Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WEATHER

TRY OUR
McFLURRY
TWIX MIX

The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

Pim blowin’ it

SOF
74F

PLENTY OF

HIGH
LOW



OR Ld ae

Volume: 105 No.110

PIN LSS)



‘Devastating
impact’ from

scruise islands

NS

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

OS ee
NT decked
ATES ees Pa ley

Concern as the Bahama
named On tax ravens is

product must he retooled

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

THE Bahamas was named on a
list of "tax havens” that have
committed to international tax
standards but have yet to imple-
ment them by the Organisation
for Economic and Co-Operation
and Development yesterday in a
move that will no doubt add more
weight to the mounting concern
regarding the future of the coun-
try's off-shore financial sector.

The list — divided into four
parts — names jurisdictions that
have implemented the interna-
tionally agreed tax standard; tax
havens that committed to the
international tax standard but
have yet to implement it; other
financial centres that have com-
mitted to the international tax
standard but have yet to imple-
ment it; and jurisdictions that
have not committed to implement
the internationally agreed tax
standard.

Speaking on the issue — short-
ly after the list was published —
in the afternoon session of Par-
liament yesterday, Opposition
spokesman on Foreign Affairs
and Trade Fred Mitchell said the
news was evidence of an impend-
ing “direct attack" on the coun-
try's offshore centre.

To mitigate against shutdowns
of the country's offshore centres
and subsequent job losses, Mr
Mitchell said the Bahamas’ finan-
cial product must be retooled.

"What is interesting is this pre-

diction, ‘the era of bank secrecy is
over’, appears to confirm coming
out of the OECD discussions and
in the communiqué, that there is
now going to be a direct attack
— if we did not know it already it
is now confirmed — that there is
going to be a direct attack on the
kind of way that we make our
money with regard to these off-
shore sectors. And so we obvi-
ously have to be adjusting our
product to ensure that the levels
on employment and the standards
of living which we've had is in
fact protected,” said Mr Mitchell.

His statement referred to a sec-
tion of the London Summit's offi-
cial statement at the close of the
G-20 summit which said the
group has agreed "to take action
against non-cooperative jurisdic-
tions, including tax havens. We
stand ready to deploy sanctions to
protect our public finances and
financial systems. The era of
banking secrecy is over. We note
that the OECD has today pub-
lished a list of countries assessed
by the Global Forum against the
international standard for
exchange of tax information.”

The list was published by the
OECD shortly after leaders of
the developed and developing
nations wrapped up the G-20
meetings in London yesterday. It
is available on the OECD's web-
site.

Thirty countries, including
Belize, the Turks and Caicos,
Monaco and the Cayman Islands

SEE page eight

hee hs
ee ee ee

Faster v

Pied) rs) om

Pret i oe
em
Bahamian-owned »*
Miami-Freeport-Massau

ASK US TO QUOTE YOU:
ie eed ee eee bs Tt ry
E: MAILBOAT@CORALWAVE.COM



Felipé Major/Tribune staff



THIS GRAFFITI has put a resident of Skyline Drive in a dilemma. The man said he wants to clean up the
scrawl, but he is concerned that removing it will only prompt the vandals to return.

$44.2m contract signed to Unemployment Benefits
dredge Nassau Harbour

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TO ENSURE that New Providence is capable of
accommodating the new “Genesis class” megacruise
ships, government signed a $44.2 million contract
with Boskalis International for the dredging and
improvement of Nassau’s harbour yesterday.

This project, set to be completed by the end of
November, will be finished just in time for the arrival
of the first megacruise ship, the Oasis of the Seas,
which is scheduled to dock in Nassau this December.

This $44.2 million contract also comes with a $6
million contingency fee, and will see nearly 1.9 mil-
lion cubic yards of rock and sand dredged out of
Nassau’s harbour.

This dredged material will then be used to extend

SEE page eight

THE injection of millions
of dollars in Unemployment
Benefits into the hands of
Bahamians will not only
assist the needy but act as a
stimulus to the ailing econ-
omy — boosting consumer
demand and keeping peo-
ple working, the Prime Min-
ister said yesterday.

Hubert Ingraham

This observation was made in the House
of Assembly as he moved three resolutions
to facilitate the introduction of Unemploy-

SEE page eight

th of Clarks children’s shoes!
larks and fill out an entry form.

rowing feet in safe hands’







Cte

PRICE — fe (Abaco and Grand Bahama D125)
Big hopes for
|
TERE!

SEE PAGE ELEVEN



Magistrate
rules that
‘Emperor’ be
discharged

m@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

LESS than a year after
being charged in the mur-
der of his nephew, Kenton
Dion Knowles, alias
‘Emperor’, has been dis-
charged.

In her ruling on a no
case submission made by
Knowles’ defence attor-
neys at a preliminary
inquiry last month, Mag-
istrate Linda Virgill said
yesterday that based on
the evidence adduced by
the prosecution, a prima
facie case had not been
made out against Knowles
and that he should be dis-
charged.

Knowles, 42, of Fox Hill,
who was represented by
attorneys Murrio Ducille
and Roger Minnis, was vis-
ibly relieved after hearing
the ruling.

Magistrate Virgill
reminded Knowles that
although she had dis-
charged him on the mur-
der charge, the charge
could be brought against
him again. Knowles was

SEE page eight

PM: NIB tax
cap on salaries

‘should be
increased’

THE cap on how much of a
worker’s salary can be taxed by
the National Insurance Board
“should be increased”, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham said
yesterday.

“The ceiling should be
increased again, it should be
increased and adjusted perhaps
once every three years to keep
pace with wages and to also
ensure that benefits people
receive are consistent with the
requirement to live,” said
Hubert Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham was addressing
the House of Assembly as he
introduced several resolutions
to facilitate the introduction of
an Unemployment Benefit
Scheme under the National
Insurance Board.

He did not state when such
an adjustment should, or will,
occur, however he _ did
announce that parliament will
“soon...be asked to approve a
number of changes to the
national insurance scheme, 35
years after its commencement.”

The Prime Minister’s sugges-
tion that government may tax
more of some workers’ incomes

SEE page eight



Marathon Mall ¢ 393-4155 « Mon-Fri 10am-8pm ® Sat 10am-9pm ¢ All major credit cards accepted. Sorry no debit cards accepted.



NASSAU AND BAHAME:

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



PM: steps taken to ensure minimal

impact from harbour dredging

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

NOTING that concerns will
be raised by local environmen-
talists when Nassau harbour is
dredged to accommodate larger
cruise ships, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said yesterday
that government has taken a
number of significant measures
to ensure there will be minimal
impact to beaches and tidal flow
in the area.

Adding that there has been no
indication of potential adverse
effects on the Western
Esplanade beach from the
planned dredging, Mr Ingraham
said the Ministry of Public
Works and Transport will “mon-
itor the area” throughout the
project.

However, he did note that an
Environmental Impact Assess-
ment has recommended that fish














Ingraham notes environmentalists’
concerns over move to
accommodate larger cruise ships

and conch usually kept in the
harbour should be stored at
alternate sites during the work.

“Turbidity levels will be with-
in the standards of the Florida
Environmental Protection
Agency. However, the BEST
Commission has under review a
proposed system of ‘active de-
watering’ for disposal of dis-
charge water that has the poten-
tial to produce reduced levels of
visible turbidity at the discharge
location, a system that was used
recently by the contractor in oth-
er project locations.

“Noise pollution has been
deemed negligible and should

eck out our new H
and Se ae i

not create any discomfort for
individuals who work nearby.
The contractors were advised of
the various requirements of the
project, and were also informed
of the need for unimpeded
movement of ship traffic (com-
mercial and pleasure craft) with-
in the harbour,” he said.

Mr Ingraham added that addi-
tional studies have also been
conducted by RTM STAR Cen-
tre — including simulations of
ship movements — to verify
dredge area limits with regard to
the safe entry and berthing of
mega cruise ships in all weather
conditions.

“This exercise was undertaken
in conjunction with cruise line
operators, the Port Department,
Nassau Harbour Pilots and the
engineering staff of the Ministry
of Public Works and Transport,”
Mr Ingraham said.

He added that mooring analy-
sis provided by cruise line oper-
ators “will guide the placement
of the mooring dolphins and the
necessary bollards for the proper
berthing of the mega cruise ships.

“Meetings have also been con-
ducted with a diverse group of
stakeholders including those on
whose activities the project will
have some impact. The meetings
were designed to explain the
scope of works to be undertaken,
to receive input, and identify spe-
cific issues related to individuals
who will be affected by the pro-
ject,” he said.

These stakeholders include:
the Bahamas Hotel Association,
the Potter’s Cay Vendors Asso-
ciation, the Arawak Cay Ven-



Oem ee UEUN

dors Association, the Ministry of
Tourism, the Immigration
Department, Customs, the Min-
istry of Agriculture and Marine
Resources, the Ministry of Envi-
ronment, the BEST Commission,
the Port Department, the Min-
istry of Health and cruise line
operators.

“Tt is anticipated that the
dredging activities will be com-
pleted by November, 30, 2009 to
accommodate the arrival in the
Bahamas of one the first of Roy-
al Caribbean International’s
mega cruise ships, Oasis of the
Seas, on its maiden voyage in
December, 2009.

“T take this opportunity to
congratulate the management
team of Boskalis on the award
of the contract. I should also like
to thank Cox & SHAL consul-
tants along with the staff mem-
bers of the various government
agencies for the part they have
played in the advancement of
this project to the present time,”
Mr Ingraham said.

Bill proposes new regulations
for pharmaceutical industry

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT took the first
concrete steps to fill a regulatory
void that pharmaceutical industry
insiders have claimed leaves mem-

bers of the public at risk.

Responding to cries from some
within the industry itself that it is
“wide open” to abuse by unscrupu-
lous individuals, Minister of Health

Hubert Minnis brought a bill

proposing new regulations to gov-

ern the pharmaceutical industry

Hubert Minnis

before the House of Assembly yes-

terday.

Called A Bill for an Act to Provide for the Regulation
and Control of the Practice of Pharmacy and for the Reg-
istration and Licensing of Persons Qualified to Practice
Pharmacy and for the Establishment of the Bahamas
Pharmacy Council and Other Matters Connected There-
with, the legislation will be known as the Pharmacy Act, if

passed.

Dr Minnis said it will ensure that pharmacies “follow

certain protocol.”

He added that it should cut down in the presence of
counterfeit drugs in the local market and require pharma-
cies to meet Bahamian and international standards.

Last year a pharmaccutical industry insider warned that
the pharmacy business in the this country suffers
from a lack of laws holding suppliers accountable for the
drugs they sell or requiring them to reveal their

source.

The concerned citizen, speaking in April 2008, said it
was high time that the government ensure there is more
oversight of Bahamian drug wholesalers and pharmacies
to ensure the public is not exposed to substandard drugs

and other associated risks.

Bruce Lowe, senior pharmacist at Lowe’s Pharmacy told
The Tribune he has been personally pushing for such legis-

lation since 1975.

Specific risks for the public arise out of the fact that, at
present, suppliers are not required to have liability insur-
ance to be used should someone suffer an adverse reaction
from taking a drug they supplied.

The lack of a national drug registry facilitates the impor-
tation of counterfeit drugs, which may not have the effect
that the person taking the medication expects them to.

Meanwhile, there is also no oversight of the conditions
in which suppliers store drugs — for example in a cool or
hot environment — despite the fact that this can significant-

ly impact the efficacy of drugs.



Bar president: better govt planning would
have prevented Court of Appeal vacancies

e/Bridal

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

IF GOVERNMENT had
engaged in better long-term
planning, there would not
be vacancies on the Court
of Appeal bench, president
of the Bahamas Bar Council

Congratulations
: \ i is

DILLETTE
PASSES
CHARTERED
ACCOUNTANT
EXAM

Wayne Munroe said.

Last October Justice Mil-
ton Ganpatsingh retired
from the Court of Appeal
and Justice Emmanuel
Osadebay is set to retire this
year. Court of Appeal Pres-
ident Dame Joan Sawyer,
Justice Osadebay, Justice
Hartman Longley and Jus-
tice Christopher Blackman
are the only judges current-

Adam Dilate of Freeport, Grand Bahama ad Nassau has suncasslully patsed ihe
Unilorm Evaluation (UFE) to become a Chamered Accountant on his first
attempt. Prior to graduating trom St, Mary's University in Halifax, Nowa Scotia in
2006 wth Bacheke's degree in Commence and his successful complejon of the
(Chartered Accountancy Programme in Canada, Mr. Diletie’s early education was in
the Anglican Schaal System at Ciscowery Primary School, Freeport Anglican High
School and then al he College of The Bahamas. He is shown being congralulaled
af the kemal convocation of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nova Scotia
14th Februsey, 2009 by its President, Leo Galant, POA, CFP. fdr, Dillette, the elder
$0n of Al anc Kethryn Diletie, is a senior auditor with the accounting firm of Deloite
4 Touche LLP in Halifax, Nova Scotia and plans a return io The Bahamas.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News aleZeoe tomer

EGitOnia betters cccte csr ec ate cs eecece sete ence aeons Pa
P9,10,11

BUSINESS SECTION

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

ly on the bench of the
Appellate Court.

While the Court of
Appeal continues to sit, Mr
Munroe said the speed at
which it hears cases and
makes judgments is affected
by the empty spot.

Government should have
planned better and had a
replacement ready in time,
he said.

“You know from the Con-
stitution when a judge will
reach the age of retirement,
so you know when you need
to fill that vacancy,” Mr
Munroe told The Tribune
yesterday.

He also expressed sur-
prise that government has
not consulted the Bar Coun-
cil regarding the empty seat.

Meanwhile, there is still
no definite word on when
new appointments to the
bench will assume their
posts.

Justices

When asked during a
brief interview yesterday
when the new justices would
be instated, Attorney Gen-
eral Michael Barnett said:
“We’re working on it.”

Earlier this year, Mr Bar-
nett said the spots would
soon be filled. He did not
give a specific date, or say
from which part of the
region they will be recruit-
ed.

However, he explained
that government has made
no secret of its intention to
have a full complement of
judges, regardless of nation-
ality.

According to Article 102
of the Constitution, a jus-
tice of appeal is permitted
to hold office until the age
of 68.

The Constitution also
allows the governor general,
after consulting with the
prime minister, to allow a
justice to sit until the age of
70.

The Constitution also says
a judge may continue to
serve beyond the age of 68,
as may be necessary to
enable him to deliver judg-
ment or fulfil any other duty
in relation to proceedings
that were commenced in his
court before he attained
that age.



PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master


























































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Threats to Tribune reported to police

THE DAY after the article, “The tragic sto-
ry of the young pilot who knew too much,”
appeared in The Tribune, a jitney pulled up
across the street from The Tribune’s Shirley
Street entrance. A senior Tribune staff member
was standing at the front of the building.

“Hey, you!” the driver shouted across the
street, “is that man Marquel who wrote Insight
in there?” Because the driver had mispro-
nounced the name of Managing Editor John
Marquis, the staff member feigned ignorance.

“Tf he’s in there, Pll come and burn down
The Tribune with him in there!” he shouted
angrily. His threat has been reported to the
police.

The jitney driver was angered by an article,
written by Mr Marquis, as a result of an inter-
view given to him by Mr Chauncey Tynes, Sr.,
on the death of his son, Chauncey, Jr. The aging
Mr Tynes believes that his son, who got mixed
up with drug smugglers at the height of the
trade in the eighties, was killed because he knew
too much. Mr Tynes, whose son used to fly for
Sir Lynden, is convinced that his son knew too
much about Sir Lynden’s relationship with drug
lord, Carlos “Joe” Lehder, who had planted
his Colombian flag on Norman’s Cay in the
Exumas from where he smuggled drugs into
the US. For all these years, Mr Tynes has
believed that his son’s knowledge made him
expendable. Apparently Mr Tynes, Sr., did not
want to go to his grave with this knowledge.

That was Mr Tynes’s story. He wanted it
told and he selected the expert pen of Mr Mar-
quis to do the telling. The “Insight” article was
published on March 9. It created quite a stir in
the town.

After publication of the article a section of
the PLP organised a rally against The Tribune
— promised by a PLP MP to be the largest ral-
ly ever seen in the Caribbean— to which about
40 persons showed up, lost interest and ended
the day partying on the Eastern Parade. How-
ever, throughout the following weeks threats
of “we’re going to burn The Tribune down”
kept surfacing. It came out in the open last
week when a concerned citizen telephoned The
Tribune to report the intemperate words of
another PLP MP, who has aspirations to lead-
ership of his party.

This man was speaking in a public parking lot
at a meeting held by a crimewatch committee in
the Shirley Street-Twynam Avenue area.

Not only did the MP “rant and rave” about
having to get this “Englishman out of this coun-
try”, but off mike and within earshot of all to

hear, he said: “We must burn The Tribune
down!”

We now flash back to May 1967 and the
Crooked Island by-election in which the late
Basil Kelly was defending his House of Assem-
bly seat. The AP reported that “Premier Lynden
Pindling’s young native-dominated government
may soon face its first popularity test at the
polls since the historic upset which swept him
into office four months ago.”

In office just four months, this was a crucial
by-election for the PLP. Premier Pindling was
determined to win. The PLP pulled out all the
stops.

Every dirty trick in its arsenal of dirty tricks
was used. Of course, as usual, The Tribune was
in the thick of the battle, and whispers of “we
gotta burn that Tribune down” was drifting
back to us.

Tribune publisher Sir Etienne Dupuch and
ourselves decided to spend the Easter week-
end at Exuma. We were there Easter Sunday
morning when we got the news that The Tri-
bune was on fire. This was just a week before
Mr Kelly won his Crooked Island seat by 47
votes, defeating an angry new government.

Early on Easter Sunday morning one or
more persons set fire to The Tribune’s stock-
room. The Tribune is a fireproof Butler build-
ing.

Although it caused thousands of dollars dam-
age to the building and machinery and com-
pletely destroyed our newsprint and materials,
it was contained to the stockroom area. By the
time we had returned to Nassau, Tribune exec-
utives, volunteers, electricians, builders and
office cleaners were busily repairing the damage.
All day Sunday neighbours, well wishers and
friends turned up with mops and brooms to get
The Tribune back into production.

A Senator with a broom in hand was side by
side with one of our paper boys sweeping water
out of the building.

The Guardian sent in supplies. The Tribune
didn’t miss a roll of the press. It was back in pub-
lication Tuesday morning — Easter Monday
was a public holiday when newspapers would
not have been published.

The police confirmed arson. Although we
had our suspicions, the political climate — even
in the police force — was such that it would
have been difficult to go after the perpetrators.
However, times have changed.

We are now busy collecting names to be
handed to the police. This time history will not
repeat itself.

ee ede
READY-MADE FRAMES

cag

Our PM should
be provided
with security

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Rt Hon Hubert A Ingra-
ham, Prime Minister of The
Bahamas, was once heard years
ago explaining that he had no
need of a security detail because
he had done nothing wrong to
anyone to warrant being protect-
ed.

And, concerning this particu-
lar issue, he must be serious. His
personal mantra “I say what I
mean and I mean what I say”
rings true with regards to his own
security because I have had occa-
sion to watch him travel along
the streets of Nassau (in a chauf-
feured car), and also, because I
live close to the area, I have had
occasion to drive past and even
walk past his house — no security.

It troubles me, as a concerned
citizen of The Bahamas that the
nation’s Chief Executive can just
wander about the streets of the
country like any other ordinary
citizen.

It does not seem right, and (’m
gonna say it), it just does not look
right for the Prime Minister of
the country to not have a security
detail while driving on our streets,
walking on our streets, or con-
stantly stationed at his house (24
hours).

T have the same mindset as the
Prime Minister — I feel that I have
done nothing wrong to anyone to
warrant 24-hour protection by the
police.

But, at the same time, I am
cognizant of the criminal element
that we, in The Bahamas, have
to contend with on a daily basis.

And me, just as a regular citi-
zen, I wouldn’t mind a police
escort everywhere I go, for my
own protection as I drive and
walk the streets of Nassau. And
also, I wouldn’t mind 24-hour
police protection at my house to
ensure my Safety.

As a matter of fact, I wouldn’t
mind that type of comprehensive
police protection for my entire
family, given the 2009 criminal
realities, which is why I cannot
understand Mr Ingraham’s stance
— refusing protection.

He is the Prime Minister; I am
only “Joe Blow”. And if I am
willing to accept that type of pro-
tection for me and my family,
don’t you think that the man who
is running the whole country
should accept some type of pro-
tection? I mean, come on, let’s
be reasonable.

Mr Ingraham is a politician, I
am not.

But even I, not being a politi-
cian, would know that the nature
of politics in The Bahamas dic-
tate that approximately half of
the country does not like your
brand of politics if you are a PLP,
and approximately half of the
country does not like your brand
of politics if you are an FNM.

Sometimes this dislike for your
brand of politics translates into a
personal hatred for you. In Amer-
ica, and some other countries, this
hatred for a particular brand of

YOUR CONWNECTION-TO

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



politics precipitates a conspiracy
and even execution of a plan to
assassinate political figures, most
notably those figures at the top of
the pyramid —- in our case, the
Prime Minister.

And so, bearing this in mind,
all of us concerned citizens of The
Bahamas should attempt to con-
vince Mr Ingraham to accept 24-
hour, comprehensive police pro-
tection for himself. As I am sure
Mr Ingraham can appreciate, he
is not an ordinary Bahamian.

And his untimely demise would
catapult this country and even
this region into a tailspin of uncer-
tainty, the likes of which we
would not opt to experience.
Very few Bahamians would miss
“Joe Blow”. But we would all cer-
tainly miss the Prime Minister.

And even Mr Ingraham would
concede that security is a neces-
sary inconvenience for those who
have a dislike for it. Consider
when dignitaries from other coun-
tries visit The Bahamas — the
government always provides
them with adequate (sometimes
overwhelming) security during
their entire length of stay in our
country.

Who’s to say that they would
like all of that protection?

But the government of The
Bahamas deems it necessary,
doesn’t it?

Excuse me for saying so, but, I
happen to believe that all of these
dignitaries are not as important as
The Prime Minister of The
Bahamas.

Mr Ingraham is my Prime Min-
ister! And if I was in a position to
do so, I would do everything with-
in my power to ensure his safety —
within and outside this jurisdic-
tion.

And so, I make an appeal (as I
hope all Bahamians would) to our

Prime Minister — The Right
Honourable Hubert A Ingraham
— to relax your personal policy of
refusing protection for the bet-
terment, forward development,
and stability of The Bahamas, and
give The Minister of National
Security license to do his job.

MARVIN G

LIGHTBOURN

Nassau,

March 22, 2009.

(We agree. Mr Ingraham is of
the same mindset as the late Sir
Roland Symonette, who we
would often see as we drove to
work at 7.30 in the morning walk-
ing from his office back to his
home after having already com-
pleted a full day’s work.

(When “RT” or “Pop” Symon-
ette, as he was affectionately
known, was confirmed as the first
Premier of the Bahamas, Police
Commissioner Nigel Morris sent
a police officer as the first securi-
ty guard to be stationed at his
home.

(When Sir Roland saw the offi-
cer he sent him back to the Com-
missioner with the message that
he needed no one to guard him,
rather he believed the officer
could be put to better use guard-
ing the people.

(However, times were differ-
ent then. There was crime, but
not at the level that we experi-
ence it today. We know that Mr
Ingraham is a man of his word,
but it is a wise man, who can
adjust his position when the situ-
ation changes.

(After all one might vow to
spend the day out of doors in the
sunshine, but as soon as it starts to
rain the wise person seeks shelter
inside. Times have changed from
Sir Roland’s day and it is impor-
tant that Mr Ingraham, for the
sake of the country and its people,
adjusts to that change.

(It should be mandatory that
this country provides security for
its chief citizen and his family. —
Ed).

Robin Hood economics will
bankrupt the world, Mr Obama

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS past week the White House announced that President
Obama will have an entourage of 1,000 officials attending the
OAS Summit in Trinidad or at least four-five jets filled with civil ser-
vants and hangers-on. Just can’t calculate how much C02 this will

pollute the atmosphere?

So it is good and permissible for the socialist government of the
US to waste public moneys on meetings but deny it to hard work-
ing employees and put the hard working hotel employees of the

Bahamas in jeopardy?

Oh this Obama Administration reminds me so much of George
Orwell’s Animal Farm — for those who have not read Animal Farm
go get a copy and then predict precisely what the Government of
the new Socialist Republic of the United States of America will do.

Robin Hood Economics will predictably bankrupt the whole

world, Mr President.

PETER WILLIAMS
Nassau,
March 7, 2009.

THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTERUPTION OF WIRELESS
NETWORK AT ATLANTIS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Ltd. (BTC) would like to advise the general public
that due to the commissioning and acceptance

of the wireless network at Atlantis, there may be

an interruption in service from Tuesday March
3list- Friday April 3rd, 2009.

BIC apologizes for any inconvenience caused.

www.btcbahamas.com



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Keith Carey
murder retrial
atijourned for
third time

this week

THE retrial of three men
charged in the February 2006
murder of businessman Kei-
th Carey has been adjourned
for the third time this week.

The trial was adjourned
yesterday, until Monday at
10am, after it was revealed
that attorney Perry Albury
who is representing murder
accused Dwight Knowles
would not be able to attend.

Mr Albury, who was
involved in a car accident on
Wednesday, has been given
medical leave, lead prosecu-
tor Cheryl Grant-Bethel told
the court.

Attorney Craig Butler,
who is representing murder
accused Jamal Glinton, told
Justice Jon Isaacs that he did
not oppose the adjournment
but asked if the court could
extend its hours beyond
4.30pm so that the trial could
be over with soon.

Extending

Justice Isaacs said that he
had no problem extending
the hours.

The retrial began on Feb-
ruary 15 before Justice
Isaacs.

Jamal Glinton, Sean
Brown and Dwight Knowles
are charged with murder as
well as armed robbery and
conspiracy to commit armed
robbery.

Keith Carey, 43, was shot
and killed on the steps of the
Bank of the Bahamas on
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway before he was able
to deposit $40,000 that
belonged to the Esso Service
Station, which he operated.

Ms Grant-Bethel,
Stephanie Pintard, Anthony
Delaney and Lennox Coleby
are prosecuting the case.

Attorneys Craig Butler
and Devard Francis are rep-
resenting Jamal Glinton,
attorney Dorsey McPhee is
representing Sean Brown,
and attorney Perry Albury is
representing Dwight
Knowles.

The prosecution has called
a total of 41 witnesses during
the trial.

US, Mexico
work together
to fight drug
cartels

@ By EILEEN SULLIVAN
CUERNAVACA, Mexico

USS. and Mexican officials
say they will soon name a
group to develop strategies
for stopping the cross-border
flow of weapons and drugs,
according to the Associated
Press.

Emerging from a confer-
ence Thursday with U.S.
officials, Mexican Attorney
General Eduardo Medina-
Mora said more meetings are
needed to develop plans to
bring warring drug cartels
under control along the bor-
der.

Medina-Mora also
announced plans to begin
checking 10 percent of the
vehicles entering his country
from the U.S. for illegal
weapons.

US. Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napolitano
and U.S. Attorney General
Eric Holder met privately
with Medina-Mora, Interior
Minister Fernando Gomez-
Mont and Public Safety Sec-
retary Genaro Garcia Luna.

Clan

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



Global pressure mounting
for Detention Centre probe

Letters from around world continue to flood The Tribune after mistreatment reports

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

LETTERS from human rights activists around the
world calling for an independent investigation of the
Carmichael Road Detention Centre continue to pour
into The Tribune office following reports of detainees
being mistreated.

Residents of France, Belgium, Germany, Switzer-
land, Spain, New Zealand and the United States are
among dozens from around the world who say they
are outraged by claims of physical abuse, filthy living
conditions and inadequate meals at the centre.

However, the Immigration Department has not yet
responded to requests for an independent investigation,
nor has it accommodated The Tribune’s request to tour
the facility.

Department director Jack Thompson led psychologist
David Allen, Archdeacon James Palacious, Royal
Bahamas Defence Force senior lieutenant Frederick
Brown and Social Services director Mellany Zonicle on
a tour of the facility on March 6, and the leading pro-
fessionals submitted reports of their impressions and
recommendations for department heads and the Cab-
inet to review.

Although Minister of Immigration Branville McCart-
ney said on March 18 the reports would be submitted to
The Tribune in full at the newspaper’s request, they
have yet to be provided.

Calls to Mr McCartney were not returned before

Brent Symonette Tommy Turnquest

LETTER FROM ODILE MAISSE (BELGIUM)





“I request an immediate,
thorough and independent
investigation into these
allegations, ensuring that
anyone found responsible is
brought to justice.”



The Tribune went to press yesterday.
And as requests remain unanswered, the global cam-

paign for an independent investigation is building.

Around 20 letters from activists addressed to Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symonette, Mr McCartney, and
Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest were
received this week, adding to the mounting pile of let-
ters sent to the Bahamas since reports of the ill-treat-
ment of detainees were first published in February.

The writers are demanding an independent investi-
gation of the detention centre and appropriate medical
attention for detainees.

Independent

Ina letter to Mr Symonette, which echoes several oth-
ers, Odile Maisse from Belgium wrote: “I request an
immediate, thorough and independent investigation
into these allegations, ensuring that anyone found
responsible is brought to justice.

“T trust you will allow an independent monitoring of
the facility by civil society including human rights organ-
isations.

“Besides I urge you that no asylum-seeker be
returned without access to a fair and effective refugee
determination procedure, including the right to appeal
to an independent tribunal and access to effective legal
assistance, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for
Refugees and interpreters.

“The detention of irregular migrants and asylum-
seekers should only be used as a measure of last resort.

“Please ensure that alternatives to detention are
available and accessible, in law and in practice, without
discrimination.”

Mother rapped for criticism over Immigration raid damage

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

IMMIGRATION officials

have hit out at single mother
for criticising the fact they have
not yet repaired damage caused
by officers who invaded her
home.

Four weeks after armed
immigration officers raided her
Nassau Village home, Violet
Hanna, 41, told The Tribune
that although the Immigration
Department is investigating the
circumstances of the early
morning raid, nothing has yet
been done to fix the back door
or rear gate which were bashed
with a maul.

The Bahamian mother-of-two
and her 7-year-old daughter,
who were at home at the time,
said they were terrified by the
aggressive invasion, have suf-
fered post-traumatic stress and
now feel unsafe in their home.

She said restoring the securi-
ty of her home is her number
one priority but she cannot
afford to fix the door herself.

In response to Wednesday’s
article entitled, “Woman claims
Immigration Department has
yet to repair damage to home”,
the department lists a number
of things addressed in the inves-
tigation, but makes no refer-
ence to when the damage will
be repaired.

The statement reads: “The
department takes grave excep-
tion to the statements issued by
Ms Violet Hanna, as they are
deceptive and misleading.

“The article seeks to give its
readers the impression that
Immigration did nothing and
adopted an uncaring attitude



Branville McCartney

regarding the matter, when in
fact this is simply not the case.

“The department would
rather not have the issue drawn
out in the public domain, but
scathing attacks without merit
will not go unchallenged.”

Immigration Minister
Branville McCartney and direc-
tor Jack Thompson maintain
they contacted Ms Hanna after
reading how around six armed
officers demanded entry into
Ms Hanna’s Price Street home
at around 4am on February 24,
brushed aside her offer to show
them her passport, and left as
her daughter was crying and
vomiting in fear.

Mr McCartney said: “If in
fact officers conducted them-
selves in an unprofessional man-
ner they will be disciplined.”

And he promised a full inves-

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tigation into the matter. A four
member panel met with Ms
Hanna and her attorney on
March 6 and visited her home
to inspect the damage on March

Apprehension

Immigration officers who par-
ticipated in the apprehension
exercise were interviewed, and
the department wrote to Ms
Hanna asking her to put an offi-
cial complaint in writing after
she promised to do so, the
department maintains.

Investigations are ongoing
and the panel plans to interview
its final list of people this week.

The statement further reads:
“The Bahamas Immigration
Department remains commit-
ted to its mandate to protect
the borders of the Bahamas.

“The minister and directorate
wish to reiterate the depart-

a
Us)
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highest level of professionalism
and respect continue to be the
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“The leadership of the Immi-
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during its apprehension exer-
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generations yet unborn.”

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Mexico reports arrest of major drug suspect

m MEXICO CITY

AN HEIR to one of Mexico’s
most notorious narcotics empires
was grabbed by police as he exer-
cised in a city park, officials
announced Thursday, shortly
before U.S. and Mexican Cabinet
officials met to coordinate attacks
on escalating drug violence, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Carrillo Leyva allegedly inherit-
ed a top position in the Juarez car-
tel from his father Amado Carrillo
Fuentes, who was nicknamed “the
Lord of the Skies” for sending jet-
liners full of cocaine to the United

The father was considered Mex-
ico’s No. 1 drug trafficker when he
died in 1997 during plastic surgery
to change his appearance. The U.S.
Embassy said Thursday that the
embattled remnant of his cartel is
still “one of Mexico’s most ruthless
organized criminal gangs, which
controls one of the primary trans-

base of Ciudad Juarez last year.

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Expanding the west side

THE Nature Conservancy is
working to expand of the
Andros West Side National
Park so that wildlife and cru-
cial nursery habitats can be pro-
tected from future threats.

TNC is undertaking this
effort in partnership with the
Bahamas National Trust
(BNT), Andros Conservancy
and Trust (ANCAT), Nature’s
Hope for South Andros and the
Kerzner Marine Foundation.

Andros is the largest island
in the Bahamas and contains
some of the most pristine
marine and terrestrial habitats
in the country, including vast
tidal flats with flourishing bone-
fish and tarpon populations, the
third longest reef in the world,
and the most blue holes of any
location in the western hemi-
sphere.

Along the west side, there are
a number of estuaries, tidal
creeks, and wetlands that sup-
port a high diversity of life and
provide important nursery and
foraging areas for commercially
valuable species.

“As part of our effort to pro-
mote the project and encour-
age community members to
become involved in conserva-
tion, the project team launched
a tee-shirt design contest in Sep-
tember 2008 throughout the
schools in Andros,” explained
the TNC in a statement. “The
submitted design had to high-
light a conservation message
that relates to the west side of
Andros.”

The competitors were from
schools in Mangrove Cay,
North, Central and South
Andros. The competition was
divided into two categories: (1)
primary school students and (2)
junior and secondary school stu-
dents.

The TNC announced that the
winners were: Jamal Neely from
Staniard Creek Primary, who
presented “Bonefish, Let’s
Observe to Preserve” and
Jachette Johnson from South
Andros High School, who pre-
sented “Save Our Natural
Resources From Extinction.”

“The project team is pleased
to have had so many young
Androsians artistically express
the value of preserving our nat-
ural resources in order to pro-
tect the Bahamian way of life,”
the TNC said. “This is indeed
the attitude towards and appre-
ciation for our natural resources
that we aim to increase through-
out the Bahamas. It is impor-
tant for us to understand how
the health of our natural
resources plays a significant role
in sustaining our quality of life
both ecologically and economi-
cally.”



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W HEN a UN spon-
sored government

was elected in Haiti there was
a glimmer of hope for the
future of this most troubled
nation.

As we approach the fifth
anniversary of the last foreign
intervention it is useful for us
to evaluate the situation.

In The Bahamas and
Jamaica the situation in Haiti
has a direct impact on many
aspects of our societies.

In Jamaica gunrunning and
drug trafficking originating in
Haiti have increased the levels
of crime and corruption.

This has consequentially
damaged the economy thus
creating more hardship for the
people.

In these times of worldwide
economic hard times the result
can be calamitous.

In The Bahamas the cur-
rent situation in Haiti increas-
es the flood of illegal immi-
grants and I am sure that of
drugs and guns as well.

The Bahamas has for years
had to deal with the problems
which result from illegal immi-
gration.

Q eve Harbour Bay East BAY St. telL.394-5767







However during this great
recession, which has impact-
ed the employment of thou-
sands of Bahamians, the eco-
nomic impact of illegal immi-
gration and the consequential
social damage is more extreme
and serious.

This brings me to the title
of this column.

However well intentioned
the US and the UN were
when they intervened in Haiti
they have failed to achieve
their objectives.

Yes, there have been elec-
tions however the social struc-
tures and security necessary
for the development and sus-
taining of a decent quality
of life has not been estab-
lished.

The financial and human
resources necessary to do the

of Andros National Park

portation routes for illegal drug }
shipments into the United States.” :

Prosecutors say Carrillo Leyva, i
32, was second only to his uncle :
Vicente Carrillo Fuentes in the }
gang, whose battles with upstart }
cartels have fed a bloodbath that }
saw 1,600 people killedin itshome }

LEFT: Felicity Burrows,
The Nature Conservan-
cy’s project manager,
presenting Jachette
Johnson with her prize
while Rivean Riley from
The Bahamas National
Trust displays the win-
ning tee-shirt design.

BELOW: Left to right -
Sharon Henfield
(Nature’s Hope for
South Andros), Javonya
Sands (third place win-
ner), Rivean Riley
(BNT), Felicity Burrows
(TNC), Jachette John-
son (winner) and
Andrae Nairn (principal
of South Andros High
School).



job have not been provided
by those who assumed the
responsibility for Haiti's
future.

The result of these events is
the gunrunning and drug trade
originating in Haiti that seri-
ously harms The Bahamas and
Jamaica.

The increased illegal migra-
tion to The Bahamas is one
more problem the country
doesn't need.

So if the interveners do not
finish the job they started in
Haiti the law of unintended
consequences will continue to
do us harm.

eR RC ESSE)
CURT E

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

edsdbeeusesvecceneuesss sec secawesseauveuedessesdceesseescessees <

Second man
pleads guilty in.
Iran aircraft |
parts scheme |

@ MIAMI

A SECOND man has plead-
ed guilty in Miami federal court }
to charges of scheming to ille- }
gally export military aircraft }
parts to Iran, according to }
Associated Press. ;

Traian Bujduveanu (Tray- }
"ANN Booj-doo-’VAY-nu) ;
pleaded guilty Thursday toa }
single conspiracy count. He act- }
ed as his own lawyer and faces
up to five years in federal :
prison when sentenced June 11. }

Iranian-born Hassan Keshari
previously pleaded guilty. Pros-
ecutors said both men were ille-
gally helping Iran obtain parts ;
for such aircraft as the F-14 }
Tomeat fighter, C-130 cargo }
plane and AH-1 attack heli- :
copter. The parts were shipped
from South Florida to Dubai
and on to Iran. :

Keshari also faces up to five
years in prison. i

Gaming Reform Committee writes
to PM over gambling legalisation

THE Gaming Reform Com-
mittee has again written to
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham asking him to move
ahead immediately with the
legislative reforms necessary
for the legalisation of gam-
bling.

The group said the weekend
arrest of several persons in
Grand Bahama in connection
with illegal gaming allegations
was just another example of
“antiquated laws and govern-
ment ineptness” at work.

GRC chairman Sidney Stra-
chan pointed out that nearly
every modern democracy
allows its citizens to gamble
within a regulated framework.

“Governments around the
world have learned through
bitter experience that the incli-
nation to game is universally
strong. If persons are unable to
pursue gaming interests
through legal, regulated means

Ministry of Tourism
partners with Southern
Boating in Rum Cay
swimsuit shoot

@ By DIANE PHILLIPS

ROBB HANRAHAN con-
fessed — the seasoned videog-
rapher was on assignment to
shoot tanned and toned stun-
ners for a swimsuit spread
when he realised there was
something different about this
gig. He couldn’t take his eyes
off... the scenery.

“It was breathtaking,” he
said. “When you are shooting
video and you've got the mod-
els who are as pretty as the
models we took down to Rum
Cay and you're having a hard
time focusing on the models
because the scenery is so
breathtaking, it says a lot,”
said Mr Harnahan.

A senior editor at Southern
Boating magazine, Mr Hanra-
han was among a contingent
of models, photographers,
make-up artists and produc-
ers who flew to Rum Cay in
the southeastern Bahamas for
the magazine’s much-antici-
pated annual swimsuit issue.

Though this was the first
video shoot, Mr Hanrahan’s
photographed here before, but
has never been as taken with a
set as he was with Rum Cay.
“You don’t see this kind of
scenery in the Bahamas. Pret-
ty beaches, good light, palms,

yes. Most of the time you just
follow the light. But this was
different. It was so dramatic,
primitive yet breathtaking. It
had some of the most remote,
beautiful locations I have ever
seen and every part was dif-
ferent.

“White cliffs on one side of
the island, caves on another,
then you’d cross over and
there were salt flats. Every-
where you went it was amaz-
ing, dramatic and wherever
you were, you felt like you left
the real world behind.”

Under management of
Montana Holdings Ltd, the
Sumner Point Marina, villas
and Out of the Blue restau-
rant played host to the
entourage with locals.

Sky Limo provided airline
service and the Ministry of
Tourism partnered in the
shoot because of the excellent
exposure for the Bahamas.

The group toured the island
and moved from backdrop to
backdrop by SUV, golf cart,
truck, buggy — whatever was
needed to get from flats to
cliffs to caves and back again.

“Getting around was even
different and the hospitality
was unbelievable. Everybody
made you feel like you were
part of a family,” said Mr



“If persons
are unable to
pursue gaming
interests
through legal,
regulated means
they will do so
illegally.”

GRC chairman
Sidney Strachan



they will do so illegally,” he
said.

“The end result is lost rev-
enue and with it problematic
limitations in social, educa-
tional and developmental pro-
gramming and initiatives. This

THE SOUTHERN BOATING
swimsuit issue (above) hit the
stands on April 1.

Hanrahan, who had one more
confession — being distracted,
for once, by the scenery, didn’t
bother his wife one bit.

“It was not your average
beach shot,” he said.

The Southern Boating swim-
suit issue hit the stands on
April 1. The editors were so
taken with Rum Cay they’ve
planned a feature on the
island, which will appear in
May.

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Saturday April 4th, 2009 at 10am
Starting at St. Barnabas Church, ending at the Mall at Marathon

Schools, churches & youth groups are invited to bring

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is exactly what is happening in
the Bahamas. It’s nothing
short of scandalous and a bla-
tant example of government
ineptness and backward think-
ing,” he said.

The GRC is calling for the
government to move forward
with legislative reform and the
establishment of a national
regulated gaming programme.
Further, the committee is rec-
ommending that modern
responsible gaming methods
and technologies be adopted
to afford Bahamians all prac-
tical means of minimising per-
sonal risk and impulsive play.

According to the commit-
tee, $15 to $20 million in gam-
ing revenue is being lost every
year because of government’s
refusal to change the law.

Important social, educa-
tional and economic initiatives
are underfunded as a conse-
quence, at the expense of



Bahamians, Mr Strachan said,
adding that important new
employment opportunities are
also slipping away — at a time
when they are very much
needed.

“Sure, gaming has its disad-
vantages.

“But holding firm to dis-
criminatory, antiquated laws
is just plain stupid. It’s a dis-

play of ineptness that cries out
for comment,” Mr Strachan
said.

The GRC is asking that
Bahamians contact their gov-
ernment representatives, the
prime minister, the gaming
authorities and others in posi-
tions of public responsibility
to demand that the gambling
laws be changed.

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Suzanne Stoll passed away on Monday 23rd
March, 200% in Ocala, FL. at age 96. She
enjoyed a long and busy life rich in travel
and experiences.

Born as Marion Suzanne Hagen on the 14th
March, 1913 in NY...
Suzanne (known as Suzie to her friends in
Nassau) arrived in Nassau in the mid 1930's

Rochester,

and shortly thereafter, married Godfrey W
The
her

Higgs. Suzie spent 22 years in

Bahamas. She is remembered for
philanthropic kindness, both to formal
charities and to many individuals assisting
them in hard times of that era. In her
Nassau days, she was active in sailing and in
stamp collecting and the establishment of a|
Stamp Club, She also active in

The Bahanwas Red Cross during the war and

wills

was befriended by the Duchess of Windsor
whe shared a common national background

with her.

[t was in The Bahamas that Suzanne became a keen deep-sea fisherwoman, competing

jin many tournaments and landing a number of world records, one of which survived

on the books for more than 40 years.

‘Suzanne lett The Bahamas to settle for a while first in Miami, FL. from where she|

continued her ishing and then in Los Angeles, CA. where she married Wayne Stoll in

1970. In her California days, she owned Midas Muffler franchises and, with Wayne, was

involved in antique car collection and restoration,

Suzanne and Wayne moved in 197d to Miami, OK. There she was active in the retail sale

of Indian jewelry and limited edition prints and plates. It was in Oklahoma that

Suzanne became an avid dog breeder working from her own Oakdale Kennels.

Suzanne truly loved her Dalmatians and won many honours with them, including Best

of Shows in the United States, Canada and The Bahamas. She spent thousands of miles}

traveling by car and by plane with Wayne at the yoke across the United States and by

| bixert through The Bahamas. Despite illnesses from time to time, she never stopped

| planning future trips.

Suzanne and Wayne moved on his retirement in 2005 to Ocala, where they much

enjoyed new friends and being closer to her Nassau family. Suzanne was|

}predeceased by her eldest son Monty. She is lovingly remembered by her husband
Wayne, sons Peter and Geoffrey, daughters-in-law Judy, Colette and Joyce,
grandchildren Andrew, Chris, Grouper and Spencer, 7 great grandchildren and close
friends in many parts of the world.

There will be a small memorial service held at Chost Church Cathedral on Tuesday, 7th

April at 11:00am.





PAGE 8, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Unemployment Benefits PM: NIB tax cap on salaries

‘will act as a stimulus’

FROM page one

ment Benefits under the
National Insurance scheme.

At the same time, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
made clearer the purpose of
the scheme — set to come
into effect on April 20th —
as well as who will be eligi-
ble, how much they can get,
when they can get it and how
and when they can apply for
it.

“Unemployment insurance
programmes provide tempo-
rary financial assistance to
eligible workers who become
unemployed, as unable to



find suitable employment
and who are capable, avail-
able, and willing to work.
“And while unemploy-
ment schemes are designed
primarily to benefit individ-
uals who lose their jobs and
lose regular income, they
also help boost the economy
in times of recession.”
“Unemployment payments

Re aera ieee
AND APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

The National Insurance Board will soon begin making

























































announcements regarding the times and places at which persons
may register to receive benefits.

During the first “interim” phase of the scheme — which will
continue until the $20 million allocated for the purpose runs out
— eligible applicants must meet the following criteria:

e Must have paid contributions to the National Insurance
Board for at least 40 weeks or nine months. These contributions
could have been made just before unemployment began or
many years before.

They must also meet one of the following three conditions:

¢ Have made at least 13 weeks (three months and one week)
of contributions in the six months prior to becoming unem-
ployed.

e Or must have made 26 weekly payments in the last 52
weeks

e Or must have made 26 payments in the last contribution year
(July to June) before becoming unemployed.

The Government intends for people who may have been
unemployed for up to four years — since lay offs at the Royal
Oasis — to be able to qualify during this first phase.

During the second phase, which will be funded equally by
contributions from employees and employers and will kick in
when the initial $20 million is exhausted — by January 2010 —
only people who have been employed for at least half of the pre-
vious nine months and a half of the previous three months will
qualify to receive the benefit.

In other words they must have:

¢ Paid a year’s worth of contributions (52 weeks).

e Have paid or been credited with 13 contributions in the 26
weeks immediately before unemployment commenced.

e And must have paid seven contributions in the 13 weeks
immediately before unemployment commenced.

Cheques will be issued every two weeks. The first set of
cheques will be paid during the week of May 4, for the period
April 20 to May 2.

Entitled individuals will be advised by the NIB as to where
and when to collect cheques.

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Out at sea is not the place to discover that
you are not prepared for the challenges
so plan to attend the free first class of the
Terrestrial Navigation Course offered by
The Bahamas School of Marine Navigation
at BASRA Headquarters on East Bay Street
on Monday, April 6, 2009, at 7p.m. then
consider enrolling in the 3 month course.
The Seamanship Course (7 Saturdays)
starts April 25th. Tel. 364-5987, 364-2861.
535-6234 or visit www.bsmn.biz

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Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

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by NIB to persons who most
probably lack the financial
ability to do so will most
likely result in the prompt
purchase of consumer goods
or in discharging other essen-
tial obligations such as rents,
electricity or mortgage pay-
ments,” he added.

Mr Ingraham explained
that the conditions that
unemployed persons will
have to satisfy to qualify for
the second phase of the
scheme — that which will be
funded by contributions from
employers and employees —
will be more stringent than
those “quite generous” con-
ditions governing disburse-
ment of funds under the first
phase, to be funded by the
transferral of $20 million
from the Medical Benefit
Branch.

However, under both
phases of the scheme, eligi-
bility for funds depends on
the applicant being a person
who was_ previously
employed and registered
with the NIB by their
employer.

The scheme is not intend-
ed to “compensate for previ-
ous periods of unemploy-
ment,” said Mr Ingraham,
emphasising that eligible
people must be unemployed
currently.

Once they satisfy neces-
sary conditions, claimants
can receive half of their aver-
age insurable wage.

“So the wages on which
your contributions were
made prior to your becom-
ing unemployed will deter-
mine the sum you will
receive,” said Mr Ingraham.

With the current ceiling on
insurable wages at $400 per
week the maximum amount
anyone can receive is $200
per week.

To maintain their eligibili-
ty throughout the stipulated
13 week period through
which they can possibly
claim benefits, unemployed
people must be able to show
that they are continuing to
seek a job.

Applicants will have to
register with the Department
of Labour’s Employment
Exchange which will issue to

M

them an Unemployment }
Card. They will then be }
required to report to the }
Department of Labour every }
four weeks to check on the }

availability of jobs.

Mr Ingraham explained
that claimants will not be }
able to refuse suitable :
employment offered to them
or refuse to apply for a suit- ;
able vacancy brought to their :
attention and still receive

benefits.

And they will also lose i
access to the funds if they :
turn down any training pro- }
gramme offered by the:
Department of Labour i
which could qualify them for :

a job.

efitting from those funds.

Meanwhile, people fired :
from their job for theft, dis- :
honesty or “fraudulent }
offences” may only be able }
to receive benefits for half :
of the prescribed benefit }

period — six weeks.

The same applies for those :
who quit their jobs, who may }
also experience some delay :
in collecting their benefits, :

added Mr Ingraham.

Any decision to withhold :
benefits can be appealed and :
heard by the NIB Appeal
Tribunal — except for in the }
instance that Unemployment
Benefit is withheld because }
an applicant is receiving two }
or more other benefits, such }
as maternity or industrial :
injury benefits, under the }

National Insurance.

Survivors benefit — that }
paid to relatives of deceased }
individuals — and disability :
benefit do not fall into this

category.

Once people have received ;
the Unemployment Benefit :
for 13 weeks they will be
ineligible to access such }
funds again for another 52 }
weeks — so as to diminish }

abuse of the system.

agistrate rules that

‘Emperor’ be discharged

FROM page one

accused of the August 2007 murder of his nephew, Kenvardo

Knowles, 26.

Kenvardo Knowles was reportedly shot in his abdomen dur-
ing an argument in the Fox Hill area on August 19 of that year.
The father-of-six was pronounced dead on arrival at Princess
Margaret Hospital, becoming the 51st murder victim for 2007.

Knowles who was on the police’s Most Wanted List for near-
ly a year was reportedly arrested on July 3, 2008, at his girl-
friend’s residence in Coral Harbour. She was charged with har-
bouring a criminal. Knowles was arraigned on the murder

charge on July 7.

After informing Knowles that he was discharged, Magistrate
Virgill reminded him that he had been accused of the murder of
his nephew. “Let your conscience be your guide,” she cau-

tioned.

‘should be increased’

FROM page one

comes shortly after he revealed that employers and employees
will soon have to pay an entirely new contribution to the National
Insurance Board — to fund unemployment benefits — at a con-
tribution rate of 50 cents from each for every $100 of insurable
wage.

Presently Government funds the National Insurance scheme by
requiring workers and employers to jointly contribute 8.8 per
cent of an employee’s insurable wage to the NIB.

The taxable wage “ceiling” is $400 a week, meaning that no
matter how much a person makes, the maximum amount of their
salary that will be taxed is $400.

The insurable wage ceiling has been increased on only two occa-
sions since the introduction of the National Insurance scheme,
once in the 1980s and again in 1999.

While suggesting that the ceiling should be raised again, the
Prime Minister said the contribution rate of 8.8 per cent, although
it was set in 1973, it is “still good today.”

“T’ve seen reports to the effect that ‘Oh well, National Insurance
is going to go broke, it’s not going to be able to pay pensions after

Outlining other restrictions
on the disbursement of
unemployment benefits, Mr }
Ingraham noted that they :
will be reduced for people :
who are receiving severance }
pay from their previous :
employer — as they will be :
unable to receive benefits for :
the period that they are ben- ;

a certain period of time,’ etc.

“T would wish to provide some information to enlighten those
who are unenlightened about the scheme,” said Mr Ingraham.

“When the rate of 8.8 per cent was established back in 1973, it was
expected the rate would be good for a maximum of 25 years. This
is the 35th year. Ten years beyond — and yet the 8.8 per cent is still
good. It’s still valid, it’s still adequate to pay pensions,” said Mr

Ingraham.

“One might argue that indeed the rate of 8.8 per cent was too
high back in the 70s, but you can also argue that the benefits have
not been sufficiently substantial to cause the equilibrium of the fund

to be realised.”

The Prime Minister added, however, that the 8.8 per cent rate will
not be able to remain for an “indefinite period.”

“At some point in time the rate will be adjusted as it should be.
In many countries the rate is adjusted with great frequency,” he not-

ed.

$44.2m contract signed to
dredge Nassau Harbour

FROM page one

the western end of Arawak
Cay by some 1,000 feet.
Along with this extension
and the dredging, Boskalis
International will also
construct three mooring dol-
phins at Prince George
Whart.

Speaking briefly at yester-
day’s signing ceremony at the
British Colonial Hilton,
Prime Minister Ingraham
also revealed that some of
the dredged material from
this project will be used to
extend the northern coast of
New Providence from East
Street to Armstrong Street
some “20 to 30 feet into the
water.”

“This will create an addi-
tional one mile of waterfront
promenade to the Woodes
Rodgers Wharf. This scenic
pedestrian promenade will
include a boardwalk, land-
scaping, service road and
utility corridor as a compo-
nent of the Nassau downtown
redevelopment project.

“The promenade is expect-
ed to facilitate both the
downtown retail sector and
promote the reintroduction
and restoration of desirable
residential communities in
our capital city,” Mr Ingra-
ham said.

This complementary work
of extending Woodes
Rodgers Wharf is expected
to cost government an addi-
tional $24 million. Also
repairs are expected to be
made to the Prince George
Wharf piers and connecting
bridges, with new bollards to
be installed to accommodate
the larger new Genesis class
cruise ships complete with a
new security screening build-

ing and support facilities at
the wharf.

Yesterday’s contract sign-
ing comes on the heels of the
completion of the financing
for the first phase of the
redevelopment of the termi-
nal at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.
Financing for stage one of
this terminal redevelopment
project, totalled over $265
million, and was transferred
to Nassau Airport Develop-
ment’s (NAD) account on
Monday, March 30, permit-
ting contracts to be awarded
to start construction.

“We were pleased that
three banks operating in and
from the Bahamas arranged
this funding facility. I wish
to acknowledge the good
work of the Royal Bank of
Canada, the depository bank
for the collateral, First
Caribbean International and
CIBC Trust as onshore col-
lateral and local placement
agents, and Citibank, project
adviser, lead arranger and
offshore collateral agent.

“Stage one of the redevel-
opment, which comprises the
new 247,000 square foot US
departure terminal; one mil-
lion square feet of paved
apron surface on the air side
of the facility; and, a new
parking access roadway and
landscape on the land side of
the terminal, is budgeted at
$198 million. Completion is
scheduled for March 2011.

“The entire project, includ-
ing stage two (international
arrivals) and stage three
(international and domestic
departures and domestic
atrivals) is scheduled to be
completed by November
2013 with a total construc-
tion cost for all three stages
of $409.5 million,” he said.

—
ANDEAUS

A GROWING INSURANCE AGENCY
IS LOOKING FOR

INSURANCE SALES EXECUTIVES

Interested persons must have some experience
in sales with the ability to promote and develop
new business opportunities. Applicants must
be professional, energetic and motivated and
be able to work on their own initiative. Basic
knowledge of General, Life and Medical
Insurances will be an asset.

Also, interested persons must have good verbal
and written communications skills, good PC
skills and excellent customer service skills.

Please send resume to: P.O. BOX CB 10979
NASSAU, BAHAMAS.
FAX NO. (242) 328-6357

Concern as the Bahamas
named on ‘tax havens’ list

FROM page one

are listed in the section in which the Bahamas is also included. The
OECD said the Cayman Islands has enacted legislation — currently
being reviewed by the OECD — that allows the jurisdiction to
exchange information unilaterally and has identified 11 countries with
which it is prepared to do so.

The list says the Bahamas committed to the OECD's standards in
2002 and has one tax information exchange agreement (with the Unit-
ed States).

Last week government released a statement to the OECD and the
European Union outlining that it was ready to negotiate additional tax
information exchange agreements on an individual basis.

"The Bahamas reaffirms its commitment recorded in a March, 2002,
agreement between The Bahamas and the OECD.

"The Bahamas recognises significant advances in commitments to
broader application of OECD standards in transparency. The Bahamas
is ready to negotiate and conclude appropriate arrangements to accom-
modate these OECD standards," said the statement.

Former attorney general Alfred Sears recently lashed out at gov-
ernment for not having a national plan to buffer the country against the
onslaught of "baseless attacks" against the financial sector. To meet the
OECD's standards, Mr Sears said government must quickly enter
into 10 additional tax information exchange treaties with other OECD
countries, based on mutual interests such as double taxation and
investment treaties.

The push for a crackdown on off-shore tax havens has gained sig-
nificant traction recently, with world leaders such as British Prime
Minister Gordon Brown lobbying for an end to such centres. The
calls come during a time when world governments, desperate for ways
to increase faltering revenues, see off-shore centres as a means for rich
citizens of developed nations to evade taxes in their homelands.



TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 9

SPORTS



THE AVID junior golfers were eager to learn from the French pro and

spent hours observing and practising. Special focus was placed on
improving their full swing, putting and chipping skills. Audrey JUNIOR golfers at the Cable Beach Golf Club participated in a training clinic this weekend pasthosted by French Golf Champion, Audrey Riguelle.
explained, "The junior golfers are very enthusiastic and fast learners. | Audrey, an ambassador for Baha Mar Resorts in the European market, recently visited the Bahamas and in partnership with the Bahamas Golf Fed-
am pleased to have had the opportunity to work with them." eration, hosted a Junior Golf Clinic.



PICTURED with the junior golfers are (back row L-R) Robert ‘Sandy’ Sands, Senior Vice President of Administration and External Affairs; Tommy Jones, Vice President of Facilities, Baha Mar Resorts; Audrey Riguelle; Glenn
Archer, President, Bahamas Golf Federation; Chris Lewis, manager, Cable Beach Golf Club; Anthony Howorth, golf trainer; Walter Robinson, President, Bahamas Golf Federation Central Junior Division.

=) AUDREY has suc-
cessfully partici-

pated in several = cao
European tourna- Aes GF, Pe

ments including

the Ladies British | \ ee 3 ?
Open, European
Ladies Champi-

onship and Open
of France Pro-
Am. Most recent-
| ly, she placed
fifth in the 2008

Ladies French

Cup. A golfer
since the age of
core | Bool IS Oh:
Me French a . A :
ampion at age
16. Audrey : Get in it. Touch it, Feel it.
Riguelle is also

member of the
French National

a Ladies team. YOU'LL FIND

= THs BiEeSsr
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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



Martinborough getting in gear

Championships



OVER the last two week-
ends, three-time World Sun-
fish champion Donnie Mart-
inborough produced two
impressive performances as
he prepares for the 39th Sun-
fish World Championships in
Montagu Bay in October.

After winning the Interna-
tional Masters Champi-

onships in Davis Islands,
Tampa, Florida over the
weekend of March 13-16,
Martinborough came back to
win the Sunfish Midwinter
National & Team Racing
Championships from March

Above, Martinborough is
shown in action.



REAR Commodore Tim Roberts of Clearwater Yacht Club presents Don-
nie Martinborough with his Top Master award at the Clearwater Midwin-

ter Regatta from March 19-22.

Bev Dolezal/Photos

MARTINBOROUGH (#55) rounding the mark with the rest of the fleet in hot pursuit.

Big hopes for Carifta Track & Field squad

FROM page 11

medal in the 200m, while Bodie looks to improve
on her silver medal performance in the 100m Hur-
dles.

The freshman at Auburn University and sopho-
more at Southwest Mississippi Community College
will return to lead a team seeking to repeat the feat
of 2008’s record breaking 400m relay team which
also included Sheniqua Ferguson and Cache Arm-
brister.

Three time gold medallist in the field, Ray-
mond Higgs returns to defend his high jump
crown, looking to claim his third gold medal in the
event.

Higgs burst onto the scene in 2007 when he
medaled in all three jumping events, gold in the
triple jump, high jump, and a bronze in the long
jump.

He returned to repeat his high jump feat in
2008.

Rashan Brown was an eighth place finisher in
the under-17 girls 400m in 2007, but returned in
2008 to claim a bronze medal in the event.

Now with her third trip to the meet, Brown
looks to once again improve on her performance.

Androsian, Tamara Myers, one of only two ath-
letes on the team not from the capital or the
nation’s second city, will chase a top finish after last
year’s silver medal in the under-17 girls high jump.

Williams and Rollle return to defend bronze
medal finishes in the shot put and 800m respec-
tively.
















WALONEE Robinson progresses through jumping
drills during practice. Robinson medaled in four }

events at the 2008 Championships.

Fraser and Wallace- Whitfield medaled in 2007
and after a series of mishaps in 2008, look to }

return to the medal podium.

Wallace-Whitfield won a gold medal in the
under-17 boys 800m while Fraser took silver in the

100m of the same division.

The Bahamas has finished fourth in consecutive
Carita track and field championships with a medal

count of 19 in 2007 and 23 in 2008.

Pictured from left: Philip G. Smith, Sales & Marketing Manager, The d’Albenas
“Agency, Ltd.; Mrs Joethia and Cp! Kaylyn Cooper, proud parents of Maliha
(not pictured) and winners of a $5,000 gift certificate for baby furniture; and
Odinga Sawyer, Kimberly Clark Specialist, The d’Albenas Agency Ltd.

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Legacy Baseball
season underway

LEGACY Baseball League
kicked off its 2009 Baseball Sea-
son at the beginning of March,
but held its Opening Cere-
monies on Saturday (March 21st
2009). Its President Steve Bur-
rows talked about the tremen-
dous growth in the girls softball
program which has expanded to
the East and West Grand
Bahama. He also spoke about
their growth in baseball, which
was evident in capturing two
division in the BBF Andre
Rodgers National Baseball
Championships in June 2008.
Legacy won the Coach Pitch
Division and the High School
16-18 Division over the three
major powerhouses in baseball,
Freedom Farm, JBLN & Grand
Bahama.

Present at the Opening Cere-
monies was August "Auggie"
Campbell (Full Football Schol-
arship to Duke University this
Fall). Mr. Burrows told the kids
at the end of his speech, you
have a role model in August.
He sat right where you are many
years ago. Through hard work
and dedication you can be in the
same position.

Mr. Burrows promised the
many parents and supporters of
Legacy that they will be bringing
back home Three Divisions
from the upcoming 2009 Nation-
al Baseball Championship.

Also in attendance from the
BBF was President Craig Kemp,
Secretary General Theodore

KIA cp

The Power to Surprise”

Sweeting and 4th Vice President
(Grand Bahama) Alonzo
"Chumpy" Pratt. Mr. Kemp
thanked the Legacy Executives
for their ongoing development
of Baseball in Grand Bahama
and encouraged them to con-
tinue to build on their success.

President Kemp presented
Legacy with there 2008 Cham-
pionship Diamond
Banners(Coach Division) and
High School 16-18 Division.

The President Craig Kemp,
Theodore Sweeting — Secretary
General, Manager Patrick
Knowles Sr. (Team Bahamas
15-16), Coach Alonzo Pratt
(Team Bahamas Mens National
Team) and Coach Opi Taylor
(Team Bahamas 16-18), con-
ducted try-outs for the young
men in Grand Bahama on Sun-
day, March 22nd from 2pm to
Spm to afford them a fair oppor-
tunity to be selected to one of
the National Teams traveling
this summer. Many of the
young men had a great showing
and the Teams will definitely
have a National makeup.

The Bahamas Baseball Fed-
eration is extremely proud and
excited to advise that 95% of
the 16-18 Team & The Senior
Mens Team presently attend
High School or College in the
USA. The Executive Commit-
tee and the Coaching Staff feel
very confident these 2 Teams
will do very well this summer.

In the 15-16 Zone Tourna-

ment, the Bahamas is coming
off a 3rd Place Finish from 2008.
High expectation is also expect-
ed from this team as all the
members have had internation-
al exposure from previous tour-
naments.

NATIONAL TEAMS TRAVELLING
THIS SUMMER:

TEAM BAHAMAS 16-18

XII Latin American Regional Big
League Tournament 2009

June 19th thru 28th 2009
Maracaibo, Venezuela

Countries Participating: Aruba,
Bahamas, Colombia, Curacao,
Guatemala, Panama, Puerto Rico,
Dominican Republic, USVI and
Venezuela

TEAM BAHAMAS 15-16

PONY Caribbean Zone Champi-
onship

July 6th thru 12th 2009

Guarbo, Puerto Rico

Countries Participating: Bahamas,
Dominican Republic, Panama,
USVI, Puerto Rico

TEAM BAHAMAS Men's
National Team

World Baseball Challenge

July 16th thru 26th 2009

Prince George, Canada
Countries: Team Bahamas, Team
Canada, Team Croatia, Chinese
Taipei, Germany Team USA,
Professional Teams: Reno Astros
& Host Prince George Axemen

2009 =reeee

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Carifta Track

FRIDAY, APRIL 3,



2009

& Field squad

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH an eclectic cross-section of athletes, led by
several veteran medal winners, the 2009 Carifta
Track and Field squad is expected to be one of
the most successful squads in recent memory.

This year’s team will field 11 individual medal
winners from the 2008 games in St. Kitts and the
2007 Games in the Turks and Caicos Islands includ-
ing, Nivea Smith, Nejmi Burnside, V’Alonee
Robinson, Raymond Higgs, Rashan Brown, Raquel
Williams, Tamara Myers, Hughnique Rolle, Krys-
tal Bodie, Warren Fraser and Kenneth Wallace-
Whitfield.

Burnside was one of the top performers at last
year’s meet, when he set a new Carifta record in the
Under-17 boys 400m hurdles.

His time of 52.81s easily surpassed the previous
mark of 52.97s set by Ricardo Melbourne of
Jamaica in 1998.

Burnside, a two time individual Carifta medallist,
finished second in the same event in 2007.

“I have been blessed so far with what I have
been able to achieve so far with the Carifta record,
the silver medal and the bronze in the relay” he
said. “I am looking to at least equal those perfor-
mances or do even better heading into this year’s
games.”

With his third selection to the Carifta squad,
Burnside said he hopes to use his past successes as
a means to mentor the younger members of the
team.

“With my experience I can let them know that it
is not all fun and games, there is a time to get seri-
ous” he said. “When we get to that point when it is
time to perform you just have to know.”

Robinson, the versatile sprinter and jumper looks
to build on her four-medal performance of 2008.

17 girls division with a gold medal performance in
the long jump, and bronze medals in the
100m,100m Hurdles and as a member of the 400m
relay team.

The St. Augustine’s College speedster advances
to the under-20 girls division this year.

Grand Bahamian sensation Nivea Smith will
look to claim her third consecutive Carifta bronze

SEE page 10

NEJMI BURNSIDE, three time medallist and Carifta
record holder in the U-17 boys’ 400m Hurdles, goes

Robinson had her handprint all over the under-

through stretching routines.

Strokers take first two
in best-of-seven series

THE Micholette Strokers are
on the verge of dethroning the
Williams Construction Jets in
the Masters Softball League’s
best-of-seven championship
series.

Micholette, runners-up in the
regular season at 10-2, took the
first two games of the series
over the weekend at the
Archdeacon William Thomp-
son Softball Park at the South-
ern Recreation Grounds.

In game one on Saturday, the
Strokers won 12-10 and they
came back on Sunday to pull
off a 20-17 decision in game
two.

Game three is set for Satur-
day at 11 am. If necessary, game
four will be played on Sunday at
1 pm.

Williams Construction won
the pennant with a 12-1 record.

e Here’s a look at the first
two games played in the series:

STROKERS 12, JETS 10:

Culbert ‘Buster’ Evans went
3-for-5 with a double, a run bat-
ted in and two runs scored to
lead Micholette to the opener of
the series.

Lester Dean helped out with
a 3-for-5 day with a double, two
RBI and a run scored and Adlai
‘Mossah’ Moss was 2-for-5 with
two RBI and three runs scored.

Hector Rolle got the win on
the mound for the Strikers and
Danny Stubbs suffered the loss
for the Jets.

Mike Major had a perfect 3-
for-3 day with three runs and
Jeff Cooper was 3-for-3 with
one home run, three RBI and
two runs scored.

STROKERS 20, JETS 17:

Culbert Evans had another
big game, going 4-for-5 with a
double and two homers with
four RBI, scoring three times
to pace Micholette to a 2-0
series lead.

Johnny Burrows helped out
this time going 4-for-5 with two
RBI, scoring three times and
Everette ‘Abe’ Johnson was 3-
for-4 with four runs scored.

Hector Rolle also picked up
his second straight win on the
mound for Micholette, this time
over Bertie Murray Sr, who
pitched for Williams Construc-
tion.

Anthony ‘Hot-dog’ Pierce
went 3-for-4 with a RBI, scoring
twice and Lee Rahming was 2-
for-3 with a homer, two RBI
and four runs scored in a los-
ing effort for the Jets.



BASKETBALL
NPBA POSTSEASON

e WHILE the defending cham-
pions Commonwealth Giants
booked their trip to the New
Providence Basketball Associ-
ation’s best-of-seven champi-
onship series, they will have to
wait a little longer to find out
who their opponents will be.
On Wednesday night at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, the
Giants completed a three-
game sweep over the Police
Crimestoppers with a 77-72
win to return to the champi-
onship series.

Last year’s runners-up Electro
Telecom Cybots were unable
to pull off the sweep of the
Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders in
game three of their series on
Wednesday as well.

The Ruff Ryders held on for a
94-93 win over the Cybots to
trail 2-1 in the series that will
continue with game four
tonight at Kendal Isaacs. If
necessary, the fifth and decid-
ing game will be played on Sat-
urday night.

BASEBALL
JBLN SCHEDULE

¢ Here’s a look at the Junior
Baseball League of Nassau’s
action on tap this weekend at
the St. Andrew’s Field of
Dreams.

TEE BALL

11 am Raptors vs Blue Claws
1 pm Grasshoppers vs Sand
Gnats

3 pm Sidewinders vs Knights
COACH PITCH

10 am Angels vs Diamond-
backs

12:30 pm Blue Jays vs Astros
3 pm Cubs vs Athletics
MINOR LEAGUE

10 am Rays vs Royals

12:30 pm Mets vs Rockies
MAJOR LEAGUE

12:30 pm Reds vs Indians

3 pm Mariners vs Marlins
JUNIOR LEAGUE

10 am Dodgers vs Yankees
12:30 pm Twins vs Cardinals
SENIOR LEAGUE

Saturday

3 pm Tigers vs Pirates
Sunday

1 pm Tigers vs Pirates

3:30 pm Rangers vs Phillies

SS

ie ae ag

ie






Female
champion
golfer hosts
junior clinic






§

Sf

arke/Tribune staff

-

MEMBERS of the 2009 Carifta Track and Field team pose just before practice yesterday at the Thomas A.
Robinson Stadium.




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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Ohama hails
Summit ‘turning
point’ but warns
of no guarantees —

m LONDON

CONCLUDING his first
international summit, President
Barack Obama hailed agree-
ments at the emergency meet-
ing of world powers Thursday
as a “turning point in our pur-
suit of global economic recov-
ery.” But he cautioned, “There
are no guarantees”, according
to Associated Press.

The new US. leader said the
heads of industrial countries
that met in London agreed on
“unprecedented steps to restore
growth and prevent a crisis like
this from happening again.”

He spoke shortly after G-20
leaders pledged an additional
$1.1 trillion in financing to the
International Monetary Fund
and other global institutions
and declared a crackdown on
tax havens and hedge funds.
The leaders announced the cre-
ation of a supervisory body to
flag problems in the global
financial system — but did not
satisfy calls from the U.S. and
others for new stimulus mea-
sures.

Despite that failure, Obama
called the one-day London
gathering “very productive”
and historic because of the
scope of the challenges the
world faces in righting the eco-
nomic crisis that’s wreaking
havoc on virtually every coun-
try.

“The challenge is clear. The
global economy is contracting,”
Obama said.

In a one-hour news confer-
ence packed with media from
across the world, Obama said,
“We’re starting to see some
restoration of America’s stand-
ing in the world.” He had been
asked about diminished esteem
under his predecessor, George
W. Bush.

“T do not buy into the notion
that America can’t lead in the
world,” Obama said, but he
added that it is “very important
for us to be able to forge part-
nerships as opposed to dictating
solutions.”

He acknowledged that some
summit participants made com-
ments that seemed to blame
America and Wall Street for
triggering the crisis that has
spread around the world.

‘Science is alive’ at CW
Sawyer Primary School

ADMINISTRATORS, teachers, par-
ents and students all gathered in the
auditorium at CW Sawyer Primary
School to officially open the school’s sci-
ence fair and exhibition under the theme
“Science is Alive”.

The day began with an electrifying
opening ceremony, featuring student
performances highlighting science-relat-
ed themes, such as science careers,
famous science inventors, seed germi-
nation, conservation rap and a weather
talk show on natural disasters.

The choir serenaded the audience with
the song: “A Science Experience” and
the entire school sang the science chant,
“Science Is Alive!” composed by the
music teacher Shaketra Knowles.

The featured speaker was Marcia Mus-
grove, National Teacher of the Year and
a former student of the school. She
enthralled the audience with an infor-

i -



Fair and exhibition

is Officially opened

mative power point presentation on the
importance of the senses.

The moment students were waiting
for finally arrived. Prizes were awarded
for the first, second and third place win-
ners from each grade that participated in
the essay, poetry, art, and scientific pro-
ject competition. Teachers said that the
number of entries submitted shows how
enthusiastic students are about science.

Following the opening ceremony, spe-
cial guests Barbara Dorsette, primary
science officer in the Ministry of Educa-

tion and Harriet Pratt, former superin-
tendent of North Western District of
Schools, led a tour of the exhibition.

On display were students’ projects,
creative folder projects, and models of
endangered animals and habitats. Such
topics as: “How Plants are Useful”,
“Animal Habitats”, and “Endangered
Animals” were researched by the stu-
dents.

Students in grades four through six
presented stand up three-dimensional
projects, using the empirical method, on

topics such as ecosystems, plants, rocks
and minerals, natural disasters, storms,
pollution and light.

The highlight of the day were the
booths set up by representatives of sev-
eral science related fields. There was a
buzz in the air when students began to
view the displays.

Represented were: the Adventure
Learning Centre; the Atlantis Touch
‘Tank; the Bahamas National Trust; Dol-
phin Encounters; the Emergency Med-
ical Services; the Fire Branch of the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force, and Vector
Control.

Dentist Dr Emmanuel Francis shared
with grade two students the importance
of taking care of their teeth. The Adven-
ture Learning Centre presented an
inspiring and informative puppet show
entitled “The Wonders of God’s Cre-
ation.”

* Gamers take to the
stage for Madden

ers.

—s He received $500 in cash and

prizes.

09 challenge

IT WAS an afternoon filled with
excitement and suspense as gamers
descended on Town Centre Mall to
participate in the Ultimate Gamers
Challenge 3.

Many competitors took to the
stage, cheered on by the spectators,
and showed off their skills at Mad-
den09 for the Playstation 2.

After hours of competition and
trash talking it was none other than
last year’s winner, Richard Davis,
who defended his title for the sec-
ond year in a row, playing with his
team of choice, the Pittsburg Steel-




Second place went to Lawrence
Smith who received a $200-gift cer-
tificate from Sports Locker along
with a DVD Dragon Ball Z set
from Super Video.

Third place went to Rod Darville
who received a boom box courtesy
of Cost Rite.

Organisers said that the day could
not have been a success without the
help of Electrojack, as they provid-
ed 26” and 37” flat screen televi-
sion sets, Playstation 2 consoles,
Madden 09 games and all acces-
sories.

The competition organisers also
thanked the Town Centre Mall for

hosting the event.

Grand Bahama to host international
religious conference for women

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Island has been select-
ed to host a major international
religious conference for women
of the Methodist Church in the
Caribbean and the Americas
(MCCA).

Dorothy Goldsmith, event
spokesperson in Freeport,
announced that the event is
expected to attract some 400-
500 women from 25 Caribbean
countries to Freeport for the
30th anniversary of the MCCA
Women’s Fifth Quinquennial
Assembly, in 2010.

The assembly will be held
July 21 through 26, 2010. It is
the first time that it has ever
been held in the Bahamas since
its inception almost 30 years
ago.

Mrs Goldsmith said the
Bahamas was able to beat out
Belize as the host country.

“When the opportunity came
for us to bid for the hosting in
2008 we were so excited. I went
to Panama with the proposal
and we competed with Belize,
and I think God has really had a
plan because we have been
extended the opportunity to

host this historical event.

“Tt is not being held in the
capital, it is in Grand Bahama
and this is something we need
to boost our economy,” she
said.

Mrs Goldsmith said Method-
ism is present worldwide. She
said the last conference was
held in Barbados and some 500
women attended.

Opportunity

“We will have spiritual con-
tent, fellowship, bonding, work-
shops, and we will have this
opportunity for people to wor-
ship and expose them to what
we have here in the Bahamas,”
she said.

Mrs Goldsmith said the
Grand Bahama Circuit is com-
prised of three Methodist
churches. She noted that mem-
bers from throughout the
Bahamas, and the Turks and
Caicos Islands are expected to
also attend the conference in
Freeport.

She said that religious
tourism is growing in the
Bahamas, which offers persons
not only spiritual revival, but
also a vacation destination.

Carmeta Miller, senior man-
ager Religious Tourism, Groups

and Special Events Department
at the Ministry of Tourism, said
the event is very significant for
Grand Bahama.

“We at the MOT have seen
the need to look into the busi-
ness of religious tourism, which
is now an $18-billion industry.
Those persons who will be trav-
elling here for religious purpos-
es to attend the conference are
making a significant contribu-
tion to the Freeport economy,”
said Ms Miller.

In 1980, the MCCA women’s
organisation was formed in Bar-
bados under the leadership of
Dr Barbara Bailey, a Universi-
ty Lecturer from Jamaica.

Dr Bailey was the first presi-
dent and Mrs Marie Murray of
the Bahamas/Turks and Caicos
Island, was the first vice presi-
dent.

The organisation allows a
relationship with the World
Federation of Methodist and
Uniting Church Women and
links with all the Methodist
women’s organisation in more
than 25 Caribbean countries in
the eight Districts of the
Bahamas/Turks and Caicos;
Islands, Belize/Honduras,
Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Lee-
ward Islands, Panama/
Costa Rica, and the South
Caribbean.

Washington shows Ho interest in Chavez Gitmo offer

m DOHA, Qatar

WASHINGTON expressed no interest
Thursday in an offer by Venezuelan Pres-
ident Hugo Chavez to take in any of the
240 remaining Guantanamo detainees
after they are released from the U.S. mil-
itary prison, according to Associated
Press.

Chavez said he would have “no prob-
lem” accepting any of the remaining
detainees in Venezuela. In an interview
with Arabic-language Al-Jazeera news
network during his trip this week to this
Persian Gulf country, Chavez also urged
President Barack Obama to free the
remaining detainees and return

the surrounding U.S. Navy base to

Cuba.

But the State Department said in a statement
that “the United States has not received a formal
offer through diplomatic channels to resettle
detainees to Venezuela and is not contemplating

resettling detainees to Venezuela.”

Chavez has frequently criticized the U.S. military
prison, but the socialist leader also has praised Oba-
ma’s pledge to close it within a year. As for the



iit Chavez

detainees, Chavez said “we would have
no problem i in receiving a human being.”

Chavez’s remarks to the Qatar-based
Al-Jazeera were later released by
Venezuela’s Information Ministry.

As part of Obama’s closure order, U.S.
officials are deciding which of the remain-
ing detainees should be shipped away to
foreign countries and which should be
tried, either in civilian U.S. courts or in
some other setting.

Prisoners transferred to third coun-
tries, mainly in Europe, would be those
determined to pose no threat but who
cannot be sent back to their homelands
because of the risk of persecution. Sev-
eral European nations, including Portu-

gal and Lithuania, have said they will consider tak-

ing such detainees.

Venezuela’s relations with the U.S. deteriorated
in recent years as the leftist Chavez crusaded against
what he calls the U.S. “empire.” In September,
Chavez expelled the U.S. ambassador to Venezuela

and recalled his envoy to Washington. And while he

has expressed a desire for improved relations under
Obama, he also called the new American president
“ignorant” last month.





u

Harbour
Bn
WER tat





on hotel
trespass



Judge awards
Pink Sands
$36,000 over
‘irresponsible, ill-
considered and
thoughtless act’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The world-renowned Pink
Sands resort and its parent com-
pany have been awarded more
than $36,000 in damages due to
Harbour Island District Coun-
cil’s “irresponsible, ill-consid-
ered and thoughtless act” in
trespassing on its property to
construct public bathrooms.

Criticising the District Coun-
cil for “lacking common sense”,
Senior Justice John Lyons said
its officers and workmen went
ahead with the planned con-
struction without conducting a
prior land survey to determine
whether the site selected was
owned by a private landholder.

Recalling how the dispute
originated in early 2005, with
the District Council’s decision
to construct public bathroom
facilities on Pink Sands Beach,
Justice Lyons found: “Without
considering the need for a sur-
vey, the council went straight
ahead and proceeded to prepare
a site for the building of these
bathroom facilities on Pink
Sands Beach.”

The site selected was at the
end of a public access road lead-
ing to the beach, and which ran
between Harbour Island’s well-
known Pink Sands and Coral
Sands resort properties.

Digging

“On Friday, May 20, 2005, Mr
von Merveldt, one of the man-
agers of the Pink Sands Hotel,
noticed that several men who
were not employees of his hotel
were clearing, digging and mea-
suring parts of the southern area
of the hotel property,” Justice
Lyons recalled.

“On approaching those per-
sons, and informing them that
they were trespassing on the
property of Pink Sands Hotel,
one of the men, who introduced
himself as Mr Roberts (the act-
ing chief councillor), informed
Mr Von Merveldt in ‘colourful
terms’ that they were there to
erect bathroom facilities.

“Again, in colourful terms,
Mr Von Merveldt was informed
by the officers of the Harbour
Island District Council and their
workmen as to what they
thought of his complaint and his
assertion that they were on
hotel property, and what he
could do with it.”

Mr Von Merveldt “sensibly
left the area” and hired Chee-a-
Tow Surveyors to conduct a sur-
vey, subsequently produced on
July 25, 2005. This showed “‘con-

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



THE TRIBUNE





FRIDAY,

Me

APRIL.3.



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



‘Devastating impact’ City Markets
from cruise islands

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The increasing development
of private island destinations by
the major cruise line is having a
“devastating impact on Bahami-
an small businesses”, the tour
operators’ association argued
yesterday, with many vessels
either bypassing
Nassau/Freeport altogether or
using them as second ports of
call after already mining their
passengers’ pocketbooks.

Jeffrey Beckles, executive
director of the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Shore Excursionists
(BASE), in a presentation to
the Grand Bahama Tours Asso-
ciation, said that while the num-
ber of cruise arrivals to the
lines’ private islands were
increasing, they were declining
elsewhere.

And there was a “massive
duplication of local tours at pri-
vate islands, and restrictions
placed on local vendors in sell-
ing their own tours”. This had
the net effect of ensuring that all
tours and excursions provided
on the private islands were con-
trolled by the cruise lines, along

with the prices, to the exclusion
of Bahamian-owned tour oper-
ators and their employees.

Mr Beckles’ presentation
warned that the “economic pic
slices” earned by Bahamian-
owned tours and excursion
providers continued to dwindle
as a result, given that cruise
lines and their passengers either
bypassed Nassau or arrived
here after the lines had exhaust-
ed their spending power on the
private islands.

Concerns

The Ministry of Tourism’s
2008 arrivals report, which has
been obtained by Tribune Busi-
ness, appears to bear out Mr
Beckles concerns.

For the year, the only desti-
nations that saw an increase in
cruise passenger arrivals were
the private islands. Castaway
Cay on Abaco saw a 58.1 per
cent rise in arrivals to 149,389,
compared to 94,511 the year
before.

The Berry Islands, which
boasts RoyalCaribbean’s get-
away, Coco Cay, saw a 9.87 per
cent growth in cruise arrivals to

Bahamas avoids
G-20 ‘blacklist’

* Nation avoids worst effects of ‘tax haven’
onslaught, at least for moment, as OECD places it
with main rivals on list of those who have
committed to tax transparency, but have yet to act
* But China keeps Hong Kong out of reach, while
US states such as Delaware also seem untouchable
* Industry executives say avoiding sanctions was
key, as would have caused pressure on clients and

Zhivargo Laing

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas last night
appeared to have avoided the
worst effects of the G-20’s ‘anti-
tax haven’ onslaught after it
escaped the so-called ‘blacklist’,
instead being placed among the
second of a three-tier list along
with most of its international
financial centre competitors.

The Bahamas was included
among those jurisdictions that
“have committed to the interna-
tionally agreed tax standard, but
have not yet substantially imple-
mented” those commitments, the
so-called ‘grey list’ produced at
the G-20’s request by its select
club, the Organisation for Eco-
nomic Co-Operation and Devel-
opment (OECD).

The Bahamas found itself in
good company, as included in the
same tier were the majority of its
international financial centre
competitors - Bermuda, the
British Virgin Islands, the Cay-
man Islands, Liechtenstein,
Monaco, Panama and San Mari-
no.

Also included in the same tier,
but in a different category, were
the likes of Austria, Luxembourg,
Switzerland and Singapore, all
major rivals to the Bahamas in
the competition for international
financial services.

SEE page 5B

foreign-owned institutions

for a better life

401,718 compared to 366,321 in
2007, while arrivals to Half
Moon Cay near Cat Island grew
by 11 per cent to 299,792, com-
pared to 270,159 in 2007. All
those figures were for first port
of entry only.

In contrast, Nassau/Paradise
Island saw a 10.2 per cent
decline in cruise passengers call-
ing as a first port of entry in the
Bahamas, the numbers falling
from 1,638,174 in 2007 to
1,471,835 in 2008.

Focusing on just December
2008, the Ministry of Tourism’s
report noted that for the month,
cruise arrivals to Nassau/Par-
adise Island were down by 2 per
cent, while arrivals as a second
port of call increased by 45 per
cent.

“A number of cruise ships
went to Nassau/Paradise Island
as a second port of call, how-
ever, rather than a first port of
call,” the Ministry of Tourism
found.

Mr Beckles said that, as a
result, there were “increased
untaxed revenues taken out of

SEE page 6B



U.S. PRESIDENT Barack Obama
speaks at a press conference at the
end of the G20 Summit at the Excel
centre in London, yesterday. The
objective of the London Summit is
to bring the world's biggest
economies together to help restore
economic growth .

plunges into
$13.4m loss

* 2008 figures worse than expected, as grocery
chain’s parent incurs $3.527m 2009 half-year loss
and $2 million-plus solvency deficiency

* More than $20m turnaround in yeat-and-a-half
from shareholder equity into deficit

* Cash flow/liquidity problems still persisting

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

City Markets’ parent company today in this newspaper
reveals that its fiscal 2008 net loss is likely worse than pro-
jected at $13.429 million, with half-year losses standing at
$3.527 million and the firm suffering from a $2 million-plus
solvency deficiency.

The unaudited management accounts for Bahamas
Supermarkets, published today upon the urging of the
Securities Commission of the Bahamas, following public
pressure from Tribune Business among others, showed
just why the company is having difficulty in avoiding its
external auditors, KPMG, from qualifying the fiscal 2008
accounts with the ‘going concern’ notation.

Bahamas Supermarkets’ chairman, Basil Sands, told

SEE page 4B



Development Bank
$5m below loan goal

my CHESTER ROBARDS — * [ends just $3.4m in 2008,
crobards@tribunemedia.net compared to §8-$0m target
THE BAHAMAS Develop- _* BDB seeking

ment Bank (BDB) missed its be fons

projected loan issuance target recapitalisation from IDB,

by almost $5 million in 2008, ‘

processing some $3.4 million in National Insurance and

advances according to its act- Caribbean Development

ing managing director. He

added that the 2009 first quarter Bank

had also seen a contraction in * :

advances, while loan arrears Half of loan portfolio,

had grown to some $27 million.

Anthony Woodside told Tri-
bune Business yesterday that
the BDB’s target for lending to

SEE page 6B

some $27m, in arrears

* Finances seven projects,
worth $622,764, for
year-to-date

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

PROCUREMENT FOR SCHOOL
FURNITURE FOR NEW SCHOOLS &
REPLACEMENTS 2009-2010
The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser”) now invites

sealed bids, from = Supphers tor the procurement of School Furniture
for New Schools and Replacements,

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from the
Purchasing‘Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education, Headquarters,
Thompson Blvd. from Wednesday 18 th March, 2009, and obtain further
information, at the second address given below

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates ina sealed
envclope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
bided on (“School Furniture-New Schools & Replacements”).

Bids noust be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address,
or before Momalay, 6th April, 200 by S200) p.m. Choscal time). It will mot
be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mal
Late bids will be rejected and retumed unopened,

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidder(s) or their Representative (5) whe choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday 7 th April, 2009 at the first address below

(1) The Chairman lender
Winistey of Finwnce
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
BO. Box 6-317
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-15M)

Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education

PO. Box N-39 124

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tele: (242) 502-8571

The Ministry reserves the right lo regect any or all Tenders



THE TRIBUNE





Investors back
Arden’s Emerald
Bay bid proposal

A Philadelphia-based real
estate group has received strong
backing from Emerald Bay real
estate owners and a neighbour-
ing $100 million property in its
bid to acquire the Exuma-based
‘anchor’ resort project.

Tribune Business revealed
yesterday that the Arden Group
had submitted a bid to acquire
the Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort and rescue it from its
almost two-year receivership.

“The Arden Group is very
strong. Their record of success
in purchasing, developing and
managing resort and commer-
cial properties speaks for itself,
and among all the bidders and
so-called bidders or interested
parties who have surfaced and
vanished over the past months,
Arden appears to be the most
qualified, the most serious and
the best positioned,” said Jim
Clabaugh, president of EGI
Ltd, developers of the $100 mil-
lion Grand Isle Resort & Spa, a
78-villa resort on 12 acres of the
480-acre Emerald Bay enclave.
“We'd be thrilled if they took it
over.”

American businessman,
Grand Isle villa owner and fre-
quent visitor to the Bahamas,
John Beasley of Tennessee,
greeted the news with equal
welcome.

“That’s the best news we’ve
heard in ages,” said Mr Beasley.
According to other sources at
Emerald Bay, home of the Four
Seasons, the Greg Norman golf
course, numerous residences
and more than $150 million in
investments caught up in the
receivership, any successful bid-
der has to be prepared to invest
heavily —a minimum of $50 mil-
lion — in infrastructure to revive

SEE page 3B

ey j ee + ie
GOLF course.

EGI LTD, developers of Grand Isle Resort & Spa, yesterday threw their sup-
port behind the Arden Group, possible bidders for Emerald Bay, the 480-
acre enclave of luxury properties in Exuma that has been in receivership
for nearly two years. Grand Isle, built on 12 acres, including the highest
point of Emerald Bay, represents the single largest investment, a $100 mil-
lion project that includes 78 luxuriously appointed villas and consistent-
ly ranks as among the top vacation experiences in The Bahamas on Tri-
pAdvisor.com.



RS Gar NM lene
YOU NEED A CERTAIN BANK.

THE BEST ASSET IS
PEACE OF MIND

You couldn’t be in better hands.

~ FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com pG@e eee Mae ee eee aa eee ee) ea





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 3B



Morton Salt parent
sold in $1.67bn deal

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Morton Salt’s Inagua facili-
ty, along with its parent com-
pany, has been acquired by
Europe’s largest salt producer,
German-based K+S Aktiene-
sellschaft, in a $1.675 billion
cash deal, it was revealed yes-
terday.

The Bahamian company,
and its Morton international
parent, were sold by Dow
Chemical Company to finance
its purchase of their former
owner, Rohm & Haas. The
decision on whether to invest
in the full rebuilding of the
Inagua plant, following the
devastation caused by Hurri-

cane Ike, will now fall into the
German company’s lap.

It is likely too early to say
what the implications of the
sale will be for the Inagua
plant, or the island’s people, as
the German owners will take
some time to sift through their
newly-acquired prize. How-
ever, the fact that Morton has
been sold to an industry buyer
is likely good news.

Glenn Bannister, Morton
Salt’s president, referred to
Tribune Business to Rohm &
Haas spokesman George
Bochanski for comment. But
he did not return Tribune
Business’s phone message.

However, in a previous
interview, Mr Bochanski said:
“Lately, Dow has been talking

about a possible sale of Mor-
ton. Until all that gets sorted
out, I don’t expect Morton
management will make a deci-
sion any time soon.

“It’s really going to be up
to Dow to determine the
future of the whole business. I
wouldn’t certainly expect any-
thing new until the deal
between Dow and Rohm &
Haas closes. There won’t be
any information coming out
of Morton until then. Ulti-
mately, it will be down to Dow
to make a decision as the new
owner.”

Mr Bochanski said “noth-
ing has changed substantively”
as it relates to Morton Salt’s
Inagua operation since it was
heavily damaged by Hurricane

Investors back Arden’s
Emerald Bay bid proposal

FROM page 2B

what started out as a dream to
create the most ambitious luxu-
ry project in recent history on a
Family Island.

That dream soured when
Emerald Bay, caught up with
delays, cost overruns and other
management issues, defaulted
on its loan that had been under-
written by Mitsui, the reinsur-
ers.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
(PwC) London was named
receiver, projecting a quick sale.
Months and then a year, now
nearly two, have passed with
hopes raised and dashed repeat-
edly as Mitsui and PwC
declined offers or potential
investors walked away.

“We have great respect for
the principals and development
team at Arden Group. We
believe that they understand

what has to happen to restore
Emerald Bay, and we believe
they are a group that can suc-
ceed at Emerald Bay and will
be good for the island of Exu-
ma, and for the Bahamas" said
Pamela McCullough, vice-pres-
ident of EGI Ltd.

"We would be delighted if
this time it is for real and it goes
through. They certainly have
our support."

Founded in 1989, Arden
Group has purchased or devel-
oped more than $1.3 billion in
real estate, while its property
and asset management division
has managed more than $5 bil-
lion in assets, including hotels,
resorts and condominiums and
over four million square feet of
Class A commercial office
space.

Among their most noted pro-
jects is the conversion of two
former bank buildings in Centre
City, Philadelphia into the

Philadelphia Ritz-Carlton, now
ranked as one of the world’s top
5-star hotels.

The work was applauded for
its preservation of an historic
building, maximising its pres-
ence and preserving it as an
integral feature in the modern
structure.

Arden is now engaged in a
$285 million luxury condomini-
um project, The Residences at
Ritz-Carlton, on adjacent land.

Its real estate portfolio is vast
and includes the Omni Hotel in
Coral Gables and the Savoy in
South Beach, both in Florida,
The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor
Gulch, Colorado; Indian
Springs Ranch in Jackson,
Wyoming; the Chase Manhat-
tan Building in New York State;
Seven Penn Centre in Philadel-
phia; Brickell Bayview Center
in Miami; and Mellon Bank
Center in Wilmington,
Delaware.

TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.

THE NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE

wishes to announce that applications are now being
invited from all qualified members who wish to be
considered for recommendation as candidates for
the seats to become available on either the Board of

Directors or The Superviso
Annual General Meeting to

23, 2009.

Committee at the 32nd
e held on Saturday May

All members interested in serving in either capacity

should collect an application form from any office of the
Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit
Union Limited offices in Nassau, Freeport or Abaco.

The qualification for each post is available upon request.

Completed applications, along with the other information
eee should be returned to any of the offices on or
before the close of business on Thursday April 30, 2009.

All Resolutions must also be submitted by Thursday

April 30, 2009.

Any application,

not full

completed or without the

requested supporting information, or received after
the aforementioned date will not be eligible for

consideration.

“TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD. SERVING
THE WHOLE BAHAMAS”



Ike, with executives operating
from temporary offices.

“There’s full employment,
no one has been laid off, and
substantively the status quo
remains until a decision is tak-
en,” Mr Bochanski said.

The K+S Aktienesellschaft
purchase is expected to close
by mid-year.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

gees ina.
—_ Col ee











Dividend Notice

Ordinary Common Shares

The Board of Directors of Colina Holdings
Bahamas Limited (CHBL) is pleased to
announce that a dividend of $0.06 per
Ordinary Common Share will be paid to
Ordinary Common Shareholders of record
of CHBL on the [5th day of April 2009.

Payment will be made within 10 days of the
record date through the Company's
Registrar and Transfer Agent, CFAL Ltd.

MUST SELL

VACANT LAND
WINTON HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

Lot #4, Block 1

All the parcel of land containing 15,589 sq. ft. on the southern side
of Woodland Way, and about 350 feet east of Culberts Hill.

Zoning is for single-family residential homes, all the utility services
are available. The site is located 5 miles from downtown Nassau,
1 mile from shopping center and 1 mile from the nearest school.

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before April 10, 2009.

For further information, please contact us @ 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE OF
EXTENSION

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in
New Providence and the Family Islands including
Grand Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser”) has
EXTENDED the date to receive sealed bids, from persons to provide
transportation to and from schools in accordance with the provision
of the Education Act. Bid forms can be collected from the Ministry
of Education and the office of Family Island Administrators between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the

subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Monday, 13th April, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they
may be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.

on Tuesday, 14th April, 2009 at the

address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-1530





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





City Markets plunges into $13.4m loss

FROM page 1B

the firm’s 2007 annual general
meeting (AGM) that the com-
pany was projecting a net loss
of at least $10 million for fiscal
2008, but the figures released
today - based on unaudited








COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

management accounts -
revealed a figure that is 34.29
per cent higher.

In addition, as at January
27, 2009, the unaudited man-
agement accounts show that
while Bahamas Supermarkets
had current assets of at least
$21.37 million, its liabilities

2008/CLE/qui/187 1

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
parcel or lot of land being Lot 215, Stella
Maris Subdivision Phase Three, Section Two,








Stella Maris, situate between the settlements
of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown on
a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles
Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Warren Robert Boli

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Warren Robert Boli
of the city of Canton, in the State of Ohio, one
of the states in the United States of America
in respect of: - ALL THAT piece parcel
or lot of land being Lot 215, Stella Maris
Subdivision Phase Three, Section Two, Stella
Maris, situate between the settlements of
Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
which said piece parcel or lot of land has
such position shape boundaries marks and
dimensions as are shown on a plan filed
herein and thereon coloured yellow

Warren Robert Boli claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the
said tract of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons
having Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a
claim not recognized in the petition shall on or before the 23"
of May A.D., 2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a statement of his
claim on or before the 23" of May A.D., 2009 will operate as a
bar to such claim.

Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:

1.The Registry of the Supreme Court;

2.The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for
the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria
Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;

3.The Notice Board of the Administrator at Stella Maris, Long

Island; and
4.The Local Constable at Stella Maris, Long Island

Dated the 23" day of March A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attomeys for the Petitioner

exceeded this by just over $2
million, standing at $23.46 mil-
lion.

Effectively, this means that
Bahamas Supermarkets is
technically insolvent, as there
are not enough assets to meet
liabilities, although the com-
pany has continued to trade -
and seems likely to carry on
doing so.

Already, its Trinidadian
operating partner, Neal &
Massey, which holds the
largest stake in the company’s
majority shareholder, BSL
Holdings, has pumped $5 mil-
lion into the company. That
was matched by $5 million
invested by BSL Holdings’
Bahamian shareholders, which
include the hotel pension
funds, Fidelity’s private equi-
ty arm, Craig Symonette and
the late Franklyn Butler’s
estate. BSL Holdings has a 78
per cent stake in Bahamas
Supermarkets.

The situation clearly calls
for a major injection of new
equity into Bahamas Super-
markets, most likely from
Neal & Massey, which has the
deepest pockets with assets in
excess of $600 million. In
effect, a recapitalisation of the
12-store Bahamian supermar-
ket chain, with its 800 employ-
ees, is what is needed.

The situation is also likely
to prompt minority share-
holders, already mulling a
legal action against Bahamas

a
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

Supermarkets and its Board
of Directors for allegedly not
acting in the company’s best
interests, to make further
moves.

Spectacular

Since it acquired Bahamas
Supermarkets for $54 million
in summer 2006, BSL Hold-
ings and its investors have
presided over what can only
be described as a spectacular
destruction of shareholder val-
ue, producing an almost-$20
million swing into technical
insolvency.

As at year-end 2007,
Bahamas Supermarkets had
net shareholder equity of
$17.615 million. That had
reduced to $1.427 million as
at year-end 2008, and at the
2009 half-year, this was at a
negative $2.09 million.

In tandem, retained earn-
ings have shrunk from $12.874
million as at year-end 2007 to
a position in the red of $3.304
million at year-end 2008. By
the 2009 half-year point, that
accumulated deficit had
reached $6.831 million.

Further analysis of the
unaudited Bahamas Super-
markets balance sheet showed
that the company is still
enduring major cash flow/liq-
uidity problems, with all its
revenues largely going to meet
payments to suppliers.

The 2009 half-year cash-on-

PRICE INQUIRY

P-150 Supply & Delivery

of OilWater Separators

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) has a

requirement for the Supply and Delivery of four, (Qty.4),

OilWater Separators in accordance with the required

schedule and specifications for completion of Stage 1

of the LPIA Expansion Project This is a Supply and

Delivery only contract.

Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm on Monday, March 30th, 2009.

Price Inquiry closing is Wednesday, April 15th, 2009 at

3:00 pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:
Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
WEDNESDAY, 1 APRIL 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,638.68 | CHG -0.12 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -73.68 | YTD % -4.30
FINDEX: CLOSE 806.63 | YTD -3.38% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low
1.28
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.55
2.83
6.46
1.31
2.09
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

1.28
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
12.55
2.83

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consclidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Fince

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

6.46
2.17
2.09
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Last Sale

S52wk-Hi__52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Securi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-O.11
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.28
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
12.55
2.83
6.46
2.06
2.09
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00
Change Daily Vol.

100.00
100.00
100.00

0.00

0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bid $
f.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol.
8.42
6.25
0.40

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ABDAB
RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

31.59

29.00

0.55 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NA Vv
1.3664
2.8988
1.4489
3.3201

12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0440
1.0364
1.0452

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3041
2.9230
1.3847
3.3201
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

YTD%

-1.40

-1.94

-3.59

Last 12 Months
4.77
3.35
4.63
-11.33
5.79

Div $
0.95

1.06

0.96
0.56 0.56
-3.59
0.00
-13.33
4.40
3.64
4.40

0.00
0.06
0.80
0.33
0.76

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.

last 52 weeks

ighted price for daily volume
hted price for daily volume
om day to day

raded today

Previous Close
Today's Close -
Change - Chang
Daily Vol. -

Div $ - Dr he last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stook Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Weekly Vol. -
EPS $ - Acompa
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meanin gtul
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

nite:
olume of the prior week

EPS $

g
0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%
0.00 T%

Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-0.041

email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

c>eyv Fc Ms Tt es LT.

Div $ P/E
0.127
0.992

0.244

-0.877

0.105
0.055
1.309
0.118
0.438
0.099
0.240
0.598
0.322
0.794
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Yield %
28-Feb-09
28-Feb-09
27-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

hand position of $54,363 did
not differ much from the
$55,770 year-end position, but
at least was an improvement
on the zero cash-on-hand at
year-end 2007. However, since
that point, Bahamas Super-
markets has had to liquidate
fixed deposits worth almost
$6 million, since none are pre-
sent on its balance sheet cur-
rently.

For Bahamas Supermar-
kets’ 2008 fiscal year, the com-
pany enjoyed a modest 2.9 per
cent sales growth to $144.355
million.

However, its cost of sales
increased by more than $12

administrative expenses up by
almost $5 million.

In his note to shareholders,
Mr Sands attributed the 2008
net loss to “inventory short-
ages and discounting masked
by late and inaccurate man-
agement financial reports”.

However, he was “opti-
mistic that the worst is behind
us”, with key operating indi-
cators showing improvement
in 2009.

The 2009 second half was
expected to be “significantly
better” than the first, due to
improved systems and con-
trols, along with a drive to
curb pilferage and theft.

million, with operating and













Re:Parenting Training Seminar
7th April, 2009 - 2nd June, 2009








The Department of Rehabilitative/Welfare
Services will commence its second
Training Seminar for the year 2009 on 7th
April, 2009. The sessions will be held at
5:00p.m. in the Conference Room, Abaco
Markets Building, Thompson Boulevard
Interested parents are invited to attend.










NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Ultera Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 12th day of March, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308
East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

VENETI COMPANY SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 of The _ International Business
Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, VENETI COMPANY
SA is in dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was the 31st day of March, 2009. Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
VENETI COMPANY SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GOLDEN MARCHE
RESOURCES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 12th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 5B





Bahamas avoids
G-20 ‘blacklist’

FROM page 1B

The Government, Bahamas-
based financial services execu-
tives and countless attorneys,
accountants and others who pro-
vide services to the industry, will
likely be breathing a sigh of relief
that, at least for the moment,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham’s public position statement
has enabled this nation to avoid
the full force of the G-20’s wrath.

Speaking to Tribune Business
before the OECD published its
list yesterday, Zhivargo Laing,
minister of state for finance, said
the Government had done what it
felt was necessary to escape the
so-called ‘blacklist’, and it would
now wait and see what actions
others took.

“We did what we believed was
appropriate. What others deter-
mine to do is up to them,” Mr
Laing said. “There is no sense in
us speculating. We have done
what we believe was appropriate
to do, and will proceed on that
basis.

“We've done what we’ve done,
and I’m not going to speculate on
what others may or may not do.”

Michael Paton, the Lennox
Paton law firm partner and for-
mer Bahamas Financial Services

Harbour Island
Council blasted

on hotel trespass
FROM page 1B

clusively that the intended loca-
tion of the building was indeed
on hotel property”.

By that stage, the District
Council’s workforce had exca-
vated the land, natural growth
on the sand dune had been dug
out, and the foundations for the
bathrooms had been laid.

Dana Wells, Pink Sands’
attorney, sent copies of the sur-
vey to both the District Council
and Minister of Local Govern-
ment, but “it appears that did
not stop the defendants”.

An injunction was eventually
obtained to stop further work,
in what had become an “acrimo-
nious” dispute. Pink Sands had
twice called the police to
remove the Council’s workers
from its property.

Eventually, the Attorney-
General’s Office got the Survey-
or-General to prepare his own
survey, which confirmed the
findings of Mr Chee-A-Tow.
That was made clear to the
Supreme Court on March 6,
2006. “This trespass continued
for 10 months, and it was not
until after the Surveyor-General
had confirmed what the plaintiff
had already told [the District
Council], and proven conclu-
sively with a professional survey
from a well-known firm of sur-
veyors, that the [District Coun-
cil] made arrangements to
remove the trespass,” Justice
Lyons found. “Thereafter, it
took some time for the natural
growth of vegetation to occur to
the point where, so far as Mr
von Merveldt was aware, the
area adversely affected is either
back to the state it was before
the trespass or very nearly back
to that condition.”

Pink Sands and its parent,
Island Outpost (Harbour
Island) Ltd, had sough damages
for the trespass, plus a declara-
tion that the District Council
had “no claim or right” to the
property being trespassed upon.

“The Pink Sands Hotel is a
well-known establishment on
Harbour Island,” Justice Lyons
found. “It seeks to attract what
are termed ‘high end patrons’,
who are housed in small villas
around the property. The tres-
pass by the [District Council]
was right in front of one of these
villas. In so trespassing on the
land and digging away the sand
dunes and commencing to erect
the facility, the [District Coun-
cil] had obviously detracted
from the beauty, amenity and
ambiance of the plaintiff’s prop-
erty, particularly in relation to
the villa nearest to the site of
the trespass.”

In explaining his rationale for
the damages award, Justice
Lyons added: “This trespass was
a serious trespass on a valuable
property. The trespass was pro-
ceeded with without the [Dis-
trict Council] making any of the
proper checks to make sure that
it was proceeding properly. The
damage remained for at least 10
to 11 months before the trespass
was removed.”

Justice Lyons found that “it
was not a trespass that was
fleeting in nature”, and caused
actual damage to Pink Sands
land. He awarded the resort
$20,000 in general damages;
$12,805 in special damages;
$3,250 to cover the costs of the
Chee-a-Tow survey and $21 for
air courier costs. “I trust now
that the [District Council] can
see what were the consequences
of their ill-considered and
thoughtless act,” Justice Lyons
said.

Board (BFSB) chairman,
described the OECD’s use of
three separate tiers as “totally
disingenuous”, because “as far as
the rest of the world is concerned,
it’s a blacklist”.

He added: “To me, it’s very
grandiose and wishful thinking to
think that they can get all the
major financial centres to the
same degree of co-operation and
standards. To think we’re all
going to converge on agreed stan-
dards is staggering.

“T’m just glad there was some-
thing that was invoked or decreed
upon. At least there’s time to
manoevere, people can talk and
we can do something that’s palat-
able.”

In an interview with Tribune
Business prior to the OECD list’s
publication, Owen Bethel, head
of Nassau-based financial services
provider, the Montaque Group,
said the critical thing for the
Bahamas was to avoid being
placed on any ‘blacklist’, given
that the G-20 was looking to
move beyond a ‘naming and
shaming’ exercise and impose
sanctions.

That scenario has been avoid-
ed, at least for the moment. But,
outlining what would have hap-
pened had it come to pass, Mr
Bethel told Tribune Business that
the effects would not only have
been felt by the sector’s clients,
but also its institutions - especial-
ly those with head offices in G-20
nations.

“We would certainly have seen
not only clients of prospective
clients getting jittery and agitated
over the consequences of actions
being taken, but the OECD and
G-20 are looking to move one
step beyond what the did last
time, with the naming and sham-
ing, and impose sanctions,” Mr
Bethel said.

“That would certainly damage
the industry, period. Clients
would take action, and not just
clients. The industry here is pop-
ulated by foreign banks. We’re
still not out of the woods yet, and
pressure could come from head
offices of foreign banks to move,
shut down or switch business else-
where.”

He added: “The possibility still
is that there could be a flight of
financial institutions, not only
client business, from these juris-
dictions.

“Going forward, it will again
be whether we have the strength
or will to demand a level playing
field, or will we simply make it
better for clients to move from
one jurisdiction to another and
lose our competitive edge. We
need to ensure we are in the
game as long as everyone is play-
ing by the same rules.”

Not surprisingly, those nations
in the ‘top tier’ of the OECD list,
meaning those who had “sub-

stantially implemented the inter-
nationally agreed tax standard”,
included all that organisation’s
members states, along with the
Isle of Man and the Channel
Islands - the latter three no doubt
aided by the UK’s protective
embrace - plus, perhaps more sur-
prisingly, the likes of Barbados,
Cyprus and Malta. Of greater
concern, perhaps, to the
Bahamas, is the fact that the
OECD initiative makes no men-
tion of US states such as
Delaware, Nevada, Wyoming and
others, all of which have far less
transparent and effective regula-
tory systems than this nation and,
to all intents and purposes, oper-
ate as international financial cen-
tres and compete for the same
market as this nation.

And totally excluded from
mention on the OECD list were
Hong Kong and Macau, a move
no doubt intended to appease
China. The footnotes in relation
to China merely mentioned that
its “special administrative
regions” had committed to the
transparency and tax information
standards being demanded. Those
jurisdictions that were ‘blacklist-
ed’ were Costa Rica, the
Malaysian region of Labuan, the
Philippines and Uruguay.

Amid much sabre-rattling as
the G-20 summit drew to a close,
there was little doubt, especially
among those nations such as
France and Germany, which are
ideologically opposed to interna-
tional financial centres, of their
intent to use the global financial
crisis as an excuse to scapegoat,
blame and get after the likes of
the Bahamas.

“The time of banking secrecy
has passed,” said French presi-
dent Nicholas Sarkozy following
the summit. “Everyone around
the table wants an end to tax
havens. Everyone knows we need
sanctions.”

China said it supported the
move, but would not agree to
have two territories, Hong Kong
and Macau, classified as tax
havens.

Potential sanctions for trans-
gressors include additional audits
on the accounts of those who use
tax havens and curbs on tax
deductions claimed by businesses
who use the territories. In their
communique, leaders said they
may also consider further penal-
ties in their bilateral relations with
tax haven territories.

Stephen Timms, financial sec-
retary to the British Treasury,
said a culture of banking secrecy
had worsened global economic
problems.

“That lack of transparency —
that opaqueness — has con-
tributed to the severity of the
problems we are seeing in the
world economy at the moment,”
he said.

NOTICE

mE struction would like to inform the public

art

eee ea ee ee eae le

April 6th, 2009 from Navy Lion Rd (by the Hilton

) the bridge by Mackey St. from the hours
of 6pm to On M elt eMecltcme) i lecM in mesic)
of 70 day j

NOTICE is hereby

ae

Nae re y

ven that DATES JOEL of

MARSH HARBOUR, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

thal any person who Knows any teason why r

istration!

naturalization should noi be granted, should send a written

and signed statement of the facts within twen
days from the 3°° day of April, 2009 to the

eight
inister

responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-

7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE is hereby given that ERVIN ERROL MARTIN

of FIRETRAIL
ROAD Nassau,

OAD SOUTH OF GLADSTONE
Bahamas, & applying to the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration!
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who Knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27" day of
Mareh, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Cit@enship, PO. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAN



eee

The Public is hereby advised that TREVOR JASON
JONES of Freeport, Bahamas intend to change my

name to
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Deputy Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

lf there are



BAHAMAS SUPERMARKETS LIMITED

CHAIRMAN'S STATEMENT

The audit of the consolideled nanciel sitemens of Bahamas Sunemariets Linted (he Company") os ot June 25, 208 i in is find stapes and once
completed wil be made avaltaite bo: all stakehokers. However in fe inkewin, the Secunties Commission of The Batamas has requested that noneobdated

rresreagpatienT! Soccer Ibe prubiechad

Accordingly, presented herewift are fhe consobdaled management aocqunts of the Company which comprise fhe consold sled balance shee! as at January
7, 2003 and the relaled consolidated statements of operaions, changes in shareholders’ equifyidelot) and cash flows for the twentpeight weets then
eyed Abo induded songsde are the consoldaied balance sheets at al June 25, 2009 and June 27, 2007 ond the retated conenbdaied stalements of

operaiioss, Changes it shansholiiers' qaity andl cash flows for the years then enced

am disappointed io report hai, as foreshadowed at fhe last AGM, the Company reported = significant loss of $15.4 milion for the year ended June 25, 2006.
The reasons for fhe bes ore meny but isle substantialy to inweniory shortages: and discounting rested Gy lale and inscargie maragenent fence
pepovis. Howese, much work bas been done to remedy the deficiencies and we-can report thal fhe Company's key operating indicalors conlinwe lo show
Segebcael inproversed! in 2008 and we aie opine hal Be worst re betind us.

Akey fador in fhe recowery has been the greater iwolvement of pur apereing partner, Heal & Massy. Heal & Wassyis adiwersiiad, inlemafonal cong lomner-
ale win assets in cecess of VSSE00) million. We are indeed lorunate to hawe Pen 25 our partners. An executive lean ol espenenced supermarket operations
from Meal. & Massy ane secosded bo drive he Company's recovery ia October 2008 and the benef of their work has becoine evde! in recent montis. A
Sgniitanl change was made in the operating nianagement of tha company wih Be appointmee! of Sund Chatran as CED. Send was formerly Group CRO
ol Bastados Shipping & Trading, oseof Neal & Macey’: subeadianes, end be comes wih song financial and operaional experence whichis pompemeniad
by retailing and purchasing eqpesise from ls offer Heal & Messy colleagues. The Neal & Messy team has alsa eecewed strony supeod from a mack
strengthened Eahanian management eam who now hes the management dlls and aenanence to successiully lead the recowery. Thay have Pe beans

hil support

The Company is nce well inko ts year ending June 24. 2009 and has mace material progpess in pufing 2008 behind it. Alhough the fest haf of 2009 showed
8 kes, iohowing major inprovernenss in operations and managemeni and fngecel cones, we expect fhe senond hal of 2008 to be signdcanity beter
AScOUTiNg Cobos aft operating Afeciway biely mostly inascial reporting hes bees nenstiluied, opacaiing cos: are being peapetly conbeoled aac
Sten and ConTois cer Feceanng, prong and perchasing @ goods ara beng constantly improved. Funes, aggressive steps have been tacan fo card elt
and piferage and the Company i confident that i i making progressin this area

The Company's sharchodders have deplayed much galiesce and coescerable tolerance for the delay in communication and repoting. We are deeply
aprocative of bein corinued sugped and weh to ctcuee then of er conniiment to bing he Company back cavity bs bees of pecitabality hal if apcetd





in fhe poz,
Sincerely,
Basi L Sands,
Charan
BARAMAS SUPERMIARETS LIMITED
Corscidates Sataren a! Operations (Expressed in Bahemien dollare|
YEAR TO) DATE
angry 7, 205 dou 3, ME dure? 007
TE weeks enced] || [Fear ended |
(Lancia! (Usmcites] [Audited |
Feet sales 5 ae BY 4 ETS: WT BAe
(Coal ofsalles, incucing warehouse
Adeleery ecpenies 52 0M ATG) (TID, 738) 07 34 Bo)
(areas. peo Ds Ue aa
Operating and anna epee: IT ESLEMS Be 1d? BA eT)
(persing bee AAT eT) |T2,316,868) pT 18)
Wiens! nice - ay EE
Perel apes isi tLe) -
Med bis i (LST OTe |T455) | 5,130)
Sasic oes per Bia j i (ef) (0a)
United per stave 5 15] 11
‘Gonsolicgiad Statement of Changes in Sharsoicess (DefcayEquiy (Expressed in Bahamian tolare|
jAccurulalad Toe
Shea PEnaiuzioe Cerne apken
Capital Fipserve Astined Eamings Equity Deft}
Balance: al June 24, 2006 jaud deal] i 4518 Wi 87, 108 aaa
Weal Ines Far tha pear - - Ae. | [15,13
Dividends = GS] FAT ae}
Bakaeoe al lune: 27), 2007 uate] 4 550 198 1E1 DM TEE A TAB KH
Det hee the pear - - (1.4388 [11424 38)
Drvaiends. - - [2 MeL] [2 ELBE
Balance at June 2, 208 juneedited| 550 196 41,00 FL) LAST
Wit logs for the parce - - FLAQT OE] FL SoT OOF
Balance at Jarwary 7, 2006 | praudited| j 4550, 156 Wie FSI, 1B eB)
Consolidated Balance Shoat (Eqpesied in Gatemion colar]
Amey 0 joe, OE ied,
(Uraucitee] [Ura aciied) [Buel eal
resets
Covent epsets:
leah j Al S70) -
Fired tapos: - be 5a
Actourk mecpicable 1 Poti WTS 14
Due: Iron reaied party wie ha Ti it
Prepaid eapenses and olber ately 12t0,108 Tora? aa a78
retire: Was 5I8 1B Als WHT
Te SAG Ag Aha
pers, pant and squipmen Tao 116 te 174 Me
4 2) ct 70 BD
liahiibes and ShershoWers' Equity
Cure lager
Bank ovens j Aire 8 497,174 79,
Accounts pepable aed sound epeeses 1A TA TELE
Dh lo pete partes Tat 0 Pa
Proven aLeE Bi 2a] feel
214851! 22) irae
Sharehoidany Melcifienuity:
Shaws cepdet
Suthoded - £000) O00 shares 051M each
bsued eed fully pad - 4.55) 1 shares 4550 18 +581 455) 88
Rava nator Sears 11 0e 1H) Hi
(Accu related deo} etaned earings 1 ET) AE) TAS
ee oS 1a Dat Tins
j 2 at AT NE Tl
Coesdlideted Statement af Casa Flows (Expresses in Daherian dota
Jann? 2 Joe, OB dred, 007
[Ri weers esdec| [isa eached] [isa esches]
(Lireaueibes] ‘Veaies] | Pced eal]
Cash Bows iron operating acivities
Retloes tor the pesod j (357 Ere [7429,388) [i130]
Adustners bor
Depecgics ad anorioice Sta ri 26,71
rinses nore = (e000 ] (56,165)
[OSTERSE REESE In povEON (i 00 fe]
Bad cea wef-of and paoatioe lor doa bial ancoas = Bb ab BaF
Previgen an anticipated ineeniory shavtages - peed % SE Ad}
/Gain}iogs on cisgogal cf oraperty plewtand equigment (Ea 24) GIB (E773)
(Cash (used injiprnvided by operahora before weding capdalcteages = (T1113) [15 Sa] MBM
Doe Mi ancoes eoevable (434 175) | 11,2) |t331]
Decreaseyincreaiay ia dea Woot retated parts 12K Pod (477)
acess cdot in pore pied cope ad offer pines (B02 Ea (tae wea
Desrenie/ increase} i inmerdories 1 SBD EM 27a, To HS BEd)
(Decrease Vincraate ft eeccunts posable ard aouued expeniea 6, (Te THI) 12S tTe Taleo
[Decreace| ncreaselin due to elated peries (9 A) Litt HT a)
Tash (used injiprnvidied by operons: E45] 50) pa 5 2e Sed
Wiese! ceived - TRS TIE EST
Mel ash used injibrrvicked by opecaling sachviiees (E450 250) Aa Sali
[ae owes Boor investing acivibes
Purchase: od property, phen! and ecm ipnent (Aaa) FL aE] FET E85)
Proceeds ftir disposal ol papery, clind ard egeipted 300.b00 Gite BT
Desreesestirereees) ni fined depos: - 4 Bal cob (HEEE?|
Met cad pied be] sed | inesing echaies Tei 1B Paw eal]
(est fees orn financing acielies
Laat bom paver cunpary 5,000.00 - .
Drvelends pad / jure 728TH)
Wet cash provided iny'[iesed in| inancing aciatins 500000 (SEE | PSN)
Wet pecraase in cash eed cast equiegients (bea OT) (il AE] Bah oe)
(haeth ated cash encarta being a! peso! (ea S33) [79,108] amaon
Cash and cash oquisaents al ed of pannd j (AT a FLD] e102)
Caeh pnd cast aquigient: camer.
Cash j 39 Sil -
Foced deposit wah maturity base than 2 moeths - bee -
Bank rvestrall TT Sa) FS FH] e102)
j EEE FLOSS Te 107)



PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Development Bank $5m below loan goal

FROM page 1B

small and medium-sized businesses was around $8
to $9 million per annum. However, he suggested
that the current economic downturn had caused
a decline in loan requests and an increase in
defaults.

Mr Woodside said the bank enacted a morato-
rium on foreclosures in 2008, hoping to draw
debtors in financial distress into the BDB to nego-
tiate loan repayments and refinancing options.
However, many of the BDB’s clients had failed to
take advantage of the opportunity.

Now, the bank, through its collections depart-
ment, is poised to move on outstanding loan pay-
ments.

“We don’t want to foreclose and liquidate.

AL
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Compoary

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

That is not our purpose,” said Mr Woodside.
“We go after those who were bad from day one,
and who would use the recession as an excuse.”

Mr Woodside revealed that the BDB is cur-
rently short on capital, and is waiting for refi-
nancing to recapitalise through the Caribbean
Development Bank (CDB), Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) and the National
Insurance Board (NIB).

So far this year, the BDB has funded seven
projects to the tune of $622,764, in the areas of
transportation, services and farming.

With half the BDB’s loan portfolio in arrears,
it has taken extra steps to ensure those business-
es it funds are successful.

In 2004, the bank created a Business Advisory
Services department to offer business develop-

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction

Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage

FROM page 1B

ment advice and resources to those small and
medium-sized businesses it finances in a bid to
make them successful.

The BDB’s manager of business advisory ser-
vices, Dale McHardy, said new small business
owners were able to procure an array of busi-
ness development literature and software, such as
Quickbooks, from the bank’s in-house Business
Information Centre.

Mrs McHardy said the BDB offers workshops
for their clients, and markets their businesses
whenever and wherever they can.

“For a small business to be successful they first
have to be educated on how to run a small busi-
ness,” she said.

One such small business owner and recipient of
the Government’s Self-Starters programme, Devi-

payments,

“unfair pricing tactics”, the fact

to Bodie, told this newspaper on Tuesday that he
sought to expand his business through funding
from the BDB, but found he did not meet certain
criteria.

The BDB has since taken a second look at Mr
Bodie’s business plan and model, and has engaged
him to evaluate his business.

“We have certain criteria, but we evaluate them
(business plans) on a case by case basis,” said
Mr Woodside.

According to Mr Bodie, he can expand his
almost $1,000 per week business if he had the
machinery, funded through the BDB, to turn the
waste products from the coconuts he uses to make
his tarts into mulch that he would then sell.

“My tarts are known from Lyford Cay to Win-
ton,” said Mr Bodie.

‘Devastating impact’
from cruise islands

He urged Bahamians to become “less

1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following
items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for
the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (ie.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

the country by cruise lines on an annual
basis”.

He indicated that BASE and its mem-
bers, who include the likes of Dolphin
Encounters, Blackbeard’s Cay, Ardastra
Gardens, Nassau Water Ferries and Sun-
shine Cruises, also felt left out by the Gov-
ernment and Ministry of Tourism when it
came to policy and negotiations with the
cruise lines on issues that impacted Bahami-
an businesses.

Among their issues with the cruise lines,
Mr Beckles said, were the receipt of timely

that the jurisdiction for resolving disputes
was not the Bahamas, trade and on-board
marketing limitations were set by the cruise
lines, and concerns that some agreements
were contrary to Bahamian law.

And Mr Beckles added: “The Bahamas in
general, and Grand Bahama in particular,
needs to constantly improve our products:
physical plant, customer service, use of tech-
nology, Internet and other modern advan-
tages to advance our businesses.

“We have more resources available to us
here in the Bahamas than many of our
regional competitors, and yet they do a
much better job with less.”

political and more business practical” in
the conduct of commerce, and that tour
operators needed to “demand more” from
elected MPs and ministers.

“Tf we don’t change, we can be assured
that globalisation will create an opportu-
nity for someone else to come in and do
what we should have been doing and there
will be little , if anything, we can do about
it,” Mr Beckles said.

“We must do more to improve our over-
all customer service product, employee
development. Eliminate mediocrity and
complacency.”

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci

Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room

located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRACI BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs



@ DAVID B. CARUSO
NEW YORK

Even Bernie Madoff isn't
exempt from the real estate
slump, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

The Florida mansion that
prosecutors seized from the
Wall Street swindler appears
to have lost a big chunk of its

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

sharro

Company Administrative Director

Experience:

value since Palm Beach Coun-
ty officials assessed its worth
last year at $9.3 million.

A new appraisal that feder-
al officials had done in March
pegged the property's likely
market price at $7.45 million.

Prosecutors disclosed in a
court filing Thursday that
Madoff and his wife tenta-
tively agreed to let the gov-
ernment sell off the waterfront
Palm Beach home while the
courts decide how much of the
family's fortune should be for-
feited and distributed to vic-
tims of his Ponzi scheme.

The planned seizure was
accelerated, however, because
of the hefty cost of maintain-
ing the five-bedroom home
and legal complications creat-
ed by a competing claim to
Madoff's assets posed by a
lawsuit in Connecticut.

Federal marshals seized the
house Wednesday, along with
a vintage, 55-foot yacht called

Bull, docked in Fort Laud-
erdale, Fla., and a 24-foot
motorboat.

The U.S. attorney in Man-
hattan revealed Thursday that
marshals also had taken pos-
session of a 38-foot yacht
called Sitting Bull at a marina
in Montauk, on the eastern tip
of Long Island.

Costs

Court papers say the
monthly costs on Madoff's
6,500-square-foot house on
the Intercoastal Waterway
included $3,000 for home-
owners insurance, $1,000 for
utilities and $3,300 for main-
tenance and security. The
family's annual flood and hur-
ricane insurance bill was
$115,000.

Madoff pleaded guilty last
month to taking billions of
dollars from investors around
the world and funneling it into

=

Important

Madoff's home in Florida lost almost $2M in value

what could be the largest
Ponzi scheme in history.

His victims included huge
hedge funds, global banks and
thousands of smaller investors
who are now scrambling to
recover whatever they can of
their life savings.

Prosecutors are trying to
preserve as much of Madoft's
fortune as possible to distrib-
ute among his victims.

They said in the court filing
that they had refused to allow
the family to pay its home
insurance bill for April
because they didn't believe
that Madoff and his wife,
Ruth, would own it for much
longer.

Madoff, a 70-year-old for-
mer Nasdaq chairman, could
get up to 150 years in prison
when he's sentenced in June.



l. Minimum five years multi-unit responsibility for daily restaurant
administrative and financial data auditing, computing and report-
ing.

2, Minimum five years experience in daily, weekly and monthly
restaurant environment payable and receivable accounts entry and
auditing.

3. Total proficiency in the monthly, quarterly and annual compila-

tion of budgets, P&L statements, balance sheets and cash-flow

reports,

4, Exceptional knowledge of all Microsoft Office Systems, and the
ACCPAC Business Reporting System.

5, Exceptional direction, communication and organizational skills.
». Tertiary level education in accounting or related field.
Salary based upon experience and productivity

Email resumes to the Managing director at
cvk/@)sbarrobahamas.com

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEW ACCEPTED







Notice

From lam to 1lam
Sunday 5th April.

As we continue efforts to improve our service to you, we
ask you to take note that our Electronic Banking System
will be temporarily unavailable during the time listed
above. We apologise for any inconvenience that this may
cause. During this period, the following services will be

unavailable:

e ABM

e VISA transactions via ABM
¢ Internet Banking

e Telephone Banking

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this.

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com

SERVICE INTERRUPTION Va












FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK
GET THERE. TOGETHER.



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST



“FX ontanoo

_ High:82°F/28°C
~ Low:68°F/20°C



" @
TAMPA’. ju MG

High: 78° F/26° C t ee ae

Low: 70° F/21°C ah F.

@ fe

Low: 71° F/22°C 2%
a
é & i
MIAMI
an f High: 88° F/31°C
. Low: 73° F/23° C

KEY WEST
High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 76° F/24°C

@

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Saturday

Today Saturday
High Low W High Low W
F/C F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 6216 41/5 c 58/14 31/0 pc Indianapolis
Anchorage 35/1 26/-3 sf 41/5 23/-5 s Jacksonville
Atlanta 66/18 45/7 pe 74/23 54/12 s Kansas City
Atlantic City 58/14 47/8 t 63/17 36/2 s Las Vegas
Baltimore 62/16 44/6 t 61/16 38/3 s Little Rock
Boston 53/11 45/7 + 60/15 41/5 pc Los Angeles
Buffalo 54/12 40/4 r 45/7 32/0 pe Louisville
Charleston, SC 78/25 49/9 t 77/25 531 $s Memphis
Chicago 47/8 32/0 pe 52/41 35/1 pe Miami
Cleveland 58/14 37/2 r 47/8 32/0 s Minneapolis
Dallas 72/22 55/12 $s 77/25 49/9 pe Nashville
Denver 52/11 27/-2 ¢ 32/0 19/-7 sn New Orleans
Detroit 52/11 33/0 r 53/11 34/1 pe New York
Honolulu 82/27 69/20 pce 82/27 70/21 c Oklahoma City
Houston 75/23 58/14 § 80/26 64/17 pc Orlando

o|1|2

LOW



MODERATE

3|4|5





Sunny, breezy and Partly cloudy. A full day of A full day of Sunny and breezy. Windy and not as
humid. sunshine. sunshine. warm.
. High: 88° High: 86° High: 87° High: 74°
High: 90° Low: 76° Low: 73° Low: 74° Low: 61° Low: 61°
Emile ETI aie a
[LF 104°-78° F 94°-81° F 93°-65° F T1°-57° F High
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 2:50 a.m.
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 3:21 p.m.
Saturda 4:00 a.m.
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunday 505 am.
ABACO Temperature 5:31 p.m.
High: 88° F/31° C HIGH ooeceeeecccececesesteseseetsteseeeeteseseeceseees 84" F/29" C Monday 602 am.
io iS LOW oocceeeeees 75° F/24° C 6:25 p.m
Low: 74° F/23°C Normal high... 80° F/27° sala
a Normal low 67° F/20° C
@ WEST PALM BEACH i LAST Year's MUDDY sissstassdenennansreiesen 85° F/29°

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 86°F/30°C



High
F/C
54/12
77/25
62/16
72/22
67/19
62/16
58/14
63/17
88/31
46/7
58/14
72/22
57/13
66/18
82/27

High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 70° F/21°C

Today

Low

F/C
36/2
49/9
42/5
47/8
46/7
52/11
39/3
49/9
70/21
30/-1
38/3
55/12
47/8
50/10
60/15

_—~

W High
F/C
r 60/15
t 80/26
Ss 66/18
pe 68/20
s 77/25
sh 70/21
pe 66/18
s 75/23
pe 85/29
pc 46/7
pe 71/21
s 78/25
r 59/15
Ss 75/23
t 82/27

Low

F/C
44/6
57/13
36/2
48/8
54/12
52/11
50/10
56/13
71/21
30/-1
48/8
65/18
46/7
40/4
62/16

FREEPORT

High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 72° F/22°C

NASSAU

High: 90° F/32° C

Low: 76° F/24° C
@

QO

hi

ANDROS
High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 75° F/24°C

Today
W High Low W

F/C F/C
s Philadelphia 63/17 48/8 t
Phoenix 87/30 58/14 pc
pe Pittsburgh 59/15 35/1 4r
$ Portland, OR 48/8 34/1 sh
pe Raleigh-Durham 73/22 44/6 t
s St. Louis 58/14 41/5 s
s Salt Lake City 44/6 28/-2 ¢
pc San Antonio 76/24 60/15 s
pe San Diego 62/16 54/12 sh
r San Francisco 57/13 44/6 s
s Seattle 46/7 33/0 pc
pc Tallahassee 78/25 45/7 §
pe Tampa 78/25 64/17 t
Cc Tucson 81/27 53/11 $s
S$ Washington, DC 62/16 47/8 t

ELEUTHERA
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 75° F/24°C

GREAT EXUMA

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 74° F/23°C

Saturday
High Low
F/C F/C
58/14 42/5
77/25 52/11
52/11 34/1
55/12 38/3
73/22 46/7
65/18 47/8
45/7 31/0
84/28 58/14
67/19 53/11
64/17 46/7
52/11 39/3
82/27 54/12
81/27 68/20
76/24 = 47/8
65/18 44/6

Ww

$
$
Ss

$
pc
sf
pc
$
$

pc

nnn on

Last year's lOW .cceceseseteeseeeeeees 72° F/22° C



RAGGED ISLAND
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 71°F/22°C



ia

CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 75° F/24°C

GREAT INAGUA .

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 72° F/22°C

iF

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 72° F/22°C

6|7

HIGH

27
24

27
25

27
27

2.8
2.9



\. HIGH

9:15 a.m.
9:26 p.m.

10:18 a.m.
10:36 p.m.

11:15 a.m.
11:40 p.m.

12:07 p.m.



8|9|10

TAY rr yy

Vv
0
| ext

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Poy

Ht.(ft.) Low — Ht.(ft.

0.3
0.2

0.2
0.1

0.1
0.0

0.0

Precipitation Suntise...... 6:59 a.m. Moonrise .... 1:46 p.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... eeccecccscsssssseeeen 0.00" Sunset....... 7:27 p.m. Moonset ..... 2:46 a.m.
Year to date ; i
Normal year to date oo... ccc ccc ceeeceeeeee 5.33" dl a ney Fits
AccuWeather.com {.°"
Forecasts and graphics provided by bic:
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr. 9 Apr. 17 Apr. 24 May 1
CATISLAND
High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 71° F/22°C
* SAN SALVADOR
High: 89° F/32°C
Low: 73° F/23°C
LONGISLAND
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 73° F/23°C
MAYAGUANA

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
64/17
57/13
61/16
64/17
93/33
85/29
59/15
64/17
70/21
68/20
64/17
70/21
64/17
66/18
68/20
79/26
81/27
99/37
36/2
90/32
82/27
67/19
58/14
55/12
68/20
61/16
48/8
90/32
41/5
68/20
88/31
55/12
65/18
75/23
85/29
83/28
63/17
68/20
90/32
84/28
90/32
55/12
37/2
66/18
86/30
97/36
47/8
63/17
62/16
80/26
75/23
66/18
84/28
91/32
91/32
17/25
88/31
75/23
48/8
52/11
77/25
79/26
59/15
50/10
88/31
46/7
67/19
55/12
32/0

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
70/21
49/9
32/0
45/7
51/10
79/26
75/23
49/9
45/7
63/17
44/6
50/10
67/19
46/7
46/7
45/7
64/17
59/15
79/26
20/-6
75/23
67/19
50/10
46/7
43/6
46/7
45/7
39/3
70/21
30/-1
66/18
57/13
44/6
55/12
51/10
76/24
64/17
43/6
36/2
73/22
52/11
63/17
45/7
28/-2
42/5
57/13
68/20
34/1
45/7
42/5
71/21
60/15
50/10
74/23
59/15
66/18
50/10
70/21
62/16
34/1
36/2
64/17
69/20
48/8
37/2

FRIDAY - APRIL 3rp - 2009 - PAGE 9B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

WwW

nonnn

72/22 t

34/1
51/10
38/3
24/-4

nono

c

High
F/C
87/30
65/18
59/15
61/16
66/18
93/33
84/28
61/16
72/22
69/20
68/20
68/20
76/24
66/18
67/19
72/22
75/23
84/28
100/37
40/4
90/32
82/27
69/20
60/15
50/10
72/22
63/17
52/11
90/32
39/3
72/22
93/33
55/12
64/17
71/21
85/29
80/26
59/15
73/22
85/29
84/28
98/36
46/7
36/2
69/20
85/29
95/35
45/7
64/17
70/21
82/27
85/29
65/18
83/28
83/28
90/32
73/22
85/29
77/25
57/13
50/10
75/23
83/28
62/16
47/8
87/30
47/8
69/20
61/16
40/4

Saturday

Low
F/C
69/20
48/8
30/-1
48/8
54/12
78/25
74/23
50/10
48/8
63/17
49/9
53/11
66/18
44/6
46/7
48/8
60/15
63/17
78/25
16/-8
71/21
68/20
54/12
49/9
39/3
48/8
48/8
43/6
70/21
32/0
68/20
61/16
47/8
48/8
51/10
75/23
62/16
43/6
43/6
76/24
46/7
64/17
32/0
23/-5
43/6
58/14
68/20
37/2
43/6
46/7
71/21
63/17
52/11
73/22
56/13
71/21
48/8
67/19
64/17
38/3
34/1
63/17
69/20
50/10
32/0
75/23
38/3
52/11
41/5
22/-5

oe?

oO

=> ee Lae

ae

m0) ee 0 ee OS eo Be eS ee OO Be Oe oo ee ee oe oe ce) ee ee Oe > ee
oO

sf

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SW at 15-30 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Saturday: Wat 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: SW at 15-30 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Saturday: | WSW at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: SW at 12-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Saturday: _ SW at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

>| Seattle.
PCD

/ BREEZY
(BREEZY ) ‘, Kansas City;

62/42

Los

62/52

Miami
88/70

Showers
T-storms
Rain

[*. +] Flurries

pe] Snow Warm Mini,
[yz ¥] Ice Stationary Magu

-10s| -0s [/s) 10s 20s [OSI 40s [50s 60s 70s (80s [Gis\/ 00ST)

Fronts
Cold
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.









AUTO INSURANCE

Never st
engine wit out us!

OUT |

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(A



PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

ee ey Ne Pe eae UO Veen 1 ere tote)

THE TRIBUNE





Abaco paar b aE
group wins top




The Planning Abaco Group has been honoured with a
Charter Award from the Congress of New Urbanism
(CNU). These awards are intended to recognise projects
around the world that best embody and advance the prin-
ciples of the Charter for New Urbanism.

Planning Abaco is a group from Andrews University
(Michigan), comprised of students, teachers, architects
and urbanists dedicated to promoting sustainable devel-
opment.

The CNU said: “The Charter Awards programme is
unique in its emphasis on the entirety of the built and nat-
ural environment - from the function and sustainability of
regions to the fine-grain architectural details that strength-
en people's ties to a place over time.

“The Charter Awards look at how plans and projects
integrate with their contexts and, consequently, how they
improve both the human experience of place and the rela-
tionship between the built and natural environments.”

The CNU describes honorees as “setting the gold stan-
dard for urban design and development”.

Chester Cooper, British
American Financial’s president
and chief executive, has been
named as the College of the
Bahamas Alumni Association’s
Hall Of Fame Honoree for
2008.

After joining British Ameri-
can Financial in 2001, follow-
ing a successful eight-year
career as an investment banker
in the Bahamas, Dublin and
Luxembourg, Mr Cooper led a
Bahamian Group that acquired
the then-British American
Insurance Company in Febru-
ary 2007.

Mr Cooper was also hon-
oured as ‘Business Person of
the Year’ by the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce in 2007.

Education

After completing his primary
and secondary education in
Exuma, Mr Cooper went to

Share your news

Charter Award joins COP’

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Nassau to further his education.

Mr Cooper also studied in
Canada, the US and the UK.
His first degree, an Associate
of Arts Degree in Economics,
was obtained at COB. He then
went on to receive a BA in Eco-
nomics and Finance, and MBA
(with distinction).

Mr Cooper holds various
directorships, including: BAB
Global Group, BAB Holdings,



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qqunenecne We."

British American chief
s Hall of Fame

PM aT a aseei ce Renn is pictured third from the left.

Bramer General Insurance,
Eleuthera Properties, RoyalStar
Assurance, Bramer General
Insurance Agency, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, and the
Bahamas Government Venture
Capital Fund.

He is an alumnus of the Col-



lege of the Bahamas and a
member of the Young Presi-
dent’s Organisation (YPO), a
Rotarian, a Toastmaster; for-
mer host of the ZNS TV-13
financial talk show, You & Your
Money, and author of the book,
Ask Chester about Saving, Plan-

WORLD BUSINESS NEWS

Banks, investment firms
borrow less from Fed

m@ JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON

Commercial banks and
investment firms borrowed less
over the past week from the
Federal Reserve's emergency
lending program, a hopeful sign
that some credit stresses are
easing a bit.

The Fed reported Thursday
that commercial banks averaged
$59.7 billion in daily borrowing
over the week that ended
Wednesday. That was down
from $62.8 billion in average
daily borrowing logged over the
week ended March 25.

Investment firms drew $19.5
billion over the past week from
the Fed program. That was
down from an average of $20.1
billion the previous week.

The identities of financial
institutions that borrow from
the Fed program are not
released. They now pay just 0.50
percent in interest for the emer-
gency loans.

The Fed's net holdings of
"commercial paper" averaged
$244.3 billion over the week
ending Wednesday, an increase
of $3.5 billion from the previ-
ous week.

The first-of-its-kind program
started on Oct. 27, a time of
intensified credit problems
when the Fed began buying
commercial paper — the cru-
cial short-term debt that com-
panies use to pay everyday
expenses. The central bank has
said about $1.3 trillion worth of
commercial paper would quali-
fy.

The Fed also said its pur-
chases of mortgage-backed
securities guaranteed by Fan-
nie Mae, Freddie Mac and Gin-
nie Mae averaged $236.4 billion
over the past week, down $540
million from the previous week.
The goal of the program, which
started on Jan. 5, is to help the
crippled mortgage-finance and
housing markets. Mortgage
rates have dropped since the
Fed announced the creation of
the program late last year.

Rates on 30-year mortgages



ning and Investing for Retire-
ment.

Mr Cooper will be officially
inducted at the 2009 Hall of
Fame Induction Reception on
Thursday, April 30, 2009, at the
British Colonial Hilton. The
reception will begin at 6.30pm.

Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP Photo

JOB SEEKERS line up for assistance at an Economic Development Depart-
ment office in Sunnyvale, Calif., Friday, Feb. 27, 2009. The Federal
Reserve's new snapshot of business activity nationwide, released Wednes-
day, March 4, showed the economic picture darkening over the last two
months and revealed little hope for a quick turnaround.

tumbled to new lows this week.
Freddie Mac reported Thurs-
day that rates on 30-year mort-
gages averaged 4.78 percent this
week, down from 4.85 percent
last week and the lowest on
records dating to 1971.

Lending

Squeezed banks and invest-
ment firms are borrowing from
the Fed because they can't get
money elsewhere. Investors
have cut them off and shifted
their money into safer Treasury
securities. Financial institutions
are hoarding whatever cash
they have, rather than lending it
to each other or customers.

The lockup in lending has
contributed to the recession,
now the longest since World
War IT.

Investment houses in March
2008 were given similar emer-
gency-loan privileges as com-
mercial banks after a run on
Bear Stearns pushed what was
the nation’s fifth-largest invest-
ment bank to the brink of bank-
ruptcy and into a takeover by
JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Critics worry the Fed's
actions have put billions of tax-
payers’ dollars at risk.

The central bank's balance
sheet now stands at $2.048 tril-
lion, down slightly from last
week, partly reflecting less
emergency borrowing by banks
and investment firms.

The Fed's balance sheet,
however, has ballooned since
September when it was just
under $900 billion.

That growth reflects the Fed's
many unconventional efforts —
various programs to lend or buy
debt — to mend the financial
system and jolt the economy
out of recession.

The report also said that cred-
it provided to insurer Ameri-
can International Group Inc.
from the Fed averaged $44.7
billion for the week ending
Wednesday, up slightly from
$43.6 billion the previous week.
AIG — faced with increasing
financial stresses — received a
fresh aid package from the gov-
ernment last month. The com-
pany's decision to pay employ-
ees millions in bonuses had
ignited a public outrage.





Full Text


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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.110FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PLENTYOF SUNSHINE HIGH 89F LOW 74F B U S I N E S S SEEBUSINESSFRONT S P O R T S ‘Devastating impact’ from cruise islands SEEPAGEELEVEN Big hopes for Carifta squad n By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas was named on a list of "tax havens" that have committed to international tax standards but have yet to imple ment them by the Organisation for Economic and Co-Operationa nd Development yesterday in a move that will no doubt add more weight to the mounting concern regarding the future of the coun try's off-shore financial sector. The list divided into four parts names jurisdictions that have implemented the internationally agreed tax standard; tax havens that committed to the international tax standard but have yet to implement it; other financial centres that have committed to the international tax standard but have yet to implement it; and jurisdictions that have not committed to implement the internationally agreed tax standard. Speaking on the issue shortly after the list was published in the afternoon session of Parliament yesterday, Opposition spokesman on Foreign Affairs and Trade Fred Mitchell said the news was evidence of an impend ing "direct attack" on the country's offshore centre. To mitigate against shutdowns of the country's offshore centres and subsequent job losses, Mr Mitchell said the Bahamas' finan cial product must be retooled. "What is interesting is this pre diction, 'the era of bank secrecy is over', appears to confirm coming out of the OECD discussions and in the communiqu, that there is now going to be a direct attack if we did not know it already it is now confirmed that there is going to be a direct attack on the kind of way that we make our money with regard to these offshore sectors. And so we obviously have to be adjusting our product to ensure that the levels on employment and the standards of living which we've had is in fact protected," said Mr Mitchell. His statement referred to a section of the London Summit's official statement at the close of the G-20 summit which said the group has agreed "to take action against non-cooperative jurisdic tions, including tax havens. We stand ready to deploy sanctions to protect our public finances and financial systems. The era of banking secrecy is over. We note that the OECD has today published a list of countries assessed by the Global Forum against the international standard for exchange of tax information." The list was published by the OECD shortly after leaders of the developed and developing nations wrapped up the G-20 meetings in London yesterday. It is available on the OECD's website. Thirty countries, including Belize, the Turks and Caicos, Monaco and the Cayman Islands The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR M cFLURRY TWIX MIX www.tribune242.com C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , A P R I L 3 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 3 . 4 8 $ 3 . 4 9 $ 3 . 4 9 f o r a b e t t e r l i f eH E A L T H I N S U R A N C E S A L E S O F F I C E S : N A S S A U I F R E E P O R T I A B A C O I E L E U T H E R A I E X U M A I C O R P O R A T E C E N T R E : E A S T B A Y S T R E E T I w w w . f a m g u a r d b a h a m a s . c o m c a l l u s t o d a y a t 3 9 6 1 3 0 0 A S U B S I D I A R Y O F h e a l t h c a r e m e d i c a l f u n d r a i s e r s l o n g l i n e s a t c l i n i c s i n d e b t f o r l i f ec u s t o m i z e d h e a l t h p l a n w i t h 2 4 / 7 c u s t o m e r s e r v i c e C i t y M a r k e t s p l u n g e s i n t o $ 1 3 . 4 m l o s s H a r b o u r I s l a n d b l a s t e d o n h o t e l t r e s p a s s nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e w o r l d r e n o w n e d P i n k S a n d s r e s o r t a n d i t s p a r e n t c o m p a n y h a v e b e e n a w a r d e d m o r e t h a n $ 3 6 , 0 0 0 i n d a m a g e s d u e t o H a r b o u r I s l a n d D i s t r i c t C o u n c i l s i r r e s p o n s i b l e , i l l c o n s i d e r e d a n d t h o u g h t l e s s a c t i n t r e s p a s s i n g o n i t s p r o p e r t y t o c o n s t r u c t p u b l i c b a t h r o o m s . C r i t i c i s i n g t h e D i s t r i c t C o u n c i l f o r l a c k i n g c o m m o n s e n s e , S e n i o r J u s t i c e J o h n L y o n s s a i d i t s o f f i c e r s a n d w o r k m e n w e n t a h e a d w i t h t h e p l a n n e d c o n s t r u c t i o n w i t h o u t c o n d u c t i n g a p r i o r l a n d s u r v e y t o d e t e r m i n e w h e t h e r t h e s i t e s e l e c t e d w a s o w n e d b y a p r i v a t e l a n d h o l d e r . R e c a l l i n g h o w t h e d i s p u t e o r i g i n a t e d i n e a r l y 2 0 0 5 , w i t h t h e D i s t r i c t C o u n c i l s d e c i s i o n t o c o n s t r u c t p u b l i c b a t h r o o m f a c i l i t i e s o n P i n k S a n d s B e a c h , J u s t i c e L y o n s f o u n d : W i t h o u t c o n s i d e r i n g t h e n e e d f o r a s u r v e y , t h e c o u n c i l w e n t s t r a i g h t a h e a d a n d p r o c e e d e d t o p r e p a r e a s i t e f o r t h e b u i l d i n g o f t h e s e b a t h r o o m f a c i l i t i e s o n P i n k S a n d s B e a c h . T h e s i t e s e l e c t e d w a s a t t h e e n d o f a p u b l i c a c c e s s r o a d l e a d i n g t o t h e b e a c h , a n d w h i c h r a n b e t w e e n H a r b o u r I s l a n d s w e l l k n o w n P i n k S a n d s a n d C o r a l S a n d s r e s o r t p r o p e r t i e s .D i g g i n g O n F r i d a y , M a y 2 0 , 2 0 0 5 , M r v o n M e r v e l d t , o n e o f t h e m a n a g e r s o f t h e P i n k S a n d s H o t e l , n o t i c e d t h a t s e v e r a l m e n w h o w e r e n o t e m p l o y e e s o f h i s h o t e l w e r e c l e a r i n g , d i g g i n g a n d m e a s u r i n g p a r t s o f t h e s o u t h e r n a r e a o f t h e h o t e l p r o p e r t y , J u s t i c e L y o n s r e c a l l e d . O n a p p r o a c h i n g t h o s e p e r s o n s , a n d i n f o r m i n g t h e m t h a t t h e y w e r e t r e s p a s s i n g o n t h e p r o p e r t y o f P i n k S a n d s H o t e l , o n e o f t h e m e n , w h o i n t r o d u c e d h i m s e l f a s M r R o b e r t s ( t h e a c t i n g c h i e f c o u n c i l l o r ) , i n f o r m e d M r V o n M e r v e l d t i n c o l o u r f u l t e r m s t h a t t h e y w e r e t h e r e t o e r e c t b a t h r o o m f a c i l i t i e s . A g a i n , i n c o l o u r f u l t e r m s , M r V o n M e r v e l d t w a s i n f o r m e d b y t h e o f f i c e r s o f t h e H a r b o u r I s l a n d D i s t r i c t C o u n c i l a n d t h e i r w o r k m e n a s t o w h a t t h e y t h o u g h t o f h i s c o m p l a i n t a n d h i s a s s e r t i o n t h a t t h e y w e r e o n h o t e l p r o p e r t y , a n d w h a t h e c o u l d d o w i t h i t . M r V o n M e r v e l d t s e n s i b l y l e f t t h e a r e a a n d h i r e d C h e e a T o w S u r v e y o r s t o c o n d u c t a s u r v e y , s u b s e q u e n t l y p r o d u c e d o n J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 0 5 . T h i s s h o w e d c o n J u d g e a w a r d s P i n k S a n d s $ 3 6 , 0 0 0 o v e r i r r e s p o n s i b l e , i l l c o n s i d e r e d a n d t h o u g h t l e s s a c t S E E p a g e 5 BnB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e B a h a m a s l a s t n i g h t a p p e a r e d t o h a v e a v o i d e d t h e w o r s t e f f e c t s o f t h e G 2 0 s a n t i t a x h a v e n o n s l a u g h t a f t e r i t e s c a p e d t h e s o c a l l e d b l a c k l i s t , i n s t e a d b e i n g p l a c e d a m o n g t h e s e c o n d o f a t h r e e t i e r l i s t a l o n g w i t h m o s t o f i t s i n t e r n a t i o n a l f i n a n c i a l c e n t r e c o m p e t i t o r s . T h e B a h a m a s w a s i n c l u d e d a m o n g t h o s e j u r i s d i c t i o n s t h a t h a v e c o m m i t t e d t o t h e i n t e r n a t i o n a l l y a g r e e d t a x s t a n d a r d , b u t h a v e n o t y e t s u b s t a n t i a l l y i m p l e m e n t e d t h o s e c o m m i t m e n t s , t h e s o c a l l e d g r e y l i s t p r o d u c e d a t t h e G 2 0 s r e q u e s t b y i t s s e l e c t c l u b , t h e O r g a n i s a t i o n f o r E c o n o m i c C o O p e r a t i o n a n d D e v e l o p m e n t ( O E C D ) . T h e B a h a m a s f o u n d i t s e l f i n g o o d c o m p a n y , a s i n c l u d e d i n t h e s a m e t i e r w e r e t h e m a j o r i t y o f i t s i n t e r n a t i o n a l f i n a n c i a l c e n t r e c o m p e t i t o r s B e r m u d a , t h e B r i t i s h V i r g i n I s l a n d s , t h e C a y m a n I s l a n d s , L i e c h t e n s t e i n , M o n a c o , P a n a m a a n d S a n M a r i n o . 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B a h a m a s S u p e r m a r k e t s c h a i r m a n , B a s i l S a n d s , t o l d * 2 0 0 8 f i g u r e s w o r s e t h a n e x p e c t e d , a s g r o c e r y c h a i n s p a r e n t i n c u r s $ 3 . 5 2 7 m 2 0 0 9 h a l f y e a r l o s s a n d $ 2 m i l l i o n p l u s s o l v e n c y d e f i c i e n c y * M o r e t h a n $ 2 0 m t u r n a r o u n d i n y e a r a n d a h a l f f r o m s h a r e h o l d e r e q u i t y i n t o d e f i c i t * C a s h f l o w / l i q u i d i t y p r o b l e m s s t i l l p e r s i s t i n g S E E p a g e 4 B nB y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r c r o b a r d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t T H E B A H A M A S D e v e l o p m e n t B a n k ( B D B ) m i s s e d i t s p r o j e c t e d l o a n i s s u a n c e t a r g e t b y a l m o s t $ 5 m i l l i o n i n 2 0 0 8 , p r o c e s s i n g s o m e $ 3 . 4 m i l l i o n i n a d v a n c e s a c c o r d i n g t o i t s a c t i n g m a n a g i n g d i r e c t o r . H e a d d e d t h a t t h e 2 0 0 9 f i r s t q u a r t e r h a d a l s o s e e n a c o n t r a c t i o n i n a d v a n c e s , w h i l e l o a n a r r e a r s h a d g r o w n t o s o m e $ 2 7 m i l l i o n . A n t h o n y W o o d s i d e t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s y e s t e r d a y t h a t t h e B D B s t a r g e t f o r l e n d i n g t o D e v e l o p m e n t B a n k $ 5 m b e l o w l o a n g o a l * L e n d s j u s t $ 3 . 4 m i n 2 0 0 8 , c o m p a r e d t o $ 8 $ 9 m t a r g e t * B D B s e e k i n g r e c a p i t a l i s a t i o n f r o m I D B , N a t i o n a l I n s u r a n c e a n d C a r i b b e a n D e v e l o p m e n t B a n k * H a l f o f l o a n p o r t f o l i o , s o m e $ 2 7 m , i n a r r e a r s * F i n a n c e s s e v e n p r o j e c t s , w o r t h $ 6 2 2 , 7 6 4 , f o r y e a r t o d a t e S E E p a g e 6 B nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e i n c r e a s i n g d e v e l o p m e n t o f p r i v a t e i s l a n d d e s t i n a t i o n s b y t h e m a j o r c r u i s e l i n e i s h a v i n g a d e v a s t a t i n g i m p a c t o n B a h a m i a n s m a l l b u s i n e s s e s , t h e t o u r o p e r a t o r s a s s o c i a t i o n a r g u e d y e s t e r d a y , w i t h m a n y v e s s e l s e i t h e r b y p a s s i n g N a s s a u / F r e e p o r t a l t o g e t h e r o r u s i n g t h e m a s s e c o n d p o r t s o f c a l l a f t e r a l r e a d y m i n i n g t h e i r p a s s e n g e r s p o c k e t b o o k s . J e f f r e y B e c k l e s , e x e c u t i v e d i r e c t o r o f t h e B a h a m a s A s s o c i a t i o n o f S h o r e E x c u r s i o n i s t s ( B A S E ) , i n a p r e s e n t a t i o n t o t h e G r a n d B a h a m a T o u r s A s s o c i a t i o n , s a i d t h a t w h i l e t h e n u m b e r o f c r u i s e a r r i v a l s t o t h e l i n e s p r i v a t e i s l a n d s w e r e i n c r e a s i n g , t h e y w e r e d e c l i n i n g e l s e w h e r e . A n d t h e r e w a s a m a s s i v e d u p l i c a t i o n o f l o c a l t o u r s a t p r i v a t e i s l a n d s , a n d r e s t r i c t i o n s p l a c e d o n l o c a l v e n d o r s i n s e l l i n g t h e i r o w n t o u r s . T h i s h a d t h e n e t e f f e c t o f e n s u r i n g t h a t a l l t o u r s a n d e x c u r s i o n s p r o v i d e d o n t h e p r i v a t e i s l a n d s w e r e c o n t r o l l e d b y t h e c r u i s e l i n e s , a l o n g w i t h t h e p r i c e s , t o t h e e x c l u s i o n o f B a h a m i a n o w n e d t o u r o p e r a t o r s a n d t h e i r e m p l o y e e s . M r B e c k l e s p r e s e n t a t i o n w a r n e d t h a t t h e e c o n o m i c p i c s l i c e s e a r n e d b y B a h a m i a n o w n e d t o u r s a n d e x c u r s i o n p r o v i d e r s c o n t i n u e d t o d w i n d l e a s a r e s u l t , g i v e n t h a t c r u i s e l i n e s a n d t h e i r p a s s e n g e r s e i t h e r b y p a s s e d N a s s a u o r a r r i v e d h e r e a f t e r t h e l i n e s h a d e x h a u s t e d t h e i r s p e n d i n g p o w e r o n t h e p r i v a t e i s l a n d s .C o n c e r n sT h e M i n i s t r y o f T o u r i s m s 2 0 0 8 a r r i v a l s r e p o r t , w h i c h h a s b e e n o b t a i n e d b y T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s , a p p e a r s t o b e a r o u t M r B e c k l e s c o n c e r n s . F o r t h e y e a r , t h e o n l y d e s t i n a t i o n s t h a t s a w a n i n c r e a s e i n c r u i s e p a s s e n g e r a r r i v a l s w e r e t h e p r i v a t e i s l a n d s . C a s t a w a y C a y o n A b a c o s a w a 5 8 . 1 p e r c e n t r i s e i n a r r i v a l s t o 1 4 9 , 3 8 9 , c o m p a r e d t o 9 4 , 5 1 1 t h e y e a r b e f o r e . T h e B e r r y I s l a n d s , w h i c h b o a s t s R o y a l C a r i b b e a n s g e t a w a y , C o c o C a y , s a w a 9 . 8 7 p e r c e n t g r o w t h i n c r u i s e a r r i v a l s t o 4 0 1 , 7 1 8 c o m p a r e d t o 3 6 6 , 3 2 1 i n 2 0 0 7 , w h i l e a r r i v a l s t o H a l f M o o n C a y n e a r C a t I s l a n d g r e w b y 1 1 p e r c e n t t o 2 9 9 , 7 9 2 , c o m p a r e d t o 2 7 0 , 1 5 9 i n 2 0 0 7 . A l l t h o s e f i g u r e s w e r e f o r f i r s t p o r t o f e n t r y o n l y . I n c o n t r a s t , N a s s a u / P a r a d i s e I s l a n d s a w a 1 0 . 2 p e r c e n t d e c l i n e i n c r u i s e p a s s e n g e r s c a l l i n g a s a f i r s t p o r t o f e n t r y i n t h e B a h a m a s , t h e n u m b e r s f a l l i n g f r o m 1 , 6 3 8 , 1 7 4 i n 2 0 0 7 t o 1 , 4 7 1 , 8 3 5 i n 2 0 0 8 . F o c u s i n g o n j u s t D e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 , t h e M i n i s t r y o f T o u r i s m s r e p o r t n o t e d t h a t f o r t h e m o n t h , c r u i s e a r r i v a l s t o N a s s a u / P a r a d i s e I s l a n d w e r e d o w n b y 2 p e r c e n t , w h i l e a r r i v a l s a s a s e c o n d p o r t o f c a l l i n c r e a s e d b y 4 5 p e r c e n t . A n u m b e r o f c r u i s e s h i p s w e n t t o N a s s a u / P a r a d i s e I s l a n d a s a s e c o n d p o r t o f c a l l , h o w e v e r , r a t h e r t h a n a f i r s t p o r t o f c a l l , t h e M i n i s t r y o f T o u r i s m f o u n d . M r B e c k l e s s a i d t h a t , a s a r e s u l t , t h e r e w e r e i n c r e a s e d u n t a x e d r e v e n u e s t a k e n o u t o f D e v a s t a t i n g i m p a c t f r o m c r u i s e i s l a n d s S E E p a g e 6 B BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Concern as the Bahamas named on ‘tax havens’ list MP says nation’s financial product must be retooled SEE page eight THISGRAFFITI has put a resident of Skyline Drive in a dilemma. The man said he wants to clean up the scrawl, but he is concerned that removing it will only prompt the vandals to return. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f GRAFFITIWOESONSKYLINEDRIVE n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune StaffR eporter LESS than a year after being charged in the murder of his nephew, Kenton Dion Knowles, alias Emperor’, has been disc harged. In her ruling on a no case submission made byK nowles’ defence attorn eys at a preliminary inquiry last month, Mag istrate Linda Virgill said y esterday that based on the evidence adduced by the prosecution, a prima f acie c ase had not been made out against Knowles and that he should be discharged. K nowles, 42, of Fox Hill, who was represented by attorneys Murrio Ducille and Roger Minnis, was vis ibly relieved after hearing the ruling. M agistrate Virgill reminded Knowles that although she had dis charged him on the murd er charge, the charge could be brought against him again. Knowles was Magistrate rules that ‘Emperor’ be discharged SEE page eight THE cap on how much of a worker’s salary can be taxed by the National Insurance Board “should be increased”, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said yesterday. “The ceiling should be increased again, it should be increased and adjusted perhaps once every three years to keep pace with wages and to also ensure that benefits people receive are consistent with the requirement to live,” said Hubert Ingraham. Mr Ingraham was addressing the House of Assembly as he introduced several resolutions to facilitate the introduction of an Unemployment Benefit Scheme under the National Insurance Board. He did not state when such an adjustment should, or will, occur, however he did announce that parliament will “soon...be asked to approve a number of changes to the national insurance scheme, 35 years after its commencement.” The Prime Minister’s sugges tion that government may tax more of some workers’ incomes PM:NIBtax cap on salaries ‘should be increased’ SEE page eight n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE injection of millions of dollars in Unemployment Benefits into the hands of Bahamians will not only assist the needy but act as a stimulus to the ailing economy boosting consumer demand and keeping people working, the Prime Minister said yesterday. This observation was made in the House of Assembly as he moved three resolutions to facilitate the introduction of UnemploySEE page eight Unemployment Benefits ‘will act as stimulus’ n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net TO ENSUREthat New Providence is capable of accommodating the new “Genesis class” megacruise ships, government signed a $44.2 million contract with Boskalis International for the dredging and improvement of Nassau’s harbour yesterday. This project, set to be completed by the end of November, will be finished just in time for the arrival of the first megacruise ship, the Oasis of the Seas, which is scheduled to dock in Nassau this December. This $44.2 million contract also comes with a $6 million contingency fee, and will see nearly 1.9 million cubic yards of rock and sand dredged out of Nassau’s harbour. This dredged material will then be used to extend $44.2m contract signed to dredge Nassau Harbour SEE page eight Hubert Ingraham

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n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net NOTING that concerns will be raised by local environmentalists when Nassau harbour is dredged to accommodate larger cruise ships, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said yesterday that government has taken a number of significant measures to ensure there will be minimal impact to beaches and tidal flow in the area. Adding that there has been no indication of potential adverse effects on the Western Esplanade beach from the planned dredging, Mr Ingraham said the Ministry of Public Works and Transport will “monitor the area” throughout the project. However, he did note that an Environmental Impact Assessment has recommended that fish and conch usually kept in the harbour should be stored at alternate sites during the work. “Turbidity levels will be within the standards of the Florida Environmental Protection Agency. However, the BEST Commission has under review a proposed system of ‘active dewatering’ for disposal of discharge water that has the potential to produce reduced levels of visible turbidity at the discharge location, a system that was used recently by the contractor in oth er project locations. “Noise pollution has been deemed negligible and should not create any discomfort for individuals who work nearby. The contractors were advised of the various requirements of the project, and were also informed of the need for unimpeded movement of ship traffic (commercial and pleasure craft) within the harbour,” he said. Mr Ingraham added that additional studies have also been conducted by RTM STAR Centre – including simulations of ship movements – to verify dredge area limits with regard to the safe entry and berthing of mega cruise ships in all weather conditions. “This exercise was undertaken in conjunction with cruise line operators, the Port Department, Nassau Harbour Pilots and the engineering staff of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport,” Mr Ingraham said. He added that mooring analysis provided by cruise line operators “will guide the placement of the mooring dolphins and the necessary bollards for the proper berthing of the mega cruise ships. “Meetings have also been conducted with a diverse group of stakeholders including those on whose activities the project will have some impact. The meetings were designed to explain the scope of works to be undertaken, to receive input, and identify spe cific issues related to individuals who will be affected by the project,” he said. These stakeholders include: the Bahamas Hotel Association, the Potter’s Cay Vendors Association, the Arawak Cay Ven dors Association, the Ministry of Tourism, the Immigration Department, Customs, the Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources, the Ministry of Environment, the BEST Commission, the Port Department, the Ministry of Health and cruise line operators. “It is anticipated that the dredging activities will be com pleted by November, 30, 2009 to accommodate the arrival in the Bahamas of one the first of Royal Caribbean International’s mega cruise ships, Oasis of the Seas, on its maiden voyage in December, 2009. “I take this opportunity to congratulate the management team of Boskalis on the award of the contract. I should also like to thank Cox & SHAL consultants along with the staff members of the various government agencies for the part they have played in the advancement of this project to the present time,” Mr Ingraham said. n By TANEKA T HOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ t ribunemedia.net IF GOVERNMENT had engaged in better long-term p lanning, there would not b e vacancies on the Court of Appeal bench, president of the Bahamas Bar Council Wayne Munroe said. Last October Justice Milt on Ganpatsingh retired from the Court of Appeal and Justice EmmanuelO sadebay is set to retire this y ear. Court of Appeal Pres ident Dame Joan Sawyer, Justice Osadebay, Justice Hartman Longley and Justice Christopher Blackman are the only judges currently on the bench of the Appellate Court. W hile the Court of Appeal continues to sit, Mr Munroe said the speed atw hich it hears cases and m akes judgments is affected by the empty spot. Government should have planned better and had a replacement ready in time, he said. “You know from the Constitution when a judge will reach the age of retirement, so you know when you need to fill that vacancy,” Mr Munroe told The Tribune yesterday. He also expressed surprise that government has not consulted the Bar Coun cil regarding the empty seat. Meanwhile, there is still no definite word on when new appointments to the bench will assume their posts. J ustices When asked during a brief interview yesterday when the new justices would be instated, Attorney Gen eral Michael Barnett said: “We’re working on it.” Earlier this year, Mr Barnett said the spots would soon be filled. He did not give a specific date, or say from which part of the region they will be recruited. However, he explained that government has made no secret of its intention to have a full complement of judges, regardless of nationality. According to Article 102 of the Constitution, a justice of appeal is permitted to hold office until the age of 68. The Constitution also allows the governor general, after consulting with the prime minister, to allow a justice to sit until the age of 70. The Constitution also says a judge may continue to serve beyond the age of 68, as may be necessary to enable him to deliver judg ment or fulfil any other duty in relation to proceedings that were commenced in his court before he attained that age. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News..........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,12 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports...............................................P9,10,11 BUSINESS SECTION Business.................................P1,2,3,4,5,6,10 Advt ............................................................P7 Comics........................................................P8 Weather.......................................................P9 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P AGES n B y ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net GOVERNMENTtook the first concrete steps to fill a regulatory void that pharmaceutical industry insiders have claimed leaves memb ers of the public at risk. R esponding to cries from some w ithin the industry itself that it is “wide open” to abuse by unscrupulous individuals, Minister of Health Hubert Minnis brought a bill proposing new regulations to govern the pharmaceutical industry before the House of Assembly yesterday. Called A Bill for an Act to Provide for the Regulation a nd Control of the Practice of Pharmacy and for the Registration and Licensing of Persons Qualified to Practice Pharmacy and for the Establishment of the BahamasP harmacy Council and Other Matters Connected Therewith, the legislation will be known as the Pharmacy Act, if passed. Dr Minnis said it will ensure that pharmacies “follow c ertain protocol.” He added that it should cut down in the presence of counterfeit drugs in the local market and require pharma-c ies to meet Bahamian and international standards. Last year a pharmaceutical industry insider warned that t he pharmacy business in the this country suffers from a lack of laws holding suppliers accountable for thed rugs they sell or requiring them to reveal their s ource. The concerned citizen, speaking in April 2008, said it was high time that the government ensure there is more oversight of Bahamian drug wholesalers and pharmacies to ensure the public is not exposed to substandard drugs and other associated risks. Bruce Lowe, senior pharmacist at Lowe’s Pharmacy told T he Tribune h e has been personally pushing for such legisl ation since 1975. Specific risks for the public arise out of the fact that, at p resent, suppliers are not required to have liability insura nce to be used should someone suffer an adverse reaction f rom taking a drug they supplied. The lack of a national drug registry facilitates the importation of counterfeit drugs, which may not have the effect that the person taking the medication expects them to. Meanwhile, there is also no oversight of the conditions in which suppliers store drugs – for example in a cool orh ot environment – despite the fact that this can significantl y impact the efficacy of drugs. Bar president: better govt planning would have prevented Court of Appeal vacancies PM: steps taken to ensure minimal impact from harbour dredging Ingraham notes environmentalists’ concerns over move to accommodate larger cruise ships Hubert Ingraham Bill proposes new regulations for pharmaceutical industry Hubert Minnis

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EDITOR, The Tribune. T he Rt Hon Hubert A Ingraham, Prime Minister of The Bahamas, was once heard years ago explaining that he had no need of a security detail becauseh e had done nothing wrong to anyone to warrant being protected. And, concerning this particul ar issue, he must be serious. His personal mantra “I say what I mean and I mean what I say” rings true with regards to his own security because I have had occa-s ion to watch him travel along the streets of Nassau (in a chauffeured car), and also, because I live close to the area, I have hado ccasion to drive past and even w alk past his house – no security. It troubles me, as a concerned c itizen of The Bahamas that the nation’s Chief Executive can just wander about the streets of the c ountry like any other ordinary c itizen. I t does not seem right, and (I’m gonna say it), it just does not look r ight for the Prime Minister of the country to not have a security d etail while driving on our streets, walking on our streets, or constantly stationed at his house (24 h ours). I have the same mindset as the P rime Minister – I feel that I have done nothing wrong to anyone to w arrant 24-hour protection by the police. But, at the same time, I am cognizant of the criminal element that we, in The Bahamas, have to contend with on a daily basis. And me, just as a regular citiz en, I wouldn’t mind a police escort everywhere I go, for my own protection as I drive and walk the streets of Nassau. And also, I wouldn’t mind 24-hour police protection at my house to ensure my safety. As a matter of fact, I wouldn’t mind that type of comprehensivep olice protection for my entire family, given the 2009 criminal realities, which is why I cannot understand Mr Ingraham’s stance refusing protection. He is the Prime Minister; I am only “Joe Blow”. And if I am w illing to accept that type of pro tection for me and my family, d on’t you think that the man who is running the whole country should accept some type of protection? I mean, come on, let’s be reasonable. Mr Ingraham is a politician, I am not. But even I, not being a politician, would know that the natureo f politics in The Bahamas dictate that approximately half of the country does not like your brand of politics if you are a PLP, and approximately half of the country does not like your brand of politics if you are an FNM. Sometimes this dislike for your brand of politics translates into a personal hatred for you. In Amer ica, and some other countries, this hatred for a particular brand of politics precipitates a conspiracy a nd even execution of a plan to assassinate political figures, most notably those figures at the top of the pyramid – in our case, the P rime Minister. A nd so, bearing this in mind, all of us concerned citizens of The Bahamas should attempt to convince Mr Ingraham to accept 24h our, comprehensive police protection for himself. As I am sure Mr Ingraham can appreciate, he is not an ordinary Bahamian. A nd his untimely demise would catapult this country and even this region into a tailspin of uncertainty, the likes of which wew ould not opt to experience. Very few Bahamians would miss Joe Blow”. But we would all certainly miss the Prime Minister. A nd even Mr Ingraham would concede that security is a neces sary inconvenience for those who have a dislike for it. Consider when dignitaries from other coun-t ries visit The Bahamas the government always providest hem with adequate (sometimes overwhelming) security during t heir entire length of stay in our country. W ho’s to say that they would like all of that protection? But the government of The Bahamas deems it necessary, doesn’t it? E xcuse me for saying so, but, I happen to believe that all of these d ignitaries are not as important as The Prime Minister of The B ahamas. Mr Ingraham is my Prime Min ister! And if I was in a position to do so, I would do everything within my power to ensure his safety – w ithin and outside this jurisdiction. A nd so, I make an appeal (as I hope all Bahamians would) to our Prime Minister The Right Honourable Hubert A Ingraham to relax your personal policy of r efusing protection for the betterment, forward development, and stability of The Bahamas, and give The Minister of National S ecurity license to do his job. MARVIN G LIGHTBOURN Nassau, M arch 22, 2009. (We agree. Mr Ingraham is of the same mindset as the late Sir Roland Symonette, who we w ould often see as we drove to work at 7.30 in the morning walking from his office back to his home after having already completed a full day’s work. ( When “RT” or “Pop” Symone tte, as he was affectionately known, was confirmed as the first P remier of the Bahamas, Police Commissioner Nigel Morris senta police officer as the first securit y guard to be stationed at his h ome. ( When Sir Roland saw the officer he sent him back to the Comm issioner with the message that he needed no one to guard him, r ather he believed the officer could be put to better use guard-i ng the people. (However, times were differe nt then. There was crime, but not at the level that we experience it today. We know that MrI ngraham is a man of his word, but it is a wise man, who can a djust his position when the situation changes. ( After all one might vow to spend the day out of doors in the s unshine, but as soon as it starts to rain the wise person seeks shelter inside. Times have changed from Sir Roland’s day and it is important that Mr Ingraham, for the s ake of the country and its people, adjusts to that change. ( It should be mandatory that this country provides security for i ts chief citizen and his family. Ed). C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm THE DAY after the article, “The tragic sto r y of the young pilot who knew too much,” appeared in The Tribune, a jitney pulled upa cross the street from The Tribune’s Shirley Street entrance. A senior Tribune staff member w as standing at the front of the building. “Hey, you!” the driver shouted across the street, “is that man Marquel who wrote Insight in there?” Because the driver had mispronounced the name of Managing Editor JohnM arquis, the staff member feigned ignorance. “If he’s in there, I’ll come and burn down T he Tribune with him in there!” he shouted angrily. His threat has been reported to the police. The jitney driver was angered by an article, written by Mr Marquis, as a result of an interv iew given to him by Mr Chauncey Tynes, Sr., on the death of his son, Chauncey, Jr. The agingM r Tynes believes that his son, who got mixed up with drug smugglers at the height of the t rade in the eighties, was killed because he knew too much. Mr Tynes, whose son used to fly for Sir Lynden, is convinced that his son knew too much about Sir Lynden’s relationship with drug lord, Carlos “Joe” Lehder, who had planted h is Colombian flag on Norman’s Cay in the Exumas from where he smuggled drugs into t he US. For all these years, Mr Tynes has believed that his son’s knowledge made him e xpendable. Apparently Mr Tynes, Sr., did not want to go to his grave with this knowledge. That was Mr Tynes’s story. He wanted it told and he selected the expert pen of Mr Marquis to do the telling. The “Insight” article was p ublished on March 9. It created quite a stir in the town. A fter publication of the article a section of the PLP organised a rally against The Tribune promised by a PLP MP to be the largest rally ever seen in the Caribbean to which about 40 persons showed up, lost interest and ended the day partying on the Eastern Parade. How ever, throughout the following weeks threats of “we’re going to burn The Tribune down” kept surfacing. It came out in the open lastw eek when a concerned citizen telephoned The Tribune to report the intemperate words of another PLP MP, who has aspirations to lead ership of his party. T his man was speaking in a public parking lot at a meeting held by a crimewatch committee in t he Shirley Street-Twynam Avenue area. Not only did the MP “rant and rave” about having to get this “Englishman out of this country”, but off mike and within earshot of all to hear, he said: “We must burn The Tribune d own!” We now flash back to May 1967 and the C rooked Island by-election in which the late Basil Kelly was defending his House of Assemb ly seat. The AP reported that “Premier Lynden Pindling’s young native-dominated government may soon face its first popularity test at the polls since the historic upset which swept him into office four months ago.” I n office just four months, this was a crucial by-election for the PLP. Premier Pindling was d etermined to win. The PLP pulled out all the stops. Every dirty trick in its arsenal of dirty tricks was used. Of course, as usual, The Tribune was in the thick of the battle, and whispers of “we g otta burn that Tribune down” was drifting back to us. T ribune publisher Sir Etienne Dupuch and ourselves decided to spend the Easter week e nd at Exuma. We were there Easter Sunday morning when we got the news that The Tribune was on fire. This was just a week before Mr Kelly won his Crooked Island seat by 47 votes, defeating an angry new government. E arly on Easter Sunday morning one or more persons set fire to The Tribune’s stock r oom. The Tribune is a fireproof Butler build ing. A lthough it caused thousands of dollars damage to the building and machinery and com pletely destroyed our newsprint and materials, it was contained to the stockroom area. By the time we had returned to Nassau, Tribune exec u tives, volunteers, electricians, builders and office cleaners were busily repairing the damage. A ll day Sunday neighbours, well wishers and friends turned up with mops and brooms to get T he Tribune back into production. A Senator with a broom in hand was side by side with one of our paper boys sweeping water out of the building. The Guardian sent in supplies. The Tribune didn’t miss a roll of the press. It was back in publication Tuesday morning Easter Mondayw as a public holiday when newspapers would not have been published. The police confirmed arson. Although we had our suspicions, the political climate eveni n the police force was such that it would have been difficult to go after the perpetrators. H owever, times have changed. We are now busy collecting names to be handed to the police. This time history will not repeat itself. Our PM should be provided with security LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Threats to Tribune reported to police EDITOR, The Tribune. THIS past week the White House announced that President Obama will have an entourage of 1,000 officials attending the OAS Summit in Trinidad or at least four-five jets filled with civil ser vants and hangers-on. Just can’t calculate how much C02 this will pollute the atmosphere? So it is good and permissible for the socialist government of the US to waste public moneys on meetings but deny it to hard working employees and put the hard working hotel employees of the Bahamas in jeopardy? Oh this Obama Administration reminds me so much of George Orwell’s Animal Farm for those who have not read Animal Farm go get a copy and then predict precisely what the Government of the new Socialist Republic of the United States of America will do. Robin Hood Economics will predictably bankrupt the whole world, Mr President. PETER WILLIAMS Nassau, March 7, 2009. Robin Hood economics will bankrupt the world, Mr Obama

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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net IMMIGRATION officials have hit out at single mother for criticising the fact they have not yet repaired damage caused by officers who invaded her home. Four weeks after armed immigration officers raided her Nassau Village home, Violet Hanna, 41, told The Tribune that although the Immigration Department is investigating the circumstances of the early morning raid, nothing has yet been done to fix the back door or rear gate which were bashed with a maul. The Bahamian mother-of-two and her 7-year-old daughter, who were at home at the time, said they were terrified by the aggressive invasion, have suffered post-traumatic stress and now feel unsafe in their home. She said restoring the securi ty of her home is her number one priority but she cannot afford to fix the door herself. In response to Wednesday’s article entitled, “Woman claims Immigration Department has yet to repair damage to home”, the department lists a number of things addressed in the investigation, but makes no reference to when the damage will be repaired. The statement reads: “The department takes grave exception to the statements issued by Ms Violet Hanna, as they are deceptive and misleading. “The article seeks to give its readers the impression that Immigration did nothing and adopted an uncaring attitude regarding the matter, when in fact this is simply not the case. “The department would rather not have the issue drawn out in the public domain, but scathing attacks without merit will not go unchallenged.” Immigration Minister Branville McCartney and director Jack Thompson maintain they contacted Ms Hanna after reading how around six armed officers demanded entry into Ms Hanna’s Price Street home at around 4am on February 24, brushed aside her offer to show them her passport, and left as her daughter was crying and vomiting in fear. Mr McCartney said: “If in fact officers conducted themselves in an unprofessional manner they will be disciplined.” And he promised a full investigation into the matter. A four member panel met with Ms Hanna and her attorney on March 6 and visited her home to inspect the damage on March9. Apprehension Immigration officers who participated in the apprehension exercise were interviewed, and the department wrote to Ms Hanna asking her to put an official complaint in writing after she promised to do so, the department maintains. Investigations are ongoing and the panel plans to interview its final list of people this week. The statement further reads: “The Bahamas Immigration Department remains committed to its mandate to protect the borders of the Bahamas. “The minister and directorate wish to reiterate the depart ment’s pledge to ensure the highest level of professionalism and respect continue to be the hallmark of the department. “The leadership of the Immigration Department will not tol erate misconduct of its officers during its apprehension exercises, and will do all in its power to preserve the Bahamas for generations yet unborn.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 5 n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net LETTERS from human rights activists around the world calling for an independent investigation of theC armichael Road Detention Centre continue to pour into The Tribune office following reports of detainees being mistreated. Residents of France, Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, New Zealand and the United States are among dozens from around the world who say they are outraged by claims of physical abuse, filthy living conditions and inadequate meals at the centre. However, the Immigration Department has not yet responded to requests for an independent investigation, nor has it accommodated The Tribune’s request to tour the facility. Department director Jack Thompson led psychologist David Allen, Archdeacon James Palacious, Royal Bahamas Defence Force senior lieutenant Frederick Brown and Social Services director Mellany Zonicle on a tour of the facility on March 6, and the leading professionals submitted reports of their impressions and recommendations for department heads and the Cabinet to review. Although Minister of Immigration Branville McCartney said on March 18 the reports would be submitted to T he Tribune i n full at the newspaper’s request, they have yet to be provided. Calls to Mr McCartney were not returned before The Tribune went to press yesterday. And as requests remain unanswered, the global campaign for an independent investigation is building. Around 20 letters from activists addressed to Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette, Mr McCartney, and Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest were received this week, adding to the mounting pile of letters sent to the Bahamas since reports of the ill-treatment of detainees were first published in February. The writers are demanding an independent investigation of the detention centre and appropriate medical attention for detainees. Independent In a letter to Mr Symonette, which echoes several others, Odile Maisse from Belgium wrote: “I request an immediate, thorough and independent investigation into these allegations, ensuring that anyone found responsible is brought to justice. “I trust you will allow an independent monitoring of the facility by civil society including human rights organisations. “Besides I urge you that no asylum-seeker be returned without access to a fair and effective refugee determination procedure, including the right to appeal to an independent tribunal and access to effective legal assistance, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and interpreters. The detention of irregular migrants and asylumseekers should only be used as a measure of last resort. “Please ensure that alternatives to detention are available and accessible, in law and in practice, without discrimination.” THE retrial of three men charged in the February 2006 murder of businessman Kei-t h Carey has been adjourned for the third time this week. The trial was adjourned yesterday, until Monday at 10am, after it was revealed that attorney Perry Alburyw ho is representing murder accused Dwight Knowles would not be able to attend. M r Albury, who was involved in a car accident on W ednesday, has been given medical leave, lead prosecutor Cheryl Grant-Bethel toldt he court. Attorney Craig Butler, who is representing murder accused Jamal Glinton, toldJ ustice Jon Isaacs that he did not oppose the adjournment b ut asked if the court could extend its hours beyond 4.30pm so that the trial couldb e over with soon. Extending Justice Isaacs said that he h ad no problem extending the hours. The retrial began on Febr uary 15 before Justice Isaacs. Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight Knowlesa re charged with murder as well as armed robbery and conspiracy to commit armedr obbery. Keith Carey, 43, was shot a nd killed on the steps of the Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique Williams-DarlingH ighway before he was able to deposit $40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Station, which he operated. Ms Grant-Bethel, S tephanie Pintard, Anthony Delaney and Lennox Coleby are prosecuting the case. Attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis are rep-r esenting Jamal Glinton, attorney Dorsey McPhee is representing Sean Brown,a nd attorney Perry Albury is representing Dwight Knowles. T he prosecution has called a total of 41 witnesses during the trial. Keith Carey murder retrial adjourned for third time this week US, Mexico work together to fight drug cartels In brief Global pressure mounting for Detention Centre probe Letters from around world continue to flood The Tribune after mistreatment reports Brent Symonette Tommy Turnquest Mother rapped for criticism over Immigration raid damage “I r e quest an immediate, thor ough and independent i nvestigation into these a llegations, ensuring that anyone found r esponsible is brought to justice.” LETTER FROM ODILE MAISSE (BELGIUM Branville McCartney n By EILEEN SULLIVAN CUERNAVACA, Mexico U.S. and Mexican officials say they will soon name a group to develop strategies for stopping the cross-border flow of weapons and drugs, according to the Associated Press . Emerging from a confer ence Thursday with U.S. officials, Mexican Attorney General Eduardo MedinaMora said more meetings are needed to develop plans to bring warring drug cartels under control along the border. Medina-Mora also announced plans to begin checking 10 percent of the vehicles entering his country from the U.S. for illegal weapons. U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder met privately with Medina-Mora, Interior Minister Fernando GomezMont and Public Safety Secretary Genaro Garcia Luna. I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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However during this great recession, which has impact ed the employment of thousands of Bahamians, the economic impact of illegal immi gration and the consequential social damage is more extreme and serious. This brings me to the title of this column. However well intentioned the US and the UN were when they intervened in Haiti they have failed to achieve their objectives. Yes, there have been elec tions however the social struc tures and security necessary for the development and sustaining of a decent quality of life has not been established. The financial and human resources necessary to do the job have not been provided by those who assumed the responsibility for Haiti's future. The result of these events is the gunrunning and drug trade originating in Haiti that seri ously harms The Bahamas and Jamaica. The increased illegal migra tion to The Bahamas is one more problem the country doesn't need. So if the interveners do not finish the job they started in Haiti the law of unintended consequences will continue to do us harm. THE Nature Conservancy is working to expand of the Andros West Side NationalP ark so that wildlife and crucial nursery habitats can be prot ected from future threats. TNC is undertaking this effort in partnership with the Bahamas National Trust (BNT and Trust (ANCAT Hope for South Andros and the Kerzner Marine Foundation. Andros is the largest island in the Bahamas and contains some of the most pristine marine and terrestrial habitats in the country, including vastt idal flats with flourishing bonefish and tarpon populations, the third longest reef in the world, and the most blue holes of any location in the western hemisphere. A long the west side, there are a number of estuaries, tidal c reeks, and wetlands that supp ort a high diversity of life and provide important nursery and f oraging areas for commercially valuable species. As part of our effort to prom ote the project and encourage community members to become involved in conservation, the project team launched a tee-shirt design contest in Sep t ember 2008 throughout the schools in Andros,” explained t he TNC in a statement. “The submitted design had to highlight a conservation message that relates to the west side of Andros.” T he competitors were from schools in Mangrove Cay, N orth, Central and South A ndros. The competition was divided into two categories: (1 primary school students and (2 j unior and secondary school students. The TNC announced that the winners were: Jamal Neely from S taniard Creek Primary, who presented “Bonefish, Let’s Observe to Preserve” and J achette Johnson from South Andros High School, who pre sented “Save Our Natural R esources From Extinction.” The project team is pleased to have had so many young Androsians artistically expresst he value of preserving our natural resources in order to pro tect the Bahamian way of life,” t he TNC said. “This is indeed the attitude towards and appreciation for our natural resources that we aim to increase through-o ut the Bahamas. It is impor tant for us to understand how the health of our natural resources plays a significant role in sustaining our quality of life both ecologically and economically.” W HEN a UN sponsored government was elected in Haiti there wasa glimmer of hope for the f uture of this most troubled nation. As we approach the fifth anniversary of the last foreign intervention it is useful for us to evaluate the situation. In The Bahamas and Jamaica the situation in Haiti has a direct impact on many aspects of our societies. In Jamaica gunrunning and drug trafficking originating in Haiti have increased the levels of crime and corruption. This has consequentially damaged the economy thus creating more hardship for the people. In these times of worldwide economic hard times the result can be calamitous. In The Bahamas the current situation in Haiti increases the flood of illegal immigrants and I am sure that of drugs and guns as well. The Bahamas has for years had to deal with the problems which result from illegal immigration. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Expanding the west side of Andros National Park LEFT: Felicity Burrows, The Nature Conservancy’s project manager, presenting Jachette Johnson with her prize while Rivean Riley from The Bahamas National Trust displays the win-n ing tee-shirt design. BELOW: Left to right – S haron Henfield (Nature’s Hope for South Andros), Javonya S ands (third place winn er), Rivean Riley ( BNT), Felicity Burrows (TNCs on (winner A ndrae Nairn (principal of South Andros High S chool). Finishing the job VIEW FROM AF AR B Y J OHN I SSA n MEXICO CITY AN HEIRto one of Mexico’s most notorious narcotics empires was grabbed by police as he exercised in a city park, officials announced Thursday, shortly before U.S. and Mexican Cabinet officials met to coordinate attacks on escalating drug violence, according to Associated Press. Carrillo Leyva allegedly inherited a top position in the Juarez cartel from his father Amado Carrillo Fuentes, who was nicknamed “the Lord of the Skies” for sending jetliners full of cocaine to the United States. The father was considered Mexico’s No. 1 drug trafficker when he died in 1997 during plastic surgery to change his appearance. The U.S. Embassy said Thursday that the embattled remnant of his cartel is still “one of Mexico’s most ruthless organized criminal gangs, which controls one of the primary transportation routes for illegal drug shipments into the United States.” Prosecutors say Carrillo Leyva, 32, was second only to his uncle Vicente Carrillo Fuentes in the gang, whose battles with upstart cartels have fed a bloodbath that saw 1,600 people killed in its home base of Ciudad Juarez last year. Mexico reports arrest of major drug suspect

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n By DIANE PHILLIPS R OBB HANRAHANconfessed – the seasoned videogr apher was on assignment to shoot tanned and toned stunners for a swimsuit spread w hen he realised there was something different about this gig. He couldn’t take his eyeso ff . . . the scenery. “It was breathtaking,” he said. “When you are shooting video and you’ve got the mod e ls who are as pretty as the m odels we took down to Rum Cay and you’re having a hard time focusing on the modelsb ecause the scenery is so breathtaking, it says a lot,” said Mr Harnahan. A senior editor at Southern B oating m agazine, Mr Hanra han was among a contingent of models, photographers, make-up artists and produc e rs who flew to Rum Cay in the southeastern Bahamas for the magazine’s much-anticip ated annual swimsuit issue. T hough this was the first video shoot, Mr Hanrahan’s photographed here before, but has never been as taken with a set as he was with Rum Cay. “You don’t see this kind of scenery in the Bahamas. Pretty beaches, good light, palms, y es. Most of the time you just follow the light. But this was d ifferent. It was so dramatic, primitive yet breathtaking. It had some of the most remote, beautiful locations I have ever seen and every part was diff erent. White cliffs on one side of the island, caves on another, then you’d cross over andt here were salt flats. Every where you went it was amazing, dramatic and wherever you were, you felt like you leftt he real world behind.” Under management of Montana Holdings Ltd, the Sumner Point Marina, villasa nd Out of the Blue restau rant played host to the entourage with locals. S ky Limo provided airline s ervice and the Ministry of Tourism partnered in the shoot because of the excellent exposure for the Bahamas. T he group toured the island and moved from backdrop to backdrop by SUV, golf cart, truck, buggy – whatever was needed to get from flats to cliffs to caves and back again. Getting around was even d ifferent and the hospitality w as unbelievable. Everybody made you feel like you were part of a family,” said Mr Hanrahan, who had one more confession – being distracted,f or once, by the scenery, didn’t b other his wife one bit. “It was not your average beach shot,” he said. The Southern Boating swimsuit issue hit the stands on April 1. The editors were so taken with Rum Cay they’ve planned a feature on the island, which will appear in May. THE Gaming Reform Committee has again written to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham asking him to move ahead immediately with the legislative reforms necessary for the legalisation of gambling. The group said the weekend a rrest of several persons in G rand Bahama in connection w ith illegal gaming allegations was just another example of “antiquated laws and government ineptness” at work. G RC chairman Sidney Strac han pointed out that nearly e very modern democracy allows its citizens to gamblew ithin a regulated framework. Governments around the world have learned through bitter experience that the inclination to game is universally strong. If persons are unable to pursue gaming interests through legal, regulated means t hey will do so illegally,” he s aid. The end result is lost reve nue and with it problematic l imitations in social, educat ional and developmental programming and initiatives. This is exactly what is happening in the Bahamas. It’s nothing short of scandalous and a blatant example of government ineptness and backward thinking,” he said. The GRC is calling for the government to move forward with legislative reform and the e stablishment of a national r egulated gaming programme. F urther, the committee is recommending that modern responsible gaming methods and technologies be adopted t o afford Bahamians all pract ical means of minimising pers onal risk and impulsive play. According to the committ ee, $15 to $20 million in gami ng revenue is being lost every year because of government’s refusal to change the law. Important social, educational and economic initiatives are underfunded as a conse quence, at the expense of Bahamians, Mr Strachan said, adding that important new employment opportunities are also slipping away – at a time when they are very much needed. “Sure, gaming has its disadvantages. “But holding firm to disc riminatory, antiquated laws i s just plain stupid. It’s a display of ineptness that cries out for comment,” Mr Strachan said. The GRC is asking that Bahamians contact their government representatives, the prime minister, the gaming authorities and others in positions of public responsibility t o demand that the gambling l aws be changed. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 7 Gaming Reform Committee writes to PM over gambling legalisation I I f f p p e e r r s s o o n n s s a a r r e e u u n n a a b b l l e e t t o o p p u u r r s s u u e e g g a a m m i i n n g g i i n n t t e e r r e e s s t t s s t t h h r r o o u u g g h h l l e e g g a a l l , , r r e e g g u u l l a a t t e e d d m m e e a a n n s s t t h h e e y y w w i i l l l l d d o o s s o o i i l l l l e e g g a a l l l l y y . . G RC chairman S idney Strachan Ministry of Tourism partners with Southern Boating in Rum Cay swimsuit shoot THE SOUTHERN BOATING s wimsuit issue (above stands on April 1. n MIAMI A SECONDman has pleaded guilty in Miami federal court to charges of scheming to illegally export military aircraft parts to Iran, according to A ssociated Press. Traian Bujduveanu (Tray- ’ANN Booj-doo-’VAY-nu) pleaded guilty Thursday to a single conspiracy count. He acted as his own lawyer and faces up to five years in federal prison when sentenced June 11. Iranian-born Hassan Keshari p reviously pleaded guilty. Prosecutors said both men were illegally helping Iran obtain parts for such aircraft as the F-14 Tomcat fighter, C-130 cargo plane and AH-1 attack helicopter. The parts were shipped from South Florida to Dubai and on to Iran. K eshari also faces up to five years in prison. Second man pleads guilty in Iran aircraft parts scheme In brief

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ment Benefits under the National Insurance scheme. At the same time, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham made clearer the purpose of the scheme set to come into effect on April 20th a s well as who will be eligible, how much they can get, when they can get it and how and when they can apply for it. “Unemployment insurance p rogrammes provide tempor ary financial assistance to e ligible workers who become unemployed, as unable to find suitable employment and who are capable, available, and willing to work. “And while unemployment schemes are designed primarily to benefit individu als who lose their jobs and l ose regular income, they a lso help boost the economy in times of recession.” “Unemployment payments by NIB to persons who most probably lack the financial ability to do so will most likely result in the prompt purchase of consumer goods or in discharging other essent ial obligations such as rents, e lectricity or mortgage paym ents,” he added. Mr Ingraham explained that the conditions that unemployed persons will have to satisfy to qualify for the second phase of thes cheme that which will be f unded by contributions from e mployers and employees w ill be more stringent than those “quite generous” con-d itions governing disbursem ent of funds under the first phase, to be funded by the transferral of $20 million from the Medical Benefit Branch. However, under both phases of the scheme, eligib ility for funds depends on t he applicant being a person w ho was previously e mployed and registered w ith the NIB by their e mployer. The scheme is not intended to “compensate for previ ous periods of unemployment,” said Mr Ingraham, emphasising that eligible people must be unemployed c urrently. Once they satisfy necessary conditions, claimants c an receive half of their avera ge insurable wage. So the wages on which your contributions were made prior to your becom-i ng unemployed will determine the sum you will receive,” said Mr Ingraham. W ith the current ceiling on i nsurable wages at $400 per week the maximum amount anyone can receive is $200 per week. T o maintain their eligibili ty throughout the stipulated 13 week period throughw hich they can possibly claim benefits, unemployed people must be able to show that they are continuing tos eek a job. A pplicants will have to register with the Department of Labour’s EmploymentE xchange which will issue to them an Unemployment Card. They will then be required to report to the Department of Labour every four weeks to check on the availability of jobs. M r Ingraham explained t hat claimants will not be a ble to refuse suitable employment offered to them or refuse to apply for a suitable vacancy brought to their attention and still receive benefits. A nd they will also lose a ccess to the funds if they t urn down any training prog ramme offered by the Department of Labourw hich could qualify them for a job. Outlining other restrictions on the disbursement of unemployment benefits, Mr Ingraham noted that they will be reduced for people who are receiving severance p ay from their previous e mployer as they will be u nable to receive benefits for t he period that they are bene fitting from those funds. M eanwhile, people fired from their job for theft, dishonesty or “fraudulent offences” may only be able to receive benefits for half of the prescribed benefit period six weeks. T he same applies for those who quit their jobs, who may also experience some delay i n collecting their benefits, a dded Mr Ingraham. A ny decision to withhold benefits can be appealed and heard by the NIB AppealT ribunal except for in the instance that Unemployment Benefit is withheld becausea n applicant is receiving two o r more other benefits, such as maternity or industrial injury benefits, under the National Insurance. S urvivors benefit that paid to relatives of deceased individuals and disabilityb enefit do not fall into this category. Once people have received the Unemployment Benefitf or 13 weeks they will be i neligible to access such funds again for another 52 weeks so as to diminisha buse of the system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are listed in the section in which the Bahamas is also included. The OECD said the Cayman Islands has enacted legislation currently being reviewed by the OECD that allows the jurisdiction to exchange information unilaterally and has identified 11 countries with which it is prepared to do so. The list says the Bahamas committed to the OECD's standards in 2002 and has one tax information exchange agreement (with the Unit ed States). Last week government released a statement to the OECD and the European Union outlining that it was ready to negotiate additional tax information exchange agreements on an individual basis. "The Bahamas reaffirms its commitment recorded in a March, 2002, agreement between The Bahamas and the OECD. "The Bahamas recognises significant advances in commitments to broader application of OECD standards in transparency. The Bahamas is ready to negotiate and conclude appropriate arrangements to accom modate these OECD standards," said the statement. Former attorney general Alfred Sears recently lashed out at gov ernment for not having a national plan to buffer the country against the onslaught of "baseless attacks" against the financial sector. To meet the OECD's standards, Mr Sears said government must quickly enter into 10 additional tax information exchange treaties with other OECD countries, based on mutual interests such as double taxation and investment treaties. The push for a crackdown on off-shore tax havens has gained sig nificant traction recently, with world leaders such as British Prime Minister Gordon Brown lobbying for an end to such centres. The calls come during a time when world governments, desperate for ways to increase faltering revenues, see off-shore centres as a means for rich citizens of developed nations to evade taxes in their homelands. the western end of Arawak C ay by some 1,000 feet. Along with this extension and the dredging, Boskalis International will also construct three mooring dol p hins at Prince George Wharf. Speaking briefly at yesterd ay’s signing ceremony at the British Colonial Hilton, Prime Minister Ingrahama lso revealed that some of the dredged material from this project will be used to extend the northern coast ofN ew Providence from East Street to Armstrong Street some to 30 feet into the w ater.” “This will create an addi tional one mile of waterfront p romenade to the Woodes R odgers Wharf. This scenic pedestrian promenade will include a boardwalk, land-s caping, service road and utility corridor as a component of the Nassau downtown redevelopment project. The promenade is expected to facilitate both the downtown retail sector andp romote the reintroduction a nd restoration of desirable residential communities in our capital city,” Mr Ingraham said. This complementary work of extending Woodes Rodgers Wharf is expected to cost government an additional $24 million. Also repairs are expected to be made to the Prince George Wharf piers and connecting bridges, with new bollards to be installed to accommodate the larger new Genesis class cruise ships complete with a new security screening buildi ng and support facilities at the wharf. Yesterday’s contract signi ng comes on the heels of the c ompletion of the financing f or the first phase of the redevelopment of the termi n al at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. Financing for stage one of t his terminal redevelopment project, totalled over $265 million, and was transferredt o Nassau Airport Development’s (NAD Monday, March 30, permit ting contracts to be awarded t o start construction. “We were pleased that three banks operating in and f rom the Bahamas arranged this funding facility. I wish to acknowledge the good work of the Royal Bank of C anada, the depository bank for the collateral, First Caribbean International andC IBC Trust as onshore col lateral and local placement agents, and Citibank, project adviser, lead arranger and o ffshore collateral agent. “Stage one of the redevelopment, which comprises then ew 247,000 square foot US departure terminal; one million square feet of paveda pron surface on the air side of the facility; and, a new parking access roadway and landscape on the land side of the terminal, is budgeted at $198 million. Completion is scheduled for March 2011. “The entire project, including stage two (international arrivals) and stage three (international and domestic departures and domestic arrivals) is scheduled to be completed by November 2013 with a total construc tion cost for all three stages of $409.5 million,” he said. accused of the August 2007 murder of his nephew, Kenvardo Knowles, 26. Kenvardo Knowles was reportedly shot in his abdomen during an argument in the Fox Hill area on August 19 of that year. The father-of-six was pronounced dead on arrival at Princess Margaret Hospital, becoming the 51st murder victim for 2007. Knowles who was on the police’s Most Wanted List for near ly a year was reportedly arrested on July 3, 2008, at his girl friend’s residence in Coral Harbour. She was charged with harbouring a criminal. Knowles was arraigned on the murder charge on July 7. After informing Knowles that he was discharged, Magistrate Virgill reminded him that he had been accused of the murder of his nephew. “Let your conscience be your guide,” she cau tioned. comes shortly after he revealed that employers and employees will soon have to pay an entirely new contribution to the National Insurance Board to fund unemployment benefits at a cont ribution rate of 50 cents from each for every $100 of insurable w age. P resently Government funds the National Insurance scheme by requiring workers and employers to jointly contribute 8.8 per cent of an employee’s insurable wage to the NIB. The taxable wage “ceiling” is $400 a week, meaning that no matter how much a person makes, the maximum amount of theirs alary that will be taxed is $400. T he insurable wage ceiling has been increased on only two occasions since the introduction of the National Insurance scheme, once in the 1980s and again in 1999. While suggesting that the ceiling should be raised again, the Prime Minister said the contribution rate of 8.8 per cent, although it was set in 1973, it is “still good today.” I’ve seen reports to the effect that ‘Oh well, National Insurance is going to go broke, it’s not going to be able to pay pensions after a certain period of time,’ etc. “I would wish to provide some information to enlighten those who are unenlightened about the scheme,” said Mr Ingraham. “When the rate of 8.8 per cent was established back in 1973, it was e xpected the rate would be good for a maximum of 25 years. This is the 35th year. Ten years beyond and yet the 8.8 per cent is still good. It’s still valid, it’s still adequate to pay pensions,” said MrI ngraham. One might argue that indeed the rate of 8.8 per cent was too high back in the 70s, but you can also argue that the benefits have not been sufficiently substantial to cause the equilibrium of the fund t o be realised.” The Prime Minister added, however, that the 8.8 per cent rate will not be able to remain for an “indefinite period.” At some point in time the rate will be adjusted as it should be. I n many countries the rate is adjusted with great frequency,” he noted. The National Insurance Board will soon begin making announcements regarding the times and places at which persons may register to receive benefits. D uring the first “interim” phase of the scheme which will c ontinue until the $20 million allocated for the purpose runs out eligible applicants must meet the following criteria: Must have paid contributions to the National Insurance B oard for at least 40 weeks or nine months. These contributions c ould have been made just before unemployment began or m any years before. They must also meet one of the following three conditions: Have made at least 13 weeks (three months and one week of contributions in the six months prior to becoming unemployed. Or must have made 26 weekly payments in the last 52 w eeks Or must have made 26 payments in the last contribution year (July to June T he Government intends for people who may have been unemployed for up to four years since lay offs at the Royal Oasis to be able to qualify during this first phase. D uring the second phase, which will be funded equally by c ontributions from employees and employers and will kick in when the initial $20 million is exhausted by January 2010 only people who have been employed for at least half of the previous nine months and a half of the previous three months will qualify to receive the benefit. In other words they must have: Paid a year’s worth of contributions (52 weeks Have paid or been credited with 13 contributions in the 26 weeks immediately before unemployment commenced. And must have paid seven contributions in the 13 weeks i mmediately before unemployment commenced. Cheques will be issued every two weeks. The first set of cheques will be paid during the week of May 4, for the period A pril 20 to May 2. Entitled individuals will be advised by the NIB as to where a nd when to collect cheques. Concer n as the Bahamas named on ‘tax havens’ list FROM page one Magistrate rules that ‘Emperor’ be discharged FROM page one PM:NIBtax cap on salaries ‘should be increased’ FROM page one $44.2m contract signed to dredge Nassau Harbour FROM page one UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFIT SCHEME ELIGIBILITY AND APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS FROM page one Unemployment Benefits ‘will act as a stimulus’

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 9 C HAMPION FRENCH GOLFER HOSTS JUNIOR CLINIC PICTURED with the junior golfers are (back row L-R Archer, President, Bahamas Golf Federation; Chris Lewis, manager, Cable Beach Golf Club; Anthony Howorth, golf trainer; Walter Robinson, President, Bahamas Golf Federation Central Junior Division. JUNIOR golfers at the Cable Beach Golf Club participated in a training clinic this weekend pasthosted by French Golf Champion, Audrey Riguelle. Audrey, an ambassador for Baha Mar Resorts in the European market, recently visited the Bahamas and in partnership with the Bahamas Golf Federation, hosted a Junior Golf Clinic. THE AVID junior golfers were eager to learn from the French pro and spent hours observing and practising. Special focus was placed on improving their full swing, putting and chipping skills. Audrey explained, "The junior golfers are very enthusiastic and fast learners. I am pleased to have had the opportunity to work with them." AUDREY has suc cessfully participated in several European tourna ments including the Ladies British Open, European Ladies Champi onship and Open of France ProAm. Most recently, she placed fifth in the 2008 Ladies French Cup. A golfer since the age of ten, Audrey was the French Ladies Champion at age 16. Audrey Riguelle is also member of the French National Ladies team.

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OVER the last two weekends, three-time World Sunfish champion Donnie Mart-i nborough produced two impressive performances as he prepares for the 39th Sunfish World Championships in Montagu Bay in October. A fter winning the International Masters Championships in Davis Islands, Tampa, Florida over the weekend of March 13-16,M artinborough came back to win the Sunfish Midwinter National & Team Racing Championships from March 19-22. A bove, Martinborough is shown in action. Martinborough getting in gear SUNFISH Championships LEGACYBaseball League kicked off its 2009 Baseball Season at the beginning of March,b ut held its Opening Cere monies on Saturday (March 21st 2009). Its President Steve Burrows talked about the tremendous growth in the girls softball program which has expanded to the East and West GrandB ahama. He also spoke about t heir growth in baseball, which was evident in capturing two division in the BBF Andre Rodgers National Baseball Championships in June 2008. Legacy won the Coach Pitch Division and the High School 16-18 Division over the three major powerhouses in baseball, Freedom Farm, JBLN & Grand Bahama. Present at the Opening Ceremonies was August "Auggie" Campbell (Full Football Scholarship to Duke University this Fall). Mr. Burrows told the kids at the end of his speech, you have a role model in August. He sat right where you are many years ago. Through hard work and dedication you can be in the same position. Mr. Burrows promised the many parents and supporters of Legacy that they will be bringing back home Three Divisions from the upcoming 2009 National Baseball Championship. Also in attendance from the BBF was President Craig Kemp, Secretary General Theodore Sweeting and 4th Vice President (Grand Bahama "Chumpy" Pratt. Mr. Kempt hanked the Legacy Executives for their ongoing development of Baseball in Grand Bahama and encouraged them to continue to build on their success. President Kemp presented Legacy with there 2008 Cham-p ionship Diamond B anners(Coach Division High School 16-18 Division. The President Craig Kemp, Theodore Sweeting – Secretary General, Manager Patrick Knowles Sr. (Team Bahamas 15-16), Coach Alonzo Pratt (Team Bahamas Mens National Team) and Coach Opi Taylor (Team Bahamas 16-18 ducted try-outs for the young men in Grand Bahama on Sunday, March 22nd from 2pm to 5pm to afford them a fair opportunity to be selected to one of the National Teams traveling this summer. Many of the young men had a great showing and the Teams will definitely have a National makeup. The Bahamas Baseball Federation is extremely proud and excited to advise that 95% of the 16-18 Team & The Senior Mens Team presently attend High School or College in the USA. The Executive Committee and the Coaching Staff feel very confident these 2 Teams will do very well this summer. In the 15-16 Zone Tournament, the Bahamas is coming off a 3rd Place Finish from 2008. High expectation is also expect e d from this team as all the members have had international exposure from previous tournaments. NATIONAL TEAMS TRAVELLING T HIS SUMMER: TEAM BAHAMAS 16-18 XII Latin American Regional Big League Tournament 2009 June 19th thru 28th 2009 Maracaibo, Venezuela Countries Participating: Aruba, Bahamas, Colombia, Curacao, Guatemala, Panama, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, USVI and Venezuela TEAM BAHAMAS 15-16 PONY Caribbean Zone Champi onship July 6th thru 12th 2009 Guarbo, Puerto Rico Countries Participating: Bahamas, Dominican Republic, Panama, USVI, Puerto Rico TEAM BAHAMAS Men's National Team World Baseball Challenge July 16th thru 26th 2009 Prince George, Canada Countries: Team Bahamas, Team Canada, Team Croatia, Chinese Taipei, Germany Team USA, Professional Teams: Reno Astros & Host Prince George Axemen Legacy Baseball season underway REAR Commodore Tim Roberts of Clearwater Yacht Club presents Donnie Martinborough with his Top Master award at the Clearwater Midwinter Regatta from March 19-22. MARTINBOROUGH (#55 B e v D o l e z a l / P h o t o s medal in the 200m, while Bodie looks to improve on her silver medal performance in the 100m Hurdles. The freshman at Auburn University and sopho more at Southwest Mississippi Community College will return to lead a team seeking to repeat the feat of 2008’s record breaking 400m relay team which also included Sheniqua Ferguson and Cache Armbrister. Three time gold medallist in the field, Ray mond Higgs returns to defend his high jump crown, looking to claim his third gold medal in the event. Higgs burst onto the scene in 2007 when he medaled in all three jumping events, gold in the triple jump, high jump, and a bronze in the long jump. He returned to repeat his high jump feat in 2008. Rashan Brown was an eighth place finisher in the under-17 girls 400m in 2007, but returned in 2008 to claim a bronze medal in the event. Now with her third trip to the meet, Brown looks to once again improve on her performance. Androsian, Tamara Myers, one of only two ath letes on the team not from the capital or the nation’s second city, will chase a top finish after last year’s silver medal in the under-17 girls high jump. Williams and Rollle return to defend bronze medal finishes in the shot put and 800m respec tively. Fraser and Wallace-Whitfield medaled in 2007 and after a series of mishaps in 2008, look to return to the medal podium. Wallace-Whitfield won a gold medal in the under-17 boys 800m while Fraser took silver in the 100m of the same division. The Bahamas has finished fourth in consecutive Carita track and field championships with a medal count of 19 in 2007 and 23 in 2008. Big hopes for Carifta Track & Field squad F ROM page 11 V’ALONEE Robinson progresses through jumping drills during practice. Robinson medaled in four events at the 2008 Championships.

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n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net WITH an eclectic cross-section of athletes, led by several veteran medal winners, the 2009 Carifta Track and Field squad is expected to be one of the most successful squads in recent memory. This year’s team will field 11 individual medal w inners from the 2008 games in St. Kitts and the 2 007 Games in the Turks and Caicos Islands includ i ng, Nivea Smith, Nejmi Burnside, V’Alonee Robinson, Raymond Higgs, Rashan Brown, Raquel Williams, Tamara Myers, Hughnique Rolle, Krystal Bodie, Warren Fraser and Kenneth WallaceWhitfield. Burnside was one of the top performers at last year’s meet, when he set a new Carifta record in the Under-17 boys 400m hurdles. His time of 52.81s easily surpassed the previous mark of 52.97s set by Ricardo Melbourne of Jamaica in 1998. Burnside, a two time individual Carifta medallist, finished second in the same event in 2007. “I have been blessed so far with what I have been able to achieve so far with the Carifta record, the silver medal and the bronze in the relay” he said. “I am looking to at least equal those perfor mances or do even better heading into this year’s games.” With his third selection to the Carifta squad, Burnside said he hopes to use his past successes asa means to mentor the younger members of the team. “With my experience I can let them know that it is not all fun and games, there is a time to get serious” he said. “When we get to that point when it is time to perform you just have to know.” Robinson, the versatile sprinter and jumper looks to build on her four-medal performance of 2008. Robinson had her handprint all over the under17 girls division with a gold medal performance in the long jump, and bronze medals in the 100m,100m Hurdles and as a member of the 400m relay team. The St. Augustine’s College speedster advances to the under-20 girls division this year. Grand Bahamian sensation Nivea Smith will look to claim her third consecutive Carifta bronze C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE Local sports news BASKETBALL NPBA POSTSEASON WHILE the defending champions Commonwealth Giants booked their trip to the New Providence Basketball Associ ation’s best-of-seven championship series, they will have to wait a little longer to find out who their opponents will be.On Wednesday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, the Giants completed a threegame sweep over the Police Crimestoppers with a 77-72 win to return to the champi-onship series. Last year’s runners-up Electro Telecom Cybots were unable to pull off the sweep of the Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders in game three of their series on Wednesday as well. The Ruff Ryders held on for a 94-93 win over the Cybots to trail 2-1 in the series that will continue with game four tonight at Kendal Isaacs. If necessary, the fifth and decid ing game will be played on Saturday night. BASEBALL JBLN SCHEDULE Here’s a look at the Junior Baseball League of Nassau’s action on tap this weekend at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams. TEE BALL 11 am Raptors vs Blue Claws 1 pm Grasshoppers vs Sand Gnats3 pm Sidewinders vs Knights COACH PITCH 10 am Angels vs Diamondbacks 12:30 pm Blue Jays vs Astros3 pm Cubs vs Athletics MINOR LEAGUE 10 am Rays vs Royals 12:30 pm Mets vs Rockies MAJOR LEAGUE 12:30 pm Reds vs Indians 3 pm Mariners vs Marlins JUNIOR LEAGUE 10 am Dodgers vs Yankees 12:30 pm Twins vs Cardinals SENIOR LEAGUE S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 3 pm Tigers vs Pirates S S u u n n d d a a y y 1 pm Tigers vs Pirates 3:30 pm Rangers vs Phillies SPORTS NOTES F emale champion golfer hosts junior clinic THE Micholette Strokers are on the verge of dethroning the Williams Construction Jets in the Masters Softball League’s best-of-seven championship series. Micholette, runners-up in the regular season at 10-2, took the first two games of the series over the weekend at the Archdeacon William Thomp son Softball Park at the Southern Recreation Grounds. In game one on Saturday, the Strokers won 12-10 and they came back on Sunday to pull off a 20-17 decision in game two. Game three is set for Satur day at 11 am. If necessary, game four will be played on Sunday at 1 pm. Williams Construction won the pennant with a 12-1 record. Here’s a look at the first two games played in the series: S TROKERS 12, JETS 10: Culbert ‘Buster’ Evans went 3-for-5 with a double, a run batted in and two runs scored to lead Micholette to the opener of the series. Lester Dean helped out with a 3-for-5 day with a double, two RBI and a run scored and Adlai ‘Mossah’ Moss was 2-for-5 with two RBI and three runs scored. Hector Rolle got the win on the mound for the Strikers and Danny Stubbs suffered the loss for the Jets. Mike Major had a perfect 3for-3 day with three runs and Jeff Cooper was 3-for-3 with one home run, three RBI and two runs scored. STROKERS 20, JETS 17 : : Culbert Evans had another big game, going 4-for-5 with a double and two homers with four RBI, scoring three times to pace Micholette to a 2-0 series lead. Johnny Burrows helped out this time going 4-for-5 with two RBI, scoring three times and Everette ‘Abe’ Johnson was 3for-4 with four runs scored. Hector Rolle also picked up his second straight win on the mound for Micholette, this time over Bertie Murray Sr, who pitched for Williams Construction. Anthony ‘Hot-dog’ Pierce went 3-for-4 with a RBI, scoring twice and Lee Rahming was 2for-3 with a homer, two RBI and four runs scored in a losing effort for the Jets. Strokers take first two in best-of-se ven series NEJMI BURNSIDE, three time medallist and Carifta record holder in the U-17 boys’ 400m Hurdles, goes through stretching routines. MEMBERS of the 2009 Carifta Track and Field team pose just before practice yesterday at the Thomas A. Robinson Stadium. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 10 B B i i g g h h o o p p e e s s f f o o r r C C a a r r i i f f t t a a T T r r a a c c k k & & F F i i e e l l d d s s q q u u a a d d

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE A DMINISTRATORS, teachers, pare nts and students all gathered in the auditorium at CW Sawyer Primary School to officially open the school’s science fair and exhibition under the theme “Science is Alive”. T he day began with an electrifying o pening ceremony, featuring student performances highlighting science-related themes, such as science careers, famous science inventors, seed germination, conservation rap and a weather talk show on natural disasters. The choir serenaded the audience with t he song: “A Science Experience” and the entire school sang the science chant, “Science Is Alive!” composed by the music teacher Shaketra Knowles. T he featured speaker was Marcia Musg rove, National Teacher of the Year and a former student of the school. She enthralled the audience with an inform ative power point presentation on the i mportance of the senses. The moment students were waiting for finally arrived. Prizes were awarded for the first, second and third place winners from each grade that participated in the essay, poetry, art, and scientific pro-j ect competition. Teachers said that the n umber of entries submitted shows how e nthusiastic students are about science. F ollowing the opening ceremony, spec ial guests Barbara Dorsette, primary science officer in the Ministry of Educat ion and Harriet Pratt, former superint endent of North Western District of Schools, led a tour of the exhibition. On display were students’ projects, creative folder projects, and models of endangered animals and habitats. Such topics as: “How Plants are Useful”, Animal Habitats”, and “Endangered A nimals” were researched by the stud ents. S tudents in grades four through six p resented stand up three-dimensional projects, using the empirical method, on t opics such as ecosystems, plants, rocks a nd minerals, natural disasters, storms, pollution and light. The highlight of the day were the booths set up by representatives of several science related fields. There was ab uzz in the air when students began to v iew the displays. Represented were: the Adventure Learning Centre; the Atlantis Touch Tank; the Bahamas National Trust; Dolphin Encounters; the Emergency Medical Services; the Fire Branch of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, and VectorC ontrol. Dentist Dr Emmanuel Francis shared with grade two students the importance of taking care of their teeth. The Adven-t ure Learning Centre presented an i nspiring and informative puppet show entitled “The Wonders of God’s Creation.” ‘Science is alive’ at CW Sawyer Primary School Fair and exhibition is officially opened n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Grand Bahama Island has been selecte d to host a major international r eligious conference for women of the Methodist Church in the Caribbean and the Americas (MCCA Dorothy Goldsmith, event spokesperson in Freeport, announced that the event is expected to attract some 400500 women from 25 Caribbean countries to Freeport for the 30th anniversary of the MCCA Women’s Fifth Quinquennial Assembly, in 2010. The assembly will be held July 21 through 26, 2010. It is the first time that it has ever been held in the Bahamas since its inception almost 30 years ago. Mrs Goldsmith said the Bahamas was able to beat out Belize as the host country. “When the opportunity came for us to bid for the hosting in 2008 we were so excited. I went to Panama with the proposal and we competed with Belize, and I think God has really had a plan because we have been extended the opportunity to host this historical event. It is not being held in the c apital, it is in Grand Bahama and this is something we need to boost our economy,” shes aid. Mrs Goldsmith said Method ism is present worldwide. She said the last conference was h eld in Barbados and some 500 women attended. Opportunity “We will have spiritual content, fellowship, bonding, workshops, and we will have this opportunity for people to worship and expose them to what we have here in the Bahamas,” she said. Mrs Goldsmith said the Grand Bahama Circuit is comprised of three Methodist churches. She noted that mem bers from throughout the Bahamas, and the Turks and Caicos Islands are expected to also attend the conference in Freeport. She said that religious tourism is growing in the Bahamas, which offers persons not only spiritual revival, but also a vacation destination. Carmeta Miller, senior manager Religious Tourism, Groups and Special Events Department a t the Ministry of Tourism, said t he event is very significant for Grand Bahama. “We at the MOT have seen t he need to look into the business of religious tourism, which is now an $18-billion industry. Those persons who will be trave lling here for religious purpos es to attend the conference are making a significant contribution to the Freeport economy,” said Ms Miller. In 1980, the MCCA women’s organisation was formed in Bar bados under the leadership of Dr Barbara Bailey, a Universi ty Lecturer from Jamaica. Dr Bailey was the first president and Mrs Marie Murray of the Bahamas/Turks and Caicos Island, was the first vice president. The organisation allows a relationship with the World Federation of Methodist and Uniting Church Women and links with all the Methodist women’s organisation in more than 25 Caribbean countries in the eight Districts of the Bahamas/Turks and Caicos; Islands, Belize/Honduras, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Leeward Islands, Panama/ Costa Rica, and the South Caribbean. IT WASan afternoon filled with excitement and suspense as gamers d escended on Town Centre Mall to p articipate in the Ultimate Gamers Challenge 3. M any competitors took to the s tage, cheered on by the spectators, a nd showed off their skills at Madden09 for the Playstation 2. After hours of competition and trash talking it was none other thanl ast year’s winner, Richard Davis, who defended his title for the second year in a row, playing with hist eam of choice, the Pittsburg Steel ers. He received $500 in cash and prizes. Second place went to Lawrence Smith who received a $200-gift cert ificate from Sports Locker along w ith a DVD Dragon Ball Z set from Super Video. T hird place went to Rod Darville w ho received a boom box courtesy o f Cost Rite. Organisers said that the day could not have been a success without the help of Electrojack, as they provid-e d 26” and 37” flat screen televi sion sets, Playstation 2 consoles, Madden 09 games and all acces s ories. The competition organisers also thanked the Town Centre Mall for hosting the event. (L-R winner Rod Darville; competition winner Richard Davis; second place winner. Gamers take to the stage for Madden challenge Grand Bahama to host international religious conference for women n DOHA, Qatar WASHINGTON expressed no interest Thursday in an offer by Venezuelan Pres ident Hugo Chavez to take in any of the 240 remaining Guantanamo detainees after they are released from the U.S. military prison, according to Associated Press. Chavez said he would have “no problem” accepting any of the remaining detainees in Venezuela. In an interview with Arabic-language Al-Jazeera news network during his trip this week to this Persian Gulf country, Chavez also urged President Barack Obama to free the remaining detainees and return thesurroundingU.S.Navybaseto Cuba. But the State Department said in a statement that “the United States has not received a formal offer through diplomatic channels to resettle detainees to Venezuela and is not contemplating resettling detainees to Venezuela.” Chavez has frequently criticized the U.S. military prison, but the socialist leader also has praised Oba ma’s pledge to close it within a year. As for the detainees, Chavez said “we would have no problem in receiving a human being.” Chavez’s remarks to the Qatar-based Al-Jazeera were later released by Venezuela’s Information Ministry. As part of Obama’s closure order, U.S. officials are deciding which of the remain ing detainees should be shipped away to foreign countries and which should be tried, either in civilian U.S. courts or in some other setting. Prisoners transferred to third countries, mainly in Europe, would be those determined to pose no threat but who cannot be sent back to their homelands because of the risk of persecution. Sev eral European nations, including Portu gal and Lithuania, have said they will consider tak ing such detainees. Venezuela’s relations with the U.S. deteriorated in recent years as the leftist Chavez crusaded against what he calls the U.S. “empire.” In September, Chavez expelled the U.S. ambassador to Venezuela and recalled his envoy to Washington. And while he has expressed a desire for improved relations under Obama, he also called the new American president “ignorant” last month. Washington shows no interest in Chavez Gitmo offer Hugo Chavez n LONDON CONCLUDINGhis first international summit, President Barack Obama hailed agreements at the emergency meeting of world powers Thursday as a “turning point in our pursuit of global economic recovery.” But he cautioned, “There are no guarantees”, according to Associated Press. The new U.S. leader said the heads of industrial countries that met in London agreed on “unprecedented steps to restore growth and prevent a crisis like this from happening again.” He spoke shortly after G-20 leaders pledged an additional $1.1 trillion in financing to the International Monetary Fund and other global institutions and declared a crackdown on tax havens and hedge funds. The leaders announced the creation of a supervisory body to flag problems in the global financial system but did not satisfy calls from the U.S. and others for new stimulus measures. Despite that failure, Obama called the one-day London gathering “very productive” and historic because of the scope of the challenges the world faces in righting the economic crisis that’s wreaking havoc on virtually every country. “The challenge is clear. The global economy is contracting,” Obama said. In a one-hour news conference packed with media from across the world, Obama said, “We’re starting to see some restoration of America’s standing in the world.” He had been asked about diminished esteem under his predecessor, George W. Bush. “I do not buy into the notion that America can’t lead in the world,” Obama said, but he added that it is “very important for us to be able to forge partnerships as opposed to dictating solutions.” He acknowledged that some summit participants made com ments that seemed to blame America and Wall Street for triggering the crisis that has spread around the world. Obama hails summit ‘turning point’ but warns of no guarantees

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.48 $3.49 $3.49 for a better lifeHEALTH INSURANCE SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com call us today at 396-1300 A SUBSIDIARY OF A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating healthcare medical fund raisers long lines at clinics in debt for lifecustomized health plan with 24/7 customer service City Markets plunges into $13.4m loss Harbour Island blasted on hotel trespass n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The world-renowned Pink S ands resort and its parent company have been awarded moret han $36,000 in damages due to Harbour Island District Coun c il’s “irresponsible, ill-consid ered and thoughtless act” in trespassing on its property to construct public bathrooms. Criticising the District Counc il for “lacking common sense”, Senior Justice John Lyons saidi ts officers and workmen went ahead with the planned con s truction without conducting a prior land survey to determine whether the site selected was owned by a private landholder. Recalling how the dispute originated in early 2005, with the District Council’s decision t o construct public bathroom facilities on Pink Sands Beach, J ustice Lyons found: “Without considering the need for a survey, the council went straight ahead and proceeded to prepare a site for the building of these bathroom facilities on Pink Sands Beach.” T he site selected was at the end of a public access road leadi ng to the beach, and which ran between Harbour Island’s wellknown Pink Sands and Coral Sands resort properties. Digg ing On Friday, May 20, 2005, Mr von Merveldt, one of the man agers of the Pink Sands Hotel, noticed that several men who were not employees of his hotelw ere clearing, digging and measuring parts of the southern area of the hotel property,” Justice Lyons recalled. “On approaching those persons, and informing them that they were trespassing on the property of Pink Sands Hotel, one of the men, who introduced himself as Mr Roberts (the acting chief councillor), informed Mr Von Merveldt in ‘colourful terms’ that they were there to erect bathroom facilities. “Again, in colourful terms, Mr Von Merveldt was informed by the officers of the Harbour Island District Council and their workmen as to what they thought of his complaint and his assertion that they were on hotel property, and what he could do with it.” Mr Von Merveldt “sensibly left the area” and hired Chee-aTow Surveyors to conduct a survey, subsequently produced on July 25, 2005. This showed “con Judge awards Pink Sands $36,000 over ‘irresponsible, illconsider ed and thoughtless act’ SEE page 5B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas last night appeared to have avoided the worst effects of the G-20’s ‘antitax haven’ onslaught after it escaped the so-called ‘blacklist’, instead being placed among the second of a three-tier list along with most of its international financial centre competitors. The Bahamas was included among those jurisdictions that “have committed to the internationally agreed tax standard, but have not yet substantially imple mented” those commitments, the so-called ‘grey list’ produced at the G-20’s request by its select club, the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Devel opment (OECD The Bahamas found itself in good company, as included in the same tier were the majority of its international financial centre competitors Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Panama and San Mari no. Also included in the same tier, but in a different category, were the likes of Austria, Luxembourg, Switzerland and Singapore, all major rivals to the Bahamas in the competition for international financial services. Bahamas avoids G-20 ‘blacklist * Nation avoids worst effects of ‘tax haven’ onslaught, at least for moment, as OECD places it with main rivals on list of those who have committed to tax transparency , but have yet to act * But China keeps Hong Kong out of reach, while US states such as Delaware also seem untouchable * Industry executives say avoiding sanctions was key , as would have caused pressure on clients and foreign-owned institutions SEE page 5B Zhivargo Laing U.S. PRESIDENT Barack Obama s peaks at a press conference at the end of the G20 Summit at the Excel centre in London, yesterday. The objective of the London Summit is to bring the world's biggest economies together to help restore economic growth . n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor City Markets’ parent company today in this newspaper reveals that its fiscal 2008 net loss is likely worse than pro-j ected at $13.429 million, with half-year losses standing at $3.527 million and the firm suffering from a $2 million-plus solvency deficiency. T he unaudited management accounts for Bahamas Supermarkets, published today upon the urging of the Securities Commission of the Bahamas, following public p ressure from Tribune Business among others, showed just why the company is having difficulty in avoiding its e xternal auditors, KPMG, from qualifying the fiscal 2008 accounts with the ‘going concern’ notation. Bahamas Supermarkets’ chairman, Basil Sands, told * 2008 figures worse than expected, as grocery chain’s parent incurs $3.527m 2009 half-year loss and $2 million-plus solvency deficiency * More than $20m turnaround in year-and-a-half from shareholder equity into deficit * Cash flow/liquidity problems still persisting S EE page 4B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE BAHAMAS Development Bank (BDB projected loan issuance target by almost $5 million in 2008, processing some $3.4 million in advances according to its act ing managing director. He added that the 2009 first quarter had also seen a contraction in advances, while loan arrears had grown to some $27 million. Anthony Woodside told Tribune Business yesterday that the BDB’s target for lending to Development Bank $5m below loan goal * Lends just $3.4m in 2008, compared to $8-$9m target * BDB seeking recapitalisation from IDB, National Insurance and Caribbean Development Bank * Half of loan portfolio, some $27m, in arrears * Finances seven projects, worth $622,764, for year-to-date SEE page 6B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The increasing development of private island destinations by the major cruise line is having a “devastating impact on Bahamian small businesses”, the tour operators’ association argued yesterday, with many vessels either bypassing Nassau/Freeport altogether or using them as second ports of call after already mining their passengers’ pocketbooks. J effrey Beckles, executive d irector of the Bahamas Asso c iation of Shore Excursionists (BASE the Grand Bahama Tours Association, said that while the number of cruise arrivals to the lines’ private islands were increasing, they were declining elsewhere. And there was a “massive duplication of local tours at pri vate islands, and restrictions placed on local vendors in selling their own tours”. This had the net effect of ensuring that all tours and excursions provided on the private islands were controlled by the cruise lines, along with the prices, to the exclusion of Bahamian-owned tour opera tors and their employees. M r Beckles’ presentation warned that the “economic pic slices” earned by Bahamianowned tours and excursion providers continued to dwindle as a result, given that cruise lines and their passengers either bypassed Nassau or arrived here after the lines had exhausted their spending power on the private islands. Concerns The Ministry of Tourism’s 2008 arrivals report, which has been obtained by Tribune Business , appears to bear out Mr Beckles concerns. For the year, the only destinations that saw an increase in cruise passenger arrivals were the private islands. Castaway Cay on Abaco saw a 58.1 per cent rise in arrivals to 149,389, compared to 94,511 the year before. The Berry Islands, which boasts RoyalCaribbean’s get away, Coco Cay, saw a 9.87 per cent growth in cruise arrivals to 401,718 compared to 366,321 in 2007, while arrivals to Half M oon Cay near Cat Island grew b y 11 per cent to 299,792, compared to 270,159 in 2007. All those figures were for first port of entry only. In contrast, Nassau/Paradise Island saw a 10.2 per cent decline in cruise passengers calling as a first port of entry in the Bahamas, the numbers falling from 1,638,174 in 2007 to 1,471,835 in 2008. Focusing on just December 2008, the Ministry of Tourism’s report noted that for the month, cruise arrivals to Nassau/Paradise Island were down by 2 per cent, while arrivals as a second port of call increased by 45 per cent. “A number of cruise ships went to Nassau/Paradise Island as a second port of call, however, rather than a first port of call,” the Ministry of Tourism found. Mr Beckles said that, as a result, there were “increased untaxed revenues taken out of ‘Devastating impact’ from cruise islands SEE page 6B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE A Philadelphia-based real estate group has received strong backing from Emerald Bay real estate owners and a neighbouring $100 million property in its bid to acquire the Exuma-based ‘anchor’ resort project. T ribune Business r evealed yesterday that the Arden Group had submitted a bid to acquire the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort and rescue it from its almost two-year receivership. “The Arden Group is very strong. Their record of success in purchasing, developing and managing resort and commercial properties speaks for itself, and among all the bidders and so-called bidders or interested parties who have surfaced and vanished over the past months, Arden appears to be the most qualified, the most serious and the best positioned,” said Jim C labaugh, president of EGI L td, developers of the $100 mill ion Grand Isle Resort & Spa, a 78-villa resort on 12 acres of the 480-acre Emerald Bay enclave. “We’d be thrilled if they took it over.” American businessman, Grand Isle villa owner and frequent visitor to the Bahamas, John Beasley of Tennessee, greeted the news with equal welcome. “That’s the best news we’ve heard in ages,” said Mr Beasley. According to other sources at Emerald Bay, home of the Four Seasons, the Greg Norman golf course, numerous residences and more than $150 million in investments caught up in the receivership, any successful bid der has to be prepared to invest heavily – a minimum of $50 million – in infrastructure to revive Investors back Arden’s Emerald Bay bid proposal GIV front of the building. GOLF course. EGI LTD , developers of Grand Isle Resort & Spa, yesterday threw their support behind the Arden Group, possible bidders for Emerald Bay, the 480acre enclave of luxury properties in Exuma that has been in receivershipf or nearly two years. Grand Isle, built on 12 acres, including the highest point of Emerald Bay, represents the single largest investment, a $100 million project that includes 78 luxuriously appointed villas and consistent ly ranks as among the top vacation experiences in The Bahamas on Tri pAdvisor.com. SEE page 3B

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ividend Notice O rdinary Common SharesThe Board of Directors of Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited (CHBL) is pleased to announce that a dividend of $0.06 per O rdinary Common Share will be paid to Ordinary Common Shareholders of record of CHBL on the 15th day of April 2009. Payment will be made within 10 days of the r ecord date through the Company’s Registrar and Transfer Agent, CFAL Ltd. n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Morton Salt’s Inagua facility, along with its parent company, has been acquired by Europe’s largest salt producer,G erman-based K+S Aktienesellschaft, in a $1.675 billion cash deal, it was revealed yesterday. The Bahamian company, and its Morton internationalp arent, were sold by Dow C hemical Company to finance its purchase of their former owner, Rohm & Haas. The decision on whether to invest i n the full rebuilding of the I nagua plant, following the devastation caused by Hurricane Ike, will now fall into the German company’s lap. It is likely too early to say what the implications of the sale will be for the Inagua plant, or the island’s people, as the German owners will take s ome time to sift through their newly-acquired prize. However, the fact that Morton has been sold to an industry buyer is likely good news. G lenn Bannister, Morton S alt’s president, referred to T ribune Business to Rohm & H aas spokesman George Bochanski for comment. But he did not return Tribune Business’s phone message. However, in a previous interview, Mr Bochanski said: “Lately, Dow has been talking about a possible sale of Morton. Until all that gets sorted out, I don’t expect Morton management will make a decision any time soon. “It’s really going to be up to Dow to determine the f uture of the whole business. I wouldn’t certainly expect anything new until the deal between Dow and Rohm & Haas closes. There won’t bea ny information coming out o f Morton until then. Ultim ately, it will be down to Dow t o make a decision as the new owner.” Mr Bochanski said “nothing has changed substantively” as it relates to Morton Salt’s Inagua operation since it was heavily damaged by Hurricane Ike, with executives operating f rom temporary offices. There’s full employment, no one has been laid off, and substantively the status quo remains until a decision is tak-e n,” Mr Bochanski said. The K+S Aktienesellschaft purchase is expected to close by mid-year. Morton Salt parent sold in $1.67bn deal what started out as a dream to create the most ambitious luxu ry project in recent history on a Family Island. That dream soured when Emerald Bay, caught up with delays, cost overruns and other management issues, defaulted on its loan that had been underwritten by Mitsui, the reinsur ers. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC receiver, projecting a quick sale. Months and then a year, now nearly two, have passed with hopes raised and dashed repeatedly as Mitsui and PwC declined offers or potential investors walked away. We have great respect for t he principals and development team at Arden Group. We believe that they understand w hat has to happen to restore Emerald Bay, and we believe they are a group that can suc-c eed at Emerald Bay and will be good for the island of Exuma, and for the Bahamas" said Pamela McCullough, vice-pres-i dent of EGI Ltd. "We would be delighted if this time it is for real and it goes through. They certainly have our support." Founded in 1989, Arden Group has purchased or devel oped more than $1.3 billion in real estate, while its property and asset management division has managed more than $5 bil lion in assets, including hotels, resorts and condominiums and over four million square feet of Class A commercial office space. A mong their most noted projects is the conversion of two former bank buildings in Centre City, Philadelphia into the P hiladelphia Ritz-Carlton, now ranked as one of the world’s top 5-star hotels. T he work was applauded for its preservation of an historic building, maximising its presence and preserving it as ani ntegral feature in the modern structure. Arden is now engaged in a $285 million luxury condominium project, The Residences at Ritz-Carlton, on adjacent land. Its real estate portfolio is vast and includes the Omni Hotel in Coral Gables and the Savoy in South Beach, both in Florida, The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch, Colorado; Indian Springs Ranch in Jackson, Wyoming; the Chase Manhattan Building in New York State; Seven Penn Centre in Philadel p hia; Brickell Bayview Center in Miami; and Mellon Bank Center in Wilmington, Delaware. F ROM page 2B Investors back Arden’s Emerald Bay bid proposal I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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t he firm’s 2007 annual general meeting (AGM pany was projecting a net loss of at least $10 million for fiscal 2008, but the figures releasedt oday based on unaudited m anagement accounts revealed a figure that is 34.29 per cent higher. In addition, as at January 2 7, 2009, the unaudited mana gement accounts show that while Bahamas Supermarkets had current assets of at least $21.37 million, its liabilities e xceeded this by just over $2 million, standing at $23.46 million. Effectively, this means that B ahamas Supermarkets is t echnically insolvent, as there are not enough assets to meet liabilities, although the company has continued to trade and seems likely to carry ond oing so. Already, its Trinidadian operating partner, Neal & Massey, which holds the largest stake in the company’sm ajority shareholder, BSL Holdings, has pumped $5 million into the company. That was matched by $5 millioni nvested by BSL Holdings’ Bahamian shareholders, which i nclude the hotel pension funds, Fidelity’s private equity arm, Craig Symonette andt he late Franklyn Butler’s estate. BSL Holdings has a 78 p er cent stake in Bahamas Supermarkets. The situation clearly calls f or a major injection of new equity into Bahamas Super markets, most likely from N eal & Massey, which has the deepest pockets with assets in e xcess of $600 million. In effect, a recapitalisation of the 12-store Bahamian supermar k et chain, with its 800 employ ees, is what is needed. T he situation is also likely to prompt minority share holders, already mulling a l egal action against Bahamas S upermarkets and its Board of Directors for allegedly not acting in the company’s best interests, to make furtherm oves. Spectacular Since it acquired Bahamas Supermarkets for $54 millioni n summer 2006, BSL Holdings and its investors have presided over what can only be described as a spectacular destruction of shareholder val-u e, producing an almost-$20 million swing into technical insolvency. As at year-end 2007, B ahamas Supermarkets had net shareholder equity of $ 17.615 million. That had reduced to $1.427 million as at year-end 2008, and at the2 009 half-year, this was at a negative $2.09 million. I n tandem, retained earnings have shrunk from $12.874 million as at year-end 2007 toa position in the red of $3.304 million at year-end 2008. By the 2009 half-year point, thata ccumulated deficit had reached $6.831 million. F urther analysis of the unaudited Bahamas Supermarkets balance sheet showedt hat the company is still enduring major cash flow/liqu idity problems, with all its revenues largely going to meet payments to suppliers. T he 2009 half-year cash-onh and position of $54,363 did not differ much from the $55,770 year-end position, but at least was an improvemento n the zero cash-on-hand at y ear-end 2007. However, since that point, Bahamas Supermarkets has had to liquidate fixed deposits worth almost $6 million, since none are pre-s ent on its balance sheet currently. For Bahamas Supermarkets’ 2008 fiscal year, the company enjoyed a modest 2.9 perc ent sales growth to $144.355 million. However, its cost of sales increased by more than $12m illion, with operating and a dministrative expenses up by almost $5 million. In his note to shareholders, Mr Sands attributed the 2008n et loss to “inventory shorta ges and discounting masked by late and inaccurate management financial reports”. However, he was “optimistic that the worst is behindu s”, with key operating indicators showing improvement in 2009. The 2009 second half was expected to be “significantlyb etter” than the first, due to improved systems and controls, along with a drive to curb pilferage and theft. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.281.280.000.1270.00010.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00%3 .743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2 .601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.55Cable Bahamas12.5512.550.001.3090.2509.61.99% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7 .446.46Commonwealth Bank (S16.466.460.000.4380.05014.70.77% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.172.06-0.110.0990.05220.82.52% 3.002.09Doctor's Hospital2.092.090.000.2400.0408.71.91% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.7940.40013.23.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.000.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44891.3847Colina Money Market Fund1.44891.064.63 3.69603.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S19-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W W W W. . B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H H O O N NE E : :2 24 4 2 2 -3 32 2 3 3-2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3-2 23 3 2 20 0NAV Date 28-Feb-09 27-Mar-09 31-Jan-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 3 35 5 6 67 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 6 64 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O OL LO O N N I I A A L L 2 24 4 2 25 5 0 02 27 75 52 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 806.63 | YTD -3.38% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSWEDNESDAY, 1 APRIL 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,638.68 | CHG -0.12 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -73.68 | YTD % -4.30BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases Nassau Airport Development Company (NADhas a requirement for the Supply and Delivery of four, (Qty.4), Oil/Water Separators in accordance with the required schedule and specifications for completion of Stage 1 of the LPIAExpansion Project. This is a Supply and D elivery only contract. Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after 1:00 pm on Monday, March 30th, 2009 . Price Inquiry closingis Wednesday, April 15th, 2009 at 3:00 pm Bahamas Time. PRICE INQUIRYP-150 Supply & Delivery of Oil/Water Separators Contact: Traci Brisby Contract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project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t&RDWWRUQH\VIRU WKHHWLWLRQHUDVVRRQ+RXVHKLUOH\WUHHWt9LFWRULD $ KHRWLFH%RDUGRIWKH$GPLQLVWUDWRUDWWHOODDULV/RQJ ,VODQGDQG KH/RFDO&RQVWDEOHDWWHOODDULV/RQJ,VODQG 'DWHGWKHU GGD\RIDUFK *5$+$07+203621t&2 &KDPEHUV 6DVVRRQ+RXVH 6KLUOH\WUHHWt9LFWRULD$YHQXH 1DVVDX%DKDPDV $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHHWLWLRQHU 127,&( ,17(51$7,21$/%86,1(66&203$1,(6$&7 9(1(7,&203$1<$ 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK 6HFWLRQRI7KH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV &RPSDQLHV$FWRI 9(1(7,&203$1< 6$ LVLQGLVVROXWLRQ7KHGDWHRIFRPPHQFHPHQWRI GLVVROXWLRQZDVWKHGD\RI0DUFK 'LOORQ 'HDQ RI1DVVDX%DKDPDVLVWKH/LTXLGDWRURI 9(1(7,&203$1< 'LOORQ'HDQ /,48,'$725 /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV City Markets plunges into $13.4m loss F ROM page 1B

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The Government, Bahamasbased financial services execut ives and countless attorneys, a ccountants and others who provide services to the industry, will likely be breathing a sigh of relief that, at least for the moment,P rime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s public position statement has enabled this nation to avoid the full force of the G-20’s wrath. S peaking to T ribune Business before the OECD published its list yesterday, Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, said the Government had done what itf elt was necessary to escape the so-called ‘blacklist’, and it would now wait and see what actions others took. We did what we believed was appropriate. What others determine to do is up to them,” Mr Laing said. “There is no sense in us speculating. We have done w hat we believe was appropriate to do, and will proceed on that basis. “We’ve done what we’ve done, and I’m not going to speculate on what others may or may not do.” M ichael Paton, the Lennox Paton law firm partner and for-m er Bahamas Financial Services B oard (BFSB described the OECD’s use of three separate tiers as “totally disingenuous”, because “as far as the rest of the world is concerned, i t’s a blacklist”. He added: “To me, it’s very grandiose and wishful thinking to think that they can get all them ajor financial centres to the same degree of co-operation and standards. To think we’re all going to converge on agreed standards is staggering. I’m just glad there was something that was invoked or decreed upon. At least there’s time to manoevere, people can talk andw e can do something that’s palatable.” In an interview with Tribune Business prior to the OECD list’s publication, Owen Bethel, head o f Nassau-based financial services provider, the Montaque Group, said the critical thing for the Bahamas was to avoid beingp laced on any ‘blacklist’, given that the G-20 was looking to move beyond a ‘naming and shaming’ exercise and impose sanctions. That scenario has been avoide d, at least for the moment. But, outlining what would have hap-p ened had it come to pass, Mr Bethel told Tribune Business that t he effects would not only have been felt by the sector’s clients, but also its institutions especially those with head offices in G-20 nations. We would certainly have seen not only clients of prospective clients getting jittery and agitated over the consequences of actions b eing taken, but the OECD and G-20 are looking to move one step beyond what the did last time, with the naming and shaming, and impose sanctions,” Mr B ethel said. “That would certainly damage t he industry, period. Clients would take action, and not just c lients. The industry here is pop ulated by foreign banks. We’re still not out of the woods yet, and pressure could come from head offices of foreign banks to move, shut down or switch business elsewhere.” He added: “The possibility still is that there could be a flight of f inancial institutions, not only client business, from these jurisdictions. “Going forward, it will again be whether we have the strength or will to demand a level playing field, or will we simply make it better for clients to move from one jurisdiction to another and l ose our competitive edge. We need to ensure we are in the game as long as everyone is playing by the same rules.” Not surprisingly, those nations in the ‘top tier’ of the OECD list, meaning those who had “sub s tantially implemented the internationally agreed tax standard”, included all that organisation’s members states, along with the Isle of Man and the Channel I slands the latter three no doubt aided by the UK’s protective embrace plus, perhaps more surprisingly, the likes of Barbados,C yprus and Malta. Of greater concern, perhaps, to the Bahamas, is the fact that the OECD initiative makes no mention of US states such as D elaware, Nevada, Wyoming and others, all of which have far less transparent and effective regulatory systems than this nation and,t o all intents and purposes, operate as international financial centres and compete for the same market as this nation. And totally excluded from m ention on the OECD list were Hong Kong and Macau, a move no doubt intended to appease China. The footnotes in relationt o China merely mentioned that its “special administrative regions” had committed to the transparency and tax information standards being demanded. Those jurisdictions that were ‘blacklist-e d’ were Costa Rica, the Malaysian region of Labuan, theP hilippines and Uruguay. Amid much sabre-rattling as t he G-20 summit drew to a close, there was little doubt, especially among those nations such as France and Germany, which are ideologically opposed to interna-t ional financial centres, of their intent to use the global financial crisis as an excuse to scapegoat, blame and get after the likes of t he Bahamas. “The time of banking secrecy has passed,” said French president Nicholas Sarkozy following the summit. “Everyone around t he table wants an end to tax havens. Everyone knows we need s anctions.” China said it supported the m ove, but would not agree to have two territories, Hong Kong and Macau, classified as tax havens. Potential sanctions for trans gressors include additional audits on the accounts of those who use tax havens and curbs on tax deductions claimed by businesses w ho use the territories. In their communique, leaders said they may also consider further penalties in their bilateral relations with tax haven territories. Stephen Timms, financial secretary to the British Treasury, said a culture of banking secrecy had worsened global economic p roblems. “That lack of transparency that opaqueness has contributed to the severity of the problems we are seeing in the world economy at the moment,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 5B c lusively that the intended location of the building was indeed on hotel property”. By that stage, the District Council’s workforce had excavated the land, natural growthon the sand dune had been dug o ut, and the foundations for the bathrooms had been laid. D ana Wells, Pink Sands’ attorney, sent copies of the surv ey to both the District Council and Minister of Local Govern m ent, but “it appears that did not stop the defendants”. An injunction was eventually obtained to stop further work, in what had become an “acrimon ious” dispute. Pink Sands had twice called the police tor emove the Council’s workers from its property. E ventually, the AttorneyGeneral’s Office got the Surveyor-General to prepare his own survey, which confirmed the findings of Mr Chee-A-Tow. T hat was made clear to the Supreme Court on March 6,2 006. “This trespass continued for 10 months, and it was not u ntil after the Surveyor-General had confirmed what the plaintiff had already told [the District Council], and proven conclu sively with a professional surveyf rom a well-known firm of sur veyors, that the [District Counc il] made arrangements to remove the trespass,” Justice Lyons found. “Thereafter, it took some time for the natural growth of vegetation to occur tot he point where, so far as Mr von Merveldt was aware, the a rea adversely affected is either back to the state it was before the trespass or very nearly back to that condition.” Pink Sands and its parent, Island Outpost (Harbour Island) Ltd, had sough damages for the trespass, plus a declaration that the District Council had “no claim or right” to the property being trespassed upon. “The Pink Sands Hotel is a well-known establishment on Harbour Island,” Justice Lyons found. “It seeks to attract what are termed ‘high end patrons’, who are housed in small villas around the property. The tres pass by the [District Council] was right in front of one of these villas. In so trespassing on the land and digging away the sanddunes and commencing to erect the facility, the [District Coun cil] had obviously detracted from the beauty, amenity and ambiance of the plaintiff’s prop erty, particularly in relation to the villa nearest to the site of the trespass.” In explaining his rationale for the damages award, Justice Lyons added: “This trespass was a serious trespass on a valuable property. The trespass was pro ceeded with without the [Dis trict Council] making any of the proper checks to make sure that it was proceeding properly. The damage remained for at least 10to 11 months before the trespass was removed.” Justice Lyons found that “it was not a trespass that was fleeting in nature”, and caused actual damage to Pink Sands land. He awarded the resort $20,000 in general damages; $12,805 in special damages; $3,250 to cover the costs of the Chee-a-Tow survey and $21 for air courier costs. “I trust now that the [District Council] can see what were the consequences of their ill-considered and thoughtless act,” Justice Lyons said. FROM page 1B Harbour Island Council blasted on hotel trespass Bahamas avoids G-20 ‘blacklist F ROM page 1B

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n DAVID B. CARUSO N EW YORK E ven Bernie Madoff isn't e xempt from the real estate slump, according to the Asso c iated Press . The Florida mansion that prosecutors seized from the Wall Street swindler appears to have lost a big chunk of its value since Palm Beach County officials assessed its worth last year at $9.3 million. A new appraisal that feder a l officials had done in March pegged the property's likely market price at $7.45 million. Prosecutors disclosed in a court filing Thursday that Madoff and his wife tenta tively agreed to let the government sell off the waterfront Palm Beach home while the courts decide how much of the family's fortune should be forfeited and distributed to victims of his Ponzi scheme. The planned seizure was accelerated, however, because of the hefty cost of maintain ing the five-bedroom home and legal complications created by a competing claim toM adoff's assets posed by a lawsuit in Connecticut. Federal marshals seized the house Wednesday, along with a vintage, 55-foot yacht called Bull, docked in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and a 24-foot motorboat. T he U.S. attorney in Man h attan revealed Thursday that marshals also had taken possession of a 38-foot yacht called Sitting Bull at a marina in Montauk, on the eastern tip of Long Island. Costs Court papers say the monthly costs on Madoff's 6,500-square-foot house on the Intercoastal Waterway included $3,000 for homeowners insurance, $1,000 for utilities and $3,300 for main tenance and security. The family's annual flood and hurricane insurance bill was$ 115,000. Madoff pleaded guilty last month to taking billions of dollars from investors around the world and funneling it into what could be the largest Ponzi scheme in history. His victims included huge h edge funds, global banks and thousands of smaller investors who are now scrambling to recover whatever they can of their life savings. Prosecutors are trying to preserve as much of Madoff's fortune as possible to distrib ute among his victims. They said in the court filing that they had refused to allow the family to pay its home insurance bill for April because they didn't believe that Madoff and his wife, Ruth, would own it for much longer. Madoff, a 70-year-old former Nasdaq chairman, could get up to 150 years in prison when he's sentenced in June. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following items: %XLOGLQJVWUXFWXUHH[WHULRUHQYHORSHH[WHULRUFDQRSLHVDQG UHODWHGVXEWUDGHSDFNDJHV *HQHUDO5HTXLUHPHQWVIRU*HQHUDO&RQWUDFWLQJVHUYLFHVIRU WKHRYHUDOOSURMHFWDQG &RQVWUXFWLRQ0DQDJHPHQW)HHIRUWHQGHULQJWKHEDODQFHRI VXEWUDGHDQGVXSSOLHUZRUNSDFNDJHVDWDODWHUGDWH The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e. mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are notincluded in this Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230 General Contractor in 2009. The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room located at the NAD Project office. TENDERC -230 General Contract, Stage 1Contact: TRACI BRISBYContract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project Ph: (24224217 P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs small and medium-sized businesses was around $8 to $9 million per annum. However, he suggested that the current economic downturn had caused a decline in loan requests and an increase in defaults. Mr Woodside said the bank enacted a moratorium on foreclosures in 2008, hoping to draw debtors in financial distress into the BDB to negotiate loan repayments and refinancing options. However, many of the BDB’s clients had failed to take advantage of the opportunity. Now, the bank, through its collections department, is poised to move on outstanding loan payments. “We don’t want to foreclose and liquidate. That is not our purpose,” said Mr Woodside. “We go after those who were bad from day one, and who would use the recession as an excuse.” Mr Woodside revealed that the BDB is currently short on capital, and is waiting for refinancing to recapitalise through the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB Development Bank (IDB Insurance Board (NIB So far this year, the BDB has funded seven projects to the tune of $622,764, in the areas of transportation, services and farming. With half the BDB’s loan portfolio in arrears, it has taken extra steps to ensure those businesses it funds are successful. In 2004, the bank created a Business Advisory Services department to offer business development advice and resources to those small and medium-sized businesses it finances in a bid to make them successful. The BDB’s manager of business advisory services, Dale McHardy, said new small business owners were able to procure an array of business development literature and software, such as Quickbooks, from the bank’s in-house Business Information Centre. Mrs McHardy said the BDB offers workshops for their clients, and markets their businesses whenever and wherever they can. “For a small business to be successful they first have to be educated on how to run a small business,” she said. One such small business owner and recipient of the Government’s Self-Starters programme, Devito Bodie, told this newspaper on Tuesday that he sought to expand his business through funding from the BDB, but found he did not meet certain criteria. The BDB has since taken a second look at Mr Bodie’s business plan and model, and has engaged him to evaluate his business. “We have certain criteria, but we evaluate them (business plans Mr Woodside. According to Mr Bodie, he can expand his almost $1,000 per week business if he had the machinery, funded through the BDB, to turn the waste products from the coconuts he uses to make his tarts into mulch that he would then sell. “My tarts are known from Lyford Cay to Winton,” said Mr Bodie. Development Bank $5m below loan goal F ROM page 1B ‘Devastating impact’ from cruise islands t he country by cruise lines on an annual b asis”. He indicated that BASE and its members, who include the likes of Dolphin Encounters, Blackbeard’s Cay, Ardastra Gardens, Nassau Water Ferries and Sunshine Cruises, also felt left out by the Government and Ministry of Tourism when it came to policy and negotiations with the cruise lines on issues that impacted Bahamian businesses. Among their issues with the cruise lines, Mr Beckles said, were the receipt of timely payments, “unfair pricing tactics”, the fact that the jurisdiction for resolving disputes was not the Bahamas, trade and on-board marketing limitations were set by the cruise lines, and concerns that some agreements were contrary to Bahamian law. And Mr Beckles added: “The Bahamas in general, and Grand Bahama in particular, needs to constantly improve our products: physical plant, customer service, use of technology, Internet and other modern advantages to advance our businesses. “We have more resources available to us here in the Bahamas than many of our regional competitors, and yet they do am uch better job with less.” He urged Bahamians to become “less political and more business practical” in the conduct of commerce, and that tour operators needed to “demand more” from elected MPs and ministers. “If we don’t change, we can be assured that globalisation will create an opportunity for someone else to come in and do what we should have been doing and there will be little , if anything, we can do about it,” Mr Beckles said. “We must do more to improve our overall customer service product, employee development. Eliminate mediocrity and complacency.” FROM page 1B Madoff's home in Florida lost almost $2M in value

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 68F/20C Low: 70F/21C Low: 70F/21C Low: 71 F/22C Low: 73F/23C Low: 76F/24C Low: 76 F/24C Low: 72F/22C High: 82F/28C High: 78F/26C High: 86 F/30C High: 86F/30C High: 88F/31C High: 85 F/29 High: 90F/32C Low: 74F/23C High: 88 F/31C Low: 75 F/24 High: 89 F/32CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 71F/22C High: 91F/33C Low: 74 F/23C High: 90F/32C Low: 71 F/22C High: 86F/30C Low: 73 F/23C High: 89F/32C Low: 75F/24C High: 92 F/33C Low: 73F/23C High: 88 F/31C Low: 72 F/22C High: 90F/32C Low: 72F/22C High: 90F/32C Low: 75 F/24C High: 93F/34C High: 86F/30CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY APRIL 3RD2009 PAGE 9BTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Sunny, breezy and humid. Partly cloudy.A full day of sunshine. A full day of sunshine. Sunny and breezy. High: 90 Low: 76 High: 88 High: 86 High: 87 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Windy and not as warm. High: 74 Low: 73 Low: 74 Low: 61 AccuWeather RealFeel 94F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 89F 104-78F 94-81F 93-65F 71-57F Low: 61 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 84F/29C Low .................................................... 75F/24C Normal high ...................................... 80F/27C Normal low ........................................ 67F/20C Last year's high .................................. 85F/29C Last year's low .................................. 72F/22C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................2.07"Normal year to date ......................................5.33" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Full Last New First Apr . 9 Apr . 17 Apr . 24 May 1 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:59 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:27 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 1:46 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 2:46 a.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 2:50 a.m.2.79:15 a.m.0.3 3:21 p.m.2.49:26 p.m.0.2 4:00 a.m.2.710:18 a.m.0.2 4:29 p.m.2.510:36 p.m.0.1 5:05 a.m.2.711:15 a.m.0.1 5:31 p.m. 2.711:40 p.m.0.0 6:02 a.m. 2.812:07 p.m.0.0 6:25 p.m. 2.9 ----WORLDCITIES Acapulco 88/3170/21s87/3069/20s Amsterdam64/1749/9s65/1848/8c Ankara, Turkey57/1332/0c59/1530/-1c Athens61/1645/7c61/1648/8s Auckland64/1751/10s66/1854/12pc Bangkok93/3379/26t93/3378/25t Barbados85/2975/23pc84/2874/23s Barcelona59/1549/9sh61/1650/10s Beijing64/1745/7pc72/2248/8s Beirut70/2163/17pc69/2063/17s Belgrade68/2044/6pc68/2049/9s Berlin64/1750/10s68/2053/11s Bermuda 70/2167/19sh76/2466/18t Bogota64/1746/7r66/1844/6r Brussels66/1846/7sh67/1946/7pc Budapest68/2045/7pc72/2248/8sBuenos Aires 79/2664/17t75/2360/15t Cairo81/2759/15pc84/2863/17s Calcutta 99/3779/26s100/3778/25s Calgar y36/220/-6sn40/416/-8c Cancun90/3275/23s90/3271/21s Caracas82/2767/19s82/2768/20pcCasablanca 67/19 50/10 s 69/2054/12s Copenhagen 58/1446/7s60/1549/9s Dublin55/1243/6pc50/1039/3pcFrankfurt 68/20 46/7pc72/2248/8sh Geneva61/1645/7sh63/1748/8s Halifax48/839/3sh52/1143/6rHavana 90/32 70/21 s90/3270/21s Helsinki41/530/-1r39/332/0pc Hong Kong 68/2066/18r72/2268/20r Islamabad88/3157/13pc93/3361/16pc Istanbul55/1244/6c55/1247/8sJerusalem 65/1855/12pc64/1748/8s Johannesburg 75/23 51/10s71/2151/10s Kingston 85/29 76/24s85/2975/23s Lima83/2864/17pc80/2662/16c London 63/17 43/6 pc59/1543/6pc Madrid68/2036/2pc73/2243/6pc Manila90/3273/22sh85/2976/24sh Mexico City84/2852/11s84/2846/7s Monterrey90/3263/17s98/3664/17sMontreal 55/1245/7r46/732/0r Moscow 37/228/-2sn36/223/-5sf Munich66/1842/5sh69/2043/6t Nairobi86/3057/13t85/2958/14pc New Delhi97/3668/20pc95/3568/20pc Oslo 47/834/1pc45/737/2c Paris 63/1745/7pc64/1743/6sh Prague62/1642/5s70/2146/7s Rio de Janeiro80/2671/21sh82/2771/21s Riyadh75/2360/15sh85/2963/17s Rome66/1850/10sh65/1852/11pc St. Thomas 84/28 74/23s83/2873/22s San Juan91/3259/15s83/2856/13s San Salvador91/3266/18s90/3271/21s Santiago77/2550/10pc73/2248/8pc Santo Domingo88/3170/21s85/2967/19s Sao Paulo75/2362/16c77/2564/17t Seoul 48/834/1c57/1338/3s Stockholm52/1136/2pc50/1034/1c Sydney77/2564/17pc75/2363/17sh T aipei 79/26 69/20pc83/2869/20pc Tokyo59/1548/8pc62/1650/10pc Toronto50/1037/2r47/832/0c Trinidad88/3172/22t87/3075/23r Vancouver46/734/1c47/838/3pcVienna 67/19 51/10s69/2052/11s Warsaw55/1238/3s61/1641/5s Winnipeg32/024/-4c40/422/-5sf HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodaySaturdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SW at 15-30 Knots3-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Saturday:W at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:SW at 15-30 Knots3-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Saturday:WSW at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:SW at 12-25 Knots3-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Saturday:SW at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 62/1641/5c58/1431/0pc Anchorage35/126/-3sf41/523/-5s Atlanta 66/18 45/7pc74/2354/12s Atlantic City58/1447/8t63/1736/2s Baltimore62/1644/6t61/1638/3sBoston 53/11 45/7r60/1541/5pc Buffalo54/1240/4r45/732/0pc Charleston, SC78/2549/9t77/2553/11s Chicago47/832/0pc52/1135/1pcCleveland 58/14 37/2r47/832/0s Dallas72/2255/12s77/2549/9pc Denver52/1127/-2c32/019/-7sn Detroit52/1133/0r53/1134/1pc Honolulu82/2769/20pc82/2770/21cHouston 75/23 58/14 s80/2664/17pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodaySaturday T odaySaturday T odaySaturday Indianapolis 54/1236/2r60/1544/6s Jacksonville77/2549/9t80/2657/13s Kansas City 62/16 42/5s66/1836/2pc Las Vegas72/2247/8pc68/2048/8s Little Rock67/1946/7s77/2554/12pcLos Angeles 62/16 52/11sh70/2152/11s Louisville58/1439/3pc66/1850/10s Memphis63/1749/9s75/2356/13pc Miami88/3170/21pc85/2971/21pc Minneapolis 46/7 30/-1pc46/730/-1r Nashville58/1438/3pc71/2148/8s New Orleans72/2255/12s78/2565/18pc New York57/1347/8r59/1546/7pc Oklahoma City66/1850/10s75/2340/4c Orlando 82/27 60/15 t82/2762/16s Philadelphia63/1748/8t58/1442/5s Phoenix87/3058/14pc77/2552/11s Pittsburgh59/1535/1r52/1134/1s Portland, OR48/834/1sh55/1238/3pc Raleigh-Durham 73/2244/6t73/2246/7s St. Louis58/1441/5s65/1847/8pcSalt Lake City 44/628/-2c45/731/0sf San Antonio 76/24 60/15 s84/2858/14pc San Diego62/1654/12sh67/1953/11s San Francisco57/1344/6s64/1746/7sSeattle 46/733/0pc52/1139/3pc T allahassee 78/2545/7s82/2754/12s Tampa78/2564/17t81/2768/20s Tucson81/2753/11s76/2447/8s Washington, DC62/1647/8t65/1844/6s UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries SnowIce AccuWeather.com

PAGE 19

C M Y K C M Y K LOCALANDINTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Chester Cooper, British American Financial’s president and chief executive, has been named as the College of the Bahamas Alumni Association’s Hall Of Fame Honoree for 2008. After joining British American Financial in 2001, following a successful eight-year career as an investment banker in the Bahamas, Dublin and Luxembourg, Mr Cooper led a Bahamian Group that acquired the then-British American Insurance Company in February 2007. Mr Cooper was also honoured as ‘Business Person of the Year’ by the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce in 2007. E E d d u u c c a a t t i i o o n n After completing his primary and secondary education in Exuma, Mr Cooper went to Nassau to further his education. Mr Cooper also studied in Canada, the US and the UK. His first degree, an Associate of Arts Degree in Economics, was obtained at COB. He then went on to receive a BA in Economics and Finance, and MBA (with distinction Mr Cooper holds various directorships, including: BAB Global Group, BAB Holdings, Bramer General Insurance, Eleuthera Properties, RoyalStar Assurance, Bramer General Insurance Agency, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, and the Bahamas Government Venture Capital Fund. He is an alumnus of the Col lege of the Bahamas and a member of the Young President’s Organisation (YPO Rotarian, a Toastmaster; former host of the ZNS TV-13 financial talk show, You & Your Money , and author of the book, Ask Chester about Saving, Plan ning and Investing for Retirement . Mr Cooper will be officially inducted at the 2009 Hall of Fame Induction Reception on Thursday, April 30, 2009, at the British Colonial Hilton. The reception will begin at 6.30pm. British American chief joins COB’s Hall of Fame The Planning Abaco Group has been honoured with a Charter Award from the Congress of New Urbanism (CNUa round the world that best embody and advance the principles of the Charter for New Urbanism. Planning Abaco is a group from Andrews University (Michigan and urbanists dedicated to promoting sustainable devel-o pment. T he CNU said: “The Charter Awards programme is unique in its emphasis on the entirety of the built and natural environment from the function and sustainability of regions to the fine-grain architectural details that strengthen people's ties to a place over time. “The Charter Awards look at how plans and projects i ntegrate with their contexts and, consequently, how they improve both the human experience of place and the relat ionship between the built and natural environments.” T he CNU describes honorees as “setting the gold standard for urban design and development”. Abaco planning group wins top Charter Award Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear f rom people who are m aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps y ou are raising funds for a g ood cause, campaigning f or improvements in the a rea or have won an a ward. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story. HALL OF FAME HONOREE: Chester Cooper is pictured third from the left. n JEANNINE AVERSA AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON Commercial banks and investment firms borrowed less over the past week from the Federal Reserve's emergency lending program, a hopeful sign that some credit stresses are easing a bit. The Fed reported Thursday that commercial banks averaged $59.7 billion in daily borrowing over the week that ended Wednesday. That was down from $62.8 billion in average daily borrowing logged over the week ended March 25. Investment firms drew $19.5 billion over the past week from the Fed program. That was down from an average of $20.1 billion the previous week. The identities of financial institutions that borrow from the Fed program are not released. They now pay just 0.50 percent in interest for the emer gency loans. The Fed's net holdings of "commercial paper" averaged $244.3 billion over the week ending Wednesday, an increase of $3.5 billion from the previous week. The first-of-its-kind program started on Oct. 27, a time of intensified credit problems when the Fed began buying commercial paper the cru cial short-term debt that companies use to pay everyday expenses. The central bank has said about $1.3 trillion worth of commercial paper would qualify. The Fed also said its pur chases of mortgage-backed securities guaranteed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and Ginnie Mae averaged $236.4 billion over the past week, down $540 million from the previous week. The goal of the program, which started on Jan. 5, is to help the crippled mortgage-finance and housing markets. Mortgage rates have dropped since the Fed announced the creation of the program late last year. Rates on 30-year mortgages tumbled to new lows this week. Freddie Mac reported Thursday that rates on 30-year mort gages averaged 4.78 percent this week, down from 4.85 percent last week and the lowest on records dating to 1971. L L e e n n d d i i n n g g Squeezed banks and investment firms are borrowing from the Fed because they can't get money elsewhere. Investors have cut them off and shifted their money into safer Treasury securities. Financial institutions are hoarding whatever cash they have, rather than lending it to each other or customers. The lockup in lending has contributed to the recession, now the longest since World War II. Investment houses in March 2008 were given similar emer gency-loan privileges as commercial banks after a run on Bear Stearns pushed what was the nation's fifth-largest investment bank to the brink of bankruptcy and into a takeover by JPMorgan Chase & Co. Critics worry the Fed's actions have put billions of taxpayers' dollars at risk. The central bank's balance sheet now stands at $2.048 trillion, down slightly from last week, partly reflecting less emergency borrowing by banks and investment firms. The Fed's balance sheet, however, has ballooned since September when it was just under $900 billion. That growth reflects the Fed's many unconventional efforts various programs to lend or buy debt to mend the financial system and jolt the economy out of recession. The report also said that credit provided to insurer American International Group Inc. from the Fed averaged $44.7 billion for the week ending Wednesday, up slightly from $43.6 billion the previous week. AIG faced with increasing financial stresses received a fresh aid package from the government last month. The company's decision to pay employees millions in bonuses had ignited a public outrage. Banks, investment firms borrow less from Fed WORLDBUSINESSNEWS JOB SEEKERS line up for assistance at an Economic Development Depart ment office in Sunnyvale, Calif., Friday, Feb. 27, 2009. The Federal Reserve's new snapshot of business activity nationwide, released Wednesday, March 4, showed the economic picture darkening over the last two months and revealed little hope for a quick turnaround. M a r c i o J o s e S a n c h e z / A P P h o t o


WEATHER

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74F

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Volume: 105 No.110

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‘Devastating
impact’ from

scruise islands

NS

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

OS ee
NT decked
ATES ees Pa ley

Concern as the Bahama
named On tax ravens is

product must he retooled

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

THE Bahamas was named on a
list of "tax havens” that have
committed to international tax
standards but have yet to imple-
ment them by the Organisation
for Economic and Co-Operation
and Development yesterday in a
move that will no doubt add more
weight to the mounting concern
regarding the future of the coun-
try's off-shore financial sector.

The list — divided into four
parts — names jurisdictions that
have implemented the interna-
tionally agreed tax standard; tax
havens that committed to the
international tax standard but
have yet to implement it; other
financial centres that have com-
mitted to the international tax
standard but have yet to imple-
ment it; and jurisdictions that
have not committed to implement
the internationally agreed tax
standard.

Speaking on the issue — short-
ly after the list was published —
in the afternoon session of Par-
liament yesterday, Opposition
spokesman on Foreign Affairs
and Trade Fred Mitchell said the
news was evidence of an impend-
ing “direct attack" on the coun-
try's offshore centre.

To mitigate against shutdowns
of the country's offshore centres
and subsequent job losses, Mr
Mitchell said the Bahamas’ finan-
cial product must be retooled.

"What is interesting is this pre-

diction, ‘the era of bank secrecy is
over’, appears to confirm coming
out of the OECD discussions and
in the communiqué, that there is
now going to be a direct attack
— if we did not know it already it
is now confirmed — that there is
going to be a direct attack on the
kind of way that we make our
money with regard to these off-
shore sectors. And so we obvi-
ously have to be adjusting our
product to ensure that the levels
on employment and the standards
of living which we've had is in
fact protected,” said Mr Mitchell.

His statement referred to a sec-
tion of the London Summit's offi-
cial statement at the close of the
G-20 summit which said the
group has agreed "to take action
against non-cooperative jurisdic-
tions, including tax havens. We
stand ready to deploy sanctions to
protect our public finances and
financial systems. The era of
banking secrecy is over. We note
that the OECD has today pub-
lished a list of countries assessed
by the Global Forum against the
international standard for
exchange of tax information.”

The list was published by the
OECD shortly after leaders of
the developed and developing
nations wrapped up the G-20
meetings in London yesterday. It
is available on the OECD's web-
site.

Thirty countries, including
Belize, the Turks and Caicos,
Monaco and the Cayman Islands

SEE page eight

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THIS GRAFFITI has put a resident of Skyline Drive in a dilemma. The man said he wants to clean up the
scrawl, but he is concerned that removing it will only prompt the vandals to return.

$44.2m contract signed to Unemployment Benefits
dredge Nassau Harbour

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TO ENSURE that New Providence is capable of
accommodating the new “Genesis class” megacruise
ships, government signed a $44.2 million contract
with Boskalis International for the dredging and
improvement of Nassau’s harbour yesterday.

This project, set to be completed by the end of
November, will be finished just in time for the arrival
of the first megacruise ship, the Oasis of the Seas,
which is scheduled to dock in Nassau this December.

This $44.2 million contract also comes with a $6
million contingency fee, and will see nearly 1.9 mil-
lion cubic yards of rock and sand dredged out of
Nassau’s harbour.

This dredged material will then be used to extend

SEE page eight

THE injection of millions
of dollars in Unemployment
Benefits into the hands of
Bahamians will not only
assist the needy but act as a
stimulus to the ailing econ-
omy — boosting consumer
demand and keeping peo-
ple working, the Prime Min-
ister said yesterday.

Hubert Ingraham

This observation was made in the House
of Assembly as he moved three resolutions
to facilitate the introduction of Unemploy-

SEE page eight

th of Clarks children’s shoes!
larks and fill out an entry form.

rowing feet in safe hands’







Cte

PRICE — fe (Abaco and Grand Bahama D125)
Big hopes for
|
TERE!

SEE PAGE ELEVEN



Magistrate
rules that
‘Emperor’ be
discharged

m@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

LESS than a year after
being charged in the mur-
der of his nephew, Kenton
Dion Knowles, alias
‘Emperor’, has been dis-
charged.

In her ruling on a no
case submission made by
Knowles’ defence attor-
neys at a preliminary
inquiry last month, Mag-
istrate Linda Virgill said
yesterday that based on
the evidence adduced by
the prosecution, a prima
facie case had not been
made out against Knowles
and that he should be dis-
charged.

Knowles, 42, of Fox Hill,
who was represented by
attorneys Murrio Ducille
and Roger Minnis, was vis-
ibly relieved after hearing
the ruling.

Magistrate Virgill
reminded Knowles that
although she had dis-
charged him on the mur-
der charge, the charge
could be brought against
him again. Knowles was

SEE page eight

PM: NIB tax
cap on salaries

‘should be
increased’

THE cap on how much of a
worker’s salary can be taxed by
the National Insurance Board
“should be increased”, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham said
yesterday.

“The ceiling should be
increased again, it should be
increased and adjusted perhaps
once every three years to keep
pace with wages and to also
ensure that benefits people
receive are consistent with the
requirement to live,” said
Hubert Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham was addressing
the House of Assembly as he
introduced several resolutions
to facilitate the introduction of
an Unemployment Benefit
Scheme under the National
Insurance Board.

He did not state when such
an adjustment should, or will,
occur, however he _ did
announce that parliament will
“soon...be asked to approve a
number of changes to the
national insurance scheme, 35
years after its commencement.”

The Prime Minister’s sugges-
tion that government may tax
more of some workers’ incomes

SEE page eight



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NASSAU AND BAHAME:

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



PM: steps taken to ensure minimal

impact from harbour dredging

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

NOTING that concerns will
be raised by local environmen-
talists when Nassau harbour is
dredged to accommodate larger
cruise ships, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said yesterday
that government has taken a
number of significant measures
to ensure there will be minimal
impact to beaches and tidal flow
in the area.

Adding that there has been no
indication of potential adverse
effects on the Western
Esplanade beach from the
planned dredging, Mr Ingraham
said the Ministry of Public
Works and Transport will “mon-
itor the area” throughout the
project.

However, he did note that an
Environmental Impact Assess-
ment has recommended that fish














Ingraham notes environmentalists’
concerns over move to
accommodate larger cruise ships

and conch usually kept in the
harbour should be stored at
alternate sites during the work.

“Turbidity levels will be with-
in the standards of the Florida
Environmental Protection
Agency. However, the BEST
Commission has under review a
proposed system of ‘active de-
watering’ for disposal of dis-
charge water that has the poten-
tial to produce reduced levels of
visible turbidity at the discharge
location, a system that was used
recently by the contractor in oth-
er project locations.

“Noise pollution has been
deemed negligible and should

eck out our new H
and Se ae i

not create any discomfort for
individuals who work nearby.
The contractors were advised of
the various requirements of the
project, and were also informed
of the need for unimpeded
movement of ship traffic (com-
mercial and pleasure craft) with-
in the harbour,” he said.

Mr Ingraham added that addi-
tional studies have also been
conducted by RTM STAR Cen-
tre — including simulations of
ship movements — to verify
dredge area limits with regard to
the safe entry and berthing of
mega cruise ships in all weather
conditions.

“This exercise was undertaken
in conjunction with cruise line
operators, the Port Department,
Nassau Harbour Pilots and the
engineering staff of the Ministry
of Public Works and Transport,”
Mr Ingraham said.

He added that mooring analy-
sis provided by cruise line oper-
ators “will guide the placement
of the mooring dolphins and the
necessary bollards for the proper
berthing of the mega cruise ships.

“Meetings have also been con-
ducted with a diverse group of
stakeholders including those on
whose activities the project will
have some impact. The meetings
were designed to explain the
scope of works to be undertaken,
to receive input, and identify spe-
cific issues related to individuals
who will be affected by the pro-
ject,” he said.

These stakeholders include:
the Bahamas Hotel Association,
the Potter’s Cay Vendors Asso-
ciation, the Arawak Cay Ven-



Oem ee UEUN

dors Association, the Ministry of
Tourism, the Immigration
Department, Customs, the Min-
istry of Agriculture and Marine
Resources, the Ministry of Envi-
ronment, the BEST Commission,
the Port Department, the Min-
istry of Health and cruise line
operators.

“Tt is anticipated that the
dredging activities will be com-
pleted by November, 30, 2009 to
accommodate the arrival in the
Bahamas of one the first of Roy-
al Caribbean International’s
mega cruise ships, Oasis of the
Seas, on its maiden voyage in
December, 2009.

“T take this opportunity to
congratulate the management
team of Boskalis on the award
of the contract. I should also like
to thank Cox & SHAL consul-
tants along with the staff mem-
bers of the various government
agencies for the part they have
played in the advancement of
this project to the present time,”
Mr Ingraham said.

Bill proposes new regulations
for pharmaceutical industry

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT took the first
concrete steps to fill a regulatory
void that pharmaceutical industry
insiders have claimed leaves mem-

bers of the public at risk.

Responding to cries from some
within the industry itself that it is
“wide open” to abuse by unscrupu-
lous individuals, Minister of Health

Hubert Minnis brought a bill

proposing new regulations to gov-

ern the pharmaceutical industry

Hubert Minnis

before the House of Assembly yes-

terday.

Called A Bill for an Act to Provide for the Regulation
and Control of the Practice of Pharmacy and for the Reg-
istration and Licensing of Persons Qualified to Practice
Pharmacy and for the Establishment of the Bahamas
Pharmacy Council and Other Matters Connected There-
with, the legislation will be known as the Pharmacy Act, if

passed.

Dr Minnis said it will ensure that pharmacies “follow

certain protocol.”

He added that it should cut down in the presence of
counterfeit drugs in the local market and require pharma-
cies to meet Bahamian and international standards.

Last year a pharmaccutical industry insider warned that
the pharmacy business in the this country suffers
from a lack of laws holding suppliers accountable for the
drugs they sell or requiring them to reveal their

source.

The concerned citizen, speaking in April 2008, said it
was high time that the government ensure there is more
oversight of Bahamian drug wholesalers and pharmacies
to ensure the public is not exposed to substandard drugs

and other associated risks.

Bruce Lowe, senior pharmacist at Lowe’s Pharmacy told
The Tribune he has been personally pushing for such legis-

lation since 1975.

Specific risks for the public arise out of the fact that, at
present, suppliers are not required to have liability insur-
ance to be used should someone suffer an adverse reaction
from taking a drug they supplied.

The lack of a national drug registry facilitates the impor-
tation of counterfeit drugs, which may not have the effect
that the person taking the medication expects them to.

Meanwhile, there is also no oversight of the conditions
in which suppliers store drugs — for example in a cool or
hot environment — despite the fact that this can significant-

ly impact the efficacy of drugs.



Bar president: better govt planning would
have prevented Court of Appeal vacancies

e/Bridal

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

IF GOVERNMENT had
engaged in better long-term
planning, there would not
be vacancies on the Court
of Appeal bench, president
of the Bahamas Bar Council

Congratulations
: \ i is

DILLETTE
PASSES
CHARTERED
ACCOUNTANT
EXAM

Wayne Munroe said.

Last October Justice Mil-
ton Ganpatsingh retired
from the Court of Appeal
and Justice Emmanuel
Osadebay is set to retire this
year. Court of Appeal Pres-
ident Dame Joan Sawyer,
Justice Osadebay, Justice
Hartman Longley and Jus-
tice Christopher Blackman
are the only judges current-

Adam Dilate of Freeport, Grand Bahama ad Nassau has suncasslully patsed ihe
Unilorm Evaluation (UFE) to become a Chamered Accountant on his first
attempt. Prior to graduating trom St, Mary's University in Halifax, Nowa Scotia in
2006 wth Bacheke's degree in Commence and his successful complejon of the
(Chartered Accountancy Programme in Canada, Mr. Diletie’s early education was in
the Anglican Schaal System at Ciscowery Primary School, Freeport Anglican High
School and then al he College of The Bahamas. He is shown being congralulaled
af the kemal convocation of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nova Scotia
14th Februsey, 2009 by its President, Leo Galant, POA, CFP. fdr, Dillette, the elder
$0n of Al anc Kethryn Diletie, is a senior auditor with the accounting firm of Deloite
4 Touche LLP in Halifax, Nova Scotia and plans a return io The Bahamas.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News aleZeoe tomer

EGitOnia betters cccte csr ec ate cs eecece sete ence aeons Pa
P9,10,11

BUSINESS SECTION

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

ly on the bench of the
Appellate Court.

While the Court of
Appeal continues to sit, Mr
Munroe said the speed at
which it hears cases and
makes judgments is affected
by the empty spot.

Government should have
planned better and had a
replacement ready in time,
he said.

“You know from the Con-
stitution when a judge will
reach the age of retirement,
so you know when you need
to fill that vacancy,” Mr
Munroe told The Tribune
yesterday.

He also expressed sur-
prise that government has
not consulted the Bar Coun-
cil regarding the empty seat.

Meanwhile, there is still
no definite word on when
new appointments to the
bench will assume their
posts.

Justices

When asked during a
brief interview yesterday
when the new justices would
be instated, Attorney Gen-
eral Michael Barnett said:
“We’re working on it.”

Earlier this year, Mr Bar-
nett said the spots would
soon be filled. He did not
give a specific date, or say
from which part of the
region they will be recruit-
ed.

However, he explained
that government has made
no secret of its intention to
have a full complement of
judges, regardless of nation-
ality.

According to Article 102
of the Constitution, a jus-
tice of appeal is permitted
to hold office until the age
of 68.

The Constitution also
allows the governor general,
after consulting with the
prime minister, to allow a
justice to sit until the age of
70.

The Constitution also says
a judge may continue to
serve beyond the age of 68,
as may be necessary to
enable him to deliver judg-
ment or fulfil any other duty
in relation to proceedings
that were commenced in his
court before he attained
that age.
PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master


























































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Threats to Tribune reported to police

THE DAY after the article, “The tragic sto-
ry of the young pilot who knew too much,”
appeared in The Tribune, a jitney pulled up
across the street from The Tribune’s Shirley
Street entrance. A senior Tribune staff member
was standing at the front of the building.

“Hey, you!” the driver shouted across the
street, “is that man Marquel who wrote Insight
in there?” Because the driver had mispro-
nounced the name of Managing Editor John
Marquis, the staff member feigned ignorance.

“Tf he’s in there, Pll come and burn down
The Tribune with him in there!” he shouted
angrily. His threat has been reported to the
police.

The jitney driver was angered by an article,
written by Mr Marquis, as a result of an inter-
view given to him by Mr Chauncey Tynes, Sr.,
on the death of his son, Chauncey, Jr. The aging
Mr Tynes believes that his son, who got mixed
up with drug smugglers at the height of the
trade in the eighties, was killed because he knew
too much. Mr Tynes, whose son used to fly for
Sir Lynden, is convinced that his son knew too
much about Sir Lynden’s relationship with drug
lord, Carlos “Joe” Lehder, who had planted
his Colombian flag on Norman’s Cay in the
Exumas from where he smuggled drugs into
the US. For all these years, Mr Tynes has
believed that his son’s knowledge made him
expendable. Apparently Mr Tynes, Sr., did not
want to go to his grave with this knowledge.

That was Mr Tynes’s story. He wanted it
told and he selected the expert pen of Mr Mar-
quis to do the telling. The “Insight” article was
published on March 9. It created quite a stir in
the town.

After publication of the article a section of
the PLP organised a rally against The Tribune
— promised by a PLP MP to be the largest ral-
ly ever seen in the Caribbean— to which about
40 persons showed up, lost interest and ended
the day partying on the Eastern Parade. How-
ever, throughout the following weeks threats
of “we’re going to burn The Tribune down”
kept surfacing. It came out in the open last
week when a concerned citizen telephoned The
Tribune to report the intemperate words of
another PLP MP, who has aspirations to lead-
ership of his party.

This man was speaking in a public parking lot
at a meeting held by a crimewatch committee in
the Shirley Street-Twynam Avenue area.

Not only did the MP “rant and rave” about
having to get this “Englishman out of this coun-
try”, but off mike and within earshot of all to

hear, he said: “We must burn The Tribune
down!”

We now flash back to May 1967 and the
Crooked Island by-election in which the late
Basil Kelly was defending his House of Assem-
bly seat. The AP reported that “Premier Lynden
Pindling’s young native-dominated government
may soon face its first popularity test at the
polls since the historic upset which swept him
into office four months ago.”

In office just four months, this was a crucial
by-election for the PLP. Premier Pindling was
determined to win. The PLP pulled out all the
stops.

Every dirty trick in its arsenal of dirty tricks
was used. Of course, as usual, The Tribune was
in the thick of the battle, and whispers of “we
gotta burn that Tribune down” was drifting
back to us.

Tribune publisher Sir Etienne Dupuch and
ourselves decided to spend the Easter week-
end at Exuma. We were there Easter Sunday
morning when we got the news that The Tri-
bune was on fire. This was just a week before
Mr Kelly won his Crooked Island seat by 47
votes, defeating an angry new government.

Early on Easter Sunday morning one or
more persons set fire to The Tribune’s stock-
room. The Tribune is a fireproof Butler build-
ing.

Although it caused thousands of dollars dam-
age to the building and machinery and com-
pletely destroyed our newsprint and materials,
it was contained to the stockroom area. By the
time we had returned to Nassau, Tribune exec-
utives, volunteers, electricians, builders and
office cleaners were busily repairing the damage.
All day Sunday neighbours, well wishers and
friends turned up with mops and brooms to get
The Tribune back into production.

A Senator with a broom in hand was side by
side with one of our paper boys sweeping water
out of the building.

The Guardian sent in supplies. The Tribune
didn’t miss a roll of the press. It was back in pub-
lication Tuesday morning — Easter Monday
was a public holiday when newspapers would
not have been published.

The police confirmed arson. Although we
had our suspicions, the political climate — even
in the police force — was such that it would
have been difficult to go after the perpetrators.
However, times have changed.

We are now busy collecting names to be
handed to the police. This time history will not
repeat itself.

ee ede
READY-MADE FRAMES

cag

Our PM should
be provided
with security

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Rt Hon Hubert A Ingra-
ham, Prime Minister of The
Bahamas, was once heard years
ago explaining that he had no
need of a security detail because
he had done nothing wrong to
anyone to warrant being protect-
ed.

And, concerning this particu-
lar issue, he must be serious. His
personal mantra “I say what I
mean and I mean what I say”
rings true with regards to his own
security because I have had occa-
sion to watch him travel along
the streets of Nassau (in a chauf-
feured car), and also, because I
live close to the area, I have had
occasion to drive past and even
walk past his house — no security.

It troubles me, as a concerned
citizen of The Bahamas that the
nation’s Chief Executive can just
wander about the streets of the
country like any other ordinary
citizen.

It does not seem right, and (’m
gonna say it), it just does not look
right for the Prime Minister of
the country to not have a security
detail while driving on our streets,
walking on our streets, or con-
stantly stationed at his house (24
hours).

T have the same mindset as the
Prime Minister — I feel that I have
done nothing wrong to anyone to
warrant 24-hour protection by the
police.

But, at the same time, I am
cognizant of the criminal element
that we, in The Bahamas, have
to contend with on a daily basis.

And me, just as a regular citi-
zen, I wouldn’t mind a police
escort everywhere I go, for my
own protection as I drive and
walk the streets of Nassau. And
also, I wouldn’t mind 24-hour
police protection at my house to
ensure my Safety.

As a matter of fact, I wouldn’t
mind that type of comprehensive
police protection for my entire
family, given the 2009 criminal
realities, which is why I cannot
understand Mr Ingraham’s stance
— refusing protection.

He is the Prime Minister; I am
only “Joe Blow”. And if I am
willing to accept that type of pro-
tection for me and my family,
don’t you think that the man who
is running the whole country
should accept some type of pro-
tection? I mean, come on, let’s
be reasonable.

Mr Ingraham is a politician, I
am not.

But even I, not being a politi-
cian, would know that the nature
of politics in The Bahamas dic-
tate that approximately half of
the country does not like your
brand of politics if you are a PLP,
and approximately half of the
country does not like your brand
of politics if you are an FNM.

Sometimes this dislike for your
brand of politics translates into a
personal hatred for you. In Amer-
ica, and some other countries, this
hatred for a particular brand of

YOUR CONWNECTION-TO

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



politics precipitates a conspiracy
and even execution of a plan to
assassinate political figures, most
notably those figures at the top of
the pyramid —- in our case, the
Prime Minister.

And so, bearing this in mind,
all of us concerned citizens of The
Bahamas should attempt to con-
vince Mr Ingraham to accept 24-
hour, comprehensive police pro-
tection for himself. As I am sure
Mr Ingraham can appreciate, he
is not an ordinary Bahamian.

And his untimely demise would
catapult this country and even
this region into a tailspin of uncer-
tainty, the likes of which we
would not opt to experience.
Very few Bahamians would miss
“Joe Blow”. But we would all cer-
tainly miss the Prime Minister.

And even Mr Ingraham would
concede that security is a neces-
sary inconvenience for those who
have a dislike for it. Consider
when dignitaries from other coun-
tries visit The Bahamas — the
government always provides
them with adequate (sometimes
overwhelming) security during
their entire length of stay in our
country.

Who’s to say that they would
like all of that protection?

But the government of The
Bahamas deems it necessary,
doesn’t it?

Excuse me for saying so, but, I
happen to believe that all of these
dignitaries are not as important as
The Prime Minister of The
Bahamas.

Mr Ingraham is my Prime Min-
ister! And if I was in a position to
do so, I would do everything with-
in my power to ensure his safety —
within and outside this jurisdic-
tion.

And so, I make an appeal (as I
hope all Bahamians would) to our

Prime Minister — The Right
Honourable Hubert A Ingraham
— to relax your personal policy of
refusing protection for the bet-
terment, forward development,
and stability of The Bahamas, and
give The Minister of National
Security license to do his job.

MARVIN G

LIGHTBOURN

Nassau,

March 22, 2009.

(We agree. Mr Ingraham is of
the same mindset as the late Sir
Roland Symonette, who we
would often see as we drove to
work at 7.30 in the morning walk-
ing from his office back to his
home after having already com-
pleted a full day’s work.

(When “RT” or “Pop” Symon-
ette, as he was affectionately
known, was confirmed as the first
Premier of the Bahamas, Police
Commissioner Nigel Morris sent
a police officer as the first securi-
ty guard to be stationed at his
home.

(When Sir Roland saw the offi-
cer he sent him back to the Com-
missioner with the message that
he needed no one to guard him,
rather he believed the officer
could be put to better use guard-
ing the people.

(However, times were differ-
ent then. There was crime, but
not at the level that we experi-
ence it today. We know that Mr
Ingraham is a man of his word,
but it is a wise man, who can
adjust his position when the situ-
ation changes.

(After all one might vow to
spend the day out of doors in the
sunshine, but as soon as it starts to
rain the wise person seeks shelter
inside. Times have changed from
Sir Roland’s day and it is impor-
tant that Mr Ingraham, for the
sake of the country and its people,
adjusts to that change.

(It should be mandatory that
this country provides security for
its chief citizen and his family. —
Ed).

Robin Hood economics will
bankrupt the world, Mr Obama

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS past week the White House announced that President
Obama will have an entourage of 1,000 officials attending the
OAS Summit in Trinidad or at least four-five jets filled with civil ser-
vants and hangers-on. Just can’t calculate how much C02 this will

pollute the atmosphere?

So it is good and permissible for the socialist government of the
US to waste public moneys on meetings but deny it to hard work-
ing employees and put the hard working hotel employees of the

Bahamas in jeopardy?

Oh this Obama Administration reminds me so much of George
Orwell’s Animal Farm — for those who have not read Animal Farm
go get a copy and then predict precisely what the Government of
the new Socialist Republic of the United States of America will do.

Robin Hood Economics will predictably bankrupt the whole

world, Mr President.

PETER WILLIAMS
Nassau,
March 7, 2009.

THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTERUPTION OF WIRELESS
NETWORK AT ATLANTIS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Ltd. (BTC) would like to advise the general public
that due to the commissioning and acceptance

of the wireless network at Atlantis, there may be

an interruption in service from Tuesday March
3list- Friday April 3rd, 2009.

BIC apologizes for any inconvenience caused.

www.btcbahamas.com
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Keith Carey
murder retrial
atijourned for
third time

this week

THE retrial of three men
charged in the February 2006
murder of businessman Kei-
th Carey has been adjourned
for the third time this week.

The trial was adjourned
yesterday, until Monday at
10am, after it was revealed
that attorney Perry Albury
who is representing murder
accused Dwight Knowles
would not be able to attend.

Mr Albury, who was
involved in a car accident on
Wednesday, has been given
medical leave, lead prosecu-
tor Cheryl Grant-Bethel told
the court.

Attorney Craig Butler,
who is representing murder
accused Jamal Glinton, told
Justice Jon Isaacs that he did
not oppose the adjournment
but asked if the court could
extend its hours beyond
4.30pm so that the trial could
be over with soon.

Extending

Justice Isaacs said that he
had no problem extending
the hours.

The retrial began on Feb-
ruary 15 before Justice
Isaacs.

Jamal Glinton, Sean
Brown and Dwight Knowles
are charged with murder as
well as armed robbery and
conspiracy to commit armed
robbery.

Keith Carey, 43, was shot
and killed on the steps of the
Bank of the Bahamas on
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway before he was able
to deposit $40,000 that
belonged to the Esso Service
Station, which he operated.

Ms Grant-Bethel,
Stephanie Pintard, Anthony
Delaney and Lennox Coleby
are prosecuting the case.

Attorneys Craig Butler
and Devard Francis are rep-
resenting Jamal Glinton,
attorney Dorsey McPhee is
representing Sean Brown,
and attorney Perry Albury is
representing Dwight
Knowles.

The prosecution has called
a total of 41 witnesses during
the trial.

US, Mexico
work together
to fight drug
cartels

@ By EILEEN SULLIVAN
CUERNAVACA, Mexico

USS. and Mexican officials
say they will soon name a
group to develop strategies
for stopping the cross-border
flow of weapons and drugs,
according to the Associated
Press.

Emerging from a confer-
ence Thursday with U.S.
officials, Mexican Attorney
General Eduardo Medina-
Mora said more meetings are
needed to develop plans to
bring warring drug cartels
under control along the bor-
der.

Medina-Mora also
announced plans to begin
checking 10 percent of the
vehicles entering his country
from the U.S. for illegal
weapons.

US. Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napolitano
and U.S. Attorney General
Eric Holder met privately
with Medina-Mora, Interior
Minister Fernando Gomez-
Mont and Public Safety Sec-
retary Genaro Garcia Luna.

Clan

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



Global pressure mounting
for Detention Centre probe

Letters from around world continue to flood The Tribune after mistreatment reports

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

LETTERS from human rights activists around the
world calling for an independent investigation of the
Carmichael Road Detention Centre continue to pour
into The Tribune office following reports of detainees
being mistreated.

Residents of France, Belgium, Germany, Switzer-
land, Spain, New Zealand and the United States are
among dozens from around the world who say they
are outraged by claims of physical abuse, filthy living
conditions and inadequate meals at the centre.

However, the Immigration Department has not yet
responded to requests for an independent investigation,
nor has it accommodated The Tribune’s request to tour
the facility.

Department director Jack Thompson led psychologist
David Allen, Archdeacon James Palacious, Royal
Bahamas Defence Force senior lieutenant Frederick
Brown and Social Services director Mellany Zonicle on
a tour of the facility on March 6, and the leading pro-
fessionals submitted reports of their impressions and
recommendations for department heads and the Cab-
inet to review.

Although Minister of Immigration Branville McCart-
ney said on March 18 the reports would be submitted to
The Tribune in full at the newspaper’s request, they
have yet to be provided.

Calls to Mr McCartney were not returned before

Brent Symonette Tommy Turnquest

LETTER FROM ODILE MAISSE (BELGIUM)





“I request an immediate,
thorough and independent
investigation into these
allegations, ensuring that
anyone found responsible is
brought to justice.”



The Tribune went to press yesterday.
And as requests remain unanswered, the global cam-

paign for an independent investigation is building.

Around 20 letters from activists addressed to Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symonette, Mr McCartney, and
Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest were
received this week, adding to the mounting pile of let-
ters sent to the Bahamas since reports of the ill-treat-
ment of detainees were first published in February.

The writers are demanding an independent investi-
gation of the detention centre and appropriate medical
attention for detainees.

Independent

Ina letter to Mr Symonette, which echoes several oth-
ers, Odile Maisse from Belgium wrote: “I request an
immediate, thorough and independent investigation
into these allegations, ensuring that anyone found
responsible is brought to justice.

“T trust you will allow an independent monitoring of
the facility by civil society including human rights organ-
isations.

“Besides I urge you that no asylum-seeker be
returned without access to a fair and effective refugee
determination procedure, including the right to appeal
to an independent tribunal and access to effective legal
assistance, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for
Refugees and interpreters.

“The detention of irregular migrants and asylum-
seekers should only be used as a measure of last resort.

“Please ensure that alternatives to detention are
available and accessible, in law and in practice, without
discrimination.”

Mother rapped for criticism over Immigration raid damage

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

IMMIGRATION officials

have hit out at single mother
for criticising the fact they have
not yet repaired damage caused
by officers who invaded her
home.

Four weeks after armed
immigration officers raided her
Nassau Village home, Violet
Hanna, 41, told The Tribune
that although the Immigration
Department is investigating the
circumstances of the early
morning raid, nothing has yet
been done to fix the back door
or rear gate which were bashed
with a maul.

The Bahamian mother-of-two
and her 7-year-old daughter,
who were at home at the time,
said they were terrified by the
aggressive invasion, have suf-
fered post-traumatic stress and
now feel unsafe in their home.

She said restoring the securi-
ty of her home is her number
one priority but she cannot
afford to fix the door herself.

In response to Wednesday’s
article entitled, “Woman claims
Immigration Department has
yet to repair damage to home”,
the department lists a number
of things addressed in the inves-
tigation, but makes no refer-
ence to when the damage will
be repaired.

The statement reads: “The
department takes grave excep-
tion to the statements issued by
Ms Violet Hanna, as they are
deceptive and misleading.

“The article seeks to give its
readers the impression that
Immigration did nothing and
adopted an uncaring attitude



Branville McCartney

regarding the matter, when in
fact this is simply not the case.

“The department would
rather not have the issue drawn
out in the public domain, but
scathing attacks without merit
will not go unchallenged.”

Immigration Minister
Branville McCartney and direc-
tor Jack Thompson maintain
they contacted Ms Hanna after
reading how around six armed
officers demanded entry into
Ms Hanna’s Price Street home
at around 4am on February 24,
brushed aside her offer to show
them her passport, and left as
her daughter was crying and
vomiting in fear.

Mr McCartney said: “If in
fact officers conducted them-
selves in an unprofessional man-
ner they will be disciplined.”

And he promised a full inves-

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tigation into the matter. A four
member panel met with Ms
Hanna and her attorney on
March 6 and visited her home
to inspect the damage on March

Apprehension

Immigration officers who par-
ticipated in the apprehension
exercise were interviewed, and
the department wrote to Ms
Hanna asking her to put an offi-
cial complaint in writing after
she promised to do so, the
department maintains.

Investigations are ongoing
and the panel plans to interview
its final list of people this week.

The statement further reads:
“The Bahamas Immigration
Department remains commit-
ted to its mandate to protect
the borders of the Bahamas.

“The minister and directorate
wish to reiterate the depart-

a
Us)
Ute ena)
PHONE: 322-2157

cai —_

ment’s pledge to ensure the
highest level of professionalism
and respect continue to be the
hallmark of the department.
“The leadership of the Immi-
gration Department will not tol-

erate misconduct of its officers
during its apprehension exer-
cises, and will do all in its pow-
er to preserve the Bahamas for
generations yet unborn.”

CLA hl C Garden





















were life is stall simple . and people stil care
Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.

Telephone 322-8493

DRESSES
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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Mexico reports arrest of major drug suspect

m MEXICO CITY

AN HEIR to one of Mexico’s
most notorious narcotics empires
was grabbed by police as he exer-
cised in a city park, officials
announced Thursday, shortly
before U.S. and Mexican Cabinet
officials met to coordinate attacks
on escalating drug violence, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Carrillo Leyva allegedly inherit-
ed a top position in the Juarez car-
tel from his father Amado Carrillo
Fuentes, who was nicknamed “the
Lord of the Skies” for sending jet-
liners full of cocaine to the United

The father was considered Mex-
ico’s No. 1 drug trafficker when he
died in 1997 during plastic surgery
to change his appearance. The U.S.
Embassy said Thursday that the
embattled remnant of his cartel is
still “one of Mexico’s most ruthless
organized criminal gangs, which
controls one of the primary trans-

base of Ciudad Juarez last year.

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Royal Bahamian Resort & Offshore Island

Invites application for the position of:

INTERNAL AUDTIOR

Applicants must process knowledge of the
application of generally accepted accounting
principles, internal control systems and
computerized systems, ability and willingness to
train, counsel and coach employees, proven ability
to create and implement project plans and re-
engineering of existing ways of doing business
to facilitate improvements in productivity as well
as strong leadership skills in area of responsibility.

Salary will be based upon qualification and
experience. We offer excellent benefits.
Interested persons should submit resume by email
to:

Send resume to:

Director of Human Resources
P.O. Box CB-13005

E-mail: cmajor@grp.sandals.com



rr.
ANDEAUS

Position Available
Receptionist:
Dates:
* Answer and address incoming telephone calls
* Greet Clients
* Provide administrative support, including all filing

Expanding the west side

THE Nature Conservancy is
working to expand of the
Andros West Side National
Park so that wildlife and cru-
cial nursery habitats can be pro-
tected from future threats.

TNC is undertaking this
effort in partnership with the
Bahamas National Trust
(BNT), Andros Conservancy
and Trust (ANCAT), Nature’s
Hope for South Andros and the
Kerzner Marine Foundation.

Andros is the largest island
in the Bahamas and contains
some of the most pristine
marine and terrestrial habitats
in the country, including vast
tidal flats with flourishing bone-
fish and tarpon populations, the
third longest reef in the world,
and the most blue holes of any
location in the western hemi-
sphere.

Along the west side, there are
a number of estuaries, tidal
creeks, and wetlands that sup-
port a high diversity of life and
provide important nursery and
foraging areas for commercially
valuable species.

“As part of our effort to pro-
mote the project and encour-
age community members to
become involved in conserva-
tion, the project team launched
a tee-shirt design contest in Sep-
tember 2008 throughout the
schools in Andros,” explained
the TNC in a statement. “The
submitted design had to high-
light a conservation message
that relates to the west side of
Andros.”

The competitors were from
schools in Mangrove Cay,
North, Central and South
Andros. The competition was
divided into two categories: (1)
primary school students and (2)
junior and secondary school stu-
dents.

The TNC announced that the
winners were: Jamal Neely from
Staniard Creek Primary, who
presented “Bonefish, Let’s
Observe to Preserve” and
Jachette Johnson from South
Andros High School, who pre-
sented “Save Our Natural
Resources From Extinction.”

“The project team is pleased
to have had so many young
Androsians artistically express
the value of preserving our nat-
ural resources in order to pro-
tect the Bahamian way of life,”
the TNC said. “This is indeed
the attitude towards and appre-
ciation for our natural resources
that we aim to increase through-
out the Bahamas. It is impor-
tant for us to understand how
the health of our natural
resources plays a significant role
in sustaining our quality of life
both ecologically and economi-
cally.”



* Must be personable, customer service driven, and have excellent verbal communication skills

* Working Knowledge of Microsoft Office Software essential

Benefits:

Excellent salary, competitive health and benefits package, rewarding incentive system, dynamic

workpluce, career development assistance

Please submit résameés vin fax 328-6357, P.O, Box CB-10979 or ¢-mail cheywonne(@andeans.com

W HEN a UN spon-
sored government

was elected in Haiti there was
a glimmer of hope for the
future of this most troubled
nation.

As we approach the fifth
anniversary of the last foreign
intervention it is useful for us
to evaluate the situation.

In The Bahamas and
Jamaica the situation in Haiti
has a direct impact on many
aspects of our societies.

In Jamaica gunrunning and
drug trafficking originating in
Haiti have increased the levels
of crime and corruption.

This has consequentially
damaged the economy thus
creating more hardship for the
people.

In these times of worldwide
economic hard times the result
can be calamitous.

In The Bahamas the cur-
rent situation in Haiti increas-
es the flood of illegal immi-
grants and I am sure that of
drugs and guns as well.

The Bahamas has for years
had to deal with the problems
which result from illegal immi-
gration.

Q eve Harbour Bay East BAY St. telL.394-5767







However during this great
recession, which has impact-
ed the employment of thou-
sands of Bahamians, the eco-
nomic impact of illegal immi-
gration and the consequential
social damage is more extreme
and serious.

This brings me to the title
of this column.

However well intentioned
the US and the UN were
when they intervened in Haiti
they have failed to achieve
their objectives.

Yes, there have been elec-
tions however the social struc-
tures and security necessary
for the development and sus-
taining of a decent quality
of life has not been estab-
lished.

The financial and human
resources necessary to do the

of Andros National Park

portation routes for illegal drug }
shipments into the United States.” :

Prosecutors say Carrillo Leyva, i
32, was second only to his uncle :
Vicente Carrillo Fuentes in the }
gang, whose battles with upstart }
cartels have fed a bloodbath that }
saw 1,600 people killedin itshome }

LEFT: Felicity Burrows,
The Nature Conservan-
cy’s project manager,
presenting Jachette
Johnson with her prize
while Rivean Riley from
The Bahamas National
Trust displays the win-
ning tee-shirt design.

BELOW: Left to right -
Sharon Henfield
(Nature’s Hope for
South Andros), Javonya
Sands (third place win-
ner), Rivean Riley
(BNT), Felicity Burrows
(TNC), Jachette John-
son (winner) and
Andrae Nairn (principal
of South Andros High
School).



job have not been provided
by those who assumed the
responsibility for Haiti's
future.

The result of these events is
the gunrunning and drug trade
originating in Haiti that seri-
ously harms The Bahamas and
Jamaica.

The increased illegal migra-
tion to The Bahamas is one
more problem the country
doesn't need.

So if the interveners do not
finish the job they started in
Haiti the law of unintended
consequences will continue to
do us harm.

eR RC ESSE)
CURT E

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

edsdbeeusesvecceneuesss sec secawesseauveuedessesdceesseescessees <

Second man
pleads guilty in.
Iran aircraft |
parts scheme |

@ MIAMI

A SECOND man has plead-
ed guilty in Miami federal court }
to charges of scheming to ille- }
gally export military aircraft }
parts to Iran, according to }
Associated Press. ;

Traian Bujduveanu (Tray- }
"ANN Booj-doo-’VAY-nu) ;
pleaded guilty Thursday toa }
single conspiracy count. He act- }
ed as his own lawyer and faces
up to five years in federal :
prison when sentenced June 11. }

Iranian-born Hassan Keshari
previously pleaded guilty. Pros-
ecutors said both men were ille-
gally helping Iran obtain parts ;
for such aircraft as the F-14 }
Tomeat fighter, C-130 cargo }
plane and AH-1 attack heli- :
copter. The parts were shipped
from South Florida to Dubai
and on to Iran. :

Keshari also faces up to five
years in prison. i

Gaming Reform Committee writes
to PM over gambling legalisation

THE Gaming Reform Com-
mittee has again written to
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham asking him to move
ahead immediately with the
legislative reforms necessary
for the legalisation of gam-
bling.

The group said the weekend
arrest of several persons in
Grand Bahama in connection
with illegal gaming allegations
was just another example of
“antiquated laws and govern-
ment ineptness” at work.

GRC chairman Sidney Stra-
chan pointed out that nearly
every modern democracy
allows its citizens to gamble
within a regulated framework.

“Governments around the
world have learned through
bitter experience that the incli-
nation to game is universally
strong. If persons are unable to
pursue gaming interests
through legal, regulated means

Ministry of Tourism
partners with Southern
Boating in Rum Cay
swimsuit shoot

@ By DIANE PHILLIPS

ROBB HANRAHAN con-
fessed — the seasoned videog-
rapher was on assignment to
shoot tanned and toned stun-
ners for a swimsuit spread
when he realised there was
something different about this
gig. He couldn’t take his eyes
off... the scenery.

“It was breathtaking,” he
said. “When you are shooting
video and you've got the mod-
els who are as pretty as the
models we took down to Rum
Cay and you're having a hard
time focusing on the models
because the scenery is so
breathtaking, it says a lot,”
said Mr Harnahan.

A senior editor at Southern
Boating magazine, Mr Hanra-
han was among a contingent
of models, photographers,
make-up artists and produc-
ers who flew to Rum Cay in
the southeastern Bahamas for
the magazine’s much-antici-
pated annual swimsuit issue.

Though this was the first
video shoot, Mr Hanrahan’s
photographed here before, but
has never been as taken with a
set as he was with Rum Cay.
“You don’t see this kind of
scenery in the Bahamas. Pret-
ty beaches, good light, palms,

yes. Most of the time you just
follow the light. But this was
different. It was so dramatic,
primitive yet breathtaking. It
had some of the most remote,
beautiful locations I have ever
seen and every part was dif-
ferent.

“White cliffs on one side of
the island, caves on another,
then you’d cross over and
there were salt flats. Every-
where you went it was amaz-
ing, dramatic and wherever
you were, you felt like you left
the real world behind.”

Under management of
Montana Holdings Ltd, the
Sumner Point Marina, villas
and Out of the Blue restau-
rant played host to the
entourage with locals.

Sky Limo provided airline
service and the Ministry of
Tourism partnered in the
shoot because of the excellent
exposure for the Bahamas.

The group toured the island
and moved from backdrop to
backdrop by SUV, golf cart,
truck, buggy — whatever was
needed to get from flats to
cliffs to caves and back again.

“Getting around was even
different and the hospitality
was unbelievable. Everybody
made you feel like you were
part of a family,” said Mr



“If persons
are unable to
pursue gaming
interests
through legal,
regulated means
they will do so
illegally.”

GRC chairman
Sidney Strachan



they will do so illegally,” he
said.

“The end result is lost rev-
enue and with it problematic
limitations in social, educa-
tional and developmental pro-
gramming and initiatives. This

THE SOUTHERN BOATING
swimsuit issue (above) hit the
stands on April 1.

Hanrahan, who had one more
confession — being distracted,
for once, by the scenery, didn’t
bother his wife one bit.

“It was not your average
beach shot,” he said.

The Southern Boating swim-
suit issue hit the stands on
April 1. The editors were so
taken with Rum Cay they’ve
planned a feature on the
island, which will appear in
May.

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is exactly what is happening in
the Bahamas. It’s nothing
short of scandalous and a bla-
tant example of government
ineptness and backward think-
ing,” he said.

The GRC is calling for the
government to move forward
with legislative reform and the
establishment of a national
regulated gaming programme.
Further, the committee is rec-
ommending that modern
responsible gaming methods
and technologies be adopted
to afford Bahamians all prac-
tical means of minimising per-
sonal risk and impulsive play.

According to the commit-
tee, $15 to $20 million in gam-
ing revenue is being lost every
year because of government’s
refusal to change the law.

Important social, educa-
tional and economic initiatives
are underfunded as a conse-
quence, at the expense of



Bahamians, Mr Strachan said,
adding that important new
employment opportunities are
also slipping away — at a time
when they are very much
needed.

“Sure, gaming has its disad-
vantages.

“But holding firm to dis-
criminatory, antiquated laws
is just plain stupid. It’s a dis-

play of ineptness that cries out
for comment,” Mr Strachan
said.

The GRC is asking that
Bahamians contact their gov-
ernment representatives, the
prime minister, the gaming
authorities and others in posi-
tions of public responsibility
to demand that the gambling
laws be changed.

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Suzanne Stoll passed away on Monday 23rd
March, 200% in Ocala, FL. at age 96. She
enjoyed a long and busy life rich in travel
and experiences.

Born as Marion Suzanne Hagen on the 14th
March, 1913 in NY...
Suzanne (known as Suzie to her friends in
Nassau) arrived in Nassau in the mid 1930's

Rochester,

and shortly thereafter, married Godfrey W
The
her

Higgs. Suzie spent 22 years in

Bahamas. She is remembered for
philanthropic kindness, both to formal
charities and to many individuals assisting
them in hard times of that era. In her
Nassau days, she was active in sailing and in
stamp collecting and the establishment of a|
Stamp Club, She also active in

The Bahanwas Red Cross during the war and

wills

was befriended by the Duchess of Windsor
whe shared a common national background

with her.

[t was in The Bahamas that Suzanne became a keen deep-sea fisherwoman, competing

jin many tournaments and landing a number of world records, one of which survived

on the books for more than 40 years.

‘Suzanne lett The Bahamas to settle for a while first in Miami, FL. from where she|

continued her ishing and then in Los Angeles, CA. where she married Wayne Stoll in

1970. In her California days, she owned Midas Muffler franchises and, with Wayne, was

involved in antique car collection and restoration,

Suzanne and Wayne moved in 197d to Miami, OK. There she was active in the retail sale

of Indian jewelry and limited edition prints and plates. It was in Oklahoma that

Suzanne became an avid dog breeder working from her own Oakdale Kennels.

Suzanne truly loved her Dalmatians and won many honours with them, including Best

of Shows in the United States, Canada and The Bahamas. She spent thousands of miles}

traveling by car and by plane with Wayne at the yoke across the United States and by

| bixert through The Bahamas. Despite illnesses from time to time, she never stopped

| planning future trips.

Suzanne and Wayne moved on his retirement in 2005 to Ocala, where they much

enjoyed new friends and being closer to her Nassau family. Suzanne was|

}predeceased by her eldest son Monty. She is lovingly remembered by her husband
Wayne, sons Peter and Geoffrey, daughters-in-law Judy, Colette and Joyce,
grandchildren Andrew, Chris, Grouper and Spencer, 7 great grandchildren and close
friends in many parts of the world.

There will be a small memorial service held at Chost Church Cathedral on Tuesday, 7th

April at 11:00am.


PAGE 8, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Unemployment Benefits PM: NIB tax cap on salaries

‘will act as a stimulus’

FROM page one

ment Benefits under the
National Insurance scheme.

At the same time, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
made clearer the purpose of
the scheme — set to come
into effect on April 20th —
as well as who will be eligi-
ble, how much they can get,
when they can get it and how
and when they can apply for
it.

“Unemployment insurance
programmes provide tempo-
rary financial assistance to
eligible workers who become
unemployed, as unable to



find suitable employment
and who are capable, avail-
able, and willing to work.
“And while unemploy-
ment schemes are designed
primarily to benefit individ-
uals who lose their jobs and
lose regular income, they
also help boost the economy
in times of recession.”
“Unemployment payments

Re aera ieee
AND APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

The National Insurance Board will soon begin making

























































announcements regarding the times and places at which persons
may register to receive benefits.

During the first “interim” phase of the scheme — which will
continue until the $20 million allocated for the purpose runs out
— eligible applicants must meet the following criteria:

e Must have paid contributions to the National Insurance
Board for at least 40 weeks or nine months. These contributions
could have been made just before unemployment began or
many years before.

They must also meet one of the following three conditions:

¢ Have made at least 13 weeks (three months and one week)
of contributions in the six months prior to becoming unem-
ployed.

e Or must have made 26 weekly payments in the last 52
weeks

e Or must have made 26 payments in the last contribution year
(July to June) before becoming unemployed.

The Government intends for people who may have been
unemployed for up to four years — since lay offs at the Royal
Oasis — to be able to qualify during this first phase.

During the second phase, which will be funded equally by
contributions from employees and employers and will kick in
when the initial $20 million is exhausted — by January 2010 —
only people who have been employed for at least half of the pre-
vious nine months and a half of the previous three months will
qualify to receive the benefit.

In other words they must have:

¢ Paid a year’s worth of contributions (52 weeks).

e Have paid or been credited with 13 contributions in the 26
weeks immediately before unemployment commenced.

e And must have paid seven contributions in the 13 weeks
immediately before unemployment commenced.

Cheques will be issued every two weeks. The first set of
cheques will be paid during the week of May 4, for the period
April 20 to May 2.

Entitled individuals will be advised by the NIB as to where
and when to collect cheques.

———————————————————
|| MARINE NAVIGATION COURSES |

Out at sea is not the place to discover that
you are not prepared for the challenges
so plan to attend the free first class of the
Terrestrial Navigation Course offered by
The Bahamas School of Marine Navigation
at BASRA Headquarters on East Bay Street
on Monday, April 6, 2009, at 7p.m. then
consider enrolling in the 3 month course.
The Seamanship Course (7 Saturdays)
starts April 25th. Tel. 364-5987, 364-2861.
535-6234 or visit www.bsmn.biz

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

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by NIB to persons who most
probably lack the financial
ability to do so will most
likely result in the prompt
purchase of consumer goods
or in discharging other essen-
tial obligations such as rents,
electricity or mortgage pay-
ments,” he added.

Mr Ingraham explained
that the conditions that
unemployed persons will
have to satisfy to qualify for
the second phase of the
scheme — that which will be
funded by contributions from
employers and employees —
will be more stringent than
those “quite generous” con-
ditions governing disburse-
ment of funds under the first
phase, to be funded by the
transferral of $20 million
from the Medical Benefit
Branch.

However, under both
phases of the scheme, eligi-
bility for funds depends on
the applicant being a person
who was_ previously
employed and registered
with the NIB by their
employer.

The scheme is not intend-
ed to “compensate for previ-
ous periods of unemploy-
ment,” said Mr Ingraham,
emphasising that eligible
people must be unemployed
currently.

Once they satisfy neces-
sary conditions, claimants
can receive half of their aver-
age insurable wage.

“So the wages on which
your contributions were
made prior to your becom-
ing unemployed will deter-
mine the sum you will
receive,” said Mr Ingraham.

With the current ceiling on
insurable wages at $400 per
week the maximum amount
anyone can receive is $200
per week.

To maintain their eligibili-
ty throughout the stipulated
13 week period through
which they can possibly
claim benefits, unemployed
people must be able to show
that they are continuing to
seek a job.

Applicants will have to
register with the Department
of Labour’s Employment
Exchange which will issue to

M

them an Unemployment }
Card. They will then be }
required to report to the }
Department of Labour every }
four weeks to check on the }

availability of jobs.

Mr Ingraham explained
that claimants will not be }
able to refuse suitable :
employment offered to them
or refuse to apply for a suit- ;
able vacancy brought to their :
attention and still receive

benefits.

And they will also lose i
access to the funds if they :
turn down any training pro- }
gramme offered by the:
Department of Labour i
which could qualify them for :

a job.

efitting from those funds.

Meanwhile, people fired :
from their job for theft, dis- :
honesty or “fraudulent }
offences” may only be able }
to receive benefits for half :
of the prescribed benefit }

period — six weeks.

The same applies for those :
who quit their jobs, who may }
also experience some delay :
in collecting their benefits, :

added Mr Ingraham.

Any decision to withhold :
benefits can be appealed and :
heard by the NIB Appeal
Tribunal — except for in the }
instance that Unemployment
Benefit is withheld because }
an applicant is receiving two }
or more other benefits, such }
as maternity or industrial :
injury benefits, under the }

National Insurance.

Survivors benefit — that }
paid to relatives of deceased }
individuals — and disability :
benefit do not fall into this

category.

Once people have received ;
the Unemployment Benefit :
for 13 weeks they will be
ineligible to access such }
funds again for another 52 }
weeks — so as to diminish }

abuse of the system.

agistrate rules that

‘Emperor’ be discharged

FROM page one

accused of the August 2007 murder of his nephew, Kenvardo

Knowles, 26.

Kenvardo Knowles was reportedly shot in his abdomen dur-
ing an argument in the Fox Hill area on August 19 of that year.
The father-of-six was pronounced dead on arrival at Princess
Margaret Hospital, becoming the 51st murder victim for 2007.

Knowles who was on the police’s Most Wanted List for near-
ly a year was reportedly arrested on July 3, 2008, at his girl-
friend’s residence in Coral Harbour. She was charged with har-
bouring a criminal. Knowles was arraigned on the murder

charge on July 7.

After informing Knowles that he was discharged, Magistrate
Virgill reminded him that he had been accused of the murder of
his nephew. “Let your conscience be your guide,” she cau-

tioned.

‘should be increased’

FROM page one

comes shortly after he revealed that employers and employees
will soon have to pay an entirely new contribution to the National
Insurance Board — to fund unemployment benefits — at a con-
tribution rate of 50 cents from each for every $100 of insurable
wage.

Presently Government funds the National Insurance scheme by
requiring workers and employers to jointly contribute 8.8 per
cent of an employee’s insurable wage to the NIB.

The taxable wage “ceiling” is $400 a week, meaning that no
matter how much a person makes, the maximum amount of their
salary that will be taxed is $400.

The insurable wage ceiling has been increased on only two occa-
sions since the introduction of the National Insurance scheme,
once in the 1980s and again in 1999.

While suggesting that the ceiling should be raised again, the
Prime Minister said the contribution rate of 8.8 per cent, although
it was set in 1973, it is “still good today.”

“T’ve seen reports to the effect that ‘Oh well, National Insurance
is going to go broke, it’s not going to be able to pay pensions after

Outlining other restrictions
on the disbursement of
unemployment benefits, Mr }
Ingraham noted that they :
will be reduced for people :
who are receiving severance }
pay from their previous :
employer — as they will be :
unable to receive benefits for :
the period that they are ben- ;

a certain period of time,’ etc.

“T would wish to provide some information to enlighten those
who are unenlightened about the scheme,” said Mr Ingraham.

“When the rate of 8.8 per cent was established back in 1973, it was
expected the rate would be good for a maximum of 25 years. This
is the 35th year. Ten years beyond — and yet the 8.8 per cent is still
good. It’s still valid, it’s still adequate to pay pensions,” said Mr

Ingraham.

“One might argue that indeed the rate of 8.8 per cent was too
high back in the 70s, but you can also argue that the benefits have
not been sufficiently substantial to cause the equilibrium of the fund

to be realised.”

The Prime Minister added, however, that the 8.8 per cent rate will
not be able to remain for an “indefinite period.”

“At some point in time the rate will be adjusted as it should be.
In many countries the rate is adjusted with great frequency,” he not-

ed.

$44.2m contract signed to
dredge Nassau Harbour

FROM page one

the western end of Arawak
Cay by some 1,000 feet.
Along with this extension
and the dredging, Boskalis
International will also
construct three mooring dol-
phins at Prince George
Whart.

Speaking briefly at yester-
day’s signing ceremony at the
British Colonial Hilton,
Prime Minister Ingraham
also revealed that some of
the dredged material from
this project will be used to
extend the northern coast of
New Providence from East
Street to Armstrong Street
some “20 to 30 feet into the
water.”

“This will create an addi-
tional one mile of waterfront
promenade to the Woodes
Rodgers Wharf. This scenic
pedestrian promenade will
include a boardwalk, land-
scaping, service road and
utility corridor as a compo-
nent of the Nassau downtown
redevelopment project.

“The promenade is expect-
ed to facilitate both the
downtown retail sector and
promote the reintroduction
and restoration of desirable
residential communities in
our capital city,” Mr Ingra-
ham said.

This complementary work
of extending Woodes
Rodgers Wharf is expected
to cost government an addi-
tional $24 million. Also
repairs are expected to be
made to the Prince George
Wharf piers and connecting
bridges, with new bollards to
be installed to accommodate
the larger new Genesis class
cruise ships complete with a
new security screening build-

ing and support facilities at
the wharf.

Yesterday’s contract sign-
ing comes on the heels of the
completion of the financing
for the first phase of the
redevelopment of the termi-
nal at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.
Financing for stage one of
this terminal redevelopment
project, totalled over $265
million, and was transferred
to Nassau Airport Develop-
ment’s (NAD) account on
Monday, March 30, permit-
ting contracts to be awarded
to start construction.

“We were pleased that
three banks operating in and
from the Bahamas arranged
this funding facility. I wish
to acknowledge the good
work of the Royal Bank of
Canada, the depository bank
for the collateral, First
Caribbean International and
CIBC Trust as onshore col-
lateral and local placement
agents, and Citibank, project
adviser, lead arranger and
offshore collateral agent.

“Stage one of the redevel-
opment, which comprises the
new 247,000 square foot US
departure terminal; one mil-
lion square feet of paved
apron surface on the air side
of the facility; and, a new
parking access roadway and
landscape on the land side of
the terminal, is budgeted at
$198 million. Completion is
scheduled for March 2011.

“The entire project, includ-
ing stage two (international
arrivals) and stage three
(international and domestic
departures and domestic
atrivals) is scheduled to be
completed by November
2013 with a total construc-
tion cost for all three stages
of $409.5 million,” he said.

—
ANDEAUS

A GROWING INSURANCE AGENCY
IS LOOKING FOR

INSURANCE SALES EXECUTIVES

Interested persons must have some experience
in sales with the ability to promote and develop
new business opportunities. Applicants must
be professional, energetic and motivated and
be able to work on their own initiative. Basic
knowledge of General, Life and Medical
Insurances will be an asset.

Also, interested persons must have good verbal
and written communications skills, good PC
skills and excellent customer service skills.

Please send resume to: P.O. BOX CB 10979
NASSAU, BAHAMAS.
FAX NO. (242) 328-6357

Concern as the Bahamas
named on ‘tax havens’ list

FROM page one

are listed in the section in which the Bahamas is also included. The
OECD said the Cayman Islands has enacted legislation — currently
being reviewed by the OECD — that allows the jurisdiction to
exchange information unilaterally and has identified 11 countries with
which it is prepared to do so.

The list says the Bahamas committed to the OECD's standards in
2002 and has one tax information exchange agreement (with the Unit-
ed States).

Last week government released a statement to the OECD and the
European Union outlining that it was ready to negotiate additional tax
information exchange agreements on an individual basis.

"The Bahamas reaffirms its commitment recorded in a March, 2002,
agreement between The Bahamas and the OECD.

"The Bahamas recognises significant advances in commitments to
broader application of OECD standards in transparency. The Bahamas
is ready to negotiate and conclude appropriate arrangements to accom-
modate these OECD standards," said the statement.

Former attorney general Alfred Sears recently lashed out at gov-
ernment for not having a national plan to buffer the country against the
onslaught of "baseless attacks" against the financial sector. To meet the
OECD's standards, Mr Sears said government must quickly enter
into 10 additional tax information exchange treaties with other OECD
countries, based on mutual interests such as double taxation and
investment treaties.

The push for a crackdown on off-shore tax havens has gained sig-
nificant traction recently, with world leaders such as British Prime
Minister Gordon Brown lobbying for an end to such centres. The
calls come during a time when world governments, desperate for ways
to increase faltering revenues, see off-shore centres as a means for rich
citizens of developed nations to evade taxes in their homelands.
TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 9

SPORTS



THE AVID junior golfers were eager to learn from the French pro and

spent hours observing and practising. Special focus was placed on
improving their full swing, putting and chipping skills. Audrey JUNIOR golfers at the Cable Beach Golf Club participated in a training clinic this weekend pasthosted by French Golf Champion, Audrey Riguelle.
explained, "The junior golfers are very enthusiastic and fast learners. | Audrey, an ambassador for Baha Mar Resorts in the European market, recently visited the Bahamas and in partnership with the Bahamas Golf Fed-
am pleased to have had the opportunity to work with them." eration, hosted a Junior Golf Clinic.



PICTURED with the junior golfers are (back row L-R) Robert ‘Sandy’ Sands, Senior Vice President of Administration and External Affairs; Tommy Jones, Vice President of Facilities, Baha Mar Resorts; Audrey Riguelle; Glenn
Archer, President, Bahamas Golf Federation; Chris Lewis, manager, Cable Beach Golf Club; Anthony Howorth, golf trainer; Walter Robinson, President, Bahamas Golf Federation Central Junior Division.

=) AUDREY has suc-
cessfully partici-

pated in several = cao
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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



Martinborough getting in gear

Championships



OVER the last two week-
ends, three-time World Sun-
fish champion Donnie Mart-
inborough produced two
impressive performances as
he prepares for the 39th Sun-
fish World Championships in
Montagu Bay in October.

After winning the Interna-
tional Masters Champi-

onships in Davis Islands,
Tampa, Florida over the
weekend of March 13-16,
Martinborough came back to
win the Sunfish Midwinter
National & Team Racing
Championships from March

Above, Martinborough is
shown in action.



REAR Commodore Tim Roberts of Clearwater Yacht Club presents Don-
nie Martinborough with his Top Master award at the Clearwater Midwin-

ter Regatta from March 19-22.

Bev Dolezal/Photos

MARTINBOROUGH (#55) rounding the mark with the rest of the fleet in hot pursuit.

Big hopes for Carifta Track & Field squad

FROM page 11

medal in the 200m, while Bodie looks to improve
on her silver medal performance in the 100m Hur-
dles.

The freshman at Auburn University and sopho-
more at Southwest Mississippi Community College
will return to lead a team seeking to repeat the feat
of 2008’s record breaking 400m relay team which
also included Sheniqua Ferguson and Cache Arm-
brister.

Three time gold medallist in the field, Ray-
mond Higgs returns to defend his high jump
crown, looking to claim his third gold medal in the
event.

Higgs burst onto the scene in 2007 when he
medaled in all three jumping events, gold in the
triple jump, high jump, and a bronze in the long
jump.

He returned to repeat his high jump feat in
2008.

Rashan Brown was an eighth place finisher in
the under-17 girls 400m in 2007, but returned in
2008 to claim a bronze medal in the event.

Now with her third trip to the meet, Brown
looks to once again improve on her performance.

Androsian, Tamara Myers, one of only two ath-
letes on the team not from the capital or the
nation’s second city, will chase a top finish after last
year’s silver medal in the under-17 girls high jump.

Williams and Rollle return to defend bronze
medal finishes in the shot put and 800m respec-
tively.
















WALONEE Robinson progresses through jumping
drills during practice. Robinson medaled in four }

events at the 2008 Championships.

Fraser and Wallace- Whitfield medaled in 2007
and after a series of mishaps in 2008, look to }

return to the medal podium.

Wallace-Whitfield won a gold medal in the
under-17 boys 800m while Fraser took silver in the

100m of the same division.

The Bahamas has finished fourth in consecutive
Carita track and field championships with a medal

count of 19 in 2007 and 23 in 2008.

Pictured from left: Philip G. Smith, Sales & Marketing Manager, The d’Albenas
“Agency, Ltd.; Mrs Joethia and Cp! Kaylyn Cooper, proud parents of Maliha
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Legacy Baseball
season underway

LEGACY Baseball League
kicked off its 2009 Baseball Sea-
son at the beginning of March,
but held its Opening Cere-
monies on Saturday (March 21st
2009). Its President Steve Bur-
rows talked about the tremen-
dous growth in the girls softball
program which has expanded to
the East and West Grand
Bahama. He also spoke about
their growth in baseball, which
was evident in capturing two
division in the BBF Andre
Rodgers National Baseball
Championships in June 2008.
Legacy won the Coach Pitch
Division and the High School
16-18 Division over the three
major powerhouses in baseball,
Freedom Farm, JBLN & Grand
Bahama.

Present at the Opening Cere-
monies was August "Auggie"
Campbell (Full Football Schol-
arship to Duke University this
Fall). Mr. Burrows told the kids
at the end of his speech, you
have a role model in August.
He sat right where you are many
years ago. Through hard work
and dedication you can be in the
same position.

Mr. Burrows promised the
many parents and supporters of
Legacy that they will be bringing
back home Three Divisions
from the upcoming 2009 Nation-
al Baseball Championship.

Also in attendance from the
BBF was President Craig Kemp,
Secretary General Theodore

KIA cp

The Power to Surprise”

Sweeting and 4th Vice President
(Grand Bahama) Alonzo
"Chumpy" Pratt. Mr. Kemp
thanked the Legacy Executives
for their ongoing development
of Baseball in Grand Bahama
and encouraged them to con-
tinue to build on their success.

President Kemp presented
Legacy with there 2008 Cham-
pionship Diamond
Banners(Coach Division) and
High School 16-18 Division.

The President Craig Kemp,
Theodore Sweeting — Secretary
General, Manager Patrick
Knowles Sr. (Team Bahamas
15-16), Coach Alonzo Pratt
(Team Bahamas Mens National
Team) and Coach Opi Taylor
(Team Bahamas 16-18), con-
ducted try-outs for the young
men in Grand Bahama on Sun-
day, March 22nd from 2pm to
Spm to afford them a fair oppor-
tunity to be selected to one of
the National Teams traveling
this summer. Many of the
young men had a great showing
and the Teams will definitely
have a National makeup.

The Bahamas Baseball Fed-
eration is extremely proud and
excited to advise that 95% of
the 16-18 Team & The Senior
Mens Team presently attend
High School or College in the
USA. The Executive Commit-
tee and the Coaching Staff feel
very confident these 2 Teams
will do very well this summer.

In the 15-16 Zone Tourna-

ment, the Bahamas is coming
off a 3rd Place Finish from 2008.
High expectation is also expect-
ed from this team as all the
members have had internation-
al exposure from previous tour-
naments.

NATIONAL TEAMS TRAVELLING
THIS SUMMER:

TEAM BAHAMAS 16-18

XII Latin American Regional Big
League Tournament 2009

June 19th thru 28th 2009
Maracaibo, Venezuela

Countries Participating: Aruba,
Bahamas, Colombia, Curacao,
Guatemala, Panama, Puerto Rico,
Dominican Republic, USVI and
Venezuela

TEAM BAHAMAS 15-16

PONY Caribbean Zone Champi-
onship

July 6th thru 12th 2009

Guarbo, Puerto Rico

Countries Participating: Bahamas,
Dominican Republic, Panama,
USVI, Puerto Rico

TEAM BAHAMAS Men's
National Team

World Baseball Challenge

July 16th thru 26th 2009

Prince George, Canada
Countries: Team Bahamas, Team
Canada, Team Croatia, Chinese
Taipei, Germany Team USA,
Professional Teams: Reno Astros
& Host Prince George Axemen

2009 =reeee

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Carifta Track

FRIDAY, APRIL 3,



2009

& Field squad

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH an eclectic cross-section of athletes, led by
several veteran medal winners, the 2009 Carifta
Track and Field squad is expected to be one of
the most successful squads in recent memory.

This year’s team will field 11 individual medal
winners from the 2008 games in St. Kitts and the
2007 Games in the Turks and Caicos Islands includ-
ing, Nivea Smith, Nejmi Burnside, V’Alonee
Robinson, Raymond Higgs, Rashan Brown, Raquel
Williams, Tamara Myers, Hughnique Rolle, Krys-
tal Bodie, Warren Fraser and Kenneth Wallace-
Whitfield.

Burnside was one of the top performers at last
year’s meet, when he set a new Carifta record in the
Under-17 boys 400m hurdles.

His time of 52.81s easily surpassed the previous
mark of 52.97s set by Ricardo Melbourne of
Jamaica in 1998.

Burnside, a two time individual Carifta medallist,
finished second in the same event in 2007.

“I have been blessed so far with what I have
been able to achieve so far with the Carifta record,
the silver medal and the bronze in the relay” he
said. “I am looking to at least equal those perfor-
mances or do even better heading into this year’s
games.”

With his third selection to the Carifta squad,
Burnside said he hopes to use his past successes as
a means to mentor the younger members of the
team.

“With my experience I can let them know that it
is not all fun and games, there is a time to get seri-
ous” he said. “When we get to that point when it is
time to perform you just have to know.”

Robinson, the versatile sprinter and jumper looks
to build on her four-medal performance of 2008.

17 girls division with a gold medal performance in
the long jump, and bronze medals in the
100m,100m Hurdles and as a member of the 400m
relay team.

The St. Augustine’s College speedster advances
to the under-20 girls division this year.

Grand Bahamian sensation Nivea Smith will
look to claim her third consecutive Carifta bronze

SEE page 10

NEJMI BURNSIDE, three time medallist and Carifta
record holder in the U-17 boys’ 400m Hurdles, goes

Robinson had her handprint all over the under-

through stretching routines.

Strokers take first two
in best-of-seven series

THE Micholette Strokers are
on the verge of dethroning the
Williams Construction Jets in
the Masters Softball League’s
best-of-seven championship
series.

Micholette, runners-up in the
regular season at 10-2, took the
first two games of the series
over the weekend at the
Archdeacon William Thomp-
son Softball Park at the South-
ern Recreation Grounds.

In game one on Saturday, the
Strokers won 12-10 and they
came back on Sunday to pull
off a 20-17 decision in game
two.

Game three is set for Satur-
day at 11 am. If necessary, game
four will be played on Sunday at
1 pm.

Williams Construction won
the pennant with a 12-1 record.

e Here’s a look at the first
two games played in the series:

STROKERS 12, JETS 10:

Culbert ‘Buster’ Evans went
3-for-5 with a double, a run bat-
ted in and two runs scored to
lead Micholette to the opener of
the series.

Lester Dean helped out with
a 3-for-5 day with a double, two
RBI and a run scored and Adlai
‘Mossah’ Moss was 2-for-5 with
two RBI and three runs scored.

Hector Rolle got the win on
the mound for the Strikers and
Danny Stubbs suffered the loss
for the Jets.

Mike Major had a perfect 3-
for-3 day with three runs and
Jeff Cooper was 3-for-3 with
one home run, three RBI and
two runs scored.

STROKERS 20, JETS 17:

Culbert Evans had another
big game, going 4-for-5 with a
double and two homers with
four RBI, scoring three times
to pace Micholette to a 2-0
series lead.

Johnny Burrows helped out
this time going 4-for-5 with two
RBI, scoring three times and
Everette ‘Abe’ Johnson was 3-
for-4 with four runs scored.

Hector Rolle also picked up
his second straight win on the
mound for Micholette, this time
over Bertie Murray Sr, who
pitched for Williams Construc-
tion.

Anthony ‘Hot-dog’ Pierce
went 3-for-4 with a RBI, scoring
twice and Lee Rahming was 2-
for-3 with a homer, two RBI
and four runs scored in a los-
ing effort for the Jets.



BASKETBALL
NPBA POSTSEASON

e WHILE the defending cham-
pions Commonwealth Giants
booked their trip to the New
Providence Basketball Associ-
ation’s best-of-seven champi-
onship series, they will have to
wait a little longer to find out
who their opponents will be.
On Wednesday night at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, the
Giants completed a three-
game sweep over the Police
Crimestoppers with a 77-72
win to return to the champi-
onship series.

Last year’s runners-up Electro
Telecom Cybots were unable
to pull off the sweep of the
Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders in
game three of their series on
Wednesday as well.

The Ruff Ryders held on for a
94-93 win over the Cybots to
trail 2-1 in the series that will
continue with game four
tonight at Kendal Isaacs. If
necessary, the fifth and decid-
ing game will be played on Sat-
urday night.

BASEBALL
JBLN SCHEDULE

¢ Here’s a look at the Junior
Baseball League of Nassau’s
action on tap this weekend at
the St. Andrew’s Field of
Dreams.

TEE BALL

11 am Raptors vs Blue Claws
1 pm Grasshoppers vs Sand
Gnats

3 pm Sidewinders vs Knights
COACH PITCH

10 am Angels vs Diamond-
backs

12:30 pm Blue Jays vs Astros
3 pm Cubs vs Athletics
MINOR LEAGUE

10 am Rays vs Royals

12:30 pm Mets vs Rockies
MAJOR LEAGUE

12:30 pm Reds vs Indians

3 pm Mariners vs Marlins
JUNIOR LEAGUE

10 am Dodgers vs Yankees
12:30 pm Twins vs Cardinals
SENIOR LEAGUE

Saturday

3 pm Tigers vs Pirates
Sunday

1 pm Tigers vs Pirates

3:30 pm Rangers vs Phillies

SS

ie ae ag

ie






Female
champion
golfer hosts
junior clinic






§

Sf

arke/Tribune staff

-

MEMBERS of the 2009 Carifta Track and Field team pose just before practice yesterday at the Thomas A.
Robinson Stadium.




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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Ohama hails
Summit ‘turning
point’ but warns
of no guarantees —

m LONDON

CONCLUDING his first
international summit, President
Barack Obama hailed agree-
ments at the emergency meet-
ing of world powers Thursday
as a “turning point in our pur-
suit of global economic recov-
ery.” But he cautioned, “There
are no guarantees”, according
to Associated Press.

The new US. leader said the
heads of industrial countries
that met in London agreed on
“unprecedented steps to restore
growth and prevent a crisis like
this from happening again.”

He spoke shortly after G-20
leaders pledged an additional
$1.1 trillion in financing to the
International Monetary Fund
and other global institutions
and declared a crackdown on
tax havens and hedge funds.
The leaders announced the cre-
ation of a supervisory body to
flag problems in the global
financial system — but did not
satisfy calls from the U.S. and
others for new stimulus mea-
sures.

Despite that failure, Obama
called the one-day London
gathering “very productive”
and historic because of the
scope of the challenges the
world faces in righting the eco-
nomic crisis that’s wreaking
havoc on virtually every coun-
try.

“The challenge is clear. The
global economy is contracting,”
Obama said.

In a one-hour news confer-
ence packed with media from
across the world, Obama said,
“We’re starting to see some
restoration of America’s stand-
ing in the world.” He had been
asked about diminished esteem
under his predecessor, George
W. Bush.

“T do not buy into the notion
that America can’t lead in the
world,” Obama said, but he
added that it is “very important
for us to be able to forge part-
nerships as opposed to dictating
solutions.”

He acknowledged that some
summit participants made com-
ments that seemed to blame
America and Wall Street for
triggering the crisis that has
spread around the world.

‘Science is alive’ at CW
Sawyer Primary School

ADMINISTRATORS, teachers, par-
ents and students all gathered in the
auditorium at CW Sawyer Primary
School to officially open the school’s sci-
ence fair and exhibition under the theme
“Science is Alive”.

The day began with an electrifying
opening ceremony, featuring student
performances highlighting science-relat-
ed themes, such as science careers,
famous science inventors, seed germi-
nation, conservation rap and a weather
talk show on natural disasters.

The choir serenaded the audience with
the song: “A Science Experience” and
the entire school sang the science chant,
“Science Is Alive!” composed by the
music teacher Shaketra Knowles.

The featured speaker was Marcia Mus-
grove, National Teacher of the Year and
a former student of the school. She
enthralled the audience with an infor-

i -



Fair and exhibition

is Officially opened

mative power point presentation on the
importance of the senses.

The moment students were waiting
for finally arrived. Prizes were awarded
for the first, second and third place win-
ners from each grade that participated in
the essay, poetry, art, and scientific pro-
ject competition. Teachers said that the
number of entries submitted shows how
enthusiastic students are about science.

Following the opening ceremony, spe-
cial guests Barbara Dorsette, primary
science officer in the Ministry of Educa-

tion and Harriet Pratt, former superin-
tendent of North Western District of
Schools, led a tour of the exhibition.

On display were students’ projects,
creative folder projects, and models of
endangered animals and habitats. Such
topics as: “How Plants are Useful”,
“Animal Habitats”, and “Endangered
Animals” were researched by the stu-
dents.

Students in grades four through six
presented stand up three-dimensional
projects, using the empirical method, on

topics such as ecosystems, plants, rocks
and minerals, natural disasters, storms,
pollution and light.

The highlight of the day were the
booths set up by representatives of sev-
eral science related fields. There was a
buzz in the air when students began to
view the displays.

Represented were: the Adventure
Learning Centre; the Atlantis Touch
‘Tank; the Bahamas National Trust; Dol-
phin Encounters; the Emergency Med-
ical Services; the Fire Branch of the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force, and Vector
Control.

Dentist Dr Emmanuel Francis shared
with grade two students the importance
of taking care of their teeth. The Adven-
ture Learning Centre presented an
inspiring and informative puppet show
entitled “The Wonders of God’s Cre-
ation.”

* Gamers take to the
stage for Madden

ers.

—s He received $500 in cash and

prizes.

09 challenge

IT WAS an afternoon filled with
excitement and suspense as gamers
descended on Town Centre Mall to
participate in the Ultimate Gamers
Challenge 3.

Many competitors took to the
stage, cheered on by the spectators,
and showed off their skills at Mad-
den09 for the Playstation 2.

After hours of competition and
trash talking it was none other than
last year’s winner, Richard Davis,
who defended his title for the sec-
ond year in a row, playing with his
team of choice, the Pittsburg Steel-




Second place went to Lawrence
Smith who received a $200-gift cer-
tificate from Sports Locker along
with a DVD Dragon Ball Z set
from Super Video.

Third place went to Rod Darville
who received a boom box courtesy
of Cost Rite.

Organisers said that the day could
not have been a success without the
help of Electrojack, as they provid-
ed 26” and 37” flat screen televi-
sion sets, Playstation 2 consoles,
Madden 09 games and all acces-
sories.

The competition organisers also
thanked the Town Centre Mall for

hosting the event.

Grand Bahama to host international
religious conference for women

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Island has been select-
ed to host a major international
religious conference for women
of the Methodist Church in the
Caribbean and the Americas
(MCCA).

Dorothy Goldsmith, event
spokesperson in Freeport,
announced that the event is
expected to attract some 400-
500 women from 25 Caribbean
countries to Freeport for the
30th anniversary of the MCCA
Women’s Fifth Quinquennial
Assembly, in 2010.

The assembly will be held
July 21 through 26, 2010. It is
the first time that it has ever
been held in the Bahamas since
its inception almost 30 years
ago.

Mrs Goldsmith said the
Bahamas was able to beat out
Belize as the host country.

“When the opportunity came
for us to bid for the hosting in
2008 we were so excited. I went
to Panama with the proposal
and we competed with Belize,
and I think God has really had a
plan because we have been
extended the opportunity to

host this historical event.

“Tt is not being held in the
capital, it is in Grand Bahama
and this is something we need
to boost our economy,” she
said.

Mrs Goldsmith said Method-
ism is present worldwide. She
said the last conference was
held in Barbados and some 500
women attended.

Opportunity

“We will have spiritual con-
tent, fellowship, bonding, work-
shops, and we will have this
opportunity for people to wor-
ship and expose them to what
we have here in the Bahamas,”
she said.

Mrs Goldsmith said the
Grand Bahama Circuit is com-
prised of three Methodist
churches. She noted that mem-
bers from throughout the
Bahamas, and the Turks and
Caicos Islands are expected to
also attend the conference in
Freeport.

She said that religious
tourism is growing in the
Bahamas, which offers persons
not only spiritual revival, but
also a vacation destination.

Carmeta Miller, senior man-
ager Religious Tourism, Groups

and Special Events Department
at the Ministry of Tourism, said
the event is very significant for
Grand Bahama.

“We at the MOT have seen
the need to look into the busi-
ness of religious tourism, which
is now an $18-billion industry.
Those persons who will be trav-
elling here for religious purpos-
es to attend the conference are
making a significant contribu-
tion to the Freeport economy,”
said Ms Miller.

In 1980, the MCCA women’s
organisation was formed in Bar-
bados under the leadership of
Dr Barbara Bailey, a Universi-
ty Lecturer from Jamaica.

Dr Bailey was the first presi-
dent and Mrs Marie Murray of
the Bahamas/Turks and Caicos
Island, was the first vice presi-
dent.

The organisation allows a
relationship with the World
Federation of Methodist and
Uniting Church Women and
links with all the Methodist
women’s organisation in more
than 25 Caribbean countries in
the eight Districts of the
Bahamas/Turks and Caicos;
Islands, Belize/Honduras,
Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Lee-
ward Islands, Panama/
Costa Rica, and the South
Caribbean.

Washington shows Ho interest in Chavez Gitmo offer

m DOHA, Qatar

WASHINGTON expressed no interest
Thursday in an offer by Venezuelan Pres-
ident Hugo Chavez to take in any of the
240 remaining Guantanamo detainees
after they are released from the U.S. mil-
itary prison, according to Associated
Press.

Chavez said he would have “no prob-
lem” accepting any of the remaining
detainees in Venezuela. In an interview
with Arabic-language Al-Jazeera news
network during his trip this week to this
Persian Gulf country, Chavez also urged
President Barack Obama to free the
remaining detainees and return

the surrounding U.S. Navy base to

Cuba.

But the State Department said in a statement
that “the United States has not received a formal
offer through diplomatic channels to resettle
detainees to Venezuela and is not contemplating

resettling detainees to Venezuela.”

Chavez has frequently criticized the U.S. military
prison, but the socialist leader also has praised Oba-
ma’s pledge to close it within a year. As for the



iit Chavez

detainees, Chavez said “we would have
no problem i in receiving a human being.”

Chavez’s remarks to the Qatar-based
Al-Jazeera were later released by
Venezuela’s Information Ministry.

As part of Obama’s closure order, U.S.
officials are deciding which of the remain-
ing detainees should be shipped away to
foreign countries and which should be
tried, either in civilian U.S. courts or in
some other setting.

Prisoners transferred to third coun-
tries, mainly in Europe, would be those
determined to pose no threat but who
cannot be sent back to their homelands
because of the risk of persecution. Sev-
eral European nations, including Portu-

gal and Lithuania, have said they will consider tak-

ing such detainees.

Venezuela’s relations with the U.S. deteriorated
in recent years as the leftist Chavez crusaded against
what he calls the U.S. “empire.” In September,
Chavez expelled the U.S. ambassador to Venezuela

and recalled his envoy to Washington. And while he

has expressed a desire for improved relations under
Obama, he also called the new American president
“ignorant” last month.


u

Harbour
Bn
WER tat





on hotel
trespass



Judge awards
Pink Sands
$36,000 over
‘irresponsible, ill-
considered and
thoughtless act’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The world-renowned Pink
Sands resort and its parent com-
pany have been awarded more
than $36,000 in damages due to
Harbour Island District Coun-
cil’s “irresponsible, ill-consid-
ered and thoughtless act” in
trespassing on its property to
construct public bathrooms.

Criticising the District Coun-
cil for “lacking common sense”,
Senior Justice John Lyons said
its officers and workmen went
ahead with the planned con-
struction without conducting a
prior land survey to determine
whether the site selected was
owned by a private landholder.

Recalling how the dispute
originated in early 2005, with
the District Council’s decision
to construct public bathroom
facilities on Pink Sands Beach,
Justice Lyons found: “Without
considering the need for a sur-
vey, the council went straight
ahead and proceeded to prepare
a site for the building of these
bathroom facilities on Pink
Sands Beach.”

The site selected was at the
end of a public access road lead-
ing to the beach, and which ran
between Harbour Island’s well-
known Pink Sands and Coral
Sands resort properties.

Digging

“On Friday, May 20, 2005, Mr
von Merveldt, one of the man-
agers of the Pink Sands Hotel,
noticed that several men who
were not employees of his hotel
were clearing, digging and mea-
suring parts of the southern area
of the hotel property,” Justice
Lyons recalled.

“On approaching those per-
sons, and informing them that
they were trespassing on the
property of Pink Sands Hotel,
one of the men, who introduced
himself as Mr Roberts (the act-
ing chief councillor), informed
Mr Von Merveldt in ‘colourful
terms’ that they were there to
erect bathroom facilities.

“Again, in colourful terms,
Mr Von Merveldt was informed
by the officers of the Harbour
Island District Council and their
workmen as to what they
thought of his complaint and his
assertion that they were on
hotel property, and what he
could do with it.”

Mr Von Merveldt “sensibly
left the area” and hired Chee-a-
Tow Surveyors to conduct a sur-
vey, subsequently produced on
July 25, 2005. This showed “‘con-

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



THE TRIBUNE





FRIDAY,

Me

APRIL.3.



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



‘Devastating impact’ City Markets
from cruise islands

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The increasing development
of private island destinations by
the major cruise line is having a
“devastating impact on Bahami-
an small businesses”, the tour
operators’ association argued
yesterday, with many vessels
either bypassing
Nassau/Freeport altogether or
using them as second ports of
call after already mining their
passengers’ pocketbooks.

Jeffrey Beckles, executive
director of the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Shore Excursionists
(BASE), in a presentation to
the Grand Bahama Tours Asso-
ciation, said that while the num-
ber of cruise arrivals to the
lines’ private islands were
increasing, they were declining
elsewhere.

And there was a “massive
duplication of local tours at pri-
vate islands, and restrictions
placed on local vendors in sell-
ing their own tours”. This had
the net effect of ensuring that all
tours and excursions provided
on the private islands were con-
trolled by the cruise lines, along

with the prices, to the exclusion
of Bahamian-owned tour oper-
ators and their employees.

Mr Beckles’ presentation
warned that the “economic pic
slices” earned by Bahamian-
owned tours and excursion
providers continued to dwindle
as a result, given that cruise
lines and their passengers either
bypassed Nassau or arrived
here after the lines had exhaust-
ed their spending power on the
private islands.

Concerns

The Ministry of Tourism’s
2008 arrivals report, which has
been obtained by Tribune Busi-
ness, appears to bear out Mr
Beckles concerns.

For the year, the only desti-
nations that saw an increase in
cruise passenger arrivals were
the private islands. Castaway
Cay on Abaco saw a 58.1 per
cent rise in arrivals to 149,389,
compared to 94,511 the year
before.

The Berry Islands, which
boasts RoyalCaribbean’s get-
away, Coco Cay, saw a 9.87 per
cent growth in cruise arrivals to

Bahamas avoids
G-20 ‘blacklist’

* Nation avoids worst effects of ‘tax haven’
onslaught, at least for moment, as OECD places it
with main rivals on list of those who have
committed to tax transparency, but have yet to act
* But China keeps Hong Kong out of reach, while
US states such as Delaware also seem untouchable
* Industry executives say avoiding sanctions was
key, as would have caused pressure on clients and

Zhivargo Laing

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas last night
appeared to have avoided the
worst effects of the G-20’s ‘anti-
tax haven’ onslaught after it
escaped the so-called ‘blacklist’,
instead being placed among the
second of a three-tier list along
with most of its international
financial centre competitors.

The Bahamas was included
among those jurisdictions that
“have committed to the interna-
tionally agreed tax standard, but
have not yet substantially imple-
mented” those commitments, the
so-called ‘grey list’ produced at
the G-20’s request by its select
club, the Organisation for Eco-
nomic Co-Operation and Devel-
opment (OECD).

The Bahamas found itself in
good company, as included in the
same tier were the majority of its
international financial centre
competitors - Bermuda, the
British Virgin Islands, the Cay-
man Islands, Liechtenstein,
Monaco, Panama and San Mari-
no.

Also included in the same tier,
but in a different category, were
the likes of Austria, Luxembourg,
Switzerland and Singapore, all
major rivals to the Bahamas in
the competition for international
financial services.

SEE page 5B

foreign-owned institutions

for a better life

401,718 compared to 366,321 in
2007, while arrivals to Half
Moon Cay near Cat Island grew
by 11 per cent to 299,792, com-
pared to 270,159 in 2007. All
those figures were for first port
of entry only.

In contrast, Nassau/Paradise
Island saw a 10.2 per cent
decline in cruise passengers call-
ing as a first port of entry in the
Bahamas, the numbers falling
from 1,638,174 in 2007 to
1,471,835 in 2008.

Focusing on just December
2008, the Ministry of Tourism’s
report noted that for the month,
cruise arrivals to Nassau/Par-
adise Island were down by 2 per
cent, while arrivals as a second
port of call increased by 45 per
cent.

“A number of cruise ships
went to Nassau/Paradise Island
as a second port of call, how-
ever, rather than a first port of
call,” the Ministry of Tourism
found.

Mr Beckles said that, as a
result, there were “increased
untaxed revenues taken out of

SEE page 6B



U.S. PRESIDENT Barack Obama
speaks at a press conference at the
end of the G20 Summit at the Excel
centre in London, yesterday. The
objective of the London Summit is
to bring the world's biggest
economies together to help restore
economic growth .

plunges into
$13.4m loss

* 2008 figures worse than expected, as grocery
chain’s parent incurs $3.527m 2009 half-year loss
and $2 million-plus solvency deficiency

* More than $20m turnaround in yeat-and-a-half
from shareholder equity into deficit

* Cash flow/liquidity problems still persisting

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

City Markets’ parent company today in this newspaper
reveals that its fiscal 2008 net loss is likely worse than pro-
jected at $13.429 million, with half-year losses standing at
$3.527 million and the firm suffering from a $2 million-plus
solvency deficiency.

The unaudited management accounts for Bahamas
Supermarkets, published today upon the urging of the
Securities Commission of the Bahamas, following public
pressure from Tribune Business among others, showed
just why the company is having difficulty in avoiding its
external auditors, KPMG, from qualifying the fiscal 2008
accounts with the ‘going concern’ notation.

Bahamas Supermarkets’ chairman, Basil Sands, told

SEE page 4B



Development Bank
$5m below loan goal

my CHESTER ROBARDS — * [ends just $3.4m in 2008,
crobards@tribunemedia.net compared to §8-$0m target
THE BAHAMAS Develop- _* BDB seeking

ment Bank (BDB) missed its be fons

projected loan issuance target recapitalisation from IDB,

by almost $5 million in 2008, ‘

processing some $3.4 million in National Insurance and

advances according to its act- Caribbean Development

ing managing director. He

added that the 2009 first quarter Bank

had also seen a contraction in * :

advances, while loan arrears Half of loan portfolio,

had grown to some $27 million.

Anthony Woodside told Tri-
bune Business yesterday that
the BDB’s target for lending to

SEE page 6B

some $27m, in arrears

* Finances seven projects,
worth $622,764, for
year-to-date

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Ue INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

PROCUREMENT FOR SCHOOL
FURNITURE FOR NEW SCHOOLS &
REPLACEMENTS 2009-2010
The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser”) now invites

sealed bids, from = Supphers tor the procurement of School Furniture
for New Schools and Replacements,

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from the
Purchasing‘Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education, Headquarters,
Thompson Blvd. from Wednesday 18 th March, 2009, and obtain further
information, at the second address given below

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates ina sealed
envclope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
bided on (“School Furniture-New Schools & Replacements”).

Bids noust be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address,
or before Momalay, 6th April, 200 by S200) p.m. Choscal time). It will mot
be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mal
Late bids will be rejected and retumed unopened,

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidder(s) or their Representative (5) whe choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday 7 th April, 2009 at the first address below

(1) The Chairman lender
Winistey of Finwnce
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
BO. Box 6-317
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-15M)

Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education

PO. Box N-39 124

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tele: (242) 502-8571

The Ministry reserves the right lo regect any or all Tenders



THE TRIBUNE





Investors back
Arden’s Emerald
Bay bid proposal

A Philadelphia-based real
estate group has received strong
backing from Emerald Bay real
estate owners and a neighbour-
ing $100 million property in its
bid to acquire the Exuma-based
‘anchor’ resort project.

Tribune Business revealed
yesterday that the Arden Group
had submitted a bid to acquire
the Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort and rescue it from its
almost two-year receivership.

“The Arden Group is very
strong. Their record of success
in purchasing, developing and
managing resort and commer-
cial properties speaks for itself,
and among all the bidders and
so-called bidders or interested
parties who have surfaced and
vanished over the past months,
Arden appears to be the most
qualified, the most serious and
the best positioned,” said Jim
Clabaugh, president of EGI
Ltd, developers of the $100 mil-
lion Grand Isle Resort & Spa, a
78-villa resort on 12 acres of the
480-acre Emerald Bay enclave.
“We'd be thrilled if they took it
over.”

American businessman,
Grand Isle villa owner and fre-
quent visitor to the Bahamas,
John Beasley of Tennessee,
greeted the news with equal
welcome.

“That’s the best news we’ve
heard in ages,” said Mr Beasley.
According to other sources at
Emerald Bay, home of the Four
Seasons, the Greg Norman golf
course, numerous residences
and more than $150 million in
investments caught up in the
receivership, any successful bid-
der has to be prepared to invest
heavily —a minimum of $50 mil-
lion — in infrastructure to revive

SEE page 3B

ey j ee + ie
GOLF course.

EGI LTD, developers of Grand Isle Resort & Spa, yesterday threw their sup-
port behind the Arden Group, possible bidders for Emerald Bay, the 480-
acre enclave of luxury properties in Exuma that has been in receivership
for nearly two years. Grand Isle, built on 12 acres, including the highest
point of Emerald Bay, represents the single largest investment, a $100 mil-
lion project that includes 78 luxuriously appointed villas and consistent-
ly ranks as among the top vacation experiences in The Bahamas on Tri-
pAdvisor.com.



RS Gar NM lene
YOU NEED A CERTAIN BANK.

THE BEST ASSET IS
PEACE OF MIND

You couldn’t be in better hands.

~ FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com pG@e eee Mae ee eee aa eee ee) ea


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 3B



Morton Salt parent
sold in $1.67bn deal

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Morton Salt’s Inagua facili-
ty, along with its parent com-
pany, has been acquired by
Europe’s largest salt producer,
German-based K+S Aktiene-
sellschaft, in a $1.675 billion
cash deal, it was revealed yes-
terday.

The Bahamian company,
and its Morton international
parent, were sold by Dow
Chemical Company to finance
its purchase of their former
owner, Rohm & Haas. The
decision on whether to invest
in the full rebuilding of the
Inagua plant, following the
devastation caused by Hurri-

cane Ike, will now fall into the
German company’s lap.

It is likely too early to say
what the implications of the
sale will be for the Inagua
plant, or the island’s people, as
the German owners will take
some time to sift through their
newly-acquired prize. How-
ever, the fact that Morton has
been sold to an industry buyer
is likely good news.

Glenn Bannister, Morton
Salt’s president, referred to
Tribune Business to Rohm &
Haas spokesman George
Bochanski for comment. But
he did not return Tribune
Business’s phone message.

However, in a previous
interview, Mr Bochanski said:
“Lately, Dow has been talking

about a possible sale of Mor-
ton. Until all that gets sorted
out, I don’t expect Morton
management will make a deci-
sion any time soon.

“It’s really going to be up
to Dow to determine the
future of the whole business. I
wouldn’t certainly expect any-
thing new until the deal
between Dow and Rohm &
Haas closes. There won’t be
any information coming out
of Morton until then. Ulti-
mately, it will be down to Dow
to make a decision as the new
owner.”

Mr Bochanski said “noth-
ing has changed substantively”
as it relates to Morton Salt’s
Inagua operation since it was
heavily damaged by Hurricane

Investors back Arden’s
Emerald Bay bid proposal

FROM page 2B

what started out as a dream to
create the most ambitious luxu-
ry project in recent history on a
Family Island.

That dream soured when
Emerald Bay, caught up with
delays, cost overruns and other
management issues, defaulted
on its loan that had been under-
written by Mitsui, the reinsur-
ers.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
(PwC) London was named
receiver, projecting a quick sale.
Months and then a year, now
nearly two, have passed with
hopes raised and dashed repeat-
edly as Mitsui and PwC
declined offers or potential
investors walked away.

“We have great respect for
the principals and development
team at Arden Group. We
believe that they understand

what has to happen to restore
Emerald Bay, and we believe
they are a group that can suc-
ceed at Emerald Bay and will
be good for the island of Exu-
ma, and for the Bahamas" said
Pamela McCullough, vice-pres-
ident of EGI Ltd.

"We would be delighted if
this time it is for real and it goes
through. They certainly have
our support."

Founded in 1989, Arden
Group has purchased or devel-
oped more than $1.3 billion in
real estate, while its property
and asset management division
has managed more than $5 bil-
lion in assets, including hotels,
resorts and condominiums and
over four million square feet of
Class A commercial office
space.

Among their most noted pro-
jects is the conversion of two
former bank buildings in Centre
City, Philadelphia into the

Philadelphia Ritz-Carlton, now
ranked as one of the world’s top
5-star hotels.

The work was applauded for
its preservation of an historic
building, maximising its pres-
ence and preserving it as an
integral feature in the modern
structure.

Arden is now engaged in a
$285 million luxury condomini-
um project, The Residences at
Ritz-Carlton, on adjacent land.

Its real estate portfolio is vast
and includes the Omni Hotel in
Coral Gables and the Savoy in
South Beach, both in Florida,
The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor
Gulch, Colorado; Indian
Springs Ranch in Jackson,
Wyoming; the Chase Manhat-
tan Building in New York State;
Seven Penn Centre in Philadel-
phia; Brickell Bayview Center
in Miami; and Mellon Bank
Center in Wilmington,
Delaware.

TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.

THE NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE

wishes to announce that applications are now being
invited from all qualified members who wish to be
considered for recommendation as candidates for
the seats to become available on either the Board of

Directors or The Superviso
Annual General Meeting to

23, 2009.

Committee at the 32nd
e held on Saturday May

All members interested in serving in either capacity

should collect an application form from any office of the
Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit
Union Limited offices in Nassau, Freeport or Abaco.

The qualification for each post is available upon request.

Completed applications, along with the other information
eee should be returned to any of the offices on or
before the close of business on Thursday April 30, 2009.

All Resolutions must also be submitted by Thursday

April 30, 2009.

Any application,

not full

completed or without the

requested supporting information, or received after
the aforementioned date will not be eligible for

consideration.

“TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD. SERVING
THE WHOLE BAHAMAS”



Ike, with executives operating
from temporary offices.

“There’s full employment,
no one has been laid off, and
substantively the status quo
remains until a decision is tak-
en,” Mr Bochanski said.

The K+S Aktienesellschaft
purchase is expected to close
by mid-year.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

gees ina.
—_ Col ee











Dividend Notice

Ordinary Common Shares

The Board of Directors of Colina Holdings
Bahamas Limited (CHBL) is pleased to
announce that a dividend of $0.06 per
Ordinary Common Share will be paid to
Ordinary Common Shareholders of record
of CHBL on the [5th day of April 2009.

Payment will be made within 10 days of the
record date through the Company's
Registrar and Transfer Agent, CFAL Ltd.

MUST SELL

VACANT LAND
WINTON HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

Lot #4, Block 1

All the parcel of land containing 15,589 sq. ft. on the southern side
of Woodland Way, and about 350 feet east of Culberts Hill.

Zoning is for single-family residential homes, all the utility services
are available. The site is located 5 miles from downtown Nassau,
1 mile from shopping center and 1 mile from the nearest school.

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before April 10, 2009.

For further information, please contact us @ 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE OF
EXTENSION

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in
New Providence and the Family Islands including
Grand Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser”) has
EXTENDED the date to receive sealed bids, from persons to provide
transportation to and from schools in accordance with the provision
of the Education Act. Bid forms can be collected from the Ministry
of Education and the office of Family Island Administrators between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the

subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Monday, 13th April, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they
may be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.

on Tuesday, 14th April, 2009 at the

address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-1530


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





City Markets plunges into $13.4m loss

FROM page 1B

the firm’s 2007 annual general
meeting (AGM) that the com-
pany was projecting a net loss
of at least $10 million for fiscal
2008, but the figures released
today - based on unaudited








COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

management accounts -
revealed a figure that is 34.29
per cent higher.

In addition, as at January
27, 2009, the unaudited man-
agement accounts show that
while Bahamas Supermarkets
had current assets of at least
$21.37 million, its liabilities

2008/CLE/qui/187 1

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
parcel or lot of land being Lot 215, Stella
Maris Subdivision Phase Three, Section Two,








Stella Maris, situate between the settlements
of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown on
a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles
Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Warren Robert Boli

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Warren Robert Boli
of the city of Canton, in the State of Ohio, one
of the states in the United States of America
in respect of: - ALL THAT piece parcel
or lot of land being Lot 215, Stella Maris
Subdivision Phase Three, Section Two, Stella
Maris, situate between the settlements of
Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
which said piece parcel or lot of land has
such position shape boundaries marks and
dimensions as are shown on a plan filed
herein and thereon coloured yellow

Warren Robert Boli claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the
said tract of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons
having Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a
claim not recognized in the petition shall on or before the 23"
of May A.D., 2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a statement of his
claim on or before the 23" of May A.D., 2009 will operate as a
bar to such claim.

Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:

1.The Registry of the Supreme Court;

2.The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for
the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria
Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;

3.The Notice Board of the Administrator at Stella Maris, Long

Island; and
4.The Local Constable at Stella Maris, Long Island

Dated the 23" day of March A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attomeys for the Petitioner

exceeded this by just over $2
million, standing at $23.46 mil-
lion.

Effectively, this means that
Bahamas Supermarkets is
technically insolvent, as there
are not enough assets to meet
liabilities, although the com-
pany has continued to trade -
and seems likely to carry on
doing so.

Already, its Trinidadian
operating partner, Neal &
Massey, which holds the
largest stake in the company’s
majority shareholder, BSL
Holdings, has pumped $5 mil-
lion into the company. That
was matched by $5 million
invested by BSL Holdings’
Bahamian shareholders, which
include the hotel pension
funds, Fidelity’s private equi-
ty arm, Craig Symonette and
the late Franklyn Butler’s
estate. BSL Holdings has a 78
per cent stake in Bahamas
Supermarkets.

The situation clearly calls
for a major injection of new
equity into Bahamas Super-
markets, most likely from
Neal & Massey, which has the
deepest pockets with assets in
excess of $600 million. In
effect, a recapitalisation of the
12-store Bahamian supermar-
ket chain, with its 800 employ-
ees, is what is needed.

The situation is also likely
to prompt minority share-
holders, already mulling a
legal action against Bahamas

a
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

Supermarkets and its Board
of Directors for allegedly not
acting in the company’s best
interests, to make further
moves.

Spectacular

Since it acquired Bahamas
Supermarkets for $54 million
in summer 2006, BSL Hold-
ings and its investors have
presided over what can only
be described as a spectacular
destruction of shareholder val-
ue, producing an almost-$20
million swing into technical
insolvency.

As at year-end 2007,
Bahamas Supermarkets had
net shareholder equity of
$17.615 million. That had
reduced to $1.427 million as
at year-end 2008, and at the
2009 half-year, this was at a
negative $2.09 million.

In tandem, retained earn-
ings have shrunk from $12.874
million as at year-end 2007 to
a position in the red of $3.304
million at year-end 2008. By
the 2009 half-year point, that
accumulated deficit had
reached $6.831 million.

Further analysis of the
unaudited Bahamas Super-
markets balance sheet showed
that the company is still
enduring major cash flow/liq-
uidity problems, with all its
revenues largely going to meet
payments to suppliers.

The 2009 half-year cash-on-

PRICE INQUIRY

P-150 Supply & Delivery

of OilWater Separators

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) has a

requirement for the Supply and Delivery of four, (Qty.4),

OilWater Separators in accordance with the required

schedule and specifications for completion of Stage 1

of the LPIA Expansion Project This is a Supply and

Delivery only contract.

Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm on Monday, March 30th, 2009.

Price Inquiry closing is Wednesday, April 15th, 2009 at

3:00 pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:
Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
WEDNESDAY, 1 APRIL 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,638.68 | CHG -0.12 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -73.68 | YTD % -4.30
FINDEX: CLOSE 806.63 | YTD -3.38% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low
1.28
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.55
2.83
6.46
1.31
2.09
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

1.28
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
12.55
2.83

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consclidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Fince

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

6.46
2.17
2.09
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Last Sale

S52wk-Hi__52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Securi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-O.11
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.28
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
12.55
2.83
6.46
2.06
2.09
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00
Change Daily Vol.

100.00
100.00
100.00

0.00

0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bid $
f.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol.
8.42
6.25
0.40

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ABDAB
RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

31.59

29.00

0.55 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NA Vv
1.3664
2.8988
1.4489
3.3201

12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0440
1.0364
1.0452

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3041
2.9230
1.3847
3.3201
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

YTD%

-1.40

-1.94

-3.59

Last 12 Months
4.77
3.35
4.63
-11.33
5.79

Div $
0.95

1.06

0.96
0.56 0.56
-3.59
0.00
-13.33
4.40
3.64
4.40

0.00
0.06
0.80
0.33
0.76

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.

last 52 weeks

ighted price for daily volume
hted price for daily volume
om day to day

raded today

Previous Close
Today's Close -
Change - Chang
Daily Vol. -

Div $ - Dr he last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stook Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Weekly Vol. -
EPS $ - Acompa
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meanin gtul
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

nite:
olume of the prior week

EPS $

g
0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%
0.00 T%

Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-0.041

email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

c>eyv Fc Ms Tt es LT.

Div $ P/E
0.127
0.992

0.244

-0.877

0.105
0.055
1.309
0.118
0.438
0.099
0.240
0.598
0.322
0.794
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Yield %
28-Feb-09
28-Feb-09
27-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

hand position of $54,363 did
not differ much from the
$55,770 year-end position, but
at least was an improvement
on the zero cash-on-hand at
year-end 2007. However, since
that point, Bahamas Super-
markets has had to liquidate
fixed deposits worth almost
$6 million, since none are pre-
sent on its balance sheet cur-
rently.

For Bahamas Supermar-
kets’ 2008 fiscal year, the com-
pany enjoyed a modest 2.9 per
cent sales growth to $144.355
million.

However, its cost of sales
increased by more than $12

administrative expenses up by
almost $5 million.

In his note to shareholders,
Mr Sands attributed the 2008
net loss to “inventory short-
ages and discounting masked
by late and inaccurate man-
agement financial reports”.

However, he was “opti-
mistic that the worst is behind
us”, with key operating indi-
cators showing improvement
in 2009.

The 2009 second half was
expected to be “significantly
better” than the first, due to
improved systems and con-
trols, along with a drive to
curb pilferage and theft.

million, with operating and













Re:Parenting Training Seminar
7th April, 2009 - 2nd June, 2009








The Department of Rehabilitative/Welfare
Services will commence its second
Training Seminar for the year 2009 on 7th
April, 2009. The sessions will be held at
5:00p.m. in the Conference Room, Abaco
Markets Building, Thompson Boulevard
Interested parents are invited to attend.










NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Ultera Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 12th day of March, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308
East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

VENETI COMPANY SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 of The _ International Business
Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, VENETI COMPANY
SA is in dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was the 31st day of March, 2009. Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
VENETI COMPANY SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GOLDEN MARCHE
RESOURCES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 12th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009, PAGE 5B





Bahamas avoids
G-20 ‘blacklist’

FROM page 1B

The Government, Bahamas-
based financial services execu-
tives and countless attorneys,
accountants and others who pro-
vide services to the industry, will
likely be breathing a sigh of relief
that, at least for the moment,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham’s public position statement
has enabled this nation to avoid
the full force of the G-20’s wrath.

Speaking to Tribune Business
before the OECD published its
list yesterday, Zhivargo Laing,
minister of state for finance, said
the Government had done what it
felt was necessary to escape the
so-called ‘blacklist’, and it would
now wait and see what actions
others took.

“We did what we believed was
appropriate. What others deter-
mine to do is up to them,” Mr
Laing said. “There is no sense in
us speculating. We have done
what we believe was appropriate
to do, and will proceed on that
basis.

“We've done what we’ve done,
and I’m not going to speculate on
what others may or may not do.”

Michael Paton, the Lennox
Paton law firm partner and for-
mer Bahamas Financial Services

Harbour Island
Council blasted

on hotel trespass
FROM page 1B

clusively that the intended loca-
tion of the building was indeed
on hotel property”.

By that stage, the District
Council’s workforce had exca-
vated the land, natural growth
on the sand dune had been dug
out, and the foundations for the
bathrooms had been laid.

Dana Wells, Pink Sands’
attorney, sent copies of the sur-
vey to both the District Council
and Minister of Local Govern-
ment, but “it appears that did
not stop the defendants”.

An injunction was eventually
obtained to stop further work,
in what had become an “acrimo-
nious” dispute. Pink Sands had
twice called the police to
remove the Council’s workers
from its property.

Eventually, the Attorney-
General’s Office got the Survey-
or-General to prepare his own
survey, which confirmed the
findings of Mr Chee-A-Tow.
That was made clear to the
Supreme Court on March 6,
2006. “This trespass continued
for 10 months, and it was not
until after the Surveyor-General
had confirmed what the plaintiff
had already told [the District
Council], and proven conclu-
sively with a professional survey
from a well-known firm of sur-
veyors, that the [District Coun-
cil] made arrangements to
remove the trespass,” Justice
Lyons found. “Thereafter, it
took some time for the natural
growth of vegetation to occur to
the point where, so far as Mr
von Merveldt was aware, the
area adversely affected is either
back to the state it was before
the trespass or very nearly back
to that condition.”

Pink Sands and its parent,
Island Outpost (Harbour
Island) Ltd, had sough damages
for the trespass, plus a declara-
tion that the District Council
had “no claim or right” to the
property being trespassed upon.

“The Pink Sands Hotel is a
well-known establishment on
Harbour Island,” Justice Lyons
found. “It seeks to attract what
are termed ‘high end patrons’,
who are housed in small villas
around the property. The tres-
pass by the [District Council]
was right in front of one of these
villas. In so trespassing on the
land and digging away the sand
dunes and commencing to erect
the facility, the [District Coun-
cil] had obviously detracted
from the beauty, amenity and
ambiance of the plaintiff’s prop-
erty, particularly in relation to
the villa nearest to the site of
the trespass.”

In explaining his rationale for
the damages award, Justice
Lyons added: “This trespass was
a serious trespass on a valuable
property. The trespass was pro-
ceeded with without the [Dis-
trict Council] making any of the
proper checks to make sure that
it was proceeding properly. The
damage remained for at least 10
to 11 months before the trespass
was removed.”

Justice Lyons found that “it
was not a trespass that was
fleeting in nature”, and caused
actual damage to Pink Sands
land. He awarded the resort
$20,000 in general damages;
$12,805 in special damages;
$3,250 to cover the costs of the
Chee-a-Tow survey and $21 for
air courier costs. “I trust now
that the [District Council] can
see what were the consequences
of their ill-considered and
thoughtless act,” Justice Lyons
said.

Board (BFSB) chairman,
described the OECD’s use of
three separate tiers as “totally
disingenuous”, because “as far as
the rest of the world is concerned,
it’s a blacklist”.

He added: “To me, it’s very
grandiose and wishful thinking to
think that they can get all the
major financial centres to the
same degree of co-operation and
standards. To think we’re all
going to converge on agreed stan-
dards is staggering.

“T’m just glad there was some-
thing that was invoked or decreed
upon. At least there’s time to
manoevere, people can talk and
we can do something that’s palat-
able.”

In an interview with Tribune
Business prior to the OECD list’s
publication, Owen Bethel, head
of Nassau-based financial services
provider, the Montaque Group,
said the critical thing for the
Bahamas was to avoid being
placed on any ‘blacklist’, given
that the G-20 was looking to
move beyond a ‘naming and
shaming’ exercise and impose
sanctions.

That scenario has been avoid-
ed, at least for the moment. But,
outlining what would have hap-
pened had it come to pass, Mr
Bethel told Tribune Business that
the effects would not only have
been felt by the sector’s clients,
but also its institutions - especial-
ly those with head offices in G-20
nations.

“We would certainly have seen
not only clients of prospective
clients getting jittery and agitated
over the consequences of actions
being taken, but the OECD and
G-20 are looking to move one
step beyond what the did last
time, with the naming and sham-
ing, and impose sanctions,” Mr
Bethel said.

“That would certainly damage
the industry, period. Clients
would take action, and not just
clients. The industry here is pop-
ulated by foreign banks. We’re
still not out of the woods yet, and
pressure could come from head
offices of foreign banks to move,
shut down or switch business else-
where.”

He added: “The possibility still
is that there could be a flight of
financial institutions, not only
client business, from these juris-
dictions.

“Going forward, it will again
be whether we have the strength
or will to demand a level playing
field, or will we simply make it
better for clients to move from
one jurisdiction to another and
lose our competitive edge. We
need to ensure we are in the
game as long as everyone is play-
ing by the same rules.”

Not surprisingly, those nations
in the ‘top tier’ of the OECD list,
meaning those who had “sub-

stantially implemented the inter-
nationally agreed tax standard”,
included all that organisation’s
members states, along with the
Isle of Man and the Channel
Islands - the latter three no doubt
aided by the UK’s protective
embrace - plus, perhaps more sur-
prisingly, the likes of Barbados,
Cyprus and Malta. Of greater
concern, perhaps, to the
Bahamas, is the fact that the
OECD initiative makes no men-
tion of US states such as
Delaware, Nevada, Wyoming and
others, all of which have far less
transparent and effective regula-
tory systems than this nation and,
to all intents and purposes, oper-
ate as international financial cen-
tres and compete for the same
market as this nation.

And totally excluded from
mention on the OECD list were
Hong Kong and Macau, a move
no doubt intended to appease
China. The footnotes in relation
to China merely mentioned that
its “special administrative
regions” had committed to the
transparency and tax information
standards being demanded. Those
jurisdictions that were ‘blacklist-
ed’ were Costa Rica, the
Malaysian region of Labuan, the
Philippines and Uruguay.

Amid much sabre-rattling as
the G-20 summit drew to a close,
there was little doubt, especially
among those nations such as
France and Germany, which are
ideologically opposed to interna-
tional financial centres, of their
intent to use the global financial
crisis as an excuse to scapegoat,
blame and get after the likes of
the Bahamas.

“The time of banking secrecy
has passed,” said French presi-
dent Nicholas Sarkozy following
the summit. “Everyone around
the table wants an end to tax
havens. Everyone knows we need
sanctions.”

China said it supported the
move, but would not agree to
have two territories, Hong Kong
and Macau, classified as tax
havens.

Potential sanctions for trans-
gressors include additional audits
on the accounts of those who use
tax havens and curbs on tax
deductions claimed by businesses
who use the territories. In their
communique, leaders said they
may also consider further penal-
ties in their bilateral relations with
tax haven territories.

Stephen Timms, financial sec-
retary to the British Treasury,
said a culture of banking secrecy
had worsened global economic
problems.

“That lack of transparency —
that opaqueness — has con-
tributed to the severity of the
problems we are seeing in the
world economy at the moment,”
he said.

NOTICE

mE struction would like to inform the public

art

eee ea ee ee eae le

April 6th, 2009 from Navy Lion Rd (by the Hilton

) the bridge by Mackey St. from the hours
of 6pm to On M elt eMecltcme) i lecM in mesic)
of 70 day j

NOTICE is hereby

ae

Nae re y

ven that DATES JOEL of

MARSH HARBOUR, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

thal any person who Knows any teason why r

istration!

naturalization should noi be granted, should send a written

and signed statement of the facts within twen
days from the 3°° day of April, 2009 to the

eight
inister

responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-

7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE is hereby given that ERVIN ERROL MARTIN

of FIRETRAIL
ROAD Nassau,

OAD SOUTH OF GLADSTONE
Bahamas, & applying to the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration!
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who Knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27" day of
Mareh, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Cit@enship, PO. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAN



eee

The Public is hereby advised that TREVOR JASON
JONES of Freeport, Bahamas intend to change my

name to
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Deputy Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

lf there are



BAHAMAS SUPERMARKETS LIMITED

CHAIRMAN'S STATEMENT

The audit of the consolideled nanciel sitemens of Bahamas Sunemariets Linted (he Company") os ot June 25, 208 i in is find stapes and once
completed wil be made avaltaite bo: all stakehokers. However in fe inkewin, the Secunties Commission of The Batamas has requested that noneobdated

rresreagpatienT! Soccer Ibe prubiechad

Accordingly, presented herewift are fhe consobdaled management aocqunts of the Company which comprise fhe consold sled balance shee! as at January
7, 2003 and the relaled consolidated statements of operaions, changes in shareholders’ equifyidelot) and cash flows for the twentpeight weets then
eyed Abo induded songsde are the consoldaied balance sheets at al June 25, 2009 and June 27, 2007 ond the retated conenbdaied stalements of

operaiioss, Changes it shansholiiers' qaity andl cash flows for the years then enced

am disappointed io report hai, as foreshadowed at fhe last AGM, the Company reported = significant loss of $15.4 milion for the year ended June 25, 2006.
The reasons for fhe bes ore meny but isle substantialy to inweniory shortages: and discounting rested Gy lale and inscargie maragenent fence
pepovis. Howese, much work bas been done to remedy the deficiencies and we-can report thal fhe Company's key operating indicalors conlinwe lo show
Segebcael inproversed! in 2008 and we aie opine hal Be worst re betind us.

Akey fador in fhe recowery has been the greater iwolvement of pur apereing partner, Heal & Massy. Heal & Wassyis adiwersiiad, inlemafonal cong lomner-
ale win assets in cecess of VSSE00) million. We are indeed lorunate to hawe Pen 25 our partners. An executive lean ol espenenced supermarket operations
from Meal. & Massy ane secosded bo drive he Company's recovery ia October 2008 and the benef of their work has becoine evde! in recent montis. A
Sgniitanl change was made in the operating nianagement of tha company wih Be appointmee! of Sund Chatran as CED. Send was formerly Group CRO
ol Bastados Shipping & Trading, oseof Neal & Macey’: subeadianes, end be comes wih song financial and operaional experence whichis pompemeniad
by retailing and purchasing eqpesise from ls offer Heal & Messy colleagues. The Neal & Messy team has alsa eecewed strony supeod from a mack
strengthened Eahanian management eam who now hes the management dlls and aenanence to successiully lead the recowery. Thay have Pe beans

hil support

The Company is nce well inko ts year ending June 24. 2009 and has mace material progpess in pufing 2008 behind it. Alhough the fest haf of 2009 showed
8 kes, iohowing major inprovernenss in operations and managemeni and fngecel cones, we expect fhe senond hal of 2008 to be signdcanity beter
AScOUTiNg Cobos aft operating Afeciway biely mostly inascial reporting hes bees nenstiluied, opacaiing cos: are being peapetly conbeoled aac
Sten and ConTois cer Feceanng, prong and perchasing @ goods ara beng constantly improved. Funes, aggressive steps have been tacan fo card elt
and piferage and the Company i confident that i i making progressin this area

The Company's sharchodders have deplayed much galiesce and coescerable tolerance for the delay in communication and repoting. We are deeply
aprocative of bein corinued sugped and weh to ctcuee then of er conniiment to bing he Company back cavity bs bees of pecitabality hal if apcetd





in fhe poz,
Sincerely,
Basi L Sands,
Charan
BARAMAS SUPERMIARETS LIMITED
Corscidates Sataren a! Operations (Expressed in Bahemien dollare|
YEAR TO) DATE
angry 7, 205 dou 3, ME dure? 007
TE weeks enced] || [Fear ended |
(Lancia! (Usmcites] [Audited |
Feet sales 5 ae BY 4 ETS: WT BAe
(Coal ofsalles, incucing warehouse
Adeleery ecpenies 52 0M ATG) (TID, 738) 07 34 Bo)
(areas. peo Ds Ue aa
Operating and anna epee: IT ESLEMS Be 1d? BA eT)
(persing bee AAT eT) |T2,316,868) pT 18)
Wiens! nice - ay EE
Perel apes isi tLe) -
Med bis i (LST OTe |T455) | 5,130)
Sasic oes per Bia j i (ef) (0a)
United per stave 5 15] 11
‘Gonsolicgiad Statement of Changes in Sharsoicess (DefcayEquiy (Expressed in Bahamian tolare|
jAccurulalad Toe
Shea PEnaiuzioe Cerne apken
Capital Fipserve Astined Eamings Equity Deft}
Balance: al June 24, 2006 jaud deal] i 4518 Wi 87, 108 aaa
Weal Ines Far tha pear - - Ae. | [15,13
Dividends = GS] FAT ae}
Bakaeoe al lune: 27), 2007 uate] 4 550 198 1E1 DM TEE A TAB KH
Det hee the pear - - (1.4388 [11424 38)
Drvaiends. - - [2 MeL] [2 ELBE
Balance at June 2, 208 juneedited| 550 196 41,00 FL) LAST
Wit logs for the parce - - FLAQT OE] FL SoT OOF
Balance at Jarwary 7, 2006 | praudited| j 4550, 156 Wie FSI, 1B eB)
Consolidated Balance Shoat (Eqpesied in Gatemion colar]
Amey 0 joe, OE ied,
(Uraucitee] [Ura aciied) [Buel eal
resets
Covent epsets:
leah j Al S70) -
Fired tapos: - be 5a
Actourk mecpicable 1 Poti WTS 14
Due: Iron reaied party wie ha Ti it
Prepaid eapenses and olber ately 12t0,108 Tora? aa a78
retire: Was 5I8 1B Als WHT
Te SAG Ag Aha
pers, pant and squipmen Tao 116 te 174 Me
4 2) ct 70 BD
liahiibes and ShershoWers' Equity
Cure lager
Bank ovens j Aire 8 497,174 79,
Accounts pepable aed sound epeeses 1A TA TELE
Dh lo pete partes Tat 0 Pa
Proven aLeE Bi 2a] feel
214851! 22) irae
Sharehoidany Melcifienuity:
Shaws cepdet
Suthoded - £000) O00 shares 051M each
bsued eed fully pad - 4.55) 1 shares 4550 18 +581 455) 88
Rava nator Sears 11 0e 1H) Hi
(Accu related deo} etaned earings 1 ET) AE) TAS
ee oS 1a Dat Tins
j 2 at AT NE Tl
Coesdlideted Statement af Casa Flows (Expresses in Daherian dota
Jann? 2 Joe, OB dred, 007
[Ri weers esdec| [isa eached] [isa esches]
(Lireaueibes] ‘Veaies] | Pced eal]
Cash Bows iron operating acivities
Retloes tor the pesod j (357 Ere [7429,388) [i130]
Adustners bor
Depecgics ad anorioice Sta ri 26,71
rinses nore = (e000 ] (56,165)
[OSTERSE REESE In povEON (i 00 fe]
Bad cea wef-of and paoatioe lor doa bial ancoas = Bb ab BaF
Previgen an anticipated ineeniory shavtages - peed % SE Ad}
/Gain}iogs on cisgogal cf oraperty plewtand equigment (Ea 24) GIB (E773)
(Cash (used injiprnvided by operahora before weding capdalcteages = (T1113) [15 Sa] MBM
Doe Mi ancoes eoevable (434 175) | 11,2) |t331]
Decreaseyincreaiay ia dea Woot retated parts 12K Pod (477)
acess cdot in pore pied cope ad offer pines (B02 Ea (tae wea
Desrenie/ increase} i inmerdories 1 SBD EM 27a, To HS BEd)
(Decrease Vincraate ft eeccunts posable ard aouued expeniea 6, (Te THI) 12S tTe Taleo
[Decreace| ncreaselin due to elated peries (9 A) Litt HT a)
Tash (used injiprnvidied by operons: E45] 50) pa 5 2e Sed
Wiese! ceived - TRS TIE EST
Mel ash used injibrrvicked by opecaling sachviiees (E450 250) Aa Sali
[ae owes Boor investing acivibes
Purchase: od property, phen! and ecm ipnent (Aaa) FL aE] FET E85)
Proceeds ftir disposal ol papery, clind ard egeipted 300.b00 Gite BT
Desreesestirereees) ni fined depos: - 4 Bal cob (HEEE?|
Met cad pied be] sed | inesing echaies Tei 1B Paw eal]
(est fees orn financing acielies
Laat bom paver cunpary 5,000.00 - .
Drvelends pad / jure 728TH)
Wet cash provided iny'[iesed in| inancing aciatins 500000 (SEE | PSN)
Wet pecraase in cash eed cast equiegients (bea OT) (il AE] Bah oe)
(haeth ated cash encarta being a! peso! (ea S33) [79,108] amaon
Cash and cash oquisaents al ed of pannd j (AT a FLD] e102)
Caeh pnd cast aquigient: camer.
Cash j 39 Sil -
Foced deposit wah maturity base than 2 moeths - bee -
Bank rvestrall TT Sa) FS FH] e102)
j EEE FLOSS Te 107)
PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Development Bank $5m below loan goal

FROM page 1B

small and medium-sized businesses was around $8
to $9 million per annum. However, he suggested
that the current economic downturn had caused
a decline in loan requests and an increase in
defaults.

Mr Woodside said the bank enacted a morato-
rium on foreclosures in 2008, hoping to draw
debtors in financial distress into the BDB to nego-
tiate loan repayments and refinancing options.
However, many of the BDB’s clients had failed to
take advantage of the opportunity.

Now, the bank, through its collections depart-
ment, is poised to move on outstanding loan pay-
ments.

“We don’t want to foreclose and liquidate.

AL
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Compoary

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

That is not our purpose,” said Mr Woodside.
“We go after those who were bad from day one,
and who would use the recession as an excuse.”

Mr Woodside revealed that the BDB is cur-
rently short on capital, and is waiting for refi-
nancing to recapitalise through the Caribbean
Development Bank (CDB), Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) and the National
Insurance Board (NIB).

So far this year, the BDB has funded seven
projects to the tune of $622,764, in the areas of
transportation, services and farming.

With half the BDB’s loan portfolio in arrears,
it has taken extra steps to ensure those business-
es it funds are successful.

In 2004, the bank created a Business Advisory
Services department to offer business develop-

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction

Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage

FROM page 1B

ment advice and resources to those small and
medium-sized businesses it finances in a bid to
make them successful.

The BDB’s manager of business advisory ser-
vices, Dale McHardy, said new small business
owners were able to procure an array of busi-
ness development literature and software, such as
Quickbooks, from the bank’s in-house Business
Information Centre.

Mrs McHardy said the BDB offers workshops
for their clients, and markets their businesses
whenever and wherever they can.

“For a small business to be successful they first
have to be educated on how to run a small busi-
ness,” she said.

One such small business owner and recipient of
the Government’s Self-Starters programme, Devi-

payments,

“unfair pricing tactics”, the fact

to Bodie, told this newspaper on Tuesday that he
sought to expand his business through funding
from the BDB, but found he did not meet certain
criteria.

The BDB has since taken a second look at Mr
Bodie’s business plan and model, and has engaged
him to evaluate his business.

“We have certain criteria, but we evaluate them
(business plans) on a case by case basis,” said
Mr Woodside.

According to Mr Bodie, he can expand his
almost $1,000 per week business if he had the
machinery, funded through the BDB, to turn the
waste products from the coconuts he uses to make
his tarts into mulch that he would then sell.

“My tarts are known from Lyford Cay to Win-
ton,” said Mr Bodie.

‘Devastating impact’
from cruise islands

He urged Bahamians to become “less

1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following
items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for
the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (ie.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

the country by cruise lines on an annual
basis”.

He indicated that BASE and its mem-
bers, who include the likes of Dolphin
Encounters, Blackbeard’s Cay, Ardastra
Gardens, Nassau Water Ferries and Sun-
shine Cruises, also felt left out by the Gov-
ernment and Ministry of Tourism when it
came to policy and negotiations with the
cruise lines on issues that impacted Bahami-
an businesses.

Among their issues with the cruise lines,
Mr Beckles said, were the receipt of timely

that the jurisdiction for resolving disputes
was not the Bahamas, trade and on-board
marketing limitations were set by the cruise
lines, and concerns that some agreements
were contrary to Bahamian law.

And Mr Beckles added: “The Bahamas in
general, and Grand Bahama in particular,
needs to constantly improve our products:
physical plant, customer service, use of tech-
nology, Internet and other modern advan-
tages to advance our businesses.

“We have more resources available to us
here in the Bahamas than many of our
regional competitors, and yet they do a
much better job with less.”

political and more business practical” in
the conduct of commerce, and that tour
operators needed to “demand more” from
elected MPs and ministers.

“Tf we don’t change, we can be assured
that globalisation will create an opportu-
nity for someone else to come in and do
what we should have been doing and there
will be little , if anything, we can do about
it,” Mr Beckles said.

“We must do more to improve our over-
all customer service product, employee
development. Eliminate mediocrity and
complacency.”

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci

Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room

located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRACI BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs



@ DAVID B. CARUSO
NEW YORK

Even Bernie Madoff isn't
exempt from the real estate
slump, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

The Florida mansion that
prosecutors seized from the
Wall Street swindler appears
to have lost a big chunk of its

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

sharro

Company Administrative Director

Experience:

value since Palm Beach Coun-
ty officials assessed its worth
last year at $9.3 million.

A new appraisal that feder-
al officials had done in March
pegged the property's likely
market price at $7.45 million.

Prosecutors disclosed in a
court filing Thursday that
Madoff and his wife tenta-
tively agreed to let the gov-
ernment sell off the waterfront
Palm Beach home while the
courts decide how much of the
family's fortune should be for-
feited and distributed to vic-
tims of his Ponzi scheme.

The planned seizure was
accelerated, however, because
of the hefty cost of maintain-
ing the five-bedroom home
and legal complications creat-
ed by a competing claim to
Madoff's assets posed by a
lawsuit in Connecticut.

Federal marshals seized the
house Wednesday, along with
a vintage, 55-foot yacht called

Bull, docked in Fort Laud-
erdale, Fla., and a 24-foot
motorboat.

The U.S. attorney in Man-
hattan revealed Thursday that
marshals also had taken pos-
session of a 38-foot yacht
called Sitting Bull at a marina
in Montauk, on the eastern tip
of Long Island.

Costs

Court papers say the
monthly costs on Madoff's
6,500-square-foot house on
the Intercoastal Waterway
included $3,000 for home-
owners insurance, $1,000 for
utilities and $3,300 for main-
tenance and security. The
family's annual flood and hur-
ricane insurance bill was
$115,000.

Madoff pleaded guilty last
month to taking billions of
dollars from investors around
the world and funneling it into

=

Important

Madoff's home in Florida lost almost $2M in value

what could be the largest
Ponzi scheme in history.

His victims included huge
hedge funds, global banks and
thousands of smaller investors
who are now scrambling to
recover whatever they can of
their life savings.

Prosecutors are trying to
preserve as much of Madoft's
fortune as possible to distrib-
ute among his victims.

They said in the court filing
that they had refused to allow
the family to pay its home
insurance bill for April
because they didn't believe
that Madoff and his wife,
Ruth, would own it for much
longer.

Madoff, a 70-year-old for-
mer Nasdaq chairman, could
get up to 150 years in prison
when he's sentenced in June.



l. Minimum five years multi-unit responsibility for daily restaurant
administrative and financial data auditing, computing and report-
ing.

2, Minimum five years experience in daily, weekly and monthly
restaurant environment payable and receivable accounts entry and
auditing.

3. Total proficiency in the monthly, quarterly and annual compila-

tion of budgets, P&L statements, balance sheets and cash-flow

reports,

4, Exceptional knowledge of all Microsoft Office Systems, and the
ACCPAC Business Reporting System.

5, Exceptional direction, communication and organizational skills.
». Tertiary level education in accounting or related field.
Salary based upon experience and productivity

Email resumes to the Managing director at
cvk/@)sbarrobahamas.com

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEW ACCEPTED







Notice

From lam to 1lam
Sunday 5th April.

As we continue efforts to improve our service to you, we
ask you to take note that our Electronic Banking System
will be temporarily unavailable during the time listed
above. We apologise for any inconvenience that this may
cause. During this period, the following services will be

unavailable:

e ABM

e VISA transactions via ABM
¢ Internet Banking

e Telephone Banking

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this.

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com

SERVICE INTERRUPTION Va












FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK
GET THERE. TOGETHER.
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST



“FX ontanoo

_ High:82°F/28°C
~ Low:68°F/20°C



" @
TAMPA’. ju MG

High: 78° F/26° C t ee ae

Low: 70° F/21°C ah F.

@ fe

Low: 71° F/22°C 2%
a
é & i
MIAMI
an f High: 88° F/31°C
. Low: 73° F/23° C

KEY WEST
High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 76° F/24°C

@

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Saturday

Today Saturday
High Low W High Low W
F/C F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 6216 41/5 c 58/14 31/0 pc Indianapolis
Anchorage 35/1 26/-3 sf 41/5 23/-5 s Jacksonville
Atlanta 66/18 45/7 pe 74/23 54/12 s Kansas City
Atlantic City 58/14 47/8 t 63/17 36/2 s Las Vegas
Baltimore 62/16 44/6 t 61/16 38/3 s Little Rock
Boston 53/11 45/7 + 60/15 41/5 pc Los Angeles
Buffalo 54/12 40/4 r 45/7 32/0 pe Louisville
Charleston, SC 78/25 49/9 t 77/25 531 $s Memphis
Chicago 47/8 32/0 pe 52/41 35/1 pe Miami
Cleveland 58/14 37/2 r 47/8 32/0 s Minneapolis
Dallas 72/22 55/12 $s 77/25 49/9 pe Nashville
Denver 52/11 27/-2 ¢ 32/0 19/-7 sn New Orleans
Detroit 52/11 33/0 r 53/11 34/1 pe New York
Honolulu 82/27 69/20 pce 82/27 70/21 c Oklahoma City
Houston 75/23 58/14 § 80/26 64/17 pc Orlando

o|1|2

LOW



MODERATE

3|4|5





Sunny, breezy and Partly cloudy. A full day of A full day of Sunny and breezy. Windy and not as
humid. sunshine. sunshine. warm.
. High: 88° High: 86° High: 87° High: 74°
High: 90° Low: 76° Low: 73° Low: 74° Low: 61° Low: 61°
Emile ETI aie a
[LF 104°-78° F 94°-81° F 93°-65° F T1°-57° F High
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 2:50 a.m.
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 3:21 p.m.
Saturda 4:00 a.m.
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunday 505 am.
ABACO Temperature 5:31 p.m.
High: 88° F/31° C HIGH ooeceeeecccececesesteseseetsteseeeeteseseeceseees 84" F/29" C Monday 602 am.
io iS LOW oocceeeeees 75° F/24° C 6:25 p.m
Low: 74° F/23°C Normal high... 80° F/27° sala
a Normal low 67° F/20° C
@ WEST PALM BEACH i LAST Year's MUDDY sissstassdenennansreiesen 85° F/29°

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 86°F/30°C



High
F/C
54/12
77/25
62/16
72/22
67/19
62/16
58/14
63/17
88/31
46/7
58/14
72/22
57/13
66/18
82/27

High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 70° F/21°C

Today

Low

F/C
36/2
49/9
42/5
47/8
46/7
52/11
39/3
49/9
70/21
30/-1
38/3
55/12
47/8
50/10
60/15

_—~

W High
F/C
r 60/15
t 80/26
Ss 66/18
pe 68/20
s 77/25
sh 70/21
pe 66/18
s 75/23
pe 85/29
pc 46/7
pe 71/21
s 78/25
r 59/15
Ss 75/23
t 82/27

Low

F/C
44/6
57/13
36/2
48/8
54/12
52/11
50/10
56/13
71/21
30/-1
48/8
65/18
46/7
40/4
62/16

FREEPORT

High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 72° F/22°C

NASSAU

High: 90° F/32° C

Low: 76° F/24° C
@

QO

hi

ANDROS
High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 75° F/24°C

Today
W High Low W

F/C F/C
s Philadelphia 63/17 48/8 t
Phoenix 87/30 58/14 pc
pe Pittsburgh 59/15 35/1 4r
$ Portland, OR 48/8 34/1 sh
pe Raleigh-Durham 73/22 44/6 t
s St. Louis 58/14 41/5 s
s Salt Lake City 44/6 28/-2 ¢
pc San Antonio 76/24 60/15 s
pe San Diego 62/16 54/12 sh
r San Francisco 57/13 44/6 s
s Seattle 46/7 33/0 pc
pc Tallahassee 78/25 45/7 §
pe Tampa 78/25 64/17 t
Cc Tucson 81/27 53/11 $s
S$ Washington, DC 62/16 47/8 t

ELEUTHERA
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 75° F/24°C

GREAT EXUMA

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 74° F/23°C

Saturday
High Low
F/C F/C
58/14 42/5
77/25 52/11
52/11 34/1
55/12 38/3
73/22 46/7
65/18 47/8
45/7 31/0
84/28 58/14
67/19 53/11
64/17 46/7
52/11 39/3
82/27 54/12
81/27 68/20
76/24 = 47/8
65/18 44/6

Ww

$
$
Ss

$
pc
sf
pc
$
$

pc

nnn on

Last year's lOW .cceceseseteeseeeeeees 72° F/22° C



RAGGED ISLAND
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 71°F/22°C



ia

CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 75° F/24°C

GREAT INAGUA .

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 72° F/22°C

iF

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 72° F/22°C

6|7

HIGH

27
24

27
25

27
27

2.8
2.9



\. HIGH

9:15 a.m.
9:26 p.m.

10:18 a.m.
10:36 p.m.

11:15 a.m.
11:40 p.m.

12:07 p.m.



8|9|10

TAY rr yy

Vv
0
| ext

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Poy

Ht.(ft.) Low — Ht.(ft.

0.3
0.2

0.2
0.1

0.1
0.0

0.0

Precipitation Suntise...... 6:59 a.m. Moonrise .... 1:46 p.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... eeccecccscsssssseeeen 0.00" Sunset....... 7:27 p.m. Moonset ..... 2:46 a.m.
Year to date ; i
Normal year to date oo... ccc ccc ceeeceeeeee 5.33" dl a ney Fits
AccuWeather.com {.°"
Forecasts and graphics provided by bic:
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr. 9 Apr. 17 Apr. 24 May 1
CATISLAND
High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 71° F/22°C
* SAN SALVADOR
High: 89° F/32°C
Low: 73° F/23°C
LONGISLAND
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 73° F/23°C
MAYAGUANA

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
64/17
57/13
61/16
64/17
93/33
85/29
59/15
64/17
70/21
68/20
64/17
70/21
64/17
66/18
68/20
79/26
81/27
99/37
36/2
90/32
82/27
67/19
58/14
55/12
68/20
61/16
48/8
90/32
41/5
68/20
88/31
55/12
65/18
75/23
85/29
83/28
63/17
68/20
90/32
84/28
90/32
55/12
37/2
66/18
86/30
97/36
47/8
63/17
62/16
80/26
75/23
66/18
84/28
91/32
91/32
17/25
88/31
75/23
48/8
52/11
77/25
79/26
59/15
50/10
88/31
46/7
67/19
55/12
32/0

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
70/21
49/9
32/0
45/7
51/10
79/26
75/23
49/9
45/7
63/17
44/6
50/10
67/19
46/7
46/7
45/7
64/17
59/15
79/26
20/-6
75/23
67/19
50/10
46/7
43/6
46/7
45/7
39/3
70/21
30/-1
66/18
57/13
44/6
55/12
51/10
76/24
64/17
43/6
36/2
73/22
52/11
63/17
45/7
28/-2
42/5
57/13
68/20
34/1
45/7
42/5
71/21
60/15
50/10
74/23
59/15
66/18
50/10
70/21
62/16
34/1
36/2
64/17
69/20
48/8
37/2

FRIDAY - APRIL 3rp - 2009 - PAGE 9B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

WwW

nonnn

72/22 t

34/1
51/10
38/3
24/-4

nono

c

High
F/C
87/30
65/18
59/15
61/16
66/18
93/33
84/28
61/16
72/22
69/20
68/20
68/20
76/24
66/18
67/19
72/22
75/23
84/28
100/37
40/4
90/32
82/27
69/20
60/15
50/10
72/22
63/17
52/11
90/32
39/3
72/22
93/33
55/12
64/17
71/21
85/29
80/26
59/15
73/22
85/29
84/28
98/36
46/7
36/2
69/20
85/29
95/35
45/7
64/17
70/21
82/27
85/29
65/18
83/28
83/28
90/32
73/22
85/29
77/25
57/13
50/10
75/23
83/28
62/16
47/8
87/30
47/8
69/20
61/16
40/4

Saturday

Low
F/C
69/20
48/8
30/-1
48/8
54/12
78/25
74/23
50/10
48/8
63/17
49/9
53/11
66/18
44/6
46/7
48/8
60/15
63/17
78/25
16/-8
71/21
68/20
54/12
49/9
39/3
48/8
48/8
43/6
70/21
32/0
68/20
61/16
47/8
48/8
51/10
75/23
62/16
43/6
43/6
76/24
46/7
64/17
32/0
23/-5
43/6
58/14
68/20
37/2
43/6
46/7
71/21
63/17
52/11
73/22
56/13
71/21
48/8
67/19
64/17
38/3
34/1
63/17
69/20
50/10
32/0
75/23
38/3
52/11
41/5
22/-5

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m0) ee 0 ee OS eo Be eS ee OO Be Oe oo ee ee oe oe ce) ee ee Oe > ee
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sf

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SW at 15-30 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Saturday: Wat 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: SW at 15-30 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Saturday: | WSW at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: SW at 12-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Saturday: _ SW at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

>| Seattle.
PCD

/ BREEZY
(BREEZY ) ‘, Kansas City;

62/42

Los

62/52

Miami
88/70

Showers
T-storms
Rain

[*. +] Flurries

pe] Snow Warm Mini,
[yz ¥] Ice Stationary Magu

-10s| -0s [/s) 10s 20s [OSI 40s [50s 60s 70s (80s [Gis\/ 00ST)

Fronts
Cold
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.









AUTO INSURANCE

Never st
engine wit out us!

OUT |

1¢8 to Auto Insurance,
: ee smart choice is
Ins Management.
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(A
PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009

ee ey Ne Pe eae UO Veen 1 ere tote)

THE TRIBUNE





Abaco paar b aE
group wins top




The Planning Abaco Group has been honoured with a
Charter Award from the Congress of New Urbanism
(CNU). These awards are intended to recognise projects
around the world that best embody and advance the prin-
ciples of the Charter for New Urbanism.

Planning Abaco is a group from Andrews University
(Michigan), comprised of students, teachers, architects
and urbanists dedicated to promoting sustainable devel-
opment.

The CNU said: “The Charter Awards programme is
unique in its emphasis on the entirety of the built and nat-
ural environment - from the function and sustainability of
regions to the fine-grain architectural details that strength-
en people's ties to a place over time.

“The Charter Awards look at how plans and projects
integrate with their contexts and, consequently, how they
improve both the human experience of place and the rela-
tionship between the built and natural environments.”

The CNU describes honorees as “setting the gold stan-
dard for urban design and development”.

Chester Cooper, British
American Financial’s president
and chief executive, has been
named as the College of the
Bahamas Alumni Association’s
Hall Of Fame Honoree for
2008.

After joining British Ameri-
can Financial in 2001, follow-
ing a successful eight-year
career as an investment banker
in the Bahamas, Dublin and
Luxembourg, Mr Cooper led a
Bahamian Group that acquired
the then-British American
Insurance Company in Febru-
ary 2007.

Mr Cooper was also hon-
oured as ‘Business Person of
the Year’ by the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce in 2007.

Education

After completing his primary
and secondary education in
Exuma, Mr Cooper went to

Share your news

Charter Award joins COP’

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Nassau to further his education.

Mr Cooper also studied in
Canada, the US and the UK.
His first degree, an Associate
of Arts Degree in Economics,
was obtained at COB. He then
went on to receive a BA in Eco-
nomics and Finance, and MBA
(with distinction).

Mr Cooper holds various
directorships, including: BAB
Global Group, BAB Holdings,



det aetna tom

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qqunenecne We."

British American chief
s Hall of Fame

PM aT a aseei ce Renn is pictured third from the left.

Bramer General Insurance,
Eleuthera Properties, RoyalStar
Assurance, Bramer General
Insurance Agency, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, and the
Bahamas Government Venture
Capital Fund.

He is an alumnus of the Col-



lege of the Bahamas and a
member of the Young Presi-
dent’s Organisation (YPO), a
Rotarian, a Toastmaster; for-
mer host of the ZNS TV-13
financial talk show, You & Your
Money, and author of the book,
Ask Chester about Saving, Plan-

WORLD BUSINESS NEWS

Banks, investment firms
borrow less from Fed

m@ JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON

Commercial banks and
investment firms borrowed less
over the past week from the
Federal Reserve's emergency
lending program, a hopeful sign
that some credit stresses are
easing a bit.

The Fed reported Thursday
that commercial banks averaged
$59.7 billion in daily borrowing
over the week that ended
Wednesday. That was down
from $62.8 billion in average
daily borrowing logged over the
week ended March 25.

Investment firms drew $19.5
billion over the past week from
the Fed program. That was
down from an average of $20.1
billion the previous week.

The identities of financial
institutions that borrow from
the Fed program are not
released. They now pay just 0.50
percent in interest for the emer-
gency loans.

The Fed's net holdings of
"commercial paper" averaged
$244.3 billion over the week
ending Wednesday, an increase
of $3.5 billion from the previ-
ous week.

The first-of-its-kind program
started on Oct. 27, a time of
intensified credit problems
when the Fed began buying
commercial paper — the cru-
cial short-term debt that com-
panies use to pay everyday
expenses. The central bank has
said about $1.3 trillion worth of
commercial paper would quali-
fy.

The Fed also said its pur-
chases of mortgage-backed
securities guaranteed by Fan-
nie Mae, Freddie Mac and Gin-
nie Mae averaged $236.4 billion
over the past week, down $540
million from the previous week.
The goal of the program, which
started on Jan. 5, is to help the
crippled mortgage-finance and
housing markets. Mortgage
rates have dropped since the
Fed announced the creation of
the program late last year.

Rates on 30-year mortgages



ning and Investing for Retire-
ment.

Mr Cooper will be officially
inducted at the 2009 Hall of
Fame Induction Reception on
Thursday, April 30, 2009, at the
British Colonial Hilton. The
reception will begin at 6.30pm.

Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP Photo

JOB SEEKERS line up for assistance at an Economic Development Depart-
ment office in Sunnyvale, Calif., Friday, Feb. 27, 2009. The Federal
Reserve's new snapshot of business activity nationwide, released Wednes-
day, March 4, showed the economic picture darkening over the last two
months and revealed little hope for a quick turnaround.

tumbled to new lows this week.
Freddie Mac reported Thurs-
day that rates on 30-year mort-
gages averaged 4.78 percent this
week, down from 4.85 percent
last week and the lowest on
records dating to 1971.

Lending

Squeezed banks and invest-
ment firms are borrowing from
the Fed because they can't get
money elsewhere. Investors
have cut them off and shifted
their money into safer Treasury
securities. Financial institutions
are hoarding whatever cash
they have, rather than lending it
to each other or customers.

The lockup in lending has
contributed to the recession,
now the longest since World
War IT.

Investment houses in March
2008 were given similar emer-
gency-loan privileges as com-
mercial banks after a run on
Bear Stearns pushed what was
the nation’s fifth-largest invest-
ment bank to the brink of bank-
ruptcy and into a takeover by
JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Critics worry the Fed's
actions have put billions of tax-
payers’ dollars at risk.

The central bank's balance
sheet now stands at $2.048 tril-
lion, down slightly from last
week, partly reflecting less
emergency borrowing by banks
and investment firms.

The Fed's balance sheet,
however, has ballooned since
September when it was just
under $900 billion.

That growth reflects the Fed's
many unconventional efforts —
various programs to lend or buy
debt — to mend the financial
system and jolt the economy
out of recession.

The report also said that cred-
it provided to insurer Ameri-
can International Group Inc.
from the Fed averaged $44.7
billion for the week ending
Wednesday, up slightly from
$43.6 billion the previous week.
AIG — faced with increasing
financial stresses — received a
fresh aid package from the gov-
ernment last month. The com-
pany's decision to pay employ-
ees millions in bonuses had
ignited a public outrage.