Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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WEATHER
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BAHAMAS EDITION Tel: 326-1875








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THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

WSS

Tm SE
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

dnemoloyment
Set to increase

Central Bank FINITE a

gives gloomy
outlook

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE unemployment rate is set
to increase beyond the 12 per cent
reported for New Providence at
year-end 2008, the Central Bank
of the Bahamas warned yester-
day, with weakness in the tourism
industry and foreign direct invest-
ment continuing through year-
end 2009.

In its latest gloomy outlook for
the Bahamian economy’s
prospects, which will come as no
surprise to most analysts, the
Central Bank said Government’s
fiscal deficit would “widen con-
siderably” due to its increased
spending on stimulus pro-
grammes, combined with a
decrease in revenue collections.

The Bahamian economy’s
short, medium and long-term
future remains inextricably linked
to the US, reiterated the Central
Bank’s report on monthly eco-
nomic developments for Febru-
ary 2009, with this nation’s
prospects for recovery dependent
on the impact made by President
Barack Obama’s stimulus poli-
cies.

“The fallout from the global
financial crisis continued to
impact the Bahamian economy
during the review month, con-
tributing to persistent weakness in
tourism and foreign investments.

SEE page eight

ok ee
eee ts

Felipé Major/Tribune staff J

ABOVE: The body of Arsenio Mortimer is removed
from the scene yesterday.

RIGHT: Arsenio Mortimer is pictured with his son
Nackyo and girlfriend Nicole Samson

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE family of Arsenio Mortimer claim that police
are trying to cover up his death by suggesting that he
opened fire on officers, justifying their decision to
return fire, hitting him twice in the back. The family
said that Arsenio was not armed.

According to the official statement from the police,
officers from the Mobile Division saw three males
in a white Mitsubishi Mirage around 11pm acting in a

SEE page 10



Privy Council Judicial Committee reserves
its decision on beach access dispute

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE JUDICIAL Committee
of the Privy Council has reserved
its decision on an appeal involving
the owners of two adjourning
properties in Lyford Cay and
their dispute over beach access.

The five Law Lords of the
Privy Council yesterday heard the
appeal in the case of Icebird Lim-
ited and Alicia P Winegardener,
which is the only appeal from the
Bahamas the Judicial Committee
will hear during its third sitting

in New Providence this week.
The appellant, Icebird Limit-
ed, is seeking to overturn a ruling
by the Court of Appeal that
upheld a judge’s order that the
appellant’s writ and statement of
claim be struck out and dismissed.
The dispute between Icebird
Limited and Winegardener, who
are owners of adjacent proper-
ties in the Clifton Bay Beach area
of Lyford Cay, stems from an
agreement made between the
properties’ previous owners

SEE page eight







Claim that
police officers
used torture
techniques

Man spends 11 days in hospital
recovering from injuries

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia. net

DELANZO Cartwright was released
from hospital yesterday after spending 11
days recovering from injuries he claimed
he suffered from waterboarding and physi-
cal abuse at the hands of officers at a local

police station.

With injuries ranging from kidney fail-
ure, to fractured ribs, Delanzo said he was
picked up by officers on March 20th for DELANZO
allegedly “causing harm” and given the beat- CARTWRIGHT,

ing of his life.

30, is pictured

With hands cuffed behind his back, he following his
said two officers escorted him upstairs to alleged beating at
an office in the police station where they the hands of police.
beat him with wooden and metal baseball

bats.

While reports of such beatings at the hands of police in recent
months are complained of more frequently, Delanzo’s incident
is the first reported case where it is alleged that officers attempt-
ed to mimic the recently outlawed torture technique of water-

boarding.

Waterboarding is a technique where the victim is suspended

SEE page eight



Expired insulin given to patient
‘was sent to Bahamas in 2006’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A PHARMACEUTICAL
manufacturer has confirmed the
expired insulin issued to a
patient at the Elizabeth Estates
Clinic pharmacy this year was
sent to the Bahamas for gov-
ernment distribution in May,
2006.

The lot number on the
Humulin insulin given to a dia-
betes patient in February and
again March has been verified
by global pharmaceutical com-
pany Eli Lilly and Company as
part of the batch of medication
sent to the Bahamas nearly
three years ago.

And Nassau Agencies Ltd,
the authorised distributor for
Humulin insulin in the
Bahamas, has confirmed it
received the medication in May,
2006, which expired 17 months
later in October, 2007, and sent
it on to the Bahamas National
Drug Agency (BNDA) upon
request.

The BNDA would then have
dispensed it to the government
clinic and pharmacy in Eliza-
beth Estates, eastern New Prov-



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

idence, where it appears to have
sat for nearly three years before
it was given to a diabetic filling
her regular prescription for the
product.

Although the diabetic of 20
years, who asked for The Tri-
bune to withhold her identity,
uses Humulin up to three times
a day to control her blood sug-
ar levels, February 3 was the
first time she went to Elizabeth
Estates to obtain the medica-
tion.

When she took the medica-
tion it had no affect on her
blood sugar level, as rather than
keeping it down as it is sup-
posed to, her blood sugar levels
continued to rise, causing her
to feel light-headed, nauseous
and have leg-cramps.

She only realised the medica-
tion was out-of-date when she
returned to Elizabeth Estates
six weeks later and was given
another box of Humulin with
an expiration date of October,
2007, and noticed it was from
the same lot as the medication
given to her in February.

Although the expiration date
printed by the manufacturer on

SEE page 10





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THE WESLEY FOUNDATION group arrive in Rock Sound.



Clemson University makes
positive impact in Eleuthera

TARPUM BAY,
ELEUTHERA - A group of
55 students and faculty from
Clemson University’s Wesley
Foundation Group visited
South Eleuthera to lend a
helping hand to the commu-
nity.

The group, led by Reverend

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News Pll.2,0,050)0 6.9, 10, 17,.19.20
ECILOnIAIMEtLer Sea. vercu.c) nouns eine annereent P4
Pii16s138.2123.24
Pale anienlo

Lane Glaze, arrived on the
island last week on a Bahama-
sair charter flight for a one
week trip, during which they
engaged in volunteer commu-
nity service, community work
and environmental studies.
They were hosted by Island
Journeys, a non-profit organi-




























































F ilbe cio Oo. ile
FOS tan satG, if es20
OBITUARIES/RELIGION 32 PAGES
CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

had Baty , “i re = = z. Tt hs
INATED B

sation dedicated to strength-
ening, transforming and
rebuilding local communities.
Three days after their
arrival, they joined winter res-
idents, locals and visitors at
the Mission Foundation in
Rock Sound, Eleuthera for the
annual welcome reception
jointly hosted by the Ministry
of Tourism and Aviation and
the Mission Foundation.
Locals said the presence of
the South Carolina university
group made the reception
even more exciting, not only
because they took part in the
festivities and won a number
of prizes, but also because
they enjoyed Bahamian food,
music and arts and crafts.
During the reception, Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation
officials, including Eleuthera
branch manager, Jacqueline
Gibson, and director for the
Central and Southern
Bahamas, Charity Armbrister,
presented a plaque to Rev-
erend Glaze in honour of his
contribution to the island.
Reverend Glaze has been
bringing groups to Eleuthera
for more than six years. Each
year, the group invests around
$90,000 in the community, and
around half a million dollars
has been injected since they
first began their trips.
The ministry says 300 par-



STUDENTS EXAMINE the flora and fauna at Lighthouse Point beach. Locals hope to protect this area

from development.

ticipants have visited and
around 50 have made return
trips.

The group missed one year
to the Bahamas, instead doing
hurricane relief work in the
Gulf of Mexico in the wake of
Hurricane Katrina.

Reverend Glaze’s organisa-
tion has donated generously
to Island Journeys and to
South Eleuthera Emergency
Partners (SEEP), which are
both run by Shaun Ingraham,
a native of Tarpum Bay.

Donations have included
two school buses, two passen-
ger vans, tools and shipping
costs on for the importation
of fire gear and equipment for
SEEP’s volunteer fire fighters.

Reverend Glaze has also
brought other groups from
North and South Carolina to
experience life in a small
island community.

Opportunity

When asked why he is so
passionate about bringing uni-
versity students to Eleuthera,
he replied: “When I was a col-
lege student, I travelled to the
Dominican Republic and it
opened a greater world for
me. I went in with the mind
that I was American but came
back that I was a human being.
So, bringing the students from
South Carolina down to
Eleuthera gives them a similar
opportunity and perspective
that there is another world out
there.”

Shaun Ingraham, director of
Island Journeys, is a commu-
nity organiser and disaster
response consultant who
brings people to South
Eleuthera with the aim that
the both the visitors and the
community will grow through
the interaction.

“The way Shaun sets up the
programme and how you can
serve the people and the com-
munity is great and you cannot
learn this experience in the



— _t



THE VOLUNTEERS work on providing a roof for a handicap access

ramp at Princess Cays.

2

classroom,” said Reverend
Glaze.

Students are placed where
their talents are best suited
and assigned tasks based on
their areas of interest.

This year’s construction pro-
jects included re-roofing a
home for a single mother in
Tarpum Bay, constructing a
shaded area for the straw ven-
dors at Princess Cays and
extending the roof on one side
of the Church of God to create
a shaded activity area.

Some of the students are
working towards education
qualifications, and they spent
time in the local schools where
they taught and observed.

Five nurses, lead by lecturer
Janice Lanham, visited clinics
to help update client records
and assist health workers with
their duties.

The environmental and nat-
ural resources students visit-
ed Lighthouse Beach at the tip

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of Southern Eleuthera to study
and document plant and bird
life.

Marketing students assisted
with creating websites and
brochures for various areas of
interest in South Eleuthera.

The students also had time
to enjoy local highlights such
as food from fish fry in Rock
Sound and a swim at Ocean
Hole.

Murder trial is
TET ETT

THE trial of three men
charged in the February 2006
murder of businessman Kei-
th Carey was adjourned again
yesterday after it was revealed
that one of the attorneys in
the case had been involved in
an accident and that one of
the accused had taken ill.

Justice Jon Isaacs, who is
hearing the case, was forced
to adjourn the trial once again
after being informed by lead
prosecutor Cheryl Grant-
Bethel that attorney Perry
Albury, who is representing
murder accused Dwight
Knowles, had been involved
in an accident and was being
treated in hospital. She told
the court yesterday that she
did not know the extent of his
injuries.

Attorney Craig Butler,
who is representing murder
accused Jamal Glinton, also
informed the court that his
client had taken ill and would
not be able to take part in the
proceedings until today.

The trial into the murder of
businessman Keith Carey
began on February 15 before
Justice Isaacs.

Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown
and Dwight Knowles are
charged with murder as well
as armed robbery and con-
spiracy to commit armed rob-
bery.

Keith Carey, 43, was shot
and killed on the steps of the
Bank of the Bahamas on
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway before he was able
to deposit $40,000 that
belonged to the Esso Service
Station, which he operated.

Ms Grant-Bethel,
Stephanie Pintard, Anthony
Delaney and Lennox Coleby
are prosecuting the case.
Attorneys Craig Butler and
Devard Francis are repre-
senting Jamal Glinton, attor-
ney Dorsey McPhee is repre-
senting Sean Brown, and
attorney Perry Albury is rep-
resenting Dwight Knowles.
The prosecution has called a
total of 41 witnesses during
the trial.



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Harl Taylor
murder

accused is
denied hail



Troyniko McNeil

FOR a third time, the man
charged in the murder of
internationally known hand-
bag designer Harl Taylor has
been denied bail.

Senior Justice Anita Allen
yesterday refused a bail
application on behalf of mur-
der accused Troyniko
McNeil, 22.

Justice Allen noted that
McNeil is charged with a
serious offence, that there is
evidence against him and
that his trial is imminent.

McNeil is expected to
stand trial on June 29, before
Senior Justice Allen.

Application

The accused made his first
application for bail in Janu-
ary.

McNeil’s attorney Murrio
Ducille submitted yesterday
that the accused must be
presumed innocent until
proven otherwise, that he is
not a flight risk and has no
previous convictions.

Attorney Lorna Longley-
Rolle, who appeared on
behalf of the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office, objected to bail
being granted. McNeil has
been in prison for nine
months.

It is alleged that McNeil
caused Taylor’s death
between Saturday, Novem-
ber 17 and Sunday, Novem-
ber 18, 2007.

He has pleaded not guilty.

Taylor, 37, was found
stabbed to death at Mount-
batten House on West Hill
Street.

Freeport man
wanted for

questioning in
maiming case

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A Freeport
man is wanted by Grand
Bahama Police for question-
ing in a case of maiming.

Police have issued an all
points bulletin for 39-year-
old Gregory Russell, aka
Rex Boy, of No 30 Coral
Reef Estates, Freeport.

He is described as being of
brown complexion, brown
eyes, and short hair.

He is about six feet, one
inch tall of stocky build and
weighs about 235lbs.

According to police, Rus-
sell is considered armed and
extremely dangerous and
should be approached with
caution.

Anyone with information
concerning the suspect is
asked to call police 352-1919,
351-9111, 351-9991, 352-
8351, 352-9076, and 350-3125
or, 911.

Clan

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



Nassau investigators help
Bimini police in manhunt

Search on for gunman who shot victim in leg

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

INVESTIGATORS from the
capital travelled to Bimini yes-
terday to assist local police there
in capturing a gunman who shot
aman in the leg during a beach
party.

The gunman, believed to be
in his mid to late 40s, was
reportedly involved in an alter-
cation with a 22-year-old man
during a party at Spook Hill
Beach, Bimini, on Tuesday.

The older man suddenly drew
a handgun and fired three shots
into the crowd, hitting a
bystander in the leg, police on
Bimini said.

In the ensuing chaos, the gun-
man allegedly attacked his
intended target, gunbutting the



OIE lelal

younger man in the head, before
fleeing the scene. Assistant
Commissioner for the Family

Islands Hulan Hanna told The
Tribune yesterday that police
responded to calls of shots being
fired at a party at Spook Hill
Beach in Bailey Town shortly
after 9pm.

At the scene, officers met two
injured men.

The men were taken to the
local clinic for treatment before
being flown to Nassau.

Their present conditions are
not known but police said their
injuries were not life-threaten-
ing.

The gunshot victim is a resi-
dent of Bimini believed to be
about 27 or 28 years old.

Up to press time last night,
the shooter - who is known to
police - had eluded capture.

“We're following significant
leads in connection with this
matter,” Mr Hanna said.

Great Selection of
Swim Trunks,
Shorts,

Pants,

Polos & Tees

and so much more!

THE BAHAMAS HOTEL, CATERING AND ALLIED WORKERS UNION
Hundreds expected to run for top union posts

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

HUNDREDS of members are expected to run
for top positions in the Bahamas Hotel, Catering
and Allied Workers Union in the upcoming elec-
tions.

Secretary general Leo Douglas said the union’s
5,000-plus members will be called upon to make
nominations for president, vice-president, and
other executive positions in early May.

Members can nominate themselves for posi-
tions as individuals or part of one of the five
teams, or parties.

Voters will have the option of selecting indi-
viduals for specific positions or selecting a party
for presidency of the union.

In addition to the top position of president,
currently held by Roy Colebrooke, there is a first
vice-president, second vice-president, secretary
general, assistant secretary general, treasurer and
assistant treasurer.

In addition, two trustees and two executive
council members will be appointed.

Mr Douglas said both Mr Colebrooke and him-

self will be in the running for another three year
term in charge of the country’s largest hotel union.

He said: “Hundreds want to run but there are
only six positions.

“We are in really serious times and the hotel
industry is not in the best position right now, so
we need someone with knowledge and experi-
ence.

Capability

“T want our members to understand its not as
simple as voting for somebody; its voting for
somebody for their capability, knowledge and
experience.”

Although only union members can vote, Mr
Douglas maintains the election is important for
the whole country, as the actions of the next pres-
ident and his team will have ramifications for the
entire hotel sector and the country’s largest indus-
try, tourism.

He said: “Everyone is affected by the tourism
industry. That’s why I am concerned we can’t
just put this organisation in anybody’s hands.

“They could destroy this organisation in a day
if they don’t know how to negotiate.”

PUBLIC NOTICE
The offices of

Arawak Homes, Sunshine
Insurance and Sunshine Finance

will be CLOSING at 3:30 on
Thursday April 2 @ 3:30 p.m and
will resume normal business hours
on Friday April 3rd.

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Wind up toys
Squishy Balls

Plastic Eggs
50

Bunnies, Chicks s
&Lambs = fem

WV Decorations
Easter Lillies
al Easter Crafts



uk cae £ i Ti ei Mi Par

Home Fabrics

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Pretty Ballerina Bunnie

Oo Egg Decorating Kits

Easter Baskets from $ 2°99
Basket Bags 10 for $750

r= Easter Baking Pans & Decorations

Easter Grass

oh Coe



MORLEY

FOR Wy,

MEN !

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6

Baypar! Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 ¢ Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

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Tue Moet Tromcooas Rretoaanoy & Cuno Ever, on Tun Jon & Fear!
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* Corpet, Uphelmery, Stone and Martie C- beaming 3
Resteraion Specie.

* Poche Cleaning Sysnomes nomeved. Danep a Heresy
SL, Hacteren, ‘Lireasc, Watermarks and Signe inom
Carpeteag & Parnitire. fewuring? em to hike ecw
aft & Trectios of replacement 2661.

Carpet, Safa's, Lowesons. Chairs. Dandi airs, Cars,
Doers, Grow, Tiles, Marte & ‘Some
Permian, Worl & Silk Canpet Cleaning Specialist

* Aiehle Polishieg Reaoration & Cane
+ Woed Floor Reateralion

Auiried Stone Tech Profesional Contractor

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
ONLY WE CAN OVD FF RRS

ee pence cert? Beer tore ecb com © acer. ore
* pope nerd ht cet

FOUN LAL AAW OF PATE
PRC HEM SYSTEM jam)

Witc :
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Merial Ween

The Mall-ai-Lar
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT AM DAILY

ran APRIL 3RD, 2009

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380-FLIX





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

John Marquis follows his mentor

IN THE 2002 election the PLP, under the
leadership of Perry Christie, presented itself to
the electorate as the “New” PLP.

Other than in name — which soon faded
away after they won that election — we could
find nothing “new” about the PLP.

Today with many of its members and diehard
supporters screaming for Tribune Managing
Editor John Marquis to be run out of the coun-
try, we hark back to the year 1969.

Today’s “new” PLP want to put the skids
under Mr Marquis and ship him out of the
Bahamas for writing a father’s tragic story about
a pilot son who lost his life — or so the father
believes — because he knew too much about
then prime minister Lynden Pindling and his
friendship with Carlos “Joe” Lehder, the
Colombian drug lord of Norman’s Cay.

In 1969 the “old” PLP had been in power for
two short years, having won its first election by
one House seat in 1967, followed the following
year by a landslide victory in a second general
election.

In those days the late Sir Etienne Dupuch,
editor-publisher of this newspaper, was the
thorn in the PLP’s political side.

“Close down The Tribune and kick out Sir
Etienne!” thundered a PLP backbencher in the
House of Assembly on February 27, 1969, in ref-
erence to an earlier controversy over press free-
dom. “What does Sir Etienne “want freedom for
— to destroy this country?” the backbencher
asked as he described the publisher as “a feeble-
minded man who is like a bull in a china closet.”

The MP based his remarks on a statement
incorrectly attributed to Sir Etienne by prime
minister Pindling. The prime minister had
accused Sir Etienne of telling a group of Miami
newsmen that he feared the spread of commu-
nism in the Bahamas. This was not true. The
Miami newsmen corrected Sir Lynden and Sir
Etienne submitted his speech in which there
was no reference to communism. However, Sir
Lynden refused to retract his lie.

Sir Etienne’s alleged comment unleashed a
tirade from this Out Island backbencher who
accused him of making a “serious attack” on the
Bahamas in front of investors “to stifle the
growth of this country.”

One rule strictly followed by Sir Etienne
was that he never criticised his country when
overseas. However, he did not restrain his pen
in this column when he felt his government
needed public exposure.

However, the amusement was that this back-
bencher wanted to ship Sir Etienne out — as
they want to ship Mr Marquis out today— but
they had a major difficulty — they didn’t know
where to ship him.

The MP believed that people who made

First Baptist Church
289 Market St. South « P.O. Box N-7984 « Nassau, Bahamas
“How do you live a life of
prayers and destiny?
One step at a time.”

damaging remarks about the country should
be thrown out, but in Sir Etienne’s case “I don’t
know where we are going to throw him because
he belongs here.”

Even if now governor-general A D Hanna’s
preposterous suggestion at the Constitutional
Conference in London had been adopted,
throwing Sir Etienne out would have still pre-
sented a problem. Not only did Sir Etienne
belong to these islands, but he was born in Nas-
sau. At the Constitutional Conference at which
the Bahamas’ independence was being negoti-
ated, the British refused Mr Hanna’s proposal
that any Bahamian who gave offence should
be rusticated to the island of his birth, where he
would be held for the rest of his life, a virtual
prisoner. Not only could he not shop in Miami,
but he could not even shop in Nassau.

However, to his credit Sir Lynden was cau-
tious. He said government would do all it could
to protect the interests of the country and of
Bahamians, but had to be careful in how they
did it.

He said in their efforts to protect they should
do nothing to destroy the freedom they had
fought to win. He knew perfectly well that Sir
Etienne only had to send what was happening
here to freedom of speech to the international
press associations’ freedom of the press com-
mittees to have this country’s reputation tar-
nished beyond repair. Especially if they dis-
covered that the freedom of the press furore all
started over that initial lie told by Sir Lynden
and broadcast by ZNS.

Sir Lynden said he regretted that freedom of
speech meant the freedom to tell lies and he
knew of no way to achieve the extinction of
lies without providing for the extinction of free
speech.

“But lies can be exposed and lies will be
exposed and the perpetrators of lies will be
exposed and time always has its way of provid-
ing just retribution for the perpetrators of lies.”

Mr Marquis’s problem today is that he is
recording statements being made by aging
Bahamians who lived through the Pindling era
and now say they want to correct the lies of
the past.

They have used Mr Marquis to tell their sto-
ry. And this is the reason that some PLPs —
many of whom don’t even know the history of
that period —would like to ship him out.

What is also interesting is that The Tribune
reporter of that exchange in the House on
Thursday, February 27, 1969, was none other
than 25-year-old John Marquis.

It seems only fitting that now that he is end-
ing his journalistic career he should be following
in the footsteps of one of his earliest mentors —
he could be in no better company.



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Young Pindlings
and Obamas — your
country needs you!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas Government
borrowed $120 million for roads,
$90 million for the harbour,
$200m to boost the economy — a
total of $390 million just short of
1/2 billion dollars and 50 per cent
or our total annual budget.

Just about every penny would
be spent in New Providence. For
many years I was saying Nassau
was a dying city because when
you would have spent $120 mil-
lion on road improvement you
still have a traffic problem in New
Providence.

Our Parliament is bankrupt on
both sides of the House. I have
said many years ago that the
problem in New Providence is the
population.

Borrow $13 billion from the
Chinese. This amount of money
should be used to build a Central
Hospital in Andros, a University
of The Bahamas, the Prison and
Defence Base. Move the port to
south west side of New Provi-
dence and shuttle the workers
from New Providence to Andros
the largest Island in The Bahamas
and fifth largest in the Caribbean
in less than hour by the Bo Hengy
boat and 10 minutes by plane to
Central Andros.

This move would bring the cost
of living in New Providence down
to 50 per cent. Farmers and fish-
ermen would be able to bring
their produce and fish from
Andros, Berry Island and South
Abaco to New Providence in the
morning, sell them and be back
home in the evening.

Also, when we make the move
with the above institutions to
Andros, New Providence over the
next 10 to 20 years population
would decrease by 100,000 per-
sons and some of these expensive
roads we are now building in New
Providence would have to be
closed because the traffic would
also be decreased.

Parliament needs a face lift
with independent thinkers and
with a proposal like the above
South Abaco, Berry Island, espe-
cially Andros and New Provi-
dence would have a boom like
they have never seen before.

The World, including The
Bahamas is praising President
Obama, a highly intelligent 47-
year-old young man. A young
leader with the idea of change.

As a young man who came to
Nassau in 1966, the Bahamian
people were crying out for hope

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



and change and only the very for-
tunate people had inside kitchens
and inside toilets; then on January
10, 1967 a brilliant young man of
38 years with new ideas brought
us to where we are today.

From outside toilets, a fishing
village to the best economy in the
region where the black, pink,
white and red people are benefit-
ting.

The FNM has Pindling and
Obama and the deputy speaker of
the House a smart, highly quali-
fied Bahamian.

The PLP has Pindlings and
Obamas. The Bahamas has a
large number of educated, highly
intelligent young men and women
with ideas which would, when
pooled together, blow our mem-
bers of parliament royal readers,
Huckleberry Finn and Tom
Sawyer ideas- bankrupt-era
minds.

Example, my son who went to
Fisk University obtained BA in
Psychology and English, Buck-
ingham University completed
LLB in Law, 1st class Hons fin-
ished in top 10.

There were three top cate-
gories, one Indian woman, one
black man and an English man.
The black man, my son Audley
Jr, who went onto North Hamp-
shire and obtained LPC and Mas-
ters degree but all of the above
did not make me proud because
he was always a smart boy.

When he was called to the New
York Bar that made me proud
because J F Kennedy Jr, three
times, his brother former Attor-
ney General Bobby Kennedy
twice.

While watching the Mighty
Sparrow who spoke about his
daughter who passed the New
York Bar.

He was proud because those
children who had all the money
did not and had to repeat.

I was able to relate to his feel-
ings. So we need the young Pin-
dlings and Obamas to bring us
out of the political bankruptcy
era we find ourselves in when it
comes to leadership in The
Bahamas.

Some of the vibrant young
Bahamian leaders that I am
thinking about come from both
sides or the House. Persons like

Glenys Hanna-Martin, Wayne
Munroe, Monique Pindling-John-
son, Kwasi Thompson, Hope
Strachan, Tommy Turnquest,
Frank Smith, Myles LaRoda,
Craig Butler, Fred Mitchell,
Branville McCartney, Jerome
Fitzgerald, Algernon Allen Jr,
Sidney Cambridge Jr, Ryan Pin-
der, Kendal Wright, Picewell
Forbes, Philip “Fish” McKenzie,
Damien Gomez, Oscar N John-
son Jr, Dwayne Hanna, Dr Ger-
ard Hanna-Rolle, Romauld Fer-
reira, Patrick Hanna, Dr Kendal
Major, Duward Francis, Sharon
Hanna, Michael Halkitis, Dr
Michael Darville, Paul Moss,
Diane Hanna-Wilson, John H
Bostwick Jr, Dr Danny Johnson,
Paulette Zonicle, Michelle
Roberts, Mario Gray, Desmond
Bannister, Cara Ingraham, Nis-
honda Tynes, Tanisha Tynes,
Anne Wells, Travett Pyfrom,
Frannon Wilson, Jimmy Knowles
Jr, Janet R Bostwick, Dr Valen-
tine Grimes, Rosel Wilson, Malis-
sa Sears, Ken Dorsett, Italia
Cartwright, Alexander Maillis II,
Christopher Plakaris Alex Storr,
Darrin Rodgers, Dr Cargills, Mar-
vin Dames, Dr _ Allison
Greenslade, Keith Bell, these
names are not in any particular
order or superior thinkers just
that I think they would make
great leaders and there are many
more that could be added to this
list.

The way I analysis the present
government, any politician who
is not computer literate should
be out because most ways of run-
ning the country of the world is
not in an exercise book or the
royal reader.

They need to pass the baton
on to our youth.

When I heard that The
Bahamas would be hosting the
Miss Universe Contest I said to
myself this would be a real oppor-
tunity to expose the other Family
of Bahamian Islands by using
boats like the Fast Ferries,
Bahamas Daybreak, Captain
Moxey, Island Link, Bo Hengy
can be used for day or over night
trips because they are nice clean
boats that would take the contes-
tants to Eleuthera, Abaco,
Andros and other close islands
and cays giving them a chance to
get a piece of the “pie”.

AUDLEY D HANNA Sr JP
Nassau,
March, 2009.

The real reason for the Pindling legacy hysteria

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I hope that I am not too late
with my comment concerning
your article on the subject.

I find it very odd that the only
persons who are defending Sir
Lynden Pindling’s legacy are the
ones who were either too young
to know what had transpired in
that era or were in schools
abroad.

Not one of Sir Lynden or Mr



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Tynes’ contemporary colleagues
have voiced their support of Sir
Lynden or refuted Mr Tynes’
account of the events of the early
1980’s.

No one wants to know of the
other side of Sir Lynden’s per-
sona.

Everyone just wants to be
focused on his positive legacy, but
to be fair to the future genera-
tions both sides of his story
should be told. That is what the
hysteria is all about — nothing
negative should be told.



Mr Marquis, that is the reason
you are vilified and Mr Michael
Craton is hailed as a hero. He
chose to perpetuate the myth that
Sir Lynden was a “saint”, while
you have the courage to show
that the man was only a human
being and he had as many char-
acter flaws as good ones. I thank
you for the enlightening articles
that you write.

E KNOWLES
Nassau,
March 23, 2009.



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



onhoard boat
is identified

THE man whose body
was discovered onboard a
boat moored near the
Potters Cay dock last
Tuesday has been identi-

fied as Leon “Crow”
Forbes, 65, of Eastwood.

A family member of Mr

Forbes’ phoned The Tri-
bune yesterday after an
article appeared in this
daily stating that police
had not yet released the
man’s identity.

Mr Forbes was found
dead in the cabin of the
vessel wearing a white T-
shirt and underwear.
Police ruled out foul play
as there were no signs of
trauma to the body, nor
any evidence on the boat
that suggested that the
man had been the victim
of a homicide.

A special memorial for
Mr Forbes was held last

Friday at Montagu Beach.

He is survived by his
son and other family
members.

Stabbing
incident is
investigated

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigat-
ing a stabbing incident that
occurred on Monday
evening.

Jaime Missick, 24, drove
himself to hospital at
around 9.55pm on Monday
after being stabbed under
his left arm.

ASP Bootle said Missick

reportedly went to drop off

his son when he got into an
altercation with his son’s
mother’s boyfriend.

He was treated for his
injuries and discharged.
Police are investigating.



you coul

~ Global United CEO

makes his case online

cen Ritchie



EMBATTLED Global United
Limited CEO Jackson Ritchie has
taken his cause to cyberspace in an
attempt to garner public sympathy
as he crusades for a meeting with the
prime minister in a last ditch bid to
save his jeopardised shipping agency.

While he initially shied away from
making public comments regarding
Global United's financial status, Mr
Ritchie has now created a profile on
the social networking site Facebook
and posted a video on the video shar-
ing site YouTube to make his case
against the government's demands
that the company pay up $6
million in outstanding debts imme-
diately.

An update on his Facebook pro-
file details Mr Ritchie's thwarted

attempt to meet with Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham at the PM’s
office yesterday, where he planned
to plead with Mr Ingraham to con-
sider accepting a payment plan to
recoup the outstanding money.

Allegations

In a two minute video posted on
YouTube, Mr Ritchie repeated his
allegations about the existence of a
Customs scam, highlighted in The
Tribune on Wednesday, which he
claims swindled Global United and
other brokerage companies out of
millions of dollars.

He is asking for government to
deduct the amount he claims was lost

to the scam from Global United's
outstanding balance.

Up to press time last night, the
video had logged 309 views.

The company head has been work-
ing feverishly over the last two weeks
to save his company from govern-
ment's winding up threat, saying it
would cost all 50 Global United
employees their jobs.

Mr Ritchie, a former PLP candi-
date for the Clifton constituency, is
not the first local political hopeful to
utilise social networking sites to gar-
ner support.

Several politicians and political
hopefuls are registered on Facebook,
which allows them to connect with
supporters on an immediate, more
personal basis.

Minister ‘has no knowledge’

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

STATE Minister for Finance
Zhirvargo Laing said he has no
knowledge of a Customs scam
that allegedly cheated local bro-
kerage firms out of "millions of
dollars.”

On Tuesday, embattled Glob-
al United CEO Jackson Ritchie
outlined the alleged scam to The
Tribune and claimed his com-
pany was targeted by corrupt
Customs officers who over-
charged “hundreds of thousands
of dollars” in Customs fees over
the past few years.

Mr Ritchie, whose company
is in jeopardy of a winding up
order by government because
of non-payment of $6 million in
outstanding debt, is asking gov-
ernment to credit the amount
the company was allegedly
cheated out of to Global's bal-
ance.

When contacted for comment
yesterday, Minister Laing
laughed off the claims, saying
he was only aware of the claims

d win a

after they were pub-
lished in Wednes-
day's Tribune.

"Tonly personally
saw the story — I
have no idea what
Mr Ritchie is talking
about at all, I really
do not," said Mr
Laing, who offered
no further comment
on the matter.

In a previous
interview, Mr
Ritchie claimed
these fees were paid
to the Customs
department and
then claimed on a
re-issued cheque to
the brokerage firm, that was
never collected by Global Unit-
ed.

He said he had documenta-
tion that showed how the
alleged scam affected his com-
pany going back “a few years”,
and estimated Global’s losses
through this scheme could
amount to “millions and mil-
lions” of dollars. Mr Ritchie is
asking government to credit this

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amount to his cur-
rent debt.

In his press state-
ment and video
released to the
media Tuesday, Mr
Ritchie provided
documentation sug-
gesting that on a sin-
gle transaction his
company overpaid
more than $55,000
for a shipment.

In the payment to
Customs of
$66,303.94 to clear
the shipment on
June 10, 2007, Glob-
al was issued a “mis-
cellaneous refunds
claim” valued at $55,253.28 only
10 days later on the same ship-
ment. However, these funds, Mr
Ritchie claimed, were never
received by his company.

With more than $125 million
worth of business a year, Mr
Ritchie said Global would annu-

of alleged Customs scam

ally pay government anywhere
from $70 and $80 million. Dur-
ing this period, Mr Ritchie said,
he was owed anywhere from $13
to $15 million.

When asked in a recent inter-
view how he could insist that it
was government that was forc-
ing him out of business when
the courts had ordered the
immediate payment of the out-
standing funds before any
attempts were made to recon-
cile the balances, Mr Ritchie
said that during any court mat-
ter both parties can still come
to some form of agreement.

He also explained that these
outstanding monies are not
funds owed by his company to
government in terms of taxes,
but the balances of his trade
payables which were “abrupt-
ly” called in by government.

Attempts to reach Acting
Comptroller of Customs Antho-
ny Adderley for comment yes-
terday were unsuccessful.

aT CL
WORM TUITE

A PUBLIC meeting will be
held tonight to inform the
South Beach community about
a new initiative to involve
coastal residents in the appre-
hension of illegal immigrants.

“Immigration Watch” will
be launched by the Depart-
ment of Immigration in seaside
communities across New Prov-
idence to stop migrants from
entering the country illegally.

Immigration department
director Jack Thompson said:
“The main thrust of the new
initiative is to invite persons in
the community and those who
reside in our coastline areas to
be on the watch for vessels,
which tend to come from that
angle, and persons disembark-
ing from those vessels, to alert
the authorities to make sure
people are not slipping through
the cracks to infiltrate the com-
munity.

“Tt is similar to ‘Crime
Watch’ but we want to ensure
we put this out so the entire
community will be involved.”

Immigration Watch meet-
ings will also be held in
Yamacraw, south east New
Providence, and other shore-
line areas, Mr Thompson said.

Tonight’s meeting will be
held at 7pm at Anatol Rodgers
High School on Faith Avenue,
South Beach.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



UO PHOTO SPECIAL

Bahamas National Youth Choir

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THE TRIBUNE

Culture is crucial for the Bahamas

This is the fifth in a series of articles discussing the potential oppor-
tunities for the Bahamas in the emerging green economy. The writer,
Colin Lightbourn, is a real estate business owner, developer and
past president of the Bahamas National Trust. To comment, discuss
and submit ideas about these articles, visit www.thegreenislands.com

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 7



[s2icexous peoples
around the world argue
that the three pillars of sus-
tainable development (eco-
nomic, environmental and
social) exclude a fourth critical
pillar — culture.

The Universal Declaration
on Cultural Diversity states
that “cultural diversity is as
necessary for humankind as
biodiversity is for nature.” It
is “one of the roots of devel-
opment understood not sim-
ply in terms of economic
growth, but also as a means
to achieve a more satisfactory
intellectual, emotional, moral
and spiritual existence”.

In the Bahamas we have a
predominately African her-
itage blended with European
traditions.

The indigenous people of
the Bahamas were the
Lucayan Indians but traces of
their culture exist only in
books and archacological or
historical publications. If the
Indians had survived the
Columbus era, more of our
culture might reflect what is
found in Mexico or Peru
where the influence of the
Mayans and Incas is still evi-
dent.

For a small and relatively
new country depending on
tourism as its primary source
of jobs and income, culture is
crucial to the Bahamas main-
taining its competitiveness in
the region. Many new devel-
opments throughout the
islands create new interpreta-
tions of aspects of Bahamian

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

RUE
PHONE: 322-2157



YOUR SAY



“The fact that
we have so
many islands
means that
diversity is
healthy and
required in
order to give
each location its
Own unique
identity and
ability to attract
visitors and
those seeking a
new home.”



culture — some good and some
bad.

The fact that we have so
many islands means that
diversity is healthy and
required in order to give each
location its own unique iden-
tity and ability to attract visi-
tors and those seeking a new
home. However, if authentic
Bahamian culture is not more
consistently expressed in
tourism products, there is the
risk of it being diluted over
time by corporate marketing.

The hub of the Bahamas is
downtown Nassau. It is the
gateway to the country for the
cruise industry, banking and
business and only a handful
of Nassuvians manage to
avoid it on a regular basis. It



was once an iconic symbol of
the Bahamas but has slipped
over the past couple of
decades into a depressing state
of neglect.

Many tourists who do not
arrive via cruise ship are told
to avoid downtown and visit
places like Marina Village on
Paradise Island and Sandy-
port, which offer cleaner and
more modern hassle-free
experiences. As the island
grows west there will be new
“Marina Villages” likely at
Cable Beach and further west
past the airport. We may even
see an effort to develop a new
hub to rival Bay Street with
the aim of attracting business-
es and entrepreneurs. Bay
Street merchants will struggle
and property owners will
realise reduced rents and
property values.

Hens have been
underway since the

late 1980s to improve down-
town. Some of the short-term
goals have been to identify
additional parking areas,
install parking meters, enforce
laws and traffic violations, lim-
it bus access to Bay Street and
control crime and harassment
by increasing police presence.

US port cities like
Charleston, South Carolina
and San Francisco, California
experienced post-World Word
II renaissances which did not
come from redevelopment but
were inspired by local artists
and writers who wanted to
promote their cities. Perhaps
the missing element to kick
start the Nassau Renaissance

Colinalmperial.

medical emergencies
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... they don't know the word “recession” either.
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VILLA DOYLE on West Hill Street is an exemplary standard with historical and cultural value.

is not about streets and build-
ings but about culture.

The master plan for the
Nassau redevelopment focus-
es on several “zones” from
Arawak Cay to Montagu.
Arawak Cay already has the
beginnings of a cultural expe-
rience. Across the street is the
Botanical Gardens, an 18-acre
site which is home to over 600
species of flowering trees and
shrubs and is unfortunately
closed to the public. Com-
bined with Fort Charlotte,
these sites hold great poten-
tial for a “must see and do”
cultural experience that can
be on every hotel and cruise
ship list.

The Botanical Gardens
itself could contain a large
amphitheatre hosting the
country’s signature culture
show. The show can build on
features from previous shows

Sar De

Discover another side of par

like Peanuts Taylor’s Drum-
beat Club, the Cabaret on Par-
adise Island and incorporate
junkanoo and the National
Youth Choir among other
attractions.

The show could depict the
story of the Bahamas from the
Indians to slavery and colo-
nialism, to independence and
a celebration of the Bahamas
today - all told through
Bahamian music, song and
dance.

The show could be market-
ed as the real Bahamian expe-
rience and sold in packages
including dinner, the show and
other options.

In order to attract volume,
cruise ships and hotels would
have to be on board to pro-
mote the packages to their
guests, probably at a cost per
head. The idea can be pro-
moted on cruise ships as part

Marina Village at Atlantis is where local Caribbean
culture comes to life. Shop in over twenty duty-free
boutiques featuring fine jewelry, perfume, original
art and luxury resort wear. Or find a treasure in one
of many carts brimming with local, handmade crafts
and treats. Dine in one of five unique eateries, taste
authentic Bahamian fare at Bimini Road, or indulge
in the creations of world-renown chef Jean-Georges
Vongerichten at the historic Café Martinique or
sample homestyle Italian dishes at Carmines, a
New York dining institution.



of a walking experience which
meanders through town and
along the waterfront
esplanade where artisans can
offer their various indigenous
crafts and art.

In addition to building a
greater sense of what the
Bahamas is, creating world-
class cultural experiences will
give the government a greater
ability to attract investors,
tourists and incorporate more
Bahamians into the overall
development of the country.

With so much emphasis
today on the monetary result
of service and hard work, cul-
ture can be used as a means to
build the city and at the same
time teach younger genera-
tions to live beautifully,
respect themselves and their
country, and hopefully service
and hard work will eventually
become second nature.

LOliee

Con



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Non

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ATLANTIS

For more information, visit Allantis.com



PAGE 8, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Meanwhile, inflation remained at
elevated levels during the review
period, reflecting mainly higher
prices for consumer goods,” the
Central Bank report said.

“The outlook for the Bahamian
economy remains weak through-
out 2009, with developments
expected to be heavily influenced
by the responsiveness of the glob-
al economy — particularly the
US — to the stimulus measures
implemented by monetary and
fiscal authorities.

“Consequently, tourism and
foreign-investment activity are
likely to remain subdued in the
near- term, with implications for a
further elevation in the unem-
ployment rate above the 12 per
cent estimated at year end-2008.”

The Central Bank said the
Government’s capital works pro-
jects, such as the New Providence
Road Improvement Project, con-
struction of court complexes and
government buildings, and the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport (LPIA) redevelopment,

Unemployment

would boost employment and
economic activity, but not reverse
the situation.

Striking a slightly more opti-
mistic note, the Central Bank said
the self-correcting mechanism
built into the Bahamian econo-
my’s structure would prevent the
current account and balance of
payments suffering “significant
deterioration.”

In any economic downturn,
Bahamian consumer and business
demand for imports is reduced,
along with credit growth, thus
reducing the outflow of foreign
currency. And the Central Bank’s
external reserves would be
enhanced by the Government’s
foreign currency borrowing.

Nevertheless, the weakness in
the general Bahamian economy
had passed into the commercial
banking sector in the form of
increased loan arrears. Credit
growth had slowed down due to
banks “more conservative lending
practices and lowered demand for
credit.”

More troubling for Bahamian
commercial banks is that in Feb-
ruary, while the percentage of
total loans more than 30 days past
due decreased, the proportion
over 90 days past due — meaning
those that are classified as non-
performing, and earning the
banks no interest — increased.

Non-performing commercial
bank loans increased by 3.7 per
cent or $14.3 million to $397.2
million, a figure that accounted
for 6.55 per cent of total bank
loans in the Bahamas. The indus-

try usually tries to keep non-per-
forming loans at 5 per cent or
below.

However, the banks enjoyed
better news when it came to loans
that were between 31-90 days past
due, as these fell by $29.5 million
to $354.5 million. These loans
dropped to 5.84 per cent of the
total, indicating that commercial
banks were having some success
in restructuring loans and pre-
venting them from falling into the
non-performing category.

Overall, the total value of pri-

Claim that police officers
used torture techniques

FROM page one





































































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on his back in a reclining position and water is poured over his head
disrupting normal breathing and making him feel that he is drown-
ing. Causing an almost instant gag reflex, the victim believes he is
about to die. It was this feeling, said Mr Cartwright, that caused him
to black out when the officers lowered his head into a toilet bowel
in one of the upstairs offices at the station.

One of the officers, he said, sat on his chest and poured water over
his face, flushing the toilet from time to time while the other held
his legs in place.

Wrestling free after regaining consciousness, Delanzo said he
struggled with the two officers who were in their plain clothes at the
time and eventually was able to get out of the stall onto the ground.

The officers he said continued to beat him with the bats, stopping
sometimes to kick him about the body, even stomping him in the

roin.
‘ “T passed out three times,” said Mr Cartwright who claims that the
beating lasted for almost two hours.

It was only his 6 foot tall, 220 pound frame, Delanzo said that
saved his life.

“They beat me across my back, my face, my legs, with this big
black metal pipe they had wrapped up in black tape. While I was on
the ground in the bathroom, a male Sergeant came in and said: ‘Ya’ ll
cover his mouth’, ’cause I was hollerin’ trying to get someone to help
me.

“And they was stomping me and kicking me and whapping me
*cause they were trying to get me to go back in the toilet and I was
holding on that thing that turns on the toilet. And these fella’s
kept whapping me and I wouldn’t let that go because I know if they
get me back in there I know what they were going to do,” he said.

Mr Cartwright said the officers threatened to carry him to the
South Beach canals to continue the beating as his howling contin-
ued to cause the officers concern that someone would hear and dis-
cover what they were doing.

“Tf they did carry me by the canal I know they were going to kill
me. But my attorney showed up and he heard them beating me.
That’s when the senior officer just disappeared,” he said.

It was at this point during The Tribune’s interview with Mr
Cartwright that his doctor emerged from the Male Medical ward
and told him he was well enough to be discharged.

Having had a catheter inserted because he was urinating blood,
Mr Cartwright said he was certain he was going to die in the hold-
ing cell of the police station that night as the officers had failed to
get him any immediate medical attention.

Apparently, it was only after the arresting officers arrived at
the station and discovered him sprawled on the floor of the cell that
they rushed him to Princess Margaret Hospital’s Accident and
Emergency section.

Here as well, he said, because he arrived in handcuffs he was
treated as “less than a human being” and only given a shot and sent
back to the station.

Ironically, while he was in hospital, Delanzo said one of the
men who allegedly beat him visited him to inform him that he was
going to be charged with causing harm, obscene language, and
disorderly behaviour at the station.

Mr Cartwright has since filed a report with the Complaints and
Corruption Unit of the Royal Bahamas Police Force and is expect-
ing to file criminal charges through his attorney against these offi-
cers as soon as possible.

Assistant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna told The Tribune
last night that he was not aware of this case and encouraged the man
to file a police report.

After being told that a police report had already been filed, Mr
Hanna said that it had not yet come to his attention.



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vate sector loans past due fell by
2 per cent, or $15.2 million, in
February 2009 to $757.7 million, a
figure that represented 12.48 per
cent of all outstanding loans.

The Central Bank attributed
the reduction in total loan arrears
to mortgages, where the total
number of loans past due fell to
12.72 per cent from 13.51 per cent
in January.

“Tn contrast, the consumer and
commercial arrears rate firmed
to 11.13 per cent and 15.49 per
cent from 10.88 per cent and 15.3
per cent respectively, amid
growth in the non-performing
component. Banks continued to
increment their loan loss provi-
sions over the review month,
leading to the ratio of provisions
to arrears firming by 0.89 per-
centage points to 23.67 per cent.

“However, the corresponding
ratio to non-performing loans
declined by 0.83 percentage
points to 45.16 per cent.”

For the first two months in
2009, the amount of Bahamian
dollar credit issues fell year-over-
year to $30.2 million, compared to
a $36.5 million advance in 2008.
Consumer lending fell by $24.7
million, and residential mortgage

2009, the Central Bank reported
that domestic inflation rose to 4.8
per cent, compared to 4.67 per
cent for the previous 12-month
period and 2.41 per cent a year
ago.

“Notable increases were regis-
tered for food and beverages
(7.43 per cent), furniture and
household operations (6.66 per
cent) and medical and healthcare
(4.54 per cent),” the Central Bank
said.

“More modest costs rises were
recorded for housing and recre-
ation and entertainment services
of 3.59 per cent and 3.7 per cent,
respectively. The remaining
groups recorded inflation rates of
less than 3 per cent,” the Central
Bank said.

For the first nine months of
2008, hotel room revenues
increased by 5.8 per cent to $424.3
million, year-over-year. This was
driven by a 9.4 per cent increase
in average daily room rates, as
hotel room night sales fell 3.3 per
cent.

“Activity in the sector is
expected to have weakened sig-
nificantly over the closing months
of the year and into early 2009,
reflecting downturns in both

growth nearly halved to $22.4 mil-
lion.
For the 12 months to February

occupancy levels and average dai-
ly room rates,” the Central Bank
said.

Privy Council Judicial Committee reserves

its decision on beach access dispute
FROM page one

regarding access to Clifton Bay beach. The appellant’s property sits on
a hill at the rear of Winegardener’s lot.

The facts of the case are that an easement was granted by Wine-
gardener’s predecessor in title over a certain part of land in favour
of the appellant’s predecessors in title, granting a right of way
access to Clifton Bay Beach along a 50-foot wide roadway. Although
a further agreement regarding access to the beach was entered
into in 1968, nothing else happened until 1999 when the appellant
— current owner — entered into discussions with Winegardener,
under the expectation that the earlier agreement would be upheld.
The appellant subsequently filed a writ in Supreme Court after
there was no resolution to the matter, alleging also that the respon-
dent had started obstructing the use of the road access to the beach.

Nothing happened until November 2001 when the appellant
applied for leave to amend his writ. The appellant did nothing fur-
ther to progress the action after that, however, and on February 18,
2004, Winegardener filed an application to have the writ struck
out.

Senior Justice John Lyons in a ruling handed down in February
2006, dismissed the action and struck out the appellant’s writ and
statement of claim for an inordinate and inexcusable delay. The
court of appeal upheld that decision later that year. In a dissenting
judgment on the appeal however, Justice Hartman Longley agreed
with the appellant’s argument that Justice Lyons had erred in his
judgment.

Julian Malins, QC, who appeared with lawyer Tracy Ferguson of
Callenders and Co on behalf of Icebird Limited adopted Justice
Longley’s reasoning for dismissing the judgment, submitting that his
client’s case is substantive and should be allowed to proceed.

Henry Bostwick, QC, who appeared with his daughter, Lisa
Bostwick, for the respondent, Alicia Winegardener, argued, how-
ever, that the decision of Senior Justice Lyons and the Court of
Appeal should be upheld. He added that the striking out of the writ
and the statement of claim was warranted. Mr Bostwick told the Law
Lords that his client wants to have the matter over and done with.

The Privy Council, which is the highest court of appeal for cer-
tain Commonwealth countries, customarily sits in Downing Street,
London. However, the Council’s Judicial Committee will sit in the
Court of Appeal until tomorrow.

The Privy Council, which usually consists of five law lords, has sat
in the Bahamas on two previous occasions— in December 2006,
which was its first sitting outside London, and again in December
2007.

The appeals are being heard before the five law lords — Lord
Philips of Worth Martravers, who is the senior Law Lord, Lord
Scott of Foscote, Lord Brown of Eaton-under-Heywood, Lord
Mance and Lord Neuberger. The Law Lords heard the appeal in the
cases of Wendall Swann vs the Attorney General of the Turks and
Caicos Islands (TCI) on Monday. The Privy Council is expected to
hear the appeal in the case of Johannes Deuss vs the Attorney
General for Bermuda and the Commissioner of Police of Bermuda
today.

KINGSWAY ACADEMY
ELEMENTARY

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Kingsway Academy will be
holding Entrance Examinations
for students wishing to enter grades
2,3.and 6on MONDAY, APRIL6,
2009. Parents are asked to collect
Application Forms from __ the
Elementary School office before
the testing date from 8:30a.m. to
4:00p.m.

For further information contact

the school at telephone numbers
324-5049, 324-2158, or 324-6269



THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

Yellow Jersey sponsor Bahamas
Ferries is ready for Ride for Hope



Donation allows BHS manager
to travel to convention in US

THE Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety (BHS) said it was over-
whelmed by the generous dona-
tion that will enable shelter man-
ager Percy Grant to attend the
Humane Society of the United
States annual convention in Las
Vegas.

Answering the call for spon-
sorship, the Bahamas Bridge
Club donated $1,000 to the BHS
for the trip.

“It is honestly a dream come
true,” Mr Grant told executive
director of BHS Stephen Turn-
quest, who had already been
sponsored by Bahamian busi-
nessman Robert Reiss of Reiss
Engineering a few weeks ago.

“We were honestly concerned
as to how we would be able to
afford to take Percy as well,”
BHS president Kim Aranha said.

“When we put the photo of
Stephen receiving his cheque in
the papers we mentioned that
Percy was looking for a sponsor,



BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY Executive Director Stephen Turnquest;
Bahamas Bridge Club Member (friend of Shirley Bays) Brenda Rouse;
Bahamas Bridge Club President (friend of Shirley Bays) Noreen Wurde-
mann and Shelter Manager Percy Grant.



PICTURED L-R ARE: Stephen Holowesko, co-founder of the Ride For Hope; Stephen Thompson of
Bahamas Ferries, Capt Andy Moxey and Susan Larson, co-founder of the event.

within hours Mrs Noreen Wur-

demann contacted me at home.”
Mrs Wurdemann is president

of the Bahamas Bridge Club.
This group of ladies donate

urges others to consider dona-
tions like this as a fitting way to
remember the departed who
loved and cherished animals.

A group of three BHS repre-
sentatives leave on Sunday for

Aranha, president; Stephen Turn-
quest, executive director, and Per-
cy Grant, shelter manager.

The Bahamas will be well rep-
resented this year as the Grand
Bahama Humane Society is also

LOCAL ferry and shipping company Bahamas
Fast Ferries is ready for this years Ride for Hope
bike-a-thon.

BFF is a founding sponsor of the charity cycling

partner. The company’s vessel, The Sea Wind, cap-

tained by Andy Moxey, will be sailing to the island

on Saturday carrying participants and equipment.
Every dollar raised by the event goes towards

event, which takes place on the island of Eleuthera. the improvement of cancer treatments and care

annually to various local charita-

i the conference. They are Kim
ble causes and has been doing so

for the past 30 years.

This year, they thought it
would be fitting to donate the
money needed to send BHS’ shel-
ter manager to Las Vegas in
memory of their beloved club
member Shirley Bays who passed
away in December 2008.

Mrs Wurdemann said, “I'm
sure Shirley would have been
delighted to know that our dona-
tion of $1,000 will be used toward
expenses for Mr Percy Grant to
attend the Vegas conference.”

Mrs Bays came to the Bahamas
in 1984 from Canada. Her inter-
ests included bridge, which she
excelled at. She adored her dogs,
all of which were potcakes, some
she picked up in the bushes and
others she found on the street.

She also had her beloved gray
parrot Noogie, who could sing
the first few bars of “Oh Cana-
da.”

Her friends remember her as
a person who was faultlessly ded-
icated to her animals and to the
works of the Bahamas Humane
Society. When she died, her wish
was that Mr Grant take care of
her parrot, and Noogie now
resides happily with the shelter
manager.

Mrs Bays was a very private
person and was not one to make
her generous gifts public. Her
friends say that they are sure that
over the years she helped many
other organisations in the
Bahamas.

Ms Aranha said, “it was such a
wonderful way to honour a spe-
cial person after they have passed
away. We are eternally grateful to
the Bahamas Bridge Club and
their innovative idea of donating
Percy's trip to the conference in
memory of Shirley.

“T am sure that she will be with
us in Vegas and watching over
us.”

The Bahamas Humane Society

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Family claim man was unarmed

FROM page one

“suspicious” manner. As the offi-
cers approached, the report
claims that the vehicle sped off. A
chase followed eventually com-
ing to an end on Goggle Eye
Road in the Redland Acres area.

“The occupants of the vehicle
exited and fired shots at the
Police causing damage to the
chasing marked unit (police car).
Police then returned fire hitting
one of the men fatally as the oth-
ers escaped. A handgun was
recovered near the deceased,”
the statement said.

However, in an extensive
interview with The Tribune out-
side the Princess Margaret
morgue yesterday, Arensio’s
older brother, Albert Jr, who
was one of the passengers in the
Mitsubishi Mirage, said that the
police’s account of Tuesday
night’s events are completely
inaccurate.

“Some guys had ganged my
brother right and took his car.
So he asked for me to go with

—
ANDEAUS

him to get his car back. So when
we reach back round there the
car was done burn down to the
ground and the police was done
on the scene. So we leave the
scene to get on our way home
in Nassau Village and these
police officers tried to pull us
over through Highbury Park in
one little dark corner.

“And we pulled our car over
ya know, but as soon as we open
our door and put your leg out
the car they just open fire. So
we just pulled off and when we
pulled off they kept firing until
we reached our destination
where my little brother dead.”

Albert Jr said the driver of the
vehicle was the first to get out of
the car, followed by his brother
who was shot twice in his back.

“IT was the last one out the car
and they ain’t do nothing to me.
I callin’ out for my brother and
he ain’t answerin’. I ask the offi-
cer if he shoot my brother dead

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and he tell me ‘see him here,
come back for yours’,” Mr Mor-
timer said.

These two officers Albert said,
proceeded to “boast” at the
scene stating that they “found” a
9mm handgun on Arsenio and
that he had shot at them first.

Furthermore, Albert Jr said
that he was at the scene speaking
to officers following his broth-
er’s shooting, so he was even
more surprised to hear on the
news Wednesday that he was
being “sought” by the police
when he was standing right there
with them the night before.

“Why they didn’t arrest me if
I was right there? We had no
weapons in the car at all. No
drugs, no weapon, none of that
was in the car. They had no right
to do that and they plant that
gun on my brother. That’s the
same gun they was shooting at
us from Highbury Park and as
soon as my brother come out
(the car) they probably use the

Expired insulin given to patient
‘was sent to Bahamas in 2006’

THE OUT-OF-DATE insulin.

FROM page one

the bottom of the box clearly
shows it expired in October,
2007, the label printed by the
Elizabeth Estates Clinic phar-
macy maintained it expired 12
months after it was issued.



A Memorial Service

of

Praise & Thanksgiving

gun they was licensed with...”

“But how they could shoot
him in his back!” exclaimed a
family member who was stand-
ing nearby.

This woman’s concerns were
the same as those of PLP activist
and Nassau Village resident
Omar Archer who was also pre-
sent at the morgue with the
Mortimer family.

“With his back turned, Arse-
nio poses no threat to an officer
so how can they justify using
deadly force? But you heard
what the officer said to his older
brother, ‘come back for yours’,”
said Mr Archer, adding that if
that is in fact what happened
“they have to be put up on
charges of murder. If this is what
the Commissioner of Police is
standing up for them he needs to
resign immediately.”

However, no amount of tears
or words of comfort could ease
the pain of Arensio’s girlfriend,
Nicole Samson, who is now left
to care for the couple’s six-
month-old son, Nackyo.

Sobbing in the waiting room

A health industry profession-
al, who did not want to be
named, said: “I understand that
mistakes are made but this is
absolutely inexcusable.

“Tt is the responsibility of the
pharmacist to check the expiry
date, that’s basic. But patients
need to check these things as
well.

“Every single patient should
check what they take before
they take it.

“If nothing else maybe peo-
ple will start checking the labels
now.”

The Ministry of Health and
Department of Public Health
maintain there are no outdat-
ed medications currently in sup-
plies at the Elizabeth Estates
Clinic pharmacy and health
bosses are investigating the
claims.

However, investigations have
produced no response as yet.

at the morgue, Nicole repeated
over and over how much she
loved Arsenio and how he had
promised that he would never
leave her.

“Baby, please don’t leave me,
Arsenio baby please don’t leave
me. I love you so much, please
baby don’t leave me,” she cried.

Composing herself for a brief
moment, Nicole outlined how
her boyfriend had been jumped
earlier that day by a group of
men through Pit Road in the
Boyd Road area. The incident
developed because of an earlier
confrontation in which she had
been harassed by the men on
that street, who felt that as she
was returning to the area with
her boyfriend he must have been
coming to get even with them.

Pulling Arsenio from the vehi-
cle, a fight followed shortly after
the couple turned onto the
street, and once the dust had set-
tled, Arsenio and Nicole were
forced to leave the car in the
possession of these neighbour-
hood thugs.

“My baby never bothered
nobody, he didn’t have no gun.
He told me he was just going to
get his car, and he was going to

call the police. He never had no
gun, he just got his life straight,”
she said.

Following his interview yes-
terday, The Tribune understands
that Albert Jr was arrested at
the morgue by Central Detec-
tive Unit officers as he viewed
his brother’s body.

Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna told The
Tribune last night that police are
encouraging anyone with further
information about this incident
to come forward so that it can
be factored into the investiga-
tion.

“We take (the claims) very
seriously, so we want those per-
sons who may have any infor-
mation to come to us,” he said.

As the investigation is in its
early stages, he said, it is pre-
mature to comment any further
on the matter.

However, Mr Hanna remind-
ed the public that the police car
was damaged during this inci-
dent, reportedly as the result of
gunfire.

Police have launched an
“intensive search” for two other
persons who they believe were
involved in the shooting.



ECUMENICAL SERVICES

. Matthew's Anglican Church



Reconciliation

7:30PM.



Cone I Vashi cme Ay A

Church & Shirley Street

PALM SUNDAY - April 5th - 7:15am Eucharist, Blessing of
Palms and Sermon; 10:00am Blessing of Palms, Procession
Eucharist, & Sermon; 7:00pm - Mission Service

MONDAY April 6th - 7:00pm — Stations of the Cross.

TUESDAY - April 7th — 7:00am Mass; 7:00pm — Service of

WEDNESDAY - April 8th - Mass 7:00am & 1:00pm at St.
Matthew’s. A Mass of the Chrism, Christ Church Cathedral at

MAUNDY THURSDAY - April 9th - 7:00pm Holy Eucharist,
Washing of Feet and Watch before the Altar of Repose.

GOOD FRIDAY - April 10th - 9:00am Liturgy for Good Friday;
12noon — 3:00pm Seven Last Words from the Cross.

EASTER DAY - April 12th - 6:00am The Great Easter Vigil &
Holy Eucharist; 10:45am — Solemn High Mass, Procession
(Within the church) LIVE RADIO BROADCAST.

7:00pm Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction.



er

For More Information Telephone: 323-8220





Christ Church Cathedral
Schedule of Services for Holy Week & Easter
April 5th - April 12th, 2009
Sunday April Sth Sunday of The Passion & Palm Sunday

7:30 a.m.
8:45 a.m.

Distribution of Palms & Holy Eucharist
The Liturgy of the Palms

Procession & Liturgy for Palm Sunday

H:1Sam. Blessing & Distribution of Palms
Holy Eucharist
Evensong, Sermon & Benediction

6:10) p.m.
Monday April 6th - 1:00 p.m.

Holy Eucharist

Tuesday April 7th - 7:00 a.m. & 12:30 p.m.
Holy Eucharist
Wednesday April 8th - 7:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.
Holy Eucharist
7:30 p.m.
Liturgy of the Renewal of Prestly Vows & Blessing of Holy Oils
Thursday April 9th - Maundy Thursday 7:30 p.m.
Commemoration of the Last Supper, Washing of Feet &
s Watch before the Altar of Repose
Friday April 10th - Good Friday 9:00 a.m.

The Good Friday Liturgy

hanlene Forbes nee Ferguson

1967-2009
®

Church of God oPELOpRecy
Elizabeth Estates, Commonwealth Blvd.

Service Times For Sunday April 12th, 2009
Easter Sunday

6:00 a.m, The Easter Vigil
Time: Friday April 3rd. 2009, @ 7:30 pm. 7:30 a.m. Holy Communion
: 9:00 acm. Procession, Solemn High Mass
li:i5a.m. Holy Eucharist
éé . , 33 6:00 p.m. Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction
As f Or God, His way ES Perfect 9:00 a.m. Procession, Solemn High Mass

Ps. 18:30

11:15 a.m.
6:(M) p.m.

Holy Eucharist
Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



John
McEnroe
to work
on ESPN2’s
US Open
telecasts

BRISTOL, Conn. (AP)
— John McEnroe will be
part of ESPN2’s announc-
ing team when the net-
work carries the U.S.
Open for the first time
this year.

He sometimes will be
paired in the broadcast
booth with his younger
brother Patrick, who suc-
ceeded him as the U.S.
Davis Cup captain.

John McEnroe won the
U.S. Open four times.

This year marks the
start of a six-year deal
through 2014 for ESPN
and Tennis Channel to
carry the U.S. Open’s
cable TV coverage, taking
over from USA Network.













































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Australia on the verge of
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SYDNEY (AP) — Josh
Kennedy and Harry Kewell
scored second-half goals to put
Australia on the cusp of secur-
ing a World Cup spot with a 2-
0 win over Uzbekistan on
Wednesday.

If the Group A match
between Bahrain and Qatar
ends in a draw later Wednes-
day at Manama, Australia will
be the first team to advance to
South Africa 2010 from Asian
qualifying.

Kennedy, a forward with
German club Karlsruhe, scored
six minutes after replacing
Celtic striker Scott McDonald
in the 60th minute.

The 26-year-old Kennedy
directed his header inside the
near post from Mark Bres-
ciano’s powerful cross from the
right edge of the area in the
66th minute to break the dead-
lock.

It was his sixth goal in 12
matches for Australia.

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drove a left-foot penalty kick
low and hard into the bottom
right corner of the net to seal
the win after Hull City mid-
fielder Richard Garcia was
felled in a rough challenge
inside the area.

It was Australia’s fourth win
in five matches in the last full
round of qualifying and the
fifth straight clean sheet for
goalkeeper Mark Schwarzer.

The Australians lead the

Uzbekistan's Farhod Tadjiyev, right,
and Australia's Scott Chipperfield
vie for the ball during their World
Cup group A qualifying soccer
match at Stadium Australia, Syd-
ney, Wednesday April 1, 2009.

ead CO SETI eed)



group with 13 points, two
ahead of Japan.

Uzbekistan, Bahrain and
Qatar all went into Wednes-
day’s matches with four points.

Uzbekistan got its campaign
back on track with a 4-0 win
over Qatar at Tashkent last
Saturday night, but now can
only challenge for third place in
the group, which earns a place
in a playoff with the third-place
team from Group B.

South Korea edges
North Korea 1-0 in
soccer match

Bm By JOHN DUERDEN
Associated Press Writer

SEOUL, South Korea (AP)
— South Korea scored a late
goal for a 1-0 win over North
Korea on Wednesday as soccer
briefly took the focus off height-
ening political tension in the
region.

South Korea reclaimed the
top place in Group B of Asian
World Cup qualifying with 11
points, one ahead of North
Korea.

It was a good-natured match,
and more entertaining than the
four recent draws in the derby
clashes.

However, North Korea coach
Kim Jong Hun was visibly upset
after the match, following Kim
Chi-woo’s late goal.

The coach suggested food
poisoning had weakened his
team and disputing the refer-
ee’s ruling on a goal-line deci-
sion, before refusing to answer
questions.

“This was a game that should-
n’t have been played. Jong Tae
Se and goalkeeper Ri Myung
Guk shouldn’t have played,” he

eet

fa

said. “After eating at the hotel
provided by South Korea, they
contracted diarrhea.”

His counterpart had no com-
plaints.

“This was a vital result for
us,” South Korea coach Huh
Jung-moo said. “We played well
and the players didn’t lose their
concentration for the whole
game and kept going until the
end.”

No sooner had supporters at
the Seoul World Cup stadium
applauded both national
anthems than North Korea
almost took the lead. Hong
Yong Jo’s fierce shot looked
destined for the top corner
before South Korean goal-
keeper Lee Woon-jae just man-
aged to make the save.

The second half was played
at a higher tempo as both teams
looked for the win.

Four minutes after the break,
North Korea’s star striker Jong
Tae-se thought he had scored
with a close-range header until
Lee blocked on the line.

North Korea coach Kim was
incensed by the call.

“Shouldn’t the referee be

Fans make
1.6m requests
for the 2010
WCup tickets

JOHANNESBURG (AP) —
Soccer fans are bidding for tick-
ets to the 2010 World Cup in
South Africa, with FIFA receiv-
ing more than 1.6 million
requests.

Fans from 205 countries
applied in the first phase of
online sales, soccer’s world gov-
erning body said Wednesday.
The tickets will be allocated in a
lottery on April 15.

South African residents made
around 30 percent of the
1,635,136 requests for seats.
They will pay $15 for the cheap-
est seats at group stage matches.

“We want to encourage even
more South Africans and
Africans to apply for their
World Cup tickets during the
next sales phase,” said Danny
Jordaan, chief executive of the
2010 World Cup organizing
committee.

Fans from the United States
made the most applications
from abroad, followed by the
United Kingdom, Germany,
Italy and Australia. The inter-
national price starts at $80 for a
seat at a group-stage match.

The most popular requests
on the 64-match program were
for the opening game on June
11 and the final on July 11. Both
will be played at the Soccer City
stadium in Johannesburg, which
is being upgraded to hold 94,700
spectators.

Fans who are allocated tickets
in the lottery will find out by e-
mail or text message by the end
of April.

Applicants were limited to
four tickets per match and a
maximum of seven matches. To
deter ticket scalpers, applicants
cannot buy tickets to different
matches played on the same
day.

The second round of sales on
FIFA’s Web site begins on May
4 and runs through November.

A third phase of sales will
begin in December after the 32
finalists are known and the
draw is announced for the
group stage matches.

fair? He ignored the fact that
the ball clearly crossed the line,”
Kim said. No replay was shown
on the big screen at the stadium.

The week leading up to the
Seoul qualifying match has been
overshadowed by the reaction
to North Korea’s plans to send
a communications satellite into
orbit between April 4-8.

The United States, South
Korea and Japan suspect the
reclusive country is using the
launch to test long-range mis-
sile technology.

North Korea countered by
accusing the United States of
spying on the site of an impend-
ing rocket launch and threat-
ened to shoot down any U.S.
planes that intrude into its air-
space.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 13





NBA Today

@ By The Associated Press

SCOREBOARD

Thursday, April 2

Utah at Denver (10:30 pm EDT).
In a potential playoff preview, the Jazz
get another chance to beat a top team
on the road when they visit the
Nuggets, who lead the Northwest Divi-
sion by one and-a-half games over
Portland and two and-a-half over Den-
ver. The Jazz have lost 15 consecutive
road games against teams with win-
ning records.

STARS

Tuesday

— David West, Hornets, matched
his career high with 40 points to help
New Orleans beat Sacramento 111-
110.

— LeBron James, Cavaliers, made
two crucial three-point plays down the
stretch and finished with 25 points and
12 rebounds as Cleveland beat Detroit
79-73 for its 13th straight victory.

— Gerald Wallace, Bobcats, had 21
points and 13 rebounds as Charlotte
continued its surprising mastery of the
Los Angeles Lakers with a 94-84 vic-
tory.

— LaMarcus Aldridge and Bran-
don Roy, Trail Blazers. Aldridge
scored 26 points, Roy had 25 points
and 11 assists, and Portland beat Utah
125-104.

— Kevin Durant, Thunder, scored
31 points to lead Oklahoma City over
San Antonio 96-95.

— T.J. Ford, Pacers, hit the go-
ahead jumper with 3.9 seconds left
and had 22 points and nine assists in
Indiana’s 107-105 victory over Cleve-
land.

POSTSEASON PLANS

Two more teams clinched playoff
berths in the Western Conference.
Denver locked up its spot with a 111-
104 victory over the New York Knicks.
The Nuggets also moved into second
place in the West. San Antonio earned
a place later Tuesday despite a 96-95
loss to Oklahoma City. The Nuggets
and Spurs, along with Dallas and
Detroit, are the only teams to have
made the playoffs every season since
2003-04.

SWEET 16

Cleveland became just the sixth
team in NBA history to win 16 games
in one month with its 79-73 victory
over Detroit. Not bad for a team that
won only 17 total in the season before
LeBron James arrived.

SURPRISING SUCCESS

Charlotte completed a season sweep
of the Los Angeles Lakers with a 94-84
victory Tuesday. The Bobcats have
won six of seven against the Western
Conference champions. Oklahoma
City has defeated the playoff-bound
San Antonio Spurs twice in about two
weeks following its 96-95 victory on
Tuesday.

SMASHING SUCCESS

Portland routed Utah 125-104 on
Tuesday, winning its third consecutive
game by at least 20 points. The Trail
Blazers (47-27) blitzed the Jazz with
torrid shooting, hitting a season-high
61.6 per cent (47-of-76) from the field.
It was the first time Portland has won
three consecutive games by at least 20
points since March 24-28, 1992.

SHUT DOWN

Kevin Garnett will miss at least the
next four games with a sore right knee
and may return for the final three
games of the Boston Celtics’ regular
season. Coach Doc Rivers said after
practice Tuesday that the team would
be “shutting down” Garnett for most
of the remaining seven regular season
games because of continued soreness
in the knee, first injured February 19 at
Utah. Garnett has missed 15 of the
last 19 games, including the last two.

VLADE’S DAY

Vlade Divac’s No. 21 jersey was
retired Tuesday night at Arco Arena,
his home for six seasons. He was the
starting center on the Kings’ back-to-
back division champs and the 2002
Western Conference finalists. Divac,
who is the second-leading rebounder
in the franchise’s Sacramento history,
said during a halftime ceremony that
the best days of his 16-year NBA
career came in Sacramento.

HEALTHY HOWARD

Josh Howard had 14 points and six
rebounds in 22 minutes in his return
from an 11-game absence in the Mav-
ericks’ 108-88 victory in Minnesota.
He had not played since March 5
because of a sore left ankle and has
missed a total of 28 games due to var-
10US injuries this season.

SPEAKING

“Tcan play 18 minutes with my eyes
closed and a 100-pound truck on my
back. ’'m wondering what the rush
was to get me back. It’s a bad time
for me mentally. I’m just trying to get
through it without starting a whole
bunch of nonsense. I’m looking at the
big picture, if I vent my frustrations,
then it’s on. Being who I am, fingers
are going to be pointed at me. Peo-
ple are going to make a big deal out of
it. ’m just trying to laugh as much as I
can and stop from crying.”

— Allen Iverson, frustrated with his
playing time while coming off the
bench in two games since returning
from a back injury to rejoin Detroit



Carifta: Athletes must qualify
if they want to compete

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ONCE again, the Bahamas Associ-
ation of Athletic Associations has
selected athletes who have not quali-
fied to make up the relay teams for
the Carifta Games in St Lucia over the
Easter holiday weekend.

Last year, they did the same thing
and there were at least 10 athletes who
made the trip to St Kitts and didn’t
even get to compete as the Bahamas’
65-member team returned with 23
medals.

It doesn’t make sense, especially in
these tough economic times, to field
the large teams and the majority of the
athletes have not attained the qualify-
ing standards. That means that we
could see a repeat of last year with
athletes just going for the ride and
exposure.

Regardless of whether or not all of
the athletes attained the qualifying
standards, the team will once again be
judged based on the amount of medals
secured and the position they finish in.

Every year, the same argument
comes up in relationship to the
Bahamas Swimming Federation, who
also sends a team off to the Carifta
Swimming Championships a week
after the BAAA’s track team return
home.

The difference is the fact that the

Vlade Divac’s jersey retired

FORMER Sacramento Kings center Vlade Divac, of Serbia, stands next to a framed copy of his jersey
that was scheduled to be retired by the team at halftime of the game between the New Orleans Hor-
nets and the Kings in Sacramento, California, later Tuesday, March 31. Divac played six seasons with

BSF stick to their
qualifying stan-
dards and they [
generally only car-
ry those swimmers
who have made
the standard,
which should be
the proper proce-
dure.

It doesn’t make
sense to impose
the standards. The
BAAA might as
well just look at
another criteria for
selecting the team. OPINION

What happens to =m =
those athletes who
ensure that they do what is necessary to
make the standards? It seems as if they
are not treated any different from
those athletes who don’t make the
standard, except for the fact that they
actually get to compete at the games.

Until more emphasis is placed on
attaining the standards, we will con-
tinue to struggle to get back to being a
powerhouse in the region because we
reward athletes who have not quali-
fied to make the trip.

STUBBS

HALL OF FAMERS

THE Bahamas Softball Federation
must be commended for submitting
the names of the four new Interna-
tional Softball Federation’s Hall of



the Kings, retiring in 2007 after playing 17 years of professional basketball.

in prison for up to 10 years.

In exchange for his plea, prosecutors on Wednesday
dropped two marijuana trafficking charges against the 40-
year-old former University of Cincinnati star.

Sentencing was set for May 13 in Butler County Com-

mon Pleas Court.

Blount was arrested Dec. 4 after sheriffs deputies
intercepted 11 pounds of marijuana sent to him at a rel-
ative’s home in southwest Ohio. They later searched
Blount’s home and say they found another 18 pounds of

marijuana.

Blount was a first-round draft pick by the Chicago
Bulls in 1993. In an 11-year NBA career, he also played
for the Lakers, Cleveland, Phoenix, Philadelphia and

Toronto.

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“Tt doesn’t make sense, especially in these tough economic times,
to field the large teams and the majority of the athletes have not
attained the qualifying standards. That means that we could see a
repeat of last year with athletes just going for the ride and exposure.”

Famers.

The mixture of a male (Richard 'the
Lion'Heart' Johnson) and female
(Candice DeGregory-Culmer) players,
a coach (Godfrey Pinder) and an
administrator (Austin ‘King Snake’
Knowles) makes it quite an induction
ceremony to look forward to on April
24.

All four persons have a lot of histo-
ry behind them in the respective posi-
tions or capacity they served in.

So hats off to Richard, Candice,
Godfrey and Austin. You all have
earned the right to be called Hall of
Famers as you join the other seven
inductees who were enshrined before
you.

Your contribution is helping to pro-
duce yet another significant interna-
tional milestone for the Bahamas.

MARTINBOROUGH

STILL GOING STRONG

IT’S good to see that three-time
World Sunfish champion Donnie Mar-
tinborough, who should one day be
enshrined in some sailing Hall of Fame,
is still competing at a very
high level of competition.

Now qualified as a Mas-
ters competitor, Martin-
borough competed in two
consecutive tournaments
in Florida where he won
the first tournament - a
Masters competition - and
was third in the other
against current reigning
world champion Eduardo
Cordero of Venezuela.

Martinborough seemed

fo

cs

aaa

— Brent Stubbs

to be just warming up as he prepares
for the World Sunfish Championship
that will return to Montagu Bay for
the first time since 1988.

Incidentally, that was the same year
that Martinborough made history by
becoming the first multiple winner of
the prestigious title. So if his perfor-
mance last month was any indication,
Martinborough should be heading for
another spectacular performance in
October.

CONDOLENCES

TO PRATT

Let me pause to offer my personal
condolences to the family of the late
Joseph Pratt.

As a youngster growing up without a
father-figure in my home, it was a
delight to watch Pratt as he engaged in
every aspect of his children’s lives,
especially as they competed in sports.

Pratt was not an outstanding player.
He didn’t have any fame or accolades
behind his name or on the trophy case
in the home of Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt
in the Grove, but his sons would always
brag that they couldn't ask for a better
coach on the sideline.

Pratt made sure that he was always
Kept abreast of all of the rules and reg-
ulations and that his children and all
those that came in contact with him,
adhere to them. He has helped count-
less youngsters as he groomed Juan,
Julian, the late Ronnie, his nephews
Darrel and Lloyd Jr. Ranger, and even
his daughter Nikki.

He will surely be remembered for
the role he played. May his soul rest in
peace.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Women's boxing
in Olympic Games
flecided in August

LAUSANNE, Switzerland
(AP) — Female boxers will find
out in August if they will be
allowed to compete at the 2012
London Games.

The International Olympic
Committee says Wednesday
that it is looking at a proposal
from the International Amateur
Boxing Association to include
women’s boxing.

Of the 26 Summer Olympic
sports federations who are orga-
nizing competitions in London,
boxing is the only one without
female participants.

The IOC said in a statement
that its program commission
will “make a recommendation
to the executive board,” which
is set to make a decision at its
meeting Aug. 13 in Berlin.

A previous bid to get wom-
en’s boxing accepted in 2005 in
time for the Beijing Olympics
failed because the IOC judged it
was not a global sport.

@ By FREDERIC J
FROMMER
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Senator John McCain wants a
presidential pardon for Jack
Johnson, who became the
nation’s first black heavyweight
boxing champion 100 years
before Barack Obama became
its first black president.

McCain feels Johnson was
wronged by a 1913 conviction
of violating the Mann Act by
having a consensual relation-
ship with a white woman — a
conviction widely seen as racial-
ly motivated.

“Pve been a very big fight
fan, I was a mediocre boxer
myself,” McCain, R-Ariz., said
in a telephone interview. “TI had
admired Jack Johnson’s

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Pardon sought for first
black heavyweight champ

prowess in the ring. And the
more I found out about him,
the more I thought a grave
injustice was done.”

On Wednesday, McCain will
join Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y.,
filmmaker Ken Burns and
Johnson’s great niece, Linda
Haywood, at a Capitol Hill
news conference to unveil a res-
olution urging a presidential
pardon for Johnson. Similar leg-
islation offered in 2004 and last
year failed to pass both cham-
bers of Congress.

King, a recreational boxer,
said a pardon would “remove
a cloud that’s been over the
American sporting scene ever
since (Johnson) was convicted
on these trumped-up charges.”

“T think the moment is now,”
King said.

Presidential pardons for the
dead are rare.

In 1999, President Bill Clin-
ton pardoned Lt. Henry O.
Flipper, the Army’s first black
commissioned officer, who was
drummed out of the military in
1882 after white officers
accused him of embezzling
$3,800 in commissary funds.
Last year, President George W.
Bush pardoned Charles Win-
ters, who was convicted of vio-
lating the Neutrality Act when
he conspired in 1948 to export
aircraft to a foreign country in
aid of Israel.

The Justice Department and
the White House declined to
comment on this latest John-
son pardon effort.

However, the idea has a pas-
sionate supporter in McCain,
who has repeatedly said he was
wrong in 1983 when he voted
against a federal holiday in hon-
our of Martin Luther King Jr.

“Tt’s just one of those things
that you don’t want to quit until
you see justice,” McCain said
of Johnson’s case. “We won’t
quit until we win. And I believe
that enough members, if you
show them the merits of this
issues, that we'll get the kind of
support we need.”

Johnson won the world
heavyweight title on December

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IN THIS 1932 file photo, boxer Jack Johnson is shown working out in New

York City at the age of 54...

26, 1908, after police in Aus-
tralia stopped his 14-round
match against the severely bat-
tered Canadian world champi-
on, Tommy Burns. That led to a
search for a “Great White
Hope” who could beat John-
son. Two years later, the Amer-
ican world titleholder Johnson
had tried for years to fight, Jim
Jeffries, came out of retirement
but lost in a match called “The
Battle of the Century,” resulting
in deadly riots.

(AP Photo)

Johnson lost the heavyweight
title to Jess Willard in 1915.

In 1913, Johnson was con-
victed of violating the Mann
Act, which outlawed transport-
ing women across state lines for
immoral purposes. The law has
since been heavily amended,
but has not been repealed.

Authorities first targeted
Johnson’s relationship with a
white woman who later became
his wife, then found another
white woman to testify against

him. Johnson fled the country
after his conviction, but agreed
years later to return and serve a
10-month jail sentence. He tried
to renew his boxing career after
leaving prison, but failed to
regain his title. He died in a car
crash in 1946 at age 68.

“When we couldn’t beat him
in the ring, the white power
establishment decided to beat
him in the courts,” Burns told
the AP in a telephone inter-
view. Burns’ 2005 documentary,
“Unforgivable Blackness: The
Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson,”
examined Johnson’s case and
the sentencing judge’s admit-
ted desire to “send a message”
to black men about relation-
ships with white women.

Both McCain and King said a
pardon, particularly one from
Obama, would carry important
symbolism.

“Tt would be indicative of the
distance we’ve come, and also
indicative of the distance we
still have to go,” McCain said.

Burns, however, sees a par-
don more as “just a question of
justice, which is not only blind,
but color blind,” adding, “And
I think it absolutely does not
have anything to do with the
symbolism of an African-Amer-
ican president pardoning an
African-American unjustly
accused.”

Burns helped form the Com-
mittee to Pardon Jack Johnson,
which filed a petition with the
Justice Department in 2004 that
was never acted on. Burns said
he spoke about the petition a
couple of times with Bush, who
as governor of Johnson’s home
state of Texas proclaimed John-
son’s birthday as “Jack John-
son Day” for five straight years.

Bush gave Burns a phone
number which led to adviser
Karl Rove, Burns said, but
Rove told him a pardon “ain’t
gonna fly.”

Rove doesn’t recall any such
conversation with Burns, his
spokeswoman Sheena Tahilra-
mani said, and “if he had been
approached, he wouldn’t have
offered an opinion.”

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Wilson City Power Station
Transmission Circuits

Wilson City, Abaco

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before

9th April, 2009

no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 701/09

WILSON CITY POWER STATION TRANSMISSION CIRCUITS

WILSON CITY, ABACO

The Corporation reserves the right to
accept or reject any or all proposals.
For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact
Mr. Wayne Farquharson at telephone 302-1216.





THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

S
k





SHOWN (I-r) are Michelle Lewis, Coca Cola marketing manager, Sonia
Knowles, BAISS committee member, Gianne Moss, Domino’s Pizza mar-
keting associate)

Domino’s and Coca-Cola
donate $5,500 to BAISS

DOMINO’S Pizza and
Caribbean Bottling Company
(Coca-Cola) have donated
$5,500 to the Bahamas Associ-
ation of Independent Secondary
Schools Track and Field Cham-
pionship.

In a joint statement, the com-
panies said they strongly believe
in supporting the community
and the youth of the nation.

The statement added: “This


























partnership over the years has
jointly contributed approxi-
mately $35,000 to the BAISS
sporting association.

“We are very happy to align
our companies with their organ-
isation, placing our financial
resources in a programme that
is certainly helping to develop
the abilities of our junior stu-
dent - athletes in the sport of
athletics.”

ts

2009



Australia on
the verge of
qualifying for
World Cup...

See page 12

Carifta pep rally all set

TO celebrate the achieve-
ments of both junior national
teams heading for competition
against the best in the region,
athletes, parents and fans will be
treated with a grand send off
next week just prior to competi-
tion.

The Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations is sched-
uled to host a pep rally for both
the Carifta Swimming/Synchro-
nized Swimming Championship
and Carifta Track and Field
Championship national teams on
April 6 at the Thomas A Robin-
son Stadium.

The rally is expected to fea-
ture performances by recording
artists Ricardo Clarke, Najie
Dun, Higher Level Band, Mani-
ifest and Joan Callendar.

And a live broadcast by Island
102.9 FM is slated for the rally
which is set for 6:30-8:00pm at
the stadium’s VIP section.

The 61-member track and field
team is scheduled to depart for
competition on April 8 for the
meet which takes place April 9-
14 in St Lucia.

The 36-member swim team
will compete the following week
in Savaneta, Aruba, April 15-20.

At a press conference to unveil

Recording artists expected to perform

the coaches for the 2009 track
and field team, BAAA press
release officer Kermit Taylor
said the association saw it fit to
recognise the athletes and leave
them enthused and prepared to
compete.

“We felt it was a good way to
show support for the athletes,
particularly for those who will

Culmer, Kenya

Dean, Devanique

Ferguson, Gortia (Exuma)
Johnson, Carlene

Kemp, Ivanique

Rolle, Hughnique

Robinson, V’Alonee

Smith, Kathrina (Grand
Bahama)

Smith, Nivea (Grand Bahama)

Deveaux, J’Vente
Duncombe, Darion

Fraser, Warren

Higgs, Alfred(Grand Bahama)
Higgs, Raymond (Grand
Bahama)

Knowles, Demetri (Grand
Bahama)

Miller, Brandon

Mc Intosh, Vernal

not be able to travel to St Lucia,”
he said. “This gives everyone a
chance to see the athletes, get to
know them and gives us a chance
to recognise their accomplish-
ments before they do us proud
by representing the country.”

Miller, Shauntae Newbold, Laquardo
Richardson, Charles
Thompson, Brice
Thompson, Zhivago
Williams, Fenton

Williams, Jaquan (Grand
Bahama)
Wallace-Whitfield, Kenneth

U-20 Boys
Bain, Dennis (Grand Bahama)
Burnside, Nejmi
Bullard, Troy (Grand
Bahama)
Deveaux, Delano
39th Carifta Track and

Field Championships Team

U-17 Girls

Adderley, Teshon

Brown, Rashan

Cash, Sparkyl

Cartwright, Devinn

Deveaux, Deandra

Farrington, Bianca

Johnson, Printassia

Miller, Shaunae

Myers, Tamara (Andros)

Seymour, Katrina

Strachan,Antonique

Williams, Raquel

Seymour, Pedrya

Johnson, Ashlee

U-17 Boys

Armbrister, Rashad (Exuma)

Bartlett, Blake (Grand

Bahama)

Bodie, Patrick

Carey, James A.

Carter, Harold

Farquharson, Jonathan

(Grand Bahama)

Farrington, Anthony

Ferguson, Byron

Ferguson, O’Jay

Hall, Tevin

Ingraham, Ryan

Minns, Lathone

Minns, Lathario

Rahming, Erle

Wilmott, Jabari

Adderley, Trae

U-20 Girls

Burnside, Deshona

Bodie, Krystal

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THE TRIBUNE

DU



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Philadelphia-based real
estate development company,
and the Amway Corporation’
founder behind an Eleuthera-
based resort development, have
emerged as new contenders to
acquire the Four Seasons Emer-
ald Bay Resort, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, with the
reduced purchase price seem-
ingly attracting an influx of
potential buyers.

Sources close to the situation
told this newspaper yesterday
that a new player in the race to
acquire the troubled Exuma-
based resort, which will soon
have been in receivership for
two years, is The Arden Group,
a company that has acquired or
developed more than $1.3 bil-
lion worth of real estate since its
1989 founding.

The company’s website
boasts that it has developed
numerous Ritz-Carlton-branded
properties across the US,
including resorts in Philadel-



I

©

THURSDAY,



ART toe



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

New buyers Qld Fort Bay resident in

in Emerald ¢7,.5m counterclaim loss
Bay shake-up

phia, Colorado, South Beach
and Wyoming, establishing the
company’s credentials as a suit-
able suitor for a five-star prop-
erty such as Emerald Bay.

And Tribune Business has
also been informed that
Richard DeVos, whose family
has as its principal business Alti-
cor, the parent company of
Amway Corporation, is also
readying a bid for the Four Sea-
sons Emerald Bay Resort.

It is unclear whether Mr
DeVos has submitted a formal
bid to the resort’s receivers,
Pricewaterhouse Coopers
(PwC), but he is already
involved in Bahamian-based
resort development/ownership
via the Powell Point at Cape
Eleuthera project.

That 700-acre project is set
to feature estate homes, beach
villas, town homes and marinas
when completed. Tribune Busi-
ness has also been informed
that a European consortium is
looking at entering the Four

SEE page 6B

Grand Bahama firm sees
68% income growth

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GRAND Bahama’s South
Riding Point bulk storage and
terminal facility saw its 2008
operating income increase by
68 per cent to $11.126 million,
driven by a 25 per cent increase
in its combined revenue
streams.

World Point Terminals, the
company’s Toronto Stock
Exchange-listed parent,
announced in its results for the
period ended on December 31,
2008, that South Riding Point’s
revenues had increased by 25
per cent or $4.432 million - ris-
ing from $18.074 million in 2007
to $22.506 million.

“This increase was attributed
to both higher storage and
marine revenues,” World Point
Terminals said. “Storage rev-
enues increased primarily due
to 1.5 million barrels of new
storage coming into service in
the third and fourth quarters of
2008. That storage capacity was
immediately placed under con-
tract.

“Marine revenues increased,
accounting for $1.973 million of
the increase. Revenues for the
fourth quarter were $8.469 mil-
lion, 91 per cent higher than the
same period in 2007.”

The two new crude oil stor-
age tanks have increased South
Riding point’s storage capacity

Peru ue IE bia

* But South Riding Point
could face ‘significant’
exposure to unpaid
tax bill in dispute
with the Government

* Storage terminal’s
revenues up 25%, with
marine income ahead
91% in last ‘O8 quarter

* Freepoint tug business
sees 14% revenue
increase

by 29 per cent, providing anoth-
er 750,000 barrels worth of stor-
age space. The company has 55
employees.

World Point’s financial state-
ments showed that prior to a
$2.388 million depreciation
charge, the Bahamas-based
South Riding Point facility had
generated $14.514 million in
gross operating profit - a 67 per
cent rise above the previous
year’s $6.618 million.

South Riding Point, as at
year-end 2008, had incurred
$11.797 million in capital expen-
ditures and had assets of
$46.052 million.

Meanwhile, World Point Ter-
minals said the Freepoint tugs
business, which provides ser-

SEE page 6B

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@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

well-
known
Old

Fort Bay resi-
dent has lost his
$7.5 million
counterclaim
against a fellow
Bahamas resi-
dent business-
man, the
Supreme Court finding that the
deal to sell his stake in a
Bahamian investment fund
formed to finance the Russian
government’s legal action
against ‘Big Tobacco’ was void

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Yank Barry ordered to pay business rival Jay Gotlieb $3.141m, after
losing case over sales agreement relating to Bahamian investment
fund formed for Russian government's tobacco litigation

because the litigation had
already been dropped.

Yank Barry, who was last
year acquitted by a Texas judge
of allegations that he had tried
to bribe a Texan prison official,
had launched a counterclaim
against fellow businessman Jay
Gotlieb, alleging that the latter
was indebted to him after per-
sonally guaranteeing the $7.5
million purchase of his compa-
ny’s stake in the Tobacco Liti-

gation Participation Fund.

This followed a previous
judgment in Mr Gotlieb’s
favour against Mr Barry, the
Supreme Court having found
that he advanced $3 million to
the latter, but this had never
been repaid. That judgment had
been stayed pending the out-
come of Mr Barry’s counter-
claim.

In his judgment, Justice John
Lyons described both Mr Barry

and Mr Gotlieb as “certainly
both men who look for the
main chance”. And although he
ultimately found in favour of
Mr Gotlieb, Justice Lyons heav-
ily criticised him for having “a
vastly over-rated opinion of his
powers of recollection”, finding
that he was not telling the truth
when he claimed he did not sign
the December 23, 2003, agree-

SEE page 3B

NIB under renewed fire on collections

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE National Insurance Board (NIB)
yesterday came under further attack from
the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s
president for its “outrageous” overdue-con-
tributions collection tactics, after both he

and Tribune Business received two e-mails
complaining about its tactics.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness that the NIB was now penalising
employers who may owe contributions dat-
ing as far back as 20 years, when their sys-
tem for keeping account of those contribu-
tions was inaccurate and inefficient.

The Chamber president said that because

Airport gas station contract ‘awarded’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD) has
awarded a contract for a gas sta-
tion that will be located at the
JFK Drive-Coral Harbour
Road intersection, its chief
financial officer telling Tribune
Business the facility was likely
to be in operation by year’s end.

But NAD has placed on hold
plans for a restaurant at the
same location, Stewart Steeves
explaining that it wanted to
receive more interest in this
proposal.

Although declining to name
who had won the contract to
operate the gas station, which
will be situated on the fringes of

hy
QOoen
in
it eure

We

Features:

=
—
,

iahes

* But restaurant placed on hold until more interest
* NAD ‘half-way through’ plans to expand retail/
restaurant tenants in existing buildings
* Airport managers says 90 per cent of tenant
calls responded to within hour
* Airport’s proximity to US gives it ‘real
advantage’ in attracting new carrier airlift

NAD’s property, Mr Steeves
confirmed: “The gas station gas
been awarded, and it’s pro-
ceeding. They’re working on
getting their permits.

“T believe it will be before the
end of the year before that’s in
operation. With the restaurant,
we did not have a lot of takers,
so we suspended that. We’re
just going to wait on that one.

EO eee

Fi

We had some interest, but
decided to wait until we get
more interest.”

Inside Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport’s (LPIA) main
terminal buildings, Mr Steeves
said NAD was now starting to
really gain momentum in terms
of the retail and food conces-

SEE page 2B

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the agency never issued monthly statements
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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bia »>humane

BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY’S

RAFFLE 09’

winners:
PRIZE # TICKET # NAME
1 06468 Zohn Burrows
2 01089 Linda Davis
S 08048 Tina Robinson
4 06046 “Holly”
5 01403 Samantha Jonhstone

Winners please contact the
Bahamas Humane Society at 323-5138
or 325-6742 to collect your prizes.

The Bahamas Humane Society wishes to
thank all who supported our annual raffle.

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Pictet accountant
passes Series 7

A TRUST accountant at
Pictet Overseas Trust Corpo-
ration, Lakeisha Swaby, has
completed the Series 7 Exam
in the US after studying with
the Nassau-based Securities
Training Institute (STI).

Ms Albury, course Admin-
istrator at STI, said: “Our pro-
grammes provide profession-
als with the conceptual foun-
dations and practical skills
necessary to keep pace with
the evolving fields of securi-
ties and financial services.”

Ms Swaby can be seen with
Michael Miller, STT’s presi-
dent.



Airport gas station contract ‘awarded’

FROM page 1B

sions it was starting to lease out.

The Dunkin’ Donuts fran-
chise, operated by a Myers
Group of Companies sub-
sidiary, has already opened two
outlets at LPIA, while Wendy’s
is due to stage its official open-
ing next week.

In a reference to the previ-
ous monopoly held on the
LPIA retail/restaurant conces-
sions, Mr Steeves said: “It took
us a while to come to terms with
the existing concession opera-
tor. That happened a few
months back, and we’ve
announced Dunkin’ Donuts and
Wendy’s.

“There’s a few other offer-
ings that will be emerging in the
US departures room in the
coming months. In the coming
month or so, there should be
more announcements on new
tenants. I’d say we’re about
half-way through what we’re
planning to offer in the current
facility, and then there will be
much more in the new facility.”

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Lease and rental revenues
from the retail/restaurant ten-
ant base are a key income
stream for NAD, and a central
component in its bid to generate
positive operating income out-
side of the passenger user facil-
ity fee.

Mr Steeves said NAD had
been able to increase revenues
from this source by adjusting
existing and new leases to
“more market-based rents”. He
added that the company, which
operates LPIA under a 30-year
lease from the Airport Author-
ity, had “pretty much identified
all the partners” it wanted as
part of its retail/restaurant mix.

The first stage of LPIA’s
redevelopment, which is esti-
mated to cost $409.5 million in
total, is likely to make a con-
struction start this summer now
that the $265 million financing
has been completed.

Mr Steeves told Tribune
Business that the first stage, for
which construction costs will be
a little under $200 million,
would involve building the new
US departures terminal on land
to the west of the existing facil-
ity, plus an expanded runway
apron and short and long-term
parking facilities.

That stage is scheduled to be
completed around March 2011,
with second stage construction
costing “just shy” of $130 mil-
lion and lasting from that date
until October 2012.

The second stage will focus
chiefly on conversion of the
existing US departures termi-
nal into the US and interna-
tional arrivals hall. The final
stage, stage three, will cost
around $85 million and be com-

pleted by November 2013, con-
centrating on the domestic and
international departures termi-
nal.

Mr Steeves told Tribune
Business that NAD had “come
a long way in a short period of
time” since taking over LPIA’s
management two years ago yes-
terday.

Among the most visible
improvements were the new
washroom/restroom facilities,
the flight information displays,
improved baggage belts, per-
formance-based cleaning con-
tracts, landscaping, the creation
of a 24-hour operations centre
and other cosmetic improve-
ments.

“T think we’re now at a place
where better than 90 per cent of
calls we get from tenants are
responded to in an hour,” Mr
Steeves said.

He also pointed to the unseen
improvements, such as the
installation of billing, leasing
and accounting systems, and
improved warehouse and inven-
tory management, as enhance-
ments to NAD’s efficiency.

When it came to airlift into
LPIA, Mr Steeves said New
Providence’s location in close
proximity to the US gave the
airport “a real advantage” when
it came to attracting new air-
lines.

Because New Providence -
and the Bahamas in general-
were such a short flight from
most east coast destinations,
being only two or three hours
away from New York, US air-
lines could send aircraft on
return trips to this nation and
still be in position to deploy
those same planes on domestic

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routes that day.

“There’s a real benefit to the
location of Nassau and its prox-
imity to the US. We’ve had a
lot of interest in new services,”
Mr Steeves explained. Delta,
Jet Blue, Excel France and
WestJet had either all commit-
ted to or introduced new ser-
vices to Nassau, and NAD had
also received “some interest
from other carriers”.

Mr Steeves said NAD had to
increase the interest rate of
return offered to investors in its
senior secured bond issue from
8 per cent to 8.5 per cent, to
compensate for the absence of a
credit rating from the Fitch
agency.

“When we went without the
credit rating, we did increase
the rate a little bit to compen-
sate for any questions that may
arise,” Mr Steeves said. “But
the important thing is that the
rates as structured fit within the
financial model and fee struc-
ture we predicted for the air-
port going forward, and we got
the deal done. Everyone should
be happy that we got things in
place and the project can pro-
ceed.

“The financial structure is
designed around keeping the
cost impact relatively low, so
we keep the rates at the airport
competitive.”

Mr Steeves said the first face
financing had established the
“financial architecture” for the
capital raisings NAD would
need to undertake for stage two
and three construction. The
revolving credit facility for each
phase would be drawn down,
then refinanced through long-
term debt.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS
Privatise agriculture, government urged

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has been
urged to privatise key compo-
nents of the Bahamian agricul-
ture infrastructure, such as pack-
ing houses and the abbattoir, in
addition to downsizing the Min-
istry of Agriculture to bring it
more in line with current industry
activity.

The recommendations and
findings paper from the recent
National Economic Summit
pointed out that while the
Bahamas’ agricultural production
“has reduced to a fraction of what
it was in 1973, the Ministry of
[Agriculture] staff complement
has grown almost 1,000 per cent”.

The summit recommended that
the Ministry of downsized to
focus on policy and food inspec-
tion. “The large number of high-
ly-skilled farmers currently
employed with the Ministry
should be provided with land
grants and financing to start farms
that serve not only private com-
mercial purposes, but also train-
ing for current and aspiring agri-

culturalists,” the Summit’s organ-
isers suggested.

Packing house privatization
was viewed as a way to overcome
existing inefficiencies and the
absence of equipment for “sec-
ondary processing opportunities,
which are essential to supporting
large scale farming”.

The Summit organisers also
recommended that Bahamians
granted leased land for farming
purposes “be made to demon-
strate a minimum level of pro-
ductivity prior to the renewal of
such leases”.

They urged that the Auditor-
General review all issuances and
renewals of land leases, given that
many Bahamians granted land for
agricultural use were not using it
for these purposes, creating an
“abuse of taxpayer resources”.

Work permits were another
vexing area, particularly when it
came to farm labourers. “In one
such case where a permit was

declined for unexplained reasons,
the result was a dramatic scaling
back of local production, which
in turn led to the termination of
Bahamian workers,” the Summit
organisers found.

The Summit organisers called
for the Government-owned and
operated abattoir to be privatised
with 100 per cent Bahamian own-
ership.

When it came to energy, the
recommendations suggested the
Bahamas was losing out on
potentially $30-$85 million in rev-
enues per year from liquefied nat-
ural gas (LNG) terminals.

The Summit organisers sug-
gested all environmental concerns
surrounding LNG had been
addressed, but recommended that
the industry only be approved for
operation in the Bahamas if
Bahamians were provided with a
minimum 30 per cent equity inter-
est.

When it came to small busi-

Old Fort Bay resident in $7.5m counterclaim loss

FROM page 1B

ment, purchasing the invest-
ment fund stake held by Mr
Barry’s company.

Although Mr Gotlieb had
accepted that it was his hand-
writing and signature on the
purchase document, the judg-
ment recorded that the busi-
nessman claimed he did not sign
it and that the signature was lift-
ed from another agreement
relating to a California casino
proposal. Justice Lyons rejected
this explanation.

“In my judgment, he did sign
the agreement with a view to
cashing in on what he saw to be
the potential of considerable
profits coming from the subject
matter of the agreement, that
subject matter having some-
thing to do with certain litiga-
tion in the United States against
the big tobacco companies,”
Justice Lyons found.

The case revolved around an
investment fund formed to
finance a legal action, initiated
by US attorneys acting for the
Russian government, in the
Florida courts. The action, ini-
tiated on August 25, 2000, was
seeking damages from tobacco
manufacturers over the alleged
harmful effects of smoking.

Justice Lyons recalled: “The
scheme was set up whereby
investors could contribute to
the cost of funding the tobacco
litigation taken by the Russian
Federation, and in respect of
which they would receive, as a
dividend, a percentage of the
return supposedly coming from
any successful litigation.

“The fund concerned was
called the Tobacco Litigation
Partnership (TL Participation
Fund). Such an investment
scheme was contrary to law in
the United States. Investors
were sought from outside the
United States, or investments
were made in the fund (domi-
ciled in the Bahamas, from
investors worldwide, which may
have included investors from
within the United States.”

Mr Barry, though his Global
Village company, obtained a
0.65 per cent interest in the fund
that he attempted to sell to Mr
Gotlieb, who guaranteed the
purchase price of $7.5 million.
That had not been paid as of
the June 15, 2004, completion
date.

Bahamian law firm Lennox
Paton, acting in a fiduciary
capacity, transferred 26.13 per
cent of its 3.75 per cent share
in the litigation proceeds, to Mr
Barry on August 27, 2001, giv-

ing him his 0.65 per cent stake.
Half of this was sold to Mr
Gotlieb.

However, Justice Lyons
found that the Russian action
was dead before the sales agree-
ment between Mr Barry and Mr
Gotlieb was drawn up. The
action was withdrawn on
August 25, 2003, prior to the
sales agreement that Decem-
ber.

Mr Gotlieb’s attorney, Philip
Davis, of Davis & Co, argued
successfully that because the
“subject matter of the sale and
purchase agreement had gone
up in smoke, the parties to that
agreement were, at the time of
entering into the sale and pur-
chase agreement, operating
under a common mistake”.

Neither side, Justice Lyons
found, became aware of the lit-
igation’s end until January 2004.
He agreed with Mr Davis that,
because the Florida litigation
had ended and there was no
attempt or prospect of reviving
it, the sale guaranteed by Mr
Gotlieb “did not exist and not
can it exist. It had, as I said,
‘gone up in smoke’.”

As aresult, Justice Lyons dis-
missed Mr Barry’s counterclaim
and removed the stay on his
judgment requiring Mr Gotlieb
to be paid $3.141 million.

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the

following position:

VISA CLERK

Serves as one of three Visa Clerks directly supervised by the Chief of
the Visa Unit. Performs moderately difficult and highly responsible
data entry and data management work pertaining to visa services.
Provides direct customer service on complex subjects in difficult

circumstances.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

Completion of Associates of Arts Degree or equivalent.

Two to three years of experience that includes data entry, customer
service, professional correspondence and interpretation of complex
rules and regulations is required.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Computer skills in data entry, spreadsheets and word processing.
Must be able to deal with the public both in one-on-one and

telephone conversations.
Must be able to work with and manage clients in a stressful

environment.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and dental
insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and

development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible
for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available online at:
http://nassau.usembassy.gov/job_opportunities.html

Please e-mail applications to the Human Resources Office no later
than April 7, 2009 to: Adamsrc@state.gov or Fernanderra@ state.gov.
Applications will not be accepted at the Security Gate of the
Embassy. Absolutely no telephone calls will be accepted.

ness, the Summit organisers urged
that the Government provide
loan guarantees “up to an aggre-
gate of $10 million and not more
than $100,000 for any single com-
pany”, in a bid to aid small firms
requiring new financing or to
restructure existing loans.

The recommendations also



called on the Government to set-
tle accounts payables with the pri-
vate sector within 30 days, and
the Bahamas Development Bank
was urged to require that com-
panies receiving loans of more
than $100,000 have “properly
functioning boards” comprised of
suitably skilled people.

When it came to Family Island
tourism, the Summit organisers
recommended that persons stay-
ing in Nassau for four nights or
more be offered a free Bahama-
sair flight to a Family Island of
choice, provided they spend at
least one night there.

The Ministry of Tourism was
encouraged to hand over 10 per
cent of its advertising budget to
Bahamian firms, so they could
participate in designing its mar-
keting campaigns.

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Ph: 393-2164 Fax: 394-4971

AutoCAD 2009

Introduction & Intermediate Course

$750

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lor More information, Please contact:

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Training Coordinator
Ph: 393-2104 Fax: 34-1971
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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





C A RIB BEAN

EXPORT

CARIBBEAN EXPORT DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

@ CI

Report coming to standardise
regional management consultancy

A report will soon be produced on regional management consultants to steer business
people along the right path when they are choosing such professionals to execute
projects on their behalf.

FROM page 1B

The report promises to be a comprehensive document which identifies management
consultants by specialty, capacity, competitive strengths and market positions among
other criteria and a survey is currently being conducted to produce the findings which will
be used in the report.

that doesn’t give you a state-
ment stating what you owe,
what you have paid and what
your outstanding balance is.
Now, to come along providing
you with no information of
where your status is and say:
“By the way, 20 years ago you
didn’t make a payment” is so
outrageous it isn’t even funny,”
said Mr D’ Aguilar.

An e-mail obtained by Tri-
bune Business, to which Mr
D’ Aguilar, made reference out-
lined the story of an 84-year-
old woman trying to ensure her
housekeeper retired with a pen-
sion.

NIB had provided the elderly
lady recently with a list of “miss-
ing” payments, going back as
far as 1986, which it said must
be paid by her before her
housekeeper can receive a pen-
sion.

“My mother has received a
list of missing payments and is
researching her files going back
to the crucifixion,” the 84 year-
old’s daughter said.

“Tt is just stressful and cruel
and unusual punishment to do
that to people after more than,
say six years (the contractual
period for suing on a debt at
common law), especially in their
later years.”

According to the author of
the e-mail, matters are being
exacerbated by the housekeep-
er’s chronic illness and the strife
this incident has left her elderly

“There has never been a comprehensive study of the Caribbean management consulting
industry from the standpoint of practitioners and procurers,’ explained Mark A. Turnquest,
the management/marketing consultant contracted to conduct the survey. “Gathering this
information will enable an assessment to be made of the competitiveness of the industry
and the development of strategies for growth. This will assist the CICMC (the Caribbean
Institute of Certified Management Consultants) in delivering on its mandate.”

The CICMC was formed in 2007 with the goal of supporting regional consultants and
enhancing their ability to serve clients according to global standards of excellence and ethics.

CICMC works in partnership with the Caribbean Export Development Agency, whose
focus is to increase the competitiveness of firms throughout CARIFORUM
member-states (Caricom and Dominican Republic), by developing trade, investment
and promotional elements.

Caribbean Export is encouraging the public to co-operate with Turnquest as he conducts
the survey. Turnquest has more than 20 years experience in sales and marketing and an
additional 10 years experience in the organizational training and development industry.
He is an author and is also president of Outreach Sales & Marketing Management Ltd,
Executive Director of The Small Business Resource Centre and an Associate Partner of CTS
Training & Consulting Institute.

More information may be obtained by contacting Mr. Mark A. Turnquest at:
Tel: 326-6748 or 427-3640 — Email: markaturnquest@gmail.com
markturnquest@consultant.com



BAHAMAS FINANCIAL CENTRE

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

TOTAL RENTABLE AREA! 2278 oP

SUBLEASE
OPPORTUNITY

PREMISES: Thad Floor
AVAILABILITY: June 30, S00" or sooner
TERA:

Threugh December 30, 2011.

For information, contact: Se a eS ee
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W. Larry Roberts
T: 242_374.0026
robe st2boahomayreally bs

Class A Building
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T; 242376,0028
dimartinborugh@bahamaseaity tos

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Full standby generater
Bahomeas Realty Limited

P.O). Box N-1132
Mossau, Bohomeas

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BAH ANAS REALTY ir
COMMEECEAL
in gprcceber orb

CBRE

CB APCHRAND ELLIS

COMPANY IN THE BUILDING TRADE

Seeks bright, energetic and confident individual for the position of

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

Sucomstul camdedate tor the Fimancial Comtrolier position must hawe at least fe years professional public accounting axperignce. Applicants

must hold a CPA, CA, 4004 of other peotisseonal designation recognized by the Baharnes Institute of Chartered 4ocountiantis.

The position of Financial Controller will be responsible for oversecing all aspects of the accounting and financial reporting functions of the
Company and will be expected ta implement and continually develop systems of indernel contro. The Financial Controller will also be expected
to prepare, analyze and present financial reports for senior management with an emphasis on bey success factors.

Essential attributes induce:
the ability io work indapandanth) amd under prassurea to meat aria deadlines

proficiency in a variety of so¢tware applications [Microsoft sutbel

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* Aacellent oral and writen Gammuricaian skills

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The Company offars a compasitivwe compensation and an atiractive banetits package, Assurance is given that avery applicant will be treated im
the sqrimest of confidence

Applicants should submit 4 cover later, ragume, and 6 copy of their professional canification by Friday, Apeil 3, 2008 tcc KPMG, Human
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mother in.

“We will be lucky if my moth-
er survives the archaeological
excavation into her records to
unearth evidence of ‘missing’
payments,” the e-mail contin-
ued. “At this rate, they will both
be gone before it is resolved.”

NIB’s director, Algernon
Cargill, said it took a common
sense approach to each case of
missing contributions. He said
an employer’s inability to pro-
duce records of contribution
payments is dealt with on a
case-by-case basis.

“We act responsibly,” he said.

Mr Cargill said contributions
that are unaccounted for could
greatly affect a pensioner’s enti-
tlement, so great effort was
being put into making sure pay-
ments have been secured for all
the years of employment.

He admonished this paper
that most stories, like that of
the elderly woman in the e-mail,
are often embellishments.

However, Tribune Business
received another e-mail with a
similar story regarding a house-
keeper whose employer recent-
ly tried to change her employ-
ment status from an employee
of her business to an employee
of her residence.

“T received a telephone call
from the Fox Hill NIB office
requesting a description of my
house and its location... I was
informed that an inspector will
be visiting my home to deter-
mine who is working in my
house,” the e-mail read.

“On reflection, the bedrock
principle in British law of a pre-
sumption of innocence has been
replaced with an assumption of
guilt warranting investigation
without probable cause.”

NIB under
renewed fire
on collections

Mr DAguilar contends that
NIB is simply taking the wrong
approach to its years-past-due
collection strategy. He said the
agency should consider figur-
ing out its records before it
approaches the public.

“Tt has been proven time and
time again in the 1980s and
1990s that National Insurance
was inefficient and inaccurate
in the posting of payments, and
now they are penalising honest,
hard working Bahamians who
have made their contributions
every month because of these
inefficiencies and inaccuracies,”
he said.

“Tt is totally unreasonable to
do what they have done to that
elderly lady, and you can tell
who are your honest customers
and who are not your honest
customers.”

Mr Cargill said NIB was in
the process of upgrading its
information technology systems
in order to issue monthly state-
ments in the future.

“These statements will enable
employers and self-employed
persons to know their contribu-
tion status without having to
visit an NIB local office, as is
currently the case. Further,
through the regular review of
NIB’s posting of their contribu-
tions, employers in particular
will be able to ensure that their
NIB accounts are correct, thus
enabling them to avoid interest
costs,” an NIB statement read.

He said the system for docu-
menting contributions paid in
the past was accurate enough,
and that past due payments
could be a case of missed post-
ings, a case of an error, or a case
of the person (employer) not
paying at all.

NOTICE

JBM Construction would like to inform the public
that excavation work would be commenced on
April 6th, 2009 from Navy Lion Rd (by the Hilton
Hotel) to the bridge by Mackey St. from the hours
of 6pm to 6am. This would take place for a period
of 70 days. Sorry for any inconvenience that may
occur during this construction.

NOTICE

RIME PORTFOLIO INC.
AN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANY

Notice is hereby given that the voluntary dissolution
of the above company commenced on the 27th day
of March, 2009 Articles of Dissolution have been
duly registered by the Registrar General’s office, P.O.
Box N532, 50 Shirley Street, Nassau Bahamas. The
Liquidator is A.J.K. Corporate Services (Bahamas)
Limited, whose adress is Suite 11, Bayparl Building,
18 Parliament Street, PO. Box AP59205/3352,

Nassau, The Bahamas.

NOTICE

All former patients of the late Dr. J. Wavell
Thompson are advised that files can be
collected from the office of

Dr. Gregory Carey

Family Medical Clinic

#22 Village Road Shopping Center
Telephone No. 394-3433

Fax. No. 394-1815

Office Hours:
Monday - Friday 9am - 6pm
Saturday 10am - 2pm
Identification required





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 5B



Tobacco tax hike puts damper JOB OPPORTUNITY
oar makers in Florida

On Cl

m By TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press Writer

MIAMI (AP) — Inside the
rolling room of El Credito Cig-
ar Company, the air is earthy
and fragrant, a mix of coffee
and nuts tinged with caramel
and leather.

Amid those sweet smells,
though, workers are worried
about a new federal tobacco tax
that threatens Florida’s $2 bil-
lion cigar industry. Starting
Wednesday, the tax will
increase from five cents to
about 40 cents on large cigars, a
little less on smaller stogies. Cig-
ar makers say the increase will
torch jobs and profits — what’s
left of them in the recession.

Like dozens of cigar compa-
nies dotting Miami’s Little
Havana neighborhood, El
Credito uses traditional rollers
— or, in Spanish, “torcedors”
— to hand make La Gloria
Cubana, the company’s most
famous and expensive cigar.
The workers sit at wooden
tables and fold tanned tobacco
leaves, cut them with a cres-
cent-shaped knife and then roll
the wads into fat Churchills,
Coronas and Torpedoes.

“Many of our rollers are wor-
ried,” said Hector Ventura,
operations manager for El
Credito. “They think that if we
have less sales, they will lose
their jobs. We know for sure
the tax increase will reduce our
sales. It’s not good for our busi-
ness, not good at all.”

The revenue from the new
tax will help pay for a health
insurance programme for low-
income children that President
Barack Obama signed into law
about two months ago. The
State Children’s Health Insur-
ance Program, or SCHIP, will
extend coverage to 11 million
kids.

Florida has long been the hub
of U.S. cigar making. In the
1890s, much of the nation’s cig-
ars were rolled in Tampa by
Cuban immigrants. In the 1960s,
another wave of Cubans with
cigar expertise opened up small-



Premium cigars are displayed at the El Credito Cigar Factory in the Little
Havana section of Miami. Beginning April 1, the tax on cigars will jump

from five cents to around 40 cents.

er shops in Miami after Fidel
Castro’s communist revolution.

Eric Newman, the co-owner
of the J.C. Newman Cigar com-
pany in Tampa, said these are
the toughest times in the com-
pany’s 114-year history.

“The last thing we needed
was the government to throw
this roadblock at us,” Newman
said. “This could push our
industry off a cliff.”

Newman said his company
will go from paying $1 million in
taxes a year to $4 million.

Cigarette smokers are angry
they will have to pay 62 cents
more per pack, but cigar mak-
ers and importers say their
industry will suffer dispropor-
tionally, especially in Florida
where 75 percent of the nation’s
cigar makers and importers are
located.

“This is part of the culture of
Miami and of Florida,” said
Enrique “Kiki” Berger, who co-
owns Cuban Crafters Cigars in
Miami. Berger’s father was a
cigar maker in Cuba until his
factory was seized by the Castro
regime. The family came to
Miami and rolled cigars out of
their garage until they could
open a factory.

Today, Cuban Crafters
employs 500 at a factory and a
tobacco farm in Esteli,
Nicaragua. Another 100 people

(AP Photo: J Pat Carter)

work in Miami at a warehouse
and small factory. The building
also serves as a tourist stop and
a place where guys smoke, play
dominoes and sip strong shots
of Cuban coffee.

Berger imports a chunk of his
cigars from Nicaragua. He said
he will pay hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars more on each
imported shipment — and that
cost will be passed along to
retailers and customers. The
price of a pack of 25 cigars —
$29.99 — will go up about $10
after the tax, he said. A single
large cigar will increase by
about 40 cents; Cuban Crafters
sells them from $1 to $15 each.

If the smokers puff fewer cig-
ars, Berger said he may shift
even more production to
Nicaragua to lower costs.

“What will the benefits be for
people that manufacture in the
U.S.? None,” said Berger.
“When they made this law, the
politicians forgot about the cig-
ar companies that employ peo-
ple in the United States.”

Jeff Borysiewicz, vice presi-
dent of the Cigar Rights of
America, said cigar makers
shouldn’t pick up the tab for
children’s health care.

“Kids aren’t addicted to
handmade cigars,” said
Borysiewicz, who is also the
president of Corona Cigar, an

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following

position:

COMPUTER MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT

Serves as the operation support of the local area network, along with stand-

alone computers.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

Baccalaureate Degree in computer science or computer information
systems is required.

MCSE certification is required.
Five years of experience performing all aspects of information systems

management.

Proficiency in Microsoft Windows 2003 Server including MS Exchange
2003 and Active Directory.
A Strong working knowledge of Microsoft XP and MS Office 2003/2007

is mandatory.

Basic understanding of a tape backup management system and Ghost
Imaging is required.

Nortel Meridian telephone background is a plus.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Must be able to administer, operate and maintain network infrastructure
inclusive of routers, switches, servers, printers, scanners, and computer

workstations.

Must be able to troubleshoot, diagnose and resolve hardware and
software problems.
Must have excellent customer service, time management and interpersonal

skills.

Must be dependable and extremely flexible.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for

employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available online at:

http://nassau.usembassy.gov/job_opportunities.html

Please e-mail applications to the Human Resources Office no later than April
8, 2009 to: Adamsrc@state.gov or Fernanderra@state.gov. Applications
will not be accepted at the Security Gate of the Embassy. Absolutely no
telephone calls will be accepted.






































Cacique International Ltd. with over 11 years of
outstanding service in destination management and
event planning is seeking to employ
a Human Resources Manager.

Requirements:
3-5 years experience in relevant position

Orlando, Fla.-based manufac-
turer and distributor. “We’re
an affordable hobby. We’re not
part of the problem with chil-
dren.”

Paul Hull, an American Can-
cer Society spokesman in Flori-
da, said tobacco takes such a
toll on health care, it’s only fair
that all companies contribute.

“For the most part, connois-
seurs of cigars tend to be in a
higher socio-economic class
anyway,” he said. “It’s hard to
imagine this will have an effect
on them.”

This may not be the last cigar
price hike. Legislatures in sev-
eral states, including New York,
Wisconsin and California, are
considering raising their state
tobacco tax to help in the wake
of declining revenue.

A Bachelor’s Degree in Human Resources will be a plus

Proficient in Microsoft Office and QuickBooks Enterprise
Solutions

Superb written and oral communication skills
Excellent presentation and training skills

Main Responsibilities:

Recruit and train employees

Prepare payroll and manage employee benefits and
compensation

Maintain employee records and personnel policies
Prepare company procedures and job descriptions
Organize motivational activities and events

Please submit your resume on or before April 17",
2009 to

Director of Human Resources

P.O. Box N-4941

Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: resumes@caciqueintl.com

MUST SELL

VACANT LAND
WINTON HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
Lot #4, Block 1

All the parcel of land containing 15,589 sq. ft. on the southern side
of Woodland Way, and about 350 feet east of Culberts Hill.

Zoning is for single-family residential homes, all the utility services
are available. The site is located 5 miles from downtown Nassau,
1 mile from shopping center and 1 mile from the nearest school.

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before April 10, 2009.

For further information, please contact us @ 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
NOTICE

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in
New Providence and the Family Islands including
Grand Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser’’)
now invites sealed bids, from persons to provide
transportation to and from schools in accordance with
the provision of the Education Act. Bid forms can be
collected from the Ministry of Education and the office
of Family Island Administrators between the hours of
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate
in a sealed envelope bearing no identity of the bidder
and endorsed with the subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at
the address below, on or before Tuesday, 31st March,
2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not be necessary
to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the
presence of those Bidders or their representatives who
choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, 2nd April,
2009 at the address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel: (242) 327-1530



PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



New buyers in Emerald Bay shake-up

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Contact 326-6121

Montrose Avenue

- TENT SALE

Saturday April 4, 2009
10:00am-6:30pm

LADIES
CASUAL
WEAR

BLOUSES $10
SKIRTS $25

JEANS $20
CAPRIS $15
SHORTS. $5

LADIES SUITS
& GIRLS DRESSES

507%0FF

LADIES HATS $60

CASH SALE ONLY

Telephone: 242-361-3620
Location: Soldier Road, West
2 doors from Southland Church of God



FROM page 1B

Seasons Emerald Bay fray,
although the players involved
remain unknown.

Sources said the renewed
buyer interest was likely to have
been stimulated through the
decision by Japanese insurer
Mitsui, whose London office
effectively owns the resort from
insuring the defaulted loan used
to finance its construction, to
slash its asking price.

Mitsui, which was previously
holding out for around $125-
$130 million, was said by some
sources to have reduced its pur-
chase price to around $55 mil-
lion, in a bid to stimulate buyer
interest at a time when credit
markets have dried up.

The entry price will be key
for any Emerald Bay buyer, giv-
en that a further investment of
at least $50 million is required
to upgrade the resort and com-
plete the original development

plan.

If the buyer can obtain the
right price, its chances of gen-
erating a return on its invest-
ment, even with tourism in a
funk and faced with the
Bahamian economy’s high
operating costs, will be much
enhanced.

Tribune Business previously
revealed that a consortium fea-
turing California-based real
estate/casino developer Barry
Silverton, and real estate
broking and investment banking
firm Cushman & Wakefield,
had been identified as the pre-
ferred buyer by the receivers.

However, that group appears
to have made little progress in
concluding the deal.

The $320 million Emerald
Bay resort has acted as Exu-
ma’s main economic engine,
attracting additional foreign
direct investment to the island.
It employs almost 500 staff, and

Grand Bahama firm sees

68% income growth

FROM page 1B

vices at the Freeport Container
Port and South Riding point,
saw its revenues increase by
$350,000 or 14 per cent com-
pared to 2007.

The Canadian company has a
50 per cent interest in Freep-
oint, and said the revenue
increase resulted from “higher
container ship volume and rate
increases”.

For the 2008 fourth quarter,
Freepoint saw its revenues
reach $815,000, some 37 per
cent higher than for the same
period in 2007.

For the 2008 full year, Freep-
oint saw its revenues rise from
$2.567 million in 2007 to $2.917
million. While it slid to a
$216,000 operating loss last
year, compared to one of
$18,000 the year before, Freep-
oint still generated net income
of $242,000.

That, though, was just 29.2
per cent of 2007’s $826,000 in
net income - a fall of more than
70 per cent. This came despite
Freepoint handling 95 per cent
of all ships using the Freeport

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

barra

Company Administrative Director

Experience:

|. Minimum five years multi-unit responsibility for daily restaurant
administrative and financial data auditing, computing and report-

Ing.

2. Mimmum five years expenence in daily, weekly and monthly
restaurant environment payable and receivable accounts entry and

auditing.

3. Total proficiency in the monthly, quarterly and annual compila-

tion of budgets, P&L

reports.

statements, balance sheets

and cash-flow

4. Exceptional knowledge of all Microsoft Office Systems, and the
ACCPAC Business Reporting System.

4, Exe

eptional direction, communication and organizational skills.

6. Tertiary level education in accounting or related field.

Salary based upon experience and productivity

Email resumes to the Managing director at

cvk(@sbarrobahamas.com

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEW ACCEPTED





Container Port.

Meanwhile, the financial
statements revealed that South
Riding Point was in talks with
the Government regarding non-
payment of “significant” taxes.

The financials said: “In 2008,
South Riding Point was con-
tacted by representatives of the
Bahamian government regard-
ing the non-payment of a local
revenue-based tax.

“South Riding Point is in the
process of evaluating this claim,
but currently believes that it is
exempt from the tax in ques-
tion.”

The tax at the centre of this
dispute was not revealed,
although there are a number of
possibilities, including business
licence fees.

The financials added: “A spe-
cific amount of tax has not yet
been assessed, and the company
has not booked a liability in its
consolidated balance sheet, as
the amount is neither estimable
nor, in the opinion of manage-
ment, probable at this time. If
South Riding Point is deemed
to owe the tax, the amount may
be significant.”

South Riding Point was also
said to be engaged in “arbitra-
tion proceedings” with a con-
tractor it had hired to perform
hurricane-related repairs to its
storage facilities.

“Both South Riding Point
and the contractor are seeking
damages against each other in
this matter for breach of con-
tract,” the financial statements
read. “The contractor has
claimed damages of approxi-
mately $2.7 million.

“South Riding Point has filed
a counter-claim, along with a
damage assessment, which well
exceeds the damages claimed
by the contractor. South Rid-
ing point continues to vigor-
ously defend its positions in this
arbitration, and incur significant
legal costs related to this mat-
ter.”

YOUR CONNECTION-ETO

features an 18-hole Greg Nor-
man Golf Course, two restau-
rants, three pools, spa, six meet-
ing rooms and 450-person
capacity ballroom.

Other investment projects
previously attracted to the
Emerald Bay vicinity include
the resort’s no-closed Pinnacle
Entertainment-managed $5 mil-
lion casino, and the $110 mil-
lion Grand Isle Villas develop-
ment.

A shopping complex has also
opened at Emerald Bay, the
anchor retailer being the Emer-
ald Isle supermarket. The com-
plex also includes businesses
such as Scotiabank and Mail
Boxes Etc.

David Johnson, deputy direc-
tor-general in the Ministry of
Tourism with responsibility for
planning, investment and busi-
ness development, warned in
2007 that the Four Seasons
needed to become a sustainable,
profitable resort, and the
Bahamas could not afford for
it to fail.

He said then that factors such
as building costs being about 40
per cent higher per square foot
than they are in Nassau, had
retarded Emerald Bay’s growth
and kept it from reaching the
development its owners had
previously predicted.

Mr Johnson said of Emerald
Bay: “The property was con-

ceived to be a mixed-use pro-
ject, with 185 keys under the
Four Seasons brand. The vast
majority of the property was to
be for mixed-use, condos and
hundreds of lots sold for signif-
icant family homes.

“After four years of opera-
tion, they have developed very
little of the sold inventory.
There’s been a lot of trading of
the land by the owners, but the
cost of building is prohibitive.

“The buildings costs, the
numbers suggest, are in excess
of 40 per cent higher per square
foot to build.”

Costs to construct such prop-
erties in Nassau were $500 per
square foot, while in Exuma the
price was $800 per square foot.

Mr Johnson also underlined
the impact the relatively high
building costs on Exuma, com-
pared to Nassau, were having
on Emerald Bay’s margins. He
pointed out that concrete there
cost $200 per yard, whereas in
Nassau it cost $125 per yard.

“The hotel, with a golf course
and spa, as a 185-room resort
of Four Seasons’ calibre, can
only be profitable if it has a
much larger customer base out-
side those rooms,” Mr Johnson
said. He added that the resort
needed to build out to 700-800
units to get close to profitabili-
ty, whereas it was currently clos-
er to 300-400 units.

J&J SEAFOOD Ltd.

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OPEN MONDAY - FRIDAY 8AM - 5PM
SATURDAY 8AM - 12NOON



THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTERUPTION OF WIRELESS
NETWORK AT ATLANTIS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Ltd. (BTC) would like to advise the general public

that due to the «

commissioning and acceptance

of the wireless network at Atlantis, there may be

an interruption in service from Tuesday March

3lst -

Friday April 3rd, 2009.

BIC apologizes for any inconvenience caused.

www.btcbahamas.com





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 7B



a ee
Leaders try not to upset market

An AP News Analysis



By TOM RAUM
Associated Press Writer

LONDON (AP) — Global
leaders are keeping a nervous
eye on world markets as they
try to fix their ailing economies.
From New York to Tokyo,
investors stand ready to instant-
ly grade the summit of the
world’s 20 biggest economic
powers.

As leaders gathered, the US
recession that triggered the
global crisis entered its 17th
month on Wednesday, making
it the longest downturn since
the decade-long Great Depres-
sion. It has now surpassed two
previous postwar US recessions
that each lasted 16 months, in
1973-75 and 1981-82.

After the Dow Jones indus-
trials’ worst first quarter in 70
years, Wall Street began the
second three months of the
year on Wednesday with a
small increase at midmorning.

Usually, leaders at interna-
tional forums care little about
what markets are doing and
markets pay little attention to
such forums. Their predictable
and vaguely written commu-
niques rarely move the num-
bers.

And after all, who can predict
market movements? Gauging
how markets might react can
be a futile exercise.

But in this case, plunging
stock markets around the world
are not only a symptom of the
larger problem, they are part
of the problem.

Trillions of dollars of wealth
have disappeared from pen-
sions, endowments, nest eggs
and home values. The market
slides have sapped consumer
confidence and spending in
developed countries and
slammed developing ones that
rely heavily on their exports.

In the United States, nearly
half of households own securi-
ties, either directly or indirect-
ly through 401(k) and other
retirement plans. That’s more
than ever before in a time of
severe economic downturn.
Stock ownership also is up m
other industrialized nations.

Summit partners don’t want
to unnecessarily spook the mar-
kets. And that injects an addi-
tional degree of caution into
their deliberations.

Failure to reach some accept-
able level of accord at Thurs-
day’s G-20 summit could “obvi-
ously have a very negative
effect on markets,” sowing
seeds of further protectionism
that in turn would “further
impact shares of major corpo-
rations,” said Joseph Lampel,
a professor at Cass Business
School at City University in
London. “A vicious circle could
accelerate.”

There’s no way to tell what
markets might view as accept-
able accomplishments. And
since much of the present glob-
al decline is caused by lack of
confidence, markets are looking
for signs of returning confi-
dence.

And this is one of the places
they’re looking.

British Prime Minister Gor-

don Brown and President
Barack Obama both sought to
show cautious confidence at
their joint news conference on
Wednesday.

Obama urged Americans,
and consumers across the globe,
to show confidence in the abil-
ity of the global economy to
recover. “Don’t short change
the future because of fear in
the present, that I think is the
most important message we can
send — not just in the United
States, but around the world,”
Obama said.

Said Brown: “It will get
worse if people do not act.”

But tensions simmered just
beneath the surface.

Hours before the leaders
were to sit down for dinner,
French President Nicolas
Sarkozy vowed to keep fight-
ing for stronger international
financial regulation, especially
of tax havens, saying in an inter-
view with Europe 1 radio that
he would not associate himself
with “false compromises.”

Few expect the gathering to
endorse either the bold stimulus
spending that the U.S. and
Britain have advocated nor the
tough new international finan-
cial regulation that France, Ger-
many and some other Euro-
pean countries want. Instead,
the gathering was expected to
endorse a mix of measured
steps, including increased coor-
dination in regulation, more
money for the International
Monetary Fund and a modest
amount of stimulus spending,
much of it already announced.

“My sense is that it will be a
credible and legitimate pack-
age of steps both on the restor-
ing-growth side and on the reg-
ulatory-reform side. And how
the market reacts to that
remains to be seen,” said Mike
Froman, a White House inter-
national economics adviser.

Markets hate uncertainty.

When Treasury Secretary

Timothy Geithner first outlined
the Obama administration’s
bank-rescue plan in early Feb-
ruary, the Dow Jones industri-
als plunged 300 points, mainly
over the plan’s lack of details.
When he later filled in the
blanks with a detailed plan, it
soared nearly 500 points.

And Geithner briefly unset-
tled currency markets a week
ago when he appeared willing
to entertain a Chinese proposal
that an international currency
replace the U.S. dollar as the
world’s main reserve currency
— a notion he quickly dis-
pelled.

Recent reports suggest the
world economy is weakening,
not strengthening.

“The world economy is in the
midst of its deepest and most
synchronized recession in our
lifetimes,” wrote Klaus
Schmidt-Hebbel, chief econo-
mist at the Organisation for
Economic Cooperation and
Development, in a report this
week predicting the world
economy would shrink this year
for the first time since World
War II, by 2.75 per cent. He
also wrote that trade would fur-
ther contract sharply.

Of course, if markets hate
uncertainty, there can also be
the certainty of low expecta-
tions.

What if the summit is viewed
as a flop?

“T think flop is pretty well
built into expectations,” said
David Wyss, chief economist of
Standard and Poor’s in New
York.

Nearly everybody involved
in the process expects more
international coordination and
regulation, “it’s just a matter of
how much,” Wyss said.

As to possible market reac-
tion, Wyss said that while the
G-20 summit “won’t accom-
plish much, it’s a good first step.
And it’s better than canceling
the meeting.”

JOB OPPORTUNITY

Cacique International Ltd. with over 11 years of outstanding
service in destination management and event planning is
seeking to employ a General Manager for their Cacique
Event Group & Catering Divisions.

General: Applicants should be highly efficient, have a strong
financial background, have the ability to multi-task on a daily
basis, have effective time management skills, be able to lead
and motivate a great team of dedicated employees and be

results-driven.

Requirements:

¢ 5 + years experience in a management position
¢ Aminimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management &

Finance
¢ Strong analytical skills
¢ Strong client relations skills

e Experience in inventory management
¢ Proficient in Microsoft Office and QuickBooks Enterprise

Solutions

e Excellent written and oral communication skills
¢ Experience in event planning and or the hospitality field a

plus

Please submit your resume on or before April 17, 2009 to

Director of Human Resources

P.O. Box N-4941
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: resumes@ caciqueintl.com



Escape this Anil to Grand Bahama!

Book your trip between Apil2-30, 2009 and ecenve

ae f Uf / Z

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Beach & Golf Resort



RBC
FINCO



PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

March 2009

Contact Numbers 393-2004

HOUSES

Parcel of Land Romer Street Fox Hill, N.P.
Single Family Residence

(3) Bedroom, (1) Bathroom

Property Size:4,961 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,014 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $115,000.00

From Fox Hill Road turn onto Romer Street (Church Of God
Prophecy and Fox Hill Community Centre junction) travel east
east on Romer Street to the third corner on the right travel south
to the fourth house on the left which is at a dead end. The subject
is a split level residence painted blue and trimmed white aith a
tiled entrance patio

Lot#3005, Sir Linden Pindling Estates, N.P
Single Family Residence

3 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,153 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $164,000.00

From Charles Saunders Highway enter Sir Lynden Pindling Estates
and travel south on Lady Marguerite Pindling Avenue to the second
street on the left(Lauren Street) travel east onLauren street to the
second corner on left (Pear Tree Avenue); Travel north on Pear
Tree Avenue to the subject, the fifteenth property on the left. The
subject is lime green trimmed white.

Lot# 3, Doris Johnson Estates
Single Family Residence
3Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,065 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,688 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $189,000.00

From Gladstone Road travel east along Rocky Pine Road for
approximately 1,444 feet and turn left on Dame Doris Drive then
another left and the subject property is the third from corner.

Lot situate approximately 70 ft westward of Florida Court
Single Family Residence

4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,750 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $227,000.00

Travel east on Balfour Avenue to the first right (Florida Court) from
Florida Court take the first right onto a 10ft wide road reservation
and the subject is the second house on the left white trimmed

grey.

Lot#4, Blk#11, Miller's Heights Subdivision
Single Family Residence w/ efficency apartment
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathroom

Apartment 1 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 7,500 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,390 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $174,000.00

From Carmichael Road travelling west turn left onto East Avenue
travel south on east Avenue to the first corner on the right travel
west thereon to the first corner on the left (Margaret Avenue)
continue on Margaret Avenue pass the first intersection and the
subject is the second property on the right. The subject is painted
white trimmed purple.

Lot#42, Foxdale Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,329 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,247 sq.ft
Appraised Value: 191,000.00

From Fox Hill Road and Bernard Road, travel west on Bernard
Road, take the first left Fox Drive then the third right Sparrow Lane
and the subject property is the last on the left.

Lot#3375/76 Sir Lynden Pindling Estates, N.P.

Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,500 sq.ft

Building Size:1,150 sq.tt

Appraised Value: $161,000.00

From East Street & Bamboo Boulevard (south beach Police
Station) travel east on Bamboo Boulevard to the round-about
continue traveling eastward on C.W.Saunders Highway take the
second right, Lady Marguerite Pindling Avenue, then take the first
Pe Pr Street and the subject property is the sixteenth lot on
the right.

Lot#23 Malcolm Road East
Single Family Residence

2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 860 sq.ft
Appraised value: $129,200.00

From East Street South - travel east along Malcolm Road and
turn right on Winder Terrace to the first road on the left continue
for about 200 ft and the subject property is on the left.

Lot#336, Golden Gates Estates#2
Single Family Residence

(3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,890 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $207,000.00

Travel west on Carmichael Road from Blue Hill Road turn onto
the third left Golden Sun Drive the corner after St.Gregory's
Anglican Church and before Carmichael Primary School travel
south on Sun Drive to the first, travel west pass the second corner
on the right and the subject fourth property on the right. The
subject is painted white trimmed white.

Lot 1 off Jean Street, R.E. Cooper Subdivision, N.P
Single Family Residence

5 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,161 sq.ft

Building size: 1,136 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $230,000.00

From Prince Charles Drive, turn into Jean Street travel north on
Jean Street to R.E. Cooper subdivision continue directly into r.E.
Cooper Subdivision and the subject is the ninth property on the

left. House is white trimmed green.

Lot#711 Golden Gates #2, Subdivision, N.P
Single Family Residence

4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,300 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $158,500.00

From Carmichael Road & Antigua Sireet (Golden Gates Assemblies
Church) travel south on Antigua Street and the subject property
is the sixth lot on the right past the first corner on the right.

Lot#2, Partition of Allotment No. 52 Cool Acres, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,867 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,716 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $229,000.00

Travel south on Fox Hill Road to Johnson Barber Shop, turn onto
the first right and travel east to the second comer on the left, travel
south to the T-Junction and the subject is straight ahead. The
house is painted olive trimmed white/beige.

Lot#26, Frelia Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,220 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $192,000.00

From Faith Avenue and Fire Trail east on Faith Avenue, follow the
curve around to the right (approximately 0.6 of a mile east of Faith
Avenue take the first left into Frelia Subdivision, then the first right
and the subject property is the last lots on the right.

Lot#124 Bel-Air Estates, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 969 sq.ft
Appraised Value: 153,000.00

From Carmichael Road and Faith Avenue travel east on Carmichael
Road take the first right lguana Way then the fourth right, Harbour
Close, and the subject property is the third on the left.

Lot situated northernside of Victoria St & Lancaster Rd, lvanhoe
Subdivision, N.P

4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms - Single Family Residence

Property Size: 12,600 sq.ft

Building Size: 3,104 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $439,000.00

From Mackey Sireet and Windsor Road (by Wendy's Resturant}
travel east on Windsor Road take the secod left to Victor Road,
then the first right which is Lancaster Road, the subject property
is the first on the left on the corner.

Lot#187, Twynam Heights Subdivision

Single Family Residence

5 Bedroom, 3 Bedroom

Property Size: 8,000 sq.ft

BuildingSize: 2,688 sq.tt

Appraised Value: $317,000.00

Travel East on Prince Charles drive to the corner east os Super

Value Winton turn right and the subject is the second house on
the left. The subject is painted lime green and trimmed white.

VACANT LAND

Lot#53, Lower Bogue Eleuthera
Vacant land

Property Size: 10,782 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $46,000.00

Travel westward on Skyline and Northward Bay Street the subject
pie te vacant land after Save More Drug Store on the right
and side.

Lot#9A, of 3 Parcels of Allotment 67, north of Carmichael Road
Vacant Land

Property Size: 9,945 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $85,000.00

From Carmichael Road -north along Faith Avenue for approximately
2,512 feet to a road reservation turn right and continue for
approximately 586 ft and turn right onto an 18ft road reservation.

Lot 500ft, West of Marigold Road & South of Hanna Road
Vacant Land

Property Size: 16,102 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 140,000.00

APARTMENTS/CONDOMINIUMS

Lot#70 Gamble Heights

Triplex Apartment

1-1 Bed, 1 Bath, /2 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathrooms

Property Size: 7,750 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,360 sq.ft

Appraised Value:$308,000.00

From Blue Hill Road & Faith United Way, travel east on Faith
United Way and the subject property is on the right hand side,
200 feet east of Faith United Church and opposite a heavy
equipment depot.

Unit#4, Hillcrest Tower Condominium, N.P.
Condominium

2 Bedroom, 2 Bathrooms

Unit Size: 1,110 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 200,000.00

Travel south on Collin Avenue to Third Terrace turn west on third
terrace and the subject is contained within the second building on
the right which is a condominium complex. The subject complex.
The subject complex is painted lime green and trimmed white.

Lot#5, Block#25 situate in Gleniston Gardens, N.P

Duplex Apartment

Each with 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 9,900 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,837 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 260,000.00

From Prince Charle Drive & Beatrice Avenue take the third right
Gleniston Park Avenue and the subject property is the fifth lot on
the left (presently the third building)

Lot#8 Hanover Court, N.P
Duplex Apartment

2 - 2 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Bathrooms
Property size: 5,670 sq.ft
Building Size: 2,107 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $283,000.00

From Fox Hill road turn onto Sea Breeze lane travel west on Sea
Breeze Lane and turn on th e first corner after the Christian Life
Centre continue north and the subject is the fourth property on
the right. White trimmed with an unpainted wall which is to be
sprayed with the marble creek spray on exterior.

Lot Rocky pine Road

Duplex Apartment

Each Unit 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
Property Size: 4,875 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,716 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $218,000.00

From Carmichael Road -travel north along Gladstone Road to
Rocky Pine Road turn right and continue to the third corner , turn
right and continue for about 1,438 feet and the subject property
is on the right.(enclosed with a chain link fence).

Lot East Windsor Place Soldier Road
Duplex Apartment

2- (2) Bathrooms, (1) Bathroom
Property Size: 6,000sq.ft

Building Size: 1,580 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $172,000.00

Travel East on Soldier Road to the intersection near Sugar Kid
Bowe Food Store turn right and travel to the end of this street,
across the intersection at the curve tum east and the subject is
the first property on the left, which is a duplex. The duplex is
recat painted blue and trimmed white with enclosed

lencing.

Property situated 350 feet south Adelaide & Coral Harbour
Duplex Apartment

1-3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathroom, 1-1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Property Size: 5,691 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,000 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $285,000.00

Travel along Carmichael Road to the roundabout continue west
onto Adelaide Road turn left at the fourth corner which is an
unpaved entrance road continue south on this road and the subject
is the fourth house on the left split level green trimmed white.

Lot#10, BIk#11, Millers Heights Subdivision, N.P
Duplex Apartment

1-2 Bedrooms., 1 Bathroom

1-2 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 7,500 sq.ft

Building Size:1,444 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 194,000.00

From Carmichael Road travelling west, turn left onto East Avenue,
travel south on East Avenue to the first corner on the right travel
north thereon to the first corner on the left (Margaret Avenue)

continue on Marafret Ave pass the first intersection and the subject
is the fifth property on the right painted mustard trimmed peach.

Lot#17, Blk#27 Shirley Heights
Two Storey Multi-Family Dwelling
2-2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
1-3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Appraised value: $252,000.00

From Wulff Road & Mt. Royal Avenue travel north on Mt. Royal
take the fifth right, Ludlow Street and the subject property is the
fourth on the left.

We providing financing to qualified buyers

CONTACT INFORMATION
RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre

®Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada



â„¢The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada



PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Three-year target for $1bn
alance of payments gain


























PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, RACAL MARVINE REGISTRE
of Fawkes Court, Oaksfield, New Providence, Bahamas intends
to change my name to RACQUEL MILLER-REGISTRE. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-
742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date

of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that |, PATROVE PATRITROUVERE

PHER NT, Freeport, Bahamas intends to change my name
to KRISTINA BRIGITTA UTBULT. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

EVERY Bahamian has an
obligation to assist the govern-
ment in effecting transforma-
tion in the economy in order to
improve this country’s balance
of payments by $1 billion with-
in three years, according to the
findings of the recent National
Economic Summit (NES).

The section of the NES
report etitled “Individual
Responsibility” outlines what
citizens can do during this eco-
nomic downturn to produce
changes in the national balance
sheet.

“During these challenging
economic times, the role that

NES, Bahamians must begin to
save, lower debt, budget, invest
and restructure loans.

“The recently enacted
amendment to the Stamp Tax
Act allows mortgagors to con-
solidate loans and transfer
mortgages of up to $500,000
without incurring stamp tax.
Mortgagors are urged to con-
sider one-time debt consolida-
tions and negotiate interest rate
reductions, which would reflect
their new empowered position,”
said the report.

It also recommended that
Bahamians spend more on local
goods and services, including
buying Bahamian grown and
manufactured items and con-
sidering domestic vacations to
the Family Islands.

On the business side, the

employed in a sustainable
career.

“Perhaps the most consistent
message that came out of the
NES was the failing of our edu-
cational system,” it read.

“Bahamians are encouraged
to pursue ongoing training, and
training in new areas should be
considered, if necessary.”

The report added that the
level of productivity in the
Bahamas should be improved,
especially during this economic
crisis, which has caused busi-
nesses to slash staff levels and
put hundreds of job in jeopardy.

Energy conservation was cit-
ed as paramount to reducing
the Bahamas’ current account
deficit by reducing this coun-
try’s oil imports and increasing
the search for alternative

be pursued,” the NES report
said.

“We went into the NES seek-
ing to achieve one primary
objective: To identify ways to
positively impact The Bahamas’
current account balance in the
immediate to medium term.
Such opportunities when
exploited will positively impact
entrepreneurial and job
prospects, and lead to an
improvement in external
reserves,” said NES developer
Lynden Nairn.

For the stories
behind the news,

individuals might play to ensure
our country’s economic
strengthening cannot be under-

NES report emphasises increas-
es in educational advancement

sources of energy.





to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ORNELLA INVESTMENTS LTD. is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on March 31, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burrows of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the May 11, 2009 to send their names and ad-
dresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

April 2, 2009
SHAKIRA BURROWS
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

ALBRECHT LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act (No.
45 of 2000). ALBRECHT LIMITED is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 19th
day of February, 2009.

Peter Saxby, 18 Quai, Jean-Charles Rey,
Fortvielle, MC 98000, Monaco
Liquidator

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Mommy at Work

stated,” the report read.

According to framers of the

NOTICE

The owner of Laing’s Towing Services requests
that Mr. Norman Smith, owner of a 2005 Ford
F150, license plate #123783, remove the
forementioned vehicle from its storage facilities
in Kennedy Subdivision within thiry (30) days.
Please note that failure to do so will result in
the said vehicle being sold to cover the cost of
storage fees.

NOTICE is hereby given that MORRIS CHARLES of 128B
REDWOOD LANE, P.O. Box F-42533, Freeport, Grand
Bahama is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of April, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

VACANCY NOTICE

Associate Attorney Required

For growing Law Practice
Qualifications:

‘Called to the Bahamas Bar for a minimum of
three years

‘Successful candidate must have knowledge and
experience and intrest in Litigation, Conveyances
and Mortgages, Family Law, and Corporate
matters

Please e-mail resume to

positionforattorney@gmail.com
on or before April 17, 2009.

EG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE i ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 31 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,638.80 | CHG -2.25 | %CHG -0.14 | YTD -73.56 | YTD % -4.30
FINDEX: CLOSE 806.63 | YTD -3.38% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.42
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00
6.95 Bank of Bahamas 6.95
0.63 Benchmark 0.63
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37
12.55 Cable Bahamas 12.56
2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83
6.46 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.48
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs 217
2.09 Doctor's Hospital 216
6.02 Famguard 7.76
11.00 Finco 11.00
10.45 ~~ FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45
5.00 Focol (S) 5.07
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.59

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 : - 0.127
11.00 0.992
6.95 a 0.244
0.63. e -0.877
3.15 . 0.105
2.37 ‘ 0.055
12.55 z 1.309
2.83 f 0.118
6.46 ‘i 0.438
2.17 : 0.099
2.09 ‘ 0.240
7.76 a 0.598
11.00 0.322
10.45 0.794
5.07 . 0.337
1.00 fe 0.000
0.30 sl 0.035
5.59 0.00 0.407

as well as ongoing training for
those who may already be

at place of employment, home
and even while driving should

read Insight
on Mondays

“Efforts to conserve energy



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that AIDAN_ LOGAN
FERGUSON of Carmichael Constituency, of the Island of
New Providence intend to change my name to AIDANLOGAN
MACKEY. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Deputy
Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

NOTICE
CIT CLUB HOUSE LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Pursuant to Section 137 (8) of the International
Business Companies Act, Notice is hereby given
that, with effect from the 19 day of March, 2009 the
above-named Company has been dissolved and has
been struck off the Register.

Dated this 31 day of March, 2009

Kyrene Kelty
Liquidator



NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID
SHIRLEY STREET WATER MAINS UPGRADE

The Water dnd Sewerage Corporation iivites bids rom seitably qualified contractors far the
uparade of the water distribution system aad sewernge system on Shirley Street. The Scape of

Works inclade the provision of all faboae, equipment and alber decestary servings required fit
the:

Ah. WATER STSTEM
The upgrade af 2] punetions, 1 water conmections and fire bvidrants

B. SEWERAGE SYSTEM
The uparade al 30 server laterals and Minar repairs 16 meinboks and sewer erayiry mains.

L Pids from potential contractors must be accompanied by comprehenstre details from the
Qualification Qaestionnaire ul-linne:

a] Experience an sinailar prrajects
bh) Personnel to be assigned (including their experience on similar projects)

¢) Finanetal capacity to eoecete Oe warks

The Contractor's qualifications and bid price will be evahiated [or award of Coanraet

8.60 J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00 0.952
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

FBB17 0.00 7%

FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%

FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $ Ask $ Last Price

Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60 z +
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00 : &
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35

ee

Hidding docements and drawiags will be avallable on request bepianle Tucstay, March 31,
TW fram the Engineering and Planniag Department of the Water and Sewerage Corporation
for a acoriireal fee at S00 per set, Tike Pre-Bd Micetiong bs seloedubed for April th, 2M at 11:
am. 87 Thampeen Hl,

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Securi Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
S2wk-Low EPS $ Div $ P/E

Symbol Weekly Vol.

Completed decunients must be returded (0 the address belive, ao later thin 6) pon. on
7 ae 4
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities Manadaly April bly eli,
ABDAB 31.72 33.26 29.00
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED) 0.00 0.00 0.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA _ Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664
2.8988 -1.40
1.4489 1.06
3.3201 -1.94
12.7397 0.96
100.5606 0.56
96.4070 -3.59

General Manager

Water. & Sewerage Corporation
#7 Thompson [vd

FG, Baa TS,
Nass, [ba ber mans

Fund Name Div $

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3847 Colina Money Market Fund
3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund

96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Fidelity International Investment Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3041
2.9230

28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-0O7
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09



1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

1.0000 0.00
9.1005 0.06
1.0440 0.80
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Telephone (242) 02.5512
Feocshemaiigs (T47) 02-5554

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

For all enquires Pegareineg Ihe leneers and pire-hikd meeting enacael -
Nis. Deidre Taylors Engineering & Planning Department

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(SS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S14) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FQ CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





THE TRIBUNE



Taxpayers bear the
brunt in California

@ By JUDY LIN
Associated Press Writer

SACRAMENTO, Calif.
(AP) — When they plugged
California’s $42 billion budget
hole in February, Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger and legislative
leaders said everyone had to
give up something to repair the
state’s finances.

But California businesses and
corporations with significant
operations in the state were
largely spared.

Now, that decision is feeding
opposition to five budget-relat-
ed measures voters are being
asked to approve during a spe-
cial election May 19. Opponents
say the budget package places
too much of a burden on tax-
payers in a state that already
has a reputation for high taxes.

A recent poll shows the
propositions in trouble, includ-
ing the one Schwarzenegger
wants most: a measure that
would implement a state spend-
ing cap in exchange for extend-
ing the taxes an additional one
to two years.

Just 39 per cent of likely vot-
ers support that measure and
46 per cent oppose it, accord-
ing to the Public Policy Insti-
tute of California survey.

If voters reject all of the mea-
sures, the state will face an addi-
tional $6 billion budget short-
fall.

For months, lawmakers could
not agree on how to close the
$42 billion budget deficit. But
they settled their differences
Feb. 20 with an agreement that
cuts $15 billion in programmes
and borrows about $6 billion.
Reaching agreement was par-
ticularly difficult because Cali-
fornia requires a two-thirds
majority vote to pass budgets
and tax increases.

The budget package, which
comes amid tumbling home
prices and an unemployment
rate in the double digits,
includes a boost in the sales tax
that took effect Wednesday and
increases in the personal income
tax and vehicle license fee.

For businesses, though, there
was a long list of corporate tax
breaks and credits, including
ones for the film industry and a
change in the tax formula that
will save businesses hundreds
of millions of dollars.

Taxpayer groups say the tax-
es are too harmful in a reces-
sion. The Howard Jarvis Tax-
payers Association estimates
the budget package will cost a

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

family of four an additional
$1,100 a year, largely canceling
any benefit Californians will
receive from federal tax cuts.

“As services are cut and
every ordinary taxpayer will
have to pay more, it is appalling
that major multinational cor-
porations get new tax breaks,”
said Lenny Goldberg, executive
director of the labour-backed
non-profit California Tax
Reform Association.

The California Budget Pro-
ject, a Sacramento-based
research group that advocates
for working families, estimates
that a couple with $40,000 in
taxable income will see a 12.9
percent increase in taxes, while
a couple making $750,000
would get a 2.9 percent increase.

The only tax break given to
average Californians is a

$10,000 credit for those who buy
anew house over the next year,
a provision sought by home
builders.

The Budget Project estimates
the tax breaks will cost the state
treasury at least $2.5 billion over
five years, potentially putting
further pressure on future bud-
gets.

The Schwarzenegger admin-
istration said it would not have
agreed to the budget deal with-
out measures it said were need-
ed to stimulate California’s
economy, which included the
corporate tax breaks and credit
for buyers of new homes.

The governor said it would
have been irresponsible to raise
taxes without also cutting
spending and taking steps to
boost the economy and create
jobs.

Christopher Thornberg, an
economist at San Rafael-based
Beacon Economics, said striking
business-friendly compromises
was the only way to get enough
votes from Republicans, the
minority party in the legislature,
to reach the needed two-thirds
approval, he said.

“Some of this is just gross
payout,” Thornberg said.

Other states are also facing
tough financial decisions. At
least a half dozen are looking
to sin taxes — including levies
on cigarettes and alcohol — to
help fill budget holes.

Lawmakers in Oregon and
Wisconsin are targeting high-
income earners. In Louisiana,
lawmakers are pushing for,
among other things, tax breaks
for seniors and cutting property
taxes.

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 9B

TICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NEVILLE BOWE, late
of Sir Lynden Pindling Estates, New Providence,
The Bahamas, DECEASED.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims
against the above-named Estate are required, on or before
the 24th April, A.D. 2009 to send their names and addresses
along with proof of their debts or claims, to the undersigned,
and if so required by notice in writing from the undersigned,
to come in and prove such debts or claims, or in default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution AND all persons indebted to the said Estate are
asked to pay their respective debts to the undersigned
immediately.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that at the expiration of the
date mentioned above, the assets of the late NEVILLE
BOWE will be distributed among persons entitled thereto
having regard only to the claims of which the Personal
Representatives shall have had notice.

Dated this 2nd day of April, A.D., 2009

C/O Turnquest & Co.
Attorneys for the Administrators
94 Nassau Street
P. O. Box N-9311
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

















































Pharmacy Technician
Course

Certification Approved
Limited Space for
April Session
Our Business, Your Success

Register Today, Office Hours
7am - 7pm
Just call Hepson.

3356-4860

Re:Parenting Training Seminar
7th April, 2009 - 2nd June, 2009

The Department of Rehabilitative/Welfare
Services will commence its second
Training Seminar for the year 2009 on 7th
April, 2009. The sessions will be held at
5:00p.m. in the Conference Room, Abaco
Markets Building, Thompson Boulevard
Interested parents are invited to attend.

A leading jewellery retailer 1s seeking a person for this senior position.

STORE MANAGER

The successful candidates wil be responsible for ensunng sales and profits are optimized

through excellent customer service and proper mantenance of inventory controls according
to established company procedures.

The sdeal candidate should possess:
lntegnty, Energetic motrvational slalls and Assertrveness
A minimum of 5 years management experience im the jewellery, watch and luxury

poods sectors,

Strong knowledge of luxucy watches, buymg, mecchanciang, selling and repaucs,
Ability to manage, teaun and motivate staff,

An eye for deta.

Good educanonal backpround. Professional qualificaton (GIA or equivalent) or
suitable work experience would be an asset.

Interested person should submut your resume with salary expectations to:



E-Mail — hiri/lusuryret

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax (242) 328-4211
urvretaillimited.c



]

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY CORPORATE OFFICE
ADVERTISEMENT
VACANCY NOTICE
Deputy Director of Finance

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of
Deputy Director of Finance, Public Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:

Educated to degree level or equivalent: a professionally qualified
accountant and member of a recognized accounting body, (American
Institute of Certified Public Accountants, or Association of Chartered
Certified Accountants or Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants or
Certified General Accountant); able to demonstrate five (5) to ten (10)
years relevant senior management experience within a large complex
organization; have the ability to demonstrate integrity and effective
leadership and management skills together with proven track record
of contributing achievements of strategy and policy development and
implementation

The successful candidate must possess excellent communication skills
and be able to adapt communication style to suit each activity/staff
group; possess strong interpersonal skills and be able to express a view
convincingly coherently, verbally and in writing.

The Deputy Director of Finance will report to the Director of Finance,
Corporate Office.

Job Summary: The holder of the post will be required to communicate
regularly with a wide range of senior staff both clinical and non-clinical
and staff at all levels within the Authority. He/she must also build and
manage highly effective relationships with local authority partners, the
public, the Public Treasury and the Ministry of Finance.

Duties not limited to the following:

1. Provides high level expertise in the areas of financial management
and corporate governance to the Board that ensures financial strategies
are effectively integrated and aligned within the corporate management
process.

2. Plans, controls and monitors the flow of the Authority’s funds
to ensure expenditure is contained within budget; produces financial
reports as required by the Board, Managing Director and all its levels of
management.

3. Leads in the implementation of the Board's financial strategy and
plans; ensures that appropriate levels of expertise are in place for
effective delivery of financial and management accounting services and
that all statutory and regulatory requirements are met relating to the
Authority’s accounts, including the submission of audited accounts in
order to meet deadlines.

4. Reviews and supervises the implementation of financial policies and
supervises approved systems of financial control to ensure the effective
use of resources and compliance with accounting standards; liaises
with audit, both internal and external to ensure systems of control are
adequate and secure; promotes optimum standards of professionalism
within the finance functions to ensure compliance with external
standards and best practices.

5. Coordinates integrated activities across the Authority and its
institutions ensuring the Board, Managing Director and all its levels of
management has the appropriate skills and tools to maximize scarce
resources so as to deliver sustainable improvements to patient care.

6. Ensures that there is effective coordination across all elements
of the finance functions of the Authority; contributes fully to the
business planning cycle of the Authority; liaises with the relevant key
managers and clinicians to encourage their participation in the process.

7. Leads, motivates, develops and trains staff within the department
to ensure that they have the necessary skills to achieve required
objectives and to encourage the development of innovative, creative
thinking and team work across the departments.

The post of Deputy Director of Finance is in Salary Scale HATM7 (B)
($48,650 x 800-$56,650).

Letters of application and curricula vitae should be submitted to the
Director of Human Resources, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals
Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville; or P. O. Box N-8200, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than 16 April,2009.





THE TRIBUNE

Bm By CALVIN WOODWARD
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
One of President Barack Oba-
ma’s campaign pledges on taxes
went up in puffs of smoke
Wednesday.

The largest increase in tobac-
co taxes took effect despite
Obama’s promise not to raise
taxes of any kind on families
earning under $250,000 or indi-
viduals under $200,000.

This is one tax that dispro-
portionately affects the poor,
who are more likely to smoke
than the rich.

To be sure, Obama’s tax
promises in last year’s campaign
were most often made in the
context of income taxes. Not
always.

“IT can make a firm pledge,”
he said in Dover, N.H., on Sept.
12. “Under my plan, no family
making less than $250,000 a
year will see any form of tax
increase. Not your income tax,
not your payroll tax, not your
capital gains taxes, not any of
your taxes.”

He repeatedly vowed “you
will not see any of your taxes
increase one single dime.”

Now in office, Obama, who
stopped smoking but has admit-
ted he slips now and then,
signed a law raising the tobacco
tax nearly 62 cents on a pack of
cigarettes, to $1.01. Other
tobacco products saw similarly
steep increases.

The extra money will be used
to finance a major expansion of
health insurance for children.
That represents a step toward
achieving another promise, to
make sure all kids are covered.

Obama said in the campaign
that Americans could have both
— a broad boost in affordable
health insurance for the nation
without raising taxes on anyone
but the rich.

His detailed campaign plan
stated that his proposed
improvement in health insur-

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 11B

Obama tax pledge
goes up in smoke

ance and health technology “is
more than covered” by raising
taxes on the wealthy alone. It
was not based on raising the
tobacco tax.

The White House contends
Obama’s campaign pledge left
room for measures such as the
one financing children’s health
insurance.

“The president’s position
throughout the campaign was
that he would not raise income
or payroll taxes on families
making less than $250,000, and
that’s a promise he has kept,”
said White House spokesman
Reid H. Cherlin. “In this case,
he supported a public health
measure that will extend health
coverage to four million chil-
dren who are currently unin-
sured.”

In some instances during the
campaign, Obama was plainly
talking about income, payroll
and investment taxes, even if
he did not say so.

Other times, his point
appeared to be that heavier tax-
ation of any sort on average
Americans is the wrong pre-
scription in tough times.

“Listen now,” he said in his
widely watched nomination
acceptance speech, “I will cut
taxes — cut taxes — for 95 per
cent of all working families,
because, in an economy like
this, the last thing we should do
is raise taxes on the middle
class.”

An unequivocal “any tax”
pledge also was heard in the
vice presidential debate, anoth-
er prominent forum.

“No one making less than
$250,000 under Barack Oba-
ma’s plan will see one single
penny of their tax raised,” Joe
Biden said, “whether it’s their
capital gains tax, their income
tax, investment tax, any tax.”

The Democratic campaign
used such statements to counter
Republican assertions that Oba-
ma would raise taxes in a mul-
titude of direct and indirect

ways, recalled Kathleen Hall
Jamieson, director of the
Annenberg Public Policy Cen-
ter at the University of Penn-
sylvania.

“JT think a reasonable person
would have concluded that Sen-
ator Obama had made a ’no
new taxes’ pledge to every cou-
ple or family making less than
$250,000,” she said.

Jamieson noted GOP ads that
claimed Obama would raise tax-
es on electricity and home heat-
ing oil. “They rebutted both
with the $250,000 claim,” she
said of the Obama campaign,
“so they did extend the rebuttal
beyond income and payroll.”

Government and private
research has found that smok-
ing rates are higher among peo-
ple of low income.

A Gallup survey of 75,000
people last year fleshed out that
conclusion. It found that 34 per
cent of respondents earning
$6,000 to $12,000 were smok-
ers, and the smoking rate con-
sistently declined among peo-
ple of higher income. Only 13
per cent of people earning
$90,000 or more were smokers.

Federal or state governments
often turn for extra tax dollars
to the one in five Americans
who smoke, and many states
already hit tobacco users this
year. So did the tobacco com-
panies, which raised the price
on many brands by more than
70 cents a pack.

The latest increase in the fed-
eral tax is by far the largest since
its introduction in 1951, when
it was eight cents a pack. It’s
gone up six times since, each
time by no more than a dime,
until now.

Apart from the tax haul, pub-
lic health advocates argue that
squeezing smokers will help
some to quit and persuade
young people not to start.

But it was a debate the coun-
try didn’t have in a presidential
campaign that swore off higher
taxation.

CHANDLER GILBERT

INSURANCE ASSOCIATES LIMITED

CONSULTANTS

BROKERS

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knowledge and experience of

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At Chandler Gilbert

We have the expertise to handle

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wide range of clients

We have relationships with
domestic and international insurers

and brokers that enable us to

solutions

P.O. Box N-7753

Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: (242) 676-2306/7

Fax: (242) 323-5788

VICTOR CHANDLER
victor@cgiacaribbean.com

GUILDEN GILBERT
guilden@cgiacaribbean.com

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PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





US construction spend
fall less than anticipated

By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Construction spending fell for
a fifth straight month in Febru-
ary, but the results were better
than expected and along with
other economic reports, sug-
gested contraction may be near-
ing an end.

The Commerce Department
said Wednesday that February

construction activity dropped
0.9 per cent, less than the 1.5
per cent decline economists had
forecast. Total construction has
been falling since October. The
level of activity is at the slowest
pace in nearly five years.
Meanwhile a trade group’s
measure of the health of the
manufacturing sector contract-
ed for the 14th straight month in
March, but at a slower pace
than expected. The Institute for
Supply Management said its

manufacturing index rose to
36.3 last month from 35.8 in
February. Economists expect-
ed the index to rise to 36.

A reading below 50 signals
contraction and the index hit a
28-year low of 32.9 in Decem-
ber.

A 4.3 per cent drop in hous-
ing construction, pushing it to
the lowest level in 11 years,
dragged down the overall con-
struction data in February.

Home builders have cut back

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE

CORRIDOR 5
JOHN F. KENNEDY DRIVE TO WEST BAY STREET
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems
JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A. has been
contracted for completion of the New Providence Road Improvement
Project - International Package. Road construction will be commencing on
Corridor 5, which may require road closures, and diversions of the following:

¢ John F. Kennedy Drive and Thompson Blvd Junction

¢ Dolphin Drive

¢ Sanford Drive and Vista Marina

Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further information will be

provided in local media.

Tel: 242-322-8341/242-322-2610

Email: jeccbahamas @cartellone.com.ar



sharply, but face a rising glut of
unsold homes as record mort-
gage foreclosures dump more
properties on the market.
Lennar Corp. said Monday that
its fiscal first-quarter losses
surged 77 per cent due to
charges to adjust land and
inventory values, and plunging
home deliveries and new orders.

On Wall Street, stocks moved
slightly higher after the con-
struction and manufacturing
reports were better than expect-
ed, and the National Associa-
tion of Realtors said pending
home sales rebounded in Feb-
ruary from a record low. The
Dow Jones industrial average
added about 80 points in mid-
day trading after dropping more
than 100 points earlier in the
day.

The manufacturing report,
based on a poll of the Tempe,
Ariz.-based trade group of pur-
chasing executives, covers indi-
cators including new orders,
production, employment, inven-
tories, prices, and export and
import orders.

None of the 18 manufacturing
industries grew in March, but
the report did say that five of
the industries surveyed —
including electrical equipment,
primary metals and machinery
— expect to gain from the gov-
ernment’s economic stimulus
measures.

“The rapid decline in manu-
facturing appears to have mod-
erated somewhat,” said Norbert
Ore, chair of the ISM manufac-
turing survey committee.

The Commerce Department
report showed nonresidential
construction rose 0.3 per cent
in February, a slight rebound
following a 4.3 per cent drop in
January that had been the
biggest decline in 15 years.

With the financial sector fac-
ing its worst crisis in seven
decades, banks have tightened
their loan standards, making it
harder to get financing for shop-
ping centers and other com-



A construction worker uses a rope while hoisting building materials at the
One Marina Park Drive office building construction site, in the South

Boston neighbourhood of Boston...

mercial projects.

More bad news on the hous-
ing front came Tuesday when
the Standard & Poor’s/Case-
Shiller index of home prices in
20 major cities showed a record
decline of 19 per cent for the
three months ending in Janu-
ary compared to the same peri-
od a year ago. The biggest
declines were in cities already
hardest hit by the housing bust
including Phoenix and San
Francisco.

Still, the Realtors last week
said sales of previously occu-
pied homes unexpectedly
jumped in February by the
largest amount in nearly six
years as first-time buyers took
advantage of deep discounts on
foreclosures and other dis-
tressed properties. Some econ-
omists say that could help mod-
erate declines.

Analysts are forecasting that
the commercial real estate

(AP Photo: Steven Senne)

industry is poised to fall into
the worst crisis since the last
great property bust of the early
1990s.

Delinquency rates on loans
for hotels, offices, retail and
industrial buildings have risen
sharply in recent months and
are likely to soar through the
end of 2010 as companies lay
off workers, downsize or shut
their doors.

Construction spending by the
government showed a 0.8 per
cent increase in February fol-
lowing two months of declines.
The strength came in a 0.8 per
cent increase in spending on
federal building projects, and
the same rise in spending on
state and local government pro-
jects.

All the changes left total con-
struction spending at a season-
ally adjusted annual rate of
$967.5 billion in February, the
slowest pace since March 2004.

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

Investment Opportunity Must Sell Lot No. 217
Pinewood Gardens Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft, being Lot
No. 217 of the Subdivision known as Pinewood Gardens, the
said subdivision situated in the Southern District of New
Providence Bahamas. Located on this property is a structure
comprising of an approximately 20 yr old single family residence
consisting of 992 sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-
bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, kitchen, drive
way and walk way. The land is on a grade and level and
appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility
of flooding. The grounds are fairly kept and yard is open.

Appraisal: $127,988.00

i eat 10)
April 2, 2009

WINTON MEADOWS (Lot No. 382)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having
an area of 8,300 sq. ft. being lot No. 382
situated in the subdivision known as Winton
Meadows, the said subdivision situated in
the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, Bahamas. This property is
comprised of a 24 year old single family
residence with an attached efficiency
(formerly the carport) consisting of
approximately 2,675 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area, front porch-198 sq. ft., back patio-380.
The building is a two storey house. Besides

Traveling south on East Street to the junction of Soldier Road, make a left at the light then turn right into Kennedy
Subdivision, go all the way to T-junction, turn right then first left then right again toward Mount Tabor Church building,
after passing Mount Tabor take first left (sapodilla blvd), the subject house is about 400 yards on the right painted yellow
trimmed green, with green and white door.

LOT NO. #7, BOILING HOLE SUBDIVISION

All that piece parcel or lot of land and inprovements situated
on the Island of Eleuthera, North of Governor’s Harbour,
comprising of Lot No. 7 in the Boiling Hole Subdivision and
comprising of approximately 10,000 sq. ft., this site
encompasses a 17 years old duplex with each unit consisting
of 2-bedrooms; 1 bathroom, frontroom, diningroom and kitchen
with a gross floor area of approximately 1,474.20 sq. ft. and
covered porch area of approximately 164.70 sq. ft. this duplex
was built in accordance with the plan and specification as
approved, and at a standard that was acceptable to the Ministry Of Public Works. This structure is in good condition.
Each apartment could be rented at $800.00 per month. The land is landscaped and planted with ficus trees, but

needs some manicuring.
APPRAISAL: $138,989.00

Exuma Lot No. 7720A, Bahama Sound # 11

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of
approximately 10,000 sq ft, being lot 7720a, situated in a

) registered subdivision known as Bahama Sound of Exuma
Section 11. Situated on this property is a 9 yrs old single
storey residence consisting of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms,

| livingroom, diningroom & kitchen, with approximately 1,563
sq. ft. of enclosed living space. The building is structurally
sound & is generally in good condition. The lot is rectangular

in shape. No adverse site conditions were noted

Appraisal: $185,636.50
Property located about 2 3/4 miles southeastwardly of the settlement of George Town. Painted pink trimmed white.

Lot No. 235 Twynam Heights Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 8,534 sq ft, being Lot
# 235, of the subdivision known as Twynam Heights. The
said subdivision situated in the eastern district of New
Providence. Located on this property is an approximately
6yr old single family residence consisting of approximately
1,826 sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-bedrooms, 3
-baths, living, dining, kitchen & carport. the land is on a
grade & level; & appears to be sufficiently elevated to
disallow the possibility of flooding. The grounds are fairly
kept, with improvments including walkway, driveway & front boundary wall.

Appraisal: $344,422.30

Traveling east on Prince Charles, turn right at Super Value Food Store, then 1st left to t-junction, turn left at
junction then right & the property will be the 6th on the left side of the road painted blue trimmed white.

For conditions of sale and other information contact 326-1771 ¢ Fax 356-3851

the efficiency apartment, the house is comprised of 3-bedrooms, 3-bathrooms, inclusive of a master bedroom
suite upstairs. Foyer, front room, dining room, family room, powder room, utility room, breakfast nook and
kitchen downstairs. Climate control is provided by ducted central air conditioning, with air circulation
enhanced by ceiling fans and other amenities. Quality of construction: Average. Standard of maintenance:
Average. Effective age: seven years (7) the land is on flat terrain; however the site appears to be sufficiently
elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding under normal weather condition, including annual heavy
rainy periods. The grounds are well kept, with improvements including neatly maintained lawns with flowering
trees, and a concrete garden/storage shed, which is located in the backyard. The yard is enclosed along the
sides with chain-link fencing, and concrete block walls that are topped with metal railings, and metal gates
at the front and back.

APPRAISAL: $343,072.50
Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive, pass the streetlight at Fox Hill Road until you get to Meadows

Boulevard, turn right onto Meadows Boulevard, go south and take the 4th left, then 1st right. The subject
house is the 2nd house on the left side painted beige trimmed white.

Crown Allotment 67, Murphy Town Abaco

All that parcel of land having an approximate area of 9,300
sq ft, being lot #67a, a portion of the murphy town crown
allotment # 67. Located on this property is a single storey
wooden residence with a total living area of approximately
1,850 sq, ft & consisting of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms,
living/dining kitchen 2-car garage & covered porch. Additional
floor space is available within roof dormers. Exterior walls
are of wood overlain with hardi board siding or concrete
duraboard siding. interior walls are of gypsum wallboard
siding. Construction demonstrates above average quality
workmanship however minor aesthetic improvement is still
needed. Landscaping has commenced, but not yet completed. The property is level with no immediate flooding
danger. All major utilities are within 100ft of the subject site.

Appraisal: $241,200.00
This proerty is situated off Bay Street Drive, Murphy Town.

VACANT PROPERTY

Lot No. 45, South Westridge Subdivision

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land having an area of 41,490 sq, ft, being lot #45 of the subdivision
known as south Westridge, the said subdivision situated in the western district of New Providence Bahamas.
This property is zonned single family/residential area. The land is slightly elevated & appears to be sufficiently
elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.

Appraisal: $342,292.00

Travelling west on JFK turn left into South Westridge (pink wall), travel to the 2nd corner left & turn left at the
tjunction. The subject property will be about the 3rd on the left side of the road.







THE TRIBUNE

THE WE

5-Day FORECAST







THURSDAY, APRIL 2np, 2009, PAGE 19B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST




POR i

A rst NY





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The Tribune oo,

OU AlSsS
& RELIGION



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Your choice for the family



THURSDAY
April 2, 2009



PG 26 The Tribune

RELIGIOUS
NEWS,
STORIES
AND
CHURCH ©
EVENTS





The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, April 2, 2009 ® PG 27





oe



m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunmedia.net

OLLOWING last week’s feature on

Mele AMAL M elite like

Tribune Religion dug deeper into the
commonly misunderstood religion, getting a

woman’s perspective on life in the faith.

Lecturer at the College of the Bahamas, Bidi Boyer
explained that life for her as a Muslim has come with its
share of challenges, but is not that different from living as
a Christian.

A native of Suriname in Northern South American, Mrs
Boyer said growing up in a strict Muslim family taught her
from early on the importance of living the modest life
required by her faith.

She said unlike the Bahamas where many people are
not familiar with Islam, life was much different in her
homeland because a larger percentage of the population
are Muslims.

While she said that about one per cent of the
Bahamian population is Muslim, in Suriname, about 20
per cent of the population (478,000) are Muslims.

She said: “Like the Bahamas which is labeled a
Christian nation, Suriname is considered a Muslim nation
because many of the residents have roots from places like
Indonesia, a place where Islam is the dominant religion.”

She said one of the iconic traits she accepted as a young
Muslim was to always live a life of modesty. For her this
reflected in both the way she interacted with others and
WOKEN Oleme scene

She said like many Christian teachings, the Qur’an
instructs all followers to respect life, meaning that killing
another human, animal, or plant is wrong, especially with-
out just cause.

She said it was also important for an Islamic woman to
fully cover her body especially her chest.

She explained that based on the teachings of Mohammad
- who is considered the last and final prophet - a women
should not expose the contour of her body, which is the rea-
son many Islamic women wear the garment known as an

SEE page 31





PG 28 ® Thursday, April 2, 2009

Good morning!

OKAY, it's an evidential fact that as
a nation we're presently between a
rock and a hard place. This fact also
extends to the lack of visionary lead-
ership from the two most influential
systems in the land today; the political
and religious systems which are key
pillars in the Babylon system.

At times I'm of the view that a vast
majority of the Bahamian public can
be categorised as “SUCKERS for bad
treatment. The above statement may
offend those who are enjoying the
good life of the systems; while the life
of the unfortunate grassroots and
brainwashed middle class are method-
ically being stifled.

Listen!

Especially you grassroots
Bahamians, isn't it obvious to you by
now that what you're embracing as
leadership today; is doing a very good
job in leading you and your children's
children to the land of nowhere. The
systems are designed to keep you
looking to and_= relying on
Governments and religion to supply
your needs.

This is one of the primary reasons
why the political leaders and religious
organisations can send whoever they
desire as representatives into a poor
grassroots area; where the people have
been trained to joyfully accept their
representation.

A people or nation that doesn't
know and have a personal relationship
with Father Yahweh, will always find
themselves as powerless victims to the





PASTOR
ALLEN

unjust treatments of the world's sys-
tem.

Dan.11:32b. But a people that do
know their God (‘e_lo_hi_ym- el-o-
heem') shall be strong and do
exploits.

The enemy has skillfully used his
political and religious systems to pro-
gram and condition the people's
minds; to consistently look to and
depend upon these systems for their
daily breads. Today's politicians /
kings and religious leaders / priests are
the culprits that are responsible for 95
per cent of the mess, and the deterio-
ration of law and order in this country.

Throughout the Bible one can find
that hard times, recession and famine
were nothing new; but whenever these
times were at hand even an ungodly
king who didn't have a personal rela-
tionship with Yahweh had enough
sense to align himself with a true man
of God.

As a nation, we're facing a type of
famine / recession; unfortunately for
our King / Prime Minister just about
all of leading clergymen of this land
are filled with religion and are in no
position to hear from Father Yahweh
to give the prime minister Godly
advice.

RELIGION

Unlike Pharaoh the king of Egypt
who had a man of God in the person of
Joseph (Gen.41:1-57) who was able to
hear from God and give good Godly
advice. Here in the Bahamas today;
we've got over four thousand religious
leaders most of whom are too politi-
cally bias and the others are too
money motivated to spend time in the
presence of God thereby not being
able to spiritually advise the king. As a
result, the people grope around in
darkness and gross darkness fills the
land.

But, I declare unto you; the down-
trodden, the least likely to succeed,
the ones who are constantly crying out
for help. As David extolled the Lord
(yeho_va_h - yeh-ho-vaw') at the ded-
ication of his house and as he declared
in Ps.30:5b. So do I declare unto you,
as you seek to dedicate your life and
house to the Lord “Weeping may
endure for a night, but joy cometh in
the morning”

In dedicating your life to Father
Yahweh through the acceptance of His
son, Yeshuwa Messiah; you've now
been given the authority to serve the
enemy with an eviction notice as it
relates to everything that's concerning
you and your family.

This eviction is never valid nor will
it ever be through religion and politics;
but rather it is valid and powerfully
enforced through the BLOOD of
Yeshuwa Messiah.

This ought to be the position you're
now prepared to take and stand firmly

The Tribune

upon; whereas you're saying to this
world's systems “Enough is enough,
I'm tired of half-stepping, and going
around in circles with politicians and
religious leaders”

If a politician can't lay-out and artic-
ulately present you with a twenty year
visionary plan for a better Bahamas;
send him and the party he represents
away skipping. Religiously, you've
attended just about every conference,
seminar, revival or workshop; where
you have helped in making the reli-
gious leaders of these events success-
fully wealthy; in purchasing all of their
tapes, cd's and books. Meanwhile your
situation both spiritually and naturally
is yet the same and has gotten even
worst.

Here's a Spirit led word for you
“stop buying all of these books and
other materials and begin to focus on
God's word” Listen to what God said
to Joshua about his success and pros-
perity.

Joshua.1:8. This book of the law
shall not depart out of thy mouth; but
thou shalt meditate therein day and
night, that thou mayest observe to do
according to all that is written there-
in: for then thou shalt make thy way
prosperous, and then thou shalt have
good success.

Your weeping days are over. Good
Morning.

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.225-3850 or 441-2021.

Long journeys

ABRAHAM had to leave Haran to
find his Promised Land. Joseph went to
Egypt against his will, but God used his
journey to save his family from the
famine and to save the Egyptians as
well. Moses traveled with the Hebrew
slaves through the Red Sea in order to
escape oppression from _ slavery,
Naaman had to go to be healed in the
River Jordan, and David traveled for
years to escape Saul. There is so much
movement in the Bible, and it is a
theme that is meant to speak to us all.

We are pilgrims on a journey follow-
ing the promptings of God. Mary and
Joseph went to Bethlehem and then to
Egypt to fulfill ancient prophecies
about the Messiah because of the dan-
ger to the Christ child. The wise men
followed the star to discover the great-
est King of all time. The shepherds left
their hills to come to the town. The

REV, ANGELA

+. PALACIOUS

Lord walked to preach, heal, and teach
to bring this peace on earth of which
the angels had sung.

The disciples went on missionary
journeys to spread the word. Some left
because of persecution, but others went
to plant churches, re-visit them to
encourage the congregations and to
assist them to remain strong. Many
have followed in their footsteps, and
brought the gospel to Spain, England,
and The United States of America and
to us.

To undertake so many journeys for

so many years, these pilgrims were peo-
ple with a passionate message about
the Kingdom of God. How are we mak-
ing a difference in our generation? Are
we also on the move for God? Are we
willing to go wherever we are sent?
Will we be as faithful as those who have
gone before?

We are also pilgrims on a journey
reaching out to others along the way.
There is no time to pitch our tent as if
we are able to stay. We are on a journey
to spread the Good News and we are
on an inner journey to find peace with-
in. There are new levels of understand-
ing, new depths of revelation, new
experiences of God’s presence waiting
for us in our own private lives, even as
we journey where we are sent.

Life is one long journey, with so
much to learn. Faith is another journey
as we speak to different groups, counsel
individuals and share the gospel with
our visitors, who have journeyed to us.
When it comes to accepting spiritual
truths and living them out in our lives,
it has been said that by far the longest
journey is from the head to the heart.

There are new
levels of
understanding,
new depths of
revelation, new
experiences of God’s
presence waiting
for us in our own
private lives, even
as we journey
where we are sent.



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, April 2, 2009 ® PG 29

In lieu of hate

“To fear the Lord is to hate evil; I
hate pride and arrogance,
evil behavior and perverse speech.”
PROVERBS 8:13 (N.I.V)

HAVE you ever killed someone?
Did you regret it? Now, I'm not pos-
ing this question to those persons who
have actually committed murder, but
instead to those among us, and let's be
honest, all of us, who have thought
about "killing" another, for an offense
done to us.

There are also those among us who
have been made so enraged by a per-
son and filled with so much hate, they
crossed that thin line and found them-
selves madly in love with the same
person. Stranger things have hap-
pened.

I'll admit it, 'Hi my name is Toni,
and I occasionally battle with the
strong forces of hate and at times find
it hard to forgive’, inhale, exhale. But
seriously, life does have it’s rough
patches, for example, we may go



through situations where we're being
harassed or taken advantage of, this
can make us extremely upset and
understandably so, and then there are
those instances that indirectly affect
us, in which a family member or friend
is the victim, yet we're equally as hurt,
thus it may seem as if hate is an
unavoidable vice.

I know hate is the opposite of love
and according to God's word, love is
the greatest of all things. So why hate?
Well when we do, it gives us a peculiar
sense of euphoria and almost always
brings some pretty nasty results with
it, it is however often derived from
pathetic characteristics such as pride.

One simple step we can take to do

All about Cursillo

The Anglican Diocesan Renewal Program
Make a Friend, Be a Friend, Bring a Friend to Christ!

What is Cursillo?

Cursillo is a movement of the church.
Its purpose is to help those in the church
understand their individual callings to be
Christian Leaders. The leadership may
be exercised in work situations, in the
family and social life, in leisure activities,
and within the Church environment.
Leadership, in Cursillo, does not mean
power over others, but influence on oth-
ers; all of us need to be aware that we
can exert a positive influence on those
around us.

What is the Goal of Cursillo?

The goal of Cursillo is the goal of the
Church: to bring all to Christ. This is
done when informed, trained leaders set
out with the support of others having a
similar commitment.

What does Cursillo do?

It helps to renew and deepen
Christian commitment. Cursillo is one of
many renewal movements. Many people
have said Cursillo provides an important
learning experience which causes many
to feel like newly made Christians with a
purpose and with support.

What is the Cursillo Movement About?
Cursillo is patterned on Jesus’ own



example. He searched out and called a
small group of potential leaders (pre-
Cursillo); He trained them by word and
example and inspired them with a vision
(Cursillo Three-Day Weekend); He
linked them together and sent them out
into the world to bring the world to Him
(post-Cursillo or the Fourth Day).

Pre-Cursillo

During this period, sponsors (.e. those
individuals that have been to the three-
day Cursillo weekend and are living the
Fourth Day) identify those
Episcopalians who are leading an active
Christian life and are a living witness to
their love for Christ, recommending
their candidacy. It is also the period that

away with hate is; to get over our-
selves. Thinking more of others, and
doing more for those in need will give
us that much needed holiday from
self.

But where does hate originate? Can
it at all times be found in our hearts?
After all, we are imperfect creatures;
or, does hate come from hurt, and hurt
come from insecurity, and this insecu-
rity come from not having formed a
loving, secure relationship with our
father God?

I'll bet the latter is more likely, and
this being the case should bring about
great relief to both the young and the
old. God is indeed greater than hate
and you need only find refuge in his
word, which will then, become like an
extinguisher for the uncontrollable
blaze that is hate. As believers, we
ought to remain sober in all that we
think, speak and do, after all, we don't
possess a VIP card, excluding us from
life's trials. That being said, we do
however understand right from wrong

selected candidates are informed of
what to expect at the three-day weekend
and assisted in appropriate preparations.

The Three-Day Weekend

The Cursillo weekend brings together
a diverse group of Episcopalians to share
the richness of many modes of worship
and to broaden each one's appreciation
for our Church. Lay people conduct the
weekend with two or three members of
the clergy functioning as spiritual advi-
sors. Cursillo presumes that those who
attend are already well grounded in the
faith. It is not intended to be a conver-
sion experience but an enriching and
deepening of what is already there. It
often provides new insights into our faith
as well as fostering ministry among lay
people.

The weekend begins Thursday
evening which is spent in the Chapel
with meditations, discussions, and
Compline. Then blessed silence is kept
until after the worship on Friday morn-
ing. After breakfast participants are
assigned to table groups for the week-
end. The three days are filled with talks
and group discussions with emphasis on
the doctrine of Grace, the Sacraments,
and the great Cursillo tripod: Piety,
Study, and Action. Plus there is fellow-
ship, singing, good food, and time for
privacy, meditation, prayer, and walks.
Eucharist is celebrated each day.

Post-Cursillo or Fourth Day

The Cursillo weekend is not an end to
itself. It is a starting point that lasts the
rest of your life. It is a springboard to a
long-range practice of the Baptismal

as written in God's word and should
strive to no longer think, speak, or act
as secular beings. To God, all persons
are VIP's, believers and non-believ-
ers, all persons have a purpose, all are
imperfect, all are unique, and all are
searching. Love is the only thing we
all have in common, so the next time
you want to hate, why not instead,
need to love. In these tough economic
and social times, we can no longer
afford to indulge in what we want, but
rather only what we need.

"And now these three remain: faith,
hope and love. But the greatest of
these is love."

1 Corinthians 13:13 (N.LV) In clos-
ing may God's blessings continuously
pour down on your life.

¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
writer and poet, currently residing in
Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to
the article can be sent to
fearless247@gmail.com.

Covenant in the life of the Church
called the Fourth Day. The Fourth Day
is composed of three major elements:

The Group Reunion

The heart of Cursillo, is a small group
of friends (usually 3-5) who meet week-
ly, and who hold each other accountable
for their spiritual journey. They report
on their piety, their study, and their
apostolic action. A bonding develops
that institutes a strong support group for
life.

The Ultreya

Usually held monthly, it is a "reunion
of the reunions". It provides support
and builds community by allowing the
sharing of communal experiences.

Spiritual Direction

Is an important element of the
Cursillo Movement. It is a commitment
to seek out skilled lay persons or cleric
for spiritual direction to provide help in
deepening their union with Christ.

Are there Cursillo Secrets?

You may have been told by some who
have attended the weekend that they
cannot tell you what Cursillo is all
about or what goes on during a Cursillo
weekend. This is not correct. Everything
that goes on during the weekend may be
told to anyone. Cursillo literature is
available to anyone who wishes to read
or purchase the materials.

¢ There will be an Ultreya on April 24
at St Matthews Anglican Church begin-
ing at 7pm



PG 30 ® Thursday, April 2, 2009



RELIGION

Francesco Proietti/AP Photo

IN THIS June 8, 2001 file photo, La Nona Ora (The Ninth Hour) a controversial installation by Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan
is seen on display at the Padiglione delle Tese as part of Venice's 49th Biennale arts exhibition.

Modern art is sacred
for Pope Benedict XVI

VATICAN CITY

THE long tradition of Vatican
patronage of the arts has given rise to
such monuments to Christianity as St.
Peter’s Basilica and Renaissance mas-
terpieces including the Sistine
Chapel, according to the Associated
Press.

Under Pope Benedict XVI, the
Holy See is seeking to revive its cul-
tural role, with plans to mount its
own pavilion at the 2011 Venice
Bienniale, the premiere international
contemporary art festival, and start a
“dialogue” with contemporary artists
that hasn’t existed for decades.

“We are reminded of the urgent
need for a renewed dialogue between
aesthetics and ethics, between beauty,
truth and goodness not only by con-
temporary cultural and artistic
debate, but also by daily reality,” said
Pope Benedict XVI, in a November
message to pontifical academies.

Monsignor Gianfranco Ravasi, who
heads the Pontifical Council for
Culture, said the aim is to re-establish
links with the contemporary art world
for the benefit of both art and faith.

“The great religious symbols, the
great stories and the great figures of
spirituality — these can stimulate an
art that more and more often lacks
any message” — or is blasphemous,

Ravasi said in a recent interview.

Ravasi also hopes to inspire art that
is appropriate for the many modern
churches built in recent decades by
such noted architects as Renzo Piano
and Richard Meier.

“So far, modern architecture has
had very good results in dialogue with
the liturgy,” he said. “But inside these
churches, there isn’t a dialogue with
contemporary artists. There is only
folk art.”

The Venice Bienniale has featured
the world’s greatest artists who exhib-
it in “pavilions” that are erected by
individual nations.

In 1920, Cezanne, Matisse and Van
Gogh were on display; the 1948 edi-
tion featured Dali, Ernst, Kandinsky
and Miro; 1977 saw Rauschenberg,
Mondrian, de Chirico and Picasso. In
the 1990s, Damien Hirst’s formalde-
hyde-encased cow made an appear-
ance. And more recently, Cy
Twombly, Richard Serra and Joseph
Beuys exhibited works.

Yet, the Vatican’s decision to par-
ticipate in the event is unusual, in
part because the once-every-two-
years art fair has incurred the wrath
of church authorities for work that
religious leaders considered a sacri-
lege.

In the Bienniale’s very first edition,
in 1895, the Patriarch of Venice, who

later became Pope Pius X, asked the

most talked-about work, Giacomo

ing the demise of Don Juan — sur-
rounded by naked women. Religious
leaders feared it would offend the
morals of visitors.

The mayor refused to take it down,

ular prize at the exhibition’s end.
More recently, church officials

complained about the 1990 edition,

when the American artists’ collective

activist group ACT UP, showed
“Pope Piece,” an image of John Paul
II and an image of a penis. It was
meant as a critique of the pontiff’s
opposition to condoms as a way to
fight AIDS.

And in 2001, Italian artist Maurizio
Cattelan exhibited his scandalous “La
Nona Ora,” or “The Ninth Hour” —
a life-size figure of John Paul being
crushed by a black meteorite.

Ravasi said there’s a risk that the

scene could be viewed merely as a
sacred counterpoint to profane dis-
plays. To avoid that risk, Ravasi said
he plans to mount the Vatican pavil-
ion away from the main exhibition
spaces.

The Tribune

reliaion

Na

By The Associated Press

DETROIT ARCHBISHOP VISITS
_ LANDMARK MICHIGAN MOSQUE

| DEARBORN, Mich.



THE new Roman Catholic arch-

: bishop of Detroit has visited one of

: the nation’s largest mosques, part of a
? continuing outreach to Muslims and

: other faith groups.

Archbishop Allen Vigneron met

i with Muslim leaders at the Islamic

; Center of America in Dearborn,

; which boasts a large Muslim popula-
? tion.

“So many of us here today are

? bound by the word of God, and we

? look to Abraham as one of our

? fathers in faith,” Vigneron said. “I am
? almost overwhelmed by your words of
: welcome and warmth.”

Vigneron’s trip to the mosque is at

? least the third by an Archbishop of

? Detroit. Cardinal Adam Maida, who
i has since retired, visited in a show of
? goodwill after the terrorist attacks of
i Sept. 11, 2001.

Vigneron, formerly bishop of the

? Diocese of Oakland, became leader of
? 1.4 million southeastern Michigan
: Catholics in January.

SCANDAL-SCARRED MEGACHURCH
: PASTOR DIES AFTER CANCER BATTLE

mayor of Venice to ban the exhibit’s i
: @ ATLANTA
Grosso’s “Supreme Meeting.” The }
work featured a coffin — represent- ;



A FORMER megachurch leader

? who rose to fame with a progressive
? evangelical ministry only to have it

? crumble after a series of sex scandals
? will be honored in the church he

i helped build in suburban Atlanta.
and the picture went on to win a pop- }
? Cathedral of the Holy Spirit at

: Chapel Hill Harvester Church died

? Sunday, March 29, after a battle with
? cancer. He was 81.

Gran Fury, a branch of the gay }

Archbishop Earl Paulk of the

For years the church was at the

i forefront of many social movements
? — admitting black members in the

: 1960s, ordaining women and opening
? its doors to gays. But Paulk was

i dogged for decades by scandal.

The most shocking revelation came

? in October 2007 when a court-

: ordered paternity test showed he was
i the biological father of his brother’s

? son, D.E. Paulk, who had become

? head pastor of the church after the

? archbishop retired the previous year.
Vatican’s entre into the modern art }

Ear] Paulk had sworn in an affi-

? davit he’d never had sex with anyone
? but his wife, which led to him plead-

? ing guilty to a felony charge of lying

? under oath. He was placed on 10

? years’ probation and assessed a

; $1,000 fine.



The Tribune

@x THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

RELIGION

Thursday, April 2, 2009 ® PG 31



Bahamian Methodists protest

IN 1883, Bahamian Methodists were
concerned about the proposal from the
Wesleyan Methodist Society of England
to place the Bahamas in the West Indies
District. Letters of protest were sent
from Abaco and Harbour Island in late
April of that year. The letter for Harbour
Island was as follows:

“We the undersigned office bearers of
the Wesley Methodist Church in the
island of Harbour Island, Bahamas
desire to call your attention to a matter
of deepest interest in the connection
with the future welfare of the church in
which we belong.

We have heard through report of a
proposal to erect the West Indies into a
separate conference, of one which the
Bahamas shall form a part.

It is our firm conviction that you
would not force us against our better
feeling and judgment a connection to
which we are opposed and which is most
undesirable to us from whatever stand-
point we may be viewed.

On the one hand by our geographical
position as also by our commercial rela-
tions, we are cut off from direct commu-
nication with those islands proposed to
be erected into separate conferences.
While on the other hand we have fre-
quent communication with England by
steamers running direct between Nassau
and London and also by others under
contract to carry our mails between New
York and Nassau.

We are of the opinion that for the
proper continuance of our relation with
any conference or association if we are
to retain our present advantages, we



= / JIM
)_ LAWLOR

should have communication of a stated
and regular and also of a tolerable fre-
quency.

It is we think essentially necessary for
the continuance of Methodism, not to
say of its progress and extension in this
colony, which we most deeply and anx-
iously desire to promote and extend, that
a supply of which we have hitherto had
no want of able, faithful and acceptable
ministers still continue to be furnished
us.

We could not, in consistence with rea-
son expect this to continue if the
Bahamas were to form a part of an inde-
pendent West Indies Conference. We
should look forward with discourage-
ment to any time when our congrega-
tions here should cease to enjoy the
advantages they have so long enjoyed of
a ministry trained and educated in
England.

We should here state that we have
nothing in common with the West Indies.
Our population and their habits of life
are so different that we have no desire of
being annexed to these, or of being
dependent upon them for our supply of
ministers, while our infrequent commu-
nication with those islands bar us from a
voice in the government under such an
altered state of things and would here

Life of a Muslim woman

FROM page 27

Abaya. An Abaya is a garment which
covers a women from head to toe, or
sometimes hangs from her shoulders,
and is often accompanied by a veil, scarf,
or gloves.

She said the Islamic women who may
go as far as covering their faces and
hands, are considered more extreme,
and adds that she only goes as far as
wearing the Abaya.

Mrs Boyer said at the age of 23 she
married a local Muslim and since then
has resided in the Bahamas.

She said that while many people tend
to be under the impression that Muslim
women are treated like servants to their
husbands following their every wish, this
myth is far from the way she lives her life
as an Islamic wife.

She said the Qur’an which is in many
ways similar to the Bible, acts as a life
compass guiding her and her husband in

the way they daily interact with one
another.

Mrs Boyer stated: “If my husband said
to do something that goes against the
teachings of the Qur’an, does that mean
that I would do it -no.”

She explained that if his requests are
in line with the Qur’an, which could
involve her cooking for their child or
taking care of the home, and even show-
ing respect for him, she would follow
through with it because for her to go
against him would be like her going
against the teachings of Mohammad and
essentially Allah.

Outside of her marriage, Mrs Boyer
said over the last few years, acceptance
of Muslims by Bahamians and
Americans has changed for the worse.

Referring to the bombing of the
World Trade Centre which was believed
to have been orchestrated by extremists
from the Islamic community, Mrs Boyer
said if there exist a small group of people
who have drifted from the teachings of

record the fact that Methodism has here
amongst its members and supporters
most of the intelligent, wealthy and
influential residents, presenting, and we
have reason to believe, a marked differ-
ence to Methodists from the West Indies.

We therefore require here a well
trained and educated ministry for the
satisfactory performance of the duties
relating to the pastoral and the pulpit.

The committee of our present connec-
tion with the missionary societies and
yourselves is by far more preferable to us
and we do sincerely trust that it will not
be severed by you to the detriment of
Methodism in the Bahamas. On finan-
cial grounds we feel assured that there
can be no objection raised to our contin-
ued connection with the Missionary
Society.

By determined effort, we hope to be
able to make this Circuit which is now
almost self sustaining fully so. And at the
same time we are putting forth effort to
contribute as largely as we can to the
“DISTRICT SUSTENTATIVE
FUND”, which was set afoot last year
and which promises to be attended with
success.

The sum raised last year throughout
the district toward the said fund and the
determined effort to be put for this year
to augment that sum will amount to £700
or £800 and its yearly increase by interest
and further donations will enable us in
the none to distant period, when as a dis-
trict we shall be able to bear the burden
of church sustenance without aid in a
pecuniary form from the Missionary
Society, thus relieving it of further

Mohammad and the laws of the Qur’an,
it is unfair for all other Muslims to be
judged or stereotyped for their error.
She said the killing of innocent people
is wrong according to the Muslim way,

expenditure of its funds upon the
“BAHAMA DISTRICT”.

Being convinced as we are, and believ-
ing as we do, that we are in a position to
judge fairly and correctly that the con-
nection of this district to the West Indies
Conference will prove to be most unfor-
tunate to the best interests and welfare
of the Church and will only tend to
weaken and reduce it, if it does not
entirely suppress it in this colony,

We are dear Sirs your faithful
brethren, William Cash, Thomas H
Johnson, James W Roberts, Vincent
Higgs, D W Johnson, C T Cash,
Theophilus Harris, Thomas M Johnson,
William J Albury, Winer Bethel, Henry
Johnson, William E Higgs, Richard
Fisher, Samuel Higgs, Jacob Tynes,
William A Albury, Theophilus G Higgs,
Richard C Roberts, Joseph Higgs,
Joseph Dyer.”

Apparently the protests were success-
ful and the Bahamas remained a part of
the British Methodist Mission until 1968
when the Synod of the Bahamas District
of Methodist Churches voted to join the
autonomous Methodist Church in the
Caribbean and the Americas. An Act of
The Bahamian Parliament in 1993 gave
self government and autonomy to The
Bahamas District of Methodist Churches
which now comprises of 34 churches. 13
Bahamian churches and 3 churches in
the Turks and Caicos Islands remained
with Methodist Church in the Caribbean
and the Americas.

(Next time: Part 24 - Difficulties of the
Anglican Mission 1886 - 1900)

and added that education and awareness
of the Muslim way of life is probably the
only way of reducing the unpopular view
on Islam held by those who are not
familiar with it.

SBYT
KIRK

SUNDAY: Worship - 9:30 am & 11 :00 am
SERMON: “The King Has Come”

TUESDAY: Bible Study 7:30 pm At The

Manse #37 Harmony Hill - Blair

MINISTER: Rev. John Macleod
Email: manse1@live.com

Phone:

322 5475

Bringing All People Closer to God
Through Worship, Ministry & Service





PG 32 ® Thursday, April 2, 2009

Divine Encounter

2009

BAHAMAS Christian
Fellowship Centre will be
hosting a national crusade
called “Divine Encounter
2009” on Thursday, April 2nd
at 7.30 pm and Friday April 3
noon and 7:30 pm at the
church’s auditorium located on
Carmichael Road.

The guest speaker will be
Apostle Charles Ndifon from
Nigeria, Africa who is known
around the world for his
“Adventures in Miracles” cru-
sades and telecasts in many
countries.

In a recent release Crusade
host Apostle Paul Butler said:
“Our country is going through
a difficult time,and people
need to experience the reality
of Christ’s love and his power.”

He further admonished sick
people who are confined to the
use of wheel chairs, crutches,
walkers, canes, or any other
apparatus to come and experi-
ence the miracle power of God
at work.

Apostle Charles accepted
Jesus Christ while studying
Engineering at the University
of Nigeria. He is the senior
pastor of Christ Love
Ministries International along
with his wife Donna Lynn
Ndifon, and they have been
ministering the gospel of Jesus
Christ for over twenty years in
more than 30 nations around
the globe. His ministry has had
tremendous impact in the lives
of millions of people all over
the world through the preach-
ing, teaching and demonstra-
tion of God’s saving, healing
and delivering power of Jesus
Christ.

Admission is free.

Clan

For the stories behind
aM Meese rye lg
on Mondays



RELIGION

The Tribune



Hip-Hopera duet earns Manifest and Joann Callender two

MARLINS@

@ By ARTHIA NIXON

THERE is a place for hip-opera after
all in the music industry and by the
sounds of the show-stopping, energised,
octave-busting, soul-stirring live per-
formance of Manifest and Joann
Callender at the Marlin Awards last
Sunday, the new genre has officially
crowned it’s Bahamian king and queen.

I Shall Rise,the unique duet has won
two awards - one for Hip Hop
Collaboration of the Year and the other
for Hip Hop Recording of The Year.
Manifest, the prolific producer and
founder of the Dunamus Soundz
Record Label was nominated in 6 cate-
gories this year. At the last gathering, he
led the pack with the most nominations
at 11.

Joann Callender is the wife of Lee
Callender, grandson of Bahamas
National Anthem composer Timothy
Gibson. Recognised as the Bahamian
pioneer in her genre, she has performed
to sold out opera houses around the
world accompanied by Lee, a respected
piano virtuoso who helped Manifest

create the unique vocal concoction
that proved to be a smash hit at the
awards.

“T am so blessed and grateful for this
opportunity to work with one of our liv-

ing legends,” says Manifest. “Ive
won Marlin Awards before but this
one feels special because of all the
work we put into it. I still am amazed
that it went from an idea floating
around in my head to sitting with Joann
and Lee and experiencing their talents

first-hand and then onto a CD, then to

perform it in front of our musical col- = ——
leagues.

“Yes, we are different genres but I 5
know we were boxed in different classi- rca
fications of music but I’m proud to know ae

that we worked together instead of over-
looking each other. Bahamians tend to
not support each other’s music and
this is a testament of how you can
enhance each other.

This song has hit stations all
over the region and it’s like
netting two birds because
the hip hoppers won’t pick
up JoAnn Callender and the
opera listeners won’t put on
Manifest. Overall, I know
that the project is much big-
ger than us and I am just
happy to know that we
are living the lyrics of
the song -we did rise,
we did overcome, no
matter what they
thought of us.”













Joann Callender



Full Text
WEATHER
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| Tal ave
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@ P. Q.Box N3723

BAHAMAS EDITION Tel: 326-1875








EAD A pee

WS

CLASSIFIEDS

ad fave

www.tribune242.com

Wi WSS EUs

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

WSS

Tm SE
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

dnemoloyment
Set to increase

Central Bank FINITE a

gives gloomy
outlook

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE unemployment rate is set
to increase beyond the 12 per cent
reported for New Providence at
year-end 2008, the Central Bank
of the Bahamas warned yester-
day, with weakness in the tourism
industry and foreign direct invest-
ment continuing through year-
end 2009.

In its latest gloomy outlook for
the Bahamian economy’s
prospects, which will come as no
surprise to most analysts, the
Central Bank said Government’s
fiscal deficit would “widen con-
siderably” due to its increased
spending on stimulus pro-
grammes, combined with a
decrease in revenue collections.

The Bahamian economy’s
short, medium and long-term
future remains inextricably linked
to the US, reiterated the Central
Bank’s report on monthly eco-
nomic developments for Febru-
ary 2009, with this nation’s
prospects for recovery dependent
on the impact made by President
Barack Obama’s stimulus poli-
cies.

“The fallout from the global
financial crisis continued to
impact the Bahamian economy
during the review month, con-
tributing to persistent weakness in
tourism and foreign investments.

SEE page eight

ok ee
eee ts

Felipé Major/Tribune staff J

ABOVE: The body of Arsenio Mortimer is removed
from the scene yesterday.

RIGHT: Arsenio Mortimer is pictured with his son
Nackyo and girlfriend Nicole Samson

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE family of Arsenio Mortimer claim that police
are trying to cover up his death by suggesting that he
opened fire on officers, justifying their decision to
return fire, hitting him twice in the back. The family
said that Arsenio was not armed.

According to the official statement from the police,
officers from the Mobile Division saw three males
in a white Mitsubishi Mirage around 11pm acting in a

SEE page 10



Privy Council Judicial Committee reserves
its decision on beach access dispute

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE JUDICIAL Committee
of the Privy Council has reserved
its decision on an appeal involving
the owners of two adjourning
properties in Lyford Cay and
their dispute over beach access.

The five Law Lords of the
Privy Council yesterday heard the
appeal in the case of Icebird Lim-
ited and Alicia P Winegardener,
which is the only appeal from the
Bahamas the Judicial Committee
will hear during its third sitting

in New Providence this week.
The appellant, Icebird Limit-
ed, is seeking to overturn a ruling
by the Court of Appeal that
upheld a judge’s order that the
appellant’s writ and statement of
claim be struck out and dismissed.
The dispute between Icebird
Limited and Winegardener, who
are owners of adjacent proper-
ties in the Clifton Bay Beach area
of Lyford Cay, stems from an
agreement made between the
properties’ previous owners

SEE page eight







Claim that
police officers
used torture
techniques

Man spends 11 days in hospital
recovering from injuries

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia. net

DELANZO Cartwright was released
from hospital yesterday after spending 11
days recovering from injuries he claimed
he suffered from waterboarding and physi-
cal abuse at the hands of officers at a local

police station.

With injuries ranging from kidney fail-
ure, to fractured ribs, Delanzo said he was
picked up by officers on March 20th for DELANZO
allegedly “causing harm” and given the beat- CARTWRIGHT,

ing of his life.

30, is pictured

With hands cuffed behind his back, he following his
said two officers escorted him upstairs to alleged beating at
an office in the police station where they the hands of police.
beat him with wooden and metal baseball

bats.

While reports of such beatings at the hands of police in recent
months are complained of more frequently, Delanzo’s incident
is the first reported case where it is alleged that officers attempt-
ed to mimic the recently outlawed torture technique of water-

boarding.

Waterboarding is a technique where the victim is suspended

SEE page eight



Expired insulin given to patient
‘was sent to Bahamas in 2006’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A PHARMACEUTICAL
manufacturer has confirmed the
expired insulin issued to a
patient at the Elizabeth Estates
Clinic pharmacy this year was
sent to the Bahamas for gov-
ernment distribution in May,
2006.

The lot number on the
Humulin insulin given to a dia-
betes patient in February and
again March has been verified
by global pharmaceutical com-
pany Eli Lilly and Company as
part of the batch of medication
sent to the Bahamas nearly
three years ago.

And Nassau Agencies Ltd,
the authorised distributor for
Humulin insulin in the
Bahamas, has confirmed it
received the medication in May,
2006, which expired 17 months
later in October, 2007, and sent
it on to the Bahamas National
Drug Agency (BNDA) upon
request.

The BNDA would then have
dispensed it to the government
clinic and pharmacy in Eliza-
beth Estates, eastern New Prov-



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

idence, where it appears to have
sat for nearly three years before
it was given to a diabetic filling
her regular prescription for the
product.

Although the diabetic of 20
years, who asked for The Tri-
bune to withhold her identity,
uses Humulin up to three times
a day to control her blood sug-
ar levels, February 3 was the
first time she went to Elizabeth
Estates to obtain the medica-
tion.

When she took the medica-
tion it had no affect on her
blood sugar level, as rather than
keeping it down as it is sup-
posed to, her blood sugar levels
continued to rise, causing her
to feel light-headed, nauseous
and have leg-cramps.

She only realised the medica-
tion was out-of-date when she
returned to Elizabeth Estates
six weeks later and was given
another box of Humulin with
an expiration date of October,
2007, and noticed it was from
the same lot as the medication
given to her in February.

Although the expiration date
printed by the manufacturer on

SEE page 10


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THE WESLEY FOUNDATION group arrive in Rock Sound.



Clemson University makes
positive impact in Eleuthera

TARPUM BAY,
ELEUTHERA - A group of
55 students and faculty from
Clemson University’s Wesley
Foundation Group visited
South Eleuthera to lend a
helping hand to the commu-
nity.

The group, led by Reverend

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News Pll.2,0,050)0 6.9, 10, 17,.19.20
ECILOnIAIMEtLer Sea. vercu.c) nouns eine annereent P4
Pii16s138.2123.24
Pale anienlo

Lane Glaze, arrived on the
island last week on a Bahama-
sair charter flight for a one
week trip, during which they
engaged in volunteer commu-
nity service, community work
and environmental studies.
They were hosted by Island
Journeys, a non-profit organi-




























































F ilbe cio Oo. ile
FOS tan satG, if es20
OBITUARIES/RELIGION 32 PAGES
CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

had Baty , “i re = = z. Tt hs
INATED B

sation dedicated to strength-
ening, transforming and
rebuilding local communities.
Three days after their
arrival, they joined winter res-
idents, locals and visitors at
the Mission Foundation in
Rock Sound, Eleuthera for the
annual welcome reception
jointly hosted by the Ministry
of Tourism and Aviation and
the Mission Foundation.
Locals said the presence of
the South Carolina university
group made the reception
even more exciting, not only
because they took part in the
festivities and won a number
of prizes, but also because
they enjoyed Bahamian food,
music and arts and crafts.
During the reception, Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation
officials, including Eleuthera
branch manager, Jacqueline
Gibson, and director for the
Central and Southern
Bahamas, Charity Armbrister,
presented a plaque to Rev-
erend Glaze in honour of his
contribution to the island.
Reverend Glaze has been
bringing groups to Eleuthera
for more than six years. Each
year, the group invests around
$90,000 in the community, and
around half a million dollars
has been injected since they
first began their trips.
The ministry says 300 par-



STUDENTS EXAMINE the flora and fauna at Lighthouse Point beach. Locals hope to protect this area

from development.

ticipants have visited and
around 50 have made return
trips.

The group missed one year
to the Bahamas, instead doing
hurricane relief work in the
Gulf of Mexico in the wake of
Hurricane Katrina.

Reverend Glaze’s organisa-
tion has donated generously
to Island Journeys and to
South Eleuthera Emergency
Partners (SEEP), which are
both run by Shaun Ingraham,
a native of Tarpum Bay.

Donations have included
two school buses, two passen-
ger vans, tools and shipping
costs on for the importation
of fire gear and equipment for
SEEP’s volunteer fire fighters.

Reverend Glaze has also
brought other groups from
North and South Carolina to
experience life in a small
island community.

Opportunity

When asked why he is so
passionate about bringing uni-
versity students to Eleuthera,
he replied: “When I was a col-
lege student, I travelled to the
Dominican Republic and it
opened a greater world for
me. I went in with the mind
that I was American but came
back that I was a human being.
So, bringing the students from
South Carolina down to
Eleuthera gives them a similar
opportunity and perspective
that there is another world out
there.”

Shaun Ingraham, director of
Island Journeys, is a commu-
nity organiser and disaster
response consultant who
brings people to South
Eleuthera with the aim that
the both the visitors and the
community will grow through
the interaction.

“The way Shaun sets up the
programme and how you can
serve the people and the com-
munity is great and you cannot
learn this experience in the



— _t



THE VOLUNTEERS work on providing a roof for a handicap access

ramp at Princess Cays.

2

classroom,” said Reverend
Glaze.

Students are placed where
their talents are best suited
and assigned tasks based on
their areas of interest.

This year’s construction pro-
jects included re-roofing a
home for a single mother in
Tarpum Bay, constructing a
shaded area for the straw ven-
dors at Princess Cays and
extending the roof on one side
of the Church of God to create
a shaded activity area.

Some of the students are
working towards education
qualifications, and they spent
time in the local schools where
they taught and observed.

Five nurses, lead by lecturer
Janice Lanham, visited clinics
to help update client records
and assist health workers with
their duties.

The environmental and nat-
ural resources students visit-
ed Lighthouse Beach at the tip

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of Southern Eleuthera to study
and document plant and bird
life.

Marketing students assisted
with creating websites and
brochures for various areas of
interest in South Eleuthera.

The students also had time
to enjoy local highlights such
as food from fish fry in Rock
Sound and a swim at Ocean
Hole.

Murder trial is
TET ETT

THE trial of three men
charged in the February 2006
murder of businessman Kei-
th Carey was adjourned again
yesterday after it was revealed
that one of the attorneys in
the case had been involved in
an accident and that one of
the accused had taken ill.

Justice Jon Isaacs, who is
hearing the case, was forced
to adjourn the trial once again
after being informed by lead
prosecutor Cheryl Grant-
Bethel that attorney Perry
Albury, who is representing
murder accused Dwight
Knowles, had been involved
in an accident and was being
treated in hospital. She told
the court yesterday that she
did not know the extent of his
injuries.

Attorney Craig Butler,
who is representing murder
accused Jamal Glinton, also
informed the court that his
client had taken ill and would
not be able to take part in the
proceedings until today.

The trial into the murder of
businessman Keith Carey
began on February 15 before
Justice Isaacs.

Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown
and Dwight Knowles are
charged with murder as well
as armed robbery and con-
spiracy to commit armed rob-
bery.

Keith Carey, 43, was shot
and killed on the steps of the
Bank of the Bahamas on
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway before he was able
to deposit $40,000 that
belonged to the Esso Service
Station, which he operated.

Ms Grant-Bethel,
Stephanie Pintard, Anthony
Delaney and Lennox Coleby
are prosecuting the case.
Attorneys Craig Butler and
Devard Francis are repre-
senting Jamal Glinton, attor-
ney Dorsey McPhee is repre-
senting Sean Brown, and
attorney Perry Albury is rep-
resenting Dwight Knowles.
The prosecution has called a
total of 41 witnesses during
the trial.
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Harl Taylor
murder

accused is
denied hail



Troyniko McNeil

FOR a third time, the man
charged in the murder of
internationally known hand-
bag designer Harl Taylor has
been denied bail.

Senior Justice Anita Allen
yesterday refused a bail
application on behalf of mur-
der accused Troyniko
McNeil, 22.

Justice Allen noted that
McNeil is charged with a
serious offence, that there is
evidence against him and
that his trial is imminent.

McNeil is expected to
stand trial on June 29, before
Senior Justice Allen.

Application

The accused made his first
application for bail in Janu-
ary.

McNeil’s attorney Murrio
Ducille submitted yesterday
that the accused must be
presumed innocent until
proven otherwise, that he is
not a flight risk and has no
previous convictions.

Attorney Lorna Longley-
Rolle, who appeared on
behalf of the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office, objected to bail
being granted. McNeil has
been in prison for nine
months.

It is alleged that McNeil
caused Taylor’s death
between Saturday, Novem-
ber 17 and Sunday, Novem-
ber 18, 2007.

He has pleaded not guilty.

Taylor, 37, was found
stabbed to death at Mount-
batten House on West Hill
Street.

Freeport man
wanted for

questioning in
maiming case

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A Freeport
man is wanted by Grand
Bahama Police for question-
ing in a case of maiming.

Police have issued an all
points bulletin for 39-year-
old Gregory Russell, aka
Rex Boy, of No 30 Coral
Reef Estates, Freeport.

He is described as being of
brown complexion, brown
eyes, and short hair.

He is about six feet, one
inch tall of stocky build and
weighs about 235lbs.

According to police, Rus-
sell is considered armed and
extremely dangerous and
should be approached with
caution.

Anyone with information
concerning the suspect is
asked to call police 352-1919,
351-9111, 351-9991, 352-
8351, 352-9076, and 350-3125
or, 911.

Clan

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



Nassau investigators help
Bimini police in manhunt

Search on for gunman who shot victim in leg

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

INVESTIGATORS from the
capital travelled to Bimini yes-
terday to assist local police there
in capturing a gunman who shot
aman in the leg during a beach
party.

The gunman, believed to be
in his mid to late 40s, was
reportedly involved in an alter-
cation with a 22-year-old man
during a party at Spook Hill
Beach, Bimini, on Tuesday.

The older man suddenly drew
a handgun and fired three shots
into the crowd, hitting a
bystander in the leg, police on
Bimini said.

In the ensuing chaos, the gun-
man allegedly attacked his
intended target, gunbutting the



OIE lelal

younger man in the head, before
fleeing the scene. Assistant
Commissioner for the Family

Islands Hulan Hanna told The
Tribune yesterday that police
responded to calls of shots being
fired at a party at Spook Hill
Beach in Bailey Town shortly
after 9pm.

At the scene, officers met two
injured men.

The men were taken to the
local clinic for treatment before
being flown to Nassau.

Their present conditions are
not known but police said their
injuries were not life-threaten-
ing.

The gunshot victim is a resi-
dent of Bimini believed to be
about 27 or 28 years old.

Up to press time last night,
the shooter - who is known to
police - had eluded capture.

“We're following significant
leads in connection with this
matter,” Mr Hanna said.

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THE BAHAMAS HOTEL, CATERING AND ALLIED WORKERS UNION
Hundreds expected to run for top union posts

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

HUNDREDS of members are expected to run
for top positions in the Bahamas Hotel, Catering
and Allied Workers Union in the upcoming elec-
tions.

Secretary general Leo Douglas said the union’s
5,000-plus members will be called upon to make
nominations for president, vice-president, and
other executive positions in early May.

Members can nominate themselves for posi-
tions as individuals or part of one of the five
teams, or parties.

Voters will have the option of selecting indi-
viduals for specific positions or selecting a party
for presidency of the union.

In addition to the top position of president,
currently held by Roy Colebrooke, there is a first
vice-president, second vice-president, secretary
general, assistant secretary general, treasurer and
assistant treasurer.

In addition, two trustees and two executive
council members will be appointed.

Mr Douglas said both Mr Colebrooke and him-

self will be in the running for another three year
term in charge of the country’s largest hotel union.

He said: “Hundreds want to run but there are
only six positions.

“We are in really serious times and the hotel
industry is not in the best position right now, so
we need someone with knowledge and experi-
ence.

Capability

“T want our members to understand its not as
simple as voting for somebody; its voting for
somebody for their capability, knowledge and
experience.”

Although only union members can vote, Mr
Douglas maintains the election is important for
the whole country, as the actions of the next pres-
ident and his team will have ramifications for the
entire hotel sector and the country’s largest indus-
try, tourism.

He said: “Everyone is affected by the tourism
industry. That’s why I am concerned we can’t
just put this organisation in anybody’s hands.

“They could destroy this organisation in a day
if they don’t know how to negotiate.”

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380-FLIX


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

John Marquis follows his mentor

IN THE 2002 election the PLP, under the
leadership of Perry Christie, presented itself to
the electorate as the “New” PLP.

Other than in name — which soon faded
away after they won that election — we could
find nothing “new” about the PLP.

Today with many of its members and diehard
supporters screaming for Tribune Managing
Editor John Marquis to be run out of the coun-
try, we hark back to the year 1969.

Today’s “new” PLP want to put the skids
under Mr Marquis and ship him out of the
Bahamas for writing a father’s tragic story about
a pilot son who lost his life — or so the father
believes — because he knew too much about
then prime minister Lynden Pindling and his
friendship with Carlos “Joe” Lehder, the
Colombian drug lord of Norman’s Cay.

In 1969 the “old” PLP had been in power for
two short years, having won its first election by
one House seat in 1967, followed the following
year by a landslide victory in a second general
election.

In those days the late Sir Etienne Dupuch,
editor-publisher of this newspaper, was the
thorn in the PLP’s political side.

“Close down The Tribune and kick out Sir
Etienne!” thundered a PLP backbencher in the
House of Assembly on February 27, 1969, in ref-
erence to an earlier controversy over press free-
dom. “What does Sir Etienne “want freedom for
— to destroy this country?” the backbencher
asked as he described the publisher as “a feeble-
minded man who is like a bull in a china closet.”

The MP based his remarks on a statement
incorrectly attributed to Sir Etienne by prime
minister Pindling. The prime minister had
accused Sir Etienne of telling a group of Miami
newsmen that he feared the spread of commu-
nism in the Bahamas. This was not true. The
Miami newsmen corrected Sir Lynden and Sir
Etienne submitted his speech in which there
was no reference to communism. However, Sir
Lynden refused to retract his lie.

Sir Etienne’s alleged comment unleashed a
tirade from this Out Island backbencher who
accused him of making a “serious attack” on the
Bahamas in front of investors “to stifle the
growth of this country.”

One rule strictly followed by Sir Etienne
was that he never criticised his country when
overseas. However, he did not restrain his pen
in this column when he felt his government
needed public exposure.

However, the amusement was that this back-
bencher wanted to ship Sir Etienne out — as
they want to ship Mr Marquis out today— but
they had a major difficulty — they didn’t know
where to ship him.

The MP believed that people who made

First Baptist Church
289 Market St. South « P.O. Box N-7984 « Nassau, Bahamas
“How do you live a life of
prayers and destiny?
One step at a time.”

damaging remarks about the country should
be thrown out, but in Sir Etienne’s case “I don’t
know where we are going to throw him because
he belongs here.”

Even if now governor-general A D Hanna’s
preposterous suggestion at the Constitutional
Conference in London had been adopted,
throwing Sir Etienne out would have still pre-
sented a problem. Not only did Sir Etienne
belong to these islands, but he was born in Nas-
sau. At the Constitutional Conference at which
the Bahamas’ independence was being negoti-
ated, the British refused Mr Hanna’s proposal
that any Bahamian who gave offence should
be rusticated to the island of his birth, where he
would be held for the rest of his life, a virtual
prisoner. Not only could he not shop in Miami,
but he could not even shop in Nassau.

However, to his credit Sir Lynden was cau-
tious. He said government would do all it could
to protect the interests of the country and of
Bahamians, but had to be careful in how they
did it.

He said in their efforts to protect they should
do nothing to destroy the freedom they had
fought to win. He knew perfectly well that Sir
Etienne only had to send what was happening
here to freedom of speech to the international
press associations’ freedom of the press com-
mittees to have this country’s reputation tar-
nished beyond repair. Especially if they dis-
covered that the freedom of the press furore all
started over that initial lie told by Sir Lynden
and broadcast by ZNS.

Sir Lynden said he regretted that freedom of
speech meant the freedom to tell lies and he
knew of no way to achieve the extinction of
lies without providing for the extinction of free
speech.

“But lies can be exposed and lies will be
exposed and the perpetrators of lies will be
exposed and time always has its way of provid-
ing just retribution for the perpetrators of lies.”

Mr Marquis’s problem today is that he is
recording statements being made by aging
Bahamians who lived through the Pindling era
and now say they want to correct the lies of
the past.

They have used Mr Marquis to tell their sto-
ry. And this is the reason that some PLPs —
many of whom don’t even know the history of
that period —would like to ship him out.

What is also interesting is that The Tribune
reporter of that exchange in the House on
Thursday, February 27, 1969, was none other
than 25-year-old John Marquis.

It seems only fitting that now that he is end-
ing his journalistic career he should be following
in the footsteps of one of his earliest mentors —
he could be in no better company.



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Phone: 323-6452 « 393-5798

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Young Pindlings
and Obamas — your
country needs you!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas Government
borrowed $120 million for roads,
$90 million for the harbour,
$200m to boost the economy — a
total of $390 million just short of
1/2 billion dollars and 50 per cent
or our total annual budget.

Just about every penny would
be spent in New Providence. For
many years I was saying Nassau
was a dying city because when
you would have spent $120 mil-
lion on road improvement you
still have a traffic problem in New
Providence.

Our Parliament is bankrupt on
both sides of the House. I have
said many years ago that the
problem in New Providence is the
population.

Borrow $13 billion from the
Chinese. This amount of money
should be used to build a Central
Hospital in Andros, a University
of The Bahamas, the Prison and
Defence Base. Move the port to
south west side of New Provi-
dence and shuttle the workers
from New Providence to Andros
the largest Island in The Bahamas
and fifth largest in the Caribbean
in less than hour by the Bo Hengy
boat and 10 minutes by plane to
Central Andros.

This move would bring the cost
of living in New Providence down
to 50 per cent. Farmers and fish-
ermen would be able to bring
their produce and fish from
Andros, Berry Island and South
Abaco to New Providence in the
morning, sell them and be back
home in the evening.

Also, when we make the move
with the above institutions to
Andros, New Providence over the
next 10 to 20 years population
would decrease by 100,000 per-
sons and some of these expensive
roads we are now building in New
Providence would have to be
closed because the traffic would
also be decreased.

Parliament needs a face lift
with independent thinkers and
with a proposal like the above
South Abaco, Berry Island, espe-
cially Andros and New Provi-
dence would have a boom like
they have never seen before.

The World, including The
Bahamas is praising President
Obama, a highly intelligent 47-
year-old young man. A young
leader with the idea of change.

As a young man who came to
Nassau in 1966, the Bahamian
people were crying out for hope

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



and change and only the very for-
tunate people had inside kitchens
and inside toilets; then on January
10, 1967 a brilliant young man of
38 years with new ideas brought
us to where we are today.

From outside toilets, a fishing
village to the best economy in the
region where the black, pink,
white and red people are benefit-
ting.

The FNM has Pindling and
Obama and the deputy speaker of
the House a smart, highly quali-
fied Bahamian.

The PLP has Pindlings and
Obamas. The Bahamas has a
large number of educated, highly
intelligent young men and women
with ideas which would, when
pooled together, blow our mem-
bers of parliament royal readers,
Huckleberry Finn and Tom
Sawyer ideas- bankrupt-era
minds.

Example, my son who went to
Fisk University obtained BA in
Psychology and English, Buck-
ingham University completed
LLB in Law, 1st class Hons fin-
ished in top 10.

There were three top cate-
gories, one Indian woman, one
black man and an English man.
The black man, my son Audley
Jr, who went onto North Hamp-
shire and obtained LPC and Mas-
ters degree but all of the above
did not make me proud because
he was always a smart boy.

When he was called to the New
York Bar that made me proud
because J F Kennedy Jr, three
times, his brother former Attor-
ney General Bobby Kennedy
twice.

While watching the Mighty
Sparrow who spoke about his
daughter who passed the New
York Bar.

He was proud because those
children who had all the money
did not and had to repeat.

I was able to relate to his feel-
ings. So we need the young Pin-
dlings and Obamas to bring us
out of the political bankruptcy
era we find ourselves in when it
comes to leadership in The
Bahamas.

Some of the vibrant young
Bahamian leaders that I am
thinking about come from both
sides or the House. Persons like

Glenys Hanna-Martin, Wayne
Munroe, Monique Pindling-John-
son, Kwasi Thompson, Hope
Strachan, Tommy Turnquest,
Frank Smith, Myles LaRoda,
Craig Butler, Fred Mitchell,
Branville McCartney, Jerome
Fitzgerald, Algernon Allen Jr,
Sidney Cambridge Jr, Ryan Pin-
der, Kendal Wright, Picewell
Forbes, Philip “Fish” McKenzie,
Damien Gomez, Oscar N John-
son Jr, Dwayne Hanna, Dr Ger-
ard Hanna-Rolle, Romauld Fer-
reira, Patrick Hanna, Dr Kendal
Major, Duward Francis, Sharon
Hanna, Michael Halkitis, Dr
Michael Darville, Paul Moss,
Diane Hanna-Wilson, John H
Bostwick Jr, Dr Danny Johnson,
Paulette Zonicle, Michelle
Roberts, Mario Gray, Desmond
Bannister, Cara Ingraham, Nis-
honda Tynes, Tanisha Tynes,
Anne Wells, Travett Pyfrom,
Frannon Wilson, Jimmy Knowles
Jr, Janet R Bostwick, Dr Valen-
tine Grimes, Rosel Wilson, Malis-
sa Sears, Ken Dorsett, Italia
Cartwright, Alexander Maillis II,
Christopher Plakaris Alex Storr,
Darrin Rodgers, Dr Cargills, Mar-
vin Dames, Dr _ Allison
Greenslade, Keith Bell, these
names are not in any particular
order or superior thinkers just
that I think they would make
great leaders and there are many
more that could be added to this
list.

The way I analysis the present
government, any politician who
is not computer literate should
be out because most ways of run-
ning the country of the world is
not in an exercise book or the
royal reader.

They need to pass the baton
on to our youth.

When I heard that The
Bahamas would be hosting the
Miss Universe Contest I said to
myself this would be a real oppor-
tunity to expose the other Family
of Bahamian Islands by using
boats like the Fast Ferries,
Bahamas Daybreak, Captain
Moxey, Island Link, Bo Hengy
can be used for day or over night
trips because they are nice clean
boats that would take the contes-
tants to Eleuthera, Abaco,
Andros and other close islands
and cays giving them a chance to
get a piece of the “pie”.

AUDLEY D HANNA Sr JP
Nassau,
March, 2009.

The real reason for the Pindling legacy hysteria

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I hope that I am not too late
with my comment concerning
your article on the subject.

I find it very odd that the only
persons who are defending Sir
Lynden Pindling’s legacy are the
ones who were either too young
to know what had transpired in
that era or were in schools
abroad.

Not one of Sir Lynden or Mr



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Tynes’ contemporary colleagues
have voiced their support of Sir
Lynden or refuted Mr Tynes’
account of the events of the early
1980’s.

No one wants to know of the
other side of Sir Lynden’s per-
sona.

Everyone just wants to be
focused on his positive legacy, but
to be fair to the future genera-
tions both sides of his story
should be told. That is what the
hysteria is all about — nothing
negative should be told.



Mr Marquis, that is the reason
you are vilified and Mr Michael
Craton is hailed as a hero. He
chose to perpetuate the myth that
Sir Lynden was a “saint”, while
you have the courage to show
that the man was only a human
being and he had as many char-
acter flaws as good ones. I thank
you for the enlightening articles
that you write.

E KNOWLES
Nassau,
March 23, 2009.



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you are not prepared for the challenges
so plan to attend the free first class of the
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on Monday, April 6, 2009, at 7p.m. then
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NO TELEPHONE CALLS, PLEASE


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



onhoard boat
is identified

THE man whose body
was discovered onboard a
boat moored near the
Potters Cay dock last
Tuesday has been identi-

fied as Leon “Crow”
Forbes, 65, of Eastwood.

A family member of Mr

Forbes’ phoned The Tri-
bune yesterday after an
article appeared in this
daily stating that police
had not yet released the
man’s identity.

Mr Forbes was found
dead in the cabin of the
vessel wearing a white T-
shirt and underwear.
Police ruled out foul play
as there were no signs of
trauma to the body, nor
any evidence on the boat
that suggested that the
man had been the victim
of a homicide.

A special memorial for
Mr Forbes was held last

Friday at Montagu Beach.

He is survived by his
son and other family
members.

Stabbing
incident is
investigated

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigat-
ing a stabbing incident that
occurred on Monday
evening.

Jaime Missick, 24, drove
himself to hospital at
around 9.55pm on Monday
after being stabbed under
his left arm.

ASP Bootle said Missick

reportedly went to drop off

his son when he got into an
altercation with his son’s
mother’s boyfriend.

He was treated for his
injuries and discharged.
Police are investigating.



you coul

~ Global United CEO

makes his case online

cen Ritchie



EMBATTLED Global United
Limited CEO Jackson Ritchie has
taken his cause to cyberspace in an
attempt to garner public sympathy
as he crusades for a meeting with the
prime minister in a last ditch bid to
save his jeopardised shipping agency.

While he initially shied away from
making public comments regarding
Global United's financial status, Mr
Ritchie has now created a profile on
the social networking site Facebook
and posted a video on the video shar-
ing site YouTube to make his case
against the government's demands
that the company pay up $6
million in outstanding debts imme-
diately.

An update on his Facebook pro-
file details Mr Ritchie's thwarted

attempt to meet with Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham at the PM’s
office yesterday, where he planned
to plead with Mr Ingraham to con-
sider accepting a payment plan to
recoup the outstanding money.

Allegations

In a two minute video posted on
YouTube, Mr Ritchie repeated his
allegations about the existence of a
Customs scam, highlighted in The
Tribune on Wednesday, which he
claims swindled Global United and
other brokerage companies out of
millions of dollars.

He is asking for government to
deduct the amount he claims was lost

to the scam from Global United's
outstanding balance.

Up to press time last night, the
video had logged 309 views.

The company head has been work-
ing feverishly over the last two weeks
to save his company from govern-
ment's winding up threat, saying it
would cost all 50 Global United
employees their jobs.

Mr Ritchie, a former PLP candi-
date for the Clifton constituency, is
not the first local political hopeful to
utilise social networking sites to gar-
ner support.

Several politicians and political
hopefuls are registered on Facebook,
which allows them to connect with
supporters on an immediate, more
personal basis.

Minister ‘has no knowledge’

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

STATE Minister for Finance
Zhirvargo Laing said he has no
knowledge of a Customs scam
that allegedly cheated local bro-
kerage firms out of "millions of
dollars.”

On Tuesday, embattled Glob-
al United CEO Jackson Ritchie
outlined the alleged scam to The
Tribune and claimed his com-
pany was targeted by corrupt
Customs officers who over-
charged “hundreds of thousands
of dollars” in Customs fees over
the past few years.

Mr Ritchie, whose company
is in jeopardy of a winding up
order by government because
of non-payment of $6 million in
outstanding debt, is asking gov-
ernment to credit the amount
the company was allegedly
cheated out of to Global's bal-
ance.

When contacted for comment
yesterday, Minister Laing
laughed off the claims, saying
he was only aware of the claims

d win a

after they were pub-
lished in Wednes-
day's Tribune.

"Tonly personally
saw the story — I
have no idea what
Mr Ritchie is talking
about at all, I really
do not," said Mr
Laing, who offered
no further comment
on the matter.

In a previous
interview, Mr
Ritchie claimed
these fees were paid
to the Customs
department and
then claimed on a
re-issued cheque to
the brokerage firm, that was
never collected by Global Unit-
ed.

He said he had documenta-
tion that showed how the
alleged scam affected his com-
pany going back “a few years”,
and estimated Global’s losses
through this scheme could
amount to “millions and mil-
lions” of dollars. Mr Ritchie is
asking government to credit this

aya I
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amount to his cur-
rent debt.

In his press state-
ment and video
released to the
media Tuesday, Mr
Ritchie provided
documentation sug-
gesting that on a sin-
gle transaction his
company overpaid
more than $55,000
for a shipment.

In the payment to
Customs of
$66,303.94 to clear
the shipment on
June 10, 2007, Glob-
al was issued a “mis-
cellaneous refunds
claim” valued at $55,253.28 only
10 days later on the same ship-
ment. However, these funds, Mr
Ritchie claimed, were never
received by his company.

With more than $125 million
worth of business a year, Mr
Ritchie said Global would annu-

of alleged Customs scam

ally pay government anywhere
from $70 and $80 million. Dur-
ing this period, Mr Ritchie said,
he was owed anywhere from $13
to $15 million.

When asked in a recent inter-
view how he could insist that it
was government that was forc-
ing him out of business when
the courts had ordered the
immediate payment of the out-
standing funds before any
attempts were made to recon-
cile the balances, Mr Ritchie
said that during any court mat-
ter both parties can still come
to some form of agreement.

He also explained that these
outstanding monies are not
funds owed by his company to
government in terms of taxes,
but the balances of his trade
payables which were “abrupt-
ly” called in by government.

Attempts to reach Acting
Comptroller of Customs Antho-
ny Adderley for comment yes-
terday were unsuccessful.

aT CL
WORM TUITE

A PUBLIC meeting will be
held tonight to inform the
South Beach community about
a new initiative to involve
coastal residents in the appre-
hension of illegal immigrants.

“Immigration Watch” will
be launched by the Depart-
ment of Immigration in seaside
communities across New Prov-
idence to stop migrants from
entering the country illegally.

Immigration department
director Jack Thompson said:
“The main thrust of the new
initiative is to invite persons in
the community and those who
reside in our coastline areas to
be on the watch for vessels,
which tend to come from that
angle, and persons disembark-
ing from those vessels, to alert
the authorities to make sure
people are not slipping through
the cracks to infiltrate the com-
munity.

“Tt is similar to ‘Crime
Watch’ but we want to ensure
we put this out so the entire
community will be involved.”

Immigration Watch meet-
ings will also be held in
Yamacraw, south east New
Providence, and other shore-
line areas, Mr Thompson said.

Tonight’s meeting will be
held at 7pm at Anatol Rodgers
High School on Faith Avenue,
South Beach.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



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THE TRIBUNE

Culture is crucial for the Bahamas

This is the fifth in a series of articles discussing the potential oppor-
tunities for the Bahamas in the emerging green economy. The writer,
Colin Lightbourn, is a real estate business owner, developer and
past president of the Bahamas National Trust. To comment, discuss
and submit ideas about these articles, visit www.thegreenislands.com

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 7



[s2icexous peoples
around the world argue
that the three pillars of sus-
tainable development (eco-
nomic, environmental and
social) exclude a fourth critical
pillar — culture.

The Universal Declaration
on Cultural Diversity states
that “cultural diversity is as
necessary for humankind as
biodiversity is for nature.” It
is “one of the roots of devel-
opment understood not sim-
ply in terms of economic
growth, but also as a means
to achieve a more satisfactory
intellectual, emotional, moral
and spiritual existence”.

In the Bahamas we have a
predominately African her-
itage blended with European
traditions.

The indigenous people of
the Bahamas were the
Lucayan Indians but traces of
their culture exist only in
books and archacological or
historical publications. If the
Indians had survived the
Columbus era, more of our
culture might reflect what is
found in Mexico or Peru
where the influence of the
Mayans and Incas is still evi-
dent.

For a small and relatively
new country depending on
tourism as its primary source
of jobs and income, culture is
crucial to the Bahamas main-
taining its competitiveness in
the region. Many new devel-
opments throughout the
islands create new interpreta-
tions of aspects of Bahamian

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

RUE
PHONE: 322-2157



YOUR SAY



“The fact that
we have so
many islands
means that
diversity is
healthy and
required in
order to give
each location its
Own unique
identity and
ability to attract
visitors and
those seeking a
new home.”



culture — some good and some
bad.

The fact that we have so
many islands means that
diversity is healthy and
required in order to give each
location its own unique iden-
tity and ability to attract visi-
tors and those seeking a new
home. However, if authentic
Bahamian culture is not more
consistently expressed in
tourism products, there is the
risk of it being diluted over
time by corporate marketing.

The hub of the Bahamas is
downtown Nassau. It is the
gateway to the country for the
cruise industry, banking and
business and only a handful
of Nassuvians manage to
avoid it on a regular basis. It



was once an iconic symbol of
the Bahamas but has slipped
over the past couple of
decades into a depressing state
of neglect.

Many tourists who do not
arrive via cruise ship are told
to avoid downtown and visit
places like Marina Village on
Paradise Island and Sandy-
port, which offer cleaner and
more modern hassle-free
experiences. As the island
grows west there will be new
“Marina Villages” likely at
Cable Beach and further west
past the airport. We may even
see an effort to develop a new
hub to rival Bay Street with
the aim of attracting business-
es and entrepreneurs. Bay
Street merchants will struggle
and property owners will
realise reduced rents and
property values.

Hens have been
underway since the

late 1980s to improve down-
town. Some of the short-term
goals have been to identify
additional parking areas,
install parking meters, enforce
laws and traffic violations, lim-
it bus access to Bay Street and
control crime and harassment
by increasing police presence.

US port cities like
Charleston, South Carolina
and San Francisco, California
experienced post-World Word
II renaissances which did not
come from redevelopment but
were inspired by local artists
and writers who wanted to
promote their cities. Perhaps
the missing element to kick
start the Nassau Renaissance

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VILLA DOYLE on West Hill Street is an exemplary standard with historical and cultural value.

is not about streets and build-
ings but about culture.

The master plan for the
Nassau redevelopment focus-
es on several “zones” from
Arawak Cay to Montagu.
Arawak Cay already has the
beginnings of a cultural expe-
rience. Across the street is the
Botanical Gardens, an 18-acre
site which is home to over 600
species of flowering trees and
shrubs and is unfortunately
closed to the public. Com-
bined with Fort Charlotte,
these sites hold great poten-
tial for a “must see and do”
cultural experience that can
be on every hotel and cruise
ship list.

The Botanical Gardens
itself could contain a large
amphitheatre hosting the
country’s signature culture
show. The show can build on
features from previous shows

Sar De

Discover another side of par

like Peanuts Taylor’s Drum-
beat Club, the Cabaret on Par-
adise Island and incorporate
junkanoo and the National
Youth Choir among other
attractions.

The show could depict the
story of the Bahamas from the
Indians to slavery and colo-
nialism, to independence and
a celebration of the Bahamas
today - all told through
Bahamian music, song and
dance.

The show could be market-
ed as the real Bahamian expe-
rience and sold in packages
including dinner, the show and
other options.

In order to attract volume,
cruise ships and hotels would
have to be on board to pro-
mote the packages to their
guests, probably at a cost per
head. The idea can be pro-
moted on cruise ships as part

Marina Village at Atlantis is where local Caribbean
culture comes to life. Shop in over twenty duty-free
boutiques featuring fine jewelry, perfume, original
art and luxury resort wear. Or find a treasure in one
of many carts brimming with local, handmade crafts
and treats. Dine in one of five unique eateries, taste
authentic Bahamian fare at Bimini Road, or indulge
in the creations of world-renown chef Jean-Georges
Vongerichten at the historic Café Martinique or
sample homestyle Italian dishes at Carmines, a
New York dining institution.



of a walking experience which
meanders through town and
along the waterfront
esplanade where artisans can
offer their various indigenous
crafts and art.

In addition to building a
greater sense of what the
Bahamas is, creating world-
class cultural experiences will
give the government a greater
ability to attract investors,
tourists and incorporate more
Bahamians into the overall
development of the country.

With so much emphasis
today on the monetary result
of service and hard work, cul-
ture can be used as a means to
build the city and at the same
time teach younger genera-
tions to live beautifully,
respect themselves and their
country, and hopefully service
and hard work will eventually
become second nature.

LOliee

Con



» DARIN
Non

- VILLAGE
: — AT Yo
ATLANTIS

For more information, visit Allantis.com
PAGE 8, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Meanwhile, inflation remained at
elevated levels during the review
period, reflecting mainly higher
prices for consumer goods,” the
Central Bank report said.

“The outlook for the Bahamian
economy remains weak through-
out 2009, with developments
expected to be heavily influenced
by the responsiveness of the glob-
al economy — particularly the
US — to the stimulus measures
implemented by monetary and
fiscal authorities.

“Consequently, tourism and
foreign-investment activity are
likely to remain subdued in the
near- term, with implications for a
further elevation in the unem-
ployment rate above the 12 per
cent estimated at year end-2008.”

The Central Bank said the
Government’s capital works pro-
jects, such as the New Providence
Road Improvement Project, con-
struction of court complexes and
government buildings, and the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport (LPIA) redevelopment,

Unemployment

would boost employment and
economic activity, but not reverse
the situation.

Striking a slightly more opti-
mistic note, the Central Bank said
the self-correcting mechanism
built into the Bahamian econo-
my’s structure would prevent the
current account and balance of
payments suffering “significant
deterioration.”

In any economic downturn,
Bahamian consumer and business
demand for imports is reduced,
along with credit growth, thus
reducing the outflow of foreign
currency. And the Central Bank’s
external reserves would be
enhanced by the Government’s
foreign currency borrowing.

Nevertheless, the weakness in
the general Bahamian economy
had passed into the commercial
banking sector in the form of
increased loan arrears. Credit
growth had slowed down due to
banks “more conservative lending
practices and lowered demand for
credit.”

More troubling for Bahamian
commercial banks is that in Feb-
ruary, while the percentage of
total loans more than 30 days past
due decreased, the proportion
over 90 days past due — meaning
those that are classified as non-
performing, and earning the
banks no interest — increased.

Non-performing commercial
bank loans increased by 3.7 per
cent or $14.3 million to $397.2
million, a figure that accounted
for 6.55 per cent of total bank
loans in the Bahamas. The indus-

try usually tries to keep non-per-
forming loans at 5 per cent or
below.

However, the banks enjoyed
better news when it came to loans
that were between 31-90 days past
due, as these fell by $29.5 million
to $354.5 million. These loans
dropped to 5.84 per cent of the
total, indicating that commercial
banks were having some success
in restructuring loans and pre-
venting them from falling into the
non-performing category.

Overall, the total value of pri-

Claim that police officers
used torture techniques

FROM page one





































































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Invites application for the position of:

INTERNAL AUDTIOR

Applicants must process knowledge of the
application of generally accepted accounting
principles, internal control systems and
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to facilitate improvements in productivity as well
as strong leadership skills in area of responsibility.

Salary will be based upon qualification and
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be able to work on their own initiative. Basic
knowledge of General, Life and Medical
Insurances will be an asset.

Also, interested persons must have good verbal
and written communications skills, good PC
skills and excellent customer service skills.

Please send resume to: P.O. BOX CB 10979
NASSAU, BAHAMAS.
FAX NO. (242) 328-6357

on his back in a reclining position and water is poured over his head
disrupting normal breathing and making him feel that he is drown-
ing. Causing an almost instant gag reflex, the victim believes he is
about to die. It was this feeling, said Mr Cartwright, that caused him
to black out when the officers lowered his head into a toilet bowel
in one of the upstairs offices at the station.

One of the officers, he said, sat on his chest and poured water over
his face, flushing the toilet from time to time while the other held
his legs in place.

Wrestling free after regaining consciousness, Delanzo said he
struggled with the two officers who were in their plain clothes at the
time and eventually was able to get out of the stall onto the ground.

The officers he said continued to beat him with the bats, stopping
sometimes to kick him about the body, even stomping him in the

roin.
‘ “T passed out three times,” said Mr Cartwright who claims that the
beating lasted for almost two hours.

It was only his 6 foot tall, 220 pound frame, Delanzo said that
saved his life.

“They beat me across my back, my face, my legs, with this big
black metal pipe they had wrapped up in black tape. While I was on
the ground in the bathroom, a male Sergeant came in and said: ‘Ya’ ll
cover his mouth’, ’cause I was hollerin’ trying to get someone to help
me.

“And they was stomping me and kicking me and whapping me
*cause they were trying to get me to go back in the toilet and I was
holding on that thing that turns on the toilet. And these fella’s
kept whapping me and I wouldn’t let that go because I know if they
get me back in there I know what they were going to do,” he said.

Mr Cartwright said the officers threatened to carry him to the
South Beach canals to continue the beating as his howling contin-
ued to cause the officers concern that someone would hear and dis-
cover what they were doing.

“Tf they did carry me by the canal I know they were going to kill
me. But my attorney showed up and he heard them beating me.
That’s when the senior officer just disappeared,” he said.

It was at this point during The Tribune’s interview with Mr
Cartwright that his doctor emerged from the Male Medical ward
and told him he was well enough to be discharged.

Having had a catheter inserted because he was urinating blood,
Mr Cartwright said he was certain he was going to die in the hold-
ing cell of the police station that night as the officers had failed to
get him any immediate medical attention.

Apparently, it was only after the arresting officers arrived at
the station and discovered him sprawled on the floor of the cell that
they rushed him to Princess Margaret Hospital’s Accident and
Emergency section.

Here as well, he said, because he arrived in handcuffs he was
treated as “less than a human being” and only given a shot and sent
back to the station.

Ironically, while he was in hospital, Delanzo said one of the
men who allegedly beat him visited him to inform him that he was
going to be charged with causing harm, obscene language, and
disorderly behaviour at the station.

Mr Cartwright has since filed a report with the Complaints and
Corruption Unit of the Royal Bahamas Police Force and is expect-
ing to file criminal charges through his attorney against these offi-
cers as soon as possible.

Assistant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna told The Tribune
last night that he was not aware of this case and encouraged the man
to file a police report.

After being told that a police report had already been filed, Mr
Hanna said that it had not yet come to his attention.



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vate sector loans past due fell by
2 per cent, or $15.2 million, in
February 2009 to $757.7 million, a
figure that represented 12.48 per
cent of all outstanding loans.

The Central Bank attributed
the reduction in total loan arrears
to mortgages, where the total
number of loans past due fell to
12.72 per cent from 13.51 per cent
in January.

“Tn contrast, the consumer and
commercial arrears rate firmed
to 11.13 per cent and 15.49 per
cent from 10.88 per cent and 15.3
per cent respectively, amid
growth in the non-performing
component. Banks continued to
increment their loan loss provi-
sions over the review month,
leading to the ratio of provisions
to arrears firming by 0.89 per-
centage points to 23.67 per cent.

“However, the corresponding
ratio to non-performing loans
declined by 0.83 percentage
points to 45.16 per cent.”

For the first two months in
2009, the amount of Bahamian
dollar credit issues fell year-over-
year to $30.2 million, compared to
a $36.5 million advance in 2008.
Consumer lending fell by $24.7
million, and residential mortgage

2009, the Central Bank reported
that domestic inflation rose to 4.8
per cent, compared to 4.67 per
cent for the previous 12-month
period and 2.41 per cent a year
ago.

“Notable increases were regis-
tered for food and beverages
(7.43 per cent), furniture and
household operations (6.66 per
cent) and medical and healthcare
(4.54 per cent),” the Central Bank
said.

“More modest costs rises were
recorded for housing and recre-
ation and entertainment services
of 3.59 per cent and 3.7 per cent,
respectively. The remaining
groups recorded inflation rates of
less than 3 per cent,” the Central
Bank said.

For the first nine months of
2008, hotel room revenues
increased by 5.8 per cent to $424.3
million, year-over-year. This was
driven by a 9.4 per cent increase
in average daily room rates, as
hotel room night sales fell 3.3 per
cent.

“Activity in the sector is
expected to have weakened sig-
nificantly over the closing months
of the year and into early 2009,
reflecting downturns in both

growth nearly halved to $22.4 mil-
lion.
For the 12 months to February

occupancy levels and average dai-
ly room rates,” the Central Bank
said.

Privy Council Judicial Committee reserves

its decision on beach access dispute
FROM page one

regarding access to Clifton Bay beach. The appellant’s property sits on
a hill at the rear of Winegardener’s lot.

The facts of the case are that an easement was granted by Wine-
gardener’s predecessor in title over a certain part of land in favour
of the appellant’s predecessors in title, granting a right of way
access to Clifton Bay Beach along a 50-foot wide roadway. Although
a further agreement regarding access to the beach was entered
into in 1968, nothing else happened until 1999 when the appellant
— current owner — entered into discussions with Winegardener,
under the expectation that the earlier agreement would be upheld.
The appellant subsequently filed a writ in Supreme Court after
there was no resolution to the matter, alleging also that the respon-
dent had started obstructing the use of the road access to the beach.

Nothing happened until November 2001 when the appellant
applied for leave to amend his writ. The appellant did nothing fur-
ther to progress the action after that, however, and on February 18,
2004, Winegardener filed an application to have the writ struck
out.

Senior Justice John Lyons in a ruling handed down in February
2006, dismissed the action and struck out the appellant’s writ and
statement of claim for an inordinate and inexcusable delay. The
court of appeal upheld that decision later that year. In a dissenting
judgment on the appeal however, Justice Hartman Longley agreed
with the appellant’s argument that Justice Lyons had erred in his
judgment.

Julian Malins, QC, who appeared with lawyer Tracy Ferguson of
Callenders and Co on behalf of Icebird Limited adopted Justice
Longley’s reasoning for dismissing the judgment, submitting that his
client’s case is substantive and should be allowed to proceed.

Henry Bostwick, QC, who appeared with his daughter, Lisa
Bostwick, for the respondent, Alicia Winegardener, argued, how-
ever, that the decision of Senior Justice Lyons and the Court of
Appeal should be upheld. He added that the striking out of the writ
and the statement of claim was warranted. Mr Bostwick told the Law
Lords that his client wants to have the matter over and done with.

The Privy Council, which is the highest court of appeal for cer-
tain Commonwealth countries, customarily sits in Downing Street,
London. However, the Council’s Judicial Committee will sit in the
Court of Appeal until tomorrow.

The Privy Council, which usually consists of five law lords, has sat
in the Bahamas on two previous occasions— in December 2006,
which was its first sitting outside London, and again in December
2007.

The appeals are being heard before the five law lords — Lord
Philips of Worth Martravers, who is the senior Law Lord, Lord
Scott of Foscote, Lord Brown of Eaton-under-Heywood, Lord
Mance and Lord Neuberger. The Law Lords heard the appeal in the
cases of Wendall Swann vs the Attorney General of the Turks and
Caicos Islands (TCI) on Monday. The Privy Council is expected to
hear the appeal in the case of Johannes Deuss vs the Attorney
General for Bermuda and the Commissioner of Police of Bermuda
today.

KINGSWAY ACADEMY
ELEMENTARY

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Kingsway Academy will be
holding Entrance Examinations
for students wishing to enter grades
2,3.and 6on MONDAY, APRIL6,
2009. Parents are asked to collect
Application Forms from __ the
Elementary School office before
the testing date from 8:30a.m. to
4:00p.m.

For further information contact

the school at telephone numbers
324-5049, 324-2158, or 324-6269
THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

Yellow Jersey sponsor Bahamas
Ferries is ready for Ride for Hope



Donation allows BHS manager
to travel to convention in US

THE Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety (BHS) said it was over-
whelmed by the generous dona-
tion that will enable shelter man-
ager Percy Grant to attend the
Humane Society of the United
States annual convention in Las
Vegas.

Answering the call for spon-
sorship, the Bahamas Bridge
Club donated $1,000 to the BHS
for the trip.

“It is honestly a dream come
true,” Mr Grant told executive
director of BHS Stephen Turn-
quest, who had already been
sponsored by Bahamian busi-
nessman Robert Reiss of Reiss
Engineering a few weeks ago.

“We were honestly concerned
as to how we would be able to
afford to take Percy as well,”
BHS president Kim Aranha said.

“When we put the photo of
Stephen receiving his cheque in
the papers we mentioned that
Percy was looking for a sponsor,



BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY Executive Director Stephen Turnquest;
Bahamas Bridge Club Member (friend of Shirley Bays) Brenda Rouse;
Bahamas Bridge Club President (friend of Shirley Bays) Noreen Wurde-
mann and Shelter Manager Percy Grant.



PICTURED L-R ARE: Stephen Holowesko, co-founder of the Ride For Hope; Stephen Thompson of
Bahamas Ferries, Capt Andy Moxey and Susan Larson, co-founder of the event.

within hours Mrs Noreen Wur-

demann contacted me at home.”
Mrs Wurdemann is president

of the Bahamas Bridge Club.
This group of ladies donate

urges others to consider dona-
tions like this as a fitting way to
remember the departed who
loved and cherished animals.

A group of three BHS repre-
sentatives leave on Sunday for

Aranha, president; Stephen Turn-
quest, executive director, and Per-
cy Grant, shelter manager.

The Bahamas will be well rep-
resented this year as the Grand
Bahama Humane Society is also

LOCAL ferry and shipping company Bahamas
Fast Ferries is ready for this years Ride for Hope
bike-a-thon.

BFF is a founding sponsor of the charity cycling

partner. The company’s vessel, The Sea Wind, cap-

tained by Andy Moxey, will be sailing to the island

on Saturday carrying participants and equipment.
Every dollar raised by the event goes towards

event, which takes place on the island of Eleuthera. the improvement of cancer treatments and care

annually to various local charita-

i the conference. They are Kim
ble causes and has been doing so

for the past 30 years.

This year, they thought it
would be fitting to donate the
money needed to send BHS’ shel-
ter manager to Las Vegas in
memory of their beloved club
member Shirley Bays who passed
away in December 2008.

Mrs Wurdemann said, “I'm
sure Shirley would have been
delighted to know that our dona-
tion of $1,000 will be used toward
expenses for Mr Percy Grant to
attend the Vegas conference.”

Mrs Bays came to the Bahamas
in 1984 from Canada. Her inter-
ests included bridge, which she
excelled at. She adored her dogs,
all of which were potcakes, some
she picked up in the bushes and
others she found on the street.

She also had her beloved gray
parrot Noogie, who could sing
the first few bars of “Oh Cana-
da.”

Her friends remember her as
a person who was faultlessly ded-
icated to her animals and to the
works of the Bahamas Humane
Society. When she died, her wish
was that Mr Grant take care of
her parrot, and Noogie now
resides happily with the shelter
manager.

Mrs Bays was a very private
person and was not one to make
her generous gifts public. Her
friends say that they are sure that
over the years she helped many
other organisations in the
Bahamas.

Ms Aranha said, “it was such a
wonderful way to honour a spe-
cial person after they have passed
away. We are eternally grateful to
the Bahamas Bridge Club and
their innovative idea of donating
Percy's trip to the conference in
memory of Shirley.

“T am sure that she will be with
us in Vegas and watching over
us.”

The Bahamas Humane Society

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Family claim man was unarmed

FROM page one

“suspicious” manner. As the offi-
cers approached, the report
claims that the vehicle sped off. A
chase followed eventually com-
ing to an end on Goggle Eye
Road in the Redland Acres area.

“The occupants of the vehicle
exited and fired shots at the
Police causing damage to the
chasing marked unit (police car).
Police then returned fire hitting
one of the men fatally as the oth-
ers escaped. A handgun was
recovered near the deceased,”
the statement said.

However, in an extensive
interview with The Tribune out-
side the Princess Margaret
morgue yesterday, Arensio’s
older brother, Albert Jr, who
was one of the passengers in the
Mitsubishi Mirage, said that the
police’s account of Tuesday
night’s events are completely
inaccurate.

“Some guys had ganged my
brother right and took his car.
So he asked for me to go with

—
ANDEAUS

him to get his car back. So when
we reach back round there the
car was done burn down to the
ground and the police was done
on the scene. So we leave the
scene to get on our way home
in Nassau Village and these
police officers tried to pull us
over through Highbury Park in
one little dark corner.

“And we pulled our car over
ya know, but as soon as we open
our door and put your leg out
the car they just open fire. So
we just pulled off and when we
pulled off they kept firing until
we reached our destination
where my little brother dead.”

Albert Jr said the driver of the
vehicle was the first to get out of
the car, followed by his brother
who was shot twice in his back.

“IT was the last one out the car
and they ain’t do nothing to me.
I callin’ out for my brother and
he ain’t answerin’. I ask the offi-
cer if he shoot my brother dead

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and he tell me ‘see him here,
come back for yours’,” Mr Mor-
timer said.

These two officers Albert said,
proceeded to “boast” at the
scene stating that they “found” a
9mm handgun on Arsenio and
that he had shot at them first.

Furthermore, Albert Jr said
that he was at the scene speaking
to officers following his broth-
er’s shooting, so he was even
more surprised to hear on the
news Wednesday that he was
being “sought” by the police
when he was standing right there
with them the night before.

“Why they didn’t arrest me if
I was right there? We had no
weapons in the car at all. No
drugs, no weapon, none of that
was in the car. They had no right
to do that and they plant that
gun on my brother. That’s the
same gun they was shooting at
us from Highbury Park and as
soon as my brother come out
(the car) they probably use the

Expired insulin given to patient
‘was sent to Bahamas in 2006’

THE OUT-OF-DATE insulin.

FROM page one

the bottom of the box clearly
shows it expired in October,
2007, the label printed by the
Elizabeth Estates Clinic phar-
macy maintained it expired 12
months after it was issued.



A Memorial Service

of

Praise & Thanksgiving

gun they was licensed with...”

“But how they could shoot
him in his back!” exclaimed a
family member who was stand-
ing nearby.

This woman’s concerns were
the same as those of PLP activist
and Nassau Village resident
Omar Archer who was also pre-
sent at the morgue with the
Mortimer family.

“With his back turned, Arse-
nio poses no threat to an officer
so how can they justify using
deadly force? But you heard
what the officer said to his older
brother, ‘come back for yours’,”
said Mr Archer, adding that if
that is in fact what happened
“they have to be put up on
charges of murder. If this is what
the Commissioner of Police is
standing up for them he needs to
resign immediately.”

However, no amount of tears
or words of comfort could ease
the pain of Arensio’s girlfriend,
Nicole Samson, who is now left
to care for the couple’s six-
month-old son, Nackyo.

Sobbing in the waiting room

A health industry profession-
al, who did not want to be
named, said: “I understand that
mistakes are made but this is
absolutely inexcusable.

“Tt is the responsibility of the
pharmacist to check the expiry
date, that’s basic. But patients
need to check these things as
well.

“Every single patient should
check what they take before
they take it.

“If nothing else maybe peo-
ple will start checking the labels
now.”

The Ministry of Health and
Department of Public Health
maintain there are no outdat-
ed medications currently in sup-
plies at the Elizabeth Estates
Clinic pharmacy and health
bosses are investigating the
claims.

However, investigations have
produced no response as yet.

at the morgue, Nicole repeated
over and over how much she
loved Arsenio and how he had
promised that he would never
leave her.

“Baby, please don’t leave me,
Arsenio baby please don’t leave
me. I love you so much, please
baby don’t leave me,” she cried.

Composing herself for a brief
moment, Nicole outlined how
her boyfriend had been jumped
earlier that day by a group of
men through Pit Road in the
Boyd Road area. The incident
developed because of an earlier
confrontation in which she had
been harassed by the men on
that street, who felt that as she
was returning to the area with
her boyfriend he must have been
coming to get even with them.

Pulling Arsenio from the vehi-
cle, a fight followed shortly after
the couple turned onto the
street, and once the dust had set-
tled, Arsenio and Nicole were
forced to leave the car in the
possession of these neighbour-
hood thugs.

“My baby never bothered
nobody, he didn’t have no gun.
He told me he was just going to
get his car, and he was going to

call the police. He never had no
gun, he just got his life straight,”
she said.

Following his interview yes-
terday, The Tribune understands
that Albert Jr was arrested at
the morgue by Central Detec-
tive Unit officers as he viewed
his brother’s body.

Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna told The
Tribune last night that police are
encouraging anyone with further
information about this incident
to come forward so that it can
be factored into the investiga-
tion.

“We take (the claims) very
seriously, so we want those per-
sons who may have any infor-
mation to come to us,” he said.

As the investigation is in its
early stages, he said, it is pre-
mature to comment any further
on the matter.

However, Mr Hanna remind-
ed the public that the police car
was damaged during this inci-
dent, reportedly as the result of
gunfire.

Police have launched an
“intensive search” for two other
persons who they believe were
involved in the shooting.



ECUMENICAL SERVICES

. Matthew's Anglican Church



Reconciliation

7:30PM.



Cone I Vashi cme Ay A

Church & Shirley Street

PALM SUNDAY - April 5th - 7:15am Eucharist, Blessing of
Palms and Sermon; 10:00am Blessing of Palms, Procession
Eucharist, & Sermon; 7:00pm - Mission Service

MONDAY April 6th - 7:00pm — Stations of the Cross.

TUESDAY - April 7th — 7:00am Mass; 7:00pm — Service of

WEDNESDAY - April 8th - Mass 7:00am & 1:00pm at St.
Matthew’s. A Mass of the Chrism, Christ Church Cathedral at

MAUNDY THURSDAY - April 9th - 7:00pm Holy Eucharist,
Washing of Feet and Watch before the Altar of Repose.

GOOD FRIDAY - April 10th - 9:00am Liturgy for Good Friday;
12noon — 3:00pm Seven Last Words from the Cross.

EASTER DAY - April 12th - 6:00am The Great Easter Vigil &
Holy Eucharist; 10:45am — Solemn High Mass, Procession
(Within the church) LIVE RADIO BROADCAST.

7:00pm Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction.



er

For More Information Telephone: 323-8220





Christ Church Cathedral
Schedule of Services for Holy Week & Easter
April 5th - April 12th, 2009
Sunday April Sth Sunday of The Passion & Palm Sunday

7:30 a.m.
8:45 a.m.

Distribution of Palms & Holy Eucharist
The Liturgy of the Palms

Procession & Liturgy for Palm Sunday

H:1Sam. Blessing & Distribution of Palms
Holy Eucharist
Evensong, Sermon & Benediction

6:10) p.m.
Monday April 6th - 1:00 p.m.

Holy Eucharist

Tuesday April 7th - 7:00 a.m. & 12:30 p.m.
Holy Eucharist
Wednesday April 8th - 7:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.
Holy Eucharist
7:30 p.m.
Liturgy of the Renewal of Prestly Vows & Blessing of Holy Oils
Thursday April 9th - Maundy Thursday 7:30 p.m.
Commemoration of the Last Supper, Washing of Feet &
s Watch before the Altar of Repose
Friday April 10th - Good Friday 9:00 a.m.

The Good Friday Liturgy

hanlene Forbes nee Ferguson

1967-2009
®

Church of God oPELOpRecy
Elizabeth Estates, Commonwealth Blvd.

Service Times For Sunday April 12th, 2009
Easter Sunday

6:00 a.m, The Easter Vigil
Time: Friday April 3rd. 2009, @ 7:30 pm. 7:30 a.m. Holy Communion
: 9:00 acm. Procession, Solemn High Mass
li:i5a.m. Holy Eucharist
éé . , 33 6:00 p.m. Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction
As f Or God, His way ES Perfect 9:00 a.m. Procession, Solemn High Mass

Ps. 18:30

11:15 a.m.
6:(M) p.m.

Holy Eucharist
Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



John
McEnroe
to work
on ESPN2’s
US Open
telecasts

BRISTOL, Conn. (AP)
— John McEnroe will be
part of ESPN2’s announc-
ing team when the net-
work carries the U.S.
Open for the first time
this year.

He sometimes will be
paired in the broadcast
booth with his younger
brother Patrick, who suc-
ceeded him as the U.S.
Davis Cup captain.

John McEnroe won the
U.S. Open four times.

This year marks the
start of a six-year deal
through 2014 for ESPN
and Tennis Channel to
carry the U.S. Open’s
cable TV coverage, taking
over from USA Network.













































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Australia on the verge of
qualifying for World Cup

SYDNEY (AP) — Josh
Kennedy and Harry Kewell
scored second-half goals to put
Australia on the cusp of secur-
ing a World Cup spot with a 2-
0 win over Uzbekistan on
Wednesday.

If the Group A match
between Bahrain and Qatar
ends in a draw later Wednes-
day at Manama, Australia will
be the first team to advance to
South Africa 2010 from Asian
qualifying.

Kennedy, a forward with
German club Karlsruhe, scored
six minutes after replacing
Celtic striker Scott McDonald
in the 60th minute.

The 26-year-old Kennedy
directed his header inside the
near post from Mark Bres-
ciano’s powerful cross from the
right edge of the area in the
66th minute to break the dead-
lock.

It was his sixth goal in 12
matches for Australia.

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drove a left-foot penalty kick
low and hard into the bottom
right corner of the net to seal
the win after Hull City mid-
fielder Richard Garcia was
felled in a rough challenge
inside the area.

It was Australia’s fourth win
in five matches in the last full
round of qualifying and the
fifth straight clean sheet for
goalkeeper Mark Schwarzer.

The Australians lead the

Uzbekistan's Farhod Tadjiyev, right,
and Australia's Scott Chipperfield
vie for the ball during their World
Cup group A qualifying soccer
match at Stadium Australia, Syd-
ney, Wednesday April 1, 2009.

ead CO SETI eed)



group with 13 points, two
ahead of Japan.

Uzbekistan, Bahrain and
Qatar all went into Wednes-
day’s matches with four points.

Uzbekistan got its campaign
back on track with a 4-0 win
over Qatar at Tashkent last
Saturday night, but now can
only challenge for third place in
the group, which earns a place
in a playoff with the third-place
team from Group B.

South Korea edges
North Korea 1-0 in
soccer match

Bm By JOHN DUERDEN
Associated Press Writer

SEOUL, South Korea (AP)
— South Korea scored a late
goal for a 1-0 win over North
Korea on Wednesday as soccer
briefly took the focus off height-
ening political tension in the
region.

South Korea reclaimed the
top place in Group B of Asian
World Cup qualifying with 11
points, one ahead of North
Korea.

It was a good-natured match,
and more entertaining than the
four recent draws in the derby
clashes.

However, North Korea coach
Kim Jong Hun was visibly upset
after the match, following Kim
Chi-woo’s late goal.

The coach suggested food
poisoning had weakened his
team and disputing the refer-
ee’s ruling on a goal-line deci-
sion, before refusing to answer
questions.

“This was a game that should-
n’t have been played. Jong Tae
Se and goalkeeper Ri Myung
Guk shouldn’t have played,” he

eet

fa

said. “After eating at the hotel
provided by South Korea, they
contracted diarrhea.”

His counterpart had no com-
plaints.

“This was a vital result for
us,” South Korea coach Huh
Jung-moo said. “We played well
and the players didn’t lose their
concentration for the whole
game and kept going until the
end.”

No sooner had supporters at
the Seoul World Cup stadium
applauded both national
anthems than North Korea
almost took the lead. Hong
Yong Jo’s fierce shot looked
destined for the top corner
before South Korean goal-
keeper Lee Woon-jae just man-
aged to make the save.

The second half was played
at a higher tempo as both teams
looked for the win.

Four minutes after the break,
North Korea’s star striker Jong
Tae-se thought he had scored
with a close-range header until
Lee blocked on the line.

North Korea coach Kim was
incensed by the call.

“Shouldn’t the referee be

Fans make
1.6m requests
for the 2010
WCup tickets

JOHANNESBURG (AP) —
Soccer fans are bidding for tick-
ets to the 2010 World Cup in
South Africa, with FIFA receiv-
ing more than 1.6 million
requests.

Fans from 205 countries
applied in the first phase of
online sales, soccer’s world gov-
erning body said Wednesday.
The tickets will be allocated in a
lottery on April 15.

South African residents made
around 30 percent of the
1,635,136 requests for seats.
They will pay $15 for the cheap-
est seats at group stage matches.

“We want to encourage even
more South Africans and
Africans to apply for their
World Cup tickets during the
next sales phase,” said Danny
Jordaan, chief executive of the
2010 World Cup organizing
committee.

Fans from the United States
made the most applications
from abroad, followed by the
United Kingdom, Germany,
Italy and Australia. The inter-
national price starts at $80 for a
seat at a group-stage match.

The most popular requests
on the 64-match program were
for the opening game on June
11 and the final on July 11. Both
will be played at the Soccer City
stadium in Johannesburg, which
is being upgraded to hold 94,700
spectators.

Fans who are allocated tickets
in the lottery will find out by e-
mail or text message by the end
of April.

Applicants were limited to
four tickets per match and a
maximum of seven matches. To
deter ticket scalpers, applicants
cannot buy tickets to different
matches played on the same
day.

The second round of sales on
FIFA’s Web site begins on May
4 and runs through November.

A third phase of sales will
begin in December after the 32
finalists are known and the
draw is announced for the
group stage matches.

fair? He ignored the fact that
the ball clearly crossed the line,”
Kim said. No replay was shown
on the big screen at the stadium.

The week leading up to the
Seoul qualifying match has been
overshadowed by the reaction
to North Korea’s plans to send
a communications satellite into
orbit between April 4-8.

The United States, South
Korea and Japan suspect the
reclusive country is using the
launch to test long-range mis-
sile technology.

North Korea countered by
accusing the United States of
spying on the site of an impend-
ing rocket launch and threat-
ened to shoot down any U.S.
planes that intrude into its air-
space.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 13





NBA Today

@ By The Associated Press

SCOREBOARD

Thursday, April 2

Utah at Denver (10:30 pm EDT).
In a potential playoff preview, the Jazz
get another chance to beat a top team
on the road when they visit the
Nuggets, who lead the Northwest Divi-
sion by one and-a-half games over
Portland and two and-a-half over Den-
ver. The Jazz have lost 15 consecutive
road games against teams with win-
ning records.

STARS

Tuesday

— David West, Hornets, matched
his career high with 40 points to help
New Orleans beat Sacramento 111-
110.

— LeBron James, Cavaliers, made
two crucial three-point plays down the
stretch and finished with 25 points and
12 rebounds as Cleveland beat Detroit
79-73 for its 13th straight victory.

— Gerald Wallace, Bobcats, had 21
points and 13 rebounds as Charlotte
continued its surprising mastery of the
Los Angeles Lakers with a 94-84 vic-
tory.

— LaMarcus Aldridge and Bran-
don Roy, Trail Blazers. Aldridge
scored 26 points, Roy had 25 points
and 11 assists, and Portland beat Utah
125-104.

— Kevin Durant, Thunder, scored
31 points to lead Oklahoma City over
San Antonio 96-95.

— T.J. Ford, Pacers, hit the go-
ahead jumper with 3.9 seconds left
and had 22 points and nine assists in
Indiana’s 107-105 victory over Cleve-
land.

POSTSEASON PLANS

Two more teams clinched playoff
berths in the Western Conference.
Denver locked up its spot with a 111-
104 victory over the New York Knicks.
The Nuggets also moved into second
place in the West. San Antonio earned
a place later Tuesday despite a 96-95
loss to Oklahoma City. The Nuggets
and Spurs, along with Dallas and
Detroit, are the only teams to have
made the playoffs every season since
2003-04.

SWEET 16

Cleveland became just the sixth
team in NBA history to win 16 games
in one month with its 79-73 victory
over Detroit. Not bad for a team that
won only 17 total in the season before
LeBron James arrived.

SURPRISING SUCCESS

Charlotte completed a season sweep
of the Los Angeles Lakers with a 94-84
victory Tuesday. The Bobcats have
won six of seven against the Western
Conference champions. Oklahoma
City has defeated the playoff-bound
San Antonio Spurs twice in about two
weeks following its 96-95 victory on
Tuesday.

SMASHING SUCCESS

Portland routed Utah 125-104 on
Tuesday, winning its third consecutive
game by at least 20 points. The Trail
Blazers (47-27) blitzed the Jazz with
torrid shooting, hitting a season-high
61.6 per cent (47-of-76) from the field.
It was the first time Portland has won
three consecutive games by at least 20
points since March 24-28, 1992.

SHUT DOWN

Kevin Garnett will miss at least the
next four games with a sore right knee
and may return for the final three
games of the Boston Celtics’ regular
season. Coach Doc Rivers said after
practice Tuesday that the team would
be “shutting down” Garnett for most
of the remaining seven regular season
games because of continued soreness
in the knee, first injured February 19 at
Utah. Garnett has missed 15 of the
last 19 games, including the last two.

VLADE’S DAY

Vlade Divac’s No. 21 jersey was
retired Tuesday night at Arco Arena,
his home for six seasons. He was the
starting center on the Kings’ back-to-
back division champs and the 2002
Western Conference finalists. Divac,
who is the second-leading rebounder
in the franchise’s Sacramento history,
said during a halftime ceremony that
the best days of his 16-year NBA
career came in Sacramento.

HEALTHY HOWARD

Josh Howard had 14 points and six
rebounds in 22 minutes in his return
from an 11-game absence in the Mav-
ericks’ 108-88 victory in Minnesota.
He had not played since March 5
because of a sore left ankle and has
missed a total of 28 games due to var-
10US injuries this season.

SPEAKING

“Tcan play 18 minutes with my eyes
closed and a 100-pound truck on my
back. ’'m wondering what the rush
was to get me back. It’s a bad time
for me mentally. I’m just trying to get
through it without starting a whole
bunch of nonsense. I’m looking at the
big picture, if I vent my frustrations,
then it’s on. Being who I am, fingers
are going to be pointed at me. Peo-
ple are going to make a big deal out of
it. ’m just trying to laugh as much as I
can and stop from crying.”

— Allen Iverson, frustrated with his
playing time while coming off the
bench in two games since returning
from a back injury to rejoin Detroit



Carifta: Athletes must qualify
if they want to compete

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ONCE again, the Bahamas Associ-
ation of Athletic Associations has
selected athletes who have not quali-
fied to make up the relay teams for
the Carifta Games in St Lucia over the
Easter holiday weekend.

Last year, they did the same thing
and there were at least 10 athletes who
made the trip to St Kitts and didn’t
even get to compete as the Bahamas’
65-member team returned with 23
medals.

It doesn’t make sense, especially in
these tough economic times, to field
the large teams and the majority of the
athletes have not attained the qualify-
ing standards. That means that we
could see a repeat of last year with
athletes just going for the ride and
exposure.

Regardless of whether or not all of
the athletes attained the qualifying
standards, the team will once again be
judged based on the amount of medals
secured and the position they finish in.

Every year, the same argument
comes up in relationship to the
Bahamas Swimming Federation, who
also sends a team off to the Carifta
Swimming Championships a week
after the BAAA’s track team return
home.

The difference is the fact that the

Vlade Divac’s jersey retired

FORMER Sacramento Kings center Vlade Divac, of Serbia, stands next to a framed copy of his jersey
that was scheduled to be retired by the team at halftime of the game between the New Orleans Hor-
nets and the Kings in Sacramento, California, later Tuesday, March 31. Divac played six seasons with

BSF stick to their
qualifying stan-
dards and they [
generally only car-
ry those swimmers
who have made
the standard,
which should be
the proper proce-
dure.

It doesn’t make
sense to impose
the standards. The
BAAA might as
well just look at
another criteria for
selecting the team. OPINION

What happens to =m =
those athletes who
ensure that they do what is necessary to
make the standards? It seems as if they
are not treated any different from
those athletes who don’t make the
standard, except for the fact that they
actually get to compete at the games.

Until more emphasis is placed on
attaining the standards, we will con-
tinue to struggle to get back to being a
powerhouse in the region because we
reward athletes who have not quali-
fied to make the trip.

STUBBS

HALL OF FAMERS

THE Bahamas Softball Federation
must be commended for submitting
the names of the four new Interna-
tional Softball Federation’s Hall of



the Kings, retiring in 2007 after playing 17 years of professional basketball.

in prison for up to 10 years.

In exchange for his plea, prosecutors on Wednesday
dropped two marijuana trafficking charges against the 40-
year-old former University of Cincinnati star.

Sentencing was set for May 13 in Butler County Com-

mon Pleas Court.

Blount was arrested Dec. 4 after sheriffs deputies
intercepted 11 pounds of marijuana sent to him at a rel-
ative’s home in southwest Ohio. They later searched
Blount’s home and say they found another 18 pounds of

marijuana.

Blount was a first-round draft pick by the Chicago
Bulls in 1993. In an 11-year NBA career, he also played
for the Lakers, Cleveland, Phoenix, Philadelphia and

Toronto.

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“Tt doesn’t make sense, especially in these tough economic times,
to field the large teams and the majority of the athletes have not
attained the qualifying standards. That means that we could see a
repeat of last year with athletes just going for the ride and exposure.”

Famers.

The mixture of a male (Richard 'the
Lion'Heart' Johnson) and female
(Candice DeGregory-Culmer) players,
a coach (Godfrey Pinder) and an
administrator (Austin ‘King Snake’
Knowles) makes it quite an induction
ceremony to look forward to on April
24.

All four persons have a lot of histo-
ry behind them in the respective posi-
tions or capacity they served in.

So hats off to Richard, Candice,
Godfrey and Austin. You all have
earned the right to be called Hall of
Famers as you join the other seven
inductees who were enshrined before
you.

Your contribution is helping to pro-
duce yet another significant interna-
tional milestone for the Bahamas.

MARTINBOROUGH

STILL GOING STRONG

IT’S good to see that three-time
World Sunfish champion Donnie Mar-
tinborough, who should one day be
enshrined in some sailing Hall of Fame,
is still competing at a very
high level of competition.

Now qualified as a Mas-
ters competitor, Martin-
borough competed in two
consecutive tournaments
in Florida where he won
the first tournament - a
Masters competition - and
was third in the other
against current reigning
world champion Eduardo
Cordero of Venezuela.

Martinborough seemed

fo

cs

aaa

— Brent Stubbs

to be just warming up as he prepares
for the World Sunfish Championship
that will return to Montagu Bay for
the first time since 1988.

Incidentally, that was the same year
that Martinborough made history by
becoming the first multiple winner of
the prestigious title. So if his perfor-
mance last month was any indication,
Martinborough should be heading for
another spectacular performance in
October.

CONDOLENCES

TO PRATT

Let me pause to offer my personal
condolences to the family of the late
Joseph Pratt.

As a youngster growing up without a
father-figure in my home, it was a
delight to watch Pratt as he engaged in
every aspect of his children’s lives,
especially as they competed in sports.

Pratt was not an outstanding player.
He didn’t have any fame or accolades
behind his name or on the trophy case
in the home of Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt
in the Grove, but his sons would always
brag that they couldn't ask for a better
coach on the sideline.

Pratt made sure that he was always
Kept abreast of all of the rules and reg-
ulations and that his children and all
those that came in contact with him,
adhere to them. He has helped count-
less youngsters as he groomed Juan,
Julian, the late Ronnie, his nephews
Darrel and Lloyd Jr. Ranger, and even
his daughter Nikki.

He will surely be remembered for
the role he played. May his soul rest in
peace.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Women's boxing
in Olympic Games
flecided in August

LAUSANNE, Switzerland
(AP) — Female boxers will find
out in August if they will be
allowed to compete at the 2012
London Games.

The International Olympic
Committee says Wednesday
that it is looking at a proposal
from the International Amateur
Boxing Association to include
women’s boxing.

Of the 26 Summer Olympic
sports federations who are orga-
nizing competitions in London,
boxing is the only one without
female participants.

The IOC said in a statement
that its program commission
will “make a recommendation
to the executive board,” which
is set to make a decision at its
meeting Aug. 13 in Berlin.

A previous bid to get wom-
en’s boxing accepted in 2005 in
time for the Beijing Olympics
failed because the IOC judged it
was not a global sport.

@ By FREDERIC J
FROMMER
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Senator John McCain wants a
presidential pardon for Jack
Johnson, who became the
nation’s first black heavyweight
boxing champion 100 years
before Barack Obama became
its first black president.

McCain feels Johnson was
wronged by a 1913 conviction
of violating the Mann Act by
having a consensual relation-
ship with a white woman — a
conviction widely seen as racial-
ly motivated.

“Pve been a very big fight
fan, I was a mediocre boxer
myself,” McCain, R-Ariz., said
in a telephone interview. “TI had
admired Jack Johnson’s

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Pardon sought for first
black heavyweight champ

prowess in the ring. And the
more I found out about him,
the more I thought a grave
injustice was done.”

On Wednesday, McCain will
join Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y.,
filmmaker Ken Burns and
Johnson’s great niece, Linda
Haywood, at a Capitol Hill
news conference to unveil a res-
olution urging a presidential
pardon for Johnson. Similar leg-
islation offered in 2004 and last
year failed to pass both cham-
bers of Congress.

King, a recreational boxer,
said a pardon would “remove
a cloud that’s been over the
American sporting scene ever
since (Johnson) was convicted
on these trumped-up charges.”

“T think the moment is now,”
King said.

Presidential pardons for the
dead are rare.

In 1999, President Bill Clin-
ton pardoned Lt. Henry O.
Flipper, the Army’s first black
commissioned officer, who was
drummed out of the military in
1882 after white officers
accused him of embezzling
$3,800 in commissary funds.
Last year, President George W.
Bush pardoned Charles Win-
ters, who was convicted of vio-
lating the Neutrality Act when
he conspired in 1948 to export
aircraft to a foreign country in
aid of Israel.

The Justice Department and
the White House declined to
comment on this latest John-
son pardon effort.

However, the idea has a pas-
sionate supporter in McCain,
who has repeatedly said he was
wrong in 1983 when he voted
against a federal holiday in hon-
our of Martin Luther King Jr.

“Tt’s just one of those things
that you don’t want to quit until
you see justice,” McCain said
of Johnson’s case. “We won’t
quit until we win. And I believe
that enough members, if you
show them the merits of this
issues, that we'll get the kind of
support we need.”

Johnson won the world
heavyweight title on December

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IN THIS 1932 file photo, boxer Jack Johnson is shown working out in New

York City at the age of 54...

26, 1908, after police in Aus-
tralia stopped his 14-round
match against the severely bat-
tered Canadian world champi-
on, Tommy Burns. That led to a
search for a “Great White
Hope” who could beat John-
son. Two years later, the Amer-
ican world titleholder Johnson
had tried for years to fight, Jim
Jeffries, came out of retirement
but lost in a match called “The
Battle of the Century,” resulting
in deadly riots.

(AP Photo)

Johnson lost the heavyweight
title to Jess Willard in 1915.

In 1913, Johnson was con-
victed of violating the Mann
Act, which outlawed transport-
ing women across state lines for
immoral purposes. The law has
since been heavily amended,
but has not been repealed.

Authorities first targeted
Johnson’s relationship with a
white woman who later became
his wife, then found another
white woman to testify against

him. Johnson fled the country
after his conviction, but agreed
years later to return and serve a
10-month jail sentence. He tried
to renew his boxing career after
leaving prison, but failed to
regain his title. He died in a car
crash in 1946 at age 68.

“When we couldn’t beat him
in the ring, the white power
establishment decided to beat
him in the courts,” Burns told
the AP in a telephone inter-
view. Burns’ 2005 documentary,
“Unforgivable Blackness: The
Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson,”
examined Johnson’s case and
the sentencing judge’s admit-
ted desire to “send a message”
to black men about relation-
ships with white women.

Both McCain and King said a
pardon, particularly one from
Obama, would carry important
symbolism.

“Tt would be indicative of the
distance we’ve come, and also
indicative of the distance we
still have to go,” McCain said.

Burns, however, sees a par-
don more as “just a question of
justice, which is not only blind,
but color blind,” adding, “And
I think it absolutely does not
have anything to do with the
symbolism of an African-Amer-
ican president pardoning an
African-American unjustly
accused.”

Burns helped form the Com-
mittee to Pardon Jack Johnson,
which filed a petition with the
Justice Department in 2004 that
was never acted on. Burns said
he spoke about the petition a
couple of times with Bush, who
as governor of Johnson’s home
state of Texas proclaimed John-
son’s birthday as “Jack John-
son Day” for five straight years.

Bush gave Burns a phone
number which led to adviser
Karl Rove, Burns said, but
Rove told him a pardon “ain’t
gonna fly.”

Rove doesn’t recall any such
conversation with Burns, his
spokeswoman Sheena Tahilra-
mani said, and “if he had been
approached, he wouldn’t have
offered an opinion.”

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Wilson City Power Station
Transmission Circuits

Wilson City, Abaco

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before

9th April, 2009

no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 701/09

WILSON CITY POWER STATION TRANSMISSION CIRCUITS

WILSON CITY, ABACO

The Corporation reserves the right to
accept or reject any or all proposals.
For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact
Mr. Wayne Farquharson at telephone 302-1216.


THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

S
k





SHOWN (I-r) are Michelle Lewis, Coca Cola marketing manager, Sonia
Knowles, BAISS committee member, Gianne Moss, Domino’s Pizza mar-
keting associate)

Domino’s and Coca-Cola
donate $5,500 to BAISS

DOMINO’S Pizza and
Caribbean Bottling Company
(Coca-Cola) have donated
$5,500 to the Bahamas Associ-
ation of Independent Secondary
Schools Track and Field Cham-
pionship.

In a joint statement, the com-
panies said they strongly believe
in supporting the community
and the youth of the nation.

The statement added: “This


























partnership over the years has
jointly contributed approxi-
mately $35,000 to the BAISS
sporting association.

“We are very happy to align
our companies with their organ-
isation, placing our financial
resources in a programme that
is certainly helping to develop
the abilities of our junior stu-
dent - athletes in the sport of
athletics.”

ts

2009



Australia on
the verge of
qualifying for
World Cup...

See page 12

Carifta pep rally all set

TO celebrate the achieve-
ments of both junior national
teams heading for competition
against the best in the region,
athletes, parents and fans will be
treated with a grand send off
next week just prior to competi-
tion.

The Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations is sched-
uled to host a pep rally for both
the Carifta Swimming/Synchro-
nized Swimming Championship
and Carifta Track and Field
Championship national teams on
April 6 at the Thomas A Robin-
son Stadium.

The rally is expected to fea-
ture performances by recording
artists Ricardo Clarke, Najie
Dun, Higher Level Band, Mani-
ifest and Joan Callendar.

And a live broadcast by Island
102.9 FM is slated for the rally
which is set for 6:30-8:00pm at
the stadium’s VIP section.

The 61-member track and field
team is scheduled to depart for
competition on April 8 for the
meet which takes place April 9-
14 in St Lucia.

The 36-member swim team
will compete the following week
in Savaneta, Aruba, April 15-20.

At a press conference to unveil

Recording artists expected to perform

the coaches for the 2009 track
and field team, BAAA press
release officer Kermit Taylor
said the association saw it fit to
recognise the athletes and leave
them enthused and prepared to
compete.

“We felt it was a good way to
show support for the athletes,
particularly for those who will

Culmer, Kenya

Dean, Devanique

Ferguson, Gortia (Exuma)
Johnson, Carlene

Kemp, Ivanique

Rolle, Hughnique

Robinson, V’Alonee

Smith, Kathrina (Grand
Bahama)

Smith, Nivea (Grand Bahama)

Deveaux, J’Vente
Duncombe, Darion

Fraser, Warren

Higgs, Alfred(Grand Bahama)
Higgs, Raymond (Grand
Bahama)

Knowles, Demetri (Grand
Bahama)

Miller, Brandon

Mc Intosh, Vernal

not be able to travel to St Lucia,”
he said. “This gives everyone a
chance to see the athletes, get to
know them and gives us a chance
to recognise their accomplish-
ments before they do us proud
by representing the country.”

Miller, Shauntae Newbold, Laquardo
Richardson, Charles
Thompson, Brice
Thompson, Zhivago
Williams, Fenton

Williams, Jaquan (Grand
Bahama)
Wallace-Whitfield, Kenneth

U-20 Boys
Bain, Dennis (Grand Bahama)
Burnside, Nejmi
Bullard, Troy (Grand
Bahama)
Deveaux, Delano
39th Carifta Track and

Field Championships Team

U-17 Girls

Adderley, Teshon

Brown, Rashan

Cash, Sparkyl

Cartwright, Devinn

Deveaux, Deandra

Farrington, Bianca

Johnson, Printassia

Miller, Shaunae

Myers, Tamara (Andros)

Seymour, Katrina

Strachan,Antonique

Williams, Raquel

Seymour, Pedrya

Johnson, Ashlee

U-17 Boys

Armbrister, Rashad (Exuma)

Bartlett, Blake (Grand

Bahama)

Bodie, Patrick

Carey, James A.

Carter, Harold

Farquharson, Jonathan

(Grand Bahama)

Farrington, Anthony

Ferguson, Byron

Ferguson, O’Jay

Hall, Tevin

Ingraham, Ryan

Minns, Lathone

Minns, Lathario

Rahming, Erle

Wilmott, Jabari

Adderley, Trae

U-20 Girls

Burnside, Deshona

Bodie, Krystal

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THE TRIBUNE

DU



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Philadelphia-based real
estate development company,
and the Amway Corporation’
founder behind an Eleuthera-
based resort development, have
emerged as new contenders to
acquire the Four Seasons Emer-
ald Bay Resort, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, with the
reduced purchase price seem-
ingly attracting an influx of
potential buyers.

Sources close to the situation
told this newspaper yesterday
that a new player in the race to
acquire the troubled Exuma-
based resort, which will soon
have been in receivership for
two years, is The Arden Group,
a company that has acquired or
developed more than $1.3 bil-
lion worth of real estate since its
1989 founding.

The company’s website
boasts that it has developed
numerous Ritz-Carlton-branded
properties across the US,
including resorts in Philadel-



I

©

THURSDAY,



ART toe



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

New buyers Qld Fort Bay resident in

in Emerald ¢7,.5m counterclaim loss
Bay shake-up

phia, Colorado, South Beach
and Wyoming, establishing the
company’s credentials as a suit-
able suitor for a five-star prop-
erty such as Emerald Bay.

And Tribune Business has
also been informed that
Richard DeVos, whose family
has as its principal business Alti-
cor, the parent company of
Amway Corporation, is also
readying a bid for the Four Sea-
sons Emerald Bay Resort.

It is unclear whether Mr
DeVos has submitted a formal
bid to the resort’s receivers,
Pricewaterhouse Coopers
(PwC), but he is already
involved in Bahamian-based
resort development/ownership
via the Powell Point at Cape
Eleuthera project.

That 700-acre project is set
to feature estate homes, beach
villas, town homes and marinas
when completed. Tribune Busi-
ness has also been informed
that a European consortium is
looking at entering the Four

SEE page 6B

Grand Bahama firm sees
68% income growth

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GRAND Bahama’s South
Riding Point bulk storage and
terminal facility saw its 2008
operating income increase by
68 per cent to $11.126 million,
driven by a 25 per cent increase
in its combined revenue
streams.

World Point Terminals, the
company’s Toronto Stock
Exchange-listed parent,
announced in its results for the
period ended on December 31,
2008, that South Riding Point’s
revenues had increased by 25
per cent or $4.432 million - ris-
ing from $18.074 million in 2007
to $22.506 million.

“This increase was attributed
to both higher storage and
marine revenues,” World Point
Terminals said. “Storage rev-
enues increased primarily due
to 1.5 million barrels of new
storage coming into service in
the third and fourth quarters of
2008. That storage capacity was
immediately placed under con-
tract.

“Marine revenues increased,
accounting for $1.973 million of
the increase. Revenues for the
fourth quarter were $8.469 mil-
lion, 91 per cent higher than the
same period in 2007.”

The two new crude oil stor-
age tanks have increased South
Riding point’s storage capacity

Peru ue IE bia

* But South Riding Point
could face ‘significant’
exposure to unpaid
tax bill in dispute
with the Government

* Storage terminal’s
revenues up 25%, with
marine income ahead
91% in last ‘O8 quarter

* Freepoint tug business
sees 14% revenue
increase

by 29 per cent, providing anoth-
er 750,000 barrels worth of stor-
age space. The company has 55
employees.

World Point’s financial state-
ments showed that prior to a
$2.388 million depreciation
charge, the Bahamas-based
South Riding Point facility had
generated $14.514 million in
gross operating profit - a 67 per
cent rise above the previous
year’s $6.618 million.

South Riding Point, as at
year-end 2008, had incurred
$11.797 million in capital expen-
ditures and had assets of
$46.052 million.

Meanwhile, World Point Ter-
minals said the Freepoint tugs
business, which provides ser-

SEE page 6B

ABOUT YOU

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Mon - Fri 9am-5pm

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

well-
known
Old

Fort Bay resi-
dent has lost his
$7.5 million
counterclaim
against a fellow
Bahamas resi-
dent business-
man, the
Supreme Court finding that the
deal to sell his stake in a
Bahamian investment fund
formed to finance the Russian
government’s legal action
against ‘Big Tobacco’ was void

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Yank Barry ordered to pay business rival Jay Gotlieb $3.141m, after
losing case over sales agreement relating to Bahamian investment
fund formed for Russian government's tobacco litigation

because the litigation had
already been dropped.

Yank Barry, who was last
year acquitted by a Texas judge
of allegations that he had tried
to bribe a Texan prison official,
had launched a counterclaim
against fellow businessman Jay
Gotlieb, alleging that the latter
was indebted to him after per-
sonally guaranteeing the $7.5
million purchase of his compa-
ny’s stake in the Tobacco Liti-

gation Participation Fund.

This followed a previous
judgment in Mr Gotlieb’s
favour against Mr Barry, the
Supreme Court having found
that he advanced $3 million to
the latter, but this had never
been repaid. That judgment had
been stayed pending the out-
come of Mr Barry’s counter-
claim.

In his judgment, Justice John
Lyons described both Mr Barry

and Mr Gotlieb as “certainly
both men who look for the
main chance”. And although he
ultimately found in favour of
Mr Gotlieb, Justice Lyons heav-
ily criticised him for having “a
vastly over-rated opinion of his
powers of recollection”, finding
that he was not telling the truth
when he claimed he did not sign
the December 23, 2003, agree-

SEE page 3B

NIB under renewed fire on collections

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE National Insurance Board (NIB)
yesterday came under further attack from
the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s
president for its “outrageous” overdue-con-
tributions collection tactics, after both he

and Tribune Business received two e-mails
complaining about its tactics.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness that the NIB was now penalising
employers who may owe contributions dat-
ing as far back as 20 years, when their sys-
tem for keeping account of those contribu-
tions was inaccurate and inefficient.

The Chamber president said that because

Airport gas station contract ‘awarded’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD) has
awarded a contract for a gas sta-
tion that will be located at the
JFK Drive-Coral Harbour
Road intersection, its chief
financial officer telling Tribune
Business the facility was likely
to be in operation by year’s end.

But NAD has placed on hold
plans for a restaurant at the
same location, Stewart Steeves
explaining that it wanted to
receive more interest in this
proposal.

Although declining to name
who had won the contract to
operate the gas station, which
will be situated on the fringes of

hy
QOoen
in
it eure

We

Features:

=
—
,

iahes

* But restaurant placed on hold until more interest
* NAD ‘half-way through’ plans to expand retail/
restaurant tenants in existing buildings
* Airport managers says 90 per cent of tenant
calls responded to within hour
* Airport’s proximity to US gives it ‘real
advantage’ in attracting new carrier airlift

NAD’s property, Mr Steeves
confirmed: “The gas station gas
been awarded, and it’s pro-
ceeding. They’re working on
getting their permits.

“T believe it will be before the
end of the year before that’s in
operation. With the restaurant,
we did not have a lot of takers,
so we suspended that. We’re
just going to wait on that one.

EO eee

Fi

We had some interest, but
decided to wait until we get
more interest.”

Inside Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport’s (LPIA) main
terminal buildings, Mr Steeves
said NAD was now starting to
really gain momentum in terms
of the retail and food conces-

SEE page 2B

Nee:

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& Withdraw From December Ist

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the agency never issued monthly statements
or made clear to employers how long they
should secure their NIB records for, it was
unfair to ask employers to trace payments
they may or may not have made back in
the 1980s.

“They are the only government entity

SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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The Bahamas Humane Society wishes to
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Pictet accountant
passes Series 7

A TRUST accountant at
Pictet Overseas Trust Corpo-
ration, Lakeisha Swaby, has
completed the Series 7 Exam
in the US after studying with
the Nassau-based Securities
Training Institute (STI).

Ms Albury, course Admin-
istrator at STI, said: “Our pro-
grammes provide profession-
als with the conceptual foun-
dations and practical skills
necessary to keep pace with
the evolving fields of securi-
ties and financial services.”

Ms Swaby can be seen with
Michael Miller, STT’s presi-
dent.



Airport gas station contract ‘awarded’

FROM page 1B

sions it was starting to lease out.

The Dunkin’ Donuts fran-
chise, operated by a Myers
Group of Companies sub-
sidiary, has already opened two
outlets at LPIA, while Wendy’s
is due to stage its official open-
ing next week.

In a reference to the previ-
ous monopoly held on the
LPIA retail/restaurant conces-
sions, Mr Steeves said: “It took
us a while to come to terms with
the existing concession opera-
tor. That happened a few
months back, and we’ve
announced Dunkin’ Donuts and
Wendy’s.

“There’s a few other offer-
ings that will be emerging in the
US departures room in the
coming months. In the coming
month or so, there should be
more announcements on new
tenants. I’d say we’re about
half-way through what we’re
planning to offer in the current
facility, and then there will be
much more in the new facility.”

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Lease and rental revenues
from the retail/restaurant ten-
ant base are a key income
stream for NAD, and a central
component in its bid to generate
positive operating income out-
side of the passenger user facil-
ity fee.

Mr Steeves said NAD had
been able to increase revenues
from this source by adjusting
existing and new leases to
“more market-based rents”. He
added that the company, which
operates LPIA under a 30-year
lease from the Airport Author-
ity, had “pretty much identified
all the partners” it wanted as
part of its retail/restaurant mix.

The first stage of LPIA’s
redevelopment, which is esti-
mated to cost $409.5 million in
total, is likely to make a con-
struction start this summer now
that the $265 million financing
has been completed.

Mr Steeves told Tribune
Business that the first stage, for
which construction costs will be
a little under $200 million,
would involve building the new
US departures terminal on land
to the west of the existing facil-
ity, plus an expanded runway
apron and short and long-term
parking facilities.

That stage is scheduled to be
completed around March 2011,
with second stage construction
costing “just shy” of $130 mil-
lion and lasting from that date
until October 2012.

The second stage will focus
chiefly on conversion of the
existing US departures termi-
nal into the US and interna-
tional arrivals hall. The final
stage, stage three, will cost
around $85 million and be com-

pleted by November 2013, con-
centrating on the domestic and
international departures termi-
nal.

Mr Steeves told Tribune
Business that NAD had “come
a long way in a short period of
time” since taking over LPIA’s
management two years ago yes-
terday.

Among the most visible
improvements were the new
washroom/restroom facilities,
the flight information displays,
improved baggage belts, per-
formance-based cleaning con-
tracts, landscaping, the creation
of a 24-hour operations centre
and other cosmetic improve-
ments.

“T think we’re now at a place
where better than 90 per cent of
calls we get from tenants are
responded to in an hour,” Mr
Steeves said.

He also pointed to the unseen
improvements, such as the
installation of billing, leasing
and accounting systems, and
improved warehouse and inven-
tory management, as enhance-
ments to NAD’s efficiency.

When it came to airlift into
LPIA, Mr Steeves said New
Providence’s location in close
proximity to the US gave the
airport “a real advantage” when
it came to attracting new air-
lines.

Because New Providence -
and the Bahamas in general-
were such a short flight from
most east coast destinations,
being only two or three hours
away from New York, US air-
lines could send aircraft on
return trips to this nation and
still be in position to deploy
those same planes on domestic

It’s

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routes that day.

“There’s a real benefit to the
location of Nassau and its prox-
imity to the US. We’ve had a
lot of interest in new services,”
Mr Steeves explained. Delta,
Jet Blue, Excel France and
WestJet had either all commit-
ted to or introduced new ser-
vices to Nassau, and NAD had
also received “some interest
from other carriers”.

Mr Steeves said NAD had to
increase the interest rate of
return offered to investors in its
senior secured bond issue from
8 per cent to 8.5 per cent, to
compensate for the absence of a
credit rating from the Fitch
agency.

“When we went without the
credit rating, we did increase
the rate a little bit to compen-
sate for any questions that may
arise,” Mr Steeves said. “But
the important thing is that the
rates as structured fit within the
financial model and fee struc-
ture we predicted for the air-
port going forward, and we got
the deal done. Everyone should
be happy that we got things in
place and the project can pro-
ceed.

“The financial structure is
designed around keeping the
cost impact relatively low, so
we keep the rates at the airport
competitive.”

Mr Steeves said the first face
financing had established the
“financial architecture” for the
capital raisings NAD would
need to undertake for stage two
and three construction. The
revolving credit facility for each
phase would be drawn down,
then refinanced through long-
term debt.

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April a ee) ro


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS
Privatise agriculture, government urged

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has been
urged to privatise key compo-
nents of the Bahamian agricul-
ture infrastructure, such as pack-
ing houses and the abbattoir, in
addition to downsizing the Min-
istry of Agriculture to bring it
more in line with current industry
activity.

The recommendations and
findings paper from the recent
National Economic Summit
pointed out that while the
Bahamas’ agricultural production
“has reduced to a fraction of what
it was in 1973, the Ministry of
[Agriculture] staff complement
has grown almost 1,000 per cent”.

The summit recommended that
the Ministry of downsized to
focus on policy and food inspec-
tion. “The large number of high-
ly-skilled farmers currently
employed with the Ministry
should be provided with land
grants and financing to start farms
that serve not only private com-
mercial purposes, but also train-
ing for current and aspiring agri-

culturalists,” the Summit’s organ-
isers suggested.

Packing house privatization
was viewed as a way to overcome
existing inefficiencies and the
absence of equipment for “sec-
ondary processing opportunities,
which are essential to supporting
large scale farming”.

The Summit organisers also
recommended that Bahamians
granted leased land for farming
purposes “be made to demon-
strate a minimum level of pro-
ductivity prior to the renewal of
such leases”.

They urged that the Auditor-
General review all issuances and
renewals of land leases, given that
many Bahamians granted land for
agricultural use were not using it
for these purposes, creating an
“abuse of taxpayer resources”.

Work permits were another
vexing area, particularly when it
came to farm labourers. “In one
such case where a permit was

declined for unexplained reasons,
the result was a dramatic scaling
back of local production, which
in turn led to the termination of
Bahamian workers,” the Summit
organisers found.

The Summit organisers called
for the Government-owned and
operated abattoir to be privatised
with 100 per cent Bahamian own-
ership.

When it came to energy, the
recommendations suggested the
Bahamas was losing out on
potentially $30-$85 million in rev-
enues per year from liquefied nat-
ural gas (LNG) terminals.

The Summit organisers sug-
gested all environmental concerns
surrounding LNG had been
addressed, but recommended that
the industry only be approved for
operation in the Bahamas if
Bahamians were provided with a
minimum 30 per cent equity inter-
est.

When it came to small busi-

Old Fort Bay resident in $7.5m counterclaim loss

FROM page 1B

ment, purchasing the invest-
ment fund stake held by Mr
Barry’s company.

Although Mr Gotlieb had
accepted that it was his hand-
writing and signature on the
purchase document, the judg-
ment recorded that the busi-
nessman claimed he did not sign
it and that the signature was lift-
ed from another agreement
relating to a California casino
proposal. Justice Lyons rejected
this explanation.

“In my judgment, he did sign
the agreement with a view to
cashing in on what he saw to be
the potential of considerable
profits coming from the subject
matter of the agreement, that
subject matter having some-
thing to do with certain litiga-
tion in the United States against
the big tobacco companies,”
Justice Lyons found.

The case revolved around an
investment fund formed to
finance a legal action, initiated
by US attorneys acting for the
Russian government, in the
Florida courts. The action, ini-
tiated on August 25, 2000, was
seeking damages from tobacco
manufacturers over the alleged
harmful effects of smoking.

Justice Lyons recalled: “The
scheme was set up whereby
investors could contribute to
the cost of funding the tobacco
litigation taken by the Russian
Federation, and in respect of
which they would receive, as a
dividend, a percentage of the
return supposedly coming from
any successful litigation.

“The fund concerned was
called the Tobacco Litigation
Partnership (TL Participation
Fund). Such an investment
scheme was contrary to law in
the United States. Investors
were sought from outside the
United States, or investments
were made in the fund (domi-
ciled in the Bahamas, from
investors worldwide, which may
have included investors from
within the United States.”

Mr Barry, though his Global
Village company, obtained a
0.65 per cent interest in the fund
that he attempted to sell to Mr
Gotlieb, who guaranteed the
purchase price of $7.5 million.
That had not been paid as of
the June 15, 2004, completion
date.

Bahamian law firm Lennox
Paton, acting in a fiduciary
capacity, transferred 26.13 per
cent of its 3.75 per cent share
in the litigation proceeds, to Mr
Barry on August 27, 2001, giv-

ing him his 0.65 per cent stake.
Half of this was sold to Mr
Gotlieb.

However, Justice Lyons
found that the Russian action
was dead before the sales agree-
ment between Mr Barry and Mr
Gotlieb was drawn up. The
action was withdrawn on
August 25, 2003, prior to the
sales agreement that Decem-
ber.

Mr Gotlieb’s attorney, Philip
Davis, of Davis & Co, argued
successfully that because the
“subject matter of the sale and
purchase agreement had gone
up in smoke, the parties to that
agreement were, at the time of
entering into the sale and pur-
chase agreement, operating
under a common mistake”.

Neither side, Justice Lyons
found, became aware of the lit-
igation’s end until January 2004.
He agreed with Mr Davis that,
because the Florida litigation
had ended and there was no
attempt or prospect of reviving
it, the sale guaranteed by Mr
Gotlieb “did not exist and not
can it exist. It had, as I said,
‘gone up in smoke’.”

As aresult, Justice Lyons dis-
missed Mr Barry’s counterclaim
and removed the stay on his
judgment requiring Mr Gotlieb
to be paid $3.141 million.

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the

following position:

VISA CLERK

Serves as one of three Visa Clerks directly supervised by the Chief of
the Visa Unit. Performs moderately difficult and highly responsible
data entry and data management work pertaining to visa services.
Provides direct customer service on complex subjects in difficult

circumstances.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

Completion of Associates of Arts Degree or equivalent.

Two to three years of experience that includes data entry, customer
service, professional correspondence and interpretation of complex
rules and regulations is required.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Computer skills in data entry, spreadsheets and word processing.
Must be able to deal with the public both in one-on-one and

telephone conversations.
Must be able to work with and manage clients in a stressful

environment.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and dental
insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and

development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible
for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available online at:
http://nassau.usembassy.gov/job_opportunities.html

Please e-mail applications to the Human Resources Office no later
than April 7, 2009 to: Adamsrc@state.gov or Fernanderra@ state.gov.
Applications will not be accepted at the Security Gate of the
Embassy. Absolutely no telephone calls will be accepted.

ness, the Summit organisers urged
that the Government provide
loan guarantees “up to an aggre-
gate of $10 million and not more
than $100,000 for any single com-
pany”, in a bid to aid small firms
requiring new financing or to
restructure existing loans.

The recommendations also



called on the Government to set-
tle accounts payables with the pri-
vate sector within 30 days, and
the Bahamas Development Bank
was urged to require that com-
panies receiving loans of more
than $100,000 have “properly
functioning boards” comprised of
suitably skilled people.

When it came to Family Island
tourism, the Summit organisers
recommended that persons stay-
ing in Nassau for four nights or
more be offered a free Bahama-
sair flight to a Family Island of
choice, provided they spend at
least one night there.

The Ministry of Tourism was
encouraged to hand over 10 per
cent of its advertising budget to
Bahamian firms, so they could
participate in designing its mar-
keting campaigns.

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





C A RIB BEAN

EXPORT

CARIBBEAN EXPORT DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

@ CI

Report coming to standardise
regional management consultancy

A report will soon be produced on regional management consultants to steer business
people along the right path when they are choosing such professionals to execute
projects on their behalf.

FROM page 1B

The report promises to be a comprehensive document which identifies management
consultants by specialty, capacity, competitive strengths and market positions among
other criteria and a survey is currently being conducted to produce the findings which will
be used in the report.

that doesn’t give you a state-
ment stating what you owe,
what you have paid and what
your outstanding balance is.
Now, to come along providing
you with no information of
where your status is and say:
“By the way, 20 years ago you
didn’t make a payment” is so
outrageous it isn’t even funny,”
said Mr D’ Aguilar.

An e-mail obtained by Tri-
bune Business, to which Mr
D’ Aguilar, made reference out-
lined the story of an 84-year-
old woman trying to ensure her
housekeeper retired with a pen-
sion.

NIB had provided the elderly
lady recently with a list of “miss-
ing” payments, going back as
far as 1986, which it said must
be paid by her before her
housekeeper can receive a pen-
sion.

“My mother has received a
list of missing payments and is
researching her files going back
to the crucifixion,” the 84 year-
old’s daughter said.

“Tt is just stressful and cruel
and unusual punishment to do
that to people after more than,
say six years (the contractual
period for suing on a debt at
common law), especially in their
later years.”

According to the author of
the e-mail, matters are being
exacerbated by the housekeep-
er’s chronic illness and the strife
this incident has left her elderly

“There has never been a comprehensive study of the Caribbean management consulting
industry from the standpoint of practitioners and procurers,’ explained Mark A. Turnquest,
the management/marketing consultant contracted to conduct the survey. “Gathering this
information will enable an assessment to be made of the competitiveness of the industry
and the development of strategies for growth. This will assist the CICMC (the Caribbean
Institute of Certified Management Consultants) in delivering on its mandate.”

The CICMC was formed in 2007 with the goal of supporting regional consultants and
enhancing their ability to serve clients according to global standards of excellence and ethics.

CICMC works in partnership with the Caribbean Export Development Agency, whose
focus is to increase the competitiveness of firms throughout CARIFORUM
member-states (Caricom and Dominican Republic), by developing trade, investment
and promotional elements.

Caribbean Export is encouraging the public to co-operate with Turnquest as he conducts
the survey. Turnquest has more than 20 years experience in sales and marketing and an
additional 10 years experience in the organizational training and development industry.
He is an author and is also president of Outreach Sales & Marketing Management Ltd,
Executive Director of The Small Business Resource Centre and an Associate Partner of CTS
Training & Consulting Institute.

More information may be obtained by contacting Mr. Mark A. Turnquest at:
Tel: 326-6748 or 427-3640 — Email: markaturnquest@gmail.com
markturnquest@consultant.com



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FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

Sucomstul camdedate tor the Fimancial Comtrolier position must hawe at least fe years professional public accounting axperignce. Applicants

must hold a CPA, CA, 4004 of other peotisseonal designation recognized by the Baharnes Institute of Chartered 4ocountiantis.

The position of Financial Controller will be responsible for oversecing all aspects of the accounting and financial reporting functions of the
Company and will be expected ta implement and continually develop systems of indernel contro. The Financial Controller will also be expected
to prepare, analyze and present financial reports for senior management with an emphasis on bey success factors.

Essential attributes induce:
the ability io work indapandanth) amd under prassurea to meat aria deadlines

proficiency in a variety of so¢tware applications [Microsoft sutbel

.
* Aacellent oral and writen Gammuricaian skills

*

. aacellant interpersonal killa aed the ability to relate veal with vendors

The Company offars a compasitivwe compensation and an atiractive banetits package, Assurance is given that avery applicant will be treated im
the sqrimest of confidence

Applicants should submit 4 cover later, ragume, and 6 copy of their professional canification by Friday, Apeil 3, 2008 tcc KPMG, Human
Resources Manager, PO, Box W129, Nassau, Bahamas or jalighthourms @kpeng,.com, be.

AUDIT = TAX = ADVISORY

S08 EPAEG, 6 Bahorren parti Thee firs of thee KPMG neta hoot cierto merrier fiems othliuned wath KPMG bererigrhora!, 4 Save o¢

mother in.

“We will be lucky if my moth-
er survives the archaeological
excavation into her records to
unearth evidence of ‘missing’
payments,” the e-mail contin-
ued. “At this rate, they will both
be gone before it is resolved.”

NIB’s director, Algernon
Cargill, said it took a common
sense approach to each case of
missing contributions. He said
an employer’s inability to pro-
duce records of contribution
payments is dealt with on a
case-by-case basis.

“We act responsibly,” he said.

Mr Cargill said contributions
that are unaccounted for could
greatly affect a pensioner’s enti-
tlement, so great effort was
being put into making sure pay-
ments have been secured for all
the years of employment.

He admonished this paper
that most stories, like that of
the elderly woman in the e-mail,
are often embellishments.

However, Tribune Business
received another e-mail with a
similar story regarding a house-
keeper whose employer recent-
ly tried to change her employ-
ment status from an employee
of her business to an employee
of her residence.

“T received a telephone call
from the Fox Hill NIB office
requesting a description of my
house and its location... I was
informed that an inspector will
be visiting my home to deter-
mine who is working in my
house,” the e-mail read.

“On reflection, the bedrock
principle in British law of a pre-
sumption of innocence has been
replaced with an assumption of
guilt warranting investigation
without probable cause.”

NIB under
renewed fire
on collections

Mr DAguilar contends that
NIB is simply taking the wrong
approach to its years-past-due
collection strategy. He said the
agency should consider figur-
ing out its records before it
approaches the public.

“Tt has been proven time and
time again in the 1980s and
1990s that National Insurance
was inefficient and inaccurate
in the posting of payments, and
now they are penalising honest,
hard working Bahamians who
have made their contributions
every month because of these
inefficiencies and inaccuracies,”
he said.

“Tt is totally unreasonable to
do what they have done to that
elderly lady, and you can tell
who are your honest customers
and who are not your honest
customers.”

Mr Cargill said NIB was in
the process of upgrading its
information technology systems
in order to issue monthly state-
ments in the future.

“These statements will enable
employers and self-employed
persons to know their contribu-
tion status without having to
visit an NIB local office, as is
currently the case. Further,
through the regular review of
NIB’s posting of their contribu-
tions, employers in particular
will be able to ensure that their
NIB accounts are correct, thus
enabling them to avoid interest
costs,” an NIB statement read.

He said the system for docu-
menting contributions paid in
the past was accurate enough,
and that past due payments
could be a case of missed post-
ings, a case of an error, or a case
of the person (employer) not
paying at all.

NOTICE

JBM Construction would like to inform the public
that excavation work would be commenced on
April 6th, 2009 from Navy Lion Rd (by the Hilton
Hotel) to the bridge by Mackey St. from the hours
of 6pm to 6am. This would take place for a period
of 70 days. Sorry for any inconvenience that may
occur during this construction.

NOTICE

RIME PORTFOLIO INC.
AN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANY

Notice is hereby given that the voluntary dissolution
of the above company commenced on the 27th day
of March, 2009 Articles of Dissolution have been
duly registered by the Registrar General’s office, P.O.
Box N532, 50 Shirley Street, Nassau Bahamas. The
Liquidator is A.J.K. Corporate Services (Bahamas)
Limited, whose adress is Suite 11, Bayparl Building,
18 Parliament Street, PO. Box AP59205/3352,

Nassau, The Bahamas.

NOTICE

All former patients of the late Dr. J. Wavell
Thompson are advised that files can be
collected from the office of

Dr. Gregory Carey

Family Medical Clinic

#22 Village Road Shopping Center
Telephone No. 394-3433

Fax. No. 394-1815

Office Hours:
Monday - Friday 9am - 6pm
Saturday 10am - 2pm
Identification required


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 5B



Tobacco tax hike puts damper JOB OPPORTUNITY
oar makers in Florida

On Cl

m By TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press Writer

MIAMI (AP) — Inside the
rolling room of El Credito Cig-
ar Company, the air is earthy
and fragrant, a mix of coffee
and nuts tinged with caramel
and leather.

Amid those sweet smells,
though, workers are worried
about a new federal tobacco tax
that threatens Florida’s $2 bil-
lion cigar industry. Starting
Wednesday, the tax will
increase from five cents to
about 40 cents on large cigars, a
little less on smaller stogies. Cig-
ar makers say the increase will
torch jobs and profits — what’s
left of them in the recession.

Like dozens of cigar compa-
nies dotting Miami’s Little
Havana neighborhood, El
Credito uses traditional rollers
— or, in Spanish, “torcedors”
— to hand make La Gloria
Cubana, the company’s most
famous and expensive cigar.
The workers sit at wooden
tables and fold tanned tobacco
leaves, cut them with a cres-
cent-shaped knife and then roll
the wads into fat Churchills,
Coronas and Torpedoes.

“Many of our rollers are wor-
ried,” said Hector Ventura,
operations manager for El
Credito. “They think that if we
have less sales, they will lose
their jobs. We know for sure
the tax increase will reduce our
sales. It’s not good for our busi-
ness, not good at all.”

The revenue from the new
tax will help pay for a health
insurance programme for low-
income children that President
Barack Obama signed into law
about two months ago. The
State Children’s Health Insur-
ance Program, or SCHIP, will
extend coverage to 11 million
kids.

Florida has long been the hub
of U.S. cigar making. In the
1890s, much of the nation’s cig-
ars were rolled in Tampa by
Cuban immigrants. In the 1960s,
another wave of Cubans with
cigar expertise opened up small-



Premium cigars are displayed at the El Credito Cigar Factory in the Little
Havana section of Miami. Beginning April 1, the tax on cigars will jump

from five cents to around 40 cents.

er shops in Miami after Fidel
Castro’s communist revolution.

Eric Newman, the co-owner
of the J.C. Newman Cigar com-
pany in Tampa, said these are
the toughest times in the com-
pany’s 114-year history.

“The last thing we needed
was the government to throw
this roadblock at us,” Newman
said. “This could push our
industry off a cliff.”

Newman said his company
will go from paying $1 million in
taxes a year to $4 million.

Cigarette smokers are angry
they will have to pay 62 cents
more per pack, but cigar mak-
ers and importers say their
industry will suffer dispropor-
tionally, especially in Florida
where 75 percent of the nation’s
cigar makers and importers are
located.

“This is part of the culture of
Miami and of Florida,” said
Enrique “Kiki” Berger, who co-
owns Cuban Crafters Cigars in
Miami. Berger’s father was a
cigar maker in Cuba until his
factory was seized by the Castro
regime. The family came to
Miami and rolled cigars out of
their garage until they could
open a factory.

Today, Cuban Crafters
employs 500 at a factory and a
tobacco farm in Esteli,
Nicaragua. Another 100 people

(AP Photo: J Pat Carter)

work in Miami at a warehouse
and small factory. The building
also serves as a tourist stop and
a place where guys smoke, play
dominoes and sip strong shots
of Cuban coffee.

Berger imports a chunk of his
cigars from Nicaragua. He said
he will pay hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars more on each
imported shipment — and that
cost will be passed along to
retailers and customers. The
price of a pack of 25 cigars —
$29.99 — will go up about $10
after the tax, he said. A single
large cigar will increase by
about 40 cents; Cuban Crafters
sells them from $1 to $15 each.

If the smokers puff fewer cig-
ars, Berger said he may shift
even more production to
Nicaragua to lower costs.

“What will the benefits be for
people that manufacture in the
U.S.? None,” said Berger.
“When they made this law, the
politicians forgot about the cig-
ar companies that employ peo-
ple in the United States.”

Jeff Borysiewicz, vice presi-
dent of the Cigar Rights of
America, said cigar makers
shouldn’t pick up the tab for
children’s health care.

“Kids aren’t addicted to
handmade cigars,” said
Borysiewicz, who is also the
president of Corona Cigar, an

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following

position:

COMPUTER MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT

Serves as the operation support of the local area network, along with stand-

alone computers.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

Baccalaureate Degree in computer science or computer information
systems is required.

MCSE certification is required.
Five years of experience performing all aspects of information systems

management.

Proficiency in Microsoft Windows 2003 Server including MS Exchange
2003 and Active Directory.
A Strong working knowledge of Microsoft XP and MS Office 2003/2007

is mandatory.

Basic understanding of a tape backup management system and Ghost
Imaging is required.

Nortel Meridian telephone background is a plus.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Must be able to administer, operate and maintain network infrastructure
inclusive of routers, switches, servers, printers, scanners, and computer

workstations.

Must be able to troubleshoot, diagnose and resolve hardware and
software problems.
Must have excellent customer service, time management and interpersonal

skills.

Must be dependable and extremely flexible.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for

employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available online at:

http://nassau.usembassy.gov/job_opportunities.html

Please e-mail applications to the Human Resources Office no later than April
8, 2009 to: Adamsrc@state.gov or Fernanderra@state.gov. Applications
will not be accepted at the Security Gate of the Embassy. Absolutely no
telephone calls will be accepted.






































Cacique International Ltd. with over 11 years of
outstanding service in destination management and
event planning is seeking to employ
a Human Resources Manager.

Requirements:
3-5 years experience in relevant position

Orlando, Fla.-based manufac-
turer and distributor. “We’re
an affordable hobby. We’re not
part of the problem with chil-
dren.”

Paul Hull, an American Can-
cer Society spokesman in Flori-
da, said tobacco takes such a
toll on health care, it’s only fair
that all companies contribute.

“For the most part, connois-
seurs of cigars tend to be in a
higher socio-economic class
anyway,” he said. “It’s hard to
imagine this will have an effect
on them.”

This may not be the last cigar
price hike. Legislatures in sev-
eral states, including New York,
Wisconsin and California, are
considering raising their state
tobacco tax to help in the wake
of declining revenue.

A Bachelor’s Degree in Human Resources will be a plus

Proficient in Microsoft Office and QuickBooks Enterprise
Solutions

Superb written and oral communication skills
Excellent presentation and training skills

Main Responsibilities:

Recruit and train employees

Prepare payroll and manage employee benefits and
compensation

Maintain employee records and personnel policies
Prepare company procedures and job descriptions
Organize motivational activities and events

Please submit your resume on or before April 17",
2009 to

Director of Human Resources

P.O. Box N-4941

Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: resumes@caciqueintl.com

MUST SELL

VACANT LAND
WINTON HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
Lot #4, Block 1

All the parcel of land containing 15,589 sq. ft. on the southern side
of Woodland Way, and about 350 feet east of Culberts Hill.

Zoning is for single-family residential homes, all the utility services
are available. The site is located 5 miles from downtown Nassau,
1 mile from shopping center and 1 mile from the nearest school.

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before April 10, 2009.

For further information, please contact us @ 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
NOTICE

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in
New Providence and the Family Islands including
Grand Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser’’)
now invites sealed bids, from persons to provide
transportation to and from schools in accordance with
the provision of the Education Act. Bid forms can be
collected from the Ministry of Education and the office
of Family Island Administrators between the hours of
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate
in a sealed envelope bearing no identity of the bidder
and endorsed with the subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at
the address below, on or before Tuesday, 31st March,
2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not be necessary
to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the
presence of those Bidders or their representatives who
choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, 2nd April,
2009 at the address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel: (242) 327-1530
PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



New buyers in Emerald Bay shake-up

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Contact 326-6121

Montrose Avenue

- TENT SALE

Saturday April 4, 2009
10:00am-6:30pm

LADIES
CASUAL
WEAR

BLOUSES $10
SKIRTS $25

JEANS $20
CAPRIS $15
SHORTS. $5

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CASH SALE ONLY

Telephone: 242-361-3620
Location: Soldier Road, West
2 doors from Southland Church of God



FROM page 1B

Seasons Emerald Bay fray,
although the players involved
remain unknown.

Sources said the renewed
buyer interest was likely to have
been stimulated through the
decision by Japanese insurer
Mitsui, whose London office
effectively owns the resort from
insuring the defaulted loan used
to finance its construction, to
slash its asking price.

Mitsui, which was previously
holding out for around $125-
$130 million, was said by some
sources to have reduced its pur-
chase price to around $55 mil-
lion, in a bid to stimulate buyer
interest at a time when credit
markets have dried up.

The entry price will be key
for any Emerald Bay buyer, giv-
en that a further investment of
at least $50 million is required
to upgrade the resort and com-
plete the original development

plan.

If the buyer can obtain the
right price, its chances of gen-
erating a return on its invest-
ment, even with tourism in a
funk and faced with the
Bahamian economy’s high
operating costs, will be much
enhanced.

Tribune Business previously
revealed that a consortium fea-
turing California-based real
estate/casino developer Barry
Silverton, and real estate
broking and investment banking
firm Cushman & Wakefield,
had been identified as the pre-
ferred buyer by the receivers.

However, that group appears
to have made little progress in
concluding the deal.

The $320 million Emerald
Bay resort has acted as Exu-
ma’s main economic engine,
attracting additional foreign
direct investment to the island.
It employs almost 500 staff, and

Grand Bahama firm sees

68% income growth

FROM page 1B

vices at the Freeport Container
Port and South Riding point,
saw its revenues increase by
$350,000 or 14 per cent com-
pared to 2007.

The Canadian company has a
50 per cent interest in Freep-
oint, and said the revenue
increase resulted from “higher
container ship volume and rate
increases”.

For the 2008 fourth quarter,
Freepoint saw its revenues
reach $815,000, some 37 per
cent higher than for the same
period in 2007.

For the 2008 full year, Freep-
oint saw its revenues rise from
$2.567 million in 2007 to $2.917
million. While it slid to a
$216,000 operating loss last
year, compared to one of
$18,000 the year before, Freep-
oint still generated net income
of $242,000.

That, though, was just 29.2
per cent of 2007’s $826,000 in
net income - a fall of more than
70 per cent. This came despite
Freepoint handling 95 per cent
of all ships using the Freeport

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

barra

Company Administrative Director

Experience:

|. Minimum five years multi-unit responsibility for daily restaurant
administrative and financial data auditing, computing and report-

Ing.

2. Mimmum five years expenence in daily, weekly and monthly
restaurant environment payable and receivable accounts entry and

auditing.

3. Total proficiency in the monthly, quarterly and annual compila-

tion of budgets, P&L

reports.

statements, balance sheets

and cash-flow

4. Exceptional knowledge of all Microsoft Office Systems, and the
ACCPAC Business Reporting System.

4, Exe

eptional direction, communication and organizational skills.

6. Tertiary level education in accounting or related field.

Salary based upon experience and productivity

Email resumes to the Managing director at

cvk(@sbarrobahamas.com

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEW ACCEPTED





Container Port.

Meanwhile, the financial
statements revealed that South
Riding Point was in talks with
the Government regarding non-
payment of “significant” taxes.

The financials said: “In 2008,
South Riding Point was con-
tacted by representatives of the
Bahamian government regard-
ing the non-payment of a local
revenue-based tax.

“South Riding Point is in the
process of evaluating this claim,
but currently believes that it is
exempt from the tax in ques-
tion.”

The tax at the centre of this
dispute was not revealed,
although there are a number of
possibilities, including business
licence fees.

The financials added: “A spe-
cific amount of tax has not yet
been assessed, and the company
has not booked a liability in its
consolidated balance sheet, as
the amount is neither estimable
nor, in the opinion of manage-
ment, probable at this time. If
South Riding Point is deemed
to owe the tax, the amount may
be significant.”

South Riding Point was also
said to be engaged in “arbitra-
tion proceedings” with a con-
tractor it had hired to perform
hurricane-related repairs to its
storage facilities.

“Both South Riding Point
and the contractor are seeking
damages against each other in
this matter for breach of con-
tract,” the financial statements
read. “The contractor has
claimed damages of approxi-
mately $2.7 million.

“South Riding Point has filed
a counter-claim, along with a
damage assessment, which well
exceeds the damages claimed
by the contractor. South Rid-
ing point continues to vigor-
ously defend its positions in this
arbitration, and incur significant
legal costs related to this mat-
ter.”

YOUR CONNECTION-ETO

features an 18-hole Greg Nor-
man Golf Course, two restau-
rants, three pools, spa, six meet-
ing rooms and 450-person
capacity ballroom.

Other investment projects
previously attracted to the
Emerald Bay vicinity include
the resort’s no-closed Pinnacle
Entertainment-managed $5 mil-
lion casino, and the $110 mil-
lion Grand Isle Villas develop-
ment.

A shopping complex has also
opened at Emerald Bay, the
anchor retailer being the Emer-
ald Isle supermarket. The com-
plex also includes businesses
such as Scotiabank and Mail
Boxes Etc.

David Johnson, deputy direc-
tor-general in the Ministry of
Tourism with responsibility for
planning, investment and busi-
ness development, warned in
2007 that the Four Seasons
needed to become a sustainable,
profitable resort, and the
Bahamas could not afford for
it to fail.

He said then that factors such
as building costs being about 40
per cent higher per square foot
than they are in Nassau, had
retarded Emerald Bay’s growth
and kept it from reaching the
development its owners had
previously predicted.

Mr Johnson said of Emerald
Bay: “The property was con-

ceived to be a mixed-use pro-
ject, with 185 keys under the
Four Seasons brand. The vast
majority of the property was to
be for mixed-use, condos and
hundreds of lots sold for signif-
icant family homes.

“After four years of opera-
tion, they have developed very
little of the sold inventory.
There’s been a lot of trading of
the land by the owners, but the
cost of building is prohibitive.

“The buildings costs, the
numbers suggest, are in excess
of 40 per cent higher per square
foot to build.”

Costs to construct such prop-
erties in Nassau were $500 per
square foot, while in Exuma the
price was $800 per square foot.

Mr Johnson also underlined
the impact the relatively high
building costs on Exuma, com-
pared to Nassau, were having
on Emerald Bay’s margins. He
pointed out that concrete there
cost $200 per yard, whereas in
Nassau it cost $125 per yard.

“The hotel, with a golf course
and spa, as a 185-room resort
of Four Seasons’ calibre, can
only be profitable if it has a
much larger customer base out-
side those rooms,” Mr Johnson
said. He added that the resort
needed to build out to 700-800
units to get close to profitabili-
ty, whereas it was currently clos-
er to 300-400 units.

J&J SEAFOOD Ltd.

Carib Road, off Chesapeake
Your Bahamian Seafood Specialist

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OPEN MONDAY - FRIDAY 8AM - 5PM
SATURDAY 8AM - 12NOON



THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTERUPTION OF WIRELESS
NETWORK AT ATLANTIS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Ltd. (BTC) would like to advise the general public

that due to the «

commissioning and acceptance

of the wireless network at Atlantis, there may be

an interruption in service from Tuesday March

3lst -

Friday April 3rd, 2009.

BIC apologizes for any inconvenience caused.

www.btcbahamas.com


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 7B



a ee
Leaders try not to upset market

An AP News Analysis



By TOM RAUM
Associated Press Writer

LONDON (AP) — Global
leaders are keeping a nervous
eye on world markets as they
try to fix their ailing economies.
From New York to Tokyo,
investors stand ready to instant-
ly grade the summit of the
world’s 20 biggest economic
powers.

As leaders gathered, the US
recession that triggered the
global crisis entered its 17th
month on Wednesday, making
it the longest downturn since
the decade-long Great Depres-
sion. It has now surpassed two
previous postwar US recessions
that each lasted 16 months, in
1973-75 and 1981-82.

After the Dow Jones indus-
trials’ worst first quarter in 70
years, Wall Street began the
second three months of the
year on Wednesday with a
small increase at midmorning.

Usually, leaders at interna-
tional forums care little about
what markets are doing and
markets pay little attention to
such forums. Their predictable
and vaguely written commu-
niques rarely move the num-
bers.

And after all, who can predict
market movements? Gauging
how markets might react can
be a futile exercise.

But in this case, plunging
stock markets around the world
are not only a symptom of the
larger problem, they are part
of the problem.

Trillions of dollars of wealth
have disappeared from pen-
sions, endowments, nest eggs
and home values. The market
slides have sapped consumer
confidence and spending in
developed countries and
slammed developing ones that
rely heavily on their exports.

In the United States, nearly
half of households own securi-
ties, either directly or indirect-
ly through 401(k) and other
retirement plans. That’s more
than ever before in a time of
severe economic downturn.
Stock ownership also is up m
other industrialized nations.

Summit partners don’t want
to unnecessarily spook the mar-
kets. And that injects an addi-
tional degree of caution into
their deliberations.

Failure to reach some accept-
able level of accord at Thurs-
day’s G-20 summit could “obvi-
ously have a very negative
effect on markets,” sowing
seeds of further protectionism
that in turn would “further
impact shares of major corpo-
rations,” said Joseph Lampel,
a professor at Cass Business
School at City University in
London. “A vicious circle could
accelerate.”

There’s no way to tell what
markets might view as accept-
able accomplishments. And
since much of the present glob-
al decline is caused by lack of
confidence, markets are looking
for signs of returning confi-
dence.

And this is one of the places
they’re looking.

British Prime Minister Gor-

don Brown and President
Barack Obama both sought to
show cautious confidence at
their joint news conference on
Wednesday.

Obama urged Americans,
and consumers across the globe,
to show confidence in the abil-
ity of the global economy to
recover. “Don’t short change
the future because of fear in
the present, that I think is the
most important message we can
send — not just in the United
States, but around the world,”
Obama said.

Said Brown: “It will get
worse if people do not act.”

But tensions simmered just
beneath the surface.

Hours before the leaders
were to sit down for dinner,
French President Nicolas
Sarkozy vowed to keep fight-
ing for stronger international
financial regulation, especially
of tax havens, saying in an inter-
view with Europe 1 radio that
he would not associate himself
with “false compromises.”

Few expect the gathering to
endorse either the bold stimulus
spending that the U.S. and
Britain have advocated nor the
tough new international finan-
cial regulation that France, Ger-
many and some other Euro-
pean countries want. Instead,
the gathering was expected to
endorse a mix of measured
steps, including increased coor-
dination in regulation, more
money for the International
Monetary Fund and a modest
amount of stimulus spending,
much of it already announced.

“My sense is that it will be a
credible and legitimate pack-
age of steps both on the restor-
ing-growth side and on the reg-
ulatory-reform side. And how
the market reacts to that
remains to be seen,” said Mike
Froman, a White House inter-
national economics adviser.

Markets hate uncertainty.

When Treasury Secretary

Timothy Geithner first outlined
the Obama administration’s
bank-rescue plan in early Feb-
ruary, the Dow Jones industri-
als plunged 300 points, mainly
over the plan’s lack of details.
When he later filled in the
blanks with a detailed plan, it
soared nearly 500 points.

And Geithner briefly unset-
tled currency markets a week
ago when he appeared willing
to entertain a Chinese proposal
that an international currency
replace the U.S. dollar as the
world’s main reserve currency
— a notion he quickly dis-
pelled.

Recent reports suggest the
world economy is weakening,
not strengthening.

“The world economy is in the
midst of its deepest and most
synchronized recession in our
lifetimes,” wrote Klaus
Schmidt-Hebbel, chief econo-
mist at the Organisation for
Economic Cooperation and
Development, in a report this
week predicting the world
economy would shrink this year
for the first time since World
War II, by 2.75 per cent. He
also wrote that trade would fur-
ther contract sharply.

Of course, if markets hate
uncertainty, there can also be
the certainty of low expecta-
tions.

What if the summit is viewed
as a flop?

“T think flop is pretty well
built into expectations,” said
David Wyss, chief economist of
Standard and Poor’s in New
York.

Nearly everybody involved
in the process expects more
international coordination and
regulation, “it’s just a matter of
how much,” Wyss said.

As to possible market reac-
tion, Wyss said that while the
G-20 summit “won’t accom-
plish much, it’s a good first step.
And it’s better than canceling
the meeting.”

JOB OPPORTUNITY

Cacique International Ltd. with over 11 years of outstanding
service in destination management and event planning is
seeking to employ a General Manager for their Cacique
Event Group & Catering Divisions.

General: Applicants should be highly efficient, have a strong
financial background, have the ability to multi-task on a daily
basis, have effective time management skills, be able to lead
and motivate a great team of dedicated employees and be

results-driven.

Requirements:

¢ 5 + years experience in a management position
¢ Aminimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management &

Finance
¢ Strong analytical skills
¢ Strong client relations skills

e Experience in inventory management
¢ Proficient in Microsoft Office and QuickBooks Enterprise

Solutions

e Excellent written and oral communication skills
¢ Experience in event planning and or the hospitality field a

plus

Please submit your resume on or before April 17, 2009 to

Director of Human Resources

P.O. Box N-4941
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: resumes@ caciqueintl.com



Escape this Anil to Grand Bahama!

Book your trip between Apil2-30, 2009 and ecenve

ae f Uf / Z

>
=
=—
a
4

* aya tak not included $5 per prson/pernient service charges. Rate basedon
sngleor double occupancy Valid Api, 2009through Api ony

F Aaa lo 4
Ps we antl f

:

I

Beach & Golf Resort



RBC
FINCO



PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

March 2009

Contact Numbers 393-2004

HOUSES

Parcel of Land Romer Street Fox Hill, N.P.
Single Family Residence

(3) Bedroom, (1) Bathroom

Property Size:4,961 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,014 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $115,000.00

From Fox Hill Road turn onto Romer Street (Church Of God
Prophecy and Fox Hill Community Centre junction) travel east
east on Romer Street to the third corner on the right travel south
to the fourth house on the left which is at a dead end. The subject
is a split level residence painted blue and trimmed white aith a
tiled entrance patio

Lot#3005, Sir Linden Pindling Estates, N.P
Single Family Residence

3 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,153 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $164,000.00

From Charles Saunders Highway enter Sir Lynden Pindling Estates
and travel south on Lady Marguerite Pindling Avenue to the second
street on the left(Lauren Street) travel east onLauren street to the
second corner on left (Pear Tree Avenue); Travel north on Pear
Tree Avenue to the subject, the fifteenth property on the left. The
subject is lime green trimmed white.

Lot# 3, Doris Johnson Estates
Single Family Residence
3Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,065 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,688 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $189,000.00

From Gladstone Road travel east along Rocky Pine Road for
approximately 1,444 feet and turn left on Dame Doris Drive then
another left and the subject property is the third from corner.

Lot situate approximately 70 ft westward of Florida Court
Single Family Residence

4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,750 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $227,000.00

Travel east on Balfour Avenue to the first right (Florida Court) from
Florida Court take the first right onto a 10ft wide road reservation
and the subject is the second house on the left white trimmed

grey.

Lot#4, Blk#11, Miller's Heights Subdivision
Single Family Residence w/ efficency apartment
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathroom

Apartment 1 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 7,500 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,390 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $174,000.00

From Carmichael Road travelling west turn left onto East Avenue
travel south on east Avenue to the first corner on the right travel
west thereon to the first corner on the left (Margaret Avenue)
continue on Margaret Avenue pass the first intersection and the
subject is the second property on the right. The subject is painted
white trimmed purple.

Lot#42, Foxdale Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,329 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,247 sq.ft
Appraised Value: 191,000.00

From Fox Hill Road and Bernard Road, travel west on Bernard
Road, take the first left Fox Drive then the third right Sparrow Lane
and the subject property is the last on the left.

Lot#3375/76 Sir Lynden Pindling Estates, N.P.

Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,500 sq.ft

Building Size:1,150 sq.tt

Appraised Value: $161,000.00

From East Street & Bamboo Boulevard (south beach Police
Station) travel east on Bamboo Boulevard to the round-about
continue traveling eastward on C.W.Saunders Highway take the
second right, Lady Marguerite Pindling Avenue, then take the first
Pe Pr Street and the subject property is the sixteenth lot on
the right.

Lot#23 Malcolm Road East
Single Family Residence

2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 860 sq.ft
Appraised value: $129,200.00

From East Street South - travel east along Malcolm Road and
turn right on Winder Terrace to the first road on the left continue
for about 200 ft and the subject property is on the left.

Lot#336, Golden Gates Estates#2
Single Family Residence

(3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,890 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $207,000.00

Travel west on Carmichael Road from Blue Hill Road turn onto
the third left Golden Sun Drive the corner after St.Gregory's
Anglican Church and before Carmichael Primary School travel
south on Sun Drive to the first, travel west pass the second corner
on the right and the subject fourth property on the right. The
subject is painted white trimmed white.

Lot 1 off Jean Street, R.E. Cooper Subdivision, N.P
Single Family Residence

5 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,161 sq.ft

Building size: 1,136 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $230,000.00

From Prince Charles Drive, turn into Jean Street travel north on
Jean Street to R.E. Cooper subdivision continue directly into r.E.
Cooper Subdivision and the subject is the ninth property on the

left. House is white trimmed green.

Lot#711 Golden Gates #2, Subdivision, N.P
Single Family Residence

4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,300 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $158,500.00

From Carmichael Road & Antigua Sireet (Golden Gates Assemblies
Church) travel south on Antigua Street and the subject property
is the sixth lot on the right past the first corner on the right.

Lot#2, Partition of Allotment No. 52 Cool Acres, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,867 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,716 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $229,000.00

Travel south on Fox Hill Road to Johnson Barber Shop, turn onto
the first right and travel east to the second comer on the left, travel
south to the T-Junction and the subject is straight ahead. The
house is painted olive trimmed white/beige.

Lot#26, Frelia Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,220 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $192,000.00

From Faith Avenue and Fire Trail east on Faith Avenue, follow the
curve around to the right (approximately 0.6 of a mile east of Faith
Avenue take the first left into Frelia Subdivision, then the first right
and the subject property is the last lots on the right.

Lot#124 Bel-Air Estates, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 969 sq.ft
Appraised Value: 153,000.00

From Carmichael Road and Faith Avenue travel east on Carmichael
Road take the first right lguana Way then the fourth right, Harbour
Close, and the subject property is the third on the left.

Lot situated northernside of Victoria St & Lancaster Rd, lvanhoe
Subdivision, N.P

4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms - Single Family Residence

Property Size: 12,600 sq.ft

Building Size: 3,104 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $439,000.00

From Mackey Sireet and Windsor Road (by Wendy's Resturant}
travel east on Windsor Road take the secod left to Victor Road,
then the first right which is Lancaster Road, the subject property
is the first on the left on the corner.

Lot#187, Twynam Heights Subdivision

Single Family Residence

5 Bedroom, 3 Bedroom

Property Size: 8,000 sq.ft

BuildingSize: 2,688 sq.tt

Appraised Value: $317,000.00

Travel East on Prince Charles drive to the corner east os Super

Value Winton turn right and the subject is the second house on
the left. The subject is painted lime green and trimmed white.

VACANT LAND

Lot#53, Lower Bogue Eleuthera
Vacant land

Property Size: 10,782 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $46,000.00

Travel westward on Skyline and Northward Bay Street the subject
pie te vacant land after Save More Drug Store on the right
and side.

Lot#9A, of 3 Parcels of Allotment 67, north of Carmichael Road
Vacant Land

Property Size: 9,945 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $85,000.00

From Carmichael Road -north along Faith Avenue for approximately
2,512 feet to a road reservation turn right and continue for
approximately 586 ft and turn right onto an 18ft road reservation.

Lot 500ft, West of Marigold Road & South of Hanna Road
Vacant Land

Property Size: 16,102 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 140,000.00

APARTMENTS/CONDOMINIUMS

Lot#70 Gamble Heights

Triplex Apartment

1-1 Bed, 1 Bath, /2 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathrooms

Property Size: 7,750 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,360 sq.ft

Appraised Value:$308,000.00

From Blue Hill Road & Faith United Way, travel east on Faith
United Way and the subject property is on the right hand side,
200 feet east of Faith United Church and opposite a heavy
equipment depot.

Unit#4, Hillcrest Tower Condominium, N.P.
Condominium

2 Bedroom, 2 Bathrooms

Unit Size: 1,110 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 200,000.00

Travel south on Collin Avenue to Third Terrace turn west on third
terrace and the subject is contained within the second building on
the right which is a condominium complex. The subject complex.
The subject complex is painted lime green and trimmed white.

Lot#5, Block#25 situate in Gleniston Gardens, N.P

Duplex Apartment

Each with 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 9,900 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,837 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 260,000.00

From Prince Charle Drive & Beatrice Avenue take the third right
Gleniston Park Avenue and the subject property is the fifth lot on
the left (presently the third building)

Lot#8 Hanover Court, N.P
Duplex Apartment

2 - 2 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Bathrooms
Property size: 5,670 sq.ft
Building Size: 2,107 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $283,000.00

From Fox Hill road turn onto Sea Breeze lane travel west on Sea
Breeze Lane and turn on th e first corner after the Christian Life
Centre continue north and the subject is the fourth property on
the right. White trimmed with an unpainted wall which is to be
sprayed with the marble creek spray on exterior.

Lot Rocky pine Road

Duplex Apartment

Each Unit 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
Property Size: 4,875 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,716 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $218,000.00

From Carmichael Road -travel north along Gladstone Road to
Rocky Pine Road turn right and continue to the third corner , turn
right and continue for about 1,438 feet and the subject property
is on the right.(enclosed with a chain link fence).

Lot East Windsor Place Soldier Road
Duplex Apartment

2- (2) Bathrooms, (1) Bathroom
Property Size: 6,000sq.ft

Building Size: 1,580 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $172,000.00

Travel East on Soldier Road to the intersection near Sugar Kid
Bowe Food Store turn right and travel to the end of this street,
across the intersection at the curve tum east and the subject is
the first property on the left, which is a duplex. The duplex is
recat painted blue and trimmed white with enclosed

lencing.

Property situated 350 feet south Adelaide & Coral Harbour
Duplex Apartment

1-3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathroom, 1-1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Property Size: 5,691 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,000 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $285,000.00

Travel along Carmichael Road to the roundabout continue west
onto Adelaide Road turn left at the fourth corner which is an
unpaved entrance road continue south on this road and the subject
is the fourth house on the left split level green trimmed white.

Lot#10, BIk#11, Millers Heights Subdivision, N.P
Duplex Apartment

1-2 Bedrooms., 1 Bathroom

1-2 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 7,500 sq.ft

Building Size:1,444 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 194,000.00

From Carmichael Road travelling west, turn left onto East Avenue,
travel south on East Avenue to the first corner on the right travel
north thereon to the first corner on the left (Margaret Avenue)

continue on Marafret Ave pass the first intersection and the subject
is the fifth property on the right painted mustard trimmed peach.

Lot#17, Blk#27 Shirley Heights
Two Storey Multi-Family Dwelling
2-2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
1-3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Appraised value: $252,000.00

From Wulff Road & Mt. Royal Avenue travel north on Mt. Royal
take the fifth right, Ludlow Street and the subject property is the
fourth on the left.

We providing financing to qualified buyers

CONTACT INFORMATION
RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre

®Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada



â„¢The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada
PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Three-year target for $1bn
alance of payments gain


























PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, RACAL MARVINE REGISTRE
of Fawkes Court, Oaksfield, New Providence, Bahamas intends
to change my name to RACQUEL MILLER-REGISTRE. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-
742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date

of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that |, PATROVE PATRITROUVERE

PHER NT, Freeport, Bahamas intends to change my name
to KRISTINA BRIGITTA UTBULT. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

EVERY Bahamian has an
obligation to assist the govern-
ment in effecting transforma-
tion in the economy in order to
improve this country’s balance
of payments by $1 billion with-
in three years, according to the
findings of the recent National
Economic Summit (NES).

The section of the NES
report etitled “Individual
Responsibility” outlines what
citizens can do during this eco-
nomic downturn to produce
changes in the national balance
sheet.

“During these challenging
economic times, the role that

NES, Bahamians must begin to
save, lower debt, budget, invest
and restructure loans.

“The recently enacted
amendment to the Stamp Tax
Act allows mortgagors to con-
solidate loans and transfer
mortgages of up to $500,000
without incurring stamp tax.
Mortgagors are urged to con-
sider one-time debt consolida-
tions and negotiate interest rate
reductions, which would reflect
their new empowered position,”
said the report.

It also recommended that
Bahamians spend more on local
goods and services, including
buying Bahamian grown and
manufactured items and con-
sidering domestic vacations to
the Family Islands.

On the business side, the

employed in a sustainable
career.

“Perhaps the most consistent
message that came out of the
NES was the failing of our edu-
cational system,” it read.

“Bahamians are encouraged
to pursue ongoing training, and
training in new areas should be
considered, if necessary.”

The report added that the
level of productivity in the
Bahamas should be improved,
especially during this economic
crisis, which has caused busi-
nesses to slash staff levels and
put hundreds of job in jeopardy.

Energy conservation was cit-
ed as paramount to reducing
the Bahamas’ current account
deficit by reducing this coun-
try’s oil imports and increasing
the search for alternative

be pursued,” the NES report
said.

“We went into the NES seek-
ing to achieve one primary
objective: To identify ways to
positively impact The Bahamas’
current account balance in the
immediate to medium term.
Such opportunities when
exploited will positively impact
entrepreneurial and job
prospects, and lead to an
improvement in external
reserves,” said NES developer
Lynden Nairn.

For the stories
behind the news,

individuals might play to ensure
our country’s economic
strengthening cannot be under-

NES report emphasises increas-
es in educational advancement

sources of energy.





to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ORNELLA INVESTMENTS LTD. is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on March 31, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burrows of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the May 11, 2009 to send their names and ad-
dresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

April 2, 2009
SHAKIRA BURROWS
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

ALBRECHT LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act (No.
45 of 2000). ALBRECHT LIMITED is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 19th
day of February, 2009.

Peter Saxby, 18 Quai, Jean-Charles Rey,
Fortvielle, MC 98000, Monaco
Liquidator

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Mommy at Work

stated,” the report read.

According to framers of the

NOTICE

The owner of Laing’s Towing Services requests
that Mr. Norman Smith, owner of a 2005 Ford
F150, license plate #123783, remove the
forementioned vehicle from its storage facilities
in Kennedy Subdivision within thiry (30) days.
Please note that failure to do so will result in
the said vehicle being sold to cover the cost of
storage fees.

NOTICE is hereby given that MORRIS CHARLES of 128B
REDWOOD LANE, P.O. Box F-42533, Freeport, Grand
Bahama is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of April, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

VACANCY NOTICE

Associate Attorney Required

For growing Law Practice
Qualifications:

‘Called to the Bahamas Bar for a minimum of
three years

‘Successful candidate must have knowledge and
experience and intrest in Litigation, Conveyances
and Mortgages, Family Law, and Corporate
matters

Please e-mail resume to

positionforattorney@gmail.com
on or before April 17, 2009.

EG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE i ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 31 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,638.80 | CHG -2.25 | %CHG -0.14 | YTD -73.56 | YTD % -4.30
FINDEX: CLOSE 806.63 | YTD -3.38% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.42
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00
6.95 Bank of Bahamas 6.95
0.63 Benchmark 0.63
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37
12.55 Cable Bahamas 12.56
2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83
6.46 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.48
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs 217
2.09 Doctor's Hospital 216
6.02 Famguard 7.76
11.00 Finco 11.00
10.45 ~~ FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45
5.00 Focol (S) 5.07
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.59

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 : - 0.127
11.00 0.992
6.95 a 0.244
0.63. e -0.877
3.15 . 0.105
2.37 ‘ 0.055
12.55 z 1.309
2.83 f 0.118
6.46 ‘i 0.438
2.17 : 0.099
2.09 ‘ 0.240
7.76 a 0.598
11.00 0.322
10.45 0.794
5.07 . 0.337
1.00 fe 0.000
0.30 sl 0.035
5.59 0.00 0.407

as well as ongoing training for
those who may already be

at place of employment, home
and even while driving should

read Insight
on Mondays

“Efforts to conserve energy



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that AIDAN_ LOGAN
FERGUSON of Carmichael Constituency, of the Island of
New Providence intend to change my name to AIDANLOGAN
MACKEY. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Deputy
Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

NOTICE
CIT CLUB HOUSE LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Pursuant to Section 137 (8) of the International
Business Companies Act, Notice is hereby given
that, with effect from the 19 day of March, 2009 the
above-named Company has been dissolved and has
been struck off the Register.

Dated this 31 day of March, 2009

Kyrene Kelty
Liquidator



NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID
SHIRLEY STREET WATER MAINS UPGRADE

The Water dnd Sewerage Corporation iivites bids rom seitably qualified contractors far the
uparade of the water distribution system aad sewernge system on Shirley Street. The Scape of

Works inclade the provision of all faboae, equipment and alber decestary servings required fit
the:

Ah. WATER STSTEM
The upgrade af 2] punetions, 1 water conmections and fire bvidrants

B. SEWERAGE SYSTEM
The uparade al 30 server laterals and Minar repairs 16 meinboks and sewer erayiry mains.

L Pids from potential contractors must be accompanied by comprehenstre details from the
Qualification Qaestionnaire ul-linne:

a] Experience an sinailar prrajects
bh) Personnel to be assigned (including their experience on similar projects)

¢) Finanetal capacity to eoecete Oe warks

The Contractor's qualifications and bid price will be evahiated [or award of Coanraet

8.60 J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00 0.952
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

FBB17 0.00 7%

FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%

FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $ Ask $ Last Price

Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60 z +
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00 : &
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35

ee

Hidding docements and drawiags will be avallable on request bepianle Tucstay, March 31,
TW fram the Engineering and Planniag Department of the Water and Sewerage Corporation
for a acoriireal fee at S00 per set, Tike Pre-Bd Micetiong bs seloedubed for April th, 2M at 11:
am. 87 Thampeen Hl,

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Securi Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
S2wk-Low EPS $ Div $ P/E

Symbol Weekly Vol.

Completed decunients must be returded (0 the address belive, ao later thin 6) pon. on
7 ae 4
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities Manadaly April bly eli,
ABDAB 31.72 33.26 29.00
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED) 0.00 0.00 0.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA _ Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664
2.8988 -1.40
1.4489 1.06
3.3201 -1.94
12.7397 0.96
100.5606 0.56
96.4070 -3.59

General Manager

Water. & Sewerage Corporation
#7 Thompson [vd

FG, Baa TS,
Nass, [ba ber mans

Fund Name Div $

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3847 Colina Money Market Fund
3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund

96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Fidelity International Investment Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3041
2.9230

28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-0O7
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09



1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

1.0000 0.00
9.1005 0.06
1.0440 0.80
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Telephone (242) 02.5512
Feocshemaiigs (T47) 02-5554

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

For all enquires Pegareineg Ihe leneers and pire-hikd meeting enacael -
Nis. Deidre Taylors Engineering & Planning Department

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(SS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S14) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FQ CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


THE TRIBUNE



Taxpayers bear the
brunt in California

@ By JUDY LIN
Associated Press Writer

SACRAMENTO, Calif.
(AP) — When they plugged
California’s $42 billion budget
hole in February, Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger and legislative
leaders said everyone had to
give up something to repair the
state’s finances.

But California businesses and
corporations with significant
operations in the state were
largely spared.

Now, that decision is feeding
opposition to five budget-relat-
ed measures voters are being
asked to approve during a spe-
cial election May 19. Opponents
say the budget package places
too much of a burden on tax-
payers in a state that already
has a reputation for high taxes.

A recent poll shows the
propositions in trouble, includ-
ing the one Schwarzenegger
wants most: a measure that
would implement a state spend-
ing cap in exchange for extend-
ing the taxes an additional one
to two years.

Just 39 per cent of likely vot-
ers support that measure and
46 per cent oppose it, accord-
ing to the Public Policy Insti-
tute of California survey.

If voters reject all of the mea-
sures, the state will face an addi-
tional $6 billion budget short-
fall.

For months, lawmakers could
not agree on how to close the
$42 billion budget deficit. But
they settled their differences
Feb. 20 with an agreement that
cuts $15 billion in programmes
and borrows about $6 billion.
Reaching agreement was par-
ticularly difficult because Cali-
fornia requires a two-thirds
majority vote to pass budgets
and tax increases.

The budget package, which
comes amid tumbling home
prices and an unemployment
rate in the double digits,
includes a boost in the sales tax
that took effect Wednesday and
increases in the personal income
tax and vehicle license fee.

For businesses, though, there
was a long list of corporate tax
breaks and credits, including
ones for the film industry and a
change in the tax formula that
will save businesses hundreds
of millions of dollars.

Taxpayer groups say the tax-
es are too harmful in a reces-
sion. The Howard Jarvis Tax-
payers Association estimates
the budget package will cost a

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

family of four an additional
$1,100 a year, largely canceling
any benefit Californians will
receive from federal tax cuts.

“As services are cut and
every ordinary taxpayer will
have to pay more, it is appalling
that major multinational cor-
porations get new tax breaks,”
said Lenny Goldberg, executive
director of the labour-backed
non-profit California Tax
Reform Association.

The California Budget Pro-
ject, a Sacramento-based
research group that advocates
for working families, estimates
that a couple with $40,000 in
taxable income will see a 12.9
percent increase in taxes, while
a couple making $750,000
would get a 2.9 percent increase.

The only tax break given to
average Californians is a

$10,000 credit for those who buy
anew house over the next year,
a provision sought by home
builders.

The Budget Project estimates
the tax breaks will cost the state
treasury at least $2.5 billion over
five years, potentially putting
further pressure on future bud-
gets.

The Schwarzenegger admin-
istration said it would not have
agreed to the budget deal with-
out measures it said were need-
ed to stimulate California’s
economy, which included the
corporate tax breaks and credit
for buyers of new homes.

The governor said it would
have been irresponsible to raise
taxes without also cutting
spending and taking steps to
boost the economy and create
jobs.

Christopher Thornberg, an
economist at San Rafael-based
Beacon Economics, said striking
business-friendly compromises
was the only way to get enough
votes from Republicans, the
minority party in the legislature,
to reach the needed two-thirds
approval, he said.

“Some of this is just gross
payout,” Thornberg said.

Other states are also facing
tough financial decisions. At
least a half dozen are looking
to sin taxes — including levies
on cigarettes and alcohol — to
help fill budget holes.

Lawmakers in Oregon and
Wisconsin are targeting high-
income earners. In Louisiana,
lawmakers are pushing for,
among other things, tax breaks
for seniors and cutting property
taxes.

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 9B

TICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NEVILLE BOWE, late
of Sir Lynden Pindling Estates, New Providence,
The Bahamas, DECEASED.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims
against the above-named Estate are required, on or before
the 24th April, A.D. 2009 to send their names and addresses
along with proof of their debts or claims, to the undersigned,
and if so required by notice in writing from the undersigned,
to come in and prove such debts or claims, or in default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution AND all persons indebted to the said Estate are
asked to pay their respective debts to the undersigned
immediately.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that at the expiration of the
date mentioned above, the assets of the late NEVILLE
BOWE will be distributed among persons entitled thereto
having regard only to the claims of which the Personal
Representatives shall have had notice.

Dated this 2nd day of April, A.D., 2009

C/O Turnquest & Co.
Attorneys for the Administrators
94 Nassau Street
P. O. Box N-9311
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

















































Pharmacy Technician
Course

Certification Approved
Limited Space for
April Session
Our Business, Your Success

Register Today, Office Hours
7am - 7pm
Just call Hepson.

3356-4860

Re:Parenting Training Seminar
7th April, 2009 - 2nd June, 2009

The Department of Rehabilitative/Welfare
Services will commence its second
Training Seminar for the year 2009 on 7th
April, 2009. The sessions will be held at
5:00p.m. in the Conference Room, Abaco
Markets Building, Thompson Boulevard
Interested parents are invited to attend.

A leading jewellery retailer 1s seeking a person for this senior position.

STORE MANAGER

The successful candidates wil be responsible for ensunng sales and profits are optimized

through excellent customer service and proper mantenance of inventory controls according
to established company procedures.

The sdeal candidate should possess:
lntegnty, Energetic motrvational slalls and Assertrveness
A minimum of 5 years management experience im the jewellery, watch and luxury

poods sectors,

Strong knowledge of luxucy watches, buymg, mecchanciang, selling and repaucs,
Ability to manage, teaun and motivate staff,

An eye for deta.

Good educanonal backpround. Professional qualificaton (GIA or equivalent) or
suitable work experience would be an asset.

Interested person should submut your resume with salary expectations to:



E-Mail — hiri/lusuryret

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax (242) 328-4211
urvretaillimited.c



]

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY CORPORATE OFFICE
ADVERTISEMENT
VACANCY NOTICE
Deputy Director of Finance

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of
Deputy Director of Finance, Public Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:

Educated to degree level or equivalent: a professionally qualified
accountant and member of a recognized accounting body, (American
Institute of Certified Public Accountants, or Association of Chartered
Certified Accountants or Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants or
Certified General Accountant); able to demonstrate five (5) to ten (10)
years relevant senior management experience within a large complex
organization; have the ability to demonstrate integrity and effective
leadership and management skills together with proven track record
of contributing achievements of strategy and policy development and
implementation

The successful candidate must possess excellent communication skills
and be able to adapt communication style to suit each activity/staff
group; possess strong interpersonal skills and be able to express a view
convincingly coherently, verbally and in writing.

The Deputy Director of Finance will report to the Director of Finance,
Corporate Office.

Job Summary: The holder of the post will be required to communicate
regularly with a wide range of senior staff both clinical and non-clinical
and staff at all levels within the Authority. He/she must also build and
manage highly effective relationships with local authority partners, the
public, the Public Treasury and the Ministry of Finance.

Duties not limited to the following:

1. Provides high level expertise in the areas of financial management
and corporate governance to the Board that ensures financial strategies
are effectively integrated and aligned within the corporate management
process.

2. Plans, controls and monitors the flow of the Authority’s funds
to ensure expenditure is contained within budget; produces financial
reports as required by the Board, Managing Director and all its levels of
management.

3. Leads in the implementation of the Board's financial strategy and
plans; ensures that appropriate levels of expertise are in place for
effective delivery of financial and management accounting services and
that all statutory and regulatory requirements are met relating to the
Authority’s accounts, including the submission of audited accounts in
order to meet deadlines.

4. Reviews and supervises the implementation of financial policies and
supervises approved systems of financial control to ensure the effective
use of resources and compliance with accounting standards; liaises
with audit, both internal and external to ensure systems of control are
adequate and secure; promotes optimum standards of professionalism
within the finance functions to ensure compliance with external
standards and best practices.

5. Coordinates integrated activities across the Authority and its
institutions ensuring the Board, Managing Director and all its levels of
management has the appropriate skills and tools to maximize scarce
resources so as to deliver sustainable improvements to patient care.

6. Ensures that there is effective coordination across all elements
of the finance functions of the Authority; contributes fully to the
business planning cycle of the Authority; liaises with the relevant key
managers and clinicians to encourage their participation in the process.

7. Leads, motivates, develops and trains staff within the department
to ensure that they have the necessary skills to achieve required
objectives and to encourage the development of innovative, creative
thinking and team work across the departments.

The post of Deputy Director of Finance is in Salary Scale HATM7 (B)
($48,650 x 800-$56,650).

Letters of application and curricula vitae should be submitted to the
Director of Human Resources, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals
Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville; or P. O. Box N-8200, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than 16 April,2009.


THE TRIBUNE

Bm By CALVIN WOODWARD
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
One of President Barack Oba-
ma’s campaign pledges on taxes
went up in puffs of smoke
Wednesday.

The largest increase in tobac-
co taxes took effect despite
Obama’s promise not to raise
taxes of any kind on families
earning under $250,000 or indi-
viduals under $200,000.

This is one tax that dispro-
portionately affects the poor,
who are more likely to smoke
than the rich.

To be sure, Obama’s tax
promises in last year’s campaign
were most often made in the
context of income taxes. Not
always.

“IT can make a firm pledge,”
he said in Dover, N.H., on Sept.
12. “Under my plan, no family
making less than $250,000 a
year will see any form of tax
increase. Not your income tax,
not your payroll tax, not your
capital gains taxes, not any of
your taxes.”

He repeatedly vowed “you
will not see any of your taxes
increase one single dime.”

Now in office, Obama, who
stopped smoking but has admit-
ted he slips now and then,
signed a law raising the tobacco
tax nearly 62 cents on a pack of
cigarettes, to $1.01. Other
tobacco products saw similarly
steep increases.

The extra money will be used
to finance a major expansion of
health insurance for children.
That represents a step toward
achieving another promise, to
make sure all kids are covered.

Obama said in the campaign
that Americans could have both
— a broad boost in affordable
health insurance for the nation
without raising taxes on anyone
but the rich.

His detailed campaign plan
stated that his proposed
improvement in health insur-

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 11B

Obama tax pledge
goes up in smoke

ance and health technology “is
more than covered” by raising
taxes on the wealthy alone. It
was not based on raising the
tobacco tax.

The White House contends
Obama’s campaign pledge left
room for measures such as the
one financing children’s health
insurance.

“The president’s position
throughout the campaign was
that he would not raise income
or payroll taxes on families
making less than $250,000, and
that’s a promise he has kept,”
said White House spokesman
Reid H. Cherlin. “In this case,
he supported a public health
measure that will extend health
coverage to four million chil-
dren who are currently unin-
sured.”

In some instances during the
campaign, Obama was plainly
talking about income, payroll
and investment taxes, even if
he did not say so.

Other times, his point
appeared to be that heavier tax-
ation of any sort on average
Americans is the wrong pre-
scription in tough times.

“Listen now,” he said in his
widely watched nomination
acceptance speech, “I will cut
taxes — cut taxes — for 95 per
cent of all working families,
because, in an economy like
this, the last thing we should do
is raise taxes on the middle
class.”

An unequivocal “any tax”
pledge also was heard in the
vice presidential debate, anoth-
er prominent forum.

“No one making less than
$250,000 under Barack Oba-
ma’s plan will see one single
penny of their tax raised,” Joe
Biden said, “whether it’s their
capital gains tax, their income
tax, investment tax, any tax.”

The Democratic campaign
used such statements to counter
Republican assertions that Oba-
ma would raise taxes in a mul-
titude of direct and indirect

ways, recalled Kathleen Hall
Jamieson, director of the
Annenberg Public Policy Cen-
ter at the University of Penn-
sylvania.

“JT think a reasonable person
would have concluded that Sen-
ator Obama had made a ’no
new taxes’ pledge to every cou-
ple or family making less than
$250,000,” she said.

Jamieson noted GOP ads that
claimed Obama would raise tax-
es on electricity and home heat-
ing oil. “They rebutted both
with the $250,000 claim,” she
said of the Obama campaign,
“so they did extend the rebuttal
beyond income and payroll.”

Government and private
research has found that smok-
ing rates are higher among peo-
ple of low income.

A Gallup survey of 75,000
people last year fleshed out that
conclusion. It found that 34 per
cent of respondents earning
$6,000 to $12,000 were smok-
ers, and the smoking rate con-
sistently declined among peo-
ple of higher income. Only 13
per cent of people earning
$90,000 or more were smokers.

Federal or state governments
often turn for extra tax dollars
to the one in five Americans
who smoke, and many states
already hit tobacco users this
year. So did the tobacco com-
panies, which raised the price
on many brands by more than
70 cents a pack.

The latest increase in the fed-
eral tax is by far the largest since
its introduction in 1951, when
it was eight cents a pack. It’s
gone up six times since, each
time by no more than a dime,
until now.

Apart from the tax haul, pub-
lic health advocates argue that
squeezing smokers will help
some to quit and persuade
young people not to start.

But it was a debate the coun-
try didn’t have in a presidential
campaign that swore off higher
taxation.

CHANDLER GILBERT

INSURANCE ASSOCIATES LIMITED

CONSULTANTS

BROKERS

Chandler Gilbert Insurance

Associates is a new insurance

brokerage firm founded on the

wealth of insurance industry

knowledge and experience of

AGENTS

OFFICE
#20 Montrose Avenue

co-founders Victor Chandler

and Guilden Gilbert.

At Chandler Gilbert

We have the expertise to handle

the unique insurance needs of a

wide range of clients

We have relationships with
domestic and international insurers

and brokers that enable us to

solutions

P.O. Box N-7753

Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: (242) 676-2306/7

Fax: (242) 323-5788

VICTOR CHANDLER
victor@cgiacaribbean.com

GUILDEN GILBERT
guilden@cgiacaribbean.com

deliver cost-effective risk financing

We are not too big to provide
personal, client-friendly service

Experience a new way to meet your

private and commercial insurance
needs. Visit, call, fax or e-mail Us at
your convenience. Our clients never
call us at the wrong time.


PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





US construction spend
fall less than anticipated

By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Construction spending fell for
a fifth straight month in Febru-
ary, but the results were better
than expected and along with
other economic reports, sug-
gested contraction may be near-
ing an end.

The Commerce Department
said Wednesday that February

construction activity dropped
0.9 per cent, less than the 1.5
per cent decline economists had
forecast. Total construction has
been falling since October. The
level of activity is at the slowest
pace in nearly five years.
Meanwhile a trade group’s
measure of the health of the
manufacturing sector contract-
ed for the 14th straight month in
March, but at a slower pace
than expected. The Institute for
Supply Management said its

manufacturing index rose to
36.3 last month from 35.8 in
February. Economists expect-
ed the index to rise to 36.

A reading below 50 signals
contraction and the index hit a
28-year low of 32.9 in Decem-
ber.

A 4.3 per cent drop in hous-
ing construction, pushing it to
the lowest level in 11 years,
dragged down the overall con-
struction data in February.

Home builders have cut back

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE

CORRIDOR 5
JOHN F. KENNEDY DRIVE TO WEST BAY STREET
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems
JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A. has been
contracted for completion of the New Providence Road Improvement
Project - International Package. Road construction will be commencing on
Corridor 5, which may require road closures, and diversions of the following:

¢ John F. Kennedy Drive and Thompson Blvd Junction

¢ Dolphin Drive

¢ Sanford Drive and Vista Marina

Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further information will be

provided in local media.

Tel: 242-322-8341/242-322-2610

Email: jeccbahamas @cartellone.com.ar



sharply, but face a rising glut of
unsold homes as record mort-
gage foreclosures dump more
properties on the market.
Lennar Corp. said Monday that
its fiscal first-quarter losses
surged 77 per cent due to
charges to adjust land and
inventory values, and plunging
home deliveries and new orders.

On Wall Street, stocks moved
slightly higher after the con-
struction and manufacturing
reports were better than expect-
ed, and the National Associa-
tion of Realtors said pending
home sales rebounded in Feb-
ruary from a record low. The
Dow Jones industrial average
added about 80 points in mid-
day trading after dropping more
than 100 points earlier in the
day.

The manufacturing report,
based on a poll of the Tempe,
Ariz.-based trade group of pur-
chasing executives, covers indi-
cators including new orders,
production, employment, inven-
tories, prices, and export and
import orders.

None of the 18 manufacturing
industries grew in March, but
the report did say that five of
the industries surveyed —
including electrical equipment,
primary metals and machinery
— expect to gain from the gov-
ernment’s economic stimulus
measures.

“The rapid decline in manu-
facturing appears to have mod-
erated somewhat,” said Norbert
Ore, chair of the ISM manufac-
turing survey committee.

The Commerce Department
report showed nonresidential
construction rose 0.3 per cent
in February, a slight rebound
following a 4.3 per cent drop in
January that had been the
biggest decline in 15 years.

With the financial sector fac-
ing its worst crisis in seven
decades, banks have tightened
their loan standards, making it
harder to get financing for shop-
ping centers and other com-



A construction worker uses a rope while hoisting building materials at the
One Marina Park Drive office building construction site, in the South

Boston neighbourhood of Boston...

mercial projects.

More bad news on the hous-
ing front came Tuesday when
the Standard & Poor’s/Case-
Shiller index of home prices in
20 major cities showed a record
decline of 19 per cent for the
three months ending in Janu-
ary compared to the same peri-
od a year ago. The biggest
declines were in cities already
hardest hit by the housing bust
including Phoenix and San
Francisco.

Still, the Realtors last week
said sales of previously occu-
pied homes unexpectedly
jumped in February by the
largest amount in nearly six
years as first-time buyers took
advantage of deep discounts on
foreclosures and other dis-
tressed properties. Some econ-
omists say that could help mod-
erate declines.

Analysts are forecasting that
the commercial real estate

(AP Photo: Steven Senne)

industry is poised to fall into
the worst crisis since the last
great property bust of the early
1990s.

Delinquency rates on loans
for hotels, offices, retail and
industrial buildings have risen
sharply in recent months and
are likely to soar through the
end of 2010 as companies lay
off workers, downsize or shut
their doors.

Construction spending by the
government showed a 0.8 per
cent increase in February fol-
lowing two months of declines.
The strength came in a 0.8 per
cent increase in spending on
federal building projects, and
the same rise in spending on
state and local government pro-
jects.

All the changes left total con-
struction spending at a season-
ally adjusted annual rate of
$967.5 billion in February, the
slowest pace since March 2004.

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

Investment Opportunity Must Sell Lot No. 217
Pinewood Gardens Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft, being Lot
No. 217 of the Subdivision known as Pinewood Gardens, the
said subdivision situated in the Southern District of New
Providence Bahamas. Located on this property is a structure
comprising of an approximately 20 yr old single family residence
consisting of 992 sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-
bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, kitchen, drive
way and walk way. The land is on a grade and level and
appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility
of flooding. The grounds are fairly kept and yard is open.

Appraisal: $127,988.00

i eat 10)
April 2, 2009

WINTON MEADOWS (Lot No. 382)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having
an area of 8,300 sq. ft. being lot No. 382
situated in the subdivision known as Winton
Meadows, the said subdivision situated in
the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, Bahamas. This property is
comprised of a 24 year old single family
residence with an attached efficiency
(formerly the carport) consisting of
approximately 2,675 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area, front porch-198 sq. ft., back patio-380.
The building is a two storey house. Besides

Traveling south on East Street to the junction of Soldier Road, make a left at the light then turn right into Kennedy
Subdivision, go all the way to T-junction, turn right then first left then right again toward Mount Tabor Church building,
after passing Mount Tabor take first left (sapodilla blvd), the subject house is about 400 yards on the right painted yellow
trimmed green, with green and white door.

LOT NO. #7, BOILING HOLE SUBDIVISION

All that piece parcel or lot of land and inprovements situated
on the Island of Eleuthera, North of Governor’s Harbour,
comprising of Lot No. 7 in the Boiling Hole Subdivision and
comprising of approximately 10,000 sq. ft., this site
encompasses a 17 years old duplex with each unit consisting
of 2-bedrooms; 1 bathroom, frontroom, diningroom and kitchen
with a gross floor area of approximately 1,474.20 sq. ft. and
covered porch area of approximately 164.70 sq. ft. this duplex
was built in accordance with the plan and specification as
approved, and at a standard that was acceptable to the Ministry Of Public Works. This structure is in good condition.
Each apartment could be rented at $800.00 per month. The land is landscaped and planted with ficus trees, but

needs some manicuring.
APPRAISAL: $138,989.00

Exuma Lot No. 7720A, Bahama Sound # 11

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of
approximately 10,000 sq ft, being lot 7720a, situated in a

) registered subdivision known as Bahama Sound of Exuma
Section 11. Situated on this property is a 9 yrs old single
storey residence consisting of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms,

| livingroom, diningroom & kitchen, with approximately 1,563
sq. ft. of enclosed living space. The building is structurally
sound & is generally in good condition. The lot is rectangular

in shape. No adverse site conditions were noted

Appraisal: $185,636.50
Property located about 2 3/4 miles southeastwardly of the settlement of George Town. Painted pink trimmed white.

Lot No. 235 Twynam Heights Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 8,534 sq ft, being Lot
# 235, of the subdivision known as Twynam Heights. The
said subdivision situated in the eastern district of New
Providence. Located on this property is an approximately
6yr old single family residence consisting of approximately
1,826 sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-bedrooms, 3
-baths, living, dining, kitchen & carport. the land is on a
grade & level; & appears to be sufficiently elevated to
disallow the possibility of flooding. The grounds are fairly
kept, with improvments including walkway, driveway & front boundary wall.

Appraisal: $344,422.30

Traveling east on Prince Charles, turn right at Super Value Food Store, then 1st left to t-junction, turn left at
junction then right & the property will be the 6th on the left side of the road painted blue trimmed white.

For conditions of sale and other information contact 326-1771 ¢ Fax 356-3851

the efficiency apartment, the house is comprised of 3-bedrooms, 3-bathrooms, inclusive of a master bedroom
suite upstairs. Foyer, front room, dining room, family room, powder room, utility room, breakfast nook and
kitchen downstairs. Climate control is provided by ducted central air conditioning, with air circulation
enhanced by ceiling fans and other amenities. Quality of construction: Average. Standard of maintenance:
Average. Effective age: seven years (7) the land is on flat terrain; however the site appears to be sufficiently
elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding under normal weather condition, including annual heavy
rainy periods. The grounds are well kept, with improvements including neatly maintained lawns with flowering
trees, and a concrete garden/storage shed, which is located in the backyard. The yard is enclosed along the
sides with chain-link fencing, and concrete block walls that are topped with metal railings, and metal gates
at the front and back.

APPRAISAL: $343,072.50
Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive, pass the streetlight at Fox Hill Road until you get to Meadows

Boulevard, turn right onto Meadows Boulevard, go south and take the 4th left, then 1st right. The subject
house is the 2nd house on the left side painted beige trimmed white.

Crown Allotment 67, Murphy Town Abaco

All that parcel of land having an approximate area of 9,300
sq ft, being lot #67a, a portion of the murphy town crown
allotment # 67. Located on this property is a single storey
wooden residence with a total living area of approximately
1,850 sq, ft & consisting of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms,
living/dining kitchen 2-car garage & covered porch. Additional
floor space is available within roof dormers. Exterior walls
are of wood overlain with hardi board siding or concrete
duraboard siding. interior walls are of gypsum wallboard
siding. Construction demonstrates above average quality
workmanship however minor aesthetic improvement is still
needed. Landscaping has commenced, but not yet completed. The property is level with no immediate flooding
danger. All major utilities are within 100ft of the subject site.

Appraisal: $241,200.00
This proerty is situated off Bay Street Drive, Murphy Town.

VACANT PROPERTY

Lot No. 45, South Westridge Subdivision

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land having an area of 41,490 sq, ft, being lot #45 of the subdivision
known as south Westridge, the said subdivision situated in the western district of New Providence Bahamas.
This property is zonned single family/residential area. The land is slightly elevated & appears to be sufficiently
elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.

Appraisal: $342,292.00

Travelling west on JFK turn left into South Westridge (pink wall), travel to the 2nd corner left & turn left at the
tjunction. The subject property will be about the 3rd on the left side of the road.




THE TRIBUNE

THE WE

5-Day FORECAST







THURSDAY, APRIL 2np, 2009, PAGE 19B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST




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highs and tonights's lows. High: 91° F/33°C New Delhi 91/382 66/18 pc 97/36 66/18 pc
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Buffalo 6246 46/7 po 5241 351 1 Louisville 68/20 48/8 t 57/13 40/4 pc SaltLakeCity 56/13 38/3 c 47/18 32/0 + GREAT INAGUA Tala Se. ASAE Cote ABA é
Charleston, SC 68/20 62/16 t 77/25 499 t Memphis 68/20 45/7 t 65/18 47/8 s San Antonio 80/26 50/10 s 77/25 60/15 s High: 91° F/33°C Tara BE/I2 49/5 BE 49/9 34/1 + (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 5412 36/2 4 47/8 34/1 po Miami 87/30 73/22 s 86/30 70/21 pc San Diego 66/18 56/13 po 60/15 54/12 sh Low. 72°F/22°C anidad 96/90 73/22 1 poorer i
Cleveland 6216 46/7 c 56/13 344 1 Minneapolis 42/5 28/-2 c 49/9 29/-1 pc Sanfrancisco 57/13 45/7 pc 5743 46/7 $ : TERESI 48/8 37/2 + AGP BAA G . New Providence Grond Bahanta Abaco Fleutherg Exum
Dallas 6618 41/5 c 73/22 5512 s Nashville 73/22 44/6 t 61/16 40/4 pc Seattle 48/8 36/2 + 48/8 35/1 pe
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Detroit 6317 44/6 c 5341 33/0 1 New York 6618 48/8 + 5512 47/8 + Tampa 84/28 72/22 po 80/26 64/17 t Winnipeg 34/1 28/-2 ¢ H/5 25/-3 ¢ th ON
Honolulu 81/27 69/20 s 82/27 69/20 pc OkKlahomaCity 56/13 36/2 r 68/20 47/8 s Tucson 80/26 5713 s 81/27 5341 s 7 : ; ; : ;
Houston 77125 45/7 t 75/23 58/14 s Orlando 86/30 69/20 pe 82/27 60/5 t — Washington,DC 67/19 50/10 po 6246 45/7 t Ne eh ee ee


The Tribune oo,

OU AlSsS
& RELIGION



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Your choice for the family
THURSDAY
April 2, 2009



PG 26 The Tribune

RELIGIOUS
NEWS,
STORIES
AND
CHURCH ©
EVENTS


The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, April 2, 2009 ® PG 27





oe



m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunmedia.net

OLLOWING last week’s feature on

Mele AMAL M elite like

Tribune Religion dug deeper into the
commonly misunderstood religion, getting a

woman’s perspective on life in the faith.

Lecturer at the College of the Bahamas, Bidi Boyer
explained that life for her as a Muslim has come with its
share of challenges, but is not that different from living as
a Christian.

A native of Suriname in Northern South American, Mrs
Boyer said growing up in a strict Muslim family taught her
from early on the importance of living the modest life
required by her faith.

She said unlike the Bahamas where many people are
not familiar with Islam, life was much different in her
homeland because a larger percentage of the population
are Muslims.

While she said that about one per cent of the
Bahamian population is Muslim, in Suriname, about 20
per cent of the population (478,000) are Muslims.

She said: “Like the Bahamas which is labeled a
Christian nation, Suriname is considered a Muslim nation
because many of the residents have roots from places like
Indonesia, a place where Islam is the dominant religion.”

She said one of the iconic traits she accepted as a young
Muslim was to always live a life of modesty. For her this
reflected in both the way she interacted with others and
WOKEN Oleme scene

She said like many Christian teachings, the Qur’an
instructs all followers to respect life, meaning that killing
another human, animal, or plant is wrong, especially with-
out just cause.

She said it was also important for an Islamic woman to
fully cover her body especially her chest.

She explained that based on the teachings of Mohammad
- who is considered the last and final prophet - a women
should not expose the contour of her body, which is the rea-
son many Islamic women wear the garment known as an

SEE page 31


PG 28 ® Thursday, April 2, 2009

Good morning!

OKAY, it's an evidential fact that as
a nation we're presently between a
rock and a hard place. This fact also
extends to the lack of visionary lead-
ership from the two most influential
systems in the land today; the political
and religious systems which are key
pillars in the Babylon system.

At times I'm of the view that a vast
majority of the Bahamian public can
be categorised as “SUCKERS for bad
treatment. The above statement may
offend those who are enjoying the
good life of the systems; while the life
of the unfortunate grassroots and
brainwashed middle class are method-
ically being stifled.

Listen!

Especially you grassroots
Bahamians, isn't it obvious to you by
now that what you're embracing as
leadership today; is doing a very good
job in leading you and your children's
children to the land of nowhere. The
systems are designed to keep you
looking to and_= relying on
Governments and religion to supply
your needs.

This is one of the primary reasons
why the political leaders and religious
organisations can send whoever they
desire as representatives into a poor
grassroots area; where the people have
been trained to joyfully accept their
representation.

A people or nation that doesn't
know and have a personal relationship
with Father Yahweh, will always find
themselves as powerless victims to the





PASTOR
ALLEN

unjust treatments of the world's sys-
tem.

Dan.11:32b. But a people that do
know their God (‘e_lo_hi_ym- el-o-
heem') shall be strong and do
exploits.

The enemy has skillfully used his
political and religious systems to pro-
gram and condition the people's
minds; to consistently look to and
depend upon these systems for their
daily breads. Today's politicians /
kings and religious leaders / priests are
the culprits that are responsible for 95
per cent of the mess, and the deterio-
ration of law and order in this country.

Throughout the Bible one can find
that hard times, recession and famine
were nothing new; but whenever these
times were at hand even an ungodly
king who didn't have a personal rela-
tionship with Yahweh had enough
sense to align himself with a true man
of God.

As a nation, we're facing a type of
famine / recession; unfortunately for
our King / Prime Minister just about
all of leading clergymen of this land
are filled with religion and are in no
position to hear from Father Yahweh
to give the prime minister Godly
advice.

RELIGION

Unlike Pharaoh the king of Egypt
who had a man of God in the person of
Joseph (Gen.41:1-57) who was able to
hear from God and give good Godly
advice. Here in the Bahamas today;
we've got over four thousand religious
leaders most of whom are too politi-
cally bias and the others are too
money motivated to spend time in the
presence of God thereby not being
able to spiritually advise the king. As a
result, the people grope around in
darkness and gross darkness fills the
land.

But, I declare unto you; the down-
trodden, the least likely to succeed,
the ones who are constantly crying out
for help. As David extolled the Lord
(yeho_va_h - yeh-ho-vaw') at the ded-
ication of his house and as he declared
in Ps.30:5b. So do I declare unto you,
as you seek to dedicate your life and
house to the Lord “Weeping may
endure for a night, but joy cometh in
the morning”

In dedicating your life to Father
Yahweh through the acceptance of His
son, Yeshuwa Messiah; you've now
been given the authority to serve the
enemy with an eviction notice as it
relates to everything that's concerning
you and your family.

This eviction is never valid nor will
it ever be through religion and politics;
but rather it is valid and powerfully
enforced through the BLOOD of
Yeshuwa Messiah.

This ought to be the position you're
now prepared to take and stand firmly

The Tribune

upon; whereas you're saying to this
world's systems “Enough is enough,
I'm tired of half-stepping, and going
around in circles with politicians and
religious leaders”

If a politician can't lay-out and artic-
ulately present you with a twenty year
visionary plan for a better Bahamas;
send him and the party he represents
away skipping. Religiously, you've
attended just about every conference,
seminar, revival or workshop; where
you have helped in making the reli-
gious leaders of these events success-
fully wealthy; in purchasing all of their
tapes, cd's and books. Meanwhile your
situation both spiritually and naturally
is yet the same and has gotten even
worst.

Here's a Spirit led word for you
“stop buying all of these books and
other materials and begin to focus on
God's word” Listen to what God said
to Joshua about his success and pros-
perity.

Joshua.1:8. This book of the law
shall not depart out of thy mouth; but
thou shalt meditate therein day and
night, that thou mayest observe to do
according to all that is written there-
in: for then thou shalt make thy way
prosperous, and then thou shalt have
good success.

Your weeping days are over. Good
Morning.

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.225-3850 or 441-2021.

Long journeys

ABRAHAM had to leave Haran to
find his Promised Land. Joseph went to
Egypt against his will, but God used his
journey to save his family from the
famine and to save the Egyptians as
well. Moses traveled with the Hebrew
slaves through the Red Sea in order to
escape oppression from _ slavery,
Naaman had to go to be healed in the
River Jordan, and David traveled for
years to escape Saul. There is so much
movement in the Bible, and it is a
theme that is meant to speak to us all.

We are pilgrims on a journey follow-
ing the promptings of God. Mary and
Joseph went to Bethlehem and then to
Egypt to fulfill ancient prophecies
about the Messiah because of the dan-
ger to the Christ child. The wise men
followed the star to discover the great-
est King of all time. The shepherds left
their hills to come to the town. The

REV, ANGELA

+. PALACIOUS

Lord walked to preach, heal, and teach
to bring this peace on earth of which
the angels had sung.

The disciples went on missionary
journeys to spread the word. Some left
because of persecution, but others went
to plant churches, re-visit them to
encourage the congregations and to
assist them to remain strong. Many
have followed in their footsteps, and
brought the gospel to Spain, England,
and The United States of America and
to us.

To undertake so many journeys for

so many years, these pilgrims were peo-
ple with a passionate message about
the Kingdom of God. How are we mak-
ing a difference in our generation? Are
we also on the move for God? Are we
willing to go wherever we are sent?
Will we be as faithful as those who have
gone before?

We are also pilgrims on a journey
reaching out to others along the way.
There is no time to pitch our tent as if
we are able to stay. We are on a journey
to spread the Good News and we are
on an inner journey to find peace with-
in. There are new levels of understand-
ing, new depths of revelation, new
experiences of God’s presence waiting
for us in our own private lives, even as
we journey where we are sent.

Life is one long journey, with so
much to learn. Faith is another journey
as we speak to different groups, counsel
individuals and share the gospel with
our visitors, who have journeyed to us.
When it comes to accepting spiritual
truths and living them out in our lives,
it has been said that by far the longest
journey is from the head to the heart.

There are new
levels of
understanding,
new depths of
revelation, new
experiences of God’s
presence waiting
for us in our own
private lives, even
as we journey
where we are sent.
The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, April 2, 2009 ® PG 29

In lieu of hate

“To fear the Lord is to hate evil; I
hate pride and arrogance,
evil behavior and perverse speech.”
PROVERBS 8:13 (N.I.V)

HAVE you ever killed someone?
Did you regret it? Now, I'm not pos-
ing this question to those persons who
have actually committed murder, but
instead to those among us, and let's be
honest, all of us, who have thought
about "killing" another, for an offense
done to us.

There are also those among us who
have been made so enraged by a per-
son and filled with so much hate, they
crossed that thin line and found them-
selves madly in love with the same
person. Stranger things have hap-
pened.

I'll admit it, 'Hi my name is Toni,
and I occasionally battle with the
strong forces of hate and at times find
it hard to forgive’, inhale, exhale. But
seriously, life does have it’s rough
patches, for example, we may go



through situations where we're being
harassed or taken advantage of, this
can make us extremely upset and
understandably so, and then there are
those instances that indirectly affect
us, in which a family member or friend
is the victim, yet we're equally as hurt,
thus it may seem as if hate is an
unavoidable vice.

I know hate is the opposite of love
and according to God's word, love is
the greatest of all things. So why hate?
Well when we do, it gives us a peculiar
sense of euphoria and almost always
brings some pretty nasty results with
it, it is however often derived from
pathetic characteristics such as pride.

One simple step we can take to do

All about Cursillo

The Anglican Diocesan Renewal Program
Make a Friend, Be a Friend, Bring a Friend to Christ!

What is Cursillo?

Cursillo is a movement of the church.
Its purpose is to help those in the church
understand their individual callings to be
Christian Leaders. The leadership may
be exercised in work situations, in the
family and social life, in leisure activities,
and within the Church environment.
Leadership, in Cursillo, does not mean
power over others, but influence on oth-
ers; all of us need to be aware that we
can exert a positive influence on those
around us.

What is the Goal of Cursillo?

The goal of Cursillo is the goal of the
Church: to bring all to Christ. This is
done when informed, trained leaders set
out with the support of others having a
similar commitment.

What does Cursillo do?

It helps to renew and deepen
Christian commitment. Cursillo is one of
many renewal movements. Many people
have said Cursillo provides an important
learning experience which causes many
to feel like newly made Christians with a
purpose and with support.

What is the Cursillo Movement About?
Cursillo is patterned on Jesus’ own



example. He searched out and called a
small group of potential leaders (pre-
Cursillo); He trained them by word and
example and inspired them with a vision
(Cursillo Three-Day Weekend); He
linked them together and sent them out
into the world to bring the world to Him
(post-Cursillo or the Fourth Day).

Pre-Cursillo

During this period, sponsors (.e. those
individuals that have been to the three-
day Cursillo weekend and are living the
Fourth Day) identify those
Episcopalians who are leading an active
Christian life and are a living witness to
their love for Christ, recommending
their candidacy. It is also the period that

away with hate is; to get over our-
selves. Thinking more of others, and
doing more for those in need will give
us that much needed holiday from
self.

But where does hate originate? Can
it at all times be found in our hearts?
After all, we are imperfect creatures;
or, does hate come from hurt, and hurt
come from insecurity, and this insecu-
rity come from not having formed a
loving, secure relationship with our
father God?

I'll bet the latter is more likely, and
this being the case should bring about
great relief to both the young and the
old. God is indeed greater than hate
and you need only find refuge in his
word, which will then, become like an
extinguisher for the uncontrollable
blaze that is hate. As believers, we
ought to remain sober in all that we
think, speak and do, after all, we don't
possess a VIP card, excluding us from
life's trials. That being said, we do
however understand right from wrong

selected candidates are informed of
what to expect at the three-day weekend
and assisted in appropriate preparations.

The Three-Day Weekend

The Cursillo weekend brings together
a diverse group of Episcopalians to share
the richness of many modes of worship
and to broaden each one's appreciation
for our Church. Lay people conduct the
weekend with two or three members of
the clergy functioning as spiritual advi-
sors. Cursillo presumes that those who
attend are already well grounded in the
faith. It is not intended to be a conver-
sion experience but an enriching and
deepening of what is already there. It
often provides new insights into our faith
as well as fostering ministry among lay
people.

The weekend begins Thursday
evening which is spent in the Chapel
with meditations, discussions, and
Compline. Then blessed silence is kept
until after the worship on Friday morn-
ing. After breakfast participants are
assigned to table groups for the week-
end. The three days are filled with talks
and group discussions with emphasis on
the doctrine of Grace, the Sacraments,
and the great Cursillo tripod: Piety,
Study, and Action. Plus there is fellow-
ship, singing, good food, and time for
privacy, meditation, prayer, and walks.
Eucharist is celebrated each day.

Post-Cursillo or Fourth Day

The Cursillo weekend is not an end to
itself. It is a starting point that lasts the
rest of your life. It is a springboard to a
long-range practice of the Baptismal

as written in God's word and should
strive to no longer think, speak, or act
as secular beings. To God, all persons
are VIP's, believers and non-believ-
ers, all persons have a purpose, all are
imperfect, all are unique, and all are
searching. Love is the only thing we
all have in common, so the next time
you want to hate, why not instead,
need to love. In these tough economic
and social times, we can no longer
afford to indulge in what we want, but
rather only what we need.

"And now these three remain: faith,
hope and love. But the greatest of
these is love."

1 Corinthians 13:13 (N.LV) In clos-
ing may God's blessings continuously
pour down on your life.

¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
writer and poet, currently residing in
Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to
the article can be sent to
fearless247@gmail.com.

Covenant in the life of the Church
called the Fourth Day. The Fourth Day
is composed of three major elements:

The Group Reunion

The heart of Cursillo, is a small group
of friends (usually 3-5) who meet week-
ly, and who hold each other accountable
for their spiritual journey. They report
on their piety, their study, and their
apostolic action. A bonding develops
that institutes a strong support group for
life.

The Ultreya

Usually held monthly, it is a "reunion
of the reunions". It provides support
and builds community by allowing the
sharing of communal experiences.

Spiritual Direction

Is an important element of the
Cursillo Movement. It is a commitment
to seek out skilled lay persons or cleric
for spiritual direction to provide help in
deepening their union with Christ.

Are there Cursillo Secrets?

You may have been told by some who
have attended the weekend that they
cannot tell you what Cursillo is all
about or what goes on during a Cursillo
weekend. This is not correct. Everything
that goes on during the weekend may be
told to anyone. Cursillo literature is
available to anyone who wishes to read
or purchase the materials.

¢ There will be an Ultreya on April 24
at St Matthews Anglican Church begin-
ing at 7pm
PG 30 ® Thursday, April 2, 2009



RELIGION

Francesco Proietti/AP Photo

IN THIS June 8, 2001 file photo, La Nona Ora (The Ninth Hour) a controversial installation by Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan
is seen on display at the Padiglione delle Tese as part of Venice's 49th Biennale arts exhibition.

Modern art is sacred
for Pope Benedict XVI

VATICAN CITY

THE long tradition of Vatican
patronage of the arts has given rise to
such monuments to Christianity as St.
Peter’s Basilica and Renaissance mas-
terpieces including the Sistine
Chapel, according to the Associated
Press.

Under Pope Benedict XVI, the
Holy See is seeking to revive its cul-
tural role, with plans to mount its
own pavilion at the 2011 Venice
Bienniale, the premiere international
contemporary art festival, and start a
“dialogue” with contemporary artists
that hasn’t existed for decades.

“We are reminded of the urgent
need for a renewed dialogue between
aesthetics and ethics, between beauty,
truth and goodness not only by con-
temporary cultural and artistic
debate, but also by daily reality,” said
Pope Benedict XVI, in a November
message to pontifical academies.

Monsignor Gianfranco Ravasi, who
heads the Pontifical Council for
Culture, said the aim is to re-establish
links with the contemporary art world
for the benefit of both art and faith.

“The great religious symbols, the
great stories and the great figures of
spirituality — these can stimulate an
art that more and more often lacks
any message” — or is blasphemous,

Ravasi said in a recent interview.

Ravasi also hopes to inspire art that
is appropriate for the many modern
churches built in recent decades by
such noted architects as Renzo Piano
and Richard Meier.

“So far, modern architecture has
had very good results in dialogue with
the liturgy,” he said. “But inside these
churches, there isn’t a dialogue with
contemporary artists. There is only
folk art.”

The Venice Bienniale has featured
the world’s greatest artists who exhib-
it in “pavilions” that are erected by
individual nations.

In 1920, Cezanne, Matisse and Van
Gogh were on display; the 1948 edi-
tion featured Dali, Ernst, Kandinsky
and Miro; 1977 saw Rauschenberg,
Mondrian, de Chirico and Picasso. In
the 1990s, Damien Hirst’s formalde-
hyde-encased cow made an appear-
ance. And more recently, Cy
Twombly, Richard Serra and Joseph
Beuys exhibited works.

Yet, the Vatican’s decision to par-
ticipate in the event is unusual, in
part because the once-every-two-
years art fair has incurred the wrath
of church authorities for work that
religious leaders considered a sacri-
lege.

In the Bienniale’s very first edition,
in 1895, the Patriarch of Venice, who

later became Pope Pius X, asked the

most talked-about work, Giacomo

ing the demise of Don Juan — sur-
rounded by naked women. Religious
leaders feared it would offend the
morals of visitors.

The mayor refused to take it down,

ular prize at the exhibition’s end.
More recently, church officials

complained about the 1990 edition,

when the American artists’ collective

activist group ACT UP, showed
“Pope Piece,” an image of John Paul
II and an image of a penis. It was
meant as a critique of the pontiff’s
opposition to condoms as a way to
fight AIDS.

And in 2001, Italian artist Maurizio
Cattelan exhibited his scandalous “La
Nona Ora,” or “The Ninth Hour” —
a life-size figure of John Paul being
crushed by a black meteorite.

Ravasi said there’s a risk that the

scene could be viewed merely as a
sacred counterpoint to profane dis-
plays. To avoid that risk, Ravasi said
he plans to mount the Vatican pavil-
ion away from the main exhibition
spaces.

The Tribune

reliaion

Na

By The Associated Press

DETROIT ARCHBISHOP VISITS
_ LANDMARK MICHIGAN MOSQUE

| DEARBORN, Mich.



THE new Roman Catholic arch-

: bishop of Detroit has visited one of

: the nation’s largest mosques, part of a
? continuing outreach to Muslims and

: other faith groups.

Archbishop Allen Vigneron met

i with Muslim leaders at the Islamic

; Center of America in Dearborn,

; which boasts a large Muslim popula-
? tion.

“So many of us here today are

? bound by the word of God, and we

? look to Abraham as one of our

? fathers in faith,” Vigneron said. “I am
? almost overwhelmed by your words of
: welcome and warmth.”

Vigneron’s trip to the mosque is at

? least the third by an Archbishop of

? Detroit. Cardinal Adam Maida, who
i has since retired, visited in a show of
? goodwill after the terrorist attacks of
i Sept. 11, 2001.

Vigneron, formerly bishop of the

? Diocese of Oakland, became leader of
? 1.4 million southeastern Michigan
: Catholics in January.

SCANDAL-SCARRED MEGACHURCH
: PASTOR DIES AFTER CANCER BATTLE

mayor of Venice to ban the exhibit’s i
: @ ATLANTA
Grosso’s “Supreme Meeting.” The }
work featured a coffin — represent- ;



A FORMER megachurch leader

? who rose to fame with a progressive
? evangelical ministry only to have it

? crumble after a series of sex scandals
? will be honored in the church he

i helped build in suburban Atlanta.
and the picture went on to win a pop- }
? Cathedral of the Holy Spirit at

: Chapel Hill Harvester Church died

? Sunday, March 29, after a battle with
? cancer. He was 81.

Gran Fury, a branch of the gay }

Archbishop Earl Paulk of the

For years the church was at the

i forefront of many social movements
? — admitting black members in the

: 1960s, ordaining women and opening
? its doors to gays. But Paulk was

i dogged for decades by scandal.

The most shocking revelation came

? in October 2007 when a court-

: ordered paternity test showed he was
i the biological father of his brother’s

? son, D.E. Paulk, who had become

? head pastor of the church after the

? archbishop retired the previous year.
Vatican’s entre into the modern art }

Ear] Paulk had sworn in an affi-

? davit he’d never had sex with anyone
? but his wife, which led to him plead-

? ing guilty to a felony charge of lying

? under oath. He was placed on 10

? years’ probation and assessed a

; $1,000 fine.
The Tribune

@x THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

RELIGION

Thursday, April 2, 2009 ® PG 31



Bahamian Methodists protest

IN 1883, Bahamian Methodists were
concerned about the proposal from the
Wesleyan Methodist Society of England
to place the Bahamas in the West Indies
District. Letters of protest were sent
from Abaco and Harbour Island in late
April of that year. The letter for Harbour
Island was as follows:

“We the undersigned office bearers of
the Wesley Methodist Church in the
island of Harbour Island, Bahamas
desire to call your attention to a matter
of deepest interest in the connection
with the future welfare of the church in
which we belong.

We have heard through report of a
proposal to erect the West Indies into a
separate conference, of one which the
Bahamas shall form a part.

It is our firm conviction that you
would not force us against our better
feeling and judgment a connection to
which we are opposed and which is most
undesirable to us from whatever stand-
point we may be viewed.

On the one hand by our geographical
position as also by our commercial rela-
tions, we are cut off from direct commu-
nication with those islands proposed to
be erected into separate conferences.
While on the other hand we have fre-
quent communication with England by
steamers running direct between Nassau
and London and also by others under
contract to carry our mails between New
York and Nassau.

We are of the opinion that for the
proper continuance of our relation with
any conference or association if we are
to retain our present advantages, we



= / JIM
)_ LAWLOR

should have communication of a stated
and regular and also of a tolerable fre-
quency.

It is we think essentially necessary for
the continuance of Methodism, not to
say of its progress and extension in this
colony, which we most deeply and anx-
iously desire to promote and extend, that
a supply of which we have hitherto had
no want of able, faithful and acceptable
ministers still continue to be furnished
us.

We could not, in consistence with rea-
son expect this to continue if the
Bahamas were to form a part of an inde-
pendent West Indies Conference. We
should look forward with discourage-
ment to any time when our congrega-
tions here should cease to enjoy the
advantages they have so long enjoyed of
a ministry trained and educated in
England.

We should here state that we have
nothing in common with the West Indies.
Our population and their habits of life
are so different that we have no desire of
being annexed to these, or of being
dependent upon them for our supply of
ministers, while our infrequent commu-
nication with those islands bar us from a
voice in the government under such an
altered state of things and would here

Life of a Muslim woman

FROM page 27

Abaya. An Abaya is a garment which
covers a women from head to toe, or
sometimes hangs from her shoulders,
and is often accompanied by a veil, scarf,
or gloves.

She said the Islamic women who may
go as far as covering their faces and
hands, are considered more extreme,
and adds that she only goes as far as
wearing the Abaya.

Mrs Boyer said at the age of 23 she
married a local Muslim and since then
has resided in the Bahamas.

She said that while many people tend
to be under the impression that Muslim
women are treated like servants to their
husbands following their every wish, this
myth is far from the way she lives her life
as an Islamic wife.

She said the Qur’an which is in many
ways similar to the Bible, acts as a life
compass guiding her and her husband in

the way they daily interact with one
another.

Mrs Boyer stated: “If my husband said
to do something that goes against the
teachings of the Qur’an, does that mean
that I would do it -no.”

She explained that if his requests are
in line with the Qur’an, which could
involve her cooking for their child or
taking care of the home, and even show-
ing respect for him, she would follow
through with it because for her to go
against him would be like her going
against the teachings of Mohammad and
essentially Allah.

Outside of her marriage, Mrs Boyer
said over the last few years, acceptance
of Muslims by Bahamians and
Americans has changed for the worse.

Referring to the bombing of the
World Trade Centre which was believed
to have been orchestrated by extremists
from the Islamic community, Mrs Boyer
said if there exist a small group of people
who have drifted from the teachings of

record the fact that Methodism has here
amongst its members and supporters
most of the intelligent, wealthy and
influential residents, presenting, and we
have reason to believe, a marked differ-
ence to Methodists from the West Indies.

We therefore require here a well
trained and educated ministry for the
satisfactory performance of the duties
relating to the pastoral and the pulpit.

The committee of our present connec-
tion with the missionary societies and
yourselves is by far more preferable to us
and we do sincerely trust that it will not
be severed by you to the detriment of
Methodism in the Bahamas. On finan-
cial grounds we feel assured that there
can be no objection raised to our contin-
ued connection with the Missionary
Society.

By determined effort, we hope to be
able to make this Circuit which is now
almost self sustaining fully so. And at the
same time we are putting forth effort to
contribute as largely as we can to the
“DISTRICT SUSTENTATIVE
FUND”, which was set afoot last year
and which promises to be attended with
success.

The sum raised last year throughout
the district toward the said fund and the
determined effort to be put for this year
to augment that sum will amount to £700
or £800 and its yearly increase by interest
and further donations will enable us in
the none to distant period, when as a dis-
trict we shall be able to bear the burden
of church sustenance without aid in a
pecuniary form from the Missionary
Society, thus relieving it of further

Mohammad and the laws of the Qur’an,
it is unfair for all other Muslims to be
judged or stereotyped for their error.
She said the killing of innocent people
is wrong according to the Muslim way,

expenditure of its funds upon the
“BAHAMA DISTRICT”.

Being convinced as we are, and believ-
ing as we do, that we are in a position to
judge fairly and correctly that the con-
nection of this district to the West Indies
Conference will prove to be most unfor-
tunate to the best interests and welfare
of the Church and will only tend to
weaken and reduce it, if it does not
entirely suppress it in this colony,

We are dear Sirs your faithful
brethren, William Cash, Thomas H
Johnson, James W Roberts, Vincent
Higgs, D W Johnson, C T Cash,
Theophilus Harris, Thomas M Johnson,
William J Albury, Winer Bethel, Henry
Johnson, William E Higgs, Richard
Fisher, Samuel Higgs, Jacob Tynes,
William A Albury, Theophilus G Higgs,
Richard C Roberts, Joseph Higgs,
Joseph Dyer.”

Apparently the protests were success-
ful and the Bahamas remained a part of
the British Methodist Mission until 1968
when the Synod of the Bahamas District
of Methodist Churches voted to join the
autonomous Methodist Church in the
Caribbean and the Americas. An Act of
The Bahamian Parliament in 1993 gave
self government and autonomy to The
Bahamas District of Methodist Churches
which now comprises of 34 churches. 13
Bahamian churches and 3 churches in
the Turks and Caicos Islands remained
with Methodist Church in the Caribbean
and the Americas.

(Next time: Part 24 - Difficulties of the
Anglican Mission 1886 - 1900)

and added that education and awareness
of the Muslim way of life is probably the
only way of reducing the unpopular view
on Islam held by those who are not
familiar with it.

SBYT
KIRK

SUNDAY: Worship - 9:30 am & 11 :00 am
SERMON: “The King Has Come”

TUESDAY: Bible Study 7:30 pm At The

Manse #37 Harmony Hill - Blair

MINISTER: Rev. John Macleod
Email: manse1@live.com

Phone:

322 5475

Bringing All People Closer to God
Through Worship, Ministry & Service


PG 32 ® Thursday, April 2, 2009

Divine Encounter

2009

BAHAMAS Christian
Fellowship Centre will be
hosting a national crusade
called “Divine Encounter
2009” on Thursday, April 2nd
at 7.30 pm and Friday April 3
noon and 7:30 pm at the
church’s auditorium located on
Carmichael Road.

The guest speaker will be
Apostle Charles Ndifon from
Nigeria, Africa who is known
around the world for his
“Adventures in Miracles” cru-
sades and telecasts in many
countries.

In a recent release Crusade
host Apostle Paul Butler said:
“Our country is going through
a difficult time,and people
need to experience the reality
of Christ’s love and his power.”

He further admonished sick
people who are confined to the
use of wheel chairs, crutches,
walkers, canes, or any other
apparatus to come and experi-
ence the miracle power of God
at work.

Apostle Charles accepted
Jesus Christ while studying
Engineering at the University
of Nigeria. He is the senior
pastor of Christ Love
Ministries International along
with his wife Donna Lynn
Ndifon, and they have been
ministering the gospel of Jesus
Christ for over twenty years in
more than 30 nations around
the globe. His ministry has had
tremendous impact in the lives
of millions of people all over
the world through the preach-
ing, teaching and demonstra-
tion of God’s saving, healing
and delivering power of Jesus
Christ.

Admission is free.

Clan

For the stories behind
aM Meese rye lg
on Mondays



RELIGION

The Tribune



Hip-Hopera duet earns Manifest and Joann Callender two

MARLINS@

@ By ARTHIA NIXON

THERE is a place for hip-opera after
all in the music industry and by the
sounds of the show-stopping, energised,
octave-busting, soul-stirring live per-
formance of Manifest and Joann
Callender at the Marlin Awards last
Sunday, the new genre has officially
crowned it’s Bahamian king and queen.

I Shall Rise,the unique duet has won
two awards - one for Hip Hop
Collaboration of the Year and the other
for Hip Hop Recording of The Year.
Manifest, the prolific producer and
founder of the Dunamus Soundz
Record Label was nominated in 6 cate-
gories this year. At the last gathering, he
led the pack with the most nominations
at 11.

Joann Callender is the wife of Lee
Callender, grandson of Bahamas
National Anthem composer Timothy
Gibson. Recognised as the Bahamian
pioneer in her genre, she has performed
to sold out opera houses around the
world accompanied by Lee, a respected
piano virtuoso who helped Manifest

create the unique vocal concoction
that proved to be a smash hit at the
awards.

“T am so blessed and grateful for this
opportunity to work with one of our liv-

ing legends,” says Manifest. “Ive
won Marlin Awards before but this
one feels special because of all the
work we put into it. I still am amazed
that it went from an idea floating
around in my head to sitting with Joann
and Lee and experiencing their talents

first-hand and then onto a CD, then to

perform it in front of our musical col- = ——
leagues.

“Yes, we are different genres but I 5
know we were boxed in different classi- rca
fications of music but I’m proud to know ae

that we worked together instead of over-
looking each other. Bahamians tend to
not support each other’s music and
this is a testament of how you can
enhance each other.

This song has hit stations all
over the region and it’s like
netting two birds because
the hip hoppers won’t pick
up JoAnn Callender and the
opera listeners won’t put on
Manifest. Overall, I know
that the project is much big-
ger than us and I am just
happy to know that we
are living the lyrics of
the song -we did rise,
we did overcome, no
matter what they
thought of us.”













Joann Callender






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Unemployment set to increase C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.109THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER BREEZYWITH SUNSHINE HIGH 89F LOW 74F n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE unemployment rate is set t o increase beyond the 12 per cent reported for New Providence at y ear-end 2008, the Central Bank of the Bahamas warned yesterday, with weakness in the tourism industry and foreign direct invest ment continuing through yeare nd 2009. In its latest gloomy outlook for t he Bahamian economy’s prospects, which will come as no s urprise to most analysts, the Central Bank said Government’s fiscal deficit would “widen con s iderably” due to its increased spending on stimulus prog rammes, combined with a decrease in revenue collections. T he Bahamian economy’s short, medium and long-term future remains inextricably linked to the US, reiterated the Central Bank’s report on monthly economic developments for February 2009, with this nation’s prospects for recovery dependent on the impact made by President Barack Obama’s stimulus poli cies. “The fallout from the global financial crisis continued to impact the Bahamian economy during the review month, contributing to persistent weakness in tourism and foreign investments. Central Bank gives gloomy outlook The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E CARS! CARS! CARS!!! CLASSIFIEDSTRADER JOBSAND HELPWANTED OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE L L O O A A D D S S O O F F SEE page eight n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net D ELANZO Cartwright was released from hospital yesterday after spending 11d ays recovering from injuries he claimed he suffered from waterboarding and physic al abuse at the hands of officers at a local police station. With injuries ranging from kidney fail ure, to fractured ribs, Delanzo said he was picked up by officers on March 20th for a llegedly “causing harm” and given the beating of his life. W ith hands cuffed behind his back, he said two officers escorted him upstairs to a n office in the police station where they beat him with wooden and metal baseball bats. While reports of such beatings at the hands of police in recent months are complained of more frequently, Delanzo’s incident i s the first reported case where it is alleged that officers attempt ed to mimic the recently outlawed torture technique of water-b oarding. Waterboarding is a technique where the victim is suspended Claim that police officers used torture techniques Man spends 11 days in hospital recovering from injuries FAMILYCLAIMMANSHOTDEADBYPOLICEWASUNARMED n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE family of Arsenio Mortimer claim that police are trying to cover up his death by suggesting that he opened fire on officers, justifying their decision to return fire, hitting him twice in the back. The family said that Arsenio was not armed. According to the official statement from the police, officers from the Mobile Division saw three males in a white Mitsubishi Mirage around 11pm acting in a SEE page 10 ABOVE: The body of Arsenio Mortimer is removed from the scene yesterday. RIGHT: Arsenio Mortimer is pictured with his son Nackyo and girlfriend Nicole Samson DELANZO C ARTWRIGHT , 3 0, is pictured following his alleged beating at the hands of police. SEE page eight n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A PHARMACEUTICAL manufacturer has confirmed the expired insulin issued to a patient at the Elizabeth Estates Clinic pharmacy this year was sent to the Bahamas for government distribution in May, 2006. The lot number on the Humulin insulin given to a dia betes patient in February and again March has been verified by global pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly and Company as part of the batch of medication sent to the Bahamas nearly three years ago. And Nassau Agencies Ltd, the authorised distributor for Humulin insulin in the Bahamas, has confirmed it received the medication in May, 2006, which expired 17 months later in October, 2007, and sent it on to the Bahamas National Drug Agency (BNDA request. The BNDA would then have dispensed it to the government clinic and pharmacy in Elizabeth Estates, eastern New Providence, where it appears to have sat for nearly three years before it was given to a diabetic filling her regular prescription for the product. Although the diabetic of 20 years, who asked for The Tri bune to withhold her identity, uses Humulin up to three times a day to control her blood sug ar levels, February 3 was the first time she went to Elizabeth Estates to obtain the medication. When she took the medication it had no affect on her blood sugar level, as rather than keeping it down as it is sup posed to, her blood sugar levels continued to rise, causing her to feel light-headed, nauseous and have leg-cramps. She only realised the medication was out-of-date when she returned to Elizabeth Estates six weeks later and was given another box of Humulin with an expiration date of October, 2007, and noticed it was from the same lot as the medication given to her in February. Although the expiration date printed by the manufacturer on Expired insulin given to patient ‘was sent to Bahamas in 2006’ SEE page 10 n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE JUDICIAL Committee of the Privy Council has reserved its decision on an appeal involving the owners of two adjourning properties in Lyford Cay and their dispute over beach access. The five Law Lords of the Privy Council yesterday heard the appeal in the case of Icebird Lim ited and Alicia P Winegardener, which is the only appeal from the Bahamas the Judicial Committee will hear during its third sitting in New Providence this week. The appellant, Icebird Limited, is seeking to overturn a ruling by the Court of Appeal that upheld a judge’s order that the appellant’s writ and statement of claim be struck out and dismissed. The dispute between Icebird Limited and Winegardener, who are owners of adjacent proper ties in the Clifton Bay Beach area of Lyford Cay, stems from an agreement made between the properties’ previous owners Privy Council Judicial Committee reserves its decision on beach access dispute SEE page eight F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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T ARPUMBAY, ELEUTHERA– A group of 55 students and faculty from Clemson University’s Wesley Foundation Group visited South Eleuthera to lend a helping hand to the community. The group, led by Reverend L ane Glaze, arrived on the island last week on a Bahamasair charter flight for a one week trip, during which they engaged in volunteer community service, community work and environmental studies. They were hosted by Island Journeys, a non-profit organis ation dedicated to strengthening, transforming and rebuilding local communities. Three days after their arrival, they joined winter residents, locals and visitors at the Mission Foundation in Rock Sound, Eleuthera for the annual welcome reception jointly hosted by the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation and the Mission Foundation. Locals said the presence of the South Carolina university group made the reception even more exciting, not only because they took part in the festivities and won a numberof prizes, but also because they enjoyed Bahamian food, music and arts and crafts. During the reception, Ministry of Tourism and Aviation officials, including Eleuthera branch manager, Jacqueline Gibson, and director for the Central and Southern Bahamas, Charity Armbrister, presented a plaque to Rev erend Glaze in honour of his contribution to the island. Reverend Glaze has been bringing groups to Eleuthera for more than six years. Each year, the group invests around $90,000 in the community, and around half a million dollars has been injected since they first began their trips. The ministry says 300 par ticipants have visited and around 50 have made return trips. The group missed one year to the Bahamas, instead doing hurricane relief work in the Gulf of Mexico in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. Reverend Glaze’s organisation has donated generously to Island Journeys and to South Eleuthera EmergencyP artners (SEEP both run by Shaun Ingraham,a native of Tarpum Bay. Donations have included two school buses, two passenger vans, tools and shipping costs on for the importationo f fire gear and equipment for S EEP’s volunteer fire fighters. Reverend Glaze has also brought other groups from North and South Carolina to experience life in a small island community. Opportunity When asked why he is so passionate about bringing university students to Eleuthera, he replied: “When I was a college student, I travelled to the Dominican Republic and it opened a greater world for me. I went in with the mind that I was American but came back that I was a human being. So, bringing the students from South Carolina down to Eleuthera gives them a similar opportunity and perspective that there is another world out there.” Shaun Ingraham, director of Island Journeys, is a commu nity organiser and disaster response consultant who brings people to South Eleuthera with the aim that the both the visitors and the community will grow through the interaction. “The way Shaun sets up the programme and how you can serve the people and the community is great and you cannot learn this experience in the classroom,” said Reverend Glaze. Students are placed where their talents are best suited and assigned tasks based on their areas of interest. This year’s construction projects included re-roofing a home for a single mother in Tarpum Bay, constructing a shaded area for the straw vendors at Princess Cays and extending the roof on one side of the Church of God to createa shaded activity area. Some of the students are working towards education qualifications, and they spent time in the local schools where they taught and observed. Five nurses, lead by lecturer Janice Lanham, visited clinics to help update client records and assist health workers with their duties. The environmental and natural resources students visit ed Lighthouse Beach at the tip of Southern Eleuthera to study and document plant and bird life. Marketing students assisted with creating websites and brochures for various areas of interest in South Eleuthera. The students also had time to enjoy local highlights such as food from fish fry in Rock Sound and a swim at Ocean Hole. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News........P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,17,19,20 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Advt ................................P11,16,18,21,23,24S ports........................................P12,13,14,15 C omics......................................................P22 B USINESS SECTION B usiness...................P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,11,12 A dvts......................P10,13,14,15,16,17,18,20 W eather.....................................................P19 OBITUARIES/RELIGION 32 PAGES CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 P AGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P AGES STUDENTS EXAMINE the flora and fauna at Lighthouse Point beach. Locals hope to protect this area f rom development. Clemson University makes positive impact in Eleuthera THE WESLEY FOUNDATION group arrive in Rock Sound. THE VOLUNTEERS work on providing a roof for a handicap access ramp at Princess Cays. T HE trial of three men charged in the February 2006 m urder of businessman Keith Carey was adjourned again yesterday after it was revealed that one of the attorneys in the case had been involved in an accident and that one of the accused had taken ill. Justice Jon Isaacs, who is hearing the case, was forced to adjourn the trial once again after being informed by lead prosecutor Cheryl GrantBethel that attorney Perry Albury, who is representing murder accused Dwight Knowles, had been involved in an accident and was being treated in hospital. She told the court yesterday that she did not know the extent of his injuries. Attorney Craig Butler, who is representing murder accused Jamal Glinton, also informed the court that his client had taken ill and would not be able to take part in the proceedings until today. The trial into the murder of businessman Keith Carey began on February 15 before Justice Isaacs. Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight Knowles are charged with murder as well as armed robbery and con spiracy to commit armed robbery. Keith Carey, 43, was shot and killed on the steps of the Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway before he was able to deposit $40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Station, which he operated. Ms Grant-Bethel, Stephanie Pintard, Anthony Delaney and Lennox Coleby are prosecuting the case. Attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis are repre senting Jamal Glinton, attorney Dorsey McPhee is repre senting Sean Brown, and attorney Perry Albury is representing Dwight Knowles. The prosecution has called a total of 41 witnesses during the trial. Mur der trial is adjourned again

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 3 PUBLIC NOTICEThe offices ofArawak Homes, Sunshine Insurance and Sunshine Finance will be CLOSING at 3:30 on Thursday April 2 @ 3:30 p.m and will resume normal business hours on Friday April 3rd. Freeport man wanted for questioning in maiming case Harl Taylor murder accused is denied bail In brief n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A Freeport man is wanted by Grand Bahama Police for questioning in a case of maiming. Police have issued an all points bulletin for 39-yearold Gregory Russell, aka Rex Boy, of No 30 Coral Reef Estates, Freeport. He is described as being of brown complexion, brown eyes, and short hair. He is about six feet, one inch tall of stocky build and weighs about 235lbs. According to police, Russell is considered armed and extremely dangerous and should be approached with caution. Anyone with information concerning the suspect is asked to call police 352-1919, 351-9111, 351-9991, 3528351, 352-9076, and 350-3125 or, 911. n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net HUNDREDS of members are expected to run for top positions in the Bahamas Hotel, Catering and Allied Workers Union in the upcoming elections. Secretary general Leo Douglas said the union’s 5,000–plus members will be called upon to make nominations for president, vice-president, and other executive positions in early May. Members can nominate themselves for posi tions as individuals or part of one of the five teams, or parties. Voters will have the option of selecting individuals for specific positions or selecting a party for presidency of the union. In addition to the top position of president, currently held by Roy Colebrooke, there is a first vice-president, second vice-president, secretary general, assistant secretary general, treasurer and assistant treasurer. In addition, two trustees and two executive council members will be appointed. Mr Douglas said both Mr Colebrooke and himself will be in the running for another three year term in charge of the country’s largest hotel union. He said: “Hundreds want to run but there are only six positions. “We are in really serious times and the hotel industry is not in the best position right now, so we need someone with knowledge and experience. Capability “I want our members to understand its not as simple as voting for somebody; its voting for somebody for their capability, knowledge and experience.” Although only union members can vote, Mr Douglas maintains the election is important for the whole country, as the actions of the next president and his team will have ramifications for the entire hotel sector and the country’s largest industry, tourism. He said: “Everyone is affected by the tourism industry. That’s why I am concerned we can’t just put this organisation in anybody’s hands. “They could destroy this organisation in a day if they don’t know how to negotiate.” n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net INVESTIGATORS from the capital travelled to Bimini yesterday to assist local police there in capturing a gunman who shot a man in the leg during a beach party. The gunman, believed to be in his mid to late 40s, was reportedly involved in an altercation with a 22-year-old man during a party at Spook Hill Beach, Bimini, on Tuesday. The older man suddenly drew a handgun and fired three shots into the crowd, hitting a bystander in the leg, police on Bimini said. In the ensuing chaos, the gunman allegedly attacked his intended target, gunbutting the younger man in the head, before fleeing the scene. Assistant Commissioner for the Family Islands Hulan Hanna told The Tribune yesterday that police responded to calls of shots being fired at a party at Spook Hill Beach in Bailey Town shortly after 9pm. At the scene, officers met two injured men. The men were taken to the l ocal clinic for treatment before b eing flown to Nassau. T heir present conditions are not known but police said their injuries were not life-threatening. The gunshot victim is a resident of Bimini believed to be about 27 or 28 years old. Up to press time last night, the shooter who is known to police had eluded capture. “We're following significant leads in connection with this matter,” Mr Hanna said. FOR a third time, the man charged in the murder ofi nternationally known handbag designer Harl Taylor has b een denied bail. Senior Justice Anita Allen yesterday refused a baila pplication on behalf of mur der accused Troyniko M cNeil, 22. Justice Allen noted that McNeil is charged with as erious offence, that there is evidence against him and t hat his trial is imminent. McNeil is expected to stand trial on June 29, beforeS enior Justice Allen. A A p p p p l l i i c c a a t t i i o o n n The accused made his first a pplication for bail in Janu ary. McNeil’s attorney Murrio D ucille submitted yesterday that the accused must be p resumed innocent until proven otherwise, that he is not a flight risk and has nop revious convictions. Attorney Lorna LongleyR olle, who appeared on behalf of the Attorney General’s Office, objected to bailb eing granted. McNeil has been in prison for nine months. It is alleged that McNeil caused Taylor’s deathb etween Saturday, Novem ber 17 and Sunday, November 18, 2007. He has pleaded not guilty. Taylor, 37, was found s tabbed to death at Mountbatten House on West Hill Street. Troyniko McNeil Nassau investigators help Bimini police in manhunt Search on for gunman who shot victim in leg H ulan Hanna Hundreds expected to run for top union posts I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s THE BAHAMAS HOTEL, CATERING AND ALLIED WORKERS UNION

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I hope that I am not too late with my comment concerning your article on the subject. I find it very odd that the only persons who are defending Sir Lynden Pindling’s legacy are the ones who were either too young to know what had transpired in that era or were in schools abroad. Not one of Sir Lynden or Mr Tynes’ contemporary colleagues have voiced their support of Sir Lynden or refuted Mr Tynes’ account of the events of the early 1980’s. No one wants to know of the other side of Sir Lynden’s persona. Everyone just wants to be focused on his positive legacy, but to be fair to the future generations both sides of his story should be told. That is what the hysteria is all about nothing negative should be told. Mr Marquis, that is the reason you are vilified and Mr Michael Craton is hailed as a hero. He chose to perpetuate the myth that Sir Lynden was a “saint”, while you have the courage to show that the man was only a human being and he had as many char acter flaws as good ones. I thank you for the enlightening articles that you write. E KNOWLES Nassau, March 23, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. The Bahamas Government borrowed $120 million for roads, $ 90 million for the harbour, $200m to boost the economy a total of $390 million just short of 1/2 billion dollars and 50 per cent or our total annual budget. Just about every penny would be spent in New Providence. For many years I was saying Nassau was a dying city because when y ou would have spent $120 million on road improvement you still have a traffic problem in New Providence. Our Parliament is bankrupt on both sides of the House. I have said many years ago that the problem in New Providence is the population. Borrow $13 billion from the C hinese. This amount of money should be used to build a Central H ospital in Andros, a University of The Bahamas, the Prison and D efence Base. Move the port to south west side of New Provi-d ence and shuttle the workers f rom New Providence to Andros the largest Island in The Bahamasa nd fifth largest in the Caribbean in less than hour by the Bo Hengy b oat and 10 minutes by plane to Central Andros. T his move would bring the cost of living in New Providence downt o 50 per cent. Farmers and fish ermen would be able to bring their produce and fish from A ndros, Berry Island and South Abaco to New Providence in the m orning, sell them and be back home in the evening. A lso, when we make the move with the above institutions to A ndros, New Providence over the next l0 to 20 years population would decrease by 100,000 persons and some of these expensive roads we are now building in New P rovidence would have to be closed because the traffic would a lso be decreased. Parliament needs a face lift w ith independent thinkers and with a proposal like the above South Abaco, Berry Island, especially Andros and New Providence would have a boom like t hey have never seen before. The World, including The B ahamas is praising President Obama, a highly intelligent 47y ear-old young man. A young leader with the idea of change. As a young man who came to Nassau in 1966, the Bahamian people were crying out for hope and change and only the very fortunate people had inside kitchens and inside toilets; then on January1 0, 1967 a brilliant young man of 38 years with new ideas brought us to where we are today. From outside toilets, a fishing v illage to the best economy in the r egion where the black, pink, white and red people are benefitting. The FNM has Pindling and O bama and the deputy speaker of the House a smart, highly qualified Bahamian. The PLP has Pindlings and O bamas. The Bahamas has a large number of educated, highly i ntelligent young men and women with ideas which would, whenp ooled together, blow our mem bers of parliament royal readers, H uckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer ideasbankrupt-era minds. Example, my son who went to Fisk University obtained BA inP sychology and English, Buckingham University completedL LB in Law, 1st class Hons fin ished in top 10. T here were three top categories, one Indian woman, one black man and an English man. The black man, my son Audley Jr, who went onto North Hamp-s hire and obtained LPC and Masters degree but all of the above d id not make me proud because he was always a smart boy. W hen he was called to the New York Bar that made me proud because J F Kennedy Jr, three times, his brother former Attorney General Bobby Kennedy twice. While watching the Mighty S parrow who spoke about his daughter who passed the NewY ork Bar. He was proud because those c hildren who had all the money did not and had to repeat. I was able to relate to his feelings. So we need the young Pin dlings and Obamas to bring us o ut of the political bankruptcy era we find ourselves in when itc omes to leadership in The Bahamas. S ome of the vibrant young Bahamian leaders that I am thinking about come from both sides or the House. Persons like Glenys Hanna-Martin, Wayne Munroe, Monique Pindling-Johnson, Kwasi Thompson, Hope Strachan, Tommy Turnquest, F rank Smith, Myles LaRoda, Craig Butler, Fred Mitchell, Branville McCartney, Jerome Fitzgerald, Algernon Allen Jr, Sidney Cambridge Jr, Ryan Pinder, Kendal Wright, Picewell Forbes, Philip “Fish” McKenzie, Damien Gomez, Oscar N Johnson Jr, Dwayne Hanna, Dr Gera rd Hanna-Rolle, Romauld Ferreira, Patrick Hanna, Dr Kendal Major, Duward Francis, Sharon Hanna, Michael Halkitis, Dr Michael Darville, Paul Moss, Diane Hanna-Wilson, John H Bostwick Jr, Dr Danny Johnson, Paulette Zonicle, Michelle Roberts, Mario Gray, Desmond Bannister, Cara Ingraham, Nish onda Tynes, Tanisha Tynes, Anne Wells, Travett Pyfrom, F rannon Wilson, Jimmy Knowles Jr, Janet R Bostwick, Dr Valen t ine Grimes, Rosel Wilson, Malissa Sears, Ken Dorsett, ItaliaC artwright, Alexander Maillis II, C hristopher Plakaris Alex Storr, Darrin Rodgers, Dr Cargills, Mar-v in Dames, Dr Allison Greenslade, Keith Bell, these n ames are not in any particular order or superior thinkers just t hat I think they would make great leaders and there are manym ore that could be added to this list. The way I analysis the present g overnment, any politician who is not computer literate should b e out because most ways of running the country of the world is n ot in an exercise book or the royal reader. T hey need to pass the baton on to our youth. When I heard that The Bahamas would be hosting the Miss Universe Contest I said to m yself this would be a real opportunity to expose the other Family o f Bahamian Islands by using boats like the Fast Ferries, B ahamas Daybreak, Captain Moxey, Island Link, Bo Hengy can be used for day or over night trips because they are nice clean boats that would take the contes t ants to Eleuthera, Abaco, Andros and other close islands a nd cays giving them a chance to get a piece of the “pie”. AUDLEY D HANNA Sr JP Nassau, March, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm IN THE 2002 election the PLP, under the leadership of Perry Christie, presented itself to t he electorate as the “New” PLP. Other than in name which soon faded away after they won that election we could find nothing “new” about the PLP. T oday with many of its members and diehard s upporters screaming for Tribune Managing Editor John Marquis to be run out of the country, we hark back to the year 1969. Today’s “new” PLP want to put the skids u nder Mr Marquis and ship him out of the Bahamas for writing a father’s tragic story about a pilot son who lost his life or so the father believes because he knew too much aboutt hen prime minister Lynden Pindling and his friendship with Carlos“Joe” Lehder, the Colombian drug lord of Norman’s Cay. In 1969 the “old” PLP had been in power for two short years, having won its first election by o ne House seat in 1967, followed the following year by a landslide victory in a second generale lection. In those days the late Sir Etienne Dupuch, e ditor-publisher of this newspaper, was the thorn in the PLP’s political side. “Close down The Tribune and kick out Sir Etienne!” thundered a PLP backbencher in the House of Assembly on February 27, 1969, in refe rence to an earlier controversy over press free dom. “What does Sir Etienne “want freedom for to destroy this country?” the backbencher asked as he described the publisher as “a feeblem inded man who is like a bull in a china closet.” The MP based his remarks on a statement incorrectly attributed to Sir Etienne by prime minister Pindling. The prime minister had accused Sir Etienne of telling a group of Miami n ewsmen that he feared the spread of commu nism in the Bahamas. This was not true. The M iami newsmen corrected Sir Lynden and Sir Etienne submitted his speech in which there w as no reference to communism. However, Sir Lynden refused to retract his lie. Sir Etienne’s alleged comment unleashed a tirade from this Out Island backbencher who accused him of making a “serious attack” on the B ahamas in front of investors “to stifle the growth of this country.” O ne rule strictly followed by Sir Etienne was that he never criticised his country when overseas. However, he did not restrain his pen in this column when he felt his governmentn eeded public exposure. However, the amusement was that this backbencher wanted to ship Sir Etienne out as they want to ship Mr Marquis out today but they had a major difficulty they didn’t know where to ship him. The MP believed that people who made damaging remarks about the country should be thrown out, but in Sir Etienne’s case “I don’t k now where we are going to throw him because he belongs here.” Even if now governor-general A D Hanna’s preposterous suggestion at the ConstitutionalC onference in London had been adopted, t hrowing Sir Etienne out would have still presented a problem. Not only did Sir Etienne belong to these islands, but he was born in Nassau. At the Constitutional Conference at which t he Bahamas’ independence was being negotiated, the British refused Mr Hanna’s proposal that any Bahamian who gave offence should be rusticated to the island of his birth, where hew ould be held for the rest of his life, a virtual prisoner. Not only could he not shop in Miami, but he could not even shop in Nassau. However, to his credit Sir Lynden was cau tious. He said government would do all it could t o protect the interests of the country and of Bahamians, but had to be careful in how theyd id it. He said in their efforts to protect they should d o nothing to destroy the freedom they had fought to win. He knew perfectly well that Sir Etienne only had to send what was happening here to freedom of speech to the international press associations’ freedom of the press comm ittees to have this country’s reputation tar nished beyond repair. Especially if they dis-c overed that the freedom of the press furore all started over that initial lie told by Sir Lynden a nd broadcast by ZNS. Sir Lynden said he regretted that freedom of speech meant the freedom to tell lies and he knew of no way to achieve the extinction of lies without providing for the extinction of free s peech. “But lies can be exposed and lies will be e xposed and the perpetrators of lies will be exposed and time always has its way of providi ng just retribution for the perpetrators of lies.” Mr Marquis’s problem today is that he is recording statements being made by aging Bahamians who lived through the Pindling era and now say they want to correct the lies of t he past. They have used Mr Marquis to tell their stor y. And this is the reason that some PLPs many of whom don’t even know the history of that period would like to ship him out. What is also interesting is that The Tribune r eporter of that exchange in the House on Thursday, February 27, 1969, was none other than 25-year-old John Marquis. It seems only fitting that now that he is ending his journalistic career he should be following in the footsteps of one of his earliest mentors he could be in no better company. Young Pindlings and Obamas – your country needs you! LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net John Marquis follows his mentor 0$5,1($9,*$7,21&2856(6 '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* $67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP We are looking to fill the following positions with energetic, dynamic and team oriented individuals. They are available on both a Part-Time and Full-Time basis. CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES/TEAM LEADER OPERATIONS SUPPORT PRESSER/FINISHERApplication must include the following:Employment Application Form/Resume Copy of Bahamian Passport Copy of National Insurance Board Card Recent (not older than one yeartificate Recent Passport Size Photo (color NO TELEPHONE CALLS, PLEASE The r eal reason for the Pindling legacy hysteria

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n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net STATE Minister for Finance Zhirvargo Laing said he has no knowledge of a Customs scam that allegedly cheated local brokerage firms out of "millions of dollars." On Tuesday, embattled Global United CEO Jackson Ritchie outlined the alleged scam to The Tribune and claimed his company was targeted by corrupt Customs officers who overcharged “hundreds of thousands of dollars” in Customs fees over the past few years. Mr Ritchie, whose company is in jeopardy of a winding up order by government because of non-payment of $6 million ino utstanding debt, is asking government to credit the amount the company was allegedly cheated out of to Global's balance. When contacted for comment yesterday, Minister Laingl aughed off the claims, saying h e was only aware of the claims after they were published in Wednesday's Tribune. "I only personally saw the story I have no idea what Mr Ritchie is talking about at all, I really d o not," said Mr L aing, who offered n o further comment on the matter. In a previous interview, Mr Ritchie claimed these fees were paid to the Customs department and then claimed on a re-issued cheque to the brokerage firm, that was never collected by Global United. He said he had documentation that showed how the alleged scam affected his com pany going back “a few years”, and estimated Global’s losses through this scheme could amount to “millions and millions” of dollars. Mr Ritchie is asking government to credit this amount to his current debt. In his press statement and video released to the media Tuesday, Mr Ritchie provided documentation sugg esting that on a sing le transaction his c ompany overpaid more than $55,000 for a shipment. In the payment to Customs of $66,303.94 to clear the shipment on June 10, 2007, Glob al was issued a “miscellaneous refunds claim” valued at $55,253.28 only 10 days later on the same shipment. However, these funds, Mr Ritchie claimed, were never received by his company. With more than $125 million worth of business a year, Mr Ritchie said Global would annually pay government anywhere from $70 and $80 million. During this period, Mr Ritchie said, he was owed anywhere from $13 to $15 million. When asked in a recent interview how he could insist that it was government that was forci ng him out of business when t he courts had ordered the i mmediate payment of the outstanding funds before any attempts were made to reconcile the balances, Mr Ritchie said that during any court matter both parties can still come to some form of agreement. He also explained that these outstanding monies are not funds owed by his company to government in terms of taxes, but the balances of his trade payables which were “abrupt ly” called in by government. Attempts to reach Acting Comptroller of Customs Antho ny Adderley for comment yes terday were unsuccessful. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, F LIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 EMBATTLED Global United Limited CEO Jackson Ritchie has taken his cause to cyberspace in an a ttempt to garner public sympathy as he crusades for a meeting with the prime minister in a last ditch bid to save his jeopardised shipping agency. W hile he initially shied away from making public comments regarding Global United's financial status, Mr Ritchie has now created a profile on the social networking site Facebook and posted a video on the video sharing site YouTube to make his case against the government's demands that the company pay up $6 m illion in outstanding debts immediately. An update on his Facebook profile details Mr Ritchie's thwarted attempt to meet with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham at the PM’s office yesterday, where he planned t o plead with Mr Ingraham to consider accepting a payment plan to recoup the outstanding money. Allegations In a two minute video posted on YouTube, Mr Ritchie repeated his allegations about the existence of a Customs scam, highlighted in The Tribune on Wednesday, which he claims swindled Global United and other brokerage companies out of m illions of dollars. He is asking for government to deduct the amount he claims was lost to the scam from Global United's outstanding balance. Up to press time last night, the v ideo had logged 309 views. The company head has been working feverishly over the last two weeks to save his company from governm ent's winding up threat, saying it would cost all 50 Global United employees their jobs. Mr Ritchie, a former PLP candidate for the Clifton constituency, is not the first local political hopeful to utilise social networking sites to garner support. Several politicians and political h opefuls are registered on Facebook, which allows them to connect with supporters on an immediate, more personal basis. T HE man whose body w as discovered onboard a boat moored near the Potters Cay dock last Tuesday has been identified as Leon “Crow”F orbes, 65, of Eastwood. A family member of Mr Forbes’ phoned The Tribune yesterday after an article appeared in thisd aily stating that police had not yet released the man’s identity. Mr Forbes was found d ead in the cabin of the vessel wearing a white Ts hirt and underwear. Police ruled out foul play as there were no signs of t rauma to the body, nor any evidence on the boat t hat suggested that the man had been the victim of a homicide. A special memorial for Mr Forbes was held last F riday at Montagu Beach. He is survived by his son and other familym embers. n By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@ t ribunemedia.net P OLICE are investigat ing a stabbing incident that occurred on Mondaye vening. Jaime Missick, 24, drove himself to hospital at around 9.55pm on Monday after being stabbed underh is left arm. ASP Bootle said Missick reportedly went to drop off his son when he got into an altercation with his son’sm other’s boyfriend. He was treated for his injuries and discharged. Police are investigating. A PUBLIC meeting will be h eld tonight to inform the South Beach community abouta new initiative to involve coastal residents in the appreh ension of illegal immigrants. Immigration Watch” will be launched by the Department of Immigration in seaside communities across New Prov-i dence to stop migrants from entering the country illegally. Immigration department director Jack Thompson said: The main thrust of the new i nitiative is to invite persons in the community and those who reside in our coastline areas to be on the watch for vessels, which tend to come from that a ngle, and persons disembarking from those vessels, to alert the authorities to make sure people are not slipping through the cracks to infiltrate the com-m unity. “It is similar to ‘Crime W atch’ but we want to ensure we put this out so the entire c ommunity will be involved.” Immigration Watch meet ings will also be held in Yamacraw, south east New Providence, and other shore-l ine areas, Mr Thompson said. Tonight’s meeting will be h eld at 7pm at Anatol Rodgers High School on Faith Avenue, S outh Beach. Man found dead onboard boat i s identified Stabbing incident is investigated In brief Global United CEO makes his case online ‘Immigration Watch’ meeting Jackson Ritchie Zhivargo Laing Minister ‘has no knowledg of alleged Customs scam

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE DURING NASSAU GLASS COMPANY’SART GALLERY Pre-Inventory SaleMackey Street 393-8165S T O R E W I D EA l l o f o u rf r a m e d & u n f r a m e d r e p r o d u c t i o n s a n d o r i g i n a l s a r e o n s a l eD U R I N G O U RP R E I N V E N T O RYS A L EN O W T H R O U G H A P R 4C U S T O M F R A M I N G & R E A D YM A D E F R A M E S1 5 % O F FN o t e : i t e m s o n c o n s i g n m e n t n o t o n s a l e . THE BAHAMAS NATIONAL YOUTH CHOIR is celebrating its 19th annual Concert season at the Dundas Center for the Performing Arts. The choir is singing “Plenty Good Room /Sit Down, Servant”. “YOU AIN’ HURRYIN ME” by Eric Minns. CHOIR singing ‘America the Beautiful’. CELEBRATES SEASON 19th concert Bahamas National Youth Choir P HOTOSPECIAL PHOTOS: Donald Knowles, Choir Photographer CALYPSO Island. THE MEN of the National Youth Choir performs a folk song from Jamaica called “Liza”.

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I N DIGENOUS peoples around the world argue that the three pillars of sustainable development (economic, environmental ands ocial) exclude a fourth critical pillar – culture. The Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity statest hat “cultural diversity is as necessary for humankind as biodiversity is for nature.” Iti s “one of the roots of development understood not simp ly in terms of economic growth, but also as a means to achieve a more satisfactory i ntellectual, emotional, moral and spiritual existence". I n the Bahamas we have a predominately African heritage blended with Europeant raditions. The indigenous people of the Bahamas were the Lucayan Indians but traces of their culture exist only inb ooks and archaeological or historical publications. If the Indians had survived theC olumbus era, more of our culture might reflect what is f ound in Mexico or Peru where the influence of the Mayans and Incas is still evi-d ent. For a small and relatively new country depending on t ourism as its primary source of jobs and income, culture is crucial to the Bahamas maintaining its competitiveness in the region. Many new devel o pments throughout the islands create new interpretations of aspects of Bahamian culture – some good and some b ad. The fact that we have so m any islands means that diversity is healthy and required in order to give eachl ocation its own unique identity and ability to attract visi tors and those seeking a new home. However, if authentic Bahamian culture is not morec onsistently expressed in tourism products, there is the risk of it being diluted over time by corporate marketing. The hub of the Bahamas is d owntown Nassau. It is the gateway to the country for the cruise industry, banking andb usiness and only a handful of Nassuvians manage to a void it on a regular basis. It w as once an iconic symbol of the Bahamas but has slipped over the past couple of decades into a depressing stateo f neglect. Many tourists who do not arrive via cruise ship are toldt o avoid downtown and visit places like Marina Village on P aradise Island and Sandyport, which offer cleaner and more modern hassle-freee xperiences. As the island grows west there will be new Marina Villages” likely at Cable Beach and further west past the airport. We may evens ee an effort to develop a new hub to rival Bay Street with t he aim of attracting businesses and entrepreneurs. Bay Street merchants will strugglea nd property owners will realise reduced rents and property values. E f forts have been underway since the late 1980s to improve down-t own. Some of the short-term goals have been to identify a dditional parking areas, install parking meters, enforce laws and traffic violations, lim-i t bus access to Bay Street and control crime and harassment b y increasing police presence. US port cities like Charleston, South Carolinaa nd San Francisco, California experienced post-World Word II renaissances which did notc ome from redevelopment but were inspired by local artists and writers who wanted top romote their cities. Perhaps the missing element to kick s tart the Nassau Renaissance is not about streets and buildings but about culture. T he master plan for the Nassau redevelopment focuse s on several “zones” from Arawak Cay to Montagu. Arawak Cay already has theb eginnings of a cultural experience. Across the street is the Botanical Gardens, an 18-acre s ite which is home to over 600 species of flowering trees and shrubs and is unfortunatelyc losed to the public. Combined with Fort Charlotte, t hese sites hold great potential for a “must see and do” cultural experience that canb e on every hotel and cruise ship list. The Botanical Gardens itself could contain a large amphitheatre hosting thec ountry’s signature culture show. The show can build on features from previous shows like Peanuts Taylor’s Drumbeat Club, the Cabaret on Par-a dise Island and incorporate junkanoo and the National Y outh Choir among other attractions. The show could depict the s tory of the Bahamas from the Indians to slavery and colonialism, to independence and a celebration of the Bahamas today – all told through Bahamian music, song andd ance. The show could be market e d as the real Bahamian experience and sold in packages including dinner, the show ando ther options. In order to attract volume, cruise ships and hotels would have to be on board to promote the packages to theirg uests, probably at a cost per head. The idea can be promoted on cruise ships as part of a walking experience which meanders through town anda long the waterfront esplanade where artisans can o ffer their various indigenous crafts and art. In addition to building a g reater sense of what the Bahamas is, creating worldclass cultural experiences will g ive the government a greater ability to attract investors, tourists and incorporate moreB ahamians into the overall development of the country. W ith so much emphasis today on the monetary result of service and hard work, cul t ure can be used as a means to build the city and at the same time teach younger genera tions to live beautifully, respect themselves and theirc ountry, and hopefully service and hard work will eventually become second nature. C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 7 Discover another side of paradise. For more information, visit Atlantis.comMarina Village at Atlantis is where local Caribbean culture comes to life. Shop in over twenty duty-free boutiques featuring fine jewelry, perfume, original art and luxury resort wear. Or find a treasure in one of many carts brimming with local,handmade crafts and treats. Dine in one of five unique eateries, taste authentic Bahamian fare at Bimini Road, or indulge in the creations of world-renown chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten at the historic Caf Martinique or sample homestyle Italian dishes at Carmines, a New York dining institution. Culture is crucial for the Bahamas VILLA DOYLE on West Hill Street is an exemplary standard with historical and cultural value. Y OUR S AY T his is the fifth in a series of articles discussing the potential opport unities for the Bahamas in the emerging green economy. The writer, Colin Lightbourn, is a real estate business owner, developer and past president of the Bahamas National Trust. To comment, discuss a nd submit ideas about these articles, visit www.thegreenislands.com T T h h e e f f a a c c t t t t h h a a t t w w e e h h a a v v e e s s o o m m a a n n y y i i s s l l a a n n d d s s m m e e a a n n s s t t h h a a t t d d i i v v e e r r s s i i t t y y i i s s h h e e a a l l t t h h y y a a n n d d r r e e q q u u i i r r e e d d i i n n o o r r d d e e r r t t o o g g i i v v e e e e a a c c h h l l o o c c a a t t i i o o n n i i t t s s o o w w n n u u n n i i q q u u e e i i d d e e n n t t i i t t y y a a n n d d a a b b i i l l i i t t y y t t o o a a t t t t r r a a c c t t v v i i s s i i t t o o r r s s a a n n d d t t h h o o s s e e s s e e e e k k i i n n g g a a n n e e w w h h o o m m e e . .

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Meanwhile, inflation remained at elevated levels during the review period, reflecting mainly higher prices for consumer goods,” the Central Bank report said. The outlook for the Bahamian economy remains weak throughout 2009, with developments expected to be heavily influenced by the responsiveness of the global economy particularly the US to the stimulus measures implemented by monetary and fiscal authorities. Consequently, tourism and foreign-investment activity are likely to remain subdued in the nearterm, with implications for a further elevation in the unemployment rate above the 12 per cent estimated at year end-2008.” The Central Bank said the Government’s capital works proj ects, such as the New Providence Road Improvement Project, construction of court complexes and government buildings, and the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA w ould boost employment and e conomic activity, but not reverse the situation. Striking a slightly more optimistic note, the Central Bank saidt he self-correcting mechanism built into the Bahamian economy’s structure would prevent the current account and balance of p ayments suffering “significant d eterioration.” In any economic downturn, Bahamian consumer and business demand for imports is reduced, a long with credit growth, thus reducing the outflow of foreign currency. And the Central Bank’s external reserves would be e nhanced by the Government’s f oreign currency borrowing. Nevertheless, the weakness in the general Bahamian economy had passed into the commercial b anking sector in the form of increased loan arrears. Credit growth had slowed down due to banks “more conservative lending p ractices and lowered demand for c redit.” More troubling for Bahamian c ommercial banks is that in February, while the percentage of total loans more than 30 days past due decreased, the proportion over 90 days past due meaningt hose that are classified as nonperforming, and earning the banks no interest increased. Non-performing commercial b ank loans increased by 3.7 per cent or $14.3 million to $397.2 million, a figure that accounted for 6.55 per cent of total bank loans in the Bahamas. The industry usually tries to keep non-perf orming loans at 5 per cent or below. However, the banks enjoyed better news when it came to loans that were between 31-90 days pastd ue, as these fell by $29.5 million to $354.5 million. These loans dropped to 5.84 per cent of the total, indicating that commercial b anks were having some success in restructuring loans and preventing them from falling into the non-performing category. Overall, the total value of private sector loans past due fell by 2 per cent, or $15.2 million, in February 2009 to $757.7 million, a figure that represented 12.48 per cent of all outstanding loans. The Central Bank attributed t he reduction in total loan arrears to mortgages, where the total number of loans past due fell to 12.72 per cent from 13.51 per cent i n January. “In contrast, the consumer and commercial arrears rate firmed to 11.13 per cent and 15.49 per cent from 10.88 per cent and 15.3p er cent respectively, amid growth in the non-performing component. Banks continued to increment their loan loss provis ions over the review month, leading to the ratio of provisions to arrears firming by 0.89 percentage points to 23.67 per cent. “However, the corresponding r atio to non-performing loans declined by 0.83 percentage points to 45.16 per cent.” For the first two months in 2 009, the amount of Bahamian dollar credit issues fell year-overyear to $30.2 million, compared to a $36.5 million advance in 2008. Consumer lending fell by $24.7m illion, and residential mortgage growth nearly halved to $22.4 million. For the 12 months to February 2009, the Central Bank reported t hat domestic inflation rose to 4.8 per cent, compared to 4.67 per cent for the previous 12-month period and 2.41 per cent a year ago. Notable increases were registered for food and beverages (7.43 per cent household operations (6.66 per c ent) and medical and healthcare (4.54 per cent said. “More modest costs rises were recorded for housing and recre-a tion and entertainment services of 3.59 per cent and 3.7 per cent, respectively. The remaining groups recorded inflation rates of l ess than 3 per cent,” the Central Bank said. For the first nine months of 2008, hotel room revenues increased by 5.8 per cent to $424.3m illion, year-over-year. This was driven by a 9.4 per cent increase in average daily room rates, as hotel room night sales fell 3.3 per c ent. “Activity in the sector is expected to have weakened significantly over the closing months of the year and into early 2009,r eflecting downturns in both occupancy levels and average daily room rates,” the Central Bank said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hen: This Friday April 3rd. Time : 12 5pm P lace: #45 3rd Street Coconut Grove Phone Orders: @ 323-5761 Or Email Order at: bridgetterolle@yahoo.com regarding access to Clifton Bay beach. The appellant’s property sits on a hill at the rear of Winegardener’s lot. The facts of the case are that an easement was granted by Wineg ardener’s predecessor in title over a certain part of land in favour of the appellant’s predecessors in title, granting a right of waya ccess to Clifton Bay Beach along a 50-foot wide roadway. Although a further agreement regarding access to the beach was entered i nto in 1968, nothing else happened until 1999 when the appellant current owner entered into discussions with Winegardener, under the expectation that the earlier agreement would be upheld. The appellant subsequently filed a writ in Supreme Court after there was no resolution to the matter, alleging also that the respon-d ent had started obstructing the use of the road access to the beach. Nothing happened until November 2001 when the appellant a pplied for leave to amend his writ. The appellant did nothing fur ther to progress the action after that, however, and on February 18, 2004, Winegardener filed an application to have the writ struck out. Senior Justice John Lyons in a ruling handed down in February 2 006, dismissed the action and struck out the appellant’s writ and statement of claim for an inordinate and inexcusable delay. The c ourt of appeal upheld that decision later that year. In a dissenting judgment on the appeal however, Justice Hartman Longley agreed w ith the appellant’s argument that Justice Lyons had erred in his judgment. Julian Malins, QC, who appeared with lawyer Tracy Ferguson of Callenders and Co on behalf of Icebird Limited adopted Justice Longley’s reasoning for dismissing the judgment, submitting that his c lient’s case is substantive and should be allowed to proceed. Henry Bostwick, QC, who appeared with his daughter, Lisa B ostwick, for the respondent, Alicia Winegardener, argued, how ever, that the decision of Senior Justice Lyons and the Court of A ppeal should be upheld. He added that the striking out of the writ and the statement of claim was warranted. Mr Bostwick told the Law Lords that his client wants to have the matter over and done with. The Privy Council, which is the highest court of appeal for certain Commonwealth countries, customarily sits in Downing Street, London. However, the Council’s Judicial Committee will sit in the Court of Appeal until tomorrow. T he Privy Council, which usually consists of five law lords, has sat in the Bahamas on two previous occasions in December 2006,w hich was its first sitting outside London, and again in December 2007. T he appeals are being heard before the five law lords Lord Philips of Worth Martravers, who is the senior Law Lord, Lord Scott of Foscote, Lord Brown of Eaton-under-Heywood, Lord Mance and Lord Neuberger. The Law Lords heard the appeal in the cases of Wendall Swann vs the Attorney General of the Turks andC aicos Islands (TCI hear the appeal in the case of Johannes Deuss vs the Attorney G eneral for Bermuda and the Commissioner of Police of Bermuda today. on his back in a reclining position and water is poured over his head d isrupting normal breathing and making him feel that he is drowning. Causing an almost instant gag reflex, the victim believes he is about to die. It was this feeling, said Mr Cartwright, that caused him to black out when the officers lowered his head into a toilet bowel i n one of the upstairs offices at the station. One of the officers, he said, sat on his chest and poured water over his face, flushing the toilet from time to time while the other held his legs in place. Wrestling free after regaining consciousness, Delanzo said he s truggled with the two officers who were in their plain clothes at the time and eventually was able to get out of the stall onto the ground. The officers he said continued to beat him with the bats, stopping sometimes to kick him about the body, even stomping him in the g roin. “I passed out three times,” said Mr Cartwright who claims that the beating lasted for almost two hours. I t was only his 6 foot tall, 220 pound frame, Delanzo said that saved his life. “They beat me across my back, my face, my legs, with this big b lack metal pipe they had wrapped up in black tape. While I was on t he ground in the bathroom, a male Sergeant came in and said: ‘Ya’ll c over his mouth’, ’cause I was hollerin’ trying to get someone to help me. And they was stomping me and kicking me and whapping me ’cause they were trying to get me to go back in the toilet and I was h olding on that thing that turns on the toilet. And these fella’s kept whapping me and I wouldn’t let that go because I know if they get me back in there I know what they were going to do,” he said. Mr Cartwright said the officers threatened to carry him to the S outh Beach canals to continue the beating as his howling continu ed to cause the officers concern that someone would hear and discover what they were doing. If they did carry me by the canal I know they were going to kill me. But my attorney showed up and he heard them beating me. T hat’s when the senior officer just disappeared,” he said. It was at this point during The Tribune’s interview with Mr Cartwright that his doctor emerged from the Male Medical ward and told him he was well enough to be discharged. Having had a catheter inserted because he was urinating blood, M r Cartwright said he was certain he was going to die in the holding cell of the police station that night as the officers had failed to g et him any immediate medical attention. Apparently, it was only after the arresting officers arrived at t he station and discovered him sprawled on the floor of the cell that they rushed him to Princess Margaret Hospital’s Accident and E mergency section. Here as well, he said, because he arrived in handcuffs he was treated as “less than a human being” and only given a shot and sent back to the station. Ironically, while he was in hospital, Delanzo said one of the m en who allegedly beat him visited him to inform him that he was going to be charged with causing harm, obscene language, andd isorderly behaviour at the station. Mr Cartwright has since filed a report with the Complaints and C orruption Unit of the Royal Bahamas Police Force and is expecting to file criminal charges through his attorney against these officers as soon as possible. Assistant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna told The Tribune last night that he was not aware of this case and encouraged the man t o file a police report. After being told that a police report had already been filed, Mr H anna said that it had not yet come to his attention. F ROM page one Unemployment C laim that police officers u sed torture techniques F ROM page one F ROM page one Privy Council Judicial Committee reserves its decision on beach access dispute

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THE Bahamas Humane Society (BHS whelmed by the generous donation that will enable shelter mana ger Percy Grant to attend the Humane Society of the United States annual convention in Las Vegas. Answering the call for sponsorship, the Bahamas Bridge Club donated $1,000 to the BHS for the trip. “It is honestly a dream come t rue,” Mr Grant told executive director of BHS Stephen Turnquest, who had already been sponsored by Bahamian businessman Robert Reiss of Reiss Engineering a few weeks ago. “We were honestly concerned as to how we would be able to afford to take Percy as well,” B HS president Kim Aranha said. “When we put the photo of Stephen receiving his cheque in the papers we mentioned that Percy was looking for a sponsor, within hours Mrs Noreen Wurdemann contacted me at home.” Mrs Wurdemann is president of the Bahamas Bridge Club. T his group of ladies donate a nnually to various local charitable causes and has been doing so f or the past 30 years. This year, they thought it w ould be fitting to donate the money needed to send BHS’ shelt er manager to Las Vegas in memory of their beloved club member Shirley Bays who passed away in December 2008. Mrs Wurdemann said, “I'm s ure Shirley would have been delighted to know that our dona-t ion of $1,000 will be used toward expenses for Mr Percy Grant to a ttend the Vegas conference.” Mrs Bays came to the Bahamas in 1984 from Canada. Her intere sts included bridge, which she excelled at. She adored her dogs, a ll of which were potcakes, some she picked up in the bushes and o thers she found on the street. She also had her beloved gray parrot Noogie, who could sing the first few bars of “Oh Cana da.” H er friends remember her as a person who was faultlessly dedi cated to her animals and to the works of the Bahamas Humane S ociety. When she died, her wish was that Mr Grant take care of her parrot, and Noogie now resides happily with the shelter manager. M rs Bays was a very private person and was not one to make h er generous gifts public. Her friends say that they are sure that o ver the years she helped many other organisations in the B ahamas. Ms Aranha said, “it was such a wonderful way to honour a special person after they have passed away. We are eternally grateful to t he Bahamas Bridge Club and their innovative idea of donatingP ercy's trip to the conference in memory of Shirley. I am sure that she will be with us in Vegas and watching over us.” The Bahamas Humane Society urges others to consider donations like this as a fitting way to remember the departed whol oved and cherished animals. A group of three BHS representatives leave on Sunday for the conference. They are Kim Aranha, president; Stephen Turnquest, executive director, and Percy Grant, shelter manager. T he Bahamas will be well represented this year as the Grand Bahama Humane Society is also sending three representatives. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 9 The New C-ClassYour most enjoyable drive ever.The new C-Class is a pleasure to behold o ffering a new interpretation of driving p leasure. Its taut lines lend it an air of effortless superiority while the wide radiator grille and distinctive rear section announce a vehicle with a real presence and dynamic personality. Few cars can compete with its ability to adjust so many facets of its character from the interior to the drive technology so quickly and precisely in response toexternal conditions and your own particular needs. The key to this flexible response is the standard-fit Agility Control Package which includes selective damping. The interior offers noticeably more space and a more distinctive atmosphere tosuit your taste. As you will see, the new C-Class is the perfect embodiment of the Mercedes-Benz philosophy.Tyreflex Star MotorsWulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas, Tel 242.325.4961 Fax 242.323.4667OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY. Donation allows BHSmanager to travel to convention in US Yellow Jersey sponsor Bahamas Ferries is ready for Ride for Hope PICTURED L-R ARE: Stephen Holowesko, co-founder of the Ride For Hope; Stephen Thompson of Bahamas Ferries, Capt Andy Moxey and Susan Larson, co-founder of the event. LOCAL ferry and shipping company Bahamas Fast Ferries is ready for this years Ride for Hope bike-a-thon. B FF is a founding sponsor of the charity cycling e vent, which takes place on the island of Eleuthera. O rganisers say BFF is also an invaluable logistics partner. The company’s vessel, The Sea Wind, captained by Andy Moxey, will be sailing to the island on Saturday carrying participants and equipment. E very dollar raised by the event goes towards t he improvement of cancer treatments and care f acilities. This year there will be a record 400 riders. BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY Executive Director Stephen Turnquest; Bahamas Bridge Club Member (friend of Shirley Bays Bahamas Bridge Club President (friend of Shirley Bays mann and Shelter Manager Percy Grant.

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the bottom of the box clearly s hows it expired in October, 2 007, the label printed by the Elizabeth Estates Clinic phar macy maintained it expired 12 months after it was issued. A health industry profession al, who did not want to be named, said: “I understand that mistakes are made but this is absolutely inexcusable. “It is the responsibility of the pharmacist to check the expiry date, that’s basic. But patients need to check these things as well. “Every single patient should check what they take before they take it. “If nothing else maybe people will start checking the labels now.” The Ministry of Health and Department of Public Health maintain there are no outdated medications currently in supplies at the Elizabeth Estates Clinic pharmacy and health bosses are investigating the claims. However, investigations have produced no response as yet. “suspicious” manner. As the officers approached, the report claims that the vehicle sped off. A chase followed eventually coming to an end on Goggle Eye R oad in the Redland Acres area. “The occupants of the vehicle exited and fired shots at the Police causing damage to the chasing marked unit (police car Police then returned fire hitting one of the men fatally as the others escaped. A handgun was recovered near the deceased,” t he statement said. However, in an extensive interview with The Tribune outside the Princess Margaret morgue yesterday, Arensio’s older brother, Albert Jr, who was one of the passengers in the Mitsubishi Mirage, said that the police’s account of Tuesday n ight’s events are completely inaccurate. “Some guys had ganged my brother right and took his car.So he asked for me to go with him to get his car back. So when we reach back round there the car was done burn down to theg round and the police was done on the scene. So we leave the scene to get on our way home in Nassau Village and these p olice officers tried to pull us o ver through Highbury Park in one little dark corner. “And we pulled our car over ya know, but as soon as we openo ur door and put your leg out the car they just open fire. So we just pulled off and when we pulled off they kept firing until w e reached our destination w here my little brother dead.” Albert Jr said the driver of the vehicle was the first to get out of the car, followed by his brotherw ho was shot twice in his back. “I was the last one out the car and they ain’t do nothing to me.I callin’ out for my brother and h e ain’t answerin’. I ask the offic er if he shoot my brother dead and he tell me ‘see him here, come back for yours’,” Mr Mortimer said. T hese two officers Albert said, proceeded to “boast” at the scene stating that they “found” a 9mm handgun on Arsenio and t hat he had shot at them first. F urthermore, Albert Jr said that he was at the scene speaking to officers following his brother’s shooting, so he was evenm ore surprised to hear on the news Wednesday that he was being “sought” by the police when he was standing right there w ith them the night before. Why they didn’t arrest me if I was right there? We had no weapons in the car at all. No drugs, no weapon, none of thatw as in the car. They had no right to do that and they plant that gun on my brother. That’s the same gun they was shooting at u s from Highbury Park and as s oon as my brother come out (the car gun they was licensed with...” But how they could shoot him in his back!” exclaimed a family member who was standing nearby. This woman’s concerns were t he same as those of PLP activist and Nassau Village resident Omar Archer who was also present at the morgue with the M ortimer family. “With his back turned, Arsenio poses no threat to an officer so how can they justify using deadly force? But you heardw hat the officer said to his older brother, ‘come back for yours’,” said Mr Archer, adding that if that is in fact what happened they have to be put up on charges of murder. If this is what the Commissioner of Police is standing up for them he needs to resign immediately.” H owever, no amount of tears or words of comfort could ease the pain of Arensio’s girlfriend, Nicole Samson, who is now left t o care for the couple’s sixmonth-old son, Nackyo. Sobbing in the waiting room at the morgue, Nicole repeated o ver and over how much she loved Arsenio and how he had promised that he would never leave her. “Baby, please don’t leave me, A rsenio baby please don’t leave me. I love you so much, please baby don’t leave me,” she cried. Composing herself for a brief m oment, Nicole outlined how her boyfriend had been jumped earlier that day by a group of men through Pit Road in the Boyd Road area. The incidentd eveloped because of an earlier confrontation in which she had been harassed by the men on that street, who felt that as she w as returning to the area with her boyfriend he must have been coming to get even with them. Pulling Arsenio from the vehicle, a fight followed shortly aftert he couple turned onto the street, and once the dust had settled, Arsenio and Nicole were forced to leave the car in the p ossession of these neighbourhood thugs. “My baby never bothered nobody, he didn’t have no gun. He told me he was just going tog et his car, and he was going to call the police. He never had no g un, he just got his life straight,” she said. Following his interview yesterday, The Tribune understands that Albert Jr was arrested att he morgue by Central Detective Unit officers as he viewed his brother’s body. Assistant Commissioner of P olice Hulan Hanna told T he Tribune last night that police are encouraging anyone with further information about this incident to come forward so that it can b e factored into the investigation. “We take (the claims seriously, so we want those pers ons who may have any information to come to us,” he said. As the investigation is in its early stages, he said, it is premature to comment any furthero n the matter. However, Mr Hanna reminded the public that the police car was damaged during this incid ent, reportedly as the result of gunfire. Police have launched an “intensive search” for two other persons who they believe werei nvolved in the shooting. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ECUMENICALSERVICESHolyWeek For More Information Telephone: 323-8220@St. Matthew’s Anglican ChurchChurch & Shirley StreetCome Worship with US! P ALM SUNDA Y April 5th – 7:15am Eucharist, Blessing of Palms and Sermon; 10:00am Blessing of Palms, Procession Eucharist, & Sermon; 7:00pm – Mission Service MONDAYApril 6th 7:00pm – Stations of the Cross. TUESDAYApril 7th – 7:00am Mass; 7:00pm – Service of Reconciliation WEDNESDAYApril 8th – Mass 7:00am & 1:00pm at St. Matthew’s. AMass of the Chrism, Christ Church Cathedral at 7:30PM. MAUNDY THURSDA Y April 9th – 7:00pm Holy Eucharist, Washing of Feet and Watch before the Altar of Repose. GOOD FRIDA Y April 10th – 9:00am Liturgy for Good Friday; 12noon – 3:00pm Seven Last Words from the Cross. EASTER DA Y April 12th – 6:00am The Great Easter Vigil & Holy Eucharist; 10:45am – Solemn High Mass, Procession (Within the church) LIVE RADIO BROADCAST. 7:00pm Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Benediction. F ROM page one Family claim man was unarmed THEOUT-OF-DATEinsulin. FROM page one Expired insulin given to patient ‘was sent to Bahamas in 2006’

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SYDNEY (AP Kennedy and Harry Kewell scored second-half goals to put Australia on the cusp of securing a World Cup spot with a 20 win over Uzbekistan on Wednesday. If the Group A match between Bahrain and Qatar ends in a draw later Wednesday at Manama, Australia will be the first team to advance to South Africa 2010 from Asian qualifying. Kennedy, a forward with German club Karlsruhe, scored six minutes after replacing Celtic striker Scott McDonald in the 60th minute. T he 26-year-old Kennedy directed his header inside the near post from Mark Bresciano’s powerful cross from the right edge of the area in the 66th minute to break the deadlock. It was his sixth goal in 12 matches for Australia. Ex-Liverpool winger Kewelldrove a left-foot penalty kick low and hard into the bottom r ight corner of the net to seal the win after Hull City midfielder Richard Garcia was felled in a rough challenge inside the area. It was Australia’s fourth win in five matches in the last full round of qualifying and the fifth straight clean sheet for g oalkeeper Mark Schwarzer. The Australians lead the group with 13 points, two ahead of Japan. U zbekistan, Bahrain and Qatar all went into Wednesday’s matches with four points. Uzbekistan got its campaign back on track with a 4-0 win over Qatar at Tashkent last Saturday night, but now can only challenge for third place in the group, which earns a place i n a playoff with the third-place team from Group B. n By JOHN DUERDEN Associated Press Writer S EOUL, South Korea (AP South Korea scored a late goal for a 1-0 win over North Korea on Wednesday as soccer briefly took the focus off heighte ning political tension in the region. South Korea reclaimed the top place in Group B of Asian World Cup qualifying with 11 p oints, one ahead of North Korea. It was a good-natured match, and more entertaining than the f our recent draws in the derby clashes. However, North Korea coach Kim Jong Hun was visibly upset after the match, following Kim C hi-woo’s late goal. T he coach suggested food poisoning had weakened his t eam and disputing the refere e’s ruling on a goal-line decision, before refusing to answer questions. “This was a game that shouldn’t have been played. Jong Tae Se and goalkeeper Ri Myung Guk shouldn’t have played,” he said. “After eating at the hotel provided by South Korea, they contracted diarrhea.” His counterpart had no complaints. “This was a vital result for us,” South Korea coach HuhJ ung-moo said. “We played well and the players didn’t lose their concentration for the whole game and kept going until the end.” N o sooner had supporters at the Seoul World Cup stadium applauded both national anthems than North Koreaa lmost took the lead. Hong Yong Jo’s fierce shot looked destined for the top corner before South Korean goal keeper Lee Woon-jae just man a ged to make the save. The second half was played at a higher tempo as both teams looked for the win. Four minutes after the break, North Korea’s star striker Jong Tae-se thought he had scored with a close-range header until Lee blocked on the line. North Korea coach Kim was incensed by the call. “Shouldn’t the referee be fair? He ignored the fact that t he ball clearly crossed the line,” K im said. No replay was shown on the big screen at the stadium. The week leading up to the Seoul qualifying match has been o vershadowed by the reaction to North Korea’s plans to send a communications satellite into orbit between April 4-8. The United States, South Korea and Japan suspect the reclusive country is using the launch to test long-range missile technology. North Korea countered by a ccusing the United States of spying on the site of an impending rocket launch and threatened to shoot down any U.S. planes that intrude into its air space. J ohn McEnroe to work on ESPN2’s US Open telecasts BRISTOL, Conn. (AP John McEnroe will be part of ESPN2’s announcing team when the network carries the U.S. Open for the first time this year. He sometimes will be paired in the broadcast booth with his younger brother Patrick, who succeeded him as the U.S. Davis Cup captain. John McEnroe won the U.S. Open four times. This year marks the start of a six-year deal through 2014 for ESPN and Tennis Channel to carry the U.S. Open’s cable TV coverage, taking over from USA Network. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS JOHANNESBURG (AP Soccer fans are bidding for tickets to the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, with FIFA receiving more than 1.6 million requests. Fans from 205 countries applied in the first phase of online sales, soccer’s world governing body said Wednesday. The tickets will be allocated in a lottery on April 15. South African residents made around 30 percent of the 1,635,136 requests for seats. They will pay $15 for the cheapest seats at group stage matches. “We want to encourage even more South Africans and Africans to apply for their World Cup tickets during the next sales phase,” said Danny Jordaan, chief executive of the 2010 World Cup organizing committee. Fans from the United States made the most applications from abroad, followed by the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy and Australia. The international price starts at $80 for a seat at a group-stage match. The most popular requests on the 64-match program were for the opening game on June 11 and the final on July 11. Both will be played at the Soccer City stadium in Johannesburg, which is being upgraded to hold 94,700 spectators. Fans who are allocated tickets in the lottery will find out by email or text message by the end of April. Applicants were limited to four tickets per match and a maximum of seven matches. To deter ticket scalpers, applicants cannot buy tickets to different matches played on the same day. The second round of sales on FIFA’s Web site begins on May4 and runs through November. A third phase of sales will begin in December after the 32 finalists are known and the draw is announced for the group stage matches. Fans make 1.6m requests for the 2010 WCup tickets Uzbekistan's Farhod Tadjiyev, right, and Australia's Scott Chipperfield vie for the ball during their World Cup group A qualifying soccer match at Stadium Australia, Sydney, Wednesday April 1, 2009. (AP Photo: Aman Sharma South Korea edges Nor th K orea 1-0 in soccer matc h Australia on the verge of qualifying for World Cup

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ONCE again, the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations has selected athletes who have not qualified to make up the relay teams for the Carifta Games in St Lucia over the Easter holiday weekend. Last year, they did the same thing and there were at least 10 athletes who made the trip to St Kitts and didn’t even get to compete as the Bahamas’ 65-member team returned with 23m edals. It doesn’t make sense, especially in these tough economic times, to field the large teams and the majority of the athletes have not attained the qualifyi ng standards. That means that we could see a repeat of last year with a thletes just going for the ride and exposure. R egardless of whether or not all of t he athletes attained the qualifying standards, the team will once again be judged based on the amount of medals secured and the position they finish in. Every year, the same argument c omes up in relationship to the Bahamas Swimming Federation, who also sends a team off to the Carifta Swimming Championships a week after the BAAA’s track team return home. The difference is the fact that the BSF stick to their q ualifying standards and they generally only carry those swimmers who have made t he standard, which should be the proper procedure. It doesn’t make sense to impose the standards. The BAAA might as well just look at another criteria for selecting the team. What happens to those athletes who ensure that they do what is necessary to make the standards? It seems as if they are not treated any different from those athletes who don’t make the standard, except for the fact that they actually get to compete at the games. Until more emphasis is placed on attaining the standards, we will continue to struggle to get back to being a powerhouse in the region because we reward athletes who have not qualified to make the trip. H H A A L L L L O O F F F F A A M M E E R R S S THE Bahamas Softball Federation m ust be commended for submitting the names of the four new International Softball Federation’s Hall of Famers. The mixture of a male (Richard 'the Lion'Heart' Johnson) and female (Candice DeGregory-Culmer a coach (Godfrey Pinder administrator (Austin 'King Snake' Knowles) makes it quite an induction ceremony to look forward to on April 24. A ll four persons have a lot of history behind them in the respective positions or capacity they served in. So hats off to Richard, Candice, Godfrey and Austin. You all have e arned the right to be called Hall of Famers as you join the other seven inductees who were enshrined before y ou. Y our contribution is helping to prod uce yet another significant international milestone for the Bahamas. M M A A R R T T I I N N B B O O R R O O U U G G H H S S T T I I L L L L G G O O I I N N G G S S T T R R O O N N G G I T’S good to see that three-time World Sunfish champion Donnie Mar tinborough, who should one day be enshrined in some sailing Hall of Fame, is still competing at a very high level of competition. Now qualified as a Masters competitor, Martin borough competed in two consecutive tournaments in Florida where he won the first tournament a Masters competition and was third in the other against current reigning world champion Eduardo Cordero of Venezuela. M artinborough seemed to be just warming up as he prepares for the World Sunfish Championship that will return to Montagu Bay for the first time since 1988. Incidentally, that was the same year that Martinborough made history by becoming the first multiple winner of the prestigious title. So if his performance last month was any indication,M artinborough should be heading for another spectacular performance in October. C C O O N N D D O O L L E E N N C C E E S S T T O O P P R R A A T T T T Let me pause to offer my personal condolences to the family of the late J oseph Pratt. A s a youngster growing up without a f ather-figure in my home, it was a delight to watch Pratt as he engaged in every aspect of his children’s lives, especially as they competed in sports. Pratt was not an outstanding player. H e didn’t have any fame or accolades behind his name or on the trophy case in the home of Cynthia 'Mother' Pratt in the Grove, but his sons would always brag that they couldn't ask for a better coach on the sideline. Pratt made sure that he was always kept abreast of all of the rules and reg ulations and that his children and all those that came in contact with him, adhere to them. He has helped count less youngsters as he groomed Juan, Julian, the late Ronnie, his nephews Darrel and Lloyd Jr. Ranger, and even his daughter Nikki. He will surely be remembered for the role he played. May his soul rest inp eace. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 13 HAMILTON, Ohio (AP Corie Blount has pleaded guilty to two felony marijuana possession charges in a plea bargain that could land him in prison for up to 10 years. In exchange for his plea, prosecutors on Wednesday dropped two marijuana trafficking charges against the 40year-old former University of Cincinnati star. Sentencing was set for May 13 in Butler County Common Pleas Court. Blount was arrested Dec. 4 after sheriff’s deputies intercepted 11 pounds of marijuana sent to him at a relative’s home in southwest Ohio. They later searched Blount’s home and say they found another 18 pounds of marijuana. Blount was a first-round draft pick by the Chicago Bulls in 1993. In an 11-year NBA career, he also played for the Lakers, Cleveland, Phoenix, Philadelphia and Toronto. Former NBA player Blount pleads to drug possession n By The Associated Press S S C C O O R R E E B B O O A A R R D D Thursday, April 2 Utah at Denver (10:30 pm EDT In a potential playoff preview, the Jazz get another chance to beat a top team on the road when they visit the Nuggets, who lead the Northwest Division by one and-a-half games over Portland and two and-a-half over Denver. The Jazz have lost 15 consecutive road games against teams with winning records. S S T T A A R R S S Tuesday David West, Hornets, matched his career high with 40 points to help New Orleans beat Sacramento 111110. LeBron James, Cavaliers, made two crucial three-point plays down the stretch and finished with 25 points and 12 rebounds as Cleveland beat Detroit 79-73 for its 13th straight victory. Gerald Wallace, Bobcats, had 21 points and 13 rebounds as Charlotte continued its surprising mastery of the Los Angeles Lakers with a 94-84 victory. LaMarcus Aldridge and Brandon Roy, Trail Blazers. Aldridges cored 26 points, Roy had 25 points and 11 assists, and Portland beat Utah 125-104. Kevin Durant, Thunder, scored 31 points to lead Oklahoma City over San Antonio 96-95. T.J. Ford, Pacers, hit the goahead jumper with 3.9 seconds left and had 22 points and nine assists in Indiana’s 107-105 victory over Cleveland. P P O O S S T T S S E E A A S S O O N N P P L L A A N N S S T wo more teams clinched playoff b erths in the Western Conference. D enver locked up its spot with a 111104 victory over the New York Knicks. The Nuggets also moved into second place in the West. San Antonio earned a place later Tuesday despite a 96-95 loss to Oklahoma City. The Nuggets and Spurs, along with Dallas and Detroit, are the only teams to have made the playoffs every season since 2003-04. S S W W E E E E T T 1 1 6 6 Cleveland became just the sixth team in NBA history to win 16 games in one month with its 79-73 victory over Detroit. Not bad for a team that won only 17 total in the season before LeBron James arrived. S S U U R R P P R R I I S S I I N N G G S S U U C C C C E E S S S S Charlotte completed a season sweep of the Los Angeles Lakers with a 94-84 victory Tuesday. The Bobcats have won six of seven against the Western Conference champions. Oklahoma City has defeated the playoff-bound San Antonio Spurs twice in about two weeks following its 96-95 victory on Tuesday. S S M M A A S S H H I I N N G G S S U U C C C C E E S S S S Portland routed Utah 125-104 on Tuesday, winning its third consecutive game by at least 20 points. The Trail Blazers (47-27 torrid shooting, hitting a season-high 61.6 per cent (47-of-76 It was the first time Portland has won three consecutive games by at least 20 points since March 24-28, 1992. S S H H U U T T D D O O W W N N Kevin Garnett will miss at least the next four games with a sore right knee and may return for the final three games of the Boston Celtics’ regular season. Coach Doc Rivers said after practice Tuesday that the team would be “shutting down” Garnett for most of the remaining seven regular season games because of continued soreness in the knee, first injured February 19 at Utah. Garnett has missed 15 of the last 19 games, including the last two. V V L L A A D D E E S S D D A A Y Y Vlade Divac’s No. 21 jersey was retired Tuesday night at Arco Arena, his home for six seasons. He was the starting center on the Kings’ back-toback division champs and the 2002 Western Conference finalists. Divac, who is the second-leading rebounder in the franchise’s Sacramento history, said during a halftime ceremony that the best days of his 16-year NBA career came in Sacramento. H H E E A A L L T T H H Y Y H H O O W W A A R R D D Josh Howard had 14 points and six rebounds in 22 minutes in his return from an 11-game absence in the Mavericks’ 108-88 victory in Minnesota. He had not played since March 5 because of a sore left ankle and has missed a total of 28 games due to various injuries this season. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G “I can play 18 minutes with my eyes closed and a 100-pound truck on my back. I’m wondering what the rush was to get me back. It’s a bad time for me mentally. I’m just trying to get through it without starting a whole bunch of nonsense. I’m looking at the big picture, if I vent my frustrations, then it’s on. Being who I am, fingers are going to be pointed at me. People are going to make a big deal out of it. I’m just trying to laugh as much as I can and stop from crying.” Allen Iverson, frustrated with his playing time while coming off the bench in two games since returning from a back injury to rejoin Detroit NBA Today FORMER Sacramento Kings center Vlade Divac, of Serbia, stands next to a framed copy of his jersey that was scheduled to be retired by the team at halftime of the game between the New Orleans Hor nets and the Kings in Sacramento, California, later Tuesday, March 31. Divac played six seasons with the Kings, retiring in 2007 after playing 17 years of professional basketball. (AP Photo: Rich Pedroncelli Vlade Divac’s jersey retired Carifta: Athletes must qualify if they want to compete It doesn’t make sense, especially in these tough economic times, t o field the large teams and the majority of the athletes have not a ttained the qualifying standards. That means that we could see a repeat of last year with athletes just going for the ride and exposure.” Brent Stubbs T o adver tise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! OPINION STUBBS

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Women’s boxing in Olympic Games decided in August n By FREDERIC J FROMMER Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP Senator John McCain wants a presidential pardon for Jack Johnson, who became the nation’s first black heavyweight boxing champion 100 years before Barack Obama became i ts first black president. McCain feels Johnson was wronged by a 1913 conviction of violating the Mann Act byh aving a consensual relationship with a white woman a conviction widely seen as racially motivated. “I’ve been a very big fight f an, I was a mediocre boxer myself,” McCain, R-Ariz., saidi n a telephone interview. “I had admired Jack Johnson’s prowess in the ring. And the m ore I found out about him, the more I thought a grave injustice was done.” On Wednesday, McCain will j oin Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., filmmaker Ken Burns and Johnson’s great niece, Linda Haywood, at a Capitol Hilln ews conference to unveil a resolution urging a presidential pardon for Johnson. Similar legislation offered in 2004 and last year failed to pass both chambers of Congress. King, a recreational boxer, said a pardon would “remove a cloud that’s been over the American sporting scene ever s ince (Johnson on these trumped-up charges.” “I think the moment is now,” King said. Presidential pardons for the dead are rare. I n 1999, President Bill Clinton pardoned Lt. Henry O. F lipper, the Army’s first black commissioned officer, who was drummed out of the military in 1882 after white officersa ccused him of embezzling $3,800 in commissary funds. L ast year, President George W. Bush pardoned Charles Winters, who was convicted of violating the Neutrality Act whenh e conspired in 1948 to export aircraft to a foreign country in a id of Israel. The Justice Department and t he White House declined to comment on this latest Johns on pardon effort. However, the idea has a pas s ionate supporter in McCain, who has repeatedly said he was wrong in 1983 when he voted against a federal holiday in honour of Martin Luther King Jr. “It’s just one of those things that you don’t want to quit until you see justice,” McCain said of Johnson’s case. “We won’t quit until we win. And I believe that enough members, if you show them the merits of this issues, that we’ll get the kind of support we need.” Johnson won the world heavyweight title on December 26, 1908, after police in Australia stopped his 14-round match against the severely battered Canadian world champi on, Tommy Burns. That led to a search for a “Great White Hope” who could beat John son. Two years later, the Amer ican world titleholder Johnson had tried for years to fight, Jim Jeffries, came out of retirement but lost in a match called “TheB attle of the Century,” resulting in deadly riots. Johnson lost the heavyweight title to Jess Willard in 1915. In 1913, Johnson was convicted of violating the Mann Act, which outlawed transporting women across state lines for immoral purposes. The law has since been heavily amended, but has not been repealed. Authorities first targeted Johnson’s relationship with a white woman who later becameh is wife, then found another white woman to testify against him. Johnson fled the country a fter his conviction, but agreed years later to return and serve a 10-month jail sentence. He tried to renew his boxing career after l eaving prison, but failed to regain his title. He died in a car crash in 1946 at age 68. “When we couldn’t beat him i n the ring, the white power establishment decided to beat him in the courts,” Burns told the AP in a telephone interview. Burns’ 2005 documentary, “Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson,” examined Johnson’s case and t he sentencing judge’s admitted desire to “send a message” t o black men about relationships with white women. Both McCain and King said a pardon, particularly one from Obama, would carry important symbolism. It would be indicative of the distance we’ve come, and also i ndicative of the distance we still have to go,” McCain said. Burns, however, sees a pardon more as “just a question ofj ustice, which is not only blind, but color blind,” adding, “And I think it absolutely does not have anything to do with the symbolism of an African-American president pardoning anA frican-American unjustly accused.” B urns helped form the Committee to Pardon Jack Johnson,w hich filed a petition with the Justice Department in 2004 that w as never acted on. Burns said he spoke about the petition ac ouple of times with Bush, who as governor of Johnson’s home state of Texas proclaimed Johnson’s birthday as “Jack Johnson Day” for five straight years. Bush gave Burns a phone number which led to adviser Karl Rove, Burns said, but Rove told him a pardon “ain’t gonna fly.” Rove doesn’t recall any such conversation with Burns, his spokeswoman Sheena Tahilramani said, and “if he had been approached, he wouldn’t have offered an opinion.” C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TheBahamasElectricityCorporation TenderWilsonCityPowerStation TransmissionCircuits Wilson City, AbacoTheBahamasElectricityCorporation invites Tenders for the above named services. Biddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe &RUSRUDWLRQ$GPLQLVWUDWLRQIFH%OXH+LOOt7XFNHURDGV Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 Tendersaretobeaddressedto: Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas DeadlinefordeliverytoBEC:onorbefore 9thApril,2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. Submissions should be marked as follows: Tender No. 701/09 :,/621&,7<:(5$7,21$160,66,21&,5&8,76 WILSON CITY, ABACO TheCorporationreservestherightto accept or reject any or all proposals. )RUDOOHQTXLULHVUHJDUGLQJWKHWHQGHUVDQGVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW Mr. Wayne Farquharson at telephone 302-1216. Pardon sought for first black heavyweight champ LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP out in August if they will be allowed to compete at the 2012 London Games. The International Olympic Committee says Wednesday that it is looking at a proposal from the International Amateur Boxing Association to include women’s boxing. Of the 26 Summer Olympic sports federations who are organizing competitions in London, boxing is the only one without female participants. The IOC said in a statement that its program commission will “make a recommendation to the executive board,” which is set to make a decision at its meeting Aug. 13 in Berlin. A previous bid to get women’s boxing accepted in 2005 in time for the Beijing Olympics failed because the IOC judged it was not a global sport. IN THIS 1932 file photo, boxer Jack Johnson is shown working out in New Y ork City at the age of 54... ( AP Photo)

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TO celebrate the achievements of both junior national teams heading for competition against the best in the region, a thletes, parents and fans will be treated with a grand send off next week just prior to competition. The Bahamas Association of A thletic Associations is scheduled to host a pep rally for both t he Carifta Swimming/Synchronized Swimming Championship a nd Carifta Track and Field Championship national teams on April 6 at the Thomas A Robinson Stadium. T he rally is expected to feat ure performances by recording artists Ricardo Clarke, Najie Dun, Higher Level Band, Maniifest and Joan Callendar. And a live broadcast by Island 1 02.9 FM is slated for the rally which is set for 6:30-8:00pm at t he stadium’s VIP section. The 61-member track and field team is scheduled to depart for competition on April 8 for the meet which takes place April 914 in St Lucia. T he 36-member swim team will compete the following week in Savaneta, Aruba, April 15-20. At a press conference to unveil the coaches for the 2009 track and field team, BAAA press release officer Kermit Taylor s aid the association saw it fit to recognise the athletes and leave them enthused and prepared to compete. “We felt it was a good way to s how support for the athletes, particularly for those who will n ot be able to travel to St Lucia,” h e said. “This gives everyone a chance to see the athletes, get to know them and gives us a chance to recognise their accomplishm ents before they do us proud b y representing the country.” 3 3 9 9 t t h h C C a a r r i i f f t t a a T T r r a a c c k k a a n n d d F F i i e e l l d d C C h h a a m m p p i i o o n n s s h h i i p p s s T T e e a a m m U-17 Girls A dderley, Teshon B rown, Rashan C ash, Sparkyl C artwright, Devinn D eveaux, Deandra Farrington, Bianca J ohnson, Printassia M iller, Shaunae M yers, Tamara (Andros Seymour, Katrina Strachan,Antonique Williams, Raquel Seymour, Pedrya J ohnson, Ashlee U -17 Boys A rmbrister, Rashad (Exuma Bartlett, Blake (Grand Bahama) Bodie, Patrick Carey, James A. C arter, Harold Farquharson, Jonathan (Grand Bahama Farrington, Anthony Ferguson, Byron F erguson, O’Jay H all, Tevin Ingraham, Ryan Minns, Lathone Minns, Lathario R ahming, Erle W ilmott, Jabari Adderley, Trae U-20 Girls Burnside, Deshona Bodie, Krystal Culmer, Kenya Dean, Devanique Ferguson, Gortia (Exuma J ohnson, Carlene Kemp, Ivanique Rolle, Hughnique Robinson, V’Alonee Smith, Kathrina (Grand B ahama) Smith, Nivea (Grand Bahama M iller, Shauntae U-20 Boys Bain, Dennis (Grand Bahama Burnside, Nejmi B ullard, Troy (Grand B ahama) D eveaux, Delano Deveaux, J’Vente Duncombe, Darion Fraser, Warren H iggs, Alfred(Grand Bahama Higgs, Raymond (Grand Bahama) Knowles, Demetri (Grand Bahama)M iller, Brandon Mc Intosh, Vernal N ewbold, Laquardo R ichardson, Charles Thompson, Brice Thompson, Zhivago Williams, Fenton W illiams, Jaquan (Grand B ahama) W allace-Whitfield, Kenneth SHOWN (l-r Knowles, BAISS committee member, Gianne Moss, Domino’s Pizza marketing associate) C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 P AGE 13 Brent Stubbs on qualifying for Carifta... Carifta pep rally all set DOMINO’S Pizza and Caribbean Bottling Company (Coca-Cola $5,500 to the Bahamas Associa tion of Independent Secondary S chools Track and Field Championship. In a joint statement, the companies said they strongly believe in supporting the community and the youth of the nation. The statement added: “This partnership over the years has jointly contributed approximately $35,000 to the BAISS sporting association. We are very happy to align o ur companies with their organisation, placing our financial resources in a programme that is certainly helping to develop the abilities of our junior student athletes in the sport of athletics.” Domino’s and Coca-Cola donate $5,500 to BAISS Australia on the verge of q ualifying for World Cup... See page 12 Recording artists expected to perform

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n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE National Insurance Board (NIB yesterday came under further attack from the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s p resident for its “outrageous” overdue-cont ributions collection tactics, after both he and Tribune Business received two e-mails c omplaining about its tactics. D ionisio D’Aguilar told Tribune Business that the NIB was now penalising employers who may owe contributions dat-i ng as far back as 20 years, when their system for keeping account of those contributions was inaccurate and inefficient. T he Chamber president said that because the agency never issued monthly statements o r made clear to employers how long they s hould secure their NIB records for, it was unfair to ask employers to trace payments they may or may not have made back int he 1980s. “They are the only government entity n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A Philadelphia-based real e state development company, and the Amway Corporation’ founder behind an Eleutherabased resort development, have emerged as new contenders to acquire the Four Seasons Emer a ld Bay Resort, Tribune Business can reveal, with the reduced purchase price seemingly attracting an influx of potential buyers. Sources close to the situation t old this newspaper yesterday t hat a new player in the race to acquire the troubled Exumabased resort, which will soonh ave been in receivership for two years, is The Arden Group,a company that has acquired or d eveloped more than $1.3 bill ion worth of real estate since its 1989 founding. The company’s website b oasts that it has developed numerous Ritz-Carlton-branded properties across the US, including resorts in Philadel phia, Colorado, South Beach a nd Wyoming, establishing the c ompany’s credentials as a suitable suitor for a five-star prope rty such as Emerald Bay. And Tribune Business has also been informed that R ichard DeVos, whose family has as its principal business Alti-c or, the parent company of A mway Corporation, is also r eadying a bid for the Four Seas ons Emerald Bay Resort. It is unclear whether Mr D eVos has submitted a formal b id to the resort’s receivers, P ricewaterhouseCoopers ( PwC), but he is already involved in Bahamian-based resort development/ownership via the Powell Point at Cape E leuthera project. T hat 700-acre project is set to feature estate homes, beach v illas, town homes and marinas when completed. Tribune Business has also been informed that a European consortium is looking at entering the Four C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4.68$4.51$4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.48 $3.49 $3.49 n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Nassau Airport Devel opment Company (NAD a warded a contract for a gas station that will be located at the JFK Drive-Coral Harbour Road intersection, its chieff inancial officer telling Tribune Business the facility was likely to be in operation by year’s end. B ut NAD has placed on hold plans for a restaurant at the same location, Stewart Steevese xplaining that it wanted to receive more interest in this proposal. Although declining to name w ho had won the contract to operate the gas station, which will be situated on the fringes of NAD’s property, Mr Steeves confirmed: “The gas station gasb een awarded, and it’s pro ceeding. They’re working on getting their permits. “I believe it will be before the e nd of the year before that’s in operation. With the restaurant, we did not have a lot of takers,s o we suspended that. We’re just going to wait on that one. We had some interest, but decided to wait until we getm ore interest.” Inside Lynden Pindling International Airport’s (LPIA terminal buildings, Mr Steeves s aid NAD was now starting to really gain momentum in terms of the retail and food conces Airpor t gas station contract ‘awarded’ * But restaurant placed on hold until more interest * NAD ‘half-way through’ plans to expand retail/ restaurant tenants in existing buildings * Airport managers says 90 per cent of tenant calls r esponded to within hour * Airpors proximity to US gives it ‘real advantage’ in attracting new carrier airlift S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor GRAND Bahama’s South Riding Point bulk storage and t erminal facility saw its 2008 operating income increase by 68 per cent to $11.126 million, d riven by a 25 per cent increase in its combined revenue streams. World Point Terminals, the c ompany’s Toronto Stock Exchange-listed parent, announced in its results for the period ended on December 31, 2008, that South Riding Point’s revenues had increased by 25 per cent or $4.432 million rising from $18.074 million in 2007t o $22.506 million. “This increase was attributed to both higher storage and marine revenues,” World Point Terminals said. “Storage rev enues increased primarily due to 1.5 million barrels of new storage coming into service in the third and fourth quarters of 2008. That storage capacity was immediately placed under contract. “Marine revenues increased, accounting for $1.973 million of the increase. Revenues for the fourth quarter were $8.469 mil lion, 91 per cent higher than the same period in 2007.” The two new crude oil storage tanks have increased South Riding point’s storage capacity b y 29 per cent, providing another 750,000 barrels worth of storage space. The company has 55 employees. World Point’s financial state ments showed that prior to a $2.388 million depreciation charge, the Bahamas-based South Riding Point facility had generated $14.514 million in gross operating profit a 67 per cent rise above the previous year’s $6.618 million. South Riding Point, as at year-end 2008, had incurred $11.797 million in capital expen ditures and had assets of $46.052 million. Meanwhile, World Point Terminals said the Freepoint tugs business, which provides ser G G r r a a n n d d B B a a h h a a m m a a f f i i r r m m s s e e e e s s 6 6 8 8 % % i i n n c c o o m m e e g g r r o o w w t t h h * But South Riding P oint could f ace ‘signif icant’ e x posur e to unpaid t ax bill in dispute with the Government * Stor age terminal’s r e venues up 25%, with mar ine income ahead 91% in last quar ter * F reepoint tug business sees 14% revenue increase S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B New buyers in Emerald Bay shake-up n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A wellknownO ld F ort Bay resident has lost his $ 7.5 million counterclaim against a fellow Bahamas resident businessm an, the Supreme Court finding that the d eal to sell his stake in a B ahamian investment fund formed to finance the Russian government’s legal action a gainst ‘Big Tobacco’ was void because the litigation had already been dropped. Y ank Barry, who was last year acquitted by a Texas judge o f allegations that he had tried to bribe a Texan prison official, had launched a counterclaim against fellow businessman Jay Gotlieb, alleging that the latterw as indebted to him after personally guaranteeing the $7.5 million purchase of his compa-n y’s stake in the Tobacco Litigation Participation Fund. This followed a previous j udgment in Mr Gotlieb’s favour against Mr Barry, the S upreme Court having found that he advanced $3 million to the latter, but this had never been repaid. That judgment had been stayed pending the out c ome of Mr Barry’s counterclaim. In his judgment, Justice John L yons described both Mr Barry and Mr Gotlieb as “certainly both men who look for the m ain chance”. And although he ultimately found in favour of M r Gotlieb, Justice Lyons heavily criticised him for having “a vastly over-rated opinion of his powers of recollection”, finding that he was not telling the truthw hen he claimed he did not sign the December 23, 2003, agreeOld Fort Bay resident in $7.5m counterclaim loss Yank Barry ordered to pay business rival Jay Gotlieb $3.141m, after losing case over sales agreement relating to Bahamian investment fund formed for Russian government’s tobacco litigation Y ank Barry NIB under renewed fire on collections S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B

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sions it was starting to lease out. The Dunkin’ Donuts franchise, operated by a Myers Group of Companies subsidiary, has already opened two outlets at LPIA, while Wendy’s is due to stage its official opening next week. I n a reference to the previous monopoly held on the L PIA retail/restaurant concessions, Mr Steeves said: “It took us a while to come to terms with the existing concession operator. That happened a fewm onths back, and we’ve a nnounced Dunkin’ Donuts and Wendy’s. “There’s a few other offerings that will be emerging in the US departures room in the coming months. In the coming month or so, there should bem ore announcements on new tenants. I’d say we’re about half-way through what we’re planning to offer in the current facility, and then there will be much more in the new facility.” Lease and rental revenues from the retail/restaurant tenant base are a key income stream for NAD, and a central component in its bid to generate positive operating income outside of the passenger user facility fee. Mr Steeves said NAD had been able to increase revenues from this source by adjusting existing and new leases to “more market-based rents”. He added that the company, which operates LPIA under a 30-year lease from the Airport Author ity, had “pretty much identified all the partners” it wanted as part of its retail/restaurant mix. The first stage of LPIA’s redevelopment, which is esti mated to cost $409.5 million in total, is likely to make a construction start this summer now that the $265 million financing has been completed. Mr Steeves told Tribune Business that the first stage, for which construction costs will bea little under $200 million, would involve building the new US departures terminal on land to the west of the existing facility, plus an expanded runway apron and short and long-term parking facilities. That stage is scheduled to be completed around March 2011, with second stage construction costing “just shy” of $130 mil lion and lasting from that date until October 2012. The second stage will focus chiefly on conversion of the existing US departures termi n al into the US and internat ional arrivals hall. The final stage, stage three, will cost around $85 million and be completed by November 2013, concentrating on the domestic and international departures terminal. Mr Steeves told Tribune Business that NAD had “comea long way in a short period of time” since taking over LPIA’s management two years ago yesterday. Among the most visible improvements were the new washroom/restroom facilities, the flight information displays, improved baggage belts, performance-based cleaning con tracts, landscaping, the creation of a 24-hour operations centre and other cosmetic improve ments. “I think we’re now at a place where better than 90 per cent of calls we get from tenants are responded to in an hour,” Mr Steeves said. He also pointed to the unseen improvements, such as the installation of billing, leasing and accounting systems, and improved warehouse and inventory management, as enhancements to NAD’s efficiency. When it came to airlift into LPIA, Mr Steeves said New Providence’s location in close proximity to the US gave the airport “a real advantage” when it came to attracting new air lines. Because New Providence and the Bahamas in generalwere such a short flight from most east coast destinations, being only two or three hours away from New York, US air l ines could send aircraft on r eturn trips to this nation and still be in position to deploy those same planes on domestic routes that day. “There’s a real benefit to the location of Nassau and its proximity to the US. We’ve had a lot of interest in new services,” Mr Steeves explained. Delta, Jet Blue, Excel France and WestJet had either all committed to or introduced new services to Nassau, and NAD had also received “some interest from other carriers”. Mr Steeves said NAD had to increase the interest rate of return offered to investors in its senior secured bond issue from8 per cent to 8.5 per cent, to compensate for the absence of a credit rating from the Fitch agency. “When we went without the credit rating, we did increase the rate a little bit to compensate for any questions that may arise,” Mr Steeves said. “But the important thing is that the rates as structured fit within the financial model and fee struc ture we predicted for the air port going forward, and we got the deal done. Everyone should be happy that we got things in place and the project can proceed. “The financial structure is designed around keeping the cost impact relatively low, so we keep the rates at the airport competitive.” Mr Steeves said the first face financing had established the “financial architecture” for the capital raisings NAD would need to undertake for stage two and three construction. Ther evolving credit facility for each p hase would be drawn down, then refinanced through longterm debt. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE %$+$0$6+80$1(&,(7< 7LQDRELQVRQ 6DPDQWKD-RQKVWRQH: LQQHUVSOHDVHFRQWDFWWKH % 7 KH %DKDPDV+XPDQHRFLHW\ZLVKHVWR WKDQNDOOZKRVXSSRUWHGRXUDQQXDOUDIH Pictet accountant passes Series 7 A TRUST accountant at Pictet Overseas Trust Corporation, Lakeisha Swaby, has completed the Series 7 Exam in the US after studying with the Nassau-based Securities Training Institute (STI Ms Albury, course Administrator at STI, said: “Our programmes provide professionals with the conceptual foundations and practical skills necessary to keep pace with the evolving fields of securities and financial services.” Ms Swaby can be seen with Michael Miller, STI’s president. Airport gas station contract ‘awarded’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE Government has been urged to privatise key components of the Bahamian agriculture infrastructure, such as packi ng houses and the abbattoir, in addition to downsizing the Ministry of Agriculture to bring it more in line with current industry activity. T he recommendations and findings paper from the recent National Economic Summit pointed out that while the B ahamas’ agricultural production “has reduced to a fraction of what it was in 1973, the Ministry of [Agriculture] staff complementhas grown almost 1,000 per cent”. The summit recommended that the Ministry of downsized to focus on policy and food inspection. “The large number of highl y-skilled farmers currently employed with the Ministry should be provided with land grants and financing to start farms that serve not only private commercial purposes, but also training for current and aspiring agriculturalists,” the Summit’s organisers suggested. Packing house privatization was viewed as a way to overcome existing inefficiencies and the absence of equipment for “secondary processing opportunities, w hich are essential to supporting large scale farming”. The Summit organisers also recommended that Bahamians granted leased land for farmingp urposes “be made to demonstrate a minimum level of productivity prior to the renewal of such leases”. T hey urged that the AuditorGeneral review all issuances and renewals of land leases, given that many Bahamians granted land for agricultural use were not using it for these purposes, creating an “abuse of taxpayer resources”. Work permits were another vexing area, particularly when it c ame to farm labourers. “In one such case where a permit was declined for unexplained reasons, the result was a dramatic scaling back of local production, which in turn led to the termination of Bahamian workers,” the Summit organisers found. The Summit organisers called f or the Government-owned and operated abattoir to be privatised with 100 per cent Bahamian ownership. When it came to energy, the r ecommendations suggested the Bahamas was losing out on potentially $30-$85 million in revenues per year from liquefied natu ral gas (LNG The Summit organisers suggested all environmental concerns surrounding LNG had been addressed, but recommended that the industry only be approved for operation in the Bahamas if Bahamians were provided with a minimum 30 per cent equity intere st. When it came to small business, the Summit organisers urged that the Government provide loan guarantees “up to an aggregate of $10 million and not more than $100,000 for any single company”, in a bid to aid small firms requiring new financing or to r estructure existing loans. The recommendations also called on the Government to settle accounts payables with the private sector within 30 days, and the Bahamas Development Bank was urged to require that companies receiving loans of more than $100,000 have “properly f unctioning boards” comprised of suitably skilled people. When it came to Family Island t ourism, the Summit organisers recommended that persons staying in Nassau for four nights or more be offered a free Bahamasair flight to a Family Island ofc hoice, provided they spend at least one night there. The Ministry of Tourism was encouraged to hand over 10 per c ent of its advertising budget to Bahamian firms, so they could participate in designing its marketing campaigns. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 3B ment, purchasing the investment fund stake held by Mr Barry’s company. Although Mr Gotlieb had accepted that it was his handwriting and signature on the purchase document, the judgment recorded that the businessman claimed he did not sign it and that the signature was lifted from another agreement relating to a California casino proposal. Justice Lyons rejected this explanation. “In my judgment, he did sign the agreement with a view to cashing in on what he saw to be t he potential of considerable profits coming from the subject matter of the agreement, that subject matter having some thing to do with certain litiga tion in the United States against the big tobacco companies,”J ustice Lyons found. The case revolved around an investment fund formed to finance a legal action, initiated by US attorneys acting for the Russian government, in the Florida courts. The action, ini t iated on August 25, 2000, was s eeking damages from tobacco manufacturers over the alleged harmful effects of smoking. Justice Lyons recalled: “The scheme was set up whereby investors could contribute to the cost of funding the tobacco litigation taken by the Russian Federation, and in respect of which they would receive, as a dividend, a percentage of the return supposedly coming from any successful litigation. “The fund concerned was called the Tobacco Litigation Partnership (TL Participation Fund). Such an investment scheme was contrary to law in the United States. Investors were sought from outside the United States, or investments were made in the fund (domiciled in the Bahamas, from investors worldwide, which may have included investors from within the United States.” Mr Barry, though his Global Village company, obtained a 0.65 per cent interest in the fund that he attempted to sell to Mr Gotlieb, who guaranteed the purchase price of $7.5 million. That had not been paid as of the June 15, 2004, completion date. Bahamian law firm Lennox Paton, acting in a fiduciary capacity, transferred 26.13 per cent of its 3.75 per cent share in the litigation proceeds, to Mr Barry on August 27, 2001, giv ing him his 0.65 per cent stake. Half of this was sold to Mr Gotlieb. However, Justice Lyons found that the Russian action was dead before the sales agreement between Mr Barry and Mr Gotlieb was drawn up. The action was withdrawn on August 25, 2003, prior to the sales agreement that December. Mr Gotlieb’s attorney, Philip Davis, of Davis & Co, argued successfully that because the “subject matter of the sale and purchase agreement had gone up in smoke, the parties to that agreement were, at the time of entering into the sale and purchase agreement, operating under a common mistake”. Neither side, Justice Lyons found, became aware of the litigation’s end until January 2004. He agreed with Mr Davis that, because the Florida litigation had ended and there was no attempt or prospect of reviving it, the sale guaranteed by Mr Gotlieb “did not exist and not can it exist. It had, as I said, ‘gone up in smoke’.” As a result, Justice Lyons dis missed Mr Barry’s counterclaim and removed the stay on his judgment requiring Mr Gotlieb to be paid $3.141 million. Old Fort Bay resident in $7.5m counterclaim loss F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Privatise agriculture, government urged

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that doesn’t give you a statement stating what you owe, what you have paid and what your outstanding balance is. Now, to come along providing you with no information of where your status is and say: “By the way, 20 years ago you didn’t make a payment” is so outrageous it isn’t even funny,” said Mr D’Aguilar. An e-mail obtained by Tribune Business, to which Mr D’Aguilar, made reference outlined the story of an 84-yearold woman trying to ensure her housekeeper retired with a pen sion. NIB had provided the elderly lady recently with a list of “missing” payments, going back as far as 1986, which it said must be paid by her before her housekeeper can receive a pension. “My mother has received a list of missing payments and is researching her files going back to the crucifixion,” the 84 yearold’s daughter said. “It is just stressful and cruel and unusual punishment to do that to people after more than, say six years (the contractual period for suing on a debt at common law), especially in their later years.” According to the author of the e-mail, matters are being exacerbated by the housekeep er’s chronic illness and the strife this incident has left her elderly mother in. “We will be lucky if my mother survives the archaeological excavation into her records to unearth evidence of ‘missing’ payments,” the e-mail continued. “At this rate, they will both be gone before it is resolved.” NIB’s director, Algernon Cargill, said it took a common sense approach to each case of missing contributions. He said an employer’s inability to produce records of contribution payments is dealt with on a case-by-case basis. “We act responsibly,” he said. Mr Cargill said contributions that are unaccounted for could greatly affect a pensioner’s entit lement, so great effort was b eing put into making sure paym ents have been secured for all the years of employment. He admonished this paper that most stories, like that of the elderly woman in the e-mail, are often embellishments. However, Tribune Business received another e-mail with a similar story regarding a housekeeper whose employer recently tried to change her employment status from an employee of her business to an employee of her residence. “I received a telephone call from the Fox Hill NIB office requesting a description of my house and its location I was informed that an inspector will be visiting my home to determine who is working in my house,” the e-mail read. “On reflection, the bedrock principle in British law of a presumption of innocence has been replaced with an assumption of guilt warranting investigation without probable cause.” Mr DAguilar contends that NIB is simply taking the wrong approach to its years-past-due collection strategy. He said the agency should consider figuring out its records before it approaches the public. “It has been proven time and time again in the 1980s and 1990s that National Insurance was inefficient and inaccurate in the posting of payments, and now they are penalising honest, hard working Bahamians who have made their contributions every month because of these inefficiencies and inaccuracies,” he said. “It is totally unreasonable to do what they have done to that e lderly lady, and you can tell w ho are your honest customers a nd who are not your honest customers.” Mr Cargill said NIB was in the process of upgrading its information technology systems in order to issue monthly statements in the future. “These statements will enable employers and self-employed persons to know their contribution status without having to visit an NIB local office, as is currently the case. Further, through the regular review of NIB’s posting of their contributions, employers in particular will be able to ensure that their NIB accounts are correct, thus enabling them to avoid interest costs,” an NIB statement read. He said the system for documenting contributions paid in the past was accurate enough, and that past due payments could be a case of missed post ings, a case of an error, or a case of the person (employer paying at all. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 127,&( 5,0(7)2/,2,1& $1,17(51$7,21$/%86,1(66&203$1< 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHYROXQWDU\GLVVROXWLRQ RIWKHDERYHFRPSDQ\FRPPHQFHGRQWKHGD\ RI0DUFK$UWLFOHVRI'LVVROXWLRQKDYHEHHQ GXO\UHJLVWHUHGWKH5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDO3 %R[6KLUOH\6WUHHW1DVVDX%DKDPDV7KH /LTXLGDWRULV&RUSRUDWH6HUYLFHV%DKDPDVf /LPLWHGZKRVHDGUHVVLV6XLWH%D\SDUO%XLOGLQJ 3DUOLDPHQW6WUHHW3%R[ 1DVVDX7KH%DKDPDV NIB under renewed fire on collections F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By TAMARA LUSH Associated Press Writer MIAMI (AP rolling room of El Credito Cigar Company, the air is earthy and fragrant, a mix of coffee a nd nuts tinged with caramel and leather. Amid those sweet smells, though, workers are worried about a new federal tobacco taxt hat threatens Florida’s $2 billion cigar industry. Starting Wednesday, the tax will increase from five cents to a bout 40 cents on large cigars, a little less on smaller stogies. Cigar makers say the increase will t orch jobs and profits what’s left of them in the recession. Like dozens of cigar companies dotting Miami’s Little Havana neighborhood, ElC redito uses traditional rollers or, in Spanish, “torcedors” to hand make La Gloria Cubana, the company’s most f amous and expensive cigar. The workers sit at wooden tables and fold tanned tobacco leaves, cut them with a crescent-shaped knife and then roll the wads into fat Churchills, Coronas and Torpedoes. “Many of our rollers are worried,” said Hector Ventura, operations manager for El Credito. “They think that if weh ave less sales, they will lose their jobs. We know for suret he tax increase will reduce our sales. It’s not good for our business, not good at all.” The revenue from the new tax will help pay for a health insurance programme for lowincome children that President B arack Obama signed into law about two months ago. The State Children’s Health Insurance Program, or SCHIP, will e xtend coverage to 11 million kids. Florida has long been the hub of U.S. cigar making. In the 1890s, much of the nation’s cigars were rolled in Tampa by Cuban immigrants. In the 1960s, another wave of Cubans with cigar expertise opened up small er shops in Miami after Fidel Castro’s communist revolution. E ric Newman, the co-owner of the J.C. Newman Cigar company in Tampa, said these are the toughest times in the company’s 114-year history. The last thing we needed was the government to throwt his roadblock at us,” Newman said. “This could push our i ndustry off a cliff.” Newman said his company will go from paying $1 million in taxes a year to $4 million. Cigarette smokers are angry they will have to pay 62 cents more per pack, but cigar makers and importers say their industry will suffer disproportionally, especially in Florida where 75 percent of the nation’s c igar makers and importers are located. This is part of the culture of Miami and of Florida,” said Enrique “Kiki” Berger, who coowns Cuban Crafters Cigars in Miami. Berger’s father was a cigar maker in Cuba until his factory was seized by the Castro r egime. The family came to Miami and rolled cigars out of their garage until they could open a factory. T oday, Cuban Crafters employs 500 at a factory and a tobacco farm in Esteli, Nicaragua. Another 100 people work in Miami at a warehouse and small factory. The building a lso serves as a tourist stop and a place where guys smoke, play dominoes and sip strong shots of Cuban coffee. Berger imports a chunk of his c igars from Nicaragua. He said he will pay hundreds of thou-s ands of dollars more on each imported shipment and that c ost will be passed along to retailers and customers. The price of a pack of 25 cigars $29.99 will go up about $10 after the tax, he said. A single large cigar will increase by about 40 cents; Cuban Crafters sells them from $1 to $15 each. If the smokers puff fewer cigars, Berger said he may shift even more production to N icaragua to lower costs. “What will the benefits be for p eople that manufacture in the U.S.? None,” said Berger. “When they made this law, the politicians forgot about the cigar companies that employ people in the United States.” Jeff Borysiewicz, vice presid ent of the Cigar Rights of America, said cigar makers shouldn’t pick up the tab for children’s health care. Kids aren’t addicted to handmade cigars,” said Borysiewicz, who is also the president of Corona Cigar, an Orlando, Fla.-based manufacturer and distributor. “We’re an affordable hobby. We’re not part of the problem with children.” Paul Hull, an American Canc er Society spokesman in Florida, said tobacco takes such a toll on health care, it’s only fair that all companies contribute. “For the most part, connoiss eurs of cigars tend to be in a higher socio-economic class anyway,” he said. “It’s hard to imagine this will have an effect o n them.” This may not be the last cigar price hike. Legislatures in several states, including New York, Wisconsin and California, are considering raising their state tobacco tax to help in the wake of declining revenue. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 5B &DFLTXH,QWHUQDWLRQDO/WGZLWKRYHU\HDUVRI RXWVWDQGLQJVHUYLFHLQGHVWLQDWLRQPDQDJHPHQWDQG HYHQWSODQQLQJLVVHHNLQJWRHPSOR\ D +XPDQHVRXUFHVDQDJHU 5HTXLUHPHQWV 3OHDVHVXEPLW\RXUUHVXPHRQRUEHIRUH$SULO W K 'LUHFWRURI+XPDQHVRXUFHV 1DVVDX%DKDPDV 2UHPDLO UHVXPHV#FDFLTXHLQWOFRP T Tobacco tax hike puts damper on cigar makers in Florida Premium cigars are displayed at the El Credito Cigar Factory in the Little Havana section of Miami. Beginning April 1, the tax on cigars will jump from five cents to around 40 cents. (AP Photo: J Pat Carter

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Seasons Emerald Bay fray, although the players involved remain unknown. Sources said the renewed buyer interest was likely to have been stimulated through the decision by Japanese insurer Mitsui, whose London office effectively owns the resort from insuring the defaulted loan used to finance its construction, to slash its asking price. Mitsui, which was previously holding out for around $125$130 million, was said by some sources to have reduced its purchase price to around $55 million, in a bid to stimulate buyer interest at a time when credit markets have dried up. The entry price will be key for any Emerald Bay buyer, given that a further investment of at least $50 million is required to upgrade the resort and complete the original development plan. If the buyer can obtain the right price, its chances of generating a return on its investment, even with tourism in a funk and faced with the Bahamian economy’s high o perating costs, will be much e nhanced. T ribune Business previously revealed that a consortium featuring California-based real estate/casino developer Barry Silverton, and real estate broking and investment banking firm Cushman & Wakefield, had been identified as the preferred buyer by the receivers. However, that group appears to have made little progress in concluding the deal. The $320 million Emerald B ay resort has acted as Exuma’s main economic engine, attracting additional foreign direct investment to the island. It employs almost 500 staff, and features an 18-hole Greg Norman Golf Course, two restaurants, three pools, spa, six meeting rooms and 450-person capacity ballroom. Other investment projects previously attracted to the E merald Bay vicinity include t he resort’s no-closed Pinnacle E ntertainment-managed $5 million casino, and the $110 million Grand Isle Villas development. A shopping complex has also opened at Emerald Bay, the anchor retailer being the Emerald Isle supermarket. The complex also includes businesses such as Scotiabank and Mail Boxes Etc. David Johnson, deputy director-general in the Ministry of T ourism with responsibility for planning, investment and business development, warned in 2007 that the Four Seasons needed to become a sustainable, profitable resort, and the Bahamas could not afford for it to fail. He said then that factors such as building costs being about 40 per cent higher per square foot than they are in Nassau, had retarded Emerald Bay’s growth and kept it from reaching the development its owners had previously predicted. Mr Johnson said of Emerald Bay: “The property was conceived to be a mixed-use project, with 185 keys under the Four Seasons brand. The vast majority of the property was to be for mixed-use, condos and hundreds of lots sold for significant family homes. After four years of operat ion, they have developed very l ittle of the sold inventory. There’s been a lot of trading of the land by the owners, but the cost of building is prohibitive. “The buildings costs, the numbers suggest, are in excess of 40 per cent higher per square foot to build.” Costs to construct such properties in Nassau were $500 per square foot, while in Exuma the price was $800 per square foot. Mr Johnson also underlined t he impact the relatively high building costs on Exuma, compared to Nassau, were having on Emerald Bay’s margins. He pointed out that concrete there cost $200 per yard, whereas in Nassau it cost $125 per yard. “The hotel, with a golf course and spa, as a 185-room resort of Four Seasons’ calibre, can only be profitable if it has a much larger customer base outside those rooms,” Mr Johnson said. He added that the resort needed to build out to 700-800 units to get close to profitability, whereas it was currently closer to 300-400 units. vices at the Freeport Container Port and South Riding point, saw its revenues increase by $ 350,000 or 14 per cent comp ared to 2007. T he Canadian company has a 50 per cent interest in Freepoint, and said the revenue increase resulted from “higher container ship volume and rate increases”. For the 2008 fourth quarter, Freepoint saw its revenues reach $815,000, some 37 per cent higher than for the same period in 2007. For the 2008 full year, Freepoint saw its revenues rise from $2.567 million in 2007 to $2.917 million. While it slid to a $216,000 operating loss last year, compared to one of $18,000 the year before, Freepoint still generated net income of $242,000. That, though, was just 29.2 per cent of 2007’s $826,000 in net income a fall of more than 70 per cent. This came despite Freepoint handling 95 per cent of all ships using the Freeport Container Port. Meanwhile, the financial statements revealed that South Riding Point was in talks with the Government regarding nonpayment of “significant” taxes. The financials said: “In 2008, South Riding Point was contacted by representatives of the Bahamian government regarding the non-payment of a local revenue-based tax. “South Riding Point is in the process of evaluating this claim, but currently believes that it is exempt from the tax in question.” The tax at the centre of this dispute was not revealed, although there are a number of possibilities, including business licence fees. The financials added: “A spe cific amount of tax has not yet been assessed, and the company has not booked a liability in its consolidated balance sheet, as the amount is neither estimable nor, in the opinion of management, probable at this time. If South Riding Point is deemed to owe the tax, the amount mayb e significant.” South Riding Point was also said to be engaged in “arbitra tion proceedings” with a con tractor it had hired to perform hurricane-related repairs to its storage facilities. Both South Riding Point a nd the contractor are seeking damages against each other in this matter for breach of con tract,” the financial statements read. “The contractor has claimed damages of approximately $2.7 million. “South Riding Point has filed a counter-claim, along with a damage assessment, which well exceeds the damages claimed by the contractor. South Riding point continues to vigorously defend its positions in this arbitration, and incur significant legal costs related to this matter.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE -t-($ Zt#56'4#.' Grand Bahama firm sees 68% income growth F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B New buyers in Emerald Bay shake-up

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An AP News Analysis n By TOM RAUM A ssociated Press Writer LONDON (AP leaders are keeping a nervous eye on world markets as theytry to fix their ailing economies. From New York to Tokyo, investors stand ready to instantly grade the summit of the world’s 20 biggest economic powers. As leaders gathered, the US recession that triggered the global crisis entered its 17th month on Wednesday, making it the longest downturn since the decade-long Great Depress ion. It has now surpassed two previous postwar US recessionst hat each lasted 16 months, in 1973-75 and 1981-82. After the Dow Jones industrials’ worst first quarter in 70 years, Wall Street began the s econd three months of the year on Wednesday with a s mall increase at midmorning. Usually, leaders at internat ional forums care little about w hat markets are doing and markets pay little attention tos uch forums. Their predictable and vaguely written commu niques rarely move the numbers. A nd after all, who can predict market movements? Gauging how markets might react canb e a futile exercise. But in this case, plunging stock markets around the world are not only a symptom of the larger problem, they are part of the problem. Trillions of dollars of wealth have disappeared from pensions, endowments, nest eggs and home values. The market s lides have sapped consumer confidence and spending in developed countries and s lammed developing ones that r ely heavily on their exports. In the United States, nearly h alf of households own securit ies, either directly or indirectl y through 401(k retirement plans. That’s more than ever before in a time of severe economic downturn. Stock ownership also is up in other industrialized nations. Summit partners don’t want to unnecessarily spook the markets. And that injects an additional degree of caution into their deliberations. Failure to reach some acceptable level of accord at Thursday’s G-20 summit could “obvi ously have a very negative effect on markets,” sowing seeds of further protectionism that in turn would “further i mpact shares of major corpo r ations,” said Joseph Lampel, a professor at Cass Business School at City University in London. “A vicious circle could accelerate.” There’s no way to tell what m arkets might view as acceptable accomplishments. And since much of the present glob al decline is caused by lack of confidence, markets are looking for signs of returning confidence. And this is one of the places they’re looking. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and President Barack Obama both sought to show cautious confidence at their joint news conference on W ednesday. Obama urged Americans, a nd consumers across the globe, to show confidence in the ability of the global economy to recover. “Don’t short change the future because of fear in the present, that I think is the most important message we can send not just in the United States, but around the world,” Obama said. Said Brown: “It will get worse if people do not act.” But tensions simmered just beneath the surface. Hours before the leaders were to sit down for dinner, French President NicolasS arkozy vowed to keep fighting for stronger international f inancial regulation, especially of tax havens, saying in an interview with Europe 1 radio that he would not associate himself with “false compromises.” F ew expect the gathering to endorse either the bold stimulus s pending that the U.S. and Britain have advocated nor the tough new international financ ial regulation that France, Germany and some other European countries want. Instead, the gathering was expected toe ndorse a mix of measured steps, including increased coordination in regulation, more money for the International Monetary Fund and a modest amount of stimulus spending, much of it already announced. “My sense is that it will be a credible and legitimate package of steps both on the restori ng-growth side and on the regulatory-reform side. And how the market reacts to that remains to be seen,” said Mike Froman, a White House international economics adviser. M arkets hate uncertainty. W hen Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner first outlined the Obama administration’s bank-rescue plan in early February, the Dow Jones industria ls plunged 300 points, mainly over the plan’s lack of details.W hen he later filled in the blanks with a detailed plan, it soared nearly 500 points. And Geithner briefly unsettled currency markets a week ago when he appeared willing to entertain a Chinese proposal that an international currency replace the U.S. dollar as the world’s main reserve currency a notion he quickly dispelled. Recent reports suggest the world economy is weakening, not strengthening. “The world economy is in the midst of its deepest and mosts ynchronized recession in our lifetimes,” wrote Klaus S chmidt-Hebbel, chief economist at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, in a report this week predicting the worlde conomy would shrink this year for the first time since World W ar II, by 2.75 per cent. He also wrote that trade would further contract sharply. O f course, if markets hate uncertainty, there can also be the certainty of low expectations. W hat if the summit is viewed as a flop? “I think flop is pretty well built into expectations,” said David Wyss, chief economist of Standard and Poor’s in New York. Nearly everybody involved in the process expects more international coordination and r egulation, “it’s just a matter of how much,” Wyss said. As to possible market reaction, Wyss said that while the G-20 summit “won’t accomplish much, it’s a good first step. A nd it’s better than canceling t he meeting.” &DFLTXH,QWHUQDWLRQDOZLWKRYHU\HDUVRIRXWVWDQGLQJ VHUYLFHLQGHVWLQDWLRQPDQDJHPHQWDQGHYHQWSODQQLQJLV VHHNLQJWRHPSOR\ D *HQHUDO0DQDJHU IRUWKHLU&DFLTXH (YHQW*URXSt&DWHULQJ'LYLVLRQV *HQHUDO 5HTXLUHPHQWV 3OHDVHVXEPLW\RXUUHVXPHRQRUEHIRUH$SULO W K 'LUHFWRURI+XPDQHVRXUFHV 1DVVDX%DKDPDV 2UHPDLO UHVXPHV#FDFLTXHLQWOFRP T C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 7B Escape this April to Grand Bahama! per night per night $99*$159* Leaders try not to upset market

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.421.28-0.141,0000.1270.00010.10.00% 1 1.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.55Cable Bahamas12.5612.55-0.0119,0001.3090.2509.61.99% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.446.46Commonwealth Bank (S16.486.46-0.0217,0000.4380.05014.70.77% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.172.170.0037,0000.0990.05221.92.40% 3.002.09Doctor's Hospital2.162.09-0.0720,0000.2400.0408.71.91%8 .106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 1 4.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.7940.40013.23.83% 6 .045.00Focol (S5.075.070.000.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1 .000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44891.3847Colina Money Market Fund1.44891.064.63 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.739711.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S19-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 24 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 28-Feb-09 27-Mar-09 31-Jan-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L L F F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 -3 35 5 6 67 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 6 6 -4 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O O N N I I A A L L 2 2 4 4 2 2 5 50 0 2 2 -7 75 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 806.63 | YTD -3.38% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTUESDAY, 31 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,638.80 | CHG -2.25 | %CHG -0.14 | YTD -73.56 | YTD % -4.30BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net EVERY Bahamian has an obligation to assist the government in effecting transformation in the economy in order to improve this country’s balance of payments by $1 billion within three years, according to the findings of the recent National Economic Summit (NES The section of the NES report etitled “Individual Responsibility” outlines what citizens can do during this economic downturn to produce changes in the national balance sheet. “During these challenging economic times, the role that individuals might play to ensure our country’s economic strengthening cannot be understated,” the report read. According to framers of the NES, Bahamians must begin to save, lower debt, budget, invest and restructure loans. “The recently enacted amendment to the Stamp Tax Act allows mortgagors to consolidate loans and transfer mortgages of up to $500,000 without incurring stamp tax. Mortgagors are urged to consider one-time debt consolidations and negotiate interest rate reductions, which would reflect their new empowered position,” said the report. It also recommended that Bahamians spend more on local goods and services, including buying Bahamian grown and manufactured items and considering domestic vacations to the Family Islands. On the business side, the N ES report emphasises increases in educational advancement as well as ongoing training for those who may already be employed in a sustainable career. “Perhaps the most consistent message that came out of the NES was the failing of our educational system,” it read. “Bahamians are encouraged to pursue ongoing training, and training in new areas should be considered, if necessary.” The report added that the level of productivity in the Bahamas should be improved, especially during this economic crisis, which has caused businesses to slash staff levels and put hundreds of job in jeopardy. Energy conservation was cited as paramount to reducing the Bahamas’ current account deficit by reducing this country’s oil imports and increasing the search for alternatives ources of energy. “Efforts to conserve energy at place of employment, home and even while driving should be pursued,” the NES report said. “We went into the NES seeking to achieve one primary objective: To identify ways to positively impact The Bahamas’ current account balance in the immediate to medium term. Such opportunities when exploited will positively impact entrepreneurial and job prospects, and lead to an improvement in external reserves,” said NES developer Lynden Nairn. Three-year target for $1bn balance of payments gain F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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n By JUDY LIN Associated Press Writer SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP California’s $42 billion budget hole in February, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and legislative leaders said everyone had to give up something to repair the state’s finances. But California businesses and corporations with significant operations in the state were largely spared. Now, that decision is feeding opposition to five budget-related measures voters are being asked to approve during a special election May 19. Opponents say the budget package places too much of a burden on tax-payers in a state that already has a reputation for high taxes. A recent poll shows the propositions in trouble, including the one Schwarzenegger wants most: a measure that would implement a state spending cap in exchange for extending the taxes an additional one to two years. Just 39 per cent of likely voters support that measure and46 per cent oppose it, according to the Public Policy Institute of California survey. If voters reject all of the measures, the state will face an additional $6 billion budget short-fall. For months, lawmakers could not agree on how to close the $42 billion budget deficit. But they settled their differences Feb. 20 with an agreement thatcuts $15 billion in programmes and borrows about $6 billion. Reaching agreement was particularly difficult because California requires a two-thirds majority vote to pass budgets and tax increases. The budget package, which comes amid tumbling home prices and an unemploymentrate in the double digits, includes a boost in the sales tax that took effect Wednesday and increases in the personal income tax and vehicle license fee. F or businesses, though, there was a long list of corporate tax breaks and credits, including ones for the film industry and a change in the tax formula that will save businesses hundredsof millions of dollars. T axpayer groups say the taxe s are too harmful in a reces sion. The Howard Jarvis Tax payers Association estimates the budget package will cost a family of four an additional $1,100 a year, largely canceling any benefit Californians will receive from federal tax cuts. “As services are cut and every ordinary taxpayer will have to pay more, it is appalling that major multinational corporations get new tax breaks,” said Lenny Goldberg, executive director of the labour-backed non-profit California Tax Reform Association. The California Budget Project, a Sacramento-based research group that advocates for working families, estimates that a couple with $40,000 in taxable income will see a 12.9 percent increase in taxes, while a couple making $750,000 would get a 2.9 percent increase. The only tax break given to a verage Californians is a $10,000 credit for those who buy a new house over the next year, a provision sought by home builders. The Budget Project estimates the tax breaks will cost the state treasury at least $2.5 billion over five years, potentially putting further pressure on future budgets. The Schwarzenegger administration said it would not have agreed to the budget deal without measures it said were needed to stimulate California’s economy, which included the corporate tax breaks and credit for buyers of new homes. The governor said it would have been irresponsible to raise taxes without also cutting spending and taking steps to boost the economy and create j obs. Christopher Thornberg, an economist at San Rafael-based Beacon Economics, said striking business-friendly compromises was the only way to get enough votes from Republicans, the minority party in the legislature, to reach the needed two-thirds approval, he said. “Some of this is just gross payout,” Thornberg said. Other states are also facing tough financial decisions. At least a half dozen are looking to sin taxes including levies on cigarettes and alcohol to help fill budget holes. Lawmakers in Oregon and Wisconsin are targeting highincome earners. In Louisiana, lawmakers are pushing for, among other things, tax breaks for seniors and cutting property t axes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f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axpayers bear the brunt in California F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009, PAGE 11B At Chandler GilbertWe have the expertise to handle the unique insurance needs of a wide range of clientsQWe have relationships with domestic and international insurers and brokers that enable us to deliver cost-effective risk financing solutionsWe are not too big to provide personal, client-friendly service Experience a new way to meet your private and commercial insurance needs. Visit, call, fax or e-mail us at your convenience. Our clients never call us at the wrong time.Chandler Gilbert Insurance Associates is a new insurance brokerage firm founded on the wealth of insurance industry knowledge and experience of co-founders Victor Chandler and Guilden Gilbert.OFFICE #20 Montrose Avenue P.O. Box N-7753 Nassau, Bahamas Phone: (242 Fax: (242 VICTOR CHANDLER victor@cgiacaribbean.com GUILDEN GILBERT guilden@cgiacaribbean.com CONSULTANTS BROKERS AGENTS n By CALVIN WOODWARD Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP One of President Barack Obama’s campaign pledges on taxes went up in puffs of smoke Wednesday. The largest increase in tobacco taxes took effect despite Obama’s promise not to raise taxes of any kind on families earning under $250,000 or individuals under $200,000. This is one tax that disproportionately affects the poor, who are more likely to smoke than the rich. To be sure, Obama’s tax promises in last year’s campaign were most often made in the context of income taxes. Not always. “I can make a firm pledge,” he said in Dover, N.H., on Sept. 12. “Under my plan, no family making less than $250,000 a year will see any form of tax increase. Not your income tax, not your payroll tax, not your capital gains taxes, not any of your taxes.” He repeatedly vowed “you will not see any of your taxes increase one single dime.” Now in office, Obama, who stopped smoking but has admitted he slips now and then, signed a law raising the tobacco tax nearly 62 cents on a pack of cigarettes, to $1.01. Other tobacco products saw similarly steep increases. The extra money will be used to finance a major expansion of health insurance for children. That represents a step toward achieving another promise, to make sure all kids are covered. Obama said in the campaign that Americans could have both a broad boost in affordable health insurance for the nation without raising taxes on anyone but the rich. His detailed campaign plan stated that his proposed improvement in health insurance and health technology “is more than covered” by raising taxes on the wealthy alone. It was not based on raising the tobacco tax. The White House contends Obama’s campaign pledge left room for measures such as the one financing children’s health insurance. “The president’s position throughout the campaign was that he would not raise income or payroll taxes on families making less than $250,000, and that’s a promise he has kept,” said White House spokesman Reid H. Cherlin. “In this case, he supported a public health measure that will extend health coverage to four million children who are currently unins ured.” I n some instances during the c ampaign, Obama was plainly talking about income, payroll and investment taxes, even if he did not say so. Other times, his point appeared to be that heavier taxation of any sort on average Americans is the wrong prescription in tough times. “Listen now,” he said in his widely watched nomination acceptance speech, “I will cut taxes cut taxes for 95 per cent of all working families, because, in an economy like this, the last thing we should do is raise taxes on the middle class.” An unequivocal “any tax” pledge also was heard in the vice presidential debate, another prominent forum. “No one making less than $250,000 under Barack Obama’s plan will see one single penny of their tax raised,” Joe Biden said, “whether it’s their capital gains tax, their income tax, investment tax, any tax.” The Democratic campaign used such statements to counter Republican assertions that Obama would raise taxes in a multitude of direct and indirect ways, recalled Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania. “I think a reasonable person would have concluded that Senator Obama had made a ’no new taxes’ pledge to every couple or family making less than $250,000,” she said. Jamieson noted GOP ads that claimed Obama would raise taxes on electricity and home heating oil. “They rebutted both with the $250,000 claim,” she said of the Obama campaign, “so they did extend the rebuttal beyond income and payroll.” Government and private research has found that smoking rates are higher among peop le of low income. A Gallup survey of 75,000 p eople last year fleshed out that conclusion. It found that 34 per cent of respondents earning $6,000 to $12,000 were smokers, and the smoking rate consistently declined among people of higher income. Only 13 per cent of people earning $90,000 or more were smokers. Federal or state governments often turn for extra tax dollars to the one in five Americans who smoke, and many states already hit tobacco users this year. So did the tobacco companies, which raised the price on many brands by more than 70 cents a pack. The latest increase in the fed eral tax is by far the largest since its introduction in 1951, when it was eight cents a pack. It’s gone up six times since, each time by no more than a dime, until now. Apart from the tax haul, public health advocates argue that squeezing smokers will help some to quit and persuade young people not to start. But it was a debate the country didn’t have in a presidential campaign that swore off higher taxation. Obama tax pledge goes up in smoke

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n By MARTIN CRUTSINGER AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP Construction spending fell for a fifth straight month in February, but the results were better than expected and along with other economic reports, suggested contraction may be nearing an end. The Commerce Department said Wednesday that February construction activity dropped 0.9 per cent, less than the 1.5 per cent decline economists had forecast. Total construction has been falling since October. The level of activity is at the slowest pace in nearly five years. Meanwhile a trade group’s m easure of the health of the manufacturing sector contracted for the 14th straight month in March, but at a slower pace than expected. The Institute for Supply Management said its manufacturing index rose to 36.3 last month from 35.8 in February. Economists expected the index to rise to 36. A reading below 50 signals contraction and the index hit a 28-year low of 32.9 in December. A 4.3 per cent drop in housing construction, pushing it to the lowest level in 11 years, dragged down the overall construction data in February. Home builders have cut back sharply, but face a rising glut of unsold homes as record mortgage foreclosures dump more properties on the market. Lennar Corp. said Monday that its fiscal first-quarter losses surged 77 per cent due to charges to adjust land andi nventory values, and plunging home deliveries and new orders. On Wall Street, stocks moved slightly higher after the construction and manufacturing reports were better than expected, and the National Association of Realtors said pending home sales rebounded in February from a record low. The Dow Jones industrial average added about 80 points in midday trading after dropping more than 100 points earlier in the day. The manufacturing report, based on a poll of the Tempe, Ariz.-based trade group of purchasing executives, covers indicators including new orders, production, employment, inventories, prices, and export and import orders. None of the 18 manufacturing industries grew in March, but the report did say that five of the industries surveyed including electrical equipment, primary metals and machinery expect to gain from the government’s economic stimulus measures. “The rapid decline in manufacturing appears to have mod erated somewhat,” said Norbert Ore, chair of the ISM manufacturing survey committee. The Commerce Department report showed nonresidential construction rose 0.3 per centi n February, a slight rebound following a 4.3 per cent drop in January that had been the biggest decline in 15 years. With the financial sector facing its worst crisis in seven decades, banks have tightenedt heir loan standards, making it h arder to get financing for shop ping centers and other commercial projects. More bad news on the housi ng front came Tuesday when t he Standard & Poor’s/CaseShiller index of home prices in 20 major cities showed a record decline of 19 per cent for the three months ending in January compared to the same peri-o d a year ago. The biggest d eclines were in cities already hardest hit by the housing bust including Phoenix and San Francisco. Still, the Realtors last week said sales of previously occupied homes unexpectedlyj umped in February by the largest amount in nearly six years as first-time buyers took advantage of deep discounts on foreclosures and other dis tressed properties. Some econ omists say that could help mod erate declines. Analysts are forecasting that the commercial real estate industry is poised to fall into the worst crisis since the last g reat property bust of the early 1 990s. Delinquency rates on loans for hotels, offices, retail and industrial buildings have risen sharply in recent months and are likely to soar through thee nd of 2010 as companies lay o ff workers, downsize or shut their doors. Construction spending by the government showed a 0.8 per cent increase in February following two months of declines. The strength came in a 0.8 perc ent increase in spending on federal building projects, and the same rise in spending on state and local government projects. All the changes left total con struction spending at a season ally adjusted annual rate of $967.5 billion in February, the slowest pace since March 2004. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 0,1,675<:25.6t75$163257 US construction spend fall less than anticipated A construction worker uses a rope while hoisting building materials at the One Marina Park Drive office building construction site, in the South Boston neighbourhood of Boston... (AP Photo: Steven Senne

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 66F/19C Low: 70F/21C Low: 73F/23C Low: 74F/23C Low: 73 F/23 C Low: 75F/24C Low: 74 F/23 C Low: 72 F/22 C High: 86F/30C High: 84F/29C High: 86 F/30 C High: 85 F/29 C High: 87F/31C High: 84 F/29C High: 89F/32C Low: 74F/23C High: 86F/30C Low: 73 F/23 C High: 87F/31C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 68F/20C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 72F/22C High: 88 F/31 Low: 69F/21C High: 84F/29C Low: 71 F/22C High: 88F/31C Low: 73 F/23 C High: 91F/33C Low: 70 F/21 C High: 87F/31C Low: 70 F/21 C High: 88F/31C Low: 72F/22C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 75F/24C High: 91F/33C High: 85 F/29 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 2 ND , 2009, PAGE 19B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Breezy with plenty of sunshine. Mainly clear.Breezy with plenty of sunshine. A spotty shower possible. Sunny. High: 89 Low: 74 High: 90 High: 88 High: 86 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Mostly sunny, breezy and humid. High: 89 Low: 76 Low: 76 Low: 74 AccuWeather RealFeel 97F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 82F 94-89F 104-81F 91-80F 95-72F Low: 67 TODAYTONIGHTFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................84F/29C Low ....................................................73F/23C Normal high ......................................80F/27C Normal low ........................................67F/20C Last year's high .................................. 84 F/29C Last year's low .................................. 72 F/22C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................2.07" Normal year to date ......................................5.25" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Apr. 2 Apr . 9 Apr . 17 Apr . 24 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:27 p.m. Moonrise . . . 12:40 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 1:54 a.m. Today Friday Saturday Sunday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1:39 a.m.2.88:09 a.m.0.3 2:10 p.m.2.38:14 p.m.0.2 2:50 a.m.2.79:15 a.m.0.3 3:21 p.m.2.49:26 p.m.0.2 4:00 a.m.2.710:18 a.m.0.2 4:29 p.m.2.510:36 p.m.0.1 5:05 a.m.2.711:15 a.m.0.1 5:31 p.m.2.711:40 p.m.0.0 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3170/21s87/3070/21s Amsterdam61/1645/7s63/1746/7s Ankara, Turkey64/1743/6t57/1334/1c Athens70/2152/11sh63/1745/7pc Auckland64/1750/10s64/1751/10s Bangkok92/3377/25sh93/3379/26pc Barbados84/2874/23pc85/2975/23s Barcelona58/1451/10r58/1449/9sh Beijing61/1646/7s63/1745/7pc Beirut69/2055/12c68/2061/16pc Belgrade64/1745/7c68/2044/6pc Berlin61/1645/7pc66/1848/8s Bermuda66/1865/18c72/2269/20sh Bogota64/1747/8r64/1746/7r Brussels64/1745/7s66/1850/10pc Budapest67/1943/6pc68/2045/7pc Buenos Aires72/2263/17c75/2366/18t Cairo83/2862/16s76/2459/15pc Calcutta97/3679/26s97/3679/26s Calgary38/321/-6c37/219/-7sn Cancun88/3173/22s88/3172/22s Caracas83/2867/19s84/2867/19pc Casablanca65/1848/8s67/1950/10s Copenhagen53/1144/6s58/1446/7s Dublin57/1343/6pc55/1241/5r Frankfurt66/1841/5pc68/2043/6pc Geneva 65/18 49/9 c 61/1647/8r Halifax 43/6 39/3 c 50/10 40/4 r Havana 88/31 68/20 s 90/32 69/20 s Helsinki 39/3 32/0c41/530/-1r Hong Kong 73/22 70/21 c 75/23 70/21t Islamabad 87/30 61/16 c 89/31 59/15 pc Istanbul54/1249/9r55/1244/6pc Jerusalem 65/18 45/7pc61/1650/10pc Johannesburg 73/2253/11t75/2348/8s Kingston 88/3175/23pc85/2976/24s Lima84/2864/17c83/2864/17pc London61/1641/5pc64/1743/6pc Madrid66/1834/1pc72/2237/2pc Manila90/3279/26c85/2976/24pc Mexico City86/3052/11s81/2744/6s Monterrey93/3357/13s89/3163/17s Montreal57/1339/3pc59/1543/6r Moscow39/327/-2c39/328/-2sn Munich61/1632/0c66/1845/7s Nairobi84/2859/15r86/3057/13pc New Delhi 91/3266/18pc97/3666/18pc Oslo45/735/1c47/834/1c Paris63/1743/6pc63/1748/8pc Prague 57/13 35/1 s 62/16 44/6 s Rio de Janeiro78/2570/21sh78/2571/21sh Riyadh80/2662/16c84/2865/18t Rome 62/16 46/7 sh 66/18 50/10 s St. Thomas82/2774/23s84/2874/23s San Juan90/3260/15s92/3359/15s San Salvador 90/32 68/20 s 89/31 72/22 s Santiago 81/2750/10pc73/2250/10pc Santo Domingo86/3068/20s84/2869/20s Sao Paulo 75/23 61/16 pc 75/23 62/16sh Seoul57/1332/0s48/834/1c Stockholm 50/10 34/1 pc 52/11 36/2 pc Sydney 73/22 66/18 sh77/2566/18sh Taipei72/2264/17c81/2769/20c T okyo 55/12 43/6 pc 59/15 48/8 s T oronto 55/1242/5pc49/934/1r Trinidad86/3073/22t87/3074/23r V ancouver 48/8 37/2 r 46/734/1c Vienna 63/1748/8pc67/1951/10pc W arsaw 50/10 32/0 s 54/12 38/3 s Winnipeg 34/1 28/-2 c 41/525/-3c H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:S at 12-25 Knots3-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Friday:SSW at 15-25 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:S at 12-25 Knots3-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Friday:S at 15-25 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:S at 8-16 Knots3-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Friday:S at 10-20 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque61/1640/4s67/1944/6pc Anchorage34/126/-3pc37/226/-3sf Atlanta64/1751/10t62/1644/6pc Atlantic City65/1848/8r58/1445/7r Baltimore64/1750/10pc60/1544/6t Boston60/1546/7r53/1145/7r Buffalo62/1646/7pc52/1135/1r Charleston, SC68/2062/16t77/2549/9t Chicago54/1236/2r47/834/1pc Cleveland62/1646/7c56/1334/1r Dallas66/1841/5c73/2255/12s Denver50/1032/0pc54/1229/-1c Detroit63/1744/6c53/1133/0r Honolulu81/2769/20s82/2769/20pc Houston77/2545/7t75/2358/14s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday TodayFridayTodayFriday Indianapolis64/1745/7r52/1136/2r Jacksonville74/2364/17t77/2549/9t Kansas City52/1131/0r62/1644/6s Las Vegas81/2756/13s72/2248/8pc Little Rock64/1742/5t68/2044/6s Los Angeles66/1854/12pc62/1650/10sh Louisville68/2048/8t57/1340/4pc Memphis68/2045/7t65/1847/8s Miami87/3073/22s86/3070/21pc Minneapolis42/528/-2c49/929/-1pc Nashville73/2244/6t61/1640/4pc New Orleans76/2457/13t71/2155/12s New York66/1848/8r55/1247/8r Oklahoma City56/1336/2r68/2047/8s Orlando86/3069/20pc82/2760/15t Philadelphia64/1748/8r63/1746/7r Phoenix 83/28 60/15 s 87/3058/14s Pittsburgh68/2048/8pc59/1536/2r Portland, OR 52/1138/3r50/1037/2sh Raleigh-Durham 64/17 56/13 r 73/22 44/6 t St. Louis56/1336/2r59/1542/5s Salt Lake City 56/13 38/3 c 47/832/0r San Antonio 80/26 50/10 s 77/25 60/15 s San Diego66/1856/13pc60/1554/12sh San Francisco 57/13 45/7 pc 57/1346/7s Seattle48/836/2r48/835/1pc T allahassee 70/2161/16t74/2345/7pc T ampa 84/28 72/22 pc 80/26 64/17t Tucson80/2657/13s81/2753/11s W ashington, DC 67/19 50/10pc62/1645/7t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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The Tribune The Tribune M y V o i c e . M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

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RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND C HURCH EVENT S PG 26The Tribune THURSDAY April 2, 2009

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The Tribune Thursday, April 2, 2009 PG 27 RELIGION n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunmedia.net F OLLOWING last week’s feature on t he hist or y of Islam in t he Bahamas, T ribune Religion dug deeper int o the commonl y misunderstood religion, getting a woman’s perspective on life in the faith. Lecturer at the College of the Bahamas, Bidi Boyer explained that life for her as a Muslim has come with its share of challenges, but is not that different from living as a Christian. A native of Suriname in Northern South American, Mrs Boyer said gr owing up in a strict Muslim family taught her fr om early on the importance of living the modest life required by her faith. She said unlike the Bahamas wher e many people ar e not familiar with Islam, life was much different in her homeland because a larger percentage of the population are Muslims. While she said that about one per cent of the Bahamian population is Muslim, in Suriname, about 20 per cent of the population (478,000 e Muslims. She said: “Like the Bahamas which is labeled a Christian nation, Suriname is considered a Muslim nation because many of the r esidents have r oots fr om places like Indonesia, a place wher e Islam is the dominant r eligion.” She said one of the iconic traits she accepted as a young Muslim was to always live a life of modesty. For her this reflected in both the way she interacted with others and the way she dressed. She said like many Christian teachings, the Qur ’an instructs all followers to respect life, meaning that killing another human, animal, or plant is wrong, especially without just cause. She said it was also impor tant for an Islamic woman to fully cover her body especially her chest. She explained that based on the teachings of Mohammad who is considered the last and final prophet a women should not expose the contour of her body, which is the reason many Islamic women wear the gar ment known as an Life of a woman MUSLIM SEE page 31

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The Tribune P G 28 Thursday, April 2, 2009 RELIGION OKAY, it's an evidential fact that as a nation we're presently between a rock and a hard place. This fact also extends to the lack of visionary leadership from the two most influential systems in the land today; the political and religious systems which are key pillars in the Babylon system. At times I'm of the view that a vast majority of the Bahamian public can be categorised as “SUCKERS for bad treatment. The above statement may offend those who are enjoying the good life of the systems; while the life of the unfortunate grassroots and brainwashed middle class are methodically being stifled. Listen! Especially you grassroots Bahamians, isn't it obvious to you by now that what you're embracing as leadership today; is doing a very good job in leading you and your children's children to the land of nowhere. The systems are designed to keep you looking to and relying on Governments and religion to supply your needs. This is one of the primary reasons why the political leaders and r eligious organisations can send whoever they desire as representatives into a poor grassroots area; where the people have been trained to joyfully accept their representation. A people or nation that doesn't know and have a personal r elationship with Father Yahweh, will always find themselves as powerless victims to the unjust treatments of the world's system. Dan.11:32b. But a people that do know their God ('e_lo_hi_ymel-oheem') shall be strong and do exploits. The enemy has skillfully used his p olitical and religious systems to program and condition the people's minds; to consistently look to and depend upon these systems for their daily breads. Today's politicians / kings and religious leaders / priests are the culprits that are responsible for 95 per cent of the mess, and the deterioration of law and order in this country. Throughout the Bible one can find that hard times, recession and famine were nothing new; but whenever these times were at hand even an ungodly king who didn't have a personal relationship with Yahweh had enough sense to align himself with a true man of God. As a nation, we'r e facing a type of famine / recession; unfortunately for our King / Prime Minister just about all of leading cler gymen of this land are filled with religion and are in no position to hear from Father Yahweh to give the prime minister Godly advice. Unlike Pharaoh the king of Egypt who had a man of God in the person of Joseph (Gen.41:1-57 who was able to hear from God and give good Godly advice. Here in the Bahamas today; we've got over four thousand religious leaders most of whom are too politically bias and the others are too money motivated to spend time in the presence of God thereby not being able to spiritually advise the king. As a result, the people grope around in darkness and gross darkness fills the land. But, I declare unto you; the downtrodden, the least likely to succeed, the ones who are constantly crying out for help. As David extolled the Lord (yeho_va_h yeh-ho-vaw') at the dedication of his house and as he declared in Ps.30:5b. So do I declare unto you, as you seek to dedicate your life and house to the Lord eeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning” In dedicating your life to Father Yahweh through the acceptance of His son, Y eshuwa Messiah; you've now been given the authority to serve the enemy with an eviction notice as it relates to everything that's concerning you and your family. This eviction is never valid nor will it ever be through religion and politics; but rather it is valid and powerfully enfor ced thr ough the BLOOD of Y eshuwa Messiah. This ought to be the position you're now prepared to take and stand firmly upon; whereas you're saying to this world's systems “Enough is enough, I'm tired of half-stepping, and going around in circles with politicians and religious leaders” If a politician can't lay-out and articulately present you with a twenty year visionary plan for a better Bahamas; send him and the party he represents away skipping. Religiously, you've attended just about every conference, seminar, revival or workshop; where you have helped in making the religious leaders of these events successfully wealthy; in purchasing all of their tapes, cd's and books. Meanwhile your situation both spiritually and naturally is yet the same and has gotten even worst. Here's a Spirit led word for you “stop buying all of these books and other materials and begin to focus on God's word” Listen to what God said to Joshua about his success and prosperity. Joshua.1:8. This book of the law shall not depart out of thy mouth; but thou shalt meditate therein day and night, that thou mayest obser ve to do according to all that is written therein: for then thou shalt make thy way prosperous, and then thou shalt have good success. Your weeping days are over. Good Morning. For questions or comments contact us via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph.225-3850 or 441-2021. Good morning! PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN ABRAHAM had to leave Haran to find his Promised Land. Joseph went to Egypt against his will, but God used his journey to save his family from the famine and to save the Egyptians as well. Moses traveled with the Hebr ew slaves thr ough the Red Sea in or der to escape oppression from slavery, Naaman had to go to be healed in the River Jordan, and David traveled for years to escape Saul. Ther e is so much movement in the Bible, and it is a theme that is meant to speak to us all. W e ar e pilgrims on a jour ney follow ing the pr omptings of God. Mar y and Joseph went to Bethlehem and then to Egypt to fulfill ancient pr ophecies about the Messiah because of the danger to the Christ child. The wise men followed the star to discover the gr eat est King of all time. The shepherds left their hills to come to the town. The Lor d walked to pr each, heal, and teach to bring this peace on earth of which the angels had sung. The disciples went on missionar y journeys to spread the word. Some left because of persecution, but others went to plant chur ches, r e-visit them to encourage the congr egations and to assist them to remain strong. Many have followed in their footsteps, and brought the gospel to Spain, England, and The United States of America and to us. To undertake so many journeys for so many years, these pilgrims wer e people with a passionate message about the Kingdom of God. How are we making a difference in our generation? Are we also on the move for God? Are we willing to go wherever we are sent? Will we be as faithful as those who have gone befor e? W e are also pilgrims on a journey reaching out to others along the way. There is no time to pitch our tent as if we are able to stay. We are on a journey to spread the Good News and we are on an inner journey to find peace within. There are new levels of understanding, new depths of revelation, new experiences of God’ s pr esence waiting for us in our own private lives, even as we jour ney wher e we ar e sent. Life is one long journey, with so much to learn. Faith is another journey as we speak to dif ferent groups, counsel individuals and share the gospel with our visitors, who have journeyed to us. When it comes to accepting spiritual tr uths and living them out in our lives, it has been said that by far the longest jour ney is fr om the head to the hear t. Long journeys REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS There are new levels of understanding, new depths of revelation, new experiences of God’s presence waiting for us in our own private lives, even as we journey where we are sent. MEDIT ATION

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“To fear the Lord is to hate evil; I hate pride and arrogance, evil behavior and perverse speech.” PROVERBS 8:13 (N.I.V) HAVEyou ever killed someone? Did you regret it? Now, I'm not posing this question to those persons who have actually committed murder, but instead to those among us, and let's be honest, all of us, who have thought about "killing" another, for an offense done to us. There are also those among us who have been made so enraged by a person and filled with so much hate, they crossed that thin line and found themselves madly in love with the same person. Stranger things have happened. I'll admit it, 'Hi my name is Toni, and I occasionally battle with the strong forces of hate and at times find it har d to for give', inhale, exhale. But seriously, life does have it's rough patches, for example, we may go through situations where we're being harassed or taken advantage of, this can make us extremely upset and understandably so, and then there are those instances that indirectly affect us, in which a family member or friend is the victim, yet we're equally as hurt, thus it may seem as if hate is an unavoidable vice. I know hate is the opposite of love and according to God's word, love is the greatest of all things. So why hate? Well when we do, it gives us a peculiar sense of euphoria and almost always brings some pretty nasty results with it, it is however often derived fr om pathetic characteristics such as pride. One simple step we can take to do away with hate is; to get over ourselves. Thinking more of others, and doing more for those in need will give us that much needed holiday from self. But where does hate originate? Can i t at all times be found in our hearts? After all, we are imperfect creatures; or, does hate come from hurt, and hurt come from insecurity, and this insecurity come from not having formed a loving, secure relationship with our father God? I'll bet the latter is more likely, and this being the case should bring about great relief to both the young and the old. God is indeed greater than hate and you need only find refuge in his word, which will then, become like an extinguisher for the uncontrollable blaze that is hate. As believers, we ought to remain sober in all that we think, speak and do, after all, we don't possess a VIP card, excluding us from life's trials. That being said, we do however understand right fr om wr ong as written in God's word and should strive to no longer think, speak, or act as secular beings. To God, all persons are VIP's, believers and non-believers, all persons have a purpose, all are imperfect, all are unique, and all ares earching. Love is the only thing we all have in common, so the next time you want to hate, why not instead, need to love. In these tough economic and social times, we can no longer afford to indulge in what we want, but rather only what we need. "And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love." 1 Corinthians 13:13 (N.I.V ing may God's blessings continuously pour down on your life. Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian writer and poet, currently residing in Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to the article can be sent to fearless247@gmail.com. In lieu of hate FEARLESS TONI STYLES The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, April 2, 2009 PG 29 What is Cursillo? Cursillo is a movement of the chur ch. Its purpose is to help those in the chur ch understand their individual callings to be Christian Leaders. The leadership may be exercised in work situations, in the family and social life, in leisure activities, and within the Church environment. Leadership, in Cursillo, does not mean power over others, but influence on oth ers; all of us need to be awar e that we can exer t a positive influence on those around us. What is the Goal of Cursillo? The goal of Cursillo is the goal of the Church: to bring all to Christ. This is done when infor med, trained leaders set out with the suppor t of others having a similar commitment. What does Cursillo do? It helps to renew and deepen Christian commitment. Cursillo is one of many renewal movements. Many people have said Cursillo pr ovides an impor tant lear ning experience which causes many to feel like newly made Christians with a purpose and with support. What is the Cursillo Movement About? Cursillo is patterned on Jesus' own example. He sear ched out and called a small gr oup of potential leaders (pr eCursillo); He trained them by wor d and example and inspired them with a vision (Cursillo Three-Day Weekend); He linked them together and sent them out into the world to bring the world to Him (post-Cursillo or the Four th Day). Pr e-Cursillo During this period, sponsors (i.e. those individuals that have been to the threeday Cursillo weekend and are living the Fourth Day) identify those Episcopalians who are leading an active Christian life and ar e a living witness to their love for Christ, r ecommending their candidacy . It is also the period that selected candidates are informed of what to expect at the thr ee-day weekend and assisted in appropriate preparations. The Thr ee-Day Weekend The Cursillo weekend brings together a diverse group of Episcopalians to share the richness of many modes of worship and to broaden each one's appreciation for our Church. Lay people conduct the weekend with two or thr ee members of the cler gy functioning as spiritual advisors. Cursillo presumes that those who attend are already well grounded in the faith. It is not intended to be a conver sion experience but an enriching and deepening of what is alr eady ther e. It often pr ovides new insights into our faith as well as fostering ministr y among lay people. The weekend begins Thursday evening which is spent in the Chapel with meditations, discussions, and Compline. Then blessed silence is kept until after the worship on Friday mor n ing. After br eakfast par ticipants ar e assigned to table gr oups for the week end. The three days are filled with talks and group discussions with emphasis on the doctrine of Grace, the Sacraments, and the great Cursillo tripod: Piety, Study, and Action. Plus there is fellowship, singing, good food, and time for privacy , meditation, prayer , and walks. Eucharist is celebrated each day . Post-Cursillo or Fourth Day The Cursillo weekend is not an end to itself. It is a starting point that lasts the rest of your life. It is a springboard to a long-range practice of the Baptismal Covenant in the life of the Church called the Four th Day . The Four th Day is composed of three major elements: The Gr oup Reunion The heart of Cursillo, is a small group of friends (usually 3-5 ly, and who hold each other accountable for their spiritual journey. They report on their piety, their study, and their apostolic action. A bonding develops that institutes a str ong support group for life. The Ultr eya Usually held monthly , it is a "r eunion of the r eunions". It pr ovides suppor t and builds community by allowing the sharing of communal experiences. Spiritual Direction Is an important element of the Cursillo Movement. It is a commitment to seek out skilled lay persons or cleric for spiritual dir ection to pr ovide help in deepening their union with Christ. Are there Cursillo Secrets? You may have been told by some who have attended the weekend that they cannot tell you what Cursillo is all about or what goes on during a Cursillo weekend. This is not cor r ect. Ever ything that goes on during the weekend may be told to anyone. Cursillo literatur e is available to anyone who wishes to read or purchase the materials. There will be an Ultreya on April 24 at St Matthews Anglican Church begining at 7pm The Anglican Diocesan Renewal Program Make a Friend, Be a Friend, Bring a Friend to Christ! All about Cursillo

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The Tribune P G 30 Thursday, April 2, 2009 RELIGION n V A TICAN CITY THE long tradition of Vatican patr onage of the arts has given rise to such monuments to Christianity as St. Peter’s Basilica and Renaissance masterpieces including the Sistine Chapel, accor ding to the Associated Pr ess . Under Pope Benedict XVI, the Holy See is seeking to revive its cultural r ole, with plans to mount its own pavilion at the 2011 Venice Bienniale, the premiere international contemporar y ar t festival, and star t a “dialogue” with contemporar y ar tists that hasn’ t existed for decades. e ar e r eminded of the ur gent need for a renewed dialogue between aesthetics and ethics, between beauty, tr uth and goodness not only by con temporary cultural and artistic debate, but also by daily reality,” said Pope Benedict XVI, in a November message to pontifical academies. Monsignor Gianfranco Ravasi, who heads the Pontifical Council for Culture, said the aim is to re-establish links with the contemporary art world for the benefit of both ar t and faith. “The great religious symbols, the great stories and the great figures of spirituality these can stimulate an ar t that mor e and more often lacks any message” or is blasphemous, Ravasi said in a recent interview. Ravasi also hopes to inspire art that is appr opriate for the many moder n chur ches built in r ecent decades by such noted ar chitects as Renzo Piano and Richard Meier. “So far, modern architecture has had very good results in dialogue with the liturgy,” he said. “But inside these churches, there isn’t a dialogue with contemporary artists. There is only folk ar t.” The V enice Bienniale has featured the world’s greatest artists who exhibit in “pavilions” that are erected by individual nations. In 1920, Cezanne, Matisse and V an Gogh were on display; the 1948 edition featured Dali, Ernst, Kandinsky and Mir o; 1977 saw Rauschenber g, Mondrian, de Chirico and Picasso. In the 1990s, Damien Hirst’s formaldehyde-encased cow made an appear ance. And more recently, Cy Twombly, Richard Serra and Joseph Beuys exhibited works. Yet, the Vatican’s decision to participate in the event is unusual, in par t because the once-ever y-twoyears ar t fair has incur red the wrath of church authorities for work that r eligious leaders consider ed a sacri lege. In the Bienniale’s very first edition, in 1895, the Patriarch of Venice, who later became Pope Pius X, asked the mayor of Venice to ban the exhibit’s most talked-about work, Giacomo Gr osso’ s “Supreme Meeting.” The work featur ed a coffin representing the demise of Don Juan surrounded by naked women. Religious leaders feared it would offend the morals of visitors. The mayor refused to take it down, and the picture went on to win a popular prize at the exhibition’ s end. Mor e recently, church officials complained about the 1990 edition, when the American artists’ collective Gran Fury, a branch of the gay activist gr oup ACT UP , showed “Pope Piece,” an image of John Paul II and an image of a penis. It was meant as a critique of the pontif f s opposition to condoms as a way to fight AIDS. And in 2001, Italian ar tist Maurizio Cattelan exhibited his scandalous “La Nona Ora,” or “The Ninth Hour” a life-size figur e of John Paul being crushed by a black meteorite. Ravasi said there’s a risk that the V atican’ s entr e into the moder n ar t scene could be viewed mer ely as a sacred counterpoint to profane displays. T o avoid that risk, Ravasi said he plans to mount the Vatican pavilion away from the main exhibition spaces. Modern art is sacred for Pope Benedict XVI IN THIS June 8, 2001 file photo, La Nona Ora (The Ninth Hour is seen on display at the Padiglione delle Tese as part of Venice's 49th Biennale arts exhibition. F r a n c e s c o P r o i e t t i / A P P h o t o religion BRIEFS By The Associated Press DETROIT ARCHBISHOP VISITS LANDMARK MICHIGAN MOSQUE n DEARBORN,Mich. THEnew Roman Catholic archbishop of Detroit has visited one of the nation’s largest mosques, part of a continuing outreach to Muslims and other faith groups. Archbishop Allen Vigneron met with Muslim leaders at the Islamic Center of America in Dearborn, which boasts a large Muslim population. “So many of us here today are bound by the word of God, and we look to Abraham as one of our fathers in faith,” Vigneron said. “I am almost overwhelmed by your words of welcome and warmth.” Vigneron’s trip to the mosque is at least the third by an Archbishop of Detroit. Cardinal Adam Maida, who has since retired, visited in a show of goodwill after the ter rorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. V igner on, formerly bishop of the Diocese of Oakland, became leader of 1.4 million southeaster n Michigan Catholics in January. SC AND AL -SC ARRED MEGACHURCH P AS TOR DIES AFTER CANCER BATTLE n ATLANTA A FORMER megachurch leader who rose to fame with a progressive evangelical ministry only to have it crumble after a series of sex scandals will be honor ed in the chur ch he helped build in suburban Atlanta. Archbishop Earl Paulk of the Cathedral of the Holy Spirit at Chapel Hill Har vester Chur ch died Sunday, March 29, after a battle with cancer. He was 81. For years the church was at the forefront of many social movements admitting black members in the 1960s, ordaining women and opening its doors to gays. But Paulk was dogged for decades by scandal. The most shocking r evelation came in October 2007 when a courtor der ed pater nity test showed he was the biological father of his brother’s son, D.E. Paulk, who had become head pastor of the church after the archbishop retired the previous year. Earl Paulk had sworn in an affidavit he’d never had sex with anyone but his wife, which led to him plead ing guilty to a felony charge of lying under oath. He was placed on 10 years’ pr obation and assessed a $1,000 fine.

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Abaya. An Abaya is a gar ment which covers a women fr om head to toe, or sometimes hangs from her shoulders, and is often accompanied by a veil, scar f, or gloves. She said the Islamic women who may go as far as covering their faces and hands, are considered more extreme, and adds that she only goes as far as wearing the Abaya. Mrs Boyer said at the age of 23 she mar ried a local Muslim and since then has resided in the Bahamas. She said that while many people tend to be under the impr ession that Muslim women are treated like servants to their husbands following their ever y wish, this myth is far from the way she lives her life as an Islamic wife. She said the Qur ’an which is in many ways similar to the Bible, acts as a life compass guiding her and her husband in the way they daily interact with one another. Mrs Boyer stated: “If my husband said to do something that goes against the teachings of the Qur’an, does that mean that I would do it -no.” She explained that if his requests are in line with the Qur’an, which could involve her cooking for their child or taking care of the home, and even showing respect for him, she would follow thr ough with it because for her to go against him would be like her going against the teachings of Mohammad and essentially Allah. Outside of her marriage, Mrs Boyer said over the last few years, acceptance of Muslims by Bahamians and Americans has changed for the worse. Referring to the bombing of the W orld T rade Centr e which was believed to have been or chestrated by extr emists from the Islamic community, Mrs Boyer said if ther e exist a small gr oup of people who have drifted from the teachings of Mohammad and the laws of the Qur ’an, it is unfair for all other Muslims to be judged or stereotyped for their error. She said the killing of innocent people is wr ong accor ding to the Muslim way , and added that education and awar eness of the Muslim way of life is pr obably the only way of reducing the unpopular view on Islam held by those who ar e not familiar with it. The Tribune Thursday, April 2, 2009 PG 31 RELIGION I N 1883, Bahamian Methodists were concerned about the proposal from the W esleyan Methodist Society of England to place the Bahamas in the West IndiesD istrict. Letters of protest were sent from Abaco and Harbour Island in late April of that year. The letter for Harbour Island was as follows: e the undersigned office bearers of the Wesley Methodist Church in the island of Harbour Island, Bahamas d esire to call your attention to a matter of deepest interest in the connection with the future welfare of the church in which we belong. We have heard through report of a proposal to erect the West Indies into a separate conference, of one which the Bahamas shall form a part. It is our fir m conviction that you would not force us against our better feeling and judgment a connection to which we are opposed and which is most undesirable to us from whatever standpoint we may be viewed. On the one hand by our geographical position as also by our commercial relations, we ar e cut of f fr om dir ect commu nication with those islands proposed to be erected into separate conferences. While on the other hand we have frequent communication with England by steamers running direct between Nassauand London and also by others under contract to carry our mails between New York and Nassau. We are of the opinion that for the pr oper continuance of our r elation with any conference or association if we are to retain our present advantages, we should have communication of a stated and regular and also of a tolerable frequency. It is we think essentially necessary for the continuance of Methodism, not to say of its progress and extension in this colony, which we most deeply and anxiously desire to promote and extend, thata supply of which we have hitherto had no want of able, faithful and acceptable ministers still continue to be furnished us. We could not, in consistence with reason expect this to continue if the Bahamas wer e to form a part of an independent West Indies Conference. We should look forward with discouragement to any time when our congregations here should cease to enjoy the advantages they have so long enjoyed ofa ministry trained and educated in England. We should here state that we have nothing in common with the West Indies. Our population and their habits of life are so different that we have no desire of being annexed to these, or of being dependent upon them for our supply of ministers, while our infrequent communication with those islands bar us fr om a voice in the gover nment under such an alter ed state of things and would her e r ecord the fact that Methodism has here amongst its members and supporters m ost of the intelligent, wealthy and influential residents, presenting, and weh ave reason to believe, a marked difference to Methodists from the West Indies. We therefore require here a well trained and educated ministry for the satisfactory performance of the duties relating to the pastoral and the pulpit. The committee of our present connect ion with the missionary societies and yourselves is by far more preferable to us and we do sincerely trust that it will not be severed by you to the detriment of Methodism in the Bahamas. On financial grounds we feel assured that there can be no objection raised to our continued connection with the Missionary Society . By determined effort, we hope to be able to make this Circuit which is now almost self sustaining fully so. And at the same time we are putting forth effort to contribute as largely as we can to the “DISTRICT SUSTENTATIVE FUND”, which was set afoot last year and which pr omises to be attended with success. The sum raised last year throughout the district toward the said fund and the determined effort to be put for this year to augment that sum will amount to or and its yearly increase by interest and further donations will enable us in the none to distant period, when as a district we shall be able to bear the burden of chur ch sustenance without aid in a pecuniary form from the Missionary Society, thus relieving it of further e xpenditure of its funds upon the “BAHAMA DISTRICT”. B eing convinced as we are, and believing as we do, that we are in a position toj udge fairly and correctly that the connection of this district to the West Indies Conference will prove to be most unfortunate to the best interests and welfare of the Church and will only tend to weaken and reduce it, if it does not entirely suppress it in this colony, W e are dear Sirs your faithful brethren, William Cash, Thomas H Johnson, James W Roberts, Vincent Higgs, D W Johnson, C T Cash, Theophilus Harris, Thomas M Johnson, William J Albury, Winer Bethel, Henry Johnson, William E Higgs, Richard Fisher, Samuel Higgs, Jacob Tynes,W illiam A Albury, Theophilus G Higgs, Richard C Roberts, Joseph Higgs, Joseph Dyer Apparently the protests were successful and the Bahamas remained a part of the British Methodist Mission until 1968 when the Synod of the Bahamas District of Methodist Churches voted to join the autonomous Methodist Chur ch in the Caribbean and the Americas. An Act of The Bahamian Parliament in 1993 gave self government and autonomy to The Bahamas District of Methodist Churches which now comprises of 34 churches. 13 Bahamian churches and 3 churches in the Turks and Caicos Islands remained with Methodist Church in the Caribbean and the Americas. (Next time: Part 24 Difficulties of the Anglican Mission 1886 1900) Bahamian Methodists protest JIM LAWLOR THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS Life of a Muslim woman FROM page 27 PART 23

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The Tribune P G 32 Thursday, April 2, 2009 RELIGION BAHAMASChristian Fellowship Centre will be hosting a national crusade called “Divine Encounter2 009” on Thursday, April 2nd at 7.30 pm and Friday April 3 noon and 7:30 pm at the church’s auditorium located on Carmichael Road. The guest speaker will be Apostle Charles Ndifon from Nigeria, Africa who is known around the world for his “Adventures in Miracles” crusades and telecasts in many countries. In a recent release Crusade host Apostle Paul Butler said: “Our country is going througha difficult time,and people need to experience the reality of Christ’s love and his power He further admonished sick people who ar e confined to the use of wheel chairs, cr utches, walkers, canes, or any other apparatus to come and experi ence the miracle power of Godat work. Apostle Charles accepted Jesus Christ while studying Engineering at the University of Nigeria. He is the senior pastor of Christ Love Ministries International along with his wife Donna Lynn Ndifon, and they have been ministering the gospel of Jesus Christ for over twenty years in more than 30 nations around the globe. His ministry has had tremendous impact in the lives of millions of people all over the world through the preaching, teaching and demonstration of God’s saving, healing and delivering power of Jesus Christ. Admission is free. Divine Encounter 2009 I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s n By ARTHIA NIXON THERE is a place for hip-opera after all in the music industry and by the sounds of the show-stopping, energised, octave-busting, soul-stirring live performance of Manifest and Joann Callender at the Marlin A war ds last Sunday, the new genre has officially crowned it’s Bahamian king and queen. I Shall Rise ,the unique duet has won two awar ds one for Hip Hop Collaboration of the Year and the other for Hip Hop Recording of The Year. Manifest, the prolific producer and founder of the Dunamus Soundz Recor d Label was nominated in 6 cate gories this year. At the last gathering, he led the pack with the most nominations at 11. Joann Callender is the wife of Lee Callender, grandson of Bahamas National Anthem composer Timothy Gibson. Recognised as the Bahamian pioneer in her genre, she has performed to sold out opera houses ar ound the world accompanied by Lee, a respected piano virtuoso who helped Manifest cr eate the unique vocal concoction that pr oved to be a smash hit at the awards. “I am so blessed and grateful for this opportunity to work with one of our living legends,” says Manifest. “I’ve won Marlin Awards before but this one feels special because of all the work we put into it. I still am amazed that it went fr om an idea floating around in my head to sitting with Joann and Lee and experiencing their talents first-hand and then onto a CD, then to perform it in front of our musical colleagues. es, we are different genres but I know we were boxed in different classifications of music but I’m pr oud to know that we worked together instead of overlooking each other. Bahamians tend to not suppor t each other s music and this is a testament of how you can enhance each other. This song has hit stations all over the region and it’s like netting two birds because the hip hoppers won’ t pick up JoAnn Callender and the opera listeners won’t put on Manifest. Overall, I know that the pr oject is much big ger than us and I am just happy to know that we are living the lyrics of the song -we did rise, we did over come, no matter what they thought of us.” Hip-Hopera duet earns Manifest and Joann Callender two MARLINS Manifest Joann Callender


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INGEST IEID ENPOZCSGM_WPN9V2 INGEST_TIME 2012-01-27T18:27:58Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01281
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES