comatose state, or whether to be buried or
cremated, are decisions that not only direct
your physical destiny, but could give life to
dozens more.

Doctor Michael Darville - Assistant Clini-
cal Director for Intermediate, and Intensive
Care Units IMCU/ICU) at Doctors Hospital
- spoke at the facility’s recent health sympo-
sium where he explained the importance of
pre-planning your final wishes.

He explained one of the most positive

results can be organ donation as doing so can
save up to to eight lives, and potentially ben-
efit close to 50 individuals.

Referring to critical and terminally ill
patients, Dr Darville said: “We (doctors)
often have to decide what’s in the best inter-
est of the patient, but sometimes that does
not line up with what the family would want.

“And so we’d have to sit and come toa
point of agreement or understanding that is
in the best interest of the patient.”

With this proving to sometimes be a diffi-
cult experience for both the doctor and the
family, Dr Darville said the practice of
advanced directives does help significantly
with providing proper medical or palliative
care in accordance with a patients wishes.

Advanced directives is a process which

SEE page five



What is Onycholysis?





ONYCHOLYSIS is the spontaneous ;
separation of the nail plate from the nail . :
bed, usually beginning at the distal free
margin and progressing proximally.

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

SO you are sitting at home painting
your toenails that bright fuchsia color
you love so much. Everything is going
great and it looks pretty good, besides
the subtle line mistakes, when all of a
sudden your toenail drops clean off.
You shut your eyes thinking that the
pain will come soon, but nothing hap-
pens. No blood, no pain, but a brand
new, soft, toe nail has emerged as you
slowly, but carefully remove the old
toenail. If this sort of thing happens to
you on more than one occasion, you
are not mutating, but it is a common
condition and you are not alone.

According to Emedicine.com, Ony-
cholysis is the spontaneous separation
of the nail plate from the nail bed, usu-
ally beginning at the distal free margin
and progressing proximally.

“Men and women can develop ony-
cholysis; however, studies demonstrate

an overwhelmingly female predilec-
tion. This is commonly seen in women
whose nails are exposed to chemical
irritants during housework. Other
common causes of onycholysis may
include repetitive micro trauma from a
poorly fitting shoe for example and,
onychomycosis (fungal infection),” the
article stated.

Doctor of Podiatric Medicine at the
Bahamas Foot Centre located on
Rosetta Street, Monique Mitchell, said
there are a number of reasons why this
problem can occur, especially in
women who have longer toenails.

“Many women like to wear their toe
nails long now a days and many prob-
lems can arise from doing that and ony-
cholysis is one of them. When you wear
a closed in shoe and you walk, your
foot can advance and hit the inside of
the shoe and the nail lifts up. A lot of
people do not feel when the toe nail
comes off or is coming off and do not
pay attention to it,” Mrs Mitchell said.

Medical conditions that can be asso-
ciated with onycholysis, according to

Emedicine.com include: psoriasis, preg-
nancy, lichen planus, systemic lupus,
Reiter’s syndrome, thyroid disease, sec-
ondary syphilis, anemia, diabetes mel-
litus, scleroderma, atopic dermatitis,
allergic contact dermatitis to nail cos-
metics, certain drugs including oral con-
traceptives, tetracyclines, captopril, etc,
foreign body for example acrylic nails
and congenital or hereditary etiologies.

Mrs Mitchell said those who experi-
ence onycholysis, should not be
alarmed as there are a number of ways
to treat the condition.

“You can first see a doctor to make
sure that you do not have a fungus.
The other thing is that you can make
sure you have your nails properly
groomed and cut at an appropriate
length. Also, keep you nails dry and
avoid frequent nail polish remover
exposure. It takes four to six months
for a fingernail to fully regrow, and
twice as long for toenails, therefore,
you will not notice the toe nail infection
until it is ready to come off most of
the time,” Mrs Mitchell said.



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PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

[LILIES

AND OTHERS

‘LILIES AND OTHERS’ cov-
ers all those bulbs, rhi-
zomes, tubers and corns that
we plant in selected areas of
the garden to grow in their
own chosen season, die
away above ground, then
come back again the next

year with added interest.

Bulbs, etc, come with instructions
as to what depth to plant them. You
may be advised to dig up the bulbs
after the blooming season is over but
that is not necessary in The Bahamas
except for those bulbs that need a
cooling period. Once flowering is
over, most bulbs multiply and pro-
duce even more flowers in the second
and subsequent years.

Bulbs that need a cooling period —
usually those that bloom in late win-
ter and early spring in temperate
zones — should be dug up once they
have fully died back and stored in
cool, dry conditions. In the period
before the expected growing time the
bulbs should be stored in the refriger-
ator for anywhere from a month to
two months.

Bulbs that grow in the late spring,
summer and autumn in temperate
zones are the ones that can stay in
the ground year round and these
form the vast majority.

The true Lily family is vast and
complex. Those often seen in
Bahamian nurseries are Asiatic, Ori-
ental and Longiflorum hybrids. Asi-
atic lilies are early blooming and
must therefore be stored and refrig-
erated in order to enjoy them year
after year. Although Easter lilies may
seem to be early bloomers, they are
forced by nursery

suppliers in order to be ready for
the Easter market. Left to their own
devices they are summer bloomers.

Amaryllis and Hippeastrum are
two different species but are so often
confused that we can deal with them
as one. Both have very large bulbs
and produce wonderfully ornate
flowers that are long lasting. Both

tend not to produce secondary bulbs
in our climate.

The gloriosa lily is a subtropical
plant grown from rhizomes that loves
our climate. But it is not a lily. Many
plants are called lilies because they
are lily-like. Other plants which are
called “lily” but are not include rain
lily and spider lily.

Gloriosa lily is a sprawling vine

that usually grows to four or five feet.

It is best grown in clusters around
some framework for support. When
the flowers first appear the petals
curl down and then, within hours,
assume the distinctive curled over
position.

The spider lily grows wild but that
does not mean it has no place in the
garden. An area of poor soil set out
with spider lilies will soon become a
focal point and conversation piece.

Zephyranthes, called August
flower or rain lily locally, have leaves
rather like St Augustine grass and
also have the habit of invading lawns.
This presents homeowners with a
problem when the lawn needs mow-
ing but the zephyranthes are bloom-
ing prettily. The usual colours seen
locally are mauve, pink, white and
yellow.

a eV

GLORIOSA lily
can be grown
singly as a
specimen plant
or in clusters.

Caladiums grow from rhizomes
and are popular candidates for shad-
ed areas. The heart-shaped leaves
feature white, pink, green and red
markings, though not all in the same
plant. Caladiums produce calla- lily
like flowers towards the end of the
season, which extends from early
spring to late autumn.

Gladiolas usually bloom in late
summer but the first time you plant
them they may bloom shortly after-
wards regardless of season. Gladiolas
are very pretty with their sword-like
foliage and stunning flowers that pro-
duce a new bloom each day. One
problem with them is that they often
need staking if the bulbs are not dug
in deep enough.

I would love to see more cannas
grown in The Bahamas. Their foliage
is redolent of the tropics and the
flowers — red, orange, coral, pink or
white — are very showy. Once estab-
lished, cannas look after themselves.
They are great candidates for grow-
ing against fences or walls where they
attain a height of four to six feet.

The planting of bulbs, rhizomes,
tubers and corms is an investment
that is sure to appreciate over the
years. And be appreciated.

THE TRIBUNE

ONCE established,
cannas look after
HIBS Meee LIL
can become a
TEL Le creed
of the garden.

> THE BULBS of
these Asiatic
Hybrid lilies need
to be cooled for a
period each year.

It whipped several very expensive creams.
(Even the $350 one.)*

¢ regeneris t

MIGB=sculpting cream

The Good Housekeeping Research Institute put ihe pricey face creams to the test.
Not one measured/up to Olay RegenerisuM icro-Sculpting Cream.

It made skin more hydrated and for allongenm period of time.

Save your skin. And $325 in the process.

*Based on Good Housekeeping Research Institute test of several $100 + face creams.

Love the skin you’re in™

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 3C



a Ne



@x
The

AS CHILDREN we have grown up wit-
nessing the relationships of our parents,
aunts, uncles, teachers and family friends.
The impressions and overall outlook on
relating, showing affection and respecting
individuals is mapped early into our sub-
conscious. This early map often influences
us in our relationships later on in life and if
these early memories have been unpleasant
or have resulted in shame then difficulties
with sexuality are common. Indeed those
early experiences may be so far back and so
shut off that sometimes we may not even be
able to see that they have anything to do
with our present situation. All that we may
know is that we are not happy with our
close relationships or perhaps the lack of
any close relationship. But there is hope.
We can overcome our past and a childhood
of unhappiness does not preclude having
an unhappy future.

Certainly there are phases to long term
relationships. Peaks and cycles change with
each decade and are influenced by life
events such as divorce, death, financial pres-
sures and children. But let's start at the
beginning. We may have fallen in love and
experienced that euphoric high of romantic
love and the wonderful effects of the rush of
oxytocin from the thought or touch of our
love interest. The bonding and attachment
from the early frequent touching contribute



Controlling “~~

oily shine

sili

LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

attern of

RELATIONSHIPS

to the desire and longing for that person
when they are not with us. There is a feeling
of hope for the future and this romantic
love stage generally lasts from three to
twenty seven months. The comfort then
sets in and we generally become relaxed.
We may put on weight and not pay so much
attention to our appearance or to other
things that were so important in the begin-
ning, such as touching. A power struggle
often develops in the long term relation-
ship and each becomes reactive and defen-
sive in an attempt to protect the feelings
of the early love. As humans, our response
to being attacked is ‘fight or flight’. We
may fight because we feel scared or we may
just withdraw and in this way create a safe
protected space. Or we may freeze and
appear uncommunicative. This may appear
as an inability to listen or to express one
self. This is the start of the disconnection
within the couple bond and if not inter-
rupted then a cycle of defensive behavior
starts. When this conflict goes on for a long
time, we may come to accept the situation
for varying reasons; financial, security,
familiarity, fear of change and lack of con-
fidence to start a fresh. Often the effect on
children and extended family influences
our decisions to stay and so we detach our-
selves a little and in essence go to 'sleep’.
It is at this stage of sleep that couples

“he wait

/

often come to couples therapy because of
lack of interest in sex, sexual problems,
noninitiation, feelings of rejection, aban-
donment, and resentment. Feelings of lack
of passion and eroticism towards the partner
may have become habitual. We may in fact
not even view our partners as erotic but as
someone who is safe. This is just living
beside someone not fully awake but
‘asleep’. The good news is that there can be
a ‘waking up’ once one or both persons
recognises and wants to rekindle the first
feelings of the romantic high. This requires
looking closely at what has happened to
each person's erotic needs along the way.
Without a doubt there is nothing that dead-
ens sexual desire faster than unresolved
differences. The resurgence of the oxytocin
rush can be brought on again with the care-
ful help of a relationship therapist and the
joy can return at any age.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and Cou-
ples Relationship Therapist. She is a Regis-
tered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Thera-
pist located at The Centre for Renewing Rela-
tionships, Grosvenor's Close West. She can
be contacted by calling 356-7983 or by e-mail
at relatebahamas@yahoo.com or at
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is
available for speaking engagements.

ae eat

¢ IN AN article appear-
ATOM MEAT a UUme)
March 24, on the topic
Surviving Menopause, the
word osteosclerosis was
used to describe a gradual
weakening of the bones in

post menopausal women
due to a lack of calcium.
However, the correct med-
ical term to describe the
condition is osteoporosis.
We hope this clears up
any confusion.





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Your kit should include oil-free
lotions or sunscreens containing
microsponges that help soak up
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wipes loaded with Salicylic Acid
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from oil-controlling ingredients.
Your professional skin thera-
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the health of skin.

¢ Sarah Beek is a skin care thera-
pist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit her
and her team of skin and body
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Join the BNT « ©
for a special evening —
of food and music
in the romantic
Retreat Gardens,
Village Road

Feast |

in the

“) Forest

and Silent Auction s








Friday, April 24, 2009
6:00pm - 10:00pm
Bring your Maid Marion or dashing
Robin Rood for an evening of food and

fun including live entertainment,
magicians, jugglers and much more!

$75 per person



THE TRIBUNE

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
PORT DEPARTMENT

REG NO.

NP: 6587

NP: 6632

NP: 2788

Davis Nigel S.
P.O. Box N-9707

Nassau, Bahamas

Forbes Randy
P.O. Box EE-17789
Nassau, Bahamas

Gomez Frederick
P.O. Box SS-5212
Nassau, Bahamas

Hartley Christopher
P.O. Box SS-5244
Nassau, Bahamas

Higgs Jonathan A.
P.O. Box AB-20350
Nassau, Bahamas

Kemp Ronald L.
Nassau, Bahamas

Miller Amos J.
P.O. Box N-8341
Nassau, Bahamas

Mcbride Eugene
P.O. Box FH-14357
Nassau, Bahamas

McCoy Marvin
P.O. Box SB-64004
Nassau, Bahamas

McPhee Levi G.
P.O. Box SB-8306
Nassau, Bahamas

Newton Dion
P.O. Box SB-51914
Nassau, Bahamas

Rolle Vernon
Nassau, Bahamas

Smith Lloyd
P.O. Box N-7423
Nassau, Bahamas

Smith Valentino
P.O. Box EE-17013
Nassau, Bahamas

Strachan Garth
P.O. Box N-1384
Nassau, Bahamas

Varga Randolph
P.O. Box SS-5219
Nassau, Bahamas

Wilson Herbert
P.O. Box N-3733
Nassau, Bahamas

RENEWAL OF BOAT LICENCE —NEW PROVIDENCE

APPLICANT BOAT NAME CLASS PASS
Cartwright Robert C. “Treesome” A 20
P.O. Box N-9967 40ft

Nassau, Bahamas Fibreglass

Strachan Garth “G Man”
Nassau, Bahamas 21ft
Fibreglass

Charter

Varga Randolph “Riding high” B
P.O. Box SS-5219 53ft
Nassau, Bahamas Fibreglass

Charter

Varga Randolph “Wind Dancer” B
P.O. Box SS-5219 4ift
Nassau, Bahamas Fibreglass

Charter

RENEWAL OF COMMERICAL RECREATIONAL WATER CRAFT

REG NO.

NP: 916 NSB Brown Carol &

NP: 155 ATE Johnson Cedric

NP: 110 ATE Johnson Cedric

NP: 109 ATE Johnson Cedric

NP: 156 ATE

(JET SKI) — NEW PROVIDENCE

APPLICANT BOAT NAME CLASS PASS USE
“No Name” D 2 Rental
Beatrice oft

P.O. Box CB-13211 Jet Ski

Nassau, Bahamas

“No Name” Rental
P.O. Box N-3426 oft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

“No Name”
P.O. Box N-3426 oft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

“No Name” Rental
P.O. Box N-3426 oft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

Johnson Cedric “No Name” Rental
P.O. Box N-3426 oft

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 5C



The quest for
empowerment

WE always hear about the impor-
tance of empowering our employ-
ees. In reality, it is not clear that
this is even possible. Ils empower-
ment something managers and
supervisors can do? Or do employ-
ees have to decide to empower
themselves? From my perspective,
empowerment cannot be given to
you. Circumstances for it to happen
can be created and then you have
to make a decision to accept the
challenge and empower yourself.

Susan Heathfield elaborates on the topic of
empowerment in this way: “Empowerment is
the process of enabling or authorising an indi-
vidual to think, behave, take action, and control
work and decision making in autonomous ways.
It is the state of feeling self-empowered to take
control of your own destiny.”

Employees either want to be empowered or
they don't. Managers either have the ability or
will to create opportunities to empower
employees or they don't. The culture of your
company has a direct impact on whether or not
managers and supervisors can create opportuni-
ties to empower you as an employee. Here are
a few examples of the components of culture
that contribute to opportunities to empower
others:

Decision Making Power: If your organisation is
highly structured with all the decision making
power centralised to the top, it can be impossi-
ble to develop an empowered team. In this
reality, the owners or executives make all the
decisions and even if they allow employee
input, there is a subtle or sometimes obvious
way they stage-manage the message and com-
munication process so the team always arrives
at the original intent of the owners or execu-
tives.

Organisational Politics: If your organisation is
highly political with employees and managers
jockeying for status, opportunities or power,
this can undermine your ability as a manager or
supervisor to create an environment that sup-
ports empowerment. For example, if a supervi-
sor is given a project to complete and highly
political team mates are appointed to the com-
mittee, the members of the committee can sab-
otage the project by incapacitating the platform
for creativity.

Communication: It is impossible to empower
employees if they don't even know what they
are supposed to be doing or if they have no
voice. If your organisation has impaired top-
down and bottom-up communication flows,
there are probably managers and employees
who hoard information or discourage employee
input. Some of these managers retain impor-
tant or relevant information to control the
team, keeping you in the dark so they can:

o Protect or build their status or brand

o Camouflage their incompetence

o Hinder your development as an employee.

o Avoid having you suggest ideas that are per-
ceived to be better than theirs

If you see yourself in one of these manager

Giving
the gift
of life

FROM page one

patients to direct the course
of their medical care should
they end up in a state where
they are unable to definitive-
ly communicate their wishes.

Dr Darville explained, in
the event that a patient has
end stage cancer, or a termi-
nal illness, the choice still lies
with the patient whether they
should be resuscitated or not.

He said: “Cardio-pul-
monary resuscitation is the
norm, unless a patient has
expressed in advance not to
be resuscitated.

“In other words, If they
don’t tell me in advance, or
do not have it written down
that they don’t wish to be
resuscitated, I am obligated



types, you usually provide a minimal amount of
data that slowly trickles down to employees and
you consciously or unconsciously discourage
the flow of information to the top. In cases
where information does move up through the
formal and informal channels, it may be
through highly political employees who are
intent on putting their spin on the facts.

Tips for Creating a Platform for Empowerment

— Release control and decentralise decision
making. If you do decide to grant employees
additional responsibility or decision making
power, you can release control in small quanti-
ties to build their skills, confidence and trust.

— Build trust by creating an environment or
space that will support creativity and allow
room for error. If employees are afraid to
make mistakes they will not be open to taking
the risks of being creative or responsible.

— Reinforce behaviours with positive feedback.
If employees are reassured that they are on the
right track and you provide coaching and men-
toring instead constant criticism you can create
opportunities for empowerment, growth and
trust.

— As an executive or owner, ask your support
staff for input and be open to letting them gen-
erate and implement creative solutions that are
different than yours.

— Be sure employees are aware of your expecta-
tions for results.

— Check in with employees periodically to sup-
port their progress. Not to micromanage them.
There are some organisational cultures that are
low on standardisation with limited polices and
procedures that need to be standardised to cre-
ate efficiencies of scale and quality products
and services. Then there are other cultures that
thrive on non-standardisation because vision,
imagination and originality are important con-
stituents of their success.

There is another type of organisational culture
that is very committed to policies and proce-
dures and centralised decision making proto-
cols. In highly scripted environments like
these, when it makes sense, you can seek to bal-
ance your need to impose policies and proce-
dures with deliberate attempts to develop and
stretch your employees.

Based on my experience, empowered employ-
ees are critical thinkers, decisive, imaginative,
results driven, accountable, self-motivated and
sometimes better leaders because of construc-
tive empowerment initiatives.

Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational Soul, an HR
Consulting and Leadership Development company.
if you are interested in exploring how you can create
a platform for empowerment, you contact her at

www.orgsoul.com.



DR Michael Darville address the audience at the recent health sym-
posium held at Doctors Hospital.

Nassau, Bahamas

Jet Ski

RENEWAL OF COMMERICAL RECREATIONAL WATER CRAFT

REG NO.

APPLICANT

NP: BB 10 PI Forbes Randy

NP: B 10 PI

NP: PS8PI

P.O. Box EE-
17789
Nassau, Bahamas

Forbes Randy
P.O. Box EE-
17789

Nassau, Bahamas

Johnson Cedric
P.O. Box N-3426
Nassau, Bahamas

BANANA BOAT

BOAT NAME USE

“Family Circle” Rental
18ft
Boston Whaler

“Banana”
17ft
Banana Boat

“U.F.O” Rental
28ft
Para sail

Signed: Captain Anthony J. Allens

Port Controller



to go ahead and start resusci-
tating.”

He said according to the
Health Care Act regarding
patients’ rights which was last
revised in 2000, patients have
the right to privacy, trans-
parency regarding their prac-
titioners background, and the
right to information on vari-
ous medical procedures.

However in the absence of
advance directives, the deci-
sions should the patient end
up in a non-communicative
state is legally that of their
family or legal representative.

However no clarity is
offered to determine which
family member has to make
that decision, giving way to
further disputes within that
family.

Dr Darville asked: “Is it my
wife who decides, is it my
mother, is it my brother who
I owe $1,000, or is it the first
relative who walks through
the doors at the hospital.”

Regardless to this debate
however, if the patient
requires immediate surgery
and the family or legal rep-
resentative can’t be reached,
then the doctor makes that
call on surgery he said.

In the existence of an
advance directive by the
patient, Dr Darville said the
physician’s obligation to the
patient should always be in
providing palliative care. This
means that whether a patient
requested medical interven-
tion or not, they should be
made as comfortable as pos-

sible in a way which doesn’t
seek to eliminate their dis-
ease or illness, but rather to
minimise the effects of its
symptoms.

Overall, Dr Darville indi-
cated that in an effort to bring
about a greater awareness of
advanced directives, there
now exist an ethics committee
of which he is a part and said
they have planned a number
of seminars to educate more
persons on the issues.

He said apart from the
important family discussion
on advance directives and
post-mortem decisions, mak-
ing your decisions clear to
your physician is also an
important step in formulat-
ing and having your impor-
tant wishes executed.



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

TUESDAY, APRIL 14TH 2009, PAGE 7C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

walil (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

a a







































7 a ~ Today Wednesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
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Gey ke ORLANDO | i Ankara, Turkey 64/17 43/6 pe so/i2 34/1 r — ABACO Today: 8 at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
_ High: 84° F/29° ¢ ~ Windy with partial Partly cloudy, breezy Mostly sunny. Sunshine with a Mostly sunny and Mostly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 67/19 54/12 sh 63/17 50/10 sh Wednesday: $ at 15-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
va Low:61°F/16°C sunshine. and humid. t-storm possible. pleasant. breezy. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 68/20 54/12 sh 67/19 53/11 pc
A : : ° ° ° ° Bangkok 91/32 80/26 sh 93/33 79/26 pc
un — Oe eeeeas : High: S High: - ic ev High: a Barbados 85/29 75/23 s SO TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
TAMPA — ey ' High: 88 Low: 75 Low: 72 Low: 67 Low: 69 Low: 72 ea OSE Barcelona 63/17 50/10 s 61/16 49/9 sh
Vera: ae y ETc Teel Beiii
°c re F / i“ r 83°F aaa ERS as sas : jing 77/25 50/10 pe 66/18 41/5 pc
High: 81° F/27°C . \ = 100° F [baer | _108°-80° Fs 94°-65° F 81°-72° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft Beirut 79/26 63/17 ¢ 67/19 60/15 pc
Low: 62° F/17°C -. / The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines : effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 11:42am. 23 5:47am. 04 Belarad 60/15 46/7 73/22 49/9
. Lo elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low forthe day, Fn 5:43pm. 04 o gia e pe S
re @ : \ P Berlin 72/22 51/10 s 75/23 52/11 s
a rh Ue Wednesday2 12am. 26 633am. 05 Bermuda 65/18 64/17 pe 73/22 6A/17 +
, “ ) =e “2:27pm. 22 6:30pm. 05 Bogota 65/18 47/8 + 66/18 47/8 +
3 “RY C Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thurstay TQ2am. 25 723am. 06 Brussels 72/22 52/11 sh 73/22 52/11 pe
{ bs ABACO Temperature 17pm. 241 7:25pm. 06 Budapest 74/23 7/8 s 72/22 49/9 s
f a oo High:87°F/31° C NGM, ees sces cnet: tacerseree tac vgasce tcceeass, 84° F/29° C Frida 7:56 am. 74 Stoam. 06 Buenos Aires 70/21 54/12 s 72/22 61/16 s
Z es ee 4° LOW escssssnne 73° F/23° C Y o%5pm. 21 82pm. 06 Cairo 99/37 61/16 pc 84/28 61/16 pc
’ — ei i Normal high .... 81° F/27° C —E——— ES Calcutta 99/37 79/26 s 99/37 77/25 s
) ai
‘_ Normal low 69° F/20° C Calgary 42/5 25/-3 c 41/5 23/-5 pe
of _ @ WEST PALM BEACH Oo. Last year's High... ssnsrstenesenssee 89° F/31° C SUE). Cancun 88/31 73/22 s 91/32 71/21 s @
— High:87° F/31°C , Last year's low Heene eae 73° F/23° C " " Caracas 82/27 69/20 pc 81/27 70/21 s Los Angeles,
Low: 68° F/20° C =} Precipitation, a ease erally ot Casablanca 70/21 52/11 5 6719 51/10 pe 68/50
As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... eects tess teense 0.00" SU PM. won NSS Copenhagen 64/17 50/10 c 56/13 44/6 pc
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT tla Year to date 07" Last New First Dublin 52/11 41/5 sh 50/10 43/6 +
High: 86° F/30° C @ High: 86° F/30° C Normal year to date oo... 6.19 , Frankfurt 77/25 50/10 pc 79/26 48/8 pc
Low: 72° F/22°C Low: 73° F/23° C Geneva 65/18 48/8 sh 70/21 52/11 pe
AccuWeather.com Halifax 44/6 24/-4 46/7 27/-2 hues
hi @ Forecasts and graphics provided by Havana 91/32 68/20 s 91/32 68/20 t T-storms 88/72
by MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr. 17 Apr. 24 May 1 Helsinki 50/10 34/1 c 43/6 32/0 pc Rain Fronts
High: 88° F/31°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 79/26 72/22 sh 79/26 70/21 t Fae nice - See
Low: 72° F/22°C NASSAU High: 88° F/31°C Islamabad 90/32 64/17 c 93/33 61/16 c ee Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
ow: 72° F/ X : j Low: 76° F/24°C aaa 68/20 49/9 r 53/11 48/8 sh Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm -fitnfiintia
High: 88° F/31° C i [e_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mengeni
Low: 75° F/24°C Jerusalem 90/32 51/10 pc 6417 49/99 s
. Johannesburg 68/20 50/10 pc 70/21 51/10 s -10s| -0s {03") 10s | 20s [B0si) 40s
KEY WEST @ i. CATISLAND Kingston 86/30 76/24 s 86/30 76/24 s
High: 85° F/29°C J 7 7 Lima 81/27 66/18 pc 82/27 65/18 c
Low: 75° F/24°C —_ High: 83° F/28° C London 63/17 46/7 pc 64/17 50/10 +
: @ Low: 69° F/21°C Madrid 5915 41/5 1 57/13 37/2 sh
: Manila 95/35 77/25 sh 87/30 79/26 t AU ie) N iS 8 4 AN C im
st Mexico City 81/27 54/12 t 81/27 47/8 s
sage Monterrey 90/32 61/16 pc 96/385 67/19 s
a GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 521 30/-1 s 5412 32/0 s
High: 86° F/30° C High: 88° F/31°C Moscow 55/12 36/2 pe 61/16 36/2 pc
; Low:73°F/23°C Ry goer °C Munich 74/23 40/4 s 74/23 40/4 s
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS , Nairobi 86/30 60/15 pc 86/30 60/15 sh V
highs and tonights's lows. High: 90° F/32°C . New Delhi 113/45 72/22 s 108/42 77/25 s e er S Our
Low: 77° F/25°C © Oslo 52/11 41/5 sh 46/77 40/4 + a a“ { O U S !
Paris 68/20 52/11 sh 70/21 50/10 sh i j
Prague 72/22 42/5 s 69/20 41/5 s 7 *
LONGISLAND Rio de Janeiro 82/27 70/21 sh 77/25 67/9 +
igh: 87° ° Riyadh 91/32 66/18 s 95/35 72/22 s e
Ce rec ra Se ee it Comes to Auto Insurance,
Today Wadnestay Today Werinasitay Toy Wadhestiay MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 85/29 74/23 s 83/28 75/23 s ‘emembe: aber tl ‘the Smart choice is
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 88° F/31°C San Juan 88/31 61/16 s 89/31 61/16 s
Fic F/C Fc F/C Fie F/C Fe FIC FC FIC Fe FIC Low: 71° F/22°C Sc at i s tea naan pe . surance Management.
Albuquerque 74/23 47/8 c 6618 39/3 pc Indianapolis 521 38/3 4+ 58/14 43/6 c Philadelphia 49/9 42/5 + 49/9 38/3 1 ; antago S S ,
Anchorage 40/4 33/0 45/7 32/0 pc Jacksonville 78/25 51/10 t 74/23 49/9 s Phoenix 88/31 63/17 c 74/23 50/10 pe CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Santo Domingo 88/31 70/21 s 85/29 69/2008 JJ “Smart peo you can trust.
Atlanta 66/18 43/6 po 65/18 46/7 s Kansas City 63/17 40/4 s 69/20 5110 pc Pittsburgh = 54/12 44/6 r= 58/14 36/2 RAGGEDISLAND Tigh:91°F/33°c — ee ee -
Atlantic City 48/8 42/5 + 47/8 36/2 + Las Vegas 79/26 49/9 po 64/17 48/8 c Portland,OR 5140 39/3 pe 54/12 40/4 pc High: 89° F/32° C Low: 73° F/23°C Sikh eet 3 at P oui a : ;
Baltimore 50/10 42/5 +r 49/9 36/2 1 Little Rock 67/19 45/7 peo 72/22 52/1 $s Raleigh-Durham 61/16 48/8 t 59/115 40/4 c Low:69°F/21°C aa — 73/99 63/17 . 77/25 59/15 pe
Boston 54/12 30/3 pc 49/9 37/2 pc LosAngeles 68/20 5010 pc 66/18 5010 s St.Louis 54/12 40/4 c 6317 478s ae 1 SRENRSDUEh — ae ON INSURANCE Mi AN AGEMENT
Buffalo 5442 35/1 pe 5542 34/1 pc Louisville 56/13 42/5 + 60/15 45/7 c Salt Lake City 57/13 39/3 1 45/7 35/1 sn GREAT INAGUA Tawa 63/17 59/15 + 68/20 54/12 :
Charleston, SC 77/25 53/11 t 71/21 45/7 s Memphis 62/16 47/8 pe 70/21 5110 s San Antonio 80/26 59/15 pe 78/25 60/15 pc High: 90° F/32° C aaa 54/12 35/1 p 51/10 37/2 pc (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 48/8 36/2 r 5442 40/4 pc Miami 88/31 72/22 s 86/30 67/19 t San Diego 6317 5542 pe 66/18 54/12 pc Low 72°F22°C Trinidad 84/28 72/22 c 85/29 67/19 pc
Cleveland 52/11 41/5 r 56/13 37/2 pe Minneapolis 62/16 38/3 s 6417 43/6 pc San Francisco 60/15 45/7 s 55/12 46/7 s i Tana 53/11 39/3 p 53/11 37/2 s f | Pr 7 Hl Grand Bahar Ah | th q Fy
Dallas 77/25 55/12 s 77/25 57/13 pe _Nashwille B42 41/5 c 6246 44/6 pc Seattle 5010 37/2 pe 53/11 40/4 pe Gene 68/20 53/11 s 73/29 54/12 ¢ EW TTOVIGECE t nto eUInEr Uma
Denver 68/20 39/3 pe 65/18 34/1 c NewOrleans 73/22 5442 s 76/24 50/15 s Tallahassee 78/25 «48/8 t 75/23 «48/8 s ear 65/18 47/8 61/16 39/3 Ht (247) 502-6400 Ih Nt) i) 3500 | Tek (247) 367-4204 ek (2 (242) 332-2862 Tel (24 (247) 336-2304
Detroit 52/11 40/4 + 6045 37/2 po New York 52/11 43/6 + 52/41 43/6 =r ‘Tampa 81/27 62/16 t 77/25 58/14 s Winnipeg 58/14 36/2 pc 61/16 39/3 pc ‘
Honolulu 83/28 70/21 pc 81/27 69/20 pc Oklahoma City 75/23 50/10 s 78/25 53/11 pe Tucson 84/28 59/15 c 75/23 46/7 $ : ————
Houston 80/26 57/13 s 82/27 62/16 pc Orlando 84/28 61/16 t 82/27 56/13 s Washington, DC 51/10 44/6 + S010 393 r+ Nh ee ee



PAGE 8C, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







it a eee ee
eee

Know that:

Mangroves and. Wetlands provide nesting
and shelter habitat for crabs, birds, fish and
other marine organisms.

Save OUr Mangroves and wetlands.



@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

GORGEOUS name brand clothing, jewelry
bags and shoes- sounds like every woman’s
dream shopping list for a trip to Los Angeles.
However, Bahamian women can now save that
ticket money and head on down to the Pri-
madona events at Gray Cliff Restaurant.

Tyrina Neely, owner of Pri-
madona, has been hosting Pri-
madona Designer Sales since
July of 2008. Originally the sales
were held every third month but
due to popular demand they will
now be held every other month
with private clearance sales for
Primadona subscribers.

Primadona carries mostly con-
temporary brands such as Diane
von Furstenberg, Calypso by
Christianne Celle, Betsey John-
son, Kenneth Cole NY, Free
People, Alice+Olivia and many
others. Ms Neely also carries
Igigi, a designer plus size brand
.xclusively in The Bahamas.

“My aim is to provide not

only beautiful designer clothing
and accessories for women that
they cannot find here on the
island at great prices but also to
provide a comfortable, elegant
setting for them to do so. Gray-
cliff provides a beautiful back-
drop to the event, but is also
very accessible which makes it a
great location,” Ms Neely said.
Literally translated in Italian,
Ms Neely explained that the
word “Primadona” means
“First Lady”, but it also has spe-
cial significance to in her life.
“T had tossed around a few
names and none of them really
resonated with me. There was
one day I recalled a small argu-

Air Conditioning
Company

ee eh

e* 3/8”
~

Stein

rT NOW
ay | eeaattseeeee aed)

SKN Coane

Tonique Williams-Darling Highway

Tel: 242.341.KOOL (5665) + Fax: 242.341.7378



PRIMADONA Designer Sales
hosted at Graycliff are now held
every other month Tyrina Neely.
Pictured are women attending
the last Primadona event.

ment I had with my mother
when I was younger. I have two
younger sisters and was most
likely throwing a temper
tantrum and accusing her of not
giving me enough attention
compared to them. She looked
at me and responded — “Tyrina,
you are the one we shell out
thousands for to get braces —
you are the one who we shuttle
to the dermatologist every time
you get a pimple...you are the
Prima dona!

‘What that said to me was
you are special, you are loved
and you are important to us.
Which is how every female
should feel and the whole aim
of Primadona’s shopping events
is to put women on a pedestal
and give them an event
designed to allow them to cater
to themselves. I fell in love with
the name Primadona and ran
with it,” Ms Neely said.

Ms Neely said due to the fact
that she always had a deep
interest in fashion, she attended
the Fashion Institute of Tech-
nology in New York where she
really developed a deep interest
and knowledge base of design-
ers.

“They say necessity is the
mother of invention. When I
decided to move home last July,
the biggest fear I had was not
being able to find the clothing I
like at prices I would be able to
afford. When I thought about
it, I realised that there had to be
many women like me whose
need for quality, contemporary
designer clothing at great prices
were not being met, forcing
them to travel abroad to shop.
Primadona fills that need local-
ly,” Ms Neely said.

Although many of the pieces
at the event retail for up to
$400, Ms Neely said she is trying
to let Bahamian women experi-
ence high end labels for what
others would never dream of
selling them for.

“The whole idea is making
quality designer apparel and
accessories available at afford-
able prices. The current eco-
nomic environment is ripe for a
new business model such as this.
Honestly, savvy shoppers in
New York City hardly ever pay
full retail price for designer
clothing and I never did when I
lived in New York for over 4
years and I wanted to bring this
distinct way of shopping to my
home,” Ms Neely said.

Ms Neely said although Pri-
madona attracts a broad cus-
tomer base, she finds her inspi-
ration for the business due to
her passion for fashion.

“T feel all women are prima
donas. From the art teacher, to
the stay at home mom to the
doctor and the entrepreneur.
Not only does the event pro-
vide the opportunity to pur-
chase great pieces at unbeat-
able prices — it has also become
a networking event. Seeing
women get excited about the
merchandise I offer and looking
forward to the sales is a huge
inspiration for me. I always
envisioned myself as an entre-
preneur in the fashion industry
—I just had no idea I would get
into it at this age, it’s a dream in
the early stages of fruition,” Ms
Neely said.

Ms Neely said although there
are not any major barriers to
enter this business — it does
require a knowledge base of
fashion and also knowledge and
familiarity of the NY, LA and
European fashion districts.

“T would love to host Pri-
madona’s designer sales once
per month and really start to
make it a bigger, grander event
because the shopping events
have morphed into networking
events in a sense. I would love
to play into that element a little
more and that is something I
am currently working on. We
are also introducing men’s mer-
chandise this year starting with
the introduction of high end
sneakers and casual wear for
men at the next sale which is
scheduled for Friday, May
29th,” Ms Neely said.





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Volume: 105 No.116



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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com




SPORTS

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

Two men dead in
violenc

weekend



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE | CAR in which the stabbing aici tried foi escape sat ihe Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre.

Stabbing and shooting

aye)



BAHAMAS THIRD IN Ta TOG

NOW OPEN

Lynden Pindling

International Airport





gall

Homes are
threatened

by enormous
bush fire

Firefighters tackling
blazes over the weekend

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SEVERAL fires threatened
homes throughout New Provi-
dence yesterday despite the
efforts of firemen who have
been fighting them all week-
end.

According to fire officials,
one of them — an enormous
bush fire — was burning across



several hundred acres adjacent
to Carmichael Road, west of
Bacardi Road and east of
Coral Harbour.

Yesterday firefighters were “
prioritising” the protection of
threatened residences on the
southern side of Carmichael
Road.

“Two fire units and their
respective crews have been

SEE page 10

incidents claim lives

m@ By ALISON LOWE
and MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporters

VIOLENCE claimed the
lives of two men over the East-
er weekend prompting murder
inquiries into the fatal stabbing
of an 18-year-old man at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-
tre and the shooting of an
unidentified man found dead in
a car.

Richard Bremmer, 18, of

Pinewood Gardens, New Prov-
idence, was stabbed multiple
times in the chest after attend-
ing a car rally at the Queen Eliz-
abeth Sports Centre race track
on Sunday, prompting witness-
es to call for more vigilant polic-
ing of the popular sports arena.

Police maintain that the
teenager was attacked by a
group of men and stabbed sev-
eral times when he accidentally

SEE page eight

Relief for redundant hotel workers

Hundreds sign up for national

unemployment benefit scheme

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

HUNDREDS of unemployed persons signed up
for financial assistance from the first national unem-
ployment benefit scheme when registration opened
to the first wave of applicants on Saturday.

A total of 774 job seekers put their names down to
claim a share of the $20 million National Insurance
Unemployment Benefit Fund, as 489 made their
applications at four venues in New Providence and
285 attended two application centres in Grand
Bahama.

Labour Minister Dion Foulkes and National Insurance Board (NIB)
consultant actuary Derek Osborne said they had expected more to
attend the first registration day after the scheme was rushed through Par-
liament in recent months, but believe some may have been held back by



Dion Foulkes

m By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REDUNDANT hotel workers who lost their jobs in the economic slump
can claim up to $1,500 in benefits from a major relief programme launched
on Thursday.

The Bahamas Hotel and Allied Industries (BHAI) Health and Welfare

Benefits Fund announced the largest individual benefits assistance pay-
out in its history, as it will cover the mortgage payments, loans, utilities and

SEE page 10

The Taste
on
Tuesdays!!

Bovsa ny;

Ba witng
eyefelures 1 JS a
lEtoppinale

large
eaKele=s
medium.

oPeaG| absolutely)



tel ite Mey ime] Mitts lehtes

eis NESE? i)

a



CHILDREN meet the Easter Bunny at the weekend as the holiday was

celebrated at Ardastra Gardens.

e SEE PAGE SIX FOR MORE PHOTOS

Obama lifts several
key Cuba restrictions

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FULFILLING an election
promise on Cuba, President Oba-
ma yesterday lifted several key
restrictions to allow more travel,
telecommunication linkages and
remittances from the United
States to the island.

Signalling what some see as a
significant chink in the United
States policy hindering interac-

tion between Americans and
companies with the Communist-
run island, the decision rolls back
stricter rules established under
former President George W.
Bush. At present it applies only to
Cuban-Americans with families
in Cuba.

However, the President’s
announcement does not disman-
tle the broader, decades-long
trade embargo or general ban on

SEE page eight

SEE page 10

Easter holiday
bookings ‘far
atta mm ETT
expected’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

STAKEHOLDERS are
optimistic that the threatened
tourism industry is “beginning
to turn around a little bit”,
according to the Minister of
Tourism — with Easter holi-
day bookings having been “far
better than expected”.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
yesterday that there is “no
question” that Easter saw
much greater tourism arrival
numbers than those in the
industry had expected based
on what they were seeing ear-

SEE page eight



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NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

American visitor
dies after falling
off golf cart

A YOUNG American visitor
has died in Harbour Island as a
result of injuries suffered when
she fell off a golf cart.

Adela Holmes Cooke, 18, of
North Carolina was taken to a
local clinic where she was pro-
nounced dead, according to a
police report.

She had been vacationing with
friends at a private residence on
the Eleutheran island, a North
Carolina newspaper, The Post
and Courier, reported.

There was some discrepancy
over the date and time that the
incident occurred, with Bahamian
police stating that the 18 year old
fell off the cart, the most popular
form of transportation for tourists
on the island, at around 2am Fri-
day.

SEE page eight


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





















































@R | Appointment

Mr. T. Baswell Donaldson, CBE,
Chairman of Commonwealth Bank Limited, is pleased to
announce the following appointment:

Mrs. Mavis A. Burrows, MBA
Vice-President, Operations

Mrs. Mavis A. Burrows was appointed
to the position of Vice-President,
Operations on March 1, 2009.

Mrs. Burrows has over thirty-five years

of banking experience and has been

with Commonwealth Bank since 1987.

During her tenure with the bank, she

has held various management positions,
the most recent being the Assistant Vice-President, Operations.

Mrs.
management and leadership both locally and abroad, and achieved

Burrows has attended numerous courses and seminars in
a Masters of Business Administration Degree in 2004 from the
University of Miami. In 2008, she completed the Richard Ivey School

of Business Program for Executives in London Ontario, Canada.

Mrs. Burrows is married to Mr. E. K. Burrows and they have three
children and three grandchildren.

ee SN

3} AN 4 | ag RNC re eee CNET arta ae ee

www.combanklitd.com

BUT voices concern over

complaints of alleged
molestation of students

mg By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The removal
of three Grand Bahama teach-
ers over complaints of alleged
molestation of students is of
great concern for officials at the
Bahamas Union of Teachers in
Freeport.

Quentin LaRhoda, BUT area
vice president, said the union
does not support sexual conduct
between teachers and students,
but is also worried that its mem-
bers may be subject to false
accusations.

“The children are precious
and should be protected against
predators, but we have concerns
also about teachers being
accused falsely and having their
reputation tarnished,” he
said.

In view of this, Ministry of
Education officials recently
warned educators about ensur-
ing that their interactions with
students do not cause their



“The children
are precious
and should be
protected against
predators, but we
have concerns also
about teachers
being accused
falsely and having
their reputation
tarnished.”



Quentin LaRhoda,
BUT area vice president

integrity to be called into ques-
tion.

This comes after allegations
of molestation at Eight Mile
Rock High School surfaced in
January when two former male

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students made a complaint to
police, accusing a male teacher
of sexually molesting them for a
period eight years, which they
claim started when they were in
seventh grade.

Andre Birbal, the Trinidadian
teacher, accused of molesting
the two male students, fled the
country after submitting his res-
ignation in February.

He is currently being sought
by Bahamian police to be ques-
tioned in connection with accu-
sations of committing acts of
unnatural sexual intercourse.

In the meantime, Police have
also launched investigations into
alleged molestation complaints
against two other teachers at the
school. The teachers — a female
and another male — have been
removed from the school.

Mr LaRhoda said Education
Minister Carl Bethel, with psy-
chologist Dr David Allen, met
with Grand Bahama teachers to
give them proper guidelines
concerning their conduct with
students.

“Teachers were told to modi-
fy their behaviour so as not to
put themselves in a position
where their integrity will be put
in question,” he said.

Mr LaRhoda said that the
issue of molestation in the
schools is “new territory for
everyone” in the education sys-
tem.

“We need to try and find a
way to address this. We never
had circumstances where alle-
gations are so outlandish.

“We need all stakeholders
working together with the Min-
istry of Education to come up
with a plan or system to remove
predators from the system, but
at the same time protect people
who are being falsely accused,”
he said.

TROPICAL
rs el
ee UE
PHONE: 322-2157
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



o mbrief Visiting US congressman _——~s

Three held after:
hoat chase and —
tirug seizure

THREE men are in custody i
today after a high speed boat :
chase in Exuma ended with }
police seizing cocaine and mar- }
ijuana stashed inside an 18-foot }

vessel.

A 48-year-old Jamaican, a 32 }
year-old Androsian and a 32- }
year-old Nassauvian travelling :
on board the boat were all }
picked up by police in connec- }
tion with the find while a fourth }
man escaped by jumping over- }

board.

The boat contained four :
taped packages of cocaine and }

20 bails of marijuana.

Police said the chase took

place in Barretarre, Exuma,

shortly after midnight on Sat-

urday.

Exuma officers and members i
of the Drug Enforcement Unit }

spotted the vessel.

Police are actively seeking :

the fourth man.

Fire in West End

destroys buildings

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A fire in }
West End destroyed two }
wooden structures and caused
extensive damage to a third }

on Easter Friday.

Supt Clyde Nixon reported

that no one was hurt.

He said one of the struc- }
tures was an abandoned :
building. The other two struc- }
tures were owned by Sherry-
mae Hield and Dimonique

Bannister.

Supt Nixon said firemen :

were dispatched to the scene,

where they saw three wooden }

structures on fire.

He said no electricity had }
been supplied to the aban- }
doned building or to the }
building owned by Mr Ban- :
nister at the time of the fire. ;
Both buildings were com- }

pletely destroyed.

He noted that Ms Hield’s
home, which had electricity, :

was extensively damaged.

Police are investigating the i

cause of the fire.

Armed robhery

is investigated

POLICE are investigating i
an armed robbery that
occurred in the Hunters area }

of Freeport on Sunday.

According to police,a man
reported that sometime }
around 12.30am he was held :
up by two men armed witha }
handgun. The culprits robbed }

him of $65 cash.

He said one of the suspects :

was of medium complexion,

and the other of dark com-

plexion.

Investigations are continu- }

ing into the matter.

says his country is
not winning drugs war

Democrat John Conyers Jr speaks out in Nassau

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A VISITING United States
Congressman admitted in Nas-
sau Thursday that his country is
not “winning” the war on drugs
— into which it has poured bil-
lions of dollars — and needs a
fresh approach if it is to reverse
“flatlining, if not diminishing”
successes.

Democrat John Conyers Jr, in
the Bahamas since Tuesday, indi-
cated that with a new adminis-
tration in Washington the time
seemed right for members of the
Judiciary Committee, which he
chairs, to initiate a “critical exam-
ination” of how the country’s
anti-drug efforts may be
enhanced in the face of unabated
consumer demand for the illicit
products in the United States.

“The problem and the truth
is that we are not winning the
drug war. The United States has
put hundreds of billions of dollars
in over the years...and it doesn’t
amount to what we can come
before you with a straight face
and say we are winning,” said Mr
Conyers.

With this in mind he and sev-
eral other members of Congress
came to this country and Haiti,
both considered “major transit
points” on a “fact finding mis-
sion” and intend to go back to
Washington to try to shape the
counter-narcotics strategy of the
new administration headed by
President Barack Obama.

The group, which also includ-
ed Congresswomen Jan
Schakowsky, Donna Christensen
and Congressman Lamar Smith,
met last week with Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham, as well as
other elected officials, the police
and prosecutors in both countries
to discuss issues that exacerbate
the drug scourge.

“Notwithstanding the very
good relations that we enjoy
between our two countries we
have to get to know each other
better so we can become more
intimately aware of the kind of
problems that we’ve got to be
able to overcome,” said Mr
Conyers.

The Congressman spoke with
The Tribune at a luncheon with
Deputy Prime Minister and Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette, as well as National
Security Minister Tommy Turn-
quest, Attorney General Michael
Barnett and other Bahamian and
US Government officials on
Thursday before leaving to return
to Washington, DC.

The second most senior mem-
ber in the House of Representa-
tives and a founding member of
the Congressional Black Caucus,
Mr Conyers admitted that drug
trafficking through the Bahamas
and Haiti still constitutes a
“tremendous problem — creat-
ed and exaggerated by the con-
sumer demand in the United
States.”

Calling Haiti the “most
wretched nation” Mr Conyers,
who has a history of promoting



“The problem
and the truth is
that we are not

The United
States has put
hundreds of
billions of
dollars in over
the years...and it
doesn’t amount
to what we can
come before
you with a
straight face
and say we are
winning.”



Haitian development in Con-
gress, noted that the group’s lat-
est visit to the impoverished
island state was an opportunity to
appreciate the “enormity of the
challenge that’s in front of us
there” in terms of reducing the
flow of illegal narcotics.

“We have (in Haiti) a literally
broken system of justice and law
enforcement and penitentiaries.
It’s hard to even talk about where
we begin, but you’ve got to
understand where you are before
you can determine how you’re
going to fix things,” said the Con-
gressman.

Meanwhile, in the Bahamas,
Congress members found the
issues that feed into the drug
problem “are of a completely dif-
ferent dimension to those in
Haiti” but also complex, he said,
referring to this country’s struggle
with illegal migration and
effectively policing its vast
waters.

He said that all countries
affected must “pull together” in a
systemic way if any dent is to be
made in drug flows — with erad-
ication at the source, for example
in Colombia, interdiction in the
transit points, such as the
Bahamas and Haiti, and reduc-

te Tole nh 2) aoe Cea)

tion in demand in the United
States all key.

“All of this is hooked up
together so you can’t just take
one little piece of it and show
some successes and say ‘Boy, this
is really great’ when really it
doesn’t matter much one way or
the other unless you can create a
systemic overall strategy so that
you’re going at everything as
much as you can at the same
time.”

According to Mr Conyers, the
group expects to coordinate fur-
ther “extensive discussions and
conferences” both in the
Caribbean and Washington to
further refine its approach to
assisting the countries in fighting
the scourge.

Speaking at the luncheon, Mr
Symonette emphasised the
Bahamas’ appreciation for the
US Government’s stated com-
mitment to promoting stability
in Haiti, which has knock on
effects for the Bahamas, and to
drug interdiction efforts.

His comments echoed those
of Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, who addressed the Con-
gressional delegation at a dinner
in their honour on Wednesday.

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~~ 380-FLIX _


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

America’s right to arms a threat

CONGRESSMAN John Conyers, Jr. chair-
man of the Judiciary Committee in Washington,
was in Nassau last week on a fact-finding mis-
sion to formulate a new policy for his country’s
fight against drugs.

While in Nassau — he also visited Haiti,
another transshipment island from which drugs
are siphoned into the US — he admitted that
the US is not winning the drug war. Faced with
the “unabated consumer demand” in the US
for illicit drugs, his committee wants to develop
new Strategies to turn around a defeat that has
already cost America billions of dollars.

Not only is America losing the war on drugs,
it is also losing the war on gun trafficking, which
is contributing to crime on our streets and aid-
ing the escalation of violent crime throughout
the Caribbean. Not only is America’s belief in its
constitutional right to bear arms a menace to
our islands, but it is a monumental problem
even for the United States. Yet that country’s
gun lobby, which must have its ammunition,
seems to have the nation in a headlock from
which it can’t free itself.

One only has to switch on the TV to see the
problem the US is having on its borders with
Mexicans trafficking guns and drugs.

William Hoover, assistant director for field
operations at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives, testified in the House
of Representatives that "there is more than
enough evidence to indicate that over 90 per
cent of the firearms that have either been recov-
ered in, or interdicted in transport to Mexico,
originated from various sources within the Unit-
ed States."

Yet the drug and gun wars continue, the first
because of Americans inordinate thirst for
drugs, the second because Americans seem to
think they have a God-given right to carry arms.
Not only are Americans suffering, but we are all
injured by the fall-out.

Recently 13 people were killed in Bingham-
ton, New York, by a man who collected guns —
the US constitution gave him that right — but
one only had to look at a photograph of his
troubled face to question the sanity of the per-
son or persons who sold him those guns. This
year marks 10 years since a high school student
with a gun killed fellow students at Columbine
High School and only two years ago when the
massacre was mimicked at Virginia Tech.
According to The New York Times “‘in the last
month, shootings have claimed the lives of more
than 50 Americans.” Forty-six years ago Presi-

dent John F Kennedy was assassinated, fol-
lowed four years later by his attorney general
brother.

In 1981 President Ronald Reagan was the
first US president to survive an assassination
attempt, which left his Press Secretary James
Brady crippled for life.

A move was made at that time to change
America’s gun laws, but the gun lobby would
not be budged from its belief in an American’s
right to bear arms. This right is claimed from a
clause written more than 200 years ago into the
US Constitution by the Founding Fathers to
take care of a young country in which there
was no standing army.

Those were the days when if the state were
threatened the farmer had to hitch up his britch-
es, drop his pitch fork, grab his fire arm and
defend his neighbours. In that situation every
man had to be armed and on the ready to meet
the foe. That situation does not exist today.

The nation not only has a standing army, but
a well armed national guard, police force and
various other armed services.

Mr Joe Blow citizen, and his fusillade is no
longer needed. It is more than likely that if the
Founding Fathers were drafting the Constitution
in the context of today, that clause would not
even have been considered.

On March 30 Mr Darwin Dottin, chairman of
the Association of Caribbean Commissioners of
Police, and Commissioner of Police in Barbados,
signed a Memorandum of Understanding with
US Charges d’ Affaires Brent Hardt, formerly
Charges d’ Affaires in the Bahamas, with a US
law enforcement agency — eTrace — that will
greatly improve that country’s ability to trace
and fight firearms trafficking. According to Mr
Dottin there is a direct link between the rise in
violent crime in the Caribbean and gun traf-
ficking.

The Caribbean is now catching up with the
Bahamas, which three to four years ago signed
on to eTrace. Not only does Commissioner of
Police Reginald Ferguson find the system ben-
eficial, but there have been occasions when per-
sons attempting to ship high powered guns into
our islands have been intercepted, and their
plans thwarted.

However, everyone’s existence would be
made that much safer if America would put its
constitution into the context of 200 years ago
and realise that today all of us — themselves
included — would be better off it their citizens
were disarmed.

Our country 1s
being run by
sorry misfits

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Yesterday’s Nassau
Guardian, (6th April) carried
an article, reporting on the most
recent, Standard & Poor’s eco-
nomic projections for the
Bahamas and the Caribbean,
through to the year 2010; the
report is consistently bleak.
They rated Jamaica as the worst
and the Bahamas only slightly
ahead of Jamaica, in terms of
improved and projected eco-
nomic conditions, with all the
others doing, and projected to
do, far better than us. I ask then:
How and why did we get in this
position? We have always led
the Caribbean, in all facets of
advanced and improved eco-
nomic development and have
always boasted of a better
tourism and development prod-
uct; a far higher than average,
per capita income and general-
ly a far better way of life than all
our Caribbean neighbours;
including many parts of the
great United States of America.
Pray tell me then, what has hap-
pened to us? [ll tell you what
happened to us, the FNM came
to power in 2007, when it was
projected, by the same S & P
and the IMF that we would
experience a GDP growth of
almost five per cent and they
blew it; that is what happened
to us.

The projections, in the report
in question, are that we will
have negative growth of at least
two per cent in this current year,
of 2009 and one per cent next
year, 2010. This spells —
whether we wish to hear it or
not — doom and gloom for the
next two years in our growth,
and with prices of essentials and
other services skyrocketing
everyday, I won’t hold out
much hope for many of our
brothers and sisters, surviving.
The misery index is already at

letters@tribunemedia net



an all time high and climbing
every day, as friends and neigh-
bours fall through the cracks;
much of it deserved, because of
the many reckless decisions they
have made, but many, unfortu-
nately, are and will be the vic-
tims of circumstances.

In its last report on the
Bahamas, S & P had to defend
itself against the scurrilous
attacks and charges of “bias”
levelled against them by, the
FNM’s, Ingraham and Laing. I
am just wondering what will
they have to say about this most
recent bleak report?

S & P, whether they realised
it or not, accused the FNM and
its policies, adopted just after
winning the elections in 2007,
of causing the erosion of
investor confidence and of
steam rolling the growth
momentum, which was carried
over and which they inherited,
from the Christie administra-
tion. Their “stop; amend; review
and cancel” policy destroyed
our economy and took it into a
tail spin from which we will
probably not recover until they
are removed from power and
the PLP takes over again.

Lest we forget, the PLP had
to bail the country out of the
economic doldrums after they
defeated the FNM in the gen-
eral elections, of 2002. The
FNM left us with nothing but a
huge national debt, which they
ran up in their 10 years in pow-
er-between 1992 and 2002 —
by their reckless borrowing and
spending of $1.255 billion, and
it seems we (PLP) will have to
do it again, come 2012 or
before.

What can I say? The country
is saddled with a bunch of sorry
misfits running its affairs and
every day the hole they are dig-
ging for us is getting deeper and
deeper. We seem to be headed
nowhere in particular. The
country is like a sailing schooner
with its sails all hoisted but not
trimmed, the wind blowing
fiercely but it has no rudder and
she is just left there, flapping in
the wind and going nowhere.
The only thing this FNM gov-
ernment seems to know how to
do well is borrow money and
spend it; increase taxes on the
Bahamian poor and fire public
sector workers and call it
restructuring.

Obama has ordered pay cuts
and freezes for his cabinet;
Turks & Caicos Islands ordered
a 15 per cent cut in pay for its
cabinet just before Britain fired
all of them; Jamaica’s prime
minister has just ordered a
salary freeze, took a 15 per cent
pay cut himself and a 10 per
cent cut for the remaining cab-
inet personnel, but Ingraham
and Laing? What have they
done? Nothing, of course; they
continue to collect their $8000-
$10,000 per month salaries as if
the bad times are only for the
poor and needy in the country.
They should have led the way in
taking a 50 per cent cut in their
pay. None of them know what
to do with $8000 per month
anyway, except to hoard it.
Their life styles leave much to
be desired and besides, on a
scale of one to 10, their perfor-
mance, in my view, is about one
and one half. If there was ever a
good example of “dumb and
dumber”: well you are the
judge.

FORRESTER J CARROLL
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,

April 8, 2009.

Traffic light problem needs addressing

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I'd like to bring the following matter to the
attention of the Ministry of Transport, Road
Traffic Department or whoever is responsible
for the horrible traffic light situation around the
island. I, unfortunately, cannot attest to the major-
ity of stop lights on New Providence, as I live
near Montagu Beach, but I have seen similar let-
ters in your newspaper in times past from dis-
gruntled drivers who move through our streets.

Tam a frequent traveller in the East Bay/Shirley
Street/Village Road area. The stop lights, when
they work, are terribly out of sync and because of
this, traffic from three onwards absolutely crawls
from the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre and

that have been backed up on East Bay to move

ahead.

Mackey.

sometimes beyond that point. When one finally

manages to make a right hand turn onto the Vil-
lage Road extension and the green signal is in
sight, immediately the light at Village Road and

Nassau,
Nassau,

G PINDER

Similarly frustrating are the lights at Bar 20
Corner and Mackey Street and Madeira and

These have not been working for as long as I
can remember, and you truly do take your life in
your hands when you try to join the traffic flow
onto Mackey Street from either of those side
streets. I would think Mackey Street is considered
a major thoroughfare, so why haven’t those lights
been repaired?

If government has money to renovate the inter-
national airport, carry out major road works, etc,
why can’t they find some to address the traffic
light problem?



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



WSC unionists claim
they acted ‘after govt

Last minute meeting over services component of EPA

: THE outcome of a last minute
: meeting called to finalise the
: Bahamas’ offer to Europe under the
? services component of the Econom-
i ic Partnership Agreement was
? unknown yesterday, as Minister of
? State for Finance Zhivargo Laing said

he had not spoken to officials who

8
9 ? attended the meeting in Belgium.
U : Senior Ministry of Finance offi-
: clals flew to Brussels to meet with

European trade officials on Thurs-
: day to discuss the Bahamas’ offer to
: the European Commission under the

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

WATER and Sewerage Corpora-
tion unionists angered by Minister of
State Phenton Neymour’s “malicious
and unwarranted attack” maintain
they were forced to act when govern-
ment refused to listen to their pleas.

Bahamas Utility Service and Allied
Worker’s Union (BUSAWUV) presi-
dent Carmen Munnings-Kemp main-
tains her union made every attempt to
negotiate with government and Water
and Sewerage Corporation (WSC)
executives before taking action last

Monday.

Ms Munnings-Kemp and Water ,
and Sewerage Management Union PHENTON NEYMOUR condemned



(WSMU) leader Ednel Rolle gath- unionists for holding ‘an illegal
ered around 200 WSC employees to strike under the guise of a press
attend a press conference outside the conference’.

WSC headquarters on Thompson

Boulevard on Monday morning last week to demand
better services, better treatment of staff and higher

salaries.

Mr Neymour condemned unionists for holding an
illegal strike under the guise of a press conference,
maintaining the unions’ demands are unrealistic in a

struggling economy.

But Ms Munnings-Kemp says BUSAWU has
made every effort to negotiate with government
and members’ patience has worn thin.

“As we have repeatedly said, we have extended
every courtesy and attempted to negotiate in
absolute good faith with the government and exec-
utive management of the corporation, but to no

avail,” she said.

“Tt is amazing that the Junior Minister only now
chooses to respond to our pleas and has chosen to
attempt to win the public’s sentiment by stating
what amounts to hot air and inaccuracies.”

The BUSAWU president hit back at Mr Ney-
mour’s call for the unions to use their skills to
address challenges faced by the corporation instead,

claiming union members have yet to
see any proposed solutions, mean-
ingful or otherwise, coming from the
Minister’s desk.

Ms Munnings-Kemp said: “In fact
his actions, or inaction at BEC, name-
ly not being able to properly address
the electricity costs, has increased the
power costs to produce and transmit
our water. This has caused a signifi-
cant jump in our subsidy require-
ment.”

WSC is the only utility company to
receive a government subsidy. It was
allocated $30 million last year.

Ms Munnings-Kemp argued WSC
should be able to increase rates as
the Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) increases surcharges as there
is a direct correlation between the
two.

Ms Munnings-Kemp also main-

tains that Mr Neymour made ill-
founded remarks regarding WSC
staff salaries, claiming he provided the inaccurate
salary of $37,000 per annum paid to senior janitors

when in fact the only permanent WSC janitor earns

less than half of that.
She said: “BUSAWU is extremely disappointed,
as I am certain is the manager’s union, that Mr Ney-

mour chooses to forget the fact the very unions in

years.

mix.

this corporation are responsible for most of, if not all,
the successes he has enjoyed over the past several

“He came from the bowels of the union and even
served as president — long after he had left our

“He benefited more from our various industrial

agreements than anybody else.”

She added: “BUSAWU is very much interested
in restoring the luster of this corporation and taking
it to higher heights.

“We found ourselves in this position, as a result of
the lack of focus and direction given to this corpo-
ration. We want to do the right thing and encourage
government to do the same.”

Bahamas’ financial services
model ‘is unsustainable’

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas’ current finan-
cial services model is unsustain-
able and must immediately be
reformed as it faces threats of pos-
sible sanctions from the Organi-
sation for Economic Co-opera-
tion and Development stemming
from its placement on the group's
“grey list”, president of Bahami-
ans Agitating for a Referendum
on Free Trade (BARF), Paul
Moss said.

Mr Moss, a lawyer and manag-
ing director of local financial ser-
vices company Dominion Man-
agement Services, chastised gov-
ernment for what he thinks is a
lackadaisical approach to ensuring
that the country's second industry
is protected from potential attack
from the international communi-
ty.
He argued that to avoid any
sanctions government should dis-
mantle its "tax haven" image by
introducing a tax system for for-
eign companies operating in the
Bahamas. This system should be
no more than two per cent of a
company's gross profit, 3.5 per
cent of its net profit or one per
cent of funds under management,
he proposed, adding this could
inject billions into the economy.

The PLP political hopeful said
this initiative should be imple-
mented over the next two to four
years for existing clients and Jan-
uary 2010 for new clients.

He also suggested, like several
others in the financial arena, that
government enter into double tax-

_

oe

c
l~
te
a
yt
:
r
|
'
F
|
i
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i
\

j

ation agreements — a treaty that
would allow citizens of OECD
nations and developed nations to
be taxed in the Bahamas at a low-
er rate.

"I think that it's offensive that
persons can come into this coun-
try, make the money that they
make, and then walk away with it
while Bahamians are left holding
the bag.

"We must be seen to be taxing,
because if we are taxing, the
OECD cannot say the Bahamas is
a tax haven," he said, adding that
the additional revenue could inject
millions into needy areas such as
educational, healthcare and infra-
structure.

Lawmakers

Mr Moss’ comments came days
after Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham told The Tribune that
government was where he expect-
ed it would be at this stage regard-
ing the OECD's standards, adding
that lawmakers will do what is
necessary "in a timely manner”
to ensure the country meets the
remaining criterion.

But Mr Moss charged that the
nation's chief "does not realise
how serious the situation is.”

He said: "That's how we got on
the blacklist — governments did
not realise — and how come we're
on the grey list today. He should
be very concerned because if the
Bahamas is not in the business of
financial services we recognise
that it accounts for a significant
amount of the (gross domestic
product) GDP, well past 20 per
cent, and that means that if we

take that away one can see that
our country and economy is floun-
dering now, it would be cata-
strophic if it's not there."

"The reality is the present mod-
el of financial services is unsus-
tainable. The approach has to be
holistic and forward thinking and
a part of that has to be we must
begin to tax these people in our
jurisdiction."

"We must begin to take hold
of this country and make sure that
people who make money from it
leave a stake in it, because other-
wise the generations to come will
look at this generation and say
what a useless lot."

Two weeks ago the Bahamas
was named by the OECD on a
list of "tax havens” that have com-
mitted to international tax stan-
dards, but have yet to implement
them.

The list was published after the
high-profile meeting of the G-20
Summit in London, where sever-
al world leaders pledged to crack-
down on so-called tax havens and
offshore jurisdictions.

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trade in services component of the
EPA.

Tt was understood that the Euro-
peans were not satisfied with the
extent to which Bahamian services
industries were being protected from
foreign participation under the ini-
tial offer and were looking for the
Bahamas to offer further concessions
in the retail, construction, computer
systems, advisory services and for-
eign/international law sectors —
allowing European companies to
establish a commercial presence in

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the Bahamas to sell these services
should they choose to do so.

Last week Mr Laing told Tribune
Business that any further liberalisa-
tion of the retail sector “will not hap-
pen” under the EPA, notwithstand-
ing the European’s alleged demands.

With only a day to go before the
six-month extension —to April 15 —
given to the Bahamas to conclude
the offer it is to make to the Euro-
pean Commission, Mr Laing told The
Tribune he expects to be briefed on
the outcome of the meeting today.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Man appears
In court over
shooting death

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

A 32-YEAR-OLD
Carmichael Road man
charged in the shooting
death of Reno Burrows
who was gunned down
near a laundromat on
Carmichael Road last
year, was arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court on Fri-
day .

Police have charged
Philip Charlow with the
January 2008 murder of
Reno Burrows. According
to police, Burrows, a resi-
dent of East Avenue,
Carmichael Road was
with a group of men near
the Pondwash Laundro-
mat on Carmichael Road,
around 8 pm when a gun-
man cloaked in a hood
approached and fired sev-
eral shots. Burrows, who
was working under the
hood of a vehicle at the
time, was reportedly shot
in the back five times.
Burrows, who had just
turned 30 two weeks
before he was gunned
down became the coun-
try’s fourth murder vic-
tim for 2008.

According to court
dockets, Charlow on Fri-
day, January 11, 2008,
intentionally caused Bur-
rows’ death. Thirteen wit-
nesses are listed on court
dockets. Charlow, who
was represented by lawyer
Ian Cargill, was arraigned
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court 1,
Bank Lane on the murder
charge.

Charlow was not
required to enter a plea to
the charge and was denied
bail. The case was
adjourned to July 27.

Mexican Congress:

(lebates legalising
marijuana

@ MEXICO CITY

MEXICO'S Congress
opened a three-day debate
Monday on the merits of
legalizing marijuana for per-
sonal use, a policy backed by
three former Latin American
presidents who warned that a
crackdown on drug cartels is
not working, according to
Associated Press.

Although President Felipe
Calderon has opposed the
idea, the unprecedented
forum shows legalizing mari-
juana is gaining support in
Mexico amid brutal drug vio-
lence.

Such a measure would be
sure to strain relations with
the United States at a time
when the two countries are
stepping up cooperation in
the fight against drug traffick-
ing. The congressional debate
— open to academics, experts
and government officials —
ends a day before President
Barack Obama arrives in
Mexico for talks on the drug
war.

Proponents had a boost in
February when three former
presidents — Cesar Gaviria
of Colombia, Ernesto Zedillo
of Mexico and Fernando Car-
doso of Brazil — urged Latin
American countries to con-
sider legalizing the drug to
undermine a major source of
income for cartels.

The congressional discus-
sion takes on a subject "that
had been taboo" in our coun-
try, said opposition lawmaker
Javier Gonzalez, adding that
his Democratic Revolution
Party supports legalizing per-

sonal marijuana consumption. }

"What we don't want is to
criminalize youths for con-
suming Or possessing marijua-
na," he said.

Calderon, whose six-year
terms ends in 2012, has pro-
posed legislation that would
offer users treatment instead
of jail time but stop short of
legalizing or decriminalizing
possession.

In 2006, Mexico backed off
a law that would have abol-
ished prison sentences for
drug possession in small
amounts after the U.S.
protested.

"It's clear that a totally
prohibitive policy has not
been a solution for all ills,"

said Interior Department offi- ;

cial Blanca Heredia. "At the
same time, it's illusory to
imagine that complete legal-
ization of marijuana would be
a panacea."

Government aims to provide
greater access to

m@ By MATT MAURA
Bahamas Information
Services

GOVERNMENT is push-
ing ahead with its initiative to
provide even greater access to
healthcare and health institu-
tions for all Bahamians,
Health Minister Dr Hubert
Minnis said in his address to
the monthly meeting of the
Nurses Association of the
Bahamas last week.

This initiative, he said, is in
anticipation of any “unex-
pected challenges” the current
worldwide financial crisis and
credit crunch could have on
healthcare locally.

Dr Minnis said it is the gov-
ernment’s belief that equitable
access to healthcare and
greater equity in health out-
comes, are fundamental to a
well-functioning economy.

“It may also be a measure
of how a civilised society is
making progress,” he said.

Impact

Dr Minnis said countries at
all levels of development — the
Bahamas included — are con-
cerned about the impact the
current financial crisis can pos-
sibly have on healthcare.

He said some of those con-
cerns relate to mental illness-
es such as depression and anx-
iety, in addition to possible
increases in the use of harmful
substances such as tobacco
and alcohol as well as increas-
es in the ingestion of
processed foods.

“In these financially
depressed times, consumers
may increase their intake of
processed foods that are high
in fats and sugar and low in
essential nutrients, leading to
more health related diseases,”

Dr Minnis said.

“It is an accepted fact that
such foods contribute to obe-
sity and chronic diseases such
as diabetes and hypertension.”

Dr Minnis said healthcare
professionals are already
experiencing, or can expect to
experience, increases in public
and private patients seeking
medical attention at the Acci-
dent and Emergency Depart-
ment of the Princess Margaret
Hospital and the community
clinics.

Health insurance coverage
being lost due to an inability
to pay, increases in chronic,
non-communicable diseases
(CNCDs), increased demand
for bed space, increased
demand for public sector sup-
plied medication and increas-
es in the number of persons
experiencing the “burn out”
syndrome can also be expect-
ed, he said.

The minister said he met
with health management
teams to devise plans that will
effectively respond to the chal-
lenging economic times.

Dr Minnis said the World
Health Organisation (WHO)
estimates that each year,
healthcare costs have risen
and that in some instances
those rising costs have led to
individuals and groups not
only losing medical coverage,
but also losing their status as
middle-class citizens.

Dr Minnis said the World
Bank issued an assessment of
the impact the financial crisis
is having on many of the
developed and developing
countries. This assessment

showed that many people are
losing their jobs, homes and
savings and their lives.

He said it is against this
backdrop that the govern-
ment, through the Ministry of
Health, has undertaken the




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“ambitious drive” to improve
access to healthcare and
health institutions for Bahami-
ans.

Funded

“In the interim, budgets
must be funded and health
programmes must be contin-
ued,” Dr Minnis said. “At my
ministry there is a renewed
focus and concern relating to
ensuring that resources,
including staff and medical
equipment are available and
functioning.”

“In spite of the financial cri-
sis affecting health, we must
ensure that we continue to
provide the best possible
healthcare system while main-
taining the highest standards,”
Dr Minnis said.

DAIHATSU

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MINISTER OF HEALTH

Dr Hubert Minnis addressed
members of the Nurses
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during the Association’s
monthly meeting held at
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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

travel to the island by other
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the move will shortly be followed
by a further decision to lift all
restrictions on travel from the
USS. to Cuba — allowing not just
Cuban Americans but all Ameri-
cans to travel to the island — Mr
Cutillas, like several tourism lead-
ers in the Bahamas, said he does
not think Bahamians should view
it as an “immediate threat.”

“Certainly, the second step that
Obama could take is the lifting
of restrictions for Americans and
not just Cuban Americans to trav-
el to Cuba. That doesn’t require
congressional action, he could do
that with an executive order and
that could create some problems
for the Bahamian economy but
I’ve always said that Cuba is not
really prepared yet to receive a
big influx of tourism — the ser-
vices, the hotels, are rather limit-
ed,” said the 77-year-old execu-
tive, who fled Cuba with his
mother, father and brother in
1960, a year after Fidel Castro’s
revolution.

According to a White House
fact sheet outlining the extent of
Mr Obama’s directive, the move
will see limits on the frequency
and duration of visits by Cuban
Americans to Cuba removed, as
well as limits on baggage weight
and expenditure.

A family member will be
defined as anyone “within three
degrees of a family relationship”
— for example, second cousins
— to travel, while anyone who
lives with an authorised traveller
can accompany them, such as a
girlfriend or boyfriend.

Limits on the frequency and
amount of remittances that can
be sent and carried by travellers
have also been lifted, and U.S.
banks will be allowed to apply
for licenses to forward remit-
tances.

Meanwhile, in a slightly more
surprising aspect of the announce-
ment, the President also indicated
that he would authorise U.S. com-
panies to establish greater
telecommunications links with
Cuba.

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enter into agreements to estab-
lish fiber-optic cable and satellite
telecommunications facilities link-
ing the United States and Cuba,
and into roaming service agree-
ments with Cuba's telecommuni-
cations service providers.

US. satellite radio and satellite
television service providers will
be permitted to engage in trans-
actions necessary to provide ser-
vices to customers in Cuba.

The White House said the
intended purpose of this was to
“advance people-to-people inter-
action at no cost to the USS. gov-
ernment (and) increase the means
through which Cubans on the
island can communicate with each
other and with persons outside
of Cuba.”

Cuban born Mr Cutillas said:
“T think it’s a good move on the
part of the United States but it’s
to be seen if (the Cuban Govern-
ment) will accept something like
that. They are not very keen on
having free communications
among people.”

“But more communications is
always good, especially when peo-
ple live in a society like Cuba
which is quite closed, where peo-
ple can’t really receive interna-
tional news freely or things like
that, where everything is con-
trolled by the government. The

fact that people can freely travel,
exchange views, is positive,” he
said.

Meanwhile, the former Bacar-
di President, who retired from his
post in 1994, said that he is scep-
tical as to whether the Govern-
ment will allow remittances to
“reach their destination”, partic-
ularly if they are being sent to
people considered political dissi-
dents by the Cuban government.

“It’s one thing to send money
to your brother or sister, but
another thing that many, many
people in Cuba need is to help
those who are in jail or who have
families who are in jail and are
really controlled by government,
they can’t get a job in Cuba, or
are really controlled by the gov-
ernment,” he added.

As for whether increased
access to communication oppor-
tunities and financial resources
will improve the likelihood of a
transition to democracy on the
island, Mr Cutillas said he sees
yesterday’s changes as “‘a step in
the right direction,” but
added: “It’s not going to be that
easy.”

Mr Cutillas expressed hope the
Cuban government “follows the
example” of Mr Obama in reduc-
ing the restrictions it imposes on
its population.

Two men dead in weekend violence

FROM page one

hit and seriously injured a 31-year-old Wilson Tract man while
driving away from the sports centre on Thompson Boulevard at

around 5pm.

However, an eyewitness told The Tribune that Mr Bremmer
was stabbed before he got into the driver’s seat of an orange 1994
Honda Prelude and hit the pedestrian as he was trying to escape his

attackers.

The collision gave Mr Bremmer’s attackers an opportunity to
“finish him off” and then steal the car stereo and speakers before
fleeing the scene, the eyewitness claimed.

Mr Bremmer was rushed to Princess Margaret Hospital where he
died of his injuries, while the 31-year-old is in serious, but stable con-

dition.

The brutal violence drove witnesses to call on the police to show
a greater presence at the sports centre and offer better protection

to spectators.

But Assistant Superintendent and police press liaison officer
Walter Evans defended police, maintaining the brutal killing was
an isolated incident and there is a strategy in place for policing the

track.

He said: “Bear in mind it was a holiday weekend and police
officers were deployed all over New Providence... Police can’t be

everywhere all the time.”

A 21-year-old is being questioned in connection with Mr Brem-

mer’s killing.

However, no one has yet been arrested in connection with the
suspicious death of a man found dead in a car yesterday.

The man, who has not yet been identified by police, was discov-
ered with a gunshot wound in his neck in a Nissan Sentra parked in
Watlings Street at around 8am Easter Monday, prompting an

intensive murder investigation.

Police are appealing to the public for assistance, and anyone
who may have information which may assist investigations should
call police on 911, 919 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on

328-TIPS (8477).

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How Do We Deal With The Learning Crisis?

Join us for an important perspective on our education crisis, presented by economist Ralph Massey

based on his recent publication, The Learning Crisis: A Bahamian Public Policy Essay. Mr Massey

identifies the factors that created the ‘perfect storm’ in education and outlines the monumental reforms that
are required to rescue our schools. This is the critical issue of our age - bar none. Be a part of the solution.

Wednesday, April 15, 6:30pm. The Nassau Yacht Club on East Bay Street.

Easter holiday

FROM page one

: lier in the year.

Meanwhile, explaining that

i those in the sector are in close
? contact with airlines about their
i seat bookings - a “good barome-
? ter” of likely arrivals to the coun-
i try in coming months - Mr Van-
i derpool Wallace added that based
? on what such carriers are report-
i ing conditions beyond the holi-
i day season are also looking up.

“From everything we see we

i are optimistic that things are
i beginning to turn around a little
i bit - even while we try to put in
: place some of these initiatives that
i we think will accelerate the pace,”
i said the tourism minister.

He puts the change down to a

i combination of external factors
i and efforts on the part of the Min-
iistry and private sector in this
i country.

On the Ministry’s part, he said

ithe private sector has been
i expressing their support for its
i advertising strategy, which has
iseen adverts running over a
i longer period of time than ever
i before.

“Our team has been buying

i better than we have ever done
i and making sure that we are
i advertising during those times
i that people are likely most recep-
i tive,” added Mr Vanderpool Wal-
? lace.

His comments come on the

: heels of what Bahamas Hotel
i Association President Robert
i Sands told The Tribune was a
i“very frank and productive”
i meeting between industry stake-
: holders and Tourism Ministry
i officials last week covering a
i broad range of issues such as the
i need for reform of the Bahamas
? gaming industry and other rec-
? ommendations as to how the sec-
i tor can be made more competi-
i tive in a number of areas.

Mr Sands, along with BHA

i Executive Director Frank Comi-
? to and Senior Vice President of
i Bahamar Eddy Cambridge, met
? with the Minister, Director Gen-
i eral, Permanent and Under Sec-
i retary in the Ministry of Tourism
i last Tuesday.

The meeting was an opportu-

i nity for them to present recom-
i mendations as to what the Casino
i industry in the Bahamas should
? do to keep up with new competi-
i tive threats - including proposed
i overhauls of gambling in Florida
? which have been identified as a
i major potential challenge to this
i country’s desirability as a gaming
i destination.

Two weeks ago Mr Sands told

i this newspaper that the industry is
i“in the dark ages” and may
i require “radical change” if it is
i to maintain its attractiveness.

Meanwhile the “two plus hour”

i meeting also covered a broad
irange of other matters coming
: out of a months-long dialogue
i between the private and public
i sector about how the industry can
i better its market share.

Yesterday Mr Vanderpool

i Wallace said that all of the sug-
i gestions made by the hotel lead-
i ers will now be discussed to deter-
? mine their feasibility.

“Very clearly we want to, par-

i ticularly with what was rcom-
i mended in the casino sector, to
i have some comment from mem-
? bers of the Gaming Board on the
i changes to the regulations that
i would be required to be changed,
: and then secondly there’s always
i the discussions we need to have
ion what the likely economic
i impact is going to be on the over-
: all economy, government taxes
i etcera,” said the Minister.

Mr Sands told The Tribune

: that the Casino Association was
? interested in seeing new types of
i games introduced, as well as
i changing the law to allow for
imore people in the country to
: gamble - such as foreign residents.

“We will see if we have any

i particular difficulties that we will
i discuss internally before we make
i any recommendations on any
i changes to be made,” said Mr
i Vanderpool Wallace yesterday.

American
visitor

FROM page one

Meanwhile, The Post and

i Courier, in an article published
i Saturday, quoted the principal
: at her high school as stating that
i the accident in fact occurred at
i around 10pm Wednesday.

Principal David Held said:

i“This is a tremendous loss for
our community. She was one of
i those great kids. Hard workers.
i Good student. Extremely well
i loved by her peers and teach-
i ers.”

Local police are investigating

: the incident.




THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 9

© mbrief FirstCaribbean branch helps to beautify

part of Palmdale Primary school campus

Kingdor National
Parkinson Foundation
set for walk/run event

APRIL is “Parkinson
Awareness Month” and in
the Bahamas the Kingdor
National Parkinson Founda-
tion has planned several
activities to commemorate
the occasion, including the
organisation’s eighth annual

walk/run competition, which

will commence at Montagu
Beach Park on Saturday,
April 25.

The Foundation is asking
Bahamians to support the
fundraising event by provid-
ing fruit for the 700 partici-
pants.

petition is used to raise

funds for research, which the

Foundation’s parent organi-
sation makes available to

many countries of the world.
Additionally, Kingdor sup- :

plies seed funds to persons

with neurological conditions.

The Foundation said it is
because the ongoing dedica-
tion and assistance by the
Bahamian people that it is

able to continue with its mis-

sion to improve the quality
of life for persons with
Parkinson’s disease and
allied conditions.












The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.








This annual walk/run com- }

MANAGEMENT staff of
FirstCaribbean International
Bank’s Palmdale Branch part-
nered with teachers of its adopt-
ed school - Palmdale Primary
School — to beautify a section
of the school campus.

The team gave the gardens a
splash of colour, enhancing the
environment and creating an
atmosphere that would make
students and visitors to the
school proud.

The bank’s Palmdale branch
manager Paul Bartlett said:
“The turn-out of both First-
Caribbean and Palmdale pri-
mary staff was a great indicator
as to the emphasis placed on the
students’ well-being. The hard
work and camaraderie was
infectious, with everyone get-
ting their hands dirty, from the
skilled gardeners in the crew to
the novices. The result was
absolutely amazing. It was well

ae
T

worth the time and effort put
into the project.”

The FirstCaribbean Palmdale
branch adopted the school in
2005 and has since made quite a
difference, including keeping
their Wednesday afternoon

Police: Iraq a factor in
PR soldier’s suicide

m@ SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

A SOLDIER who had told his family he did not want to return
to Iraq apparently killed himself in a Puerto Rican motel days
before he was to join his unit and head back to the war zone,
police in the U.S. territory said Monday, according to Associated

Press.

Army Spc. Nokware Rosado Munoz, 28, had been arguing with

again,” Rivera said.

129 confirmed cases.

Break away from the ordinary
and discover how to experience

his pregnant wife about his upcoming redeployment before hang-
ing himself Sunday, said Lt. Edilberto Rivera Santiago, director of
the police homicide division in the San Juan suburb of Bayamon.

"They were having problems because he had been activated

Rosado was scheduled to rejoin his unit at Fort Bliss, Texas, this
week, before moving on to Iraq.

The soldier's mother-in-law, Migdalia Estrada, was quoted by
newspaper El Nuevo Dia as saying that Rosado was receiving psy-
chiatric treatment stemming from a previous Iraq deployment.

"He had said to my daughter that he didn't want to go back to
Iraq," Estrada said. "I don't understand how they can order him
back if he was having problems.”

An Army official in San Juan, Felix Santiago, said the military
was cooperating with Puerto Rican authorities in an investigation.
Officials in Fort Bliss had no immediate comment.

Suicides in the Army have increased yearly since 2004 as soldiers
deal with longer and repeated tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. The
Army had its highest rate of suicide on record in 2008 with at least

i: al oe

als GARDENS were given a splash ai colour by the team.



appointment to read to students
in the school’s upper grades —
an initiative done in conjunc-
tion with the Ministry of Edu-
cation and the American
Embassy.

FirstCaribbean Palmdale
remains committed to Palmdale
Primary and to doing its part to
keep the Bahamas “clean, green
and pristine,” while living the

bank’s commitment to “enrich-
ing our communities - togeth-
er,” the bank said.







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THE TRIBUNE





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LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

school fees for an estimated 700 peo-
ple who lost their jobs at Atlantis,
the British Colonial Hilton and Our
Lucaya in Grand Bahama between
November 2008 and February this
year.

Tt is the second time in six months
the fund has moved to provide
financial assistance to hotel work-
ers affected by the severe economic
downturn as an estimated 6,000
workers whose hours were reduced
to three days a week or less in Sep-
tember and October were called up
to claim $1,000 to be paid directly to
creditors in October, and now hun-
dreds more who have been made
redundant are invited to come for-
ward for financial support.

It is estimated that around 300
people are still eligible to apply for
the first wave of benefits, and anoth-
er 700 are potentially eligible for
the new benefits package, expect-
ed to draw just over $1 million from
the fund.

BHAI Health and Welfare Ben-
efits Fund trustee and president of
the Bahamas Hotel Employers
Association J Barrie Farrington said

Hotel workers

the decision to provide further ben-
efits was based on considered review
of the continuing economic crisis
affecting the hotel industry.

He said: “We didn’t expect to be
doing it so quickly, we hoped there
would have been a rebound since
the last benefits were launched, but
there are things happening within
the industry that we think will create
some excitement and hopefully pro-
duce an increased volume of busi-
ness in the country.”

Mr Farrington hopes hosting the
Miss Universe and Miss Teen USA
pageants as well as the internation-
al FIFA conference at Atlantis this
year will bring international atten-
tion to the Bahamas and help boost
tourism.

“We are looking forward with
optimism,” Mr Farrington said.

“But the important thing we are
doing now is responding to the cry
of a lot of workers in the industry
who have been displaced.”

He spoke during a press confer-
ence at Workers House on Harrold
Road with Bahamas Hotel, Catering

Unemployment benefit

FROM page one

Easter holiday plans.

Around 15,000 people who have been out of work for up to four
years are expected to apply for benefits throughout the week, and those
who fit the broad criteria set out for the first phase of the scheme can
expect to collect their cheques in about two weeks.

They will receive half of their average insurable weekly wage for 13
weeks, and as the current ceiling on insurable wages is $400, the maximum
amount anyone can receive is $200 per week.

Mr Foulkes visited all four of the New Providence venues on Saturday
as job seekers gave details of when they became unemployed to Depart-
ment of Labour staff and were then issued certificates to register with NIB.

The minister said: “ I must compliment National Insurance Board
staff and the Department of Labour staff for their hard work.

“Tt was the first time we have done such an exercise between both the

and Allied Workers Union presi-
dent Roy Colebrook, Bahamas
Hotel and Allied Industries Pension
Fund executive director Louis
Dames and Bahamar and Cable
Beach Resorts vice president Robert
“Sandy” Sands to launch the scheme
on Thursday.

Mr Sands said he too is hopeful
the hotel industry will bounce back,
but did not shy away from the harsh
reality facing hundreds of workers.

He said: “The reality is things
continue to deteriorate. Hotels are
receiving respectable levels of busi-
ness, but the spend of those cus-
tomers has not materialised to the
spend we would anticipate.

“The waters are still murky...
And we do expect more downward
trend after the Easter period and
into May and June.

“T don’t think we have hit bottom
as yet, but hotels are doing things to
mitigate against unemployment...
We all recognise that compounding
the situation by adding more to the
unemployment at this time helps no
one in this period.”

Major hotels are doing their best
to retain staff by cutting costs in oth-
er areas, such as by reducing work-
ing hours and paid annual leave, Mr
Sands said.

Hotel workers made redundant
from Atlantis, British Colonial
Hilton and Our Lucaya between
November and February can apply
for the new benefits package at the
pension fund offices at Workers
House in Nassau and Freeport from
10am on Monday, April 20.

Applications will be taken in
alphabetical order of surnames in
the first two weeks with letters A
to E processed on Mondays, F to L

Oless td

on Tuesdays, M to R on Wednes-
days and S to Z on Thursdays in
New Providence, and in Grand
Bahama A to L will be handled on
Mondays and Wednesdays, and M
to Z on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Applicants must have their
National Insurance card and docu-
mentation for bills and mortgage
payments with them.

The application process will con-
tinue until June 30.

For more information call Work-
ers House in Nassau at 322-5123,
and Workers House on Settlers
Way, Freeport, on 351-7832 from
9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday.

Bush fire

FROM page one

assigned to extinguish this mas-
sive blaze,” said Fire chief Walter
Evans.

Meanwhile, another fire, which
started near the Bahamas Gas
Company, and a blaze at the City
Dump were also being taken care
of by separate fire units.

Fire services were called to the
City Dump fire at around lam on
Saturday, and have been working
to put out the flames since then.
The fire was still burning yesterday
with the blaze confined to a west-
ern portion of the landfill.

“Tn all of these matters, home
owners are affected by the pres-
ence of smoke. They are to be
reminded that efforts are being
made to suppress these fires in the
shortest possible time,” said press
liaison officer Walter Evans.

i
“=

Ga ren

National Insurance Board and the Department of Labour and it’s a new
benefit that we are introducing so we didn’t really know what to expect,
but we were properly organised and are happy things went extremely
well.”

Applicants are asked to sign up on particular days throughout the
week according to their surname. Those whose surnames begin with
letters A to D were invited to register on Saturday, while those with sur-
names beginning with the letters E to L can sign up today, M to R can
attend tomorrow, and S to Z on Thursday.

Friday and Saturday will be open to people of any name, however Mr
Foulkes encourages all applicants to register within their specified group
to keep the application process under control.

The minister also thanked the media for showing sensitivity and pro-
fessionalism in covering the registration process.

The Unemployment Benefits scheme was signed into law by Gover-
nor General Arthur Hanna last week following Parliament’s enactment
of a bill to amend the National Insurance Act on March 25 and subsequent
passing of amendments to the contributions regulations, benefits and assis-
tance regulations, and financial and accounting regulations.

Registration venues include CC Sweeting Jr School in Oakes Field,
Doris Johnson in Prince Charles Drive, CR Walker in Blue Hill Road
north, and SC McPherson in Blue Hill Road South and two venues in
Grand Bahama. All are open from 9am to 4pm daily.

For more information contact NIB’s public relations department on
356-2070 extension 236/234/232, e-mail info@nib-bahamas.com, or log on

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JOYCE MINUS

BASKETBALL CLASSIC

line.
¢ Here's a look at those
games played:

EVANGELISTIC CENTER 49, :
CALVARY BIBLE 45 (OT): :
Sherman Bowe scored 14 }
and Tyrone Sands had 12 for ;
Evangelistic Center, who }

"Team Bahamas achieves

in the loss for Calvary Bible, :
who are not eligible for the ;

will now have to play idled
undefeated Christian Taber-
nacle for the men's vice
president pennant on Satur-
day.

Harcourt McCoy had 17

playofts.

EVANGELISTIC CENTER 39, :
GOLDEN GATES 38: Tyrone :
Sands and R Ferguson both }
scored 13 points in the win :
for Evangelistic Center as }
they kept their pennant :
hopes alive in the men's vice i

president division.

Daniel Johnson had a :
game high 14 in a losing :
effort for Golden Gates, }
who have been eliminated :

from the playoff picture.

FIRST BAPTIST 37, LATTER- :
Noel }
Richardson had a side high :
13 points and Eddie Miller :
added nine as First Baptist }
stayed undefeated in the :
men's president division }
heading into their match-up }
against Temple Fellowship }
for the pennant o Saturday. :
Thompson ;}
matched the game high hon- }
ors with 13 for Latter-Day, }
who still earned a playoff :

DAY SAINTS 32:

Cordero

berth.

NEW BETHLEHEM 28,

New Bethlehem clinched a

playoff spot in the men's ;

vice president division.

Roibinson Estorcica had :
nine in the loss for Church
of the Nazarene, whose :
playoff spot has been ruined.

CITY OF PRAISE 78, :
EBENEZER 16:R Edgecombe :
scored 16 and T Rolle andJ }
Rolle both had 13 as Cirty of }
Praise clinched their playoff :
spot in the men's president :

division.

Dane Stuat had 12 in the
loss for the hapless Ebenez- :
er, who will not make the }

playoff.

TEMPLE FELLOWSHIP 52, :
MACEDONIA 23: Gabbic
Laurant had a game high 17 :
points and Najee Bethell :
had nine as Temple Fellow- }
ship kept their playoff hopes ;
alive in the 19-and-under }

division.

Prince Pinder led Mace- }
donia with six as they await :
for the final outcome to see }
if they will make the play- }

offs.

FIRST BAPTIST 46, FAITH

UNITED 24: Noel Richard- }
son exploded for a game
high 17 points and Kirby }
Thergelus added nine as }
First Baptist moved on top }
of the 19-and-under stand- :
ings for a shot at winning ;

the pennant.

GOLDEN GATES 18, MIRA- :
CLE WORKING COG 16: :
Dustin McKenzie scored 11
to lead Golden Gates as i

SEE page 12

TUESDAY, APRIL 14,

IT will come down to one }
last chance as both the pen-
nants and playoff positions }
that haven't been decided :
are completed as the Bap- }
tist Sports Council wrap up :
the 2009 Joyce Minus Bas- :
ketball Classic's regular sea- :
son on Saturday at the Bail- :
lou Hills Sporting Complex. :

On Saturday past, the ;
BSC hosted a series of :
games with pennant and :
playoff implications on the :

2009






INSIDE ¢ Local sports news



| THE UNDER 20

‘| Girls 400m relay
| team of V'Alonee
Robinson,
Ivanique Kemp,
Gortia Ferguson
and Nivea Smith
pose with their
silver medals.

metal count in three years

VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA: For
Team Bahamas, the 2009 Carifta Games
produced a new record, the highest
medal total since 2006 and an impressive
showing at the most populated meet in
Carifta history.

At the conclusion of the four day
meet, the Bahamas placed third in the
total medal count with 28.

The 61-member team collected three
gold, 17 silver and eight bronze.

Jamaica again topped the medal table
with a total of 67 medals, 39 gold, 15 sil-
ver and 13 bronze.

Trinidad and Tobago finished second
with a total of 29 medals, nine gold, 10
silver and 10 bronze and Barbados was
fourth with a total of 21 medals, four
gold, nine silver and eight bronze and
host country St. Lucia rounded out the
top five as they finished with the most
medals in their country’s history, four
gold and two silver.

Although they fell short of the gold
medal total of previous years, The
Bahamas won more silver medals than

DAY ONE

VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA: The
Bahamas got off to a quick start on day
one of the 38th Carifta Track and Field
Championships with a medal in the first
contested event and concluding with a
pair of medals in the field.

MEDALLISTS

POLE VAULT

Vernal McIntosh, Bronze, 3.20m

e Despite a broken, unfamiliar pole
and finishing well short of his personal
best, McIntosh performed well enough
to claim the Bahamas’ first medal of
these Carifta Games.

McIntosh cleared 3.20 on his first
attempt, but missed three opportunities
to stay in the competition at 3.30m.

A pair of native St. Lucians took the
top two spots in the field, Shem Edwards
took first with a jump of 3.60m and Rick
Valcin finished second in 3.50m.

Although it was the first medal won at
the meet, it failed to qualify as an official
event in overall medal standings with
just three competitors from two coun-
tries.

Events which do not meet the stan-
dard of five competitors from three





VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA: The
Bahamas captured its first gold medal
of the meet on day two and the Bahami-
an faithful was re-energized by the most
decorated jumper in Carifta history after
a pair of untimely injuries and disquali-
fications.

MEDALS

U-17 GIRLS SHOT PUT
Raquel Williams — Gold, 11.93m
e It took just one throw for the top



any other country in the field.

The team posted back to back 30
medal performances in 2005 and 2006,
but since has yet to reach the 30 medal
mark.

Team Bahamas was once again led by
Raymond Higgs who finished with a
new Carifta record in the Under 20
Boys’ High Jump and came within a
centimetre of claiming another gold
medal in the long jump, reminiscent of
his hallowed 2006 performance.

Other outstanding performances
included Patrick Bodie who medalled in
both the 400m hurdles (silver) and 100m
hurdles (bronze) in the Under 17 Boys
division and Rashan Brown who cap-
tured three medals, silvers in the Under
17 Girls 400m and 4x400m relay, and a
bronze in the 200m.

Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations President Curt
Hollingsworth said the effort from the
entire team and the coaching staff was
one to be commended.

“Tt was exciting, this team was picked




countries officially qualify as an exhibi-
tion.

McIntosh, a relative newcomer to the
sport said although he was unable to
reach a personal best and the gold
medal, he was pleased with his effort.

“Tt feels pretty good, I knew I could
have done better and probably have the
gold medal but I am happy with what
God gave me. I came out here, I did not
perform to the best of my ability but I
made the best of what equipment I had,”
he said. “The pole was not mine and it
was broken so J had to improvise with it.
My personal best is way higher than
what I jumped out there but hopefully I
will continue at my next meet and
improve. I am quite confident in my abil-
ities and in my other meets I will con-
tinue to do my best to make the country
proud.”

U-20 GIRLS 1500M
Hughnique Rolle, Silver, 4:44.16s

e With the new Carifta record holder
nearly 200 metres ahead of the remain-
der of the field, Rolle secured her berth
atop the medal stand with a brillantly
executed race en route to a second place
finish.

Rolle captured the country’s first
medal on the track behind the eventual
gold medal winner and new Carifta
record holder, Natoya Goule of Jamaica
who finished more than 17 seconds

high school thrower in the country to
solidify her claim as the best in the region
and simultaneously capture the
Bahamas’ first gold medal of the meet.

Raquel Williams had the top two
throws of the competition, 11.80m on
her first attempt and the winning of 11.93
on her final effort to end the event in
dominating fashion.

Sasha-Gaye Marston of Jamaica was
second with a throw of 11.80m and
Catherine Mastail of Martinique was
third with her throw of 11.09m.

Williams surpassed the 11m mark on
three attempts and her shortest throw
of the competition, 10.87m on her third
attempt, would have still been good
enough to finish in fourth place.

based on qualifications and we are quite
satisfied and the children gave 100 per-
cent. They went out there, they left it on
the track and as a result we able to
accomplish most of the objectives that
we set out to accomplish as a team,” he
said. “The coaching staff, I think a lot of
people underestimated their ability but I
think this coaching team did a tremen-
dous job and their effort will be vilified
in the medal count. We have a whole lot
of work to do, but I think once we get
ourselves organised and we move in that
direction we will get where we need to
go. 2?
Hollingsworth said one of the main
topics of the 38th Carifta Congress was
the manner in which the gap between
Jamaica and the other Cariibean coun-
tries is closing and with a full effort
from all entities involved in the
Bahamas’ national programme the
BAAAs will continue to progress
towards the ultimate goal of a Carifta
championship.

“Tt is a credit to the RDC which pro-

ahead of the field in 4:27.48s.

Goule successfully defended her U-
20 title, while Rolle reached the medal
stand in just her first year contesting the
division.

She shaved more than 25 seconds off
her time in last year’s U-17 1500m final
when she finished Sth in 5:10.61s.

Rolle said although she felt ill-pre-
pared for the race due to a change in
schedule, faith kept her grounded and en
route to victory.

“T decided just to stay with the pack
instead of going out there and rushing
and chasing after her and going out fast
like I do in Nassau. Basically I did not
think I was ready but I prayed hard and
God came through. When I was in sec-
ond place and she went out in frst I
decided I was going to keep up with her
because I wanted to medal,” she said.
“This shows all the people back home
who probably did not believe in distance
runners that we do have what it takes to
win.”

U-17 BOYS HIGH JUMP
Ryan Ingraham, Silver, 1.95m
Jabari Wilmott, Bronze, 1.95m

e A duo of basketball players turned
high jumpers continued the Bahamas’
recent history of success in the high jump
concluding an exciting day one with pair
of medals.

While Wilmott improved on last year’s

Marston was the only other competitor
to pass the 11m mark on more than one
attempt.

In a single year, Williams improved
her performance by nearly two metres
from a last year’s Carifta Championships
in St Kitts.

Behind a veteran field, in her first
Carifta performance she threw just
10.51m in 2008 to finish in 5th place.

Williams said: “It feels good, I have
been practising hard for the past couple
months and I was able to come out here
on top.”

U-17 GIRLS 400M
Rashan Brown, Silver, 53.93s

vides all of the regional members with
the certification programme for coaches.
Many coaches in the region are taking
full advantage of it, our coaches are tak-
ing full advantage of it and they are also
becoming more knowledgeable so the
gap is closing,” he said. “It is exciting to
note that the gap is narrowing we just
need to take another step up, our coach-
es have to pick up their programmes,
our kids have to make more sacrifices,
we as an administration need to do our
part and everything will fall into place.”

Kerani James, of Grenada, was
named the Most Outstanding partici-
pant of the meet after setting a new
record in the Under 20 boys 400m, a
mark previously held by Usain Bolt of
Jamaica.

At the 38th Carifta Congress, dele-
gates decided that the 39th edition of
the games will be hosted by the Cayman
Islands in 2010.

Full results of all Bahamian competi-
tors will be published in tomorrow’s
edition of the Tribune.

ES ea EO

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE :
20: Theo Cleare scored 10
and Amon Baker had 10 as :

ninth place performance of 1.90m, Ingra-
ham reached the medal stand in his
debut Carifta appearance.

Both jumpers passed on the initial
heights of 1.70m and 1.75m and entered
the contest at 1.80m, clearing on their
first attempt.

Ingraham was stellar over the course
of the next three heights, clearing 1.85,
1.90, and 1.95 each n his first attempt.

Wilmott cleared 1.85 and 1.90 on his
second attempt but cleared 1.95 on his
initial effort.

In showdown for the gold medal, both
Wilmott and Ingraham failed on all three
attempts to clear 2.00, however Barba-
dian jumper Kemar Jones bypassed the
bar on his third and final attempt.

Both players, stars on the hardwood at
C.I Gibson (Ingraham) and St.
Augustine’s College (Wilmott) respec-
tively, said they did not give their best
effort despite reaching the medal stand.

“T feel that 2.00m I could have
jumped it but it just was not there
tonight,” Wilmott said.

Ingraham echoed the sentiments but
said he was thankful for the silver medal
in his frst Carifta games.

“T feel like I could have done way bet-
ter,” he said.

Both athletes said with basketball and
the high jump in their future athletic
plans, they will continue to pursue both
sports.

Katrina Seymour, DQ-lane infraction
A bittersweet finish for the Bahamas
in the first of four quartermile finals as
we witnessed the progression of one ath-
lete net a silver medal and flirt with the
meet record, while the other in her first
Carifta appearance lost a bronze medal
performance due to disqualification.
Brown willed herself to a second place
finish behind Shericka Jackson of Jamaica,
who set a new Carifta record of 43.48s.
Brown kept pace with Jackson on the
final curve and held on to second place
from a charging Seymour who finished in
third.
The two time Carifta medallist came

SEE page 12
PAGE 12, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

NGC



FROM page 11

into the final with the fastest
qualifying time in the field, as
she took her heat in 55.53s while
Seymout’s time of 56.03s was the
fourth fastest qualifying time.

In her debut Carifta Games
appearance, 2007 in Turks and
Caicos, Brown finished eight in
the 400m final, and improved to
a bronze medal performance last
year in St. Kitts.

Seymour nearly came away
with a medal performance in her
debut Carifta appearance before
learining of the disqualification

Brown said she was pleased
with her execution but fell short
of her ultimate goal

“Treally wanted to execute my
curve, pick up the stagger and
maintain my speed. I am a little
disappointed because my mind
was set on the gold and I came
up a little short but I thank God
that I have no injuries and I am
happy I came up with the silver.”

U-17 BOYS 100M
Jonathan Farquharson, Silver,
10.59s

e For the third consecutive
year, the Bahamas fielded a
medal winner in this division,
with a gritty performance
from Farquharson in the final
20m who just missing out on a
gold medal performance by a
few tenths of a second.

Farquharson came into the
final with just the fourth
fastest time of the field, but
nearly pulled off the upset
over gold medalist Jahazeel



VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA:
Triumphs in the field and from
the relay teams lead the charge
for the Bahamas on day three
highlighted by a pair of triple
jumpers who claimed silver
medals in their respective divi-
sions.

MEDALS

U-17 BOYS 400MH
Patrick Bodie, Silver, 55.48s

e Training with event record
holder, Nejmi Burnside paid
great dividends for Bodie as he
claimed the Bahamas’ first medal
on the track on day three.



Murphy of Jamaica who won
in 10.41s.

“T thought I had it from
start but the last 10 meters but
the Jamaican came through
and took it,” he said. “I think I
ran my best because he pretty
much pushed me to the limit.”

U-20 BOYS 100M
Warren Fraser, Silver, 10.26s
(wind aided)

e Tragedy was followed close-
ly by triumph for the Bahamas in
the contest to decide the
Caribbean’s fastest junior ath-
lete.

After witnessing his teammate
go down with an injury before a
somber and stunned George
Oldham stadium, Fraser pow-
ered home to a second place fin-
ish, just three tenths of a second
behind the eventual winner,
Shakiel Graves of Barbados.

While going through routine
warm-ups just seconds before
the start of the final, Marcus
Thompson suffered an ankle
injury and was forced to leave
the track under medical assis-
tance.

With Fraser the lone Bahami-
an competitior remaining, he
came within three tenths of a
second within being named the
fastest man at the Carifta level.

Fraser improved on the 10.56s
he posted in the preliminaries,
which seeded him third for the
final.

Thompson’s time of 10.60
after winning his opening round
heat seeded him fourth.

Two years removed from his

Bodie took an early lead and
maintained an advantage for
much of the race until tramaine
Maloney of Barbados surpassed
him him to take the final in
54.88s.

He said training alongside
Burnside provided excellent
competition and said holding on
to a medal positioning in the final
moments of the race was due to
pure will and effort

“T tried to maintain and hold
like my coach said I knew [had it
almost the whole lap. I was not
expecting the guy from Barba-
dos to come I was trying my best
to hold him off but I guess I lost

silver medal performance in the
Turks and Caicos, Fraser
returned to the marquee event
of the games to repeat his feat.

Just crossing the finish line,
Fraser tripped and fell injuring
both wrists and twisting his ankle
in the process.

“T was trying to come back I
was catching him, I felt myself
right there gaining on him and I
dipped and I sort of lost balance
in stride,” he said. “I was very
confident, I just wanted to PR,
which I did. It was a good race. I
got out the blocks, I drove, exe-
cuted, coming down the stretch
he sort of passed me but I came
back and it was a good race in
all,” he said.

U-20 BOYS HIGH JUMP
Raymond Higgs, Gold, 2.21m,
Carifta Record

e During his Carifta tenure,
Raymond Higgs has completely
re-written the Carifta record
books making him arguably the
most dominant athlete in his
respective discipline through-
out the history of the meet.

Higgs set a new record in the
Under 20 Men’s High Jump
with a leap of 2.21m, surpass-
ing the previous mark of 2.20m
set by Jamal Wilson in 2007.

The three time Carifta Cham-
pion took the gold medal in just
three jumps, passing on five
heights while his competitors
struggled throughout

He entered the competition
at 1.80m with the field, cleared
easily on his first attempt,
passed on 1.85m, 1.90m, 1.95m,
cleared 2.00m on his first
attempt, and with the remainder
of the field eliminated, cleared
2.09 on his first attempt for the

a little at the last hurdle,” he said.
“T gave it all I had, I knew I had
the heart of a lion so I just gave it
all I had. He’s a good training
partner and I wanted to at least
try and challenge the record,
maybe I did not but it was a good
race nonetheless.”

U-20 BOYS TRIPLE JUMP
J’Vente Deveaux, Silver,
15.47m

e It took five rounds for
Deveaux to solidify himself in
medal contention, but after the
dust settled he improved on an
eigth place performance from
the 2008 games.

Deveuax landed the silver
medal winning jump in the fifth
of six rounds finishing second
to Elton Walcott of Trinidad

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2009

Here’s a look at the final medal count from the Carifta Games:



wei)

AP Pe

TRINIDAD & TOBAGO
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ST. LUCIA

BAHAMAS

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lita Uy

LUN AAT

DONMINICA

ita HClO es

dea LOLDELY

LU DMUs

U. S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
Ue ae eh
PUL Remy ate.)
ST.VINCENT & GRENEDINES
ST. KITTS & NEVIS
CAYMAN ISLANDS
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PVCU a

gold medal.

Gold Medal well in hand,
Higgs passed on 2.12m, and set
a new Carifta record of 2.21m,
which he cleared on his second
attempt.

Higgs now holds both Carifta
records in the Under 17 Boys
(2.13m) and Under 20 Men’s
divisions.

Higgs said the gold medal was
an afterthought, his primary
goal was setting a new Carifta

and Tobago who leapt 15.61m
in the secnd round.

U-17 GIRLS TRIPLE JUMP
Tamara Myers, Silver, 11.70m

e Myers set a new personal
best and became a two time
Carifa medallist on day two,
continuing her progression in
the event.

The Exumian’s unorthodox
style landed her on the medal
podium on her third jump of
the competition.

“T jumped 11.70m which was
a personal best for me so ’'m
happy about that,” she said.

U-17 BOYS JAVELIN
Byron Ferguson, Bronze,
52.99m

e Although he fell short of
his personal best, in just two
years in the sport, Ferguson
has transformed himself from
a talented pitcher to one of
the best javelin throwers in
the region.

“It feels great to get the
bronze medal but I know I
really could have had the sil-
ver or even the gold, my best
throw would have put me on
that level,” he said. “I do not
feel like it was my best perfor-
mance but it went well. One
throw that I got everthing into
the wind carried it back a little
but all in all Iam very pleased
with what I have.”

Ferguson who has only been
competing at the sport for two
years, finished fourth at the
2008 championships and said
he continues to be encouraged
by his performances which get
“better and better everytime.”

Gold

Silver Bronze Total
15 as)
10 10
je)

ine)
a

ee Nom EE = I ooo SE om SO o> PE

C—O) > nO Gn
|= 32 42M = HA wR WODMHDY WON oO

record.

“JT just came set to break the
record that was the mindset I
had. I felt comfortable jumping
so I was just taking my time and
going through my jumps. I was
trying to PR but I just will have
to do it next time I guess,” he
said. “I probably would have
made it if I had competition,
more people jumping with me
but I will have to be sure to do it
next time.”

U-17 GIRLS 4X100
Anthonique Strachan, Shau-
nae Miller, Sparkyl Cash,
Printassia Johnson, Bronze

e For Johnson, redemption
from a disappointing 100m
came on the anchor leg of he
400m relay when she powered
down the track, surpassing two
competitiors to claim the bronze
for team Bahamas.

U-20 GIRLS 4X100

V’Alonee Robinson, Ivanique
Kemp, Ortia Ferguson, Nivea
Smith; Silver, 45.43s

e Smith delivered a remark-
able come from behind perfor-
mance to gain the Bahamas
spot atop the medal podium,
nearly nipping Jamaiacan
anchor Carrie Russell at the
line.

“These girls ran their heart
out, they ran their hardest so I
am not disappointed at all,” she
said. “This is a young team so in
Cariftas to come I know they
will continue to do better.”

U-17 BOYS 4X100

Rashad Armbrister, Harold
Carter, Blake Barrett,
Johnathan Farquharson; Sil-
ver, 41.89s

e With the backdrop of the
Jamaican team setting a new
Carifta record in 40.76s, the
Bahamas outclassed the remain-
der of the field after a blistering
start from 100m finalst Arm-
brister.

I tried to get a good start
because I know in the relay it is
important to get that start,” he
said. “We had our prayer before
the race and God came through
for us.”

DAY FOUR

¢ VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA:
The final day of competition
proved to be the most lucrative
for Team Bahamas with a total
of 11 medals on day four.

U-20 BOYS LONG JUMP
Raymond Higgs, Silver, 7.35m
e Just one centimetre sepa-
rated Raymond Higgs from a
double gold medal performance
on the final day of competition
at the 2009 Carifta Games.
Higgs duelled with native St.
Lucian Lenyn Leonce for six
rounds and despite digging deep
on his final attempt for his best
jump of the contest was unable
to surpass the mark of 7.36 set
by Leonce in the fourth round.

U-17 BOYS 100M HURDLES
Patrick Bodie, Bronze, 13.45s

e Bodie’s dip at the line
forced a photo finish before the
final placement was decided
and he edged out his competitor
by one thousandth of a second
to claim his second medal of the
meet.

U-20 GIRLS 100M HURDLES
Ivanique Kemp, Silver, 13.78s

e An exuberant Kemp wore
her emotions on her sleeve after
she shocked herself and the
crowd with her come from
behind performance to claim
the silver medal.

U-20 BOYS 110M HURDLES
Dennis Bain, Silver, 13.93s
e Despite hitting the third hur-
dle, Bain was able to recover



and take the silver medal for
the Bahamas’ third consecutive
triumph in the sprint hurdles.

U-17 GIRLS 200M

Antonique Strachan, Silver,
23.95s

Rashan Brown, Bronze, 23.97s
e Both athletes claimed their
second medals of the meet
simultaneously giving their
Bahamas their first dual medal
finish on the track.

U-20 GIRLS 200M

Nivea Smith, Silver, 23.36s

e After a gruelling indoor sea-
son after her freshman year at
Auburn University, Nivea
Smith was unable to extend her
Carifta championship streak to
three in the 200m.

U-17 BOYS TRIPLE JUMP
Lathone Minns, Silver, 14.58m
Lathario Minns, Bronze,
14.49m

¢ It was double trouble for the
remainder of the field in the
triple jump as the duo of broth-
ers ensured the Bahamas
claimed two positions atop the
medal stand.

U-17 GIRLS 4X400M RELAY
Teshon Adderley, Rashan
Brown, Bianca Farrington,
Katrina Seymour; Silver

U-20 GIRLS 4X400M RELAY
Katherina Smith, Devanique
Dean, Shaunte Miller,
Deshana Burnside; Bronze,
3:45.99s

JOYCE MINUS

BASKETBALL CLASSIC

FROM page 11

: they hold onto a shot at
? making the 19-and-under
? playoffs.

: Omal Deveaux had six in
i the loss for Miracle Working
? Church of God.

? Avery Armbrister had six
? for Faith United, who have
: been eliminated from the
: postseason.

: GOLDEN GATES 34, FIRST
: BAPTIST 30: Neil Sands
} scored eight and Lavandre
? Rubins seven for Golden
? Gates, who clinched the sec-
i ond spot in the 15-and-
: under playoffs behind pen-
? nant winning Temple Fel-
? lowship.

? Leon Saunders had eight
: in a losing effort for First
? Baptist, who have been
? eliminated from the post-
: season.

: FAITH UNITED 25, MIRA-
i: CLE WORKING COG 24:
? Delano Forbes scored nine,
? including the winning bas-
i ket, to push Faith United
? into the 15-and-under play-
? offs.
? Oscar Lenny had seven in
i the loss for Miracle Working
? Church of God, who won't
? make te playoffs.
: ¢@ Here's the last week of
: play coming up on Saturday:
: Court One
? 10am First Baptist vs Mir-
? acle Working COG (15).
: 11am First Baptist vs
? Golden Gates (19).
? Noon New Bethlehem vs
? Bahamas Harvest (M)
: 1pm First Baptist vs Tem-
? ple Fellowship (M)
i 2pm Bahamas Harvest vs
? Golden Gates (M).
: Court Two
? 10am Mercy Seat vs Lat-
? ter-Day Saints (19).
i? 11am Golden Gates No.2
: vs Temple Fellowship (19).
: Noon Evangelistic Center
i? vs Christian Tabernacle (M).
i: 1pm Faith United vs
} Golden Gates No.2 (19).
: 2 pm Church of the
? Nazarene vs Calvary Bible
i: (M).
: © Here's a look at the
: team standings:
i: Teams WL Pct. GB

Men's President

X — First Baptist 5 0 1,000

i X-— Temple Fellowship 4

i 1.8001

i X- City of Praise 42 .666

P 112

i? X- Latter-Day Saints 3 3

i 500 21/2

i? BIBA33 .500 21/2
Ebenezer 1 5 .000 4
Pilgrim 0 6 .000 51/2
Men's Vice-President

i X- Christian Tabernacle

: 50 1,000 -

: X-— New Bethlehem 4 1

? .8001

i X-Evangelistic Center 4

: 1.8001

: Bahamas Harvest 2 2 500

? 21/2

? Church of the Nazarene 1

: 4.2004

Golden Gates 1 4 .200 4

Calvary Bible 05 .0005

19-And-Under

X - First Baptist 5 2 .714 -

Miracle Working COG 5

625 1/2

Latter-Day Saints 43 571 1

Temple Fellowship 43 5711

Golden Gates 43 .571 1

Macedonia 4 4 .500 11/2

Golden Gates No2 33 5002

Faith United 3 4 .428 2

Mercy Seat 1 6 .142 4

15-And-Under

i Y-— Temple Fellowship 7

i 1.875 -

i X-—Golden Gates 62 .7501
X — Macedonia 5 3 .625 2
X — Faith United 5 3 .625 2
First Baptist 3 4 .428 31/2

i Miracle Working COG 3

? 4 428 31/2

: Latter-Day No.2 35 3754
Latter-Day 2 6 .2505
Zion South Beach 17 1256

? Y — denotes clinch pen-

? nant.

: X - denotes clinch play-

: off berth.

wo

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
este Mato le lid
on Mondays


TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



Giants even
series 1-1

@ By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net_ :

THE Commonwealth
Bank Giants avoided falling
into a hole by levelling their
New Providence Basketball
Association's best-of-five
championship series against
the Electro Telecom Cybots
at 1-1.

Last Wednesday at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
before taking a break for the
Easter holiday weekend, the
defending champions Giants
stomped last year's runners-
up Cybots 89-77 to stage up
the remainder of the series
that will continue on
Wednesday night.

"We needed to tie the
series because going down 2-
Ois a difficult position to be
in,” said Commonwealth
Bank's coach Perry Thomp-
son. "In the first game, we
made a lot of mistakes in the
latter part of the game, but
we weren't too concerned
about that.

"We knew that if we came
back and concentrated on
controlling the ball and play
good defensively, we would
be back in the series. We did
a wonderful job of that
tonight."

While the Giants had to
play the second half without
point guard Adrian Miller,
who got ejected afer he
picked up his second techni-
cal foul, Garvin Lightbourne
came off the bench and was
almost a one-man wrecking
crew.

Lightbourne, who didn't
play in game one because of
an injury, pumped in a game
high 28 points as he made up
for the absence as well of
Mark Hanna, who didn't
play in game two. Three oth-
er Commonwealth Bank
playters were in double fig-
ures with Michael 'Fernley’
Bain adding 21, Jeremy
Huthinson 11 and Lamar
Gilbert contributing 10.

Before fouling out, Miller,
along with Creto Kowles
both scored nine.

The Giants’ defensive

66 The Cybots is a

very good team, but
the whole idea is to

keep them off balance.

So from game to }
game, we will throw }
different things at
them that we have }
been working on }
from last year. 99.

PERRY THOMPSON

effort resulted in only two
Cybots making any signifi-
cant impact. They were Bri-
an "Tucker' Bain with 26 and
Nelson 'Mandella’ Joseph
with 21. Cecil Mackey and
Billy Sands were the next
two high scorers with six
apeice. Dereck Cummings
and Dereck Sands both had
five.

Electro Telecom's coach

Wayde Watson said tey were

just simply flat.
"They were at a disadvan-
tage when one of their play-

ers gone and we just couldn't i

stop them,” Watson said.
"We should have been able
to play Cybots basketball
and we didn't."

As they look ahead to
game three, Thompson said
they will continue to focus
on their defense.

"The Cybots is a very
good team, but the whole
idea is to keep them off bal-
ance," he said. "So from
game to game, we will throw
different things at them that
we have been working on
from last year."

Watson said they will try to

get in a practice before game
three and hopefully they will
get back to playing the way
they did in game one.

"We know we can play
better than we did," he said.
"We just have t come out

and prove it. It's not going to }

be easy because they are the
defending champions and
they are going to defend
their title. If we want the
title, we have to go out and
take it from them."

The series so far has been
a keenly contested one with
some interesting match-ups
in just about every position.
It will probably come down
to who play the better
defense as both teams are
capable of lighting the nets
up offensively.

Relay teams ‘got their
first crack’ in Miami

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations got
their first crack at the relay
teams qualifying for the 12th
International Amateur Athlet-
ic Federation's World Champi-
onships in Athletics.

But both the women's 4 x 100
and 4 x 400 and the men's 4 x
100 metre relay teams fell short
at the Miami Elite Track Meet
held on Saturday at the Uni-
versity of Miami.

Fritz Grant, one of the relay
coordinators, said all three of
the teams performed excep-
tionally well and based on their
performances, the Bahamas

could definitely end up having
all four teams qualified for the
World Championships for the
first time.

“T think it was a good start
for the relay teams,” Grant said.
“T expect that when they go to
the Penn Relays next weekend,
they will all qualify for the
World Championships with the
men’s 4 x 4 team.”

The team of Sasha Rolle,
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie,
Christine Amertil and Shakei-
tha Henfield needed to run
three minutes and 31 seconds
to qualify for their spot in
Berlin, Germany in August.

However, they missed the cut
in winning the race in 3:32.50
that was established as a new
Bahamian record, improving on

‘Showtime’
real corsmly bee

Week Classic




Baillou Sporting Complex.

Sweeting took the senior divisional four-lap or one-
mile race in two minutes and 35.76 seconds. Kevin
‘Kilo-man' Ingraham came in second in 2.41, followed
by Anthony ‘Biggie’ Colebrooke in 2.44.25, Robert
‘Penatrator’ Bethell in 2.44.53 and Henry Kline in

2.51.38.

In the junior's four-lapper, Justin ‘Jet’ Minnis won in
3.07, Antinece 'Little' Simmons was second in 3.12,
Carlano 'Car' Bain was third in 3.37 and Oman Cole-

brooke got fourth in 3.48.

The Cadets or pee wee competitors had a one-lap
sprint with Felix Neely crossing the line first, followed
by Leonard Richardson and Ashley Colebrook.

Another Wednesday series will be staged on

Wednesday at 6 pm at Baillou.

WESTERN NEW PROVIDENCE SERIES: THE
New Providence Cycling Association hosted its West-
ern New Providence series on Saturday around a six-
mile loop around the western end of the island.

In the seven-lap race, Barron 'Turbo' Musgrove
clocked one hour, 52 minutes and 44.66 seconds to win.
He was followed by Tracy ‘Showtime’ Sweeting in
1:53:56.41. John Cox was third in 1:53:57.25.

Coming in fourth was Anthony ‘Biggie’ Colebrook in
1:54:05.32. Tim Huber got fifth in 1:54:05.32; Jamie
Nottage was sixth in 1:54:13.06; Van Demeritte seventh
in 1:59:33.53 and Tony Mackey eighth in 212:15.72.

There was also a four-lapper with Shawn 'the Beast’
Fox taking the victory in 1:09, followed by Edmund

Butler in 1:11.

And in a three-lapper, Justin Minnis won in 50 min-
utes, followed by Lashane Dean, Henry Kline and

Antinece Simmons.

This weekend, the majority of the cyclists will be
heading to Grand Bahama to compete in their road

race and timed trials.

MID-WEEK CLASSIC: TRACY 'Showtime' Sweeting
clinched the victory in the New Providence Cycling
Association's Mid-Week Classic series that was staged
last Wednesday at the one-mile cycling track at the

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the old mark of 3:33.14 that was
set by the team of Rolle, Amer-
til, Hernfield and Tonique
Williams-Darling in Nassau at
the Central American and
Caribbean Championships in
12005.

It was also a stadium record
that surpassed the mark of
3:30.72 that was held by South
Carolina from 2004.

“Debbie seemed to be com-
mitted to the relay team,” Grant
said. “She went out and ran a 52
split and Christine did 50. The
other girls ran 54. So they are
right there.”

Not to be outdone was the
men's 4 x 100 relay team of
Rodney Green, Adrian Griffith,
Michael Mathieu and Dereck
Carey. They had to run 39.10

ce

to qualify for Berlin, but was
shy of the mark in winning in
39.77. However, they too posted
a stadium record, shattering the
old mark of 38.89 by Louisiana
State University in 2006.

“Dereck competed with a
slight injury, but I think if he
was 100 percent, they would
have ran much faster,” Grant
said. “But it was the fastest
opener that the Bahamas has
ever ran, so they are looking
good.”

The women's 4 x 1 team of
Sasha Rolle, Chandra Sturrup,
Christine Amertil and Debbie
Fergusn-McKenzie ran 43.96 for
second place. But they needed
to run 43.90 to qualify for
Berlin.

South Florida Elite won in

43.16.

“We didn’t have all of our
sprinters, but the team went out
and perform their best,” Grant
said. “They are just as excited
about the women’s 4 x 4 team
and by the Penn Relays, they
should qualify as well.”

Individually, the Bahamas
also got two victories from vet-
eran Lavern Eve and Michael
Mathieu.

Eve, who is vying for another
appearance at the World Cham-
pionships, took just one throw
and dominated the women's
javelin with 188-feet, 5-inches
(57.44). Her nearest rival was
Erin Zampell, a freshman from
Nova Southeastern, with 117-

SEE page 14



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PAGE 14, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



GOLF JR |

TEAM TRIALS

THE Bahamas Golf
Federation will hold
its final trials for the
junior national team
this week in Grand
Bahama. The players
will be vying for
spots on the team
that will travel to the
Caribbean Junior
Golf Championships.

The federation
hosted its Central
Divisional trials last
month at the Cable
Beach Golf Club and
the golfers pictured
are some of the qual-
ifiers who will make
the trip to Grand
Bahama for the final
trials, scheduled for
April 14-16.

www.atlanticmedicalfunwalk.com





=) =) Relay teams ‘got their
===" first crack’ in Miami

FROM page 13

? 07 (35.83).
? Mathieu, the member of the men's
: silver medal relay team at the Olympic
? Games in Beijing, China last August,
.| } won the men's 400 in 46.45. But it was-
«| : n'tast enough for him to qualify for
? Berlin.

Also in the event was Ravanno Fer-
? guson, who was fourth in heat two and
? 18th overal in 49.98.
? Mathieu took part in the 200 as well,
? coming in second in 21.02 after he won
i heat two. Adrian Griffith competed in te
? heat, oming in third in 21.34 for eighth
? place. Rodney Green, winning heat five,
? clocked 21.88 for 11th. Leon Covington
? won heat one in the fastest time of 20.99.
? In the 100, Rodney Green clocked
? 10.43 for secxond in heat two and sixth
? place oveall, while Adrian Griffith was
: eighth overall after he got sixth in heat
? one in 10.50.
i Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie was the
? only athlete to attain a qualifying stan-
: dard for Berlin at the meet. She did the
? B mark in the women's 200 after she
? won heat two in 23.01 for second overall.
? The B standard was 23.30. Rosemary
â„¢| } Whyte won heat one in 22.95.
: Chandra Sturrup got sixth in the wom-
? en's century in 11.52. American Lauryn
? Williams won the race in 11.11.
: In the women's 400, Sasha Rolle
? turned in a seventh place finish in heat
? one 54.30. Shakeitha Henfield was sec-
? ond in heat two in 54.51 for ninth over-
? all.

And in the women's 100 hurdles, 'Tia-
? vannia "Tia' Thompson got seventh in
? 13.72.

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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

()

Two-Way Radios

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for all makes am all

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IT’S STORE number eight
for Wendy's Bahamas and the
newest location at the Lyn-
den Pindling International
Airport is targeting a diverse,
new market segment — inter-
national and domestic pas-
sengers and airport employ-
ees,

Since the new location
opened in the Domestic Ter-
minal on March 31 at 5 a.m.,
customers have been bustling
through to enjoy the conve-
nience of fresh, hot hamburg-
ers, crisp salads and refreshing
desserts.

Late last year, the Nassau
Airport Development Com-
pany awarded the contract to
Aetos Holdings Ltd., parent
company of Wendy's
Bahamas.

The resulting renovations
brought about a buzz of
excitement in the terminal, as
people anticipated the speedy
arrival of this international
quick-serve icon.

Chris Tsavoussis, President
of Wendy's Bahamas, believes
the move to the airport makes
good business sense despite
challenging economic times.
“We are happy to be the lat-
est food and beverage outlet

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“Based on the numbers of
passengers travelling through
LPIA annually, we are confi-
dent that our newest store will
do well, and we consider it an
honour to be a part of the
dynamic changes taking place
at LPIA.”

Customers

The store anticipates high
traffic from local and interna-
tional travellers and Wendy's
hopes to attract additional
customers from the Family
Islands to the world recog-
nised brand.

Wendy's LPIA location
represents 35 new jobs for
Bahamians, adding to the cur-
rent team of 400 employees.

With more than 6,600
stores worldwide and 199
stores in the Latin Ameri-
ca/Caribbean region, the
brand offers a variety of deli-
cious, signature hamburgers,
healthy salads and made-to-
order menu items that allow
customers to customize

New Wendy’s targets
diverse market segment





ZHIVARGO LAING and Miss Bahamas Universe Sacha Scott perform
the ribbon cutting to launch Wendy’s LPIA.

their meals.

Wendy's is the second
international franchise to
open at the airport. Just last
month, the Dunkin' Donuts
brand opened two outlets at
LPIA.

“We are excited that
Wendy's is the second inter-
national brand at LPIA and
we are looking forward to
growing our relationship with

Whopper Jr.

Double
Cheeseburger

BLT & Cheese

all of our vendors as we move
forward with the airport rede-
velopment,” said John Spinks,
Vice President, Commercial
Development for NAD. “Our
goal is to improve the passen-
ger experience at the airport.
Providing them with a variety
of food and beverage options
is a big part of that. We look
forward to working with the
Wendy's team.”

Includes Fries &

160z Soft Drink

oti me. weed Cele

5pe Tenders

Adda

l20z Milkshake

es
2 Cookies for .99¢

Village Rd. Roundabout + Harold Rd. + Prince Charles + Frederick Street North * Cable Beach


u



G-20/OECD

assault could
eri Cyr



Former trade union
leader says Bahamas
may be forced to finally
bring in more equitable
income tax structure,
which could also save
financial industry

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A former trade union leader
has described the G-
20/OECD assault on interna-
tional financial centres as a
potential “blessing in disguise”
for the Bahamas, as it could
finally force this nation to
adopt a more equitable tax
structure via an income tax.

Huedley Moss, who previ-
ously headed the union rep-
resenting Water & Sewerage
Corporation workers, told Tri-
bune Business that “if the
Bahamas uses its brain”, it can
still preserve its existing finan-
cial services industry via the
imposition of low income tax
rates, and the subsequent con-
clusion of bilateral double tax-
ation and investment treaties
that will benefit international
clients.

Arguing that the G-
20/OECD initiatives will
inevitably mean that the
Bahamas has to alter its finan-
cial services model, Mr Moss
told Tribune Business that this
nation needed to move away
from regressive taxes as its pri-
mary revenue source.

Regressive taxes are those
that are unrelated to ability to
pay. The Bahamas’ main rev-
enue source, import duties,
are a form of regressive tax

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



THE TRIBUNE



TUE S21 A %s

Ine



APRIL

14,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Court dimisses hotel
marina docks seizure foreign-owned licensees

@ Ruling in favour of Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort's holding company due to 'complete lack
of evidence’ in multi-million dollar dispute

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

| he Supreme Court has

refused to grant an
order allowing a Florida-based
contractor to repossess docks
at the Four Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort’s marina, finding
“there was a complete lack of
proper evidence” to support its
assertions in a payments dis-
pute.

Senior Justice John Lyons, in
his interlocutory ruling on the
summons filed by Florida
Floats, which was doing busi-
ness as Bellingham Marine, crit-
icised attorneys representing
both parties for failing to put
solid evidence before the
Supreme Court, instead relying
on affidavits produced by asso-
ciates in their firms.

The ruling recounted how
Florida Floats initiated its action
against the Exuma-based resort
via summons on September 12,



66

As the application of
a Romalpa Clause is a
question of fact, I am
totally unable, due to
the complete lack of
appropriate evidence,
to come to any con-
clusion as to when
title to any portion of
those floating docks
passed, if at all.”

Sentor Justice John Lyons

2008. This sought a Supreme
Court declaration confirming
that it owned the portion of
concrete floating docks for
which payment had not been

received from the hotel’s ulti-
mate ownership company,
Emerald Bay Resort Holdings.

The contractor also sought a
declaration that it was “entitled
to remove the said docks imme-
diately from the premises”, in
line with a February 14, 2008,
judgment in its favour. Finally,
it wanted a Supreme Court
order requiring the Four Sea-
sons Emerald Bay resort to give
it access to its property so it
could remove the docks.

Docks

“By agreement dated March
8, 2006, the plaintiff contracted
with the defendants [Emerald
Bay Resort Holdings] to pro-
vide a system of floating docks
for the defendant’s resort at
Emerald Bay,” Justice Lyons
found.

“The construction and provi-

SEE page 6B

Dispute over ex-governor general's $10m
life policy sent into arbitration mode

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A dispute involving a $10 mil-
lion life insurance policy taken
out on ex-Governor-General,
Sir Orville Turnquest, and an
associated $1.507 million loan
has been ordered into arbitra-
tion proceedings by the Flori-
da courts, Tribune Business can
reveal.

US District Judge Federico
Moreno, sitting in the Miami
division of the south Florida dis-
trict court, in late 2008 ordered
that the action initiated by
Dulaw Management, a Bahami-
an firm acting as the successor
trustee for the Sir Orville Turn-
quest Irrevocable Insurance
Trust, against four US compa-
nies be placed into arbitration.

Judge Moreno ordered that
the case be stayed pending the
arbitration’s outcome. The
terms of the order state that the
dispute can come back before
the US court “if circumstances
change”, but research by Tri-
bune Business shows that this
has not happened.

Dulaw Management had ini-
tiated its action against life
insurer, PHL (Phoenix) Vari-
able Insurance Company, plus
LaSalle Bank, Coventry Capital
and Boundless Solutions, in July
2008.

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It was seeking the rescission
of PHL’s life insurance policy
numbered 97516352, which was
a $10 million life insurance pol-
icy issued on Sir Orville’s life
and held by the Sir Orville
Turnquest Irrevocable Trust.

Dulaw was also alleging
“breach of agreement, misrep-
resentation and conversion
based on their converting of
both the insurance policy in
question, and the asset of Sir
Orville Turnquest of his insura-
bility”, to their own.

As the US district court
summed up so succinctly in its
arbitration order: “The trust

acquired a life insurance poli-
cy from PHL Variable Insur-
ance for the former governor-
general of the Bahamas, Sir
Orville Turnquest.

“To finance payment of the
premiums due on the policy, the
trust obtained a loan from
LaSalle Bank. The loan was
secured by the policy itself. Co-
defendant Coventry Capital
served as the agent servicing the
loan on behalf of LaSalle Bank,
and co-defendant Boundless
Solutions served as the agent

SEE page 10B

Make it a reality.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



Freeport needs
‘thousands’ of small,

* Attorney urges Bahamas to ‘open Immigration
doors’ and give foreign investors confidence to
increase investments via permanent status

* Touts benefits of economic diversification for
keeping city's economy afloat

* Without industrial sector, Freeport economy
would be ‘in a state of complete meltdown’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A prominent attorney has
urged the Bahamas to “open
the Immigration doors” and
permit “hundreds, if not
thousands” of small foreign-
owned licensees to base
themselves in Freeport, in
order to build a stronger eco-
nomic base.

Fred Smith, a Freeport-
based partner in Callender’s
& Co, told Tribune Business
that citizenship or permanent
residency status for both for-
eign investors in Freeport
and their families would give
them the confidence to ulti-

SEE page 7B



Rules must be enforced
for capital market integrity

“TRIBUNE BUSINESS OPINION’



B etter late than never. Finally, finally, Bahamas Supermar-
kets published its unaudited fiscal 2008 financial statements,
around nine months after year-end and with no little public and Secu-
rities Commission prodding to make it happen. Reaction was relatively
muted, no doubt because most minority shareholders were anticipat-
ing the worst. The worst was what they got, with the whole episode pro-
viding another black eye for Bahamian capital markets integrity.
Quite apart from the $13.4 million net loss is the length of time it
actually took for Bahamas Supermarkets to publish those figures.
Public companies have four months, or 120 days, from year-end to pub-
lish their audited financials, meaning that, by rights, a June 30 fiscal peri-

SEE page 8B

Brokerage Accounts

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THE TRIBUNE

Accounting firm is
‘International Star’

PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

ZS

Colinalmperial





CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Business Analyst

We are looking for a Business Analyst to develop and document detailed
business procedures and test plans. The Business Analyst should have a strong
technical background but will be primarily focused on business process
improvement.



Specific duties:
e Develop, document and execute test plans and business procedures
Resolve user issues related to business software applications
Liaise between end-users and technical staff
Maintain a project issues list
Coordinate small software development projects

Qualifications:
Bachelors degree in Business Administration/Management or Computer
Information Systems
3-5 years experience in the Financial Industry with exposure to multiple
departments within an organization

Insurance software experience a plus

Proficient using Microsoft office products (i.e. Word, Excel, Access,
Outlook and PowerPoint)

Knowledge of basic Project Management concepts

Understanding of basic relational database concepts and simple SQL
queries, HTML

Proficient in using a computer and able to learn new software
applications with minimal guidance

Excellent written and oral communication skills

The successful candidate will:
Exercise a professional attitude and excellent communication skills
Be inquisitive and a problem solver
Possess time management skills to ensure comfortable working rela-
tionship with several internal customers to meet project requirements
and deadlines
Be dependable, organized, and detail oriented

To apply:

Send electronic résumé via email to careers@colinaimperial.com

Subject: Business Analyst
or

Send résumé to:

Human Resources Department
308 East Bay Street

P.O. Box N-4728

Nassau, Bahamas

Applications must be received by 20 April 2009.

Bahamian accounting firm BDO
Mann Judd has received the Interna-
tional Star for Leadership in Quality
award from Business Initiative Direc-
tions (BID), a major private business
entity. BDO Mann Judd received the
award in the Gold category, recogniz-
ing its commitment to quality, leader-
ship, technology and innovation. It was
presented in Paris on March 23, 2009,
at the International BID Quality con-
vention, with companies from 54 coun-
tries receiving awards.

BDO Mann Judd was founded in
Nassau in 1977 by G. Clifford Culmer,

and provides accounting, auditing,
insolvency, corporate finance, corpo-
rate recovery and restructuring, foren-
sic investigations and business con-
sulting to multinational companies,
public sector entities and owner-man-
aged businesses,

The company is a member of BDO
International, the world’s fifth largest
accounting organisation.

Mr Culmer is pictured here with Jose
Prieto, executive president of BID,
receiving the International Star for
Leadership in Quality Award in the
Gold category

UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES, THE BAHAMAS
3rd Annual Research Day

RAND MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2009
7:0 am — 1:00 pm

7:30 am Regitration—hs Charge
8:00 am—lO35 arn
Official Opening Ceremomes

Grashoppers, Rabbits, Cerin ated Canes
Prof. Sond Fao
Pro View Chancellor, Graduate Stadia IAT

Targedng the Genes: The New Eroin Concer Therapy
Or, Korat Stern, Professor ay Concer ideation
Tregetial College Hammersmith Hospital TE.

Cenical Cancer in Grond Bahoma - A 3 yr Review:
Or, Eagar Qoiggler, Registrar Deparmes GaGa TA Rava dence
Flagp iad

Chronic Renal Disease in Grom Boheme
Or, fev Balle, Senior Houwre Gifleer Depeterent Intern Medicine
ord Memonal Hoses

Enviromental Impacts on Child Development
in Developing Countries

Dr, Adie Meeks Gonder

Professor of Child Development

Darector, Consortium for Social Developroeent and Research
Head, Caribbean Child Development Centre

LO 25 ae Cape Break
150 am —1900 pon

Breast Concer - The Grond Balhome Experience
Or, Wilmnna Mesie, Senta House Oyficer
Departeent Surgery Aone Mdemranet Hospi

(Genetic Mobations in the Breast Cancer
Oneagenes in Bahamian Females
Or, Theadore

The International Campaign against Gastro-Enteritie: Advancing
the Rotavirus Vaccine

(infections Disease, Epidemio kigy aod Public Health)

Marija Inaced Gastritis
Dr, Mofoweed Shang? Beg ccpror Oeste DIetemat iedicom
aha Afenortal Hospital

Ethok: Tiifferences in Cardiovascalay Diseases:
Genetic Variations are Undilkely.

Profesor Kennedy Craichferit

University of Manchester, United Ringo

CENTRE FOR HOTEL & TOURISM MANAGEMENT
AND THE OPEN CAMPUS, BAHAMAS.

NASSAU, BAHAMAS
THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2009
3.30 pam — 9300 pon

3:30pm Registration and Retreshments
000 pm — S500 pm.
Official Opening Ceremony
Key Hote Address:
Sustainabit Tourist in the Bahamas baking it a Realty

Senator, Hon Vincent Vanderpool Wallace
Minister of Tourism.

‘(Grosshoppers, Rabbits, Gens ond Genes
Professor Ronald Young
Pro View Chancellor Graduates studies

‘Children and Wiokence in the Caribbean

Dr. Julie Meeks Gardner

Professor af Child Development

Director, Consortium for Bocial Development and Research
Head, Caribbean Child Development Centre

TAT Open Campas

Preliminary Report on the Concerns of Bahomdan Applicants to the
University of the West Indies"

Tiets in the Chronic Mon Comin cade Diseases
Students of the Centra for Hotel & Touriem Management

REFRESHMENTS



SCHOOL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE AND
RESEARCH, THE BAHAMAS
SCHOOL OF NURSING AUDITORIUM
GROSVENOR CLOSE, NASSAU BAHAMAS
FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

7:30 am Registration - Ho Charge

8:13 om - 100 om.
‘Official Opening Cerenuinies
The APC Ror! Bark of Comada Oretare:
Targeting the Genes The New Erain Cancer Therapy
Dr. Karol] Sikora, Professor of Cancer Medicine, Imperial
College Haromersmith Hospital UE

Cervical Cancer Trends in the Bahamas
Dr. Ealeigh Butler Consultant Gynecologic Oncology, FR

‘Genetic Mbutations in the Breast Cancer Onoogenes

in Beahamian Females
Dr. Theodore Tumnquest, Consultant Medical Oncology, PRX

1200 aa -L0:30 am Goyer Bak oad Wiel Porter Eiriaos
130 am 1200 pm

Insulin Antibodies in Type 1 Deabetes
Dr. Omala Ablack DM Internal Madicine (24 Bahanae

The International Campaign against Gastro-Enteritic
Advancing The Rotavirus Vaccine
Dr. Celia Christie, Professor and. Chair of Pediatrics LW, Jamsica

HIÂ¥ FPrevaleme & CW in Retroviral Disease
Dr. Dicone Danes DM Internal Medicine (LWT) Babarmas

Feasibility of Triage PAP with HFY in Low Resource Settings
Dr. Darron Halliday: DM OBNGYH COnWT) Baba

Teenage Pregnancy amd HIV Risk Reduction in the Baheasress
Dr. Veunds Sakharker Lecturer OBSGYH UWL, Bahanias

1215 pm- 1:00 pm Sere Bog Cock dt Fisit Poster Eociribite
1:00 pm— 3:00 pm

BMI & Pregnancy Outonmes
Dor. Andres Griftths Poet Grad Resident ORGY (OWT) Bahamas

Ethnics Ditterences in Cardiovascular Diseases
‘Genetic Variations are Ualikety

Dr. Kennedy Cruickshank, Prof. Internal Medicine
Tiniversity of Manchester, United Kingdom

Effects of Sedlentary Activity on Obesity in Adolescents
Dr. Francis Willams, DM Family Practice (01) Bahairas

Wocwum Extraction in the Boharnes
Dr LixioPedeo: DM OBIGYH COAT Babaras
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 3B



RoyalFidelity plans kiosk expansion

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

RoyalFidelity Merchant
Bank & Trust is looking to
expand its commercial bank
reach by setting up a kiosk
within at least two other
branches, an investment advi-
sor with the company telling
Tribune Business that the ini-
tiative has given one share-
holder greater differentiation
from its rivals and the other
greater market reach.

Philip Dorset, who mans
RoyalFidelity’s prototype
kiosk inside Royal Bank of
Canada’s main branch on Bay
Street, told Tribune Business
that the initiative had gener-
ated “a really good response”
from the latter’s branch
clients, who were now inquir-
ing about the merchant bank’s
investment-related products.

Mr Dorset said the Royal-
Fidelity kiosk had been oper-
ational for about four months,
and added: “We did it to make
ourselves more visible. We
want to let Royal Bank clients
know we’re here, and there’s
no better way to do that than
situate ourselves in Royal
Bank’s main branch.

“We're right in the middle
of the floor. It gives me an
opportunity to talk about our
investment products and ser-
vices. That’s why we’re here.”

Mr Dorset explained that
the kiosk was one of the visi-
ble developments in the joint
venture between Royal Bank
and Fidelity. That has already
resulted in Royal Bank tak-
ing a 50 per cent stake in Roy-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that



UTE em at

ROYAL FIDELITY

|



PICTURED (left to right): Back: Michael Anderson, president of Royal Fidelity; Alden Gibson, manager of
mutual funds, Royal Fidelity. Front Row: Velma Miller, manager of investments, Royal Fidelity; Debbie Zon-
icle marketing manager, RBC; Quincy Fisher, Manager of personal financial RBC; Phillip Dorset, Royal Fideli-
ty financial investment advisor; Jan Knowles, public relations, RBC; James Graham vice-president, Roy-
al Fidelity.

alFidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust, becoming an equal
50/50 partner in the institution
with Fidelity Bank & Trust
International.

The kiosk initiative, Mr
Dorset said, was already being
eyed for expansion, with pos-
sible locations at Royal Bank’s
Palmdale branch and Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Cable Beach

branch being explored.

“The advantage to Royal
Bank of Canada is that they
can now offer pensions and
investments products to their
clients, because they can go
to a bank providing them with
access to those products,” Mr
Dorset explained. “So Royal
Bank can differentiate itself
from other commercial banks

MASTERSCAN
DNA TESTING

EASTER SALE

by providing these services.”

He added that the main
products his kiosk was offer-
ing were brokerage accounts,
investment accounts, individ-
ual retirement accounts and
mutual funds. “We’ve had a
really good response,” Mr
Dorset said. “A lot of persons
have come up to me, asking
me what it’s all about.

“It’s one of those areas peo-
ple have an interest in, but
they don’t know how to go
about finding the information,

LAURETTE DERISIER of

PALMETTO AVE., P.O. BOX N-9426 NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

No Blood NoID
376-2810 326-7414

INSIGHT

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why

registration/naturalization

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7 day of April,
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

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and finding the information
on products and services.” He
added that another key was
explaining to Royal Bank cus-
tomers that investing was “not
for the rich, not for the elite,
but for everybody”.

Able to open accounts from
his kiosk, Mr Dorset said the
kiosk had both a sales and
marketing function. “On aver-
age, I probably see on some




days two to three people, on
others I serve 10 people.

“It goes with the ebb and
flow of customers coming into
the bank,” he explained.

Mr Dorset said the partner-
ship with Royal Bank of
Canada had given RoyalFi-
delity extra leverage, as it pro-
vided extra reassurance to
Bahamians unsure about get-
ting into investment activities.

Notice

Notice is hereby given of loss of Bahamas Government Registered










Stock Certificate as follows:

Interest Certificate
Stock Rate No.
2015-2017 1.2500APR 52.141

Maturity
Date
15/10/2017

Amount
$10,000.00

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement
certificate. If this certificate is found, please write to
PO. Box CB-12604, Nassau Bahamas.











Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs








Job vacancies:

CAMPUS NURSE COUNSELLOR
FINANCIAL CONTROLLER
FINANCIAL ANALYST








Further details can be found at the College of The
Bahamas website, www.cob.edu.bs




Interested applicants should submit:






Completed Application with supplemental documentation




requested attached

(inclusive of passport photo)
Cover letter of interest




Current Resume’




This package should be forwarded to the following address



by Monday, April 20, 2009:

The Director

Human Resources Department
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus

P.O. Box N-4912

Nassau, Bahamas OR hrapply @cob.edu.bs

(ENERAL

Worldwide

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE

General Worldwide) Europ Assistance ts lnoking to recruit an experienced Business Development
Assoclate for its medical insurance operations in the Bahamas and in the Caribbean area.

We are committed to growing our business based on quality of products and service and require a
highly motivated individual to develop business with our partners. This will involve proup sales and
renewals, , marketing and liaising with our various partners and with the broker community in the
Bahamas and throughout the wider Caribbean ares,

Minimum Requirements:

* Minimum (3) three years experience in the medical insurance market
* Experienced in sales and marketing, aé well as extremely well organized.
Strategic thinker with the ability to tackle and solve problems

Attentive to detail with a strong track record of team building,

Must possess the ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing,
Must be high energy, driven and self motivated,
Committed Customer Service Advocate,

li you believe you have these attributes and want to join a dynamic and progressive team, please

apply by sending your CV and a covering letter to:

RE: Business Development Associate

Generali Worldwide
P.O, Bow AP = 59223, Slot 361
Nassau, Bahamas

You may also email your resume, RE; Business Development Associate to:

perspective, hr] Memailco

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Generali Worldwide is a wholly owned subsidiary of Assicurazioni Generali S.p.A (the Generali
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largest insurers in the world, has an international presence across five continents, employs over 61,000
people and operates in some 40 markets, Its success is reflected in it being ranked a top 30 company by
the 2007 Fortune Global 500, with assets under management in excess of €330 billion (as at June 7008)
and has an S&P rating of AA, a Moody's rating of Aa3, AM Best of A+ and a Fitch rating of AA,


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





TTT IM G-20/OECD assault
could be a ‘blessing’





















Bahamas Food Services
has a Vacancy for a
Professional Food Service Representative

Requirements:

Minimum of Three (3) Years
Experience in the food service Industry

Excellent Communication Skills

Excellent Customer Service

Applicants are Requirements to Submit their
resumes via email ONLY to:
humanresources@bahamafood.com

All Applications will be Treated in the
Strictest Confidence

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NEVILLE BOWE, late
of Sir Lynden Pindling Estates, New Providence,
The Bahamas, DECEASED.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims
against the above-named Estate are required, on or before
the 24th April, A.D. 2009 to send their names and addresses
along with proof of their debts or claims, to the undersigned,
and if so required by notice in writing from the undersigned,
to come in and prove such debts or claims, or in default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution AND all persons indebted to the said Estate are
asked to pay their respective debts to the undersigned
immediately.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that at the expiration of the
date mentioned above, the assets of the late NEVILLE
BOWE will be distributed among persons entitled thereto
having regard only to the claims of which the Personal
Representatives shall have had notice.

Dated this 2nd day of April, A.D., 2009

C/O Turnquest & Co.
Attorneys for the Administrators
94 Nassau Street
P. O. Box N-9311
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

MINISTRY OF HOUSING

FROM page 1B

because, when imported
goods are sold to the end-con-
sumer, the price paid is the
same regardless of whether
you are rich or poor.

Mr Moss said: For years”,
the Trade Union Congress
(TUC) has advocated for a
fair form of taxation for the
Bahamas. We were like John
the Baptist in the wilderness,
calling for an end to the
regressive form of current tax-
ation in the Bahamas.

“We were not successful in
convincing any government to
adopt our view on a fair form
of taxation, namely income
tax. However, a number of
cabinet ministers - both cur-
rent and former - have all
agreed privately that the
Bahamas is in dire need of a
fair form of taxation.”

Mr Moss said the most-dis-
cussed alternatives to the pre-
sent import duty regime,
namely a sales tax or value-
added tax (VAT), still repre-
sented indirect and regressive
forms of taxation. Both were
unrelated to ability to pay,
which meant that poor and
rich Bahamians would pay the

“We were not
successful in
convincing any
government to
adopt our view
on a fair form
of taxation,
namely income
tax.”

\VHuedley Moss

same amount. Yet the former
would be paying a far greater
proportion of their income in
tax.

“This is why the World
Trade Organisation (WTO)),
Organisation for Economic
Co-Operation and Develop-
ment (OECD), and Tax Infor-
mation Exchange Agreements
(TIEAs) are blessings to those
of us who are advocating for
an equitable form of taxation
for the Bahamas,” Mr Moss
said. “Just maybe these global
agencies will assist the

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and share your story.

ENGINEERING SERVICES FOR THE DESIGN OF
ROADS AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM

IN ARDASTRA ESTATE

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP

The Goverment of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas through the Ministry of
Housing & requesting proposals from qualified Consulting Engineering finms to
provide Engineering Design, Supervision of the Construction Tender Process,
ond Contract Administration Services for the development of the following

housing subdivision:

i] Ardasira Estate, New Providence — Roads and dranage sytem design,

Interested parties may obtain further infomation and a copy of the Request for

Proposal from:

The Office of the Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Housing

Bahamas in accomplishing this
necessary task.

“I fully support the
Bahamas liberalising its tax
haven policies so that our
country will no longer be per-
ceived as a haven for tax
dodgers, and persons and enti-
ties with questionable back-
ground and character. As a
matter of fact, by complying
with the minimum request of
the OECD, we will be well on
our way towards implement-
ing an equitable form of direct
taxation for the Bahamas, and
thus eliminate the skewed
indirect taxation that current-
ly favors the rich.”

And the former union
leader added: “If the Bahamas
uses its brain, it can very much
capitalise on what it perceives
as a threat, and use this threat
to our advantage by coming

up with a single digit form of
income tax, thus attracting
new customers to our finan-
cial industry. And, at the same
time, stop a possible signifi-
cant defection of clients from
this industry. This is quite
probable because most of the
G-20 countries have high rates
of double digit income taxa-
tion.”

Mr Moss argued that there
was nothing the Bahamas can
do to persuade the G-20 coun-
tries not to pursue the collec-
tive $7.3 trillion in tax dollars
they alleged they were losing
annually.

This, he added, threatened
the whole structure and foun-
dation of the Bahamian finan-
cial services industry, as it was
clear the existing model was
on borrowed time.

JOB OPENING

Needed immediatel, expereinced Nurses
to work in Operating Theatre. Must have a
good employment background, must posses
a Bachelors Degree in Nursing, must have
Operating Theatre expereince and must
be licensed in the Commonwealth of the

ISy-lereveaehsn

For immediate consideration,

please send your resume to:

PHYSICIANS ALLIANCE LTD.
P.O.BOX EE 17022
#3 GROSVENOR CLOSE OFFICE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
FAX: (242) 326-8874

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

THIS MONTHS TOPIC:

SPEAKER:

Julia Lee - Dietitian

Purpose:

Nutrition

LECTURE DATE

Thursday, April 16th ‘09 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP ¢ Seating is Limited * 302-4603

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

LECTURE SERIES

Cloughion House
Shirley and Chartotte Sis,
Nassau, Bahamas

To educate the public about
the important health issues,
presented by distinguished

pays: Nutrition

Tet | 2a -4005 6006 : Pees:
aie Julia Lee-Dietitian

Screenings:

Get your Free Blood
Pressure Cholesterol, and
Glucose testing between

Spm & 6pm.

meeting wil be held on Tuesday 21? Apnl at 10000 om in the conference room aft the
Ministry of Housing, Claughton House. Breast Reduction & Lift

Dr. Colleen Fitzcharles Bowe
lenders aré fo be submited ma feoled anvelbooe marked a indicated in ihe RFP

document to:

RSVP:

To ensure available seating

Phone: 302-4603

The Office of the Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Housing
Clavghion House
Shirley and Charlotte Sts,
Nossou, Bohomas

Urinary Incontinence
Dr. Robin Roberts

Womens Health
Dr. Madelene Sawyer

4" DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

No boter than 12 noon on Tuesday 28", Apr, 2007, Tenders wil be opened :
on Tuesday 28", April, 2009 in the conference room ait the Ministry

Claughton House, The Government reserves the right to raject any or oll Tenders


THE TRIBUNE





Economy dampens hope of
a comfortable retirement

@ DAVID PITT
AP Personal
Finance Writer

DES MOINES, lowa

Rising costs and uncertainty
about the economy have work-
ers less confident in their abili-
ty to save enough money to
retire comfortably, say the
authors of a new study released
Tuesday, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

Even though workers are sav-
ing more and expecting to work
longer to improve their chances
of a happy retirement, there's
still a disconnect. The survey
shows many are failing to plan
appropriately and making incor-
rect assumptions about retire-
ment income. The new survey
by the nonpartisan Employee
Benefit Research Institute
reveals only 13 percent of U.S.
workers say they're very confi-
dent they'll have enough money
to retire comfortably.

"Concerns about the poor
economy coupled with the loss-
es that have recently been expe-
rienced in the stock market

have resulted in the lowest per-
centage (of a confident outlook)
since the start of the survey 19
years ago,” said Jack VanDer-
hei, one of the survey's authors
and the EBRI research direc-
tor. "But the good news is, I
really do think this will be a
wake up call for many people
who had false optimism in the
past.”

Another 41 percent of work-
ers said they're somewhat con-
fident of having enough savings
for retirement, down two per-
centage points from the year
before. Only 20 percent of peo-
ple already retired say they're
very confident they'll be finan-
cially secure. That's just half of
the 40 percent from the survey a
year earlier. It's no surprise that
most survey respondents said
the economy was largely behind
their pessimism.

Change in
behaviour

With the dour mood about
retirement prospects comes

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) TONOSHA S.A. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 30th day of March, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR



Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham

some behavioral changes that
advisers and retirement plan-
ners say may be one of the pos-
itives coming out of the eco-
nomic downturn.

The survey shows 81 percent
of those who have lost confi-
dence in having enough money
to retire say they are spending
less. The survey also shows 65
percent of workers say they are
currently saving money for
retirement.

"One strategy would have
been to roll up into a ball and
somehow put your head in the
sand and ignore this is happen-
ing,” said Dan Houston, presi-
dent of retirement and investor
services at Principal Financial
Group Inc., an underwriter of
the survey. Workers have not
done that, however. He said
people are beginning to under-
stand a secure retirement means
saving much more than they
have been.

The average worker with an
employer-sponsored retirement
plan puts aside 7 percent, which
is about half of what today's
worker would need to live a
comparable lifestyle in retire-
ment, Houston said.

Estimating how much mon-
ey it will take to live a good
retirement is one of the largest
miscalculations among workers,
VanDerhei said.

About half the workers in the
survey say their household sav-
ings and investments total less
than $25,000, excluding the val-
ue of their home. A surprising
20 percent say they have less
than $1,000 in savings.

This signals a tremendous
problem ahead. Consider that
a woman earning $40,000 at
retirement would need to have
$203,134 in savings by age 65 to
ensure she could replace 80 per-
cent of her income in retire-
ment, VanDerhei said. The cal-
culation assumes she has pur-
chased an annuity with a nomi-
nal guaranteed income and
receives Social Security. A man
under the same circumstances
would need $190,138.

PROCLAMATION
COASTAL AWARENESS MONTH

WHEREAS, The Bahamas Coastal Awareness Committee, which is populated

Sources of
retirement income

Another point of confusion
for many workers is the source
of their retirement income.

Among workers without a
defined benefit retirement plan
at work, 41 percent believe they
have such a pension plan. A
defined benefit plan is one in
which an employer pays into
but the worker does not.

"I'm just afraid you still have
a situation where these are peo-
ple who don't understand the
difference between defined ben-
efit and defined contribution
plans," VanDerhei said. "They
think they'll magically end up
with what mom and dad had.”

The U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics said in a March report
that just 20 percent of private
industry workers have a defined
benefit plan. About 43 percent
have a defined contribution
plan such as a 401(k).

A disturbing factor for many
investment advisers and retire-
ment planners from the EBRI
survey is that only 44 percent
of workers say they have tried
to calculate how much money
they'll need to have saved for
retirement. Another 44 percent
said they simply guess at how
much they'll need.

Fewer than a quarter say
they've tried to approximate
how much they'll need and few-
er than a fifth say they've
checked with a financial adviser.
Nine percent say they read or
heard about how much they
should have, 7 percent have
used an Internet calculator and
5 percent filled out a worksheet.

The survey is based on ran-
dom telephone calls to 1,257
people age 25 and older in Jan-
uary. It included a cell phone
supplement to encompass a
broader selection of people.
The survey's statistical margin
of error is plus or minus 3 per-
centage points.

The was sponsored by EBRI
and Washington-based market
research company Mathew
Greenwald & Associates Inc.

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 5B

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LASHAN MARIE MOSS of JOAN
HEIGHT’S, P.O. BOX CB-13475, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

VACANCY NOTICE

Associate Attorney Required

For growing Law Practice
Qualifications:

‘Called to the Bahamas Bar for a minimum of
three years

‘Successful candidate must have knowledge and
experience and intrest in Litigation, Conveyances
and Mortgages, Family Law, and Corporate
matters

Please e-mail resume to

positionforattorney@gmail.com
on or before April 17, 2009.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

TECH STREAM
INVESTMENTS LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000). TECH STREAM INVESTMENTS
LIMITED is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 25th
day of March, 2009.

Michael Charles Russell
Waterloo House
Don Street
St. Helier, Jersey
Liquidator



MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

by stakeholders from the private and public sectors, was formed and mandated to heighten
the public’s awareness of the importance of protecting and preserving our coastline, and to
monitor the extent to which the country is in conformity with its obligations as signatory
to several international marine Conventions;

NOTICE OF
EXTENSION

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in
New Providence and the Family Islands including
Grand Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

AND WHEREAS, in 1986 the international community took measures to
mobilize both human and material resources in an effort to direct attention to the need
for coastal areas, comprising sea, beach and the land surrounding the wider Caribbean,
to be managed and protected for the economic and social well-being of their respective
inhabitants;

AND WHEREAS, in June 1992, The Bahamas became signatory to the
Convention of Biological Diversity, agreeing thereby to recognize the importance of
marine biodiversity and the need to develop mechanisms to ensure the sustainable use of
coastal and marine biological diversity;

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser”) has
EXTENDED the date to receive sealed bids, from persons to provide
transportation to and from schools in accordance with the provision
of the Education Act. Bid forms can be collected from the Ministry
of Education and the office of Family Island Administrators between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

AND WHEREAS, in June 1997, the Government of The Bahamas became
signatory of the Ramsar Convention;

AND WHEREAS, as a country whose revenue generation is almost wholly
reliant on the Tourism Industry, The Bahamas recognizes the importance of its coastal
zones to its vital industry and by extension the socio-economic development of the

county Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed

envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the

AND WHEREAS, policy makers and programme planners in The Bahamas are subject bided on.

keenly aware of their obligations to educate stakeholders about the value of the country’s
natural resources and the devastating effect which natural and man-made disasters, such
as climate change and human activities, can have on the coastal environment if long-range
planning and mitigation efforts are not undertaken;

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Monday, 13th April, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they

AND WHEREAS, the Ministry of Tourism, in collaboration with partners in may be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

the public and private sectors, has designated the month of April 2009 as the month to
implement a schedule of activities and events to heighten the awareness of the importance

f th try’ tal ; . . ; .
lilies alae Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those

Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.

NOW, THEREFORE, | Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of The Common- L
on Tuesday, 14th April, 2009 at the address below:

wealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim April, 2009 “COASTAL AWARENESS
MONTH.”

The Chairman, Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel: (242) 327-1530

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
I have hereunto set my Hand
and Seal this Ist day of April, 2009

Hhesdel Faade

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Court dimisses hotel marina docks seizure

contract.

“The payments were to be
made progressively throughout
the history of the agreement.

“Some progressive payments

FROM page 1B

sion of the floating docks was to

be done in several stages.
“The schedule of payments

is set out in Exhibit A in the






















COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

2009
No.0020

Equity Side

IN THE MATTER OF a piece parcel or lot of land contained
by measurements one and two hundred and ninety four
hundredths (1.294) acres and situate on the northeastern side of
the Queen's Highway in the vicinity of Palestine Baptist Church
in the settlement of Deadman’s Cay in the Island of Long Island,

The Bahamas.
AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Alvin S. Turnquest.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act 1959
NOTICE

The Petitioner in this matter claims to be the owner in fee simple
possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described and the
Petitioner has made an application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and
the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in the
Certificate of Title granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal office
hours at:

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court.
(2) The Administrators Office at Clarence Town, Long Island.
(3) The Chambers of the undersigned.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or
right to dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall before the 30th day of April, A.D., 2009
from the publication of the notice inclusive of the day of such
publication file Notice in the Supreme Court in the City of
Nassau in the Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve
on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his or her
claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. The failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his or her claim within the time fixed by the Notice
aforesaid shall operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 25th day of February, A.D., 2009

PYFROM & CO,
Chambers
No.58, Shirley Street,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner.

have been made. A balance
remains due and owing.”

A dispute arose between
Florida Floats and Emerald Bay
Resort Holdings, which is cur-
rently in receivership, over pay-
ment of the outstanding bal-
ance. Arbitration proceedings
found in the contractor’s favour,
and awarded it a sum of money,
which it was now looking to the
Bahamian Supreme Court to
enforce.

“Tn its summons, the plaintiff
[Florida Floats] seeks to have
the court grant it access to the
defendant’s premises for the
purpose of securing and remov-
ing that portion of the docks as
would presumably represent an
amount sufficient to cover the
amount awarded it in arbitra-
tion,” Justice Lyons ruled.

He added that the corner-

stone of Florida Floats’ claim
was that “title to the docks it
wishes to take possession of has
not passed, and those docks
remain its property”.

This was dealt with in the
Emerald Bay contract by what
Justice Lyons described as a
Romalpa Clause.

“Title to the docks passes
when payment is made and not
before,” he explained of its
meaning. “Thus, in a contract
of this nature, where there is a
schedule of progressive pay-
ments, the title to the docks,
which the progressive payments
represent, passes when that pay-
ment is made.”

However, Justice Lyons said
that despite being told that the
Emerald Bay marina contract
required payment in eight
stages, and that some payments

had been made, no evidence
was placed before him to prove
that assertion. Nor did the con-
tract itself provide any help.

The main document relied on
by Florida Floats was an affi-
davit from Kendal Nottage, an
associate with the law firm rep-
resenting the company. His affi-
davit stated that Docks B and D
in the Emerald Bay marina
equated to 9,480 square feet of
total dock space, and were con-
structed at a cost of $1.176 mil-
lion.

This, Mr Nottage alleged,
meant that repossessing both
these docks would satisfy the
amount awarded to Florida
Floats by the courts. But Jus-
tice Lyons ruled: “I have no
idea of Mr Nottage’s expertise
in coming to the mathematical
calculation that he does.

“T have no idea as to whether

not paid for.” Dismissing Flori-
da Floats’ claim for lack of evi-
dence, the judge found: “As the
application of a Romalpa
Clause is a question of fact, I
am totally unable, due to the
complete lack of appropriate
evidence, to come to any con-
clusion as to when title to any
portion of those floating docks
passed, if at all.

“Tam thus unable to come to
the conclusion sought as to
whether title has not passed,
and thus grant the orders
sought.”

Justice Lyons also gave short
shrift to the arguments by
Emerald Bay Resort Holdings’
attorneys that the docks had
become fixtures, and it was thus
not right for the Supreme Court
to order their removal.

This again, he said, was not
supported by evidence placed

NOTICE is hereby given that BRIAN RAMAISH SARJUDAS
of SEABREEZE ESTATES, P.O. BOX N-9505, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RODLIN FLORESTOL of
EAST ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 14" day of April, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSETTE DORSAINVIL
of MOUNT TABOUR ESTATE OFF NASSAU VILLAGE,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7" day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

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Docks B and D were or were _ before the court.

NOTICE

HORSESTAR LIMITED
N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) HORSESTAR LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 8th April, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse

Trust Limited, Nassau Bahamas.

Dated this 9th day of April, A.D. 2009



Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

2008/CLE/qui/1871

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
parcel or lot of land being Lot 215, Stella
Maris Subdivision Phase Three, Section Two,
Stella Maris, situate between the settlements
of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown on
a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles
Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Warren Robert Boli

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act 1959
The Petition of Warren Robert Bolt
of the city of Canton, in the State of Ohio, one
of the states in the United States of America
in respect of: - ALL THAT piece parcel
or lot of land being Lot 215, Stella Maris
Subdivision Phase Three, Section Two, Stella
Maris, situate between the settlements of
Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
which said piece parcel or lot of land has
such position shape boundaries marks and
dimensions as are shown on a plan filed
herein and thereon coloured yellow

Warren Robert Boli claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the
said tract of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons
having Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a
claim not recognized in the petition shall on or before the 23"
of May A.D., 2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a statement of his
claim on or before the 23" of May A.D., 2009 will operate as a
bar to such claim.

Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:

1.The Registry of the Supreme Court;

2.The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for
the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria
Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;

3.The Notice Board of the Administrator at Stella Maris, Long

Island; and
4.The Local Constable at Stella Maris, Long Island

Dated the 23" day of March A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 7B



a |S
Freeport needs 'thousands' of

small, foreign- owned licensees

FROM page 1B

mately increase their Bahamas-
based investments, and elimi-
nate the “shifting sands” upon
which the city’s economy was
relying.

He told Tribune Business:
“My thought is that we should
not always look at big, huge
developments. What Freeport
needs is hundreds, if not thou-
sands, of small licensees as well.

“Tt should not be limited to
Bahamians. It is my view that
the more foreigners we can
entice to invest in Freeport, and
at the same time give those for-
eigners and their families per-
manent residence and citizen-
ship status, so they become part
of the community — not just
temporary extra for the com-
munity — then we will see some
sustained, long-term founda-
tions for growth.”

Mr Smith added: “We can-
not do it all ourselves, and
unless we give foreign investors
confidence about the long-term
continuity of their investments,
be it large or small, and give
them confidence about their
long-term Immigration status,
so that they become permanent
fixtures in the community, we
will still be building on shifting
sands.

Immigration

“T would again encourage
opening our Immigration doors
to give people long-term Immi-
gration rights. We need immi-
gration, and should use it as a
tool of development, not one
of restriction and protection-
ism.”

Mr Smith’s comments are
similar to those uttered earlier
this year by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, who indicat-
ed that Bahamians’ general
aversion to essential expatriate
workers being brought into this
country was hampering eco-
nomic development. It was, the
Prime Minister hinted, deter-
ring both potential new
investors and current ones from
expanding their existing facili-
ties. Meanwhile, Mr Smith told
Tribune Business that he did
not subscribe to “the doom and
gloom vision of Freeport, and
Freeport’s current economic sit-
uation” that many seemed to
have bought into.

While the tourism sector was
admittedly not performing well,
Mr Smith said this was true for
all parts of the world. Freeport,
though, was reaping the benefits
from a diversified economy,
with its industrial sector help-
ing to compensate for some of
the tourism-related downturn.

Without that diversification,
and the existence of its indus-



“It would be
fantastic if all
these three pistons
were humming at
once in Freeport.
But at least two of
the three are
humming, in some
health and in
some vigour.”

Fred Smith

trial sector, the Freeport econ-
omy would be in “complete
meltdown”.

“Although we have seen a
dramatic downturn in the
tourism sector, the truth of the
matter is that Freeport’s diver-
sified economic base is still sus-
taining quite a strong economy.
Everything is not as bad as
many perceive,” Mr Smith told
Tribune Business. "A diversi-
fied economy helps to sustain
a community in good and bad
times.

“The Container Port is still

growing strong, although it
recently laid-off a number of
employees. The Grand
Bahamas Shipyard has seen a
dramatic expansion with the
addition of a third dry dock, the
Sands Brewery is doing quite
well, the new glass window fac-
tory has just opened. Vopak has
plans for expansion, and Brad-
ford Marine is doing well. There
is a tremendous amount of low
and middle income housing in
various stages of construction
in the Lucaya area. Devco has
been doing a lot of infrastruc-
ture and development improve-
ments.”

Mr Smith added that a fur-
ther injection of fresh capital
into Freeport’s economy had
been provided by the initial
phase of Ross University’s
investment in its Grand
Bahama-based medical school.
This, he said, had already cre-
ated additional demand for
housing, plus retail and restau-
rant services.

“Freeport has, over the
decades, experienced ups and
downs,” Mr Smith told Tribune
Business. “Unfortunately, since
Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne,
Freeport has been quite chal-
lenged. But the economy has

EXPERIENCED COOK WANTED

Looking for person with experience in preparing
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years experience, also must be an aggressive worker. Able to
work shifts and willing to work on Sunday's.

All interested persons please hand deliver a copy of your resumé,
a passport photo, police record and health certificate to the
Nassau Yatch Club, Attention Manager

WANTED
SALES MANAGER

for a manufacturing concern.

Job requirements:

Bahamian - 35 years or older

College Graduate

Strong communication skills (oral & verbal)

Computer literate

Capable of motivating 20 + staff to achieve

company's goals.

Willing to work bong hours.

Excellent personal skills necessary for promoting
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Salary commensurate with experience and

performance

All applications will be treated in the strictest of confidence,
Send applications to P.O. Box CB-11392.

UBS ANNEX

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

LEASING
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For infomation, contact:

W, Larry Roberts
T; 242 376.0026
robe sebonorarealty bs

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T: 242 396.0028

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Bahar Reevalhy Limited
P.O. Box M-1 1a
Nosou, Bahar

Wate DOMOMosCommearciat

—} —



elie a

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TOTAL REMTABLE AREA: 11,427 SF

PREMISES: First lavel

AVAILABILITY: september 2009

TERM: Negotiable

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REALTY un
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CBRE

CO ACAASD ELLE

been able to sustain itself with
the industrial sector, housing,
construction and sales to for-
eign real estate buyers.

“If the industrial sector was
not here, Freeport would be in a
state of complete meltdown. It
is a reflection of the vision
inherent in the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement that there is the for-
eign residential economy, there
is the tourism economy, and
there is the industrial and com-
mercial economy.

“It would be fantastic if all
these three pistons were hum-
ming at once in Freeport. But at
least two of the three are hum-
ming, in some health and in
some vigour.”

Mr Smith added that
Freeport needed “continued
foreign and local investment”
if its economy was to grow and
thrive, with the industrial sector
having picked up the slack from
tourism when it came to pro-
viding employment and invest-
ment opportunities.

“Speaking to the continued
shareholder dispute at the Port
Authority, that is possibly a fac-
tor in discouraging inward
development, and the sooner
the parties can settle their dis-
pute, the better the investment
environment will become,” Mr
Smith said.



Commercial Space

a

GROSVENOR SUITES - WEST

#3 Grosvenor Close - off Shirley Street

Phone 242-328-5550
for viewing.

First month free with renovations

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
SABLEDOR HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution. Salwa
Bahey EJ-Din Mounib El-Sayed is the Liquidator and can
be contacted at Zahran Plaza, 3rd Floor, 7th Circle, P.O. Box
140825, Amman 11814, Jordan. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before the 10th day of May, 2009.

Si
fet

et ie

Sabet Bahey El-Din Mounib El-Sayed
Liquidana



PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL

VACANCY NOTICE

COORDINATOR PATIENT RELATIONS SERVICES

Applications are

Invited from suitably qualified individuals for
of Coordinator Patient Relation Services,
Public Hospitals Authority.

the post

Princess Margaret Hospital,

Applicant must possess the following qualifications:-

Bachelors Degree in Psychology, one of the Social Sciences, Human
Relations or related field and five (5) years relevant experience three (3)
of which must be at the supervisory level.

DUTIES

Establishes annual goals and objectives for the Patient Relation Services
and chairs the Patient Relation Management Team.

Coordinates the development of policies and procedures for the

effective functioning of the Patient Relation Services and supports

the Hospital’s quality improvement.

Keeps abreast of developments in the hospital and provides suggestions,
assistance and counsel to the Hospital Executive Management Committee
as to how services can be improved to further the mission and goals of the

hospital

Advises the Hospital Administrator/designate Administrative Officer on the
general operation of the Patient Relation Services, changing trends of
problems/concerns addressed and appropriate/alternate plans/strategies
to meet the objectives of the Patient Relations.

Implements management policies and ensures compliance.

Coordinates the preparation of the budget for the service, identifying
human and material resources required for the effective operation of

the department, with appropriate justification.

Selects qualified personnel following the established guidelines in
accordance with the Public Hospitals Authority’s hiring practices,
Employee Relation Policies and procedures and hospital established
positions for Patient Relations Services.

Assists with educational in-service programmes, special projects and
studies assigned by the Hospital Administrator and submits reports as

required.

Conducts informal and formal performance enhancement coaching
on an ongoing basis, utilizing the Criteria Based Job Description/
Evaluation as a reference tool and documenting results.

. Annually completes Employee Performance Evaluation prior to
established evaluation date in accordance with the Public Hospitals.
Authority policies and procedures.

. Coordinates and conducts staff meetings regularly and maintains
ongoing dialogue with Patient Representatives and Trainees to
provide information, interpret policies, procedures and standards
and to foster open communication in the department

. Supervises the Patient Relation activities to ensure that acceptable
standards are being maintained at all times and that such standards
are consistent of those approved by the Executive Management

Committee.

. Provides leadership, support, advice and guidance to Patient Relation staff
and maintains a monthly updated list of staff telephone/fax contacts.

. Collaborates with unit staff In coordinating a planned and systematic
process for monitoring/evaluating Patient Relation Services and for
problem solving activities, ensuring that they meet the obiective and

required standards.

15. Prepares monthly reports of activities of Patient Relation Services for
submission to the Hospital Administrator.

16. Responds to queries addressed to the hospital concerning Patient Relation
activities as directed and approved by the Hospital Administrator.

17. Approves requests for routine and non-stock supplies for the Patient
Relation Services and assists with the establishment of an inventory list
and procuring of materials as needed on a timely basis for the service.

18. Deploys Patient Relation Services staff to meet inpatient and outpatient
service needs ensuring adequate coverage for absenteeism, vacation and

special leave.

19. Monitors attendance, overtime, and disciplinary matters as it relates
to staff within the department.

20. Assists with arranging the airlifting of patients.

21. Liaises with volunteer groups to coordinate their efforts to assist for the
benefit of patients/guests of Princess Margaret Hospital.

22. Provides information and consultation as requested by colleagues in the
broad professional community.

23. Performs other related duties.

The salary for the post is In Scale HAA$7 ($28,650 x 700 - $32,850)

Letters of application and curricula vitae should be submitted through your
Head of Department to the Chief Hospital Administrator. Princess Margaret
Hospital or 3rd Terrace Centerville (West), no later than 24th April, 2009.


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



NTS SS
Rules must be enforced for capital market integrity

FROM page 1B

od close or thereabouts for
Bahamas Supermarkets should
have seen those statements pub-
lished by end-October 2008.
What everyone got was unau-
dited accounts some five months
late, and seemingly not even a
slap on the wrist for the City Mar-
kets holding company from the
Securities Commission for its tar-
diness and the information vacu-
um that has existed since the 2007
annual general meeting (AGM).
Transparency and full disclosure,
especially where the 22 per cent
minority investors are concerned,
have been sadly lacking, as evi-

denced by no formal public state-
ment on why external auditors
KPMG are finding it so hard to
sign off on the 2008 audit.

But there is a much wider issue
than Bahamas Supermarkets’
well-being here, and it goes to the
heart of Bahamian capital mar-
kets integrity and regulation. If a
high-profile company such as this
can apparently get away with
missing statutory requirements,
with no explanation and without
so much as a public reprimand,
what does that say to all other
listed firms and Securities Com-
mission registrants? In Tribune
Business’s opinion, it sends the
message: “Don’t worry about
playing by the strict letter of the

Legal Notice

NOTICE

regulations, because they are nev-
er enforced.” Surely that is the
wrong message to send. What will
it do to investor confidence in
market integrity?

To be fair to the Securities
Commission, it is widely recog-
nised that the existing legislation
is wholly inadequate in terms of
enforcement and sanctions pow-
ers. Yet it admitted earlier this
year that it had failed to enforce
the rules in other areas, namely
broker/dealer capital require-
ments and investment funds
meeting the statutory deadlines
for filing their annual figures.

With all due respect to the
Securities Commission, if there
is much more of this it will come
to be seen as a relatively ‘tooth-
less tiger’ that refuses to bite
when the going gets tough. Not
that it is alone in this respect.
Many of the Bahamas’ problems
stem from just that — enforce-
ment. This nation has all the laws
it needs on the books, but they’re
never enforced. If you’re not
going to enforce the rules, get rid
of them!

Back in the City Markets’ aisle,
it is obvious that its parent — and
all others on the so-called over-
the-counter market — need to be
brought on to the Bahamas Inter-
national Securities Exchange

Legal Notice

(BISX). There, they would also
have to comply with BISX Rules,
an extra set of regulatory stan-
dards, and there would be no
debate as to whether they are tru-
ly ‘public companies’. Enforcing
the rules would also go a long
way.

As for the operational side, it is
apparent that the road to recov-
ery for City Markets may be one
that lasts for several years, and it
will not be painless. Despite neg-
ative equity of more than $2 mil-
lion, which makes its parent tech-
nically insolvent, the 12-store
supermarket chain has been able
to meet all operational expenses
and supplier payments. The main
question mark is the ability of its
major 78 per cent shareholder,
BSL Holdings, to service the $24
million debt load it took on from
Royal Bank of Canada in the

However, it appears the bank is
holding off, at least for now.

In many respects, Bahamas
Supermarkets is a mirror image of
where its rival Abaco Markets
was some six years ago. Back
then, the Solomon’s SuperCentre
and Cost Right owner was bur-
dened by a similar level of Royal
Bank debt, and strained cash flow
and liquidity, which all resulted
in a $24 million-plus loss for fiscal
2003. As with City Markets now,
a team from Royal Bank’s Cana-
dian head office had already been
in to run the rule over the com-
pany’s internal operations.

My, my. How the tables have
turned. It is now Bahamas Super-
markets that has gone from
churning out a consistent $6-$8
million per annum profit, with
regular dividends, under Winn-
Dixie, to a supermarket chain

NOTICE
UTRECHT
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— f,—

absence of dividends upstreamed
from Bahamas Supermarkets.

HAWKINSHILL ACRE LTD. SEE page 9B

(In Voluntary Liquidation) "
Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAPHIRE & DIAMONDS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of UTRECHT INVESTMENTS LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is- Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Bahamas.
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Fae

A global leader in audit, tax and advisory services
Legal Notice

NOTICE
SEB FAMILY LTD.

Assistant Manager/Manager, Restructuring

The Assistant Manager/Manager will report to the Déctors of KPMG Restructuing Ltd... The role has
primary responsibility for managing qmortfolio of liquidation and corpoate restructuring clients.
—_ —>, ___.
Specific duties include managing: ‘
© liquidation cases, including both voluntary liquidationand court appointments
e restructuring engagements for lenders, providig independent business reviews of borrowers’
businesses, and assisting lenders in developing and implemeting options with respect to their
financial exposure to such borrowers
restructuring advisory services tocompanies with financial issues
complex and lengthy litigation issuesin several jurisdictions
a portfolio of restructuring clients, including financial matters sl as work in progress, and
accounts receivable
restructuring professionals in their work, andnvolvement in the internal performance appraisal
process
business development initiatives

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SEB FAMILY LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Applicants must be a university graduate and a memér of a recognized accountary or insolvency body in
addition to holding a minimum of five to seven years rlevant work experience, with preferably three or
more of those in a restructuring role at a comparablevel. This position requires attention to detail, strong
financial and writing skills, the ability to work at one's own initiative, and thability to meet tight

deadlines.
Legal Notice

NOTICE
NUILITE INC.

—_— f—

KPMG offers a competitive compensation and benefitspackage inclusive of medical and pension plans.



Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, a copy of their degree and professional certifications and a copy of their transcripts to: KPMG,
Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or jalightbourne@ kpmg.com.bs no later than Friday 24 April, 2009.

AUDIT = TAX «© ADVISORY

© 2009. KPMG, a Bahamas partnership, and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Notice is hereby given that m accordance with Section 138

Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NUILITE INC. has been completed; a Cer-

tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

ROYAL = FIDELITY

has therefore been struck off the Register.
Morey 21 Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 7 APRIL 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,622.57 | CHG -15.99 | %CHG -0.98 | YTD -89.79 | YTD % -5.24
FINDEX: CLOSE 805.27 | YTD -3.55% | 2008 -12.31%

WWwWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.28 1.28 0.00 0.127 10.1
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992 11.1
6.95 Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95 0.00 0.244 28.5
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877 N/M
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.105 30.0
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 43.1
11.31 Cable Bahamas 12.55 11.31 -1.24 1.309 8.6
2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83 0.00 0.249 11.4
6.45 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 0.438 14.7
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs 0.099 23.8
2.09 Doctor's Hospital 0.240 8.7
6.02 Famguard 0.598 13.0
11.00 Finco 0.322 34.2
0.794 13.1
0.337 15.0
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6
0.407 13.7
0.952 11.0
0.180 55.6

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

6.45
2.42
2.09
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.59

6.45
2.36
2.09
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.59

0.00
-0.06
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.05
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW CAPSTONES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

10.40
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60

10.00

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 TY%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
£.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA _ Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664
2.8962
1.4489
3.3201
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0440
1.0364
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund

Div $
1.3041
2.9230
1.3847
3.3201
12.1564

100.0000

96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investrnent Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund 4.40
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S81) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany‘s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE



CLICO's foreign liabilities could he asset for liquidator

( LICO (Bahamas) poli-
cyholders will not have
had too much to celebrate this
Easter, and understandably so.
Their long-term life savings, pen-
sions and healthcare coverage are
all inaccessible, and how much
they get back is in the hands of
court-appointed liquidator Craig
‘Tony’ Gomez. It is, as Tribune
Business said, likely to be less
than the full dollar invested.
Yet there is finally a first glim-
mer of light for Bahamian insur-
ance policyholders and annuity
depositors, but not for their coun-
terparts in Guyana and Suriname.
The hint is contained in Mr
Gomez’s first report to the
Supreme Court as provisional liq-
uidator, where he states that $49
million worth of funds ($34 mil-
lion from Guyana, $15 million
from Suriname) that flowed into

Rules must be enforced for
capital market integrity

FROM page 8B

now embarking on the long road to recovery. Abaco Markets, fol-
lowing four to five years of downsizing, cost cutting and hard deci-
sions, is by contrast starting to churn out regular annual profits
and getting investors salivating over the prospect of dividend pay-
ments.

And that is why Bahamas Supermarkets shareholders should
not lose hope. Yes, much will depend on Trinidadian operating
partner Neal & Massey, and the new business plan put together for
City Markets. But the way forward has been shown by Abaco Mar-
kets, granted that it may be an arduous one.



policy contracts.

As a result, if this line of think-
ing and treatment is upheld by
the Supreme Court, it would
mean that $49 million worth of
liabilities would drop down the

(Bahamas). That would mean
Bahamian institutions and poli-
cyholders would get first call on
the assets, with Guyana and Suri-
name left to fight over what is left
and be the ones most out of pock-

Removing those $49 million
worth of liabilities would result
in a far healthier balance sheet
facing Mr Gomez, with some
$116.965 million in assets playing
$86 million in liabilities. Even if
$40-million plus is knocked off
the value of CLICO (Bahamas)
Florida real estate investments,
reducing assets to around $66 mil-
lion, the situation facing the lig-
uidator will look far healthier.

On another note, CLICO
(Bahamas) balance sheet shows
just how much of a deposit-taking
(banking) institution it was, as
opposed to an insurance compa-
ny. Some $98.524 million — almost
$100 million — of its $135 million
liabilities are to Executive Flexi-
ble Premium Annuity (EFPA)
clients, representing those who
piled into it above-average inter-
est return annuity products. They

CLICO (Bahamas) were trans-
fers of funds that amounted to
related-party loans, not standard

pecking order, and be ranked
below the liabilities owed to
Bahamian clients of CLICO

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ALIANZA SLOPES INC.

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ALIANZA SLOPES INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FLORIDORO INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BOLLINGEN HOLDINGS LTD.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BOLLINGEN HOLDINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KK COWBOYS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

did not equate risk with return.
Lesson learned for the future, we
hope, ladies and gentlemen.

et. Could mean some tricky
CARICOM meetings for Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JEVER CLIVER LTD.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of JEVER CLIVER LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KBOTO LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 18th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MONTAQUE ALPS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WIDONWIDE LTD.

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of WINDONWIDE LID. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 9B

Legal Notice



























NOTICE
EOLO GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KLAGEN LTD.

— f,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KLAGEN LTD. has been completed; a Cer-
tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAN MARTIN S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VILNIUS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CRANBERYANNE INC.

— + /_—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CRANBERYANNE INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

rr =<). | =<<—
Dispute over ex-governor general's $10m life policy sent into arbitration mode

FROM page 1B

for PHL Variable Insurance
Company.”

In its initial complaint, Dulaw
Management alleged that for a
life insurance policy to be valid
under Florida law, the policy
owner must have an “insurable
interest in the life of the pro-

posed insured”.

It alleged that this was not
the case with the policy taken
out on Sir Orville’s life, as the
defendants had obtained an
insurance policy on the former
governor-general’s life without
having an insurable interest in
it.

Dulaw alleged that Bound-

less Solutions, acting as a PHL
agent, had approached Sir
Orville in early 2006, propos-
ing that it would obtain free life
insurance for two years on his
life.

It also claimed that the policy
was represented as a vehicle for
Sir Orville to “market his insur-
ability in a way that would

obtain for him a substantial
profit”.

Scheme

However, Dulaw alleged that
the transaction was nothing
more than a scheme that would
enable LaSalle Bank, Coventry
Capital and Boundless Solu-

Our youth will be responsible for their financial futures one day. Will they be ready?

tions to obtain large fees, con-
vert Sir Orville’s insurability to
themselves and end up with a
$10 million policy on the for-
mer governor-general’s life.
Dulaw also alleged that the
$1.507 million loan that LaSalle
advanced to pay the premiums
for two years was a “sham
transaction”, and a non-
recourse loan that restricted its
ability to sell the life insurance
policy even if it were able to
obtain financing that exceeded
the loan amount. Annual pre-
miums were said to be $540,000.
Ultimately, Dulaw alleged

THE TRIBUNE

that the policy was an “illegal
wagering contract” that need-
ed to be rescinded.

In response, all four US com-
panies vehemently denied
Dulaw Management’s allega-
tions. In its defence, Boundless
Solutions alleged that the con-
tracts contained all the required
details that fully disclosed the
terms of the deal. It added that
the coverage remained in force
until an alleged default on the
loan, at which point LaSalle and
Coventry converted the policy
to their own interest.

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cs THE TRIBUNE

f 4 tf
man TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009





S

ECTION C © HEALTH: Body and mind



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iia eel i oLiciritirivitit tat ttiet tt rir

iii eee! Cer ecre cece rre pf eee

Peta te a eT

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‘>. oe





@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

MOST people assume
the choice of deciding
who to marry, which
college to attend, or
deciding one of the
many major decisions
we are faced with dur-
ing life, should be per-
sonal decisions.

However many fail to give as much thought
to post-mortem decisions, in many cases leay-
ing family or doctors to decide what’s best for
them.

According to one medical professional,
detailing your last wishes when it comes to
deciding whether or not to donate your
organs after your death, determining whether
or not to pull the plug should you end up ina
comatose state, or whether to be buried or
cremated, are decisions that not only direct
your physical destiny, but could give life to
dozens more.

Doctor Michael Darville - Assistant Clini-
cal Director for Intermediate, and Intensive
Care Units IMCU/ICU) at Doctors Hospital
- spoke at the facility’s recent health sympo-
sium where he explained the importance of
pre-planning your final wishes.

He explained one of the most positive

results can be organ donation as doing so can
save up to to eight lives, and potentially ben-
efit close to 50 individuals.

Referring to critical and terminally ill
patients, Dr Darville said: “We (doctors)
often have to decide what’s in the best inter-
est of the patient, but sometimes that does
not line up with what the family would want.

“And so we’d have to sit and come toa
point of agreement or understanding that is
in the best interest of the patient.”

With this proving to sometimes be a diffi-
cult experience for both the doctor and the
family, Dr Darville said the practice of
advanced directives does help significantly
with providing proper medical or palliative
care in accordance with a patients wishes.

Advanced directives is a process which

SEE page five



What is Onycholysis?





ONYCHOLYSIS is the spontaneous ;
separation of the nail plate from the nail . :
bed, usually beginning at the distal free
margin and progressing proximally.

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

SO you are sitting at home painting
your toenails that bright fuchsia color
you love so much. Everything is going
great and it looks pretty good, besides
the subtle line mistakes, when all of a
sudden your toenail drops clean off.
You shut your eyes thinking that the
pain will come soon, but nothing hap-
pens. No blood, no pain, but a brand
new, soft, toe nail has emerged as you
slowly, but carefully remove the old
toenail. If this sort of thing happens to
you on more than one occasion, you
are not mutating, but it is a common
condition and you are not alone.

According to Emedicine.com, Ony-
cholysis is the spontaneous separation
of the nail plate from the nail bed, usu-
ally beginning at the distal free margin
and progressing proximally.

“Men and women can develop ony-
cholysis; however, studies demonstrate

an overwhelmingly female predilec-
tion. This is commonly seen in women
whose nails are exposed to chemical
irritants during housework. Other
common causes of onycholysis may
include repetitive micro trauma from a
poorly fitting shoe for example and,
onychomycosis (fungal infection),” the
article stated.

Doctor of Podiatric Medicine at the
Bahamas Foot Centre located on
Rosetta Street, Monique Mitchell, said
there are a number of reasons why this
problem can occur, especially in
women who have longer toenails.

“Many women like to wear their toe
nails long now a days and many prob-
lems can arise from doing that and ony-
cholysis is one of them. When you wear
a closed in shoe and you walk, your
foot can advance and hit the inside of
the shoe and the nail lifts up. A lot of
people do not feel when the toe nail
comes off or is coming off and do not
pay attention to it,” Mrs Mitchell said.

Medical conditions that can be asso-
ciated with onycholysis, according to

Emedicine.com include: psoriasis, preg-
nancy, lichen planus, systemic lupus,
Reiter’s syndrome, thyroid disease, sec-
ondary syphilis, anemia, diabetes mel-
litus, scleroderma, atopic dermatitis,
allergic contact dermatitis to nail cos-
metics, certain drugs including oral con-
traceptives, tetracyclines, captopril, etc,
foreign body for example acrylic nails
and congenital or hereditary etiologies.

Mrs Mitchell said those who experi-
ence onycholysis, should not be
alarmed as there are a number of ways
to treat the condition.

“You can first see a doctor to make
sure that you do not have a fungus.
The other thing is that you can make
sure you have your nails properly
groomed and cut at an appropriate
length. Also, keep you nails dry and
avoid frequent nail polish remover
exposure. It takes four to six months
for a fingernail to fully regrow, and
twice as long for toenails, therefore,
you will not notice the toe nail infection
until it is ready to come off most of
the time,” Mrs Mitchell said.



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PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

[LILIES

AND OTHERS

‘LILIES AND OTHERS’ cov-
ers all those bulbs, rhi-
zomes, tubers and corns that
we plant in selected areas of
the garden to grow in their
own chosen season, die
away above ground, then
come back again the next

year with added interest.

Bulbs, etc, come with instructions
as to what depth to plant them. You
may be advised to dig up the bulbs
after the blooming season is over but
that is not necessary in The Bahamas
except for those bulbs that need a
cooling period. Once flowering is
over, most bulbs multiply and pro-
duce even more flowers in the second
and subsequent years.

Bulbs that need a cooling period —
usually those that bloom in late win-
ter and early spring in temperate
zones — should be dug up once they
have fully died back and stored in
cool, dry conditions. In the period
before the expected growing time the
bulbs should be stored in the refriger-
ator for anywhere from a month to
two months.

Bulbs that grow in the late spring,
summer and autumn in temperate
zones are the ones that can stay in
the ground year round and these
form the vast majority.

The true Lily family is vast and
complex. Those often seen in
Bahamian nurseries are Asiatic, Ori-
ental and Longiflorum hybrids. Asi-
atic lilies are early blooming and
must therefore be stored and refrig-
erated in order to enjoy them year
after year. Although Easter lilies may
seem to be early bloomers, they are
forced by nursery

suppliers in order to be ready for
the Easter market. Left to their own
devices they are summer bloomers.

Amaryllis and Hippeastrum are
two different species but are so often
confused that we can deal with them
as one. Both have very large bulbs
and produce wonderfully ornate
flowers that are long lasting. Both

tend not to produce secondary bulbs
in our climate.

The gloriosa lily is a subtropical
plant grown from rhizomes that loves
our climate. But it is not a lily. Many
plants are called lilies because they
are lily-like. Other plants which are
called “lily” but are not include rain
lily and spider lily.

Gloriosa lily is a sprawling vine

that usually grows to four or five feet.

It is best grown in clusters around
some framework for support. When
the flowers first appear the petals
curl down and then, within hours,
assume the distinctive curled over
position.

The spider lily grows wild but that
does not mean it has no place in the
garden. An area of poor soil set out
with spider lilies will soon become a
focal point and conversation piece.

Zephyranthes, called August
flower or rain lily locally, have leaves
rather like St Augustine grass and
also have the habit of invading lawns.
This presents homeowners with a
problem when the lawn needs mow-
ing but the zephyranthes are bloom-
ing prettily. The usual colours seen
locally are mauve, pink, white and
yellow.

a eV

GLORIOSA lily
can be grown
singly as a
specimen plant
or in clusters.

Caladiums grow from rhizomes
and are popular candidates for shad-
ed areas. The heart-shaped leaves
feature white, pink, green and red
markings, though not all in the same
plant. Caladiums produce calla- lily
like flowers towards the end of the
season, which extends from early
spring to late autumn.

Gladiolas usually bloom in late
summer but the first time you plant
them they may bloom shortly after-
wards regardless of season. Gladiolas
are very pretty with their sword-like
foliage and stunning flowers that pro-
duce a new bloom each day. One
problem with them is that they often
need staking if the bulbs are not dug
in deep enough.

I would love to see more cannas
grown in The Bahamas. Their foliage
is redolent of the tropics and the
flowers — red, orange, coral, pink or
white — are very showy. Once estab-
lished, cannas look after themselves.
They are great candidates for grow-
ing against fences or walls where they
attain a height of four to six feet.

The planting of bulbs, rhizomes,
tubers and corms is an investment
that is sure to appreciate over the
years. And be appreciated.

THE TRIBUNE

ONCE established,
cannas look after
HIBS Meee LIL
can become a
TEL Le creed
of the garden.

> THE BULBS of
these Asiatic
Hybrid lilies need
to be cooled for a
period each year.

It whipped several very expensive creams.
(Even the $350 one.)*

¢ regeneris t

MIGB=sculpting cream

The Good Housekeeping Research Institute put ihe pricey face creams to the test.
Not one measured/up to Olay RegenerisuM icro-Sculpting Cream.

It made skin more hydrated and for allongenm period of time.

Save your skin. And $325 in the process.

*Based on Good Housekeeping Research Institute test of several $100 + face creams.

Love the skin you’re in™

>A personalized skin care Consultation awaits you @ OlayForYou.com


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 3C



a Ne



@x
The

AS CHILDREN we have grown up wit-
nessing the relationships of our parents,
aunts, uncles, teachers and family friends.
The impressions and overall outlook on
relating, showing affection and respecting
individuals is mapped early into our sub-
conscious. This early map often influences
us in our relationships later on in life and if
these early memories have been unpleasant
or have resulted in shame then difficulties
with sexuality are common. Indeed those
early experiences may be so far back and so
shut off that sometimes we may not even be
able to see that they have anything to do
with our present situation. All that we may
know is that we are not happy with our
close relationships or perhaps the lack of
any close relationship. But there is hope.
We can overcome our past and a childhood
of unhappiness does not preclude having
an unhappy future.

Certainly there are phases to long term
relationships. Peaks and cycles change with
each decade and are influenced by life
events such as divorce, death, financial pres-
sures and children. But let's start at the
beginning. We may have fallen in love and
experienced that euphoric high of romantic
love and the wonderful effects of the rush of
oxytocin from the thought or touch of our
love interest. The bonding and attachment
from the early frequent touching contribute



Controlling “~~

oily shine

sili

LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

attern of

RELATIONSHIPS

to the desire and longing for that person
when they are not with us. There is a feeling
of hope for the future and this romantic
love stage generally lasts from three to
twenty seven months. The comfort then
sets in and we generally become relaxed.
We may put on weight and not pay so much
attention to our appearance or to other
things that were so important in the begin-
ning, such as touching. A power struggle
often develops in the long term relation-
ship and each becomes reactive and defen-
sive in an attempt to protect the feelings
of the early love. As humans, our response
to being attacked is ‘fight or flight’. We
may fight because we feel scared or we may
just withdraw and in this way create a safe
protected space. Or we may freeze and
appear uncommunicative. This may appear
as an inability to listen or to express one
self. This is the start of the disconnection
within the couple bond and if not inter-
rupted then a cycle of defensive behavior
starts. When this conflict goes on for a long
time, we may come to accept the situation
for varying reasons; financial, security,
familiarity, fear of change and lack of con-
fidence to start a fresh. Often the effect on
children and extended family influences
our decisions to stay and so we detach our-
selves a little and in essence go to 'sleep’.
It is at this stage of sleep that couples

“he wait

/

often come to couples therapy because of
lack of interest in sex, sexual problems,
noninitiation, feelings of rejection, aban-
donment, and resentment. Feelings of lack
of passion and eroticism towards the partner
may have become habitual. We may in fact
not even view our partners as erotic but as
someone who is safe. This is just living
beside someone not fully awake but
‘asleep’. The good news is that there can be
a ‘waking up’ once one or both persons
recognises and wants to rekindle the first
feelings of the romantic high. This requires
looking closely at what has happened to
each person's erotic needs along the way.
Without a doubt there is nothing that dead-
ens sexual desire faster than unresolved
differences. The resurgence of the oxytocin
rush can be brought on again with the care-
ful help of a relationship therapist and the
joy can return at any age.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and Cou-
ples Relationship Therapist. She is a Regis-
tered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Thera-
pist located at The Centre for Renewing Rela-
tionships, Grosvenor's Close West. She can
be contacted by calling 356-7983 or by e-mail
at relatebahamas@yahoo.com or at
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is
available for speaking engagements.

ae eat

¢ IN AN article appear-
ATOM MEAT a UUme)
March 24, on the topic
Surviving Menopause, the
word osteosclerosis was
used to describe a gradual
weakening of the bones in

post menopausal women
due to a lack of calcium.
However, the correct med-
ical term to describe the
condition is osteoporosis.
We hope this clears up
any confusion.





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¢ Create a “matte kit” that fits
conveniently in your purse or
backpack for mid-day touch-ups.
Your kit should include oil-free
lotions or sunscreens containing
microsponges that help soak up
excess oil. It can also contain
wipes loaded with Salicylic Acid
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from oil-controlling ingredients.
Your professional skin thera-
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the health of skin.

¢ Sarah Beek is a skin care thera-
pist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit her
and her team of skin and body
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Join the BNT « ©
for a special evening —
of food and music
in the romantic
Retreat Gardens,
Village Road

Feast |

in the

“) Forest

and Silent Auction s








Friday, April 24, 2009
6:00pm - 10:00pm
Bring your Maid Marion or dashing
Robin Rood for an evening of food and

fun including live entertainment,
magicians, jugglers and much more!

$75 per person
THE TRIBUNE

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
PORT DEPARTMENT

REG NO.

NP: 6587

NP: 6632

NP: 2788

Davis Nigel S.
P.O. Box N-9707

Nassau, Bahamas

Forbes Randy
P.O. Box EE-17789
Nassau, Bahamas

Gomez Frederick
P.O. Box SS-5212
Nassau, Bahamas

Hartley Christopher
P.O. Box SS-5244
Nassau, Bahamas

Higgs Jonathan A.
P.O. Box AB-20350
Nassau, Bahamas

Kemp Ronald L.
Nassau, Bahamas

Miller Amos J.
P.O. Box N-8341
Nassau, Bahamas

Mcbride Eugene
P.O. Box FH-14357
Nassau, Bahamas

McCoy Marvin
P.O. Box SB-64004
Nassau, Bahamas

McPhee Levi G.
P.O. Box SB-8306
Nassau, Bahamas

Newton Dion
P.O. Box SB-51914
Nassau, Bahamas

Rolle Vernon
Nassau, Bahamas

Smith Lloyd
P.O. Box N-7423
Nassau, Bahamas

Smith Valentino
P.O. Box EE-17013
Nassau, Bahamas

Strachan Garth
P.O. Box N-1384
Nassau, Bahamas

Varga Randolph
P.O. Box SS-5219
Nassau, Bahamas

Wilson Herbert
P.O. Box N-3733
Nassau, Bahamas

RENEWAL OF BOAT LICENCE —NEW PROVIDENCE

APPLICANT BOAT NAME CLASS PASS
Cartwright Robert C. “Treesome” A 20
P.O. Box N-9967 40ft

Nassau, Bahamas Fibreglass

Strachan Garth “G Man”
Nassau, Bahamas 21ft
Fibreglass

Charter

Varga Randolph “Riding high” B
P.O. Box SS-5219 53ft
Nassau, Bahamas Fibreglass

Charter

Varga Randolph “Wind Dancer” B
P.O. Box SS-5219 4ift
Nassau, Bahamas Fibreglass

Charter

RENEWAL OF COMMERICAL RECREATIONAL WATER CRAFT

REG NO.

NP: 916 NSB Brown Carol &

NP: 155 ATE Johnson Cedric

NP: 110 ATE Johnson Cedric

NP: 109 ATE Johnson Cedric

NP: 156 ATE

(JET SKI) — NEW PROVIDENCE

APPLICANT BOAT NAME CLASS PASS USE
“No Name” D 2 Rental
Beatrice oft

P.O. Box CB-13211 Jet Ski

Nassau, Bahamas

“No Name” Rental
P.O. Box N-3426 oft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

“No Name”
P.O. Box N-3426 oft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

“No Name” Rental
P.O. Box N-3426 oft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

Johnson Cedric “No Name” Rental
P.O. Box N-3426 oft

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 5C



The quest for
empowerment

WE always hear about the impor-
tance of empowering our employ-
ees. In reality, it is not clear that
this is even possible. Ils empower-
ment something managers and
supervisors can do? Or do employ-
ees have to decide to empower
themselves? From my perspective,
empowerment cannot be given to
you. Circumstances for it to happen
can be created and then you have
to make a decision to accept the
challenge and empower yourself.

Susan Heathfield elaborates on the topic of
empowerment in this way: “Empowerment is
the process of enabling or authorising an indi-
vidual to think, behave, take action, and control
work and decision making in autonomous ways.
It is the state of feeling self-empowered to take
control of your own destiny.”

Employees either want to be empowered or
they don't. Managers either have the ability or
will to create opportunities to empower
employees or they don't. The culture of your
company has a direct impact on whether or not
managers and supervisors can create opportuni-
ties to empower you as an employee. Here are
a few examples of the components of culture
that contribute to opportunities to empower
others:

Decision Making Power: If your organisation is
highly structured with all the decision making
power centralised to the top, it can be impossi-
ble to develop an empowered team. In this
reality, the owners or executives make all the
decisions and even if they allow employee
input, there is a subtle or sometimes obvious
way they stage-manage the message and com-
munication process so the team always arrives
at the original intent of the owners or execu-
tives.

Organisational Politics: If your organisation is
highly political with employees and managers
jockeying for status, opportunities or power,
this can undermine your ability as a manager or
supervisor to create an environment that sup-
ports empowerment. For example, if a supervi-
sor is given a project to complete and highly
political team mates are appointed to the com-
mittee, the members of the committee can sab-
otage the project by incapacitating the platform
for creativity.

Communication: It is impossible to empower
employees if they don't even know what they
are supposed to be doing or if they have no
voice. If your organisation has impaired top-
down and bottom-up communication flows,
there are probably managers and employees
who hoard information or discourage employee
input. Some of these managers retain impor-
tant or relevant information to control the
team, keeping you in the dark so they can:

o Protect or build their status or brand

o Camouflage their incompetence

o Hinder your development as an employee.

o Avoid having you suggest ideas that are per-
ceived to be better than theirs

If you see yourself in one of these manager

Giving
the gift
of life

FROM page one

patients to direct the course
of their medical care should
they end up in a state where
they are unable to definitive-
ly communicate their wishes.

Dr Darville explained, in
the event that a patient has
end stage cancer, or a termi-
nal illness, the choice still lies
with the patient whether they
should be resuscitated or not.

He said: “Cardio-pul-
monary resuscitation is the
norm, unless a patient has
expressed in advance not to
be resuscitated.

“In other words, If they
don’t tell me in advance, or
do not have it written down
that they don’t wish to be
resuscitated, I am obligated



types, you usually provide a minimal amount of
data that slowly trickles down to employees and
you consciously or unconsciously discourage
the flow of information to the top. In cases
where information does move up through the
formal and informal channels, it may be
through highly political employees who are
intent on putting their spin on the facts.

Tips for Creating a Platform for Empowerment

— Release control and decentralise decision
making. If you do decide to grant employees
additional responsibility or decision making
power, you can release control in small quanti-
ties to build their skills, confidence and trust.

— Build trust by creating an environment or
space that will support creativity and allow
room for error. If employees are afraid to
make mistakes they will not be open to taking
the risks of being creative or responsible.

— Reinforce behaviours with positive feedback.
If employees are reassured that they are on the
right track and you provide coaching and men-
toring instead constant criticism you can create
opportunities for empowerment, growth and
trust.

— As an executive or owner, ask your support
staff for input and be open to letting them gen-
erate and implement creative solutions that are
different than yours.

— Be sure employees are aware of your expecta-
tions for results.

— Check in with employees periodically to sup-
port their progress. Not to micromanage them.
There are some organisational cultures that are
low on standardisation with limited polices and
procedures that need to be standardised to cre-
ate efficiencies of scale and quality products
and services. Then there are other cultures that
thrive on non-standardisation because vision,
imagination and originality are important con-
stituents of their success.

There is another type of organisational culture
that is very committed to policies and proce-
dures and centralised decision making proto-
cols. In highly scripted environments like
these, when it makes sense, you can seek to bal-
ance your need to impose policies and proce-
dures with deliberate attempts to develop and
stretch your employees.

Based on my experience, empowered employ-
ees are critical thinkers, decisive, imaginative,
results driven, accountable, self-motivated and
sometimes better leaders because of construc-
tive empowerment initiatives.

Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational Soul, an HR
Consulting and Leadership Development company.
if you are interested in exploring how you can create
a platform for empowerment, you contact her at

www.orgsoul.com.



DR Michael Darville address the audience at the recent health sym-
posium held at Doctors Hospital.

Nassau, Bahamas

Jet Ski

RENEWAL OF COMMERICAL RECREATIONAL WATER CRAFT

REG NO.

APPLICANT

NP: BB 10 PI Forbes Randy

NP: B 10 PI

NP: PS8PI

P.O. Box EE-
17789
Nassau, Bahamas

Forbes Randy
P.O. Box EE-
17789

Nassau, Bahamas

Johnson Cedric
P.O. Box N-3426
Nassau, Bahamas

BANANA BOAT

BOAT NAME USE

“Family Circle” Rental
18ft
Boston Whaler

“Banana”
17ft
Banana Boat

“U.F.O” Rental
28ft
Para sail

Signed: Captain Anthony J. Allens

Port Controller



to go ahead and start resusci-
tating.”

He said according to the
Health Care Act regarding
patients’ rights which was last
revised in 2000, patients have
the right to privacy, trans-
parency regarding their prac-
titioners background, and the
right to information on vari-
ous medical procedures.

However in the absence of
advance directives, the deci-
sions should the patient end
up in a non-communicative
state is legally that of their
family or legal representative.

However no clarity is
offered to determine which
family member has to make
that decision, giving way to
further disputes within that
family.

Dr Darville asked: “Is it my
wife who decides, is it my
mother, is it my brother who
I owe $1,000, or is it the first
relative who walks through
the doors at the hospital.”

Regardless to this debate
however, if the patient
requires immediate surgery
and the family or legal rep-
resentative can’t be reached,
then the doctor makes that
call on surgery he said.

In the existence of an
advance directive by the
patient, Dr Darville said the
physician’s obligation to the
patient should always be in
providing palliative care. This
means that whether a patient
requested medical interven-
tion or not, they should be
made as comfortable as pos-

sible in a way which doesn’t
seek to eliminate their dis-
ease or illness, but rather to
minimise the effects of its
symptoms.

Overall, Dr Darville indi-
cated that in an effort to bring
about a greater awareness of
advanced directives, there
now exist an ethics committee
of which he is a part and said
they have planned a number
of seminars to educate more
persons on the issues.

He said apart from the
important family discussion
on advance directives and
post-mortem decisions, mak-
ing your decisions clear to
your physician is also an
important step in formulat-
ing and having your impor-
tant wishes executed.
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

TUESDAY, APRIL 14TH 2009, PAGE 7C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

walil (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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Gey ke ORLANDO | i Ankara, Turkey 64/17 43/6 pe so/i2 34/1 r — ABACO Today: 8 at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
_ High: 84° F/29° ¢ ~ Windy with partial Partly cloudy, breezy Mostly sunny. Sunshine with a Mostly sunny and Mostly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 67/19 54/12 sh 63/17 50/10 sh Wednesday: $ at 15-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
va Low:61°F/16°C sunshine. and humid. t-storm possible. pleasant. breezy. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 68/20 54/12 sh 67/19 53/11 pc
A : : ° ° ° ° Bangkok 91/32 80/26 sh 93/33 79/26 pc
un — Oe eeeeas : High: S High: - ic ev High: a Barbados 85/29 75/23 s SO TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
TAMPA — ey ' High: 88 Low: 75 Low: 72 Low: 67 Low: 69 Low: 72 ea OSE Barcelona 63/17 50/10 s 61/16 49/9 sh
Vera: ae y ETc Teel Beiii
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High: 81° F/27°C . \ = 100° F [baer | _108°-80° Fs 94°-65° F 81°-72° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft Beirut 79/26 63/17 ¢ 67/19 60/15 pc
Low: 62° F/17°C -. / The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines : effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 11:42am. 23 5:47am. 04 Belarad 60/15 46/7 73/22 49/9
. Lo elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low forthe day, Fn 5:43pm. 04 o gia e pe S
re @ : \ P Berlin 72/22 51/10 s 75/23 52/11 s
a rh Ue Wednesday2 12am. 26 633am. 05 Bermuda 65/18 64/17 pe 73/22 6A/17 +
, “ ) =e “2:27pm. 22 6:30pm. 05 Bogota 65/18 47/8 + 66/18 47/8 +
3 “RY C Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thurstay TQ2am. 25 723am. 06 Brussels 72/22 52/11 sh 73/22 52/11 pe
{ bs ABACO Temperature 17pm. 241 7:25pm. 06 Budapest 74/23 7/8 s 72/22 49/9 s
f a oo High:87°F/31° C NGM, ees sces cnet: tacerseree tac vgasce tcceeass, 84° F/29° C Frida 7:56 am. 74 Stoam. 06 Buenos Aires 70/21 54/12 s 72/22 61/16 s
Z es ee 4° LOW escssssnne 73° F/23° C Y o%5pm. 21 82pm. 06 Cairo 99/37 61/16 pc 84/28 61/16 pc
’ — ei i Normal high .... 81° F/27° C —E——— ES Calcutta 99/37 79/26 s 99/37 77/25 s
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‘_ Normal low 69° F/20° C Calgary 42/5 25/-3 c 41/5 23/-5 pe
of _ @ WEST PALM BEACH Oo. Last year's High... ssnsrstenesenssee 89° F/31° C SUE). Cancun 88/31 73/22 s 91/32 71/21 s @
— High:87° F/31°C , Last year's low Heene eae 73° F/23° C " " Caracas 82/27 69/20 pc 81/27 70/21 s Los Angeles,
Low: 68° F/20° C =} Precipitation, a ease erally ot Casablanca 70/21 52/11 5 6719 51/10 pe 68/50
As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... eects tess teense 0.00" SU PM. won NSS Copenhagen 64/17 50/10 c 56/13 44/6 pc
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT tla Year to date 07" Last New First Dublin 52/11 41/5 sh 50/10 43/6 +
High: 86° F/30° C @ High: 86° F/30° C Normal year to date oo... 6.19 , Frankfurt 77/25 50/10 pc 79/26 48/8 pc
Low: 72° F/22°C Low: 73° F/23° C Geneva 65/18 48/8 sh 70/21 52/11 pe
AccuWeather.com Halifax 44/6 24/-4 46/7 27/-2 hues
hi @ Forecasts and graphics provided by Havana 91/32 68/20 s 91/32 68/20 t T-storms 88/72
by MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr. 17 Apr. 24 May 1 Helsinki 50/10 34/1 c 43/6 32/0 pc Rain Fronts
High: 88° F/31°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 79/26 72/22 sh 79/26 70/21 t Fae nice - See
Low: 72° F/22°C NASSAU High: 88° F/31°C Islamabad 90/32 64/17 c 93/33 61/16 c ee Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
ow: 72° F/ X : j Low: 76° F/24°C aaa 68/20 49/9 r 53/11 48/8 sh Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm -fitnfiintia
High: 88° F/31° C i [e_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mengeni
Low: 75° F/24°C Jerusalem 90/32 51/10 pc 6417 49/99 s
. Johannesburg 68/20 50/10 pc 70/21 51/10 s -10s| -0s {03") 10s | 20s [B0si) 40s
KEY WEST @ i. CATISLAND Kingston 86/30 76/24 s 86/30 76/24 s
High: 85° F/29°C J 7 7 Lima 81/27 66/18 pc 82/27 65/18 c
Low: 75° F/24°C —_ High: 83° F/28° C London 63/17 46/7 pc 64/17 50/10 +
: @ Low: 69° F/21°C Madrid 5915 41/5 1 57/13 37/2 sh
: Manila 95/35 77/25 sh 87/30 79/26 t AU ie) N iS 8 4 AN C im
st Mexico City 81/27 54/12 t 81/27 47/8 s
sage Monterrey 90/32 61/16 pc 96/385 67/19 s
a GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 521 30/-1 s 5412 32/0 s
High: 86° F/30° C High: 88° F/31°C Moscow 55/12 36/2 pe 61/16 36/2 pc
; Low:73°F/23°C Ry goer °C Munich 74/23 40/4 s 74/23 40/4 s
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS , Nairobi 86/30 60/15 pc 86/30 60/15 sh V
highs and tonights's lows. High: 90° F/32°C . New Delhi 113/45 72/22 s 108/42 77/25 s e er S Our
Low: 77° F/25°C © Oslo 52/11 41/5 sh 46/77 40/4 + a a“ { O U S !
Paris 68/20 52/11 sh 70/21 50/10 sh i j
Prague 72/22 42/5 s 69/20 41/5 s 7 *
LONGISLAND Rio de Janeiro 82/27 70/21 sh 77/25 67/9 +
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Today Wadnestay Today Werinasitay Toy Wadhestiay MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 85/29 74/23 s 83/28 75/23 s ‘emembe: aber tl ‘the Smart choice is
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 88° F/31°C San Juan 88/31 61/16 s 89/31 61/16 s
Fic F/C Fc F/C Fie F/C Fe FIC FC FIC Fe FIC Low: 71° F/22°C Sc at i s tea naan pe . surance Management.
Albuquerque 74/23 47/8 c 6618 39/3 pc Indianapolis 521 38/3 4+ 58/14 43/6 c Philadelphia 49/9 42/5 + 49/9 38/3 1 ; antago S S ,
Anchorage 40/4 33/0 45/7 32/0 pc Jacksonville 78/25 51/10 t 74/23 49/9 s Phoenix 88/31 63/17 c 74/23 50/10 pe CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Santo Domingo 88/31 70/21 s 85/29 69/2008 JJ “Smart peo you can trust.
Atlanta 66/18 43/6 po 65/18 46/7 s Kansas City 63/17 40/4 s 69/20 5110 pc Pittsburgh = 54/12 44/6 r= 58/14 36/2 RAGGEDISLAND Tigh:91°F/33°c — ee ee -
Atlantic City 48/8 42/5 + 47/8 36/2 + Las Vegas 79/26 49/9 po 64/17 48/8 c Portland,OR 5140 39/3 pe 54/12 40/4 pc High: 89° F/32° C Low: 73° F/23°C Sikh eet 3 at P oui a : ;
Baltimore 50/10 42/5 +r 49/9 36/2 1 Little Rock 67/19 45/7 peo 72/22 52/1 $s Raleigh-Durham 61/16 48/8 t 59/115 40/4 c Low:69°F/21°C aa — 73/99 63/17 . 77/25 59/15 pe
Boston 54/12 30/3 pc 49/9 37/2 pc LosAngeles 68/20 5010 pc 66/18 5010 s St.Louis 54/12 40/4 c 6317 478s ae 1 SRENRSDUEh — ae ON INSURANCE Mi AN AGEMENT
Buffalo 5442 35/1 pe 5542 34/1 pc Louisville 56/13 42/5 + 60/15 45/7 c Salt Lake City 57/13 39/3 1 45/7 35/1 sn GREAT INAGUA Tawa 63/17 59/15 + 68/20 54/12 :
Charleston, SC 77/25 53/11 t 71/21 45/7 s Memphis 62/16 47/8 pe 70/21 5110 s San Antonio 80/26 59/15 pe 78/25 60/15 pc High: 90° F/32° C aaa 54/12 35/1 p 51/10 37/2 pc (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 48/8 36/2 r 5442 40/4 pc Miami 88/31 72/22 s 86/30 67/19 t San Diego 6317 5542 pe 66/18 54/12 pc Low 72°F22°C Trinidad 84/28 72/22 c 85/29 67/19 pc
Cleveland 52/11 41/5 r 56/13 37/2 pe Minneapolis 62/16 38/3 s 6417 43/6 pc San Francisco 60/15 45/7 s 55/12 46/7 s i Tana 53/11 39/3 p 53/11 37/2 s f | Pr 7 Hl Grand Bahar Ah | th q Fy
Dallas 77/25 55/12 s 77/25 57/13 pe _Nashwille B42 41/5 c 6246 44/6 pc Seattle 5010 37/2 pe 53/11 40/4 pe Gene 68/20 53/11 s 73/29 54/12 ¢ EW TTOVIGECE t nto eUInEr Uma
Denver 68/20 39/3 pe 65/18 34/1 c NewOrleans 73/22 5442 s 76/24 50/15 s Tallahassee 78/25 «48/8 t 75/23 «48/8 s ear 65/18 47/8 61/16 39/3 Ht (247) 502-6400 Ih Nt) i) 3500 | Tek (247) 367-4204 ek (2 (242) 332-2862 Tel (24 (247) 336-2304
Detroit 52/11 40/4 + 6045 37/2 po New York 52/11 43/6 + 52/41 43/6 =r ‘Tampa 81/27 62/16 t 77/25 58/14 s Winnipeg 58/14 36/2 pc 61/16 39/3 pc ‘
Honolulu 83/28 70/21 pc 81/27 69/20 pc Oklahoma City 75/23 50/10 s 78/25 53/11 pe Tucson 84/28 59/15 c 75/23 46/7 $ : ————
Houston 80/26 57/13 s 82/27 62/16 pc Orlando 84/28 61/16 t 82/27 56/13 s Washington, DC 51/10 44/6 + S010 393 r+ Nh ee ee
PAGE 8C, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







it a eee ee
eee

Know that:

Mangroves and. Wetlands provide nesting
and shelter habitat for crabs, birds, fish and
other marine organisms.

Save OUr Mangroves and wetlands.



@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

GORGEOUS name brand clothing, jewelry
bags and shoes- sounds like every woman’s
dream shopping list for a trip to Los Angeles.
However, Bahamian women can now save that
ticket money and head on down to the Pri-
madona events at Gray Cliff Restaurant.

Tyrina Neely, owner of Pri-
madona, has been hosting Pri-
madona Designer Sales since
July of 2008. Originally the sales
were held every third month but
due to popular demand they will
now be held every other month
with private clearance sales for
Primadona subscribers.

Primadona carries mostly con-
temporary brands such as Diane
von Furstenberg, Calypso by
Christianne Celle, Betsey John-
son, Kenneth Cole NY, Free
People, Alice+Olivia and many
others. Ms Neely also carries
Igigi, a designer plus size brand
.xclusively in The Bahamas.

“My aim is to provide not

only beautiful designer clothing
and accessories for women that
they cannot find here on the
island at great prices but also to
provide a comfortable, elegant
setting for them to do so. Gray-
cliff provides a beautiful back-
drop to the event, but is also
very accessible which makes it a
great location,” Ms Neely said.
Literally translated in Italian,
Ms Neely explained that the
word “Primadona” means
“First Lady”, but it also has spe-
cial significance to in her life.
“T had tossed around a few
names and none of them really
resonated with me. There was
one day I recalled a small argu-

Air Conditioning
Company

ee eh

e* 3/8”
~

Stein

rT NOW
ay | eeaattseeeee aed)

SKN Coane

Tonique Williams-Darling Highway

Tel: 242.341.KOOL (5665) + Fax: 242.341.7378



PRIMADONA Designer Sales
hosted at Graycliff are now held
every other month Tyrina Neely.
Pictured are women attending
the last Primadona event.

ment I had with my mother
when I was younger. I have two
younger sisters and was most
likely throwing a temper
tantrum and accusing her of not
giving me enough attention
compared to them. She looked
at me and responded — “Tyrina,
you are the one we shell out
thousands for to get braces —
you are the one who we shuttle
to the dermatologist every time
you get a pimple...you are the
Prima dona!

‘What that said to me was
you are special, you are loved
and you are important to us.
Which is how every female
should feel and the whole aim
of Primadona’s shopping events
is to put women on a pedestal
and give them an event
designed to allow them to cater
to themselves. I fell in love with
the name Primadona and ran
with it,” Ms Neely said.

Ms Neely said due to the fact
that she always had a deep
interest in fashion, she attended
the Fashion Institute of Tech-
nology in New York where she
really developed a deep interest
and knowledge base of design-
ers.

“They say necessity is the
mother of invention. When I
decided to move home last July,
the biggest fear I had was not
being able to find the clothing I
like at prices I would be able to
afford. When I thought about
it, I realised that there had to be
many women like me whose
need for quality, contemporary
designer clothing at great prices
were not being met, forcing
them to travel abroad to shop.
Primadona fills that need local-
ly,” Ms Neely said.

Although many of the pieces
at the event retail for up to
$400, Ms Neely said she is trying
to let Bahamian women experi-
ence high end labels for what
others would never dream of
selling them for.

“The whole idea is making
quality designer apparel and
accessories available at afford-
able prices. The current eco-
nomic environment is ripe for a
new business model such as this.
Honestly, savvy shoppers in
New York City hardly ever pay
full retail price for designer
clothing and I never did when I
lived in New York for over 4
years and I wanted to bring this
distinct way of shopping to my
home,” Ms Neely said.

Ms Neely said although Pri-
madona attracts a broad cus-
tomer base, she finds her inspi-
ration for the business due to
her passion for fashion.

“T feel all women are prima
donas. From the art teacher, to
the stay at home mom to the
doctor and the entrepreneur.
Not only does the event pro-
vide the opportunity to pur-
chase great pieces at unbeat-
able prices — it has also become
a networking event. Seeing
women get excited about the
merchandise I offer and looking
forward to the sales is a huge
inspiration for me. I always
envisioned myself as an entre-
preneur in the fashion industry
—I just had no idea I would get
into it at this age, it’s a dream in
the early stages of fruition,” Ms
Neely said.

Ms Neely said although there
are not any major barriers to
enter this business — it does
require a knowledge base of
fashion and also knowledge and
familiarity of the NY, LA and
European fashion districts.

“T would love to host Pri-
madona’s designer sales once
per month and really start to
make it a bigger, grander event
because the shopping events
have morphed into networking
events in a sense. I would love
to play into that element a little
more and that is something I
am currently working on. We
are also introducing men’s mer-
chandise this year starting with
the introduction of high end
sneakers and casual wear for
men at the next sale which is
scheduled for Friday, May
29th,” Ms Neely said.






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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Two men dead in weekend violence C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.116TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER WINDYWITH SUNSHINE HIGH 88F LOW 75F BAHAMASTHIRDINMEDALTABLE CARIFTA GAMES FROMSTLUCIA from St Lucia S P O R T S The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR McFLURRY TWIX MIX www.tribune242.com I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate Stabbing and shooting incidents claim lives MAKINGFRIENDSWITHTHEEASTERBUNNY n By ALISON LOWE and MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporters VIOLENCE claimed the lives of two men over the Easter weekend prompting murder inquiries into the fatal stabbing of an 18-year-old man at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre and the shooting of an unidentified man found dead in a car. Richard Bremmer, 18, of Pinewood Gardens, New Prov idence, was stabbed multiple times in the chest after attending a car rally at the Queen Eliz abeth Sports Centre race track on Sunday, prompting witness es to call for more vigilant policing of the popular sports arena. Police maintain that the teenager was attacked by a group of men and stabbed sev eral times when he accidentally THECAR in which the stabbing victim tried to escape at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page eight CHILDREN meet the Easter Bunny at the weekend as the holiday was celebrated at Ardastra Gardens. SEEPAGESIXFORMOREPHOTOS n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net SEVERAL fires threatened h omes throughout New Providence yesterday despite the efforts of firemen who have been fighting them all weekend. A ccording to fire officials, one of them an enormous b ush fire was burning across several hundred acres adjacent t o Carmichael Road, west of Bacardi Road and east of C oral Harbour. Yesterday firefighters were “ p rioritising” the protection of threatened residences on the southern side of Carmichael Road. “Two fire units and their r espective crews have been Homes are threatened by enormous bush fire F irefighters tackling blazes over the weekend SEE page 10 n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net HUNDREDS of unemployed persons signed up for financial assistance from the first national unemployment benefit scheme when registration opened to the first wave of applicants on Saturday. A total of 774 job seekers put their names down to claim a share of the $20 million National Insurance Unemployment Benefit Fund, as 489 made their applications at four venues in New Providence and2 85 attended two application centres in Grand Bahama. L abour Minister Dion Foulkes and National Insurance Board (NIB consultant actuary Derek Osborne said they had expected more to attend the first registration day after the scheme was rushed through Parliament in recent months, but believe some may have been held back by Hundreds sign up for national unemplo yment benef it sc heme SEE page 10 Dion Foulkes n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net STAKEHOLDERS are optimistic that the threatened tourism industry is “beginning to turn around a little bit”, according to the Minister of Tourism with Easter holiday bookings having been “far better than expected”. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said yesterday that there is “no question” that Easter saw much greater tourism arrival numbers than those in the industry had expected based on what they were seeing earEaster holiday bookings ‘far better than expected’ SEE page eight A YOUNGAmerican visitor has died in Harbour Island as a result of injuries suffered when she fell off a golf cart. Adela Holmes Cooke, 18, of North Carolina was taken to a local clinic where she was pronounced dead, according to a police report. She had been vacationing with friends at a private residence on the Eleutheran island, a North Carolina newspaper, The Post and Courier , reported. There was some discrepancy over the date and time that the incident occurred, with Bahamian police stating that the 18 year old fell off the cart, the most popular form of transportation for tourists on the island, at around 2am Friday. American visitor dies after falling off golf cart SEE page eight n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net FULFILLING an election promise on Cuba, President Oba ma yesterday lifted several key restrictions to allow more travel, telecommunication linkages and remittances from the United States to the island. Signalling what some see as a significant chink in the United States policy hindering interaction between Americans and companies with the Communistrun island, the decision rolls back stricter rules established under former President George W. Bush. At present it applies only to Cuban-Americans with families in Cuba. However, the President’s announcement does not dismantle the broader, decades-long trade embargo or general ban on Obama lifts several key Cuba restrictions SEE page eight n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net REDUNDANT hotel workers who lost their jobs in the economic slump can claim up to $1,500 in benefits from a major relief programme launched on Thursday. The Bahamas Hotel and Allied Industries (BHAI Benefits Fund announced the largest individual benefits assistance payout in its history, as it will cover the mortgage payments, loans, utilities and Relief for redundant hotel workers SEE page 10

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The removal of three Grand Bahama teachers over complaints of alleged molestation of students is of great concern for officials at the Bahamas Union of Teachers in Freeport. Quentin LaRhoda, BUT area vice president, said the union does not support sexual conduct between teachers and students, but is also worried that its members may be subject to false accusations. “The children are precious and should be protected against predators, but we have concerns also about teachers being accused falsely and having their reputation tarnished,” he said. In view of this, Ministry of Education officials recently warned educators about ensuring that their interactions with students do not cause their integrity to be called into question. This comes after allegations of molestation at Eight Mile Rock High School surfaced in January when two former male students made a complaint to police, accusing a male teacher of sexually molesting them for a period eight years, which they claim started when they were in seventh grade. Andre Birbal, the Trinidadian teacher, accused of molesting the two male students, fled the country after submitting his resignation in February. He is currently being sought by Bahamian police to be questioned in connection with accusations of committing acts of unnatural sexual intercourse. In the meantime, Police have also launched investigations into alleged molestation complaints against two other teachers at the school. The teachers – a female and another male have been removed from the school. Mr LaRhoda said Education Minister Carl Bethel, with psychologist Dr David Allen, met with Grand Bahama teachers to give them proper guidelines concerning their conduct with students. “Teachers were told to modify their behaviour so as not to put themselves in a position where their integrity will be put in question,” he said. Mr LaRhoda said that the issue of molestation in the schools is “new territory for everyone” in the education system. “We need to try and find a way to address this. We never had circumstances where allegations are so outlandish. “We need all stakeholders working together with the Min istry of Education to come up with a plan or system to remove predators from the system, but at the same time protect people who are being falsely accused,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Mr. T. Baswell Donaldson, CBE, C hairman of Commonwealth Bank Limited, is pleased to announce the following appointment: www.combankltd.com “Leader in Personal Banking Services” M rs. Mavis A. Burrows was appointed t o the position of Vice-President, Operations on March 1, 2009. Mrs. Burrows has over thirty-ve years of banking experience and has been with Commonwealth Bank since 1987. During her tenure with the bank, she h as held various management positions, the most recent being the Assistant Vice-President, Operations. Mrs. Burrows has attended numerous courses and seminars in management and leadership both locally and abroad,and achieved a Masters of Business Administration Degree in 2004 from the University of Miami.In 2008, she completed the Richard Ivey School o f Business Program for Executives in London Ontario, Canada. Mrs. Burrows is married to Mr.E.K. Burrows and they have three children and three grandchildren.Mrs. Mavis A. Burrows, MBA Vice-President, Operations Appointment BUTvoices concern over complaints of alleged molestation of students T T h h e e c c h h i i l l d d r r e e n n a a r r e e p p r r e e c c i i o o u u s s a a n n d d s s h h o o u u l l d d b b e e p p r r o o t t e e c c t t e e d d a a g g a a i i n n s s t t p p r r e e d d a a t t o o r r s s , , b b u u t t w w e e h h a a v v e e c c o o n n c c e e r r n n s s a a l l s s o o a a b b o o u u t t t t e e a a c c h h e e r r s s b b e e i i n n g g a a c c c c u u s s e e d d f f a a l l s s e e l l y y a a n n d d h h a a v v i i n n g g t t h h e e i i r r r r e e p p u u t t a a t t i i o o n n t t a a r r n n i i s s h h e e d d . . Q uentin LaRhoda, BUT area vice president

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n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A VISITINGUnited States Congressman admitted in Nassau Thursday that his country is not “winning” the war on drugs into which it has poured billions of dollars and needs a fresh approach if it is to reverse “flatlining, if not diminishing” successes. D emocrat John Conyers Jr, in the Bahamas since Tuesday, indicated that with a new administration in Washington the time seemed right for members of the Judiciary Committee, which he chairs, to initiate a “critical examination” of how the country’s anti-drug efforts may bee nhanced in the face of unabated consumer demand for the illicit products in the United States. “The problem and the truth is that we are not winning the drug war. The United States has put hundreds of billions of dollars in over the years...and it doesn’t amount to what we can come before you with a straight face and say we are winning,” said Mr Conyers. With this in mind he and several other members of Congress came to this country and Haiti, both considered “major transit points” on a “fact finding mission” and intend to go back to Washington to try to shape the counter-narcotics strategy of the new administration headed by President Barack Obama. The group, which also included Congresswomen Jan Schakowsky, Donna Christensen and Congressman Lamar Smith, met last week with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, as well as other elected officials, the police and prosecutors in both countries to discuss issues that exacerbate the drug scourge. “Notwithstanding the very good relations that we enjoy between our two countries we have to get to know each other better so we can become more intimately aware of the kind of problems that we’ve got to be able to overcome,” said Mr Conyers. The Congressman spoke with The Tribune at a luncheon with Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette, as well as National Security Minister Tommy Turn quest, Attorney General Michael Barnett and other Bahamian and US Government officials on Thursday before leaving to return to Washington, DC. The second most senior member in the House of Representa tives and a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus, Mr Conyers admitted that drug trafficking through the Bahamas and Haiti still constitutes a “tremendous problem created and exaggerated by the consumer demand in the United States.” Calling Haiti the “most wretched nation” Mr Conyers, who has a history of promoting Haitian development in Congress, noted that the group’s latest visit to the impoverished island state was an opportunity to appreciate the “enormity of the challenge that’s in front of us there” in terms of reducing the flow of illegal narcotics. “We have (in Haiti broken system of justice and law enforcement and penitentiaries. It’s hard to even talk about where we begin, but you’ve got to understand where you are before you can determine how you’re going to fix things,” said the Con gressman. Meanwhile, in the Bahamas, Congress members found the issues that feed into the drug problem “are of a completely dif ferent dimension to those in Haiti” but also complex, he said, referring to this country’s struggle with illegal migration and effectively policing its vast waters. He said that all countries affected must “pull together” in a systemic way if any dent is to be made in drug flows with erad ication at the source, for example in Colombia, interdiction in the transit points, such as the Bahamas and Haiti, and reduction in demand in the United States all key. “All of this is hooked up together so you can’t just take one little piece of it and show some successes and say ‘Boy, this is really great’ when really it doesn’t matter much one way or the other unless you can create a systemic overall strategy so that you’re going at everything as much as you can at the same time.” According to Mr Conyers, the group expects to coordinate further “extensive discussions and conferences” both in the Caribbean and Washington to further refine its approach to assisting the countries in fighting the scourge. Speaking at the luncheon, Mr Symonette emphasised the Bahamas’ appreciation for the US Government’s stated com mitment to promoting stability in Haiti, which has knock on effects for the Bahamas, and to drug interdiction efforts. His comments echoed those of Prime Minister Hubert Ingra ham, who addressed the Con gressional delegation at a dinner in their honour on Wednesday. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 3 THREE men are in custody today after a high speed boat chase in Exuma ended with police seizing cocaine and marijuana stashed inside an 18-foot vessel. A 48-year-old Jamaican, a 32 year-old Androsian and a 32year-old Nassauvian travelling on board the boat were all picked up by police in connection with the find while a fourth man escaped by jumping overboard. The boat contained four taped packages of cocaine and 20 bails of marijuana. Police said the chase took place in Barretarre, Exuma, shortly after midnight on Saturday. Exuma officers and members of the Drug Enforcement Unit spotted the vessel. Police are actively seeking the fourth man. Visiting US congressman says his country is not winning drugs war Three held after boat chase and drug seizure In brief n B y DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – A fire in West End destroyed two wooden structures and causede xtensive damage to a third on Easter Friday. Supt Clyde Nixon reported t hat no one was hurt. H e said one of the struct ures was an abandoned building. The other two struct ures were owned by Sherry mae Hield and Dimonique Bannister. S upt Nixon said firemen were dispatched to the scene, where they saw three wooden s tructures on fire. He said no electricity had been supplied to the abandoned building or to the b uilding owned by Mr Bannister at the time of the fire. Both buildings were com-p letely destroyed. He noted that Ms Hield’s home, which had electricity,w as extensively damaged. Police are investigating the cause of the fire. Fire in West End destroys buildings P OLICE are investigating an armed robbery that occurred in the Hunters area of Freeport on Sunday. According to police, a man reported that sometime around 12.30am he was held up by two men armed with a handgun. The culprits robbed him of $65 cash. He said one of the suspects was of medium complexion, and the other of dark com plexion. Investigations are continuing into the matter. Ar med r obbery is investigated Democrat John Conyers Jr (AP T T h h e e p p r r o o b b l l e e m m a a n n d d t t h h e e t t r r u u t t h h i i s s t t h h a a t t w w e e a a r r e e n n o o t t w w i i n n n n i i n n g g t t h h e e d d r r u u g g w w a a r r . . T T h h e e U U n n i i t t e e d d S S t t a a t t e e s s h h a a s s p p u u t t h h u u n n d d r r e e d d s s o o f f b b i i l l l l i i o o n n s s o o f f d d o o l l l l a a r r s s i i n n o o v v e e r r t t h h e e y y e e a a r r s s . . . . . . a a n n d d i i t t d d o o e e s s n n t t a a m m o o u u n n t t t t o o w w h h a a t t w w e e c c a a n n c c o o m m e e b b e e f f o o r r e e y y o o u u w w i i t t h h a a s s t t r r a a i i g g h h t t f f a a c c e e a a n n d d s s a a y y w w e e a a r r e e w w i i n n n n i i n n g g . . Democrat John Conyers Jr speaks out in Nassau

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Yesterday’s Nassau Guardian, (6th April an article, reporting on the most recent, Standard & Poor’s economic projections for the Bahamas and the Caribbean, through to the year 2010; the report is consistently bleak. They rated Jamaica as the worst and the Bahamas only slightly a head of Jamaica, in terms of improved and projected eco-n omic conditions, with all the others doing, and projected to do, far better than us. I ask then: How and why did we get in this position? We have always led the Caribbean, in all facets of advanced and improved economic development and have always boasted of a better tourism and development product; a far higher than average, per capita income and generally a far better way of life than allo ur Caribbean neighbours; including many parts of the great United States of America. Pray tell me then, what has happened to us? I’ll tell you what happened to us, the FNM came to power in 2007, when it was projected, by the same S & P and the IMF that we would experience a GDP growth of almost five per cent and they blew it; that is what happened to us. The projections, in the report in question, are that we will have negative growth of at least two per cent in this current year, of 2009 and one per cent next year, 2010. This spells whether we wish to hear it or not doom and gloom for the next two years in our growth, and with prices of essentials and other services skyrocketing everyday, I won’t hold out much hope for many of our brothers and sisters, surviving. The misery index is already at an all time high and climbing every day, as friends and neighbours fall through the cracks; much of it deserved, because of the many reckless decisions theyh ave made, but many, unfortunately, are and will be the victims of circumstances. In its last report on the Bahamas, S & P had to defend itself against the scurrilous attacks and charges of “bias” levelled against them by, the FNM’s, Ingraham and Laing. I am just wondering what will they have to say about this most recent bleak report? S & P, whether they realised it or not, accused the FNM and its policies, adopted just after winning the elections in 2007, of causing the erosion of investor confidence and of steam rolling the growth momentum, which was carried over and which they inherited, from the Christie administra tion. Their “stop; amend; review and cancel” policy destroyed our economy and took it into a tail spin from which we will probably not recover until they are removed from power and the PLP takes over again. Lest we forget, the PLP had to bail the country out of the economic doldrums after they defeated the FNM in the general elections, of 2002. The FNM left us with nothing but a huge national debt, which they r an up in their 10 years in power-between 1992 and 2002 by their reckless borrowing ands pending of $1.255 billion, and it seems we (PLP do it again, come 2012 or before. What can I say? The country is saddled with a bunch of sorry misfits running its affairs and every day the hole they are digging for us is getting deeper and deeper. We seem to be headed nowhere in particular. The country is like a sailing schooner with its sails all hoisted but not trimmed, the wind blowing fiercely but it has no rudder and she is just left there, flapping in t he wind and going nowhere. The only thing this FNM gov-e rnment seems to know how to do well is borrow money and spend it; increase taxes on the Bahamian poor and fire public sector workers and call it restructuring. Obama has ordered pay cuts and freezes for his cabinet; Turks & Caicos Islands ordereda 15 per cent cut in pay for its cabinet just before Britain fired all of them; Jamaica’s prime minister has just ordered as alary freeze, took a 15 per cent pay cut himself and a 10 per cent cut for the remaining cabinet personnel, but Ingraham and Laing? What have they done? Nothing, of course; they continue to collect their $8000$10,000 per month salaries as if the bad times are only for the poor and needy in the country. They should have led the way in taking a 50 per cent cut in their pay. None of them know what to do with $8000 per month anyway, except to hoard it. Their life styles leave much to be desired and besides, on a scale of one to 10, their performance, in my view, is about one and one half. If there was ever a good example of “dumb and dumber”: well you are the judge. FORRESTER J CARROLL Freeport, Grand Bahama, April 8, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm CONGRESSMAN John Conyers, Jr. chairm an of the Judiciary Committee in Washington, w as in Nassau last week on a fact-finding mission to formulate a new policy for his country’s fight against drugs. While in Nassau he also visited Haiti, a nother transshipment island from which drugs are siphoned into the US he admitted thatt he US is not winning the drug war. Faced with the “unabated consumer demand” in the US f or illicit drugs, his committee wants to develop new strategies to turn around a defeat that has already cost America billions of dollars. Not only is America losing the war on drugs, it is also losing the war on gun trafficking, which i s contributing to crime on our streets and aiding the escalation of violent crime throughout t he Caribbean. Not only is America’s belief in its constitutional right to bear arms a menace to o ur islands, but it is a monumental problem even for the United States. Yet that country’s gun lobby, which must have its ammunition, seems to have the nation in a headlock from which it can’t free itself. One only has to switch on the TV to see the problem the US is having on its borders with Mexicans trafficking guns and drugs. William Hoover, assistant director for field o perations at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, testified in the House of Representatives that "there is more than enough evidence to indicate that over 90 per cent of the firearms that have either been recov ered in, or interdicted in transport to Mexico, originated from various sources within the Unit ed States." Yet the drug and gun wars continue, the first b ecause of Americans inordinate thirst for drugs, the second because Americans seem to think they have a God-given right to carry arms. Not only are Americans suffering, but we are all injured by the fall-out. Recently 13 people were killed in Binghamton, New York, by a man who collected guns the US constitution gave him that right but one only had to look at a photograph of his troubled face to question the sanity of the person or persons who sold him those guns. This year marks 10 years since a high school student with a gun killed fellow students at Columbine High School and only two years ago when the massacre was mimicked at Virginia Tech. According to The New York Times “in the last month, shootings have claimed the lives of more than 50 Americans.” Forty-six years ago President John F Kennedy was assassinated, foll owed four years later by his attorney general b rother. In 1981 President Ronald Reagan was the first US president to survive an assassination attempt, which left his Press Secretary James B rady crippled for life. A move was made at that time to change A merica’s gun laws, but the gun lobby would not be budged from its belief in an American’s r ight to bear arms. This right is claimed from a clause written more than 200 years ago into the US Constitution by the Founding Fathers to take care of a young country in which there was no standing army. T hose were the days when if the state were threatened the farmer had to hitch up his britch e s, drop his pitch fork, grab his fire arm and defend his neighbours. In that situation every m an had to be armed and on the ready to meet the foe. That situation does not exist today. The nation not only has a standing army, but a well armed national guard, police force and various other armed services. Mr Joe Blow citizen, and his fusillade is no longer needed. It is more than likely that if the Founding Fathers were drafting the Constitution in the context of today, that clause would not e ven have been considered. On March 30 Mr Darwin Dottin, chairman of the Association of Caribbean Commissioners of Police, and Commissioner of Police in Barbados, signed a Memorandum of Understanding with US Charges d’Affaires Brent Hardt, formerly Charges d’Affaires in the Bahamas, with a US law enforcement agency eTrace that will greatly improve that country’s ability to trace a nd fight firearms trafficking. According to Mr Dottin there is a direct link between the rise in violent crime in the Caribbean and gun traf ficking. The Caribbean is now catching up with the Bahamas, which three to four years ago signed on to eTrace. Not only does Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson find the system beneficial, but there have been occasions when persons attempting to ship high powered guns into our islands have been intercepted, and their plans thwarted. However, everyone’s existence would be made that much safer if America would put its constitution into the context of 200 years ago and realise that today all of us themselves included would be better off it their citizens were disarmed. Our country is being run by sorry misfits LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net America’s right to arms a threat EDITOR, The Tribune. I’d like to bring the following matter to the attention of the Ministry of Transport, Road Traffic Department or whoever is responsible for the horrible traffic light situation around the island. I, unfortunately, cannot attest to the major ity of stop lights on New Providence, as I live near Montagu Beach, but I have seen similar letters in your newspaper in times past from disgruntled drivers who move through our streets. I am a frequent traveller in the East Bay/Shirley Street/Village Road area. The stop lights, when they work, are terribly out of sync and because of this, traffic from three onwards absolutely crawls from the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre and sometimes beyond that point. When one finally manages to make a right hand turn onto the Vil lage Road extension and the green signal is in sight, immediately the light at Village Road and Shirley Street turns red, thus allowing no cars that have been backed up on East Bay to move ahead. Similarly frustrating are the lights at Bar 20 Corner and Mackey Street and Madeira and Mackey. These have not been working for as long as I can remember, and you truly do take your life in your hands when you try to join the traffic flow onto Mackey Street from either of those side streets. I would think Mackey Street is considered a major thoroughfare, so why haven’t those lights been repaired? If government has money to renovate the inter national airport, carry out major road works, etc, why can’t they find some to address the traffic light problem? G PINDER Nassau, Nassau, April 2, 2009. Traffic light problem needs addressing

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n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas' current financial services model is unsustain able and must immediately be reformed as it faces threats of pos-sible sanctions from the Organi sation for Economic Co-operation and Development stemming from its placement on the group's “grey list”, president of Bahami ans Agitating for a Referendum on Free Trade (BARF Moss said. Mr Moss, a lawyer and managing director of local financial services company Dominion Management Services, chastised government for what he thinks is a lackadaisical approach to ensuring that the country's second industry is protected from potential attack from the international community. He argued that to avoid any sanctions government should dismantle its "tax haven" image by introducing a tax system for foreign companies operating in the Bahamas. This system should be no more than two per cent of a company's gross profit, 3.5 per cent of its net profit or one per cent of funds under management, he proposed, adding this could inject billions into the economy. The PLP political hopeful said this initiative should be imple mented over the next two to four years for existing clients and January 2010 for new clients. He also suggested, like several others in the financial arena, that government enter into double tax ation agreements a treaty that would allow citizens of OECD nations and developed nations to be taxed in the Bahamas at a lower rate. "I think that it's offensive that persons can come into this country, make the money that they make, and then walk away with it while Bahamians are left holding the bag. "We must be seen to be taxing, because if we are taxing, the OECD cannot say the Bahamas isa tax haven," he said, adding that the additional revenue could inject millions into needy areas such as educational, healthcare and infrastructure. Lawmakers Mr Moss' comments came days a fter Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told The Tribune that government was where he expect ed it would be at this stage regarding the OECD's standards, adding that lawmakers will do what is necessary "in a timely manner" to ensure the country meets the remaining criterion. But Mr Moss charged that the nation's chief "does not realise how serious the situation is." He said: "That's how we got on the blacklist – governments did not realise – and how come we're on the grey list today. He should be very concerned because if the Bahamas is not in the business of financial services we recognise that it accounts for a significant amount of the (gross domestic product) GDP, well past 20 per cent, and that means that if we take that away one can see that our country and economy is floun dering now, it would be catastrophic if it's not there." "The reality is the present mod el of financial services is unsustainable. The approach has to be holistic and forward thinking and a part of that has to be we must begin to tax these people in our jurisdiction." "We must begin to take hold of this country and make sure that people who make money from it leave a stake in it, because other wise the generations to come will look at this generation and say what a useless lot." Two weeks ago the Bahamas was named by the OECD on a list of "tax havens" that have committed to international tax standards, but have yet to implement them. The list was published after the high-profile meeting of the G-20 Summit in London, where sever al world leaders pledged to crackdown on so-called tax havens and offshore jurisdictions. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 5 3 pc Queen Post Bed 3 pc Queen Post Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,950 $3,950 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,150 $4,150Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM( DF55) n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net WATER and Sewerage Corporation unionists angered by Minister of State Phenton Neymour’s “malicious and unwarranted attack” maintain they were forced to act when government refused to listen to their pleas. B ahamas Utility Service and Allied Worker’s Union (BUSAWU dent Carmen Munnings-Kemp maintains her union made every attempt to negotiate with government and Water and Sewerage Corporation (WSC executives before taking action last Monday. Ms Munnings-Kemp and Water a nd Sewerage Management Union (WSMU ered around 200 WSC employees to attend a press conference outside the WSC headquarters on Thompson Boulevard on Monday morning last week to demand better services, better treatment of staff and higher salaries. Mr Neymour condemned unionists for holding an illegal strike under the guise of a press conference, m aintaining the unions’ demands are unrealistic in a struggling economy. But Ms Munnings-Kemp says BUSAWU has made every effort to negotiate with government and members’ patience has worn thin. “As we have repeatedly said, we have extended every courtesy and attempted to negotiate in absolute good faith with the government and exec utive management of the corporation, but to no a vail,” she said. “It is amazing that the Junior Minister only now chooses to respond to our pleas and has chosen to attempt to win the public’s sentiment by stating what amounts to hot air and inaccuracies.” The BUSAWU president hit back at Mr Neymour’s call for the unions to use their skills to address challenges faced by the corporation instead, claiming union members have yet to see any proposed solutions, meaningful or otherwise, coming from the Minister’s desk. Ms Munnings-Kemp said: “In fact his actions, or inaction at BEC, namely not being able to properly address the electricity costs, has increased the power costs to produce and transmit our water. This has caused a significant jump in our subsidy requirement.” WSC is the only utility company to receive a government subsidy. It was allocated $30 million last year. Ms Munnings-Kemp argued WSC should be able to increase rates as the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC is a direct correlation between the two. Ms Munnings-Kemp also maintains that Mr Neymour made illfounded remarks regarding WSC staff salaries, claiming he provided the inaccurate salary of $37,000 per annum paid to senior janitors when in fact the only permanent WSC janitor earns less than half of that. She said: “BUSAWU is extremely disappointed, as I am certain is the manager’s union, that Mr Ney mour chooses to forget the fact the very unions in this corporation are responsible for most of, if not all, the successes he has enjoyed over the past several years. “He came from the bowels of the union and even served as president long after he had left our mix. “He benefited more from our various industrial agreements than anybody else.” She added: “BUSAWU is very much interested in restoring the luster of this corporation and taking it to higher heights. “We found ourselves in this position, as a result of the lack of focus and direction given to this corporation. We want to do the right thing and encourage government to do the same.” THE outcome of a last minute meeting called to finalise the Bahamas’ offer to Europe under the services component of the Economic Partnership Agreement was unknown yesterday, as Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing said he had not spoken to officials who attended the meeting in Belgium. Senior Ministry of Finance officials flew to Brussels to meet with European trade officials on Thursday to discuss the Bahamas’ offer to the European Commission under the trade in services component of the EPA. It was understood that the Europeans were not satisfied with the extent to which Bahamian services industries were being protected from foreign participation under the initial offer and were looking for the Bahamas to offer further concessions in the retail, construction, computer systems, advisory services and foreign/international law sectors allowing European companies to establish a commercial presence in the Bahamas to sell these services should they choose to do so. Last week Mr Laing told Tribune Business that any further liberalisation of the retail sector “will not happen” under the EPA, notwithstanding the European’s alleged demands. With only a day to go before the six-month extension to April 15 given to the Bahamas to conclude the offer it is to make to the European Commission, Mr Laing told The Tribune he expects to be briefed on the outcome of the meeting today. Last minute meeting over services component of EPA WSC unionists claim they acted ‘after govt refused to listen to pleas’ PHENTON NEYMOUR condemned unionists for holding ‘an illegal strike under the guise of a press conference’. Bahamas’ financial services model ‘is unsustainable’

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ARDASTRA GARDENS celebrated Easter over the weekend as kids got a kiss from a parrot. EASTER AT ARDASTRA PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff EGGHUNTBEGINS C HILDREN f eeding parrots.

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n B yMATT MAURA Bahamas Information Services GOVERNMENT is pushi ng ahead with its initiative to p rovide even greater access to healthcare and health institutions for all Bahamians, Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said in his address to the monthly meeting of the Nurses Association of the B ahamas last week. This initiative, he said, is in anticipation of any “unexpected challenges” the current worldwide financial crisis and credit crunch could have on h ealthcare locally. D r Minnis said it is the gove rnment’s belief that equitable a ccess to healthcare and g reater equity in health outc omes, are fundamental to a well-functioning economy. “It may also be a measure of how a civilised society ism aking progress,” he said. Impact D r Minnis said countries at all levels of development – the Bahamas included – are concerned about the impact the current financial crisis can possibly have on healthcare. He said some of those conc erns relate to mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety, in addition to possible i ncreases in the use of harmful s ubstances such as tobacco a nd alcohol as well as increases in the ingestion of processed foods. In these financially depressed times, consumers may increase their intake of processed foods that are highi n fats and sugar and low in essential nutrients, leading to more health related diseases,” Dr Minnis said. It is an accepted fact that s uch foods contribute to obes ity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension.” Dr Minnis said healthcare professionals are already experiencing, or can expect to experience, increases in public and private patients seeking medical attention at the Accident and Emergency Department of the Princess Margaret Hospital and the community clinics. H ealth insurance coverage being lost due to an inability to pay, increases in chronic, non-communicable diseases ( CNCDs), increased demand f or bed space, increased demand for public sector supp lied medication and increase s in the number of persons e xperiencing the “burn out” syndrome can also be expect-e d, he said. T he minister said he met with health management teams to devise plans that will effectively respond to the challenging economic times. Dr Minnis said the World Health Organisation (WHO e stimates that each year, h ealthcare costs have risen a nd that in some instances t hose rising costs have led to i ndividuals and groups not o nly losing medical coverage, but also losing their status as middle-class citizens. Dr Minnis said the World Bank issued an assessment of the impact the financial crisis is having on many of the d eveloped and developing countries. This assessment showed that many people arel osing their jobs, homes and s avings and their lives. He said it is against this backdrop that the government, through the Ministry ofH ealth, has undertaken the “ambitious drive” to improve a ccess to healthcare and h ealth institutions for Bahamia ns. Funded In the interim, budgets must be funded and health programmes must be continued,” Dr Minnis said. “At my ministry there is a renewed f ocus and concern relating to e nsuring that resources, including staff and medical e quipment are available and f unctioning.” In spite of the financial cris is affecting health, we must e nsure that we continue to p rovide the best possible healthcare system while maintaining the highest standards,” Dr Minnis said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 7 Government aims to provide greater access to healthcare MINISTER OF HEALTH Dr Hubert Minnis addressed members of the NursesA ssociation of the Bahamas d uring the Association’s monthly meeting held at Longley House. P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A 32-YEAR-OLD Carmichael Road man c harged in the shooting d eath of Reno Burrows w ho was gunned down near a laundromat on Carmichael Road last year, was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court on Friday . Police have charged Philip Charlow with the J anuary 2008 murder of R eno Burrows. According to police, Burrows, a resident of East Avenue, Carmichael Road was w ith a group of men near the Pondwash Laundromat on Carmichael Road, a round 8 pm when a gunm an cloaked in a hood a pproached and fired seve ral shots. Burrows, who w as working under the h ood of a vehicle at the time, was reportedly shot in the back five times. Burrows, who had just turned 30 two weeks before he was gunned down became the count ry’s fourth murder vict im for 2008. According to court d ockets, Charlow on Frid ay, January 11, 2008, i ntentionally caused Burrows’ death. Thirteen wit-nesses are listed on court d ockets. Charlow, who was represented by lawyer Ian Cargill, was arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane on the murder charge. C harlow was not r equired to enter a plea to the charge and was denied bail. The case wasa djourned to July 27. Man appears in court over shooting death n MEXICO CITY MEXICO'S Congress opened a three-day debate Monday on the merits of legalizing marijuana for per sonal use, a policy backed by three former Latin American p residents who warned that a crackdown on drug cartels is not working, according to Associated Press. Although President Felipe Calderon has opposed the idea, the unprecedented forum shows legalizing mari juana is gaining support in Mexico amid brutal drug violence. Such a measure would be sure to strain relations with the United States at a time when the two countries are stepping up cooperation in the fight against drug trafficking. The congressional debate open to academics, experts and government officials ends a day before President Barack Obama arrives in Mexico for talks on the drug war. Proponents had a boost in February when three former presidents Cesar Gaviria of Colombia, Ernesto Zedillo of Mexico and Fernando Cardoso of Brazil urged Latin American countries to con sider legalizing the drug to undermine a major source of income for cartels. The congressional discussion takes on a subject "that had been taboo" in our country, said opposition lawmaker Javier Gonzalez, adding that his Democratic Revolution Party supports legalizing per sonal marijuana consumption. "What we don't want is to criminalize youths for consuming or possessing marijua na," he said. Calderon, whose six-year terms ends in 2012, has pro posed legislation that would offer users treatment instead of jail time but stop short of legalizing or decriminalizing possession. In 2006, Mexico backed off a law that would have abolished prison sentences for drug possession in small amounts after the U.S. protested. "It's clear that a totally prohibitive policy has not been a solution for all ills," said Interior Department official Blanca Heredia. "At the same time, it's illusory to imagine that complete legal ization of marijuana would be a panacea." Mexican Congr ess debates legalising marijuana

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travel to the island by other Americans. Yesterday, former President of the Bacardi rum company and Lyford Cay resident Manuel C utillas welcomed the move, but warned that its impact and success depends to a significant extent on the willingness of the Cuban government to also libera lise its policies. M eanwhile, as to whether the Bahamas should be worried that the move will shortly be followed b y a further decision to lift all restrictions on travel from the U.S. to Cuba allowing not just Cuban Americans but all Americans to travel to the island MrC utillas, like several tourism leaders in the Bahamas, said he does not think Bahamians should view it as an “immediate threat.” Certainly, the second step that Obama could take is the lifting of restrictions for Americans and not just Cuban Americans to travel to Cuba. That doesn’t requirec ongressional action, he could do that with an executive order and that could create some problems for the Bahamian economy but I ’ve always said that Cuba is not really prepared yet to receive a big influx of tourism the services, the hotels, are rather limited,” said the 77-year-old execu-t ive, who fled Cuba with his mother, father and brother in 1960, a year after Fidel Castro’s revolution. A ccording to a White House fact sheet outlining the extent of Mr Obama’s directive, the move will see limits on the frequency and duration of visits by CubanA mericans to Cuba removed, as well as limits on baggage weight and expenditure. A family member will be d efined as anyone “within three degrees of a family relationship” for example, second cousins to travel, while anyone who l ives with an authorised traveller can accompany them, such as a g irlfriend or boyfriend. Limits on the frequency and a mount of remittances that can be sent and carried by travellersh ave also been lifted, and U.S. banks will be allowed to apply f or licenses to forward remittances. Meanwhile, in a slightly more surprising aspect of the announcement, the President also indicatedt hat he would authorise U.S. companies to establish greatert elecommunications links with Cuba. This includes allowing U.S. telecommunications networks to enter into agreements to establ ish fiber-optic cable and satellite telecommunications facilities linking the United States and Cuba, and into roaming service agreements with Cuba's telecommuni-c ations service providers. U.S. satellite radio and satellite television service providers will be permitted to engage in transa ctions necessary to provide services to customers in Cuba. The White House said the intended purpose of this was to “advance people-to-people inter-a ction at no cost to the U.S. government (and through which Cubans on the island can communicate with each o ther and with persons outside of Cuba.” Cuban born Mr Cutillas said: “I think it’s a good move on the part of the United States but it’st o be seen if (the Cuban Government) will accept something like that. They are not very keen on having free communications a mong people.” “But more communications is always good, especially when people live in a society like Cuba which is quite closed, where peo-p le can’t really receive international news freely or things like that, where everything is controlled by the government. The fact that people can freely travel, e xchange views, is positive,” he said. Meanwhile, the former Bacardi President, who retired from his post in 1994, said that he is scep-t ical as to whether the Government will allow remittances to “reach their destination”, particularly if they are being sent to p eople considered political dissidents by the Cuban government. “It’s one thing to send money to your brother or sister, but another thing that many, manyp eople in Cuba need is to help those who are in jail or who have families who are in jail and are really controlled by government, t hey can’t get a job in Cuba, or are really controlled by the government,” he added. As for whether increased access to communication oppor-t unities and financial resources will improve the likelihood of a transition to democracy on the island, Mr Cutillas said he sees y esterday’s changes as “a step in the right direction,” but added: “It’s not going to be that easy.” Mr Cutillas expressed hope the C uban government “follows the example” of Mr Obama in reducing the restrictions it imposes on its population. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE hit and seriously injured a 31-year-old Wilson Tract man while driving away from the sports centre on Thompson Boulevard at around 5pm. H owever, an eyewitness told T he Tribune t hat Mr Bremmer w as stabbed before he got into the driver’s seat of an orange 1994 Honda Prelude and hit the pedestrian as he was trying to escape his attackers. The collision gave Mr Bremmer’s attackers an opportunity to “finish him off” and then steal the car stereo and speakers before fleeing the scene, the eyewitness claimed. Mr Bremmer was rushed to Princess Margaret Hospital where he died of his injuries, while the 31-year-old is in serious, but stable condition. The brutal violence drove witnesses to call on the police to show a greater presence at the sports centre and offer better protection to spectators. But Assistant Superintendent and police press liaison officer Walter Evans defended police, maintaining the brutal killing was an isolated incident and there is a strategy in place for policing the track. He said: “Bear in mind it was a holiday weekend and police officers were deployed all over New Providence... Police can’t be everywhere all the time.” A 21-year-old is being questioned in connection with Mr Bremmer’s killing. However, no one has yet been arrested in connection with the suspicious death of a man found dead in a car yesterday. The man, who has not yet been identified by police, was discov ered with a gunshot wound in his neck in a Nissan Sentra parked in Watlings Street at around 8am Easter Monday, prompting an intensive murder investigation. Police are appealing to the public for assistance, and anyone who may have information which may assist investigations should call police on 911 , 919 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 ). l ier in the year. Meanwhile, explaining that those in the sector are in close contact with airlines about their s eat bookings a “good barometer” of likely arrivals to the country in coming months Mr Vanderpool Wallace added that based on what such carriers are report-i ng conditions beyond the holiday season are also looking up. “From everything we see we are optimistic that things are b eginning to turn around a little bit even while we try to put in place some of these initiatives that we think will accelerate the pace,” said the tourism minister. H e puts the change down to a combination of external factors and efforts on the part of the Ministry and private sector in this c ountry. On the Ministry’s part, he said the private sector has been expressing their support for its advertising strategy, which hass een adverts running over a longer period of time than ever before. “Our team has been buying b etter than we have ever done and making sure that we are advertising during those times that people are likely most receptive,” added Mr Vanderpool Wallace. H is comments come on the h eels of what Bahamas Hotel A ssociation President Robert Sands told The Tribune was a very frank and productive” meeting between industry stakeh olders and Tourism Ministry officials last week covering a broad range of issues such as the n eed for reform of the Bahamas g aming industry and other reco mmendations as to how the sector can be made more competit ive in a number of areas. Mr Sands, along with BHA E xecutive Director Frank Comito and Senior Vice President of Bahamar Eddy Cambridge, met with the Minister, Director General, Permanent and Under Sec r etary in the Ministry of Tourism last Tuesday. T he meeting was an opportunity for them to present recom m endations as to what the Casino industry in the Bahamas should do to keep up with new competitive threats including proposed overhauls of gambling in Florida which have been identified as a major potential challenge to this c ountry’s desirability as a gaming destination. T wo weeks ago Mr Sands told this newspaper that the industry is in the dark ages” and may require “radical change” if it is to maintain its attractiveness. Meanwhile the “two plus hour” meeting also covered a broad r ange of other matters coming out of a months-long dialogueb etween the private and public sector about how the industry can b etter its market share. Yesterday Mr Vanderpool Wallace said that all of the suggestions made by the hotel lead ers will now be discussed to deter m ine their feasibility. “Very clearly we want to, part icularly with what was rcommended in the casino sector, to h ave some comment from mem bers of the Gaming Board on the c hanges to the regulations that would be required to be changed, and then secondly there’s always the discussions we need to have on what the likely economic impact is going to be on the overall economy, government taxes etcera,” said the Minister. Mr Sands told The Tribun e that the Casino Association was interested in seeing new types of games introduced, as well as changing the law to allow for more people in the country to gamble such as foreign residents. “We will see if we have any particular difficulties that we will discuss internally before we make any recommendations on any changes to be made,” said Mr Vanderpool Wallace yesterday. Meanwhile, The Post and Courier , in an article published Saturday, quoted the principal at her high school as stating that the accident in fact occurred at around 10pm Wednesday. Principal David Held said: “This is a tremendous loss for our community. She was one of those great kids. Hard workers. Good student. Extremely well loved by her peers and teach ers.” Local police are investigating the incident. F ROM page one Cuba restrictions FROM page one Two men dead in weekend violence Easter holiday F ROM page one FROM page one American visitor

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MANAGEMENT staff of F irstCaribbean International Bank’s Palmdale Branch part-n ered with teachers of its adopted school Palmdale Primary School – to beautify a section of the school campus. The team gave the gardens a s plash of colour, enhancing the e nvironment and creating an atmosphere that would make students and visitors to the school proud. The bank’s Palmdale branch manager Paul Bartlett said: The turn-out of both FirstC aribbean and Palmdale primary staff was a great indicator as to the emphasis placed on the students’ well-being. The hard work and camaraderie was infectious, with everyone gett ing their hands dirty, from the skilled gardeners in the crew to t he novices. The result was absolutely amazing. It was well w orth the time and effort put into the project.” The FirstCaribbean Palmdale b ranch adopted the school in 2 005 and has since made quite a d ifference, including keeping t heir Wednesday afternoon a ppointment to read to students in the school’s upper grades – an initiative done in conjunct ion with the Ministry of Educ ation and the American E mbassy. F irstCaribbean Palmdale remains committed to Palmdale P rimary and to doing its part to k eep the Bahamas “clean, green and pristine,” while living the b ank’s commitment to “enriching our communities together,” the bank said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 9 Apply for In-House Financing online today! Add a Stylish to your RoomPurchasefor as low as S h o p 2 H o p B a h a m a s &W I N O v e r$4 0 , 0 0 0i n B a h a m i a n I s l a n dWe e ke n d G e t a wa y sF P 9 4 0 Nassau GrandBahama WorldWideWeb20yearsCelebrating www.furnitureplus.com Tel:(242397-PLUS(7587NASSAU • Town Centre Mall Mon-Sat 9am-9pm Fax:(242 Tel:(242352-PLUS(7587GRAND BAHAMA • Madeira Croft Mon-Fri 9am-6pm • Sat 9am-4pm Fax:(242* While Supplies Last * With Approved Credit * Some Stipulations May Apply Furniture Plus is celebrating its 20th Anniversary by promoting our beautiful country and everything Bahamian! You can experience paradise when you SHOPBahamastoHOPacrossour dazzling archipelago! Hers how you can WIN: Spend $500* or more. Fill out your entry forms (1 per every $500 spent Your entries rollover every monthuntil September. Shop early for MORE CHANCES to WINWinone of 16wonderful IslandGetaway trips for 2 (Hotel & Flights includedNassauandGrand BahamaShowroomswill draw Winnersat the end of everymonth. WIN aweekend for two$5per week* FirstCaribbean branch helps to beautify part of Palmdale Primary school campus THE GARDENS were given a splash of colour by the team. APRIL is “Parkinson Awareness Month” and in the Bahamas the Kingdor National Parkinson Foundation has planned several a ctivities to commemorate t he occasion, including the organisation’s eighth annual walk/run competition, which will commence at Montagu Beach Park on Saturday, April 25. The Foundation is asking B ahamians to support the f undraising event by providing fruit for the 700 participants. This annual walk/run competition is used to raise f unds for research, which the F oundation’s parent organisation makes available to m any countries of the world. A dditionally, Kingdor supp lies seed funds to persons with neurological conditions. The Foundation said it is b ecause the ongoing dedication and assistance by the Bahamian people that it is able to continue with its miss ion to improve the quality of life for persons with Parkinson’s disease and a llied conditions. Kingdor National Parkinson Foundation set for walk/run event In brief n S AN JUAN, Puerto Rico A SOLDIERwho had told his family he did not want to return to Iraq apparently killed himself in a Puerto Rican motel days b efore he was to join his unit and head back to the war zone, police in the U.S. territory said Monday, according to Associated Press. A rmy Spc. Nokware Rosado Munoz, 28, had been arguing with h is pregnant wife about his upcoming redeployment before hanging himself Sunday, said Lt. Edilberto Rivera Santiago, director of the police homicide division in the San Juan suburb of Bayamon. "They were having problems because he had been activated again," Rivera said. Rosado was scheduled to rejoin his unit at Fort Bliss, Texas, this w eek, before moving on to Iraq. The soldier's mother-in-law, Migdalia Estrada, was quoted by newspaper El Nuevo Dia as saying that Rosado was receiving psy c hiatric treatment stemming from a previous Iraq deployment. "He had said to my daughter that he didn't want to go back to Iraq," Estrada said. "I don't understand how they can order him back if he was having problems." A n Army official in San Juan, Felix Santiago, said the military was cooperating with Puerto Rican authorities in an investigation. Officials in Fort Bliss had no immediate comment. S uicides in the Army have increased yearly since 2004 as soldiers deal with longer and repeated tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Army had its highest rate of suicide on record in 2008 with at least1 29 confirmed cases. Police: Iraq a factor in PR soldier’s suicide Share your news The T ribune wants to hear fr o m people who are m aking news in their neighbour h oods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* )$67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5 RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP HATTERAS SPORTSFISHERBOATDESCRIPTION: 197842’SIZE:Beam-15’/Depth11”G ROSS TON:22,800lbs LOCATION: TexacoEastBayDock APPRAISED VALUE: $198,800 F O R S A L E IN TERESTED PARTIESSHOULD SUBMITOFFERSINCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONECONTACTAND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CBDISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT D EPARTMENT, P.O BOXSS-6263 NASSAU,BAHAMAS OR EMAIL US AT:DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM *WERESERVETHERIGHTTOREJECTANYORALL OFFERS. school fees for an estimated 700 people who lost their jobs at Atlantis,t he British Colonial Hilton and Our Lucaya in Grand Bahama between November 2008 and February this year. I t is the second time in six months t he fund has moved to provide financial assistance to hotel workers affected by the severe economic downturn as an estimated 6,000w orkers whose hours were reduced to three days a week or less in September and October were called up to claim $1,000 to be paid directly to c reditors in October, and now hund reds more who have been made redundant are invited to come forward for financial support. It is estimated that around 300 p eople are still eligible to apply for the first wave of benefits, and another 700 are potentially eligible for the new benefits package, expecte d to draw just over $1 million from the fund. BHAI Health and Welfare Benefits Fund trustee and president of the Bahamas Hotel EmployersA ssociation J Barrie Farrington said the decision to provide further bene fits was based on considered review of the continuing economic crisis affecting the hotel industry. He said: “We didn’t expect to be d oing it so quickly, we hoped there would have been a rebound since the last benefits were launched, but there are things happening within the industry that we think will creates ome excitement and hopefully produce an increased volume of business in the country.” Mr Farrington hopes hosting the M iss Universe and Miss Teen USA pageants as well as the international FIFA conference at Atlantis this year will bring international attention to the Bahamas and help boostt ourism. “We are looking forward with optimism,” Mr Farrington said. “But the important thing we are d oing now is responding to the cry of a lot of workers in the industry who have been displaced.” He spoke during a press conference at Workers House on HarroldR oad with Bahamas Hotel, Catering and Allied Workers Union presid ent Roy Colebrook, Bahamas Hotel and Allied Industries Pension Fund executive director Louis Dames and Bahamar and Cable Beach Resorts vice president Robert Sandy” Sands to launch the scheme on Thursday. Mr Sands said he too is hopeful the hotel industry will bounce back, b ut did not shy away from the harsh reality facing hundreds of workers. He said: “The reality is things continue to deteriorate. Hotels are receiving respectable levels of busi-n ess, but the spend of those customers has not materialised to the spend we would anticipate. “The waters are still murky... A nd we do expect more downward trend after the Easter period and into May and June. “I don’t think we have hit bottom as yet, but hotels are doing things tom itigate against unemployment... We all recognise that compounding the situation by adding more to the unemployment at this time helps no o ne in this period.” Major hotels are doing their best to retain staff by cutting costs in other areas, such as by reducing working hours and paid annual leave, MrS ands said. Hotel workers made redundant from Atlantis, British Colonial Hilton and Our Lucaya between N ovember and February can apply for the new benefits package at the pension fund offices at Workers House in Nassau and Freeport from 1 0am on Monday, April 20. Applications will be taken in a lphabetical order of surnames in the first two weeks with letters A t o E processed on Mondays, F to L on Tuesdays, M to R on Wednesd ays and S to Z on Thursdays in New Providence, and in Grand Bahama A to L will be handled on Mondays and Wednesdays, and M to Z on Tuesdays and Thursdays. A pplicants must have their National Insurance card and documentation for bills and mortgage payments with them. T he application process will continue until June 30. For more information call Workers House in Nassau at 322-5123, and Workers House on SettlersW ay, Freeport, on 351-7832 from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday. assigned to extinguish this massive blaze,” said Fire chief Walter Evans. M eanwhile, another fire, which started near the Bahamas Gas Company, and a blaze at the City Dump were also being taken care o f by separate fire units. Fire services were called to the City Dump fire at around 1am on Saturday, and have been working to put out the flames since then.T he fire was still burning yesterday with the blaze confined to a western portion of the landfill. “In all of these matters, home owners are affected by the prese nce of smoke. They are to be r eminded that efforts are being m ade to suppress these fires in the s hortest possible time,” said press liaison officer Walter Evans. Easter holiday plans. Around 15,000 people who have been out of work for up to four years are expected to apply for benefits throughout the week, and those w ho fit the broad criteria set out for the first phase of the scheme can expect to collect their cheques in about two weeks. T hey will receive half of their average insurable weekly wage for 13 weeks, and as the current ceiling on insurable wages is $400, the maximum amount anyone can receive is $200 per week. Mr Foulkes visited all four of the New Providence venues on Saturday as job seekers gave details of when they became unemployed to Depart m ent of Labour staff and were then issued certificates to register with NIB. The minister said: “ I must compliment National Insurance Board s taff and the Department of Labour staff for their hard work. “It was the first time we have done such an exercise between both the N ational Insurance Board and the Department of Labour and it’s a new benefit that we are introducing so we didn’t really know what to expect, but we were properly organised and are happy things went extremely well.” Applicants are asked to sign up on particular days throughout the w eek according to their surname. Those whose surnames begin with letters A to D were invited to register on Saturday, while those with surn ames beginning with the letters E to L can sign up today, M to R can attend tomorrow, and S to Z on Thursday. F riday and Saturday will be open to people of any name, however Mr Foulkes encourages all applicants to register within their specified group t o keep the application process under control. The minister also thanked the media for showing sensitivity and pro fessionalism in covering the registration process. The Unemployment Benefits scheme was signed into law by Governor General Arthur Hanna last week following Parliament’s enactment o f a bill to amend the National Insurance Act on March 25 and subsequent passing of amendments to the contributions regulations, benefits and assis t ance regulations, and financial and accounting regulations. Registration venues include CC Sweeting Jr School in Oakes Field, D oris Johnson in Prince Charles Drive, CR Walker in Blue Hill Road north, and SC McPherson in Blue Hill Road South and two venues in Grand Bahama. All are open from 9am to 4pm daily. For more information contact NIB’s public relations department on 356-2070 extension 236/234/232, e-mail info@nib-bahamas.com, or log on to www.nib-bahamas.com. F ROM page one Unemployment benefit FROM page one Hotel workers F ROM page one Bush fire

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VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA: The Bahamas captured its first gold medal of the meet on day two and the Bahamian faithful was re-energized by the most decorated jumper in Carifta history after a pair of untimely injuries and disqualifications. MEDALS U-17 GIRLS SHOT PUT R R a a q q u u e e l l W W i i l l l l i i a a m m s s G G o o l l d d , , 1 1 1 1 . . 9 9 3 3 m m It took just one throw for the top high school thrower in the country to solidify her claim as the best in the region and simultaneously capture the Bahamas’ first gold medal of the meet. Raquel Williams had the top two throws ofthe competition, 11.80mon her first attempt and the winning of 11.93 on her final effort to end the event in dominating fashion. Sasha-Gaye Marston of Jamaica was second with a throw of 11.80m and Catherine Mastail of Martinique was third with her throw of 11.09m. Williams surpassed the 11m mark on three attempts and her shortest throw of the competition, 10.87m on her third attempt, would have still been good enough to finish in fourth place. Marston was the only other competitor to pass the 11m mark on more than one attempt. In a single year, Williams improved her performance by nearly two metres from a last year’s Carifta Championships in St Kitts. Behind a veteran field, in her first Carifta performance she threw just 10.51m in 2008 to finish in 5th place. Williams said: “It feels good, I have been practising hard for the past couple months and I was able to come out here on top.” U-17 GIRLS 400M R R a a s s h h a a n n B B r r o o w w n n , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 5 5 3 3 . . 9 9 3 3 s s K K a a t t r r i i n n a a S S e e y y m m o o u u r r , , D D Q Q l l a a n n e e i i n n f f r r a a c c t t i i o o n n A bittersweet finish for the Bahamas in the first of four quartermile finals as we witnessed the progression of one athlete net a silver medal and flirt with the meet record, while the other in her first Carifta appearance lost a bronze medal performance due to disqualification. Brown willed herself to a second place finish behind Shericka Jackson of Jamaica, who set a new Carifta record of 43.48s. Brown kept pace with Jackson on the final curve and held on to second place from a charging Seymour who finished in third. The two time Carifta medallist came VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA: The Bahamas got off to a quick start on day one of the 38th Carifta Track and Field Championships with a medal in the first contested event and concluding with a pair of medals in the field. MEDALLISTS POLE VAULT V V e e r r n n a a l l M M c c I I n n t t o o s s h h , , B B r r o o n n z z e e , , 3 3 . . 2 2 0 0 m m Despite a broken, unfamiliar pole and finishing well short of his personal best, McIntosh performed well enough to claim the Bahamas’ first medal of these Carifta Games. McIntosh cleared 3.20 on his first attempt, but missed three opportunities to stay in the competition at 3.30m. A pair of native St. Lucians took the top two spots in the field, Shem Edwards took first with a jump of 3.60m and Rick Valcinfinished second in 3.50m. Although it was the first medal won at the meet, it failed to qualify as an official event in overall medal standings with just three competitors from two coun tries. Events which do not meet the standard of five competitors from three countries officially qualify as an exhibition. McIntosh, a relative newcomer to the sport said although he was unable to reach a personal best and the gold medal, he was pleased with his effort. “It feels pretty good, I knew I could have done better and probably have the gold medal but I am happy with what God gave me. I came out here, I did not perform to the best of my ability but I made the best of what equipment I had,” he said. “The pole was not mine and it was broken so I had to improvise with it. My personal best is way higher than what I jumped out there but hopefully I will continue at my next meet and improve. I am quite confident in my abilities and in my other meets I will con tinue to do my best to make the country proud.” U-20 GIRLS 1500M H H u u g g h h n n i i q q u u e e R R o o l l l l e e , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 4 4 : : 4 4 4 4 . . 1 1 6 6 s s With the new Carifta record holder nearly 200 metres ahead of the remainder of the field, Rolle secured her berth atop the medal stand with a brillantly executed race en route to a second place finish. Rolle captured the country’s first medal on the track behind the eventual gold medal winner and new Carifta record holder, Natoya Goule of Jamaica who finished more than 17 seconds ahead of the field in 4:27.48s. Goule successfully defended her U20 title, while Rolle reached the medal stand in just her first year contesting the division. She shaved more than 25 seconds off her time in last year’s U-17 1500m final when she finished 5th in 5:10.61s. Rolle said although she felt ill-prepared for the race due to a change in schedule, faith kept her grounded and en route to victory. “I decided just to stay with the pack instead of going out there and rushing and chasing after her and going out fast like I do in Nassau. Basically I did not think I was ready but I prayed hard and God came through. When I was in second place and she went out in frst I decided I was going to keep up with her because I wanted to medal,” she said. “This shows all the people back home who probably did not believe in distance runners that we do have what it takes to win.” U-17 BOYS HIGH JUMP R R y y a a n n I I n n g g r r a a h h a a m m , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 1 1 . . 9 9 5 5 m m J J a a b b a a r r i i W W i i l l m m o o t t t t , , B B r r o o n n z z e e , , 1 1 . . 9 9 5 5 m m A duo of basketball players turned high jumpers continued the Bahamas’ recent history of success in the high jump concluding anexciting day one with pair of medals. While Wilmott improved on last year’s ninth place performance of 1.90m, Ingraham reached the medal stand in his debut Carifta appearance. Both jumpers passed on the initial heights of 1.70m and 1.75m and entered the contest at 1.80m, clearing on their first attempt. Ingraham was stellar over the course of the next three heights, clearing 1.85, 1.90, and 1.95 each n his first attempt. Wilmott cleared 1.85 and 1.90 on his second attempt but cleared 1.95 on his initial effort. In showdown for the gold medal, both Wilmott and Ingraham failed on all three attempts to clear 2.00, however Barbadian jumper Kemar Jones bypassed the bar on his third and final attempt. Both players, stars on the hardwood at C.I Gibson (Ingraham Augustine’s College (Wilmott tively, said they did not give their best effort despite reaching the medal stand. “I feel that 2.00m I could have jumped it but it just was not there tonight,” Wilmott said. Ingraham echoed the sentiments but said he was thankful for the silver medal in his frst Carifta games. “I feel like I could have done way better,” he said. Both athletes said with basketball and the high jump in their future athletic plans, they will continue to pursue both sports. C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE Local sports news IT will come down to one last chance as both the pen-n ants and playoff positions that haven't been decided are completed as the Bap-t ist Sports Council wrap up the 2009 Joyce Minus Bask etball Classic's regular season on Saturday at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. O n Saturday past, the BSC hosted a series of g ames with pennant and playoff implications on the line. Here's a look at those games played: EVANGELISTIC CENTER 49, CALVARY BIBLE 45 (OT Sherman Bowe scored 14 a nd Tyrone Sands had 12 for Evangelistic Center, who will now have to play idledu ndefeated Christian Tabernacle for the men's vice president pennant on Saturd ay. Harcourt McCoy had 17 in the loss for Calvary Bible,w ho are not eligible for the playoffs. EVANGELISTIC CENTER 39, GOLDEN GATES 38: Tyrone Sands and R Ferguson both scored 13 points in the win for Evangelistic Center ast hey kept their pennant hopes alive in the men's vice president division. D aniel Johnson had a game high 14 in a losing e ffort for Golden Gates, who have been eliminated from the playoff picture. FIRST BAPTIST 37, LATTERDAY SAINTS 32: Noel Richardson had a side high 13 points and Eddie Miller added nine as First Baptist stayed undefeated in them en's president division heading into their match-up against Temple Fellowshipf or the pennant o Saturday. Cordero Thompson matched the game high hon-o rs with 13 for Latter-Day, who still earned a playoff berth. NEW BETHLEHEM 28, CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 20: Theo Cleare scored 10 and Amon Baker had 10 as New Bethlehem clinched a playoff spot in the men's vice president division. Roibinson Estorcica had nine in the loss for Church of the Nazarene, whose playoff spot has been ruined. CITY OF PRAISE 78, EBENEZER 16: R Edgecombe scored 16 and T Rolle and J Rolle both had 13 as Cirty of Praise clinched their playoff spot in the men's president division. Dane Stuat had 12 in the loss for the hapless Ebenezer, who will not make the playoff. TEMPLE FELLOWSHIP 52, MACEDONIA 23: Gabbie Laurant had a game high 17 points and Najee Bethell had nine as Temple Fellowship kept their playoff hopes alive in the 19-and-under division. Prince Pinder led Macedonia with six as they await for the final outcome to see if they will make the playoffs. FIRST BAPTIST 46, FAITH UNITED 24: Noel Richardson exploded for a game high 17 points and Kirby Thergelus added nine as First Baptist moved on top of the 19-and-under standings for a shot at winning the pennant. GOLDEN GATES 18, MIRA CLE WORKING COG 16: Dustin McKenzie scored 11 to lead Golden Gates as 2009 JOYCE MINUS BASKETBALL CLASSIC SEE page 12 VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA: For Team Bahamas, the 2009 Carifta Games produced a new record, the highest medal total since 2006 and an impressive showing at the most populated meet inC arifta history. A t the conclusion of the four day meet, the Bahamas placed third in the total medal count with 28. The 61-member team collected three gold, 17 silver and eight bronze. Jamaica again topped the medal table with a total of 67 medals, 39 gold, 15 sil v er and 13 bronze. Trinidad and Tobago finished second with a total of 29 medals, nine gold, 10 silver and 10 bronze and Barbados was fourth with a total of 21 medals, four gold, nine silver and eight bronze and host country St. Lucia rounded out the top five as they finished with the most medals in their country’s history, four gold and two silver. Although they fell short of the gold medal total of previous years, The Bahamas won more silver medals than any other country in the field. The team posted back to back 30 medal performances in 2005 and 2006, but since has yet to reach the 30 medal mark. T eam Bahamas was once again led by R aymond Higgs who finished with a new Carifta record in the Under 20 Boys’ High Jump and came within a centimetre of claiming another gold medal in the long jump, reminiscent of his hallowed 2006 performance. Other outstanding performances i ncluded Patrick Bodie who medalled in both the 400m hurdles (silver hurdles (bronze division and Rashan Brown who captured three medals, silvers in the Under 17 Girls 400m and 4x400m relay, and a bronze in the 200m. Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations President Curt Hollingsworth said the effort from the entire team and the coaching staff was one to be commended. “It was exciting, this team was picked based on qualifications and we are quite satisfied and the children gave 100 per cent. They went out there, they left it on the track and as a result we able to accomplish most of the objectives thatw e set out to accomplish as a team,” he s aid. “The coaching staff, I think a lot of people underestimated their ability but I think this coaching team did a tremendous job and their effort will be vilified in the medal count. We have a whole lot of work to do, but I think once we get ourselves organised and we move in thatd irection we will get where we need to go.” Hollingsworth said one of the main topics of the 38th Carifta Congress was the manner in which the gap between Jamaica and the other Cariibean coun tries is closing and with a full effort from all entities involved in the Bahamas’ national programme the BAAAs will continue to progress towards the ultimate goal of a Carifta championship. “It is a credit to the RDC which pro vides all of the regional members with the certification programme for coaches. Many coaches in the region are taking full advantage of it, our coaches are taking full advantage of it and they are alsob ecoming more knowledgeable so the g ap is closing,” he said. “It is exciting to note that the gap is narrowing we just need to take another step up, our coaches have to pick up their programmes, our kids have to make more sacrifices, we as an administration need to do our part and everything will fall into place.” K erani James, of Grenada, was named the Most Outstanding participant of the meet after setting a new record in the Under 20 boys 400m, a mark previously held by Usain Bolt of Jamaica. At the 38th Carifta Congress, dele gates decided that the 39th edition of the games will be hosted by the Cayman Islands in 2010. Full results of all Bahamian competitors will be published in tomorrow’s edition of the Tribune. Team Bahamas achieves highest medal count in three years CARIFTA GAMES BREAKDOWN All coverage by RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net DA Y ONE DA Y TWO SEE page 12 THE UNDER 20 Girls 400m relay team of V'Alonee Robinson, Ivanique Kemp, Gortia Ferguson and Nivea Smith p ose with their silver medals.

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V IEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA: Triumphs in the field and from the relay teams lead the charge for the Bahamas on day three highlighted by a pair of triple jumpers who claimed silver medals in their respective divi sions. MEDALS U-17 BOYS 400MH P P a a t t r r i i c c k k B B o o d d i i e e , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 5 5 5 5 . . 4 4 8 8 s s Training with event record holder, Nejmi Burnside paid great dividends for Bodie as he claimed the Bahamas’ first medal on the track on day three. B odie took an early lead and maintained an advantage for much of the race until tramaine Maloney of Barbados surpassed him him to take the final in 54.88s. He said training alongside Burnside provided excellent competition and said holding on to a medal positioning in the final moments of the race was due to pure will and effort “I tried to maintain and hold like my coach said I knew I had it almost the whole lap. I was not expecting the guy from Barba dos to come I was trying my best to hold him offbut I guess I lost a little at the last hurdle,” he said. “I gave it all I had, I knew I hadt he heart of a lion so I just gave it all I had. He’s a good training partner and I wanted to at least try and challenge the record, maybe I did not but it was a good race nonetheless.” U -20 BOYS TRIPLE JUMP J J V V e e n n t t e e D D e e v v e e a a u u x x , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 1 1 5 5 . . 4 4 7 7 m m It took five rounds for D eveaux to solidify himself in m edal contention, but after the dust settled he improved on an eigth place performance from the 2008 games. Deveuax landed the silver medal winning jump in the fifth of six rounds finishing second to Elton Walcott of Trinidad and Tobago who leapt 15.61m in the secnd round. U-17 GIRLS TRIPLE JUMP T T a a m m a a r r a a M M y y e e r r s s , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 1 1 1 1 . . 7 7 0 0 m m Myers set a new personal b est and became a two time Carifa medallist on day two, continuing her progression in the event. The Exumian’s unorthodox style landed her on the medal podium on her third jump oft he competition. I jumped 11.70m which was a personal best for me so I’m happy about that,” she said. U -17 BOYS JAVELIN B B y y r r o o n n F F e e r r g g u u s s o o n n , , B B r r o o n n z z e e , , 5 5 2 2 . . 9 9 9 9 m m Although he fell short of his personal best, in just two years in the sport, Ferguson has transformed himself from a talented pitcher to one of the best javelin throwers in the region. “It feels great to get the bronze medal but I know I really could have had the silver or even the gold, my best throw would have put me on that level,” he said. “I do not feel like it was my best perfor mance but it went well. One throw that I got everthing into the wind carried it back a little but all in all I am very pleased with what I have.” Ferguson who has only been competing at the sport for two years, finished fourth at the 2008 championships and said he continues to be encouraged by his performances which get “better and better everytime.” U-17 GIRLS 4X100 A A n n t t h h o o n n i i q q u u e e S S t t r r a a c c h h a a n n , , S S h h a a u u n n a a e e M M i i l l l l e e r r , , S S p p a a r r k k y y l l C C a a s s h h , , P P r r i i n n t t a a s s s s i i a a J J o o h h n n s s o o n n , , B B r r o o n n z z e e For Johnson, redemption f rom a disappointing 100m c ame on the anchor leg of he 400m relay when she powered down the track, surpassing two competitiors to claim the bronze for team Bahamas. U-20 GIRLS 4X100 V V A A l l o o n n e e e e R R o o b b i i n n s s o o n n , , I I v v a a n n i i q q u u e e K K e e m m p p , , O O r r t t i i a a F F e e r r g g u u s s o o n n , , N N i i v v e e a a S S m m i i t t h h ; ; S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 4 4 5 5 . . 4 4 3 3 s s Smith delivered a remark able come from behind performance to gain the Bahamas spot atop the medal podium, nearly nipping Jamaiacan anchor Carrie Russell at the line. “Thesegirls ran their heart out, they ran their hardest so I am not disappointed at all,” she said. “This is a young team so in Cariftas to come I know they will continue to do better.” U-17 BOYS 4X100 R R a a s s h h a a d d A A r r m m b b r r i i s s t t e e r r , , H H a a r r o o l l d d C C a a r r t t e e r r , , B B l l a a k k e e B B a a r r r r e e t t t t , , J J o o h h n n a a t t h h a a n n F F a a r r q q u u h h a a r r s s o o n n ; ; S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 4 4 1 1 . . 8 8 9 9 s s With the backdrop of the Jamaican team setting a new Carifta record in 40.76s, the Bahamas outclassed the remain der of the field after a blistering start from 100m finalst Arm brister. I tried to get a good start because I know in the relay it is important to get that start,” he said. “We had our prayer before the race and God came through for us.” C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS they hold onto a shot at making the 19-and-underp layoffs. Omal Deveaux had six in the loss for Miracle Working Church of God. Avery Armbrister had six f or Faith United, who have been eliminated from the postseason. GOLDEN GATES 34, FIRST BAPTIST 30: Neil Sands scored eight and Lavandre R ubins seven for Golden Gates, who clinched the seco nd spot in the 15-andunder playoffs behind pennant winning Temple Fel-l owship. Leon Saunders had eight i n a losing effort for First Baptist, who have been eliminated from the post-s eason. FAITH UNITED 25, MIRAC LE WORKING COG 24: D elano Forbes scored nine, including the winning bask et, to push Faith United into the 15-and-under playoffs. O scar Lenny had seven in the loss for Miracle Working C hurch of God, who won't make te playoffs. Here's the last week of p lay coming up on Saturday: C C o o u u r r t t O O n n e e 10 am First Baptist vs Miracle Working COG (15 11 am First Baptist vs Golden Gates (19 Noon New Bethlehem vs B ahamas Harvest (M 1 pm First Baptist vs Tem ple Fellowship (M 2 pm Bahamas Harvest vs Golden Gates (M C C o o u u r r t t T T w w o o 10 am Mercy Seat vs Latter-Day Saints (19 1 1 am Golden Gates No.2 vs Temple Fellowship (19 N oon Evangelistic Center vs Christian Tabernacle (M 1 pm Faith United vs G olden Gates No.2 (19 2 pm Church of the Nazarene vs Calvary Bible (M Here's a look at the t eam standings: T T e e a a m m s s W W L L P P c c t t . . G G B B M M e e n n ' ' s s P P r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t X – First Baptist 5 0 1,000 X – Temple Fellowship 4 1 .800 1 X – City of Praise 4 2 .666 1 1/2 X – Latter-Day Saints 3 3 .500 21/2 B IBA 3 3 .500 21/2 Ebenezer 1 5 .000 4 Pilgrim 0 6 .000 51/2 M M e e n n ' ' s s V V i i c c e e P P r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t X – Christian Tabernacle 5 0 1,000 X – New Bethlehem 4 1 .800 1 X – Evangelistic Center 4 1 .800 1 Bahamas Harvest 2 2 .500 21/2 Church of the Nazarene 1 4 .200 4 Golden Gates 1 4 .200 4 Calvary Bible 0 5 .000 5 1 1 9 9 A A n n d d U U n n d d e e r r X First Baptist 5 2 .714 Miracle Working COG 5 3 .625 1/2 Latter-Day Saints 4 3 .571 1 Temple Fellowship 4 3 .571 1 Golden Gates 4 3 .571 1 Macedonia 4 4 .500 11/2 Golden Gates No.2 3 3 .500 2 Faith United 3 4 .428 2 Mercy Seat 1 6 .142 4 1 1 5 5 A A n n d d U U n n d d e e r r Y – Temple Fellowship 7 1 .875 X – Golden Gates 6 2 .750 1 X – Macedonia 5 3 .625 2 X – Faith United 5 3 .625 2 First Baptist 3 4 .428 31/2 Miracle Working COG 3 4 .428 31/2 Latter-Day No.2 3 5 .375 4 Latter-Day 2 6 .250 5 Zion South Beach 1 7 .125 6 Y – denotes clinch pen nant. X – denotes clinch playoff berth. F ROM page 11 2009 JOYCE MINUS B ASKETBALL CLASSIC I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s into the final with the fastest qualifying time in the field, as she took her heat in 55.53s while Seymour’s time of 56.03s was the fourth fastest qualifying time. In her debut Carifta Games appearance, 2007 in Turks and Caicos, Brown finished eight in the 400m final, and improved to a bronze medal performance last y ear in St. Kitts. S eymour nearly came away with a medal performance in her debut Carifta appearance before learining of the disqualification Brown said she was pleased with her execution but fell short of her ultimate goal “I really wanted to execute my curve, pick up the stagger and maintain my speed. I am a little disappointed because my mind was set on the gold and I came up a little short but I thank God t hat I have no injuries and I am h appy I came up with the silver.” U-17 BOYS 100M J J o o n n a a t t h h a a n n F F a a r r q q u u h h a a r r s s o o n n , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 1 1 0 0 . . 5 5 9 9 s s For the third consecutive year, the Bahamas fielded a medal winner in this division, with a gritty performance from Farquharson in the final 20m who just missing out on a gold medal performance by a few tenths of a second. Farquharson came into the final with just the fourth fastest time of the field, but nearly pulled off the upset over gold medalist Jahazeel Murphy of Jamaica who won in 10.41s. “I thought I had it from start but the last 10 meters but the Jamaican came through and took it,” he said. “I think I ran my best because he pretty much pushed me to the limit.” U-20 BOYS 100M W W a a r r r r e e n n F F r r a a s s e e r r , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 1 1 0 0 . . 2 2 6 6 s s ( ( w w i i n n d d a a i i d d e e d d ) ) Tragedy was followed closely by triumph for the Bahamas in the contest to decide the Caribbean’s fastest junior athlete. After witnessing his teammate go down with an injury before a somber and stunned George Oldham stadium, Fraser powered home to a second place finish, just three tenths of a second behind the eventual winner, Shakiel Graves of Barbados. While going through routine warm-ups just seconds before the start of the final, Marcus Thompson suffered an ankle injury and was forced to leave the track under medical assistance. With Fraser the lone Bahamian competitior remaining, he came within three tenths of a second within being named the fastest man at the Carifta level. Fraser improved on the 10.56s he posted in the preliminaries, which seeded him third for the final. Thompson’s time of 10.60 after winning his opening round heat seeded him fourth. Two years removed from his silver medal performance in the Turks and Caicos, Fraser returned to the marquee event of the games to repeat his feat. Just crossing the finish line, Fraser tripped and fell injuring both wrists and twisting his ankle in the process. “I was trying to come back I was catching him, I felt myself right there gaining on him and I dipped and I sort of lost balance in stride,” he said. “I was very confident, I just wanted to PR, which I did. It was a good race. I got out the blocks, I drove, executed, coming down the stretch he sort of passed me but I came back and it was a good race in all,” he said. U-20 BOYS HIGH JUMP R R a a y y m m o o n n d d H H i i g g g g s s , , G G o o l l d d , , 2 2 . . 2 2 1 1 m m , , C C a a r r i i f f t t a a R R e e c c o o r r d d During his Carifta tenure, Raymond Higgs has completely re-written the Carifta record books making him arguably the most dominant athlete in his respective discipline throughout the history of the meet. Higgs set a new record in the U nder 20 Men’s High Jump w ith a leap of 2.21m, surpassi ng the previous mark of 2.20m set by Jamal Wilson in 2007. The three time Carifta Champion took the gold medal in just three jumps, passing on five heights while his competitors struggled throughout He entered the competition at 1.80m with the field, cleared easily on his first attempt, passed on 1.85m, 1.90m, 1.95m, cleared 2.00m on his first attempt, and with the remainder o f the field eliminated, cleared 2 .09 on his first attempt for the gold medal. Gold Medal well in hand, Higgs passed on 2.12m, and set a new Carifta record of 2.21m, which he cleared on his second attempt. Higgs now holds both Carifta records in the Under 17 Boys (2.13m divisions. Higgs said the gold medal was an afterthought, his primary goal was setting a new Carifta record. “I just came set to break the record that was the mindset I had. I felt comfortable jumping so I was just taking my time and going through my jumps. I was trying to PR but I just will have to do it next time I guess,” he said. “I probably would have made it if I had competition, more people jumping with me but I will have to be sure to do it next time.” F ROM page 11 DAY THREE DAY TWO VIEUX FORT, ST, LUCIA: The final day of competition proved to be the most lucrative for Team Bahamas with a total of 11 medals on day four. U-20 BOYS LONG JUMP R R a a y y m m o o n n d d H H i i g g g g s s , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 7 7 . . 3 3 5 5 m m Just one centimetre sepa rated Raymond Higgs from a double gold medal performance on the final day of competition at the 2009 Carifta Games. Higgs duelled with native St. Lucian Lenyn Leonce for six rounds and despite digging deep on his final attempt for his best jump of the contest was unable to surpass the mark of 7.36 set by Leonce in the fourth round. U-17 BOYS 100M HURDLES P P a a t t r r i i c c k k B B o o d d i i e e , , B B r r o o n n z z e e , , 1 1 3 3 . . 4 4 5 5 s s Bodie’s dip at the line forced a photo finish before the final placement was decided and he edged out his competitor by one thousandth of a second to claim his second medal of the meet. U-20 GIRLS 100M HURDLES I I v v a a n n i i q q u u e e K K e e m m p p , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 1 1 3 3 . . 7 7 8 8 s s An exuberant Kemp wore her emotions on her sleeve after she shocked herself and the crowd with her come from behind performance to claim the silver medal. U-20 BOYS 110M HURDLES D D e e n n n n i i s s B B a a i i n n , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 1 1 3 3 . . 9 9 3 3 s s Despite hitting the third hur dle, Bain was able to recover and take the silver medal for the Bahamas’ third consecutive triumph in the sprint hurdles. U-17 GIRLS 200M A A n n t t o o n n i i q q u u e e S S t t r r a a c c h h a a n n , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 2 2 3 3 . . 9 9 5 5 s s Rashan Brown, Bronze, 23.97s Both athletes claimed their second medals of the meet simultaneously giving their Bahamas their first dual medal finish on the track. U-20 GIRLS 200M N N i i v v e e a a S S m m i i t t h h , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 2 2 3 3 . . 3 3 6 6 s s After a gruelling indoor season after her freshman year at Auburn University, Nivea Smith was unable to extend her Carifta championship streak to three in the 200m. U-17 BOYS TRIPLE JUMP L L a a t t h h o o n n e e M M i i n n n n s s , , S S i i l l v v e e r r , , 1 1 4 4 . . 5 5 8 8 m m L L a a t t h h a a r r i i o o M M i i n n n n s s , , B B r r o o n n z z e e , , 1 1 4 4 . . 4 4 9 9 m m It was double trouble for the remainder of the field in the triple jump as the duo of broth ers ensured the Bahamas claimed two positions atop the medal stand. U-17 GIRLS 4X400M RELAY T T e e s s h h o o n n A A d d d d e e r r l l e e y y , , R R a a s s h h a a n n B B r r o o w w n n , , B B i i a a n n c c a a F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n , , K K a a t t r r i i n n a a S S e e y y m m o o u u r r ; ; S S i i l l v v e e r r U-20 GIRLS 4X400M RELAY K K a a t t h h e e r r i i n n a a S S m m i i t t h h , , D D e e v v a a n n i i q q u u e e D D e e a a n n , , S S h h a a u u n n t t e e M M i i l l l l e e r r , , D D e e s s h h a a n n a a B B u u r r n n s s i i d d e e ; ; B B r r o o n n z z e e , , 3 3 : : 4 4 5 5 . . 9 9 9 9 s s DA Y FOUR continued H ere’s a look at the final medal count from the Carifta Games: TEAMGold Silver BronzeTotal JAMAICA 39 1513 67 TRINIDAD & TOBAGO 9 1010 29 BARBADOS 4 9 8 21 S T. LUCIA 4 2 0 6 BAHAMAS 3 178 28 MARTINIQUE 3 1 6 10 GRENADA 1 2 4 7 G UYANA 1 1 1 3 DONMINICA 1 1 0 2 FRENCH GUYANA 1 0 1 2 BERMUDA 0 2 4 6 G UADELOUPE 0 2 1 3 U. S. VIRGIN ISLANDS 0 1 3 4 T URKS & CAICOS 0 1 2 3 A NTIGUA & BARBUDA 0 1 0 1 S T.VINCENT & GRENEDINES 0 1 0 1 S T. KITTS & NEVIS 0 0 2 2 CAYMAN ISLANDS 0 0 1 1 N ETHERLANDS ANTILLES 0 0 1 1 A NGUILLA 0 0 1 1 CARIFTA 2009 RESULTS

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n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Commonwealth Bank Giants avoided falling into a hole by levelling their New Providence Basketball Association's best-of-five c hampionship series against t he Electro Telecom Cybots a t 1-1. Last Wednesday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium before taking a break for the Easter holiday weekend, the defending champions Giants stomped last year's runnersup Cybots 89-77 to stage up the remainder of the series that will continue on Wednesday night. "We needed to tie the series because going down 20 is a difficult position to be in," said Commonwealth Bank's coach Perry Thompson. "In the first game, we m ade a lot of mistakes in the l atter part of the game, but we weren't too concerned a bout that. "We knew that if we came back and concentrated on controlling the ball and play good defensively, we wouldbe back in the series. We did a wonderful job of that tonight." While the Giants had to play the second half without point guard Adrian Miller,w ho got ejected afer he picked up his second technical foul, Garvin Lightbourne came off the bench and was almost a one-man wrecking crew. Lightbourne, who didn't play in game one because ofan injury, pumped in a game high 28 points as he made up for the absence as well of Mark Hanna, who didn'tplay in game two. Three other Commonwealth Bank playters were in double fig-ures with Michael 'Fernley' Bain adding 21, Jeremy Huthinson 11 and Lamar Gilbert contributing 10. Before fouling out, Miller, along with Creto Kowles both scored nine. The Giants' defensive effort resulted in only two Cybots making any signifi cant impact. They were Brian 'Tucker' Bain with 26 and Nelson 'Mandella' Joseph with 21. Cecil Mackey and Billy Sands were the next two high scorers with six apeice. Dereck Cummings and Dereck Sands both hadfive. Electro Telecom's coach Wayde Watson said tey were just simply flat. "They were at a disadvantage when one of their players gone and we just couldn't stop them," Watson said. "We should have been ableto play Cybots basketball and we didn't." As they look ahead to game three, Thompson said they will continue to focus on their defense. "The Cybots is a very good team, but the whole idea is to keep them off balance," he said. "So from game to game, we will throw different things at them thatwe have been working on from last year." Watson said they will try to get in a practice before game three and hopefully they will get back to playing the way they did in game one. "We know we can play better than we did," he said. "We just have t come out and prove it. It's not going to be easy because they are the defending champions and they are going to defend their title. If we want the title, we have to go out and take it from them." The series so far has been a keenly contested one with some interesting match-ups in just about every position. It will probably come down to who play the better defense as both teams are capable of lighting the nets up offensively. The Cybots is a very good team, but the whole idea is to keep them of f balance. So from game to game, we will throw dif ferent things at them that we have been working on from last year. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 13 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations got their first crack at the relay teams qualifying for the 12th International Amateur Athletic Federation's World Championships in Athletics. But both the women's 4 x 100 and 4 x 400 and the men's 4 x 100 metre relay teams fell short at the Miami Elite Track Meet held on Saturday at the University of Miami. Fritz Grant, one of the relay coordinators, said all three of the teams performed exceptionally well and based on their performances, the Bahamas could definitely end up having all four teams qualified for the World Championships for the first time. “I think it was a good start for the relay teams,” Grant said. “I expect that when they go to the Penn Relays next weekend, they will all qualify for the World Championships with the men’s 4 x 4 team.” The team of Sasha Rolle, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, Christine Amertil and Shakeitha Henfield needed to run three minutes and 31 seconds to qualify for their spot in Berlin, Germany in August. However, they missed the cut in winning the race in 3:32.50 that was established as a new Bahamian record, improving on the old mark of 3:33.14 that was set by the team of Rolle, Amertil, Hernfield and Tonique Williams-Darling in Nassau at the Central American and Caribbean Championships in 12005. It was also a stadium record that surpassed the mark of 3:30.72 that was held by South Carolina from 2004. “Debbie seemed to be committed to the relay team,” Grant said. “She went out and ran a 52 split and Christine did 50. The other girls ran 54. So they are right there.” Not to be outdone was the men's 4 x 100 relay team of Rodney Green, Adrian Griffith, Michael Mathieu and Dereck Carey. They had to run 39.10 to qualify for Berlin, but was shy of the mark in winning in 39.77. However, they too posted a stadium record, shattering the old mark of 38.89 by Louisiana State University in 2006. “Dereck competed with a slight injury, but I think if he was 100 percent, they would have ran much faster,” Grant said. “But it was the fastest opener that the Bahamas has ever ran, so they are looking good.” The women's 4 x 1 team of Sasha Rolle, Chandra Sturrup, Christine Amertil and Debbie Fergusn-McKenzie ran 43.96 for second place. But they needed to run 43.90 to qualify for Berlin. South Florida Elite won in 43.16. “We didn’t have all of our sprinters, but the team went out and perform their best,” Grant said. “They are just as excited about the women’s 4 x 4 team and by the Penn Relays, they should qualify as well.” Individually, the Bahamas also got two victories from veteran Lavern Eve and Michael Mathieu. Eve, who is vying for another appearance at the World Championships, took just one throw and dominated the women's javelin with 188-feet, 5-inches (57.44 Erin Zampell, a freshman from Nova Southeastern, with 117Relay teams ‘got their first crack’ in Miami SEE page 14 M M I I D D W W E E E E K K C C L L A A S S S S I I C C : TRACY 'Showtime' Sweeting clinched the victory in the New Providence CyclingA ssociation's Mid-Week Classic series that was staged last Wednesday at the one-mile cycling track at theB aillou Sporting Complex. Sweeting took the senior divisional four-lap or onemile race in two minutes and 35.76 seconds. Kevin 'Kilo-man' Ingraham came in second in 2.41, followed by Anthony 'Biggie' Colebrooke in 2.44.25, Robert ' Penatrator' Bethell in 2.44.53 and Henry Kline in 2.51.38. I n the junior's four-lapper, Justin 'Jet' Minnis won in 3.07, Antinece 'Little' Simmons was second in 3.12, C arlano 'Car' Bain was third in 3.37 and Oman Cole brooke got fourth in 3.48. The Cadets or pee wee competitors had a one-lap sprint with Felix Neely crossing the line first, followed by Leonard Richardson and Ashley Colebrook. A nother Wednesday series will be staged on Wednesday at 6 pm at Baillou. W W E E S S T T E E R R N N N N E E W W P P R R O O V V I I D D E E N N C C E E S S E E R R I I E E S S : : THE N ew Providence Cycling Association hosted its Western New Providence series on Saturday around a sixmile loop around the western end of the island. In the seven-lap race, Barron 'Turbo' Musgrove clocked one hour, 52 minutes and 44.66 seconds to win. H e was followed by Tracy 'Showtime' Sweeting in 1:53:56.41. John Cox was third in 1:53:57.25. C oming in fourth was Anthony 'Biggie' Colebrook in 1:54:05.32. Tim Huber got fifth in 1:54:05.32; Jamie N ottage was sixth in 1:54:13.06; Van Demeritte seventh in 1:59:33.53 and Tony Mackey eighth in 212:15.72. There was also a four-lapper with Shawn 'the Beast' Fox taking the victory in 1:09, followed by Edmund Butler in 1:11. A nd in a three-lapper, Justin Minnis won in 50 min utes, followed by Lashane Dean, Henry Kline andA ntinece Simmons. This weekend, the majority of the cyclists will be h eading to Grand Bahama to compete in their road race and timed trials. ‘Showtime’ takes MidWeek Classic Giants even series 1-1 PERRY THOMPSON

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 14, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Premier Health Colonial Group International is rated A-(ExcellentyAM Best. GOLF JR NATIONAL TEAM TRIALS T HE Bahamas Golf Federation will hold its final trials for the junior national team t his week in Grand B ahama. The players w ill be vying for s pots on the team that will travel to the Caribbean Junior Golf Championships. The federation h osted its Central D ivisional trials last m onth at the Cable B each Golf Club and t he golfers pictured are some of the qualifiers who will make the trip to Grand B ahama for the final t rials, scheduled for A pril 14-16. 07 (35.83 Mathieu, the member of the men's silver medal relay team at the Olympic Games in Beijing, China last August, won the men's 400 in 46.45. But it wasn'tast enough for him to qualify for Berlin. Also in the event was Ravanno Ferguson, who was fourth in heat two and 18th overal in 49.98. Mathieu took part in the 200 as well, coming in second in 21.02 after he won heat two. Adrian Griffith competed in te heat, oming in third in 21.34 for eighth place. Rodney Green, winning heat five, clocked 21.88 for 11th. Leon Covington won heat one in the fastest time of 20.99. In the 100, Rodney Green clocked 10.43 for secxond in heat two and sixth place oveall, while Adrian Griffith was eighth overall after he got sixth in heat one in 10.50. Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie was the only athlete to attain a qualifying standard for Berlin at the meet. She did the B mark in the women's 200 after she won heat two in 23.01 for second overall. T he B standard was 23.30. Rosemary Whyte won heat one in 22.95. Chandra Sturrup got sixth in the women's century in 11.52. American Lauryn Williams won the race in 11.11. In the women's 400, Sasha Rolle turned in a seventh place finish in heat one 54.30. Shakeitha Henfield was second in heat two in 54.51 for ninth overall. And in the women's 100 hurdles, Tiavannia 'Tia' Thompson got seventh in 13.72. Relay teams ‘got their first crack’ in Miami F ROM page 13

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IT'S STOREnumber eight for Wendy's Bahamas and the newest location at the Lyn-d en Pindling International Airport is targeting a diverse, new market segment international and domestic passengers and airport employees. Since the new location o pened in the Domestic Term inal on March 31 at 5 a.m., customers have been bustling t hrough to enjoy the convenience of fresh, hot hamburgers, crisp salads and refreshing d esserts. L ate last year, the Nassau A irport Development Comp any awarded the contract to A etos Holdings Ltd., parent c ompanyofWendy's Bahamas. T he resulting renovations brought about a buzz of excitement in the terminal, as p eople anticipated the speedy arrival of this international q uick-serve icon. Chris Tsavoussis, President of Wendy's Bahamas, believest he move to the airport makes good business sense despite c hallenging economic times. “We are happy to be the late st food and beverage outlet to begin operations here at t he airport,” said Mr Tsavouss is. Based on the numbers of passengers travelling throughL PIA annually, we are confi d ent that our newest store will do well, and we consider it an honour to be a part of the dynamic changes taking place at LPIA.” Customers T he store anticipates high traffic from local and international travellers and Wendy's hopes to attract additional customers from the Family Islands to the world recog nised brand. Wendy's LPIA location r epresents 35 new jobs for Bahamians, adding to the current team of 400 employees. W ith more than 6,600 stores worldwide and 199 stores in the Latin Ameri ca/Caribbean region, the b rand offers a variety of deli c ious, signature hamburgers, healthy salads and made-toorder menu items that allowc ustomers to customize their meals. Wendy's is the second i nternational franchise to o pen at the airport. Just last month, the Dunkin' Donuts brand opened two outlets at LPIA. We are excited that Wendy's is the second inter national brand at LPIA andw e are looking forward to growing our relationship with all of our vendors as we move forward with the airport rede-v elopment,” said John Spinks, V ice President, Commercial Development for NAD. “Our goal is to improve the passen ger experience at the airport.P roviding them with a variety of food and beverage options is a big part of that. We lookf orward to working with the Wendy's team.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Caribbean Bottling Company congratulatesTHE 2009 BAHAMAS CARIFTA TEAMGo Team Bahamas! The Coca-Cola Company. “Coca-Cola” is a registered trademark of The Coca-Cola Company. New Wendy’s targets diverse market segment T HE GRAND OPENING f estivities culminate with pulsating Junkanoo beats and a live Rushout. ZHIVARGO LAING and Miss Bahamas Universe Sacha Scott perform the ribbon cutting to launch Wendy’s LPIA.

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A dispute involving a $10 million life insurance policy taken out on ex-Governor-General, Sir Orville Turnquest, and an associated $1.507 million loan has been ordered into arbitration proceedings by the Florida courts, Tribune Business can reveal. US District Judge Federico Moreno, sitting in the Miami division of the south Florida dis trict court, in late 2008 ordered that the action initiated by Dulaw Management, a Bahamian firm acting as the successor trustee for the Sir Orville Turnquest Irrevocable Insurance Trust, against four US companies be placed into arbitration. Judge Moreno ordered that the case be stayed pending the arbitration’s outcome. The terms of the order state that the dispute can come back before the US court “if circumstances change”, but research by Tri bune Business shows that this has not happened. Dulaw Management had ini tiated its action against life insurer, PHL (Phoenix able Insurance Company, plus LaSalle Bank, Coventry Capital and Boundless Solutions, in July 2008. It was seeking the rescission of PHL’s life insurance policy numbered 97516352, which wasa $10 million life insurance pol icy issued on Sir Orville’s life and held by the Sir Orville Turnquest Irrevocable Trust. Dulaw was also alleging “breach of agreement, misrepresentation and conversion based on their converting of both the insurance policy in question, and the asset of Sir Orville Turnquest of his insurability”, to their own. As the US district court summed up so succinctly in its arbitration order: “The trust acquired a life insurance poli cy from PHL Variable Insur ance for the former governorgeneral of the Bahamas, Sir Orville Turnquest. “To finance payment of the premiums due on the policy, the trust obtained a loan from LaSalle Bank. The loan was secured by the policy itself. Codefendant Coventry Capital served as the agent servicing the loan on behalf of LaSalle Bank, and co-defendant Boundless Solutions served as the agent C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$ $3.48 $3.49 $3.49 #!( nnrnn)'&#)&&#"( .(#+"#)'(+($$&# -'%)& &f -&##!#&$## +'+# !"!(##(f)&' rbntffn! !b n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T h e Supreme Court has refused to grant an o rder allowing a Florida-based contractor to repossess docks at the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort’s marina, finding “there was a complete lack of proper evidence” to support its assertions in a payments dispute. Senior Justice John Lyons, in his interlocutory ruling on the summons filed by Florida Floats, which was doing business as Bellingham Marine, crit icised attorneys representing both parties for failing to put solid evidence before the Supreme Court, instead relying on affidavits produced by asso ciates in their firms. The ruling recounted how Florida Floats initiated its action against the Exuma-based resort via summons on September 12, 2008. This sought a Supreme Court declaration confirming that it owned the portion of concrete floating docks for which payment had not been received from the hotel’s ultimate ownership company, Emerald Bay Resort Holdings. The contractor also sought a declaration that it was “entitled to remove the said docks immediately from the premises”, in line with a February 14, 2008, judgment in its favour. Finally, it wanted a Supreme Court order requiring the Four Seasons Emerald Bay resort to give it access to its property so it could remove the docks. Doc ks “By agreement dated March 8, 2006, the plaintiff contracted with the defendants [Emerald Bay Resort Holdings] to provide a system of floating docks for the defendant’s resort at Emerald Bay,” Justice Lyons found. “The construction and proviCourt dimisses hotel marina docks seizure Ruling in favour of Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort's holding company due to 'complete lack of evidence' in multi-million dollar dispute Freeport needs ‘thousands’ of small, foreign-owned licensees G-20/OECD assault could be a ‘blessing’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A prominent attorney has urged the Bahamas to “open the Immigration doors” and permit “hundreds, if not thousands” of small foreignowned licensees to base themselves in Freeport, in order to build a stronger economic base. Fred Smith, a Freeportbased partner in Callender’s & Co, told Tribune Business that citizenship or permanent residency status for both for eign investors in Freeport and their families would give them the confidence to ulti* Attorney urges Bahamas to 'open Immigration doors' and give foreign investors confidence to increase investments via permanent status * Touts benefits of economic diversification for keeping city's economy afloat * Without industrial sector, Freeport economy would be 'in a state of complete meltdown' SEE page 7B SEE page 6B Fred Smith Dispute over ex-governor general's $10m life policy sent into arbitration mode SEE page 10B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A former trade union leader has described the G-2 0/OECD assault on international financial centres as a potential “blessing in disguise” for the Bahamas, as it could finally force this nation toa dopt a more equitable tax structure via an income tax. Huedley Moss, who previo usly headed the union representing Water & Sewerage C orporation workers, told Tri bune Business that “if the B ahamas uses its brain”, it can still preserve its existing finan cial services industry via the i mposition of low income tax rates, and the subsequent con c lusion of bilateral double tax ation and investment treaties that will benefit internationalc lients. Arguing that the G20/OECD initiatives will inevitably mean that the Bahamas has to alter its finan-c ial services model, Mr Moss told Tribune Business that this nation needed to move away from regressive taxes as its pri mary revenue source. R egressive taxes are those that are unrelated to ability to pay. The Bahamas’ main rev e nue source, import duties, are a form of regressive tax F ormer trade union leader says Bahamas may be forced to finally bring in more equitable income tax structure, which could also save financial industry SEE page 4B As the application of a Romalpa Clause is a q uestion of fact, I am totally unable, due to the complete lack of appr opriate evidence, to come to any conclusion as to when title to any portion of those floating docks passed, if at all.” Senior Justice John Lyons B etter late than never. Finally, finally, Bahamas Supermarkets published its unaudited fiscal 2008 financial statements, around nine months after year-end and with no little public and Secu rities Commission prodding to make it happen. Reaction was relatively m uted, no doubt because most minority shareholders were anticipating the worst. The worst was what they got, with the whole episode pro v iding another black eye for Bahamian capital markets integrity. Quite apart from the $13.4 million net loss is the length of time it actually took for Bahamas Supermarkets to publish those figures. Public companies have four months, or 120 days, from year-end to pub lish their audited financials, meaning that, by rights, a June 30 fiscal periRules must be enforced for capital market integrity RIBUNE B USINESS O PINION SEE page 8B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE CAREER OPPORTUNITY Business Analyst W e are looking for a Business Analyst to develop and document detailed business procedures and test plans. Th e B usiness A nalyst should have a strong t echnical background but will be primarily focused on business process improvement. Specific duties: x Develop, document and execute test plans and business procedures x Resolve user issues related to business software applications x Liaise between end-users and technical staff x Maintain a project issues list x Coordinate small software development projects Q ualifications: xB achelors degree in Business Administration/Management or Computer I nformation Systems x3 -5 years experience in the Financial Industrywith exposure to multiple departments within an organizationxI nsurance software experience a plus xP roficient using Microsoft office products (i.e. Word, Excel, Access, O utlook and PowerPoint) xK nowledge of basic Project Management concepts xU nderstandingof basicrelational database concepts and simpleSQL q ueries, HTMLxP roficient in using a computer and able to learn new software a pplications with minimal guidancexE xcellent written and oral communication skills T he successful candidate will: x Exercise a professional attitude and excellent communication skills x Be inquisitive and a problem solver x Possess time management skills to ensure comfortable working relationship with several internal customers to meet project requirements a nd deadlines x Be dependable, organized, and detail oriented To apply: S end electronic rsum via email to careers@colinaimperial.com S ubject: Business Analyst o r S end rsum to: H uman Resources Department 308 East Bay Street P .O. Box N-4728 Nassau, Bahamas A pplications must be received by 20 April 2009. Bahamian accounting firm BDO Mann Judd has received the Interna-t ional Star for Leadership in Quality award from Business Initiative Direct ions (BID entity. BDO Mann Judd received the a ward in the Gold category, recognizing its commitment to quality, leaders hip, technology and innovation. It was presented in Paris on March 23, 2009, at the International BID Quality con-v ention, with companies from 54 coun t ries receiving awards. BDO Mann Judd was founded in Nassau in 1977 by G. Clifford Culmer, and provides accounting, auditing, insolvency, corporate finance, corpo-r ate recovery and restructuring, foren sic investigations and business cons ulting to multinational companies, public sector entities and owner-man a ged businesses, The company is a member of BDO I nternational, the world’s fifth largest accounting organisation. Mr Culmer is pictured here with Jose P rieto, executive president of BID, r eceiving the International Star for Leadership in Quality Award in the Gold category Accounting firm is ‘International Star’

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor R oyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust is looking to expand its commercial bankreach by setting up a kiosk within at least two otherb ranches, an investment advisor with the company telling Tribune Business that the initiative has given one shareholder greater differentiation from its rivals and the otherg reater market reach. Philip Dorset, who mans RoyalFidelity’s prototype kiosk inside Royal Bank ofC anada’s main branch on Bay Street, told Tribune Business that the initiative had gener-a ted “a really good response” from the latter’s branch c lients, who were now inquiring about the merchant bank’s investment-related products. M r Dorset said the RoyalFidelity kiosk had been operational for about four months, and added: “We did it to make ourselves more visible. Wew ant to let Royal Bank clients know we’re here, and there’s no better way to do that than s ituate ourselves in Royal Bank’s main branch. We’re right in the middle of the floor. It gives me an opportunity to talk about ouri nvestment products and services. That’s why we’re here.” M r Dorset explained that the kiosk was one of the visible developments in the jointv enture between Royal Bank and Fidelity. That has already r esulted in Royal Bank taking a 50 per cent stake in Roy alFidelity Merchant Bank & T rust, becoming an equal 50/50 partner in the institution w ith Fidelity Bank & Trust International. The kiosk initiative, Mr D orset said, was already being eyed for expansion, with poss ible locations at Royal Bank’s Palmdale branch and Fidelity B ank (Bahamas branch being explored. The advantage to Royal Bank of Canada is that they c an now offer pensions and investments products to their clients, because they can got o a bank providing them with access to those products,” Mr D orset explained. “So Royal Bank can differentiate itself f rom other commercial banks by providing these services.” H e added that the main products his kiosk was offeri ng were brokerage accounts, investment accounts, individual retirement accounts andm utual funds. “We’ve had a really good response,” Mr D orset said. “A lot of persons have come up to me, asking m e what it’s all about. “It’s one of those areas people have an interest in, but they don’t know how to go about finding the information, and finding the information on products and services.” Hea dded that another key was explaining to Royal Bank customers that investing was “not for the rich, not for the elite, b ut for everybody”. Able to open accounts from his kiosk, Mr Dorset said the kiosk had both a sales and marketing function. “On aver-a ge, I probably see on some days two to three people, on others I serve 10 people. It goes with the ebb and flow of customers coming into the bank,” he explained. Mr Dorset said the partners hip with Royal Bank of Canada had given RoyalFidelity extra leverage, as it provided extra reassurance to Bahamians unsure about get-t ing into investment activities. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 3B 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW /$85(77('(5,6,(5RI 3 $/0(77$3%2;1$66$8%$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG &LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH %DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\ UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOG VHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQ WZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WK GD\ RI $SULO WRWKH 0 LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 1 RoyalFidelity plans kiosk expansion PICTURED (left to right Back : Michael Anderson, president of Royal Fidelity; Alden Gibson, manager of mutual funds, Royal Fidelity. Front Row : Velma Miller, manager of investments, Royal Fidelity; Debbie Zonicle marketing manager, RBC; Quincy Fisher, Manager of personal financial RBC; Phillip Dorset, Royal Fidelity financial investment advisor; Jan Knowles, public relations, RBC; James Graham vice-president, Roy-a l Fidelity. I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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because, when imported g oods are sold to the end-consumer, the price paid is the same regardless of whether you are rich or poor. Mr Moss said: For years”, the Trade Union Congress( TUC) has advocated for a fair form of taxation for the Bahamas. We were like Johnt he Baptist in the wilderness, calling for an end to the r egressive form of current taxation in the Bahamas. “We were not successful in c onvincing any government to adopt our view on a fair form o f taxation, namely income tax. However, a number of cabinet ministers both cur-r ent and former have all agreed privately that the B ahamas is in dire need of a fair form of taxation.” Mr Moss said the most-disc ussed alternatives to the present import duty regime, namely a sales tax or valueadded tax (VAT sented indirect and regressivef orms of taxation. Both were unrelated to ability to pay, which meant that poor andr ich Bahamians would pay the same amount. Yet the former w ould be paying a far greater proportion of their income in tax. This is why the World Trade Organisation (WTO)), O rganisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECDm ation Exchange Agreements (TIEAs of us who are advocating for an equitable form of taxation for the Bahamas,” Mr Mosss aid. “Just maybe these global agencies will assist the B ahamas in accomplishing this necessary task. “I fully support the Bahamas liberalising its tax haven policies so that ourc ountry will no longer be perceived as a haven for tax dodgers, and persons and entities with questionable back-g round and character. As a matter of fact, by complying with the minimum request oft he OECD, we will be well on our way towards implementi ng an equitable form of direct taxation for the Bahamas, and thus eliminate the skewedi ndirect taxation that currently favors the rich.” A nd the former union leader added: “If the Bahamas uses its brain, it can very muchc apitalise on what it perceives as a threat, and use this threat to our advantage by coming u p with a single digit form of income tax, thus attracting new customers to our financial industry. And, at the same time, stop a possible signifi-c ant defection of clients from this industry. This is quite probable because most of the G-20 countries have high rateso f double digit income taxation.” Mr Moss argued that there w as nothing the Bahamas can do to persuade the G-20 count ries not to pursue the collective $7.3 trillion in tax dollars they alleged they were losinga nnually. This, he added, threatened t he whole structure and foundation of the Bahamian financial services industry, as it wasc lear the existing model was on borrowed time. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Thursday,April16th09@6PM DoctorsHospitalConferenceRoom RSVPSeatingisLimited302-4603 Nutrition Julia Lee-DietitianApril 16 Breast Reduction & Lift Dr.ColleenFitzcharlesBoweMay 21 June 19 DOCTORSHOSPITALDISTINGUISHEDLECTURESERIESTHISMONTHSTOPIC :SCHEDULELECTURESERIES Pleasejoinusasourguesteverythird Thursday of the month for this scintillating seriesofthemostrelevanthealthissues affectingsocietytoday.Purpose:Toeducate thepublicabout the importanthealthissues, presented by distinguished physicians.Screenings:Get your Free Blood Pressure,Cholesterol, and Glucosetesting between 5pm&6pm.RSVP:To ensureavailable seatingPhone: 302-4603LECTURE DATE SPEAKER:Julia Lee Dietitian Urinary Incontinence Dr.RobinRobertsJuly 16 Womens Health Dr.MadeleneSawyerNutrition :$17(' %DKDPDV)RRGHUYLFHVKDVDDFDQF\IRUD 3URIHVVLRQDO)RRGHUYLFHHSUHVHQWDWLYH 5HTXLUHPHQWV 0LQLPXPRIKUHHf
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n DAVID PITT AP Personal Finance Writer DES MOINES, Iowa Rising costs and uncertainty about the economy have workers less confident in their abili-ty to save enough money to retire comfortably, say the authors of a new study released Tuesday, according to the Associated Press . Even though workers are saving more and expecting to work longer to improve their chances of a happy retirement, there's still a disconnect. The survey shows many are failing to plan appropriately and making incorrect assumptions about retirement income. The new survey by the nonpartisan Employee Benefit Research Institute reveals only 13 percent of U.S. workers say they're very confident they'll have enough money to retire comfortably. "Concerns about the poor economy coupled with the losses that have recently been experienced in the stock market have resulted in the lowest percentage (of a confident outlook since the start of the survey 19 years ago," said Jack VanDerhei, one of the survey's authors and the EBRI research director. "But the good news is, I really do think this will be a wake up call for many people who had false optimism in the past." Another 41 percent of workers said they're somewhat confident of having enough savings for retirement, down two percentage points from the year before. Only 20 percent of people already retired say they're very confident they'll be financially secure. That's just half of the 40 percent from the survey a year earlier. It's no surprise that most survey respondents said the economy was largely behind their pessimism. C hange in b ehaviour With the dour mood about retirement prospects comes some behavioral changes that advisers and retirement planners say may be one of the positives coming out of the economic downturn. The survey shows 81 percent of those who have lost confidence in having enough money to retire say they are spending less. The survey also shows 65 percent of workers say they arec urrently saving money for retirement. "One strategy would have been to roll up into a ball and somehow put your head in the sand and ignore this is happening," said Dan Houston, president of retirement and investor services at Principal Financial Group Inc., an underwriter of the survey. Workers have not done that, however. He said people are beginning to understand a secure retirement means saving much more than they have been. The average worker with an employer-sponsored retirementp lan puts aside 7 percent, which is about half of what today's worker would need to live a comparable lifestyle in retirement, Houston said. Estimating how much mone y it will take to live a good retirement is one of the largest miscalculations among workers, VanDerhei said. About half the workers in the survey say their household savings and investments total less than $25,000, excluding the value of their home. A surprising 20 percent say they have less than $1,000 in savings. This signals a tremendous problem ahead. Consider that a woman earning $40,000 at retirement would need to have $203,134 in savings by age 65 to ensure she could replace 80 per cent of her income in retire ment, VanDerhei said. The cal culation assumes she has pur chased an annuity with a nomi nal guaranteed income and receives Social Security. A man under the same circumstances would need $190,138. Sources of r etirement income A nother point of confusion for many workers is the source of their retirement income. Among workers without a defined benefit retirement plan at work, 41 percent believe they have such a pension plan. A defined benefit plan is one in which an employer pays into but the worker does not. "I'm just afraid you still have a situation where these are people who don't understand the difference between defined benefit and defined contribution plans," VanDerhei said. "They think they'll magically end up w ith what mom and dad had." The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics said in a March report that just 20 percent of private industry workers have a defined benefit plan. About 43 percent have a defined contribution plan such as a 401(k A disturbing factor for many investment advisers and retirement planners from the EBRI survey is that only 44 percent of workers say they have tried to calculate how much money they'll need to have saved for retirement. Another 44 percent said they simply guess at how much they'll need. Fewer than a quarter say they've tried to approximate how much they'll need and fewer than a fifth say they've checked with a financial adviser. Nine percent say they read or heard about how much they should have, 7 percent have used an Internet calculator and5 percent filled out a worksheet. The survey is based on ran dom telephone calls to 1,257 people age 25 and older in January. It included a cell phone supplement to encompass a broader selection of people. The survey's statistical margin of error is plus or minus 3 percentage points. The was sponsored by EBRI and Washington-based market research company Mathew Greenwald & Associates Inc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conomy dampens hope of a comfortable retirement

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sion of the floating docks was to be done in several stages. “The schedule of payments is set out in Exhibit A in the contract. “The payments were to be made progressively throughout the history of the agreement. “Some progressive payments have been made. A balance remains due and owing.” A dispute arose between Florida Floats and Emerald Bay Resort Holdings, which is currently in receivership, over payment of the outstanding balance. Arbitration proceedings found in the contractor’s favour, and awarded it a sum of money, which it was now looking to the Bahamian Supreme Court to enforce. “In its summons, the plaintiff [Florida Floats] seeks to have the court grant it access to the defendant’s premises for the purpose of securing and removing that portion of the docks as would presumably represent an amount sufficient to cover the amount awarded it in arbitration,” Justice Lyons ruled. He added that the cornerstone of Florida Floats’ claim was that “title to the docks it wishes to take possession of has not passed, and those docks remain its property”. This was dealt with in the Emerald Bay contract by what Justice Lyons described as a Romalpa Clause. “Title to the docks passes when payment is made and not before,” he explained of its meaning. “Thus, in a contract of this nature, where there is a schedule of progressive payments, the title to the docks, which the progressive payments represent, passes when that payment is made.” However, Justice Lyons said that despite being told that the Emerald Bay marina contract required payment in eight stages, and that some payments had been made, no evidence was placed before him to prove that assertion. Nor did the contract itself provide any help. The main document relied on by Florida Floats was an affidavit from Kendal Nottage, an associate with the law firm representing the company. His affidavit stated that Docks B and D in the Emerald Bay marina equated to 9,480 square feet of total dock space, and were constructed at a cost of $1.176 million. This, Mr Nottage alleged, meant that repossessing both these docks would satisfy the amount awarded to Florida Floats by the courts. But Justice Lyons ruled: “I have no idea of Mr Nottage’s expertise in coming to the mathematical calculation that he does. “I have no idea as to whether Docks B and D were or were not paid for.” Dismissing Florida Floats’ claim for lack of evidence, the judge found: “As the application of a Romalpa Clause is a question of fact, I am totally unable, due to the complete lack of appropriate evidence, to come to any conclusion as to when title to any portion of those floating docks passed, if at all. “I am thus unable to come to the conclusion sought as to whether title has not passed, and thus grant the orders sought.” Justice Lyons also gave short shrift to the arguments by Emerald Bay Resort Holdings’ attorneys that the docks had become fixtures, and it was thus not right for the Supreme Court to order their removal. This again, he said, was not supported by evidence placed before the court. 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mately increase their Bahamasbased investments, and eliminate the “shifting sands” upon which the city’s economy was relying. He told Tribune Business: “My thought is that we should not always look at big, huge developments. What Freeport needs is hundreds, if not thousands, of small licensees as well. “It should not be limited to Bahamians. It is my view that the more foreigners we can entice to invest in Freeport, and at the same time give those foreigners and their families permanent residence and citizenship status, so they become part of the community – not just temporary extra for the community – then we will see some sustained, long-term foundations for growth.” Mr Smith added: “We cannot do it all ourselves, and unless we give foreign investors confidence about the long-term continuity of their investments, be it large or small, and give them confidence about their long-term Immigration status, so that they become permanent fixtures in the community, we will still be building on shifting sands. Immigration would again encourage opening our Immigration doors to give people long-term Immigration rights. We need immigration, and should use it as a tool of development, not oneof restriction and protectioni sm.” M r Smith’s comments are similar to those uttered earlier this year by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who indicat ed that Bahamians’ general aversion to essential expatriate workers being brought into thisc ountry was hampering economic development. It was, thePrime Minister hinted, deter ring both potential new investors and current ones from expanding their existing facili ties. Meanwhile, Mr Smith told Tribune Business that he did not subscribe to “the doom and gloom vision of Freeport, and Freeport’s current economic sit uation” that many seemed to have bought into. While the tourism sector was admittedly not performing well, Mr Smith said this was true for all parts of the world. Freeport, though, was reaping the benefits from a diversified economy, with its industrial sector help ing to compensate for some of the tourism-related downturn. Without that diversification, and the existence of its industrial sector, the Freeport economy would be in “complete meltdown”. “Although we have seen a dramatic downturn in the tourism sector, the truth of the matter is that Freeport’s diversified economic base is still sustaining quite a strong economy. Everything is not as bad as many perceive,” Mr Smith told Tribune Business. "A diversified economy helps to sustain a community in good and bad times. “The Container Port is still growing strong, although it recently laid-off a number of employees. The Grand Bahamas Shipyard has seen a dramatic expansion with the addition of a third dry dock, the Sands Brewery is doing quite well, the new glass window factory has just opened. Vopak has plans for expansion, and Bradford Marine is doing well. There is a tremendous amount of low and middle income housing in various stages of construction in the Lucaya area. Devco has been doing a lot of infrastructure and development improvements.” Mr Smith added that a further injection of fresh capital into Freeport’s economy had been provided by the initial phase of Ross University’s investment in its Grand Bahama-based medical school. This, he said, had already created additional demand for housing, plus retail and restau rant services. “Freeport has, over the decades, experienced ups and downs,” Mr Smith told Tribune Business. “Unfortunately, since Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne, Freeport has been quite challenged. But the economy has been able to sustain itself with the industrial sector, housing, construction and sales to foreign real estate buyers. “If the industrial sector was not here, Freeport would be in a state of complete meltdown. It is a reflection of the vision inherent in the Hawksbill Creek Agreement that there is the foreign residential economy, there is the tourism economy, and there is the industrial and commercial economy. “It would be fantastic if all these three pistons were humming at once in Freeport. But at least two of the three are humming, in some health and in some vigour.” Mr Smith added that Freeport needed “continued foreign and local investment” if its economy was to grow and thrive, with the industrial sector having picked up the slack from tourism when it came to providing employment and invest ment opportunities. “Speaking to the continued shareholder dispute at the Port Authority, that is possibly a factor in discouraging inward development, and the sooner the parties can settle their dispute, the better the investment environment will become,” Mr Smith said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fQRODWHUWKDQWK Freeport needs 'thousands' of small, foreignowned licensees F ROM page 1B It would be f antastic if all these three pistons w ere humming at o nce in Freeport. But at least two of the three are h umming, in some h ealth and in some vigour Fred Smith

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od close or thereabouts for Bahamas Supermarkets should have seen those statements pub-l ished by end-October 2008. What everyone got was unaudited accounts some five months late, and seemingly not even a slap on the wrist for the City Mark ets holding company from the Securities Commission for its tardiness and the information vacuum that has existed since the 2007a nnual general meeting (AGM Transparency and full disclosure, especially where the 22 per cent minority investors are concerned, have been sadly lacking, as evidenced by no formal public statem ent on why external auditors KPMG are finding it so hard to sign off on the 2008 audit. But there is a much wider issue than Bahamas Supermarkets’ well-being here, and it goes to the heart of Bahamian capital markets integrity and regulation. If a high-profile company such as this c an apparently get away with missing statutory requirements, with no explanation and without so much as a public reprimand, w hat does that say to all other listed firms and Securities Commission registrants? In Tribune Business’s opinion, it sends the message: “Don’t worry aboutp laying by the strict letter of the regulations, because they are never enforced.” Surely that is the wrong message to send. What will it do to investor confidence in m arket integrity? To be fair to the Securities Commission, it is widely recognised that the existing legislation is wholly inadequate in terms of enforcement and sanctions powers. Yet it admitted earlier this year that it had failed to enforce the rules in other areas, namely b roker/dealer capital requirements and investment funds meeting the statutory deadlines for filing their annual figures. With all due respect to the S ecurities Commission, if there is much more of this it will come to be seen as a relatively ‘toothless tiger’ that refuses to bite when the going gets tough. Not that it is alone in this respect. Many of the Bahamas’ problems stem from just that – enforcement. This nation has all the laws i t needs on the books, but they’re never enforced. If you’re not going to enforce the rules, get rid of them! B ack in the City Markets’ aisle, it is obvious that its parent – and all others on the so-called overthe-counter market – need to be brought on to the Bahamas Inter-n ational Securities Exchange (BISX h ave to comply with BISX Rules, an extra set of regulatory standards, and there would be no debate as to whether they are truly ‘public companies’. Enforcing the rules would also go a long way. As for the operational side, it is apparent that the road to recove ry for City Markets may be one that lasts for several years, and it will not be painless. Despite negative equity of more than $2 mill ion, which makes its parent technically insolvent, the 12-store supermarket chain has been able to meet all operational expenses and supplier payments. The mainq uestion mark is the ability of its major 78 per cent shareholder, BSL Holdings, to service the $24 million debt load it took on from R oyal Bank of Canada in the absence of dividends upstreamed from Bahamas Supermarkets. However, it appears the bank is h olding off, at least for now. In many respects, Bahamas Supermarkets is a mirror image of where its rival Abaco Markets was some six years ago. Back then, the Solomon’s SuperCentre and Cost Right owner was burdened by a similar level of Royal Bank debt, and strained cash flow a nd liquidity, which all resulted in a $24 million-plus loss for fiscal 2003. As with City Markets now,a team from Royal Bank’s Canad ian head office had already been in to run the rule over the company’s internal operations. My, my. How the tables have turned. It is now Bahamas Super-m arkets that has gone from churning out a consistent $6-$8 million per annum profit, with regular dividends, under WinnD ixie, to a supermarket chain C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.281.280.000.1270.00010.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.1511.31Cable Bahamas12.5511.31-1.241,0001.3090.2508.62.21% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.45Commonwealth Bank (S16.456.450.000.4380.05014.70.78% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.422.36-0.060.0990.05223.82.20% 3.002.09Doctor's Hospital2.092.090.000.2400.0408.71.91% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.40FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.40-0.054,4300.7940.40013.13.85% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.000.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.44891.3847Colina Money Market Fund1.44891.064.63 3.69603.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L: : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 27 70 0 1 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L L F F I I D D E E L L I I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 -3 35 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F F G G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K KE E T T S S 2 24 4 2 2-3 3 9 9 6 6 4 4 0 0 0 00 0 | | C C O OL L O O N N I I A A L L 2 2 4 42 2 -5 5 0 02 27 75 5 2 25 5F INDEX: CLOSE 805.27 | YTD -3.55% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTUESDAY, 7 APRIL 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,622.57 | CHG -15.99 | %CHG -0.98 | YTD -89.79 | YTD % -5.24BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . . B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 33 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 42 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3-2 2 3 3 2 20 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 27-Mar-09 31-Jan-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV A global leader in audit, tax and advisory services Assistant Manager/Manager, Restructuring The Assistant Manager/Manager will report to the Dir ectors of KPMG Restructur ing Ltd.. The role has primary responsibility for managing a portfolio of liquidation and corpor ate restructuring clients. Specific duties include managing: xliquidation cases, including both voluntary liquidations and court appointments xr estructuring engagements for lenders, providi ng independent business reviews of borrowers’ b usinesses, and assisting lenders in developing and implemen ting options with respect to their financial exposure to such borrowers xrestructuring advisory services to companies with financial issues xcomplex and lengthy litigation issues in several jurisdictions xa portfolio of restructuring clients, including financial matters su ch as work in progress, and accounts receivable xr estructuring professionals in their work, and i nvolvement in the internal performance appraisal p rocess xbusiness development initiatives Applicants must be a university graduate and a memb er of a recognized accountan cy or insolvency body in addition to holding a minimum of five to seven years re levant work experience, with preferably three or more of those in a restructuring role at a comparable level. This position requires attention to detail, strong financial and writing skills, the ability to work at one's own initiative, and th e ability to meet tight deadlines. KPMG offers a competitive compensation and benefits package inclusive of medical and pension plans. _______________________________________Applicants should submita cover letter, resume,a copy of their degree and professional certifications and a copy of theirtranscripts to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or jalightbourne@kpmg.com.bs no later than Friday 24 April, 2009 . 2009. KPMG, aBahamas partnership, and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative.All rights reserved. Rules must be enforced for capital market integrity F ROM page 1B SEE page 9B Opinion

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C LICO (Bahamas c yholders will not have had too much to celebrate this Easter, and understandably so. Their long-term life savings, pensions and healthcare coverage are all inaccessible, and how much they get back is in the hands of court-appointed liquidator Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez. It is, as Tribune Business said, likely to be less than the full dollar invested. Y et there is finally a first glimmer of light for Bahamian insurance policyholders and annuity depositors, but not for their coun-t erparts in Guyana and Suriname. The hint is contained in Mr Gomez’s first report to the Supreme Court as provisional liquidator, where he states that $49 million worth of funds ($34 million from Guyana, $15 millionf rom Suriname) that flowed into CLICO (Bahamas fers of funds that amounted to related-party loans, not standard policy contracts. As a result, if this line of thinking and treatment is upheld by the Supreme Court, it would mean that $49 million worth of liabilities would drop down the pecking order, and be ranked below the liabilities owed to Bahamian clients of CLICO (Bahamas Bahamian institutions and policyholders would get first call on the assets, with Guyana and Suriname left to fight over what is left and be the ones most out of pocket. Could mean some tricky CARICOM meetings for Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham. Removing those $49 million worth of liabilities would resulti n a far healthier balance sheet facing Mr Gomez, with some $116.965 million in assets playing $86 million in liabilities. Even if $40-million plus is knocked off the value of CLICO (Bahamas F lorida real estate investments, reducing assets to around $66 million, the situation facing the liquidator will look far healthier. On another note, CLICO (Bahamas just how much of a deposit-taking ( banking) institution it was, as opposed to an insurance company. Some $98.524 million – almost $100 million – of its $135 million liabilities are to Executive Flexible Premium Annuity (EFPAc lients, representing those who piled into it above-average interest return annuity products. They d id not equate risk with return. Lesson learned for the future, we hope, ladies and gentlemen. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 9B /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV now embarking on the long road to recovery. Abaco Markets, foll owing four to five years of downsizing, cost cutting and hard decis ions, is by contrast starting to churn out regular annual profits and getting investors salivating over the prospect of dividend payments. And that is why Bahamas Supermarkets shareholders should n ot lose hope. Yes, much will depend on Trinidadian operating partner Neal & Massey, and the new business plan put together for City Markets. But the way forward has been shown by Abaco Markets, granted that it may be an arduous one. CLICO’s foreign liabilities could be asset for liquidator Rules must be enforced for capital market integrity F ROM page 8B

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for PHL Variable Insurance Company.” In its initial complaint, Dulaw Management alleged that for a life insurance policy to be valid under Florida law, the policy owner must have an “insurable interest in the life of the proposed insured”. It alleged that this was not the case with the policy taken out on Sir Orville’s life, as the defendants had obtained an insurance policy on the former governor-general’s life without having an insurable interest in it. Dulaw alleged that Boundless Solutions, acting as a PHL agent, had approached Sir Orville in early 2006, proposing that it would obtain free life insurance for two years on his life. It also claimed that the policy was represented as a vehicle for Sir Orville to “market his insurability in a way that would obtain for him a substantial profit”. Scheme However, Dulaw alleged that the transaction was nothing more than a scheme that would enable LaSalle Bank, Coventry Capital and Boundless Solutions to obtain large fees, convert Sir Orville’s insurability to themselves and end up with a $10 million policy on the former governor-general’s life. Dulaw also alleged that the $1.507 million loan that LaSalle advanced to pay the premiums for two years was a “sham transaction”, and a nonrecourse loan that restricted its ability to sell the life insurance policy even if it were able to obtain financing that exceeded the loan amount. Annual premiums were said to be $540,000. Ultimately, Dulaw alleged that the policy was an “illegal wagering contract” that needed to be rescinded. In response, all four US companies vehemently denied Dulaw Management’s allegations. In its defence, Boundless Solutions alleged that the contracts contained all the required details that fully disclosed the terms of the deal. It added that the coverage remained in force until an alleged default on the loan, at which point LaSalle and Coventry converted the policy to their own interest. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Dispute over ex-governor general's $10m life policy sent into arbitration mode F ROM page 1B

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C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONC HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 Giving IFE the gift of n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net MOST people assume t he choice of deciding who t o marry, which college to attend, or deciding one of the many major decisions w e are faced with during life, should be personal decisions. However many fail to give as much thought to post-mortem decisions, in many cases leav ing family or doctors to decide what’s best for t hem. According to one medical professional, detailing your last wishes when it comes to deciding whether or not to donate your organs after your death, determining whethero r not to pull the plug should you end up in a comatose state, or whether to be buried or cremated, are decisions that not only direct your physical destiny, but could give life to dozens more. D octor Michael Darville Assistant Clini cal Director for Intermediate, and Intensive Care Units (IMCU/ICU spoke at the facility’s recent health symposium where he explained the importance of pre-planning your final wishes. He explained one of the most positive results can be organ donation as doing so can save up to to eight lives, and potentially ben efit close to 50 individuals. R eferring to critical and terminally ill patients, Dr Darville said: “We (doctors often have to decide what’s in the best interest of the patient, but sometimes that does not line up with what the family would want. And so we’d have to sit and come to a point of agreement or understanding that is in the best interest of the patient.” With this proving to sometimes be a diffi cult experience for both the doctor and the f amily, Dr Darville said the practice of advanced directives does help significantly with providing proper medical or palliative care in accordance with a patients wishes. Advanced directives is a process which allows n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net SO you are sitting at home painting your toenails that bright fuchsia color you love so much. Everything is going great and it looks pretty good, besides the subtle line mistakes, when all of a sudden your toenail drops clean off. You shut your eyes thinking that the pain will come soon, but nothing happens. No blood, no pain, but a brand new, soft, toe nail has emerged as you slowly, but carefully remove the old toenail. If this sort of thing happens to you on more than one occasion, you are not mutating, but it is a common condition and you are not alone. According to Emedicine.com, Ony cholysis is the spontaneous separation of the nail plate from the nail bed, usually beginning at the distal free margin and progressing proximally. “Men and women can develop ony cholysis; however, studies demonstrate an overwhelmingly female predilection. This is commonly seen in women whose nails are exposed to chemical irritants during housework. Other common causes of onycholysis may include repetitive micro trauma from a poorly fitting shoe for example and, onychomycosis (fungal infection article stated. Doctor of Podiatric Medicine at the Bahamas Foot Centre located on Rosetta Street, Monique Mitchell, said there are a number of reasons why this problem can occur, especially in women who have longer toenails. “Many women like to wear their toe nails long now a days and many problems can arise from doing that and ony cholysis is one of them. When you wear a closed in shoe and you walk, your foot can advance and hit the inside of the shoe and the nail lifts up. A lot of people do not feel when the toe nail comes off or is coming off and do not pay attention to it,” Mrs Mitchell said. Medical conditions that can be associated with onycholysis, according to Emedicine.com include: psoriasis, pregnancy, lichen planus, systemic lupus, Reiter’s syndrome, thyroid disease, sec ondary syphilis, anemia, diabetes mellitus, scleroderma, atopic dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis to nail cosmetics, certain drugs including oral contraceptives, tetracyclines, captopril, etc, foreign body for example acrylic nails and congenital or hereditary etiologies. Mrs Mitchell said those who experi ence onycholysis, should not be alarmed as there are a number of ways to treat the condition. “You can first see a doctor to make sure that you do not have a fungus. The other thing is that you can make sure you have your nails properly groomed and cut at an appropriate length. Also, keep you nails dry and avoid frequent nail polish remover exposure. It takes four to six months for a fingernail to fully regrow, and twice as long for toenails, therefore, you will not notice the toe nail infection until it is ready to come off most of the time,” Mrs Mitchell said. What is Onycholysis? SEE page five ONYCHOLYSIS is the spontaneous separation of the nail plate from the nail bed, usually beginning at the distal free margin and progressing proximally.

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LILIES AND OTHERS’ covers all those bulbs, rhizomes, tubers and corns that w e plant in selected areas of the garden to grow in their own chosen season, diea way above ground, then come back again the next year with added interest. Bulbs, etc, come with instructions as to what depth to plant them. You may be advised to dig up the bulbs after the blooming season is over but that is not necessary in The Bahamas except for those bulbs that need a cooling period. Once flowering is over, most bulbs multiply and produce even more flowers in the second and subsequent years. Bulbs that need a cooling period – usually those that bloom in late winter and early spring in temperate zones – should be dug up once they have fully died back and stored in cool, dry conditions. In the period before the expected growing time the bulbs should be stored in the refrigerator for anywhere from a month to two months. Bulbs that grow in the late spring, summer and autumn in temperate zones are the ones that can stay in the ground year round and these form the vast majority. The true Lily family is vast and complex. Those often seen in Bahamian nurseries are Asiatic, Oriental and Longiflorum hybrids. Asiatic lilies are early blooming and must therefore be stored and refrigerated in order to enjoy them yearafter year. Although Easter lilies may seem to be early bloomers, they are forced by nursery suppliers in order to be ready for the Easter market. Left to their own devices they are summer bloomers. Amaryllis and Hippeastrum are two different species but are so often confused that we can deal with them as one. Both have very large bulbs and produce wonderfully ornate flowers that are long lasting. Both tend not to produce secondary bulbs in our climate. The gloriosa lily is a subtropical plant grown from rhizomes that loves our climate. But it is not a lily. Many plants are called lilies because they are lily-like. Other plants which are called “lily” but are not include rain lily and spider lily. Gloriosa lily is a sprawling vine that usually grows to four or five feet. It is best grown in clusters around some framework for support. When the flowers first appear the petals curl down and then, within hours, assume the distinctive curled over position. The spider lily grows wild but that does not mean it has no place in the garden. An area of poor soil set outw ith spider lilies will soon become a focal point and conversation piece. Zephyranthes, called August flower or rain lily locally, have leaves rather like St Augustine grass and also have the habit of invading lawns. This presents homeowners with ap roblem when the lawn needs mowi ng but the zephyranthes are blooming prettily. The usual colours seen locally are mauve, pink, white and yellow. Caladiums grow from rhizomes and are popular candidates for shaded areas. The heart-shaped leaves feature white, pink, green and red markings, though not all in the same plant. Caladiums produce callalily like flowers towards the end of the season, which extends from early spring to late autumn. Gladiolas usually bloom in late summer but the first time you plant them they may bloom shortly afterwards regardless of season. Gladiolas are very pretty with their sword-like foliage and stunning flowers that pro duce a new bloom each day. One problem with them is that they often need staking if the bulbs are not dug in deep enough. I would love to see more cannas g rown in The Bahamas. Their foliage is redolent of the tropics and the flowers – red, orange, coral, pink or white – are very showy. Once estab lished, cannas look after themselves. They are great candidates for growing against fences or walls where theya ttain a height of four to six feet. T he planting of bulbs, rhizomes, tubers and corms is an investment that is sure to appreciate over the years. And be appreciated. GREEN SCENE By GARDENER JACK C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE P&G Love the skin you’re in.It whipped several very expensive creams. (Even the $350 one. A personalized skin care consultation awaits you @ OlayForYou.com The Good Housekeeping Research Institute put the pricey face creams to the test. Not one measured up to Olay Regenerist Micro-Sculpting Cream. It made skin more hydrated and for a longer period of time. Save your skin. And $325 in the process.*Based on Good Housekeeping Research Institute test of several $100 + face creams. L ILIES AND OTHERS GLORIOSA lily can be grown singly as as pecimen plant or in clusters. THE BULBS of these Asiatic Hybrid lilies need to be cooled for a period each year. ONCE established, cannas look after themselves and can become a dominant feature of the garden.

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SICK of mid-day slick and shine? Make a few adjustments to your skin care regimen to help control oil production frommorning until night. Create a “matte kit” that fits conveniently in your purse or backpack for mid-day touch-ups. Your kit should include oil-free lotions or sunscreens containing microsponges that help soak up excess oil. It can also contain wipes loaded with Salicylic Acid (not alcohol! skin, help prohibit acne bacte ria, and keep skin feeling fresh. Use a clay-based cleanser to help mop up oil on the surface. After cleansing, apply a moisturiser, even if you think your skin doesn't need it. Oily skin can suffer from dehydration (which is a lack of waterw hile being oily. Once or twice a week, apply a clay-based masque to help control sebaceous gland secretions and clean out pores. Exfoliation can help control oil production, improve skin texture, and help prevent clogged pores that lead to breakouts. It also helps prep the skin for maximum treatment from oil-controlling ingredients. Your professional skin therapist can prescribe a physical or chemical exfoliant to improve the health of skin. Sarah Beek is a skin care therapist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit her and her team of skin and body therapists at One Sandyport Plaza (the same building as Bally’s Gym). For more information visit www.dermal-clinic.com or call 327.6788 . L OVING RELATIONSHIPS C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 3C AS CHILDRENwe have grown up witnessing the relationships of our parents, aunts, uncles, teachers and family friends. The impressions and overall outlook on relating, showing affection and respecting individuals is mapped early into our subconscious. This early map often influencesus in our relationships later on in life and if these early memories have been unpleasant or have resulted in shame then difficulties with sexuality are common. Indeed those early experiences may be so far back and so shut off that sometimes we may not even be able to see that they have anything to do with our present situation. All that we may know is that we are not happy with our close relationships or perhaps the lack of any close relationship. But there is hope. We can overcome our past and a childhood of unhappiness does not preclude having an unhappy future. Certainly there are phases to long term relationships. Peaks and cycles change with each decade and are influenced by life events such as divorce, death, financial pres sures and children. But let's start at the beginning. We may have fallen in love and experienced that euphoric high of romantic love and the wonderful effects of the rush of oxytocin from the thought or touch of our love interest. The bonding and attachment from the early frequent touching contribute to the desire and longing for that person when they are not with us. There is a feeling of hope for the future and this romantic love stage generally lasts from three to twenty seven months. The comfort then sets in and we generally become relaxed. We may put on weight and not pay so much attention to our appearance or to other things that were so important in the beginning, such as touching. A power struggle often develops in the long term relationship and each becomes reactive and defensive in an attempt to protect the feelings of the early love. As humans, our response to being attacked is 'fight or flight'. We may fight because we feel scared or we may just withdraw and in this way create a safe protected space. Or we may freeze and appear uncommunicative. This may appear as an inability to listen or to express one self. This is the start of the disconnection within the couple bond and if not interrupted then a cycle of defensive behavior starts. When this conflict goes on for a long time, we may come to accept the situation for varying reasons; financial, security, familiarity, fear of change and lack of confidence to start a fresh. Often the effect on children and extended family influences our decisions to stay and so we detach ourselves a little and in essence go to 'sleep'. It is at this stage of sleep that couples often come to couples therapy because of lack of interest in sex, sexual problems, noninitiation, feelings of rejection, abandonment, and resentment. Feelings of lack of passion and eroticism towards the partner may have become habitual. We may in fact not even view our partners as erotic but as someone who is safe. This is just living beside someone not fully awake but 'asleep'. The good news is that there can bea 'waking up' once one or both persons recognises and wants to rekindle the first feelings of the romantic high. This requires looking closely at what has happened to each person's erotic needs along the way. Without a doubt there is nothing that deadens sexual desire faster than unresolved differences. The resurgence of the oxytocin rush can be brought on again with the careful help of a relationship therapist and the joy can return at any age. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist located at The Centre for Renewing Relationships, Grosvenor's Close West. She can be contacted by calling 356-7983 or by e-mail a t relatebahamas@yahoo.com or at w ww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is available for speaking engagements. The pattern of RELATIONSHIPS BY MAGGIE BAIN CORRECTION IN AN article appeari ng in T ribune Health o n M arch 24, on the topic S urviving Menopause , the word osteosclerosis was used to describe a gradual w eakening of the bones in p ost menopausal women due to a lack of calcium. However, the correct med-i cal term to describe the condition is osteoporosis. We hope this clears up any confusion. Controlling oily shine BY SARAH BEEK

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Susan Heathfield elaborates on the topic of empowerment in this way: “Empowerment is the process of enabling or authorising an individual to think, behave, take action, and control work and decision making in autonomous ways. It is the state of feeling self-empowered to take control of your own destiny.” Employees either want to be empowered or they don't. Managers either have the ability or will to create opportunities to empower employees or they don't. The culture of your company has a direct impact on whether or not managers and supervisors can create opportunities to empower you as an employee. Here area few examples of the components of culture that contribute to opportunities to empower others: D D e e c c i i s s i i o o n n M M a a k k i i n n g g P P o o w w e e r r : If your organisation is highly structured with all the decision making power centralised to the top, it can be impossible to develop an empowered team. In this reality, the owners or executives make all the decisions and even if they allow employee input, there is a subtle or sometimes obvious way they stage-manage the message and communication process so the team always arrives at the original intent of the owners or executives. O O r r g g a a n n i i s s a a t t i i o o n n a a l l P P o o l l i i t t i i c c s s : If your organisation is highly political with employees and managers jockeying for status, opportunities or power, this can undermine your ability as a manager or supervisor to create an environment that sup ports empowerment. For example, if a supervisor is given a project to complete and highly political team mates are appointed to the com mittee, the members of the committee can sabotage the project by incapacitating the platform for creativity. C C o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n : : It is impossible to empower e mployees if they don't even know what they a re supposed to be doing or if they have no voice. If your organisation has impaired topdown and bottom-up communication flows, there are probably managers and employees who hoard information or discourage employee input. Some of these managers retain important or relevant information to control thet eam, keeping you in the dark so they can: o Protect or build their status or brand o Camouflage their incompetence o Hinder your development as an employee. o Avoid having you suggest ideas that are perceived to be better than theirs If you see yourself in one of these manager types, you usually provide a minimal amount of data that slowly trickles down to employees and you consciously or unconsciously discourage the flow of information to the top. In cases where information does move up through the formal and informal channels, it may be through highly political employees who are intent on putting their spin on the facts. T T i i p p s s f f o o r r C C r r e e a a t t i i n n g g a a P P l l a a t t f f o o r r m m f f o o r r E E m m p p o o w w e e r r m m e e n n t t R R e e l l e e a a s s e e c c o o n n t t r r o o l l a a n n d d d d e e c c e e n n t t r r a a l l i i s s e e d d e e c c i i s s i i o o n n m m a a k k i i n n g g . If you do decide to grant employees additional responsibility or decision making power, you can release control in small quantities to build their skills, confidence and trust. B B u u i i l l d d t t r r u u s s t t by creating an environment or space that will support creativity and allow room for error. If employees are afraid to make mistakes they will not be open to taking the risks of being creative or responsible. R R e e i i n n f f o o r r c c e e b b e e h h a a v v i i o o u u r r s s w w i i t t h h p p o o s s i i t t i i v v e e f f e e e e d d b b a a c c k k . If employees are reassured that they are on the right track and you provide coaching and mentoring instead constant criticism you can create opportunities for empowerment, growth and trust. As an executive or owner , , a a s s k k y y o o u u r r s s u u p p p p o o r r t t s s t t a a f f f f f f o o r r i i n n p p u u t t and be open to letting them generate and implement creative solutions that ared ifferent than yours. B B e e s s u u r r e e e e m m p p l l o o y y e e e e s s a a r r e e a a w w a a r r e e o o f f y y o o u u r r e e x x p p e e c c t t a a t t i i o o n n s s f f o o r r r r e e s s u u l l t t s s . C C h h e e c c k k i i n n w w i i t t h h e e m m p p l l o o y y e e e e s s p p e e r r i i o o d d i i c c a a l l l l y y to sup port their progress. Not to micromanage them. There are some organisational cultures that are low on standardisation with limited polices andp rocedures that need to be standardised to cre ate efficiencies of scale and quality products and services. Then there are other cultures that thrive on non-standardisation because vision, imagination and originality are important constituents of their success. There is another type of organisational culturet hat is very committed to policies and proced ures and centralised decision making proto cols. In highly scripted environments like these, when it makes sense, you can seek to balance your need to impose policies and procedures with deliberate attempts to develop and stretch your employees. Based on my experience, empowered employ ees are critical thinkers, decisive, imaginative, results driven, accountable, self-motivated and sometimes better leaders because of construc tive empowerment initiatives. Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational Soul, an HR Consulting and Leadership Development company. If you are interested in exploring how you can create a platform for empowerment, you contact her at www.orgsoul.com . C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009, PAGE 5C Signed: Captain Anthony J. Allens Port Controller MINISTRYOFTHE ENVIRONMENT PORTDEPARTMENT W E always hear about the importance of empowering our employees. In reality, it is not clear that t his is even possible. Is empowerment something managers and supervisors can do? Or do employ-e es have to decide to empower themselves? From my perspective, empowerment cannot be given to y ou. Circumstances for it to happen can be created and then you have to make a decision to accept the challenge and empower yourself. By YVETTE BETHEL The quest for empowerment patients to direct the course of their medical care should they end up in a state where they are unable to definitively communicate their wishes. Dr Darville explained, in the event that a patient has end stage cancer, or a termi nal illness, the choice still lies with the patient whether they should be resuscitated or not. He said: “Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation is the norm, unless a patient has expressed in advance not to be resuscitated. “In other words, If they don’t tell me in advance, or do not have it written down that they don’t wish to be resuscitated, I am obligated to go ahead and start resuscitating.” He said according to the Health Care Act regarding patients’ rights which was last revised in 2000, patients have the right to privacy, transparency regarding their prac titioners background, and the right to information on various medical procedures. However in the absence of advance directives, the decisions should the patient end up in a non-communicative state is legally that of their family or legal representative. However no clarity is offered to determine which family member has to make that decision, giving way to further disputes within that family. Dr Darville asked: “Is it my wife who decides, is it my mother, is it my brother who I owe $1,000, or is it the first relative who walks through the doors at the hospital.” Regardless to this debate however, if the patient requires immediate surgery and the family or legal rep resentative can’t be reached, then the doctor makes that call on surgery he said. In the existence of an advance directive by the patient, Dr Darville said the physician’s obligation to the patient should always be in providing palliative care. This means that whether a patient requested medical interven tion or not, they should be made as comfortable as possible in a way which doesn’t seek to eliminate their disease or illness, but rather to minimise the effects of its symptoms. Overall, Dr Darville indi cated that in an effort to bring about a greater awareness of advanced directives, there now exist an ethics committee of which he is a part and said they have planned a number of seminars to educate more persons on the issues. He said apart from the important family discussion on advance directives and post-mortem decisions, mak ing your decisions clear to your physician is also an important step in formulat ing and having your impor tant wishes executed. Giving the gift of life FROM page one DR Michael Darville address the audience at the recent health symposium held at Doctors Hospital.

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 61F/16C Low: 62F/17C Low: 68F/20C Low: 72 F/22C Low: 72F/22C Low: 75F/24C Low: 75 F/24C Low: 73F/23C High: 84F/29C High: 81F/27C High: 87 F/31C High: 86F/30C High: 88F/31C High: 85 F/29 High: 88F/31C Low: 75F/24C High: 87 F/31C Low: 76 F/24 High: 88 F/31CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 69F/21C High: 89F/32C Low: 73 F/23C High: 86F/30C Low: 69 F/21C High: 83F/28C Low: 72 F/22C High: 88F/31C Low: 73F/23C High: 91 F/33C Low: 71F/22C High: 87 F/31C Low: 71 F/22C High: 88F/31C Low: 72F/22C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25C High: 90F/32C High: 86F/30CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 14TH2009, PAGE 7CTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Windy with partial sunshine. Partly cloudy, breezy and humid. Mostly sunny.Sunshine with a t-storm possible. Mostly sunny and pleasant. High: 88 Low: 75 High: 89 High: 83 High: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Mostly sunny and breezy. High: 81 Low: 72 Low: 67 Low: 69 AccuWeather RealFeel 100F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 83F 108-80F 94-65F 78-67F 81-72F Low: 72 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 84F/29C Low .................................................... 73F/23C Normal high ...................................... 81F/27C Normal low ........................................ 69F/20C Last year's high .................................. 89F/31C Last year's low .................................. 73F/23C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................2.07"Normal year to date ......................................6.19" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Last New First Full Apr . 17 Apr . 24 May 1May 9 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:49 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:32 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . . . . none Moonset . . . . 10:10 a.m. Today W ednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 11:42 a.m.2.35:47 a.m.0.4 -----5:43 p.m.0.4 12:12 a.m.2.66:33 a.m.0.5 12:27 p.m.2.26:30 p.m.0.5 1:02 a.m.2.57:23 a.m.0.6 1:17 p.m. 2.17:25 p.m.0.6 1:56 a.m. 2.48:16 a.m.0.6 2:15 p.m. 2.1 8:25 p.m.0.6 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 90/3273/22s88/3174/23s Amsterdam65/1850/10sh70/2150/10pc Ankara, Turkey64/1743/6pc55/1234/1r Athens67/1954/12sh63/1750/10sh Auckland68/2054/12sh67/1953/11pc Bangkok91/3280/26sh93/3379/26pc Barbados85/2975/23s85/2976/24s Barcelona63/1750/10s61/1649/9sh Beijing77/2550/10pc66/1841/5pc Beirut79/2663/17c67/1960/15pc Belgrade60/1546/7pc73/2249/9s Berlin72/2251/10s75/2352/11s Bermuda 65/1864/17pc73/2264/17r Bogota65/1847/8r66/1847/8r Brussels72/2252/11sh73/2252/11pc Budapest74/2347/8s72/2249/9sBuenos Aires 70/2154/12s72/2261/16s Cairo99/3761/16pc84/2861/16pc Calcutta 99/3779/26s99/3777/25s Calgar y42/525/-3c41/523/-5pc Cancun88/3173/22s91/3271/21s Caracas82/2769/20pc81/2770/21sCasablanca 70/21 52/11 s 67/1951/10pc Copenhagen 64/1750/10c56/1344/6pc Dublin52/1141/5sh50/1043/6rFrankfurt 77/25 50/10pc79/2648/8pc Geneva65/1848/8sh70/2152/11pc Halifax44/624/-4c46/727/-2sHavana 91/32 68/20 s91/3268/20t Helsinki50/1034/1c43/632/0pc Hong Kong 79/2672/22sh79/2670/21t Islamabad90/3264/17c93/3361/16c Istanbul68/2049/9r53/1148/8shJerusalem 90/3251/10pc64/1749/9s Johannesburg 68/20 50/10pc70/2151/10s Kingston 86/30 76/24s86/3076/24s Lima81/2766/18pc82/2765/18c London 63/17 46/7 pc64/1750/10r Madrid59/1541/5r57/1337/2sh Manila95/3577/25sh87/3079/26t Mexico City81/2754/12t81/2747/8s Monterrey90/3261/16pc96/3567/19sMontreal 52/1130/-1s54/1232/0s Moscow 55/1236/2pc61/1636/2pc Munich74/2340/4s74/2340/4s Nairobi86/3060/15pc86/3060/15sh New Delhi113/4572/22s108/4277/25s Oslo 52/1141/5sh46/740/4r Paris 68/2052/11sh70/2150/10sh Prague72/2242/5s69/2041/5s Rio de Janeiro82/2770/21sh77/2567/19r Riyadh91/3266/18s95/3572/22s Rome70/2149/9s68/2052/11s St. Thomas 85/29 74/23s83/2875/23s San Juan88/3161/16s89/3161/16s San Salvador93/3370/21s88/3172/22pc Santiago84/2850/10s82/2750/10s Santo Domingo88/3170/21s85/2969/20s Sao Paulo74/2356/13t71/2155/12t Seoul 72/2246/7pc59/1545/7r Stockholm55/1234/1pc50/1032/0pc Sydney73/2263/17t77/2559/15s T aipei 77/25 69/20r81/2770/21pc Tokyo63/1759/15r68/2054/12r Toronto54/1235/1pc51/1037/2pc Trinidad84/2872/22c85/2967/19pc Vancouver53/1139/3pc53/1137/2sVienna 68/20 53/11s73/2254/12s Warsaw65/1847/8s61/1639/3s Winnipeg58/1436/2pc61/1639/3pc HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayWednesdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles76F Wednesday:S at 15-20 Knots3-5 Feet10-20 Miles76F Today:S at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles76F Wednesday:S at 15-20 Knots3-5 Feet10-20 Miles76F Today:S at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles76F Wednesday:S at 15-20 Knots3-5 Feet10-20 Miles76F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 74/2347/8c66/1839/3pc Anchorage40/433/0c45/732/0pc Atlanta 66/18 43/6pc65/1846/7s Atlantic City48/842/5r47/836/2r Baltimore50/1042/5r49/936/2rBoston 54/12 39/3pc49/937/2pc Buffalo54/1235/1pc55/1234/1pc Charleston, SC77/2553/11t71/2145/7s Chicago48/836/2r54/1240/4pcCleveland 52/11 41/5r56/1337/2pc Dallas77/2555/12s77/2557/13pc Denver68/2039/3pc65/1834/1c Detroit52/1140/4r60/1537/2pc Honolulu83/2870/21pc81/2769/20pcHouston 80/26 57/13 s82/2762/16pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayWednesday T odayWednesday T odayWednesday Indianapolis 52/1138/3r58/1443/6c Jacksonville78/2551/10t74/2349/9s Kansas City 63/17 40/4s69/2051/10pc Las Vegas79/2649/9pc64/1748/8c Little Rock67/1945/7pc72/2252/11sLos Angeles 68/20 50/10pc66/1850/10s Louisville56/1342/5r60/1545/7c Memphis62/1647/8pc70/2151/10s Miami88/3172/22s86/3067/19t Minneapolis 62/16 38/3s64/1743/6pc Nashville54/1241/5c62/1644/6pc New Orleans73/2254/12s76/2459/15s New York52/1143/6r52/1143/6r Oklahoma City75/2350/10s78/2553/11pc Orlando 84/28 61/16 t82/2756/13s Philadelphia49/942/5r49/938/3r Phoenix88/3163/17c74/2350/10pc Pittsburgh54/1244/6r58/1436/2c Portland, OR51/1039/3pc54/1240/4pc Raleigh-Durham 61/1648/8t59/1540/4c St. Louis54/1240/4c63/1747/8sSalt Lake City 57/1339/3r45/735/1sn San Antonio 80/26 59/15 pc78/2560/15pc San Diego63/1755/12pc66/1854/12pc San Francisco60/1545/7s55/1246/7sSeattle 50/1037/2pc53/1140/4pc T allahassee 78/2548/8t75/2348/8s Tampa81/2762/16t77/2558/14s Tucson84/2859/15c75/2346/7s Washington, DC51/1044/6r50/1039/3r UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-stormsRain Flurries SnowIce AccuWeather.com

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Tyrina Neely, owner of Primadona, has been hosting Primadona Designer Sales since July of 2008. Originally the sales were held every third month but due to popular demand they will now be held every other month with private clearance sales for Primadona subscribers. Primadona carries mostly con temporary brands such as Diane von Furstenberg, Calypso by Christianne Celle, Betsey John s on, Kenneth Cole NY, Free People, Alice+Olivia and many others. Ms Neely also carries Igigi, a designer plus size brand .xclusively in The Bahamas. “My aim is to provide not only beautiful designer clothing and accessories for women that they cannot find here on the island at great prices but also to provide a comfortable, elegant setting for them to do so. Graycliff provides a beautiful backdrop to the event, but is also very accessible which makes it a great location,” Ms Neely said. Literally translated in Italian, Ms Neely explained that the word “Primadona” means First Lady”, but it also has spe cial significance to in her life. “I had tossed around a few names and none of them really resonated with me. There was one day I recalled a small argument I had with my mother when I was younger. I have two younger sisters and was most likely throwing a temper tantrum and accusing her of not giving me enough attention compared to them. She looked at me and responded – ‘Tyrina, you are the one we shell out thousands for to get braces – you are the one who we shuttle to the dermatologist every time you get a pimpleyou are the Prima dona! ‘What that said to me was you are special, you are loved and you are important to us. Which is how every female should feel and the whole aim of Primadona’s shopping events is to put women on a pedestal and give them an event designed to allow them to cater to themselves. I fell in love with the name Primadona and ran with it,” Ms Neely said. Ms Neely said due to the fact that she always had a deep interest in fashion, she attended the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York where she really developed a deep interest and knowledge base of designers. “They say necessity is the mother of invention. When I decided to move home last July, the biggest fear I had was not being able to find the clothing I like at prices I would be able to afford. When I thought about it, I realised that there had to be many women like me whose need for quality, contemporary designer clothing at great prices were not being met, forcing them to travel abroad to shop. Primadona fills that need local ly,” Ms Neely said. Although many of the pieces at the event retail for up to $400, Ms Neely said she is trying to let Bahamian women experience high end labels for what others would never dream of selling them for. “The whole idea is making quality designer apparel and accessories available at affordable prices. The current economic environment is ripe for a new business model such as this. Honestly, savvy shoppers in New York City hardly ever pay full retail price for designer clothing and I never did when I lived in New York for over 4 years and I wanted to bring this distinct way of shopping to my home,” Ms Neely said. Ms Neely said although Primadona attracts a broad customer base, she finds her inspiration for the business due to her passion for fashion. “I feel all women are prima donas. From the art teacher, to the stay at home mom to the doctor and the entrepreneur. Not only does the event provide the opportunity to purchase great pieces at unbeatable prices – it has also become a networking event. Seeing women get excited about the merchandise I offer and looking forward to the sales is a huge inspiration for me. I always envisioned myself as an entrepreneur in the fashion industry I just had no idea I would get into it at this age, it’s a dream in the early stages of fruition,” Ms Neely said. Ms Neely said although there are not any major barriers to enter this business – it does require a knowledge base of fashion and also knowledge and familiarity of the NY, LA and European fashion districts. “I would love to host Primadona’s designer sales once per month and really start to make it a bigger, grander event because the shopping events have morphed into networking events in a sense. I would love to play into that element a little more and that is something I am currently working on. We are also introducing men’s mer chandise this year starting with the introduction of high end sneakers and casual wear for men at the next sale which is scheduled for Friday, May 29th,” Ms Neely said. n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter a missick@tribunemedia.net GORGEOUS name brand clothing, jewelry bags and shoessounds like every woman’s dream shopping list for a trip to Los Angeles. However, Bahamian women can now save that ticket money and head on down to the Primadona events at Gray Cliff Restaurant. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 8C, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE PRIMA DONA D RESSING LIKE A PRIMADONA Designer Sales hosted at Graycliff are now held every other month Tyrina Neely. Pictured are women attending the last Primadona event.