Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

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Volume: 105 No.107

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TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009
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SEE WOMAN SECTION

weakne

Minister admits
system vulnerable
to child abuse

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BAHAMAS BIGGEST



Caribbean
community
is ready to
discuss trade
agreement
with Canada

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

LESS than six months
after the Caribbean Com-
munity signed onto a con-
troversial trade agree-
ment with the European
Union, regional leaders
have indicated they are
ready to discuss creating
a similar agreement with
Canada.

According to the Asso-
ciated Press, the issue will
be discussed on the side-
lines of the April 17 Sum-
mit of the Americas, in
Trinidad.

Yesterday Deputy
Prime Minister and Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs

m@ By ALISON police, revamp the role Brent Symonette said
LOWE of school guidance CARICOM had previ-
Tribune Staff counsellors — who will ously agreed to begin dis-
Reporter be trained in “coun- cussions on a proposed
alowe@ selling psycho-therapy” economic partnership

tribunemedia.net

TWO sex scandals
involving teachers
who are alleged to
have preyed on stu-
dents at a Grand
Bahama high school
have exposed sys-
temic weaknesses
that made it easier
for potential predators to take
advantage of children, the Min-
ister of Education has admit-
ted.

According to Carl Bethel, the
Ministry of Education has now
taken “extraordinary measures”
to deal with the repercussions of
allegations made against certain
teachers at the Eight Mile Rock
High School and to reduce the
likelihood of children at any
government-run school being
molested in the future.

The Ministry plans to have
all new teachers vetted by

ener



— and institute “stu-
dent safety commit-
tees” comprising par-
ents, teachers, adminis-
trators and students.

Mr Bethel’s com-
ments came in a press
conference called to
respond to allegations
from PLP Chairman
Glenys Hanna Martin
that he has remained “callously
and inexcusably” silent on the
situation at Eight Mile Rock
High School and failed to keep
concerned parents apprised of
what steps are being taken by
the Ministry in the wake of
shocking allegations of miscon-
duct by some teachers at the
school.

Mrs Hanna Martin accused
Mr Bethel on Sunday of being
in “gross default” of his duty as
Minister in relation to the “dis-

SEE page 12

The Taste

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Value of loans in arrears

expanded by 228 per cent

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE value of loans in arrears
for 30 days or more expanded
by 228 per cent in the last quar-
ter of 2008, the Central Bank
revealed yesterday.

Evidencing the worsening
impact of the economic down-
turn on the ability of mortgage
holders to meet their financial
obligations, the bank’s Quar-
terly Economic Review for the
period ending December 2008
said the value of loans in arrears
for this length of time swelled
by $143.5 million to $771.8 mil-
lion.

This equated to an elevated
arrears rate of 12.5 per cent vis-
a-vis a 9.4 per cent rate during
the corresponding period in
2007 and a 10.5 per cent rate at
the end of the last quarterly
period in September 2008.

Among these loans, commer-
cial loans showed the “most
marked weakening” — reach-

ing an arrears rate of 15.5 per
cent at the end of December
2008, from 13.6 per cent in Sep-
tember of that year, and 9.3 per
cent in December 2007.

Consumer loans, meanwhile,
registered a 1.7 per cent arrears
rate increase over the previous
quarter, and a 2.5 per cent rise
since the same period in 2007.

“Non performing loans, those
in arrears for over 90 days and
on which banks no longer
accrue interest rose to 5.96 per
cent of total claims at end
December, from 5.51 per cent at
end September, and 4.4 per cent
at December 2007.

“Tn line with rising credit risks
the banking system’s loan loss
provisions expanded to $2.74 of
total loans from 2.57 per cent
in September and 2.11 per cent
in December 2007. However
the corresponding ratio of pro-
visions to the total non-per-
forming loans ratio was lower
at 45.98 per cent from 46.65 per

SEE page 12

ed otto eM cco) 0) a
A SSHMcd AON ar UIMe) Om O11 010)
charged with murder.

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff

Reporter



A 32-YEAR-OLD
man charged in a
shooting on Arawak
Cay that claimed the
life a local taxi driver
was arraigned in a
Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday on a murder
charge.

Police have charged
Perez Ellis of Mount
Pleasant Village in the
March 9 murder of
Gentry McPhee.

McPhee, 30, of
Carmichael Road, was
shot shortly after mid-
night on March 9, while
in The Big Yard night-
club on Arawak Cay.
McPhee, the nephew of
Rev Philip McPhee
received serious
injuries to his abdomen
and hands. He was
rushed to Princess Mar-
garet Hospital by
ambulance where he
died shortly after
arrival. McPhee was

SEE page 12



























Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

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agreement (EPA) with
Canada once the region
had wrapped up negoti-
ations with the EU.
While negotiations
have not begun between
CARICOM and Canada,
Mr Symonette expects
the nuts and bolts of the
proposed agreement to
be comparable to the

SEE page 12



Changes to
affect appeals
to Privy Council

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

PROCEDURAL changes,
which will ultimately affect the
way appeals to the Privy Council
are filed, will come into effect
next month it was stated yester-
day.

During his remarks at the
opening ceremony marking the
Privy Council’s third working
visit, Lord Philips of Worth
Matravers noted that some pro-
cedural changes will be intro-
duced under the new Privy
Council rules.

“In the Privy Council it will
be business as usual. There will
be no change in the jurisdiction
of the court or in the way in
which it conducts its hearings.
We are, however, introducing
some procedural changes under
the new Privy Council rules

SEE page 12





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



SOME ANGRY HARBOUR ISLAND RESIDENTS ACCUSE ALVIN SMITH OF “LACK OF REPRESENTATION’

Shape up or ship out, MP told

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SOME residents of Harbour
Island are fuming over what
they call the “lack of repre-
sentation" by MP for the area
Alvin Smith.

They say they are prepared








to vote him out of office in the
next general election if he
"doesn't shape up".

In response, Mr Smith — who
is also the Speaker of the
House — told The Tribune he
spends a lot of time in his con-
stituency.

He added that during his
three terms as MP for North

Eleuthera, he has consistently
lobbied successive govern-
ments to upgrade infrastruc-
ture on the islands he repre-
sents.

He also said he is planning a
series of town meetings where
constituents can air their con-
cerns,

Residents said their fury

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came to a head at a meeting in
Lower Bogue on Friday —
which Mr Smith did not
attend.

Free National Movement
chairman Johnley Ferguson
showed up instead, and was
reportedly peppered with com-
plaints by about 40 residents
of North Eleuthera.

According to an entrepre-
neur on Harbour Island, who
asked that his name be with-
held, the meeting was organ-
ised by local government offi-
cials to let Mr Smith know how
his supporters feel.

Residents are calling for:

¢ a youth officer to be per-
manently stationed on Har-
bour Island to organise activi-
ties for the young

¢ work to be carried out on
the island’s shoddy roads

¢ an island-wide clean-up

¢ the expansion of the
island's main dock, which they
say the community has out-
grown

Upset

They are also upset that Mr
Smith has not organised for
more Cabinet ministers to tour
North Eleuthera and see the
problems first hand.

"Everybody is disappointed
in Alvin Smith's performance.
People complain about things
on the island, but we don't
have anyone to complain to -—
we're dying for him to have a
public meeting on Harbour
Island. There are a lot of con-
cerns in North Eleuthera,
especially Harbour Island; we
have local government here
but that's not working," the
Harbour Island resident said.

"If Alvin Smith runs again
then definitely the FNM will
lose this seat and this is an
FNM stronghold," he added.

When contacted for com-
ment yesterday, Mr Smith said
as far as he knew the meeting
in question was held so that

ADELAIDE TRAGEDY

FNM chairman Johnley Fer-
guson could speak with North
Eleuthera constituents.

He said he was told the
meeting went well, despite a
few concerns being raised.

And despite what his critics
say, Mr Smith maintained that
he is in constant contact with
local government and fre-
quently visits his constituency,
which includes Spanish Wells,
Harbour Island, James Cistern,
and Current Island.

"T visit my constituency I
would say more than any Fam-
ily Island MP, except those
that live in their constituen-
cy," he said.

"But we're going to have a
series of town mectings
throughout the constituency



“I visit my
constituency I
would say
more than any
Family Island
MP, except
those that live
in their con-
stituency. But
we're going to
have a series of
town meetings
throughout the
constituency to
hear what the
people have to
say.”



Alvin Smith

to hear what the people have
to say. I'm meeting with vari-
ous local government town
councils — last week Tuesday I
met with North Eleuthera dis-
trict council and also with the
Harbour Island district coun-
cil.”

He said he hopes to meet
with the other councils in his
constituency soon.

Mr Smith said government
has committed to paving the
roads on James Cistern, Cur-
rent Island and Harbour
Island; is open to “serious dis-
cussions” about building an
alternative dock on Harbour
Island; and has completed sig-
nificant repairs to the Glass
Window Bridge on mainland
Eleuthera.

Huge support for families
of two boys who drowned

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

SUPPORT poured in for the
families of the two boys who
drowned off the coast of Ade-
laide as their mothers were
interviewed by Ortland Bodie
on More 94 FM yesterday
morning.

Callers pledged donations to
help the mothers cover the costs
of the funerals upon hearing
them talk about the tragedy of

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their sons’ deaths. As more and
more listeners offered to make
donations, many reaching
beyond their means, others took
even greater strides to support
the family.

Suits

One caller said they would
buy new suits for the boys to
be buried in, and the director
of a funeral home, the name of
which was not revealed, called
to say they would hold the
funerals free of charge.

The children’s lifeless bodies
were pulled from the waters off
Adelaide Beach on Monday,
March 23, after they were
reported missing the previous

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day. Rovan Smith, 9, and Craig
Stubbs, 10, had taken a small
blue skiff, which reportedly had
been drawn from the bushes to
the beach the night before the
boys took it out to sea.

The skiff had a hole in it, and
the boys are thought to have
drowned in the rough tide that
carried them out into the cur-
rent.

A search party of around 20
of the families’ friends and
neighbours scoured the shallow
waters off Adelaide beach look-
ing for the boys on Monday last
week with support from a US
Coast Guard helicopter, the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force
and from volunteers in their
boats.

Rovan’s body was brought to
shore by the neighbourhood
search party at around llam,
and Craig was found by RBDF
officers about a quarter of a
mile out to sea at around
2.30pm.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 3

._- | CENTRAL BANK OF BAHAMAS FIGURES
0 In brief

Struggling consumers
hit even harder in
pocket during 2008

But prices dipped slightly towards end of year

PLP MP
accuses Grant
of blocking
construction
of community
centres



Alfred Gray

PLP MP Alfred Gray
accused Minister of Works
Neko Grant of preventing
the construction of commu-
nity centres on the five
islands that constitute the
MICAL constituency.

The MP, who made the
statement during the after-
noon session of the House of
Assembly yesterday, said
that he pledged months ago
“under the authority of the
prime minister” that he
would begin several commu-
nity centres in the various
islands of his southern con-
stituency with his annual
constituency allowance of
$100,000.

The allowance, he said,
would launch the construc-
tion of these centres and
through “self-help” the resi-
dents of the islands would
complete the buildings.

However, Mr Gray said
the minister of works has
“apparently unilaterally”
decided that the $100,000
would not be dispersed
unless it can be proven that
the money will be enough to
complete the projects.

“Most and if not all of
those islands are without a
community centre and it was
intended to put $100,000 in
each one and let the island
people complete it from
whatever stage the $100,000
took.

Self-help

“In each of those islands
(Mayaguana, Inagua,
Crooked Island, Acklins and
Long Cay) that’s how they
developed; through self-help,
because governments tend to
do very little for them any-
way,” Mr Gray said.

The MP said that he
would not allow Mr Grant to
prevent construction of the
centres without explaining to
the islanders the reason for
his decision.

“T know that $100,000 may
not complete the community
centre but the people are
willing to contribute to the
completion of the buildings,”
he said.

Mr Grant responded that
his ministry’s job is to ensure
that public funds are proper-
ly spent.

He added that Mr Gray
was not correct in his asser-
tions.

“T find it regrettable that
the member has misled this
House and I shall return in
due course with the proper
information to be laid in the
House,” Mr Grant said.




@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AFTER rising throughout
last year, prices declined
slightly towards the end of
2008 but were still much high-
er than in 2007 — particularly
in terms of education and
food.

New Central Bank of the
Bahamas figures show that
many individuals struggling in
the face of job losses and
reductions in their working
hours will have had an even
harder time purchasing nec-
essary goods than in 2007.

Overall in 2008, consumer
price inflation “accelerated”
to 4.5 per cent from 2.5 per
cent in 2007.

“With the easing of exter-
nal price pressures of the sec-
ond half of the year, inflation
trended lower during the
fourth quarter but remained
sharply elevated on an annual
basis,” said the bank’s Quar-
terly Economic Review for the
three month period ending
December 2008.

“The quarterly rise in the
average retail price index
moderated sharply to 0.2 per
cent from a 0.8 per cent run up
in the same period in 2007,” it



“The quarterly
rise in the average
retail price index
moderated sharply
to 0.2 per cent from
a 0.8 per cent run
up in the same

period in 2007.”



said, adding: “Given the
downtrend in energy costs, the
housing component — the most
heavily weighted item in the
index — declined by 0.7 per
cent after an increase of 0.3
per cent in 2007.”

Declines

In the last three months of
2008, average price declines
were also recorded in trans-
portation and communication
(1.1 per cent) and recreation
and entertainment services (1
per cent), as well as in clothing
and footwear (0.4 per cent)
and medical care and health
(0.5 per cent).

“Conversely, higher aver-
age price gains were registered
for food and beverages (2.2

per cent) and education (3.4
per cent),” said the review.

According to the bank, for
2008 overall, there was a 3.5
per cent rise in average house
costs, compared to a 0.5 per
cent rise in 2007, while the
rate at which the price of food
and beverages rose almost
doubled to 6.7 per cent.

The report added that aver-
age costs for ‘other’ goods and
services also rose for 2008
overall, growing at a “signifi-
cantly increased pace of 7.5
per cent and incrementally
higher price increases were
recorded for furniture and
household operations (6.8 per
cent) medical care and health
(5 per cent), education (2.6
per cent) and clothing and
footwear (1.5 per cent).”

Meanwhile, the cost of
diesel and gasoline declined
in the last quarter of 2008 as
the international price of
crude oil fell.

“Similarly the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation’s aver-
age energy fuel surcharge was
lowered over the quarter by
21.9 per cent to 18.06 cents
per kilowatt hour (kWH)
although still exceeding the
corresponding 2007 average
of 13.27 cents per kWh,” the
review said.

Turnquest tables regulations
on unemployment benefit plan

ACTING as Minister of
Finance in the absence of the
prime minister, Tommy Turn-
quest tabled three sets of reg-
ulations pertaining to the
details of the government’s
unemployment benefit plan in
the House of Assembly yes-
terday afternoon.

The three documents speci-
fy, respectively, the benefit
and assistance details, the
financial and accounting con-
siderations, and the specifica-
tions and conditions of the
plan.

As previously reported, out-
of-work Bahamians who qual-
ify for benefits under the tem-
porary unemployment plan
can expect to receive financial
assistance for a period of 13
weeks a year.

To be entitled to receive
benefits, a person has to be
younger than 65 and to have
paid NIB contributions for at

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The weekly amount to be
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per cent of each person’s aver-
age weekly insurable wage or
income before they became
unemployed.

Unemployment benefits will
be paid for each day of the
week except Sundays.

A person will be disquali-
fied from receiving benefits if
he or she:

¢ refuses suitable employ-
ment;

¢ fails to apply for suitable
employment where there is a
known vacancy;

¢ neglects to avail them-
selves of an opportunity for
suitable employment;

¢ makes no reasonable
effort to obtain suitable
employment.

A person also will be dis-
qualified if they were termi-
nated from their work place
as a result of theft, fraud, or
some other form of dishon-
esty.



Memorial service
for Peter Knowles

A memorial ser-
vice will be held for
Peter Nicholas
Knowles Jr on Sun-
day, April 5, at 3pm
at the New Provi-
dence Community
Centre.

Described as a
loving husband, sup-
portive father, dot-
ing son, nurturing
brother and a friend
to all, Peter died on
Thursday, March 26,
when his scooter col-
lided with a dump
truck at the junction
of Prospect Ridge
and John F Kennedy Drive.

The 32-year-old led a spiritually fulfilling and family-ori-
ented life.

He was able to establish a well-known business, a strong
family that includes a wife and three children, and a deep-
rooted friendship with and respect for God, said a family
member.

“He fulfilled all of his goals in such a short time here on
Earth.

“He was able to touch many people and will continue to
help us and serve God for all eternity.

“We are thankful and grateful to have been blessed with his
presence.

“The family appreciates all of the condolences, love and
respect of those who are aware of Peter's passing. He will be
dearly missed and grieved by all,” a statement from his fam-
ily read.

The family asked that those attending the service dress in
red, green, yellow, or white.

DEARLY MISSED: Peter Knowles



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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

America’s leadership role damaged

TEN years ago the cover of Time magazine
featured Robert Rubin, then Treasury secre-
tary, Alan Greenspan, then chairman of the
Federal Reserve, and Lawrence Summers, then
deputy Treasury secretary. Time dubbed the
three “the committee to save the world,” cred-
iting them with leading the global financial sys-
tem through a crisis that seemed terrifying at the
time, although it was a small blip compared
with what we’re going through now.

All the men on that cover were Americans,
but nobody considered that odd. After all, in
1999 the United States was the unquestioned
leader of the global crisis response. That lead-
ership role was only partly based on American
wealth; it also, to an important degree, reflect-
ed America’s stature as a role model. The Unit-
ed States, everyone thought, was the country
that knew how to do finance right.

How times have changed.

Never mind the fact that two members of the
committee have since succumbed to the maga-
zine cover curse, the plunge in reputation that so
often follows lionization in the media. (Sum-
mers, now the head of the National Economic
Council, is still going strong). Far more impor-
tant is the extent to which our claims of financial
soundness — claims often invoked as we lec-
tured other countries on the need to change
their ways — have proved hollow.

Indeed, these days America is looking like the
Bernie Madoff of economies: for many years it
was held in respect, even awe, but it turns out to
have been a fraud all along.

It’s painful now to read a lecture that Sum-
mers gave in early 2000, as the economic crisis
of the 1990s was winding down. Discussing the
causes of that crisis, Summers pointed to things
that the crisis countries lacked — and that, by
implication, the United States had. These things
included “well-capitalized and supervised
banks” and reliable, transparent corporate
accounting. Oh well.

One of the analysts Summers cited in that
lecture, by the way, was the economist Simon
Johnson. In an article in the current issue of
The Atlantic, Johnson, who served as the chief
economist at the IMF and is now a professor at
MIT, declares that America’s current difficulties
are “shockingly reminiscent” of crises in places
like Russia and Argentina — including the key
role played by crony capitalists.

In America as in the third world, he writes,
“elite business interests — financiers, in the
case of the U.S. — played a central role in cre-
ating the crisis, making ever-larger gambles,

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with the implicit backing of the government,
until the inevitable collapse. More alarming,
they are now using their influence to prevent
precisely the sorts of reforms that are needed,
and fast, to pull the economy out of its nose-
dive.”

It’s no wonder, then, that an article in Sun-
day’s Times about the response President
Barack Obama will receive in Europe was titled
“English-Speaking Capitalism on Trial.”

Now, in fairness we have to say that the Unit-
ed States was far from being the only nation in
which banks ran wild. Many European leaders
are still in denial about the continent’s eco-
nomic and financial troubles, which arguably
run as deep as our own — although their
nations’ much stronger social safety nets mean
that we’re likely to experience far more human
suffering. Still, it’s a fact that the crisis has cost
America much of its credibility, and with it
much of its ability to lead.

And that’s a very bad thing.

Like many other economists, I’ve been revis-
iting the Great Depression, looking for lessons
that might help us avoid a repeat performance.
And one thing that stands out from the history
of the early 1930s is the extent to which the
world’s response to crisis was crippled by the
inability of the world’s major economies to
cooperate.

The details of our current crisis are very dif-
ferent, but the need for cooperation is no less.
Obama got it exactly right last week when he
declared: “All of us are going to have to take
steps in order to lift the economy. We don’t
want a situation in which some countries are
making extraordinary efforts and other coun-
tries aren’t.”

Yet that is exactly the situation we’re in. I
don’t believe that even America’s economic
efforts are adequate, but they’re far more than
most other wealthy countries have been willing
to undertake. And by rights this week’s G-20
summit ought to be an occasion for Obama to
chide and chivy European leaders, in particular,
into pulling their weight.

But these days foreign leaders are in no mood
to be lectured by American officials, even when
— as in this case — the Americans are right.

The financial crisis has had many costs. And
one of those costs is the damage to America’s
reputation, an asset we’ve lost just when we,
and the world, need it most.

(This article was written by Paul Krugman
— c.2007 New York Times News Service).



Turtle meat
eating is a
legitimate part
of our culture

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me space to
express my humble apprecia-
tion for the many, many
Bahamians of all walks of life
who called and wrote to me to
support my letter against a ban
of turtle meat from Bahamian
diets.

From Crown Haven, Abaco,
to Spanish Wells, to Lisbon
Creek, Andros, Bahamians
seem to be awakening to the
need to take responsibility for
sustainability on their own
terms, rather than having a
tainted and suspect version of
the environmental agenda
imposed on them from the out-
side.

Bahamians who both love
their environment and sense an
entitlement to enjoy its boun-
ties seem to be realising, for the
first time, that our lifestyle and
culture must not be further
delegitimised at the whim of
every and any group without
even a thought for us as part of
their equations. There has been
too much of that already.

The consumption of turtle-
meat is a healthy, traditional
and utterly legitimate aspect of
Bahamian culture. The chal-
lenge is to keep it sustainable.
So long as that is our starting
point, then there ought to be
no disagreement between peo-
ple who want to secure healthy
turtle stocks well into the future.

But alas, that is not the start-
ing point for some. And all of
the difference lies in a mere
preposition: I and people like
me want to save marine turtles
for Bahamians. Some others, by

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



their words and actions, want
to save marine turtles from
Bahamians.

That is why, just below the
surface of the supposedly ratio-
nal sustainability arguments, lies
a snarling contempt that is
ready to brush all turtle-eating
Bahamians with a stigma of cru-
elty or savagery.

We are reminded, for
instance, that we will be hosting
a miss universe event later in
the year and just how embar-
rassing it will be should our pre-
cious guests stumble upon some
Bahamian savages putting sob-
bing turtles to a horrific death at
Potter’s Cay or Montagu.

Tt is with such comments that
the objective observer is tipped
off about what this whole thing
is really about. It is not about
environmentalism; it is about
cultural prejudice and pretence
of the crassest kind. It is about a
tiny, externally-oriented mind-
set that has such little regard
for the host culture of this coun-
try that it feels that whole
chunks of it can and should be
lobbed off to spare the sensi-
bilities of the few.

While we value our guests,
thinking Bahamians will never
be embarrassed out of their cul-
ture by the supposed need to
pander to the ignorance of
those visitors who are lacking
in exposure and tolerance.

In fact, if visitors attending
this summer’s events want to

avoid the horrific sight of
Bahamians preparing their
food, they can stay in the west-
ern parts of the island, home to
several gourmet stores selling
civilized things like pate de foie
gras. Hold on a minute!....isn’t
that the stuff made in France
by force-feeding geese to the
point that their livers balloon
in a simulated response to toxic
shock?

Or maybe let them go to Par-
adise Island for the festivities
over there instead.

What will be on menu? Veal,
perhaps? Actually, as those who
eat it may know, this product is
obtained by rendering calves
anaemic (physically depriving
them of light, movement and
stimulation) and keeping them
that way right up until their
most untimely butchery.

Or maybe those with more
robust tastes will go for the
finest full-blooded steaks. If so,
and if you happen to find your-
self within earshot, please do
not mention that such rich taste
invariably involves castration
(ouch!) of the bull in question.

The silliness can go on and
on. The simple fact is that one
man’s food is another man’s
barbarity. We in The Bahamas
have no intention of storming
French goose farms or mining
Argentine abattoirs.

Likewise, nobody should
expect our taste in food to con-
form to their own, foreign sen-
sibilities.

Hands off our turtles!

ANDREW ALLEN

Nassau,
March 25, 2009.

Nicki Kelly’s apparent memory lapse

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Nicki Kelly, in her eagerness
to get back at me for relieving
her of her duties as a Tribune
columnist seven years ago, is
now trying to cast aspersions on
my integrity as an editor.

She implies that a story I
quoted from in my recent con-
troversial Insight article on Sir
Lynden Pindling was a figment
of my imagination.

“Tn his March 23 Insight piece
on Sir Lynden Pindling, Mr
Marquis referred to ‘Tribune
reporter Nicki Kelly’ and ‘Nicki
Kelly’s Tribune article’ dated
January 9, 1985,” she wrote in



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Monday’s Punch. “That is
impossible. I could not have
been writing stories for The Tri-
bune in 1985 because I quit the
paper on December 31, 1975 —
10 years earlier.”

Yet here I have before me
the January 9, 1985, copy of The
Tribune containing a sizeable
piece under Nicki Kelly’s byline
headed “1984: a traumatic year
for Bahamas.”

In it, she writes at length
about the Commission of
Inquiry into drug trafficking,
including the paragraphs from
which I quoted (accurately) in
my piece.

Frankly, I don’t care if she
were a staff journalist or a free-
lance contributor at the time —
the story is there, bold as brass,
in The Tribune, and that’s good
enough for me.

It came to The Tribune via
CANA (the Caribbean News
Agency), to which this newspa-



per subscribed at the time. In
pointing out this non-existent
discrepancy, Mrs Kelly suggests
very strongly that I was guilty of
copyright infringement and
“playing fast and loose with the
truth” — both grievous accusa-
tions which could have formed
the basis of a successful libel
action if the Bahamas had a
legal system worthy of the
name.

The truth, however, is that
she appears to be suffering from
a serious lapse of memory.

If you were only to check the
files, Nicki, and get your facts
straight, you would not run into
these problems, and save your-
self much embarrassment.

JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor,
The Tribune,
Nassau,

March 31, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 5



Diabetic woman ‘given out-of-date

Trial of men
accused of
murder of
husinessman
to resume

THE trial of three men
charged in the February
2006 murder of business-
man Keith Carey will
resume on Wednesday
after the request for an
adjournment by the pros-
ecution was granted yes-
terday.

The prosecution told
the court that it wanted to
properly consider the
defence’s case and review
the evidence.

Lead prosecutor in the
case and Deputy Director
of Public Prosecutions
Cheryl Grant-Bethel said:
“We do not want to mis-
lead the jury on the facts.”

The trial into the mur-
der of businessman Keith
Carey began on February
15 before Justice Jon
Isaacs.

Jamal Glinton, Sean
Brown and Dwight
Knowles are charged with
the murder as well as
armed robbery and con-
spiracy to commit armed
robbery.

Keith Carey, 43, was
shot and killed on the
steps of the Bank of the
Bahamas on Tonique
Williams-Darling High-
way before he was able to
deposit $40,000 that
belonged to the Esso Ser-
vice Station, which he
operated.

Ms Grant-Bethel,
Stephanie Pintard, Antho-
ny Delaney and Lennox
Coleby are prosecuting
the case. Attorneys Craig
Butler and Devard Fran-
cis are representing Jamal
Glinton, attorney Dorsey
McPhee is representing
Sean Brown and attorney
Perry Albury is represent-
ing Dwight Knowles. The
prosecution has called a
total of 41 witnesses dur-
ing the trial.

Concerned
citizen finds
a hantigun

A CONCERNED citi-
zen stumbled across a .38
handgun in a yard in
northwestern New Provi-
dence on Sunday.

Police said that some
time after 9am, they were
contacted about the dis-
covery and went to the
scene to examine the
weapon and confiscate it.

Alligator
wanders onto
porch, bites
Florida man

@ EUSTIS, Fla.

AUTHORITIES say
a small alligator
climbed through the
porch door of a house
north of Orlando and
then bit the homeown-
er’s arm when it was
forced out, according to
Associated Press.

The 2-foot-long alli-
gator wandered onto
James Gaff’s canal-
front property in Lake
County on Sunday.
Gaff tried to remove
the gator, which then
latched onto his right
forearm.

A spokeswoman for
the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Commission
says Gaff’s wife, Elaine,
pried the gator off
using a broom handle
and the couple threw
the reptile into the
water behind their
home.

The 52-year-old Gaft
was treated at a hospi-
tal for minor cuts and
scrapes.

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m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A DIABETIC woman who was given
out-of-date insulin at a government phar-
macy has hit out at health authorities for
not admitting their mistake.

The Ministry of Health and Depart-
ment of Public Health issued a public
statement claiming expired medication is
not being distributed to patients at the
Elizabeth Estates Clinic pharmacy after a
44-year-old woman was given Humulin
insulin with an expiration date on the box
of October 2007 in early February and
again in mid-March.

Investigation

Health bosses maintain that an investi-
gation into how the woman got the
expired medications was launched after
the claim was reported in The Tribune
last Tuesday, but calls to Director of Pub-
lic health Dr Pearl McMillan for an update
have not yet been returned.

The Ministry of Health and Depart-
ment of Public Health maintains that
“preliminary investigations into the report
have revealed that adequate supplies of



THE DIABETIC WOMAN says she was given this out-of-date medication.

several types of insulin are presently in
stock at the Elizabeth Estates Clinic.
“The investigations further indicate that
the earliest expiration date is October
2009 and that the majority of the stock
on-hand expires in 2010 and 2011.”
However, the diabetic of 20 years is
concerned the defunct medication has
been given to hundreds of other patients

as she claims it was given to her twice in
just over six weeks.

When she took it in February, it failed
to control her blood sugar levels, which
rose, making her light-headed, nauseous
and giving her leg cramps. She then
bought insulin at a private pharmacy and
her blood sugar levels returned to nor-
mal.

medicine’ hits out at health authorities

And when she went back to the Eliza-
beth Estates Clinic two weeks ago, she
noticed the Humulin given to her had
expired in October 2007, and then realised
the bottle issued in February had the same
2007 expiration date.

Insulin

But the prescription papers printed
at the pharmacy stated the Humulin
insulin expired in February and March
2010.

The patient said: “They will put that it
expires today’s date 2010, when in actual
fact the medication expires in October
2007, which is printed by the manufactur-
er on the bottom of each box.

“I want answers because it’s not as if
this is 2007, this is 2009, and they didn’t
just give me one, they gave me two.

“It’s the Ministry of Health’s mandate
to provide quality healthcare for the
Bahamian public and visitors alike,
whether rich or poor, black or white.

“Issuing expired medication to a patient
is not quality healthcare, particularly when
there are many people who cannot afford
to go to private doctors and private phar-
macies and depend on the government
services.”

PLP hopetul claims police have not
eranted requisite permit for march

PLP nomination hopeful
Omar Archer has postponed
his Real Men March, claim-
ing the police have not grant-
ed him the requisite permit.

Mr Archer said he has
decided to give the police
force time to reconsider its
position.

“Tt is quite obvious they
were hoping I went ahead
with this non-violent protest
without a proper permit so as
to publicly embarrass me and
present me as an individual
who has absolutely no regard
for law and order.

“We are however more
determined that ever to have
this march, but it will be done
in order or in line with
the laws of this country,” he
said.

Now, Mr Archer said, the
march is scheduled for May
26. He said that if he is denied
a second time, the march will
proceed.

“Freedom of speech and
expression are a fundamental
rights granted to us all as
Bahamian citizens and we will
do whatever it takes to defend
such rights,” Mr Archer said.

He said the march is for
anyone who thinks the
Bahamas needs better family
values, believes homosexual-
ity is being imposed upon on






“Freedom of
speech and
expression are

a fundamental
rights granted
to us all as
Bahamian
citizens and we
will do whatever
it takes to defend
such rights.”

Omar Archer



children and young adults,
and thinks the sexual exploita-
tion of minors is a growing
problem in this society.

In addition, Mr Archer is
hoping to attract those who
believe the penalty for mari-
juana possession should be
reduced to a seven year crim-
inal record and a fine, and
those who think ex-convicts
should be re-integrated into
society quickly.

He said the march will also
focus on the problems of
police brutality, police harass-
ment, crime and unemploy-
ment.

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SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00169

Whereas CLIFFORD ALEXANDER
SEYMOUR of the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of EDDISON
MILTON SEYMOUR late of Garden Hills No.
1 in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00170

Whereas CLOVIS FILS-AIME of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with
the Will annexed of the Real and Personal
Estate of BRENDA LOUISE FILS-AIME late
of Pinewood Gardens in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00171

Whereas WILFRED KNOWLES of the
Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of TIMOTHY
KNOWLES late of McKanns in the Island of
Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00172

Whereas YVETTE KAREN TODD of Sunset
Park Estates in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of VERNITA
MARY HINSEY-HALL late of Tyler Street in
the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) REGISTRAR



TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS





New conservation
ampaign planned

CONSERVATIONIST D’Shan Maycock
m By K QUINCY PARKER

BAHAMIAN conservationist
D’Shan Maycock has planned a
conservation campaign on Abaco
that could lead to better manage-
ment of the island’s marine
resources, and deeper penetration
of the message of conservation
nationwide.

Despite the abundance of
marine resources in the Bahamas,
and the decades-old impulse — on
both the policy and public-aware-
ness fronts — toward maximising
the nation’s marine resources, the
number of professional conserva-
tionists in the Bahamas remains
small by any measure.

One group, RARE, is pumping

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consider enrolling in the 3 month course.
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starts April 25th. Tel. 364-5987, 364-2861.
535-6234 or visit www.bsmn.biz

RARE Conservation

$125,000 into training and
resources for d’Shan Maycock to
mount the new campaign in two
weeks or so. At the end of the
training sessions at Georgetown
University — the first time RARE

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has held its traming in the United
States — Ms Maycock will return
to Abaco to begin the fieldwork
phase.

When the training phase is com-
plete, Ms Maycock will have spent
17 weeks in Washington, DC doing
what her RARE mentor — Ariela
Rosenstein — called “intensive
course work.”

Success

Ms Maycock is the education
officer of Abaco-based Friends of
The Environment, an environ-
mental activism body founded in
1988, and has partnered with
RARE Conservation — which has a
track record of success already in
the Bahamas — to launch what the
NGO calls a RARE Pride cam-
paign. The campaign is focused on
discouraging illegal fishing prac-
tices, encouraging sustainable alter-
natives and creating support for
Marine Protected Areas (MPAs)
throughout Abaco, with the goal of
having five such MPAs designated
throughout the Bahamas by 2010.

In the 1990s, a RARE Pride
campaign centred around the Aba-
co Parrot helped establish the Aba-
co National Park.

The two-year long programme —
at the end of which Ms Maycock
will receive a masters degree in
communication from the Univer-
sity of Texas El Paso — will focus
particularly on the spawning craw-
fish. The species is now under
threat from both illegal fishing
practices and habitat destruction.

The idea is to use what is known
as “social marketing,” a concept



D’ SHAN MAYCOCK AND A COHORT OF STUDENTS from other countries with delicate ecosystems, like Mon-
golia, Thailand, Fiji, Laos and Madagascar, are studying conservation and social marketing during a spe-
cial course hosted at Georgetown University in Washington DC.

that dates back to the 1970s, and
takes as its basis the belief that
marketing principles used to sell
products to consumers could be
used to “sell” ideas, attitudes and
behaviors.

Social marketing seeks to influ-
ence social behavior not to benefit
the marketer, but to benefit the
target audience and the general
society, and has been used exten-
sively in international health pro-
grammes, especially for contra-
ceptives, and is being used with
more frequency in the Bahamas
for such diverse topics as drug
abuse, AIDS awareness and chron-
ic non-communicable diseases.

A major thrust of the campaign,
Ms Maycock said, is to give those
who depend on the island’s marine
resources for their livelihood a raft
of alternatives that would make it
less onerous to follow conserva-
tion guidelines enshrined in law.

“We have many marine species
in the Bahamas that are very eco-
nomically viable,” she said.

“You have to create alternatives.
If you know that this is the time
when the crawfish — for instance —
is bearing their eggs, and you know
that [if you protect only one egg-
bearing crawfish, you will get thou-
sands of them in the future], you
can look at some alternative fish
that you could focus on.”

“It’s just a matter of educating
the public that there are alterna-
tives out there, and that if we don’t
protect these species ourselves,
then we would find ourselves
just like our neighbours, where
they don’t even get the size fish
that we get in the Bahamas any-
more.”

Students cook their way

into Keiser University

THREE students who participated in the first Ministry of Educa-
tion/Keiser University “Cook-Off” were the recipients of scholarships
totalling more that $20,000 to attend Keiser University Culinary Arts
Programme in Florida.

Deandra Rolle, a 12th grade student at Aquinas College, was the win-
ner of the cook-off held at Ardastra Gardens on Saturday, March 21.

Against the backdrop of marching flamingos, strutting peacocks
and curious tourists, Deandra was able to impress the judges with her
presentation, “A Taste of The Bahamas” in the final round of the
cook-off and win a $10,000-scholarship to attend Keiser University.

The winning meal was the “Carmichael seafood surprise, a zesty
tingum salad, a crazy cabbage fiesta with cultural rice.”

Kenrick Ferguson, a student of C C Sweeting Senior High School,
was awarded second place in the competition and a $7,500-scholarship,
while Kristen Johnson of Central Andros High School was the third
place finisher and recipient of a $5,000-scholarship.

Both scholarships are tenable at one of Keiser’s Culinary Arts pro-
grammes in Florida.

The students were challenged to produce a Bahamian dish from 13
ingredients (exclusive of salt and black pepper).

Judges for the competition were Cacique Award winners and veteran
chefs Edwin Johnson and Don Ingraham, and director of Culinary Arts
at Keiser University Dan Dunham.

Experience

Isadelle Howells, first assistant secretary in the Ministry of Educa-
tion, who represented Minister of Education Carl Bethel, offered con-
gratulations to the students and told them once they have obtained their
education and some critical field experience, they should seek to
establish eateries in the downtown area to cater to the 2.5 million vis-
itors who disembark at Prince George Dock.

“It would be a travesty for the government to make this significant
investment in infrastructure only to see downtown saturated by foreign
franchises. Use your talents to do more than being a chef — let it
empower you to become a ‘brand’ such as Chef Wolfgang Puck, Chef
Emerill Lagasse and our own internationally acclaimed Bahamian
chefs Edwin Johnson, Don Ingraham, Jasmine Young and Tracey
Sweeting,” she said.

She also thanked Keiser University for their generosity in awarding
the students the substantial scholarships and added that when the
Bahamians “descend” on Keiser’s campus, the food will never be the
same.

Jennifer Long, a Keiser official involved in the competition, said the
university was delighted to be a part of the event and noted that by
offering the scholarships their institution has lived up to its philosophy
of putting students first.

The two-day competition was an initiative that the Ministry of Edu-
cation produced out of the National Careers Fair, held in October of
2008 to ensure that high school students were exposed to careers of their
choice.



é\ The Tribune’s & Kelly’s /°

) | S/ANSSULEAS |

FIRST PRIZE
GIFT BASKET vatue $125
In Each Age Group












SECOND PRIZE THIRD PRIZE
GIFT BASKET vatue $100 GIFT BASKET vatue $75
In Each Age Group In Each Age Group




NYS ZO
1d IS EEN

-














py yer ey
x SORE




’.
7 f A.)

f rh PK)
LIT AL
LLL

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2

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ohd IM ee













ote) es Ss

1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives are not eligible to enter.
2. Coloring may be done with crayons and other decorations. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN

COLORING THE ENTRY

3. Enter as much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Friday, April 3, 2009. Winners will be announced Thursday, April 9, 2009.
Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to IOOJAMZ / 101.9 JOY FM or COOL 9GFM to hear your name.

4. There will be one first-prize winner, one second- prize winner and one third- prize winner in each age groups.

5. Allentries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

“NO PHOTOCOPIES. USE NEWSPAPER AD ONLY”



Child’s Name: ParenUGuardian Signature

Address: Tel: Age:

1 * Egg Colouring Kits
' o Niel s * Easter Candies a Ready Made
a : Re meh ale ~ i Easter
eS Cl ae he Baskets
| j | Ae CTeters | io | 99
| «© Games * Yard Decorations |

* Stuffed Bunnies a ai Kelly's a
fal ar Menges nition

* Beach Toys ES
* Reading Books Cele CM rr pee

nee





TRIBUNE SPORTS



TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 9



evonn Knowles

Alaena Carey

Dustin Tynes



NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Alaena Carey

Vaal olan isso

DEL erts)

SPORTS

Carifta ‘09: Swimmer profiles

Armando Moss

EUR eT|eselh

OP TCOMm Elaine

SEMIN se U4

Crystal Rahmin



NAME

“NICKNAME”

McKayla Lightbourn

“Coco”



BIRTH DATE

5.19.92



AGE & SEX

16 Female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Pine View School
Grade 11



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

SWIFT



FAVORITE EVENTS

200 IM, 200 back, 200 breast, 400 IM,
100 back



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

11/12 High point winner at Bahamas National

Swimming Championships, multiple national

record holder in 11/12, 13/14/,15 & Over, and
senior age groups



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Finalist at 2007 Pan Am Games, Brazil;
Competitor at 2008 Youth Commonwealth
Games, India;

Multiple Medal Winner at 2008 CISC,
Jamaica;

CARIFTA multiple medal winner;
Qualifier at U.S. Junior Nationals;
Qualifier at U.S. Senior Nationals





NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Shaunte Jade Moss
Mitze

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Do my best to help the team bring home the
Championship, and better my times.



BIRTH DATE

August 2", 1993



AGE & SEX

15, Female

NAME

“NICKNAME”

Taryn Nicole Smith

“TT”





NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation

BIRTH DATE

21" June 1996





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Nassau Christian Academy
Grade 10

AGE & SEX

2 (twelve) yrs old - female









BIRTH DATE

August 8 1996

NAME

‘NICKNAME”

BERCHADETTE MOSS
“MERGHERT”

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

SWIFT SWIMMING

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation









AGE & SEX

12
Female

BIRTH DATE

MARCH 21°,1995

FAVORITE EVENTS

50/100/200 Meter Breaststroke
50/100 Freestyle 100 Butterfly

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Sunland Baptist Academy
8"" Grade



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

YMCA Waverunners







NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation

AGE & SEX

14 YRS - FEMALE





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Queer’s College
Grade 7

NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION (BSF)





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Sea Bees Swim Club

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE
GRADE 9

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

National Record Holder 8U & 9 - 10
High Point Trophy Winner 8U & 9 — 10

FAVORITE EVENTS

200 IM, 200 free, 50 fly









FAVORITE EVENTS

50, 100 & 200 Breast

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

DOLPHINS SWIM CLUB





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

High Point Winner; 8 Under Girls 2003

FAVORITE EVENTS

50 BUTTERFLY
50 FREE
50 BACKSTROKE





INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

RECORD HOLDER
9-10 50FLY
9-10 HIGH POINT RUNNER UP.

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Carifta and CISC Silver Medalist

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

High Point trophy every year but 2008 got
runner up.









CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Improve my Times
Win a medal
Gain a higher level of experience

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

SILVER MEDALIST 2007

MEMBER 2007 & 2008 CARIFTA TEAM
MEMBER OF CISC — 2008

MEMBER OF 2009 CARIFTA TEAM

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To Medal in all my events

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Made the Carifta team in 2008.





NAME

“NICKNAME”

Zarian L.K. Cleare

Kidd Z, Z-Train

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To beat all old times; place in all events; to
do my very best.





BIRTH DATE

26 April 1995







CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

TO ACHIEVE AN INDIVIDUAL MEDAL









NAME

“NICKNAME”

‘Ashley Jade Butler

“Pumpkin?

NAME

“NICKNAME”

Crystal Rahming





BIRTH DATE

MARCH 27, 1992

BIRTH DATE

December 7, 1996





AGE & SEX

17
Female

AGE & SEX

11 Female





NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas swimming federation

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming federation





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

The Bolles School
Grade 11

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St Andrews School





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Swift Swimming

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Swift Swimming





FAVORITE EVENTS

50 FREE, 100 FREE, 5OBACK , 100 BACK, 50 FLY & 100 FLY

FAVORITE EVENTS

50M freestyle, 100M freestyle, 50M butterfly





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

NATIONAL RECORDS IN 50 FREE, 100 FREE, 50 BACK
BAHAMAS NATIONAL HIGH POINT CHAMPION-2003,
Bahamas National high point runnerup-2005, 2006

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Several medals in Nationals from age 6.





INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Carifta Muliiple Medalist,

C.LS.C- Multiple Medalist

CCAN Multiple Medalist

Florida State High School Swimming Championship Muttiple
Finalist

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Participated in Plantation and
Coral Springs, Florida Meets





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



COLLECT A FEW GOLD MEDALS









NAME

‘NIGKNAME”

MANCER B. ROBERTS If

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

| would like to make finals in all individual
events and medal. | would also love to help
my team getinto the top 3 positions in the
relays.



AGE & SEX

13 Male

NAME

‘NICKNAME’

MAYA K. ALBURY





NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation

BIRTH DATE

SEPTEMBER 11, 1994





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Queer’s College
Grade 9

AGE & SEX

14 YEARS, FEMALE





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Dolphin Swimming Club

NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION





FAVORITE EVENTS

50 Free, 50 Fly, 100 Free, 200 IM

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

SUNLAND BAPTIST ACADEMY
GRADE 10





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Boys 13-14 National Champion 2008

Boys 9-10 1° Runner Up

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

YMCA WAVE-RUNNERS



FAVORITE EVENTS

200 FREESTYLE, 50&100 BUTTERFLY





INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS











BIRTH DATE

15 AUGUST, 1993

NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Matthew D. Lowe





AGE & SEX

15- MALE

BIRTH DATE

March 30", 1994





NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION

AGE & SEX

14 years old — Male





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

KINGSWAY ACADEMY HIGH SCHOOL

GRADE - 10

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation





LOGAL SWIM CLUB

BARRACUDA SWIM CLUB

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Queer’s College, grade 10





FAVORITE EVENTS

50, 100 BACK, 100, 200 FREE, 50F ly

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Record in 50 backstroke, 2008
Nationals High Point Runner up, 2008
Nationals High Point Runner up,2007

Records in 50 and 100 Backstroke, 2006

FAVORITE EVENTS

200 fly, 1500 free and 400 free





INTERNATIONAL
ACHIEVEMENTS

Carifta 2008 Silver medalist

Relay Medals, Carifta 2007 finalist in Multiple
events, Plantation Winter Championships

2007 medalist.

CISC 2006 Finalist 400 Free 50,100 & 200

Back, Medal 400 Medley Relay,

Carifta 2006 Finalist in all individual events,

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS





Medal in Multiple Individual Events
Make CCCAN cuts

CARIFTA 2009
SWIMMER PROFLIE



NAME

"NICKNAME?

Pemrae Shaquille “Pem” Walker



BIRTH DATE

December 10” , 1992



AGE & SEX

16 years / Male



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Andrews School / Grade 10



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda’s Swim Club



FAVORITE EVENTS

50, 100, 200 Breast Stroke



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS:

Competed in Bahamas National Swimming
Championships 2003 — 2008 Medaling Gold,
Silver and Bronze.



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS:

Parlicipated in 2005, 2006 Carita Swimming
Championships; Participated in Plantation
Winter Championships 2004 — 2008.



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



To make finals and medal in all events.







INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Carifta 2006, 2007 & 2008







CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Improve in everything | swim.





NAME

“NICKNAME”

Rfequel PONE

Nielknerce - kelly



BIRTH DATE

eCcspwen we 144s



AGE & SEX

1D yrs of age ) Penne



NAME OF FEDERATION

Egllawas Sewing Fedevaeon



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Aaquettna' CBeRe ge.





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

DetpRin Sub- Chl



FAVORITE EVENTS



So Breast
Ico breast



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS.

High Asint Winner er 4-10, ia |



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS.

dra place at CariPia ky OED

¢







CARIFTA 2009 GOALS







NAME

“NICKNAME”

TOBY McCARROLL

NAME

“NICKNAME”

Zach Timothy Moses





BIRTH DATE

18" AUGUST 1994

BIRTH DATE

3 February, 1997





AGE & SEX

14/MALE

AGE & SEX

12 Male





NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERDATION

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

QUEEN'S COLLEGE / GRADE 9

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Andrew’s School Grade 7





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

DOLPHINS SWIMMING CLUB

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Swift





FAVORITE EVENTS

50m/100m/200m BREASTSTROKE

FAVORITE EVENTS

50 Free, 200 Free, 400 Free, 800 Free





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS:

Silver Medal at Nationals in the 100m and
200m Breaststroke, bronze medal in the 50m
Breaststroke. Qualified in all Breaststroke
events for CARIFTA 2009.

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

2006 8 & under High Point Trophy Winner
2007 9-10 High Point Trophy Winner





INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Was a member of the CARIFTA team 2008,
making finals in the 200m Breaststroke,
placing 6"and member of the 4X100 Medley
Relay team that came second. Was also a
member of the CISC 2008 Team’s 4X100
Medley Relay team that placed third.

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS





Represent The Bahamas to the best of my
ability. | would like to swim my best times in
all my events, and hopefully qualify for
CCCAN. | also hope to make it to the finals in
all of my events and hope to achieve medals.







CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Drop times in every event | swim and score
points for The Bahamas 2009 Carifta Team





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



To represent my country to the best of my
ability, to improve my times and to make the
finals in each of my events.

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

BAHAMAS RECORD 50 FLY





3 years or 65K warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty
and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

2008 FORD RANGER
2.5 Turbo Diesel/Standard Shift

was $32,848.00
NOW $28,700.00

LOADED

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

2®° 100 METER BUTTERFLY
3°° 50 METER BUTTERFLY
11-12 AGE GROUP - CARIFTA 2007







2008 FORD EVEREST

2.5 Turbo Diesel Automatic, Leather,
LOADED - 7 Passanger

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and
licensed and inspected up to birthday.

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was $38,114.00







PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009



SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Carifta ‘09: Swimmer profiles



NAME

“NICKNAME”

Abigail Lowe



BIRTH DATE

July 3, 1996



AGE & SEX

Female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St— Andrews School
Year 7



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Swift Swimming



FAVORITE EVENTS

400 free and 200 free



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To break 5min in the 400 free, and have
personal best in all other events.



NAME

“NICKNAME”

Armando Moss
Mando



BIRTH DATE

July 29, 1992



AGE & SEX

Male



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Augustine’s College
Grade 11



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Sea Bees Swim Club



FAVORITE EVENTS

50m Butterfly, 50m freestyle, 100m Butterfly,
100m Freestyle



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Awarded Most Outstanding Student-Grade 8
Awarded Most Outstanding BJG
Performance — Mathematics
High Point Senior Boys (Sea Bees Swim
Club) - 2008



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Swim best times
Medal in my events
Qualify for CCAN



NAME

“NICKNAME”

Carteron Rowe

"Carey"



BIRTH DATE

DecenBég 22°, 14%,



AGE & SEX

IF, MACE



NAME OF FEDERATION

Baars Susemmue Fooeeyron



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Os. Aususttne Cocehee=
GARDE 12



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

DoveHte Surette Ceuk

Kohen Kerr

Shaunte Moss

a

Jacinda Williams

Teele iO ata

McKayla Lightbourne

Taryn Smith

JeNae Saunders

UMA tsa

Toby McCarroll

John Bradley

Lauren Glinton

Pemrae Walker

Zach Moses



NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Ariel Toby Weech

“Weech”



BIRTH DATE

October 28", 1991



AGE & SEX

17 Female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Augustine’s College
Grade 12



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracudas Swimming Club



FAVORITE EVENTS

50 & 100 Free
50 & 100 Back
50 & 100 Fly



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Bahamian National Record Holder:
8&U 50 Back
13-14 50 Free
13-14 100 Free
13-14 50 Back
13-14 50 Fly
High point runner up



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

2004, 2006, 2007, 2008 CARIFTA Swimming
Championships team member
2004- 4 gold, 1 bronze
2006- 5 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze
2007- 5 gold, 4 bronze
2008- 4 gold, 3 silver
2004 & 2006 CISC team member and record
holder
2004- 3 silver medals
2006- 6 gold, 1 silver
2006 CAC team member- 1 bronze medal
2005 & 2007 CCCAN team member
2007 Pan Am Games Swim Team member
2008 CARIFTA Team Captain



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Medal & Swim personal bests in all of my
events



NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Bria Deveaux

Bre



BIRTH DATE

June 7â„¢ 1994



AGE & SEX

14 and Female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Andrews School
Grade 10



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda’s Swim Club



FAVORITE EVENTS

100&200 free, 200 fly



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Highpoint winner 8& under,9-10,11-12,and
13-14
Age Group Record Holder
National medal holder



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

CARIFTA 06,07,08 attendee, medal Holder
CARIFTA 2007 record holder
CISC 06,08 attendee and Medal Holder
CCCAN O7attendee and Medal Holder



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

¢ To make finals in most events
¢ To win medals in most events
¢ To better my times in all events



NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Devonn Christoff Knowles



BIRTH DATE

March 16, 1993





NAME

“NICKNAME”

Camron Kristen Bruney

NAME

“NICKNAME”

Evante Gibson

AGE & SEX

16 years — male



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation





FAVORITE EVENTS

SO FLY
100 FLY



BIRTH DATE

August 20â„¢ 1994

BIRTH DATE

March 9â„¢ 1994

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Anne’s High School
10 Paul







NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS.

‘Hate MERLS oBIAIWED Af
Basanas Watrowacs Srece Ben. {



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

«MEMBER OF Doos Basacas
DATONAL Sur) TEAM.

* 2008 Cartrra Aric paar

AGE & SEX

14yrs, male

AGE & SEX

15 male



NAME OF FEDERATION

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Queer’s College

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

The Baylor School Tennessee
Grade 10

FAVORITE EVENTS

50 and 100 Freestyle
50 and 100 backstroke





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

YMGA Freeport Grand Bahama



FAVORITE EVENTS

100 free & 400 free

FAVORITE EVENTS

50 & 100 butterfly
50 & 100 breaststroke
200 I.M

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

National Swimming Championships
2000-2008

High Point/Runner Up Awards
Barracuda Swim Club







CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To MARE CCCAN Cute]



NAME

“NICKNAME”

Dionisio S. F. Carey

“Si”



BIRTH DATE

June 13, 1997



AGE & SEX

Male 11 Years old



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Queen’s College
Grade 6



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club



FAVORITE EVENTS

50 Backstroke, 50 Breast stroke, 50
Freestyle, 50 Butterfly and 200 IM



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Bahamas & Open Records

9/10
50m and 200m Freestyle, 50m and 100m
Backstroke, 50m Breast stroke, 50m and
100m Butterfly, and 200m IM, 200m Free

and Medley Relays
11/2
50m Backstroke

National Records
9/10
50m and 100m Backstroke, 50m and 100m
Breast stroke, 200m IM, 200m Free and
Medley relay,



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Florida Gold Coast Winter Champ. Nov 2008
Gold - 50yd. Breast stroke

Silver — 50yd. Butterfly
5'"_ 100yd. Breast stroke

5" — 50yd. Backstroke



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To win High Point Trophy
To break the 50m Backstroke and 50m
Breast stroke records





NAME

“NICKNAME”

DUSTIN E. TYNES

DUSTY



BIRTH DATE

MARCH 7, 1996



AGE & SEX

13
MALE



NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

QUEEN’S COLLEGE
7



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

BARRACUDA SWIM CLUB



FAVORITE EVENTS

200 Breast, 50 Breast and 100 Breast



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

HIGH POINT RUNNER UP 2007
NATIONALS

BAHAMIAN RECORD HOLDER 200
BREAST STROKE 11 - 12 BOYS



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

BRONZE MEDAL - CARIFTA 2008, 200
BREAST STROKE
SILVER MEDAL -C.I.S.C. 2008, 200
BREAST STROKE
BRONZE MEDAL - C.I.S.C. 2008 400
MEDLAY RELAY



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



TO SWIM PERSONAL BESTS



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Numerous medals in the National
Championships

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

A Carifta bronze medal in 2007

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Carifta 2006-2009
CISC 2006/2008
Plantation Winter Champtionships
2005-2008



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Achieve personal best times in all selected
events





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To make finals, score in all of my events and
to pick up a medal or two.



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To do all personal best times in my events





NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Je”Nae Saunders

Nae, Nae



BIRTH DATE

November 6 1994







NAME

“NICKNAME”

Gabrielle S.N. Greene

Gabbie, Gabs

NAME

“NICKNAME”

JACINDA ANNE WILLIAMS

“JENKINS*

AGE & SEX

14 Female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation







BIRTH DATE

December 17", 1995

BIRTH DATE

SEPTEMBER 7TH 1996



AGE & SEX

FEMALE AGE 12

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Augustine College
Grade 9





AGE & SEX

13 female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation

NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club







SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Andrews International School
Grade 8

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

QUEENS COLLEGE GRADE 7

FAVORITE EVENTS

100 Breast & 200IM







LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

DOLPHIN SWIM CLUB





FAVORITE EVENTS

50 freestyle, 50 breaststroke

FAVORITE EVENTS

50/100 Backstroke
Relays





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

200 freestyle relay record, Gold medalist in
the Bahamas National Swimming
Championships (50 free, 100 free, 200
freestyle relay)

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

11-12 2â„¢ Place 200 Backstroke
11-12 3" Place 200 Freestyle

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

National High Point runner up 9-10, 11-12,
13-14







INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Finalist in the 50 free and 50 breast at CISC

Member of the Carifta and CISC teams for
the Bahamas Swimming Federation

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

FIRST TIME REPRENTING MY COUNTRY

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

CARIFTA Medalist 2006, 2007 & 2008
CISC Medalist 2006
CCCAN Medalist 2007







CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To qualify for CCCAN in 50 freestyle





NAME

“NICKNAME”

LARON KEVIN MORLEY

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To Swim My Personal Best
And Bring Home Gold for My Country.



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Medal in most of my events
Improve all of my times



NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Lauren Glinton
LG/ “Life’s Good”



BIRTH DATE

28.Sept.1994



AGE & SEX

14/Female







BIRTH DATE

AUGUST 25, 1994

NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Laura J. Morley

NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS







AGE & SEX

MALE AGE :14

BIRTH DATE

October 1%, 1996

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Andrew's
Grade 9







NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION

AGE & SEX

12 years - Female

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

DOLPHIN SWM CLUB







SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

AQUINAS COLLEGE GRADE 9

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

SEABEES SWIM CLUB

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Andrew’s School — Year 7

FAVORITE EVENTS

200fly

200 breast
200 free
400 free





FAVORITE EVENTS

50BACK AND 50 FREE

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Swift Swim Club





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

SILVER 50 BACK,BRONZE 100BACK, 200
BACK AND 50 FLY

FAVORITE EVENTS

Breatstroke, IM’s and distance
Freestyle

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Qualified for CARIFTA @ 1 1yrs in 400 IM;
Qualified for every Nationals since 8 yrs old;











NAME

“NICKNAME”

Dylan J. Cash

Flare



BIRTH DATE

24 August 1996



AGE & SEX

12, Male



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Augustine’s College
Grade 7



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Sea Bees Swim Club



FAVORITE EVENTS

Backstroke 50/100



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

31:53 - 50 Free
34:30 — 50 Back
1:20:06 — 100 Back



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

N/A



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



33:00 — 50 Back
31:30 — 50 Free
1:15:00 — 100 Back



NAME

“NICKNAME”

Amber Talia Weech

“Ambie”



BIRTH DATE

October 28", 1991



AGE & SEX

17 Female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Augustine’s College
Grade 12



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracudas Swimming Club

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

CARIFTA 2007 RELAY TEAM SILVER
MEDALIST

CCAN 2007 RELAY TEAM BRONZE
MEDALISTS

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Runner-up high point trophy winner at
Bahamas National Championships
2006 & 2007

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Member of 2005 CARIFTA team
Placed 7" in 200 Fly









CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

TO OBTAIN AS MANY INDIVIDUAL
MEDALS AND DO WELL IN ALL MY
EVENTS



INTERNATIONAL
ACHIEVEMENTS

Finals
2008 Carifta & CISC
Swimming Championships

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



- to final in all of my events;
- toswim my best times
- to help the relay teams medal

















NAME

“NICKNAME”

KEITH JAMAL LLOYD
KJ

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To make finals in all of my events and
to swim my personal best times.





BIRTH DATE

MAY17, 1996



AGE & SEX

12 / MALE

NAME

“NICKNAME”

John Bradley

NAME

“NICKNAME”

Kohen Kerr





NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION

BIRTH DATE

Jan 271991

BIRTH DATE

May 1st 1996





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

AQUINAS COLLEGE
GRADE 7

AGE & SEX

18 Male

AGE & SEX

12 - male





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

SEABEES SWIM CLUB

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation





FAVORITE EVENTS

50M,100M, 200M BUTTERFLY
50M & 100M BACKSTROKE

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Lewis University
Aviation Administration Major

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Queers College
7" Grade



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

YMCA Wave Runners

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

2” — 50M BACKSTROKE AGE 9-10
3° _ SOM BUTTERFLY AGE 9-10
SEVERAL 1°" IN RELAY RACES AGE 9-10



FAVORITE EVENTS

200, 400 & 800 Free



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

2004, 2006 & 2009 CARIFTA team member





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



Swim personal bests in all of my events and
hope to win at least one medal





INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

TO SWIM PERSONAL BEST TIMES IN ALL

THE EVENTS THAT | WILL SWIM AT
CARIFTA AND WITH THAT WIN SOME
MEDAL AND SCORE SOME POINTS FOR
THE BAHAMAS



FAVORITE EVENTS

200m & 400m Free

FAVORITE EVENTS

50, 100, 200, 400 freestyle



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Various National Records
BASRA Marathon Defending Champion

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

50 freestyle, 3 place.





INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Commonweath Youth Games 2008
National Team 2003 — Present

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

2006 — Winter Championships, Plantation,
Florida.











CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



Represent my country with dignity and pride
in my final carifta.





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



To get a gold in every event that | swim.







THE TRIBUNE

S
b

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

number of

Bahamian ath-

letes, led by

Olympian Sheni-
qua ‘Q’ Ferguson (right), com-
peted in some of the collegiate
meets around the United States
over the weekend.

Ferguson, competing for
Southwest Mississippi in the
LSU Tiger Relays at the Bernie
Moore Stadium, clocked 11.69
seconds for third place overall
after she won the second of six
heats in the women’s 100
metres.

She came back in the final
and had to settle for third again,
but this time in 11.93. The win-
ning time posted was 11.42 by
Kenyanna Wilson of LSU, fol-
lowed by her team-mate,
Samatha Henry in 11.59.

On the men’s side, Olympic
quarter-miler Michael Mathieu
showed some speed as he con-
tested the men’s century. Rep-
resenting Tiger Olympians, the
Grand Bahamian ended up



MICHAEL MATHIEU

Eleven to manage Carifta team

WHILE the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Associations
is expected to carry a 61-mem-
ber team to the Carifta Games
in St Lucia over the Easter hol-
iday weekend, an 11-member
management team will travel
along with them.

Ray Hepburn, president of
the New Providence Amateur
Athletic Association, will serve
as the team manager and he will
be assisted by Stephanie Higgs.
The chaperone is Mabelene
Miller.

Bradley Cooper is the team’s
head coach. He will be assisted
by Sandra Laing, Antonio
Saunders, Wendell Collie Sr
and Dexter Bodie.

The team doctor is Rickey
Davis and the physiotherapists
are Cottrice Robinson and Car-
lene Strachan.



PAGE 11
r |

TUESDAY, MARCH 31,

sixth in the straight away in
10.79.

Baylor’s Trey Harts won the
race in 10.43.

Mathieu had the fifth fastest
qualifying time of 10.67 after he
won the third of nine heats.
Harts took heat seven in 10.41.

At the University of Alabama
in the Alabama Relays at Sam
Bailey Track, sprinter Lanece
Clarke topped the Bahamian
performances.

The McKendree College
senior won section two of the
women’s 100 in 12.13. The time
placed her ninth overall. LaJada
Baldwin, a sophomore from
Mississippi, had the fastest time
of 11.68.

Clarke, the daughter of for-
mer Carifta queen Maryann
Higgs, moved up to compete in
the 400 as well. She completed
the one-lapper in third place in
section two in 57.45. The win-
ning time was 56.99 by Lindsay
Doucett, a senior at Mississippi.

Clarke’s time was the eighth
fastest. Alecia Brown, a senior
at Western Kentucky, had the
fastest time overall in 54.41 in
winning section two.



2009



Sasha Joyce, a junior team-
mate of Clarke at McKendree,
turned in a third place finish in
the women’s 100 hurdles in
15.03 in section three. Alexis
Brown, a junior at Western
Michigan, won the race in 14.78.

Joyce ended up 17th overall.
Lorian Price, running unat-
tached, won section one in the
fastest time in 13.47.

Also, Joyce competed in the
400 hurdles, coming sixth in sec-
tion two in 1:08.27. Chiamaka
Obi, a sophomore from Austin
Peay, won the race in 1:03.15.

Joyce finished 14th overall.
Danielle Brown, a senior at
Western Michigan, turned in
the fastest time in 58.46 in win-
ning section one.

Together, Clarke and Joyce,
competing on the third and
anchor legs respectively, helped
McKendree to a sixth place fin-
ish in the 4x 100 relay in 47.52.

Mississippi won in 45.82.

Clarke also ran on the third
leg of McKendree’s 4 x 4 relay
team that finished sixth in
3:57.41. Mississippi once again
won the event in 3:39.63.



Carifta ‘O09:
Swimmer

profiles...

See pages 9-10

SPORTS
Wag

BASEBALL
JBLN UPDATE

THE Junior Baseball
League of Nassau continued
its regular season over the
weekend at the St Andrew’s
Field of Dreams with the fol-
lowing results posted:

TEE BALL

Grasshoppers 22, Blue
Claws 21

Sidewinders 19, Sand
Gnats 9

COACH PITCH

Diamondbacks 15, Blue
Jays 7

Athletics 17, Angels 16

Cubs 18, Astros 13

MINOR LEAGUE

Rockies 12, Rays 1

Mets 11, Red Sox 3

MAJOR LEAGUE

Indians 11, Mariners 7

Marlins 10, Reds 7

JUNIOR LEAGUE

Twins 11, Yankees 10

Dodgers 18, Cardinals 7

SENIOR LEAGUE

Rangers 7, Tigers 6

Phillies 7, Pirates 4

























































“ALN ATE]

BD Chee a ya:
reer ae for yy Stop in TODAY and LOOK for the ‘op-of-the-Hill, Mackey Street
: PRUNE ee a eee WE LUE eee



Sale Ends





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Sex scandal exposes weakness in schools

Value of loans =
in arrears
expanded by
228 per cent

FROM page one

cent at end September, given
the more accelerated
increase in loan servicing dif-
ficulties.”

The Central Bank report
added that up until Septem-
ber 2008 domestic bank’s net
income fell by $17.7 million,
or 23.1 per cent, to $59 mil-
lion, relative to the same
quarter last year.

Up to December 2008, the
fourth quarter, bank’s net
interest margin increased by
3.1 per cent to $117.6 mil-
lion but this was “offset by a
reduction in the contribu-
tion from commission and
foreign exchange income,
which decreased by 43.7 per
cent to $6.2 million,” said
the review.

This lowered bank’s gross
earnings by 1.0 per cent in
the face of a 2.3 per cent rise
in operating costs to $65.3
million.

The review notes that the
“most significant effect on
the outcome was the reduc-
tion in the other income
component (net of depreci-
ation and bad debt expens-
es) to $0.6 million from $15.6
million in 2007, correspond-
ing mainly to a hike in pro-
visions for bad debts.

Man charged
FROM page one

the country’s 13th homi-
cide victim for the year.

Ellis, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Ancella
Williams in Court One,
Bank Lane, was not
required to enter a plea to
the murder charge. Ellis
was represented yesterday
by lawyer Alex Morley.
After the magistrate had
read and outlined the
nature of the charge
against him, Ellis who
appeared perplexed, asked
whether he was charged
with murder or conspiracy
to commit murder. Magis-
trate Williams told Ellis
that he was charged with
murder.

Ellis was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison yes-
terday. His case has been
transferred to Court 5,
Bank Lane. The case was
adjourned to April 24
which is when a date will
be set for the commence-
ment of a preliminary
inquiry into the matter.

FROM page one

turbing events” at Eight Mile Rock High
School.

The high school has, since the begin-
ning of the year, seen three teachers
removed from their duties over concerns
about molestation of students.

The series of events unfolded after
two male former students accused one of
them, a male expatriate teacher, of
molestation during their time at the
school.

In addition to that male teacher, who
recently fled the country after police
moved to press charges, and a female
teacher — alleged to have had a sexual
relationship with a student — who has
been removed pending investigation,
The Tribune can reveal that increased
scrutiny resulted in alarm bells also being
raised about the relationship between a
student and another male teacher.

A police investigation is also now
underway into the third teacher’s actions,
although an education official said that
the ministry is quite confident that the
involvement of the second male teacher,
who is currently suspended, was harm-
less.

“From what we understand his wife
and family sort of adopted the boy,” said
the source.

Responding to Mrs Hanna Martin’s
statement, Mr Bethel said the “safety
and welfare of all children entrusted to

the care of the Ministry of
Education in public schools
are of paramount importance
to all senior officials of my
ministry.”

Ministry’s officials are,
“generally speaking, reluc-
tant to publicly comment in
detail about allegations made
against persons involved in
the education system with-
out the results of an official
investigation...out of a con-
cern not to in any way
impede or appear to be
attempting to prejudge the
outcome of such an investi-
gation,” he added.

Referring to the fact that

the teacher accused of GLENYS HANNA-MARTIN
molesting the male students accused Mr Bethel on
was now believed to have Sunday of being in ‘gross
skipped the country, Mr default’ of his duty.

Bethel said that “the Acting

Director of Education made every effort
within his power to allay the fears of the
teacher and to prevent him becoming a
flight risk.”

While noting that he was not criticising
the press for “heightening public aware-
ness” he said that the public disclosure of
allegations surrounding this teacher
“instantaneously impeded a proper
investigation.”

He emphasised that despite several
visits to the school last year he was not
personally informed of allegations



against the teacher until they
appeared in the media.

Meanwhile, in response to
claims that parents have been
inadequately apprised of
steps taken by the Ministry in
the wake of the series of
events, Mr Bethel said that
“as a representative of par-
ents generally” Eight Mile
Rock High School Parent
Teachers Association Presi-
dent Troy Garvey has been
kept updated, while all par-
ents of children who may
have come in contact with
the teachers involved have
been “kept fully informed”
of the Ministry’s s “extraordi-
nary measures” to secure
their well being.

Mr Bethel revealed that an
undisclosed number of chil-
dren at the school, said to
have been “at risk” in view of contact
with the male teacher who subsequently
fled the country, were subject to two
separate psychological evaluations —
firstly by the chief school psychologist
in Grand Bahama, and secondly by psy-
chologist Dr David Allen.

Meanwhile, Mr Bethel said, the receipt
by the Ministry of Education of an
“undated, unsigned” note in March,
including the names of a number of chil-
dren, led to further evaluations being
conducted by Dr Allen.

Neither confirming or denying the
claim made by Mrs Hanna Martin that
“at least one child” from the school has
been admitted to Sandilands after suf-
fering abuse, Mr Bethel said he would
“only say that any therapeutic interven-
tions that occurred have only occurred as
a direct result of our extraordinary
actions in sending Dr Allen to Eight
Mile Rock.”

The Minister noted that as a result of
investigations into the sex allegations at
Eight Mile Rock High School “and in
one or two other instances” he has dis-
covered that children who are deprived
in some form — whether it be food or
other material needs — are most at risk
of molestation.

Declining to go further into details,
Mr Bethel said: “One of the critical areas
that I have identified because of this sit-
uation in Eight Mile Rock and in one
or two other instances is that hunger,
hungry children, the absence sometimes
of food, is the greatest single point of
entry in terms of persons who are ill
disposed and seek to take advantage
of children, that is the point of
contact.”

He added that from now on all alle-
gations of sexual impropriety involving a
teacher and a student will be referred
directly to the police for investigation,
rather than having the matter initially
sent to the Attorney General’s office for
a legal opinion, as had been established
practice.

Caribbean ready to discuss
trade agreement with Canada

FROM page one

region's EPA with Europe.

"It's similar to the one we negoti-
ated with Europe — CARICOM
had committed to that and said to
Canada that once they had finished
the negotiations of the EU's (Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement), they
would commence discussions with
the Canadian authorities with regard
to a CARICOM-Canada economic
partnership agreement.

"We have good working relations
with Canada and obviously this just
will improve as countries begin to
move more on a global approach to
trade, and CARICOM will be seen
in that region," he said.

On October 15, 2008 government
signed onto the EPA with the EU — along
with 12 other member states — after much con-
tentious debate over the potential damage the
agreement could wreak on the local economy.
Guyana, whose president initially opposed the
agreement — signed the EPA on October 21,
2008 after two additional clauses were added.
Haiti has until 2010 to sign the agreement.

Opponents of the EPA have argued that it
will not create any significant benefits for the
Bahamas and would drastically reduce govern-
ment revenue.

According to The Jamaica Gleaner, Jamaica's
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of For-
eign Affairs and Foreign Trade Dr Kenneth
Baugh has already expressed concerns about

Brent Symonette



the upcoming trade agreement dur-
ing a recent visit to Canada.

He told Canadian officials that an
impact analysis showed that opening
up trade with Canada would be
detrimental to Jamaica, unless there
was a development component, The
Gleaner reported. He also report-
edly noted that Jamaica would be
flooded with Canadian products
as a result of the proposed agree-
ment.

"We are small countries and we
have to be careful how we enter into
free-trade agreements. What would
make a big difference is technology
transfer," Dr Baugh is quoted as
saying.

Meanwhile, government has yet
to commence an impact analysis of
the agreement, which would mea-
sure its effect on the economy, due to the ear-
ly stages of the proposal.

"That is part of the process of negotiating.
There is a Caribbean Regional Negotiating
Machinery (CRNM) who will look at the whole
application to see whether or not it is feasible,
whether or not it is beneficial to both coun-
tries and advise CARICOM on the way for-
ward but that process hasn't started yet. We're
just in the early stages of it, but I think CARI-
COM has indicated to Canada that it is pre-
pared to begin discussions," said Mr Symonette,
who was acting as Prime Minister in place of
Prime Minister Ingraham who was at a meeting
of the International Development Bank in
Colombia.

FAMILY GUARDIAN

TEATS ClalCM CALENDAR CONTEST ie oe

45th

CONTEST RULES

anniversary calendar

1 Family Guardian's Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for the company’s 2010 calendar will be “A CELEBRATION OF
NATURE - 45th Anniversary Calendar”. Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or a scene which is a striking example of nature as

§found in The Bahamas,

as well as, photographs of the Family Guardian Corporate Centre, located on Village Road and Eas Stre

gurther competition details (www.familyguardian.com).

PINE FORM

*See website

Bie IS JUNE 1, 2009. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk and will not be returned.

delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre, Village Road and East Bay Street, Nassau, between 9:00AM and 5:00PM

should be marked “Calendar Contest”.

artpanted by an official ening avai

provided 4 ; ‘ on CD. Digital images must be of high quali
i ce eine signs ‘of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure t (
( ordi images should be supplied i in RAW, TIFF or high quality JPEG and in the a colour format the camera uses (LAB or r RGB), All =

6 ~ Judging of ates will be ne on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph, Particular areas and subjects of
interest are detailed on the website (www-familyguardian.com). The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian's 2010 calendar. The
decision of the judges will be final.

7 A gift certificate valued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs selected. Photographic credits will be given in the calendar. The number
of entries per photographer is limited to a maximum of 5 photos.

8 The winning photographs, along with all publication and reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and the company

reserves the right to use

such in the future. Photos will not be returned.

9 Employees of Family Guardian, its affiliated companies or family members are not eligible.
10 Previously published photos are not eligible.

2010 Calendar Photo Contest Entry Form

Return with photos to:
Calendar Contest, Family Guardian
Village Road & East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

_ ENTRY DEADLINE: JUNE 1, 2009

Photo by Jade Greensword
Family Guardian’s 2009 Calendar

TELBUSINESS
Corporate Centre EMAIL
P.O, BOX

ADDRESS

STREET

*For further details & key subjects of interest
visit our website at www.familyguardian.com

NUMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERED (maximum of 5)

| agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as a winner in the 2010 Family Guardian
Calendar Photo Contest it will become the property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and| assign to Family Guardian
all rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos entered in this contest were taken in
The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not been previously published.





SIGNATURE

DATE



Changes to affect
Privy Council appeals

FROM page one

which I think will come into
effect on April 1,” Lord Philips
said.

“We are introducing some
quite tight time limits for fil-
ing applications. We do think
that it is a good idea that
there should be a sense of
urgency with regard to
appeals to the Privy Council.
It is not just that respondents
should be left in a state of
uncertainty as to whether or
not there is to be an appeal,”
he said.

“Another significant
change is that all petitions for
leave to appeal will now ini-
tially be considered on paper.
In some case we shall direct
an oral hearing but it is
unlikely that this will happen
very often,” Lord Philips said.

“This will give effect to
requests we have received
from many practitioners who
have complained about the
cost involved in going all the
way to London to petition for
leave to appeal. Finally we
are introducing new forms
which we are unloading from
our website.

“You will be able to file
applications and appeals via
e-mail. This I suspect will not
be to the delight of every-
one,” he said.

Lord Philips noted that the
changes are designed to pro-
duce rules suitable for the
21st century and bring them
in line with rules that Eng-
land and Wales have intro-
duced. Lord Philips also not-
ed that that law lords are set
to become justices of the new
Supreme Court which is
scheduled to open in Octo-
ber of this year.

Attorney General Michael
Barnett during his remarks,
noted that the Privy Council
is the final court of appeal for

the Bahamas and affects the
lives of Bahamians, people
in the region and in the wider
common law world.

“Tt’s good that they’re here
so that the Bahamian people
can see their final court of
appeal at work,” the Attor-
ney General said yesterday.

During his welcoming
address on behalf of the
Inner Bar, attorney Thomas
Evans, QC, said: “Your con-
tinued presence at the apex
of our court structure is a
source of confidence in our
system to many litigants and
practitioners alike.”

The Privy Council, which
acts as the highest court of
appeal for certain Common-
wealth countries, customarily
sits in Downing Street, Lon-
don.

The Privy Council, which
usually consists of five law
lords, has sat in the Bahamas
on two previous occasions—
in December 2006, which was
its first sitting outside of Lon-
don, and again in December
2007. The Privy Council will
sit in the Court of Appeal
until Friday, April 3. While
here this week it will hear
three appeals, one of which is
a Bahamian case.

The appeals will be heard
before the five law lords —
Lord Philips of Worth Matra-
vers, who is the senior Law
Lord, Lord Scott of Foscote,
Lord Brown of Eaton-under-
Heywood, Lord Mance and
Lord Neuberger. The Law
Lords will hear appeals in the
cases of Wendall Swann vs
the Attorney General of the
Turks and Caicos Islands
(TCI); Icebird Limited vs
Alicia Winegardener
(Bahamas), and Johannes
Deuss vs the Attorney Gen-
eral for Bermuda and the
Commissioner of Police of
Bermuda.

A New beet SU le

ee at?
BUTTERFLY

SJ tat La

$4.35







U



THE TRIBUNE i

-
’ =

TUESDAY,

MARCH 31,



2009

. SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net



‘Retirement nightmare’
looms for Bahamas

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas
is facing a
“retirement
nightmare”, a
leading financial
adviser told Tri-
bune Business
yesterday, with
the relatively low
level of private
pension plan par-
ticipation and
poor savings habits creating an
ever-increasing “social time-
tomb”.

Commenting on the Central
Bank of the Bahamas’ survey
of Bahamian private pension
funds, which found that less
than one out of every three
workers participated in a pri-
vate pension plan, Kenwood
Kerr, Providence Advisors’
chief executive, said this con-
tributed to an “over-reliance”
on the National Insurance
Board (NIB) as the sole source
of retirement funding.

“Broad-based education is
required,” Mr Kerr told Tri-
bune Business, “and we need
to have more people covered.
In the absence of pension funds
to cover you, in the absence of



* Financial adviser warns of ‘social timebomb’ caused
by lack of pension fund and personal savings,
poor discipline and NIB ‘over-reliance’

* Less than one in every three Bahamian workers
participates in private pension plan

* Savings rates heavily skewed, as ‘75 per cent of
accounts have less than $10,000, and more than
75% of aggregate savings in less than 10 per
cent of individual accounts’

personal savings habits and dis-
cipline, and in asking NIB to
bear too much of the burden,
retirement is going to be a
nightmare.”

Mr Kerr said the develop-
ment of these qualities - per-
sonal savings habits, discipline
and private pension plans (indi-
vidual and employer-spon-
sored) - were essential for the
social security of thousands of
Bahamians, especially in their
retirement years, and the main-
tenance of living standards.

He added that NIB needed
to be used as a supplement to
other sources of retirement
income, rather than the main
source.

The percentage of Bahamian

Colinalmperial profits up 86.2%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

COLINAImperial Insurance Company executives yesterday
predicted that the life and health insurer would enjoy a 2009 finan-
cial performance similar to last year, with total revenues relative-
ly flat and a focus on expense/benefit containment, as it reported an
86.2 per cent rise in net income to $8.129 million.

The company, whose parent is BISX-listed Colina Holdings,
enjoyed a $4.335 million net income boost in its 2008 fourth quar-
ter, which accounted for more than half of its annual profits.

The full-year figure represented a significant improvement on the
$4.366 million net income produced for the 12 months to Decem-
ber 31, 2007, as a more than $12 million reduction in benefits and
expenses outweighed a more-than $8 million drop in Colinalmpe-
rial’s total revenues to $160.176 million.

When asked why Colinalmperial seemed to traditionally gener-
ate the bulk of its net income in the fourth quarter of every year,
2007 having produced a similar $4 million-plus result, Cathy
Williams, the company’s vice-president of finance, explained: “A lot

of it has to do with year-end pro-
cedures and what we find at year- SEE page 5B

Capital costs curb hotels’
efforts over energy supply

workers participating in private
pension schemes increased from
25.8 per cent in 2005 to 27.5 per
cent 2007, but this means that
more than two out of every
three Bahamian workers is not
covered by this source of retire-
ment funding.

Still, the Central Bank found
that the raw number of private
pension plan participants had
increased by 6.5 per cent in 2006
and 7.1 per cent in 2007 to reach
47,221. Average coverage rates
for participants, as a percent-
age of total employees within
the surveyed plans, improved
to 91.4 per cent in 2007 com-
pared to 88.6 per cent in 2005.

SEE page 4B

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CLICO’s insolvency
likely more than $18m

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CLICO (Bahamas) solvency deficiency will
likely be much more than $18 million because
its main $73 million investment, accounting
for 62.9 per cent of its total assets, “is unlike-
ly to be recovered at full value”, the provi-
sional liquidator has warned, with a further $42
million investment required before it can be
sold.

Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez, in his first report to the
Supreme Court, said that Bahamian-regis-
tered CLICO Enterprises, the entity to whom
CLICO (Bahamas) had advanced the $73.629
million loan, was itself insolvent to the tune of
$21 million.

In turn, CLICO Enterprises had advanced
the majority of the loan funds it received to
Wellington Preserve, the Florida-based real
estate development that ultimately accounts
for most of the assets presented on CLICO
(Bahamas) balance sheet.

Mr Gomez said CLICO Enterprises’ assets
included a $70 million loan that was due from
Wellington Preserve, described as one of its
wholly-owned subsidiaries. And CLICO
Enterprises had become even more exposed to
Wellington Preserve through making a direct
$13 million investment in the project.

In turn, the provisional liquidator said that
Wellington Preserve’s unaudited financial
statements for the year to December 31, 2008,
while valuing the real estate project as a $127
million investment property, had written down

* Main $73m investment, accounting
for 63% of Bahamian company’s
$116m assets, ‘unlikely to be
recovered at full value’

* Key real estate project needs further
$42m investment before it can be
marketed for sale, with current
value written down from
$127m to $62m

* Chief subsidiary insolvent
to tune of $21m

* $2m required to pay CLICO
Bahamas due severance monies

its current value to $62 million.

And, to make matters worse, Mr Gomez
said Wellington Preserve requires an extra
$42 million investment to upgrade the prop-
erty before it can be marketed for sale to buy-
ers.

“The Wellington Preserve real estate project
in Florida consists principally of 80 residential
lots, and various amenities and commercial

sites laid out in a 523-acre tract,” Mr Gomez
wrote.

SEE page 4B



Colinalmperial resisted annuity product pressure

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

COLINAImperial Insurance
Company resisted pressure
from its agency sales force to
launch an annuity product to
rival the likes of CLICO
(Bahamas) because it “could
not see how it would make
money” from it, its executive
vice-chairman said yesterday.

Emanuel Alexiou, who is also
a principal in the life and health
insurer’s ultimate majority
shareholder, said Colinalmper-
ial “wanted a very strong bal-
ance sheet” and, to achieve that,
some 81 per cent of its actuarial
liabilities covered ordinary life
insurance policyholders.

This stood in stark contrast

Company declined to follow CLICO (Bahamas)
because it ‘could not see how it would make money’

to CLICO (Bahamas), which
had 88 per cent of its actuarial
liabilities covering annuity
depositors when it collapsed
into insolvency and was placed
into provisional liquidation.

Recalling the pleas of Coli-
nalmperial’s agents for the com-
pany to develop a new annuity
product, Mr Alexiou told an
analysts’ conference on the
company’s year-end 2008
results: “When the market was
so frothy, they plagued us for
the last couple of years to devel-
op an annuity product.

“We investigated, looked at it
and Marcus [Bosland, Coli-

nalmperial’s resident actuary]
did some work on it.

“We just could not see the
economics of having it with
[rival] companies selling it, and
made a conscious decision not
to sell it. We did not see how we
could make money. So we
abandoned the project and
decided to look at it another
day.”

Mr Alexiou said that while
Colinalmperial did have an
annuity portfolio on its books,
largely inherited from the acqui-
sitions that had created the

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

OLDER Bahamian hotels
are far behind newer properties
in the race to become energy
efficient, the Bahamas Hotel
Association’s (BHA) president
said yesterday.

As Caribbean hotels, through
the Caribbean Hotel Associa-
tion and the Caribbean Tourism
Organisation, signed a Memo-

randum of Understanding on
Renewable Energy yesterday,
Robert Sands, who is also vice-
president of governmental and
external operations at Baha
Mar, told Tribune Business that
while individual hotels in the
Bahamas have been making
concerted efforts towards ener-
gy efficiency, high capital costs
often get in the way.

He explained that hotels and

SEE page 5B

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamas needs unity in
face of economic storm

THIS week, I had intended to
write the conclusion of my four-
part series on tax reform. How-
ever, this was not to be as I have
been engaged in many conver-
sations concerning the state of
the economy and its implications
for everyday Bahamians.

On Friday afternoon, I
received a call from one of my
colleagues asking whether I was
seeing what he is seeing regard-
ing the state of the economy and
why I (and others) have not writ-
ten about it. I cannot speak for
others, but in recent times I have
found it extremely challenging
to produce a weekly column.
However, I will attempt to con-
tribute ‘my two cents’ to what
should be a national economic
discussion.

Disturbing data
During the last several weeks
there have been several
announcements by government
SS officials that certainly give me
a — great cause for concern. First,
/ A /

there was the announcement

Second, there was the announce-
ment that the unemployment
rate in New Providence and
Freeport exceeds 12 per cent
and 14 per cent respectively.
Third, the Minister of Educa-
tion reported that some 700 stu-
dents were withdrawn from the
“private school’ educational sys-
tem and enrolled in the “public
school’ system during the first
two months of the year. Finally,
last week it was announced that
government revenues for the fis-
cal year 2008-2009 to date were
$100 million behind budgeted
revenues. Each of these statis-
tics warrants further investiga-
tion and analysis, so I was some-
what surprised that the media,
for the most part, reported them
in isolation and without much
fuss.

In a time when wage growth is
essentially flat, a 2 per cent
increase in inflation is a signifi-

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cant jump. The obvious impli-
cation for most persons is that
your limited dollars now buy you
less.

A 12 per cent unemployment
rate must be concerning because
it will have obvious implications
for other social indicators such as
crime and poverty.

I am most concerned about
the number of students that had
to be transferred back into the
public educational system, pre-
sumably for economic reasons. Is
this a precursor of bigger prob-
lems down the road?

A sharp revenue shortfall
means two things: enforcement
will be strengthened, and taxes
will increase. Tougher enforce-
ment will mean more pressure
on the income of those not pay-
ing their taxes. If taxes are not
increased, then central govern-
ment must borrow more, thus
increasing the national debt. To
the extent that we have to bor-
row heavily, our credit rating
could be under downward pres-
sure. If our credit rating comes
down then it becomes more
expensive for the Government
to borrow money. To what
degree this is all playing out...I
am not sure, but it certainly war-
rants greater discussion.

Dark clouds

Two years ago, US Senators
Carl Levin, Norm Coleman and
Barack Obama sponsored legis-
lation that seeks to stop offshore
tax haven and tax shelter abuses.
In introducing the Stop Tax
Haven Abuse Bill, Senator Cole-
man said: “It is simply unac-
ceptable that some individuals
are using offshore tax havens
and secrecy jurisdictions to shel-
ter trillions of dollars in assets
from taxation. These tax

schemes cause a massive rev-
enue shortfall and, sadly, it is
the honest American taxpayer
who must bear a disproportion-
ate burden of investing in areas
like education and healthcare.
We are introducing this bill to
close these loopholes, shut down
offshore tax schemes and ensure
that every American pays their
fair share of taxes.”

The then-Senator Barack
Obama, in his contribution,
added: “ This is a basic issue of
fairness and integrity. We need
to crack down on individuals and
businesses that abuse our tax
laws so that those who work
hard and play by the rules aren’t
disadvantaged.”

These were certainly strong
words by both Senator Coleman
and the now-president of the
US. President Obama can cer-
tainly advance this agenda if he
so chooses.

On February 22, 2009, Euro-
pean Union (EU) Heads of
Government agreed that the
extraordinary international crisis
called for an overhaul of the
international financial system,
including a new system of regu-
lation for all financial markets,
products and participants.
Among their deliberations, the
leaders reached consensus on
the following:

* EU Heads blamed the inter-
national financial crisis on “off-
shore jurisdictions”... where
they allege non-transparent busi-
ness is carried out; and

* EU Heads promised to pre-
pare a “toolbox of sanctions to
be applied against such tax
havens”

Such a ‘toolbox of sanctions’ is
to be unveiled when this group
meets again on April 2 in Lon-
don.

Finally, four days later, Pres-
ident Obama, when presenting
his national budget for the year,
summed it all up when he said
“Our economy is in a deep

recession that threatens to be
deeper and longer than any
since the Great depression”.
Notwithstanding the new
threats, a weak US economy
means a weak Bahamian econo-
my.

Direction

You might ask “where is he
going with all of this?” The
answer is quite simple. There is a
confluence of events that all
have very negative implications
for the Bahamian economy...the
brewing of a proverbial perfect
storm. Yet in the face of this, we
have not mobilised a bi-partisan
response to prepare our econo-
my for what may be coming
down the pipeline. The political
parties are still consumed with
petty politics as usual. It kind of
reminds me of the mythical say-
ing: “While Rome burned, Nero
fiddled”.

These are some of the most
challenging economic times that
we probably face in our lifetime,
especially if President Obama is
correct in his assessment of the
magnitude of this recession. It
is a challenge which, in my hum-
ble opinion, requires that all
capable hands are ‘on deck’. Yet
notwithstanding the imminent
economic threat, there seems to
be little urgency in crafting a tru-
ly national response. Until next
week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas), a
wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Colo-
nial Group International or any
of its subsidiary and/or affili-
ated companies. Please direct
any questions or comments to
rigibson@atlantichouse.com.bs

CRAVEN’S BAKERY

Market Street South
7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Monday - Saturday

Phone: (242) 326-4246

Now taking orders for the

following:

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THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 3B



700k IDB grants
to aid National
Energy Policy

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE PRIME Minister’s visit
to Colombia to sign two
$700,000 agreements with the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) will aid the Gov-
ernment’s pursuit of a National
Energy Policy, the minister of
state for the environment told
Tribune Business yesterday.
Phenton Neymour revealed that
the Bahamas was far behind
other countries in the region in
implementing such a policy, but
was catching up quickly.

Mr Neymour said one of the
grants, totalling $700,000, will
focus on streamlining the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC), and will look
specifically at the corporation’s
inefficiencies in order to reduce
costs and improve service.

He added that as part of the
grant project, the Government
would look into BEC’s finan-
cial position and research ways
to improve this by looking at
its internal structure and the
rates it charges customers.

The project, expected to run
for 12 months, will also deter-
mine ways that fossil fuel-burn-
ing power producer will be able
to integrate renewable energy
alternatives into its grid, with a
determined focus on waste to
energy power production. This
means that BEC’s regulatory
framework will have to be eval-
uated as part of the project, in
order to sanction mergers with
independent power producers.

Mr Neymour said the Gov-

ernment
will also
look at
BEC’ s]}
humanf
resources.

The sec-
ond grant,
totalling
$750,000
and with a
timeline of
14 months,
will address
the design and implementation
of a National Energy Efficiency
Programme and _ further
research into other possible
alternative energy solutions.

Mr Neymour said the grant
would address deficiencies with
regard to data collection in the
energy sector, and explore areas
where wind energy can be best
harvested throughout the
Bahamas. It will identify the
best possible ways to use solar
energy and ocean thermal ener-
gy conversion.

The Government will also
look at ways consumers can
save energy at home and in
transportation, and how com-
mercial customers, schools and
government agencies can do the
same.

“This grant that we have got-
ten from the IDB, we consider
it a significant achievement for
moving toward the implemen-
tation of our National Energy
Policy initiative,” said Mr Ney-
mour.

“This policy will affect a num-
ber of the Government agen-
cies and ministries, and is meant
to improve the country’s energy

Neymour

A peel of poor life ond Me Balemar ance FTF
era tt eure ard

Annive

Sa



security. It is also, from my per-
spective, a major component of
beginning the consumer educa-
tion programme that we think
has potential for reducing ener-
gy demand.”

Mr Neymour added that it
was important for the Bahamas
to implement a National Ener-
gy Policy before “beginning to
address key aspects of the ener-
gy industry”.

He said the Government had
already begun some short-term
projects, and had advertised
publicly for engineering firms
to participate in these projects,
obtaining a favourable response
from the industry.

Mr Neymour also told Tri-
bune Business that the Gov-
ernment is still mulling over
Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) asa
potential energy source, but
have found out after receiving
proposals from AES (an LNG
company) that further review
is necessary.

“We have recently had a
review of the LNG regulations
by B.E.S.T. (Bahamas Envi-

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Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PROGRESSIVE VENTURES LTD. is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on March 30, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burrows of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the May 4, 2009 to send their names and ad-
dresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

March 31, 2009
SHAKIRA BURROWS
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

ronmental Science and Tech-
nology Commission),” he said.
“We are looking at the technical
viability of the project.”



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs
STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following
position:

Alumni Relations & Annual Giving Associate, who will be
responsible for implementing The College of The Bahamas Alumni
Relations Programme and delivering a successful Annual Giving
fundraising programme. The successful candidate will be someone with
strong interpersonal, communication (both oral and written) and
organizational skills who enjoys the challenge of engaging individuals
on a one-on-one level.

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to,
implementing the new Annual Giving strategy; implementing the
programmes for Annual Fund solicitation; maintaining electronic/database
records and monitoring, tracking and analyzing Annual Fund performance.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor's degree or equivalent and five
(5) years post-qualification experience at the AS-2 level. For a detailed
job description, visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates
should submit a detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than
Thursday, April 9th, 2009.





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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS ee
CLICO’s insolvency likely more than $18m

FROM page 1B

“Tt was to be a high-end resi-
dential subdivision with an
equestrian/polo theme. Most of
the residential lots are connect-
ed to or contain polo pitches
and horse stables. Unfortu-
nately, the project requires a
substantial cash injection of a
minimum of $42 million before
it can be reasonably presented
for sale.”

The upshot of all this for CLI-
CO (Bahamas) insurance poli-
cyholders, annuity depositors
and other creditors is that the
company’s financial picture will
ultimately be much worse than
the one presented in Mr
Gomez’s first report, given that
the provisional liquidator will
struggle to recover the full $73
million loan value from
Wellington Preserve.

According to the balance
sheet presented by Mr Gomez
to the Supreme Court, CLICO
(Bahamas) is currently insol-
vent to the tune of $18.286 mil-
lion, with assets standing at
$116.965 and liabilities reach-
ing $135.251 million.



Assuming that these figures
all stay the same, all creditors
rank equally, and Mr Gomez is
able to monetise all those assets,
CLICO (Bahamas) creditors
currently stand to recover 86.5
per cent of their investments,
or 86.5 cents on every $1.

Yet 63 per cent of those
$116.965 million in assets are
accounted for by the loans to
CLICO Enterprises and
Wellington Preserve, which the
liquidator believes will not be
recovered at full value. And
then there is the $42 million
investment required to ready
the real estate at Wellington
Preserve for sale.

Failure to realise the full $73
million from Wellington Pre-
serve’s eventual sale will leave
an even larger hole on the bal-
ance sheet, further depleting the
asset pool and reducing creditor
recoveries. The further $42 mil-
lion investment required will
likely make any buyer discount
the purchase price they pay, and
creditors will recover far less
than $0.865 cents on the $1.

Explaining the full extent of
the problem confronting him,

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)








SEABROWN HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, SEABROWN HOLDINGS LIMITED, has
been dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar

General on the 17th day of March, 2009.









Sarnia Directors Limited
Suite V
Tower Hill House
Le Bordage, St. Peter Port
Guernsey, GY1 3QT
Liquidator










NOTICE is hereby given that NEVILLETON
PARAGUE of 8MARIA GALANTE ROAD,
P.O. BOX CR-56836, Nassau, Bahamas, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 31S" day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

a
NAD

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Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
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new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following

items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;
* General Requirements for General Contracting services for

the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (ie.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected fo be tendered by the successful C-230

General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRACI BRISBY
Contract & Procurement Manager
LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117

P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

with the liquidation likely to be
long and complex, Mr Gomez
wrote in his report to the
Supreme Court: “Since 2004,
the [CLICO (Bahamas)] has
advanced funds to its wholly-
owned subsidiary, Clico Enter-
prises (CEL).

“As at December 31, 2008,
approximately $73 million had
been advanced to CEL, but it is
unlikely that this loan can be
recovered at full value as CEL’s
December 31, 2008, unaudited
financial statements reflect a
deficit of $21 million as the
assets are $108 million and its
liabilities are $129 million.

“Included in CEL’s assets is a
loan due from Wellington Pre-
setve (WPL) a wholly-owned
subsidiary of CEL, for $70 mil-
lion.

“The December 31, 2008,
unaudited financial of WPL
includes investment property in
Florida and valued at $127 mil-
lion. However, the same real
estate valued on an ‘as is’ basis
is worth approximately $62 mil-
lion.”

The provisional liquidator
added: “The loan to subsidiary
CEL)of approximately $73 mil-
lion is not considered presently
collectible, and thus endangers
the asset base of the company
and places policy values in per-
il. The funds advanced to CEL
were advanced by CEL to
WPL, the wholly-owned sub-

sidiary of CEL, which acquired
its real estate holding in Florida,
USA.

“This real estate is not
presently considered mar-
ketable as a result of the signif-
icant downturn in the Florida
real estate market.”

Elsewhere, Mr Gomez said
he needed to determine a date
for ‘releasing’ CLICO
(Bahamas) 141 staff and pay-
ing them what was due.

He explained: “Failure to do
so on a timely basis will result in
the staff being paid from the
company’s resources, which will
result in an erosion of the asset
pool as revenue is not being
generated from which staff
could be paid.

“T have calculated the sever-
ance pay for CLICO’s perma-
nent staff, and agents, which
totals approximately $2 mil-
lion.”

Mr Gomez noted in his
report that FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
had told him of its concerns that
some $35 million worth of its
mortgage loans, covered by
CLICO (Bahamas) life insur-
ance policies, had been placed
at risk by the impending liqui-
dation.

The Baker Tilly Gomez part-
ner added that he was still in
discussions with four Bahamas-
based life and health insurers -
Colinalmperial Insurance Com-

pany, Family Guardian, British
American Financial and
Atlantic Medical - in a bid to
transfer CLICO (Bahamas)
insurance portfolio to them.

Tribune Business under-
stands that, in the first instance,
the liquidator and his team are
seeking to find another carrier
who will take on administration
of the CLICO (Bahamas) port-
folio, dealing with all claims and
premium payments, with a view
to acquiring it at a later date
once matching assets can be
released from the liquidation.

Meanwhile, Mr Gomez said
he had agreed upon drafting an
installment payment plan to be
submitted to CLICO
(Bahamas) two reinsurers,
Bupa for health and Swiss Re
for life. The pair are owed
$930,750 and $203,915 respec-
tively in outstanding reinsur-
ance premiums, but the rein-
surance agreements remain in
force.

The provisional liquidator
added that he was investigating
the termination of $10 million
worth of Bahamas-based term
deposits between year-end 2008
and the date CLICO
(Bahamas) was placed into lig-
uidation to determine whether
any policyholders received a
preferential payment ahead of
other creditors.

Mr Gomez is also assessing
whether CLICO (Bahamas) has

a claim against its parent,
Trinidad-based CL Financial,
which had guaranteed the loan
to CLICO Enterprises. He is
also weighing up whether to
intervene in Trinidad legal pro-
ceedings to prevent CL Finan-
cial’s assets from being dissi-
pated.

Mr Gomez said he was also
investigating the $34 million and
$15.5 million claims submitted
against CLICO (Bahamas) by
Guyana and Suriname, indicat-
ing that his initial review found
that funds placed by clients
from those countries were for-
warded to the Turks & Caicos
branch, and then flowed into
the US. While these funds were
recorded in CLICO (Bahamas)
records, Mr Gomez said it
appeared as if they had been
paid directly into the US
account.

“Unfortunately, the contracts
that were entered into with the
company do not appear to have
been standard policy contracts
but, in many cases, could easily
appear to be the transfer of
funds to the Bahamas that could
easily be classified as related
party loans rather than poli-
cies,” Mr Gomez said of the
Guyana/Suriname claims.

Tribune Business was yester-
day told that Lawrence Duprey,
CL Financial’s chairman, is cur-
rently in Nassau, although it is
unclear why he is here.

‘Retirement nightmare’ looms for Bahamas

FROM page 1B

The survey found that the
growth of private pension funds
had outpaced the nominal
growth in the Bahamas’ gross
domestic product (GDP), the
former having increased from
14.4 per cent of GDP in 2005
to 15.4 per cent in 2007. Private
pension plans had collectively
$1.1 billion in total assets at
year-end 2007.

However, the Central Bank
survey also revealed the work
that needs to be done. It point-

BKG/410.03

ed out that bank deposits and
NIB’s invested assets remained
the two largest Bahamian
national savings sources, with
the former very heavily skewed
towards a minority of large
deposits.

Personal savings in bank
accounts stood at $3.1 billion or
43 per cent of Bahamian GDP
in 2007, compared to 40.1 per
cent in 2005.

“However, for most account
holders, the resources are not
a significant retirement buffer,”
the Central Bank warned, “as

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$71,000,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Wednesday, April 1, 2009. Successful tenderers, who will be
advised should take up their bills against payment on
Friday, April 3, 2009. These bills will be in mintmum
multiples of B$100.00. Tenders are to be on special forms
obtainable from the Central Bank of The Bahamas or

Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

WASTE - ED

LITTER, YOU AND THE LAW

You are breaking the law if:
* You drop or create litter in a place public

place

* Your household/commercial garbage for
collection is kept in a way that creates litter

* You own or occupy land and fail to keep it

litter free

* You own or occupy land along a public road
and you fail to keep the footpaths or
abutment (the area between a shop/house
and the road) free of litter

* You own, hire or drive a vehicle and litter is

dropped from it

DONT’ BE ALITTERBUG. OBEY THE LAW

A MESSAGE FROM THE MINISTRY OF
THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES



the average balances in more
than 75 per cent of these
accounts is less than $10,000,
and more than three-quarters
of their aggregate savings are
concentrated in less than 10 per
cent of individual accounts.

“The NIB held collective
retirement savings of $1.3 bil-
lion, representing 18.4 per cent
of GDP in 2007, vis-a-vis a
slightly lower 19.9 per cent in
2005. The combined domestic
savings in life insurance com-
panies are credit unions
approached $1.1 billion in 2007,
approximately 14.9 per cent and
3.9 per cent of GDP, respec-
tively.”

Mr Kerr yesterday told Tri-
bune Business that a failure to
develop private pension plans
and savings habits would lead
to “an over-reliance on NIB”
for retirement funding, further
propelling its reserve fund into
bankruptcy if the status quo was
maintained.

“NIB would then have to
either lessen the amount of pay-
outs or increase the uptake,”
Mr Kerr explained. “You have
to several things at once. Look-
ing at NIB on its own, if you
don’t implement pension funds
to lessen the burden on NIB, it
will have to lower benefits or
increase the taxes it takes in to
keep going.”

He added: “It’s a social time-
bomb and we need to act with
some urgency. That urgency is
now. We need to move forward,
and put in legislation that looks
at existing practices in light of
the CLICO (Bahamas) incident.
We had poor management,
poor oversight and a lack of
education.”

Mr Kerr pointed out that with
the Bahamian population’s
demographics ageing, the tax
base provided by younger,
working persons was set to
shrink, while the social security
burden would rise with an
increase in the ageing popula-
tion.

The Central Bank found that
defined contribution schemes,
where employers matched their
employees’ contributions, were
the most popular pension plans
in the Bahamas, accounting for
73.8 per cent of all scheme
respondents.

However, defined contribu-
tion plans accounted for only
24.7 per cent of total Bahamian
pension plan assets, and 16.5
per cent of all private scheme
participants.

This was largely because most
defined contribution schemes
were started after 1990, and are
operated by smaller companies
and sponsors, where sharing the
contribution burdens with
employees is important to
ensure the plans are sustainable.
The defined benefit schemes,
by contrast, accounted for 83.5
per cent and 75.3 per cent of
total private pension fund assets
and participants respectively,
being operated by major gov-
ernment corporations.

Some 29.2 per cent of
Bahamian pension plans were
managed in-house, largely by
financial institutions and pro-
fessional services firms. Others
outsourced the administration
to insurance companies (27.9
per cent), other professional
administrators (25.9 per cent)
and banks and trust companies
(17 per cent).

The Central Bank found:
“Despite improved average
rates of return on investment
assets for 2007 vis-a-vis 2005,
sponsors were motivated to
steadily increase the average
paid-in contribution for pension
funds as a percentage of
employees’ salaries.

“Weighted by total assets, the
average contribution rate
increased marginally to 11.61
per cent in 2007, after a slight
dip to 11.46 per cent in 2006,
and a paid-in rate of 11.52 per
cent in 2005.”

While government bonds and
other public sector securities
remain the main investment
feature for Bahamian pension
plans, accounting for 36 per cent
of total invested assets, this was
down from 37.6 per cent in 2005
and a 40.4 per cent peak in
2004.

Investments in mutual funds,
equities and bonds were up to
32.9 per cent of pension fund
asset allocations in 2007, com-
pared to 30.9 per cent in 2005,
although the growth rate has
slowed due to the decline in pri-
vate sector capital raising since
2004.

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUVINA REVOL of

rs

Mackey Street, P.O. Box

N-7 060, Nassau

Bahamas is

applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Cit@enship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
regestration'naluralization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 24" day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, RO. Box N-7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA JEAN-LOUIS of FARM
ROAD and CENTREVILLE CONSTWENCY one of the Island
of Niew Providence, one of the Islands of the Gommonvealth
Of The Bahamas, is app ying to ihe Minister responsdle tor

Natonality and Gilizen
citizen ol The Bahamas

uo. lor negistrationinaturalization as a
and thal any person who knows ary

reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statamant of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24" day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citzenshe, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Baharnas





THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 5B



ColinaImperial
profits up 86.2%

FROM page 1B

end.”

Explaining that Colinalmpe-
rial had to make conservative
actuarial and other assumptions
during the first three quarters
of every year, Ms Williams said
that until the final numbers
were computed it was “very dif-
ficult to ascertain what the final
projections will be at the end.”

She added that Colinalmpe-
rial’s resident actuary, Marcus
Bosland, and his team were
working to bring forward actu-
arial and other calculations to
mid-year, as opposed to year-
end, a move that would smooth
out earnings calculations.

Mr Bosland yesterday said
Colinalmperial’s refinancing of
its $20 million preference share
debt, replacing the initial issue
with one that carried a 1.5 per
cent coupon rate as opposed to
2.25 per cent, would save the
company $150,000 per year in
dividend payments.

He added that the life and
health insurer’s key solvency
ratio, the Minimum Continuing

Capital and Surplus Require-
ment (MCCSR) stood at 178
per cent at year-end 2008, well
above the 150 per cent supervi-
sory target.

Colinalmperial, said Mr
Bosland, expected that MCC-
SR reading to “be higher than
that this year”. He added that
while policy lapse rates “had
increased slightly in 2008 com-
pared to the prior year, a trend
that had continued into 2009,
this was not significant and had
been expected given the eco-
nomic environment.

While Colinalmperial was not
expecting growth in ordinary
life premiums that was compa-
rable to prior years, Emanuel
Alexiou, its executive vice-
chairman, said group and indi-
vidual health premiums were
set to be “a little higher” in 2009
due to product re-pricing and
the launch of its Stellar Care
portfolio.

Colinalmperial also saw A.
M. Best, the international insur-
ance credit rating agency, reaf-
firm its A- (Excellent) financial
strength rating and a- issuer

credit rating, both carrying a
stable outlook.

“The rating affirmations are
based on ColinaImperial's lead-
ing market share in the
life/health market in the
Bahamas, its diversified prod-
uct portfolio, favourable risk-
adjusted capitalisation and con-
servative reserving practices,”
A. M. Best said.

Market

“As the life/health market
leader, with more than 50 per
cent market share in the
Bahamas, Colinalmperial con-
tinues to leverage its competi-
tive advantages by expanding
within the islands of the
Bahamas and into other
Caribbean and Latin American
markets.

“A.M. Best notes that while
Colinalmperial's earnings per-
formance and growth in assets
have primarily been achieved
through several acquisitions, the
company's potential for new
business growth and earnings
sustainability will depend on its

ability to attract new business
growth organically in a mature
Bahamian life/health insurance
market. A.M. Best also notes
improved results in Colinalm-
perial's group and individual
health business lines.”

It added: “Partially offsetting
these strengths are the mature
nature of the Bahamian
life/health market and the
recent erosion in the Bahamas'
economy, primarily resulting
from a decline in the tourism
sector.

“The weakness in the
Bahamian economy may
impede Colinalmperial's poten-
tial for organic growth, its abil-
ity to stabilise the volatility in its
operating results and increased
delinquencies in its mortgage
loan portfolio, which would
require additional charges to
operating income.

“A.M. Best notes that Coli-
nalmperial has implemented
aggressive measures to address
the rising delinquencies in its
mortgage loan portfolio and
provide for all potential losses
in that portfolio.”

Capital costs curb
hotels’ efforts over

energy supply



CST
Real Estate

=

WRT eCE UML Mn LETC (0

Everywhere The Buyers Are!



a
Cit P

IN THE ESTATE OF THOMAS

Tel: 502 2356



ALLISON

AUGUSTUS CLEARE SR late of Joe Farrington

Road in the Eastern District in

the Island of New

Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of

the Bahamas.

Deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any
claims against the above-named Estate are required, on
or before the 10th day of April, A.D. 2009 to send their
names and addresses, and particulars of their debts or
claims, to the undersigned, and if so required by notice
in writing from the undersigned, to come in and prove
such debts or claims, or in default thereof they will be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution AND all
persons indebted to the said Estate are asked to pay their
respective debts to the undersigned at once.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the expiration
of the mentioned above, the assets of the late THOMAS

ALLISON AUGUSTUS CLEARE SR _ will be
distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Administrator
shall then have had notice.

Dated this 20th day of March, A.D., 2009

c/o PYFROM & CO

Attorneys for the Administrator,
No.58 Shirley Street,

P.O. Box N 8958,

Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.



FROM page 1B

resorts can incur huge bills in
an attempt to outfit their oper-
ations with energy-saving
devices, which can be bank
account breakers.

Air conditioning, a major
voltage consumer in any hotel,
is one of the most expensive
pieces of hardware to replace,
but one of the most important.

“(New energy efficient equip-
ment implementation) can only
be applicable to new installs
because the capital costs of a
change out on any large scale,
as well as retrofitting, isn’t
financially viable,” said Mr
Sands. “We are constantly look-
ing at ways to be more energy
efficient.”

Project

He added that the Baha Mar
project was considering deep
water cooling as an alternative
source of energy for air condi-
tioning and electricity genera-
tion, and had brought in experts
in the field to advise the pro-
ject.

“We’re looking at all forms
of renewable energy because
we know that it is the way of
the future,” Mr Sands said.

The Government has also
advocated energy efficiency in
the hospitality sector, accord-
ing to Mr Sands, and have
acknowledged the need to look
at alternative forms of energy.

Hotels

He said hotels around the
Bahamas have slowly begun to
integrate energy saving devices,
such as fluorescent lighting, but
were still often handicapped in
terms of energy consumption.

“The difficulty in our busi-
ness is we’re demand-side, and
whether we have 10 per cent or
100 per cent occupancy the
amount of electricity remains
the same, because we continue
to cool and light,” said Mr
Sands

However, he suggested that
the private sector and the Gov-
ernment might be able to imple-
ment short-term cost savings on
energy with better calculations
for fuel surcharge rates that will
help to further bring down the
high cost of utilities.

Colinalmperial resisted annuity

FROM page 1B

company, the product was
geared to providing clients with
retirement savings.

He pointed out that the annu-
ity product mix was substan-
tially different from Colinalm-
perial’s competitors, especially
CLICO (Bahamas), which had
treated annuity deposits almost
as certificates of deposit or
banking products.

CLICO (Bahamas) had been

offering above-market interest
rates of returns on its annuities
in a bid to attract new investor
money into the business and
stave off its impending insol-
vency.
The CLICO (Bahamas) bal-
ance sheet produced by provi-
sional liquidator Craig “Tony’
Gomez showed that future pol-
icyholder benefits to meet annu-
ity payments stood at $112.39
million, 83 per cent of its total
liabilities.

Meanwhile, Mr Alexiou said
yesterday that Colinalmperial
was “not looking to go after”
acquiring CLICO (Bahamas)
life and health insurance port-
folio because there were still
too many uncertainties associ-
ated with it.

Given that the provisional liq-
uidator had much work to do, it
was impossible, Mr Alexiou

said, for other insurers to deter-
mine what approach they might
take.

NOTICE

The owner of Laing’s Towing Services requests
that Mr. Norman Smith, owner of a 2005 Ford
F150, license plate #123783, remove the
forementioned vehicle from its storage facilities
in Kennedy Subdivision within thiry (30) days.
Please note that failure to do so will result in
the said vehicle being sold to cover the cost of
storage fees.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROYANN CYRILEAN PEDICAN of
PORT-au-PRINCE, HAITI is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 31th day of MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

ea

wi

i

BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

There will be an issue of Treasury Bills on Friday
April 3, 2009. Tenders for these bills should be
given to the Central Bank of The Bahamas be-
fore 3:00 pm on Wednesday April 1, 2009. All
Envelopes Enclosing Tenders should be labelled
“Tender for Bahamas Government Treasury
Bills.” Full details and application forms may be

obtained from The Central Bank Of The Bahamas
or from commercial banks.

WASTE - ED

PUT LITTER WHERE IT
BELONGS. IN THE CAN, MAN!

Litter Decomposition

Time

Plastic Container | 1 Million Years
Soda Can 200-500 Years
Disposable Diaper | 550 Years
Paper Bag 1 Month

A MESSAGE FROM THE MINISTRY
OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH SERVICES



BANKS DISASTER RECOVERY CENTRES

CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES
HOTEL & RESORTS
LAWYERS & ACCOUNTANTS





THE TRIBUNE



5-Day FORECAST

4

y a
( ryt
a

ORLANDO



. ; ane : : i ine. ine. The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
, High: 82° F/28° C ae ae and Patchy clouds Partly sunny. i of Plenty of sunshine Plenty of sunshine Ger od etree
Low: 58°F/14°C : : a 2
° @ ll . High: 86 High: 87 High: 90 High: 88
< A, ¢ High: 85° Low: 74° Low: 76° Low: 74° Low: 74° Low: 76° see EE
TAMPA Len (ge ae EE
High: 82° F/28° C Lad . a 106° F 95°-82° F 94°-87° F 103°-84° F High Hi.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft.
Low: 62° F/17°C ! -. / The See ee eae an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:04pm. 24 6:06am. 0.1
0 — elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low forthe day, 6:04p.m. 0.0
Wednesday'2:09 4m. 29 7:05am. 0.2
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday T39am.. 28 809am. 03
~~ ABACO jemperatfe _____________ 2410p.m. 23 8:14pm. 02
ne he High:81°F/27° C i a Hrmeeenrmenn ae Friday a a a ae a a
y ee Low: 71° F/22°C Normal high... coerce
7 eo Normal low 67° F/19° C
pt Som, @ WEST PALM BEACH es Last year's Migh ....ccccsscssseseeesine grec | ONT TIMI
— High: 84° F/29°C Last year's LOW ne ceeeenennnenenee 72° F/22° C a a TR ies
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Low: 70 F/21 Cc od Precipitation - Se os am ane am
As of 2 p.m. yesterday 0... .sccsecteneerneen 0.02 unsel....... co p.m. Moonset. ........ none
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT i. Year to date First Full Last New
High: 84° F/29° C @ High: 80° F/27° C Normal year to date oo... 5.11" 7 i.
Low: 73° F/23°C Low: 69° F/21°C
~, AccuWeather.com
@ — a Forecasts and graphics provided by SS %
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr. 2 Apr. 9 Apr.17 Apr. 24
= 5 High: 86° F/30° C ELEUT HERA
bow: 72°F/22"¢ _NASSAU SS Eat
High: 85° F/29° C 4
Low: 74° F/23° C
@
KEY WEST eX CATISLAND
High: 8a" F/29° C High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 72° F/22° C Low: 71° F/22°C
. i
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
a ‘on 84 a 4 High: 86° F/30°C
ow: 74° i Low: 73° °
. 2 ow: 73°F/23°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 75° F/24° C
LONG ISLAND
Low: 72° F/22°C
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 87° F/31°C
F/C FIC F/C = FIC FC FIC F/C FC FC FC Fie FC ; Low: 69° F/21°C
Albuquerque 61/16 36/2 s 56/13 33/0 c Indianapolis 62/16 43/6 + 60/15 41/5 pe Philadelphia 62/16 40/4 s 58/14 44/6 r+
Anchorage 33/0 21/6 c 35/1 20/-6 pc Jacksonville 74/23 6216 pe 77/25 65/18 t Phoenix 81/27 55/12 $s 82/27 54/12 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 6719 5412 t 66/18 53/11 pc Kansas City 48/8 31/0 po 54/12 341 pc Pittsburgh 63/17 43/6 s 55/12 38/3 RAGGEDISLAND — igh:89°F/s2°c
Atlantic City 56/13 37/2 s 55/12 45/7 + Las Vegas 75/23 51/10 s 78/25 538/41 pc Portland,OR 53/1 40/4 sh 52/11 44/6 c High: 87° F/31° C Low: 73° F/23°C
Baltimore 64/17 40/4 s 52/1 44/6 + Little Rock 61/16 40/4 t 70/21 48/8 s Raleigh-Durham 70/21 48/8 po 64/17 49/9 F Low: 70°F/21°C
Boston 50/110 36/2 s 49/9 39/3 ¢ Los Angeles 74/23 54/12 § 74/23 54/12 pe St. Louis 56/13 40/4 t 65/18 46/7 pc .
Buffalo 54412 38/3 s 50/10 39/3 + Louisville 68/20 47/8 t 64/17 45/7 pe Salt Lake City 51/10 31/0 c 43/6 29/-1_ sf GREATINAGUA
Charleston, SC 74/23 57/13 pce 75/23 61/16 t Memphis 58/14 42/5 t 70/21 50/10 s San Antonio 74/23 51410 pe 79/26 56/13 5s High: 88° F/31°C
Chicago 56/13 34/1 + B10 33/0 pe Miami 86/30 74/23 pce 88/31 73/22 pc San Diego 69/20 56/13 s 64/17 57/13 pe Low 69°F2I°C
Cleveland 56/13 42/5 pe 56/13 38/3 1 Minneapolis 40/4 27/-2 sn 40/4 26/-3 sn San Francisco 65/18 50/10 pe 67/19 51/10 s y
Dallas 66/18 45/7 s 73/22 55/12 pe Nashville 64/17 43/6 t 68/20 44/6 pc Seattle 50/10 39/3 sh 47/8 41/ ¢
Denver 45/7 24/-4 pc 42/5 23/-5 ¢ New Orleans 78/25 56/13 t 73/22 61/16 pc Tallahassee 74/23 63/17 t 78/25 63/17 t
Detroit 56/13 40/4 pe 51/0 37/2 ¢ New York 59/15 43/6 s 52/1 45/7 + Tampa 82/27 70/21 pc 83/28 70/21 t
Honolulu 82/27 71/21 c 82/27 71/21 pc Oklahoma City 62/16 39/3 s 72/22 45/7 pc Tucson 78/25 48/8 s 79/26 48/8 s
Houston 69/20 49/9 r 77/25 59/15 s Orlando 82/27 67/19 pce 87/30 67/19 t Washington, DC 65/18 43/6 s 5o/12 46/7 4+















THE WEATHER REPORT




AY ae aN

v.
8| eho
: EXT.

o|1|2

LOW

3|4|5

MODERATE
























6|7

HIGH





\. HIGH



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
55/12
68/20
73/22
67/19
93/33
84/28
52/11
52/11
68/20
59/15
55/12
68/20
66/18
57/13
56/13
15/23
80/26
99/37
36/2
88/31
82/27
66/18
50/10
55/12
57/13
57/13
39/3
90/32
39/3
75/23
90/32
69/20
61/16
79/26
85/29
84/28
59/15
57/13
84/28
84/28
90/32
46/7
41/5
43/6
85/29
91/32
39/3
59/15
53/11
82/27
82/27
68/20
83/28
82/27
88/31
86/30
86/30
17/25
50/10
45/7
72/22
69/20
57/13
44/6
86/30
48/8
56/13
52/11
36/2

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
70/21
46/7
43/6
63/17
52/11
78/25
73/22
49/9
36/2
63/17
51/10
41/5
60/15

mio hao Bao

no Bao wa

sn

Wednesday

High
F/C
87/30
59/15
64/17
74/23
63/17
94/34
84/28
57/13
61/16
69/20
66/18
59/15
68/20
64/17
59/15
62/16
70/21
84/28
100/37
32/0
90/32
83/28
66/18
52/11
54/12
61/16
64/17
44/6
90/32
37/2
75/23
90/32
64/17
66/18
75/23
85/29
85/29
63/17
59/15
82/27
81/27
92/33
52/11
41/5
50/10
85/29
96/35
40/4
61/16
58/14
80/26
86/30
70/21
82/27
84/28
89/31
82/27
84/28
75/23
54/12
48/8
73/22
70/21
57/13
48/8
86/30
46/7
62/16
50/10
35/1

Low
F/C
70/21
43/6
45/7
62/16
48/8
78/25
74/23
49/9
37/2
64/17
52/11
43/6
63/17
46/7
41/5
44/6
59/15
65/18
79/26
19/-7
72/22
67/19
43/8
46/7
41/5
39/3
45/7
32/0
68/20
32/0
64/17
61/16
56/13
54/12
50/10
76/24
64/17
43/6
36/2
75/23
45/7
62/16
37/2
32/0
38/3
60/15
67/19
32/0
39/3
35/1
71/21
54/12
52/11
72/22
61/16
71/21
54/12
68/20
61/16
34/1
32/0
66/18
57/13
45/7
38/3
71/21
41/5
45/7
39/3
19/-7





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST

Ww

foe c>

TiO he me Ome Oo ee ae ee ee Re

amc fae co) fxm co mom oO

czTUT”
com C> fe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





TUESDAY, MARCH 31st, 2009, PAGE 11B

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Wednesday: SE at 10-20 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Wednesday: SE at 10-20 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: E at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Wednesday: SE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Seattiov

74/54

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries

Miami
86/74

Fronts
Col =

War fief

Stationary eageafi

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

-0s Os- 10s 20s [B03)) 40s

AUTO INSURANCE

Never start your
Emeame) without us!

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ee





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 7B



a Ne





The Tribune

B Oi



1€a





ith



It’s way e more than



m@ By LLOYDALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

WITH Spring well on its
way, some experts are now
predicting an active pollen
induced allergy period.

Although there are no local agen-
cies which test for airbourne pollen lev-
els, internet reports predict this year
will be an active season based on last
year’s high pollen counts.

As high seasonal pollen counts can
affect numerous types of allergies, from
eye allergies (conjunctivitis) to skin
reactions (dermatitis), the most com-
mon spring allergy is allergic rhinitis
which is also known as hay fever.

Dr Chinyere Carey-Bullard - a fam-
ily medicine specialist from the
Advanced Family Medical centre on
Shirley Street - says the ball is still in
your hands in controlling your season-
al allergies.

She said although allergy sufferers
may be in for a rough spring, taking a
few extra steps to protect themselves
will make the difference between hav-
ing an allergy free spring, or enduring
allergy symptoms while exposed to the
elements.

Some common allergens include
house dust, cigarette or cigar smoke,
dust-mites, molds & fungi, cut grass,
animal dander or discharges, and more
commonly airbourne pollen.

Dr Carey-Bullard started by pointing
out the importance in observing sea-
sonal changes in the body.

Where many people may not even
be aware that they suffer from one or
more allergies, Dr Carey-Bullard said
the symptoms which frequently pass
under the radar, are commonly mis-
taken for less threatening ailments like
the common cold, or a dry throat.

She said: “Symptoms (related to an
allergy) can range from just a dry couch
which we call a variant asthma, to itchy
and watery eyes, watery nose, eczema,
constant sneezing, being stuffed up,

wheezing, or something worse such as
an upper respiratory symptoms like the
tightening of the chest.”

Whatever the symptom, she said
seeking an allergy, asthma, or Ear,
Nose, and Throat (ENT) specialist will
be the smart step in identifying whether
you have allergies or not.

She said getting a blood or skin aller-
gy test for a diagnosis, will prove

extremely useful for those who wish to
minimise their symptoms.





AS high seasonal pollen
counts can affect numerous
types of allergies, from eye
allergies (conjunctivitis) to
skin reactions (dermatitis), the
most common spring allergy
is allergic rhinitis which is also
known as hay fever.



-

The test which can be performed by
ENT, asthma, or allergy practitioner,
examines skin or blood reactions to
common allergens.

ENT/Otorhinolaryngologist Winston
Campbell, said prompt testing is need-
ed because sometimes severe internal
effects associated with various types of
allergies.

Dr Campbell explained: “Allergies
can produce scaly, itchy ear canals trig-
gering the usage of Q-tips, bobby-pins,

tooth-picks etc.

“The end result however, is only fur-
ther wax impaction of the ear canals,
hearing loss and painful ear canal infec-
tions. The inner ear may also be affect-
ed resulting in some variants of
Méniére's disease.”

As he explained, this is a disorder
which develops in the inner ear that
can affect hearing and balance, and is
caused by elevated pressure on the
endolymph.

Another allergy related disorder
according to Dr Campbell is Obstruc-
tive Sleep Apnea (OSA), which can be
triggered by an allergic reaction which
blocks or inflames the upper airway
passages.

Dr Campbell explained: “This
obstruction to nasal breathing may also
have an even greater ripple effect on
energy level, early morning fatigue,
inter-personal marital/family/work rela-
tionships, as well as memory and
reduced attention span (in students and
adults) when it interferes with one’s
ability to get quality, deep, sweet sleep.”

He said this disorder can also lead
to chronic sleep deprivation and sleep
fragmentation, should the individual
forgo medical intervention.

“Of course, in the vast majority of
cases, the effects of allergies on the ear
nose and throat are managed conserv-
atively using oral anti-histamine/decon-
gestants, topical nasal steroids [which
generate minimal to nil systemic side-
effects, and mucolytics,” he said.

Having an allergic reactions to cer-
tain medications or airbourne sub-
stances is a lifetime disorder, but the
likelihood of minimising its effects
depends on a sufferer being diagnosed
and treated, following the advice of
their medical practitioner, and a few
good housekeeping tips.

Some of the common steps include;
dusting your house regularly to avoid
dust buildups, frequently washing your
hands and hair after being in the out-
doors, washing your pets who frequent
the outdoors, installing screens to all
doors and windows in your home, and
choosing a wood or tiled floor for your
home in place of complete carpeting.



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PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ae

Even the best relationships have differences





OST people would
agree that there are
some relationships

that are so harmful and so
destructive that staying in the
union would not be in the best
interest of anyone involved. But
relationships are complex and
often situations and self destruc-
tive cycles have been left to fes-
ter and grow. In the midst of
our busy lives couples often fail
to recognise that they can not
work out their problems alone.
Divorce papers require the tick-
ing of a box to acknowledge
these ‘irreconcilable differ-
ences’. Is this a last ditch effort
to put some sort of label on a
marriage that they felt was too
far gone to salvage? Or is it that
if we choose a partner who is
so different from our culture
and beliefs that the relationship
is doomed to fail? Or is it sim-
pler than that -the other choic-
es to tick do not fit our view of
the reasons why we want a
divorce? But is it not these very

differences and individualism
that is so appealing to our new
love interests at the beginning
of the relationship?

Our unique characteristics,
qualities, eccentricities are what
catches the eye of our new
admirer. We stand out in the
crowd, our eyes lock and a con-
nection is made. During the ear-
ly dating days there is high ener-
gy and the differences are either
ignored or embraced because
of the overpowering sexual ten-
sion. We are more preoccupied
with our intense sexual feelings
and the feelings of love come
about from the longing and sep-
aration from that person. We
are affectionate, attentive, lis-
ten and talk to each other. Cou-
ples inevitably spend a lot of
time touching because it is the
power of touch that attaches
and bonds us to one another.
So what happens then as we set-
tle into the relationship and
become comfortable with each
other? One of the most com-
mon mistakes is that people

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spend too much time and ener-
gy trying to make their partner
be ‘like them’ or they try to ‘fix
them.’ This is a waste of pre-
cious life energy. In time we
come to realise that making
room for differences and to
peacefully coexist is a better use
of both time and energy. We
can only influence people and
each one of us is in charge of
our own thoughts and behav-
ior. Not all situations can be
worked out or in fact need to
be. One of the keys to a suc-
cessful relationship is accepting
and respecting the differences.
Embrace them; enrich your life
instead of trying to eliminate
them. The foundation of a rela-
tionship is the respect, commit-
ment and love for each other.
This may all sound easier said
than done. Our beliefs, percep-
tions and attitudes are often
deeply entrenched and have
been with us for years. Howev-
er things can become easier
when we realise that by shift-
ing our present thoughts, per-

ceptions and attitudes towards
our relationship things can
improve. Negative thoughts
producing harmful and destruc-
tive behavior in the home is
then witnessed by children,
extended family and cowork-
ers. By learning how to chan-
nel your thoughts and then your
behaviour, your relationships
will improve. It takes a lot of
hard work and you may well
question the validity of the
process. It takes the guidance
and careful steering of a rela-
tionship therapist to make these
changes possible. Once you see
an improvement, your life feels
better, is going in the direction
you want it to go, it is then all
worthwhile. Single people with-
out an intimate relationship or
who experience recurring failing
relationships will also benefit
from such guidance. The goal
may be to understand why we
choose the same type of per-
son, or they may be unsatisfying
or destructive. People often feel
defeated when they feel they

It’s

are alone in being willing to do
the work to improve things. It is
possible for one person to take
the first step, to change the
direction of the wheel particu-
larly if both compete against
each other. It is not a sign of
giving in but a sign of courage to
be the one to make the first
move. A relationship involves
two people and the best results
are achieved when both work
together towards a more fulfill-
ing intimate relationship. Great
relationships do not just hap-
pen; they are created.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual
and Couples Relationship Thera-
pist. She is a Registered Nurse and
a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist
located at The Centre for Renewing
Relationships, Grosvenor's Close
West. She can be contacted by
calling 356-7983 or by e-mail at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or at
www.relatebahamas. blogspot.com.
She is available for speaking
engagements.

IT IS now officially spring and we enter a new
phase of our gardening year. The days are slow-
ly growing longer and many plants will be reju-
venating themselves. In colloquial terms we say
the sap is rising, meaning that plants are respond-
ing to their conditions and heading towards doing
what they are supposed to do — propagate them-
selves.

If we take a very simplistic view we arrive at the
conclusion that the meaning of life is to make
new life. A mayfly has an adult life of anywhere
between half an hour and twelve hours. During
that conscious time it does one thing — it mates
and (if female) lays eggs. Job over. Die.

The procreational urge is strong and becomes
overwhelming in spring. We will be seeing many
more flowers in the next few weeks — in our gar-
dens, in the bush — and we must remember that
flowers are the sex organs of plants.

Were you to climb a Himalayan mountain to
consult a saffron-clad mystic — or visit a yurt in
Mongolia to commune with a rancid yak butter-
eating guru about the meaning of life — you may
get a one-word answer.

The increase in plant metabolism brought on by
spring makes it a fine time to take cuttings and to
start air layering in order to propagate many
plants, particularly flowering shrubs.

Vigorous new growth also means the ideal time
to do some judicious pruning. With flowering
shrubs like hibiscus I like to prune one-third of the
shrub laterally, then a few weeks later prune
another third, then finish the job after another few
weeks. By that time the original pruned area
should be flowering and you will have avoided
having a flowerless hibiscus for a month to six
weeks.

On the subject of pruning, if you have kept
some Christmas poinsettias and they are begin-
ning to look woebegone, put them in the ground
in full sun and away from artificial light sources.

——=



BROCCOLI was a disappointing
producer in the garden this winter.

Once they have settled in, prune them drastical-
ly, cutting away about half of the foliage. In a
couple of months’ time prune them again, halfway
above the original pruning points. This pruning
will ensure a bushy plant that will be the envy of
your neighbours when December arrives and the
colourful bracts appear. Do not prune poinsettias
after August as you may cut away material that
forms the bracts.

Our vegetables season pretty well lasts through
autumn, winter and spring. Once summer sets in
we have to choose what we grow very carefully.
Most veggie gardeners take the summer off and
survive on everlasting cherry tomatoes.

I have spoken with many fellow gardeners and
farmers about the vegetable season so far and
many of them had the same problems.

The biggest disappointment of the year was
broccoli. Late autumn and winter gave us cool
weather that you would have thought was ideal
for broccoli. The heads, however, were generally
small. In my own garden my cauliflower formed
rather ugly curds that were still tasty but aes-
thetically less than photogenic. My cabbages were
fine but others

complained of slow and stunted growth. Sweet
peppers had a very slow season with very few
examples of excellence. Eggplants seemed to
flower forever before producing fruit.

In case I have made the season sound a total
disaster I should mention that tomatoes, beans,
chard, English peas, fennel, spring onions, hot
peppers, strawberries and herbs were very pro-
ductive.

Almost to a man (and woman) the older people
are predicting a hotter than usual summer. That
inspires me to get the most out of my vegetable
garden between now and the end of spring and
then see if they are right.

They usually are.
rr
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THE TRIBUNE



BRIDE to be Phaedra Saunders gets her lau =aniile sppiciitn by cakellp artist vendor.

91st Annual Bahamas

FROM page 12

where talking about a bad econ-
omy and so forth. One of the
things that troubled me in par-
ticular is that when the econo-
my goes bad or goes slow, I
don’t like when our leaders
start to talk about tightening
our belt and all the negative
stuff rather than encouraging
people to use their resources
that they have available in
order to get us back on our feet.
Many times you have to rebuild
rather than go tight and this
year the retailers prove that
they have seen the same thing
and the response we got form
the public has been great- espe-
cially from the brides and
grooms to be because they are
eager for this,” Mr Stubbs said.

One of the wedding cake
vendors, Deborah Burrows of
the Cake Box, was excited
about participating in this years
event and brought a few of her
fabulous cakes with her on dis-
play.

“T have been baking almost
all my life and I specialise in
wedding cakes and special occa-
sion extraordinary cakes. This
is my passion and I love it.
When it comes to the details on
the cakes I do a lot of hand
work. With shells, they are indi-
vidually made, dried and air-
brushed, with the gum paste
flowers, each petal, leaf and bud
is made individually. To make
the normal wedding cake, after
baking, would take anywhere
from two to three hours and
some can take longer,” Mrs
Burrows said.

Ms Burrows said if others
want to get into the cake busi-
ness, it takes a lot of training.

“T have trained with Collette
Peters, along with others from
the Food Network, and you
have to find the artists if you
like their work and get the train-
ing. It is a passion because
sometimes when I am working I
forget to eat and before I realize
it, the sun is up. Its not easy
work, but if you have a love for
it then it becomes what you
love,” Mrs Burrows said.

When it comes to the pho-
tographers who attended the
bridal show, Photography by
Fabian, owned by Fabian
Whimms took centre frame.

“T have been doing photog-
raphy for a little over 15 years. I

MODEL showing off Lilac brides-
maid dress by Buttons Formal
Wear.



have had different experiences
with many brides do to the
many different personalities I
have come into contact with.
Some are smaller, bigger, and
so forth. I have only problems
with brides if they have prob-
lems that can arise from the
limo, flowers, makeup and so
forth because it then falls on me
because I know what I want to
do. Time is very important,” Mr
Whimms said.

As a photographer, Mr
Whimms said although this is
his second bridal show, he tries
to educate the brides as best he
could.

“Weddings are a touchy sub-
ject. I try to educate them about
time and how important it is.
Many times the couple may
want certain things, but it would
be difficult to do what they want
in one day. So I try to get my
brides to take even to some of
their photos before or after the
wedding where there is no rush.
Most brides do not want to put
on their full attire after the wed-
ding. I had a couple who took
their photos a month after the
wedding on a Sunday and there
was no pressure. So as a pho-
tographer, I try to do everything
different and focus on different
things,” Mr Whimms said.

The décor at a wedding can
set the stage for any mood the
bride wants to portray, which
allows Victorine Bannister-Col-
lie, general manager of Bahama
Fantasies to work at what she
does best- bringing fantasies to
life.

“T have been in the event
planning business since 1997. I

“For All Your
Printing Needs!”

prefer to use real flowers with
my décor because of the color
schemes you can achieve. There
is nothing like real flowers. You
can get so many colors with
flowers. I read a lot of books
and watch events on television
just to get inspired sometime
and make it my own. I try to
keep current and think outside
the box. I do not call my tables
arrangements, I call them
escapes,” Mrs Collie said.

Mrs Collie said her escapes
are aS unique as her centre
pieces and she tries to please all
of her clients.

“A table scape, using these
live Phalaenopsis orchids can
run into $300 a table. I have
done centerpieces for as high
as $325 try to be as reasonable
as I can with my clients. We do
international themed décor as
well,” Mrs Collie said.

The Bahamas Bridal show
was a complete success with
brides and grooms winning
numerous prizes and surprises
to prepare them for their spe-
cial day. Registered brides and
grooms to be received their
share of over $30,000 in gifts
and prizes donated by partici-
pating exhibitors. A fashion
show was also staged later on in
the day, featuring fabulous wed-
ding and special occasion
gowns, tuxedos, honeymoon
clothing and lingerie for those
brides and grooms to end their
special day. This years Bahamas
Bridal Show was not just a
show, but an all day event ded-
icated to helping young people
fulfill their wedding dreams and
fantasies.

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TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 9B




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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





(Coy THE COACH APPROACH

Obstacles or o

What do you see?

IN an environment flooded by fear
and frustration, it may be difficult to
consider that great opportunities exist
just beneath the surface of your chal-
lenges. Hence, many willingly settle
for a small life of discontent; fearing
that this abundant universe is with-
out the essential provisions to sustain
their well-being.

This is the nugget of negative think-
ing that fuels low energy; which mush-
rooms into lack of confidence,
reduced productivity and poor per-
formance on the personal and busi-
ness level.

Thus, you must consistently analyse
your thinking; a critical process that
ought not to be taken lightly. Your
thoughts are the bricks with which
you build your life and they eventual-
ly become the slabs with which we
collectively build our society.

Nation building is not about blocks
and cement; rather, it’s about building

Deets)
Williams



¢ ,
: \
c :
2 :
I ‘ : I
Kelly's currently has the following brides =
; gifts in stock. Please collect your gifts =
= immediately by May 30th, 2009. d
I Uncollected gifts will be returned back to inventory.
7 :
f | i
- Adderley Lanovia D. Gaitor Lesley (Tammy) 5
i Algreen Barbara Deanne Gibson Prenell D. a
y. Ali Denise S. Gilbert Shakera L. I
= Allen Anishka Jaunita Graham Samantha r
: Anderson Samantha T. Gray Kenisha M. “
5 Archer Patrice Green Robynn I. I
* Armbrister Tamu N. Griffin Esther =
I Auberg Melissa D. Grimes Valron S. i
= Beauchand Rolanda Handfield Maryann (Tamika) I
I Bethel Kenya P. Hanna RanelJ. =
| _Bethell Dollene Peaches Heastie Anasieya Chariso I
= — Bonimy Chakita Hinsey Ngaio F. il
I Braithwaite Joan Ingraham Kenya S. z
I Brave Wiselene Johnson Jacklyn S. I
- Brennen Deshon Kemp Nicolette D. -
I Bullard Lashan K. Knowles Kimberley V. =
5 Burrows Nakeisha K. Lamb Vanessa G. i
= Carey Monalisa M. Lees Mayleene N. -
I Cartwright ~Cheyenne M. Lewis Selecia L.C. :
5 Cash Apryll J. Lockhart Lynaire A. 5
* Clarke Deidre A. Sands Jenell L. :
I Cleare Jaminia J. Saunders Psyche T. a
> Collie Pamela L. Sawyer Carina Marie r
I Cooper Angela N.T. Selver Melissa :
I Curtis Cynthia Shantell Seymour Erica i
= Darville Torrianna L. Smith Kayla Patrina 7
i Dean Camille C. Stewart Gingha =
jy _Deleveaux _Dereka F. Storr Marissa i
- Dorsette Dianette L. Stubbs Sheila r
I Edgecombe Mary Sturrup Sherrell A. ~
5 -Estwick Selina A L Swaby Stephanie A. i
E Eulin Antoyeka Sweeting Carmetta M. =
I Evans Prenette S. Symmonette Tamika K. i
y Ferguson —_Kimra M. Thompson Mcquessa I. I
= Fernander Jonelle Thompson/Rolle Dedrie M. =
I ‘Forbes Aanica S Williams Yasmin N. i
yj Fowler Marcia F. Wilson | La-Keisha I
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* ¢



people, one mind at a time.

Small Shift - Big Change

A small shift in your thinking can
make big things happen; but you must
be willing to do the work at resetting
your mind, something few are pre-
pared to do.

I find it odd that despite the daz-
zling opportunities within our Bahama
Islands, admired by many around the
world; the population mindset remains
laced with fear rather than faith;
where the currency of hope is quickly
exchanged for the popularity of
despair.

Little do we understand that fear
only leads to aggression; any steady
diet of negativity slowly shapes who
we become; a fear-driven community,

imprisoned by the barriers of nega-
tive thinking.

This thought may mean very little to
those who have concluded that the
world is coming to a close and that
we are experiencing ‘the last days’.
However, for the souls of tomorrow,
who are awaiting their chance to enjoy
the opportunity of life, we owe it to
them to create a bigger vision of pos-
sibility that impels them towards even
greater achievements.

Until we take the time to reconcile
our thoughts and build our minds, we
will continue to uncover the many
obstacles that we seem so desperately
seeking to find. Shifting from pes-
simism to optimism enables you to
discover endless opportunities that
are right before your eyes.

Final thoughts...

What is most fascinating about the
human mind is that it has infinite
capacity to think, learn and grow. This
understanding reassures that there is
truly nothing to fear; as the entire
kingdom is within, waiting for you to
bring it into expression.

When I consider the magnitude and

majesty of this universe; boundless
and endless, I cannot comprehend how
so many give up on the substance of
life.I believe that that this current
sense of powerlessness is not the result
of people being without power; as
much as it is the result of people being
without understanding.

I cannot imagine a world, where
even the tiniest creature is consistent-
ly provided for, but human kind, who
is made in the image and likeness of
the creator,is without sustenance.

I cannot imagine a world where
there is miscalculation of needs or dis-
regarded desires; a world where well-
ness gives way to illness and wealth is
replaced by poverty.

Such a world, I truly cannot imagine;
but if it does exists, rest assured that it
lives only within your own mind.

For some this may be deemed as
too much optimism; but this is more
than good ole optimism. It is the
absolute certainty that a bountiful life
is always on our side. A philosophy
rooted in the knowledge that we are
the creators of our own reality and
that obstacles are typically the wrap-
ping paper with which opportunities

pportunities

are presented.

This is the world that I know; this is
the world that I see. Now, it’s your
turn; what kind of world do you imag-
ine, what kind of world do you see?

Remember — whenever you ask, it is
always given. Whether you see obsta-
cles or opportunities, you always
receive, encounter or discover what-
ever you seek within your heart and
mind. I encourage you to see the
upside of life; because in truth, that is
all that really exists.

¢ If you are ready to analyse your
thoughts and optimise your mind — join
my upcoming NoExcuses Goals Pro-
gram. Please send an e-mail to
coach4ward@Yahoo.com or call 429-
6770. Call Now To Enter For Free Coach-
ing Opportunity!

Michelle M. Miller is a certified Life-
Coach and Stress Management Consul-
tant. She is the Principal Coach of the
Coaching Studio, which located on
Madeira Street, Palmdale.

Questions or comments can be sent to
P.O. Box CB-13060 — e-mail
coach4ward@yahoo.com

DUANE WILLIAMS: WEDDING COORDINATOR

ee | | | | | | | |





@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Feature
Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

MARRIAGE for many peo-
ple is a time where you have
just one shot to pull off your
dream event for friends and
family.

This task nowadays is hardly
ever a solo project, leading to
the increasing popularity in pro-
fessional wedding planners.

Unlike most people who
walk away from their wedding
to begin life with their new wife
or husband, Duane Williams
realised after getting married
that there was a special talent
she possessed as a wedding
coordinator.

Although a finance major in

ee ee eee

Ten nt tt on ne nn

college, Mrs Williams said her
eventual transition from a desk
job to becoming a wedding
planner took many years of
searching and several career
changes.

“T was watching the televi-
sion one day and came across a
biography about Vera Wang.
They were talking about how
she had done her own wedding
and how elegant it was,” she
said.

After learning of how
involved the famous designer
had become in the whole con-
cept of weddings, she thought of
how heavily she was involved
in her own wedding in making
the invitations, and organising
the entire event.

During that exact moment,
she said she had received a call
from a friend who said she had
recently met a wedding coordi-
nator who had impressed her,
and told her that she could see
her doing the same thing.

Seeing this as a preamble to
her destiny, Mrs Williams said
she soon applied and completed
her wedding consultant certifi-
cation from Weddings Beautiful
- an American based company,
and thus entered the world of
wedding planning.

Mrs Williams said although

she had lost her desk job, she
was determined to succeed in
this new venture, simply
because it was her destiny.

Now five years later, Mrs
Williams continues to watch her
business grow, while taking care
of her husband and young son.

She explained: “Brides tend
to look around a year in
advance for their weddings.
Some of them will even contact
you 30 days before and are nor-
mally not looking for anything
major.”

While most of her clients are
foreigners, she said they tend
to just be as interested in finding
someone to perform their cere-
mony, securing witnesses, and
then getting a boutonniére and
bouquet.

Although those minimal
request have had some impact
on her business, Mrs Williams
said the addition of her new
company’s website www.arose-
unfolding.net, has helped in
promoting her business to peo-
ple who would have otherwise
not known about her.

When she first started her
company, like most new entre-
preneur she said at times that
she wondered if her business
would be successful.

“Tve felt discouraged at

Gretchen & Michael LaBonia

times, but like clock-work
someone would call and ask ‘is
this Rose Unfolding, I want to
find out about what services you
offer.’

“That has been the push for
me, knowing that this is some-
thing that God wants me to do.”

Mrs Williams said in an
industry where it is so easy to be
lost in the sea of the many com-
panies offering similar services,
one thing she has done to stand
out is diversifying her wedding
packages.

Offering a cross section of
pre-arranged or customised
packages, she said from her
experience of once being a
bride, she understands how
important it is to have options,
especially if you’re working with
a limited budget.

As aconsultant, Mrs Williams
also assists brides who are look-
ing for the island wedding expe-
rience.

She said offering elements
like Bahamian music, food,
Androsia, and flowers to a visit-
ing bride goes a long way in sell-
ing what is available locally.

With the help of her husband,
Mrs Williams looks forward to
her company becoming the
agency of choice for persons
planning their weddings.







THE TRIBUNE

man TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

21° Annual Bahamas

BRIDAL

5S H O W

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

ECOR, the perfect dress, flowers,

invitations, party favours, when you

think about it there is a lot of plan-
ning, not to mention the headache and frus-
tration that goes into the wedding planning
experience. The perfect way for a bride to
relive the stress of shopping from store to
store to plan her perfect day is to attend a
bridal show and the 21st Bahamas Bridal
Show, under the theme “Two Hearts, One
Beat” brought together 44 vendors just to
assist the many brides to be that attended
the spectacular event.

ly "
a
s
aA
i
.





A Bridal show is basically a one stop shop
for all things wedding. Vendors came out with
all the glam and glitter they possibly can to
showcase their products to potential brides and
grooms alike. Makeup artists from Sacha Cos-
metics made a huge
impression on the

brides to be by giv- =
ing free makeup ———
demonstrations.

Florists displayed

their exquisite

arrangements of

7
both silk and real
flowers, photogra-
phers gave shots to ; i
couples as they he
entered the room, r “5 re
and so much more
was made avail-
able to the cou-
ples to offer their
services and
expert advice.

Visiting all
those different
bridal vendors in
one location
made it so much
easier to com-
pare prices and
services and in
turn, to save
the multitude
of young cou-
ples who
Sndiemey. vance of

a ald atti

Executive Buttons Formal Wear. en
producer and
creator of The
Bahamas Bridal Show, Tommy Stubbs, said
although they have been around since 1990,
there has been a lot of time and effort to pull
off such a large scaled event.

“First the bridal show was done to help
launch my company, Buttons Formal wear,
and then we realised we should not only do it
to promote Buttons, but we should involve
other companies that need to do the same
thing. We are now doing this as a partnership
to promote all companies that are involved in
weddings or interested in promoting their
products,” Mr Stubbs said.

Mr Stubbs said although there is usually
more companies participating, he would like
the brides and grooms to be to take away from
the show a lot of fun, memories, prizes and
ideas for their wedding day.

“One of the things was that we usually antici-
pate around 50 vendors but a lot of persons

.
7" .
. a"
.
=
.
.
2



SEE page nine

Mario Duncanson/Photos

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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Sex scandal exposes weakness in schools C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.107TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND HUMID HIGH 85F LOW 74F F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S Bahamas SEEPAGEELEVEN Bridal show ‘Q’ leads pack on track n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@ tribunemedia.net T WO sex scandals involving teachers who are alleged toh ave preyed on students at a Grand Bahama high school have exposed sys temic weaknesses that made it easier for potential predators to take advantage of children, the Minister of Education has admitted. According to Carl Bethel, the Ministry of Education has now taken “extraordinary measures” to deal with the repercussions of allegations made against certain teachers at the Eight Mile Rock High School and to reduce the likelihood of children at any government-run school being molested in the future. The Ministry plans to have all new teachers vetted by police, revamp the role o f school guidance counsellors who will be trained in “coun s elling psycho-therapy” and institute “stu dent safety committees” comprising par-e nts, teachers, administrators and students. Mr Bethel’s com m ents came in a press conference called to respond to allegationsf rom PLP Chairman Glenys Hanna Martin that he has remained “callously and inexcusably” silent on the situation at Eight Mile Rock High School and failed to keep concerned parents apprised of what steps are being taken by the Ministry in the wake of shocking allegations of miscon duct by some teachers at the school. Mrs Hanna Martin accused Mr Bethel on Sunday of being in “gross default” of his duty as Minister in relation to the “disMinister admits system vulnerable to child abuse The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR D OUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff R eporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net L ESS than six months after the Caribbean Community signed onto a cont roversial trade agreement with the European Union, regional leaders h ave indicated they are ready to discuss creating a similar agreement with Canada. A ccording to the Asso ciated Press, the issue will be discussed on the side l ines of the April 17 Summit of the Americas, in Trinidad. Y esterday Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette saidC ARICOM had previously agreed to begin dis cussions on a proposede conomic partnership agreement (EPA Canada once the regionh ad wrapped up negotiations with the EU. While negotiations have not begun between CARICOM and Canada, Mr Symonette expects the nuts and bolts of the proposed agreement to be comparable to the Carl Bethel Caribbean community is ready to discuss trade agreement with Canada SEE page 12 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE value of loans in arrears for 30 days or more expanded by 228 per cent in the last quarter of 2008, the Central Bank revealed yesterday. Evidencing the worsening impact of the economic downturn on the ability of mortgage holders to meet their financial obligations, the bank’s Quar terly Economic Review for the period ending December 2008 said the value of loans in arrears for this length of time swelled by $143.5 million to $771.8 mil lion. This equated to an elevated arrears rate of 12.5 per cent vis-vis a 9.4 per cent rate during the corresponding period in 2007 and a 10.5 per cent rate at the end of the last quarterly period in September 2008. Among these loans, commercial loans showed the “most marked weakening” reaching an arrears rate of 15.5 per cent at the end of December 2008, from 13.6 per cent in Sep tember of that year, and 9.3 per cent in December 2007. Consumer loans, meanwhile, registered a 1.7 per cent arrears rate increase over the previous quarter, and a 2.5 per cent rise since the same period in 2007. “Non performing loans, those in arrears for over 90 days and on which banks no longer accrue interest rose to 5.96 per cent of total claims at end December, from 5.51 per cent at end September, and 4.4 per cent at December 2007. “In line with rising credit risks the banking system’s loan loss provisions expanded to $2.74 of total loans from 2.57 per cent in September and 2.11 per cent in December 2007. However the corresponding ratio of provisions to the total non-performing loans ratio was lower at 45.98 per cent from 46.65 per MANCHARGEDWITHMURDEROFTAXIDRIVER n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A 32-YEAR-OLD man charged in a shooting on Arawak Cay that claimed the life a local taxi driver was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday on a murder charge. Police have charged Perez Ellis of Mount Pleasant Village in the March 9 murder of Gentry McPhee. McPhee, 30, of Carmichael Road, was shot shortly after midnight on March 9, while in The Big Yard nightclub on Arawak Cay. McPhee, the nephew of Rev Philip McPhee received serious injuries to his abdomen and hands. He was rushed to Princess Mar garet Hospital by ambulance where he died shortly after arrival. McPhee was PEREZ ELLIS leaves court yesterday after beingc harged with murder. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 12 Value of loans in arrears expanded by 228 per cent SEE page 12 SEE page 12 n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter PROCEDURAL changes, which will ultimately affect the way appeals to the Privy Council are filed, will come into effect next month it was stated yesterday. During his remarks at the opening ceremony marking the Privy Council’s third working visit, Lord Philips of Worth Matravers noted that some procedural changes will be introduced under the new Privy Council rules. “In the Privy Council it will be business as usual. There will be no change in the jurisdiction of the court or in the way in which it conducts its hearings. We are, however, introducing some procedural changes under the new Privy Council rules Changes to affect appeals to Privy Council SEE page 12

PAGE 2

n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net SUPPORT poured in for the families of the two boys who drowned off the coast of Adelaide as their mothers were interviewed by Ortland Bodie on More 94 FM yesterday morning. Callers pledged donations to help the mothers cover the costs of the funerals upon hearing them talk about the tragedy of their sons’ deaths. As more and more listeners offered to make donations, many reachingb eyond their means, others took even greater strides to support the family. S S u u i i t t s s One caller said they would buy new suits for the boys to be buried in, and the director of a funeral home, the name of which was not revealed, called to say they would hold the funerals free of charge. The children’s lifeless bodies were pulled from the waters off Adelaide Beach on Monday, March 23, after they were reported missing the previous day. Rovan Smith, 9, and Craig Stubbs, 10, had taken a small blue skiff, which reportedly had been drawn from the bushes to the beach the night before the boys took it out to sea. The skiff had a hole in it, and the boys are thought to have drowned in the rough tide that carried them out into the current. A search party of around 20 of the families’ friends and neighbours scoured the shallow waters off Adelaide beach looking for the boys on Monday last week with support from a US Coast Guard helicopter, the Royal Bahamas Defence Force and from volunteers in their boats. Rovan’s body was brought to shore by the neighbourhood search party at around 11am, and Craig was found by RBDF officers about a quarter of a mile out to sea at around 2.30pm. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net SOME residents of Harbour Island are fuming over what t hey call the "lack of representation" by MP for the area Alvin Smith. They say they are prepared to vote him out of office in the n ext general election if he "doesn't shape up". In response, Mr Smith – who is also the Speaker of theH ouse – told T he Tribune h e spends a lot of time in his constituency. He added that during his t hree terms as MP for North Eleuthera, he has consistently l obbied successive governments to upgrade infrastructure on the islands he represents. He also said he is planning a s eries of town meetings where constituents can air their concerns. Residents said their fury came to a head at a meeting in L ower Bogue on Friday – w hich Mr Smith did not a ttend. F ree National Movement chairman Johnley Ferguson showed up instead, and was reportedly peppered with complaints by about 40 residents of North Eleuthera. According to an entrepreneur on Harbour Island, who asked that his name be withheld, the meeting was organ-i sed by local government officials to let Mr Smith know how his supporters feel. Residents are calling for: a youth officer to be perm anently stationed on Harbour Island to organise activities for the young work to be carried out on the island’s shoddy roads an island-wide clean-up the expansion of the i sland's main dock, which they say the community has outg rown U U p p s s e e t t They are also upset that Mr Smith has not organised for m ore Cabinet ministers to tour North Eleuthera and see the problems first hand. "Everybody is disappointed in Alvin Smith's performance. People complain about things o n the island, but we don't h ave anyone to complain to – we're dying for him to have a public meeting on Harbour Island. There are a lot of concerns in North Eleuthera, e specially Harbour Island; we h ave local government here b ut that's not working," the Harbour Island resident said. "If Alvin Smith runs again then definitely the FNM will lose this seat and this is an FNM stronghold," he added. W hen contacted for com ment yesterday, Mr Smith said as far as he knew the meeting in question was held so that FNM chairman Johnley Ferg uson could speak with North Eleuthera constituents. H e said he was told the meeting went well, despite a few concerns being raised. A nd despite what his critics say, Mr Smith maintained that he is in constant contact with local government and frequently visits his constituency,w hich includes Spanish Wells, Harbour Island, James Cistern, and Current Island. "I visit my constituency I would say more than any Fam-i ly Island MP, except those that live in their constituen cy," he said. " But we're going to have a series of town meetings t hroughout the constituency to hear what the people have t o say. I'm meeting with various local government town c ouncils – last week Tuesday I met with North Eleuthera district council and also with theH arbour Island district council.” He said he hopes to meet with the other councils in his constituency soon. M r Smith said government has committed to paving the roads on James Cistern, Current Island and Harbour Island; is open to “serious dis-c ussions” about building an alternative dock on Harbour Island; and has completed sig-n ificant repairs to the Glass Window Bridge on mainland E leuthera. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Shape up or ship out, MP told S O MEANGRY H A RBOUR I S LANDRESIDENTSACCUSE A L VIN S M ITHOF L ACKOFREPRESENTATION I visit my constituency I would say more than any Family Island MP, except those that livei n their constituency. But we're going to have a series of town meetings throughout the constituency to hear what thep eople have to say.” Alvin Smith Huge support for families of two boys who drowned ADELAIDE TRAGEDY

PAGE 3

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accuses Granto f blocking construction of community centres In brief P LP MP Alfred Gray accused Minister of Works Neko Grant of preventingt he construction of community centres on the five i slands that constitute the MICAL constituency. The MP, who made the s tatement during the after noon session of the House of Assembly yesterday, said that he pledged months ago “under the authority of thep rime minister” that he would begin several commu nity centres in the various islands of his southern con stituency with his annual c onstituency allowance of $100,000. The allowance, he said, w ould launch the construction of these centres and t hrough “self-help” the residents of the islands would complete the buildings. H owever, Mr Gray said the minister of works has “apparently unilaterally” decided that the $100,000 would not be dispersedu nless it can be proven that the money will be enough to complete the projects. “Most and if not all of those islands are without ac ommunity centre and it was intended to put $100,000 in each one and let the island people complete it from whatever stage the $100,000t ook. S S e e l l f f h h e e l l p p “In each of those islands (Mayaguana, Inagua, Crooked Island, Acklins and Long Cay) that’s how they developed; through self-help, because governments tend to do very little for them anyway,” Mr Gray said. The MP said that he would not allow Mr Grant to prevent construction of the centres without explaining to the islanders the reason for his decision. “I know that $100,000 may not complete the community centre but the people are willing to contribute to the completion of the buildings,” he said. Mr Grant responded that his ministry’s job is to ensure that public funds are properly spent. He added that Mr Gray was not correct in his assertions. “I find it regrettable that the member has misled this House and I shall return in due course with the proper information to be laid in the House,” Mr Grant said. A memorial service will be held for Peter Nicholas Knowles Jr on Sun-d ay, April 5, at 3pm at the New Providence Community Centre. Described as a l oving husband, supportive father, doting son, nurturing brother and a friend to all, Peter died onT hursday, March 26, w hen his scooter coll ided with a dump truck at the junction o f Prospect Ridge and John F Kennedy Drive. The 32-year-old led a spiritually fulfilling and family-orie nted life. He was able to establish a well-known business, a strong f amily that includes a wife and three children, and a deeprooted friendship with and respect for God, said a family member. He fulfilled all of his goals in such a short time here on Earth. “He was able to touch many people and will continue to h elp us and serve God for all eternity. “We are thankful and grateful to have been blessed with his p resence. “The family appreciates all of the condolences, love and respect of those who are aware of Peter's passing. He will bed early missed and grieved by all,” a statement from his family read. T he family asked that those attending the service dress in red, green, yellow, or white. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net AFTER rising throughout l ast year, prices declined slightly towards the end of 2 008 but were still much higher than in 2007 – particularly in terms of education andf ood. New Central Bank of the B ahamas figures show that many individuals struggling in the face of job losses andr eductions in their working hours will have had an even h arder time purchasing necessary goods than in 2007. Overall in 2008, consumer p rice inflation “accelerated” to 4.5 per cent from 2.5 per cent in 2007. “With the easing of external price pressures of the sec-o nd half of the year, inflation trended lower during the fourth quarter but remaineds harply elevated on an annual basis,” said the bank’s Quart erly Economic Review for the three month period ending D ecember 2008. “The quarterly rise in the average retail price indexm oderated sharply to 0.2 per cent from a 0.8 per cent run up i n the same period in 2007,” it said, adding: “Given the d owntrend in energy costs, the housing component – the most heavily weighted item in thei ndex – declined by 0.7 per cent after an increase of 0.3 p er cent in 2007.” D D e e c c l l i i n n e e s s In the last three months of 2 008, average price declines were also recorded in transportation and communication( 1.1 per cent) and recreation and entertainment services (1 per cent), as well as in clothing and footwear (0.4 per cent and medical care and health( 0.5 per cent). “Conversely, higher aver age price gains were registered for food and beverages (2.2 per cent) and education (3.4 p er cent),” said the review. According to the bank, for 2 008 overall, there was a 3.5 per cent rise in average house costs, compared to a 0.5 perc ent rise in 2007, while the rate at which the price of food a nd beverages rose almost doubled to 6.7 per cent. The report added that avera ge costs for ‘other’ goods and services also rose for 2008 overall, growing at a “significantly increased pace of 7.5 per cent and incrementallyh igher price increases were recorded for furniture and household operations (6.8 perc ent) medical care and health (5 per cent), education (2.6 p er cent) and clothing and footwear (1.5 per cent Meanwhile, the cost of d iesel and gasoline declined in the last quarter of 2008 as t he international price of crude oil fell. “Similarly the Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s average energy fuel surcharge wasl owered over the quarter by 21.9 per cent to 18.06 cents per kilowatt hour (kWHa lthough still exceeding the corresponding 2007 average of 13.27 cents per kWh,” the review said. Alfred Gray Struggling consumers hit even harder in pocket during 2008 ACTING as Minister of Finance in the absence of the prime minister, Tommy Turn quest tabled three sets of reg u lations pertaining to the details of the government’su nemployment benefit plan in the House of Assembly yes t erday afternoon. The three documents specify, respectively, the benefit and assistance details, the financial and accounting considerations, and the specifications and conditions of the plan. As previously reported, outof-work Bahamians who qualify for benefits under the temporary unemployment plan can expect to receive financial assistance for a period of 13 weeks a year. To be entitled to receive benefits, a person has to be younger than 65 and to have paid NIB contributions for at least 40 weeks. The weekly amount to be paid out will be equal to 50 per cent of each person’s average weekly insurable wage or income before they became unemployed. U nemployment benefits will be paid for each day of thew eek except Sundays. A person will be disquali f ied from receiving benefits if he or she: refuses suitable employment; fails to apply for suitable employment where there is a known vacancy; neglects to avail themselves of an opportunity for suitable employment; makes no reasonable effort to obtain suitable employment. A person also will be disqualified if they were terminated from their work place as a result of theft, fraud, or some other form of dishonesty. CENTRALBANKOFBAHAMASFIGURES But prices dipped slightly towards end of year Memorial service for Peter Knowles DEARLY MISSED: Peter Knowles Neko Grant Turnquest tables regulations on unemployment benefit plan Tommy Turnquest “The quarterly r ise in the average r etail price index moderated sharply t o 0.2 per cent from a 0.8 per cent run up in the same p eriod in 2007

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Nicki Kelly, in her eagerness to get back at me for relieving her of her duties as a Tribune columnist seven years ago, is now trying to cast aspersions on my integrity as an editor. She implies that a story I quoted from in my recent controversial Insight article on Sir Lynden Pindling was a figment of my imagination. “In his March 23 Insight piece on Sir Lynden Pindling, Mr Marquis referred to ‘Tribune reporter Nicki Kelly’ and ‘Nicki Kelly’s Tribune article’ dated January 9, 1985,” she wrote in Monday’s Punch . “That is impossible. I could not have been writing stories for The Tribune in 1985 because I quit the paper on December 31, 1975 10 years earlier.” Y et here I have before me the January 9, 1985, copy of The Tribune containing a sizeable piece under Nicki Kelly’s byline headed : a traumatic year for Bahamas.” In it, she writes at length about the Commission of Inquiry into drug trafficking, including the paragraphs from which I quoted (accurately my piece. Frankly, I don’t care if she were a staff journalist or a freelance contributor at the time the story is there, bold as brass, in The Tribune , and that’s good enough for me. It came to The Tribune via CANA (the Caribbean News Agency), to which this newspa per subscribed at the time. In pointing out this non-existent discrepancy, Mrs Kelly suggests very strongly that I was guilty of copyright infringement and “playing fast and loose with the truth” both grievous accusations which could have formed the basis of a successful libel action if the Bahamas had a legal system worthy of the name. The truth, however, is that she appears to be suffering from a serious lapse of memory. If you were only to check the files, Nicki, and get your facts straight, you would not run into these problems, and save your self much embarrassment. JOHN MARQUIS Managing Editor, The Tribune, Nassau, March 31, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Please allow me space to express my humble appreciation for the many, many Bahamians of all walks of life who called and wrote to me to support my letter against a ban of turtle meat from Bahamian diets. From Crown Haven, Abaco, to Spanish Wells, to Lisbon Creek, Andros, Bahamians seem to be awakening to the need to take responsibility for sustainability on their own terms, rather than having a tainted and suspect version of the environmental agenda imposed on them from the outside. Bahamians who both love their environment and sense an entitlement to enjoy its bount ies seem to be realising, for the first time, that our lifestyle and c ulture must not be further delegitimised at the whim of every and any group without even a thought for us as part of their equations. There has beent oo much of that already. T he consumption of turtlemeat is a healthy, traditional and utterly legitimate aspect of Bahamian culture. The challenge is to keep it sustainable. So long as that is our starting point, then there ought to ben o disagreement between peo ple who want to secure healthy turtle stocks well into the future. But alas, that is not the starting point for some. And all of the difference lies in a mere preposition: I and people like me want to save marine turtles for Bahamians. Some others, by t heir words and actions, want t o save marine turtles from Bahamians. That is why, just below the surface of the supposedly rational sustainability arguments, liesa snarling contempt that is ready to brush all turtle-eating Bahamians with a stigma of cruelty or savagery. We are reminded, for instance, that we will be hostinga miss universe event later in the year and just how embarr assing it will be should our prec ious guests stumble upon some Bahamian savages putting sobbing turtles to a horrific death at Potter’s Cay or Montagu. It is with such comments that the objective observer is tipped off about what this whole thing is really about. It is not about environmentalism; it is about cultural prejudice and pretence of the crassest kind. It is about a tiny, externally-oriented mindset that has such little regard for the host culture of this country that it feels that whole chunks of it can and should be lobbed off to spare the sensi bilities of the few. While we value our guests, thinking Bahamians will never be embarrassed out of their culture by the supposed need to pander to the ignorance of those visitors who are lacking in exposure and tolerance. In fact, if visitors attending this summer’s events want to avoid the horrific sight of Bahamians preparing their food, they can stay in the western parts of the island, home to several gourmet stores selling civilized things like pate de foie gras. Hold on a minute!.isn’t that the stuff made in France by force-feeding geese to the point that their livers balloon in a simulated response to toxic shock? Or maybe let them go to Paradise Island for the festivities over there instead. What will be on menu? Veal, perhaps? Actually, as those who eat it may know, this product is obtained by rendering calves anaemic (physically depriving them of light, movement and stimulation) and keeping them that way right up until their most untimely butchery. O r maybe those with more robust tastes will go for the f inest full-blooded steaks. If so, and if you happen to find yourself within earshot, please do not mention that such rich taste invariably involves castration( ouch!) of the bull in question. T he silliness can go on and on. The simple fact is that one man’s food is another man’s barbarity. We in The Bahamas have no intention of storming French goose farms or mining Argentine abattoirs. L ikewise, nobody should expect our taste in food to conform to their own, foreign sen sibilities. Hands off our turtles! ANDREW ALLEN Nassau, March 25, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm TEN years ago the cover of Time magazine f eatured Robert Rubin, then Treasury secretary, Alan Greenspan, then chairman of theF ederal Reserve, and Lawrence Summers, then deputy Treasury secretary. Time dubbed the t hree “the committee to save the world,” crediting them with leading the global financial system through a crisis that seemed terrifying at the time, although it was a small blip compared with what we’re going through now. A ll the men on that cover were Americans, but nobody considered that odd. After all, in 1 999 the United States was the unquestioned leader of the global crisis response. That leadership role was only partly based on American wealth; it also, to an important degree, reflected America’s stature as a role model. The Unite d States, everyone thought, was the country that knew how to do finance right. H ow times have changed. Never mind the fact that two members of the c ommittee have since succumbed to the maga zine cover curse, the plunge in reputation that so often follows lionization in the media. (Summers, now the head of the National Economic Council, is still going strong). Far more import ant is the extent to which our claims of financial soundness claims often invoked as we lec t ured other countries on the need to change their ways have proved hollow. I ndeed, these days America is looking like the Bernie Madoff of economies: for many years it was held in respect, even awe, but it turns out to have been a fraud all along. It’s painful now to read a lecture that Sum m ers gave in early 2000, as the economic crisis of the 1990s was winding down. Discussing the c auses of that crisis, Summers pointed to things that the crisis countries lacked and that, by i mplication, the United States had. These things included “well-capitalized and supervised banks” and reliable, transparent corporate accounting. Oh well. One of the analysts Summers cited in that lecture, by the way, was the economist Simon Johnson. In an article in the current issue ofT he Atlantic, Johnson, who served as the chief economist at the IMF and is now a professor at MIT, declares that America’s current difficulties are “shockingly reminiscent” of crises in placesl ike Russia and Argentina including the key role played by crony capitalists. I n America as in the third world, he writes, “elite business interests financiers, in the case of the U.S. played a central role in creating the crisis, making ever-larger gambles, with the implicit backing of the government, u ntil the inevitable collapse. More alarming, they are now using their influence to preventp recisely the sorts of reforms that are needed, and fast, to pull the economy out of its nosed ive.” It’s no wonder, then, that an article in Sunday’s Times about the response President Barack Obama will receive in Europe was titled “English-Speaking Capitalism on Trial.” N ow, in fairness we have to say that the United States was far from being the only nation in w hich banks ran wild. Many European leaders are still in denial about the continent’s economic and financial troubles, which arguably run as deep as our own although their nations’ much stronger social safety nets mean t hat we’re likely to experience far more human suffering. Still, it’s a fact that the crisis has costA merica much of its credibility, and with it much of its ability to lead. A nd that’s a very bad thing. Like many other economists, I’ve been revisiting the Great Depression, looking for lessons that might help us avoid a repeat performance. And one thing that stands out from the history o f the early 1930s is the extent to which the world’s response to crisis was crippled by the i nability of the world’s major economies to cooperate. T he details of our current crisis are very different, but the need for cooperation is no less. Obama got it exactly right last week when he declared: “All of us are going to have to take steps in order to lift the economy. We don’t w ant a situation in which some countries are making extraordinary efforts and other coun t ries aren’t.” Yet that is exactly the situation we’re in. I d on’t believe that even America’s economic efforts are adequate, but they’re far more than most other wealthy countries have been willing to undertake. And by rights this week’s G-20 summit ought to be an occasion for Obama to chide and chivy European leaders, in particular, into pulling their weight. B ut these days foreign leaders are in no mood to be lectured by American officials, even when as in this case the Americans are right. The financial crisis has had many costs. And o ne of those costs is the damage to America’s reputation, an asset we’ve lost just when we, a nd the world, need it most. (This article was written by Paul Krugman c.2007 New York Times News Service). Turtle meat eating is a legitimate part of our culture LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net America’s leadership role damaged Nicki Kells apparent memory lapse

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P LP nomination hopeful O mar Archer has postponed his Real Men March, claim-i ng the police have not grante d him the requisite permit. Mr Archer said he has decided to give the police force time to reconsider its position. “It is quite obvious they were hoping I went aheadw ith this non-violent protest w ithout a proper permit so as to publicly embarrass me and present me as an individual who has absolutely no regardf or law and order. “We are however more determined that ever to have this march, but it will be done in order or in line with the laws of this country,” he said. N ow, Mr Archer said, the m arch is scheduled for May 26. He said that if he is denieda second time, the march will proceed. “Freedom of speech and expression are a fundamental rights granted to us all asB ahamian citizens and we will d o whatever it takes to defend such rights,” Mr Archer said. He said the march is for anyone who thinks the Bahamas needs better family values, believes homosexuality is being imposed upon on c hildren and young adults, and thinks the sexual exploita tion of minors is a growing p roblem in this society. In addition, Mr Archer is hoping to attract those who believe the penalty for mari j uana possession should be r educed to a seven year crim inal record and a fine, and those who think ex-convicts s hould be re-integrated into society quickly. He said the march will also f ocus on the problems of p olice brutality, police harassm ent, crime and unemployment. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 5 '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* )$67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A DIABETIC woman who was given out-of-date insulin at a government pharmacy has hit out at health authorities for not admitting their mistake. The Ministry of Health and Department of Public Health issued a publics tatement claiming expired medication is not being distributed to patients at the Elizabeth Estates Clinic pharmacy after a 44-year-old woman was given Humulin insulin with an expiration date on the box of October 2007 in early February and again in mid-March. Investigation Health bosses maintain that an investigation into how the woman got the expired medications was launched after the claim was reported in The Tribune last Tuesday, but calls to Director of Public health Dr Pearl McMillan for an update have not yet been returned. The Ministry of Health and Department of Public Health maintains that “preliminary investigations into the report have revealed that adequate supplies of several types of insulin are presently in stock at the Elizabeth Estates Clinic. “The investigations further indicate that the earliest expiration date is October 2009 and that the majority of the stock on-hand expires in 2010 and 2011.” However, the diabetic of 20 years is concerned the defunct medication has been given to hundreds of other patients as she claims it was given to her twice in just over six weeks. When she took it in February, it failed to control her blood sugar levels, which rose, making her light-headed, nauseous and giving her leg cramps. She then bought insulin at a private pharmacy and her blood sugar levels returned to normal. And when she went back to the Elizabeth Estates Clinic two weeks ago, she n oticed the Humulin given to her had expired in October 2007, and then realised the bottle issued in February had the same 2007 expiration date. Insulin But the prescription papers printed at the pharmacy stated the Humulin insulin expired in February and March 2010. The patient said: “They will put that it expires today’s date 2010, when in actual fact the medication expires in October 2007, which is printed by the manufacturer on the bottom of each box. “I want answers because it’s not as if this is 2007, this is 2009, and they didn’t just give me one, they gave me two. “It’s the Ministry of Health’s mandate to provide quality healthcare for the Bahamian public and visitors alike, whether rich or poor, black or white. “Issuing expired medication to a patient is not quality healthcare, particularly when there are many people who cannot afford to go to private doctors and private pharmacies and depend on the government services.” A CONCERNED citi zen stumbled across a .38 handgun in a yard in n orthwestern New Provid ence on Sunday. P olice said that some time after 9am, they were contacted about the dis covery and went to the scene to examine the weapon and confiscate it. THE trial of three men c harged in the February 2 006 murder of businessm an Keith Carey will resume on Wednesday after the request for an adjournment by the prosecution was granted yesterday. The prosecution told the court that it wanted to p roperly consider the d efence’s case and review the evidence. Lead prosecutor in the case and Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel said:“We do not want to misl ead the jury on the facts.” T he trial into the mur d er of businessman Keith C arey began on February 1 5 before Justice Jon I saacs. Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight Knowles are charged with the murder as well as armed robbery and con spiracy to commit armedr obbery. Keith Carey, 43, was shot and killed on the s teps of the Bank of the B ahamas on Tonique W illiams-Darling Highway before he was able to deposit $40,000 thatb elonged to the Esso Service Station, which he operated. Ms Grant-Bethel, S tephanie Pintard, Antho ny Delaney and Lennox Coleby are prosecuting the case. Attorneys CraigB utler and Devard Francis are representing Jamal Glinton, attorney DorseyM cPhee is representing S ean Brown and attorney Perry Albury is represent ing Dwight Knowles. The prosecution has called at otal of 41 witnesses during the trial. Diabetic woman ‘given out-of-date medicine’ hits out at health authorities THEDIABETICWOMAN says she was given this out-of-date medication. F F r r e e e e d d o o m m o o f f s s p p e e e e c c h h a a n n d d e e x x p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n a a r r e e a a f f u u n n d d a a m m e e n n t t a a l l r r i i g g h h t t s s g g r r a a n n t t e e d d t t o o u u s s a a l l l l a a s s B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n c c i i t t i i z z e e n n s s a a n n d d w w e e w w i i l l l l d d o o w w h h a a t t e e v v e e r r i i t t t t a a k k e e s s t t o o d d e e f f e e n n d d s s u u c c h h r r i i g g h h t t s s . . Omar Ar c her Trial of men accused of murder of businessman to resume In brief Concer ned citizen finds a handgun n EUSTIS, Fla. AUTHORITIES say a small alligator climbed through the porch door of a house north of Orlando and then bit the homeowner’s arm when it was forced out, according to Associated Press . The 2-foot-long alli gator wandered onto James Gaff’s canalfront property in Lake County on Sunday. Gaff tried to remove the gator, which then latched onto his right forearm. A spokeswoman for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission says Gaff’s wife, Elaine, pried the gator off using a broom handle and the couple threw the reptile into the water behind their home. The 52-year-old Gaff was treated at a hospi tal for minor cuts and scrapes. Alligator wanders onto porch, bites Florida man PLP hopeful claims police have not granted requisite permit for march

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n By K QUINCY PARKER BAHAMIAN conservationist D’Shan Maycock has planned a conservation campaign on Abaco that could lead to better management of the island’s marine resources, and deeper penetration of the message of conservation nationwide. Despite the abundance of marine resources in the Bahamas, and the decades-old impulse – on both the policy and public-awareness fronts – toward maximising the nation’s marine resources, the number of professional conservationists in the Bahamas remains small by any measure. One group, RARE, is pumping $125,000 into training and resources for d’Shan Maycock to mount the new campaign in two weeks or so. At the end of the training sessions at Georgetown University – the first time RARE has held its training in the United States – Ms Maycock will return to Abaco to begin the fieldwork phase. When the training phase is complete, Ms Maycock will have spent 17 weeks in Washington, DC doing what her RARE mentor – Ariela Rosenstein – called “intensive course work.” Success Ms Maycock is the education officer of Abaco-based Friends of The Environment, an environ mental activism body founded in 1988, and has partnered with RARE Conservation – which has a track record of success already in the Bahamas – to launch what the NGO calls a RARE Pride cam paign. The campaign is focused on discouraging illegal fishing practices, encouraging sustainable alternatives and creating support for Marine Protected Areas (MPAs throughout Abaco, with the goal of having five such MPAs designated throughout the Bahamas by 2010. In the 1990s, a RARE Pride campaign centred around the Aba co Parrot helped establish the Abaco National Park. The two-year long programme – at the end of which Ms Maycock will receive a masters degree in communication from the University of Texas El Paso – will focus particularly on the spawning crawfish. The species is now under threat from both illegal fishing practices and habitat destruction. The idea is to use what is known as “social marketing,” a concept that dates back to the 1970s, and takes as its basis the belief that marketing principles used to sell products to consumers could be used to “sell” ideas, attitudes and behaviors. Social marketing seeks to influence social behavior not to benefit the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society, and has been used extensively in international health pro grammes, especially for contraceptives, and is being used with more frequency in the Bahamas for such diverse topics as drug abuse, AIDS awareness and chronic non-communicable diseases. A major thrust of the campaign, M s Maycock said, is to give those who depend on the island’s marine resources for their livelihood a raft of alternatives that would make it less onerous to follow conservation guidelines enshrined in law. “We have many marine species in the Bahamas that are very eco nomically viable,” she said. You have to create alternatives. If you know that this is the time when the crawfish – for instance – is bearing their eggs, and you know that [if you protect only one eggbearing crawfish, you will get thousands of them in the future], you can look at some alternative fish that you could focus on.” “It’s just a matter of educating the public that there are alterna tives out there, and that if we don’t protect these species ourselves, then we would find ourselves just like our neighbours, where they don’t even get the size fish that we get in the Bahamas anymore.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 7 0$5,1($9,*$7,21&2856(6 THREE students who participated in the first Ministry of Education/Keiser University “Cook-Off” were the recipients of scholarships totalling more that $20,000 to attend Keiser University Culinary Arts Programme in Florida. Deandra Rolle, a 12th grade student at Aquinas College, was the winner of the cook-off held at Ardastra Gardens on Saturday, March 21. Against the backdrop of marching flamingos, strutting peacocks and curious tourists, Deandra was able to impress the judges with her presentation, “A Taste of The Bahamas” in the final round of the cook-off and win a $10,000-scholarship to attend Keiser University. The winning meal was the “Carmichael seafood surprise, a zesty tingum salad, a crazy cabbage fiesta with cultural rice.” Kenrick Ferguson, a student of C C Sweeting Senior High School, was awarded second place in the competition and a $7,500-scholarship, while Kristen Johnson of Central Andros High School was the third place finisher and recipient of a $5,000-scholarship. Both scholarships are tenable at one of Keiser’s Culinary Arts programmes in Florida. The students were challenged to produce a Bahamian dish from 13 ingredients (exclusive of salt and black pepper Judges for the competition were Cacique Award winners and veteran chefs Edwin Johnson and Don Ingraham, and director of Culinary Arts at Keiser University Dan Dunham. Experience Isadelle Howells, first assistant secretary in the Ministry of Educa tion, who represented Minister of Education Carl Bethel, offered con gratulations to the students and told them once they have obtained their education and some critical field experience, they should seek to establish eateries in the downtown area to cater to the 2.5 million visitors who disembark at Prince George Dock. “It would be a travesty for the government to make this significant investment in infrastructure only to see downtown saturated by foreign franchises. Use your talents to do more than being a chef – let it empower you to become a ‘brand’ such as Chef Wolfgang Puck, Chef Emerill Lagasse and our own internationally acclaimed Bahamian chefs Edwin Johnson, Don Ingraham, Jasmine Young and Tracey Sweeting,” she said. She also thanked Keiser University for their generosity in awarding the students the substantial scholarships and added that when the Bahamians “descend” on Keiser’s campus, the food will never be the same. Jennifer Long, a Keiser official involved in the competition, said the university was delighted to be a part of the event and noted that by offering the scholarships their institution has lived up to its philosophy of putting students first. The two-day competition was an initiative that the Ministry of Education produced out of the National Careers Fair, held in October of 2008 to ensure that high school students were exposed to careers of their choice. Students cook their way into Keiser University New conservation campaign planned D’SHAN MAYCOCK AND A COHORT OF STUDENTS from other countries with delicate ecosystems, like Mong olia, Thailand, Fiji, Laos and Madagascar, are studying conservation and social marketing during a spe c ial course hosted at Georgetown University in Washington DC.R A R E C o n s e r v a t i o n CONSERVATIONIST D’Shan Maycock

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS NAME ICKNAMEAbigailLowe BIRTHDATEJuly3,1996 AGE&SEXFemale NAMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADEStAndrewsSchool Year7 LOCALSWIMCLUBSwiftSwimming FAVORITEEVENTS400freeand200free NATIONALACHIEVEMENTS INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTS C ARIFTA2009GOALSTobreak5mininthe400free,andhave personalbestinallotherevents. NAME ICKNAMEA rmandoMoss Mando BIRTHDATEJuly29,1992 AGE&SEXMale NAMEOFFEDERATIONB ahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADES t.Augustine’sCollege Grade11 LOCALSWIMCLUBSeaBeesSwimClub FAVORITEEVENTS50mButterfly,50mfreestyle,100mButterfly, 100mFreestyle NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSAwardedMostOutstandingStudentGrade8 AwardedMostOutstandingBJC P erformanceMathematics HighPointSeniorBoys(SeaBeesSwim C lub)-2008 I NTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTS CARIFTA2009GOALSS wimbesttimes Medalinmyevents Q ualifyforCCAN NAME ICKNAMEDionisioS.F.Carey io BIRTHDATEJune13,1997 A GE&SEXM ale11Yearsold NAMEOFFEDERATIONB ahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADEQueen’sCollege Grade6 L OCALSWIMCLUBB arracudaSwimClub FAVORITEEVENTS50Backstroke,50Breaststroke,50 F reestyle,50Butterflyand200IM NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSBahamas&OpenRecords 9 /10 50mand200mFreestyle,50mand100m Backstroke,50mBreaststroke,50mand 100mButterfly,and200mIM,200mFree andMedleyRelays 11/12 50mBackstroke N ationalRecords 9 /10 5 0mand100mBackstroke,50mand100m Breaststroke,200mIM,200mFreeand Medleyrelay, INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSFloridaGoldCoastWinterChamp.Nov2008 Gold50yd.Breaststroke Silver50yd.Butterfly 5th100yd.Breaststroke 5t h50yd.Backstroke C ARIFTA2009GOALST owinHighPointTrophy Tobreakthe50mBackstrokeand50m B reaststrokerecords N AME NICKNAMEDUSTINE.TYNES DUSTY BIRTHDATEM ARCH7,1996 A GE&SEX13 MALE NAMEOFFEDERATIONBAHAMASSWIMMINGFEDERATION SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADEQ UEENSCOLLEGE 7 L OCALSWIMCLUBBARRACUDASWIMCLUB FAVORITEEVENTS2 00Breast,50Breastand100Breast NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSH IGHPOINTRUNNERUP2007 N ATIONALS B AHAMIANRECORDHOLDER200 BREASTSTROKE1112BOYS I NTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSBRONZEMEDALCARIFTA2008,200 BREASTSTROKE SILVERMEDALC.I.S.C.2008,200 BREASTSTROKE BRONZEMEDALC.I.S.C.2008400 MEDLAYRELAY CARIFTA2009GOALSTOSWIMPERSONALBESTS NAME ICKNAMEJohnBradley BIRTHDATEJan2nd1991 AGE&SEX18Male NAMEOFFEDERATIONBahamas SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADELewisUniversity AviationAdministrationMajor LOCALSWIMCLUBYMCAWaveRunners FAVORITEEVENTS200m&400mFree NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSVariousNationalRecords BASRAMarathonDefendingChampion INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSCommonweathYouthGames2008 NationalTeam2003Present CARIFTA2009GOALSRepresentmycountrywithdignityandpride inmyfinalcarifta. NAME ICKNAMEKohenKerr BIRTHDATEMay1st1996 AGE&SEX12-male NAMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADEQueen’sCollege 7thGrade LOCALSWIMCLUBBarracudaSwimClub FAVORITEEVENTS50,100,200,400freestyle NATIONALACHIEVEMENTS50freestyle,3rdplace. INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTS2006WinterChampionships,Plantation, Florida. CARIFTA2009GOALSTogetagoldineveryeventthatIswim. NAME ICKNAMEKEITHJAMALLLOYDKJ BIRTHDATEMAY17,1996 AGE&SEX12/MALE NAMEOFFEDERATIONBAHAMASSWIMMINGFEDERATION SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADEAQUINASCOLLEGE GRADE7 LOCALSWIMCLUBSEABEESSWIMCLUB FAVORITEEVENTS50M,100M,200MBUTTERFLY 50M&100MBACKSTROKE NATIONALACHIEVEMENTS2ND50MBACKSTROKEAGE9-10 3RD50MBUTTERFLYAGE9-10 SEVERAL1STINRELAYRACESAGE9-10 INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSNIL CARIFTA2009GOALSTOSWIMPERSONALBESTTIMESINALL THEEVENTSTHATIWILLSWIMAT CARIFTAANDWITHTHATWINSOME MEDALANDSCORESOMEPOINTSFOR THEBAHAMAS N AME ICKNAMEDylanJ.Cash Flare BIRTHDATE24August1996 A GE&SEX12,Male N AMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADESt.Augustine’sCollege Grade7 LOCALSWIMCLUBSeaBeesSwimClub FAVORITEEVENTSBackstroke50/100 NATIONALACHIEVEMENTS31:53-50Free 34:3050Back 1:20:06100Back INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSN/A CARIFTA2009GOALS33:0050Back 31:3050Free 1:15:00100Back NAME NICKNAMECamronKristenBruney B IRTHDATEA ugust20th1 994 AGE&SEX14yrs,male NAMEOFFEDERATION S CHOOLNAME ANDGRADEQ ueensCollege LOCALSWIMCLUBBarracudaSwimClub FAVORITEEVENTS100free&400free NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSN umerousmedalsintheNational Championships I NTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSACariftabronzemedalin2007 CARIFTA2009GOALSTomakefinals,scoreinallofmyeventsand topickupamedalortwo. NAME ICKNAMEGabrielleS.N.Greene Gabbie,Gabs B IRTHDATEDecember17th,1995 AGE&SEX13female N AMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation S CHOOLNAME A NDGRADES t.AndrewsInternationalSchool Grade8 LOCALSWIMCLUBB arracudaSwimClub FAVORITEEVENTS50freestyle,50breaststroke NATIONALACHIEVEMENTS200freestylerelayrecord,Goldmedalistin theBahamasNationalSwimming Championships(50free,100free,200 freestylerelay) I NTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSFinalistinthe50freeand50breastatCISC MemberoftheCariftaandCISCteamsfor theBahamasSwimmingFederation CARIFTA2009GOALST oqualifyforCCCANin50freestyle N AME ICKNAMELARONKEVINMORLEY BIRTHDATEAUGUST25,1994 A GE&SEXM ALEAGE:14 N AMEOFFEDERATIONB AHAMASSWIMMINGFEDERATION S CHOOLNAME A NDGRADEAQUINASCOLLEGEGRADE9 LOCALSWIMCLUBSEABEESSWIMCLUB FAVORITEEVENTS50BACKAND50FREE NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSSILVER50BACK,BRONZE100BACK,200 BACKAND50FLY INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSCARIFTA2007RELAYTEAMSILVER MEDALIST CCAN2007RELAYTEAMBRONZE MEDALISTS CARIFTA2009GOALSTOOBTAINASMANYINDIVIDUAL MEDALSANDDOWELLINALLMY EVENTS NAME ICKNAMELauraJ.Morley BIRTHDATEOctober1st,1996 AGE&SEX12years-Female NAMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADESt.AndrewsSchoolYear7 LOCALSWIMCLUBS wiftSwimClub FAVORITEEVENTSBreatstroke,IMsanddistance Freestyle NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSRunner-uphighpointtrophywinnerat BahamasNationalChampionships 2006&2007 INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTSFinals 2008Carifta&CISC SwimmingChampionships CARIFTA2009GOALSTomakefinalsinallofmyeventsand toswimmypersonalbesttimes. N AME ICKNAMEL aurenGlinton LG/LifesGood BIRTHDATE2 8.Sept.1994 A GE&SEX14/Female N AMEOFFEDERATIONBAHAMAS S CHOOLNAME A NDGRADESt.Andrews Grade9 L OCALSWIMCLUBDOLPHINSWMCLUB FAVORITEEVENTS200fly 200breast 200free 400free NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSQualifiedforCARIFTA@11yrsin400IM; QualifiedforeveryNationalssince8yrsold; INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSMemberof2005CARIFTAteam Placed7thin200Fly C ARIFTA2009GOALS-tofinalinallofmyevents; -toswimmybesttimes tohelptherelayteamsmedal CARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIEN AME ICKNAME J ACINDAANNEWILLIAMS " JENKINS" BIRTHDATE S EPTEMBER7TH1996 A GE&SEX F EMALEAGE12 NAMEOFFEDERATION BAHAMASSWIMMINGFEDERATION SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADE QUEENSCOLLEGEGRADE7 LOCALSWIMCLUB D OLPHINSWIMCLUB FAVORITEEVENTS5 0/100Backstroke R elays NATIONALACHIEVEMENTS1 1-122n dP lace200Backstroke 11-123rdPlace200Freestyle INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTS FIRSTTIMEREPRENTINGMYCOUNTRY CARIFTA2009GOALST oSwimMyPersonalBest A ndBringHomeGoldforMyCountry. CARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIENAME ICKNAMEJe”NaeSaunders Nae,Nae BIRTHDATENovember61994 AGE&SEX1 4Female NAMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADESt.AugustineCollege G rade9 LOCALSWIMCLUBBarracudaSwimClub FAVORITEEVENTS100Breast&200IM NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSNationalHighPointrunnerup9-10,11-12, 1 3-14 INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSCARIFTAMedalist2006,2007&2008 CISCMedalist2006C CCANMedalist2007 CARIFTA2009GOALSM edalinmostofmyevents I mproveallofmytimes CARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIENAME NICKNAMEE vanteGibson B IRTHDATEMarch9th1994 AGE&SEX15male NAMEOFFEDERATIONB ahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADETheBaylorSchoolTennessee Grade10 LOCALSWIMCLUBYMCAFreeportGrandBahama F AVORITEEVENTS5 0&100butterfly 50&100breaststroke 200I.M N ATIONALACHIEVEMENTS I NTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTS CARIFTA2009GOALST odoallpersonalbesttimesinmyevents CARIFTA2009S WIMMERPROFLIEN AME NICKNAMED evonnChristoffKnowles B IRTHDATEMarch16,1993 A GE&SEX1 6yearsmale NAMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADESt.AnnesHighSchool 1 0Paul L OCALSWIMCLUBB arracudaSwimClub F AVORITEEVENTS50and100Freestyle 5 0and100backstroke N ATIONALACHIEVEMENTSNationalSwimmingChampionships 2000-2008 HighPoint/RunnerUpAwards B arracudaSwimClub INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSCarifta2006-2009 CISC2006/2008 P lantationWinterChamptionships 2005-2008 CARIFTA2009GOALSA chievepersonalbesttimesinallselected events CARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIENAME ICKNAMEBriaDeveaux B re BIRTHDATEJune7t h1994 AGE&SEX14andFemale NAMEOFFEDERATIONB ahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADES t.AndrewsSchool Grade10 LOCALSWIMCLUBBarracuda’sSwimClub FAVORITEEVENTS100&200free,200fly NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSH ighpointwinner8&under,9-10,11-12,and 13-14 AgeGroupRecordHolder Nationalmedalholder I NTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSC ARIFTA06,07,08attendee,medalHolder CARIFTA2007recordholder C ISC06,08attendeeandMedalHolder CCCAN07attendeeandMedalHolder C ARIFTA2009GOALS Tomakefinalsinmostevents Towinmedalsinmostevents Tobettermytimesinallevents Carifta : Swimmer profiles CARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIENAME ICKNAMEAmberTaliaWeech “Ambie BIRTHDATEOctober28th,1991 AGE&SEX17Female NAMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADESt.Augustine’sCollege Grade12 LOCALSWIMCLUBBarracudasSwimmingClub FAVORITEEVENTS200,400&800Free NATIONALACHIEVEMENTS INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTS2004,2006&2009CARIFTAteammember CARIFTA2009GOALSSwimpersonalbestsinallofmyeventsand hopetowinatleastonemedal C ARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIEN AME NICKNAMEArielTobyWeech eech BIRTHDATEOctober28th,1991 A GE&SEX17Female N AMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADES t.Augustine’sCollege Grade12 L OCALSWIMCLUBB arracudasSwimmingClub FAVORITEEVENTS5 0&100Free 50&100Back 50&100Fly NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSBahamianNationalRecordHolder: 8 &U50Back 13-1450Free 13-14100Free 1 3-1450Back 13-1450Fly Highpointrunnerup INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTS2004,2006,2007,2008CARIFTASwimming C hampionshipsteammember 2 004-4gold,1bronze 2006-5gold,1silver,1bronze 2 007-5gold,4bronze 2008-4gold,3silver 2 004&2006CISCteammemberandrecord holder 2004-3silvermedals 2006-6gold,1silver 2006CACteammember-1bronzemedal 2 005&2007CCCANteammember 2007PanAmGamesSwimTeammember 2 008CARIFTATeamCaptain CARIFTA2009GOALSMedal&Swimpersonalbestsinallofmy e vents Gabrielle Greene Jacinda Williams JeNae Saunders John Bradley Keith Lloyd Kohen Kerr Laron Morley Laura Morley Lauren Glinton Mancer Roberts Matthew Lowe Maya Albury McKayla Lightbourne Pemrae Walker Riquel Rolle S haunte Moss T aryn Smith T oby McCarroll Z ach Moses Z arian Cleare

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 9 Carifta : Swimmer profiles C ARIFTA 2009 SWIMMER PROFLIE NAME ‘NICKNAMEM ANCER B. ROBERTS II BIRTH DATE 15 AUGUST, 1993 AGE & SEX 15 MALE NAME OF FEDERATION BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION SCHOOL NAME AND GRADE KINGSWAY ACADEMY HIGH SCHOOL GRADE 10 LOCAL SWIM CLUBB ARRACUDA SWIM CLUB FAVORITE EVENTS5 0, 100 BACK, 100, 200 FREE, 50Fly NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS Record in 50 backstroke, 2008 N ationals High Point Runner up, 2008 N ationals High Point Runner up,2007 R ecords in 50 and 100 Backstroke, 2006 INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS C arifta 2008 Silver medalist R elay Medals, Carifta 2007 finalist in Multiple e vents, Plantation Winter Championships 2 007 medalist. C ISC 2006 Finalist 400 Free 50,100 & 200 Back, Medal 400 Medley Relay, Carifta 2006 Finalist in all individual events, CARIFTA 2009 GOALS M edal in Multiple Individual Events Make CCCAN cuts CARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIENAME ICKNAMEPemraeShaquillePemWalker BIRTHDATEDecember10th,1992 A GE&SEX16years/Male NAMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation S CHOOLNAME ANDGRADESt.AndrewsSchool/Grade10 LOCALSWIMCLUBB arracuda’sSwimClub FAVORITEEVENTS50,100,200BreastStroke N ATIONALACHIEVEMENTSCompetedinBahamasNationalSwimming Championships20032008MedalingGold, SilverandBronze. INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSP articipatedin2005,2006CariftaSwimming Championships;ParticipatedinPlantation WinterChampionships20042008. C ARIFTA2009GOALSTomakefinalsandmedalinallevents. C ARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIEN AME ICKNAMEZarianL.K.Cleare K iddZ,Z-Train BIRTHDATE26April1995 A GE&SEX1 3Male NAMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADEQueen’sCollege Grade9 L OCALSWIMCLUBDolphinSwimmingClub FAVORITEEVENTS50Free,50Fly,100Free,200IM NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSBoys13-14NationalChampion2008 Boys9-101stRunnerUp INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSN /A C ARIFTA2009GOALSTorepresentmycountrytothebestofmy ability,toimprovemytimesandtomakethe finalsineachofmyevents. CARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIENAME ICKNAMEZachTimothyMoses BIRTHDATE3r dFebruary,1997 AGE&SEX12Male NAMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADESt.AndrewsSchoolGrade7 LOCALSWIMCLUBSwift FAVORITEEVENTS50Free,200Free,400Free,800Free NATIONALACHIEVEMENTS20068&underHighPointTrophyWinner 2007910HighPointTrophyWinner INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTS CARIFTA2009GOALSDroptimesineveryeventIswimandscore pointsforTheBahamas2009CariftaTeam CARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIENAME ICKNAMETOBYMcCARROLL BIRTHDATE18thAUGUST1994 AGE&SEX14/MALE NAMEOFFEDERATIONBAHAMASSWIMMINGFEDERDATION SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADEQUEENCOLLEGE/GRADE9 LOCALSWIMCLUBDOLPHINSSWIMMINGCLUB FAVORITEEVENTS50m/100m/200mBREASTSTROKE NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSSilverMedalatNationalsinthe100mand 200mBreaststroke,bronzemedalinthe50m Breaststroke.QualifiedinallBreaststroke eventsforCARIFTA2009. INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSWasamemberoftheCARIFTAteam2008, makingfinalsinthe200mBreaststroke, placing6thandmemberofthe4X100Medley Relayteamthatcamesecond.Wasalsoa memberoftheCISC2008Teams4X100 MedleyRelayteamthatplacedthird. CARIFTA2009GOALSRepresentTheBahamastothebestofmy ability.Iwouldliketoswimmybesttimesin allmyevents,andhopefullyqualifyfor CCCAN.Ialsohopetomakeittothefinalsin allofmyeventsandhopetoachievemedals. C ARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIEN AME ‘NICKNAMEMAYAK.ALBURY BIRTHDATESEPTEMBER11,1994 AGE&SEX14YEARS,FEMALE N AMEOFFEDERATIONBAHAMAS SWIMMINGFEDERATION SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADESUNLAND BAPTIST ACADEMY GRADE10 LOCALSWIMCLUBYMCAWAVE-RUNNERS FAVORITEEVENTS200FREESTYLE,50&100BUTTERFLY NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSBAHAMASRECORD50FLY INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTS2N D 100 METER BUTTERFLY 3R D50METERBUTTERFLY 11-12AGEGROUP-CARIFTA2007 CARIFTA2009GOALSGETMEDALS CARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIENAME ICKNAMEShaunteJadeMoss M itze B IRTHDATEAugust2n d,1993 AGE&SEX1 5,Female NAMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADENassauChristianAcademy G rade10 LOCALSWIMCLUBS WIFTSWIMMING FAVORITEEVENTS50/100/200MeterBreaststroke 50/100Freestyle100Butterfly NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSNationalRecordHolder8U&910 HighPointTrophyWinner8U&910 INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSCariftaandCISCSilverMedalist CARIFTA2009GOALST oMedalinallmyevents CARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIENAME ICKNAMETarynNicoleSmith TT BIRTHDATE2 1s tJ une1996 AGE&SEX1 2(twelve)yrsold-female N AMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation S CHOOLNAME A NDGRADESunlandBaptistAcademy 8t hGrade LOCALSWIMCLUBYMCAWaverunners FAVORITEEVENTS200IM,200free,50fly N ATIONALACHIEVEMENTSH ighPointtrophyeveryyearbut2008got runnerup. I NTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSMadetheCariftateamin2008. CARIFTA2009GOALSTobeatalloldtimes;placeinallevents;to domyverybest. CARIFTA2009S WIMMERPROFLIENAME ICKNAMEM atthewD.Lowe BIRTHDATEMarch30t h,1994 AGE&SEX14yearsoldMale N AMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation SCHOOLNAME A NDGRADEQueen’sCollege,grade10 LOCALSWIMCLUBBarracudaSwimClub FAVORITEEVENTS200fly,1500freeand400free NATIONALACHIEVEMENTS I NTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSCarifta2006,2007&2008 CARIFTA2009GOALSImproveineverythingIswim. CARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIENAME ICKNAMEMcKaylaLightbourn oc BIRTHDATE5 .19.92 AGE&SEX16Female NAMEOFFEDERATIONBahamasSwimmingFederation S CHOOLNAME ANDGRADEPineViewSchool G rade11 LOCALSWIMCLUBSWIFT FAVORITEEVENTS2 00IM,200back,200breast,400IM, 100back NATIONALACHIEVEMENTS11/12HighpointwinneratBahamasNational S wimmingChampionships,multiplenational recordholderin11/12,13/14/,15&0ver,and s enioragegroups INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSF inalistat2007PanAmGames,Brazil; Competitorat2008YouthCommonwealth G ames,India; MultipleMedalWinnerat2008CISC, J amaica; CARIFTAmultiplemedalwinner; QualifieratU.S.JuniorNationals; Q ualifieratU.S.SeniorNationals C ARIFTA2009GOALSDomybesttohelptheteambringhomethe Championship,andbettermytimes. Abigail Lowe Alaena Carey Amber Weech Ariel Weech Armando Moss Devonn Knowles Dionisio Carey Dustin Tynes Dylan Cash Evante Gibson Ashley Butler B Moss Bria Deveaux Cameron Rolle Camron Bruney Crystal Rahming C ARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIENAME ICKNAME AshleyJadeButler Pumpkin BIRTHDATE MARCH27,1992 AGE&SEX1 7 Female NAMEOFFEDERATION Bahamasswimmingfederation SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADETheBollesSchool Grade11 L OCALSWIMCLUBSwiftSwimming F AVORITEEVENTS 50F REE,100F REE,50B ACK,100B ACK,50F LY&100F LY N ATIONALACHIEVEMENTSNATIONALRECORDSIN5 0FREE, 100FREE, 50BACK BAHAMASNATIONALHIGHPOINTCHAMPION-2003 BahamasNationalhighpointrunnerup-2005,2006 INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSCariftaMultipleMedalist; C.I.S.C-MultipleMedalist CCANMultipleMedalist FloridaStateHighSchoolSwimmingChampionshipMultiple Finalist CARIFTA2009GOALS COLLECTAFEWGOLDMEDALS C ARIFTA2009S WIMMERPROFLIENAME ICKNAMEB ERCHADETTEMOSS ERGHERT BIRTHDATEM ARCH21s t, 1995 AGE&SEX1 4YRS-FEMALE NAMEOFFEDERATIONBAHAMASSWIMMINGFEDERATION(BSF) SCHOOLNAME ANDGRADEST.JOHNCOLLEGE G RADE9 L OCALSWIMCLUBD OLPHINSSWIMCLUB FAVORITEEVENTS50BUTTERFLY 50FREE 5 0BACKSTROKE NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSR ECORDHOLDER 9 -1050FLY 9-10HIGHPOINTRUNNERUP INTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSSILVERMEDALIST2007 MEMBER2007&2008CARIFTATEAM MEMBEROFCISC2008M EMBEROF2009CARIFTATEAM C ARIFTA2009GOALSTOACHIEVEANINDIVIDUALMEDAL C ARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIEN AME ICKNAMECrystalRahming BIRTHDATED ecember7,1996 AGE&SEX11Female N AMEOFFEDERATIONB ahamasSwimmingfederation S CHOOLNAME ANDGRADEStAndrewsSchool L OCALSWIMCLUBS wiftSwimming FAVORITEEVENTS50Mfreestyle,100Mfreestyle,50Mbutterfly NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSSeveralmedalsinNationalsfromage6. I NTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTSParticipatedinPlantationand CoralSprings,FloridaMeets CARIFTA2009GOALSIwouldliketomakefinalsinallindividual eventsandmedal.Iwouldalsolovetohelp myteamgetintothetop3positionsinthe r elays. CARIFTA2009SWIMMERPROFLIENAME NICKNAMEAlaenaCarey BIRTHDATEA ugust81996 AGE&SEX1 2 Female N AMEOFFEDERATIONB ahamasSwimmingFederation S CHOOLNAME A NDGRADEQueen’sCollege Grade7 LOCALSWIMCLUBSeaBeesSwimClub FAVORITEEVENTS50,100&200Breast NATIONALACHIEVEMENTSHighPointWinner;8UnderGirls2003 I NTERNATIONALACHIEVEMENTS CARIFTA2009GOALSImprovemyTimes Winamedal Gainahigherlevelofexperience

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net A number of Bahamian athletes, led by O lympian Sheniq ua ‘Q’ Ferguson ( right) , comp eted in some of the collegiate meets around the United States over the weekend. Ferguson, competing for Southwest Mississippi in the LSU Tiger Relays at the Bernie Moore Stadium, clocked 11.69 seconds for third place overall after she won the second of six heats in the women’s 100 metres. She came back in the final and had to settle for third again, b ut this time in 11.93. The winning time posted was 11.42 by Kenyanna Wilson of LSU, followed by her team-mate, Samatha Henry in 11.59. On the men’s side, Olympic quarter-miler Michael Mathieu showed some speed as he con tested the men’s century. Representing Tiger Olympians, the Grand Bahamian ended up sixth in the straight away in 10.79. Baylor’s Trey Harts won the race in 10.43. Mathieu had the fifth fastest qualifying time of 10.67 after he won the third of nine heats. Harts took heat seven in 10.41. At the University of Alabama in the Alabama Relays at Sam Bailey Track, sprinter Lanece Clarke topped the Bahamian performances. The McKendree College senior won section two of the women’s 100 in 12.13. The time placed her ninth overall. LaJada Baldwin, a sophomore from Mississippi, had the fastest time of 11.68. Clarke, the daughter of former Carifta queen Maryann Higgs, moved up to compete in the 400 as well. She completed the one-lapper in third place in section two in 57.45. The winning time was 56.99 by Lindsay Doucett, a senior at Mississippi. Clarke’s time was the eighth fastest. Alecia Brown, a senior at Western Kentucky, had the fastest time overall in 54.41 in winning section two. Sasha Joyce, a junior teammate of Clarke at McKendree, turned in a third place finish in the women’s 100 hurdles in 15.03 in section three. Alexis Brown, a junior at Western Michigan, won the race in 14.78. Joyce ended up 17th overall. Lorian Price, running unattached, won section one in the fastest time in 13.47. Also, Joyce competed in the 400 hurdles, coming sixth in sec tion two in 1:08.27. Chiamaka Obi, a sophomore from Austin Peay, won the race in 1:03.15. Joyce finished 14th overall. Danielle Brown, a senior at Western Michigan, turned in the fastest time in 58.46 in winning section one. Together, Clarke and Joyce, competing on the third and anchor legs respectively, helped McKendree to a sixth place finish in the 4 x 100 relay in 47.52. Mississippi won in 45.82. Clarke also ran on the third leg of McKendree’s 4 x 4 relay team that finished sixth in 3:57.41. Mississippi once again won the event in 3:39.63. Eleven to manage Carifta team B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L J J B B L L N N U U P P D D A A T T E E THE Junior Baseball League of Nassau continued its regular season over the weekend at the St Andrew’s Field of Dreams with the following results posted: T T E E E E B B A A L L L L Grasshoppers 22, Blue Claws 21 Sidewinders 19, Sand Gnats 9 C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H D iamondbacks 15, Blue Jays 7 A thletics 17, Angels 16 Cubs 18, Astros 13 M M I I N N O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Rockies 12, Rays 1 Mets 11, Red Sox 3 M M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Indians 11, Mariners 7 Marlins 10, Reds 7 J J U U N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Twins 11, Yankees 10 Dodgers 18, Cardinals 7 S S E E N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Rangers 7, Tigers 6 Phillies 7, Pirates 4 C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 WHILE the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations is expected to carry a 61-member team to the Carifta Games in St Lucia over the Easter hol iday weekend, an 11-member management team will travel along with them. Ray Hepburn, president of the New Providence Amateur Athletic Association, will serve as the team manager and he will be assisted by Stephanie Higgs. The chaperone is Mabelene Miller. Bradley Cooper is the team’s head coach. He will be assisted by Sandra Laing, Antonio Saunders, Wendell Collie Sr and Dexter Bodie. The team doctor is Rickey Davis and the physiotherapists are Cottrice Robinson and Car lene Strachan. SPORTS IN BRIEF ‘Q’ leads pack on track Carifta : Swimmer profiles... See pages 9-10 MICHAEL MATHIEU ATHLETES compete at the Carifta trials over the weekend...

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 2010 Calendar Photo Contest Entry FormReturn with photos to: Calendar Contest, Family Guardian Corporate Centre Village Road & East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas ENTRY DEADLINE: JUNE 1, 2009Photo by Jade Greensword Family Guardian’s 2009 CalendarNAME TEL BUSINESSHOME EMAIL P.O. BOXSTREET ADDRESSISLAND NUMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERED (maximum of 5I agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as a winner in the 2010 Family Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it will become the property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and I assign to Family Guardian all rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. I also conrm that the photos entered in this contest were taken in The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not been previously published.SIGNATUREDATE for a better lifeCALENDAR CONTEST CONTEST RULESFamily Guardian’s Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for the company’s 2010 calendar will be A CELEBRATION OF NATURE45th Anniversary Calendar”.Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate found in The Bahamas, as well as, photographs of the Family Guardian Corporate Centre, located on Village Road and East Bay Street. *See website for further competition details (www.familyguardian.com).DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS JUNE 1, 2009. All entries are submitted at the owner’s risk and will not be returned. All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian’s Corporate Centre, Village Road and East Bay Street, Nassau, between 9:00AMand 5:00PMweekdays only. Envelopes should be marked “Calendar Contest”. All entries must be accompanied by an ofcial entry form, available at any Family Guardian ofce, as published in the newspapers or on the website (www.familyguardian.com). Only colour images will be considered. Images must be provided as digital les on CD. Digital images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing signs of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFFor high quality JPEGand in the original colour format the camera uses (LABor RGB). All entries must be supplied with colour prints (8 x 10) which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints submitted without CD’s will not be eligible and vice versa). The photographer’s name, photo subject and location must be written on the reverse of the print. Judging of entries will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph. Particular areas and subjects of interest are detailed on the website (www.familyguardian.com). The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian’s 2010 calendar. The decision of the judges will be nal. A gift certicate valued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs selected. Photographic credits will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per photographer is limited to a maximum of 5 photos. The winning photographs, along with all publication and reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and the company reserves the right to use such in the future. Photos will not be returned. Employees of Family Guardian, its afliated companies or family members are not eligible. Previously published photos are not eligible. 1 2 3 45 6 7 89 10a celebration of nature 45th anniversary calendar 14 winning entries will appear in Family Guardian’s 2010 Calendar Winning entries will receive a gift certicate valued at $400.Entry deadline is June 1, 2009*For further details & key subjects of interest visit our website at www.familyguardian.com t urbing events” at Eight Mile Rock High S chool. T he high school has, since the beginning of the year, seen three teachers removed from their duties over concerns about molestation of students. The series of events unfolded after t wo male former students accused one of t hem, a male expatriate teacher, of molestation during their time at the school. In addition to that male teacher, who recently fled the country after police moved to press charges, and a femalet eacher alleged to have had a sexual relationship with a student who has been removed pending investigation, The Tribune can reveal that increased scrutiny resulted in alarm bells also being raised about the relationship between a student and another male teacher. A police investigation is also now underway into the third teacher’s actions, a lthough an education official said that the ministry is quite confident that the i nvolvement of the second male teacher, who is currently suspended, was harmless. “From what we understand his wife and family sort of adopted the boy,” saidt he source. Responding to Mrs Hanna Martin’s statement, Mr Bethel said the “safetya nd welfare of all children entrusted to t he care of the Ministry of Education in public schools are of paramount importance to all senior officials of my ministry.” Ministry’s officials are, generally speaking, reluct ant to publicly comment in detail about allegations made against persons involved in the education system without the results of an official i nvestigation...out of a concern not to in any way i mpede or appear to be attempting to prejudge the outcome of such an investigation,” he added. Referring to the fact that t he teacher accused of molesting the male students was now believed to have skipped the country, Mr Bethel said that “the Acting Director of Education made every effort within his power to allay the fears of the teacher and to prevent him becoming a flight risk.” W hile noting that he was not criticising t he press for “heightening public awareness” he said that the public disclosure of allegations surrounding this teacher instantaneously impeded a proper investigation.” H e emphasised that despite several v isits to the school last year he was not p ersonally informed of allegations a gainst the teacher until they appeared in the media. Meanwhile, in response to claims that parents have been inadequately apprised of steps taken by the Ministry int he wake of the series of e vents, Mr Bethel said that “as a representative of parents generally” Eight Mile Rock High School Parent Teachers Association Presid ent Troy Garvey has been kept updated, while all pare nts of children who may have come in contact with the teachers involved have been “kept fully informed” of the Ministry’s “extraordi-n ary measures” to secure their well being. Mr Bethel revealed that an undisclosed number of children at the school, said to have been “at risk” in view of contact with the male teacher who subsequently fled the country, were subject to two separate psychological evaluations f irstly by the chief school psychologist i n Grand Bahama, and secondly by psychologist Dr David Allen. Meanwhile, Mr Bethel said, the receipt b y the Ministry of Education of an “undated, unsigned” note in March,i ncluding the names of a number of child ren, led to further evaluations being c onducted by Dr Allen. N either confirming or denying the claim made by Mrs Hanna Martin that “at least one child” from the school has been admitted to Sandilands after suffering abuse, Mr Bethel said he would “only say that any therapeutic interven-t ions that occurred have only occurred as a direct result of our extraordinary actions in sending Dr Allen to Eight Mile Rock.” The Minister noted that as a result of investigations into the sex allegations at E ight Mile Rock High School “and in one or two other instances” he has disc overed that children who are deprived in some form whether it be food or other material needs are most at risk of molestation. Declining to go further into details, M r Bethel said: “One of the critical areas that I have identified because of this situation in Eight Mile Rock and in one or two other instances is that hunger, hungry children, the absence sometimes of food, is the greatest single point of entry in terms of persons who are ill disposed and seek to take advantage of children, that is the point of c ontact.” H e added that from now on all allegations of sexual impropriety involving a teacher and a student will be referred d irectly to the police for investigation, rather than having the matter initiallys ent to the Attorney General’s office for a legal opinion, as had been established p ractice. c ent at end September, given t he more accelerated increase in loan servicing difficulties.” The Central Bank report added that up until September 2008 domestic bank’s neti ncome fell by $17.7 million, or 23.1 per cent, to $59 million, relative to the same quarter last year. Up to December 2008, the fourth quarter, bank’s net interest margin increased by3 .1 per cent to $117.6 million but this was “offset by a reduction in the contribution from commission andf oreign exchange income, w hich decreased by 43.7 per cent to $6.2 million,” said the review. T his lowered bank’s gross e arnings by 1.0 per cent in the face of a 2.3 per cent rise i n operating costs to $65.3 million. The review notes that the “most significant effect on t he outcome was the reduct ion in the other income component (net of deprecia tion and bad debt expenses) to $0.6 million from $15.6 million in 2007, corresponding mainly to a hike in provisions for bad debts. t he country’s 13th homi c ide victim for the year. Ellis, whowas arraigned before Magistrate AncellaW illiams in Court One, Bank Lane, was not required to enter a plea to the murder charge. Ellisw as represented yesterday by lawyer Alex Morley. After the magistrate hadr ead and outlined the n ature of the charge against him, Ellis who appeared perplexed, asked whether he was chargedw ith murder or conspiracy to commit murder. Magis trate Williams told Ellist hat he was charged with murder. Ellis was remanded to H er Majesty’s Prison yest erday. His case has been t ransferred to Court 5, Bank Lane. The case was adjourned to April 24 w hich is when a date will b e set for the commencement of a preliminary inquiry into the matter. r egion's EPA with Europe. " It's similar to the one we negotiated with Europe CARICOM had committed to that and said toC anada that once they had finished t he negotiations of the EU's (Eco nomic Partnership Agreement), they would commence discussions witht he Canadian authorities with regard to a CARICOM-Canada economic partnership agreement. " We have good working relations with Canada and obviously this just will improve as countries begin to move more on a global approach to t rade, and CARICOM will be seen in that region," he said. On October 15, 2008 government signed onto the EPA with the EU along with 12 other member states after much contentious debate over the potential damage thea greement could wreak on the local economy. Guyana, whose president initially opposed the agreement signed the EPA on October 21, 2 008 after two additional clauses were added. Haiti has until 2010 to sign the agreement. Opponents of the EPA have argued that it will not create any significant benefits for the Bahamas and would drastically reduce government revenue. According to The Jamaica Gleaner, Jamaica's D eputy Prime Minister and Minister of For eign Affairs and Foreign Trade Dr Kenneth Baugh has already expressed concerns about the upcoming trade agreement duri ng a recent visit to Canada. H e told Canadian officials that an impact analysis showed that opening up trade with Canada would be d etrimental to Jamaica, unless there was a development component, The Gleaner reported. He also report e dly noted that Jamaica would be f looded with Canadian products as a result of the proposed agreement. " We are small countries and we have to be careful how we enter into free-trade agreements. What wouldm ake a big difference is technology transfer," Dr Baugh is quoted as saying. Meanwhile, government has yet t o commence an impact analysis of the agreement, which would mea sure its effect on the economy, due to the ear l y stages of the proposal. "That is part of the process of negotiating. There is a Caribbean Regional NegotiatingM achinery (CRNM a pplication to see whether or not it is feasible, whether or not it is beneficial to both coun-t ries and advise CARICOM on the way forward but that process hasn't started yet. We're just in the early stages of it, but I think CARI COM has indicated to Canada that it is prep ared to begin discussions," said Mr Symonette, who was acting as Prime Minister in place of Prime Minister Ingraham who was at a meetingo f the International Development Bank in Colombia. which I think will come into effect on April 1,” Lord Philips said. We are introducing some q uite tight time limits for fil ing applications. We do think that it is a good idea that there should be a sense ofu rgency with regard to appeals to the Privy Council. It is not just that respondentss hould be left in a state of u ncertainty as to whether or not there is to be an appeal,” he said. “Another significant c hange is that all petitions for leave to appeal will now initially be considered on paper.I n some case we shall direct an oral hearing but it is unlikely that this will happen very often,” Lord Philips said. This will give effect to requests we have received from many practitioners who have complained about the c ost involved in going all the way to London to petition for leave to appeal. Finally we a re introducing new forms w hich we are unloading from our website. “You will be able to file applications and appeals via e-mail. This I suspect will not be to the delight of everyone,” he said. Lord Philips noted that the changes are designed to pro duce rules suitable for the 21st century and bring them in line with rules that England and Wales have introduced. Lord Philips also not ed that that law lords are set to become justices of the new Supreme Court which is scheduled to open in October of this year. Attorney General Michael Barnett during his remarks, noted that the Privy Council is the final court of appeal for the Bahamas and affects the lives of Bahamians, people i n the region and in the wider common law world. “It’s good that they’re here s o that the Bahamian people c an see their final court of a ppeal at work,” the Attor ney General said yesterday. During his welcoming a ddress on behalf of the Inner Bar, attorney Thomas Evans, QC, said: “Your continued presence at the apexo f our court structure is a source of confidence in our system to many litigants and practitioners alike.” T he Privy Council, which acts as the highest court of appeal for certain Common w ealth countries, customarily s its in Downing Street, Lon don. The Privy Council, which usually consists of five law lords, has sat in the Bahamas on two previous occasions in December 2006, which was its first sitting outside of Lon don, and again in December 2007. The Privy Council will sit in the Court of Appeal u ntil Friday, April 3. While here this week it will hear three appeals, one of which isa Bahamian case. The appeals will be heard before the five law lords Lord Philips of Worth Matravers, who is the senior Law Lord, Lord Scott of Foscote, Lord Brown of Eaton-underHeywood, Lord Mance and Lord Neuberger. The Law Lords will hear appeals in the cases of Wendall Swann vs the Attorney General of the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI Alicia Winegardener (Bahamas Deuss vs the Attorney General for Bermuda and the Commissioner of Police of Bermuda. Value of loans in arrears expanded by 228 per cent F ROM page one Man charged FROM page one Sex scandal exposes weakness in schools F ROM page one GLENYS HANNA-MARTIN accused Mr Bethel on S unday of being in ‘gross d efault’ of his duty. Caribbean ready to discuss trade agreement with Canada Brent Symonette FROM page one Changes to affect Privy Council appeals FROM page one

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CLICO’s insolvency likely more than $18m C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information contained is from a third party and The T ribune can not be held responsible for e rrors and/or o mission from the d aily report. $3.48 $3.49 $3.49 '%,$-0-*1 n*''%!'&,!'%/",!+"&,"'*$"."& + +.!+."-$$1$+(*'(*,1/",! '&,/'#!'-+'*.+ '%%-&",1 frtffnnt$'%%(#&( &(#! #"&(#$&#&( &(#! n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas is facing a “retirement nightmare”, a leading financial adviser told Tribune Business yesterday, with the relatively low level of private pension plan participation and poor savings habits creating an ever-increasing “social timetomb”. Commenting on the Central Bank of the Bahamas’ survey of Bahamian private pension funds, which found that less than one out of every three workers participated in a private pension plan, Kenwood Kerr, Providence Advisors’ chief executive, said this contributed to an “over-reliance” on the National Insurance Board (NIB of retirement funding. “Broad-based education is required,” Mr Kerr told Tribune Business, “and we need to have more people covered. In the absence of pension funds to cover you, in the absence of personal savings habits and dis cipline, and in asking NIB to bear too much of the burden, retirement is going to be a nightmare.” Mr Kerr said the development of these qualities personal savings habits, discipline and private pension plans (individual and employer-sponsored) were essential for the social security of thousands of Bahamians, especially in their retirement years, and the maintenance of living standards. H e added that NIB needed t o be used as a supplement to other sources of retirement income, rather than the main source. The percentage of Bahamian workers participating in private pension schemes increased from 25.8 per cent in 2005 to 27.5 per cent 2007, but this means that more than two out of every three Bahamian workers is not covered by this source of retirement funding. Still, the Central Bank found that the raw number of private pension plan participants had increased by 6.5 per cent in 2006 and 7.1 per cent in 2007 to reach 47,221. Average coverage rates for participants, as a percent-a ge of total employees within t he surveyed plans, improved to 91.4 per cent in 2007 com pared to 88.6 per cent in 2005. ‘Retirement nightmar looms for Bahamas n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CLICO (Bahamas likely be much more than $18 million because its main $73 million investment, accounting for 62.9 per cent of its total assets, “is unlikely to be recovered at full value”, the provisional liquidator has warned, with a further $42 million investment required before it can be sold. Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez, in his first report to the Supreme Court, said that Bahamian-regist ered CLICO Enterprises, the entity to whom C LICO (Bahamas m illion loan, was itself insolvent to the tune of $21 million. In turn, CLICO Enterprises had advanced the majority of the loan funds it received to Wellington Preserve, the Florida-based real estate development that ultimately accounts for most of the assets presented on CLICO (Bahamas Mr Gomez said CLICO Enterprises’ assets included a $70 million loan that was due from Wellington Preserve, described as one of its wholly-owned subsidiaries. And CLICO Enterprises had become even more exposed to Wellington Preserve through making a direct $13 million investment in the project. In turn, the provisional liquidator said that Wellington Preserve’s unaudited financial statements for the year to December 31, 2008, while valuing the real estate project as a $127 million investment property, had written down its current value to $62 million. And, to make matters worse, Mr Gomez said Wellington Preserve requires an extra $42 million investment to upgrade the property before it can be marketed for sale to buyers. “The Wellington Preserve real estate project in Florida consists principally of 80 residential lots, and various amenities and commercial sites laid out in a 523-acre tract,” Mr Gomez wrote. * Financial adviser warns of ‘social timebomb’ caused by lack of pension fund and personal savings, p oor discipline and NIB ‘over-reliance’ * Less than one in every three Bahamian workers p articipates in private pension plan * Savings rates heavily skewed, as per cent of a ccounts have less than $10,000, and more than 7 5% of aggregate savings in less than 10 per c ent of individual accounts’ Kerr S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B * Main $73m investment, accounting for 63% of Bahamian company’s $116m assets, ‘unlikely to be recovered at full value’ * Key real estate project needs further $42m investment before it can be marketed for sale, with current value written down from $127m to $62m * Chief subsidiary insolvent to tune of $21m * $2m required to pay CLICO Bahamas due severance monies n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor COLINAImperial Insurance Company resisted pressure from its agency sales force to launch an annuity product to rival the likes of CLICO (Bahamas not see how it would make money” from it, its executive vice-chairman said yesterday. Emanuel Alexiou, who is also a principal in the life and health insurer’s ultimate majority shareholder, said ColinaImper ial “wanted a very strong bal ance sheet” and, to achieve that, some 81 per cent of its actuarial liabilities covered ordinary life insurance policyholders. This stood in stark contrast t o CLICO (Bahamas had 88 per cent of its actuarial liabilities covering annuity depositors when it collapsed into insolvency and was placed into provisional liquidation. Recalling the pleas of Coli naImperial’s agents for the company to develop a new annuity product, Mr Alexiou told an analysts’ conference on the company’s year-end 2008 results: “When the market was so frothy, they plagued us for the last couple of years to develop an annuity product. “We investigated, looked at it and Marcus [Bosland, Colin aImperial’s resident actuary] did some work on it. “We just could not see the economics of having it with [rival] companies selling it, and made a conscious decision not to sell it. We did not see how we could make money. So we abandoned the project and decided to look at it another day.” Mr Alexiou said that while ColinaImperial did have an annuity portfolio on its books, largely inherited from the acquisitions that had created the ColinaImperial resisted annuity product pressure Company declined to follow CLICO (Bahamas because it ‘could not see how it would make mone S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor COLINAImperial Insurance Company executives yesterday predicted that the life and health insurer would enjoy a 2009 finan cial performance similar to last year, with total revenues relative ly flat and a focus on expense/benefit containment, as it reported an 86.2 per cent rise in net income to $8.129 million. The company, whose parent is BISX-listed Colina Holdings, enjoyed a $4.335 million net income boost in its 2008 fourth quarter, which accounted for more than half of its annual profits. The full-year figure represented a significant improvement on the $4.366 million net income produced for the 12 months to December 31, 2007, as a more than $12 million reduction in benefits and expenses outweighed a more-than $8 million drop in ColinaImperial’s total revenues to $160.176 million. When asked why ColinaImperial seemed to traditionally generate the bulk of its net income in the fourth quarter of every year, 2007 having produced a similar $4 million-plus result, Cathy Williams, the company’s vice-president of finance, explained: “A lot of it has to do with year-end pro cedures and what we find at yearColinaImperial profits up 86.2% S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net OLDER Bahamian hotels are far behind newer properties in the race to become energy efficient, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA said yesterday. As Caribbean hotels, through the Caribbean Hotel Association and the Caribbean Tourism Organisation, signed a Memorandum of Understanding on Renewable Energy yesterday, Robert Sands, who is also vicepresident of governmental and external operations at Baha Mar, told Tribune Business that while individual hotels in the Bahamas have been making concerted efforts towards energy efficiency, high capital costs often get in the way. He explained that hotels and Capital costs curb hotels’ efforts over energy supply S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THIS week, I had intended to write the conclusion of my fourp art series on tax reform. However, this was not to be as I have been engaged in many conversations concerning the state oft he economy and its implications for everyday Bahamians. On Friday afternoon, I received a call from one of my colleagues asking whether I was seeing what he is seeing regarding the state of the economy and why I (and otherst en about it. I cannot speak for others, but in recent times I have found it extremely challenging to produce a weekly column. However, I will attempt to contribute ‘my two cents’ to what should be a national economic discussion. D D i i s s t t u u r r b b i i n n g g d d a a t t a a During the last several weeks there have been severala nnouncements by government officials that certainly give me great cause for concern. First, there was the announcement that the inflation rate for 2008 was 4.5 per cent, compared to 2.5 per cent the previous year. S econd, there was the announcement that the unemployment rate in New Providence and Freeport exceeds 12 per cent and 14 per cent respectively. Third, the Minister of Education reported that some 700 students were withdrawn from the ‘private school’ educational sys tem and enrolled in the ‘public school’ system during the first two months of the year. Finally, last week it was announced that government revenues for the fis-c al year 2008-2009 to date were $100 million behind budgeted r evenues. Each of these statis tics warrants further investiga tion and analysis, so I was some what surprised that the media, for the most part, reported them in isolation and without much fuss. In a time when wage growth is essentially flat, a 2 per cent increase in inflation is a signifi c ant jump. The obvious implication for most persons is that your limited dollars now buy you less. A 12 per cent unemployment rate must be concerning because it will have obvious implications for other social indicators such as crime and poverty. I am most concerned about the number of students that had to be transferred back into the p ublic educational system, presumably for economic reasons. Is this a precursor of bigger problems down the road? A sharp revenue shortfall means two things: enforcement will be strengthened, and taxes will increase. Tougher enforcem ent will mean more pressure on the income of those not paying their taxes. If taxes are not increased, then central govern m ent must borrow more, thus increasing the national debt. To the extent that we have to borrow heavily, our credit rating could be under downward pressure. If our credit rating comes down then it becomes more e xpensive for the Government to borrow money. To what degree this is all playing outI am not sure, but it certainly war rants greater discussion. D D a a r r k k c c l l o o u u d d s s Two years ago, US Senators Carl Levin, Norm Coleman and Barack Obama sponsored legislation that seeks to stop offshore tax haven and tax shelter abuses. In introducing the Stop Tax Haven Abuse Bill, Senator Cole man said: “It is simply unac ceptable that some individuals are using offshore tax havens and secrecy jurisdictions to shelter trillions of dollars in assets from taxation. These tax schemes cause a massive revenue shortfall and, sadly, it is t he honest American taxpayer who must bear a disproportionate burden of investing in areas like education and healthcare.W e are introducing this bill to close these loopholes, shut down offshore tax schemes and ensure that every American pays their fair share of taxes.” The then-Senator Barack Obama, in his contribution, added: “ This is a basic issue off airness and integrity. We need to crack down on individuals and businesses that abuse our tax laws so that those who work hard and play by the rules aren’t disadvantaged.” These were certainly strong words by both Senator Coleman a nd the now-president of the US. President Obama can certainly advance this agenda if he so chooses. O n February 22, 2009, European Union (EU Government agreed that the extraordinary international crisis called for an overhaul of the international financial system, including a new system of regul ation for all financial markets, products and participants. Among their deliberations, the leaders reached consensus on the following: * EU Heads blamed the international financial crisis on “off shore jurisdictions” where they allege non-transparent busi ness is carried out; and * EU Heads promised to prepare a “toolbox of sanctions to be applied against such taxh avens” S uch a ‘toolbox of sanctions’ is to be unveiled when this group meets again on April 2 in Lon don. Finally, four days later, President Obama, when presenting his national budget for the year, summed it all up when he said “Our economy is in a deep recession that threatens to be deeper and longer than any s ince the Great depression”. Notwithstanding the new threats, a weak US economy means a weak Bahamian econo-m y. D D i i r r e e c c t t i i o o n n You might ask “where is he going with all of this?” The answer is quite simple. There is a confluence of events that all have very negative implicationsf or the Bahamian economythe brewing of a proverbial perfect storm. Yet in the face of this, we have not mobilised a bi-partisan response to prepare our economy for what may be coming down the pipeline. The political parties are still consumed with p etty politics as usual. It kind of reminds me of the mythical saying: “While Rome burned, Nero fiddled”. T hese are some of the most challenging economic times that we probably face in our lifetime, especially if President Obama is correct in his assessment of the magnitude of this recession. It is a challenge which, in my humb le opinion, requires that all capable hands are ‘on deck’. Yet notwithstanding the imminent economic threat, there seems to be little urgency in crafting a truly national response. Until next week N N B B : : L L a a r r r r y y R R . . G G i i b b s s o o n n , , a a C C h h a a r r t t e e r r e e d d F F i i n n a a n n c c i i a a l l A A n n a a l l y y s s t t , , i i s s v v i i c c e e p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t p p e e n n s s i i o o n n s s , , C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l P P e e n n s s i i o o n n s s S S e e r r v v i i c c e e s s ( ( B B a a h h a a m m a a s s ) ) , , a a w w h h o o l l l l y y o o w w n n e e d d s s u u b b s s i i d d i i a a r r y y o o f f C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l G G r r o o u u p p I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l , , w w h h i i c c h h o o w w n n s s A A t t l l a a n n t t i i c c M M e e d d i i c c a a l l I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e a a n n d d i i s s a a m m a a j j o o r r s s h h a a r r e e h h o o l l d d e e r r o o f f S S e e c c u u r r i i t t y y & & G G e e n n e e r r a a l l I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e C C o o m m p p a a n n y y i i n n t t h h e e B B a a h h a a m m a a s s . . T T h h e e v v i i e e w w s s e e x x p p r r e e s s s s e e d d a a r r e e t t h h o o s s e e o o f f t t h h e e a a u u t t h h o o r r a a n n d d d d o o n n o o t t n n e e c c e e s s s s a a r r i i l l y y r r e e p p r r e e s s e e n n t t t t h h o o s s e e o o f f C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l G G r r o o u u p p I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l o o r r a a n n y y o o f f i i t t s s s s u u b b s s i i d d i i a a r r y y a a n n d d / / o o r r a a f f f f i i l l i i a a t t e e d d c c o o m m p p a a n n i i e e s s . . P P l l e e a a s s e e d d i i r r e e c c t t a a n n y y q q u u e e s s t t i i o o n n s s o o r r c c o o m m m m e e n n t t s s t t o o r r l l g g i i b b s s o o n n @ @ a a t t l l a a n n t t i i c c h h o o u u s s e e . . c c o o m m . . b b s s Bahamas needs unity in face of economic storm Financial Focus By Larry Gibson

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE PRIME Minister’s visit to Colombia to sign two $700,000 agreements with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB ernment’s pursuit of a National Energy Policy, the minister of state for the environment told Tribune Business yesterday. Phenton Neymour revealed that the Bahamas was far behindo ther countries in the region in implementing such a policy, but was catching up quickly. Mr Neymour said one of the grants, totalling $700,000, will focus on streamlining the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC specifically at the corporation’s inefficiencies in order to reduce costs and improve service. He added that as part of the grant project, the Government w ould look into BEC’s financ ial position and research ways to improve this by looking at its internal structure and the rates it charges customers. The project, expected to run for 12 months, will also deter mine ways that fossil fuel-burning power producer will be ableto integrate renewable energy alternatives into its grid, with a determined focus on waste to energy power production. This means that BEC’s regulatory framework will have to be evaluated as part of the project, in order to sanction mergers with independent power producers. Mr Neymour said the Government will also look at BEC’s human resources. The second grant, totalling $750,000 and with a timeline of 14 months, will address the design and implementation of a National Energy Efficiency Programme and further research into other possible alternative energy solutions. Mr Neymour said the grant would address deficiencies with regard to data collection in the energy sector, and explore areas where wind energy can be best harvested throughout the Bahamas. It will identify the best possible ways to use solar energy and ocean thermal energy conversion. The Government will also look at ways consumers can save energy at home and in transportation, and how com mercial customers, schools and government agencies can do the same. “This grant that we have gotten from the IDB, we consider it a significant achievement for moving toward the implementation of our National Energy Policy initiative,” said Mr Ney mour. “This policy will affect a number of the Government agencies and ministries, and is meant to improve the country’s energy security. It is also, from my perspective, a major component of beginning the consumer education programme that we think has potential for reducing energy demand.” Mr Neymour added that it was important for the Bahamas to implement a National Energy Policy before “beginning to address key aspects of the energy industry”. He said the Government had already begun some short-term projects, and had advertised publicly for engineering firms to participate in these projects, obtaining a favourable response from the industry. Mr Neymour also told Tribune Business that the Government is still mulling over Liquid Natural Gas (LNG potential energy source, but have found out after receiving proposals from AES (an LNG company) that further review is necessary. “We have recently had a review of the LNG regulations by B.E.S.T. (Bahamas Environmental Science and Technology Commission),” he said. “We are looking at the technical viability of the project.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 3B * -2%,7,21 $ 6DOHVDQG 0 DUNHWLQJ$JHQW $WOHDVW\HDUV H[SHULHQFH: ULWHWR3 $700k IDB grants to aid National Energy Policy N eymour

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The survey found that the g rowth of private pension funds had outpaced the nominal growth in the Bahamas’ gross domestic product (GDP former having increased from 14.4 per cent of GDP in 2005 to 15.4 per cent in 2007. Privatep ension plans had collectively $1.1 billion in total assets at year-end 2007. However, the Central Bank survey also revealed the work that needs to be done. It point ed out that bank deposits and NIB’s invested assets remained the two largest Bahamian national savings sources, with the former very heavily skewedt owards a minority of large d eposits. Personal savings in bank accounts stood at $3.1 billion or 43 per cent of Bahamian GDP in 2007, compared to 40.1 per cent in 2005. “However, for most account h olders, the resources are not a significant retirement buffer,” the Central Bank warned, “as the average balances in more than 75 per cent of these accounts is less than $10,000, and more than three-quarters of their aggregate savings arec oncentrated in less than 10 per c ent of individual accounts. “The NIB held collective retirement savings of $1.3 billion, representing 18.4 per cent of GDP in 2007, vis-a-vis a slightly lower 19.9 per cent in 2005. The combined domestics avings in life insurance companies are credit unions approached $1.1 billion in 2007, approximately 14.9 per cent and 3.9 per cent of GDP, respectively.” Mr Kerr yesterday told Tribune Business that a failure to develop private pension plans and savings habits would lead to “an over-reliance on NIB” for retirement funding, further propelling its reserve fund into bankruptcy if the status quo was maintained. “NIB would then have to either lessen the amount of payouts or increase the uptake,” Mr Kerr explained. “You haveto several things at once. Look ing at NIB on its own, if you don’t implement pension funds to lessen the burden on NIB, it will have to lower benefits or increase the taxes it takes in to keep going.” He added: “It’s a social time bomb and we need to act with some urgency. That urgency is now. We need to move forward, and put in legislation that looks at existing practices in light of the CLICO (Bahamas We had poor management, poor oversight and a lack of education.” Mr Kerr pointed out that with the Bahamian population’s demographics ageing, the tax base provided by younger, working persons was set to shrink, while the social security burden would rise with an increase in the ageing population. The Central Bank found that defined contribution schemes, where employers matched their employees’ contributions, were the most popular pension plans in the Bahamas, accounting for 73.8 per cent of all scheme respondents. However, defined contribution plans accounted for only 24.7 per cent of total Bahamian pension plan assets, and 16.5 per cent of all private schemep articipants. T his was largely because most defined contribution schemes were started after 1990, and are operated by smaller companies and sponsors, where sharing the contribution burdens with employees is important toe nsure the plans are sustainable. The defined benefit schemes, by contrast, accounted for 83.5 per cent and 75.3 per cent of total private pension fund assets and participants respectively, being operated by major government corporations. Some 29.2 per cent of Bahamian pension plans were managed in-house, largely by financial institutions and pro fessional services firms. Others outsourced the administration to insurance companies (27.9 per cent), other professional administrators (25.9 per cent and banks and trust companies (17 per cent The Central Bank found: “Despite improved average rates of return on investment assets for 2007 vis-a-vis 2005, sponsors were motivated to steadily increase the average paid-in contribution for pension funds as a percentage of employees’ salaries. “Weighted by total assets, the average contribution rate increased marginally to 11.61 per cent in 2007, after a slight dip to 11.46 per cent in 2006, and a paid-in rate of 11.52 per cent in 2005.” While government bonds and other public sector securities remain the main investment feature for Bahamian pension plans, accounting for 36 per cent of total invested assets, this was down from 37.6 per cent in 2005 and a 40.4 per cent peak in 2004. Investments in mutual funds, equities and bonds were up to 32.9 per cent of pension fund asset allocations in 2007, compared to 30.9 per cent in 2005, although the growth rate has slowed due to the decline in private sector capital raising since 2004. “It was to be a high-end residential subdivision with an equestrian/polo theme. Most of the residential lots are connected to or contain polo pitches and horse stables. Unfortunately, the project requires a substantial cash injection of a minimum of $42 million before it can be reasonably presented for sale.” The upshot of all this for CLICO (Bahamas cyholders, annuity depositorsand other creditors is that the company’s financial picture will ultimately be much worse than the one presented in Mr Gomez’s first report, given that the provisional liquidator will struggle to recover the full $73 million loan value from Wellington Preserve. According to the balance sheet presented by Mr Gomez to the Supreme Court, CLICO (Bahamas vent to the tune of $18.286 million, with assets standing at $116.965 and liabilities reaching $135.251 million. Assuming that these figures all stay the same, all creditors rank equally, and Mr Gomez is able to monetise all those assets, CLICO (Bahamas currently stand to recover 86.5 per cent of their investments, or 86.5 cents on every $1. Yet 63 per cent of those $116.965 million in assets are accounted for by the loans to CLICO Enterprises and Wellington Preserve, which the liquidator believes will not be recovered at full value. And then there is the $42 million investment required to ready the real estate at Wellington Preserve for sale. Failure to realise the full $73 million from Wellington Preserve’s eventual sale will leave an even larger hole on the balance sheet, further depleting the asset pool and reducing creditor recoveries. The further $42 million investment required will likely make any buyer discount the purchase price they pay, and creditors will recover far less than $0.865 cents on the $1. Explaining the full extent of the problem confronting him, with the liquidation likely to be long and complex, Mr Gomez wrote in his report to the Supreme Court: “Since 2004, the [CLICO (Bahamas advanced funds to its whollyowned subsidiary, Clico Enterprises (CEL “As at December 31, 2008, approximately $73 million had been advanced to CEL, but it is unlikely that this loan can be recovered at full value as CEL’s December 31, 2008, unaudited financial statements reflect a deficit of $21 million as the assets are $108 million and its liabilities are $129 million. “Included in CEL’s assets is a loan due from Wellington Preserve (WPL subsidiary of CEL, for $70 million. “The December 31, 2008, unaudited financial of WPL includes investment property in Florida and valued at $127 million. However, the same real estate valued on an ‘as is’ basis is worth approximately $62 million.” The provisional liquidator added: “The loan to subsidiary CEL)of approximately $73 million is not considered presentlyc ollectible, and thus endangers the asset base of the company and places policy values in peril. The funds advanced to CEL were advanced by CEL to WPL, the wholly-owned subsidiary of CEL, which acquired its real estate holding in Florida, USA. “This real estate is not presently considered marketable as a result of the significant downturn in the Florida real estate market.” Elsewhere, Mr Gomez said he needed to determine a date for ‘releasing’ CLICO (Bahamas ing them what was due. He explained: “Failure to do so on a timely basis will result in the staff being paid from the company’s resources, which will result in an erosion of the asset pool as revenue is not being generated from which staff could be paid. “I have calculated the severance pay for CLICO’s permanent staff, and agents, which totals approximately $2 million.” Mr Gomez noted in his report that FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas had told him of its concerns that some $35 million worth of its mortgage loans, covered by CLICO (Bahamas ance policies, had been placed at risk by the impending liqui-d ation. The Baker Tilly Gomez partner added that he was still in discussions with four Bahamasbased life and health insurers ColinaImperial Insurance Company, Family Guardian, British American Financial and Atlantic Medical in a bid to transfer CLICO (Bahamas insurance portfolio to them. Tribune Business understands that, in the first instance, the liquidator and his team are seeking to find another carrier who will take on administration of the CLICO (Bahamas folio, dealing with all claims and premium payments, with a view to acquiring it at a later date once matching assets can be released from the liquidation. Meanwhile, Mr Gomez said he had agreed upon drafting an installment payment plan to be submitted to CLICO (Bahamas Bupa for health and Swiss Re for life. The pair are owed $930,750 and $203,915 respectively in outstanding reinsurance premiums, but the reinsurance agreements remain in force. The provisional liquidator added that he was investigating the termination of $10 million worth of Bahamas-based term deposits between year-end 2008 and the date CLICO (Bahamasu idation to determine whether any policyholders received a preferential payment ahead of other creditors. Mr Gomez is also assessing whether CLICO (Bahamas a claim against its parent, Trinidad-based CL Financial, which had guaranteed the loan to CLICO Enterprises. He is also weighing up whether to intervene in Trinidad legal proceedings to prevent CL Financial’s assets from being dissipated. Mr Gomez said he was also investigating the $34 million and $15.5 million claims submitted against CLICO (Bahamas Guyana and Suriname, indicating that his initial review found that funds placed by clients from those countries were forwarded to the Turks & Caicos branch, and then flowed into the US. While these funds were recorded in CLICO (Bahamas records, Mr Gomez said it appeared as if they had been paid directly into the US account. “Unfortunately, the contracts that were entered into with the company do not appear to have been standard policy contracts but, in many cases, could easily appear to be the transfer of funds to the Bahamas that could easily be classified as related party loans rather than policies,” Mr Gomez said of theG uyana/Suriname claims. Tribune Business was yesterday told that Lawrence Duprey, CL Financial’s chairman, is currently in Nassau, although it is unclear why he is here. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following items: %XLOGLQJVWUXFWXUHH[WHULRUHQYHORSHH[WHULRUFDQRSLHVDQG UHODWHGVXEWUDGHSDFNDJHV *HQHUDO5HTXLUHPHQWVIRU*HQHUDO&RQWUDFWLQJVHUYLFHVIRU WKHRYHUDOOSURMHFWDQG &RQVWUXFWLRQ0DQDJHPHQW)HHIRUWHQGHULQJWKHEDODQFHRI VXEWUDGHDQGVXSSOLHUZRUNSDFNDJHVDWDODWHUGDWH The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e. mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are notincluded in this Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230 General Contractor in 2009. The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room located at the NAD Project office. TENDERC-230 General Contract, Stage 1Contact: TRACI BRISBYContract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project Ph: (24224217 P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs 6 ($%52:1+2/',1*6/,0,7(' 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ RIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW RI 6 ($%52:1+2/',1*6/,0,7(' KDV EHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJ W WKH&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGWKH5HJLVWUDU 6DUQLD'LUHFWRUV/LPLWHG 6 XLWH 7RZHU+LOO+RXVH /H%RUGDJHWHWHURUW *XHUQVH\ /LTXLGDWRU CLICO’s insolvency likely more than $18m F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B ‘Retirement nightmare’ looms for Bahamas F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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company, the product was geared to providing clients with retirement savings. He pointed out that the annuity product mix was substantially different from ColinaImperial’s competitors, especially CLICO (Bahamas treated annuity deposits almost as certificates of deposit or banking products. CLICO (Bahamas offering above-market interest rates of returns on its annuities in a bid to attract new investor money into the business and stave off its impending insolvency. The CLICO (Bahamas ance sheet produced by provi sional liquidator Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez showed that future policyholder benefits to meet annuity payments stood at $112.39 million, 83 per cent of its total liabilities. Meanwhile, Mr Alexiou said yesterday that ColinaImperial was “not looking to go after” acquiring CLICO (Bahamas life and health insurance portfolio because there were still too many uncertainties associated with it. Given that the provisional liquidator had much work to do, it was impossible, Mr Alexiou said, for other insurers to determine what approach they might take. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 5B ColinaImperial resisted annuity F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B ColinaImperial profits up 86.2% end.” Explaining that ColinaImperial had to make conservative actuarial and other assumptions during the first three quarters of every year, Ms Williams said that until the final numbers were computed it was “very difficult to ascertain what the final projections will be at the end.” She added that ColinaImperial’s resident actuary, Marcus Bosland, and his team were working to bring forward actuarial and other calculations to mid-year, as opposed to yearend, a move that would smooth out earnings calculations. Mr Bosland yesterday said ColinaImperial’s refinancing of its $20 million preference share debt, replacing the initial issue with one that carried a 1.5 per cent coupon rate as opposed to 2.25 per cent, would save the company $150,000 per year in dividend payments. He added that the life and health insurer’s key solvency ratio, the Minimum Continuing Capital and Surplus Requirement (MCCSR per cent at year-end 2008, well above the 150 per cent supervisory target. ColinaImperial, said Mr Bosland, expected that MCCSR reading to “be higher than that this year”. He added that while policy lapse rates “had increased slightly in 2008 compared to the prior year, a trend that had continued into 2009, this was not significant and had been expected given the economic environment. While ColinaImperial was not expecting growth in ordinary life premiums that was comparable to prior years, Emanuel Alexiou, its executive vicechairman, said group and individual health premiums were set to be “a little higher” in 2009 due to product re-pricing and the launch of its Stellar Care portfolio. ColinaImperial also saw A. M. Best, the international insurance credit rating agency, reaffirm its A(Excellent strength rating and aissuer credit rating, both carrying a stable outlook. “The rating affirmations are based on ColinaImperial's leading market share in the life/health market in the Bahamas, its diversified product portfolio, favourable riskadjusted capitalisation and conservative reserving practices,” A. M. Best said. M arket “As the life/health market leader, with more than 50 per cent market share in the Bahamas, ColinaImperial continues to leverage its competitive advantages by expanding within the islands of the Bahamas and into other Caribbean and Latin American markets. “A.M. Best notes that while ColinaImperial's earnings performance and growth in assets have primarily been achieved through several acquisitions, the company's potential for new business growth and earnings sustainability will depend on its ability to attract new business growth organically in a mature Bahamian life/health insurance market. A.M. Best also notes improved results in ColinaImperial's group and individual health business lines.” It added: “Partially offsetting these strengths are the mature nature of the Bahamian life/health market and the recent erosion in the Bahamas' economy, primarily resulting from a decline in the tourism sector. “The weakness in the Bahamian economy may impede ColinaImperial's potential for organic growth, its ability to stabilise the volatility in its operating results and increased delinquencies in its mortgage loan portfolio, which would require additional charges to operating income. “A.M. Best notes that ColinaImperial has implemented aggressive measures to address the rising delinquencies in its mortgage loan portfolio and provide for all potential losses in that portfolio.” Capital costs curb hotels’ efforts over energy supply resorts can incur huge bills in an attempt to outfit their operations with energy-saving devices, which can be banka ccount breakers. Air conditioning, a major voltage consumer in any hotel, is one of the most expensive pieces of hardware to replace, but one of the most important. “(New energy efficient equipment implementation) can only be applicable to new installs because the capital costs of a change out on any large scale, as well as retrofitting, isn’t financially viable,” said Mr S ands. “We are constantly looking at ways to be more energy efficient.” Project He added that the Baha Mar project was considering deep water cooling as an alternative source of energy for air conditioning and electricity genera tion, and had brought in experts in the field to advise the project. “We’re looking at all forms of renewable energy because we know that it is the way of the future,” Mr Sands said. The Government has also advocated energy efficiency in the hospitality sector, according to Mr Sands, and have acknowledged the need to look at alternative forms of energy. Hotels He said hotels around the Bahamas have slowly begun to integrate energy saving devices, such as fluorescent lighting, but were still often handicapped in terms of energy consumption. “The difficulty in our busi ness is we’re demand-side, and whether we have 10 per cent or 100 per cent occupancy the amount of electricity remains the same, because we continue to cool and light,” said Mr Sands However, he suggested that the private sector and the Government might be able to implement short-term cost savings on energy with better calculations for fuel surcharge rates that will help to further bring down the high cost of utilities. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 58F/14C Low: 62F/17C Low: 70F/21C Low: 73 F/23C Low: 72F/22C Low: 72F/22C Low: 74 F/23C Low: 69F/21C High: 82F/28C High: 82F/28C High: 84 F/29C High: 84F/29C High: 86F/30C High: 84 F/29 High: 85F/29C Low: 71F/22C High: 81 F/27C Low: 75 F/24 High: 84 F/29CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 70F/21C High: 87F/31C Low: 74 F/23C High: 84F/29C Low: 71 F/22C High: 83F/28C Low: 73 F/23C High: 86F/30C Low: 73F/23C High: 89 F/32C Low: 72F/22C High: 86 F/30C Low: 69 F/21C High: 87F/31C Low: 69F/21C High: 88F/31C Low: 75 F/24C High: 86F/30C High: 80F/27CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 31ST, 2009, PAGE 11BTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Mostly sunny and humid. Patchy clouds.Partly sunny.Breezy with plenty of sunshine. Plenty of sunshine. High: 85 Low: 74 High: 86 High: 87 High: 90 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Plenty of sunshine. High: 88 Low: 76 Low: 74 Low: 74 AccuWeather RealFeel 106F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 79F 99-79F 95-82F 94-87F 103-84F Low: 76 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 86F/30C Low .................................................... 73F/23C Normal high ...................................... 80F/27C Normal low ........................................ 67F/19C Last year's high .................................. 83F/28C Last year's low .................................. 72F/22C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.02" Year to date ..................................................2.07"Normal year to date ......................................5.11" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU First Full Last New Apr . 2 Apr . 9 Apr . 17 Apr . 24 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:03 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:26 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 10:32 a.m. Moonset . . . . . . . . . none Today W ednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:04 p.m.2.46:06 a.m.0.1 -----6:04 p.m.0.0 12:35 a.m.2.97:05 a.m.0.2 1:03 p.m.2.37:05 p.m.0.1 1:39 a.m.2.88:09 a.m.0.3 2:10 p.m. 2.38:14 p.m.0.2 2:50 a.m. 2.79:15 a.m.0.3 3:21 p.m. 2.4 9:26 p.m.0.2 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 88/3170/21s87/3070/21s Amsterdam55/1246/7pc59/1543/6s Ankara, Turkey68/2043/6pc64/1745/7c Athens73/2263/17c74/2362/16pc Auckland67/1952/11pc63/1748/8pc Bangkok93/3378/25t94/3478/25t Barbados84/2873/22pc84/2874/23s Barcelona52/1149/9r57/1349/9r Beijing52/1136/2pc61/1637/2s Beirut68/2063/17s69/2064/17c Belgrade59/1551/10c66/1852/11c Berlin55/1241/5s59/1543/6s Bermuda 68/2060/15pc68/2063/17pc Bogota66/1848/8r64/1746/7r Brussels57/1337/2s59/1541/5s Budapest56/1346/7pc62/1644/6sBuenos Aires 75/2355/12pc70/2159/15pc Cairo80/2664/17pc84/2865/18pc Calcutta 99/3778/25t100/3779/26s Calgar y36/218/-7c32/019/-7sf Cancun88/3172/22s90/3272/22s Caracas82/2768/20s83/2867/19pcCasablanca 66/18 46/7 s 66/1848/8s Copenhagen 50/1044/6c52/1146/7pc Dublin55/1243/6pc54/1241/5sFrankfurt 57/13 36/2s61/1639/3s Geneva57/1342/5pc64/1745/7c Halifax39/325/-3sf44/632/0pcHavana 90/32 70/21 pc90/3268/20s Helsinki39/332/0c37/232/0pc Hong Kong 75/2364/17c75/2364/17pc Islamabad90/3258/14pc90/3261/16c Istanbul69/2059/15c64/1756/13cJerusalem 61/1647/8s66/1854/12pc Johannesburg 79/26 53/11pc75/2350/10sh Kingston 85/29 75/23s85/2976/24sh Lima84/2865/18c85/2964/17c London 59/15 43/6 pc63/1743/6s Madrid57/1334/1pc59/1536/2sh Manila84/2877/25r82/2775/23sh Mexico City84/2848/8s81/2745/7s Monterrey90/3263/17pc92/3362/16pcMontreal 46/732/0s52/1137/2pc Moscow 41/530/-1pc41/532/0r Munich43/632/0c50/1038/3pc Nairobi85/2962/16t85/2960/15r New Delhi91/3261/16s96/3567/19s Oslo 39/328/-2c40/432/0c Paris 59/1539/3s61/1639/3pc Prague53/1135/1s58/1435/1s Rio de Janeiro82/2772/22sh80/2671/21r Riyadh82/2750/10s86/3054/12s Rome68/2056/13r70/2152/11r St. Thomas 83/28 74/23sh82/2772/22s San Juan82/2760/15pc84/2861/16r San Salvador88/3166/18pc89/3171/21s Santiago86/3052/11s82/2754/12pc Santo Domingo86/3068/20s84/2868/20pc Sao Paulo77/2561/16t75/2361/16pc Seoul 50/1036/2pc54/1234/1s Stockholm45/734/1r48/832/0pc Sydney72/2266/18sh73/2266/18r T aipei 69/20 62/16c70/2157/13sh Tokyo57/1348/8c57/1345/7r Toronto44/636/2s48/838/3r Trinidad86/3073/22t86/3071/21c Vancouver48/839/3sh46/741/5cVienna 56/13 42/5s62/1645/7s Warsaw52/1137/2s50/1039/3c Winnipeg36/220/-6sn35/119/-7sf HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayWednesdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 8-16 Knots3-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Wednesday:SE at 10-20 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:E at 8-16 Knots3-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Wednesday:SE at 10-20 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:E at 8-16 Knots3-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Wednesday:SE at 8-16 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 61/1636/2s56/1333/0c Anchorage33/021/-6c35/120/-6pc Atlanta 67/19 54/12t66/1853/11pc Atlantic City56/1337/2s55/1245/7r Baltimore64/1740/4s52/1144/6rBoston 50/10 36/2s49/939/3c Buffalo54/1238/3s50/1039/3r Charleston, SC74/2357/13pc75/2361/16t Chicago56/1334/1r51/1033/0pcCleveland 56/13 42/5pc56/1338/3r Dallas66/1845/7s73/2255/12pc Denver45/724/-4pc42/523/-5c Detroit56/1340/4pc51/1037/2c Honolulu82/2771/21c82/2771/21pcHouston 69/20 49/9 r77/2559/15s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayWednesday T odayWednesday T odayWednesday Indianapolis 62/1643/6r60/1541/5pc Jacksonville74/2362/16pc77/2565/18t Kansas City 48/8 31/0pc54/1234/1pc Las Vegas75/2351/10s78/2553/11pc Little Rock61/1640/4t70/2148/8sLos Angeles 74/23 54/12s74/2354/12pc Louisville68/2047/8t64/1745/7pc Memphis58/1442/5t70/2150/10s Miami86/3074/23pc88/3173/22pc Minneapolis 40/4 27/-2sn40/426/-3sn Nashville64/1743/6t68/2044/6pc New Orleans78/2556/13t73/2261/16pc New York59/1543/6s52/1145/7r Oklahoma City62/1639/3s72/2245/7pc Orlando 82/27 67/19 pc87/3067/19t Philadelphia62/1640/4s58/1444/6r Phoenix81/2755/12s82/2754/12s Pittsburgh63/1743/6s55/1238/3r Portland, OR53/1140/4sh52/1144/6c Raleigh-Durham 70/2148/8pc64/1749/9r St. Louis56/1340/4t65/1846/7pcSalt Lake City 51/1031/0c43/629/-1sf San Antonio 74/23 51/10 pc79/2656/13s San Diego69/2056/13s64/1757/13pc San Francisco65/1850/10pc67/1951/10sSeattle 50/1039/3sh47/841/5c T allahassee 74/2363/17t78/2563/17t Tampa82/2770/21pc83/2870/21t Tucson78/2548/8s79/2648/8s Washington, DC65/1843/6s55/1246/7r UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-storms Rain FlurriesSnowIce AccuWeather.com

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n By LLOYDALLEN T ribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net WITH Spring well on its w ay, some experts are now predicting an active pollen induced allergy period. Although there are no local agencies which test for airbourne pollen levels, internet reports predict this year will be an active season based on last year’s high pollen counts. As high seasonal pollen counts can affect numerous types of allergies, from eye allergies (conjunctivitis reactions (dermatitis mon spring allergy is allergic rhinitis which is also known as hay fever. Dr Chinyere Carey-Bullard a family medicine specialist from the Advanced Family Medical centre on Shirley Street says the ball is still in your hands in controlling your seasonal allergies. She said although allergy sufferers may be in for a rough spring, taking afew extra steps to protect themselves will make the difference between hav-i ng an allergy free spring, or enduring allergy symptoms while exposed to the elements. Some common allergens include house dust, cigarette or cigar smoke, dust-mites, molds & fungi, cut grass, animal dander or discharges, and morec ommonly airbourne pollen. Dr Carey-Bullard started by pointing out the importance in observing sea sonal changes in the body. W here many people may not even be aware that they suffer from one or more allergies, Dr Carey-Bullard said the symptoms which frequently pass under the radar, are commonly mistaken for less threatening ailments like the common cold, or a dry throat. S he said: “Symptoms (related to an allergy) can range from just a dry couch which we call a variant asthma, to itchy and watery eyes, watery nose, eczema, constant sneezing, being stuffed up, w heezing, or something worse such as an upper respiratory symptoms like the tightening of the chest.” Whatever the symptom, she said seeking an allergy, asthma, or Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT be the smart step in identifying whethery ou have allergies or not. She said getting a blood or skin allergy test for a diagnosis, will prove extremely useful for those who wish to minimise their symptoms. T he test which can be performed by ENT, asthma, or allergy practitioner, examines skin or blood reactions to common allergens. ENT/Otorhinolaryngologist Winston Campbell, said prompt testing is needed because sometimes severe internale ffects associated with various types of allergies. Dr Campbell explained: “Allergies can produce scaly, itchy ear canals triggering the usage of Q-tips, bobby-pins, tooth-picks etc. “The end result however, is only further wax impaction of the ear canals, hearing loss and painful ear canal infections. The inner ear may also be affected resulting in some variants of Mnire's disease.” As he explained, this is a disorder which develops in the inner ear that can affect hearing and balance, and is caused by elevated pressure on the endolymph. Another allergy related disorder according to Dr Campbell is Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA triggered by an allergic reaction which blocks or inflames the upper airway passages. Dr Campbell explained: “This obstruction to nasal breathing may also have an even greater ripple effect on energy level, early morning fatigue, inter-personal marital/family/work relationships, as well as memory and reduced attention span (in students and adults) when it interferes with one’s ability to get quality, deep, sweet sleep.” He said this disorder can also lead to chronic sleep deprivation and sleep fragmentation, should the individual forgo medical intervention. “Of course, in the vast majority of cases, the effects of allergies on the ear nose and throat are managed conservatively using oral anti-histamine/decongestants, topical nasal steroids [which generate minimal to nil systemic sideeffects, and mucolytics,” he said. Having an allergic reactions to certain medications or airbourne substances is a lifetime disorder, but the likelihood of minimising its effects depends on a sufferer being diagnosed and treated, following the advice of their medical practitioner, and a few good housekeeping tips. Some of the common steps include; dusting your house regularly to avoid dust buildups, frequently washing your hands and hair after being in the out doors, washing your pets who frequent the outdoors, installing screens to all doors and windows in your home, and choosing a wood or tiled floor for your home in place of complete carpeting. C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 7B BODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e health It’s way in the Spring air more than AS high seasonal pollen counts can affect numerous types of allergies, from eye allergies (conjunctivitis skin reactions (dermatitis most common spring allergy is allergic rhinitis which is also known as hay fever.

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S PRING IT IS now officially spring and we enter a new phase of our gardening year. The days are slowly growing longer and many plants will be reju v enating themselves. In colloquial terms we say the sap is rising, meaning that plants are responding to their conditions and heading towards doing what they are supposed to do – propagate themselves. If we take a very simplistic view we arrive at the conclusion that the meaning of life is to make new life. A mayfly has an adult life of anywhere between half an hour and twelve hours. During that conscious time it does one thing – it mates and (if female The procreational urge is strong and becomes overwhelming in spring. We will be seeing many more flowers in the next few weeks – in our gardens, in the bush – and we must remember that flowers are the sex organs of plants. Were you to climb a Himalayan mountain to consult a saffron-clad mystic – or visit a yurt in Mongolia to commune with a rancid yak buttereating guru about the meaning of life – you may get a one-word answer. The increase in plant metabolism brought on by spring makes it a fine time to take cuttings and to start air layering in order to propagate many plants, particularly flowering shrubs. Vigorous new growth also means the ideal time to do some judicious pruning. With flowering shrubs like hibiscus I like to prune one-third of the shrub laterally, then a few weeks later prune another third, then finish the job after another few weeks. By that time the original pruned area should be flowering and you will have avoided having a flowerless hibiscus for a month to six weeks. On the subject of pruning, if you have kept some Christmas poinsettias and they are beginning to look woebegone, put them in the ground in full sun and away from artificial light sources. Once they have settled in, prune them drastical ly, cutting away about half of the foliage. In a couple of months’ time prune them again, halfwaya bove the original pruning points. This pruning will ensure a bushy plant that will be the envy of your neighbours when December arrives and the colourful bracts appear. Do not prune poinsettias after August as you may cut away material that forms the bracts. Our vegetables season pretty well lasts through autumn, winter and spring. Once summer sets in we have to choose what we grow very carefully. Most veggie gardeners take the summer off and survive on everlasting cherry tomatoes. I have spoken with many fellow gardeners and farmers about the vegetable season so far and many of them had the same problems. The biggest disappointment of the year was broccoli. Late autumn and winter gave us cool weather that you would have thought was ideal for broccoli. The heads, however, were generally small. In my own garden my cauliflower formed rather ugly curds that were still tasty but aesthetically less than photogenic. My cabbages were fine but others complained of slow and stunted growth. Sweet peppers had a very slow season with very few examples of excellence. Eggplants seemed to flower forever before producing fruit. In case I have made the season sound a total disaster I should mention that tomatoes, beans, chard, English peas, fennel, spring onions, hot peppers, strawberries and herbs were very pro ductive. Almost to a man (and woman are predicting a hotter than usual summer. That inspires me to get the most out of my vegetable garden between now and the end of spring and then see if they are right. They usually are. L OVING RELATIONSHIPS C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 THE TRIBUNE M OST people would agree that there are some relationships that are so harmful and so destructive that staying in the union would not be in the best interest of anyone involved. But relationships are complex and often situations and self destructive cycles have been left to fester and grow. In the midst of our busy lives couples often fail to recognise that they can not work out their problems alone. Divorce papers require the ticking of a box to acknowledge these 'irreconcilable differences'. Is this a last ditch effort to put some sort of label on a marriage that they felt was too far gone to salvage? Or is it that if we choose a partner who is so different from our culture and beliefs that the relationship is doomed to fail? Or is it simpler than that -the other choices to tick do not fit our view of the reasons why we want a divorce? But is it not these very differences and individualism that is so appealing to our new love interests at the beginning of the relationship? Our unique characteristics, qualities, eccentricities are what catches the eye of our new admirer. We stand out in the crowd, our eyes lock and a connection is made. During the early dating days there is high energy and the differences are either ignored or embraced because of the overpowering sexual tension. We are more preoccupied with our intense sexual feelings and the feelings of love come about from the longing and separation from that person. We are affectionate, attentive, listen and talk to each other. Couples inevitably spend a lot of time touching because it is the power of touch that attaches and bonds us to one another. So what happens then as we settle into the relationship and become comfortable with each other? One of the most common mistakes is that people spend too much time and energy trying to make their partner be 'like them' or they try to 'fix them.' This is a waste of precious life energy. In time we come to realise that making room for differences and to peacefully coexist is a better use of both time and energy. We can only influence people and each one of us is in charge of our own thoughts and behavior. Not all situations can be worked out or in fact need to be. One of the keys to a successful relationship is accepting and respecting the differences. Embrace them; enrich your life instead of trying to eliminate them. The foundation of a relationship is the respect, commitment and love for each other. This may all sound easier said than done. Our beliefs, perceptions and attitudes are often deeply entrenched and have been with us for years. However things can become easier when we realise that by shifting our present thoughts, perceptions and attitudes towards our relationship things can improve. Negative thoughts producing harmful and destructive behavior in the home is then witnessed by children, extended family and coworkers. By learning how to channel your thoughts and then your behaviour, your relationships will improve. It takes a lot of hard work and you may well question the validity of the process. It takes the guidance and careful steering of a relationship therapist to make these changes possible. Once you see an improvement, your life feels better, is going in the direction you want it to go, it is then all worthwhile. Single people without an intimate relationship or who experience recurring failing relationships will also benefit from such guidance. The goal may be to understand why we choose the same type of person, or they may be unsatisfying or destructive. People often feel defeated when they feel they are alone in being willing to do the work to improve things. It is possible for one person to take the first step, to change the direction of the wheel particularly if both compete against each other. It is not a sign of giving in but a sign of courage to be the one to make the first move. A relationship involves two people and the best results are achieved when both work together towards a more fulfilling intimate relationship. Great relationships do not just happen; they are created. M argaret Bain i s an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist located at The Centre for Renewing Relationships, Grosvenor's Close West. She can be contacted by calling 356-7983 or by e-mail at relatebahamas@yahoo.com or at www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is available for speaking engagements. Even the best relationships have differences By Maggie Bain GREEN SCENE By GARDENER JACK It’s THIS poinsettia was a Christmas decoration for 2007 but is now a 4feet tall multi-headed plant. BROCCOLI was a disappointing producer in the garden this winter.

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w here talking about a bad economy and so forth. One of the things that troubled me in particular is that when the economy goes bad or goes slow, I don’t like when our leaders start to talk about tightening our belt and all the negative stuff rather than encouraging people to use their resources that they have available in order to get us back on our feet. Many times you have to rebuild rather than go tight and thisyear the retailers prove that they have seen the same thing and the response we got form the public has been greatespecially from the brides and grooms to be because they are eager for this,” Mr Stubbs said. One of the wedding cake vendors, Deborah Burrows ofthe Cake Box, was excited about participating in this years event and brought a few of her fabulous cakes with her on display. “I have been baking almost all my life and I specialise in wedding cakes and special occa sion extraordinary cakes. This is my passion and I love it. When it comes to the details on the cakes I do a lot of hand work. With shells, they are indi vidually made, dried and air brushed, with the gum paste flowers, each petal, leaf and budis made individually. To make the normal wedding cake, after baking, would take anywhere from two to three hours and some can take longer,” Mrs Burrows said. Ms Burrows said if others want to get into the cake business, it takes a lot of training. “I have trained with Collette Peters, along with others from the Food Network, and you have to find the artists if you like their work and get the train ing. It is a passion because sometimes when I am working I forget to eat and before I realize it, the sun is up. Its not easy work, but if you have a love for it then it becomes what you love,” Mrs Burrows said. When it comes to the pho tographers who attended the bridal show, Photography by Fabian, owned by Fabian Whimms took centre frame. “I have been doing photography for a little over 15 years. I have had different experiences with many brides do to the many different personalities I have come into contact with. Some are smaller, bigger, and so forth. I have only problems with brides if they have problems that can arise from the limo, flowers, makeup and so forth because it then falls on me because I know what I want to do. Time is very important,” Mr Whimms said. As a photographer, Mr Whimms said although this is his second bridal show, he tries to educate the brides as best he could. “Weddings are a touchy subject. I try to educate them about time and how important it is. Many times the couple may want certain things, but it would be difficult to do what they want in one day. So I try to get my brides to take even to some of their photos before or after the wedding where there is no rush. Most brides do not want to puto n their full attire after the wedding. I had a couple who took their photos a month after the wedding on a Sunday and there was no pressure. So as a photographer, I try to do everything different and focus on differentt hings,” Mr Whimms said. T he dcor at a wedding can set the stage for any mood the bride wants to portray, which allows Victorine Bannister-Col lie, general manager of Bahama Fantasies to work at what she does bestbringing fantasies to life. “I have been in the event planning business since 1997. I prefer to use real flowers with my dcor because of the color schemes you can achieve. There is nothing like real flowers. You can get so many colors with flowers. I read a lot of books and watch events on television just to get inspired sometime and make it my own. I try to keep current and think outside the box. I do not call my tables arrangements, I call them escapes,” Mrs Collie said. Mrs Collie said her escapes are as unique as her centre pieces and she tries to please all of her clients. “A table scape, using these live Phalaenopsis orchids can run into $300 a table. I have done centerpieces for as high as $325 try to be as reasonable as I can with my clients. We do international themed dcor as well,” Mrs Collie said. The Bahamas Bridal show was a complete success with brides and grooms winning numerous prizes and surprisest o prepare them for their special day. Registered brides and grooms to be received their share of over $30,000 in gifts and prizes donated by participating exhibitors. A fashion show was also staged later on int he day, featuring fabulous wedd ing and special occasion gowns, tuxedos, honeymoon clothing and lingerie for those brides and grooms to end their special day. This years Bahamas Bridal Show was not just a show, but an all day event dedicated to helping young people fulfill their wedding dreams and fantasies. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 9B F ROM page 12 MODEL showing off Lilac bridesmaid dress by Buttons Formal Wear. 21st Annual Bahamas Bridal Show JUNKANOO themed wedding cake by Deborah Burrows of CakeBox Cakes. THE BRIDE and groom can ride away in luxury in this stylish vehicle from Chain of Events. MALE model showing off white and maroon tuxedo by Buttons Formal Wear. BRIDE to be Phaedra Saunders gets her makeup sample application by makeup artist vendor.

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n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Feature R eporter lallen@tribunemedia.net MARRIAGE for many people is a time where you have just one shot to pull off your dream event for friends and family. This task nowadays is hardly ever a solo project, leading to the increasing popularity in professional wedding planners. Unlike most people who walk away from their weddingt o begin life with their new wife o r husband, Duane Williams realised after getting married that there was a special talent she possessed as a wedding coordinator. Although a finance major in college, Mrs Williams said her eventual transition from a desk job to becoming a wedding planner took many years of searching and several career changes. “I was watching the television one day and came across a biography about Vera Wang. They were talking about how she had done her own wedding and how elegant it was,” she said. After learning of how involved the famous designer had become in the whole concept of weddings, she thought of how heavily she was involved in her own wedding in making the invitations, and organising the entire event. During that exact moment, she said she had received a callf rom a friend who said she had recently met a wedding coordinator who had impressed her, and told her that she could see her doing the same thing. Seeing this as a preamble to her destiny, Mrs Williams saids he soon applied and completed h er wedding consultant certification from Weddings Beautifulan American based company, and thus entered the world of wedding planning. Mrs Williams said although she had lost her desk job, she was determined to succeed in this new venture, simply because it was her destiny. Now five years later, Mrs Williams continues to watch her business grow, while taking care of her husband and young son. She explained: “Brides tend to look around a year in advance for their weddings. Some of them will even contact you 30 days before and are normally not looking for anything major.” While most of her clients are foreigners, she said they tend to just be as interested in finding someone to perform their ceremony, securing witnesses, and then getting a boutonnire and bouquet. Although those minimal r equest have had some impact on her business, Mrs Williams said the addition of her new company’s website www.arose unfolding.net, has helped in promoting her business to peo ple who would have otherwise n ot known about her. W hen she first started her company, like most new entre preneur she said at times that she wondered if her business would be successful. “I’ve felt discouraged at times, but like clock-work someone would call and ask ‘is this Rose Unfolding, I want to find out about what services you offer.’ “That has been the push for me, knowing that this is something that God wants me to do.” Mrs Williams said in an industry where it is so easy to be lost in the sea of the many companies offering similar services, one thing she has done to stand out is diversifying her wedding packages. Offering a cross section of pre-arranged or customised packages, she said from her experience of once being a bride, she understands how important it is to have options, especially if you’re working witha limited budget. A s a consultant, Mrs Williams also assists brides who are looking for the island wedding expe rience. She said offering elements like Bahamian music, food, Androsia, and flowers to a visit-i ng bride goes a long way in selli ng what is available locally. With the help of her husband, Mrs Williams looks forward to her company becoming the agency of choice for persons planning their weddings. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 THE TRIBUNE AdderleyLanovia D. AlgreenBarbara Deanne AliDenise S. AllenAnishka Jaunita AndersonSamantha T. ArcherPatrice ArmbristerTamu N. AubergMelissa D. BeauchandRolanda BethelKenya P. Bethell BonimyChakita Braithwaite BraveWiselene Brennen Bullard Burrows Carey Cartwright CashApryll J. Clarke Cleare Collie Cooper Curtis Darville Dean DeleveauxDereka F. Dorsette Edgecombe Estwick Eulin Evans Ferguson Fernander Forbes Fowler FoxCherez N. FranksGina Alicia Lashann Lanovia D. Barbara Deanne Denise S. Anishka Jaunita Samantha T. Patrice Tamu N. Melissa D. Rolanda Kenya P. Dollene Peaches Chakita Joan Wiselene Deshon Lashan K. Nakeisha K. Monalisa M. Cheyenne M. Apryll J. Deidre A. Jaminia J. Pamela L. Angela N.T. Cynthia Shantell Torrianna L. Camille C. Dereka F. Dianette L. Mary Selina A L Antoyeka Prenette S. Kimra M. Jonelle Aanica S Marcia F. Cherez N. Gina Alicia Lashann GaitorLesley (Tammy Gibson Gilbert Graham Gray GreenRobynn I. Griffin GrimesValron S. Handfield Hanna Heastie Hinsey Ingraham Johnson Kemp Knowles Lamb Lees Lewis Lockhart Sands Saunders Sawyer Selver Seymour Smith Stewart Storr Stubbs Sturrup Swaby Sweeting Symmonette ThompsonMcquessa I.Thompson/RolleWilliamsYasmin N. WilsonLa-Keisha Woodside Lesley (TammyPrenell D. Shakera L. Samantha Kenisha M. Robynn I. Esther Valron S.Maryann (TamikaRanel J.Anasieya CharisoNgaio F. Kenya S. Jacklyn S. Nicolette D. Kimberley V. Vanessa G. Mayleene N. Selecia L.C. Lynaire A. Jenell L. Psyche T. Carina Marie Melissa Erica Kayla Patrina Gingha Marissa Sheila Sherrell A. Stephanie A. Carmetta M. Tamika K. Mcquessa I.Dedrie M.Yasmin N. La-Keisha Sherell “It takes insight not eyesight to see the opportunity beneath the surface of a perceived obstacle.” INan environment flooded by fear and frustration, it may be difficult to consider that great opportunities exist just beneath the surface of your challenges. Hence, many willingly settle for a small life of discontent; fearing that this abundant universe is without the essential provisions to sustain their well-being. This is the nugget of negative thinking that fuels low energy; which mushrooms into lack of confidence, reduced productivity and poor performance on the personal and busi-ness level. Thus, you must consistently analyse your thinking; a critical process thatought not to be taken lightly. Your thoughts are the bricks with which you build your life and they eventually become the slabs with which we collectively build our society. Nation building is not about blocks and cement; rather, it’s about building people, one mind at a time. Small Shift Big Change A small shift in your thinking can make big things happen; but you must b e willing to do the work at resetting your mind, something few are prepared to do. I find it odd that despite the dazzling opportunities within our Bahama Islands, admired by many around the world; the population mindset remains laced with fear rather than faith; where the currency of hope is quickly exchanged for the popularity of despair. Little do we understand that fear only leads to aggression; any steady diet of negativity slowly shapes who we become; a fear-driven community, imprisoned by the barriers of negative thinking. This thought may mean very little to those who have concluded that the world is coming to a close and that we are experiencing ‘the last days’. However, for the souls of tomorrow, who are awaiting their chance to enjoy the opportunity of life, we owe it to them to create a bigger vision of possibility that impels them towards even greater achievements. Until we take the time to reconcile our thoughts and build our minds, we will continue to uncover the many obstacles that we seem so desperately seeking to find. Shifting from pessimism to optimism enables you to discover endless opportunities that are right before your eyes. Final thoughts What is most fascinating about the human mind is that it has infinite capacity to think, learn and grow.This understanding reassures that there is truly nothing to fear; as the entire kingdom is within, waiting for you to bring it into expression. When I consider the magnitude and majesty of this universe; boundless and endless, I cannot comprehend how so many give up on the substance of life.I believe that that this current sense of powerlessness is not the result of people being without power; as much as it is the result of people being without understanding. I cannot imagine a world, where even the tiniest creature is consistently provided for, but human kind, who is made in the image and likeness of the creator,is without sustenance. I cannot imagine a world where there is miscalculation of needs or disregarded desires; a world where wellness gives way to illness and wealth is replaced by poverty. Such a world, I truly cannot imagine; but if it does exists, rest assured that it lives only within your own mind. For some this may be deemed as too much optimism; but this is more than good ole optimism.It is the absolute certainty that a bountiful life is always on our side. A philosophy rooted in the knowledge that we are the creators of our own reality and that obstacles are typically the wrapping paper with which opportunities are presented. This is the world that I know; this is the world that I see. Now, it’s your turn; what kind of world do you imagine, what kind of world do you see? Remember – whenever you ask, it is always given.Whether you see obstacles or opportunities, you always receive, encounter or discover whatever you seek within your heart and mind. I encourage you to see the upside of life; because in truth, that is all that really exists. If you are ready to analyse your thoughts and optimise your mind – join my upcoming NoExcuses Goals Program. Please send an e-mail to coach4ward@Yahoo.com or call 4296770.Call Now To Enter For Free Coaching Opportunity! Michelle M. Miller is a certified LifeCoach and Stress Management Consultant.She is the Principal Coach of the Coaching Studio, which located on Madeira Street, Palmdale. Questions or comments can be sent to P.O. Box CB-13060 – e-mail coach4ward@yahoo.com Obstacles or opportunities T HE COACH APPROACH B y Michelle M M iller, CC What do you see? DUANE WILLIAMS: WEDDING COORDINATOR Gretchen & Michael LaBonia Duane Williams

PAGE 22

C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009 21 st Annual Bahamas BRIDAL SHOW n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Staff Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net D COR, the perfect dress, flowers, invitations, party favours, when you think about it there is a lot of planning, not to mention the headache and frustration that goes into the wedding planning experience. The perfect way for a bride to relive the stress of shopping from store to store to plan her perfect day is to attend a bridal show and the 21st Bahamas Bridal Show, under the theme “Two Hearts, One Beat” brought together 44 vendors just to assist the many brides to be that attended the spectacular event. A Bridal show is basically a one stop shop for all things wedding. Vendors came out with all the glam and glitter they possibly can to showcase their products to potential brides and grooms alike. Makeup artists from Sacha Cosmetics made a huge impression on the brides to be by giving free makeup demonstrations. Florists displayed their exquisite arrangements of both silk and real flowers, photogra phers gave shots to couples as they entered the room, and so much more was made available to the cou ples to offer their services and expert advice. Visiting all those different bridal vendors in one location made it so much easier to compare prices and services and in turn, to save the multitude of young couples who attended time and money. Executive producer and creator of The Bahamas Bridal Show, Tommy Stubbs, said although they have been around since 1990, there has been a lot of time and effort to pull off such a large scaled event. “First the bridal show was done to help launch my company, Buttons Formal wear, and then we realised we should not only do it to promote Buttons, but we should involve other companies that need to do the same thing. We are now doing this as a partnership to promote all companies that are involved in weddings or interested in promoting their products,” Mr Stubbs said. Mr Stubbs said although there is usually more companies participating, he would like the brides and grooms to be to take away from the show a lot of fun, memories, prizes and ideas for their wedding day. “One of the things was that we usually antici pate around 50 vendors but a lot of persons M O D E L s h o w i n g o f f e v e n i n g / b r i d e s m a i d a t t i r e f r o m B u t t o n s F o r m a l W e a r . SEE page nine THIS couple dazzled the crowd with bride and groom wear from Buttons Formal Wear. Mario Duncanson/ Photos


The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

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weakne

Minister admits
system vulnerable
to child abuse

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BAHAMAS BIGGEST



Caribbean
community
is ready to
discuss trade
agreement
with Canada

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

LESS than six months
after the Caribbean Com-
munity signed onto a con-
troversial trade agree-
ment with the European
Union, regional leaders
have indicated they are
ready to discuss creating
a similar agreement with
Canada.

According to the Asso-
ciated Press, the issue will
be discussed on the side-
lines of the April 17 Sum-
mit of the Americas, in
Trinidad.

Yesterday Deputy
Prime Minister and Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs

m@ By ALISON police, revamp the role Brent Symonette said
LOWE of school guidance CARICOM had previ-
Tribune Staff counsellors — who will ously agreed to begin dis-
Reporter be trained in “coun- cussions on a proposed
alowe@ selling psycho-therapy” economic partnership

tribunemedia.net

TWO sex scandals
involving teachers
who are alleged to
have preyed on stu-
dents at a Grand
Bahama high school
have exposed sys-
temic weaknesses
that made it easier
for potential predators to take
advantage of children, the Min-
ister of Education has admit-
ted.

According to Carl Bethel, the
Ministry of Education has now
taken “extraordinary measures”
to deal with the repercussions of
allegations made against certain
teachers at the Eight Mile Rock
High School and to reduce the
likelihood of children at any
government-run school being
molested in the future.

The Ministry plans to have
all new teachers vetted by

ener



— and institute “stu-
dent safety commit-
tees” comprising par-
ents, teachers, adminis-
trators and students.

Mr Bethel’s com-
ments came in a press
conference called to
respond to allegations
from PLP Chairman
Glenys Hanna Martin
that he has remained “callously
and inexcusably” silent on the
situation at Eight Mile Rock
High School and failed to keep
concerned parents apprised of
what steps are being taken by
the Ministry in the wake of
shocking allegations of miscon-
duct by some teachers at the
school.

Mrs Hanna Martin accused
Mr Bethel on Sunday of being
in “gross default” of his duty as
Minister in relation to the “dis-

SEE page 12

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Value of loans in arrears

expanded by 228 per cent

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE value of loans in arrears
for 30 days or more expanded
by 228 per cent in the last quar-
ter of 2008, the Central Bank
revealed yesterday.

Evidencing the worsening
impact of the economic down-
turn on the ability of mortgage
holders to meet their financial
obligations, the bank’s Quar-
terly Economic Review for the
period ending December 2008
said the value of loans in arrears
for this length of time swelled
by $143.5 million to $771.8 mil-
lion.

This equated to an elevated
arrears rate of 12.5 per cent vis-
a-vis a 9.4 per cent rate during
the corresponding period in
2007 and a 10.5 per cent rate at
the end of the last quarterly
period in September 2008.

Among these loans, commer-
cial loans showed the “most
marked weakening” — reach-

ing an arrears rate of 15.5 per
cent at the end of December
2008, from 13.6 per cent in Sep-
tember of that year, and 9.3 per
cent in December 2007.

Consumer loans, meanwhile,
registered a 1.7 per cent arrears
rate increase over the previous
quarter, and a 2.5 per cent rise
since the same period in 2007.

“Non performing loans, those
in arrears for over 90 days and
on which banks no longer
accrue interest rose to 5.96 per
cent of total claims at end
December, from 5.51 per cent at
end September, and 4.4 per cent
at December 2007.

“Tn line with rising credit risks
the banking system’s loan loss
provisions expanded to $2.74 of
total loans from 2.57 per cent
in September and 2.11 per cent
in December 2007. However
the corresponding ratio of pro-
visions to the total non-per-
forming loans ratio was lower
at 45.98 per cent from 46.65 per

SEE page 12

ed otto eM cco) 0) a
A SSHMcd AON ar UIMe) Om O11 010)
charged with murder.

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff

Reporter



A 32-YEAR-OLD
man charged in a
shooting on Arawak
Cay that claimed the
life a local taxi driver
was arraigned in a
Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday on a murder
charge.

Police have charged
Perez Ellis of Mount
Pleasant Village in the
March 9 murder of
Gentry McPhee.

McPhee, 30, of
Carmichael Road, was
shot shortly after mid-
night on March 9, while
in The Big Yard night-
club on Arawak Cay.
McPhee, the nephew of
Rev Philip McPhee
received serious
injuries to his abdomen
and hands. He was
rushed to Princess Mar-
garet Hospital by
ambulance where he
died shortly after
arrival. McPhee was

SEE page 12



























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agreement (EPA) with
Canada once the region
had wrapped up negoti-
ations with the EU.
While negotiations
have not begun between
CARICOM and Canada,
Mr Symonette expects
the nuts and bolts of the
proposed agreement to
be comparable to the

SEE page 12



Changes to
affect appeals
to Privy Council

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

PROCEDURAL changes,
which will ultimately affect the
way appeals to the Privy Council
are filed, will come into effect
next month it was stated yester-
day.

During his remarks at the
opening ceremony marking the
Privy Council’s third working
visit, Lord Philips of Worth
Matravers noted that some pro-
cedural changes will be intro-
duced under the new Privy
Council rules.

“In the Privy Council it will
be business as usual. There will
be no change in the jurisdiction
of the court or in the way in
which it conducts its hearings.
We are, however, introducing
some procedural changes under
the new Privy Council rules

SEE page 12


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



SOME ANGRY HARBOUR ISLAND RESIDENTS ACCUSE ALVIN SMITH OF “LACK OF REPRESENTATION’

Shape up or ship out, MP told

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SOME residents of Harbour
Island are fuming over what
they call the “lack of repre-
sentation" by MP for the area
Alvin Smith.

They say they are prepared








to vote him out of office in the
next general election if he
"doesn't shape up".

In response, Mr Smith — who
is also the Speaker of the
House — told The Tribune he
spends a lot of time in his con-
stituency.

He added that during his
three terms as MP for North

Eleuthera, he has consistently
lobbied successive govern-
ments to upgrade infrastruc-
ture on the islands he repre-
sents.

He also said he is planning a
series of town meetings where
constituents can air their con-
cerns,

Residents said their fury

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came to a head at a meeting in
Lower Bogue on Friday —
which Mr Smith did not
attend.

Free National Movement
chairman Johnley Ferguson
showed up instead, and was
reportedly peppered with com-
plaints by about 40 residents
of North Eleuthera.

According to an entrepre-
neur on Harbour Island, who
asked that his name be with-
held, the meeting was organ-
ised by local government offi-
cials to let Mr Smith know how
his supporters feel.

Residents are calling for:

¢ a youth officer to be per-
manently stationed on Har-
bour Island to organise activi-
ties for the young

¢ work to be carried out on
the island’s shoddy roads

¢ an island-wide clean-up

¢ the expansion of the
island's main dock, which they
say the community has out-
grown

Upset

They are also upset that Mr
Smith has not organised for
more Cabinet ministers to tour
North Eleuthera and see the
problems first hand.

"Everybody is disappointed
in Alvin Smith's performance.
People complain about things
on the island, but we don't
have anyone to complain to -—
we're dying for him to have a
public meeting on Harbour
Island. There are a lot of con-
cerns in North Eleuthera,
especially Harbour Island; we
have local government here
but that's not working," the
Harbour Island resident said.

"If Alvin Smith runs again
then definitely the FNM will
lose this seat and this is an
FNM stronghold," he added.

When contacted for com-
ment yesterday, Mr Smith said
as far as he knew the meeting
in question was held so that

ADELAIDE TRAGEDY

FNM chairman Johnley Fer-
guson could speak with North
Eleuthera constituents.

He said he was told the
meeting went well, despite a
few concerns being raised.

And despite what his critics
say, Mr Smith maintained that
he is in constant contact with
local government and fre-
quently visits his constituency,
which includes Spanish Wells,
Harbour Island, James Cistern,
and Current Island.

"T visit my constituency I
would say more than any Fam-
ily Island MP, except those
that live in their constituen-
cy," he said.

"But we're going to have a
series of town mectings
throughout the constituency



“I visit my
constituency I
would say
more than any
Family Island
MP, except
those that live
in their con-
stituency. But
we're going to
have a series of
town meetings
throughout the
constituency to
hear what the
people have to
say.”



Alvin Smith

to hear what the people have
to say. I'm meeting with vari-
ous local government town
councils — last week Tuesday I
met with North Eleuthera dis-
trict council and also with the
Harbour Island district coun-
cil.”

He said he hopes to meet
with the other councils in his
constituency soon.

Mr Smith said government
has committed to paving the
roads on James Cistern, Cur-
rent Island and Harbour
Island; is open to “serious dis-
cussions” about building an
alternative dock on Harbour
Island; and has completed sig-
nificant repairs to the Glass
Window Bridge on mainland
Eleuthera.

Huge support for families
of two boys who drowned

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

SUPPORT poured in for the
families of the two boys who
drowned off the coast of Ade-
laide as their mothers were
interviewed by Ortland Bodie
on More 94 FM yesterday
morning.

Callers pledged donations to
help the mothers cover the costs
of the funerals upon hearing
them talk about the tragedy of

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their sons’ deaths. As more and
more listeners offered to make
donations, many reaching
beyond their means, others took
even greater strides to support
the family.

Suits

One caller said they would
buy new suits for the boys to
be buried in, and the director
of a funeral home, the name of
which was not revealed, called
to say they would hold the
funerals free of charge.

The children’s lifeless bodies
were pulled from the waters off
Adelaide Beach on Monday,
March 23, after they were
reported missing the previous

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day. Rovan Smith, 9, and Craig
Stubbs, 10, had taken a small
blue skiff, which reportedly had
been drawn from the bushes to
the beach the night before the
boys took it out to sea.

The skiff had a hole in it, and
the boys are thought to have
drowned in the rough tide that
carried them out into the cur-
rent.

A search party of around 20
of the families’ friends and
neighbours scoured the shallow
waters off Adelaide beach look-
ing for the boys on Monday last
week with support from a US
Coast Guard helicopter, the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force
and from volunteers in their
boats.

Rovan’s body was brought to
shore by the neighbourhood
search party at around llam,
and Craig was found by RBDF
officers about a quarter of a
mile out to sea at around
2.30pm.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 3

._- | CENTRAL BANK OF BAHAMAS FIGURES
0 In brief

Struggling consumers
hit even harder in
pocket during 2008

But prices dipped slightly towards end of year

PLP MP
accuses Grant
of blocking
construction
of community
centres



Alfred Gray

PLP MP Alfred Gray
accused Minister of Works
Neko Grant of preventing
the construction of commu-
nity centres on the five
islands that constitute the
MICAL constituency.

The MP, who made the
statement during the after-
noon session of the House of
Assembly yesterday, said
that he pledged months ago
“under the authority of the
prime minister” that he
would begin several commu-
nity centres in the various
islands of his southern con-
stituency with his annual
constituency allowance of
$100,000.

The allowance, he said,
would launch the construc-
tion of these centres and
through “self-help” the resi-
dents of the islands would
complete the buildings.

However, Mr Gray said
the minister of works has
“apparently unilaterally”
decided that the $100,000
would not be dispersed
unless it can be proven that
the money will be enough to
complete the projects.

“Most and if not all of
those islands are without a
community centre and it was
intended to put $100,000 in
each one and let the island
people complete it from
whatever stage the $100,000
took.

Self-help

“In each of those islands
(Mayaguana, Inagua,
Crooked Island, Acklins and
Long Cay) that’s how they
developed; through self-help,
because governments tend to
do very little for them any-
way,” Mr Gray said.

The MP said that he
would not allow Mr Grant to
prevent construction of the
centres without explaining to
the islanders the reason for
his decision.

“T know that $100,000 may
not complete the community
centre but the people are
willing to contribute to the
completion of the buildings,”
he said.

Mr Grant responded that
his ministry’s job is to ensure
that public funds are proper-
ly spent.

He added that Mr Gray
was not correct in his asser-
tions.

“T find it regrettable that
the member has misled this
House and I shall return in
due course with the proper
information to be laid in the
House,” Mr Grant said.




@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AFTER rising throughout
last year, prices declined
slightly towards the end of
2008 but were still much high-
er than in 2007 — particularly
in terms of education and
food.

New Central Bank of the
Bahamas figures show that
many individuals struggling in
the face of job losses and
reductions in their working
hours will have had an even
harder time purchasing nec-
essary goods than in 2007.

Overall in 2008, consumer
price inflation “accelerated”
to 4.5 per cent from 2.5 per
cent in 2007.

“With the easing of exter-
nal price pressures of the sec-
ond half of the year, inflation
trended lower during the
fourth quarter but remained
sharply elevated on an annual
basis,” said the bank’s Quar-
terly Economic Review for the
three month period ending
December 2008.

“The quarterly rise in the
average retail price index
moderated sharply to 0.2 per
cent from a 0.8 per cent run up
in the same period in 2007,” it



“The quarterly
rise in the average
retail price index
moderated sharply
to 0.2 per cent from
a 0.8 per cent run
up in the same

period in 2007.”



said, adding: “Given the
downtrend in energy costs, the
housing component — the most
heavily weighted item in the
index — declined by 0.7 per
cent after an increase of 0.3
per cent in 2007.”

Declines

In the last three months of
2008, average price declines
were also recorded in trans-
portation and communication
(1.1 per cent) and recreation
and entertainment services (1
per cent), as well as in clothing
and footwear (0.4 per cent)
and medical care and health
(0.5 per cent).

“Conversely, higher aver-
age price gains were registered
for food and beverages (2.2

per cent) and education (3.4
per cent),” said the review.

According to the bank, for
2008 overall, there was a 3.5
per cent rise in average house
costs, compared to a 0.5 per
cent rise in 2007, while the
rate at which the price of food
and beverages rose almost
doubled to 6.7 per cent.

The report added that aver-
age costs for ‘other’ goods and
services also rose for 2008
overall, growing at a “signifi-
cantly increased pace of 7.5
per cent and incrementally
higher price increases were
recorded for furniture and
household operations (6.8 per
cent) medical care and health
(5 per cent), education (2.6
per cent) and clothing and
footwear (1.5 per cent).”

Meanwhile, the cost of
diesel and gasoline declined
in the last quarter of 2008 as
the international price of
crude oil fell.

“Similarly the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation’s aver-
age energy fuel surcharge was
lowered over the quarter by
21.9 per cent to 18.06 cents
per kilowatt hour (kWH)
although still exceeding the
corresponding 2007 average
of 13.27 cents per kWh,” the
review said.

Turnquest tables regulations
on unemployment benefit plan

ACTING as Minister of
Finance in the absence of the
prime minister, Tommy Turn-
quest tabled three sets of reg-
ulations pertaining to the
details of the government’s
unemployment benefit plan in
the House of Assembly yes-
terday afternoon.

The three documents speci-
fy, respectively, the benefit
and assistance details, the
financial and accounting con-
siderations, and the specifica-
tions and conditions of the
plan.

As previously reported, out-
of-work Bahamians who qual-
ify for benefits under the tem-
porary unemployment plan
can expect to receive financial
assistance for a period of 13
weeks a year.

To be entitled to receive
benefits, a person has to be
younger than 65 and to have
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he or she:

¢ refuses suitable employ-
ment;

¢ fails to apply for suitable
employment where there is a
known vacancy;

¢ neglects to avail them-
selves of an opportunity for
suitable employment;

¢ makes no reasonable
effort to obtain suitable
employment.

A person also will be dis-
qualified if they were termi-
nated from their work place
as a result of theft, fraud, or
some other form of dishon-
esty.



Memorial service
for Peter Knowles

A memorial ser-
vice will be held for
Peter Nicholas
Knowles Jr on Sun-
day, April 5, at 3pm
at the New Provi-
dence Community
Centre.

Described as a
loving husband, sup-
portive father, dot-
ing son, nurturing
brother and a friend
to all, Peter died on
Thursday, March 26,
when his scooter col-
lided with a dump
truck at the junction
of Prospect Ridge
and John F Kennedy Drive.

The 32-year-old led a spiritually fulfilling and family-ori-
ented life.

He was able to establish a well-known business, a strong
family that includes a wife and three children, and a deep-
rooted friendship with and respect for God, said a family
member.

“He fulfilled all of his goals in such a short time here on
Earth.

“He was able to touch many people and will continue to
help us and serve God for all eternity.

“We are thankful and grateful to have been blessed with his
presence.

“The family appreciates all of the condolences, love and
respect of those who are aware of Peter's passing. He will be
dearly missed and grieved by all,” a statement from his fam-
ily read.

The family asked that those attending the service dress in
red, green, yellow, or white.

DEARLY MISSED: Peter Knowles



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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
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WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

America’s leadership role damaged

TEN years ago the cover of Time magazine
featured Robert Rubin, then Treasury secre-
tary, Alan Greenspan, then chairman of the
Federal Reserve, and Lawrence Summers, then
deputy Treasury secretary. Time dubbed the
three “the committee to save the world,” cred-
iting them with leading the global financial sys-
tem through a crisis that seemed terrifying at the
time, although it was a small blip compared
with what we’re going through now.

All the men on that cover were Americans,
but nobody considered that odd. After all, in
1999 the United States was the unquestioned
leader of the global crisis response. That lead-
ership role was only partly based on American
wealth; it also, to an important degree, reflect-
ed America’s stature as a role model. The Unit-
ed States, everyone thought, was the country
that knew how to do finance right.

How times have changed.

Never mind the fact that two members of the
committee have since succumbed to the maga-
zine cover curse, the plunge in reputation that so
often follows lionization in the media. (Sum-
mers, now the head of the National Economic
Council, is still going strong). Far more impor-
tant is the extent to which our claims of financial
soundness — claims often invoked as we lec-
tured other countries on the need to change
their ways — have proved hollow.

Indeed, these days America is looking like the
Bernie Madoff of economies: for many years it
was held in respect, even awe, but it turns out to
have been a fraud all along.

It’s painful now to read a lecture that Sum-
mers gave in early 2000, as the economic crisis
of the 1990s was winding down. Discussing the
causes of that crisis, Summers pointed to things
that the crisis countries lacked — and that, by
implication, the United States had. These things
included “well-capitalized and supervised
banks” and reliable, transparent corporate
accounting. Oh well.

One of the analysts Summers cited in that
lecture, by the way, was the economist Simon
Johnson. In an article in the current issue of
The Atlantic, Johnson, who served as the chief
economist at the IMF and is now a professor at
MIT, declares that America’s current difficulties
are “shockingly reminiscent” of crises in places
like Russia and Argentina — including the key
role played by crony capitalists.

In America as in the third world, he writes,
“elite business interests — financiers, in the
case of the U.S. — played a central role in cre-
ating the crisis, making ever-larger gambles,

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with the implicit backing of the government,
until the inevitable collapse. More alarming,
they are now using their influence to prevent
precisely the sorts of reforms that are needed,
and fast, to pull the economy out of its nose-
dive.”

It’s no wonder, then, that an article in Sun-
day’s Times about the response President
Barack Obama will receive in Europe was titled
“English-Speaking Capitalism on Trial.”

Now, in fairness we have to say that the Unit-
ed States was far from being the only nation in
which banks ran wild. Many European leaders
are still in denial about the continent’s eco-
nomic and financial troubles, which arguably
run as deep as our own — although their
nations’ much stronger social safety nets mean
that we’re likely to experience far more human
suffering. Still, it’s a fact that the crisis has cost
America much of its credibility, and with it
much of its ability to lead.

And that’s a very bad thing.

Like many other economists, I’ve been revis-
iting the Great Depression, looking for lessons
that might help us avoid a repeat performance.
And one thing that stands out from the history
of the early 1930s is the extent to which the
world’s response to crisis was crippled by the
inability of the world’s major economies to
cooperate.

The details of our current crisis are very dif-
ferent, but the need for cooperation is no less.
Obama got it exactly right last week when he
declared: “All of us are going to have to take
steps in order to lift the economy. We don’t
want a situation in which some countries are
making extraordinary efforts and other coun-
tries aren’t.”

Yet that is exactly the situation we’re in. I
don’t believe that even America’s economic
efforts are adequate, but they’re far more than
most other wealthy countries have been willing
to undertake. And by rights this week’s G-20
summit ought to be an occasion for Obama to
chide and chivy European leaders, in particular,
into pulling their weight.

But these days foreign leaders are in no mood
to be lectured by American officials, even when
— as in this case — the Americans are right.

The financial crisis has had many costs. And
one of those costs is the damage to America’s
reputation, an asset we’ve lost just when we,
and the world, need it most.

(This article was written by Paul Krugman
— c.2007 New York Times News Service).



Turtle meat
eating is a
legitimate part
of our culture

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me space to
express my humble apprecia-
tion for the many, many
Bahamians of all walks of life
who called and wrote to me to
support my letter against a ban
of turtle meat from Bahamian
diets.

From Crown Haven, Abaco,
to Spanish Wells, to Lisbon
Creek, Andros, Bahamians
seem to be awakening to the
need to take responsibility for
sustainability on their own
terms, rather than having a
tainted and suspect version of
the environmental agenda
imposed on them from the out-
side.

Bahamians who both love
their environment and sense an
entitlement to enjoy its boun-
ties seem to be realising, for the
first time, that our lifestyle and
culture must not be further
delegitimised at the whim of
every and any group without
even a thought for us as part of
their equations. There has been
too much of that already.

The consumption of turtle-
meat is a healthy, traditional
and utterly legitimate aspect of
Bahamian culture. The chal-
lenge is to keep it sustainable.
So long as that is our starting
point, then there ought to be
no disagreement between peo-
ple who want to secure healthy
turtle stocks well into the future.

But alas, that is not the start-
ing point for some. And all of
the difference lies in a mere
preposition: I and people like
me want to save marine turtles
for Bahamians. Some others, by

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



their words and actions, want
to save marine turtles from
Bahamians.

That is why, just below the
surface of the supposedly ratio-
nal sustainability arguments, lies
a snarling contempt that is
ready to brush all turtle-eating
Bahamians with a stigma of cru-
elty or savagery.

We are reminded, for
instance, that we will be hosting
a miss universe event later in
the year and just how embar-
rassing it will be should our pre-
cious guests stumble upon some
Bahamian savages putting sob-
bing turtles to a horrific death at
Potter’s Cay or Montagu.

Tt is with such comments that
the objective observer is tipped
off about what this whole thing
is really about. It is not about
environmentalism; it is about
cultural prejudice and pretence
of the crassest kind. It is about a
tiny, externally-oriented mind-
set that has such little regard
for the host culture of this coun-
try that it feels that whole
chunks of it can and should be
lobbed off to spare the sensi-
bilities of the few.

While we value our guests,
thinking Bahamians will never
be embarrassed out of their cul-
ture by the supposed need to
pander to the ignorance of
those visitors who are lacking
in exposure and tolerance.

In fact, if visitors attending
this summer’s events want to

avoid the horrific sight of
Bahamians preparing their
food, they can stay in the west-
ern parts of the island, home to
several gourmet stores selling
civilized things like pate de foie
gras. Hold on a minute!....isn’t
that the stuff made in France
by force-feeding geese to the
point that their livers balloon
in a simulated response to toxic
shock?

Or maybe let them go to Par-
adise Island for the festivities
over there instead.

What will be on menu? Veal,
perhaps? Actually, as those who
eat it may know, this product is
obtained by rendering calves
anaemic (physically depriving
them of light, movement and
stimulation) and keeping them
that way right up until their
most untimely butchery.

Or maybe those with more
robust tastes will go for the
finest full-blooded steaks. If so,
and if you happen to find your-
self within earshot, please do
not mention that such rich taste
invariably involves castration
(ouch!) of the bull in question.

The silliness can go on and
on. The simple fact is that one
man’s food is another man’s
barbarity. We in The Bahamas
have no intention of storming
French goose farms or mining
Argentine abattoirs.

Likewise, nobody should
expect our taste in food to con-
form to their own, foreign sen-
sibilities.

Hands off our turtles!

ANDREW ALLEN

Nassau,
March 25, 2009.

Nicki Kelly’s apparent memory lapse

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Nicki Kelly, in her eagerness
to get back at me for relieving
her of her duties as a Tribune
columnist seven years ago, is
now trying to cast aspersions on
my integrity as an editor.

She implies that a story I
quoted from in my recent con-
troversial Insight article on Sir
Lynden Pindling was a figment
of my imagination.

“Tn his March 23 Insight piece
on Sir Lynden Pindling, Mr
Marquis referred to ‘Tribune
reporter Nicki Kelly’ and ‘Nicki
Kelly’s Tribune article’ dated
January 9, 1985,” she wrote in



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Monday’s Punch. “That is
impossible. I could not have
been writing stories for The Tri-
bune in 1985 because I quit the
paper on December 31, 1975 —
10 years earlier.”

Yet here I have before me
the January 9, 1985, copy of The
Tribune containing a sizeable
piece under Nicki Kelly’s byline
headed “1984: a traumatic year
for Bahamas.”

In it, she writes at length
about the Commission of
Inquiry into drug trafficking,
including the paragraphs from
which I quoted (accurately) in
my piece.

Frankly, I don’t care if she
were a staff journalist or a free-
lance contributor at the time —
the story is there, bold as brass,
in The Tribune, and that’s good
enough for me.

It came to The Tribune via
CANA (the Caribbean News
Agency), to which this newspa-



per subscribed at the time. In
pointing out this non-existent
discrepancy, Mrs Kelly suggests
very strongly that I was guilty of
copyright infringement and
“playing fast and loose with the
truth” — both grievous accusa-
tions which could have formed
the basis of a successful libel
action if the Bahamas had a
legal system worthy of the
name.

The truth, however, is that
she appears to be suffering from
a serious lapse of memory.

If you were only to check the
files, Nicki, and get your facts
straight, you would not run into
these problems, and save your-
self much embarrassment.

JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor,
The Tribune,
Nassau,

March 31, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 5



Diabetic woman ‘given out-of-date

Trial of men
accused of
murder of
husinessman
to resume

THE trial of three men
charged in the February
2006 murder of business-
man Keith Carey will
resume on Wednesday
after the request for an
adjournment by the pros-
ecution was granted yes-
terday.

The prosecution told
the court that it wanted to
properly consider the
defence’s case and review
the evidence.

Lead prosecutor in the
case and Deputy Director
of Public Prosecutions
Cheryl Grant-Bethel said:
“We do not want to mis-
lead the jury on the facts.”

The trial into the mur-
der of businessman Keith
Carey began on February
15 before Justice Jon
Isaacs.

Jamal Glinton, Sean
Brown and Dwight
Knowles are charged with
the murder as well as
armed robbery and con-
spiracy to commit armed
robbery.

Keith Carey, 43, was
shot and killed on the
steps of the Bank of the
Bahamas on Tonique
Williams-Darling High-
way before he was able to
deposit $40,000 that
belonged to the Esso Ser-
vice Station, which he
operated.

Ms Grant-Bethel,
Stephanie Pintard, Antho-
ny Delaney and Lennox
Coleby are prosecuting
the case. Attorneys Craig
Butler and Devard Fran-
cis are representing Jamal
Glinton, attorney Dorsey
McPhee is representing
Sean Brown and attorney
Perry Albury is represent-
ing Dwight Knowles. The
prosecution has called a
total of 41 witnesses dur-
ing the trial.

Concerned
citizen finds
a hantigun

A CONCERNED citi-
zen stumbled across a .38
handgun in a yard in
northwestern New Provi-
dence on Sunday.

Police said that some
time after 9am, they were
contacted about the dis-
covery and went to the
scene to examine the
weapon and confiscate it.

Alligator
wanders onto
porch, bites
Florida man

@ EUSTIS, Fla.

AUTHORITIES say
a small alligator
climbed through the
porch door of a house
north of Orlando and
then bit the homeown-
er’s arm when it was
forced out, according to
Associated Press.

The 2-foot-long alli-
gator wandered onto
James Gaff’s canal-
front property in Lake
County on Sunday.
Gaff tried to remove
the gator, which then
latched onto his right
forearm.

A spokeswoman for
the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Commission
says Gaff’s wife, Elaine,
pried the gator off
using a broom handle
and the couple threw
the reptile into the
water behind their
home.

The 52-year-old Gaft
was treated at a hospi-
tal for minor cuts and
scrapes.

TROPICAL
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PHONE: 322-2157





m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A DIABETIC woman who was given
out-of-date insulin at a government phar-
macy has hit out at health authorities for
not admitting their mistake.

The Ministry of Health and Depart-
ment of Public Health issued a public
statement claiming expired medication is
not being distributed to patients at the
Elizabeth Estates Clinic pharmacy after a
44-year-old woman was given Humulin
insulin with an expiration date on the box
of October 2007 in early February and
again in mid-March.

Investigation

Health bosses maintain that an investi-
gation into how the woman got the
expired medications was launched after
the claim was reported in The Tribune
last Tuesday, but calls to Director of Pub-
lic health Dr Pearl McMillan for an update
have not yet been returned.

The Ministry of Health and Depart-
ment of Public Health maintains that
“preliminary investigations into the report
have revealed that adequate supplies of



THE DIABETIC WOMAN says she was given this out-of-date medication.

several types of insulin are presently in
stock at the Elizabeth Estates Clinic.
“The investigations further indicate that
the earliest expiration date is October
2009 and that the majority of the stock
on-hand expires in 2010 and 2011.”
However, the diabetic of 20 years is
concerned the defunct medication has
been given to hundreds of other patients

as she claims it was given to her twice in
just over six weeks.

When she took it in February, it failed
to control her blood sugar levels, which
rose, making her light-headed, nauseous
and giving her leg cramps. She then
bought insulin at a private pharmacy and
her blood sugar levels returned to nor-
mal.

medicine’ hits out at health authorities

And when she went back to the Eliza-
beth Estates Clinic two weeks ago, she
noticed the Humulin given to her had
expired in October 2007, and then realised
the bottle issued in February had the same
2007 expiration date.

Insulin

But the prescription papers printed
at the pharmacy stated the Humulin
insulin expired in February and March
2010.

The patient said: “They will put that it
expires today’s date 2010, when in actual
fact the medication expires in October
2007, which is printed by the manufactur-
er on the bottom of each box.

“I want answers because it’s not as if
this is 2007, this is 2009, and they didn’t
just give me one, they gave me two.

“It’s the Ministry of Health’s mandate
to provide quality healthcare for the
Bahamian public and visitors alike,
whether rich or poor, black or white.

“Issuing expired medication to a patient
is not quality healthcare, particularly when
there are many people who cannot afford
to go to private doctors and private phar-
macies and depend on the government
services.”

PLP hopetul claims police have not
eranted requisite permit for march

PLP nomination hopeful
Omar Archer has postponed
his Real Men March, claim-
ing the police have not grant-
ed him the requisite permit.

Mr Archer said he has
decided to give the police
force time to reconsider its
position.

“Tt is quite obvious they
were hoping I went ahead
with this non-violent protest
without a proper permit so as
to publicly embarrass me and
present me as an individual
who has absolutely no regard
for law and order.

“We are however more
determined that ever to have
this march, but it will be done
in order or in line with
the laws of this country,” he
said.

Now, Mr Archer said, the
march is scheduled for May
26. He said that if he is denied
a second time, the march will
proceed.

“Freedom of speech and
expression are a fundamental
rights granted to us all as
Bahamian citizens and we will
do whatever it takes to defend
such rights,” Mr Archer said.

He said the march is for
anyone who thinks the
Bahamas needs better family
values, believes homosexual-
ity is being imposed upon on






“Freedom of
speech and
expression are

a fundamental
rights granted
to us all as
Bahamian
citizens and we
will do whatever
it takes to defend
such rights.”

Omar Archer



children and young adults,
and thinks the sexual exploita-
tion of minors is a growing
problem in this society.

In addition, Mr Archer is
hoping to attract those who
believe the penalty for mari-
juana possession should be
reduced to a seven year crim-
inal record and a fine, and
those who think ex-convicts
should be re-integrated into
society quickly.

He said the march will also
focus on the problems of
police brutality, police harass-
ment, crime and unemploy-
ment.

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SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00169

Whereas CLIFFORD ALEXANDER
SEYMOUR of the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of EDDISON
MILTON SEYMOUR late of Garden Hills No.
1 in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00170

Whereas CLOVIS FILS-AIME of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with
the Will annexed of the Real and Personal
Estate of BRENDA LOUISE FILS-AIME late
of Pinewood Gardens in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00171

Whereas WILFRED KNOWLES of the
Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of TIMOTHY
KNOWLES late of McKanns in the Island of
Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00172

Whereas YVETTE KAREN TODD of Sunset
Park Estates in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of VERNITA
MARY HINSEY-HALL late of Tyler Street in
the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) REGISTRAR



TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS





New conservation
ampaign planned

CONSERVATIONIST D’Shan Maycock
m By K QUINCY PARKER

BAHAMIAN conservationist
D’Shan Maycock has planned a
conservation campaign on Abaco
that could lead to better manage-
ment of the island’s marine
resources, and deeper penetration
of the message of conservation
nationwide.

Despite the abundance of
marine resources in the Bahamas,
and the decades-old impulse — on
both the policy and public-aware-
ness fronts — toward maximising
the nation’s marine resources, the
number of professional conserva-
tionists in the Bahamas remains
small by any measure.

One group, RARE, is pumping

EF ——————— ehh]
|| MARINE NAVIGATION COURSES |

Out at sea is not the place to discover that
you are not prepared for the challenges
so plan to attend the free first class of the
Terrestrial Navigation Course offered by
The Bahamas School of Marine Navigation
at BASRA Headquarters on East Bay Street
on Monday, April 6, 2009, at 7p.m. then
consider enrolling in the 3 month course.
The Seamanship Course (7 Saturdays)
starts April 25th. Tel. 364-5987, 364-2861.
535-6234 or visit www.bsmn.biz

RARE Conservation

$125,000 into training and
resources for d’Shan Maycock to
mount the new campaign in two
weeks or so. At the end of the
training sessions at Georgetown
University — the first time RARE

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Invites application for the position of:

INTERNAL AUDTIOR

Applicants must process knowledge of the
application of generally accepted accounting
principles, internal control systems and
computerized systems, ability and willingness to
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engineering of existing ways of doing business
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as strong leadership skills in area of responsibility.

Salary will be based upon qualification and

experience. We offer excellent benefits.
Interested persons should submit resume by email
to:

Send resume to:

Director of Human Resources
P.O. Box CB-13005

E-mail: cmajor@grp.sandals.com



has held its traming in the United
States — Ms Maycock will return
to Abaco to begin the fieldwork
phase.

When the training phase is com-
plete, Ms Maycock will have spent
17 weeks in Washington, DC doing
what her RARE mentor — Ariela
Rosenstein — called “intensive
course work.”

Success

Ms Maycock is the education
officer of Abaco-based Friends of
The Environment, an environ-
mental activism body founded in
1988, and has partnered with
RARE Conservation — which has a
track record of success already in
the Bahamas — to launch what the
NGO calls a RARE Pride cam-
paign. The campaign is focused on
discouraging illegal fishing prac-
tices, encouraging sustainable alter-
natives and creating support for
Marine Protected Areas (MPAs)
throughout Abaco, with the goal of
having five such MPAs designated
throughout the Bahamas by 2010.

In the 1990s, a RARE Pride
campaign centred around the Aba-
co Parrot helped establish the Aba-
co National Park.

The two-year long programme —
at the end of which Ms Maycock
will receive a masters degree in
communication from the Univer-
sity of Texas El Paso — will focus
particularly on the spawning craw-
fish. The species is now under
threat from both illegal fishing
practices and habitat destruction.

The idea is to use what is known
as “social marketing,” a concept



D’ SHAN MAYCOCK AND A COHORT OF STUDENTS from other countries with delicate ecosystems, like Mon-
golia, Thailand, Fiji, Laos and Madagascar, are studying conservation and social marketing during a spe-
cial course hosted at Georgetown University in Washington DC.

that dates back to the 1970s, and
takes as its basis the belief that
marketing principles used to sell
products to consumers could be
used to “sell” ideas, attitudes and
behaviors.

Social marketing seeks to influ-
ence social behavior not to benefit
the marketer, but to benefit the
target audience and the general
society, and has been used exten-
sively in international health pro-
grammes, especially for contra-
ceptives, and is being used with
more frequency in the Bahamas
for such diverse topics as drug
abuse, AIDS awareness and chron-
ic non-communicable diseases.

A major thrust of the campaign,
Ms Maycock said, is to give those
who depend on the island’s marine
resources for their livelihood a raft
of alternatives that would make it
less onerous to follow conserva-
tion guidelines enshrined in law.

“We have many marine species
in the Bahamas that are very eco-
nomically viable,” she said.

“You have to create alternatives.
If you know that this is the time
when the crawfish — for instance —
is bearing their eggs, and you know
that [if you protect only one egg-
bearing crawfish, you will get thou-
sands of them in the future], you
can look at some alternative fish
that you could focus on.”

“It’s just a matter of educating
the public that there are alterna-
tives out there, and that if we don’t
protect these species ourselves,
then we would find ourselves
just like our neighbours, where
they don’t even get the size fish
that we get in the Bahamas any-
more.”

Students cook their way

into Keiser University

THREE students who participated in the first Ministry of Educa-
tion/Keiser University “Cook-Off” were the recipients of scholarships
totalling more that $20,000 to attend Keiser University Culinary Arts
Programme in Florida.

Deandra Rolle, a 12th grade student at Aquinas College, was the win-
ner of the cook-off held at Ardastra Gardens on Saturday, March 21.

Against the backdrop of marching flamingos, strutting peacocks
and curious tourists, Deandra was able to impress the judges with her
presentation, “A Taste of The Bahamas” in the final round of the
cook-off and win a $10,000-scholarship to attend Keiser University.

The winning meal was the “Carmichael seafood surprise, a zesty
tingum salad, a crazy cabbage fiesta with cultural rice.”

Kenrick Ferguson, a student of C C Sweeting Senior High School,
was awarded second place in the competition and a $7,500-scholarship,
while Kristen Johnson of Central Andros High School was the third
place finisher and recipient of a $5,000-scholarship.

Both scholarships are tenable at one of Keiser’s Culinary Arts pro-
grammes in Florida.

The students were challenged to produce a Bahamian dish from 13
ingredients (exclusive of salt and black pepper).

Judges for the competition were Cacique Award winners and veteran
chefs Edwin Johnson and Don Ingraham, and director of Culinary Arts
at Keiser University Dan Dunham.

Experience

Isadelle Howells, first assistant secretary in the Ministry of Educa-
tion, who represented Minister of Education Carl Bethel, offered con-
gratulations to the students and told them once they have obtained their
education and some critical field experience, they should seek to
establish eateries in the downtown area to cater to the 2.5 million vis-
itors who disembark at Prince George Dock.

“It would be a travesty for the government to make this significant
investment in infrastructure only to see downtown saturated by foreign
franchises. Use your talents to do more than being a chef — let it
empower you to become a ‘brand’ such as Chef Wolfgang Puck, Chef
Emerill Lagasse and our own internationally acclaimed Bahamian
chefs Edwin Johnson, Don Ingraham, Jasmine Young and Tracey
Sweeting,” she said.

She also thanked Keiser University for their generosity in awarding
the students the substantial scholarships and added that when the
Bahamians “descend” on Keiser’s campus, the food will never be the
same.

Jennifer Long, a Keiser official involved in the competition, said the
university was delighted to be a part of the event and noted that by
offering the scholarships their institution has lived up to its philosophy
of putting students first.

The two-day competition was an initiative that the Ministry of Edu-
cation produced out of the National Careers Fair, held in October of
2008 to ensure that high school students were exposed to careers of their
choice.
é\ The Tribune’s & Kelly’s /°

) | S/ANSSULEAS |

FIRST PRIZE
GIFT BASKET vatue $125
In Each Age Group












SECOND PRIZE THIRD PRIZE
GIFT BASKET vatue $100 GIFT BASKET vatue $75
In Each Age Group In Each Age Group




NYS ZO
1d IS EEN

-














py yer ey
x SORE




’.
7 f A.)

f rh PK)
LIT AL
LLL

»
2

fy
ohd IM ee













ote) es Ss

1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives are not eligible to enter.
2. Coloring may be done with crayons and other decorations. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN

COLORING THE ENTRY

3. Enter as much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Friday, April 3, 2009. Winners will be announced Thursday, April 9, 2009.
Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to IOOJAMZ / 101.9 JOY FM or COOL 9GFM to hear your name.

4. There will be one first-prize winner, one second- prize winner and one third- prize winner in each age groups.

5. Allentries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

“NO PHOTOCOPIES. USE NEWSPAPER AD ONLY”



Child’s Name: ParenUGuardian Signature

Address: Tel: Age:

1 * Egg Colouring Kits
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nee


TRIBUNE SPORTS



TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 9



evonn Knowles

Alaena Carey

Dustin Tynes



NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Alaena Carey

Vaal olan isso

DEL erts)

SPORTS

Carifta ‘09: Swimmer profiles

Armando Moss

EUR eT|eselh

OP TCOMm Elaine

SEMIN se U4

Crystal Rahmin



NAME

“NICKNAME”

McKayla Lightbourn

“Coco”



BIRTH DATE

5.19.92



AGE & SEX

16 Female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Pine View School
Grade 11



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

SWIFT



FAVORITE EVENTS

200 IM, 200 back, 200 breast, 400 IM,
100 back



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

11/12 High point winner at Bahamas National

Swimming Championships, multiple national

record holder in 11/12, 13/14/,15 & Over, and
senior age groups



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Finalist at 2007 Pan Am Games, Brazil;
Competitor at 2008 Youth Commonwealth
Games, India;

Multiple Medal Winner at 2008 CISC,
Jamaica;

CARIFTA multiple medal winner;
Qualifier at U.S. Junior Nationals;
Qualifier at U.S. Senior Nationals





NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Shaunte Jade Moss
Mitze

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Do my best to help the team bring home the
Championship, and better my times.



BIRTH DATE

August 2", 1993



AGE & SEX

15, Female

NAME

“NICKNAME”

Taryn Nicole Smith

“TT”





NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation

BIRTH DATE

21" June 1996





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Nassau Christian Academy
Grade 10

AGE & SEX

2 (twelve) yrs old - female









BIRTH DATE

August 8 1996

NAME

‘NICKNAME”

BERCHADETTE MOSS
“MERGHERT”

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

SWIFT SWIMMING

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation









AGE & SEX

12
Female

BIRTH DATE

MARCH 21°,1995

FAVORITE EVENTS

50/100/200 Meter Breaststroke
50/100 Freestyle 100 Butterfly

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Sunland Baptist Academy
8"" Grade



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

YMCA Waverunners







NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation

AGE & SEX

14 YRS - FEMALE





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Queer’s College
Grade 7

NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION (BSF)





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Sea Bees Swim Club

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE
GRADE 9

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

National Record Holder 8U & 9 - 10
High Point Trophy Winner 8U & 9 — 10

FAVORITE EVENTS

200 IM, 200 free, 50 fly









FAVORITE EVENTS

50, 100 & 200 Breast

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

DOLPHINS SWIM CLUB





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

High Point Winner; 8 Under Girls 2003

FAVORITE EVENTS

50 BUTTERFLY
50 FREE
50 BACKSTROKE





INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

RECORD HOLDER
9-10 50FLY
9-10 HIGH POINT RUNNER UP.

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Carifta and CISC Silver Medalist

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

High Point trophy every year but 2008 got
runner up.









CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Improve my Times
Win a medal
Gain a higher level of experience

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

SILVER MEDALIST 2007

MEMBER 2007 & 2008 CARIFTA TEAM
MEMBER OF CISC — 2008

MEMBER OF 2009 CARIFTA TEAM

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To Medal in all my events

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Made the Carifta team in 2008.





NAME

“NICKNAME”

Zarian L.K. Cleare

Kidd Z, Z-Train

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To beat all old times; place in all events; to
do my very best.





BIRTH DATE

26 April 1995







CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

TO ACHIEVE AN INDIVIDUAL MEDAL









NAME

“NICKNAME”

‘Ashley Jade Butler

“Pumpkin?

NAME

“NICKNAME”

Crystal Rahming





BIRTH DATE

MARCH 27, 1992

BIRTH DATE

December 7, 1996





AGE & SEX

17
Female

AGE & SEX

11 Female





NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas swimming federation

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming federation





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

The Bolles School
Grade 11

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St Andrews School





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Swift Swimming

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Swift Swimming





FAVORITE EVENTS

50 FREE, 100 FREE, 5OBACK , 100 BACK, 50 FLY & 100 FLY

FAVORITE EVENTS

50M freestyle, 100M freestyle, 50M butterfly





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

NATIONAL RECORDS IN 50 FREE, 100 FREE, 50 BACK
BAHAMAS NATIONAL HIGH POINT CHAMPION-2003,
Bahamas National high point runnerup-2005, 2006

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Several medals in Nationals from age 6.





INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Carifta Muliiple Medalist,

C.LS.C- Multiple Medalist

CCAN Multiple Medalist

Florida State High School Swimming Championship Muttiple
Finalist

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Participated in Plantation and
Coral Springs, Florida Meets





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



COLLECT A FEW GOLD MEDALS









NAME

‘NIGKNAME”

MANCER B. ROBERTS If

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

| would like to make finals in all individual
events and medal. | would also love to help
my team getinto the top 3 positions in the
relays.



AGE & SEX

13 Male

NAME

‘NICKNAME’

MAYA K. ALBURY





NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation

BIRTH DATE

SEPTEMBER 11, 1994





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Queer’s College
Grade 9

AGE & SEX

14 YEARS, FEMALE





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Dolphin Swimming Club

NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION





FAVORITE EVENTS

50 Free, 50 Fly, 100 Free, 200 IM

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

SUNLAND BAPTIST ACADEMY
GRADE 10





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Boys 13-14 National Champion 2008

Boys 9-10 1° Runner Up

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

YMCA WAVE-RUNNERS



FAVORITE EVENTS

200 FREESTYLE, 50&100 BUTTERFLY





INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS











BIRTH DATE

15 AUGUST, 1993

NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Matthew D. Lowe





AGE & SEX

15- MALE

BIRTH DATE

March 30", 1994





NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION

AGE & SEX

14 years old — Male





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

KINGSWAY ACADEMY HIGH SCHOOL

GRADE - 10

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation





LOGAL SWIM CLUB

BARRACUDA SWIM CLUB

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Queer’s College, grade 10





FAVORITE EVENTS

50, 100 BACK, 100, 200 FREE, 50F ly

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Record in 50 backstroke, 2008
Nationals High Point Runner up, 2008
Nationals High Point Runner up,2007

Records in 50 and 100 Backstroke, 2006

FAVORITE EVENTS

200 fly, 1500 free and 400 free





INTERNATIONAL
ACHIEVEMENTS

Carifta 2008 Silver medalist

Relay Medals, Carifta 2007 finalist in Multiple
events, Plantation Winter Championships

2007 medalist.

CISC 2006 Finalist 400 Free 50,100 & 200

Back, Medal 400 Medley Relay,

Carifta 2006 Finalist in all individual events,

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS





Medal in Multiple Individual Events
Make CCCAN cuts

CARIFTA 2009
SWIMMER PROFLIE



NAME

"NICKNAME?

Pemrae Shaquille “Pem” Walker



BIRTH DATE

December 10” , 1992



AGE & SEX

16 years / Male



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Andrews School / Grade 10



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda’s Swim Club



FAVORITE EVENTS

50, 100, 200 Breast Stroke



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS:

Competed in Bahamas National Swimming
Championships 2003 — 2008 Medaling Gold,
Silver and Bronze.



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS:

Parlicipated in 2005, 2006 Carita Swimming
Championships; Participated in Plantation
Winter Championships 2004 — 2008.



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



To make finals and medal in all events.







INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Carifta 2006, 2007 & 2008







CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Improve in everything | swim.





NAME

“NICKNAME”

Rfequel PONE

Nielknerce - kelly



BIRTH DATE

eCcspwen we 144s



AGE & SEX

1D yrs of age ) Penne



NAME OF FEDERATION

Egllawas Sewing Fedevaeon



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Aaquettna' CBeRe ge.





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

DetpRin Sub- Chl



FAVORITE EVENTS



So Breast
Ico breast



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS.

High Asint Winner er 4-10, ia |



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS.

dra place at CariPia ky OED

¢







CARIFTA 2009 GOALS







NAME

“NICKNAME”

TOBY McCARROLL

NAME

“NICKNAME”

Zach Timothy Moses





BIRTH DATE

18" AUGUST 1994

BIRTH DATE

3 February, 1997





AGE & SEX

14/MALE

AGE & SEX

12 Male





NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERDATION

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

QUEEN'S COLLEGE / GRADE 9

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Andrew’s School Grade 7





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

DOLPHINS SWIMMING CLUB

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Swift





FAVORITE EVENTS

50m/100m/200m BREASTSTROKE

FAVORITE EVENTS

50 Free, 200 Free, 400 Free, 800 Free





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS:

Silver Medal at Nationals in the 100m and
200m Breaststroke, bronze medal in the 50m
Breaststroke. Qualified in all Breaststroke
events for CARIFTA 2009.

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

2006 8 & under High Point Trophy Winner
2007 9-10 High Point Trophy Winner





INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Was a member of the CARIFTA team 2008,
making finals in the 200m Breaststroke,
placing 6"and member of the 4X100 Medley
Relay team that came second. Was also a
member of the CISC 2008 Team’s 4X100
Medley Relay team that placed third.

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS





Represent The Bahamas to the best of my
ability. | would like to swim my best times in
all my events, and hopefully qualify for
CCCAN. | also hope to make it to the finals in
all of my events and hope to achieve medals.







CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Drop times in every event | swim and score
points for The Bahamas 2009 Carifta Team





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



To represent my country to the best of my
ability, to improve my times and to make the
finals in each of my events.

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

BAHAMAS RECORD 50 FLY





3 years or 65K warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty
and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

2008 FORD RANGER
2.5 Turbo Diesel/Standard Shift

was $32,848.00
NOW $28,700.00

LOADED

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

2®° 100 METER BUTTERFLY
3°° 50 METER BUTTERFLY
11-12 AGE GROUP - CARIFTA 2007







2008 FORD EVEREST

2.5 Turbo Diesel Automatic, Leather,
LOADED - 7 Passanger

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and
licensed and inspected up to birthday.

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EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

was $38,114.00




PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009



SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Carifta ‘09: Swimmer profiles



NAME

“NICKNAME”

Abigail Lowe



BIRTH DATE

July 3, 1996



AGE & SEX

Female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St— Andrews School
Year 7



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Swift Swimming



FAVORITE EVENTS

400 free and 200 free



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To break 5min in the 400 free, and have
personal best in all other events.



NAME

“NICKNAME”

Armando Moss
Mando



BIRTH DATE

July 29, 1992



AGE & SEX

Male



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Augustine’s College
Grade 11



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Sea Bees Swim Club



FAVORITE EVENTS

50m Butterfly, 50m freestyle, 100m Butterfly,
100m Freestyle



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Awarded Most Outstanding Student-Grade 8
Awarded Most Outstanding BJG
Performance — Mathematics
High Point Senior Boys (Sea Bees Swim
Club) - 2008



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Swim best times
Medal in my events
Qualify for CCAN



NAME

“NICKNAME”

Carteron Rowe

"Carey"



BIRTH DATE

DecenBég 22°, 14%,



AGE & SEX

IF, MACE



NAME OF FEDERATION

Baars Susemmue Fooeeyron



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Os. Aususttne Cocehee=
GARDE 12



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

DoveHte Surette Ceuk

Kohen Kerr

Shaunte Moss

a

Jacinda Williams

Teele iO ata

McKayla Lightbourne

Taryn Smith

JeNae Saunders

UMA tsa

Toby McCarroll

John Bradley

Lauren Glinton

Pemrae Walker

Zach Moses



NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Ariel Toby Weech

“Weech”



BIRTH DATE

October 28", 1991



AGE & SEX

17 Female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Augustine’s College
Grade 12



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracudas Swimming Club



FAVORITE EVENTS

50 & 100 Free
50 & 100 Back
50 & 100 Fly



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Bahamian National Record Holder:
8&U 50 Back
13-14 50 Free
13-14 100 Free
13-14 50 Back
13-14 50 Fly
High point runner up



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

2004, 2006, 2007, 2008 CARIFTA Swimming
Championships team member
2004- 4 gold, 1 bronze
2006- 5 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze
2007- 5 gold, 4 bronze
2008- 4 gold, 3 silver
2004 & 2006 CISC team member and record
holder
2004- 3 silver medals
2006- 6 gold, 1 silver
2006 CAC team member- 1 bronze medal
2005 & 2007 CCCAN team member
2007 Pan Am Games Swim Team member
2008 CARIFTA Team Captain



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Medal & Swim personal bests in all of my
events



NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Bria Deveaux

Bre



BIRTH DATE

June 7â„¢ 1994



AGE & SEX

14 and Female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Andrews School
Grade 10



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda’s Swim Club



FAVORITE EVENTS

100&200 free, 200 fly



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Highpoint winner 8& under,9-10,11-12,and
13-14
Age Group Record Holder
National medal holder



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

CARIFTA 06,07,08 attendee, medal Holder
CARIFTA 2007 record holder
CISC 06,08 attendee and Medal Holder
CCCAN O7attendee and Medal Holder



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

¢ To make finals in most events
¢ To win medals in most events
¢ To better my times in all events



NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Devonn Christoff Knowles



BIRTH DATE

March 16, 1993





NAME

“NICKNAME”

Camron Kristen Bruney

NAME

“NICKNAME”

Evante Gibson

AGE & SEX

16 years — male



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation





FAVORITE EVENTS

SO FLY
100 FLY



BIRTH DATE

August 20â„¢ 1994

BIRTH DATE

March 9â„¢ 1994

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Anne’s High School
10 Paul







NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS.

‘Hate MERLS oBIAIWED Af
Basanas Watrowacs Srece Ben. {



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

«MEMBER OF Doos Basacas
DATONAL Sur) TEAM.

* 2008 Cartrra Aric paar

AGE & SEX

14yrs, male

AGE & SEX

15 male



NAME OF FEDERATION

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Queer’s College

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

The Baylor School Tennessee
Grade 10

FAVORITE EVENTS

50 and 100 Freestyle
50 and 100 backstroke





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

YMGA Freeport Grand Bahama



FAVORITE EVENTS

100 free & 400 free

FAVORITE EVENTS

50 & 100 butterfly
50 & 100 breaststroke
200 I.M

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

National Swimming Championships
2000-2008

High Point/Runner Up Awards
Barracuda Swim Club







CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To MARE CCCAN Cute]



NAME

“NICKNAME”

Dionisio S. F. Carey

“Si”



BIRTH DATE

June 13, 1997



AGE & SEX

Male 11 Years old



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Queen’s College
Grade 6



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club



FAVORITE EVENTS

50 Backstroke, 50 Breast stroke, 50
Freestyle, 50 Butterfly and 200 IM



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Bahamas & Open Records

9/10
50m and 200m Freestyle, 50m and 100m
Backstroke, 50m Breast stroke, 50m and
100m Butterfly, and 200m IM, 200m Free

and Medley Relays
11/2
50m Backstroke

National Records
9/10
50m and 100m Backstroke, 50m and 100m
Breast stroke, 200m IM, 200m Free and
Medley relay,



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Florida Gold Coast Winter Champ. Nov 2008
Gold - 50yd. Breast stroke

Silver — 50yd. Butterfly
5'"_ 100yd. Breast stroke

5" — 50yd. Backstroke



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To win High Point Trophy
To break the 50m Backstroke and 50m
Breast stroke records





NAME

“NICKNAME”

DUSTIN E. TYNES

DUSTY



BIRTH DATE

MARCH 7, 1996



AGE & SEX

13
MALE



NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

QUEEN’S COLLEGE
7



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

BARRACUDA SWIM CLUB



FAVORITE EVENTS

200 Breast, 50 Breast and 100 Breast



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

HIGH POINT RUNNER UP 2007
NATIONALS

BAHAMIAN RECORD HOLDER 200
BREAST STROKE 11 - 12 BOYS



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

BRONZE MEDAL - CARIFTA 2008, 200
BREAST STROKE
SILVER MEDAL -C.I.S.C. 2008, 200
BREAST STROKE
BRONZE MEDAL - C.I.S.C. 2008 400
MEDLAY RELAY



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



TO SWIM PERSONAL BESTS



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Numerous medals in the National
Championships

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

A Carifta bronze medal in 2007

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Carifta 2006-2009
CISC 2006/2008
Plantation Winter Champtionships
2005-2008



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Achieve personal best times in all selected
events





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To make finals, score in all of my events and
to pick up a medal or two.



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To do all personal best times in my events





NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Je”Nae Saunders

Nae, Nae



BIRTH DATE

November 6 1994







NAME

“NICKNAME”

Gabrielle S.N. Greene

Gabbie, Gabs

NAME

“NICKNAME”

JACINDA ANNE WILLIAMS

“JENKINS*

AGE & SEX

14 Female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation







BIRTH DATE

December 17", 1995

BIRTH DATE

SEPTEMBER 7TH 1996



AGE & SEX

FEMALE AGE 12

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Augustine College
Grade 9





AGE & SEX

13 female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation

NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club







SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Andrews International School
Grade 8

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

QUEENS COLLEGE GRADE 7

FAVORITE EVENTS

100 Breast & 200IM







LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

DOLPHIN SWIM CLUB





FAVORITE EVENTS

50 freestyle, 50 breaststroke

FAVORITE EVENTS

50/100 Backstroke
Relays





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

200 freestyle relay record, Gold medalist in
the Bahamas National Swimming
Championships (50 free, 100 free, 200
freestyle relay)

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

11-12 2â„¢ Place 200 Backstroke
11-12 3" Place 200 Freestyle

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

National High Point runner up 9-10, 11-12,
13-14







INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Finalist in the 50 free and 50 breast at CISC

Member of the Carifta and CISC teams for
the Bahamas Swimming Federation

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

FIRST TIME REPRENTING MY COUNTRY

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

CARIFTA Medalist 2006, 2007 & 2008
CISC Medalist 2006
CCCAN Medalist 2007







CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To qualify for CCCAN in 50 freestyle





NAME

“NICKNAME”

LARON KEVIN MORLEY

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To Swim My Personal Best
And Bring Home Gold for My Country.



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

Medal in most of my events
Improve all of my times



NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Lauren Glinton
LG/ “Life’s Good”



BIRTH DATE

28.Sept.1994



AGE & SEX

14/Female







BIRTH DATE

AUGUST 25, 1994

NAME

‘NICKNAME”

Laura J. Morley

NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS







AGE & SEX

MALE AGE :14

BIRTH DATE

October 1%, 1996

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Andrew's
Grade 9







NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION

AGE & SEX

12 years - Female

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

DOLPHIN SWM CLUB







SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

AQUINAS COLLEGE GRADE 9

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

SEABEES SWIM CLUB

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Andrew’s School — Year 7

FAVORITE EVENTS

200fly

200 breast
200 free
400 free





FAVORITE EVENTS

50BACK AND 50 FREE

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Swift Swim Club





NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

SILVER 50 BACK,BRONZE 100BACK, 200
BACK AND 50 FLY

FAVORITE EVENTS

Breatstroke, IM’s and distance
Freestyle

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Qualified for CARIFTA @ 1 1yrs in 400 IM;
Qualified for every Nationals since 8 yrs old;











NAME

“NICKNAME”

Dylan J. Cash

Flare



BIRTH DATE

24 August 1996



AGE & SEX

12, Male



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Augustine’s College
Grade 7



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Sea Bees Swim Club



FAVORITE EVENTS

Backstroke 50/100



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

31:53 - 50 Free
34:30 — 50 Back
1:20:06 — 100 Back



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

N/A



CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



33:00 — 50 Back
31:30 — 50 Free
1:15:00 — 100 Back



NAME

“NICKNAME”

Amber Talia Weech

“Ambie”



BIRTH DATE

October 28", 1991



AGE & SEX

17 Female



NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation



SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

St. Augustine’s College
Grade 12



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracudas Swimming Club

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

CARIFTA 2007 RELAY TEAM SILVER
MEDALIST

CCAN 2007 RELAY TEAM BRONZE
MEDALISTS

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Runner-up high point trophy winner at
Bahamas National Championships
2006 & 2007

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Member of 2005 CARIFTA team
Placed 7" in 200 Fly









CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

TO OBTAIN AS MANY INDIVIDUAL
MEDALS AND DO WELL IN ALL MY
EVENTS



INTERNATIONAL
ACHIEVEMENTS

Finals
2008 Carifta & CISC
Swimming Championships

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



- to final in all of my events;
- toswim my best times
- to help the relay teams medal

















NAME

“NICKNAME”

KEITH JAMAL LLOYD
KJ

CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

To make finals in all of my events and
to swim my personal best times.





BIRTH DATE

MAY17, 1996



AGE & SEX

12 / MALE

NAME

“NICKNAME”

John Bradley

NAME

“NICKNAME”

Kohen Kerr





NAME OF FEDERATION

BAHAMAS SWIMMING FEDERATION

BIRTH DATE

Jan 271991

BIRTH DATE

May 1st 1996





SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

AQUINAS COLLEGE
GRADE 7

AGE & SEX

18 Male

AGE & SEX

12 - male





LOCAL SWIM CLUB

SEABEES SWIM CLUB

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas

NAME OF FEDERATION

Bahamas Swimming Federation





FAVORITE EVENTS

50M,100M, 200M BUTTERFLY
50M & 100M BACKSTROKE

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Lewis University
Aviation Administration Major

SCHOOL NAME
AND GRADE

Queers College
7" Grade



LOCAL SWIM CLUB

YMCA Wave Runners

LOCAL SWIM CLUB

Barracuda Swim Club



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

2” — 50M BACKSTROKE AGE 9-10
3° _ SOM BUTTERFLY AGE 9-10
SEVERAL 1°" IN RELAY RACES AGE 9-10



FAVORITE EVENTS

200, 400 & 800 Free



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS



INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

2004, 2006 & 2009 CARIFTA team member





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



Swim personal bests in all of my events and
hope to win at least one medal





INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS

TO SWIM PERSONAL BEST TIMES IN ALL

THE EVENTS THAT | WILL SWIM AT
CARIFTA AND WITH THAT WIN SOME
MEDAL AND SCORE SOME POINTS FOR
THE BAHAMAS



FAVORITE EVENTS

200m & 400m Free

FAVORITE EVENTS

50, 100, 200, 400 freestyle



NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Various National Records
BASRA Marathon Defending Champion

NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

50 freestyle, 3 place.





INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Commonweath Youth Games 2008
National Team 2003 — Present

INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

2006 — Winter Championships, Plantation,
Florida.











CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



Represent my country with dignity and pride
in my final carifta.





CARIFTA 2009 GOALS



To get a gold in every event that | swim.




THE TRIBUNE

S
b

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

number of

Bahamian ath-

letes, led by

Olympian Sheni-
qua ‘Q’ Ferguson (right), com-
peted in some of the collegiate
meets around the United States
over the weekend.

Ferguson, competing for
Southwest Mississippi in the
LSU Tiger Relays at the Bernie
Moore Stadium, clocked 11.69
seconds for third place overall
after she won the second of six
heats in the women’s 100
metres.

She came back in the final
and had to settle for third again,
but this time in 11.93. The win-
ning time posted was 11.42 by
Kenyanna Wilson of LSU, fol-
lowed by her team-mate,
Samatha Henry in 11.59.

On the men’s side, Olympic
quarter-miler Michael Mathieu
showed some speed as he con-
tested the men’s century. Rep-
resenting Tiger Olympians, the
Grand Bahamian ended up



MICHAEL MATHIEU

Eleven to manage Carifta team

WHILE the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Associations
is expected to carry a 61-mem-
ber team to the Carifta Games
in St Lucia over the Easter hol-
iday weekend, an 11-member
management team will travel
along with them.

Ray Hepburn, president of
the New Providence Amateur
Athletic Association, will serve
as the team manager and he will
be assisted by Stephanie Higgs.
The chaperone is Mabelene
Miller.

Bradley Cooper is the team’s
head coach. He will be assisted
by Sandra Laing, Antonio
Saunders, Wendell Collie Sr
and Dexter Bodie.

The team doctor is Rickey
Davis and the physiotherapists
are Cottrice Robinson and Car-
lene Strachan.



PAGE 11
r |

TUESDAY, MARCH 31,

sixth in the straight away in
10.79.

Baylor’s Trey Harts won the
race in 10.43.

Mathieu had the fifth fastest
qualifying time of 10.67 after he
won the third of nine heats.
Harts took heat seven in 10.41.

At the University of Alabama
in the Alabama Relays at Sam
Bailey Track, sprinter Lanece
Clarke topped the Bahamian
performances.

The McKendree College
senior won section two of the
women’s 100 in 12.13. The time
placed her ninth overall. LaJada
Baldwin, a sophomore from
Mississippi, had the fastest time
of 11.68.

Clarke, the daughter of for-
mer Carifta queen Maryann
Higgs, moved up to compete in
the 400 as well. She completed
the one-lapper in third place in
section two in 57.45. The win-
ning time was 56.99 by Lindsay
Doucett, a senior at Mississippi.

Clarke’s time was the eighth
fastest. Alecia Brown, a senior
at Western Kentucky, had the
fastest time overall in 54.41 in
winning section two.



2009



Sasha Joyce, a junior team-
mate of Clarke at McKendree,
turned in a third place finish in
the women’s 100 hurdles in
15.03 in section three. Alexis
Brown, a junior at Western
Michigan, won the race in 14.78.

Joyce ended up 17th overall.
Lorian Price, running unat-
tached, won section one in the
fastest time in 13.47.

Also, Joyce competed in the
400 hurdles, coming sixth in sec-
tion two in 1:08.27. Chiamaka
Obi, a sophomore from Austin
Peay, won the race in 1:03.15.

Joyce finished 14th overall.
Danielle Brown, a senior at
Western Michigan, turned in
the fastest time in 58.46 in win-
ning section one.

Together, Clarke and Joyce,
competing on the third and
anchor legs respectively, helped
McKendree to a sixth place fin-
ish in the 4x 100 relay in 47.52.

Mississippi won in 45.82.

Clarke also ran on the third
leg of McKendree’s 4 x 4 relay
team that finished sixth in
3:57.41. Mississippi once again
won the event in 3:39.63.



Carifta ‘O09:
Swimmer

profiles...

See pages 9-10

SPORTS
Wag

BASEBALL
JBLN UPDATE

THE Junior Baseball
League of Nassau continued
its regular season over the
weekend at the St Andrew’s
Field of Dreams with the fol-
lowing results posted:

TEE BALL

Grasshoppers 22, Blue
Claws 21

Sidewinders 19, Sand
Gnats 9

COACH PITCH

Diamondbacks 15, Blue
Jays 7

Athletics 17, Angels 16

Cubs 18, Astros 13

MINOR LEAGUE

Rockies 12, Rays 1

Mets 11, Red Sox 3

MAJOR LEAGUE

Indians 11, Mariners 7

Marlins 10, Reds 7

JUNIOR LEAGUE

Twins 11, Yankees 10

Dodgers 18, Cardinals 7

SENIOR LEAGUE

Rangers 7, Tigers 6

Phillies 7, Pirates 4

























































“ALN ATE]

BD Chee a ya:
reer ae for yy Stop in TODAY and LOOK for the ‘op-of-the-Hill, Mackey Street
: PRUNE ee a eee WE LUE eee



Sale Ends


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Sex scandal exposes weakness in schools

Value of loans =
in arrears
expanded by
228 per cent

FROM page one

cent at end September, given
the more accelerated
increase in loan servicing dif-
ficulties.”

The Central Bank report
added that up until Septem-
ber 2008 domestic bank’s net
income fell by $17.7 million,
or 23.1 per cent, to $59 mil-
lion, relative to the same
quarter last year.

Up to December 2008, the
fourth quarter, bank’s net
interest margin increased by
3.1 per cent to $117.6 mil-
lion but this was “offset by a
reduction in the contribu-
tion from commission and
foreign exchange income,
which decreased by 43.7 per
cent to $6.2 million,” said
the review.

This lowered bank’s gross
earnings by 1.0 per cent in
the face of a 2.3 per cent rise
in operating costs to $65.3
million.

The review notes that the
“most significant effect on
the outcome was the reduc-
tion in the other income
component (net of depreci-
ation and bad debt expens-
es) to $0.6 million from $15.6
million in 2007, correspond-
ing mainly to a hike in pro-
visions for bad debts.

Man charged
FROM page one

the country’s 13th homi-
cide victim for the year.

Ellis, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Ancella
Williams in Court One,
Bank Lane, was not
required to enter a plea to
the murder charge. Ellis
was represented yesterday
by lawyer Alex Morley.
After the magistrate had
read and outlined the
nature of the charge
against him, Ellis who
appeared perplexed, asked
whether he was charged
with murder or conspiracy
to commit murder. Magis-
trate Williams told Ellis
that he was charged with
murder.

Ellis was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison yes-
terday. His case has been
transferred to Court 5,
Bank Lane. The case was
adjourned to April 24
which is when a date will
be set for the commence-
ment of a preliminary
inquiry into the matter.

FROM page one

turbing events” at Eight Mile Rock High
School.

The high school has, since the begin-
ning of the year, seen three teachers
removed from their duties over concerns
about molestation of students.

The series of events unfolded after
two male former students accused one of
them, a male expatriate teacher, of
molestation during their time at the
school.

In addition to that male teacher, who
recently fled the country after police
moved to press charges, and a female
teacher — alleged to have had a sexual
relationship with a student — who has
been removed pending investigation,
The Tribune can reveal that increased
scrutiny resulted in alarm bells also being
raised about the relationship between a
student and another male teacher.

A police investigation is also now
underway into the third teacher’s actions,
although an education official said that
the ministry is quite confident that the
involvement of the second male teacher,
who is currently suspended, was harm-
less.

“From what we understand his wife
and family sort of adopted the boy,” said
the source.

Responding to Mrs Hanna Martin’s
statement, Mr Bethel said the “safety
and welfare of all children entrusted to

the care of the Ministry of
Education in public schools
are of paramount importance
to all senior officials of my
ministry.”

Ministry’s officials are,
“generally speaking, reluc-
tant to publicly comment in
detail about allegations made
against persons involved in
the education system with-
out the results of an official
investigation...out of a con-
cern not to in any way
impede or appear to be
attempting to prejudge the
outcome of such an investi-
gation,” he added.

Referring to the fact that

the teacher accused of GLENYS HANNA-MARTIN
molesting the male students accused Mr Bethel on
was now believed to have Sunday of being in ‘gross
skipped the country, Mr default’ of his duty.

Bethel said that “the Acting

Director of Education made every effort
within his power to allay the fears of the
teacher and to prevent him becoming a
flight risk.”

While noting that he was not criticising
the press for “heightening public aware-
ness” he said that the public disclosure of
allegations surrounding this teacher
“instantaneously impeded a proper
investigation.”

He emphasised that despite several
visits to the school last year he was not
personally informed of allegations



against the teacher until they
appeared in the media.

Meanwhile, in response to
claims that parents have been
inadequately apprised of
steps taken by the Ministry in
the wake of the series of
events, Mr Bethel said that
“as a representative of par-
ents generally” Eight Mile
Rock High School Parent
Teachers Association Presi-
dent Troy Garvey has been
kept updated, while all par-
ents of children who may
have come in contact with
the teachers involved have
been “kept fully informed”
of the Ministry’s s “extraordi-
nary measures” to secure
their well being.

Mr Bethel revealed that an
undisclosed number of chil-
dren at the school, said to
have been “at risk” in view of contact
with the male teacher who subsequently
fled the country, were subject to two
separate psychological evaluations —
firstly by the chief school psychologist
in Grand Bahama, and secondly by psy-
chologist Dr David Allen.

Meanwhile, Mr Bethel said, the receipt
by the Ministry of Education of an
“undated, unsigned” note in March,
including the names of a number of chil-
dren, led to further evaluations being
conducted by Dr Allen.

Neither confirming or denying the
claim made by Mrs Hanna Martin that
“at least one child” from the school has
been admitted to Sandilands after suf-
fering abuse, Mr Bethel said he would
“only say that any therapeutic interven-
tions that occurred have only occurred as
a direct result of our extraordinary
actions in sending Dr Allen to Eight
Mile Rock.”

The Minister noted that as a result of
investigations into the sex allegations at
Eight Mile Rock High School “and in
one or two other instances” he has dis-
covered that children who are deprived
in some form — whether it be food or
other material needs — are most at risk
of molestation.

Declining to go further into details,
Mr Bethel said: “One of the critical areas
that I have identified because of this sit-
uation in Eight Mile Rock and in one
or two other instances is that hunger,
hungry children, the absence sometimes
of food, is the greatest single point of
entry in terms of persons who are ill
disposed and seek to take advantage
of children, that is the point of
contact.”

He added that from now on all alle-
gations of sexual impropriety involving a
teacher and a student will be referred
directly to the police for investigation,
rather than having the matter initially
sent to the Attorney General’s office for
a legal opinion, as had been established
practice.

Caribbean ready to discuss
trade agreement with Canada

FROM page one

region's EPA with Europe.

"It's similar to the one we negoti-
ated with Europe — CARICOM
had committed to that and said to
Canada that once they had finished
the negotiations of the EU's (Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement), they
would commence discussions with
the Canadian authorities with regard
to a CARICOM-Canada economic
partnership agreement.

"We have good working relations
with Canada and obviously this just
will improve as countries begin to
move more on a global approach to
trade, and CARICOM will be seen
in that region," he said.

On October 15, 2008 government
signed onto the EPA with the EU — along
with 12 other member states — after much con-
tentious debate over the potential damage the
agreement could wreak on the local economy.
Guyana, whose president initially opposed the
agreement — signed the EPA on October 21,
2008 after two additional clauses were added.
Haiti has until 2010 to sign the agreement.

Opponents of the EPA have argued that it
will not create any significant benefits for the
Bahamas and would drastically reduce govern-
ment revenue.

According to The Jamaica Gleaner, Jamaica's
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of For-
eign Affairs and Foreign Trade Dr Kenneth
Baugh has already expressed concerns about

Brent Symonette



the upcoming trade agreement dur-
ing a recent visit to Canada.

He told Canadian officials that an
impact analysis showed that opening
up trade with Canada would be
detrimental to Jamaica, unless there
was a development component, The
Gleaner reported. He also report-
edly noted that Jamaica would be
flooded with Canadian products
as a result of the proposed agree-
ment.

"We are small countries and we
have to be careful how we enter into
free-trade agreements. What would
make a big difference is technology
transfer," Dr Baugh is quoted as
saying.

Meanwhile, government has yet
to commence an impact analysis of
the agreement, which would mea-
sure its effect on the economy, due to the ear-
ly stages of the proposal.

"That is part of the process of negotiating.
There is a Caribbean Regional Negotiating
Machinery (CRNM) who will look at the whole
application to see whether or not it is feasible,
whether or not it is beneficial to both coun-
tries and advise CARICOM on the way for-
ward but that process hasn't started yet. We're
just in the early stages of it, but I think CARI-
COM has indicated to Canada that it is pre-
pared to begin discussions," said Mr Symonette,
who was acting as Prime Minister in place of
Prime Minister Ingraham who was at a meeting
of the International Development Bank in
Colombia.

FAMILY GUARDIAN

TEATS ClalCM CALENDAR CONTEST ie oe

45th

CONTEST RULES

anniversary calendar

1 Family Guardian's Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for the company’s 2010 calendar will be “A CELEBRATION OF
NATURE - 45th Anniversary Calendar”. Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or a scene which is a striking example of nature as

§found in The Bahamas,

as well as, photographs of the Family Guardian Corporate Centre, located on Village Road and Eas Stre

gurther competition details (www.familyguardian.com).

PINE FORM

*See website

Bie IS JUNE 1, 2009. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk and will not be returned.

delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre, Village Road and East Bay Street, Nassau, between 9:00AM and 5:00PM

should be marked “Calendar Contest”.

artpanted by an official ening avai

provided 4 ; ‘ on CD. Digital images must be of high quali
i ce eine signs ‘of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure t (
( ordi images should be supplied i in RAW, TIFF or high quality JPEG and in the a colour format the camera uses (LAB or r RGB), All =

6 ~ Judging of ates will be ne on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph, Particular areas and subjects of
interest are detailed on the website (www-familyguardian.com). The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian's 2010 calendar. The
decision of the judges will be final.

7 A gift certificate valued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs selected. Photographic credits will be given in the calendar. The number
of entries per photographer is limited to a maximum of 5 photos.

8 The winning photographs, along with all publication and reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and the company

reserves the right to use

such in the future. Photos will not be returned.

9 Employees of Family Guardian, its affiliated companies or family members are not eligible.
10 Previously published photos are not eligible.

2010 Calendar Photo Contest Entry Form

Return with photos to:
Calendar Contest, Family Guardian
Village Road & East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

_ ENTRY DEADLINE: JUNE 1, 2009

Photo by Jade Greensword
Family Guardian’s 2009 Calendar

TELBUSINESS
Corporate Centre EMAIL
P.O, BOX

ADDRESS

STREET

*For further details & key subjects of interest
visit our website at www.familyguardian.com

NUMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERED (maximum of 5)

| agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as a winner in the 2010 Family Guardian
Calendar Photo Contest it will become the property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and| assign to Family Guardian
all rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos entered in this contest were taken in
The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not been previously published.





SIGNATURE

DATE



Changes to affect
Privy Council appeals

FROM page one

which I think will come into
effect on April 1,” Lord Philips
said.

“We are introducing some
quite tight time limits for fil-
ing applications. We do think
that it is a good idea that
there should be a sense of
urgency with regard to
appeals to the Privy Council.
It is not just that respondents
should be left in a state of
uncertainty as to whether or
not there is to be an appeal,”
he said.

“Another significant
change is that all petitions for
leave to appeal will now ini-
tially be considered on paper.
In some case we shall direct
an oral hearing but it is
unlikely that this will happen
very often,” Lord Philips said.

“This will give effect to
requests we have received
from many practitioners who
have complained about the
cost involved in going all the
way to London to petition for
leave to appeal. Finally we
are introducing new forms
which we are unloading from
our website.

“You will be able to file
applications and appeals via
e-mail. This I suspect will not
be to the delight of every-
one,” he said.

Lord Philips noted that the
changes are designed to pro-
duce rules suitable for the
21st century and bring them
in line with rules that Eng-
land and Wales have intro-
duced. Lord Philips also not-
ed that that law lords are set
to become justices of the new
Supreme Court which is
scheduled to open in Octo-
ber of this year.

Attorney General Michael
Barnett during his remarks,
noted that the Privy Council
is the final court of appeal for

the Bahamas and affects the
lives of Bahamians, people
in the region and in the wider
common law world.

“Tt’s good that they’re here
so that the Bahamian people
can see their final court of
appeal at work,” the Attor-
ney General said yesterday.

During his welcoming
address on behalf of the
Inner Bar, attorney Thomas
Evans, QC, said: “Your con-
tinued presence at the apex
of our court structure is a
source of confidence in our
system to many litigants and
practitioners alike.”

The Privy Council, which
acts as the highest court of
appeal for certain Common-
wealth countries, customarily
sits in Downing Street, Lon-
don.

The Privy Council, which
usually consists of five law
lords, has sat in the Bahamas
on two previous occasions—
in December 2006, which was
its first sitting outside of Lon-
don, and again in December
2007. The Privy Council will
sit in the Court of Appeal
until Friday, April 3. While
here this week it will hear
three appeals, one of which is
a Bahamian case.

The appeals will be heard
before the five law lords —
Lord Philips of Worth Matra-
vers, who is the senior Law
Lord, Lord Scott of Foscote,
Lord Brown of Eaton-under-
Heywood, Lord Mance and
Lord Neuberger. The Law
Lords will hear appeals in the
cases of Wendall Swann vs
the Attorney General of the
Turks and Caicos Islands
(TCI); Icebird Limited vs
Alicia Winegardener
(Bahamas), and Johannes
Deuss vs the Attorney Gen-
eral for Bermuda and the
Commissioner of Police of
Bermuda.

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THE TRIBUNE i

-
’ =

TUESDAY,

MARCH 31,



2009

. SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net



‘Retirement nightmare’
looms for Bahamas

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas
is facing a
“retirement
nightmare”, a
leading financial
adviser told Tri-
bune Business
yesterday, with
the relatively low
level of private
pension plan par-
ticipation and
poor savings habits creating an
ever-increasing “social time-
tomb”.

Commenting on the Central
Bank of the Bahamas’ survey
of Bahamian private pension
funds, which found that less
than one out of every three
workers participated in a pri-
vate pension plan, Kenwood
Kerr, Providence Advisors’
chief executive, said this con-
tributed to an “over-reliance”
on the National Insurance
Board (NIB) as the sole source
of retirement funding.

“Broad-based education is
required,” Mr Kerr told Tri-
bune Business, “and we need
to have more people covered.
In the absence of pension funds
to cover you, in the absence of



* Financial adviser warns of ‘social timebomb’ caused
by lack of pension fund and personal savings,
poor discipline and NIB ‘over-reliance’

* Less than one in every three Bahamian workers
participates in private pension plan

* Savings rates heavily skewed, as ‘75 per cent of
accounts have less than $10,000, and more than
75% of aggregate savings in less than 10 per
cent of individual accounts’

personal savings habits and dis-
cipline, and in asking NIB to
bear too much of the burden,
retirement is going to be a
nightmare.”

Mr Kerr said the develop-
ment of these qualities - per-
sonal savings habits, discipline
and private pension plans (indi-
vidual and employer-spon-
sored) - were essential for the
social security of thousands of
Bahamians, especially in their
retirement years, and the main-
tenance of living standards.

He added that NIB needed
to be used as a supplement to
other sources of retirement
income, rather than the main
source.

The percentage of Bahamian

Colinalmperial profits up 86.2%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

COLINAImperial Insurance Company executives yesterday
predicted that the life and health insurer would enjoy a 2009 finan-
cial performance similar to last year, with total revenues relative-
ly flat and a focus on expense/benefit containment, as it reported an
86.2 per cent rise in net income to $8.129 million.

The company, whose parent is BISX-listed Colina Holdings,
enjoyed a $4.335 million net income boost in its 2008 fourth quar-
ter, which accounted for more than half of its annual profits.

The full-year figure represented a significant improvement on the
$4.366 million net income produced for the 12 months to Decem-
ber 31, 2007, as a more than $12 million reduction in benefits and
expenses outweighed a more-than $8 million drop in Colinalmpe-
rial’s total revenues to $160.176 million.

When asked why Colinalmperial seemed to traditionally gener-
ate the bulk of its net income in the fourth quarter of every year,
2007 having produced a similar $4 million-plus result, Cathy
Williams, the company’s vice-president of finance, explained: “A lot

of it has to do with year-end pro-
cedures and what we find at year- SEE page 5B

Capital costs curb hotels’
efforts over energy supply

workers participating in private
pension schemes increased from
25.8 per cent in 2005 to 27.5 per
cent 2007, but this means that
more than two out of every
three Bahamian workers is not
covered by this source of retire-
ment funding.

Still, the Central Bank found
that the raw number of private
pension plan participants had
increased by 6.5 per cent in 2006
and 7.1 per cent in 2007 to reach
47,221. Average coverage rates
for participants, as a percent-
age of total employees within
the surveyed plans, improved
to 91.4 per cent in 2007 com-
pared to 88.6 per cent in 2005.

SEE page 4B

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CLICO’s insolvency
likely more than $18m

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CLICO (Bahamas) solvency deficiency will
likely be much more than $18 million because
its main $73 million investment, accounting
for 62.9 per cent of its total assets, “is unlike-
ly to be recovered at full value”, the provi-
sional liquidator has warned, with a further $42
million investment required before it can be
sold.

Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez, in his first report to the
Supreme Court, said that Bahamian-regis-
tered CLICO Enterprises, the entity to whom
CLICO (Bahamas) had advanced the $73.629
million loan, was itself insolvent to the tune of
$21 million.

In turn, CLICO Enterprises had advanced
the majority of the loan funds it received to
Wellington Preserve, the Florida-based real
estate development that ultimately accounts
for most of the assets presented on CLICO
(Bahamas) balance sheet.

Mr Gomez said CLICO Enterprises’ assets
included a $70 million loan that was due from
Wellington Preserve, described as one of its
wholly-owned subsidiaries. And CLICO
Enterprises had become even more exposed to
Wellington Preserve through making a direct
$13 million investment in the project.

In turn, the provisional liquidator said that
Wellington Preserve’s unaudited financial
statements for the year to December 31, 2008,
while valuing the real estate project as a $127
million investment property, had written down

* Main $73m investment, accounting
for 63% of Bahamian company’s
$116m assets, ‘unlikely to be
recovered at full value’

* Key real estate project needs further
$42m investment before it can be
marketed for sale, with current
value written down from
$127m to $62m

* Chief subsidiary insolvent
to tune of $21m

* $2m required to pay CLICO
Bahamas due severance monies

its current value to $62 million.

And, to make matters worse, Mr Gomez
said Wellington Preserve requires an extra
$42 million investment to upgrade the prop-
erty before it can be marketed for sale to buy-
ers.

“The Wellington Preserve real estate project
in Florida consists principally of 80 residential
lots, and various amenities and commercial

sites laid out in a 523-acre tract,” Mr Gomez
wrote.

SEE page 4B



Colinalmperial resisted annuity product pressure

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

COLINAImperial Insurance
Company resisted pressure
from its agency sales force to
launch an annuity product to
rival the likes of CLICO
(Bahamas) because it “could
not see how it would make
money” from it, its executive
vice-chairman said yesterday.

Emanuel Alexiou, who is also
a principal in the life and health
insurer’s ultimate majority
shareholder, said Colinalmper-
ial “wanted a very strong bal-
ance sheet” and, to achieve that,
some 81 per cent of its actuarial
liabilities covered ordinary life
insurance policyholders.

This stood in stark contrast

Company declined to follow CLICO (Bahamas)
because it ‘could not see how it would make money’

to CLICO (Bahamas), which
had 88 per cent of its actuarial
liabilities covering annuity
depositors when it collapsed
into insolvency and was placed
into provisional liquidation.

Recalling the pleas of Coli-
nalmperial’s agents for the com-
pany to develop a new annuity
product, Mr Alexiou told an
analysts’ conference on the
company’s year-end 2008
results: “When the market was
so frothy, they plagued us for
the last couple of years to devel-
op an annuity product.

“We investigated, looked at it
and Marcus [Bosland, Coli-

nalmperial’s resident actuary]
did some work on it.

“We just could not see the
economics of having it with
[rival] companies selling it, and
made a conscious decision not
to sell it. We did not see how we
could make money. So we
abandoned the project and
decided to look at it another
day.”

Mr Alexiou said that while
Colinalmperial did have an
annuity portfolio on its books,
largely inherited from the acqui-
sitions that had created the

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

OLDER Bahamian hotels
are far behind newer properties
in the race to become energy
efficient, the Bahamas Hotel
Association’s (BHA) president
said yesterday.

As Caribbean hotels, through
the Caribbean Hotel Associa-
tion and the Caribbean Tourism
Organisation, signed a Memo-

randum of Understanding on
Renewable Energy yesterday,
Robert Sands, who is also vice-
president of governmental and
external operations at Baha
Mar, told Tribune Business that
while individual hotels in the
Bahamas have been making
concerted efforts towards ener-
gy efficiency, high capital costs
often get in the way.

He explained that hotels and

SEE page 5B

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamas needs unity in
face of economic storm

THIS week, I had intended to
write the conclusion of my four-
part series on tax reform. How-
ever, this was not to be as I have
been engaged in many conver-
sations concerning the state of
the economy and its implications
for everyday Bahamians.

On Friday afternoon, I
received a call from one of my
colleagues asking whether I was
seeing what he is seeing regard-
ing the state of the economy and
why I (and others) have not writ-
ten about it. I cannot speak for
others, but in recent times I have
found it extremely challenging
to produce a weekly column.
However, I will attempt to con-
tribute ‘my two cents’ to what
should be a national economic
discussion.

Disturbing data
During the last several weeks
there have been several
announcements by government
SS officials that certainly give me
a — great cause for concern. First,
/ A /

there was the announcement

Second, there was the announce-
ment that the unemployment
rate in New Providence and
Freeport exceeds 12 per cent
and 14 per cent respectively.
Third, the Minister of Educa-
tion reported that some 700 stu-
dents were withdrawn from the
“private school’ educational sys-
tem and enrolled in the “public
school’ system during the first
two months of the year. Finally,
last week it was announced that
government revenues for the fis-
cal year 2008-2009 to date were
$100 million behind budgeted
revenues. Each of these statis-
tics warrants further investiga-
tion and analysis, so I was some-
what surprised that the media,
for the most part, reported them
in isolation and without much
fuss.

In a time when wage growth is
essentially flat, a 2 per cent
increase in inflation is a signifi-

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cant jump. The obvious impli-
cation for most persons is that
your limited dollars now buy you
less.

A 12 per cent unemployment
rate must be concerning because
it will have obvious implications
for other social indicators such as
crime and poverty.

I am most concerned about
the number of students that had
to be transferred back into the
public educational system, pre-
sumably for economic reasons. Is
this a precursor of bigger prob-
lems down the road?

A sharp revenue shortfall
means two things: enforcement
will be strengthened, and taxes
will increase. Tougher enforce-
ment will mean more pressure
on the income of those not pay-
ing their taxes. If taxes are not
increased, then central govern-
ment must borrow more, thus
increasing the national debt. To
the extent that we have to bor-
row heavily, our credit rating
could be under downward pres-
sure. If our credit rating comes
down then it becomes more
expensive for the Government
to borrow money. To what
degree this is all playing out...I
am not sure, but it certainly war-
rants greater discussion.

Dark clouds

Two years ago, US Senators
Carl Levin, Norm Coleman and
Barack Obama sponsored legis-
lation that seeks to stop offshore
tax haven and tax shelter abuses.
In introducing the Stop Tax
Haven Abuse Bill, Senator Cole-
man said: “It is simply unac-
ceptable that some individuals
are using offshore tax havens
and secrecy jurisdictions to shel-
ter trillions of dollars in assets
from taxation. These tax

schemes cause a massive rev-
enue shortfall and, sadly, it is
the honest American taxpayer
who must bear a disproportion-
ate burden of investing in areas
like education and healthcare.
We are introducing this bill to
close these loopholes, shut down
offshore tax schemes and ensure
that every American pays their
fair share of taxes.”

The then-Senator Barack
Obama, in his contribution,
added: “ This is a basic issue of
fairness and integrity. We need
to crack down on individuals and
businesses that abuse our tax
laws so that those who work
hard and play by the rules aren’t
disadvantaged.”

These were certainly strong
words by both Senator Coleman
and the now-president of the
US. President Obama can cer-
tainly advance this agenda if he
so chooses.

On February 22, 2009, Euro-
pean Union (EU) Heads of
Government agreed that the
extraordinary international crisis
called for an overhaul of the
international financial system,
including a new system of regu-
lation for all financial markets,
products and participants.
Among their deliberations, the
leaders reached consensus on
the following:

* EU Heads blamed the inter-
national financial crisis on “off-
shore jurisdictions”... where
they allege non-transparent busi-
ness is carried out; and

* EU Heads promised to pre-
pare a “toolbox of sanctions to
be applied against such tax
havens”

Such a ‘toolbox of sanctions’ is
to be unveiled when this group
meets again on April 2 in Lon-
don.

Finally, four days later, Pres-
ident Obama, when presenting
his national budget for the year,
summed it all up when he said
“Our economy is in a deep

recession that threatens to be
deeper and longer than any
since the Great depression”.
Notwithstanding the new
threats, a weak US economy
means a weak Bahamian econo-
my.

Direction

You might ask “where is he
going with all of this?” The
answer is quite simple. There is a
confluence of events that all
have very negative implications
for the Bahamian economy...the
brewing of a proverbial perfect
storm. Yet in the face of this, we
have not mobilised a bi-partisan
response to prepare our econo-
my for what may be coming
down the pipeline. The political
parties are still consumed with
petty politics as usual. It kind of
reminds me of the mythical say-
ing: “While Rome burned, Nero
fiddled”.

These are some of the most
challenging economic times that
we probably face in our lifetime,
especially if President Obama is
correct in his assessment of the
magnitude of this recession. It
is a challenge which, in my hum-
ble opinion, requires that all
capable hands are ‘on deck’. Yet
notwithstanding the imminent
economic threat, there seems to
be little urgency in crafting a tru-
ly national response. Until next
week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas), a
wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Colo-
nial Group International or any
of its subsidiary and/or affili-
ated companies. Please direct
any questions or comments to
rigibson@atlantichouse.com.bs

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THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 3B



700k IDB grants
to aid National
Energy Policy

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE PRIME Minister’s visit
to Colombia to sign two
$700,000 agreements with the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) will aid the Gov-
ernment’s pursuit of a National
Energy Policy, the minister of
state for the environment told
Tribune Business yesterday.
Phenton Neymour revealed that
the Bahamas was far behind
other countries in the region in
implementing such a policy, but
was catching up quickly.

Mr Neymour said one of the
grants, totalling $700,000, will
focus on streamlining the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC), and will look
specifically at the corporation’s
inefficiencies in order to reduce
costs and improve service.

He added that as part of the
grant project, the Government
would look into BEC’s finan-
cial position and research ways
to improve this by looking at
its internal structure and the
rates it charges customers.

The project, expected to run
for 12 months, will also deter-
mine ways that fossil fuel-burn-
ing power producer will be able
to integrate renewable energy
alternatives into its grid, with a
determined focus on waste to
energy power production. This
means that BEC’s regulatory
framework will have to be eval-
uated as part of the project, in
order to sanction mergers with
independent power producers.

Mr Neymour said the Gov-

ernment
will also
look at
BEC’ s]}
humanf
resources.

The sec-
ond grant,
totalling
$750,000
and with a
timeline of
14 months,
will address
the design and implementation
of a National Energy Efficiency
Programme and _ further
research into other possible
alternative energy solutions.

Mr Neymour said the grant
would address deficiencies with
regard to data collection in the
energy sector, and explore areas
where wind energy can be best
harvested throughout the
Bahamas. It will identify the
best possible ways to use solar
energy and ocean thermal ener-
gy conversion.

The Government will also
look at ways consumers can
save energy at home and in
transportation, and how com-
mercial customers, schools and
government agencies can do the
same.

“This grant that we have got-
ten from the IDB, we consider
it a significant achievement for
moving toward the implemen-
tation of our National Energy
Policy initiative,” said Mr Ney-
mour.

“This policy will affect a num-
ber of the Government agen-
cies and ministries, and is meant
to improve the country’s energy

Neymour

A peel of poor life ond Me Balemar ance FTF
era tt eure ard

Annive

Sa



security. It is also, from my per-
spective, a major component of
beginning the consumer educa-
tion programme that we think
has potential for reducing ener-
gy demand.”

Mr Neymour added that it
was important for the Bahamas
to implement a National Ener-
gy Policy before “beginning to
address key aspects of the ener-
gy industry”.

He said the Government had
already begun some short-term
projects, and had advertised
publicly for engineering firms
to participate in these projects,
obtaining a favourable response
from the industry.

Mr Neymour also told Tri-
bune Business that the Gov-
ernment is still mulling over
Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) asa
potential energy source, but
have found out after receiving
proposals from AES (an LNG
company) that further review
is necessary.

“We have recently had a
review of the LNG regulations
by B.E.S.T. (Bahamas Envi-

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NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PROGRESSIVE VENTURES LTD. is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on March 30, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burrows of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the May 4, 2009 to send their names and ad-
dresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

March 31, 2009
SHAKIRA BURROWS
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

ronmental Science and Tech-
nology Commission),” he said.
“We are looking at the technical
viability of the project.”



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs
STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following
position:

Alumni Relations & Annual Giving Associate, who will be
responsible for implementing The College of The Bahamas Alumni
Relations Programme and delivering a successful Annual Giving
fundraising programme. The successful candidate will be someone with
strong interpersonal, communication (both oral and written) and
organizational skills who enjoys the challenge of engaging individuals
on a one-on-one level.

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to,
implementing the new Annual Giving strategy; implementing the
programmes for Annual Fund solicitation; maintaining electronic/database
records and monitoring, tracking and analyzing Annual Fund performance.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor's degree or equivalent and five
(5) years post-qualification experience at the AS-2 level. For a detailed
job description, visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates
should submit a detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than
Thursday, April 9th, 2009.





Housewares
China & Gifts
Home Decor
Stationery
Lawn & Telco Tp
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We would like to thank our valued The es 14
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9:00am-9:00pm
nday closed
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Tel: re 393.4002 Saturday
Fax: (242) 393-4096


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS ee
CLICO’s insolvency likely more than $18m

FROM page 1B

“Tt was to be a high-end resi-
dential subdivision with an
equestrian/polo theme. Most of
the residential lots are connect-
ed to or contain polo pitches
and horse stables. Unfortu-
nately, the project requires a
substantial cash injection of a
minimum of $42 million before
it can be reasonably presented
for sale.”

The upshot of all this for CLI-
CO (Bahamas) insurance poli-
cyholders, annuity depositors
and other creditors is that the
company’s financial picture will
ultimately be much worse than
the one presented in Mr
Gomez’s first report, given that
the provisional liquidator will
struggle to recover the full $73
million loan value from
Wellington Preserve.

According to the balance
sheet presented by Mr Gomez
to the Supreme Court, CLICO
(Bahamas) is currently insol-
vent to the tune of $18.286 mil-
lion, with assets standing at
$116.965 and liabilities reach-
ing $135.251 million.



Assuming that these figures
all stay the same, all creditors
rank equally, and Mr Gomez is
able to monetise all those assets,
CLICO (Bahamas) creditors
currently stand to recover 86.5
per cent of their investments,
or 86.5 cents on every $1.

Yet 63 per cent of those
$116.965 million in assets are
accounted for by the loans to
CLICO Enterprises and
Wellington Preserve, which the
liquidator believes will not be
recovered at full value. And
then there is the $42 million
investment required to ready
the real estate at Wellington
Preserve for sale.

Failure to realise the full $73
million from Wellington Pre-
serve’s eventual sale will leave
an even larger hole on the bal-
ance sheet, further depleting the
asset pool and reducing creditor
recoveries. The further $42 mil-
lion investment required will
likely make any buyer discount
the purchase price they pay, and
creditors will recover far less
than $0.865 cents on the $1.

Explaining the full extent of
the problem confronting him,

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)








SEABROWN HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, SEABROWN HOLDINGS LIMITED, has
been dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar

General on the 17th day of March, 2009.









Sarnia Directors Limited
Suite V
Tower Hill House
Le Bordage, St. Peter Port
Guernsey, GY1 3QT
Liquidator










NOTICE is hereby given that NEVILLETON
PARAGUE of 8MARIA GALANTE ROAD,
P.O. BOX CR-56836, Nassau, Bahamas, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 31S" day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

a
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dewolopmont Company

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following

items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;
* General Requirements for General Contracting services for

the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (ie.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected fo be tendered by the successful C-230

General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRACI BRISBY
Contract & Procurement Manager
LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117

P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

with the liquidation likely to be
long and complex, Mr Gomez
wrote in his report to the
Supreme Court: “Since 2004,
the [CLICO (Bahamas)] has
advanced funds to its wholly-
owned subsidiary, Clico Enter-
prises (CEL).

“As at December 31, 2008,
approximately $73 million had
been advanced to CEL, but it is
unlikely that this loan can be
recovered at full value as CEL’s
December 31, 2008, unaudited
financial statements reflect a
deficit of $21 million as the
assets are $108 million and its
liabilities are $129 million.

“Included in CEL’s assets is a
loan due from Wellington Pre-
setve (WPL) a wholly-owned
subsidiary of CEL, for $70 mil-
lion.

“The December 31, 2008,
unaudited financial of WPL
includes investment property in
Florida and valued at $127 mil-
lion. However, the same real
estate valued on an ‘as is’ basis
is worth approximately $62 mil-
lion.”

The provisional liquidator
added: “The loan to subsidiary
CEL)of approximately $73 mil-
lion is not considered presently
collectible, and thus endangers
the asset base of the company
and places policy values in per-
il. The funds advanced to CEL
were advanced by CEL to
WPL, the wholly-owned sub-

sidiary of CEL, which acquired
its real estate holding in Florida,
USA.

“This real estate is not
presently considered mar-
ketable as a result of the signif-
icant downturn in the Florida
real estate market.”

Elsewhere, Mr Gomez said
he needed to determine a date
for ‘releasing’ CLICO
(Bahamas) 141 staff and pay-
ing them what was due.

He explained: “Failure to do
so on a timely basis will result in
the staff being paid from the
company’s resources, which will
result in an erosion of the asset
pool as revenue is not being
generated from which staff
could be paid.

“T have calculated the sever-
ance pay for CLICO’s perma-
nent staff, and agents, which
totals approximately $2 mil-
lion.”

Mr Gomez noted in his
report that FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
had told him of its concerns that
some $35 million worth of its
mortgage loans, covered by
CLICO (Bahamas) life insur-
ance policies, had been placed
at risk by the impending liqui-
dation.

The Baker Tilly Gomez part-
ner added that he was still in
discussions with four Bahamas-
based life and health insurers -
Colinalmperial Insurance Com-

pany, Family Guardian, British
American Financial and
Atlantic Medical - in a bid to
transfer CLICO (Bahamas)
insurance portfolio to them.

Tribune Business under-
stands that, in the first instance,
the liquidator and his team are
seeking to find another carrier
who will take on administration
of the CLICO (Bahamas) port-
folio, dealing with all claims and
premium payments, with a view
to acquiring it at a later date
once matching assets can be
released from the liquidation.

Meanwhile, Mr Gomez said
he had agreed upon drafting an
installment payment plan to be
submitted to CLICO
(Bahamas) two reinsurers,
Bupa for health and Swiss Re
for life. The pair are owed
$930,750 and $203,915 respec-
tively in outstanding reinsur-
ance premiums, but the rein-
surance agreements remain in
force.

The provisional liquidator
added that he was investigating
the termination of $10 million
worth of Bahamas-based term
deposits between year-end 2008
and the date CLICO
(Bahamas) was placed into lig-
uidation to determine whether
any policyholders received a
preferential payment ahead of
other creditors.

Mr Gomez is also assessing
whether CLICO (Bahamas) has

a claim against its parent,
Trinidad-based CL Financial,
which had guaranteed the loan
to CLICO Enterprises. He is
also weighing up whether to
intervene in Trinidad legal pro-
ceedings to prevent CL Finan-
cial’s assets from being dissi-
pated.

Mr Gomez said he was also
investigating the $34 million and
$15.5 million claims submitted
against CLICO (Bahamas) by
Guyana and Suriname, indicat-
ing that his initial review found
that funds placed by clients
from those countries were for-
warded to the Turks & Caicos
branch, and then flowed into
the US. While these funds were
recorded in CLICO (Bahamas)
records, Mr Gomez said it
appeared as if they had been
paid directly into the US
account.

“Unfortunately, the contracts
that were entered into with the
company do not appear to have
been standard policy contracts
but, in many cases, could easily
appear to be the transfer of
funds to the Bahamas that could
easily be classified as related
party loans rather than poli-
cies,” Mr Gomez said of the
Guyana/Suriname claims.

Tribune Business was yester-
day told that Lawrence Duprey,
CL Financial’s chairman, is cur-
rently in Nassau, although it is
unclear why he is here.

‘Retirement nightmare’ looms for Bahamas

FROM page 1B

The survey found that the
growth of private pension funds
had outpaced the nominal
growth in the Bahamas’ gross
domestic product (GDP), the
former having increased from
14.4 per cent of GDP in 2005
to 15.4 per cent in 2007. Private
pension plans had collectively
$1.1 billion in total assets at
year-end 2007.

However, the Central Bank
survey also revealed the work
that needs to be done. It point-

BKG/410.03

ed out that bank deposits and
NIB’s invested assets remained
the two largest Bahamian
national savings sources, with
the former very heavily skewed
towards a minority of large
deposits.

Personal savings in bank
accounts stood at $3.1 billion or
43 per cent of Bahamian GDP
in 2007, compared to 40.1 per
cent in 2005.

“However, for most account
holders, the resources are not
a significant retirement buffer,”
the Central Bank warned, “as

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$71,000,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Wednesday, April 1, 2009. Successful tenderers, who will be
advised should take up their bills against payment on
Friday, April 3, 2009. These bills will be in mintmum
multiples of B$100.00. Tenders are to be on special forms
obtainable from the Central Bank of The Bahamas or

Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

WASTE - ED

LITTER, YOU AND THE LAW

You are breaking the law if:
* You drop or create litter in a place public

place

* Your household/commercial garbage for
collection is kept in a way that creates litter

* You own or occupy land and fail to keep it

litter free

* You own or occupy land along a public road
and you fail to keep the footpaths or
abutment (the area between a shop/house
and the road) free of litter

* You own, hire or drive a vehicle and litter is

dropped from it

DONT’ BE ALITTERBUG. OBEY THE LAW

A MESSAGE FROM THE MINISTRY OF
THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES



the average balances in more
than 75 per cent of these
accounts is less than $10,000,
and more than three-quarters
of their aggregate savings are
concentrated in less than 10 per
cent of individual accounts.

“The NIB held collective
retirement savings of $1.3 bil-
lion, representing 18.4 per cent
of GDP in 2007, vis-a-vis a
slightly lower 19.9 per cent in
2005. The combined domestic
savings in life insurance com-
panies are credit unions
approached $1.1 billion in 2007,
approximately 14.9 per cent and
3.9 per cent of GDP, respec-
tively.”

Mr Kerr yesterday told Tri-
bune Business that a failure to
develop private pension plans
and savings habits would lead
to “an over-reliance on NIB”
for retirement funding, further
propelling its reserve fund into
bankruptcy if the status quo was
maintained.

“NIB would then have to
either lessen the amount of pay-
outs or increase the uptake,”
Mr Kerr explained. “You have
to several things at once. Look-
ing at NIB on its own, if you
don’t implement pension funds
to lessen the burden on NIB, it
will have to lower benefits or
increase the taxes it takes in to
keep going.”

He added: “It’s a social time-
bomb and we need to act with
some urgency. That urgency is
now. We need to move forward,
and put in legislation that looks
at existing practices in light of
the CLICO (Bahamas) incident.
We had poor management,
poor oversight and a lack of
education.”

Mr Kerr pointed out that with
the Bahamian population’s
demographics ageing, the tax
base provided by younger,
working persons was set to
shrink, while the social security
burden would rise with an
increase in the ageing popula-
tion.

The Central Bank found that
defined contribution schemes,
where employers matched their
employees’ contributions, were
the most popular pension plans
in the Bahamas, accounting for
73.8 per cent of all scheme
respondents.

However, defined contribu-
tion plans accounted for only
24.7 per cent of total Bahamian
pension plan assets, and 16.5
per cent of all private scheme
participants.

This was largely because most
defined contribution schemes
were started after 1990, and are
operated by smaller companies
and sponsors, where sharing the
contribution burdens with
employees is important to
ensure the plans are sustainable.
The defined benefit schemes,
by contrast, accounted for 83.5
per cent and 75.3 per cent of
total private pension fund assets
and participants respectively,
being operated by major gov-
ernment corporations.

Some 29.2 per cent of
Bahamian pension plans were
managed in-house, largely by
financial institutions and pro-
fessional services firms. Others
outsourced the administration
to insurance companies (27.9
per cent), other professional
administrators (25.9 per cent)
and banks and trust companies
(17 per cent).

The Central Bank found:
“Despite improved average
rates of return on investment
assets for 2007 vis-a-vis 2005,
sponsors were motivated to
steadily increase the average
paid-in contribution for pension
funds as a percentage of
employees’ salaries.

“Weighted by total assets, the
average contribution rate
increased marginally to 11.61
per cent in 2007, after a slight
dip to 11.46 per cent in 2006,
and a paid-in rate of 11.52 per
cent in 2005.”

While government bonds and
other public sector securities
remain the main investment
feature for Bahamian pension
plans, accounting for 36 per cent
of total invested assets, this was
down from 37.6 per cent in 2005
and a 40.4 per cent peak in
2004.

Investments in mutual funds,
equities and bonds were up to
32.9 per cent of pension fund
asset allocations in 2007, com-
pared to 30.9 per cent in 2005,
although the growth rate has
slowed due to the decline in pri-
vate sector capital raising since
2004.

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUVINA REVOL of

rs

Mackey Street, P.O. Box

N-7 060, Nassau

Bahamas is

applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Cit@enship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
regestration'naluralization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 24" day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, RO. Box N-7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA JEAN-LOUIS of FARM
ROAD and CENTREVILLE CONSTWENCY one of the Island
of Niew Providence, one of the Islands of the Gommonvealth
Of The Bahamas, is app ying to ihe Minister responsdle tor

Natonality and Gilizen
citizen ol The Bahamas

uo. lor negistrationinaturalization as a
and thal any person who knows ary

reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statamant of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24" day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citzenshe, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Baharnas


THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 5B



ColinaImperial
profits up 86.2%

FROM page 1B

end.”

Explaining that Colinalmpe-
rial had to make conservative
actuarial and other assumptions
during the first three quarters
of every year, Ms Williams said
that until the final numbers
were computed it was “very dif-
ficult to ascertain what the final
projections will be at the end.”

She added that Colinalmpe-
rial’s resident actuary, Marcus
Bosland, and his team were
working to bring forward actu-
arial and other calculations to
mid-year, as opposed to year-
end, a move that would smooth
out earnings calculations.

Mr Bosland yesterday said
Colinalmperial’s refinancing of
its $20 million preference share
debt, replacing the initial issue
with one that carried a 1.5 per
cent coupon rate as opposed to
2.25 per cent, would save the
company $150,000 per year in
dividend payments.

He added that the life and
health insurer’s key solvency
ratio, the Minimum Continuing

Capital and Surplus Require-
ment (MCCSR) stood at 178
per cent at year-end 2008, well
above the 150 per cent supervi-
sory target.

Colinalmperial, said Mr
Bosland, expected that MCC-
SR reading to “be higher than
that this year”. He added that
while policy lapse rates “had
increased slightly in 2008 com-
pared to the prior year, a trend
that had continued into 2009,
this was not significant and had
been expected given the eco-
nomic environment.

While Colinalmperial was not
expecting growth in ordinary
life premiums that was compa-
rable to prior years, Emanuel
Alexiou, its executive vice-
chairman, said group and indi-
vidual health premiums were
set to be “a little higher” in 2009
due to product re-pricing and
the launch of its Stellar Care
portfolio.

Colinalmperial also saw A.
M. Best, the international insur-
ance credit rating agency, reaf-
firm its A- (Excellent) financial
strength rating and a- issuer

credit rating, both carrying a
stable outlook.

“The rating affirmations are
based on ColinaImperial's lead-
ing market share in the
life/health market in the
Bahamas, its diversified prod-
uct portfolio, favourable risk-
adjusted capitalisation and con-
servative reserving practices,”
A. M. Best said.

Market

“As the life/health market
leader, with more than 50 per
cent market share in the
Bahamas, Colinalmperial con-
tinues to leverage its competi-
tive advantages by expanding
within the islands of the
Bahamas and into other
Caribbean and Latin American
markets.

“A.M. Best notes that while
Colinalmperial's earnings per-
formance and growth in assets
have primarily been achieved
through several acquisitions, the
company's potential for new
business growth and earnings
sustainability will depend on its

ability to attract new business
growth organically in a mature
Bahamian life/health insurance
market. A.M. Best also notes
improved results in Colinalm-
perial's group and individual
health business lines.”

It added: “Partially offsetting
these strengths are the mature
nature of the Bahamian
life/health market and the
recent erosion in the Bahamas'
economy, primarily resulting
from a decline in the tourism
sector.

“The weakness in the
Bahamian economy may
impede Colinalmperial's poten-
tial for organic growth, its abil-
ity to stabilise the volatility in its
operating results and increased
delinquencies in its mortgage
loan portfolio, which would
require additional charges to
operating income.

“A.M. Best notes that Coli-
nalmperial has implemented
aggressive measures to address
the rising delinquencies in its
mortgage loan portfolio and
provide for all potential losses
in that portfolio.”

Capital costs curb
hotels’ efforts over

energy supply



CST
Real Estate

=

WRT eCE UML Mn LETC (0

Everywhere The Buyers Are!



a
Cit P

IN THE ESTATE OF THOMAS

Tel: 502 2356



ALLISON

AUGUSTUS CLEARE SR late of Joe Farrington

Road in the Eastern District in

the Island of New

Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of

the Bahamas.

Deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any
claims against the above-named Estate are required, on
or before the 10th day of April, A.D. 2009 to send their
names and addresses, and particulars of their debts or
claims, to the undersigned, and if so required by notice
in writing from the undersigned, to come in and prove
such debts or claims, or in default thereof they will be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution AND all
persons indebted to the said Estate are asked to pay their
respective debts to the undersigned at once.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the expiration
of the mentioned above, the assets of the late THOMAS

ALLISON AUGUSTUS CLEARE SR _ will be
distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Administrator
shall then have had notice.

Dated this 20th day of March, A.D., 2009

c/o PYFROM & CO

Attorneys for the Administrator,
No.58 Shirley Street,

P.O. Box N 8958,

Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.



FROM page 1B

resorts can incur huge bills in
an attempt to outfit their oper-
ations with energy-saving
devices, which can be bank
account breakers.

Air conditioning, a major
voltage consumer in any hotel,
is one of the most expensive
pieces of hardware to replace,
but one of the most important.

“(New energy efficient equip-
ment implementation) can only
be applicable to new installs
because the capital costs of a
change out on any large scale,
as well as retrofitting, isn’t
financially viable,” said Mr
Sands. “We are constantly look-
ing at ways to be more energy
efficient.”

Project

He added that the Baha Mar
project was considering deep
water cooling as an alternative
source of energy for air condi-
tioning and electricity genera-
tion, and had brought in experts
in the field to advise the pro-
ject.

“We’re looking at all forms
of renewable energy because
we know that it is the way of
the future,” Mr Sands said.

The Government has also
advocated energy efficiency in
the hospitality sector, accord-
ing to Mr Sands, and have
acknowledged the need to look
at alternative forms of energy.

Hotels

He said hotels around the
Bahamas have slowly begun to
integrate energy saving devices,
such as fluorescent lighting, but
were still often handicapped in
terms of energy consumption.

“The difficulty in our busi-
ness is we’re demand-side, and
whether we have 10 per cent or
100 per cent occupancy the
amount of electricity remains
the same, because we continue
to cool and light,” said Mr
Sands

However, he suggested that
the private sector and the Gov-
ernment might be able to imple-
ment short-term cost savings on
energy with better calculations
for fuel surcharge rates that will
help to further bring down the
high cost of utilities.

Colinalmperial resisted annuity

FROM page 1B

company, the product was
geared to providing clients with
retirement savings.

He pointed out that the annu-
ity product mix was substan-
tially different from Colinalm-
perial’s competitors, especially
CLICO (Bahamas), which had
treated annuity deposits almost
as certificates of deposit or
banking products.

CLICO (Bahamas) had been

offering above-market interest
rates of returns on its annuities
in a bid to attract new investor
money into the business and
stave off its impending insol-
vency.
The CLICO (Bahamas) bal-
ance sheet produced by provi-
sional liquidator Craig “Tony’
Gomez showed that future pol-
icyholder benefits to meet annu-
ity payments stood at $112.39
million, 83 per cent of its total
liabilities.

Meanwhile, Mr Alexiou said
yesterday that Colinalmperial
was “not looking to go after”
acquiring CLICO (Bahamas)
life and health insurance port-
folio because there were still
too many uncertainties associ-
ated with it.

Given that the provisional liq-
uidator had much work to do, it
was impossible, Mr Alexiou

said, for other insurers to deter-
mine what approach they might
take.

NOTICE

The owner of Laing’s Towing Services requests
that Mr. Norman Smith, owner of a 2005 Ford
F150, license plate #123783, remove the
forementioned vehicle from its storage facilities
in Kennedy Subdivision within thiry (30) days.
Please note that failure to do so will result in
the said vehicle being sold to cover the cost of
storage fees.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROYANN CYRILEAN PEDICAN of
PORT-au-PRINCE, HAITI is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 31th day of MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

ea

wi

i

BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

There will be an issue of Treasury Bills on Friday
April 3, 2009. Tenders for these bills should be
given to the Central Bank of The Bahamas be-
fore 3:00 pm on Wednesday April 1, 2009. All
Envelopes Enclosing Tenders should be labelled
“Tender for Bahamas Government Treasury
Bills.” Full details and application forms may be

obtained from The Central Bank Of The Bahamas
or from commercial banks.

WASTE - ED

PUT LITTER WHERE IT
BELONGS. IN THE CAN, MAN!

Litter Decomposition

Time

Plastic Container | 1 Million Years
Soda Can 200-500 Years
Disposable Diaper | 550 Years
Paper Bag 1 Month

A MESSAGE FROM THE MINISTRY
OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH SERVICES



BANKS DISASTER RECOVERY CENTRES

CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES
HOTEL & RESORTS
LAWYERS & ACCOUNTANTS


THE TRIBUNE



5-Day FORECAST

4

y a
( ryt
a

ORLANDO



. ; ane : : i ine. ine. The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
, High: 82° F/28° C ae ae and Patchy clouds Partly sunny. i of Plenty of sunshine Plenty of sunshine Ger od etree
Low: 58°F/14°C : : a 2
° @ ll . High: 86 High: 87 High: 90 High: 88
< A, ¢ High: 85° Low: 74° Low: 76° Low: 74° Low: 74° Low: 76° see EE
TAMPA Len (ge ae EE
High: 82° F/28° C Lad . a 106° F 95°-82° F 94°-87° F 103°-84° F High Hi.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft.
Low: 62° F/17°C ! -. / The See ee eae an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:04pm. 24 6:06am. 0.1
0 — elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low forthe day, 6:04p.m. 0.0
Wednesday'2:09 4m. 29 7:05am. 0.2
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday T39am.. 28 809am. 03
~~ ABACO jemperatfe _____________ 2410p.m. 23 8:14pm. 02
ne he High:81°F/27° C i a Hrmeeenrmenn ae Friday a a a ae a a
y ee Low: 71° F/22°C Normal high... coerce
7 eo Normal low 67° F/19° C
pt Som, @ WEST PALM BEACH es Last year's Migh ....ccccsscssseseeesine grec | ONT TIMI
— High: 84° F/29°C Last year's LOW ne ceeeenennnenenee 72° F/22° C a a TR ies
= jo oR Se tt~<‘a‘OUUCUC“‘éi tation lll wt—<“‘i STO : .M. wee VUE .M.
Low: 70 F/21 Cc od Precipitation - Se os am ane am
As of 2 p.m. yesterday 0... .sccsecteneerneen 0.02 unsel....... co p.m. Moonset. ........ none
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT i. Year to date First Full Last New
High: 84° F/29° C @ High: 80° F/27° C Normal year to date oo... 5.11" 7 i.
Low: 73° F/23°C Low: 69° F/21°C
~, AccuWeather.com
@ — a Forecasts and graphics provided by SS %
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr. 2 Apr. 9 Apr.17 Apr. 24
= 5 High: 86° F/30° C ELEUT HERA
bow: 72°F/22"¢ _NASSAU SS Eat
High: 85° F/29° C 4
Low: 74° F/23° C
@
KEY WEST eX CATISLAND
High: 8a" F/29° C High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 72° F/22° C Low: 71° F/22°C
. i
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
a ‘on 84 a 4 High: 86° F/30°C
ow: 74° i Low: 73° °
. 2 ow: 73°F/23°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 75° F/24° C
LONG ISLAND
Low: 72° F/22°C
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 87° F/31°C
F/C FIC F/C = FIC FC FIC F/C FC FC FC Fie FC ; Low: 69° F/21°C
Albuquerque 61/16 36/2 s 56/13 33/0 c Indianapolis 62/16 43/6 + 60/15 41/5 pe Philadelphia 62/16 40/4 s 58/14 44/6 r+
Anchorage 33/0 21/6 c 35/1 20/-6 pc Jacksonville 74/23 6216 pe 77/25 65/18 t Phoenix 81/27 55/12 $s 82/27 54/12 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 6719 5412 t 66/18 53/11 pc Kansas City 48/8 31/0 po 54/12 341 pc Pittsburgh 63/17 43/6 s 55/12 38/3 RAGGEDISLAND — igh:89°F/s2°c
Atlantic City 56/13 37/2 s 55/12 45/7 + Las Vegas 75/23 51/10 s 78/25 538/41 pc Portland,OR 53/1 40/4 sh 52/11 44/6 c High: 87° F/31° C Low: 73° F/23°C
Baltimore 64/17 40/4 s 52/1 44/6 + Little Rock 61/16 40/4 t 70/21 48/8 s Raleigh-Durham 70/21 48/8 po 64/17 49/9 F Low: 70°F/21°C
Boston 50/110 36/2 s 49/9 39/3 ¢ Los Angeles 74/23 54/12 § 74/23 54/12 pe St. Louis 56/13 40/4 t 65/18 46/7 pc .
Buffalo 54412 38/3 s 50/10 39/3 + Louisville 68/20 47/8 t 64/17 45/7 pe Salt Lake City 51/10 31/0 c 43/6 29/-1_ sf GREATINAGUA
Charleston, SC 74/23 57/13 pce 75/23 61/16 t Memphis 58/14 42/5 t 70/21 50/10 s San Antonio 74/23 51410 pe 79/26 56/13 5s High: 88° F/31°C
Chicago 56/13 34/1 + B10 33/0 pe Miami 86/30 74/23 pce 88/31 73/22 pc San Diego 69/20 56/13 s 64/17 57/13 pe Low 69°F2I°C
Cleveland 56/13 42/5 pe 56/13 38/3 1 Minneapolis 40/4 27/-2 sn 40/4 26/-3 sn San Francisco 65/18 50/10 pe 67/19 51/10 s y
Dallas 66/18 45/7 s 73/22 55/12 pe Nashville 64/17 43/6 t 68/20 44/6 pc Seattle 50/10 39/3 sh 47/8 41/ ¢
Denver 45/7 24/-4 pc 42/5 23/-5 ¢ New Orleans 78/25 56/13 t 73/22 61/16 pc Tallahassee 74/23 63/17 t 78/25 63/17 t
Detroit 56/13 40/4 pe 51/0 37/2 ¢ New York 59/15 43/6 s 52/1 45/7 + Tampa 82/27 70/21 pc 83/28 70/21 t
Honolulu 82/27 71/21 c 82/27 71/21 pc Oklahoma City 62/16 39/3 s 72/22 45/7 pc Tucson 78/25 48/8 s 79/26 48/8 s
Houston 69/20 49/9 r 77/25 59/15 s Orlando 82/27 67/19 pce 87/30 67/19 t Washington, DC 65/18 43/6 s 5o/12 46/7 4+















THE WEATHER REPORT




AY ae aN

v.
8| eho
: EXT.

o|1|2

LOW

3|4|5

MODERATE
























6|7

HIGH





\. HIGH



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
55/12
68/20
73/22
67/19
93/33
84/28
52/11
52/11
68/20
59/15
55/12
68/20
66/18
57/13
56/13
15/23
80/26
99/37
36/2
88/31
82/27
66/18
50/10
55/12
57/13
57/13
39/3
90/32
39/3
75/23
90/32
69/20
61/16
79/26
85/29
84/28
59/15
57/13
84/28
84/28
90/32
46/7
41/5
43/6
85/29
91/32
39/3
59/15
53/11
82/27
82/27
68/20
83/28
82/27
88/31
86/30
86/30
17/25
50/10
45/7
72/22
69/20
57/13
44/6
86/30
48/8
56/13
52/11
36/2

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
70/21
46/7
43/6
63/17
52/11
78/25
73/22
49/9
36/2
63/17
51/10
41/5
60/15

mio hao Bao

no Bao wa

sn

Wednesday

High
F/C
87/30
59/15
64/17
74/23
63/17
94/34
84/28
57/13
61/16
69/20
66/18
59/15
68/20
64/17
59/15
62/16
70/21
84/28
100/37
32/0
90/32
83/28
66/18
52/11
54/12
61/16
64/17
44/6
90/32
37/2
75/23
90/32
64/17
66/18
75/23
85/29
85/29
63/17
59/15
82/27
81/27
92/33
52/11
41/5
50/10
85/29
96/35
40/4
61/16
58/14
80/26
86/30
70/21
82/27
84/28
89/31
82/27
84/28
75/23
54/12
48/8
73/22
70/21
57/13
48/8
86/30
46/7
62/16
50/10
35/1

Low
F/C
70/21
43/6
45/7
62/16
48/8
78/25
74/23
49/9
37/2
64/17
52/11
43/6
63/17
46/7
41/5
44/6
59/15
65/18
79/26
19/-7
72/22
67/19
43/8
46/7
41/5
39/3
45/7
32/0
68/20
32/0
64/17
61/16
56/13
54/12
50/10
76/24
64/17
43/6
36/2
75/23
45/7
62/16
37/2
32/0
38/3
60/15
67/19
32/0
39/3
35/1
71/21
54/12
52/11
72/22
61/16
71/21
54/12
68/20
61/16
34/1
32/0
66/18
57/13
45/7
38/3
71/21
41/5
45/7
39/3
19/-7





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST

Ww

foe c>

TiO he me Ome Oo ee ae ee ee Re

amc fae co) fxm co mom oO

czTUT”
com C> fe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





TUESDAY, MARCH 31st, 2009, PAGE 11B

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Wednesday: SE at 10-20 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Wednesday: SE at 10-20 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: E at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Wednesday: SE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Seattiov

74/54

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries

Miami
86/74

Fronts
Col =

War fief

Stationary eageafi

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

-0s Os- 10s 20s [B03)) 40s

AUTO INSURANCE

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Tt (242) 502-6400] Tel (242) 350-3500 | Tels (242) 367-4204 | Tel: (242) 332-2862 | Tek (242) 336-2304

ee


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 7B



a Ne





The Tribune

B Oi



1€a





ith



It’s way e more than



m@ By LLOYDALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

WITH Spring well on its
way, some experts are now
predicting an active pollen
induced allergy period.

Although there are no local agen-
cies which test for airbourne pollen lev-
els, internet reports predict this year
will be an active season based on last
year’s high pollen counts.

As high seasonal pollen counts can
affect numerous types of allergies, from
eye allergies (conjunctivitis) to skin
reactions (dermatitis), the most com-
mon spring allergy is allergic rhinitis
which is also known as hay fever.

Dr Chinyere Carey-Bullard - a fam-
ily medicine specialist from the
Advanced Family Medical centre on
Shirley Street - says the ball is still in
your hands in controlling your season-
al allergies.

She said although allergy sufferers
may be in for a rough spring, taking a
few extra steps to protect themselves
will make the difference between hav-
ing an allergy free spring, or enduring
allergy symptoms while exposed to the
elements.

Some common allergens include
house dust, cigarette or cigar smoke,
dust-mites, molds & fungi, cut grass,
animal dander or discharges, and more
commonly airbourne pollen.

Dr Carey-Bullard started by pointing
out the importance in observing sea-
sonal changes in the body.

Where many people may not even
be aware that they suffer from one or
more allergies, Dr Carey-Bullard said
the symptoms which frequently pass
under the radar, are commonly mis-
taken for less threatening ailments like
the common cold, or a dry throat.

She said: “Symptoms (related to an
allergy) can range from just a dry couch
which we call a variant asthma, to itchy
and watery eyes, watery nose, eczema,
constant sneezing, being stuffed up,

wheezing, or something worse such as
an upper respiratory symptoms like the
tightening of the chest.”

Whatever the symptom, she said
seeking an allergy, asthma, or Ear,
Nose, and Throat (ENT) specialist will
be the smart step in identifying whether
you have allergies or not.

She said getting a blood or skin aller-
gy test for a diagnosis, will prove

extremely useful for those who wish to
minimise their symptoms.





AS high seasonal pollen
counts can affect numerous
types of allergies, from eye
allergies (conjunctivitis) to
skin reactions (dermatitis), the
most common spring allergy
is allergic rhinitis which is also
known as hay fever.



-

The test which can be performed by
ENT, asthma, or allergy practitioner,
examines skin or blood reactions to
common allergens.

ENT/Otorhinolaryngologist Winston
Campbell, said prompt testing is need-
ed because sometimes severe internal
effects associated with various types of
allergies.

Dr Campbell explained: “Allergies
can produce scaly, itchy ear canals trig-
gering the usage of Q-tips, bobby-pins,

tooth-picks etc.

“The end result however, is only fur-
ther wax impaction of the ear canals,
hearing loss and painful ear canal infec-
tions. The inner ear may also be affect-
ed resulting in some variants of
Méniére's disease.”

As he explained, this is a disorder
which develops in the inner ear that
can affect hearing and balance, and is
caused by elevated pressure on the
endolymph.

Another allergy related disorder
according to Dr Campbell is Obstruc-
tive Sleep Apnea (OSA), which can be
triggered by an allergic reaction which
blocks or inflames the upper airway
passages.

Dr Campbell explained: “This
obstruction to nasal breathing may also
have an even greater ripple effect on
energy level, early morning fatigue,
inter-personal marital/family/work rela-
tionships, as well as memory and
reduced attention span (in students and
adults) when it interferes with one’s
ability to get quality, deep, sweet sleep.”

He said this disorder can also lead
to chronic sleep deprivation and sleep
fragmentation, should the individual
forgo medical intervention.

“Of course, in the vast majority of
cases, the effects of allergies on the ear
nose and throat are managed conserv-
atively using oral anti-histamine/decon-
gestants, topical nasal steroids [which
generate minimal to nil systemic side-
effects, and mucolytics,” he said.

Having an allergic reactions to cer-
tain medications or airbourne sub-
stances is a lifetime disorder, but the
likelihood of minimising its effects
depends on a sufferer being diagnosed
and treated, following the advice of
their medical practitioner, and a few
good housekeeping tips.

Some of the common steps include;
dusting your house regularly to avoid
dust buildups, frequently washing your
hands and hair after being in the out-
doors, washing your pets who frequent
the outdoors, installing screens to all
doors and windows in your home, and
choosing a wood or tiled floor for your
home in place of complete carpeting.



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PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ae

Even the best relationships have differences





OST people would
agree that there are
some relationships

that are so harmful and so
destructive that staying in the
union would not be in the best
interest of anyone involved. But
relationships are complex and
often situations and self destruc-
tive cycles have been left to fes-
ter and grow. In the midst of
our busy lives couples often fail
to recognise that they can not
work out their problems alone.
Divorce papers require the tick-
ing of a box to acknowledge
these ‘irreconcilable differ-
ences’. Is this a last ditch effort
to put some sort of label on a
marriage that they felt was too
far gone to salvage? Or is it that
if we choose a partner who is
so different from our culture
and beliefs that the relationship
is doomed to fail? Or is it sim-
pler than that -the other choic-
es to tick do not fit our view of
the reasons why we want a
divorce? But is it not these very

differences and individualism
that is so appealing to our new
love interests at the beginning
of the relationship?

Our unique characteristics,
qualities, eccentricities are what
catches the eye of our new
admirer. We stand out in the
crowd, our eyes lock and a con-
nection is made. During the ear-
ly dating days there is high ener-
gy and the differences are either
ignored or embraced because
of the overpowering sexual ten-
sion. We are more preoccupied
with our intense sexual feelings
and the feelings of love come
about from the longing and sep-
aration from that person. We
are affectionate, attentive, lis-
ten and talk to each other. Cou-
ples inevitably spend a lot of
time touching because it is the
power of touch that attaches
and bonds us to one another.
So what happens then as we set-
tle into the relationship and
become comfortable with each
other? One of the most com-
mon mistakes is that people

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spend too much time and ener-
gy trying to make their partner
be ‘like them’ or they try to ‘fix
them.’ This is a waste of pre-
cious life energy. In time we
come to realise that making
room for differences and to
peacefully coexist is a better use
of both time and energy. We
can only influence people and
each one of us is in charge of
our own thoughts and behav-
ior. Not all situations can be
worked out or in fact need to
be. One of the keys to a suc-
cessful relationship is accepting
and respecting the differences.
Embrace them; enrich your life
instead of trying to eliminate
them. The foundation of a rela-
tionship is the respect, commit-
ment and love for each other.
This may all sound easier said
than done. Our beliefs, percep-
tions and attitudes are often
deeply entrenched and have
been with us for years. Howev-
er things can become easier
when we realise that by shift-
ing our present thoughts, per-

ceptions and attitudes towards
our relationship things can
improve. Negative thoughts
producing harmful and destruc-
tive behavior in the home is
then witnessed by children,
extended family and cowork-
ers. By learning how to chan-
nel your thoughts and then your
behaviour, your relationships
will improve. It takes a lot of
hard work and you may well
question the validity of the
process. It takes the guidance
and careful steering of a rela-
tionship therapist to make these
changes possible. Once you see
an improvement, your life feels
better, is going in the direction
you want it to go, it is then all
worthwhile. Single people with-
out an intimate relationship or
who experience recurring failing
relationships will also benefit
from such guidance. The goal
may be to understand why we
choose the same type of per-
son, or they may be unsatisfying
or destructive. People often feel
defeated when they feel they

It’s

are alone in being willing to do
the work to improve things. It is
possible for one person to take
the first step, to change the
direction of the wheel particu-
larly if both compete against
each other. It is not a sign of
giving in but a sign of courage to
be the one to make the first
move. A relationship involves
two people and the best results
are achieved when both work
together towards a more fulfill-
ing intimate relationship. Great
relationships do not just hap-
pen; they are created.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual
and Couples Relationship Thera-
pist. She is a Registered Nurse and
a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist
located at The Centre for Renewing
Relationships, Grosvenor's Close
West. She can be contacted by
calling 356-7983 or by e-mail at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or at
www.relatebahamas. blogspot.com.
She is available for speaking
engagements.

IT IS now officially spring and we enter a new
phase of our gardening year. The days are slow-
ly growing longer and many plants will be reju-
venating themselves. In colloquial terms we say
the sap is rising, meaning that plants are respond-
ing to their conditions and heading towards doing
what they are supposed to do — propagate them-
selves.

If we take a very simplistic view we arrive at the
conclusion that the meaning of life is to make
new life. A mayfly has an adult life of anywhere
between half an hour and twelve hours. During
that conscious time it does one thing — it mates
and (if female) lays eggs. Job over. Die.

The procreational urge is strong and becomes
overwhelming in spring. We will be seeing many
more flowers in the next few weeks — in our gar-
dens, in the bush — and we must remember that
flowers are the sex organs of plants.

Were you to climb a Himalayan mountain to
consult a saffron-clad mystic — or visit a yurt in
Mongolia to commune with a rancid yak butter-
eating guru about the meaning of life — you may
get a one-word answer.

The increase in plant metabolism brought on by
spring makes it a fine time to take cuttings and to
start air layering in order to propagate many
plants, particularly flowering shrubs.

Vigorous new growth also means the ideal time
to do some judicious pruning. With flowering
shrubs like hibiscus I like to prune one-third of the
shrub laterally, then a few weeks later prune
another third, then finish the job after another few
weeks. By that time the original pruned area
should be flowering and you will have avoided
having a flowerless hibiscus for a month to six
weeks.

On the subject of pruning, if you have kept
some Christmas poinsettias and they are begin-
ning to look woebegone, put them in the ground
in full sun and away from artificial light sources.

——=



BROCCOLI was a disappointing
producer in the garden this winter.

Once they have settled in, prune them drastical-
ly, cutting away about half of the foliage. In a
couple of months’ time prune them again, halfway
above the original pruning points. This pruning
will ensure a bushy plant that will be the envy of
your neighbours when December arrives and the
colourful bracts appear. Do not prune poinsettias
after August as you may cut away material that
forms the bracts.

Our vegetables season pretty well lasts through
autumn, winter and spring. Once summer sets in
we have to choose what we grow very carefully.
Most veggie gardeners take the summer off and
survive on everlasting cherry tomatoes.

I have spoken with many fellow gardeners and
farmers about the vegetable season so far and
many of them had the same problems.

The biggest disappointment of the year was
broccoli. Late autumn and winter gave us cool
weather that you would have thought was ideal
for broccoli. The heads, however, were generally
small. In my own garden my cauliflower formed
rather ugly curds that were still tasty but aes-
thetically less than photogenic. My cabbages were
fine but others

complained of slow and stunted growth. Sweet
peppers had a very slow season with very few
examples of excellence. Eggplants seemed to
flower forever before producing fruit.

In case I have made the season sound a total
disaster I should mention that tomatoes, beans,
chard, English peas, fennel, spring onions, hot
peppers, strawberries and herbs were very pro-
ductive.

Almost to a man (and woman) the older people
are predicting a hotter than usual summer. That
inspires me to get the most out of my vegetable
garden between now and the end of spring and
then see if they are right.

They usually are.
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THE TRIBUNE



BRIDE to be Phaedra Saunders gets her lau =aniile sppiciitn by cakellp artist vendor.

91st Annual Bahamas

FROM page 12

where talking about a bad econ-
omy and so forth. One of the
things that troubled me in par-
ticular is that when the econo-
my goes bad or goes slow, I
don’t like when our leaders
start to talk about tightening
our belt and all the negative
stuff rather than encouraging
people to use their resources
that they have available in
order to get us back on our feet.
Many times you have to rebuild
rather than go tight and this
year the retailers prove that
they have seen the same thing
and the response we got form
the public has been great- espe-
cially from the brides and
grooms to be because they are
eager for this,” Mr Stubbs said.

One of the wedding cake
vendors, Deborah Burrows of
the Cake Box, was excited
about participating in this years
event and brought a few of her
fabulous cakes with her on dis-
play.

“T have been baking almost
all my life and I specialise in
wedding cakes and special occa-
sion extraordinary cakes. This
is my passion and I love it.
When it comes to the details on
the cakes I do a lot of hand
work. With shells, they are indi-
vidually made, dried and air-
brushed, with the gum paste
flowers, each petal, leaf and bud
is made individually. To make
the normal wedding cake, after
baking, would take anywhere
from two to three hours and
some can take longer,” Mrs
Burrows said.

Ms Burrows said if others
want to get into the cake busi-
ness, it takes a lot of training.

“T have trained with Collette
Peters, along with others from
the Food Network, and you
have to find the artists if you
like their work and get the train-
ing. It is a passion because
sometimes when I am working I
forget to eat and before I realize
it, the sun is up. Its not easy
work, but if you have a love for
it then it becomes what you
love,” Mrs Burrows said.

When it comes to the pho-
tographers who attended the
bridal show, Photography by
Fabian, owned by Fabian
Whimms took centre frame.

“T have been doing photog-
raphy for a little over 15 years. I

MODEL showing off Lilac brides-
maid dress by Buttons Formal
Wear.



have had different experiences
with many brides do to the
many different personalities I
have come into contact with.
Some are smaller, bigger, and
so forth. I have only problems
with brides if they have prob-
lems that can arise from the
limo, flowers, makeup and so
forth because it then falls on me
because I know what I want to
do. Time is very important,” Mr
Whimms said.

As a photographer, Mr
Whimms said although this is
his second bridal show, he tries
to educate the brides as best he
could.

“Weddings are a touchy sub-
ject. I try to educate them about
time and how important it is.
Many times the couple may
want certain things, but it would
be difficult to do what they want
in one day. So I try to get my
brides to take even to some of
their photos before or after the
wedding where there is no rush.
Most brides do not want to put
on their full attire after the wed-
ding. I had a couple who took
their photos a month after the
wedding on a Sunday and there
was no pressure. So as a pho-
tographer, I try to do everything
different and focus on different
things,” Mr Whimms said.

The décor at a wedding can
set the stage for any mood the
bride wants to portray, which
allows Victorine Bannister-Col-
lie, general manager of Bahama
Fantasies to work at what she
does best- bringing fantasies to
life.

“T have been in the event
planning business since 1997. I

“For All Your
Printing Needs!”

prefer to use real flowers with
my décor because of the color
schemes you can achieve. There
is nothing like real flowers. You
can get so many colors with
flowers. I read a lot of books
and watch events on television
just to get inspired sometime
and make it my own. I try to
keep current and think outside
the box. I do not call my tables
arrangements, I call them
escapes,” Mrs Collie said.

Mrs Collie said her escapes
are aS unique as her centre
pieces and she tries to please all
of her clients.

“A table scape, using these
live Phalaenopsis orchids can
run into $300 a table. I have
done centerpieces for as high
as $325 try to be as reasonable
as I can with my clients. We do
international themed décor as
well,” Mrs Collie said.

The Bahamas Bridal show
was a complete success with
brides and grooms winning
numerous prizes and surprises
to prepare them for their spe-
cial day. Registered brides and
grooms to be received their
share of over $30,000 in gifts
and prizes donated by partici-
pating exhibitors. A fashion
show was also staged later on in
the day, featuring fabulous wed-
ding and special occasion
gowns, tuxedos, honeymoon
clothing and lingerie for those
brides and grooms to end their
special day. This years Bahamas
Bridal Show was not just a
show, but an all day event ded-
icated to helping young people
fulfill their wedding dreams and
fantasies.

RUBBER STAMP
& PRINTING
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Chesapeake Road

& Arawak Ave.

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TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009, PAGE 9B




MALE model song off white
and maroon tuxedo by Buttons
Formal Wear.

JUNKANOO themed wedding cake af Deborah Burrows of CakeBox
Cakes.

THE BRIDE
and groom
can ride
away in
luxury in
this stylish
vehicle
from Chain
of Events.



















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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





(Coy THE COACH APPROACH

Obstacles or o

What do you see?

IN an environment flooded by fear
and frustration, it may be difficult to
consider that great opportunities exist
just beneath the surface of your chal-
lenges. Hence, many willingly settle
for a small life of discontent; fearing
that this abundant universe is with-
out the essential provisions to sustain
their well-being.

This is the nugget of negative think-
ing that fuels low energy; which mush-
rooms into lack of confidence,
reduced productivity and poor per-
formance on the personal and busi-
ness level.

Thus, you must consistently analyse
your thinking; a critical process that
ought not to be taken lightly. Your
thoughts are the bricks with which
you build your life and they eventual-
ly become the slabs with which we
collectively build our society.

Nation building is not about blocks
and cement; rather, it’s about building

Deets)
Williams



¢ ,
: \
c :
2 :
I ‘ : I
Kelly's currently has the following brides =
; gifts in stock. Please collect your gifts =
= immediately by May 30th, 2009. d
I Uncollected gifts will be returned back to inventory.
7 :
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- Adderley Lanovia D. Gaitor Lesley (Tammy) 5
i Algreen Barbara Deanne Gibson Prenell D. a
y. Ali Denise S. Gilbert Shakera L. I
= Allen Anishka Jaunita Graham Samantha r
: Anderson Samantha T. Gray Kenisha M. “
5 Archer Patrice Green Robynn I. I
* Armbrister Tamu N. Griffin Esther =
I Auberg Melissa D. Grimes Valron S. i
= Beauchand Rolanda Handfield Maryann (Tamika) I
I Bethel Kenya P. Hanna RanelJ. =
| _Bethell Dollene Peaches Heastie Anasieya Chariso I
= — Bonimy Chakita Hinsey Ngaio F. il
I Braithwaite Joan Ingraham Kenya S. z
I Brave Wiselene Johnson Jacklyn S. I
- Brennen Deshon Kemp Nicolette D. -
I Bullard Lashan K. Knowles Kimberley V. =
5 Burrows Nakeisha K. Lamb Vanessa G. i
= Carey Monalisa M. Lees Mayleene N. -
I Cartwright ~Cheyenne M. Lewis Selecia L.C. :
5 Cash Apryll J. Lockhart Lynaire A. 5
* Clarke Deidre A. Sands Jenell L. :
I Cleare Jaminia J. Saunders Psyche T. a
> Collie Pamela L. Sawyer Carina Marie r
I Cooper Angela N.T. Selver Melissa :
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people, one mind at a time.

Small Shift - Big Change

A small shift in your thinking can
make big things happen; but you must
be willing to do the work at resetting
your mind, something few are pre-
pared to do.

I find it odd that despite the daz-
zling opportunities within our Bahama
Islands, admired by many around the
world; the population mindset remains
laced with fear rather than faith;
where the currency of hope is quickly
exchanged for the popularity of
despair.

Little do we understand that fear
only leads to aggression; any steady
diet of negativity slowly shapes who
we become; a fear-driven community,

imprisoned by the barriers of nega-
tive thinking.

This thought may mean very little to
those who have concluded that the
world is coming to a close and that
we are experiencing ‘the last days’.
However, for the souls of tomorrow,
who are awaiting their chance to enjoy
the opportunity of life, we owe it to
them to create a bigger vision of pos-
sibility that impels them towards even
greater achievements.

Until we take the time to reconcile
our thoughts and build our minds, we
will continue to uncover the many
obstacles that we seem so desperately
seeking to find. Shifting from pes-
simism to optimism enables you to
discover endless opportunities that
are right before your eyes.

Final thoughts...

What is most fascinating about the
human mind is that it has infinite
capacity to think, learn and grow. This
understanding reassures that there is
truly nothing to fear; as the entire
kingdom is within, waiting for you to
bring it into expression.

When I consider the magnitude and

majesty of this universe; boundless
and endless, I cannot comprehend how
so many give up on the substance of
life.I believe that that this current
sense of powerlessness is not the result
of people being without power; as
much as it is the result of people being
without understanding.

I cannot imagine a world, where
even the tiniest creature is consistent-
ly provided for, but human kind, who
is made in the image and likeness of
the creator,is without sustenance.

I cannot imagine a world where
there is miscalculation of needs or dis-
regarded desires; a world where well-
ness gives way to illness and wealth is
replaced by poverty.

Such a world, I truly cannot imagine;
but if it does exists, rest assured that it
lives only within your own mind.

For some this may be deemed as
too much optimism; but this is more
than good ole optimism. It is the
absolute certainty that a bountiful life
is always on our side. A philosophy
rooted in the knowledge that we are
the creators of our own reality and
that obstacles are typically the wrap-
ping paper with which opportunities

pportunities

are presented.

This is the world that I know; this is
the world that I see. Now, it’s your
turn; what kind of world do you imag-
ine, what kind of world do you see?

Remember — whenever you ask, it is
always given. Whether you see obsta-
cles or opportunities, you always
receive, encounter or discover what-
ever you seek within your heart and
mind. I encourage you to see the
upside of life; because in truth, that is
all that really exists.

¢ If you are ready to analyse your
thoughts and optimise your mind — join
my upcoming NoExcuses Goals Pro-
gram. Please send an e-mail to
coach4ward@Yahoo.com or call 429-
6770. Call Now To Enter For Free Coach-
ing Opportunity!

Michelle M. Miller is a certified Life-
Coach and Stress Management Consul-
tant. She is the Principal Coach of the
Coaching Studio, which located on
Madeira Street, Palmdale.

Questions or comments can be sent to
P.O. Box CB-13060 — e-mail
coach4ward@yahoo.com

DUANE WILLIAMS: WEDDING COORDINATOR

ee | | | | | | | |





@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Feature
Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

MARRIAGE for many peo-
ple is a time where you have
just one shot to pull off your
dream event for friends and
family.

This task nowadays is hardly
ever a solo project, leading to
the increasing popularity in pro-
fessional wedding planners.

Unlike most people who
walk away from their wedding
to begin life with their new wife
or husband, Duane Williams
realised after getting married
that there was a special talent
she possessed as a wedding
coordinator.

Although a finance major in

ee ee eee

Ten nt tt on ne nn

college, Mrs Williams said her
eventual transition from a desk
job to becoming a wedding
planner took many years of
searching and several career
changes.

“T was watching the televi-
sion one day and came across a
biography about Vera Wang.
They were talking about how
she had done her own wedding
and how elegant it was,” she
said.

After learning of how
involved the famous designer
had become in the whole con-
cept of weddings, she thought of
how heavily she was involved
in her own wedding in making
the invitations, and organising
the entire event.

During that exact moment,
she said she had received a call
from a friend who said she had
recently met a wedding coordi-
nator who had impressed her,
and told her that she could see
her doing the same thing.

Seeing this as a preamble to
her destiny, Mrs Williams said
she soon applied and completed
her wedding consultant certifi-
cation from Weddings Beautiful
- an American based company,
and thus entered the world of
wedding planning.

Mrs Williams said although

she had lost her desk job, she
was determined to succeed in
this new venture, simply
because it was her destiny.

Now five years later, Mrs
Williams continues to watch her
business grow, while taking care
of her husband and young son.

She explained: “Brides tend
to look around a year in
advance for their weddings.
Some of them will even contact
you 30 days before and are nor-
mally not looking for anything
major.”

While most of her clients are
foreigners, she said they tend
to just be as interested in finding
someone to perform their cere-
mony, securing witnesses, and
then getting a boutonniére and
bouquet.

Although those minimal
request have had some impact
on her business, Mrs Williams
said the addition of her new
company’s website www.arose-
unfolding.net, has helped in
promoting her business to peo-
ple who would have otherwise
not known about her.

When she first started her
company, like most new entre-
preneur she said at times that
she wondered if her business
would be successful.

“Tve felt discouraged at

Gretchen & Michael LaBonia

times, but like clock-work
someone would call and ask ‘is
this Rose Unfolding, I want to
find out about what services you
offer.’

“That has been the push for
me, knowing that this is some-
thing that God wants me to do.”

Mrs Williams said in an
industry where it is so easy to be
lost in the sea of the many com-
panies offering similar services,
one thing she has done to stand
out is diversifying her wedding
packages.

Offering a cross section of
pre-arranged or customised
packages, she said from her
experience of once being a
bride, she understands how
important it is to have options,
especially if you’re working with
a limited budget.

As aconsultant, Mrs Williams
also assists brides who are look-
ing for the island wedding expe-
rience.

She said offering elements
like Bahamian music, food,
Androsia, and flowers to a visit-
ing bride goes a long way in sell-
ing what is available locally.

With the help of her husband,
Mrs Williams looks forward to
her company becoming the
agency of choice for persons
planning their weddings.




THE TRIBUNE

man TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

21° Annual Bahamas

BRIDAL

5S H O W

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

ECOR, the perfect dress, flowers,

invitations, party favours, when you

think about it there is a lot of plan-
ning, not to mention the headache and frus-
tration that goes into the wedding planning
experience. The perfect way for a bride to
relive the stress of shopping from store to
store to plan her perfect day is to attend a
bridal show and the 21st Bahamas Bridal
Show, under the theme “Two Hearts, One
Beat” brought together 44 vendors just to
assist the many brides to be that attended
the spectacular event.

ly "
a
s
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i
.





A Bridal show is basically a one stop shop
for all things wedding. Vendors came out with
all the glam and glitter they possibly can to
showcase their products to potential brides and
grooms alike. Makeup artists from Sacha Cos-
metics made a huge
impression on the

brides to be by giv- =
ing free makeup ———
demonstrations.

Florists displayed

their exquisite

arrangements of

7
both silk and real
flowers, photogra-
phers gave shots to ; i
couples as they he
entered the room, r “5 re
and so much more
was made avail-
able to the cou-
ples to offer their
services and
expert advice.

Visiting all
those different
bridal vendors in
one location
made it so much
easier to com-
pare prices and
services and in
turn, to save
the multitude
of young cou-
ples who
Sndiemey. vance of

a ald atti

Executive Buttons Formal Wear. en
producer and
creator of The
Bahamas Bridal Show, Tommy Stubbs, said
although they have been around since 1990,
there has been a lot of time and effort to pull
off such a large scaled event.

“First the bridal show was done to help
launch my company, Buttons Formal wear,
and then we realised we should not only do it
to promote Buttons, but we should involve
other companies that need to do the same
thing. We are now doing this as a partnership
to promote all companies that are involved in
weddings or interested in promoting their
products,” Mr Stubbs said.

Mr Stubbs said although there is usually
more companies participating, he would like
the brides and grooms to be to take away from
the show a lot of fun, memories, prizes and
ideas for their wedding day.

“One of the things was that we usually antici-
pate around 50 vendors but a lot of persons

.
7" .
. a"
.
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.
2



SEE page nine

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