Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
{)\

Pim blowin’ it

76F
61F

SUN, SHOWER
«ee AND WINDY

Volume: 105 No.113

mast!

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

CARS FOR SALE,
HELP WANTED
OG MS ES

NOW OPEN

Lynden Pindling
International Airport

HIGH
LOW



Easter
eee

o
Fs

aU

ire its
SEE WOMAN SECTION

Water and seuerae staff





BAHAMAS BIGGEST

llemand Salary increase

Around

200 gather
outside of
headquarters

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

WATER and Sewerage Corpo-
ration employees were allegedly
kept from work yesterday morning
as their unions called on the gov-
ernment to negotiate outdated
industrial contract agreements and
increase their salaries.

Around 200 Bahamas Utilities
Services Allied Workers Union
(BUSAWU) and Water and Sew-
erage Management Union
(WSMU) members gathered out-
side the Water and Sewerage head-
quarters in Thompson Boulevard
at 9.30am as BUSAWU president
Carmen Kemp and WSMU pres-
ident Ednel Rolle relayed their
mutual demands through the
media.

They claimed that Water and
Sewerage bosses withheld keys to
employees’ vehicles preventing
them from working yesterday
morning, which chairman Anton
Saunders later denied.

But the press conference pub-
licly urging government to re-open
negotiations about the industrial
contract agreements, which they
say have been up for renewal since
June 2007, was not intended to be
a strike, Ms Kemp said.

Speaking for both unions Mr
Rolle maintained workers have
sacrificed their salary increases
since 2004 for the financial benefit
of the Water and Sewerage Cor-

Clarke/Tribune staff

ae

WATER AND SEWERAGE Man-
agement Union President Ednel
Rolle speaks on behalf of his
union and the Bahamas Utilities
Services Allied Workers Union at
the press conference yesterday.

poration (WSC), but now
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) and Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC)
employees are enjoying higher
salaries and more benefits, their
patience has worn thin.

He said: “Whilst we recognise

SEE page eight

Christie believes grim |
economic forecasts

are ‘Optimistic’



_ Minister meets with Eight
Mile Rock High School
students and teachers

mg By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie hopes the country's eco-
nomic conditions for this year and
2010 are as "optimistic" as a recent
dismal forecast published by inter-
national credit rating agency Stan-
dard and Poor's.

rT



aA OASIS

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Education Min-

: ister Carl Bethel met with students
? and teachers of the Eight Mile Rock
? High School on Monday to give
? them some words of encouragement
: following several unfortunate inci-

He added that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham's cematth shool

recent reported statements regarding the likelihood of } strong criticism last week from PTA

Mr Bethel’s visit comes after

Oram elite)





PLP voices
concern over
livelihoods
of Bahamian

fishermen

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

CALLING for a “full
and frank disclosure” by
the Government on the
Economic Partnership
agreement — the PLP yes-
terday suggested the liveli-
hoods of thousands of
Bahamian fishermen may
be at risk.

Opposition spokesman
for Foreign Affairs, Fred
Mitchell yesterday ques-
tioned whether Bahamian
crawfishermen’s duty free
access to European markets
“may be in jeopardy” in
view of the looming possi-
bility that Government may
miss an April 15th EPA
deadline.

But a Bahamian EPA
source, speaking with The
Tribune on the condition of
anonymity, denied this is
the case, proposing that in
the instance that the
Bahamas does not satisfy
the European Commission
within the week, that the
EC is likely to offer “great
flexibility”.

This week minister of
state for finance, Zhivargo
Laing, revealed that the

SEE page eight



‘Harsh penalties’
for those who
take advantage of
unemployment
benefit plan

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

PERSONS who may be plot-
ting to knowingly take advantage
of the unemployment benefit plan
may face harsh penalties under
law, Minister of National Insur-
ance Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said.

Last year, police investigated
several cases of fraudulent claims

one ba emeair ae wing highlights the Asai } officials over his silence and lack of response to alle-
Tation surrounding the economy, exacerbated’ SY + gations of molestation involving teachers at the school.

the fact that economists cannot predict when the : ~ “Tam here to help them and provide a listening ear,

SEE page eight SEE page eight

to the extended social relief pack-
age which came into effect on
October 1, 2008. With thousands
of persons expected to apply for
the unemployment benefit,

The Taste
on

Tuesdays!!



only on Ivesdays!

ETO EN ETE ELTA an CTT

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Government is in dis-
cussions with the I Group devel-
opers in Mayaguana to see how
it can remove “any impedi-
ments” that may be further slow-
ing progress on the island’s

delayed anchor project, the Min-
ister of Tourism said yesterday.

Over three years after a
Heads of Agreement was signed
with the Boston-based develop-
ers, Vincent Vanderpool Wal-
lace said they meet regularly
with Government and remain
“without question...as commit-
ted as ever” to the project, but

economic circumstances contin-
ue to ensure their plans for the
island remain restricted for the
moment.

“Needless to say global con-
ditions have caused everyone to
at least scale back on their
expectations in terms of the

SEE page eight



Fidelity Bank DebtS$AVER LOAN

¢ Debt consolidation with built-in savings

e Lower monthly payments
¢ Debt reduction

Nassau: 356.7764 Freeport: 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: 367.3135

2

FIDELITY
30* ANNIVERSARY



NASSAU AND BAHAME:

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

observers have questioned how
the government will mitigate
against possible fraud.

Speaking to the media at a press
conference held at the National
Insurance Board headquarters on
Sunday, Mr Ingraham said NIB
has extensive verification mea-
sures in place to counteract any
false claims.

National Insurance will under-
take a verification process “from
the time you come in and make

SEE page eight





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Greed behind businessman’s ERR
killing, claims prosecution

Closing arguments presented in Keith Carey murder retrial

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE prosecution in the Keith Carey
murder retrial presented its closing argu-
ments in court yesterday, claiming that
greed was the motive behind the business-
man’s murder.

During her closing address to the jury
yesterday, lead prosecutor and Deputy
Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl
Grant-Bethel described murder accused
Dwight Knowles as the “mastermind” of
the plot to kill Carey, 43. Mrs Grant Bethel
said that his co-accused Sean Brown was a
part of the conspiracy that led up to Carey’s
murder. She also told the jurors that Jamal
Glinton, alias “Bumper”, was brought in
as the muscle. She told the jury that it was
Glinton who had shot Carey twice on the
steps of The Bank of The Bahamas on the
morning of February 27, 2006. Mrs Grant-
Bethel also told the jury that greed was the
motive for the killing, claiming that the
accused men wanted Carey’s money and
would do whatever was necessary to get it.

Mrs Grant Bethel directed the jury to the
evidence of the prosecution’s star witness
Vaughn Carey, noting that he had testified
that he had initially been approached by
Dwight Knowles about setting up Keith
Carey. She told the jury that Carey’s evi-

dence had never changed but rather that he
had changed from a defendant to a prose-
cution witness.

According to the prosecutor, Carey — a
cousin of the deceased — had wanted to
come forward with his account earlier but at
the time had been advised against doing so
by his attorney.

She told the jury that although Vaughn
Carey had set up the robbery, he was not at
the bank at the time of the murder and had
not set his cousin up to be killed.

Mrs Grant Bethel told the jury, that it
was Carey’s evidence that Glinton was sup-
posed to push the businessman down and
snatch the money bag.

Deadly

The prosecutor noted, however, that the
deceased was a man well over six feet tall,
weighing more than 225 pounds and of mus-
cular build.

She said that the accused men had to
have agreed to use deadly force in the rob-
bery attempt, which is why they brought in
Jamal Glinton as the shooter.

Mrs Grant Bethel also told the jury that
the accused men had lied to court in their
efforts to hide their guilt and escape the
charges.

While noting that the Crown’s case is

based on circumstantial evidence, she called
upon the jurors to put all of the circum-
stances together to prove the men’s guilt.

During his closing submissions, attorney
Perry Albury who is representing murder
accused Dwight Knowles, refuted the pros-
ecution’s claim that his client was the mas-
termind of the plot to rob and kill busi-
nessman Keith Carey, stating that his client
was rather the victim.

Mr Albury told the court that the evi-
dence against Knowles is of a reasonable
doubt.

Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight
Knowles are charged with murder as well as
armed robbery and conspiracy to commit
armed robbery.

Carey was shot and killed on the steps of
the Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway before he was
able to deposit $40,000 that belonged to
the Esso Service Station, which he operat-
ed. Mrs Grant-Bethel, Stephanie Pintard,
Anthony Delaney and Lennox Coleby are
prosecuting the case.

Attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Fran-
cis are representing Jamal Glinton, attorney
Dorsey McPhee is representing Sean
Brown, and attorney Perry Albury is rep-
resenting Dwight Knowles.

The prosecution has called 37 witnesses
during the two-month long trial.

IndiGO is better for your business

less stress, more benefits
IndiGO is better for your business.

Significantly decrease your phone bills.
Improve your operations & service.

Stay connected.

Join leading Bahamian businesses
that already take advantage of IndiGO‘s
communications solutions.

why aren't you with IndiGO?

677 1111 nassau 688 1111 freeport www.indigonetworks.com IN)

ndiGO

WO R KS

index is released

FOOD such as carrots
(left) and macaroni
(below) are seeing an
increase in price.



































CLAIMING that the government has done all it can to reduce
food costs for the average Bahamian, the Department of Statistics
yesterday released its monthly food pricing index, revealing increas-
es and decreases on a number of breadbasket items.

With certain food items such as mackerel, spaghetti, tomato
paste, carrots, mustard, macaroni, and crab meat seeing a seven to
12 per cent increase in price, other items such as baby juice, mineral
water, eggs, milk, cooking oil, chicken parts and crawfish remained
constant from January to February of this year.

Those items seeing a decrease from January to February were
grits, corn, whole chicken, season-all, butter, steak, grapefruits,
red and white grapes, potatoes, lamb chops and flour.

With a decrease of six per cent or more were tomatoes, avocados,
sweet peppers, limes, daisy cheese, oatmeal and onions, which saw
the largest decrease in price of 13 per cent from $2.24 to $1.94 for
a three-pound bag.

In the Family Islands, however, some of these same items saw a
slight increase, especially in Grand Bahama.

Peppers

Sweet peppers, originally discounted in New Providence, saw
an increase of 11 per cent in Grand Bahama from $2.59 a pound to
$2.87.

Breakfast cereals, along with celery, fruit juices, tomato paste, cab-
bage, oranges, chicken parts, and turkey wings and drumsticks saw
an increase anywhere from six to 11 per cent from January to Feb-
ruary.

Other staples, such as corned beef, milk, flour and grits remained
constant with little or no change whatsoever in their prices in
Grand Bahama.

Amongst this group are whole turkeys, sliced and whole ham,
spare ribs, macaroni, hot dogs, fruit juices, fresh and frozen fish,
mackerel, canned tuna, eggs, baby milk, pineapples, limes, and
carrots. Canned milk, rice, steak, Irish potatoes and pork chops all
saw a small decrease in pricing.

In Grand Bahama, the most discounted items from January to
February of this year were tomatoes which saw a 25 per cent
decrease from $1.77 a pound to $1.32.

Lamb chops came second at nine per cent, followed with decreas-
es of eight per cent in the price for onions, seven per cent in apples,
and five per cent in lettuce, grapefruits and boxed salt.

SOT ae are

eran wen 1 Ta

ns

TRONAING RENTAL
SERVICE

starting at 528.00 per month
including three talk groups and more...

TH4A80

KENWOOD

oe i7.WILcON ie

“ vy id oer or

ree activation if your equipment is compatible with our service

#41 Mackey Street & Palmdale Ave.
Mon-Fri, 8:20am - 4:30pm
Tél: a94-$025
sales@two-waysolutions.com

ovo lus
SOuUTIOnS



THE TRIBUNE

Man appears in
court on armed
robbery charge

A 20-YEAR-OLD man
was arraigned in a Magis-
trate’s Court on an armed
robbery charge yesterday.

It is alleged in court
dockets that Davardo
James Rigby, of Millenni-
um Gardens, while armed
with a handgun on March
26, robbed Daphne Sands
of $236 and an assortment
of phone cards valued at
$85.

Rigby, who appeared
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street, was not
required to plead to the
charge. He was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison
and the case has been
adjourned to August 18.

¢ A 38-year-old man
accused of robbing a local
service station was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday on an
armed robbery charge.

It is alleged that Engle-

bert Antonio Scott on Sun-

day, December 21, robbed
Fernand Francois of $900
in cash, an assortment of
phone cards valued at $375
and two packages of Back-
wood cigars valued at $96,
the property of Texaco
Service Station, located on
Prince Charles Drive.

Scott, who was arraigned

before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street, was not
required to plead to the
charge. He was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison.
The case has been
adjourned to May 15. His
co-accused in the case,
Lewis Alex Williams, 29,
of Union Village, has
already been arraigned on
the charge. He is expected
back in court on May 15.

Defence Force
marine undergoes

minor surgery after

BERNARD Barr, a
marine from the Comman-
do Squadron Department
of the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force, underwent
minor surgery on Sunday
afternoon after being acci-
dentally shot while taking
part in a training exercise
in Trinidad and Tobago.

At around 11.30am on
Saturday, Mr Barr sus-
tained a flesh wound to his
upper thigh during the
training exercise on the
Tucker Valley Shooting
Range in Trinidad and
Tobago.

According to a press

statement from senior lieu-

tenant Sonia Miller, the
marine was treated for his
injury and is resting com-
fortably at the Port of
Spain General Hospital.
“He is a part of the 32-
member Royal Bahamas
Defence Force contingent
which is expected to pro-
vide joint operational sup-
port with the other
Caribbean nations for the
5th Summit of the Americ-
as in Port of Spain,
Trinidad and Tobago,
from April 17 -19, 2009.
“As is customary in
these matters an investiga-
tion is being conducted to
determine the circum-
stances surrounding the
incident,” she said.

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

| alin they withheld staff's car keys

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

EXECUTIVES of the
Water and Sewerage Corpo-
ration yesterday refuted
claims that they had withheld
employees’ keys to prevent
them from working.

Members of the Bahamas
Utilities Services Allied
Workers Union (BUSAWU)
and Water and Sewerage
Management Union
(WSMU) called on the gov-
emment to negotiate indus-
trial agreements and increase
workers’ salaries in a press
conference held outside the
Water and Sewerage Corpo-
ration (WSC) headquarters
on Thompson Boulevard yes-
terday morning.

The union members
claimed that WSC executives
had withheld employees’ car
keys preventing them from
working.

But Water and Sewerage
Corporation (WSC) chairman
Anton Saunders and mem-
bers of the board and execu-
tive management told the
press that union members
have access to the keys and
were free to start work when-
ever they wished.

Protocol

“The keys are in control of
the union, both unions have
an industrial disagreement
and the normal protocol was
followed,” Mr Saunders said.
“But some people want to
work and some don’t.”

The unions started to speak
publicly about their issues on
Sunday, and Mr Saunders
said he was called to speak



NCTU PRESIDENT John Pinder gave his support for the unions yesterday.

on the air about the concerns
and demands union members
are taking up with the gov-
ernment on Sunday night.

However, Mr Saunders said
that he was surprised by yes-
terday’s joint union state-
ments about industrial con-
tract agreements as negotia-
tions with the BUSAWU and
the non-management union
began in November 2007 and
only the financially impacted
articles are still outstanding.

He maintains negotiations
with the management union,
WSMU, began in October
last year and the union has
recently expressed the desire
to discuss a financial package
for its members as a matter of
priority.

Mr Saunders confirmed the
last contract with BUSAWU
and WSMU expired in June
2007 and that the biggest
expenses for the WSC are
water production costs in the
amount of $32.3 million and

salaries and related benefits
in the amount of $24.5 mil-
lion.

“The WSC is now the
recipient of the largest sub-
sidy of all the government
agencies,” Mr Saunders said,
“having received $30 million
in subsidies in the 2008/09 fis-
cal year, as compared to $18.4
million in the previous year.

Budget

“The government has
enunciated its intent to roll
back its budget to 2007/08
levels.

“Consequently on March
11, 2009, both unions were
advised there will be no gen-
eral increases at this time due
to the economic challenges
currently facing the nation.

“All increments, promo-
tions and anomalies will con-
tinue to be addressed in the
normal manner.”

Union members had been

Senate passes resolutions facilitating
unemployment benefits introduction

THREE resolutions to
facilitate the introduction of
unemployment benefits
under the National Insurance
scheme were passed in the
Senate yesterday.

The regulations, which
were moved in the House of
Assembly last week, are
expected to be signed into
law as early as April 9.

On Sunday, Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of National
Insurance Hubert Ingraham
said registration for the ben-
efit plan will begin on April
11, leading up to April 20.
Cheques will be issued dur-
ing the first week of May.

Schools

Four schools in New Prov-
idence - Doris Johnson Sec-
ondary School, Prince
Charles Drive; C C Sweeting
Junior High School, Oakes
Field; C R Walker Secondary
School, Baillou Hill Road
North, and S C McPherson
Junior High School, Baillou
Hill Road South - will be
used as registration centres.

In Grand Bahama, appli-
cants can register at the
Father Pestena Centre at
Christ the King Anglican
Church in Freeport and at
the Eight Mile Rock High
School gymnasium.

Starting April 11, residents
of New Providence with last
names beginning with letters
A to D should register; on
April 14 those with last
names beginning with letters
E to Lcan register; on April

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Pipes OO omie

Gate Meat nec eeeceaas aia et P4

Bora Oeag

BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION

Business
Comics

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

15 persons with last names
beginning with M to R
should register; on April 16
applicants with last names
beginning with the letters S
to Z should register.

In Grand Bahama, those
with last names beginning
with letters A to L should
register on April 11 and on
April 14 persons with last
names beginning with M to Z
should apply.

Open call registration in
New Providence will be held
on April 17 and 18, and in
Grand Bahama on April 15
through April 17.

Applicants should come
with proper identification
and proof of dismissal, such
as a letter of termination, if
one was issued.










nO amNe eM

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
fea W TEU)
Me aC rey
Krad Li) |



* SEE PAGE ONE

informed by Minister for the
Environment Earl Deveaux
that salary increases would
be impossible in the current
economic circumstances, Mr
Saunders said, however the
government is open to any
recommendations they may
have.

Man dies in
| hit and run

A 49-YEAR-OLD man

? died after he was hit by a

? truck and dragged along
? Baillou Hill Road “for some
? distance” early yesterday
? morning, police reported.
? =The Pinewood Gardens
? resident was walking on
? Baillou Hill Road, near the
? junction of Wulff Road, at
? around 2am when he was hit
? by a white truck.
? As the truck continued to
? drive on, the man was
? dragged along before his
i? body dislodged and the 49-
? year-old died of his injuries,
? police said.
? ~=The truck driver fled the
? scene.
? ~~ Police have launched an
? active investigation and an
i island-wide search for the
? truck driver in New Provi-
? dence.
i? The make and model of
? the vehicle has not been
? ascertained. Anyone who
? may have been in the area at
i the time, or has any infor-
? mation which could lead to
? the apprehension of the dri-
i ver, should contact police
? immediately on 393-7714/5,
? 919, or call Crime Stoppers
? anonymously on 328-
: TIPS/8477.

IX



{~~





' Look CHIC
this Faster
Holiday!!

New Arrivals





Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family
Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
* Fax: 326-9953
Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com ¢ P.O. Box N-121



FOR ALL YOUR ce eee

“Lowest Prices On The Island”





























FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

gtutt

Anniversary
SALE

STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald’s Furniture
And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875





PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama visit to Turkey no afterthought

WASHINGTON — President Barack Oba-
ma's stop in Turkey is hardly an afterthought, a
"while I'm in the neighbourhood" visit.

For starters, he wants to mend relations
strained when the United States went to war in
Iraq six years ago. Ankara's Islamic-rooted gov-
ernment denied Washington's request to use
Turkish territory to invade Iraq from the north.
But Turkey also is in line for thanks for trying to
bring peace between Israelis and Palestinians.

Turkey is the only predominantly Muslim
country in NATO, an alliance stalwart and
America's best friend in the Islamic world. Oba-
ma, completing a European trip, arrives Sunday
and undoubtedly will reprise his message from
a town hall meeting Friday in France.

"We must be honest with ourselves. In recent
years, we've allowed our alliance to drift,” he
said at that appearance.

Turkey maintains a small military force in
Afghanistan, part of the NATO contingent
working with U.S. troops to beat back the resur-
gent Taliban and deny al-Qaida a safe haven
along the largely lawless territory that strad-
dles Afghanistan's border with Pakistan.
Turkey's participation carries enormous sym-
bolic importance because it is the only Muslim
country with a presence in the fight against
Islamic extremism.

In talks with Turkey's president, Abdullah
Gul, and prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdo-
gan, Obama will try to sell his strategy for
Afghanistan and Pakistan. He should find wel-
coming ears, given the new U.S. focus on meld-
ing troop increases with civilian efforts to better
the lives of people in both countries.

"Obama may be able to create momentum
for help from a broader sector of nominal U.S.
allies in the Muslim world,” said Jeffrey Mar-
tinson, a historian and political scientist at
Meredith College in North Carolina.

"The fact that he's visiting the Turks at the
end of this major European trip is a nice
homage to them," Martinson said, noting that
uppermost on Turkey's agenda is gaining mem-
bership in the European Union.

The new president has pushed for Muslim
diplomacy. In his inaugural address in January,
Obama assured the Muslim world that "we will
extend a hand if you are willing to unclench
your fist." He has made early telephone calls to
friendly Arab leaders and sent special envoy
George J. Mitchell to the Middle East on a "lis-
tening tour."

Obama's declaration that he will close the
prison for suspected terrorists Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba, was seen as a move to address a
chief source of ill will among Muslim nations
since Sept. 11.

Obama's father and stepfather were Muslim
and he spent part of his childhood in Indonesia,
a largely Muslim country. Throughout the cam-

¢ ROLL SHUTTERS

Aluminum rolling shutters are custom-fitted
and available in a choice of colours. They
provide security and hurricane protection.
Easily operated by hand crank or electric
motor, Roll shutters add beauty, security and
convenience to any home.

#® Don Stainton (Protection) Ltd.

SERVING THE BAHAMAS SINCE 1978
HILLSIDE PLAZA, THOMPSON BOULEVARD
FREE ESTIMATES 322-8160/322-8219

HURRICANE SHUTTERS

ee =

paign, Obama, who is Christian, fought false
Internet rumours that he is a Muslim.

Turkey is one of only two key Muslim coun-
tries with cordial relations with Israel. The
Turks, along with the Egyptians, are working
with France in trying to maintain a cease-fire
and broker a permanent truce between Israel
and Hamas, the Palestinian faction that rules the
Gaza Strip. That is essential to America's pledge
to spare no effort in establishing peace between
the ancient antagonists and establishing a Pales-
tinian state.

Beyond that, Turkey has shepherded con-
tacts between Israel and Syria, where a suc-
cessful outcome could entice Muslim nations
across the Middle East into accepting Israel's
right to exist.

Despite the likely good will, Obama must
finesse the tangled issue of Turkey's history
with Armenia. Historians estimate that up to 1.5
million Armenians were killed by Ottoman
Turks leading up to and during World War I, an
event widely viewed by many scholars as the
first genocide of the 20th century. Turkey denies
that the deaths constituted genocide, claiming
the toll has been inflated and the casualties
were victims of civil war and unrest.

"The Armenian genocide is not an allegation,
a personal opinion, or a point of view, but rather
a widely documented fact supported by an over-
whelming body of historical evidence," Oba-
ma said in a January 2008 statement on his cam-
paign Web site. "America deserves a leader
who speaks truthfully about the Armenian
genocide and responds forcefully to all geno-
cides. I intend to be that president."

So far, Obama aides refuse to say how he will
deal with the legacy of that statement while in
Turkey. Nor would they predict his stance on a
resolution to be introduced soon in the House
that describes the killings as genocide. His vis-
it to Turkey also is uncomfortably close to the
annual April 24 Armenian remembrance day.

"The smartest thing on Armenia is to try to
ignore what he said in the campaign," Martinson
said. Then there is Iran. Turkey's eastern neigh-
bour is accused by the United States and most of
Washington's European allies of trying to devel-
op a nuclear weapon. The Turkish government
supports Iran's right to develop nuclear energy
for peaceful use but wants Tehran to be trans-
parent about its nuclear programme and favours
dialogue.

That goes along with Obama's efforts to
open a diplomatic front with Iran and the mes-
sage from this past week's Group of 20 summit.
At that meeting, leaders said Iran must open up
its nuclear programme and support its claim
that it does not intend to build a bomb.

(This article was written by Steven R. Hurst
of The Associated Press).



Promised turtle
fishing ban may
e in jeopardy

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Many people, both Bahami-
an and foreign, rejoiced a few
months ago when Agriculture
and Marine Resources Minis-
ter Larry Cartwright announced
the Ministry’s intent to enact a
complete ban on marine turtle
fishing in the Bahamas. It was
the culmination of many years
effort by various groups con-
cerned about our marine envi-
ronment and particularly these
majestic, gentle sea creatures
who are afforded complete pro-
tection in most developed and
undeveloped countries of the
world. Cuba, Mexico, and most
of our Caribbean neighbors
long ago enacted strict bans on
the capture, killing and con-
sumption of marine turtles.

The complete ban that was
promised may be in jeopardy.
The amendment has not yet
been passed by Parliament. A
few weeks ago, The Ministry of
Agriculture wanted to hear
from more Bahamians on this
issue. After hearing from at
least several thousand since
then, in favour of the ban, the
amendment has still not been
passed. The talk from months
ago, that it might pass but with
an exception to continue to
allow the “personal consump-
tion” of turtle meat, may still
happen.

There are very few fisher-
men who catch turtles to feed
their families. They catch tur-
tles opportunistically, especial-
ly if they’ve had a bad day
conching or craw fishing. They
catch them to sell. The gas it
would cost a fisherman to go
out specifically to catch a turtle
for his dinner table would cost
far more than a chicken from
the food store.

This is a ludicrous proposi-
tion for many reasons, the most
obvious being the issue of
enforcement. Will the Ministry
position a Fisheries officer at
every dock and every boat land-
ing, on every island? Will they
follow the fisherman home,

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



watch him kill, clean AND eat
the turtle he has caught? How
else to enforce this?

What will be done about the
extreme cruelty and torture
inflicted on these defenseless
animals while they are awaiting
slaughter? Ranging from being
left on their backs for hours or
days in the broiling sun, to hav-
ing their flippers crudely pierced
with whatever sharp object is
at hand and having rope thread-
ed through them, then hogtied
to prevent them from thrash-
ing. Not to mention kids and
even grown men cruelly tor-
menting and abusing them,
often in public view — and
nothing is done about it, despite
calls to both Police and Fish-
eries. Have we become so cold
and unfeeling that we think it is
normal or even sporting to tor-
ture an innocent animal?
Because it is to be eaten, its pain
and suffering is irrelevant?

Our young people see their
elders perpetrating abuses and
cruelty on innocent, helpless
creatures, and they learn from
this. What do they learn? Think
about it. No wonder our crime
rate is escalating. The abuse of
animals has proven links as a
stepping stone to the abuse of
people and violent crime.

In these times of extreme
economic instability and hard-
ship, one would think the con-
cept of enticing tourists to visit
us instead of repelling them
might have some attraction. A
live turtle viewed in the wild is
worth far more in tourism dol-
lars than a suffering, tormented
turtle on a dock, which is guar-
anteed to disgust most people
who see it. Tourists who wit-
ness this leave here vowing nev-
er to come back, and discourage
their friends and family from
visiting. The Miss Universe

pageant is to be held on Par-
adise Island in August; what a
black eye the Bahamas would
receive if the attendant inter-
national press happen upon a
poor hapless turtle being tor-
tured on the Potter’s Cay docks.

The irony is that these are
not “Bahamian” turtles. These
turtles do not belong to any one
nation; they are migratory ani-
mals and it is extremely dis-
heartening and frustrating to
those other countries trying to
protect and save them, that sim-
ply because their migratory pat-
terns bring them to Bahamian
waters, they are subject to being
not only killed but tortured and
abused in the process. This is
one issue where “foreign” opin-
ions should be weighed and
considered as these turtles do
not “belong” to the Bahamas.
Most of them are not born here,
and those that are, do not
remain here their entire lives.

We participate in the inter-
national protection of the many
migratory bird species that pass
through the Bahamas every
year, why are turtles different?
Because they swim rather than
fly? Because we have more fish-
ermen than bird hunters?

We urge the public to voice
their opinions to Minister
Cartwright, and also to your
local Members of Parliament.
Marine turtles are evidently still
in extreme jeopardy in the
Bahamas; they need your help
more than ever and time is of
the essence.

ELIZABETH BURROWS

Executive Director, Humane
Society of Grand Bahama

Member, Bahamas Sea Tur-
tle Conservation Group.

CHRIS JOHNSTON

President, Board of Direc-
tors, Humane Society of Grand
Bahama.

Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
March 27, 2009.

Most visitors find turtles hunting practice abhorrent

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In regards to the recent letter by Andrew Allen
re consumption of turtle meat, I note that the
World Wildlife Fund regards six of the seven
species of turtle as endangered or critically endan-
gered and 166 nations currently prohibit trade
of the species for any purpose which includes

consumption.

As far as any historical right to consume sea tur-
tles as food, I fully respect the traditional practice
which, in a modern world, could be considered the
same approach to unique island wildlife assets

small minority to exploit their natural fauna for
profit and faux gastronomy in direct opposition to

worldwide conservation efforts?

Be assured that the majority of visitors to this
beautiful island and many residents find the prac-
tice of hunting and consuming sea turtles abhor-
rent. For those that doubt this perhaps an exit sur-
vey on endangered species at Nassau Airport

would be in order to confirm the fact?

overdue.

that led to the extinction of the Dodo on Mauri-

tius. Perhaps Mr Allen would also like to join
the Japanese on a “traditional” whale hunt.
For how much longer can Bahamians allow a










Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED
CARS & TRUCKS

For the best deal in town on

pre-owned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales





Nassau,

Bahamians please look after the many natural
treasures that you have, seize the day, a broad ban
on the hunting/consumption of sea turtles is long

A RESIDENT

March 31, 2009.

Sponging was also a legitimate part of our culture

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: Turtle meat eating is a legitimate part of our culture - Tribune

March 31.

Once upon a time, we used to “enjoy the bounties” of another legit-
imate part of our culture - it was called sponging.

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
(Turtle pie lover)
Nassau,

March 31, 2009.

A question for Mr Andrew Allen

EDITOR, The Tribune.

© We guarantee motors for 5 years, material
and labour for two years and respond to
service calls within 48 hours, usually on the
same day.








NOW
IN STOCK!

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

oe | ‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
a , u,(06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
is lock mechanisms for secure fastening. a i a; ‘06 HYUN D Al SON ATA
i = ‘02 SUZUKI XL-7
| ‘07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 5dr
awnings are permanently installed and close ‘01 HYUND Al HD-6 5 TRUCK
‘05 TOYOTA COROLLA

quickly for storm protection. They give everyday
i a, a u t 0 a °
ae

protection from heat and rain, and help prevent
2 gets
Sales (2)
#1) AUTO GEALER IM THE BAHAMAS

LIMITED -
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Wet cur ohoercom ai Geol ty auto Soho Preepord Lid tor dor decds, Geseere Hey, 2S2-d0 77
or dboce Meter Moll. Don Mockap Bhd, 27-281 S

Thave a question for Mr. Andrew Allen. Are domestic cows and
geese on the Threatened List?

SU me ise

| The lock of colonial wooden shutters, but with
the strength and maintenance - free qualities of
aluminum. Add a finishing architectural touch to
your home with these functional yet decorative
shutters. Provides protection against storms,
sun and vandals.

A DAMIANOS
Nassau,
April 1, 2009

Vacancy for Maintenance Worker/Helper

A reputable company with many locations is
seeking to hire a:

Maintenance Worker/Helper

Qualihed applicants must:

Be Bahamian

Be able io work under pressure
Be able io handle multipl tasks



* CLIP-LOCK ALUMINUM STORM PANELS

The most cost-effective protection available.
Lightweight, easy to store and to use. We give you
10% extra spring steel clips and use closed-end
headers to prevent the panels "creeping".

interested persona should e-mail
fan’, phone comieect and work expanence fc
Fantasticjobopportunity igmailcom
Deadline: Wednesday, April 150%, 2000

CHOOSING HURRICANE SHUTTERS

This guide offers a look at the benefits of five varieties of Hurricane Shutters



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Small Family
Islands not
affected hy
the global
recession

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

WHILE countries around
the world experience econom-
ic hardships due to the global
recession, islanders in the iso-
lated communities of Cat
Island and Crooked Island
have not been affected,
according to Local Govern-
ment officials.

Unlike the industrialised
cities of Nassau and Freeport,
residents of smaller communi-
ties, which depend on incomes
generated by tourism, farming
or fishing, claim the state of
the economy in their islands is
no different than it was this
time last year.

Phillesa Thurston, secretary
to the Cat Island administra-
tor, said residents she spoke to
while travelling from one end
of the island to the other had
no complaints about feeling
the effects of the global eco-
nomic crisis. And she said
around five out of ten cars she
passed were carrying tourists
visiting the island.

There are around five major
hotels in Cat Island, none of
which are experiencing a drop
in visitors compared to last
year, Ms Thurston said.

“Tn the islands we would not
feel it as bad as you would in
Nassau,” she said. “We see a
lot of tourists every day and
there are five or six yachts in
the harbour, and those people
come to shore and look at the
craft work, so I think every-
body is faring pretty well.”

Tight-knit

Ms Thurston pointed out
that because the communities
within the just 1,500-strong
population of Cat Island are
very tight-knit, people look
out for each other in times of
trouble. “On the island every-
body is their brother’s and sis-
ter’s keeper,” she said.

“So you can go to the neigh-
bours if you don’t have some-
thing, or you can go to the
farm to reap crops.

“Farming is the main thing,
so the only problem there is
that the weather has been
extremely dry. But the crops
that are farmed, are sold,” she
said. Hylene Moss, chief clerk
to the administrator in
Crooked Island, said residents
in this southern constituency
are also faring well in these
tough economic times.

She maintains that the cash
flow on the island, which has a
population of only 280 people,
is just as it was this time last
year. “I guess there are no
changes — we are used to eco-
nomic crises up here so it
comes natural to us — every-
thing seems to be going the
same.

“We still have a few tourists
coming in, and most persons
are self-employed in fishing
and sport-fishing, so they are
still taking guests out. We
have very little farming, peo-
ple farm for themselves.

“And over here you are
your brother’s keeper, so
everybody is still happy,” she
said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
eee
PHONE: $22-2157



‘This is one of the
boldest rip-ofts’

THE New Providence and
Grand Bahama clean-up pro-
gramme is one of the “boldest
rip-offs of the public treasury in
recent times”, former Works Min-
ister Bradley Roberts claimed.

Speaking at a meeting of PLP
supporters over the weekend, Mr
Roberts said that private proper-
ties which are owned by persons
who could afford to pay for their
own clean-ups are been cleared at
public expense.

“The programme was so badly
organised that it has run out of
monies. The public could see with
their own eyes persons walking
up and down streets with little or
nothing to do,” he claimed.

“The rains will come soon and
the weeds will follow and the rip-
off will resume.”

Mr Roberts said that consider-
able pressure was placed on FNM
MPs for jobs, thus the govern-
ment’s need for the programme.

He claimed that since coming
to office in May 2007, the FNM
has fired hundreds of persons per-
ceived to be PLP supporters and
has replaced them with FNM sup-
porters, not only in the central
government but in the govern-
ment corporations.

Former Minister criticises New Providence
and Grand Bahama clean-up programme

Bradley Roberts



Mr Roberts said he is also con-
vinced that the FNM, “by their
selfish stupid actions, chased away
major foreign investors and has
allowed our vital number one
industry to badly suffer by fail-
ing to take advantage of the
Bahamas’ close vicinity to the US
mainland, and is now turning

thousands of proud hard-work-
ing Bahamians into recipients of
funds from the National Insur-
ance Board.”

The former minister said he did
not hear a word of “regret or
apology” to the Bahamian people
from the prime minister for allow-
ing the major decline in tourism.

“Instead Hubert and his Cabi-
net one by one have without
shame threw the blame on the
recession. Our Bahamian broth-
ers and sisters in the main are a
proud people with a long history
of working for their keep. Hubert
Ingraham and his FNM govern-
ment policies are turning more
of our people into becoming
wards of the state. This is unfor-
givable,” Mr Roberts said.

Calls to Minister of Environ-
ment Earl Deveaux asking him
to comment on Mr Roberts’
claims about the clean-up cam-
paign were not returned up to
press time last night.

Pain-wracked pensioner accuses PMH

staff of negligence following bed fall



a
Taras SLU eminence htcaene hm tcny

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A great-grandmother is blaming negligent staff at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital for an injurious fall from bed following a spinal surgery
which required her to undergo four additional surgeries.

Pensioner Betty Antonio, 60, and her husband Hugh, 67, say they
have paid out $25,000, which was put aside for their retirement, to pay
for Mrs Antonio’s operations and medical care in the last two years. Yet
Mrs Antonio is still in constant pain.

She has no feeling in her left leg, is unable to walk without the aid of
a walker, cannot bathe herself, and her husband of 44 years, who suf-
fers from glaucoma, is her full-time caregiver.

Another operation is needed to repair her damaged spine, but the
Antonios, who have a combined monthly pension of $547, are no
longer in a position to pay for it. They are seeking compensation from
the Public Hospitals Authority to cover the costs of her multiple oper-
ations and medication to ease her prolonged pain and suffering.

Mrs Antonio maintains she fell from her hospital bed after her first
operation in April 2007. She claims nurses neglected to bring her a bed-
pan when she called, and there were no rails on the side of her bed stop-
ping her from trying to get up to use the toilet in her dazed state fol-
lowing the surgery. “When I fell out of bed it felt like fire went through
my body,” she said.

Doctors told her the nurses should have put up rails at the sides of
her bed and responded when she called, Mrs Antonio said.

The mother-of-five is trying to obtain hospital records detailing her
series of operations and health problems to seek compensation from the
Public Hospitals Authority. She claims she was unable to walk after the
operation and was advised to travel to Florida with her husband and
daughter to get an MRI scan. She then returned to the United States
for a second MRI, costing a total of $1,800.

The couple then had to pay $5,000 for a pain relief system to ease her
suffering while she waited for a second operation in November 2007 to
insert artificial discs in her back at the cost of $8,000.

But the artificial discs only brought more discomfort, as one of the
screws did not hold, Mrs Antonio said.

Prescribed pain relief medication now costs her $725 per month, “and
the point is, it still isn’t working, I’m still in pain,” she said.

Mrs Antonio had three subsequent surgeries in December, 2007, Jan-
uary 2008, and November 2008, to drain the surgical wound infec-
tion, and she now requires another operation.

However, she has had so many spinal surgeries in the last two years,
surgeons will need to perform a complicated operation cutting through
her front and side, she said.

And she and her husband are no longer in a position to afford the
surgery. She said: “It is a long time I have been suffering and it’s like
the Hospital Authority don’t care. I can’t bathe myself, can’t stand at
the stove to cook — must I live like this for the rest of my life? That’s
not fair. You go into the hospital to get help and you come out worse
than you come in. I am appealing to the Minister of Health and the
prime minister to deal with this.

“T don't have any intention of being swept under the carpet anymore.
I need help because I can't help myself.

“T have given them ample time to address the situation and this
should have been addressed a long time ago.”

A spokesman for the Public Hospitals Authority was unable to
track Mrs Antonio’s case to respond to her complaint before The Tri-
bune went to press yesterday.



“When I fell
out of bed it
felt like fire






went through

my body.”



Betty Antonio

h

Wednesday

WOOD AND COLD-FORMED STEEL
TRUSSES

DESIGN
ENGINEERING
COMPETITIVE PRICING

FAST BIDDING INFORMATION

361-7764

Road to City Dump after Premix
Email:ggongora@coralwave.com

AUTHORED
MANUFACTURER



r

Odessa Sarden

where fife is stil simple and people still care
Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

Easter Vinvl Flannel Backed Tablecloths, Seats 4
to 6 persons, for your Kitchen or dining Table, Wipe

Clean. Easter Egg or Easter Bunny Design.

White Lace Cotton Tablecloth, has Last Supper
design in the Lace in centre of Cloth, seats 6 to &
persons,

Beautiful Rose Pink Tea Towel and Pot Holder
sets with Easter Eeg Applique.



British Colonial Hilton’s
credible evening buffet offer!

| Join us in the Portofino Restaurant for
special value menus all week long =





81995

Paves nfede
one [ret Boer oe
Gia ol en

Tuesday

Plentiful Pasta

Hot Off the Grill

hursde

usio



(a)
British Colonial Hilton

CMR Hiaticery ga tp le

Travel should take you places



PAGE 6, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Roberts slams govt

over TG Glover delay

Claim that FNM ‘jealous’
of PLP achievements

Montagu Gardens

Easter
Specials

Date April 12,

9

Special One

Tossed Salad
Roast leg of lamb with gravy
Pan fried grouper
Roasted potatoes
Rice
Fresh glazed baby carrots and corn
Dessert carrot cake or Key Lime Fie

Price $19.00 per person
plus 15% gratuity

Special Two

Tossed salad
Baked turkey with gravy
Sausage stuffing
Baked grouper
Oven Roasted potatoes
Rice
Fresh glazed Carrots and corn
Dessert carrot cake or kev lime pie

Price $19.00 per person
plus 15% gratuity



JEALOUSY of the PLP’s
achievements is preventing the
government from allowing TG
Glover students and teachers
from returning to their class-
rooms, former Minister of
Works Bradley Roberts claimed
as he addressed PLP supporters
at a party meeting over the
weekend.

By not moving the teachers
into the facility, Mr Roberts said,
the FNM is denying the thou-
sands of people of the greater
Chippingham area access to a
state-of-the-art primary school.

“This project was also placed
on hold (because of) several
Cabinet Ministers’ insane claim
of the school been built on a tox-
ic waste dump site, which turned
out to be a simple case of mon-
key tamarind. The four- to five-
month delay has increased the
cost of construction and
(delayed) the occupancy of the
school by the students and the
teachers,” Mr Roberts said.

“It therefore does in no way
surprise me that the Ingraham
government would take the deci-
sion that it appears moving
towards to deny the working
class people of greater Chip-
pingham, Boyd Road, Boyd sub-
division, Farrington Road, the
Quarry Mission Road and the
Bain and Grants Town areas — in
short Fort Charlotte and the
Bain and Grants Town con-
stituencies’ residents - of the use
of a state-of-the-art primary
school which has been promised
to them for many years. This is
also a big slap in the face of the
teachers of the former TG
Glover School who have wait-
ed for some three years to move
into new and modern facilities.”

Mr Roberts said now that the
school is nearing completion,
and the “beauty and sensible
planning which characterise the
structure is now evident to all, it
has aroused a sense of jealousy
that here is an edifice conceived
and largely executed by the for-
mer PLP government.”

“The senior establishment in



EAGLE ELECTRICAL

& LIGHTING

Tel (242) 341-4000
Fax (242) 341-5080

Email: eaglebahamas@gmail.com



ENJOY EASTER WITH EAGLE!

Don’t miss out on these SUPER SAVINGS. ONE WEEK ONLY!

#14 THHN WIRE
500' ROLL*

“TV CABLE
4000' ROLL*

* All prices are net.

EAGLE’

CAT 5 WIRE
1000' ROLL*

TELEPHONE WIRE
1000' ROLL*

0) Se SS ae) ee

“4 gate sc | Eagle Electrical Supplies & Lighting Center
Tonique Williams Darling Highway (formerly Harold Road)
* PO. Box CR-55440 Nassau, Bahamas

BEST QUALITY, BEST PRICE, GUARANTEED !!!





“The four
to five-month
delay has
increased.
the cost of
construction
and (delayed)
the occupancy
of the school by
the students and
the teachers.”



Bradley Roberts

the Ministry of Education has
been persuaded to go along with
the ruse that the school is not
suitable for primary school chil-
dren, even though with the
exception of the departure of
Minister Sears, the permanent
secretary and the director, they
were of one joyous accord when
the project was conceptualised,
designed and when construction
began. One is prompted to ask
what has brought about the sud-
den change of heart. The answer
lies deep in the twisted logic of
the government of our nation,”
Mr Roberts said.

The former minister explained
that when the PLP came to
office in 2002, former Education
Minster Alfred Sears discovered
that children and teachers were
occupying a school building that
was condemned by structural
engineers from the Ministry of
Works.

Immediate action was ordered
by Mr Sears to discontinue hold-
ing classes at the school, Mr
Roberts said.

During the summer break, the
former minister said, additional
classrooms were built at the
Albury Sayles Primary School
on Nassau Street to accommo-
date the majority of the students.



It was then determined that a
new primary school would be
built on the old TG Glover
School site.

The contract for construction
of the new building was signed
on July 17, 2006 and construc-
tion was well under way when
the PLP left office in May 2007.

The current government has
since been threatened by indus-
trial action from teachers of TG
Glover who want to be placed in
their own facilities.

Minister of Education Carl
Bethel told The Tribune that he
has met with the teachers of the
primary school and their discus-
sions were “very positive.”

“T explained to them the gov-
ernment's concerns about the
Horseshoe Drive building, they
agreed with me on a number of
points, not all, as to its unsuit-
ability as a primary school.

“And of course I expressed to
them my understanding of their
great frustration and my sympa-
thy for them and my determina-
tion as minister to ensure come
September they will walk in to
appropriately built TG Glover
Primary School premises. And
they seem to have accepted my
presentation,” Mr Bethel said.

Performances of

Bahamian cast of

God's Trombone
_to be screened

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — This Easter, ser-

? mon performances by the Bahami-
? an cast of God’s Trombone will
? be shown during a film screening
? at the Simpson C Penn Talent
: Theatre in Grand Bahama.

Frank Penn, of GBI Recording

i Studios, is premiering the film ver-
? sion of the 1995 performances on
? April 10 and April 11 at 7.30pm at
? the theatre on Queens Highway.

The production will also be

? shown in Nassau at the National
? Theatre of the Performing Arts at
? Spm and 7pm on Sunday, April
? 19, and at 7.30pm on April 20. A
: donation of $10 is required.

Director Gloria McGlone, Bri-

? an Roxbury and Portia Cole-
? brooke were among the original
: Bahamian cast that performed the
? production 14 years ago in
? Freeport.

Ms McGlone, a former Broad-

: way actress, said the original God’s
? Trombone production was per-
? formed on Broadway about 25 to
? 30 years ago by very well-known
: black actors such as James Earl
? Jones.

The Bahamian production fea-

? tured some of the best actors on
? the island such as Brian Roxbury,
? Tawari Rodgers, Bert Duncanson,
? Denika Penn, the late Kristin
? Penn-Davis and the late Bessimae
: Nottage, who performed Christ’s
? Passion.

“Tt is a compilation of sermons

: you hear in the black churches of
: Jonah or Moses delivering the
i Jews out of Egypt and the singing
? of old religious hymns and spiritu-
i als,” she explained.

Ms McGlone said that the pro-

i duction is very moving and she
i believes that audiences will enjoy
? the film.

“We had church every night and

? during the production, a number
i of persons in the show found their
? anointing and it was very heart-
: felt,” she said.

Ms McGlone believes that the

: screening, which is being released
i? this Easter by Mr Penn, is very
; timely.

“The world is in turmoil and I

? think God’s Trombone is about
i basic religion and getting back to
? the root of the stories we all know
? and trusted in and found our way
? through,” she said.

“We Ship to the Family Islands”

Tonique Williams-Darling Highway

{just before Burger Ring)

P.O Box CB 11561 * Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 341-8400 or (242) 361-8400

Fax: (242) 341-2200

Email: bsweeting(@\cbstiredepot.com





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 7





ABOVE: The Bahamian gospel group ‘The Elevations’ accept the Rev Arthur Preacher Rolle
Lifetime Achievement Award for their contribution towards the development and advance-
ment of Bahamian gospel music for the past forty years.



LEFT: Simeon Outten won two awards including Rake and Scrape Vocal Performance of
the Year and Traditional Recording of the Year for ‘Thank You’, a testimonial record about
how he and his family overcame the loss of their home and personal belongings following
a major hurricane in Freeport several years ago.

Bahamian gospel artists
dominate Marlin Awards

THE Bahamas emerged as the country to
win the most awards at this year’s Caribbean
Gospel Music Marlin Awards.

Securing a total of 28 awards at the event
held last week at the Diplomat Centre, the
Bahamas took first place, with Jamaica coming
in second with thirteen awards. Third place
went to Trinidad and Tobago with a total of
ten awards.

Leading the pack was the Mount Tabor
praise and worship team, which won three
Marlin Awards including one for Adapted
Praise and Worship Recording of the Year
for their remake of the contemporary wor-
ship anthem “Amazed” and another for Praise
and Worship Recording of the Year for their
original hit single “Don’t Do It Without Me”
featuring pastor/author and recording artist
Bishop Paul Morton.

Mount Tabor also made history by becom-
ing the recipients of the first ever Record of the
Year Award, one of two online voting cate-
gories introduced by the Marlin Awards this
year and coordinated and managed by
Jamaican media personality Arnold Kelly and
his Caribbean Hour organisation.

Bahamian classical singer JoAnn Callender
took home three awards including one for
Special Event Recording of the Year for
her jazz inspired Christmas single “Silent
Night.”

She also won two awards along with Mani-
fest, CEO of Dunamus Soundz Records, for
the hip hop meets opera smash hit “I Shall
Rise.” Manifest also won Hip Hop Record-
ing of the Year.

Simeon Outten won two awards including
Rake and Scrape Vocal Performance of the
Year and Traditional Recording of the Year
for “Thank You,” a testimonial record about
how he and his family overcame the loss of
their home and personal belongings follow-
ing a major hurricane in Freeport several years
ago.

Also winning two awards was the male vocal
group “Vision” who took home the award for
Contemporary Vocal Performance of the
Year-Duo/Group for their radio hit “Evi-
dence” and the other for Music Video of the
Year Duo for their remake of the Visionaries
classic “Brand New World.”

Lion of Judah CEO Monty G won two
awards as well, one along with his sonic partner
DJ Frost for Producer of the Year, and the oth-
er along with Trinidad reggae singer Positive
for Reggae Vocal Performance of the Year-
Duo for their single “I Want to Know.”

Composer

Finally, veteran composer and producer
Chris Fox also won two more Marlin Awards
to add to his trophy mantle.

Mr Fox won for Instrumental Record of the
Year for “Then Look At Me” and for Adapt-
ed Contemporary Recording of the Year for
his remake of the old American classic “Heav-
en Help us All,” with some help from Ameri-
can gospel soul singer Bob Bailey.

Other top award winners included Christian
Massive (Junkanoo Recording of the Year-

THE GARDENS
NURSERY

Est. 1994

"From Our Garven To Yours"

EASTER SPECIALS

UDR Te a8

4" Orchids starting at $20
6" Orchids starting at $40
Premium Potting Soil $8.50
BES RESET SAUD
Bromeliads starting at $12
*while supplies last*

TSUKAI ATC

ae meeyin

SOP ESP e rt
12 St. Albans Drive, Nassau
(Opposite Premier Importers)



“Create”); Demetrius Stubbs (Rake and
Scrape Recording of the Year-“Revolution”);
The Rahming Brothers (Traditional Vocal
Performance Duo/Group-“Bring Them In”);
Hubert McIntosh (Traditional Vocal Perfor-
mance of the Year-Male-“Restored”); Vago
(Contemporary Vocal Performance of the
Year-Male-“Take Me Higher”); Da Squad
(Hip Hop Vocal Performance of the Year-
Duo/Group-“No Wayz Tired”); CMA (Adapt-
ed Rake and Scrape Vocal Performance of
the Year-““We Acknowledge You”); Bren-
dalee Petty (Adapted Traditional Recording of
the Year-“Grace Grace”); Dano Rolle (Adapt-
ed Reggae Recording of the Year-“I Need
You to Survive”); Professa (Hip Hop Vocal
Performance of the Year-Solo-“Back Up Off
Me”); Avalanchee (Reggae Hip Hop
Recording of the Year-“Hold On Strong”)
and the award for Choir/Chorale Recording of
the Year went to Minister Denczil Rolle
Presents COGIBINC Mass Youth Choir for
their debut album “Our Worship-Live in Nas-
sau.”

The Rev Arthur Preacher Rolle Lifetime
Achievement Award was presented to the
Bahamian gospel group “The Elevations” for
their contribution towards the development
and advancement of Bahamian gospel music
for the past forty years.

Most of the original members of the group
were on hand to accept their well-deserved
award.

The Marlin Awards are produced by Harris
Communications and are held bi-annually in
Nassau, Bahamas.



Odessa ( Garden

where life is still simple and people still care
Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.

Telephone 322-8493

DRESSES
for EASTER

Fancy White Pre-teen and Teen dresses for Special
Occasions - Church, Graduation, Confirmation,
First Communion, Weddings, Funerals.

Pretty Hand Smocked Dresses in Pastel Colours,
Perfect for Easter Sunday, Dressy Parties

and Tea Parties.

Easter Trees

Easter Trees for your Holiday Table - Beautiful
used as a Centerpiece - fully decorated,
come and see!!!

J&J SEAFOOD Ltd.

Carib Road, off Chesapeake
Your Bahamian Seafood Specialist

‘Easter Sale’
20% OFF

FRESH WHOLE NASSAU GROUPER
(Prepared any way you want it)
Additional discounts for bulk purchase

~ SNAPPERS

Fresh, Cleaned, Pick your size

KITS OF SNAPPER - $120
Also Available;
Jacks, Lobster, Fillet, Grouper Steaks
Hog Snapper, Conch, Goggle Eye, Barracuda etc.

VENDOR DISCOUNTS YEAR ROUND
OPEN MONDAY - FRIDAY 8AM - 5PM

SATURDAY 8AM - 12NOON
TEL: 393-8164



SV ERATE MRR RVC



Easter Holiday Banking Hours
THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2009 - 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 2009 - CLOSED

MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2009 - CLOSED

Normal Banking hours will resume

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 - 9:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

meee ca E eae

Bank of The Bahamas Limited

Lae

Commonwealth Bank Limited

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
RC CEU ee EE
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited



PAGE 8, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

global economic turbulence will
bottom out and rebound.

Last week Standard and Poor's
predicted that the country's gross
domestic product (GDP) will
decline by two per cent in 2009
and one per cent in 2010. The esti-
mate was based on the Bahamas’
dependence on tourism as a dri-
ving economic force and lack of a
diversified economy.

"I believe even that is an opti-
mistic forecast. In other words that
that advice I hope it is so, I hope
that the contraction in the econo-
my is only to that extent but given
the fact that foreign direct invest-
ment also is a driving component
in our economy and the prospects
for that in any significant degree,
from where I sit, is also dismal.

"And people are perhaps taking
a ‘wait and see’ attitude that the
contraction could even be
greater,” said Mr Christie, who
added that government should
take the recent projections into
account when it introduces its bud-
get next month.

Late last year the agency low-
ered its outlook on the Bahamas
to negative from stable due to
worries about the country’s retard-

Christie

ing economic growth, a weakened
tourism sector, compounded with
reduced investment and consumer
demand from 2008 and 2009. Last
year S and P also revised the
Bahamas’ GDP growth forecast
for 2008 and 2009 to 1.1 per cent
and 1 per cent, respectively, down
from its previous forecast of 3 per
cent and 4 per cent growth, respec-
tively.

These harsh economic realities
were highlighted in recent report-
ed comments by the prime minis-
ter who told the press that gov-
ernment intends to borrow more
money outside of a $200 million
loan recently approved by Parlia-
ment. It's a measure government
may have to take in the face of
dwindling revenues and rising
unemployment — all conse-
quences of the troubled tourism
industry hit hard by the global
recession.

"The prime minister has indi-
cated that there may be a need
for additional borrowing — it only
serves to underscore the advice
we are receiving as to how grim
the circumstances are and how
potentially difficult the times



ahead are," said Mr Christie. "The
government is obviously facing
what appears to be an unprece-
dented deterioration of the econ-
omy of the Bahamas, and that's
strong. The Americans describe
the impact on their economy as
the worst since the Great Depres-
sion which is again strong. I sus-
pect that the prime minister is
warning the country that there are
further difficult times ahead and
he is unable to predict the extent
to which it will go and the duration

of the difficult times."

About two weeks ago, Mr
Ingraham told Parliament that
government revenue collection for
the first quarter of 2009 was "dis-
astrous". He added that the coun-
try is facing "the most challeng-
ing” economic factors that most
Bahamians have ever seen.

Last week Mr Christie, with a
delegation of Opposition mem-
bers, met with representatives of
the International Monetary Fund.
While he declined to get into the

specifics of that meeting, the for-
mer prime minister said their dis-
cussion reflected similar state-
ments the group had previously
made to government and the Cen-
tral Bank.

"The meeting was a briefing of
what happened and we have
agreed that essentially the views
expressed by them at this stage
are still confidential. That is
because it leads into the govern-
ment's preparations of the budget
next month," he said.

CUMENICAL SERVICES

FROM page one

these are indeed challenging times
and can empathise with prudent
measures, we emphasise that the
government established a bold
precedent by signing off on the
industrial agreement contracts for
BEC and BTC in these very same
challenging times.

“This action, or inaction, on
their part speaks volumes to our
members!”

The union leaders said the press
conference was prompted by Min-
ister for the Environment Earl
Deveaux’s failure to respond to a letter sent on March
13, addressing union concerns and requesting a five per
cent salary package of the contractual period from July
2007 to June 2010 after government offered a 4.5 per
cent salary increase at the end of last year, and then
replaced it with a zero per cent offer until 2010.

Outraged union leaders argued employees are not
able to meet the rising cost of living without a corre-
sponding pay increase.

They disputed government claims that the
increased subsidy from $19 million to $30 million allo-
cated to the Water and Sewerage Corporation (WSC)
went towards their salaries, as it was instead spent
on construction of the Blue Hills Reverse Osmosis
(RO) plant which has increased the WSC’s power
costs to its detriment.

Earl Deveaux



Water and Sewerage

manager over the last six years for ineffective organ-
isation of the WSC.

A restructuring exercise intended for completion in
January, has not yet been implemented, Mr Rolle
said, and he argued an effective mains renewal pro-
gramme is needed to address the increasing number of
reports of rusty water and water shortages throughout
New Providence.

The WSMU president said: “Address the issues
that you should and having funds to pay your staff and
provide water throughout the islands will not be a
problem.

“Today we speak in unison as we amplify our call
for the government and executives to do the right
thing by our employees, this corporation, and our
country.

“Our corporation is beset with problems and the
government must address them. Not next week, not
next month, not next year, but now.”

Ms Kemp added: “We don’t have any wish to
harm the Bahamian people, we just want them to
hear our plight and be sensitive to our plight.

“We had no intention of taking a strike, we just
wanted to express our displeasure, but we are not
afraid of industrial action.”

John Pinder, president of the National Congress of
Trade Unions (NCTU), and his general secretary
Robert Farquharson also lent their support to the

. Matthew's Anglican Church



Reconciliation

7:30PM.



ea) re ae

Church & Shirley Street

PALM SUNDAY - April 5th - 7:15am Eucharist, Blessing of
Palms and Sermon; 10:00am Blessing of Palms, Procession
Eucharist, & Sermon; 7:00pm — Mission Service

MONDAY April 6th - 7:00pm — Stations of the Cross.

TUESDAY - April 7th - 7:00am Mass; 7:00pm — Service of

WEDNESDAY - April 8th - Mass 7:00am & 1:00pm at St.
Matthew’s. A Mass of the Chrism, Christ Church Cathedral at

MAUNDY THURSDAY - April 9th - 7:00pm Holy Eucharist,
Washing of Feet and Watch before the Altar of Repose.

GOOD FRIDAY - April 10th — 9:00am Liturgy for Good Friday;
12noon - 3:00pm Seven Last Words from the Cross.

EASTER DAY - April 12th - 6:00am The Great Easter Vigil &
Holy Eucharist; 10:45am — Solemn High Mass, Procession
(Within the church) LIVE RADIO BROADCAST.

7:00pm Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction.

er

For More Information Telephone: 323-8220



r

WSC unions.

And they blamed the lack of a permanent general

e SEE PAGE THREE

FROM page one

European Commission has not
accepted the offer made by the
Bahamas in terms of how much
of its trade in services this country
is willing to liberalise under the
EPA.

A team of technocrats from the
Ministry of Finance is now sched-
uled to meet and negotiate with
European officials in Brussels,
Belgium, on Thursday April 9th
— less than a week ahead of the
April 15th deadline given to this
country to complete its services
offer to Europe.

In view of the proximity to the
deadline, already one that has
been extended for the Bahamas
beyond that given to other
Caribbean countries, Mr Mitchell
yesterday claimed that “some-
body has messed up” and “there
is clearly a problem.”

“We are concerned about the
fact that the agreement itself may
be in jeopardy. A lot of work has
been put into bringing this to a
successful conclusion to protect
the access of crawfish into the
market and we want to make sure
this continues,” said Mr Mitchell.

Contradicting the EPA source,
Mr Mitchell said he does not see
Europe extending the deadline
again for the Bahamas.

Government officials have pre-
viously admitted that it was pri-
marily the intention to save
Bahamian exports, such as craw-
fish, from losing their duty free
access to the European market
that drove this country to sign
onto the wide-ranging EPA.

The Government, along with



Christ Church Cathedral
Schedule of Services for Holy Week & Easter
April 5th - April 12th, 2009
Sunday April 5th Sunday of The Passion & Palm Sunday

7:30 a.m,
8:45 a.m.

11:15 a.m.

6:1) p.m.

Distribution of Palms & Holy Eucharist
The Liturgy of the Palms

Procession & Liturgy for Palm Sunday

Blessing & Distribution of Palms
Holy Eucharist
Evensong, Sermon & Benediction

Monday April 6th - 1:00 p.m.

Holy Eucharist

Tuesday April 7th - 7:00 a.m. & 12:30 p.m.

Holy Eucharist

Wednesday April 8th - 7:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.

Holy Eucharist
7:30 p.m.

Liturgy of the Renewal of Priestly Vows & Blessing of Holy Oils

Thursday April 9th - Maundy Thursday 7:30 p.m.
Commemoration of the Last Supper, Washing of Feet &

Watch before the Altar of Repose

Friday April 10th - Good Friday 9:00 a.m.

The Good Friday Liturgy

Service Times For Sunday April 12th, 2009

Easter Sunday

6:00 a.m, The Easter Vigil
7:30 a.m, Holy Communion
9:00 a.m.

11:15 a.m.
6:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.
11:15 a.m.
:(M) p.m.

Holy Eucharist

Holy Eucharist

Procession, Solemn High Mass

Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction
Procession, Solemn High Mass

Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction



PLP concern

all other Caricom countries,
signed the goods portion of the
EPA in October of last year to
protect this industry, at the same
time committing itself to gradu-
ally reducing import duties on
goods coming in from Europe to
the Bahamas.

It was then given a six month
extension — until April 15th — to
complete its offer under the ser-
vices portion of the EPA, which
involves offering to open up trade
between the Bahamas and
Europe in services such as con-
struction or healthcare in return
for reciprocal benefits. But after
submitting its offer, it found that
Europe was not happy with what
was being put on the table. The
Bahamas is now being questioned
as to whether it will offer more.

Mr Mitchell criticised Mr Laing
for what he termed “masterful
obfuscation” in comments he
made to The Nassau Guardian
on the status of this country’s ser-
vices offer to the European Com-
mission.

While Mr Laing told the news-

paper that the country’s offer in
terms of how much of its trade in
services it is willing to liberalise
had not been rejected by Europe,
he submitted that it had not been
accepted.

But Mr Mitchell said: “If an
offer is not accepted then it’s
rejected, there’s no in between.”

“What we want to know is:
What were the terms of the offer
that has now been rejected and is
it true that our failure to meet
the deadline of the 15th of April
may jeopardise the entire agree-
ment and thereby put our fishing
industry at risk?” asked the Fox
Hill MP.

In contrast to earlier critics who
claimed the Government was giv-
ing away too much under the
EPA, Mr Mitchell suggested that
government may have tried to
limit its liberalisation too much
in order to protect Bahamian
industries.

“You have to show a good faith
effort of reciprocity...and I think
that is where the difficulty lies
today,” he said.

See today’s Business section
for more information on this
issue.

‘Harsh penalties’

FROM page one

your claim, they will then check your records to see whether or not you
are registered with this number, that these contributions have come in on

your behalf,” Mr Ingraham said.

“They may not be able to call each and every employer to see whether
or not (a claimant) was in fact fired, but they will have sufficient infor-
mation to be able to make a judgment, and while you might get that first
cheque before (the end) of verification, by the time as you come back for
the second one they ought to be able to verify what has happened.

"So there may be some cases where somebody may receive a benefit
that is not continued because of information that's discovered. The
truth of the matter is that there are always some people, a minority, who
seek to collect something that they're not entitled to — I don't want to
frighten anybody, but there are very stiff penalties under the National
Insurance Act for persons who do such things,” he said.

Mr Ingraham added that anyone found guilty of such an offence will
be made an example of in order to deter copycats. He urged those per-
sons who know they are ineligible to receive benefits not to apply.

Under the National Insurance Act anyone who knowingly makes any
false statement or false representation; or produces, furnishes, causes or
knowingly allows to be produced or furnished, any document or infor-
mation which he knows to be false in a material particular, could be fined
not more than $2,500 or imprisoned for not more than 12 months, or

both.

Applicants will be eligible for the benefit if they are currently unem-
ployed; under 65; not self-employed; able to and willing to work; were last
employed on or after July 1, 2004; not receiving other NIB benefits, oth-
er than disability or survivors benefits; and have made a certain number

of contributions to NIB.

Unemployed persons whose employer deducted contributions from
their wages but did not pay NIB will still be eligible for the benefit,
although the claim may take a little longer to be processed, Mr Ingraham

said.

The unprecedented unemployment scheme, set to come into effect on
April 20, will provide qualified unemployed persons with a maximum of
$200 per week for a maximum of 13 weeks at a time. During the 13-week
period, claimants must remain unemployed, be available and willing to
work, must not refuse suitable employment, an interview or training.

They will be subject to a review by the Department of Labour every
four weeks as long as they receive the benefit. Once people have
received unemployment benefit for 13 weeks they will be ineligible to
access such funds again for the next 52 weeks.

FROM page one

| Govt seeking to remove
| Mayaguana anchor

project ‘impediments’
FROM page one

development.”

“We’re really combing
through the agreement on
both sides to really see if we
can make any kind of adjust-
ments that would enable it to
move forward. (The develop-
ers) come back to us occa-
sionally on a number of items
for us to respond to and so far
we’ve done all we can to facil-
itate them,” said the minister.

Developers are progressing
with the island’s infrastruc-
tural requirements, but have
been “really slowed down”
when it comes to moving
ahead on the construction of
accommodation.

“That’s another matter,
because obviously you want
to get a return on that invest-
ment immediately,” said the
Minister.

Developers are in a strong
position financially, with a
“oreat deal of their financing
already identified” prior to the
present crisis, but Mr Van-
derpool Wallace suggested
that financiers generally want
to see an “uptick in global
conditions first before they
begin to advance the kinds of
things that are going to need
an immediate investment.”

Meanwhile, despite interest
from high end boutique hotel
brands in operating the
resort’s hotel once completed
remains “very strong”, Mr
Vanderpool Wallace said
there is yet to be any firm
commitment on this aspect of
the project.

“We are looking at a num-
ber of brand name hotel
developers that have been
down there and will continue
to go down there to look at
the site because it’s generally
agreed that it’s a wonderful
opportunity, but needless to
say in the kind of global envi-
ronment we have now very
few people are making those
kind of commitments imme-
diately,” said the minister.

Initial construction of the
grand “anchor project” —
heralded as being worth $1.8
billon in total — began on
Mayaguana in January 2005.

The project is ultimately
envisioned as including an air-
port, utilities, a marina village,
private condominiums and vil-
las, a boutique resort, as well
as “commercial, industrial,
social and educational devel-
opments and nature pre-
serves.”

A Heads of Agreement,
signed in March 2006, for-
malised the project as a joint
venture between the
Mayaguana Development
Company Ltd and the
Hotel Corporation of the
Bahamas.

Under the agreement, 9,999
acres of land on the island of
300 inhabitants was to be con-
veyed to the developers in
stages, and if they were unable
to meet agreed milestones,
would be re-conveyed to the
Government.

“They are continuing with
the infrastructural develop-
ment, with the airport and
road development, and they
are putting in place accom-
modations for people who
need to come down there to
see the project so they can
stay there comfortably.

“So they’re beginning to
put all the bits and pieces in
place to ensure that any
investor is clear that they are
committed to the project,”
said Mr Vanderpool Wallace.

As to a ball park comple-
tion date for the sprawling
development, the minister
declined to speculate.

“Tt’s hard to say,” he said.

Contacted yesterday for
comment on the project’s
progress, Mayaguana island
administrator Harvey Roberts
declined to speak with The
Tribune on the matter, while
resident project manager Tim
Haffner referred this newspa-
per to Boston-based Execu-
tive Vice President Stephen
Pritchard.

A message left for Mr
Pritchard was not returned up
to press time.

a helpful hand, and to do everything in our power to
provide a safe, secure and holistic environment that is
conducive to education at the Eight Mile Rock High
School,” he said.

Mr Bethel said that the teachers felt “stigmatized”
by the alleged events, which have been highly publi-
cised in the media.

He stated that Dr David Allen will begin the process
of giving guidance to teachers as to what the appro-
priate boundaries and limitations are when dealing
with students.

“With Dr Allen’s help, he is seeking to help teach-
ers find their bearings to know the danger zones, the
‘no go’ zones, to know what the limitation and bound-
aries are, and how to coordinate efforts offered by the
Ministry of Education.

“As we review the safe school manual...the Depart-
ment of Education in close consultation with Dr Allen
and other professionals will devise guidelines affecting
every aspect of teacher contact with students,” Mr
Bethel said.

He noted that teachers also will be given instructions
of what to do when a child comes to them in confi-
dence about a crisis.

Fight Mile Rock High School

Andre Birbal, a former art teacher, has been
accused of molesting two former students at Eight
Mile Rock High.

The Trinidadian teacher, who has fled the country,
is currently being sought by Bahamian police to be
questioned in connection with accusations of com-
mitting acts of unnatural intercourse.

Police have also launched investigations into alleged
molestation complaints against two other teachers
who have also been removed from the school.

Since the incidents, the Ministry of Education plans
to have all new teachers vetted by police.

Minister Bethel said that there was always an estab-
lished procedure requiring persons to submit a police
certificate or record to the Ministry of Education.

“That is usually a very good indicator of character.
Some teachers have served for many years, and the
teacher in question at Eight Mile Rock, Mr Birbal, was
there for more than 20 years,” he said.

Minister Bethel also held a meeting with teachers in
the entire district at 4pm at the Hilton Outten Con-
vention Centre at 4pm. He also met with PTA officials
at the Eight Mile Rock High at 7pm.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS

Sprinter has high hopes for
IAAF World Championships

No Bull
in Toronto
for college

recruitment,
exhibition

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

A 20-member team from
the No Bull Basketball Club
left town yesterday for a nine-
day trip to Toronto, Canada,
for a college recruitment and
exhibition series.

The trip is an annual one for
the club headed by Geno
Bullard, coach of the West-
minster Diplomats.

“This trip is more or less
trying to expose our guys to
the next level,” said Bullard
just before they departed the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport.

“We know that our boys
play a lot of basketball, but on
this trip, we will have a lot of
scouts and coaches from the
various schools in Toronto,
who will be there to watch our
boys in hopes of giving them
scholarships to attend their
schools.”

At least five schools, includ-
ing Seneca College, Humber
College, Ridley College, York
University and Shreidan Col-
lege are expected to be a part
of this year’s exhibition series.

While in Toronto, the play-
ers will also get to watch a live
National Basketball Associa-
tion (NBA) game between the
Raptors from Toronto and the
Philadelphia 76ers on Sunday,
April 12.

Also during the trip, the
team will visit Niagara Falls
before they are due to return
home on Tuesday, April 14.

No Bull, founded back in
2003, is based on the motivat-
ing philosophy of providing
fundamental skill develop-
ment instruction for young
student-athletes in the com-
munity (boys and girls) who
have a desire to compete in a
high level of basketball com-
petition.

Bullard said their pro-
gramme and all of their coach-
es are committed to providing
an opportunity for players to
expand both their knowledge
and their love for the game of
basketball in an environment
that teaches respect, team-
work, sportsmanship, commit-
ment and hard work.

He noted that their goal is
to strive for excellence, both
on and off the court.

The trip to Canada, accord-
ing to Bullard, will help to fur-
ther motivate the younger
guys, who make up the majori-
ty of the team as they start
looking towards their future.

“Hopefully this will make it
easy for them to make that
transition to the next level,”
Bullard said. “We have three
seniors who are graduating
from Westminster and a cou-
ple seniors who are in the club
to get them off to school.”

Through the trip, Bullard
said No Bull should be able to
accomplish its feat of bringing
about a balance with athletics
and academics for its players.

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SPRINTER Chamal Bethel
is in some unique company
training in Jamaica. By August,
he’s hoping to be running along
side them at the [AAF World
Championships in Berlin, Ger-
many.

Home to attend the funeral
service of his grandmother on
Saturday, Bethel said he’s look-
ing forward to turning in a good
performance when he competes
on August 18.

“This year, coach has already
seen some bad habits and he
started to correct them, so when
I go back, I will continue to
work on improving my perfor-
mances,” Bethel said.

For the first two years, the
23-year-old 2003 graduate of St
John’s College has been in
Jamaica training in the High
Performance Track Club camp
that features world champion
Usain Bolt.

But Bethel, who is studying

marketing and economy at the
University of Technology, has
switched to the MVP Track
Club, coached by Steve Fran-
cis and led by former world
champion Asafa Powell.

So far this year, Bethel has
ran in two meets, coming fifth in
the first event in the 100 before
he came across the finish line
first in the last meet.

He has done a season’s best
of 10.72, but he’s looking for-
ward to surpassing his personal
best of 10.69.

“T’m just trying to put togeth-
er my season,” he said. “The
passing of my grandmother has
really opened up my eyes a lot,
so I’ve decided to dedicate the
rest of the season to her.”

Bethel said he’s really thrilled
to have the opportunity to work
with coach Francis, who is very
sociable and makes sure that he
does the necessary things to be
competitive.

Nation-aside, Bethel said he
was even more surprised that
both Francis and the other
members of the Jamaican

Ma | ee



national training squad have
gracefully accepted and assisted
him in his preparation.

“Tt’s all about making each
other better,” Bethel said.
“They have been trying to learn
from our culture and they have
been teaching me some things
about their culture.”

On top of it all, Bethel said he
has forged a good working rela-
tionship with both Bolt and
Powell. In fact, Bethel said con-
trary to what might be per-
ceived as a rivalry between the
two top sprinters is actually a
cordial relationship.

“There’s a lot of talk on the
streets in Jamaica about who is
really the fastest man,” Bethel
said. “But they both spent a lot
of time around each other.

“They are close friends and
they are always interested in the
best for each other because they
know that at the end of the day,
it will be Jamaica who will be in
the forefront.”

Last year, despite nursing a
slight injury, Bethel came home
and finished second in the B
final of the men’s 100 at the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations’ National
Open Track and Field Cham-
pionships at the Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium.

With a chance to qualify for
the IAAF World Champi-



onships, Bethel is hoping that
when he comes home to com-
pete at this year’s Nationals in
June, he will get an opportunity
to finally make the national
team and join his former St
John’s team-mate Andretti Bain
and even possibly Tyrone
Sawyer.

“My goal is to eventually
become a world champion,”
Bethel said. “It might be a little
difficult right now, but I believe
that everybody will have their
chance to succeed and I’m just
waiting on my own.

“Derrick Atkins went and he
put us out, but we still have a lot
more sprinters like myself,
Adrian Griffith, Dominic
Demeritte and Jamial Rolle. I
just want to be able to compete
with these guys and make a con-
tribution to the national team.”

No doubt with the intense
training in the internationally
recognised camp, Bethel, the
son of Charmaine and Steven
Bethel, said he will be able to
produce some stellar times this
year.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

ALPHEUS ‘HAWK’ FINLAYSON, BAAAs president Curt Hollingsworth, Sports Minister Desmond Bannister, BSF president Algernon Cargill and Bahamasair general sales and market-
ing manager Mike Sands at Monday’s press conference...

ERROR CLR P ETc

FROM page 11

such requests as this, it means
that all of our operational
departments go into a full mode
of making major adjustments
to our schedule, particularly
with it being Easter weekend
and we had to take into consid-
eration that we have a number
of schedules that we have to be
able to maintain with integri-
ty,” he said.

“On behalf of the manage-
ment and the board at Bahama-
sair, we wish the teams all the
best and we will work closely
with national sports federations,
not just for Bahamasair to be
the carrier of choice on inter-
national routes but most defi-
nitely on domestic routes as
well.”

BSF president Algernon
Cargill said procuring the direct
charter to and from the games
for the team has been an event-
free experience for the first time
in his tenure as president.

“In previous Carifta (Games)
we have always had a problem
in trying to finalize the Bahama-
sair charter. I would be the first
to say this is the smoothest its
gone since I have been presi-
dent in 2003. The Ministry of
Sports came to the BSF very
early in the process and asked
us to outline what our needs
were and all we had to do was
pretty much outline to the min-
ister that we needed a charter
and frankly I have had a back-
seat from then and all of the
arrangements have been made
to the full satisfaction of the
BSF,” he said.

“Tt is important for our team
to arrive at an international
meet on the national flag carri-
er and it really gets the team
going on a positive feeling and
that can go a long way in con-
tributing to the performances
of the swimmers.”

Cargill said while the team’s
performances in the past have
warranted lofty expectations
from the Bahamian public, win-
ning the games and the even-
tual medal count is a secondary
goal for the team and the fed-
eration.

“The BSF is indeed proud to
have a 36-member team headed
to Aruba and what is significant
about our team this year is we
have a team of 36 qualifiers. In
other words every member of
our team has earned the right to
represent the Bahamas through

our qualification process. What
we are proud of is that the team
has done extremely well at
Carifta over the last five years,
even coming within a few points
of winning one year,” he said.

“The message we want to
leave the Bahamas is that while
our expectations are high for
this team, winning is not the
only important thing. What we
try to do in the Swimming Fed-
eration is create good role mod-
els and secondly ensure that our
swimmers perform at the best
level. We do not want to put
too much pressure on our swim-
mers. Although we really want
them to win it is not the most
important thing for us. What is
important is the team represents
the country well and also that
they perform at their best.”

BAAAs president Curt
Hollingsworth said the team is
eager to finally begin competi-
tion after weeks of diligent
preparation.

“The team that has been put
together they are ready and pre-
pared for competition in St
Lucia,” he said. “The athletes,
coaches and management team,
they are all prepared and the
association is 100 per cent
behind them.”

Travel Itinerary
for Carifta Teams

April 8 — Track and Field
team departs Nassau at 11am;
arrives in Provo at 12:15pm

- Teams depart Provo at 1pm;
arrive in St Lucia at 3:15pm

April 9— Friends and Family
members of Track and Field
team depart Nassau at 9:30pm;
arrive in St Lucia at 12:15am

April 14 — Track and Field
Teams depart St Lucia at 10am;
arrives in Provo at 12:15pm

- Track and Field Team
departs Provo at lam; arrives
in Nassau at 2:15pm

- Swim team departs Nassau
at 8am; arrives in Aruba at
10:30am

- Friends and Family mem-
bers of Track and Field team
depart St Lucia at 2:30pm;
arrive in Nassau at 5:15pm

April 20

- Swim team departs Aruba
at lpm; arrives in Nassau at
3:30pm

elebrating

years

and counting!”

SANPIN MOTORS THANKS ALL OF THEIR
CUSTOMERS AND FUTURE CUSTOMERS
FOR 30 YEARS OF BUSINESS AND SERVICE

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED oS THE SPOrrINANcING Wir

#209 Wl Rood
PO). Be Mudd,

1 (242) 39444? |./49) 393-8738

Thompson Blvd. + Oakes Field
t. 242.326.6977 * f, 242.326.6315

&, sanping@coralwave.com

COMMONWEALTH BANK

INSURANCE AWASLABLE WITH
ADVANTAGE SURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS.LTD,





PAGE 10, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender
Fuel oil tank erection &
Associated Works
Bailey Town, Bimini

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders far the abowe named serviced

Bidders are required ta collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed ta:
Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on of before
30th April, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tondor No, 689/09
FUEL OF<“L TANK ERECTION & ASSOCIATED WORKS
BAILEY TOWM, BIMIMI

The Corporation reserves the right
fo accept of reject any or all proposals,
For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, comtact

Mr, Kermit McCartney at telephone 302-1247



SPORTS

Donnie Martinborough wins SPORTS
International Sunfish Masters =

@ By DIANE PHILLIPS

THREE-time Sunfish world
champion Donnie Martinbor-
ough sailed to victory in the
International Sunfish Masters
championship in late March,
beating a field of 55 sailors and
achieving the one goal that had
eluded him in a nearly-perfect
career, a victory in American
waters.

“What made this personal
feat so special was that it with
all the racing over all the years,
including 10 wins in Bermuda
Race Week and three world
championships in different
countries, it was the very first
time that I won on US soil,”
said Martinborough, who out-
sailed and out-manuevered
more than 50 Sunfish sailors
from the US and a handful
from other nations in the age
40 and over event held in Tam-
pa Bay.

Martinborough, 49, was the
only Bahamian who compet-
ed in the 9-race series. Based
on low point scoring, with the
right to discard one race, Mar-
tinborough finished with only
13 points of the eight scored
races.



THREE-time Sunfish World Cham-
pion Bahamian Donnie Martinbor-
ough, who also holds an unbreak-
able Bermuda Race Week sailing
record with 10 titles, added anoth-
er chapter to his legacy in March,
beating a field of 55 to win the
International Sunfish Masters event
held in Tampa, Florida. He went on
to take third overall in the Sunfish
Mid-Winters, at 49, finishing a
close third to the seven-time Sun-
fish world champion, Eduardo
Cordero of Venezuela and four-time
defending champion David Mendel-
blatt of the US...

Two-time defending cham-
pion Tim Whitehurst of Pen-
sacola, Florida, finished sec-
ond with 18 points, tied with
Anne Edwards, also of the US,
with 18 points. In the case of a

“What made this personal feat
so special was that it with all the
racing over all the years, including
10 wins in Bermuda Race Week
and three world championships
in different countries, it was
TOM YOM YM NTSB TUCO INTL
I won on US soil.”

— Donnie Martinborough

Save BIG Right Now!

2008 FORD EVEREST

2.5 Turbo Diesel Automatic, Leather,
LOADED - 7 oe

3 years or 65K warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty
and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

2008 FORD RANGER )\ —
2.5 Turbo Diesel/Standard Shift
LOADED

as $32,848.00
NOW $28,700.00

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and
licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOWTHAT S REALL A/ =3[ |(@Deal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com





tie, the person with the highest
number of best finishes takes
the higher spot.

According to Martinbor-
ough, who now has 14 inter-
national titles, the greatest
challenge was wind — too little
of it.

“We had light and variable
winds the entire series,” said
Martinborough, “so my starts
were extremely difficult. There
were one or two races where I
got into trouble early so I was
pleased to recover and turn in
a respectable finish.”

Martinborough said recent
intensive training preparing for
the 2009 world championship
slated for the Bahamas in
October helped him fight his
way back after less than perfect
starts.

“The start line was really
crowded. You’ve got 55 boats
trying to cross the line at one
time and with light winds,
you’ve got to make a clean
start and search for clear air
as fast as you can.”

For the slightly-built sailor,
light winds were a disadvan-
tage, but recent practice, he
said, paid off.

“We've been doing a lot of
local sailing as a build-up for
the upcoming world champi-
onship with good competition
from local sailors who continue
to push me, so I think that
helped keep me sharp and
focused,” said the sailor, who
has to balance his hobby with
career — he’s a director of
Bahamas Realty where he is
responsible for its commercial
and property management
division — and his role as hus-
band and father of three young
children.

The red-headed super Sun-
fish sailor who holds the
unbreakable record of the
most wins of any class of sail-
boat in Bermuda Race Week
in the 20th Century, also won

BRIEF

BASEBALL
JBLN UPDATE

THE Junior Baseball
League of Nassau contin-
ued its regular season over
the weekend at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex
with the following results
posted:

TEE BALL

Raptors 17, Blue Claws 13
Grasshoppers 18, Sand
Gnats 16

Sidewinders 19, Knights 5
COACH PITCH
Diamondbacks 14, Angels
3

Blue Jays 5, Astros 4
Athletics 13, Cubs 1
MINOR LEAGUE

Rays 12, Royals 10

Mets 10, Rockies 9
MAJOR LEAGUE
Reds 8, Indians 4
Marlins 6, Mariners 6 (Tie
Game)

JUNIOR LEAGUE
Yankees 11, Dodgers 9
Twins 15, Cardinals 8
SENIOR LEAGUE
Tigers 13, Pirates 10
Rangers 10, Phillies 6
Tigers 12, Pirates 11 (Re-
Scheduled Game)

the title of Apprentice Mas-
ters International during the
Davis Yacht Club event.

With those wins behind him
in Tampa, he went on to the
Sunfish Mid-Winters in nearby
Clearwater, Florida, where he
finished third overall out of 60
boats. That series was won by
Venezuelan Eduardo Cordero,
seven-time world champion.

Second place went to David
Mendelblatt of the US, four-
time defending champion.

“Tt was a real achievement
to go to the US Nationals and
compete and finish a close
third behind these two guys
who are considered the best in
the world,” said Martinbor-
ough. “But no matter what
happens, it’s always just an
honour to represent the
Bahamas.”

Teleos basketball teams to take
part in North America tourney



SHOWN (I-r) are Teleos Christian School students with Mrs Brenda Bethel (left), senior manager at the Thomp-
son Blvd branch and Dr David Adams (right), administrator and assistant coach

Thanks to Scotiabank donation

THE senior and junior bas-
ketball teams of Teleos Christ-
ian School were scheduled to
travel to Toronto, Canada, on
April 6 to participate in the
biggest single bracket basket-
ball tournament in North
America.

And this trip was made pos-
sible through a financial dona-
tion from Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Ltd.

Dr David L Adams, adminis-
trator and assistant coach at

Teleos Christian School,
expressed his gratitude to Sco-
tiabank for this most generous
donation.

“As a result of this donation,
Scotiabank has created a won-
derful opportunity for our
young men to travel and to gain
more exposure in the field of
basketball” said Dr Adams.

Scotiabank is committed to

supporting the communities in
which we live and work.

Recognised as a leader inter-
nationally and among Canadian
corporations for its charitable
donations and philanthropic
activities, in 2008 the bank pro-
vided about $43 million in spon-
sorships and donations to a
variety of projects and initia-
tives.

All pedals set on bike race for cash

THE Grand Bahama Tank
Cleaning Company in coalition
with the Grand Bahama
Cyclists Club presents the First
Annual Me Clean’s Town to
West End Island Run Bike
Race April 18-19.

“Cyclists will traverse 85
miles from Mc Clean’s Town
into West End and overcome
the odds to prove themselves
victorious.

“They will suffer and they will
toil and in the end, one shall
prove himself above all claiming
an award above all else...victory.
On the line is $1,000 divided
among the victors,” according
to a statement.

At 6:30am Saturday, partici-
pants are expected to assemble
in the parking lot of Pepper Pot,
from where they will leave
together and drive into Mc
Clean’s Town.

Once in Mc Clean’s Town,
cyclists are to begin their trek at
10am from the police station in
Mc Clean’s Town and travel
into West End.

“This should be a fun and
exciting event as there are spot
prizes/cash incentives along the
route for which cyclists will be
competing along with a $150
prize to the cyclist who crosses
the line in first place,” said the
statement.

The event continues with a
12-mile time trial at 9am April
18 on the Grand Bahama High-
way near the airport round-a-
bout, followed by a junior bike
race. The winner of the time tri-
al will also receive a cash incen-
tive of $100.

“There are also cash awards
for overall winners. The road
race and the time trial will be
combined to form overall win-

ners for whom prizes will be
divided as follows:

¢ $200 to first place

¢ $150 to second place

¢ $100.00 to third place

“There are also trophies that
will be awarded to juniors and
novice competitors.

“As mentioned there is a
novice division for cyclists who
do not feel that they can make
the trek from Mc Clean’s Town
into West End. These cyclists
can come out on Sunday and
compete in a 24-mile circuit
event on the Grand Bahama
Highway that will be run along-
side the junior event.

“For those who do not wish
to compete they can also come
out to support this new event
that hopes to revive the sport
of cycling in Grand Bahama.
Participation is encouraged and
spectators are welcome.”



THE TRIBUNE

Sp

Carifta teams to fly

UESDAY, APRIL 7,

PAGE 11

r



ts

2009

nigh,

private with Bahamasair

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

he Ministry of Youth
"L'sers and Culture and
Bahamasair have
promised to ensure that both
junior national teams scheduled
for regional competition over
the next few weeks will arrive at
their destinations by way of the
national flag carrier.

Representatives of both enti-
ties announced yesterday that
teams for the Carifta Track and
Field Championships in St
Lucia and the Carifta Swim-
ming Championships in Aruba
are scheduled to travel to both
respective venues courtesy of
private charters provided by
Bahamasair.

The 61-member track and
field squad leaves for St Lucia
at 1lam on April 8, while the
36-member swim team departs
for Aruba at 6am April 14.

While the swim team will
travel direct on the nearly three-
hour flight to Aruba, the track
and field team, en route to St
Lucia — as per its agreement
with the Turks and Caicos Min-
istry of Sports — will make a
brief stop in Providenciales to
pick up their country’s national
team.

The charter flights for both
teams will make the Bahamas
the only country in the region to
ensure their teams arrives under
the nation’s flag carrier.

Minister of Youth Sports and





Photos: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

SPORTS MINISTER Desmond Bannister presents BAAAs president Curt Hollingsworth with a cheque...

Culture Desmond Bannister
said the Carifta format is vital in
the development of great senior
athletes of the future.

“T want to thank the BSF,
BAAAs and Bahamasair, for
being such co-operative part-
ners of the ministry in ensuring
that the Bahamas is well repre-
sented at this year’s Carifta

SPORTS MINISTER Desmond Bannister presents BSF president Algernon
Cargill with a cheque at Monday’s press conference...

COM

Whopper Jr.

Double
Cheeseburger

BLT & Cheese

Games,” he said.

“Tt is a critical event for the
development of our young peo-
ple. If you look through the his-
tory of the Carifta Games you
will see that almost every one of
our major athletes who have
attained success at the interna-
tional level have come through
this competition.”

Bannister, whose ministry
pledged approximately $200,000
to assist both federations in
their endeavours, said giving the
athletes a sense of pride in their
travel even before competition
begins is influential in their suc-
cess.

“We believe it is important
that athletes from this country
embark on foreign soil in their
national flag carrier,” he said.
“There is no other country in
the region that does this, so the
Government of the Bahamas
should be able to be congratu-
lated for giving that sense of
pride to our athletes.”

Bahamasair general sales and
marketing manager Mike Sands
said the company was thrilled
to become a part of this ven-
ture and insisted they would

Re 7 «|
ib 30S

Includes Fries &

160z Soft Drink

Ham & Cheese

5pce Tenders

Add a

120z Milkshake

°y
2 Cookies for .99¢

Village Rd. Roundabout * Harold Rd. * Prince Charles « Frederick Street North » Cable Beach

become more involved with
national team travel with other
federations as well.
“Bahamasair is very pleased
to be apart of this national
effort. When Bahamasair gets

SEE page 9



Sprinter has
phigh hopes

for IAAF World

| Championships...

See page 9



















































Business Hours:

April 6" -9th 8:00am - 8:00pm
Snappers, Jacks, Goggle Eyes,
Grunts, Turbots, Margaret,

Kits or Retail available ‘Sold by weight

Advanced Payment required for all Cleaned kits
Groupers, Crawfish, Conchs, Shrimps, Salmon All

Pn and Ready To Golly,
- o-_ ne

Carmichael Road: 341-3664 |

Eden Street: 325-0116

One way arly!

Grand Bahama ;

baco &

Now until Mday 37st

Exuma

Monday through Thursday
and Saturdays only.

a |

Frequent Flyer members get

when they fly during this period.
rr

Come fly your airline today!

Reservations:

242-377-5505

Book Online:

www.bahamasair.com



a Wr chan’ fat Aly beara, Wivte lie: ee

®
a
°
Og



PAGE 12, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS





THE CROWD enjoys a night of entertainment, featuring fashion, fun and music, during the fundraising event
‘A Wave of Fashion’ held to support the work of BASRA Grand Bahama.


























ie ca CHONG faa alate

HUNG! Pai ee) =

ool
uy

4 i
san)
fe een)
ar” = vi

i Veen
u os t

noaaiile
ier ee:

Pan
AC re oe

CHOICES

Your Plan fora Balanced Lifeâ„¢

Receive a FREE Healthy Choice eco-friendly green bag
when you bring in 2 Healthy Choice soup labels, or 1 Healthy
Choice Café Steamers Box into the d'Albenas Agency Ltd.
located in Palmdale. otter good white cupplies tact.

www.healthy choice.com

Healthy Choice is a registered
Trademark of ConAgea Foods international.

#Â¥ The dAlbenas Agency Ltd.



‘A wave of fashion’

BASRA FUNDRAISER A HUGE SUCCESS

xan}
z
=!
ma]
any
feb)
=
=
rob)
feb)
Sz
oy
>
a
a”
I
[a
=
=
=
{ae}



BASRA GRAND BAHAMA CHAIRMA Justin Snisky
(right) presents a bouquet of flowers to the newly-
crowned Miss Grand Bahama Garelle Hudson (left)
who made one of her first public appearances at ‘A
Wave of Fashion.’

MODEL SHELLY shows off an original hat design called
‘Tropical Paradise’ by Carlaynae Designs at ‘A Wave of
Fashion’ held at Tides Mansion as part of the fundrais-
ing event for BASRA Grand Bahama.

MASTER OF
CEREMONIES
for the
evening of
J fun and
fashion David
Wallace, who
kept the
=) crowd

} entertained
through the
night. The
fundraising
event was
created to
support the
mm work of
BASRA Grand
Bahama.

For more than a century we've done
more than issue policies

weve kept

Our promises.

Confidence for Life

acm
ne
Colinalmperial.

376.2000) 356.8900 wa coalriaencerkal cor

bee pees lee Bate gece
pr eee aye)









ZHIVARGO LAING

Bahamas starts
process for WI10
full membership

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas has submitted
its Memorandum of Trade
Regime to begin its accession
to full World Trade Organisa-
tion (WTO) membership, the
minister of state for finance con-
firmed to Tribune Business yes-
terday, the start of a three-five
year process that will integrate
this nation’s economy with a

SEE page 4B

THE TRIBUNE

USINESS



TUESDAY.

AO RT ei

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

EU seeks ‘possibilities’
on retail liberalisation

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

iberalising the retail industry to
enable European companies to
set-up operations in the Bahamas
“will not happen”, the minister
of state for finance told Tribune
Business yesterday, with this newspaper able to
reveal that the European Union (EU) is seek-
ing further concessions in the construction,
computer systems, advisory services and for-
eign/international law sectors.

While unable to confirm the specific sectors
in which the EU is seeking movement from
the Bahamas in relation to its Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA) services offer,
Zhivargo Laing confirmed Tribune Business’s
reports that the Europeans are seeking “more
concessions” from the Bahamas on mode three
- commercial presence, or the ability of Euro-
pean firms to establish their own operations in
this nation.

While he “can’t be confident” that the
Bahamas will reach agreement with the EU
on its services offer by the April 15, 2009, dead-
line for all negotiations to be concluded, Mr
Laing said he was optimistic the issue would be
resolved to the satisfaction of all parties.

When asked by Tribune Business whether
failure to meet the April 15 deadline might
jeopardise the Bahamas’ membership in the
EPA, and the ability of its businesses and entre-
preneurs to access its various trade prefer-
ences/benefits, Mr Laing said there was noth-
ing in the treaty or in law to indicate this might

* Minister says this will not happen, as
Europe seeks EPA movement from
Bahamas on construction, computer
systems, advisory services and
foreign/international law sectors

* Commercial presence the key, with EU
concerned on Bahamas’ services offer
not going as far as they thought, not
matching on-ground reality and being
subject to policy rather than law

* Minister uncertain on whether
April 15 deadline met; hopeful
EU will grant extension

* Says fisheries industry need not worry

be the case.

Urging the Bahamian fisheries and crawfish
industry not to worry, this sector having argued
that duty-free access to EU markets is key to
maintaining its competitiveness, Mr Laing said
he felt the EU would give the Bahamas an
extension on its services offer once it saw it
was negotiating in good faith.

Yet one source close to the negotiating
process told Tribune Business that the EU had
rejected the Bahamas’ initial services offer,

Bahamas working
on the ‘breadth and
depth’ of its tours

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas is “already
down the road” in creating new
and improved excursions and
tours for visiting cruise passen-
gers, the minister of tourism and
aviation told Tribune Business
yesterday, adding that concerns
over the “breadth and depth”
of these attractions accounted
for 80 per cent of a cruise indus-
try presentation he attended
recently.

Arguing that it did not make
sense for Bahamian tour/excur-
sion operators and the cruise
lines to adopt “adversarial”
positions in their efforts to max-
imise the economic returns
from the industry, Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace said his min-
istry had been attempting to
achieve a solution acceptable
to both sides since autumn 2008.

The minister told Tribune
Business that it was vital for the
Bahamas to “continue to grow
the number of tours and excur-
sions it provides for visiting
cruise passengers, given that it is
a relatively mature destination
due to the frequency of cruise
ship calls - especially on the
three and four-day voyages
from Florida.

Concerns on issue dominate
‘80 per cent’ of cruise lines
presentation, as minister
urges industry and Bahamian
excursion operators not to
adopt ‘adversarial’ positions

“Tt was brought to our atten-
tion that we don’t have the vari-
ety of tours given the number of
passengers that come here,” Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace said, a
cruise industry concern that was
amplified by the fact that many
passengers were not first-time
visitors to the Bahamas.

This issue, he said, accounted
for much of a presentation he
witnesses in attending a Febru-
ary 2009 meeting of the Florida-
Caribbean Cruise Association
(FCCA), the industry trade
body that represents the major
cruise lines such as Carnival,
RoyalCaribbean and Norwe-
gian Cruise Lines.

“T personally went to an
FCCA meeting in February, a
couple of months ago, and 80
per cent of the presentation had
to deal with this issue,” Mr Van-
derpool-Wallace said. “I asked

SEE page 2B

AIRPORT INDUSTRIAL PARK, TURNKEY OFFICE
BUILDING #4797 The main building features 12 executive offices,

reception area, boardroom, secretarial pool area and small warehouse

space. Plus detached building used as a lunch room. Five minutes from

International airport. Ample paved parking for clients and employees on
enclosed | acre site. ASKING $1,800,000. MOTIVATED SELLER.
Mark.Hussey@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.9193

Damianos

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Member of
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | #242.322.2033 | The Bahamas MLS





SEE page 4B

ROYAL FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

Family Guardian’s
key solvency ratio
now stands at 218%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FAMILY Guardian’s presi-
dent yesterday told Tribune
Business that the company’s
key solvency ratio currently
stood at 218 per cent, well
above the 150 per cent mini-
mum regulatory threshold, the
company’s A- (Excellent) finan-
cial strength rating having been
reaffirmed by A. M. Best.

The leading international
insurance credit rating agency
also reaffirmed Family
Guardian’s ‘a-’ issuer credit rat-
ing, and Patricia Hermanns said
the fact that the firm had “the
highest rating available to any
[life and health insurer] in the
Bahamas” would further
enhance the BISX-listed com-
pany’s competitive positioning.

Confirming that Family
Guardian’s Minimum Contin-
uing Capital and Surplus
Requirement (MCCSR) stood
at 218 per cent at year-end 2008,
well above the 150 per cent
supervisory target, Ms Her-
mamnns said: “We are very, very
strong in terms of capital, and
the MCCSR measures that. We
are very well positioned for
financial strength.”

Court defers ruling over $330m claim

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Supreme Court has
deferred a decision on whether
a $330 million claim against a
Bahamian bank and trust com-
pany should be reinstated, with
both sides asked to prepare sub-
missions on whether a party can
proceed with foreign litigation
without the court’s leave, then
return to lodge a claim in a
Bahamas-based liquidation.

Investors in a fraudulent US-
based Ponzi scheme, called
Cash 4 Titles, are appealing the
decision by Leadenhall Bank &
Trust’s liquidator, Craig ‘Tony’
Gomez, to reject their $330 mil-
lion claim against the bank after
they were awarded that sum in

Judge questions whether defrauded investors can
pursue foreign litigation against Bahamas bank
without court’s leave, then try to lodge claim in
this nation, after entity placed in liquidation

a default judgment by the US
District Court for southern
Florida.

In his judgment, Senior Jus-
tice John Lyons said that while
he had “little difficulty” accept-
ing that judgments in foreign
courts were “in most instances,
enforceable in the Bahamas”,
his main difficulty was Section
194 of the Companies Act
(Chapter 308).

This section in the Bahami-
an law said that when compa-
nies were ordered wound-up,

Make it a reality.

or a provisional liquidator
appointed, no legal actions
could proceed or start against
them without the Supreme
Court’s permission.

“What has occurred here is
that the applicants proceeded
with their action in Florida,
notwithstanding that they did
not have leave to do so,” Justice
Lyons found.

“As can be seen, there was
an intervening event between

SEE page 5B

Prime Income Fund

e A higher, stable rate of return

e Long-term capital preservation

e Lower risk investment

PP

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

Pel Ase)

e Diversified portfolio

* Insurer retains top A. M.
Best ratings, although
concerns expressed on
mortgage investments
and financial services
division performance

* BISX-listed firm’s head says
mortgage investments down
2% as percentage of total
invested assets, while
financial services concerns
relate to expansion and
rise in death claims that
has now tapered off

Explaining its rationale for
Family Guardian’s ratings, A.
M. Best said in a statement:
“The affirmation of the ratings
are based on Family Guardian's
favourable risk-adjusted capi-
talisation, profitable aggregate
gains from operations and its
marketing presence as one of
the leading life insurance com-
panies in the Bahamas.......

“The trends in profitability
and stockholders’ equity con-

SEE page 6B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



e Professional fund management

We can get you there!

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



USNS eee
Bahamas working on the ‘breadth and depth’

FROM page 1B

them specifically what we need to put
in place to be more competitive in this
area.”

The minister added that the cruise
lines had been “very good in working
with us to put this together” when it
came to the Bahamas offering a
refreshed, expanded
tour/excursion/getaway product that
would enhance its appeal to cruise pas-
sengers.

That, though, may not ease the con-
cerns harboured by members of the
Bahamas Association of Shore Excur-
sionists (BASE). Jeffrey Beckles, its
executive director, in a presentation
to the Grand Bahama Tours Associa-
tion last week, said the increasing
development of private island destina-
tions by the major cruise line is having
a “devastating impact on Bahamian
small businesses”

Many vessels were either bypassing
Nassau/Freeport altogether or using
them as second ports of call after
already mining their passengers’ pock-
etbooks, Mr Beckles said, and while
the number of cruise arrivals to the
lines’ private islands were increasing,
they were declining elsewhere.

He added that there was a “massive
duplication of local tours at private
islands, and restrictions placed on local
vendors in selling their own tours”.
This had the net effect of ensuring that
all tours and excursions provided on
the private islands were controlled by
the cruise lines, along with the prices,
to the exclusion of Bahamian-owned
tour operators and their employees.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace yesterday,
though, said Bahamian tour and excur-

sion providers still had “the opportu-
nity to sell tours to cruise passengers
that are different from the experiences
on the private islands”.

“Much greater breadth and depth”
when it came to tour options was
required, and comparisons needed to
be done with what the cruise lines were
offering to ensure a point of differen-
tiation existed.

However, Tribune Business under-
stands that a number of Bahamian-
owned excursion providers have seen
the cruise lines cancel long-standing
contracts for their services within
recent months, and there is mounting
concern among both BASE members
and Bay Street merchants about the
increasing tendency of cruise passen-
gers to be shipped to Atlantis’s Par-
adise Island attractions once they dis-
embark at Prince George’s Wharf -
bypassing their businesses altogether.

This, needless to say, is continuing to
negatively impact small Bahamian-
owned businesses, which are consid-
ered the lifeblood of the Bahamian
economy.

It is also understood that BASE and
others are concerned about the cruise
lines’ increasing demands for price cuts,
and that their cash flow could be
impacted by the lines’ decision to pay
for services via wire transfer - a process
that could take several weeks to clear.
In the meantime, Bahamian business-
es must find the wherewithal to pay
for crucial supplies.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace acknowl-
edged that it was “extremely” impor-
tant for Bahamian businesses to earn
their share of the rewards from the
cruise ship industry. He added: “This is
one of those areas where the over-used

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

IHTERNATIONAL BANK

Pe ee RS eS

phrase, win-win, is true.”

With the cruise lines enjoying 100
per cent occupancy on their voyages to
the Bahamas, and finding it hard to
increase yields, selling more tours -
and earning commissions from doing so
- was one way to enhance financial per-
formance.

This - getting more cruise passen-
gers off their vessels - was exactly what
the Bahamas and its toiur/excursion
providers needed, Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace said, as it would enable them
to maximise customer numbers and
business revenues.



And an improved product would
also improve per capita cruise passen-
ger spending in the Bahamas, which
according to 2007 numbers stands at
$73 for Nassau and $57 for Grand
Bahama. Increasing these per capita
yields is critical for the well-being of
the Bahamian tourism industry and
wider economy.

As a result, both sides needed to
come together and work with each oth-
er for the common good, rather than
adopt adversarial positions, the min-
ister suggested.

Mr Beckles’ presentation warned

of its tours

that the “economic pic slices” earned
by Bahamian-owned tours and excur-
sion providers continued to dwindle
as a result, given that cruise lines and
their passengers either bypassed Nas-
sau or arrived here after the lines had
exhausted their spending power on the
private islands.

The Ministry of Tourism’s 2008
arrivals report, which has been
obtained by Tribune Business, appear
to bear out Mr Beckles’ concerns.

For the year, the only destinations
that saw an increase in cruise passenger
arrivals were the private islands. Cast-
away Cay on Abaco saw a 58.1 per
cent rise in arrivals to 149,389, com-
pared to 94,511 the year before.

The Berry Islands, which boasts
RoyalCaribbean’s getaway, Coco Cay,
saw a 9.87 per cent growth in cruise
arrivals to 401,718 compared to 366,321
in 2007, while arrivals to Half Moon
Cay near Cat Island grew by 11 per
cent to 299,792, compared to 270,159 in
2007. All those figures were for first
port of entry only.

In contrast, Nassau/Paradise Island
saw a 10.2 per cent decline in cruise
passengers calling as a first port of
entry in the Bahamas, the numbers
falling from 1,638,174 in 2007 to
1,471,835 in 2008.

Focusing on just December 2008,
the Ministry of Tourism’s report noted
that for the month, cruise arrivals to
Nassau/Paradise Island were down by
2 per cent, while arrivals as a second
port of call increased by 45 per cent.

“A number of cruise ships went to
Nassau/Paradise Island as a second
port of call, however, rather than a
first port of call,” the Ministry of
Tourism found.

NRO NGS aS Vi esy
YOU NEED A CERTAIN BANK.

LOCAL BANK.
INTERNATIONAL
Sia Guia P

With all that security behind you, there’s a sure future ahead.

Te Ae ica: sl elele ner mela

“~ FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE.

TOGETHER.

FirstCaribbean International Bank is a member of the CIBC Group.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS CSCS
Bahamas must convince EU to accept offer Concerns over fisheries sector

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Government has no
choice but to convince the
European Union (EU) to
accept the Bahamas services
offer as a part of its commit-
ment to the Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA), the
incoming Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce president said
yesterday.

Khaalis Rolle told Tribune
Business it was in this nation’s
best interest to reach an agree-
ment with the EU to secure
the EPA’s trade benefits.

The EPA, establishes the
trade rules between the EuU
and CARIFORUM countries,
is a replacement of the Con-
tonou Agreement and creates
reciprocal trade benefits
between the two parties.

The EPA bundles traded
goods and services into one
agreement. They are not mutu-
ally exclusive, which means
that signing on to the agree-
ment binds CARIFORUM

Genesis accountant
passes Series 7 exam

countries to offer both goods
and services for trade.

However, when the
Bahamas signed on to the
agreement it was not prepared
to offer services to the EU for
its approval, and an extension
was negotiated and penned
into the agreement.

Now, according to former
minister of foreign affairs, Fred
Mitchell, this country’s initial
services offering was “reject-
ed” by the EU and could jeop-
ardise the entire agreement if
not amended and resubmitted.

According to sources close
to the Bahamas Trade Com-
mission, the original services
offer that was rejected was not
“comprehensive” and was
“woefully inaccurate”.

“There was no real thought
and consideration that went
into it,” the source said.

The source added that the
Government had ample time
to put together an acceptable
services offer, as the ground-
work had already been done
and funds were available to
solicit technical trade exper-



Khaalis Rolle

tise from abroad.

Mr Rolle said if the
Bahamas’ service offer was
rejected, the Government and
private sector would need to
consider the EU’s reasons for
rejection and create a suitable
agreement. He added that
implementation of the EPA

should be as transparent as
possible. “This process,
because it is a national one,
needs to be open and trans-
parent,” he said. “The Minister
(Zhivargo Liang) tends to be
open in his discussions.”

Mr Rolle argued that the
private sector did not yet seem
to be concerned about the han-
dling of the services offer, but
most have not had the luxury
of seeing what the EU has
objected to.

Nattalie Rochester-King,
who at the CRNM examines
the interest of CARIFORUM
countries and the European
Commission, assured this
paper yesterday that “in diplo-
macy anything can be negoti-
ated,” referring to the
Bahamas’ late approach to the
EU for consultation, with such
a rapidly approaching dead-
line.

“Negotiations often consist
of several engagements in
which improvements are
requested, and the flexibility
of the other party is always
tested,” she said.

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

QUESTIONS were raised yester-
day by the former foreign affairs min-
ister as to the fate of the fisheries
industry should the Bahamas default
on the Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) with the European
Union (EU).

Fred Mitchell said there was a need
for “full and frank disclosure” from
the Government on what was hap-
pening with the EPA.

"What we are told is that the Gov-
ernment made mistakes in their offer,
and the offer is unacceptable to the
EU,” he said.

Should the European Commission
not accept the Bahamas’ services
offer, it is feared that the agreement,
signed in October, will become
defunct and destroy this nation’s lob-
ster exports into the EU.

For the moment, however, the
Bahamas and other CARIFORUM
countries involved in the EPA can
presently enjoy the benefits of the
agreement.

A Caribbean Regional Negotiating
Machinery representative, speaking
at an EPA seminar put on by the
Bahamas Chamber of commerce last

week, said this nation and other CAR-
IFORUM countries can already begin
to benefit from the signing for the
agreement.

Lincoln Price said the nations who
signed on to the EPA are already
enjoying duty free, quota free treat-
ment in the European Union market.

“By 2010 all of our products that
are certified by CARIFORUM coun-
tries will receive this duty free, quota
and free trade into the EU market,”
he said.

“We are starting to comply with the
obligations that we have signed on
1,”

Mr Price said that whenever the
services obligations are met by this
country, management consultants,
engineers and persons engaged in the
music and creative industries will like-
ly benefit greatly.

“Tt provides more certainty in terms
of the market access into Europe than
we had before in the arrangement that
is called the Contonou, which is the
trade and development deal that pre-
ceded the EPA,” said Mr Price.

He said participating countries will
list specific sectors that they will facil-
itate business with European service
providers in, and omit sectors that will
be remain as it exists in the offering
country.

The Annual General Meeting of the Medical Association of
The Bahamas will be held at MAB House,
6th Terrace Centerville on
Monday, May 4, 2009 at 6:00pm.

Election of Officers for the Executive Council for

2009 - 2010 will be held.
Members are reminded that they must be in good standing (all
membership fees paid) in order to vote.
All doctors are encouraged to take part in this important meeting.



AFUND accountant with Genesis Fund Services, Sharene Gaitor, has passed the Series 7 exam after studying
with the Nassau-based Nastac Group. She can now apply for registration with the Securities Commission of the
Bahamas after passing the Series 7 exam, which is administered by the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and
FINRA. Ms Gaitor is pictured above with Reece Chipman, the Nastac Group’s managing director.





The Parish Church Of The Most
Holy Trinity

Trinity Way, Stapledon Gardens * P.O. Box N-§696 “ Nassau, The Bahamas
Telephone: [242] 328-B677 / 322-6578 * Fax: [242] 322-657!

HOLY WEEK AND
EASTER SERVICES

MAUNDY THURSDAY

Soup & Hot Cross Buns [$8.00]

The Commemoration of the
Institution of The Holy Eucharist

with Washing Of Feet and Holy Communion

GOOD FRIDAY
The Celebration of the Lord's Passion, Divine Liturgy - Addresses on The
Passion and Holy Communion

HOLY SATURDAY AND EASTER EVE
Blessing of New Fire, Lighting of Paschal Candle, Liturgy of The Word,
Renewal of Baptismal Vows, Holy Baptism

EASTER SUNDAY

THE SUNDAY OF THE RESURRECTION

Holy Eucharist

The Solemn Eucharist Of The Resurrection Of Our
Lord, Senmon, Holy Communion

Festal Evensong & Benediction

Rector:

Venerable E. Etienne €. Bowleg, Ph.0., O.B.E., J.P
Assistant Curate:
Rev. Fr. Mervyn Johnson, B.A, 8.Th., M-TH.
Associate:
Rev. Fr. John Kabiga, 8.A., B.Th., M.Ed



Run iia ey

Dr. T. Barrett-President, MAB



in Daytona Beach, Florida.
| Apply for admission on April 16, from 7-9 p.m., at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel, One Bay St., Nassau.

Download required documents at www.daytonastate.eduw/bahamas.html
and bring them with you on April 16.

Ear your Associate of ArtsUniversity Transfer degree, or stucly Hospitality and Culinary
Management, Camputer Science, Business Administration, Allied] Health and much

Enjoy varsity sports, student activities and cultural events. Make lifelong friendships
with American and fellow international students frarn all over the world.

or e-mail admissions @DaytonaState.edu

It'S not too late to
tateside:

! "up. =i ‘i
‘Sine, 8a, 28s i"
co ee “Na,
Trea “th fi
tear
See eee ee e edn nt
an oe 1eoy ee i
ee eee
ee

Se sellin

k ee hw, tt

ene ; Dai eeaue lin,

iaeesee igen

Sea alin. Tn
SRL eaaE 7





ging
ame

= Earn Your Degree Stateside at Daytona State College, 4
4

mare!

*Closetohome *Expertfaculty * Personal attention

* State-of-the-art facilites * Scholarships available! a
om

Experience whal it’s like to be a collage student living in the heart of Daytona Beach,

Florida - the World's Most Famous Beach! |

a
o
iz
:

eel
call (386) 506-1471



PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EU seeks ‘possibilities’ on retail liberalisation

FROM page 1B

and that without it this nation
did not have a complete EPA
agreement.

The Bahamas was supposed
to liberalise at least 75 per cent
of its services industries in the
EPA, and the source said: “The
offer just did not meet the
requirements and the agreed
percentage amounts to be lib-
eralised by the CARIFORUM
group.

“There is no EPA agreement
without a complete services
offer,” the source added,
explaining that unless the

Bahamas met the required
thresholds for liberalisation “it
can be rejected by both the
CARIFORUM and EU par-
ties”.

Tribune Business was told
that the EU and its members
states “were asking for greater
concessions and liberalisation
in mode three”, commercial
presence, especially on advisory
services, foreign and interna-
tional law, computer reserva-
tion services and construction
services.

“Tt was claimed that the EU
wants mode three possibilities
under retail, which is against

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FAYD HOLDINGS LIMITED

—— )—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of FAYD HOLDINGS LIMITED has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE



the National Investment Poli-
cy,” the source said. “The
CARICOM Regional Negoti-
ating Machinery wanted more
mode three commitments under
financial services and telecom-
munications.”

However, Mr Laing shot
down any possibility that the
Bahamas would open up its
retail sector - traditionally
reserved for Bahamian owner-
ship only - to EU companies.

“Even if they raised that,
that’s a non-issue for us,” he
explained. “That will not hap-
pen. It’s not something we will
consider.”

Behind the scenes, Tribune
Business has learnt that the
matter is more complex than it
appears. The EU’s concerns on
mode three commercial pres-
ence stem, at least in part, from
its confusion on why the
Bahamas has made no commit-
ments to liberalise industries -
such as construction services -
where the Government has
already given permission for
certain foreign companies to
operate.

As a result, Tribune Business
can reveal that the EU is having
difficulty in understanding why
the Bahamas’ services offer
appears not to have gone as far
as the reality on the ground, and
liberalised more sectors for
European firms to establish a
commercial presence.

In addition, the EU’s con-
cerns also revolve around the
fact that much of the Bahamas
investment-related regulations
are contained in policy, not
statutory regulation. As a result,
the EU fears that access to the

Notice is hereby given of the loss of Bahamas Government Registered Stock Certificates as

follows:

Stock
1. Bahamas
Registered
Stock

2. Bahamas
Registered
Stock

Interest Rate
6.000% A.P.R.

Certificate No.

0.15625% A.PR. 75335

43024 2009

Maturity Date Amount

$500,000

$164,000

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement certificate. If this certificate is found,
please write to P.O. Box CB12-407, Nassau, Bahamas.

CHANDLER GILBERT

INSURANCE ASSOCIATES LIMITED

CONSULTANTS

BROKERS

Chandler Gilbert Insurance

Associates is a new insurance

brokerage firm founded on the

wealth of insurance industry

knowledge and experience of

AGENTS

OFFICE
#20 Montrose Avenue

co-founders Victor Chandler

and Guilden Gilbert.

At Chandler Gilbert

We have the expertise to handle
the unique insurance needs of a
wide range of clients

We have relationships with
domestic and international insurers

and brokers that enable us to

solutions

P.O. Box N-7753

Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: (242) 676-2306/7

Fax: (242) 323-5788

VICTOR CHANDLER
victor@cgiacaribbean.com

GUILDEN GILBERT
guilden@cgiacaribbean.com

deliver cost-effective risk financing

We are not too big to provide
personal, client-friendly service

Experience a new way fo meet your
private and commercial insurance
needs. Visit, call, fax or e-mail Us at
your convenience. Our clients never
call us at the wrong time.



Bahamian market for its com-
panies will be subject to political
whim, with no certainty in law,
and it wants this also to be clar-
ified.

Confirmed

Mr Laing effectively con-
firmed the latter aspect, telling
Tribune Business yesterday:
“Broadly, I think the issue is
one of further concessions
sought in mode three in certain
areas. The essential point is that
we did not make as many offers
as they thought we would make,
given our National Investment
Policy.

“We have a very open invest-
ment and trade regime, and
having that reflected in a trade
agreement does not challenge
us in any fundamental way.

“What we sought to do was to
avoid making any commitments
in aservices offer, even where it
was consistent with the Nation-
al Investment Policy, because
we anticipate codifying the
same by putting it in a Bahamas
Investment Law.”

Mr Laing explained that if the
Bahamas did not make a liber-
alisation commitment under the
EPA, its National Investment
Policy would still apply, and the
Government would decide
which foreign companies could
operate in the Bahamas.

That, though, is not good
enough for the EU. “People
want certainty. They prefer that
[investment policy] to be
enshrined in the agreement. If it
is put in statute, it will accom-
plish the same thing,” the min-
ister added.

“It’s for us to be able to dis-
cuss with them [the EU] our
rationale going forward, doing
what we have done, and give
them some assurances going
forward in our thinking on this
matter, so it’s up for discus-
sion.”

In addition, Tribune Business
understands that the Bahamas
is adopting a tough negotiating
stance, having submitted an
EPA services offer that was
designed not to give everything
away. The agreement it will ulti-
mately conclude with the EU
will form the baseline for all
future trade agreements, includ-
ing those with the US, Canada
and World Trade Organisation
(WTO) membership.

Mr Laing hinted that the EU
had been late in responding to
the Bahamas’ services offer,
saying it had been submitted to
the CRNM in November. This,
he added, was thought to be suf-
ficient time for further negotia-
tions prior to April 15, but the
EU’s response had only been
received in February 2009.

When asked whether the
Bahamas was likely to meet the
April 15 deadline, Mr Laing
said: “Well, I can’t be confident
that it will all be resolved by
April 15, because there is a
short time between now and
then, and discussions have to
be held. Iam very confident the
matter will be resolved.”

Adding that he was not aware
of any treaty text or law stating
that April 15 was set in stone,
the minister said: “That is some-
thing to be considered. We are
striving to meet that deadline,
and I don’t believe it will be

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PERTUS INT’L
INVESTMENTS LTD.

—— 6—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PERTUS INT’L INVESTMENTS LTD.

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
IMPACT HOLDINGS LIMITED

— 5—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of IMPACT HOLDINGS LIMITED has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Rea



impossible or difficult, if it’s
being resolved, to get it extend-
ed - especially if the EU shares
the view, as I believe they will,
that we are earnestly seeking to
have the matter resolved.”

Mr Laing said there should
be “absolutely no concern” on
the fisheries industry’s part
regarding the EPA, as the
Bahamas would come to an
agreement on the services side
to add to the goods.

“All that’s left to do is agree
with the Europeans on the
extent of our offer, and I’m sure
that will happen,” Mr Laing
said.

He will not be going to Brus-
sels on Thursday. The Bahami-
an delegation will be led by
Simon Wilson, the Ministry of
Finance’s director of economic
planning, along with a Bahamas
Trade Commission representa-
tive.

Bahamas starts
process for WTO
full membership

FROM page 1B

rules-based trading regime.

Zhivargo Laing, when con-
tacted by this newspaper, con-
firmed: “We’ve submitted it.”
He added that the Memoran-
dum of Trade Regime, the doc-
ument that sets out this coun-
try’s legislative and policy
framework relating to all trade-
related matters, had been sub-
mitted to the WTO in Geneva
“at least a month ago”.

Mr Laing said it was likely
that the Bahamas’ accession to
full WTO membership was like-
ly to take three to five years, a
normal timeframe for the
process.

The WTO, which is the body
that oversees the global rules-
based trading regime, is now
forming a committee to “over-
see” the Bahamas’ WTO acces-
sion process. This will be the
body that, in the first instance,
the Bahamas will have to nego-
tiate with over its terms of
accession, and the economic
sectors it will have to liberalise
to foreign companies and com-
petition.

Mr Laing explained that the
committee would be formed
from representatives of nations
who both currently traded with
the Bahamas, and might have
a future interest in trading with
this nation.

“The most critical thing about
the WTO accession process is
that the WTO represents the
basic, fundamental trading plat-
form for trading in the world,”
Mr Laing told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“All the trading partners we
have in this country, or might
have, trade off this platform. It
just makes sense for us at this
point, given the evolution of
international affairs to join that
platform. It makes all future
trade arrangements subject to
that platform.”

Full membership in the
WTO, Mr Laing explained,
would bind the Bahamas into a
global rules-based trading sys-
tem, providing it with certain
privileges and rights, but also
imposing obligations on it, too.

Bahamian businessmen and
companies, and their counter-
parties abroad, would be able
to trade in a more predictable,
rules-based environment, the
minister explained, something
that should enhance trade vol-
umes and relationships.

Estate |

WEEE ieee UCU UIC CELL ALOT coe ego LCL

Everywhere The Buyers Are!

a

Tel: 502 2356

for ad rates





THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 5B



Court defers
ruling over
S 330m claim

FROM page 1B

the commencement of their
action and judgment. That was
the placing of Leadenhall into
liquidation. On that event tak-
ing place, Section 194 became
relevant.”

The Class 4 Titles investors
had initiated their action on
March 30, 2005, alleging that
Leadenhall had provided finan-
cial services to the Cash 4 Titles
scheme in the knowledge that it
was a fraud. This was denied by
the Bahamian bank and trust
company.

While Leadenhall initially
defended its case, it dropped
out of the Florida proceedings
after it was placed into receiver-
ship, then liquidation on
November 25, 2005. This was

communicated to the bank’s
Florida attorneys by Mr
Gomez’s attorney, Sidney Cam-
bridge of Callender’s & Co.

The default judgment was
then obtained on September 10,
2007, and this is what the Cash 4
Titles plaintiffs - through their
attorneys, Dr Peter Maynard
and Jason Maynard - are now
seeking to have enforced in the
Bahamas. They effectively want
their claim to join the Leaden-
hall creditors queue.

Justice Lyons wrote in his rul-
ing: “What I am having diffi-
culty with is whether or not a
foreign litigant, who proceeds
to obtain judgment in a foreign
jurisdiction without the grant
of leave, is then able to come
back into this jurisdiction and
prove his debt in a liquidation

here.

“Tt seems to me to be likely
that persons placed in a similar
position within this jurisdiction
could not proceed to prove the
debt by reason of having con-
tinued with their litigation with-
out the grant of leave first hav-
ing been obtained.”

The judge said that in the
Cash 4 Titles investors’ case, “it
could surely be argued that, by
the use of the foreign judgment,
it has obtained an advantage
that would most likely be
unavailable to a person holding
a local judgment”.

Justice Lyons said the main
question to be answered was
whether the Cash 4 Titles
investors, “having continued the
Florida proceedings, arguably
without the need for leave to

do so, can now come back into
the jurisdiction, absent that
leave, and successfully prove
their debt in a liquidation in this
jurisdiction?”

He added: “I would think
that, as I have said, if this were
just a local question relative
only to local proceedings and
parties, that a party continuing
legal proceedings notwith-
standing the stay would have
some difficulty in enforcing any
judgment obtained in those pro-
ceedings where they have pro-
ceeded without the leave of the
court first being obtained.”

Justice Lyons told attorneys
for both parties to assess this
issue, prepare and submit fur-
ther submissions on it, and then
reconvene before him at a later
date.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, PATROVE PATRITROUVERE
PHERGUSONT, Freeport, Bahamas intends to change my name
to KRISTINA BIRGITTA UTBULT. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LAURETTE DERISIER of
PALMETTO AVE., P.O. BOX N-9426 NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should

send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7 day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

WANTED
SALES MANAGER

for a manufacturing concern.

Job requirements:

Bahamian - 35 years or older
College Graduate

Strong communication skills (oral & verbal)
Computer literate

Capable of motivating 20 + staff to achieve
company’s goals.

Willing to work bong hours.

Excellent personal skills necessary for promoting
customer and employee relations.

Salary commensurate with experience and
performance

> ae
Nassau Airport
Development Company

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

PRC SM dT
ea MEA
MIR) rere ya TEL

All applications will be treated in the strictest of confidence,
Send applications to P.O. Box CB-11392.

eee al

A Bahamas based IT Company is seeking
the employment of a Network Management
Professional with at least



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSETTE DORSAINVIL
of MOUNT TABOUR ESTATE OFF NASSAU VILLAGE,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7" day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following
items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for
the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

*5 years experience in a senior position.

* Must have MCSE 2003 certification or better
and with security certification a plus.

* Must be able to work and travel internationally

* Must be able to work and meet deadlines

* General Knowledge of programming

* Must have project management skills

* Must be versed in most areas of network
communications

* Must have good written and verbal
communication skills

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

NOTICE is hereby given that ROYANN CYRILEAN PEDICAN of
PORT-au-PRINCE, HAITI is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
awritten and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 31th day of MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRAC] BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci brisby@nas.bs

Please send all resumes and reference via
email to HR @itbahamas.com

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that: -

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BEOKEBAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
Pre:

COM TAT

ROYAL S FIDELITY

(a) TONOSHA S.A. is in dissolution; oeer a ere it 4

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 6 APRIL 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,638.56 | CHG -0.08 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -73.80 | YTD % -4.31
FINDEX: CLOSE 805.27 | YTD -3.55% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
Abaco Markets 1.28 1.28 0.00 0.127
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992
Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95 0.00 0.244
Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.105
Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055
Cable Bahamas 12.55 12.55 0.00 1.309
Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83 0.00 0.249
Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.45 6.45 0.00 0.438
Consolidated Water BDRs 2.50 2.42 -0.08 0.099
Doctor's Hospital 2.09 2.09 0.00
Famguard 7.76 7.76 0.00
Finco 11.00 11.00 0.00
FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45 10.45 0.00

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 30th day of March, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308
East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

0.240
0.598
0.322
0.794
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Focal (S) 5.07 5.07 0.00
Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00
ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

FBB17 0.00 7%

FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%

FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60
‘i 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00
1 . zi 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35
Five Steps To Change: Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NA _V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $

1.3664 0.95 4.77

2.8962 -1.49 -3.35

1.4489 1.06 4.63

3.3201 -1.94 -11.33

12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59

1.0000 0.00 0.00

9.1005 0.06 -13.33

1.0440 0.80 4.40

1.0364 0.33 3.64

1.0452 0.76 4.40

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Securi Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

WASTE - ED

Litter Does Not Just Happen - It Is Caused. i
-0.041 0.300
0.000 0.480 N/M

0.001 0.000 256.6

4.540
0.002

0.000 9.03
0.000 261.90

* Think Clean - Only in the bin

* Pick Up - Pick up litter and put in a bin

* Get Invioved - Support community and
national clean-up activities

* Be Aware - Litter hurts our economy and our
standard of living

* Speak Out - Report littering to the Police or
the Department of Environmental Health

NAV Date
28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
27-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

52wk-Low
1.3041
2.9230
1.3847

Fund Name Yield %
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.1564 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

A MESSAGE FROM THE MINISTRY OF
THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
iS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



























































UT t=
Last Name:
Company:

First Name:
Title:

Work:
PO.Box:

Telephone # Home:

Fox #:
Exact Street Address:

House #:
House Colour:

House Name:
Type of Fence/Wall:
Requested Start Date:

No matter what your schedule is
See ee eerie el ae ec

POWER

3 MONTHS | 6 MONTHS | 1 YEAR

“Rewarding. My work at The Tribune is creative and challenging. I enjoy

contributing to the look of our newspaper, while meeting the needs of

our advertisers. | enjoy working here. The Tribune is my newspaper.”

The Tribune

ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

Family
Guardian’s
key solvency
ratio now stands
at 218 per cent

FROM page 1B

tinue to remain positive, with
growth in stockholders’ equity
over the past five years, despite
dividend payments. Family
Guardian's three core business
segments, home service, finan-
cial services and group division
led by BahamaHealth, provide
business diversification and
competitive advantages in a
generally limited and mature
marketplace in the Bahamas.”

On the downside, A. M. Best
warned: “Partially offsetting
these positive rating factors are
the continuing weak operating
results Family Guardian report-
ed in 2008 from its financial ser-
vices segment, the volatility and
risk inherent in its health busi-
ness and the high concentration
of mortgage loans relative to
total equity, with increasing
delinquencies attributed to the
current weak economic envi-
ronment.

“However, A.M Best notes
that Family Guardian has con-
sistently decreased its exposure
to mortgage loans, as a per-
centage of invested assets, over
a five-year period, and delin-
quent loans past due over 90
days have decreased during
year-end 2008.

“Additionally, the mature
nature of the Bahamian
life/health market and the cur-
rent weakness in the Bahamas’
economy may impede Family
Guardian's potential for organ-
ic growth.”

Tackling each of those points,
Ms Hermanns said A. M. Best’s
comments on its financial ser-
vices segment, which chiefly fea-
tures its ordinary life division,
related to an increase in death
claims experienced during 2008,
coupled with increased invest-
ment and expenses associated

with growing that business.
“What we are looking at is
the exponential growth and
expansion of our financial ser-
vices division, which is the
newest division Family
Guardian has been involved
with,” Ms Hermanns explained.
She added that with the
increase in its agency force,
Family Guardian’s ordinary life
division had been “growing very
rapidly” in recent years.

Claims

On the death claims, Ms Her-
manns said the increase in this
area had impacted Family
Guardian’s profitability in 2008,
but “that slowed in the final
quarter, and certainly we’re see-
ing much lower levels in 2009,
so that was a short-term issue”.

Death claims, she added,
often went in cycles, and other
Bahamian life and health insur-
ers had experienced a similar
cycle - a surge in death claims in
2008, with a tapering off in 2009.

Health insurance by its very
nature was volatile when it
came to the claims experience,
while Family Guardian’s mort-
gage investments as a percent-
age of total invested assets
stood at less than 50 per cent
at year-end 2007.

Out of the company’s total
invested assets of $125 million,
between $50-$60 million were
mortgages, placing the percent-
age at between $50-$60 million.

Ms Hermanns said mortgage
assets as a percentage of total
investments had fallen by 2 per
cent at year-end 2008, com-
pared to 2007, while the level
of delinquencies had “fallen a
couple of basis points” during
last year. This, she said, was “a
major achievement in this mar-
ketplace”.



PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





RIDING:HOPE








@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

NORTH Eleuthera this past week-
end was transformed into a cancer
fighting mecca where more than
400 bikers and 150 volunteers took
part in the forth annual Ride For

Hope (RFH) cancer initiative.

The popular bike-a-thon first started in 2005,
serves as a cancer support group with a major
focus on raising awareness of the illness, as well as
hosting similar fundraisers intended to assist in
research and care.

Susan Larson, a co-founder for the initiative,
said RFH was born as a result of her and her
brother’s desire to start something similar to the
cancer awareness movement started after cyclist
Lance Armstrong announced he had cancer.

She explained: “There is a natural affinity
between fund raising and cancer largely because of
Lance Armstrong, and many people now use
cycling as a way to raise money for some of the
major illnesses.

Mrs Larson said 2006 was the launch year for
the event drawing in around 100 people, and since
then it has grown to over 400 participants.

“Over the past three years, we have raised over
$700,000 for cancer care, cancer treatment, and
cancer research in the Bahamas,” she said.

This year the event was so heavily supported,
that the organisers were forced to turn down many
persons hoping to take part.

T he route for the non-competitive bike-a-thon
ran from the North Eleuthera airport heading
through Queens Highway, and went as far south as
Palmetto Point.

Bikers were also given the choice of riding 20,



HALFWAY through their journey, these
bikers make their way up one of the

F many hills along Queen's Highway.

30, 50, or for the truly fit 100 miles for the event,
with around eight cooling stations along the way.

With the numerous scenic views throughout
the island, Tribune Features spoke with many per-
sons who shared stories of loss, support, and hope
for those affected by cancer.

Along the way, we met up with Domonic
Thompson from Glinton Sweeting O’Brien, work-
ing as a volunteer offering aid to bikers at the
five mile stop set in front of A & R ice-cream
parlor.

She explained: “Volunteering to me means giv-
ing from yourself, your time and energy, and just
to help someone else.”

Mrs Thompson said although she has not been
personally affected by cancer, volunteering in the
RFH is an important cause, “because this sickness
can show up at any time with a family member or
friend, so you just want to be prepared and insure
that someone is helped along the way.”

Further up at the 10 mile cooling station, we
spoke with cycling trio Averny Fernander, Gladys
Fernander, and Erlene Cartwright. While they
were all taking part for the general purpose of
raising cancer awareness, they explained that can-
cer has touched very close to home as they had all
lost their grandfathers to prostate cancer, and
have since pledged to the cause.

Also riding for hope was Speaker of The House
and North Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith who said
the RFH was an important initiative for all
Bahamians.

He explained: “It is always good when we can
do whatever we can to help our brothers and sis-
ter, and this RFH means alot to me because I
have had family members, particularly young ones
who have died of cancer.”

Mr Smith added that the 22 mile ride he com-
mitted to was a chance to get some much needed
exercise, and was definitely a challenging but also
a rewarding experience for him.

We're Cooking Up Savings For You!

AVANTI

Refrigerators

11.0 Cu Ft
Apartment
Refrigerator
ONLY

318] uu

SHOP ON-LINE
www.taylor-industries.com

Visit Taylor Industries Showroom
and find Name Brand Appliances
at GREAT prices with functions
and styles you like!

AVANTI
Water Coolers
Free Standing

$25000 Hot/Cold

Counter Top

a Kl

30” Gas Range from

15 CF Refrigerator - white

18CF Refrigerator - white
TOP Fre@ZOfiissssssessssessen $955

7 CF Chest Freezer.............+ $570

Washers

*742

Dryers

Moh

We Accept
VISA,
ECT or 1 1
SUN CARD &
DISCOVER

10 CF Chest Freezer.......$715
15 CF Chest Freezer..$1,012

Stack Washer/Dryer
from $1,748

10a
Cer RS Cel <)
white

Sooo La

ENA TUL US L SS

SHIRLEY STREET ¢ TEL: 322-8941
OPEN: MON - FRI 7:30 am - 4:30 pm ¢ SAT 8:00 am - 12 noon

J

Further up at the Gregory Town 20 mile
rest stop, a massive celebration was held by
local residents who shook cow-bells, served
food, and offered overwhelming support to
bikers braving the humid Eleuthera weather.

Although there were some bikers who were
unable to complete their cycling targets, there
were numerous mobile assistance crews as
well as ample food, medical assistance, and
cheering squads at the finish line area.

Organiser said the event which was her-
alded a success, would not have been possible
» without the help of its many sponsors. They
include Odyssey Aviation, Glinton Sweet-
ing O’Brien law firm, The Rotary Club,
Kerzner International, White Crown Avia-
tion, Pictet bank and trust, and many others.

TAKING a breath at the 10 mile cooling station,
Erlene Cartwright, Averny and Gladys Fernander
pose for the camera while remembering their
grandfathers who died from cancer.






















Lignum Institute of Technology

Harbour Bay Shopoing Plass. Cast Bay Street

Pic 353-2164 Fa: 354-497 1

AutoCAD 2009
etrodaction & brtenmedate Course
nif Si)

Certhed Intemational Propert Vanagenvent Course
AAP PT Tifa
bd

Certited Rick Management (Course
1a
wag

â„¢ r F Pe
F | a
, d sd i x !

| ie |

Baba BE O
Frelece @anasteegl

wae Sa

ee

For Quer Aer Flee eat
Cand buy
lieenng. Ga fia
Pa Gt Phe Face: dT
ewe’ peeererh er



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 9B



HEALTH



The Tribune

B





‘Unhappy Marriages' may
well have caught your eye
for many reasons. You may
identify with some or all of
the ideas and positions.
Needless to say each mar-
riage is unique and to sum
all of the complexities
would be naive and neglect-
ful to the individualism of
each relationship.

Some of us may have entered mar-
riage with longing; unhealed wounds,
unmet needs and other unfinished
business that we secretly hoped our
beloved would heal. Many of us hold
our partners responsible for our own
happiness and it is often this disap-
pointment of unfulfilled expectations
that causes such deep unhappiness.
Marriage is such an intimate connec-
tion and the tension thread between
the needs of the individual and the
relationship are often difficult to

Myths about
oily skin



THERE'S no shortage
of myths when it comes to
oily skin. Get the factsto
further your understanding :
of how to really keep oil i
under control.

Myth 1: Oil can be con-
trolled by stripping skin
with harsh, drying ingredi-
ents such as alcohol.



in

negotiate for some couples. The tug of
war becomes a constant battle over
who is the winner and loser, things are
black and white and the whole con-
cept of a 'win win’ solution for all
involved is lost. It is this dealing with
conflicts that often causes unhappi-
ness. As relationship therapists we see
the effects of this as one partner
becomes or is seen as being overly
demanding and the other person with-
draws and becomes non communica-
tive. This often produces a cycle
where each person's behavior makes
the other worse. Hurt and fear take
root and motives are questioned.
Over time the bond becomes weaker.
This erosion of the intimate bond has

far reaching effects than most can see
or admit to. How we interact with our
children, families and work colleagues
all too often result from our personal
and marital happiness or unhappiness.
In previous weeks we have dis-
cussed some the essential ingredient
for a happy relationship- being able to
express yourself, effective listening
and the deepening of couple intimacy.
To be able to open yourself requires
such vulnerability and can only be
achieved in an atmosphere of trust.
This trust comes about when we know
that we have access to our partner for
our own individual needs and must
then result in reciprocal accessibility
for them. Remember true intimacy is
two sided and only achieved between
two equals. These needs generally
include money, time, energy, and mat-
ters of the heart such as acceptance,
attention, love and sex. If we feel we
can not guarantee access or in fact are
denied access to any of these areas
and a deep intimate bond has not
been established, then fear and hurt
creep in and a damaging cycle can be

created. Perhaps trust in your partner
has been tested and stretched to full
capacity. You may in fact have closed
down some doors. Just remember that
it is possible to forgive and trust again.
Trust can be rebuilt, even after a
painful betrayal, but it requires hard
work. It may not happen quickly and
may take many years but keep in
mind that facing these fears will make
you stronger, more emotionally
mature and a more loving person. To
be able to control ourselves emotion-
ally requires great insight into what
makes us behave and react in a cer-
tain way. Exercising this self control
allows us to become assertive and put
forward our needs in an appropriate
manner. We then do not need to dom-
ineer and control all those around us
and we are rewarded by a happier
home life.

There is no doubt that the length of
time this unhappiness has been
allowed to calcify is often indicative of
the ability that a couple can resolve it
with out professional help. One of the

first areas to become affected by the
cycle of access and control is the sexu-
al relationship and the intimacy. Sexu-
al problems such as low desire, little
or no sex, orgasmic or erectile prob-
lems, or infidelities are often psy-
chosocial and often not physiological.
Some times the presenting problem is
not the cause and it takes careful and
gentle questioning to reveal the main
complaint. It is possible to work at
and resolve a lot of these problems
with the help of a trained professional.
Keep in mind that there is no shame
or weakness in getting help -just great
intelligence.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a
Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical
Sex Therapist located at The Centre for
Renewing Relationships, Grosvenor's
Close West. She can be contacted by
calling 356-7983 or by e-mail at relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com or at www.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com. She is available for
speaking engagements.

Iron Network relationship building summit

choose the relationships that are right for you!

IRON NETWORK, a multifaceted
organisation designed to help women
discover their purpose and specific
assignment on the earth, will be host-
ing a Relationship Building Summit
at the British Colonial Hilton, April
25, from 8.30pm to 4.30pm.

Sherika Brown, CEO and Founder
of the Iron Network, told TheTribune
that the event, being held under the
theme, “Choose The Relationships
That Are Right For You”, is specifi-
cally designed to help women discov-
er relationships that will assist them in
the facilitation of their purpose.

She explained that in order to suc-
ceed at anything in life you need the

right environment to function effec-
tively and noted that the right envi-
ronment consists of the right people.

“We want to help women under-
stand why relationships are important
in fulfilling purpose and destiny,” she
said. “We also want to equip women
with skills to identify characteristics
of healthy relationships. Our aim is to
assist women in developing quality
relationships that will enable them to
ignite, activate and refine their poten-
tial.”

Ms Brown said that the event is not
designed to just assist women in find-
ing the right intimate relationships but
to help women find the right relation-

ships in every area of life such as the
right mentors, the right bosses, the
right business partners, the right team
members, the right spiritual leaders
and also the right friends. She said:
“The quality of our life is the quality of
our relationships, hence, we must be
trained on how to choose relation-
ships wisely.”

Along with the Summit, Ms Brown
is partnering with local entrepreneurs
across the nation to showcase their
products and services.

This initiative will allow business
persons to further establish strategic

partnerships that will enable them to
grow their business and increase their

number of clients.

Ms Brown is a certified public
accountant employed with a leading
offshore banking institution in the
Bahamas. She is presently a member
of Bahamas Faith Ministries Interna-
tional and is in partnership with Spir-
it 92.5 Gospel; a local gospel radio sta-
tion in the Bahamas. Ms. Brown can
be heard every Thursday morning at
sam.

For further information regarding
the summit, persons can view details
on the network’s website at www.iron-
networkinc.org

http://www.ironnetworkinc.org or
contact info@ironnetworkinc.org.

FALSE. Stripping the
skin of oil can actually

cause an overproduction of :

oil. Why? Because skin's
trying to make up for and
replace what's lost! Those
who self-treat oily skin
with alcohol-based prod-
ucts often end up with
dehydrated, irritated, sen-
sitised skin.

Myth 2: Sunscreens
increase oil production.

FALSE. Speak with
your professional skin
therapist about new,
sophisticated formulations
that won't clog pores, and
even contain oil-absorbing
microsponges for the ulti-
mate in sun protection and
skin care benefits.

Myth 3: A little sun

exposure is ideal for drying

up skin.

FALSE. Sun exposure is
never good for skin. While
it may seem the sun pro-
vides a temporary “drying”
effect, sebaceous glands
will fire into overdrive to
help replace lost oil. The
result: more oil on the sur-
face than before.

MYTH 4: There's noth-
ing that can be done to
help control oily skin.

FALSE! Don't give up!
An oily skin condition is
just as manageable as any
skin condition. Speak to a
professional skin therapist
who can analyze your skin,
then provide a proper
diagnosis including a regi-
men of products and
lifestyle changes to keep
skin under control.

¢ Sarah Beek is a skin care
therapist at the Dermal Clinic.
Visit her and her team of skin
and body therapists at One
Sandyport Plaza (the same
building as Bally’s Gym). For
more information visit
www.dermal-clinic.com or
call 327.6788.

The month of April

WE can expect a distinct
warming up during the month
of April. Many of us will be
taking our first sea dip of the
year during the Easter holi-
day and the water should have
the nip taken off it. We can
also expect a thunderstorm or
two and to notice that the
grass is beginning to grow and
needs mowing.

Our vegetable gardens
should maintain their peak
production throughout April
and May but there will be dis-
cernible changes occurring
slowly. Tomato plants with
large fruits need temperatures
below 68 degrees F in order to
self-pollinate. We should have
precious few of them. The
slack can be taken up by
growing Italian type tomatoes
like Roma that will bear well
into the summer. Cherry
tomatoes, particularly the
large fruited varieties, also do
well and are large enough to
use for salads and sandwiches.

Our established sweet pep-
per plants will continue pro-
ducing but their fruits will
grow smaller. Bell peppers are
particularly susceptible to sun-
scald, even during the spring
months. Cubanelle peppers
take the heat quite well and if
sown during April will guar-
antee harvests into summer.
Some gardeners like to plant
their summer peppers, like
Cubanelles, in pairs so that
the foliage is increased and
helps shade the fruits. That
means, of course, that you will
have to increase the fertiliser
and water the double-sown
peppers receive.

New Zealand and Malabar
spinach can be grown starting
in April for cooking purposes
but, unfortunately, cannot be
enjoyed raw. We may be able
to squeeze another crop of
snap beans out of our garden

but thereafter it would be best
to grow snake or asparagus
beans, also known as yard-
long beans. These need some
form of support like a trellis
to do really well.

Probably the major garden
vegetable for this time of year
is corn. Instead of rows, corn
must be grown in blocks. Corn
likes very rich soil that allows
it to grow quickly. There are
few more rewarding garden-
ing experiences than picking
and shucking one’s own corn.

The annuals in our flower
gardens we have prepared for
Easter may have to be
changed to accommodate the

warmer months ahead. Most
of the annuals we grow in
summer also do well in fall,
winter and spring. Impatiens
tend do die back, as do some
of the more tender annuals.
Those that can survive into
and throughout summer
include cosmos, gerbera
daisies, vinca, marigolds, Mex-
ican sunflowers, gazanias and
zinnias.

New Guinea impatiens, cal-
adiums and gingers can also
be established this month. The
first two like a little shade but
many gingers can take full
sun. Gingers can be grown
from rhizomes but established
clumps of torch or shell ginger
(plus a few others) can be
divided and planted to form
anew colony. If you see some

“CHOOSE THE
RELATIONSHIPS

ke BIGHT or YOU"

edible ginger hands in the
supermarket that are sprout-
ing, buy them and bury them
about five inches deep. They
produce pleasant foliage and
delicate butterfly-like flowers.
When they die back you can
harvest the ginger root and
use it for culinary purposes or
dry them somewhat and then
re-sow them.

Citrus and fruit trees need
to be well fertilised in spring,
summer and autumn. As
April is the first full month of
spring, now might be a good
time to get the job done. Fer-
tiliser is best applied when the
ground is thoroughly wet.
Granulated fertiliser should
be applied at and slightly
beyond the drip line of the
trees in order to promote root

growth. The base of the trunk
should have an iron drench
applied to help overcome the
tendency of limestone soil to
tie up nutrients. Two tea-
spoons of Sequestrene 138
chelated iron in five gallons
of water is sufficient for a
mature tree, less for juveniles
or small citrus trees.

At the same time apply a
minor nutrient spray to the
leaves using a sticker/spread-
er to help the liquid adhere
to the leaves. Citrus leaves
are quite slick and benefit
most when stick-spreader is
used.

Once this chore is done you
can rest from your labours for
another three months. By that
time you should be picking
ripe mangoes.

April 25, 2009 « British Colonial Hilton « d:30e.m. - $:309.m.

tere ore ee ol tbe 1 ben ae ag m8 Teearn [ire oo dha Aly change gurls y

1 ican ib pores 2 pare ed ccladnrainps

Fa he oe bara ite Lie ie Loeb po ch at i pha fre ve

moecr gu el ile

[carn hires i rot ihe oye oH doc 2 bee.

ron 7] sae hee i Give ee pe ile rer De
= Domus bs Cel Ue oda bo Led pe GL
Tar Pore: ot Soy.

Fearuriog Artists: :
Sehemiah Dbeld & Richa Saumds

Tr wT 8 & E

=

wal Shera Foren
Sere

Fawr # a Fg

of Liye Wioteonel

De ee a i ee |
et be ee i Be ae ee |





PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

Ala yo) sl Og

THE TRIBUNE



The} }

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

ITis no secret that a significant num-
ber of traffic accidents and fatalities are
caused by speedy and impatient dri-
vers.

It is only four months into the year,
and already the Road Traffic division of
the Royal Bahamian Police Force has
confirmed 19 traffic fatalities.

According to the coordinator of the
National Road Safety committee
Michael Hudson, the reality of 19 traf-
fic fatalities is well beyond those num-
bers of 2008 and 2007 during the same
period.

Mr Hudson explained: “In some cas-
es we are seeing where inexperience is
causing some of these accidents, as well
as persons driving without due care and
attention.

“Many of the accidents are happening
late at night, so one could assume that
people are coming from parties where
drinking and fatigue could be a factor...
and statistics are showing that we have
more fatalities in men than we have in
females.”

However one concerning trend, is the
number of young male drivers at fault in
these and other traffic incidents.

dieSpeed
Why do men love to speed

In this week’s Barbershop, Tribune
Features spoke with a group of guys at
Platinum Cutz on Mackey Street, on
the issue of men behind the wheel.

Patron Jason Fountain, a 25-year-old
resident of Winton, feels many of the
incidents of speedy and reckless driving
are mostly attributed to young
motorists.

Jason explained: “A lot of the older
generation who are 25 plus, they’re not
really the ones who are driving reck-
lessly and incoherently on the streets.

“T could speak of the days when I
was younger and had first gotten my
license, I was reckless on the road
myself, so I think it’s a mixture of both
young men and women who drive reck-
less and cause these fatalities.”

Jason recalls an incident where his
cousin was killed by a male driver, and
said the accident occurred because of
negligence by both individuals.

Jason said his cousin’s decision to
hold onto the back of a moving vehicle
while on roller blades combined with
the lack of attention by the driver lead
to his cousin’s death.

Although this tragedy has affected
him and his family, Jason said he hopes
that more drivers especially men, will
become increasingly aware of the dan-
gers of speeding.

Patron Ryan Stubbs of Winton

Estates, pointed out that apart from
incidents of speeding that take place
on many roads, one blessing in disguise
is the large number of pot-holes infest-
ing them.

The 26-year-old claims: “I don’t real-
ly speed, but if all the roads were
smoother, then everyone might just start
speeding, so it might be a good thing
that we have so many pot-holes in the
road.”

Looking at the issue of young and
inexperienced male drivers who are
commonly rated by insurance compa-
mies as more at risk drivers than females
in the same category, Ryan said
although the practice may not be fair to
all within that group, he feels these com-
panies have good reasons for their
actions.

“Most of the time a lot of young men
are under the influence of alcohol,
maybe smoking grass, and playing music
at the same time they’re driving, and
statistics speaks for itself.”

Ryan also recounted an experience in
his late teens where he was involved in
a severe car accident where the car he
was driving was totaled because of his
speeding, and said the close call taught
him a good lesson on the dangers of
speeding.

23-year-old Barber Carlen Darling,
said although speeding does have its

consequences, death is still based on
one’s fate.

Carlen explained: “If someone’s
meant to die on the road then they will,
and furthermore death on the road isn’t
always your fault.

“Tt don’t have to be you who was
drinking and driving, someone else
could come and hit you. If you die, then
it’s just your time.”

Adding to the discussion of whether
men are the number one culprits of
speedy drivers, Carlen said he thinks
they are because “men are more show-
offers, and are more aggressive drivers.”

Proprietor 31-year-old Andy Bethel
of Elizabeth Estates, feels many traffic
accidents occur because of the insuffi-
cient number of road signage at accident
prone areas.

Andy said as frequently as serious
accidents happen in “death zones” like
the curve behind Hammer Heads off
Bay Street, the numerous curves on
Tonique Williams Darling Highway,
and parts of Bernard Road, he feels
nothing is being done to protect inno-
cent motorists.

He went on to say: “As simple as
someone coming out a four-way cor-
ner that doesn’t line up, it causes a
whole confusion, but could easily be
fixed with a stop light or an officer post-
ed there to control the traffic.”

Andy who is also a frequent visitor to
the United States said like the US, local
authorities should look into installing
sensors in traffic lights to allow the
smoother flow of traffic.

“Tf the lights had a sensor to deter-
mine that there was a build-up of traffic
from one way, and no cars coming from
the other direction, it could automati-
cally change and could help people to
get where they’re going much quick-
er,” he said.

34-year-old patron E Bowe said, the
majority of females are bad drivers, and
frequently cause men to drive more
aggressively because of their chaotic
driving.

He said: “How many times you see
women pulling up on the light, on their
cell-phone, and stopping on a green
light, and when someone hits them, they
wanna say it’s that person’s fault.”

He said cell-phone usage, especially
texting should be outlawed while behind
the wheel, an action he thinks will even-
tually help in reducing the number of
accidents locally.

Generally these guys do agree that
there are times when people are tempt-
ed to speed such as when they’re late for
work, or in a rush to get somewhere.
However they insist that due-care-and-
attention is still the only option when it
comes to preventing traffic accidents.

Easter hats on parade

FROM page 12

Mrs Saunders said with her hats starting at }
about $100, 95 per cent of her business is by word }
of mouth and it usually takes her about half an }
hour to create on of her creations. i

Mrs Saunders said she loves to see Bahamian :
women dress because there are no limits to their }
fashion trends. i

“They love it and I love that are happy. I love to }
see those ladies looking good. Hats are making a }
come back. Hats are becoming such a thing now }
and I am going with this wave as it comes. If you }
do not own a hat, you are not saying anything. The }
outfit is not complete without a hat. The best }
clients I have are the ones who always say they }
have never worn a hat. I always tell them I want }
them to be pleased. If I have to make that hat ;
three to four times to please that client, that is
what I will do because I am sure if they are }
pleased they will tell others,” Mrs Saunders said. }

Mrs Saunders said she is indeed grateful to }
Solomon’s Mines for teaching her to how to be }
customer oriented. :

“People like when you can get down to their }
level and be personable which has helped me in }
my business. When it comes to my work, I like for ;
people to be comfortable. You have to be a peo- }
ple’s person and not a snob and that is one of the }
things I learned from Solomon’s,” Mrs Saunders }
said. :

Mrs Saunders said her creative juice comes }
from just beginning her work on a blank hat } 7
frame. :

“When it comes to my work, because [am cre- }
ating, I could never make that same hat again. }

You can get something close, but never exact. I }

like to work with my own inspiration and flow }

because half the time as I am working it just :

comes. When I got that turn, I don’t know how my }

fingers twisted to get it. I like working like that }

because you get a one of a kind piece. The ladies } 4
don’t have to worry that when they go out with } : F:
that hat someone else has the exact same thing,” }

Mrs Saunders said. :

Mrs Saunders said she enjoys every minute of }
what she does and hopes she can continue to cre- ;
ate gorgeous hats for the benefit of self expression }
of beautiful Bahamian women. : =

The itchy
dog





EASTER BREAK

ROCK CLIMBING
CAMP

SkyClimbers Will be Hosting 2 Two Full Day

Climbing Camps 9am-Spm
¢ April 14-15
¢ April 16-17

Activities Include:
* Climbing at SkyClimbers!

¢ Climbing at Climber’s Rush ATLANTIS!

¢ Tours of Dolphin Cay!
* Meet the Sea Lions!
¢ Feed the Sting Rays
¢ Tours of Aquaventure!

Cost For All this Fun $40

PROBABLY the most com-
plex, the most frustrating and the
most annoying clinical condition
that clients in the Bahamas are
faced with on a daily basis is that of
a scratching, itchy dog. Every day
I hear the same complain: ‘Dr
Sands, my dog will not stop
scratching! What can we do to cor-
rect it?’ There are many causes of
scratching in the dog. Only by a
thorough work up of the scratchy
patient can an exact diagnosis be
made, and then the appropriate
treatment can be started. I always
tell my clients to be patient as I
work up the case. The Bahamian
client wants and expects solutions
now and if the dog does not stop
scratching today we tend to get
upset.

One of the first things is to elim-
inate is if there are any external
parasites.

Fleas, ticks, mosquitoes and lice
which may be visible or those invis-
ible parasites(mites such as Sca-
bies or Demodex) that bury in the
skin and cause intense itching can
only be detected by microscopic
examination of skin scrapings.

Your veterinarian will recog-
nise these obvious causes of
scratching and will be able to
advise you on appropriate treat-
ment. Eg : Paramite and Front-
line for ticks and fleas. In most
cases when the cause of scratching
is parasitic the response to treat-
ment is excellent. However the
elimination of parasites from the
environment is just as important,
as re-infestation of your pet will
cause recurrence of the symptoms.
For example; fleas and ticks
require year round control in the
Bahamas.

Bacterial skin disease or Pyo-
derma is another common cause
of scratching. The presence of bac-
terial infection on the skin is usu-
ally secondary, but may be prima-
ry. Common causes are skin para-
sites, poor nutrition, unhygienic

environment, allergies or long
term steroid therapy. Bacterial
skin disease is usually charac-
terised by pustules, crusts, itching
and hair loss. Some dogs may be
lethargic and depressed.

Treatment for bacterial skin dis-
ease usually requires antibiotics
and medical shampoos. (Benzoyl
peroxide) It is recommended that
antibiotic therapy is continued for
seven to ten days after resolution
of the clinical signs. If the response
to antibiotic therapy is poor, then
bacterial culture and antibiotic sen-
sitivity tests should be considered.

This leads us to probably the
most common cause of skin dis-
ease- allergies!

One such allergy is food hyper-
sensitivity. This is where your dog
becomes sensitised to some com-
ponents of its diet resulting in skin
disease. Common foodstuffs that
have been implicated in food
hypersensitivity are beef, dairy
products, wheat, eggs and even
chicken. Some dogs that experi-
ence food hypersensitivity will
have gastrointestinal signs. Foods
allergies may cause intense itch-
ing, they may also be involved in
ear infections as do most skin
allergies.

Your vet will advise on an
appropriate diet to test if food
hypersensitivity is involved. These
diets are known as hypoallergenic
diets and may be home made or
may be commercially available.
Mutton, rice and fish are exam-
ples of some food components that
appear to be less allergy stimulat-
ing. These diets may have to be
given for four to eight weeks
before complete resolution of signs
is seen. Then it is possible to re-
introduce foods you are suspicious
of to the diet and observe if the
signs reoccur. This way the guilty
foods can be totally eliminated
from the diet in the future. Fail-
ure to clear up the skin condition
may indicate allergies are present

SkyClimbers Easter Break Camps







Spaces are Limited to 20 Students/Camp
minimum age is 9 years old.

ARM CURA RRS Coe

363-0626

SKY

will be held at the SkyClimbers

THE COVE
ATLANTIS:



CLIMBERS
“aay



apart from food based allergies.

Contact based allergies are
another cause of skin disease. This
is where the dog becomes affected
in its environment where it is lying
or sleeping. The feet and under
side of the body are frequently
affected. This form of irritation
may also be caused by an irritant
substance and may not be allergic.
An examination of the bedding
and places that your dog is laying
should be examined. Blankets,
feeding bowls, carpets should be
given scrutiny. To test this aller-
gy, the dog should be removed
from suspect rooms and possible
bedding in its sleeping area to
something which is known not to
irritate or introduce allergy. Paper
is ideal bedding forthese dogs and
can be used to test if their own
bedding was guilty increasing skin
irritation. If no improvement is
seen after rigorous avoidance of
suspected floorcoverings and bed-
dings then this form of allergy can
be eliminated from the investiga-
tion.

This brings us to the most com-
mon cause of allergy based skin
disease -atopy. This is where the
dog becomes sensitised to envi-
ronmental allergens. These aller-
gens cause skin disease after being
inhaled. This form of allergy may
be seasonal or year round. The
house dust mite and certain pol-
lens are frequently implicated as
causes of atopic skin disease. Cer-
tain breeds of dog appear suscep-
tible such as the west highland ter-
rier, the corgi, the Shar Pei, but
any breed of dog may develop the
condition. Cases presented with
itching of the face feet and under-
sides of the body, possible ear
infections and they may be run-
ning from the eyes or show a com-
bination of these symptoms. In
general these dogs are eighteen
months plus before they developed
this condition.

So what can we do about the
treatment of allergies? Unfortu-
nately it is not very easy, by using
tests; it may be possible to deter-
mine the exact causes of allergies.

However it is very expensive
and I don’t routinely recommend
it. This is of great benefit when
something we can eliminate from
the environment. However fre-
quently the allergens such as pillow
mites are impossible to eliminate
from the environment and in these
cases we have to rely symptomatic
relief of the patient. This involves
the use of an arsenal of various
anti-inflammatory drugs.

Anti-histamines help in moder-
ate cases. In difficult cases the use
of oral glucocorticoid steroids may
be necessary to control the symp-
toms. The combination of supple-
mentation of the diet with essential
fatty acids have proved to be ben-
eficial.

In treatment it is always the aim
of the vet to keep the use of
steroids to a minimum and use
combinations of other drugs to
reduce their dosage. In some cases
there will be no choice to use
steroids. I personally feel this is
always better than a pet that is in
constant discomfort and does not
get the quality of life it deserves. In
summary the control of itching in
these dogs can be very difficult, so
be patient with your vet as he/she
endeavors to get the scratchy and
underlying conditions under con-
trol.

¢ Dr Basil Sands is a veterinarian at the
Central Animal Hospital. Questions or
comments should be directed to pot-
cake59@hotmail.com. Dr Sands can
also be contacted at 325-1288






THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 7,





2009

@ BY ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net







is generally a time of bright pastel colours, candy, chocolate bun-
ny shaped molds and Easter egg hunts for the kids. However, in the fashion
world of the Bahamas, hundreds of women will be looking for oversized
millinery creations to wear Easter Sunday morning.

Sandra Saunders, owner of Ele-
gant and Sophisticated Ladies Hats
and Accessories, located in Palm
Beach Street and Balfour Ave, has
been making hats for over 20 years
and said she knows all to well about
the Easter hat craze.

Most of Mrs Saunders’ hats are
custom made using sisal, straw and
felt.

“You can bring in your clothing,
shoes or any color you want us to
make the hat to match. We are
almost like a little factory. We buy
the base and we create from that
base and that is what is so unique
about us because it is not something
that you can go on the shelf and
pick up knowing other ladies have
the same hat. We take the simple
hat, change the bottom, top, and
colour and it is a different style all
together. We do hats for funerals,
hats for weddings, corsages, head
pieces for bridesmaids and bouton-
nieres for men. We also spray shoes
and bags as long as it is of satin
material,” Mrs Saunders said.

As for the Easter season, Mrs

Saunders said this is a time when
the bright colors are on parade.

“All of the pastel colors come out
for Easter- the lime greens, yellows,
oranges and rose pink among many
others but those are the most popu-
lar. When it comes to the size of a
hat for Easter, they either choose
the small bonnets or very wide
brimmed ones. Silk flowers in vari-
ous sizes and varieties are the main
decoration used in making Easter
hats,” Mrs Saunders said.

Mrs Saunders said she got her
start making hats at home as a side
job.

“T get a thrill from seeing women
dressed. I love to know that when I
have created something, the client
is pleased. I used to work at
Solomon’s downtown selling watch-
es and jewelry for about 13 years
and about 10 years ago I decided to
open my own shop. Hat making
was my sidekick- did it on my day
off or time off. Now I eat sleep and
drink hat making,” Mrs Saunders
said.

SEE page 10

Discover the goodness
of Ovaltine.

Ovaltine’s unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway e 394-1759





THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST



ie

TAMPA
High: 65° F/18° C
Low: 50° F/10°C

@

a

y



KEY WEST
High: 74° F/23°C
Low: 65° F/18° C

@

ORLANDO»
High:65°FA8°C
Low: 49° F/9° C

ee

}
?
tm

Pa:

di
pl,

Ft

i

es

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Wednesday

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston

High
F/C
72/22
42/5
50/10
50/10
50/10
46/7
36/2
58/14
40/4
36/2
68/20
68/20
36/2
80/26
72/22

Today

Low

F/C
45/7
29/-1
29/-1
30/-1
30/-1
37/2
28/-2
32/0
31/0
31/0
53/11
34/1
28/-2
69/20
48/8

WwW

S$
Ss
sf
Cc
pc
Cc
sf
pc
sf
sf
$
S$
sf
pc
S$

High
F/C
66/18

Low
F/C
41/5

41/5 27/-2

60/15
49/9
53/11
47/8
38/3
66/18
50/10
44/6

46/7
34/1
36/2
36/2
31/0
45/7
33/0
34/1

79/26 59/15

62/16
47/8

33/0
33/0

82/27 69/20
78/25 63/17

Ww

pc
sf
$
pc
pc
pc
c
$

pe

OS he Be oO

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

ite. *
Te

Mostly cloudy, a
shower; cooler.

High: 76°

CEU ac acct

@ WEST PALM BEACH

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 74° F/23° C @
Low: 58° F/14°C

@





Mainly clear and Breezy with plenty of
breezy. sunshine.
High: 78°
Low: 63° Low: 68°

High: 74° F/23° C
Low: 57° F/14°C

MIAMI



High
F/C
42/5
60/15
56/13
82/27
58/14
70/21
46/7
54/12
77/25
45/7
46/7
63/17
45/7
68/20
65/18

High: 77° F/25°C
Low: 60°F/16°C

Today

Low

F/C
29/-1
30/-1
36/2
54/12
39/3
52/11
34/1
39/3
54/12
29/-1
34/1
42/5
37/2
43/6
42/5

WwW

nnnn

i 0) hey co

High
F/C
55/12
67/19
67/19
69/20
13/22
68/20
59/15
70/21
74/23
52/11
63/17
73/22
48/8
75/23
73/22

Wednesday

Low

F/C
41/5
41/5
46/7
55/12
54/12
52/11
46/7
54/12
60/15
32/0
48/8
57/13
41/5
54/12
48/8

ANDROS

ABACO
High: 84° F/29° C

High: 76° F/24° C

Breezy with plenty of

sunshine.

High: 82°
Low: 70°

BCE aec lt
[ _ 80°-69°F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ee is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Low: 63° F/17°C
om
i
a
an
i
FREEPORT al —
High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 60° F/16°C
NASSAU

Low: 63° F/17°C
@

High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 69° F/21°C

Ww

pc
$
pc
pc
$
sh
pc
$
s
pc
pc
s
pc
$
s

Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis

Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson

~wYr

High
F/C
48/8
90/32
37/2
67/19
55/12
50/10
66/18
74/23
67/19
62/16
61/16
58/14
65/18
88/31

Today

Low

F/C
34/1
61/16
30/-1
45/7
29/-1
33/3
45/7
52/11
56/13
50/10
43/6
30/-1
44/6
58/14

Washington, DC 5140 35/1

Ww

c
s
sf
pc
pc
pc
pc
$
pc
r
$
s
pc
$
pc

ELEUTHERA

Sunshine. Partly sunny and
humid.
High: 86° High: 85°
Low: 75° Low: 75°
ETCH
97°-81° F 100°-82° F

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature



IGM sesssasedvssenselacecsvnaesecseaditared csaecanes 86° F/30° C
LOW Normal high .... 80° F/27° C
Normal low 68° F/20° C
Last year's Nigh oo... ceeteteeeeeteees 85° F/29° C

Last year's LOW o..cccceseseeeseeeeneees 76° F/25° C
Precipitation



As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....ccccccccccceeeceeee trace

Year to date

Normal year to date oo... ceeceeeeeeee 5. 64"
AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009

High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 69° F/21°C

—__*

GREAT EXUMA

High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 68° F/20° C

<2
LY

Wednesday
High Low
F/C F/C
50/10 36/2
75/23 55/12
47/8 34/1
57/13 44/6
58/14 40/4
64/17 48/8
60/15 42/5
81/27 62/16
64/17 56/13
57/13 48/8
54/12 42/5
70/21 44/6
70/21 54/12
72/22 48/8
53/11 40/4

WwW

pc
pc
C
Cc
pc
pc
sh
Ss
sh
Cc
c
S
Ss
pc
pc

CATISLAND
High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 69° F/21°C

ae
7
rt

o|1|2

LOW

3l4[s

MODERATE





6|7

HIGH



\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Posey

Ht. (ft.

High

Today 6:54 a.m.

7:15 p.m.

Wednesday “: 41a. 7
ednesday or

Thursd 8:25 a.m.

mney 3-43 pm.

Frid 9:06 a.m.

ae 9:25 p.m.

28
3.1

2.8
3.2

27
3.2

27
3.1

Low

12:36 a.m.
12:54 p.m.

1:28 a.m.
1:38 p.m.
2:15 a.m.
2:20 p.m.
2:59 a.m.
3:00 p.m.

Ht.(ft.

-0.1
-0.1

-0.2
-0.1

-0.2
-0.1

-0.1
-0.1

Sunrise...... 6:55 a.m. Moonrise .... 5:53 p.m.
Sunset....... 7:29 p.m. Moonset..... 5:25 a.m.
New First

Full Last

Ane 17

Apr. 9

SAN SALVADOR

High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 74° F/23°C

i

LONGISLAND
High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 73° F/23°C



Apr. 24

MAYAGUANA

High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 72° F/22°C

CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS

RAGGED ISLAND
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 71°F/22°C

Low: 74° F/23°C

GREAT INAGUA

High: 91° F/33° C

=
AKL

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 72° F/22°C

=



May 1

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
54/12
52/11
67/19
70/21
93/33
84/28
60/15
86/30
66/18
73/22
72/22
72/22
65/18
58/14
76/24
81/27
81/27
100/37
54/12
75/23
80/26
65/18
57/13
52/11
71/21
62/16
48/8
75/23
41/5
72/22
79/26
58/14
65/18
71/21
86/30
79/26
57/13
61/16
90/32
75/23
79/26
43/6
39/3
68/20
88/31
93/33
52/11
57/13
69/20
86/30
91/32
66/18
83/28
86/30
91/32
88/31
86/30
78/25
66/18
54/12
70/21
74/23
68/20
34/1
86/30
55/12
68/20
61/16
34/1

> Ll

TAT [CT Sa

soja
EXT.

Today

Low
F/C
68/20
43/6
37/2
53/11
55/12
77/25
75/23
47/8
43/8
55/12
51/10
53/11
63/17
47/8
43/6
48/8
54/12
58/14
77/25
30/-1
59/15
69/20
45/7
52/11
41/5
48/8
47/8
37/2
54/12
32/0
64/17
59/15
51/10
45/7
51/10
75/23
65/18
45/7
36/2
79/26
43/8

SS a ee

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Ww

S$
sh
sh
pc
c
t
pc
r
Ss
S$
pc
sh
c
t
sh
pc
pc
S$
Ss
pc
pc
pc
pc
sh
sh
pc
sh
r
pc
pc
pc
C
r
S$
t
pc
Cc
sh
sh
pc
t
Ss
sn
Cc
sh
t
$
sh
sh
S$
sh

pc
pc

Wednesday

High
F/C
88/31
55/12
55/12
68/20
63/17
97/36
84/28
61/16
84/28
64/17
75/23
68/20
70/21
65/18
55/12
73/22
70/21
77/25
99/37
47/8
85/29
81/27
67/19
53/11
50/10
64/17
54/12
40/4
79/26
46/7
75/23
75/23
65/18
58/14
70/21
83/28
79/26
59/15
66/18
90/32
78/25
94/34
37/2
41/5
62/16
86/30
97/36
45/7
59/15
67/19
82/27
93/33
68/20
83/28
80/26
91/32
88/31
85/29
76/24
72/22
52/11
72/22
72/22
66/18
39/3
81/27
52/11
71/21
65/18
43/6

Low
F/C
73/22
47/8
36/2
54/12
52/11
79/26
75/23
50/10
52/11
59/15
53/11
50/10
60/15
47/8
43/6
50/10
57/13
56/13
79/26
30/-1
65/18
69/20
52/11
47/8
39/3
46/7
47/8
29/-1
59/15
36/2
66/18
55/12
53/11
45/7
50/10
74/23
64/17
41/5
37/2
79/26
46/7
66/18
34/1
27/-2
48/8
64/17
70/21
36/2
46/7
47/8
71/21
73/22
52/11
75/23
60/15
72/22
55/12
69/20
60/15
39/3
41/5
55/12
63/17
52/11
31/0
71/21
43/6
54/12
42/5
26/-3

fe feo) eo ee Kee eee ea - eo ee
oO oO ——

pe

Omen ec wee Bee men
= oO

sh
pc
C
r
sh
S$
pc
Cc

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c- san sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: | SSWat10-20Knots . 3-OFeet 10-20Miles 75°F
Wednesday: NW at 15-20 Knots 4-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F
FREEPORT Today: SSW at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 75° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-20 Knots 4-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F
ABACO Today: SSW at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 75° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-20 Knots 4-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Minneapolis

Los

70/52

Showers
T-storms
Rain

* _*| Flurries
«| Snow
[v=] Ice

10s | Os (05) 10s 20s (05%) 40s









Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Miami
77154

Fronts

Cold
Wall flint

Stationary Mangum.

AUTO INSURANCE

Never start
Some Wwitho

V Pir. to Auto Insurance,
\ remember tl the smart choice is

OUL |
t us!

{surance Management.

—s

ff

“New Proven | Gro Bohona | tha Ni.
We (242) 502-6400 | Te (M0) 950-3500 | Tel (242) 367-4204

re

t people you can trust.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Eleuthera |
Tel: (242) 332-2862



cal
Tel: (242) 336-23



Full Text


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ENJ32VLJY_D5KILZ INGEST_TIME 2012-01-27T20:58:07Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01285
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


{)\

Pim blowin’ it

76F
61F

SUN, SHOWER
«ee AND WINDY

Volume: 105 No.113

mast!

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

CARS FOR SALE,
HELP WANTED
OG MS ES

NOW OPEN

Lynden Pindling
International Airport

HIGH
LOW



Easter
eee

o
Fs

aU

ire its
SEE WOMAN SECTION

Water and seuerae staff





BAHAMAS BIGGEST

llemand Salary increase

Around

200 gather
outside of
headquarters

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

WATER and Sewerage Corpo-
ration employees were allegedly
kept from work yesterday morning
as their unions called on the gov-
ernment to negotiate outdated
industrial contract agreements and
increase their salaries.

Around 200 Bahamas Utilities
Services Allied Workers Union
(BUSAWU) and Water and Sew-
erage Management Union
(WSMU) members gathered out-
side the Water and Sewerage head-
quarters in Thompson Boulevard
at 9.30am as BUSAWU president
Carmen Kemp and WSMU pres-
ident Ednel Rolle relayed their
mutual demands through the
media.

They claimed that Water and
Sewerage bosses withheld keys to
employees’ vehicles preventing
them from working yesterday
morning, which chairman Anton
Saunders later denied.

But the press conference pub-
licly urging government to re-open
negotiations about the industrial
contract agreements, which they
say have been up for renewal since
June 2007, was not intended to be
a strike, Ms Kemp said.

Speaking for both unions Mr
Rolle maintained workers have
sacrificed their salary increases
since 2004 for the financial benefit
of the Water and Sewerage Cor-

Clarke/Tribune staff

ae

WATER AND SEWERAGE Man-
agement Union President Ednel
Rolle speaks on behalf of his
union and the Bahamas Utilities
Services Allied Workers Union at
the press conference yesterday.

poration (WSC), but now
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) and Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC)
employees are enjoying higher
salaries and more benefits, their
patience has worn thin.

He said: “Whilst we recognise

SEE page eight

Christie believes grim |
economic forecasts

are ‘Optimistic’



_ Minister meets with Eight
Mile Rock High School
students and teachers

mg By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie hopes the country's eco-
nomic conditions for this year and
2010 are as "optimistic" as a recent
dismal forecast published by inter-
national credit rating agency Stan-
dard and Poor's.

rT



aA OASIS

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Education Min-

: ister Carl Bethel met with students
? and teachers of the Eight Mile Rock
? High School on Monday to give
? them some words of encouragement
: following several unfortunate inci-

He added that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham's cematth shool

recent reported statements regarding the likelihood of } strong criticism last week from PTA

Mr Bethel’s visit comes after

Oram elite)





PLP voices
concern over
livelihoods
of Bahamian

fishermen

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

CALLING for a “full
and frank disclosure” by
the Government on the
Economic Partnership
agreement — the PLP yes-
terday suggested the liveli-
hoods of thousands of
Bahamian fishermen may
be at risk.

Opposition spokesman
for Foreign Affairs, Fred
Mitchell yesterday ques-
tioned whether Bahamian
crawfishermen’s duty free
access to European markets
“may be in jeopardy” in
view of the looming possi-
bility that Government may
miss an April 15th EPA
deadline.

But a Bahamian EPA
source, speaking with The
Tribune on the condition of
anonymity, denied this is
the case, proposing that in
the instance that the
Bahamas does not satisfy
the European Commission
within the week, that the
EC is likely to offer “great
flexibility”.

This week minister of
state for finance, Zhivargo
Laing, revealed that the

SEE page eight



‘Harsh penalties’
for those who
take advantage of
unemployment
benefit plan

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

PERSONS who may be plot-
ting to knowingly take advantage
of the unemployment benefit plan
may face harsh penalties under
law, Minister of National Insur-
ance Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said.

Last year, police investigated
several cases of fraudulent claims

one ba emeair ae wing highlights the Asai } officials over his silence and lack of response to alle-
Tation surrounding the economy, exacerbated’ SY + gations of molestation involving teachers at the school.

the fact that economists cannot predict when the : ~ “Tam here to help them and provide a listening ear,

SEE page eight SEE page eight

to the extended social relief pack-
age which came into effect on
October 1, 2008. With thousands
of persons expected to apply for
the unemployment benefit,

The Taste
on

Tuesdays!!



only on Ivesdays!

ETO EN ETE ELTA an CTT

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Government is in dis-
cussions with the I Group devel-
opers in Mayaguana to see how
it can remove “any impedi-
ments” that may be further slow-
ing progress on the island’s

delayed anchor project, the Min-
ister of Tourism said yesterday.

Over three years after a
Heads of Agreement was signed
with the Boston-based develop-
ers, Vincent Vanderpool Wal-
lace said they meet regularly
with Government and remain
“without question...as commit-
ted as ever” to the project, but

economic circumstances contin-
ue to ensure their plans for the
island remain restricted for the
moment.

“Needless to say global con-
ditions have caused everyone to
at least scale back on their
expectations in terms of the

SEE page eight



Fidelity Bank DebtS$AVER LOAN

¢ Debt consolidation with built-in savings

e Lower monthly payments
¢ Debt reduction

Nassau: 356.7764 Freeport: 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: 367.3135

2

FIDELITY
30* ANNIVERSARY



NASSAU AND BAHAME:

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

observers have questioned how
the government will mitigate
against possible fraud.

Speaking to the media at a press
conference held at the National
Insurance Board headquarters on
Sunday, Mr Ingraham said NIB
has extensive verification mea-
sures in place to counteract any
false claims.

National Insurance will under-
take a verification process “from
the time you come in and make

SEE page eight


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Greed behind businessman’s ERR
killing, claims prosecution

Closing arguments presented in Keith Carey murder retrial

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE prosecution in the Keith Carey
murder retrial presented its closing argu-
ments in court yesterday, claiming that
greed was the motive behind the business-
man’s murder.

During her closing address to the jury
yesterday, lead prosecutor and Deputy
Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl
Grant-Bethel described murder accused
Dwight Knowles as the “mastermind” of
the plot to kill Carey, 43. Mrs Grant Bethel
said that his co-accused Sean Brown was a
part of the conspiracy that led up to Carey’s
murder. She also told the jurors that Jamal
Glinton, alias “Bumper”, was brought in
as the muscle. She told the jury that it was
Glinton who had shot Carey twice on the
steps of The Bank of The Bahamas on the
morning of February 27, 2006. Mrs Grant-
Bethel also told the jury that greed was the
motive for the killing, claiming that the
accused men wanted Carey’s money and
would do whatever was necessary to get it.

Mrs Grant Bethel directed the jury to the
evidence of the prosecution’s star witness
Vaughn Carey, noting that he had testified
that he had initially been approached by
Dwight Knowles about setting up Keith
Carey. She told the jury that Carey’s evi-

dence had never changed but rather that he
had changed from a defendant to a prose-
cution witness.

According to the prosecutor, Carey — a
cousin of the deceased — had wanted to
come forward with his account earlier but at
the time had been advised against doing so
by his attorney.

She told the jury that although Vaughn
Carey had set up the robbery, he was not at
the bank at the time of the murder and had
not set his cousin up to be killed.

Mrs Grant Bethel told the jury, that it
was Carey’s evidence that Glinton was sup-
posed to push the businessman down and
snatch the money bag.

Deadly

The prosecutor noted, however, that the
deceased was a man well over six feet tall,
weighing more than 225 pounds and of mus-
cular build.

She said that the accused men had to
have agreed to use deadly force in the rob-
bery attempt, which is why they brought in
Jamal Glinton as the shooter.

Mrs Grant Bethel also told the jury that
the accused men had lied to court in their
efforts to hide their guilt and escape the
charges.

While noting that the Crown’s case is

based on circumstantial evidence, she called
upon the jurors to put all of the circum-
stances together to prove the men’s guilt.

During his closing submissions, attorney
Perry Albury who is representing murder
accused Dwight Knowles, refuted the pros-
ecution’s claim that his client was the mas-
termind of the plot to rob and kill busi-
nessman Keith Carey, stating that his client
was rather the victim.

Mr Albury told the court that the evi-
dence against Knowles is of a reasonable
doubt.

Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight
Knowles are charged with murder as well as
armed robbery and conspiracy to commit
armed robbery.

Carey was shot and killed on the steps of
the Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway before he was
able to deposit $40,000 that belonged to
the Esso Service Station, which he operat-
ed. Mrs Grant-Bethel, Stephanie Pintard,
Anthony Delaney and Lennox Coleby are
prosecuting the case.

Attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Fran-
cis are representing Jamal Glinton, attorney
Dorsey McPhee is representing Sean
Brown, and attorney Perry Albury is rep-
resenting Dwight Knowles.

The prosecution has called 37 witnesses
during the two-month long trial.

IndiGO is better for your business

less stress, more benefits
IndiGO is better for your business.

Significantly decrease your phone bills.
Improve your operations & service.

Stay connected.

Join leading Bahamian businesses
that already take advantage of IndiGO‘s
communications solutions.

why aren't you with IndiGO?

677 1111 nassau 688 1111 freeport www.indigonetworks.com IN)

ndiGO

WO R KS

index is released

FOOD such as carrots
(left) and macaroni
(below) are seeing an
increase in price.



































CLAIMING that the government has done all it can to reduce
food costs for the average Bahamian, the Department of Statistics
yesterday released its monthly food pricing index, revealing increas-
es and decreases on a number of breadbasket items.

With certain food items such as mackerel, spaghetti, tomato
paste, carrots, mustard, macaroni, and crab meat seeing a seven to
12 per cent increase in price, other items such as baby juice, mineral
water, eggs, milk, cooking oil, chicken parts and crawfish remained
constant from January to February of this year.

Those items seeing a decrease from January to February were
grits, corn, whole chicken, season-all, butter, steak, grapefruits,
red and white grapes, potatoes, lamb chops and flour.

With a decrease of six per cent or more were tomatoes, avocados,
sweet peppers, limes, daisy cheese, oatmeal and onions, which saw
the largest decrease in price of 13 per cent from $2.24 to $1.94 for
a three-pound bag.

In the Family Islands, however, some of these same items saw a
slight increase, especially in Grand Bahama.

Peppers

Sweet peppers, originally discounted in New Providence, saw
an increase of 11 per cent in Grand Bahama from $2.59 a pound to
$2.87.

Breakfast cereals, along with celery, fruit juices, tomato paste, cab-
bage, oranges, chicken parts, and turkey wings and drumsticks saw
an increase anywhere from six to 11 per cent from January to Feb-
ruary.

Other staples, such as corned beef, milk, flour and grits remained
constant with little or no change whatsoever in their prices in
Grand Bahama.

Amongst this group are whole turkeys, sliced and whole ham,
spare ribs, macaroni, hot dogs, fruit juices, fresh and frozen fish,
mackerel, canned tuna, eggs, baby milk, pineapples, limes, and
carrots. Canned milk, rice, steak, Irish potatoes and pork chops all
saw a small decrease in pricing.

In Grand Bahama, the most discounted items from January to
February of this year were tomatoes which saw a 25 per cent
decrease from $1.77 a pound to $1.32.

Lamb chops came second at nine per cent, followed with decreas-
es of eight per cent in the price for onions, seven per cent in apples,
and five per cent in lettuce, grapefruits and boxed salt.

SOT ae are

eran wen 1 Ta

ns

TRONAING RENTAL
SERVICE

starting at 528.00 per month
including three talk groups and more...

TH4A80

KENWOOD

oe i7.WILcON ie

“ vy id oer or

ree activation if your equipment is compatible with our service

#41 Mackey Street & Palmdale Ave.
Mon-Fri, 8:20am - 4:30pm
Tél: a94-$025
sales@two-waysolutions.com

ovo lus
SOuUTIOnS
THE TRIBUNE

Man appears in
court on armed
robbery charge

A 20-YEAR-OLD man
was arraigned in a Magis-
trate’s Court on an armed
robbery charge yesterday.

It is alleged in court
dockets that Davardo
James Rigby, of Millenni-
um Gardens, while armed
with a handgun on March
26, robbed Daphne Sands
of $236 and an assortment
of phone cards valued at
$85.

Rigby, who appeared
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street, was not
required to plead to the
charge. He was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison
and the case has been
adjourned to August 18.

¢ A 38-year-old man
accused of robbing a local
service station was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday on an
armed robbery charge.

It is alleged that Engle-

bert Antonio Scott on Sun-

day, December 21, robbed
Fernand Francois of $900
in cash, an assortment of
phone cards valued at $375
and two packages of Back-
wood cigars valued at $96,
the property of Texaco
Service Station, located on
Prince Charles Drive.

Scott, who was arraigned

before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street, was not
required to plead to the
charge. He was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison.
The case has been
adjourned to May 15. His
co-accused in the case,
Lewis Alex Williams, 29,
of Union Village, has
already been arraigned on
the charge. He is expected
back in court on May 15.

Defence Force
marine undergoes

minor surgery after

BERNARD Barr, a
marine from the Comman-
do Squadron Department
of the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force, underwent
minor surgery on Sunday
afternoon after being acci-
dentally shot while taking
part in a training exercise
in Trinidad and Tobago.

At around 11.30am on
Saturday, Mr Barr sus-
tained a flesh wound to his
upper thigh during the
training exercise on the
Tucker Valley Shooting
Range in Trinidad and
Tobago.

According to a press

statement from senior lieu-

tenant Sonia Miller, the
marine was treated for his
injury and is resting com-
fortably at the Port of
Spain General Hospital.
“He is a part of the 32-
member Royal Bahamas
Defence Force contingent
which is expected to pro-
vide joint operational sup-
port with the other
Caribbean nations for the
5th Summit of the Americ-
as in Port of Spain,
Trinidad and Tobago,
from April 17 -19, 2009.
“As is customary in
these matters an investiga-
tion is being conducted to
determine the circum-
stances surrounding the
incident,” she said.

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

| alin they withheld staff's car keys

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

EXECUTIVES of the
Water and Sewerage Corpo-
ration yesterday refuted
claims that they had withheld
employees’ keys to prevent
them from working.

Members of the Bahamas
Utilities Services Allied
Workers Union (BUSAWU)
and Water and Sewerage
Management Union
(WSMU) called on the gov-
emment to negotiate indus-
trial agreements and increase
workers’ salaries in a press
conference held outside the
Water and Sewerage Corpo-
ration (WSC) headquarters
on Thompson Boulevard yes-
terday morning.

The union members
claimed that WSC executives
had withheld employees’ car
keys preventing them from
working.

But Water and Sewerage
Corporation (WSC) chairman
Anton Saunders and mem-
bers of the board and execu-
tive management told the
press that union members
have access to the keys and
were free to start work when-
ever they wished.

Protocol

“The keys are in control of
the union, both unions have
an industrial disagreement
and the normal protocol was
followed,” Mr Saunders said.
“But some people want to
work and some don’t.”

The unions started to speak
publicly about their issues on
Sunday, and Mr Saunders
said he was called to speak



NCTU PRESIDENT John Pinder gave his support for the unions yesterday.

on the air about the concerns
and demands union members
are taking up with the gov-
ernment on Sunday night.

However, Mr Saunders said
that he was surprised by yes-
terday’s joint union state-
ments about industrial con-
tract agreements as negotia-
tions with the BUSAWU and
the non-management union
began in November 2007 and
only the financially impacted
articles are still outstanding.

He maintains negotiations
with the management union,
WSMU, began in October
last year and the union has
recently expressed the desire
to discuss a financial package
for its members as a matter of
priority.

Mr Saunders confirmed the
last contract with BUSAWU
and WSMU expired in June
2007 and that the biggest
expenses for the WSC are
water production costs in the
amount of $32.3 million and

salaries and related benefits
in the amount of $24.5 mil-
lion.

“The WSC is now the
recipient of the largest sub-
sidy of all the government
agencies,” Mr Saunders said,
“having received $30 million
in subsidies in the 2008/09 fis-
cal year, as compared to $18.4
million in the previous year.

Budget

“The government has
enunciated its intent to roll
back its budget to 2007/08
levels.

“Consequently on March
11, 2009, both unions were
advised there will be no gen-
eral increases at this time due
to the economic challenges
currently facing the nation.

“All increments, promo-
tions and anomalies will con-
tinue to be addressed in the
normal manner.”

Union members had been

Senate passes resolutions facilitating
unemployment benefits introduction

THREE resolutions to
facilitate the introduction of
unemployment benefits
under the National Insurance
scheme were passed in the
Senate yesterday.

The regulations, which
were moved in the House of
Assembly last week, are
expected to be signed into
law as early as April 9.

On Sunday, Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of National
Insurance Hubert Ingraham
said registration for the ben-
efit plan will begin on April
11, leading up to April 20.
Cheques will be issued dur-
ing the first week of May.

Schools

Four schools in New Prov-
idence - Doris Johnson Sec-
ondary School, Prince
Charles Drive; C C Sweeting
Junior High School, Oakes
Field; C R Walker Secondary
School, Baillou Hill Road
North, and S C McPherson
Junior High School, Baillou
Hill Road South - will be
used as registration centres.

In Grand Bahama, appli-
cants can register at the
Father Pestena Centre at
Christ the King Anglican
Church in Freeport and at
the Eight Mile Rock High
School gymnasium.

Starting April 11, residents
of New Providence with last
names beginning with letters
A to D should register; on
April 14 those with last
names beginning with letters
E to Lcan register; on April

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Pipes OO omie

Gate Meat nec eeeceaas aia et P4

Bora Oeag

BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION

Business
Comics

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

15 persons with last names
beginning with M to R
should register; on April 16
applicants with last names
beginning with the letters S
to Z should register.

In Grand Bahama, those
with last names beginning
with letters A to L should
register on April 11 and on
April 14 persons with last
names beginning with M to Z
should apply.

Open call registration in
New Providence will be held
on April 17 and 18, and in
Grand Bahama on April 15
through April 17.

Applicants should come
with proper identification
and proof of dismissal, such
as a letter of termination, if
one was issued.










nO amNe eM

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
fea W TEU)
Me aC rey
Krad Li) |



* SEE PAGE ONE

informed by Minister for the
Environment Earl Deveaux
that salary increases would
be impossible in the current
economic circumstances, Mr
Saunders said, however the
government is open to any
recommendations they may
have.

Man dies in
| hit and run

A 49-YEAR-OLD man

? died after he was hit by a

? truck and dragged along
? Baillou Hill Road “for some
? distance” early yesterday
? morning, police reported.
? =The Pinewood Gardens
? resident was walking on
? Baillou Hill Road, near the
? junction of Wulff Road, at
? around 2am when he was hit
? by a white truck.
? As the truck continued to
? drive on, the man was
? dragged along before his
i? body dislodged and the 49-
? year-old died of his injuries,
? police said.
? ~=The truck driver fled the
? scene.
? ~~ Police have launched an
? active investigation and an
i island-wide search for the
? truck driver in New Provi-
? dence.
i? The make and model of
? the vehicle has not been
? ascertained. Anyone who
? may have been in the area at
i the time, or has any infor-
? mation which could lead to
? the apprehension of the dri-
i ver, should contact police
? immediately on 393-7714/5,
? 919, or call Crime Stoppers
? anonymously on 328-
: TIPS/8477.

IX



{~~





' Look CHIC
this Faster
Holiday!!

New Arrivals





Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family
Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
* Fax: 326-9953
Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com ¢ P.O. Box N-121



FOR ALL YOUR ce eee

“Lowest Prices On The Island”





























FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

gtutt

Anniversary
SALE

STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald’s Furniture
And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama visit to Turkey no afterthought

WASHINGTON — President Barack Oba-
ma's stop in Turkey is hardly an afterthought, a
"while I'm in the neighbourhood" visit.

For starters, he wants to mend relations
strained when the United States went to war in
Iraq six years ago. Ankara's Islamic-rooted gov-
ernment denied Washington's request to use
Turkish territory to invade Iraq from the north.
But Turkey also is in line for thanks for trying to
bring peace between Israelis and Palestinians.

Turkey is the only predominantly Muslim
country in NATO, an alliance stalwart and
America's best friend in the Islamic world. Oba-
ma, completing a European trip, arrives Sunday
and undoubtedly will reprise his message from
a town hall meeting Friday in France.

"We must be honest with ourselves. In recent
years, we've allowed our alliance to drift,” he
said at that appearance.

Turkey maintains a small military force in
Afghanistan, part of the NATO contingent
working with U.S. troops to beat back the resur-
gent Taliban and deny al-Qaida a safe haven
along the largely lawless territory that strad-
dles Afghanistan's border with Pakistan.
Turkey's participation carries enormous sym-
bolic importance because it is the only Muslim
country with a presence in the fight against
Islamic extremism.

In talks with Turkey's president, Abdullah
Gul, and prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdo-
gan, Obama will try to sell his strategy for
Afghanistan and Pakistan. He should find wel-
coming ears, given the new U.S. focus on meld-
ing troop increases with civilian efforts to better
the lives of people in both countries.

"Obama may be able to create momentum
for help from a broader sector of nominal U.S.
allies in the Muslim world,” said Jeffrey Mar-
tinson, a historian and political scientist at
Meredith College in North Carolina.

"The fact that he's visiting the Turks at the
end of this major European trip is a nice
homage to them," Martinson said, noting that
uppermost on Turkey's agenda is gaining mem-
bership in the European Union.

The new president has pushed for Muslim
diplomacy. In his inaugural address in January,
Obama assured the Muslim world that "we will
extend a hand if you are willing to unclench
your fist." He has made early telephone calls to
friendly Arab leaders and sent special envoy
George J. Mitchell to the Middle East on a "lis-
tening tour."

Obama's declaration that he will close the
prison for suspected terrorists Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba, was seen as a move to address a
chief source of ill will among Muslim nations
since Sept. 11.

Obama's father and stepfather were Muslim
and he spent part of his childhood in Indonesia,
a largely Muslim country. Throughout the cam-

¢ ROLL SHUTTERS

Aluminum rolling shutters are custom-fitted
and available in a choice of colours. They
provide security and hurricane protection.
Easily operated by hand crank or electric
motor, Roll shutters add beauty, security and
convenience to any home.

#® Don Stainton (Protection) Ltd.

SERVING THE BAHAMAS SINCE 1978
HILLSIDE PLAZA, THOMPSON BOULEVARD
FREE ESTIMATES 322-8160/322-8219

HURRICANE SHUTTERS

ee =

paign, Obama, who is Christian, fought false
Internet rumours that he is a Muslim.

Turkey is one of only two key Muslim coun-
tries with cordial relations with Israel. The
Turks, along with the Egyptians, are working
with France in trying to maintain a cease-fire
and broker a permanent truce between Israel
and Hamas, the Palestinian faction that rules the
Gaza Strip. That is essential to America's pledge
to spare no effort in establishing peace between
the ancient antagonists and establishing a Pales-
tinian state.

Beyond that, Turkey has shepherded con-
tacts between Israel and Syria, where a suc-
cessful outcome could entice Muslim nations
across the Middle East into accepting Israel's
right to exist.

Despite the likely good will, Obama must
finesse the tangled issue of Turkey's history
with Armenia. Historians estimate that up to 1.5
million Armenians were killed by Ottoman
Turks leading up to and during World War I, an
event widely viewed by many scholars as the
first genocide of the 20th century. Turkey denies
that the deaths constituted genocide, claiming
the toll has been inflated and the casualties
were victims of civil war and unrest.

"The Armenian genocide is not an allegation,
a personal opinion, or a point of view, but rather
a widely documented fact supported by an over-
whelming body of historical evidence," Oba-
ma said in a January 2008 statement on his cam-
paign Web site. "America deserves a leader
who speaks truthfully about the Armenian
genocide and responds forcefully to all geno-
cides. I intend to be that president."

So far, Obama aides refuse to say how he will
deal with the legacy of that statement while in
Turkey. Nor would they predict his stance on a
resolution to be introduced soon in the House
that describes the killings as genocide. His vis-
it to Turkey also is uncomfortably close to the
annual April 24 Armenian remembrance day.

"The smartest thing on Armenia is to try to
ignore what he said in the campaign," Martinson
said. Then there is Iran. Turkey's eastern neigh-
bour is accused by the United States and most of
Washington's European allies of trying to devel-
op a nuclear weapon. The Turkish government
supports Iran's right to develop nuclear energy
for peaceful use but wants Tehran to be trans-
parent about its nuclear programme and favours
dialogue.

That goes along with Obama's efforts to
open a diplomatic front with Iran and the mes-
sage from this past week's Group of 20 summit.
At that meeting, leaders said Iran must open up
its nuclear programme and support its claim
that it does not intend to build a bomb.

(This article was written by Steven R. Hurst
of The Associated Press).



Promised turtle
fishing ban may
e in jeopardy

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Many people, both Bahami-
an and foreign, rejoiced a few
months ago when Agriculture
and Marine Resources Minis-
ter Larry Cartwright announced
the Ministry’s intent to enact a
complete ban on marine turtle
fishing in the Bahamas. It was
the culmination of many years
effort by various groups con-
cerned about our marine envi-
ronment and particularly these
majestic, gentle sea creatures
who are afforded complete pro-
tection in most developed and
undeveloped countries of the
world. Cuba, Mexico, and most
of our Caribbean neighbors
long ago enacted strict bans on
the capture, killing and con-
sumption of marine turtles.

The complete ban that was
promised may be in jeopardy.
The amendment has not yet
been passed by Parliament. A
few weeks ago, The Ministry of
Agriculture wanted to hear
from more Bahamians on this
issue. After hearing from at
least several thousand since
then, in favour of the ban, the
amendment has still not been
passed. The talk from months
ago, that it might pass but with
an exception to continue to
allow the “personal consump-
tion” of turtle meat, may still
happen.

There are very few fisher-
men who catch turtles to feed
their families. They catch tur-
tles opportunistically, especial-
ly if they’ve had a bad day
conching or craw fishing. They
catch them to sell. The gas it
would cost a fisherman to go
out specifically to catch a turtle
for his dinner table would cost
far more than a chicken from
the food store.

This is a ludicrous proposi-
tion for many reasons, the most
obvious being the issue of
enforcement. Will the Ministry
position a Fisheries officer at
every dock and every boat land-
ing, on every island? Will they
follow the fisherman home,

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



watch him kill, clean AND eat
the turtle he has caught? How
else to enforce this?

What will be done about the
extreme cruelty and torture
inflicted on these defenseless
animals while they are awaiting
slaughter? Ranging from being
left on their backs for hours or
days in the broiling sun, to hav-
ing their flippers crudely pierced
with whatever sharp object is
at hand and having rope thread-
ed through them, then hogtied
to prevent them from thrash-
ing. Not to mention kids and
even grown men cruelly tor-
menting and abusing them,
often in public view — and
nothing is done about it, despite
calls to both Police and Fish-
eries. Have we become so cold
and unfeeling that we think it is
normal or even sporting to tor-
ture an innocent animal?
Because it is to be eaten, its pain
and suffering is irrelevant?

Our young people see their
elders perpetrating abuses and
cruelty on innocent, helpless
creatures, and they learn from
this. What do they learn? Think
about it. No wonder our crime
rate is escalating. The abuse of
animals has proven links as a
stepping stone to the abuse of
people and violent crime.

In these times of extreme
economic instability and hard-
ship, one would think the con-
cept of enticing tourists to visit
us instead of repelling them
might have some attraction. A
live turtle viewed in the wild is
worth far more in tourism dol-
lars than a suffering, tormented
turtle on a dock, which is guar-
anteed to disgust most people
who see it. Tourists who wit-
ness this leave here vowing nev-
er to come back, and discourage
their friends and family from
visiting. The Miss Universe

pageant is to be held on Par-
adise Island in August; what a
black eye the Bahamas would
receive if the attendant inter-
national press happen upon a
poor hapless turtle being tor-
tured on the Potter’s Cay docks.

The irony is that these are
not “Bahamian” turtles. These
turtles do not belong to any one
nation; they are migratory ani-
mals and it is extremely dis-
heartening and frustrating to
those other countries trying to
protect and save them, that sim-
ply because their migratory pat-
terns bring them to Bahamian
waters, they are subject to being
not only killed but tortured and
abused in the process. This is
one issue where “foreign” opin-
ions should be weighed and
considered as these turtles do
not “belong” to the Bahamas.
Most of them are not born here,
and those that are, do not
remain here their entire lives.

We participate in the inter-
national protection of the many
migratory bird species that pass
through the Bahamas every
year, why are turtles different?
Because they swim rather than
fly? Because we have more fish-
ermen than bird hunters?

We urge the public to voice
their opinions to Minister
Cartwright, and also to your
local Members of Parliament.
Marine turtles are evidently still
in extreme jeopardy in the
Bahamas; they need your help
more than ever and time is of
the essence.

ELIZABETH BURROWS

Executive Director, Humane
Society of Grand Bahama

Member, Bahamas Sea Tur-
tle Conservation Group.

CHRIS JOHNSTON

President, Board of Direc-
tors, Humane Society of Grand
Bahama.

Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
March 27, 2009.

Most visitors find turtles hunting practice abhorrent

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In regards to the recent letter by Andrew Allen
re consumption of turtle meat, I note that the
World Wildlife Fund regards six of the seven
species of turtle as endangered or critically endan-
gered and 166 nations currently prohibit trade
of the species for any purpose which includes

consumption.

As far as any historical right to consume sea tur-
tles as food, I fully respect the traditional practice
which, in a modern world, could be considered the
same approach to unique island wildlife assets

small minority to exploit their natural fauna for
profit and faux gastronomy in direct opposition to

worldwide conservation efforts?

Be assured that the majority of visitors to this
beautiful island and many residents find the prac-
tice of hunting and consuming sea turtles abhor-
rent. For those that doubt this perhaps an exit sur-
vey on endangered species at Nassau Airport

would be in order to confirm the fact?

overdue.

that led to the extinction of the Dodo on Mauri-

tius. Perhaps Mr Allen would also like to join
the Japanese on a “traditional” whale hunt.
For how much longer can Bahamians allow a










Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED
CARS & TRUCKS

For the best deal in town on

pre-owned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales





Nassau,

Bahamians please look after the many natural
treasures that you have, seize the day, a broad ban
on the hunting/consumption of sea turtles is long

A RESIDENT

March 31, 2009.

Sponging was also a legitimate part of our culture

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: Turtle meat eating is a legitimate part of our culture - Tribune

March 31.

Once upon a time, we used to “enjoy the bounties” of another legit-
imate part of our culture - it was called sponging.

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
(Turtle pie lover)
Nassau,

March 31, 2009.

A question for Mr Andrew Allen

EDITOR, The Tribune.

© We guarantee motors for 5 years, material
and labour for two years and respond to
service calls within 48 hours, usually on the
same day.








NOW
IN STOCK!

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

oe | ‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
a , u,(06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
is lock mechanisms for secure fastening. a i a; ‘06 HYUN D Al SON ATA
i = ‘02 SUZUKI XL-7
| ‘07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 5dr
awnings are permanently installed and close ‘01 HYUND Al HD-6 5 TRUCK
‘05 TOYOTA COROLLA

quickly for storm protection. They give everyday
i a, a u t 0 a °
ae

protection from heat and rain, and help prevent
2 gets
Sales (2)
#1) AUTO GEALER IM THE BAHAMAS

LIMITED -
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Wet cur ohoercom ai Geol ty auto Soho Preepord Lid tor dor decds, Geseere Hey, 2S2-d0 77
or dboce Meter Moll. Don Mockap Bhd, 27-281 S

Thave a question for Mr. Andrew Allen. Are domestic cows and
geese on the Threatened List?

SU me ise

| The lock of colonial wooden shutters, but with
the strength and maintenance - free qualities of
aluminum. Add a finishing architectural touch to
your home with these functional yet decorative
shutters. Provides protection against storms,
sun and vandals.

A DAMIANOS
Nassau,
April 1, 2009

Vacancy for Maintenance Worker/Helper

A reputable company with many locations is
seeking to hire a:

Maintenance Worker/Helper

Qualihed applicants must:

Be Bahamian

Be able io work under pressure
Be able io handle multipl tasks



* CLIP-LOCK ALUMINUM STORM PANELS

The most cost-effective protection available.
Lightweight, easy to store and to use. We give you
10% extra spring steel clips and use closed-end
headers to prevent the panels "creeping".

interested persona should e-mail
fan’, phone comieect and work expanence fc
Fantasticjobopportunity igmailcom
Deadline: Wednesday, April 150%, 2000

CHOOSING HURRICANE SHUTTERS

This guide offers a look at the benefits of five varieties of Hurricane Shutters
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Small Family
Islands not
affected hy
the global
recession

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

WHILE countries around
the world experience econom-
ic hardships due to the global
recession, islanders in the iso-
lated communities of Cat
Island and Crooked Island
have not been affected,
according to Local Govern-
ment officials.

Unlike the industrialised
cities of Nassau and Freeport,
residents of smaller communi-
ties, which depend on incomes
generated by tourism, farming
or fishing, claim the state of
the economy in their islands is
no different than it was this
time last year.

Phillesa Thurston, secretary
to the Cat Island administra-
tor, said residents she spoke to
while travelling from one end
of the island to the other had
no complaints about feeling
the effects of the global eco-
nomic crisis. And she said
around five out of ten cars she
passed were carrying tourists
visiting the island.

There are around five major
hotels in Cat Island, none of
which are experiencing a drop
in visitors compared to last
year, Ms Thurston said.

“Tn the islands we would not
feel it as bad as you would in
Nassau,” she said. “We see a
lot of tourists every day and
there are five or six yachts in
the harbour, and those people
come to shore and look at the
craft work, so I think every-
body is faring pretty well.”

Tight-knit

Ms Thurston pointed out
that because the communities
within the just 1,500-strong
population of Cat Island are
very tight-knit, people look
out for each other in times of
trouble. “On the island every-
body is their brother’s and sis-
ter’s keeper,” she said.

“So you can go to the neigh-
bours if you don’t have some-
thing, or you can go to the
farm to reap crops.

“Farming is the main thing,
so the only problem there is
that the weather has been
extremely dry. But the crops
that are farmed, are sold,” she
said. Hylene Moss, chief clerk
to the administrator in
Crooked Island, said residents
in this southern constituency
are also faring well in these
tough economic times.

She maintains that the cash
flow on the island, which has a
population of only 280 people,
is just as it was this time last
year. “I guess there are no
changes — we are used to eco-
nomic crises up here so it
comes natural to us — every-
thing seems to be going the
same.

“We still have a few tourists
coming in, and most persons
are self-employed in fishing
and sport-fishing, so they are
still taking guests out. We
have very little farming, peo-
ple farm for themselves.

“And over here you are
your brother’s keeper, so
everybody is still happy,” she
said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
eee
PHONE: $22-2157



‘This is one of the
boldest rip-ofts’

THE New Providence and
Grand Bahama clean-up pro-
gramme is one of the “boldest
rip-offs of the public treasury in
recent times”, former Works Min-
ister Bradley Roberts claimed.

Speaking at a meeting of PLP
supporters over the weekend, Mr
Roberts said that private proper-
ties which are owned by persons
who could afford to pay for their
own clean-ups are been cleared at
public expense.

“The programme was so badly
organised that it has run out of
monies. The public could see with
their own eyes persons walking
up and down streets with little or
nothing to do,” he claimed.

“The rains will come soon and
the weeds will follow and the rip-
off will resume.”

Mr Roberts said that consider-
able pressure was placed on FNM
MPs for jobs, thus the govern-
ment’s need for the programme.

He claimed that since coming
to office in May 2007, the FNM
has fired hundreds of persons per-
ceived to be PLP supporters and
has replaced them with FNM sup-
porters, not only in the central
government but in the govern-
ment corporations.

Former Minister criticises New Providence
and Grand Bahama clean-up programme

Bradley Roberts



Mr Roberts said he is also con-
vinced that the FNM, “by their
selfish stupid actions, chased away
major foreign investors and has
allowed our vital number one
industry to badly suffer by fail-
ing to take advantage of the
Bahamas’ close vicinity to the US
mainland, and is now turning

thousands of proud hard-work-
ing Bahamians into recipients of
funds from the National Insur-
ance Board.”

The former minister said he did
not hear a word of “regret or
apology” to the Bahamian people
from the prime minister for allow-
ing the major decline in tourism.

“Instead Hubert and his Cabi-
net one by one have without
shame threw the blame on the
recession. Our Bahamian broth-
ers and sisters in the main are a
proud people with a long history
of working for their keep. Hubert
Ingraham and his FNM govern-
ment policies are turning more
of our people into becoming
wards of the state. This is unfor-
givable,” Mr Roberts said.

Calls to Minister of Environ-
ment Earl Deveaux asking him
to comment on Mr Roberts’
claims about the clean-up cam-
paign were not returned up to
press time last night.

Pain-wracked pensioner accuses PMH

staff of negligence following bed fall



a
Taras SLU eminence htcaene hm tcny

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A great-grandmother is blaming negligent staff at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital for an injurious fall from bed following a spinal surgery
which required her to undergo four additional surgeries.

Pensioner Betty Antonio, 60, and her husband Hugh, 67, say they
have paid out $25,000, which was put aside for their retirement, to pay
for Mrs Antonio’s operations and medical care in the last two years. Yet
Mrs Antonio is still in constant pain.

She has no feeling in her left leg, is unable to walk without the aid of
a walker, cannot bathe herself, and her husband of 44 years, who suf-
fers from glaucoma, is her full-time caregiver.

Another operation is needed to repair her damaged spine, but the
Antonios, who have a combined monthly pension of $547, are no
longer in a position to pay for it. They are seeking compensation from
the Public Hospitals Authority to cover the costs of her multiple oper-
ations and medication to ease her prolonged pain and suffering.

Mrs Antonio maintains she fell from her hospital bed after her first
operation in April 2007. She claims nurses neglected to bring her a bed-
pan when she called, and there were no rails on the side of her bed stop-
ping her from trying to get up to use the toilet in her dazed state fol-
lowing the surgery. “When I fell out of bed it felt like fire went through
my body,” she said.

Doctors told her the nurses should have put up rails at the sides of
her bed and responded when she called, Mrs Antonio said.

The mother-of-five is trying to obtain hospital records detailing her
series of operations and health problems to seek compensation from the
Public Hospitals Authority. She claims she was unable to walk after the
operation and was advised to travel to Florida with her husband and
daughter to get an MRI scan. She then returned to the United States
for a second MRI, costing a total of $1,800.

The couple then had to pay $5,000 for a pain relief system to ease her
suffering while she waited for a second operation in November 2007 to
insert artificial discs in her back at the cost of $8,000.

But the artificial discs only brought more discomfort, as one of the
screws did not hold, Mrs Antonio said.

Prescribed pain relief medication now costs her $725 per month, “and
the point is, it still isn’t working, I’m still in pain,” she said.

Mrs Antonio had three subsequent surgeries in December, 2007, Jan-
uary 2008, and November 2008, to drain the surgical wound infec-
tion, and she now requires another operation.

However, she has had so many spinal surgeries in the last two years,
surgeons will need to perform a complicated operation cutting through
her front and side, she said.

And she and her husband are no longer in a position to afford the
surgery. She said: “It is a long time I have been suffering and it’s like
the Hospital Authority don’t care. I can’t bathe myself, can’t stand at
the stove to cook — must I live like this for the rest of my life? That’s
not fair. You go into the hospital to get help and you come out worse
than you come in. I am appealing to the Minister of Health and the
prime minister to deal with this.

“T don't have any intention of being swept under the carpet anymore.
I need help because I can't help myself.

“T have given them ample time to address the situation and this
should have been addressed a long time ago.”

A spokesman for the Public Hospitals Authority was unable to
track Mrs Antonio’s case to respond to her complaint before The Tri-
bune went to press yesterday.



“When I fell
out of bed it
felt like fire






went through

my body.”



Betty Antonio

h

Wednesday

WOOD AND COLD-FORMED STEEL
TRUSSES

DESIGN
ENGINEERING
COMPETITIVE PRICING

FAST BIDDING INFORMATION

361-7764

Road to City Dump after Premix
Email:ggongora@coralwave.com

AUTHORED
MANUFACTURER



r

Odessa Sarden

where fife is stil simple and people still care
Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

Easter Vinvl Flannel Backed Tablecloths, Seats 4
to 6 persons, for your Kitchen or dining Table, Wipe

Clean. Easter Egg or Easter Bunny Design.

White Lace Cotton Tablecloth, has Last Supper
design in the Lace in centre of Cloth, seats 6 to &
persons,

Beautiful Rose Pink Tea Towel and Pot Holder
sets with Easter Eeg Applique.



British Colonial Hilton’s
credible evening buffet offer!

| Join us in the Portofino Restaurant for
special value menus all week long =





81995

Paves nfede
one [ret Boer oe
Gia ol en

Tuesday

Plentiful Pasta

Hot Off the Grill

hursde

usio



(a)
British Colonial Hilton

CMR Hiaticery ga tp le

Travel should take you places
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Roberts slams govt

over TG Glover delay

Claim that FNM ‘jealous’
of PLP achievements

Montagu Gardens

Easter
Specials

Date April 12,

9

Special One

Tossed Salad
Roast leg of lamb with gravy
Pan fried grouper
Roasted potatoes
Rice
Fresh glazed baby carrots and corn
Dessert carrot cake or Key Lime Fie

Price $19.00 per person
plus 15% gratuity

Special Two

Tossed salad
Baked turkey with gravy
Sausage stuffing
Baked grouper
Oven Roasted potatoes
Rice
Fresh glazed Carrots and corn
Dessert carrot cake or kev lime pie

Price $19.00 per person
plus 15% gratuity



JEALOUSY of the PLP’s
achievements is preventing the
government from allowing TG
Glover students and teachers
from returning to their class-
rooms, former Minister of
Works Bradley Roberts claimed
as he addressed PLP supporters
at a party meeting over the
weekend.

By not moving the teachers
into the facility, Mr Roberts said,
the FNM is denying the thou-
sands of people of the greater
Chippingham area access to a
state-of-the-art primary school.

“This project was also placed
on hold (because of) several
Cabinet Ministers’ insane claim
of the school been built on a tox-
ic waste dump site, which turned
out to be a simple case of mon-
key tamarind. The four- to five-
month delay has increased the
cost of construction and
(delayed) the occupancy of the
school by the students and the
teachers,” Mr Roberts said.

“It therefore does in no way
surprise me that the Ingraham
government would take the deci-
sion that it appears moving
towards to deny the working
class people of greater Chip-
pingham, Boyd Road, Boyd sub-
division, Farrington Road, the
Quarry Mission Road and the
Bain and Grants Town areas — in
short Fort Charlotte and the
Bain and Grants Town con-
stituencies’ residents - of the use
of a state-of-the-art primary
school which has been promised
to them for many years. This is
also a big slap in the face of the
teachers of the former TG
Glover School who have wait-
ed for some three years to move
into new and modern facilities.”

Mr Roberts said now that the
school is nearing completion,
and the “beauty and sensible
planning which characterise the
structure is now evident to all, it
has aroused a sense of jealousy
that here is an edifice conceived
and largely executed by the for-
mer PLP government.”

“The senior establishment in



EAGLE ELECTRICAL

& LIGHTING

Tel (242) 341-4000
Fax (242) 341-5080

Email: eaglebahamas@gmail.com



ENJOY EASTER WITH EAGLE!

Don’t miss out on these SUPER SAVINGS. ONE WEEK ONLY!

#14 THHN WIRE
500' ROLL*

“TV CABLE
4000' ROLL*

* All prices are net.

EAGLE’

CAT 5 WIRE
1000' ROLL*

TELEPHONE WIRE
1000' ROLL*

0) Se SS ae) ee

“4 gate sc | Eagle Electrical Supplies & Lighting Center
Tonique Williams Darling Highway (formerly Harold Road)
* PO. Box CR-55440 Nassau, Bahamas

BEST QUALITY, BEST PRICE, GUARANTEED !!!





“The four
to five-month
delay has
increased.
the cost of
construction
and (delayed)
the occupancy
of the school by
the students and
the teachers.”



Bradley Roberts

the Ministry of Education has
been persuaded to go along with
the ruse that the school is not
suitable for primary school chil-
dren, even though with the
exception of the departure of
Minister Sears, the permanent
secretary and the director, they
were of one joyous accord when
the project was conceptualised,
designed and when construction
began. One is prompted to ask
what has brought about the sud-
den change of heart. The answer
lies deep in the twisted logic of
the government of our nation,”
Mr Roberts said.

The former minister explained
that when the PLP came to
office in 2002, former Education
Minster Alfred Sears discovered
that children and teachers were
occupying a school building that
was condemned by structural
engineers from the Ministry of
Works.

Immediate action was ordered
by Mr Sears to discontinue hold-
ing classes at the school, Mr
Roberts said.

During the summer break, the
former minister said, additional
classrooms were built at the
Albury Sayles Primary School
on Nassau Street to accommo-
date the majority of the students.



It was then determined that a
new primary school would be
built on the old TG Glover
School site.

The contract for construction
of the new building was signed
on July 17, 2006 and construc-
tion was well under way when
the PLP left office in May 2007.

The current government has
since been threatened by indus-
trial action from teachers of TG
Glover who want to be placed in
their own facilities.

Minister of Education Carl
Bethel told The Tribune that he
has met with the teachers of the
primary school and their discus-
sions were “very positive.”

“T explained to them the gov-
ernment's concerns about the
Horseshoe Drive building, they
agreed with me on a number of
points, not all, as to its unsuit-
ability as a primary school.

“And of course I expressed to
them my understanding of their
great frustration and my sympa-
thy for them and my determina-
tion as minister to ensure come
September they will walk in to
appropriately built TG Glover
Primary School premises. And
they seem to have accepted my
presentation,” Mr Bethel said.

Performances of

Bahamian cast of

God's Trombone
_to be screened

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — This Easter, ser-

? mon performances by the Bahami-
? an cast of God’s Trombone will
? be shown during a film screening
? at the Simpson C Penn Talent
: Theatre in Grand Bahama.

Frank Penn, of GBI Recording

i Studios, is premiering the film ver-
? sion of the 1995 performances on
? April 10 and April 11 at 7.30pm at
? the theatre on Queens Highway.

The production will also be

? shown in Nassau at the National
? Theatre of the Performing Arts at
? Spm and 7pm on Sunday, April
? 19, and at 7.30pm on April 20. A
: donation of $10 is required.

Director Gloria McGlone, Bri-

? an Roxbury and Portia Cole-
? brooke were among the original
: Bahamian cast that performed the
? production 14 years ago in
? Freeport.

Ms McGlone, a former Broad-

: way actress, said the original God’s
? Trombone production was per-
? formed on Broadway about 25 to
? 30 years ago by very well-known
: black actors such as James Earl
? Jones.

The Bahamian production fea-

? tured some of the best actors on
? the island such as Brian Roxbury,
? Tawari Rodgers, Bert Duncanson,
? Denika Penn, the late Kristin
? Penn-Davis and the late Bessimae
: Nottage, who performed Christ’s
? Passion.

“Tt is a compilation of sermons

: you hear in the black churches of
: Jonah or Moses delivering the
i Jews out of Egypt and the singing
? of old religious hymns and spiritu-
i als,” she explained.

Ms McGlone said that the pro-

i duction is very moving and she
i believes that audiences will enjoy
? the film.

“We had church every night and

? during the production, a number
i of persons in the show found their
? anointing and it was very heart-
: felt,” she said.

Ms McGlone believes that the

: screening, which is being released
i? this Easter by Mr Penn, is very
; timely.

“The world is in turmoil and I

? think God’s Trombone is about
i basic religion and getting back to
? the root of the stories we all know
? and trusted in and found our way
? through,” she said.

“We Ship to the Family Islands”

Tonique Williams-Darling Highway

{just before Burger Ring)

P.O Box CB 11561 * Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 341-8400 or (242) 361-8400

Fax: (242) 341-2200

Email: bsweeting(@\cbstiredepot.com


THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 7





ABOVE: The Bahamian gospel group ‘The Elevations’ accept the Rev Arthur Preacher Rolle
Lifetime Achievement Award for their contribution towards the development and advance-
ment of Bahamian gospel music for the past forty years.



LEFT: Simeon Outten won two awards including Rake and Scrape Vocal Performance of
the Year and Traditional Recording of the Year for ‘Thank You’, a testimonial record about
how he and his family overcame the loss of their home and personal belongings following
a major hurricane in Freeport several years ago.

Bahamian gospel artists
dominate Marlin Awards

THE Bahamas emerged as the country to
win the most awards at this year’s Caribbean
Gospel Music Marlin Awards.

Securing a total of 28 awards at the event
held last week at the Diplomat Centre, the
Bahamas took first place, with Jamaica coming
in second with thirteen awards. Third place
went to Trinidad and Tobago with a total of
ten awards.

Leading the pack was the Mount Tabor
praise and worship team, which won three
Marlin Awards including one for Adapted
Praise and Worship Recording of the Year
for their remake of the contemporary wor-
ship anthem “Amazed” and another for Praise
and Worship Recording of the Year for their
original hit single “Don’t Do It Without Me”
featuring pastor/author and recording artist
Bishop Paul Morton.

Mount Tabor also made history by becom-
ing the recipients of the first ever Record of the
Year Award, one of two online voting cate-
gories introduced by the Marlin Awards this
year and coordinated and managed by
Jamaican media personality Arnold Kelly and
his Caribbean Hour organisation.

Bahamian classical singer JoAnn Callender
took home three awards including one for
Special Event Recording of the Year for
her jazz inspired Christmas single “Silent
Night.”

She also won two awards along with Mani-
fest, CEO of Dunamus Soundz Records, for
the hip hop meets opera smash hit “I Shall
Rise.” Manifest also won Hip Hop Record-
ing of the Year.

Simeon Outten won two awards including
Rake and Scrape Vocal Performance of the
Year and Traditional Recording of the Year
for “Thank You,” a testimonial record about
how he and his family overcame the loss of
their home and personal belongings follow-
ing a major hurricane in Freeport several years
ago.

Also winning two awards was the male vocal
group “Vision” who took home the award for
Contemporary Vocal Performance of the
Year-Duo/Group for their radio hit “Evi-
dence” and the other for Music Video of the
Year Duo for their remake of the Visionaries
classic “Brand New World.”

Lion of Judah CEO Monty G won two
awards as well, one along with his sonic partner
DJ Frost for Producer of the Year, and the oth-
er along with Trinidad reggae singer Positive
for Reggae Vocal Performance of the Year-
Duo for their single “I Want to Know.”

Composer

Finally, veteran composer and producer
Chris Fox also won two more Marlin Awards
to add to his trophy mantle.

Mr Fox won for Instrumental Record of the
Year for “Then Look At Me” and for Adapt-
ed Contemporary Recording of the Year for
his remake of the old American classic “Heav-
en Help us All,” with some help from Ameri-
can gospel soul singer Bob Bailey.

Other top award winners included Christian
Massive (Junkanoo Recording of the Year-

THE GARDENS
NURSERY

Est. 1994

"From Our Garven To Yours"

EASTER SPECIALS

UDR Te a8

4" Orchids starting at $20
6" Orchids starting at $40
Premium Potting Soil $8.50
BES RESET SAUD
Bromeliads starting at $12
*while supplies last*

TSUKAI ATC

ae meeyin

SOP ESP e rt
12 St. Albans Drive, Nassau
(Opposite Premier Importers)



“Create”); Demetrius Stubbs (Rake and
Scrape Recording of the Year-“Revolution”);
The Rahming Brothers (Traditional Vocal
Performance Duo/Group-“Bring Them In”);
Hubert McIntosh (Traditional Vocal Perfor-
mance of the Year-Male-“Restored”); Vago
(Contemporary Vocal Performance of the
Year-Male-“Take Me Higher”); Da Squad
(Hip Hop Vocal Performance of the Year-
Duo/Group-“No Wayz Tired”); CMA (Adapt-
ed Rake and Scrape Vocal Performance of
the Year-““We Acknowledge You”); Bren-
dalee Petty (Adapted Traditional Recording of
the Year-“Grace Grace”); Dano Rolle (Adapt-
ed Reggae Recording of the Year-“I Need
You to Survive”); Professa (Hip Hop Vocal
Performance of the Year-Solo-“Back Up Off
Me”); Avalanchee (Reggae Hip Hop
Recording of the Year-“Hold On Strong”)
and the award for Choir/Chorale Recording of
the Year went to Minister Denczil Rolle
Presents COGIBINC Mass Youth Choir for
their debut album “Our Worship-Live in Nas-
sau.”

The Rev Arthur Preacher Rolle Lifetime
Achievement Award was presented to the
Bahamian gospel group “The Elevations” for
their contribution towards the development
and advancement of Bahamian gospel music
for the past forty years.

Most of the original members of the group
were on hand to accept their well-deserved
award.

The Marlin Awards are produced by Harris
Communications and are held bi-annually in
Nassau, Bahamas.



Odessa ( Garden

where life is still simple and people still care
Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.

Telephone 322-8493

DRESSES
for EASTER

Fancy White Pre-teen and Teen dresses for Special
Occasions - Church, Graduation, Confirmation,
First Communion, Weddings, Funerals.

Pretty Hand Smocked Dresses in Pastel Colours,
Perfect for Easter Sunday, Dressy Parties

and Tea Parties.

Easter Trees

Easter Trees for your Holiday Table - Beautiful
used as a Centerpiece - fully decorated,
come and see!!!

J&J SEAFOOD Ltd.

Carib Road, off Chesapeake
Your Bahamian Seafood Specialist

‘Easter Sale’
20% OFF

FRESH WHOLE NASSAU GROUPER
(Prepared any way you want it)
Additional discounts for bulk purchase

~ SNAPPERS

Fresh, Cleaned, Pick your size

KITS OF SNAPPER - $120
Also Available;
Jacks, Lobster, Fillet, Grouper Steaks
Hog Snapper, Conch, Goggle Eye, Barracuda etc.

VENDOR DISCOUNTS YEAR ROUND
OPEN MONDAY - FRIDAY 8AM - 5PM

SATURDAY 8AM - 12NOON
TEL: 393-8164



SV ERATE MRR RVC



Easter Holiday Banking Hours
THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2009 - 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 2009 - CLOSED

MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2009 - CLOSED

Normal Banking hours will resume

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 - 9:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

meee ca E eae

Bank of The Bahamas Limited

Lae

Commonwealth Bank Limited

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
RC CEU ee EE
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
PAGE 8, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

global economic turbulence will
bottom out and rebound.

Last week Standard and Poor's
predicted that the country's gross
domestic product (GDP) will
decline by two per cent in 2009
and one per cent in 2010. The esti-
mate was based on the Bahamas’
dependence on tourism as a dri-
ving economic force and lack of a
diversified economy.

"I believe even that is an opti-
mistic forecast. In other words that
that advice I hope it is so, I hope
that the contraction in the econo-
my is only to that extent but given
the fact that foreign direct invest-
ment also is a driving component
in our economy and the prospects
for that in any significant degree,
from where I sit, is also dismal.

"And people are perhaps taking
a ‘wait and see’ attitude that the
contraction could even be
greater,” said Mr Christie, who
added that government should
take the recent projections into
account when it introduces its bud-
get next month.

Late last year the agency low-
ered its outlook on the Bahamas
to negative from stable due to
worries about the country’s retard-

Christie

ing economic growth, a weakened
tourism sector, compounded with
reduced investment and consumer
demand from 2008 and 2009. Last
year S and P also revised the
Bahamas’ GDP growth forecast
for 2008 and 2009 to 1.1 per cent
and 1 per cent, respectively, down
from its previous forecast of 3 per
cent and 4 per cent growth, respec-
tively.

These harsh economic realities
were highlighted in recent report-
ed comments by the prime minis-
ter who told the press that gov-
ernment intends to borrow more
money outside of a $200 million
loan recently approved by Parlia-
ment. It's a measure government
may have to take in the face of
dwindling revenues and rising
unemployment — all conse-
quences of the troubled tourism
industry hit hard by the global
recession.

"The prime minister has indi-
cated that there may be a need
for additional borrowing — it only
serves to underscore the advice
we are receiving as to how grim
the circumstances are and how
potentially difficult the times



ahead are," said Mr Christie. "The
government is obviously facing
what appears to be an unprece-
dented deterioration of the econ-
omy of the Bahamas, and that's
strong. The Americans describe
the impact on their economy as
the worst since the Great Depres-
sion which is again strong. I sus-
pect that the prime minister is
warning the country that there are
further difficult times ahead and
he is unable to predict the extent
to which it will go and the duration

of the difficult times."

About two weeks ago, Mr
Ingraham told Parliament that
government revenue collection for
the first quarter of 2009 was "dis-
astrous". He added that the coun-
try is facing "the most challeng-
ing” economic factors that most
Bahamians have ever seen.

Last week Mr Christie, with a
delegation of Opposition mem-
bers, met with representatives of
the International Monetary Fund.
While he declined to get into the

specifics of that meeting, the for-
mer prime minister said their dis-
cussion reflected similar state-
ments the group had previously
made to government and the Cen-
tral Bank.

"The meeting was a briefing of
what happened and we have
agreed that essentially the views
expressed by them at this stage
are still confidential. That is
because it leads into the govern-
ment's preparations of the budget
next month," he said.

CUMENICAL SERVICES

FROM page one

these are indeed challenging times
and can empathise with prudent
measures, we emphasise that the
government established a bold
precedent by signing off on the
industrial agreement contracts for
BEC and BTC in these very same
challenging times.

“This action, or inaction, on
their part speaks volumes to our
members!”

The union leaders said the press
conference was prompted by Min-
ister for the Environment Earl
Deveaux’s failure to respond to a letter sent on March
13, addressing union concerns and requesting a five per
cent salary package of the contractual period from July
2007 to June 2010 after government offered a 4.5 per
cent salary increase at the end of last year, and then
replaced it with a zero per cent offer until 2010.

Outraged union leaders argued employees are not
able to meet the rising cost of living without a corre-
sponding pay increase.

They disputed government claims that the
increased subsidy from $19 million to $30 million allo-
cated to the Water and Sewerage Corporation (WSC)
went towards their salaries, as it was instead spent
on construction of the Blue Hills Reverse Osmosis
(RO) plant which has increased the WSC’s power
costs to its detriment.

Earl Deveaux



Water and Sewerage

manager over the last six years for ineffective organ-
isation of the WSC.

A restructuring exercise intended for completion in
January, has not yet been implemented, Mr Rolle
said, and he argued an effective mains renewal pro-
gramme is needed to address the increasing number of
reports of rusty water and water shortages throughout
New Providence.

The WSMU president said: “Address the issues
that you should and having funds to pay your staff and
provide water throughout the islands will not be a
problem.

“Today we speak in unison as we amplify our call
for the government and executives to do the right
thing by our employees, this corporation, and our
country.

“Our corporation is beset with problems and the
government must address them. Not next week, not
next month, not next year, but now.”

Ms Kemp added: “We don’t have any wish to
harm the Bahamian people, we just want them to
hear our plight and be sensitive to our plight.

“We had no intention of taking a strike, we just
wanted to express our displeasure, but we are not
afraid of industrial action.”

John Pinder, president of the National Congress of
Trade Unions (NCTU), and his general secretary
Robert Farquharson also lent their support to the

. Matthew's Anglican Church



Reconciliation

7:30PM.



ea) re ae

Church & Shirley Street

PALM SUNDAY - April 5th - 7:15am Eucharist, Blessing of
Palms and Sermon; 10:00am Blessing of Palms, Procession
Eucharist, & Sermon; 7:00pm — Mission Service

MONDAY April 6th - 7:00pm — Stations of the Cross.

TUESDAY - April 7th - 7:00am Mass; 7:00pm — Service of

WEDNESDAY - April 8th - Mass 7:00am & 1:00pm at St.
Matthew’s. A Mass of the Chrism, Christ Church Cathedral at

MAUNDY THURSDAY - April 9th - 7:00pm Holy Eucharist,
Washing of Feet and Watch before the Altar of Repose.

GOOD FRIDAY - April 10th — 9:00am Liturgy for Good Friday;
12noon - 3:00pm Seven Last Words from the Cross.

EASTER DAY - April 12th - 6:00am The Great Easter Vigil &
Holy Eucharist; 10:45am — Solemn High Mass, Procession
(Within the church) LIVE RADIO BROADCAST.

7:00pm Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction.

er

For More Information Telephone: 323-8220



r

WSC unions.

And they blamed the lack of a permanent general

e SEE PAGE THREE

FROM page one

European Commission has not
accepted the offer made by the
Bahamas in terms of how much
of its trade in services this country
is willing to liberalise under the
EPA.

A team of technocrats from the
Ministry of Finance is now sched-
uled to meet and negotiate with
European officials in Brussels,
Belgium, on Thursday April 9th
— less than a week ahead of the
April 15th deadline given to this
country to complete its services
offer to Europe.

In view of the proximity to the
deadline, already one that has
been extended for the Bahamas
beyond that given to other
Caribbean countries, Mr Mitchell
yesterday claimed that “some-
body has messed up” and “there
is clearly a problem.”

“We are concerned about the
fact that the agreement itself may
be in jeopardy. A lot of work has
been put into bringing this to a
successful conclusion to protect
the access of crawfish into the
market and we want to make sure
this continues,” said Mr Mitchell.

Contradicting the EPA source,
Mr Mitchell said he does not see
Europe extending the deadline
again for the Bahamas.

Government officials have pre-
viously admitted that it was pri-
marily the intention to save
Bahamian exports, such as craw-
fish, from losing their duty free
access to the European market
that drove this country to sign
onto the wide-ranging EPA.

The Government, along with



Christ Church Cathedral
Schedule of Services for Holy Week & Easter
April 5th - April 12th, 2009
Sunday April 5th Sunday of The Passion & Palm Sunday

7:30 a.m,
8:45 a.m.

11:15 a.m.

6:1) p.m.

Distribution of Palms & Holy Eucharist
The Liturgy of the Palms

Procession & Liturgy for Palm Sunday

Blessing & Distribution of Palms
Holy Eucharist
Evensong, Sermon & Benediction

Monday April 6th - 1:00 p.m.

Holy Eucharist

Tuesday April 7th - 7:00 a.m. & 12:30 p.m.

Holy Eucharist

Wednesday April 8th - 7:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.

Holy Eucharist
7:30 p.m.

Liturgy of the Renewal of Priestly Vows & Blessing of Holy Oils

Thursday April 9th - Maundy Thursday 7:30 p.m.
Commemoration of the Last Supper, Washing of Feet &

Watch before the Altar of Repose

Friday April 10th - Good Friday 9:00 a.m.

The Good Friday Liturgy

Service Times For Sunday April 12th, 2009

Easter Sunday

6:00 a.m, The Easter Vigil
7:30 a.m, Holy Communion
9:00 a.m.

11:15 a.m.
6:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.
11:15 a.m.
:(M) p.m.

Holy Eucharist

Holy Eucharist

Procession, Solemn High Mass

Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction
Procession, Solemn High Mass

Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction



PLP concern

all other Caricom countries,
signed the goods portion of the
EPA in October of last year to
protect this industry, at the same
time committing itself to gradu-
ally reducing import duties on
goods coming in from Europe to
the Bahamas.

It was then given a six month
extension — until April 15th — to
complete its offer under the ser-
vices portion of the EPA, which
involves offering to open up trade
between the Bahamas and
Europe in services such as con-
struction or healthcare in return
for reciprocal benefits. But after
submitting its offer, it found that
Europe was not happy with what
was being put on the table. The
Bahamas is now being questioned
as to whether it will offer more.

Mr Mitchell criticised Mr Laing
for what he termed “masterful
obfuscation” in comments he
made to The Nassau Guardian
on the status of this country’s ser-
vices offer to the European Com-
mission.

While Mr Laing told the news-

paper that the country’s offer in
terms of how much of its trade in
services it is willing to liberalise
had not been rejected by Europe,
he submitted that it had not been
accepted.

But Mr Mitchell said: “If an
offer is not accepted then it’s
rejected, there’s no in between.”

“What we want to know is:
What were the terms of the offer
that has now been rejected and is
it true that our failure to meet
the deadline of the 15th of April
may jeopardise the entire agree-
ment and thereby put our fishing
industry at risk?” asked the Fox
Hill MP.

In contrast to earlier critics who
claimed the Government was giv-
ing away too much under the
EPA, Mr Mitchell suggested that
government may have tried to
limit its liberalisation too much
in order to protect Bahamian
industries.

“You have to show a good faith
effort of reciprocity...and I think
that is where the difficulty lies
today,” he said.

See today’s Business section
for more information on this
issue.

‘Harsh penalties’

FROM page one

your claim, they will then check your records to see whether or not you
are registered with this number, that these contributions have come in on

your behalf,” Mr Ingraham said.

“They may not be able to call each and every employer to see whether
or not (a claimant) was in fact fired, but they will have sufficient infor-
mation to be able to make a judgment, and while you might get that first
cheque before (the end) of verification, by the time as you come back for
the second one they ought to be able to verify what has happened.

"So there may be some cases where somebody may receive a benefit
that is not continued because of information that's discovered. The
truth of the matter is that there are always some people, a minority, who
seek to collect something that they're not entitled to — I don't want to
frighten anybody, but there are very stiff penalties under the National
Insurance Act for persons who do such things,” he said.

Mr Ingraham added that anyone found guilty of such an offence will
be made an example of in order to deter copycats. He urged those per-
sons who know they are ineligible to receive benefits not to apply.

Under the National Insurance Act anyone who knowingly makes any
false statement or false representation; or produces, furnishes, causes or
knowingly allows to be produced or furnished, any document or infor-
mation which he knows to be false in a material particular, could be fined
not more than $2,500 or imprisoned for not more than 12 months, or

both.

Applicants will be eligible for the benefit if they are currently unem-
ployed; under 65; not self-employed; able to and willing to work; were last
employed on or after July 1, 2004; not receiving other NIB benefits, oth-
er than disability or survivors benefits; and have made a certain number

of contributions to NIB.

Unemployed persons whose employer deducted contributions from
their wages but did not pay NIB will still be eligible for the benefit,
although the claim may take a little longer to be processed, Mr Ingraham

said.

The unprecedented unemployment scheme, set to come into effect on
April 20, will provide qualified unemployed persons with a maximum of
$200 per week for a maximum of 13 weeks at a time. During the 13-week
period, claimants must remain unemployed, be available and willing to
work, must not refuse suitable employment, an interview or training.

They will be subject to a review by the Department of Labour every
four weeks as long as they receive the benefit. Once people have
received unemployment benefit for 13 weeks they will be ineligible to
access such funds again for the next 52 weeks.

FROM page one

| Govt seeking to remove
| Mayaguana anchor

project ‘impediments’
FROM page one

development.”

“We’re really combing
through the agreement on
both sides to really see if we
can make any kind of adjust-
ments that would enable it to
move forward. (The develop-
ers) come back to us occa-
sionally on a number of items
for us to respond to and so far
we’ve done all we can to facil-
itate them,” said the minister.

Developers are progressing
with the island’s infrastruc-
tural requirements, but have
been “really slowed down”
when it comes to moving
ahead on the construction of
accommodation.

“That’s another matter,
because obviously you want
to get a return on that invest-
ment immediately,” said the
Minister.

Developers are in a strong
position financially, with a
“oreat deal of their financing
already identified” prior to the
present crisis, but Mr Van-
derpool Wallace suggested
that financiers generally want
to see an “uptick in global
conditions first before they
begin to advance the kinds of
things that are going to need
an immediate investment.”

Meanwhile, despite interest
from high end boutique hotel
brands in operating the
resort’s hotel once completed
remains “very strong”, Mr
Vanderpool Wallace said
there is yet to be any firm
commitment on this aspect of
the project.

“We are looking at a num-
ber of brand name hotel
developers that have been
down there and will continue
to go down there to look at
the site because it’s generally
agreed that it’s a wonderful
opportunity, but needless to
say in the kind of global envi-
ronment we have now very
few people are making those
kind of commitments imme-
diately,” said the minister.

Initial construction of the
grand “anchor project” —
heralded as being worth $1.8
billon in total — began on
Mayaguana in January 2005.

The project is ultimately
envisioned as including an air-
port, utilities, a marina village,
private condominiums and vil-
las, a boutique resort, as well
as “commercial, industrial,
social and educational devel-
opments and nature pre-
serves.”

A Heads of Agreement,
signed in March 2006, for-
malised the project as a joint
venture between the
Mayaguana Development
Company Ltd and the
Hotel Corporation of the
Bahamas.

Under the agreement, 9,999
acres of land on the island of
300 inhabitants was to be con-
veyed to the developers in
stages, and if they were unable
to meet agreed milestones,
would be re-conveyed to the
Government.

“They are continuing with
the infrastructural develop-
ment, with the airport and
road development, and they
are putting in place accom-
modations for people who
need to come down there to
see the project so they can
stay there comfortably.

“So they’re beginning to
put all the bits and pieces in
place to ensure that any
investor is clear that they are
committed to the project,”
said Mr Vanderpool Wallace.

As to a ball park comple-
tion date for the sprawling
development, the minister
declined to speculate.

“Tt’s hard to say,” he said.

Contacted yesterday for
comment on the project’s
progress, Mayaguana island
administrator Harvey Roberts
declined to speak with The
Tribune on the matter, while
resident project manager Tim
Haffner referred this newspa-
per to Boston-based Execu-
tive Vice President Stephen
Pritchard.

A message left for Mr
Pritchard was not returned up
to press time.

a helpful hand, and to do everything in our power to
provide a safe, secure and holistic environment that is
conducive to education at the Eight Mile Rock High
School,” he said.

Mr Bethel said that the teachers felt “stigmatized”
by the alleged events, which have been highly publi-
cised in the media.

He stated that Dr David Allen will begin the process
of giving guidance to teachers as to what the appro-
priate boundaries and limitations are when dealing
with students.

“With Dr Allen’s help, he is seeking to help teach-
ers find their bearings to know the danger zones, the
‘no go’ zones, to know what the limitation and bound-
aries are, and how to coordinate efforts offered by the
Ministry of Education.

“As we review the safe school manual...the Depart-
ment of Education in close consultation with Dr Allen
and other professionals will devise guidelines affecting
every aspect of teacher contact with students,” Mr
Bethel said.

He noted that teachers also will be given instructions
of what to do when a child comes to them in confi-
dence about a crisis.

Fight Mile Rock High School

Andre Birbal, a former art teacher, has been
accused of molesting two former students at Eight
Mile Rock High.

The Trinidadian teacher, who has fled the country,
is currently being sought by Bahamian police to be
questioned in connection with accusations of com-
mitting acts of unnatural intercourse.

Police have also launched investigations into alleged
molestation complaints against two other teachers
who have also been removed from the school.

Since the incidents, the Ministry of Education plans
to have all new teachers vetted by police.

Minister Bethel said that there was always an estab-
lished procedure requiring persons to submit a police
certificate or record to the Ministry of Education.

“That is usually a very good indicator of character.
Some teachers have served for many years, and the
teacher in question at Eight Mile Rock, Mr Birbal, was
there for more than 20 years,” he said.

Minister Bethel also held a meeting with teachers in
the entire district at 4pm at the Hilton Outten Con-
vention Centre at 4pm. He also met with PTA officials
at the Eight Mile Rock High at 7pm.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS

Sprinter has high hopes for
IAAF World Championships

No Bull
in Toronto
for college

recruitment,
exhibition

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

A 20-member team from
the No Bull Basketball Club
left town yesterday for a nine-
day trip to Toronto, Canada,
for a college recruitment and
exhibition series.

The trip is an annual one for
the club headed by Geno
Bullard, coach of the West-
minster Diplomats.

“This trip is more or less
trying to expose our guys to
the next level,” said Bullard
just before they departed the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport.

“We know that our boys
play a lot of basketball, but on
this trip, we will have a lot of
scouts and coaches from the
various schools in Toronto,
who will be there to watch our
boys in hopes of giving them
scholarships to attend their
schools.”

At least five schools, includ-
ing Seneca College, Humber
College, Ridley College, York
University and Shreidan Col-
lege are expected to be a part
of this year’s exhibition series.

While in Toronto, the play-
ers will also get to watch a live
National Basketball Associa-
tion (NBA) game between the
Raptors from Toronto and the
Philadelphia 76ers on Sunday,
April 12.

Also during the trip, the
team will visit Niagara Falls
before they are due to return
home on Tuesday, April 14.

No Bull, founded back in
2003, is based on the motivat-
ing philosophy of providing
fundamental skill develop-
ment instruction for young
student-athletes in the com-
munity (boys and girls) who
have a desire to compete in a
high level of basketball com-
petition.

Bullard said their pro-
gramme and all of their coach-
es are committed to providing
an opportunity for players to
expand both their knowledge
and their love for the game of
basketball in an environment
that teaches respect, team-
work, sportsmanship, commit-
ment and hard work.

He noted that their goal is
to strive for excellence, both
on and off the court.

The trip to Canada, accord-
ing to Bullard, will help to fur-
ther motivate the younger
guys, who make up the majori-
ty of the team as they start
looking towards their future.

“Hopefully this will make it
easy for them to make that
transition to the next level,”
Bullard said. “We have three
seniors who are graduating
from Westminster and a cou-
ple seniors who are in the club
to get them off to school.”

Through the trip, Bullard
said No Bull should be able to
accomplish its feat of bringing
about a balance with athletics
and academics for its players.

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SPRINTER Chamal Bethel
is in some unique company
training in Jamaica. By August,
he’s hoping to be running along
side them at the [AAF World
Championships in Berlin, Ger-
many.

Home to attend the funeral
service of his grandmother on
Saturday, Bethel said he’s look-
ing forward to turning in a good
performance when he competes
on August 18.

“This year, coach has already
seen some bad habits and he
started to correct them, so when
I go back, I will continue to
work on improving my perfor-
mances,” Bethel said.

For the first two years, the
23-year-old 2003 graduate of St
John’s College has been in
Jamaica training in the High
Performance Track Club camp
that features world champion
Usain Bolt.

But Bethel, who is studying

marketing and economy at the
University of Technology, has
switched to the MVP Track
Club, coached by Steve Fran-
cis and led by former world
champion Asafa Powell.

So far this year, Bethel has
ran in two meets, coming fifth in
the first event in the 100 before
he came across the finish line
first in the last meet.

He has done a season’s best
of 10.72, but he’s looking for-
ward to surpassing his personal
best of 10.69.

“T’m just trying to put togeth-
er my season,” he said. “The
passing of my grandmother has
really opened up my eyes a lot,
so I’ve decided to dedicate the
rest of the season to her.”

Bethel said he’s really thrilled
to have the opportunity to work
with coach Francis, who is very
sociable and makes sure that he
does the necessary things to be
competitive.

Nation-aside, Bethel said he
was even more surprised that
both Francis and the other
members of the Jamaican

Ma | ee



national training squad have
gracefully accepted and assisted
him in his preparation.

“Tt’s all about making each
other better,” Bethel said.
“They have been trying to learn
from our culture and they have
been teaching me some things
about their culture.”

On top of it all, Bethel said he
has forged a good working rela-
tionship with both Bolt and
Powell. In fact, Bethel said con-
trary to what might be per-
ceived as a rivalry between the
two top sprinters is actually a
cordial relationship.

“There’s a lot of talk on the
streets in Jamaica about who is
really the fastest man,” Bethel
said. “But they both spent a lot
of time around each other.

“They are close friends and
they are always interested in the
best for each other because they
know that at the end of the day,
it will be Jamaica who will be in
the forefront.”

Last year, despite nursing a
slight injury, Bethel came home
and finished second in the B
final of the men’s 100 at the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations’ National
Open Track and Field Cham-
pionships at the Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium.

With a chance to qualify for
the IAAF World Champi-



onships, Bethel is hoping that
when he comes home to com-
pete at this year’s Nationals in
June, he will get an opportunity
to finally make the national
team and join his former St
John’s team-mate Andretti Bain
and even possibly Tyrone
Sawyer.

“My goal is to eventually
become a world champion,”
Bethel said. “It might be a little
difficult right now, but I believe
that everybody will have their
chance to succeed and I’m just
waiting on my own.

“Derrick Atkins went and he
put us out, but we still have a lot
more sprinters like myself,
Adrian Griffith, Dominic
Demeritte and Jamial Rolle. I
just want to be able to compete
with these guys and make a con-
tribution to the national team.”

No doubt with the intense
training in the internationally
recognised camp, Bethel, the
son of Charmaine and Steven
Bethel, said he will be able to
produce some stellar times this
year.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

ALPHEUS ‘HAWK’ FINLAYSON, BAAAs president Curt Hollingsworth, Sports Minister Desmond Bannister, BSF president Algernon Cargill and Bahamasair general sales and market-
ing manager Mike Sands at Monday’s press conference...

ERROR CLR P ETc

FROM page 11

such requests as this, it means
that all of our operational
departments go into a full mode
of making major adjustments
to our schedule, particularly
with it being Easter weekend
and we had to take into consid-
eration that we have a number
of schedules that we have to be
able to maintain with integri-
ty,” he said.

“On behalf of the manage-
ment and the board at Bahama-
sair, we wish the teams all the
best and we will work closely
with national sports federations,
not just for Bahamasair to be
the carrier of choice on inter-
national routes but most defi-
nitely on domestic routes as
well.”

BSF president Algernon
Cargill said procuring the direct
charter to and from the games
for the team has been an event-
free experience for the first time
in his tenure as president.

“In previous Carifta (Games)
we have always had a problem
in trying to finalize the Bahama-
sair charter. I would be the first
to say this is the smoothest its
gone since I have been presi-
dent in 2003. The Ministry of
Sports came to the BSF very
early in the process and asked
us to outline what our needs
were and all we had to do was
pretty much outline to the min-
ister that we needed a charter
and frankly I have had a back-
seat from then and all of the
arrangements have been made
to the full satisfaction of the
BSF,” he said.

“Tt is important for our team
to arrive at an international
meet on the national flag carri-
er and it really gets the team
going on a positive feeling and
that can go a long way in con-
tributing to the performances
of the swimmers.”

Cargill said while the team’s
performances in the past have
warranted lofty expectations
from the Bahamian public, win-
ning the games and the even-
tual medal count is a secondary
goal for the team and the fed-
eration.

“The BSF is indeed proud to
have a 36-member team headed
to Aruba and what is significant
about our team this year is we
have a team of 36 qualifiers. In
other words every member of
our team has earned the right to
represent the Bahamas through

our qualification process. What
we are proud of is that the team
has done extremely well at
Carifta over the last five years,
even coming within a few points
of winning one year,” he said.

“The message we want to
leave the Bahamas is that while
our expectations are high for
this team, winning is not the
only important thing. What we
try to do in the Swimming Fed-
eration is create good role mod-
els and secondly ensure that our
swimmers perform at the best
level. We do not want to put
too much pressure on our swim-
mers. Although we really want
them to win it is not the most
important thing for us. What is
important is the team represents
the country well and also that
they perform at their best.”

BAAAs president Curt
Hollingsworth said the team is
eager to finally begin competi-
tion after weeks of diligent
preparation.

“The team that has been put
together they are ready and pre-
pared for competition in St
Lucia,” he said. “The athletes,
coaches and management team,
they are all prepared and the
association is 100 per cent
behind them.”

Travel Itinerary
for Carifta Teams

April 8 — Track and Field
team departs Nassau at 11am;
arrives in Provo at 12:15pm

- Teams depart Provo at 1pm;
arrive in St Lucia at 3:15pm

April 9— Friends and Family
members of Track and Field
team depart Nassau at 9:30pm;
arrive in St Lucia at 12:15am

April 14 — Track and Field
Teams depart St Lucia at 10am;
arrives in Provo at 12:15pm

- Track and Field Team
departs Provo at lam; arrives
in Nassau at 2:15pm

- Swim team departs Nassau
at 8am; arrives in Aruba at
10:30am

- Friends and Family mem-
bers of Track and Field team
depart St Lucia at 2:30pm;
arrive in Nassau at 5:15pm

April 20

- Swim team departs Aruba
at lpm; arrives in Nassau at
3:30pm

elebrating

years

and counting!”

SANPIN MOTORS THANKS ALL OF THEIR
CUSTOMERS AND FUTURE CUSTOMERS
FOR 30 YEARS OF BUSINESS AND SERVICE

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED oS THE SPOrrINANcING Wir

#209 Wl Rood
PO). Be Mudd,

1 (242) 39444? |./49) 393-8738

Thompson Blvd. + Oakes Field
t. 242.326.6977 * f, 242.326.6315

&, sanping@coralwave.com

COMMONWEALTH BANK

INSURANCE AWASLABLE WITH
ADVANTAGE SURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS.LTD,


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender
Fuel oil tank erection &
Associated Works
Bailey Town, Bimini

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders far the abowe named serviced

Bidders are required ta collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed ta:
Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on of before
30th April, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tondor No, 689/09
FUEL OF<“L TANK ERECTION & ASSOCIATED WORKS
BAILEY TOWM, BIMIMI

The Corporation reserves the right
fo accept of reject any or all proposals,
For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, comtact

Mr, Kermit McCartney at telephone 302-1247



SPORTS

Donnie Martinborough wins SPORTS
International Sunfish Masters =

@ By DIANE PHILLIPS

THREE-time Sunfish world
champion Donnie Martinbor-
ough sailed to victory in the
International Sunfish Masters
championship in late March,
beating a field of 55 sailors and
achieving the one goal that had
eluded him in a nearly-perfect
career, a victory in American
waters.

“What made this personal
feat so special was that it with
all the racing over all the years,
including 10 wins in Bermuda
Race Week and three world
championships in different
countries, it was the very first
time that I won on US soil,”
said Martinborough, who out-
sailed and out-manuevered
more than 50 Sunfish sailors
from the US and a handful
from other nations in the age
40 and over event held in Tam-
pa Bay.

Martinborough, 49, was the
only Bahamian who compet-
ed in the 9-race series. Based
on low point scoring, with the
right to discard one race, Mar-
tinborough finished with only
13 points of the eight scored
races.



THREE-time Sunfish World Cham-
pion Bahamian Donnie Martinbor-
ough, who also holds an unbreak-
able Bermuda Race Week sailing
record with 10 titles, added anoth-
er chapter to his legacy in March,
beating a field of 55 to win the
International Sunfish Masters event
held in Tampa, Florida. He went on
to take third overall in the Sunfish
Mid-Winters, at 49, finishing a
close third to the seven-time Sun-
fish world champion, Eduardo
Cordero of Venezuela and four-time
defending champion David Mendel-
blatt of the US...

Two-time defending cham-
pion Tim Whitehurst of Pen-
sacola, Florida, finished sec-
ond with 18 points, tied with
Anne Edwards, also of the US,
with 18 points. In the case of a

“What made this personal feat
so special was that it with all the
racing over all the years, including
10 wins in Bermuda Race Week
and three world championships
in different countries, it was
TOM YOM YM NTSB TUCO INTL
I won on US soil.”

— Donnie Martinborough

Save BIG Right Now!

2008 FORD EVEREST

2.5 Turbo Diesel Automatic, Leather,
LOADED - 7 oe

3 years or 65K warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty
and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

2008 FORD RANGER )\ —
2.5 Turbo Diesel/Standard Shift
LOADED

as $32,848.00
NOW $28,700.00

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and
licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOWTHAT S REALL A/ =3[ |(@Deal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com





tie, the person with the highest
number of best finishes takes
the higher spot.

According to Martinbor-
ough, who now has 14 inter-
national titles, the greatest
challenge was wind — too little
of it.

“We had light and variable
winds the entire series,” said
Martinborough, “so my starts
were extremely difficult. There
were one or two races where I
got into trouble early so I was
pleased to recover and turn in
a respectable finish.”

Martinborough said recent
intensive training preparing for
the 2009 world championship
slated for the Bahamas in
October helped him fight his
way back after less than perfect
starts.

“The start line was really
crowded. You’ve got 55 boats
trying to cross the line at one
time and with light winds,
you’ve got to make a clean
start and search for clear air
as fast as you can.”

For the slightly-built sailor,
light winds were a disadvan-
tage, but recent practice, he
said, paid off.

“We've been doing a lot of
local sailing as a build-up for
the upcoming world champi-
onship with good competition
from local sailors who continue
to push me, so I think that
helped keep me sharp and
focused,” said the sailor, who
has to balance his hobby with
career — he’s a director of
Bahamas Realty where he is
responsible for its commercial
and property management
division — and his role as hus-
band and father of three young
children.

The red-headed super Sun-
fish sailor who holds the
unbreakable record of the
most wins of any class of sail-
boat in Bermuda Race Week
in the 20th Century, also won

BRIEF

BASEBALL
JBLN UPDATE

THE Junior Baseball
League of Nassau contin-
ued its regular season over
the weekend at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex
with the following results
posted:

TEE BALL

Raptors 17, Blue Claws 13
Grasshoppers 18, Sand
Gnats 16

Sidewinders 19, Knights 5
COACH PITCH
Diamondbacks 14, Angels
3

Blue Jays 5, Astros 4
Athletics 13, Cubs 1
MINOR LEAGUE

Rays 12, Royals 10

Mets 10, Rockies 9
MAJOR LEAGUE
Reds 8, Indians 4
Marlins 6, Mariners 6 (Tie
Game)

JUNIOR LEAGUE
Yankees 11, Dodgers 9
Twins 15, Cardinals 8
SENIOR LEAGUE
Tigers 13, Pirates 10
Rangers 10, Phillies 6
Tigers 12, Pirates 11 (Re-
Scheduled Game)

the title of Apprentice Mas-
ters International during the
Davis Yacht Club event.

With those wins behind him
in Tampa, he went on to the
Sunfish Mid-Winters in nearby
Clearwater, Florida, where he
finished third overall out of 60
boats. That series was won by
Venezuelan Eduardo Cordero,
seven-time world champion.

Second place went to David
Mendelblatt of the US, four-
time defending champion.

“Tt was a real achievement
to go to the US Nationals and
compete and finish a close
third behind these two guys
who are considered the best in
the world,” said Martinbor-
ough. “But no matter what
happens, it’s always just an
honour to represent the
Bahamas.”

Teleos basketball teams to take
part in North America tourney



SHOWN (I-r) are Teleos Christian School students with Mrs Brenda Bethel (left), senior manager at the Thomp-
son Blvd branch and Dr David Adams (right), administrator and assistant coach

Thanks to Scotiabank donation

THE senior and junior bas-
ketball teams of Teleos Christ-
ian School were scheduled to
travel to Toronto, Canada, on
April 6 to participate in the
biggest single bracket basket-
ball tournament in North
America.

And this trip was made pos-
sible through a financial dona-
tion from Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Ltd.

Dr David L Adams, adminis-
trator and assistant coach at

Teleos Christian School,
expressed his gratitude to Sco-
tiabank for this most generous
donation.

“As a result of this donation,
Scotiabank has created a won-
derful opportunity for our
young men to travel and to gain
more exposure in the field of
basketball” said Dr Adams.

Scotiabank is committed to

supporting the communities in
which we live and work.

Recognised as a leader inter-
nationally and among Canadian
corporations for its charitable
donations and philanthropic
activities, in 2008 the bank pro-
vided about $43 million in spon-
sorships and donations to a
variety of projects and initia-
tives.

All pedals set on bike race for cash

THE Grand Bahama Tank
Cleaning Company in coalition
with the Grand Bahama
Cyclists Club presents the First
Annual Me Clean’s Town to
West End Island Run Bike
Race April 18-19.

“Cyclists will traverse 85
miles from Mc Clean’s Town
into West End and overcome
the odds to prove themselves
victorious.

“They will suffer and they will
toil and in the end, one shall
prove himself above all claiming
an award above all else...victory.
On the line is $1,000 divided
among the victors,” according
to a statement.

At 6:30am Saturday, partici-
pants are expected to assemble
in the parking lot of Pepper Pot,
from where they will leave
together and drive into Mc
Clean’s Town.

Once in Mc Clean’s Town,
cyclists are to begin their trek at
10am from the police station in
Mc Clean’s Town and travel
into West End.

“This should be a fun and
exciting event as there are spot
prizes/cash incentives along the
route for which cyclists will be
competing along with a $150
prize to the cyclist who crosses
the line in first place,” said the
statement.

The event continues with a
12-mile time trial at 9am April
18 on the Grand Bahama High-
way near the airport round-a-
bout, followed by a junior bike
race. The winner of the time tri-
al will also receive a cash incen-
tive of $100.

“There are also cash awards
for overall winners. The road
race and the time trial will be
combined to form overall win-

ners for whom prizes will be
divided as follows:

¢ $200 to first place

¢ $150 to second place

¢ $100.00 to third place

“There are also trophies that
will be awarded to juniors and
novice competitors.

“As mentioned there is a
novice division for cyclists who
do not feel that they can make
the trek from Mc Clean’s Town
into West End. These cyclists
can come out on Sunday and
compete in a 24-mile circuit
event on the Grand Bahama
Highway that will be run along-
side the junior event.

“For those who do not wish
to compete they can also come
out to support this new event
that hopes to revive the sport
of cycling in Grand Bahama.
Participation is encouraged and
spectators are welcome.”
THE TRIBUNE

Sp

Carifta teams to fly

UESDAY, APRIL 7,

PAGE 11

r



ts

2009

nigh,

private with Bahamasair

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

he Ministry of Youth
"L'sers and Culture and
Bahamasair have
promised to ensure that both
junior national teams scheduled
for regional competition over
the next few weeks will arrive at
their destinations by way of the
national flag carrier.

Representatives of both enti-
ties announced yesterday that
teams for the Carifta Track and
Field Championships in St
Lucia and the Carifta Swim-
ming Championships in Aruba
are scheduled to travel to both
respective venues courtesy of
private charters provided by
Bahamasair.

The 61-member track and
field squad leaves for St Lucia
at 1lam on April 8, while the
36-member swim team departs
for Aruba at 6am April 14.

While the swim team will
travel direct on the nearly three-
hour flight to Aruba, the track
and field team, en route to St
Lucia — as per its agreement
with the Turks and Caicos Min-
istry of Sports — will make a
brief stop in Providenciales to
pick up their country’s national
team.

The charter flights for both
teams will make the Bahamas
the only country in the region to
ensure their teams arrives under
the nation’s flag carrier.

Minister of Youth Sports and





Photos: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

SPORTS MINISTER Desmond Bannister presents BAAAs president Curt Hollingsworth with a cheque...

Culture Desmond Bannister
said the Carifta format is vital in
the development of great senior
athletes of the future.

“T want to thank the BSF,
BAAAs and Bahamasair, for
being such co-operative part-
ners of the ministry in ensuring
that the Bahamas is well repre-
sented at this year’s Carifta

SPORTS MINISTER Desmond Bannister presents BSF president Algernon
Cargill with a cheque at Monday’s press conference...

COM

Whopper Jr.

Double
Cheeseburger

BLT & Cheese

Games,” he said.

“Tt is a critical event for the
development of our young peo-
ple. If you look through the his-
tory of the Carifta Games you
will see that almost every one of
our major athletes who have
attained success at the interna-
tional level have come through
this competition.”

Bannister, whose ministry
pledged approximately $200,000
to assist both federations in
their endeavours, said giving the
athletes a sense of pride in their
travel even before competition
begins is influential in their suc-
cess.

“We believe it is important
that athletes from this country
embark on foreign soil in their
national flag carrier,” he said.
“There is no other country in
the region that does this, so the
Government of the Bahamas
should be able to be congratu-
lated for giving that sense of
pride to our athletes.”

Bahamasair general sales and
marketing manager Mike Sands
said the company was thrilled
to become a part of this ven-
ture and insisted they would

Re 7 «|
ib 30S

Includes Fries &

160z Soft Drink

Ham & Cheese

5pce Tenders

Add a

120z Milkshake

°y
2 Cookies for .99¢

Village Rd. Roundabout * Harold Rd. * Prince Charles « Frederick Street North » Cable Beach

become more involved with
national team travel with other
federations as well.
“Bahamasair is very pleased
to be apart of this national
effort. When Bahamasair gets

SEE page 9



Sprinter has
phigh hopes

for IAAF World

| Championships...

See page 9



















































Business Hours:

April 6" -9th 8:00am - 8:00pm
Snappers, Jacks, Goggle Eyes,
Grunts, Turbots, Margaret,

Kits or Retail available ‘Sold by weight

Advanced Payment required for all Cleaned kits
Groupers, Crawfish, Conchs, Shrimps, Salmon All

Pn and Ready To Golly,
- o-_ ne

Carmichael Road: 341-3664 |

Eden Street: 325-0116

One way arly!

Grand Bahama ;

baco &

Now until Mday 37st

Exuma

Monday through Thursday
and Saturdays only.

a |

Frequent Flyer members get

when they fly during this period.
rr

Come fly your airline today!

Reservations:

242-377-5505

Book Online:

www.bahamasair.com



a Wr chan’ fat Aly beara, Wivte lie: ee

®
a
°
Og
PAGE 12, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS





THE CROWD enjoys a night of entertainment, featuring fashion, fun and music, during the fundraising event
‘A Wave of Fashion’ held to support the work of BASRA Grand Bahama.


























ie ca CHONG faa alate

HUNG! Pai ee) =

ool
uy

4 i
san)
fe een)
ar” = vi

i Veen
u os t

noaaiile
ier ee:

Pan
AC re oe

CHOICES

Your Plan fora Balanced Lifeâ„¢

Receive a FREE Healthy Choice eco-friendly green bag
when you bring in 2 Healthy Choice soup labels, or 1 Healthy
Choice Café Steamers Box into the d'Albenas Agency Ltd.
located in Palmdale. otter good white cupplies tact.

www.healthy choice.com

Healthy Choice is a registered
Trademark of ConAgea Foods international.

#Â¥ The dAlbenas Agency Ltd.



‘A wave of fashion’

BASRA FUNDRAISER A HUGE SUCCESS

xan}
z
=!
ma]
any
feb)
=
=
rob)
feb)
Sz
oy
>
a
a”
I
[a
=
=
=
{ae}



BASRA GRAND BAHAMA CHAIRMA Justin Snisky
(right) presents a bouquet of flowers to the newly-
crowned Miss Grand Bahama Garelle Hudson (left)
who made one of her first public appearances at ‘A
Wave of Fashion.’

MODEL SHELLY shows off an original hat design called
‘Tropical Paradise’ by Carlaynae Designs at ‘A Wave of
Fashion’ held at Tides Mansion as part of the fundrais-
ing event for BASRA Grand Bahama.

MASTER OF
CEREMONIES
for the
evening of
J fun and
fashion David
Wallace, who
kept the
=) crowd

} entertained
through the
night. The
fundraising
event was
created to
support the
mm work of
BASRA Grand
Bahama.

For more than a century we've done
more than issue policies

weve kept

Our promises.

Confidence for Life

acm
ne
Colinalmperial.

376.2000) 356.8900 wa coalriaencerkal cor

bee pees lee Bate gece
pr eee aye)






ZHIVARGO LAING

Bahamas starts
process for WI10
full membership

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas has submitted
its Memorandum of Trade
Regime to begin its accession
to full World Trade Organisa-
tion (WTO) membership, the
minister of state for finance con-
firmed to Tribune Business yes-
terday, the start of a three-five
year process that will integrate
this nation’s economy with a

SEE page 4B

THE TRIBUNE

USINESS



TUESDAY.

AO RT ei

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

EU seeks ‘possibilities’
on retail liberalisation

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

iberalising the retail industry to
enable European companies to
set-up operations in the Bahamas
“will not happen”, the minister
of state for finance told Tribune
Business yesterday, with this newspaper able to
reveal that the European Union (EU) is seek-
ing further concessions in the construction,
computer systems, advisory services and for-
eign/international law sectors.

While unable to confirm the specific sectors
in which the EU is seeking movement from
the Bahamas in relation to its Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA) services offer,
Zhivargo Laing confirmed Tribune Business’s
reports that the Europeans are seeking “more
concessions” from the Bahamas on mode three
- commercial presence, or the ability of Euro-
pean firms to establish their own operations in
this nation.

While he “can’t be confident” that the
Bahamas will reach agreement with the EU
on its services offer by the April 15, 2009, dead-
line for all negotiations to be concluded, Mr
Laing said he was optimistic the issue would be
resolved to the satisfaction of all parties.

When asked by Tribune Business whether
failure to meet the April 15 deadline might
jeopardise the Bahamas’ membership in the
EPA, and the ability of its businesses and entre-
preneurs to access its various trade prefer-
ences/benefits, Mr Laing said there was noth-
ing in the treaty or in law to indicate this might

* Minister says this will not happen, as
Europe seeks EPA movement from
Bahamas on construction, computer
systems, advisory services and
foreign/international law sectors

* Commercial presence the key, with EU
concerned on Bahamas’ services offer
not going as far as they thought, not
matching on-ground reality and being
subject to policy rather than law

* Minister uncertain on whether
April 15 deadline met; hopeful
EU will grant extension

* Says fisheries industry need not worry

be the case.

Urging the Bahamian fisheries and crawfish
industry not to worry, this sector having argued
that duty-free access to EU markets is key to
maintaining its competitiveness, Mr Laing said
he felt the EU would give the Bahamas an
extension on its services offer once it saw it
was negotiating in good faith.

Yet one source close to the negotiating
process told Tribune Business that the EU had
rejected the Bahamas’ initial services offer,

Bahamas working
on the ‘breadth and
depth’ of its tours

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas is “already
down the road” in creating new
and improved excursions and
tours for visiting cruise passen-
gers, the minister of tourism and
aviation told Tribune Business
yesterday, adding that concerns
over the “breadth and depth”
of these attractions accounted
for 80 per cent of a cruise indus-
try presentation he attended
recently.

Arguing that it did not make
sense for Bahamian tour/excur-
sion operators and the cruise
lines to adopt “adversarial”
positions in their efforts to max-
imise the economic returns
from the industry, Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace said his min-
istry had been attempting to
achieve a solution acceptable
to both sides since autumn 2008.

The minister told Tribune
Business that it was vital for the
Bahamas to “continue to grow
the number of tours and excur-
sions it provides for visiting
cruise passengers, given that it is
a relatively mature destination
due to the frequency of cruise
ship calls - especially on the
three and four-day voyages
from Florida.

Concerns on issue dominate
‘80 per cent’ of cruise lines
presentation, as minister
urges industry and Bahamian
excursion operators not to
adopt ‘adversarial’ positions

“Tt was brought to our atten-
tion that we don’t have the vari-
ety of tours given the number of
passengers that come here,” Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace said, a
cruise industry concern that was
amplified by the fact that many
passengers were not first-time
visitors to the Bahamas.

This issue, he said, accounted
for much of a presentation he
witnesses in attending a Febru-
ary 2009 meeting of the Florida-
Caribbean Cruise Association
(FCCA), the industry trade
body that represents the major
cruise lines such as Carnival,
RoyalCaribbean and Norwe-
gian Cruise Lines.

“T personally went to an
FCCA meeting in February, a
couple of months ago, and 80
per cent of the presentation had
to deal with this issue,” Mr Van-
derpool-Wallace said. “I asked

SEE page 2B

AIRPORT INDUSTRIAL PARK, TURNKEY OFFICE
BUILDING #4797 The main building features 12 executive offices,

reception area, boardroom, secretarial pool area and small warehouse

space. Plus detached building used as a lunch room. Five minutes from

International airport. Ample paved parking for clients and employees on
enclosed | acre site. ASKING $1,800,000. MOTIVATED SELLER.
Mark.Hussey@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.9193

Damianos

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Member of
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | #242.322.2033 | The Bahamas MLS





SEE page 4B

ROYAL FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

Family Guardian’s
key solvency ratio
now stands at 218%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FAMILY Guardian’s presi-
dent yesterday told Tribune
Business that the company’s
key solvency ratio currently
stood at 218 per cent, well
above the 150 per cent mini-
mum regulatory threshold, the
company’s A- (Excellent) finan-
cial strength rating having been
reaffirmed by A. M. Best.

The leading international
insurance credit rating agency
also reaffirmed Family
Guardian’s ‘a-’ issuer credit rat-
ing, and Patricia Hermanns said
the fact that the firm had “the
highest rating available to any
[life and health insurer] in the
Bahamas” would further
enhance the BISX-listed com-
pany’s competitive positioning.

Confirming that Family
Guardian’s Minimum Contin-
uing Capital and Surplus
Requirement (MCCSR) stood
at 218 per cent at year-end 2008,
well above the 150 per cent
supervisory target, Ms Her-
mamnns said: “We are very, very
strong in terms of capital, and
the MCCSR measures that. We
are very well positioned for
financial strength.”

Court defers ruling over $330m claim

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Supreme Court has
deferred a decision on whether
a $330 million claim against a
Bahamian bank and trust com-
pany should be reinstated, with
both sides asked to prepare sub-
missions on whether a party can
proceed with foreign litigation
without the court’s leave, then
return to lodge a claim in a
Bahamas-based liquidation.

Investors in a fraudulent US-
based Ponzi scheme, called
Cash 4 Titles, are appealing the
decision by Leadenhall Bank &
Trust’s liquidator, Craig ‘Tony’
Gomez, to reject their $330 mil-
lion claim against the bank after
they were awarded that sum in

Judge questions whether defrauded investors can
pursue foreign litigation against Bahamas bank
without court’s leave, then try to lodge claim in
this nation, after entity placed in liquidation

a default judgment by the US
District Court for southern
Florida.

In his judgment, Senior Jus-
tice John Lyons said that while
he had “little difficulty” accept-
ing that judgments in foreign
courts were “in most instances,
enforceable in the Bahamas”,
his main difficulty was Section
194 of the Companies Act
(Chapter 308).

This section in the Bahami-
an law said that when compa-
nies were ordered wound-up,

Make it a reality.

or a provisional liquidator
appointed, no legal actions
could proceed or start against
them without the Supreme
Court’s permission.

“What has occurred here is
that the applicants proceeded
with their action in Florida,
notwithstanding that they did
not have leave to do so,” Justice
Lyons found.

“As can be seen, there was
an intervening event between

SEE page 5B

Prime Income Fund

e A higher, stable rate of return

e Long-term capital preservation

e Lower risk investment

PP

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

Pel Ase)

e Diversified portfolio

* Insurer retains top A. M.
Best ratings, although
concerns expressed on
mortgage investments
and financial services
division performance

* BISX-listed firm’s head says
mortgage investments down
2% as percentage of total
invested assets, while
financial services concerns
relate to expansion and
rise in death claims that
has now tapered off

Explaining its rationale for
Family Guardian’s ratings, A.
M. Best said in a statement:
“The affirmation of the ratings
are based on Family Guardian's
favourable risk-adjusted capi-
talisation, profitable aggregate
gains from operations and its
marketing presence as one of
the leading life insurance com-
panies in the Bahamas.......

“The trends in profitability
and stockholders’ equity con-

SEE page 6B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



e Professional fund management

We can get you there!

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



USNS eee
Bahamas working on the ‘breadth and depth’

FROM page 1B

them specifically what we need to put
in place to be more competitive in this
area.”

The minister added that the cruise
lines had been “very good in working
with us to put this together” when it
came to the Bahamas offering a
refreshed, expanded
tour/excursion/getaway product that
would enhance its appeal to cruise pas-
sengers.

That, though, may not ease the con-
cerns harboured by members of the
Bahamas Association of Shore Excur-
sionists (BASE). Jeffrey Beckles, its
executive director, in a presentation
to the Grand Bahama Tours Associa-
tion last week, said the increasing
development of private island destina-
tions by the major cruise line is having
a “devastating impact on Bahamian
small businesses”

Many vessels were either bypassing
Nassau/Freeport altogether or using
them as second ports of call after
already mining their passengers’ pock-
etbooks, Mr Beckles said, and while
the number of cruise arrivals to the
lines’ private islands were increasing,
they were declining elsewhere.

He added that there was a “massive
duplication of local tours at private
islands, and restrictions placed on local
vendors in selling their own tours”.
This had the net effect of ensuring that
all tours and excursions provided on
the private islands were controlled by
the cruise lines, along with the prices,
to the exclusion of Bahamian-owned
tour operators and their employees.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace yesterday,
though, said Bahamian tour and excur-

sion providers still had “the opportu-
nity to sell tours to cruise passengers
that are different from the experiences
on the private islands”.

“Much greater breadth and depth”
when it came to tour options was
required, and comparisons needed to
be done with what the cruise lines were
offering to ensure a point of differen-
tiation existed.

However, Tribune Business under-
stands that a number of Bahamian-
owned excursion providers have seen
the cruise lines cancel long-standing
contracts for their services within
recent months, and there is mounting
concern among both BASE members
and Bay Street merchants about the
increasing tendency of cruise passen-
gers to be shipped to Atlantis’s Par-
adise Island attractions once they dis-
embark at Prince George’s Wharf -
bypassing their businesses altogether.

This, needless to say, is continuing to
negatively impact small Bahamian-
owned businesses, which are consid-
ered the lifeblood of the Bahamian
economy.

It is also understood that BASE and
others are concerned about the cruise
lines’ increasing demands for price cuts,
and that their cash flow could be
impacted by the lines’ decision to pay
for services via wire transfer - a process
that could take several weeks to clear.
In the meantime, Bahamian business-
es must find the wherewithal to pay
for crucial supplies.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace acknowl-
edged that it was “extremely” impor-
tant for Bahamian businesses to earn
their share of the rewards from the
cruise ship industry. He added: “This is
one of those areas where the over-used

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

IHTERNATIONAL BANK

Pe ee RS eS

phrase, win-win, is true.”

With the cruise lines enjoying 100
per cent occupancy on their voyages to
the Bahamas, and finding it hard to
increase yields, selling more tours -
and earning commissions from doing so
- was one way to enhance financial per-
formance.

This - getting more cruise passen-
gers off their vessels - was exactly what
the Bahamas and its toiur/excursion
providers needed, Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace said, as it would enable them
to maximise customer numbers and
business revenues.



And an improved product would
also improve per capita cruise passen-
ger spending in the Bahamas, which
according to 2007 numbers stands at
$73 for Nassau and $57 for Grand
Bahama. Increasing these per capita
yields is critical for the well-being of
the Bahamian tourism industry and
wider economy.

As a result, both sides needed to
come together and work with each oth-
er for the common good, rather than
adopt adversarial positions, the min-
ister suggested.

Mr Beckles’ presentation warned

of its tours

that the “economic pic slices” earned
by Bahamian-owned tours and excur-
sion providers continued to dwindle
as a result, given that cruise lines and
their passengers either bypassed Nas-
sau or arrived here after the lines had
exhausted their spending power on the
private islands.

The Ministry of Tourism’s 2008
arrivals report, which has been
obtained by Tribune Business, appear
to bear out Mr Beckles’ concerns.

For the year, the only destinations
that saw an increase in cruise passenger
arrivals were the private islands. Cast-
away Cay on Abaco saw a 58.1 per
cent rise in arrivals to 149,389, com-
pared to 94,511 the year before.

The Berry Islands, which boasts
RoyalCaribbean’s getaway, Coco Cay,
saw a 9.87 per cent growth in cruise
arrivals to 401,718 compared to 366,321
in 2007, while arrivals to Half Moon
Cay near Cat Island grew by 11 per
cent to 299,792, compared to 270,159 in
2007. All those figures were for first
port of entry only.

In contrast, Nassau/Paradise Island
saw a 10.2 per cent decline in cruise
passengers calling as a first port of
entry in the Bahamas, the numbers
falling from 1,638,174 in 2007 to
1,471,835 in 2008.

Focusing on just December 2008,
the Ministry of Tourism’s report noted
that for the month, cruise arrivals to
Nassau/Paradise Island were down by
2 per cent, while arrivals as a second
port of call increased by 45 per cent.

“A number of cruise ships went to
Nassau/Paradise Island as a second
port of call, however, rather than a
first port of call,” the Ministry of
Tourism found.

NRO NGS aS Vi esy
YOU NEED A CERTAIN BANK.

LOCAL BANK.
INTERNATIONAL
Sia Guia P

With all that security behind you, there’s a sure future ahead.

Te Ae ica: sl elele ner mela

“~ FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE.

TOGETHER.

FirstCaribbean International Bank is a member of the CIBC Group.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS CSCS
Bahamas must convince EU to accept offer Concerns over fisheries sector

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Government has no
choice but to convince the
European Union (EU) to
accept the Bahamas services
offer as a part of its commit-
ment to the Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA), the
incoming Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce president said
yesterday.

Khaalis Rolle told Tribune
Business it was in this nation’s
best interest to reach an agree-
ment with the EU to secure
the EPA’s trade benefits.

The EPA, establishes the
trade rules between the EuU
and CARIFORUM countries,
is a replacement of the Con-
tonou Agreement and creates
reciprocal trade benefits
between the two parties.

The EPA bundles traded
goods and services into one
agreement. They are not mutu-
ally exclusive, which means
that signing on to the agree-
ment binds CARIFORUM

Genesis accountant
passes Series 7 exam

countries to offer both goods
and services for trade.

However, when the
Bahamas signed on to the
agreement it was not prepared
to offer services to the EU for
its approval, and an extension
was negotiated and penned
into the agreement.

Now, according to former
minister of foreign affairs, Fred
Mitchell, this country’s initial
services offering was “reject-
ed” by the EU and could jeop-
ardise the entire agreement if
not amended and resubmitted.

According to sources close
to the Bahamas Trade Com-
mission, the original services
offer that was rejected was not
“comprehensive” and was
“woefully inaccurate”.

“There was no real thought
and consideration that went
into it,” the source said.

The source added that the
Government had ample time
to put together an acceptable
services offer, as the ground-
work had already been done
and funds were available to
solicit technical trade exper-



Khaalis Rolle

tise from abroad.

Mr Rolle said if the
Bahamas’ service offer was
rejected, the Government and
private sector would need to
consider the EU’s reasons for
rejection and create a suitable
agreement. He added that
implementation of the EPA

should be as transparent as
possible. “This process,
because it is a national one,
needs to be open and trans-
parent,” he said. “The Minister
(Zhivargo Liang) tends to be
open in his discussions.”

Mr Rolle argued that the
private sector did not yet seem
to be concerned about the han-
dling of the services offer, but
most have not had the luxury
of seeing what the EU has
objected to.

Nattalie Rochester-King,
who at the CRNM examines
the interest of CARIFORUM
countries and the European
Commission, assured this
paper yesterday that “in diplo-
macy anything can be negoti-
ated,” referring to the
Bahamas’ late approach to the
EU for consultation, with such
a rapidly approaching dead-
line.

“Negotiations often consist
of several engagements in
which improvements are
requested, and the flexibility
of the other party is always
tested,” she said.

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

QUESTIONS were raised yester-
day by the former foreign affairs min-
ister as to the fate of the fisheries
industry should the Bahamas default
on the Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) with the European
Union (EU).

Fred Mitchell said there was a need
for “full and frank disclosure” from
the Government on what was hap-
pening with the EPA.

"What we are told is that the Gov-
ernment made mistakes in their offer,
and the offer is unacceptable to the
EU,” he said.

Should the European Commission
not accept the Bahamas’ services
offer, it is feared that the agreement,
signed in October, will become
defunct and destroy this nation’s lob-
ster exports into the EU.

For the moment, however, the
Bahamas and other CARIFORUM
countries involved in the EPA can
presently enjoy the benefits of the
agreement.

A Caribbean Regional Negotiating
Machinery representative, speaking
at an EPA seminar put on by the
Bahamas Chamber of commerce last

week, said this nation and other CAR-
IFORUM countries can already begin
to benefit from the signing for the
agreement.

Lincoln Price said the nations who
signed on to the EPA are already
enjoying duty free, quota free treat-
ment in the European Union market.

“By 2010 all of our products that
are certified by CARIFORUM coun-
tries will receive this duty free, quota
and free trade into the EU market,”
he said.

“We are starting to comply with the
obligations that we have signed on
1,”

Mr Price said that whenever the
services obligations are met by this
country, management consultants,
engineers and persons engaged in the
music and creative industries will like-
ly benefit greatly.

“Tt provides more certainty in terms
of the market access into Europe than
we had before in the arrangement that
is called the Contonou, which is the
trade and development deal that pre-
ceded the EPA,” said Mr Price.

He said participating countries will
list specific sectors that they will facil-
itate business with European service
providers in, and omit sectors that will
be remain as it exists in the offering
country.

The Annual General Meeting of the Medical Association of
The Bahamas will be held at MAB House,
6th Terrace Centerville on
Monday, May 4, 2009 at 6:00pm.

Election of Officers for the Executive Council for

2009 - 2010 will be held.
Members are reminded that they must be in good standing (all
membership fees paid) in order to vote.
All doctors are encouraged to take part in this important meeting.



AFUND accountant with Genesis Fund Services, Sharene Gaitor, has passed the Series 7 exam after studying
with the Nassau-based Nastac Group. She can now apply for registration with the Securities Commission of the
Bahamas after passing the Series 7 exam, which is administered by the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and
FINRA. Ms Gaitor is pictured above with Reece Chipman, the Nastac Group’s managing director.





The Parish Church Of The Most
Holy Trinity

Trinity Way, Stapledon Gardens * P.O. Box N-§696 “ Nassau, The Bahamas
Telephone: [242] 328-B677 / 322-6578 * Fax: [242] 322-657!

HOLY WEEK AND
EASTER SERVICES

MAUNDY THURSDAY

Soup & Hot Cross Buns [$8.00]

The Commemoration of the
Institution of The Holy Eucharist

with Washing Of Feet and Holy Communion

GOOD FRIDAY
The Celebration of the Lord's Passion, Divine Liturgy - Addresses on The
Passion and Holy Communion

HOLY SATURDAY AND EASTER EVE
Blessing of New Fire, Lighting of Paschal Candle, Liturgy of The Word,
Renewal of Baptismal Vows, Holy Baptism

EASTER SUNDAY

THE SUNDAY OF THE RESURRECTION

Holy Eucharist

The Solemn Eucharist Of The Resurrection Of Our
Lord, Senmon, Holy Communion

Festal Evensong & Benediction

Rector:

Venerable E. Etienne €. Bowleg, Ph.0., O.B.E., J.P
Assistant Curate:
Rev. Fr. Mervyn Johnson, B.A, 8.Th., M-TH.
Associate:
Rev. Fr. John Kabiga, 8.A., B.Th., M.Ed



Run iia ey

Dr. T. Barrett-President, MAB



in Daytona Beach, Florida.
| Apply for admission on April 16, from 7-9 p.m., at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel, One Bay St., Nassau.

Download required documents at www.daytonastate.eduw/bahamas.html
and bring them with you on April 16.

Ear your Associate of ArtsUniversity Transfer degree, or stucly Hospitality and Culinary
Management, Camputer Science, Business Administration, Allied] Health and much

Enjoy varsity sports, student activities and cultural events. Make lifelong friendships
with American and fellow international students frarn all over the world.

or e-mail admissions @DaytonaState.edu

It'S not too late to
tateside:

! "up. =i ‘i
‘Sine, 8a, 28s i"
co ee “Na,
Trea “th fi
tear
See eee ee e edn nt
an oe 1eoy ee i
ee eee
ee

Se sellin

k ee hw, tt

ene ; Dai eeaue lin,

iaeesee igen

Sea alin. Tn
SRL eaaE 7





ging
ame

= Earn Your Degree Stateside at Daytona State College, 4
4

mare!

*Closetohome *Expertfaculty * Personal attention

* State-of-the-art facilites * Scholarships available! a
om

Experience whal it’s like to be a collage student living in the heart of Daytona Beach,

Florida - the World's Most Famous Beach! |

a
o
iz
:

eel
call (386) 506-1471
PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EU seeks ‘possibilities’ on retail liberalisation

FROM page 1B

and that without it this nation
did not have a complete EPA
agreement.

The Bahamas was supposed
to liberalise at least 75 per cent
of its services industries in the
EPA, and the source said: “The
offer just did not meet the
requirements and the agreed
percentage amounts to be lib-
eralised by the CARIFORUM
group.

“There is no EPA agreement
without a complete services
offer,” the source added,
explaining that unless the

Bahamas met the required
thresholds for liberalisation “it
can be rejected by both the
CARIFORUM and EU par-
ties”.

Tribune Business was told
that the EU and its members
states “were asking for greater
concessions and liberalisation
in mode three”, commercial
presence, especially on advisory
services, foreign and interna-
tional law, computer reserva-
tion services and construction
services.

“Tt was claimed that the EU
wants mode three possibilities
under retail, which is against

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FAYD HOLDINGS LIMITED

—— )—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of FAYD HOLDINGS LIMITED has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE



the National Investment Poli-
cy,” the source said. “The
CARICOM Regional Negoti-
ating Machinery wanted more
mode three commitments under
financial services and telecom-
munications.”

However, Mr Laing shot
down any possibility that the
Bahamas would open up its
retail sector - traditionally
reserved for Bahamian owner-
ship only - to EU companies.

“Even if they raised that,
that’s a non-issue for us,” he
explained. “That will not hap-
pen. It’s not something we will
consider.”

Behind the scenes, Tribune
Business has learnt that the
matter is more complex than it
appears. The EU’s concerns on
mode three commercial pres-
ence stem, at least in part, from
its confusion on why the
Bahamas has made no commit-
ments to liberalise industries -
such as construction services -
where the Government has
already given permission for
certain foreign companies to
operate.

As a result, Tribune Business
can reveal that the EU is having
difficulty in understanding why
the Bahamas’ services offer
appears not to have gone as far
as the reality on the ground, and
liberalised more sectors for
European firms to establish a
commercial presence.

In addition, the EU’s con-
cerns also revolve around the
fact that much of the Bahamas
investment-related regulations
are contained in policy, not
statutory regulation. As a result,
the EU fears that access to the

Notice is hereby given of the loss of Bahamas Government Registered Stock Certificates as

follows:

Stock
1. Bahamas
Registered
Stock

2. Bahamas
Registered
Stock

Interest Rate
6.000% A.P.R.

Certificate No.

0.15625% A.PR. 75335

43024 2009

Maturity Date Amount

$500,000

$164,000

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement certificate. If this certificate is found,
please write to P.O. Box CB12-407, Nassau, Bahamas.

CHANDLER GILBERT

INSURANCE ASSOCIATES LIMITED

CONSULTANTS

BROKERS

Chandler Gilbert Insurance

Associates is a new insurance

brokerage firm founded on the

wealth of insurance industry

knowledge and experience of

AGENTS

OFFICE
#20 Montrose Avenue

co-founders Victor Chandler

and Guilden Gilbert.

At Chandler Gilbert

We have the expertise to handle
the unique insurance needs of a
wide range of clients

We have relationships with
domestic and international insurers

and brokers that enable us to

solutions

P.O. Box N-7753

Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: (242) 676-2306/7

Fax: (242) 323-5788

VICTOR CHANDLER
victor@cgiacaribbean.com

GUILDEN GILBERT
guilden@cgiacaribbean.com

deliver cost-effective risk financing

We are not too big to provide
personal, client-friendly service

Experience a new way fo meet your
private and commercial insurance
needs. Visit, call, fax or e-mail Us at
your convenience. Our clients never
call us at the wrong time.



Bahamian market for its com-
panies will be subject to political
whim, with no certainty in law,
and it wants this also to be clar-
ified.

Confirmed

Mr Laing effectively con-
firmed the latter aspect, telling
Tribune Business yesterday:
“Broadly, I think the issue is
one of further concessions
sought in mode three in certain
areas. The essential point is that
we did not make as many offers
as they thought we would make,
given our National Investment
Policy.

“We have a very open invest-
ment and trade regime, and
having that reflected in a trade
agreement does not challenge
us in any fundamental way.

“What we sought to do was to
avoid making any commitments
in aservices offer, even where it
was consistent with the Nation-
al Investment Policy, because
we anticipate codifying the
same by putting it in a Bahamas
Investment Law.”

Mr Laing explained that if the
Bahamas did not make a liber-
alisation commitment under the
EPA, its National Investment
Policy would still apply, and the
Government would decide
which foreign companies could
operate in the Bahamas.

That, though, is not good
enough for the EU. “People
want certainty. They prefer that
[investment policy] to be
enshrined in the agreement. If it
is put in statute, it will accom-
plish the same thing,” the min-
ister added.

“It’s for us to be able to dis-
cuss with them [the EU] our
rationale going forward, doing
what we have done, and give
them some assurances going
forward in our thinking on this
matter, so it’s up for discus-
sion.”

In addition, Tribune Business
understands that the Bahamas
is adopting a tough negotiating
stance, having submitted an
EPA services offer that was
designed not to give everything
away. The agreement it will ulti-
mately conclude with the EU
will form the baseline for all
future trade agreements, includ-
ing those with the US, Canada
and World Trade Organisation
(WTO) membership.

Mr Laing hinted that the EU
had been late in responding to
the Bahamas’ services offer,
saying it had been submitted to
the CRNM in November. This,
he added, was thought to be suf-
ficient time for further negotia-
tions prior to April 15, but the
EU’s response had only been
received in February 2009.

When asked whether the
Bahamas was likely to meet the
April 15 deadline, Mr Laing
said: “Well, I can’t be confident
that it will all be resolved by
April 15, because there is a
short time between now and
then, and discussions have to
be held. Iam very confident the
matter will be resolved.”

Adding that he was not aware
of any treaty text or law stating
that April 15 was set in stone,
the minister said: “That is some-
thing to be considered. We are
striving to meet that deadline,
and I don’t believe it will be

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PERTUS INT’L
INVESTMENTS LTD.

—— 6—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PERTUS INT’L INVESTMENTS LTD.

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
IMPACT HOLDINGS LIMITED

— 5—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of IMPACT HOLDINGS LIMITED has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Rea



impossible or difficult, if it’s
being resolved, to get it extend-
ed - especially if the EU shares
the view, as I believe they will,
that we are earnestly seeking to
have the matter resolved.”

Mr Laing said there should
be “absolutely no concern” on
the fisheries industry’s part
regarding the EPA, as the
Bahamas would come to an
agreement on the services side
to add to the goods.

“All that’s left to do is agree
with the Europeans on the
extent of our offer, and I’m sure
that will happen,” Mr Laing
said.

He will not be going to Brus-
sels on Thursday. The Bahami-
an delegation will be led by
Simon Wilson, the Ministry of
Finance’s director of economic
planning, along with a Bahamas
Trade Commission representa-
tive.

Bahamas starts
process for WTO
full membership

FROM page 1B

rules-based trading regime.

Zhivargo Laing, when con-
tacted by this newspaper, con-
firmed: “We’ve submitted it.”
He added that the Memoran-
dum of Trade Regime, the doc-
ument that sets out this coun-
try’s legislative and policy
framework relating to all trade-
related matters, had been sub-
mitted to the WTO in Geneva
“at least a month ago”.

Mr Laing said it was likely
that the Bahamas’ accession to
full WTO membership was like-
ly to take three to five years, a
normal timeframe for the
process.

The WTO, which is the body
that oversees the global rules-
based trading regime, is now
forming a committee to “over-
see” the Bahamas’ WTO acces-
sion process. This will be the
body that, in the first instance,
the Bahamas will have to nego-
tiate with over its terms of
accession, and the economic
sectors it will have to liberalise
to foreign companies and com-
petition.

Mr Laing explained that the
committee would be formed
from representatives of nations
who both currently traded with
the Bahamas, and might have
a future interest in trading with
this nation.

“The most critical thing about
the WTO accession process is
that the WTO represents the
basic, fundamental trading plat-
form for trading in the world,”
Mr Laing told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“All the trading partners we
have in this country, or might
have, trade off this platform. It
just makes sense for us at this
point, given the evolution of
international affairs to join that
platform. It makes all future
trade arrangements subject to
that platform.”

Full membership in the
WTO, Mr Laing explained,
would bind the Bahamas into a
global rules-based trading sys-
tem, providing it with certain
privileges and rights, but also
imposing obligations on it, too.

Bahamian businessmen and
companies, and their counter-
parties abroad, would be able
to trade in a more predictable,
rules-based environment, the
minister explained, something
that should enhance trade vol-
umes and relationships.

Estate |

WEEE ieee UCU UIC CELL ALOT coe ego LCL

Everywhere The Buyers Are!

a

Tel: 502 2356

for ad rates


THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 5B



Court defers
ruling over
S 330m claim

FROM page 1B

the commencement of their
action and judgment. That was
the placing of Leadenhall into
liquidation. On that event tak-
ing place, Section 194 became
relevant.”

The Class 4 Titles investors
had initiated their action on
March 30, 2005, alleging that
Leadenhall had provided finan-
cial services to the Cash 4 Titles
scheme in the knowledge that it
was a fraud. This was denied by
the Bahamian bank and trust
company.

While Leadenhall initially
defended its case, it dropped
out of the Florida proceedings
after it was placed into receiver-
ship, then liquidation on
November 25, 2005. This was

communicated to the bank’s
Florida attorneys by Mr
Gomez’s attorney, Sidney Cam-
bridge of Callender’s & Co.

The default judgment was
then obtained on September 10,
2007, and this is what the Cash 4
Titles plaintiffs - through their
attorneys, Dr Peter Maynard
and Jason Maynard - are now
seeking to have enforced in the
Bahamas. They effectively want
their claim to join the Leaden-
hall creditors queue.

Justice Lyons wrote in his rul-
ing: “What I am having diffi-
culty with is whether or not a
foreign litigant, who proceeds
to obtain judgment in a foreign
jurisdiction without the grant
of leave, is then able to come
back into this jurisdiction and
prove his debt in a liquidation

here.

“Tt seems to me to be likely
that persons placed in a similar
position within this jurisdiction
could not proceed to prove the
debt by reason of having con-
tinued with their litigation with-
out the grant of leave first hav-
ing been obtained.”

The judge said that in the
Cash 4 Titles investors’ case, “it
could surely be argued that, by
the use of the foreign judgment,
it has obtained an advantage
that would most likely be
unavailable to a person holding
a local judgment”.

Justice Lyons said the main
question to be answered was
whether the Cash 4 Titles
investors, “having continued the
Florida proceedings, arguably
without the need for leave to

do so, can now come back into
the jurisdiction, absent that
leave, and successfully prove
their debt in a liquidation in this
jurisdiction?”

He added: “I would think
that, as I have said, if this were
just a local question relative
only to local proceedings and
parties, that a party continuing
legal proceedings notwith-
standing the stay would have
some difficulty in enforcing any
judgment obtained in those pro-
ceedings where they have pro-
ceeded without the leave of the
court first being obtained.”

Justice Lyons told attorneys
for both parties to assess this
issue, prepare and submit fur-
ther submissions on it, and then
reconvene before him at a later
date.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, PATROVE PATRITROUVERE
PHERGUSONT, Freeport, Bahamas intends to change my name
to KRISTINA BIRGITTA UTBULT. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LAURETTE DERISIER of
PALMETTO AVE., P.O. BOX N-9426 NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should

send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7 day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

WANTED
SALES MANAGER

for a manufacturing concern.

Job requirements:

Bahamian - 35 years or older
College Graduate

Strong communication skills (oral & verbal)
Computer literate

Capable of motivating 20 + staff to achieve
company’s goals.

Willing to work bong hours.

Excellent personal skills necessary for promoting
customer and employee relations.

Salary commensurate with experience and
performance

> ae
Nassau Airport
Development Company

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

PRC SM dT
ea MEA
MIR) rere ya TEL

All applications will be treated in the strictest of confidence,
Send applications to P.O. Box CB-11392.

eee al

A Bahamas based IT Company is seeking
the employment of a Network Management
Professional with at least



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSETTE DORSAINVIL
of MOUNT TABOUR ESTATE OFF NASSAU VILLAGE,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7" day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following
items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for
the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

*5 years experience in a senior position.

* Must have MCSE 2003 certification or better
and with security certification a plus.

* Must be able to work and travel internationally

* Must be able to work and meet deadlines

* General Knowledge of programming

* Must have project management skills

* Must be versed in most areas of network
communications

* Must have good written and verbal
communication skills

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

NOTICE is hereby given that ROYANN CYRILEAN PEDICAN of
PORT-au-PRINCE, HAITI is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
awritten and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 31th day of MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRAC] BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci brisby@nas.bs

Please send all resumes and reference via
email to HR @itbahamas.com

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that: -

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BEOKEBAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
Pre:

COM TAT

ROYAL S FIDELITY

(a) TONOSHA S.A. is in dissolution; oeer a ere it 4

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 6 APRIL 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,638.56 | CHG -0.08 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -73.80 | YTD % -4.31
FINDEX: CLOSE 805.27 | YTD -3.55% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
Abaco Markets 1.28 1.28 0.00 0.127
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992
Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95 0.00 0.244
Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.105
Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055
Cable Bahamas 12.55 12.55 0.00 1.309
Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83 0.00 0.249
Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.45 6.45 0.00 0.438
Consolidated Water BDRs 2.50 2.42 -0.08 0.099
Doctor's Hospital 2.09 2.09 0.00
Famguard 7.76 7.76 0.00
Finco 11.00 11.00 0.00
FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45 10.45 0.00

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 30th day of March, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308
East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

0.240
0.598
0.322
0.794
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Focal (S) 5.07 5.07 0.00
Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00
ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

FBB17 0.00 7%

FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%

FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60
‘i 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00
1 . zi 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35
Five Steps To Change: Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NA _V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $

1.3664 0.95 4.77

2.8962 -1.49 -3.35

1.4489 1.06 4.63

3.3201 -1.94 -11.33

12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59

1.0000 0.00 0.00

9.1005 0.06 -13.33

1.0440 0.80 4.40

1.0364 0.33 3.64

1.0452 0.76 4.40

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Securi Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

WASTE - ED

Litter Does Not Just Happen - It Is Caused. i
-0.041 0.300
0.000 0.480 N/M

0.001 0.000 256.6

4.540
0.002

0.000 9.03
0.000 261.90

* Think Clean - Only in the bin

* Pick Up - Pick up litter and put in a bin

* Get Invioved - Support community and
national clean-up activities

* Be Aware - Litter hurts our economy and our
standard of living

* Speak Out - Report littering to the Police or
the Department of Environmental Health

NAV Date
28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
27-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

52wk-Low
1.3041
2.9230
1.3847

Fund Name Yield %
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.1564 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

A MESSAGE FROM THE MINISTRY OF
THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
iS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



























































UT t=
Last Name:
Company:

First Name:
Title:

Work:
PO.Box:

Telephone # Home:

Fox #:
Exact Street Address:

House #:
House Colour:

House Name:
Type of Fence/Wall:
Requested Start Date:

No matter what your schedule is
See ee eerie el ae ec

POWER

3 MONTHS | 6 MONTHS | 1 YEAR

“Rewarding. My work at The Tribune is creative and challenging. I enjoy

contributing to the look of our newspaper, while meeting the needs of

our advertisers. | enjoy working here. The Tribune is my newspaper.”

The Tribune

ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

Family
Guardian’s
key solvency
ratio now stands
at 218 per cent

FROM page 1B

tinue to remain positive, with
growth in stockholders’ equity
over the past five years, despite
dividend payments. Family
Guardian's three core business
segments, home service, finan-
cial services and group division
led by BahamaHealth, provide
business diversification and
competitive advantages in a
generally limited and mature
marketplace in the Bahamas.”

On the downside, A. M. Best
warned: “Partially offsetting
these positive rating factors are
the continuing weak operating
results Family Guardian report-
ed in 2008 from its financial ser-
vices segment, the volatility and
risk inherent in its health busi-
ness and the high concentration
of mortgage loans relative to
total equity, with increasing
delinquencies attributed to the
current weak economic envi-
ronment.

“However, A.M Best notes
that Family Guardian has con-
sistently decreased its exposure
to mortgage loans, as a per-
centage of invested assets, over
a five-year period, and delin-
quent loans past due over 90
days have decreased during
year-end 2008.

“Additionally, the mature
nature of the Bahamian
life/health market and the cur-
rent weakness in the Bahamas’
economy may impede Family
Guardian's potential for organ-
ic growth.”

Tackling each of those points,
Ms Hermanns said A. M. Best’s
comments on its financial ser-
vices segment, which chiefly fea-
tures its ordinary life division,
related to an increase in death
claims experienced during 2008,
coupled with increased invest-
ment and expenses associated

with growing that business.
“What we are looking at is
the exponential growth and
expansion of our financial ser-
vices division, which is the
newest division Family
Guardian has been involved
with,” Ms Hermanns explained.
She added that with the
increase in its agency force,
Family Guardian’s ordinary life
division had been “growing very
rapidly” in recent years.

Claims

On the death claims, Ms Her-
manns said the increase in this
area had impacted Family
Guardian’s profitability in 2008,
but “that slowed in the final
quarter, and certainly we’re see-
ing much lower levels in 2009,
so that was a short-term issue”.

Death claims, she added,
often went in cycles, and other
Bahamian life and health insur-
ers had experienced a similar
cycle - a surge in death claims in
2008, with a tapering off in 2009.

Health insurance by its very
nature was volatile when it
came to the claims experience,
while Family Guardian’s mort-
gage investments as a percent-
age of total invested assets
stood at less than 50 per cent
at year-end 2007.

Out of the company’s total
invested assets of $125 million,
between $50-$60 million were
mortgages, placing the percent-
age at between $50-$60 million.

Ms Hermanns said mortgage
assets as a percentage of total
investments had fallen by 2 per
cent at year-end 2008, com-
pared to 2007, while the level
of delinquencies had “fallen a
couple of basis points” during
last year. This, she said, was “a
major achievement in this mar-
ketplace”.
PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





RIDING:HOPE








@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

NORTH Eleuthera this past week-
end was transformed into a cancer
fighting mecca where more than
400 bikers and 150 volunteers took
part in the forth annual Ride For

Hope (RFH) cancer initiative.

The popular bike-a-thon first started in 2005,
serves as a cancer support group with a major
focus on raising awareness of the illness, as well as
hosting similar fundraisers intended to assist in
research and care.

Susan Larson, a co-founder for the initiative,
said RFH was born as a result of her and her
brother’s desire to start something similar to the
cancer awareness movement started after cyclist
Lance Armstrong announced he had cancer.

She explained: “There is a natural affinity
between fund raising and cancer largely because of
Lance Armstrong, and many people now use
cycling as a way to raise money for some of the
major illnesses.

Mrs Larson said 2006 was the launch year for
the event drawing in around 100 people, and since
then it has grown to over 400 participants.

“Over the past three years, we have raised over
$700,000 for cancer care, cancer treatment, and
cancer research in the Bahamas,” she said.

This year the event was so heavily supported,
that the organisers were forced to turn down many
persons hoping to take part.

T he route for the non-competitive bike-a-thon
ran from the North Eleuthera airport heading
through Queens Highway, and went as far south as
Palmetto Point.

Bikers were also given the choice of riding 20,



HALFWAY through their journey, these
bikers make their way up one of the

F many hills along Queen's Highway.

30, 50, or for the truly fit 100 miles for the event,
with around eight cooling stations along the way.

With the numerous scenic views throughout
the island, Tribune Features spoke with many per-
sons who shared stories of loss, support, and hope
for those affected by cancer.

Along the way, we met up with Domonic
Thompson from Glinton Sweeting O’Brien, work-
ing as a volunteer offering aid to bikers at the
five mile stop set in front of A & R ice-cream
parlor.

She explained: “Volunteering to me means giv-
ing from yourself, your time and energy, and just
to help someone else.”

Mrs Thompson said although she has not been
personally affected by cancer, volunteering in the
RFH is an important cause, “because this sickness
can show up at any time with a family member or
friend, so you just want to be prepared and insure
that someone is helped along the way.”

Further up at the 10 mile cooling station, we
spoke with cycling trio Averny Fernander, Gladys
Fernander, and Erlene Cartwright. While they
were all taking part for the general purpose of
raising cancer awareness, they explained that can-
cer has touched very close to home as they had all
lost their grandfathers to prostate cancer, and
have since pledged to the cause.

Also riding for hope was Speaker of The House
and North Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith who said
the RFH was an important initiative for all
Bahamians.

He explained: “It is always good when we can
do whatever we can to help our brothers and sis-
ter, and this RFH means alot to me because I
have had family members, particularly young ones
who have died of cancer.”

Mr Smith added that the 22 mile ride he com-
mitted to was a chance to get some much needed
exercise, and was definitely a challenging but also
a rewarding experience for him.

We're Cooking Up Savings For You!

AVANTI

Refrigerators

11.0 Cu Ft
Apartment
Refrigerator
ONLY

318] uu

SHOP ON-LINE
www.taylor-industries.com

Visit Taylor Industries Showroom
and find Name Brand Appliances
at GREAT prices with functions
and styles you like!

AVANTI
Water Coolers
Free Standing

$25000 Hot/Cold

Counter Top

a Kl

30” Gas Range from

15 CF Refrigerator - white

18CF Refrigerator - white
TOP Fre@ZOfiissssssessssessen $955

7 CF Chest Freezer.............+ $570

Washers

*742

Dryers

Moh

We Accept
VISA,
ECT or 1 1
SUN CARD &
DISCOVER

10 CF Chest Freezer.......$715
15 CF Chest Freezer..$1,012

Stack Washer/Dryer
from $1,748

10a
Cer RS Cel <)
white

Sooo La

ENA TUL US L SS

SHIRLEY STREET ¢ TEL: 322-8941
OPEN: MON - FRI 7:30 am - 4:30 pm ¢ SAT 8:00 am - 12 noon

J

Further up at the Gregory Town 20 mile
rest stop, a massive celebration was held by
local residents who shook cow-bells, served
food, and offered overwhelming support to
bikers braving the humid Eleuthera weather.

Although there were some bikers who were
unable to complete their cycling targets, there
were numerous mobile assistance crews as
well as ample food, medical assistance, and
cheering squads at the finish line area.

Organiser said the event which was her-
alded a success, would not have been possible
» without the help of its many sponsors. They
include Odyssey Aviation, Glinton Sweet-
ing O’Brien law firm, The Rotary Club,
Kerzner International, White Crown Avia-
tion, Pictet bank and trust, and many others.

TAKING a breath at the 10 mile cooling station,
Erlene Cartwright, Averny and Gladys Fernander
pose for the camera while remembering their
grandfathers who died from cancer.






















Lignum Institute of Technology

Harbour Bay Shopoing Plass. Cast Bay Street

Pic 353-2164 Fa: 354-497 1

AutoCAD 2009
etrodaction & brtenmedate Course
nif Si)

Certhed Intemational Propert Vanagenvent Course
AAP PT Tifa
bd

Certited Rick Management (Course
1a
wag

â„¢ r F Pe
F | a
, d sd i x !

| ie |

Baba BE O
Frelece @anasteegl

wae Sa

ee

For Quer Aer Flee eat
Cand buy
lieenng. Ga fia
Pa Gt Phe Face: dT
ewe’ peeererh er
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 9B



HEALTH



The Tribune

B





‘Unhappy Marriages' may
well have caught your eye
for many reasons. You may
identify with some or all of
the ideas and positions.
Needless to say each mar-
riage is unique and to sum
all of the complexities
would be naive and neglect-
ful to the individualism of
each relationship.

Some of us may have entered mar-
riage with longing; unhealed wounds,
unmet needs and other unfinished
business that we secretly hoped our
beloved would heal. Many of us hold
our partners responsible for our own
happiness and it is often this disap-
pointment of unfulfilled expectations
that causes such deep unhappiness.
Marriage is such an intimate connec-
tion and the tension thread between
the needs of the individual and the
relationship are often difficult to

Myths about
oily skin



THERE'S no shortage
of myths when it comes to
oily skin. Get the factsto
further your understanding :
of how to really keep oil i
under control.

Myth 1: Oil can be con-
trolled by stripping skin
with harsh, drying ingredi-
ents such as alcohol.



in

negotiate for some couples. The tug of
war becomes a constant battle over
who is the winner and loser, things are
black and white and the whole con-
cept of a 'win win’ solution for all
involved is lost. It is this dealing with
conflicts that often causes unhappi-
ness. As relationship therapists we see
the effects of this as one partner
becomes or is seen as being overly
demanding and the other person with-
draws and becomes non communica-
tive. This often produces a cycle
where each person's behavior makes
the other worse. Hurt and fear take
root and motives are questioned.
Over time the bond becomes weaker.
This erosion of the intimate bond has

far reaching effects than most can see
or admit to. How we interact with our
children, families and work colleagues
all too often result from our personal
and marital happiness or unhappiness.
In previous weeks we have dis-
cussed some the essential ingredient
for a happy relationship- being able to
express yourself, effective listening
and the deepening of couple intimacy.
To be able to open yourself requires
such vulnerability and can only be
achieved in an atmosphere of trust.
This trust comes about when we know
that we have access to our partner for
our own individual needs and must
then result in reciprocal accessibility
for them. Remember true intimacy is
two sided and only achieved between
two equals. These needs generally
include money, time, energy, and mat-
ters of the heart such as acceptance,
attention, love and sex. If we feel we
can not guarantee access or in fact are
denied access to any of these areas
and a deep intimate bond has not
been established, then fear and hurt
creep in and a damaging cycle can be

created. Perhaps trust in your partner
has been tested and stretched to full
capacity. You may in fact have closed
down some doors. Just remember that
it is possible to forgive and trust again.
Trust can be rebuilt, even after a
painful betrayal, but it requires hard
work. It may not happen quickly and
may take many years but keep in
mind that facing these fears will make
you stronger, more emotionally
mature and a more loving person. To
be able to control ourselves emotion-
ally requires great insight into what
makes us behave and react in a cer-
tain way. Exercising this self control
allows us to become assertive and put
forward our needs in an appropriate
manner. We then do not need to dom-
ineer and control all those around us
and we are rewarded by a happier
home life.

There is no doubt that the length of
time this unhappiness has been
allowed to calcify is often indicative of
the ability that a couple can resolve it
with out professional help. One of the

first areas to become affected by the
cycle of access and control is the sexu-
al relationship and the intimacy. Sexu-
al problems such as low desire, little
or no sex, orgasmic or erectile prob-
lems, or infidelities are often psy-
chosocial and often not physiological.
Some times the presenting problem is
not the cause and it takes careful and
gentle questioning to reveal the main
complaint. It is possible to work at
and resolve a lot of these problems
with the help of a trained professional.
Keep in mind that there is no shame
or weakness in getting help -just great
intelligence.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a
Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical
Sex Therapist located at The Centre for
Renewing Relationships, Grosvenor's
Close West. She can be contacted by
calling 356-7983 or by e-mail at relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com or at www.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com. She is available for
speaking engagements.

Iron Network relationship building summit

choose the relationships that are right for you!

IRON NETWORK, a multifaceted
organisation designed to help women
discover their purpose and specific
assignment on the earth, will be host-
ing a Relationship Building Summit
at the British Colonial Hilton, April
25, from 8.30pm to 4.30pm.

Sherika Brown, CEO and Founder
of the Iron Network, told TheTribune
that the event, being held under the
theme, “Choose The Relationships
That Are Right For You”, is specifi-
cally designed to help women discov-
er relationships that will assist them in
the facilitation of their purpose.

She explained that in order to suc-
ceed at anything in life you need the

right environment to function effec-
tively and noted that the right envi-
ronment consists of the right people.

“We want to help women under-
stand why relationships are important
in fulfilling purpose and destiny,” she
said. “We also want to equip women
with skills to identify characteristics
of healthy relationships. Our aim is to
assist women in developing quality
relationships that will enable them to
ignite, activate and refine their poten-
tial.”

Ms Brown said that the event is not
designed to just assist women in find-
ing the right intimate relationships but
to help women find the right relation-

ships in every area of life such as the
right mentors, the right bosses, the
right business partners, the right team
members, the right spiritual leaders
and also the right friends. She said:
“The quality of our life is the quality of
our relationships, hence, we must be
trained on how to choose relation-
ships wisely.”

Along with the Summit, Ms Brown
is partnering with local entrepreneurs
across the nation to showcase their
products and services.

This initiative will allow business
persons to further establish strategic

partnerships that will enable them to
grow their business and increase their

number of clients.

Ms Brown is a certified public
accountant employed with a leading
offshore banking institution in the
Bahamas. She is presently a member
of Bahamas Faith Ministries Interna-
tional and is in partnership with Spir-
it 92.5 Gospel; a local gospel radio sta-
tion in the Bahamas. Ms. Brown can
be heard every Thursday morning at
sam.

For further information regarding
the summit, persons can view details
on the network’s website at www.iron-
networkinc.org

http://www.ironnetworkinc.org or
contact info@ironnetworkinc.org.

FALSE. Stripping the
skin of oil can actually

cause an overproduction of :

oil. Why? Because skin's
trying to make up for and
replace what's lost! Those
who self-treat oily skin
with alcohol-based prod-
ucts often end up with
dehydrated, irritated, sen-
sitised skin.

Myth 2: Sunscreens
increase oil production.

FALSE. Speak with
your professional skin
therapist about new,
sophisticated formulations
that won't clog pores, and
even contain oil-absorbing
microsponges for the ulti-
mate in sun protection and
skin care benefits.

Myth 3: A little sun

exposure is ideal for drying

up skin.

FALSE. Sun exposure is
never good for skin. While
it may seem the sun pro-
vides a temporary “drying”
effect, sebaceous glands
will fire into overdrive to
help replace lost oil. The
result: more oil on the sur-
face than before.

MYTH 4: There's noth-
ing that can be done to
help control oily skin.

FALSE! Don't give up!
An oily skin condition is
just as manageable as any
skin condition. Speak to a
professional skin therapist
who can analyze your skin,
then provide a proper
diagnosis including a regi-
men of products and
lifestyle changes to keep
skin under control.

¢ Sarah Beek is a skin care
therapist at the Dermal Clinic.
Visit her and her team of skin
and body therapists at One
Sandyport Plaza (the same
building as Bally’s Gym). For
more information visit
www.dermal-clinic.com or
call 327.6788.

The month of April

WE can expect a distinct
warming up during the month
of April. Many of us will be
taking our first sea dip of the
year during the Easter holi-
day and the water should have
the nip taken off it. We can
also expect a thunderstorm or
two and to notice that the
grass is beginning to grow and
needs mowing.

Our vegetable gardens
should maintain their peak
production throughout April
and May but there will be dis-
cernible changes occurring
slowly. Tomato plants with
large fruits need temperatures
below 68 degrees F in order to
self-pollinate. We should have
precious few of them. The
slack can be taken up by
growing Italian type tomatoes
like Roma that will bear well
into the summer. Cherry
tomatoes, particularly the
large fruited varieties, also do
well and are large enough to
use for salads and sandwiches.

Our established sweet pep-
per plants will continue pro-
ducing but their fruits will
grow smaller. Bell peppers are
particularly susceptible to sun-
scald, even during the spring
months. Cubanelle peppers
take the heat quite well and if
sown during April will guar-
antee harvests into summer.
Some gardeners like to plant
their summer peppers, like
Cubanelles, in pairs so that
the foliage is increased and
helps shade the fruits. That
means, of course, that you will
have to increase the fertiliser
and water the double-sown
peppers receive.

New Zealand and Malabar
spinach can be grown starting
in April for cooking purposes
but, unfortunately, cannot be
enjoyed raw. We may be able
to squeeze another crop of
snap beans out of our garden

but thereafter it would be best
to grow snake or asparagus
beans, also known as yard-
long beans. These need some
form of support like a trellis
to do really well.

Probably the major garden
vegetable for this time of year
is corn. Instead of rows, corn
must be grown in blocks. Corn
likes very rich soil that allows
it to grow quickly. There are
few more rewarding garden-
ing experiences than picking
and shucking one’s own corn.

The annuals in our flower
gardens we have prepared for
Easter may have to be
changed to accommodate the

warmer months ahead. Most
of the annuals we grow in
summer also do well in fall,
winter and spring. Impatiens
tend do die back, as do some
of the more tender annuals.
Those that can survive into
and throughout summer
include cosmos, gerbera
daisies, vinca, marigolds, Mex-
ican sunflowers, gazanias and
zinnias.

New Guinea impatiens, cal-
adiums and gingers can also
be established this month. The
first two like a little shade but
many gingers can take full
sun. Gingers can be grown
from rhizomes but established
clumps of torch or shell ginger
(plus a few others) can be
divided and planted to form
anew colony. If you see some

“CHOOSE THE
RELATIONSHIPS

ke BIGHT or YOU"

edible ginger hands in the
supermarket that are sprout-
ing, buy them and bury them
about five inches deep. They
produce pleasant foliage and
delicate butterfly-like flowers.
When they die back you can
harvest the ginger root and
use it for culinary purposes or
dry them somewhat and then
re-sow them.

Citrus and fruit trees need
to be well fertilised in spring,
summer and autumn. As
April is the first full month of
spring, now might be a good
time to get the job done. Fer-
tiliser is best applied when the
ground is thoroughly wet.
Granulated fertiliser should
be applied at and slightly
beyond the drip line of the
trees in order to promote root

growth. The base of the trunk
should have an iron drench
applied to help overcome the
tendency of limestone soil to
tie up nutrients. Two tea-
spoons of Sequestrene 138
chelated iron in five gallons
of water is sufficient for a
mature tree, less for juveniles
or small citrus trees.

At the same time apply a
minor nutrient spray to the
leaves using a sticker/spread-
er to help the liquid adhere
to the leaves. Citrus leaves
are quite slick and benefit
most when stick-spreader is
used.

Once this chore is done you
can rest from your labours for
another three months. By that
time you should be picking
ripe mangoes.

April 25, 2009 « British Colonial Hilton « d:30e.m. - $:309.m.

tere ore ee ol tbe 1 ben ae ag m8 Teearn [ire oo dha Aly change gurls y

1 ican ib pores 2 pare ed ccladnrainps

Fa he oe bara ite Lie ie Loeb po ch at i pha fre ve

moecr gu el ile

[carn hires i rot ihe oye oH doc 2 bee.

ron 7] sae hee i Give ee pe ile rer De
= Domus bs Cel Ue oda bo Led pe GL
Tar Pore: ot Soy.

Fearuriog Artists: :
Sehemiah Dbeld & Richa Saumds

Tr wT 8 & E

=

wal Shera Foren
Sere

Fawr # a Fg

of Liye Wioteonel

De ee a i ee |
et be ee i Be ae ee |


PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009

Ala yo) sl Og

THE TRIBUNE



The} }

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

ITis no secret that a significant num-
ber of traffic accidents and fatalities are
caused by speedy and impatient dri-
vers.

It is only four months into the year,
and already the Road Traffic division of
the Royal Bahamian Police Force has
confirmed 19 traffic fatalities.

According to the coordinator of the
National Road Safety committee
Michael Hudson, the reality of 19 traf-
fic fatalities is well beyond those num-
bers of 2008 and 2007 during the same
period.

Mr Hudson explained: “In some cas-
es we are seeing where inexperience is
causing some of these accidents, as well
as persons driving without due care and
attention.

“Many of the accidents are happening
late at night, so one could assume that
people are coming from parties where
drinking and fatigue could be a factor...
and statistics are showing that we have
more fatalities in men than we have in
females.”

However one concerning trend, is the
number of young male drivers at fault in
these and other traffic incidents.

dieSpeed
Why do men love to speed

In this week’s Barbershop, Tribune
Features spoke with a group of guys at
Platinum Cutz on Mackey Street, on
the issue of men behind the wheel.

Patron Jason Fountain, a 25-year-old
resident of Winton, feels many of the
incidents of speedy and reckless driving
are mostly attributed to young
motorists.

Jason explained: “A lot of the older
generation who are 25 plus, they’re not
really the ones who are driving reck-
lessly and incoherently on the streets.

“T could speak of the days when I
was younger and had first gotten my
license, I was reckless on the road
myself, so I think it’s a mixture of both
young men and women who drive reck-
less and cause these fatalities.”

Jason recalls an incident where his
cousin was killed by a male driver, and
said the accident occurred because of
negligence by both individuals.

Jason said his cousin’s decision to
hold onto the back of a moving vehicle
while on roller blades combined with
the lack of attention by the driver lead
to his cousin’s death.

Although this tragedy has affected
him and his family, Jason said he hopes
that more drivers especially men, will
become increasingly aware of the dan-
gers of speeding.

Patron Ryan Stubbs of Winton

Estates, pointed out that apart from
incidents of speeding that take place
on many roads, one blessing in disguise
is the large number of pot-holes infest-
ing them.

The 26-year-old claims: “I don’t real-
ly speed, but if all the roads were
smoother, then everyone might just start
speeding, so it might be a good thing
that we have so many pot-holes in the
road.”

Looking at the issue of young and
inexperienced male drivers who are
commonly rated by insurance compa-
mies as more at risk drivers than females
in the same category, Ryan said
although the practice may not be fair to
all within that group, he feels these com-
panies have good reasons for their
actions.

“Most of the time a lot of young men
are under the influence of alcohol,
maybe smoking grass, and playing music
at the same time they’re driving, and
statistics speaks for itself.”

Ryan also recounted an experience in
his late teens where he was involved in
a severe car accident where the car he
was driving was totaled because of his
speeding, and said the close call taught
him a good lesson on the dangers of
speeding.

23-year-old Barber Carlen Darling,
said although speeding does have its

consequences, death is still based on
one’s fate.

Carlen explained: “If someone’s
meant to die on the road then they will,
and furthermore death on the road isn’t
always your fault.

“Tt don’t have to be you who was
drinking and driving, someone else
could come and hit you. If you die, then
it’s just your time.”

Adding to the discussion of whether
men are the number one culprits of
speedy drivers, Carlen said he thinks
they are because “men are more show-
offers, and are more aggressive drivers.”

Proprietor 31-year-old Andy Bethel
of Elizabeth Estates, feels many traffic
accidents occur because of the insuffi-
cient number of road signage at accident
prone areas.

Andy said as frequently as serious
accidents happen in “death zones” like
the curve behind Hammer Heads off
Bay Street, the numerous curves on
Tonique Williams Darling Highway,
and parts of Bernard Road, he feels
nothing is being done to protect inno-
cent motorists.

He went on to say: “As simple as
someone coming out a four-way cor-
ner that doesn’t line up, it causes a
whole confusion, but could easily be
fixed with a stop light or an officer post-
ed there to control the traffic.”

Andy who is also a frequent visitor to
the United States said like the US, local
authorities should look into installing
sensors in traffic lights to allow the
smoother flow of traffic.

“Tf the lights had a sensor to deter-
mine that there was a build-up of traffic
from one way, and no cars coming from
the other direction, it could automati-
cally change and could help people to
get where they’re going much quick-
er,” he said.

34-year-old patron E Bowe said, the
majority of females are bad drivers, and
frequently cause men to drive more
aggressively because of their chaotic
driving.

He said: “How many times you see
women pulling up on the light, on their
cell-phone, and stopping on a green
light, and when someone hits them, they
wanna say it’s that person’s fault.”

He said cell-phone usage, especially
texting should be outlawed while behind
the wheel, an action he thinks will even-
tually help in reducing the number of
accidents locally.

Generally these guys do agree that
there are times when people are tempt-
ed to speed such as when they’re late for
work, or in a rush to get somewhere.
However they insist that due-care-and-
attention is still the only option when it
comes to preventing traffic accidents.

Easter hats on parade

FROM page 12

Mrs Saunders said with her hats starting at }
about $100, 95 per cent of her business is by word }
of mouth and it usually takes her about half an }
hour to create on of her creations. i

Mrs Saunders said she loves to see Bahamian :
women dress because there are no limits to their }
fashion trends. i

“They love it and I love that are happy. I love to }
see those ladies looking good. Hats are making a }
come back. Hats are becoming such a thing now }
and I am going with this wave as it comes. If you }
do not own a hat, you are not saying anything. The }
outfit is not complete without a hat. The best }
clients I have are the ones who always say they }
have never worn a hat. I always tell them I want }
them to be pleased. If I have to make that hat ;
three to four times to please that client, that is
what I will do because I am sure if they are }
pleased they will tell others,” Mrs Saunders said. }

Mrs Saunders said she is indeed grateful to }
Solomon’s Mines for teaching her to how to be }
customer oriented. :

“People like when you can get down to their }
level and be personable which has helped me in }
my business. When it comes to my work, I like for ;
people to be comfortable. You have to be a peo- }
ple’s person and not a snob and that is one of the }
things I learned from Solomon’s,” Mrs Saunders }
said. :

Mrs Saunders said her creative juice comes }
from just beginning her work on a blank hat } 7
frame. :

“When it comes to my work, because [am cre- }
ating, I could never make that same hat again. }

You can get something close, but never exact. I }

like to work with my own inspiration and flow }

because half the time as I am working it just :

comes. When I got that turn, I don’t know how my }

fingers twisted to get it. I like working like that }

because you get a one of a kind piece. The ladies } 4
don’t have to worry that when they go out with } : F:
that hat someone else has the exact same thing,” }

Mrs Saunders said. :

Mrs Saunders said she enjoys every minute of }
what she does and hopes she can continue to cre- ;
ate gorgeous hats for the benefit of self expression }
of beautiful Bahamian women. : =

The itchy
dog





EASTER BREAK

ROCK CLIMBING
CAMP

SkyClimbers Will be Hosting 2 Two Full Day

Climbing Camps 9am-Spm
¢ April 14-15
¢ April 16-17

Activities Include:
* Climbing at SkyClimbers!

¢ Climbing at Climber’s Rush ATLANTIS!

¢ Tours of Dolphin Cay!
* Meet the Sea Lions!
¢ Feed the Sting Rays
¢ Tours of Aquaventure!

Cost For All this Fun $40

PROBABLY the most com-
plex, the most frustrating and the
most annoying clinical condition
that clients in the Bahamas are
faced with on a daily basis is that of
a scratching, itchy dog. Every day
I hear the same complain: ‘Dr
Sands, my dog will not stop
scratching! What can we do to cor-
rect it?’ There are many causes of
scratching in the dog. Only by a
thorough work up of the scratchy
patient can an exact diagnosis be
made, and then the appropriate
treatment can be started. I always
tell my clients to be patient as I
work up the case. The Bahamian
client wants and expects solutions
now and if the dog does not stop
scratching today we tend to get
upset.

One of the first things is to elim-
inate is if there are any external
parasites.

Fleas, ticks, mosquitoes and lice
which may be visible or those invis-
ible parasites(mites such as Sca-
bies or Demodex) that bury in the
skin and cause intense itching can
only be detected by microscopic
examination of skin scrapings.

Your veterinarian will recog-
nise these obvious causes of
scratching and will be able to
advise you on appropriate treat-
ment. Eg : Paramite and Front-
line for ticks and fleas. In most
cases when the cause of scratching
is parasitic the response to treat-
ment is excellent. However the
elimination of parasites from the
environment is just as important,
as re-infestation of your pet will
cause recurrence of the symptoms.
For example; fleas and ticks
require year round control in the
Bahamas.

Bacterial skin disease or Pyo-
derma is another common cause
of scratching. The presence of bac-
terial infection on the skin is usu-
ally secondary, but may be prima-
ry. Common causes are skin para-
sites, poor nutrition, unhygienic

environment, allergies or long
term steroid therapy. Bacterial
skin disease is usually charac-
terised by pustules, crusts, itching
and hair loss. Some dogs may be
lethargic and depressed.

Treatment for bacterial skin dis-
ease usually requires antibiotics
and medical shampoos. (Benzoyl
peroxide) It is recommended that
antibiotic therapy is continued for
seven to ten days after resolution
of the clinical signs. If the response
to antibiotic therapy is poor, then
bacterial culture and antibiotic sen-
sitivity tests should be considered.

This leads us to probably the
most common cause of skin dis-
ease- allergies!

One such allergy is food hyper-
sensitivity. This is where your dog
becomes sensitised to some com-
ponents of its diet resulting in skin
disease. Common foodstuffs that
have been implicated in food
hypersensitivity are beef, dairy
products, wheat, eggs and even
chicken. Some dogs that experi-
ence food hypersensitivity will
have gastrointestinal signs. Foods
allergies may cause intense itch-
ing, they may also be involved in
ear infections as do most skin
allergies.

Your vet will advise on an
appropriate diet to test if food
hypersensitivity is involved. These
diets are known as hypoallergenic
diets and may be home made or
may be commercially available.
Mutton, rice and fish are exam-
ples of some food components that
appear to be less allergy stimulat-
ing. These diets may have to be
given for four to eight weeks
before complete resolution of signs
is seen. Then it is possible to re-
introduce foods you are suspicious
of to the diet and observe if the
signs reoccur. This way the guilty
foods can be totally eliminated
from the diet in the future. Fail-
ure to clear up the skin condition
may indicate allergies are present

SkyClimbers Easter Break Camps







Spaces are Limited to 20 Students/Camp
minimum age is 9 years old.

ARM CURA RRS Coe

363-0626

SKY

will be held at the SkyClimbers

THE COVE
ATLANTIS:



CLIMBERS
“aay



apart from food based allergies.

Contact based allergies are
another cause of skin disease. This
is where the dog becomes affected
in its environment where it is lying
or sleeping. The feet and under
side of the body are frequently
affected. This form of irritation
may also be caused by an irritant
substance and may not be allergic.
An examination of the bedding
and places that your dog is laying
should be examined. Blankets,
feeding bowls, carpets should be
given scrutiny. To test this aller-
gy, the dog should be removed
from suspect rooms and possible
bedding in its sleeping area to
something which is known not to
irritate or introduce allergy. Paper
is ideal bedding forthese dogs and
can be used to test if their own
bedding was guilty increasing skin
irritation. If no improvement is
seen after rigorous avoidance of
suspected floorcoverings and bed-
dings then this form of allergy can
be eliminated from the investiga-
tion.

This brings us to the most com-
mon cause of allergy based skin
disease -atopy. This is where the
dog becomes sensitised to envi-
ronmental allergens. These aller-
gens cause skin disease after being
inhaled. This form of allergy may
be seasonal or year round. The
house dust mite and certain pol-
lens are frequently implicated as
causes of atopic skin disease. Cer-
tain breeds of dog appear suscep-
tible such as the west highland ter-
rier, the corgi, the Shar Pei, but
any breed of dog may develop the
condition. Cases presented with
itching of the face feet and under-
sides of the body, possible ear
infections and they may be run-
ning from the eyes or show a com-
bination of these symptoms. In
general these dogs are eighteen
months plus before they developed
this condition.

So what can we do about the
treatment of allergies? Unfortu-
nately it is not very easy, by using
tests; it may be possible to deter-
mine the exact causes of allergies.

However it is very expensive
and I don’t routinely recommend
it. This is of great benefit when
something we can eliminate from
the environment. However fre-
quently the allergens such as pillow
mites are impossible to eliminate
from the environment and in these
cases we have to rely symptomatic
relief of the patient. This involves
the use of an arsenal of various
anti-inflammatory drugs.

Anti-histamines help in moder-
ate cases. In difficult cases the use
of oral glucocorticoid steroids may
be necessary to control the symp-
toms. The combination of supple-
mentation of the diet with essential
fatty acids have proved to be ben-
eficial.

In treatment it is always the aim
of the vet to keep the use of
steroids to a minimum and use
combinations of other drugs to
reduce their dosage. In some cases
there will be no choice to use
steroids. I personally feel this is
always better than a pet that is in
constant discomfort and does not
get the quality of life it deserves. In
summary the control of itching in
these dogs can be very difficult, so
be patient with your vet as he/she
endeavors to get the scratchy and
underlying conditions under con-
trol.

¢ Dr Basil Sands is a veterinarian at the
Central Animal Hospital. Questions or
comments should be directed to pot-
cake59@hotmail.com. Dr Sands can
also be contacted at 325-1288



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 7,





2009

@ BY ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net







is generally a time of bright pastel colours, candy, chocolate bun-
ny shaped molds and Easter egg hunts for the kids. However, in the fashion
world of the Bahamas, hundreds of women will be looking for oversized
millinery creations to wear Easter Sunday morning.

Sandra Saunders, owner of Ele-
gant and Sophisticated Ladies Hats
and Accessories, located in Palm
Beach Street and Balfour Ave, has
been making hats for over 20 years
and said she knows all to well about
the Easter hat craze.

Most of Mrs Saunders’ hats are
custom made using sisal, straw and
felt.

“You can bring in your clothing,
shoes or any color you want us to
make the hat to match. We are
almost like a little factory. We buy
the base and we create from that
base and that is what is so unique
about us because it is not something
that you can go on the shelf and
pick up knowing other ladies have
the same hat. We take the simple
hat, change the bottom, top, and
colour and it is a different style all
together. We do hats for funerals,
hats for weddings, corsages, head
pieces for bridesmaids and bouton-
nieres for men. We also spray shoes
and bags as long as it is of satin
material,” Mrs Saunders said.

As for the Easter season, Mrs

Saunders said this is a time when
the bright colors are on parade.

“All of the pastel colors come out
for Easter- the lime greens, yellows,
oranges and rose pink among many
others but those are the most popu-
lar. When it comes to the size of a
hat for Easter, they either choose
the small bonnets or very wide
brimmed ones. Silk flowers in vari-
ous sizes and varieties are the main
decoration used in making Easter
hats,” Mrs Saunders said.

Mrs Saunders said she got her
start making hats at home as a side
job.

“T get a thrill from seeing women
dressed. I love to know that when I
have created something, the client
is pleased. I used to work at
Solomon’s downtown selling watch-
es and jewelry for about 13 years
and about 10 years ago I decided to
open my own shop. Hat making
was my sidekick- did it on my day
off or time off. Now I eat sleep and
drink hat making,” Mrs Saunders
said.

SEE page 10

Discover the goodness
of Ovaltine.

Ovaltine’s unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway e 394-1759


THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST



ie

TAMPA
High: 65° F/18° C
Low: 50° F/10°C

@

a

y



KEY WEST
High: 74° F/23°C
Low: 65° F/18° C

@

ORLANDO»
High:65°FA8°C
Low: 49° F/9° C

ee

}
?
tm

Pa:

di
pl,

Ft

i

es

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Wednesday

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston

High
F/C
72/22
42/5
50/10
50/10
50/10
46/7
36/2
58/14
40/4
36/2
68/20
68/20
36/2
80/26
72/22

Today

Low

F/C
45/7
29/-1
29/-1
30/-1
30/-1
37/2
28/-2
32/0
31/0
31/0
53/11
34/1
28/-2
69/20
48/8

WwW

S$
Ss
sf
Cc
pc
Cc
sf
pc
sf
sf
$
S$
sf
pc
S$

High
F/C
66/18

Low
F/C
41/5

41/5 27/-2

60/15
49/9
53/11
47/8
38/3
66/18
50/10
44/6

46/7
34/1
36/2
36/2
31/0
45/7
33/0
34/1

79/26 59/15

62/16
47/8

33/0
33/0

82/27 69/20
78/25 63/17

Ww

pc
sf
$
pc
pc
pc
c
$

pe

OS he Be oO

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

ite. *
Te

Mostly cloudy, a
shower; cooler.

High: 76°

CEU ac acct

@ WEST PALM BEACH

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 74° F/23° C @
Low: 58° F/14°C

@





Mainly clear and Breezy with plenty of
breezy. sunshine.
High: 78°
Low: 63° Low: 68°

High: 74° F/23° C
Low: 57° F/14°C

MIAMI



High
F/C
42/5
60/15
56/13
82/27
58/14
70/21
46/7
54/12
77/25
45/7
46/7
63/17
45/7
68/20
65/18

High: 77° F/25°C
Low: 60°F/16°C

Today

Low

F/C
29/-1
30/-1
36/2
54/12
39/3
52/11
34/1
39/3
54/12
29/-1
34/1
42/5
37/2
43/6
42/5

WwW

nnnn

i 0) hey co

High
F/C
55/12
67/19
67/19
69/20
13/22
68/20
59/15
70/21
74/23
52/11
63/17
73/22
48/8
75/23
73/22

Wednesday

Low

F/C
41/5
41/5
46/7
55/12
54/12
52/11
46/7
54/12
60/15
32/0
48/8
57/13
41/5
54/12
48/8

ANDROS

ABACO
High: 84° F/29° C

High: 76° F/24° C

Breezy with plenty of

sunshine.

High: 82°
Low: 70°

BCE aec lt
[ _ 80°-69°F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ee is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Low: 63° F/17°C
om
i
a
an
i
FREEPORT al —
High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 60° F/16°C
NASSAU

Low: 63° F/17°C
@

High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 69° F/21°C

Ww

pc
$
pc
pc
$
sh
pc
$
s
pc
pc
s
pc
$
s

Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis

Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson

~wYr

High
F/C
48/8
90/32
37/2
67/19
55/12
50/10
66/18
74/23
67/19
62/16
61/16
58/14
65/18
88/31

Today

Low

F/C
34/1
61/16
30/-1
45/7
29/-1
33/3
45/7
52/11
56/13
50/10
43/6
30/-1
44/6
58/14

Washington, DC 5140 35/1

Ww

c
s
sf
pc
pc
pc
pc
$
pc
r
$
s
pc
$
pc

ELEUTHERA

Sunshine. Partly sunny and
humid.
High: 86° High: 85°
Low: 75° Low: 75°
ETCH
97°-81° F 100°-82° F

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature



IGM sesssasedvssenselacecsvnaesecseaditared csaecanes 86° F/30° C
LOW Normal high .... 80° F/27° C
Normal low 68° F/20° C
Last year's Nigh oo... ceeteteeeeeteees 85° F/29° C

Last year's LOW o..cccceseseeeseeeeneees 76° F/25° C
Precipitation



As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....ccccccccccceeeceeee trace

Year to date

Normal year to date oo... ceeceeeeeeee 5. 64"
AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009

High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 69° F/21°C

—__*

GREAT EXUMA

High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 68° F/20° C

<2
LY

Wednesday
High Low
F/C F/C
50/10 36/2
75/23 55/12
47/8 34/1
57/13 44/6
58/14 40/4
64/17 48/8
60/15 42/5
81/27 62/16
64/17 56/13
57/13 48/8
54/12 42/5
70/21 44/6
70/21 54/12
72/22 48/8
53/11 40/4

WwW

pc
pc
C
Cc
pc
pc
sh
Ss
sh
Cc
c
S
Ss
pc
pc

CATISLAND
High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 69° F/21°C

ae
7
rt

o|1|2

LOW

3l4[s

MODERATE





6|7

HIGH



\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Posey

Ht. (ft.

High

Today 6:54 a.m.

7:15 p.m.

Wednesday “: 41a. 7
ednesday or

Thursd 8:25 a.m.

mney 3-43 pm.

Frid 9:06 a.m.

ae 9:25 p.m.

28
3.1

2.8
3.2

27
3.2

27
3.1

Low

12:36 a.m.
12:54 p.m.

1:28 a.m.
1:38 p.m.
2:15 a.m.
2:20 p.m.
2:59 a.m.
3:00 p.m.

Ht.(ft.

-0.1
-0.1

-0.2
-0.1

-0.2
-0.1

-0.1
-0.1

Sunrise...... 6:55 a.m. Moonrise .... 5:53 p.m.
Sunset....... 7:29 p.m. Moonset..... 5:25 a.m.
New First

Full Last

Ane 17

Apr. 9

SAN SALVADOR

High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 74° F/23°C

i

LONGISLAND
High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 73° F/23°C



Apr. 24

MAYAGUANA

High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 72° F/22°C

CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS

RAGGED ISLAND
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 71°F/22°C

Low: 74° F/23°C

GREAT INAGUA

High: 91° F/33° C

=
AKL

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 72° F/22°C

=



May 1

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
54/12
52/11
67/19
70/21
93/33
84/28
60/15
86/30
66/18
73/22
72/22
72/22
65/18
58/14
76/24
81/27
81/27
100/37
54/12
75/23
80/26
65/18
57/13
52/11
71/21
62/16
48/8
75/23
41/5
72/22
79/26
58/14
65/18
71/21
86/30
79/26
57/13
61/16
90/32
75/23
79/26
43/6
39/3
68/20
88/31
93/33
52/11
57/13
69/20
86/30
91/32
66/18
83/28
86/30
91/32
88/31
86/30
78/25
66/18
54/12
70/21
74/23
68/20
34/1
86/30
55/12
68/20
61/16
34/1

> Ll

TAT [CT Sa

soja
EXT.

Today

Low
F/C
68/20
43/6
37/2
53/11
55/12
77/25
75/23
47/8
43/8
55/12
51/10
53/11
63/17
47/8
43/6
48/8
54/12
58/14
77/25
30/-1
59/15
69/20
45/7
52/11
41/5
48/8
47/8
37/2
54/12
32/0
64/17
59/15
51/10
45/7
51/10
75/23
65/18
45/7
36/2
79/26
43/8

SS a ee

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Ww

S$
sh
sh
pc
c
t
pc
r
Ss
S$
pc
sh
c
t
sh
pc
pc
S$
Ss
pc
pc
pc
pc
sh
sh
pc
sh
r
pc
pc
pc
C
r
S$
t
pc
Cc
sh
sh
pc
t
Ss
sn
Cc
sh
t
$
sh
sh
S$
sh

pc
pc

Wednesday

High
F/C
88/31
55/12
55/12
68/20
63/17
97/36
84/28
61/16
84/28
64/17
75/23
68/20
70/21
65/18
55/12
73/22
70/21
77/25
99/37
47/8
85/29
81/27
67/19
53/11
50/10
64/17
54/12
40/4
79/26
46/7
75/23
75/23
65/18
58/14
70/21
83/28
79/26
59/15
66/18
90/32
78/25
94/34
37/2
41/5
62/16
86/30
97/36
45/7
59/15
67/19
82/27
93/33
68/20
83/28
80/26
91/32
88/31
85/29
76/24
72/22
52/11
72/22
72/22
66/18
39/3
81/27
52/11
71/21
65/18
43/6

Low
F/C
73/22
47/8
36/2
54/12
52/11
79/26
75/23
50/10
52/11
59/15
53/11
50/10
60/15
47/8
43/6
50/10
57/13
56/13
79/26
30/-1
65/18
69/20
52/11
47/8
39/3
46/7
47/8
29/-1
59/15
36/2
66/18
55/12
53/11
45/7
50/10
74/23
64/17
41/5
37/2
79/26
46/7
66/18
34/1
27/-2
48/8
64/17
70/21
36/2
46/7
47/8
71/21
73/22
52/11
75/23
60/15
72/22
55/12
69/20
60/15
39/3
41/5
55/12
63/17
52/11
31/0
71/21
43/6
54/12
42/5
26/-3

fe feo) eo ee Kee eee ea - eo ee
oO oO ——

pe

Omen ec wee Bee men
= oO

sh
pc
C
r
sh
S$
pc
Cc

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c- san sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: | SSWat10-20Knots . 3-OFeet 10-20Miles 75°F
Wednesday: NW at 15-20 Knots 4-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F
FREEPORT Today: SSW at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 75° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-20 Knots 4-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F
ABACO Today: SSW at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 75° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-20 Knots 4-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Minneapolis

Los

70/52

Showers
T-storms
Rain

* _*| Flurries
«| Snow
[v=] Ice

10s | Os (05) 10s 20s (05%) 40s









Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Miami
77154

Fronts

Cold
Wall flint

Stationary Mangum.

AUTO INSURANCE

Never start
Some Wwitho

V Pir. to Auto Insurance,
\ remember tl the smart choice is

OUL |
t us!

{surance Management.

—s

ff

“New Proven | Gro Bohona | tha Ni.
We (242) 502-6400 | Te (M0) 950-3500 | Tel (242) 367-4204

re

t people you can trust.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Eleuthera |
Tel: (242) 332-2862



cal
Tel: (242) 336-23




PAGE 1

n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net FORMER Prime Minister Per ry Christie hopes the country's economic conditions for this year and 2010 are as "optimistic" as a recent dismal forecast published by international credit rating agency Stan dard and Poor's. He added that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham's recent reported statements regarding the likelihood of more government borrowing highlights the "deterioration" surrounding the economy, exacerbated by the fact that economists cannot predict when the N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Water and Sewerage staff demand salar y increase C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.113TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUN, SHOWER ANDWINDY HIGH 76F LOW 61F F E A T U R E S S EEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S Easter hats on parade SEEPAGEELEVEN Carifta teams to fly with Bahamasair n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net WATER and Sewerage Corporation employees were allegedly kept from work yesterday morning as their unions called on the gov ernment to negotiate outdated industrial contract agreements and increase their salaries. Around 200 Bahamas Utilities Services Allied Workers Union (BUSAWU erage Management Union (WSMU side the Water and Sewerage headquarters in Thompson Boulevard at 9.30am as BUSAWU president Carmen Kemp and WSMU pres ident Ednel Rolle relayed their mutual demands through the media. They claimed that Water and Sewerage bosses withheld keys to employees’ vehicles preventing them from working yesterday morning, which chairman Anton Saunders later denied. But the press conference pub licly urging government to re-open negotiations about the industrial contract agreements, which they say have been up for renewal since June 2007, was not intended to be a strike, Ms Kemp said. Speaking for both unions Mr Rolle maintained workers have sacrificed their salary increases since 2004 for the financial benefit of the Water and Sewerage Cor poration (WSC Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC Electricity Corporation (BEC employees are enjoying higher salaries and more benefits, their patience has worn thin. He said: “Whilst we recognise Around 200 gather outside of headquarters The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR M cFLURRY TWIX MIX www.tribune242.com B AHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E WATER AND SEWERAGE Man agement Union President Ednel Rolle speaks on behalf of his union and the Bahamas Utilities Services Allied Workers Union at the press conference yesterday. SEE page eight T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net CALLING for a “full and frank disclosure” by the Government on the Economic Partnership agreement the PLP yesterday suggested the livelihoods of thousands of Bahamian fishermen may be at risk. Opposition spokesman for Foreign Affairs, Fred Mitchell yesterday ques tioned whether Bahamian crawfishermen’s duty free access to European markets “may be in jeopardy” in view of the looming possibility that Government may miss an April 15th EPA deadline. But a Bahamian EPA source, speaking with The Tribune on the condition of anonymity, denied this is the case, proposing that in the instance that the Bahamas does not satisfy the European Commission within the week, that the EC is likely to offer “great flexibility”. This week minister of state for finance, Zhivargo Laing, revealed that the PLP voices concern over livelihoods of Bahamian fishermen n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net PERSONS who may be plot ting to knowingly take advantage of the unemployment benefit plan may face harsh penalties under law, Minister of National Insurance Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said. Last year, police investigated several cases of fraudulent claims to the extended social relief pack age which came into effect on October 1, 2008. With thousands of persons expected to apply for the unemployment benefit, observers have questioned how the government will mitigate against possible fraud. Speaking to the media at a press conference held at the National Insurance Board headquarters on Sunday, Mr Ingraham said NIB has extensive verification mea sures in place to counteract any false claims. National Insurance will undertake a verification process “from the time you come in and make SEE page eight ‘Harsh penalties’ for those who take advantage of unemployment benefit plan SEE page eight n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Government is in dis cussions with the I Group developers in Mayaguana to see how it can remove “any impediments” that may be further slow ing progress on the island’s delayed anchor project, the Minister of Tourism said yesterday. Over three years after a Heads of Agreement was signed with the Boston-based develop ers, Vincent Vanderpool Wal lace said they meet regularly with Government and remain “without question...as committed as ever” to the project, but economic circumstances continue to ensure their plans for the island remain restricted for the moment. “Needless to say global con ditions have caused everyone to at least scale back on their expectations in terms of the Govt seeking to remove Mayaguana anchor project ‘impediments’ SEE page eight n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Education Min ister Carl Bethel met with students and teachers of the Eight Mile Rock High School on Monday to give them some words of encouragement following several unfortunate incidents at the school. Mr Bethel’s visit comes after strong criticism last week from PTA officials over his silence and lack of response to allegations of molestation involving teachers at the school. “I am here to help them and provide a listening ear, Christie believes grim economic forecasts ar e ‘optimistic’ SEE page eight SEE page eight Minister meets with Eight Mile Rock High School students and teachers Carl Bethel Perry Christie

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE prosecution in the Keith Carey murder retrial presented its closing arguments in court yesterday, claiming that greed was the motive behind the businessman’s murder. During her closing address to the jury yesterday, lead prosecutor and Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel described murder accused Dwight Knowles as the “mastermind” of the plot to kill Carey, 43. Mrs Grant Bethel said that his co-accused Sean Brown was a part of the conspiracy that led up to Carey’s murder. She also told the jurors that Jamal Glinton, alias “Bumper”, was brought in as the muscle. She told the jury that it was Glinton who had shot Carey twice on the steps of The Bank of The Bahamas on the morning of February 27, 2006. Mrs GrantBethel also told the jury that greed was the motive for the killing, claiming that the accused men wanted Carey’s money and would do whatever was necessary to get it. Mrs Grant Bethel directed the jury to the evidence of the prosecution’s star witness Vaughn Carey, noting that he had testified that he had initially been approached by Dwight Knowles about setting up Keith Carey. She told the jury that Carey’s evidence had never changed but rather that he had changed from a defendant to a prosecution witness. According to the prosecutor, Carey a cousin of the deceased had wanted to come forward with his account earlier but at the time had been advised against doing so by his attorney. She told the jury that although Vaughn Carey had set up the robbery, he was not at the bank at the time of the murder and had not set his cousin up to be killed. Mrs Grant Bethel told the jury, that it was Carey’s evidence that Glinton was supposed to push the businessman down and snatch the money bag. D eadly The prosecutor noted, however, that the deceased was a man well over six feet tall, weighing more than 225 pounds and of muscular build. She said that the accused men had to have agreed to use deadly force in the robb ery attempt, which is why they brought in J amal Glinton as the shooter. M rs Grant Bethel also told the jury that the accused men had lied to court in their efforts to hide their guilt and escape the charges. While noting that the Crown’s case is based on circumstantial evidence, she called upon the jurors to put all of the circumstances together to prove the men’s guilt. During his closing submissions, attorney Perry Albury who is representing murder accused Dwight Knowles, refuted the prosecution’s claim that his client was the mastermind of the plot to rob and kill businessman Keith Carey, stating that his client was rather the victim. Mr Albury told the court that the evidence against Knowles is of a reasonable doubt. Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight Knowles are charged with murder as well as armed robbery and conspiracy to commit armed robbery. Carey was shot and killed on the steps of the Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway before he was able to deposit $40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Station, which he operated. Mrs Grant-Bethel, Stephanie Pintard, Anthony Delaney and Lennox Coleby are prosecuting the case. A ttorneys Craig Butler and Devard Franc is are representing Jamal Glinton, attorney D orsey McPhee is representing Sean Brown, and attorney Perry Albury is representing Dwight Knowles. The prosecution has called 37 witnesses during the two-month long trial. CLAIMING that the government has done all it can to reduce food costs for the average Bahamian, the Department of Statistics yesterday released its monthly food pricing index, revealing increases and decreases on a number of breadbasket items. With certain food items such as mackerel, spaghetti, tomato paste, carrots, mustard, macaroni, and crab meat seeing a seven to 12 per cent increase in price, other items such as baby juice, mineral w ater, eggs, milk, cooking oil, chicken parts and crawfish remained constant from January to February of this year. Those items seeing a decrease from January to February were grits, corn, whole chicken, season-all, butter, steak, grapefruits, red and white grapes, potatoes, lamb chops and flour. With a decrease of six per cent or more were tomatoes, avocados, sweet peppers, limes, daisy cheese, oatmeal and onions, which saw the largest decrease in price of 13 per cent from $2.24 to $1.94 for a three-pound bag. I n the Family Islands, however, some of these same items saw a slight increase, especially in Grand Bahama. Peppers Sweet peppers, originally discounted in New Providence, saw an increase of 11 per cent in Grand Bahama from $2.59 a pound to$ 2.87. B reakfast cereals, along with celery, fruit juices, tomato paste, cabbage, oranges, chicken parts, and turkey wings and drumsticks saw an increase anywhere from six to 11 per cent from January to February. O ther staples, such as corned beef, milk, flour and grits remained constant with little or no change whatsoever in their prices inG rand Bahama. Amongst this group are whole turkeys, sliced and whole ham, s pare ribs, macaroni, hot dogs, fruit juices, fresh and frozen fish, mackerel, canned tuna, eggs, baby milk, pineapples, limes, and carrots. Canned milk, rice, steak, Irish potatoes and pork chops all saw a small decrease in pricing. In Grand Bahama, the most discounted items from January to F ebruary of this year were tomatoes which saw a 25 per cent decrease from $1.77 a pound to $1.32. L amb chops came second at nine per cent, followed with decreases of eight per cent in the price for onions, seven per cent in apples, and five per cent in lettuce, grapefruits and boxed salt. Greed behind businessman’s killing, claims prosecution Closing arguments presented in Keith Carey murder retrial Monthly food pricing index is released FOOD such as carrots (left (below increase in price.

PAGE 3

n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@ t ribunemedia.net EXECUTIVES of the Water and Sewerage Corporation yesterday refuted claims that they had withheld employees’ keys to prevent them from working. Members of the Bahamas Utilities Services Allied Workers Union (BUSAWU and Water and Sewerage ManagementUnion( WSMU) called on the government to negotiate industrial agreements and increase workers’ salaries in a press c onference held outside the Water and Sewerage Corporation (WSC o n Thompson Boulevard yest erday morning. The union members c laimed that WSC executives h ad withheld employees’ car keys preventing them from working. But Water and Sewerage C orporation (WSC Anton Saunders and members of the board and execut ive management told the p ress that union members h ave access to the keys and were free to start work when-e ver they wished. Protocol The keys are in control of t he union, both unions have a n industrial disagreement and the normal protocol wasf ollowed,” Mr Saunders said. But some people want to work and some don’t.” The unions started to speak publicly about their issues onS unday, and Mr Saunders s aid he was called to speak on the air about the concerns and demands union members are taking up with the government on Sunday night. H owever, Mr Saunders said that he was surprised by yes terday’s joint union state-m ents about industrial cont ract agreements as negotia t ions with the BUSAWU and the non-management unionb egan in November 2007 and o nly the financially impacted articles are still outstanding. He maintains negotiations with the management union, WSMU, began in October last year and the union has recently expressed the desire t o discuss a financial package f or its members as a matter of priority. M r Saunders confirmed the l ast contract with BUSAWU a nd WSMU expired in June 2007 and that the biggest expenses for the WSC arew ater production costs in the a mount of $32.3 million and salaries and related benefits in the amount of $24.5 million. “The WSC is now the r ecipient of the largest subsidy of all the government agencies,” Mr Saunders said, having received $30 million i n subsidies in the 2008/09 fis c al year, as compared to $18.4 million in the previous year. Budget “The government has e nunciated its intent to roll b ack its budget to 2007/08 l evels. “Consequently on March 11, 2009, both unions werea dvised there will be no general increases at this time due to the economic challenges currently facing the nation. “All increments, promotions and anomalies will continue to be addressed in the normal manner.” U nion members had been informed by Minister for the Environment Earl Deveaux that salary increases would be impossible in the current e conomic circumstances, Mr Saunders said, however the government is open to any r ecommendations they may h ave. THREE resolutions to f acilitate the introduction of unemployment benefits under the National Insurance scheme were passed in theS enate yesterday. The regulations, which were moved in the House of Assembly last week, are e xpected to be signed into law as early as April 9. On Sunday, Prime Minis t er and Minister of National I nsurance Hubert Ingraham s aid registration for the benefit plan will begin on April 11, leading up to April 20. Cheques will be issued dur ing the first week of May. Sc hools Four schools in New Providence Doris Johnson Secondary School, Prince Charles Drive; C C Sweeting Junior High School, Oakes Field; C R Walker Secondary School, Baillou Hill Road North, and S C McPherson Junior High School, Baillou Hill Road South will be used as registration centres. In Grand Bahama, appli cants can register at the Father Pestena Centre at Christ the King Anglican Church in Freeport and at the Eight Mile Rock High School gymnasium. Starting April 11, residents of New Providence with last names beginning with letters A to D should register; on April 14 those with last names beginning with lettersE to L can register; on April 15 persons with last names b eginning with M to R should register; on April 16 applicants with last names beginning with the letters St o Z should register. In Grand Bahama, those with last names beginning with letters A to L should r egister on April 11 and on April 14 persons with last names beginning with M to Z s hould apply. O pen call registration in N ew Providence will be held on April 17 and 18, and in Grand Bahama on April 15 through April 17. Applicants should come with proper identification and proof of dismissal, such as a letter of termination, if one was issued. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 3 INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News..........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,12 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports ............................................... P9,10,11 BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION Business ......................................P1,2,3,4,5,6 Comics ........................................................ P7 Woman...........................................P8,9,10,12 W eather .....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 P AGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P AGES A 20-YEAR-OLDman was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court on an armed robbery charge yesterday. I t is alleged in court d ockets that Davardo J ames Rigby, of Millennium Gardens, while armed with a handgun on March 26, robbed Daphne Sands of $236 and an assortment of phone cards valued at $85. R igby, who appeared b efore Magistrate Susan S ylvester in Court 11, Nassau Street, was not required to plead to the charge. He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison and the case has been adjourned to August 18. A 38-year-old man accused of robbing a local s ervice station was a rraigned in a Magistrate’s C ourt yesterday on an armed robbery charge. It is alleged that Engle b ert Antonio Scott on Sunday, December 21, robbed Fernand Francois of $900 in cash, an assortment of phone cards valued at $375 and two packages of Back wood cigars valued at $96,t he property of Texaco S ervice Station, located on P rince Charles Drive. Scott, who was arraigned b efore Magistrate Susan S ylvester in Court 11, Nassau Street, was not required to plead to the charge. He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case has been adjourned to May 15. Hisc o-accused in the case, Lewis Alex Williams, 29, of Union Village, hasa lready been arraigned on t he charge. He is expected back in court on May 15. BERNARD Barr, a marine from the Comman d o Squadron Department o f the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, underwent minor surgery on Sunday afternoon after being accidentally shot while taking part in a training exercisein Trinidad and Tobago. At around 11.30am on Saturday, Mr Barr sustained a flesh wound to his upper thigh during the training exercise on the Tucker Valley Shooting Range in Trinidad and Tobago. According to a press statement from senior lieutenant Sonia Miller, the marine was treated for his injury and is resting com fortably at the Port of Spain General Hospital. “He is a part of the 32member Royal Bahamas Defence Force contingent which is expected to pro vide joint operational support with the other Caribbean nations for the 5th Summit of the Americas in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, from April 17 -19, 2009. “As is customary in these matters an investiga tion is being conducted to determine the circumstances surrounding the incident,” she said. Man appears in court on armed robbery charge Defence For ce marine undergoes minor surgery after shooting accident In brief Senate passes resolutions facilitating unemployment benefits introduction Hubert Ingraham A 49-YEAR-OLD man died after he was hit by a truck and dragged along Baillou Hill Road “for some distance” early yesterdaym orning, police reported. T he Pinewood Gardens resident was walking on Baillou Hill Road, near the junction of Wulff Road, at around 2am when he was hit by a white truck. A s the truck continued to drive on, the man was dragged along before his body dislodged and the 49year-old died of his injuries, police said. The truck driver fled the s cene. P olice have launched an active investigation and an island-wide search for the truck driver in New Providence. T he make and model of the vehicle has not been ascertained. Anyone whom ay have been in the area at the time, or has any information which could lead to the apprehension of the driver, should contact police immediately on 393-7714/5, 919, or call Crime Stoppersa nonymously on 328TIPS/8477. Man dies in hit and run Water and Sewerage executives deny claims they withheld staffs car keys NCTUPRESIDENT John Pinder gave his support for the unions yesterday. SEEPAGEONE

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune . Many people, both Bahamia n and foreign, rejoiced a few months ago when Agriculture and Marine Resources Minister Larry Cartwright announced the Ministry’s intent to enact a complete ban on marine turtle fishing in the Bahamas. It was the culmination of many years effort by various groups concerned about our marine environment and particularly these majestic, gentle sea creatures who are afforded complete protection in most developed and undeveloped countries of the w orld. Cuba, Mexico, and most of our Caribbean neighbors long ago enacted strict bans on the capture, killing and consumption of marine turtles. The complete ban that was promised may be in jeopardy. The amendment has not yet been passed by Parliament. A few weeks ago, The Ministry of Agriculture wanted to hear from more Bahamians on this issue. After hearing from at least several thousand since then, in favour of the ban, the amendment has still not been passed. The talk from months ago, that it might pass but with an exception to continue toa llow the “personal consumption” of turtle meat, may still happen. There are very few fisher men who catch turtles to feed their families. They catch tur tles opportunistically, especially if they’ve had a bad day conching or craw fishing. They catch them to sell. The gas it would cost a fisherman to go out specifically to catch a turtle for his dinner table would cost far more than a chicken from the food store. This is a ludicrous proposi tion for many reasons, the most obvious being the issue of enforcement. Will the Ministry position a Fisheries officer at every dock and every boat landing, on every island? Will they follow the fisherman home, watch him kill, clean AND eat the turtle he has caught? How else to enforce this? What will be done about the extreme cruelty and torture inflicted on these defenseless animals while they are awaiting slaughter? Ranging from being left on their backs for hours or days in the broiling sun, to having their flippers crudely pierced with whatever sharp object is at hand and having rope threaded through them, then hogtied to prevent them from thrashing. Not to mention kids and even grown men cruelly tormenting and abusing them, o ften in public view and nothing is done about it, despite c alls to both Police and Fisheries. Have we become so cold and unfeeling that we think it is normal or even sporting to torture an innocent animal? Because it is to be eaten, its pain and suffering is irrelevant? Our young people see their elders perpetrating abuses and cruelty on innocent, helpless creatures, and they learn fromt his. What do they learn? Think about it. No wonder our crime r ate is escalating. The abuse of animals has proven links as a stepping stone to the abuse of people and violent crime. In these times of extreme economic instability and hard ship, one would think the con cept of enticing tourists to visit us instead of repelling them might have some attraction. A live turtle viewed in the wild is worth far more in tourism dollars than a suffering, tormented turtle on a dock, which is guar anteed to disgust most people who see it. Tourists who wit ness this leave here vowing nev er to come back, and discourage their friends and family from visiting. The Miss Universe pageant is to be held on Paradise Island in August; what a black eye the Bahamas would receive if the attendant international press happen upon a poor hapless turtle being tortured on the Potter’s Cay docks. The irony is that these are not “Bahamian” turtles. These turtles do not belong to any one nation; they are migratory animals and it is extremely disheartening and frustrating to those other countries trying to protect and save them, that simply because their migratory patterns bring them to Bahamian w aters, they are subject to being not only killed but tortured and abused in the process. This is one issue where “foreign” opinions should be weighed and considered as these turtles do not “belong” to the Bahamas. Most of them are not born here, and those that are, do not remain here their entire lives. We participate in the international protection of the many migratory bird species that pass through the Bahamas every year, why are turtles different? Because they swim rather than fly? Because we have more fishermen than bird hunters? We urge the public to voice their opinions to Minister Cartwright, and also to your l ocal Members of Parliament. Marine turtles are evidently still in extreme jeopardy in the Bahamas; they need your helpm ore than ever and time is of the essence. ELIZABETH BURROWS Executive Director, Humane Society of Grand Bahama Member, Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group. CHRIS JOHNSTON President, Board of Direc tors, Humane Society of Grand Bahama. Freeport, Grand Bahama, March 27, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON President Barack Obam a's stop in Turkey is hardly an afterthought, a "while I'm in the neighbourhood" visit. F or starters, he wants to mend relations strained when the United States went to war in I raq six years ago. Ankara's Islamic-rooted government denied Washington's request to use Turkish territory to invade Iraq from the north. But Turkey also is in line for thanks for trying to bring peace between Israelis and Palestinians. T urkey is the only predominantly Muslim country in NATO, an alliance stalwart andA merica's best friend in the Islamic world. Oba ma, completing a European trip, arrives Sundaya nd undoubtedly will reprise his message from a town hall meeting Friday in France. "We must be honest with ourselves. In recent years, we've allowed our alliance to drift," he said at that appearance. T urkey maintains a small military force in Afghanistan, part of the NATO contingent w orking with U.S. troops to beat back the resur gent Taliban and deny al-Qaida a safe haven a long the largely lawless territory that straddles Afghanistan's border with Pakistan. Turkey's participation carries enormous symbolic importance because it is the only Muslim country with a presence in the fight against Islamic extremism. In talks with Turkey's president, Abdullah Gul, and prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdo gan, Obama will try to sell his strategy for A fghanistan and Pakistan. He should find welcoming ears, given the new U.S. focus on meld ing troop increases with civilian efforts to better the lives of people in both countries. "Obama may be able to create momentum for help from a broader sector of nominal U.S. allies in the Muslim world," said Jeffrey Martinson, a historian and political scientist at Meredith College in North Carolina. " The fact that he's visiting the Turks at the end of this major European trip is a nice homage to them," Martinson said, noting that uppermost on Turkey's agenda is gaining mem bership in the European Union. The new president has pushed for Muslim diplomacy. In his inaugural address in January, Obama assured the Muslim world that "we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench y our fist." He has made early telephone calls to friendly Arab leaders and sent special envoy G eorge J. Mitchell to the Middle East on a "listening tour." Obama's declaration that he will close the prison for suspected terrorists Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was seen as a move to address ac hief source of ill will among Muslim nations since Sept. 11. O bama's father and stepfather were Muslim and he spent part of his childhood in Indonesia, a largely Muslim country. Throughout the cam paign, Obama, who is Christian, fought false I nternet rumours that he is a Muslim. Turkey is one of only two key Muslim count ries with cordial relations with Israel. The Turks, along with the Egyptians, are working w ith France in trying to maintain a cease-fire and broker a permanent truce between Israel and Hamas, the Palestinian faction that rules the Gaza Strip. That is essential to America's pledge to spare no effort in establishing peace betweent he ancient antagonists and establishing a Palestinian state. B eyond that, Turkey has shepherded con tacts between Israel and Syria, where a suc-c essful outcome could entice Muslim nations across the Middle East into accepting Israel's right to exist. Despite the likely good will, Obama must finesse the tangled issue of Turkey's history w ith Armenia. Historians estimate that up to 1.5 million Armenians were killed by Ottoman T urks leading up to and during World War I, an event widely viewed by many scholars as the f irst genocide of the 20th century. Turkey denies that the deaths constituted genocide, claiming the toll has been inflated and the casualties were victims of civil war and unrest. "The Armenian genocide is not an allegation, a personal opinion, or a point of view, but rather a widely documented fact supported by an overwhelming body of historical evidence," Oba ma said in a January 2008 statement on his camp aign Web site. "America deserves a leader who speaks truthfully about the Armenian genocide and responds forcefully to all genocides. I intend to be that president." So far, Obama aides refuse to say how he will deal with the legacy of that statement while in Turkey. Nor would they predict his stance on a resolution to be introduced soon in the House that describes the killings as genocide. His visi t to Turkey also is uncomfortably close to the annual April 24 Armenian remembrance day. "The smartest thing on Armenia is to try to ignore what he said in the campaign," Martinson said. Then there is Iran. Turkey's eastern neighbour is accused by the United States and most of Washington's European allies of trying to devel op a nuclear weapon. The Turkish government supports Iran's right to develop nuclear energy f or peaceful use but wants Tehran to be transparent about its nuclear programme and favours d ialogue. That goes along with Obama's efforts to open a diplomatic front with Iran and the message from this past week's Group of 20 summit. At that meeting, leaders said Iran must open upi ts nuclear programme and support its claim that it does not intend to build a bomb. (This article was written by Steven R. Hurst of The Associated Press). Promised turtle fishing ban may be in jeopardy LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Obama visit to Turkey no afterthought EDITOR, The Tribune. In regards to the recent letter by Andrew Allen re consumption of turtle meat, I note that the World Wildlife Fund regards six of the seven species of turtle as endangered or critically endangered and 166 nations currently prohibit trade of the species for any purpose which includes consumption. As far as any historical right to consume sea turtles as food, I fully respect the traditional practice which, in a modern world, could be considered the same approach to unique island wildlife assets that led to the extinction of the Dodo on Mauritius. Perhaps Mr Allen would also like to join the Japanese on a “traditional” whale hunt. For how much longer can Bahamians allow a small minority to exploit their natural fauna for profit and faux gastronomy in direct opposition to worldwide conservation efforts? Be assured that the majority of visitors to this beautiful island and many residents find the prac tice of hunting and consuming sea turtles abhorrent. For those that doubt this perhaps an exit survey on endangered species at Nassau Airport would be in order to confirm the fact? Bahamians please look after the many natural treasures that you have, seize the day, a broad ban on the hunting/consumption of sea turtles is long overdue. A RESIDENT Nassau, March 31, 2009. Most visitors find tur tles hunting practice abhor r ent EDITOR, The Tribune. Re: Turtle meat eating is a legitimate part of our culture Tribune March 31. Once upon a time, we used to “enjoy the bounties” of another legit imate part of our culture it was called sponging. KEN W KNOWLES, MD (Turtle pie lover Nassau, March 31, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune . I have a question for Mr. Andrew Allen. Are domestic cows and geese on the Threatened List? A DAMIANOS Nassau, April 1, 2009 A question for Mr Andrew Allen Sponging was also a legitimate part of our culture

PAGE 5

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 5 '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* )$67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5 RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ ( PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP Small Family Islands not affected by the global recession In brief THE New Providence and Grand Bahama clean-up programme is one of the “boldest rip-offs of the public treasury in recent times”, former Works Minister Bradley Roberts claimed. Speaking at a meeting of PLP supporters over the weekend, Mr Roberts said that private properties which are owned by persons w ho could afford to pay for their own clean-ups are been cleared at public expense. “The programme was so badly organised that it has run out of monies. The public could see with their own eyes persons walking up and down streets with little or nothing to do,” he claimed. “The rains will come soon and the weeds will follow and the ripoff will resume.” Mr Roberts said that considerable pressure was placed on FNM MPs for jobs, thus the government’s need for the programme. H e claimed that since coming to office in May 2007, the FNM has fired hundreds of persons perc eived to be PLP supporters and h as replaced them with FNM supporters, not only in the central g overnment but in the governm ent corporations. Mr Roberts said he is also convinced that the FNM, “by their s elfish stupid actions, chased away major foreign investors and has allowed our vital number one industry to badly suffer by fail-i ng to take advantage of the B ahamas’ close vicinity to the US mainland, and is now turning thousands of proud hard-working Bahamians into recipients of funds from the National Insura nce Board.” T he former minister said he did not hear a word of “regret or apology” to the Bahamian people from the prime minister for allow-i ng the major decline in tourism. “Instead Hubert and his Cabinet one by one have without shame threw the blame on the r ecession. Our Bahamian brothe rs and sisters in the main are a proud people with a long history of working for their keep. Hubert Ingraham and his FNM govern-m ent policies are turning more of our people into becoming wards of the state. This is unforgivable,” Mr Roberts said. Calls to Minister of Environment Earl Deveaux asking himt o comment on Mr Roberts’ claims about the clean-up cam-p aign were not returned up to press time last night. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net WHILE countries around the world experience economic hardships due to the global recession, islanders in the isolated communities of Cat Island and Crooked Island have not been affected, according to Local Government officials. Unlike the industrialised cities of Nassau and Freeport, residents of smaller communities, which depend on incomes generated by tourism, farming or fishing, claim the state of the economy in their islands isno different than it was this time last year. Phillesa Thurston, secretary to the Cat Island administrat or, said residents she spoke to w hile travelling from one end o f the island to the other had no complaints about feeling the effects of the global economic crisis. And she said around five out of ten cars she passed were carrying tourists visiting the island. There are around five major hotels in Cat Island, none of which are experiencing a drop in visitors compared to last year, Ms Thurston said. “In the islands we would not feel it as bad as you would in Nassau,” she said. “We see a lot of tourists every day and there are five or six yachts in the harbour, and those people come to shore and look at the craft work, so I think everybody is faring pretty well.” Tight-knit Ms Thurston pointed out that because the communities within the just 1,500-strong population of Cat Island are very tight-knit, people lookout for each other in times of trouble. “On the island everybody is their brother’s and sis ter’s keeper,” she said. “So you can go to the neighbours if you don’t have some thing, or you can go to the farm to reap crops. “Farming is the main thing, so the only problem there is that the weather has been extremely dry. But the crops that are farmed, are sold,” she said. Hylene Moss, chief clerkto the administrator in Crooked Island, said residentsin this southern constituency are also faring well in these tough economic times. She maintains that the cash flow on the island, which has a population of only 280 people, is just as it was this time last year. “I guess there are no changes we are used to eco nomic crises up here so it comes natural to us every thing seems to be going thesame. “We still have a few tourists coming in, and most persons are self-employed in fishing and sport-fishing, so they are still taking guests out. We have very little farming, people farm for themselves. “And over here you are your brother’s keeper, so everybody is still happy,” she said. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A great-grandmother is blaming negligent staff at the Princess Margaret Hospital for an injurious fall from bed following a spinal surgery which required her to undergo four additional surgeries. Pensioner Betty Antonio, 60, and her husband Hugh, 67, say they have paid out $25,000, which was put aside for their retirement, to pay for Mrs Antonio’s operations and medical care in the last two years. Yet Mrs Antonio is still in constant pain. She has no feeling in her left leg, is unable to walk without the aid of a walker, cannot bathe herself, and her husband of 44 years, who suffers from glaucoma, is her full-time caregiver. Another operation is needed to repair her damaged spine, but the Antonios, who have a combined monthly pension of $547, are no longer in a position to pay for it. They are seeking compensation from the Public Hospitals Authority to cover the costs of her multiple operations and medication to ease her prolonged pain and suffering. Mrs Antonio maintains she fell from her hospital bed after her first operation in April 2007. She claims nurses neglected to bring her a bedpan when she called, and there were no rails on the side of her bed stopping her from trying to get up to use the toilet in her dazed state following the surgery. “When I fell out of bed it felt like fire went through my body,” she said. Doctors told her the nurses should have put up rails at the sides of her bed and responded when she called, Mrs Antonio said. The mother-of-five is trying to obtain hospital records detailing her series of operations and health problems to seek compensation from the Public Hospitals Authority. She claims she was unable to walk after the operation and was advised to travel to Florida with her husband and daughter to get an MRI scan. She then returned to the United States for a second MRI, costing a total of $1,800. The couple then had to pay $5,000 for a pain relief system to ease her suffering while she waited for a second operation in November 2007 to insert artificial discs in her back at the cost of $8,000. But the artificial discs only brought more discomfort, as one of the screws did not hold, Mrs Antonio said. Prescribed pain relief medication now costs her $725 per month, “and the point is, it still isn’t working, I’m still in pain,” she said. Mrs Antonio had three subsequent surgeries in December, 2007, January 2008, and November 2008, to drain the surgical wound infec tion, and she now requires another operation. However, she has had so many spinal surgeries in the last two years, surgeons will need to perform a complicated operation cutting through her front and side, she said. And she and her husband are no longer in a position to afford the surgery. She said: “It is a long time I have been suffering and it’s like the Hospital Authority don’t care. I can’t bathe myself, can’t stand at the stove to cook must I live like this for the rest of my life? That’s not fair. You go into the hospital to get help and you come out worse than you come in. I am appealing to the Minister of Health and the prime minister to deal with this. “I don't have any intention of being swept under the carpet anymore. I need help because I can't help myself. “I have given them ample time to address the situation and this should have been addressed a long time ago.” A spokesman for the Public Hospitals Authority was unable to track Mrs Antonio’s case to respond to her complaint before The Tri bune went to press yesterday. ‘This is one of the boldest rip-offs’ Former Minister criticises New Providence and Grand Bahama clean-up programme Bradley Roberts “When I fell out of bed it felt like fir e went through my body.” Betty Antonio T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEEKING COMPENSATION: Betty Antonio and husband Hugh. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. Pain-wracked pensioner accuses PMH staf f of negligence following bed fall

PAGE 6

JEALOUSY of the PLP’s achievements is preventing theg overnment from allowing TG G lover students and teachers from returning to their classrooms, former Minister of Works Bradley Roberts claimed as he addressed PLP supporters at a party meeting over thew eekend. B y not moving the teachers into the facility, Mr Roberts said, the FNM is denying the thousands of people of the greater Chippingham area access to a state-of-the-art primary school. “This project was also placed o n hold (because of C abinet Ministers’ insane claim of the school been built on a toxic waste dump site, which turned out to be a simple case of monkey tamarind. The fourto fivem onth delay has increased the c ost of construction and ( delayed) the occupancy of the school by the students and the teachers,” Mr Roberts said. “It therefore does in no way surprise me that the Ingraham g overnment would take the decis ion that it appears moving t owards to deny the working c lass people of greater Chip pingham, Boyd Road, Boyd subd ivision, Farrington Road, the Quarry Mission Road and theB ain and Grants Town areas – in s hort Fort Charlotte and the Bain and Grants Town constituencies’ residents of the use of a state-of-the-art primary s chool which has been promised t o them for many years. This is also a big slap in the face of the t eachers of the former TG Glover School who have waited for some three years to move into new and modern facilities.” Mr Roberts said now that the s chool is nearing completion, and the “beauty and sensible p lanning which characterise the structure is now evident to all, it has aroused a sense of jealousy that here is an edifice conceiveda nd largely executed by the former PLP government.” “The senior establishment in the Ministry of Education has b een persuaded to go along with t he ruse that the school is not suitable for primary school children, even though with the e xception of the departure of Minister Sears, the permanent secretary and the director, theyw ere of one joyous accord when t he project was conceptualised, designed and when construction began. One is prompted to ask what has brought about the sudden change of heart. The answer lies deep in the twisted logic oft he government of our nation,” Mr Roberts said. Theformerminister explained that when the PLP came to office in 2002, former Education M inster Alfred Sears discovered t hat children and teachers were o ccupying a school building that was condemned by structural engineers from the Ministry ofW orks. Immediate action was ordered by Mr Sears to discontinue hold ing classes at the school, Mr R oberts said. During the summer break, the former minister said, additional c lassrooms were built at the Albury Sayles Primary School on Nassau Street to accommo d ate the majority of the students. It was then determined that a new primary school would beb uilt on the old TG Glover School site. The contract for construction of the new building was signed on July 17, 2006 and construction was well under way when the PLP left office in May 2007. T he current government has since been threatened by industrial action from teachers of TG Glover who want to be placed in their own facilities. M inister of Education Carl B ethel told T he Tribune t hat he h as met with the teachers of the primary school and their discus sions were “very positive.” I explained to them the government's concerns about theH orseshoe Drive building, they agreed with me on a number of p oints, not all, as to its unsuitability as a primary school. “And of course I expressed to t hem my understanding of their great frustration and my sympathy for them and my determina-t ion as minister to ensure come S eptember they will walk in to appropriately built T G Glover Primary School premises. Andt hey seem to have accepted my presentation,” Mr Bethel said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE * All prices are net. EAGLE ELECTRICAL &LIGHTING2" GALVANIZED PIPE* 4X4 BOXES ENJOY EASTER WITH EAGLE! E A S T E R S P E C I A L S ! Tel (242 Fax (242 Email: eaglebahamas@gmail.com * All prices are net.6" RECESSED CANS TV CABLE1000' ROLL* #14 THHN WIRE 500' ROLL* $ 3 0 . 0 0 TELEPHONE WIRE1000' ROLL* Don’t miss out on these SUPER SAVINGS. ONE WEEK ONLY!CAT 5 WIRE 1000' ROLL* $ 9 9 . 0 0 $ 8 1 . 0 0 $ 7 5 . 0 0 $ 1 1 . 0 0 $ 2 . 2 5 $ 1 3 8 . 6 0 ONE WEEK ONLY!!! $ 1 . 0 0 1/2" PVC PIPE Roberts slams govt over TG Glover delay n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – This Easter, sermon performances by the Bahamia n cast of God’s Trombone will be shown during a film screening at the Simpson C Penn Talent Theatre in Grand Bahama. Frank Penn, of GBI Recording Studios, is premiering the film version of the 1995 performances on April 10 and April 11 at 7.30pm at the theatre on Queens Highway. T he production will also be shown in Nassau at the National Theatre of the Performing Arts at 5pm and 7pm on Sunday, April 19, and at 7.30pm on April 20. A donation of $10 is required. Director Gloria McGlone, Brian Roxbury and Portia Colebrooke were among the original B ahamian cast that performed the production 14 years ago in Freeport. Ms McGlone, a former Broadway actress, said the original God’s Trombone production was performed on Broadway about 25 to 30 years ago by very well-known b lack actors such as James Earl Jones. T he Bahamian production featured some of the best actors on the island such as Brian Roxbury, Tawari Rodgers, Bert Duncanson, Denika Penn, the late Kristin Penn-Davis and the late Bessimae Nottage, who performed Christ’sP assion. “It is a compilation of sermons y ou hear in the black churches of Jonah or Moses delivering the Jews out of Egypt and the singing of old religious hymns and spirituals,” she explained. Ms McGlone said that the production is very moving and sheb elieves that audiences will enjoy the film. We had church every night and during the production, a number of persons in the show found their anointing and it was very heartfelt,” she said. Ms McGlone believes that the screening, which is being released this Easter by Mr Penn, is very timely. “The world is in turmoil and I think God’s Trombone is about basic religion and getting back to the root of the stories we all know and trusted in and found our way through,” she said. Performances of Bahamian cast of God’s Trombone to be screened Claim that FNM ‘jealous’ of PLP achievements T T h h e e f f o o u u r r t t o o f f i i v v e e m m o o n n t t h h d d e e l l a a y y h h a a s s i i n n c c r r e e a a s s e e d d t t h h e e c c o o s s t t o o f f c c o o n n s s t t r r u u c c t t i i o o n n a a n n d d ( ( d d e e l l a a y y e e d d ) ) t t h h e e o o c c c c u u p p a a n n c c y y o o f f t t h h e e s s c c h h o o o o l l b b y y t t h h e e s s t t u u d d e e n n t t s s a a n n d d t t h h e e t t e e a a c c h h e e r r s s . . B radley Roberts

PAGE 7

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 7 -t-($ Zt#56'4#.' THE Bahamas emerged as the country to win the most awards at this year’s Caribbean Gospel Music Marlin Awards. Securing a total of 28 awards at the event held last week at the Diplomat Centre, the Bahamas took first place, with Jamaica coming in second with thirteen awards. Third place went to Trinidad and Tobago with a total of ten awards. Leading the pack was the Mount Tabor praise and worship team, which won three Marlin Awards including one for Adapted Praise and Worship Recording of the Year for their remake of the contemporary worship anthem “Amazed” and another for Praise and Worship Recording of the Year for their original hit single “Don’t Do It Without Me” featuring pastor/author and recording artist Bishop Paul Morton. Mount Tabor also made history by becoming the recipients of the first ever Record of the Year Award, one of two online voting cate gories introduced by the Marlin Awards this year and coordinated and managed by Jamaican media personality Arnold Kelly and his Caribbean Hour organisation. Bahamian classical singer JoAnn Callender took home three awards including one for Special Event Recording of the Year for her jazz inspired Christmas single “Silent Night.” She also won two awards along with Manifest, CEO of Dunamus Soundz Records, for the hip hop meets opera smash hit “I Shall Rise.” Manifest also won Hip Hop Record ing of the Year. Simeon Outten won two awards including Rake and Scrape Vocal Performance of the Year and Traditional Recording of the Year for “Thank You,” a testimonial record about how he and his family overcame the loss of their home and personal belongings following a major hurricane in Freeport several years ago. Also winning two awards was the male vocal group “Vision”who took home the award for Contemporary Vocal Performance of the Year-Duo/Group for their radio hit “Evidence” and the other for Music Video of the Year Duo for their remake of the Visionaries classic “Brand New World.” Lion of Judah CEO MontyG won two awards as well, one along with his sonic partner DJ Frost for Producer of the Year, and the other along with Trinidad reggae singer Positive for Reggae Vocal Performance of the YearDuo for their single “I Want to Know.” Composer Finally, veteran composer and producer Chris Fox also won two more Marlin Awards to add to his trophy mantle. Mr Fox won for Instrumental Record of the Year for “Then Look At Me” and for Adapt ed Contemporary Recording of the Year for his remake of the old American classic “Heaven Help us All,” with some help from Ameri-c an gospel soul singer Bob Bailey. Other top award winners included Christian Massive (Junkanoo Recording of the Year- “Create”); Demetrius Stubbs (Rake and Scrape Recording of the Year-“Revolution”); The RahmingBrothers (Traditional Vocal Performance Duo/Group-“Bring Them In”); Hubert McIntosh (Traditional Vocal Performance of the Year-Male-“Restored”); Vago (Contemporary Vocal Performance of the Year-Male-“Take Me Higher”); Da Squad (Hip Hop Vocal Performance of the YearDuo/Group-“No Wayz Tired”); CMA (Adapted Rake and Scrape Vocal Performance of the Year-“We Acknowledge You”); Brendalee Petty (Adapted Traditional Recording of the Year-“Grace Grace”); Dano Rolle (Adapted Reggae Recording of the Year-“I Need You to Survive”); Professa(Hip Hop Vocal Performance of the Year-Solo-“Back Up Off Me”); Avalanchee (Reggae Hip Hop Recording of the Year-“Hold On Strong”) and the award for Choir/Chorale Recording of the Year went toMinister Denczil Rolle Presents COGIBINC Mass Youth Choir for their debut album “Our Worship-Live in Nassau.” The Rev Arthur Preacher Rolle Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to the Bahamian gospel group “The Elevations” for their contribution towards the development and advancement of Bahamian gospel music for the past forty years. Most of the original members of the group were on hand to accept their well-deserved award. The Marlin Awards are produced by Harris Communications and are held bi-annually in Nassau, Bahamas. ABOVE: The Bahamian gospel group ‘The Elevations’ accept the Rev Arthur Preacher Rolle L ifetime Achievement Award for their contribution towards the development and advancement of Bahamian gospel music for the past forty years. LEFT: Simeon Outten won two awards including Rake and Scrape Vocal Performance of the Year and Traditional Recording of the Year for ‘Thank You’, a testimonial record abouth ow he and his family overcame the loss of their home and personal belongings following a major hurricane in Freeport several years ago. Bahamian gospel artists dominate Marlin Awards

PAGE 8

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ECUMENICALSERVICESHolyWeek For More Information Telephone: 323-8220@St. Matthew’s Anglican ChurchChurch & Shirley StreetCome Worship with US! P ALM SUNDA Y April 5th – 7:15am Eucharist, Blessing of Palms and Sermon; 10:00am Blessing of Palms, Procession E ucharist, & Sermon; 7:00pm – Mission Service MONDAYApril 6th 7:00pm – Stations of the Cross. TUESDAYApril 7th – 7:00am Mass; 7:00pm – Service of Reconciliation WEDNESDAYApril 8th – Mass 7:00am & 1:00pm at St. Matthew’s. AMass of the Chrism, Christ Church Cathedral at 7:30PM. MAUNDY THURSDA Y April 9th – 7:00pm Holy Eucharist, W ashing of Feet and Watch before the Altar of Repose. GOOD FRIDA Y April 10th – 9:00am Liturgy for Good Friday; 12noon – 3:00pm Seven Last Words from the Cross. EASTER DA Y April 12th – 6:00am The Great Easter Vigil & H oly Eucharist; 10:45am – Solemn High Mass, Procession (Within the church) LIVE RADIO BROADCAST. 7:00pm Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction. global economic turbulence will bottom out and rebound. Last week Standard and Poor's predicted that the country's gross domestic product (GDP decline by two per cent in 2009 and one per cent in 2010. The estimate was based on the Bahamas' dependence on tourism as a driving economic force and lack of a diversified economy. "I believe even that is an optimistic forecast. In other words that that advice I hope it is so, I hope that the contraction in the economy is only to that extent but given the fact that foreign direct investment also is a driving component in our economy and the prospects for that in any significant degree, from where I sit, is also dismal. "And people are perhaps taking a 'wait and see' attitude that the contraction could even be greater," said Mr Christie, who added that government should take the recent projections into account when it introduces its budget next month. Late last year the agency lowered its outlook on the Bahamas to negative from stable due to worries about the country’s retarding economic growth, a weakened tourism sector, compounded with reduced investment and consumer demand from 2008 and 2009. Last year S and P also revised the Bahamas' GDP growth forecast for 2008 and 2009 to 1.1 per cent and 1 per cent, respectively, down from its previous forecast of 3 per cent and 4 per cent growth, respectively. These harsh economic realities were highlighted in recent reported comments by the prime minister who told the press that government intends to borrow more money outside of a $200 million loan recently approved by Parliament. It's a measure government may have to take in the face of dwindling revenues and rising unemployment all consequences of the troubled tourism industry hit hard by the global recession. "The prime minister has indicated that there may be a need for additional borrowing it only serves to underscore the advice we are receiving as to how grim the circumstances are and how potentially difficult the times ahead are," said Mr Christie. "The government is obviously facing what appears to be an unprecedented deterioration of the economy of the Bahamas, and that's strong. The Americans describe the impact on their economy as the worst since the Great Depression which is again strong. I suspect that the prime minister is warning the country that there are further difficult times ahead and he is unable to predict the extent to which it will go and the duration of the difficult times." About two weeks ago, Mr Ingraham told Parliament that government revenue collection for the first quarter of 2009 was "disastrous". He added that the country is facing "the most challenging" economic factors that most Bahamians have ever seen. Last week Mr Christie, with a delegation of Opposition members, met with representatives of the International Monetary Fund. While he declined to get into the specifics of that meeting, the former prime minister said their discussion reflected similar statements the group had previously made to government and the Central Bank. "The meeting was a briefing of what happened and we have agreed that essentially the views expressed by them at this stage are still confidential. That is because it leads into the government's preparations of the budget next month," he said. development.” “We’re really combing through the agreement on both sides to really see if we can make any kind of adjustments that would enable it to move forward. (The developers) come back to us occasionally on a number of items for us to respond to and so far we’ve done all we can to facilitate them,” said the minister. Developers are progressing with the island’s infrastructural requirements, but have been “really slowed down” when it comes to moving ahead on the construction of accommodation. “That’s another matter, because obviously you want to get a return on that investment immediately,” said the Minister. Developers are in a strong position financially, with a “great deal of their financing already identified” prior to the present crisis, but Mr Vanderpool Wallace suggested that financiers generally want to see an “uptick in global conditions first before they begin to advance the kinds of things that are going to need an immediate investment.” Meanwhile, despite interest from high end boutique hotel brands in operating the resort’s hotel once completed remains “very strong”, Mr Vanderpool Wallace said there is yet to be any firm commitment on this aspect of the project. “We are looking at a number of brand name hotel developers that have been down there and will continue to go down there to look at the site because it’s generally agreed that it’s a wonderful opportunity, but needless to say in the kind of global environment we have now very few people are making those kind of commitments immediately,” said the minister. Initial construction of the grand “anchor project” heralded as being worth $1.8 billon in total began on Mayaguana in January 2005. The project is ultimately envisioned as including an air port, utilities, a marina village, private condominiums and vil las, a boutique resort, as well as “commercial, industrial, social and educational devel opments and nature preserves.” A Heads of Agreement, signed in March 2006, formalised the project as a joint venture between the Mayaguana Development Company Ltd and the Hotel Corporation of the Bahamas. Under the agreement, 9,999 acres of land on the island of 300 inhabitants was to be conveyed to the developers in stages, and if they were unable to meet agreed milestones, would be re-conveyed to the Government. “They are continuing with the infrastructural development, with the airport and road development, and they are putting in place accommodations for people who need to come down there to see the project so they can stay there comfortably. “So they’re beginning to put all the bits and pieces in place to ensure that any investor is clear that they are committed to the project,” said Mr Vanderpool Wallace. As to a ball park completion date for the sprawling development, the minister declined to speculate. “It’s hard to say,” he said. Contacted yesterday for comment on the project’s progress, Mayaguana island administrator Harvey Roberts declined to speak with The Tribune on the matter, while resident project manager Tim Haffner referred this newspa per to Boston-based Executive Vice President Stephen Pritchard. A message left for Mr Pritchard was not returned up to press time. European Commission has not accepted the offer made by the Bahamas in terms of how much of its trade in services this country is willing to liberalise under the EPA. A team of technocrats from the Ministry of Finance is now scheduled to meet and negotiate with European officials in Brussels, Belgium, on Thursday April 9th less than a week ahead of the April 15th deadline given to this country to complete its services offer to Europe. In view of the proximity to the deadline, already one that has been extended for the Bahamas beyond that given to other Caribbean countries, Mr Mitchell yesterday claimed that “some body has messed up” and “there is clearly a problem.” “We are concerned about the fact that the agreement itself may be in jeopardy. A lot of work has been put into bringing this to a successful conclusion to protect the access of crawfish into the market and we want to make sure this continues,” said Mr Mitchell. Contradicting the EPA source, Mr Mitchell said he does not see Europe extending the deadline again for the Bahamas. Government officials have pre viously admitted that it was pri marily the intention to save Bahamian exports, such as crawfish, from losing their duty free access to the European market that drove this country to sign onto the wide-ranging EPA. The Government, along with all other Caricom countries, signed the goods portion of the EPA in October of last year to p rotect this industry, at the same time committing itself to gradually reducing import duties on goods coming in from Europe to the Bahamas. It was then given a six month extension until April 15th to complete its offer under the ser vices portion of the EPA, which i nvolves offering to open up trade between the Bahamas and Europe in services such as construction or healthcare in return for reciprocal benefits. But after submitting its offer, it found that Europe was not happy with what was being put on the table. The Bahamas is now being questioneda s to whether it will offer more. Mr Mitchell criticised Mr Laing for what he termed “masterful obfuscation” in comments he made to The Nassau Guardian on the status of this country’s ser vices offer to the European Commission. While Mr Laing told the newspaper that the country’s offer in terms of how much of its trade in services it is willing to liberalise h ad not been rejected by Europe, he submitted that it had not been accepted. But Mr Mitchell said: “If an offer is not accepted then it’s rejected, there’s no in between.” “What we want to know is: What were the terms of the offer that has now been rejected and is i t true that our failure to meet the deadline of the 15th of April may jeopardise the entire agree ment and thereby put our fishing industry at risk?” asked the Fox Hill MP. In contrast to earlier critics who claimed the Government was giving away too much under theE PA, Mr Mitchell suggested that government may have tried to limit its liberalisation too much in order to protect Bahamian industries. “You have to show a good faith effort of reciprocity...and I think that is where the difficulty lies today,” he said. S ee today’s Business section for more information on this issue. your claim, they will then check your records to see whether or not you are registered with this number, that these contributions have come in on your behalf,” Mr Ingraham said. “They may not be able to call each and every employer to see whether o r not (a claimant mation to be able to make a judgment, and while you might get that first cheque before (the end the second one they ought to be able to verify what has happened. "So there may be some cases where somebody may receive a benefit that is not continued because of information that's discovered. The truth of the matter is that there are always some people, a minority, who seek to collect something that they're not entitled to I don't want to frighten anybody, but there are very stiff penalties under the National Insurance Act for persons who do such things," he said. Mr Ingraham added that anyone found guilty of such an offence will be made an example of in order to deter copycats. He urged those persons who know they are ineligible to receive benefits not to apply. Under the National Insurance Act anyone who knowingly makes any false statement or false representation; or produces, furnishes, causes or knowingly allows to be produced or furnished, any document or infor mation which he knows to be false in a material particular, could be fined not more than $2,500 or imprisoned for not more than 12 months, or both. Applicants will be eligible for the benefit if they are currently unem ployed; under 65; not self-employed; able to and willing to work; were last employed on or after July 1, 2004; not receiving other NIB benefits, oth er than disability or survivors benefits; and have made a certain number of contributions to NIB. Unemployed persons whose employer deducted contributions from their wages but did not pay NIB will still be eligible for the benefit, although the claim may take a little longer to be processed, Mr Ingraham said. The unprecedented unemployment scheme, set to come into effect on April 20, will provide qualified unemployed persons with a maximum of $200 per week for a maximum of 13 weeks at a time. During the 13-week period, claimants must remain unemployed, be available and willing to work, must not refuse suitable employment, an interview or training. They will be subject to a review by the Department of Labour every four weeks as long as they receive the benefit. Once people have received unemployment benefit for 13 weeks they will be ineligible to access such funds again for the next 52 weeks. these are indeed challenging times and can empathise with prudent measures, we emphasise that the government established a bold precedent by signing off on the industrial agreement contracts for BEC and BTC in these very same challenging times. “This action, or inaction, on their part speaks volumes to our members!” The union leaders said the press conference was prompted by Minister for the Environment Earl Deveaux’s failure to respond to a letter sent on March 13, addressing union concerns and requesting a five per cent salary package of the contractual period from July 2007 to June 2010 after government offered a 4.5 per cent salary increase at the end of last year, and then replaced it with a zero per cent offer until 2010. Outraged union leaders argued employees are not able to meet the rising cost of living without a corresponding pay increase. They disputed government claims that the increased subsidy from $19 million to $30 million allocated to the Water and Sewerage Corporation (WSC went towards their salaries, as it was instead spent on construction of the Blue Hills Reverse Osmosis (RO costs to its detriment. And they blamed the lack of a permanent general manager over the last six years for ineffective organisation of the WSC. A restructuring exercise intended for completion in January, has not yet been implemented, Mr Rolle said, and he argued an effective mains renewal programme is needed to address the increasing number of reports of rusty water and water shortages throughout New Providence. The WSMU president said: “Address the issues that you should and having funds to pay your staff and provide water throughout the islands will not be a problem. “Today we speak in unison as we amplify our call for the government and executives to do the right thing by our employees, this corporation, and our country. “Our corporation is beset with problems and the government must address them. Not next week, not next month, not next year, but now.” Ms Kemp added: “We don’t have any wish to harm the Bahamian people, we just want them to hear our plight and be sensitive to our plight. “We had no intention of taking a strike, we just wanted to express our displeasure, but we are not afraid of industrial action.” John Pinder, president of the National Congress of Trade Unions (NCTU Robert Farquharson also lent their support to the WSC unions. SEE PAGETHREE a helpful hand, and to do everything in our power to provide a safe, secure and holistic environment that is conducive to education at the Eight Mile Rock High School,” he said. Mr Bethel said that the teachers felt “stigmatized” by the alleged events, which have been highly publi cised in the media. He stated that Dr David Allen will begin the process of giving guidance to teachers as to what the appro priate boundaries and limitations are when dealing with students. “With Dr Allen’s help, he is seeking to help teachers find their bearings to know the danger zones, the ‘no go’ zones, to know what the limitation and boundaries are, and how to coordinate efforts offered by the Ministry of Education. “As we review the safe school manualthe Depart ment of Education in close consultation with Dr Allen and other professionals will devise guidelines affecting every aspect of teacher contact with students,” Mr Bethel said. He noted that teachers also will be given instructions of what to do when a child comes to them in confidence about a crisis. Andre Birbal, a former art teacher, has been accused of molesting two former students at Eight Mile Rock High. The Trinidadian teacher, who has fled the country, is currently being sought by Bahamian police to be questioned in connection with accusations of committing acts of unnatural intercourse. Police have also launched investigations into alleged molestation complaints against two other teachers who have also been removed from the school. Since the incidents, the Ministry of Education plans to have all new teachers vetted by police. Minister Bethel said that there was always an estab lished procedure requiring persons to submit a police certificate or record to the Ministry of Education. “That is usually a very good indicator of character. Some teachers have served for many years, and the teacher in question at Eight Mile Rock, Mr Birbal, was there for more than 20 years,” he said. Minister Bethel also held a meeting with teachers in the entire district at 4pm at the Hilton Outten Con vention Centre at 4pm. He also met with PTA officials at the Eight Mile Rock High at 7pm. FROM page one Christie Water and Sewerage FROM page one E arl Deveaux F ROM page one PLP concern Eight Mile Rock High School FROM page one ‘Harsh penalties’ FROM page one FROM page one G ovt seeking to remove Mayaguana anchor project ‘impediments’

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 9 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net SPRINTER Chamal Bethel is in some unique company training in Jamaica. By August, he’s hoping to be running along side them at the IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Germany. Home to attend the funeral service of his grandmother on Saturday, Bethel said he’s looking forward to turning in a good performance when he competes on August 18. “This year, coach has already seen some bad habits and he started to correct them, so whenI go back, I will continue to work on improving my performances,” Bethel said. For the first two years, the 23-year-old 2003 graduate of St John’s College has been in Jamaica training in the High Performance Track Club camp that features world champion Usain Bolt. But Bethel, who is studying marketing and economy at the University of Technology, has switched to the MVP Track Club, coached by Steve Francis and led by former world champion Asafa Powell. So far this year, Bethel has ran in two meets, coming fifth in the first event in the 100 before he came across the finish line first in the last meet. He has done a season’s best of 10.72, but he’s looking forward to surpassing his personal best of 10.69. “I’m just trying to put together my season,” he said. “The passing of my grandmother has really opened up my eyes a lot, so I’ve decided to dedicate the r est of the season to her.” B ethel said he’s really thrilled t o have the opportunity to work with coach Francis, who is very sociable and makes sure that he does the necessary things to be competitive. Nation-aside, Bethel said he was even more surprised that both Francis and the other members of the Jamaican n ational training squad have g racefully accepted and assisted h im in his preparation. “It’s all about making each other better,” Bethel said. “They have been trying to learn from our culture and they have been teaching me some things about their culture.” On top of it all, Bethel said he has forged a good working relationship with both Bolt and Powell. In fact, Bethel said contrary to what might be perceived as a rivalry between the two top sprinters is actually a cordial relationship. “There’s a lot of talk on the streets in Jamaica about who is really the fastest man,” Bethel said. “But they both spent a lot of time around each other. “They are close friends and they are always interested in the best for each other because they know that at the end of the day, it will be Jamaica who will be in the forefront.” Last year, despite nursing a s light injury, Bethel came home a nd finished second in the B f inal of the men’s 100 at the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations’ National Open Track and Field Championships at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium. With a chance to qualify for the IAAF World Championships, Bethel is hoping that when he comes home to compete at this year’s Nationals in June, he will get an opportunity to finally make the national team and join his former St John’s team-mate Andretti Bain and even possibly Tyrone Sawyer. “My goal is to eventually become a world champion,” Bethel said. “It might be a little difficult right now, but I believe that everybody will have their chance to succeed and I’m just waiting on my own. “Derrick Atkins went and he put us out, but we still have a lot more sprinters like myself, Adrian Griffith, Dominic D emeritte and Jamial Rolle. I j ust want to be able to compete w ith these guys and make a contribution to the national team.” No doubt with the intense training in the internationally recognised camp, Bethel, the son of Charmaine and Steven Bethel, said he will be able to produce some stellar times this year. Sprinter has high hopes for IAAF World Championships n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net A 20-member team from the No Bull Basketball Club left town yesterday for a nineday trip to Toronto, Canada, for a college recruitment and exhibition series. The trip is an annual one for the club headed by Geno Bullard, coach of the Westminster Diplomats. “This trip is more or less trying to expose our guys to the next level,” said Bullard just before they departed the Lynden Pindling International Airport. “We know that our boys play a lot of basketball, but on this trip, we will have a lot of scouts and coaches from the various schools in Toronto, who will be there to watch our boys in hopes of giving them scholarships to attend their schools.” At least five schools, including Seneca College, Humber College, Ridley College, York University and Shreidan Col lege are expected to be a part of this year’s exhibition series. While in Toronto, the players will also get to watch a live National Basketball Association (NBA Raptors from Toronto and the Philadelphia 76ers on Sunday, April 12. Also during the trip, the team will visit Niagara Falls before they are due to return home on Tuesday, April 14. No Bull, founded back in 2003, is based on the motivating philosophy of providing fundamental skill develop ment instruction for young student-athletes in the community (boys and girls have a desire to compete in a high level of basketball competition. Bullard said their programme and all of their coaches are committed to providing an opportunity for players to expand both their knowledge and their love for the game of basketball in an environment that teaches respect, teamwork, sportsmanship, commit ment and hard work. He noted that their goal is to strive for excellence, both on and off the court. The trip to Canada, according to Bullard, will help to further motivate the younger g uys, who make up the majority of the team as they start looking towards their future. “Hopefully this will make it easy for them to make that transition to the next level,” Bullard said. “We have three seniors who are graduating from Westminster and a couple seniors who are in the club to get them off to school.” Through the trip, Bullard said No Bull should be able to accomplish its feat of bringing about a balance with athletics and academics for its players. No Bull in Toronto for college recruitment, exhibition CHAMAL BETHEL ALPHEUS ‘HAWK’ FINLAYSON , BAAAs president Curt Hollingsworth, Sports Minister Desmond Bannister, BSF president Algernon Cargill and Bahamasair general sales and market ing manager Mike Sands at Monday’s press conference... T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f such requests as this, it means that all of our operational departments go into a full mode of making major adjustmentst o our schedule, particularly w ith it being Easter weekend and we had to take into consideration that we have a number of schedules that we have to be able to maintain with integrity,” he said. “On behalf of the management and the board at Bahamasair, we wish the teams all the best and we will work closely with national sports federations, not just for Bahamasair to be the carrier of choice on international routes but most definitely on domestic routes as well.” BSF president Algernon Cargill said procuring the direct charter to and from the games for the team has been an eventfree experience for the first time in his tenure as president. “In previous Carifta (Games we have always had a problem in trying to finalize the Bahamasair charter. I would be the first to say this is the smoothest its gone since I have been president in 2003. The Ministry of Sports came to the BSF very early in the process and asked us to outline what our needs were and all we had to do was pretty much outline to the minister that we needed a charter and frankly I have had a back seat from then and all of the arrangements have been made to the full satisfaction of the BSF,” he said. “It is important for our team to arrive at an international meet on the national flag carrier and it really gets the team going on a positive feeling and that can go a long way in contributing to the performances of the swimmers.” Cargill said while the team’s performances in the past have warranted lofty expectations from the Bahamian public, winning the games and the even tual medal count is a secondary goal for the team and the federation. “The BSF is indeed proud to have a 36-member team headed to Aruba and what is significant about our team this year is we have a team of 36 qualifiers. In other words every member of our team has earned the right to represent the Bahamas through our qualification process. What we are proud of is that the team has done extremely well at Carifta over the last five years, even coming within a few points of winning one year,” he said. “The message we want to leave the Bahamas is that while our expectations are high for this team, winning is not the only important thing. What we try to do in the Swimming Federation is create good role models and secondly ensure that our swimmers perform at the best level. We do not want to put too much pressure on our swim mers. Although we really want them to win it is not the most important thing for us. What is important is the team represents the country well and also that they perform at their best.” BAAAs president Curt Hollingsworth said the team is eager to finally begin competition after weeks of diligent preparation. “The team that has been put together they are ready and prepared for competition in St Lucia,” he said. “The athletes, coaches and management team, they are all prepared and the association is 100 per cent behind them.” T T r r a a v v e e l l I I t t i i n n e e r r a a r r y y f f o o r r C C a a r r i i f f t t a a T T e e a a m m s s A A p p r r i i l l 8 8 – Track and Field team departs Nassau at 11am; arrives in Provo at 12:15pm Teams depart Provo at 1pm; arrive in St Lucia at 3:15pm A A p p r r i i l l 9 9 – Friends and Family members of Track and Field team depart Nassau at 9:30pm; arrive in St Lucia at 12:15am A A p p r r i i l l 1 1 4 4 – Track and Field Teams depart St Lucia at 10am; arrives in Provo at 12:15pm Track and Field Team departs Provo at 1am; arrives in Nassau at 2:15pm Swim team departs Nassau at 8am; arrives in Aruba at 10:30am Friends and Family members of Track and Field team depart St Lucia at 2:30pm; arrive in Nassau at 5:15pm A A p p r r i i l l 2 2 0 0 Swim team departs Aruba at 1pm; arrives in Nassau at 3:30pm Carifta teams to fly private with Bahamasair Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1

PAGE 10

n By DIANE PHILLIPS THREE-time Sunfish world champion Donnie Martinboro ugh sailed to victory in the International Sunfish Masters championship in late March, b eating a field of 55 sailors and achieving the one goal that had eluded him in a nearly-perfect career, a victory in American waters. “What made this personal f eat so special was that it with a ll the racing over all the years, i ncluding 10 wins in Bermuda R ace Week and three world c hampionships in different c ountries, it was the very first t ime that I won on US soil,” s aid Martinborough, who outs ailed and out-manuevered m ore than 50 Sunfish sailors from the US and a handful f rom other nations in the age 4 0 and over event held in Tamp a Bay. M artinborough, 49, was the only Bahamian who competed in the 9-race series. Based o n low point scoring, with the right to discard one race, Mar-t inborough finished with only 13 points of the eight scored races. T wo-time defending champ ion Tim Whitehurst of Pensacola, Florida, finished second with 18 points, tied with A nne Edwards, also of the US, with 18 points. In the case of a tie, the person with the highest n umber of best finishes takes the higher spot. According to Martinboro ugh, who now has 14 international titles, the greatest challenge was wind – too little o f it. “We had light and variable winds the entire series,” said Martinborough, “so my starts were extremely difficult. There were one or two races where I g ot into trouble early so I was p leased to recover and turn in a respectable finish.” M artinborough said recent i ntensive training preparing for t he 2009 world championship s lated for the Bahamas in O ctober helped him fight his w ay back after less than perfect s tarts. “The start line was really c rowded. You’ve got 55 boats t rying to cross the line at one t ime and with light winds, y ou’ve got to make a clean start and search for clear air as fast as you can.” F or the slightly-built sailor, light winds were a disadvan-t age, but recent practice, he said, paid off. “We’ve been doing a lot of l ocal sailing as a build-up for t he upcoming world championship with good competition f rom local sailors who continue t o push me, so I think that helped keep me sharp and focused,” said the sailor, who has to balance his hobby with career – he’s a director ofB ahamas Realty where he is responsible for its commerciala nd property management d ivision – and his role as hus band and father of three young children. T he red-headed super Sunfish sailor who holds the unbreakable record of them ost wins of any class of sailb oat in Bermuda Race Week in the 20th Century, also won the title of Apprentice Mast ers International during the D avis Yacht Club event. W ith those wins behind him i n Tampa, he went on to the Sunfish Mid-Winters in nearby Clearwater, Florida, where he f inished third overall out of 60 boats. That series was won by Venezuelan Eduardo Cordero,s even-time world champion. S econd place went to David Mendelblatt of the US, four-t ime defending champion. “It was a real achievement t o go to the US Nationals and c ompete and finish a close third behind these two guys who are considered the best int he world,” said Martinbor ough. “But no matter what happens, it’s always just anh onour to represent the Bahamas.” THE senior and junior basketball teams of Teleos Christ ian School were scheduled to travel to Toronto, Canada, on April 6 to participate in the biggest single bracket basketball tournament in North America. And this trip was made pos sible through a financial donation from Scotiabank (Bahamas Dr David L Adams, administrator and assistant coach at Teleos Christian School, expressed his gratitude to Scotiabank for this most generous donation. “As a result of this donation, Scotiabank has created a won derful opportunity for our young men to travel and to gain more exposure in the field of basketball” said Dr Adams. Scotiabank is committed to supporting the communities in which we live and work. Recognised as a leader inter nationally and among Canadian corporations for its charitable donations and philanthropic activities, in 2008 the bank provided about $43 million in sponsorships and donations to a variety of projects and initia tives. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L J J B B L L N N U U P P D D A A T T E E THE Junior Baseball League of Nassau continued its regular season over the weekend at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex with the following results posted: T T E E E E B B A A L L L L Raptors 17, Blue Claws 13 G rasshoppers 18, Sand G nats 16 Sidewinders 19, Knights 5 C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H Diamondbacks 14, Angels 3 Blue Jays 5, Astros 4 Athletics 13, Cubs 1 M M I I N N O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Rays 12, Royals 10 Mets 10, Rockies 9 M M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Reds 8, Indians 4 Marlins 6, Mariners 6 (Tie Game) J J U U N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Yankees 11, Dodgers 9 Twins 15, Cardinals 8 S S E E N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Tigers 13, Pirates 10 R angers 10, Phillies 6 Tigers 12, Pirates 11 (ReS cheduled Game) T eleos basketball teams to take part in North America tourney THE Grand Bahama Tank Cleaning Company in coalition with the Grand Bahama Cyclists Club presents the First Annual Mc Clean’s Town to West End Island Run Bike Race April 18-19. “Cyclists will traverse 85 miles from Mc Clean’s Town into West End and overcome the odds to prove themselves victorious. “They will suffer and they will toil and in the end, one shall prove himself above all claiming an award above all else...victory. On the line is $1,000 divided among the victors,” according to a statement. At 6:30am Saturday, participants are expected to assemble in the parking lot of Pepper Pot, from where they will leave together and drive into Mc Clean’s Town. Once in Mc Clean’s Town, cyclists are to begin their trek at 10am from the police station in Mc Clean’s Town and travel into West End. “This should be a fun and exciting event as there are spot prizes/cash incentives along the route for which cyclists will be competing along with a $150 prize to the cyclist who crosses the line in first place,” said the statement. The event continues with a 12-mile time trial at 9am April 18 on the Grand Bahama High way near the airport round-about, followed by a junior bike race. The winner of the time tri al will also receive a cash incentive of $100. “There are also cash awards for overall winners. The road race and the time trial will be combined to form overall win ners for whom prizes will be divided as follows: $200 to first place $150 to second place $100.00 to third place “There are also trophies that will be awarded to juniors and novice competitors. “As mentioned there is a novice division for cyclists who do not feel that they can make the trek from Mc Clean’s Town into West End. These cyclists can come out on Sunday and compete in a 24-mile circuit event on the Grand Bahama Highway that will be run alongside the junior event. “For those who do not wish to compete they can also come out to support this new event that hopes to revive the sport of cycling in Grand Bahama. Participation is encouraged and spectators are welcome.” All pedals set on bik e r ace f or cash Donnie Martinborough wins International Sunfish Masters SPORTS IN BRIEF Thanks to Scotiabank donation SHOWN (l-rleft son Blvd branch and Dr David Adams (right THREE -time Sunfish World Champion Bahamian Donnie Martinborough, who also holds an unbreakable Bermuda Race Week sailing r ecord with 10 titles, added another chapter to his legacy in March, beating a field of 55 to win the International Sunfish Masters event held in Tampa, Florida. He went on to take third overall in the Sunfish Mid-Winters, at 49, finishing a close third to the seven-time Sunfish world champion, Eduardo Cordero of Venezuela and four-time defending champion David Mendelblatt of the US... “What made this personal feat so special was that it with all the racing over all the years, including 10 wins in Bermuda Race Week and three world championships in different countries, it was the very first time that I won on US soil.” Donnie Martinborough

PAGE 11

n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net T he Ministry of Youth Sports and Culture and Bahamasair have promised to ensure that both junior national teams scheduled for regional competition over the next few weeks will arrive at their destinations by way of the national flag carrier. Representatives of both enti ties announced yesterday thatt eams for the Carifta Track and F ield Championships in St L ucia and the Carifta Swimming Championships in Aruba are scheduled to travel to both respective venues courtesy of private charters provided by Bahamasair. The 61-member track and field squad leaves for St Lucia at 11am on April 8, while the 36-member swim team departs for Aruba at 6am April 14. While the swim team will travel direct on the nearly threehour flight to Aruba, the track and field team, en route to St Lucia –as per its agreement with the Turks and Caicos Min istry of Sports – will make a brief stop in Providenciales to pick up their country’s national team. The charter flights for both teams will make the Bahamas the only country in the region to ensure their teams arrives under the nation’s flag carrier. Minister of Youth Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister said the Carifta format is vital in the development of great senior athletes of the future. “I want to thank the BSF, BAAAs and Bahamasair, for being such co-operative part ners of the ministry in ensuring t hat the Bahamas is well repres ented at this year’s Carifta Games,” he said. “It is a critical event for the development of our young people. If you look through the his tory of the Carifta Games you will see that almost every one of our major athletes who have attained success at the interna t ional level have come through t his competition.” Bannister, whose ministry pledged approximately $200,000 to assist both federations in their endeavours, said giving the athletes a sense of pride in their travel even before competitionb egins is influential in their suc cess. “We believe it is important that athletes from this country embark on foreign soil in their national flag carrier,” he said. “There is no other country in the region that does this, so the Government of the Bahamas should be able to be congratulated for giving that sense of pride to our athletes.” Bahamasair general sales and marketing manager Mike Sands said the company was thrilled to become a part of this ven ture and insisted they would become more involved with national team travel with other federations as well. “Bahamasair is very pleased to be apart of this national effort. When Bahamasair gets C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 9 N o Bull i n Toronto for college recruitment... Sprinter has high hopes for IAAF World Championships... See page 9 SPORTS MINISTER Desmond Bannister presents BAAAs president Curt Hollingsworth with a cheque... S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 P h o t o s : T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Carifta teams to fly high, private with Bahamasair SPORTS MINISTER Desmond Bannister presents BSF president Algernon Cargill with a cheque at Monday’s press conference...

PAGE 12

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE E r i k J R u s s e l l / K e e n i M e d i a L t d THECROWD enjoys a night of entertainment, featuring fashion, fun and music, during the fundraising event ‘A Wave of Fashion’ held to support the work of BASRA Grand Bahama. ‘A wave of fashion’ BASRA FUNDRAISERAHUGESUCCESS M ODEL SHELLY s hows off an original hat design called Tropical Paradise’ by Carlaynae Designs at ‘A Wave of F ashion’ held at Tides Mansion as part of the fundraisi ng event for BASRA Grand Bahama. E r i k J . R u s s e l l / K e e n i M e d i a L t d BASRA GRAND BAHAMA CHAIRMA Justin Snisky ( right) presents a bouquet of flowers to the newlyc rowned Miss Grand Bahama Garelle Hudson (left who made one of her first public appearances at ‘A Wave of Fashion.’ M ASTER OF CEREMONIES f or the evening of fun and f ashion David W allace, who k ept the crowd entertained through the night. Thef undraising event was created to s upport the work of BASRA GrandB ahama.

PAGE 13

n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas has submitted its Memorandum of Trade Regime to begin its accession to full World Trade Organisation (WTO minister of state for finance con firmed to Tribune Business yesterday, the start of a three-five year process that will integrate this nation’s economy with a n B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor FAMILY Guardian’s president yesterday told Tribune Business that the company’s key solvency ratio currently stood at 218 per cent, well above the 150 per cent minimum regulatory threshold, the company’s A(Excellent cial strength rating having been reaffirmed by A. M. Best. The leading international insurance credit rating agency also reaffirmed Family Guardian’s ‘a-’ issuer credit rating, and Patricia Hermanns said the fact that the firm had “the highest rating available to any [life and health insurer] in the Bahamas” would further enhance the BISX-listed company’s competitive positioning. Confirming that Family Guardian’s Minimum Continuing Capital and Surplus Requirement (MCCSR at 218 per cent at year-end 2008, well above the 150 per cent supervisory target, Ms Hermanns said: “We are very, very strong in terms of capital, andt he MCCSR measures that. We are very well positioned for financial strength.” Explaining its rationale for Family Guardian’s ratings, A. M. Best said in a statement: “The affirmation of the ratings are based on Family Guardian's favourable risk-adjusted capitalisation, profitable aggregate gains from operations and its marketing presence as one of the leading life insurance companies in the Bahamas....... “The trends in profitability and stockholders' equity con C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$ $3.48 $3.49 $3.49 " ff r# !$ !!% !r#!#!$#" "$!' !" ffbnt )%,**#-(+$#!-# &+-"(' n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Supreme Court has deferred a decision on whethera $330 million claim against a Bahamian bank and trust company should be reinstated, with both sides asked to prepare sub missions on whether a party can proceed with foreign litigation without the court’s leave, then return to lodge a claim in a Bahamas-based liquidation. Investors in a fraudulent USbased Ponzi scheme, called Cash 4 Titles, are appealing the decision by Leadenhall Bank & Trust’s liquidator, Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez, to reject their $330 million claim against the bank after they were awarded that sum in a default judgment by the US District Court for southern Florida. In his judgment, Senior Jus tice John Lyons said that while he had “little difficulty” accepting that judgments in foreign courts were “in most instances, enforceable in the Bahamas”, his main difficulty was Section 194 of the Companies Act (Chapter 308 This section in the Bahamian law said that when compa nies were ordered wound-up, or a provisional liquidator appointed, no legal actions could proceed or start against them without the Supreme Court’s permission. “What has occurred here is that the applicants proceeded with their action in Florida, notwithstanding that they did not have leave to do so,” Justice Lyons found. “As can be seen, there was an intervening event between Court defers ruling over $330m claim J udg e questions whether defrauded investors can p ur sue f or eign litigation a gainst Bahamas bank without cours leave, then try to lodge claim in this nation, after entity placed in liquidation S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas is “already down the road” in creating new and improved excursions and tours for visiting cruise passen gers, the minister of tourism and a viation told Tribune Business y esterday, adding that concerns over the “breadth and depth” of these attractions accounted for 80 per cent of a cruise industry presentation he attended recently. A rguing that it did not make s ense for Bahamian tour/excur sion operators and the cruise lines to adopt “adversarial” positions in their efforts to maximise the economic returns from the industry, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said his min istry had been attempting to achieve a solution acceptable to both sides since autumn 2008. The minister told Tribune Business that it was vital for the Bahamas to “continue to grow the number of tours and excursions it provides for visiting cruise passengers, given that it is a relatively mature destination due to the frequency of cruise ship calls especially on the three and four-day voyages from Florida. “It was brought to our atten tion that we don’t have the variety of tours given the number of passengers that come here,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said, a cruise industry concern that was amplified by the fact that many passengers were not first-time visitors to the Bahamas. This issue, he said, accounted for much of a presentation he witnesses in attending a February 2009 meeting of the FloridaCaribbean Cruise Association (FCCA body that represents the major cruise lines such as Carnival, RoyalCaribbean and Norwegian Cruise Lines. “I personally went to an FCCA meeting in February, a couple of months ago, and 80 per cent of the presentation had to deal with this issue,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. “I asked Bahamas working on the ‘br eadth and depth’ of its tours Concerns on issue dominate per cent’ of cruise lines presentation, as minister urges industry and Bahamian excursion operators not to adopt ‘adversarial’ positions S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B Family Guardian’s key solvency ratio now stands at 218% * Insurer retains top A. M. Best ratings, although c oncerns expressed on m ortgage investments a nd financial services division performance * BISX-listed firm’s head says mortgage investments down 2% as percentage of total invested assets, while financial services concernsr elate to expansion and rise in death claims that has now tapered off Bahamas starts process for WTO full membership ZHIVARGO LAING n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor L iberalising the retail industry to enable European companies to set-up operations in the Bahamas “will not happen”, the minister of state for finance told Tribune Business yesterday, with this newspaper able to reveal that the European Union (EU ing further concessions in the construction, computer systems, advisory services and foreign/international law sectors. While unable to confirm the specific sectors in which the EU is seeking movement from the Bahamas in relation to its Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA Zhivargo Laing confirmed Tribune Business’s reports that the Europeans are seeking “more concessions” from the Bahamas on mode three commercial presence, or the ability of European firms to establish their own operations in this nation. While he “can’t be confident” that the Bahamas will reach agreement with the EU on its services offer by the April 15, 2009, deadline for all negotiations to be concluded, Mr Laing said he was optimistic the issue would be resolved to the satisfaction of all parties. When asked by Tribune Business whether failure to meet the April 15 deadline might jeopardise the Bahamas’ membership in the EPA, and the ability of its businesses and entrepreneurs to access its various trade preferences/benefits, Mr Laing said there was noth ing in the treaty or in law to indicate this might be the case. Urging the Bahamian fisheries and crawfish industry not to worry, this sector having argued that duty-free access to EU markets is key to maintaining its competitiveness, Mr Laing said he felt the EU would give the Bahamas an extension on its services offer once it saw it was negotiating in good faith. Yet one source close to the negotiating process told Tribune Business that the EU had rejected the Bahamas’ initial services offer, EU seeks ‘possibilities’ on retail liberalisation * Minister says this will not happen, as Europe seeks EPA movement from B ahamas on construction, computer systems, advisory services andf oreign/international law sectors * Commercial presence the key, with EU c oncerned on Bahamas’ services offer n ot going as far as they thought, not matching on-ground reality and being s ubject to policy rather than law * Minister uncertain on whether A pril 15 deadline met; hopeful EU will grant extension * Says fisheries industry need not worry S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

PAGE 14

t hem specifically what we need to put i n place to be more competitive in this area.” The minister added that the cruise lines had been “very good in working with us to put this together” when it came to the Bahamas offering ar efreshed, expanded t our/excursion/getaway product that would enhance its appeal to cruise passengers. That, though, may not ease the concerns harboured by members of the Bahamas Association of Shore Excursionists (BASEe xecutive director, in a presentation to the Grand Bahama Tours Association last week, said the increasing development of private island destinations by the major cruise line is having a “devastating impact on Bahamian small businesses” M any vessels were either bypassing Nassau/Freeport altogether or using t hem as second ports of call after already mining their passengers’ pocke tbooks, Mr Beckles said, and while the number of cruise arrivals to thel ines’ private islands were increasing, t hey were declining elsewhere. H e added that there was a “massive d uplication of local tours at private islands, and restrictions placed on local vendors in selling their own tours”. This had the net effect of ensuring that all tours and excursions provided ont he private islands were controlled by the cruise lines, along with the prices, to the exclusion of Bahamian-owned tour operators and their employees. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace yesterday, t hough, said Bahamian tour and excurs ion providers still had “the opportunity to sell tours to cruise passengers that are different from the experiences on the private islands”. “Much greater breadth and depth” when it came to tour options wasr equired, and comparisons needed to b e done with what the cruise lines were offering to ensure a point of differentiation existed. However, Tribune Business understands that a number of Bahamianowned excursion providers have seent he cruise lines cancel long-standing c ontracts for their services within recent months, and there is mounting concern among both BASE members and Bay Street merchants about the increasing tendency of cruise passeng ers to be shipped to Atlantis’s Paradise Island attractions once they dise mbark at Prince George’s Wharf bypassing their businesses altogether. This, needless to say, is continuing to negatively impact small Bahamianowned businesses, which are considered the lifeblood of the Bahamian e conomy. I t is also understood that BASE and o thers are concerned about the cruise l ines’ increasing demands for price cuts, and that their cash flow could be i mpacted by the lines’ decision to pay for services via wire transfer a process that could take several weeks to clear.I n the meantime, Bahamian businesses must find the wherewithal to pay for crucial supplies. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace acknowledged that it was “extremely” important for Bahamian businesses to earn their share of the rewards from thec ruise ship industry. He added: “This is one of those areas where the over-used p hrase, win-win, is true.” W ith the cruise lines enjoying 100 per cent occupancy on their voyages to t he Bahamas, and finding it hard to increase yields, selling more tours and earning commissions from doing sowas one way to enhance financial performance. This getting more cruise passengers off their vessels was exactly what the Bahamas and its toiur/excursion providers needed, Mr VanderpoolWallace said, as it would enable themt o maximise customer numbers and business revenues. A nd an improved product would a lso improve per capita cruise passenger spending in the Bahamas, which a ccording to 2007 numbers stands at $73 for Nassau and $57 for Grand Bahama. Increasing these per capitay ields is critical for the well-being of the Bahamian tourism industry and wider economy. As a result, both sides needed to come together and work with each other for the common good, rather than adopt adversarial positions, the min i ster suggested. Mr Beckles’ presentation warned t hat the “economic pic slices” earned by Bahamian-owned tours and excursion providers continued to dwindle as a result, given that cruise lines and their passengers either bypassed Nassau or arrived here after the lines hade xhausted their spending power on the p rivate islands. The Ministry of Tourism’s 2008 arrivals report, which has been obtained by Tribune Business, appear to bear out Mr Beckles’ concerns. For the year, the only destinations t hat saw an increase in cruise passenger a rrivals were the private islands. Castaway Cay on Abaco saw a 58.1 per cent rise in arrivals to 149,389, compared to 94,511 the year before. The Berry Islands, which boasts R oyalCaribbean’s getaway, Coco Cay, saw a 9.87 per cent growth in cruise a rrivals to 401,718 compared to 366,321 in 2007, while arrivals to Half Moon Cay near Cat Island grew by 11 per cent to 299,792, compared to 270,159 in 2007. All those figures were for first port of entry only. I n contrast, Nassau/Paradise Island s aw a 10.2 per cent decline in cruise p assengers calling as a first port of e ntry in the Bahamas, the numbers falling from 1,638,174 in 2007 to 1 ,471,835 in 2008. Focusing on just December 2008, the Ministry of Tourism’s report notedt hat for the month, cruise arrivals to Nassau/Paradise Island were down by 2 per cent, while arrivals as a second port of call increased by 45 per cent. “A number of cruise ships went to Nassau/Paradise Island as a second port of call, however, rather than af irst port of call,” the Ministry of Tourism found. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Bahamas working on the ‘breadth and depth’ of its tours V INCENT VANDERPOOL-WALLACE F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 15

Concerns over fisheries sector C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 3B A FUND accountant with Genesis Fund Services, Sharene Gaitor, has passed the Series 7 exam after studying with the Nassau-based Nastac Group. She can now apply for registration with the Securities Commission of the Bahamas after passing the Series 7 exam, which is administered by the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE FINRA. Ms Gaitor is pictured above with Reece Chipman, the Nastac Group’s managing director. Genesis accountant passes Series 7 exam n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE Government has no c hoice but to convince the European Union (EU accept the Bahamas services o ffer as a part of its commitment to the Economic Partn ership Agreement (EPA incoming Bahamas Chamber of Commerce president said yesterday. Khaalis Rolle told Tribune B usiness it was in this nation’s best interest to reach an agreement with the EU to secure the EPA’s trade benefits. The EPA, establishes the trade rules between the EuU and CARIFORUM countries,i s a replacement of the Contonou Agreement and creates reciprocal trade benefits between the two parties. The EPA bundles traded g oods and services into one agreement. They are not mutually exclusive, which means that signing on to the agreement binds CARIFORUM countries to offer both goods a nd services for trade. However, when the Bahamas signed on to the agreement it was not prepared to offer services to the EU for i ts approval, and an extension was negotiated and penned into the agreement. Now, according to former minister of foreign affairs, Fred M itchell, this country’s initial services offering was “rejecte d” by the EU and could jeopardise the entire agreement if not amended and resubmitted. According to sources close to the Bahamas Trade Comm ission, the original services offer that was rejected was not “comprehensive” and was “woefully inaccurate”. “There was no real thought a nd consideration that went into it,” the source said. T he source added that the Government had ample time to put together an acceptable s ervices offer, as the groundwork had already been done a nd funds were available to solicit technical trade expertise from abroad. Mr Rolle said if the Bahamas’ service offer was r ejected, the Government and private sector would need to c onsider the EU’s reasons for rejection and create a suitable agreement. He added that implementation of the EPA should be as transparent as p ossible. “This process, because it is a national one, needs to be open and transparent,” he said. “The Minister (Zhivargo Liang o pen in his discussions.” Mr Rolle argued that the private sector did not yet seem to be concerned about the handling of the services offer, but m ost have not had the luxury of seeing what the EU has o bjected to. Nattalie Rochester-King, who at the CRNM examines the interest of CARIFORUM countries and the European C ommission, assured this paper yesterday that “in diplomacy anything can be negotiated,” referring to the Bahamas’ late approach to the E U for consultation, with such a rapidly approaching deadl ine. “Negotiations often consist of several engagements in w hich improvements are requested, and the flexibility o f the other party is always tested,” she said. Bahamas must convince EU to accept offer n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net QUESTIONS were raised yesterday by the former foreign affairs minister as to the fate of the fisheriesi ndustry should the Bahamas default on the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA Union (EU F red Mitchell said there was a need f or “full and frank disclosure” from the Government on what was happening with the EPA. "What we are told is that the Gove rnment made mistakes in their offer, and the offer is unacceptable to the EU,” he said. Should the European Commission n ot accept the Bahamas’ services o ffer, it is feared that the agreement, signed in October, will become defunct and destroy this nation’s lobster exports into the EU. F or the moment, however, the Bahamas and other CARIFORUM countries involved in the EPA can presently enjoy the benefits of the a greement. A Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery representative, speaking at an EPA seminar put on by the Bahamas Chamber of commerce last w eek, said this nation and other CARIFORUM countries can already begin to benefit from the signing for the agreement. Lincoln Price said the nations who s igned on to the EPA are already enjoying duty free, quota free treatment in the European Union market. “By 2010 all of our products that a re certified by CARIFORUM countries will receive this duty free, quota and free trade into the EU market,” he said. “We are starting to comply with the o bligations that we have signed on to.” Mr Price said that whenever the services obligations are met by this c ountry, management consultants, engineers and persons engaged in the music and creative industries will likely benefit greatly. “It provides more certainty in terms o f the market access into Europe than we had before in the arrangement that is called the Contonou, which is the trade and development deal that prec eded the EPA,” said Mr Price. He said participating countries will list specific sectors that they will facilitate business with European service providers in, and omit sectors that willb e remain as it exists in the offering country. Khaalis Rolle

PAGE 16

a nd that without it this nation d id not have a complete EPA agreement. The Bahamas was supposed to liberalise at least 75 per cent of its services industries in the EPA, and the source said: “The offer just did not meet the requirements and the agreed percentage amounts to be liberalised by the CARIFORUM group. “There is no EPA agreement without a complete services offer,” the source added, explaining that unless the Bahamas met the required thresholds for liberalisation “it can be rejected by both the CARIFORUM and EU parties”. Tribune Business was told that the EU and its members states “were asking for greater concessions and liberalisation in mode three”, commercial presence, especially on advisory services, foreign and international law, computer reservation services and construction services. “It was claimed that the EU wants mode three possibilities under retail, which is against the National Investment Policy,” the source said. “The CARICOM Regional Negotiating Machinery wanted more mode three commitments under financial services and telecommunications.” However, Mr Laing shot down any possibility that the Bahamas would open up its retail sector traditionally reserved for Bahamian ownership only to EU companies. “Even if they raised that, that’s a non-issue for us,” he explained. “That will not happen. It’s not something we will consider.” Behind the scenes, Tribune Business has learnt that the matter is more complex than it appears. The EU’s concerns on mode three commercial presence stem, at least in part, from its confusion on why the Bahamas has made no commitments to liberalise industries such as construction services where the Government has already given permission for certain foreign companies to operate. As a result, Tribune Business can reveal that the EU is having difficulty in understanding why the Bahamas’ services offer appears not to have gone as far as the reality on the ground, and liberalised more sectors for European firms to establish a commercial presence. In addition, the EU’s concerns also revolve around the fact that much of the Bahamas investment-related regulations are contained in policy, not statutory regulation. As a result, the EU fears that access to the Bahamian market for its companies will be subject to political whim, with no certainty in law, and it wants this also to be clarified. C onfirmed Mr Laing effectively confirmed the latter aspect, telling Tribune Business yesterday: “Broadly, I think the issue is one of further concessions sought in mode three in certain areas. The essential point is that we did not make as many offers as they thought we would make, given our National Investment Policy. “We have a very open investment and trade regime, and having that reflected in a trade agreement does not challenge us in any fundamental way. “What we sought to do was to avoid making any commitments in a services offer, even where it was consistent with the National Investment Policy, because we anticipate codifying the same by putting it in a Bahamas Investment Law.” Mr Laing explained that if the Bahamas did not make a liberalisation commitment under the EPA, its National Investment Policy would still apply, and the Government would decide which foreign companies could operate in the Bahamas. That, though, is not good enough for the EU. “People want certainty. They prefer that [investment policy] to be enshrined in the agreement. If it is put in statute, it will accomplish the same thing,” the minister added. “It’s for us to be able to discuss with them [the EU] our rationale going forward, doing what we have done, and give them some assurances going forward in our thinking on this matter, so it’s up for discussion.” In addition, Tribune Business understands that the Bahamas is adopting a tough negotiating stance, having submitted an EPA services offer that was designed not to give everything away. The agreement it will ultimately conclude with the EU will form the baseline for all future trade agreements, including those with the US, Canada and World Trade Organisation (WTO Mr Laing hinted that the EU had been late in responding to the Bahamas’ services offer, saying it had been submitted to the CRNM in November. This, he added, was thought to be sufficient time for further negotiations prior to April 15, but the EU’s response had only been received in February 2009. When asked whether the Bahamas was likely to meet the April 15 deadline, Mr Laing said: “Well, I can’t be confident that it will all be resolved by April 15, because there is a short time between now and then, and discussions have to be held. I am very confident the matter will be resolved.” Adding that he was not aware of any treaty text or law stating that April 15 was set in stone, the minister said: “That is something to be considered. We are striving to meet that deadline, and I don’t believe it will be impossible or difficult, if it’s being resolved, to get it extended especially if the EU shares the view, as I believe they will, that we are earnestly seeking to have the matter resolved.” Mr Laing said there should be “absolutely no concern” on the fisheries industry’s part regarding the EPA, as the Bahamas would come to an agreement on the services side to add to the goods. “All that’s left to do is agree with the Europeans on the extent of our offer, and I’m sure that will happen,” Mr Laing said. He will not be going to Brussels on Thursday. The Bahamian delegation will be led by Simon Wilson, the Ministry of Finance’s director of economic planning, along with a Bahamas Trade Commission representative. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE At Chandler GilbertWe have the expertise to handle the unique insurance needs of a wide range of clientsQWe have relationships with domestic and international insurers and brokers that enable us to deliver cost-effective risk financing solutionsWe are not too big to provide personal, client-friendly service Experience a new way to meet your private and commercial insurance needs. Visit, call, fax or e-mail us at your convenience. Our clients never call us at the wrong time.Chandler Gilbert Insurance Associates is a new insurance brokerage firm founded on the wealth of insurance industry knowledge and experience of co-founders Victor Chandler and Guilden Gilbert.OFFICE #20 Montrose Avenue P.O. Box N-7753 Nassau, Bahamas Phone: (242 Fax: (242 VICTOR CHANDLER victor@cgiacaribbean.com GUILDEN GILBERT guilden@cgiacaribbean.com CONSULTANTS BROKERS AGENTS Bahamas starts process for WTO full membership rules-based trading regime. Zhivargo Laing, when contacted by this newspaper, confirmed: “We’ve submitted it.” He added that the Memorandum of Trade Regime, the document that sets out this country’s legislative and policy framework relating to all traderelated matters, had been submitted to the WTO in Geneva “at least a month ago”. Mr Laing said it was likely that the Bahamas’ accession to full WTO membership was like ly to take three to five years, a normal timeframe for the process. T he WTO, which is the body t hat oversees the global rulesbased trading regime, is now forming a committee to “oversee” the Bahamas’ WTO acces sion process. This will be the body that, in the first instance, the Bahamas will have to nego-t iate with over its terms of accession, and the economic sectors it will have to liberalise to foreign companies and competition. Mr Laing explained that the committee would be formed from representatives of nations who both currently traded with the Bahamas, and might havea future interest in trading with this nation. “The most critical thing about the WTO accession process is that the WTO represents the basic, fundamental trading plat form for trading in the world,” Mr Laing told Tribune Business. “All the trading partners we have in this country, or might have, trade off this platform. It just makes sense for us at this point, given the evolution of international affairs to join that platform. It makes all future trade arrangements subject to that platform.” Full membership in the WTO, Mr Laing explained, would bind the Bahamas into a global rules-based trading system, providing it with certain privileges and rights, but also imposing obligations on it, too. Bahamian businessmen and companies, and their counter parties abroad, would be able to trade in a more predictable, rules-based environment, the minister explained, something that should enhance trade volumes and relationships. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B E U seeks ‘possibilities’ on retail liberalisation F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 17

the commencement of their action and judgment. That was the placing of Leadenhall into liquidation. On that event taking place, Section 194 became relevant.” The Class 4 Titles investors had initiated their action on March 30, 2005, alleging that Leadenhall had provided financial services to the Cash 4 Titles scheme in the knowledge that it was a fraud. This was denied by the Bahamian bank and trust company. While Leadenhall initially defended its case, it dropped out of the Florida proceedings after it was placed into receivership, then liquidation on November 25, 2005. This was communicated to the bank’s Florida attorneys by Mr Gomez’s attorney, Sidney Cambridge of Callender’s & Co. The default judgment was then obtained on September 10, 2007, and this is what the Cash 4 Titles plaintiffs through their attorneys, Dr Peter Maynard and Jason Maynard are now seeking to have enforced in the Bahamas. They effectively want t heir claim to join the Leadenhall creditors queue. Justice Lyons wrote in his ruling: “What I am having difficulty with is whether or not a foreign litigant, who proceeds to obtain judgment in a foreign jurisdiction without the grant of leave, is then able to come back into this jurisdiction and prove his debt in a liquidation here. “It seems to me to be likely that persons placed in a similar position within this jurisdiction could not proceed to prove the debt by reason of having continued with their litigation without the grant of leave first having been obtained.” The judge said that in the Cash 4 Titles investors’ case, “it could surely be argued that, by t he use of the foreign judgment, it has obtained an advantage that would most likely be unavailable to a person holding a local judgment”. Justice Lyons said the main question to be answered was whether the Cash 4 Titles investors, “having continued the Florida proceedings, arguably without the need for leave to do so, can now come back into the jurisdiction, absent that leave, and successfully prove their debt in a liquidation in this jurisdiction?” He added: “I would think that, as I have said, if this were just a local question relative only to local proceedings and parties, that a party continuing legal proceedings notwithstanding the stay would have s ome difficulty in enforcing any judgment obtained in those proceedings where they have proceeded without the leave of the court first being obtained.” Justice Lyons told attorneys for both parties to assess this issue, prepare and submit further submissions on it, and then reconvene before him at a later date. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 5B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.281.280.000.1270.00010.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.55Cable Bahamas12.5512.550.001.3090.2509.61.99% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.45Commonwealth Bank (S16.456.450.000.4380.05014.70.78% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.502.42-0.080.0990.05224.42.15% 3.002.09Doctor's Hospital2.092.090.000.2400.0408.71.91% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.7940.40013.23.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.009,3360.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1 .000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.44891.3847Colina Money Market Fund1.44891.064.63 3.69603.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 25 5 0 0 2 27 70 01 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 24 4 2 2-3 35 5 6 6-7 77 7 6 6 4 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K KE E T T S S 2 2 4 42 2 3 39 9 6 64 40 00 0 0 0 | | C C O O L LO ON N I I A A L L 2 2 4 4 2 2 5 5 0 02 2 7 7 5 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 805.27 | YTD -3.55% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSMONDAY, 6 APRIL 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,638.56 | CHG -0.08 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -73.80 | YTD % -4.31BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H HA A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 24 4 2 2 -3 32 2 3 3 -2 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 | | F FA A C C S S I I M M I I L LE E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2-3 32 2 3 3 2 23 3 2 20 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 27-Mar-09 31-Jan-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following items: %XLOGLQJVWUXFWXUHH[WHULRUHQYHORSHH[WHULRUFDQRSLHVDQG UHODWHGVXEWUDGHSDFNDJHV *HQHUDO5HTXLUHPHQWVIRU*HQHUDO&RQWUDFWLQJVHUYLFHVIRU WKHRYHUDOOSURMHFWDQG &RQVWUXFWLRQ0DQDJHPHQW)HHIRUWHQGHULQJWKHEDODQFHRI VXEWUDGHDQGVXSSOLHUZRUNSDFNDJHVDWDODWHUGDWH The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e. mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are notincluded in this Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230 General Contractor in 2009. T he C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room located at the NAD Project office. TENDERC-230 General Contract, Stage 1C ontact: TRACI BRISBYContract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project Ph: (24224217 P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs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ourt defers ruling over $330m claim F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!

PAGE 18

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Family Guardian’s key solvency ratio now stands at 218 per cent tinue to remain positive, with growth in stockholders' equity over the past five years, despite dividend payments. Family Guardian's three core business segments, home service, financial services and group division led by BahamaHealth, provide business diversification and competitive advantages in a generally limited and mature marketplace in the Bahamas.” O n the downside, A. M. Best w arned: “Partially offsetting t hese positive rating factors are the continuing weak operating results Family Guardian reported in 2008 from its financial services segment, the volatility and risk inherent in its health business and the high concentration of mortgage loans relative to total equity, with increasing delinquencies attributed to the current weak economic environment. “However, A.M Best notes that Family Guardian has consistently decreased its exposure to mortgage loans, as a per centage of invested assets, over a five-year period, and delin quent loans past due over 90 days have decreased during year-end 2008. “Additionally, the mature nature of the Bahamian life/health market and the cur rent weakness in the Bahamas' economy may impede Family Guardian's potential for organ ic growth.” Tackling each of those points, Ms Hermanns said A. M. Best’s comments on its financial services segment, which chiefly features its ordinary life division, related to an increase in death claims experienced during 2008, coupled with increased invest ment and expenses associated with growing that business. “What we are looking at is the exponential growth and expansion of our financial services division, which is the newest division Family Guardian has been involved with,” Ms Hermanns explained. S he added that with the increase in its agency force, Family Guardian’s ordinary life division had been “growing very rapidly” in recent years. Claims On the death claims, Ms Hermanns said the increase in this area had impacted Family Guardian’s profitability in 2008, but “that slowed in the final quarter, and certainly we’re seeing much lower levels in 2009, so that was a short-term issue”. Death claims, she added, often went in cycles, and other Bahamian life and health insurers had experienced a similar cycle a surge in death claims in 2008, with a tapering off in 2009. Health insurance by its very nature was volatile when it came to the claims experience, while Family Guardian’s mortgage investments as a percent age of total invested assets stood at less than 50 per cent at year-end 2007. Out of the company’s total invested assets of $125 million, between $50-$60 million were mortgages, placing the percentage at between $50-$60 million. Ms Hermanns said mortgage assets as a percentage of total investments had fallen by 2 per cent at year-end 2008, compared to 2007, while the level of delinquencies had “fallen a couple of basis points” during last year. This, she said, was “a major achievement in this marketplace”. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 19

C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net N O RTH Eleuthera this past weekend was transformed into a cancer fighting mecca where more than 4 00 bik ers and 1 50 v olunt eers t ook part in the forth annual Ride For Hope (RFHe. The popular bike-a-thon first started in 2005, serves as a cancer support group with a major focus on raising awareness of the illness, as well as hosting similar fundraisers intended to assist in research and care. Susan Larson, a co-founder for the initiative, said RFH was born as a result of her and her brother’s desire to start something similar to the cancer awareness movement started after cyclist Lance Armstrong announced he had cancer. S he explained: “There is a natural affinity between fund raising and cancer largely because of Lance Armstrong, and many people now use cycling as a way to raise money for some of the major illnesses. Mrs Larson said 2006 was the launch year for the event drawing in around 100 people, and sincet hen it has grown to over 400 participants. “Over the past three years, we have raised over $700,000 for cancer care, cancer treatment, and cancer research in the Bahamas,” she said. This year the event was so heavily supported, that the organisers were forced to turn down many persons hoping to take part. T he route for the non-competitive bike-a-thon ran from the North Eleuthera airport heading through Queens Highway, and went as far south as Palmetto Point. Bikers were also given the choice of riding 20, 30, 50, or for the truly fit 100 miles for the event, with around eight cooling stations along the way. With the numerous scenic views throughout the island, Tribune Features spoke with many persons who shared stories of loss, support, and hope for those affected by cancer. Along the way, we met up with Domonic Thompson from Glinton Sweeting O’Brien, work ing as a volunteer offering aid to bikers at the five mile stop set in front of A & R ice-cream parlor. She explained: “Volunteering to me means giving from yourself, your time and energy, and just to help someone else.” Mrs Thompson said although she has not been personally affected by cancer, volunteering in the RFH is an important cause, “because this sickness can show up at any time with a family member or friend, so you just want to be prepared and insure that someone is helped along the way.” Further up at the 10 mile cooling station, we spoke with cycling trio Averny Fernander, Gladys Fernander, and Erlene Cartwright. While theyw ere all taking part for the general purpose of raising cancer awareness, they explained that cancer has touched very close to home as they had all lost their grandfathers to prostate cancer, and have since pledged to the cause. Also riding for hope was Speaker of The House and North Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith who saidt he RFH was an important initiative for all B ahamians. He explained: “It is always good when we can do whatever we can to help our brothers and sis ter, and this RFH means alot to me because I have had family members, particularly young ones who have died of cancer.” Mr Smith added that the 22 mile ride he committed to was a chance to get some much needed exercise, and was definitely a challenging but also a rewarding experience for him. RIDINGHOPE F O R Further up at the Gregory Town 20 mile rest stop, a massive celebration was held by local residents who shook cow-bells, served food, and offered overwhelming support to bikers braving the humid Eleuthera weather. Although there were some bikers who were unable to complete their cycling targets, there were numerous mobile assistance crews as well as ample food, medical assistance, and cheering squads at the finish line area. Organiser said the event which was heralded a success, would not have been possible without the help of its many sponsors.They include Odyssey Aviation, Glinton Sweet ing O’Brien law firm, The Rotary Club, Kerzner International, White Crown Aviation, Pictet bank and trust, and many others. TAKING a breath at the 10 mile cooling station, Erlene Cartwright, Averny and Gladys Fernander pose for the camera while remembering their grandfathers who died from cancer. HALFWAY through their journey, these bikers make their way up one of the many hills along Queen’s Highway. VOLUNTEERS cheering on cyclists as they make their way to the 5 mile ice cream stop.

PAGE 20

GREEN SCENE By GARDENER JACK WE can expect a distinct warming up during the month of April. Many of us will be taking our first sea dip of the year during the Easter holiday and the water should have the nip taken off it. We can also expect a thunderstorm or two and to notice that the grass is beginning to grow and needs mowing. Our vegetable gardens should maintain their peak production throughout April and May but there will be discernible changes occurring slowly. Tomato plants with large fruits need temperatures below 68 degrees F in order to self-pollinate. We should have precious few of them. The slack can be taken up by growing Italian type tomatoes like Roma that will bear well into the summer. Cherry tomatoes, particularly the large fruited varieties, also do well and are large enough to use for salads and sandwiches. Our established sweet pep per plants will continue producing but their fruits will grow smaller. Bell peppers are particularly susceptible to sunscald, even during the spring months. Cubanelle peppers take the heat quite well and if sown during April will guarantee harvests into summer. Some gardeners like to plant their summer peppers, like Cubanelles, in pairs so that the foliage is increased and helps shade the fruits. That means, of course, that you will have to increase the fertiliser and water the double-sown peppers receive. New Zealand and Malabar spinach can be grown starting in April for cooking purposes but, unfortunately, cannot be enjoyed raw. We may be able to squeeze another crop of snap beans out of our garden but thereafter it would be best to grow snake or asparagus beans, also known as yardlong beans. These need some form of support like a trellis to do really well. Probably the major garden vegetable for this time of year is corn. Instead of rows, corn must be grown in blocks. Corn likes very rich soil that allows it to grow quickly. There are few more rewarding garden ing experiences than picking and shucking one’s own corn. The annuals in our flower gardens we have prepared for Easter may have to be changed to accommodate the warmer months ahead. Most of the annuals we grow in summer also do well in fall, winter and spring. Impatiens tend do die back, as do some of the more tender annuals. Those that can survive into and throughout summer include cosmos, gerbera daisies, vinca, marigolds, Mexican sunflowers, gazanias and zinnias. New Guinea impatiens, caladiums and gingers can also be established this month. The first two like a little shade but many gingers can take full sun. Gingers can be grown from rhizomes but established clumps of torch or shell ginger (plus a few others divided and planted to forma new colony. If you see some edible ginger hands in the supermarket that are sprouting, buy them and bury them about five inches deep. They produce pleasant foliage and delicate butterfly-like flowers. When they die back you can harvest the ginger root and use it for culinary purposes or dry them somewhat and then re-sow them. Citrus and fruit trees need to be well fertilised in spring, summer and autumn. As April is the first full month of spring, now might be a good time to get the job done. Fertiliser is best applied when the ground is thoroughly wet. Granulated fertiliser should be applied at and slightly beyond the drip line of the trees in order to promote root growth. The base of the trunk should have an iron drench applied to help overcome the tendency of limestone soil to tie up nutrients. Two teaspoons of Sequestrene 138 chelated iron in five gallons of water is sufficient for a mature tree, less for juveniles or small citrus trees. At the same time apply a minor nutrient spray to the leaves using a sticker/spreader to help the liquid adhere to the leaves. Citrus leaves are quite slick and benefit most when stick-spreader is used. Once this chore is done you can rest from your labours for another three months. By that time you should be picking ripe mangoes. ' Unhappy Marriages' may well have caught your eye for many reasons. You may identify with some or all of the ideas and positions. Needless to say each mar-r iage is unique and to sum all of the complexities would be naive and neglectf ul to the individualism of each relationship. Some of us may have entered marriage with longing; unhealed wounds, unmet needs and other unfinished business that we secretly hoped our beloved would heal. Many of us hold our partners responsible for our own happiness and it is often this disapp ointment of unfulfilled expectations t hat causes such deep unhappiness. Marriage is such an intimate connection and the tension thread between the needs of the individual and the relationship are often difficult to negotiate for some couples. The tug of war becomes a constant battle over who is the winner and loser, things are black and white and the whole concept of a 'win win' solution for all involved is lost. It is this dealing with conflicts that often causes unhappiness. As relationship therapists we see the effects of this as one partner becomes or is seen as being overly demanding and the other person withdraws and becomes non communicative. This often produces a cycle where each person's behavior makes the other worse. Hurt and fear take root and motives are questioned. Over time the bond becomes weaker. This erosion of the intimate bond has far reaching effects than most can see or admit to. How we interact with our children, families and work colleagues all too often result from our personal and marital happiness or unhappiness. In previous weeks we have discussed some the essential ingredient for a happy relationshipbeing able to express yourself, effective listening and the deepening of couple intimacy. To be able to open yourself requires such vulnerability and can only be achieved in an atmosphere of trust. This trust comes about when we know that we have access to our partner for our own individual needs and must then result in reciprocal accessibility for them. Remember true intimacy is two sided and only achieved between two equals. These needs generally include money, time, energy, and matters of the heart such as acceptance, attention, love and sex. If we feel we can not guarantee access or in fact are denied access to any of these areas and a deep intimate bond has not been established, then fear and hurt creep in and a damaging cycle can be created. Perhaps trust in your partner has been tested and stretched to full capacity. You may in fact have closed down some doors. Just remember that it is possible to forgive and trust again. Trust can be rebuilt, even after a painful betrayal, but it requires hard work. It may not happen quickly and may take many years but keep in mind that facing these fears will make you stronger, more emotionally mature and a more loving person. To be able to control ourselves emotionally requires great insight into what makes us behave and react in a certain way. Exercising this self control allows us to become assertive and put forward our needs in an appropriate manner. We then do not need to domineer and control all those around us and we are rewarded by a happier home life. There is no doubt that the length of time this unhappiness has been allowed to calcify is often indicative of the ability that a couple can resolve it with out professional help. One of the first areas to become affected by the cycle of access and control is the sexual relationship and the intimacy. Sexual problems such as low desire, little or no sex, orgasmic or erectile problems, or infidelities are often psychosocial and often not physiological. Some times the presenting problem is not the cause and it takes careful and gentle questioning to reveal the main complaint. It is possible to work at and resolve a lot of these problems with the help of a trained professional. Keep in mind that there is no shame or weakness in getting help -just great intelligence. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist located at The Centre for R enewing Relationships, Grosvenor's C lose West. She can be contacted by c alling 356-7983 or by e-mail at relatebahamas@yahoo.com or at www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is available for speaking engagements. C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009, PAGE 9B health B ODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e Unhappy marriages LOVING RELATIONSHIPS B Y MAGGIE BAIN T HERE'Sno shortage of myths when it comes to oily skin. Get the facts to further your understanding of how to really keep oilu nder control. Myth 1 : Oil can be cont rolled by stripping skin with harsh, drying ingredi e nts such as alcohol. FALSE. Stripping the skin of oil can actually cause an overproduction of oil. Why? Because skin's trying to make up for and replace what's lost! Those who self-treat oily skin with alcohol-based prod ucts often end up with dehydrated, irritated, sensitised skin. Myth 2 : Sunscreens increase oil production. FALSE. Speak with your professional skin therapist about new, sophisticated formulations that won't clog pores, and even contain oil-absorbing microsponges for the ulti mate in sun protection and skin care benefits. Myth 3 : A little sun exposure is ideal for drying up skin. FALSE. Sun exposure is never good for skin. While it may seem the sun pro vides a temporary “drying” effect, sebaceous glands will fire into overdrive to help replace lost oil. The result: more oil on the surface than before. MYTH 4 : There's nothing that can be done to help control oily skin. FALSE! Don't give up! An oily skin condition is just as manageable as any skin condition. Speak to a professional skin therapist who can analyze your skin, then provide a proper diagnosis including a regi men of products and lifestyle changes to keep skin under control. Sarah Beek is a skin care therapist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit her and her team of skin and body therapists at One Sandyport Plaza (the same building as Bally’s Gym). For more information visit www.dermal-clinic.com or call 327.6788 . Myths about oily skin BY SARAH BEEK I RON NETWORK, a multifaceted organisation designed to help women discover their purpose and specific assignment on the earth, will be host-i ng a Relationship Building Summit at the British Colonial Hilton, April 25, from 8.30pm to 4.30pm. Sherika Brown, CEO and Founder of the Iron Network, told TheTribune that the event, being held under the t heme, “Choose The Relationships T hat Are Right For You”, is specifically designed to help women discover relationships that will assist them int he facilitation of their purpose. She explained that in order to suc ceed at anything in life you need the r ight environment to function effec tively and noted that the right environment consists of the right people. “We want to help women unders tand why relationships are important in fulfilling purpose and destiny,” she said. “We also want to equip women with skills to identify characteristics of healthy relationships. Our aim is to assist women in developing quality r elationships that will enable them to i gnite, activate and refine their potential.” Ms Brown said that the event is not d esigned to just assist women in finding the right intimate relationships but to help women find the right relation s hips in every area of life such as the right mentors, the right bosses, the right business partners, the right team members, the right spiritual leadersa nd also the right friends. She said: “The quality of our life is the quality of our relationships, hence, we must be trained on how to choose relationships wisely.” Along with the Summit, Ms Brown i s partnering with local entrepreneurs a cross the nation to showcase their products and services. This initiative will allow business p ersons to further establish strategic partnerships that will enable them to grow their business and increase their n umber of clients. Ms Brown is a certified public accountant employed with a leading offshore banking institution in theB ahamas. She is presently a member of Bahamas Faith Ministries International and is in partnership with Spirit 92.5 Gospel; a local gospel radio station in the Bahamas. Ms. Brown can be heard every Thursday morning at 8 am. F or further information regarding the summit, persons can view details on the network’s website at www.iron n etworkinc.org http://www.ironnetworkinc.org or contact info@ironnetworkinc.org. Iron Network relationship building summit choose the relationships that are right for you! The month of April

PAGE 21

PROBABLY the most complex, the most frustrating and them ost annoying clinical condition that clients in the Bahamas are f aced with on a daily basis is that of a scratching, itchy dog. Every day I hear the same complain: ‘Dr Sands, my dog will not stop scratching! What can we do to corr ect it?’ There are many causes of scratching in the dog. Only by at horough work up of the scratchy patient can an exact diagnosis be m ade, and then the appropriate treatment can be started. I always tell my clients to be patient as I work up the case. The Bahamian client wants and expects solutions n ow and if the dog does not stop scratching today we tend to get u pset. One of the first things is to elim i nate is if there are any external parasites. Fleas, ticks, mosquitoes and lice which may be visible or those invisible parasites(mites such as Sca b ies or Demodex) that bury in the skin and cause intense itching can o nly be detected by microscopic examination of skin scrapings. Y our veterinarian will recognise these obvious causes of s cratching and will be able to advise you on appropriate treatment. Eg : Paramite and Frontline for ticks and fleas. In most cases when the cause of scratching is parasitic the response to treat ment is excellent. However the elimination of parasites from the environment is just as important,a s re-infestation of your pet will cause recurrence of the symptoms. For example; fleas and ticks require year round control in the Bahamas. Bacterial skin disease or Pyo derma is another common cause of scratching. The presence of bac terial infection on the skin is usually secondary, but may be primary. Common causes are skin para sites, poor nutrition, unhygienic environment, allergies or long term steroid therapy. Bacterials kin disease is usually characterised by pustules, crusts, itching a nd hair loss. Some dogs may be lethargic and depressed. Treatment for bacterial skin disease usually requires antibiotics and medical shampoos. (Benzoyl p eroxide) It is recommended that antibiotic therapy is continued fors even to ten days after resolution of the clinical signs. If the response t o antibiotic therapy is poor, then bacterial culture and antibiotic sen sitivity tests should be considered. This leads us to probably the most common cause of skin dis e aseallergies! One such allergy is food hyper s ensitivity. This is where your dog becomes sensitised to some com p onents of its diet resulting in skin disease. Common foodstuffs that have been implicated in food hypersensitivity are beef, dairy products, wheat, eggs and even c hicken. Some dogs that experience food hypersensitivity will h ave gastrointestinal signs. Foods allergies may cause intense itchi ng, they may also be involved in ear infections as do most skin a llergies. Your vet will advise on an appropriate diet to test if food hypersensitivity is involved. These diets are known as hypoallergenic diets and may be home made or may be commercially available. Mutton, rice and fish are exam ples of some food components that a ppear to be less allergy stimulating. These diets may have to be given for four to eight weeks before complete resolution of signs is seen. Then it is possible to reintroduce foods you are suspicious of to the diet and observe if the signs reoccur. This way the guilty foods can be totally eliminated from the diet in the future. Failure to clear up the skin condition may indicate allergies are present The for needspeed C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net IT is no secret that a significant number of traffic accidents and fatalities are caused by speedy and impatient drivers. It is only four months into the year, and already the Road Traffic division of the Royal Bahamian Police Force has confirmed 19 traffic fatalities. According to the coordinator of the National Road Safety committee Michael Hudson, the reality of 19 traffic fatalities is well beyond those numbers of 2008 and 2007 during the same period. Mr Hudson explained: “In some cases we are seeing where inexperience is causing some of these accidents, as well as persons driving without due care and attention. “Many of the accidents are happening late at night, so one could assume that people are coming from parties where drinking and fatigue could be a factor and statistics are showing that we have more fatalities in men than we have inf emales.” However one concerning trend, is the number of young male drivers at fault in these and other traffic incidents. In this week’s Barbershop, Tribune Features spoke with a group of guys at Platinum Cutz on Mackey Street, on the issue of men behind the wheel. Patron Jason Fountain, a 25-year-old resident of Winton, feels many of the incidents of speedy and reckless driving are mostly attributed to young motorists. Jason explained: “A lot of the older generation who are 25 plus, they’re not really the ones who are driving recklessly and incoherently on the streets. “I could speak of the days when I was younger and had first gotten my license, I was reckless on the road myself, so I think it‘s a mixture of both young men and women who drive reckless and cause these fatalities.” Jason recalls an incident where his cousin was killed by a male driver, and said the accident occurred because of negligence by both individuals. Jason said his cousin’s decision to hold onto the back of a moving vehicle while on roller blades combined with the lack of attention by the driver lead to his cousin’s death. Although this tragedy has affected him and his family, Jason said he hopes that more drivers especially men, will become increasingly aware of the dangers of speeding. Patron Ryan Stubbs of Winton Estates, pointed out that apart from incidents of speeding that take place on many roads, one blessing in disguise is the large number of pot-holes infesting them. The 26-year-old claims: “I don’t really speed, but if all the roads were smoother, then everyone might just start speeding, so it might be a good thing that we have so many pot-holes in the road.” Looking at the issue of young and inexperienced male drivers who are commonly rated by insurance companies as more at risk drivers than females in the same category, Ryan said although the practice may not be fair to all within that group, he feels these companies have good reasons for their actions. “Most of the time a lot of young men are under the influence of alcohol, maybe smoking grass, and playing music at the same time they’re driving, and statistics speaks for itself.” Ryan also recounted an experience in his late teens where he was involved in a severe car accident where the car he was driving was totaled because of his speeding, and said the close call taught him a good lesson on the dangers of speeding. 23-year-old Barber Carlen Darling, said although speeding does have its consequences, death is still based on one’s fate. Carlen explained: “If someone’s meant to die on the road then they will, and furthermore death on the road isn’t always your fault. “It don’t have to be you who was drinking and driving, someone else could come and hit you. If you die, then it’s just your time.” Adding to the discussion of whether men are the number one culprits of speedy drivers, Carlen said he thinks they are because “men are more showoffers, and are more aggressive drivers.” Proprietor 31-year-old Andy Bethel of Elizabeth Estates, feels many traffic accidents occur because of the insufficient number of road signage at accident prone areas. Andy said as frequently as serious accidents happen in “death zones” like the curve behind Hammer Heads off Bay Street, the numerous curves on Tonique Williams Darling Highway, and parts of Bernard Road, he feels nothing is being done to protect innocent motorists. He went on to say: “As simple as someone coming out a four-way corner that doesn’t line up, it causes a whole confusion, but could easily be fixed with a stop light or an officer posted there to control the traffic.” Andy who is also a frequent visitor to the United States said like the US, local authorities should look into installing sensors in traffic lights to allow the smoother flow of traffic. “If the lights had a sensor to determine that there was a build-up of traffic from one way, and no cars coming from the other direction, it could automatically change and could help people to get where they’re going much quicker,” he said. 34-year-old patron E Bowe said, the majority of females are bad drivers, and frequently cause men to drive more aggressively because of their chaotic driving. He said: “How many times you see women pulling up on the light, on their cell-phone, and stopping on a green light, and when someone hits them, they wanna say it’s that person’s fault.” He said cell-phone usage, especially texting should be outlawed while behind the wheel, an action he thinks will eventually help in reducing the number of accidents locally. Generally these guys do agree that there are times when people are tempted to speed such as when they’re late for work, or in a rush to get somewhere. However they insist that due-care-andattention is still the only option when it comes to preventing traffic accidents. Why do men love to speed T HE BARBERSHOP Mrs Saunders said with her hats starting at about $100, 95 per cent of her business is by word of mouth and it usually takes her about half anh our to create on of her creations. Mrs Saunders said she loves to see Bahamian women dress because there are no limits to their fashion trends. They love it and I love that are happy. I love to see those ladies looking good. Hats are making ac ome back. Hats are becoming such a thing now and I am going with this wave as it comes. If you do not own a hat, you are not saying anything. The outfit is not complete without a hat. The best clients I have are the ones who always say they have never worn a hat. I always tell them I want them to be pleased. If I have to make that hat three to four times to please that client, that is what I will do because I am sure if they arep leased they will tell others,” Mrs Saunders said. Mrs Saunders said she is indeed grateful to Solomon’s Mines for teaching her to how to be customer oriented. People like when you can get down to their level and be personable which has helped me in my business. When it comes to my work, I like for people to be comfortable. You have to be a people’s person and not a snob and that is one of the things I learned from Solomon’s,” Mrs Saunders said. Mrs Saunders said her creative juice comes from just beginning her work on a blank hat frame. “When it comes to my work, because I am cre ating, I could never make that same hat again. You can get something close, but never exact. I like to work with my own inspiration and flow because half the time as I am working it just comes. When I got that turn, I don’t know how my fingers twisted to get it. I like working like that because you get a one of a kind piece. The ladies don’t have to worry that when they go out with that hat someone else has the exact same thing,” Mrs Saunders said. Mrs Saunders said she enjoys every minute of what she does and hopes she can continue to create gorgeous hats for the benefit of self expression of beautiful Bahamian women. F ROM page 12 Easter hats on parade apart from food based allergies. Contact based allergies are a nother cause of skin disease. This is where the dog becomes affectedi n its environment where it is lying or sleeping. The feet and under s ide of the body are frequently affected. This form of irritation may also be caused by an irritant substance and may not be allergic. An examination of the bedding a nd places that your dog is laying should be examined. Blankets,f eeding bowls, carpets should be given scrutiny. To test this aller g y, the dog should be removed from suspect rooms and possible bedding in its sleeping area to something which is known not to irritate or introduce allergy. Paper i s ideal bedding forthese dogs and can be used to test if their own b edding was guilty increasing skin irritation. If no improvement is s een after rigorous avoidance of suspected floorcoverings and bed dings then this form of allergy can be eliminated from the investigation. T his brings us to the most com mon cause of allergy based skin d isease -atopy. This is where the dog becomes sensitised to envir onmental allergens. These allergens cause skin disease after being i nhaled. This form of allergy may be seasonal or year round. The house dust mite and certain pollens are frequently implicated asc auses of atopic skin disease. Certain breeds of dog appear suscep tible such as the west highland terrier, the corgi, the Shar Pei, but any breed of dog may develop the condition. Cases presented with itching of the face feet and under sides of the body, possible ear infections and they may be running from the eyes or show a com bination of these symptoms. In general these dogs are eighteen months plus before they developed this condition. So what can we do about the treatment of allergies? Unfortu nately it is not very easy, by using tests; it may be possible to determine the exact causes of allergies. However it is very expensive and I don’t routinely recommend it. This is of great benefit when something we can eliminate from the environment. However frequently the allergens such as pillow mites are impossible to eliminate from the environment and in these cases we have to rely symptomatic relief of the patient. This involves the use of an arsenal of various anti-inflammatory drugs. Anti-histamines help in moderate cases. In difficult cases the use of oral glucocorticoid steroids may be necessary to control the symptoms. The combination of supplementation of the diet with essential fatty acids have proved to be ben eficial. In treatment it is always the aim of the vet to keep the use of steroids to a minimum and use combinations of other drugs to reduce their dosage. In some cases there will be no choice to use steroids. I personally feel this is always better than a pet that is in constant discomfort and does not get the quality of life it deserves. In summary the control of itching in these dogs can be very difficult, so be patient with your vet as he/she endeavors to get the scratchy and underlying conditions under control. Dr Basil Sands is a veterinarian at the Central Animal Hospital. Questions or comments should be directed to pot cake59@hotmail.com. Dr Sands can also be contacted at 325-1288 By DR BASIL SANDS The itchy dog

PAGE 22

C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 E H aster arade ats on n BY ALEX MISSICK T ribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net EASTER is generally a time of bright pastel colours, candy, chocolate bun ny shaped molds and Easter egg hunts for the kids. However, in the fashion world of the Bahamas, hundreds of women will be looking for oversized millinery creations to wear Easter Sunday morning. P Sandra Saunders, owner of Elegant and Sophisticated Ladies Hats and Accessories, located in Palm Beach Street and Balfour Ave, has been making hats for over 20 years and said she knows all to well about the Easter hat craze. Most of Mrs Saunders’ hats are custom made using sisal, straw and felt. “You can bring in your clothing, shoes or any color you want us to make the hat to match. We are almost like a little factory. We buy the base and we create from that base and that is what is so unique about us because it is not something that you can go on the shelf and pick up knowing other ladies have the same hat. We take the simple hat, change the bottom, top, and colour and it is a different style all together. We do hats for funerals, hats for weddings, corsages, head pieces for bridesmaids and boutonnires for men. We also spray shoes and bags as long as it is of satin material,” Mrs Saunders said. As for the Easter season, Mrs Saunders said this is a time when the bright colors are on parade. “All of the pastel colors come out for Easterthe lime greens, yellows, oranges and rose pink among many others but those are the most popular. When it comes to the size of a hat for Easter, they either choose the small bonnets or very wide brimmed ones. Silk flowers in various sizes and varieties are the main decoration used in making Easter hats,” Mrs Saunders said. Mrs Saunders said she got her start making hats at home as a side job. “I get a thrill from seeing women dressed. I love to know that when I have created something, the client is pleased. I used to work at Solomon’s downtown selling watches and jewelry for about 13 years and about 10 years ago I decided to open my own shop. Hat making was my sidekickdid it on my day off or time off. Now I eat sleep and drink hat making,” Mrs Saunders said. SEE page 10 SOME of the fabulous easter hats at Elegant and Sophisticated Hats springing into style this easter holiday.

PAGE 23

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 49F/9C Low: 50F/10C Low: 57F/14C Low: 58F/14C Low: 60 F/16 C Low: 65F/18C Low: 63 F/17 C Low: 60 F/16 C High: 65F/18C High: 65F/18C High: 74 F/23 C High: 74 F/23 C High: 77F/25C High: 74 F/23C High: 76F/24C Low: 63F/17C High: 84F/29C Low: 69 F/21 C High: 86F/30C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 71F/22C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 68F/20C High: 84 F/29 Low: 69F/21C High: 80F/27C Low: 74 F/23C High: 86F/30C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 91F/33C Low: 73 F/23 C High: 86F/30C Low: 72 F/22 C High: 89F/32C Low: 72F/22C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 69F/21C High: 89F/32C High: 81 F/27 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 7 TH 2009, PAGE 11C THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly cloudy, a shower; cooler. Mainly clear and breezy. Breezy with plenty of sunshine. Breezy with plenty of sunshine. Sunshine. High: 76 Low: 63 High: 78 High: 82 High: 86 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny and humid. High: 85 Low: 68 Low: 70 Low: 75 AccuWeather RealFeel 73F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 58F 74-65F 80-69F 97-81F 100-82F Low: 75 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................86F/30C Low ....................................................75F/24C Normal high ......................................80F/27C Normal low ........................................68F/20C Last year's high .................................. 85 F/29C Last year's low .................................. 76 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................trace Year to date ..................................................2.07" Normal year to date ......................................5.64" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First Apr. 9 Apr . 17 Apr . 24 May 1 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:55 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:29 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 5:53 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 5:25 a.m. Today Wednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 6:54 a.m.2.812:36 a.m.-0.1 7:15 p.m.3.112:54 p.m.-0.1 7:41 a.m.2.81:28 a.m.-0.2 8:00 p.m.3.21:38 p.m.-0.1 8:25 a.m.2.72:15 a.m.-0.2 8:43 p.m.3.22:20 p.m.-0.1 9:06 a.m.2.72:59 a.m.-0.1 9:25 p.m.3.13:00 p.m.-0.1 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3168/20s88/3173/22s Amsterdam54/1243/6sh55/1247/8r Ankara, Turkey52/1137/2sh55/1236/2c Athens67/1953/11pc68/2054/12s Auckland70/2155/12c63/1752/11sh Bangkok93/3377/25t97/3679/26pc Barbados84/2875/23pc84/2875/23sh Barcelona60/1547/8r61/1650/10r Beijing86/3048/8s84/2852/11s Beirut66/1855/12s64/1759/15sh Belgrade73/2251/10pc75/2353/11s Berlin72/2253/11sh68/2050/10pc Bermuda72/2263/17c70/2160/15r Bogota65/1847/8t65/1847/8r Brussels58/1443/6sh55/1243/6r Budapest76/2448/8pc73/2250/10c Buenos Aires81/2754/12pc70/2157/13s Cairo81/2758/14s77/2556/13s Calcutta100/3777/25s99/3779/26s Calgary54/1230/-1pc47/830/-1c Cancun75/2359/15pc85/2965/18s Caracas80/2669/20pc81/2769/20t Casablanca65/1845/7pc67/1952/11s Copenhagen57/1352/11sh53/1147/8sh Dublin52/1141/5sh50/1039/3pc Frankfurt71/2148/8pc64/1746/7c Geneva 62/16 47/8 sh 54/1247/8c Halifax 48/8 37/2 r 40/4 29/-1 pc Havana 75/23 54/12 pc 79/26 59/15 pc Helsinki 41/5 32/0pc46/736/2pc Hong Kong 72/22 64/17 pc 75/23 66/18pc Islamabad 79/26 59/15 c 75/23 55/12 t Istanbul58/1451/10r65/1853/11s Jerusalem 65/18 45/7s58/1445/7s Johannesburg 71/2151/10t70/2150/10s Kingston 86/3075/23pc83/2874/23sh Lima79/2665/18c79/2664/17sh London57/1345/7sh59/1541/5r Madrid61/1636/2sh66/1837/2pc Manila90/3279/26pc90/3279/26pc Mexico City75/2348/8t78/2546/7pc Monterrey79/2655/12s94/3466/18pc Montreal43/634/1sn37/234/1sf Moscow39/328/-2c41/527/-2c Munich68/2044/6sh62/1648/8s Nairobi88/3163/17t86/3064/17t New Delhi 93/3370/21s97/3670/21pc Oslo52/1140/4sh45/736/2r Paris57/1341/5sh59/1546/7sh Prague 69/20 47/8 s 67/19 47/8 s Rio de Janeiro86/3075/23sh82/2771/21t Riyadh91/3270/21s93/3373/22s Rome 66/18 48/8 t 68/20 52/11 r St. Thomas83/2875/23s83/2875/23s San Juan86/3062/16pc80/2660/15r San Salvador 91/32 68/20 s 91/32 72/22 pc Santiago 88/3155/12s88/3155/12s Santo Domingo86/3070/21pc85/2969/20sh Sao Paulo 78/25 63/17 t 76/24 60/15t Seoul66/1837/2s72/2239/3s Stockholm 54/12 39/3 pc 52/11 41/5 sh Sydney 70/21 57/13 pc72/2255/12s Taipei74/2365/18c72/2263/17sh T okyo 68/20 50/10 s 66/18 52/11 pc T oronto 34/126/-3sf39/331/0c Trinidad86/3073/22t81/2771/21r V ancouver 55/12 45/7 s 52/1143/6sh Vienna 68/2054/12s71/2154/12s W arsaw 61/16 45/7 pc 65/18 42/5 pc Winnipeg 34/1 29/-1 pc 43/626/-3c H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SSW at 10-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles75F Wednesday:NW at 15-20 Knots4-8 Feet7-10 Miles75F Today:SSW at 10-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles75F Wednesday:NW at 15-20 Knots4-8 Feet7-10 Miles75F Today:SSW at 10-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles75F Wednesday:NW at 15-20 Knots4-8 Feet7-10 Miles75F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque72/2245/7s66/1841/5pc Anchorage42/529/-1s41/527/-2sf Atlanta50/1029/-1sf60/1546/7s Atlantic City50/1030/-1c49/934/1pc Baltimore50/1030/-1pc53/1136/2pc Boston46/737/2c47/836/2pc Buffalo36/228/-2sf38/331/0c Charleston, SC58/1432/0pc66/1845/7s Chicago40/431/0sf50/1033/0pc Cleveland36/231/0sf44/634/1c Dallas68/2053/11s79/2659/15s Denver68/2034/1s62/1633/0c Detroit36/228/-2sf47/833/0c Honolulu80/2669/20pc82/2769/20pc Houston72/2248/8s78/2563/17s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday TodayWednesdayTodayWednesday Indianapolis42/529/-1c55/1241/5pc Jacksonville60/1530/-1s67/1941/5s Kansas City56/1336/2s67/1946/7pc Las Vegas82/2754/12s69/2055/12pc Little Rock58/1439/3s73/2254/12s Los Angeles70/2152/11sh68/2052/11sh Louisville46/734/1c59/1546/7pc Memphis54/1239/3pc70/2154/12s Miami77/2554/12pc74/2360/15s Minneapolis45/729/-1pc52/1132/0pc Nashville46/734/1c63/1748/8pc New Orleans63/1742/5s73/2257/13s New York45/737/2c48/841/5pc Oklahoma City68/2043/6s75/2354/12s Orlando65/1842/5s73/2248/8s Philadelphia48/834/1c50/1036/2pc Phoenix 90/32 61/16 s 75/2355/12pc Pittsburgh37/230/-1sf47/834/1c Portland, OR 67/1945/7pc57/1344/6c Raleigh-Durham 55/12 29/-1 pc 58/14 40/4 pc St. Louis50/1038/3pc64/1748/8pc Salt Lake City 66/18 45/7 pc 60/1542/5sh San Antonio 74/23 52/11 s 81/27 62/16 s San Diego67/1956/13pc64/1756/13sh San Francisco 62/16 50/10 r 57/1348/8c Seattle61/1643/6s54/1242/5c T allahassee 58/1430/-1s70/2144/6s T ampa 65/18 44/6 pc 70/21 54/12s Tucson88/3158/14s72/2248/8pc W ashington, DC 51/10 35/1pc53/1140/4pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com