Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
WEATHER

TRY OUR
DOUBLE
FISH FILET

The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

Pim blowin’ it

82F
71F

SUNNY AND
BREEZY

Volume: 105 No.104

HIGH
LOW





BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009



UC TT aL
assets and firm’s
Rl

Casinos in Bahama
need radical ly

Getting ready
mit ev
iil



PM’s statements on
tax transparency
‘may not prevent

a blacklisting’

Financial expert speaks out ahead
of G-20 meeting next month

New Florida gaming
legislation ‘to have
dramatic impact’
on the industry

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

CASINOS in the Bahamas will
have to undergo “radical change”
if they are to survive new com-
petitive threats, a tourism leader
warned yesterday.

Two new pieces of Florida
gaming legislation stand ready to
have a “dramatic impact” on the
future of the Bahamian industry,
he added.

President of the Bahamas
Hotel Association Robert Sands
said the industry in this country
remains “in the dark ages” at a
time when proposed upgrades to
Florida’s gambling centres in par-
ticular represent a looming threat
to the attractiveness of Bahamian
casinos in the US market.

Consequently, recommenda-
tions to modernise the Bahamian
gaming sector are set to be put
to the government by the Casino
Association, through the
Bahamas Hotel Association,
within the next week.

Mr Sands, also senior vice-pres-
ident at Bahamar, told The Tri-
bune yesterday that “time is of
the essence” when it comes to the
government’s reaction.

On Wednesday, The Florida
Senate Regulated Industries
Committee swiftly approved the
two new bills, which US com-
mentators are describing as offer-
ing a “no holds barred” expan-
sion of gambling in the state.

The editor of an industry web-

SEE page eight



ML ws Nala Se COLLIDES ih a

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE SCOOTER lies under the front of the dumptruck.

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



A COLLISION between a dumptruck and a scooter left a
man dead - his body unrecognisable due to the extent of its
injuries.

The incident, which occurred at the junction of Prospect
Ridge and John F Kennedy Drive yesterday, led to traffic
being held up for over an hour as police cleared up the scene.

According to an eyewitness who was in a car stopped
behind the Mack truck which rolled over the driver of the sil-
ver scooter, the victim pulled up on the right-hand side of the
dumptruck as it signalled to turn right on to JFK at around

SEE page eight

Brother of Wendall Jones
in Court for allegedly failing
to pay NIB contributions

VAUGHN JONES, brother
of Jones Communications CEO
Wendall Jones, is among the
latest high-profile employers to
appear in court for allegedly
failing to pay National Insur-
ance contributions, The Tribune
has learned.

National Insurance officials
confirmed that Mr Jones, own-
er of Jones Brothers Morticians,
Mount Royal Avenue,
appeared in Court 11, Nassau

SEE page eight

ONDA INSPIRE

1998 HO New BODY)

$7,500

















CEO of Global
United expects to
lose millions if
company wound up

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

GLOBAL United CEO
Jackson Ritchie said he expects
to lose hundreds and millions
of dollars in future profits if his
company is wound up today by
the government.

Continuing his push for a
meeting with the government
through Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, Mr Ritchie said he
hoped the two parties could
thrash out an agreement to save
Global United and ensure the
government and the host of oth-
er local businesses that the com-
pany owes would eventually get
their money.

Having sunk “millions and
millions” of his own money into
trying to save the company, Mr
Ritchie said: “This is all or noth-
ing. This is my 18-year-old child.
I have five, and this is the sixth

SEE page eight

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

THE prime minister's state-
ments regarding tax trans-
parency and information
exchange may not be enough
to avoid a potential blacklist-
ing that may come out of an
upcoming meeting of the G-20
nations in London next
month, a financial expert said
yesterday.

Raymond Winder, manag-
ing partner of prominent
accounting firm Deloitte and
Touche, is hopeful the recent
announcement was enough to
ward off any negative actions
by the two parties but thinks
immediate action by the
Bahamas is needed to validate
the country's stance.

"I would like to hope and
believe that it (the prime min-
ister's announcement) would
put us in good standing (with
the G-20 nations). It would be
unfair that after we made this





KEVIN ANTHONIO FLOWERS
: claims police officers beat him.

Innocent man
claims he was
brutally beaten
_ by police officers

: 7 By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

? turns to brutally beat him,

? putting him in fear for his life,

Kevin Anthonio Flowers,

SEE page 11



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

) (ST ANI DIS? TG)

DING NEWSPAPER

announcement to still put us
on the blacklist but you can't
say 100 per cent it won't hap-
pen, but I would like to
believe that that would be suf-
ficient.

“And I think the Bahamas
will have to show good faith
by immediately beginning the
process with some countries,"
Mr Winder told The Tribune
yesterday.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham announced
Wednesday that the country
has had a number of requests
for the country to enter into
tax information exchange
agreements.

He said the country was
now prepared to consider
these requests on a case-by-
case basis. At present, the
country has only one Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ment (TIEA) with the United
States.

The agreements have been
criticised by some as being
beneficial to one side - the

SEE page 11

Business manager
assaulted, kidnapped
and forced to help in

robbery of workplace

: ml By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE manager of a well-

i known Nassau business was
? assaulted, kidnapped from his
? home and forced to help masked
? men rob his workplace before
i being left bound with a tele-
? phone cable, according to police.

The shocking scenario unfold-

: ed in broad daylight on Wednes-
: day, at around 5.30pm, when the
Tyre Empire employee arrived at
i his home off Eastern Road.

Police and Tyre Empire pro-

i prietor Henderson Burrows both
: believe it is possible that the

? criminals involved knew the vic-

AN INNOCENT man } tim and his routine.

: claims police officers took }

It was moments after he

? arrived home that the man was

; ? accosted by three masked and
: after he was arrested without ;

; ? armed men, dressed all in black.
? reason. :

He was gun-butted and kicked,

and forced to drive with the men

; 22, maintains he was hand- # jn his own car to the Chesapeake

? cuffed and held at Arawak

Cay Police Staaom while sey ? Road business before being told

: to unlock the company safe.

SEE page eight





PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Mistreatment claims probe expected to end soon

Dion Foulkes waiting for final report
into Chinese workers’ allegations

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

WORKERS
stage their
protest
against their
employer
this week.



“I have not received
the report but we've
spoken to the
employer and we are
trying to verify some
of the things that he
has said to us, but
until I get the final
report I don't want to
make a public
statement.”
ESSERE

Dion Foulkes

mg By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Labour Dion
Foulkes said he expects the inves-
tigation into claims by Chinese
workers of alleged mistreatment
at the hands of a local construc-
tion firm to be completed shortly.

Yesterday, Mr Foulkes declined
to make a statement on the
Department of Labour’s investi-
gation until he has seen the final
report. About two dozen Chinese
workers contracted by the con-
struction firm E R Hanna to
rebuild the T G Glover Primary
School protested against alleged
mistreatment by their employer
on Wednesday.

The group staged a similar
protest earlier this month which
prompted the ongoing investiga-
tion, Mr Foulkes said yesterday.

"I have not received the report
but we've spoken to the employer
and we are trying to verify some
of the things that he has said to us,
but until I get the final report I
don't want to make a public state-
ment,” the minister said.

However, he assured The Tri-
bune that the Department of
Labour was treating the case “as a
matter of urgency.”

Meanwhile, Director of Immi-
gration Jack Thompson told The
Tribune yesterday that as far as
he was aware the group's work
permits were still valid.

On Wednesday, E R Hanna

DCAM MOU Cs



representative Tameka Hanna
said the company will move to
have the group’s permits revoked
because, according to her, they
violated their contract when they
stopped working on March 3,
2009.

Earlier this month Mr Thomp-
son told another daily the work-
ers’ permits were valid until June
2009.

He said yesterday that the cur-
rent problem between the work-
ers and the company is not an
immigration issue, but rather a
matter for the Department of
Labour. During the protest, the
group of about two dozen men
alleged — through an interpreter —
that the company owes them
months of back pay, that they are
not provided with sufficient food
supplies, that drinking water is
not provided at the site and that
their rights are being violated.

They also claimed they are
threatened with deportation

whenever they complain about
their working conditions.

Speaking to The Tribune after
Wednesday's protest, company
operations manager Tameka Han-
na dismissed all the allegations.
She claimed that E R Hanna had
paid what was owed to the work-
ers and that any discrepancy lay
with an international company —
the workers are paid through an
agency in China which E R Han-
na has a contract with.

Ms Hanna also dismissed claims
of insufficient food and mistreat-
ment, and said for the past two
years the workers were ade-
quately housed in a company
facility, fed three times a day and
that fresh drinking water is avail-
able at the site.

After the protest, the compa-
ny had discussions with an inde-
pendent translator, four of the
protesters and a representative
from the agency in China, The
Tribune was told.

It is understood that the Chi-
nese workers were given several
offers which they reportedly
refused. Yesterday, the translator
for the group said their agency in
China has not verified any receipt
of their wages.

He said the men do not want to
continue working for the compa-
ny, but are not prepared to leave
the country without being paid.
Attempts to reach company attor-
ney Oswald Isaacs and Ms Hanna
for an update were unsuccessful
up to press time yesterday.

FORMER GOVERNOR GENERAL

Sir Orville Turnquest pays

respects to MP for Long Island

James Knowles yesterday at the
House of Assembly.

ee

~ R&B BOAT YARI
| oa



~ Full-Service
Synchro-Lift

THE body of former mem- later Ragged Island for 25 be held today at 11am at the



Catamarans up to 70 ft, LOA
up to 40 tons

Railway
Boats up to 90 ft.LOA
up to 120 tons

ber of parliament James “Jim-
my” Knowles was laid in state
at the House of Assembly yes-
terday morning.

Mr Knowles represented
the people of Long Island and

years, and served as a Cabi-
net minister in the first FNM
government.

The Cabinet Office
announced that an official
funeral for Mr Knowles will

Christ Church Cathedral on
George Street.

Rev Father Crosley
Walkine and Archdeacon Kei-
th Cartwright will officiate,
assisted by Father Michael

up to 28ft. beam
gras Gittens.

Private

A private ceremony of
interment will follow at St
Anne’s cemetery, Fox Hill.

The deceased is survived by
his widow Amarylis, daughter
Kimberly, sons James Jr and
Roman, and his mother Agnes
Knowles.

Mr Knowles died at his
home last Saturday following
a four-year battle with cancer.
He had been diagnosed with
melanoma.

The Free National Move-
ment has suspended all politi-
cal activities until March 28
out of respect for Mr Knowles.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and other Cabinet
ministers, parliamentarians,
party officers, members and
supporters will be in atten-
dance at the funeral.

MARINE HARDWARE SUPPLIES
Second to None
in the Bahamas:
* Full line of Pettit Products
Interlux
Rust-oleum
Awigrip
«Fram & Racor Filters
and : Cutlass Bearings
the things you don't plan on: « Fiberglass Accessories
« In-water Prop/Shaft/Rudder « Zincs
Repairs *Anti-fouling paints still not
Vessel Repairs & Recovery _—_ available in the U.S.

the things you plan on:
* Boat Bottom Maintenance
* Welding & Fabrication on
Stainless Steel, Steel &
Aluminum

ac

A Wew EEL ee

* Fiberglass Construction &
Repair

lai}
BUTTERFLY

SHRIMP

ua He

PH:242~-333-44629 EXTERMINATORS

FX:242-333-4249
rmbboatyard@gmail.com

P.O. Box EL-27413
Spanish Wells, Bahamas

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157







THE TRIBUNE



Police
shooting
victim
identified

THE man shot by police in
Pride Estates on Sunday night
has been identified as Renald
Jean Charles, 21.

Police maintain officers shot
to kill when Charles pointed his
firearm at them after a high-
speed car chase from Fire Trail
Road, which led to a dead end
street in a remote area of Pride
Estates. The car chase ensued
when a concerned citizen called
police to say the driver of a
white Cadillac had hit his car on
John F Kennedy Drive and then
sped off sometime after 9pm on
Sunday. Police caught up with
the Cadillac in Fire Trail Road
and pursued it at high speed
until the car stopped in Allen
Drive, Pride Estates.

The driver and Charles got
out of the car and Charles
pulled out a gun to start shoot-
ing, police say.

The officers returned fire,
fatally wounding him in the
upper torso. Police officers were
not injured in the fire fight.

The driver escaped and police
have launched an island-wide
manhunt.

GB resort

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter



A MOTHER accused of caus-
ing the death of her newborn
baby, which was discovered in a
field near a church on Soldier
Road last December, was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court
yesterday.

Stacia Rolle,19, alias Stacia
Adderley, of Windsor Place
Road, was arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court One, Bank Lane, charged
with concealment of a body of a
child.

According to court dockets,

Rolle on Wednesday, December
10, 2008, with the intent to con-
ceal birth, caused the death of a
child.

The dead infant was reported-
ly discovered by a resident of the
neighbourhood near the Church
of God on Soldier Road. It was
believed the baby may have been
born only hours before its body
was discovered. When police
arrived at the scene they found
one of the fingers on the baby’s
hand and one of the feet had
been mutilated. Police also dis-
covered what appeared to be
fresh blood on pieces of clothing.

Rolle, who was dressed in a

white T-shirt and blue jeans, was
not represented by an attorney
at the arraignment. When asked
by the magistrate whether she
understood the charge against
her, Rolle replied: “No.” Magis-
trate Gomez explained that the
charge meant that she had con-
cealed the body of the child after
she gave birth.

When asked by the magistrate
to enter a plea, Rolle hesitated,
then responded: “Guilty.” The
accused was remanded to Sandi-
lands Rehabilitation Centre for
psychological evaluation. Rolle is
oo back in court on April

Caters eritise iste linked
to economic development

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SECURITY in Haiti has
improved, but so long as this does
not translate into economic devel-
opment and jobs, the level of
Haitian migration to the Bahamas
will not decrease, according to



FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Mother accused of
causing newborn baby’s
death appears in court

a ke

Galleria Oe

he Mall-at-"Lanat hen
BCX OFFRCE OPENS AT 10-00. DAILY

EFFECTIVE MARCH 27th, 2009

movers AUENS new | 5 [a5 | | 6 [a0 [10s |
I Oo
THE HADNTNGINCOMMECTCAT yew [etd | R40 | NA [ 610 [895 |
po [a [ae ef
uovevouuan ee [0 a0 [fos
aceTowncnwountum —w_| eso | | NA | eco [as [oo |
LastwOUSEONTHELET | 06 [x20 | WA_| eas | 220 [10040 |
arcane | etn [ik | 00 | rn | ks |

sumeeTGHTER | eto [ag || tet | as [1045 |
TER PERRYSMADEAGOESTOUWL 7 | 108 | nao [WA | gas | 90 fross |

ramen ic | ets | nao [| ets [a0 fr

the Haitian Ambassador to the
Bahamas. Haiti continues to reel
from the devastation wrought by

hoasts

Ramon Espinosa/AP Photo



occupancy
rate of 80
per cent

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

WHILE most hotels on
Grand Bahama are struggling to
keep afloat, at least one resort is
beating the odds with an occu-
pancy rate close to 80 per cent
for the first three months of
2009.

All-inclusive resort Viva Club
Fortuna, which has a capacity of
276 rooms, is consistently
attracting visitors through
heavy advertising in the United
States and Europe, as well as by
offering charter flights from
Europe to the island.

Consistent

Despite the turbulent Grand
Bahama economy, the resort's
first quarter occupancy rate has
remained consistent, according
to general manager Roberto
Paresce.

"The occupancy the first
quarter is averaged at a 78 per
cent. This is on line with the
same period of last year," he
told The Tribune by email.

Starting May 7 the resort —
which Mr Paresce said attracts
families looking for a value-
based all inclusive product — is
anticipating the launch of a
direct charter flight from
France.

The new route will be the first
direct flight from France to
Freeport, he said.

“We do most of our market-
ing in USA but we also invest a
lot to market in Europe — we
have the French charter that
will come directly to Freeport
starting May 7 and the Italian
charter coming on July and
August like every year".

He said the resort has to
adjust its staff numbers due to
Grand Bahama's soft economy
— which was hard hit by back-to-
back hurricanes even the eco-
nomic downturn took root — but
is confident it can retain its high
occupancy level through quality
service.

"Even though, the economy
we are faced with is very chal-
lenging, we minimised our staff
and were still able to offer our
guests quality service, and 'wow'
them enough to want to come
back to our resort.

“We have kept our good rela-
tionships with tour operators in
different markets, and we've
been able to bring several char-
ters to Grand Bahama during
our history.

“Tf we continue to give our
customers quality service, I
think we will be able to contin-
ue high occupancy in spite of
the difficult tume Grand
Bahama and the entire
Bahamas is experiencing at this
time," said Mr Paresce.

Lenten Reflections
session tonight

THE Bahamas Anglican
Cursillo Movement will be
hosting a Lenten Reflections
session at St Anne's Parish,
Fox Hill Road tonight at
7.30pm. The public is invited
to attend.

a series of major hurricanes last
year, which caused massive flood-
ing, dislocation and an estimated
billion dollars of damage.

The country’s already fragile
infrastructure and agricultural
sector took a serious beating and
residents are still struggling
months later to remove huge
mounds of mud created by the
flooding.

Ambassador Harold Joseph, in
an interview from the Haitian
Embassy in Nassau, said: “Right
now in Haiti the situation is bet-
ter. In terms of security, we have
less crime, less kidnapping, and
the UN is pleased with the situa-
tion, but now what we need to do
is we need to translate that
progress in the security field to
the economic field.”

Mr Joseph noted that it is “very
encouraging” that a small number
of Haitian police officers have
been asked to take up posts with
the UN security forces in Chad,
Africa. However, with the global
economy still trending down-
wards, the troubled nation will
likely not receive as much assis-
tance towards building its econo-
my as could have been the case.
Several UN appeals for $108 mil-
lion in assistance after the hurri-
canes elicited a lukewarm
response from the international
community. The government will
try again at a Haiti donors con-
ference in Washington in April,
where it will be seeking $3 bil-
lion for a poverty-reduction plan.

This comes at a time when the
country has been hit by an esti-
mated 10 per cent drop in remit-
tances from Haitian nationals liv-

A BOY makes his way with his bicycle in the slum of Cite Soleil, in Port-

au-Prince, Friday, March 20, 2009.

ing abroad, who have typically
worked assiduously to save up
and send home funds to their
struggling relatives — equivalent in
recent times to a third of the
country’s gross domestic product.

“We are living in a very diffi-
cult time with the economic crisis.
I think the migrant situation for
the time being will stay the same,”
said Mr Joseph.

Repatriated

This month the Department of
Immigration revealed that it has
repatriated 1,204 Haitian nation-
als who illegally attempted to
enter the Bahamas since the start
of 2009 alone. They made up the
bulk of a total of 1,340 illegal
immigrants returned to their
countries of citizenship.

Mr Joseph and Minister of
State for Immigration Branville
McCartney met last week at the
Immigration Department.

The ambassador said the two
had a “very good discussion about
the migrant situation” with Mr
McCartney expressing the view
that the Department of Immigra-
tion will be “pleased to regularise
the status of Haitian migrants
who are qualified to be in the
country, but those who are not
qualified should go back to
Haiti.”

Mr Joseph lamented yesterday
that an agreement outlining a
framework for greater co-opera-
tion between the Bahamas and
Haiti, negotiated under the for-

Murder accused attacks credibility
Of the prosecution's star witness

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

MURDER accused Jamal Glinton yesterday attacked the credibil-
ity of the prosecution’s star witness in the Keith Carey trial, telling
jurors that he is not a murderer.

Glinton, who along with Dwight Knowles and Sean Brown, is
charged in the armed robbery and murder of businessman Keith
Carey, 43, told jurors yesterday that he does not know his co-accused.

In an unsworn statement from the prisoner’s dock, Glinton ques-
tioned why Vaughn Carey - a cousin of the deceased and witness in this
case - had “set up” the businessman and waited three years to come for-
ward to reveal how the murder took place.

Glinton denied that he and his co-accused had a conversation regard-
ing the murder in the exercise yard of Her Majesty’s Prison, as Vaughn
Carey had previously testified.

Vaughn Carey, who was charged with conspiracy to commit armed
robbery before he became a witness for the Crown, had testified that
while at Her Majesty’s Prison he had a conversation with his co-
accused during which Knowles allegedly said that Glinton had shot
Carey. Glinton told the jury yesterday that that conversation never hap-
pened. He admitted to the jurors that he had sold marijuana, but said,
“T’m no murderer.”

Knowles then went on to attack the credibility of another prosecu-
tion witness, Mervin Benson, claiming that he and Benson never had
a conversation regarding $80,000 he had allegedly given to someone to
keep for him. Knowles denied knowing his co-accused telling the jury,
“I don’t know these fellas.”

He claimed that he suffers from “the fits” and told the jury that he
was slapped several times by police while at the Central Detective Unit.
He also claimed that a plastic bag was placed over his head which result-
ed in him having “fits.”

Glinton’s attorney Craig Butler in opening his client’s defence said
that the prosecution wants the jurors to draw inferences as they had no
physical or scientific evidence connecting the accused to the crime.

The trial into the February 2006 murder of businessman Keith
Carey began on February 15 before Justice Jon Isaacs.

Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight Knowles are charged with
the murder as well as armed robbery and conspiracy to commit armed
robbery. Keith Carey was shot and killed on the steps of the Bank of
the Bahamas on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway before he was able
to deposit $40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Station, which he
operated. Deputy director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel,
Stephanie Pintard, Anthony Delaney and Lennox Coleby are prose-
cuting the case. Attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis are rep-
resenting Jamal Glinton, attorney Dorsey McPhee is representing
Sean Brown and attorney Perry Albury is representing Dwight
Knowles.

mer PLP administration prior to
the ousting of former Haitian
President Jean Bertrand Aristide,
has not been signed.

“Unfortunately in February
2004, Aristide left and we did not
have a good chance to sign the
agreement. Now in the meantime
you have new government in the
Bahamas...” said Mr Joseph.

The ambassador said that he
feels that more dialogue on the
migration issue “could be prof-
itable to both countries.”

“Migration is not a bad thing
per se, if both governments sit
together and establish a continu-
ous dialogue,” he said.

er AEE Peay

[WETS ATS

AW GALLERIA NEM AS

ners waves —wew] 10 [0 [| WA | eve [ as] sa
rat vane WW a [40 [WA | eat |e] eas

et WA_| G18 | a0 | tas

118 | ad Wi |) Sto | a0! dena
[J

380-FLIX



THE CARIBBEAN GOSPEL MUSIC

MARLIN

—-AWARDS—

MARLIN AWARDS 2009
SUNDAY MARCH 297 @ 7PM

The Diplomat Center Carmichael Road

TICKETS:

$25 in advance ° $30 at the Door « VIP $40

Hosted by: Jamie Thomas (Tempo “Rise & Shine”)
DRESS CODE: Formal

TICKET OUTLETS:

e 100% Bible & Gift Shop (Marathon Mall & Madeira Street) * Juke Box (Marathon Mall)
e Faith Life Book & Music Center (Carmichael Road) ¢ Bucks Gospel (Wulff Road)

¢ The Christian Bookshop (Rosetta Street)

e Logos Book Store (Harbour Bay Shopping Center)

Cotre ee
ol

Paaraarnartl ws Mord

C08 5 REALTT





PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Judge Lyons’ conduct questioned

JUDGING by the heated chatter on a radio
talk show yesterday morning, the public is not
only alarmed, but angered by the conduct of a
judge in what can only be called the A, B, C,D
“and others” case. The case carries the name of
no person, because, for some mysterious reason,
it has been sealed and the names of plaintiffs
and defendants are anonymously represented to
the public by the first four letters of the alpha-
bet.

In addition to the buzz on the radio stations,
the National Jubilee Coalition, headed by Bish-
op Simeon Hall with executives Dr Philip
McPhee and Dr Keith Russell, has called for a
public investigation. Anyone, said their state-
ment, associated with the judicial system should
be “beyond the slightest reproach.” The Coali-
tion demanded an appropriate investigation
into Senior Justice John Lyons’ decision in the
“A,B,C,D,” case.

“Any hint that a sitting judge might be com-
promised in anyway warrants the appropriate
attention and investigation,” said the Coalition.

This case — a partnership operated between
1992 and 2000 had been dissolved. Now in con-
tention was the 50-50 distribution of the profits
from that partnership between A and B. Senior
Justice Anita Allen observed that the case had
“already been in the system longer than it ought
to have due mainly to the resignation of the
first accountant appointed by the court and
more recently to the sudden recusal of the judge
(Justice John Lyons) who had carriage of the
matter.”

Justice Lyons had charge of the case up to
September 2008 when he “recused” himself
because, he said, he had no time to hear it. The
parties were left to find another judge.

A preliminary issue was whether the incom-
plete accounts of the second court appointed
accountant should be approved as the parties
did not agree the report. She invited the litigants
to make some concessions on this point “to
move the matter along.” One of the litigants
disagreed and invited her to recuse herself from
the case, citing bias. The senior judge denied
bias and refused recusal. As a result the matter
has been moved to the Court of Appeal —
where we shall leave it without further obser-
vation.

Daniel Ferguson, was appointed the second
accountant for the litigants on October 27, 2007
by Justice Lyons who instructed him that the
balancing payment was “by nature a forensic
accounting and you should put together the
best team you can. They have kept records, it is
a reconciliation of their records we need.”

Upon cross-examination it was discovered

Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED
CARS & TRUCKS

that Mr Ferguson qualified as a Certified Pub-
lic Accountant in 1985, but his forensic account-
ing was limited to only two cases in his whole
career. He also admitted, that the last auditing
experience he had was before he became qual-
ified as an accountant. He agreed he had never
certified an account.

It was revealed that he was appointed to a
job that required a highly skilled forensic
accountant for which he was being paid £500 per
hour at an exchange rate just over $2 to the £,
which when converted was about $1,000 per
hour. He said he worked an average of 50 hours
which amounted to $50,000 a week or about
$2.5 million per year for the work, which at
that point he had not completed. The integrity
of his report was in question.

Baffled as to how Mr Ferguson could have
been appointed for this specialised work, one of
the counsel told the court that Mr Justice Lyons
“had literally forced the appointment on them,
threatening to walk out of court if they did not
agree to the appointment.” At one point the
judge got up to leave “when counsel begged
him to have a seat. The judge was asked by one
counsel if it was an ultimatum to which he
responded ‘you bet it is.”

It then transpired through questioning that
the accountant’s sister had a relationship with
the judge and that in fact she was on her broth-
er’s team to do the work for the court. “It was
only then,” said Justice Allen, “that I made the
connection between the accountant and infor-
mation, which was in the public domain for
sometime, that the judge had more than a
friendship with a woman, who up to that point
I did not know was the accountant’s sister.”

At this point we would like to know why
this case was sealed, and who is attempting to
hide what from the public?

The tradition of our judicial system is that
justice must not only be done, but must be seen
to be done. And so litigation is settled behind
closed doors and out of public view in very lim-
ited cases — matters of national security, and
those involving children and mental cases.

The case now before the court is a commer-
cial matter. Why is the information sealed?
What is being hidden behind “A,B,C,D, and
others” and why?

Our judicial system is in such bad odour
that we agree that not only should this case be
opened, but that there should be an investiga-
tion into Judge Lyons’ decision on the appoint-
ment of the accountant.

Justice Anita Allen is to be congratulated for
bringing what appears to be an unsavoury situ-
ation into public view.



Robbery of
our guests
has to stop

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Dear Mr Marquis

The Tribune brings problems
to the public attention so well, I
am asking you to bring one
more item to the people.

I’m talking about the way we
rob our guests, through high
priced food and drink, with
mandatory maximum tips for
poor service. It all starts at the
front desk, mandatory tips for
maids and bellmen.

Thad a cousin from the states
visit, he stayed on Cable Beach,
he had only one bag and car-
ried it to his room himself, a
day later I picked him up he
was looking over his bill and
asked about a five dollar tip for
the bellman that he never even
saw.

The girl at the front desk told
him he must pay the tip whether
or not he used the bellman, she
then mentioned that he was
only charged tip for the maid
as a single occupant, he
informed her this was no favour
as I was only picking him up,
he was alone. Can you imagine
that the mandatory tip for the
maid goes up according to the
number of people in the room,
even though she still only has
to clean the bath and room
once. What happened to a maid
cleaning simply because that is
her job. Now a maid, with no
education or other skills, can
make more money than a col-
lege graduate! How does this
encourage our youth to succeed
in life, when you can clean a

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



bathroom, make a bed and
make more money than an edu-
cated person. Being a bellman
that doesn’t even have to lift a
bag and still make a tip!

My spouse and I, on occasion,
go to the Marina Village for a
walk and stop and have a drink.
We enjoy visiting with the
tourists and answer questions,
tell them places to visit, etc. The
main complaint, the high cost
of coming to the Bahamas. We
recently had a drink with a cou-
ple from England, with three
children. They had just spent
over $600 on dinner. Not only is
the price of dinner outrageous,
but over $90 of this bill was a
tip! When is the last time any of
us gave a waiter a $90 tip? Asa
matter of fact the tip attached to
our drinks was almost two dol-
lars each. Can anyone besides
us, think this is just taking a cru-
el advantage of our much need-
ed tourist?

How many Bahamians would
go to Miami or other destina-
tions if we were given this same
treatment? We have the option
of going out for a cocktail or
stay at home, but as a tourist,
you have no choice, pay up or
go hungry. For a country that
has little to offer a guest other
than food or drink, shouldn’t
we be thinking on a different

level? Eat, drink and be merry,
until you get your bill. This
same couple took their family to
the breakfast buffet, which
totalled over $140, for break-
fast, come on and again the
same problem a mandatory tip,
for serving themselves!

How long can we allow the
union leaders ruin our tourism,
just for temporary wealth, for
unskilled workers? With the
large amount of our economy
and work force depending on
tourism, you’d think these
resorts and restaurants would
start treating our guests, the
same way they are treated else-
where. Everyone knows how
much food and drinks cost any-
where else in the world, do we
want to have the reputation of
being thieves?

We need to look at our guests
as people we want to come
back, tell everyone how great
it is here, and recommend us to
everyone.

With the Internet, everyone
“blogging”, the rule of thumb
is, you upset one person, 3,000
people read about it. Our Min-
istry of Tourism and the larger
resorts pay outrageous amounts
of money to bring tourists here,
but then we ruin it with poor
service, mediocre food and high
prices with a maximum tip
attached. Sun, sea and sand is
everywhere, we need to offer
more.

MRS THOMPSON
Nassau,
March 24, 2009.

Urgent need for a new
Bahamas land policy

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In the name of “develop-
ment”, the birthrights of the
Bahamian masses were sacri-
ficed on the altar of greed,
even before my birth in 1936.
Of course, Bahamians were
British subjects, then.

Of particular interest to this
writer, is my birthplace,
Inagua, where the Inagua
Tramway and Salt Company
(ITSCO-my abbreviation) was
formed in 1865, the year of
my paternal grandmother’s
birth. Successors to ITSCO
are eg West India Chemicals
Company (The Ericksons),
Morton International (Mor-

DON STAINTON |
PROTECTION Lia.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

For the best deal in town on

pre-owned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

TOP QUALITY TEMPERED
ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

ton Salt) and now, Morton
Bahamas with its parent,
Rohm and Haas.

Thousands of acres of
Bahamian land are vested in
the above even though there is
no equitable on-going devel-
opment for the benefit of this
generation.

Ditto for Freeport and West
Grand Bahama, and, of
course, other Bahamian
islands.

A system persists where
Bahamians are mendicants for
a “piece of the rock” in our
Bahamas, whether such is for
joint venturing or to otherwise
benefit Bahamians.

Allegations of “Bahamian
Land Giveaways” were hot
topics in the 2007 general elec-
tions to the extent, the FNM
edged out the PLP to bring
about a change in govern-
ment.

My own focus was sharp-
ened recently, as I watched
the TV programme “Bahami-
an At Sunrise” broadcast from
Inagua. My dearest mother,
Mrs Inez Farquharson, 94
years young participated in
the broadcast.

In recent memory, many of
our Caribbean and Latin
America neighbours and, of
course, African nations, eg
Zimbabwe and South Africa
were prime examples of land
policy gone awry, many of

lives were lost, and are still
being lost in Darfur and other
hot spots in Africa.

There is therefore, the
inescapable reality for the
urgent need for a new
Bahamas land policy via an
institutionalised legislative
process for direct Bahamian
benefit, as opposed to political
manipulation where Bahami-
ans continue to be used as
pawns in the dehumanising
game of “quid pro quo” and
subterfuge, where the “tail
wags the dog”, if you know
what I mean!

Any new Land Policy ought
to be in tandem with election
finance legislation, and so
packaged to form part of the
overall educational curricu-
lum, allowing students in
Inagua and other Bahamian
islands to do research and
appreciate their true heritage
as opposed to enduring insults
to their integrity; such insults
as the renaming of Lake Rosa
to Lake Windsor after a failed
Royal or, certain Freeport
High Schools named after pre-
tenders disguised as benefac-
tors.

ETIENNE L
FARQUHARSON
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,
March, 2009.

IN STOCK!

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
enq06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
(yep (06 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘02 SUZUKI XL-7 :
‘(07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 5dr See
‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK is :
‘05 TOYOTA COROLLA | )
sales

» QUALIT
nT LIMITED

#1 AUTO DEALER IM THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Yat our shorercom ai Geol fy dato Soho | Preecord Lid for dedor deole, Geseers Hey, 32-o077
a dboce Motor Moll. Don MocKap Bed, Bo?-2 91S

FOR SALE

WELL ESTABLISHED
FURNITURE &
APPLIANCE BUSINESS.

SERIOUS INQUIRIES

ONLY
CALL #425-8075
FOR FURTHER INFO

D

Free Estimates

| WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL! |
L Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 |

auto





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



parliamentarians
in ‘the world's top
30 political beauties’

NONE of the Bahamas’
women parliamentarians has
made it into the top 50 “polit-
ical beauties” in the world, a
poll has revealed.

Peruvians took the top two
places, with a Mexican and
Italian in third and fourth
places.

But the Bahamas was left
out in the cold in an online
poll which highlighted “beau-
tiful” politicians from more
than 30 countries.

Among those in the top 50
were Americans Sarah Palin
and Hillary Clinton — and
the stunning French socialist
Segolene Royal.

But all were well down the
list, with Palin at 24, Royal at
36 and 61-year-old Clinton —
the oldest woman mentioned
— at 34.

Politicians from
Afghanistan, Spain, Indone-
sia, Angola, China, Iceland
and Finland were among
those listed.

m@ CORRECTION

THE Tribune story enti-
tled ‘Highest honour for :
Bahamian student’ published ;
on Wednesday, March 25, }
inaccurately reported :
William Saunders III piloted :
a plane at age 16 when for- ;
mer US presidents Ronald
Reagan and George Bush Sr
visited the school.

However, William Saun-
ders, otherwise known as
‘AJ’, piloted a plane for a
flyover for General Flanna-

Couple on Crooked

Island: what recession?

Frugal living in ‘the
best place on earth’

m By JOHN MARQUIS

WHILE everyone in Nassau
worries about the credit crunch,
the economic downturn and the
depressed property market, a
sprightly Canadian couple living
the good life on Crooked Island
are asking: What recession?

Donald and June MacMillan,
who moved on to the island in
1965, say that with living costs a
mere $400 a month - that’s right,
$100 per week - the word “reces-
sion” means no more to them than
the current state of the Japanese

en.

“When I watch TV at night, I
realise how glad I am to be living
on Crooked Island,” Mr MacMil-
lan, 78, said from his seafront home
at Pittstown Point.

“The word ‘recession’ doesn’t
mean a whole lot down here, not
when living costs are about $400 a
month (excluding taxes, of course)
and there are so few places to
spend any money.”

It’s true that the bonefishing
business is down this year, with
fewer Americans and Canadians
flying in for their annual sport, but
when life is lived so frugally, and
contentedly, there’s not a lot that
greedy international moneymen
can do to make you sleep less eas-
ily at night.

“We spend $115 a time to
replace our propane gas tank, and
I need gas to get around in my vehi-
cle, but other than that and our

food supply, there’s not much to
spend money on here,” he said.

Mr MacMillan, a former film
industry executive, fell in love with
Crooked Island during the early
1960s. It didn’t take long for he and
his wife to make it a winter home,
an escape from the ice and slush
of the north.

Since 1993, they have lived on
the island year-round, venturing
back to Canada only on occasional
visits, and enduring the 85 per cent
summer humidity with good grace
even after other perspiring foreign
residents have flown out in search
of cooler air.

“T can actually sit here and hear
my things rusting in Crooked
Island, the humidity is so high,” he
said, “but we love it here. The more
aware you become of what’s hap-
pening in the outside world, the
gladder you are to be living in a
place like this.”

During a recent medical check, a
Canadian doctor told Mr MacMil-
lan: “I don’t know what you’re
doing, but whatever it is it’s good
for you.”

Plenty of fish hauled out of the



nearby sea, and ample fruit and
vegetables grown on their patch of
land ensure that the MacMillans
eat the kind of fare that doctors
recommend.

“There is no fast food down
here,” he said, “We catch tuna,
wahoo, mackerel, snapper, mahi-
mahi, muttonfish, you name it. And
we have a garden where we grow
plenty of our food.

Mailboat

“We buy things, too, of course,
and bring in supplies on the mail-
boat, but you can live well here
without the expense of city life.

“After all, who needs suits and
ties in Crooked Island? I wear jeans
and sweatshirt most of the time,
and there’s no impulse buying here
- you just buy what you need, noth-
ing more.”

Apart from running a tiny hard-
ware store from a metal container
outside his home (mornings only),
Mr MacMillan fills his time by
“pottering about” (his term) and
wood-carving, a hobby he took up
recently.

Call for Animal Protection
and Control Act to be law



“T don’t earn enough from the
store to buy a stick of gum, but it
keeps my head turning over and
enables me to meet people every
day. It’s therapy, not a business,” he
said.

With a total population of 248,
and 38 second homes owned main-
ly by North Americans, Crooked
Island isn’t exactly overrun with
humanity.

But he said social life is thriving,
with couples taking turns to host
dinner at their homes, and the local
taverns alive with noise as Crooked
Islanders debate the issues of the
day.

“There’s not a single security bar
in Crooked Island,” he said, “when
we go out we leave the doors open.
Things are very congenial here. We
get along very well.”

The MacMillans’ idyllic existence
is proof that opportunities exist on
the islands for Bahamians stressed-
out by urban living to live agreeably
in communities where mortgages
and credit cards don’t mean a lot.

One man recently took advan-
tage of a government crown land
scheme by starting a fruit farm,
producing limes, bananas, Cali-
fornian oranges and tangerines.
Some Bahamian retirees are also
choosing island life because they
can get by more comfortably on a
limited pension.

“T think more Bahamians living
in Nassau are looking to their fam-
ihes’ home islands for their retire-
ment,” said Mr MacMillan.

“Here they can get away from
the crime and congestion. And
money goes much, much further.”

Though the island’s limited hol-
iday trade is noticeably down this
year, mainly because Americans
are spending less to get through
the current crisis, projects are
underway to boost business for the
future.

Cameron McRae, who owns the
Bojangles restaurant chain in the
United States, is developing a bou-
tique hotel for upscale foreigners at
Pittstown.

Last week, he completed a 3,500-
foot runway for private fliers and is
hoping to sell home lots equipped
with individual hangars for those
who want to make Crooked Island
their Bahamas base.

With amenities improving all the
time - you can even get the Internet
nowadays - Crooked Island is not
quite as remote as it used to be.

Foreclosures

Satellite TV is on hand to remind
residents what they’re missing in
the great recession-hit world out-
side - the home foreclosures, the
Bernie Madoffs, the avaricious
bankers and huge credit debts of a
capital system gone wrong.

“T can sit here with my cigar, a
cup of coffee, a good book - every-
body passes books around - and
feel really sorry for those guys who
are up against it in the outside
world,” said Mr MacMillan.

“Down here there is no reces-
sion, there is no crime - my wife
and I just love the place.”

Where else can you spend a hun-
dred bucks a week and live like
Riley in an environment where it
rarely rains and never snows -
where “consumer spending” is a
box of tinned food off the mail-
boat, and “bail out” is something
you do in a leaking dinghy?

Mr and Mrs MacMillan don’t
know. That’s why Canada is some-
where they visit from time to time
and Crooked Island is the spot they
now call home.

“We have never regretted being
here,” they say, “it’s the best place
on earth.”





gan, who was the pilot for :
Marine I for Mr Reagan and :
Mr Bush. :

Final in-orbit
space shuttle
inspection is

completed

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.



@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

will not be allowed in the designat-
ed MPA. As it stands now, we
believe the east side of the North
Sound will be saved for future gen-
erations.”

“We are hoping that the golf
course will not be allowed because
the Bahamas National Trust is
against the construction of the golf
course and the government listens
to the BNT,” said Ms Woon.

On the issue of endangered sea
turtles, Ms Woon is appealing to
Bahamian citizens to express their
views concerning a ban on the har-
vesting of the reptiles. She said that
government announced in 2008 that
it will ban the harvest of sea turtles
as of April 1, 2009.

“All six of the sea turtles world-
wide are endangered.

“There is a chance that this (ban)



FREEPORT - An environmen-
tal organisation in Grand Bahama is
agitating for the Animal Protection
and Control Act to be made into
law.

“We have a draft Animal Cruel-
ty Act that has been finalised but
not passed. We need to let govern-
ment know that the Animal Cruel-
ty Act needs to be made into actual
legislation,” said Earthcare founder
Gail Woon.

The recent slaughtering of pro-
tected iguanas, turtles and wild
ducks in the Bahamas has outraged
many persons who feel that the
incidents are a form of animal cru-
elty.

While speaking at the Grand Bahama Sunrise
Rotary Club, Ms Woon told Rotarians that there are
several pertinent environmental issues facing the
country.

“The Bahamas has a new Ministry of the Envi-
ronment that was created last year - again we have
a draft Act, but no environmental laws to speak
of,” she said.

Ms Woon, a marine biologist, was very pleased
about the news of the creation of a marine protect-
ed area (MPA) on North Bimini, where there have
been both local and international concerns
regarding the mega-resort development on that
island.

“Government has said that the Bimini MPA will
be ‘revisited’. This will result in decisions being
made about what will be allowed and what activities

Odessa G arden
where life ts still simple and people still care
Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

BRAND NEW BOOKS
for EASTER

_ AT DAWN WE SLEPT - The unteld story of Pearl Harbour.’
“The Best Loved Poems of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis."
“Shakespeare - Art Edition Copywright 1869
( All of his Great Works),
Lincoln At Gettysburg - A New Birth Of Freedom ist Ed.

ASTRONAUTS aboard
space shuttle Discovery con-
ducted a final inspection of the }
vehicle Thursday and at first
glance found no significant dam- }
age which would prevent itfrom :
returning to Earth, according to }
Associated Press. :

Mission managers will decide
whether it’s safe for Discovery :
to land Saturday at the Kennedy
Space Center in Florida once }
engineers finish studying the }
results of the five-hour, routine
survey. They said Thursday :
afternoon they hadn’t detected
any areas of concern so far. i

Astronauts combed the out- :
side of the shuttle with a 50-foot
inspection boom mounted on }
Discovery’s robotic arm. The }
boom was equipped with laser :
and camera tools that beamed
images and data back to Mis- }
sion Control. i

“To the untrained eye, it }
looked very, very clean,” said
Paul Dye, lead flight director.

Astronauts were looking for i
damage from micrometeorites ;
or space debris that may have }
hit the shuttle as it was docked }
to the international space sta- }
tion for eight days. The results :
were being compared with those
taken during an inspection on }
the mission’s second day. ;

The procedure was put in }
place after the 2003 Columbia }
disaster killed seven astronauts. }
A piece of foam from Columbi-
a’s external tank damaged the :
shuttle’s wing during launch, }
allowing fiery gases to penetrate i
the orbiter during its descent }
back to Earth. :

Discovery undocked from the
space station on Wednesday }
after its seven-person crew deliv- }
ered and installed power-gen-
erating solar wings at the orbit-
ing outpost. Discovery was }
orbiting Earth for two days }
before it was to re-enter Earth-
*s atmosphere on Saturday. i

Astronaut Sandra Magnus }
joined the crew for the return
trip after living four months at ;
the space station. She spent two }
sessions on the shuttle’s exer-
cise machine Thursday in order
to prepare her body for the
effects of gravity. ;

“Sandy is on her way home,” }
space station commander :
Mike Fincke radioed Mission
Control. ;

“We certainly enjoyed work- }
ing with her.” i

Earthcare founder Gail Woon

may not happen.

“The Ministry of Fisheries wants more input from
Bahamian citizens. They have heard a lot of support
for the ban from non-Bahamians. Please let the
Ministry of Fisheries know about your support of the
ban before April 1,” she said.

Ms Woon said another issue of concern is the
invasion of the lionfish in Bahamian waters.

She said the lionfish is a voracious predator that is
threatening the local fishery.

“The current thinking is to kill them. Some fish-
ermen have reported finding lionfish in grouper
stomachs. We need to find out the effect of eating
lionfish has on native species such as the grouper. Is
the grouper flesh safe to eat if it has ingested lionfish
with their venomous spines? This is research that
needs to be done,” she said.

EASTER, DECORATIONS
Painted Easter Ornaments to decorate your Easter Tree
and for your Easter Baskets.



ATTENTION LADIES!!!



Shoe & Bag Bounque
is having a
ONE WEEK

Pre-Easter

BLOW OUT
~~

vgs Ss







i) Shows

Sale Starts this
Thursday 26th March

Sale Ends

CUSTOM &
READY-MADE FRAMES

as Ly

a ee 1 ae

7 / Wo Exchange “No Refunds *All Sales Final

Tel: 328-8391



FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IAA Tas

PoP airs (a mee opal ae

ee Petey
822-2157

eee ee hee eg Ty







PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Photos by Chris d’Albenas

Caves Village Professional
Turn Key Office Suites For Rent

“The premier choice for serious business”

1,661 sq. ft.
1,083 sq. ft.
839 sq. ft.
850 sq. ft.

$5,813.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees
$3,790.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees
$2,936.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees
$2,975.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees

Contact Mr. Simon Chappell on

327-1575 or 477-7610
Email: simon @cavesheights.com

DAIHATSU

FV ath='T-

Easy to drive, easy to load

¢ Standard transmission
¢ Air conditioning

2 year/24,000-mile factory warranty.

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED DAIHATSU DEALER
Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) * Queens Hwy, 352-6122 * Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916



THE HONDA ACCORD hit a wall then flipped over.

Driver unhurt
after car crashes
and flips over

THE driver escaped unscathed after this Honda Accord hit a wall
and flipped over in a narrow Nassau street at around 10.30pm on
Wednesday.

Onlookers who crowded around the crash scene told The Tribune
the driver said he had been driving east on East Bay Street, passed
the bridge to Paradise Island, and took a right turn into Ernest
Street, which runs behind Hammerheads Bar and Grill.

But as he turned into the road, a beggar approached the car
asking for a dollar and tried to grab the driver through the window.

The driver told onlookers he slammed on the brakes, lost control
of the car and crashed into a low wall.

Police attended the crash scene, as did fire and ambulance ser-
vices.

Fully furnished and Test eyareal Ver Maas ae

Othe Aros Fe tee

sunrise - Ft, Lauderdale
Phone: 1.886.460.7568
inf@shamrockcorp.com

werwshamrockoorp.com

Shamrock

POPU Tn FLORIOA

OA au





welcomes

ielersirk




THE global real estate sys-
tem RE/MAX celebrated the
official signing of the Bahamas
- the 73rd country to join the
RE/MAX network - with a
flag-raising ceremony at its
Denver headquarters last week.

In 2008, RE/MAX surpassed
the 70-country milestone and
now has an international pres-
ence greater than any of its
competitors.

“RE/MAX is recognised
around the world and there is
certainly a place for this pow-
erful network in the Bahamas,”
said William Soteroff, senior
vice-president of international
development at RE/MAX
International.

“The Bahamas has an estab-
lished real estate market and
agents and consumers alike will
benefit from the international
resources and tools that
RE/MAX has to offer.”

New Bahamas franchise own-
ers Craig Pinder, broker and
owner of RE/MAX Paradise
Realty (formerly known as Par-
adise Real Estate), and William
Wong, broker and owner of
RE/MAX Ocean Realty
Bahamas (formerly known as
William Wong and Associates
Realty), were at the RE/MAX
headquarters for the flag-rais-
ing ceremony and for the new
franchisee training seminar.

The two Bahamian realtors
will continue to operate their
separate offices and will imple-
ment the power of the
RE/MAX brand name to
attract both local and foreign
home buyers and sellers.

“RE/MAX has a market
brand presence like no other
real estate network in the
world,” said Mr Wong, who has
been in the real estate business
for over ten years and is presi-
dent of the Bahamas Real
Estate Association.

“My agents will benefit from
being a part of a major inter-
national franchise, and this
office, with its experience and
resources, will only build on its
current success. I want us to be
a major competitor in the
Bahamian real estate market
and take advantage of the great
referral opportunities

y ;
William Wong and Craig Pinder

RE/MAX has to offer.”

Mr Wong’s RE/MAX Ocean
Realty Bahamas office will be
managed by his daughter, Lau-
ren Ashley Wong.

Mr Pinder, who has over ten
years of real estate experience,
wants to establish RE/MAX as
a household name in the
Bahamas.

The RE/MAX affiliation, he
said, will help him add even
more listings and sales to his
already robust business.

“T had contemplated joining
for a while and when I recently
viewed a few RE/MAX televi-
sion commercials, especially
during the Super Bowl, I
realised that this is the most
recognised real estate brand in
the world and it was the per-
fect time to introduce
RE/MAX to the Bahamas,” Mr
Pinder said.

Attending the recent
RE/MAX International Con-
vention and training seminars
in Las Vegas also helped Mr
Pinder’s decision to join
RE/MAX.

“Bahamian real estate agents
are some of the best educated
in the region and RE/MAX
agents have an added advan-
tage with access to top educa-
tional resources,” he said.

The Bahamas is the seventh
country to join the RE/MAX
network in the last four months.
The countries of Albania,
Ecuador, Macedonia, Uruguay,
India and Singapore have all
recently launched new
RE/MAX franchises.

For the ninth time in the last
ten years, RE/MAX ranked
higher than any other real
estate franchise in Entrepre-
neur Magazine’s “The Fran-
chise 500 Survey.”

The Denver-based franchisor
led all its competitors in three
categories, including global
franchises.

agara Chrisitian Community
of School

NCC offers academic excellence in a family-like

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matthew’s Church)
Open Mon to Fri 8am - 5:30pm
Sat 8am - 12noon

Tel: 397-1700

E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs Apes
Parts and service guaranteed (a



atmosphere, inspiring life-long learners

Window Van
& Panel Van

(not shown)

¢ Automatic
transmission

¢ Air conditioning
¢ Power steering

* Radio/cassette
player
¢ 3 cylinder 659cc

NCC will be hosting personal family visits at the Wyndam Nassau
Resort at Cable Beach on April 2, April 3 and April 4. Please
contact Sarah Schmoll at NCC directly at sschmoll@niagaracc.com
or call the Wyndam Nassau Resort 242-327-6200 to learn more
about this opportunity.

¢ Private School established in 1932

¢ Rich tradition and heritage

¢ Co-educational, Day and Residential

¢ Elementary , Middle and Secondary Schools

° Safe, family-like environment

¢ Dedicated faculty and small class sizes

¢ Comprehensive co-curricular and residential
programs

¢ Championship Sports Teams

¢ Distinguished university placement

° 400 students from 18 countries

¢ Beautiful campus near Niagara Falls

fee

website: www.niagaracc.com
sschmoll@niagaracc.com

Sei



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Eleven are accused of

pansacking synagogue |

in Venezuela

â„¢ CARACAS, Venezuela

VENEZUELAN prosecutors }
have filed charges against eight :
police officers and three other peo-
ple, accusing them of involvement }

in a January attack on Caracas’

largest synagogue, prosecutors said :
Thursday, according to Associated }

Press.

Prosecutors said in a statement :
they’ve asked a court to approve :
charges including robbery, “acts :

of contempt against a religion,”
and concealing firearms.

Among the suspects is a police }
officer who worked as a body-
guard for a rabbi. Another sus- }
pect is one of two security guards :
on duty during the attack, who is :
suspected of aiding intruders by }
deactivating an alarm and an elec- }

tric fence surrounding the building. ;

Study into wind as alternative
energy source gets underway

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A study of the
feasibility of using wind as an
alternative energy source is now
underway in Grand Bahama.

Equipment designed to mea-
sure wind speed is expected to be
put up over the next few weeks.

Excell O Ferrell, president and
CEO of the Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company, said the company is
looking at other alternative ener-
gy resources as well.

The company, he said, is work-
ing with one of its owners, Emera
—a major energy firm that has a
diversified portfolio worth $5.3
billion — to conduct the wind stud-
ies, which will last a year.

Ministry of Environment
launches a harbour
clean-up campaign

THE Ministry of the Envi-
ronment and the National
Coastal Awareness Committee
are joining forces to launch a
clean-up campaign of Nassau’s
historic harbour.

The campaign includes the
removal of derelict and aban-
doned vessels stretching from
Potter’s Cay Dock west to
Arawak Cay as well as the
removal of trash (marine
debris) from the sea floor and
shoreline.

The first harbour clean-up
will take place on Saturday,
April 4, in the Potter’s Cay
vicinity between the two
bridges.

“The Ministry of the Envi-
ronment supports environmen-
tal stewardship demonstrated
by the National Coastal Aware-
ness Committee and its efforts
to clean up our coastal envi-
ronment,” the ministry said in a
press statement.

“This work is extremely
important. It provides a reward-
ing experience for those who
take part in this exercise. The
ministry is fully committed to
ensuring that the cleanliness of
the physical environment
receives top priority, therefore,
it encourages community par-
ticipation in this event. This
commitment is manifested in
action which involves preven-
tion, control and abatement of
practices and or factors which
adversely impact the environ-
ment and may affect the fragile
marine environment/life and
ultimately the health and phys-
ical well being of our people.

Plan

“Therefore, it is the ministry’s
plan to encourage the continuity
of this effort by educating and
sensitising the public in order
to protect our environment.”

The Ministry of the Environ-
ment will commit the resources
that it has available to fully par-
ticipate in this clean-up initia-
tive. The ministry said it is
impressed with the efforts and
activities of the National
Coastal Awareness Committee
over the past five years. As a
result of their annual clean-up
programme, there is a notice-
able difference around the
coastline, particularly in New
Providence, the ministry said.

“The National Coastal
Awareness Committee is
pleased to join forces with the
Ministry of the Environment
for the launch of their harbour
clean up,” said Earlston
McPhee, chairman of the Com-
mittee and director of sustain-
able tourism development for
the Ministry of Tourism.

“In the last two years, our
committee has held three large
harbour clean-ups as part of our
national initiative that made a
tremendous impact - but so
much more needs to be done.”

“Together with the Ministry
of the Environment we will be
able to make significant, long-
term, positive changes to our
harbour which is one of our
country’s most important nat-
ural assets,” Mr McPhee said.

“We have a beautiful natural
harbour that can become a
tremendous tourist attraction
in the future. I envision one day
that the city of Nassau will be
mentioned along with other
famous waterfront cities like
Helsinki, Finland; Sydney, Aus-
tralia; Hamburg, Germany; and
Stockholm, Sweden.”

The clean-up will involve
both land and sea coordination.
Stuart Cove and his dive team
along with the Royal Bahamas

Defense Force, the Department
of Marine Resources and other
dive volunteers will assist in
removing vessels and marine
debris from the harbour floor.

The vessels will be lifted up
and transported to the point of
disposal. All trash removed will
be sorted and catalogued by
volunteers through Dolphin
Encounters — Project BEACH
to help track common types of
litter and to prevent these items
from returning to the harbour in
the future.

Coastline

“Within the next two weeks,
the Ministry of the Environ-
ment will place 37 - four and
six cubic yard containers at all
of the public areas along the
coastline throughout New Prov-
idence. This is another partner-
ship similar to the one we are
happy to forge with the Nation-
al Coastal Committee.

“We hope the public will join
us as we strive to sustain the
natural beauty of these islands
for our socio-economic welfare

“We should have equipment
up in the next few weeks and we
will be able to measure the wind
duration and the speed on the
hour. And it will take a year or so
to really determine if there is suf-
ficient wind to actually construct
wind turbines.

Turbines

“Tf it turns out that there is suf-
ficient wind to make turbines
practical, I anticipate we would
build wind turbines and end up
with an energy source that has no
cost for fuel.

“The benefit to the consumers
on the island is that you’ve got
an energy source that is not
impacted by what happens in

and that of our guests,” Mr
McPhee said.

“This is a large task but an
important one.

“We are all in this together.”

The public is invited to par-
ticipate in the harbour clean-
up.

Certified divers and volun-
teers to sort and catalogue
debris are needed.

To volunteer call Stuart Cov-
e’s Dive.

The National Coastal Aware-
ness Committee of the Bahamas
is a group of stakeholders from
the private and public sectors
with an interest in promoting
the sustainable development of
the Bahamas.

world prices of oil,” explained Mr
Ferrell.

However, he added that the
company will not be able gener-
ate all its electricity by using wind
because “you cannot depend on
it.”

“You have to have generation
that is powered by something
other than the wind to meet the
load.

“There will be some small per-
centage of total wind and total
energy, and it will make some
reduction in fuel price and overall
cost, and so from that standpoint,
Iam optimistic,” he said.

In addition to the wind study,
Mr Ferrel said the GBPC is talk-
ing with land owners to deter-
mine the feasibility of capturing
methane gas which has been not-



TERT

potpourri gift sep

ee ee ee

ed to flare up in certain areas of
the island.

Environmentalist Gail Woon,
founder of Earthcare, said her
organisation supports these
efforts to find alternative energy
sources.

She noted that alternative ener-
gy will help to reduce the coun-
try’s need to import oil.

“There is good news in the area
of alternate energy — government
has received several bids for alter-
nate energy,” she said.

“Tt will result in 20 percent of




the energy for New Providence
being provided by alternate forms
of energy such as solar or wind
power.

She added that the identity of
Bahamians involved in the vari-
ous alternative energy bids should
be made public, in the interest of
fairness and transparency.

Ms Woon said the government
also needs to release the details of
its energy policy, and that the law
prohibiting homes from having
solar panels and windmills should
be changed.

Oessa Garden

were life is stall simple : and people stil care

Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493





DRESSES
for, EASTER

Fancy White Pre-teen and Teen dresses for
Special Ocassions - Church, Graduation,
Confirmation, First Communion, Weddings,
Funerals,

Pretty Hand Smocked Dresses in Pastel Colours,
Perfect for Easter Sunday, Dressy Parties
and Tea Parties.

keeprake ttems ~ decor pieces

pagar -~

Nassau, Bahamas - Phone

iT Thi SALE
VisitlourBUYAl|get}1/FREE|arec

statues — bags — metal & wicker pois ~ cushions runners — sconces — mirrors — home scents

~ pillar & votive candles ~ framed art ~ ceramics ~ picture frames

Reet Pet Dis ee bar



Ce ABN Miata ato rei eest mare ua

HAVE YOU SUDDENLY FOUND YOURSELF
WITHOUT HEALTH INSURANCE?

WE HAVE THE SOLUTION ...

COVERAGE FOR ALL AGES

(From birth to 85 years - renewable for life)

COVERAGE CAN BE ARRANGED
FOR MOST PRE-EXISTING
MEDICAL CONDITIONS *

(e.g. Hypertension, Diabetes, Cancer, Heart Disease)

STAR

Health & Life
393-5529

* Certain terms & conditions apply

INSURANCE BY LLOYD’S

OF LONDON (An A-rated Insurer)

PREMIUMS GUARANTEED
NOT TO INCREASE FOR

NEXT 2 YEARS

LLOYDS

WorldwideMedicalTrust

Call one of our agents today!

Mark Reynolds

Durell Shearer



Tamara Boyd

Cyril Peet



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



| CEO of Global United expects to

lose millions if company wound up

Business manager assaulted, kidnapped
FROM page one

The men then fled with what police called a “large quantity of
cash”, leaving the manager tied up inside the premises with a
telephone cable. Luckily, he was able to wriggle free and raise the
alarm.

Mr Burrows said he found out about the incident around an hour
later and is still in shock.

Nothing like this had ever happened at his business, he said,
adding that he is considering ways to beef up the company’s secu-
rity system - which was cut by the robbers before they entered.

Yesterday, the manager took a day off work to seek medical
treatment for his injuries.

Meanwhile, the 1999 Toyota Corolla used by the three men to
flee the scene of the crime was found dumped in the Wells Lane
area, behind the Village Road City Market, at around 9pm on
Wednesday.

Police are investigating but have no solid leads, they said.

Birth yo ay

goes out to our
Princess

ACCEPOECE

from your dad, Terry; mom, Latishka;
grandmother, great grandmother, aunts,
uncles and especially Rosemarie Evans,
and The Soul Wining Church of God in
Christ Family.

ae Vfiu!

EARNBONJS



FROM page one

one, and what they are trying
to do is crucify one of my chil-
dren,” an impassioned Mr
Ritchie said yesterday.

For the past week, Mr Ritchie
has led a one-man campaign in
the media calling on the gov-
ernment to rethink its approach
in calling in his company’s out-
standing debt, which ultimately
will force the brokerage firm
out of business.

Asked how he could insist
that it was the government that
was forcing him out of business
when the courts had ordered
immediate payment of out-
standing funds before any
attempts were made to recon-
cile the balances, Mr Ritchie
said that during any court mat-
ter both parties can still come to
some form of agreement.

Mr Ritchie also explained
that the outstanding money was
not funds owed by his company
to the government in terms of
taxes, but the balances of his
trade payables.

These “trade payables”, Mr
Ritchie said, were abruptly
called in by the government,
forcing him to resort to utilising
certified cheques to pay
employees and then working
day-to-day on a cash basis sys-
tem.

“In any business your
payables drag to 30-60 days. If
you have good terms you can
get 60 maybe 90 days. But with
government we don’t try that
because we know they want to
get paid as quick as possible. So
we would be a couple of weeks
out and that’s what they jumped
on.

“Now, my people, I’m giving
them 30-60-90 days and I’m
waiting on them to pay me.
Suddenly the government says
pay me all my money now or
we're going to sue you. The
bank then, for whatever reason,
suddenly hardens up on my
overdraft and holds all my
assets personal and business.

“So now they bounce my
cheques. They bounce dollar
cheques without any notice but
we worked it out and I replace
them with certified cheques. I
took them down to Mr Mullings
myself. Now suddenly I’m pay-
ing cash - because I’m still in
business, ’'m supposed to be
out of business. So now I’m put
on cash in October, and all my
vendors want cash up front. So
I have to provide a service toa
client, I have to pay for that ser-

INTEREST WITH THE
SCOTIABANK SAVINGS

REWARD PLAN.

SAVE REGULARLY - AND REWARD YOUR GOOD HABITS!
THE MORE YOU SAVE, THE MORE YOU EARN. SO START

SAVING WITH SCOTIABANK TODAY!



Ask your Scotiabank representative for details.

§ Scotiabank:

+ Conditions apy * Taderrrk of The Bank of None Sons, used under licence,
BS 0708

vice in advance, so I have to
find the money to pay, then I
have to bill them and wait 30,
60, even 90 days to get paid. So
my cash flow has taken a three

to four month slip the
wrong way,” Mr Ritchie
explained.

This tactic, he said, which was
inflicted upon his company, can
be done to any other company,
Mr Ritchie warned.

Doing over $125 million
worth of business a year, Mr

Ritchie said GUL would annu-
ally pay the government any-
where between $70 and $80 mil-
lion. And during this period, Mr
Ritchie said, he was owed any-
where between $13 and $15 mil-
lion.

“T was owed more than what
I owed anybody else.

“But I must be from the
wrong island, with the wrong
background and in the wrong
party because I haven’t seen this
happen to nobody else. And

ain’t nobody can tell me no oth-
er reason why.”

Mr Ritchie said he isn’t wor-
ried because he knows that he is
in the right and he has his facts
which will come out “one way
or the other”.

“T will pay every bill and
every dollar. For me to be in
this position, yes it is embar-
rassing, but I will come out. The
fact of the matter is that what
was done to me and my compa-
ny is an injustice,” he said.

Man dies in collision

FROM page one

10.55am.

As the dumptruck pulled off to make the turn,
the driver said she was engulfed in a cloud of
dust which, when it cleared, revealed the body of
what she soon realised was the driver of the scoot-
er lying in the road.

The motorbike itself was trapped under the
front of the truck, which stopped moments later.

According to those on the scene, the driver of
the truck would have been unable to see the
moped, which was located on the opposite side to
the truck’s driver.

“Shaken up” by the incident, the truck driver
was taken to hospital by ambulance.

The victim has yet to be identified.

Brother of Wendall Jones in court for
allegedly failing to pay NIB contributions

FROM page one

Street, yesterday for allegedly
failing to pay NIB contribu-
tions. NIB officials, however,
declined to release any infor-
mation regarding the matter.
Last month, Jones Commu-
nications CEO Wendall Jones
pleaded guilty to owing NIB

over $430,000. Mr Jones
agreed to pay 40 per cent of
the sum — $180,000 — and the
remainder over a two-year
period.

The National Insurance
Board is increasing its review
of accounts of delinquent
employers and self-employed
people in order to ensure com-

pliance with the National
Insurance Act.

For this year alone, the
National Insurance Board of
Directors has reportedly rec-
ommended that close to 300
employers who have failed to
pay employees’ contributions
or produce National Insurance
records be prosecuted.



FROM page one

site, casinogamblingweb.com, yesterday suggested
the bills - if passed - would “cripple” the Bahamian
gambling industry, keeping Floridian gamblers at
home and drawing those from other states to gam-
ble in Florida rather than the Bahamas.

“We are a gaming state, so why wouldn’t we want
to be the cream of the crop rather than losing citizens
going somewhere else?” the sponsor of the two Bills
and SRIC chairman Dennis Jones was reported to
have asked.

Yesterday, Mr Sands said gaming stakeholders
in this country are keenly aware of the threat they
face - already having seen a “precipitous drop” in the
number of people travelling to the Bahamas to play
so-called table games in the wake of the introduction
of more of these in Florida casinos last year.

“If they were to open up further that would have
a dramatic impact on us being able to remain com-
petitive in this particular area,” said Mr Sands.

“We are obviously keeping our eye on it and we
are running a parallel track in terms of lobbying
the government for some major changes to the exist-
ing regulations and casino legislation that has
presently been in force for more than 40 years,” he
added.

The hotelier said that, while discussions on the
need for modernisation of the Bahamian casino
industry have been ongoing “over a long period,
the time has really come for us to be extremely
proactive in being advocates for this change.”

“(We need to) ensure that we can respond to the
changing needs of the gaming market fairly quickly
so we’re not caught off-hand,” he noted.

Revealing some contents of the presentation set to
be made to the Minister of Tourism, Mr Sands said
it will address the need for “new games and all
derivative forms of existing table games” to be intro-
duced, as well as the thorny question of who should
be allowed to gamble in the Bahamas.

While stopping short of proposing that Bahamians
be permitted to legally do so, as some advocate, Mr
Sands said the presentation will suggest that some



Casinos in Bahamas
‘need radical change’

Bahamian residents, including second home owners
“who have a proven net worth,” should be given the
chance to play as part of an effort to shore up casi-
no profits.

“What we intend to do is have a very compre-
hensive approach, looking at regulations, the legis-
lation, that will allow the Bahamas jurisdiction for
gaming to be competitive with the other gaming
jurisdictions around the world.

“We believe that we must be progressive and be
prepared for radical change in our gaming industry
if it’s going to continue to survive in this particular
market place,” said the BHA president.

The new bills approved by the Florida Senate
Regulated Industries Committee provide for oper-
ators to introduce new games like blackjack, craps
and roulette, and gives a tax break on gambling
revenues for “racinos” - dog and horse tracks.

That comes on top of allowing Hard Rock Cafes
to be revamped into full-blown casinos and lowering
of the legal gambling age in the state from 21 to 18.

With the bills’ sponsors suggesting the state could
bring in an extra $1 billion annually by changing
the laws, they have also received the support of
Florida Governor Charlie Crist - formerly opposed
to the expansion of gambling in the state. He is des-
perately trying to increase Florida’s revenue base in
the face of a budget deficit.

However, the Florida House of Representatives is
said to be less keen on the idea as a solution to the
state’s money woes, making the certainty of the
bills’ passage less assured.

Rep Bill Galvano, a Republican who chairs the
House Compact Review committee, said of the Sen-
ate proposal: “They are allowing anything and every-
thing; we’re not prepared to do that.”

A message left for Minister of Tourism Vincent
Vanderpool Wallace was not returned up to press
time yesterday.

®

Grains Of Wisdom

ma) A cn Se piel) Every Time...

Brown Rice,
Tomato and Basil
Salad

2 1/4 cups water

SS eee mia eo

1 cup Mahatma® Brown Rice
2 teaspoons coarse salt
2 tablespoons Champagne vinegar or white wine vinegar

2 teaspoons sugar

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 pound tomatoes, cut into 12-inch pieces
1 cup (packed) fresh basil leaves, finely chopped

Bring 2 1/4 cups water to boil in heavy medium saucepan. Mix in Mahatma
Brown Rice and call. Cover, reduce heal to low and simmer uniil ree is tender
and walter is absorbed, aboul 40 minutes. Transfer rice to large bewl: Tul with
fork and cool. Whisk vinegar and sugar in small bowl. Gradually whisk in ail. Pour

over foe, Add tomatoes and basil and

toss to combine. Season with salt and

b Sion per. (Can be made 6 hours ahead. Cover, chill, Bring ta roam temperature
Bron

E one ) Makes 6 servings.

THE NUMBER ONE RICE.. “ALL a 4 TC

Distributed by ASA H. PRITCHARD, LTD.
Robinson & Claridge Roads - Tel: 393-2437



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 9



The Chinese living in the Bahamas
remember their history with Tibet

MEMORIES, CONTROVERSY LINGER HALF-CENTURY AFTER LHASA UPRISING OF 1959

YOUR SAY

@ Xinhua News Agency
Issued by the Chinese
Embassy, Nassau

Fe many people, 1959
is just a number, or per-

haps a date in a textbook. But
for those who witnessed events in
Tibet that year, it remains an
indelible memory after half a cen-
tury.

Gyaga Losang Tangyai, now
81, remains forceful and ener-
getic. In 1959, he was serving
under the 10th Panchen Lama,
who was the second most impor-
tant religious figure in Tibet next
to the Dalai Lama.

The Panchen Lama controlled
many temples and much land in
old Tibet, just like other living
Buddhas.

In 1954, Gyaga accompanied
the Panchen Lama and 14th
Dalai Lama on a mission to Bei-
jing on behalf of the Gaxag gov-
ernment (the old Tibetan gov-
ernment). They were received by
the late Chairman Mao Zedong.

"He told us that democratic
reform wouldn't be carried out
for at least six more years," Gya-
ga recalled.

"Democratic reform" literally
meant the end of serfdom and
abolition of the hierarchic social
system characterised by a theoc-
racy, with the Dalai Lama as the
core of the leadership. That sys-
tem had existed in Tibet for some
1,000 years.

The aim was to free about 1
million serfs and slaves who
accounted for 90 per cent of the
Tibetan population in the 1950s.
They were controlled by lamas,
officials and nobles, including the
Dalai Lama's family.

Mao believed that reform,
despite public appeal, could only
be launched when the Tibetan
nobles, including the Dalai Lama,
were ready to support it. Without
that support, reform would have
to be further postponed, Mao
told the Tibetan delegation. With
that understanding, they returned
home.

SURPRISE IN 1959

One day five years later, Gya-
ga was taken by surprise at the
Tashilunpo Temple in Xigaze.
He was told that the Dalai Lama
and his supporters had staged an
"armed riot" in Lhasa, which was
then — as now — the capital of
Tibet.

"I got the news from soldiers,
and the Panchen Lama soon
asked me to accompany him to
Beijing by way of Lhasa," he said.

They arrived in Lhasa on
March 20, 1959. The city had
become a totally unfamiliar place
to Gyaga.

"Tt looked like a war zone: few
people outside, craters in the
streets."

He and the Panchen Lama first
visited the Jokhang Temple,
where lamas "appeared disori-
ented ... There was water every-
where, and they told us that they
had just put out a fire.”

The situation was even worse
at the Ramoche Temple, also in
Lhasa, where they saw no lamas,
only "bullet holes on the golden
roof," he said.

"T felt that the rebels had gone
mad," he said. "How can they
damage their own city?" He ges-
tured furiously while recounting
the long-ago story.

FATEFUL DAY

Ngapoi Ngawang Jigme, son
of a Tibetan aristocrat who later
became vice chairman of the 11th
National Committee of the Chi-
nese People’s Political Consulta-
tive Conference (CPPCC, the top
advisory body), also recalls the
riot in 1959. His account goes like
this:

The Dalai Lama wanted to
watch a troupe of the Tibet Mili-
tary Region on March 10, but he
declined to have them come to
Norbu Lingka, his palace.
Instead, he insisted on going to a
military auditorium, where he
said his supporters would meet
him.

"I sensed that something
would happen," because the
Dalai Lama rarely left Norbu
Lingka, recalled Ngapoi, now 98.

On the morning of March 10,
1959, he said, turmoil broke out
in Lhasa. People were fearful that
the Dalai Lama had been kid-
napped.

"Some people cried out, ‘let us
protect our treasure! The Hans
kidnapped him!’ The Hans are
the ethnic Chinese majority.

"This was like a bolt from the
blue to pious Tibetans, who soon
flooded to Norbu Lingka in
shock, confusion and horror ..."

But, Ngapoi said, the rumor
was spread by the Dalai Lama's
supporters. Rioters soon sur-
rounded Norbu Lingka, intent
on killing and destruction, shout-
ing "Tibet independence" and
"get out, you Hans".

VETERAN'S
RECOLLECTIONS

Lhabgyi, an 83-year-old veter-
an of the People's Liberation
Army (PLA), who was dis-
patched to Lhasa in April 1959,
recalled that the city was still like
a "battlefield" when he arrived,
with rubble everywhere.

The PLA's mission was to per-
suade the rioters to surrender.
"We assured them that if they
surrendered, they would not be
killed, jailed, or denounced in
public meetings,” he said.

But disorder continued and
spread throughout Tibet, and
Lhabgyi can still recall his fallen
comrades.

"In a battle in May in Linzhou
County, which is about 65 kilo-
meters from Lhasa, a soldier died,
while three rioters were killed.
In another one, six soldiers died,
including our political instructor,”
he said.

A man leading the rioters in
Linzhou was injured in his arm.
"His wife persuaded him to sur-
render, saying that otherwise
their two sons would be killed as
well," Lhabgyi said. The man lat-
er became a member of the
Lhasa People's Political Consul-
tative Conference.

THREE YEARS
FOR PEACE

The PLA halted the riots in
Lhasa in two days. But it took
nearly three years to restore
peace in the entire region. There
is no known accurate count of
the final death toll.

According to
www.huanqiu.com, the website
of a political periodical, nearly
90,000 people were involved in
riots around Tibet, of whom 42.8
per cent surrendered. The
"diehard" core members num-
bered about 23,000.

A document in the State
Archives Administration record-
ed a speech by Mao, who said
China would welcome the Dalai
Lama back and give him a role in
the central government if he sup-
ported democratic reform.

But the Dalai Lama didn't
return. He had already fled to
India.

Lhalu Cewang Doje, now 94,
had a key role in the insurgency
but later became Vice Chairman
of the Tibet People's Political
Consultative Conference.

He later wrote a book, "Rise
and Fall of the Lhalu Family,"
about his family, some of whom
had been Panchen or Dalai
Lamas.

He said that after being arrest-
ed in the riots, he thought the
central government would exe-
cute him. Hence, he refused to
confess anything. Once he was
taken to a public denunciation
where some people threatened
to beat him, he said, but two sol-
diers protected him.

Lhalu said it was then that he
began to believe in the policies of
the Communist Party and con-
fessed. He was jailed in 1959 and
released in 1965. When he left
prison, he got back his prized pos-
sessions: golden earrings, a watch
and a pen.

ACCOUNTS DIFFER

In the Chinese version of his
autobiography, "Freedom in
Exile,” the 14th Dalai Lama tells
a different story. He writes that
his followers in the Tibet uprising
met their deaths in many violent
ways, being "crucified, dismem-
bered and disemboweled ...
beheaded, burned, lashed, buried
alive, dragged by galloping hors-
es, hanged, and thrown into freez-
ing water with their limbs tied.”

The book also states: "I also
heard from refugees that the cen-
tral government aimed cannons
at the Potala Palace and the
Jokhang Temple, after bom-
barding Norbu Lingka. Buildings
in these places were severely
damaged." The Chinese govern-
ment has disputed this account.

Although their accounts differ,
both sides acknowledge that the
Dalai Lama fled Tibet for India,
where he has lived since. His
departure shocked and distressed
his followers and many Tibetans.



TIME FOR CHANGE

The riot changed everything in
Tibet. The Communists soon
decided that democratic reform
should be carried out immedi-
ately to demolish the entire old
system led by the Dalai Lama.

The Preparatory Committee
of Tibet Autonomous Region
replaced the Gaxag government
and set out to lead the reform.

From 1959 to until 1966, when
the Cultural Revolution began,
1 million slaves were granted
land, houses and their freedom.
One of those slaves was Migmar
Dondrup, now 75, who got 1.4
hectares of land.

He served for 11 years in Parl-
ha Manor, an aristocrat's home,
as a nangsan, the lowest level of
serfdom.

Migmar was a tailor and his
wife was a maid, and both
worked from dawn until mid-
night. If they didn't satisfy their
masters, they might be whipped
or even killed.

Their home was a dark, seven
square metre adobe house, where
they lived with their daughter.
The family had to subsist on 28
kilograms of barley, the basis for
the traditional Tibetan dish of
tsampa.

He was lucky compared with
one of his relatives, a groom, who
was beaten to death because the
landlord believed he had wasted
fodder when feeding the horses.

Many such tales are on display
in the Museum of Tibet, with
about a score of black-and-white
photos depicting the brutality of
landowners: slaves’ eyes gouged
out, fingers chopped off, noses
cut and the tendons of their feet
removed.

Again, the Dalai Lama's
account of these days differs. In
the fifth chapter of his autobiog-
raphy, he claims that "in Tibet,
the relationship of landowners
and their slaves was much better
than that in the inland of China,
and there were no such cruel
punishments as manacles and cas-
tration, which prevailed all over
China."

REMEMBERING
FREEDOM

Tt was in the autumn of 1959, as
Migmar recalled, when more
than 500 people gathered in a
garden in the Parlha Manor,
where he was then a serf. A PLA
soldier told them they would
soon get their own land, and peo-
ple applauded enthusiastically.
More than 30 households held a
draw for the land.

"I could hardly express my
happiness then," he said emo-
tionally. When he was a low-
ranking serf, he didn't have any
land. "When I was a nangsan, I
wasn't even allowed to keep a
cat."

Some serfs had been working
the land under contract. They set
fire to those contracts and to
receipts for usurious loans. Then
they danced, cried and drank.

In the living room of the old
man's two-story house, there still
hangs a black-and-white photo
of Mao that shows him working
in a field wearing a straw hat.

Migmar put a khata, or white
Tibetan scarf on it, a symbol used
to show respect.

"Even my parents couldn't
give me land, but he did," the
former serf said.

Lhabgyi, the PLA veteran, said
that almost every household had
photos then had photos of Mao,
whom they revered.

"Of course there were people
who disbelieved the policies of
the Communist Party,” he
recalled. But soldiers managed
to dispel their suspicions by being
helpful.

NEW LIFE FOR NOBILITY

As for former aristocrats who
were not involved in the riot, they
were not left empty-handed, and
received financial compensation
for their land.

Gyaga Losang Tangyai in
Xigaze had several manors and
some 20 ha of land. When demo-
cratic reform took place, he was
worried and "dared not to expect
any compensation.

"I said all I wanted was a
peaceful life, but the government
gave me about 10,000 yuan,” he
said. That amount is equivalent to
about 1,470 US dollars at con-
temporary rates.

More than 600 people who
served under the Panchen Lama

stayed behind in Xigaze, except
for one who moved to India for
business.

Gyaga was a member of the
national committee of the
CPPCC for 15 years.

CONTROVERSIES LINGER
AFTER 50 YEARS

While Gyaga and Migmar
were starting new lives, the situ-
ation in Tibet came controver-
sial worldwide.

In September 1959, Christian
Archibald Herter, then US Sec-
retary of State, told the UN Gen-
eral Assembly that the Chinese
Communist Party was imposing
colonial rule in Tibet.

The Dalai Lama has main-
tained a government-in-exile
since 1959, and China has

charged that this group was
behind last year's riot in Lhasa
and other Tibetan areas of China.

This year marks the 50th
anniversary of democratic reform
in Tibet.

In that half-century, Tibet has
experienced great changes but
the controversy over the past per-
sists.

Zhu Xiaoming, research fel-
low at the China Tibetology
Research Center in Beijing, said
some foreign countries and inter-
national organisations continued
to use the Tibet issue as a lever
against China.

"T once discussed this with
some scholars in the United
States," he said.

"LT said that Abraham Lincoln
was revered after signing the
Emancipation Proclamation for

black slaves, and Chairman Mao
abolished the serf system in Tibet.
But why was the former hailed as
protecting human rights and the
latter was denounced as human
rights infringement? The scholars
were speechless."

The Dalai Lama, now 76, has
also taken note of the approach-
ing 50th anniversary. Chinese
analysts said that he was likely
to use the date to "make a last
attempt" at independence for
Tibet.

Even after his death, they said,
the controversy would linger,
since it was unclear who would
inherit his position.

For Migmar, it is simple. "Life
is getting better each year.

“T wish I was younger, so I
would have longer to enjoy my
happiness.”

MUST SELL

VACANT LAND
WINTON HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

Lot #4, Block 1

All the parcel of land containing 15,589 sq. ft. on the southern side
of Woodland Way, and about 350 feet east of Culberts Hill.

Zoning is for single-family residential homes, all the utility services
are available. The site is located 5 miles from downtown Nassau,
1 mile from shopping center and 1 mile from the nearest school.

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before April 10, 2009.

For further information, please contact us @ 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608

oy e

ee al EE

oF

ARLO WS

MILAN

Marina Village, Paradise Island 363-1351 « Bay Street, Nassau 325-4083





THE TRIBUNE



Innocent man claims he was brutally beaten

FROM page one

eral police officers took turns punching and kick-
ing him.

He was apprehended outside his Colony Club
apartment near Saunders Beach at around
10.30pm on Wednesday by two officers respond-
ing to calls from a woman who had been beaten
by a man who was staying with Mr Flowers at the
time, he said.

And despite the woman’s protests, Mr Flowers
claims the officers seized him and slapped him in
the face telling him to ‘shut-up’ when he asked
why he was being arrested.

The tattoo artist at Tattoo King in Bay Street
was then thrown to the ground, handcuffed and
slung into the police van before a crowd of
onlookers, he maintains.

“They asked me to sit on the chair properly, but
I couldn’t move because my knee was sprained
from when they threw me on the ground, so they
picked me up and slapped me in the chair,” he
said.

The detainee said he was then driven to
Arawak Cay Police Station where he was thrown
on the floor of an isolated room and five or six
officers attacked him one after the other.

“They hit me over and over in my face,” he
said.

“One guy held me and slapped me, my head
would fall then come up, and he would punch
me again. Then another guy would come.

“One guy would hit me ten times, then the

next guy would hit me ten times, and these were
not light blows either.

“These were blows for a prisoner who had
done something wrong. But I hadn’t done any-
thing wrong.”

Mr Flowers said he was poked with a gun,
slammed to the ground and kicked by officers.

“T thought they were going to end up killing me
because when they body-slammed me on the
floor everything turned black and I thought: “Oh
my God, I am going to die, they’re going to kill
me’,” he said.

But after attacking Mr Flowers for around five
minutes, police released him and told him to keep
quiet.

He told The Tribune he had to stop on his walk
home as he was dizzy, vomiting and fainting.

“They beat me sick, I just felt sick after that
beating,” he said.

He was treated at Princess Margaret Hospital
and has been off work since the attack as he was
unable to walk for around five days, and vision is
still blurry in his bloodied right eye.

“Tm just glad I’m not dead,” he said.

“T thought I was going to be dead. I thought I
was finished.”

Mr Flowers’ complaint will be investigated by
the Bahamas Police Complaints and Corruption
Unit.

Supt Hulan Hanna said: “I am not aware of
any such incident but that isn’t to disclaim what-
ever it is that he is saying.

“Tt sounds extremely and highly unusual, but

we will allow for the investigation to happen.”

FROM page one

more developed nation.

In order to make new TIEAs
mutually beneficial, Mr Winder
said government must negotiate
tourism and investment benefits
at the bargaining table with indi-
vidual countries.

"The question is, 'what are we
going to get?' That is still inde-
terminate. I would think if the
Bahamas signed a TIEA with
China, the Bahamas would
receive lots of additional bene-
fits on the other side, simply
because of the relationship we
have with China and we have
with other countries like that. We
have to seek to make it an agree-
ment where both sides are receiv-
ing something.”

In a statement released hours
after the prime minister's
announcement, former attorney
general Alfred Sears - who has
been a vocal critic of the govern-
ment's "slow" and "inadequate"
response to the threat to the
financial services sector - lashed
out at the prime minister.

He charged that Mr Ingraham's
announcement was devoid of a
national strategy to defend the

|}
PM's statements

financial services industry from
baseless attacks from the inter-
national community.

He noted that one criterion of
satisfactory tax exchange pushed
by the OECD is the existence of
"at least 11 tax information
exchange treaties".

"To meet the current OECD
standard, The Bahamas will have
to enter 10 additional tax infor-
mation exchange treaties with
other OECD countries," based
on mutual interests such as dou-
ble taxation and investment
treaties, his statement said.

"From the communication, it
would appear that the Bahamas is
like an ostrich with its head in the
sand, hoping that the danger from
the Group of 20 and the Stop Tax
Haven Abuse Bill will, like a hur-
ricane, spare The Bahamas from
a direct hit.”

The mentioned Bill is legisla-
tion proposed by US Senator Carl
Levin and supported by the Oba-
ma administration that would tar-
get offshore “tax havens” used
for investment by US citizens.

Mtr Sears said in order to prop-

A patel of poor life ond Me Balemar ance PF T7
mr UMM ttre am oun

Annive

Sa

erly defend the country's financial
services sector, government
should lobby all OECD countries,
especially the United States, to
stop the passage of the Stop Tax
Haven Abuse Bill and other puni-
tive measures from the OECD
against offshore financial centres;
invest in a policy research unit at
the College of The Bahamas to
monitor the global economy and
trends; and review and restruc-
ture the country's tax system.

The full statement released to
Europe and the OECD by gov-
ernment yesterday reads: "The
Bahamas notes significant recent
progress towards the adoption of
standards on tax transparency and
information exchange set by the
Organisation for Economic Co-
operation and Development.

"The Bahamas reaffirms its
commitment recorded in a
March, 2002, agreement between
The Bahamas and the OECD.

"The Bahamas recognises sig-
nificant advances in commitments
to broader application of OECD
standards in transparency. The
Bahamas is ready to negotiate
and conclude appropriate
arrangements to accommodate
these OECD standards.”

March 27th -April 1st, 2009

%

off

* Except on red tagged and net items

EU ML CROR UL A Um |
RRO MILL CL KC
OOO MCN Te 4

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 11

START THE NEW YEAR WITH

A NEW LIFE IN FASHION

Let Hillside Investment Co. LTD. lead you in a best of the best
lifestyle, Work with brands like ¢ ‘hopard, Carlo Milano, Prada,

D&G, Versace and many more.

If you have poise, refinement, class and work ethic to represent
top brand names. We are currently seeking self-motivated

Sales Associates. Must have retail experience.

Please email photo and resume to infog@carlomilano.com or

fax bo $63-3824. Only qualified candadies will be responded to.

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

be

Chopard’) MILANO VERSACE

Housewares
China & Gifts

Home Decor

Stationery
Lawn & eel col Tp
Bleue >

Ba by Balloons —
Paint aeeueics

Toys uly
Kelly

“The Easter Bunny”

Saturday March 28th
Ipm - 4pm

Great Years... Thanks!

1) Ween

Mall at Marathon
Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:00pm
Saturday 9:00am-9:00pm
RST Te fone closed
www.kellysbahamas.com

ir oo Shee ey,
Fax: (242) 393-4096





PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



TAYLOR Phin-
ney of the U.S.
in action during
qualifying for
the Men's Indi-
vidual Pursuit
in the World
Track Cycling
Championships
at Pruszkow,
near Warsaw,
Poland, Thurs-
day, March 26,
2009.

Alastair Grant/AP Photo

CHURCH OR OFFICE SPACE

47' =x 40°
CS ey eee ee
Se me a eae
ees le ee

pe ee ey eo eg
31260 - Phe 324-2618 aex for Mr Ginter



POTS. be herekey peor ibe] REPLI ES of BLL
HILL OAD. P00, BO Me HASEAL BARA
O aopeeis bo lhe Migr peers ce Alice ree
Gibanaio. ka negrinlinind liao eo olen A The
Bubherrare. aed eae pon he: oes ery eee ty
rte lie ved oe be ie dee
Te Ben ed seed Jakes oe beet whe
Preoe-c ipa, deere Dee ee 2 ep cl ec. 2 be ee

iinies roscoe Foe rele Sarai. 2. Be

A-TT. Henvow Pabernare.

NOTICE





American Phinney
wins individual
pursuit at worlds

TRACK & FIELD
PRUSZKOW, Poland
Associated Press

TAYLOR Phinney of the
United States won the individ-
ual pursuit and Morgan
Kneisky of France captured the
scratch title at the track world
championships on Thursday.

Phinney outpaced Jack
Bobridge of Australia with a
time of 4 minutes, 17.631 sec-
onds to win his first world title.
Bobridge finished almost 3 sec-

in Copenhagen.

“My mom was pursuit world
champion, my dad was a great
sprinter, so I sort of see myself
as having this big genetic advan-
tage over everybody else. It’s
sort of written in my gene code
that I should be good at this
event,” Phinney said. “So it’s
something that I take forward
and have a little mental edge
over everybody else.”

Australia’s Kaarle McCulloch
and Anna Meares upset British
defending champions Victoria
Pendleton and Shanaze Reade

tenth (of a second) to beat the
Australian team. We both did,
but we didn’t anticipate the
Australians would find more
speed for the final,” Pendleton
said.

Kneisky gave France its sec-
ond gold medal of the compe-
tition with his win in the scratch
race. Riding most of the 60 laps
in a breakaway group of six rid-
ers, Kneisky made his move on
the final turn to edge past
Angel Dario Colla of Argenti-
na and Travis Meyer of Aus-
tralia at the line. Colla took the








> SPORTS SCONT'D
FROM page 14

9 am Coco Plums vs Jujus
10:15 am Dillies vs Sea-
grapes

COACHPITCH:
Saturday

11:30 am Mosquitoes vs
Sandflies

1 pm Wasps vs Greentur-
tles

3 pm vs Boas vs Bees
Sunday

3 pm Sandflies vs Bees
9-10:

Tonight

7:30 pm Octopus vs Bar-
racudas

Saturday

9 am Turbots vs Dolphins
10:30 pm Red Snappers vs
Octopus

Sunday

4:30 pm Dolphins vs Bar-
racudas

11-12:

Today

6 pm Hurricanes vs Parrots
7:30 pm Wild Dogs vs Mar-
lins

Saturday

Noon White Crowns vs
Iguanas

1:30 pm Groupers vs
Conchs

3:30 pm Hurricanes vs Wild
Dogs

Sunday

3 pm White Crowns vs
Marlins

4:30 pm Iguanas vs
Groupers

13-15:

Saturday

9am Owlz vs Silverjacks
11 am Potcakes vs
Stingrays

1 pm Qwiz vs Sharks

3 pm Silverjacks vs Rac-
coons

16-18:

Sunday

2:30 pm Tainos vs
Lucayans

4 pm Caribs vs Arawaks

BASEBALL
JBLN SCHEDULE

onds back. sce thee. att G : 4 hile M Wied e THE Junior Baseball
app SS “I came here and definitely in the team sprint; Germany’s _ silver, while Meyer settled for League of Nassau will be
ac : a suuTh FRECII MEAS TIN expected myself to win,” Phin- Maximilian Levy won the bronze. . : _ back in action this weekend
Ww! AE TAL 1 20 SLT UF GLALS r URE ney said. “I came and did what keirin; and Britain outpaced It s unimaginable, it’s fan- at the St. Andrews Heldof
Bath Seer: seo: Fo reise = = 8 I had to do, and it feels good.” New Zealand for the women’s tastic, it’s a dream,” Kneisky Dreams with the following
"aa Ta Ue Pe Lae HLL bL* The 18-year-old Phinney, the team pursuit crown. . said. games on tap:
esedsssrce os cee ce Tes ise ses eo reer son of 1984 Olympic medalists. McCulloch and Meares fin-
wdc Wes mery tee were ego a el lee Connie Carpenter-Phinney and ished the sprint in a blistering TEE BALL
ee fhe weese chu cone cose see cose eee Davis Phinney, set anew Amer- 33.149 seconds, just ahead of 11 am Blue Claws vs
ia lech # yeast digo bars Ge 2Tâ„¢ dey of ican record of 4 minutes, 15.160 Pendleton and Reade, world Grasshoppers
Maret “one 1 he Unies werenchéi. Gr erorohe ie seconds in qualifying earlier in Champions the previous two 1 pm Knights vs Raptors
: i : alr oe the day, breaking the mark he years, who crossed the line in 3 pm Sand Gnats vs
——— set at the World Cup last month 33-380. Lithuania outpaced Sidewinders
France for the bronze. COACH PITCH
“We really did have to beat 10 am Diamond Backs vs
See Bee =e chica the tis = do it, Blue Jays
fl ; a ee ee and that's a great leelng, 12:30 pm Athleti
cere 4 FL Prue Werviridicn a Meares said. “It’s such a dood —
- big high.” 3 pm Ast Cub
haicurer ay - aturday Sofia. to O22 ponm- oe ind eae sl MINOR. LEAGUE.

Reade, also the BMX
world champ, thought

* LAMPS
* PILLOWS

-MATTRESSES
« WROUGHT IRON

10 am Rockies vs Rays
12:30 pm Red Sox vs Mets





they had enough speed. MAJOR LEAGUE
& BRASS BEDS -« CUSHIONS PM aia ride 12:30 pm Mariners vs Indi-
ss anaze an new we
- te Et Li ne as! | * - a i needed to find another 3 pm Marlins vs Reds
and ois: Eee circadoing ck chase amt JUNIOR LEAGUE
Ph. (242) 327-5336-+-PFax. (242) 327-5336 10 am Twins vs Yankees
a 0): 8,e ‘LOE a a 12:30 pm Cardinals vs
Dodgers
Oo UU ene DB ee
1 — aturday
LP ‘| Q i) ORF The Public i hereby aches fel LAQUAA 3 pm Rangers vs Tigers
’ —_ DEMANETT EVANS of P.O Qux 55-5958, intend iu} : Sunday
| * | change my name bo ml ’ 7 3 pm Phillies vs Pirates
hil \/ ersa ale Tt here une amy objections o the: charge i rag TE by i CYCLING
; ’ Deed Poll, you may wile suc uch ooysciions lo the Chel MID-WEEK SERIES

Porespurt Oi icer, PO. Box Nera

On selected items this steer than Hrinly (30) ckeys after
Friday & Saturday ONLY?! Unies musics

has Suu, Bahamas ng
fe dale of publication ol ¢ ONCE again the New
Providence Cycling Associa-
tion’s mid-week track Time
Trial Series continued with

fast times being recorded on

—



PRESSURE RELIEVING
SWEDISH MATTRESSES AND PILLOWS

Liege

ST i hoete shen Gel BOP RLY TIES of ET
ALPACA. BL oo, ST. FA
PAHOA fe eeotying ke bw Windle: rege be
Halolite aed Slo, i yon PLL

ma Gk a

The Batwa. wd

bed. oy Tes

Air! Ero Bp on he oe rela

eed ce Ge ere.

aed

Gros = be

ve soe oo wiles we

ects whi bool.

faa en ihe HP dep cl Merc 04 be be Blteer

ecrpaee fo relccvelly
B-T MT. Harve. Bberare.

qd Gio. TO. Bee:

OTT i heaahy pan rin AGS GORGES of

THE BLUFF EUEUTHEPA BAHASA.

fre bs

the: Alliances bor Soins nd etree tp:

a

iy oY phon Ww oilhe

Ror. 4d phage a A ea: ig

wie poe cara du! ey.
Ao pee scaring ed cpa Ceara

mati
he Bacar

len bere ers bo Pe 2 ee ol Merce.
ies os tw: hiniorer capo for niwodirg rei

1 0 Eos A



TST, Foe). ul ory.

NOTICE

sienzy glee fat ORETE WALEMTING OTAEMEN

read GLADS ONC
EVES BU

Ht Sami =
OMe ES MANS Bty

war ne o Se ie
we Core Poe



TCG,

Hoo SFT Geao

aes ao &

re a"

Wednesday at the one-mile
cycling track at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex.

The Speed Demons (track
cyclist) don their "Track
Machines’, as this event is all
about riding against the
clock.

Robert 'Penetrator'’
Bethell, Kevin 'Kilo-Man'
Ingraham, Henry ‘Spinning-
Man’ Kline, Anthony 'Big-
gie’ Colebrook, Justin ‘Jet’
Minnis, Antinece "Lilly'
Simmons were just some of
the cyclist who are getting
faster and faster, the battle
line has been drawn.

e Here’s a look at the
results from Wednesday:

2 lap TT (Cadets)

Felix Colebrook — 2min,
14sec.; Audrica Colebrook —
3min. 03sec.; Ashley Cole-
brook — 3min. 10 sec.

3 lap TT G/4 mile —
*juniors)

The Penetrator — 2min,
.O1sec.; Spinning-Man 2min.,
.O5sec.; Kilo-Man
2min., .06sec.; Biggie 2min.,
08sec; *Jet 2min., .25sec
*Lilly 2min.,
30sec *Jakota Johnson
2min., .37sec *Adrian Can-
ter 3min., .l6sec; *Larry
Russell 3min., .43sec.

Call to
advertise:

502-2371





TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



Giants overcome Comets,
Falcons rout Warriors

SENIOR GIRLS
ST. JOHN'S GIANTS - 32
GI COMETS — 23

e AFTER a lacklustre first quarter in
a game one loss, the Giants responded
with a 15 point first quarter yesterday
en route to their first win of the tourna-
ment.

The Giants led wire to wire, and shot
nearly perfect from the field in the open-
ing quarter as they took a 15-2 advantage
ona Tanika Sandiford jumper after.

Giants’ point guard Caryn Moss gave
her team their biggest lead of the game
on a tough three point play as time
expired in the second quarter.

The Giants took a 24-7 into the half.

The third quarter would be all Comets
as they outscored the Giants 11-2 to get
themselves back into the game.

Shadell Williams’ three pointer
brought the Comets within single digits
for the first time since the opening quar-
ter and her basket on the ensuing pos-
session trimmed the deficit, 24-18.

Darrinique Young ended the Comets
run and scored the only Giants basket of
the quarter for a 26-18 lead headed into
the fourth.

Moss opened the final quarter with a
three pointer to regain a double figure
advantage for the Giants and the Comets
never came within nine to close out the
contest.

The Comets brought just one mem-
ber of this year’s senior girls squad into
the tournament, but their juniors put
together a spirited effort to nearly upset
the BAISSS runners up.

Alexis Maycock led the Giants with
nine points, while Moss and Young
chipped in with seven apiece.

Williams led the Comets and all scor-
ers with 11.

Maycock said her team rebounded
well from the sluggish start in an opening
day loss and looks forward to redemp-
tion in a rematch with the GSSSA cham-
pion C.R Walker Knights.

“Our game yesterday was not so good,
but I think we can beat the C.R Walker
Knights I think we just came off with a
slow start,” she said, “We just have to
stay focused and play hard and I think
we can win this tournament. We have
to stay focused come out hard and not be
afraid to take on any challengers.”

C.R WALKER KNIGHTS - 24
GHS MAGIC - 14

e A PIVOTAL 8-2 third quarter run
led the Knights to their second win of the



ACTION from day two of the Pattie Johnson annual basketball tournament.

tournament.

In an uncharacteristic slow start, the
score was tied at three after the opening
quarter and The GSSSA champions
trailed 7-6 at the half.

Malesha Peterson tied the game at 9
with the first of her two three pointers on
the afternoon.

Her second gave the Knights a 12-9
lead putting them ahead for good.

Peterson followed with three point
play on the ensuing possession and
Pamela Bethel scored just as time
expired to give the Knights a 17-11 lead
heading into the fourth.

The Knights led by as much as 12 in
the final period.

Peterson finished with a game high 13
points.

C.1 GIBSON RATTLERS — 21
NCA CRUSADERS — 15

e THE Rattlers doubled the Crusaders
scoring output in the second half to
remain in the winner’s bracket of the



tournament.

Tied 9-9 at the half, the Rattlers
opened the third quarter on a 6-0 run,
keyed by baskets from Danielle Taylor
and Robin Gibson.

The Crusaders only score of the quar-
ter came from Gabrielle McKinney at
the free throw line and the Rattlers took
a 16-10 lead into the fourth.

Momentum looked to swing heavily
in the Crusaders favor when Rattlers
star forward Robin Gibson picked up
her fourth personal foul and a technical
foul at the end of the third quarter.

N.C.A capitalized as McKinney
sparked a 5-0 run of her own with a pair
of jumpers and a conversion from the
free throw line to bring her team within
a single score, 16-15 with just over three
minutes remaining.

Taylor made one of two free throws to
give the Rattlers a 17-15 lead with 1:23
left to play.

Back in the game after sitting much of
the fourth quarter, Gibson gave the Rat-

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

LIGhtUDWOURNOME

ANDISAVE!

NEW
LOW LOW
PRICES!
DUTY FREE
ITEM!

TAYLOR INDUSTRIES

a
ee

a.

LD

a

Mini-Jar

13 Watt (equal to 65w)
Spiral

15 Watt (equal to 75w)

ENERGY SAVING FLOURESCENT

COOL & WARM LIGHT BULBS
(Medium & Regular Based Bulbs)

from $6.20
from $4.30

20 Watt (equal to 100w)...from $4.55

Regular Jar

23 Watt (Par38 Flood)

and Cool Lite 5000k.

SHIRLEY STREET « TEL: 322-8941
OPEN: MON - FRI 7:30 am - 4:30 pm « SAT 8:00 am - 12 noon
Visit our web site at www.taylor-industries.com

23 Watt (equal to 115w)...from $4.55
24 Watt (equal to 120w)...from $9.60

from $8.00

| Available in Warm White 3000k

SR 2 ee ee ey ee ee |
ee ee
prey oat peers ay

ALL-NEW 09 FORD F-150 «=

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

tlers a two score advantage, 19-15 with a
jumper in the lane with just 20 seconds
remaining.

Gibson and Taylor both finished with
six points, while McKinney led all scorers
with 10.

SAC BIG RED MACHINE — 22
NCA CRUSADERS — 16

¢ GABRIELLE McKinney dug the
Crusaders out of a second half deficit
for the second time on the afternoon,
but again her team fell just short down
the stretch.

The Big Red Machine got to a fast
start with a 10-2 lead after the first quar-
ter, but went scoreless in the second as
the Crusaders came within four, 10-6 at
the half.

The Crusaders opened the third quar-
ter on a 4-0 run to tie the game at 10.

A pair of Tarae Sweeting baskets
stopped momentum and regained the
four point advantage for the Big Red
machine.

McKinney’s steal at half court and fast
break lay-up as time expired tied the
game again at 14 headed into the fourth
quarter.

The Crusaders led for the first time
all game on the opening possession of
the fourth, but failed to score the remain-
der of the game.

Sweeting’s lay-up gave SAC a two pos-
session advantage, 20-16 with just under
one minute remaining.

Brittney Harrison, Ashley Bethel and
Sweeting finished with six points apiece.

McKinney led the Crusaders with
nine.

PRINCE WILLIAM FALCONS — 22
FREEDOM WARRIORS — 3

e AFTER a shutout on day one, the
Warriors scored their first basket of
the tournament yet still fell to 0-2 with
another lopsided loss.

The Falcons led 5-0 after the first
quarter, and led by as much as eight
before a desperation heave by the
Warriors’ Tabitha Major placed her
team on the scoreboard.

The Falcons led 11-3 heading into
the fourth quarter and doubled their
offensive output in the final period for
the game’s final margin.

Ranel Ferguson led the Falcons with
eight points.

PRIMARY GIRLS
TEMPLE CHRISTIAN SUNS — 18
KINGSWAY SAINTS — 2

Adrian Griffith

Conner



BAAA getting reatly
for IAAF World
Championships

FROM page 14

qualify the two teams to com-
pete in the championship this
year, especially with the ear-
ly start they are getting.

McKinney encouraged
those persons who will be
travelling to Florida over the
Easter holiday weekend to
do some shopping to take the
time out and head to UM to
watch the teams perform.

As for the men’s 4 x 400
relay team, which is coming
off a silver medal at the
Olympic Games in Beijing,
China last August, McKin-
ney said they won’t run until
the Penn Relays, scheduled
for April 23-25.

“We will have to wait and
see who is available and
ready to run,” McKinney
said. “We have a lot of tools
in that respect in terms of
people who are not in school,
so we’re not too concerned
about that team.”

The men’s 4 x 4 team will
have to run 3:03.30 to qualify.

THINKING ABOUT
GETTING A TRUCK?

Get in it. Touch it. Feel it.
YOU'LL FIND |

Ss
Ii

SS Pe Oe
oS ry



be ed es ee ee
Bo ell 2) Bees Ps gee ee i bee

THOMPSON BOUL 4 Wass at Te: FAX: 325-6094

oe ee

nbs Eat ie DS"

ou A



oid Se AT TL! eT





NU

BASKETBALL
NPBA SERIES

¢ THE Commonwealth Bank Giants and the
Electro Telecom Cybots are on their way to a ;
possible rematch of last year’s finals in the New ;

Providence Basketball Association.

Playing in game one of their Vince Fergu- }
son’s best-of-five series against the Sunshine }
Auto Ruff Ryders, the Cybots pulled off a115- }
111 victory on Wednesday night at the CI Gib-

son Gymnasium.

Brian Bain led the attack with a game high 30 }
points. Nelson ‘Mandella’ Joseph had 21 and }
Cecil Mackey added 13, including a couple of }
clutch free throws down the stretch off the :

bench.

For Sunshine Auto, Ernest Saunders had 22. }
In the John Archer’s best-of-five series, the }
Giants prevailed with a 99-87 decision as the }
defending champions held off the Police :

Crimestoppers.

Michael ‘Ferley’ Bain had a game high 17

points in the win.

Game two of both series will be played on

Monday night.

BASKETBALL
DEFENCE FORCE/POLICE REMATCH

e ONCE again, the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium is expected to be jammed pack on
Saturday night at the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force and the Royal Bahamas
Police Force participate in their annual
basketball showdown.

The Police will be out to defend their
title when they host the Defence Force,
starting at 8 pm. The game is expected to
be carried live on ZNS television.

However, this year there will be no press
versus ZNS game. Last year, the press
knocked off ZNS in a prelude to the
Defence Force/Police game.

As a result of the large amount of
awards to be given out to the Legends of
both the Defence Force and the Police,
organisers have eliminated the media
game.

Fans, however, will also get to watch
the “Battle of the Bands” between the
Defence Force and the Police. Last year,
the Police Force won the band showdown
as well.

BASEBALL
FREEDOM FARM SCHEDULE

e ACTION in the Freedom Farm Baseball

League will continue throughout the weekend }
: will be sending a 36-member team
: in a bid to try and knock off the
i two power-houses French Antilles
: and Trinidad & Tobago.

at the park in Yamacraw.

e Here’s a look at the schedule of games:
TEE BALL:

Tonight

6 pm Seagrapes vs Guineps

Saturday

SEE page 12



Bre
.



FRIDAY, MARCH 27,





BMDA 20th Annual New Car Show -

—

2009

BAAA getting





ready for IAAF

World Championships



Penden een

LAST year in Savaneta, Aru-

: ba, the Bahamas posted a total of
? 721 points and collected 50
: medals, inclusive of 22 gold, 18
i silver and 10 bronze for third

place.
When the championships return

to Aruba April 16-19, the

Bahamas Swimming Federation

The French Antilles finished on

: top of the field last year with 1,107
i points and had 91 medals — 29
gold, 38 silver and 24 bronze, fol-

i ri road f.
int () fe ce BT

Te







a new vehicle!

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the focus for the juniors
taking place in St. Lucia at the Carif-
ta Games over the Easter holiday
weekend, some of the top senior ath-
letes will be competing at the Miami
Elite Invitational.

That’s when the Bahamas Associ-
ation of Athletic Associations will
begin its quest for qualifying both
the women and the men 4 x 100
metre relay teams for the IAAF
World Championships in Berlin,
Germany in August.

Ralph McKinney, one of the
BAAA’s executives, announced that
the BAAA’s relay coordinators have
put together two teams that will rep-
resent the Bahamas at the invita-
tional on April 11 at the University
of Miami.

“We have this initiative where we
want to get them all together so that
they can run some times early so
that they can go to the major inter-
national events,” McKinney said.

“These teams that we have select-
ed will consist of persons who are
not in high school or in college
because they will either be running
at Carifta or in their collegiate
meets.”

The women’s team, under the
coordination of George Cleare and
Fritz Grant, will comprise of Chan-
dra Sturrup, Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, Christine Amertil, Sasha

lowed by Trinidad & Tobago with
801 points along with 24 gold, 15
silver and 22 bronze for 61.

This year’s team will be headed
by Jeff Eneas. Also travelling with
him to complete the coaching staff
are Shirley Mireault and Michael
Stewart.

After hosting its final trials over
the weekend at the Betty Kelly
Kenning Aquatic Center, the fed-
eration ratified the team on Sun-
day evening.

However, they released the full
list of the team on Tuesday.

¢ Here’s a look at the swimmers
selected:



Rolle, Shekethia Henfield and Tia-
vannia “Tia’ Thompson.

The men’s team will include Rod-
ney Greene, Dominic Demeritte,
Adrian Griffith, Michael Mathieu
and Jamial Rolle. The relay coordi-
nators are Rupert Gardiner and
Tyrone Burrows.

“This will cost us some good mon-
ey to put it all together, but we have
to doit,” McKinney said. “Our con-
centration right now may be on
Carifta, but we are trying to get our
teams ready for the World Cham-
pionships.”

The 12th version of the champi-
onships is scheduled for August 15-
23. The women will have to run at
43.90 seconds or faster, while the
men will have to at least do 39.10 to
qualify.

The “Golden Girls” team of
Savatheda Fynes, Chandra Sturrup,
Pauline Davis-Thompson, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie and Eldece
Clarke-Lewis won the gold at the
1999 Championships in Seville,
Spain.

Although the team came back in
2000 to duplicate the feat at the
Olympic Games in Sydney, Aus-
tralia, the Bahamas has not had any
success since at either of the two
major international meets on both
the women and men’s sides.

Looking at the athletes available
now, McKinney said he doesn’t see
why the Bahamas should be able to

SEE page 13

¢ GIRLS 11-12

Alaena Carey, Abigail Lowe,
Laura Morley, Crystal Rahming,
Taryn Smith and Jacinda
Williams.

¢ GIRLS 13-14

Maya Albury, Bria Deveauv,
Lauren Glinton, Gabrielle
Greene, Berchadette Moss,
Riquel Rolle and Je’Nae Saun-
ders.

¢ GIRLS 15-17

Ashley Butler, McKayla Light-
bourn, Shaunte Moss, Amber
Weech and Ariel Weech.

Vitout tee attoched eatry ferme

“
ze
b=

'

i
=

0 ey eae
Aan

deliver it to The Tribune om
ey Street, of place in bins
ed at the BMIDA New Car
» Show at the Mail at Marathon
“by Gpm on Friday, March 27-

‘the purchase of a car from pz
1A show.

hdem 2. yl. po eed



Chandra Sturrup

Carifta swim team to compete in April

° BOYS 11-12

Dionisio Carey, Dylan Cash,
Kohen Kerr, Keith Lloyd, Zach
Moses and Dustin Tynes.

° BOYS 13-14

Camron Bruney, Zarian Cleare,
Evante Gibson, Matthew Lowe,
Toby McCarroll and Laron Mor-
ley.

° BOYS 15-17
John Bradley, Devonn
Knowles, Armando Moss,

Mancer Roberts, Cameron Rolle
and Pemrae Walker.

Friday. March 27 & Saturday, March 26 - Mall at Marathon




Thee 1.000 price will only be redeomabde towards

ts at the

Pel ond Die Lee ek pe de ee ed ee ok ey ey 8
thy EP coe eed ey he. eel fe aged 2d





























Aes
reer





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS

RBDF troops off to [iitomoaeantitacc
Summit of Americas FeaOieleea rina

A CONTINGENT of 32
marines from the Commando
Squadron Department of the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force
recently left the capital to pro-
vide joint operational support for
the 5th Summit of the Americas.

The Summit will be held in
Port of Spain, Trinidad and Toba-
go, from April 17-19. It is the first
time a Caribbean nation has ever
hosted the event.

The marines from the Bahamas
will join up with the United States
and Canada, and other Caribbean
nations’ military forces, includ-
ing troops from Barbados, St
Kitts and Jamaica.

They will undergo additional
training exercises to prepare them
for their specific duties and roles
for the Summit. Primary duties
include providing assistance to
the Ministry of National Security
of the Republic of Trinidad in the
conduct of joint inter-agency mul-
ti-national task force security
operations.

They will also provide security
for the 34 heads of states and del-
egates of the Organisation of
America States (OAS), who will
be in Trinidad, sharing ideas and



Lynden Pindling International Airport. The Marines are expected to pro-
vide joint operational support for the 5th Summit of the Americas.

exchanging opinions.

The Defence Force troops, led
by Lieutenant Dereck Ferguson
and Petty Officer Patrick Adder-
ley, departed New Providence on
April 24 via a Canadian military
aircraft.

The marines are expected to

gain valuable experience from
what will be only the second over-
seas deployment that the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force has par-
ticipated in. The first was the
United Nations Peacekeeping
Missions in Haiti during 1994-
1996.



RBDF photos: Acting Sub Lieutenant Desiree Corneille

COMMANDER MICHAEL SIMMONS briefing the RBDF troops at the Coral Harbour Base prior to their

departure to Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. The marines are expected to provide joint operational
support for the 5th Summit of the Americas.

CRAVEN’S BAKERY

Market Street South
7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Monday - Saturday

Phone: (242) 326-4246

Now taking orders for the
following:

EASTER SPECIALS

Hot Cross Buns $10.00 Per Doz.

Twist Donut $ 8.40 Per Doz.

8” Cheese Cake $35.00 Each

(Cherry or Pineapple topping)

Easter Bread $ 3.00 Per Loaf

French Bread $ 1.00 Per Loaf

Sale ends April 9th, 2009

“We bake fresh from scratch everyday to give
you the best for a whole lot less.”



THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce is working with a
regional organisation in an effort
to increase support and technical
assistance for local small and
medium-sized enterprises.

Through the efforts of the
chamber’s Small and Medium
Enterprises Support Unit (SME-
SU), officials from the Caribbean
Export and Development
Agency (CEDA) have met with
a cross-section of Bahamian busi-
nesses, inclusive of small and
medium sized enterprises repre-
senting manufacturing, agricul-
ture, fisheries, art, entertainment
and small business consultant
professionals to inform them of
support opportunities provided
by the regional trade and invest-
ment development organisation.

“Overall the meeting was a
success with 25 persons partici-
pating in the session. The group
represented a cross section of
Bahamian businesses and includ-
ed both small and medium-sized
enterprises. Through detailed
and focused discussions the
group was able to secure the
commitment of the CEDA to
host and facilitate several activi-
ties in the Bahamas,” said the
Chamber’s executive director
Philip Simon.

Importance

Donnalee Bowe, assistant gen-
eral manager of the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC) and the
Bahamas Representative to
CEDA, said: “We are certainly
pleased with the turnout of
today’s meeting with all of the
stakeholders who are going to
help to build the Bahamas, in
particular during a time like this
when the whole world is in a
recession. We can see that every-
one is now realising the impor-
tance that SMEs are going to
play in the future development of
our nation. I hope that this is the
start of great things to come for
the economic prosperity of the
Bahamas.”

The Caribbean Export and
Development Agency is com-
prised of fifteen (15) CARIFO-
RUM member states of which












Anastasia Stubbs/Visionaire Marketing



PICTURED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT is Hank Ferguson, director of the
chamber’ SMESU trade unit; Phillip Williams, executive director of
CEDA; Donnalee Bowe, assistant general manager of the Bahamas Agri-
cultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC) and the Bahamas’ repre-
sentative to CEDA, and Philip Simon, executive director of the Bahamas

Chamber of Commerce.

the Bahamas is a member.

The Chamber’s executive
director Mr Simon and director
of the Chamber’s SMESU trade
unit Hank Ferguson recently met
with representatives from the
Caribbean Export and Develop-
ment Agency along with various
local businesses.

The Caribbean Export dele-
gation was led by its executive
director Phillip Williams, its
deputy executive director Alan
Ramirez and Quentin Baldwin,
management consultant and
country representative for the
Bahamas.

Mrs Bowe also accompanied
the group along with Dale
McHardy, manager of business
advisory services at the Bahamas
Development Bank.

Mr Ferguson explained that
the meeting was arranged to
achieve several objectives, which
included that of informing the
Bahamas private sector of the
work of Caribbean Export, as
well as to gain support from
stakeholders for the work for the
agency and to assist executives
of Caribbean Export in gaining
insight about the Bahamas’ pri-
vate sector’s most urgent tech-

Share your news
















The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

nical assistance needs.

“Additionally, the meeting
sought to identify suitable insti-
tutional partners for joint action
at national and regional levels as
well as develop a programme of
specific activities, which can be
undertaken with selected nation-
al partner institutions,” Mr Fer-
guson said.

He said the Chamber is look-
ing forward to partnering with
CEDA to host three trade relat-
ed workshops in the near future.

“The workshops are being
designed jointly, and expected
to inform Bahamian manufac-
turers and service providers
(including artists) on how to gain
the negotiated benefits from the
recently signed Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA).”

Workshops

He continued, “The second of
the workshops will address trade
liberalisation in general terms
and address the specific chal-
lenges for the Bahamas to imple-
ment its commitments under the
EPA.”

“The third and final workshop
agreed to between the Chamber
and Caribbean Export will
address trade negotiations
process and look specifically at
the pending negotiations
between the Caribbean and
Canada and also address exist-
ing preferential agreements that
Bahamian businesspersons can
benefit from.

“Tt is anticipated that the first
workshop will be held in May
2009. Additional activities pro-
posed will include partnerships
with the Bahamas National Craft
Association and the Bahamas
Development Bank,” Mr Fergu-
son said.



PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Per Case
I Freeport & Abaco

Per a
| Maxpdedexcaperpacm

Available in
NASSAU: Budget Liquors, Wholesale Wine & Spirits
nie | Saunders Beach Liquor Store
KRAWD PRIX PARIS 1889 i i |; FREEPORT: Plaza Liquors, Eight Mile Rock Liquor Store
Qe Sai — ABACO: AB) Liquors

WEDAILLE por Panis 1875





THE TRIBUNE @







Neb
IEMA ie
WRLC AEA
debt/GDP

Zhivargo Laing



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas’ national debt
may have passed the 40 per cent
debt-to-GDP ratio widely
regarded as a key ‘warning’
threshold, a government minis-
ter acknowledged yesterday,
although the administration had
the fiscal “capacity to absorb
the situation we’re in”.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, speaking to
Tribune Business from Colom-
bia, where he was attending an
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) conference, said
that while the current fiscal sit-
uation was not ideal, “the way
we have managed our fiscal
affairs” in the past and relatively
low level of foreign indebted-
ness had given the Government
room to hopefully ride out the
current storm.

Comparing the Bahamas to
countries in the Caribbean and
other states with similar credit
ratings, Mr Laing said they gen-
erally had much higher debt-to-
gross domestic product (GDP)
ratios, whereas the Bahamas’
was much lower.

“Looking at 40 to 41 per cent
of GDP, relatively speaking,

SEE page 2B

Solomon’s Mines

closes down store

SOLOMON’S Mines has
shut-down one of its stores on
Bay Street, Tribune Business
has learned, citing the eco-
nomic downturn as the reason
for the closure.

Sources, who were not
authorised to speak on behalf
of the company, confirmed
yesterday that Solomon’s
Mines Diamond Centre closed
its doors recently, with no
plans to reopen in the near
future.

The store, located on Bay
and Parliament Streets, has a
sign which read “closed
today” posted on its window
for almost two weeks.

Sources told Tribune Busi-
ness that all of the staff were
relocated to its other Bay
Street stores.

Calls to the store’s upper
management, including presi-
dent Mark Finlayson, were
not returned up to press time
yesterday. Middle manage-
ment refused to meet or make
a statement to Tribune Busi-
ness when they visited their
Bay Street head office.

The information contained is from a third |
party and The Tribune can not be held

responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report. -



ll

FRIDAY,

ao
oo

MsACRIG@ se Paar |



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Global chief: My assets
and firm’s all for sale

I Ritchie says unnamed investor ready to inject cash to save Global United if
Government stays winding-up, and says only $6m, not $8m, owed

I Argues that government action preventing company collecting $10m owed to it

I 50 staff jobs in jeopardy, to add to 160 already dismissed

I But admits overambitious expansion started firm’s woes, and that NIB owed
contributions he is aiming to pay

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Global United’s president
yesterday told Tribune Busi-
ness he had an unnamed
investor “standing by to inject
cash into” the business if the
Government would hold-off
on winding it up, adding that
currently all his and the firm’s
fixed assets were on the mar-
ket for sale.

In a series of e-mailed
replies to Tribune Business’s
questions, Jackson Ritchie
said the Government had so
far shown no sign of changing
its position on enforcing the
Supreme Court judgments
requiring Global United to

pay around $6 million in
unpaid customs duties, fees
and departure taxes. He
denied that it was a previous-
ly claimed $8 million, arguing
that the Government had got
its figures wrong.

Working feverishly to res-
cue his shipping agency, trans-
portation and logistics busi-
ness, Captain Ritchie told Tri-
bune Business yesterday: “The
company can only survive if
the Government relents and
comes to the table to work
with us, the bank and other
stakeholders.

“We have an investor stand-
ing by to inject cash into the
business once the Govern-
ment indicates they will work

Realtors go to the ‘Max’
to get ‘to next level’

NO FLAGGING: Craig Pinder (right)



|

pictured with Bahamas Real Estate

Association (BREA) president William Wong.

* BREA chief, Paradise
Real Estate become
RE/MAX franchisees

* Network’s website gets
100,000 hits inquiring
about Bahamas in one
month

* While inquiries off
20%, activity in high-end
market ‘still strong’ as
high net worths seek
purchases to hedge
against inflation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Two Bahamas-based realtors
yesterday said they hoped their
newly-acquired RE/MAX fran-
chises would take their busi-
nesses “to the next level”, one
telling Tribune Business that
while inquiries had dipped by
20 per cent “the high-end mar-
ket is still very strong”.

The RE/MAX name and
franchise will now be carried by
RE/MAX Paradise Real Estate,
the former Paradise Real Estate
owned by broker Craig Pinder,
and RE/MAX Ocean Realty
Bahamas. The latter is the for-
mer William Wong & Associ-
ates, owned by current
Bahamas Real Estate Associa-
tion (BREA) president William
Wong.

Both Mr Wong and Mr Pin-
der said they expected the
RE/MAX brand to boost their
business by further enhancing
their respective organisations’
credibility in international mar-

SEE page 5B

with the company. They [the
Government] have to act now
to commence winding-up pro-
ceedings. As far as we know,
they have not acted. If they
do, we close. If they don’t, we
continue as normal. Right
now, we plan to continue on
as we still have the support of
the bank [FirstCaribbean
International Bank
(Bahamas)] and our major
vendors.”

Captain Ritchie said Global
United’s efforts to collect $10
million allegedly owed to it by
clients were also being ham-
pered by the Government’s
threat to wind-up the compa-

SEE page 3B

t’s back to the court

today, and many

CLICO policyhold-

ers/depositors are
desperately looking around
for someone to scalp for
their financial plight. This is
perfectly understandable,
given that a reckless business
strategy and mismanagement
have played havoc with their
long-term savings and retire-
ment plans. Tribune Busi-
ness, for what it’s worth,
gives them its wholehearted
sympathy, because the out-
look is bleak whatever way
you slice it.

SEE page 8B

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Business licence ripe for
corporate income tax
change, says ex-minister

Switch would allow Bahamas to pursue double tax
treaties as TIEA alternative, as Smith says ‘fallout
not too great’ from OECD compliance move

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas could convert the
current business licence fee system
into a corporate income tax if it
decided to pursue double taxation
agreements with other countries, a
former finance minister told Tri-
bune Business, arguing that accom- |
modating the OECD/G-20
demands could help spur much-
needed tax reform.

James Smith, the former minister
of state for finance in the Christie
administration, said that while the
Organisation for Economic Co-
Operation and Development
(OECD’s) anti-international finan-
cial centre initiative was “being driven by might rather than
right”, there were still opportunities for the Bahamas to pur-
sue investment/tax treaties that would be more beneficial than
a standard Tax Information Exchange Agreement (TIEA).

“There could be a tax opportunity here, because going
forward we would have to alter the tax system, so we might
be able to look at that now. Double tax treaties might serve

SEE page 4B

JAMES SMITH



Parent guarantee stops 59%
CLICO Bahamas asset impair

Sys ee

— * debtor. rdr Palawan briaiers high Cede od be

lets) 00 day, each eae ee Gee eer 20 per come el in voles

Regulator Probes CLICO’s over
/0 per cent affiliate exposure

IN THE NEWS: The CLICO
saga has made headlines.



FAMILY GUARDIAN

WU INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

[| steady cash flow
C5 worry-free retireme
[ guaranteed incon

A all of the

— eanancial Strength Rating

A Eeeettemt





PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas may be past | Ro
40% debt/GDP ratio | hj

FROM page 1B

you have the capacity to absorb
the situation we find ourselves
in,” Mr Laing told Tribune
Business. “It’s not ideal for us,
it’s not where we want to be as
we want to be in a better posi-
tion than that. But we certainly
have the capacity to absorb the
situation we’re in.”

Bahamas’ debt-to-GDP ratio
was higher than 40 per cent, a
threshold regarded as a ‘warn-
ing’ level by international insti-
tutions such as the Internation-
al Monetary Fund (IMF) and
credit rating agencies, Mr Laing
said the Government did not
currently have final data on this.

But he conceded: “Given
where we were, around 38 per

When asked whether the cent, in the most recent indica-

A
NAD

Nassau Airport
Developmont Company

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following
items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for
the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (ie.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected fo be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access fo the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRACI BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs





tions we could certainly be
around that [40-41 per cent] fig-
ure.”

Many observers have fre-
quently contended that the
Bahamas’ national debt-to-
GDP ratio is much higher than
the data provided by the Gov-
ernment, arguing that it is prob-
ably closer to 44-45 per cent.
Some have argued that it could
be as high as 50 per cent, and
publicly decried the ever-
increasing size of government
and seeming reluctance to
reduce recurrent spending.

Once past the 40 per cent
threshold, the danger increases
that a nation could be subject to
a downgrade in its sovereign
credit rating. If that happened, it
would be unable to obtain debt
(bond) financing on preferen-
tial terms, increasing its debt
servicing costs.

Mr Laing, who on Wednes-
day said government revenues
were now $100 million below
forecast for the 2008-2009 Bud-
get year, due to a major drop
during the 2009 first quarter -
traditionally the period when it
obtains most revenue - also
acknowledged that the GFS fis-
cal deficit for the full year was
set to be higher than projected.

The GFS fiscal deficit strips
out the actual cost of debt prin-
cipal redemptions.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing said it
was “extremely important” and
of “great benefit” to the
Bahamas’ fiscal management
that it had maintained “a low
level of foreign indebtedness”.
Most of the national debt is
domestically held, with minimal
exposure outside the Bahamas.

JOB POSITION

PNBSy- SMe,
Marketing Agent.
At least 5 years

ey ered atsvilnoe

MiKo Coe
P.O.Box EE17318

Mebaren [ie ingrece [tend

THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, U.S. EMBASSY &

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK PRESENT

THE

BUSINESS EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009 + 8:00a.m.- 3:30 p.m. * The British Colonial Hilton

AGENDA

830 REGISTRATION/NETWORKING

1130 PANEL DISCUSSION Il

* SURVIVING THE ECONOMIC

Sod = INVOCATION, PRAYER &

NATIONAL ANTHEMS

RECESSION’
* Ken Kerr (Providence Advisors!

* Barry Maloolm (Scotiabank Bahamas ltd)

INTRODUCTION & MODERATOR
* Philip Simon, Executive Director
Bohomes Chamber of Commerce

* James Smith (Colina Rinancial Advisors!

LUNCHEON PRESENTATION

“THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC THREAT! THE

WELCOME REKARKS

+ Dionisio OD Aguilar, President
Bohomeas Chamber of Cammerce

+ Darron Cash, Chairman
Eohomas Oevelpament fant

+ Timothy Zimiga-Brown, Charge”
d'Affairs a. U5, Embassy

GLOBAL ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY!”

* Ronald Langston, (Forme! National
Oirector of the Minority Gusiness
Orveloament Agency (MBDA, U, §.
OQepartment of Commence

PANEL DISCUSSION Ill

* POSITIONED FOR SUCCESS, BEYOND

‘ REASONS TO REJOICE IN RECESSION *
* Gregory Bathell, President
Fidelity Rank

COFFEE BREAK

PANEL DISCUSSION!
‘WAKING, MAXIMIZING &
PROTECTING YOUR INVESTMENT *
* Peter Miller (Aohames Develoornent
amr;
+ Khaalis Rolle (Mossay Water ferries!
+ Inapector Sandra Miller
(Royal Bahanns Police Force)

Registration Fee: $100.00

Please A.5.V.B

Contact: The Chamber of Commerce

CLOSING

THE RECESSION WHAT'S NEXT!’
* Larry Gibson (Colonia! Bension Servires!
* Chester Cooper (Aritish American
Finaricial!

* Raymond Winder (Defoitte 4 Touche)

Teal: 322-2145 or email: register@thebahamaschamber.com



yal Bank draws upon
gher Asue savings rate

Bank disappointed in response of loan defaulters

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards @tribunemedia.net

ROYAL BANK of Cana-
da (RBC) has been disap-
pointed with the number of
customers seeking help for
loan delinquencies and has
seen an increase in defaults,
its country vice-president said
yesterday, at the launch of the
bank’s new savings program
called RBC Asue.

Nathaniel Beneby said Roy-
al Bank saw an increased
amount of loan defaults into
year-end 2008 and the begin-
ning of 2009, as a result of the
economic downturn and mass
layoffs.

“There is an increase in
defaults, and as this recession
is prolonged it will worsen.
You will see an increase, but
that disappointment with peo-
ple not coming in is them not
being proactive enough, not
paying attention and
approaching the bank to
address their present situa-
tion,” Mr Beneby said.

“We’re hoping that what is
being experienced today will
really help Bahamians change
their habits. This will be a
change in behaviour, which
will be the positive thing that
will come out of this. They will
pay alittle bit more attention
and things will probably nor-
malise, where people will then
be able to borrow what they
can afford to pay and spend
what they can afford to pay.”

According to Mr Beneby,
RBC’s Asue savings pro-
gramme will encourage
Bahamians to save and pro-
mote prudent money man-
agement.

Programme

The programme is not like
the traditional Asue known to
most Bahamians, with various
individuals contributing to a
cumulative coffer and even-
tually enjoying a draw on what
they have invested, but a sav-
ings scheme with an interest
rate 0.5 per cent higher than a
regular savings account.

“The traditional Asue is a
concept that Bahamians read-
ily identify with, and although
we are all bankers around this
table, it is a practice that has
benefited many Bahamian
families in achieving short-
term and long-term goals,”
said Mr Beneby.

“We decided to improve
upon the Asue concept and
offer Bahamians a tangible
tool for consistent savings
towards a worthwhile goal.”

He added that Royal Bank
is part of the Canadian bank-
ing system, which has been
rated the best in the world.

According to Reuters,
Canada has the soundest
banking system in the world,
followed by Sweden Luxem-
bourg and Australia. And
according to a Financial Times
article headed Canada Banks
Prove Envy of the World,
Canadian investment banks
have been so strong because
of a tightly regulated sector
where institutions would “pay
a price for unwise investing”.

‘Give me capitalism,
warts and all, always’

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT’s
implementation of the nation-
al unemployment benefit
scheme will increase taxes, but
the loss for taxpayers will not
be subsidiaed on any other
front, the Nassau Institute’s
vice-president said yesterday.

Rick Lowe told the Rotary
Club of West Nassau at its
monthly meeting that the
scheme emphasises the Gov-
ernment’s socialist tendencies.

He explained that more
government intervention in
the economy will inevitably
lead to an increase in the

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Bahamas’ current $3 billion-
plus national debt that will
burden future generations.

“At the Nassau Institute we
might be considered fiscal
conservatives, but I prefer to
think it is better for govern-
ment to spend within its
means than burden future
generations, yet unborn, with
deficits and debt that we will
never repay in most of our
lifetimes,” he said.

Mr Lowe said he had
received copies of the draft
Bill for the unemployment
benefit scheme, and noted
that computer payroll systems
would have to be changed to
accommodate the tax increase.

He added that the tax
increase that will come with
the scheme comes at the worst

2008/CLE/qui/01870

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising an area of 13, 486 square feet situate approximately
500 feet west of Lincoln Boulevard and north side of Palm Beach
Court on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of
land has such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions
as are shown on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Mary Jane Smith

NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Mary Jane Smith of the Southern
District, of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas in respect of: - ALL
THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising an area of 13,
436 square feet situate approximately 500 feet west of Lincoln
Boulevard and north side of Palm Beach Courton the Island
of New Providence one of the Islands in the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of land has
such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions as
are shown on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

Mary Jane Smith claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the
said tract of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having
Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the petition shall on or before the 27" of AprilA.D.,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed form
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before
the 27" of April A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:The Registry of

the Supreme Court;

The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for the
Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,

Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;

Dated the 27" day of January A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner







“The Bahamas
has decided to
venture down
this slippery
slope with the
implementation
of unemploy-

ment insurance.”



possible time, without a cor-
responding decrease in other
areas to compensate, and
companies would be forced to
provide government with
more forms when an employ-
ee is dismissed.

“One might believe that it is
magnanimous of the Govern-
ment to offer this programme,
but even I would be a hero if I
could pass laws to take money
from one person under the
threat of fines or jail time and
give it to someone else,” said
Mr Lowe.

“The Bahamas has decided
to venture down this slippery
slope with the implementation
of unemployment insurance.

“Government handouts, no
matter how well intentioned,
create black holes for taxpay-
ers’ hard earned money.”

Mr Lowe said abuse of the
unemployment scheme could
become ingrained in the sys-
tem “that honest taxpaying
Bahamians will have to fund.”

The Nassau Institute advo-
cates smaller government and
laissez-faire capitalism, as
opposed to more government
planning.

According to Mr Lowe,
under government’s watch,
the national debt has risen
from $870 million to $3 billion
in 18 years, representing a
$118 million increase each and
every year or 244.8 per cent
increase.

Mr Lowe said that the
Bahamas had fallen from 43rd
to 49th on an index that ranks
the economic freedom of
countries, when it was ranked
7th in 1972. “I sincerely
believe the goal of downsiz-
ing government is a much
more worthy national eco-
nomic plan than encouraging
more failed government plan-
ning,” he said. “Give me cap-
italism, warts and all, any
day.”

Claw

For the stories

behind the news,
ie et-Co Merde] 4T 4
on Mondays



THE TRIBUNE

Global chief: My assets
and firm’s all for sale

the company.

He pointed out that only
FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas), which had
a fixed and floating charge
over $20 million worth of
Global United assets, would
likely recover what was owed
in the event of liquidation
“and in this economic climate
even they may fall short”.

Captain Ritchie argued that
all Global United’s payment
plans were rejected, with

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 3B



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you
are raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in
the area or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and share
your story.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

FROM page 1B

ny.

He added that if the Gov-
ernment made good on its
winding-up threat, some 50
Global United staff would
have to be laid-off, adding to
the 160 who had already been
released since April/May 2008.

When asked by Tribune
Business whether Global
United’s problems stemmed

CRANLEIGH PROPERTIES LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, CRANLEIGH PROPERTIES LIMITED, has
been dissolved and struck off the Register according to
the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar

General on the 18th day of March, 2009.

from expanding too far, too
fast, and taking on an unsus-
tainable debt load it could not

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham refusing to meet with
himself and persons acting for

service with cash flows that
were generated, Captain
Ritchie effectively conceded

Simon John Harman
Equity Trust House
28-30 The Parade

the company to resolve the
situation.
He said that Global United

this was the case. The key pur-
chases were United Shipping
and Global Customs Brokers
& Trucking and World Bound
Couriers

“Admittedly, on reflection,
Global United’s
expansion/acquisitions were
probably too aggressive, which
adversely affected the cash
flow, thereby creating the
environment for the follow-
ing events to occur,” Captain
Ritchie said.

“In retrospect, however, the
acquisitions were pivotal and
essential to Global United
securing a foothold in Nassau
and the long-term growth of
the business. Once non-essen-
tial assets are shed there will
be steady growth in its core
business segments, which will
not only be good for Global
United but also for employ-
ment and the economy at
large.”

And Captain Ritchie also
confirmed that the company
owed the National Insurance
Board (NIB) money, a sum
former employees had told
this newspaper was around
$60,000.

Captain Ritchie did not con-
firm that figure, but told this
newspaper: “Since our Cash
flow was flipped around by 90
- 120 days in early 2007 when
this action commenced, we
have been unable to pay many
vendors.

“Up until that time the com-
pany had paid its National
Insurance regularly. The com-
pany recently made a payment
to National Insurance and
made a proposal to pay off the
balance over a period. We are
waiting for their response.

“In addition to making a



Jackson Ritchie

lump sum payment to Cus-
toms, the planned outcome of
our restructuring was to bring
all vendors current, including
National Insurance.

“It is to be noted that Glob-
al United is owed millions of
dollars by both local and for-
eign companies, and part of
the plan is to collect these and
use the proceeds to liquidate
some of the debt.”

And Captain Ritchie
revealed that Global United’s
Airport Industrial Park head-
quarters, for which he is seek-
ing $1.8 million, “along with
all the company’s fixed assets
and those owned by myself
are on the market”.

Detailing the company’s
troubles, Captain Ritchie
explained that the critical
effect the Government’s
action, which began in 2007,
had on his business was to
damage cash flow/liquidity by
demanding immediate repay-
ment of all monies owed,
something that disrupted the
previous 90-120 day payment
periods Global United had
enjoyed.

Captain Ritchie said prac-
tice was different from the
law, which he indicated was

unrealistic. Ministry of
Finance officials had insisted
that all cruise passenger
departure taxes were to be
paid within 10 days after they
were collected, something that
he said, “if truly enforced”,
would make all cruise lines,
shipping and travel agencies
indebted to the Public Trea-
sury “to the tune of hundreds
of millions of dollars”.

The Global United presi-
dent and chief executive
described as “unique” the fact
that “after following estab-
lished practice for years, Glob-
al United trade payables were
called in instantly.

“Global United used to
have over $125 million flowing
through its accounts in a given
year,” he added, arguing that
requiring immediate payment,
up-front and in a lump sum,
was a condition the company
would never be able to meet.

Questioning why Global
United was seemingly the only
company that the Govern-
ment had served with statuto-
ry demands for immediate
payment, Captain Ritchie sug-
gested in an e-mailed reply to
Tribune Business that it would
be meaningless to liquidate

ultimately proposed a
$400,000 per month payment
programme to settle the debt,
which FirstCaribbean offered
to guarantee.

“In a classic catch 22 situa-
tion, Customs refused to
accept the plan unless the
bank guaranteed it in writing,
and the bank refused to guar-
antee the plan unless Customs
accepted it in writing,” Cap-
tain Ritchie alleged.

After initially proposing a
$150,000 week payment pro-
gramme, Captain Ritchie then
offered to pay the Customs
Department $211,567 per
month for a period that would
not last longer than Decem-
ber 31, 2008. This then
increased to the $400,000 per
month.

The final payment plan,
Captain Ritchie added, includ-
ed a $500,000 lump sum pay-
ment to the Government
upfront.

He again questioned why
Global United was seeming-
ly being targeted, when other
companies - especially foreign-
owned ones - were not being
subjected to the same pres-
sure.

PRICEWATERHOUsE(GOPERS

MANAGER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

One of our major clients seeks to recruit a qualified information technology professional
with experience in financial and customer service applications for the above position.

QUALIFICATIONS:

St. Helier, Jersey,
JE1 1EQ
Liquidator

NOTICE

CGA Holdings Limited

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 18th day of March, 2009.

David Becker
Liquidator

CGA Holdings Limited



of



* Masters of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

* Eight or more years experience including hands-on technical experience and
two years minimum managing an information technology department in a large
organization with a complex, multi-vendor, multi-platform and distributed
computing environment
Visionary who can analyze problems within the context of corporate strategy,
balancing the consideration of facts, priorities, resources, constraints and
altematives

RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Lead, monitor and develop a team of information technology professionals to
deliver customer focused service and set performance expectations to achieve
excellence
Manage the development, implementation and day-to-day operations of the
Information Technology department
Actively contribute to the tactical and strategic development of information
technology to support the organization’s business needs
Accountable for the successful delivery to agreed time scales and within budget of
departmental projects or programmes
Assist accounting and engineering departments in ensuring accurate and timely
preparation of reports



“We've Hatched Some
GREAT Getaways for you!”

ite tor hs
Direct to London

$574.00

Economyround trip.
Taxes not included.



res
TCH CTC)

ET

T Oe
wo ee
ED ped

REQUIREMENTS:
This is a senior position that will require a professional with very extensive
experience in supervising and controlling computer professionals in financial,
customer services and engineering applications.
Strong management and communications skills
Strong technical and troubleshooting skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure
Solid understanding of business operations and strategic planning

ol Mey
Lee

eh | yaa! er
TE A TTT mr

Rt os
SY ad AIT)

ele ae dg eee tome
included.

COMPENSATION:
Attractive salary and other benefits will be commensurate with training and experience.

Taxes included - Seals are ienibed - restrictions aopty.

Written applications should be addressed to:

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: IT MANAGER 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Private & Confidential





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

SS SSS eS ee SSS
Tourism scholarship

Business licence ripe for corporate
income tax change, says ex-minister

FROM page 1B

that purpose,” Mr Smith told
Tribune Business.

By signing a double tax treaty
with another nation, Bahamas
subsidiaries of parent compa-
nies domiciled in that country
would have their profits taxed at
a likely lower rate by this
nation. No tax would be
imposed by the parent compa-
ny’s country, providing both it
and the Bahamas-domiciled
entity with important tax sav-
ings.

In this way, foreign compa-
nies would be enticed to estab-
lish subsidiaries in the Bahamas,
increasing investment, com-
merce and employment in this
nation.

But to be able to sign double
taxation agreements, the
Bahamas would first need to
implement some kind of income
tax base.

Mr Smith yesterday suggested
to Tribune Business that this
could be achieved by converting
the existing business licence fee
into a corporate income tax.

“We have a turnover tax, the
business licence fee,” he
explained.



“The devil will
be in the detail,
in terms of
which countries
do it and
when.”



James Smith

“All you’d have to do is mod-
ify that and make provisions for
deductions where you do it on
the net, rather than the gross, as
is done now, and make provi-
sions for repatriation and infor-
mation exchange with other
jurisdictions.

“That’s if we want to go down
the route of double taxation.”

Currently, the business
licence fee is levied as a per-
centage of gross turnover,
rather than the net.

Responding to the Govern-
ment’s public position that it
would now negotiate TIEAs “as
a matter of priority” with

save 30%

on newspaper & radio



UOT

stimulus

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money ot Work

OECD and G-20 members who
wanted them, Mr Smith added:
“The devil will be in the detail,
in terms of which countries to
do it with and when. Once we
indicated this intention, we have
to take it on board and move
quickly to meet the OECD
standard of 12 TIEAs.”

The OECD has threatened
to ‘blacklist’ jurisdictions that
do not have a minimum of 12
TIEAs with other states.

At present, the Bahamas has
only one, and it is understood
that the Government is seeking
feedback, via the Bahamas
Financial Services Board
(BFSB), on which nations it
would be ‘least harmful’ to sign
TIEAs with based on the finan-
cial services sector’s current
client base.

Mr Smith said there would
be some “trade offs” when it
came to signing TIEAs, and
that some agreements might
prompt a few clients or institu-
tions to leave the Bahamas.

But he added: “I suspect the
fall-out will not be too great,
because all international finan-
cial centres are on the same
page.

“At the end of the day, there
will be a little shake-out, but

LIMITED TIME OFFER

nothing too disastrous. The
worst thing that could have hap-
pened would have been to end
up on that list and others did
not.”

The former minister said the
consequences of being black-
listed by the OECD/G-20 could
have been severe, as France was
threatening not to allow its
banks to do business with insti-
tutions in listed countries.

That, in turn, could have
forced many Bahamas-based
institutions with French head
offices to leave this nation.

As for the US, Mr Smith
pointed out that it could deny
Bahamas-based institutions
access to the US financial sys-
tem, closing off credit/debit card
clearing, correspondent bank-
ing and securities settlements.
A withholding tax might also
be imposed on remittances to
this nation.

He added that the Bahamas
had already done much work
on restructuring its internation-
al financial services sector
already, but a number of fac-
tors - not least the economic
downturn and enhanced glob-
al regulatory efforts - were like-
ly to ensure it generated “very
slow growth”.

242.322.4652

G*&

cr A Ll”

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKEBAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

-f£2 MIF s&s 1.

applicants sought

Applicants seeking scholarships to finance their tourism-
related studies have until month’s end to apply, it was
revealed yesterday.

Over the past four years, 21 hotel industry scholarships
valued at $70,000 have been awarded to Bahamian students,
thanks to the efforts of the the Bahamas Hotel Association
and its partner organisations, the Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union and the Bahamas Hotel
Employers Association.

"Now is an ideal time to invest in one's future, by pur-
suing studies in the hospitality industry” said Bahamas
Hotel Association president Robert Sands.

Opportunities

"Despite the global economic downturn, looking ahead,
tourism will continue to be the world's leading growth
industry, and the career and entrepreneurial opportunities
for Bahamians will be considerable. For many students and
families, this financial support could not come at a better
time. We are grateful to our members, our industry part-
ners, and the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers
Union for their contributions, which enable us to offer
these scholarships."

The BHA is presently soliciting applicants both for the
industry partners Pat Bain Scholarships, and the Caribbean
Hotel & Tourism Education Foundation’s scholarship pro-
grams. Six $4,000 College of the Bahamas scholarships
are available under the Industry Partners programme,
named in honour of the late union leader Pat Bain, who was
a strong advocate for education and training.

The application process is open until March 31, and
awards will be announced by June 30. Individuals wishing
to apply should contact Bridget Murray, workforce devel-
opment manager for the Bahamas Hotel Association, at
322-8381 for eligibility criteria and application forms, or vis-
it the Education section of BHA's website.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00115

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Millard Bethel
NOTICE OF PETITION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Millard Bethel
of North Palmetto Point, Eleuthera, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
is applying to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas to have his title
investigated determined and declared under the

Quieting Titles Act. 1959 (Ch. 393) in respect

of the land hereafter described, that is to say:
“ ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
comprising Eight and Seven-hundredtwenty-nine
Thousandths (8.729) Acres located approximately
Eighty-seven (87) feet South of the Eleuthera
Main Road and approximately Zero and Three
Tenths (0.3) miles North-Westwardly of Palmetto
Point Crossing and is bounded Northwardly
by the Estate of Horatius Thompson running
thereon for a total distance of Four-Hundred-
twelve and Thirty-five Hundredths (412.35) feet,
Eastwardly by property formerly of the Estate
of Anthony Drexel and now the property of the
Petitioner running thereon for a total distance of
Eleven-hundred two and ninety-three hundredths
(1102.93) feet, Southwardly by property of
Eleuthera Land Company Ltd., running thereon for
a total distance of Three hundred-thirty-two and
Twenty-two hundredths (332.22) feet, Westwardly
by property of Emma E. Cooper running thereon
for a total distance of Nine hundred-seventy-
nine and Forth Three Hundredths (979.43) feet
continuing back to the point of commencement
the said piece parcel or tract of land described
aforesaid is delineated in PINK on the plan
submitted with the Petitioner’s Petition.”
AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition
and the Plan of the said land may be inspected
during normal office hours at the following
places:

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 26 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,640.47 | CHG 0.50 | %CHG 0.03 | YTD -71.89 | YTD % -4.20
FINDEX: CLOSE 806.09 | YTD -3.45% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $
Abaco Markets 1.42 0.127
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
4.80 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.48
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs 1.61
Doctor's Hospital 2.16
Famguard TFS
Fince 11.00
FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45
Focol (S) 5.07
Focol Class B Preference 1.00
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnsen 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00

i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House,
East Street North, New Providence, The
Bahamas.

il. Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, East Shirley
Street, Highland Terrace, New Providence,
The Bahamas.

il. The Administrator's Office, Governor’s
Harbour, Eleuthera, The Bahamas

Div $

1.39

0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.309

0.63
3.15
1.95

0.63
3.15
2.37

0.63
3.15
2.37

0.118
0.438
0.099
0.240
0.598
0.322
0.794
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

6.48
1.65
2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00

2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person
having dower or right to dower, an adverse claim
or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall
on or before the 6th May A.D., 2009 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petition or his
attorney an Adverse Claim in the prescribed
form supported by Affidavit.

OOOO OC OC OPO OC OOS
22909009990009000000
6666656685056656560566

0.30

5.50

8.60
10.00

0.30
5.50

0.30

5.59. 1,050

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low

1000.00

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB22 100.00

S52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve
an Adverse Claim on or before 6th May A.D.,
2009 date will operate as a bar to such claim.

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
RND Holdings

0.00 0.00
0.45 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months
0.95 4.77
-1.40 -3.35
0.67 4.37
-1.94 -11.33
0.96 5.79

0.00
0.55

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

NA _ Vv
1.3664
2.8988
1.4432
3.3201

12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0440
1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
nd Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Ci jelity
Last Price - Last traded
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Div $
1.3041
2.9230
1.3828
3.3201
11.8789

100.0000

96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

28-Feb-0939
28-Feb-09
6-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-O7
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

Dated this 5th day of March A.D., 2009

Sharon Wilson & Co.
Chambers
Delvest House
East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner

0.56
-3.59
0.00

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-13.33
4.40
3.64
4.40

0.06
0.80

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

in last 52 weeks
weighted price for daily volume
ted price for daily volume
m day to day
raded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
jed by the last 12 month earnin gs
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





THE TRIBUNE



Realtors go to the ‘Max’ to get ‘to next level’

FROM page 1B

kets, and with foreign buyers.

Through their franchises, the
Bahamas has become the 73rd
country to join RE/MAX’s
global network, and both men
believe membership will pro-
vide their listing clients with
wider exposure for their
Bahamas-based properties via
other franchise members.

In addition, other RE/MAX
members will be able to direct
foreign clients eyeing Bahamian
real estate to their companies,
increasing business on both
sides.

Mr Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness: “We feel it’s going to be a
big help for us in attracting
more foreign clients to our
shores.

“Outside the Bahamas, we
need some help, and we’re asso-
ciated with one of the biggest
players in the business.

“We’re looking forward to
expanding our business and tak-
ing it to the next level.

“They [RE/MAX] had
100,000 hits in 30 days, from
January to the beginning of
February, from people wanting
information on the Bahamas.
Ever since we tied up with
them, in the last week we’ve

been getting a tremendous
amount of hits on our wed page
from people looking at the
Bahamas.”

Mr Wong added that while
both he and Mr Pinder would
remain competitors, as
RE/MAX franchisees they
would also be operating as
allies.

He added that the brand
identity would help them both
compete in the Nassau and
Bahamian markets with the
likes of Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty, Bahamas Real-
ty, ERA Dupuch Real Estate,
Sotheby’s Damianos Realty and
H. G. Christie.

Merits

Mr Pinder told Tribune Busi-
ness that he first thought about
seeking the RE/MAX franchise
some six months ago, but the
plan crystallised when he visited
its Las Vegas conference three
weeks ago, where he spoke to
other franchisees from the
region who extolled the brand’s
merits.

“The RE/MAX brand is well-
known and should increase traf-
fic to my website,” he explained.
“Tt’s a well-known and trusted
real estate brand name.

RE/MAX now has over a 50
per cent market share for all
real estate TV commercials. It
was looking to get a big brand
name, and RE/MAX was the
clear choice by far.”

Pointing to this “huge expo-
sure”, which included advertis-
ing slots during the Super Bowl,
Mr Pinder said the franchise
affiliation would help grow his
business.

“With the increased business,
we should increase sales, attract
more agents and serve more
islands” Mr Pinder said. Cur-
rently, he has four agents in
Nassau, two in Abaco and one
in Eleuthera.

While real estate inquiries
received compared to last year
had dropped “probably by 20
per cent”, Mr Pinder said he
was busier than he had been
compared to the same period
in both 2008 and 2007.

“The high-end market is still
very strong,” Mr Pinder
explained.

“There’s a lot of high-net
worth individuals with cash
looking for good deals.

“They know the market’s
going to turn at some point, and
are ready to catch good prop-
erties at a decent price to take
advantage of the situation.

“Tf you’re willing to put in the
hours to locate these deals for
high net worth individuals ready
ti buy, it’s well worth the
effort.”

Mr Pinder added that buyers
with liquidity were also looking
at real estate as a hedge against
an expected increase in infla-
tion, as the various economic
stimulus packages expanded fis-
cal spending and the money
supply in the US and elsewhere.

Mr Wong added that because
the Bahamas had such a good
reputation worldwide, other
RE/MAX realtors were “dying
to send their clients here. The
Bahamas has a very good name
abroad”.

He added that to join the
RE/MAX network, a $20,000
first-time fee had to be paid for
the first five years.

RE/MAX also earned a per-
centage of the firm’s gross rev-
enues, with all agents paying a
commission as well.

Therefore, franchises such as
RE/MAX are truly beneficial
for real estate firms with a large
volume of business, as opposed
to the part-timers.

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 5B

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Equity Side

2009
No.0020

IN THE MATTER OF a piece parcel or lot of land contained
by measurements one and two hundred and ninety four
hundredths (1.294) acres and situate on the northeastern side of

the Queen’s Highway in the vicinity of Palestine B

aptist

I

Church in the settlement of Deadman’s Cay in the Island of

Long Island, The Bahamas.
AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Alvin S. Turnquest.

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act 1959

NOTICE

The Petitioner in this matter claims to be the owner in fee simple
possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described and the
Petitioner has made an application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and
the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in the
Certificate of Title granted by the Court in accordance with the

provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal office

hours at:

Governments position
on OECD backed by BFSB

The Bahamas Financial Services Board
(BFSB) yesterday gave its backing to the
Government’s announced position on the
OECD and G-20 initiatives, and its endorse-
ment of moves to meet standards for trans-
parency and tax information exchange.

“The insistence of the Government on
clarity and unequivocal language with
respect to a level playing field, particularly
as it relates to timelines and standards, was
strongly supported by industry in 2002,”
the BFSB said in a statement.

“Likewise, the industry now supports the
decision of the Government, in conjunc-
tion with the governments of other major
financial centres, to agree to endorse the
OECD standards on transparency and

effective exchange of information through
defined and agreed protocols.

“This decision will serve to reinforce the
respect for personal privacy and the use of
appropriate means for cooperation among
countries.

“We believe this is in the best interest of
clients and the international financial ser-
vices industry of the Bahamas.”

The BFSB said that, like the Bahamas’
existing Tax Information Exchange Agree-
ment (TIEA) with the US, any future such
treaties would limit information exchanges
to specific requests. Client confidentiality
would be preserved through preventing
‘fishing expeditions’, and restrictions regard-
ing procedures and arrangements.

Master Technici

APPLIANCES &

ROCK-BOTTOM CLEARANCE

SALE

Over 100 items on Clearance!

climes ee ee eee eel eee

Panasonic 42” Fixed TV Wall Mount
RETO Ce Msi ec hubs

PVE TCM elma eam lc
Panasonic Home Theater System
PVT Melee |e) ee mt] col

Toshiba 27” DVD/VCR Combo TV

Aelia ae A

ites MOL (mt ltade (ee Plas
Whirlpool Gold Series 30” Black Cooktop

Whirlpool Black Microwave Hood Combo

OO Ter,

rene tt

eee ee ee ee ee eee ee ae ee
Much More To See.

Clearance items
discounted up to 33

Village Rd., Open Mon. thru Sat. 8:30am 'til $:30pm
PH: 393-5310, www. mastertechbahamas.com

eae se eee eee ere



$25.00
hier at
$227.50
eae
ee Pe
Aral

$1,200.00
Prer Um OL8)
$510.00

“Respect for the rule of law has always
been fundamental to the success and
strength of the financial services industry in
the Bahamas,” the BFSB said.

“As such, clients can be assured that the
Bahamas will only exchange information
on agreed and transparent protocols.

“These protocols, as established under
the tax information exchange agreement
with the US and recognised by the OECD,
preserve the traditional confidentiality
extended to those engaged in legitimate
business. Legislative and administrative
regimes in the Bahamas have, and will con-
tinue to have, respect for the privacy of our
clients and will preserve banking confiden-
tiality.”

Purpose

Essential Functions

projects.

customer service.

server environment.

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court.
(2) The Administrators Office at Clarence Town, Long Island.
(3) The Chambers of the undersigned.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or
right to dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall before the 30th day of April, A.D.,2009
from the publication of the notice inclusive of the day of such
publication file Notice in the Supreme Court in the City of
Nassau in the Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve
on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his or her
claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. The failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his or her claim within the time fixed by the Notice
aforesaid shall operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 25th day of February, A.D., 2009

PYFROM & CO,
Chambers
No.58, Shirley Street,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner.



PRICEVVATERHOUSE(COPERS

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) will provide technology vision and leadership in the
development and implementation of information technology (IT) programmes. He/she will
lead the planning and implementation of enterprise information systems to support business
operations and achieve more effective and cost beneficial enterprise-wide IT operations.

e Establish guidelines and programmes for effective IT management.

¢ Provide data processing services required.

¢ Recommend long and short range management information systems plans and budgets.
¢ Approve staff recommendations on major systems development and/or research

Establish strategic policy for planning, development, and design of information needs.
Research management information systems hardware and software including applicable
vendor applications, data base management, and operational control packages.

Sets policies to ensure privacy and security of data processing facilities.

Establish guidelines and programmes for effective database management utilisation.
Consult with and advise department heads on IT management needs and problems.
Demonstrate continuous effort to improve operations, decrease turnaround times,
streamline work processes, and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality

Education, Experience and Necessary Qualifications

Minimum of 3 years of experience with increasing responsibilities for management and
support of information systems and IT; direct management of a major IT operation is
preferred. Experience should also include exposure to both shared and outsourced solutions,
as well as support of in-house information and communication systems in a multi-site client-
Specific experience with financial and human resource management
information systems is a plus. Other skills required include:

¢ Familiarity with: desktop, notebook, handheld, and server computer hardware; local
and wide area network design, implementation, and operation; operating systems such
as Windows, OS/400, Unix, and Linux; and computer peripherals such as printers,
monitors, modems and other equipment.
Knowledge of office productivity software programmes such as word processing,
spreadsheet programmes, databases, and communications software.
Ability to: analyse and resolve complex issues, both logical and interpersonal; and
negotiate and defuse conflict.
Effective verbal and written communications skills and effective presentation skills, all
geared toward coordination and education.
Self-motivator, independent, cooperative, flexible and creative.

Required Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:
Requires a master’s degree in Computer Science, Business Administration or a related field or
equivalent experience. Comprehensive knowledge of:
¢ Data processing methods and procedures, and computer software systems.
Systems design and development process, including requirements analysis, feasibility
studies, software design, programming, pilot testing, installation, evaluation and
operational management.
Business process analysis and redesign.
Design, management, and operation of managed IT systems

Proven skills in: negotiating with vendors, contractors, and others; budget preparation and
monitoring; management and leadership; and communication.

Demonstrated ability to: relate to all levels of the user community; be a team player
that motivates and educates other team members; plan, implement and support systems
in a complex education environment; set and manage priorities; comprehend complex,
technical subjects; translate technical language to lay audiences; and link and apply complex
technologies to business strategies.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: CIO 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas



Private & Confidential



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST
e~










y C
Z \e
ie 4
r %

Pee

ORLANDO»















Le

— i
















o|1

on














LOW

|2



MODERATE

3|4|5



6|7

HIGH





\. HIGH

v
8|9|10

° EXT.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

. ih. on’. \ Mostly sunny and Partly cloudy and Breezy and very Periods of sun with Partly sunny with a Partly sunny. 4 1
C De ee aa breezy. breezy. warm with sunshine, winds subsiding. shower possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
"2 os @ —_— ; High: 85° High: 86° High: 85° High: 82°
< pd ¢ High: 82° Low: 71° Low: 72° Low: 74° Low: 74° Low: 74° see ERD
j Sore va lg AED EE
igh: 82° F/28° A aS [ 93°83" FF 101°-78° F A
Low: 65° F/18°C ! -. / The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ao an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:04am. 2.7 2:57am. -0.1
le @ Z @ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:18pm. 34 3:01pm. -0.1
os i » : :
\ \ a Saturd 9:44am. 26 3:40am. -0.1
a f | CO ee 40:01 p.m. 3.1 3:40pm. -0.1
2 i Z Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sinlay 27am. 26 425am. Od
| 4 m ABACO Temperature 10:47pm. 31 4:23pm. -0.1
/ LS o, 1 High: 79° F/26°C 7 aan taeg dun aeenahececunsecsevaseieateontezeeeesh ao ces ; Monday ie a.m. | a.m. ie
< e Low: 64° F/18°C Normal high sorree¢ EP
‘ , Normal low 66° F/19° C
2. sypnflaeee 3 @ WEST PALMBEACH Co. Last year's HIgh .sccccssecscecenesnnn 7 F26°C | ONT CII
: — High: 84° F/29°C Last year's lOW o..eseseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 66° F/19° C
Rie Low: 68° F/20°C Precipitation Sunrise...... 7:07 a.m. Moonrise. .... 7:25 a.m.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccsssescssseeeseeseeeee 0.00" Sunset....... 7:24 p.m. Moonset. .... 8:39 p.m.
li raphe f i Year to date 07" First Full Last New
High: 80° F/27° C @ High: 79° F/26° C Normal year to date oo... 4.89 7 i.
Low: 70° F/21°C Low: 63° F/17°C
AccuWeather.com
Ae @ Forecasts and graphics provided by Ss SN ©
“ MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr. 2 Apr. 9 Apr. 17 Apr. 24
High: 84° F/29° C 5 an 4 0 °
e~ Low: 70°F/21°C NASSAU Serre
High: 82° F/28° C aM:
Low: 71° F/22°C
@
KEY WEST Ce CATISLAND
High: 82° F/28°C High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 73° F/23°C Low:61°FA6°C
. i
a
a SAN SALVADOR
—_— é High: 81° F/27°C
; ANDROS , Low: 66° FA °C few: 63° a c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's : Oe
highs and tonights's lows. fest te
ow: 67° F/I ©
LONGISLAND
Low: 63° F/A17°C
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 83° F/28° C
FC FIC F/C FC Fic FIC FC FIC FC FC Fic FC Low: 63° F/17° C
Albuquerque 43/6 32/0 c 60/15 38/3 s Indianapolis 56/13 44/6 + 56/13 36/2 1 Philadelphia 67/19 44/6 pe 53/11 46/7 Fr
Anchorage 38/3 26/-3 c 35/1 21/6 s Jacksonville 80/26 63/17 pc 86/80 63/17 pc Phoenix 76/24 50/10 s 82/27 55/12 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 65/18 5713 + 70/21 46/7 t Kansas City 42/5 29/-1 r 39/3 -24/-4 sn Pittsburgh 6216 44/6 po 59/15 467 RAGGEDISLAND — High:86°F/s0°c
Atlantic City 57/13 42/5 po 55/12 48/8 + Las Vegas 70/21 47/8 s 78/25 538/41 s Portland,OR 58/414 42/5 c 51/10 38/3 1 High: 86° F/30° C Low: 65° F/18°C
Baltimore 66/18 45/7 pe 58/14 42/5 1 Little Rock 64/17 45/7 t 55/12 37/2 pe Raleigh-Durham 66/18 57/13 r 70/21 56/13 c Low:62°F/17°C
Boston 50/10 40/4 r+ 52/11 44/6 pc Los Angeles 76/24 50/10 s 80/26 54/12 ¢ St. Louis 50/10 39/3 Fr 45/7 32/0 +r .
Buffalo 5412 39/3 pe 5412 43/6 4+ Louisville 62/16 52/1 4+ 63/17 40/4 ¢r Salt Lake City 48/8 30/-1 pe 56/13 38/3 pc GREATINAGUA
Charleston,SC 70/21 62/16 t 78/25 60/15 pc Memphis 72/22 49/9 t 55/12 41/5 pe San Antonio 80/26 44/6 pce 76/24 41/5 s High:87° F/31°C
Chicago 46/7 36/2 + 44/6 29/-1 + Miami 84/28 72/22 s 86/30 72/22 s San Diego 74/23 52/11 = s 71/21 55/12 5 Low. 66°FA9°C
Cleveland 58/14 38/38 pe 55/12 44/6 1 Minneapolis 38/3 20/6 c 38/3 22/-5 pc San Francisco 69/20 50/10 s 64/117 49/99 s i
Dallas 64/17 37/2 c 55/12 38/3 pe Nashville 66/18 55/12 4 68/20 40/4 r Seattle 54/12 40/4 c 48/8 38/3 +
Denver 32/0 16/-8 pce 50/10 29/-1 pc New Orleans 78/25 56/13 t 61/16 46/7 1 Tallahassee 78/25 62/16 t 79/26 57/13 t
Detroit 52/11 36/2 pe 52/11 40/4 1 New York 68/20 47/8 pe 53/11 43/6 1 Tampa 82/27 68/20 s 85/29 67/19 pc
Honolulu 81/27 69/20 pc 82/27 69/20 s Oklahoma City 46/7 32/0 r 41/5 32/0 pe Tucson 67/19 42/5 s 77/25 49/9 §
Houston 79/26 49/9 t 67/19 45/7 § Orlando 84/28 66/18 s 87/30 68/20 s Washington, DC 65/18 47/8 pce 56/13 51/10 Fr

pe MN
4 ~









Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

i
PS

High
F/C
91/32
47/8
50/10
57/13
69/20
92/33
85/29
65/18
51/10
66/18
59/15
46/7
66/18
65/18
46/7
52/11
82/27
80/26
94/34
39/3
86/30
77/25
76/24
43/6
46/7
45/7
51/10
42/5
86/30
32/0
80/26
78/25
50/10
66/18
76/24
86/30
83/28
50/10
75/23
86/30
81/27
99/37
54/12
32/0
48/8
89/31
94/34
32/0
50/10
48/8
83/28
86/30
59/15
81/27
93/33
90/32
82/27
86/30
17/25
46/7
37/2
69/20
80/26
48/8
54/12
86/30
49/9
48/8
43/6
18/-7

ail

Today

Low
F/C
73/22
41/5
28/-2
45/7
59/15
78/25
75/23
50/10
39/3
50/10
42/5
37/2
62/16
48/8
37/2
33/3
64/17





sh

55/12 s

17/25
21/-6
72/22
66/18
54/12
35/1
37/2
36/2
41/5
32/0
66/18
25/-3
74/23
57/13
40/4
47/8
55/12
73/22
64/17
37/2
41
76/24
46/7
52/11
36/2
19/-7
38/3
59/15
67/19
28/-2
36/2
36/2
73/22
62/16
44/6
72/22
66/18
61/16
52/11
66/18
63/17
25/-3
32/0
61/16
70/21
39/3
36/2
73/22
41/5
43/6
36/2
12/-11

i
pc

High
F/C
92/33
45/7
45/7
61/16
71/21
94/34
84/28
61/16
53/11
63/17
67/19
45/7
70/21
64/17
45/7
59/15
88/31
73/22
96/35
35/1
88/31
83/28
70/21
42/5
45/7
48/8
42/5
47/8
86/30
36/2
84/28
79/26
56/13
56/13
78/25
85/29
85/29
52/11
61/16
86/30
76/24
75/23
55/12
36/2
43/6
88/31
98/36
36/2
45/7
49/9
83/28
83/28
59/15
83/28
96/35
89/31
82/27
82/27
79/26
52/11
41/5
71/21
72/22
53/11
50/10
86/30
47/8
61/16
47/8
33/0

Saturday
Low
F/C
69/20
39/3
27/-2
48/8
60/15
78/25
75/23
46/7
34/1
57/13
45/7
34/1
65/18
46/7
36/2
45/7
68/20
50/10
77/25
20/-6
68/20
69/20
56/13
41/5
36/2

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

36/2 Fr

35/1
35/1
68/20
30/-1
70/21
56/13
45/7
42/5
56/13
75/23
64/17
36/2
34/1
75/23
43/6
50/10
39/3
23/-5
34/1
59/15
68/20
30/-1
34/1
35/1
74/23
64/17
52/11
72/22
64/17
72/22
50/10
65/18
63/17
30/-1
34/1
60/15
66/18
39/3
39/3
74/23
36/2
46/7
39/3
14/-10

Bee wes oc mea

wn
=

C
pe
pe
r

$
i
c
r
c

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

FRIDAY, MARCH 27Th, 2009, PAGE 7B



MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Saturday: Eat 10-20 Knots 4-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F
Saturday: Eat 10-20 Knots 4-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: E at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Saturday: _E at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F



Seattle
54/40
a

76/50





PLEASANT )) Miami

84/72

Showers
T-storms



Rain Fronts
[x4 =| luimes Shown are noon positions of weather systems and tse

Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. wan

Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menge
10s -Os [JOS] 10s | 20s [0Si) 40s









a @ Pw a

Never start your
ee without us!

ies to Auto Insurance,
nber the Smart choice is
surance Management.

i eople you can trust.







hs = oy

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

Ds (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

“Hew Providence Cron an Abaco Eleuthera Exum
Tt (242) 502-6401 Tel (242) 350-3500 | Tel: (242) 367-4204 | Tel: (242) 332-0862 / Tel (242) 336-2304

ee ee



PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



TRIBUNE BUSINESS OPINION

CLICO policyholders may face a long wait

aad

ble) 8) 5) 85

FILET O' FISH












FROM page 1B

FR: the brutal reality is
that not only are CLI-
CO (Bahamas) policyholders
unlikely to recover 100 per cent
of their investments, but they
may well have to wait for some
considerable time before they
recover the bulk of whatever
percentage it is on the dollar
they ultimately collect. This is
because, in Tribune Business’s
estimation, it will take liquidator
Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez time to
unwind all CLICO (Bahamas)
investments and, in so doing,
obtain the best value for all pol-
icyholders and creditors.

Especially problematic is like-
ly to be the critical investment,
the Florida-based real estate
project known as Wellington
Preserve. This was the main
asset owned by CLICO Enter-
prises, the insurer’s Bahamas-
registered affiliate, to which it
had lent 59 per cent of its
$97.352 million in total assets
at year-end.

As Tribune Business has
repeatedly stated, Florida real
estate is among the world’s cur-
rent worst investment options,
due to the collapse of that
state’s - and, indeed, the whole
US - real estate market.
Wellington Preserve, as this
newspaper had previously
revealed, had suffered a more
than 20 per cent market decline
in 2007, falling from an
appraised $104 million in 2006
to $80.5 million at year-end
2007.

This erosion of value is likely
to have continued into 2008,
and probably 2009. What this
means is that if CLICO
(Bahamas) liquidator was to
seek a buyer and sell Welling-
ton Preserve now, he would
likely only obtain a ‘fire sale’
price.

This means the project would
be sold for a value well below
what CLICO (Bahamas) and its

Congratulations
Tredika Davis















Agent of the Month January

Carmichael Branch

We provide

Financial Solutions for Life!

Planning for Education, Mortgage, Retirement?

Give me a call... and let me design a plan
to suit your financial needs.

242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Firegert 242-357-7209 Exam 202-336-3005 lies 22-367 -Shpt

British
"th American

Paradise feels the debt burden

Allis clearly not well in Paradise.... on Paradise Island, at least.
Kerzner International’s exhortations for 2,500 non-unionised
Atlantis employees to take two weeks ‘voluntary unpaid leave’
indicates that further lay-offs remain a real possibility if the required
level of savings cannot be found elsewhere. Yet the company’s
problems are not solely attributable to the global recession.

Rather, they are due to a combination of the softening in tourism
and reduced top-line growth, and the $2.775 billion debt burden
loaded on Kerzner International in 2006, when Sol Kerzner decid-
ed to buy-out the company’s public shareholders and take it private.
In effect, the Atlantis and One & Only Ocean Club owner is being
squeezed from both ends.

Kerzner International’s senior vice-president of public affairs, Ed
Fields, not normally noted for revealing much to the Bahamian
media, for once let the proverbial ‘cat out of the bag’ when he
explained that the unpaid vacation request was made to “ensure
that the company meets its bank covenants and financial obliga-
tions.”

This indicates that while Kerzner International’s Paradise Island
operations, and those elsewhere, are still largely profitable, they are
not as profitable as they need to be - or were expected to be - when
it comes to generating cash flow/liquidity, and meeting the banking
covenants attached to the financing put together by a syndicate
headed by Goldman Sachs and Deutsche Bank.

Pressure

Among these covenants is a maximum total net debt to operat-
ing income ratio, something that is likely to be under pressure due
to the travel industry downturn’s impact on Kerzner International’s
top line.

But while the picture may not be as rosy as the one painted by
some at Kerzner International, there is no danger that the compa-
ny’s resort empire will collapse.

For a start, it is making the necessary - but tough - decisions. The
800 lay-offs announced before 2008 year-end were also critical in
keeping the company in line with its banking covenants. There is
also no secret in the fact that Atlantis was probably overstaffed, cer-
tainly when it came to 2009 anticipated business levels, and that
many of those released were considered to be the company’s least
productive workers.

While no one wants to lose out on income, and initial anger
could be strong, the 2,500 staff who have been asked to take unpaid
vacation should stop, think and look at the bigger picture. If Kerzn-
er International breaches its bank covenants, it gives the banks
an opportunity to take control, or at least start dictating terms to the
company.

If that happens, the 800 Atlantis redundancies to date could be
a ‘drop in the ocean’ compared to what the banks might order. They
will only have concern for the bottom line, unlike Kerzner man-
agement, who are all to keenly aware of the immense social and eco-
nomic responsibility they have as the nation’s largest private sector
employer. It is better to have half a loaf of bread, rather than no loaf
at all, as the saying goes. Everyone would do well to remember that
in these troubled times.



affiliates invested in it. In turn,
this would leave a gaping hole
in the balance sheet, with lia-
bilities by far exceeding assets,
and CLICO (Bahamas) in a far-
worse position than the esti-
mated existing $9 million insol-
vency. Therefore, there is every
likelihood that the liquidator
may be forced to hold the
Wellington Preserve project for
several years until the market
turns, and he can maximise
recovery for creditors. This, of
course, means that policyhold-

UGS (Bahamas) Lid. sone of thew
Caribbean. Through ur Bursitis

ar her wealthy PrVale Camits
enhancing services. Qur clien

the resources ial are availabe

ers/depositors may not see a
quick recovery of their funds.
Their frustrations will likely
be taken out on the liquidator
and the Government, but the
latter got it right in petitioning
for CLICO (Bahamas) to be
wound-up - albeit having failed
abysmally to protect the insur-
er’s clients when it should have
been taking action to stop this
eventuality four-plus years ago.
It represents a catastrophic reg-
ulatory failure, to say the least,
given that Tribune Business was

warning about the situation as
far back as 2007, as can be seen
from these former headlines.

The best hope, at least as far
as insurance policyholders are
concerned, is for their portfo-
lio to be transferred to another
Bahamian life and health insur-
er. That, though, is not a given,
and much will depend on the
overall portfolio quality.

Asset recovery may well be
difficult. The liquidator’s work
is understood to have been
made more difficult by the fact
CLICO (Bahamas) was run out
of Trinidad, where its parent,
CL Financial, took all the
important decisions. All Board
meeting minutes and accounting
records are located to the south,
Tribune Business has been told.

This, in turn, makes it difficult
for the liquidator and/or credi-
tors to take legal action against
CLICO (Bahamas) Board and
management team. CL Finan-
cial and CLICO (Bahamas)
Boards are understood to have
largely been one and the same,
meaning that if they are to hold
the directors liable, they will
have to bring legal proceedings
in Trinidad - an action fraught
with additional difficulties and
costs. Apart from ensuring
Bahamas-resident companies at
least have some Bahamas-based
directors, the Government and
regulators also need to look at
how annuities as a product are
regulated. Are they long-term,
retirement savings products, or
certificates of deposit? The lat-
ter purpose is how many
investors treated them in CLI-
CO (Bahamas) case. Should the
Central Bank regulate them?
Perhaps.

Ultimately, Tribune Business
feels the Supreme Court has lit-
tle choice but to place CLICO
(Bahamas) into liquidation,
with creditors giving Mr Gomez
time and space to do his best
on their behalf. It is to be hoped
that the court allows him to be
as transparent as possible, pub-
lishing reports on his findings
and actions on the Internet,
once filed with the Registry.

Before leaving the CLICO
(Bahamas) matter, one irony of
note. Not to rub it in, but media
reports suggested Allyson May-
nard-Gibson is a CLICO
(Bahamas) creditor. As minister
of financial services and invest-
ments from 2002-2006, she had
ultimate ministerial responsi-
bility for CLICO (Bahamas), as
the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office came under her ministry.

Word's leading financed nstitubars in the

Area Viealth Management International we look

viding them with comerehensive, value
ships wilh

wer woral relali

1 acess WBS, helping them provide a ful

range of weelih management services

In-order to strengthen our team in Nassau, wee are looking to fill the following

Posiiion

Human Resources Manager

The main responsibilities of the position holder incdude:

Define and manage strategic plans. im commection with, Compersation & Benefits, Recruitment,

Training & Development, Employee Relations and Intennational Assignment Serwices

Soret as acvis

polices and procedures

Recrui rmaraeerial are horenaniageria

Develan, retigw and execule HR processes and policies

Supenvise a small team
» Liaise and negotiate with

ntemal specialists and exter

In order to satisty Gur requirement. the apmicamts must possess:

qo management, kcal employes and International Assignees on relevant HR

atall (locally and internationally)

al service providers.

® Minimum tree years expenence in a comparable Human Resources Management position with a

leading global company (oreterak

=i

Solid international experience in a very diverse, complex an

yin the banking industry)

d dynam environment

Bachelor's degres in a rekvant discipline fram a recogaized and accredited educational matity

Proven track record as manager, leader and team player

Proven track

rd 46.4 presenter and coach.

Capability to successfully build up and foster relationships and networks.

Excellent communication, presentation and coaching skills.
Sour erect edge of M45 Office and HR software applications.

Please send your reSsurme, On tr before Aoril 151, 2009 to

UBS (Bahamas) Lid., Human Resources, P.O. Box N-7 757, Masau, Baharia

It starts with you.

bv Rm ers





Full Text
WEATHER

TRY OUR
DOUBLE
FISH FILET

The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

Pim blowin’ it

82F
71F

SUNNY AND
BREEZY

Volume: 105 No.104

HIGH
LOW





BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009



UC TT aL
assets and firm’s
Rl

Casinos in Bahama
need radical ly

Getting ready
mit ev
iil



PM’s statements on
tax transparency
‘may not prevent

a blacklisting’

Financial expert speaks out ahead
of G-20 meeting next month

New Florida gaming
legislation ‘to have
dramatic impact’
on the industry

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

CASINOS in the Bahamas will
have to undergo “radical change”
if they are to survive new com-
petitive threats, a tourism leader
warned yesterday.

Two new pieces of Florida
gaming legislation stand ready to
have a “dramatic impact” on the
future of the Bahamian industry,
he added.

President of the Bahamas
Hotel Association Robert Sands
said the industry in this country
remains “in the dark ages” at a
time when proposed upgrades to
Florida’s gambling centres in par-
ticular represent a looming threat
to the attractiveness of Bahamian
casinos in the US market.

Consequently, recommenda-
tions to modernise the Bahamian
gaming sector are set to be put
to the government by the Casino
Association, through the
Bahamas Hotel Association,
within the next week.

Mr Sands, also senior vice-pres-
ident at Bahamar, told The Tri-
bune yesterday that “time is of
the essence” when it comes to the
government’s reaction.

On Wednesday, The Florida
Senate Regulated Industries
Committee swiftly approved the
two new bills, which US com-
mentators are describing as offer-
ing a “no holds barred” expan-
sion of gambling in the state.

The editor of an industry web-

SEE page eight



ML ws Nala Se COLLIDES ih a

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE SCOOTER lies under the front of the dumptruck.

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



A COLLISION between a dumptruck and a scooter left a
man dead - his body unrecognisable due to the extent of its
injuries.

The incident, which occurred at the junction of Prospect
Ridge and John F Kennedy Drive yesterday, led to traffic
being held up for over an hour as police cleared up the scene.

According to an eyewitness who was in a car stopped
behind the Mack truck which rolled over the driver of the sil-
ver scooter, the victim pulled up on the right-hand side of the
dumptruck as it signalled to turn right on to JFK at around

SEE page eight

Brother of Wendall Jones
in Court for allegedly failing
to pay NIB contributions

VAUGHN JONES, brother
of Jones Communications CEO
Wendall Jones, is among the
latest high-profile employers to
appear in court for allegedly
failing to pay National Insur-
ance contributions, The Tribune
has learned.

National Insurance officials
confirmed that Mr Jones, own-
er of Jones Brothers Morticians,
Mount Royal Avenue,
appeared in Court 11, Nassau

SEE page eight

ONDA INSPIRE

1998 HO New BODY)

$7,500

















CEO of Global
United expects to
lose millions if
company wound up

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

GLOBAL United CEO
Jackson Ritchie said he expects
to lose hundreds and millions
of dollars in future profits if his
company is wound up today by
the government.

Continuing his push for a
meeting with the government
through Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, Mr Ritchie said he
hoped the two parties could
thrash out an agreement to save
Global United and ensure the
government and the host of oth-
er local businesses that the com-
pany owes would eventually get
their money.

Having sunk “millions and
millions” of his own money into
trying to save the company, Mr
Ritchie said: “This is all or noth-
ing. This is my 18-year-old child.
I have five, and this is the sixth

SEE page eight

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

THE prime minister's state-
ments regarding tax trans-
parency and information
exchange may not be enough
to avoid a potential blacklist-
ing that may come out of an
upcoming meeting of the G-20
nations in London next
month, a financial expert said
yesterday.

Raymond Winder, manag-
ing partner of prominent
accounting firm Deloitte and
Touche, is hopeful the recent
announcement was enough to
ward off any negative actions
by the two parties but thinks
immediate action by the
Bahamas is needed to validate
the country's stance.

"I would like to hope and
believe that it (the prime min-
ister's announcement) would
put us in good standing (with
the G-20 nations). It would be
unfair that after we made this





KEVIN ANTHONIO FLOWERS
: claims police officers beat him.

Innocent man
claims he was
brutally beaten
_ by police officers

: 7 By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

? turns to brutally beat him,

? putting him in fear for his life,

Kevin Anthonio Flowers,

SEE page 11



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

) (ST ANI DIS? TG)

DING NEWSPAPER

announcement to still put us
on the blacklist but you can't
say 100 per cent it won't hap-
pen, but I would like to
believe that that would be suf-
ficient.

“And I think the Bahamas
will have to show good faith
by immediately beginning the
process with some countries,"
Mr Winder told The Tribune
yesterday.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham announced
Wednesday that the country
has had a number of requests
for the country to enter into
tax information exchange
agreements.

He said the country was
now prepared to consider
these requests on a case-by-
case basis. At present, the
country has only one Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ment (TIEA) with the United
States.

The agreements have been
criticised by some as being
beneficial to one side - the

SEE page 11

Business manager
assaulted, kidnapped
and forced to help in

robbery of workplace

: ml By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE manager of a well-

i known Nassau business was
? assaulted, kidnapped from his
? home and forced to help masked
? men rob his workplace before
i being left bound with a tele-
? phone cable, according to police.

The shocking scenario unfold-

: ed in broad daylight on Wednes-
: day, at around 5.30pm, when the
Tyre Empire employee arrived at
i his home off Eastern Road.

Police and Tyre Empire pro-

i prietor Henderson Burrows both
: believe it is possible that the

? criminals involved knew the vic-

AN INNOCENT man } tim and his routine.

: claims police officers took }

It was moments after he

? arrived home that the man was

; ? accosted by three masked and
: after he was arrested without ;

; ? armed men, dressed all in black.
? reason. :

He was gun-butted and kicked,

and forced to drive with the men

; 22, maintains he was hand- # jn his own car to the Chesapeake

? cuffed and held at Arawak

Cay Police Staaom while sey ? Road business before being told

: to unlock the company safe.

SEE page eight


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Mistreatment claims probe expected to end soon

Dion Foulkes waiting for final report
into Chinese workers’ allegations

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

WORKERS
stage their
protest
against their
employer
this week.



“I have not received
the report but we've
spoken to the
employer and we are
trying to verify some
of the things that he
has said to us, but
until I get the final
report I don't want to
make a public
statement.”
ESSERE

Dion Foulkes

mg By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Labour Dion
Foulkes said he expects the inves-
tigation into claims by Chinese
workers of alleged mistreatment
at the hands of a local construc-
tion firm to be completed shortly.

Yesterday, Mr Foulkes declined
to make a statement on the
Department of Labour’s investi-
gation until he has seen the final
report. About two dozen Chinese
workers contracted by the con-
struction firm E R Hanna to
rebuild the T G Glover Primary
School protested against alleged
mistreatment by their employer
on Wednesday.

The group staged a similar
protest earlier this month which
prompted the ongoing investiga-
tion, Mr Foulkes said yesterday.

"I have not received the report
but we've spoken to the employer
and we are trying to verify some
of the things that he has said to us,
but until I get the final report I
don't want to make a public state-
ment,” the minister said.

However, he assured The Tri-
bune that the Department of
Labour was treating the case “as a
matter of urgency.”

Meanwhile, Director of Immi-
gration Jack Thompson told The
Tribune yesterday that as far as
he was aware the group's work
permits were still valid.

On Wednesday, E R Hanna

DCAM MOU Cs



representative Tameka Hanna
said the company will move to
have the group’s permits revoked
because, according to her, they
violated their contract when they
stopped working on March 3,
2009.

Earlier this month Mr Thomp-
son told another daily the work-
ers’ permits were valid until June
2009.

He said yesterday that the cur-
rent problem between the work-
ers and the company is not an
immigration issue, but rather a
matter for the Department of
Labour. During the protest, the
group of about two dozen men
alleged — through an interpreter —
that the company owes them
months of back pay, that they are
not provided with sufficient food
supplies, that drinking water is
not provided at the site and that
their rights are being violated.

They also claimed they are
threatened with deportation

whenever they complain about
their working conditions.

Speaking to The Tribune after
Wednesday's protest, company
operations manager Tameka Han-
na dismissed all the allegations.
She claimed that E R Hanna had
paid what was owed to the work-
ers and that any discrepancy lay
with an international company —
the workers are paid through an
agency in China which E R Han-
na has a contract with.

Ms Hanna also dismissed claims
of insufficient food and mistreat-
ment, and said for the past two
years the workers were ade-
quately housed in a company
facility, fed three times a day and
that fresh drinking water is avail-
able at the site.

After the protest, the compa-
ny had discussions with an inde-
pendent translator, four of the
protesters and a representative
from the agency in China, The
Tribune was told.

It is understood that the Chi-
nese workers were given several
offers which they reportedly
refused. Yesterday, the translator
for the group said their agency in
China has not verified any receipt
of their wages.

He said the men do not want to
continue working for the compa-
ny, but are not prepared to leave
the country without being paid.
Attempts to reach company attor-
ney Oswald Isaacs and Ms Hanna
for an update were unsuccessful
up to press time yesterday.

FORMER GOVERNOR GENERAL

Sir Orville Turnquest pays

respects to MP for Long Island

James Knowles yesterday at the
House of Assembly.

ee

~ R&B BOAT YARI
| oa



~ Full-Service
Synchro-Lift

THE body of former mem- later Ragged Island for 25 be held today at 11am at the



Catamarans up to 70 ft, LOA
up to 40 tons

Railway
Boats up to 90 ft.LOA
up to 120 tons

ber of parliament James “Jim-
my” Knowles was laid in state
at the House of Assembly yes-
terday morning.

Mr Knowles represented
the people of Long Island and

years, and served as a Cabi-
net minister in the first FNM
government.

The Cabinet Office
announced that an official
funeral for Mr Knowles will

Christ Church Cathedral on
George Street.

Rev Father Crosley
Walkine and Archdeacon Kei-
th Cartwright will officiate,
assisted by Father Michael

up to 28ft. beam
gras Gittens.

Private

A private ceremony of
interment will follow at St
Anne’s cemetery, Fox Hill.

The deceased is survived by
his widow Amarylis, daughter
Kimberly, sons James Jr and
Roman, and his mother Agnes
Knowles.

Mr Knowles died at his
home last Saturday following
a four-year battle with cancer.
He had been diagnosed with
melanoma.

The Free National Move-
ment has suspended all politi-
cal activities until March 28
out of respect for Mr Knowles.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and other Cabinet
ministers, parliamentarians,
party officers, members and
supporters will be in atten-
dance at the funeral.

MARINE HARDWARE SUPPLIES
Second to None
in the Bahamas:
* Full line of Pettit Products
Interlux
Rust-oleum
Awigrip
«Fram & Racor Filters
and : Cutlass Bearings
the things you don't plan on: « Fiberglass Accessories
« In-water Prop/Shaft/Rudder « Zincs
Repairs *Anti-fouling paints still not
Vessel Repairs & Recovery _—_ available in the U.S.

the things you plan on:
* Boat Bottom Maintenance
* Welding & Fabrication on
Stainless Steel, Steel &
Aluminum

ac

A Wew EEL ee

* Fiberglass Construction &
Repair

lai}
BUTTERFLY

SHRIMP

ua He

PH:242~-333-44629 EXTERMINATORS

FX:242-333-4249
rmbboatyard@gmail.com

P.O. Box EL-27413
Spanish Wells, Bahamas

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157




THE TRIBUNE



Police
shooting
victim
identified

THE man shot by police in
Pride Estates on Sunday night
has been identified as Renald
Jean Charles, 21.

Police maintain officers shot
to kill when Charles pointed his
firearm at them after a high-
speed car chase from Fire Trail
Road, which led to a dead end
street in a remote area of Pride
Estates. The car chase ensued
when a concerned citizen called
police to say the driver of a
white Cadillac had hit his car on
John F Kennedy Drive and then
sped off sometime after 9pm on
Sunday. Police caught up with
the Cadillac in Fire Trail Road
and pursued it at high speed
until the car stopped in Allen
Drive, Pride Estates.

The driver and Charles got
out of the car and Charles
pulled out a gun to start shoot-
ing, police say.

The officers returned fire,
fatally wounding him in the
upper torso. Police officers were
not injured in the fire fight.

The driver escaped and police
have launched an island-wide
manhunt.

GB resort

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter



A MOTHER accused of caus-
ing the death of her newborn
baby, which was discovered in a
field near a church on Soldier
Road last December, was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court
yesterday.

Stacia Rolle,19, alias Stacia
Adderley, of Windsor Place
Road, was arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court One, Bank Lane, charged
with concealment of a body of a
child.

According to court dockets,

Rolle on Wednesday, December
10, 2008, with the intent to con-
ceal birth, caused the death of a
child.

The dead infant was reported-
ly discovered by a resident of the
neighbourhood near the Church
of God on Soldier Road. It was
believed the baby may have been
born only hours before its body
was discovered. When police
arrived at the scene they found
one of the fingers on the baby’s
hand and one of the feet had
been mutilated. Police also dis-
covered what appeared to be
fresh blood on pieces of clothing.

Rolle, who was dressed in a

white T-shirt and blue jeans, was
not represented by an attorney
at the arraignment. When asked
by the magistrate whether she
understood the charge against
her, Rolle replied: “No.” Magis-
trate Gomez explained that the
charge meant that she had con-
cealed the body of the child after
she gave birth.

When asked by the magistrate
to enter a plea, Rolle hesitated,
then responded: “Guilty.” The
accused was remanded to Sandi-
lands Rehabilitation Centre for
psychological evaluation. Rolle is
oo back in court on April

Caters eritise iste linked
to economic development

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SECURITY in Haiti has
improved, but so long as this does
not translate into economic devel-
opment and jobs, the level of
Haitian migration to the Bahamas
will not decrease, according to



FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Mother accused of
causing newborn baby’s
death appears in court

a ke

Galleria Oe

he Mall-at-"Lanat hen
BCX OFFRCE OPENS AT 10-00. DAILY

EFFECTIVE MARCH 27th, 2009

movers AUENS new | 5 [a5 | | 6 [a0 [10s |
I Oo
THE HADNTNGINCOMMECTCAT yew [etd | R40 | NA [ 610 [895 |
po [a [ae ef
uovevouuan ee [0 a0 [fos
aceTowncnwountum —w_| eso | | NA | eco [as [oo |
LastwOUSEONTHELET | 06 [x20 | WA_| eas | 220 [10040 |
arcane | etn [ik | 00 | rn | ks |

sumeeTGHTER | eto [ag || tet | as [1045 |
TER PERRYSMADEAGOESTOUWL 7 | 108 | nao [WA | gas | 90 fross |

ramen ic | ets | nao [| ets [a0 fr

the Haitian Ambassador to the
Bahamas. Haiti continues to reel
from the devastation wrought by

hoasts

Ramon Espinosa/AP Photo



occupancy
rate of 80
per cent

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

WHILE most hotels on
Grand Bahama are struggling to
keep afloat, at least one resort is
beating the odds with an occu-
pancy rate close to 80 per cent
for the first three months of
2009.

All-inclusive resort Viva Club
Fortuna, which has a capacity of
276 rooms, is consistently
attracting visitors through
heavy advertising in the United
States and Europe, as well as by
offering charter flights from
Europe to the island.

Consistent

Despite the turbulent Grand
Bahama economy, the resort's
first quarter occupancy rate has
remained consistent, according
to general manager Roberto
Paresce.

"The occupancy the first
quarter is averaged at a 78 per
cent. This is on line with the
same period of last year," he
told The Tribune by email.

Starting May 7 the resort —
which Mr Paresce said attracts
families looking for a value-
based all inclusive product — is
anticipating the launch of a
direct charter flight from
France.

The new route will be the first
direct flight from France to
Freeport, he said.

“We do most of our market-
ing in USA but we also invest a
lot to market in Europe — we
have the French charter that
will come directly to Freeport
starting May 7 and the Italian
charter coming on July and
August like every year".

He said the resort has to
adjust its staff numbers due to
Grand Bahama's soft economy
— which was hard hit by back-to-
back hurricanes even the eco-
nomic downturn took root — but
is confident it can retain its high
occupancy level through quality
service.

"Even though, the economy
we are faced with is very chal-
lenging, we minimised our staff
and were still able to offer our
guests quality service, and 'wow'
them enough to want to come
back to our resort.

“We have kept our good rela-
tionships with tour operators in
different markets, and we've
been able to bring several char-
ters to Grand Bahama during
our history.

“Tf we continue to give our
customers quality service, I
think we will be able to contin-
ue high occupancy in spite of
the difficult tume Grand
Bahama and the entire
Bahamas is experiencing at this
time," said Mr Paresce.

Lenten Reflections
session tonight

THE Bahamas Anglican
Cursillo Movement will be
hosting a Lenten Reflections
session at St Anne's Parish,
Fox Hill Road tonight at
7.30pm. The public is invited
to attend.

a series of major hurricanes last
year, which caused massive flood-
ing, dislocation and an estimated
billion dollars of damage.

The country’s already fragile
infrastructure and agricultural
sector took a serious beating and
residents are still struggling
months later to remove huge
mounds of mud created by the
flooding.

Ambassador Harold Joseph, in
an interview from the Haitian
Embassy in Nassau, said: “Right
now in Haiti the situation is bet-
ter. In terms of security, we have
less crime, less kidnapping, and
the UN is pleased with the situa-
tion, but now what we need to do
is we need to translate that
progress in the security field to
the economic field.”

Mr Joseph noted that it is “very
encouraging” that a small number
of Haitian police officers have
been asked to take up posts with
the UN security forces in Chad,
Africa. However, with the global
economy still trending down-
wards, the troubled nation will
likely not receive as much assis-
tance towards building its econo-
my as could have been the case.
Several UN appeals for $108 mil-
lion in assistance after the hurri-
canes elicited a lukewarm
response from the international
community. The government will
try again at a Haiti donors con-
ference in Washington in April,
where it will be seeking $3 bil-
lion for a poverty-reduction plan.

This comes at a time when the
country has been hit by an esti-
mated 10 per cent drop in remit-
tances from Haitian nationals liv-

A BOY makes his way with his bicycle in the slum of Cite Soleil, in Port-

au-Prince, Friday, March 20, 2009.

ing abroad, who have typically
worked assiduously to save up
and send home funds to their
struggling relatives — equivalent in
recent times to a third of the
country’s gross domestic product.

“We are living in a very diffi-
cult time with the economic crisis.
I think the migrant situation for
the time being will stay the same,”
said Mr Joseph.

Repatriated

This month the Department of
Immigration revealed that it has
repatriated 1,204 Haitian nation-
als who illegally attempted to
enter the Bahamas since the start
of 2009 alone. They made up the
bulk of a total of 1,340 illegal
immigrants returned to their
countries of citizenship.

Mr Joseph and Minister of
State for Immigration Branville
McCartney met last week at the
Immigration Department.

The ambassador said the two
had a “very good discussion about
the migrant situation” with Mr
McCartney expressing the view
that the Department of Immigra-
tion will be “pleased to regularise
the status of Haitian migrants
who are qualified to be in the
country, but those who are not
qualified should go back to
Haiti.”

Mr Joseph lamented yesterday
that an agreement outlining a
framework for greater co-opera-
tion between the Bahamas and
Haiti, negotiated under the for-

Murder accused attacks credibility
Of the prosecution's star witness

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

MURDER accused Jamal Glinton yesterday attacked the credibil-
ity of the prosecution’s star witness in the Keith Carey trial, telling
jurors that he is not a murderer.

Glinton, who along with Dwight Knowles and Sean Brown, is
charged in the armed robbery and murder of businessman Keith
Carey, 43, told jurors yesterday that he does not know his co-accused.

In an unsworn statement from the prisoner’s dock, Glinton ques-
tioned why Vaughn Carey - a cousin of the deceased and witness in this
case - had “set up” the businessman and waited three years to come for-
ward to reveal how the murder took place.

Glinton denied that he and his co-accused had a conversation regard-
ing the murder in the exercise yard of Her Majesty’s Prison, as Vaughn
Carey had previously testified.

Vaughn Carey, who was charged with conspiracy to commit armed
robbery before he became a witness for the Crown, had testified that
while at Her Majesty’s Prison he had a conversation with his co-
accused during which Knowles allegedly said that Glinton had shot
Carey. Glinton told the jury yesterday that that conversation never hap-
pened. He admitted to the jurors that he had sold marijuana, but said,
“T’m no murderer.”

Knowles then went on to attack the credibility of another prosecu-
tion witness, Mervin Benson, claiming that he and Benson never had
a conversation regarding $80,000 he had allegedly given to someone to
keep for him. Knowles denied knowing his co-accused telling the jury,
“I don’t know these fellas.”

He claimed that he suffers from “the fits” and told the jury that he
was slapped several times by police while at the Central Detective Unit.
He also claimed that a plastic bag was placed over his head which result-
ed in him having “fits.”

Glinton’s attorney Craig Butler in opening his client’s defence said
that the prosecution wants the jurors to draw inferences as they had no
physical or scientific evidence connecting the accused to the crime.

The trial into the February 2006 murder of businessman Keith
Carey began on February 15 before Justice Jon Isaacs.

Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight Knowles are charged with
the murder as well as armed robbery and conspiracy to commit armed
robbery. Keith Carey was shot and killed on the steps of the Bank of
the Bahamas on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway before he was able
to deposit $40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Station, which he
operated. Deputy director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel,
Stephanie Pintard, Anthony Delaney and Lennox Coleby are prose-
cuting the case. Attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis are rep-
resenting Jamal Glinton, attorney Dorsey McPhee is representing
Sean Brown and attorney Perry Albury is representing Dwight
Knowles.

mer PLP administration prior to
the ousting of former Haitian
President Jean Bertrand Aristide,
has not been signed.

“Unfortunately in February
2004, Aristide left and we did not
have a good chance to sign the
agreement. Now in the meantime
you have new government in the
Bahamas...” said Mr Joseph.

The ambassador said that he
feels that more dialogue on the
migration issue “could be prof-
itable to both countries.”

“Migration is not a bad thing
per se, if both governments sit
together and establish a continu-
ous dialogue,” he said.

er AEE Peay

[WETS ATS

AW GALLERIA NEM AS

ners waves —wew] 10 [0 [| WA | eve [ as] sa
rat vane WW a [40 [WA | eat |e] eas

et WA_| G18 | a0 | tas

118 | ad Wi |) Sto | a0! dena
[J

380-FLIX



THE CARIBBEAN GOSPEL MUSIC

MARLIN

—-AWARDS—

MARLIN AWARDS 2009
SUNDAY MARCH 297 @ 7PM

The Diplomat Center Carmichael Road

TICKETS:

$25 in advance ° $30 at the Door « VIP $40

Hosted by: Jamie Thomas (Tempo “Rise & Shine”)
DRESS CODE: Formal

TICKET OUTLETS:

e 100% Bible & Gift Shop (Marathon Mall & Madeira Street) * Juke Box (Marathon Mall)
e Faith Life Book & Music Center (Carmichael Road) ¢ Bucks Gospel (Wulff Road)

¢ The Christian Bookshop (Rosetta Street)

e Logos Book Store (Harbour Bay Shopping Center)

Cotre ee
ol

Paaraarnartl ws Mord

C08 5 REALTT


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Judge Lyons’ conduct questioned

JUDGING by the heated chatter on a radio
talk show yesterday morning, the public is not
only alarmed, but angered by the conduct of a
judge in what can only be called the A, B, C,D
“and others” case. The case carries the name of
no person, because, for some mysterious reason,
it has been sealed and the names of plaintiffs
and defendants are anonymously represented to
the public by the first four letters of the alpha-
bet.

In addition to the buzz on the radio stations,
the National Jubilee Coalition, headed by Bish-
op Simeon Hall with executives Dr Philip
McPhee and Dr Keith Russell, has called for a
public investigation. Anyone, said their state-
ment, associated with the judicial system should
be “beyond the slightest reproach.” The Coali-
tion demanded an appropriate investigation
into Senior Justice John Lyons’ decision in the
“A,B,C,D,” case.

“Any hint that a sitting judge might be com-
promised in anyway warrants the appropriate
attention and investigation,” said the Coalition.

This case — a partnership operated between
1992 and 2000 had been dissolved. Now in con-
tention was the 50-50 distribution of the profits
from that partnership between A and B. Senior
Justice Anita Allen observed that the case had
“already been in the system longer than it ought
to have due mainly to the resignation of the
first accountant appointed by the court and
more recently to the sudden recusal of the judge
(Justice John Lyons) who had carriage of the
matter.”

Justice Lyons had charge of the case up to
September 2008 when he “recused” himself
because, he said, he had no time to hear it. The
parties were left to find another judge.

A preliminary issue was whether the incom-
plete accounts of the second court appointed
accountant should be approved as the parties
did not agree the report. She invited the litigants
to make some concessions on this point “to
move the matter along.” One of the litigants
disagreed and invited her to recuse herself from
the case, citing bias. The senior judge denied
bias and refused recusal. As a result the matter
has been moved to the Court of Appeal —
where we shall leave it without further obser-
vation.

Daniel Ferguson, was appointed the second
accountant for the litigants on October 27, 2007
by Justice Lyons who instructed him that the
balancing payment was “by nature a forensic
accounting and you should put together the
best team you can. They have kept records, it is
a reconciliation of their records we need.”

Upon cross-examination it was discovered

Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED
CARS & TRUCKS

that Mr Ferguson qualified as a Certified Pub-
lic Accountant in 1985, but his forensic account-
ing was limited to only two cases in his whole
career. He also admitted, that the last auditing
experience he had was before he became qual-
ified as an accountant. He agreed he had never
certified an account.

It was revealed that he was appointed to a
job that required a highly skilled forensic
accountant for which he was being paid £500 per
hour at an exchange rate just over $2 to the £,
which when converted was about $1,000 per
hour. He said he worked an average of 50 hours
which amounted to $50,000 a week or about
$2.5 million per year for the work, which at
that point he had not completed. The integrity
of his report was in question.

Baffled as to how Mr Ferguson could have
been appointed for this specialised work, one of
the counsel told the court that Mr Justice Lyons
“had literally forced the appointment on them,
threatening to walk out of court if they did not
agree to the appointment.” At one point the
judge got up to leave “when counsel begged
him to have a seat. The judge was asked by one
counsel if it was an ultimatum to which he
responded ‘you bet it is.”

It then transpired through questioning that
the accountant’s sister had a relationship with
the judge and that in fact she was on her broth-
er’s team to do the work for the court. “It was
only then,” said Justice Allen, “that I made the
connection between the accountant and infor-
mation, which was in the public domain for
sometime, that the judge had more than a
friendship with a woman, who up to that point
I did not know was the accountant’s sister.”

At this point we would like to know why
this case was sealed, and who is attempting to
hide what from the public?

The tradition of our judicial system is that
justice must not only be done, but must be seen
to be done. And so litigation is settled behind
closed doors and out of public view in very lim-
ited cases — matters of national security, and
those involving children and mental cases.

The case now before the court is a commer-
cial matter. Why is the information sealed?
What is being hidden behind “A,B,C,D, and
others” and why?

Our judicial system is in such bad odour
that we agree that not only should this case be
opened, but that there should be an investiga-
tion into Judge Lyons’ decision on the appoint-
ment of the accountant.

Justice Anita Allen is to be congratulated for
bringing what appears to be an unsavoury situ-
ation into public view.



Robbery of
our guests
has to stop

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Dear Mr Marquis

The Tribune brings problems
to the public attention so well, I
am asking you to bring one
more item to the people.

I’m talking about the way we
rob our guests, through high
priced food and drink, with
mandatory maximum tips for
poor service. It all starts at the
front desk, mandatory tips for
maids and bellmen.

Thad a cousin from the states
visit, he stayed on Cable Beach,
he had only one bag and car-
ried it to his room himself, a
day later I picked him up he
was looking over his bill and
asked about a five dollar tip for
the bellman that he never even
saw.

The girl at the front desk told
him he must pay the tip whether
or not he used the bellman, she
then mentioned that he was
only charged tip for the maid
as a single occupant, he
informed her this was no favour
as I was only picking him up,
he was alone. Can you imagine
that the mandatory tip for the
maid goes up according to the
number of people in the room,
even though she still only has
to clean the bath and room
once. What happened to a maid
cleaning simply because that is
her job. Now a maid, with no
education or other skills, can
make more money than a col-
lege graduate! How does this
encourage our youth to succeed
in life, when you can clean a

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



bathroom, make a bed and
make more money than an edu-
cated person. Being a bellman
that doesn’t even have to lift a
bag and still make a tip!

My spouse and I, on occasion,
go to the Marina Village for a
walk and stop and have a drink.
We enjoy visiting with the
tourists and answer questions,
tell them places to visit, etc. The
main complaint, the high cost
of coming to the Bahamas. We
recently had a drink with a cou-
ple from England, with three
children. They had just spent
over $600 on dinner. Not only is
the price of dinner outrageous,
but over $90 of this bill was a
tip! When is the last time any of
us gave a waiter a $90 tip? Asa
matter of fact the tip attached to
our drinks was almost two dol-
lars each. Can anyone besides
us, think this is just taking a cru-
el advantage of our much need-
ed tourist?

How many Bahamians would
go to Miami or other destina-
tions if we were given this same
treatment? We have the option
of going out for a cocktail or
stay at home, but as a tourist,
you have no choice, pay up or
go hungry. For a country that
has little to offer a guest other
than food or drink, shouldn’t
we be thinking on a different

level? Eat, drink and be merry,
until you get your bill. This
same couple took their family to
the breakfast buffet, which
totalled over $140, for break-
fast, come on and again the
same problem a mandatory tip,
for serving themselves!

How long can we allow the
union leaders ruin our tourism,
just for temporary wealth, for
unskilled workers? With the
large amount of our economy
and work force depending on
tourism, you’d think these
resorts and restaurants would
start treating our guests, the
same way they are treated else-
where. Everyone knows how
much food and drinks cost any-
where else in the world, do we
want to have the reputation of
being thieves?

We need to look at our guests
as people we want to come
back, tell everyone how great
it is here, and recommend us to
everyone.

With the Internet, everyone
“blogging”, the rule of thumb
is, you upset one person, 3,000
people read about it. Our Min-
istry of Tourism and the larger
resorts pay outrageous amounts
of money to bring tourists here,
but then we ruin it with poor
service, mediocre food and high
prices with a maximum tip
attached. Sun, sea and sand is
everywhere, we need to offer
more.

MRS THOMPSON
Nassau,
March 24, 2009.

Urgent need for a new
Bahamas land policy

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In the name of “develop-
ment”, the birthrights of the
Bahamian masses were sacri-
ficed on the altar of greed,
even before my birth in 1936.
Of course, Bahamians were
British subjects, then.

Of particular interest to this
writer, is my birthplace,
Inagua, where the Inagua
Tramway and Salt Company
(ITSCO-my abbreviation) was
formed in 1865, the year of
my paternal grandmother’s
birth. Successors to ITSCO
are eg West India Chemicals
Company (The Ericksons),
Morton International (Mor-

DON STAINTON |
PROTECTION Lia.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

For the best deal in town on

pre-owned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

TOP QUALITY TEMPERED
ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

ton Salt) and now, Morton
Bahamas with its parent,
Rohm and Haas.

Thousands of acres of
Bahamian land are vested in
the above even though there is
no equitable on-going devel-
opment for the benefit of this
generation.

Ditto for Freeport and West
Grand Bahama, and, of
course, other Bahamian
islands.

A system persists where
Bahamians are mendicants for
a “piece of the rock” in our
Bahamas, whether such is for
joint venturing or to otherwise
benefit Bahamians.

Allegations of “Bahamian
Land Giveaways” were hot
topics in the 2007 general elec-
tions to the extent, the FNM
edged out the PLP to bring
about a change in govern-
ment.

My own focus was sharp-
ened recently, as I watched
the TV programme “Bahami-
an At Sunrise” broadcast from
Inagua. My dearest mother,
Mrs Inez Farquharson, 94
years young participated in
the broadcast.

In recent memory, many of
our Caribbean and Latin
America neighbours and, of
course, African nations, eg
Zimbabwe and South Africa
were prime examples of land
policy gone awry, many of

lives were lost, and are still
being lost in Darfur and other
hot spots in Africa.

There is therefore, the
inescapable reality for the
urgent need for a new
Bahamas land policy via an
institutionalised legislative
process for direct Bahamian
benefit, as opposed to political
manipulation where Bahami-
ans continue to be used as
pawns in the dehumanising
game of “quid pro quo” and
subterfuge, where the “tail
wags the dog”, if you know
what I mean!

Any new Land Policy ought
to be in tandem with election
finance legislation, and so
packaged to form part of the
overall educational curricu-
lum, allowing students in
Inagua and other Bahamian
islands to do research and
appreciate their true heritage
as opposed to enduring insults
to their integrity; such insults
as the renaming of Lake Rosa
to Lake Windsor after a failed
Royal or, certain Freeport
High Schools named after pre-
tenders disguised as benefac-
tors.

ETIENNE L
FARQUHARSON
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,
March, 2009.

IN STOCK!

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
enq06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
(yep (06 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘02 SUZUKI XL-7 :
‘(07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 5dr See
‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK is :
‘05 TOYOTA COROLLA | )
sales

» QUALIT
nT LIMITED

#1 AUTO DEALER IM THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Yat our shorercom ai Geol fy dato Soho | Preecord Lid for dedor deole, Geseers Hey, 32-o077
a dboce Motor Moll. Don MocKap Bed, Bo?-2 91S

FOR SALE

WELL ESTABLISHED
FURNITURE &
APPLIANCE BUSINESS.

SERIOUS INQUIRIES

ONLY
CALL #425-8075
FOR FURTHER INFO

D

Free Estimates

| WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL! |
L Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 |

auto


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



parliamentarians
in ‘the world's top
30 political beauties’

NONE of the Bahamas’
women parliamentarians has
made it into the top 50 “polit-
ical beauties” in the world, a
poll has revealed.

Peruvians took the top two
places, with a Mexican and
Italian in third and fourth
places.

But the Bahamas was left
out in the cold in an online
poll which highlighted “beau-
tiful” politicians from more
than 30 countries.

Among those in the top 50
were Americans Sarah Palin
and Hillary Clinton — and
the stunning French socialist
Segolene Royal.

But all were well down the
list, with Palin at 24, Royal at
36 and 61-year-old Clinton —
the oldest woman mentioned
— at 34.

Politicians from
Afghanistan, Spain, Indone-
sia, Angola, China, Iceland
and Finland were among
those listed.

m@ CORRECTION

THE Tribune story enti-
tled ‘Highest honour for :
Bahamian student’ published ;
on Wednesday, March 25, }
inaccurately reported :
William Saunders III piloted :
a plane at age 16 when for- ;
mer US presidents Ronald
Reagan and George Bush Sr
visited the school.

However, William Saun-
ders, otherwise known as
‘AJ’, piloted a plane for a
flyover for General Flanna-

Couple on Crooked

Island: what recession?

Frugal living in ‘the
best place on earth’

m By JOHN MARQUIS

WHILE everyone in Nassau
worries about the credit crunch,
the economic downturn and the
depressed property market, a
sprightly Canadian couple living
the good life on Crooked Island
are asking: What recession?

Donald and June MacMillan,
who moved on to the island in
1965, say that with living costs a
mere $400 a month - that’s right,
$100 per week - the word “reces-
sion” means no more to them than
the current state of the Japanese

en.

“When I watch TV at night, I
realise how glad I am to be living
on Crooked Island,” Mr MacMil-
lan, 78, said from his seafront home
at Pittstown Point.

“The word ‘recession’ doesn’t
mean a whole lot down here, not
when living costs are about $400 a
month (excluding taxes, of course)
and there are so few places to
spend any money.”

It’s true that the bonefishing
business is down this year, with
fewer Americans and Canadians
flying in for their annual sport, but
when life is lived so frugally, and
contentedly, there’s not a lot that
greedy international moneymen
can do to make you sleep less eas-
ily at night.

“We spend $115 a time to
replace our propane gas tank, and
I need gas to get around in my vehi-
cle, but other than that and our

food supply, there’s not much to
spend money on here,” he said.

Mr MacMillan, a former film
industry executive, fell in love with
Crooked Island during the early
1960s. It didn’t take long for he and
his wife to make it a winter home,
an escape from the ice and slush
of the north.

Since 1993, they have lived on
the island year-round, venturing
back to Canada only on occasional
visits, and enduring the 85 per cent
summer humidity with good grace
even after other perspiring foreign
residents have flown out in search
of cooler air.

“T can actually sit here and hear
my things rusting in Crooked
Island, the humidity is so high,” he
said, “but we love it here. The more
aware you become of what’s hap-
pening in the outside world, the
gladder you are to be living in a
place like this.”

During a recent medical check, a
Canadian doctor told Mr MacMil-
lan: “I don’t know what you’re
doing, but whatever it is it’s good
for you.”

Plenty of fish hauled out of the



nearby sea, and ample fruit and
vegetables grown on their patch of
land ensure that the MacMillans
eat the kind of fare that doctors
recommend.

“There is no fast food down
here,” he said, “We catch tuna,
wahoo, mackerel, snapper, mahi-
mahi, muttonfish, you name it. And
we have a garden where we grow
plenty of our food.

Mailboat

“We buy things, too, of course,
and bring in supplies on the mail-
boat, but you can live well here
without the expense of city life.

“After all, who needs suits and
ties in Crooked Island? I wear jeans
and sweatshirt most of the time,
and there’s no impulse buying here
- you just buy what you need, noth-
ing more.”

Apart from running a tiny hard-
ware store from a metal container
outside his home (mornings only),
Mr MacMillan fills his time by
“pottering about” (his term) and
wood-carving, a hobby he took up
recently.

Call for Animal Protection
and Control Act to be law



“T don’t earn enough from the
store to buy a stick of gum, but it
keeps my head turning over and
enables me to meet people every
day. It’s therapy, not a business,” he
said.

With a total population of 248,
and 38 second homes owned main-
ly by North Americans, Crooked
Island isn’t exactly overrun with
humanity.

But he said social life is thriving,
with couples taking turns to host
dinner at their homes, and the local
taverns alive with noise as Crooked
Islanders debate the issues of the
day.

“There’s not a single security bar
in Crooked Island,” he said, “when
we go out we leave the doors open.
Things are very congenial here. We
get along very well.”

The MacMillans’ idyllic existence
is proof that opportunities exist on
the islands for Bahamians stressed-
out by urban living to live agreeably
in communities where mortgages
and credit cards don’t mean a lot.

One man recently took advan-
tage of a government crown land
scheme by starting a fruit farm,
producing limes, bananas, Cali-
fornian oranges and tangerines.
Some Bahamian retirees are also
choosing island life because they
can get by more comfortably on a
limited pension.

“T think more Bahamians living
in Nassau are looking to their fam-
ihes’ home islands for their retire-
ment,” said Mr MacMillan.

“Here they can get away from
the crime and congestion. And
money goes much, much further.”

Though the island’s limited hol-
iday trade is noticeably down this
year, mainly because Americans
are spending less to get through
the current crisis, projects are
underway to boost business for the
future.

Cameron McRae, who owns the
Bojangles restaurant chain in the
United States, is developing a bou-
tique hotel for upscale foreigners at
Pittstown.

Last week, he completed a 3,500-
foot runway for private fliers and is
hoping to sell home lots equipped
with individual hangars for those
who want to make Crooked Island
their Bahamas base.

With amenities improving all the
time - you can even get the Internet
nowadays - Crooked Island is not
quite as remote as it used to be.

Foreclosures

Satellite TV is on hand to remind
residents what they’re missing in
the great recession-hit world out-
side - the home foreclosures, the
Bernie Madoffs, the avaricious
bankers and huge credit debts of a
capital system gone wrong.

“T can sit here with my cigar, a
cup of coffee, a good book - every-
body passes books around - and
feel really sorry for those guys who
are up against it in the outside
world,” said Mr MacMillan.

“Down here there is no reces-
sion, there is no crime - my wife
and I just love the place.”

Where else can you spend a hun-
dred bucks a week and live like
Riley in an environment where it
rarely rains and never snows -
where “consumer spending” is a
box of tinned food off the mail-
boat, and “bail out” is something
you do in a leaking dinghy?

Mr and Mrs MacMillan don’t
know. That’s why Canada is some-
where they visit from time to time
and Crooked Island is the spot they
now call home.

“We have never regretted being
here,” they say, “it’s the best place
on earth.”





gan, who was the pilot for :
Marine I for Mr Reagan and :
Mr Bush. :

Final in-orbit
space shuttle
inspection is

completed

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.



@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

will not be allowed in the designat-
ed MPA. As it stands now, we
believe the east side of the North
Sound will be saved for future gen-
erations.”

“We are hoping that the golf
course will not be allowed because
the Bahamas National Trust is
against the construction of the golf
course and the government listens
to the BNT,” said Ms Woon.

On the issue of endangered sea
turtles, Ms Woon is appealing to
Bahamian citizens to express their
views concerning a ban on the har-
vesting of the reptiles. She said that
government announced in 2008 that
it will ban the harvest of sea turtles
as of April 1, 2009.

“All six of the sea turtles world-
wide are endangered.

“There is a chance that this (ban)



FREEPORT - An environmen-
tal organisation in Grand Bahama is
agitating for the Animal Protection
and Control Act to be made into
law.

“We have a draft Animal Cruel-
ty Act that has been finalised but
not passed. We need to let govern-
ment know that the Animal Cruel-
ty Act needs to be made into actual
legislation,” said Earthcare founder
Gail Woon.

The recent slaughtering of pro-
tected iguanas, turtles and wild
ducks in the Bahamas has outraged
many persons who feel that the
incidents are a form of animal cru-
elty.

While speaking at the Grand Bahama Sunrise
Rotary Club, Ms Woon told Rotarians that there are
several pertinent environmental issues facing the
country.

“The Bahamas has a new Ministry of the Envi-
ronment that was created last year - again we have
a draft Act, but no environmental laws to speak
of,” she said.

Ms Woon, a marine biologist, was very pleased
about the news of the creation of a marine protect-
ed area (MPA) on North Bimini, where there have
been both local and international concerns
regarding the mega-resort development on that
island.

“Government has said that the Bimini MPA will
be ‘revisited’. This will result in decisions being
made about what will be allowed and what activities

Odessa G arden
where life ts still simple and people still care
Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

BRAND NEW BOOKS
for EASTER

_ AT DAWN WE SLEPT - The unteld story of Pearl Harbour.’
“The Best Loved Poems of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis."
“Shakespeare - Art Edition Copywright 1869
( All of his Great Works),
Lincoln At Gettysburg - A New Birth Of Freedom ist Ed.

ASTRONAUTS aboard
space shuttle Discovery con-
ducted a final inspection of the }
vehicle Thursday and at first
glance found no significant dam- }
age which would prevent itfrom :
returning to Earth, according to }
Associated Press. :

Mission managers will decide
whether it’s safe for Discovery :
to land Saturday at the Kennedy
Space Center in Florida once }
engineers finish studying the }
results of the five-hour, routine
survey. They said Thursday :
afternoon they hadn’t detected
any areas of concern so far. i

Astronauts combed the out- :
side of the shuttle with a 50-foot
inspection boom mounted on }
Discovery’s robotic arm. The }
boom was equipped with laser :
and camera tools that beamed
images and data back to Mis- }
sion Control. i

“To the untrained eye, it }
looked very, very clean,” said
Paul Dye, lead flight director.

Astronauts were looking for i
damage from micrometeorites ;
or space debris that may have }
hit the shuttle as it was docked }
to the international space sta- }
tion for eight days. The results :
were being compared with those
taken during an inspection on }
the mission’s second day. ;

The procedure was put in }
place after the 2003 Columbia }
disaster killed seven astronauts. }
A piece of foam from Columbi-
a’s external tank damaged the :
shuttle’s wing during launch, }
allowing fiery gases to penetrate i
the orbiter during its descent }
back to Earth. :

Discovery undocked from the
space station on Wednesday }
after its seven-person crew deliv- }
ered and installed power-gen-
erating solar wings at the orbit-
ing outpost. Discovery was }
orbiting Earth for two days }
before it was to re-enter Earth-
*s atmosphere on Saturday. i

Astronaut Sandra Magnus }
joined the crew for the return
trip after living four months at ;
the space station. She spent two }
sessions on the shuttle’s exer-
cise machine Thursday in order
to prepare her body for the
effects of gravity. ;

“Sandy is on her way home,” }
space station commander :
Mike Fincke radioed Mission
Control. ;

“We certainly enjoyed work- }
ing with her.” i

Earthcare founder Gail Woon

may not happen.

“The Ministry of Fisheries wants more input from
Bahamian citizens. They have heard a lot of support
for the ban from non-Bahamians. Please let the
Ministry of Fisheries know about your support of the
ban before April 1,” she said.

Ms Woon said another issue of concern is the
invasion of the lionfish in Bahamian waters.

She said the lionfish is a voracious predator that is
threatening the local fishery.

“The current thinking is to kill them. Some fish-
ermen have reported finding lionfish in grouper
stomachs. We need to find out the effect of eating
lionfish has on native species such as the grouper. Is
the grouper flesh safe to eat if it has ingested lionfish
with their venomous spines? This is research that
needs to be done,” she said.

EASTER, DECORATIONS
Painted Easter Ornaments to decorate your Easter Tree
and for your Easter Baskets.



ATTENTION LADIES!!!



Shoe & Bag Bounque
is having a
ONE WEEK

Pre-Easter

BLOW OUT
~~

vgs Ss







i) Shows

Sale Starts this
Thursday 26th March

Sale Ends

CUSTOM &
READY-MADE FRAMES

as Ly

a ee 1 ae

7 / Wo Exchange “No Refunds *All Sales Final

Tel: 328-8391



FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IAA Tas

PoP airs (a mee opal ae

ee Petey
822-2157

eee ee hee eg Ty




PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Photos by Chris d’Albenas

Caves Village Professional
Turn Key Office Suites For Rent

“The premier choice for serious business”

1,661 sq. ft.
1,083 sq. ft.
839 sq. ft.
850 sq. ft.

$5,813.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees
$3,790.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees
$2,936.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees
$2,975.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees

Contact Mr. Simon Chappell on

327-1575 or 477-7610
Email: simon @cavesheights.com

DAIHATSU

FV ath='T-

Easy to drive, easy to load

¢ Standard transmission
¢ Air conditioning

2 year/24,000-mile factory warranty.

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED DAIHATSU DEALER
Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) * Queens Hwy, 352-6122 * Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916



THE HONDA ACCORD hit a wall then flipped over.

Driver unhurt
after car crashes
and flips over

THE driver escaped unscathed after this Honda Accord hit a wall
and flipped over in a narrow Nassau street at around 10.30pm on
Wednesday.

Onlookers who crowded around the crash scene told The Tribune
the driver said he had been driving east on East Bay Street, passed
the bridge to Paradise Island, and took a right turn into Ernest
Street, which runs behind Hammerheads Bar and Grill.

But as he turned into the road, a beggar approached the car
asking for a dollar and tried to grab the driver through the window.

The driver told onlookers he slammed on the brakes, lost control
of the car and crashed into a low wall.

Police attended the crash scene, as did fire and ambulance ser-
vices.

Fully furnished and Test eyareal Ver Maas ae

Othe Aros Fe tee

sunrise - Ft, Lauderdale
Phone: 1.886.460.7568
inf@shamrockcorp.com

werwshamrockoorp.com

Shamrock

POPU Tn FLORIOA

OA au





welcomes

ielersirk




THE global real estate sys-
tem RE/MAX celebrated the
official signing of the Bahamas
- the 73rd country to join the
RE/MAX network - with a
flag-raising ceremony at its
Denver headquarters last week.

In 2008, RE/MAX surpassed
the 70-country milestone and
now has an international pres-
ence greater than any of its
competitors.

“RE/MAX is recognised
around the world and there is
certainly a place for this pow-
erful network in the Bahamas,”
said William Soteroff, senior
vice-president of international
development at RE/MAX
International.

“The Bahamas has an estab-
lished real estate market and
agents and consumers alike will
benefit from the international
resources and tools that
RE/MAX has to offer.”

New Bahamas franchise own-
ers Craig Pinder, broker and
owner of RE/MAX Paradise
Realty (formerly known as Par-
adise Real Estate), and William
Wong, broker and owner of
RE/MAX Ocean Realty
Bahamas (formerly known as
William Wong and Associates
Realty), were at the RE/MAX
headquarters for the flag-rais-
ing ceremony and for the new
franchisee training seminar.

The two Bahamian realtors
will continue to operate their
separate offices and will imple-
ment the power of the
RE/MAX brand name to
attract both local and foreign
home buyers and sellers.

“RE/MAX has a market
brand presence like no other
real estate network in the
world,” said Mr Wong, who has
been in the real estate business
for over ten years and is presi-
dent of the Bahamas Real
Estate Association.

“My agents will benefit from
being a part of a major inter-
national franchise, and this
office, with its experience and
resources, will only build on its
current success. I want us to be
a major competitor in the
Bahamian real estate market
and take advantage of the great
referral opportunities

y ;
William Wong and Craig Pinder

RE/MAX has to offer.”

Mr Wong’s RE/MAX Ocean
Realty Bahamas office will be
managed by his daughter, Lau-
ren Ashley Wong.

Mr Pinder, who has over ten
years of real estate experience,
wants to establish RE/MAX as
a household name in the
Bahamas.

The RE/MAX affiliation, he
said, will help him add even
more listings and sales to his
already robust business.

“T had contemplated joining
for a while and when I recently
viewed a few RE/MAX televi-
sion commercials, especially
during the Super Bowl, I
realised that this is the most
recognised real estate brand in
the world and it was the per-
fect time to introduce
RE/MAX to the Bahamas,” Mr
Pinder said.

Attending the recent
RE/MAX International Con-
vention and training seminars
in Las Vegas also helped Mr
Pinder’s decision to join
RE/MAX.

“Bahamian real estate agents
are some of the best educated
in the region and RE/MAX
agents have an added advan-
tage with access to top educa-
tional resources,” he said.

The Bahamas is the seventh
country to join the RE/MAX
network in the last four months.
The countries of Albania,
Ecuador, Macedonia, Uruguay,
India and Singapore have all
recently launched new
RE/MAX franchises.

For the ninth time in the last
ten years, RE/MAX ranked
higher than any other real
estate franchise in Entrepre-
neur Magazine’s “The Fran-
chise 500 Survey.”

The Denver-based franchisor
led all its competitors in three
categories, including global
franchises.

agara Chrisitian Community
of School

NCC offers academic excellence in a family-like

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matthew’s Church)
Open Mon to Fri 8am - 5:30pm
Sat 8am - 12noon

Tel: 397-1700

E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs Apes
Parts and service guaranteed (a



atmosphere, inspiring life-long learners

Window Van
& Panel Van

(not shown)

¢ Automatic
transmission

¢ Air conditioning
¢ Power steering

* Radio/cassette
player
¢ 3 cylinder 659cc

NCC will be hosting personal family visits at the Wyndam Nassau
Resort at Cable Beach on April 2, April 3 and April 4. Please
contact Sarah Schmoll at NCC directly at sschmoll@niagaracc.com
or call the Wyndam Nassau Resort 242-327-6200 to learn more
about this opportunity.

¢ Private School established in 1932

¢ Rich tradition and heritage

¢ Co-educational, Day and Residential

¢ Elementary , Middle and Secondary Schools

° Safe, family-like environment

¢ Dedicated faculty and small class sizes

¢ Comprehensive co-curricular and residential
programs

¢ Championship Sports Teams

¢ Distinguished university placement

° 400 students from 18 countries

¢ Beautiful campus near Niagara Falls

fee

website: www.niagaracc.com
sschmoll@niagaracc.com

Sei
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Eleven are accused of

pansacking synagogue |

in Venezuela

â„¢ CARACAS, Venezuela

VENEZUELAN prosecutors }
have filed charges against eight :
police officers and three other peo-
ple, accusing them of involvement }

in a January attack on Caracas’

largest synagogue, prosecutors said :
Thursday, according to Associated }

Press.

Prosecutors said in a statement :
they’ve asked a court to approve :
charges including robbery, “acts :

of contempt against a religion,”
and concealing firearms.

Among the suspects is a police }
officer who worked as a body-
guard for a rabbi. Another sus- }
pect is one of two security guards :
on duty during the attack, who is :
suspected of aiding intruders by }
deactivating an alarm and an elec- }

tric fence surrounding the building. ;

Study into wind as alternative
energy source gets underway

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A study of the
feasibility of using wind as an
alternative energy source is now
underway in Grand Bahama.

Equipment designed to mea-
sure wind speed is expected to be
put up over the next few weeks.

Excell O Ferrell, president and
CEO of the Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company, said the company is
looking at other alternative ener-
gy resources as well.

The company, he said, is work-
ing with one of its owners, Emera
—a major energy firm that has a
diversified portfolio worth $5.3
billion — to conduct the wind stud-
ies, which will last a year.

Ministry of Environment
launches a harbour
clean-up campaign

THE Ministry of the Envi-
ronment and the National
Coastal Awareness Committee
are joining forces to launch a
clean-up campaign of Nassau’s
historic harbour.

The campaign includes the
removal of derelict and aban-
doned vessels stretching from
Potter’s Cay Dock west to
Arawak Cay as well as the
removal of trash (marine
debris) from the sea floor and
shoreline.

The first harbour clean-up
will take place on Saturday,
April 4, in the Potter’s Cay
vicinity between the two
bridges.

“The Ministry of the Envi-
ronment supports environmen-
tal stewardship demonstrated
by the National Coastal Aware-
ness Committee and its efforts
to clean up our coastal envi-
ronment,” the ministry said in a
press statement.

“This work is extremely
important. It provides a reward-
ing experience for those who
take part in this exercise. The
ministry is fully committed to
ensuring that the cleanliness of
the physical environment
receives top priority, therefore,
it encourages community par-
ticipation in this event. This
commitment is manifested in
action which involves preven-
tion, control and abatement of
practices and or factors which
adversely impact the environ-
ment and may affect the fragile
marine environment/life and
ultimately the health and phys-
ical well being of our people.

Plan

“Therefore, it is the ministry’s
plan to encourage the continuity
of this effort by educating and
sensitising the public in order
to protect our environment.”

The Ministry of the Environ-
ment will commit the resources
that it has available to fully par-
ticipate in this clean-up initia-
tive. The ministry said it is
impressed with the efforts and
activities of the National
Coastal Awareness Committee
over the past five years. As a
result of their annual clean-up
programme, there is a notice-
able difference around the
coastline, particularly in New
Providence, the ministry said.

“The National Coastal
Awareness Committee is
pleased to join forces with the
Ministry of the Environment
for the launch of their harbour
clean up,” said Earlston
McPhee, chairman of the Com-
mittee and director of sustain-
able tourism development for
the Ministry of Tourism.

“In the last two years, our
committee has held three large
harbour clean-ups as part of our
national initiative that made a
tremendous impact - but so
much more needs to be done.”

“Together with the Ministry
of the Environment we will be
able to make significant, long-
term, positive changes to our
harbour which is one of our
country’s most important nat-
ural assets,” Mr McPhee said.

“We have a beautiful natural
harbour that can become a
tremendous tourist attraction
in the future. I envision one day
that the city of Nassau will be
mentioned along with other
famous waterfront cities like
Helsinki, Finland; Sydney, Aus-
tralia; Hamburg, Germany; and
Stockholm, Sweden.”

The clean-up will involve
both land and sea coordination.
Stuart Cove and his dive team
along with the Royal Bahamas

Defense Force, the Department
of Marine Resources and other
dive volunteers will assist in
removing vessels and marine
debris from the harbour floor.

The vessels will be lifted up
and transported to the point of
disposal. All trash removed will
be sorted and catalogued by
volunteers through Dolphin
Encounters — Project BEACH
to help track common types of
litter and to prevent these items
from returning to the harbour in
the future.

Coastline

“Within the next two weeks,
the Ministry of the Environ-
ment will place 37 - four and
six cubic yard containers at all
of the public areas along the
coastline throughout New Prov-
idence. This is another partner-
ship similar to the one we are
happy to forge with the Nation-
al Coastal Committee.

“We hope the public will join
us as we strive to sustain the
natural beauty of these islands
for our socio-economic welfare

“We should have equipment
up in the next few weeks and we
will be able to measure the wind
duration and the speed on the
hour. And it will take a year or so
to really determine if there is suf-
ficient wind to actually construct
wind turbines.

Turbines

“Tf it turns out that there is suf-
ficient wind to make turbines
practical, I anticipate we would
build wind turbines and end up
with an energy source that has no
cost for fuel.

“The benefit to the consumers
on the island is that you’ve got
an energy source that is not
impacted by what happens in

and that of our guests,” Mr
McPhee said.

“This is a large task but an
important one.

“We are all in this together.”

The public is invited to par-
ticipate in the harbour clean-
up.

Certified divers and volun-
teers to sort and catalogue
debris are needed.

To volunteer call Stuart Cov-
e’s Dive.

The National Coastal Aware-
ness Committee of the Bahamas
is a group of stakeholders from
the private and public sectors
with an interest in promoting
the sustainable development of
the Bahamas.

world prices of oil,” explained Mr
Ferrell.

However, he added that the
company will not be able gener-
ate all its electricity by using wind
because “you cannot depend on
it.”

“You have to have generation
that is powered by something
other than the wind to meet the
load.

“There will be some small per-
centage of total wind and total
energy, and it will make some
reduction in fuel price and overall
cost, and so from that standpoint,
Iam optimistic,” he said.

In addition to the wind study,
Mr Ferrel said the GBPC is talk-
ing with land owners to deter-
mine the feasibility of capturing
methane gas which has been not-



TERT

potpourri gift sep

ee ee ee

ed to flare up in certain areas of
the island.

Environmentalist Gail Woon,
founder of Earthcare, said her
organisation supports these
efforts to find alternative energy
sources.

She noted that alternative ener-
gy will help to reduce the coun-
try’s need to import oil.

“There is good news in the area
of alternate energy — government
has received several bids for alter-
nate energy,” she said.

“Tt will result in 20 percent of




the energy for New Providence
being provided by alternate forms
of energy such as solar or wind
power.

She added that the identity of
Bahamians involved in the vari-
ous alternative energy bids should
be made public, in the interest of
fairness and transparency.

Ms Woon said the government
also needs to release the details of
its energy policy, and that the law
prohibiting homes from having
solar panels and windmills should
be changed.

Oessa Garden

were life is stall simple : and people stil care

Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493





DRESSES
for, EASTER

Fancy White Pre-teen and Teen dresses for
Special Ocassions - Church, Graduation,
Confirmation, First Communion, Weddings,
Funerals,

Pretty Hand Smocked Dresses in Pastel Colours,
Perfect for Easter Sunday, Dressy Parties
and Tea Parties.

keeprake ttems ~ decor pieces

pagar -~

Nassau, Bahamas - Phone

iT Thi SALE
VisitlourBUYAl|get}1/FREE|arec

statues — bags — metal & wicker pois ~ cushions runners — sconces — mirrors — home scents

~ pillar & votive candles ~ framed art ~ ceramics ~ picture frames

Reet Pet Dis ee bar



Ce ABN Miata ato rei eest mare ua

HAVE YOU SUDDENLY FOUND YOURSELF
WITHOUT HEALTH INSURANCE?

WE HAVE THE SOLUTION ...

COVERAGE FOR ALL AGES

(From birth to 85 years - renewable for life)

COVERAGE CAN BE ARRANGED
FOR MOST PRE-EXISTING
MEDICAL CONDITIONS *

(e.g. Hypertension, Diabetes, Cancer, Heart Disease)

STAR

Health & Life
393-5529

* Certain terms & conditions apply

INSURANCE BY LLOYD’S

OF LONDON (An A-rated Insurer)

PREMIUMS GUARANTEED
NOT TO INCREASE FOR

NEXT 2 YEARS

LLOYDS

WorldwideMedicalTrust

Call one of our agents today!

Mark Reynolds

Durell Shearer



Tamara Boyd

Cyril Peet
PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



| CEO of Global United expects to

lose millions if company wound up

Business manager assaulted, kidnapped
FROM page one

The men then fled with what police called a “large quantity of
cash”, leaving the manager tied up inside the premises with a
telephone cable. Luckily, he was able to wriggle free and raise the
alarm.

Mr Burrows said he found out about the incident around an hour
later and is still in shock.

Nothing like this had ever happened at his business, he said,
adding that he is considering ways to beef up the company’s secu-
rity system - which was cut by the robbers before they entered.

Yesterday, the manager took a day off work to seek medical
treatment for his injuries.

Meanwhile, the 1999 Toyota Corolla used by the three men to
flee the scene of the crime was found dumped in the Wells Lane
area, behind the Village Road City Market, at around 9pm on
Wednesday.

Police are investigating but have no solid leads, they said.

Birth yo ay

goes out to our
Princess

ACCEPOECE

from your dad, Terry; mom, Latishka;
grandmother, great grandmother, aunts,
uncles and especially Rosemarie Evans,
and The Soul Wining Church of God in
Christ Family.

ae Vfiu!

EARNBONJS



FROM page one

one, and what they are trying
to do is crucify one of my chil-
dren,” an impassioned Mr
Ritchie said yesterday.

For the past week, Mr Ritchie
has led a one-man campaign in
the media calling on the gov-
ernment to rethink its approach
in calling in his company’s out-
standing debt, which ultimately
will force the brokerage firm
out of business.

Asked how he could insist
that it was the government that
was forcing him out of business
when the courts had ordered
immediate payment of out-
standing funds before any
attempts were made to recon-
cile the balances, Mr Ritchie
said that during any court mat-
ter both parties can still come to
some form of agreement.

Mr Ritchie also explained
that the outstanding money was
not funds owed by his company
to the government in terms of
taxes, but the balances of his
trade payables.

These “trade payables”, Mr
Ritchie said, were abruptly
called in by the government,
forcing him to resort to utilising
certified cheques to pay
employees and then working
day-to-day on a cash basis sys-
tem.

“In any business your
payables drag to 30-60 days. If
you have good terms you can
get 60 maybe 90 days. But with
government we don’t try that
because we know they want to
get paid as quick as possible. So
we would be a couple of weeks
out and that’s what they jumped
on.

“Now, my people, I’m giving
them 30-60-90 days and I’m
waiting on them to pay me.
Suddenly the government says
pay me all my money now or
we're going to sue you. The
bank then, for whatever reason,
suddenly hardens up on my
overdraft and holds all my
assets personal and business.

“So now they bounce my
cheques. They bounce dollar
cheques without any notice but
we worked it out and I replace
them with certified cheques. I
took them down to Mr Mullings
myself. Now suddenly I’m pay-
ing cash - because I’m still in
business, ’'m supposed to be
out of business. So now I’m put
on cash in October, and all my
vendors want cash up front. So
I have to provide a service toa
client, I have to pay for that ser-

INTEREST WITH THE
SCOTIABANK SAVINGS

REWARD PLAN.

SAVE REGULARLY - AND REWARD YOUR GOOD HABITS!
THE MORE YOU SAVE, THE MORE YOU EARN. SO START

SAVING WITH SCOTIABANK TODAY!



Ask your Scotiabank representative for details.

§ Scotiabank:

+ Conditions apy * Taderrrk of The Bank of None Sons, used under licence,
BS 0708

vice in advance, so I have to
find the money to pay, then I
have to bill them and wait 30,
60, even 90 days to get paid. So
my cash flow has taken a three

to four month slip the
wrong way,” Mr Ritchie
explained.

This tactic, he said, which was
inflicted upon his company, can
be done to any other company,
Mr Ritchie warned.

Doing over $125 million
worth of business a year, Mr

Ritchie said GUL would annu-
ally pay the government any-
where between $70 and $80 mil-
lion. And during this period, Mr
Ritchie said, he was owed any-
where between $13 and $15 mil-
lion.

“T was owed more than what
I owed anybody else.

“But I must be from the
wrong island, with the wrong
background and in the wrong
party because I haven’t seen this
happen to nobody else. And

ain’t nobody can tell me no oth-
er reason why.”

Mr Ritchie said he isn’t wor-
ried because he knows that he is
in the right and he has his facts
which will come out “one way
or the other”.

“T will pay every bill and
every dollar. For me to be in
this position, yes it is embar-
rassing, but I will come out. The
fact of the matter is that what
was done to me and my compa-
ny is an injustice,” he said.

Man dies in collision

FROM page one

10.55am.

As the dumptruck pulled off to make the turn,
the driver said she was engulfed in a cloud of
dust which, when it cleared, revealed the body of
what she soon realised was the driver of the scoot-
er lying in the road.

The motorbike itself was trapped under the
front of the truck, which stopped moments later.

According to those on the scene, the driver of
the truck would have been unable to see the
moped, which was located on the opposite side to
the truck’s driver.

“Shaken up” by the incident, the truck driver
was taken to hospital by ambulance.

The victim has yet to be identified.

Brother of Wendall Jones in court for
allegedly failing to pay NIB contributions

FROM page one

Street, yesterday for allegedly
failing to pay NIB contribu-
tions. NIB officials, however,
declined to release any infor-
mation regarding the matter.
Last month, Jones Commu-
nications CEO Wendall Jones
pleaded guilty to owing NIB

over $430,000. Mr Jones
agreed to pay 40 per cent of
the sum — $180,000 — and the
remainder over a two-year
period.

The National Insurance
Board is increasing its review
of accounts of delinquent
employers and self-employed
people in order to ensure com-

pliance with the National
Insurance Act.

For this year alone, the
National Insurance Board of
Directors has reportedly rec-
ommended that close to 300
employers who have failed to
pay employees’ contributions
or produce National Insurance
records be prosecuted.



FROM page one

site, casinogamblingweb.com, yesterday suggested
the bills - if passed - would “cripple” the Bahamian
gambling industry, keeping Floridian gamblers at
home and drawing those from other states to gam-
ble in Florida rather than the Bahamas.

“We are a gaming state, so why wouldn’t we want
to be the cream of the crop rather than losing citizens
going somewhere else?” the sponsor of the two Bills
and SRIC chairman Dennis Jones was reported to
have asked.

Yesterday, Mr Sands said gaming stakeholders
in this country are keenly aware of the threat they
face - already having seen a “precipitous drop” in the
number of people travelling to the Bahamas to play
so-called table games in the wake of the introduction
of more of these in Florida casinos last year.

“If they were to open up further that would have
a dramatic impact on us being able to remain com-
petitive in this particular area,” said Mr Sands.

“We are obviously keeping our eye on it and we
are running a parallel track in terms of lobbying
the government for some major changes to the exist-
ing regulations and casino legislation that has
presently been in force for more than 40 years,” he
added.

The hotelier said that, while discussions on the
need for modernisation of the Bahamian casino
industry have been ongoing “over a long period,
the time has really come for us to be extremely
proactive in being advocates for this change.”

“(We need to) ensure that we can respond to the
changing needs of the gaming market fairly quickly
so we’re not caught off-hand,” he noted.

Revealing some contents of the presentation set to
be made to the Minister of Tourism, Mr Sands said
it will address the need for “new games and all
derivative forms of existing table games” to be intro-
duced, as well as the thorny question of who should
be allowed to gamble in the Bahamas.

While stopping short of proposing that Bahamians
be permitted to legally do so, as some advocate, Mr
Sands said the presentation will suggest that some



Casinos in Bahamas
‘need radical change’

Bahamian residents, including second home owners
“who have a proven net worth,” should be given the
chance to play as part of an effort to shore up casi-
no profits.

“What we intend to do is have a very compre-
hensive approach, looking at regulations, the legis-
lation, that will allow the Bahamas jurisdiction for
gaming to be competitive with the other gaming
jurisdictions around the world.

“We believe that we must be progressive and be
prepared for radical change in our gaming industry
if it’s going to continue to survive in this particular
market place,” said the BHA president.

The new bills approved by the Florida Senate
Regulated Industries Committee provide for oper-
ators to introduce new games like blackjack, craps
and roulette, and gives a tax break on gambling
revenues for “racinos” - dog and horse tracks.

That comes on top of allowing Hard Rock Cafes
to be revamped into full-blown casinos and lowering
of the legal gambling age in the state from 21 to 18.

With the bills’ sponsors suggesting the state could
bring in an extra $1 billion annually by changing
the laws, they have also received the support of
Florida Governor Charlie Crist - formerly opposed
to the expansion of gambling in the state. He is des-
perately trying to increase Florida’s revenue base in
the face of a budget deficit.

However, the Florida House of Representatives is
said to be less keen on the idea as a solution to the
state’s money woes, making the certainty of the
bills’ passage less assured.

Rep Bill Galvano, a Republican who chairs the
House Compact Review committee, said of the Sen-
ate proposal: “They are allowing anything and every-
thing; we’re not prepared to do that.”

A message left for Minister of Tourism Vincent
Vanderpool Wallace was not returned up to press
time yesterday.

®

Grains Of Wisdom

ma) A cn Se piel) Every Time...

Brown Rice,
Tomato and Basil
Salad

2 1/4 cups water

SS eee mia eo

1 cup Mahatma® Brown Rice
2 teaspoons coarse salt
2 tablespoons Champagne vinegar or white wine vinegar

2 teaspoons sugar

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 pound tomatoes, cut into 12-inch pieces
1 cup (packed) fresh basil leaves, finely chopped

Bring 2 1/4 cups water to boil in heavy medium saucepan. Mix in Mahatma
Brown Rice and call. Cover, reduce heal to low and simmer uniil ree is tender
and walter is absorbed, aboul 40 minutes. Transfer rice to large bewl: Tul with
fork and cool. Whisk vinegar and sugar in small bowl. Gradually whisk in ail. Pour

over foe, Add tomatoes and basil and

toss to combine. Season with salt and

b Sion per. (Can be made 6 hours ahead. Cover, chill, Bring ta roam temperature
Bron

E one ) Makes 6 servings.

THE NUMBER ONE RICE.. “ALL a 4 TC

Distributed by ASA H. PRITCHARD, LTD.
Robinson & Claridge Roads - Tel: 393-2437
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 9



The Chinese living in the Bahamas
remember their history with Tibet

MEMORIES, CONTROVERSY LINGER HALF-CENTURY AFTER LHASA UPRISING OF 1959

YOUR SAY

@ Xinhua News Agency
Issued by the Chinese
Embassy, Nassau

Fe many people, 1959
is just a number, or per-

haps a date in a textbook. But
for those who witnessed events in
Tibet that year, it remains an
indelible memory after half a cen-
tury.

Gyaga Losang Tangyai, now
81, remains forceful and ener-
getic. In 1959, he was serving
under the 10th Panchen Lama,
who was the second most impor-
tant religious figure in Tibet next
to the Dalai Lama.

The Panchen Lama controlled
many temples and much land in
old Tibet, just like other living
Buddhas.

In 1954, Gyaga accompanied
the Panchen Lama and 14th
Dalai Lama on a mission to Bei-
jing on behalf of the Gaxag gov-
ernment (the old Tibetan gov-
ernment). They were received by
the late Chairman Mao Zedong.

"He told us that democratic
reform wouldn't be carried out
for at least six more years," Gya-
ga recalled.

"Democratic reform" literally
meant the end of serfdom and
abolition of the hierarchic social
system characterised by a theoc-
racy, with the Dalai Lama as the
core of the leadership. That sys-
tem had existed in Tibet for some
1,000 years.

The aim was to free about 1
million serfs and slaves who
accounted for 90 per cent of the
Tibetan population in the 1950s.
They were controlled by lamas,
officials and nobles, including the
Dalai Lama's family.

Mao believed that reform,
despite public appeal, could only
be launched when the Tibetan
nobles, including the Dalai Lama,
were ready to support it. Without
that support, reform would have
to be further postponed, Mao
told the Tibetan delegation. With
that understanding, they returned
home.

SURPRISE IN 1959

One day five years later, Gya-
ga was taken by surprise at the
Tashilunpo Temple in Xigaze.
He was told that the Dalai Lama
and his supporters had staged an
"armed riot" in Lhasa, which was
then — as now — the capital of
Tibet.

"I got the news from soldiers,
and the Panchen Lama soon
asked me to accompany him to
Beijing by way of Lhasa," he said.

They arrived in Lhasa on
March 20, 1959. The city had
become a totally unfamiliar place
to Gyaga.

"Tt looked like a war zone: few
people outside, craters in the
streets."

He and the Panchen Lama first
visited the Jokhang Temple,
where lamas "appeared disori-
ented ... There was water every-
where, and they told us that they
had just put out a fire.”

The situation was even worse
at the Ramoche Temple, also in
Lhasa, where they saw no lamas,
only "bullet holes on the golden
roof," he said.

"T felt that the rebels had gone
mad," he said. "How can they
damage their own city?" He ges-
tured furiously while recounting
the long-ago story.

FATEFUL DAY

Ngapoi Ngawang Jigme, son
of a Tibetan aristocrat who later
became vice chairman of the 11th
National Committee of the Chi-
nese People’s Political Consulta-
tive Conference (CPPCC, the top
advisory body), also recalls the
riot in 1959. His account goes like
this:

The Dalai Lama wanted to
watch a troupe of the Tibet Mili-
tary Region on March 10, but he
declined to have them come to
Norbu Lingka, his palace.
Instead, he insisted on going to a
military auditorium, where he
said his supporters would meet
him.

"I sensed that something
would happen," because the
Dalai Lama rarely left Norbu
Lingka, recalled Ngapoi, now 98.

On the morning of March 10,
1959, he said, turmoil broke out
in Lhasa. People were fearful that
the Dalai Lama had been kid-
napped.

"Some people cried out, ‘let us
protect our treasure! The Hans
kidnapped him!’ The Hans are
the ethnic Chinese majority.

"This was like a bolt from the
blue to pious Tibetans, who soon
flooded to Norbu Lingka in
shock, confusion and horror ..."

But, Ngapoi said, the rumor
was spread by the Dalai Lama's
supporters. Rioters soon sur-
rounded Norbu Lingka, intent
on killing and destruction, shout-
ing "Tibet independence" and
"get out, you Hans".

VETERAN'S
RECOLLECTIONS

Lhabgyi, an 83-year-old veter-
an of the People's Liberation
Army (PLA), who was dis-
patched to Lhasa in April 1959,
recalled that the city was still like
a "battlefield" when he arrived,
with rubble everywhere.

The PLA's mission was to per-
suade the rioters to surrender.
"We assured them that if they
surrendered, they would not be
killed, jailed, or denounced in
public meetings,” he said.

But disorder continued and
spread throughout Tibet, and
Lhabgyi can still recall his fallen
comrades.

"In a battle in May in Linzhou
County, which is about 65 kilo-
meters from Lhasa, a soldier died,
while three rioters were killed.
In another one, six soldiers died,
including our political instructor,”
he said.

A man leading the rioters in
Linzhou was injured in his arm.
"His wife persuaded him to sur-
render, saying that otherwise
their two sons would be killed as
well," Lhabgyi said. The man lat-
er became a member of the
Lhasa People's Political Consul-
tative Conference.

THREE YEARS
FOR PEACE

The PLA halted the riots in
Lhasa in two days. But it took
nearly three years to restore
peace in the entire region. There
is no known accurate count of
the final death toll.

According to
www.huanqiu.com, the website
of a political periodical, nearly
90,000 people were involved in
riots around Tibet, of whom 42.8
per cent surrendered. The
"diehard" core members num-
bered about 23,000.

A document in the State
Archives Administration record-
ed a speech by Mao, who said
China would welcome the Dalai
Lama back and give him a role in
the central government if he sup-
ported democratic reform.

But the Dalai Lama didn't
return. He had already fled to
India.

Lhalu Cewang Doje, now 94,
had a key role in the insurgency
but later became Vice Chairman
of the Tibet People's Political
Consultative Conference.

He later wrote a book, "Rise
and Fall of the Lhalu Family,"
about his family, some of whom
had been Panchen or Dalai
Lamas.

He said that after being arrest-
ed in the riots, he thought the
central government would exe-
cute him. Hence, he refused to
confess anything. Once he was
taken to a public denunciation
where some people threatened
to beat him, he said, but two sol-
diers protected him.

Lhalu said it was then that he
began to believe in the policies of
the Communist Party and con-
fessed. He was jailed in 1959 and
released in 1965. When he left
prison, he got back his prized pos-
sessions: golden earrings, a watch
and a pen.

ACCOUNTS DIFFER

In the Chinese version of his
autobiography, "Freedom in
Exile,” the 14th Dalai Lama tells
a different story. He writes that
his followers in the Tibet uprising
met their deaths in many violent
ways, being "crucified, dismem-
bered and disemboweled ...
beheaded, burned, lashed, buried
alive, dragged by galloping hors-
es, hanged, and thrown into freez-
ing water with their limbs tied.”

The book also states: "I also
heard from refugees that the cen-
tral government aimed cannons
at the Potala Palace and the
Jokhang Temple, after bom-
barding Norbu Lingka. Buildings
in these places were severely
damaged." The Chinese govern-
ment has disputed this account.

Although their accounts differ,
both sides acknowledge that the
Dalai Lama fled Tibet for India,
where he has lived since. His
departure shocked and distressed
his followers and many Tibetans.



TIME FOR CHANGE

The riot changed everything in
Tibet. The Communists soon
decided that democratic reform
should be carried out immedi-
ately to demolish the entire old
system led by the Dalai Lama.

The Preparatory Committee
of Tibet Autonomous Region
replaced the Gaxag government
and set out to lead the reform.

From 1959 to until 1966, when
the Cultural Revolution began,
1 million slaves were granted
land, houses and their freedom.
One of those slaves was Migmar
Dondrup, now 75, who got 1.4
hectares of land.

He served for 11 years in Parl-
ha Manor, an aristocrat's home,
as a nangsan, the lowest level of
serfdom.

Migmar was a tailor and his
wife was a maid, and both
worked from dawn until mid-
night. If they didn't satisfy their
masters, they might be whipped
or even killed.

Their home was a dark, seven
square metre adobe house, where
they lived with their daughter.
The family had to subsist on 28
kilograms of barley, the basis for
the traditional Tibetan dish of
tsampa.

He was lucky compared with
one of his relatives, a groom, who
was beaten to death because the
landlord believed he had wasted
fodder when feeding the horses.

Many such tales are on display
in the Museum of Tibet, with
about a score of black-and-white
photos depicting the brutality of
landowners: slaves’ eyes gouged
out, fingers chopped off, noses
cut and the tendons of their feet
removed.

Again, the Dalai Lama's
account of these days differs. In
the fifth chapter of his autobiog-
raphy, he claims that "in Tibet,
the relationship of landowners
and their slaves was much better
than that in the inland of China,
and there were no such cruel
punishments as manacles and cas-
tration, which prevailed all over
China."

REMEMBERING
FREEDOM

Tt was in the autumn of 1959, as
Migmar recalled, when more
than 500 people gathered in a
garden in the Parlha Manor,
where he was then a serf. A PLA
soldier told them they would
soon get their own land, and peo-
ple applauded enthusiastically.
More than 30 households held a
draw for the land.

"I could hardly express my
happiness then," he said emo-
tionally. When he was a low-
ranking serf, he didn't have any
land. "When I was a nangsan, I
wasn't even allowed to keep a
cat."

Some serfs had been working
the land under contract. They set
fire to those contracts and to
receipts for usurious loans. Then
they danced, cried and drank.

In the living room of the old
man's two-story house, there still
hangs a black-and-white photo
of Mao that shows him working
in a field wearing a straw hat.

Migmar put a khata, or white
Tibetan scarf on it, a symbol used
to show respect.

"Even my parents couldn't
give me land, but he did," the
former serf said.

Lhabgyi, the PLA veteran, said
that almost every household had
photos then had photos of Mao,
whom they revered.

"Of course there were people
who disbelieved the policies of
the Communist Party,” he
recalled. But soldiers managed
to dispel their suspicions by being
helpful.

NEW LIFE FOR NOBILITY

As for former aristocrats who
were not involved in the riot, they
were not left empty-handed, and
received financial compensation
for their land.

Gyaga Losang Tangyai in
Xigaze had several manors and
some 20 ha of land. When demo-
cratic reform took place, he was
worried and "dared not to expect
any compensation.

"I said all I wanted was a
peaceful life, but the government
gave me about 10,000 yuan,” he
said. That amount is equivalent to
about 1,470 US dollars at con-
temporary rates.

More than 600 people who
served under the Panchen Lama

stayed behind in Xigaze, except
for one who moved to India for
business.

Gyaga was a member of the
national committee of the
CPPCC for 15 years.

CONTROVERSIES LINGER
AFTER 50 YEARS

While Gyaga and Migmar
were starting new lives, the situ-
ation in Tibet came controver-
sial worldwide.

In September 1959, Christian
Archibald Herter, then US Sec-
retary of State, told the UN Gen-
eral Assembly that the Chinese
Communist Party was imposing
colonial rule in Tibet.

The Dalai Lama has main-
tained a government-in-exile
since 1959, and China has

charged that this group was
behind last year's riot in Lhasa
and other Tibetan areas of China.

This year marks the 50th
anniversary of democratic reform
in Tibet.

In that half-century, Tibet has
experienced great changes but
the controversy over the past per-
sists.

Zhu Xiaoming, research fel-
low at the China Tibetology
Research Center in Beijing, said
some foreign countries and inter-
national organisations continued
to use the Tibet issue as a lever
against China.

"T once discussed this with
some scholars in the United
States," he said.

"LT said that Abraham Lincoln
was revered after signing the
Emancipation Proclamation for

black slaves, and Chairman Mao
abolished the serf system in Tibet.
But why was the former hailed as
protecting human rights and the
latter was denounced as human
rights infringement? The scholars
were speechless."

The Dalai Lama, now 76, has
also taken note of the approach-
ing 50th anniversary. Chinese
analysts said that he was likely
to use the date to "make a last
attempt" at independence for
Tibet.

Even after his death, they said,
the controversy would linger,
since it was unclear who would
inherit his position.

For Migmar, it is simple. "Life
is getting better each year.

“T wish I was younger, so I
would have longer to enjoy my
happiness.”

MUST SELL

VACANT LAND
WINTON HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

Lot #4, Block 1

All the parcel of land containing 15,589 sq. ft. on the southern side
of Woodland Way, and about 350 feet east of Culberts Hill.

Zoning is for single-family residential homes, all the utility services
are available. The site is located 5 miles from downtown Nassau,
1 mile from shopping center and 1 mile from the nearest school.

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before April 10, 2009.

For further information, please contact us @ 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608

oy e

ee al EE

oF

ARLO WS

MILAN

Marina Village, Paradise Island 363-1351 « Bay Street, Nassau 325-4083


THE TRIBUNE



Innocent man claims he was brutally beaten

FROM page one

eral police officers took turns punching and kick-
ing him.

He was apprehended outside his Colony Club
apartment near Saunders Beach at around
10.30pm on Wednesday by two officers respond-
ing to calls from a woman who had been beaten
by a man who was staying with Mr Flowers at the
time, he said.

And despite the woman’s protests, Mr Flowers
claims the officers seized him and slapped him in
the face telling him to ‘shut-up’ when he asked
why he was being arrested.

The tattoo artist at Tattoo King in Bay Street
was then thrown to the ground, handcuffed and
slung into the police van before a crowd of
onlookers, he maintains.

“They asked me to sit on the chair properly, but
I couldn’t move because my knee was sprained
from when they threw me on the ground, so they
picked me up and slapped me in the chair,” he
said.

The detainee said he was then driven to
Arawak Cay Police Station where he was thrown
on the floor of an isolated room and five or six
officers attacked him one after the other.

“They hit me over and over in my face,” he
said.

“One guy held me and slapped me, my head
would fall then come up, and he would punch
me again. Then another guy would come.

“One guy would hit me ten times, then the

next guy would hit me ten times, and these were
not light blows either.

“These were blows for a prisoner who had
done something wrong. But I hadn’t done any-
thing wrong.”

Mr Flowers said he was poked with a gun,
slammed to the ground and kicked by officers.

“T thought they were going to end up killing me
because when they body-slammed me on the
floor everything turned black and I thought: “Oh
my God, I am going to die, they’re going to kill
me’,” he said.

But after attacking Mr Flowers for around five
minutes, police released him and told him to keep
quiet.

He told The Tribune he had to stop on his walk
home as he was dizzy, vomiting and fainting.

“They beat me sick, I just felt sick after that
beating,” he said.

He was treated at Princess Margaret Hospital
and has been off work since the attack as he was
unable to walk for around five days, and vision is
still blurry in his bloodied right eye.

“Tm just glad I’m not dead,” he said.

“T thought I was going to be dead. I thought I
was finished.”

Mr Flowers’ complaint will be investigated by
the Bahamas Police Complaints and Corruption
Unit.

Supt Hulan Hanna said: “I am not aware of
any such incident but that isn’t to disclaim what-
ever it is that he is saying.

“Tt sounds extremely and highly unusual, but

we will allow for the investigation to happen.”

FROM page one

more developed nation.

In order to make new TIEAs
mutually beneficial, Mr Winder
said government must negotiate
tourism and investment benefits
at the bargaining table with indi-
vidual countries.

"The question is, 'what are we
going to get?' That is still inde-
terminate. I would think if the
Bahamas signed a TIEA with
China, the Bahamas would
receive lots of additional bene-
fits on the other side, simply
because of the relationship we
have with China and we have
with other countries like that. We
have to seek to make it an agree-
ment where both sides are receiv-
ing something.”

In a statement released hours
after the prime minister's
announcement, former attorney
general Alfred Sears - who has
been a vocal critic of the govern-
ment's "slow" and "inadequate"
response to the threat to the
financial services sector - lashed
out at the prime minister.

He charged that Mr Ingraham's
announcement was devoid of a
national strategy to defend the

|}
PM's statements

financial services industry from
baseless attacks from the inter-
national community.

He noted that one criterion of
satisfactory tax exchange pushed
by the OECD is the existence of
"at least 11 tax information
exchange treaties".

"To meet the current OECD
standard, The Bahamas will have
to enter 10 additional tax infor-
mation exchange treaties with
other OECD countries," based
on mutual interests such as dou-
ble taxation and investment
treaties, his statement said.

"From the communication, it
would appear that the Bahamas is
like an ostrich with its head in the
sand, hoping that the danger from
the Group of 20 and the Stop Tax
Haven Abuse Bill will, like a hur-
ricane, spare The Bahamas from
a direct hit.”

The mentioned Bill is legisla-
tion proposed by US Senator Carl
Levin and supported by the Oba-
ma administration that would tar-
get offshore “tax havens” used
for investment by US citizens.

Mtr Sears said in order to prop-

A patel of poor life ond Me Balemar ance PF T7
mr UMM ttre am oun

Annive

Sa

erly defend the country's financial
services sector, government
should lobby all OECD countries,
especially the United States, to
stop the passage of the Stop Tax
Haven Abuse Bill and other puni-
tive measures from the OECD
against offshore financial centres;
invest in a policy research unit at
the College of The Bahamas to
monitor the global economy and
trends; and review and restruc-
ture the country's tax system.

The full statement released to
Europe and the OECD by gov-
ernment yesterday reads: "The
Bahamas notes significant recent
progress towards the adoption of
standards on tax transparency and
information exchange set by the
Organisation for Economic Co-
operation and Development.

"The Bahamas reaffirms its
commitment recorded in a
March, 2002, agreement between
The Bahamas and the OECD.

"The Bahamas recognises sig-
nificant advances in commitments
to broader application of OECD
standards in transparency. The
Bahamas is ready to negotiate
and conclude appropriate
arrangements to accommodate
these OECD standards.”

March 27th -April 1st, 2009

%

off

* Except on red tagged and net items

EU ML CROR UL A Um |
RRO MILL CL KC
OOO MCN Te 4

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 11

START THE NEW YEAR WITH

A NEW LIFE IN FASHION

Let Hillside Investment Co. LTD. lead you in a best of the best
lifestyle, Work with brands like ¢ ‘hopard, Carlo Milano, Prada,

D&G, Versace and many more.

If you have poise, refinement, class and work ethic to represent
top brand names. We are currently seeking self-motivated

Sales Associates. Must have retail experience.

Please email photo and resume to infog@carlomilano.com or

fax bo $63-3824. Only qualified candadies will be responded to.

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

be

Chopard’) MILANO VERSACE

Housewares
China & Gifts

Home Decor

Stationery
Lawn & eel col Tp
Bleue >

Ba by Balloons —
Paint aeeueics

Toys uly
Kelly

“The Easter Bunny”

Saturday March 28th
Ipm - 4pm

Great Years... Thanks!

1) Ween

Mall at Marathon
Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:00pm
Saturday 9:00am-9:00pm
RST Te fone closed
www.kellysbahamas.com

ir oo Shee ey,
Fax: (242) 393-4096


PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



TAYLOR Phin-
ney of the U.S.
in action during
qualifying for
the Men's Indi-
vidual Pursuit
in the World
Track Cycling
Championships
at Pruszkow,
near Warsaw,
Poland, Thurs-
day, March 26,
2009.

Alastair Grant/AP Photo

CHURCH OR OFFICE SPACE

47' =x 40°
CS ey eee ee
Se me a eae
ees le ee

pe ee ey eo eg
31260 - Phe 324-2618 aex for Mr Ginter



POTS. be herekey peor ibe] REPLI ES of BLL
HILL OAD. P00, BO Me HASEAL BARA
O aopeeis bo lhe Migr peers ce Alice ree
Gibanaio. ka negrinlinind liao eo olen A The
Bubherrare. aed eae pon he: oes ery eee ty
rte lie ved oe be ie dee
Te Ben ed seed Jakes oe beet whe
Preoe-c ipa, deere Dee ee 2 ep cl ec. 2 be ee

iinies roscoe Foe rele Sarai. 2. Be

A-TT. Henvow Pabernare.

NOTICE





American Phinney
wins individual
pursuit at worlds

TRACK & FIELD
PRUSZKOW, Poland
Associated Press

TAYLOR Phinney of the
United States won the individ-
ual pursuit and Morgan
Kneisky of France captured the
scratch title at the track world
championships on Thursday.

Phinney outpaced Jack
Bobridge of Australia with a
time of 4 minutes, 17.631 sec-
onds to win his first world title.
Bobridge finished almost 3 sec-

in Copenhagen.

“My mom was pursuit world
champion, my dad was a great
sprinter, so I sort of see myself
as having this big genetic advan-
tage over everybody else. It’s
sort of written in my gene code
that I should be good at this
event,” Phinney said. “So it’s
something that I take forward
and have a little mental edge
over everybody else.”

Australia’s Kaarle McCulloch
and Anna Meares upset British
defending champions Victoria
Pendleton and Shanaze Reade

tenth (of a second) to beat the
Australian team. We both did,
but we didn’t anticipate the
Australians would find more
speed for the final,” Pendleton
said.

Kneisky gave France its sec-
ond gold medal of the compe-
tition with his win in the scratch
race. Riding most of the 60 laps
in a breakaway group of six rid-
ers, Kneisky made his move on
the final turn to edge past
Angel Dario Colla of Argenti-
na and Travis Meyer of Aus-
tralia at the line. Colla took the








> SPORTS SCONT'D
FROM page 14

9 am Coco Plums vs Jujus
10:15 am Dillies vs Sea-
grapes

COACHPITCH:
Saturday

11:30 am Mosquitoes vs
Sandflies

1 pm Wasps vs Greentur-
tles

3 pm vs Boas vs Bees
Sunday

3 pm Sandflies vs Bees
9-10:

Tonight

7:30 pm Octopus vs Bar-
racudas

Saturday

9 am Turbots vs Dolphins
10:30 pm Red Snappers vs
Octopus

Sunday

4:30 pm Dolphins vs Bar-
racudas

11-12:

Today

6 pm Hurricanes vs Parrots
7:30 pm Wild Dogs vs Mar-
lins

Saturday

Noon White Crowns vs
Iguanas

1:30 pm Groupers vs
Conchs

3:30 pm Hurricanes vs Wild
Dogs

Sunday

3 pm White Crowns vs
Marlins

4:30 pm Iguanas vs
Groupers

13-15:

Saturday

9am Owlz vs Silverjacks
11 am Potcakes vs
Stingrays

1 pm Qwiz vs Sharks

3 pm Silverjacks vs Rac-
coons

16-18:

Sunday

2:30 pm Tainos vs
Lucayans

4 pm Caribs vs Arawaks

BASEBALL
JBLN SCHEDULE

onds back. sce thee. att G : 4 hile M Wied e THE Junior Baseball
app SS “I came here and definitely in the team sprint; Germany’s _ silver, while Meyer settled for League of Nassau will be
ac : a suuTh FRECII MEAS TIN expected myself to win,” Phin- Maximilian Levy won the bronze. . : _ back in action this weekend
Ww! AE TAL 1 20 SLT UF GLALS r URE ney said. “I came and did what keirin; and Britain outpaced It s unimaginable, it’s fan- at the St. Andrews Heldof
Bath Seer: seo: Fo reise = = 8 I had to do, and it feels good.” New Zealand for the women’s tastic, it’s a dream,” Kneisky Dreams with the following
"aa Ta Ue Pe Lae HLL bL* The 18-year-old Phinney, the team pursuit crown. . said. games on tap:
esedsssrce os cee ce Tes ise ses eo reer son of 1984 Olympic medalists. McCulloch and Meares fin-
wdc Wes mery tee were ego a el lee Connie Carpenter-Phinney and ished the sprint in a blistering TEE BALL
ee fhe weese chu cone cose see cose eee Davis Phinney, set anew Amer- 33.149 seconds, just ahead of 11 am Blue Claws vs
ia lech # yeast digo bars Ge 2Tâ„¢ dey of ican record of 4 minutes, 15.160 Pendleton and Reade, world Grasshoppers
Maret “one 1 he Unies werenchéi. Gr erorohe ie seconds in qualifying earlier in Champions the previous two 1 pm Knights vs Raptors
: i : alr oe the day, breaking the mark he years, who crossed the line in 3 pm Sand Gnats vs
——— set at the World Cup last month 33-380. Lithuania outpaced Sidewinders
France for the bronze. COACH PITCH
“We really did have to beat 10 am Diamond Backs vs
See Bee =e chica the tis = do it, Blue Jays
fl ; a ee ee and that's a great leelng, 12:30 pm Athleti
cere 4 FL Prue Werviridicn a Meares said. “It’s such a dood —
- big high.” 3 pm Ast Cub
haicurer ay - aturday Sofia. to O22 ponm- oe ind eae sl MINOR. LEAGUE.

Reade, also the BMX
world champ, thought

* LAMPS
* PILLOWS

-MATTRESSES
« WROUGHT IRON

10 am Rockies vs Rays
12:30 pm Red Sox vs Mets





they had enough speed. MAJOR LEAGUE
& BRASS BEDS -« CUSHIONS PM aia ride 12:30 pm Mariners vs Indi-
ss anaze an new we
- te Et Li ne as! | * - a i needed to find another 3 pm Marlins vs Reds
and ois: Eee circadoing ck chase amt JUNIOR LEAGUE
Ph. (242) 327-5336-+-PFax. (242) 327-5336 10 am Twins vs Yankees
a 0): 8,e ‘LOE a a 12:30 pm Cardinals vs
Dodgers
Oo UU ene DB ee
1 — aturday
LP ‘| Q i) ORF The Public i hereby aches fel LAQUAA 3 pm Rangers vs Tigers
’ —_ DEMANETT EVANS of P.O Qux 55-5958, intend iu} : Sunday
| * | change my name bo ml ’ 7 3 pm Phillies vs Pirates
hil \/ ersa ale Tt here une amy objections o the: charge i rag TE by i CYCLING
; ’ Deed Poll, you may wile suc uch ooysciions lo the Chel MID-WEEK SERIES

Porespurt Oi icer, PO. Box Nera

On selected items this steer than Hrinly (30) ckeys after
Friday & Saturday ONLY?! Unies musics

has Suu, Bahamas ng
fe dale of publication ol ¢ ONCE again the New
Providence Cycling Associa-
tion’s mid-week track Time
Trial Series continued with

fast times being recorded on

—



PRESSURE RELIEVING
SWEDISH MATTRESSES AND PILLOWS

Liege

ST i hoete shen Gel BOP RLY TIES of ET
ALPACA. BL oo, ST. FA
PAHOA fe eeotying ke bw Windle: rege be
Halolite aed Slo, i yon PLL

ma Gk a

The Batwa. wd

bed. oy Tes

Air! Ero Bp on he oe rela

eed ce Ge ere.

aed

Gros = be

ve soe oo wiles we

ects whi bool.

faa en ihe HP dep cl Merc 04 be be Blteer

ecrpaee fo relccvelly
B-T MT. Harve. Bberare.

qd Gio. TO. Bee:

OTT i heaahy pan rin AGS GORGES of

THE BLUFF EUEUTHEPA BAHASA.

fre bs

the: Alliances bor Soins nd etree tp:

a

iy oY phon Ww oilhe

Ror. 4d phage a A ea: ig

wie poe cara du! ey.
Ao pee scaring ed cpa Ceara

mati
he Bacar

len bere ers bo Pe 2 ee ol Merce.
ies os tw: hiniorer capo for niwodirg rei

1 0 Eos A



TST, Foe). ul ory.

NOTICE

sienzy glee fat ORETE WALEMTING OTAEMEN

read GLADS ONC
EVES BU

Ht Sami =
OMe ES MANS Bty

war ne o Se ie
we Core Poe



TCG,

Hoo SFT Geao

aes ao &

re a"

Wednesday at the one-mile
cycling track at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex.

The Speed Demons (track
cyclist) don their "Track
Machines’, as this event is all
about riding against the
clock.

Robert 'Penetrator'’
Bethell, Kevin 'Kilo-Man'
Ingraham, Henry ‘Spinning-
Man’ Kline, Anthony 'Big-
gie’ Colebrook, Justin ‘Jet’
Minnis, Antinece "Lilly'
Simmons were just some of
the cyclist who are getting
faster and faster, the battle
line has been drawn.

e Here’s a look at the
results from Wednesday:

2 lap TT (Cadets)

Felix Colebrook — 2min,
14sec.; Audrica Colebrook —
3min. 03sec.; Ashley Cole-
brook — 3min. 10 sec.

3 lap TT G/4 mile —
*juniors)

The Penetrator — 2min,
.O1sec.; Spinning-Man 2min.,
.O5sec.; Kilo-Man
2min., .06sec.; Biggie 2min.,
08sec; *Jet 2min., .25sec
*Lilly 2min.,
30sec *Jakota Johnson
2min., .37sec *Adrian Can-
ter 3min., .l6sec; *Larry
Russell 3min., .43sec.

Call to
advertise:

502-2371


TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



Giants overcome Comets,
Falcons rout Warriors

SENIOR GIRLS
ST. JOHN'S GIANTS - 32
GI COMETS — 23

e AFTER a lacklustre first quarter in
a game one loss, the Giants responded
with a 15 point first quarter yesterday
en route to their first win of the tourna-
ment.

The Giants led wire to wire, and shot
nearly perfect from the field in the open-
ing quarter as they took a 15-2 advantage
ona Tanika Sandiford jumper after.

Giants’ point guard Caryn Moss gave
her team their biggest lead of the game
on a tough three point play as time
expired in the second quarter.

The Giants took a 24-7 into the half.

The third quarter would be all Comets
as they outscored the Giants 11-2 to get
themselves back into the game.

Shadell Williams’ three pointer
brought the Comets within single digits
for the first time since the opening quar-
ter and her basket on the ensuing pos-
session trimmed the deficit, 24-18.

Darrinique Young ended the Comets
run and scored the only Giants basket of
the quarter for a 26-18 lead headed into
the fourth.

Moss opened the final quarter with a
three pointer to regain a double figure
advantage for the Giants and the Comets
never came within nine to close out the
contest.

The Comets brought just one mem-
ber of this year’s senior girls squad into
the tournament, but their juniors put
together a spirited effort to nearly upset
the BAISSS runners up.

Alexis Maycock led the Giants with
nine points, while Moss and Young
chipped in with seven apiece.

Williams led the Comets and all scor-
ers with 11.

Maycock said her team rebounded
well from the sluggish start in an opening
day loss and looks forward to redemp-
tion in a rematch with the GSSSA cham-
pion C.R Walker Knights.

“Our game yesterday was not so good,
but I think we can beat the C.R Walker
Knights I think we just came off with a
slow start,” she said, “We just have to
stay focused and play hard and I think
we can win this tournament. We have
to stay focused come out hard and not be
afraid to take on any challengers.”

C.R WALKER KNIGHTS - 24
GHS MAGIC - 14

e A PIVOTAL 8-2 third quarter run
led the Knights to their second win of the



ACTION from day two of the Pattie Johnson annual basketball tournament.

tournament.

In an uncharacteristic slow start, the
score was tied at three after the opening
quarter and The GSSSA champions
trailed 7-6 at the half.

Malesha Peterson tied the game at 9
with the first of her two three pointers on
the afternoon.

Her second gave the Knights a 12-9
lead putting them ahead for good.

Peterson followed with three point
play on the ensuing possession and
Pamela Bethel scored just as time
expired to give the Knights a 17-11 lead
heading into the fourth.

The Knights led by as much as 12 in
the final period.

Peterson finished with a game high 13
points.

C.1 GIBSON RATTLERS — 21
NCA CRUSADERS — 15

e THE Rattlers doubled the Crusaders
scoring output in the second half to
remain in the winner’s bracket of the



tournament.

Tied 9-9 at the half, the Rattlers
opened the third quarter on a 6-0 run,
keyed by baskets from Danielle Taylor
and Robin Gibson.

The Crusaders only score of the quar-
ter came from Gabrielle McKinney at
the free throw line and the Rattlers took
a 16-10 lead into the fourth.

Momentum looked to swing heavily
in the Crusaders favor when Rattlers
star forward Robin Gibson picked up
her fourth personal foul and a technical
foul at the end of the third quarter.

N.C.A capitalized as McKinney
sparked a 5-0 run of her own with a pair
of jumpers and a conversion from the
free throw line to bring her team within
a single score, 16-15 with just over three
minutes remaining.

Taylor made one of two free throws to
give the Rattlers a 17-15 lead with 1:23
left to play.

Back in the game after sitting much of
the fourth quarter, Gibson gave the Rat-

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

LIGhtUDWOURNOME

ANDISAVE!

NEW
LOW LOW
PRICES!
DUTY FREE
ITEM!

TAYLOR INDUSTRIES

a
ee

a.

LD

a

Mini-Jar

13 Watt (equal to 65w)
Spiral

15 Watt (equal to 75w)

ENERGY SAVING FLOURESCENT

COOL & WARM LIGHT BULBS
(Medium & Regular Based Bulbs)

from $6.20
from $4.30

20 Watt (equal to 100w)...from $4.55

Regular Jar

23 Watt (Par38 Flood)

and Cool Lite 5000k.

SHIRLEY STREET « TEL: 322-8941
OPEN: MON - FRI 7:30 am - 4:30 pm « SAT 8:00 am - 12 noon
Visit our web site at www.taylor-industries.com

23 Watt (equal to 115w)...from $4.55
24 Watt (equal to 120w)...from $9.60

from $8.00

| Available in Warm White 3000k

SR 2 ee ee ey ee ee |
ee ee
prey oat peers ay

ALL-NEW 09 FORD F-150 «=

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

tlers a two score advantage, 19-15 with a
jumper in the lane with just 20 seconds
remaining.

Gibson and Taylor both finished with
six points, while McKinney led all scorers
with 10.

SAC BIG RED MACHINE — 22
NCA CRUSADERS — 16

¢ GABRIELLE McKinney dug the
Crusaders out of a second half deficit
for the second time on the afternoon,
but again her team fell just short down
the stretch.

The Big Red Machine got to a fast
start with a 10-2 lead after the first quar-
ter, but went scoreless in the second as
the Crusaders came within four, 10-6 at
the half.

The Crusaders opened the third quar-
ter on a 4-0 run to tie the game at 10.

A pair of Tarae Sweeting baskets
stopped momentum and regained the
four point advantage for the Big Red
machine.

McKinney’s steal at half court and fast
break lay-up as time expired tied the
game again at 14 headed into the fourth
quarter.

The Crusaders led for the first time
all game on the opening possession of
the fourth, but failed to score the remain-
der of the game.

Sweeting’s lay-up gave SAC a two pos-
session advantage, 20-16 with just under
one minute remaining.

Brittney Harrison, Ashley Bethel and
Sweeting finished with six points apiece.

McKinney led the Crusaders with
nine.

PRINCE WILLIAM FALCONS — 22
FREEDOM WARRIORS — 3

e AFTER a shutout on day one, the
Warriors scored their first basket of
the tournament yet still fell to 0-2 with
another lopsided loss.

The Falcons led 5-0 after the first
quarter, and led by as much as eight
before a desperation heave by the
Warriors’ Tabitha Major placed her
team on the scoreboard.

The Falcons led 11-3 heading into
the fourth quarter and doubled their
offensive output in the final period for
the game’s final margin.

Ranel Ferguson led the Falcons with
eight points.

PRIMARY GIRLS
TEMPLE CHRISTIAN SUNS — 18
KINGSWAY SAINTS — 2

Adrian Griffith

Conner



BAAA getting reatly
for IAAF World
Championships

FROM page 14

qualify the two teams to com-
pete in the championship this
year, especially with the ear-
ly start they are getting.

McKinney encouraged
those persons who will be
travelling to Florida over the
Easter holiday weekend to
do some shopping to take the
time out and head to UM to
watch the teams perform.

As for the men’s 4 x 400
relay team, which is coming
off a silver medal at the
Olympic Games in Beijing,
China last August, McKin-
ney said they won’t run until
the Penn Relays, scheduled
for April 23-25.

“We will have to wait and
see who is available and
ready to run,” McKinney
said. “We have a lot of tools
in that respect in terms of
people who are not in school,
so we’re not too concerned
about that team.”

The men’s 4 x 4 team will
have to run 3:03.30 to qualify.

THINKING ABOUT
GETTING A TRUCK?

Get in it. Touch it. Feel it.
YOU'LL FIND |

Ss
Ii

SS Pe Oe
oS ry



be ed es ee ee
Bo ell 2) Bees Ps gee ee i bee

THOMPSON BOUL 4 Wass at Te: FAX: 325-6094

oe ee

nbs Eat ie DS"

ou A



oid Se AT TL! eT


NU

BASKETBALL
NPBA SERIES

¢ THE Commonwealth Bank Giants and the
Electro Telecom Cybots are on their way to a ;
possible rematch of last year’s finals in the New ;

Providence Basketball Association.

Playing in game one of their Vince Fergu- }
son’s best-of-five series against the Sunshine }
Auto Ruff Ryders, the Cybots pulled off a115- }
111 victory on Wednesday night at the CI Gib-

son Gymnasium.

Brian Bain led the attack with a game high 30 }
points. Nelson ‘Mandella’ Joseph had 21 and }
Cecil Mackey added 13, including a couple of }
clutch free throws down the stretch off the :

bench.

For Sunshine Auto, Ernest Saunders had 22. }
In the John Archer’s best-of-five series, the }
Giants prevailed with a 99-87 decision as the }
defending champions held off the Police :

Crimestoppers.

Michael ‘Ferley’ Bain had a game high 17

points in the win.

Game two of both series will be played on

Monday night.

BASKETBALL
DEFENCE FORCE/POLICE REMATCH

e ONCE again, the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium is expected to be jammed pack on
Saturday night at the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force and the Royal Bahamas
Police Force participate in their annual
basketball showdown.

The Police will be out to defend their
title when they host the Defence Force,
starting at 8 pm. The game is expected to
be carried live on ZNS television.

However, this year there will be no press
versus ZNS game. Last year, the press
knocked off ZNS in a prelude to the
Defence Force/Police game.

As a result of the large amount of
awards to be given out to the Legends of
both the Defence Force and the Police,
organisers have eliminated the media
game.

Fans, however, will also get to watch
the “Battle of the Bands” between the
Defence Force and the Police. Last year,
the Police Force won the band showdown
as well.

BASEBALL
FREEDOM FARM SCHEDULE

e ACTION in the Freedom Farm Baseball

League will continue throughout the weekend }
: will be sending a 36-member team
: in a bid to try and knock off the
i two power-houses French Antilles
: and Trinidad & Tobago.

at the park in Yamacraw.

e Here’s a look at the schedule of games:
TEE BALL:

Tonight

6 pm Seagrapes vs Guineps

Saturday

SEE page 12



Bre
.



FRIDAY, MARCH 27,





BMDA 20th Annual New Car Show -

—

2009

BAAA getting





ready for IAAF

World Championships



Penden een

LAST year in Savaneta, Aru-

: ba, the Bahamas posted a total of
? 721 points and collected 50
: medals, inclusive of 22 gold, 18
i silver and 10 bronze for third

place.
When the championships return

to Aruba April 16-19, the

Bahamas Swimming Federation

The French Antilles finished on

: top of the field last year with 1,107
i points and had 91 medals — 29
gold, 38 silver and 24 bronze, fol-

i ri road f.
int () fe ce BT

Te







a new vehicle!

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the focus for the juniors
taking place in St. Lucia at the Carif-
ta Games over the Easter holiday
weekend, some of the top senior ath-
letes will be competing at the Miami
Elite Invitational.

That’s when the Bahamas Associ-
ation of Athletic Associations will
begin its quest for qualifying both
the women and the men 4 x 100
metre relay teams for the IAAF
World Championships in Berlin,
Germany in August.

Ralph McKinney, one of the
BAAA’s executives, announced that
the BAAA’s relay coordinators have
put together two teams that will rep-
resent the Bahamas at the invita-
tional on April 11 at the University
of Miami.

“We have this initiative where we
want to get them all together so that
they can run some times early so
that they can go to the major inter-
national events,” McKinney said.

“These teams that we have select-
ed will consist of persons who are
not in high school or in college
because they will either be running
at Carifta or in their collegiate
meets.”

The women’s team, under the
coordination of George Cleare and
Fritz Grant, will comprise of Chan-
dra Sturrup, Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, Christine Amertil, Sasha

lowed by Trinidad & Tobago with
801 points along with 24 gold, 15
silver and 22 bronze for 61.

This year’s team will be headed
by Jeff Eneas. Also travelling with
him to complete the coaching staff
are Shirley Mireault and Michael
Stewart.

After hosting its final trials over
the weekend at the Betty Kelly
Kenning Aquatic Center, the fed-
eration ratified the team on Sun-
day evening.

However, they released the full
list of the team on Tuesday.

¢ Here’s a look at the swimmers
selected:



Rolle, Shekethia Henfield and Tia-
vannia “Tia’ Thompson.

The men’s team will include Rod-
ney Greene, Dominic Demeritte,
Adrian Griffith, Michael Mathieu
and Jamial Rolle. The relay coordi-
nators are Rupert Gardiner and
Tyrone Burrows.

“This will cost us some good mon-
ey to put it all together, but we have
to doit,” McKinney said. “Our con-
centration right now may be on
Carifta, but we are trying to get our
teams ready for the World Cham-
pionships.”

The 12th version of the champi-
onships is scheduled for August 15-
23. The women will have to run at
43.90 seconds or faster, while the
men will have to at least do 39.10 to
qualify.

The “Golden Girls” team of
Savatheda Fynes, Chandra Sturrup,
Pauline Davis-Thompson, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie and Eldece
Clarke-Lewis won the gold at the
1999 Championships in Seville,
Spain.

Although the team came back in
2000 to duplicate the feat at the
Olympic Games in Sydney, Aus-
tralia, the Bahamas has not had any
success since at either of the two
major international meets on both
the women and men’s sides.

Looking at the athletes available
now, McKinney said he doesn’t see
why the Bahamas should be able to

SEE page 13

¢ GIRLS 11-12

Alaena Carey, Abigail Lowe,
Laura Morley, Crystal Rahming,
Taryn Smith and Jacinda
Williams.

¢ GIRLS 13-14

Maya Albury, Bria Deveauv,
Lauren Glinton, Gabrielle
Greene, Berchadette Moss,
Riquel Rolle and Je’Nae Saun-
ders.

¢ GIRLS 15-17

Ashley Butler, McKayla Light-
bourn, Shaunte Moss, Amber
Weech and Ariel Weech.

Vitout tee attoched eatry ferme

“
ze
b=

'

i
=

0 ey eae
Aan

deliver it to The Tribune om
ey Street, of place in bins
ed at the BMIDA New Car
» Show at the Mail at Marathon
“by Gpm on Friday, March 27-

‘the purchase of a car from pz
1A show.

hdem 2. yl. po eed



Chandra Sturrup

Carifta swim team to compete in April

° BOYS 11-12

Dionisio Carey, Dylan Cash,
Kohen Kerr, Keith Lloyd, Zach
Moses and Dustin Tynes.

° BOYS 13-14

Camron Bruney, Zarian Cleare,
Evante Gibson, Matthew Lowe,
Toby McCarroll and Laron Mor-
ley.

° BOYS 15-17
John Bradley, Devonn
Knowles, Armando Moss,

Mancer Roberts, Cameron Rolle
and Pemrae Walker.

Friday. March 27 & Saturday, March 26 - Mall at Marathon




Thee 1.000 price will only be redeomabde towards

ts at the

Pel ond Die Lee ek pe de ee ed ee ok ey ey 8
thy EP coe eed ey he. eel fe aged 2d





























Aes
reer


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS

RBDF troops off to [iitomoaeantitacc
Summit of Americas FeaOieleea rina

A CONTINGENT of 32
marines from the Commando
Squadron Department of the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force
recently left the capital to pro-
vide joint operational support for
the 5th Summit of the Americas.

The Summit will be held in
Port of Spain, Trinidad and Toba-
go, from April 17-19. It is the first
time a Caribbean nation has ever
hosted the event.

The marines from the Bahamas
will join up with the United States
and Canada, and other Caribbean
nations’ military forces, includ-
ing troops from Barbados, St
Kitts and Jamaica.

They will undergo additional
training exercises to prepare them
for their specific duties and roles
for the Summit. Primary duties
include providing assistance to
the Ministry of National Security
of the Republic of Trinidad in the
conduct of joint inter-agency mul-
ti-national task force security
operations.

They will also provide security
for the 34 heads of states and del-
egates of the Organisation of
America States (OAS), who will
be in Trinidad, sharing ideas and



Lynden Pindling International Airport. The Marines are expected to pro-
vide joint operational support for the 5th Summit of the Americas.

exchanging opinions.

The Defence Force troops, led
by Lieutenant Dereck Ferguson
and Petty Officer Patrick Adder-
ley, departed New Providence on
April 24 via a Canadian military
aircraft.

The marines are expected to

gain valuable experience from
what will be only the second over-
seas deployment that the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force has par-
ticipated in. The first was the
United Nations Peacekeeping
Missions in Haiti during 1994-
1996.



RBDF photos: Acting Sub Lieutenant Desiree Corneille

COMMANDER MICHAEL SIMMONS briefing the RBDF troops at the Coral Harbour Base prior to their

departure to Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. The marines are expected to provide joint operational
support for the 5th Summit of the Americas.

CRAVEN’S BAKERY

Market Street South
7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Monday - Saturday

Phone: (242) 326-4246

Now taking orders for the
following:

EASTER SPECIALS

Hot Cross Buns $10.00 Per Doz.

Twist Donut $ 8.40 Per Doz.

8” Cheese Cake $35.00 Each

(Cherry or Pineapple topping)

Easter Bread $ 3.00 Per Loaf

French Bread $ 1.00 Per Loaf

Sale ends April 9th, 2009

“We bake fresh from scratch everyday to give
you the best for a whole lot less.”



THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce is working with a
regional organisation in an effort
to increase support and technical
assistance for local small and
medium-sized enterprises.

Through the efforts of the
chamber’s Small and Medium
Enterprises Support Unit (SME-
SU), officials from the Caribbean
Export and Development
Agency (CEDA) have met with
a cross-section of Bahamian busi-
nesses, inclusive of small and
medium sized enterprises repre-
senting manufacturing, agricul-
ture, fisheries, art, entertainment
and small business consultant
professionals to inform them of
support opportunities provided
by the regional trade and invest-
ment development organisation.

“Overall the meeting was a
success with 25 persons partici-
pating in the session. The group
represented a cross section of
Bahamian businesses and includ-
ed both small and medium-sized
enterprises. Through detailed
and focused discussions the
group was able to secure the
commitment of the CEDA to
host and facilitate several activi-
ties in the Bahamas,” said the
Chamber’s executive director
Philip Simon.

Importance

Donnalee Bowe, assistant gen-
eral manager of the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC) and the
Bahamas Representative to
CEDA, said: “We are certainly
pleased with the turnout of
today’s meeting with all of the
stakeholders who are going to
help to build the Bahamas, in
particular during a time like this
when the whole world is in a
recession. We can see that every-
one is now realising the impor-
tance that SMEs are going to
play in the future development of
our nation. I hope that this is the
start of great things to come for
the economic prosperity of the
Bahamas.”

The Caribbean Export and
Development Agency is com-
prised of fifteen (15) CARIFO-
RUM member states of which












Anastasia Stubbs/Visionaire Marketing



PICTURED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT is Hank Ferguson, director of the
chamber’ SMESU trade unit; Phillip Williams, executive director of
CEDA; Donnalee Bowe, assistant general manager of the Bahamas Agri-
cultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC) and the Bahamas’ repre-
sentative to CEDA, and Philip Simon, executive director of the Bahamas

Chamber of Commerce.

the Bahamas is a member.

The Chamber’s executive
director Mr Simon and director
of the Chamber’s SMESU trade
unit Hank Ferguson recently met
with representatives from the
Caribbean Export and Develop-
ment Agency along with various
local businesses.

The Caribbean Export dele-
gation was led by its executive
director Phillip Williams, its
deputy executive director Alan
Ramirez and Quentin Baldwin,
management consultant and
country representative for the
Bahamas.

Mrs Bowe also accompanied
the group along with Dale
McHardy, manager of business
advisory services at the Bahamas
Development Bank.

Mr Ferguson explained that
the meeting was arranged to
achieve several objectives, which
included that of informing the
Bahamas private sector of the
work of Caribbean Export, as
well as to gain support from
stakeholders for the work for the
agency and to assist executives
of Caribbean Export in gaining
insight about the Bahamas’ pri-
vate sector’s most urgent tech-

Share your news
















The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

nical assistance needs.

“Additionally, the meeting
sought to identify suitable insti-
tutional partners for joint action
at national and regional levels as
well as develop a programme of
specific activities, which can be
undertaken with selected nation-
al partner institutions,” Mr Fer-
guson said.

He said the Chamber is look-
ing forward to partnering with
CEDA to host three trade relat-
ed workshops in the near future.

“The workshops are being
designed jointly, and expected
to inform Bahamian manufac-
turers and service providers
(including artists) on how to gain
the negotiated benefits from the
recently signed Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA).”

Workshops

He continued, “The second of
the workshops will address trade
liberalisation in general terms
and address the specific chal-
lenges for the Bahamas to imple-
ment its commitments under the
EPA.”

“The third and final workshop
agreed to between the Chamber
and Caribbean Export will
address trade negotiations
process and look specifically at
the pending negotiations
between the Caribbean and
Canada and also address exist-
ing preferential agreements that
Bahamian businesspersons can
benefit from.

“Tt is anticipated that the first
workshop will be held in May
2009. Additional activities pro-
posed will include partnerships
with the Bahamas National Craft
Association and the Bahamas
Development Bank,” Mr Fergu-
son said.
PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Per Case
I Freeport & Abaco

Per a
| Maxpdedexcaperpacm

Available in
NASSAU: Budget Liquors, Wholesale Wine & Spirits
nie | Saunders Beach Liquor Store
KRAWD PRIX PARIS 1889 i i |; FREEPORT: Plaza Liquors, Eight Mile Rock Liquor Store
Qe Sai — ABACO: AB) Liquors

WEDAILLE por Panis 1875


THE TRIBUNE @







Neb
IEMA ie
WRLC AEA
debt/GDP

Zhivargo Laing



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas’ national debt
may have passed the 40 per cent
debt-to-GDP ratio widely
regarded as a key ‘warning’
threshold, a government minis-
ter acknowledged yesterday,
although the administration had
the fiscal “capacity to absorb
the situation we’re in”.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, speaking to
Tribune Business from Colom-
bia, where he was attending an
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) conference, said
that while the current fiscal sit-
uation was not ideal, “the way
we have managed our fiscal
affairs” in the past and relatively
low level of foreign indebted-
ness had given the Government
room to hopefully ride out the
current storm.

Comparing the Bahamas to
countries in the Caribbean and
other states with similar credit
ratings, Mr Laing said they gen-
erally had much higher debt-to-
gross domestic product (GDP)
ratios, whereas the Bahamas’
was much lower.

“Looking at 40 to 41 per cent
of GDP, relatively speaking,

SEE page 2B

Solomon’s Mines

closes down store

SOLOMON’S Mines has
shut-down one of its stores on
Bay Street, Tribune Business
has learned, citing the eco-
nomic downturn as the reason
for the closure.

Sources, who were not
authorised to speak on behalf
of the company, confirmed
yesterday that Solomon’s
Mines Diamond Centre closed
its doors recently, with no
plans to reopen in the near
future.

The store, located on Bay
and Parliament Streets, has a
sign which read “closed
today” posted on its window
for almost two weeks.

Sources told Tribune Busi-
ness that all of the staff were
relocated to its other Bay
Street stores.

Calls to the store’s upper
management, including presi-
dent Mark Finlayson, were
not returned up to press time
yesterday. Middle manage-
ment refused to meet or make
a statement to Tribune Busi-
ness when they visited their
Bay Street head office.

The information contained is from a third |
party and The Tribune can not be held

responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report. -



ll

FRIDAY,

ao
oo

MsACRIG@ se Paar |



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Global chief: My assets
and firm’s all for sale

I Ritchie says unnamed investor ready to inject cash to save Global United if
Government stays winding-up, and says only $6m, not $8m, owed

I Argues that government action preventing company collecting $10m owed to it

I 50 staff jobs in jeopardy, to add to 160 already dismissed

I But admits overambitious expansion started firm’s woes, and that NIB owed
contributions he is aiming to pay

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Global United’s president
yesterday told Tribune Busi-
ness he had an unnamed
investor “standing by to inject
cash into” the business if the
Government would hold-off
on winding it up, adding that
currently all his and the firm’s
fixed assets were on the mar-
ket for sale.

In a series of e-mailed
replies to Tribune Business’s
questions, Jackson Ritchie
said the Government had so
far shown no sign of changing
its position on enforcing the
Supreme Court judgments
requiring Global United to

pay around $6 million in
unpaid customs duties, fees
and departure taxes. He
denied that it was a previous-
ly claimed $8 million, arguing
that the Government had got
its figures wrong.

Working feverishly to res-
cue his shipping agency, trans-
portation and logistics busi-
ness, Captain Ritchie told Tri-
bune Business yesterday: “The
company can only survive if
the Government relents and
comes to the table to work
with us, the bank and other
stakeholders.

“We have an investor stand-
ing by to inject cash into the
business once the Govern-
ment indicates they will work

Realtors go to the ‘Max’
to get ‘to next level’

NO FLAGGING: Craig Pinder (right)



|

pictured with Bahamas Real Estate

Association (BREA) president William Wong.

* BREA chief, Paradise
Real Estate become
RE/MAX franchisees

* Network’s website gets
100,000 hits inquiring
about Bahamas in one
month

* While inquiries off
20%, activity in high-end
market ‘still strong’ as
high net worths seek
purchases to hedge
against inflation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Two Bahamas-based realtors
yesterday said they hoped their
newly-acquired RE/MAX fran-
chises would take their busi-
nesses “to the next level”, one
telling Tribune Business that
while inquiries had dipped by
20 per cent “the high-end mar-
ket is still very strong”.

The RE/MAX name and
franchise will now be carried by
RE/MAX Paradise Real Estate,
the former Paradise Real Estate
owned by broker Craig Pinder,
and RE/MAX Ocean Realty
Bahamas. The latter is the for-
mer William Wong & Associ-
ates, owned by current
Bahamas Real Estate Associa-
tion (BREA) president William
Wong.

Both Mr Wong and Mr Pin-
der said they expected the
RE/MAX brand to boost their
business by further enhancing
their respective organisations’
credibility in international mar-

SEE page 5B

with the company. They [the
Government] have to act now
to commence winding-up pro-
ceedings. As far as we know,
they have not acted. If they
do, we close. If they don’t, we
continue as normal. Right
now, we plan to continue on
as we still have the support of
the bank [FirstCaribbean
International Bank
(Bahamas)] and our major
vendors.”

Captain Ritchie said Global
United’s efforts to collect $10
million allegedly owed to it by
clients were also being ham-
pered by the Government’s
threat to wind-up the compa-

SEE page 3B

t’s back to the court

today, and many

CLICO policyhold-

ers/depositors are
desperately looking around
for someone to scalp for
their financial plight. This is
perfectly understandable,
given that a reckless business
strategy and mismanagement
have played havoc with their
long-term savings and retire-
ment plans. Tribune Busi-
ness, for what it’s worth,
gives them its wholehearted
sympathy, because the out-
look is bleak whatever way
you slice it.

SEE page 8B

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Business licence ripe for
corporate income tax
change, says ex-minister

Switch would allow Bahamas to pursue double tax
treaties as TIEA alternative, as Smith says ‘fallout
not too great’ from OECD compliance move

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas could convert the
current business licence fee system
into a corporate income tax if it
decided to pursue double taxation
agreements with other countries, a
former finance minister told Tri-
bune Business, arguing that accom- |
modating the OECD/G-20
demands could help spur much-
needed tax reform.

James Smith, the former minister
of state for finance in the Christie
administration, said that while the
Organisation for Economic Co-
Operation and Development
(OECD’s) anti-international finan-
cial centre initiative was “being driven by might rather than
right”, there were still opportunities for the Bahamas to pur-
sue investment/tax treaties that would be more beneficial than
a standard Tax Information Exchange Agreement (TIEA).

“There could be a tax opportunity here, because going
forward we would have to alter the tax system, so we might
be able to look at that now. Double tax treaties might serve

SEE page 4B

JAMES SMITH



Parent guarantee stops 59%
CLICO Bahamas asset impair

Sys ee

— * debtor. rdr Palawan briaiers high Cede od be

lets) 00 day, each eae ee Gee eer 20 per come el in voles

Regulator Probes CLICO’s over
/0 per cent affiliate exposure

IN THE NEWS: The CLICO
saga has made headlines.



FAMILY GUARDIAN

WU INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

[| steady cash flow
C5 worry-free retireme
[ guaranteed incon

A all of the

— eanancial Strength Rating

A Eeeettemt


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas may be past | Ro
40% debt/GDP ratio | hj

FROM page 1B

you have the capacity to absorb
the situation we find ourselves
in,” Mr Laing told Tribune
Business. “It’s not ideal for us,
it’s not where we want to be as
we want to be in a better posi-
tion than that. But we certainly
have the capacity to absorb the
situation we’re in.”

Bahamas’ debt-to-GDP ratio
was higher than 40 per cent, a
threshold regarded as a ‘warn-
ing’ level by international insti-
tutions such as the Internation-
al Monetary Fund (IMF) and
credit rating agencies, Mr Laing
said the Government did not
currently have final data on this.

But he conceded: “Given
where we were, around 38 per

When asked whether the cent, in the most recent indica-

A
NAD

Nassau Airport
Developmont Company

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following
items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for
the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (ie.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected fo be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access fo the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRACI BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs





tions we could certainly be
around that [40-41 per cent] fig-
ure.”

Many observers have fre-
quently contended that the
Bahamas’ national debt-to-
GDP ratio is much higher than
the data provided by the Gov-
ernment, arguing that it is prob-
ably closer to 44-45 per cent.
Some have argued that it could
be as high as 50 per cent, and
publicly decried the ever-
increasing size of government
and seeming reluctance to
reduce recurrent spending.

Once past the 40 per cent
threshold, the danger increases
that a nation could be subject to
a downgrade in its sovereign
credit rating. If that happened, it
would be unable to obtain debt
(bond) financing on preferen-
tial terms, increasing its debt
servicing costs.

Mr Laing, who on Wednes-
day said government revenues
were now $100 million below
forecast for the 2008-2009 Bud-
get year, due to a major drop
during the 2009 first quarter -
traditionally the period when it
obtains most revenue - also
acknowledged that the GFS fis-
cal deficit for the full year was
set to be higher than projected.

The GFS fiscal deficit strips
out the actual cost of debt prin-
cipal redemptions.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing said it
was “extremely important” and
of “great benefit” to the
Bahamas’ fiscal management
that it had maintained “a low
level of foreign indebtedness”.
Most of the national debt is
domestically held, with minimal
exposure outside the Bahamas.

JOB POSITION

PNBSy- SMe,
Marketing Agent.
At least 5 years

ey ered atsvilnoe

MiKo Coe
P.O.Box EE17318

Mebaren [ie ingrece [tend

THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, U.S. EMBASSY &

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK PRESENT

THE

BUSINESS EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009 + 8:00a.m.- 3:30 p.m. * The British Colonial Hilton

AGENDA

830 REGISTRATION/NETWORKING

1130 PANEL DISCUSSION Il

* SURVIVING THE ECONOMIC

Sod = INVOCATION, PRAYER &

NATIONAL ANTHEMS

RECESSION’
* Ken Kerr (Providence Advisors!

* Barry Maloolm (Scotiabank Bahamas ltd)

INTRODUCTION & MODERATOR
* Philip Simon, Executive Director
Bohomes Chamber of Commerce

* James Smith (Colina Rinancial Advisors!

LUNCHEON PRESENTATION

“THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC THREAT! THE

WELCOME REKARKS

+ Dionisio OD Aguilar, President
Bohomeas Chamber of Cammerce

+ Darron Cash, Chairman
Eohomas Oevelpament fant

+ Timothy Zimiga-Brown, Charge”
d'Affairs a. U5, Embassy

GLOBAL ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY!”

* Ronald Langston, (Forme! National
Oirector of the Minority Gusiness
Orveloament Agency (MBDA, U, §.
OQepartment of Commence

PANEL DISCUSSION Ill

* POSITIONED FOR SUCCESS, BEYOND

‘ REASONS TO REJOICE IN RECESSION *
* Gregory Bathell, President
Fidelity Rank

COFFEE BREAK

PANEL DISCUSSION!
‘WAKING, MAXIMIZING &
PROTECTING YOUR INVESTMENT *
* Peter Miller (Aohames Develoornent
amr;
+ Khaalis Rolle (Mossay Water ferries!
+ Inapector Sandra Miller
(Royal Bahanns Police Force)

Registration Fee: $100.00

Please A.5.V.B

Contact: The Chamber of Commerce

CLOSING

THE RECESSION WHAT'S NEXT!’
* Larry Gibson (Colonia! Bension Servires!
* Chester Cooper (Aritish American
Finaricial!

* Raymond Winder (Defoitte 4 Touche)

Teal: 322-2145 or email: register@thebahamaschamber.com



yal Bank draws upon
gher Asue savings rate

Bank disappointed in response of loan defaulters

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards @tribunemedia.net

ROYAL BANK of Cana-
da (RBC) has been disap-
pointed with the number of
customers seeking help for
loan delinquencies and has
seen an increase in defaults,
its country vice-president said
yesterday, at the launch of the
bank’s new savings program
called RBC Asue.

Nathaniel Beneby said Roy-
al Bank saw an increased
amount of loan defaults into
year-end 2008 and the begin-
ning of 2009, as a result of the
economic downturn and mass
layoffs.

“There is an increase in
defaults, and as this recession
is prolonged it will worsen.
You will see an increase, but
that disappointment with peo-
ple not coming in is them not
being proactive enough, not
paying attention and
approaching the bank to
address their present situa-
tion,” Mr Beneby said.

“We’re hoping that what is
being experienced today will
really help Bahamians change
their habits. This will be a
change in behaviour, which
will be the positive thing that
will come out of this. They will
pay alittle bit more attention
and things will probably nor-
malise, where people will then
be able to borrow what they
can afford to pay and spend
what they can afford to pay.”

According to Mr Beneby,
RBC’s Asue savings pro-
gramme will encourage
Bahamians to save and pro-
mote prudent money man-
agement.

Programme

The programme is not like
the traditional Asue known to
most Bahamians, with various
individuals contributing to a
cumulative coffer and even-
tually enjoying a draw on what
they have invested, but a sav-
ings scheme with an interest
rate 0.5 per cent higher than a
regular savings account.

“The traditional Asue is a
concept that Bahamians read-
ily identify with, and although
we are all bankers around this
table, it is a practice that has
benefited many Bahamian
families in achieving short-
term and long-term goals,”
said Mr Beneby.

“We decided to improve
upon the Asue concept and
offer Bahamians a tangible
tool for consistent savings
towards a worthwhile goal.”

He added that Royal Bank
is part of the Canadian bank-
ing system, which has been
rated the best in the world.

According to Reuters,
Canada has the soundest
banking system in the world,
followed by Sweden Luxem-
bourg and Australia. And
according to a Financial Times
article headed Canada Banks
Prove Envy of the World,
Canadian investment banks
have been so strong because
of a tightly regulated sector
where institutions would “pay
a price for unwise investing”.

‘Give me capitalism,
warts and all, always’

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT’s
implementation of the nation-
al unemployment benefit
scheme will increase taxes, but
the loss for taxpayers will not
be subsidiaed on any other
front, the Nassau Institute’s
vice-president said yesterday.

Rick Lowe told the Rotary
Club of West Nassau at its
monthly meeting that the
scheme emphasises the Gov-
ernment’s socialist tendencies.

He explained that more
government intervention in
the economy will inevitably
lead to an increase in the

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Bahamas’ current $3 billion-
plus national debt that will
burden future generations.

“At the Nassau Institute we
might be considered fiscal
conservatives, but I prefer to
think it is better for govern-
ment to spend within its
means than burden future
generations, yet unborn, with
deficits and debt that we will
never repay in most of our
lifetimes,” he said.

Mr Lowe said he had
received copies of the draft
Bill for the unemployment
benefit scheme, and noted
that computer payroll systems
would have to be changed to
accommodate the tax increase.

He added that the tax
increase that will come with
the scheme comes at the worst

2008/CLE/qui/01870

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising an area of 13, 486 square feet situate approximately
500 feet west of Lincoln Boulevard and north side of Palm Beach
Court on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of
land has such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions
as are shown on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Mary Jane Smith

NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Mary Jane Smith of the Southern
District, of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas in respect of: - ALL
THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising an area of 13,
436 square feet situate approximately 500 feet west of Lincoln
Boulevard and north side of Palm Beach Courton the Island
of New Providence one of the Islands in the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of land has
such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions as
are shown on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

Mary Jane Smith claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the
said tract of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having
Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the petition shall on or before the 27" of AprilA.D.,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed form
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before
the 27" of April A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:The Registry of

the Supreme Court;

The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for the
Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,

Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;

Dated the 27" day of January A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner







“The Bahamas
has decided to
venture down
this slippery
slope with the
implementation
of unemploy-

ment insurance.”



possible time, without a cor-
responding decrease in other
areas to compensate, and
companies would be forced to
provide government with
more forms when an employ-
ee is dismissed.

“One might believe that it is
magnanimous of the Govern-
ment to offer this programme,
but even I would be a hero if I
could pass laws to take money
from one person under the
threat of fines or jail time and
give it to someone else,” said
Mr Lowe.

“The Bahamas has decided
to venture down this slippery
slope with the implementation
of unemployment insurance.

“Government handouts, no
matter how well intentioned,
create black holes for taxpay-
ers’ hard earned money.”

Mr Lowe said abuse of the
unemployment scheme could
become ingrained in the sys-
tem “that honest taxpaying
Bahamians will have to fund.”

The Nassau Institute advo-
cates smaller government and
laissez-faire capitalism, as
opposed to more government
planning.

According to Mr Lowe,
under government’s watch,
the national debt has risen
from $870 million to $3 billion
in 18 years, representing a
$118 million increase each and
every year or 244.8 per cent
increase.

Mr Lowe said that the
Bahamas had fallen from 43rd
to 49th on an index that ranks
the economic freedom of
countries, when it was ranked
7th in 1972. “I sincerely
believe the goal of downsiz-
ing government is a much
more worthy national eco-
nomic plan than encouraging
more failed government plan-
ning,” he said. “Give me cap-
italism, warts and all, any
day.”

Claw

For the stories

behind the news,
ie et-Co Merde] 4T 4
on Mondays
THE TRIBUNE

Global chief: My assets
and firm’s all for sale

the company.

He pointed out that only
FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas), which had
a fixed and floating charge
over $20 million worth of
Global United assets, would
likely recover what was owed
in the event of liquidation
“and in this economic climate
even they may fall short”.

Captain Ritchie argued that
all Global United’s payment
plans were rejected, with

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 3B



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you
are raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in
the area or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and share
your story.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

FROM page 1B

ny.

He added that if the Gov-
ernment made good on its
winding-up threat, some 50
Global United staff would
have to be laid-off, adding to
the 160 who had already been
released since April/May 2008.

When asked by Tribune
Business whether Global
United’s problems stemmed

CRANLEIGH PROPERTIES LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, CRANLEIGH PROPERTIES LIMITED, has
been dissolved and struck off the Register according to
the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar

General on the 18th day of March, 2009.

from expanding too far, too
fast, and taking on an unsus-
tainable debt load it could not

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham refusing to meet with
himself and persons acting for

service with cash flows that
were generated, Captain
Ritchie effectively conceded

Simon John Harman
Equity Trust House
28-30 The Parade

the company to resolve the
situation.
He said that Global United

this was the case. The key pur-
chases were United Shipping
and Global Customs Brokers
& Trucking and World Bound
Couriers

“Admittedly, on reflection,
Global United’s
expansion/acquisitions were
probably too aggressive, which
adversely affected the cash
flow, thereby creating the
environment for the follow-
ing events to occur,” Captain
Ritchie said.

“In retrospect, however, the
acquisitions were pivotal and
essential to Global United
securing a foothold in Nassau
and the long-term growth of
the business. Once non-essen-
tial assets are shed there will
be steady growth in its core
business segments, which will
not only be good for Global
United but also for employ-
ment and the economy at
large.”

And Captain Ritchie also
confirmed that the company
owed the National Insurance
Board (NIB) money, a sum
former employees had told
this newspaper was around
$60,000.

Captain Ritchie did not con-
firm that figure, but told this
newspaper: “Since our Cash
flow was flipped around by 90
- 120 days in early 2007 when
this action commenced, we
have been unable to pay many
vendors.

“Up until that time the com-
pany had paid its National
Insurance regularly. The com-
pany recently made a payment
to National Insurance and
made a proposal to pay off the
balance over a period. We are
waiting for their response.

“In addition to making a



Jackson Ritchie

lump sum payment to Cus-
toms, the planned outcome of
our restructuring was to bring
all vendors current, including
National Insurance.

“It is to be noted that Glob-
al United is owed millions of
dollars by both local and for-
eign companies, and part of
the plan is to collect these and
use the proceeds to liquidate
some of the debt.”

And Captain Ritchie
revealed that Global United’s
Airport Industrial Park head-
quarters, for which he is seek-
ing $1.8 million, “along with
all the company’s fixed assets
and those owned by myself
are on the market”.

Detailing the company’s
troubles, Captain Ritchie
explained that the critical
effect the Government’s
action, which began in 2007,
had on his business was to
damage cash flow/liquidity by
demanding immediate repay-
ment of all monies owed,
something that disrupted the
previous 90-120 day payment
periods Global United had
enjoyed.

Captain Ritchie said prac-
tice was different from the
law, which he indicated was

unrealistic. Ministry of
Finance officials had insisted
that all cruise passenger
departure taxes were to be
paid within 10 days after they
were collected, something that
he said, “if truly enforced”,
would make all cruise lines,
shipping and travel agencies
indebted to the Public Trea-
sury “to the tune of hundreds
of millions of dollars”.

The Global United presi-
dent and chief executive
described as “unique” the fact
that “after following estab-
lished practice for years, Glob-
al United trade payables were
called in instantly.

“Global United used to
have over $125 million flowing
through its accounts in a given
year,” he added, arguing that
requiring immediate payment,
up-front and in a lump sum,
was a condition the company
would never be able to meet.

Questioning why Global
United was seemingly the only
company that the Govern-
ment had served with statuto-
ry demands for immediate
payment, Captain Ritchie sug-
gested in an e-mailed reply to
Tribune Business that it would
be meaningless to liquidate

ultimately proposed a
$400,000 per month payment
programme to settle the debt,
which FirstCaribbean offered
to guarantee.

“In a classic catch 22 situa-
tion, Customs refused to
accept the plan unless the
bank guaranteed it in writing,
and the bank refused to guar-
antee the plan unless Customs
accepted it in writing,” Cap-
tain Ritchie alleged.

After initially proposing a
$150,000 week payment pro-
gramme, Captain Ritchie then
offered to pay the Customs
Department $211,567 per
month for a period that would
not last longer than Decem-
ber 31, 2008. This then
increased to the $400,000 per
month.

The final payment plan,
Captain Ritchie added, includ-
ed a $500,000 lump sum pay-
ment to the Government
upfront.

He again questioned why
Global United was seeming-
ly being targeted, when other
companies - especially foreign-
owned ones - were not being
subjected to the same pres-
sure.

PRICEWATERHOUsE(GOPERS

MANAGER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

One of our major clients seeks to recruit a qualified information technology professional
with experience in financial and customer service applications for the above position.

QUALIFICATIONS:

St. Helier, Jersey,
JE1 1EQ
Liquidator

NOTICE

CGA Holdings Limited

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 18th day of March, 2009.

David Becker
Liquidator

CGA Holdings Limited



of



* Masters of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

* Eight or more years experience including hands-on technical experience and
two years minimum managing an information technology department in a large
organization with a complex, multi-vendor, multi-platform and distributed
computing environment
Visionary who can analyze problems within the context of corporate strategy,
balancing the consideration of facts, priorities, resources, constraints and
altematives

RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Lead, monitor and develop a team of information technology professionals to
deliver customer focused service and set performance expectations to achieve
excellence
Manage the development, implementation and day-to-day operations of the
Information Technology department
Actively contribute to the tactical and strategic development of information
technology to support the organization’s business needs
Accountable for the successful delivery to agreed time scales and within budget of
departmental projects or programmes
Assist accounting and engineering departments in ensuring accurate and timely
preparation of reports



“We've Hatched Some
GREAT Getaways for you!”

ite tor hs
Direct to London

$574.00

Economyround trip.
Taxes not included.



res
TCH CTC)

ET

T Oe
wo ee
ED ped

REQUIREMENTS:
This is a senior position that will require a professional with very extensive
experience in supervising and controlling computer professionals in financial,
customer services and engineering applications.
Strong management and communications skills
Strong technical and troubleshooting skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure
Solid understanding of business operations and strategic planning

ol Mey
Lee

eh | yaa! er
TE A TTT mr

Rt os
SY ad AIT)

ele ae dg eee tome
included.

COMPENSATION:
Attractive salary and other benefits will be commensurate with training and experience.

Taxes included - Seals are ienibed - restrictions aopty.

Written applications should be addressed to:

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: IT MANAGER 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Private & Confidential


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

SS SSS eS ee SSS
Tourism scholarship

Business licence ripe for corporate
income tax change, says ex-minister

FROM page 1B

that purpose,” Mr Smith told
Tribune Business.

By signing a double tax treaty
with another nation, Bahamas
subsidiaries of parent compa-
nies domiciled in that country
would have their profits taxed at
a likely lower rate by this
nation. No tax would be
imposed by the parent compa-
ny’s country, providing both it
and the Bahamas-domiciled
entity with important tax sav-
ings.

In this way, foreign compa-
nies would be enticed to estab-
lish subsidiaries in the Bahamas,
increasing investment, com-
merce and employment in this
nation.

But to be able to sign double
taxation agreements, the
Bahamas would first need to
implement some kind of income
tax base.

Mr Smith yesterday suggested
to Tribune Business that this
could be achieved by converting
the existing business licence fee
into a corporate income tax.

“We have a turnover tax, the
business licence fee,” he
explained.



“The devil will
be in the detail,
in terms of
which countries
do it and
when.”



James Smith

“All you’d have to do is mod-
ify that and make provisions for
deductions where you do it on
the net, rather than the gross, as
is done now, and make provi-
sions for repatriation and infor-
mation exchange with other
jurisdictions.

“That’s if we want to go down
the route of double taxation.”

Currently, the business
licence fee is levied as a per-
centage of gross turnover,
rather than the net.

Responding to the Govern-
ment’s public position that it
would now negotiate TIEAs “as
a matter of priority” with

save 30%

on newspaper & radio



UOT

stimulus

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money ot Work

OECD and G-20 members who
wanted them, Mr Smith added:
“The devil will be in the detail,
in terms of which countries to
do it with and when. Once we
indicated this intention, we have
to take it on board and move
quickly to meet the OECD
standard of 12 TIEAs.”

The OECD has threatened
to ‘blacklist’ jurisdictions that
do not have a minimum of 12
TIEAs with other states.

At present, the Bahamas has
only one, and it is understood
that the Government is seeking
feedback, via the Bahamas
Financial Services Board
(BFSB), on which nations it
would be ‘least harmful’ to sign
TIEAs with based on the finan-
cial services sector’s current
client base.

Mr Smith said there would
be some “trade offs” when it
came to signing TIEAs, and
that some agreements might
prompt a few clients or institu-
tions to leave the Bahamas.

But he added: “I suspect the
fall-out will not be too great,
because all international finan-
cial centres are on the same
page.

“At the end of the day, there
will be a little shake-out, but

LIMITED TIME OFFER

nothing too disastrous. The
worst thing that could have hap-
pened would have been to end
up on that list and others did
not.”

The former minister said the
consequences of being black-
listed by the OECD/G-20 could
have been severe, as France was
threatening not to allow its
banks to do business with insti-
tutions in listed countries.

That, in turn, could have
forced many Bahamas-based
institutions with French head
offices to leave this nation.

As for the US, Mr Smith
pointed out that it could deny
Bahamas-based institutions
access to the US financial sys-
tem, closing off credit/debit card
clearing, correspondent bank-
ing and securities settlements.
A withholding tax might also
be imposed on remittances to
this nation.

He added that the Bahamas
had already done much work
on restructuring its internation-
al financial services sector
already, but a number of fac-
tors - not least the economic
downturn and enhanced glob-
al regulatory efforts - were like-
ly to ensure it generated “very
slow growth”.

242.322.4652

G*&

cr A Ll”

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKEBAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

-f£2 MIF s&s 1.

applicants sought

Applicants seeking scholarships to finance their tourism-
related studies have until month’s end to apply, it was
revealed yesterday.

Over the past four years, 21 hotel industry scholarships
valued at $70,000 have been awarded to Bahamian students,
thanks to the efforts of the the Bahamas Hotel Association
and its partner organisations, the Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union and the Bahamas Hotel
Employers Association.

"Now is an ideal time to invest in one's future, by pur-
suing studies in the hospitality industry” said Bahamas
Hotel Association president Robert Sands.

Opportunities

"Despite the global economic downturn, looking ahead,
tourism will continue to be the world's leading growth
industry, and the career and entrepreneurial opportunities
for Bahamians will be considerable. For many students and
families, this financial support could not come at a better
time. We are grateful to our members, our industry part-
ners, and the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers
Union for their contributions, which enable us to offer
these scholarships."

The BHA is presently soliciting applicants both for the
industry partners Pat Bain Scholarships, and the Caribbean
Hotel & Tourism Education Foundation’s scholarship pro-
grams. Six $4,000 College of the Bahamas scholarships
are available under the Industry Partners programme,
named in honour of the late union leader Pat Bain, who was
a strong advocate for education and training.

The application process is open until March 31, and
awards will be announced by June 30. Individuals wishing
to apply should contact Bridget Murray, workforce devel-
opment manager for the Bahamas Hotel Association, at
322-8381 for eligibility criteria and application forms, or vis-
it the Education section of BHA's website.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00115

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Millard Bethel
NOTICE OF PETITION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Millard Bethel
of North Palmetto Point, Eleuthera, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
is applying to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas to have his title
investigated determined and declared under the

Quieting Titles Act. 1959 (Ch. 393) in respect

of the land hereafter described, that is to say:
“ ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
comprising Eight and Seven-hundredtwenty-nine
Thousandths (8.729) Acres located approximately
Eighty-seven (87) feet South of the Eleuthera
Main Road and approximately Zero and Three
Tenths (0.3) miles North-Westwardly of Palmetto
Point Crossing and is bounded Northwardly
by the Estate of Horatius Thompson running
thereon for a total distance of Four-Hundred-
twelve and Thirty-five Hundredths (412.35) feet,
Eastwardly by property formerly of the Estate
of Anthony Drexel and now the property of the
Petitioner running thereon for a total distance of
Eleven-hundred two and ninety-three hundredths
(1102.93) feet, Southwardly by property of
Eleuthera Land Company Ltd., running thereon for
a total distance of Three hundred-thirty-two and
Twenty-two hundredths (332.22) feet, Westwardly
by property of Emma E. Cooper running thereon
for a total distance of Nine hundred-seventy-
nine and Forth Three Hundredths (979.43) feet
continuing back to the point of commencement
the said piece parcel or tract of land described
aforesaid is delineated in PINK on the plan
submitted with the Petitioner’s Petition.”
AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition
and the Plan of the said land may be inspected
during normal office hours at the following
places:

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 26 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,640.47 | CHG 0.50 | %CHG 0.03 | YTD -71.89 | YTD % -4.20
FINDEX: CLOSE 806.09 | YTD -3.45% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $
Abaco Markets 1.42 0.127
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
4.80 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.48
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs 1.61
Doctor's Hospital 2.16
Famguard TFS
Fince 11.00
FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45
Focol (S) 5.07
Focol Class B Preference 1.00
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnsen 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00

i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House,
East Street North, New Providence, The
Bahamas.

il. Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, East Shirley
Street, Highland Terrace, New Providence,
The Bahamas.

il. The Administrator's Office, Governor’s
Harbour, Eleuthera, The Bahamas

Div $

1.39

0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.309

0.63
3.15
1.95

0.63
3.15
2.37

0.63
3.15
2.37

0.118
0.438
0.099
0.240
0.598
0.322
0.794
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

6.48
1.65
2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00

2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person
having dower or right to dower, an adverse claim
or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall
on or before the 6th May A.D., 2009 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petition or his
attorney an Adverse Claim in the prescribed
form supported by Affidavit.

OOOO OC OC OPO OC OOS
22909009990009000000
6666656685056656560566

0.30

5.50

8.60
10.00

0.30
5.50

0.30

5.59. 1,050

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low

1000.00

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB22 100.00

S52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve
an Adverse Claim on or before 6th May A.D.,
2009 date will operate as a bar to such claim.

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
RND Holdings

0.00 0.00
0.45 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months
0.95 4.77
-1.40 -3.35
0.67 4.37
-1.94 -11.33
0.96 5.79

0.00
0.55

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

NA _ Vv
1.3664
2.8988
1.4432
3.3201

12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0440
1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
nd Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Ci jelity
Last Price - Last traded
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Div $
1.3041
2.9230
1.3828
3.3201
11.8789

100.0000

96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

28-Feb-0939
28-Feb-09
6-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-O7
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

Dated this 5th day of March A.D., 2009

Sharon Wilson & Co.
Chambers
Delvest House
East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner

0.56
-3.59
0.00

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-13.33
4.40
3.64
4.40

0.06
0.80

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

in last 52 weeks
weighted price for daily volume
ted price for daily volume
m day to day
raded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
jed by the last 12 month earnin gs
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


THE TRIBUNE



Realtors go to the ‘Max’ to get ‘to next level’

FROM page 1B

kets, and with foreign buyers.

Through their franchises, the
Bahamas has become the 73rd
country to join RE/MAX’s
global network, and both men
believe membership will pro-
vide their listing clients with
wider exposure for their
Bahamas-based properties via
other franchise members.

In addition, other RE/MAX
members will be able to direct
foreign clients eyeing Bahamian
real estate to their companies,
increasing business on both
sides.

Mr Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness: “We feel it’s going to be a
big help for us in attracting
more foreign clients to our
shores.

“Outside the Bahamas, we
need some help, and we’re asso-
ciated with one of the biggest
players in the business.

“We’re looking forward to
expanding our business and tak-
ing it to the next level.

“They [RE/MAX] had
100,000 hits in 30 days, from
January to the beginning of
February, from people wanting
information on the Bahamas.
Ever since we tied up with
them, in the last week we’ve

been getting a tremendous
amount of hits on our wed page
from people looking at the
Bahamas.”

Mr Wong added that while
both he and Mr Pinder would
remain competitors, as
RE/MAX franchisees they
would also be operating as
allies.

He added that the brand
identity would help them both
compete in the Nassau and
Bahamian markets with the
likes of Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty, Bahamas Real-
ty, ERA Dupuch Real Estate,
Sotheby’s Damianos Realty and
H. G. Christie.

Merits

Mr Pinder told Tribune Busi-
ness that he first thought about
seeking the RE/MAX franchise
some six months ago, but the
plan crystallised when he visited
its Las Vegas conference three
weeks ago, where he spoke to
other franchisees from the
region who extolled the brand’s
merits.

“The RE/MAX brand is well-
known and should increase traf-
fic to my website,” he explained.
“Tt’s a well-known and trusted
real estate brand name.

RE/MAX now has over a 50
per cent market share for all
real estate TV commercials. It
was looking to get a big brand
name, and RE/MAX was the
clear choice by far.”

Pointing to this “huge expo-
sure”, which included advertis-
ing slots during the Super Bowl,
Mr Pinder said the franchise
affiliation would help grow his
business.

“With the increased business,
we should increase sales, attract
more agents and serve more
islands” Mr Pinder said. Cur-
rently, he has four agents in
Nassau, two in Abaco and one
in Eleuthera.

While real estate inquiries
received compared to last year
had dropped “probably by 20
per cent”, Mr Pinder said he
was busier than he had been
compared to the same period
in both 2008 and 2007.

“The high-end market is still
very strong,” Mr Pinder
explained.

“There’s a lot of high-net
worth individuals with cash
looking for good deals.

“They know the market’s
going to turn at some point, and
are ready to catch good prop-
erties at a decent price to take
advantage of the situation.

“Tf you’re willing to put in the
hours to locate these deals for
high net worth individuals ready
ti buy, it’s well worth the
effort.”

Mr Pinder added that buyers
with liquidity were also looking
at real estate as a hedge against
an expected increase in infla-
tion, as the various economic
stimulus packages expanded fis-
cal spending and the money
supply in the US and elsewhere.

Mr Wong added that because
the Bahamas had such a good
reputation worldwide, other
RE/MAX realtors were “dying
to send their clients here. The
Bahamas has a very good name
abroad”.

He added that to join the
RE/MAX network, a $20,000
first-time fee had to be paid for
the first five years.

RE/MAX also earned a per-
centage of the firm’s gross rev-
enues, with all agents paying a
commission as well.

Therefore, franchises such as
RE/MAX are truly beneficial
for real estate firms with a large
volume of business, as opposed
to the part-timers.

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 5B

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Equity Side

2009
No.0020

IN THE MATTER OF a piece parcel or lot of land contained
by measurements one and two hundred and ninety four
hundredths (1.294) acres and situate on the northeastern side of

the Queen’s Highway in the vicinity of Palestine B

aptist

I

Church in the settlement of Deadman’s Cay in the Island of

Long Island, The Bahamas.
AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Alvin S. Turnquest.

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act 1959

NOTICE

The Petitioner in this matter claims to be the owner in fee simple
possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described and the
Petitioner has made an application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and
the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in the
Certificate of Title granted by the Court in accordance with the

provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal office

hours at:

Governments position
on OECD backed by BFSB

The Bahamas Financial Services Board
(BFSB) yesterday gave its backing to the
Government’s announced position on the
OECD and G-20 initiatives, and its endorse-
ment of moves to meet standards for trans-
parency and tax information exchange.

“The insistence of the Government on
clarity and unequivocal language with
respect to a level playing field, particularly
as it relates to timelines and standards, was
strongly supported by industry in 2002,”
the BFSB said in a statement.

“Likewise, the industry now supports the
decision of the Government, in conjunc-
tion with the governments of other major
financial centres, to agree to endorse the
OECD standards on transparency and

effective exchange of information through
defined and agreed protocols.

“This decision will serve to reinforce the
respect for personal privacy and the use of
appropriate means for cooperation among
countries.

“We believe this is in the best interest of
clients and the international financial ser-
vices industry of the Bahamas.”

The BFSB said that, like the Bahamas’
existing Tax Information Exchange Agree-
ment (TIEA) with the US, any future such
treaties would limit information exchanges
to specific requests. Client confidentiality
would be preserved through preventing
‘fishing expeditions’, and restrictions regard-
ing procedures and arrangements.

Master Technici

APPLIANCES &

ROCK-BOTTOM CLEARANCE

SALE

Over 100 items on Clearance!

climes ee ee eee eel eee

Panasonic 42” Fixed TV Wall Mount
RETO Ce Msi ec hubs

PVE TCM elma eam lc
Panasonic Home Theater System
PVT Melee |e) ee mt] col

Toshiba 27” DVD/VCR Combo TV

Aelia ae A

ites MOL (mt ltade (ee Plas
Whirlpool Gold Series 30” Black Cooktop

Whirlpool Black Microwave Hood Combo

OO Ter,

rene tt

eee ee ee ee ee eee ee ae ee
Much More To See.

Clearance items
discounted up to 33

Village Rd., Open Mon. thru Sat. 8:30am 'til $:30pm
PH: 393-5310, www. mastertechbahamas.com

eae se eee eee ere



$25.00
hier at
$227.50
eae
ee Pe
Aral

$1,200.00
Prer Um OL8)
$510.00

“Respect for the rule of law has always
been fundamental to the success and
strength of the financial services industry in
the Bahamas,” the BFSB said.

“As such, clients can be assured that the
Bahamas will only exchange information
on agreed and transparent protocols.

“These protocols, as established under
the tax information exchange agreement
with the US and recognised by the OECD,
preserve the traditional confidentiality
extended to those engaged in legitimate
business. Legislative and administrative
regimes in the Bahamas have, and will con-
tinue to have, respect for the privacy of our
clients and will preserve banking confiden-
tiality.”

Purpose

Essential Functions

projects.

customer service.

server environment.

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court.
(2) The Administrators Office at Clarence Town, Long Island.
(3) The Chambers of the undersigned.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or
right to dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall before the 30th day of April, A.D.,2009
from the publication of the notice inclusive of the day of such
publication file Notice in the Supreme Court in the City of
Nassau in the Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve
on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his or her
claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. The failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his or her claim within the time fixed by the Notice
aforesaid shall operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 25th day of February, A.D., 2009

PYFROM & CO,
Chambers
No.58, Shirley Street,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner.



PRICEVVATERHOUSE(COPERS

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) will provide technology vision and leadership in the
development and implementation of information technology (IT) programmes. He/she will
lead the planning and implementation of enterprise information systems to support business
operations and achieve more effective and cost beneficial enterprise-wide IT operations.

e Establish guidelines and programmes for effective IT management.

¢ Provide data processing services required.

¢ Recommend long and short range management information systems plans and budgets.
¢ Approve staff recommendations on major systems development and/or research

Establish strategic policy for planning, development, and design of information needs.
Research management information systems hardware and software including applicable
vendor applications, data base management, and operational control packages.

Sets policies to ensure privacy and security of data processing facilities.

Establish guidelines and programmes for effective database management utilisation.
Consult with and advise department heads on IT management needs and problems.
Demonstrate continuous effort to improve operations, decrease turnaround times,
streamline work processes, and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality

Education, Experience and Necessary Qualifications

Minimum of 3 years of experience with increasing responsibilities for management and
support of information systems and IT; direct management of a major IT operation is
preferred. Experience should also include exposure to both shared and outsourced solutions,
as well as support of in-house information and communication systems in a multi-site client-
Specific experience with financial and human resource management
information systems is a plus. Other skills required include:

¢ Familiarity with: desktop, notebook, handheld, and server computer hardware; local
and wide area network design, implementation, and operation; operating systems such
as Windows, OS/400, Unix, and Linux; and computer peripherals such as printers,
monitors, modems and other equipment.
Knowledge of office productivity software programmes such as word processing,
spreadsheet programmes, databases, and communications software.
Ability to: analyse and resolve complex issues, both logical and interpersonal; and
negotiate and defuse conflict.
Effective verbal and written communications skills and effective presentation skills, all
geared toward coordination and education.
Self-motivator, independent, cooperative, flexible and creative.

Required Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:
Requires a master’s degree in Computer Science, Business Administration or a related field or
equivalent experience. Comprehensive knowledge of:
¢ Data processing methods and procedures, and computer software systems.
Systems design and development process, including requirements analysis, feasibility
studies, software design, programming, pilot testing, installation, evaluation and
operational management.
Business process analysis and redesign.
Design, management, and operation of managed IT systems

Proven skills in: negotiating with vendors, contractors, and others; budget preparation and
monitoring; management and leadership; and communication.

Demonstrated ability to: relate to all levels of the user community; be a team player
that motivates and educates other team members; plan, implement and support systems
in a complex education environment; set and manage priorities; comprehend complex,
technical subjects; translate technical language to lay audiences; and link and apply complex
technologies to business strategies.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: CIO 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas



Private & Confidential
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST
e~










y C
Z \e
ie 4
r %

Pee

ORLANDO»















Le

— i
















o|1

on














LOW

|2



MODERATE

3|4|5



6|7

HIGH





\. HIGH

v
8|9|10

° EXT.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

. ih. on’. \ Mostly sunny and Partly cloudy and Breezy and very Periods of sun with Partly sunny with a Partly sunny. 4 1
C De ee aa breezy. breezy. warm with sunshine, winds subsiding. shower possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
"2 os @ —_— ; High: 85° High: 86° High: 85° High: 82°
< pd ¢ High: 82° Low: 71° Low: 72° Low: 74° Low: 74° Low: 74° see ERD
j Sore va lg AED EE
igh: 82° F/28° A aS [ 93°83" FF 101°-78° F A
Low: 65° F/18°C ! -. / The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ao an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:04am. 2.7 2:57am. -0.1
le @ Z @ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:18pm. 34 3:01pm. -0.1
os i » : :
\ \ a Saturd 9:44am. 26 3:40am. -0.1
a f | CO ee 40:01 p.m. 3.1 3:40pm. -0.1
2 i Z Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sinlay 27am. 26 425am. Od
| 4 m ABACO Temperature 10:47pm. 31 4:23pm. -0.1
/ LS o, 1 High: 79° F/26°C 7 aan taeg dun aeenahececunsecsevaseieateontezeeeesh ao ces ; Monday ie a.m. | a.m. ie
< e Low: 64° F/18°C Normal high sorree¢ EP
‘ , Normal low 66° F/19° C
2. sypnflaeee 3 @ WEST PALMBEACH Co. Last year's HIgh .sccccssecscecenesnnn 7 F26°C | ONT CII
: — High: 84° F/29°C Last year's lOW o..eseseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 66° F/19° C
Rie Low: 68° F/20°C Precipitation Sunrise...... 7:07 a.m. Moonrise. .... 7:25 a.m.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccsssescssseeeseeseeeee 0.00" Sunset....... 7:24 p.m. Moonset. .... 8:39 p.m.
li raphe f i Year to date 07" First Full Last New
High: 80° F/27° C @ High: 79° F/26° C Normal year to date oo... 4.89 7 i.
Low: 70° F/21°C Low: 63° F/17°C
AccuWeather.com
Ae @ Forecasts and graphics provided by Ss SN ©
“ MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr. 2 Apr. 9 Apr. 17 Apr. 24
High: 84° F/29° C 5 an 4 0 °
e~ Low: 70°F/21°C NASSAU Serre
High: 82° F/28° C aM:
Low: 71° F/22°C
@
KEY WEST Ce CATISLAND
High: 82° F/28°C High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 73° F/23°C Low:61°FA6°C
. i
a
a SAN SALVADOR
—_— é High: 81° F/27°C
; ANDROS , Low: 66° FA °C few: 63° a c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's : Oe
highs and tonights's lows. fest te
ow: 67° F/I ©
LONGISLAND
Low: 63° F/A17°C
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 83° F/28° C
FC FIC F/C FC Fic FIC FC FIC FC FC Fic FC Low: 63° F/17° C
Albuquerque 43/6 32/0 c 60/15 38/3 s Indianapolis 56/13 44/6 + 56/13 36/2 1 Philadelphia 67/19 44/6 pe 53/11 46/7 Fr
Anchorage 38/3 26/-3 c 35/1 21/6 s Jacksonville 80/26 63/17 pc 86/80 63/17 pc Phoenix 76/24 50/10 s 82/27 55/12 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 65/18 5713 + 70/21 46/7 t Kansas City 42/5 29/-1 r 39/3 -24/-4 sn Pittsburgh 6216 44/6 po 59/15 467 RAGGEDISLAND — High:86°F/s0°c
Atlantic City 57/13 42/5 po 55/12 48/8 + Las Vegas 70/21 47/8 s 78/25 538/41 s Portland,OR 58/414 42/5 c 51/10 38/3 1 High: 86° F/30° C Low: 65° F/18°C
Baltimore 66/18 45/7 pe 58/14 42/5 1 Little Rock 64/17 45/7 t 55/12 37/2 pe Raleigh-Durham 66/18 57/13 r 70/21 56/13 c Low:62°F/17°C
Boston 50/10 40/4 r+ 52/11 44/6 pc Los Angeles 76/24 50/10 s 80/26 54/12 ¢ St. Louis 50/10 39/3 Fr 45/7 32/0 +r .
Buffalo 5412 39/3 pe 5412 43/6 4+ Louisville 62/16 52/1 4+ 63/17 40/4 ¢r Salt Lake City 48/8 30/-1 pe 56/13 38/3 pc GREATINAGUA
Charleston,SC 70/21 62/16 t 78/25 60/15 pc Memphis 72/22 49/9 t 55/12 41/5 pe San Antonio 80/26 44/6 pce 76/24 41/5 s High:87° F/31°C
Chicago 46/7 36/2 + 44/6 29/-1 + Miami 84/28 72/22 s 86/30 72/22 s San Diego 74/23 52/11 = s 71/21 55/12 5 Low. 66°FA9°C
Cleveland 58/14 38/38 pe 55/12 44/6 1 Minneapolis 38/3 20/6 c 38/3 22/-5 pc San Francisco 69/20 50/10 s 64/117 49/99 s i
Dallas 64/17 37/2 c 55/12 38/3 pe Nashville 66/18 55/12 4 68/20 40/4 r Seattle 54/12 40/4 c 48/8 38/3 +
Denver 32/0 16/-8 pce 50/10 29/-1 pc New Orleans 78/25 56/13 t 61/16 46/7 1 Tallahassee 78/25 62/16 t 79/26 57/13 t
Detroit 52/11 36/2 pe 52/11 40/4 1 New York 68/20 47/8 pe 53/11 43/6 1 Tampa 82/27 68/20 s 85/29 67/19 pc
Honolulu 81/27 69/20 pc 82/27 69/20 s Oklahoma City 46/7 32/0 r 41/5 32/0 pe Tucson 67/19 42/5 s 77/25 49/9 §
Houston 79/26 49/9 t 67/19 45/7 § Orlando 84/28 66/18 s 87/30 68/20 s Washington, DC 65/18 47/8 pce 56/13 51/10 Fr

pe MN
4 ~









Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

i
PS

High
F/C
91/32
47/8
50/10
57/13
69/20
92/33
85/29
65/18
51/10
66/18
59/15
46/7
66/18
65/18
46/7
52/11
82/27
80/26
94/34
39/3
86/30
77/25
76/24
43/6
46/7
45/7
51/10
42/5
86/30
32/0
80/26
78/25
50/10
66/18
76/24
86/30
83/28
50/10
75/23
86/30
81/27
99/37
54/12
32/0
48/8
89/31
94/34
32/0
50/10
48/8
83/28
86/30
59/15
81/27
93/33
90/32
82/27
86/30
17/25
46/7
37/2
69/20
80/26
48/8
54/12
86/30
49/9
48/8
43/6
18/-7

ail

Today

Low
F/C
73/22
41/5
28/-2
45/7
59/15
78/25
75/23
50/10
39/3
50/10
42/5
37/2
62/16
48/8
37/2
33/3
64/17





sh

55/12 s

17/25
21/-6
72/22
66/18
54/12
35/1
37/2
36/2
41/5
32/0
66/18
25/-3
74/23
57/13
40/4
47/8
55/12
73/22
64/17
37/2
41
76/24
46/7
52/11
36/2
19/-7
38/3
59/15
67/19
28/-2
36/2
36/2
73/22
62/16
44/6
72/22
66/18
61/16
52/11
66/18
63/17
25/-3
32/0
61/16
70/21
39/3
36/2
73/22
41/5
43/6
36/2
12/-11

i
pc

High
F/C
92/33
45/7
45/7
61/16
71/21
94/34
84/28
61/16
53/11
63/17
67/19
45/7
70/21
64/17
45/7
59/15
88/31
73/22
96/35
35/1
88/31
83/28
70/21
42/5
45/7
48/8
42/5
47/8
86/30
36/2
84/28
79/26
56/13
56/13
78/25
85/29
85/29
52/11
61/16
86/30
76/24
75/23
55/12
36/2
43/6
88/31
98/36
36/2
45/7
49/9
83/28
83/28
59/15
83/28
96/35
89/31
82/27
82/27
79/26
52/11
41/5
71/21
72/22
53/11
50/10
86/30
47/8
61/16
47/8
33/0

Saturday
Low
F/C
69/20
39/3
27/-2
48/8
60/15
78/25
75/23
46/7
34/1
57/13
45/7
34/1
65/18
46/7
36/2
45/7
68/20
50/10
77/25
20/-6
68/20
69/20
56/13
41/5
36/2

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

36/2 Fr

35/1
35/1
68/20
30/-1
70/21
56/13
45/7
42/5
56/13
75/23
64/17
36/2
34/1
75/23
43/6
50/10
39/3
23/-5
34/1
59/15
68/20
30/-1
34/1
35/1
74/23
64/17
52/11
72/22
64/17
72/22
50/10
65/18
63/17
30/-1
34/1
60/15
66/18
39/3
39/3
74/23
36/2
46/7
39/3
14/-10

Bee wes oc mea

wn
=

C
pe
pe
r

$
i
c
r
c

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

FRIDAY, MARCH 27Th, 2009, PAGE 7B



MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Saturday: Eat 10-20 Knots 4-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F
Saturday: Eat 10-20 Knots 4-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: E at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Saturday: _E at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F



Seattle
54/40
a

76/50





PLEASANT )) Miami

84/72

Showers
T-storms



Rain Fronts
[x4 =| luimes Shown are noon positions of weather systems and tse

Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. wan

Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menge
10s -Os [JOS] 10s | 20s [0Si) 40s









a @ Pw a

Never start your
ee without us!

ies to Auto Insurance,
nber the Smart choice is
surance Management.

i eople you can trust.







hs = oy

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

Ds (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

“Hew Providence Cron an Abaco Eleuthera Exum
Tt (242) 502-6401 Tel (242) 350-3500 | Tel: (242) 367-4204 | Tel: (242) 332-0862 / Tel (242) 336-2304

ee ee
PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



TRIBUNE BUSINESS OPINION

CLICO policyholders may face a long wait

aad

ble) 8) 5) 85

FILET O' FISH












FROM page 1B

FR: the brutal reality is
that not only are CLI-
CO (Bahamas) policyholders
unlikely to recover 100 per cent
of their investments, but they
may well have to wait for some
considerable time before they
recover the bulk of whatever
percentage it is on the dollar
they ultimately collect. This is
because, in Tribune Business’s
estimation, it will take liquidator
Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez time to
unwind all CLICO (Bahamas)
investments and, in so doing,
obtain the best value for all pol-
icyholders and creditors.

Especially problematic is like-
ly to be the critical investment,
the Florida-based real estate
project known as Wellington
Preserve. This was the main
asset owned by CLICO Enter-
prises, the insurer’s Bahamas-
registered affiliate, to which it
had lent 59 per cent of its
$97.352 million in total assets
at year-end.

As Tribune Business has
repeatedly stated, Florida real
estate is among the world’s cur-
rent worst investment options,
due to the collapse of that
state’s - and, indeed, the whole
US - real estate market.
Wellington Preserve, as this
newspaper had previously
revealed, had suffered a more
than 20 per cent market decline
in 2007, falling from an
appraised $104 million in 2006
to $80.5 million at year-end
2007.

This erosion of value is likely
to have continued into 2008,
and probably 2009. What this
means is that if CLICO
(Bahamas) liquidator was to
seek a buyer and sell Welling-
ton Preserve now, he would
likely only obtain a ‘fire sale’
price.

This means the project would
be sold for a value well below
what CLICO (Bahamas) and its

Congratulations
Tredika Davis















Agent of the Month January

Carmichael Branch

We provide

Financial Solutions for Life!

Planning for Education, Mortgage, Retirement?

Give me a call... and let me design a plan
to suit your financial needs.

242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Firegert 242-357-7209 Exam 202-336-3005 lies 22-367 -Shpt

British
"th American

Paradise feels the debt burden

Allis clearly not well in Paradise.... on Paradise Island, at least.
Kerzner International’s exhortations for 2,500 non-unionised
Atlantis employees to take two weeks ‘voluntary unpaid leave’
indicates that further lay-offs remain a real possibility if the required
level of savings cannot be found elsewhere. Yet the company’s
problems are not solely attributable to the global recession.

Rather, they are due to a combination of the softening in tourism
and reduced top-line growth, and the $2.775 billion debt burden
loaded on Kerzner International in 2006, when Sol Kerzner decid-
ed to buy-out the company’s public shareholders and take it private.
In effect, the Atlantis and One & Only Ocean Club owner is being
squeezed from both ends.

Kerzner International’s senior vice-president of public affairs, Ed
Fields, not normally noted for revealing much to the Bahamian
media, for once let the proverbial ‘cat out of the bag’ when he
explained that the unpaid vacation request was made to “ensure
that the company meets its bank covenants and financial obliga-
tions.”

This indicates that while Kerzner International’s Paradise Island
operations, and those elsewhere, are still largely profitable, they are
not as profitable as they need to be - or were expected to be - when
it comes to generating cash flow/liquidity, and meeting the banking
covenants attached to the financing put together by a syndicate
headed by Goldman Sachs and Deutsche Bank.

Pressure

Among these covenants is a maximum total net debt to operat-
ing income ratio, something that is likely to be under pressure due
to the travel industry downturn’s impact on Kerzner International’s
top line.

But while the picture may not be as rosy as the one painted by
some at Kerzner International, there is no danger that the compa-
ny’s resort empire will collapse.

For a start, it is making the necessary - but tough - decisions. The
800 lay-offs announced before 2008 year-end were also critical in
keeping the company in line with its banking covenants. There is
also no secret in the fact that Atlantis was probably overstaffed, cer-
tainly when it came to 2009 anticipated business levels, and that
many of those released were considered to be the company’s least
productive workers.

While no one wants to lose out on income, and initial anger
could be strong, the 2,500 staff who have been asked to take unpaid
vacation should stop, think and look at the bigger picture. If Kerzn-
er International breaches its bank covenants, it gives the banks
an opportunity to take control, or at least start dictating terms to the
company.

If that happens, the 800 Atlantis redundancies to date could be
a ‘drop in the ocean’ compared to what the banks might order. They
will only have concern for the bottom line, unlike Kerzner man-
agement, who are all to keenly aware of the immense social and eco-
nomic responsibility they have as the nation’s largest private sector
employer. It is better to have half a loaf of bread, rather than no loaf
at all, as the saying goes. Everyone would do well to remember that
in these troubled times.



affiliates invested in it. In turn,
this would leave a gaping hole
in the balance sheet, with lia-
bilities by far exceeding assets,
and CLICO (Bahamas) in a far-
worse position than the esti-
mated existing $9 million insol-
vency. Therefore, there is every
likelihood that the liquidator
may be forced to hold the
Wellington Preserve project for
several years until the market
turns, and he can maximise
recovery for creditors. This, of
course, means that policyhold-

UGS (Bahamas) Lid. sone of thew
Caribbean. Through ur Bursitis

ar her wealthy PrVale Camits
enhancing services. Qur clien

the resources ial are availabe

ers/depositors may not see a
quick recovery of their funds.
Their frustrations will likely
be taken out on the liquidator
and the Government, but the
latter got it right in petitioning
for CLICO (Bahamas) to be
wound-up - albeit having failed
abysmally to protect the insur-
er’s clients when it should have
been taking action to stop this
eventuality four-plus years ago.
It represents a catastrophic reg-
ulatory failure, to say the least,
given that Tribune Business was

warning about the situation as
far back as 2007, as can be seen
from these former headlines.

The best hope, at least as far
as insurance policyholders are
concerned, is for their portfo-
lio to be transferred to another
Bahamian life and health insur-
er. That, though, is not a given,
and much will depend on the
overall portfolio quality.

Asset recovery may well be
difficult. The liquidator’s work
is understood to have been
made more difficult by the fact
CLICO (Bahamas) was run out
of Trinidad, where its parent,
CL Financial, took all the
important decisions. All Board
meeting minutes and accounting
records are located to the south,
Tribune Business has been told.

This, in turn, makes it difficult
for the liquidator and/or credi-
tors to take legal action against
CLICO (Bahamas) Board and
management team. CL Finan-
cial and CLICO (Bahamas)
Boards are understood to have
largely been one and the same,
meaning that if they are to hold
the directors liable, they will
have to bring legal proceedings
in Trinidad - an action fraught
with additional difficulties and
costs. Apart from ensuring
Bahamas-resident companies at
least have some Bahamas-based
directors, the Government and
regulators also need to look at
how annuities as a product are
regulated. Are they long-term,
retirement savings products, or
certificates of deposit? The lat-
ter purpose is how many
investors treated them in CLI-
CO (Bahamas) case. Should the
Central Bank regulate them?
Perhaps.

Ultimately, Tribune Business
feels the Supreme Court has lit-
tle choice but to place CLICO
(Bahamas) into liquidation,
with creditors giving Mr Gomez
time and space to do his best
on their behalf. It is to be hoped
that the court allows him to be
as transparent as possible, pub-
lishing reports on his findings
and actions on the Internet,
once filed with the Registry.

Before leaving the CLICO
(Bahamas) matter, one irony of
note. Not to rub it in, but media
reports suggested Allyson May-
nard-Gibson is a CLICO
(Bahamas) creditor. As minister
of financial services and invest-
ments from 2002-2006, she had
ultimate ministerial responsi-
bility for CLICO (Bahamas), as
the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office came under her ministry.

Word's leading financed nstitubars in the

Area Viealth Management International we look

viding them with comerehensive, value
ships wilh

wer woral relali

1 acess WBS, helping them provide a ful

range of weelih management services

In-order to strengthen our team in Nassau, wee are looking to fill the following

Posiiion

Human Resources Manager

The main responsibilities of the position holder incdude:

Define and manage strategic plans. im commection with, Compersation & Benefits, Recruitment,

Training & Development, Employee Relations and Intennational Assignment Serwices

Soret as acvis

polices and procedures

Recrui rmaraeerial are horenaniageria

Develan, retigw and execule HR processes and policies

Supenvise a small team
» Liaise and negotiate with

ntemal specialists and exter

In order to satisty Gur requirement. the apmicamts must possess:

qo management, kcal employes and International Assignees on relevant HR

atall (locally and internationally)

al service providers.

® Minimum tree years expenence in a comparable Human Resources Management position with a

leading global company (oreterak

=i

Solid international experience in a very diverse, complex an

yin the banking industry)

d dynam environment

Bachelor's degres in a rekvant discipline fram a recogaized and accredited educational matity

Proven track record as manager, leader and team player

Proven track

rd 46.4 presenter and coach.

Capability to successfully build up and foster relationships and networks.

Excellent communication, presentation and coaching skills.
Sour erect edge of M45 Office and HR software applications.

Please send your reSsurme, On tr before Aoril 151, 2009 to

UBS (Bahamas) Lid., Human Resources, P.O. Box N-7 757, Masau, Baharia

It starts with you.

bv Rm ers








PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Casinos in Bahamas ‘need radical change’ C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.104FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNYAND BREEZY HIGH 82F LOW 71F SEEBUSINESSFRONT S P O R T S Global chief: My assets and firm’s all for sale SEEPAGEFOURTEEN Getting ready forthe IAAF championships n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net CASINOS in the Bahamas will have to undergo “radical change” if they are to survive new com petitive threats, a tourism leader warned yesterday. T wo new pieces of Florida gaming legislation stand ready to have a “dramatic impact” on the future of the Bahamian industry, he added. President of the Bahamas Hotel Association Robert Sands said the industry in this country remains “in the dark ages” at a t ime when proposed upgrades to Florida’s gambling centres in par ticular represent a looming threat to the attractiveness of Bahamian casinos in the US market. Consequently, recommenda tions to modernise the Bahamian gaming sector are set to be put to the government by the Casino Association, through the Bahamas Hotel Association, within the next week. Mr Sands, also senior vice-president at Bahamar, told The Tri bune yesterday that “time is of the essence” when it comes to the government’s reaction. On Wednesday, The Florida Senate Regulated Industries Committee swiftly approved the two new bills, which US commentators are describing as offering a “no holds barred” expan sion of gambling in the state. The editor of an industry web New Florida gaming legislation ‘to have dramatic impact’ on the industry The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , M A R C H 2 7 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 3 . 4 8 $ 3 . 4 9 $ 3 . 4 9 f o r a b e t t e r l i f eI M M E D I A T E A N N U I T Y S A L E S O F F I C E S : N A S S A U I F R E E P O R T I A B A C O I E L E U T H E R A I E X U M A I C O R P O R A T E C E N T R E : E A S T B A Y S T R E E T I w w w . f a m g u a r d b a h a m a s . c o m c a l l u s t o d a y a t 3 9 6 1 3 5 5 A S U B S I D I A R Y O F g o l d e n y e a r s s t e a d y c a s h o w w o r r y f r e e r e t i r e m e n t g u a r a n t e e d i n c o m e f o r l i f ea l l o f t h e a b o v e It s b a c k t o t h e c o u r t t o d a y , a n d m a n y C L I C O p o l i c y h o l d e r s / d e p o s i t o r s a r e d e s p e r a t e l y l o o k i n g a r o u n d f o r s o m e o n e t o s c a l p f o r t h e i r f i n a n c i a l p l i g h t . T h i s i s p e r f e c t l y u n d e r s t a n d a b l e , g i v e n t h a t a r e c k l e s s b u s i n e s s s t r a t e g y a n d m i s m a n a g e m e n t h a v e p l a y e d h a v o c w i t h t h e i r l o n g t e r m s a v i n g s a n d r e t i r e m e n t p l a n s . T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s , f o r w h a t i t s w o r t h , g i v e s t h e m i t s w h o l e h e a r t e d s y m p a t h y , b e c a u s e t h e o u t l o o k i s b l e a k w h a t e v e r w a y y o u s l i c e i t .C L I C O p o l i c y h o l d e r s m a y f a c e a l o n g w a i t B u s i n e s s l i c e n c e r i p e f o r c o r p o r a t e i n c o m e t a x c h a n g e , s a y s e x m i n i s t e r B a h a m a s m a y b e p a s t 4 0 % d e b t / G D P r a t i o TR I B U N EBU S I N E S SOP I N I O N S E E p a g e 8 B I N T H E N E W S : T h e C L I C O s a g a h a s m a d e h e a d l i n e s .nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T w o B a h a m a s b a s e d r e a l t o r s y e s t e r d a y s a i d t h e y h o p e d t h e i r n e w l y a c q u i r e d R E / M A X f r a n c h i s e s w o u l d t a k e t h e i r b u s i n e s s e s t o t h e n e x t l e v e l , o n e t e l l i n g T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t w h i l e i n q u i r i e s h a d d i p p e d b y 2 0 p e r c e n t t h e h i g h e n d m a r k e t i s s t i l l v e r y s t r o n g . T h e R E / M A X n a m e a n d f r a n c h i s e w i l l n o w b e c a r r i e d b y R E / M A X P a r a d i s e R e a l E s t a t e , t h e f o r m e r P a r a d i s e R e a l E s t a t e o w n e d b y b r o k e r C r a i g P i n d e r , a n d R E / M A X O c e a n R e a l t y B a h a m a s . T h e l a t t e r i s t h e f o r m e r W i l l i a m W o n g & A s s o c i a t e s , o w n e d b y c u r r e n t B a h a m a s R e a l E s t a t e A s s o c i a t i o n ( B R E A ) p r e s i d e n t W i l l i a m W o n g . B o t h M r W o n g a n d M r P i n d e r s a i d t h e y e x p e c t e d t h e R E / M A X b r a n d t o b o o s t t h e i r b u s i n e s s b y f u r t h e r e n h a n c i n g t h e i r r e s p e c t i v e o r g a n i s a t i o n s c r e d i b i l i t y i n i n t e r n a t i o n a l m a r R e a l t o r s g o t o t h e M a x t o g e t t o n e x t l e v e l N O F L A G G I N G : C r a i g P i n d e r ( l e f t ) p i c t u r e d w i t h B a h a m a s R e a l E s t a t e A s s o c i a t i o n ( B R E A ) p r e s i d e n t W i l l i a m W o n g .* B R E A c h i e f , P a r a d i s e R e a l E s t a t e b e c o m e R E / M A X f r a n c h i s e e s * N e t w o r k s w e b s i t e g e t s 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 h i t s i n q u i r i n g a b o u t B a h a m a s i n o n e m o n t h * W h i l e i n q u i r i e s o f f 2 0 % , a c t i v i t y i n h i g h e n d m a r k e t s t i l l s t r o n g a s h i g h n e t w o r t h s s e e k p u r c h a s e s t o h e d g e a g a i n s t i n f l a t i o nS E E p a g e 5 B S w i t c h w o u l d a l l o w B a h a m a s t o p u r s u e d o u b l e t a x t r e a t i e s a s T I E A a l t e r n a t i v e , a s S m i t h s a y s f a l l o u t n o t t o o g r e a t f r o m O E C D c o m p l i a n c e m o v enB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e B a h a m a s c o u l d c o n v e r t t h e c u r r e n t b u s i n e s s l i c e n c e f e e s y s t e m i n t o a c o r p o r a t e i n c o m e t a x i f i t d e c i d e d t o p u r s u e d o u b l e t a x a t i o n a g r e e m e n t s w i t h o t h e r c o u n t r i e s , a f o r m e r f i n a n c e m i n i s t e r t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s , a r g u i n g t h a t a c c o m m o d a t i n g t h e O E C D / G 2 0 d e m a n d s c o u l d h e l p s p u r m u c h n e e d e d t a x r e f o r m . J a m e s S m i t h , t h e f o r m e r m i n i s t e r o f s t a t e f o r f i n a n c e i n t h e C h r i s t i e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , s a i d t h a t w h i l e t h e O r g a n i s a t i o n f o r E c o n o m i c C o O p e r a t i o n a n d D e v e l o p m e n t ( O E C D s ) a n t i i n t e r n a t i o n a l f i n a n c i a l c e n t r e i n i t i a t i v e w a s b e i n g d r i v e n b y m i g h t r a t h e r t h a n r i g h t , t h e r e w e r e s t i l l o p p o r t u n i t i e s f o r t h e B a h a m a s t o p u r s u e i n v e s t m e n t / t a x t r e a t i e s t h a t w o u l d b e m o r e b e n e f i c i a l t h a n a s t a n d a r d T a x I n f o r m a t i o n E x c h a n g e A g r e e m e n t ( T I E A ) . T h e r e c o u l d b e a t a x o p p o r t u n i t y h e r e , b e c a u s e g o i n g f o r w a r d w e w o u l d h a v e t o a l t e r t h e t a x s y s t e m , s o w e m i g h t b e a b l e t o l o o k a t t h a t n o w . D o u b l e t a x t r e a t i e s m i g h t s e r v e J A M E S S M I T H S E E p a g e 4 B nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e B a h a m a s n a t i o n a l d e b t m a y h a v e p a s s e d t h e 4 0 p e r c e n t d e b t t o G D P r a t i o w i d e l y r e g a r d e d a s a k e y w a r n i n g t h r e s h o l d , a g o v e r n m e n t m i n i s t e r a c k n o w l e d g e d y e s t e r d a y , a l t h o u g h t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n h a d t h e f i s c a l c a p a c i t y t o a b s o r b t h e s i t u a t i o n w e r e i n . Z h i v a r g o L a i n g , m i n i s t e r o f s t a t e f o r f i n a n c e , s p e a k i n g t o T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s f r o m C o l o m b i a , w h e r e h e w a s a t t e n d i n g a n I n t e r A m e r i c a n D e v e l o p m e n t B a n k ( I D B ) c o n f e r e n c e , s a i d t h a t w h i l e t h e c u r r e n t f i s c a l s i t u a t i o n w a s n o t i d e a l , t h e w a y w e h a v e m a n a g e d o u r f i s c a l a f f a i r s i n t h e p a s t a n d r e l a t i v e l y l o w l e v e l o f f o r e i g n i n d e b t e d n e s s h a d g i v e n t h e G o v e r n m e n t r o o m t o h o p e f u l l y r i d e o u t t h e c u r r e n t s t o r m . C o m p a r i n g t h e B a h a m a s t o c o u n t r i e s i n t h e C a r i b b e a n a n d o t h e r s t a t e s w i t h s i m i l a r c r e d i t r a t i n g s , M r L a i n g s a i d t h e y g e n e r a l l y h a d m u c h h i g h e r d e b t t o g r o s s d o m e s t i c p r o d u c t ( G D P ) r a t i o s , w h e r e a s t h e B a h a m a s w a s m u c h l o w e r . L o o k i n g a t 4 0 t o 4 1 p e r c e n t o f G D P , r e l a t i v e l y s p e a k i n g , S E E p a g e 2 BS O L O M O N S M i n e s h a s s h u t d o w n o n e o f i t s s t o r e s o n B a y S t r e e t , T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s h a s l e a r n e d , c i t i n g t h e e c o n o m i c d o w n t u r n a s t h e r e a s o n f o r t h e c l o s u r e . S o u r c e s , w h o w e r e n o t a u t h o r i s e d t o s p e a k o n b e h a l f o f t h e c o m p a n y , c o n f i r m e d y e s t e r d a y t h a t S o l o m o n s M i n e s D i a m o n d C e n t r e c l o s e d i t s d o o r s r e c e n t l y , w i t h n o p l a n s t o r e o p e n i n t h e n e a r f u t u r e . T h e s t o r e , l o c a t e d o n B a y a n d P a r l i a m e n t S t r e e t s , h a s a s i g n w h i c h r e a d c l o s e d t o d a y p o s t e d o n i t s w i n d o w f o r a l m o s t t w o w e e k s . S o u r c e s t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t a l l o f t h e s t a f f w e r e r e l o c a t e d t o i t s o t h e r B a y S t r e e t s t o r e s . C a l l s t o t h e s t o r e s u p p e r m a n a g e m e n t , i n c l u d i n g p r e s i d e n t M a r k F i n l a y s o n , w e r e n o t r e t u r n e d u p t o p r e s s t i m e y e s t e r d a y . M i d d l e m a n a g e m e n t r e f u s e d t o m e e t o r m a k e a s t a t e m e n t t o T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s w h e n t h e y v i s i t e d t h e i r B a y S t r e e t h e a d o f f i c e .S o l o m o n s M i n e s c l o s e s d o w n s t o r e Z h i v a r g o L a i n g nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r G l o b a l U n i t e d s p r e s i d e n t y e s t e r d a y t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s h e h a d a n u n n a m e d i n v e s t o r s t a n d i n g b y t o i n j e c t c a s h i n t o t h e b u s i n e s s i f t h e G o v e r n m e n t w o u l d h o l d o f f o n w i n d i n g i t u p , a d d i n g t h a t c u r r e n t l y a l l h i s a n d t h e f i r m s f i x e d a s s e t s w e r e o n t h e m a r k e t f o r s a l e . I n a s e r i e s o f e m a i l e d r e p l i e s t o T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s s q u e s t i o n s , J a c k s o n R i t c h i e s a i d t h e G o v e r n m e n t h a d s o f a r s h o w n n o s i g n o f c h a n g i n g i t s p o s i t i o n o n e n f o r c i n g t h e S u p r e m e C o u r t j u d g m e n t s r e q u i r i n g G l o b a l U n i t e d t o p a y a r o u n d $ 6 m i l l i o n i n u n p a i d c u s t o m s d u t i e s , f e e s a n d d e p a r t u r e t a x e s . H e d e n i e d t h a t i t w a s a p r e v i o u s l y c l a i m e d $ 8 m i l l i o n , a r g u i n g t h a t t h e G o v e r n m e n t h a d g o t i t s f i g u r e s w r o n g . W o r k i n g f e v e r i s h l y t o r e s c u e h i s s h i p p i n g a g e n c y , t r a n s p o r t a t i o n a n d l o g i s t i c s b u s i n e s s , C a p t a i n R i t c h i e t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s y e s t e r d a y : T h e c o m p a n y c a n o n l y s u r v i v e i f t h e G o v e r n m e n t r e l e n t s a n d c o m e s t o t h e t a b l e t o w o r k w i t h u s , t h e b a n k a n d o t h e r s t a k e h o l d e r s . W e h a v e a n i n v e s t o r s t a n d i n g b y t o i n j e c t c a s h i n t o t h e b u s i n e s s o n c e t h e G o v e r n m e n t i n d i c a t e s t h e y w i l l w o r k w i t h t h e c o m p a n y . T h e y [ t h e G o v e r n m e n t ] h a v e t o a c t n o w t o c o m m e n c e w i n d i n g u p p r o c e e d i n g s . A s f a r a s w e k n o w , t h e y h a v e n o t a c t e d . I f t h e y d o , w e c l o s e . I f t h e y d o n t , w e c o n t i n u e a s n o r m a l . R i g h t n o w , w e p l a n t o c o n t i n u e o n a s w e s t i l l h a v e t h e s u p p o r t o f t h e b a n k [ F i r s t C a r i b b e a n I n t e r n a t i o n a l B a n k ( B a h a m a s ) ] a n d o u r m a j o r v e n d o r s . C a p t a i n R i t c h i e s a i d G l o b a l U n i t e d s e f f o r t s t o c o l l e c t $ 1 0 m i l l i o n a l l e g e d l y o w e d t o i t b y c l i e n t s w e r e a l s o b e i n g h a m p e r e d b y t h e G o v e r n m e n t s t h r e a t t o w i n d u p t h e c o m p a G l o b a l c h i e f : M y a s s e t s a n d f i r m s a l l f o r s a l e R i t c h i e s a y s u n n a m e d i n v e s t o r r e a d y t o i n j e c t c a s h t o s a v e G l o b a l U n i t e d i f G o v e r n m e n t s t a y s w i n d i n g u p , a n d s a y s o n l y $ 6 m , n o t $ 8 m , o w e d A r g u e s t h a t g o v e r n m e n t a c t i o n p r e v e n t i n g c o m p a n y c o l l e c t i n g $ 1 0 m o w e d t o i t 5 0 s t a f f j o b s i n j e o p a r d y , t o a d d t o 1 6 0 a l r e a d y d i s m i s s e d B u t a d m i t s o v e r a m b i t i o u s e x p a n s i o n s t a r t e d f i r m s w o e s , a n d t h a t N I B o w e d c o n t r i b u t i o n s h e i s a i m i n g t o p a y S E E p a g e 3 B B U S I N E S S B AHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E PM’s statements on tax transparency ‘may not prevent a blacklisting’ n B y TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ t ribunemedia.net T HE prime minister's state ments regarding tax transparency and information exchange may not be enough to avoid a potential blacklist i ng that may come out of an upcoming meeting of the G-20n ations in London next month, a financial expert said y esterday. Raymond Winder, managing partner of prominent accounting firm Deloitte and Touche, is hopeful the recent a nnouncement was enough to ward off any negative actionsb y the two parties but thinks immediate action by the B ahamas is needed to validate the country's stance. "I would like to hope and believe that it (the prime min ister's announcement) would p ut us in good standing (with the G-20 nations). It would be u nfair that after we made this a nnouncement to still put us on the blacklist but you can't s ay 100 per cent it won't hap pen, but I would like to believe that that would be sufficient. "And I think the Bahamas w ill have to show good faith by immediately beginning thep rocess with some countries," Mr Winder told The Tribune y esterday. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced Wednesday that the country has had a number of requests f or the country to enter into tax information exchange a greements. He said the country was n ow prepared to consider these requests on a case-bycase basis. At present, the country has only one Tax Information Exchange Agreem ent (TIEA States. T he agreements have been criticised by some as beingb eneficial to one side the Financial expert speaks out ahead of G-20 meeting next month SEE page 11 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A COLLISION between a dumptruck and a scooter left a man dead his body unrecognisable due to the extent of its injuries. The incident, which occurred at the junction of Prospect Ridge and John F Kennedy Drive yesterday, led to traffic being held up for over an hour as police cleared up the scene. According to an eyewitness who was in a car stopped behind the Mack truck which rolled over the driver of the silver scooter, the victim pulled up on the right-hand side of the dumptruck as it signalled to turn right on to JFK at around MAN DIES AFTER SC OO TER COLLIDESWITHDUMPTRUCK SEE page eight SEE page eight THE SCOOTER lies under the front of the dumptruck. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f VAUGHN JONES , brother of Jones Communications CEO Wendall Jones, is among the latest high-profile employers to appear in court for allegedly failing to pay National Insurance contributions, The Tribune has learned. National Insurance officials confirmed that Mr Jones, own er of Jones Brothers Morticians, Mount Royal Avenue, appeared in Court 11, Nassau Brother of Wendall Jones in court for allegedly failing to pay NIB contributions SEE page eight n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net GLOBAL United CEO Jackson Ritchie said he expects to lose hundreds and millions of dollars in future profits if his company is wound up today by the government. Continuing his push for a meeting with the government through Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, Mr Ritchie said he hoped the two parties could thrash out an agreement to save Global United and ensure the government and the host of other local businesses that the company owes would eventually get their money. Having sunk “millions and millions” of his own money into trying to save the company, Mr Ritchie said: “This is all or noth ing. This is my 18-year-old child. I have five, and this is the sixth CEO of Global United expects to lose millions if company wound up SEE page eight n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net AN INNOCENT man claims police officers took turns to brutally beat him, putting him in fear for his life, after he was arrested without reason. Kevin Anthonio Flowers, 22, maintains he was hand cuffed and held at Arawak Cay Police Station while sevKEVIN ANTHONIO FLOWERS claims police officers beat him. Innocent man claims he was brutally beaten by police officers SEE page 11 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THEmanager of a wellknown Nassau business was assaulted, kidnapped from his home and forced to help masked men rob his workplace before being left bound with a telephone cable, according to police. The shocking scenario unfolded in broad daylight on Wednesday, at around 5.30pm, when the Tyre Empire employee arrived at his home off Eastern Road. Police and Tyre Empire proprietor Henderson Burrows both believe it is possible that the criminals involved knew the victim and his routine. It was moments after he arrived home that the man was accosted by three masked and armed men, dressed all in black. He was gun-butted and kicked, and forced to drive with the men in his own car to the Chesapeake Road business before being told to unlock the company safe. Business manager assaulted, kidnapped and forced to help in robbery of workplace SEE page eight

PAGE 2

THE body of former mem ber of parliament James “Jimmy” Knowles was laid in state at the House of Assembly yes terday morning. Mr Knowles represented the people of Long Island and later Ragged Island for 25 years, and served as a Cabinet minister in the first FNM government. The Cabinet Office announced that an official funeral for Mr Knowles will be held today at 11am at the Christ Church Cathedral on George Street. Rev Father Crosley Walkine and Archdeacon Keith Cartwright will officiate, assisted by Father Michael Gittens. P P r r i i v v a a t t e e A private ceremony of interment will follow at St Anne’s cemetery, Fox Hill. The deceased is survived by his widow Amarylis, daughter Kimberly, sons James Jr and Roman, and his mother Agnes Knowles. Mr Knowles died at his home last Saturday following a four-year battle with cancer. He had been diagnosed with melanoma. The Free National Move ment has suspended all political activities until March 28 out of respect for Mr Knowles. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and other Cabinet ministers, parliamentarians, party officers, members and supporters will be in atten dance at the funeral. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Mini Famous Bowl $2.75 n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net MINISTER of Labour Dion Foulkes said he expects the investigation into claims by Chinese workers of alleged mistreatment at the hands of a local construct ion firm to be completed shortly. Yesterday, Mr Foulkes declined to make a statement on the Department of Labour’s investigation until he has seen the final report. About two dozen Chinese workers contracted by the construction firm E R Hanna to rebuild the T G Glover Primary S chool protested against alleged mistreatment by their employer on Wednesday. The group staged a similar protest earlier this month which prompted the ongoing investigation, Mr Foulkes said yesterday. "I have not received the report b ut we've spoken to the employer and we are trying to verify some o f the things that he has said to us, but until I get the final report Id on't want to make a public statem ent,” the minister said. H owever, he assured T he Trib une t hat the Department of Labour was treating the case “as a m atter of urgency.” Meanwhile, Director of Immig ration Jack Thompson told T he Tribune yesterday that as far as h e was aware the group's work permits were still valid. O n Wednesday, E R Hanna representative Tameka Hanna s aid the company will move to have the group’s permits revoked because, according to her, they violated their contract when they s topped working on March 3, 2 009. Earlier this month Mr Thompson told another daily the workers' permits were valid until June2 009. H e said yesterday that the current problem between the workers and the company is not an immigration issue, but rather am atter for the Department of L abour. During the protest, the group of about two dozen men alleged – through an interpreter – that the company owes them m onths of back pay, that they are not provided with sufficient food supplies, that drinking water is not provided at the site and thatt heir rights are being violated. T hey also claimed they are threatened with deportation whenever they complain about their working conditions. S peaking to T he Tribune a fter W ednesday's protest, company operations manager Tameka Hanna dismissed all the allegations. She claimed that E R Hanna had p aid what was owed to the workers and that any discrepancy lay with an international company – the workers are paid through an a gency in China which E R Hann a has a contract with. Ms Hanna also dismissed claims of insufficient food and mistreatment, and said for the past two y ears the workers were adequately housed in a company facility, fed three times a day and that fresh drinking water is availa ble at the site. A fter the protest, the company had discussions with an independent translator, four of the protesters and a representative f rom the agency in China, T he T ribune w as told. It is understood that the Chin ese workers were given several o ffers which they reportedly refused. Yesterday, the translator for the group said their agency in China has not verified any receipt o f their wages. He said the men do not want to continue working for the company, but are not prepared to leavet he country without being paid. A ttempts to reach company attorney Oswald Isaacs and Ms Hanna for an update were unsuccessful up to press time yesterday. Official funeral for James ‘Jimmy’ Knowles announced FORMER GOVERNOR GENERAL Sir Orville Turnquest pays respects to MP for Long Island James Knowles yesterday at the House of Assembly. Mistreatment claims probe expected to end soon Dion Foulkes waiting for final report into Chinese workers’ allegations Dion Foulkes WORKERS stage their protest against their employer this week. “I have not received the report but we've spoken to the employer and we ar e trying to verify some of the things that he has said to us, but until I get the final report I don't want to make a public statement.” Dion Foulkes T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 3

n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net SECURITY in Haiti has i mproved, but so long as this does not translate into economic devel-o pment and jobs, the level of Haitian migration to the Bahamas w ill not decrease, according to the Haitian Ambassador to the Bahamas. Haiti continues to reel from the devastation wrought by a series of major hurricanes last y ear, which caused massive flooding, dislocation and an estimatedb illion dollars of damage. The country’s already fragile i nfrastructure and agricultural sector took a serious beating and residents are still struggling months later to remove huge mounds of mud created by the f looding. Ambassador Harold Joseph, in a n interview from the Haitian Embassy in Nassau, said: “Right n ow in Haiti the situation is better. In terms of security, we have less crime, less kidnapping, and the UN is pleased with the situa tion, but now what we need to do is we need to translate that progress in the security field to t he economic field.” Mr Joseph noted that it is “very e ncouraging” that a small number of Haitian police officers have been asked to take up posts with the UN security forces in Chad, Africa. However, with the global economy still trending down wards, the troubled nation willl ikely not receive as much assis tance towards building its econom y as could have been the case. Several UN appeals for $108 mil lion in assistance after the hurricanes elicited a lukewarm response from the international community. The government will try again at a Haiti donors con f erence in Washington in April, where it will be seeking $3 billion for a poverty-reduction plan. This comes at a time when the country has been hit by an esti m ated 10 per cent drop in remittances from Haitian nationals livi ng abroad, who have typically worked assiduously to save up a nd send home funds to their struggling relatives – equivalent in r ecent times to a third of the country’s gross domestic product. “We are living in a very difficult time with the economic crisis.I think the migrant situation for the time being will stay the same,” said Mr Joseph. R R e e p p a a t t r r i i a a t t e e d d This month the Department of Immigration revealed that it has repatriated 1,204 Haitian nationals who illegally attempted to enter the Bahamas since the start of 2009 alone. They made up the bulk of a total of 1,340 illegal immigrants returned to their c ountries of citizenship. Mr Joseph and Minister of State for Immigration Branville McCartney met last week at the Immigration Department. The ambassador said the two had a “very good discussion about the migrant situation” with Mr McCartney expressing the view t hat the Department of Immigration will be “pleased to regularise the status of Haitian migrants who are qualified to be in the country, but those who are not qualified should go back to Haiti.” Mr Joseph lamented yesterday that an agreement outlining a framework for greater co-opera tion between the Bahamas and Haiti, negotiated under the form er PLP administration prior to the ousting of former Haitian P resident Jean Bertrand Aristide, has not been signed. Unfortunately in February 2004, Aristide left and we did not have a good chance to sign the agreement. Now in the meantime you have new government in the Bahamas...” said Mr Joseph. The ambassador said that he feels that more dialogue on the migration issue “could be profi table to both countries.” “Migration is not a bad thing per se, if both governments sit together and establish a continuous dialogue,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 3 Police shooting victim identified GB resort boasts occupancy rate of 80 per cent Lenten Reflections session tonight In brief THE Bahamas Anglican Cursillo Movement will be hosting a Lenten Reflections session at St Anne's Parish, Fox Hill Road tonight at 7.30pm. The public is invited to attend. n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A MOTHER accused of causing the death of her newborn baby, which was discovered in af ield near a church on Soldier Road last December, was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court y esterday. Stacia Rolle,19, alias Stacia Adderley, of Windsor Place Road, was arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in C ourt One, Bank Lane, charged with concealment of a body of a child. A ccording to court dockets, Rolle on Wednesday, December 10, 2008, with the intent to conceal birth, caused the death of ac hild. The dead infant was reportedl y discovered by a resident of the neighbourhood near the Churcho f God on Soldier Road. It was believed the baby may have been b orn only hours before its body was discovered. When policea rrived at the scene they found one of the fingers on the baby’s h and and one of the feet had been mutilated. Police also dis-c overed what appeared to be fresh blood on pieces of clothing. R olle, who was dressed in a white T-shirt and blue jeans, was not represented by an attorney at the arraignment. When askedb y the magistrate whether she understood the charge against h er, Rolle replied: “No.” Magistrate Gomez explained that thec harge meant that she had concealed the body of the child after s he gave birth. When asked by the magistrate t o enter a plea, Rolle hesitated, then responded: “Guilty.” The a ccused was remanded to Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre forp sychological evaluation. Rolle is expected back in court on April1 7. THE man shot by police in P ride Estates on Sunday night has been identified as Renald Jean Charles, 21. Police maintain officers shot t o kill when Charles pointed his firearm at them after a highspeed car chase from Fire Trail Road, which led to a dead end street in a remote area of PrideE states. The car chase ensued when a concerned citizen called police to say the driver of a white Cadillac had hit his car on J ohn F Kennedy Drive and then sped off sometime after 9pm on Sunday. Police caught up with the Cadillac in Fire Trail Road and pursued it at high speedu ntil the car stopped in Allen Drive, Pride Estates. The driver and Charles got out of the car and Charles pulled out a gun to start shooti ng, police say. T he officers returned fire, f atally wounding him in the u pper torso. Police officers were not injured in the fire fight. T he driver escaped and police have launched an island-wide m anhunt. n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter MURDER accused Jamal Glinton yesterday attacked the credibility of the prosecution’s star witness in the Keith Carey trial, telling jurors that he is not a murderer. Glinton, who along with Dwight Knowles and Sean Brown, is charged in the armed robbery and murder of businessman Keith Carey, 43, told jurors yesterday that he does not know his co-accused. In an unsworn statement from the prisoner’s dock, Glinton ques tioned why Vaughn Carey a cousin of the deceased and witness in this case had “set up” the businessman and waited three years to come forward to reveal how the murder took place. Glinton denied that he and his co-accused had a conversation regarding the murder in the exercise yard of Her Majesty’s Prison, as Vaughn Carey had previously testified. Vaughn Carey, who was charged with conspiracy to commit armed robbery before he became a witness for the Crown, had testified that while at Her Majesty’s Prison he had a conversation with his coaccused during which Knowles allegedly said that Glinton had shot Carey. Glinton told the jury yesterday that that conversation never happened. He admitted to the jurors that he had sold marijuana, but said, “I’m no murderer.” Knowles then went on to attack the credibility of another prosecu tion witness, Mervin Benson, claiming that he and Benson never had a conversation regarding $80,000 he had allegedly given to someone to keep for him. Knowles denied knowing his co-accused telling the jury, “I don’t know these fellas.” He claimed that he suffers from “the fits” and told the jury that he was slapped several times by police while at the Central Detective Unit. He also claimed that a plastic bag was placed over his head which resulted in him having “fits.” Glinton’s attorney Craig Butler in opening his client’s defence said that the prosecution wants the jurors to draw inferences as they had no physical or scientific evidence connecting the accused to the crime. The trial into the February 2006 murder of businessman Keith Carey began on February 15 before Justice Jon Isaacs. Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight Knowles are charged with the murder as well as armed robbery and conspiracy to commit armed robbery. Keith Carey was shot and killed on the steps of the Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway before he was able to deposit $40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Station, which he operated. Deputy director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel, Stephanie Pintard, Anthony Delaney and Lennox Coleby are prose cuting the case. Attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis are representing Jamal Glinton, attorney Dorsey McPhee is representing Sean Brown and attorney Perry Albury is representing Dwight Knowles. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net W HILE most hotels on Grand Bahama are struggling to k eep afloat, at least one resort is beating the odds with an occup ancy rate close to 80 per cent for the first three months of 2009. All-inclusive resort Viva Club Fortuna, which has a capacity of 2 76 rooms, is consistently attracting visitors through h eavy advertising in the United States and Europe, as well as by o ffering charter flights from Europe to the island. C C o o n n s s i i s s t t e e n n t t Despite the turbulent Grand Bahama economy, the resort's f irst quarter occupancy rate has remained consistent, accordingt o general manager Roberto Paresce. "The occupancy the first quarter is averaged at a 78 per cent. This is on line with the same period of last year," he told The Tribune by email. Starting May 7 the resort – which Mr Paresce said attracts families looking for a valuebased all inclusive product – is anticipating the launch of a direct charter flight from France. The new route will be the first direct flight from France to Freeport, he said. "We do most of our marketing in USA but we also invest a lot to market in Europe – we have the French charter that will come directly to Freeport starting May 7 and the Italian charter coming on July and August like every year". He said the resort has to adjust its staff numbers due to Grand Bahama's soft economy – which was hard hit by back-toback hurricanes even the economic downturn took root – but is confident it can retain its high occupancy level through quality service. "Even though, the economy we are faced with is very challenging, we minimised our staff and were still able to offer our guests quality service, and 'wow' them enough to want to come back to our resort. “We have kept our good relationships with tour operators in different markets, and we've been able to bring several charters to Grand Bahama during our history. “If we continue to give our customers quality service, I think we will be able to continue high occupancy in spite of the difficult time Grand Bahama and the entire Bahamas is experiencing at this time," said Mr Paresce. Mother accused of causing newborn baby’s death appears in court Murder accused attacks credibility of the pr osecution’ s star witness Haitian migration linked to economic development A BOY makes his way with his bicycle in the slum of Cite Soleil, in Portau-Prince, Friday, March 20, 2009. R a m o n E s p i n o s a / A P P h o t o

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. I n the name of “development”, the birthrights of the Bahamian masses were sacrificed on the altar of greed,e ven before my birth in 1936. Of course, Bahamians were British subjects, then. O f particular interest to this writer, is my birthplace, Inagua, where the Inagua Tramway and Salt Company (ITSCO-my abbreviation formed in 1865, the year of my paternal grandmother’s birth. Successors to ITSCO are eg West India Chemicals Company (The Ericksons Morton International (Mor ton Salt) and now, Morton Bahamas with its parent, Rohm and Haas. Thousands of acres of Bahamian land are vested in the above even though there is no equitable on-going development for the benefit of this g eneration. Ditto for Freeport and West Grand Bahama, and, of course, other Bahamian islands. A system persists where Bahamians are mendicants for a “piece of the rock” in our Bahamas, whether such is for joint venturing or to otherwise benefit Bahamians. Allegations of “Bahamian Land Giveaways” were hot topics in the 2007 general elec tions to the extent, the FNM edged out the PLP to bring about a change in government. My own focus was sharp ened recently, as I watched the TV programme “Bahamian At Sunrise” broadcast from Inagua. My dearest mother, Mrs Inez Farquharson, 94 years young participated in the broadcast. In recent memory, many of our Caribbean and Latin America neighbours and, of course, African nations, eg Zimbabwe and South Africa were prime examples of land policy gone awry, many of lives were lost, and are still being lost in Darfur and other hot spots in Africa. There is therefore, the i nescapable reality for the urgent need for a new Bahamas land policy via an institutionalised legislative process for direct Bahamian benefit, as opposed to political manipulation where Bahamians continue to be used as pawns in the dehumanising game of “quid pro quo” and subterfuge, where the “tail wags the dog”, if you know what I mean! Any new Land Policy ought to be in tandem with election finance legislation, and so packaged to form part of the overall educational curriculum, allowing students in Inagua and other Bahamian islands to do research and appreciate their true heritage as opposed to enduring insults to their integrity; such insults as the renaming of Lake Rosa to Lake Windsor after a failed Royal or, certain Freeport High Schools named after pretenders disguised as benefactors. ETIENNE L FARQUHARSON Freeport, Grand Bahama, March, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Dear Mr Marquis The Tribune brings problems to the public attention so well, I am asking you to bring one more item to the people. I’m talking about the way we rob our guests, through high priced food and drink, with mandatory maximum tips for poor service. It all starts at the front desk, mandatory tips for maids and bellmen. I had a cousin from the states visit, he stayed on Cable Beach, h e had only one bag and carried it to his room himself, a day later I picked him up he was looking over his bill and asked about a five dollar tip for the bellman that he never even saw. The girl at the front desk told him he must pay the tip whether or not he used the bellman, she then mentioned that he was only charged tip for the maid as a single occupant, he informed her this was no favour as I was only picking him up, he was alone. Can you imagine that the mandatory tip for the maid goes up according to the number of people in the room, even though she still only has to clean the bath and room once. What happened to a maid cleaning simply because that is her job. Now a maid, with no education or other skills, can make more money than a col lege graduate! How does this encourage our youth to succeedi n life, when you can clean a bathroom, make a bed and make more money than an educated person. Being a bellman that doesn’t even have to lift a bag and still make a tip! My spouse and I, on occasion, g o to the Marina Village for a walk and stop and have a drink. We enjoy visiting with the t ourists and answer questions, tell them places to visit, etc. The main complaint, the high cost of coming to the Bahamas. We recently had a drink with a couple from England, with three children. They had just spent over $600 on dinner. Not only is the price of dinner outrageous, but over $90 of this bill was a tip! When is the last time any of u s gave a waiter a $90 tip? As a matter of fact the tip attached to our drinks was almost two dol lars each. Can anyone besides us, think this is just taking a cruel advantage of our much needed tourist? How many Bahamians would go to Miami or other destina tions if we were given this same treatment? We have the option of going out for a cocktail or stay at home, but as a tourist, you have no choice, pay up or go hungry. For a country that has little to offer a guest other than food or drink, shouldn’t we be thinking on a different level? Eat, drink and be merry, until you get your bill. This same couple took their family to the breakfast buffet, which totalled over $140, for breakfast, come on and again the same problem a mandatory tip, for serving themselves! How long can we allow the union leaders ruin our tourism, just for temporary wealth, for unskilled workers? With the large amount of our economy and work force depending on tourism, you’d think these resorts and restaurants would start treating our guests, the same way they are treated elsewhere. Everyone knows how much food and drinks cost anywhere else in the world, do we want to have the reputation of being thieves? We need to look at our guests as people we want to come back, tell everyone how great it is here, and recommend us to everyone. With the Internet, everyone “blogging”, the rule of thumb is, you upset one person, 3,000 people read about it. Our Ministry of Tourism and the larger resorts pay outrageous amounts of money to bring tourists here, but then we ruin it with poor service, mediocre food and high prices with a maximum tip attached. Sun, sea and sand is everywhere, we need to offer more. MRS THOMPSON Nassau, March 24, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm JUDGING by the heated chatter on a radio t alk show yesterday morning, the public is not o nly alarmed, but angered by the conduct of a judge in what can only be called the A, B, C, D “and others” case. The case carries the name of no person, because, for some mysterious reason, i t has been sealed and the names of plaintiffs and defendants are anonymously represented to the public by the first four letters of the alphabet. I n addition to the buzz on the radio stations, t he National Jubilee Coalition, headed by Bishop Simeon Hall with executives Dr Philip M cPhee and Dr Keith Russell, has called for a public investigation. Anyone, said their statem ent, associated with the judicial system should be “beyond the slightest reproach.” The Coalition demanded an appropriate investigation into Senior Justice John Lyons’ decision in the “A,B,C,D,” case. Any hint that a sitting judge might be compromised in anyway warrants the appropriate a ttention and investigation,” said the Coalition. This case a partnership operated between 1 992 and 2000 had been dissolved. Now in contention was the 50-50 distribution of the profitsfrom that partnership between A and B. Senior Justice Anita Allen observed that the case had “already been in the system longer than it ought t o have due mainly to the resignation of the first accountant appointed by the court and m ore recently to the sudden recusal of the judge (Justice John Lyons m atter.” Justice Lyons had charge of the case up to September 2008 when he “recused” himself because, he said, he had no time to hear it. The parties were left to find another judge. A preliminary issue was whether the incomplete accounts of the second court appointed accountant should be approved as the parties did not agree the report. She invited the litigants t o make some concessions on this point “to move the matter along.” One of the litigants disagreed and invited her to recuse herself from the case, citing bias. The senior judge denied bias and refused recusal. As a result the matter has been moved to the Court of Appeal where we shall leave it without further obser-v ation. Daniel Ferguson, was appointed the second a ccountant for the litigants on October 27, 2007 by Justice Lyons who instructed him that the b alancing payment was “by nature a forensic accounting and you should put together the best team you can. They have kept records, it is a reconciliation of their records we need.” Upon cross-examination it was discovered that Mr Ferguson qualified as a Certified Publ ic Accountant in 1985, but his forensic accounti ng was limited to only two cases in his whole career. He also admitted, that the last auditing experience he had was before he became qualified as an accountant. He agreed he had never c ertified an account. It was revealed that he was appointed to a job that required a highly skilled forensic accountant for which he was being paid perh our at an exchange rate just over $2 to the , w hich when converted was about $1,000 per hour. He said he worked an average of 50 hours w hich amounted to $50,000 a week or about $2.5 million per year for the work, which at t hat point he had not completed. The integrity of his report was in question. Baffled as to how Mr Ferguson could have been appointed for this specialised work, one of the counsel told the court that Mr Justice Lyons had literally forced the appointment on them, threatening to walk out of court if they did not a gree to the appointment.” At one point the judge got up to leave “when counsel begged h im to have a seat. The judge was asked by one counsel if it was an ultimatum to which he responded ‘you bet it is.’” It then transpired through questioning that the accountant’s sister had a relationship with t he judge and that in fact she was on her brother’s team to do the work for the court. “It was o nly then,” said Justice Allen, “that I made the connection between the accountant and inform ation, which was in the public domain for sometime, that the judge had more than a friendship with a woman, who up to that point I did not know was the accountant’s sister.” At this point we would like to know why this case was sealed, and who is attempting to hide what from the public? The tradition of our judicial system is that justice must not only be done, but must be seen t o be done. And so litigation is settled behind closed doors and out of public view in very lim ited cases matters of national security, and those involving children and mental cases. The case now before the court is a commercial matter. Why is the information sealed? What is being hidden behind “A,B,C,D, ando thers” and why? Our judicial system is in such bad odour t hat we agree that not only should this case be opened, but that there should be an investigat ion into Judge Lyons’ decision on the appoint ment of the accountant. Justice Anita Allen is to be congratulated for bringing what appears to be an unsavoury situation into public view. Robbery of our guests has to stop LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Judge Lyons’ conduct questioned )25$/(:(//(67$%/,6+(' )851,785(t $33/,$1&(%86,1(666(5,286,148,5,(6 21/<&$// )25)857+(5,1 Urgent need for a new Bahamas land policy

PAGE 5

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 5 n By JOHN MARQUIS WHILE everyone in Nassau worries about the credit crunch, the economic downturn and the d epressed property market, a s prightly Canadian couple living the good life on Crooked Island are asking: What recession? Donald and June MacMillan, w ho moved on to the island in 1965, say that with living costs a mere $400 a month that’s right, $100 per week the word “recess ion” means no more to them than t he current state of the Japanese yen. “When I watch TV at night, I realise how glad I am to be living o n Crooked Island,” Mr MacMillan, 78, said from his seafront home at Pittstown Point. “The word ‘recession’ doesn’t m ean a whole lot down here, not when living costs are about $400 a month (excluding taxes, of course and there are so few places tos pend any money.” It’s true that the bonefishing b usiness is down this year, with fewer Americans and Canadians f lying in for their annual sport, but when life is lived so frugally, and contentedly, there’s not a lot that greedy international moneymen can do to make you sleep less eas-i ly at night. “We spend $115 a time to r eplace our propane gas tank, and I need gas to get around in my vehic le, but other than that and our food supply, there’s not much to s pend money on here,” he said. Mr MacMillan, a former film industry executive, fell in love with Crooked Island during the early 1960s. It didn’t take long for he andh is wife to make it a winter home, an escape from the ice and slush of the north. Since 1993, they have lived on t he island year-round, venturing back to Canada only on occasional visits, and enduring the 85 per cent summer humidity with good grace even after other perspiring foreignr esidents have flown out in search of cooler air. “I can actually sit here and hear m y things rusting in Crooked Island, the humidity is so high,” hes aid, “but we love it here. The more aware you become of what’s happ ening in the outside world, the g ladder you are to be living in a place like this.” D uring a recent medical check, a Canadian doctor told Mr MacMil l an: “I don’t know what you’re doing, but whatever it is it’s goodf or you.” Plenty of fish hauled out of the nearby sea, and ample fruit and v egetables grown on their patch of land ensure that the MacMillans eat the kind of fare that doctors recommend. “There is no fast food down h ere,” he said, “We catch tuna, wahoo, mackerel, snapper, mahimahi, muttonfish, you name it. And we have a garden where we grow p lenty of our food. Mailboat We buy things, too, of course, a nd bring in supplies on the mailboat, but you can live well here without the expense of city life. After all, who needs suits and ties in Crooked Island? I wear jeans a nd sweatshirt most of the time, and there’s no impulse buying here you just buy what you need, nothing more.” Apart from running a tiny hardw are store from a metal container outside his home (mornings onlyM r MacMillan fills his time by “pottering about” (his term w ood-carving, a hobby he took up recently. “I don’t earn enough from the store to buy a stick of gum, but it keeps my head turning over ande nables me to meet people every day. It’s therapy, not a business,” he said. With a total population of 248, a nd 38 second homes owned mainly by North Americans, Crooked Island isn’t exactly overrun with humanity. But he said social life is thriving, w ith couples taking turns to host dinner at their homes, and the local taverns alive with noise as Crooked Islanders debate the issues of the d ay. “There’s not a single security bar in Crooked Island,” he said, “when we go out we leave the doors open. Things are very congenial here. Weg et along very well.” The MacMillans’ idyllic existence is proof that opportunities exist on the islands for Bahamians stressedo ut by urban living to live agreeably in communities where mortgages and credit cards don’t mean a lot. O ne man recently took advantage of a government crown lands cheme by starting a fruit farm, producing limes, bananas, Calif ornian oranges and tangerines. S ome Bahamian retirees are also choosing island life because they c an get by more comfortably on a limited pension. I think more Bahamians living in Nassau are looking to their fam-i lies’ home islands for their retire ment,” said Mr MacMillan. Here they can get away from the crime and congestion. And money goes much, much further.” Though the island’s limited holiday trade is noticeably down thisy ear, mainly because Americans are spending less to get through t he current crisis, projects are underway to boost business for the future. Cameron McRae, who owns the Bojangles restaurant chain in the United States, is developing a bou-t ique hotel for upscale foreigners at Pittstown. Last week, he completed a 3,500foot runway for private fliers and is h oping to sell home lots equipped with individual hangars for those who want to make Crooked Island their Bahamas base. With amenities improving all the t ime you can even get the Internet nowadays Crooked Island is not quite as remote as it used to be. Foreclosures Satellite TV is on hand to remind residents what they’re missing in t he great recession-hit world outs ide the home foreclosures, the Bernie Madoffs, the avaricious bankers and huge credit debts of a c apital system gone wrong. I can sit here with my cigar, a cup of coffee, a good book everybody passes books around and f eel really sorry for those guys who are up against it in the outside w orld,” said Mr MacMillan. “Down here there is no recession, there is no crime my wife and I just love the place.” Where else can you spend a hund red bucks a week and live like Riley in an environment where itr arely rains and never snows where “consumer spending” is a b ox of tinned food off the mailboat, and “bail out” is something you do in a leaking dinghy? Mr and Mrs MacMillan don’t know. That’s why Canada is somewhere they visit from time to time and Crooked Island is the spot they n ow call home. “We have never regretted being h ere,” they say, “it’s the best place on earth.” n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – An environment al organisation in Grand Bahama is agitating for the Animal Protectiona nd Control Act to be made into law. We have a draft Animal Cruel ty Act that has been finalised but not passed. We need to let government know that the Animal Cruel ty Act needs to be made into actual l egislation,” said Earthcare founder Gail Woon. T he recent slaughtering of protected iguanas, turtles and wild d ucks in the Bahamas has outraged many persons who feel that the incidents are a form of animal cruelty. While speaking at the Grand Bahama Sunrise R otary Club, Ms Woon told Rotarians that there are several pertinent environmental issues facing thec ountry. “The Bahamas has a new Ministry of the Environment that was created last year again we have a draft Act, but no environmental laws to speak of,” she said. M s Woon, a marine biologist, was very pleased about the news of the creation of a marine protect e d area (MPA been both local and international concerns r egarding the mega-resort development on that island. “Government has said that the Bimini MPA will be ‘revisited’. This will result in decisions being made about what will be allowed and what activities w ill not be allowed in the designated MPA. As it stands now, we b elieve the east side of the North Sound will be saved for future gen erations.” “We are hoping that the golf course will not be allowed because t he Bahamas National Trust is against the construction of the golf c ourse and the government listens to the BNT,” said Ms Woon. O n the issue of endangered sea turtles, Ms Woon is appealing to Bahamian citizens to express their views concerning a ban on the har vesting of the reptiles. She said thatg overnment announced in 2008 that it will ban the harvest of sea turtles a s of April 1, 2009. “All six of the sea turtles worldw ide are endangered. “There is a chance that this (ban may not happen. “The Ministry of Fisheries wants more input from Bahamian citizens. They have heard a lot of support f or the ban from non-Bahamians. Please let the Ministry of Fisheries know about your support of theb an before April 1,” she said. Ms Woon said another issue of concern is the i nvasion of the lionfish in Bahamian waters. She said the lionfish is a voracious predator that is threatening the local fishery. “The current thinking is to kill them. Some fishermen have reported finding lionfish in groupers tomachs. We need to find out the effect of eating lionfish has on native species such as the grouper. Is the grouper flesh safe to eat if it has ingested lionfish with their venomous spines? This is research that needs to be done,” she said. NONE of the Bahamas’ women parliamentarians has made it into the top 50 “political beauties” in the world, a poll has revealed. Peruvians took the top two places, with a Mexican and Italian in third and fourth places. But the Bahamas was left out in the cold in an online poll which highlighted “beautiful” politicians from more than 30 countries. Among those in the top 50 were Americans Sarah Palin and Hillary Clinton and the stunning French socialist Segolene Royal. But all were well down the list, with Palin at 24, Royal at 36 and 61-year-old Clinton the oldest woman mentioned at 34. Politicians from A fghanistan, Spain, Indones ia, Angola, China, Iceland a nd Finland were among those listed. N o Bahamian women parliamentarians in ‘the world’s top 5 0 political beauties’ In brief n C ORRECTION THE Tribune story entit led ‘Highest honour for Bahamian student’ published on Wednesday, March 25, inaccurately reported William Saunders III piloteda plane at age 16 when former US presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush Sr v isited the school. However, William Saunders, otherwise known as AJ’, piloted a plane for a flyover for General Flannag an, who was the pilot for Marine I for Mr Reagan and Mr Bush. Couple on Crooked Island:what recession? Call for Animal Protection and Control Act to be law Earthcare founder Gail Woon Frugal living in ‘the best place on earth’ n CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ASTRONAUTSaboard space shuttle Discovery con d ucted a final inspection of the vehicle Thursday and at first g lance found no significant dam age which would prevent it from returning to Earth, according to Associated Press. Mission managers will decide whether it’s safe for Discovery to land Saturday at the Kennedy S pace Center in Florida once engineers finish studying the r esults of the five-hour, routine survey. They said Thursday afternoon they hadn’t detecteda ny areas of concern so far. Astronauts combed the outs ide of the shuttle with a 50-foot inspection boom mounted on Discovery’s robotic arm. The boom was equipped with laser and camera tools that beamed images and data back to Mis sion Control. “To the untrained eye, it looked very, very clean,” said Paul Dye, lead flight director. Astronauts were looking for damage from micrometeorites or space debris that may have hit the shuttle as it was docked to the international space sta tion for eight days. The results were being compared with those taken during an inspection on the mission’s second day. The procedure was put in place after the 2003 Columbia disaster killed seven astronauts. A piece of foam from Columbia’s external tank damaged the shuttle’s wing during launch, allowing fiery gases to penetrate the orbiter during its descent back to Earth. Discovery undocked from the space station on Wednesday after its seven-person crew delivered and installed power-generating solar wings at the orbit ing outpost. Discovery was orbiting Earth for two days before it was to re-enter Earth- ’s atmosphere on Saturday. Astronaut Sandra Magnus joined the crew for the return trip after living four months at the space station. She spent two sessions on the shuttle’s exer cise machine Thursday in order to prepare her body for the effects of gravity. “Sandy is on her way home,” space station commander Mike Fincke radioed Mission Control. “We certainly enjoyed work ing with her.” Final in-orbit space shuttle inspection is completed

PAGE 6

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 1LDJDUD&KULVLWLDQ&RPPXQLW\ RIFKRRO1&&RIIHUVDFDGHPLFH[FHOOHQFHLQDIDPLO\OLNH DWPRVSKHUHLQVSLULQJOLIHORQJOHDUQHUV VVFKPROO#QLDJDUDFFFRP 3ULYDWHFKRROHVWDEOLVKHGLQ 5LFKWUDGLWLRQDQGKHULWDJH &RHGXFDWLRQDO'D\DQGHVLGHQWLDO (OHPHQWDU\LGGOHDQGHFRQGDU\FKRROV 6DIHIDPLO\OLNHHQYLURQPHQW 'HGLFDWHGIDFXOW\DQGVPDOOFODVVVL]HV &RPSUHKHQVLYHFRFXUULFXODUDQGUHVLGHQWLDO SURJUDPV &KDPSLRQVKLSSRUWVHDPV 'LVWLQJXLVKHGXQLYHUVLW\SODFHPHQW VWXGHQWVIURPFRXQWULHV %HDXWLIXOFDPSXVQHDULDJDUD)DOOV THE global real estate system RE/MAX celebrated theo fficial signing of the Bahamas the 73rd country to join the R E/MAX network with a flag-raising ceremony at its Denver headquarters last week. In 2008, RE/MAX surpassed the 70-country milestone and now has an international pres-e nce greater than any of its competitors. “RE/MAX is recognised around the world and there is certainly a place for this powerful network in the Bahamas,” said William Soteroff, seniorv ice-president of international development at RE/MAX International. “The Bahamas has an established real estate market and a gents and consumers alike will b enefit from the international resources and tools that R E/MAX has to offer.” N ew Bahamas franchise owners Craig Pinder, broker and o wner of RE/MAX Paradise Realty (formerly known as Paradise Real Estate), and William Wong, broker and owner of RE/MAX Ocean Realty B ahamas (formerly known as William Wong and Associates R ealty), were at the RE/MAX h eadquarters for the flag-raising ceremony and for the new franchisee training seminar. The two Bahamian realtors w ill continue to operate their s eparate offices and will implement the power of the R E/MAX brand name to attract both local and foreign h ome buyers and sellers. RE/MAX has a market b rand presence like no other r eal estate network in the world,” said Mr Wong, who has been in the real estate business for over ten years and is presi dent of the Bahamas Real E state Association. “My agents will benefit from being a part of a major inter n ational franchise, and this office, with its experience and resources, will only build on itsc urrent success. I want us to be a major competitor in the Bahamian real estate market and take advantage of the greatr eferral opportunities RE/MAX has to offer.” Mr Wong’s RE/MAX Ocean Realty Bahamas office will be managed by his daughter, Lauren Ashley Wong. M r Pinder, who has over ten y ears of real estate experience, wants to establish RE/MAX as a household name in the Bahamas. The RE/MAX affiliation, he said, will help him add evenm ore listings and sales to his already robust business. I had contemplated joining f or a while and when I recently viewed a few RE/MAX televi sion commercials, especially d uring the Super Bowl, I realised that this is the most recognised real estate brand in t he world and it was the perf ect time to introduce RE/MAX to the Bahamas,” Mr Pinder said. A ttending the recent RE/MAX International Convention and training seminars i n Las Vegas also helped Mr P inder’s decision to join R E/MAX. “Bahamian real estate agents a re some of the best educated in the region and RE/MAX agents have an added advan-t age with access to top educat ional resources,” he said. The Bahamas is the seventh country to join the RE/MAX network in the last four months. The countries of Albania, Ecuador, Macedonia, Uruguay,I ndia and Singapore have all recently launched new RE/MAX franchises. F or the ninth time in the last ten years, RE/MAX ranked higher than any other reale state franchise in Entrepren eur Magazine’s “The Franchise 500 Survey.” The Denver-based franchisor l ed all its competitors in three c ategories, including global franchises. RE/MAX welcomes Bahamas THE driver escaped unscathed after this Honda Accord hit a wall and flipped over in a narrow Nassau street at around 10.30pm on W ednesday. O nlookers who crowded around the crash scene told T he Tribune t he driver said he had been driving east on East Bay Street, passed the bridge to Paradise Island, and took a right turn into Ernest Street, which runs behind Hammerheads Bar and Grill. B ut as he turned into the road, a beggar approached the car asking for a dollar and tried to grab the driver through the window. T he driver told onlookers he slammed on the brakes, lost control o f the car and crashed into a low wall. P olice attended the crash scene, as did fire and ambulance services. Driver unhurt after car crashes and flips over William Wong and Craig Pinder P h o t o s b y C h r i s d A l b e n a s T HEHONDA ACCORD h it a wall then flipped over.

PAGE 7

n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A study of the feasibility of using wind as an alternative energy source is now underway in Grand Bahama. Equipment designed to measure wind speed is expected to be put up over the next few weeks. Excell O Ferrell, president and CEO of the Grand Bahama Power Company, said the company is looking at other alternative energy resources as well. The company, he said, is working with one of its owners, Emera a major energy firm that has a diversified portfolio worth $5.3 billion – to conduct the wind studies, which will last a year. “We should have equipment up in the next few weeks and we will be able to measure the wind duration and the speed on the hour. And it will take a year or so to really determine if there is sufficient wind to actually construct wind turbines. Turbines “If it turns out that there is sufficient wind to make turbines practical, I anticipate we would build wind turbines and end up with an energy source that has no cost for fuel. “The benefit to the consumers on the island is that you’ve got an energy source that is not impacted by what happens in world prices of oil,” explained Mr Ferrell. However, he added that the company will not be able generate all its electricity by using wind because “you cannot depend on it.” “You have to have generation that is powered by something other than the wind to meet the load. “There will be some small percentage of total wind and total energy, and it will make some reduction in fuel price and overall cost, and so from that standpoint,I am optimistic,” he said. In addition to the wind study, Mr Ferrel said the GBPC is talking with land owners to determine the feasibility of capturing methane gas which has been noted to flare up in certain areas of the island. Environmentalist Gail Woon, founder of Earthcare, said her organisation supports these efforts to find alternative energy sources. She noted that alternative energy will help to reduce the country’s need to import oil. “There is good news in the area of alternate energy – government has received several bids for alternate energy,” she said. “It will result in 20 percent of the energy for New Providence being provided by alternate forms of energy such as solar or wind power. She added that the identity of Bahamians involved in the various alternative energy bids should be made public, in the interest of fairness and transparency. Ms Woon said the government also needs to release the details of its energy policy, and that the law prohibiting homes from having solar panels and windmills should be changed. THE Ministry of the Environment and the National Coastal Awareness Committee are joining forces to launch a clean-up campaign of Nassau’sh istoric harbour. The campaign includes the removal of derelict and aban-d oned vessels stretching from Potter’s Cay Dock west to Arawak Cay as well as the r emoval of trash (marine d ebris) from the sea floor and shoreline. The first harbour clean-up w ill take place on Saturday, April 4, in the Potter’s Cay vicinity between the two bridges. The Ministry of the Envi ronment supports environmen tal stewardship demonstrated b y the National Coastal Aware ness Committee and its efforts to clean up our coastal envi r onment,” the ministry said in a p ress statement. “This work is extremely important. It provides a reward i ng experience for those who take part in this exercise. The ministry is fully committed to e nsuring that the cleanliness of the physical environment receives top priority, therefore, it encourages community par t icipation in this event. This commitment is manifested in action which involves preven t ion, control and abatement of practices and or factors which adversely impact the environ-m ent and may affect the fragile marine environment/life and ultimately the health and phys-i cal well being of our people. Plan “Therefore, it is the ministry’s plan to encourage the continuityof this effort by educating and sensitising the public in order to protect our environment.” The Ministry of the Environ ment will commit the resources that it has available to fully participate in this clean-up initiative. The ministry said it is impressed with the efforts and activities of the National Coastal Awareness Committee over the past five years. As a result of their annual clean-up programme, there is a noticeable difference around the coastline, particularly in New Providence, the ministry said. “The National Coastal Awareness Committee is pleased to join forces with the Ministry of the Environment for the launch of their harbour clean up,” said Earlston McPhee, chairman of the Com mittee and director of sustainable tourism development for the Ministry of Tourism. “In the last two years, our committee has held three large harbour clean-ups as part of our national initiative that made a tremendous impact but so much more needs to be done.” “Together with the Ministry of the Environment we will be able to make significant, longterm, positive changes to our harbour which is one of our country’s most important nat ural assets,” Mr McPhee said. “We have a beautiful natural harbour that can become a tremendous tourist attractionin the future. I envision one day that the city of Nassau will be mentioned along with other famous waterfront cities like Helsinki, Finland; Sydney, Aus tralia; Hamburg, Germany; and Stockholm, Sweden.” The clean-up will involve both land and sea coordination. Stuart Cove and his dive team along with the Royal Bahamas Defense Force, the Department of Marine Resources and other dive volunteers will assist in removing vessels and marine debris from the harbour floor. T he vessels will be lifted up and transported to the point of disposal. All trash removed willb e sorted and catalogued by volunteers through Dolphin Encounters – Project BEACH t o help track common types of l itter and to prevent these items from returning to the harbour in the future. Coastline Within the next two weeks, the Ministry of the Environ m ent will place 37 four and s ix cubic yard containers at all of the public areas along the coastline throughout New Prov i dence. This is another partners hip similar to the one we are happy to forge with the National Coastal Committee. “We hope the public will join us as we strive to sustain the natural beauty of these islands f or our socio-economic welfare and that of our guests,” Mr McPhee said. This is a large task but an important one. “We are all in this together.”T he public is invited to participate in the harbour cleanup. C ertified divers and volun teers to sort and catalogue debris are needed. T o volunteer call Stuart Cove ’s Dive. The National Coastal Awareness Committee of the Bahamasi s a group of stakeholders from the private and public sectors with an interest in promotingt he sustainable development of the Bahamas. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 7 bf fbffft tn" nntf n r"r tn tn btf Ministry of Environment launches a harbour clean-up campaign THE CAMPAIGN will work on the area from Potter’s Cay Dock west to Arawak Cay Study into wind as alternative energy source gets underway n CARACAS, Venezuela VENEZUELANprosecutors have filed charges against eight police officers and three other people, accusing them of involvement in a January attack on Caracas’ largest synagogue, prosecutors said Thursday, according to Associated Press. Prosecutors said in a statement they’ve asked a court to approve charges including robbery, “acts of contempt against a religion,” and concealing firearms. Among the suspects is a police officer who worked as a bodyguard for a rabbi. Another suspect is one of two security guards on duty during the attack, who is suspected of aiding intruders by deactivating an alarm and an electric fence surrounding the building. Eleven are accused of ransacking synagogue in Venezuela In brief

PAGE 8

one, and what they are trying to do is crucify one of my children,” an impassioned Mr Ritchie said yesterday. For the past week, Mr Ritchie has led a one-man campaign in the media calling on the government to rethink its approach in calling in his company’s outstanding debt, which ultimately will force the brokerage firm out of business. Asked how he could insist that it was the government that was forcing him out of business when the courts had ordered immediate payment of outstanding funds before any attempts were made to reconcile the balances, Mr Ritchie said that during any court matter both parties can still come to some form of agreement. Mr Ritchie also explained that the outstanding money was not funds owed by his company to the government in terms of taxes, but the balances of his trade payables. These “trade payables”, Mr Ritchie said, were abruptly called in by the government, forcing him to resort to utilising certified cheques to pay employees and then working day-to-day on a cash basis system. “In any business your payables drag to 30-60 days. If you have good terms you can get 60 maybe 90 days. But with government we don’t try that because we know they want to get paid as quick as possible. So we would be a couple of weeks out and that’s what they jumped on. “Now, my people, I’m giving them 30-60-90 days and I’m waiting on them to pay me. Suddenly the government says pay me all my money now or we’re going to sue you. The bank then, for whatever reason,s uddenly hardens up on my overdraft and holds all my assets personal and business. “So now they bounce my cheques. They bounce dollar cheques without any notice but we worked it out and I replacet hem with certified cheques. I t ook them down to Mr Mullings myself. Now suddenly I’m pay ing cash because I’m still in business, I’m supposed to be out of business. So now I’m put on cash in October, and all my vendors want cash up front. SoI have to provide a service to a client, I have to pay for that service in advance, so I have to find the money to pay, then I have to bill them and wait 30, 60, even 90 days to get paid. So my cash flow has taken a three to four month slip the wrong way,” Mr Ritchie explained. This tactic, he said, which was inflicted upon his company, can be done to any other company, Mr Ritchie warned. Doing over $125 million worth of business a year, Mr Ritchie said GUL would annually pay the government anywhere between $70 and $80 million. And during this period, Mr Ritchie said, he was owed anywhere between $13 and $15 million. “I was owed more than what I owed anybody else. “But I must be from the wrong island, with the wrong background and in the wrong party because I haven’t seen this happen to nobody else. And ain’t nobody can tell me no other reason why.” Mr Ritchie said he isn’t worried because he knows that he is in the right and he has his facts which will come out “one way or the other”. “I will pay every bill and every dollar. For me to be in this position, yes it is embarrassing, but I will come out. The fact of the matter is that what was done to me and my company is an injustice,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE site, casinogamblingweb.com, yesterday suggested t he bills if passed would “cripple” the Bahamian gambling industry, keeping Floridian gamblers at h ome and drawing those from other states to gam ble in Florida rather than the Bahamas. “We are a gaming state, so why wouldn’t we want to be the cream of the crop rather than losing citizens going somewhere else?” the sponsor of the two Bills a nd SRIC chairman Dennis Jones was reported to have asked. Y esterday, Mr Sands said gaming stakeholders in this country are keenly aware of the threat they f ace already having seen a “precipitous drop” in the number of people travelling to the Bahamas to play so-called table games in the wake of the introduction of more of these in Florida casinos last year. “If they were to open up further that would have a dramatic impact on us being able to remain competitive in this particular area,” said Mr Sands. We are obviously keeping our eye on it and we are running a parallel track in terms of lobbying t he government for some major changes to the exist ing regulations and casino legislation that has presently been in force for more than 40 years,” he added. The hotelier said that, while discussions on the n eed for modernisation of the Bahamian casino industry have been ongoing “over a long period, t he time has really come for us to be extremely proactive in being advocates for this change.” (We need to changing needs of the gaming market fairly quickly so we’re not caught off-hand,” he noted. Revealing some contents of the presentation set to be made to the Minister of Tourism, Mr Sands said it will address the need for “new games and all derivative forms of existing table games” to be intro-d uced, as well as the thorny question of who should be allowed to gamble in the Bahamas. While stopping short of proposing that Bahamians be permitted to legally do so, as some advocate, Mr Sands said the presentation will suggest that some Bahamian residents, including second home owners who have a proven net worth,” should be given the chance to play as part of an effort to shore up casi-n o profits. “What we intend to do is have a very compreh ensive approach, looking at regulations, the legis lation, that will allow the Bahamas jurisdiction for gaming to be competitive with the other gaming jurisdictions around the world. “We believe that we must be progressive and be p repared for radical change in our gaming industry if it’s going to continue to survive in this particularm arket place,” said the BHA president. The new bills approved by the Florida Senate R egulated Industries Committee provide for oper ators to introduce new games like blackjack, craps and roulette, and gives a tax break on gambling revenues for “racinos” dog and horse tracks. That comes on top of allowing Hard Rock Cafes t o be revamped into full-blown casinos and lowering of the legal gambling age in the state from 21 to 18. W ith the bills’ sponsors suggesting the state could bring in an extra $1 billion annually by changing t he laws, they have also received the support of Florida Governor Charlie Crist formerly opposed to the expansion of gambling in the state. He is desperately trying to increase Florida’s revenue base in the face of a budget deficit. However, the Florida House of Representatives is said to be less keen on the idea as a solution to the state’s money woes, making the certainty of the bills’ passage less assured. Rep Bill Galvano, a Republican who chairs the House Compact Review committee, said of the Sen-a te proposal: “They are allowing anything and everything; we’re not prepared to do that.” A message left for Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool Wallace was not returned up to press time yesterday. 10.55am. As the dumptruck pulled off to make the turn, the driver said she was engulfed in a cloud of dust which, when it cleared, revealed the body of what she soon realised was the driver of the scooter lying in the road. The motorbike itself was trapped under the front of the truck, which stopped moments later. According to those on the scene, the driver of the truck would have been unable to see the moped, which was located on the opposite side to the truck’s driver. “Shaken up” by the incident, the truck driver was taken to hospital by ambulance. T he victim has yet to be identified. Street, yesterday for allegedly failing to pay NIB contributions. NIB officials, however, declined to release any information regarding the matter. Last month, Jones Commu nications CEO Wendall Jones pleaded guilty to owing NIB o ver $430,000. Mr Jones agreed to pay 40 per cent of the sum $180,000 and the remainder over a two-year period. The National Insurance Board is increasing its review of accounts of delinquent employers and self-employed people in order to ensure comp liance with the National Insurance Act. For this year alone, the National Insurance Board of Directors has reportedly recommended that close to 300 employers who have failed to pay employees' contributions or produce National Insurance records be prosecuted. T he men then fled with what police called a “large quantity of cash”, leaving the manager tied up inside the premises with a telephone cable. Luckily, he was able to wriggle free and raise the alarm. Mr Burrows said he found out about the incident around an hour later and is still in shock. Nothing like this had ever happened at his business, he said, adding that he is considering ways to beef up the company’s security system which was cut by the robbers before they entered. Yesterday, the manager took a day off work to seek medical treatment for his injuries. Meanwhile, the 1999 Toyota Corolla used by the three men to flee the scene of the crime was found dumped in the Wells Lane area, behind the Village Road City Market, at around 9pm on W ednesday. P olice are investigating but have no solid leads, they said. B usiness manager assaulted, kidnapped F ROM page one FROM page one Casinos in Bahamas ‘need radical change’ Brother of Wendall Jones in court for allegedly failing to pay NIB contributions FROM page one FROM page one Man dies in collision F ROM page one CEO of Global Unitedexpects to lose millions if company wound up

PAGE 9

n Xinhua News Agency Issued by the ChineseE mbassy, Nassau F ORmany people, 1959 is just a number, or perhaps a date in a textbook. But for those who witnessed events inT ibet that year, it remains an i ndelible memory after half a century. Gyaga Losang Tangyai, now 81, remains forceful and energetic. In 1959, he was serving under the 10th Panchen Lama, who was the second most impor-t ant religious figure in Tibet next to the Dalai Lama. The Panchen Lama controlled many temples and much land ino ld Tibet, just like other living B uddhas. In 1954, Gyaga accompanied the Panchen Lama and 14th Dalai Lama on a mission to Beijing on behalf of the Gaxag gove rnment (the old Tibetan gove rnment). They were received by the late Chairman Mao Zedong. "He told us that democratic r eform wouldn't be carried out for at least six more years," Gyaga recalled. " Democratic reform" literally m eant the end of serfdom and abolition of the hierarchic social system characterised by a theocr acy, with the Dalai Lama as the core of the leadership. That system had existed in Tibet for some1 ,000 years. T he aim was to free about 1 million serfs and slaves who accounted for 90 per cent of the Tibetan population in the 1950s. They were controlled by lamas, officials and nobles, including theD alai Lama's family. Mao believed that reform, despite public appeal, could only be launched when the Tibetan n obles, including the Dalai Lama, were ready to support it. Without that support, reform would have t o be further postponed, Mao told the Tibetan delegation. With that understanding, they returnedh ome. SURPRISE IN 1959 O ne day five years later, Gyaga was taken by surprise at the Tashilunpo Temple in Xigaze. H e was told that the Dalai Lama and his supporters had staged an "armed riot" in Lhasa, which wast hen as now – the capital of Tibet. "I got the news from soldiers, and the Panchen Lama soon asked me to accompany him to Beijing by way of Lhasa," he said. They arrived in Lhasa on M arch 20, 1959. The city had become a totally unfamiliar place to Gyaga. " It looked like a war zone: few people outside, craters in the streets." He and the Panchen Lama first visited the Jokhang Temple, where lamas "appeared disoriented ... There was water every where, and they told us that they had just put out a fire." The situation was even worse at the Ramoche Temple, also in Lhasa, where they saw no lamas, only "bullet holes on the golden roof," he said. "I felt that the rebels had gone mad," he said. "How can they damage their own city?" He gestured furiously while recountingthe long-ago story. FATEFUL DAY Ngapoi Ngawang Jigme, son of a Tibetan aristocrat who later became vice chairman of the 11th National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC, the top advisory body), also recalls the riot in 1959. His account goes like this: The Dalai Lama wanted to watch a troupe of the Tibet Military Region on March 10, but he declined to have them come to Norbu Lingka, his palace. Instead, he insisted on going to a military auditorium, where he said his supporters would meet him. "I sensed that something would happen," because the Dalai Lama rarely left Norbu Lingka, recalled Ngapoi, now 98. On the morning of March 10, 1959, he said, turmoil broke out in Lhasa. People were fearful that the Dalai Lama had been kid napped. "Some people cried out, 'let us protect our treasure! The Hans kidnapped him!' The Hans are the ethnic Chinese majority. "This was like a bolt from the blue to pious Tibetans, who soon flooded to Norbu Lingka in shock, confusion and horror ..." But, Ngapoi said, the rumor w as spread by the Dalai Lama's supporters. Rioters soon surrounded Norbu Lingka, intent on killing and destruction, shouting "Tibet independence" and" get out, you Hans". VETERAN'S RECOLLECTIONS Lhabgyi, an 83-year-old vetera n of the People's Liberation Army (PLA patched to Lhasa in April 1959,r ecalled that the city was still like a "battlefield" when he arrived, with rubble everywhere. The PLA's mission was to persuade the rioters to surrender. "We assured them that if they surrendered, they would not bek illed, jailed, or denounced in public meetings," he said. But disorder continued and spread throughout Tibet, and Lhabgyi can still recall his fallen c omrades. " In a battle in May in Linzhou C ounty, which is about 65 kilometers from Lhasa, a soldier died, while three rioters were killed.I n another one, six soldiers died, including our political instructor,"h e said. A man leading the rioters in L inzhou was injured in his arm. "His wife persuaded him to sur render, saying that otherwise t heir two sons would be killed as well," Lhabgyi said. The man later became a member of the Lhasa People's Political Consul t ative Conference. THREE YEARS F OR PEACE The PLA halted the riots in L hasa in two days. But it took nearly three years to restore peace in the entire region. There is no known accurate count oft he final death toll. According to www.huanqiu.com, the website of a political periodical, nearly 90,000 people were involved in riots around Tibet, of whom 42.8 per cent surrendered. The "diehard" core members numbered about 23,000. A document in the State Archives Administration recorded a speech by Mao, who said China would welcome the Dalai Lama back and give him a role in the central government if he sup ported democratic reform. B ut the Dalai Lama didn't return. He had already fled to India. Lhalu Cewang Doje, now 94, had a key role in the insurgency but later became Vice Chairman of the Tibet People's Political Consultative Conference. He later wrote a book, "Rise and Fall of the Lhalu Family," about his family, some of whom had been Panchen or Dalai Lamas. He said that after being arrested in the riots, he thought the central government would exe cute him. Hence, he refused to confess anything. Once he was taken to a public denunciation where some people threatened to beat him, he said, but two soldiers protected him. Lhalu said it was then that he began to believe in the policies of the Communist Party and con fessed. He was jailed in 1959 and released in 1965. When he left prison, he got back his prized pos sessions: golden earrings, a watch and a pen. ACCOUNTS DIFFER In the Chinese version of his autobiography, "Freedom in Exile," the 14th Dalai Lama tellsa different story. He writes that his followers in the Tibet uprising met their deaths in many violent ways, being "crucified, dismembered and disemboweled ... beheaded, burned, lashed, buried alive, dragged by galloping hors es, hanged, and thrown into freez ing water with their limbs tied." The book also states: "I also heard from refugees that the central government aimed cannons at the Potala Palace and the Jokhang Temple, after bombarding Norbu Lingka. Buildings in these places were severely damaged." The Chinese govern ment has disputed this account. Although their accounts differ, both sides acknowledge that the Dalai Lama fled Tibet for India, where he has lived since. His departure shocked and distressed his followers and many Tibetans. TIME FOR CHANGE The riot changed everything in Tibet. The Communists soon decided that democratic reform should be carried out immedi-a tely to demolish the entire old s ystem led by the Dalai Lama. The Preparatory Committee of Tibet Autonomous Region replaced the Gaxag government and set out to lead the reform. F rom 1959 to until 1966, when the Cultural Revolution began, 1 million slaves were granted l and, houses and their freedom. O ne of those slaves was Migmar Dondrup, now 75, who got 1.4 hectares of land. He served for 11 years in Parlha Manor, an aristocrat's home, as a nangsan, the lowest level ofs erfdom. Migmar was a tailor and his wife was a maid, and both worked from dawn until midnight. If they didn't satisfy their m asters, they might be whipped o r even killed. T heir home was a dark, seven square metre adobe house, where they lived with their daughter.T he family had to subsist on 28 kilograms of barley, the basis fort he traditional Tibetan dish of t sampa. H e was lucky compared with one of his relatives, a groom, who was beaten to death because thel andlord believed he had wasted fodder when feeding the horses. Many such tales are on display in the Museum of Tibet, with a bout a score of black-and-white photos depicting the brutality of landowners: slaves' eyes gouged o ut, fingers chopped off, noses cut and the tendons of their feet removed. A gain, the Dalai Lama's account of these days differs. In the fifth chapter of his autobiography, he claims that "in Tibet,t he relationship of landowners and their slaves was much better than that in the inland of China, and there were no such cruel punishments as manacles and cas tration, which prevailed all over China." REMEMBERING FREEDOM It was in the autumn of 1959, as Migmar recalled, when more than 500 people gathered in a garden in the Parlha Manor, where he was then a serf. A PLAs oldier told them they would soon get their own land, and peo ple applauded enthusiastically. More than 30 households held a draw for the land. "I could hardly express my happiness then," he said emo tionally. When he was a lowranking serf, he didn't have any land. "When I was a nangsan, I wasn't even allowed to keep a cat." Some serfs had been working the land under contract. They set fire to those contracts and to receipts for usurious loans. Then they danced, cried and drank. In the living room of the old man's two-story house, there still hangs a black-and-white photo of Mao that shows him working in a field wearing a straw hat. Migmar put a khata, or white Tibetan scarf on it, a symbol used to show respect. "Even my parents couldn't give me land, but he did," the former serf said. Lhabgyi, the PLA veteran, said that almost every household had photos then had photos of Mao, whom they revered. "Of course there were people who disbelieved the policies of the Communist Party," he recalled. But soldiers managed to dispel their suspicions by being helpful. NEW LIFE FOR NOBILITY As for former aristocrats who were not involved in the riot, they were not left empty-handed, and received financial compensation for their land. Gyaga Losang Tangyai in Xigaze had several manors and some 20 ha of land. When demo cratic reform took place, he was worried and "dared not to expect any compensation. "I said all I wanted was a peaceful life, but the government gave me about 10,000 yuan," he said. That amount is equivalent to about 1,470 US dollars at con temporary rates. More than 600 people who served under the Panchen Lama stayed behind in Xigaze, except for one who moved to India for business. Gyaga was a member of the n ational committee of the C PPCC for 15 years. CONTROVERSIES LINGER AFTER 50 YEARS While Gyaga and Migmar w ere starting new lives, the situa tion in Tibet came controversial worldwide. In September 1959, Christian Archibald Herter, then US Secretary of State, told the UN General Assembly that the ChineseC ommunist Party was imposing c olonial rule in Tibet. T he Dalai Lama has maint ained a government-in-exile s ince 1959, and China has charged that this group was behind last year's riot in Lhasa and other Tibetan areas of China. This year marks the 50th a nniversary of democratic reform i n Tibet. In that half-century, Tibet has experienced great changes but the controversy over the past persists. Zhu Xiaoming, research fell ow at the China Tibetology R esearch Center in Beijing, said some foreign countries and international organisations continued to use the Tibet issue as a lever against China. "I once discussed this with s ome scholars in the United S tates," he said. " I said that Abraham Lincoln w as revered after signing the E mancipation Proclamation for black slaves, and Chairman Mao abolished the serf system in Tibet. But why was the former hailed as protecting human rights and the l atter was denounced as human r ights infringement? The scholars were speechless." The Dalai Lama, now 76, has also taken note of the approaching 50th anniversary. Chinese analysts said that he was likelyt o use the date to "make a last a ttempt" at independence for Tibet. Even after his death, they said, the controversy would linger, since it was unclear who would inherit his position. F or Migmar, it is simple. "Life i s getting better each year. I wish I was younger, so I w ould have longer to enjoy my h appiness." C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 9 The Chinese living in the Bahamas remember their history with Tibet Y OUR S AY M EMORIES , CONTROVERSYLINGERHALF CENTURYAFTER L HASAUPRISINGOF 1959

PAGE 10

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 11 * eral police officers took turns punching and kicking him. He was apprehended outside his Colony Club apartment near Saunders Beach at around 10.30pm on Wednesday by two officers responding to calls from a woman who had been beaten by a man who was staying with Mr Flowers at the time, he said. And despite the woman’s protests, Mr Flowers claims the officers seized him and slapped him in the face telling him to ‘shut-up’ when he asked why he was being arrested. The tattoo artist at Tattoo King in Bay Street was then thrown to the ground, handcuffed and slung into the police van before a crowd of onlookers, he maintains. “They asked me to sit on the chair properly, but I couldn’t move because my knee was sprained from when they threw me on the ground, so they picked me up and slapped me in the chair,” he said. The detainee said he was then driven to Arawak Cay Police Station where he was thrown on the floor of an isolated room and five or six officers attacked him one after the other. “They hit me over and over in my face,” he said. “One guy held me and slapped me, my head w ould fall then come up, and he would punch m e again. Then another guy would come. One guy would hit me ten times, then the next guy would hit me ten times, and these were not light blows either. “These were blows for a prisoner who had done something wrong. But I hadn’t done anything wrong.” Mr Flowers said he was poked with a gun, slammed to the ground and kicked by officers. “I thought they were going to end up killing me because when they body-slammed me on the floor everything turned black and I thought: ‘Oh my God, I am going to die, they’re going to kill me’,” he said. But after attacking Mr Flowers for around five minutes, police released him and told him to keep quiet. He told The Tribune he had to stop on his walk home as he was dizzy, vomiting and fainting. “They beat me sick, I just felt sick after that beating,” he said. He was treated at Princess Margaret Hospital and has been off work since the attack as he was unable to walk for around five days, and vision is still blurry in his bloodied right eye. “I’m just glad I’m not dead,” he said. “I thought I was going to be dead. I thought I was finished.” Mr Flowers’ complaint will be investigated by the Bahamas Police Complaints and Corruption Unit. Supt Hulan Hanna said: “I am not aware of any such incident but that isn’t to disclaim whate ver it is that he is saying. It sounds extremely and highly unusual, but w e will allow for the investigation to happen.” more developed nation. I n order to make new TIEAs mutually beneficial, Mr Winders aid government must negotiate tourism and investment benefits a t the bargaining table with individual countries. "The question is, 'what are we going to get?' That is still indeterminate. I would think if theB ahamas signed a TIEA with China, the Bahamas wouldr eceive lots of additional benefits on the other side, simply b ecause of the relationship we have with China and we have w ith other countries like that. We have to seek to make it an agreement where both sides are receiving something." In a statement released hours a fter the prime minister's announcement, former attorneyg eneral Alfred Sears who has been a vocal critic of the govern m ent's "slow" and "inadequate" response to the threat to the financial services sector lashed out at the prime minister. He charged that Mr Ingraham's a nnouncement was devoid of a national strategy to defend the f inancial services industry from baseless attacks from the intern ational community. He noted that one criterion of satisfactory tax exchange pushed by the OECD is the existence of "at least 11 tax information e xchange treaties". "To meet the current OECD standard, The Bahamas will have to enter 10 additional tax inform ation exchange treaties with o ther OECD countries," based o n mutual interests such as double taxation and investment treaties, his statement said. " From the communication, it w ould appear that the Bahamas is l ike an ostrich with its head in the sand, hoping that the danger from t he Group of 20 and the Stop Tax H aven Abuse Bill will, like a hurr icane, spare The Bahamas from a direct hit." The mentioned Bill is legislat ion proposed by US Senator Carl L evin and supported by the Oba m a administration that would tar g et offshore "tax havens" used f or investment by US citizens. M r Sears said in order to prop e rly defend the country's financial services sector, government should lobby all OECD countries, especially the United States, to stop the passage of the Stop Tax H aven Abuse Bill and other punitive measures from the OECD against offshore financial centres; invest in a policy research unit at the College of The Bahamas to m onitor the global economy and trends; and review and restructure the country's tax system. The full statement released to Europe and the OECD by government yesterday reads: "The Bahamas notes significant recent p rogress towards the adoption of s tandards on tax transparency and information exchange set by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. " The Bahamas reaffirms its commitment recorded in a March, 2002, agreement between The Bahamas and the OECD. " The Bahamas recognises sig n ificant advances in commitments to broader application of OECD s tandards in transparency. The B ahamas is ready to negotiate and conclude appropriate arrangements to accommodate these OECD standards.” FROM page one PM’s statements Innocent man claims he was brutally beaten F ROM page one

PAGE 11

n TRACK & FIELD P RUSZKOW, Poland Associated Press TAYLOR Phinney of the United States won the individual pursuit and Morgan Kneisky of France captured the scratch title at the track world championships on Thursday. Phinney outpaced Jack Bobridge of Australia with a time of 4 minutes, 17.631 seconds to win his first world title. Bobridge finished almost 3 seconds back. “I came here and definitely expected myself to win,” Phinney said. “I came and did whatI had to do, and it feels good.” The 18-year-old Phinney, the son of 1984 Olympic medalists Connie Carpenter-Phinney and Davis Phinney, set a new American record of 4 minutes, 15.160 seconds in qualifying earlier in the day, breaking the mark he set at the World Cup last month i n Copenhagen. My mom was pursuit world c hampion, my dad was a great sprinter, so I sort of see myself as having this big genetic advantage over everybody else. It’s sort of written in my gene code that I should be good at this event,” Phinney said. “So it’s something that I take forward and have a little mental edge over everybody else.” Australia’s Kaarle McCulloch and Anna Meares upset British defending champions Victoria Pendleton and Shanaze Reade in the team sprint; Germany’s Maximilian Levy won the keirin; and Britain outpaced New Zealand for the women’s team pursuit crown. McCulloch and Meares fin ished the sprint in a blistering 33.149 seconds, just ahead of Pendleton and Reade, world champions the previous two years, who crossed the line in 33.380. Lithuania outpaced France for the bronze. “We really did have to beat the best in the game to do it, and that’s a great feeling,” Meares said. “It’s such a big high.” Pendleton and Reade, also the BMX world champ, thought they had enough speed. “After the first ride Shanaze and I knew we needed to find another t enth (of a second A ustralian team. We both did, b ut we didn’t anticipate the Australians would find more speed for the final,” Pendleton said. Kneisky gave France its second gold medal of the competition with his win in the scratch race. Riding most of the 60 laps in a breakaway group of six riders, Kneisky made his move on the final turn to edge past Angel Dario Colla of Argentina and Travis Meyer of Australia at the line. Colla took the silver, while Meyer settled for bronze. “It’s unimaginable, it’s fantastic, it’s a dream,” Kneisky said. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS American Phinney wins individual pursuit at worlds TAYLOR Phinney of the U.S. in action during qualifying for the Men's Individual Pursuit i n the World Track Cycling Championships at Pruszkow, near Warsaw, Poland, Thursday, March 26, 2009. A l a s t a i r G r a n t / A P P h o t o 9 am Coco Plums vs Jujus 10:15 am Dillies vs Seagrapes C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H : : S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 11:30 am Mosquitoes vs Sandflies 1 pm Wasps vs Greenturtles 3 pm vs Boas vs Bees S S u u n n d d a a y y 3 pm Sandflies vs Bees 9 9 1 1 0 0 : : T T o o n n i i g g h h t t 7:30 pm Octopus vs Barracudas S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 9 am Turbots vs Dolphins 10:30 pm Red Snappers vs Octopus S S u u n n d d a a y y 4:30 pm Dolphins vs Barracudas 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 : : T T o o d d a a y y 6 pm Hurricanes vs Parrots 7:30 pm Wild Dogs vs Marlins S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y Noon White Crowns vs Iguanas 1:30 pm Groupers vs Conchs 3:30 pm Hurricanes vs Wild Dogs S S u u n n d d a a y y 3 pm White Crowns vs Marlins 4:30 pm Iguanas vs Groupers 1 1 3 3 1 1 5 5 : : S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 9am Owlz vs Silverjacks 11 am Potcakes vs Stingrays 1 pm Qwlz vs Sharks 3 pm Silverjacks vs Raccoons 1 1 6 6 1 1 8 8 : : S S u u n n d d a a y y 2:30 pm Tainos vs Lucayans 4 pm Caribs vs Arawaks BASEBALL JBLN SCHEDULE THE Junior Baseball L eague of Nassau will be back in action this weekend at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams with the following games on tap: T T E E E E B B A A L L L L 1 1 am Blue Claws vs Grasshoppers 1 pm Knights vs Raptors 3 pm Sand Gnats vs Sidewinders C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H 10 am Diamond Backs vs Blue Jays 12:30 pm Athletics vs Angels 3 pm Astros vs Cubs M M I I N N O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E 10 am Rockies vs Rays 12:30 pm Red Sox vs Mets M M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E 12:30 pm Mariners vs Indians 3 pm Marlins vs Reds J J U U N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E 10 am Twins vs Yankees 12:30 pm Cardinals vs Dodgers S S E E N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 3 pm Rangers vs Tigers S S u u n n d d a a y y 3 pm Phillies vs Pirates CYCLING MID-WEEK SERIES ONCE again the New Providence Cycling Association’s mid-week track Time Trial Series continued with fast times being recorded on Wednesday at the one-mile cycling track at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. The Speed Demons (track cyclist) don their 'Track Machines', as this event is all about riding against the clock. Robert 'Penetrator' Bethell, Kevin 'Kilo-Man' Ingraham, Henry 'SpinningMan' Kline, Anthony 'Biggie' Colebrook, Justin 'Jet' Minnis, Antinece 'Lilly' Simmons were just some of the cyclist who are getting faster and faster, the battle line has been drawn. Here’s a look at the results from Wednesday: 2 lap TT (Cadets Felix Colebrook – 2min, 14sec.; Audrica Colebrook – 3min. 03sec.; Ashley Colebrook – 3min. 10 sec. 3 lap TT (3/4 mile – *juniors) The Penetrator – 2min, .01sec.; Spinning-Man 2min., .05sec.; Kilo-Man 2min., .06sec.; Biggie 2min., .08sec; *Jet 2min., .25sec *Lilly 2min., .30sec *Jakota Johnson 2min., .37sec *Adrian Canter 3min., .16sec; *Larry Russell 3min., .43sec. SPORTS NOTES CONT F ROM page 14 C C a a l l l l t t o o a a d d v v e e r r t t i i s s e e : : 5 5 0 0 2 2 2 2 3 3 7 7 1 1 Taylor Phinney

PAGE 12

SENIOR GIRLS ST. JOHN’S GIANTS 32 QC COMETS – 23 AFTER a lacklustre first quarter in a game one loss, the Giants responded with a 15 point first quarter yesterday en route to their first win of the tournament. The Giants led wire to wire, and shot nearly perfect from the field in the opening quarter as they took a 15-2 advantage on a Tanika Sandiford jumper after. Giants’ point guard Caryn Moss gave her team their biggest lead of the game on a tough three point play as time expired in the second quarter. The Giants took a 24-7 into the half. T he third quarter would be all Comets a s they outscored the Giants 11-2 to get themselves back into the game. Shadell Williams’ three pointer brought the Comets within single digits for the first time since the opening quarter and her basket on the ensuing possession trimmed the deficit, 24-18. Darrinique Young ended the Comets run and scored the only Giants basket of the quarter for a 26-18 lead headed into the fourth. Moss opened the final quarter with a three pointer to regain a double figure advantage for the Giants and the Comets never came within nine to close out the contest. The Comets brought just one memb er of this year’s senior girls squad into t he tournament, but their juniors put t ogether a spirited effort to nearly upset the BAISSS runners up. Alexis Maycock led the Giants with nine points, while Moss and Young chipped in with seven apiece. Williams led the Comets and all scorers with 11. M aycock said her team rebounded well from the sluggish start in an opening day loss and looks forward to redemp tion in a rematch with the GSSSA cham pion C.R Walker Knights. “Our game yesterday was not so good, but I think we can beat the C.R Walker Knights I think we just came off with a slow start,” she said, “We just have to stay focused and play hard and I think we can win this tournament. We have to stay focused come out hard and not be afraid to take on any challengers.” C .R WALKER KNIGHTS – 24 G HS MAGIC – 14 A PIVOTAL 8-2 third quarter run led the Knights to their second win of the t ournament. In an uncharacteristic slow start, the score was tied at three after the opening quarter and The GSSSA champions trailed 7-6 at the half. Malesha Peterson tied the game at 9 w ith the first of her two three pointers on t he afternoon. Her second gave the Knights a 12-9 lead putting them ahead for good. Peterson followed with three point play on the ensuing possession and Pamela Bethel scored just as time expired to give the Knights a 17-11 leadh eading into the fourth. The Knights led by as much as 12 in the final period. Peterson finished with a game high 13 points. C.I GIBSON RATTLERS – 21 NCA CRUSADERS – 15 THE Rattlers doubled the Crusaders scoring output in the second half to remain in the winner’s bracket of the t ournament. Tied 9-9 at the half, the Rattlers opened the third quarter on a 6-0 run, keyed by baskets from Danielle Taylor and Robin Gibson. The Crusaders only score of the quart er came from Gabrielle McKinney at t he free throw line and the Rattlers took a 16-10 lead into the fourth. Momentum looked to swing heavily in the Crusaders favor when Rattlers star forward Robin Gibson picked up her fourth personal foul and a technical foul at the end of the third quarter. N .C.A capitalized as McKinney sparked a 5-0 run of her own with a pair of jumpers and a conversion from the free throw line to bring her team withina single score, 16-15 with just over three minutes remaining. Taylor made one of two free throws to give the Rattlers a 17-15 lead with 1:23 left to play. Back in the game after sitting much of the fourth quarter, Gibson gave the Rat tlers a two score advantage, 19-15 with a jumper in the lane with just 20 seconds remaining. Gibson and Taylor both finished with six points, while McKinney led all scorers with 10. SAC BIG RED MACHINE – 22 NCA CRUSADERS – 16 GABRIELLEMcKinney dug the Crusaders out of a second half deficit for the second time on the afternoon, but again her team fell just short down the stretch. The Big Red Machine got to a fast start with a 10-2 lead after the first quarter, but went scoreless in the second as the Crusaders came within four, 10-6 at the half. The Crusaders opened the third quarter on a 4-0 run to tie the game at 10. A pair of Tarae Sweeting baskets stopped momentum and regained the four point advantage for the Big Red machine. McKinney’s steal at half court and fast break lay-up as time expired tied the game again at 14 headed into the fourth quarter. The Crusaders led for the first time all game on the opening possession of the fourth, but failed to score the remainder of the game. Sweeting’s lay-up gave SAC a two possession advantage, 20-16 with just under one minute remaining. Brittney Harrison, Ashley Bethel and Sweeting finished with six points apiece. McKinney led the Crusaders with nine. PRINCE WILLIAM FALCONS – 22 FREEDOM WARRIORS – 3 AFTER a shutout on day one, the W arriors scored their first basket of the tournament yet still fell to 0-2 with another lopsided loss. The Falcons led 5-0 after the first quarter, and led by as much as eight before a desperation heave by the Warriors’ Tabitha Major placed hert eam on the scoreboard. The Falcons led 11-3 heading into the fourth quarter and doubled their offensive output in the final period for the game’s final margin. Ranel Ferguson led the Falcons with eight points. PRIMARY GIRLS TEMPLE CHRISTIAN SUNS – 18 KINGSWAY SAINTS – 2 C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 13 qualify the two teams to compete in the championship this year, especially with the early start they are getting. McKinney encouraged those persons who will be travelling to Florida over the Easter holiday weekend to do some shopping to take the time out and head to UM to watch the teams perform. As for the men’s 4 x 400 relay team, which is coming off a silver medal at the Olympic Games in Beijing, China last August, McKinney said they won’t run until the Penn Relays, scheduled for April 23-25. “We will have to wait and see who is available and ready to run,” McKinney said. “We have a lot of tools in that respect in terms of people who are not in school, so we’re not too concerned about that team.” The men’s 4 x 4 team will have to run 3:03.30 to qualify. FROM page 14 BAAA getting ready for IAAF World Championships Adrian Griffith Christine Amertil T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Giants overcome Comets, Falcons rout Warriors ACTION from day two of the Pattie Johnson annual basketball tournament.

PAGE 13

BASKETBALL NPBA SERIES THE Commonwealth Bank Giants and the Electro Telecom Cybots are on their way to a possible rematch of last year’s finals in the New Providence Basketball Association. Playing in game one of their Vince Ferguson’s best-of-five series against the Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders, the Cybots pulled off a 115111 victory on Wednesday night at the CI Gibson Gymnasium. Brian Bain led the attack with a game high 30 points. Nelson ‘Mandella’ Joseph had 21 and Cecil Mackey added 13, including a couple of clutch free throws down the stretch off the bench. For Sunshine Auto, Ernest Saunders had 22. In the John Archer’s best-of-five series, the Giants prevailed with a 99-87 decision as the defending champions held off the Police Crimestoppers. Michael ‘Ferley’ Bain had a game high 17 points in the win. Game two of both series will be played on Monday night. BASKETBALL DEFENCE FORCE/POLICE REMATCH ONCE again, the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium is expected to be jammed pack on S aturday night at the Royal Bahamas D efence Force and the Royal Bahamas P olice Force participate in their annual basketball showdown. The Police will be out to defend their title when they host the Defence Force, starting at 8 pm. The game is expected to be carried live on ZNS television. However, this year there will be no press versus ZNS game. Last year, the press knocked off ZNS in a prelude to the Defence Force/Police game. As a result of the large amount of awards to be given out to the Legends of both the Defence Force and the Police, organisers have eliminated the media game. Fans, however, will also get to watch the “Battle of the Bands” between the Defence Force and the Police. Last year, the Police Force won the band showdown as well. BASEBALL FREEDOM FARM SCHEDULE ACTION in the Freedom Farm Baseball League will continue throughout the weekendat the park in Yamacraw. Here’s a look at the schedule of games: T T E E E E B B A A L L L L : : T T o o n n i i g g h h t t 6 pm Seagrapes vs Guineps S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 T HETRIBUNE PAGE 14 INSIDE International sports news sports NOTES SEE page 12 n By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WITH the focus for the juniors taking place in St. Lucia at the Carifta Games over the Easter holiday weekend, some of the top senior athletes will be competing at the Miami Elite Invitational. That’s when the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations will begin its quest for qualifying both the women and the men 4 x 100 metre relay teams for the IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Germany in August. Ralph McKinney, one of the BAAA’s executives, announced that the BAAA’s relay coordinators have put together two teams that will represent the Bahamas at the invitational on April 11 at the University of Miami. “We have this initiative where we want to get them all together so that they can run some times early so that they can go to the major international events,” McKinney said. “These teams that we have selected will consist of persons who are not in high school or in college because they will either be running at Carifta or in their collegiate meets.” The women’s team, under the coordination of George Cleare and Fritz Grant, will comprise of Chan dra Sturrup, Debbie FergusonMcKenzie, Christine Amertil, Sasha Rolle, Shekethia Henfield and Tiavannia ‘Tia’ Thompson. The men’s team will include Rodney Greene, Dominic Demeritte, Adrian Griffith, Michael Mathieu and Jamial Rolle. The relay coordinators are Rupert Gardiner and Tyrone Burrows. “This will cost us some good money to put it all together, but we have to do it,” McKinney said. “Our concentration right now may be on Carifta, but we are trying to get our teams ready for the World Championships.” The 12th version of the championships is scheduled for August 1523. The women will have to run at 43.90 seconds or faster, while the m en will have to at least do 39.10 to q ualify. T he “Golden Girls” team of Savatheda Fynes, Chandra Sturrup, Pauline Davis-Thompson, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and Eldece Clarke-Lewis won the gold at the 1999 Championships in Seville, Spain. Although the team came back in 2000 to duplicate the feat at the Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia, the Bahamas has not had any success since at either of the two major international meets on both the women and men’s sides. Looking at the athletes available now, McKinney said he doesn’t see why the Bahamas should be able to BAAA getting ready for IAAF World Championships Debbie Ferguson Chandra Sturrup SEE page 13 L AST year in Savaneta, Aruba, the Bahamas posted a total of 721 points and collected 50 medals, inclusive of 22 gold, 18 silver and 10 bronze for thirdp lace. When the championships return to Aruba April 16-19, theB ahamas Swimming Federation will be sending a 36-member team i n a bid to try and knock off the two power-houses French Antilles and Trinidad & Tobago. The French Antilles finished on top of the field last year with 1,107 points and had 91 medals – 29 gold, 38 silver and 24 bronze, fol l owed by Trinidad & Tobago with 801 points along with 24 gold, 15 silver and 22 bronze for 61. This year’s team will be headed by Jeff Eneas. Also travelling withh im to complete the coaching staff are Shirley Mireault and Michael Stewart. A fter hosting its final trials over the weekend at the Betty Kelly K enning Aquatic Center, the federation ratified the team on Sunday evening. However, they released the full list of the team on Tuesday. Here’s a look at the swimmers selected: GIRLS 11-12 Alaena Carey, Abigail Lowe, L aura Morley, Crystal Rahming, Taryn Smith and Jacinda Williams. GIRLS 13-14 Maya Albury, Bria Deveauv, Lauren Glinton, Gabrielle Greene, Berchadette Moss,R iquel Rolle and Je’Nae Saunders. GIRLS 15-17 Ashley Butler, McKayla Lightbourn, Shaunte Moss, Amber Weech and Ariel Weech. BOYS 11-12 Dionisio Carey, Dylan Cash, Kohen Kerr, Keith Lloyd, Zach Moses and Dustin Tynes. BOYS 13-14 Camron Bruney, Zarian Cleare, Evante Gibson, Matthew Lowe, Toby McCarroll and Laron Mor ley. BOYS 15-17 John Bradley, Devonn Knowles, Armando Moss, Mancer Roberts, Cameron Rolle and Pemrae Walker. Carifta swim team to compete in April

PAGE 14

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009, PAGE 15 A CONTINGENT of 32 marines from the CommandoS quadron Department of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force recently left the capital to provide joint operational support for the 5th Summit of the Americas. The Summit will be held in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, from April 17-19. It is the first time a Caribbean nation has everh osted the event. The marines from the Bahamas will join up with the United States and Canada, and other Caribbean nations’ military forces, including troops from Barbados, St Kitts and Jamaica. They will undergo additional training exercises to prepare themf or their specific duties and roles for the Summit. Primary duties include providing assistance to the Ministry of National Securityof the Republic of Trinidad in the conduct of joint inter-agency multi-national task force security operations. They will also provide security for the 34 heads of states and del-e gates of the Organisation of America States (OAS be in Trinidad, sharing ideas and exchanging opinions. The Defence Force troops, led by Lieutenant Dereck Ferguson and Petty Officer Patrick Adderley, departed New Providence on April 24 via a Canadian military aircraft. The marines are expected to gain valuable experience from what will be only the second overseas deployment that the Royal Bahamas Defence Force has participated in. The first was the United Nations Peacekeeping Missions in Haiti during 19941996. T HE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce is working with a regional organisation in an effort to increase support and technical assistance for local small and medium-sized enterprises. Through the efforts of the c hamber’s Small and Medium Enterprises Support Unit (SMESU), officials from the Caribbean Export and Development Agency (CEDA a cross-section of Bahamian businesses, inclusive of small and medium sized enterprises repre-s enting manufacturing, agricul t ure, fisheries, art, entertainment and small business consultant p rofessionals to inform them of support opportunities provided by the regional trade and investment development organisation. “Overall the meeting was a s uccess with 25 persons participating in the session. The group r epresented a cross section of B ahamian businesses and included both small and medium-sized enterprises. Through detailed and focused discussions the g roup was able to secure the c ommitment of the CEDA to host and facilitate several activit ies in the Bahamas,” said the Chamber’s executive director P hilip Simon. Importance D onnalee Bowe, assistant gen eral manager of the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Cor-p oration (BAIC Bahamas Representative to CEDA, said: “We are certainly pleased with the turnout oft oday’s meeting with all of the stakeholders who are going to help to build the Bahamas, in p articular during a time like this when the whole world is in a recession. We can see that every-o ne is now realising the import ance that SMEs are going to play in the future development of our nation. I hope that this is thes tart of great things to come for the economic prosperity of the Bahamas.” T he Caribbean Export and Development Agency is com prised of fifteen (15 RUM member states of which the Bahamas is a member. T he Chamber’s executive d irector Mr Simon and director of the Chamber’s SMESU trade unit Hank Ferguson recently metw ith representatives from the Caribbean Export and Development Agency along with various l ocal businesses. T he Caribbean Export deleg ation was led by its executive director Phillip Williams, its d eputy executive director Alan Ramirez and Quentin Baldwin, management consultant and c ountry representative for the Bahamas. Mrs Bowe also accompanied t he group along with Dale McHardy, manager of business advisory services at the Bahamas Development Bank. M r Ferguson explained that the meeting was arranged to achieve several objectives, which i ncluded that of informing the Bahamas private sector of the work of Caribbean Export, as well as to gain support from s takeholders for the work for the agency and to assist executives of Caribbean Export in gainingi nsight about the Bahamas’ private sector’s most urgent tech nical assistance needs. Additionally, the meeting s ought to identify suitable institutional partners for joint action at national and regional levels asw ell as develop a programme of specific activities, which can be undertaken with selected nationa l partner institutions,” Mr Ferg uson said. H e said the Chamber is looking forward to partnering with C EDA to host three trade relat ed workshops in the near future. “The workshops are being d esigned jointly, and expected to inform Bahamian manufac turers and service providers ( including artists) on how to gain the negotiated benefits from the recently signed Economic Part nership Agreement (EPA W orkshops He continued, “The second of the workshops will address trade liberalisation in general terms a nd address the specific chal lenges for the Bahamas to implement its commitments under theE PA.” “The third and final workshop agreed to between the Chambera nd Caribbean Export will address trade negotiations process and look specifically att he pending negotiations between the Caribbean and Canada and also address exist ing preferential agreements that Bahamian businesspersons can benefit from. It is anticipated that the first workshop will be held in May 2009. Additional activities pro posed will include partnerships with the Bahamas National Craft Association and the Bahamas Development Bank,” Mr Ferguson said. COMMANDER MICHAEL SIMMONS briefing the RBDF troops at the Coral Harbour Base prior to their d eparture to Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. The marines are expected to provide joint operational support for the 5th Summit of the Americas. RBDF troops off to Summit of Americas DEFENCE FORCE troops boarding the Canadian military aircraft at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. The Marines are expected to provide joint operational support for the 5th Summit of the Americas. R B D F p h o t o s : A c t i n g S u b L i e u t e n a n t D e s i r e e C o r n e i l l e Chamber of Commerce, regional body aiming to help local enterprises PICTURED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT is Hank Ferguson, director of the chamber’ SMESU trade unit; Phillip Williams, executive director of CEDA; Donnalee Bowe, assistant general manager of the Bahamas Agric ultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC s entative to CEDA, and Philip Simon, executive director of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce. A n a s t a s i a S t u b b s / V i s i o n a i r e M a r k e t i n g Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y.

PAGE 15

C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 16

C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.48 $3.49 $3.49 for a better lifeIMMEDIATE ANNUITY SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com call us today at 396-1355 A SUBSIDIARY OF A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating golden years steady cash ow worry-free retirement guaranteed income for lifeall of the above I t’s back to the court today, and many CLICO policyhold ers/depositors are desperately looking around for someone to scalp for their financial plight. This is perfectly understandable, given that a reckless business strategy and mismanagement have played havoc with their long-term savings and retirement plans. Tribune Business, for what it’s worth, gives them its wholehearted sympathy, because the outlook is bleak whatever way you slice it. CLICO policyholders may face a long wait Business licence ripe for corporate income tax change, says ex-minister Bahamas may be past 40% debt/GDP ratio T RIB UNE B USINESS O PINION SEE page 8B INTHENEWS: The CLICO saga has made headlines. n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Two Bahamas-based realtors yesterday said they hoped their newly-acquired RE/MAX fran chises would take their businesses “to the next level”, one telling Tribune Business that while inquiries had dipped by 20 per cent “the high-end market is still very strong”. The RE/MAX name and franchise will now be carried by RE/MAX Paradise Real Estate, the former Paradise Real Estate owned by broker Craig Pinder, and RE/MAX Ocean Realty Bahamas. The latter is the former William Wong & Associates, owned by current Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREA Wong. Both Mr Wong and Mr Pinder said they expected the RE/MAX brand to boost their business by further enhancing their respective organisations’ credibility in international marRealtors go to the ‘Max’ to get ‘to next level’ NO FLAGGING: Craig Pinder (right Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREA * BREA chief, Paradise Real Estate become RE/MAX franchisees * Network’s website gets 100,000 hits inquiring about Bahamas in one month * While inquiries off 20%, activity in high-end market ‘still strong’ as high net worths seek purchases to hedge against inflation SEE page 5B Switch would allow Bahamas to pursue double tax treaties as TIEA alternative, as Smith says ‘fallout not too great’ from OECD compliance move n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas could convert the current business licence fee system into a corporate income tax if it decided to pursue double taxation agreements with other countries, a former finance minister told Tribune Business, arguing that accom modating the OECD/G-20 demands could help spur muchneeded tax reform. James Smith, the former minister of state for finance in the Christie administration, said that while the Organisation for Economic CoOperation and Development (OECD’s cial centre initiative was “being driven by might rather than right”, there were still opportunities for the Bahamas to purs ue investment/tax treaties that would be more beneficial than a standard Tax Information Exchange Agreement (TIEA “There could be a tax opportunity here, because going forward we would have to alter the tax system, so we might be able to look at that now. Double tax treaties might serve JAMESSMITH SEE page 4B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas’ national debt may have passed the 40 per cent debt-to-GDP ratio widely regarded as a key ‘warning’ threshold, a government minister acknowledged yesterday, although the administration had the fiscal “capacity to absorb the situation we’re in”. Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, speaking to Tribune Business from Colombia, where he was attending an Inter-American Development Bank (IDB that while the current fiscal sit uation was not ideal, “the way we have managed our fiscal affairs” in the past and relatively low level of foreign indebtedness had given the Government room to hopefully ride out the current storm. Comparing the Bahamas to countries in the Caribbean and other states with similar credit ratings, Mr Laing said they generally had much higher debt-togross domestic product (GDP ratios, whereas the Bahamas’ was much lower. “Looking at 40 to 41 per cent o f GDP, relatively speaking, SEE page 2B SOLOMON’S Mines has shut-down one of its stores on Bay Street, Tribune Business has learned, citing the economic downturn as the reason for the closure. Sources, who were not authorised to speak on behalf of the company, confirmed yesterday that Solomon’s Mines Diamond Centre closed its doors recently, with no plans to reopen in the near future. The store, located on Bay and Parliament Streets, has a sign which read “closed today” posted on its window for almost two weeks. Sources told Tribune Busi ness that all of the staff were relocated to its other Bay Street stores. Calls to the store’s upper management, including president Mark Finlayson, were not returned up to press time yesterday. Middle manage ment refused to meet or make a statement to Tribune Busi ness when they visited their Bay Street head office. Solomon’s Mines closes down store Zhivargo Laing n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor G lobal United’s president yesterday told Tribune Business he had an unnamed i nvestor “standing by to inject cash into” the business if the G overnment would hold-off on winding it up, adding that currently all his and the firm’sf ixed assets were on the market for sale. In a series of e-mailed r eplies to Tribune Business’s questions, Jackson Ritchie said the Government had sof ar shown no sign of changing its position on enforcing the S upreme Court judgments requiring Global United to pay around $6 million in unpaid customs duties, feesa nd departure taxes. He denied that it was a previously claimed $8 million, arguing that the Government had got its figures wrong. W orking feverishly to rescue his shipping agency, transportation and logistics busi-n ess, Captain Ritchie told Tribune Business yesterday: “The c ompany can only survive if the Government relents andc omes to the table to work with us, the bank and other stakeholders. We have an investor standing by to inject cash into the b usiness once the Government indicates they will work with the company. They [the Government] have to act nowt o commence winding-up proceedings. As far as we know, they have not acted. If they do, we close. If they don’t, we continue as normal. Rightn ow, we plan to continue on as we still have the support of the bank [FirstCaribbeanI nternational Bank (Bahamas v endors.” Captain Ritchie said Global U nited’s efforts to collect $10 million allegedly owed to it by clients were also being ham-p ered by the Government’s threat to wind-up the compaGlobal chief: My assets and firm’s all for sale R itchie says unnamed investor ready to inject cash to save Global United if Government stays winding-up, and says only $6m, not $8m, owed Argues that government action preventing company collecting $10m owed to it5 0 staff jobs in jeopardy, to add to 160 already dismissed But admits overambitious expansion started firm’s woes, and that NIB owed contributions he is aiming to pay S EE page 3B

PAGE 17

n By CHESTER R OBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE GOVERNMENT’s i mplementation of the national unemployment benefit scheme will increase taxes, butt he loss for taxpayers will not be subsidiaed on any other front, the Nassau Institute’s vice-president said yesterday. Rick Lowe told the Rotary C lub of West Nassau at its monthly meeting that the scheme emphasises the Government’s socialist tendencies. He explained that more g overnment intervention in the economy will inevitably lead to an increase in the Bahamas’ current $3 billionp lus national debt that will burden future generations. “At the Nassau Institute we m ight be considered fiscal conservatives, but I prefer to t hink it is better for government to spend within its means than burden futureg enerations, yet unborn, with deficits and debt that we will never repay in most of our lifetimes,” he said. Mr Lowe said he had r eceived copies of the draft Bill for the unemployment benefit scheme, and noted t hat computer payroll systems would have to be changed to accommodate the tax increase. H e added that the tax increase that will come with the scheme comes at the worst p ossible time, without a corresponding decrease in other areas to compensate, and companies would be forced to provide government withm ore forms when an employ ee is dismissed. “One might believe that it is m agnanimous of the Govern ment to offer this programme, but even I would be a hero if I could pass laws to take money from one person under the threat of fines or jail time and give it to someone else,” said Mr Lowe. “The Bahamas has decided to venture down this slippery slope with the implementation of unemployment insurance. “Government handouts, no matter how well intentioned, create black holes for taxpayers’ hard earned money.” Mr Lowe said abuse of the unemployment scheme could become ingrained in the sys tem “that honest taxpaying Bahamians will have to fund.” The Nassau Institute advo cates smaller government and laissez-faire capitalism, as opposed to more government planning. According to Mr Lowe, under government’s watch, the national debt has risen from $870 million to $3 billion in 18 years, representing a $118 million increase each and every year or 244.8 per cent increase. Mr Lowe said that the Bahamas had fallen from 43rd to 49th on an index that ranks the economic freedom of countries, when it was ranked 7th in 1972. “I sincerely believe the goal of downsiz ing government is a much more worthy national eco nomic plan than encouraging more failed government planning,” he said. “Give me capitalism, warts and all, any day.” you have the capacity to absorb the situation we find ourselves in,” Mr Laing told Tribune Business . “It’s not ideal for us, it’s not where we want to be as we want to be in a better posi-tion than that. But we certainly have the capacity to absorb the situation we’re in.” When asked whether the B ahamas’ debt-to-GDP ratio w as higher than 40 per cent, a threshold regarded as a ‘warning’ level by international institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF credit rating agencies, Mr Laing said the Government did not currently have final data on this. But he conceded: “Given where we were, around 38 per cent, in the most recent indicat ions we could certainly be a round that [40-41 per cent] figure.” Many observers have frequently contended that the Bahamas’ national debt-toGDP ratio is much higher than the data provided by the Government, arguing that it is probably closer to 44-45 per cent. Some have argued that it could be as high as 50 per cent, and publicly decried the everincreasing size of government a nd seeming reluctance to r educe recurrent spending. Once past the 40 per cent threshold, the danger increases that a nation could be subject toa downgrade in its sovereign credit rating. If that happened, it would be unable to obtain debt (bond tial terms, increasing its debt servicing costs. Mr Laing, who on Wednesday said government revenues were now $100 million below forecast for the 2008-2009 Budget year, due to a major drop during the 2009 first quarter traditionally the period when it o btains most revenue also a cknowledged that the GFS fisc al deficit for the full year was set to be higher than projected. The GFS fiscal deficit strips out the actual cost of debt principal redemptions. Meanwhile, Mr Laing said it was “extremely important” and of “great benefit” to the Bahamas’ fiscal management that it had maintained “a low level of foreign indebtedness”. Most of the national debt is domestically held, with minimale xposure outside the Bahamas. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following items: %XLOGLQJVWUXFWXUHH[WHULRUHQYHORSHH[WHULRUFDQRSLHVDQG UHODWHGVXEWUDGHSDFNDJHV *HQHUDO5HTXLUHPHQWVIRU*HQHUDO&RQWUDFWLQJVHUYLFHVIRU WKHRYHUDOOSURMHFWDQG &RQVWUXFWLRQ0DQDJHPHQW)HHIRUWHQGHULQJWKHEDODQFHRI VXEWUDGHDQGVXSSOLHUZRUNSDFNDJHVDWDODWHUGDWH The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e. mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are notincluded in this Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230 General Contractor in 2009. The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room located at the NAD Project office. TENDERC -230 General Contract, Stage 1C ontact: TRACI BRISBYContract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project Ph: (24224217 P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs &20021:($/7+)7+(%$+$0$6&/(TXL,17+(0$77(52)$//7+$7 $1',17+($77(5 $1',17+($77(5 127,&( $// 7+$7 127,&(,6+(5(%<*,9(1 WK WK 7KH5HJLVWU\RI WKHXSUHPH&RXUW WK *5$+$07+203621t&2 -2%,7,21 $DOHVDQG 0DUNHWLQJ$JHQW $WOHDVW\HDUV H[SHULHQFH: ULWHWR3 F ROM page 1B Bahamas may be past 40% debt/GDP ratio n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net ROYAL BANK of Canada (RBC pointed with the number of customers seeking help forl oan delinquencies and has seen an increase in defaults, its country vice-president said yesterday, at the launch of theb ank’s new savings program called RBC Asue. N athaniel Beneby said Royal Bank saw an increased amount of loan defaults intoy ear-end 2008 and the beginning of 2009, as a result of the e conomic downturn and mass layoffs. “There is an increase in defaults, and as this recession i s prolonged it will worsen. You will see an increase, but that disappointment with peo-p le not coming in is them not being proactive enough, not p aying attention and approaching the bank to address their present situa-t ion,” Mr Beneby said. “We’re hoping that what is being experienced today willr eally help Bahamians change t heir habits. This will be a change in behaviour, which will be the positive thing that will come out of this. They will pay a little bit more attentiona nd things will probably normalise, where people will then be able to borrow what they can afford to pay and spendw hat they can afford to pay.” According to Mr Beneby, R BC’s Asue savings programme will encourage Bahamians to save and pro-m ote prudent money management. P P r r o o g g r r a a m m m m e e T he programme is not like the traditional Asue known to m ost Bahamians, with various individuals contributing to a cumulative coffer and even-t ually enjoying a draw on what they have invested, but a savings scheme with an interest rate 0.5 per cent higher than a regular savings account. “The traditional Asue is a concept that Bahamians read-i ly identify with, and although w e are all bankers around this table, it is a practice that has benefited many Bahamian families in achieving shortterm and long-term goals,”s aid Mr Beneby. “We decided to improve upon the Asue concept and offer Bahamians a tangiblet ool for consistent savings towards a worthwhile goal.” H e added that Royal Bank is part of the Canadian banking system, which has beenr ated the best in the world. According to Reuters, C anada has the soundest banking system in the world, followed by Sweden Luxem-b ourg and Australia. And according to a Financial Times a rticle headed C anada Banks Prove Envy of the World , Canadian investment banksh ave been so strong because of a tightly regulated sector where institutions would “pay a price for unwise investing”. Royal Bank draws upon higher Asue savings rate Bank disappointed in response of loan defaulters ‘Give me capitalism, warts and all, always’ I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s “The Bahamas has decided to ventur e down this slippery slope with the implementation of unemploy ment insurance.

PAGE 18

ny. He added that if the Government made good on its winding-up threat, some 50G lobal United staff would have to be laid-off, adding to the 160 who had already been released since April/May 2008. W hen asked by Tribune Business whether Global United’s problems stemmedf rom expanding too far, too fast, and taking on an unsust ainable debt load it could not service with cash flows that were generated, CaptainR itchie effectively conceded this was the case. The key purchases were United Shipping and Global Customs Brokers& Trucking and World Bound Couriers “Admittedly, on reflection, Global United’s expansion/acquisitions werep robably too aggressive, which adversely affected the cash flow, thereby creating thee nvironment for the following events to occur,” Captain R itchie said. “In retrospect, however, the acquisitions were pivotal and essential to Global Uniteds ecuring a foothold in Nassau and the long-term growth of the business. Once non-essential assets are shed there willbe steady growth in its core b usiness segments, which will not only be good for Global United but also for employ m ent and the economy at large.” A nd Captain Ritchie also confirmed that the company owed the National InsuranceB oard (NIB former employees had told t his newspaper was around $60,000. Captain Ritchie did not conf irm that figure, but told this newspaper: “Since our Cash flow was flipped around by 90120 days in early 2007 when this action commenced, weh ave been unable to pay many vendors. “Up until that time the com pany had paid its National Insurance regularly. The com p any recently made a payment to National Insurance and made a proposal to pay off theb alance over a period. We are waiting for their response. “In addition to making a lump sum payment to Cust oms, the planned outcome of our restructuring was to bring all vendors current, includingN ational Insurance. “It is to be noted that Glob a l United is owed millions of dollars by both local and foreign companies, and part oft he plan is to collect these and use the proceeds to liquidate some of the debt.” And Captain Ritchie revealed that Global United’sA irport Industrial Park head quarters, for which he is seeking $1.8 million, “along with all the company’s fixed assets and those owned by myselfa re on the market”. Detailing the company’s troubles, Captain Ritchiee xplained that the critical effect the Government’s a ction, which began in 2007, had on his business was to damage cash flow/liquidity byd emanding immediate repayment of all monies owed, something that disrupted the previous 90-120 day payment periods Global United hade njoyed. Captain Ritchie said prac tice was different from the law, which he indicated was unrealistic. Ministry of F inance officials had insisted that all cruise passenger departure taxes were to bep aid within 10 days after they were collected, something that h e said, “if truly enforced”, would make all cruise lines, shipping and travel agenciesi ndebted to the Public Treasury “to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars”. The Global United president and chief executived escribed as “unique” the fact that “after following established practice for years, Global United trade payables were called in instantly. Global United used to have over $125 million flowing through its accounts in a giveny ear,” he added, arguing that requiring immediate payment, u p-front and in a lump sum, was a condition the company would never be able to meet. Q uestioning why Global United was seemingly the only company that the Government had served with statuto ry demands for immediate p ayment, Captain Ritchie suggested in an e-mailed reply to Tribune Business that it would be meaningless to liquidate the company. He pointed out that only FirstCaribbean InternationalB ank (Bahamas a fixed and floating charge over $20 million worth of Global United assets, would likely recover what was owedi n the event of liquidation and in this economic climate even they may fall short”. Captain Ritchie argued that a ll Global United’s payment plans were rejected, with P rime Minister Hubert Ingraham refusing to meet with himself and persons acting fort he company to resolve the situation. H e said that Global United ultimately proposed a $400,000 per month paymentp rogramme to settle the debt, which FirstCaribbean offered to guarantee. In a classic catch 22 situation, Customs refused to a ccept the plan unless the bank guaranteed it in writing, and the bank refused to guar a ntee the plan unless Customs accepted it in writing,” Capt ain Ritchie alleged. After initially proposing a $150,000 week payment pro-g ramme, Captain Ritchie then offered to pay the Customs Department $211,567 per month for a period that would not last longer than Decem b er 31, 2008. This then increased to the $400,000 per month. The final payment plan, Captain Ritchie added, includ e d a $500,000 lump sum pay ment to the Government upfront. H e again questioned why Global United was seemingl y being targeted, when other companies especially foreignowned ones were not beings ubjected to the same pres sure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t&RQGHQWLDO &5$1/(,*+(57,(6/,0,7(' 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ RIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW RI & 5$1/(,*+3523(57,(6/,0,7(' KDV EHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJWR W KH&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGWKH5HJLVWUDU 6 LPRQ-RKQ+DUPDQ (TXLW\UXVW+RXVH 6 W+HOLHU-HUVH\ / LTXLGDWRU Global chief: My assets and firm’s all for sale F ROM page 1B Jackson Ritchie Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps youa re raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. I f so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 19

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.421.420.000.1270.00011.20.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3 .743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2 .601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.56Cable Bahamas12.5612.560.001.3090.2509.61.99% 3 .142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7 .904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.486.480.000.4380.05014.80.77% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs1.611.650.040.0990.05216.73.15% 3 .002.16Doctor's Hospital2.162.160.000.2400.0409.01.85% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 1 4.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.7940.40013.23.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.000.3370.15015.02.96% 1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1 .000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.590.091,0500.4070.50013.78.94% 1 2.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44321.3828Colina Money Market Fund1.44320.674.37 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.739711.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S19-Feb-09 9-Feb-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 28-Feb-09 6-Mar-09 31-Jan-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 806.09 | YTD -3.45% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMST HURSDAY, 26 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,640.47 | CHG 0.50 | %CHG 0.03 | YTD -71.89 | YTD % -4.20BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases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t&R&KDPEHUV(DVWKLUOH\ 6WUHHW+LJKODQG7HUUDFHHZURYLGHQFH 7KH%DKDPDV 7KH$GPLQLVWUDWRUFH*RYHUQRU +DUERXU(OHXWKHUD7KH%DKDPDV $1')857+(57$.(127,&( WKDWDQ\SHUVRQ KDYLQJGRZHURUULJKWWRGRZHUDQDGYHUVHFODLP RUFODLPQRWUHFRJQL]HGLQWKH3HWLWLRQVKDOO RQRUEHIRUHWKH 0D\ OH LQ WKH 6XSUHPH&RXUWDQGVHUYHRQWKH3HWLWLRQRUKLV DWWRUQH\DQ$GYHUVH&ODLPLQWKHSUHVFULEHG IRUPVXSSRUWHGE\$IGDYLW )$,/85($1<3(5621 WR OH DQGVHUYH DQ$GYHUVH&ODLPRQRUEHIRUH WK 0D\ GDWHZLOORSHUDWHDVEDUWRVXFKFODLP 'DWHGWKLVWKGD\RIDUFK6KDURQ:LOVRQt&R &KDPEHUV 'HOYHVW+RXVH (DVWKLUOH\WUHHW+LJKODQGHUUDFH 1DVVDXKH%DKDPDV $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHHWLWLRQHU that purpose,” Mr Smith told Tribune Business . By signing a double tax treaty with another nation, Bahamas subsidiaries of parent companies domiciled in that country would have their profits taxed at a likely lower rate by this nation. No tax would be i mposed by the parent compan y’s country, providing both it a nd the Bahamas-domiciled entity with important tax savings. In this way, foreign companies would be enticed to establish subsidiaries in the Bahamas, increasing investment, commerce and employment in this nation. But to be able to sign double taxation agreements, the Bahamas would first need to implement some kind of income tax base. Mr Smith yesterday suggested to Tribune Business that this could be achieved by converting the existing business licence fee into a corporate income tax. “We have a turnover tax, the business licence fee,” he explained. “All you’d have to do is modify that and make provisions for deductions where you do it on the net, rather than the gross, as is done now, and make provisions for repatriation and information exchange with other jurisdictions. “That’s if we want to go down the route of double taxation.” Currently, the business licence fee is levied as a percentage of gross turnover, rather than the net. Responding to the Governm ent’s public position that it would now negotiate TIEAs “as a matter of priority” with OECD and G-20 members who wanted them, Mr Smith added: “The devil will be in the detail, in terms of which countries to do it with and when. Once we indicated this intention, we have to take it on board and move quickly to meet the OECD standard of 12 TIEAs.” The OECD has threatened to ‘blacklist’ jurisdictions that do not have a minimum of 12 TIEAs with other states. At present, the Bahamas has only one, and it is understood that the Government is seeking feedback, via the Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB would be ‘least harmful’ to sign TIEAs with based on the financial services sector’s current client base. Mr Smith said there would be some “trade offs” when it came to signing TIEAs, and that some agreements might prompt a few clients or institutions to leave the Bahamas. But he added: “I suspect the fall-out will not be too great, because all international financial centres are on the same page. “At the end of the day, there will be a little shake-out, but nothing too disastrous. The worst thing that could have happened would have been to end up on that list and others did not.” The former minister said the consequences of being blacklisted by the OECD/G-20 could have been severe, as France was threatening not to allow its banks to do business with institutions in listed countries. That, in turn, could have forced many Bahamas-based institutions with French head offices to leave this nation. As for the US, Mr Smith pointed out that it could deny Bahamas-based institutions access to the US financial system, closing off credit/debit card clearing, correspondent banking and securities settlements.A withholding tax might also be imposed on remittances to this nation. He added that the Bahamas had already done much work on restructuring its international financial services sector already, but a number of factors not least the economic downturn and enhanced global regulatory efforts were likely to ensure it generated “very slow growth”. Business licence ripe for corporate income tax change, says ex-minister F ROM page 1B Applicants seeking scholarships to finance their tourismrelated studies have until month’s end to apply, it was revealed yesterday. Over the past four years, 21 hotel industry scholarships v alued at $70,000 have been awarded to Bahamian students, t hanks to the efforts of the the Bahamas Hotel Association and its partner organisations, the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union and the Bahamas Hotel Employers Association. "Now is an ideal time to invest in one's future, by purs uing studies in the hospitality industry" said Bahamas H otel Association president Robert Sands. O O p p p p o o r r t t u u n n i i t t i i e e s s "Despite the global economic downturn, looking ahead, t ourism will continue to be the world's leading growth i ndustry, and the career and entrepreneurial opportunities for Bahamians will be considerable. For many students and f amilies, this financial support could not come at a better t ime. We are grateful to our members, our industry partners, and the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers U nion for their contributions, which enable us to offer these scholarships." The BHA is presently soliciting applicants both for the i ndustry partners Pat Bain Scholarships, and the Caribbean Hotel & Tourism Education Foundation's scholarship prog rams. Six $4,000 College of the Bahamas scholarships are available under the Industry Partners programme, named in honour of the late union leader Pat Bain, who wasa strong advocate for education and training. The application process is open until March 31, and a wards will be announced by June 30. Individuals wishing to apply should contact Bridget Murray, workforce development manager for the Bahamas Hotel Association, at3 22-8381 for eligibility criteria and application forms, or visit the Education section of BHA's website. Tourism scholarship applicants sought “The devil will be in the detail, in terms of which countries do it andw hen.” James Smith

PAGE 20

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t&2 &KDPEHUV HHW 1DVVDX $ WWRUQH\VIRUWKHHWLWLRQHU 7KHHJLVWU\RIWKHXSUHPH&RXUW $GPLQLVWUDWRUVIFHDW&ODUHQFHRZQ/RQJ,VODQG f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t&RQGHQWLDO kets, and with foreign buyers. Through their franchises, the Bahamas has become the 73rd country to join RE/MAX’s global network, and both men believe membership will provide their listing clients with wider exposure for their Bahamas-based properties via other franchise members. In addition, other RE/MAX members will be able to direct foreign clients eyeing Bahamian real estate to their companies, increasing business on both sides. Mr Wong told Tribune Business: “We feel it’s going to be a big help for us in attracting more foreign clients to our shores. “Outside the Bahamas, we need some help, and we’re associated with one of the biggest players in the business. “We’re looking forward to expanding our business and taking it to the next level. “They [RE/MAX] had 100,000 hits in 30 days, from January to the beginning of February, from people wanting information on the Bahamas. Ever since we tied up with them, in the last week we’ve been getting a tremendous amount of hits on our wed page from people looking at the Bahamas.” Mr Wong added that while both he and Mr Pinder would remain competitors, as RE/MAX franchisees they would also be operating as allies. He added that the brand identity would help them both compete in the Nassau and Bahamian markets with the likes of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty, Bahamas Realty, ERA Dupuch Real Estate, Sotheby’s Damianos Realty and H. G. Christie. M M e e r r i i t t s s Mr Pinder told Tribune Business that he first thought about seeking the RE/MAX franchise some six months ago, but the plan crystallised when he visited its Las Vegas conference three weeks ago, where he spoke to other franchisees from the region who extolled the brand’s merits. “The RE/MAX brand is wellknown and should increase traffic to my website,” he explained. “It’s a well-known and trusted real estate brand name. RE/MAX now has over a 50 per cent market share for all real estate TV commercials. It was looking to get a big brand name, and RE/MAX was the clear choice by far.” Pointing to this “huge exposure”, which included advertising slots during the Super Bowl, Mr Pinder said the franchise affiliation would help grow his business. “With the increased business, we should increase sales, attract more agents and serve more islands” Mr Pinder said. Currently, he has four agents in Nassau, two in Abaco and one in Eleuthera. While real estate inquiries r eceived compared to last year had dropped “probably by 20 per cent”, Mr Pinder said he was busier than he had been compared to the same period in both 2008 and 2007. “The high-end market is still very strong,” Mr Pinder explained. “There’s a lot of high-net worth individuals with cash looking for good deals. “They know the market’s going to turn at some point, and are ready to catch good properties at a decent price to take advantage of the situation. “If you’re willing to put in the hours to locate these deals for high net worth individuals ready ti buy, it’s well worth the effort.” Mr Pinder added that buyers with liquidity were also looking at real estate as a hedge against an expected increase in inflation, as the various economic stimulus packages expanded fiscal spending and the money supply in the US and elsewhere. Mr Wong added that because the Bahamas had such a good reputation worldwide, other RE/MAX realtors were “dying to send their clients here. The Bahamas has a very good name abroad”. He added that to join the RE/MAX network, a $20,000 first-time fee had to be paid for the first five years. RE/MAX also earned a percentage of the firm’s gross revenues, with all agents paying a commission as well. Therefore, franchises such as RE/MAX are truly beneficial for real estate firms with a large volume of business, as opposed to the part-timers. Realtors go to the ‘Max’ to get ‘to next level’ F ROM page 1B The Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB Government’s announced position on the OECD and G-20 initiatives, and its endorsement of moves to meet standards for trans parency and tax information exchange. “The insistence of the Government on clarity and unequivocal language with respect to a level playing field, particularly as it relates to timelines and standards, was strongly supported by industry in 2002,” the BFSB said in a statement. “Likewise, the industry now supports the decision of the Government, in conjunc tion with the governments of other major financial centres, to agree to endorse the OECD standards on transparency and effective exchange of information through defined and agreed protocols. “This decision will serve to reinforce the respect for personal privacy and the use of appropriate means for cooperation among countries. “We believe this is in the best interest of clients and the international financial ser vices industry of the Bahamas.” The BFSB said that, like the Bahamas’ existing Tax Information Exchange Agree ment (TIEA treaties would limit information exchanges to specific requests. Client confidentiality would be preserved through preventing ‘fishing expeditions’, and restrictions regarding procedures and arrangements. “Respect for the rule of law has always been fundamental to the success and strength of the financial services industry in the Bahamas,” the BFSB said. “As such, clients can be assured that the Bahamas will only exchange information on agreed and transparent protocols. “These protocols, as established under the tax information exchange agreement with the US and recognised by the OECD, preserve the traditional confidentiality extended to those engaged in legitimate business. Legislative and administrative regimes in the Bahamas have, and will con tinue to have, respect for the privacy of our clients and will preserve banking confidentiality.” Government’s position on OECD backed by BFSB

PAGE 21

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 62F/17C Low: 65F/18C Low: 68F/20C Low: 70 F/21C Low: 70F/21C Low: 73F/23C Low: 71 F/22C Low: 63F/17C High: 84F/29C High: 82F/28C High: 84 F/29C High: 80F/27C High: 84F/29C High: 82 F/28 High: 82F/28C Low: 64F/18C High: 79 F/26C Low: 65 F/18 High: 81 F/27CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 62F/17C High: 86F/30C Low: 66 F/19C High: 80F/27C Low: 61 F/16C High: 78F/26C Low: 63 F/17C High: 81F/27C Low: 65F/18C High: 86 F/30C Low: 63F/17C High: 82 F/28C Low: 63 F/17C High: 83F/28C Low: 66F/19C High: 87F/31C Low: 67 F/19C High: 86F/30C High: 79F/26CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 27TH, 2009, PAGE 7BTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Mostly sunny and breezy . Partly cloudy and breezy. Breezy and very warm with sunshine. Periods of sun with winds subsiding. Partly sunny with a shower possible. High: 82 Low: 71 High: 85 High: 86 High: 85 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny. High: 82 Low: 72 Low: 74 Low: 74 AccuWeather RealFeel 82F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 76F 96-73F 93-83F 101-78F 94-77F Low: 74 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 75F/24C Low .................................................... 63F/17C Normal high ...................................... 80F/26C Normal low ........................................ 66F/19C Last year's high .................................. 79F/26C Last year's low .................................. 66F/19C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................2.07"Normal year to date ......................................4.89" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU First Full Last New Apr . 2 Apr . 9 Apr . 17 Apr . 24 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:07 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:24 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 7:25 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 8:39 p.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 9:04 a.m.2.72:57 a.m.-0.1 9:18 p.m.3.13:01 p.m.-0.1 9:44 a.m.2.63:40 a.m.-0.1 10:01 p.m.3.13:40 p.m.-0.1 10:27 a.m.2.64:25 a.m.-0.1 10:47 p.m. 3.14:23 p.m.-0.1 11:13 a.m. 2.55:13 a.m.0.0 11:38 p.m. 3.0 5:10 p.m.-0.1 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 91/3273/22s92/3369/20s Amsterdam47/841/5sh45/739/3sh Ankara, Turkey50/1028/-2sh45/727/-2s Athens57/1345/7pc61/1648/8s Auckland69/2059/15s71/2160/15pc Bangkok92/3378/25pc94/3478/25pc Barbados85/2975/23sh84/2875/23sh Barcelona65/1850/10s61/1646/7c Beijing51/1039/3c53/1134/1s Beirut66/1850/10r63/1757/13sh Belgrade59/1542/5pc67/1945/7pc Berlin46/737/2sh45/734/1r Bermuda 66/1862/16pc70/2165/18pc Bogota65/1848/8r64/1746/7t Brussels46/737/2sh45/736/2sh Budapest52/1138/3c59/1545/7pcBuenos Aires 82/2764/17s88/3168/20s Cairo80/2655/12s73/2250/10s Calcutta 94/3477/25t96/3577/25s Calgar y39/321/-6sf35/120/-6c Cancun86/3072/22s88/3168/20s Caracas77/2566/18sh83/2869/20tCasablanca 76/24 54/12 pc 70/2156/13t Copenhagen 43/635/1sh42/541/5r Dublin46/737/2r45/736/2shFrankfurt 45/7 36/2sh48/836/2r Geneva51/1041/5sh42/535/1r Halifax42/532/0pc47/835/1pcHavana 86/30 66/18 s86/3068/20s Helsinki32/025/-3c36/230/-1sn Hong Kong 80/2674/23c84/2870/21pc Islamabad78/2557/13c79/2656/13t Istanbul50/1040/4pc56/1345/7sJerusalem 66/1847/8s56/1342/5pc Johannesburg 76/24 55/12s78/2556/13s Kingston 86/30 73/22sh85/2975/23sh Lima83/2864/17c85/2964/17pc London 50/10 37/2 sh52/1136/2sh Madrid75/2341/5pc61/1634/1pc Manila86/3076/24r86/3075/23r Mexico City81/2746/7s76/2443/6s Monterrey99/3752/11s75/2350/10sMontreal 54/1236/2pc55/1239/3c Moscow 32/019/-7pc36/223/-5pc Munich48/838/3sh43/634/1sn Nairobi89/3159/15s88/3159/15pc New Delhi94/3467/19c98/3668/20pc Oslo 32/028/-2sn36/230/-1sn Paris 50/1036/2sh45/734/1sh Prague48/836/2sh49/935/1r Rio de Janeiro83/2873/22sh83/2874/23r Riyadh86/3062/16pc83/2864/17pc Rome59/1544/6pc59/1552/11r St. Thomas 81/27 72/22s83/2872/22s San Juan93/3366/18s96/3564/17s San Salvador90/3261/16s89/3172/22s Santiago82/2752/11s82/2750/10s Santo Domingo86/3066/18pc82/2765/18s Sao Paulo77/2563/17t79/2663/17t Seoul 46/725/-3pc52/1130/-1s Stockholm37/232/0sn41/534/1sh Sydney69/2061/16r71/2160/15c T aipei 80/26 70/21c72/2266/18pc Tokyo48/839/3pc53/1139/3pc Toronto54/1236/2pc50/1039/3r Trinidad86/3073/22t86/3074/23sh Vancouver49/941/5c47/836/2rVienna 48/8 43/6r61/1646/7c Warsaw43/636/2r47/839/3r Winnipeg18/-712/-11pc33/014/-10c HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodaySaturdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 12-25 Knots4-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Saturday:E at 10-20 Knots4-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:E at 12-25 Knots4-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Saturday:E at 10-20 Knots4-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:E at 12-25 Knots4-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Saturday:E at 12-25 Knots4-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 43/632/0c60/1538/3s Anchorage38/326/-3c35/121/-6s Atlanta 65/18 57/13r70/2146/7t Atlantic City57/1342/5pc55/1248/8r Baltimore66/1845/7pc58/1442/5rBoston 50/10 40/4r52/1144/6pc Buffalo54/1239/3pc54/1243/6r Charleston, SC70/2162/16t78/2560/15pc Chicago46/736/2r44/629/-1rCleveland 58/14 38/3pc55/1244/6r Dallas64/1737/2c55/1238/3pc Denver32/016/-8pc50/1029/-1pc Detroit52/1136/2pc52/1140/4r Honolulu81/2769/20pc82/2769/20sHouston 79/26 49/9 t67/1945/7s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodaySaturday T odaySaturday T odaySaturday Indianapolis 56/1344/6r56/1336/2r Jacksonville80/2663/17pc86/3063/17pc Kansas City 42/5 29/-1r39/324/-4sn Las Vegas70/2147/8s78/2553/11s Little Rock64/1745/7t55/1237/2pcLos Angeles 76/24 50/10s80/2654/12s Louisville62/1652/11r63/1740/4r Memphis72/2249/9t55/1241/5pc Miami84/2872/22s86/3072/22s Minneapolis 38/3 20/-6c38/322/-5pc Nashville66/1855/12r68/2040/4r New Orleans78/2556/13t61/1646/7r New York68/2047/8pc53/1143/6r Oklahoma City46/732/0r41/532/0pc Orlando 84/28 66/18 s87/3068/20s Philadelphia67/1944/6pc53/1146/7r Phoenix76/2450/10s82/2755/12s Pittsburgh62/1644/6pc59/1546/7r Portland, OR58/1442/5c51/1038/3r Raleigh-Durham 66/1857/13r70/2156/13c St. Louis50/1039/3r45/732/0rSalt Lake City 48/830/-1pc56/1338/3pc San Antonio 80/26 44/6 pc76/2441/5s San Diego74/2352/11s71/2155/12s San Francisco69/2050/10s64/1749/9sSeattle 54/1240/4c48/838/3r T allahassee 78/2562/16t79/2657/13t Tampa82/2768/20s85/2967/19pc Tucson67/1942/5s77/2549/9s Washington, DC65/1847/8pc56/1351/10r UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms Rain FlurriesSnow Ice AccuWeather.com

PAGE 22

F or the brutal reality is that not only are CLIC O (Bahamas u nlikely to recover 100 per cent o f their investments, but they may well have to wait for some considerable time before they recover the bulk of whatever percentage it is on the dollar they ultimately collect. This is because, in Tribune Business’s estimation, it will take liquidator Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez time to unwind all CLICO (Bahamas investments and, in so doing, obtain the best value for all policyholders and creditors. Especially problematic is likely to be the critical investment, the Florida-based real estate project known as Wellington Preserve. This was the main asset owned by CLICO Enterprises, the insurer’s Bahamasregistered affiliate, to which it had lent 59 per cent of its $97.352 million in total assets at year-end. As Tribune Business has repeatedly stated, Florida real estate is among the world’s current worst investment options, due to the collapse of that state’s and, indeed, the whole US real estate market. Wellington Preserve, as this n ewspaper had previously revealed, had suffered a more than 20 per cent market decline in 2007, falling from an appraised $104 million in 2006 to $80.5 million at year-end 2007. T his erosion of value is likely t o have continued into 2008, and probably 2009. What this means is that if CLICO (Bahamas seek a buyer and sell Wellington Preserve now, he would likely only obtain a ‘fire sale’p rice. This means the project would be sold for a value well below what CLICO (Bahamas affiliates invested in it. In turn, this would leave a gaping hole in the balance sheet, with liabilities by far exceeding assets, and CLICO (Bahamas worse position than the estimated existing $9 million insolvency. Therefore, there is every likelihood that the liquidator may be forced to hold the Wellington Preserve project for several years until the market turns, and he can maximise recovery for creditors. This, of course, means that policyholders/depositors may not see a quick recovery of their funds. Their frustrations will likely be taken out on the liquidator and the Government, but the latter got it right in petitioning for CLICO (Bahamas wound-up albeit having failed abysmally to protect the insur er’s clients when it should have been taking action to stop this eventuality four-plus years ago. It represents a catastrophic regulatory failure, to say the least, given that Tribune Business was warning about the situation as far back as 2007, as can be seen from these former headlines. The best hope, at least as far as insurance policyholders are concerned, is for their portfolio to be transferred to another Bahamian life and health insurer. That, though, is not a given, and much will depend on the overall portfolio quality. Asset recovery may well be difficult. The liquidator’s work i s understood to have been m ade more difficult by the fact C LICO (Bahamas of Trinidad, where its parent, CL Financial, took all the important decisions. All Board meeting minutes and accounting records are located to the south, Tribune Business has been told. This, in turn, makes it difficult for the liquidator and/or creditors to take legal action against CLICO (Bahamas management team. CL Financial and CLICO (Bahamas Boards are understood to have largely been one and the same, meaning that if they are to hold the directors liable, they will have to bring legal proceedings in Trinidad an action fraught with additional difficulties and costs. Apart from ensuring Bahamas-resident companies at least have some Bahamas-based directors, the Government and regulators also need to look at how annuities as a product are regulated. Are they long-term, retirement savings products, or certificates of deposit? The latter purpose is how many investors treated them in CLI CO (Bahamas Central Bank regulate them?P erhaps. Ultimately, Tribune Business feels the Supreme Court has lit tle choice but to place CLICO (Bahamas with creditors giving Mr Gomez time and space to do his besto n their behalf. It is to be hoped t hat the court allows him to be as transparent as possible, publishing reports on his findings and actions on the Internet, once filed with the Registry. Before leaving the CLICO (Bahamas note. Not to rub it in, but media reports suggested Allyson Maynard-Gibson is a CLICO (Bahamas of financial services and investments from 2002-2006, she had ultimate ministerial responsi bility for CLICO (Bahamas the Registrar of Insurance’s Office came under her ministry. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE CLICO policyholders may face a long wait All is clearly not well in Paradise.... on Paradise Island, at least. Kerzner International’s exhortations for 2,500 non-unionised A tlantis employees to take two weeks ‘voluntary unpaid leave’ indicates that further lay-offs remain a real possibility if the required level of savings cannot be found elsewhere. Yet the company’s problems are not solely attributable to the global recession. R ather, they are due to a combination of the softening in tourism a nd reduced top-line growth, and the $2.775 billion debt burden loaded on Kerzner International in 2006, when Sol Kerzner decided to buy-out the company’s public shareholders and take it private. In effect, the Atlantis and One & Only Ocean Club owner is being s queezed from both ends. Kerzner International’s senior vice-president of public affairs, Ed Fields, not normally noted for revealing much to the Bahamian media, for once let the proverbial ‘cat out of the bag’ when he e xplained that the unpaid vacation request was made to “ensure t hat the company meets its bank covenants and financial obligations.” This indicates that while Kerzner International’s Paradise Island operations, and those elsewhere, are still largely profitable, they are not as profitable as they need to be or were expected to be when it comes to generating cash flow/liquidity, and meeting the banking covenants attached to the financing put together by a syndicateh eaded by Goldman Sachs and Deutsche Bank. P P r r e e s s s s u u r r e e Among these covenants is a maximum total net debt to operati ng income ratio, something that is likely to be under pressure due to the travel industry downturn’s impact on Kerzner International’s top line. But while the picture may not be as rosy as the one painted by s ome at Kerzner International, there is no danger that the compan y’s resort empire will collapse. For a start, it is making the necessary but tough decisions. The 800 lay-offs announced before 2008 year-end were also critical in keeping the company in line with its banking covenants. There is a lso no secret in the fact that Atlantis was probably overstaffed, cer tainly when it came to 2009 anticipated business levels, and thatm any of those released were considered to be the company’s least productive workers. W hile no one wants to lose out on income, and initial anger could be strong, the 2,500 staff who have been asked to take unpaid vacation should stop, think and look at the bigger picture. If Kerzner International breaches its bank covenants, it gives the banks an opportunity to take control, or at least start dictating terms to the c ompany. If that happens, the 800 Atlantis redundancies to date could be a ‘drop in the ocean’ compared to what the banks might order. They will only have concern for the bottom line, unlike Kerzner mana gement, who are all to keenly aware of the immense social and economic responsibility they have as the nation’s largest private sector employer. It is better to have half a loaf of bread, rather than no loaf at all, as the saying goes. Everyone would do well to remember that in these troubled times. Paradise feels the debt burden TRIBUNEBUSINESS OPINION F ROM page 1B


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E76FKS2UN_1M2HLX INGEST_TIME 2012-01-26T18:45:00Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01276
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES