Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

up all night!

McDonald’s downtown

drive-thru is now open

24 hours

GCE Emer rN)

HIGH
LOW

SOF
72F

SUNNY AND

WARM

Volume: 105 No.105

POLICE officers from Nas-
sau were flown to Abaco yes-
terday to assist in investigations
after Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham’s fishing boat was
“tampered with” and believed
used in a theft.

Port
chair
resigns

FREEPORT, Grand
Bahama: Mr Hannes Babak
resumed his position as
chairman of the Board of
Directors of The Grand
Bahama Port Authority,
Limited Friday, as Felix
Stubbs stepped down from
the post that he has held for
the past several months.

Mr Stubbs will continue
as director of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
Board (GBPA).

On Friday GBPA
announced the acceptance
of Mr Stubbs’ resignation.

“Working with the dedi-
cated GBPA team has been
a valuable experience for
me and I hope I was able
to provide a caring and sup-
portive leadership the past
several months,” said Mr
Stubbs. “I believe, however,
that it is in the best interest
of the company for me to
step down as Chairman at
this time. This would allow
for better synergy in the
leadership team and make it
a lot easier to position the
Group of Companies to cre-
ate an environment for
Grand Bahama to realise its
full potential.”

Mr Stubbs said “the
decision was made after
much careful consideration,
but I am comforted by the
fact that the company is in
great hands with its new
leadership and I will con-
tinue to give advice on the
future of the company as a
Director of the Board.”



According to Assistant Com-
missioner Hulan Hanna, the
police are taking this matter
“very seriously.” However, he
could not confirm whether the
Prime Minister’s “run-about”
had been removed from its
moorings and used to commit
a crime.

What the police do know at
this time, however, is that it is
clear that the boat has been
tampered with and the prime
minister is being kept abreast
of developments in the investi-
gation.

However, sources on the
island claim that the 21-foot
Contender was taken from the
marina at Green Turtle Cay and
returned later — only after the
thieves had used it to steal two
Yamaha 250 engines worth
$60,000 from another boat.

The matter came to light
when one of Mr Ingraham’s
fishing companions went to
check the craft only to discover
its deck smeared with oil and
littered with engine parts.

The incident was part of an
alarming growth in boat theft
in the Abaco cays, which is
causing concern among second-
home owners on the islands.

A worried resident of Green
Turtle Cay told The Tribune
yesterday: “Tourists are getting
tired of these thefts, which are
occurring at the rate of about
one-a-night from the Abacos.

“Nearly all the cays off Aba-
co have been affected and we
are beginning to think the boats
are being taken for use in the
drug trade.”

The main targets are twin-
engined 35-foot go-fast boats
worth up to $200,000 apiece.

The boat, from which the
engines were stolen by the
thieves who had taken Mr
Ingraham’s craft, had been
stolen from Green Turtle Cay
three weeks ago.

Because the stolen boat was
fitted with a tracking device, it
was traced to Nassau and
retrieved by its foreign owner.

It was after the boat was
returned to Green Turtle Cay
and hoisted on a lift that thieves
struck a second time, removing

SEE page 8

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009

ail acetals of former cabinet minister James Knowles looks on as friends and colleagues speak about their memories of

FRANZIA

PMS fishing hoa
tampered With

Police probe
if vessel used
for crime act

the late James ‘Jimmy’ Knowles.

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham yesterday remembered
former Member of Parliament and Cabinet Minister James “Jim-
my” Knowles as a “valuable ally and an honourable adversary.”

Paying tribute to the late MP at the funeral service held at
Christ Church Cathedral, Mr Ingraham said:

“We were all aware that our friend and former colleague had
been courageously battling the dreaded disease of cancer for a
number of years now. The last weeks and months were an espe-
cially difficult season in his life but as was typical of him, he
fought valiantly. Still, the passing of Jimmy Knowles at the rela-
tively young age of 66 came as a shock to all of us.”

Mr Ingraham said he knew the deceased for many years, first
as a fellow member of the Bahamas Bar, then as an MP and lat-

Police continuing
probe into alleged

judicial corruption

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police inves-
tigations are still continuing into
alleged complaints of corrup-
tion involving a former Grand
Bahama magistrate, Police
Commissioner Reginald Fergu-
son told The Tribune.

He said investigations start-
ed early last year sometime into
the allegations against the mag-
istrate and other persons at the
Magistrate’s Court in the Gar-
net Levarity Justice Centre in
Freeport.

“We have not turned over
the matter to the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office — it is still in the
police domain and is not yet



completed,” Commissioner Fer-
guson said.

According to reports, the for-
mer magistrate is accused of
allegedly accepting bribes and
was suspended sometime in
June 2007. It is also alleged that
a prosecutor and others in the
court might have been involved
in the alleged corruption,
involving the payments of fines.

The former Grand Bahama
magistrate has filed a legal suit
against another sitting magis-
trate in Freeport claiming that
she caused her emotional and
mental distress and severely
damaged her career and repu-
tation by accusing her of accept-
ing bribes from accused per-
sons.

SEE page 8



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THE PATRON

Spirits COMPANY



Three charged
with stabbing
at Green Parrot

= By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

POLICE have charged three men in connection with a brutal
attack on a 28-year-old man whose neck was sliced open outside

The Green Parrot bar and grill.

But the victim has condemned police for not yet apprehend-

ing all six of his attackers.

He recognised four of the men involved in the incident, which
took place in the car park of the East Bay Street bar and grill at
around 10pm on Friday, March 20.

er as a minister in his Cabinet.

SEE page 8

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

“He had articled with the legendary Sir Stafford Sands, and
throughout his practice of the law, whether with some of the coun-
try’s leading law firms or on his own, he maintained the highest
standards of integrity and trustworthiness,” the prime minister

said.

In the political arena, Mr Knowles “courageously followed his
conscience and was a valuable ally and an honourable adversary.”
Mr Ingraham said that throughout his tenure in Parliament, Mr
Knowles fought continually to improve the condition of his Long

SEE page 8



Attorney: CLICO
premiums safe in
protected account

= By NATARIO MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ALL CLICO premiums paid
since the winding up order was
issued against the insurance
company in late February will
be placed in a separate protect-
ed client fund, an attorney
involved in the case said yes-
terday.

Lawyer Sidney Cambridge,
who represents provisional liq-
uidator Craig Gomez, also told
the court yesterday that the
company that reportedly has
some 23,000 Bahamian police
holders is insolvent and has
more liabilities than assets. He
added that the liquidation of
the company should proceed.
Mr Cambridge told the court
that the provisional liquidator’s



NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

report has been filed and made
available.

He said that his team has
engaged counsel in Trinidad to
file an injunction against the
parent company CL Financial
in order to bar the sale of assets.
He also said that his team has
engaged counsel in Florida
regarding land in that state con-
sidered to be a part of CLICO
Bahamas’ asset pool. Mr Cam-
bridge also told the court that
an agreement has been reached
with regard to the reinsurer con-
tinuing coverage.

The case, which is before
Justice Cheryl Albury, was
adjourned to April 7. The death
knell came for CLICO

SEE page 8



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS
THE FUNERAL OF FORMER MP



AT CHRIST THE KING CHURCH

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial institutions in the
Caribbean. Through our Business Area Wealth Management International we look
after wealthy private clients by providing them with comprehensive, value
enhancing services. Our client advisors combine strong personal relationships with
the resources that are available from across UBS, helping them provide a full
range of wealth management services.

In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we are looking to fill the following
position:

Human Resources Manager

The main responsibilities of the position holder include:

" Define and manage strategic plans in connection with, Compensation & Benefits, Recruitment,
Training & Development, Employee Relations and International Assignment Services.
Serve as advisor to management, local employees and International Assignees on relevant HR
polices and procedures.
Recruit managerial and non-managerial staff (locally and internationally).
Develop, review and execute HR processes and policies.
Supervise a small team.
Liaise and negotiate with internal specialists and external service providers.

In order to satisfy our requirements the applicants must possess:

Minimum five years experience in a comparable Human Resources Management position with a
leading global company (preferably in the banking industry).

Solid international experience in a very diverse, complex and dynamic environment.

Bachelor’s degree in a relevant discipline from a recognized and accredited educational institu-
tion.

Proven track record as manager, leader and team player.

Proven track record as a presenter and coach.

Capability to successfully build up and foster relationships and networks.

Excellent communication, presentation and coaching skills.

Sound knowledge of MS Office and HR software applications.








PRIME Minister Huburt Ingraham shared some of his
memory of James Knowles yesterday during the ser-
vice at Christ Church Cathedral.

Please send your resume, on or before April 1st, 2009 to
hrbahamas@ubs.com

or

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd., Human Resources, P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas

It starts with you.



CHRISTIAN Knowles the nephew of the late James MEMBERS of parliment and the Senate all attended the
Knowles speaks at the funeral. funeral servive of James Knowles.

RSBBOAL YARD

pat ea 8

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Rising sea level could
threaten Bahama islands



Family of murdered —
man still await justice

GRIEVING relatives of Deron ‘Sharky’ Bethel are still wait- }
ing for justice three years to the day after he was shot dead i

while sitting in his car.
His tearful mother, Diana Bethel, told The Tribune yesterday:

“Tt is still very painful. I cry every day because I miss my boy so

much.”

Deron, 20, was shot while waiting outside his home in
Pinewood Gardens. A police officer was later charged with his

murder.

However, three years on, a court date has not yet been set for i

a Supreme Court hearing.

Mrs Bethel said: “We have no indication at all of a court date. }

The family is still grieving and we are still waiting for justice three
years after Deron died.”

Eyewitnesses swore affidavits following Deron’s death claim- :

ing he was shot by an off-duty policeman who had arrived outside

his home to investigate a domestic dispute in a neighbouring :

house.

They said police killed a totally innocent man thinking he was

someone else.

At Deron’s funeral in April, 2006, placard protesters marched

to Lakeview Memorial Gardens demanding “no cover-up.”

The Attorney General’s Office is now awaiting depositions i
from the magistrates court hearing to determine how they will
proceed with the case in the Supreme Court, an official said

yesterday.

But no indication was given about when the next hearing will

take place.

Man shot several times at
his home in Johnson Park

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A JOHNSON Park man was shot several times by a late-

night visitor who confronted him at his home before opening fire.

The 26-year-old victim heard a knock at his front door some
time after 10pm on Thursday. When he opened the door, he }
was confronted by a man with whom he had a disagreement }
earlier, press liaison officer Assistant Superintendent Walter i

Evans said.

During the confrontation, the visitor drew a handgun and

shot him several times.

The victim was taken to hospital where he is listed in serious

condition.

Police are also actively investigating the brazen armed robbery i

of a 55-year-old West Bay Street resident.

According to ASP Evans, the man was at his home with a
relative when a cutlass wielding bandit burst through the front :

door and demanded cash sometime after 10pm on Thursday.

The robber was able to make off with a small amount of cash
before fleeing, heading in an unknown direction, ASP Evans i

said.
Investigations into both incidents continue.

13-year-old girl seriously

injured in car crash

mg By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 13-year-old girl was airlifted to New Provi-
dence on Thursday morning with serious injuries following a :

traffic accident.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle reported that the accident
occurred at the intersection of Dominica Avenue and Swordfish :
Street, involving two vehicles — a 1998 Volvo and a 2000 Hyundai

Accent.

According to reports, Evelyn Pinder, 43, was driving the Vol-
vo heading south on Swordfish Street when her vehicle collided
with the Hyundai, which was being driven by 33-year-old Tiffany

Marshall.

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THREE of the Bahamas’
major landmasses — Abaco,
Andros and Grand Bahama —
will be either totally or partially
flooded if there is a one metre
sea level rise, according to the
director of the Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technol-
ogy Commission.

This warning comes as four
of the world’s top climate sci-
entists have revealed new data
indicating that oceans are
expected to rise as much as a
metre or more by 2100 — twice
as fast as predicted by the Unit-
ed Nations just two years ago.

The scientists, speaking at a
press conference in Copen-
hagen earlier this month, said
millions face displacement as
low-lying countries could see
large parts of their surface areas
vanish.

Considered by international
bodies to be among those coun-

tries most vulnerable to sea lev-
el rise, the Maldives recently
announced it is preparing to buy
new land in other countries so
that its population will have
somewhere to go when its pic-
turesque atolls are engulfed by
rising seas.

The islands, located in the
Indian Ocean with a population
of 385,000, are already in the
process of constructing new arti-
ficial islands for the same pur-
pose.

Eighty per cent of the coun-
try’s landmass is only one metre
above sea level — just like the
Bahamas.

Yesterday Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technol-
ogy (BEST) Commission direc-
tor Phillip Weech said the
Bahamas is not planning to
resort to such “extreme scenar-
10s” as the Maldives in response
to climate change but is also
preparing for an “uncertain
future”.

He suggested the Bahamas has
enough land well above sea lev-

el to accommodate displaced
inhabitants if certain islands were
to be submerged.

However, Mr Weech added
that the “scenarios that have
been mentioned by the Mal-
dives are in many cases very
similar to ours.”

“We are preparing in a similar
way to deal with energy security,
our green house gas footprint
and preparing for an uncertain
future.

“This is why we have prepared
our first national communication
(to the United Nations Frame-
work Convention on Climate
Change) and why we are now
working on a second national
communication.

“Tt’s why we are now working
with regard to a national energy
policy and on diversity and the
preservation of our natural land-
scape, as well as on issues related
to the Caribbean Challenge
where we are trying to set aside
parks and protected areas.”

“The best way of adapting to a
rising sea level is to keep coastal

Bahamas may have to offer
Europe more under EPA

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas may have to
offer up a wider portion of the
country's services schedule to the
European Union under the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
than initially proposed.

Minister of State for Finance
Zhirvargo Laing told The Tribune
yesterday that government
intends to meet with the
Caribbean Regional Negotiating
Machinery (CRNM) next month
to discuss the EU's observations
on the schedule that the Bahamas
submitted to the CRNM for
review earlier this year.

While he declined to get into
the specifics of those comments,
he said they relate to whether or
not the Bahamas is prepared to
offer a larger portion of the ser-
vices schedule to the EU.

"We are having some discus-
sions with them at the moment
about the services (schedule). We
expect perhaps to have a meet-
ing some time in April. So the dis-
cussions are ongoing.

"They have provided us with
some comments from the EU
about it and we've responded to
those comments so just we're dis-

cussing, finalising the documents
with them.

"The comments relate to some
questions they might have asked
about whether we are prepared
to be offer more in this area or
the other area and that's stan-
dard,” Mr Laing, who was out of
the country, said in a brief tele-
phone interview yesterday.

When asked if the country was
prepared to liberalise a greater
portion of its trade in services to
the EU, Mr Laing replied: "We
are in discussions with them — we
thought that we made the offer
that we want to make”.

The government has said that
after the review, it plans to submit
another services schedule to the
EU by the April 15 deadline for
inclusion in the Annexes of the
Agreement.

The services schedule repre-
sents the offer that the Bahamas
has made to the EU and CARI-
COM under the EPA with respect
to trade and services, according
to the Ministry of Finance. The
Bahamas signed the goods only
portion of the EPA on October
16, 2008 and was given a six-month
extension to submit its services
schedule.

Asa country with “Most Devel-
oped Country” status in CARI-

Man wanted in connection
with rape and armed robbery

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

FORUM, the Bahamas has pro-
posed liberalising trade in 83 per
cent of its 155 services industries.
The EPA is a trade agreement
that allows more open trade in
both goods and services between
CARIFORUM countries and the
European Community.

defences intact and the decisions
this government has made to
establish marine protected
reserves across the Bahamas will
do some of that,” he said.

Meanwhile, a critical moment
is approaching in the climate
change debate — the UN Climate
Change Conference in Copen-
hagen in December.

Many countries are hoping a
new global deal on cutting car-
bon emissions can be reached at
the conference, described by
many as the last chance the
world may have to avert the
most dangerous consequences
of climate change.

Via the Alliance of Small
Island States, which consists of
49 countries, the Bahamas is
“making sure its issues are on
the table” in the international
negotiating process, said Mr
Weech.

“The approach has to be to
do what we can do, as well as
what we can encourage the
developing countries to do,” he
said.



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ASP Bootle said Chauma Barrett, 13, was a passenger in Mar-

shall’s vehicle.

He said all three persons were injured and taken to Rand

Memorial Hospital for treatment. Due to the severity of Barrett’s i
injuries, she was later airlifted to the Princess Margaret Hospital. :

Man crushed by truck identified

THE man who died in a
gruesome collision between
a scooter and a dumptruck
has been identified as 33-
year-old Peter Knowles.

The incident occurred at
the junction of Prospect
Ridge and John F Kennedy
Drive on Thursday and held
up traffic for over an hour as
police cleared up the scene.

According to an eyewitness
who was in a car stopped
behind the Mack truck which
rolled over the driver of the
silver scooter, the victim
pulled up on the right-hand
side of the dumptruck as it
signalled to turn right on to
John F Kennedy Drive at
around 10.55am.

As the dumptruck pulled
off to make the turn, the dri-
ver said she was engulfed ina
cloud of dust which, when it

cleared, revealed the body of
what she soon realised was }
the driver of the scooter lying ;

in the road.

The motorbike itself was
trapped under the front of the
stopped :

truck, which
moments later.

According to those on the }
scene, the driver of the truck :
would have been unable to }
see the moped, which was }
located on the opposite side }

to the truck’s driver.

“Shaken up” by the inci-
dent, the truck driver was tak-

en to hospital by ambulance.










FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE

Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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Me eC ey
322-2157

To advertise ALL your

LEGAL NOTICES

call The Tribune’s Sales Department

502-2394



Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police have
issued an all-points bulletin for a
27-year-old Grand Bahama man
who is wanted for questioning in
connection with a rape and armed
robbery.

A wanted poster for Renaldo
Nekito Javarr Kemp, also known
as “Blue”, was officially released
by police on Thursday

His last known address is 45
Starlane Drive, Nassau East, New
Providence, and Grand Bahama.

Kemp is of “dark complexion, has brown eyes and short
crinkly hair.” He is about five feet, nine inches tall, of medi-
um built and weighs approximately 210lbs.

He is considered armed and dangerous and should be
approached with caution. Anyone with information con-
cerning this individual is asked to contact police at 352-1919,
351-9111, 351-9991, 352-8351, 352-9076, and 350-3125 or, 911.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
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WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Pendulum swings to financial

WASHINGTON (AP) — Capitalism can't
always be trusted. If you're too big to fail, you're
too big to make all your own decisions, accord-
ing to the emerging view in Washington.

Three decades after Ronald Reagan
launched a determined campaign to ease gov-
ernment regulations on business, the pendu-
lum is swinging the other way.

Riding a wave of public anger over Wall
Street greed and government bailouts, the Oba-
ma administration on Thursday unveiled a far-
reaching plan for "better, tougher, smarter"
rules over big financial companies. The plan
would crack down on major — but now lightly
regulated — players such as hedge funds and
traders of exotic financial products.

The administration is also pressing for clos-
er international coordination. Allies want the
USS. to get tougher, and the new plan will give
President Barack Obama something to show
when he goes to London next week for an eco-
nomic summit of 20 major and developing
nations.

Most of what Obama is seeking, including a
new regulator to oversee the entire financial
system, will require legislation. With the level of
angst in the country as high as it is, it seems
likely he will get at least some of the changes
through the Democratic-controlled Congress.

Even administration critics acknowledge
there needs to be more financial regulation to
avoid any repeat of the kind of meltdown that
has plunged much of the globe into painful
recession. Few would argue that it's a good idea
to allow sprawling financial conglomerates to be
able to shop for their own regulator — pretty
much what bailed-out insurer American Inter-
national Group did.

But there is also fear of going too far and
suppressing the entrepreneurial spirit that is
part of the nation's free-market heritage. The
pendulum had been swinging against tough reg-
ulation until recently. Although President Jim-
my Carter began deregulation efforts in the
late 1970s, focusing on airlines, trucking, rail-
roads and natural gas, Reagan popularized the
idea as a major government goal. He imposed a
moratorium on all new federal regulation
enforcement upon taking office.

President Bill Clinton continued the process,
signing legislation ending the 1930s-era barrier
between banks and investment and insurance
companies, but without subjecting those non-
bank institutions to the rules that apply to banks.

In the midst of the current crisis, Sen. Judd
Gregg, R-N.H., still says the government needs

to not over regulate “to the point where we
wipe out one of our great advantages as a
nation, which is that we had folks willing to put
money up for people willing to take risks and try
to create jobs.”

Paul C. Light, a professor of public service at
New York University, noted that complex
investment products known as derivatives,
including mortgage-backed securities, "were
once seen as a great innovation and widely cel-
ebrated." Their implosion set off the global
financial meltdown.

"We want more transparency but we want, at
the same time, to protect innovative ideas.
Everyone's so angry. What the public wants is a
radical pendulum swing toward the tightest reg-
ulation. We just have to be careful that we don't
overdo it," Light said.

Supporters of more regulation say they don't
want to squelch American entrepreneurship.

"Obviously, no system is going to prevent all
failures, because it would then be too restric-
tive," said House Financial Services Committee
Chairman Barney Frank, D-Mass. The goal is to
minimize the likelihood that big financial enti-
ties will get so heavily indebted “that their lack
of success threatens the whole system," he said.

The proposals announced on Thursday,
designed to limit risk-taking, are "a good start to
a long process," said White House spokesman
Robert Gibbs.

Still, Washington always addresses the sins of
the past, tries to solve old problems and doesn't
have a crystal ball to deal with the future.

Whatever the rules, someone tries to come
up with ways to slip around them, sometimes
with Washington's help.

Remember: Brooksley E. Born, former
chairwoman of the Commodity Futures Trading
Commission, tried in 1997 to impose greater
federal rules on derivatives. She was fiercely
opposed by Alan Greenspan, then the Federal
Reserve chairman, and by Robert Rubin, Pres-
ident Bill Clinton's treasury secretary.

Rubin, now an outside adviser to Obama,
says he favours regulating derivatives, particu-
larly increasing reserves against potential loss-
es, but saw no way of doing so while serving as
treasury secretary.

Greenspan calls the current downturn a
"once in a century” financial crisis. He says the
problem wasn't with the derivative contracts
but with the greed of the people who dealt in
them.

(This article was written by Tom Raum of the
Associated Press).



Recession
fixes bad
investment

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The theory is that in any busi-
ness expansion, there will be
people who make unwise
investments. There will always
be people who are too opti-
mistic, too confident in their
own forecasts, or who simply
misread shifts in people’s tastes.
If there's only a little bad invest-
ment, it can be cleaned up by
the people who made it. The
Bahamian contractors who
bought a new backhoe, Gov-
ernment and private sector
plans to build more homes
would mean that his business
could only go up, may find that
the housing downturn has made
it tough for many of his cus-
tomers to get the home loan
they need to pay for a new
house. If nothing else goes
wrong, he can probably work
his way out of the problem —
lower profits while he pays off
the under-used backhoe, but
not a business failure.

Inflation always causes bad
investments because inflation
fools people into thinking that
things are going especially well.
Businesses see a surge in busi-
nesses, which prompts them to
expand. When it turns out that
the surge was all illusion (they
were getting more dollars, but
the dollars were worth less),
they’ve already committed to
an expansion that has no future.

Government spending pro-
duces bad investment a well, as
businesses gear up to produce
whatever the government is
buying today. It’s obviously not
the best use for the investment
(or you wouldn't need govern-
ment spending to support it),
plus it’s highly vulnerable to

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



being a very bad investment, if
government priorities change.
When there’s a lot of bad
investments, though, it’s not so
easy to fix. A company that has
borrowed to expand, but does-
n’t get enough business to ser-
vice the new debt, is in trouble.
Even businesses that aren’t in
debt can shut in a downturn. If
business gets bad enough, it’s
cheaper to just close the doors
than to pay to keep the place
staffed and the lights turned on.
The key here, though, is that
an investment is only bad
investment if the price is too
high. That is, the contractors
extra backhoe may be a lousy
investment at $100,000, but if
someone else can pick it up at a
liquidation sale for $50,000, that
might not be a bad investment
at all. So, the thrust of this
thread is that recessions are how
bad investment gets worked out
of the economy. Some busi-
nesses go under, others sell off
under performing pieces. The
result is an economy where pro-
ductive assets are reallocated
to where they can be used prof-
itably — at which point the
stage is set for a sound recovery.
If the government heads off the
recession, by cutting interest
rates too aggressively, or by
buying whatever it is that isn’t
being bought, the bad invest-
ment goes uncorrected, leaving
potentially productive assets in
the hands of people who can’t
use them to their best effect,
while leaving other people (who

could use them) unable to
thrive.

Can the government help?

People on both sides of the
issue see that government
action leads generally to bad
investment. For the people who
advocate for the government
trying to help, that’s unavoid-
able — and simply needs to be
dealt with by more government
action. For the people who
advocate against, it’s a reason
for the government to do as lit-
tle as possible.

As to whether governments
can help in a recession, the
answer clearly depends on
where you stand. Cutting inter-
est rates is great for people who
have variable-rate debt (or
would like to), but it sucks for
people who have cash. Higher
government spending is all well
and good for people who build
roads or grow corn, but does-
n’t mean much for the guy who
runs a restaurant or works at a
hotel (except, eventually, high-
er taxes).

In the end, the people who
are helped are very specific and
very aware of the help, while
others are either not harmed,
or are harmed only in a diffuse,
general way (along with every-
one else). The result is that the
political pressure always tends
to be on the side of more help.
Whether it helps the economy
or not, it definitely helps the
people who get it, and that's
enough for the politicians to
keep at it. Think about it!

FRANKLYN

¢ 2—D oO OM 9
MUNROE
Nassau,

March 24, 2009.

We all have a role to play

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Tam extremely grateful for this
opportunity to express my views
on “The role of the government
and its citizens” in your illustrious
newspaper. It is my hope that by
reading this article there will be a
movement towards improvement
within our country.

What is a nation without its
government? What is a govern-
ment without its citizens? Plato, a
famous Greek philosopher who
wrote “the Republic,” often
referred to the governing body
as the guardian and the civilians
as the producers. In this piece I
will portray the guardian as the
law makers and rulers of our
country, while depicting the pro-
ducers as the ones who work and

support our local government.
The purpose of this article is to
convey that the government has a
role to demonstrate guardianship
over the producers of a given
community, while the civilians
must execute its role as the sup-
porters of this regime.

As guardians, the government
should watch over, protect and
care for its local citizens (the pro-
ducers). It is the guardian’s duty
to provide proper healthcare for a
society, create jobs, ensure the
stabilisation of an economy, pro-
mote entrepreneurship, provide
proper infrastructural develop-
ment, as well as establish the best
educational tools and mechanisms
for its civilians. The government
should also meet the safety needs
of a community; it should control

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and aim to reduce crime rates.
Moreover, it is the responsibility
of the government to maintain a
competitive advantage as it
relates to its industries such as
tourism, banking and agriculture.
The government should also
make certain that a community
is taking the correct actions
toward becoming a more global
society, while ensuring that its
cultural identity is kept intact.

As producers we too must play
a role not only in working to
develop ourselves, but also to
develop our nation. While it is
essential to support our local hier-
archy, we as citizens have an
obligation to hold the government
accountable to their duties and
promises in this democracy. We
can not sit back and watch the
world revolve and evolve around
us. We must continuously find
ways to contribute and give back
to our community in order to
increase our local standards and
improve the ways in which the
world views us. We must promote
a strategy that provides service
to our country selflessly. In this
way, we will continually provide a
means to enhance our nation.

Remember Bahamas, although
we must hold the government
accountable to its role, we can
not blame every flaw and mishap
of our society on the government.
As residents of this nation we
must be held responsible for a
role as contributors, but also as
doers and proactive supporters
of the law. We can not expect to
have a better country yet despise
and in some cases retaliate on the
government for enforcing the law.
We cannot expect a jurisdiction
that enforces justice, but quietly
seek favours that promote a sys-
tem of injustice.

While I believe that there is no
“ideal society,” there are pro-
gressing societies. These are soci-
eties that under the management
of the government and support
and labour of its citizens, strive
for excellence in healthcare, edu-
cation, the economy, infrastruc-
tural development and law. It is
vital that as residents and citizens
of the Bahamas we understand
that as a nation there is a two-
part act to be played; the govern-
ment as the guardians and the cit-
izens as the producers. Nonethe-
less, in order to have a powerful
nation the formula requires that
the roles of the government and
the citizens are clearly and effec-
tively met.

WEL’ANDRA

AR FRANCIS,

BS, MBA

Nassau, March, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009, PAGE 5



Bahamian gaming industry needs

to enhance its competitiveness



@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

"Iso vex 'cause I call da }

Central Bank for dem to help

dis old woman find her

deceased husband's 'dormant'

money who for an incredible
45 years told her, like plenty
Bahamian men, dat they ain’t

gats no bank account. Once

da Central Bank certifies dem }
I figure dey can pulldaname :
in dey big computer but dey }
refuse and say she has to go }
to all a dem other banks to }

look for dis money.

"Aint no wonda dey is now :
have all dis $40 million dor- :
mant of poor people money }
dat dem now deceased men }
hide from dey wives an chil- }

dren and others. Poor people

really does catch hell scrap-
ping for pennies while da rest
seems to get way wid mil-

lions.”
- DA BUCK STOPS DERE

"We all are wex down here }

in da south of da island!

Twice a day dat noisy
Bahamasair done lift off from
da airport an’ make one quick

right turn toward Miami and
that brings all kinda noise an’
rattlin’ goin’ on in da house

dem below! Seven in da :
morning and the same that }

night.
"On Sunday morning the

day of rest after a long night's
work, all I hear is :

‘brrroooom' overhead like

one race track! How come all :
adem (other airliner) jets go ;
further out before makin’ that :

turn an’ they sound so good

compared to that old noise :
maker! We asking dem con- :
trollers keep Bahamasair out }
there over da ocean for a few :

miles more!"

— SHAKE, RATTLE N' ROLL

"I wonder if there is any- i
one else who finds this to be }
annoyingly unprofessional. I }
needed to do some business }
with BTC in the mall, the }
closest place to me from
where I work, so I called to }
find out what time they }
closed. I was told 5.30pm. I;
arrived at BTC mall location }
at 5.25pm to find a closed sign
on the receptionist desk sol
told the lady that it was not }
quite 5.30pm and I had been }

trying to get something sorted
out for a while with them,

only to be told they stop tak-

ing customers at 5.20pm.
"Another incident, I speed

from work to (a shoe store) in
Palmdale almost five days

back to back only to find

them closed each time I got
there at approximately :
5.25pm so I called them to }

find out what time they closed

and was told 5.30pm. I pro-
ceeded to tell the person on }

the phone what happened.

‘Oh! We close the door a few

minutes early,’ she said.
"Do these people not see

the inconvenience of incor- :
rect information or do they }
just not care? Put up a cor- ;
rect sign and when customers
call tell them the truth so they
can plan accordingly. This is :

just another form of the bad

service Bahamians thought-

lessly give.”

"I vex at dem idiot tour car }
drivers that crawl down West
Bay with a string of irate dri- }
vers behind, all trying to get }

pass. What, are they blind,

don’t care less, or jus' plain }

stupid? I know dey gat a job

to do, but what does it take to :
pull over every couple min- }
utes to let the other folks pass

safely!
"For Pete (and Mike) sake,

use your eyes and your brain }

if you gat any!!"

TROPICAL
ars pel

eee
PHONE: 322-2157



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

THIS year’s tourism budget already
includes provisions for legislative
changes that may be need to be enacted
to enhance the competitiveness of the
Bahamian gaming industry, said the
Minister of Tourism.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said he
is “looking forward to” receiving input
from the casino association on how the
industry can be urgently updated to
keep enticing tourists.

On Thursday president of the
Bahamas Hotel Association Robert
Sands said the Bahamian industry is “in
the dark ages”, operating in a frame-
work set up 40 years ago.

new legislation proposed in Florida to
massively expand gaming in that state
could have a “dramatic impact” on the
attractiveness of the Bahamas as a des-
tination for gamblers.

And he said “time is of the essence”
when it comes to the government react-
ing to recommendations from industry
stakeholders.

Yesterday Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said: “We’ve been talking about this
since months ago and we have been
awaiting the input from the Casino
Association.

“Certainly in defining our budget for
this year, including budgeting for items
we also wanted to take a look at all of
the legislative changes that would have
to be made if any to make us more com-
petitive and also bring us up to the lev-
el of competition that’s all around us.”

umentation from the Casino Associa-
tion about the needed changes, adding
that it is “something I’m looking for-
ward to.”

On Wednesday the Florida Senate
Regulated Industries Committee
approved two new bills which will,
among other things, lower the legal
gambling age from 21 to 18, allow Hard
Rock Cafes to be turned into full-blown
casinos, provide tax breaks for “raci-
no” dog and horse tracks, as well as
increasing the variety of table games
and slot-type machines permitted.

Mr Sands said the time has come for
the industry to be “really proactive
agents” for the changes required to keep
the Bahamas competitive.

“We believe that we must be pro-
gressive and be prepared for radical
change in our gaming industry if it’s

= TNT

-MIKET :

Echoing the sentiments of US com-
mentators, he expressed concern that

Man appeals multi-billion |



dollar lawsuit against NIB

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN who is seeking the
liquidation of the National
Insurance Board over his claim
for a multi-billion dollar settle-
ment has filed an appeal against
a judge’s ruling which dismissed
his petition on the grounds that
it was “frivolous and vexa-
tious.”

Anthony Wright of Freeport,
Grand Bahama claims that the
National Insurance Board nev-
er properly paid him for an on-
the-job injury almost 30 years
ago.

Mr Wright, who filed the
“wind-up” petition in March of
last year, contends that NIB
owes him billions of dollars in
back-pay, medical bills and set-
tlement money after a 1982 acci-
dent on the premises of his for-
mer job with Franklyn Chemi-
cals in Grand Bahama. Mr
Wright claimed that he suffered

a fall which left him with a rup- |
tured disc and damage to the :

soft tissue of his back.

In a ruling on the matter on }
February 19, Senior Justice John i
Lyons stated: “Clearly the }
amounts claimed by the peti- }
tioner bear no semblance of real- i
ity. It appears that he just i
plucked the figures out of the

sky and put them in his petition.”

In his ruling Justice Lyons also :
stated that the entity could only :

be dissolved by parliament,

which “created it by statute in

the first place.”

Mr Wright is now seeking an
order from the Court of Appeal }

granting the wind-up order,

essentially setting aside Justice i
Lyons’ ruling. Mr Wright intends
to rely on 10 grounds of appeal.
He is contending that the }
Supreme Court did not have the
power to refuse the winding-up
order, dismiss the petition or i
award costs against him. No date }
has been set for the hearing of

the appeal.

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160

ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR
SCREENED ROOM

ALUMINUM CAR PORT
Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said he has
been informed that he will receive doc-

going to continue to survive in this par-
ticular market place,” he added.



Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo

UNITED States Embassy clients no longer have to stand in long queues
without protection from the elements thanks to the construction of covered
seating by the Ministry of Public Works and Transport.

Works Minister Neko Grant along with Permanent Secretary Colin Higgs
visited the US Embassy on Thursday, March 26, 2009 to view the recently
completed shed and seating. Mr Grant expressed satisfaction with the con-
struction. Pictured is the minister chatting with clients as they make use of
the new facilities.





























PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Ross University to participate in the

to broaden ties in
culture, education
and technology

THE Bahamas and the
Republic of India pledged to }
strengthen their diplomatic }
relationship in the areas of
culture, technology and eco- }

nomic development.

This commitment was }
expressed as Governor Gen- }
eral Arthur Hanna accepted }
Letters of Commission from }
Mohinder Grover, High }
Commissioner of the Repub- }
lic of India to the Bahamas, }
during a ceremony at Gov- }
ernment House on Thursday. }
Commissioner }
Grover acknowledged that }
both countries share common
linkages in history, parlia-
mentary democracy, mem- }
bership of the Common- }
wealth and the English lan- }
the }
Bahamas, isa member of the
Group of 77, Group of 15 and
the Non-Alignment Move- }

High

guage. India, like

ment.

“Both are developing coun- }
tries, share similar concerns }
and common aspirations for }
accelerated economic growth, }
eradication of poverty, }
improvement in the quality
of life of our people and pro-

motion of equity,” he said.

The High Commissioner }
further pledged cooperation }
in the solar energy sector, to }
organise training programmes
and pursue cooperation in the }
IT sector on the basis of spe- i
cific details to be provided by }
the Bahamas on the ‘Hole in
the Wall Education Limited }

Project’? (HIWEL).

The Bahamas and India
share a wide base of linkages }
founded on common aspects

Ricardo P Deveaux to receive honorary doctorate at Bethune-Cookman University

of history, the Governor Gen-
eral said, adding that the
diplomatic relations that have
followed have consolidated
common understanding.

“The Bahamas values the }
cordial relations between our
two countries and looks for-
to continuing to }
strengthen our friendly rela- }

ward

tionship,” he said.

“As members of the global i
community with many of the }
same development chal- }
lenges, our two countries }
share the highest aspirations
and dedication to the devel- }
opment and protection of our }
world and societies,” the Gov- }
ernor General said. “The }
multilateral fora in which we }
both participate bring us }
together in a joint commit- }
ment to ensure that our goals }

come to fruition.”

=

It’s






Get

Time to

Connected â„¢

THE entire Grand Bahama
community is once again invit-
ed to take part in the fourth
annual Grand Bahama Health
Expo.

The event is set to be held
at the Shiloh Seventh Day
Adventist Church grounds on
Sunday, March 29 from
11.30am to 6pm.

The Shiloh SDA Church
Health Department is hosting
the expo in conjunction with
the Ross University School of
Medicine under the theme,
"Your Health and You". The
event is entirely free.

Keynote speaker at the event
will be the administrator of the
Rand Memorial Hospital,
Sharon Williams and guest
speakers will be Dr Tamara
Burke-Moree and Dr Alvira
Higgs.

There will be vegetarian dish-
es, blood pressure screening,
blood glucose screening, den-
tal exams, a kids corner, eye
and ear testing, cholesterol test-
ing, weight and health assess-
ments and more.

Alexys Bell, health ministries
director at Shiloh Church, said:
“We are so pleased to be work-
ing alongside Ross University
students for our fourth annual
health expo. We hope the com-
munity will take advantage of
this wonderful opportunity to
learn more about their own
health.”

Ross University medical stu-
dent and vice president of their
Student Government Associa-
tion, Timothy Yu said, "Com-
munity service and health edu-
cation are the core reasons that
inspired many of Ross students

























7 |
Ricardo Deveaux



4th Annual Grand Bahama Health Expo

m By LINDSAY THOMPSON :

Robbin Whachell/Photo

PART of the Grand Bahama Health Expo organising team on the grounds of the Shiloh SDA Church, where the 4th Annual Health Expo will take
place. Left to right: Daniel Lowe, Shiloh Church elder; Erin James, Ross University SNMA Club president; Timothy Yu, Ross University vice
president of the Student Government Association; Dr McMillan of Shiloh Church; Alexys Bell, health ministries director at Shiloh Church.

to pursue a career in medicine.
This partnership with Shiloh
Seventh Day Adventist Church
is the first of many opportuni-
ties for Ross University School
of Medicine students to
strengthen the Bahamian
healthcare community. At this
health fair we are focusing on
essential topics including hyper-

DAYTONA BEACH -A
Bahamian is one of two men to
be awarded honorary doctorates
by a Florida university, it was
announced yesterday.

On Saturday, May 9, Bethune-
Cookman University (B-CU) will
welcome two distinguished alum-
ni back to campus as participants
in the University’s 2009 com-
mencement ceremony.

Ricardo P Deveaux, a 1990
graduate and now senior assis-
tant secretary in the Bahamas
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture; and Lee Rhyant, a 1972
graduate and now executive vice
president and general manager
for the Marietta, Ga, facility of
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics
Company and a B-CU Trustee,
will both receive the honorary
degree of Doctor of Humane
Letters. Mr Deveaux will give the
commencement address.





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Foseieey Theo ! hoo
Panton Fl he Fe

Frakes yer | a 7



PoraHTe |
Pak Tir
Péed USgrece 5 Sagkee Teer

SPertigy |e Fie oe i, in eee (beg oe”
Puli . HL Modes, = scons, a aid = lee Pea

tension, diabetes, eye and ear
health, and breast cancer
awareness. We are very excited
about this event and we encour-
age families and singles of all
ages to come by for this fun and
educational expo, as we con-
tinue to strive to build and part-
ner with our new community.”

The Shiloh church is located

“Tt is my great honour to wel-
come these two distinguished
alumni back to Bethune-Cook-
man University. Mr Deveaux and
Mr Rhyant represent the kind of
excellence that we seek to devel-
op in our students — profession-
alism, leadership and a commit-
ment to serving the community.
In these challenging times, our
graduating seniors will benefit
greatly from the advice and wis-
dom Mr Deveaux will provide in
his remarks,” said B-CU presi-
dent Trudie Kibbe Reed.

As part of his official govern-
ment duties, Mr Deveaux man-
ages a $1 million grant pro-
gramme that assists young
Bahamian entrepreneurs in
establishing or expanding their
small businesses.

He also is the president and
CEO of the Bahamas Primary
School Student of the Year Foun-








ero | Lary

on Torcross Road next to the
Grand Bahama Academy and
close to Maurice Moore Pri-
mary School.

Ross University was founded
in 1978 and is a provider of
medical and veterinary educa-
tion offering doctor of medi-
cine and doctor of veterinary
medicine degree programmes.

dation, a non-profit foundation
established to recognise out-
standing primary school students.
The foundation has presented
more than $250,000 in scholar-
ships and prizes to outstanding
primary school students since
2005.

Mr Deveaux graduated with
honours from Bethune-Cookman
University in 1990, earning a BS
degree in psychology. In 1992, he
received a M S degree in human
services with a specialisation in
human resources management
from Nova Southeastern Uni-
versity.

“Tam extremely honoured
and humbled to be serving as
the commencement speaker and
receiving an honourary degree
from Bethune-Cookman Uni-
versity,” said Mr Deveaux.
What makes this occasion even
more special is the fact that I
will receive this honour on the
30th Anniversary of Sir Lynden
Pindling, former Prime Minis-
ter of the Bahamas serving as
the commencement speaker and
receiving his honorary degree
from Bethune.”

Lee E Rhyant is the execu-
tive vice president and general
manager for the Marietta, Ga,
facility of Lockheed Martin
Aeronautics Company where he
is responsible for the 7,000-
employee operation, delivering
the world’s finest military air-
craft such as the C-130J Her-

The School of Medicine is
located in Dominica, the West
Indies. The Freeport, Grand
Bahama campus opened in Jan-
uary 2009. The School of Vet-
erinary Medicine is located in
St. Kitts.

Ross University's adminis-
trative offices are located in
North Brunswick, NJ.

cules, F-22 stealth fighter, P-3
reconnaissance and C-5B mod-
ification programmes.

Mr Rhyant also is involved
with Lockheed Martin strategic
development, corporate special
assignments and metro Atlanta
community and government
relations. He came to Lockheed
Martin in 2000 after a 35 year
career in the aerospace and
automotive industries, includ-
ing stints with Rolls-Royce
Aerospace and Allison Gas Tur-
bine, a division of General
Motors.

Mr Rhyant has been widely
recognised for his leadership in
the Atlanta community, partic-
ularly his work mentoring young
men to be good fathers, posi-
tive role models and citizens.
He was named the 2008 Citizen
of the Year by the Cobb Cham-
ber of Commerce/Marietta Dai-
ly Journal and 2008 Man of the
Year by the Atlanta Tribune for
his outstanding community ser-
vice and dedication to the com-
munity. He was also named a
2007 Man of Influence by the
Atlanta Business League.

He graduated from Bethune-
Cookman University in 1972
and holds an MBA degree from
Indiana University. He current-
ly serves on the B-CU Board of
Trustees as its first vice chair-
man. Mr Rhyant is also a long-
time financial supporter of the
university.

Come! Join us Lhis Sumday us we
Coanedt ‘lo God Throwgh Prapel










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SUNDAY SERVICES
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CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, MARCH 29TH, 2009

11:30 a.m. Speaker:
Pastor Dexter Duvalier

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

Grace and Pease Weeteyan Grurcn

a ee
et ta a

ee

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Furhis Fee eee ll ier sr
Draper Times Fe
| dare trhonl cists Hersins heewre

Pl: Teri 1) ie
aT Pri Lharkce Drive
MWinmter: Kev. Nentes Perey
FED Baer Se bl

THepa one corm ber: 324-2555

Teieles gel BOO se

LE a de ee





Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MARCH 29TH, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Colin Archer/Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Katherine Rose
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Contemporary Service

“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)

ST AND LIFE COMMUNITY COROT

Pee Lirnmediod dm he Piast 2:
Fin. Geured To The Future

O

Worship time: Jv Fem
Areamtire Kechawel: odor
Praver time: 6:30 pen
Place:

The Mavetra
Shwopiay Crater

Bees. Th. Froamk loa Fore.

ALL ARE WELCOME T0 ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Or Franklin Knowles
Pte, EE Jaar

Teleyuine numiaer 725-37 92
ARLE. - dead eae 0



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009, PAGE 7



Tourists narrowly escape burning taxi

ao Rs:



TWO Canadian tourists had a nar-
row escape yesterday when a taxi
burst into flames as it was driving
through the streets of Nassau.

The vehicle, driven by 50-year-old
Leroy Neely, began smoking as it
passed the Central Bank at the end of
Shirley Street.

As Mr Neely diverted up Market
Street, the taxi caught fire behind
Government House in School Lane.

Firemen were called and extin-
guished the blaze, but they were
unable to save the vehicle, which was
destroyed.

No-one was hurt in the drama,
which occurred at about 12.15pm out-
side C R Walker School.

A source told The Tribune: “The
two Canadians were a husband and
wife. They and the driver got out of
the taxi okay, and the couple caught
another cab to get to their destina-
tion.”

It is believed the fire was caused by
an electrical fault.

ie | i

é

CARILEC holds meeting in Grand Bahama on disaster preparedness .

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Members of the
Caribbean Electric Utility Service Cor-
poration visited Grand Bahama for a
two-day disaster preparedness meet-
ing to create a response plan for the
upcoming hurricane season of 2009.

Lawrence Benjamin, project manag-
er at CARILEC, coordinated the annu-
al meeting at Mary Anne’s Restaurant
in Freeport, where issues such as
improving disaster response in the
member states were addressed.

Representatives from 10 electrical
utility companies attended the meet-
ing, which officially commenced on
March 26.

“We normally meet prior to the start
of the hurricane season so we can share
knowledge and experiences, as well as
cite issues in our efficient response to a
disaster so that we can better serve in
responding to any disaster that may
occur,” said Mr Benjamin.

“We strive continually to improve
our services to members and stake-
holders.”

Excell Ferrell, president and CEO
of the Grand Bahama Power Company,

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New
Providence and the Family Islands including Grand

Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser’) now invites
sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from
schools in accordance with the provisions of the Education Act. Bid
forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of
Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00

p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the

subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Tuesday, 31st March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local

said there are a number of measures
being taken to improve its facilities in
Freeport in case of disasters.

He revealed that a 24-hour trans-
mission distribution control centre will
be launched within the next couple of
months. This, he said, will allow the
company to be able to handle the trans-
mission line and system remotely.

“We are also putting in a new com-
munication system which will improve
communication with our workers on
the entire 96 miles of Grand Bahama.

“We continue to work to improve
the system so you do not have outages,
except when there is a major hurricane

and it is difficult to avoid,” he said.

Mr Ferrell said GBPC also plans to
upgrade its infrastructure and equip-
ment and carry out other system
improvements before the “lightning
season.”

He noted that lightning is a major
cause of power outages on Grand
Bahama and said improvements are
being made to improve the transmission
line system to withstand lightning
strikes.

“We have gone through our entire
system by reviewing and updating the
protection and coordination, and we
are in the process of putting in some

automation that should eliminate the
number of outages that customers expe-
rience.”

When asked for an update on the
new $12 million electrical infrastruc-
ture project for West End, Mr Ferrell
said the project is moving forward.

He noted that engineering for the
22-mile transmission line has been com-
pleted and a request has been submit-
ted to the government.

“We expect a response on that short-
ly and the materials will be ordered in
the next few days and we will begin
construction and have it completed (by)
year’s end,” he said.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Request for Tender for Security fae li at
The Bahamas Technical and Vocational
at Old Trail Road, and Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas

nstitute campuses

The Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute (B.T.V.I.) now
invites sealed bids for the provision of Security Services at The Bahamas

Technical and Vocational Institute campuses at Old Trail Road, and Wulff
Road Nassau, Bahamas.

The Contract is for a period of twelve (12) months in the first
instance and interested security firms are invited to submit Tenders
with comprehensive details of their proposal for security operations for
a twenty-four period starting at 6:00 a.m. daily (including weekends
and holidays). The Contract will be awarded to the applicant providing

the most economical and acceptable Tender for the full duration of the
contract period.

Interested Bidders may inspect campuses between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Collection of the
specification and bidding documents can be obtained from the Reception
Desk at B.T.V.I., Old Trail Road between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:00

p.m., Monday through Friday beginning Monday, 16" March, 2009 and
obtain further information at the second address given below.

time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday, 7" April, 2009 at the address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel: (242) 327-1530

Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “Tender for
Security, Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute” and delivered
to the attention of:-

The Chairman of the Tenders’ Board

Ministry of Finance
Cecil
Cable Beach

P. O. Box N-3017

Nassau, Bahamas

The Manager
Bahamas
Old Trail Road

P. O. Box N-4934
Nassau, Bahamas

allace Whitfield Building

echnical and Vocational Institute

Bids must be received by 4:00 p.m. on Friday, 3% April, 2009
accompanied by an endorsed copy of a current Business Licence.

Persons who submit Tenders are invited to a public opening of bids at
the Ministry of Finance, in the Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building, Cable
Beach on Tuesday, 14" April, 2009.

B.T.V.I. reserves the right to reject any or all Bids.





PAGE 8, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





PLRKN w itm
for wind-up

to proceed

FROM page one

(Bahamas) when the Trinidad government and regulators were
forced to bail out CL Financial, the parent company of CLICO
(Bahamas), which failed to pay out a guaranteed $57 million loan
accounting for 59 per cent of the Bahamian insurer’s assets at
year-end 2007. CLICO Enterprises had invested the majority of
funds advanced to it in Florida-based real estate development
company Wellington Preserve Real Estate, which suffered more
than a 20 per cent decline in market value at year-end 2007 due to
a collapsing property market.

A winding-up Order was granted by the Supreme Court on Feb-
ruary 24, appointing Mr Craig Gomez of Baker Tilley Gomez as
Provisional Liquidator for CLICO (Bahamas) Limited (CLICO).
The Order was made following a petition by the Registrar of Insur-
ance Companies (ORIC) in accordance with authority granted
under Section 41 of the Insurance Act.

Attorneys Damian Gomez, Alfred Sears, Godfrey ‘Pro’ Pinder,
Glenys Hanna Martin and Diane Stewart are among several of the
attorneys representing CLICO policy holders.

Investigation into
stabbing at Green
Parrot continues

FROM page one

The Sandyport resident provided police with details of their
names and occupations when he reported the assault at the Central
Police Station.

He said security guards stood idly by as the attack took place. The
27-year-old woman who was with him drove her wounded friend to
the Princess Margaret Hospital.

The well-known Bahamian man, who asked The Tribune to
withhold his identity, has since been told of the charges by officer
McKenzie, who is leading the investigation, but his attempts to con-
tact her since have been unsuccessful.

He said: “I feel really uneasy about the handling of the situation.

“T filed a report for six people and we gave them four names, so
why was the fourth person not charged?

“The three they have charged should have been able to give
them information about the other three.

“Tt just seems to be really strange to me.”

He suspects there might be some corruption in the handling of the
investigation, and added: “One of the guy’s brothers is in the Drug
Enforcement Unit, and maybe that’s just the way things work in this
country, but we are definitely not going to let that happen.”

The victim also wants police to release public information about
the suspects at large to help apprehend the criminals.

He said: “It’s dangerous for them to be on the streets, they’re
threatening people’s lives, and the police are looking at this like peo-
ple’s lives are not precious.

“We need to find out what’s going on with this, and why the
police haven’t done any investigation about the other three.”

The three men charged in connection with the incident are due
to be arraigned before a magistrate on April 9.

Police press liaison officer Walter Evans said investigations are

continuing.

NOTICE is hereby given that RAYMOND DECORDOVA
BROMFIELD of 670 SAFFRON ST., PINEWOOD
GARDENS, P.O. BOX SP-60952, Nassau, Bahamas, is

applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 28" day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



Island constituents.

“His list was always long. But
he was persistent in his efforts
and though he was seldom suc-
cessful, particularly before 1992,
he never despaired.”

The prime minister said he
could only ever comment posi-
tively on Mr Knowles’ dedica-
tion and performance, whether
as a back bencher, as chairman
of the Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation or
as a minister.

“His father who served in
parliament before him was a
well-known farmer who hailed
from Long Island, an island
famous for farming and animal
husbandry. Although Jimmy
was born in Fox Hill, he trea-
sured his Long Island connec-
tion and I believe most people
thought of him as a son of Long
Island. There is no doubt that
served Long Island well,” Mr
Ingraham said.

“Jimmy Knowles was also a
proud son of the Bahamas. He

believed deeply in his country
and strove to do all within his
capacity to see us grow and
develop. He was always
straightforward and could be
counted on to give his best
advice. And, he had a great
sense of humour and he was
always an amiable companion.”

The prime minister yester-
day also remembered the
deceased as a devoted family
man.

“On behalf of the govern-
ment and people of the
Bahamas, on behalf of the offi-
cers and members of the Free
National Movement, and on
behalf of Delores and myself, I
should like to express my grati-
tude for the life and service of
Jimmy Knowles.

“T should like also to extend
our deepest sympathy to his
mother, Mrs Knowles; his wife,
Amarylis; his sons, James Jr and
Roman; his daughter, Kimber-
ley; his brothers and sisters, and
the entire Knowles family. I
pray that you find peace in the
words of St Paul — in his time
Jimmy fought a good fight, fin-

Magistrate’s court:
Police probe ongoing

FROM page one

She is seeking damages for slander, libel, malicious falsehood and
misfeasance in public office, as well aggravated and exemplary

damages.

ROYAL FIDELITY

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SCENES from James Knowles’s funeral. Pictures by Tim Clarke



ished his course, and kept faith,
now he has gone on to reap his
promised rewards. May he rest
in peace,” Mr Ingraham said.

Also paying tribute was Mr J
Henry Bostwick, QC, a political
colleague and friend. Archdea-
con Keith Cargtwright preached
the sermon.

The large funeral was attend-
ed by Governor General
Arthur Hanna, members of
government and opposition in
both House and Senate, the
Chief Justice and members of
the judiciary, the police and
defence forces, members of the
clergy, Lady Pindling, family
and friends.

Parliamentary pallbearers

were Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette, National
Security Minister TommyTurn-
quest, Education Minister Carl
Bethel, Labour and Social
Development Minister Dion
Foulkes, Senator Allyson May-
nard-Gibson, Senator Hope
Strachan, MP Obie Wilch-
combe, and MP Philip (Brave)
Davis.

Honorary pallbearers were
John Darville, James Pinder,
Tony Knowles, Mike Light-
bourn, Bert Knowles and
Joseph Treco.

Pallbearers were his five
brothers, Alex, Emerick, Charl-
ton, Patrick and Geoffrey
Knowles; and Eric Knowles.

PM kept informed
over boat inquiry

FROM page one

the engines and speeding off with them in Mr Ingraham’s boat.

The source said: “The Contender is the PM’s run-about which he
uses for fishing and relaxing when he comes up here.”

Mr Michael Albury, chairman of Abaco’s Chamber of Com-
merce, has been on local radio to warn boat owners about the
theft spree.

Businessmen are concerned that increased crime on Abaco may
deter boaters and second-home owners who are a crucial part of the
island economy.

“These people spend a lot of money here,” said the source. “We
need to make sure this boat theft problem is brought to an end.”

Two men are understood to be helping Marsh Harbour police

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that NATALEE ANTIONETTE
DELL of CLARIDGE ROAD, Nassau, Bahamas,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 28'* day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTONIO GERALDO
MEKO GAYLE of RIDGELAND PARK, Nassau,
Bahamas, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within

twenty-eight days from the 28"" day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES MOSS of
COWPEN ROAD, P.O. BOX SB-52293, Nassau,
Bahamas, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 28"" day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

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PAGE 12 © Special Olympics Bahamas’ special course...

SATURDAY, MARCH 28,

2009






~~ ISKF

has first
grading
for ‘O9...

See page 15

Angels rally for 67-66
victory over Truckers



WOMEN’S B-BALL

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

he Johnson’s Lady Truck-
ers have had a stranglehold
on the New Providence
Women’s Basketball Asso-
ciation title for the past three years.
But the Bommer G Lady Angels,

Bommer G take 1-0 lead in series

winners of the initial two titles in 2003
and 2004, are hoping that this will be
the year that they break the Lady
Truckers’ winning streak.

On Thursday night at the DW
Davis Gymnasium, Bommer G, sport-
ing new uniforms, rallied down the
stretch for a 67-66 victory over the
Lady Truckers to snatch a 1-0 lead in

their best-of-five championship series.
Game two is scheduled to be played
next week Thursday.

It was a huge win, considering the
fact that the Lady Angels had to go
the last three and-a-half minutes with-
out guard Sharelle Cash who fouled
out and power forward Keisha
Richardson, who had to hobble

around on a slight sprained ankle.

Center Alexandria ‘Shaq’ Fernan-
der stepped up and provided the
spark, coming up with two consecu-
tive block shots to help fuel a 65-64
lead and after missing a pair of free
throws at 41.1 seconds, finally con-
verted one or two with 6.2 seconds
to eventually seal the win.

‘BLAST FROM THE PAST

TRIBUNE Sports’ ‘Blast From The Past’ today takes you
back to a couple memorable fights involving the Bahamas
Boxing Commission’s chairman and former cruiserweight
champion. In this shot, Ernie ‘the Androsian Tiger’ Barr
(left) takes a blow to the face from Strachan during one of
their bouts on November 30, 1980. Barr, however, went on
to win the 10-round decision on points...



See other photo on page 12

“We knew this was going to be a
stiff competition between us and the
Truckers, but we just wanted to go
out there and play our best, make our
lay-ups and get back on defense and
that is what we did,” Fernander said.

Fernander, who finished the game
with four blocks, one steal, 12 points
and a game high 14 rebounds, said
her mind went back to when San
Antonio played against Boston and
Manu Ginobili missed four free
throws in a row as the Spurs lost to
the Celtics.

“T think I was concentrating too
much at that point,” she reflected.

Before fouling out, Cash con-
tributed a side high 21 points with
five rebounds and a block, steal and
assist. Richardson helped out with 12
points and seven rebounds and Chris-
handra Kelly had 12 points with two
rebounds.

Despite the fact that the Lady
Angels tried to take Shantell Rolle
out of the equation, the prolific scor-
er still managed to get loose for a
game high 29 points with eight
rebounds, three assists and three
steals for the Lady Truckers.

Glenda Gilcud, the other half of
their dynamic backcourt duo, was
held to just 16 points, while Janice
Williams had a double with 11 points
and one rebound. Latoya Rolle only
had four points with six rebounds.

The game was a keenly contested
one with no team taking any consid-
erable lead. In fact, the Lady Angels
had the biggest at 53-49 at the end of
the third.

The Lady Truckers, who opened a
slight 18-16 margin at the end of the
first and played to a 34-34 half-time
lead, had a couple of key turnovers
down the stretch that made the dif-
ference.

SEE page 12

Want an athletic scholarship?

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT’S not often that visiting
colleges or universities from
the United States or Canada
come to town to look at poten-
tial Bahamian athletes for ath-
letic scholarships.

Today from 9 am at the DW
Davis Gymnasium, two coach-
es from Holland College are
expected to conduct a training
session to look at both male
and female basketball players
in grades 11-12 and those who
have just recently graduated.

Trevor Grant, head coach
of the CR Walker Knights’
senior boys basketball team,
said they were able to arrange
the trip for Michael O’Grady
and Jeff Walker through their
Maritime Training Center.

“It was offered to our
school, but I decided to open it
up to all schools, who have
players who are athletically
and academically inclined to
go to college,” Grant said.

“We just want them to come
out and try to attain one or
two of the scholarships.”

On Monday evening at 7 pm
at the Radisson Cable Beach
Hotel, O’Grady and Walker
are slated to hold a workshop
to discuss the requirements for
entry into Holland College
with prospective student-ath-

letes and their parents.
O’Grady, the vice president
of Holland College, said for

the past five years they have
been collaborating with the
Bahamas Maritime Authority

with a joint programme where
graduates have been invited
to attend their school.

Holland College coaches to conduct training session for male,
female basketball players in grades 11-12, high school graduates



SHOWN are persons involved in the Holland College’s recruitment for Bahamian student-athletes today at the DW Davis Gymnasium. (L-r) are Jeff
Walker of Holland College, coach Trevor Grant of CR Walker, Michael O’Grady of Holland College, Steve MacFarlane of the Bahamas Maritime Cen-
ter and Arthur Thompson Jr, who will assist Grant...

“This weekend, along with
several other things, we will
run the basketball camp for

boys and girls senior high play-
ers and senior players in gen-
eral, who might be interested
in coming up to Holland Col-
lege to play basketball,” he
sald.

“We expect to see some
tremendous Bahamian ath-
letes that will be able to fill
into our academic pro-
gramme.”

Walker, the student services
and athletic officer, is set to
conduct the clinic today.

“We're expecting some big
things. We already had a test
in getting to know coach Grant
and from a lot of things that
we heard, we’re expecting a
lot of talented players to come
out,” he said.

“We're looking forward to
seeing what’s here and look-
ing forward to getting some
athletes to come to Canada for
college.”

Once the student-athletes
can meet the athletic require-
ments, based on the pro-
gramme they are interested in,
and if they have the athletic
skills, Walker said they will be
happy to sign them before they
leave on Tuesday.

Holland College is located
on Weymouth Street, Char-
lottetown, Canada. Their var-
sity Hurricane’s teams play in
the highly competitive Atlantic
Colleges Athletic Association
(ACAA) league.



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Special Olympics Bahamas
puts together special course

WITH the numbers of chil-
dren with intellectual disabili-
ties increasing, many schools in
New Providence have intro-
duced special units into their
system.

Even though they are
assigned specially trained
instructors for their cognitive
development, they are not for-
tunate enough to have specially
trained physical education
instructors for their sports
development.

The board of directors of
Special Olympics Bahamas, in
conjunction with the sports divi-
sion of the Ministry of Educa-
tion, organised a special course
this week to address that con-
cern.

Basil Christie, chairman of
Special Olympics, reinforced
the philosophy of the organisa-
tion that, through sports train-
ing and competition, persons
with intellectual disabilities
develop strength in character,
personality and self esteem.

He stressed that if those
instructors involved with these
students were trained in Spe-
cial Olympics techniques and
methodology, they would be
able to offer more to their total
development.

Thus, Special Olympics
organised the course, which was
conducted by Craig Pippert, a
senior training instructor from
the Special Olympics North
American office.

He was assisted by Roosevelt
Thompson, Technical 7 sports
director of Special Olympics
Bahamas.

The course was conducted
March 25-26 at the National
Tennis Center, and 38 instruc-
tors gained certification in
“Basic Special Olympics Ori-
entation”.

The intention is for these
instructors to use the Special
Olympics structure and tech-
niques within their schools. As
most of these students are not in
the Special Olympics pro-



Thirty eight instructors gain certification
in ‘Basic Special Olympics Orientation’

ers

i a
| a arth Fe ETT
Oe i cll aoa Ed



BASIL CHRISTIE, national chairman of Special Olympics Bahamas, Dawn Knowles, senior sports officer in the Ministry of Education, and Craig Pippert, senior technical director of

Special Olympics North America...

gramme, Christie is hopeful that
they can benefit from the Spe-
cial Olympics techniques
through the newly trained
instructors.

The special event was offi-

cially opened by Archie Nairn,
permanent secretary in the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture. He congratulated Special
Olympics for providing this
training opportunity for local

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physical education instructors,
and encouraged registrants to
learn from the best. He then
pledged his ministry’s contin-
ued support of the national pro-
gramme.

Physical education teachers
and activities co-ordinators
from 17 schools and institutions
such as Sandilands Rehabilita-
tion Centre and the Every Child
Counts School in Abaco attend-

ed the course.

Instructors took the oppor-
tunity to register their athletes
for the upcoming Special
Olympics Games set for May
29-30.

‘BLAST FROM THE PAST’



= o

IN THIS photo, Strachan gets a left jab through the defense of Ken Davis in their bout on May 1, 1984. Stra-
chan was eventually awarded a 10-round decision over Davis...

YT CEM A Ct) Wd TC a

FROM page 11

“We made some crucial
turnovers and we made some
fouls when we didn’t play
defense and that cost us,” Price
said. “They were in the bonus
early and going to the line they
made one or two, which was
the same thing as getting two
points.”

Come Thursday, Price
assured the Lady Angels that
they will be back and will play
Truckers basketball.

“We’re coming to play,” he
said. “Once we come to play,

we will even the series.”

Unlike the regular season
when the Lady Truckers used
their potent offensive attack,
they were contained a lot more
as the Lady Angels tightened
up on their defense.

Bommer G’s coach Anthony
Swaby said his squad is just
hungry to regain the title.

“The whole series will be
like this because you have a
team with 18 championships
under their belt and the team
who is trying for four straight,”
Swaby said.

“So I don’t think they will
just roll over and play dead. In



game two we will have to step
up our intensity and hopefully
our free throws will be better
than tonight.”

The week break in action,
according to Swaby, may work
in favour of his Lady Angels,
who have a little more healing
process to go through than the
younger Truckers.

“We will go back to practice
and improve on some things
that we need to work on,” said
Swaby, who noted that he was
really pleased with the contri-
bution he got from point guard
Keva Barry and forward Chris-
handra Kelly.



TRIBUNE SPORTS SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS

ISKF has first grading for ‘

THE ISKF (International
Shotokan Karate Federation)
Group had there first grading
for the year earlier this week.

Master Teruyuki Okazaki, a
10th degree black belt, con-
ducted the grading at The
Shotokan Karate Bahamas
Dojo, West Bay Street.

Master Okazaki was also in
Grand Bahama to conduct their
grading as well.

Sensei Brian Stapleton is the
chief instructor.

Shotokan Karate Bahamas is
a new and small karate dojo
with big dreams. Their goal is
the promulgation of Tradition-
al Shotokan Karate in the
Bahamas as espoused by the
International Shotokan Karate
Federation (ISKF) and the
Japan Karate Association
(JKA).

Apart from their affiliations
with the above bodies,
Shotokan Karate Bahamas is
also affiliated with the Bahamas
Japan Karate Association
(BJKA), which is the main body
representing ISKF/JKA karate
in the Bahamas.

Classes are held on Mondays,
Wednesdays and Thursdays
between 6:30 - 8 pm and there is
a monthly fee.

Shotokan Karate Bahamas is
dedicated to the practice and >
promulgation of Traditional
Shotokan Karate in the MASTER OKAZAKI is shown with some of the black belts from the various schools in New Providence as they
Bahamas. went through the grading...





Na ea

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

Ti (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST



Tae NG
































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High:89°F/32°C . Breezy and very Partly cloudy. Very warm with Partly sunny; chance Mostly sunny and Partly sunny. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 63/17 51/10 s 63/17 56/13 c Sunday: __ SE at 12-25 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F
- Es FA9°C - 12 warm with sunshine. sunshine and clouds. of a shower. humid. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 71/21 58/14 c 71/21 59/15 s
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r ia f High: 85° Low: 72° Low: 74° Low: 74° Low: 74° Low: 74° Dismal ay = es
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Low: 68° F/20°C i # The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ee an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:44am. 26 3:40am. -0.1 eaIGaus 69/20 47/8 s 69/20 52/11 sh
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x @ —_ Forecasts and graphics provided by Ei ai Havana 86/30 66/18 s 84/28 66/18 sh T-storms
he MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr.2 Apr.9)— Apr.17)—Apr.24 Helsinki 34/1 30/-1 sn 36/2 30/-1 ¢ Rain Fronts
High: 86° F/30° C High: 84° F/29°C Hong Kong 77/25 70/21 t 73/22 65/18 sh * *| Flurries a ‘ er : Cold
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tem Low: 74° F/23°C ; NASSAU had pone ee si a e — | : Dee] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fitnfiintitn
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Low: 72° F/22°C
“4 Johannesburg 78/25 54/12 s 78/25 51/10 s -10s | -Os 0s 10s 20s [808)) 40s
KEY WEST eX @ CATISLAND Kingston 88/31 77/25 pc 85/29 76/24 s
High: 83° F/28° C = es 3 Lima 85/29 64/17 pc 83/28 64/17 pce
Low: 76° F/24°C High: 81° F/27°C London 45/7 32/0 sh 5010 30/-1 c
: @ Low: 64° F/18°C Madrid 5512 32/0 1 52/11 30/-1 sh
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Mexico City 79/26 45/7 pe 77/25 At s
GREATEXUMA Monterrey 79/26 50/10 s 84/28 56/13 s
SAN SALVADOR Montreal 5713 41 ¢ 50/10 36/2 r
High: 84° F/29° C ah: QR° ° Moscow 34/1 23/-5 sf 37/2 32/0 c
Low:69°F/21°C eerie Munich 51/10 34/1 35/1 34/1 sn .
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS : Nairobi 88/31 60/15 pe 88/31 61/16 t
highs and tonights's lows. ) ae High: 89° F/32° C New Delhi 85/29 74/23 pe 91/32 72/22 pc
2 P Low: 71° F/22°C Oslo 36/2 32/0 sn 38/3 «31/0 c
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Low:67°FA9°C Rome 6317 54/12 B73. 54/12 + A 5
Today sunday Today Sunday Today inde MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 83/28 72/22 s 83/28 72/22 s ae Smart choice is
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 84° F/29° C San Juan 95/35 64/17 s 96/35 64/17 s A
FIC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC re Low: 65° F/18°C gee alee oman s oe aan s 1s Management.
Albuquerque 60/15 38/3 s 70/21 39/3 s Indianapolis 56/13 38/3 r 44/6 33/0 c Philadelphia + 56/13. 46/7 + «0/15. 40/4 antiago s s
Anchorage 35/1 25/-3 pe 36/2 27/-2 pc Jacksonville 86/30 64/17 pc 74/23 46/7 t Phoenix 82/27 55/12 s 85/29 57/13 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS sami Daring B6IS0 5/20 s GIES G6/1B s peel et ple you can trust.
Atlanta 68/20 46/7 t 62/16 42/5 s Kansas City 36/2 26/-3 sn 49/9 37/2 pe _ Pittsburgh 5915 46/7 + 52/11 34/1 sh RAGGEDISLAND "ish:87°F/31°C = _ — errs t a — t se
Atlantic City 56/13 48/8 + 65/18 41/5 1 LasVegas 78/25 53/11 s 80/26 55/12 s Portland, OR 51/10 42/5 r 53/11 39/8 Higher? Fire 4 LOW*68°F/20°C Sinkhol i os aa : on 5 oa fs =
Baltimore B42 45/7 + 6417 40/4 + Little Rock 5412 37/2 po 65/18 40/4 s Raleigh-Durham 67/19 56/13 r 70/21 39/3 pe Low:67°F/19°C a a arr ° mens GAT " Ol :
Boston 54/12 44/6 po 53/11 41/5 1 LosAngeles 82/27 5412 s 70/21 5412 s St. Louis 467 351 1 521 416 s oe SOR REEL SaDOLROAGES i INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Buffalo 5412 43/6 c 5442 32/0 sh Louisville 64/17 40/4 + 50/10 36/2 c Salt Lake City 58/14 38/3 pc 42/5 25/-3 sh GREAT INAGUA Tua 53/11 39/3 52/1 42/5 c ‘ i
Charleston, SC 78/25 61/16 pce 71/21 47/8 t Memphis 6116 39/8 pe 57/13 48/6 s San Antonio 70/21 41/5 $s 75/23 55/12 s «4006 é y P (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
: ae é High: 88° F/31°C Toronto 5442 40/4 c 47/8 31/0 sh |
Chicago 44/6 31/0 1 42/5 27/-2 ¢ Miami 86/30 74/23 s 86/30 66/18 t San Diego 77/25 5512 s 66/18 55/12 pc ano 3 a ‘ =
: . . Low: 69° F/21°C Trinidad 84/28 73/22 t 85/29 76/24 sh
Cleveland 54/12 42/5 + 51/10 30/-1 sh Minneapolis 44/6 22/-5 pc 48/8 24/-4 s San Francisco 64/17 49/9 s 65/18 46/7 s Tana 44/6 36/2 + 47/8 40/4 pe ' “Hey ravens Grond Bat Abacg i th i
Dallas 52/11 38/3 pe 65/18 5140 s Nashville 66/18 30/3 r 53/11 37/2 pc — Seattle 48/8 40/4 + 50/10 38/3 pe con B16 49/9 p ee eee [ one Burner rund
Denver 42/5 31/0 pe 56/13 25/-3 pce NewOrleans 64/17 48/8 r 61/16 50/10 s Tallahassee 77/25 57/13 t 71/21 43/6 pe are 47/8 43/6 c 44/6 39/3 + RCA ST HN SPS Fe M0 si Tek: (240) 332: DRA) Be (247) 3-04
Detroit 5010 344 + 43/6 27/-2 sh New York 56/13 48/8 c Boi) Sa Tampa 85/29 70/21 pe 75/23 55/12 t Winnipeg 28/-2 17/-8 po 39/3 19/-7 c
Honolulu 82/27 69/20 pc 81/27 69/20 pc Oklahoma City 38/3 27/-2 sn 58/14 43/6 pc Tucson 77/25 49/9 s 81/27 51/10 s : ———
Houston 63/17 43/6 s 70/21 55/12 s Orlando 89/31 68/20 s 78/25 56/13 t Washington,DC 57/13 53/11 r 66/18 43/6 pc Teh ne ee ae



PAGE 16, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

thescene

by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP









NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA







& a=

“

MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
OF THE BAHAMAS’ 37TH
ANNUAL CONFERENCE

2009

4. Dr Timothy Barrett, president
of the Medical Association of the
Bahamas; Dr Corrine Sin Quee,
chairman of the Conference
Committee; Dr Hubert Minnis,
Minister of Health.

2. Dr Robin Roberts, urologist;
Dr Corrine Sin Quee, pediatric
oncologist, Dr Duane Sands,
cardiac surgeon; Dr Arthur
Porter, CEP of McGill Health
Centre; Dr Timothy Barrett, psy-
chiatrist; Dr Glenn Beneby, anes-
thesiologist and medial advisor,
PMH; Dr Christine Chin, general
practitioner, co-chairman of the
conference; Dr Magnus Eked-
edee, neurosugeon; Dr Horizal
Simmons, gynecologist, past
president of the Medical Associ-
ation of the Bahamas.

3. Businessman E Pedro
Roberts, CEO of Commonwealth
Drugs, is flanked by Nurse Bev-
erley Culmer and Nurse Lillian
McNeil.

4. Dr Mortimer Moxey, general
practitioner; Dr George Charite,
president of the Bahama Medical
and Dental Association and Dr
Horizal Simmons, past president
of the Medical Association of the
Bahamas.



5. Dr Barrett Mc Cartney, anes-
thesiologist; Nurse Lillian
McNeil; Dr Percival Mc-Neil,
pediatrician; and Dr Kurian
Campbell, surgeon.

6. Dr Arthur Porter, CEO of
McGill Health Centre in Montreal
and Dr Vincent Nwosa, pheuma-
tologist.

7. Dr Munir Rashad, oral/maxil-
lary facial Surgeon; Dr May Hes-
timo, orthopedic surgeon, Dr
Noelynn Rolle, optometrist; and
Dr Kirk Culmer, family practi-
tioner.

8. Dr Leslie Culmer, general
practitioner and Dr Bernard
Rolle, general practitioner.







Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.105SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND WARM HIGH 85F LOW 72F P OLICE officers from Nassau were flown to Abaco yesterday to assist in investigations after Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s fishing boat was “tampered with” and believed used in a theft. A ccording to Assistant Commissioner Hulan Hanna, the police are taking this matter “very seriously.” However, he could not confirm whether the Prime Minister’s “run-about” had been removed from its moorings and used to commit a crime. What the police do know at t his time, however, is that it is clear that the boat has been tampered with and the prime minister is being kept abreast of developments in the investigation. However, sources on the island claim that the 21-foot Contender was taken from the marina at Green Turtle Cay and returned later only after the thieves had used it to steal two Yamaha 250 engines worth $60,000 from another boat. The matter came to light when one of Mr Ingraham’s fishing companions went to check the craft only to discover its deck smeared with oil and littered with engine parts. The incident was part of an alarming growth in boat theft in the Abaco cays, which is causing concern among secondhome owners on the islands. A worried resident of Green Turtle Cay told The Tribune yesterday: “Tourists are getting tired of these thefts, which are occurring at the rate of about one-a-night from the Abacos. “Nearly all the cays off Aba co have been affected and we are beginning to think the boats are being taken for use in the drug trade.” The main targets are twinengined 35-foot go-fast boats worth up to $200,000 apiece. The boat, from which the engines were stolen by the thieves who had taken Mr Ingraham’s craft, had been stolen from Green Turtle Cay three weeks ago. Because the stolen boat was fitted with a tracking device, it was traced to Nassau and retrieved by its foreign owner. It was after the boat was returned to Green Turtle Cay and hoisted on a lift that thieves struck a second time, removing P olice pr obe if v essel used for crime act The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR D OUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com PM’s fishing boat ‘tampered’ with Three charged with stabbing at Green Parrot FREEPORT – Police investigations are still continuing into alleged complaints of corrup tion involving a former Grand Bahama magistrate, Police Commissioner Reginald Fergu son told The Tribune. He said investigations start ed early last year sometime into the allegations against the mag istrate and other persons at the Magistrate’s Court in the Garnet Levarity Justice Centre in Freeport. “We have not turned over the matter to the Attorney Gen eral’s Office it is still in the police domain and is not yet completed,” Commissioner Ferguson said. According to reports, the for mer magistrate is accused of allegedly accepting bribes and was suspended sometime in June 2007. It is also alleged that a prosecutor and others in the court might have been involved in the alleged corruption, involving the payments of fines. The former Grand Bahama magistrate has filed a legal suit against another sitting magis trate in Freeport claiming that she caused her emotional and mental distress and severely damaged her career and reputation by accusing her of accepting bribes from accused persons. P OLICE have charged three men in connection with a brutal a ttack on a 28-year-old man whose neck was sliced open outside The Green Parrot bar and grill. B ut the victim has condemned police for not yet apprehend ing all six of his attackers. H e recognised four of the men involved in the incident, which took place in the car park of the East Bay Street bar and grill at around 10pm on Friday, March 20. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net SEE page 8 T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f THE family of former cabinet minister James Knowles looks on as friends and colleagues speak about their memories of the late James ‘Jimmy’ Knowles. PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham yesterday remembered former Member of Parliament and Cabinet Minister James “Jimmy” Knowles as a “valuable ally and an honourable adversary.” Paying tribute to the late MP at the funeral service held at Christ Church Cathedral, Mr Ingraham said: “We were all aware that our friend and former colleague had been courageously battling the dreaded disease of cancer for a number of years now. The last weeks and months were an espe cially difficult season in his life but as was typical of him, he fought valiantly. Still, the passing of Jimmy Knowles at the relatively young age of 66 came as a shock to all of us.” Mr Ingraham said he knew the deceased for many years, first as a fellow member of the Bahamas Bar, then as an MP and later as a minister in his Cabinet. “He had articled with the legendary Sir Stafford Sands, and throughout his practice of the law, whether with some of the coun try’s leading law firms or on his own, he maintained the highest standards of integrity and trustworthiness,” the prime minister said. In the political arena, Mr Knowles “courageously followed his conscience and was a valuable ally and an honourable adversary.” Mr Ingraham said that throughout his tenure in Parliament, Mr Knowles fought continually to improve the condition of his Long PM r ecalls ‘valuable ally’ SEE page 8 Port chair resigns FREEPORT, Grand Bahama: Mr Hannes Babak resumed his position as chairman of the Board of Directors of The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited Friday, as Felix Stubbs stepped down from the post that he has held for the past several months. Mr Stubbs will continue as director of the Grand Bahama Port Authority Board (GBPA On Friday GBPA announced the acceptance of Mr Stubbs’ resignation. “Working with the dedicated GBPA team has been a valuable experience for me and I hope I was able to provide a caring and sup portive leadership the past several months,” said Mr Stubbs. “I believe, however, that it is in the best interest of the company for me to step down as Chairman at this time. This would allow for better synergy in the leadership team and make it a lot easier to position the Group of Companies to cre ate an environment for Grand Bahama to realise its full potential.” Mr Stubbs said “the decision was made after much careful consideration, but I am comforted by the fact that the company is in great hands with its new leadership and I will con tinue to give advice on the future of the company as a Director of the Board.” SEE page 8 Police continuing pr obe into alleged judicial corruption n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net SEE page 8 ALL CLICO premiums paid since the winding up order was issued against the insurance company in late February will be placed in a separate protect ed client fund, an attorney involved in the case said yesterday. Lawyer Sidney Cambridge, who represents provisional liquidator Craig Gomez, also told the court yesterday that the company that reportedly has some 23,000 Bahamian police holders is insolvent and has more liabilities than assets. He added that the liquidation of the company should proceed. Mr Cambridge told the court that the provisional liquidator’s report has been filed and made available. He said that his team has engaged counsel in Trinidad to file an injunction against the parent company CL Financial in order to bar the sale of assets. He also said that his team has engaged counsel in Florida regarding land in that state con sidered to be a part of CLICO Bahamas’ asset pool. Mr Cambridge also told the court that an agreement has been reached with regard to the reinsurer continuing coverage. The case, which is before Justice Cheryl Albury, was adjourned to April 7. The death knell came for CLICO Attorney: CLICO pr emiums safe in protected account SEE page 8 n By NATARIO MCKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter

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J AMESKNOWLES C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE FUNERAL OF FORMER MP AT CHRIST THE KING CHURCH PRIME Minister Huburt Ingraham shared some of his memory of James Knowles yesterday during the service at Christ Church Cathedral. C HRISTIAN K nowles the nephew of the late James K nowles speaks at the funeral. MEMBERS of parliment and the Senate all attended the f uneral servive of James Knowles. T im Clarke / Tribune staff

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n B y TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas may have to offer up a wider portion of the country's services schedule to the European Union under the Economic Partnership Agreement than initially proposed. M inister of State for Finance Z hirvargo Laing told T he Tribune yesterday that government intends to meet with the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM to discuss the EU's observations on the schedule that the Bahamas submitted to the CRNM for review earlier this year. While he declined to get into the specifics of those comments, he said they relate to whether or not the Bahamas is prepared to offer a larger portion of the ser vices schedule to the EU. " We are having some discus sions with them at the moment about the services (schedule expect perhaps to have a meeting some time in April. So the dis cussions are ongoing. "They have provided us with some comments from the EU about it and we've responded to those comments so just we're discussing, finalising the documents with them. "The comments relate to some questions they might have asked about whether we are prepared to be offer more in this area or t he other area and that's standard," Mr Laing, who was out of the country, said in a brief telephone interview yesterday. When asked if the country was prepared to liberalise a greater portion of its trade in services tot he EU, Mr Laing replied: "We are in discussions with them – we thought that we made the offer that we want to make". The government has said that a fter the review, it plans to submit another services schedule to the EU by the April 15 deadline for inclusion in the Annexes of the Agreement. The services schedule represents the offer that the Bahamas has made to the EU and CARICOM under the EPA with respect to trade and services, accordingt o the Ministry of Finance. T he B ahamas signed the goods only portion of the EPA on October 16, 2008 and was given a six-month extension to submit its services schedule. As a country with “Most Devel oped Country” status in CARIFORUM, the Bahamas has proposed liberalising trade in 83 per cent of its 155 services industries. The EPA is a trade agreement that allows more open trade in both goods and services between C ARIFORUM countries and the European Community. THE man who died in a gruesome collision between a scooter and a dumptruck has been identified as 33year-old Peter Knowles. The incident occurred at the junction of Prospect Ridge and John F Kennedy Drive on Thursday and held up traffic for over an hour as police cleared up the scene. According to an eyewitness who was in a car stopped behind the Mack truck which rolled over the driver of the silver scooter, the victim pulled up on the right-hand side of the dumptruck as it signalled to turn right on to John F Kennedy Drive at around 10.55am. As the dumptruck pulled off to make the turn, the dri ver said she was engulfed in a cloud of dust which, when it cleared, revealed the body of what she soon realised was the driver of the scooter lying in the road. The motorbike itself was trapped under the front of the truck, which stopped moments later. According to those on the scene, the driver of the truck would have been unable to see the moped, which was located on the opposite side to the truck’s driver. “Shaken up” by the inci dent, the truck driver was tak en to hospital by ambulance. GRIEVINGrelatives of Deron ‘Sharky’ Bethel are still waiting for justice three years to the day after he was shot dead while sitting in his car. H is tearful mother, Diana Bethel, told T he Tribune y esterday: It is still very painful. I cry every day because I miss my boy so much.” Deron, 20, was shot while waiting outside his home in Pinewood Gardens. A police officer was later charged with his murder. However, three years on, a court date has not yet been set for a Supreme Court hearing. M rs Bethel said: “We have no indication at all of a court date. The family is still grieving and we are still waiting for justice three years after Deron died.” Eyewitnesses swore affidavits following Deron’s death claimi ng he was shot by an off-duty policeman who had arrived outside his home to investigate a domestic dispute in a neighbouring house. They said police killed a totally innocent man thinking he was someone else. At Deron’s funeral in April, 2006, placard protesters marched to Lakeview Memorial Gardens demanding “no cover-up.” T he Attorney General’s Office is now awaiting depositions from the magistrates court hearing to determine how they will proceed with the case in the Supreme Court, an official saidy esterday. But no indication was given about when the next hearing will take place. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009, PAGE 3 INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News..........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,16 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Advts ..................................................... P9,10 Sports.............................................P11,12,13 Comics ......................................................P14 W eather ..................................................... P15 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 P AGES USA TODA Y WEEKENDER 8 P AGES n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Police have issued an all-points bulletin for a 27-year-old Grand Bahama man who is wanted for questioning in connection with a rape and armed robbery. A wanted poster for Renaldo Nekito Javarr Kemp, also known as “Blue”, was officially released by police on Thursday His last known address is 45 Starlane Drive, Nassau East, New Providence, and Grand Bahama. Kemp is of “dark complexion, has brown eyes and short crinkly hair.” He is about five feet, nine inches tall, of medi um built and weighs approximately 210lbs. He is considered armed and dangerous and should be approached with caution. Anyone with information concerning this individual is asked to contact police at 352-1919, 351-9111, 351-9991, 352-8351, 352-9076, and 350-3125 or, 911. Man wanted in connection with rape and armed robbery WANTED WANTED WANTED n B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – A 13-year-old girl was airlifted to New Provid ence on Thursday morning with serious injuries following a traffic accident. Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle reported that the accident occurred at the intersection of Dominica Avenue and Swordfish Street, involving two vehicles – a 1998 Volvo and a 2000 Hyundai Accent. According to reports, Evelyn Pinder, 43, was driving the Vol vo heading south on Swordfish Street when her vehicle collided with the Hyundai, which was being driven by 33-year-old Tiffany Marshall. ASP Bootle said Chauma Barrett, 13, was a passenger in Mar shall’s vehicle. He said all three persons were injured and taken to Rand Memorial Hospital for treatment. Due to the severity of Barrett’s injuries, she was later airlifted to the Princess Margaret Hospital. Man crushed by truck identified 13-year-old girl seriously injured in car crash Man shot several times at his home in Johnson Park n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net A JOHNSON Park man was shot several times by a latenight visitor who confronted him at his home before opening fire. T he 26-year-old victim heard a knock at his front door some t ime after 10pm on Thursday. When he opened the door, he was confronted by a man with whom he had a disagreement earlier, press liaison officer Assistant Superintendent WalterE vans said. D uring the confrontation, the visitor drew a handgun and shot him several times. The victim was taken to hospital where he is listed in serious condition. Police are also actively investigating the brazen armed robbery of a 55-year-old West Bay Street resident. A ccording to ASP Evans, the man was at his home with a relative when a cutlass wielding bandit burst through the front door and demanded cash sometime after 10pm on Thursday. The robber was able to make off with a small amount of cash b efore fleeing, heading in an unknown direction, ASP Evans said. Investigations into both incidents continue. news BRIEFS Family of murdered man still await justice To advertise ALL your LEGAL NO TICES , call The Tribune’s Sales Department 502-2394 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net THREE of the Bahamas’ major landmasses – Abaco, Andros and Grand Bahama – will be either totally or partiallyf looded if there is a one metre s ea level rise, according to the director of the Bahamas Environment, Science and Technology Commission. This warning comes as four of the world’s top climate sci-e ntists have revealed new data i ndicating that oceans are expected to rise as much as a metre or more by 2100 – twice as fast as predicted by the Unite d Nations just two years ago. T he scientists, speaking at a p ress conference in Copenhagen earlier this month, said m illions face displacement as low-lying countries could see large parts of their surface areasv anish. C onsidered by international bodies to be among those countries most vulnerable to sea leve l rise, the Maldives recently a nnounced it is preparing to buy new land in other countries so that its population will have somewhere to go when its picturesque atolls are engulfed by rising seas. T he islands, located in the I ndian Ocean with a population of 385,000, are already in the process of constructing new artificial islands for the same purpose. Eighty per cent of the count ry’s landmass is only one metre a bove sea level – just like the Bahamas. Yesterday Bahamas Environment, Science and Technol-o gy (BEST tor Phillip Weech said the Bahamas is not planning to resort to such “extreme scenarios” as the Maldives in response to climate change but is also preparing for an “uncertainf uture”. He suggested the Bahamas has enough land well above sea level to accommodate displaced i nhabitants if certain islands were t o be submerged. However, Mr Weech added that the “scenarios that have been mentioned by the Maldives are in many cases very similar to ours.” We are preparing in a similar w ay to deal with energy security, our green house gas footprint and preparing for an uncertain future. “This is why we have prepared our first national communication ( to the United Nations Framew ork Convention on Climate Change) and why we are now working on a second national communication. It’s why we are now working with regard to a national energy policy and on diversity and the preservation of our natural landscape, as well as on issues related to the Caribbean Challenge where we are trying to set asidep arks and protected areas.” “The best way of adapting to a rising sea level is to keep coastal defences intact and the decisions t his government has made to e stablish marine protected reserves across the Bahamas will do some of that,” he said. Meanwhile, a critical moment is approaching in the climate change debate – the UN Climate C hange Conference in Copenh agen in December. Many countries are hoping a new global deal on cutting carbon emissions can be reached at the conference, described by many as the last chance the w orld may have to avert the m ost dangerous consequences of climate change. Via the Alliance of Small Island States, which consists of4 9 countries, the Bahamas is “making sure its issues are on the table” in the international negotiating process, said Mr Weech. “The approach has to be to do what we can do, as well asw hat we can encourage the developing countries to do,” he said. Rising sea level could threaten Bahama islands Bahamas may have to offer Europe more under EPA Zhirvargo Laing

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I am extremely grateful for this opportunity to express my views on “The role of the government and its citizens” in your illustrious newspaper. It is my hope that by reading this article there will be a movement towards improvement within our country. What is a nation without its government? What is a govern ment without its citizens? Plato, a famous Greek philosopher who wrote “the Republic,” often referred to the governing body as the guardian and the civilians as the producers. In this piece I will portray the guardian as the law makers and rulers of our country, while depicting the producers as the ones who work and support our local government. The purpose of this article is to convey that the government has a role to demonstrate guardianship over the producers of a given community, while the civilians must execute its role as the supporters of this regime. As guardians, the government should watch over, protect and care for its local citizens (the producers). It is the guardian’s duty to provide proper healthcare for a society, create jobs, ensure the stabilisation of an economy, pro mote entrepreneurship, provide proper infrastructural develop ment, as well as establish the best educational tools and mechanisms for its civilians. The government should also meet the safety needs of a community; it should control and aim to reduce crime rates. Moreover, it is the responsibility of the government to maintain a competitive advantage as it relates to its industries such as tourism, banking and agriculture. The government should also make certain that a community is taking the correct actions toward becoming a more global society, while ensuring that its cultural identity is kept intact. As producers we too must play a role not only in working to develop ourselves, but also to develop our nation. While it is essential to support our local hier archy, we as citizens have an obligation to hold the government accountable to their duties and promises in this democracy. We can not sit back and watch the world revolve and evolve around us. We must continuously find ways to contribute and give back to our community in order to increase our local standards and improve the ways in which the world views us. We must promote a strategy that provides service to our country selflessly. In this way, we will continually provide a means to enhance our nation. Remember Bahamas, although we must hold the government accountable to its role, we can not blame every flaw and mishap of our society on the government. As residents of this nation we must be held responsible for a role as contributors, but also as doers and proactive supporters of the law. We can not expect to have a better country yet despise and in some cases retaliate on the government for enforcing the law. We cannot expect a jurisdiction that enforces justice, but quietly seek favours that promote a sys tem of injustice. While I believe that there is no “ideal society,” there are progressing societies. These are societies that under the management of the government and support and labour of its citizens, strive for excellence in healthcare, education, the economy, infrastruc tural development and law. It is vital that as residents and citizens of the Bahamas we understand that as a nation there is a twopart act to be played; the government as the guardians and the citizens as the producers. Nonethe less, in order to have a powerful nation the formula requires that the roles of the government and the citizens are clearly and effec tively met. WEL’ANDRA AR FRANCIS, BS, MBA Nassau, March, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. T he theory is that in any business expansion, there will be people who make unwise investments. There will always be people who are too optim istic, too confident in their o wn forecasts, or who simply misread shifts in people’s tastes. I f there's only a little bad investment, it can be cleaned up by the people who made it. TheB ahamian contractors who bought a new backhoe, Government and private sector p lans to build more homes w ould mean that his business could only go up, may find that the housing downturn has made it tough for many of his customers to get the home loan they need to pay for a newh ouse. If nothing else goes wrong, he can probably work his way out of the problem lower profits while he pays off the under-used backhoe, but not a business failure. I nflation always causes bad i nvestments because inflation fools people into thinking that things are going especially well.B usinesses see a surge in busi nesses, which prompts them to expand. When it turns out that t he surge was all illusion (they were getting more dollars, but the dollars were worth less), they’ve already committed to a n expansion that has no future. Government spending produces bad investment a well, as businesses gear up to produce w hatever the government is buying today. It’s obviously not t he best use for the investment ( or you wouldn't need govern ment spending to support it), plus it’s highly vulnerable to being a very bad investment, if government priorities change. When there’s a lot of bad investments, though, it’s not soe asy to fix. A company that has borrowed to expand, but doesn’t get enough business to ser-v ice the new debt, is in trouble. E ven businesses that aren’t in debt can shut in a downturn. If business gets bad enough, it’s c heaper to just close the doors than to pay to keep the place staffed and the lights turned on. T he key here, though, is that a n investment is only bad investment if the price is too high. That is, the contractors e xtra backhoe may be a lousy investment at $100,000, but if someone else can pick it up at al iquidation sale for $50,000, that might not be a bad investment at all. So, the thrust of this thread is that recessions are how bad investment gets worked out of the economy. Some businesses go under, others sell offu nder performing pieces. The result is an economy where pro ductive assets are reallocated to where they can be used profi tably at which point the stage is set for a sound recovery. If the government heads off ther ecession, by cutting interest rates too aggressively, or by buying whatever it is that isn’tb eing bought, the bad invest ment goes uncorrected, leaving potentially productive assets in the hands of people who can’tu se them to their best effect, while leaving other people (who could use them) unable to t hrive. C an the government help? People on both sides of the issue see that government action leads generally to bad investment. For the people who a dvocate for the government t rying to help, that’s unavoidable and simply needs to be d ealt with by more government action. For the people who advocate against, it’s a reasonf or the government to do as little as possible. As to whether governments c an help in a recession, the a nswer clearly depends on where you stand. Cutting interest rates is great for people who have variable-rate debt (or would like to), but it sucks for people who have cash. Higherg overnment spending is all well and good for people who build roads or grow corn, but doesn’t mean much for the guy who runs a restaurant or works at a hotel (except, eventually, highe r taxes). I n the end, the people who are helped are very specific and very aware of the help, whileo thers are either not harmed, or are harmed only in a diffuse, general way (along with everyo ne else). The result is that the political pressure always tends to be on the side of more help. Whether it helps the economy o r not, it definitely helps the people who get it, and that's enough for the politicians to keep at it. Think about it ! FRANKLYN DOOM” M UNROE Nassau, March 24, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 Freeport fax: (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON (AP always be trusted. If you're too big to fail, you're too big to make all your own decisions, according to the emerging view in Washington. Three decades after Ronald Reagan launched a determined campaign to ease government regulations on business, the pendulum is swinging the other way. Riding a wave of public anger over Wall Street greed and government bailouts, the Obama administration on Thursday unveiled a farreaching plan for "better, tougher, smarter" rules over big financial companies. The plan would crack down on major but now lightly regulated players such as hedge funds and traders of exotic financial products. The administration is also pressing for closer international coordination. Allies want the U.S. to get tougher, and the new plan will give President Barack Obama something to show when he goes to London next week for an eco nomic summit of 20 major and developing nations. Most of what Obama is seeking, including a new regulator to oversee the entire financial system, will require legislation. With the level ofangst in the country as high as it is, it seems likely he will get at least some of the changes through the Democratic-controlled Congress. Even administration critics acknowledge there needs to be more financial regulation to avoid any repeat of the kind of meltdown that has plunged much of the globe into painful recession. Few would argue that it's a good idea to allow sprawling financial conglomerates to be able to shop for their own regulator pretty much what bailed-out insurer American International Group did. But there is also fear of going too far and suppressing the entrepreneurial spirit that is part of the nation's free-market heritage. The pendulum had been swinging against tough regulation until recently. Although President Jim my Carter began deregulation efforts in the late 1970s, focusing on airlines, trucking, railroads and natural gas, Reagan popularized the idea as a major government goal. He imposed a moratorium on all new federal regulation enforcement upon taking office. President Bill Clinton continued the process, signing legislation ending the 1930s-era barrier between banks and investment and insurance companies, but without subjecting those nonbank institutions to the rules that apply to banks. In the midst of the current crisis, Sen. Judd Gregg, R-N.H., still says the government needs to not over regulate "to the point where we wipe out one of our great advantages as a nation, which is that we had folks willing to put money up for people willing to take risks and try to create jobs." Paul C. Light, a professor of public service at New York University, noted that complex investment products known as derivatives, including mortgage-backed securities, "were once seen as a great innovation and widely celebrated." Their implosion set off the global financial meltdown. "We want more transparency but we want, at the same time, to protect innovative ideas. Everyone's so angry. What the public wants is a radical pendulum swing toward the tightest regulation. We just have to be careful that we don't overdo it," Light said. Supporters of more regulation say they don't want to squelch American entrepreneurship. "Obviously, no system is going to prevent all failures, because it would then be too restric tive," said House Financial Services Committee Chairman Barney Frank, D-Mass. The goal is to minimize the likelihood that big financial enti ties will get so heavily indebted "that their lack of success threatens the whole system," he said. The proposals announced on Thursday, designed to limit risk-taking, are "a good start to a long process," said White House spokesman Robert Gibbs. Still, Washington always addresses the sins of the past, tries to solve old problems and doesn't have a crystal ball to deal with the future. Whatever the rules, someone tries to come up with ways to slip around them, sometimes with Washington's help. Remember: Brooksley E. Born, former chairwoman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, tried in 1997 to impose greater federal rules on derivatives. She was fiercely opposed by Alan Greenspan, then the Federal Reserve chairman, and by Robert Rubin, Pres ident Bill Clinton's treasury secretary. Rubin, now an outside adviser to Obama, says he favours regulating derivatives, particularly increasing reserves against potential losses, but saw no way of doing so while serving as treasury secretary. Greenspan calls the current downturn a "once in a century" financial crisis. He says the problem wasn't with the derivative contracts but with the greed of the people who dealt in them. (This article was written by Tom Raum of the Associated Press). Recession fixes bad investment LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Pendulum swings to financial We all have a role to play

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009, PAGE 5 WHY YOU VEX? n B y TANEKA T HOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net "I so vex 'cause I call da C entral Bank for dem to help dis old woman find her d eceased husband's 'dormant' m oney who for an incredible 45 years told her, like plenty Bahamian men, dat they ain’t g ats no bank account. Once d a Central Bank certifies dem I figure dey can pull da name i n dey big computer but dey r efuse and say she has to go to all a dem other banks to look for dis money. " Aint no wonda dey is now h ave all dis $40 million dorm ant of poor people money dat dem now deceased men h ide from dey wives an children and others. Poor people really does catch hell scrap-p ing for pennies while da rest s eems to get way wid mill ions.” DA BUCK STOPS DERE "We all are wex down here in da south of da island! Twice a day dat noisy B ahamasair done lift off from da airport an' make one quick right turn toward Miami and that brings all kinda noise an' r attlin' goin' on in da house dem below! Seven in da m orning and the same that n ight. "On Sunday morning the day of rest after a long night's w ork, all I hear is 'brrroooom' overhead like one race track! How come all a dem (other airliner further out before makin' that turn an' they sound so good compared to that old noise m aker! We asking dem con trollers keep Bahamasair out there over da ocean for a few miles more!" SHAKE, RATTLE N' ROLL " I wonder if there is any one else who finds this to be annoyingly unprofessional. In eeded to do some business with BTC in the mall, the closest place to me from where I work, so I called tof ind out what time they closed. I was told 5.30pm. I arrived at BTC mall location at 5.25pm to find a closed sign on the receptionist desk so Itold the lady that it was not quite 5.30pm and I had been trying to get something sorted out for a while with them, only to be told they stop tak ing customers at 5.20pm. "Another incident, I speed from work to (a shoe store Palmdale almost five days back to back only to find them closed each time I got there at approximately 5.25pm so I called them to find out what time they closedand was told 5.30pm. I proceeded to tell the person on the phone what happened. ‘Oh! We close the door a few minutes early,’ she said. "Do these people not see the inconvenience of incor rect information or do they just not care? Put up a cor rect sign and when customers call tell them the truth so they can plan accordingly. This is just another form of the bad service Bahamians thought-lessly give.” TNT "I vex at dem idiot tour car drivers that crawl down West Bay with a string of irate dri vers behind, all trying to get pass. What, are they blind, don’t care less, or jus' plain stupid? I know dey gat a job to do, but what does it take to pull over every couple min-utes to let the other folks pass safely! "For Pete (and Mike use your eyes and your brainif you gat any!!" MIKE T n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A MAN who is seeking the liquidation of the National Insurance Board over his claim f or a multi-billion dollar settle ment has filed an appeal against a judge’s ruling which dismissed h is petition on the grounds that it was “frivolous and vexa tious.” A nthony Wright of Freeport, Grand Bahama claims that the National Insurance Board nev-e r properly paid him for an onthe-job injury almost 30 years ago. Mr Wright, who filed the “wind-up” petition in March of last year, contends that NIB owes him billions of dollars in b ack-pay, medical bills and settlement money after a 1982 acci dent on the premises of his former job with Franklyn Chemicals in Grand Bahama. Mr Wright claimed that he suffered a fall which left him with a ruptured disc and damage to the soft tissue of his back. I n a ruling on the matter on February 19, Senior Justice John Lyons stated: “Clearly the amounts claimed by the petit ioner bear no semblance of real ity. It appears that he just plucked the figures out of the s ky and put them in his petition.” In his ruling Justice Lyons also stated that the entity could onlyb e dissolved by parliament, which “created it by statute in the first place.” M r Wright is now seeking an order from the Court of Appeal granting the wind-up order, essentially setting aside JusticeL yons’ ruling. Mr Wright intends to rely on 10 grounds of appeal. He is contending that the Supreme Court did not have the power to refuse the winding-up order, dismiss the petition or award costs against him. No date has been set for the hearing of the appeal. Man appeals multi-billion dollar lawsuit against NIB UNITED States Embassy clients no longer have to stand in long queues without protection from the elements thanks to the construction of covered s eating by the Ministry of Public Works and Transport. W orks Minister Neko Grant along with Permanent Secretary Colin Higgs visited the US Embassy on Thursday, March 26, 2009 to view the recentlyc ompleted shed and seating. Mr Grant expressed satisfaction with the construction. Pictured is the minister chatting with clients as they make use of the new facilities. n B y ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THIS year’s tourism budget already includes provisions for legislative changes that may be need to be enacted t o enhance the competitiveness of the Bahamian gaming industry, said the Minister of Tourism. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said he is “looking forward to” receiving input f rom the casino association on how the industry can be urgently updated to keep enticing tourists. On Thursday president of the Bahamas Hotel Association Robert S ands said the Bahamian industry is “in t he dark ages”, operating in a framew ork set up 40 years ago. E choing the sentiments of US comm entators, he expressed concern that new legislation proposed in Florida to m assively expand gaming in that state could have a “dramatic impact” on the attractiveness of the Bahamas as a destination for gamblers. A nd he said “time is of the essence” w hen it comes to the government reacting to recommendations from industry stakeholders. Yesterday Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said: “We’ve been talking about this s ince months ago and we have been awaiting the input from the Casino Association. “Certainly in defining our budget for this year, including budgeting for items we also wanted to take a look at all of t he legislative changes that would have to be made if any to make us more competitive and also bring us up to the level of competition that’s all around us.” M r Vanderpool-Wallace said he has been informed that he will receive documentation from the Casino Associat ion about the needed changes, adding that it is “something I’m looking forward to.” On Wednesday the Florida Senate R egulated Industries Committee a pproved two new bills which will, among other things, lower the legal gambling age from 21 to 18, allow Hard Rock Cafes to be turned into full-blown casinos, provide tax breaks for “racin o” dog and horse tracks, as well as increasing the variety of table games and slot-type machines permitted. Mr Sands said the time has come for the industry to be “really proactive agents” for the changes required to keep t he Bahamas competitive. “We believe that we must be progressive and be prepared for radical change in our gaming industry if it’s g oing to continue to survive in this particular market place,” he added. Bahamian gaming industry needs to enhance its competitiveness Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S P h o t o

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DAYTONA BEACH A Bahamian is one of two men to be awarded honorary doctorates by a Florida university, it was announced yesterday. On Saturday, May 9, BethuneCookman University (B-CU welcome two distinguished alumni back to campus as participants in the University’s 2009 commencement ceremony. Ricardo P Deveaux, a 1990 graduate and now senior assistant secretary in the Bahamas Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture; and Lee Rhyant, a 1972 graduate and now executive vice president and general manager for the Marietta, Ga, facility of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company and a B-CU Trustee, will both receive the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters. Mr Deveaux will give the commencement address. “It is my great honour to wel come these two distinguished alumni back to Bethune-Cookman University. Mr Deveaux and Mr Rhyant represent the kind of excellence that we seek to devel op in our students – professionalism, leadership and a commitment to serving the community. In these challenging times, our graduating seniors will benefit greatly from the advice and wis dom Mr Deveaux will provide in his remarks,” said B-CU president Trudie Kibbe Reed. As part of his official govern ment duties, Mr Deveaux man ages a $1 million grant pro gramme that assists young Bahamian entrepreneurs in establishing or expanding their small businesses. He also is the president and CEO of the Bahamas Primary School Student of the Year Foun dation, a non-profit foundation established to recognise out standing primary school students. The foundation has presented more than $250,000 in scholarships and prizes to outstanding primary school students since 2005. Mr Deveaux graduated with honours from Bethune-Cookman University in 1990, earning a BS degree in psychology. In 1992, he received a M S degree in human services with a specialisation in human resources management from Nova Southeastern Uni versity. “I am extremely honoured and humbled to be serving as the commencement speaker and receiving an honourary degree from Bethune-Cookman University,” said Mr Deveaux. What makes this occasion even more special is the fact that I will receive this honour on the 30th Anniversary of Sir Lynden P indling, former Prime Minister of the Bahamas serving as the commencement speaker and receiving his honorary degree from Bethune.” Lee E Rhyant is the execu tive vice president and general manager for the Marietta, Ga, facility of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company where he is responsible for the 7,000employee operation, delivering the world’s finest military aircraft such as the C-130J Hercules, F-22 stealth fighter, P-3 reconnaissance and C-5B mod ification programmes. Mr Rhyant also is involved with Lockheed Martin strategic development, corporate special assignments and metro Atlanta community and government relations. He came to Lockheed Martin in 2000 after a 35 year career in the aerospace and automotive industries, includ ing stints with Rolls-Royce Aerospace and Allison Gas Turbine, a division of General Motors. Mr Rhyant has been widely recognised for his leadership in the Atlanta community, particularly his work mentoring young men to be good fathers, posi tive role models and citizens. He was named the 2008 Citizen of the Year by the Cobb Chamber of Commerce/Marietta Dai ly Journal and 2008 Man of the Year by the Atlanta Tribune for h is outstanding community service and dedication to the community. He was also named a 2007 Man of Influence by the Atlanta Business League. He graduated from BethuneCookman University in 1972 and holds an MBA degree from Indiana University. He current ly serves on the B-CU Board of Trustees as its first vice chairman. Mr Rhyant is also a long time financial supporter of the university. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Ricardo P Deveaux to receive honorary doctorate at Bethune-Cookman University n ByLINDSAY THOMPSON T HE Bahamas and the Republic of India pledged to strengthen their diplomatic relationship in the areas of culture, technology and econ omic development. T his commitment was expressed as Governor General Arthur Hanna accepted Letters of Commission from Mohinder Grover, High Commissioner of the Republ ic of India to the Bahamas, d uring a ceremony at Government House on Thursday. High Commissioner Grover acknowledged that both countries share commonl inkages in history, parliamentary democracy, mem-b ership of the Commonw ealth and the English language. India, like the Bahamas, is a member of theG roup of 77, Group of 15 and the Non-Alignment Movement. “Both are developing countries, share similar concerns and common aspirations for a ccelerated economic growth, e radication of poverty, improvement in the quality of life of our people and pro-m otion of equity,” he said. The High Commissioner further pledged cooperation i n the solar energy sector, to o rganise training programmes and pursue cooperation in the IT sector on the basis of spec ific details to be provided by the Bahamas on the ‘Hole in the Wall Education LimitedP roject’ (HIWEL T he Bahamas and India share a wide base of linkages founded on common aspects of history, the Governor General said, adding that the diplomatic relations that havef ollowed have consolidated common understanding. “The Bahamas values the cordial relations between ourt wo countries and looks forward to continuing to strengthen our friendly relat ionship,” he said. “As members of the global community with many of thes ame development chall enges, our two countries share the highest aspirations and dedication to the devel-o pment and protection of our world and societies,” the Gov ernor General said. “The m ultilateral fora in which we both participate bring us together in a joint commit-m ent to ensure that our goals come to fruition.” Bahamas and India to broaden ties in culture, education and technology Ricardo Deveaux THE entire Grand Bahama community is once again invited to take part in the fourtha nnual Grand Bahama Health E xpo. T he event is set to be held at the Shiloh Seventh Day Adventist Church grounds on Sunday, March 29 from 11.30am to 6pm. T he Shiloh SDA Church H ealth Department is hosting t he expo in conjunction with the Ross University School of Medicine under the theme, "Your Health and You". The event is entirely free. K eynote speaker at the event w ill be the administrator of the Rand Memorial Hospital, Sharon Williams and guest speakers will be Dr Tamara B urke-Moree and Dr Alvira H iggs. There will be vegetarian dishes, blood pressure screening,b lood glucose screening, dental exams, a kids corner, eyea nd ear testing, cholesterol testi ng, weight and health assessments and more. Alexys Bell, health ministries director at Shiloh Church, said: “We are so pleased to be working alongside Ross University students for our fourth annualh ealth expo. We hope the community will take advantage of this wonderful opportunity to learn more about their own health.” Ross University medical stud ent and vice president of their S tudent Government Association, Timothy Yu said, "Com munity service and health educ ation are the core reasons that inspired many of Ross students t o pursue a career in medicine. This partnership with Shiloh Seventh Day Adventist Church is the first of many opportunities for Ross University School of Medicine students to s trengthen the Bahamian h ealthcare community. At this health fair we are focusing on essential topics including hypert ension, diabetes, eye and ear health, and breast cancer awareness.We are very excited about this event and we encourage families and singles of all ages to come by for this fun and e ducational expo, as we cont inue to strive to build and partner with our new community." The Shiloh church is located o n Torcross Road next to the Grand Bahama Academy and close to Maurice Moore Primary School. Ross University was founded in 1978 and is a provider of m edical and veterinary educat ion offering doctor of medicine and doctor of veterinary medicine degree programmes. T he School of Medicine is located in Dominica, the West Indies. The Freeport, Grand Bahama campus opened in January 2009. The School of Veterinary Medicine is located in S t. Kitts. R oss University's administrative offices are located in North Brunswick, NJ. Ross University to participate in the 4th Annual Grand Bahama Health Expo PART of the Grand Bahama Health Expo organising team on the grounds of the Shiloh SDA Church, where the 4th Annual Health Expo will take p lace. Left to right: Daniel Lowe, Shiloh Church elder; Erin James, Ross University SNMA Club president; Timothy Yu, Ross University vice president of the Student Government Association; Dr McMillan of Shiloh Church; Alexys Bell, health ministries director at Shiloh Church. R o b b i n W h a c h e l l / P h o t o

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009, PAGE 7 &20021:($/7+)+(%$+$0$6 *29(510(17,&( 7+(%$+$0$6(&+1,&$/t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f7KH&RQWUDFWZLOOEHDZDUGHGWRWKHDSSOLFDQWSURYLGLQJ WKHPRVWHFRQRPLFDODQGDFFHSWDEOH7HQGHUIRUWKHIXOOGXUDWLRQRIWKH FRQWUDFWSHULRG ,QWHUHVWHG%LGGHUVPD\LQVSHFWFDPSXVHVEHWZHHQWKHKRXUV RIWR0RQGD\WKURXJK)ULGD\&ROOHFWLRQRIWKH VSHFLFDWLRQDQGELGGLQJGRFXPHQWVFDQEHREWDLQHGIURPWKH5HFHSWLRQ 'HVNDW%2OG7UDLORDGEHWZHHQWKHKRXUVRI 0RQGD\WKURXJK)ULGD\EHJLQQLQJ0RQGD\WK0DUFKDQG REWDLQIXUWKHULQIRUPDWLRQDWWKHVHFRQGDGGUHVVJLYHQEHORZ %LGVPXVWEHVXEPLWWHGLQVHDOHGHQYHORSHVPDUNHG HQGHUIRU 6HFXULW\%DKDPDV7HFKQLFDODQG9RFDWLRQDO,QVWLWXWH DQGGHOLYHUHG WRWKHDWWHQWLRQRI 7KH&KDLUPDQRIWKHHQGHUV%RDUG 0LQLVWU\RI)LQDQFH &HFLO:DOODFH:KLWHOG%XLOGLQJ &DEOH%HDFK 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV 7KHDQDJHU %DKDPDVHFKQLFDODQGRFDWLRQDO,QVWLWXWH 2OGUDLORDG 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV %LGVPXVWEHUHFHLYHGRQ)ULGD\UG$SULO DFFRPSDQLHGE\DQHQGRUVHGFRS\RIDFXUUHQW%XVLQHVV/LFHQFH 3HUVRQVZKRVXEPLW7HQGHUVDUHLQYLWHGWRSXEOLFRSHQLQJRIELGVDW WKH0LQLVWU\RI)LQDQFHLQWKH &HFLO:DOODFH:KLWHOG%XLOGLQJ&DEOH %HDFKRQXHVGD\WK %,UHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRUHMHFWDQ\RUDOO%LGV n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Members of the Caribbean Electric Utility Service Cor p oration visited Grand Bahama for a two-day disaster preparedness meeting to create a response plan for the upcoming hurricane season of 2009. L awrence Benjamin, project manag er at CARILEC, coordinated the annual meeting at Mary Anne’s Restaurant i n Freeport, where issues such as improving disaster response in the member states were addressed. Representatives from 10 electrical utility companies attended the meet i ng, which officially commenced on March 26. “We normally meet prior to the start of the hurricane season so we can share k nowledge and experiences, as well as cite issues in our efficient response to a disaster so that we can better serve inr esponding to any disaster that may occur,” said Mr Benjamin. “We strive continually to improve o ur services to members and stake holders.” Excell Ferrell, president and CEO of the Grand Bahama Power Company, said there are a number of measures being taken to improve its facilities inF reeport in case of disasters. He revealed that a 24-hour trans mission distribution control centre will be launched within the next couple of m onths. This, he said, will allow the company to be able to handle the trans mission line and system remotely. We are also putting in a new communication system which will improve communication with our workers ont he entire 96 miles of Grand Bahama. “We continue to work to improve the system so you do not have outages, except when there is a major hurricane and it is difficult to avoid,” he said. Mr Ferrell said GBPC also plans to u pgrade its infrastructure and equipment and carry out other system improvements before the “lightning season.” H e noted that lightning is a major cause of power outages on Grand Bahama and said improvements areb eing made to improve the transmission line system to withstand lightning strikes. We have gone through our entire system by reviewing and updating the protection and coordination, and we are in the process of putting in some automation that should eliminate the number of outages that customers expe r ience.” When asked for an update on the new $12 million electrical infrastructure project for West End, Mr Ferrell s aid the project is moving forward. He noted that engineering for the 22-mile transmission line has been com-p leted and a request has been submitted to the government. “We expect a response on that short l y and the materials will be ordered in the next few days and we will begin construction and have it completed (by year’s end,” he said. CARILEC holds meeting in Grand Bahama on disaster preparedness TWO Canadian tourists had a narr ow escape yesterday when a taxi burst into flames as it was driving through the streets of Nassau. The vehicle, driven by 50-year-old Leroy Neely, began smoking as it passed the Central Bank at the end of S hirley Street. A s Mr Neely diverted up Market S treet, the taxi caught fire behind G overnment House in School Lane. Firemen were called and exting uished the blaze, but they were unable to save the vehicle, which was destroyed. N o-one was hurt in the drama, which occurred at about 12.15pm outside C R Walker School. A source told The Tribune : “The two Canadians were a husband and wife. They and the driver got out of the taxi okay, and the couple caughta nother cab to get to their destination.” It is believed the fire was caused by an electrical fault. Tourists narrowly escape burning taxi

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T he Sandyport resident provided police with details of their names and occupations when he reported the assault at the Central Police Station. He said security guards stood idly by as the attack took place. The 27-year-old woman who was with him drove her wounded friend to the Princess Margaret Hospital. T he well-known Bahamian man, who asked The Tribune to withhold his identity, has since been told of the charges by officer McKenzie, who is leading the investigation, but his attempts to con tact her since have been unsuccessful. H e said: “I feel really uneasy about the handling of the situation. “I filed a report for six people and we gave them four names, so why was the fourth person not charged? The three they have charged should have been able to give them information about the other three. “It just seems to be really strange to me.”H e suspects there might be some corruption in the handling of the i nvestigation, and added: “One of the guy’s brothers is in the Drug Enforcement Unit, and maybe that’s just the way things work in this country, but we are definitely not going to let that happen.” T he victim also wants police to release public information about the suspects at large to help apprehend the criminals. He said: “It’s dangerous for them to be on the streets, they’re t hreatening people’s lives, and the police are looking at this like people’s lives are not precious. “We need to find out what’s going on with this, and why the police haven’t done any investigation about the other three.” T he three men charged in connection with the incident are due to be arraigned before a magistrate on April 9. Police press liaison officer Walter Evans said investigations are c ontinuing. the engines and speeding off with them in Mr Ingraham’s boat. The source said: “The Contender is the PM’s run-about which he uses for fishing and relaxing when he comes up here.” Mr Michael Albury, chairman of Abaco’s Chamber of Com merce, has been on local radio to warn boat owners about the theft spree. Businessmen are concerned that increased crime on Abaco may deter boaters and second-home owners who are a crucial part of the island economy. “These people spend a lot of money here,” said the source. “We need to make sure this boat theft problem is brought to an end.” Two men are understood to be helping Marsh Harbour police Island constituents. His list was always long. But he was persistent in his efforts and though he was seldom successful, particularly before 1992, h e never despaired.” The prime minister said he c ould only ever comment positively on Mr Knowles’ dedication and performance, whether as a back bencher, as chairmano f the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation or as a minister. “His father who served in parliament before him was a well-known farmer who hailed from Long Island, an island f amous for farming and animal husbandry. Although Jimmy was born in Fox Hill, he trea sured his Long Island connect ion and I believe most people thought of him as a son of Long Island. There is no doubt that served Long Island well,” Mr Ingraham said. “Jimmy Knowles was also a proud son of the Bahamas. He believed deeply in his country and strove to do all within his capacity to see us grow and d evelop. He was always straightforward and could be counted on to give his best advice. And, he had a greats ense of humour and he was always an amiable companion.” The prime minister yester d ay also remembered the deceased as a devoted family man. On behalf of the governm ent and people of the Bahamas, on behalf of the offi cers and members of the Free N ational Movement, and on behalf of Delores and myself, I should like to express my grati t ude for the life and service of Jimmy Knowles. “I should like also to extend our deepest sympathy to hism other, Mrs Knowles; his wife, Amarylis; his sons, James Jr and Roman; his daughter, Kimber-l ey; his brothers and sisters, and the entire Knowles family. I pray that you find peace in the words of St Paul in his timeJ immy fought a good fight, fin ished his course, and kept faith, now he has gone on to reap his promised rewards. May he rest i n peace,” Mr Ingraham said. Also paying tribute was Mr J Henry Bostwick, QC, a political colleague and friend. Archdea c on Keith Cargtwright preached the sermon. The large funeral was attend e d by Governor General Arthur Hanna, members of government and opposition inb oth House and Senate, the C hief Justice and members of the judiciary, the police and defence forces, members of thec lergy, Lady Pindling, family and friends. Parliamentary pallbearers were Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette, National Security Minister TommyTurnq uest, Education Minister Carl Bethel, Labour and Social Development Minister Dion Foulkes, Senator Allyson May n ard-Gibson, Senator Hope Strachan, MP Obie Wilch combe, and MP Philip (BraveD avis. Honorary pallbearers were John Darville, James Pinder,T ony Knowles, Mike Lightb ourn, Bert Knowles and Joseph Treco. Pallbearers were his five b rothers, Alex, Emerick, Charlton, Patrick and Geoffrey Knowles; and Eric Knowles. She is seeking damages for slander, libel, malicious falsehood and misfeasance in public office, as well aggravated and exemplary damages. ( Bahamas) when the Trinidad government and regulators were forced to bail out CL Financial, the parent company of CLICO (Bahamas accounting for 59 per cent of the Bahamian insurer’s assets at year-end 2007. CLICO Enterprises had invested the majority off unds advanced to it in Florida-based real estate development c ompany Wellington Preserve Real Estate, which suffered more than a 20 per cent decline in market value at year-end 2007 due to a collapsing property market. A winding-up Order was granted by the Supreme Court on Feb ruary 24, appointing Mr Craig Gomez of Baker Tilley Gomez as P rovisional Liquidator for CLICO (BahamasCLICO The Order was made following a petition by the Registrar of Insurance Companies (ORIC u nder Section 41 of the Insurance Act. A ttorneys Damian Gomez, Alfred Sears, Godfrey ‘Pro’ Pinder, Glenys Hanna Martin and Diane Stewart are among several of the attorneys representing CLICO policy holders. FROM page one Investigation into stabbing at Green Parrot continues FROM page one Liquidators attorney calls for wind-up to proceed Magistrate’s court: Police pr obe ongoing FROM page one FROM page one PMkept informed over boat inquiry FROM page one PM hails ‘proud son of Bahamas’ S CENES from J ames Knowles’s funeral. Pictures by Tim Clarke

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n B y BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T h e Johnson’s Lady Truckers have had a stranglehold o n the New Providence W omen’s Basketball Assoc iation title for the past three years. B ut the Bommer G Lady Angels, winners of the initial two titles in 2003 and 2004, are hoping that this will be t he year that they break the Lady Truckers’ winning streak. O n Thursday night at the DW D avis Gymnasium, Bommer G, sporting new uniforms, rallied down thes tretch for a 67-66 victory over the L ady Truckers to snatch a 1-0 lead in their best-of-five championship series. Game two is scheduled to be played n ext week Thursday. It was a huge win, considering the f act that the Lady Angels had to go t he last three and-a-half minutes without guard Sharelle Cash who fouledo ut and power forward Keisha R ichardson, who had to hobble around on a slight sprained ankle. Center Alexandria ‘Shaq’ Fernand er stepped up and provided the spark, coming up with two consecu-t ive block shots to help fuel a 65-64 l ead and after missing a pair of free throws at 41.1 seconds, finally con-v erted one or two with 6.2 seconds t o eventually seal the win. “We knew this was going to be a stiff competition between us and the T ruckers, but we just wanted to go out there and play our best, make ourl ay-ups and get back on defense and t hat is what we did,” Fernander said. Fernander, who finished the game w ith four blocks, one steal, 12 points a nd a game high 14 rebounds, said her mind went back to when San Antonio played against Boston andM anu Ginobili missed four free throws in a row as the Spurs lost to the Celtics. I think I was concentrating too much at that point,” she reflected. B efore fouling out, Cash cont ributed a side high 21 points with five rebounds and a block, steal and assist. Richardson helped out with 12 points and seven rebounds and Chris handra Kelly had 12 points with two rebounds. D espite the fact that the Lady A ngels tried to take Shantell Rolle out of the equation, the prolific scor-e r still managed to get loose for a game high 29 points with eight rebounds, three assists and threes teals for the Lady Truckers. G lenda Gilcud, the other half of their dynamic backcourt duo, was held to just 16 points, while JaniceW illiams had a double with 11 points and one rebound. Latoya Rolle only had four points with six rebounds. The game was a keenly contested one with no team taking any consid e rable lead. In fact, the Lady Angels had the biggest at 53-49 at the end of the third. T he Lady Truckers, who opened a slight 18-16 margin at the end of the first and played to a 34-34 half-time lead, had a couple of key turnovers down the stretch that made the difference. C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 12 Special Olympics Bahamas’ special course... Angels rally for 67-66 victory over Truckers n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net IT’S not often that visiting colleges or universities from the United States or Canada come to town to look at potential Bahamian athletes for athletic scholarships. Today from 9 am at the DW Davis Gymnasium, two coaches from Holland College are expected to conduct a training session to look at both male and female basketball players in grades 11-12 and those who have just recently graduated. Trevor Grant, head coach of the CR Walker Knights’ senior boys basketball team, said they were able to arrange the trip for Michael O’Grady and Jeff Walker through their Maritime Training Center. “It was offered to our school, but I decided to open it up to all schools, who have players who are athletically and academically inclined to go to college,” Grant said. “We just want them to come out and try to attain one or two of the scholarships.” On Monday evening at 7 pm at the Radisson Cable Beach Hotel, O’Grady and Walker are slated to hold a workshop to discuss the requirements for entry into Holland College with prospective student-ath letes and their parents. O’Grady, the vice president of Holland College, said for the past five years they have been collaborating with the Bahamas Maritime Authority with a joint programme where graduates have been invited to attend their school. “This weekend, along with several other things, we will run the basketball camp for boys and girls senior high players and senior players in general, who might be interested in coming up to Holland College to play basketball,” he said. “We expect to see some tremendous Bahamian ath letes that will be able to fill into our academic pro gramme.” Walker, the student services and athletic officer, is set to conduct the clinic today. “We’re expecting some big things. We already had a test in getting to know coach Grant and from a lot of things that we heard, we’re expecting a lot of talented players to come out,” he said. “We’re looking forward to seeing what’s here and looking forward to getting some athletes to come to Canada for college.” Once the student-athletes can meet the athletic requirements, based on the pro gramme they are interested in, and if they have the athletic skills, Walker said they will be happy to sign them before they leave on Tuesday. Holland College is located on Weymouth Street, Charlottetown, Canada. Their varsity Hurricane’s teams play in the highly competitive Atlantic Colleges Athletic Association (ACAA Want an athletic scholarship? Holland College coaches to conduct training session for male, female basketball players in grades 11-12, high school graduates SHOWN are persons involved in the Holland College’s recruitment for Bahamian student-athletes today at the DW Davis Gymnasium. (L-r Walker of Holland College, coach Trevor Grant of CR Walker, Michael O’Grady of Holland College, Steve MacFarlane of the Bahamas Maritime Center and Arthur Thompson Jr, who will assist Grant... Bommer G take 1-0 lead in series ‘BLAST FROM THE PAST’ W W O O M M E E N N S S B B B B A A L L L L S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2 TRIBUNE Sports’ ‘Blast From The Past’ today takes you b ack to a couple memorable fights involving the Bahamas B oxing Commission’s chairman and former cruiserweight champion. In this shot, Ernie ‘the Androsian Tiger’ Barr (left their bouts on November 30, 1980. Barr, however, went on to win the 10-round decision on points... See other photo on page 12 ISKF has first grading for ... See page 13

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WITH the numbers of children with intellectual disabilities increasing, many schools in New Providence have introduced special units into their system. Even though they are assigned specially trained instructors for their cognitive development, they are not fortunate enough to have specially trained physical education instructors for their sports development. The board of directors of Special Olympics Bahamas, in conjunction with the sports divi-sion of the Ministry of Educat ion, organised a special course t his week to address that conc ern. Basil Christie, chairman of Special Olympics, reinforced the philosophy of the organisation that, through sports training and competition, persons with intellectual disabilities develop strength in character, personality and self esteem. He stressed that if those instructors involved with these students were trained in Special Olympics techniques and m ethodology, they would be able to offer more to their total development. Thus, Special Olympics organised the course, which was conducted by Craig Pippert, a senior training instructor from the Special Olympics North American office. He was assisted by Roosevelt Thompson, Technical 7 sports director of Special Olympics Bahamas. The course was conducted March 25-26 at the National Tennis Center, and 38 instructors gained certification in “Basic Special Olympics Ori entation”. The intention is for these instructors to use the Special Olympics structure and tech niques within their schools. As most of these students are not in the Special Olympics programme, Christie is hopeful that they can benefit from the Spe cial Olympics techniques through the newly trained instructors. The special event was officially opened by Archie Nairn, permanent secretary in the Min istry of Youth, Sports and Cul ture. He congratulated Special Olympics for providing this training opportunity for local physical education instructors, and encouraged registrants to learn from the best. He then pledged his ministry’s continued support of the national pro gramme. Physical education teachers and activities co-ordinators from 17 schools and institutions such as Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre and the Every Child Counts School in Abaco attended the course. Instructors took the oppor tunity to register their athletes for the upcoming Special Olympics Games set for May 29-30. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Angels rally for 67-66 victory “We made some crucial turnovers and we made some fouls when we didn’t play defense and that cost us,” Price said. “They were in the bonus early and going to the line they made one or two, which was the same thing as getting two points.” Come Thursday, Price assured the Lady Angels that they will be back and will play Truckers basketball. “We’re coming to play,” he said. “Once we come to play, we will even the series.” Unlike the regular season when the Lady Truckers used their potent offensive attack, they were contained a lot more as the Lady Angels tightened up on their defense. Bommer G’s coach Anthony Swaby said his squad is just hungry to regain the title. “The whole series will be like this because you have a team with 18 championships under their belt and the team who is trying for four straight,” Swaby said. “So I don’t think they will just roll over and play dead. In game two we will have to step up our intensity and hopefully our free throws will be better than tonight.” The week break in action, according to Swaby, may work in favour of his Lady Angels, who have a little more healing process to go through than the younger Truckers. “We will go back to practice and improve on some things that we need to work on,” said Swaby, who noted that he was really pleased with the contribution he got from point guard Keva Barry and forward Chrishandra Kelly. IN THIS photo, Strachan gets a left jab through the defense of Ken Davis in their bout on May 1, 1984. Strachan was eventually awarded a 10-round decision over Davis... F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 ‘BLAST FROM THE PAST’ Special Olympics Bahamas puts together special course Thirty eight instructors gain certification in ‘Basic Special Olympics Orientation’ BASIL CHRISTIE , national chairman of Special Olympics Bahamas, Dawn Knowles, senior sports officer in the Ministry of Education, and Craig Pippert, senior technical director of S pecial Olympics North America...

PAGE 11

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009, PAGE 13 THE ISKF (International Shotokan Karate Federation) Group had there first grading for the year earlier this week. Master Teruyuki Okazaki, a 1 0th degree black belt, cond ucted the grading at The S hotokan Karate Bahamas Dojo, West Bay Street. Master Okazaki was also in Grand Bahama to conduct their grading as well. Sensei Brian Stapleton is the chief instructor. Shotokan Karate Bahamas is a new and small karate dojo with big dreams. Their goal is the promulgation of Traditional Shotokan Karate in the Bahamas as espoused by the I nternational Shotokan Karate Federation (ISKF Japan Karate Association (JKA Apart from their affiliations with the above bodies, Shotokan Karate Bahamas is also affiliated with the Bahamas Japan Karate Association (BJKA representing ISKF/JKA karatein the Bahamas. Classes are held on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays between 6:30 8 pm and there is a monthly fee. Shotokan Karate Bahamas is dedicated to the practice and p romulgation of Traditional S hotokan Karate in the B ahamas. ISKF has first grading for M ASTER OKAZAKI i s shown with some of the black belts from the various schools in New Providence as they went through the grading...

PAGE 12

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 66F/19C Low: 68F/20C Low: 73 F/23C Low: 75 F/24 Low: 74 F/23C Low: 76 F/24C Low: 72F/22C Low: 68 F/20 High: 89F/32C High: 85F/29C High: 85F/29C High: 85F/29C High: 86F/30C High: 83F/28C High: 85F/29C Low: 68F/20C High: 84F/29C Low: 68 F/20C High: 84F/29CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 67 F/19C High: 87F/31C Low: 69F/21C High: 84 F/29C Low: 64F/18C High: 81F/27C Low: 66 F/19 High: 85F/29C Low: 68 F/20C High: 87F/31C Low: 67 F/19C High: 85 F/29C Low: 65F/18C High: 84F/29C Low: 69 F/21 High: 88F/31C Low: 71F/22C High: 89 F/32C High: 83 F/28 CFREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI SATURDAY MARCH 28 2009THE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Breezy and very warm with sunshine. Partly cloudy .Very warm with sunshine and clouds. Partly sunny; chance of a shower . Mostly sunny and humid. High: 85 Low: 72 High: 89 High: 85 High: 85 AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel Partly sunny. High: 86 Low: 74 Low: 74 Low: 74 AccuWeather RealFeel 90 The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 75F 95-88F 90-82F 91-76F 92 F Low: 74 TODAYTONIGHTSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY ALMANAC High ..................................................77F/25C Low ....................................................68F/20C Normal high ......................................80F/27C Normal low ........................................67F/19C Last year's high ..................................81F/27C Last year's low ..................................67F/20C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................2.07" Normal year to date ......................................4.95" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU First Full Last New Apr . 2 Apr. 9Apr. 17Apr. 24 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:06 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:25 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 8:04 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 9:41 p.m. Today Sunday Monday T uesday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 9:44 a.m.2.63:40 a.m.-0.1 10:01 p.m.3.13:40 p.m.-0.1 10:27 a.m. 2.64:25 a.m.-0.1 10:47 p.m. 3.14:23 p.m.-0.1 11:13 a.m.2.55:13 a.m.0.0 11:38 p.m.3.05:10 p.m.-0.1 12:04 p.m.2.46:06 a.m.0.1 -----6:04 p.m.0.0 WORLDCITIES Acapulco88/3170/21s88/3170/21s Amsterdam49/943/6r47/838/3sAnkara, T urkey48/827/-2pc58/1429/-1s Athens63/1751/10s63/1756/13c Auckland71/2158/14c71/2159/15s Bangkok94/3478/25c94/3479/26cBarbados 84/2875/23pc85/2974/23s Barcelona61/1646/7r60/1544/6c Beijing49/931/0s40/429/-1sn Beirut58/1452/11sh59/1555/12sBelgrade 69/20 47/8s69/2052/11sh Berlin 49/9 36/2r50/1035/1c Bermuda68/2065/18c70/2165/18pc Bogota64/1748/8r63/1747/8r Brussels43/636/2r48/837/2shBudapest 59/1543/6c54/1248/8r Buenos Aires88/3168/20s88/3168/20s Cairo73/2250/10s73/2249/9s Calcutta96/3577/25c95/3578/25s Calgary38/318/-7c35/117/-8sf Cancun88/3173/22s84/2868/20sh Caracas79/2666/18t83/2868/20c Casablanca68/2056/13sh68/2048/8pc Copenhagen 42/541/5r46/740/4sh Dublin46/736/2sh48/839/3pc Frankfurt 48/8 36/2 r50/1036/2c Geneva 42/5 39/3 r46/734/1c Halifax52/1134/1pc48/838/3r Havana86/3066/18s84/2866/18sh Helsinki34/130/-1sn36/230/-1cHong Kong 77/2570/21t73/2265/18sh Islamabad83/2860/15pc82/2755/12t Istanbul56/1345/7s61/1654/12sJerusalem 56/13 40/4pc55/1240/4s Johannesburg78/2554/12s78/2551/10s Kingston88/3177/25pc85/2976/24s Lima85/2964/17pc83/2864/17pc London45/732/0sh50/1030/-1c Madrid55/1232/0r52/1130/-1sh Manila 90/32 75/23 t94/3475/23t Mexico City 79/26 45/7pc77/2541/5s Monterrey 79/2650/10s84/2856/13s Montreal57/1341/5c50/1036/2r Moscow34/123/-5sf37/232/0c Munich 51/10 34/1 r35/134/1sn Nairobi 88/31 60/15pc88/3161/16t New Delhi85/2974/23pc91/3272/22pc Oslo36/232/0sn38/331/0c Paris 49/939/3sh48/834/1c Prague56/1337/2r44/636/2r Rio de Janeiro 81/2774/23r82/2775/23r Riyadh81/2761/16pc85/2955/12s Rome 63/17 54/12 r57/1354/12r St. Thomas83/2872/22s83/2872/22s San Juan95/3564/17s96/3564/17s San Salvador91/3264/17s89/3173/22s Santiago84/2850/10s81/2752/11s Santo Domingo 86/30 68/20 s84/2866/18s Sao Paulo 76/2463/17t78/2566/18t Seoul48/828/-2s55/1231/0pc Stockholm41/532/0c41/532/0c Sydney74/2360/15pc78/2563/17pcT aipei 76/24 66/18r69/2062/16r T okyo53/1139/3pc52/1142/5c Toronto54/1240/4c47/831/0sh T rinidad 84/2873/22t85/2976/24sh Vancouver44/636/2r47/840/4pc Vienna61/1649/9pc54/1246/7r Warsaw47/843/6c44/639/3rWinnipeg 28/-2 17/-8 pc39/319/-7c HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C T odaySundayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow , i -ice, Pr cp-precipitation, T r -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO T oday:SE at 10-20 Knots4-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Sunday: SE at 10-20 Knots4-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:SE at 10-20 Knots4-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Sunday:SE at 10-20 Knots4-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:SE at 12-25 Knots5-8 Feet7-10 Miles74F Sunday:SE at 12-25 Knots5-8 Feet7-10 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 60/15 38/3s70/2139/3s Anchorage35/125/-3pc36/227/-2pc Atlanta 68/2046/7t62/1642/5s Atlantic City56/1348/8r65/1841/5r Baltimore 54/12 45/7 r 64/1740/4r Boston 54/1244/6pc53/1141/5r Buffalo54/1243/6c54/1232/0sh Charleston, SC78/2561/16pc71/2147/8t Chicago44/631/0r42/527/-2c Cleveland54/1242/5r51/1030/-1shDallas 52/11 38/3 pc65/1851/10s Denver42/531/0pc56/1325/-3pcDetroit 50/1034/1r43/627/-2sh Honolulu82/2769/20pc81/2769/20pc Houston63/1743/6s70/2155/12s HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/C F/CF/C High LowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C High LowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodaySunday T odaySunday T odaySunday Indianapolis 56/13 38/3r44/633/0c Jacksonville86/3064/17pc74/2346/7t Kansas City 36/226/-3sn49/937/2pc Las Vegas78/2553/11s80/2655/12s Little Rock 54/12 37/2 pc 65/1840/4s Los Angeles 82/2754/12s70/2154/12s Louisville64/1740/4r50/1036/2c Memphis61/1639/3pc57/1343/6s Miami86/3074/23s86/3066/18t Minneapolis44/622/-5pc48/824/-4sNashville 66/18 39/3 r53/1137/2pc New Orleans64/1748/8r61/1650/10s New Y ork56/1348/8c55/1242/5r Oklahoma City38/327/-2sn58/1443/6pc Orlando89/3168/20s78/2556/13t Philadelphia56/1346/7r60/1540/4r Phoenix82/2755/12s85/2957/13s Pittsburgh59/1546/7r52/1134/1sh Portland, OR 51/1042/5r53/1139/3c Raleigh-Durham 67/19 56/13r70/2139/3pc St. Louis46/735/1r52/1141/5s Salt Lake City 58/14 38/3 pc 42/5 25/-3 sh San Antonio70/2141/5s75/2355/12s San Diego 77/25 55/12s66/1855/12pc San Francisco 64/17 49/9 s 65/1846/7s Seattle 48/840/4r50/1038/3pc Tallahassee77/2557/13t71/2143/6pc Tampa85/2970/21pc75/2355/12tT ucson77/2549/9s81/2751/10s W ashington, DC 57/13 53/11r66/1843/6pc UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather.com

PAGE 13

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE the scene N A SSAU E V ENTS C A PTURED O N C A MERA b y Franklyn G Ferguson, J P MEDICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE B AHAMAS’ 37TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 1 2 3 4 6 8 7 5 2009 1. Dr Timothy Barrett, president of the Medical Association of the Bahamas; Dr Corrine Sin Quee,c hairman of the Conference C ommittee; Dr Hubert Minnis, M inister of Health. 2. Dr Robin Roberts, urologist; Dr Corrine Sin Quee, pediatric o ncologist, Dr Duane Sands, c ardiac surgeon; Dr Arthur P orter, CEP of McGill Health C entre; Dr Timothy Barrett, psyc hiatrist; Dr Glenn Beneby, anes thesiologist and medial advisor, P MH; Dr Christine Chin, general p ractitioner, co-chairman of the c onference; Dr Magnus Ekededee, neurosugeon; Dr Horizal S immons, gynecologist, past president of the Medical Associ ation of the Bahamas. 3. Businessman E Pedro R oberts, CEO of Commonwealth Drugs, is flanked by Nurse Beverley Culmer and Nurse Lillian McNeil. 4. Dr Mortimer Moxey, general practitioner; Dr George Charite, president of the Bahama Medical and Dental Association and Dr Horizal Simmons, past president of the Medical Association of the Bahamas. 5. Dr Barrett Mc Cartney, anesthesiologist; Nurse Lillian McNeil; Dr Percival Mc-Neil, pediatrician; and Dr Kurian Campbell, surgeon. 6. Dr Arthur Porter, CEO of McGill Health Centre in Montreal and Dr Vincent Nwosa, pheumatologist. 7. Dr Munir Rashad, oral/maxil lary facial Surgeon; Dr May Hes timo, orthopedic surgeon, Dr Noelynn Rolle, optometrist; and Dr Kirk Culmer, family practitioner. 8. Dr Leslie Culmer, general practitioner and Dr Bernard Rolle, general practitioner.


m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

up all night!

McDonald’s downtown

drive-thru is now open

24 hours

GCE Emer rN)

HIGH
LOW

SOF
72F

SUNNY AND

WARM

Volume: 105 No.105

POLICE officers from Nas-
sau were flown to Abaco yes-
terday to assist in investigations
after Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham’s fishing boat was
“tampered with” and believed
used in a theft.

Port
chair
resigns

FREEPORT, Grand
Bahama: Mr Hannes Babak
resumed his position as
chairman of the Board of
Directors of The Grand
Bahama Port Authority,
Limited Friday, as Felix
Stubbs stepped down from
the post that he has held for
the past several months.

Mr Stubbs will continue
as director of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
Board (GBPA).

On Friday GBPA
announced the acceptance
of Mr Stubbs’ resignation.

“Working with the dedi-
cated GBPA team has been
a valuable experience for
me and I hope I was able
to provide a caring and sup-
portive leadership the past
several months,” said Mr
Stubbs. “I believe, however,
that it is in the best interest
of the company for me to
step down as Chairman at
this time. This would allow
for better synergy in the
leadership team and make it
a lot easier to position the
Group of Companies to cre-
ate an environment for
Grand Bahama to realise its
full potential.”

Mr Stubbs said “the
decision was made after
much careful consideration,
but I am comforted by the
fact that the company is in
great hands with its new
leadership and I will con-
tinue to give advice on the
future of the company as a
Director of the Board.”



According to Assistant Com-
missioner Hulan Hanna, the
police are taking this matter
“very seriously.” However, he
could not confirm whether the
Prime Minister’s “run-about”
had been removed from its
moorings and used to commit
a crime.

What the police do know at
this time, however, is that it is
clear that the boat has been
tampered with and the prime
minister is being kept abreast
of developments in the investi-
gation.

However, sources on the
island claim that the 21-foot
Contender was taken from the
marina at Green Turtle Cay and
returned later — only after the
thieves had used it to steal two
Yamaha 250 engines worth
$60,000 from another boat.

The matter came to light
when one of Mr Ingraham’s
fishing companions went to
check the craft only to discover
its deck smeared with oil and
littered with engine parts.

The incident was part of an
alarming growth in boat theft
in the Abaco cays, which is
causing concern among second-
home owners on the islands.

A worried resident of Green
Turtle Cay told The Tribune
yesterday: “Tourists are getting
tired of these thefts, which are
occurring at the rate of about
one-a-night from the Abacos.

“Nearly all the cays off Aba-
co have been affected and we
are beginning to think the boats
are being taken for use in the
drug trade.”

The main targets are twin-
engined 35-foot go-fast boats
worth up to $200,000 apiece.

The boat, from which the
engines were stolen by the
thieves who had taken Mr
Ingraham’s craft, had been
stolen from Green Turtle Cay
three weeks ago.

Because the stolen boat was
fitted with a tracking device, it
was traced to Nassau and
retrieved by its foreign owner.

It was after the boat was
returned to Green Turtle Cay
and hoisted on a lift that thieves
struck a second time, removing

SEE page 8

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009

ail acetals of former cabinet minister James Knowles looks on as friends and colleagues speak about their memories of

FRANZIA

PMS fishing hoa
tampered With

Police probe
if vessel used
for crime act

the late James ‘Jimmy’ Knowles.

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham yesterday remembered
former Member of Parliament and Cabinet Minister James “Jim-
my” Knowles as a “valuable ally and an honourable adversary.”

Paying tribute to the late MP at the funeral service held at
Christ Church Cathedral, Mr Ingraham said:

“We were all aware that our friend and former colleague had
been courageously battling the dreaded disease of cancer for a
number of years now. The last weeks and months were an espe-
cially difficult season in his life but as was typical of him, he
fought valiantly. Still, the passing of Jimmy Knowles at the rela-
tively young age of 66 came as a shock to all of us.”

Mr Ingraham said he knew the deceased for many years, first
as a fellow member of the Bahamas Bar, then as an MP and lat-

Police continuing
probe into alleged

judicial corruption

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police inves-
tigations are still continuing into
alleged complaints of corrup-
tion involving a former Grand
Bahama magistrate, Police
Commissioner Reginald Fergu-
son told The Tribune.

He said investigations start-
ed early last year sometime into
the allegations against the mag-
istrate and other persons at the
Magistrate’s Court in the Gar-
net Levarity Justice Centre in
Freeport.

“We have not turned over
the matter to the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office — it is still in the
police domain and is not yet



completed,” Commissioner Fer-
guson said.

According to reports, the for-
mer magistrate is accused of
allegedly accepting bribes and
was suspended sometime in
June 2007. It is also alleged that
a prosecutor and others in the
court might have been involved
in the alleged corruption,
involving the payments of fines.

The former Grand Bahama
magistrate has filed a legal suit
against another sitting magis-
trate in Freeport claiming that
she caused her emotional and
mental distress and severely
damaged her career and repu-
tation by accusing her of accept-
ing bribes from accused per-
sons.

SEE page 8



extrahours

PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

S$
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BAISTOL

WINES & SPIRITS

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BACARDI. tan licensor

THE PATRON

Spirits COMPANY



Three charged
with stabbing
at Green Parrot

= By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

POLICE have charged three men in connection with a brutal
attack on a 28-year-old man whose neck was sliced open outside

The Green Parrot bar and grill.

But the victim has condemned police for not yet apprehend-

ing all six of his attackers.

He recognised four of the men involved in the incident, which
took place in the car park of the East Bay Street bar and grill at
around 10pm on Friday, March 20.

er as a minister in his Cabinet.

SEE page 8

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

“He had articled with the legendary Sir Stafford Sands, and
throughout his practice of the law, whether with some of the coun-
try’s leading law firms or on his own, he maintained the highest
standards of integrity and trustworthiness,” the prime minister

said.

In the political arena, Mr Knowles “courageously followed his
conscience and was a valuable ally and an honourable adversary.”
Mr Ingraham said that throughout his tenure in Parliament, Mr
Knowles fought continually to improve the condition of his Long

SEE page 8



Attorney: CLICO
premiums safe in
protected account

= By NATARIO MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ALL CLICO premiums paid
since the winding up order was
issued against the insurance
company in late February will
be placed in a separate protect-
ed client fund, an attorney
involved in the case said yes-
terday.

Lawyer Sidney Cambridge,
who represents provisional liq-
uidator Craig Gomez, also told
the court yesterday that the
company that reportedly has
some 23,000 Bahamian police
holders is insolvent and has
more liabilities than assets. He
added that the liquidation of
the company should proceed.
Mr Cambridge told the court
that the provisional liquidator’s



NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

report has been filed and made
available.

He said that his team has
engaged counsel in Trinidad to
file an injunction against the
parent company CL Financial
in order to bar the sale of assets.
He also said that his team has
engaged counsel in Florida
regarding land in that state con-
sidered to be a part of CLICO
Bahamas’ asset pool. Mr Cam-
bridge also told the court that
an agreement has been reached
with regard to the reinsurer con-
tinuing coverage.

The case, which is before
Justice Cheryl Albury, was
adjourned to April 7. The death
knell came for CLICO

SEE page 8
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS
THE FUNERAL OF FORMER MP



AT CHRIST THE KING CHURCH

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial institutions in the
Caribbean. Through our Business Area Wealth Management International we look
after wealthy private clients by providing them with comprehensive, value
enhancing services. Our client advisors combine strong personal relationships with
the resources that are available from across UBS, helping them provide a full
range of wealth management services.

In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we are looking to fill the following
position:

Human Resources Manager

The main responsibilities of the position holder include:

" Define and manage strategic plans in connection with, Compensation & Benefits, Recruitment,
Training & Development, Employee Relations and International Assignment Services.
Serve as advisor to management, local employees and International Assignees on relevant HR
polices and procedures.
Recruit managerial and non-managerial staff (locally and internationally).
Develop, review and execute HR processes and policies.
Supervise a small team.
Liaise and negotiate with internal specialists and external service providers.

In order to satisfy our requirements the applicants must possess:

Minimum five years experience in a comparable Human Resources Management position with a
leading global company (preferably in the banking industry).

Solid international experience in a very diverse, complex and dynamic environment.

Bachelor’s degree in a relevant discipline from a recognized and accredited educational institu-
tion.

Proven track record as manager, leader and team player.

Proven track record as a presenter and coach.

Capability to successfully build up and foster relationships and networks.

Excellent communication, presentation and coaching skills.

Sound knowledge of MS Office and HR software applications.








PRIME Minister Huburt Ingraham shared some of his
memory of James Knowles yesterday during the ser-
vice at Christ Church Cathedral.

Please send your resume, on or before April 1st, 2009 to
hrbahamas@ubs.com

or

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd., Human Resources, P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas

It starts with you.



CHRISTIAN Knowles the nephew of the late James MEMBERS of parliment and the Senate all attended the
Knowles speaks at the funeral. funeral servive of James Knowles.

RSBBOAL YARD

pat ea 8

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Rising sea level could
threaten Bahama islands



Family of murdered —
man still await justice

GRIEVING relatives of Deron ‘Sharky’ Bethel are still wait- }
ing for justice three years to the day after he was shot dead i

while sitting in his car.
His tearful mother, Diana Bethel, told The Tribune yesterday:

“Tt is still very painful. I cry every day because I miss my boy so

much.”

Deron, 20, was shot while waiting outside his home in
Pinewood Gardens. A police officer was later charged with his

murder.

However, three years on, a court date has not yet been set for i

a Supreme Court hearing.

Mrs Bethel said: “We have no indication at all of a court date. }

The family is still grieving and we are still waiting for justice three
years after Deron died.”

Eyewitnesses swore affidavits following Deron’s death claim- :

ing he was shot by an off-duty policeman who had arrived outside

his home to investigate a domestic dispute in a neighbouring :

house.

They said police killed a totally innocent man thinking he was

someone else.

At Deron’s funeral in April, 2006, placard protesters marched

to Lakeview Memorial Gardens demanding “no cover-up.”

The Attorney General’s Office is now awaiting depositions i
from the magistrates court hearing to determine how they will
proceed with the case in the Supreme Court, an official said

yesterday.

But no indication was given about when the next hearing will

take place.

Man shot several times at
his home in Johnson Park

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A JOHNSON Park man was shot several times by a late-

night visitor who confronted him at his home before opening fire.

The 26-year-old victim heard a knock at his front door some
time after 10pm on Thursday. When he opened the door, he }
was confronted by a man with whom he had a disagreement }
earlier, press liaison officer Assistant Superintendent Walter i

Evans said.

During the confrontation, the visitor drew a handgun and

shot him several times.

The victim was taken to hospital where he is listed in serious

condition.

Police are also actively investigating the brazen armed robbery i

of a 55-year-old West Bay Street resident.

According to ASP Evans, the man was at his home with a
relative when a cutlass wielding bandit burst through the front :

door and demanded cash sometime after 10pm on Thursday.

The robber was able to make off with a small amount of cash
before fleeing, heading in an unknown direction, ASP Evans i

said.
Investigations into both incidents continue.

13-year-old girl seriously

injured in car crash

mg By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 13-year-old girl was airlifted to New Provi-
dence on Thursday morning with serious injuries following a :

traffic accident.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle reported that the accident
occurred at the intersection of Dominica Avenue and Swordfish :
Street, involving two vehicles — a 1998 Volvo and a 2000 Hyundai

Accent.

According to reports, Evelyn Pinder, 43, was driving the Vol-
vo heading south on Swordfish Street when her vehicle collided
with the Hyundai, which was being driven by 33-year-old Tiffany

Marshall.

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THREE of the Bahamas’
major landmasses — Abaco,
Andros and Grand Bahama —
will be either totally or partially
flooded if there is a one metre
sea level rise, according to the
director of the Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technol-
ogy Commission.

This warning comes as four
of the world’s top climate sci-
entists have revealed new data
indicating that oceans are
expected to rise as much as a
metre or more by 2100 — twice
as fast as predicted by the Unit-
ed Nations just two years ago.

The scientists, speaking at a
press conference in Copen-
hagen earlier this month, said
millions face displacement as
low-lying countries could see
large parts of their surface areas
vanish.

Considered by international
bodies to be among those coun-

tries most vulnerable to sea lev-
el rise, the Maldives recently
announced it is preparing to buy
new land in other countries so
that its population will have
somewhere to go when its pic-
turesque atolls are engulfed by
rising seas.

The islands, located in the
Indian Ocean with a population
of 385,000, are already in the
process of constructing new arti-
ficial islands for the same pur-
pose.

Eighty per cent of the coun-
try’s landmass is only one metre
above sea level — just like the
Bahamas.

Yesterday Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technol-
ogy (BEST) Commission direc-
tor Phillip Weech said the
Bahamas is not planning to
resort to such “extreme scenar-
10s” as the Maldives in response
to climate change but is also
preparing for an “uncertain
future”.

He suggested the Bahamas has
enough land well above sea lev-

el to accommodate displaced
inhabitants if certain islands were
to be submerged.

However, Mr Weech added
that the “scenarios that have
been mentioned by the Mal-
dives are in many cases very
similar to ours.”

“We are preparing in a similar
way to deal with energy security,
our green house gas footprint
and preparing for an uncertain
future.

“This is why we have prepared
our first national communication
(to the United Nations Frame-
work Convention on Climate
Change) and why we are now
working on a second national
communication.

“Tt’s why we are now working
with regard to a national energy
policy and on diversity and the
preservation of our natural land-
scape, as well as on issues related
to the Caribbean Challenge
where we are trying to set aside
parks and protected areas.”

“The best way of adapting to a
rising sea level is to keep coastal

Bahamas may have to offer
Europe more under EPA

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas may have to
offer up a wider portion of the
country's services schedule to the
European Union under the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
than initially proposed.

Minister of State for Finance
Zhirvargo Laing told The Tribune
yesterday that government
intends to meet with the
Caribbean Regional Negotiating
Machinery (CRNM) next month
to discuss the EU's observations
on the schedule that the Bahamas
submitted to the CRNM for
review earlier this year.

While he declined to get into
the specifics of those comments,
he said they relate to whether or
not the Bahamas is prepared to
offer a larger portion of the ser-
vices schedule to the EU.

"We are having some discus-
sions with them at the moment
about the services (schedule). We
expect perhaps to have a meet-
ing some time in April. So the dis-
cussions are ongoing.

"They have provided us with
some comments from the EU
about it and we've responded to
those comments so just we're dis-

cussing, finalising the documents
with them.

"The comments relate to some
questions they might have asked
about whether we are prepared
to be offer more in this area or
the other area and that's stan-
dard,” Mr Laing, who was out of
the country, said in a brief tele-
phone interview yesterday.

When asked if the country was
prepared to liberalise a greater
portion of its trade in services to
the EU, Mr Laing replied: "We
are in discussions with them — we
thought that we made the offer
that we want to make”.

The government has said that
after the review, it plans to submit
another services schedule to the
EU by the April 15 deadline for
inclusion in the Annexes of the
Agreement.

The services schedule repre-
sents the offer that the Bahamas
has made to the EU and CARI-
COM under the EPA with respect
to trade and services, according
to the Ministry of Finance. The
Bahamas signed the goods only
portion of the EPA on October
16, 2008 and was given a six-month
extension to submit its services
schedule.

Asa country with “Most Devel-
oped Country” status in CARI-

Man wanted in connection
with rape and armed robbery

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

FORUM, the Bahamas has pro-
posed liberalising trade in 83 per
cent of its 155 services industries.
The EPA is a trade agreement
that allows more open trade in
both goods and services between
CARIFORUM countries and the
European Community.

defences intact and the decisions
this government has made to
establish marine protected
reserves across the Bahamas will
do some of that,” he said.

Meanwhile, a critical moment
is approaching in the climate
change debate — the UN Climate
Change Conference in Copen-
hagen in December.

Many countries are hoping a
new global deal on cutting car-
bon emissions can be reached at
the conference, described by
many as the last chance the
world may have to avert the
most dangerous consequences
of climate change.

Via the Alliance of Small
Island States, which consists of
49 countries, the Bahamas is
“making sure its issues are on
the table” in the international
negotiating process, said Mr
Weech.

“The approach has to be to
do what we can do, as well as
what we can encourage the
developing countries to do,” he
said.



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ASP Bootle said Chauma Barrett, 13, was a passenger in Mar-

shall’s vehicle.

He said all three persons were injured and taken to Rand

Memorial Hospital for treatment. Due to the severity of Barrett’s i
injuries, she was later airlifted to the Princess Margaret Hospital. :

Man crushed by truck identified

THE man who died in a
gruesome collision between
a scooter and a dumptruck
has been identified as 33-
year-old Peter Knowles.

The incident occurred at
the junction of Prospect
Ridge and John F Kennedy
Drive on Thursday and held
up traffic for over an hour as
police cleared up the scene.

According to an eyewitness
who was in a car stopped
behind the Mack truck which
rolled over the driver of the
silver scooter, the victim
pulled up on the right-hand
side of the dumptruck as it
signalled to turn right on to
John F Kennedy Drive at
around 10.55am.

As the dumptruck pulled
off to make the turn, the dri-
ver said she was engulfed ina
cloud of dust which, when it

cleared, revealed the body of
what she soon realised was }
the driver of the scooter lying ;

in the road.

The motorbike itself was
trapped under the front of the
stopped :

truck, which
moments later.

According to those on the }
scene, the driver of the truck :
would have been unable to }
see the moped, which was }
located on the opposite side }

to the truck’s driver.

“Shaken up” by the inci-
dent, the truck driver was tak-

en to hospital by ambulance.










FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE

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Me eC ey
322-2157

To advertise ALL your

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call The Tribune’s Sales Department

502-2394



Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police have
issued an all-points bulletin for a
27-year-old Grand Bahama man
who is wanted for questioning in
connection with a rape and armed
robbery.

A wanted poster for Renaldo
Nekito Javarr Kemp, also known
as “Blue”, was officially released
by police on Thursday

His last known address is 45
Starlane Drive, Nassau East, New
Providence, and Grand Bahama.

Kemp is of “dark complexion, has brown eyes and short
crinkly hair.” He is about five feet, nine inches tall, of medi-
um built and weighs approximately 210lbs.

He is considered armed and dangerous and should be
approached with caution. Anyone with information con-
cerning this individual is asked to contact police at 352-1919,
351-9111, 351-9991, 352-8351, 352-9076, and 350-3125 or, 911.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News FPaApZ roe oLONe mo
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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Pendulum swings to financial

WASHINGTON (AP) — Capitalism can't
always be trusted. If you're too big to fail, you're
too big to make all your own decisions, accord-
ing to the emerging view in Washington.

Three decades after Ronald Reagan
launched a determined campaign to ease gov-
ernment regulations on business, the pendu-
lum is swinging the other way.

Riding a wave of public anger over Wall
Street greed and government bailouts, the Oba-
ma administration on Thursday unveiled a far-
reaching plan for "better, tougher, smarter"
rules over big financial companies. The plan
would crack down on major — but now lightly
regulated — players such as hedge funds and
traders of exotic financial products.

The administration is also pressing for clos-
er international coordination. Allies want the
USS. to get tougher, and the new plan will give
President Barack Obama something to show
when he goes to London next week for an eco-
nomic summit of 20 major and developing
nations.

Most of what Obama is seeking, including a
new regulator to oversee the entire financial
system, will require legislation. With the level of
angst in the country as high as it is, it seems
likely he will get at least some of the changes
through the Democratic-controlled Congress.

Even administration critics acknowledge
there needs to be more financial regulation to
avoid any repeat of the kind of meltdown that
has plunged much of the globe into painful
recession. Few would argue that it's a good idea
to allow sprawling financial conglomerates to be
able to shop for their own regulator — pretty
much what bailed-out insurer American Inter-
national Group did.

But there is also fear of going too far and
suppressing the entrepreneurial spirit that is
part of the nation's free-market heritage. The
pendulum had been swinging against tough reg-
ulation until recently. Although President Jim-
my Carter began deregulation efforts in the
late 1970s, focusing on airlines, trucking, rail-
roads and natural gas, Reagan popularized the
idea as a major government goal. He imposed a
moratorium on all new federal regulation
enforcement upon taking office.

President Bill Clinton continued the process,
signing legislation ending the 1930s-era barrier
between banks and investment and insurance
companies, but without subjecting those non-
bank institutions to the rules that apply to banks.

In the midst of the current crisis, Sen. Judd
Gregg, R-N.H., still says the government needs

to not over regulate “to the point where we
wipe out one of our great advantages as a
nation, which is that we had folks willing to put
money up for people willing to take risks and try
to create jobs.”

Paul C. Light, a professor of public service at
New York University, noted that complex
investment products known as derivatives,
including mortgage-backed securities, "were
once seen as a great innovation and widely cel-
ebrated." Their implosion set off the global
financial meltdown.

"We want more transparency but we want, at
the same time, to protect innovative ideas.
Everyone's so angry. What the public wants is a
radical pendulum swing toward the tightest reg-
ulation. We just have to be careful that we don't
overdo it," Light said.

Supporters of more regulation say they don't
want to squelch American entrepreneurship.

"Obviously, no system is going to prevent all
failures, because it would then be too restric-
tive," said House Financial Services Committee
Chairman Barney Frank, D-Mass. The goal is to
minimize the likelihood that big financial enti-
ties will get so heavily indebted “that their lack
of success threatens the whole system," he said.

The proposals announced on Thursday,
designed to limit risk-taking, are "a good start to
a long process," said White House spokesman
Robert Gibbs.

Still, Washington always addresses the sins of
the past, tries to solve old problems and doesn't
have a crystal ball to deal with the future.

Whatever the rules, someone tries to come
up with ways to slip around them, sometimes
with Washington's help.

Remember: Brooksley E. Born, former
chairwoman of the Commodity Futures Trading
Commission, tried in 1997 to impose greater
federal rules on derivatives. She was fiercely
opposed by Alan Greenspan, then the Federal
Reserve chairman, and by Robert Rubin, Pres-
ident Bill Clinton's treasury secretary.

Rubin, now an outside adviser to Obama,
says he favours regulating derivatives, particu-
larly increasing reserves against potential loss-
es, but saw no way of doing so while serving as
treasury secretary.

Greenspan calls the current downturn a
"once in a century” financial crisis. He says the
problem wasn't with the derivative contracts
but with the greed of the people who dealt in
them.

(This article was written by Tom Raum of the
Associated Press).



Recession
fixes bad
investment

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The theory is that in any busi-
ness expansion, there will be
people who make unwise
investments. There will always
be people who are too opti-
mistic, too confident in their
own forecasts, or who simply
misread shifts in people’s tastes.
If there's only a little bad invest-
ment, it can be cleaned up by
the people who made it. The
Bahamian contractors who
bought a new backhoe, Gov-
ernment and private sector
plans to build more homes
would mean that his business
could only go up, may find that
the housing downturn has made
it tough for many of his cus-
tomers to get the home loan
they need to pay for a new
house. If nothing else goes
wrong, he can probably work
his way out of the problem —
lower profits while he pays off
the under-used backhoe, but
not a business failure.

Inflation always causes bad
investments because inflation
fools people into thinking that
things are going especially well.
Businesses see a surge in busi-
nesses, which prompts them to
expand. When it turns out that
the surge was all illusion (they
were getting more dollars, but
the dollars were worth less),
they’ve already committed to
an expansion that has no future.

Government spending pro-
duces bad investment a well, as
businesses gear up to produce
whatever the government is
buying today. It’s obviously not
the best use for the investment
(or you wouldn't need govern-
ment spending to support it),
plus it’s highly vulnerable to

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



being a very bad investment, if
government priorities change.
When there’s a lot of bad
investments, though, it’s not so
easy to fix. A company that has
borrowed to expand, but does-
n’t get enough business to ser-
vice the new debt, is in trouble.
Even businesses that aren’t in
debt can shut in a downturn. If
business gets bad enough, it’s
cheaper to just close the doors
than to pay to keep the place
staffed and the lights turned on.
The key here, though, is that
an investment is only bad
investment if the price is too
high. That is, the contractors
extra backhoe may be a lousy
investment at $100,000, but if
someone else can pick it up at a
liquidation sale for $50,000, that
might not be a bad investment
at all. So, the thrust of this
thread is that recessions are how
bad investment gets worked out
of the economy. Some busi-
nesses go under, others sell off
under performing pieces. The
result is an economy where pro-
ductive assets are reallocated
to where they can be used prof-
itably — at which point the
stage is set for a sound recovery.
If the government heads off the
recession, by cutting interest
rates too aggressively, or by
buying whatever it is that isn’t
being bought, the bad invest-
ment goes uncorrected, leaving
potentially productive assets in
the hands of people who can’t
use them to their best effect,
while leaving other people (who

could use them) unable to
thrive.

Can the government help?

People on both sides of the
issue see that government
action leads generally to bad
investment. For the people who
advocate for the government
trying to help, that’s unavoid-
able — and simply needs to be
dealt with by more government
action. For the people who
advocate against, it’s a reason
for the government to do as lit-
tle as possible.

As to whether governments
can help in a recession, the
answer clearly depends on
where you stand. Cutting inter-
est rates is great for people who
have variable-rate debt (or
would like to), but it sucks for
people who have cash. Higher
government spending is all well
and good for people who build
roads or grow corn, but does-
n’t mean much for the guy who
runs a restaurant or works at a
hotel (except, eventually, high-
er taxes).

In the end, the people who
are helped are very specific and
very aware of the help, while
others are either not harmed,
or are harmed only in a diffuse,
general way (along with every-
one else). The result is that the
political pressure always tends
to be on the side of more help.
Whether it helps the economy
or not, it definitely helps the
people who get it, and that's
enough for the politicians to
keep at it. Think about it!

FRANKLYN

¢ 2—D oO OM 9
MUNROE
Nassau,

March 24, 2009.

We all have a role to play

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Tam extremely grateful for this
opportunity to express my views
on “The role of the government
and its citizens” in your illustrious
newspaper. It is my hope that by
reading this article there will be a
movement towards improvement
within our country.

What is a nation without its
government? What is a govern-
ment without its citizens? Plato, a
famous Greek philosopher who
wrote “the Republic,” often
referred to the governing body
as the guardian and the civilians
as the producers. In this piece I
will portray the guardian as the
law makers and rulers of our
country, while depicting the pro-
ducers as the ones who work and

support our local government.
The purpose of this article is to
convey that the government has a
role to demonstrate guardianship
over the producers of a given
community, while the civilians
must execute its role as the sup-
porters of this regime.

As guardians, the government
should watch over, protect and
care for its local citizens (the pro-
ducers). It is the guardian’s duty
to provide proper healthcare for a
society, create jobs, ensure the
stabilisation of an economy, pro-
mote entrepreneurship, provide
proper infrastructural develop-
ment, as well as establish the best
educational tools and mechanisms
for its civilians. The government
should also meet the safety needs
of a community; it should control

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and aim to reduce crime rates.
Moreover, it is the responsibility
of the government to maintain a
competitive advantage as it
relates to its industries such as
tourism, banking and agriculture.
The government should also
make certain that a community
is taking the correct actions
toward becoming a more global
society, while ensuring that its
cultural identity is kept intact.

As producers we too must play
a role not only in working to
develop ourselves, but also to
develop our nation. While it is
essential to support our local hier-
archy, we as citizens have an
obligation to hold the government
accountable to their duties and
promises in this democracy. We
can not sit back and watch the
world revolve and evolve around
us. We must continuously find
ways to contribute and give back
to our community in order to
increase our local standards and
improve the ways in which the
world views us. We must promote
a strategy that provides service
to our country selflessly. In this
way, we will continually provide a
means to enhance our nation.

Remember Bahamas, although
we must hold the government
accountable to its role, we can
not blame every flaw and mishap
of our society on the government.
As residents of this nation we
must be held responsible for a
role as contributors, but also as
doers and proactive supporters
of the law. We can not expect to
have a better country yet despise
and in some cases retaliate on the
government for enforcing the law.
We cannot expect a jurisdiction
that enforces justice, but quietly
seek favours that promote a sys-
tem of injustice.

While I believe that there is no
“ideal society,” there are pro-
gressing societies. These are soci-
eties that under the management
of the government and support
and labour of its citizens, strive
for excellence in healthcare, edu-
cation, the economy, infrastruc-
tural development and law. It is
vital that as residents and citizens
of the Bahamas we understand
that as a nation there is a two-
part act to be played; the govern-
ment as the guardians and the cit-
izens as the producers. Nonethe-
less, in order to have a powerful
nation the formula requires that
the roles of the government and
the citizens are clearly and effec-
tively met.

WEL’ANDRA

AR FRANCIS,

BS, MBA

Nassau, March, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009, PAGE 5



Bahamian gaming industry needs

to enhance its competitiveness



@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

"Iso vex 'cause I call da }

Central Bank for dem to help

dis old woman find her

deceased husband's 'dormant'

money who for an incredible
45 years told her, like plenty
Bahamian men, dat they ain’t

gats no bank account. Once

da Central Bank certifies dem }
I figure dey can pulldaname :
in dey big computer but dey }
refuse and say she has to go }
to all a dem other banks to }

look for dis money.

"Aint no wonda dey is now :
have all dis $40 million dor- :
mant of poor people money }
dat dem now deceased men }
hide from dey wives an chil- }

dren and others. Poor people

really does catch hell scrap-
ping for pennies while da rest
seems to get way wid mil-

lions.”
- DA BUCK STOPS DERE

"We all are wex down here }

in da south of da island!

Twice a day dat noisy
Bahamasair done lift off from
da airport an’ make one quick

right turn toward Miami and
that brings all kinda noise an’
rattlin’ goin’ on in da house

dem below! Seven in da :
morning and the same that }

night.
"On Sunday morning the

day of rest after a long night's
work, all I hear is :

‘brrroooom' overhead like

one race track! How come all :
adem (other airliner) jets go ;
further out before makin’ that :

turn an’ they sound so good

compared to that old noise :
maker! We asking dem con- :
trollers keep Bahamasair out }
there over da ocean for a few :

miles more!"

— SHAKE, RATTLE N' ROLL

"I wonder if there is any- i
one else who finds this to be }
annoyingly unprofessional. I }
needed to do some business }
with BTC in the mall, the }
closest place to me from
where I work, so I called to }
find out what time they }
closed. I was told 5.30pm. I;
arrived at BTC mall location }
at 5.25pm to find a closed sign
on the receptionist desk sol
told the lady that it was not }
quite 5.30pm and I had been }

trying to get something sorted
out for a while with them,

only to be told they stop tak-

ing customers at 5.20pm.
"Another incident, I speed

from work to (a shoe store) in
Palmdale almost five days

back to back only to find

them closed each time I got
there at approximately :
5.25pm so I called them to }

find out what time they closed

and was told 5.30pm. I pro-
ceeded to tell the person on }

the phone what happened.

‘Oh! We close the door a few

minutes early,’ she said.
"Do these people not see

the inconvenience of incor- :
rect information or do they }
just not care? Put up a cor- ;
rect sign and when customers
call tell them the truth so they
can plan accordingly. This is :

just another form of the bad

service Bahamians thought-

lessly give.”

"I vex at dem idiot tour car }
drivers that crawl down West
Bay with a string of irate dri- }
vers behind, all trying to get }

pass. What, are they blind,

don’t care less, or jus' plain }

stupid? I know dey gat a job

to do, but what does it take to :
pull over every couple min- }
utes to let the other folks pass

safely!
"For Pete (and Mike) sake,

use your eyes and your brain }

if you gat any!!"

TROPICAL
ars pel

eee
PHONE: 322-2157



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

THIS year’s tourism budget already
includes provisions for legislative
changes that may be need to be enacted
to enhance the competitiveness of the
Bahamian gaming industry, said the
Minister of Tourism.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said he
is “looking forward to” receiving input
from the casino association on how the
industry can be urgently updated to
keep enticing tourists.

On Thursday president of the
Bahamas Hotel Association Robert
Sands said the Bahamian industry is “in
the dark ages”, operating in a frame-
work set up 40 years ago.

new legislation proposed in Florida to
massively expand gaming in that state
could have a “dramatic impact” on the
attractiveness of the Bahamas as a des-
tination for gamblers.

And he said “time is of the essence”
when it comes to the government react-
ing to recommendations from industry
stakeholders.

Yesterday Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said: “We’ve been talking about this
since months ago and we have been
awaiting the input from the Casino
Association.

“Certainly in defining our budget for
this year, including budgeting for items
we also wanted to take a look at all of
the legislative changes that would have
to be made if any to make us more com-
petitive and also bring us up to the lev-
el of competition that’s all around us.”

umentation from the Casino Associa-
tion about the needed changes, adding
that it is “something I’m looking for-
ward to.”

On Wednesday the Florida Senate
Regulated Industries Committee
approved two new bills which will,
among other things, lower the legal
gambling age from 21 to 18, allow Hard
Rock Cafes to be turned into full-blown
casinos, provide tax breaks for “raci-
no” dog and horse tracks, as well as
increasing the variety of table games
and slot-type machines permitted.

Mr Sands said the time has come for
the industry to be “really proactive
agents” for the changes required to keep
the Bahamas competitive.

“We believe that we must be pro-
gressive and be prepared for radical
change in our gaming industry if it’s

= TNT

-MIKET :

Echoing the sentiments of US com-
mentators, he expressed concern that

Man appeals multi-billion |



dollar lawsuit against NIB

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN who is seeking the
liquidation of the National
Insurance Board over his claim
for a multi-billion dollar settle-
ment has filed an appeal against
a judge’s ruling which dismissed
his petition on the grounds that
it was “frivolous and vexa-
tious.”

Anthony Wright of Freeport,
Grand Bahama claims that the
National Insurance Board nev-
er properly paid him for an on-
the-job injury almost 30 years
ago.

Mr Wright, who filed the
“wind-up” petition in March of
last year, contends that NIB
owes him billions of dollars in
back-pay, medical bills and set-
tlement money after a 1982 acci-
dent on the premises of his for-
mer job with Franklyn Chemi-
cals in Grand Bahama. Mr
Wright claimed that he suffered

a fall which left him with a rup- |
tured disc and damage to the :

soft tissue of his back.

In a ruling on the matter on }
February 19, Senior Justice John i
Lyons stated: “Clearly the }
amounts claimed by the peti- }
tioner bear no semblance of real- i
ity. It appears that he just i
plucked the figures out of the

sky and put them in his petition.”

In his ruling Justice Lyons also :
stated that the entity could only :

be dissolved by parliament,

which “created it by statute in

the first place.”

Mr Wright is now seeking an
order from the Court of Appeal }

granting the wind-up order,

essentially setting aside Justice i
Lyons’ ruling. Mr Wright intends
to rely on 10 grounds of appeal.
He is contending that the }
Supreme Court did not have the
power to refuse the winding-up
order, dismiss the petition or i
award costs against him. No date }
has been set for the hearing of

the appeal.

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160

ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR
SCREENED ROOM

ALUMINUM CAR PORT
Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said he has
been informed that he will receive doc-

going to continue to survive in this par-
ticular market place,” he added.



Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo

UNITED States Embassy clients no longer have to stand in long queues
without protection from the elements thanks to the construction of covered
seating by the Ministry of Public Works and Transport.

Works Minister Neko Grant along with Permanent Secretary Colin Higgs
visited the US Embassy on Thursday, March 26, 2009 to view the recently
completed shed and seating. Mr Grant expressed satisfaction with the con-
struction. Pictured is the minister chatting with clients as they make use of
the new facilities.


























PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Ross University to participate in the

to broaden ties in
culture, education
and technology

THE Bahamas and the
Republic of India pledged to }
strengthen their diplomatic }
relationship in the areas of
culture, technology and eco- }

nomic development.

This commitment was }
expressed as Governor Gen- }
eral Arthur Hanna accepted }
Letters of Commission from }
Mohinder Grover, High }
Commissioner of the Repub- }
lic of India to the Bahamas, }
during a ceremony at Gov- }
ernment House on Thursday. }
Commissioner }
Grover acknowledged that }
both countries share common
linkages in history, parlia-
mentary democracy, mem- }
bership of the Common- }
wealth and the English lan- }
the }
Bahamas, isa member of the
Group of 77, Group of 15 and
the Non-Alignment Move- }

High

guage. India, like

ment.

“Both are developing coun- }
tries, share similar concerns }
and common aspirations for }
accelerated economic growth, }
eradication of poverty, }
improvement in the quality
of life of our people and pro-

motion of equity,” he said.

The High Commissioner }
further pledged cooperation }
in the solar energy sector, to }
organise training programmes
and pursue cooperation in the }
IT sector on the basis of spe- i
cific details to be provided by }
the Bahamas on the ‘Hole in
the Wall Education Limited }

Project’? (HIWEL).

The Bahamas and India
share a wide base of linkages }
founded on common aspects

Ricardo P Deveaux to receive honorary doctorate at Bethune-Cookman University

of history, the Governor Gen-
eral said, adding that the
diplomatic relations that have
followed have consolidated
common understanding.

“The Bahamas values the }
cordial relations between our
two countries and looks for-
to continuing to }
strengthen our friendly rela- }

ward

tionship,” he said.

“As members of the global i
community with many of the }
same development chal- }
lenges, our two countries }
share the highest aspirations
and dedication to the devel- }
opment and protection of our }
world and societies,” the Gov- }
ernor General said. “The }
multilateral fora in which we }
both participate bring us }
together in a joint commit- }
ment to ensure that our goals }

come to fruition.”

=

It’s






Get

Time to

Connected â„¢

THE entire Grand Bahama
community is once again invit-
ed to take part in the fourth
annual Grand Bahama Health
Expo.

The event is set to be held
at the Shiloh Seventh Day
Adventist Church grounds on
Sunday, March 29 from
11.30am to 6pm.

The Shiloh SDA Church
Health Department is hosting
the expo in conjunction with
the Ross University School of
Medicine under the theme,
"Your Health and You". The
event is entirely free.

Keynote speaker at the event
will be the administrator of the
Rand Memorial Hospital,
Sharon Williams and guest
speakers will be Dr Tamara
Burke-Moree and Dr Alvira
Higgs.

There will be vegetarian dish-
es, blood pressure screening,
blood glucose screening, den-
tal exams, a kids corner, eye
and ear testing, cholesterol test-
ing, weight and health assess-
ments and more.

Alexys Bell, health ministries
director at Shiloh Church, said:
“We are so pleased to be work-
ing alongside Ross University
students for our fourth annual
health expo. We hope the com-
munity will take advantage of
this wonderful opportunity to
learn more about their own
health.”

Ross University medical stu-
dent and vice president of their
Student Government Associa-
tion, Timothy Yu said, "Com-
munity service and health edu-
cation are the core reasons that
inspired many of Ross students

























7 |
Ricardo Deveaux



4th Annual Grand Bahama Health Expo

m By LINDSAY THOMPSON :

Robbin Whachell/Photo

PART of the Grand Bahama Health Expo organising team on the grounds of the Shiloh SDA Church, where the 4th Annual Health Expo will take
place. Left to right: Daniel Lowe, Shiloh Church elder; Erin James, Ross University SNMA Club president; Timothy Yu, Ross University vice
president of the Student Government Association; Dr McMillan of Shiloh Church; Alexys Bell, health ministries director at Shiloh Church.

to pursue a career in medicine.
This partnership with Shiloh
Seventh Day Adventist Church
is the first of many opportuni-
ties for Ross University School
of Medicine students to
strengthen the Bahamian
healthcare community. At this
health fair we are focusing on
essential topics including hyper-

DAYTONA BEACH -A
Bahamian is one of two men to
be awarded honorary doctorates
by a Florida university, it was
announced yesterday.

On Saturday, May 9, Bethune-
Cookman University (B-CU) will
welcome two distinguished alum-
ni back to campus as participants
in the University’s 2009 com-
mencement ceremony.

Ricardo P Deveaux, a 1990
graduate and now senior assis-
tant secretary in the Bahamas
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture; and Lee Rhyant, a 1972
graduate and now executive vice
president and general manager
for the Marietta, Ga, facility of
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics
Company and a B-CU Trustee,
will both receive the honorary
degree of Doctor of Humane
Letters. Mr Deveaux will give the
commencement address.





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tension, diabetes, eye and ear
health, and breast cancer
awareness. We are very excited
about this event and we encour-
age families and singles of all
ages to come by for this fun and
educational expo, as we con-
tinue to strive to build and part-
ner with our new community.”

The Shiloh church is located

“Tt is my great honour to wel-
come these two distinguished
alumni back to Bethune-Cook-
man University. Mr Deveaux and
Mr Rhyant represent the kind of
excellence that we seek to devel-
op in our students — profession-
alism, leadership and a commit-
ment to serving the community.
In these challenging times, our
graduating seniors will benefit
greatly from the advice and wis-
dom Mr Deveaux will provide in
his remarks,” said B-CU presi-
dent Trudie Kibbe Reed.

As part of his official govern-
ment duties, Mr Deveaux man-
ages a $1 million grant pro-
gramme that assists young
Bahamian entrepreneurs in
establishing or expanding their
small businesses.

He also is the president and
CEO of the Bahamas Primary
School Student of the Year Foun-








ero | Lary

on Torcross Road next to the
Grand Bahama Academy and
close to Maurice Moore Pri-
mary School.

Ross University was founded
in 1978 and is a provider of
medical and veterinary educa-
tion offering doctor of medi-
cine and doctor of veterinary
medicine degree programmes.

dation, a non-profit foundation
established to recognise out-
standing primary school students.
The foundation has presented
more than $250,000 in scholar-
ships and prizes to outstanding
primary school students since
2005.

Mr Deveaux graduated with
honours from Bethune-Cookman
University in 1990, earning a BS
degree in psychology. In 1992, he
received a M S degree in human
services with a specialisation in
human resources management
from Nova Southeastern Uni-
versity.

“Tam extremely honoured
and humbled to be serving as
the commencement speaker and
receiving an honourary degree
from Bethune-Cookman Uni-
versity,” said Mr Deveaux.
What makes this occasion even
more special is the fact that I
will receive this honour on the
30th Anniversary of Sir Lynden
Pindling, former Prime Minis-
ter of the Bahamas serving as
the commencement speaker and
receiving his honorary degree
from Bethune.”

Lee E Rhyant is the execu-
tive vice president and general
manager for the Marietta, Ga,
facility of Lockheed Martin
Aeronautics Company where he
is responsible for the 7,000-
employee operation, delivering
the world’s finest military air-
craft such as the C-130J Her-

The School of Medicine is
located in Dominica, the West
Indies. The Freeport, Grand
Bahama campus opened in Jan-
uary 2009. The School of Vet-
erinary Medicine is located in
St. Kitts.

Ross University's adminis-
trative offices are located in
North Brunswick, NJ.

cules, F-22 stealth fighter, P-3
reconnaissance and C-5B mod-
ification programmes.

Mr Rhyant also is involved
with Lockheed Martin strategic
development, corporate special
assignments and metro Atlanta
community and government
relations. He came to Lockheed
Martin in 2000 after a 35 year
career in the aerospace and
automotive industries, includ-
ing stints with Rolls-Royce
Aerospace and Allison Gas Tur-
bine, a division of General
Motors.

Mr Rhyant has been widely
recognised for his leadership in
the Atlanta community, partic-
ularly his work mentoring young
men to be good fathers, posi-
tive role models and citizens.
He was named the 2008 Citizen
of the Year by the Cobb Cham-
ber of Commerce/Marietta Dai-
ly Journal and 2008 Man of the
Year by the Atlanta Tribune for
his outstanding community ser-
vice and dedication to the com-
munity. He was also named a
2007 Man of Influence by the
Atlanta Business League.

He graduated from Bethune-
Cookman University in 1972
and holds an MBA degree from
Indiana University. He current-
ly serves on the B-CU Board of
Trustees as its first vice chair-
man. Mr Rhyant is also a long-
time financial supporter of the
university.

Come! Join us Lhis Sumday us we
Coanedt ‘lo God Throwgh Prapel










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SUNDAY SERVICES
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CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, MARCH 29TH, 2009

11:30 a.m. Speaker:
Pastor Dexter Duvalier

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

Grace and Pease Weeteyan Grurcn

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et ta a

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Furhis Fee eee ll ier sr
Draper Times Fe
| dare trhonl cists Hersins heewre

Pl: Teri 1) ie
aT Pri Lharkce Drive
MWinmter: Kev. Nentes Perey
FED Baer Se bl

THepa one corm ber: 324-2555

Teieles gel BOO se

LE a de ee





Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MARCH 29TH, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Colin Archer/Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Katherine Rose
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Contemporary Service

“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)

ST AND LIFE COMMUNITY COROT

Pee Lirnmediod dm he Piast 2:
Fin. Geured To The Future

O

Worship time: Jv Fem
Areamtire Kechawel: odor
Praver time: 6:30 pen
Place:

The Mavetra
Shwopiay Crater

Bees. Th. Froamk loa Fore.

ALL ARE WELCOME T0 ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Or Franklin Knowles
Pte, EE Jaar

Teleyuine numiaer 725-37 92
ARLE. - dead eae 0
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009, PAGE 7



Tourists narrowly escape burning taxi

ao Rs:



TWO Canadian tourists had a nar-
row escape yesterday when a taxi
burst into flames as it was driving
through the streets of Nassau.

The vehicle, driven by 50-year-old
Leroy Neely, began smoking as it
passed the Central Bank at the end of
Shirley Street.

As Mr Neely diverted up Market
Street, the taxi caught fire behind
Government House in School Lane.

Firemen were called and extin-
guished the blaze, but they were
unable to save the vehicle, which was
destroyed.

No-one was hurt in the drama,
which occurred at about 12.15pm out-
side C R Walker School.

A source told The Tribune: “The
two Canadians were a husband and
wife. They and the driver got out of
the taxi okay, and the couple caught
another cab to get to their destina-
tion.”

It is believed the fire was caused by
an electrical fault.

ie | i

é

CARILEC holds meeting in Grand Bahama on disaster preparedness .

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Members of the
Caribbean Electric Utility Service Cor-
poration visited Grand Bahama for a
two-day disaster preparedness meet-
ing to create a response plan for the
upcoming hurricane season of 2009.

Lawrence Benjamin, project manag-
er at CARILEC, coordinated the annu-
al meeting at Mary Anne’s Restaurant
in Freeport, where issues such as
improving disaster response in the
member states were addressed.

Representatives from 10 electrical
utility companies attended the meet-
ing, which officially commenced on
March 26.

“We normally meet prior to the start
of the hurricane season so we can share
knowledge and experiences, as well as
cite issues in our efficient response to a
disaster so that we can better serve in
responding to any disaster that may
occur,” said Mr Benjamin.

“We strive continually to improve
our services to members and stake-
holders.”

Excell Ferrell, president and CEO
of the Grand Bahama Power Company,

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New
Providence and the Family Islands including Grand

Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser’) now invites
sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from
schools in accordance with the provisions of the Education Act. Bid
forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of
Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00

p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the

subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Tuesday, 31st March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local

said there are a number of measures
being taken to improve its facilities in
Freeport in case of disasters.

He revealed that a 24-hour trans-
mission distribution control centre will
be launched within the next couple of
months. This, he said, will allow the
company to be able to handle the trans-
mission line and system remotely.

“We are also putting in a new com-
munication system which will improve
communication with our workers on
the entire 96 miles of Grand Bahama.

“We continue to work to improve
the system so you do not have outages,
except when there is a major hurricane

and it is difficult to avoid,” he said.

Mr Ferrell said GBPC also plans to
upgrade its infrastructure and equip-
ment and carry out other system
improvements before the “lightning
season.”

He noted that lightning is a major
cause of power outages on Grand
Bahama and said improvements are
being made to improve the transmission
line system to withstand lightning
strikes.

“We have gone through our entire
system by reviewing and updating the
protection and coordination, and we
are in the process of putting in some

automation that should eliminate the
number of outages that customers expe-
rience.”

When asked for an update on the
new $12 million electrical infrastruc-
ture project for West End, Mr Ferrell
said the project is moving forward.

He noted that engineering for the
22-mile transmission line has been com-
pleted and a request has been submit-
ted to the government.

“We expect a response on that short-
ly and the materials will be ordered in
the next few days and we will begin
construction and have it completed (by)
year’s end,” he said.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Request for Tender for Security fae li at
The Bahamas Technical and Vocational
at Old Trail Road, and Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas

nstitute campuses

The Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute (B.T.V.I.) now
invites sealed bids for the provision of Security Services at The Bahamas

Technical and Vocational Institute campuses at Old Trail Road, and Wulff
Road Nassau, Bahamas.

The Contract is for a period of twelve (12) months in the first
instance and interested security firms are invited to submit Tenders
with comprehensive details of their proposal for security operations for
a twenty-four period starting at 6:00 a.m. daily (including weekends
and holidays). The Contract will be awarded to the applicant providing

the most economical and acceptable Tender for the full duration of the
contract period.

Interested Bidders may inspect campuses between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Collection of the
specification and bidding documents can be obtained from the Reception
Desk at B.T.V.I., Old Trail Road between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:00

p.m., Monday through Friday beginning Monday, 16" March, 2009 and
obtain further information at the second address given below.

time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday, 7" April, 2009 at the address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel: (242) 327-1530

Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “Tender for
Security, Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute” and delivered
to the attention of:-

The Chairman of the Tenders’ Board

Ministry of Finance
Cecil
Cable Beach

P. O. Box N-3017

Nassau, Bahamas

The Manager
Bahamas
Old Trail Road

P. O. Box N-4934
Nassau, Bahamas

allace Whitfield Building

echnical and Vocational Institute

Bids must be received by 4:00 p.m. on Friday, 3% April, 2009
accompanied by an endorsed copy of a current Business Licence.

Persons who submit Tenders are invited to a public opening of bids at
the Ministry of Finance, in the Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building, Cable
Beach on Tuesday, 14" April, 2009.

B.T.V.I. reserves the right to reject any or all Bids.


PAGE 8, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





PLRKN w itm
for wind-up

to proceed

FROM page one

(Bahamas) when the Trinidad government and regulators were
forced to bail out CL Financial, the parent company of CLICO
(Bahamas), which failed to pay out a guaranteed $57 million loan
accounting for 59 per cent of the Bahamian insurer’s assets at
year-end 2007. CLICO Enterprises had invested the majority of
funds advanced to it in Florida-based real estate development
company Wellington Preserve Real Estate, which suffered more
than a 20 per cent decline in market value at year-end 2007 due to
a collapsing property market.

A winding-up Order was granted by the Supreme Court on Feb-
ruary 24, appointing Mr Craig Gomez of Baker Tilley Gomez as
Provisional Liquidator for CLICO (Bahamas) Limited (CLICO).
The Order was made following a petition by the Registrar of Insur-
ance Companies (ORIC) in accordance with authority granted
under Section 41 of the Insurance Act.

Attorneys Damian Gomez, Alfred Sears, Godfrey ‘Pro’ Pinder,
Glenys Hanna Martin and Diane Stewart are among several of the
attorneys representing CLICO policy holders.

Investigation into
stabbing at Green
Parrot continues

FROM page one

The Sandyport resident provided police with details of their
names and occupations when he reported the assault at the Central
Police Station.

He said security guards stood idly by as the attack took place. The
27-year-old woman who was with him drove her wounded friend to
the Princess Margaret Hospital.

The well-known Bahamian man, who asked The Tribune to
withhold his identity, has since been told of the charges by officer
McKenzie, who is leading the investigation, but his attempts to con-
tact her since have been unsuccessful.

He said: “I feel really uneasy about the handling of the situation.

“T filed a report for six people and we gave them four names, so
why was the fourth person not charged?

“The three they have charged should have been able to give
them information about the other three.

“Tt just seems to be really strange to me.”

He suspects there might be some corruption in the handling of the
investigation, and added: “One of the guy’s brothers is in the Drug
Enforcement Unit, and maybe that’s just the way things work in this
country, but we are definitely not going to let that happen.”

The victim also wants police to release public information about
the suspects at large to help apprehend the criminals.

He said: “It’s dangerous for them to be on the streets, they’re
threatening people’s lives, and the police are looking at this like peo-
ple’s lives are not precious.

“We need to find out what’s going on with this, and why the
police haven’t done any investigation about the other three.”

The three men charged in connection with the incident are due
to be arraigned before a magistrate on April 9.

Police press liaison officer Walter Evans said investigations are

continuing.

NOTICE is hereby given that RAYMOND DECORDOVA
BROMFIELD of 670 SAFFRON ST., PINEWOOD
GARDENS, P.O. BOX SP-60952, Nassau, Bahamas, is

applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 28" day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



Island constituents.

“His list was always long. But
he was persistent in his efforts
and though he was seldom suc-
cessful, particularly before 1992,
he never despaired.”

The prime minister said he
could only ever comment posi-
tively on Mr Knowles’ dedica-
tion and performance, whether
as a back bencher, as chairman
of the Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation or
as a minister.

“His father who served in
parliament before him was a
well-known farmer who hailed
from Long Island, an island
famous for farming and animal
husbandry. Although Jimmy
was born in Fox Hill, he trea-
sured his Long Island connec-
tion and I believe most people
thought of him as a son of Long
Island. There is no doubt that
served Long Island well,” Mr
Ingraham said.

“Jimmy Knowles was also a
proud son of the Bahamas. He

believed deeply in his country
and strove to do all within his
capacity to see us grow and
develop. He was always
straightforward and could be
counted on to give his best
advice. And, he had a great
sense of humour and he was
always an amiable companion.”

The prime minister yester-
day also remembered the
deceased as a devoted family
man.

“On behalf of the govern-
ment and people of the
Bahamas, on behalf of the offi-
cers and members of the Free
National Movement, and on
behalf of Delores and myself, I
should like to express my grati-
tude for the life and service of
Jimmy Knowles.

“T should like also to extend
our deepest sympathy to his
mother, Mrs Knowles; his wife,
Amarylis; his sons, James Jr and
Roman; his daughter, Kimber-
ley; his brothers and sisters, and
the entire Knowles family. I
pray that you find peace in the
words of St Paul — in his time
Jimmy fought a good fight, fin-

Magistrate’s court:
Police probe ongoing

FROM page one

She is seeking damages for slander, libel, malicious falsehood and
misfeasance in public office, as well aggravated and exemplary

damages.

ROYAL FIDELITY

‘honey at work

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SCENES from James Knowles’s funeral. Pictures by Tim Clarke



ished his course, and kept faith,
now he has gone on to reap his
promised rewards. May he rest
in peace,” Mr Ingraham said.

Also paying tribute was Mr J
Henry Bostwick, QC, a political
colleague and friend. Archdea-
con Keith Cargtwright preached
the sermon.

The large funeral was attend-
ed by Governor General
Arthur Hanna, members of
government and opposition in
both House and Senate, the
Chief Justice and members of
the judiciary, the police and
defence forces, members of the
clergy, Lady Pindling, family
and friends.

Parliamentary pallbearers

were Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette, National
Security Minister TommyTurn-
quest, Education Minister Carl
Bethel, Labour and Social
Development Minister Dion
Foulkes, Senator Allyson May-
nard-Gibson, Senator Hope
Strachan, MP Obie Wilch-
combe, and MP Philip (Brave)
Davis.

Honorary pallbearers were
John Darville, James Pinder,
Tony Knowles, Mike Light-
bourn, Bert Knowles and
Joseph Treco.

Pallbearers were his five
brothers, Alex, Emerick, Charl-
ton, Patrick and Geoffrey
Knowles; and Eric Knowles.

PM kept informed
over boat inquiry

FROM page one

the engines and speeding off with them in Mr Ingraham’s boat.

The source said: “The Contender is the PM’s run-about which he
uses for fishing and relaxing when he comes up here.”

Mr Michael Albury, chairman of Abaco’s Chamber of Com-
merce, has been on local radio to warn boat owners about the
theft spree.

Businessmen are concerned that increased crime on Abaco may
deter boaters and second-home owners who are a crucial part of the
island economy.

“These people spend a lot of money here,” said the source. “We
need to make sure this boat theft problem is brought to an end.”

Two men are understood to be helping Marsh Harbour police

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that NATALEE ANTIONETTE
DELL of CLARIDGE ROAD, Nassau, Bahamas,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 28'* day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTONIO GERALDO
MEKO GAYLE of RIDGELAND PARK, Nassau,
Bahamas, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within

twenty-eight days from the 28"" day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES MOSS of
COWPEN ROAD, P.O. BOX SB-52293, Nassau,
Bahamas, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 28"" day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

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PAGE 12 © Special Olympics Bahamas’ special course...

SATURDAY, MARCH 28,

2009






~~ ISKF

has first
grading
for ‘O9...

See page 15

Angels rally for 67-66
victory over Truckers



WOMEN’S B-BALL

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

he Johnson’s Lady Truck-
ers have had a stranglehold
on the New Providence
Women’s Basketball Asso-
ciation title for the past three years.
But the Bommer G Lady Angels,

Bommer G take 1-0 lead in series

winners of the initial two titles in 2003
and 2004, are hoping that this will be
the year that they break the Lady
Truckers’ winning streak.

On Thursday night at the DW
Davis Gymnasium, Bommer G, sport-
ing new uniforms, rallied down the
stretch for a 67-66 victory over the
Lady Truckers to snatch a 1-0 lead in

their best-of-five championship series.
Game two is scheduled to be played
next week Thursday.

It was a huge win, considering the
fact that the Lady Angels had to go
the last three and-a-half minutes with-
out guard Sharelle Cash who fouled
out and power forward Keisha
Richardson, who had to hobble

around on a slight sprained ankle.

Center Alexandria ‘Shaq’ Fernan-
der stepped up and provided the
spark, coming up with two consecu-
tive block shots to help fuel a 65-64
lead and after missing a pair of free
throws at 41.1 seconds, finally con-
verted one or two with 6.2 seconds
to eventually seal the win.

‘BLAST FROM THE PAST

TRIBUNE Sports’ ‘Blast From The Past’ today takes you
back to a couple memorable fights involving the Bahamas
Boxing Commission’s chairman and former cruiserweight
champion. In this shot, Ernie ‘the Androsian Tiger’ Barr
(left) takes a blow to the face from Strachan during one of
their bouts on November 30, 1980. Barr, however, went on
to win the 10-round decision on points...



See other photo on page 12

“We knew this was going to be a
stiff competition between us and the
Truckers, but we just wanted to go
out there and play our best, make our
lay-ups and get back on defense and
that is what we did,” Fernander said.

Fernander, who finished the game
with four blocks, one steal, 12 points
and a game high 14 rebounds, said
her mind went back to when San
Antonio played against Boston and
Manu Ginobili missed four free
throws in a row as the Spurs lost to
the Celtics.

“T think I was concentrating too
much at that point,” she reflected.

Before fouling out, Cash con-
tributed a side high 21 points with
five rebounds and a block, steal and
assist. Richardson helped out with 12
points and seven rebounds and Chris-
handra Kelly had 12 points with two
rebounds.

Despite the fact that the Lady
Angels tried to take Shantell Rolle
out of the equation, the prolific scor-
er still managed to get loose for a
game high 29 points with eight
rebounds, three assists and three
steals for the Lady Truckers.

Glenda Gilcud, the other half of
their dynamic backcourt duo, was
held to just 16 points, while Janice
Williams had a double with 11 points
and one rebound. Latoya Rolle only
had four points with six rebounds.

The game was a keenly contested
one with no team taking any consid-
erable lead. In fact, the Lady Angels
had the biggest at 53-49 at the end of
the third.

The Lady Truckers, who opened a
slight 18-16 margin at the end of the
first and played to a 34-34 half-time
lead, had a couple of key turnovers
down the stretch that made the dif-
ference.

SEE page 12

Want an athletic scholarship?

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT’S not often that visiting
colleges or universities from
the United States or Canada
come to town to look at poten-
tial Bahamian athletes for ath-
letic scholarships.

Today from 9 am at the DW
Davis Gymnasium, two coach-
es from Holland College are
expected to conduct a training
session to look at both male
and female basketball players
in grades 11-12 and those who
have just recently graduated.

Trevor Grant, head coach
of the CR Walker Knights’
senior boys basketball team,
said they were able to arrange
the trip for Michael O’Grady
and Jeff Walker through their
Maritime Training Center.

“It was offered to our
school, but I decided to open it
up to all schools, who have
players who are athletically
and academically inclined to
go to college,” Grant said.

“We just want them to come
out and try to attain one or
two of the scholarships.”

On Monday evening at 7 pm
at the Radisson Cable Beach
Hotel, O’Grady and Walker
are slated to hold a workshop
to discuss the requirements for
entry into Holland College
with prospective student-ath-

letes and their parents.
O’Grady, the vice president
of Holland College, said for

the past five years they have
been collaborating with the
Bahamas Maritime Authority

with a joint programme where
graduates have been invited
to attend their school.

Holland College coaches to conduct training session for male,
female basketball players in grades 11-12, high school graduates



SHOWN are persons involved in the Holland College’s recruitment for Bahamian student-athletes today at the DW Davis Gymnasium. (L-r) are Jeff
Walker of Holland College, coach Trevor Grant of CR Walker, Michael O’Grady of Holland College, Steve MacFarlane of the Bahamas Maritime Cen-
ter and Arthur Thompson Jr, who will assist Grant...

“This weekend, along with
several other things, we will
run the basketball camp for

boys and girls senior high play-
ers and senior players in gen-
eral, who might be interested
in coming up to Holland Col-
lege to play basketball,” he
sald.

“We expect to see some
tremendous Bahamian ath-
letes that will be able to fill
into our academic pro-
gramme.”

Walker, the student services
and athletic officer, is set to
conduct the clinic today.

“We're expecting some big
things. We already had a test
in getting to know coach Grant
and from a lot of things that
we heard, we’re expecting a
lot of talented players to come
out,” he said.

“We're looking forward to
seeing what’s here and look-
ing forward to getting some
athletes to come to Canada for
college.”

Once the student-athletes
can meet the athletic require-
ments, based on the pro-
gramme they are interested in,
and if they have the athletic
skills, Walker said they will be
happy to sign them before they
leave on Tuesday.

Holland College is located
on Weymouth Street, Char-
lottetown, Canada. Their var-
sity Hurricane’s teams play in
the highly competitive Atlantic
Colleges Athletic Association
(ACAA) league.
PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Special Olympics Bahamas
puts together special course

WITH the numbers of chil-
dren with intellectual disabili-
ties increasing, many schools in
New Providence have intro-
duced special units into their
system.

Even though they are
assigned specially trained
instructors for their cognitive
development, they are not for-
tunate enough to have specially
trained physical education
instructors for their sports
development.

The board of directors of
Special Olympics Bahamas, in
conjunction with the sports divi-
sion of the Ministry of Educa-
tion, organised a special course
this week to address that con-
cern.

Basil Christie, chairman of
Special Olympics, reinforced
the philosophy of the organisa-
tion that, through sports train-
ing and competition, persons
with intellectual disabilities
develop strength in character,
personality and self esteem.

He stressed that if those
instructors involved with these
students were trained in Spe-
cial Olympics techniques and
methodology, they would be
able to offer more to their total
development.

Thus, Special Olympics
organised the course, which was
conducted by Craig Pippert, a
senior training instructor from
the Special Olympics North
American office.

He was assisted by Roosevelt
Thompson, Technical 7 sports
director of Special Olympics
Bahamas.

The course was conducted
March 25-26 at the National
Tennis Center, and 38 instruc-
tors gained certification in
“Basic Special Olympics Ori-
entation”.

The intention is for these
instructors to use the Special
Olympics structure and tech-
niques within their schools. As
most of these students are not in
the Special Olympics pro-



Thirty eight instructors gain certification
in ‘Basic Special Olympics Orientation’

ers

i a
| a arth Fe ETT
Oe i cll aoa Ed



BASIL CHRISTIE, national chairman of Special Olympics Bahamas, Dawn Knowles, senior sports officer in the Ministry of Education, and Craig Pippert, senior technical director of

Special Olympics North America...

gramme, Christie is hopeful that
they can benefit from the Spe-
cial Olympics techniques
through the newly trained
instructors.

The special event was offi-

cially opened by Archie Nairn,
permanent secretary in the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture. He congratulated Special
Olympics for providing this
training opportunity for local

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physical education instructors,
and encouraged registrants to
learn from the best. He then
pledged his ministry’s contin-
ued support of the national pro-
gramme.

Physical education teachers
and activities co-ordinators
from 17 schools and institutions
such as Sandilands Rehabilita-
tion Centre and the Every Child
Counts School in Abaco attend-

ed the course.

Instructors took the oppor-
tunity to register their athletes
for the upcoming Special
Olympics Games set for May
29-30.

‘BLAST FROM THE PAST’



= o

IN THIS photo, Strachan gets a left jab through the defense of Ken Davis in their bout on May 1, 1984. Stra-
chan was eventually awarded a 10-round decision over Davis...

YT CEM A Ct) Wd TC a

FROM page 11

“We made some crucial
turnovers and we made some
fouls when we didn’t play
defense and that cost us,” Price
said. “They were in the bonus
early and going to the line they
made one or two, which was
the same thing as getting two
points.”

Come Thursday, Price
assured the Lady Angels that
they will be back and will play
Truckers basketball.

“We’re coming to play,” he
said. “Once we come to play,

we will even the series.”

Unlike the regular season
when the Lady Truckers used
their potent offensive attack,
they were contained a lot more
as the Lady Angels tightened
up on their defense.

Bommer G’s coach Anthony
Swaby said his squad is just
hungry to regain the title.

“The whole series will be
like this because you have a
team with 18 championships
under their belt and the team
who is trying for four straight,”
Swaby said.

“So I don’t think they will
just roll over and play dead. In



game two we will have to step
up our intensity and hopefully
our free throws will be better
than tonight.”

The week break in action,
according to Swaby, may work
in favour of his Lady Angels,
who have a little more healing
process to go through than the
younger Truckers.

“We will go back to practice
and improve on some things
that we need to work on,” said
Swaby, who noted that he was
really pleased with the contri-
bution he got from point guard
Keva Barry and forward Chris-
handra Kelly.
TRIBUNE SPORTS SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS

ISKF has first grading for ‘

THE ISKF (International
Shotokan Karate Federation)
Group had there first grading
for the year earlier this week.

Master Teruyuki Okazaki, a
10th degree black belt, con-
ducted the grading at The
Shotokan Karate Bahamas
Dojo, West Bay Street.

Master Okazaki was also in
Grand Bahama to conduct their
grading as well.

Sensei Brian Stapleton is the
chief instructor.

Shotokan Karate Bahamas is
a new and small karate dojo
with big dreams. Their goal is
the promulgation of Tradition-
al Shotokan Karate in the
Bahamas as espoused by the
International Shotokan Karate
Federation (ISKF) and the
Japan Karate Association
(JKA).

Apart from their affiliations
with the above bodies,
Shotokan Karate Bahamas is
also affiliated with the Bahamas
Japan Karate Association
(BJKA), which is the main body
representing ISKF/JKA karate
in the Bahamas.

Classes are held on Mondays,
Wednesdays and Thursdays
between 6:30 - 8 pm and there is
a monthly fee.

Shotokan Karate Bahamas is
dedicated to the practice and >
promulgation of Traditional
Shotokan Karate in the MASTER OKAZAKI is shown with some of the black belts from the various schools in New Providence as they
Bahamas. went through the grading...


Na ea

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

Ti (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST



Tae NG
































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r ia f High: 85° Low: 72° Low: 74° Low: 74° Low: 74° Low: 74° Dismal ay = es
TAMPA if ET EI Ele vol cae os can a eaate
High: 85° F/29° C e , | -90°-82°F 91°-76° F 92°-80° F High Ht.(ft.) Low __Ht.(ft. ar 58/14 52/11 sh 5/15 55/12 s 48/40, F
Low: 68° F/20°C i # The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ee an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:44am. 26 3:40am. -0.1 eaIGaus 69/20 47/8 s 69/20 52/11 sh
Q@ od £ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:01p.m. 3.1 3:40 p.m. -0.1 are 49/9 36/2 + 50/10 35/1 c
6 LT SE eee edie ie
af : | — : mM. : mM. WU. ogota r r
i: i Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday TTi3am. 25 5i3am. 00 Brussels 43/6 36/2 r 48/8 37/2 sh
: a ABACO Temperature 11:38pm. 3.0 5:10pm. -0.1 Budapest 59/15 43/6 c 54/12 48/8 r
, Ls i ah: 24° ‘0 PGI eeecccatcstes Oacerareetscetaaeee scceese 77° F/25° C : : Buenos Aires 88/31 68/20 s 88/31 68/20 s
y “s 1 an E25" C Low... 69° F/20°¢ Tuesday 20 PM 28 a oo Calo 73/22 50/10 s 73/22 49/9 s
* A Low: 68° F/20°C Normal high... gor F/277c Calcutta 96/35 77/25 c 95/35 78/25 s
r Normal low 67° F/19° C Calgary 38/3 18/-7 c 35/1 17/-8 sf
: >= @ WEST PALM BEACH = Last year's iG Mirsrenietscuestarna testes: 81° F/27° C SUN Ay Ty ity Cancun 88/31 73/22 5 84/28 68/20 sh
' —— High: 85° F/29° C i Last year $ low eres et ee eee 67° F/20° C " " Caracas 79/26 66/18 t 83/28 63/20 c
"hoe Low: 73° F/23°C oe Precipitation “_ nes ore a.m. Lan uaa | am. Casablanca 68/20 56/13 sh 68/20 48/8 pe
As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... ees tecseecssseessseees 0.00" UNS PL eae ee DANE. MOONS El iis 2 ‘41 p.m. Copenhagen 42/5 41/5 46/7 40/4 sh
i FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date First Full Last New Dublin 46/7 36/2 sh 48/8 39/3. pc
ae sat @ High: 83° F/28° C Normal year to date ......cccccccccccccsecsecsecseeeees 4.95" a a a Frankfurt 48/8 36/2 r 50/10 36/2 c
ow: 75° F/24°C Low: 68° F/20° C 1 Geneva 42/5 39/3 46/7 34/1 c
AccuWeather.com cc es Halifax 52/11 34/1 pc 48/8 38/3 r Showers Miam
x @ —_ Forecasts and graphics provided by Ei ai Havana 86/30 66/18 s 84/28 66/18 sh T-storms
he MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr.2 Apr.9)— Apr.17)—Apr.24 Helsinki 34/1 30/-1 sn 36/2 30/-1 ¢ Rain Fronts
High: 86° F/30° C High: 84° F/29°C Hong Kong 77/25 70/21 t 73/22 65/18 sh * *| Flurries a ‘ er : Cold
co s ie o e own are noon positions of weather sysiems an
tem Low: 74° F/23°C ; NASSAU had pone ee si a e — | : Dee] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fitnfiintitn
High: 85° F/29° C q cn 56/13 40/4 7" 55/12 40/4 : [y_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Magen
Low: 72° F/22°C
“4 Johannesburg 78/25 54/12 s 78/25 51/10 s -10s | -Os 0s 10s 20s [808)) 40s
KEY WEST eX @ CATISLAND Kingston 88/31 77/25 pc 85/29 76/24 s
High: 83° F/28° C = es 3 Lima 85/29 64/17 pc 83/28 64/17 pce
Low: 76° F/24°C High: 81° F/27°C London 45/7 32/0 sh 5010 30/-1 c
: @ Low: 64° F/18°C Madrid 5512 32/0 1 52/11 30/-1 sh
a Manila 90/32 75/23 t 94/34 75/23 t ANG TO NM 3 8 RA N a EF
Mexico City 79/26 45/7 pe 77/25 At s
GREATEXUMA Monterrey 79/26 50/10 s 84/28 56/13 s
SAN SALVADOR Montreal 5713 41 ¢ 50/10 36/2 r
High: 84° F/29° C ah: QR° ° Moscow 34/1 23/-5 sf 37/2 32/0 c
Low:69°F/21°C eerie Munich 51/10 34/1 35/1 34/1 sn .
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS : Nairobi 88/31 60/15 pe 88/31 61/16 t
highs and tonights's lows. ) ae High: 89° F/32° C New Delhi 85/29 74/23 pe 91/32 72/22 pc
2 P Low: 71° F/22°C Oslo 36/2 32/0 sn 38/3 «31/0 c
dg
me ms a eng ® Ie witho ; us!
LONGISLAND Prague 56/13 37/2 +r 44/6 36/2 r
Rio de Janeiro 81/27 74/23 5 82/27 75/23 5 : i
Ce sre a St aa ou mE gear t comes to Auto Insurance
Low:67°FA9°C Rome 6317 54/12 B73. 54/12 + A 5
Today sunday Today Sunday Today inde MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 83/28 72/22 s 83/28 72/22 s ae Smart choice is
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 84° F/29° C San Juan 95/35 64/17 s 96/35 64/17 s A
FIC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC re Low: 65° F/18°C gee alee oman s oe aan s 1s Management.
Albuquerque 60/15 38/3 s 70/21 39/3 s Indianapolis 56/13 38/3 r 44/6 33/0 c Philadelphia + 56/13. 46/7 + «0/15. 40/4 antiago s s
Anchorage 35/1 25/-3 pe 36/2 27/-2 pc Jacksonville 86/30 64/17 pc 74/23 46/7 t Phoenix 82/27 55/12 s 85/29 57/13 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS sami Daring B6IS0 5/20 s GIES G6/1B s peel et ple you can trust.
Atlanta 68/20 46/7 t 62/16 42/5 s Kansas City 36/2 26/-3 sn 49/9 37/2 pe _ Pittsburgh 5915 46/7 + 52/11 34/1 sh RAGGEDISLAND "ish:87°F/31°C = _ — errs t a — t se
Atlantic City 56/13 48/8 + 65/18 41/5 1 LasVegas 78/25 53/11 s 80/26 55/12 s Portland, OR 51/10 42/5 r 53/11 39/8 Higher? Fire 4 LOW*68°F/20°C Sinkhol i os aa : on 5 oa fs =
Baltimore B42 45/7 + 6417 40/4 + Little Rock 5412 37/2 po 65/18 40/4 s Raleigh-Durham 67/19 56/13 r 70/21 39/3 pe Low:67°F/19°C a a arr ° mens GAT " Ol :
Boston 54/12 44/6 po 53/11 41/5 1 LosAngeles 82/27 5412 s 70/21 5412 s St. Louis 467 351 1 521 416 s oe SOR REEL SaDOLROAGES i INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Buffalo 5412 43/6 c 5442 32/0 sh Louisville 64/17 40/4 + 50/10 36/2 c Salt Lake City 58/14 38/3 pc 42/5 25/-3 sh GREAT INAGUA Tua 53/11 39/3 52/1 42/5 c ‘ i
Charleston, SC 78/25 61/16 pce 71/21 47/8 t Memphis 6116 39/8 pe 57/13 48/6 s San Antonio 70/21 41/5 $s 75/23 55/12 s «4006 é y P (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
: ae é High: 88° F/31°C Toronto 5442 40/4 c 47/8 31/0 sh |
Chicago 44/6 31/0 1 42/5 27/-2 ¢ Miami 86/30 74/23 s 86/30 66/18 t San Diego 77/25 5512 s 66/18 55/12 pc ano 3 a ‘ =
: . . Low: 69° F/21°C Trinidad 84/28 73/22 t 85/29 76/24 sh
Cleveland 54/12 42/5 + 51/10 30/-1 sh Minneapolis 44/6 22/-5 pc 48/8 24/-4 s San Francisco 64/17 49/9 s 65/18 46/7 s Tana 44/6 36/2 + 47/8 40/4 pe ' “Hey ravens Grond Bat Abacg i th i
Dallas 52/11 38/3 pe 65/18 5140 s Nashville 66/18 30/3 r 53/11 37/2 pc — Seattle 48/8 40/4 + 50/10 38/3 pe con B16 49/9 p ee eee [ one Burner rund
Denver 42/5 31/0 pe 56/13 25/-3 pce NewOrleans 64/17 48/8 r 61/16 50/10 s Tallahassee 77/25 57/13 t 71/21 43/6 pe are 47/8 43/6 c 44/6 39/3 + RCA ST HN SPS Fe M0 si Tek: (240) 332: DRA) Be (247) 3-04
Detroit 5010 344 + 43/6 27/-2 sh New York 56/13 48/8 c Boi) Sa Tampa 85/29 70/21 pe 75/23 55/12 t Winnipeg 28/-2 17/-8 po 39/3 19/-7 c
Honolulu 82/27 69/20 pc 81/27 69/20 pc Oklahoma City 38/3 27/-2 sn 58/14 43/6 pc Tucson 77/25 49/9 s 81/27 51/10 s : ———
Houston 63/17 43/6 s 70/21 55/12 s Orlando 89/31 68/20 s 78/25 56/13 t Washington,DC 57/13 53/11 r 66/18 43/6 pc Teh ne ee ae
PAGE 16, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

thescene

by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP









NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA







& a=

“

MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
OF THE BAHAMAS’ 37TH
ANNUAL CONFERENCE

2009

4. Dr Timothy Barrett, president
of the Medical Association of the
Bahamas; Dr Corrine Sin Quee,
chairman of the Conference
Committee; Dr Hubert Minnis,
Minister of Health.

2. Dr Robin Roberts, urologist;
Dr Corrine Sin Quee, pediatric
oncologist, Dr Duane Sands,
cardiac surgeon; Dr Arthur
Porter, CEP of McGill Health
Centre; Dr Timothy Barrett, psy-
chiatrist; Dr Glenn Beneby, anes-
thesiologist and medial advisor,
PMH; Dr Christine Chin, general
practitioner, co-chairman of the
conference; Dr Magnus Eked-
edee, neurosugeon; Dr Horizal
Simmons, gynecologist, past
president of the Medical Associ-
ation of the Bahamas.

3. Businessman E Pedro
Roberts, CEO of Commonwealth
Drugs, is flanked by Nurse Bev-
erley Culmer and Nurse Lillian
McNeil.

4. Dr Mortimer Moxey, general
practitioner; Dr George Charite,
president of the Bahama Medical
and Dental Association and Dr
Horizal Simmons, past president
of the Medical Association of the
Bahamas.



5. Dr Barrett Mc Cartney, anes-
thesiologist; Nurse Lillian
McNeil; Dr Percival Mc-Neil,
pediatrician; and Dr Kurian
Campbell, surgeon.

6. Dr Arthur Porter, CEO of
McGill Health Centre in Montreal
and Dr Vincent Nwosa, pheuma-
tologist.

7. Dr Munir Rashad, oral/maxil-
lary facial Surgeon; Dr May Hes-
timo, orthopedic surgeon, Dr
Noelynn Rolle, optometrist; and
Dr Kirk Culmer, family practi-
tioner.

8. Dr Leslie Culmer, general
practitioner and Dr Bernard
Rolle, general practitioner.









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