Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009



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USS

rTM et
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

Disastrous’ govt
revenue collection

PM: we are
going through
very rough time

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

GOVERNMENT revenue col-
lection for the first three months
of 2009 has been “disastrous”,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
told parliament yesterday.

“We are going through a very
rough time. Government revenue
is down substantially. What would
have applied in December of last
year...1n December of last year
you'd have been able to say, “Well
the revenue is not what we expect
it to be, but it’s roughly what we
collected the year before.’

“We couldn’t make such a
claim today. January, February
and March have been disastrous!
Terrible!” exclaimed Mr Ingra-
ham.

The major slippage in govern-
ment income comes just a month
after Mr Ingraham told parlia-
ment that, while revenue for the
first six months of the 2008/2009
fiscal year (up to December,
2008) was weak, “remarkably” it
was still “largely in line” with col-
lections over the first six months
of the 2007/2008 fiscal year.

Speaking on the mid-year bud-
get, he warned that the country is
facing “the most challenging glob-
al economic environment that the
vast majority of Bahamians have
ever witnessed.”

The knock on effects of this on
Bahamian economic performance

SEE page 15

kL
pee Ee lL

THE WORKERS stage their protest against their employer yesterday.

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ABOUT two dozen angry Chinese work-
ers contracted by a local construction firm to
rebuild the T G Glover Primary School
protested against alleged mistreatment by
their employer yesterday.

The men held placards outside the site on
Horse Shoe Drive which all read "E R Han-

Investigations into



na no pay Chinese money” and alleged —
through an interpreter — that the company
owes them months of back pay, that they
are not provided with sufficient food rations,
that drinking water is not provided at the
site and that their rights are being violated. It
was also claimed that the group has been
threatened with deportation when they com-
plain about their working conditions.

apparent teen suicide

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
Police are continuing their inves-
tigations into the apparent sui-



cide of a 15-year-old male who
was found hanging in a bedroom
of his family’s residence in West
End.

The teen, who is a student at
Eight Mile Rock High School,
was discovered Tuesday evening
hanging in a back closet with a
necktie around his neck.

Police have not released the
identity of the victim, who is a
resident of the Bight, West End.

“We are not releasing the name
of the victim at this time as all
family members have not been
notified,” said Assistant Superin-
tendent Welbourne Bootle.

Mr Bootle said police received
information around 7.50pm Tues-
day of an alleged suicide and dis-
patched officers to the scene to
investigate.

“The Police...found the lifeless
body of a 15-year-old black male
lying on his back in a closet.
Members of his family were try-
ing to revive him,” he said.

ASP Bootle said Dr Khan

SEE page 14



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SEE page 14
























The Bahamas
Re A RK
pressure on
‘tax havens’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

REACTING to height-
ened global pressure on so-
called tax havens, the
Bahamas has signalled to
Europe and the Organisation
for Economic Cooperation
and Development its readi-
ness “as a matter of priority”
to accommodate evolving
standards on tax transparen-
cy and information exchange.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham told parliament
yesterday that it is appropri-
ate, in light of statements
made this month by other

SEE page 13

Cynthia Pratt’s
husband Joseph
dies age 70

JOSEPH PRATT is pictured with Cynthia Pratt

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

JOSEPH Pratt, husband of Cynthia Pratt deputy leader of the
PLP and former deputy Prime Minister, died yesterday as a
result of complications associated with long term illnesses.

He was 70 years old.

Mrs Pratt left the House of Assembly to be at his bedside in
a private medical ward at the Princess Margaret Hospital yes-
terday afternoon where she spent what became her last moments
with her husband of 36 years.

She left the hospital at around Spm, and had arrived home
when doctors called to say Mr Pratt was not responsive and had
to be resuscitated.

Although he recovered from the first resuscitation, by the time
Mrs Pratt returned to the hospital, doctors were resuscitating
him again, but were not successful.

Mr Pratt had suffered from a number of complicated illness-
es, including diabetes, hypertension, renal failure, poor circu-
lation and Alzheimer’s disease in the last six years.

SEE page 14

Global United CEO hoped for
payment plan for owed $8m



m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

GLOBAL United CEO
Jackson Ritchie said he hoped
commonsense would have pro-
pelled government to agree toa
payment plan for the nearly $8
million that his company owed
the Customs Department
instead of taking an “all or
nothing” approach, which ulti-
mately will force the brokerage
firm out of business.

Stating that government had
rejected or ignored every

attempt to establish a payment
plan, Mr Ritchie said it is obvi-
ous that if the company is
wound up, government would
get nothing.

In a letter sent to other inter-
ested parties involved in GUL,
First Caribbean Bank, through
its lawyers said that the assets of
the company if realised in the
current economic climate,
“especially on a fire sale basis”
would not be sufficient to meet
its debt.

“The principals of the com-

SEE page 15

Bid to ‘persuade’ the British govt to

shorten Turks and Caicos suspension

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham said that
the Bahamas and other CARICOM countries
will intervene on behalf of the Turks and Caicos
Islands and seek to “persuade” the British gov-
ernment to give some consideration to short-
ening the island’s constitutional suspension if
government and opposition leaders in TCI can
agree on “certain things.”

The prime minister said that the Bahamas is
proposing that each country of CARICOM
make separate representations to the British

SEE page 12

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@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

INFURIATED property own-
ers in the Vista Marina subdivi-
sion are demanding answers from
government, as they claim the
development of a multi-million
dollar highway is proceeding both
around and within the boundaries
of their properties.

Summoning the press to her
home near Saunders Beach, Dr
Madeline Sawyer — joined by
neighbours Michelle Campbell
and Telvern Dean — said that the
proposed corridor 18 highway will
encroach on private properties,
pollute the area with noisy vehi-
cles, and endanger the lives of
people in the community with the
speeding traffic it is bound to
attract.

While the project will no doubt
depreciate the value of her prop-
erty, Dr Sawyer said she is more
concerned with the noise pollu-
tion that she will face as the high-
way will pass within a few feet of
her home. “I’m concerned about
the environmental pollution and
I’m concerned about the possi-
bility of flooding. As you know,
this area is very prone to flooding
and when the building was built
the property had to be built up
to provide a slope. And I’m con-
cerned that this advantage is
going to be taken away and it
means therefore that this area will
be prone to flooding. And then
lastly, I am really concerned
about safety because that road
comes really close to the proper-
ty line and I’m concerned that
the mixed traffic of tractor trailers
and smaller vehicles can come off
that road and right into the prop-
erty,” she said.

Initial discussions on the road
work, Dr Sawyer said, focused on
the need to add a lane to Bay
Street to create more parking for
visitors to Saunders Beach.

While this measure was wel-
comed by all, new proposals first
mentioned at a recent town meet-
ing — including a new corridor, a
roundabout and a parking facility
— did not go down well with resi-
dents, she said.

“The new road now being pro-
posed I knew nothing about until
Mrs Campbell here called me a
few weeks ago to ask me what I



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

mage item Residents vent fury
7 | plan

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

DR MADELINE SAWYER (left) along with Telvern Dean and Michelle
Campbell inform the press of their concerns with the proposed highway
that is slated to be built in the area of Vista Marina, West Bay Street.

SITE of controversy
thought about this road. So I said,
‘what road?’ So she said this road
is coming right across your prop-
erty,” Dr Sawyer said.

Horrified

Having received a fax from Mrs
Campbell outlining the project-
ed path of the new highway, Dr
Sawyer said she was “horrified.”

According to information the
trio have gathered in their inves-
tigations into the matter, it seems
that corridor 18 is scheduled to
be the main access route from
John F Kennedy Drive to the new
proposed container port that is
set to be established on a new
man-made island off the shore of
Saunders Beach.

Under the current plan, the 72-
acre island would be accessed by
a corridor or bridge that would
begin at the proposed new round-
about on Saunders Beach. The
island would also be connected
to Arawak Cay by another cause-
way on its eastern end.

As Corridor Five, which will
lead traffic from John F Kennedy
Drive to Bay Street, is set to cross
a natural pond and wildlife
reserve, (which is outlined on the
community plans as a ‘green
space’ area) Mrs Campbell said it

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seems as if the government cares
very little about what they destroy
in pursuance of the road project.

“We talk to people in the
neighbourhood every evening
when we go around and not one
person I talked to knew the full
extent of what was happening.
It’s like you know a little but you
don’t know enough to connect
the dots to know exactly what the
government is doing. I have a
problem with that. I mean, we
live here. We’re affected by this.

“Also, the government talks
about a stimulus for the country.
When I went to the Ministry of
Works, and I do not have a prob-
lem with foreigners but the
majority of the people there are
foreigners. And then the compa-
ny that is constructing the road
is Jose Cartellone. They’re from
Argentina. Then the consultants
are English. Who is going to be
stimulated?” she asked.

Mrs Campbell said she spoke
to one Bahamian connected to
the project who said he was hired
to cut some bush in the area at $4
a hour. “That is about $160 a
week! So who is being stimulat-
ed? I do not know,” she said.

On Monday, Minister of Works
Neko Grant said he felt there has
been “‘a bit of a overreaction” to
the project.

Insisting that government has
to look at “what’s best for the
common good”, Mr Grant admit-
ted that his ministry has received
a number of complaints and is “in
the process of responding.”

However, he pointed out that
all of appropriate notices were
posted and no part of the road
improvement plans have changed.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



© In brief

Prosecutors
giving Anna
Nicole case
new look



Mark J. Terrill, file/AP Photo

TRAGIC: In this Dec. 1, 2004 file
photo, Anna Nicole Smith poses
for a photo as she arrives for the
VH1 "Big in '04" awards in Los
Angeles.

m FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.

Prosecutors in South Florida
are taking a fresh look at evi-
dence in the 2007 death of
actress-model Anna Nicole
Smith.

Broward County prosecu-
tors met recently with authori-
ties in Los Angeles and the
California Department of Jus-
tice, said a spokesman for
State Attorney Michael Satz.

That follows the indictment
March 13 in California of
Smith’s former boyfriend
Howard K. Stern and two doc-
tors on charges of conspiring
to illegally prescribe drugs for
Smith.

Evidence

Broward County prosecu-
tors want to see if any evi-
dence in that case might lead
to a new investigation in Flori-
da. Smith died Feb. 8, 2007, in
Florida after collapsing at a
hotel. She was 39. Her death
was ruled an accidental drug
overdose.

The Seminole Police
Department, which handled
Smith’s case because it tran-
spired on tribal land, said it
had provided prosecutors and
authorities in California with
investigative materials, but
had no plans to reopen the
case itself.

“The tribe has completed its
case and it’s closed,” said
spokesman Gary Bitner.

Call for investigation
into judge’s conduct

National Jubilee Coalition demands probe into Justice Lyons’ actions

THE National Jubilee Coali-
tion is calling for an investigation
into the conduct of Senior Justice
John Lyons whose actions when
handling a contentious court case
were recently called into question.

In a statement released yester-
day, the Coalition said anyone
associated with the judicial sys-
tem should be “beyond the slight-
est reproach” and demanded an
appropriate investigation into Jus-
tice Lyons’ decision.

“Any hint that a sitting judge
might be compromised in any way
warrants the appropriate atten-
tion and investigation.

“The pervasive crime problem
in our Bahamas is exacerbated by
an ever revolving justice system
that seems unable to deliver swift
justice,” the statement said.

The call came a day after a writ-
ten judgment handed down by
Senior Justice Anita Allen — who
is now hearing the case — claimed
that Justice Lyons shared “more
than a friendship” with the sister
of Daniel Ferguson, an accoun-
tant Justice Lyons had appointed
to make a report in a case he was
hearing up to September last year.

Mr Ferguson’s sister also assist-
ed her brother with preparing
documents for the case, said Jus-
tice Allen as she decided whether
or not to recuse herself from hear-



ing the matter “on
the ground of
apparent bias”
because of her
knowledge of this
matter.

Sane Justice Lyons
ates had eventually
Hall recused himself

from the case,
which involved the
distribution of funds between
business partners, on the basis
that he did not have time to hear
the matter. However, attorneys
involved in the case told Justice
Allen that Justice Lyons had “lit-
erally forced” the appointment of
the accountant on them. They said
that Justice Lyons “threatened”
to walk out of court if they did
not agree to the appointment.

Sealed

Justice Allen has ordered the
names of the litigants in the case
sealed.

According to the judgment, on
the first day of the hearing, the
accountant was asked and denied
that he had a social relationship
with Senior Justice Lyons.

Then, on the second day of
cross-examination, he was asked
whether a relative of his had any
relationship with Senior Justice

Lyons to which he responded that
“he didn’t get into his sister’s busi-
ness but he knew that she and the
judge were friends.”

“Tt was only then that I made
the connection between the
accountant and information which
was in the public domain for some
time, that the judge had more
than a friendship with a woman
who up to that point I did not
know was the accountant’s sister,”
Justice Allen stated in the ruling,
which was handed down on
March 24. In an attempt to ensure
transparency in her conduct as a
judicial officer and as the judge
who was to determine whether
the accountant’s report should be
approved, Justice Allen said she
informed counsel that she was
aware of this information.

The ruling was in relation to a
request by lawyers for one of the
litigants that Justice Allen recuse
herself from the case because of
her knowledge of Justice Lyon’s
relationship with the accountant’s
sister, which might have preju-
diced her judgment as to whether
the accountant’s report would
have been valid. The National
Jubilee Coalition consists of Bish-
op Simeon Hall, president, Dr
Philip McPhee, vice-president and
Dr Keith Russell, Grand Bahama
regional director.

Questions raised about apparent outrage over Pindling articles

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Outrage expressed by PLP MPs over articles
recently written about the legacy of Sir Lynden Pin-
dling is out of step with their alleged complacency 12
years ago when the former prime minister gave his
last address to parliament, a former PLP deputy

chairman suggested yesterday.

MP for Golden Isles Charles Maynard, now an
FNM parliamentarian, stirred up a hornet’s nest in
the House of Assembly yesterday when he accused
PLP parliamentary candidates of not bothering to do
their bit to honour Sir Lynden on the day he left
political life. Later submitting to a request to with-
draw his allegation, as he could provide no sub-
stantiating evidence for his version of events, Mr
Maynard concluded by stating that whether or not
the details could be proven, the fact remained that
barely any PLPs turned out to rally around Sir Lyn-
den, as requested by the party. “The point is made
— you cannot wait until 12 years later and then get
passionate for the father of the nation. When the
father of the nation needed you, you weren’t there!”

Mr Maynard claimed.

The MP accused the PLP of “taking credit for the
old PLP when it’s convenient” but when it is not con-

venient, saying “that’s not us.”

He claimed that in 1997, shortly before Sir Lynden
was due to make his last address to parliament, then
party chairman Obie Wilchcombe contacted him
and suggested that it would be a good idea if he
were to organise for “thousands” of supporters to



gather outside parliament.

“T said I thought it was a
good idea,” Mr Maynard told
the House of Assembly.

The then deputy chairman
claimed he contacted all of the
people who had just run as

EMICSMNEM Ee] candidates in the 1997 general

election, suggesting that they

could contact all of their supporters and tell them to

silastic.

come along, as this would be the easiest way of
organising such a crowd. But Mr Maynard claimed
the reception the idea received was less than enthu-

“They all told me they couldn’t do it. (They sug-
gested) we should just let Sir Lynden go,” he said.

His allegation caused several PLP MPs who ran in
the 1997 election to jump up on a point of order and
claim they were never contacted by Mr Maynard for
such a reason. Along with Yamacraw MP Melanie
Griffin, Bain and Grants Town MP Bernard Not-
tage, MICAL MP Alfred Gray, and St Thomas
More MP Frank Smith loudly accused Mr Maynard
of “telling an untruth.”

But Mr Maynard continued: “They can get up —

but there was no one there. I was embarrassed,

completely embarrassed. It was the father of the
nation, giving his last address to parliament, and

no one wanted to stand with him.” In an interview

with The Tribune outside parliament, Mr Wilch-
combe, now MP for West End and Bimini, admitted
that he “did give those instructions” to Mr May-
nard in 1997, however he said he “wasn’t aware of
what happened and the details” beyond that point.

Murder trial jurors told: prosecutors convinced witness to lie

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ONE of the three men charged
in the February 2006 murder of
businessman Keith Carey told the
jury yesterday that prosecutors
had convinced a key witness to
lie and that the trial was preju-
diced. In an unsworn statement
from the prisoner’s dock, murder
accused Dwight Knowles told the
jury that prosecutors had dropped
a conspiracy to commit armed
robbery charge against their star
witness Vaughn Carey — a cousin
of the victim — so that he would
implicate Knowles in the murder.

Knowles said that during a con-
versation in prison earlier this
year, Carey had told him that he
had met with prosecutors, who
had offered him the same deal
Knowles had once been offered.

At the first trial, Knowles had
appeared as a witness for the
prosecution but was charged in
connection with the murder after
testifying that police had coached
him to give a false statement.

“T just feel like this whole trial
is prejudiced,” Knowles said,
adding that after turning himself
over to police on March 7, he was
taken to the Central Detective
Unit. Knowles claimed that he
was placed in a cell at the back of
the unit and while there, heard a
person screaming, “I tell yall I
don’t know them.”

Knowles told the jury he saw
officers drag his co-accused Jamal
Glinton out of a room with a plas-
tic bag over his head, and that
Glinton was struggling to breathe
and appeared to be having a
seizure. Knowles said that he was
removed from the cell and placed
in a “torture chamber” where he
was shown five different witness
statements. The accused claimed
that police told him what to say in
his statement, and that the
coached statement did not impli-
cate him in Carey’s murder.
Knowles said that he was

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promised by police that he would
“get off” in a month’s time and
would be a key prosecution wit-
ness. He said the officers asked
whether he wanted to have an
attorney present, but he declined.
He added that he feared police
brutality. According to Knowles,
he was asked by Cecil Hilton, his
attorney at the time, to contact
him before giving any statement.
Knowles said he never mur-
dered anyone and never commit-
ted or conspired to commit armed
robbery.
At the first trial, he said, pros-
ecutors asked him to lie about
Vaughn Carey because they

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wanted Carey convicted. Knowles
said when he refused to do this,
prosecutors threatened to have a
witness tell lies about him.
Attorney Cecil Hilton was
called to the stand as a witness
for Knowles. He said Knowles
came to his office on March 7
after informing the attorney that
he wanted to turn himself in to
police. He said Knowles claimed
he was innocent. Mr Hilton said
he phoned the Central Detective
Unit and two police officers came
to his office to arrest Knowles.
The attorney said he told
Knowles that if he simply repeat-
ed what he had said earlier, he

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about.

Mr Hilton said that at no time
during his visits with Knowles did
the accused ever claim police bru-
talised him. He also denied ever
telling Knowles he needed to be
present when the accused was
being interviewed by police.

The trial into the February
2006 murder of businessman Kei-
th Carey began on February 15
before Justice Jon Isaacs. Jamal
Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight
Knowles are charged with the
murder as well as armed robbery
and conspiracy to commit armed
robbery.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited, ‘Time to put
the brakes

on speeding

bus drivers



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 EDITOR, The Tribune. if these same policemen could
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352 OB Ia Mere monitor the driving habits of
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387 ZOOM! Whoosh! our jitney drivers. And what I,

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Bahamas filled with unthinking people

UNTHINKING people don’t like to hear
anything that might force them to question their
perception of life. They hide within their cocoon
of comfortable beliefs, and turn apoplectic
should anyone suggest that their views might be
wrong or could be open to other interpreta-
tions.

The Bahamas is filled with such unthinking
people — particularly diehard party supporters
who shout their approval even before the party
hack on the political platform has finished his
sentence. Sir Lynden was constantly surround-
ed and buoyed up and maintained in power for
25 years by such supporters. And now in death
he has been turned into an icon with a halo
around his head — “The Father of the Nation.”

However, a new generation of Bahamians
who want to know more about this “Father of
the Nation” — warts and all — have been ask-
ing questions ever since Mr Chauncey Tynes
Sr told Tribune Managing Editor John Mar-
quis the story of his pilot son who disappeared
from the radar 36 years ago. No one bothered to
investigate his disappearance, but Mr Tynes,
Sr, a once loyal PLP supporter and party official,
is convinced that the young pilot knew too much
about Sir Lynden’s relations with drug kingpin
Carlos “Joe” Lehder, who transshipped drugs to
the US from his headquarters on Norman’s Cay
in the Exumas. Young Chauncey had to be
eliminated, according to his father.

Mr Tynes remained silent all these years,
but now in the winter of his life, he turned to Mr
Marquis to share his doubts, hopeful that with
his pen the editor could correct the myths. There
has been no public outcry against Mr Tynes or
his story, but Pindling supporters and some par-
ty leaders want the writer of the “Insight” arti-
cle — “The tragic young pilot who knew too
much” — to be driven from the country, work
permit revoked. According to the Marquis crit-
ics no foreigner in this country has the democ-
ratic right of free speech — as long as they are
here that speech is a “privilege.” And if they
know what is good for them they had better
express their opinions with care. Mr Marquis, a
fearless journalist, never learned that lesson.

Under the Pindling regime this right of free
speech was even denied Bahamians, which
meant that anyone who criticised Pindling dur-
ing his administration did so at their peril. Too
many remained silent.

After publication of the 1984 Commission of
Inquiry report into drug smuggling, which was a
shocking revelation in which only half of the
truth was told, Evangelist Rex Major, entered
the pulpit on April 28, 1985, the Commission
report, the Bible and Constitution in hand, and
roundly condemned the materialism and greed
that had shamed this country. The sermon was

Sirst Baptist Church

269 Market St. South = BO. Box N-T864 © Nossau, Bohomas

“Give God what's RIGHT,

broadcast. Before the broadcast ended a mem-
ber of the public called the church and warned
the evangelist to “shut up.”

This group of Bahamians, who stopped their
ears to the Truth, did not want to accept that
they and their leaders had sinned against God
and in the words of the evangelist “we’ve (as a
people) lied and cheated.”

“We have called red black and blue green —
we have mixed everything up! We’ve confused
truth!” he said.

Evangelist Major expressed his disgust that
we would have in our House of Assembly “men
whose names have been so tainted and whose
characters are so tinged that we wonder how
they could sleep.”

One of these was Lynden Oscar Pindling,
the Father of the Nation.

Today young Bahamians want to know the
truth and today there are still many Bahamians
of that generation who know the truth, but dur-
ing the Pindling administration were too afraid
to tell it.

Even during the Commission of Inquiry there
were many who were too afraid to go before the
Commission with valuable information. We
recall one man, tormented by his conscience
and paralysed by fear, who existed in a state of
confusion. He had important information, infor-
mation that the Commission desperately need-
ed. And so he consulted us, giving us permission
to go to the Commission on his behalf. He felt
more secure having been summoned by the
Commission rather than having volunteered.
He took the stand and honestly answered lead-
ing counsel Robert Ellicott’s questions.

And then there was the pilot. This pilot had
told us how he had flown Pindling to Norman’s
Cay to meet Lehder. When he took the stand he
denied that he had landed at Norman’s Cay.
Later we asked him why he had lied to the
Commission.

He said that he had been asked the question
in such a way that it had allowed him to tell
the truth, although he knew that he was mis-
leading the Commissioners. You see although
he had landed the plane, he had never left the
aircraft and so he had never landed on Nor-
man’s Cay.

Bahamians were terrified to talk. Although
the Commissioners extracted a terrible story, a
disgraceful story that in some way touched all
strata of society, the full story of how our lead-
ers failed us has never been told.

Some of these people with full knowledge
are still alive and if we are to be true to our his-
tory — and with nothing now to fear — it is
their duty to tell what life was really like in
those days and what really did happen to turn
these beautiful islands into “a nation for sale.”



Screech! What is all this
noise? Well, Editor, those are
the sounds I recently heard
while riding a 15A Route bus
recently.

The bus was going so fast, I
could hear the “zoom” of the
engine.

The bus was passing so
many cars, I could hear the
“whoosh” of the wind.

The bus had to stop so sud-
denly so many times, I could
hear the “screech” of the
brakes. What was going on?

Well, editor, PI tell you.
You see, this particular bus
was engaged in a racing game
with another 15A Route bus.
Both of these drivers wanted
to be the first bus to pick up
waiting customers along this
route, and at the same time
they wanted to deliver bus rid-
ers to their destination as fast
as they possibly could.

On this bus I was riding, the
driver and his helper vocifer-
ously encouraged passengers
to disembark as fast as they
could.

Those two even dumped an
elderly lady off the bus and
suggested that she take the
bus behind us because they
had decided that it would not
be in their best (financial)

letters@tribunemedia net



interest to deliver her to her
destination, which she had
announced on entering the
bus would be at the end of the
route.

Along the route, the driver
even passed a line of cars at a
red traffic light and proceeded
to pass the red light; all in an
effort to win the racing game.
And all the while, the driver’s
helper was egging him on- go
faster, pass more cars, run all
the traffic lights.

I needn’t remind you, Edi-
tor, that this whole ordeal
transpired on public trans-
portation.

And all these dangerous
manoeuvres were being per-
formed while there were pas-
sengers on the bus! Can you
believe that!?

In another letter to the edi-
tor from myself I suggested
that the commissioner of
police deploy armed plain-
clothes policemen to random-
ly ride jitneys to alleviate the
fears of bus drivers as well as
passengers concerning the
crime that occurs on our pub-
lic transportation.

It would go a long way also

and we all went through that
particular day would have lit-
tle chance of happening on
our streets. We deserve bet-
ter than that.

And don’t think that this
was an isolated incident.

This speeding, and overtak-
ing cars, and passing red traf-
fic lights go on all the time.

And what I have been
advised is that the passengers
on our bus would not even
have been covered by insur-
ance, because we didn’t pay
the driver as we entered the
bus.

According to my sources,
only paying customers are
covered by the jitney’s insur-
ance carriers in the event of a
serious accident. We came
close to that that day.

I call on The Commissioner
of Police, The Controller of
Road Traffic Department, and
The Government of The
Bahamas to take control of
this out of control situation on
our streets with a view to mak-
ing it safe to drive and take
the bus in Nassau again.

MARVIN G
LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,

March 17, 2009.

Why are we left in the dark?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I recently spoke to Mr Neko
Grant the MP for the area for
Royal Bahamia Estates, who
informed me that the reason
for the blackout in the Royal
Bahamia area was due to an
outstanding bill of some
$66.000 in arrears.

He told me that he pleaded
with an hierarchy member
from the Grand Bahama Pow-
er Co in November of 2008 to
keep the power on through
the Christmas period which
they did, we the residents say
thank you.

Mr Grant told me that he
had a meeting with Mr

THE GARDEN HILLS
CONSTITUENCY

Frankie Sands the President
of the Association on this
issue.

To date our streets have
been in total darkness for
more the two months, we have
heard nothing regarding what
needs to be done in restoring
and correcting this vexing
matter, does the Association
need a bail out?

My suggestion would be
that if you are unable to carry
out your duties, then arrange
to turn the area over to the

Port Authority, my under-
standing is that, Malibu Reef
when they were faced with a
similar matter they turned it
over to the Grand Bahama
Port Authority. Is that a hard
decision to make?

Do we have to wait for an
approaching election to have
our street lights turned on?

KELLY D BURROWS
Freeport, GB
March, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 5



Unemployment benefits

come a big step closer

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

As joblessness hits a 15-year high, unemployment
benefits eagerly awaited by thousands of Bahamians
came a step closer to being issued yesterday.

A Bill was passed in the House of Assembly
which, when it comes into effect, will amend the
National Insurance Act to include a provision for
unemployment pay-outs. The Bill was supported
by both government and opposition MPs.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said the provi-
sion — which the government hopes to bring into
effect by April 1, 2009 — will bring the National
Insurance Board a step closer to becoming what it
was envisioned to be when implemented in 1970.

Under the amendment, unemployed people who
have contributed to the National Insurance Fund will
receive payments equivalent to 40 per cent of their
insurable wage for 13 to 26 weeks.

The government expects that by January 2010
employees and employers will jointly contribute to
a National Insurance Unemployment Benefit Fund.

“Tt will provide much relief in society,” said leader
of government business in the House, Tommy Turn-
quest.

Leader of opposition business Dr Bernard Not-
tage stated that while some may “seek to besmirch”
the legacy of the PLP with “scandalous and nasty
allegations” it is thanks to the PLP that the Nation-



yy al Insurance scheme, currently
BF nolding assets of $1. 5 billion,
exists.

He said the PLP supports the
Bill as it is “the right thing to
do now and at any time.”

However, the MP added that
the opposition “have some con-
ditions (they’d) like to see met
and some alternative suggestions
we'd like to make” during the
debate on the proposal, expect-
ed to take place next week,
when the details and regulations also will be pre-
sented.

HUBERT
INGRAHAM

Concerned

He suggested the party is particularly concerned
that self-employed people should also be able to
access benefits. Mr Ingraham responded that if Dr
Nottage could identify such a system anywhere else
in the world, he would consider it.

Mr Ingraham said that in keeping with the gov-
ernment’s commitment to “bringing to fruition the
original object and purpose” of National Insurance,
it is hoped that by April or May, the Chronic Disease
Prescription Drug Bill also will be passed.

The Bill will provide for free essential medications
for people suffering from any of a number of cata-
strophic illnesses.

bi-partisan approach seen as key to tackling problems

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

BI-PARTISAN discussions
are crucial to tackling the eco-
nomic and social problems
plaguing the country, PLP
deputy leadership contender
Philip ‘Brave’ Davis said yes-
terday.

Workable solutions to the
recession, mounting levels of
crime and the problem of illegal
immigration will only be
achieved through co-operation,
he said.

"There is the concern of
severe downturn in our econo-
my, which regretfully, will get
somewhat worse before it gets
better. In these present circum-
stances, there is little sense in
attempting to affix blame here
or there especially when it is
obvious that the root causes
come from the outside," he said.

Other challenges include
establishing an effective nation-
al healthcare system, building a
new straw market, completing
the New Providence Road
Improvement Project and ensur-
ing there is proper infrastruc-



shut

ture on every Family Island, he
said. "We are all aware that
these cannot be achieved
overnight or in the next year or
two but let us begin, and we can
begin by sitting together as con-
cerned Bahamians," he said.

Focus

Mr Davis said the opposition
must now focus on identifying
the needs and concerns of the
public.

At the PLP’s next convention
in October or November, Fort
Charlotte MP Alfred Sears,
West End and Bimini MP Obie
Wilchcombe, Paul Moss and Mr
Davis are expected to vie for
the deputy leader post. Yester-
day, Mr Davis told The Tribune
he feels he is the best man for
the job.

"T think I am a unifier, a team
player, I think this is the time
when our party needs someone
who's going to bring everybody
together as opposed to being
divisive. Not to say that these

men have been divisive, but my

track record is one of service to
my organisation, one of keep-
ing people together and ensur-

pectacular

ass

layaway!

ing that wounds are healed
rather than opened.”

If elected to the post, topmost
on Mr Davis’ agenda will be ral-
lying the party’s supporter base.

"The first thing we need to
do is to shore up all our branch-
es, shore up our support and
then inspire the Bahamian peo-
ple (to) the view that they
always have held, that we are
the best party for them in the
Bahamas,” he said.

"I will be running for the
deputy leader and then if the
post of leadership comes up, I'll
consider running for that too,”
he added.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Some CLICO policy holders
claim lack of support from MPs |

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A large num-
ber of CLICO policy holders
met in Grand Bahama to dis-
cuss a number of concerns —
including what they say is a lack
of support from their MPs.

Rev Dr Philip McPhee, pastor
of Mount Calvary Baptist Cathe-
dral and vice-president of the
Bahamas National Baptist Con-
vention, said policy holders are
very worried and want some
kind of support from their rep-
resentatives.

None of the six Grand
Bahama MPs have attended
either of the two meetings held
for policy holders in Freeport



since CLICO collapsed several
weeks ago.

Rev McPhee revealed that let-
ters have been mailed on behalf
of policy holders to every mem-
ber of parliament in the country.

“When your people are in
trouble you need to go there and
be with them,” he said. “People
just want to know they are
standing with them, that’s all
they want to know.

“People elected them and
they have an obligation to be
with their people. They were
with them when they needed
votes,” said Rev McPhee.

Bishop Simeon Hall, pastor
of New Covenant Baptist
Church, and Bishop Sobig
Kemp, president of Grand
Bahama Christian Council, were

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Rev Kemp said he requested
a meeting with State Minister of
Finance Zhivargo Laing and is
still awaiting a response.

Rev McPhee said: “I am con-
cerned about the hurt I see and
hear in people’s voices. They are
very concerned and very wor-
ried.”

Policy holder Vincent Ewing
said he was upset that MPs and
cabinet ministers have not come
out to support them.

“T went to the same school as
an MP in Freeport and I con-
tacted him on his cellular phone
and he said he would get back to
me. I had to wait on Bishop Hall
and Rev McPhee from New
Providence to come to
Freeport,” said the concerned
father.

Mr Ewing’s insurance was
prepaid and covered himself and
his family.

Patrice Davis, another policy-
holder, said she is unable to use
her insurance card when pur-
chasing medication.

“T went to the pharmacy to
purchase my medication which
initially cost me $24 and I had to
pay $68. It is hard,” she said.

Rev Hall told policy holders
to continue to pay their premi-
ums as the prime minister has
urged.

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CHINA’S AMBASSADOR to the Bahamas Hu Dingxian (centre) and BAIC executive chairman Edison Key
were happy with products from Mel Wells’ farm.

Abaco impresses
China’s Ambassador

MARSH HARBOUR,
Abaco — Abaco stands to ben-
efit from assistance in agricul-
ture from the Chinese gov-
ernment.

“Chinese techniques in agri-
culture are suitable for the
Bahamas and cooperation
between our two countries can
be mutually beneficial,” said
Hu Dingxian, Ambassador of
the People’s Republic of Chi-

na to the Bahamas.
Ambassador Hu, first sec-
retary Tan Jian and a team
from the Bahamas Agricul-
tural and Industrial Corpora-
tion (BAIC) and the Inter-
American Institute for Coop-
eration on Agriculture toured
Abaco farmlands on Tuesday.
Hosted by BAIC executive
chairman and Member of Par-
liament for South Abaco Edi-

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son Key, Mr Hu was wel-
comed by the island’s admin-
istrators, chief councillors,
local government officials and
the Ministry of Agriculture
and Marine Resources.

“T have a very good impres-
sion of this beautiful island,”
said Mr Hu.

“The people are so friendly
and hospitable. There is great
potential for agriculture here.
You have everything — love-
ly weather and natural condi-
tions.”

China’s Vice Premier Hui
Liangyu and Bahamas Minis-
ter of Agriculture and Marine
Resources Lawrence
Cartwright recently signed a
Memorandum of Under-
standing on agricultural coop-
eration.

“My Premier laid a good
foundation during his visit,”
said the Ambassador. “Now
we need to lay the bricks on
this foundation.

“After this study tour, we
will discuss with officials of
the Ministry of Agriculture
and BAIC and see what spe-
cific fields we can cooperate
on. We are looking forward
to that.”

Ambassador Hu was also
taken on a tour of the new
Spring City community, the
Treasure Cay resort and the
proposed sites of the Abaco
craft centre, farmers market
and industrial park among
others.

Mr Key said, “Mr Hu has
expressed great interest in
assisting us — helping us to get

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Applications must be in by

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“We requested some trac-
tors and maybe this trip will
be the means of obtaining
some assistance. They have
the technology. We can bene-
fit tremendously from what
they might have to offer on
the technical side.”

In north and south Abaco,
BAIC is preparing more than
1,000 acres of its arable land
for lease at $25 per acre, per
year to Bahamians interested
in food production.

“There is a lot of interest in
agriculture here,” said Mr
Key. “People are really hyped
up about the prospects of food
production and food security
for the country. I believe
down the road it will pay great
dividends.”

Mr Key also took the
opportunity to show off the
resurrected Spring City com-
munity south of Marsh Har-
bour. It was created during
the heyday of agriculture to
accommodate farm workers.
When agriculture waned, it
fell dormant and started to
deteriorate.

With the basic infrastruc-
ture already in place, the gov-
ernment is now putting in 100
new homes. It will be further
expanded by 88 acres which
will provide more than 200
lots.

“That is going to be a
tremendous boost for south
Abaco,” said Mr Key.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Goals for 2009 police plan outlined

New Celebration —

Cruise Line sails
from Nassau to
Fort Lauderdale

CELEBRATION Cruise
Line’s new ship is expected
to bring up to 3,600 cruise
passengers to Nassau on a
weekly basis.

While some of the pas-
sengers will bring additional
business to the hotels, those
not staying overnight will
spend eight to ten hours in
Nassau, shopping, dining
and participating in other
tourist activities.

Celebration Cruise Line
began operations out of
Port Everglades with the
March 16 sailing of the MS
Bahamas Celebration.

The official inaugural sail-
ing will be on April 3 with a
ceremony in Nassau on
April 4. The new cruise line
will depart Nassau every
Tuesday, Thursday and Sat-
urday, and from Port Ever-
glades, Florida, every Mon-
day, Wednesday and Fri-
day. Sunday is a day at sea.

At nearly 700 feet and
over 35,000 gross tonnage,
the MS Bahamas Celebra-
tion will hold up to 1,500
passengers.

With its classic European
style, the ship was ready to
begin sailing out of south
Florida after being pur-
chased in 2008, but Celebra-
tion Cruise Holdings want-
ed to first add some more
amenities to the former
Norwegian vessel MS Prins-
esse Ragnhild.

The MS Bahamas Cele-
bration has four restaurants,
a 630-seat nightclub, multi-
ple lounges, a casino, a com-
plete spa, a fitness room,
three children’s clubs with
age-appropriate electronic
games and activities, a pool
for adults and a pirate-
themed pool with a 180-foot
slide for children.

The cruise also offers a
variety of live music and
shows, as well as
snorkelling, sightseeing
tours and beach resort
excursions.

Free-style dining allows
passengers to dine when
and where they want. The
options include a classic
American restaurant, an all-
you-can-eat Brazilian-style
steakhouse and buffet, and
a casual Italian restaurant,
all as part of the cruise
price. For individuals look-
ing for more upscale dining,
the elegant Cove restaurant
is available at an additional
cost.

The MS Bahamas Cele-
bration is available for cruis-
es and transportation
departing from Nassau
three nights a week.

Nassau passengers will
get the full cruise experi-
ence with accommodations,
food and entertainment
included in the price of the
cruise. Rates start at $97
each way. There are a limit-
ed number of smaller cabins
at $74.

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A SIGNIFICANT reduction in
the number of murders, house
break-ins, armed robberies and
auto thefts is one of the 13 goals
outlined as priority in the 2009
Royal Bahamas Police Force Polic-
ing Plan, Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest said.

Mr Turnquest said crime statis-
tics show that homicides, armed
robberies, house and shop break-

(SEATED R-L): JANET Johnson, chairman; Eric Carey, Sheila Bethel;

ins and auto theft continue to pre-
sent challenges.

“There are also many illegal
firearms on our streets and illicit
drugs and drug trafficking which
lend support to crime and crimi-
nality,” he said.

Mr Turnquest said while the
number of murders —15 — com-
mitted in the Bahamas for the first
three months of 2009 is slightly



(standing r-l) former CARICOM Ambassador Leonard Archer and Peter
Goudie. Missing from the photograph is Carlton Wright.

International Cultural Festival
back by popular demand

AFTER a year’s hiatus, plans are underway for staging the Inter-
national Cultural Festival, sponsored by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
and Immigration, at the Botanical Gardens, Chippenham.

The event is scheduled to be held on October 17 and 18.

The idea for the 14th Annual International Cultural Festival
stemmed from the celebration of United Nations Day which original-
ly only consisted of a flag- raising ceremony for all participating coun-

tries.

Chairman of the International Committee’s board of directors Janet
Johnson said that to amplify the message, organisers are forging links
with other UN oriented activities including Zonta’s 23rd Annual Ecu-
menical Church Service at Christ Church Cathedral; Rotary’s 12th
Annual Model United Nations Sessions; Zonta’s 15th Annual United
Nations Essay Contest, and new this year, Islands of the World Fash-
ion Week, which will showcase cultural and eco-fashions from around
the world, under the auspices of UNESCO.

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lower than last year’s numbers, the
number remains “unacceptably
high.”

“Internationally, the benchmark
annual rate for murders/homicides
should not exceed five per
100,000 of population,” Mr Turn-
quest said.

“Using a population base of
350,000 people, the Bahamas’ rate
should not exceed 18 murders per
annum. Last year, there were 72
murders or 21 per 100,000. Obvi-
ously, we still have a lot of work to
do.”

The National Security Minister
said the use of firearms feature in
many of the murders and armed

robberies being committed in the
country.

He said law enforcement offi-
cials have been doing a “‘yeoman’s
job” in removing the illegal
weapons from the streets.

Mr Turnquest said statistics
reveal that there has been a decline
in the number of armed robberies
committed in the Bahamas over
the first three months of the year,
with 117 cases of reported armed
robberies, compared to 123 for the
same period last year.

He said the decline has also
occurred in the number of house
and shop break-ins and auto thefts.
Mr Turnquest said there have been

378 reported cases of house break-
ins for the first three months of
2009 compared to 480 last year;
192 cases of shop break-ins com-
pared to 225 for the same period in
2008, and 137 cases of stolen vehi-
cles as compared to 232 for the
same period last year.

“While there have been some
improvements in these areas, the
number of incidents is still too
high,” Mr Turnquest said.

The National Security Minister
said the Royal Bahamas Police
Force has implemented a number
of strategies designed to reduce
the number of house and shop
break-ins and armed robberies.

SNA








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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Se TTS EE
Building a green economy

This is the fourth in a series of articles discussing the potential opportunities for the
Bahamas in the emerging green economy. The writer, Colin Lightbourn, is a real estate
business owner, developer and past president of the Bahamas National Trust. To
comment, discuss and submit ideas about these articles, visit: www.thegreenislands.com

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own reason.

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rights are protected and indi-
viduals are free.

The collapse of the world’s
natural resources poses one
of the greatest risks to indi-

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vidual freedom, as people
cannot make decisions freely
if they are constrained by
physical circumstances.

For example, the lack of
safe drinking water and san-
itation can be seen as the
root cause of a great deal of

hunger, disease and
poverty around the world
today.

In the Bahamas, fishery
stocks are the staple food
source for most Family
Islanders and any threat to
supplies poses a great risk to
the welfare and heritage of
these communities.

A green economy can inte-
grate the economic growth
of the islands and manage
valuable resources at the
same time.

However, before such an
economy can take root, there
must be a commitment from
government, so that individ-
uals can feel confident about
investing and working in this
emerging market.

The government has a
responsibility to ensure that
future generations of
Bahamians have access to
the country’s natural
resources, and can do so by
planning, developing and
adhering to an overarching
environmental policy, com-
plete with specific guidelines
and stipulations.

New economic processes
must be designed, and new
policies written, so that
incentives for ecological con-
duct are built into everyday
economic life.

Some areas where the gov-
ernment can be influential
are:

hee

best for the Bahamas.

° Consistent zoning

regulations

Bahamians have become
used to the mis-match of
warchouses in residential
neighbourhoods and con-
tainer ports in the heart of
our tourist hub. Without
strict zoning regulations indi-
viduals will build whatever
can maximise their specific
property or business value in
the short term, eventually
eroding the overall aesthetic
value of the area. While cor-
recting this problem, the gov-
ernment can take steps to
promote a green economy.
For example, incentives can
be afforded to certain zon-
ing areas that invest in alter-
native technology, manufac-
turing and agriculture.

e An expanded national
park and protected area
system
The Bahamas is well below



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the world average for pro-
tected areas as a percentage
of overall territory. Offshore
national parks serve as giant
natural nurseries for the
replenishment of fishery
stocks, while protected areas
on land allow for the effec-
tive management of water
reservoirs.

¢ Tax incentives

While it is the industry of
the future, green technology
is still in its relative infancy
and requires incentives to
attract the private sector.
Import/export, business and
property tax incentives must
be created to entice busi-
nesses to invest capital.

¢ Environmental Bonds
The new trend of mixed-
use resort and real estate

SEE page nine

YOUR CONNECTIONPTO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

Directory Publications Queries
and Complaints

BIC would like to advise the general public that in
agreement with their advertising contract, all queries
or complaints for the 200% Bahamas, Grand Bahama
and Abaco Telephone Directories must be received
on or before March 31st 2009.

Advertisers with quernes or complaints are urged to
contact the Directory publications department im-

mediately at the following addresses:

Nassau Office

summerwinds Plaza, Tonique Williams-Darling Hwy
TEL: 242-322-9183-8 * FAX 242-322-9195
Email: yellowpages@btcbahamas.com

Grand Bahama Office
Government Complex, Mall Drive
TEL: 242-352-2336/8 » FAX: 242-352-2431
Email: yellowpages@btcbahamas.com

Family Island
customers can contact us al
TEL: 242-300-1997
Email: yellowpages@btcbahamas.com

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a, j





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 9



All points bulletin released for
teacher accused of molestation

— the role of Government |



“New economic
processes must
be designed, and
new policies
written, so
that incentives
for ecological
conduct are built
into everyday
economic life.”



FROM page eight

developments requires that
projects have a bond in place
to ensure that crucial infra-
structure is completed.
Throughout the Bahamas we
see situations where devel-
opers cither begin clear cut-
ting and digging prior to nec-
essary approvals or fail to
reach the level of pre-sales
necessary to complete their
projects. When the projects
come to a halt, left behind
are large tracts of butchered
land, destroyed water reser-
voirs and dashed hopes of
locals who see their eco-
nomic future sink with the
project. An environmental
bond will give the govern-
ment the ability to replenish
the damaged area to the
extent physically and natu-
rally feasible and hold devel-
Opers more accountable for
their work.

° A green hotel rating
system

While a rating system can
apply to just about any busi-
ness, hotels and real estate
developments are likely the
immediate forms of econom-
ic growth in the Family
Islands.

Similar to the five-star
label (recently increased to
Six Stars) that is used world-
wide when assessing the qual-
ity of a resort, a green rating
system will assess the degree
to which developments

CONSISTENT ZONING contributes to value over the long term

adhere to sustainable build-
ing and management policies.
In addition to the initial rat-
ing, recommendations can be
given to improve the rating
which can ultimately help
struggling operators to
improve their bottom line by
cutting costs and increasing
their marketability.

¢ Business and

development

procedures manual

In order to maintain the
integrity and consistency of
any effort to develop the
Family Islands in a more sus-
tainable manner, the gov-
ernment will have to be the
enforcer of such policies. A
business guide to green
development, policies and
procedures can offer this to
businesses and also keep the
government consistent with
its own policies.

¢ International Promotion
and Public Relations
An effort by the Bahamas
to go greener in the devel-
opment of the Family Islands

who can sell your home?

242.422.4677

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will be its own free interna-
tional ad campaign. The
international press are look-
ing for success stories which
reveal that the green renais-
sance is not a fantasy ideolo-
gy or ‘Hollywood buzz’, but
the dawning of a new age of
economic freedom and self-
sufficiency. A little country
like the Bahamas can make a
big impact with the help of
the international media.

¢ Foster Bahamian

involvement

By most definitions, the
green effort is not just about
how we build, live and man-
age food and water, but also
includes the effort to build
economic and social inde-
pendence in local communi-
ties. Making the opportuni-
ties available to Bahamians is
paramount to success.

There is no doubt that the
government will have to be a
central figure in any success-
ful effort to build self-suffi-
cient economies in the Fam-
ily Islands. There are more

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than enough business people
both locally and internation-
ally that are interested in
doing business throughout
the islands, however, high
costs, political bureaucracy,
red tape and the lack of any
real plan for the future keep
most uncomfortable about
making the investment. It is
the governments’ lead and
vision that will win the con-
fidence of investors and
spawn a new wave of innov-
ative business thinkers who
are both fiscally responsible
and environmentally and
socially conscious. In a world
of increasing volatility, self-
sufficiency is more crucial
than ever to a small country
like the Bahamas and the
technology to power and run
small island communities, if
not already developed, is on
the immediate horizon. The
Bahamas does not have to
be a spectator and follower
in the next global revolution,
but can be an active partici-
pant and promoter of build-
ing a cleaner and healthier
planet for future generations.

m By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Grand Bahama

? Police have issued an all points bul-
: letin for the former Eight Mile Rock
? High School teacher who is wanted
: in connection with the alleged
? molestation of two former male stu-
? dents.

Andre Birbal, a 46-year-old

? Trinidadian national, is wanted by
i police for questioning in connec-
? tion with alleged unnatural sexual
? intercourse.

Mr Birbal was an art teacher at

i Eight Mile Rock High for several
: years. Police believe that he is no
? longer in the country.

Allegations of sexual molesta-

? tion first surfaced in January when
? School PTA president Troy Gar-
i vey expressed concerns about
? alleged sexual abuse of two former
: male students.

It is alleged the abuse started

while boys were in the seventh
? grade and lasted for eight years.

The young men also claimed that

i the teacher allegedly made them
? strip while he took nude pho-
: tographs of them, wearing only a
? hard hat and tool belt.






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The victims, who are both 19,
have filed complaints with the
police.

Ministry of Education officials in
Freeport removed Mr Birbal from
the school while it conducted an
investigation into the allegations.

He was sent to New Providence
and placed on probationary leave,
pending the outcome of investiga-
tions.

After police concluded its inves-
tigations, the matter was forwarded
to the Attorney-General Office’s
for determination.

However, before a determina-
tion was made, Mr Birbal resigned
from the Ministry of Education and
has left the country.

Police are searching for Mr Bir-
bal, who is described as 5 feet, 7
inches tall of slim build and weighs
about 150 to 200 lbs.

He has light complexion, brown
eyes and short length hair.

According to police, Mr Birbal
is considered armed and extremely
dangerous and should be
approached with caution.

Anyone with information con-
cerning the whereabouts of Mr Bir-
bal is asked to contact police at 352-
1919, 351-9111, 351-9991, 352-8351,
352-9076, and 350-3125 or, 911.




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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Call for donkeys to be protected
from locals shooting them for meat

INAGUA’s wild donkeys
must be protected from
locals who shoot them for
meat, animal welfare cam-
paigners demanded yester-
day.

Between 45 and 60 don-
Keys a year are killed to pro-
duce donkey steaks and
7 stew, one source claimed,
# BABY DONKEY ventures out of ith heads and offal being
left in the bush, causing dis-
tress for the island’s few
tourists.

The donkeys, reckoned to
be progeny of herds brought
into the Bahamas to work
the salt industry in the 19th
century, are among Inagua’s
wildlife attractions.

The once trusting creatures
have traditionally been one
of the draws - along with
Inagua’s flamingo flock — for
foreign visitors.

But in recent times killing
by locals has escalated to a
point where animal welfare
experts fear the island’s don-
key population is under

The Annual General Meeting 5, cscs these anima
of the Bahamas National Trust Sees |i
will be held on Thursday
April 2, 2009
at 6:30pm

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don’t want in the bush, and
sometimes even on the
roads.”

Some concerned visitors
say they have found heads,
legs and innards on bush
pathways used by bird-
watchers and other visitors
drawn to the island’s wild
areas.

“I would say there are up
to 5,000 donkeys on the
island,” said a source, “they
used to go into town at one
time, but they have become
wary of humans since the
shootings began.

“It is a shame because the
donkey herd is one of the
few assets of that desolate
place.”

He said locals kill donkeys
for their own food, but there
was also a market outside
Inagua, with one or two



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Bahamas National Trust



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Bahamian restaurants offer-
ing donkey steaks and don-
key stew.

“It’s time for these animals
to be protected,” he said.
“Some argue that they are
not native to the Bahamas,

that they were brought in
from outside, but that’s rub-
bish ... they have been here a
long time.

“They should get the same
protection as flamingoes,
Bahamian parrots and other

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remote areas.”

Representatives of the
Bahamas National Trust
could not be reached for
comment up to press time
yesterday.

Shuttle undocks
from space station
after eight days

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

AFTER eight days together,
space shuttle Discovery pulled away
from the international space station
Wednesday, ending a successful
effort to boost electrical power and
science research at the orbiting out-
post, according to Associated Press.

The two spacecraft went sepa-
rate ways as they soared above the
Indian Ocean. The undocking puts
Discovery and its seven-member
crew on course for a Saturday
touchdown.

“Godspeed,” called out the space
station’s skipper, Mike Fincke. He
added: “Come again.”

NASA was eager to see the space
station with its new glistening pair of
solar wings following Discovery’s
departure. The shuttle took a vic-
tory lap around the station, primar-
ily for picture-taking. But because
there was no television availability
during the flyaround, Mission Con-
trol and the rest of the world had to
wait for the astronauts to beam
down the recorded video views.

With the installation last week of
the final set of solar wings, the space
station finally resembles the artist
renderings from years past, bal-
anced with four wings on both sides.

NASA expects the extra electri-
cal power to drastically increase the
amount of research in the various
labs that make up the 220-mile-high
outpost.

“You made the space station
much better than it was before,”
Fincke told the shuttle astronauts
just before their departure. “You
gave us more power, symmetry —
which is not to be underrated —
and you gave us a new crew mem-
ber.”

That new member, Japanese
astronaut Koichi Wakata, remained
behind on the space station with
Fincke and a Russian cosmonaut.

Sandra Magnus, whom Wakata
replaced, kept waving as she disap-
peared down the hatch and float-
ed into Discovery.

Wednesday marked her
131st day in space; she moved
into the space station in mid-
November.



THE TRIBUNE



Coastal Awareness Committee to focus
on habitat destruction, pollution effects

THE Coastal Awareness Com-
mittee of the Bahamas, a group of
stakeholders from the private and
public sectors with an interest in
promoting sustainable develop-
ment, has announced the focus for
their campaign in 2009 — the effects
that habitat destruction and pol-
lution have on the country’s coastal
environment.

“Habitat destruction and pollu-
tion are major issues affecting our
coastal zones in the Bahamas,”
said Earlston McPhee, chairman
of the National Coastal Aware-
ness Committee and director of
sustainable tourism development
for the Ministry of Tourism.

“Many plants and animals
depend on coastal habitats for their
nutrition, shelter and breeding
habitat. The destruction of these
habitats can lead to declines in sea
turtle and seabird populations as
well as destroying nursery areas
for conch, crawfish and grouper.
Additionally, they can negatively
impact the clarity of our sea
bathing water and pristine beaches
thus affecting our important
tourism sector as well as local
recreation. Our committee will
focus on the effects of climate
change and pollution on our
coastal resources and determine
what we can do as Bahamians to
help combat these issues. Our goal
is to educate the public and to offer
real solutions to people that col-
lectively will help us as a develop-
ing country and as a tourist desti-
nation,” he said.

The National Coastal Aware-

Tae



THE NATIONAL COASTAL AWARENESS COMMITTEE i is planning a large
number of activities during the month of April to help create an awareness
of the threats affecting the Bahamas’ coastal areas.

ness Committee, which is now is its
fifth year, has increased the num-
ber of activities scheduled for April
which is officially National Coastal
Awareness Month in the Bahamas.
The public is invited to participate.

The Committee will host, in col-
laboration with its strategic part-
ners both in the public and private
sectors the following: National
public service announcement cam-
paigns on television, radio and
print media; a lecture at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas on March 30;
two extensive clean-ups of Nassau
Harbour on Saturday April 4 and
Saturday April 25; beach clean-
ups that will include the removal of
invasive plants and the planting of
native trees; an educational marine

=,

exhibition at the Marathon Mall
from April 27 through May 9 that
will feature a travelling exhibit cre-
ated by Florida State University
entitled “Our Reefs — Caribbean
Connections”; erection of banners
throughout participating islands in
the Bahamas; primary and sec-
ondary school competitions with
a submission deadline of May 15;
field trips with Dolphin Encounters
on Blue Lagoon Island, Dive Stu-
art Cove, the Bahamas National
Trust and Blackbeard’s Cay have
been arranged to provide students
with an opportunity to learn about
protecting the coasts and enjoy the
marine wonders of the Bahamas.
There will also be a national T-
shirt day on Friday, April 24.

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THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

As this is a national initiative,
beach clean-ups and other coastal
awareness activities are planned
for the islands of Abaco, Andros,
Bimini, Eleuthera, Grand Bahama,
Exuma and San Salvador.

The 2009 Coastal Awareness
Committee includes members
from the following organisations:
Ministry of Tourism; Bahamas
Environment Science and Tech-
nology Commission (BEST);
Bahamas Hotel Association;
Bahamas National Trust; Bahamas
Reef Environment Educational
Foundation (BREEF); Broad-
casting Corporation of the
Bahamas; College of the Bahamas;
Department of Environmental
Health Services; Department of
Marine Resources; Dive Stuart
Cove ; Dolphin Encounters; the
Nature Conservancy; Ministry of
Education, Science and Technolo-
gy; the College of the Bahamas,
and the University of the West
Indies

“Our coastal and marine
resources help shape our nation’s
character and its distinctive per-
sonality,” said Mr McPhee.

“All beneficiaries of the tourism
industry must take an interest and
active role in conserving our nat-
ural resources, particularly in grow-
ing Small Island Developing States
(SIDS) like the Bahamas.

“As we depend on the tourism
industry, the economic sustain-
ability of the Bahamas hinges on
our ability to maintain the natural
beauty of these islands that attracts
millions to our shores.”

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Bid to ‘persuade’ the British govt to
shorten Turks and Caicos suspension




















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government, provided that
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parties in the Turks and Caicos
to agree on a “set of things.”

“In my discussions with both
sides I gathered that they can
agree upon some items and
whether they can agree on all I
do not know.

“But whatever they can
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British government to give
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ceeding for, certainly not the

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length of time, and in some
cases not undertaking some of
the measures proposed,” Mr
Ingraham said.

Opposition Leader Perry
Christie said that the PLP were
in support of what the prime
minister said.

Delegation

Mr Christie led a delegation
to Turks and Caicos on Sun-
day and met with the Opposi-
tion for discussions with the
Opposition having met with
the Premier and his delegation
in New Providence the previ-
ous Friday.

“(We) join with (the prime
minister) in the hope that the
Bahamas and other countries
could bring a return to the con-
stitutional government as it
was based on what we know
and all that we have heard pri-
or to the period of two years
that have been stated,” Mr
Christie said.

On March 16 the Interim
Report of the Turks and
Caicos Commission of Inquiry
into possible corruption or oth-
er dishonesty in relation to
past and present elected mem-
bers of the legislature in recent
years was made public.

It had been released to the
Governor of the TCI on Feb-
ruary 28.

The Commissioner recom-
mended in the Interim Report
“the suspension of the entire
Constitution for an indetermi-

nate period, to replace the
democratic process presently
provided by the Cabinet and
the House of Assembly with
direct rule from Westminster,
acting through the Governor
with, but not bound by, the
advice of an Advisory Execu-
tive Council.”

An Order in Council was
subsequently made on March
18 and was laid before the
British Parliament on Wednes-
day, March 25. The Order will
continue in force for a period
of two years from the date of
its commencement unless it is
revoked earlier, or continued
in force, by a further Order in
Council. Once given effect, the
Order in Council will suspend
certain provisions of the Con-
stitution of the TCI relating to
ministerial government and the
House of Assembly. It will also
remove trial by jury and
enlarge the franchise to the
disadvantage of the TCI peo-
ple.

In a written statement yes-
terday CARICOM said that its
members who strongly uphold
the exercise of democracy, do
not believe that good gover-
nance, the rule of law and rep-
resentative democracy can be
ensured or strengthened by
constitutional suspension in
the TCI and a return to direct
rule by the colonial power
through its governor.

“These provisions threaten
the democratic process in the
TCI by terminating the exis-
tence of the Cabinet and dis-

solving the elected Legislature,
in effect thwarting the will of
the people of the TCI. Fur-
thermore, the power, duty or
function of the Cabinet and
the House of Assembly would
now be completely exercised
or performed by the Governor
in his or her discretion with-
out any effective checks and
balances or general oversight
by the TCI people,” CARI-
COM said.

Report

However, CARICOM said
that it is fully aware of the
“scathing nature” of the Inter-
im Report with regard to the
present governance in the TCI
and conscious of the serious-
ness of the situation.

However, it believes that the
time between the Order in
Council being laid in the
British Parliament and the
publication of the final Report
of the Commission of Inquiry
provides a window of oppor-
tunity for the Governing and
Opposition parties to come
together in the national inter-
est as well as for deeper reflec-
tion by all involved in order to
come up with a solution that
will minimize constitutional
disruption.

CARICOM said that it
believes that this could be
done even while providing
some immediate safeguards
against the abuses related in
the Interim Report.

Unaher the distinguished patronage of Thea Excolbancies, Hon «uthur DO. Hanna
Govemor General of the Gommomwealth of The Bahamas and Mrs. Hanne

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 13



LOCAL NEWS

The Bahamas reacts to
pressure on ‘tax Havens’

FROM page one

countries providing financial ser-
vices expressing their intention
to enhance their co-operation in
this regard, that the Bahamas
also “reaffirm” its commitment
to do so ahead of the April 2
meeting of the Group of 20
nations and the OECD in Lon-
don.

In a move that will reassure
financial services professionals
and former Attorney General
Alfred Sears who proposed that
The Bahamas must make a pol-
icy statement in advance of the
G-20 gathering in order to avoid
being unduly penalised or “iso-
lated”, Mr Ingraham said a
release indicating the same was
being forwarded to Europe and
the OECD at 11am yesterday.

Illustrating further willingness
to please those countries, like the
UK, which have been pushing
for so-called tax havens to elim-
inate much of the secrecy that
shrouds their operations, Mr
Ingraham told parliament that
The Bahamas would “as a matter
of priority...enter into negotia-
tions” to “conclude appropriate
arrangements to accommodate
OECD standards” on trans-
parency.

“There are a number of out-
standing requests for The
Bahamas to enter into agree-
ments which provide for the
exchange of information. Each
requests from each country will
be considered on an individual
basis,” he stated.

At present The Bahamas only
has one Tax Information
Exchange Agreement — and
that with the United States. Mr
Ingraham did not say which oth-
er countries were seeking such
agreements.

Describing the context in
which the message being issued
to the global community was pre-
pared, Mr Ingraham said it came
after “wide consultation with
members of The Bahamas finan-
cial services board (BFSB), the
association of international banks
and trusts (AIBT) and the
financial services industry gen-
erally.”

And he suggested that The
Bahamas’ readiness to respond
to further demands for informa-
tion and transparency had
matured after it saw that other
countries with which it is in com-
petition were now being
forced to adhere to the same
standards.

In a March 2002 letter from
then Minister of Finance William
Allen The Bahamas’ relayed its
commitment to the OECD that
it would — as Mr Ingraham yes-
terday described it — “be a
responsible member of the inter-
national community...and a
responsible financial services cen-
tre,” but also proposed some of
its own conditions to the OECD.

Among these, Mr Allen wrote,
was that the Bahamas considers
a “level playing field” among all
OECD member countries and
non-member jurisdictions with
which it is in competition in the
field of cross border financial ser-
vices “to be critical to its eco-
nomic interest.”

Yesterday, Mr Ingraham said:
“Over the past few weeks much
has been reported...about the
efforts of the governments that
make up the Organisation for
Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD) to
require greater standards of
transparency and exchange of
information between countries,
most especially countries offering
or providing financial services.”

“Greater standards of trans-
parency and exchange of infor-
mation are evolving to become
the international standards
applicable to all countries.

“Many countries have now
indicated their adoption of the
standards being required and
soon to be applied by the OECD
for transparency and exchange
of information.”

Earlier this month, Caribbean
jurisdictions signalling their
acceptance of the OECD’s
“evolving standards” in their
financial services industries
included the Cayman Islands,
Bermuda and the British Virgin
Islands.

The European countries of
Austria, Andorra, Belgium,
Monaco, Switzerland, Lichten-
stein and the Channel Islands of
Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of
Man also sent messages to the
OECD stating their willingness
to comply.

Their shift in attitudes came
after the global banking collapse
caused fresh and focused scruti-
ny to be trained on so-called
international tax havens.

Britain’s Prime Minister Gor-
don Brown has been among
those leading the call for an end
to such centres, which, at a time
when governments are scram-
bling to find ways to boost their
dwindling tax revenues, are being
blamed for facilitating wealthy
citizens of countries such as
Britain to evade taxation in their
own countries.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Cynthia Pratt's

FROM page one

He had both of his legs ampu-
tated at PMH recently, was
unable to eat solid food, and
doctors had little hope of seeing
any improvement in his condi-
tion.

When at his bedside yester-
day ‘Mother’ Pratt said Mr Pratt
opened his eyes to see her, but
was unable to speak.

She said: “He was sort of
reaching for me and indicating
for me to hold his hand, which I
did, and when I looked at him he
had deteriorated so much
because he had lost so much
weight.”

Mts Pratt told her St Cecilia
constituents in a press confer-
ence last week how her hus-
band’s deteriorating health has
been her primary concern as he
has not only been her husband,
but her best friend.

Speaking to The Tribune from
the hospital yesterday, Mrs Pratt
said: “He’s been such a good
husband, very supportive. He

iNew cu



loved his country.

“He wanted what was best for
the country. Everything I
attempted to do he supported
me. Even when I went to col-
lege he stayed home and kept
the children until I returned.”

A statement issued by the
PLP party last night said: “In his

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own right, Joseph ‘Joe’ Pratt was i
a long standing supporter of }
deep conviction and most serious }
commitment to our party and its ;

core principles.

“As the husband of our }
deputy leader he has been }
unstinting and passionate in his }
devotion to his wife both pri- :
vately and publicly; first when }
she was elected to Parliament }
and ultimately, when she made
history by becoming the first }
woman to hold the office of }

Deputy Prime Minister.

“Joe Pratt could always be }
seen at her side, or sitting in the i
gallery of the House of Assem- }
bly whenever she made a major }
presentation, or on the campaign }
trail in St Cecilia where they }
lived and where his wife was the }

Parliamentary representative,

always supporting and encour- }

aging her efforts and her work.

“He was a man of great :
strength and unquestioned com- }
mitment to our political cause }
and one who displayed incredi- }
ble love for his wife and his fam-

ily.

our beloved Deputy Leader,

Cynthia Pratt, during this time of :

great loss and grief.

“Our prayers are with her, and
their children and their entire }

family.”




“We stand in solidarity with

stage protest

FROM page one

Yesterday officers from the
RBPF's Special Intelligence
Branch (SIB) were called to the
scene to take statements from
the interpreter, a representative
from the Chinese Embassy, and
E R Hanna.

The group alleged they were
paid three weeks ago for work
completed in November but
have not been paid for subse-
quent labour. They reportedly
stopped working on March 3,
2009 because they were unsure
if their work permits were valid,
according to the group's inter-
preter, Louis.

Speaking for the group, Louis
said the men want payment due
to them — reportedly “about
$40,000 per worker” — before
they return to their homeland.
He said the group feels their
rights are being violated
because the company has pos-
session of their passports and
work permits. He also claimed
the group has been harassed by
police officers in what he
believes is an attempt to silence

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The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the repair of Storage Tank #13 at its
Clifton Pier Power Station.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before

31st March, 2009

no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 683/08
REPAIR OF STORAGE TANK #13
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or
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For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Shevonn N, Cambridge at telephone 302-1208.

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at BEC, Clifton Pier Power Station.

their complaints.

"Since we stopped work, four
times policemen come to our
house wanting to get rid of me
because I'm the only one who
speaks English. If they get rid of
me, policemen (can) carry them
away or immigration (can) get
them away without pay, that's
the situation,” he said.

Through their interpreter
some claimed that sometimes
they were only fed breakfast
and dinner while performing
strenuous work on the site.

Speaking to The Tribune
after yesterday's demonstration,
E R Hanna representative
Tameka Hanna denied these
accusations. She said the com-
pany was "astounded" to hear
the workers’ complaints that
they had not been paid.

She said E R Hanna had
paid what was owed to the
workers and that any discrep-
ancy lay with an international
company that was responsible
for payment of a portion of the
workers’ wages.

She also dismissed claims of
insufficient food and mistreat-
ment saying for the past two
years the workers were ade-
quately housed in a company
facility and fed three times a
day and that fresh drinking
water is available at the site.

And in spite of the workers’
strike, she said the company
continues to house and feed
them.

During the interview, Ms
Hanna said the company
remained in discussions with the
Chinese workers through an
independent translator to
bring some resolution to the sit-
uation.

However she said the com-
pany will seek to have the work-
ers’ permits revoked because of
their recent conduct. She said
the company had been working
with Immigration to get the
documents renewed, but would
move to reverse this because
the workers violated their con-
tract when they stopped work-
ing.

Odessa G

s husband dies. Chinese workers _ Investigations

into apparent
— teen suicide

FROM page one

examined that the body and
pronounced the young man
dead at the scene.

According to police
reports, the deceased was
last seen alive at around
6pm on Tuesday when he
was involved in an alterca-
tion with a family member.

He then locked himself in
a bedroom. Family mem-
bers later forced the door
open and discovered the
body in the closet.

Ministry of Education
officials, including the
school psychologist, met
with staff at the Eight Mile
Rock High School to offer
counseling.

School Principal Ben-
jamin Stubbs said the stu-
dent’s death has saddened
many persons at the school.

He said the incident is
one of several unfortunate
incidents that have occurred
at the school in recent
months.

BURGLARY AND
ARMED ROBBERY

Police are investigating a
burglary and armed robbery
that occurred at a residence
in the Malibu Reef Subdivi-
sion early Wednesday
morning.

ASP Bootle reported that
a resident of Malibu Reef
was at home around 2am
when his southern living
room door was kicked in by
three masked men.

The suspects — one armed
with a shotgun and the oth-
er with a machine gun —
demanded cash.

The victim was robbed of
one dark blue Motorola cel-
lular phone, valued at $300.

One of the gunmen is
described as being 5ft, 9ins
tall of slim build with dark
complexion. The other is
also described as 5ft 9ins
tall of medium build with
dark complexion. The sus-
pects were wearing dark
clothing.

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THE TRIBUNE

FROM page one

pany have assured the bank of
its viability and its ability to
meet all its obligations in the
fullness of time if allowed to
continue to operate. In lieu of
appointing a receiver or pursu-
ing any of its other remedies as
a mortgagee, the bank has
allowed the company to contin-
ue in operation pending a busi-
ness review,” the letter read.

However, as outlined in a let-
ter dated January 28, 2008, the
Ministry of Finance rejected Mr
Ritchie’s offer, and demanded
payment in full.

“Some of these charges relate
to years 2006 and early 2007
and sufficient time has already
been extended,” the ministry
wrote.

“In addition, cruise ship oper-
ators have already paid these
amounts to your company. In
your letter, you indicated that
the amount owed amounts to
$4,822,444.40. This amount does
not include part lists, diesel,
overtime and transportation. In
a letter to us, dated November
5, 2007, Customs indicated that
you had owed $5,426,452.76
plus dishonoured cheques of
$2,614,817.79. Please explain the
discrepancy,” the ministry
demanded.

Representing Mr Ritchie,
attorney Philip Davis informed
The Tribune yesterday that
GUL was simply asking gov-
ernment to hold off on collect-
ing their debt at this time; or at

Revenue
collection

FROM page one

and prospects are “evident and
stark,” he noted.

Pointing to a $51.6 million rev-
enue shortfall for the first six
months of the 2008/2009 fiscal
year, he revealed that Govern-
ment was seeking to arrange a
$200 million loan to cover its costs
and was not planning on cutting
back on current expenditure.

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 15
Global United CEO hoped for

payment plan for owed $8m

the very least agree to a pay-
ment plan that would keep the
company’s doors open and
Bahamians employed.

However, as outlined by the
court documents between the
Treasury of the Bahamas and
Global United Limited, the
company received substantial
monies on behalf of the Trea-
sury for docking fees, departure
taxes and tonnage charges that
were never handed over.

In a press statement issued to

the media on Tuesday, Mr
Ritchie — a former PLP nomi-
nee for the Clifton constituency
— said that he felt that the
actions by government were
designed primarily to force his
company out of business rather
than collecting outstanding
duties.

As a result, he said, the com-
pany is expected to close its
doors tomorrow and terminate
the remaining staff at its loca-
tions.

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The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Wilson City Power Station
Transmission Circuits

Wilson City, Abaco

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before

9th April, 2009

no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 701/09

WILSON CITY POWER STATION TRANSMISSION CIRCUITS

WILSON CITY, ABACO

The Corporation reserves the right to
accept or reject any or all proposals.
For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact
Mr. Wayne Farquharson at telephone 302-1216.







FOUR CONNECTION fo THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER NOTICES FOR DIRECTORY PUBLICATIONS

TENDER - PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENTS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from the general public who wish to advertise in our premium spots on the 2010
Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENT" to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - PRINTING AND DELIVERY OF
TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies to provide services for the printing and delivery
of the 2010 and 2011 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES” to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - COVER DESIGNS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies to provide Graphic Artist services for the 2010
Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - COVER DESIGNS” to the
attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - DISPLAY ADS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies or individuals to provide Graphic Artist services
for the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, "TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - DISPLAY ADS" to the atten-
tion. of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL
NARRATIVES SERVICES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies or individuals to provide Creative Writing and
Sectional Narratives services for the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL NARRATIVES
SERVICES" to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

www.btcbahamas.com
tl ll





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Goodell wants longer regular season

lm By BARRY WILNER
AP Football Writer

DANA POINT, Calif. (AP) — Roger Good-
ell wants the NFL regular season to expand to
17 or 18 games.

The commissioner hopes to have a proposal
to present to league owners in May. The matter
was discussed at length during the NFL meet-

and counting

ings that ended Wednesday.

Goodell said the league has not broached
the subject with its broadcast partners or the
players’ union, and nothing could be done with-
out a new labor agreement.

The league now plays a 16-game season. A
longer schedule, perhaps by 2011, would mean
fewer preseason games. Goodell said the league
doesn’t need four exhibition games anymore.

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IN THIS August 27, 2007 file photo, Atlanta Falcons football player Michael Vick leaves federal court after plead-
ing guilty to a dogfighting charge in Richmond, Va.

(AP Photo: Steve Helber)

Vick leaves
federal prison

@ By LARRY O’DELL
Associated Press Writer

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) —
Suspended NFL star Michael
Vick has left a federal lockup
in Kansas, apparently bound for
Virginia to appear at a bank-
ruptcy hearing next week.

The U.S. Bureau of Prisons
Web site showed Wednesday
that Vick was no longer at the
federal penitentiary in Leaven-
worth, Kan. It listed his status as
“in transit.”

It was not clear when he left,
or where he was. But two weeks
ago, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge
Frank Santoro demanded that
Vick to testify at an April 2
hearing in Newport News about
whether his Chapter 11 bank-
ruptcy plan should be con-
firmed. Another judge issued a
court order directing federal
marshals to bring the former

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Atlanta Falcons quarterback to
Virginia for the hearing.

Bureau of Prisons spokes-
woman Victoria Joseph said
bureau policy prohibits disclo-
sure of the prisoner’s destina-
tion until after he arrives. Vick-
*s attorneys did not immediate-
ly return phone messages left
by The Associated Press.

Vick is serving 23 months for
bankrolling a dogfighting con-
spiracy. He is eligible to move
into home confinement no ear-
lier than May 21 and is sched-
uled to be released from cus-
tody on July 20.

Vick will likely be kept in a
southeastern Virginia jail until
the hearing, but it wasn’t known
which one. Newport News Sher-
iff Gabe Morgan said he had
not been notified that Vick
would be staying in the city jail,
but it was possible Vick and fed-
eral marshals would show up

unannounced.

The judge overseeing Vick’s
bankruptcy case rejected the
idea of allowing testimony by
video hookup, saying he needed
Vick in the courtroom so he
could assess his demeanor and
credibility.

Vick’s plan for paying his
creditors is based largely on his
intention to resume his NFL
career. Vick was suspended
indefinitely after his 2007 indict-
ment, and NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell has said he will
review Vick’s status after he is
released.

The Falcons still hold the con-
tract rights to Vick but have
said they will try to trade him.
Vick’s bankruptcy plan would
allow him to keep the first
$750,000 of his annual pay.
After that, a percentage would
go to his creditors based on a
sliding scale.

Cooper to head

Carifta coaches

FROM page 19

tance. Most of the events when
it comes to what we have to do
on the field, I think the coaches
on the team can handle it,” he
said.

“One of the things we are
asking this weekend, we need
the total support of the
Bahamas behind our team at
the trials first. We can not just
say we will send the team out
and hope that they will bring
something back if we do not
give the support.”

The BAAA Carifta Trials is
scheduled for this weekend at
the Thomas A Robinson Stadi-
um.

According to press relations
officer Kermit Taylor, just
under 30 athletes have met
qualifications thus far.

Last year, the Bahamas field-
ed 64 athletes for the Carifta
games in St Kitts.

BAAA president Curt
Hollingsworth said the cross
section of coaches will provide
the team with the best oppor-
tunity to succeed.

“One of the misconceptions
that lingers around in the coach-
ing community is that specialty
coaches when it comes to
national teams. I believe every
coach and every administrative
member plays one significant
role, and that is to manage the
athletes,” he said.

“We do not expect for coach-
es to try and change or tamper
with an athlete’s technique or
skill within a week or two prior
to competition. Our responsi-
bility basically is to motivate,
encourage and to manage these



athletes for the pending days
leading up to travel.”

Hollingsworth said from the
meet and with the guidance of
coaches and the selection com-
mittee the best possible team
will be traveling to St Lucia.

“We will field the best, the
most qualified and the most
competent athletes that we can
field this weekend. At the end
of the day we will give as many
of our kids as possible the
opportunity to participate in
these games. I am a believer in
standards but I also believe that
those children who train hard
and have an opportunity to per-
form, we always have a surprise
in store for that. So we will do
our best to give everyone an
opportunity.”

Regarding collegiate and
absentee athletes being selected
to this year’s squad, he said
preference will be given to ath-
letes who qualify locally.

“Tf athletes qualify locally in
those events, the collegiate ath-
letes or athletes absent from the
country will not be considered
at that time. Those athletes that
qualified locally outright will be
given first choice. We have
invited all our absentee athletes
to attend these trials and there
are quite a number of them,”
he said.

“Right now we have high
jumpers that have qualified and
when you look at Raymond
Higgs for example, I understand
he might not be able to get here
for the trials. Raymond Higgs is
a gold medallist from the last
Carifta Games, but if we have
local qualifiers in the event then
they would be going to Carif-
ta.”



TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 17



SPORTS

SPORT eee
Annual Pattie Johnson
-ball tourney underway

NBA Today

By The Associated Press

SCOREBOARD

Thursday, March 26

Los Angeles Lakers at Detroit
(7:30 pm EDT). Winners of three
in a row, the Lakers face the Pis-
tons, who are playing without
Allen Iverson, Rasheed Wallace
and Richard Hamilton.

STARS

Tuesday

—Kirk Hinrich, Bulls, scored
24 points filling in for injured
Derrick Rose, and Chicago beat
Detroit 99-91 to pull within a
game of the seventh-place Pis-
tons in the Eastern Conference.

—Tony Parker, Spurs, scored
30 points and the Spurs finally
won a close finish in San Anto-
nio, beating Golden State 107-
106.

— Deron Williams and Ron-
nie Brewer, Jazz. Williams had
19 points and 12 assists, and
Brewer scored 12 of his 17 points
in the second half of Utah’s 99-86
win over Houston.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Monta Ellis scored 27 points in
Golden State’s 107-106 loss at
San Antonio on Tuesday night.

Kevin Durant had 24 points in
Oklahoma City’s 107-89 loss to
the Los Angeles Lakers.

Tayshaun Prince and Will
Bynum scored 20 points each in
Detroit’s 99-91 loss at Chicago.

Aaron Brooks scored 20
points and Shane Battier added
18 in Houston’s 99-86 loss at
Utah.

STREAK STOPPER

Roger Mason sank the go-
ahead jumper with 23.8 seconds
left and the Spurs dodged their
second three-game skid of the
season after last-minute losses
against Boston and Houston last
week, beating Golden State 107-
106.

EASY WIN

The Lakers beat Oklahoma
City 107-89 while leading from
start to finish for the ninth time
this season. All five starters were
given a rest for the final 8 min-
utes.

ROSE RESTS

Rookie of the Year candidate
Derrick Rose sat out the Chica-
go Bulls’ 99-91 win over the
Detroit Pistons because of a
bruised right wrist. Rose missed
his first game after being injured
on a dunk attempt in the first
half of Monday’s 101-99 victory
at Washington. X-rays and an
MRI revealed no structural dam-
age. Kirk Hinrich scored 24
points as his fill in.

SPEAKING

“By no means is Kirk a back-
up point guard. But we’ve got
the best backup point guard in
the league.”

— Chicago’s John Salmons
about teammate Kirk Hinrich,
who scored 24 points filling in
for injured Derrick Rose in the
Bulls’ 99-91 won over Detroit on
Tuesday

THE annual Pattie Johnson
basketball tournament, featur-
ing primary, junior and senior
girls from a cross section of
schools, got underway yester-
day at the C I Gibson Gymnasi-
um, with the tournament’s
namesake leading her team to
one of the most impressive per-
formances of the afternoon.

Junior Girls

HO Nash Lions - 43

SAC Big Red Machine - 9

The GSSSA Champions got
out to a blistering start, gaining
a 20-0 advantage at the end of
the first quarter to cruise to the
most lopsided win of the tour-
nament thus far.

With their vaunted full court
trap, the Lions forced eight
turnovers in the opening quarter
in route to the insurmountable
margin and led 26-4 at the half.

The Big Red Machine’s first
basket came with 2:40 left to
play in the second quarter when
Jada Saunders scored in the lane
on a short jumper.

With the Lions’ starters back
on the floor to begin the third

quarter, they opened on an 8-0
run.

A Lakishna Munroe basket
gave them a 38-5 lead heading
into the final period.

H O Nash got their biggest
lead of the game on a Kaleisha
Laing three pointer early in the
fourth quarter which gave them
a 41-5 advantage.

Randya Kemp led the Lions
with 10 points, Laing finished
with nine, Khadijah Moncur and
Regine Curtis added six apiece
while Munroe finished with
four.

Senior Girls

CI Gibson Rattlers - 29

Freedom Warriors - 0

The Rattlers held serve on
their home floor with a domi-
nant performance to begin their
tournament run.

Robin Gibson led all scorers
with 16 points while Danielle
Taylor added 10 points in the
win.

CR Walker Knights - 24
St John’s Giants - 20
The Giants never recovered

after a sluggish scoreless first
quarter and the Knights capi-
talized with timely baskets in
the fourth quarter to cling to the
win.

With star wing player Male-
sha Peterson on the bench for
the beginning of the game, the
Knights relied on a concentrat-
ed defensive effort to take a 9-0
lead after the first quarter.

The Giants’ first baskets came
on a pair of free throws by Dar-
rinique Young early in the sec-
ond quarter, but they failed to
gain significant ground on the
margin as a Tamika Martin
jumper gave the Knights a 13-6
lead at the half.

The BAISS runners-up con-
tinued to chip away at the lead
with a pair of free throws by
Taneka Sandiford trimming the
deficit 15-12.

Peterson followed with a pair
of baskets to stop the run and
the Knights took a 19-15 lead
into the final quarter.

The Giants again trimmed the
deficit to three in the final peri-
od, 20-17, but the Knights
answered with a timely 6-0 run

to seal the win.

Martin led all scorers with
eight points while Peterson
added six. Caryn Moss and
Young led the Giants with six
points apiece.

NCA Crusaders - 13

Prince William Falcons - 12

The Crusaders nearly relin-
quished a lead they held for
more than three and a half quar-
ters but with a key late game
defensive stand held on for the
opening day win.

In a low scoring affair, the
Crusaders led 5-2 after the
opening quarter, 7-4 at the half
and 11-8 heading into the fourth.

The Falcons opened the
fourth on a 4-0 run and gained
their first lead of the game, 12-
11 on a Ranel Ferguson lay-up.

Leanna Johnson responded
to give the Crusaders a 13-12
advantage ad the game’s final
score with 2:42 left to play.

Ferguson had an opportuni-
ty to win the game when she
was fouled on a jumper with 4.8
seconds remaining but missed
both shots at the line.

England to face West Indies

ENGLAND’S cricket captain Andrew Strauss drinks a sports beverage after batting in the nets during training at Kensington Oval in Bridgetown,
Barbados, Wednesday. England will face West Indies in a third One-Day International cricket match on Friday...

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ANTIQUE MONGOLIAN

Former house-
keeper sues
Kole Bryant,

his wife

SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) —
Kobe Bryant’s former house-
keeper is suing the NBA star and
his wife, contending she was
“harassed and humiliated,”
denied health insurance and
forced to quit because of “intol-
erable” working conditions.

In one instance, Maria
Jimenez says Bryant’s wife
ordered her to put her hand ina
container of dog waste to
retrieve the price tag of a blouse.

Jimenez filed suit Friday in
Orange County Superior Court.
She says in court papers that
Vanessa Bryant “badgered,
harassed and humiliated” her in
front of Bryant, the couple’s chil-
dren and others. She said the
couple failed to provide health
coverage, as promised when she
was hired. She said she didn’t
learn she didn’t have it until she
became ill and sought medical
attention.

The action seeks unspecified
general, punitive and special
damages, as well as back pay and
overtime Jimenez says she is
owed. The lawsuit was first
reported by tmz.com.

Rob Pelinka, agent for the Los
Angeles Lakers star, did not
immediately return a call.

Jimenez wasn’t fired but her
lawyer said she was wrongly dis-
charged because Bryant’s wife
made it impossible for her to
continue working at the couple’s
Orange County home.

“She quit but because the
working conditions were intol-
erable,” attorney William Vogel-
er said Wednesday. “We allege it
was a Violation of labour laws
that protect people from working
in unhealthy situations.”

In court papers, Jimenez says
she went to work for the Bryants
in September 2007 and left in
March 2008. Almost immediate-
ly upon starting work, “Vanessa
began a continuing pattern of
verbally abusing and demeaning
her.” Jimenez said she was called
lazy, slow, dumb, a liar and was
cursed and screamed at.

After Jimenez told Kobe
Bryant she wanted to quit he
talked her out of it and elicited
an apology from his wife, court
papers said. But then, she said,
the abuse began again.

According to the papers,
Vanessa Bryant screamed at
Jimenez for putting an expen-
sive blouse in the Bryants’
clothes washer. “Then Vanessa
demanded that Maria put her
hand in a bag of dog feces to
retrieve the price tag for the
blouse.”

Although she gave notice,
Jimenez said, Vanessa Bryant
demanded that she work until
her next pay day to cover the
$690 cost of the blouse. Jimenez
said she did.

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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS

















































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Players want fair

consideration
in selection of
national teams

THE Bahamas Basketball
Federation last week released
the names of its new coaching
staff for both the junior and
senior men and women nation-
al teams that will play in a num-
ber of tournaments this sum-
mer.

Unlike in the past when
American King Rice was invit-
ed to serve as the men’s head
coach, the federation has decid-
ed to stick strictly to Bahamian
coaches. The list is split
between coaches from New
Providence and Grand
Bahama.

Over the years, however,
players have been reluctant to
come out and try out for the
teams because of who was
coaching and the manner in
which the teams were selected.
In the latter case, locally based
players have complained that
they attended every practice
only to be cut at the eleventh
hour for one of the interna-
tionally based players when
they came home.

Is it fair, players have asked?

Federation executives feel so.

They claim that in most of
those cases, they have gotten
prior commitment from the
internationally based players
that they will be coming home
to travel with the team and so
they left their spot open for
them.

The problem, however, is
that it should be made clear as
to the number of spots that are
open to the local players.
Maybe, in hindsight, the feder-
ation should only be inviting
players to fill those spots that
they need.

Unless, as the federation
states, they should have a local-
ly based national team in place

Carifta team trials this weekend

can easily

rely onto ||
play gy
whenever ||
they have |
an exhibi-
tion game
to be
played
instead of
calling on
the club
teams to
get ready. ff

Like

every oth- OPINION

that they STUBBS



er team
sport, it
will be an
enormous undertaking for the
federation to put together a
national team that will com-
prise of the vast amount of tal-
ent that we have spread across
the world.

In order for the Bahamas to
take another crack at qualifying
for the Tournament of Ameri-
cas, which serves as the basis
for entry into the Olympic
Games, the federation will
need all of the players avail-
able to accomplish the feat.

In the meantime, we do have
the regional tournaments to
participate in and that is where
the focus of the federation is.
Obviously, the locally players
will be in the forefront as the
federation assembles the teams.

So the federation is encour-
aging those players who have
been invited out to come and
make their presence felt. They
are assuring them that once
they put their best foot for-

CABLE BEACH
Sdhappimng Carre
VA reed pa

ward, they will be considered
for team selection.

And that's all the players are
asking for - a fair consideration
for team selection.

CARIFTA SELECTION

THIS is a big weekend for
the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations. They will
hold the final trials for the
Carifta team that will travel to
St Lucia over the Easter holi-
day weekend.

The trials will take place on
Friday and Saturday at the
Thomas A Robinson Track and
Field Stadium. On Sunday, the
BAAA 1s expected to ratify the
team and announce the squad.

With the management team
already selected (see story),
you can bet that it will be
another long and tedious
process that the BAAA will
engage in as coaches attempt
to justify why their athletes
should be included on the
team.

The BAAA will definitely
try to put together the best
team possible to compete at the
games, but the team should
only be selected based on the
athletes’ performances in rela-
tionship to the qualifying stan-
dards.

So let’s hope that the athletes
go out this weekend and per-
form at their best so that they
can secure their spots on the
team and not have to worry
about whether or not their
coaches can get them on or not.

Either they've done the nec-
essary work to make it or they
will get left home.

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THE TRIBUNE

S
b
T

PAGE 19



ts

HURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

s hundreds of

athletes dili-

gently prepare

for an opportu-

nity to qualify
for the top junior track and field
meet of the region, the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations revealed the
team of coaches that will lead
the national squad into compe-
tition.

Bradley Cooper has been
chosen to head the team of
coaches for the 39th annual
Carifta Track and Field Cham-
pionships, April 9-14 in St
Lucia.

Cooper, widely regarded as
the greatest thrower in Bahami-
an track and field history, brings
a résumé filled with two
Olympic qualifications, an
NCAA championship and over
two decades of coaching expe-

39th track and field championships
set for April 9-14 in St Lucia

rience.

Cooper will be assisted by the
team of Sandra Laing, Antonio
Saunders, Wendell Collie and
Dexter Bodie. Ray Hepburn is
the team manager while
Stephanie Higgs will serve as
assistant manager.

Cooper said the return to
national coaching on the junior
circuit should be a seamless
transition with the perfor-
mances he has seen from the
athletes in the past weeks.

“It has been quite a while
since I have been in the junior
circuit working with athletes on
the international scene, but
locally I have been doing it
quite a bit,” he said. “After
watching the athletes over the
last couple of weeks and watch-
ing their performances, the

times, the distances they are
throwing, I am very happy to
say that as far as the Bahamas’
team is concerned we will go
and do our best and try not just
to bring medals but try to get
the maximum performance and
personal best out of all our ath-
letes.”

Cooper said he is confident
in the team’s coaching ability
and emplored parents to offer
their continued support for the
athletes in the weeks leading up
to Carifta.

“We have a few other coach-
es from the association that will
be traveling down and if I need
any volunteers they have said
they will be happy to give assis-

SEE page 16B

Good start for junior tennis
players against best in region

JUNIORS representing the
Bahamas on the international
tennis circuit got off to a suc-
cessful start against the best
players in the region.

The three member junior
Davis Cup team of Jonathan
Taylor, Kevin Major and
Ondre Cargill and the three
member junior Fed Cup team
of Gabrielle Moxey, Erin Stra-
chan and Simone Pratt each
recorded wins in their respec-
tive tournaments in Santo
Domingo, Dominican Repub-
lic.

The junior Fed Cup team
took their opening round
match over the Dominican
Republic, 2-1.

After Moxey lost her open-
ing round match to Michelle
Valdez (7-5,6-2), Pratt took
her singles effort over Loudres
Bernardez (6-2,6-0) and Mox-





ey and Pratt returned to defeat
Valdez and Pamela Peguero
in doubles.

They won their second series
of the day over Panama, 2-1.

After Moxey lost a hard
fought three set match to Ros-
alie Chavez (4-6,6-0,6-3), Pratt
scored a win over Alma
Espinosa (6-3,6-2) and the duo
took the doubles match over
Chavez and Espinosa (7-5,7-
5)

The team heads group four
which also includes Panama,
Jamaica and the host team
Dominican Republic.

The junior Davis Cup team
swept their opening series
against Jamaica, 3-0.

Major took Rowland
Phillips in straight sets (6-1,7-
6), Cargill won (6-2,6-0) over
Jordan Harris while Major and
Taylor beat Phillips and Joe-



seph Ross in doubles (6-1,6-
ey
They returned later to sweep
Haiti 3-0 in their second series.

Cargill again breezed to an
easy win, (6-2,6-1) over Elize
Delva, Taylor got by Fabibio
Villard (2-6,7-5,6-3), while
Cargill and Major defeated
Delva and Nicolson St Louis in
doubles (6-0,6-3).

The Bahamas heads group
two which also includes
Jamaica, Haiti, and Costa
Rica.

The North/Central Ameri-
can and Caribbean pre-quali-
fying event for both teams will
continue until March 28.

The winning teams for both
the Fed Cup and Davis Cup
squads will join Canada, Mex-
ico and the United States in
the final qualifying event, May
1-3 in Boca Raton, Florida.



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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS


















































THE Hub, a downtown art
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area which many people
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The intent of the mural work-
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which The Hub occupies on
East Bay Street a sorely needed
“facelift.”

The workshop is facilitated by
Margot Bethel, a local artist and
designer with an interest in
advancing the “green move-
ment.”

Her co-facilitator, Suanne
McGregor, is a visiting artist
from Toronto, Canada, who has
designed large-scale indoor and

i outdoor mural art as part of her
T he sig Vi of great things fo eo me extensive professional career.

‘ “We at The Hub are con-
vinced that now is the time to
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 21



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



NY art exhibit takes Chelsea to Havana

m@ By ANITA SNOW
HAVANA

The profiles of President
Obama and a young Fidel Cas-
tro, cut from a flat wooden
board painted red, are unmis-
takable, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

Leaning against the wall of
Havana's Museo Nacional de
Bellas Artes before installation,
the two sides that form "Cas-
trobama" by New York artist
Padraig Tarrant, will be joined
into a single head with Castro
looking to one side and Oba-
ma to the other.

The piece is among more
than 30 often whimsical works
by American artists being
mounted this week for a major
exposition that hopes to ride
the wave of growing support for
better U.S.-Cuba relations
under the Obama administra-
tion. Opening Saturday and
running through May 17, the
"Chelsea Visits Havana" exhib-
it will be the largest collective
display of contemporary Amer-
ican art in Cuba in nearly 25
years.

"Tt would be wonderful if an
opening between the two coun-
tries could start with art,"
Alberto Magnan, the exhibit's
American curator, said as work-
ers inside the exhibition space
used drills and hammers to
open wooden crates containing
the works.

Hopes are high among some
people on both sides of the
Florida Straits for warmer ties
between the United States and
Cuba under Obama. The two
countries have not had diplo-
matic relations for nearly five
decades, and the Bush adminis-
tration significantly tightened
trade and travel restrictions,
making art and other cultural
exchanges increasingly difficult
in recent years.

Coinciding with the 10th
Havana Biennial, the exhibit
includes other images the
Cuban public will recognize.

There's a jigsaw-puzzle por-
trait of Ernesto "Che" Guevara,
called "Black Che,” by
Christoph Draeger. "New
Mount Rushmore," by Long-
Bin Chen, is a sculpture made
with New York City Yellow

Javier Galeano/AP Photo



A WORKER paints a wall next to a sculpture by New York artist Padraig Tarrant called "Castrobama’ at the National Museum of Fine Arts in Havana, Friday, March 20, 2009. The piece is
part of the "Chelsea Visits Havana" exhibit, the largest collective display of contemporary American art in Cuba in nearly a quarter-century.

presidents featured at Mount
Rushmore, plus Obama.

Artist Doug Young, who was
helping open the crates, said he
was installing a Cold Era-style
sculpture of a desk designed by
the U.S. military decades ago
to launch Titan I nuclear mis-
siles. The desk features a huge
white launch button.

"This has been a great chance
to visit Havana, which is like
the South Bronx and Disney-
land all wrapped up into one,”
said the 35-year-old artist,
whose work from the Roebling
Hall Gallery in New York's
Chelsea neighborhood is being
shown outside the United States
for the first time.

The exhibit includes works

by 30 artists from more than
two dozen Chelsea galleries,
including the Jack Shainman,
Loretta Lux, Charles Cowles
and Lehmann Maupin galleries.

Admission

Organizers say thousands of
Cubans and foreign visitors are
expected to see the exhibit dur-
ing its stay. Admission to the
museum is about 4 cents for
Cubans and $5.40 for foreigners.

The show was the idea of
Cuban-born American curator
Magnan, who left the island
when he was 5 and has been
back numerous times in recent
years.

Pages of the four American

The 47-year-old sits on the



m@ By ANDREW WHALEN
LIMA, Peru

A guilty verdict against former Peruvian Pres-
ident Alberto Fujimori in his murder and kid-
napping trial would only strengthen his party in
presidential elections in 2011, his daughter said in
an interview Tuesday, according to the Associat-
ed Press.

Keiko Fujimori, considered a possible front-
runner in the presidential vote at the head of her
jailed father's party, told The Associated Press she
expects her father to be acquitted but that the
opposite verdict would generate solidarity for his
political movement.

"My father's true sentencing will come in the
2011 elections, in which the people will decide if
Alberto Fujimori is innocent or not,” said Keiko
Fujimori, a Peruvian lawmaker who received
more votes than any other congressional candi-
date in the 2006 elections.

The 33-year-old has not officially announced
her presidential candidacy but she said she is
traveling across the Andean nation to build sup-
port for a pro-Fujimori political coalition called
Fuerza 2011, or Strength 2011.

A recent Ipsos Apoyo poll of voting prefer-
ences for 2011 presidential elections showed
Keiko Fujimori in a tie with Lima Mayor Luis
Castaneda, each with 19 percent support. The
poll was conducted in 16 cities and had a margin
for error of 3.1 percentage points.

Alberto Fujimori, 70, faces up to 30 years in
prison on charges of murder and kidnapping for
allegedly authorizing a military death squad
responsible for two massacres and several kid-
nappings in the early 1990s.

He denies authorizing a dirty war against the
Shining Path and its sympathizers, and says he had
no knowledge of death squad activity until after
the massacres.

A verdict by the three-judge panel is expected
next month.

Running for more than a year, the televised
trial has stirred mixed emotions in a country
where many still admire Fujimori and credit him
with leading the country out of an economic cri-
sis and defeating a bloody Maoist insurgency. A
truth commission found that nearly 70,000 people

were killed in the 20-year conflict, almost a third
by the military.

But critics refer to Fujimori's 10-year presi-
dency as "the dictatorship,” a government marked
by corruption and human rights abuses.

A recent Universidad de Lima poll in Peru's
capital found that 71 percent believe Fujimori is
guilty. The poll was published on March 10. It sur-
veyed 6.3 people in Lima with a margin for error
of 4 percentage points.

Fujimori fled to his ancestral Japan in 2000
and faxed in his resignation amid a corruption
scandal involving his spymaster Vladimiro Mon-
tesinos, currently jailed for corruption and run-
ning drugs to Colombian rebels.

Analysts say many Peruvians could see a vote
for Keiko as a vote for a Fujimori presidency
free of the shadow of Montesinos, whom some
believe came to be more powerful than Fujimori

himself.
Mistake

Keiko said the biggest mistake of her father's
presidency was his association with Montesinos,
on whom she pinned the government's corrup-
tion. "Corruption attacked the Fujimori govern-
ment, as it attacked others, but in this case we
would be relentless and never allow that type of
scourge to undermine” a future presidency, Keiko
said.

But critics say Keiko — who served as first
lady after her parents’ divorce — was too close to
his government to start afresh, pointing to alle-
gations that she used taxpayer dollars to pay for
a U.S. college education. Keiko testified before
congress on the charges in 2001, but the allega-
tions were never proven.

Keiko has said in the past that she would par-
don her father if he is found guilty and she wins
the presidency, but she told the AP that a pardon
won't be necessary as she expects him to be found
innocent.

Both sides are expected to appeal the verdict.

"If they find my father guilty, I believe we are
going to see more and more solidarity toward
him, the family and the movement,” Keiko said.

Fujimori's party currently has 13 seats in Peru's
120-member congress.

board of directors of the
exhibit's sponsor, Fundacion
Amistad, a U.S.-based nonprofit
organization that promotes
exchanges and understanding
between Americans and
Cubans.

He and his wife, Dara Metz,
own the Magnan Projects Gal-
ley in Chelsea.

"It's time for a change, espe-
cially now with the new Oba-
ma administration,” Magnan
said. "At least he’s open to
talks."

Obama has said he is open to
discussions between American
and Cuban officials, and during
his campaign promised to lift
travel and remittance restric-
tions on people in the United

States with relatives on the
island. Congress recently passed
legislation, which Obama signed
into law that will allow family
visits to the island every year
rather than every three years.

Because of the United States’
unilateral trade embargo on
Cuba, and other tough restric-
tions, showing any American
art in Cuba is rare.

Lesser works, brought to the
island by the artists in their suit-
cases, sometimes are exhibited.

The exhibit's local curator,
Abelardo Maena, who oversees
the international collection at
the Bellas Artes museum, said
the last group show by Ameri-
can artists in Cuba, "Beyond
the Blockade," was shown at

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in Havana in early 2005.

But that was a solo show.
And because tight enforcement
under President Bush's admin-
istration slowed down approvals
for direct shipment from the
United States, the works had to
be shipped through Canada.

The "Chelsea Visits Havana"
works were shipped directly to
Cuba through Miami early this
month without any significant
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Magnan said.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 23



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Zimbabwe's prime minister
ready to return to work

gm By ANGUS SHAW
HARARE, Zimbabwe

Prices in Zimbabwe have
started to fall after years of dev-
astating inflation that left the
national currency nearly worth-
less — a rare piece of good
news for an economy that
remains a shambles, according
to the Associated Press.

Prices of goods bought in
USS. dollars — Zimbabwe's new
official currency — declined by
3 percent since January, the
state statistical office said Tues-
day.

The figures were announced
as Zimbabwean Prime Minis-
ter Morgan Tsvangirai returned
home after a week in neighbor-
ing South Africa, where he
spent time with his children fol-
lowing his wife's death in a road
crash. He said he was ready to
get back to work.

Until the Zimbabwe dollar
became virtually obsolete in
recent weeks, Zimbabwe's last
official inflation rate in the local
currency was given as 231 mil-
lion percent in August, by far
the highest in the world.

Moffat Nyoni, head of the
Central Statistical Office, said
items priced at an average of
$100 (?73) in January cost $97
(271) this month.

No official annual U.S. dol-
lar inflation figure was calculat-
ed, Nyoni told reporters. And
the situation is complex,
because dollars are not readily
available. But some Zimbab-
weans get money from relatives
or friends working abroad, and
the government recently began
paying civil servants in dollar
vouchers.

The switch to the American
currency in recent months saw
fluctuations in prices slowly
decline through as imported
goods, mainly from South

Easy Credit VO Interest.






Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP Photo

A PORTRAIT of Susan, the late wife of Zimbabwe's prime minister Morgan Tsvangirai, is placed near her cof-
fin during a church service in Harare, Tuesday, March, 10, 2009. Tsvangirai was attending a church service in
memory of his wife Susan who was killed in a car accident last week. Zimbabwe's long history of political vio-
lence blamed on Mugabe's forces fueled speculation that Friday's crash, in which the prime minister was slight-
ly injured, was not an accident. Tsvangirai tried to quell the rumors Monday, saying at a news conference there

was "no foul play" in the crash.

Africa, became more widely
available.

But chronic shortages of hard
currency, food, gasoline and
most basic goods have contin-
ued alongside the collapse of
water, power and public health
utilities. Zimbabwe industries
have reported a decline in pro-
duction of up to 90 percent.

In several years of political
and economic turmoil an esti-
mated 4 million Zimbabweans,
a quarter of the population,
have fled to neighboring South
Africa and to Australia, Europe
and the United States.

The money they send to fam-
ilies at home is cited as the
biggest source of hard currency.

About 7 million Zimbab-

weans — most without access
to hard currency — are receiv-
ing food handouts from foreign
donors and charities in the for-
mer regional breadbasket.
Tsvangirai was sworn in as
prime minister last month under
a unity government deal meant
to end nearly a year of political
impasse. The government has
been troubled from the start,
with its members struggling to
overcome a decade of mistrust.
The death of Tsvangirai's wife
March 6 further slowed the
work of government. Tsvangirai
was slightly injured in the crash.
His deputy, Thokozani Khupe,
has been acting prime minister.
"I'm happy to be back home.
I'm well," Tsvangirai told

reporters Tuesday. "I’m look-
ing forward to getting back for
work." He has a Cabinet meet-
ing Thursday, as well as a ses-
sion with businesspeople to dis-
cuss reviving the tourism indus-
try.

Tsvangirai returned on a
flight that also carried the top
Norwegian development offi-
cial, Eric Solhein. He was begin-
ning a three-day trip during
which he was to talk with
Tsvangirai and other leaders
from the three parties in the
unity government.

"I'm here for international
cooperation following the for-
mation of (the) unity govern-
ment,” Solhein told reporters
at the airport. "We would like



SUPPORTERS cheer Zimbabwe's Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai,
right, during his tour of Harare's main government hospital, in Harare, Zim-
babwe, Friday, Feb. 27, 2009. In his first public appearance since joining
the unity government, the longtime opposition leader toured Harare's main
hospital. On Saturday Tsvangirai will attend a birthday bash for President
Robert Mugabe in a rare show of unity.



A NURSE attends to a patient in Harare's main government hospital, as
Zimbabwe's Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, not seen, visits the ward,
in Harare, Zimbabwe, Friday, Feb. 27, 2009. In his first public appearance
since joining the unity government, the longtime opposition leader toured
Harare's main hospital Friday. Tsvangirai said about US$ 1.5 million is
needed to revamp the rundown hospital. The new coalition government is
faced with the world's highest official inflation rate, a hunger crisis and a
cholera epidemic that has killed nearly 4,000 people since August.

to see the release of political
prisoners and the return of the
rule of law."

The international community
has been helping Zimbabwe
cope with a cholera and hunger
emergency, but withholding sig-
nificant development aid until it
sees President Robert Mugabe
cede real power to Tsvangirai,
his longtime rival.

The United Nations on Tues-
day released updated cholera
data.

The number of cholera cases
and cholera deaths in Zimbab-
we has been falling, U.N. asso-
ciate spokesman Farhan Haq
said at U.N. headquarters in
New York.

While the number is still high,

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the World Health Organization
reported that in the week end-
ing March 14, 2,076 cholera cas-
es were reported, down from
3,812 cases the previous week
and over 8,000 cases per week
at the beginning of February,
he said. The number of fatalities
also decreased from 6 percent
of those infected in January to
2.3 percent in the week ending
March 14, Haq said.

Mugabe, in power since inde-
pendence from Britain in 1980,
is accused of ruining a once
prosperous nation's economy
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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Renewable energy project

could hurt environment



m@ By MEERA SELVA
SLIMBRIDGE, England

In this broad gray estuary,
where thousands of migratory
birds shelter and wildlife lovers
walk, it's a battle of nature ver-
sus future, reports the Associat-
ed Press.

Environmentalists want to
build the world's largest renew-
able energy plant here to gen-
erate clean power, in what
would be Britain's biggest pub-
lic construction project since the
Channel Tunnels were com-
pleted 15 years ago. But con-
versationists want to protect the
mudflats and Atlantic salt
marshes, which sustain ducks,
swans and geese.

The plans for the dam on the
border between England and
Wales highlight the collision of
two environmentally sensitive
goals — protecting wildlife ver-
sus reducing dependence on
fossil fuels. The gigantic scale
of the $28 billion project has
only increased the stakes.

"Birds have been coming
here for generations, " said
James Lees, a gamekeeper at
Slimbridge, a nature reserve the
size of New York's Central Park
on the banks of the Severn
Estuary. "They fly thousands of
miles (kilometers) and know
they can shelter here. It's irre-
placeable.”

The proposed dam, one of a
shortlist of five green energy
proposals, would be made up
of a 10-mile-long (16-kilome-
ter-long) wall built across the
Severn Estuary, a broad stretch
of water that narrows into trib-
utaries meandering through
bucolic villages with names like
Tintern, Dursley and Tenbury
Wells. The wall will hold back
these immense tides, then
release the water through a
series of turbines to generate
electricity.

Some environmental groups
want the government to con-
sider a smaller system of tidal
"reefs" — reversible turbines
placed on the estuary floor to
generate power while the tide
moves in and out.

"Of course we want to fight
climate change. But we want to
fight it with technology that
doesn't destroy natural habi-

| | ee

tat,” said Martin Harper at con-
servation group Royal Society
for the Protection of Birds. "A
lot of people assume the birds
will simply find somewhere else
to go. They won't. It takes them
years to find a feeding ground."

Though small tidal mills have
been used to generate power in
southern England since the
Middle Ages, the potential for
environmental degradation has
hampered further construction
and discouraged larger projects.
A report by the World Energy
Council said there are several
suitable sites in the world, but
large capital costs and environ-
mental impact have made politi-
cians hesitate.

Biggest

The Cardiff-Weston project
would be the biggest of its kind.
Britain plans to derive 15 per-
cent of its energy from renew-
ables by 2020, and a successful
tidal power plan here could gen-
erate up to 8.6 gigawatts of
power or the equivalent of eight
coal-fired power stations — or 5
percent of Britain's needs.

A similar plant at La Rance
in northern France built in the
1960s, is comparable, but the
dam there generates just 240
megawatts of electricity — 35
times less than what Severn
could do.

Since there's little to compare
it to, no one is exactly sure what
the impact of the Severn dam
will be.

The government acknowl-
edges the project could wipe
out nearly 50,000 acres (20,235
hectares) along the estuary but
promises to set land aside else-
where to compensate. Conser-
vationists say much of the land
is irreplaceable, especially at the
Slimbridge reserve, founded 65
years ago by Sir Peter Scott, son
of the famous Antarctic explor-
er.

This peaceful stretch of
marshland about 120 miles (193
kilometers) west of London is
one of the country's most pop-
ular reserves, attracting hun-
dreds on sunny days.

Local birdspotters bring
flasks of tea and sandwiches
wrapped in paper and sit for
hours in wooden hides or sheds,



watching kingfishers and
curlews through the mist. On a
good day, they may see a pere-
grine falcon perched on a rock,
looking out for wigeon and dun-
lin.

Wardens worry that a dam
downstream would disturb the
tides that bring in food for the
60,000 migratory and wintering
birds each year. The Royal Soci-
ety for the Protection of Birds
also says that the dam will harm
the estimated 30,000 salmon
and other fish that swim
through the broad estuary to
reach their spawning grounds
in adjacent rivers.

The dam could also affect
local industry. Around 20 miles
(32 kilometers) down river from
Slimbridge, operators at the
deep-water port in the industri-
al city of Bristol fear the project
could reduce water levels and
limit the number of ships com-
ing in.

"The biggest ships will not be
able to get through,” said
Patrick Kearon at the Bristol
Ports Company, which admin-
isters the port.

"We could look at solutions,
like putting in locks to control
water levels, but they will still be
a deterrent to our customers as
they slow down shipping and
generate delays.”

But others say the case
against the Cardiff-Weston dam
is overstated.

Hydroelectric engineer Tom
Shaw suggests the dam will in
fact take some of the sediment
out of the water and make it
less muddy for birds and ships.

Unwilling to commit to either
side, the government has agreed
to fund further research into
tidal reefs. In the meantime, it
will continue consultations on
other smaller projects, which
include proposals for smaller
dams at narrower points of the
estuary and for tidal lagoons,
or smaller-scale turbines that
operate with less water.

With an election likely next
year, a decision on such a mas-
sive project is unlikely soon.

While the debate rages on,
the moorhens, oyster catchers
and white-fronted geese con-
tinue to waddle and swoop in
the rich Simbridge mud —
while they still can.

SE TO ie

Pakistan's top
judge back after

years of turmoil



Emilio Morenatti/AP Photo

SUPPORTERS of Chief Justice Iftiknar Mohammed Chaudhry dance as he arrives at the Supreme Court com-
pound in Islamabad, Pakistan, Tuesday, March 24, 2009. The Pakistani chief justice whose ouster sparked
tremendous political turmoil made a celebrated return to his office Tuesday following calls for reconcilia-
tion and a strong judiciary by the country's president, who had long blocked the judge's reinstatement.

m@ By NAHAL TOOSI
ISLAMABAD

Pakistan's supreme court chief justice called
for an end to judicial corruption after returning to
bench for the first time in two years — brought
back to resolve a political crisis that showed the
country’s volatility as the fight against terrorism
intensifies, according to the Associated Press.

Judge Iftikhar Mohammed Chaudhry also
faced demands Tuesday to investigate the disap-
pearance of hundreds of people believed detained
by security forces since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist
attacks in the United States.

Chaudhry, hailed by supporters as a fearless
and independent justice, was dismissed two years
ago by then-President Pervez Musharraf, spawn-
ing protests by lawyers that helped oust the U.S.-
backed military ruler in 2008.

Musharraf's successor, Asif Ali Zardari, had
resisted demands to reinstate Chaudhry, appar-
ently out of fears he may examine a deal that
has provided Zardari protection from prosecution
on corruption claims.

Relented



Emilio Morenatti/AP Photo

PAKISTANI POLICE officers escort the Chief Justice
of Pakistan Iftiknar Mohammed Chaudhry, center,
as he arrives at the Supreme Court compound in
Islamabad, Pakistan, on Tuesday, March 24, 2009.

several hundred people believed detained during
Musharraf's rule.

The issue could prove embarrassing to the
United States because some of the missing may
have been turned over to American authorities.
The U.S. Embassy in Islamabad declined com-
ment. The wife of one alleged victim, Zahida
Sharif, said she had new hope that Chaudhry
would investigate the case of her husband, a doc-



? tor who vanished in 2005 in the northwest city of
= Zardari relented this month, but only after ee a ys
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THE TRIBUNE





O In brief

Czech gov.
loses no-
Confidence vote

m@ PRAGUE

THE Czech government
collapsed Tuesday after los-
ing a parliamentary no-con-
fidence vote over its han-
dling of the economic crisis.

It was a huge embarrass-
ment for Prime Minister
Mirek Topolanek, coming
just days before a planned
visit by President Barack
Obama and midway through
the Czech Republic’s six-
month European Union
presidency.

The lower house of Par-
liament voted 101-96 to
declare no confidence in the
three-party coalition gov-
ernment, after four law-
makers broke rank with
their parties and voted with
the opposition. Three legis-
lators were absent from the
vote.

It was the first time a gov-
ernment has been ousted by
parliament since the coun-
try came to existence after
the 1993 split of Czechoslo-
vakia.

Topolanek said he could
resign after a planned trip
to Brussels on Wednesday.
“T take the vote into account
and will act according to the
Constitution,” he said.

There has been no indi-
cation of whom President
Vaclav Klaus might choose

to form a new Cabinet. If

three attempts to form a
government fail, early elec-
tions must be called.
Topolanek’s minority
coalition took charge in Jan-

uary 2007, after months of

difficult negotiations fol-
lowing 2006 general elec-
tions that resulted in no
clear winner.

The government has
struggled to resolve deep
divisions within Parliament
over whether to allow com-
ponents of a U.S. missile
defense shield on Czech ter-
ritory, and whether to adopt
the EU reform treaty to
streamline decision-making
in the bloc.

In recent months, opposi-
tion lawmakers also said
they became frustrated with
the government’s response
to the global economic slow-
down. Before the crisis, the
Czech Republic’s export-
oriented economy had been
growing fast, but the coun-
try is expected to enter a
recession this year. Annual
industrial output fell 23.3
percent in January.

The opposition said the
government acted too late
and did too little — approv-
ing a stimulus package only
last month worth 70 billion
koruna ($3.5 billion), includ-
ing measures for invest-
ments in ecology and infra-
structure along with tax cuts
and loan guarantees.

get food

@ UNITED NATIONS

MORE than one million
people in Darfur will not get
their food rations starting in
May if Sudan and the United
Nations can’t fill gaps left by
the expulsion of more than a
dozen foreign aid groups, a
joint U.N.-Sudanese assess-
ment team said Tuesday,
according to the Associated
Press.

Even if other relief organi-
zations in the region help, those
are “Band-Aid solutions, not
long-term solutions,” John
Holmes, the U.N.’s top human-
itarian official, said.

Sudan expelled 13 foreign aid
organizations and closed three
local ones this month after the
International Criminal Court
in the Netherlands issued an
arrest warrant for President
Omar al-Bashir for war crimes
and crimes against humanity in
the western region of Darfur.

Sudan’s government refuses
to have any dealings with the
court and has accused the aid
groups of collaborating with its
case. The groups deny it, and
they warn of a humanitarian
crisis in Darfur without their
presence.

The U.N.-Sudanese assess-
ment team toured Darfur from
March 11-19 after the groups
were expelled.

About 1.1 million people now
dependent on food aid will not
receive their rations starting in
May if the aid gaps aren’t filled,
the U.N. humanitarian coordi-
nator in Sudan, Ameerah Haq,
said on behalf of the team.

She warned that money will
run out within four weeks for
spare parts and fuel needed to
provide drinking water for
850,000 people.

And more than 600,000 peo-
ple are in danger of not getting
materials needed to build shel-
ters before the upcoming rainy
season, Haq said.

“The risks are high,” Holmes
told reporters Tuesday. “The
key tests still lie ahead.”

He described the summary of
the assessment tour, which had
to be signed by both the U.N.
and Sudan, as a compromise
document — but he denied that
the U.N. was downplaying the
potential dangers to try to mol-
lify al-Bashir.

Holmes said the aid gaps
would not immediately lead to
the deaths of hundreds of thou-
sands of people, but said it is
“something where the issues
build up over time.”

The summary, signed by Haq
and the head of Sudan’s
Humanitarian Aid Commission,
says the government and the
U.N. will continue working
together with existing aid orga-
nizations in Darfur to ensure

South Africa peace
conference postponed
over Dalai Lama

mg JOHANNESBURG

ORGANIZERS shelved a
peace conference meant to
show how sports can bring peo-
ple and nations together
because South Africa’s gov-
ernment — fearing trouble
with China — won’t allow the
Dalai Lama to attend.

South Africa’s soccer offi-
cials and a grandson of Nelson
Mandela, who were putting
Friday’s conference together,
announced Tuesday it was
postponed indefinitely because
the Dalai Lama had been
barred.

The conference had been in
doubt since South Africa’s gov-
ernment said a day earlier the
Dalai Lama was not welcome,
prompting condemnation and a
boycott by retired Cape Town
Archbishop Desmond Tutu
and others.

Queen Rania of Jordan, the
entire Nobel Peace Commit-
tee, other laureates and Hol-
lywood actress Charlize
Theron, a native of South
Africa, had been among those
confirmed to attend.

Friday’s conference was
intended to highlight ways soc-
cer can promote peace, and all
Nobel peace laureates had
been invited, along with world
statesmen and celebrities. Irvin
Khoza, who is chairman of the
South African committee orga-



Ashwini Bhatia/AP Photo

IN this Tuesday March 10,
2009, file photo, Tibetan spiritu-
al leader, the Dalai Lama,
speaks to the media on the 50th
anniversary of the Tibetan
uprising against Chinese rule
that sent him into exile, in
Dharmsala, India.

nizing the 2010 World Cup,
also heads the professional soc-
cer league that was arranging
and funding the conference.

Organizers said they hoped
to hold the event when the
Dalai Lama could attend, and
that they hoped that would be
before the World Cup. South
Africa’s tournament will be the
first in Africa.

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 25

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

“that civilians in need can con-
tinue to receive lifesaving food,
health care, shelter, and water
and sanitation.”

Holmes also said security
remains a top concern after a
39-year-old Sudanese relief
worker was shot dead at his
home in western Darfur on
Monday by gunmen who came
looking to steal satellite phones.

And less than two weeks ago,
three foreign aid workers and
one local colleague were kid-
napped in Darfur by what one
local governor called a group
seeking to retaliate for the
court’s warrant for al-Bashir.
The Doctors Without Borders
workers were released three
days later.

Nicole Widdersheim, head of
Oxfam International’s New
York office, said some of the
places her group worked before
being expelled — such as the
overcrowded Kalma camp in
southern Darfur that houses
88,000 refugees — are facing
severe water shortages.

She said women are lining up
for hours to get tiny rations of
water because only hand pumps
are still working, while over-
flowing waste is increasing the
risk of serious outbreaks of
cholera and diarrhea. When the
rainy season arrives many peo-
ple living in flood-prone areas
will be “at extreme risk” of
death or illness because of flim-
sy shelters and overflowing
latrines, she said.

“Current stop-gap measures
will only be effective for a short
time,” Widdersheim said,
adding that the U.N.-Sudanese
assessment overlooked “enor-
mous gaps and needs in the rest
of northern Sudan.”

~ 1 million in Sudan won’
aid from May



Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
UNAMID force commander Gen. Martin Agwai, center is seen through two peacekeepers as he arrives

at the Kas military base near the southern Darfur town of Kas, Sudan, Tuesday, March 24, 2009. Gen.
Agwai conducted a one day field trip that included two of his operating UNAMID military units in the

Darfur remote towns of Kas and Nertiti.

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PAGE 28, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



mg JERUSALEM

CHANTS of “Disgrace, disgrace!”
echoed through the convention hall as a
divided Labor Party voted to join the
incoming government of Benjamin
Netanyahu, a leading skeptic about talks
with the Palestinians, according to the
Associated Press.

Defense Minister Ehud Barak pushed
through the proposal Tuesday despite
angry opposition from party activists who
feared Labor would give only a superficial
gloss to a government little interested in
moving toward peace.

“We are entering this government ... as
a wagging tail, no more than that,”
declared one opponent, lawmaker Shelly
Yacimovich, warning that joining the coali-
tion would make Labor an accessory to a
coalition of hard-liners.

The decision, by a 680-507 vote, paves
the way for a broader government than
the narrow and hawkish one Netanyahu
would otherwise have had to settle for,
increasing his chances of gaining interna-
tional acceptance and avoiding potential
friction with the Obama administration.

Still, the vote could split the party as
opponents signaled Tuesday they might
join the opposition at the first sign of
Israeli foot-dragging over peacemaking.

Labor’s move gives Netanyahu’s coali-
tion a majority of 66 in the 120-seat par-
liament. Barak was set to remain defense
minister, a key position in the new Cabi-
net, that could allow Labor to promote
peace efforts with the Palestinians.

On the other hand, the expected
appointment of Avigdor Lieberman as
foreign minister could overshadow
Barak’s input. Lieberman is widely per-
ceived as a racist because of his demands
that Israel’s minority Arabs take a loyalty
oath or forfeit their citizenship.

On Tuesday, Jewish extremists
marched through the northern Israeli-



Centrist Lahor joining new Israeli government |

Dan Balilty/AP Photo

A MEMBER of Israel's Labor Party gestures during the speech of leader Ehud Barak, during a meeting of the party's central committee in
Tel Aviv, Tuesday, March 24, 2009. Prime Minister designate Benjamin Netanyahu reached a preliminary agreement Tuesday that would
bring the centrist Labor Party into his coalition, an important step toward moderating the emerging government. Labor Party activists
gathered Tuesday afternoon to vote on the deal, which calls on the government to pursue peace negotiations with the Palestinians.

Arab town of Umm el-Fahm, demanding
residents show loyalty to Israel and setting
off stone-throwing protests by Arab
youths that police dispersed with stun
grenades and tear gas. No serious injuries
were reported, but residents denounced
the march on one of Israel’s largest Arab
communities.

In Israel, the prime minister sets the

tone for his government, and Netanyahu
remains deeply skeptical about negotia-
tions with the Palestinians. The past year
of U.S.-backed talks have produced no
discernible results, because the leadership
of both sides appeared too weak to make
the necessary concessions on vital issues
like borders, refugees and settlements.
Netanyahu claims the Palestinians are

not ready for statehood and suggests eco-
nomic development instead. The Pales-
tinians reject that and have received the
backing of Secretary of State Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton. She emphasized several
times during a visit here this month that
the Obama administration’s goal is cre-
ation of a Palestinian state that would live
in peace next to Israel.

Morocco clamps down on Shiites

@ RABAT, Morocco

MOROCCO’S government is
clamping down on homosexual-
ity and alleged Shiite propagan-
da, saying it will tackle any group
that threatens moral and reli-
gious values in the Sunni Arab
kingdom, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

A weekend statement from
the Interior Ministry about

defending those values came
after Morocco cut diplomatic ties
with Iran and accused it of trying
to spread Shiite Islam in the
North African country.

Several independent media
last week urged Morocco to
grant more freedom of speech
to gay activists. An Interior Min-
istry official, speaking only on
condition of anonymity because
of ministry rules, said Tuesday

that the statement referred to
the promotion of homosexuality.

“Certain media are taking a
stand for certain ignominious
behaviors, which is a provoca-
tion for the national public opin-
ion,” the statement said on Sat-
urday. “Any act contrary to
moral or religious values will be
repressed.”

Though they coincide, the
twin moves against Shiite Islam

A 7
Ts Oar eh

at

‘and B



and gay advocates did not
appear to be related. Earlier this
month, Rabat severed diplo-
matic relations with Iran, accus-
ing the Shiite Muslim republic
of trying to spread its faith in
Morocco.

Rights groups have
denounced the clampdown, say-
ing it is an unusual step for
Morocco — a nation mostly
known for tolerance and open-
ness within the Arab world.

Rights groups say about a
dozen people have since been
arrested in working class neigh-
borhoods of northern Morocco
towns on suspicion they had con-
verted to Shiite Islam.

The Moroccan Association for
Human Rights warned that “the
war being waged by Morocco
against belonging to the Shiite
rite” is against the country’s
strong move recently toward
democracy and civil liberties.

Recent reports in the pro-gov-
ernment press accuse Iran of
using Shiite Islam to undermine
the stability of moderate Arab

states. Several media quoted
unidentified government offi-
cials as alleging Iran is trying to
create a rift between moderate,
pro-U.S. Arab states like Moroc-
co or Saudi Arabia, and more
hardline states like Syria.

Iran’s influence has been ris-
ing in the Arab world, and some
in Morocco worry that Tehran
could use Shiite Islam to pro-
mote its cause. Iran denies this.
The Iranian Foreign Ministry
has said it was surprised at
Rabat’s decision to sever diplo-
matic ties.

On Saturday, authorities
closed down the Iraqi school in
Rabat, the capital. The closure
was triggered by a complaint by
parents complaining the school
was promoting Shiite Islam,
Moroccan media reported.

The school taught about 400
children, mostly Moroccans. The
Education Ministry said in a
statement that the school was
closed because “the pedagogy ...
was contrary to the law” on pri-
vate education in Morocco.

Pm lovin’ it



0 In brief

China calls for
hew global
ClUrrency

| MBEIJING

CHINA is calling for a

? new global currency to
? replace the dominant dollar,
i showing a growing assertive-
? ness on revamping the world
? economy ahead of next
? week’s London summit on
? the financial crisis, accord-
i ing to the Associated Press.

The surprise proposal by

i Beijing’s central bank gov-
? ernor reflects unease about
i its vast holdings of U.S. gov-
? ernment bonds and adds to

Chinese pressure to overhaul
a global financial system
dominated by the dollar and

i Western governments. Both
? the United States and the
? European Union brushed off
? the idea.

The world economic crisis

? shows the “inherent vulner-

abilities and systemic risks in

? the existing international
i monetary system,” Gov.
? Zhou Xiaochuan said in an
? essay released Monday by
? the bank. He recommended
? creating a currency made up

a basket of global currencies
and controlled by the Inter-

national Monetary Fund and
: said it would help “to

achieve the objective of safe-

guarding global economic

and financial stability.”
Zhou did not mention the
dollar by name. But in an

? unusual step, the essay was
? published in both Chinese and
? English, making clear it was
? meant for a foreign audience.

China has long been

uneasy about relying on the

dollar for the bulk of its

? trade and to store foreign
i? reserves. Premier Wen
? Jiabao publicly appealed to
? Washington this month to

avoid any response to the cri-

i sis that might weaken the

dollar and the value of Bei-

i jing’s estimated $1 trillion in
i Treasuries and other U.S.
? government debt.

For decades, the dollar has

? been the world’s most wide-
? ly used currency. Many gov-
: ernments hold a large por-
? tion of their reserves in dol-
i lars. Crude oil and many
? commodities are priced in

dollars. Business deals
around the world are done

in dollars.

But the financial crisis has

i highlighted how America’s
? economic problems — and
? by extension the dollar — can
? wreak havoc on nations

around the world. China is in
a bind. To keep the value of

i its currency steady — some
? say undervalued — the Chi-
? nese government has to recy-
? cle its huge trade surpluses,

and the biggest, most liquid

: option for investing them is
? U.S. government debt.

To better insulate coun-

? tries from the ills of one
? country or one currency,
? Zhou said the IMF should
i create a “reserve currency”
? based on shares in the body
i? held by its 185 member
? nations, known as special

drawing rights, or SDRs.
He said it also should be

? used for trade, pricing com-
? modities and accounting, not
? just government finance.

In Washington, U.S. Trea-

sury Secretary Timothy Gei-
? thner and Federal Reserve

Chairman Ben Bernanke
appeared to dismiss China’s

proposal during a congres-
? sional hearing Tuesday.

The two key U.S. econom-

ic officials were asked by

Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-

} Minn., if they would “cate-
? gorically renounce the Unit-
? ed States moving away from
? the dollar and going to a
? global currency,” and both
? said they would.

And the European Union’s

top economy official said the

dollar’s role as the interna-

i tional reserve currency is
? secure despite China’s pro-
? posal.

“Everybody agrees also

: that the present world reserve
? currency, the dollar, is there

and will continue to be there

for a long period of time,”
? EU Commissioner Joaquin
? Almunia said Tuesday after

a meeting of the European
Commission.
Zhou also called for chang-

ing how SDRs are valued.

Currently, they are based on

i the value of four currencies
? — the dollar, euro, yen and
? British pound. “The basket
? of currencies forming the
i basis for SDR valuation
i? should be expanded to
? include currencies of all major
? economies,” he wrote.



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

THE TRIBUNE

ine

THURSDAY,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



# Bank of The Bahamas

IRB TEHRWMATIOBM AL
MARCH 26.
Online at

BankBahamas Online.com



Ministry rejected
Global’s $150,000
per month offer

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GLOBAL
United in early
2008 offered to
pay the Cus-
toms Depart-
ment $150,000
per month
over a three-
year period in
an attempt to
settle an out-
standing
$4.918 million
tax bill, but this was rejected by
the Ministry of Finance, which
wanted payment in full.

In January 15, 2008, letter to
Customs Comptroller Anthony
Adderley, Global United’s pres-
ident and chief executive, Jack-
son Ritchie, offered to pay the
outstanding customs duty over a
three-year period at an annual
interest rate of 5 per cent, while
the company sought outside
investor capital and financing
to pay off the debt in one lump
sum.

Stating that the non-recurring
balance owed to Customs was
then $4.918 million, Mr Ritchie
wrote: “We have been, and are
still, negotiating with several
funding sources to raise the req-
uisite funds to liquidate this bal-
ance as well as to provide for
working capital for the compa-
ny’s expansion plans.

“We believe that we will
obtain the financing for these
purposes, which we are certain
that we will do during the cur-

rene



Government wanted
payment in full, with
some taxes owed back
as far as 2006, and
claimed real amount
owed was $8m

rent calendar year, at which
time we will retire the amount
of the non-recurring liability to
you. In the meantime, we con-
sider it an urgent priority to reg-
ularise our position with you
until we can accomplish that
objective.”

Outlining his planned pay-
ment schedule, Mr Ritchie said:
“We propose to pay the
Bahamas Customs Department,
via certified cheques, monthly
payments in the amount of
$150,000 each for the period
that will not exceed the current
calendar year.

“The monthly payment is
computed to amortise the entire
amount outstanding - $4.918
million - over three years at an
annual interest rate of 5 per
cent or $147,404 per month. We
will undertake to pay off the
outstanding balance by way of a
lump sum payment, once we
obtain the aforementioned
financing.”

Mr Ritchie added that Glob-
al United had made arrange-
ments for its clients to pay Cus-
toms directly, thus avoiding
remittance delays, while the

SEE page 12B

Ginn denies buyer
lawsuit allegations

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

obby Ginn and

the holding com-

pany behind the

$4.9 billion Ginn

sur mer resort
project have emphatically
denied allegations contained in
a lawsuit filed by seven real
estate buyers at the Grand
Bahama West End project that
they failed to “disclose material
facts” regarding the property
purchases.

In a lawsuit filed in the Mid-
dle District Court of Florida,
the seven lot buyers alleged that
Bobby Ginn, Ginn-LA West
End, Ginn Financial Services,
Stewart Title Company and oth-
ers had failed to disclose that
in acquiring the project’s real
estate from the Grand Bahama
Hotel Company, they “may not
hold” clean title to about 80
acres of the 2,100 acre site.

“The property reports failed
to disclose that Section 7 (d) of
the Grand Bahama Hotel Com-
pany contract provided that
Ginn Development was ‘aware
of the existence of litigation
styled Angela Williams vs
Grand Bahama Properties ltd,
West End Resorts Ltd, Old
Bahama Bay Management Ltd
and Old Bahama Community
Association ltd, and that Ginn
Development ‘agreed to accept
title to the property subject to
litigation’,” the lawsuit alleged.

The property owners also

* Real estate buyers allege company failed
to disclose material facts on title and
financing for West End development

* Claim only funds available were $134m
for canal and infrastructure, and $36m
for golf course, both in escrow

alleged that Ginn failed to
reveal information on its finan-
cial condition, claiming that
“the only funds set aside for the
development of the Versailles
sur mer subdivision consisted
of a $124 million escrow to fund
the remaining canal and infra-
structure, and a $36 million
escrow to complete one golf
course”.

Some of the property owners
alleged that Ginn had either
refused, or failed to acknowl-
edge, their attempts to with-
draw from the real estate pur-
chases and recover their funds.

And the property owners also
alleged that Ginn’s property
reports had failed to provide
information on their likely
Bahamas real property tax lia-
bilities, especially by not includ-
ing annual tax cost estimates.

They claimed that Ginn’s
property reports also failed to
disclose the existence of a $675
million lending facility from a
syndicate put together by Cred-
it Suisse, and the implications

Bahamas ‘now has to find new model’ in financial sector

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas “now has to
find a new model” for its finan-
cial services industry in the

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



wake of yes-
terday’s state-
ment by the
Government
that it was
ready to com-
ply with the
G-20/OECD’s
tax demands,
with its com-
petitors’ rush
to compliance
meaning that
the ‘level play-
ing field’ required for this
nation’s 2002 commitment to
kick-in was now in place.

Michael Paton, a former
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) chairman, yes-
terday told Tribune Business
that Bahamian-based clients
and institutions should not pan-
ic in the face of the new global
regulatory landscape, as there
would be a “transition period”
before any new Tax Informa-
tion Exchange Agreements
(TIEAs) signed by this nation
came into effect.

He urged that the Govern-
ment not rush headlong into
signing purely TIEAs, and

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* Former BESB chair says yesterday’s commitment inevitable, given that

‘level playing field’ condition 2002 position based on had been met
* Says Bahamas ‘had little choice’, and focus must move to repositioning sector
* Urges government to focus on investment, double tax treaties as well as TIEAs
* Industry urged not to panic, as has transition time and no retroactive measures

instead explore how the
Bahamas could maximise reci-
procal benefits from these bilat-
eral arrangements via alterna-
tive agreements, such as invest-

Features:

ment and double taxation
treaties.

SEE page 4B

that a mortgage or lien over the
West End property might have
for them.

“The plaintiff property
reports failed to include mater-
ial facts concerning the manner
of recording a conveyance deed
in the Bahamas and the related
risks to a purchaser,” the lot
owners alleged.

“The plaintiff property
reports fail to inform prospec-
tive purchasers that the con-
veyance deeds for lots pur-
chased in the Versailles sur mer
subdivision were not routinely
recorded until several months
after the closing dates for the
sale of those lots.

“The fact that the conveyance
deeds for lots purchased in the
Versailles sur mer subdivision
were routinely not recorded
until several months following
the closing date for the sale of
those lots was material, because
a reasonable prospective pur-
chaser would consider that fact
important in making a decision
whether to purchase a lot.”



Scotiabank
moves to
flismiss claim
by the Chut
llevelopers

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SCOTIABANK (Bahamas)
has filed a motion to dismiss the
counterclaim filed by the devel-
opers of a $250 million Bahami-
an-based resort project, alleg-
ing that their claims were “in
direct conflict” with the $45 mil-
lion loan agreement they had
guaranteed.

The bank, in its motion to dis-
miss the counterclaim submit-
ted by Walter McCrory and
Bob Moss, two of the principals
behind the Berry Islands-based
Chub Cay resort project,
alleged that both had admitted
executing two agreements at the
heart of the dispute - a $4 mil-
lion payment guarantee, and a
guarantee that the project
should be completed.

Scotiabank (Bahamas)
alleged that in their “scatter-
shot of defences and counter-
claims”, Messrs McCrory and
Moss had based their arguments
exclusively on Florida law,
“seven though the applicable
choice of law under the agree-
ments is the law of the
Bahamas”. The bank and its
attorneys argued that this was
another reason the counter-
claim should be dismissed.

SEE page 12B

‘Drastic changes’
underway at NIB

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE National Insurance Board

Board ‘trying to remove
politics as much as possible’

(NIB) is “changing drastically in the way it does business”, a mem-
ber of its Board told Tribune Business, with its directors “trying to
remove politics” from the way it is governed.

Responding to concerns raised
about NIB’s ability to administer

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Facing the threat from cyber crime

IN the age of Facebook,
MySpace, Twitter and other
social networking websites, and
the increase in identity theft and
credit card fraud involving the
use of computers and computer
programmes, it is important to

recognise the legislative devel-
opments in the Bahamas to
address these issues.

The Computer Misuse Act
2003 was enacted in June 2003,
to be used alongside, in certain
instances, the Data Protection

(Privacy of Personal Informa-
tion) Act 2003, and to provide
for six offences related to or
arising from the unlawful inter-
ference with computers and
their security systems.

The Act is based primarily on

The Annual General Meeting of the
Bahamas Real Estate Association will
be held on Tuesday, March 31st 2009,
at 12:30p.m. The Luncheon will be

held at Poop Deck, West Bay Street.
Luncheon reservations are priced at
$30.00 per person.

The Annual Election of Officers and
Directors will be conducted at the
Annual General Meeting.
Only members in good standing are
eligible to vote in the elections.

For further information you can
contact the BREA’S Office at:

325-4942 / 356-4578



the guidelines for the regula-
tion of computer misuse and
crimes established by the Euro-
pean Council and the Organi-
sation for Economic Coopera-
tion and Development
(OECD), which have been
adopted by about 30 countries
worldwide.

With regard to the six
offences mentioned within the
Act, it is important to note that,
in relation to such offences and
as enforced in other criminal
offences, any attempt, incite-
ment, solicitation, abetment or
conspiracy to commit these
offences will be punishable to
the same extent as the commis-
sion of the full offences under
the Act.

Additionally, it should be
emphasised that the Act applies
to any of the six offences, once
it can be proven that the
accused person was physically
in the Bahamas at the material
time of the offence, or the com-
puter programme or data was
in the Bahamas at the material
time.

Legal proceedings related to
or involving the six offences
may be brought within 12
months of the date that suffi-
cient evidence (in the opinion of
the Attorney General) warrants
prosecution. However, no
action may be brought, under
the Act, three years after the
commission of any of the six
offences.

The offences include the fol-
lowing:

* Unauthorised access to
computer material

* Access with the intent to
commit or facilitate the com-
mission of an offence

* Unauthorised modification
of computer material

* Unauthorised use or inter-
ception of computer service

* Unauthorised obstruction
of use of computer

* Unauthorised disclosure of
access codes

Unauthorised access to

computer material

Any unauthorised person,
who knowingly or deliberately
intends to access information
or programmes held in a com-
puter, with the knowledge that
such access is unauthorised, will
be guilty of this offence and
liable on summary conviction
to a maximum fine of $5,000 or
six months imprisonment or
both for a first offence. In the
case of a second or subsequent
conviction for the offence, the
fine and prison term are dou-
bled. This offence is designed
primarily to prevent and min-
imise the antics and actions of
hackers, whose purpose for
unauthorised access to comput-
er material is mostly recre-
ational.

Access with the intent to

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commit or facilitate the com-
mission of an offence

This offence is committed by
any person who uses a comput-
er to gain access to any pro-
gramme or data held in another
computer, with the intent to
commit an offence (whether by
himself or by any other person)
that may involve property,
fraud, dishonesty or causes bod-
ily harm. This is punishable on
conviction for a term of two or
more years imprisonment.

The access to computer pro-
grammes or data may be autho-
rised or unauthorised, and the
commission of the offence does
not have to occur at the same
time as the access to the pro-
gramme or data.

Any person found guilty of
this offence will be liable on
summary conviction to a maxi-
mum fine of $10,000, three
years imprisonment or both.

Unauthorised modification

of computer material

Any person who deliberately
or knowingly causes the unau-
thorised modification of the
contents of any computer will
be guilty of this offence. This is
notwithstanding the fact that
the data or programme held in
the computer, which may have
been affected by the unautho-
rised modification, was not the
data or programme of the com-
puter that may have been orig-
inally used or targeted by that
person.

The penalty for this offence is
a maximum fine of $10,000, one
year’s imprisonment or both.
On subsequent conviction(s) of
the offence, the fine and prison
term are doubled.

Where damage is caused as
a result of this offence, a person
convicted will be liable to pay a
maximum fine of $20,000 or
face imprisonment for a maxi-
mum term of three years or
both.

Under the provisions of the
Act, “damage” is defined as:
“Any impairment to a comput-
er or the integrity or availabili-
ty of data, a programme or sys-
tem, or information, that causes
economic loss aggregating
$10,000 in value or such other
amount as the Minister may, by
notice published in the Gazette,
prescribe, except that any such
loss incurred or accrued more

a by Tyrone Fitzgerald
ba

than one year after the date of
the offence in question shall not
be taken into account.”

Other definitions include:

* Damage that modifies or
impairs, or potentially modifies
or impairs, the medical exami-
nation, diagnosis, treatment or
care of one or more persons

* Damage that causes or
threatens physical injury or
death to any person

* Damage threatens public
health or public safety

* Damage that threatens
physical damage to a computer

Unauthorised use or inter-
ception of computer service

Any person who knowingly
secures unauthorised access to a
computer for the purpose of
obtaining, directly or indirectly,
any computer service, or inter-
cepts or causes to be intercept-
ed, without authority - directly
or indirectly - any function of a
computer by use of a device for
such interception, or uses or
causes to be used, directly or
indirectly, the computer for the
purpose of committing an
offence involving such access or
interception, will be guilty of
this offence.

The offence carries a penalty
of a maximum fine of $10,000 or
imprisonment for a maximum
term of three years or both.
Upon subsequent conviction of
the offence, there is a maximum
fine of $20,000, a maximum
term of three years or both.
With regard to any damage
caused a result of this offence, a
maximum fine of $50,000 is
required to be paid, imprison-
ment of a maximum term of five
years or both.

Unauthorised obstruction

of use of computer

This offence relates to any
person who, knowingly and
without authority or lawful
excuse, interferes with, inter-
rupts or obstructs the lawful use
or functioning of a computer,
or impedes or prevents access to
any programme or data stored
in a computer.

This particular provision of
the Act is aimed at preventing
and minimising acts of sabotage,

SEE page 6B

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 3B





Tax exchange talks ‘a matter of priority

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT is set
to begin negotiations with coun-
tries requesting Tax Informa-
tion Exchange Agreements
(TIEAs) “as a matter of priori-
ty”, and is committed to adopt-
ing advances in OECD stan-
dards, the Prime Minister said
yesterday.

The Government released its
long-anticipated position state-
ment, effectively pledging to ful-
fill its 2002 commitments and
committing the Bahamas to
greater co-operation on tax
matters and transparency, after
mounting pressure from the
Organisation for Economic
Cooperation and Development
(OECD) and G-20 nations
effectively left this nation with
little choice other than to fol-
low suit.

Mr Ingraham, who is also
Minister of Finance, said that
after meetings with the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB), the Association
of International Banks and
Trusts (AIBT) and the wider
financial services industry, the
Bahamas was prepared to “reaf-
firm its commitment” to engage
in tax information exchange and
OECD standards of trans-
parency.

Aswiftly approaching April 2
G-20 meeting in London is also
likely the reason for the Gov-
ernment’s need to state its posi-
tion on the growing campaign
targeting so called ‘tax havens’.
Other international financial
centres, similar to the Bahamas,
have already committed to
adhering to evolving OECD
standards.

“It is clear that the OECD
standards of transparency and
exchange of information are
being accepted by OECD mem-
ber countries ,and by those non-
member jurisdictions which pro-
vide financial services similar
to those provided in the
Bahamas,” said Mr Ingraham.

The main proponents for the
dismantling of offshore finan-
cial services centres, the US and
UK, have recently heightened
their commitment to extinguish
what they see as tax aversion

PM Hubert Ingraham



harboured by these nations.

International financial cen-
tres have even been fingered as
key players in the global finan-
cial meltdown, though many
believe they are being used by
those bigger countries as
“scapegoats” to blow smoke
over the real issues in their own
countries.

Shortly after Mr Ingraham
completed his address to the
House, the contents of his
speech appeared on foreign
news wires, underscoring the
importance of the Bahamas’
commitment to its responsibili-
ties.

“Tt has always been the posi-
tion of my government that the
Bahamas will be a responsible
member of the international
community. It has always been
the position of my government
that the Bahamas will be a
responsible financial services
centre,” said Mr Ingraham.

A letter from the then-Minis-
ter of Finance, Sir William
Allen, to the OECD secretary-
general in 2002, pledged a will-
ingness on the Bahamas’ part
to engage in greater trans-
parency and tax information
exchange, provided all other
nations adopted the same stan-
dards and timelines. The
Bahamas added that its com-
mitment was contingent on it
not being placed on a list of
“Un-cooperative tax havens,
nor subject to any framework
of coordinated defensive mea-

sures.”

The letter included an annex
that outlined commitments the
Bahamas was prepared to make
incrementally by December 31,
2005.

It stated that: “The Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas
agrees to the effective exchange
of information for criminal tax
matters, which shall become
effective for the first tax year
after 31 December, 2003. As
regards the effective exchange
of information for civil tax mat-
ters, this will become effective
for the first tax year after 31
December, 2005.

“Such exchanges shall be
achieved under negotiated tax
information exchange agree-
ments that require the effective
exchange of information in spe-
cific tax matters pursuant to a
specific request. The tax infor-
mation exchange agreements
will define the tax matters cov-
ered, and include protections
against unauthorised disclosures
or unauthorised use of infor-
mation.

“In a case involving informa-
tion required for the investiga-
tion and prosecution of criminal
tax matters, information shall
be provided without the
requirement that the conduct
being investigated must consti-
tute a crime in the Bahamas.”

The commitments made by
the Bahamas in the letter, to
exchange tax information with
other countries, is at the centre
of the renewed interest in regu-
lating offshore financial centres.
Many OECD jurisdictions say
they are denied millions in tax
revenues each year because
they are hidden in the so called
‘tax havens’.

Mr Ingraham said in his
address that he is satisfied that
the Bahamas has made neces-
sary steps to establish a ‘level
playing field’.

And with other so called ‘tax
havens’ committing themselves
to OECD standards, he
explained: “It is appropriate,
therefore, that the Bahamas
takes this opportunity, as the
OECD and G-20 countries
meet in London, to reaffirm its
commitments to international
standards of transparency and
exchange of information as

Congratulations
Mrs. Coralie Adderley

accepted by, and applied, to all
member countries of the
OECD and to the majority of
financial centres.”

signaled a willingness to in
applying the OECD’s evolving
standards are Austria, Andorra,
Belgium, Monaco, Switzerland,

Isle of Man and Guernsey. And
in this country’s region, the Cay-
man Islands, the British Virgin
Islands and Bermuda.

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PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Public Relations & Corporate Programs

Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and implementation of a
strategic public relations and communication program together with the effective and efficient
planning and execution of all corporate events and activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Assists in the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate Programs plan to
support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;
Oversees the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations programs, plan and

budget;

Assists with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation and where necessary

the wider community;

Prepares and distributes the Corporation’s Annual Report;

Directs press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press releases, photographs,
fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management and media representatives;
Coordinates the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion surveys;
Provides assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in writing speeches,
preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;

Evaluates and assesses customer complaints and queries and disseminates information to
management;

Aids in the development, implementation and management of all external communication
efforts;

Is proactive in identifying opportunities to improve the image of the Corporation to its employees
and in the community at large;

Coordinates Marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the external Public
Relations Firms and the Media;

Identifies and liaises with service providers to secure speakers, presenters and entertainment
for Corporate events;

Liaises with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e. awards, invitations,
prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as necessary and maintain an inventory
of the same;

Prepares and distributes all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices) relative to Corporate
activities, as necessary;

Creates and updates all Standard Operating Procedures for all activities, as necessary;
Ensures timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of bills for all events
and activities as necessary;

Works closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that there is global
publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate activities;
Ensures that websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company newsletter and internal PA
system are used for the communication of information relative to corporate activities/events;

One Snaueday, March 22, Mrs. Corale L. daderley, Chief Hospital Administrator at the Princes Margaret Hospital,

wes inducted asa Fellow in the American College of Healthcare Professionals, an international

nis 7 4 r i a4 wil. bl ‘ i i Pr | oa Og
profesional society of rmare than 30,00 healthcare executives mina send inespitals anid healthcare system,

ACHE is known for its prestigions credentialing and educational programs and has nore than 80 chapters. In
addition to years of experience in healthcare management, applicants mast pas the Botrd of Governors
Exonination ox Healthcare Management te become a Fellow. Fellows ave described ax leaders in their

organizations and the field. They are actively imvotven in healthcare and civic organizations,

Mis, Adderley began her professional career at the Princess Margaret Hospital in 1986, She bas alto svorbed at Job requirements include:

m I-J 1.3. . a] I vs - ~or r PP J .
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre; and as C ‘hie| Operating Cificer at Doctors Hospitat far a nnmber of years, A-piinniianicde a Bachetots deeteetin pablie:Retouans/ euinatinniMameine Busnes
Administration/Business Communication, or equivalent.

A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisory/Management level.
Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform to prescribed
style and format;

Ability to effectively present information to senior and Executive management and public
groups;

Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing
Experience in managing special events and activities

Excellent time management and organizational skills

Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills

Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications.
Good analytical skills.

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability

graduate of Andrews Academy, Berrien Springs, Mu higan: Mrs, Adderley obtained a Bachelor's snd Master's
degree it Hospital Aaministration from Florida International University.

Born in South America to Bahamian missionary parents, Des. Wendell and Alther McMillen, Mrs. Addertey
enjoys serving reals, and sharing her avealth of experience with staff colleagues, and ber two siblings, Mrs, Laurel
Long, Aasistamt Vice President for Human Resonces at the University of Alabama, and Wendell R. McMillan If
Mis, Adderley has devoted ler enitive professional lie 0 the delivery of quality healthvare, She is married to Esha

Adderley.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The
Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: April Ist, 2009.

Congratulations Coralie, H’e love yaw!





PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



T= 1" =) | =<~)~
‘now has to find new model in financial sector

Bahamas

FROM page 1B

Mr Paton said the Bahamas
“had little choice” but to fol-
low other international finan-
cial centres in announcing it
would enhance co-operation on
greater transparency and tax
information exchange, given
that its main rivals - Switzer-

land, Luxembourg, Singapore,
Hong Kong, the Cayman
Islands and Bermuda et al - had
already done so.

This meant, he explained,
that the condition the Bahamas
had set in its 2002 letter to the
Organisation for Economic Co-
Operation and Development
(OECD), which was for there to
be a ‘level playing field’ on tax

KINGSWAY ACADEMY
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matters among all jurisdictions
before it provided greater co-
operation, was now in place.
“T think the Government
really had little choice, as our
2002 commitment was a valid
commitment, subject to valid
conditions being met,” Mr
Paton told Tribune Business.
“T think that has been met,
in that competitor countries
have endorsed the OECD’s
standards for transparency and
information exchange. It came
to the point where we were
called upon to fulfill our 2002
commitment, and now we have
to do so. The die was cast in

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Mr Paton said the fulfillment
of the ‘level playing field’ con-
dition, where all countries
would commit to and imple-
ment the same standards at the
same time, had - at the end -
“come a lot quicker than some
of us had thought”.

The rush was caused by a
combination of pressures,
including President Barack
Obama’s ascendancy to the
White House, which placed
renewed momentum behind the
Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act he
sponsored as a senator and the
OECD’s ‘harmful tax practices’

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drive. Then there was the glob-
al financial crisis, and the scape-
goating of international finan-
cial centres by other G-20
nations, particularly the UK,
France and Germany, for this.

Mr Paton added: “It doesn’t
surprise me that that is the deci-
sion they [the Government]
took today. I think the indus-
try now has to come out and
support that.

“T think we would have found
ourselves very isolated had we
not supported the endorsement
[of OECD/G-2- tax information
exchange/transparency stan-
dards]. The challenge for us
now is to develop a strategic
plan for how the Bahamas posi-
tions itself in this new environ-
ment, because I believe we still
have an opportunity for the
Bahamas to position itself as a
strong international financial
centre in the Western Hemi-
sphere.”

In his address to the House of
Assembly, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said the Gov-
ernment intended to enter
negotiations with nations who
had made outstanding requests
for TIEAs with the Bahamas
“as a matter of priority”.

The OECD has already made
noises about creating another
‘blacklist’ for countries who
have not entered 12 or more
TIEAs with its members, and
the Bahamas to date has only
signed one such agreement with
the US.

The Bahamas public position,
published yesterday, said: “The
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas notes significant
recent progress towards the
adoption of standards on tax
transparency and information
exchange set by the Organisa-
tion for Economic Co-opera-
tion and Development.

“The Bahamas reaffirms its
commitment recorded ina
March 2002 agreement between
The Bahamas and the OECD.

“The Bahamas recognises sig-
nificant advances in commit-
ments to broader application of
OECD standards of trans-
parency. The Bahamas is ready
to negotiate and conclude
appropriate arrangements to
accommodate these OECD
standards.”

Mr Paton told Tribune Busi-
ness that despite the inevitable
long-term changes this would
mean for the Bahamas’ inter-

national financial services mod-
el, he was looking at the situa-
tion from a ‘glass half full, not
half-empty’ viewpoint.

While the Bahamas had to
move with “haste” to craft a
strategy for its medium and
long-term repositioning, the for-
mer BFSB chairman said this
nation should not rush, like the
Isle of Man had done, into sign-
ing just TIEAs with anyone
who presented themselves.

Suggesting that the Bahamas
also seek investment treaties
and double tax treaties, Mr
Paton added: “There should be
room to negotiate bilateral
agreements in good faith, which
would give the OECD states
what they want and what the
Bahamas wants and needs. It’s
not a one-size fits all TIEA that
we should be forced to accept.

“T think there’s going to be
some uneasiness and tension,
but at the end of the day the
decision was pre-made in 2002.”

Mr Paton added that it would
take time for the Bahamas to
agree any new TIEAs, and
there would then be a transi-
tion period before they came
into effect. Nor would they be
retroactive, he said, pointing to
the US TIEA, which came into
effect from criminal matters two
to three years after it was
signed, with civil matters tak-
ing effect after another three
years.

“The message to go out to
clients and banks is that there is
a transition period, your past
affairs are protected. It’s a ques-
tioning of positioning for the
future. We now have to swim
in a brave new world.”

Had the Bahamas not made a
public position statement, Mr
Paton said this nation may “find
ourselves in a league of nations
we would not want to find our-
selves in”.

He added: “We in the
Bahamas have always regard-
ed ourselves as a top tier finan-
cial centre, and that does come
with obligations. We rode the
old model as long as we could,
and now have to find a new
model, which I’m confident we
can.

“Tm not a pessimist. I’m san-
guine about the future. We just
have to buy into a new business
model. It would not be good if
people come out and criticise
now, because the choice was
made years ago.”

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New
Providence and the Family Islands including Grand
Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the Purchaser”) now invites
sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from
schools in accordance with the provisions of the Education Act. Bid
forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of
Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00

p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the

subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Tuesday, 31 March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday, 7" April, 2009 at the address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-1530





THE TRIBUNE



Commission manager
passes securities exam

AN assistant manager for
market surveillance at the
Securities Commission of the
Bahamas, Narissa L. Taylor,
has passed the Canadian
Securities Course (CSC)
exams after studying at the
Nassau-based Securities
Training Institute (STI).

Ms Albury, STIs course
administrator, said: “The CSC
provides a very comprehen-
sive coverage of investment
products and markets, and can
provide a gateway to a
rewarding career in financial
services.”

® Ms Taylor is pictured with
Michael Miller, director of
STI Global Education.

‘Drastic

FROM page 1B

the Government’s proposed
unemployment scheme, given
the difficulties it has in coping
with its existing benefits pack-
age, Brian Nutt said: “I really
feel the National Insurance
Board is changing drastically in
the way it does business, the
checks and balances being put
in place, and it’s moving in the
right direction.”

Mr Nutt, who is also the
Bahamas Employers Confeder-
ation’s (BECon) president, said
that when the unemployment
benefit scheme was presented
to the press last week, he felt
the way in which Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham referred to
Patrick Ward, the current NIB
chairman, was significant.

“One of the things I found
interesting is that the Prime

Minister said Mr Ward was the
first non-politician to chair
NIB,” Mr Nutt said. “[?’'m on
the Board, and can say that all
the Board members are look-
ing at NIB as a business.

“We try to remove politics as
much as possible from the
Board. A number of initiatives
are being taken to improve
management.”

He added: “I think progress is
being made. There’s still a long
way to go, but in the adminis-
tration of the NIB, and the
work of employees, you’re
going to see some improvement
for some time to come.”

Under the proposed unem-
ployment benefit scheme, ben-
efits will be paid two weeks in
arrears. This means that, if the
scheme comes into effect on
April 20, the first benefits would
be paid on May 4, 2009.

The proposed scheme,
although initially financed by

A peel of poor life ond Me Balemar aoe 17
er tt meu ard

Anniversary

ale

March 27th -April 1st, 2009



changes’ underway at NIB

$20 million transferred from the
National Insurance Board’s
(NIB) medical benefits branch,
and supplemented by the Gov-
ernment’s consolidated fund if
needed, will in the long-term be
financed by employer/employee
contributions.

These will be split 50/50
between employer and employ-
ee, and in total be equivalent
to 1 per cent of the insurable
wage ceiling. Given that current
NIB contributions were 8.8 per
cent, split 5.4 per cent/3.4 per
cent between employer/employ-
ee, Mr Nutt said the unemploy-
ment benefit contribution
would take this to 5.9 per
cent/3.9 per cent or 9.8 per cent
in total.

Tribune Business has
obtained a copy of the proposed
amendments to the National
Insurance Act, and its accom-
panying Benefits and Assistance
Regulations, which indicate the

%

off

* Except on red tagged and net items

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 5B

NOTICE

Deum ic cm ra emu Ml

Please be advised that the Master Treasurer, Sir George Newman,
eerolere NOR ORV Cia Amt U enema mmr aun le rAulice

A Lecture/Dinner Gala is scheduled for Friday, 3rd April 2009,
at the Balmoral Club, Stanford Drive @ 7pm Sharp.

All members are asked to contact:
PSECU El Rew P eee ee Bm atm ORE LOE]

To: Clients of the late

David Bethel

Please contact the

Bahamas Bar Association

Office at telephone:
242-326-3276

TYREFLEX
STAR MOTORS

Will be

unemployment benefit scheme
and its attendant reforms are
more wide-ranging than previ-
ously revealed.

For instance, workers who
are “kept on short-time” and
suffer a loss of employment
earnings - meaning workers
working a reduced work week -
where their income is reduced
to less than half their average
insurable weekly earnings, will
receive unemployment benefit.

And when employers termi-
nate an employee’s service, they
will expose themselves to a $500
fine and summary conviction if
they fail to complete the appro-
priate NIB-approved form, or
fail to give it to the employee of
send it to the Board within one
week of the termination date.

Any continuing failure to
comply will result in the
employer incurring a $200 per
day fine for each day the
form(s) are outstanding.

CLOSED on FRIDAY
MARCH 27th, 2009.

For the funeral of
Mr. James Knowles.

We will reopen
for business as usual on
MONDAY, MARCH 30th, 2009.



Housewares
China & Gifts

Home Decor

Stationery
Lawn & Telco Tp
Linens 4 FRE

Ba by Balloons
Paint

Toys

We would like to thank our valued
CERAM LULL ML Ca
PO OMe TR 4

Great Years... Thanks!
House,

ie VE mote

Mall at Marathon
Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:00pm

Tel: oo 393-4002 teed 9:00am-9:00pm

. & Candies

Hoppy
Kelly

“The Easter Bunny”
Saturday March 28th
Ipm - 4pm

Fax: (242) 393-4096 asa

n
Senne ater ee ce





PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Facing the threat from cyber crime

FROM page 2B

and the introduction of com-
puter viruses to computer sys-
tems.

The penalty for this offence is
a maximum fine of $10,000, a
maximum term of three years
imprisonment or both. Upon

subsequent conviction for this
offence, there is a maximum
fine of $20,000, a maximum
term of five years imprisonment
or both.

Any damage which may
result from such an offence will
require payment of a maximum
fine of $50,000, a maximum

term of five years imprisonment
or both.

Unauthorised disclosure of
access codes

Any person who, knowingly
and without authority, discloses
any password, access code or
any other means of gaining

access to any programme or
data held in a computer, for
wrongful gain, an unlawful pur-
pose or disclosing such infor-
mation knowing that it is likely
to cause wrongful loss to any
person, will be guilty of this
offence.

The penalty for this offence is




























Legal Notice

NOTICE
PEORIA INVESTMENTS PTE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
XETTERIDGE INVESTMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 12th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas. Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

VACANCY NOTICE

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the position of
Director, responsible for the operations, development and execution of strategic and tactical plans of its
Customer Service Department.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

The successful candidate is expected to manage the account activities of approximately 30,000
customers, including metering, billings, credit, collections and a 24-hour call center.

The applicant must have strong communication, problem solving and trouble shooting skills with
demonstrated decision-making ability and leadership.

Applicants must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Accounting or Equivalent;
5 years supervisory experience in billing and collections in a high volume utility environment, banking
or its equivalent and a track record of reducing arrears.

Qualified applicants may apply to:-

THE DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES
GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMITED
P.O. BOX F-40888
KLE Co UM ree mms rien
OR BY EMAIL: hrdept@gb-power.com

wy

CRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY
iia (aoe Saar | Aaa Sagal

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS
MARCH 31, 2009

Favny Fay

eh A) ze

Saturday, April 18th 2009

REGISTER NOW!

Te leo hoe
Cate of Birth

Shit sire (cece ore) Sma Mein

Lange Funning ( |
et

Emergency Goniaci: Name, Telephone

PF a

ROUTE: Starting at Tropical Shipping, head east on East Bay 351; over the west bridge
io the east bridge; back to Nassau; East on East Bay St: South on Village Ad_; Wasi on
Shiney St; North on Victoria Ave.; East on Bay Street ending al Tropical Shipping.

dee eRe asl e Ma Me Re Me me seers te Ms MM Tel Ma eT}

Wares! decline ac wernt ted! een poyslom lyin io partic pate in Tropica! Shipping’ Fun Ao Walk aod rays not Seen ested
Gliheruvige by eo medical practtio mer, The underi greed on behat of te perticipeant andthe perticipea d's person! representatives
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related te the Fun ak The unceegaed on behal of particinet andthe participants perboral reprmeseriaives, aasigrae
rere @ md eae ul OC8 AS tive (ign bo cue, neteaped ly af losseg ad derages tna ange Irom ery i Die Dearie oO
the pertecipant's property or regulting in the participant's death in respect of this Fun Aun'Vietk. The participant is fully eeere
of the fee ed heed isheerecd in perticipatins inthe Fon Rowe acd elects te volurtarty compete anc sepume a) thee
reg

aT.
ary to

a maximum fine of $10,000, a
maximum term of three years
imprisonment or both. Upon
subsequent conviction, a maxi-
mum fine of $20,000 or a maxi-
mum term of five years impris-
onment or both.

The Act also makes provision
for more severe penalties in
instances where an offence
under the act involves a “pro-
tected computer” (meaning a
computer used for security,
defence, international relations,
law enforcement, communica-
tions infrastructure, public util-
ities, medical or essential ser-
vices). The penalty in such
instances will be a maximum
fine of $100,000, a maximum
term of 20 years imprisonment
or both.

The Act also gives the police
wide powers of search and
seizure (inclusive of access to
information and computers
involved in the offence), under
certain specified conditions, and
the court has the power to order
forfeiture of any property that
was in possession or under the
control of a person convicted
on an offence under the Act.
This is particularly where such
property was used or intended
to be used for the purpose of

committing or facilitating the
commission of the offence.

©2005. Tyrone L.E. Fitzger-
ald. All rights reserved.

NB: The information con-
tained in this article does not
constitute nor is it a substitute
for legal advice. Persons reading
this article and/or column, gen-
erally, are encouraged to seek
the relevant legal advice and
assistance regarding issues that
may affect them and may relate
to the information presented.

Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an
attorney with Fitzgerald &
Fitzgerald. Should you have any
comments regarding this arti-
cle, you may contact Mr Fitzger-
ald at Suite 212, Lagoon Court
Building, Olde Towne Mall at
Sandyport, West Bay St., P. O.
Box CB-11173, Nassau,
Bahamas or at tyrone@tle-
fitzgeraldgroup.com.

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



Legal Notice

NOTICE
MMVIII VERITAS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PREMIER STAR INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

PVA IN
Oi

Bahamasair Employees
Provident Fund

will be held on
Tuesday, April 28th, 2009

at

The Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Worker’s Union
Building
WORKER’S HOUSE at 7:30p.m.

Important matters, including the External
Audit Report for 2008 will be discussed

ALL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO ATTEND



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 7B





White House looks for
3.6trn budget support

m@ By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The White House sought yes-
terday to stress the positive in a
looming fight with Congress
over a $3.6 trillion budget, saying
blueprints put forth by Democ-
ratic allies hew closely to Presi-
dent Barack Obama’s priorities.

Budget director Peter Orszag
told reporters that companion
fiscal 2010 blueprints emerging
from the House and Senate bud-
get panels will bolster adminis-
tration efforts to give a higher
priority to education and clean
energy programs as well as tak-
ing into account Obama’s desire
to overhaul health care.

Obama has been hearing
increasingly vocal opposition to
the blueprint he sent to Con-
gress last month, however, and
he arranged to travel to Capitol
Hill later Wednesday to meet
with Democrats. Some of the
Opposition on spending, partic-
ularly, has come from moderate
to conservative members of his
own party. For their part,
Republicans have almost uni-

versally assailed his spending
plan as overly ambitious, saying
that it would dump trillions in
debt on future generations.

The budget panels, in fact,
submitted plans that would dis-
card Obama’s signature $400 tax
credit for most workers after it
expires at the end of next year.
According to their budget out-
line, that tax break could only
be extended if other taxes are
raised to pay for it.

In a conference call with
reporters in advance of Obama’s
Hill visit, Orszag said the pro-
posals coming from the budget
panels mirror Obama’s. And he
said the administration was
studying ways to simplify the
U.S. tax code, seeking to close
loopholes with an eye toward
further budget savings.

Meanwhile, House Minority
Whip Eric Cantor charged that
Obama’s budget is “so far out
of the mainstream” that even
members of Obama’s own party
are reluctant to support it.

The Virginia Republican said
it puts too many taxes on busi-
nesses and said that policymak-
ers must “provide relief to the

www.atlanticmedicalfunwalk.com

job creators.”

Both the House and Senate
budget chairmen have been
forced by worsening deficit esti-
mates to scale back Obama’s
requests for domestic programs,
while deeply controversial rev-
enues from his global warming
initiative won’t be included
either.

Senate Budget Committee
Chairman Kent Conrad, D-
N.D., announced a budget blue-
print Tuesday that would scrap
Obama’s signature tax cut after
2010 while employing some
sleight of hand to cut the annual
budget deficit to a sustainable
level.

Conrad promises to reduce
the deficit from a projected $1.7
trillion this year to a still-high
$508 billion in 2014. Along the
way, the Senate plan would have
Obama’s “Making Work Pay”
tax credit, delivering $400 tax
cuts to most workers and $800 to
couples, expire at the end of
next year. Those tax cuts were
included in Obama’s stimulus
package.

In the House, Budget Chair-
man John Spratt Jr., D-S.C., said

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NAME:

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his companion blueprint would
employ fast-track procedures to
allow Obama’s overhaul of the
USS. health care system to pass
Congress without the threat of a
GOP filibuster in the Senate.

Democrats point out that
Obama inherited an unprece-
dented fiscal mess caused by the
recession and the taxpayer-
financed bailout of Wall Street.
Rather than retrenching, how-
ever, they still promise to award
big budget increases to educa-
tion and clean energy programs,
while assuming Obama’s plans
to overhaul the U.S. health care
system advance.

“The best way to bring our
deficit down in the long run is ...
with a budget that leads to broad
economic growth by moving
from an era of borrow and
spend to one where we save and
invest,” Obama said in a Tues-
day night news conference.

It’s also becoming clear that
Obama’s controversial global
warming initiative has experi-
enced a setback, as neither
House nor Senate Democrats
are directly incorporating into
their budget plans Obama’s con-

troversial “cap-and-trade” sys-
tem for auctioning permits to
emit greenhouse gases.

Obama’s budget has ignited a
firestorm on Capitol Hill, with
Republicans assailing it for
record spending and budget
deficits. Democrats are gener-
ally supportive, though some
have sticker shock over the
deficit figures.

Conrad’s plan was released in
the wake of new Congressional
Budget Office estimates that
predicted Obama’s plan would
produce alarming estimates of
red ink — $9.3 trillion over 10
years and a deficit of $749 billion
in 2014. Obama’s budget
promises a $570 billion deficit
in that year, and to get below
that figure Conrad was forced
to make a series of difficult
choices.

Conrad said his budget makes
room for Obama’s hopes to
deliver health care to the unin-
sured. He said the plan would
not add to the deficit over the
long haul.

In grappling with the deficit,
Conrad would cut Obama’s pro-
posed increases for next year for

domestic agencies funded by
lawmakers to growth of about
$27 billion, or 6 percent. Over
five years, the savings from Oba-
ma’s budget would be $160 bil-
lion.

But Conrad also makes sev-
eral shaky assumptions, espe-
cially that Congress will raise
taxes by about $114 billion over
2013-14 to make sure middle-
class taxpayers won’t get hit by
the alternative minimum tax. He
also saves $87 billion by promis-
ing Congress will come up with
spending cuts or new revenues
to avoid cuts in Medicare pay-
ments to doctors.

Both problems have been
fixed in recent years by using
deficit dollars.

Under Congress’ arcane pro-
cedures, the annual congres-
sional budget resolution is a
nonbinding measure that sets
the terms for follow-up legisla-
tion.

Neither budget includes Oba-
ma’s $250 billion set-aside for
more bailouts of banks and oth-
er firms.

Cantor was interviewed on
NBC’s “Today” show.

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PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE




























































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[—~SCSéUSINESS.
White House seeks

rapid firm collapse
legislation

Bm By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

THE administration wants
Congress to act quickly on leg-
islation that would give it
sweeping new powers to seize
financial firms whose collapse
could jeopardize the U.S.
economy, Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner said
Wednesday.

In a speech in New York,
Geithner said the country
should never again be faced
with having to choose between
a meltdown of the financial
system and massive taxpayer
bailouts.

The new legislation, which
Geithner said will be sent to
Congress this week, would
give the administration the
power to take over financial
institutions like troubled insur-
ance giant American Interna-
tional Group Inc.

That would give the admin-
istration the same authority to
seize nonbank financial com-
panies as federal regulators
have with insolvent banks.

“One of the key lessons of
the current crisis is that desta-
bilizing dangers can come
from financial institutions
beyond banks, but our current
regulatory system provides few
ways to deal with these risks,”
Geithner said in remarks to
the Council on Foreign Rela-
tions.

In response to a question,
Geithner said he had not seen
arecent article by the head of
China’s central bank, Zhou
Xiaochuan, in which he called
for a new currency to eventu-
ally replace the dollar as the
world’s major reserve curren-
cy. But Geithner praised Zhou
and said he looked forward to
reading the article. Those com-
ments immediately sent the
dollar plunging on world cur-

rency markets.

In an effort to contain the
damage, Roger Altman, a for-
mer deputy Treasury secretary
in the Clinton administration,
asked Geithner later to clarify
his comments, asking if he had
meant to imply that the dollar
should no longer be the
world’s major reserve curren-
cy.
Geithner said he did not see
any immediate change in the
dollar’s position. “I think the
dollar remains the world’s
dominant reserve currency and
I think that it is likely to
remain (in that position) for
some time,” he said.

The House Financial Ser-
vices Committee could take up
the new financial regulatory
legislation as early as next
week. The administration is
hoping to use the public out-
rage over $165 million in
bonuses provided to AIG,
after it had received more than
$180 billion in government
support, to win congressional
approval for the new powers.

Geithner is scheduled to tes-
tify before the House commit-
tee on Thursday and will out-
line the administration’s pro-
posals for an overhaul of the
entire financial regulatory
structure. The legislation will
seek to limit risk-taking at
firms that could set off severe
damage and will raise regula-
tory requirements to make
sure banks have sufficient
resources to withstand an eco-
nomic downturn, he said.

The administration in the
coming weeks also will pro-
pose new and stronger rules to
protect consumers and
investors against financial
fraud and abuse.

“These will help us deal in
the future with threats like the
practices in subprime lending
that kicked off the current cri-
sis,” Geithner said.

GEOPAK SERVICES
LIMITED (MIDAS)

Will be

CLOSED on FRIDAY
MARCH 27th, 2009.

For the funeral of
Mr. James Knowles.

We will reopen
for business as usual on
SATURDAY, MARCH 28th, 2009.

IOM International Organization for Migration
OIM Organisation Internationale pour les Migrations
OIM Organizacion Internacional para las Migraciones

Vacancy Announcement

The International Organization for Migration is
seeking a highly qualified National Officer to head
its new program in Nassau, Bahamas. The
incumbent will manage a program to promote
reintegration of recently returned Bahamian nationals.
The successful candidate will have a University
degree, preferably in Political Science, Law,
International Affairs, psychology or social work; a
minimum of eight years of relevant experience
required, preferably in the area of social work and
program management; strong writing abilities and
a good background in program administration
desirable. Salary commensurate with responsibility

and experience.

For a full description of the position please visit:
www.iom.int/unitedstates/vacancies/vacancies.htm

Please submit your CV and a letter of interest to
VNO209Bahamas@iom. int



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 9B



a | 2.
EU chief: Obama economic plans ‘a road to hell’

@ By RAF CASERT
Associated Press Writer

STRASBOURG, France
(AP) — The president of the
European Union slammed
President Barack Obama’s
plans to have the U.S. spend its
way out of recession as “a road
to hell,” underscoring Euro-
pean differences with Wash-
ington ahead of a crucial sum-
mit next week on fixing the
world economy.

Other European politicians
kept their distance from the
blunt remarks by Czech Prime
Minister Mirek Topolanek, with
some reproaching the Czech
leader for his strong language
and others reaffirming their
good diplomatic ties with the
US

Topolanek, whose country
currently holds the rotating EU
presidency, told the European
Parliament on Wednesday that
Obama’s massive stimulus
package and banking bailout
“will undermine the liquidity of
the global financial market.”
European governments, led
by France and Germany, say
the focus should be on tighter
financial regulation, while the
USS. is pushing for larger eco-
nomic stimulus plans — but



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

THI



nobody has so far escalated the
rhetoric to such strident levels.

Topolanek’s remarks are the
strongest criticism so far from a
European leader as the 27-
nation bloc sticks to its position
that its member countries are
already spending enough to
stimulate demand.

The remark highlights the dif-
ficulties leaders may face com-
ing up with a common approach
at the April 2 summit in Lon-
don among leaders of the
Group of 20 industrialized and
leading developing countries.

The host of the summit,
British Prime Minister Gordon
Brown, praised Obama on
Tuesday for his willingness to
work with Europe on reforming
the global economy in the run-
up to the G-20 summit.

The United States plans to
spend heavily to try and lift its
economy out of recession with a
$787 billion economic stimulus
plan of tax rebates, health and
welfare benefits, as well as extra
energy and infrastructure
spending.

To encourage banks to lend
again, the government will also
pump $1 trillion into the finan-
cial system by buying up trea-
sury bonds and mortgage secu-
rities in an effort to clear some



of the “toxic assets” — deval-
ued and untradeable assets —
from banks’ balance sheets.

Topolanek, whose govern-
ment lost a vote of confidence
Tuesday but who will remain
EU president until a new Czech
government is established,
bluntly said that “the United
States did not take the right
path.”.

He slammed the U.S.’ widen-
ing budget deficit and protec-
tionist trade measures — such
as the “Buy America” policies
included in the stimulus bill,
although Obama has said he
Opposes protectionism in prin-
ciple.

Topolanek said that “all of
these steps, these combinations
and permanency is the road to
hell.”

“We need to read the history
books and the lessons of histo-
ry and the biggest success of the
(EU) is the refusal to go this
way,” he said.

“Americans will need liquid-
ity to finance all their measures
and they will balance this with
the sale of their bonds but this
will undermine the liquidity of
the global financial market,”
said Topolanek.

Since the EU presidency is
expected to always to take the

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CRANLEIGH PROPERTIES LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, CRANLEIGH PROPERTIES LIMITED, has
been dissolved and struck off the Register according to
the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar

General on the 18th day of March, 2009.

Simon John Harman
Equity Trust House
29-30 The Parade
St. Helier, Jersey,
JE1 1EQ
Liquidator

i, Fldaarees Thevslopeneat Mak

BA HLALAS COHAMBPER OF COMALERCE, LLS. EMBASSY &
BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK PRESENT

THI

BUSINESS EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009 + &:00a.m.-2:30p.m. * The British Colonial Hilton



AGENDA

REGS TRATION NETW ORR ING

IWC ATIC, PRAY EDR &
NATIONAL ANTHEMS.

INTRODUCTION & hiODER ATOR

11:30 =PANEL DISCUSSION Il

* SURI VINNG THE ECONO iC

RECESSION"

* Ken Keer (Providence Ady ios)
* Barry Malcolm (Seonabank Saban fed}

* Philip Simeon, Executive Oyector

fatannas Chantbeys of Commence

WELCOME REMARKS
* Dienrale DiAguiee, President
fahanras Chanrbey of Gonmernce
+*Dorron Cosh, Ghainan
Saharnas Deve dornear Bonk

* Janes Somith (Colin Fluor tal Advisors)

LUNCHEON PRESENTATION

“THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC THREAT! THE
GLOBAL ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY!"

« Tine hy 2ifiga-Grown, Change”

a Affairs}. U5, Ennely

* REASONS TO RENCE IN RECESSION’
+ Gregery Bethel, Presider,

Figtel Ay Paral

COFFEE BREAK

PANEL DISCUSSION

*Renald Langston, Fone) National
Orectorolthe Minanity Fusiness
Devalop ment Agency (EAL OLS
Qepartmernt of Gamers

PANEL DISCUSSION Ill

* POSITIONED FOR SUCCES 5, BEYOND

THE RECESS10N WHAT'S MEXT!“
* Larry Gibson (Cobia! Beacon Senines!

* Cheater Cooper (Hritih Ameriant

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‘Raymond Winder (Deteine & Touche)

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PROTECTING YOUR INVES THIENT °
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sensitivities of the member
nations into account, the state-
ment was daring and alarmed
other European leaders, who
moved quickly to mend fences
with Washington.

Martin Schulz, leader of the
Socialist group in the European
parliament, said it was “not the
level on which the EU ought to
be operating with the United
States.”

“You have not understood
what the task of the EU presi-
dency is,” he told Topolanek in
the debate.

European Commission Pres-
ident Jose Manuel Barroso also
weighed in with a tribute to
trans-Atlantic cooperation.

“T really believe it is not a
helpful debate, as I see some-
times, to try to suggest that
Americans and Europeans are
coming with very different
approaches to the crisis,” he
told legislators. “On the con-
trary, what we are seeing is
increased convergence.”

Although German Chancel-
lor Angela Merkel has warned
against a spending race and said
that ever bigger bailouts would
create too much of a budgetary
risk, French President Nicolas
Sarkozy said Tuesday he is pre-
pared to support the economy
with a new spending package
that may go down well in Wash-
ington.

Obama insisted Tuesday that
his massive budget proposal is
moving the nation down the

BE

Â¥
Al

right path and will help the ail-
ing economy grow again. “This
budget is inseparable from this
recovery,” he said, “because it is
what lays the foundation for a
secure and lasting prosperity.”

Obama also claimed early
progress in his aggressive cam-
paign to lead the United States
out of its worst economic crisis
in 70 years and declared that
despite obstacles ahead, the
U.S. is “moving in the right
direction.”

Barber Shop and Day Spa

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Cetedinating if Chitin yi hea if “i

On Saturday, March 28", the Montagu Constituency Association

will host a celebratory dinner in honor of its past Members of

Mead

Sr Geoffrey lohestone

Sor Kendal (seacs

Parliament,

| Raney Bestwick

1982 - 1997

Sar Cinilie Tumguest

Sr Willam Alen Brent Symonette

1997-2002 = 2002-2007

From 1967 to 2007, the constituency has had a total of six Representatives. Not

only have these noble sons served Montagu with distinction, but have all gone on
to become nation builders of the highest caliber.

OU, rf’ re
Montagu Salutes Them!

Venue: Montagu Gardens, East Bay Street

Time: 7:30 pm

For further information on the event please contact the constituency

headquarters at (242) 393-0878





THE TRIBUNE

@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Orders to U.S. factories for big-
ticket manufactured goods and
new homes sales both rose
unexpectedly in February, but
economists said the gains were
unlikely to last as the recession
persists.

The Commerce Department
said Wednesday that orders for
durable goods — manufactured
products expected to last at
least three years — increased
3.4 per cent last month, much
better than the two per cent fall
economists expected. It was the
first advance after a record six
straight declines and the
strongest one-month gain in 14
months.

The department also reported
that new home sales rose to a
seasonally adjusted annual rate
of 337,000 from an upwardly
revised January figure of
322,000. The results, while bet-
ter than the drop to 300,000
units that analysts expected, still
were the second-worst on
record. Even after the revision
to January’s results, the month
remained the worst on records
dating to 1963.

But Wall Street rose on the
better-than-expected govern-
ment data. The Dow Jones
industrial average added about
150 points in midday trading
and broader indicators also
gained.

Last month’s strength in

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 11B

US new home
sales increase

durable goods orders was led
by asurge in orders for military
aircraft “and parts, which shot

2.4 per cent. Demand for
machinery, computers and fab-
ricated metal products also rose.

Still, the rebound in both fac-
tory orders and new home sales
may be temporary. Upticks in
retail sales and housing starts
last month, along with a private
sector group’s index of leading
economic indicators dropping
less than expected were wel-
comed, but none were viewed
as sustainable given all the
problems facing the economy.
And a large drop in durable
goods orders in January was
revised even lower, bolstering
estimates that February data
represented a blip.

“The worst of the drop in
(home) sales is over but a sus-
tained recovery, still less price
stability, is a way off still,” Ian
Shepherdson, chief U.S. econo-
mist at High Frequency Eco-
nomics, wrote in a note to
clients.

He was even more skeptical
of a rebound in durable goods.
Noting the steep downward
revisions in January and that
half of last month’s gains came
from defense, Shepherdson said
the rise in orders was welcome,
but “much less impressive than
it looks at first sight and it can-
not possibly last.”

RBS Greenwich Capital ana-
lyst David Ader agreed.
“Durable goods was firmer than
expected but with the caveats
of downward revisions and the

To advertise in The Tribune -
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
Me IR) Perey a BTL

bounce ... coming on the heels
of several months of weakness
.. and we don’t see an effort to
interpret it as a sign the eco-
nomic bottom is in,” he wrote in
a note.

Manufacturers have been bat-
tered by the current recession
— already the longest in a quar-
ter-century — as demand for
cars, airplanes, household appli-
ances, furniture and other large
goods shrinks both in the U.S.
and overseas.

The government is scheduled
to report Thursday on the over-
all economy. Economists
believe that data will show the
economy falling at an annual
rate of 6.5 per cent in the final
three months of last year, even
deeper than the 6.2 per cent
drop in the gross domestic prod-
uct reported a month ago.

Economists believe the GDP
fell just as sharply in the cur-
rent quarter and likely will keep
contracting until the second half
of this year.

Still, orders for durable goods
excluding the pears trans-
portation sector rose 3.9 per
cent last month, easily beating
the two-per cent drop that econ-
omists expected.

But despite the big surge in
demand for military aircraft,
overall orders for transporta-
tion products fell 0.8 per cent
in February. Demand for com-
mercial aircraft plunged 28.9
per cent after a huge increase in
January. Orders for autos and
auto parts dipped 0.6 per cent as
that industry’s struggles persist.

Detroit’s General Motors
Corp. and Chrysler LLC are
restructuring operations in
hopes of securing billions more
in federal aid.

In areas of strength, orders
for heavy machinery surged 13.5
per cent in February, demand
for computers rose 10.1 per cent
and orders for fabricated metal
products edged up 1.5 per cent.

e AP Real Estate Writer
Alan Zibel contributed to this
report.

PRICEWATERHOUsE(COPERS

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

Purpose

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) will provide technology vision and leadership in the
development and implementation of information technology (IT) programmes. He/she will
lead the planning and implementation of enterprise information systems to support business
operations and achieve more effective and cost beneficial enterprise-wide IT operations.

Essential Functions

e Establish guidelines and programmes for effective IT management.
Provide data processing, services required.
Recommend long and short range management information systems plans and budgets.
Approve staff recommendations on major systems development and/or research
projects.
Establish strategic policy for planning, development, and design of information needs.
Research management information systems hardware and software including applicable
vendor applications, data base management, and operational control packages.
Sets policies to ensure privacy and security of data processing facilities.
Establish guidelines and programmes for effective database management utilisation.
Consult with and advise department heads on IT management needs and problems.
Demonstrate continuous effort to improve operations, decrease turnaround times,
streamline work processes, and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality
customer service.

Education, Experience and Necessary Qualifications

Minimum of 3 years of experience with increasing responsibilities for management and
support of information tems and IT; direct management of a major IT operation is
preferred. Experience should also include exposure to both shared and outsourced solutions,
as well as support of in-house information and communication systems in a multi-site client-
server environment. Specific experience with financial and human resource management
information systems is a plus. Other skills required include:

e Familiarity with: desktop, notebook, handheld, and server computer hardware; local
and wide area network design, implementation, and operation; operating systems such
as Windows, OS/400, Unix, and Linux; and computer peripherals such as printers,
monitors, modems and other equipment.

Knowledge of office productivity software programmes such as word processing,
spreadsheet programmes, databases, and communications software.

Ability to: analyse and resolve complex issues, both logical and interpersonal; and
negotiate and defuse conflict.

Effective verbal and written communications skills and effective presentation skills, all
geared toward coordination and education.

Self-motivator, independent, cooperative, flexible and creative.

Required Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:
Requires a master’s degree in Computer Science, Business Administration or a related field or
equry alent experience. Comprehensive knowledge of:
Data processing methods and procedures, and computer software systems.
Systems design and development process, including requirements analysis, feasibility
studies, software design, programming, pilot testing, installation, evaluation and
operational management.
Business process analysis and redesign.
Design, management, and operation of managed IT

Proven skills in: negotiating with vendors, contractors, and others; budget preparation and
monitoring; management and leadership; and communication.

Demonstrated ability to: relate to all levels of the user community; be a team player
that motivates and educates other team members; plan, implement and support systems
in a complex education environment; set and manage priorities, comprehend complex,
technical subjects; translate technical language to lay audiences; and link and apply complex
technologies to business strategies.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: CIO 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Private & Confidential





PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Real Estate

Wee ee eo Sa eT





THOM Uc eteg tah Lae

ee ep ee Are!

Legal Notice
NOTICE

JOGURT LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(A4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, JOGURT LIMITED. is in dissolution as of
March 20, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice
NOTICE

BELLMORE MARKETING LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(A4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, BELLMORE MARKETING LTD. is in
dissolution as of March 20, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



GN-841

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

Ministry of Public Works & Transport
Tender For Paving Works
West Bay St/Marlborough St./Navy Lion Rd./
Bay St./ East Bay St. -
(Blake Rd. eastward to Mackey St.)

Interested Contractors are invited to tender for the
Paving Works on West Bay Street/Marlborough Sitreet/
Navy Lion Road/ Bay Street/ East Bay Street between
Blake Road and Mackey Sireet.

The Tender Document may be collected at:

Civil Engineering Section
Department of Public Works
ist Floor East Wing
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive
Nassau, Bahamas

Sealed Tender submissions are to be deposited in the
Tender Box located at:

Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor
Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received no later than
10:00 a.m., Tuesday, 31st March, 2009.

Tenderers are invited to attend the Tender opening at
10:00 a.m., Tuesday, 31st March 2009 at the Tenders
Board.

Signed
Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary



Ministry rejected
Global’s $150,000
per month offer

FROM page IB

firm was “making current pay-
ments.... on a timely basis for
all current transactions and
believe that these arrangements
will enhance both the reporting
and payment arrangements.”

Mr Ritchie’s suggestion was
rejected in a letter sent to him
13 days later, not by the Cus-
toms Comptroller but a Min-
istry of Finance official, Joseph
Mullings, writing on behalf of
financial secretary to the Trea-
sury.

Mr Mulling said the Ministry
of Finance had “rejected” the
proposal and was demanding
payment in full. He added:
“Some of these charges relate to
years 2006 and early 2007, and
sufficient time has already been
extended. In addition, cruise
ship operators have already
paid these amounts to your
company.”

Mr Mullings also asked Mr
Ritchie to explain the discrep-

ancy between the $4.918 mil-
lion quoted in his letter, and the
$5.426 million Customs said
Global United owed, in addi-
tion to $2.615 million worth of
dishonoured cheques, making
for a grand total of more than
$8 million.

Replying that same day, Mr
Ritchie said some $108,000 had
been paid on the dishonoured
cheques, reducing the out-
standing sum owed to $4.7 mil-
lion. He again appealed for
leniency and acceptance of the
payment plan, which was reject-
ed by Customs in a letter on
February 14, 2008.

Business sources yesterday
expressed surprise that Mr
Ritchie had gone public with
the dispute, viewing it as a last-
ditch, crude attempt to appeal
to the Bahamian public and
hope that this would stay the
Attorney General’s Office’s
hand in moving to wind-up
Global United.

It is unlikely to succeed, with
the Government having served
a statutory demand for payment

by today, meaning that Global
United will likely have to close
its doors and cease operations
tomorrow. Other sources also
suggested it was a “smoke-
screen” to divert attention from
the real causes of Global Unit-
ed’s woes.

Several Tribune Business
sources had previously backed
the Government’s position, sug-
gesting that Global United’s
real problems stemmed from
the fact it had expanded too far,
too fast, and taken on an ulti-
mately unsustainable debt bur-
den from FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas) as a
result.

Tribune Business revealed
last month how Global United
had placed its Airport Industri-
al Park headquarters up for sale
for $1.8 million, and that its
Global United store at Sandy-
port was set to close (it has now
done so). Captain Ritchie has
also placed his personal resi-
dence at Sandyport on the mar-
Ket.

Global United began life as

Freeport-based Tanja Enter-
prises. But Captain Ritchie
embarked on headlong expan-
sion in 2004, becoming the main
shipping agent in Freeport by
acquiring United Shipping.

It followed that up the fol-
lowing year with the purchase
of Nassau-based Global Cus-
toms Brokers & Trucking and
World Bound Couriers,
enabling it to enter the New
Providence market as a major
player in the shipping agency,
distribution and logistics and
transportation business.

At the height of his ambi-
tions, Captain Ritchie also
agreed a deal to purchase Dis-
covery Cruise Line, although
that ultimately fell through.

Among Global United’s oth-
er creditors are its preference
shareholders. They include Col-
inalmperial Insurance Compa-
ny, which had $2-$3 million
worth of preference shares that
it inherited from the Imperial
Life purchase, and Edward
Fitzgerald, father of PLP Sena-
tor Jerome Fitzgerald.

Scotiabank moves to dismiss claim by the Chub developers

FROM page IB

In its motion, Scotiabank
(Bahamas) alleged: “The bank
commenced this action against
the defendants for judgment
under two separate guarantees
relating to a $45 million loan,
which was made by the bank to
two Bahamian entities for the
construction and development
of specified improvements on
Chub Cay in the Bahamas.”

Scotiabank (Bahamas)
alleged that the two Bahamian
borrowing entities, Chub Cay
Associates and Chub Cay
Resorts, entered the project
financing agreement on July 28,
2006.

It claimed Messrs McCrory
and Moss had guaranteed the
two companies’ repayment
obligations up to a $4 million
maximum limit. They also
allegedly entered into a com-
pletion guarantee, pledging that
construction of the Chub Cay
project was to be completed by
December 31, 2007. That guar-
antee was said to be partially
secured by a standby letter of
credit worth $4 million.

Pointing out that Mr Moss
owned a Florida-based con-
struction company that was the
main contractor for Chub Cay,
Scotiabank (Bahamas) alleged
that it was his company’s esti-
mate in support of loan draw-
down request that showed “the
cost of completion of the project
is not less than $38.6 million.

“At present, the borrowers

owe the bank [Scotiabank]
unpaid principal in the amount
of $44. 011 million, together
with accrued interest, cost and
expense.”

Scotiabank (Bahamas)
alleged that Messrs McCrory
and Moss, in their counterclaim,
had ignored the fact that both
the loan agreement and com-
pletion guarantee were gov-
erned by Bahamian law as the
primary jurisdiction. Instead,
they had based their defence on
Florida’s version of the Uni-
form Commercial Code.

However, Scotiabank
(Bahamas) alleged that “the
loan is being extended by a
Bahamian bank, to Bahamian
borrowers, for development of
exclusively Bahamian real prop-
erty, and that is secured by a
mortgage upon real Bahamian
property

“Here, the defendants have
not even attempted to allege
any claims (or defences) under
Bahamas law, nor have they
alleged that Bahamas law con-
travenes any Florida public pol-
icy. Instead, they rely solely
upon Florida law, notwith-
standing that the facility agree-
ment and completion guaran-
tee each contain explicit
Bahamas choice of law provi-
sions, and the dispute between
the parties arises from a loan
transaction among Bahamian
corporations........

“Because defendants assert
no claims or defences under
Bahamian law, their claims

GN-842

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

SALE OF 2007
UPDATES OF LAWS

The Cabinet Office announces the sale of the
2007 Updates of the Statute Law and Subsidiary
Legislation of The Bahamas at the Government
Publications Office, Bay Street. Sale of the
compact discs commences with immediate effect
while sale of the Loose-Leaf Pages will begin on
20th April, 2009. These versions contain legislation
up to the period ending 31st December, 2007.

Cost are as follow:

Loose-Leaf Updates (Inserts) - $350.00 per set

Compact Discs

- $200.00

Government Publications Office is also offering
for sale a limited quantity of the 1987 Statute
Laws and Subsidiary Legislation together with
copies of the 2002 and 2004 CD versions of the
laws. As a package, the cost is $600.00 and the
CDs sold separately are $50 and $100

respectively.



should be dismissed for failure
to state a claim, and the related
affirmative defences stricken.”

In their counterclaim, Messrs
McCrory and Moss had alleged
that Scotiabank (Bahamas) had
already “been paid to the full
extent of what it can recover
under the” guarantee through
accessing the pledged stand-by
letter of credit.

While admitting that they
were guarantors and “that all
payments called for by the
agreement have not been
made”, Messrs McCrory and
Moss denied they were liable
for the $4 million guarantee.

They further alleged that
their obligations were limited
to this guarantee, and denied
that a guarantee to complete
the Chub Cay project had been
part of the terms.

Messrs McCrory and Moss
alleged that they and Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) had “agreed
to limit [their] completion oblig-
ations to certain construction

- bee
oe ae

projects on Chub Cay. For
instance, the corporate borrow-
ers did not broadly and uncon-
ditionally commit to construct
an entire 800 acre mega project
in the Bahamas, irrespective of
whether customers actually
materialised to make purchases
in the project”.

The duo also denied Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) assertion “that
all portions of Chub Cay Club
resort remain incomplete and
subject to deterioration.

“Defendants affirmatively
assert that some villas, a marina,
extensive infrastructure and
other aspects of Chub Cay Club
resort were constructed and not
subject to deterioration. Defen-
dants deny that completion of
the portions of the Chub Cay
Club Resort that the facility
agreement requires to be com-
pleted will cost $38 million.”

The Chub Cay project is cur-
rently in the care of receivers
appointed by Scotiabank
(Bahamas).

OFFICE OF THE
DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER AND
MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

The Ministry Of Foreign Affairs Offers

For Sale

The following vehicles:

(1) 1997 Ford Crown Victoria (Black)
S/N ZFALP73W5VX163226

(2) 1998 Ford Crown Victoria (Black)
S/N 2FAFP73W3NX123466
License #1775

Sealed Tenders may be addressed to:

The Permanent Secretary
Ministry Of Foreign Affairs

P.O. Box N-3746

Nassau, The Bahamas

or

Hand delivered to the Ministry located
on the 2nd Floor, Goodman’s Bay
Corporate Center West Bay Street.

The vehicles may be viewed at the
Ministry’s Headquarters, East Hill Street,
9am - Spm Monday - Friday. Deadline
for submission of tenders is 31st March,
2009.

The Ministry reserves the right to reject

any or all tenders.





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 13B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

Investment Opportunity Must Sell Lot No. 217
Pinewood Gardens Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft, being Lot
No. 217 of the Subdivision known as Pinewood Gardens, the
said subdivision situated in the Southern District of New
Providence Bahamas. Located on this property is a structure
comprising of an approximately 20 yr old single family residence
consisting of 992 sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-
bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, kitchen, drive
way and walk way. The land is on a grade and level and
appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility
of flooding. The grounds are fairly kept and yard is open.

Appraisal: $127,988.00

Traveling south on East Street to the junction of Soldier Road, make a left at the light then turn right into Kennedy
Subdivision, go all the way to T-junction, turn right then first left then right again toward Mount Tabor Church building,
after passing Mount Tabor take first left (sapodilla blvd), the subject house is about 400 yards on the right painted yellow
trimmed green, with green and white door.

LOT NO. #7, BOILING HOLE SUBDIVISION

All that piece parcel or lot of land and inprovements situated

on the Island of Eleuthera, North of Governor’s Harbour,

comprising of Lot No. 7 in the Boiling Hole Subdivision and

comprising of approximately 10,000 sq. ft., this site

encompasses a 17 years old duplex with each unit consisting

| of 2-bedrooms; 1 bathroom, frontroom, diningroom and kitchen

with a gross floor area of approximately 1,474.20 sq. ft. and

covered porch area of approximately 164.70 sq. ft. this duplex

was built in accordance with the plan and specification as

approved, and at a standard that was aecepnls to the Ministry Of Public Works. This structure is in good condition.
Each apartment could be rented at $800.00 per month. The land is landscaped and planted with ficus trees, but

needs some manicuring.
APPRAISAL: $138,989.00

Exuma Lot No. 7720A, Bahama Sound # 11

| All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of
approximately 10,000 sq ft, being lot 7720a, situated in a
registered subdivision known as Bahama Sound of Exuma
Section 11. Situated on this property is a 9 yrs old single
storey residence consisting of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms,
livingroom, diningroom & kitchen, with approximately 1,563
sq. ft. of enclosed living space. The building is structurally
sound & is generally in good condition. The lot is rectangular
in shape. No adverse site conditions were noted

Appraisal: $185,636.50

Property located about 2 3/4 miles southeastwardly of the settlement of George Town. Painted pink trimmed white.

Lot No. 235 Twynam Heights Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 8,534 sq ft, being Lot
% | #235, of the subdivision known as Twynam Heights. The
. - » | said subdivision situated in the eastern district of New
EE = 7 = mes Providence. Located on this property is an approximately
6yr old single family residence consisting of approximately
1,826 sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-bedrooms, 3
-baths, living, dining, kitchen & carport. the land is on a
grade & level; & appears to be sufficiently elevated to
disallow the possibility of flooding. The grounds are fairly
kept, with improvments including walkway, driveway & front boundary wall.

Appraisal: $344,422.30

Traveling east on Prince Charles, turn right at Super Value Food Store, then 1st left to t-junction, turn left at
junction then right & the property will be the 6th on the left side of the road painted blue trimmed white.

e/a 19) a
March 26, 2009

WINTON MEADOWS (Lot No. 382)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having
an area of 8,300 sq. ft. being lot No. 382
situated in the subdivision known as Winton
Meadows, the said subdivision situated in
the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, Bahamas. This property is
comprised of a 24 year old single family
residence with an attached efficiency
(formerly the carport) consisting of
approximately 2,675 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area, front porch-198 sq. ft., back patio-380.
The building is a two storey house. Besides
the efficiency apartment, the house is comprised of 3-bedrooms, 3-bathrooms, inclusive of a master bedroom
suite upstairs. Foyer, front room, dining room, family room, powder room, utility room, breakfast nook and
kitchen downstairs. Climate control is provided by ducted central air conditioning, with air circulation
enhanced by ceiling fans and other amenities. Quality of construction: Average. Standard of maintenance:
Average. Effective age: seven years (7) the land is on flat terrain; however the site appears to be sufficiently
elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding under normal weather condition, including annual heavy
rainy periods. The grounds are well kept, with improvements including neatly maintained lawns with flowering
trees, and a concrete garden/storage shed, which is located in the backyard. The yard is enclosed along the
sides with chain-link fencing, and concrete block walls that are topped with metal railings, and metal gates
at the front and back.

APPRAISAL: $343,072.50

Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive, pass the streetlight at Fox Hill Road until you get to Meadows
Boulevard, turn right onto Meadows Boulevard, go south and take the 4th left, then Ist right. The subject
house is the 2nd house on the left side painted beige trimmed white.

Crown Allotment 67, Murphy Town Abaco

All that parcel of land having an approximate area of 9,300
sq ft, being lot #67a, a portion of the murphy town crown
allotment # 67. Located on this property is a single storey
wooden residence with a total living area of approximately
1,850 sq, ft & consisting of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms,
living/dining kitchen 2-car garage & covered porch. Additional
floor space is available within roof dormers. Exterior walls
are of wood overlain with hardi board siding or concrete
duraboard siding. interior walls are of gypsum wallboard
siding. Construction demonstrates above average quality
workmanship however minor aesthetic improvement is still
needed. Landscaping has commenced, but not yet completed. The property is level with no immediate flooding
danger. All major utilities are within 100ft of the subject site.

Appraisal: $241,200.00
This proerty is situated off Bay Street Drive, Murphy Town.

VACANT PROPERTY

Lot No. 45, South Westridge Subdivision

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land having an area of 41,490 sq, ft being lot #45 of the subdivision
known as south Westridge, the said subdivision situated in the western district of New Providence Bahamas.
This property is zonned single family/residential area. The land is slightly elevated & appears to be sufficiently
elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.

Appraisal: $342,292.00

Travelling west on JFK turn left into South Westridge (pink wall), travel to the 2nd corner left & turn left at the
tjunction. The subject property will be about the 3rd on the left side of the road.

For conditions of sale and other information contact 326-1771 ¢ Fax 356-3851

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

MANAGER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

One of our major clients seeks to recruit a qualified information technology professional
with experience in financial and customer service applications for the above position.

QUALIFICATIONS:

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

* Masters of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

* Eight or more years experience including hands-on technical experience and
two years minimum managing an information technology department in a large
organization with a complex, multi-vendor, multi-platform and distributed
computing environment
Visionary who can analyze problems within the context of corporate strategy,
balancing the consideration of facts, priorities, resources, constraints and
alternatives

RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Lead, monitor and develop a team of information technology professionals to
deliver customer focused service and set performance expectations to achieve
excellence
Manage the development, implementation and day-to-day operations of the
Information Technology department
Actively contribute to the tactical and strategic development of information
technology to support the organization’s business needs
Accountable for the successful delivery to agreed time scales and within budget of
departmental projects or programmes
Assist accounting and engineering departments in ensuring accurate and timely
preparation of reports

REQUIREMENTS:

* This is a senior position that will require a professional with very extensive
experience in supervising and controlling computer professionals in financial,
customer services and engineering applications.

Strong management and communications skills

Strong technical and troubleshooting skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure

Solid understanding of business operations and strategic planning

COMPENSATION:
Attractive salary and other benefits will be commensurate with training and experience.

Written applications should be addressed to:

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: IT MANAGER 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Private & Confidential

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

PROCUREMENT FOR SCHOOL
FURNITURE FOR NEW SCHOOLS &
REPLACEMENTS 2009-2010

The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’”) now invites
sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement of School Furniture
for New Schools and Replacements.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from the
Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education, Headquarters,
Thompson Blvd. from Wednesday 18 th March, 2009, and obtain further
information, at the second address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
bided on (“School Furniture-New Schools & Replacements”).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address,
or before Monday, 6 th April, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not
be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday 7 th April, 2009 at the first address below.

(1) The Chairman Tender
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education

P.O. Box N-3913/4

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tele: (242) 502-8571

The Ministry reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME CIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Funeral Service For

Davanand
“Dave”? McDonald
Edilall, 27

of Dunmore Avenue,
Chippingham and formerly of
Jumbey Street, Pinewood
Gardens, Nassau, The Bahamas,

| will be held at St. Gregory’s

_ | Anglican Church, Carmichael
| Road, Nassau, on Saturday, 28th

i March, 2009 at 2:00p.m.

Reverend Father Atma Budhu

assisted by Reverend Marie

Roach will officiate and
interment will follow in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F. Kennedy
Drive, Nassau.

He is survived by his parents: Kemraj “Allan” and Gwendolyn Edilall;
one (1) sister: Priadashni “Pria” Edilall; two (2) brothers: Keiran and
Kristen Edilall; grandparents: Herman and Viola Burrows of Long Island
and Kimranie Edilall of New York; two (2) sisters-in-law: Junise and
Shericka Edilall; four (4) aunts: Miriam Procter, Marjorie Archer, Nadira
Jafar and Patrina Edilall both of New York; three (3) uncles: Rajesh
Edilall, Praim Jafar of New York and Robert Archer; two (2) nieces:
Kemren and Kaylen Edilall; one (1) nephew: Kemraj Edilall; Special
Friend: Kaisha Hanchell; numerous cousins: Keisha and Kenneth McPhee,
Anya and Ricardo Gomez, Melanie and Stephen Johnson, Ariana and
Ryan Jafar, Ashley and Brandon Edilall, Vijay Punwasi, Kenisha and
Kenneth McPhee Jr., Ricardo Gomez Jr., and Jaylin Johnson; three (3)
grandaunts: Dora Turnquest, Lucrusha and Ethlyn Burrows; one (1)
granduncle: Virginus Burrows; Godparents: Deslie Miller, Virginia
Woodside and Prescott Burrows; other relatives including: Janet Minnis,
Larone Russell, Shawn and Bianca Minnis, Angie Punwasi and Family,
Prince and Ethlyn Turnquest and Family, Carol and Durell Shearer and
Family, Morgan and Ruth Turnquest and Family, Peter and Ellamae
Turnquest and Family, Kendal and Noel Turnquest, Gloria and Monsell
Turnquest and Family, Henry Burrows Jr. and Family, Alistair Burrows,
Alice Missick, Della Mack, John Smith and Nellena Burrows; Denise
Gordon and Family, Arlene Smith and Family, Idamae Farrington and
Family, Patricia Archer, Dr. Earle and Melanie Farrington, Rev. Dr. Colin
and Marjorie Archer, Albert and Alexandra Archer and Family, Donald
and Deborah Archer and Family, Danny and Catherine Persaud and
Family, Rohan and Bernadette Metholall, Tony and Regina Mohabir and
family, Fr. Atma and Lavinia Budhu and Family, and the St. Gregory’s
Anglican Church Family; close friends: Wellington McIntosh, Robin
Fowler, Duan Cole, Rupert Mackey, Roderick Mackey, Harry McKinney,
Dereck Taylor, Leslie Miller, Thia Bethel, Amanda Smith, Denardo
Coverly, Staff of Platos, Staff of Atlantis, Prince Williams High School-
Class of ‘97 and ‘99, The Butler’s Service Family, Imperial Club Family,
The Chippingham Family, The Pinewood Family, The Long Island and
Black Point Exuma Family, and many others too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp’s Funeral Home Limited, 22
Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, on Friday from 10:00a.m. to 7:00p.m and
on Saturday from 10:00a.m. to 12:00 noon and at the church from
1:00p.m. until service time.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Mr. Samuel Knowles Jr.
and the family of the late

MRS. VALERIE
DAVIS-KNOWLES

wish to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to
all those who called, visited, prayed, offered words of
comfort, sent cards, floral arrangements/wreaths, food,
drinks, or assisted in any way during Val’s illness and
her death.

Special thanks to Bishop Delton Fernander and the
members of New Destiny Baptist Cathedral, Butler’s
Funeral Home, Dr. Ricky Davis and family, Dr. Theodore
Turnquest and staff, Dr. Beverton R. Moxey, Dr.
Farquharson, Dr. Johnson, Frank Hanna and staff, Ms.
Geneva McIntosh and family, Ms. Joanne Pinder, Mrs.
Melony Woodside, SB Fashion, Mrs. Janet Farrington
and family, Mr. Phillip ‘Brave’ Davis, Mr. Alfred Sears,
staff of Woodlawn Gardens.

A very, very, special thanks to Ms. Ursula Dean for
putting everything together.

~ Ney God bless you all.~





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 3
2% In Loving Memory
wi eh, = >






a “ — re F
: JA obert Roderick Turnquest
= 1927-1999

Today marks ten years since you left us
With much wise counsel

| Simple yet poignant s Fig)

C9 Time eases pain

| Ete, We remember you with love. PEP.

(Dc ; The Family CS ‘Se Oy.







PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Se Lo Ung MW mca oY

Matriarch Angela Major McSweeney
Sunrise September 1st, 1928
Sunset March 26th 2006

God saw you were getting tired
And a cure was not to be,
So he put his arms around you
And whispered, * Come to me"
it has been three years now
Silent tears still flow
No one would ever know
How much | miss you so

The tamily of the late SANDRA COLLETTE “PEACHIE" MCSWEENEY

THOMPSON wishes to. csxpress our, sincere thanks and appreciation to all

those who called, visited; prayed, offered words of comfort, sent cards,

If tears could build a stairway. floral arrangaments during her illnass. and racent daath.
And memories a lane

I'd walk right up to Heaven and
Bring you home again

No farewell words were spoken

You were gone before we know it
And only God knows.

Special thanks goes to the staff of the Female Medical Ward 1, and
especially the professional, dedicated and caring doctors and nurses of the
Intensive Gare Unit (ICU) Princess Margaret Hospital. Archdeacon E.
Etienne Bowleg, Fr Buck Johnson and Fr. John Kabiga and the entire
congregation of The Most Holy Trinfty Anglican Church; The staff of
Deparment of Physical Planning; Management and staff of CasaBlanca
Casing. Providenicales, Turks & Caicos: Managment and staff of Delta
Airline: Mrs: Hill and siaff of Cedar Crest Funéral Home; Hon. Tommy A.
Turngues!, Minister for National Security, MP for Mi. Moriah Constinwancy:
Pastor C. Alexander Willams 177 JP. Abundant Lite Ministries Intemational,
Providencales, Turks & Caicos and Ms. Maltise Rigby, Freeport Grand
Bahama

Precious memories would forever linger in the hearts of
her children, Carmell, Stephanie, Rudolph and Terrance,
grand children, great grand children, sister Alfreda
Butler, family members and friends.



MAY GOD BLESS YOU

Ynina Weonury| | | INLOVING MEMORY |
: a e AFRO Al ~ OF





ay TELEFAR LAURA BAIN

[ [ I | March 10, 1974 to March 29, 2008
E ‘Ls E N: UME S Vihar it means fo love you, you give us love in fullest measure, your
APRIL 28. 1913 - MARCH 25. 2008 care, Deviation and memories to treasure, your beautiful smile and

genie expressions of love, I brakes our hearts fo see you go but
mother you did not go alone for part of ws went wilh you. You are in
our thoughts everyday To some you may be forgotfen, but to
those whe have loved you, your mentary will forever fast.

A Mother's Love is like a Rose that never fades away.
Mother, We will see you again one sweet

; day on that Glad Re-union Day. Left to cherish her Memories, her children; Jennifer Bain, Herman
With fond and loving memories, children, Bain, Edison Bain, Monica Allen, Lerlene Carey, Enna Williams,
grandchildren, great grandchildren, Frances Johnson and Ruby Fowler; grand children; great grand

| & great great grandchildren children; great great grand children; sisters; nieces; nephews, The Zion
Baptist Church Family, East & Shirley St. and family and frends.

FAMILY AND FRIENDS To well loved to be forgotten.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 5

ee Ress 5 se oe

March16, 1979 - March 29, 2003

Six long empty years have gone
by, six years oe natow pain, A
loving, warm, and wonderful

son, brother, and friend. In the

short time that you were loaned

to us, you taught us so much and

touched the hearts of so many. |
never stop thinking of you, my

tears continue to dv | have to
believe that your destiny has

been fulfilled, and it was time to

go; no good-byes, no tomorrows,

only yesterdays

| Miss You
Love Mom

To some you may be forgotten,
to others a part of the past, But
to those of us who loved and lost
you, your mOry will always
ast.

Lovingly and deeply missed by
your mom Ann Bease. stepfather
Bob Bease, dad Michael Scott
brothers, Jamie and Conor, sister
Sasha, The Andrean Community,
Cable 12 staff and all those who
still hold you close to their
hearts.





PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

DOUGLAS ERSKINE

19th Nov., 1930 - 31st Jan., 2009

We give God thanks for placing

so many wonderful people in our

lives. You have demonstrated your
care, compassion and love. Your prayers, words of
comfort, encouragement and support have helped us
to stay focused during these challenging times. We
appreciate everything that you have done for us. Words
are never sufficient to express our innermost feelings.
Please be assured that your involvement with us is
fully noted. For whatever you did to console our hearts,



we sincerely thank you. @ | |
% a a DEANDRE DION SAUNDERS
~ The Erskine Family ~ "ie ih " Sh ortman"
1987 - 2009

Time speeds on, one month has passed
Since death its gloom, its shadow, cast
Within our home, where all seemed bright,
And took from us a shinning light,

We miss that light, and ever will,

His vacant place there is none to fill.
Down here we mourn, but not in vain,
For up in heaven we will meet again.

The family of the Late Deandre Dion Saunders wish to
express their sincere thanks and ap, ation for all

have offered words of comfort, sympathetic
gestures, prayers, sent floral arrangements or wreaths,
visited our home and who have been so thoughtful and
caring during our time of bereavement. Special thanks
to Monsignor Preston Moss, Fr. Noel Clarke, Deacon
Raymond Forbes and the Faith Community of St
Anselm's Catholic Church, Management and Staff of
Vaughn O. Jones Memonal Center, Management and
Staff of Kerzner Intemational especially The Water
Features Department, Mr. Percy “Vola” Francis and the
Shell Saxons Superstars, the Fox Hill Congos and
Funtime Junkanoo Groups, The Francis Avenue
Family, the Hon. Fred Mitchell, Senator Dr. Jacinta
Higgs, Staff of the Attorney General's Office, the entire
Fox Hill Community, and the Doctors and Nurses of
ae and Emergency of the Princess Margaret

ospital.

i y z
" = a eee |





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Card of Thanks

Minister Richard Herman Munroe
1936 - 2009

Gratitude is not a human achievernent
Gratitude is a divine treasure
Granted to us
By the inner Pilot within us
The Absolute Supreme-author unknown

The family of the late Minister Richard Herman Munroe wishes
to express our profound thanks and appreciation to our relatives,
friends, co-workers and neighbors for all acts of kindness
shown. We gratefully ae knowled ge-- Bishop Delton Fernander
and the New Destiny Family especially- Reverends Clarence and
Tyrone Knowles and Alice Lockhart, Minister Ezra Dean,
Elders Mary Scott and Dorothy King and Deacon Stephan
Edgecombe, Father Atma Budhu and the 5t. Gregory's Anglican
Church Family especially Mrs. Shirley McDonald, Apostle
Raymond Wells and the Living Waters Church Family, Deacon
Neil Nairn & Family, The Honorable Desmond Bannister,
Minister of Youth & Sports, Most Worshipful Calvin Wallace
Grand master of the Most Worshipful Prince of Peace Grand
Lodge and Queen Bethesada Grand Chapter, The Commodore,
Officers and member of the Nassau Sailing Association, the
Commodere, Officers and members of the Bahamas Boat
Owners Association Mr. Bertram Knowles and the staff of
Caribbean World Trading, The Staff of the Ministry of
Education, especially the Supply Department, Mr. James
Wallace and the Staff of the Sailor's Choice Restaurant, the
Management and Staff of Colina General Insurance Company,
Mrs. Donella Bodie and the staff of the Department of Public
Service, Mrs. Mary Reckley and the Staff of First Caribbean
Bank, Thompson Boulevard= and Ms. Rendra Major, the Human
Resources Department of Atlantis Hotel, the Management and
Staff of Munroe's Landscaping, ‘The Management and Stat? of
Cedar Crest Funeral Home, Mrs. Michelle Dames and family,
Henry & Shirley Saunders, Rozalia Bowe, Orintha Nesbitt,
Laverne & Brenda Lockhart, Charles & Willamae Seortt, the
neighbors and friends of Crab Apple Road and Penny Bank
Community.

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 7

CARD OF THANKS

Our dear wife, mother, daugh-

ter, sister, frend and co-

worker, gone but not forgot:

ten. Your legacy lives on

forever in our hearts. Sleep

“an "Percis" and take your rest
until we meet again.

When" 9 Wu
“When i must leave Pte
For a lithe while
Please do not grieve
And shed wild tears
And hug your sorrow to you
Through the years,

But start out bravely
With a gallant smile:
And for my sake
And in my name
Live on and do
All things the same,
One empty days,

But fill each waking hour
In useful ways,
Reach out your hand
In comfort and in cheer
And | in turn will comfort you
And old you near;
And never, never
Be afraid to die,

For | am waiting for you in the sky,

Helen Steinar Ace
We the family, of the laie Percis Cambridge would like 19 extend hearttalt thanks
to all those persons who have shown act of Kindness or shared words of comtart
during our time of bereavement,

Special thanks to; The Golden Gates Church of Christ Family, The Independance
Drive Church of God Family Gospel Truth Tabernacle Church of God Inc, Family
Administrators and Staff at the Princess Margaret Hospital, The Staff of the Private
Medical Ward The Bamboo Town Family New Bight and Hatchet Bay Communities
Staff at The Continuing Education Department, C.0.6, Staff at the Ministry of
Agnculture and Marine Resources Staff at ZNS and Jones Communication The
Maintenance department of the Royal Bahamas Police Force Staff of the
Physician Alliance Ltd and all her dear friends and patients whose lives she have
touch over the years,
Please know that we are forever grateful and may the
blessings of God be with you.





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Vaughn O. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”

JUDITH DIANN
RODGERS, 51

of #17 Seagrape Avenue, Seabreeze
Estates, will be held on Saturday, March :
28th, 2009 at 1lam, at Pilgrim Baptist :
Temple, St. James Road. Officiating :
will be Bishop E. Randy Fraser, assisted }
by other Ministers of the gosepl. :
Interment will follow in Woodlawn :

Gardens, Soldier Road.

Precious memories will forever linger

in the hearts of her beloved mother, |
Dot A. Rodgers; eight brothers, Leo, Sidney, Terrance, Don, Michael, :
Roy, Audley and Bernard Rodgers; ten sisters, Jacqueline Davis of :
New York, Ginger Grant of New Jersey, Gillian Rodgers, Gina |
Lightbourne, Min. Lindell Johnson, Teresta-Harrison, Debra Davis, |
Brenda White, Audrey of Miami and Patrice Rodgers; fifty-one nephews, :
Alfred Jr., Sidney Sean and Stephen Davis York, Burton Lawrence, |
Leo Jr., Letravino, Leron Leandrew, Juan, Tawari, Ron, Elder Lawrence, !

: law, Tara; great grandchildren, Patrick II, Tafarl, Nyah and Kami;

Kriston, Kahlin, Sean Gerrod, Jamal, Justin, Don, Darren and Zavion : brothers, Garneth, William and Hayward; sisters, Romilda of Orlando,

Rodgers, Maurice and Demitrie Grant of New Jersey, Mickell, Clint, : Florida, Hortense, Iris of West End, Grand Bahama and Ulease; sisters-

Anwar, Doncolleon, Darrio, Rasheim Rodgers, Anthony, Anwar and : in-law, Rowena, Mary, Vera, Amelia and Sheba; brother-in-law, Albert

Antwuan Lightbourne, Garth, Arton and Unchea Harrisons, Remado, : Hall; nephews, Loran, Oral, Derek, Edwin, Howard, Gary, Q. of

Garvin, Ricardo, Marvin and Lashon Rodgers, Roy, Jeremy, Renard | Freeport, Paul, Raymond, Hubert, Dennis, Kenneth, Kirkwood, Jeffery,

and Dion White, Ivory Johnson, Terrance and Leevan Archer, Trevor : Tyrone of Opa-Locka, Florida, Goldenboy of Detroit, Michael, Johnny,

Edgecombe, Kirk Young, Nelson Barret, Roskeino Neely and Neil : Robert, David, Alphonso, Franz, Charles and Sean; nieces, Agatha,

Andrews, Shamon Rodgers Edgecombe; thirty-one nieces, Antonia ! )arilyn. Cheryl. Sheila. D S ‘
: : : yn, Cheryl, Sheila, Dawn, Suzette, Shandell, Audrey, Judy, Sylvia,
and Anthonice Lightbourne, Monea, Breja, Wendy, Vernell and Ursula : Patrice, Vanessa of Orlando, Florida, Yvette, Geraldine, Leeann, Sandra,

Rodgers, Lecheryl Barret, Leona Young, Levonne Neely, Lashone :} pamela, Rena, Fern, Kim, Judy, Rosie, Diane, Christine, Barbara, and

Terrel, Dawn and Amorie Rodgers, Gale Andrews, Tanya, Nedra, Linda, : ] eshan; numerous relatives and friends including, Rev. Fr. James

Sheryl, Shareelle, Ineisy, Arlene, Claienestic, Jennifer and Rekia : Moultrie, Oscar and Mary Jessie of Miami, Florida, the Greene family,

Rodgers, Shanika and Renette White, Lynresha and Ivernique Johnson, } the Burrows family, Fernando Knowles and family, Drexel Rahming

Sharon Harrison, Eve Arhcer and Stacy (Laurice Bernard); eight aunts, + ang family, Hubert Rahming, the Deah family, Dr. Sears and family,

Deloris Sherman, Patricia Jervis, Eleanor Elliot, Roslyn Johnson, Anita the Walkine family, Bishop Cannel Swain and family, Mae Davis and

Cooper, Leah Moss, Gertrude Rodgers and Evelyn Hepburn; four ! family, Dirk Simmons and family, George Duncanson, Noel Allen,

uncles, Gerth Knowles, Brooks Sherman, Robert Elliot and Paul Cooper : Brenda Duvalier, St. Margaret's Church family, Doctors and Nursing

and a host of other relatives and friends including, Rev. Carol and | graff at Princess Margaret Hospital.

Helen Johnson, George and Carolyn Rodgers, Sheila Albury, Sonja :
and Sidnell Cox, Karen Albury, Anthony Lightbourn, the Nassau Vilage ; Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O. Jones Memorial

Community, Sophia, the Munnings family, Kim, Dorothy Johnson, + Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street on Tuesday from 9:00 a.m. to

Dorothy Clarke, Charles, Leo, Sam, George and Stanley Rodgers, Ellen : 9.99 p.m. and at the church on Tuesday from 3:00 p.m. to service time.

Forebs, Lorena Rolle, Marsha Fox, Judy Bastian, Kenneth and Sandra :

Fox and the Seabreeze family.

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O. Jones Memorial
* Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm
: and at the churchon Saturday from 10am to service time.

MRS. EDNA M.
GREENE, 80

of #11 Lucien Road, Pyfrom Addition
and formerly of Deals, Long Island will
be held on Tuesday, March 31, 2009 at
4:00 p.m. at St. Margaret's Anglican
Church, Kemp Road. Officiating will
be Rev. Fr. Joseph Mycklewhyte and
Rev. Angela Palacious. Cremation will
follow.

Left to cherish her memories are her
grandson, Patrick; grand daughter-in-

Wulff Road and Primrose Street,
Cpposite Studio of Draperies
Telephone: 326-9800/1 ¢ 24 Hour Emergency 434-9220/380-8077





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 9

f
MCSE? 3

FUNERAL DIRECTORS"
“Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless of financial condition.”

7th Terrace, Collins Avenue * (242) 356-2187 *
P.O. Box GT-2679 * Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

GODFREY TAMAR
MURPHY, 16

of #4 Bird Road, will be held on Saturday, |
March 28th, 2009 at 10am at Christ |
Community Church, Bellot Road. |
Officiating will be Dr. Deanza |
Cunningham and Pastor Ellison |
Greenslade. Interment will be made in |
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F. |

Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish his memories are his father, |
Godfrey Murphy II; mother, Tiffany |

McPhee; adopted parents, Ian and Clarice |
Clarke; grandparents, Patrick and Laverne McPhee, Godfrey and Louise |
Murphy; adopted grandparents, Maurice and Hestermae Clarke; great |
grandparents, Beverley Smith and Lillian Saunders; sisters, Tanaz Scott, |
Tarell McPhee, Kian Clarke, Nikisha and Godneka Murphy; brothers, |
Kwanzaa and Koa Clarke, Tarez Scott, Savion McPhee, Travis and Roberto |
Murphy; niece, Zarria Murphy; aunts, Alexandria McPhee, Sabrina Clarke, |
Nakeesha Turnquest, Sisco Smith, Erica Walford, Karla Hield, Claudine |
Collie, Samantha Hamilton; uncles, Kevin, Patrick Jr., Marco and Owen |
McPhee, Maurice, Silbert and Billy Clarke, Raymond Rahming, Don and |
Marlon Murphy; grand aunts, Eugenia Thurston, Edna Roker, Bernadette |
Rolle, Stephanie Edwards, Andrea Francis, Paulette Godet, Charlotte and |
Venus Carey, Sarah Sturrup, Clarice Cartwright, Marion and Lisa Saunders, |
Grace Douglas, Harriot Butterfield, Brenda Romer, Idamae Brown, Gracelyn |
Ferguson, Merl Smith, Enid Burnside, Gretel Mather, Ethelyn Hield, |
Pandora Miller, Francita Gibson, Barbara Maxine, Carmen Smith, Judy |
Prosper; grand uncles, Bradley Russell, Henry Thurston, Charles, Edwin, |
Dwight, Derek and Deno Pratt, Robert, Ted and Derick Saunders, Bursil |
Duvalier, Clifton Cartwright, Andrew Sturrup, Derick Edwards, Jeffery |
Francis, Marco Godet, Rudolph Cornish and Henson Prosper; godparents, |
Tony and Marvin Missick, Tyrone Stuart; numerous cousins including, |
Dericka Nottage, Indira Newbold, Lynn Brown, Jessica and Janae Francis, |
N'aila Hamilton, Dorlan, D'Rian and Daniel Collie, Krystal and Kendra |
Carey; numerous other relatives and friends including, Christ Community |
Church, Bible Truth Ministry, Cousin McPhee Cathedral, The Saunders, |
Carey, Collie and Thurston families, Mrs Pearl Strachan and family, Gwenith |
Smith and family, Cleveland Stuart and family, Eulease Smith and family, |
Rebecca Bethel, Rev. Leon Burrows and family, Spurgeon Lightbourne |
and family, Miss Betty Bowe and family, Nola Stuart and family, Mr. Val :
Butler and family, Nola Jolly and family, Elsie Roker and family, Milton |
Russell and family, Rev. Ruth Saunders and family, Livingston Barr and |
family, Gwendolyn Smith and family, Sabrina Saunders and family, Ruth |
Evans and family, Patrick Smith and family of Freeport, Bahamas, Principal |
staff and students of High School and the graduating class of 2010, The |
Stapledon School family, C.C.C. Youth J.A.M., the Sunset Park Community, |

the Market Street and West End Ave. family and many many others too
numerous to mention.

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at Ferguson's Funeral
Directors, 7th Terrace Collins Avenue on Thursday from 10am to 5pm and
at the church on Saturday from 9am until service time.

MARK WALNER
DANIELS, 34

of Augusta Street will be held on
Saturday, March 28, 2009 at 10:45 a.m.
at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Boyd
Road. Officiating will be Deacon Gregory
Taylor. Interment will be made in The
Catholic Cemetery, Tyler Street.

Left to cherish his memories are parents,
Beryl Marshall and Walner Daniels;
children, Marquell, Mark Jr., Marcus,
Lamar and Omar Daniels; sisters, Theresa
Knowles, Anna Sands, Ruth and Naomi
Smith, Mary, Florence, Malvese, Wilmane,
Monique and Carly Daniels; brothers, Alaxander Symonette, Jeremiah
Stubbs, Joseph, Waldeck, Walnerson and Jean Daniels; nieces, Alexandra,
Stanique, Rickiesha, Shanae, Jereniqua, Candiesha, Tamara, Tatyanna,
Rickera, Raven, Antwonae, Giavantae, Mary and Tatyanna; nephews,
Deangelo, Ricardo Jr., Jerethor, Antwon, Perry Jr., Giovanni, Jeremiah Jr.,
and Ricnardo; grand nephew, Teco; aunt, Lena Williams; uncle, William
Daniels, brothers-in-law, Ricardo Sr., Jeremy, Antwon and Perry Sr.; cousins,
Danina, Valnetta, Kettly, David, Willy, Ricardo, Erica, Shacara, Erick,
Wilna, Rysler, Jade, Kendall Marshall, Rayanna, Davan and Johnny Smith;
numerous other family and friends including, The Black, Cole, Johnson,
Grant, Ward, Coleby, Christie, Miller, Dillet, Bodie, Clark, Saunders, Lamb
and Hart families, Olive, Nicole, Sherry, Adrianna Gibson and family,
Eleanor Maynard and family, Rev. Dr. C.B. Moss and family, Rt. Hon. Dr.
Bernard Nottage and family, Derrick and Rodney Neymour, Ruth Minus
and family, Ken Lightbourne and family, Latoya, Lynden, Lavern and
family, Freddie, Dianne Evans, Wanda, Sandra, Mildred Brown, Lean and
their families, Derrick Cummings and family, Kenrick Delaney and family,
Christine Edmund and family, the communities of Bain Town, Kemp Road
and Nassau Village, the staff of City Market Ltd., the staff of Ministry of
Education, staff of Yellow Elder Primary School, staff of The Cove & Reef
Engineering Department. Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Sands, Mrs Clarice Ranger
and Mr. & Mrs Val Bethel.

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at Ferguson's Funeral
Directors, 7th Terrace, Collins Avenue on Thursday from 10am to 5pm and
at the church on Saturday from 9:45am until service time.





PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Michelle Lorraine Douglas, 50:

: Betty Tulloch & family, The Teachers & Students of Kingsway Academy
i Grade 11, The Laboratory Departments of the Princess Margaret & Doctor's

of Sandford Drive will be held on Saturday | Hospitals, Drs. Turnquest & Curling, Oncology Consultants Ltd., Dr.

March 28th, at 10:00 a.m. at Church of | Margo Munroe, The Nurses of the Eye Wing of Princess Margaret Hospital,
; : the family & friends of the Church of God of Prophecy Carmichael Road,
Paulette Johnson and Bishop Hartman L. | the Churches of God of Prophecy, Baillou Hill Road, East Street, Minnie
: s L i Street & Wulff Road, New Providence, The Church of God of Prophecy,
in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F. ? Coral Road, Freeport, The Hepburn, Roker, Burrows & Cox families of
! Coconut Grove, the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, the family and friends

‘ . . . i of the Wild Tamarind Condominiums and a host of other family and friends.
Michelle is survived by: parents: Wilfred :
"Battling" & Gloria Douglas; daughter, | Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Ashley Douglas; Siblings, Melony | Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at
Douglas of Florida, Kirk Douglas, Melina :
& Cleveland Mullings, Michael & Thelma :
Douglas of Grand Bahama, Keva, Kim, :
Doreen, Cheryl, Aja & Tiffany Douglas :
& Shirley & Clarence Saunders; aunts & :
uncles, Pastor Lionel & Nadie Douglas, Pastor Paulette Johnson, Kingsley _;
"Willie" Johnson, Coral & Wilton Knowles, Vincent Johnson, Erma & |
Alfred ’Dukie” Demeritte & Edsal "George" & Mary Johnson; grand aunt ;
& uncle, Leon & Maria Johnson, Nicholas Thompson; nieces, Maya, Anya, :
Janella, Nivia & Chikara; nephews, Mekell, D'Angelo, Neil, Matthew,
Micah, Clarence, Jalal, Antoine & Christian; cousins, James, Joe, & Earl :
Johnson, Bruce & Shanetha Johnson, W. Craig & Anita Knowles, Brent :
Knowles, Katherine Demeritte, Kevin & Tanya Demeritte, Dion Demeritte, |
Sharon & Emery Symonette, Shavonne, Melissa & Elsa Johnson, Prince |
& Floricka Davis, Gloria Pitter, Sylvia & Pastor Simeon Wallace, Edna :
Emmanuel, Hubert, George & Wilfred Douglas, Lionel & Sheila Douglas, |
Michael & Cheryl Douglas, Gwendolyn Dorsette, Joyanne Tucker & |
Donalee Douglas, Thomas Higgs, Livingston, John Arthur, Adrian, Simon |
& Paul Johnson, Antoinette Thompson, Shirley Miller, Genesta Bartlett, :
Norma Hopkins, Patricia Dean, Virginia Minnis, Sally Forbes, Ann Sears, |
Mary & Dolly Thompson, Kirk & Zala Thompson, Kingsley,'Hartley, :
James, Philip, Alec & Alvord Smith, Majorie Foreman, Pandora, Bertha, :
Marlene, Valerie, Valarea and Sandra Johnson, Gloriamae Finley, Rose |

Thompson & Margaret Johnson; other relatives & friends, Patrice & Nathan Gomez, Jerome and Jean Gomez, James and Christine Gomez, John and

| } : da, : Simone Gomez, Kurtz and Carol Ritchie, Mark and Kressville Ritchie,
Donna Stuart & family, Rose Lunn & family, Glenville Roberts & family, | Mucan and Nicola Dawkins, Clifford and Michelle Moxey, Leroy and
Alvan & Jacqueline Rolle & family, Wilfred Coakley & Family, Bishop i Lisa Moncur, Leonardo and Patricia Miller, Anthony and Kenny Stewart,
Hartman Rolle & family, Bishop Shelton Beneby & family, The Descendants | Danny and Sabrina Higgs, Warren and Monique Bethell, Dwayne and

of Arthur & Rose Maycock, including Pastor Arthur Leroy & Judith
i Donna Johnson, Calae Rolle, Alicia Gomez, Mary Clarke, Bentley Collie,
i Humphrey Gomez, Warren Gomez, Marco Gomez and Police Corporal
i 947 Jason Gomez; other relatives and friends including, Julian Gomez,
3 t 5, ‘ | : Jeneve Gomez, Father Laverne Alain, Hyacinth Grant, Jane Brown, Helen
family, Dorcas Johnson & family, Patricia Pratt & family, Ruby Curtis & | Coverley, ida and Lourna Stuart, Leonard Stuart, Marie Beckles, Allan
: Stuart, Christopher Nottage, Ricky Farquharson, Bridgette McPhee, Johnny
i and Stephanie Sainttoma, Pierre, Gordan Sturrup and family and staff of
: Male Surgical Ward 2, ENT Clinic.

Elon & Shirley Arnett & family, Victoria Munroe & family, Michael & |

i Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
: Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at

Donalee Minnis & family, Cedric & Idell Newbold & family, Novelet the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

God of Prophecy, Shirley Street. Minister
Rolle will officiate. Interment will follow

Kennedy Drive.

Stone & family of Mississippi, Gloretta Duncombe & family of Florida,

Maycock & family, Pastor Steven and Jancie Greene, Pastor Andrew
Brown & family, Pastor Andrew & Naquel Brown & family, Minister
Denver & Merlene Dames & family, Senator Johnley & Minister Carnetta
Ferguson & Family, Dr. Hubert Minnis, MP & family, Caroline Hanna &

family, Miriam Curtis & Family, Bueford & Shelly Curtis & family,
Delmetta Seymour & family, Janetta Dean & family, Alvissa Forbes &
family, Lorina Cox & family, Cardinal & Minerva Edwards & family,

Eulease Munroe & family, Eurice (Karen & Dellerese of Miami Florida),
Elva Nairn & family, Vernice Bodie & family, Marina Smith & family,

Greene & family, Beverly Rolle & family, Hyacinth Spence & family,

the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

Nelson Gomez, 60

of Lyon Road will be held on Saturday
March 2fih, at 11:00 a.m. at St. Bede's
Roman Catholic Church, Sutton Street,
off Kemp Road. Rev. Fr. Alain Laverne
will officiate. Interment will follow in St.
Bede's Church cemetery.

Left to cherish his memories are his
brothers and sisters, Fredrick and Shirley
Gomez, Patrick and Jeanie Gomez, Sybil
Louise Ritchie, Jackie and Linda Gomez,
Nurse Louise Dorsett, Flornell Gomez-
Sweeting and Myrtle Gomez; aunt,
Bloneva Gomez-Rahming; nephews and
nieces, Craig and Wanda Gomez, Paul
and Cheryl Gomez, Keith and Elaine

Tiffany Pratt, Felicia Rolle-Adams, Natalie Rutherford, Chantel Hield,





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE

Chester Louis Wells, 61

of #4 Patton Crest, Eastwood Estates
and formerly of Deadman's Cay, Long
Island will be held on Saturday March
28th, at 10:00 a.m. at St. Barnabas
Anglican Church, Wulff & Blue Hill
Roads. Canon Basil Tynes will
officiate. Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Memorial Gardens,
Soldier Road.

His memory will live on in the hearts
of his wife, Cynthia Wells; one son,
Chercovie Wells; seven daughters,
Cherfelt Wells; Chervonne Griggs,
Chernette Wells, Monique
Lightbourne, Tanya Yvette & Carla
Wells, Sheanda Maycock; three sons-
in-law, Clint Fletcher Lightbourne, Dereo Maycock and Anthony
Griggs; one daughter-in-law, Kadian Wells; mother: Edith Wells; one
brother: William Wells; two sisters: Elvina McPhee and Marilyn Sands;
Seventeen grandchildren: Anthony Tyrone and Charlise Griggs; Triniti,
Chercorie and Cherkadin Wells; Chattara Wells, Chelsy, Crystal and
Clint 'CJ' Lightbourne; Shavone Armbrister; Desiree’ Russell;
Alexandria Wells; Antwon Major; Derean, De'Shanel, Dereal & Dereo
"PARCE" Maycock; two great grandchildren: Gem Wells & Darrio
'DJ' Adderley; mother- in-law: Luella Watkins; aunts and uncle: Earlene
Beard Gilbert; Euthine Anderson; Lois A. Edgecombe; Chicqutar
Landray; Lereader West; Hortense L., Doyle, Ethan and Don
Edgecombe;- Rupert & Elise . Watkins, Samuel and William Butler,
Francina Watson, Cathlene Butler; brothers -in-law: Rev. Charles
Sands; Philip, Mervin, Raymond & Gary Watkins, Rev'd. Dr. Vaughan
Cash, Claude Hanna; sisters-in-law: Rosamond & Lynn Wells; Delison
Watkins, Wendy Cash, Lawrena Knowles, Melony Hanna, Kenmarie,
Patricia, Gloria and Janet Watkins; nieces and nephews: Thaddeus
McPhee, Lorna Winder, Jason, Valance and Valencia Francis, Renwood,
Carbrio, Ketress, Kemisha Wells, Raymond, Troy Sands, Cheryl
Ferguson, Marilyn Roberts, Nola Dean, Katrina. Sands, Deborah
Arthur, Pamela, Phyron and Rochelle Wells, Earlison Curry, Annishka,
Nathania, Philip Nathaniel I, Philippa Watkins, Heather Hunt, Lydia
Watkins, Sherrill Poitier, Abigail, Atalia, and Vaughan Lester Cash I,
Adelia Curtis, Conroy, Raynessia, Rayanna Watkins, Torez and Melissa
Hanna, Janiece, Janae and Janell Watkins; godchildren: Tamara Rolle,
Verne and Vanessa Perigord; Clarence Missick, Shanika Adderley
Other Relatives and Friends including: Lyn Armstead, Andrew
Thompson, Lois and Beverly Davis, Patsy Roker, Leona Davis-
Rahming, Debra Knowles-Clarke, Ethelyn Michaels, Carmen Smith,
Dale McLeod, Yvonne Shaw, Deacon Theophilus Davis, David
Adderley, Denise McPhee, Anthony Winder, Maurice Arthur, Sarah
Wells, Godfrey Rolle; Virginia Ellis, Stella DeCosta, Lilleth Forbes,
Pandora and Dr. Shequel Pearce, Monique Forbes, Toni Johnson,
Cornelia Taylor, Ms. Cleomie Wood, Jerome Adderley, Leonard
McPhee, Henry Miller, Norris Amett, Joe Edgecombe, Christopher
McKinney, John Davis, D Cleare, Mrs. Nadine Griggs and family
(Leesburg, Florida) Ida Lewis, Pauline North, and many others too
numerous to list.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 11

Cadar Crest fmeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street « P.O.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

FUNERAL SERVICE

LURIEL VALENTINE
"Bulla"
BURROWS, 70

a resident of Domingo Heights and
formerly of Pure Gold, Andros, will be
held 10:00 a.m. Saturday, March 28th,
2009 at All Saints Anglican Church, All
Saints Way, Joans Heights. Officiating
will be Rev. Fr. S. Sebastian Campbell,
Rev. Fr. E. Julian Campbell, assisted by
other Ministers. Interment will be made
in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F.
} Kennedy Drive and Gladstone Road.

Left to celebrate Luriel's life and cherish
memories of him are his loving wife, Brenda Burrows; his children, Brandon
Burrows, Mona Knowles, Krista Burrows, Corrington Burrows and Craig Burrows;
1 adopted son, Terrance Forbes; 6 Grandchildren, Devon Burrows, Taylor Knowles,
Amelia Burrows, Lavonda, Lance and Mikhilo Forbes; 3 sisters, Elverna James,
Zel Lockhart and Wilma Marshall; 1 son-in-law, George Knowles; 1 daughter-
in-law, Carrol Burrows; his nieces and nephews, Kevin Lockhart, Evadnie Wilson,
Meka Lockhart, Erica James, Pina Davis, Stanya Davis, Keisha Hicks, Sandra
Lighbourne, Denise Garland, Shemeka Moxey, Fiona Forbes, Ricardo Armbrister,
Shannon Armbrister, Theophilis Forbes, Barry Forbes, Kendrick Forbes, Keith
Forbes, Daphne Adderley, Randy Adderley, Tocina Adderley, Duvanna Morris,
Annikita Knowles and Antoine Adderley; 2 Uncles, George Burrows and James
Dorsette; 4 Aunts, Eva Smith, Maria Dorsett, Madeline Major and Willamae
Scott; his cousins, Lucille "Sukkie" Ferguson, Volodus Carey, Loriosa "Mungy
Aiden Burrows, Fr Rodney Burrows, Ural Burrows, Gloria, Eddington Burrows,
Brenda Burrows, James Burrows, Adrian Burrows, Edmund Burrows Jr, Elsiemae
Cleare, Everette Burrows, Bidgette Byer, William Outten, Sheila Johnson, Winifred
Lockhart, Hubert Smith Jr, Rueben Smith, Ross Smith, Carlton Smith, Wales
Smith, Franklyn Smith, Veronica Smith, Coral Dean, Beryl Duncombe, Cecil
Longley, Goulcetta, Shermaine, Elva, Clifford, Marian, Sidney, Minera, Truman,
Gladstone, Roosvelt, Elias, Phillip, Berthalee, Anthony, Maria, Percy, Karen,
Bernard, Carolyn, Dwight, Emily, Yvonne, Larry, Sandra, Priscilla, Felecia,
Emmanuel, Keith, Darrell, Tranille, Errol, Marian, Maryanne, Leaman, Sandra,
Patricia, Raymond, Pedro, Sedrely, Sherylann, Stephanie, Shervon, Sherene,
Stephen, Sherece, Shaketra, Frank Carey, Delores Pinder, Vera Rolle, Sabrina
Carey and Naomi Carey; 2 sisters-in-law, Ruth Adderley and Petrina Forbes; 4
brothers-in-law, Carmi James, Lorenzo Lockhart, James Adderley and Dennis
Marshall; his special and extended friends and family Alonzo Major and crew
at A.J. Major and Son Tyre Shop especially Wesley "Shortie" Ferguson, Duke
Dorsette, Densil and VernalI Major, Joseph Adderley, Wilfred Tinker, Ian "The
Plumber" Major, Michael Curtis, Frank Bethel, Etta Mae Major & family, Billy
Albury, Helen Forbes & family, Vernita Dean, Audra Armbrister, Almeda Campbell
and the entire Campbell family, Rev. Fr. E. Julian Campbell, Pamela Hunt &
family, Dionne and Cheryl Dean, Alice Gardiner & family, Marilyn Russell,
Sandra Johnson & family, Leah and Rachel O'Brien, Errol Edgecombe, Charles
and Clara Knowles & family, Orea and Portia Smith & family, Reve Francis &
family, The Domingo Heights family, Fr James Moultrie, Fr Addison Tumquest,
Stafford Armbrister and the Boating Association, Oswald "Ed" Morrison, The
South Andros Homecoming Association,Fr Sebastian Campbell and the All Saints
family, Member of St Thomas Grant Lodge No 2, B.E.C. (Metering and Protection),
The Staff of the Rand Laboratory P.M. H., Bakers Bay Club, Dr. Christine Chin,
Dr. Agreta Eneas Carey, Ms. McQueen and the Coastline Community Nursing
Center and others too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Gambier House, the Progressive
Liberal Party Head Quarters, Farrington Road on Friday from 10:00 a.m to
4:00p.m., and on Saturday at the church from 9:30a.m., until service time.

In Lieu of floral Tributes donations are to be made to All Saints Community
Centre Building Fund in memory of Luriel Valentine "Bulla" Burrows.





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Clarke's Ganeral Home

#2 Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
P.O. Box EE-16634 ¢ Tel: (242) 361-2569/361-8612 ¢ Fax: (242) 361-1856
Mobile: (242) 457-1491 or (242) 477-2034 ¢ Evening: 324-4687

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

HENRY "Herbie"
PRITCHARD, 75

of McClean's Town, Grand Bahama and formerly:
of Cooper's Town, Abaco will be held on :
Saturday, March 28th, 2009 at 1:00pm at Full :
Gospel Assembly, Treasure Cay, Abaco. !
Officiating will be Pastor Eulin McIntosh, +
assisted by Bishop J. Rodney Roberts and other :
Ministers of the Gospel. Interment will follow :
in the Southside Cemetery, Cooper's Town, !

Abaco.

His legacy lives on in the heart of his loving and devoted wife of 55 years; Inez !
McIntosh-Pritchard; (6) Daughters: Nelrose Parker of Treasure Cay, Abaco, !
Pastor Curlene Roberts of Nassau, Valarie Brathwaite of New York, Joycelyn :
Saunders of Nassau, Karen Lightbourne and Andrea Joseph of Abaco; (5) Sons: !
Tyrone, Deacon Felton and Kevin Pritchard, Berkley Wright of Abaco and !
Deacon Barry Pritchard of Nassau; (4) Sons-in-law: Fred Parker, Bishop J. :!
Rodney Roberts, Charles Lightbourne and Benson Joseph; (3) Daughters-in- !
law: Bonnie, Jennifer and Marinda Pritchard; (15) Grand-daughters: Rosanna |
: Rolle, Clarice, Freddie, Milton, Anna Dames, Valderine, Armando, Nolan, Pedro

Parker, Genea Roberts, lana, Marissa, Amelia, Alexandrea, Nathalie, Katelyn

and Patrica Pritchard, Bertranique Saunders, Jada Williams, Keandra and Whitney !
Lightbourne, Maliyah Forbes and Shantea Wright; (12) Grand-sons; Javaughn :
and Vonrico Toote, Doran and Jakim Roberts, Aliandro Braithwaite, Jaquon :
Murray, Brandon Pritchard, Kenson and Jabez Lighbourne, Bertram Saunders |
Jr., Keshawn Parker and Tyria Rahmsey; (2) Great-grand daughters: Keanna :
and Kearra Lightbourne; (1) Brother: Rufus Pritchard Sr. of Great Harbour +
Cay; (2) Sisters: Iona Gardiner of Abaco and Erma Laing of Grand Bahama; !
(4) Sisters-in-law: Hettie and Adelina McIntosh, Alvera Pritchard-Rolle and !
Donna Russell; (3) Brothers-in-law: Rev. Eulin McIntosh, Shelton Gardner and :
James Dames; (1) Aunt: Virginia Carey of McClean's Town, Grand Bahama; :
(1) Uncle: David Pinder of McClean's Town, Grand Bahama; (22) Nieces +
including: Marsha Wilmalee Bastian, Rose Pritchard, Ina Sturrup, Dorlene :
Poitier, Vernell Swain, Tishka Pritchard, Brenda Woodside, Patricia Ambrister, :
Tawana Davis, Jackie and Cinder McIntosh, Edris Curry, Shanalie Sands, Janet !
and Kay Cooper, lona and Marilyn Laing, Nicole Colebrooke, Patrilee Deleveaux, |
Joycelyn & Debbie McIntosh and Issie Cooper; (22) Nephews including: Fritz:
and Rufus Pritchard Jr., Joseph, Zyndall, Michael, Marvin, and Ernie Pritchard, !
Ronnie, Pete and Lenroy Laing, Ken, Willard, Keshawn and Hanson Gardiner, !
Leo, Nobath, Deolie and Earle McIntosh, Nelson, Jerome & Dario McIntosh :
and Eulin Dames; (3) Adopted daughters: Marsha Roberts, Myrtis Russell and :
Jennifer Des Auguste; (3) Adopted sons: Edwin Curry, Josamer Brave and Esias !
Commish; God children: Viola Edgecombe, Jollian McIntosh, Groveener Delancy +
and Pete Williams; Numerous relatives and best friends including: Medius !
Edgecombe, Ruth Gardiner, Sharon & Kurt Stianiansen, Bob and Marie Vangenert, +
Mike Fish, Harold and Madge Chance, Sharon Heinzeroth, Dave and Louise :
Daveney, Mac and Lucy Beckwith, Mr. & Mrs. Taylor, Ella & Everett Pinder, !
Pastor Stafford and Lucy Symonette, Mother Laura Roberts, Rev. Rudy Roberts, :
Brenda Laing, Loris Pinder, Horatio and Hazel Balliou, Sylvia and Floyd Poitier, :
Eric and Rev. Pedyson Balliou and family, Velma Pritchard, Norman Basdian, |
Linda Dames, Jerome Deleveaux, Rosnell Buterfield, Rev. Lawrence and Theresa !
Pinder, Dr. Robin Roberts, Pastor Earlin Baillou, Minister Alicia Evans, Missionary !
Christine Taylor and family, Pastor Jannette Gerenus, and Minister Shane and 1
Garnell Newchurch of Nassau, Five Porches Of Deliverance Apostolic Church, ! Viewing will be held on Thursday, March 26th at Clarke's Funeral Home, #10
the Nurses and Doctors from Cooper's Town Clinic, Full Gospel Assembly, Taxi !
Drivers of Treasure Cay, Abaco the entire Cooper's Town and McClean's Town :

and High Rock communities and others too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held on Thursday, March 26th at Clarke's Funeral Home #10
: Tonique Williams-Darling Highway from 10:00am to 6:00pm ONLY and on

Saturday from 12:00noon at the church in Treasure Cay, Abaco until service

BASIL "Blanket"
MUNROE, 71

of Blanket Sound, Central Andros and formerly
of Crooked Island Street will be held on Saturday,
March 28th, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at Judea Baptist
Church, Harold Road. Officiating will be Rev.
Marina Sands, assisted by other Ministers.
Interment will follow in the Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish wonderful memories are his wife,
Sharmaine Munroe; (18) children, Duran,
Leonardo, Shadasha, Basil Jr., Shantraille, Garth Sr., Shervin Sr., Gregory, Gloria

and Opal; (4) adopted children, Nicola, Marsha, Deann and Patrick Rolle; (34)
grandchildren, Reino, Steven, Garth Jr., Crystal, Shervin Jr., Giovani, Albreano,
Shendera, Adia, Sharvia, Keva, Armondo Jr., Jayson, Rudell, Rickey, Mchyoie,
Bridgette, Calvin, Ulrick, Deangio, Devack, Elron, Sonny, Vargo, Zearia, Milton
Jr., Eboni, Todd, Dante, Alfa, Anicka, Ricardo, Sharvonne and Villio; (4) great
grandchildren; (1) sister, Rosemary Munroe-Johnson; (6) brothers, Hiram,
Raymond, Neville, Felix, Lionel and Brutinel Munroe; (3) aunts, Elaine Sands,
Shirley Wright and Lillian Belle; (3) uncles, Neville Simmons, Elgin Wright
and Deryil Sands; (6) brothers-in-law, Chris, Elvis and Sheldon Mackey, Gary
Williams, Jerome Sands and Christopher Johnson; (14) sisters-in-law, Talinda
Williams, Themeia Sands, Delphine, Kathrine and Euerka Mackey, Orita, Helena,
Aladice, Mary, Alma, Cleomi and Marilyn Munroe, Virginia Newton and Sedia
Newbold; mother-in-law, Coralee Sands Stevens; (1) son-in-law, Jeffery Rolle;
(3) daughters-in-law, Ewonka Forbes, Tracey and Reena Munroe; fathers-in-
law, Leroy Stevens and Leo Mackey; grandmother-in-law, Leola Sands; (45)
nieces including, Elarenita Woodside, Jennifer Anderson, Malani, Oliver,
Kondalezza Mackey, Nicklothe Sands, Nh'kasha Neymour, Paulliann, Dorie and
Nh'choria Mackey; (35) nephews including, Baltram, Kendal, Mark, Caro,
Steven, Valentine, Darren, Osmond and Samuel Munroe, Kevron Mackey, Jerome
and Jermine Sands, Te'vion Lloyd, Edney Newton and Jason Munroe; godmother,
Rosemary Roberts; a host of other relatives and friends including, Rev. Marina
Sands and the officers and members of Judea Baptist Church family, Pastor
Andrew Stubbs Sr., Minister Ishmael Brown and family, Fredericka Pennerman
and family, Rev. Patrice Deleveaux and family, Gaynor Curtis, Ed Hanna and
family, Edward Penn and family, Jewel Dean, Paul Moss and family, Franklyn
Ferguson and family, Charles Thompson and family, Benjamin Bain and family,
Gorrin Brown and family, Shekeithra Lightbourne and family, Deborah Potter
and family, Ed Moxey and family, Errol Munroe, Dereck Jolly, Darlene Duncombe,
the PLP Branch of St. Cecilia, Roy Colebrooke of the Bahamas Hotel & Allied
Workers Catering Union, the entire Pink Porch Crew, the Grove, Conch Hill
and Crooked Island Street families.

Tonique Williams-Darling Highway from 10am to Spm and on Saturday, from
10am at the church until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 13

jvommonirealth tuneral Home

Independence Drive ¢ Phone: 341-4055
FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT FOR

PAUL DANIEL
COX, 48

affectionately called :
"Pablo"

of Cooper's Town, Abaco, ,

will be held on Saturday : Carmel, Vanessa, Bradley McKenzie, Jeno, Lamont,

10:00 a.m. at Revival Time ; Rev. Elucid Baillou, Mizpha and Neil, Johnnly and

} Pentecostal Church, Cooper's Rosie Edgecombe, Ellen Newbold, Bishop Henry

Town, Abaco. Bishop Cedric | Wright and family, Bishop Archilus Cooper and family,

Bullard, assisted by Bishop Burnell Parker will officiate | Thelma Edgecombe and family, Noreen and Kirk

and interment will follow in South Side Cemetery, ; Murray, Eric Jr. and Jason “Willie” Cooper, Corey

: Lowe, Marvin, Zyndell and Joseph Pritchard, Henza
: Dawkins, Ruth Cox-Jones, Tony, Oscar, Cecil and

Cooper's Town, Abaco.

Precious memories are held by his life long |

companion, Florina Cornish; four children, Kevelyn ; Bootle, Gersil and Maria Edgecombe, Candymae

Cox, Reserve Police Constable #864 Pauline Cox of ; Murphy, Philip Lowe of Freeport, Kirk and Stanley

and | Pedican, Lester McDonald, Leo Reckley, Solomon
Shandeka Cox; three grandchildren, Kefron Wright, :

Trevon Heild and Peejay Jervon Cox; ten sisters, 1569 Cpl. Garvin Mackey, R.B.D.F. Charles Williams,

Brenetta Bullard, Victoria and Shirlean Rolle, Rosetta : Glen and Emily Culmer, Floyd and Charles Poitier,
Piety Delpminss lease), leita Isticiav ies, Einerst Cutty O.C & Melvern Cornish, Melvese Williams, Samuel

Patrice Cox, Barbadella McKinney and Greta }
McKenzie; two brothers, Furnley and Odell Cox; :
nine aunts, Miriam Roker of Miami, Florida, Estelle, :
Annie, Kathleen, Florence, Delphine, Betty and Ruth :
McIntosh and Dorcas Cox of Freeport, Grand Bahama; :

three uncles, Ronald, Calvin and Eddie McIntosh; : . aa
nieces and nephews, Evangelist Catherina Thompson, } Mckinney, Cooper, Wright, McDonald, Adams, Poitier,
Minister Yvette McIntosh, Minister Troy and Sabrina :
Russell, Bishop Cedric and Gertrude Ambrose, Alma :

and Shawn Bullard, Marold, Rustin, Quintin and Nurse :

Seanica Rolle, Erica, Remeca, Mandell, Torrianno, : Force, Abaco, and the entire communities of Cooper's

Neja, Rickell, Rickera and Rick Jr., Demetrius, Odell

Cox Jr., Kinglsey Jr., and Kishna Murray, Vernique, : iis d friend oe THE
Taron, and Tarik Russell, Nevin, Ritchie and Dorena | a ae MEMORIEE Cl OMIMIONWEALTH
Curry, Paulette Forbes, Sinovia McIntosh, Jewayna, : ?

ancl | FUNERAL HOME, INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on

Nathaniel McKinney, Niketo Edgecombe, Marinique, ; Thursday from 4:00 - 7:00 p.m., on Friday from 10:00

Maronicia and Moriah Knowles; sister-in-law, Chantell :

Cox; nine brothers-in-law, James Bullard, Kinglsey | from 6:30 p.m. to service time on Saturday.

the Royal Bahamas Police Force, Paul Jr.,

Wayne McKenzie Jr., Rolanda Simpson Jr.,

: Murray, Veron Russell, Livingstone Rolle, Pastor Mark
! Knowles, Beltrum Curry, Rick Cox, Rudolph
McKinney and Wayne McKenzie; godparents,
Orthnell and Mildred Russell; other relatives and
friends including, Vivian Cornish, Lenward, Clyde
and Charmaine, Eddison Sr. and Orlean, Wesley,
: Sidney and Randolph Cornish, Elaine Baillou, Nigel

and Jennalee Bootle, Evamae Reckley, Lonnie Cornish,

Alphonso Rolle, Santino Cornish, Noel and Carnetta

Russell, Timothy "Dim" McIntosh, Leroy McIntosh,

Dr. Albert Francois, Melvina Black, Hilgrove Delancy,

Miller, Oscar, Clint and Clarke Jones, Reno, Lynden
Wright, Uta Rolle, Samuel Cooper, Cathy McIntosh,
Joan Sands, Donald Cornish, Ejnar Cornish, Archie
and Cassie McDonald, McIntosh family, Russell,
Cornish, Curry, Parker, Rolle, Bootle, Pedican,

Mills, Murray, Nairn, Sands, Pritchard, Reckley,
Edgecombe, Williams, Jones, Sawyer, Duncombe and
Nesbitt families, the staff of The Royal Bahamas Police

Town, Fire Road and Blackwood, Abaco.

a.m. - 12:30 p.m. and at the church in Abaco on Friday





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
P.O. Box N-3572
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

RUDOLPH ‘Rudy’
CHRIS GRIFFIN, 60

of Augusta Street will be held on
Sunday, March 29th, 2009, at 11:00
a.m., at Grant's Town Seventh Day
Adventist Church, Wellington Street.
Officiating will be Pastor Andrew
E. Burrows. Interment follows in
Old Trail Cemetery, Abundant Life
Road.

Left to cherish his memories: one
son: Rudolph Jr.; grandson: Rudolph
III; sisters: Louise Rolle and
Joycelyn Brown; brothers: Leviticus
Rolle of Miami, Florida, Franklyn Brown and Billy Rolle; nieces:
Merilyn Morrison-Hamilton, Deborah Burrows, Theresa Rolle, Shanette
Pratt and Elaine Knowles; nephews: Clarence Cleare and Johnathan
Rolle; grand nieces and nephews: Taimak, Yolande, Shenique and
Deangelo Cleare, Bakari Miller, Talez Strachan, Destiny Bridgewater,
Crystal and Krisdion Pratt, Carlos Jr. and Alexandria Coakley; uncle:
Leroy Glass; numerous cousins including: Sherry Elliott-Ferguson,
Dorey Delaney, Sonia "Nettie" Elliott of Boynton Beach, Florida,
Dwayne Colebrooke, Dianne, Jacob, Lynden, Ednal, Ruthmae and
Philip Rose, Brian, Walter and Eunice Rose, Deborah Rose-Munnings,
Sharon Rose-Hutchinson, Edna Hanna, Marsha, Theresa and Renbert
Mortimer, Roslyn Rolle, Philip and Raynard Johnson, Yvonne Johnson,
Cisel Newbold, Charles Brown, Kenneth Christie, Gloria Culmer,
Joseph, Donald Sr., Leroy II, Wilfred, David, Althea and Violet Glass,
Yvonne and George Gardiner Sr., Christine, Vera, Georimae, Philip and
George Gardiner Jr., Patricia Johnson and Carmeletta Williams; step
uncle: Egbert Rolle; step aunts: Caroline, Carmie and Etta Rolle;
godmother: Becca Davis; god brother and sisters: Philip Greenslade,
Paula Greenslade and Delbom Johnson; a host of other relatives and
friends including: Christopher Pratt, "Ambadar & Freddie", Mavis
Brown, the Miller Family, Rubyann Darling & Family, Philamese
Burrows, Maureen and Charles Brown, Anthony 'Ancie', Donnamae
Knowles, Bernencha Nesbitt, Beryl Marshall, Lena Williams, Cherine
Hart, Apostle & Mother Wallace, Adrianna Gibson, Eleanor Maynard
& Family, Kenrick Delaney, Beryl Thompson, Kirky Lightbourn,
Michael Lockhart, Michael Pratt, Morina McKenzie, Adrina Bastian,
Sandra Frazier, Angel Thompson, Monique Delancey, Zebeus and
Andrake Rolle, the entire Bain Town Community, (especially Augusta
Street), C.H. Reeves Junior High School, special thanks to the Pastor
and members of Grant's Town Seventh Day Adventist Church, Pastor
and members of New Destiny Baptist Church, and the Staff of Princess
Margaret Hospital's Main Operating Theatre.

Relatives and mends may pay their last respects at Newbold Brothers
Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street off Market and East Streets
on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Sunday at the church from
10:00 a.m., until service time,

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

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Topaz Funeral Service
For

MISS MARILYN
ONELL MUNROE, 35

of #24 Sumner Street, Nassau Village will be
held on Saturday, March 28, 2009 at 2pm at
Bethel Baptist Church, Meeting Street. Elder
William Miller, assisted by Evangelist Kevin
Beneby, Elders Nelson Turnquest and Eldon
Hastie will officiate and burial will be in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens & Mausoleums,
John F. Kennedy Drive & Gladstone Road.

The Radiance of this “Topaz of A Gem” will always glow in the hearts of her:
Mother: Lillian Wilson;

Four Brothers: Prince, Christopher, Spellman, Jr. and Steven Munroe;
Eight Sisters: Barbara Taylor, Marsha Boston,. Edith Smith, Judymae Nesbitt,
Nadre Boothe-Clarke, Victoria Williams, Orenia Marshall and Carmell Munroe;
Five Uncles: Rupert Butler, John Wilson and Addington Nairn, Arnold Seymour,
Randolph Minnis;

Six Aunts: Julia Seymour, Helen Parker of Newark New Jersey, Claramae
Stubbs. Julieth Minnis, Cynthia Butler and Cleotha Wilson;
Three Brothers-in-law: Glenroy Taylor, Patrick Boston and Shawn Smith;
Two Sisters-in-law: Siobhan and Hilda Munroe;

One Great Grand Uncle: Charles Anderson;

Five Great Grand Aunts: Hilda Bosfield, Unez Anderson, Miriam Farquharson,
Ester Fox and Inez Claridge;

Special Friend: Hugo Brown;

God Son: Andre Ferguson;

Numerous Nephews and Nieces Including: Brandon, Bria, Antanae, Anthony,
Shawn Jr., Patrick Brian, Melody, Christopher Jr., Monique, Lavern, Lauramae,
Dionne, Theora, Icelyn, June, Ellen, Portia, Stephanie, Matrina, Melony,
Cedric, Ranford, Valentino, Bradford, Steven, Theophelis and Dennis;
Cousins: Patrice, Tina, Fritz Jr., Prince, Cyntyche, Danaz, Caron, Carol,
Valarie, Pamela, Carla, Letheria, Charles, Matthew, Darrin, Edris, John, Judith,
Carla, Chrissy, Adrian, Andrew, Jared, Jamal, Terrell, Roya, Randy, Rochelle,
Dana, Theresa, Mellie, Ryan, Ceon, Teran, Rickell, Ratan and Rashad, Janet
Harvey, Susan DaCosta, Janet Harvey, Susan DaCosta, Felice Wallace, Godfrey
Bethel, Cecil Edgecombe and Irma McKenzie;

Numerous other loving family and friends including: Unamae Nairn,
Christina Rolle, Shantell Dames, Michelle Moss and Family, Stewart Miller,
William Gibson, Loraine Knowles, Ade and Christine Docemo, Loraine Simms,
Nathalie Coleby, Gwen Saunders, Constance Munnings and their families,
The Hon. Claire Hepburn, The Hon. Michael Barnett, The Management and
Staff of Graham, Thompson and Co., The Management and Staff of Higgs
and Johnson, The entire Church of Christ Family of Highbury Park, The
Brown, The Joseph, The Rahming, The Clarke, The Dean and The Deveaux
families, The BFM Family, The Bethel Baptist Church Family, and the Sumner
Street and Nassau Villase Communities.

Visitation will be in the “Fimerald Suite” Emerald Ridge Mortuary & Monument
Company Ltd. #20 Claridge Road on Friday, March 27, 2009 from 1pm to
6pm and at Bethel Baptist Church, Meeting Street on Saturday, March 28,
2009 from 1pm to service time.

Visit our website: www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video
tributes, sign guest book, send condolence, sympathy, share
memories and make funeral arrangements.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 15

Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020¢ Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 ¢ 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

MEMORIAL SERVICE/GRAVESIDE SERVICE

Memorial Service for

Bishop Cleavert Bain, 73

of Golden Isles Road will be held on :
Friday at 8:00 P.M. at Faith Tabernacle :
Church of God, Golden Isles Road. :
Officiating will be Bishop Robert :

Meph isted by Other Ministers. :
Pee BS SINE OY MINE MOSES: and Fifth Street on Friday from 2:00 P.M. until 6:00 P.M., Saturday

‘ from 11:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M. and at the church on Sunday from

Last rites for Bishop Cleavert Bain aged }
73 of Golden Isles Road will be held :
on Sunday at 1:00 P.M. at Church of :
God Temple, Coconut Grove Ave and :
Crooked Island Street. Officiating will :
be Bishop Robert Mcphee assisted by :
other Ministers. Interment in Lakeview :
Memorial Gardens, J.F.K. Drive and Gladstone Road. :

He is survived by his wife: Reverend Veronica Bain; one son: Reverend
Karven Q. Bain; one daughter: Anita Bain-Ferguson of Miami, :
Florida; one son-in-law: Deacon Dana Ferguson Sr. of Miami, :

Florida; one daughter-in-law:

Newry & Bernie Bowe of Goulds, Florida; four brothers-in-law:

Bishop Robert McPhee, Laurel McPhee, Cecil Newry & Sam Reckley; }
six sisters-in-law: Jennie Bain of Macon, Georgia; Molly Bain of :
Homestead, Florida; Evangelist Modena McPhee, Victoria McPhee, :
Emmarita Reckley, Naomi McPhee; two step-sons: Ron McPhee & :
Reynold Placide; Nephews & Nieces: Wilton Jr. & Brenda Bain, :
Wendall & Brenda Bain, Kenneth & Florence Beckford, Clyde and :
Viola Beckford, Godfrey & Rosemary Newry, Kenneth & Pamela :
Newry, Andrew & Maurice Newry, Wentworth Newry, Steve Newry, :
Leslie Bowe, Craig & Shannie Bowe, Trevor McPhee, Shawn McPhee, :

Shavon & Cambridge, Adrain & Kiki McPhee, Yvette & Shawnwell
Hayes, Moleka Thompson, Theresa Bowe, Eleanor & Fred Dames,

Deborah & Steven Moxey, Judy & George Gardiner, Beaulah &
Anthony Arthur, Claudine & Godfrey Thurston, Katherina Newry,

Jacqueline E. Bain; four :
grandchildren: LaKwan & Adriel Bain and Dana & Deveron }
Ferguson; two brothers: Wilton Bain of Macon, Gerogia & Gustavus :
Bain of Homestead, Florida; three sisters: Viola Beckford, Mildred :

: Dorcena Nixon, Pastor Judy Charlton, Mr. Donald & Pastor Irene
: Charlton & Family, Dr. Inez Rolle, Minister Nellie Carey, Pastor Otis
: Williams & Family, Bishop John & Mother Hariette Davis & Family,
: Vernal & Tara McPhee, Kim McPhee, Meril Storr, Larry Storr, Gregory

McPhee, Marvin Gibson, Valvare Roker, Telsene Storr, Ellamae Storr,
Melody, Joy & Ramona Newton, Doctors and Staff of Male Orthopedic
Ward of the Princess Margaret Hospital and numerous godchildren.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson Road

12:00 Noon until service time.

Graveside service
James Rufus Fox, 74

of Bonefish Pond of Carmichael Road
and formerly off Fox Town, Abaco will
be held on Saturday at The Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen and Spiknard Roads
at 2:00 P.M. Officiating will be Fr.
Sebastian Campbell

He is survived by his father, Robert Fox;
5 Children: Brinton, Gary, Terry,
Michaelia and Melissa Fox; 6
Stepchildren: Nelson Cartwright, Diane
Bowe, Deborah Rahming, Michael
Hopkins, Melissa Munroe and
Antoinette Hopkins; 2 Sisters: Althea
McBride and Ethel Fox; 1 Brother: Gilbert Fox; 1 Aunt: Jestina
Russell; Numerous Grandchildren: Garyio, Garrison, Anthonique,
Indera, Gary Jr., Giovanno, Brintina, Ricardo, Bjay, Shanell, Kassandra
Fox, Tinesha Gibson, Brendi and Brenae Butler, Janaz and Jamal

Ranger, Chantique Brown, Valentino Ash, Keonte Wholeness, Sergeant
Knowles, Robyn & Minister Denczil Rolle, Mechelle & Pastor Edward :
: Nelson Cartwright Jr., Talitha Cartwright, Craig Peterson, Shamek
Paulamae Brice, Gloria Beckford, Joann Beckford, Cheryl Beckford, :

2303 Lisa Rahming-Pratt, Shantel Rahming, Crystal Cartwright,
Ewing; 7 Great Grandchildren: Theotis Johnson Jr., Adriel Pratt, Craig

: Peterson Jr., Terrance Jr., Tyrese and Teandra Ewing and Kaylen
: Butler; 3 Daughters-in-law: Sharon Fox, Kayadera Clarke and Erma
Estella Newry, Lydia Woodside, Aramintha & Malcolm Wright, and :
numerous grand-nephews and grand-nieces. A host of other relatives :
and friends including: Faith Tabernacle Church of God, Cooper’s :
Terrace Church of God, Highway Churches of God Bahamas, :
Pentecostal Unity Fellowship Churches, Golden Isles Road Community, :
Kemp Road Community, Fort Fincastle Community, Coca-Cola :
Company Limited, Aqua Water Company(formally AquaBev), :
Chelsea’s Choice, Bateman Bain & Family, Helen Hall & Family, :
Rocky Robinson & Family, Bradley & Antionette Pratte, Nurse

Cartwright; Numerous nieces and nephews; Special Friend: Laura
Collie; Host of other relatives and friends including Sawyer, Harris
Thompson, Charlie Gibson, Laverity Deveaux, Joanna Hopkins,
Charles McDonald and Morgan;

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson Road
and Fifth Street on Friday from 12:00 Noon until 6:00 P.M. and at
the gravesite from 1:45 p.m. until service time





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

Piutler’s duneral Home

& Qrematortun

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Official
Funeral Announcement

for the former MP of Long Island
and Cabinet Minister,

JAMES
FRANKLIN
KNOWLES, 66

will be held on Friday,
March 27th, 2009 at 11:00
a.m., at Christ Church
Cathedral, George Street.
Officiating will be
Archdeacon Keith
Cartwright, Fr. Michael
Gittens and Fr. Crosley
Walkine. Interment will
follow in St. Anne’s
Cemetery, Fox Hill.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Amarylis
Knowles, two sons; James A. Knowles and Roman
Knowles, one daughter; Kimberly Knowles, his mother;
Agnes Knowles of Texas, six brothers; Alex Jr., Emerick,
Patrick, Geoffrey, Charlton and Eric Knowles, six sisters;
Ethlyn Virginia Pinder, Ruby Louise Collins of West
Palm Beach Florida, Ruth Yvonne Knowles of Dallas
Texas, Deborah Susan Knowles and Julianna Green of
Rowlett Texas, one uncle; Hilbert Burrington Pinder,
numerous nieces and nephews, in-laws; Mavis and Joey
Treco, William (Bill) Pinder, Richard Anderson Sr.,
Shirley, Brenda, Rosa, Linda and Lolitta Knowles, James
Green, Predensia Fox, Bernadette Darville, Jennifer
Cartwright, a host of other relatives and friends and
special thanks and appreciation to his many doctors.

Mr. Knowles will lie in state at the House of Assembly
on Thursday, March 26, from 9:00am until 5:00pm. In
lieu of flowers the family has requested that donations
be made to the Cancer Society, P. O. Box SS-6539, in
memory of James Knowles.

Funeral Services are being handled by Butlers’ Funeral
Home & Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Pinder's Funeral Home
“Serntice Beyond Meacure ”

=

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 « CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

Funeral Service for

DENCLE DEWITT
MUNNINGS, 76

who died at the Princess
Margaret Hospital on
Sunday will be held at
Ebenezer Methodist
Church Shirley Street on
Saturday March 28 , 2009
at 11:00am. Burial will be
in the church cemetery.
Rev. Christopher Neilly
/ and Rev. Dr. Laverne
Lockhart officiating.

He is survived by his wife: Constance Munnings; his
children: Nicky and Tracy Munnings, Cindy Rudon,
Mary Hepburn and Dencle Munnings Jr.; sons-in-law:
Orlando Rudon and Willard Hepburn; daughter-in-law:
Irene Munnings; grandchildren: Bianca and Xavier
Munnings, Byron and Corey Cartwright, Tracia
Munnings, Sven Alcondo, Jeannie Mae, Swan Hepburn,
Durie Lavanya, Lamara and Dencle Edgecombe; great
grandchildren: Devin and Sven Jr. Hepburn, Jyohan
"Remy" Rahming, Aaron Neely, and Arianna Wright;
two brothers: Cecil Thompson and Harold Munnings;
four sisters: Mavis and Jeannie Holbert, Cynthia Nairn
and Gwen McDiggan; sisters-in-law: Georgette
Thompson, Gwynneth Munnings, Rev. Kenris Carey,
Patricia Sawyer, Audrey Deveaux and Deveral Ferguson;
brothers-in-law: Hon. Earl Deveaux, Lavarity and Steve
Deveaux and Ashward Ferguson; nieces and nephews:
Judy Deveaux, Vanria Fisher, Sandra Rogers, Ava
Munnings, Leanord, Leandrix, Leroy, Leanadette, Ross,
Anthony, Cedric and Wendal Munnings, Paulette and
Gregory Huyler, Dennis and Keva Malone, Debbie and
Donna Williams, Dina and Dudley Smith, Denise Rolle,
Linda and Melony Williams, Caron Nairn, many other
relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respect at Pinders Funeral
Home Palmdale Ave., Palmdale on Friday March 27th,
2009 from 4:00pm until 7:00pm.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 17

ae
and Crematouumn Limited

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Rodd, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB- 12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

Dr. Rolle, Dr. Stubbs and Nurses of the ICU at the Rand Memorial Hospital.

LO UE a FOR

BIRNELL OLSON
RUSSELL, 60

OF #139 SCOTT AVENUE, FREEPORT,
+s) GRAND BAHAMA AND FORMERLY :
) OF WEST END, GRAND BAHAMA ;

WILL BE HELD ON SATURDAY,

* | MARCH 28, 2009 AT 10:00 A.M. AT ST.
MARY MAGDALENE ANGLICAN }
CHURCH, WEST END, GRAND :
BAHAMA. OFFICIATING WILL BE :
REV’D FATHER STEPHEN D. GRANT

| ASSISTED BY REV. THEOPHILUS N.
J ROLLE. CREMATION WILL FOLLOW. :

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Renay Taylor-Russell; sons:
Remardo, Reneldo and Remiro Russell; stepmother: Rachel Russell; sisters:
Maria Johnson, Antoinette Rolle, Maureen Bethel, Coral Pinder, Dawn Bethel,

Kathleen Rolle, Patricia Russell, Barbara Outten, Sharon Greene, Roberta
Slinger, Rev. Stephanie Mackey, Sandra Flowers, Janet Minnis, Sabrina

Skinner, Lillian Russell and Suzette Tulloch; brothers: Charles Bethel Jr.,

Audley Russell Jr., Ralph Brown, Brian, Doyle, Patrick and Ricardo Russell;

numerous nieces and nephews including: Maurice, Claudia, Natasha,
Cecelia, Mia, Evita, Kenya, Anishka, Luella, Michael, Alice, Shaniek, Cliftina,
Lisel, Teneil, Chantel, Coria, Charles, Gregory, Tavari, Chad, Shamrock,
Mikie, Davon, Earl, Philmore, Shane, Sasha, Tanya, Troy, Jumoke, Yinka,

Audra and Serena; aunts: Violet Wildgoose, Cynthia Saunders and Joan }
Russell-Newton; sisters-in-law: Emily Munnings, Francina Adderley, Margo
Major, Denza Bethel, Elizabeth and Betty Russell; brothers-in-law: Franklyn }
“Bob” Taylor, Hansel Taylor, Everette Johnson, Kenneth Rolle, Clifford
Pinder, Israel Rolle, Pastor Wilbur Outten, Keith Greene, Lamuel Mackey, }
Peter Skinner and Sydney Tolluch; aunts-in-law: Thelma Cartwright, Lona }
Wells, Muriel Sears and Peggy Sawyer; uncles-in-law: Frank and Garnett }

Culmer and Gerald Wildgoose; godfather: Vincent Russell; godchildren:

Trevor Johnson Sr., and Treston Roberts and a host of other relatives and }
friends including: Bradley and Dolly Armbrister and family, Hon. Neko and :
Barbara Grant and family, Basil Armbrister, Maurice and Lin Glinton and }
family, Ali and Patrice Campbell and family, Fred and Diane Russell and :
family, Naaman and Beatrice Russell and family, Donal and Nancy Sweeting }
and family, Eddison and Naomi Butler and family, Margaurite Johnson and }

family, Osbourne and Nora Cooper and family, Eddie and Carnie Claude,

Gerald and Victoria Wright and family, Hartman and Autherine Jones and

family, A.S.P Clarence and Michelle Reckley and family, Sandy Thompson,

Bradley Gibbs, Melvin Knowles and family, Philip and Erica Kemp and
family, Gus and Maria Vacatos, Dennis and Sonny Martin, Mr. and Mrs.
Addison Culmer and family, Madeline Pinder and family, Mabel Colton and ;
family, The Wilchcombe family, Walter Rolle and family, Father and Mrs. }
Stephen Grant and family, Bishop Michael Eldon, Canon and Mrs. Winfield }
Goodridge and family, Father and Mrs. Norman Lightbourne and family, }

Father and Mrs. Rudolph Cooper and family, Rev. and Mrs. Theophilus Rolle,
Rev and Mrs. Emmett Weir, Cara and Francisco Taylor, Stacy Moultrie,
Maurissa Wells, Kercheriffe Munnings, Olga Culmer, Rev. Carla Culmer,

Reudon Knowles, Thomas Atkinson Jr., Mrs. Sheila Pratt, Wayne Carey, |
Thelia Archer, Claudia Garland, Pearl Russell, Phedra Fitzgerald, Gea :

Robinson, Polymers International Ltd., Freeport Advertising family, St. Paul’s
Methodist College and Church family, the Wes End community, Dr. Forbes,

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “PERPETUAL SUITE” OF
RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM LIMITED,
11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY
FROM 10:00 A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY
FROM 8:30 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

DEZARENE LARANDA
FERGUSON, 33

OF #49 WEST PIONEER’S WAY,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA WILL
BE HELD ON SATURDAY, MARCH 28,
2009 AT 11:00 A.M. AT ZION BAPTIST
CHURCH, EAST SUNRISE HIGHWAY,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA.
OFFICIATING WILL BE REV. DR
PETER PINDER. INTERMENT WILL
FOLLOW IN THE GRAND BAHAMA
MEMORIAL PARK, FROBISHER
DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA.

Left to cherish her memories are her: Carl Ferguson; stepmother: Idamae
Ferguson; 4 sisters: Sharon Major, Yvette Ferguson, Sarah Swain and Bernice
Cooper; 2 brothers: Carl Jr. and Carven Ferguson; adopted sisters: Michelle
Pratt, Shandell Adderley, Sabrina Paul of Nassau, Mizpah Mitchell and
Theresa Russell; five nieces: Lashanda McDonald Cedonie, Carlisa Ferguson,
Andrea Major, Angel Spencer and Quianna Cooper; eleven nephew: Shane
Jr. and Chadreco Thurston, Rashon and Barrino Swain, D’Angelo Major,
Carl II, Alexis, Cameron, Nyshanti and Matio Ferguson and Daniel Cooper;
two grandnieces: Tredijah Duncombe and Miracle Deal; four grandnephews:
KyVoughn and Kiajae McDonald, Kimani and Avante Cedonie; eight aunts:
Lelorise Russell, Sybil Ferguson, Patsy Mott, Diann Williams, Delcina Pratt,
Linda Pinder, Marjorie Ferguson and Elise Cornish; uncles: Austin Duncombe;
sister-in-law: Iona Ferguson; three brothers: Andrew Major, Barry Swain
and Edwin Cooper; nephew-in-law: Alan Cedonie; five aunts-in-law: Mary
Duncombe, Remelda Feaster, Kemah and Emily Ferguson and Susie Davis;

three uncles-in-law: Samuel Pratt, Rev. Douglas Williams and Harold
Russell; 87 first cousins especially: Kirklin Williams and Cleophus Bevans;
cousins: Winifred and Pandora Mitchell, Shirley, Muriel, Ula, John and Ruth
Russell, Idamae, Janet, Dawn, Sandra and Curlene Feaster, Shelia Johnson,
Brenda Simms, Clara Walker, Dolly Swann, Joan Jones, Henzel, Huden and
James Davis, Charity and Sarah Johnson, Blossom Davis, Cheryl, Bessie,
Alidice, Ulga, Wilton, Jackson, Donald, Dori and Liz Martin, Michelle Martin,
Margaret Russell and Kanita Glinton; godparents: Tony and Stephanie
Marshall and a host of other relatives and friends.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “IRENIC SUITE” OF RESTVIEW
MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST
CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM
10:00 A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY FROM
9:30 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.





PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

tir haar ae HNP
and Crematouum Limiled

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Rodd, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034

EOE USA LS re FOR

CHARLENE COLETTE
RENEE FORBES, 41

OF #48 WESTERIA AVENUE,

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA AND ?
FORMERLY OF NASSAU, NEW ?
PROVIDENCE WILL BE HELD ON :
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 AT 2:00 i
P.M. AT COMMUNITY AT HEART
TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD OF :

PROPHECY, CORAL ROAD,

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA. :
OFFICIATING WILL BE PASTOR }
KERMIT E. SAUNDERS ASSISTED BY
BISHOP GHALY SWANN. INTERMENT
WILL FOLLOW IN THE GRAND :

BAHAMA MEMORIAL PARK SECTION #2, FROBISHER DRIVE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA.

Left to cherish her memories are her husband: Roderick V. Forbes; children:

Chanah and Chavanna Forbes; stepchildren: Rasheda, Ramika and Francheska |
Forbes; parents: Hurai “Big One” & Cynthia Ferguson; mother and father- }
in-law: Coleta Forbes, Hugh and Valeria Solomon; brothers & Sisters: Keith

& Jan Ferguson, Dwight & Pamela Ferguson, Kevin & Samita Ferguson,

Dwayne Ferguson, Marvin & Jillian Ferguson, Leonard & Michelle Hall, Dave

& Lynette Taylor; brothers and sister-in-laws: Janet Dean, Nelda Forbes,

Jacqueline Forbes, Schreece Solomon, Simone Solomon, Akeira Laing, Nckoya :
Hall, Hayward Forbes, Dwayne Forbes, Ethon Dean, Odell Solomon, Charles :

Laing, Gevon Hall; nephews & nieces: Dhurai, Dhuranique, Keith Jr., Karina,

Karrah, Davanno, Davyn, Tadan, Ene, Erica, and Jada Dean, Laurika Flowers i
and Hayward Forbes, Jr.; uncles & aunts: Philip & Sybil Cox, Elzibeth & :
Parthena Ferguson, Azure and Alan Hall, Jr.; uncles and aunts-in-law: Marjorie i
Hall, Miriam Outten, Helen Hall, Evelyn Gardiner, Wally Robinson, Annie
Gardiner, Sarah and Marilyn Robinson, Hazel Mc Intosh, Rodney, Carl and }
Orthneil Forbes, Franklyn, James and Nathaniel Robinson, Lewis & Jenny }

Forbes; cousins: Clayton, Wendal, Allen, Rhonda, Ricardo, Beverly, Lester,

Stephen, Eva, Marcia, Harold, Elzabad Jr. Ivan, Nicole & Michelle and a host

of other family & friends: Pastor Kermit and Lady Adrianna Saunders & family,

Anthony and Christine Robinson, Nathaniel & Eulease Beneby, Edmund and

Betty Rigby Franklyn & Rosilda Rigby, Karen Rigby, Elaine & Theo Clark,
Evelyn Lois, Almeda Lightbourne, Christine Mitchell, Esther & Nolan Dorsette,

Jay & Margaret Williams, Curly& Terah Rahming, Beatrice Carter, Virginia

McIntosh, Ann Gary, Gloria Archer, Janeen “Champ” Pinder, Loniece Miller,

and Monique Roker, Kingdom Worship Center International, Honourable

Zhivago Laing and family, Greg and Lisa Duhaney, Alvin &Caron Smith,
Patrice Hall & Family, Elsie Lindsay, Bahamas Customs Department Freeport,

Sherick Martin, Rodney Grant, Cyril McIntosh, Lincoln Strachan, Michelle
Pelecanos, Karen Nixon, Tyrone Laing & Family, Chesney Rigby & family, i
Dwayne & Miriam Fernander, Rex Rolle, Sammy Rolle, Xavier Colton, Trevor i
Hanna, Tracey Rolle, Katrina Marche, Adrian Fox, Wendy Seymour, Sophia }

Smith, Brenda Ferguson, Clement Bosfield, Reina Predelus and Family,

Bradlena Gibbs, Michelle Walker, Daniel Romer, Butler’s Specialty -Jeff Butler
& Staff, Management and Staff Kross Town Investments, Bishop Franklyn & i
Rowena Ferguson, Pastor Kendal and Joy Simmons, Bishop Woodley & }
Vernique Thompson and the entire membership of the Church Of God Of
Prophecy Coral Road and East Street Pastor Keith & Allison Palmer, Bright i

Star Pre-school, Pastor Frank and Mrs. Hagen, Romeo Ferguson and family,

Old Scholars of Hawksbill High and Freeport Anglican High School, Bishop
Ghaly & Lady Angela Swann and the entire membership of the Church Of God

Of Prophecy Elizabeth Estates, Nassau, Staff of B. E. C, Charlton & Greg
Smith, Attorney Gregory Moss, Kenneth & Courtnee Romer, Dr. Winston
Forbes, Dr. Leviticus Rolle, Staff ‘of Rand Memorial & Ambulance Department,
Rosemary Braynen and Pandora Jones and Pastor Phil Munroe & Word of Life
Ministries.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “SERENITY SUITE” OF RESTVIEW
MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST
CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00
A..M, TO 6:00 P.M AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY FROM 12:30
P.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

PATRICK DORN “DON”
JOHNSON, 49

OF #15 MAN-O-WAR CIRCLE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA WILL
BE HELD ON SATURDAY, MARCH 28,
2009 AT 10:00 A.M. AT COMMUNITY
AT HEART TABERNACLE CHURCH
OF GOD OF PROPHECY, CORAL
ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA.,
OFFICIATING WILL BE BISHOP
GEORGE E. THOMPSON ASSISTED BY
MINISTER CECIL BETHEL.
CREMATION WILL FOLLOW.

Left to cherish his memories are his father:
Rev. Stanley Johnson; stepmother: Winifred Johnson; two sons: Tristan and
Tavaris Johnson; three daughters: Alicia, Raven and Azende Johnson; adopted
children: Fabian, Virgil, Antonio, Parrish, Colette and Benjamin; grandchildren:
Tristina, Tristan and Tristan Johnson, Dario, Jario, Xavier and Kiya; three
sisters: Drusilla Butterfield, Ivy Cleare and Stanlika Taylor; three brothers:
Warren, Ronnie, Andrew and Calvin Johnson; two stepsisters: Marsha Saunders
and Patrice Glinton; stepbrother: Odie Glinton; companion of 25 years:
Myrtle Cartwright; aunts: Cecila McPhee, Patricia Fisher, Agnes Mather,
Penny Cleare, Frances Lewis of Miami, Fla., Anita Curry, Selma Caiser of
Baltimore, Mar. and Madeline Johnson; uncles: Roger, Leon and Percival Jr.
(Summer) Riley, Jeffrey, Rendell and Alkie Johnson, Anthony, John, Bennett
and Vincent Mather; grandaunts: Sarah Berry, Gerelean Saunders, Diane
Culmer and Eloise Roberts; sisters-in-law: Maria, Curlymae, Lorretta and
Alice Johnson; brothers-in-law: Ricardo Butterfield, Steward Cleare and Mark
Taylor; aunts-in-law: Chloe and Genita Mather, Catherine, Eleanor, Cirklyn,
Christine and Nancy Johnson; uncles-in-law: Howard Caiser, Benlin Cleare
and Alton (Coon) Lewis; godmother: Patricia Lewis, numerous nieces, nephews,
grandnieces, grandnephews, cousin, and a host of other relatives and friends
including: Eloise Johnson and family, Lola Saunders, Bertha Sawyer and family,
Susan Cleare and family, Eva Lorraine Sawyer and family, Craig Lewis and
family, Vincent Johnson and family, Freeport Harbour Security Dept., Kings
Inn staff, Holiday Inn staff, Bullard Laundry, Freeport Harbour Company,
Loletta and family, Lauramae Saunders and family, Queenie Hanna, Michelle
Parker, June Carey, David Wright, Anthony Rolle and family, Patrick Adderley,
Shirley Ingraham, Ms. Tynes and Ms. Baptiste.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “HALYCON SUITE” OF RESTVIEW
MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST
CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00
A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY FROM 8:30
A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 19

Resteias Memorial Mortuary
and Cremalovium Limited

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Rodd, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

ROSABELLA “ROSIE”
RUSSELL, 69

OF LEWIS

1:00 PLM. AT ST.
PAUL CATHOLIC CHURCH,

HUNTER’S, GRAND BAHAMA. |
OFFICIATING WILL BE FATHER |

REGINALD DEMERITTE,

ASSISTED BY FATHER REMY
DAVID AND DEACON JEFFREY }
HOLLINGSWORTH. INTERMENT }

WILL FOLLOW IN THE HUNTER’S PUBLIC CEMETERY,
HUNTER’S, GRAND BAHAMA.

Left to cherish her memories are her children: Rosamarie, Bradford
and Linda Russell and Douglas Kent, adopted children: Marian and }

Ray Anthony; grandchildren: Floyd, Melissa, Jonathan, Kevinique, :

Julius Jr., Floyd Samuel II, Bradford II, Floyd, Anthanique, Eden,

Lyniece, Samuel Ray, Esther Martin Loyns (Jeffrey), Moya, Cyril and

Chaeremon; great grandchildren: Floydrica, Noassis, Manario,
Devaughte, Calvadio, Danielle, Kyla, Zekeshia, Tajor, Glinton, Noah,

Jaylon and Jordon; sisters: Victoria Henfield, Marilee and Debra }
Cooper; brothers: Alphonzo, Rev. Harvard, Shervin, Jerry and Walton | E JT. Oe
: Julie Williams; father-in-law: Samuel Williams and a host of other

Cooper; nieces: Andrea (Allison) Pinder, Stephanie (Elvis) Burrows,

Emil (Kenth) Symonette, Ethel Cooper, Lavonda (Dr. Marvin) Smith }
of Nassau, Phyllis (Wellington) Russell, Katherine (Marvin) Henfield, }
Uzaleen, Oplyn, Velyn and Colleen Cooper, Denise (Troy) Rolle, Tanya | FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A
Allen, Betty (Dexter) Davis, Bella Cooper, Roberta Slinger, Kathleen ;
(Israel) Rolle, Barbara (Wilbur) Outten, Patricia Fagbayi, Sandra :
(Michael) Flowers, Sabrina Skinner, Janet Minnis, Sharon (Keith) ;
Green, Lillian Russell, Stephana J. Saunders and Caline Newton; ;
nephews: Dr. Harvard (Alice), Paxton (Patrice), Samuel (Enid), Cornell ;
(Mavis), Alvin (Audra), Collins (Yolanda), LeRon (Jessica) and Harrison ;
Cooper of Nassau, Sam Archer, Warren (Hopeful) Henfield, Gerald ;

Wildgoose Jr., Bradford, Xavier (Chantelle) and Gilbert Wildgoose,
Ralph, Brian, Patrick, Doyle (Mary), Audley Jr. and Ricardo Russell,

Kenneth and Keith Saunders and Cleon Newton; aunts: Jessie Russell }
and Virginia Rolle; sisters-in-law: Doris Minette, Velva and Betty :
Cooper, Violette Wildgoose, Cynthia Saunders and Joanna Newton- ;
Russell; brothers-in-law: Gerald Wildgoose and Kenneth Cooper; :
aunt-in-law: Mrs. Effie Russell of Naranja, Florida and a host of other :
relatives and friends: Margaret Burrows, Francine Gibson, Myrtle and :
Leroy Laing, Cleola Wright, George and Bruno Russell, Armstrong ;
and Vanderine Russell, Della Lee and Ruth Russell, Julius “Doc” Lewis, :
families of the late Rollington and Asa Cooper, the communities of |
Lewis Yard and Pinder’s Point and the Haitian community. aia estat the lates and Hee.
VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “CELESTIAL SUITE” OF :

RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM LATER DATE.

Williams; son: Harold Williams Jr.;

i LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND
i BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT
i THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY FROM 11:30 A.M. UNTIL
i SERVICE TIME.

YARD, GRAND}
BAHAMA WILL BE HELD ON}
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 AT }
VINCENT DE }

MRS. THERESA
| ARNETTE WILLIAMS, 47

OF #3 CHURCHILL ROAD, SOUTH

BAHAMIA, FREEPORT, GRAND

BAHAMA AND FORMERLY OF

MATTHEW TOWN, INAGUA DIED
>} AT THE RAND MEMORIAL

HOSPITAL, FREEPORT, GRAND
| BAHAMA ON WEDNESDAY,
| MARCH 25, 2009.

She is survived by her husband: Harold
Williams Sr.; daughter: Perissa
father: Carlton D. Pinder Sr.;
adopted mother: Nurse Anna Hall; sister: Effie Higgs; four brothers:
Carlton Jr., Roderick, Paul and Mark Pinder; mother-in-law: Peirrina

relatives and friends.

LATER DATE.

MRS. DASIL BABATES
JOLLY, 92

OF SEAGRAPE, EIGHT MILE
ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA AND
FORMERLY OF BOTTLE CREEK,
NORTH CAICOS, DIED AT HER
RESIDENCE ON FRIDAY, MARCH
20, 2009.

She is survived by her sons: Hopeful
Hendfield, Eldon and Granville Jolly;
daughters: Theresa, Gloria, Sandra and
Brenda Jolly, numerous grandchildren

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A





PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

and Crematorium

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Ox Memorial Morluary

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Rodd, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 373-3005

( W da f
SSAU

NA:
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

CLARENCE
NATHANIEL

CURLING
Affectionately called
“KIAH”, 45

of Ragged Island will be held on Saturday, }
March 28th, 2009 at 11:00am at Golden : |
| Gates World Outreach Ministries, }
Carmichael Road. Officiating will be }
Bishop Ross Davis, assisted by other }
ministers of the gospel. Interment will ;

follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Roads.

His memories will forever live on in the hearts of his family especially: }
Wife: Gail Curling; sons: A’delbert, Chaz and Trey; adopted daughter: |
Kryzia Maycock; mother: Sheila Curling; sisters: Emmaline, Amanda, ;
Sheryl, Avilda, Maketa and Latoya Curling; brothers: Lealan, Hollis, William, |
and Charles Curling; adopted sisters: Terriseta Ward, Yvette Morris, Padrey i }; : Ae Sten Shia a : ‘ ‘
Lockhart and Gloria Wallace: adopted brothers: Elliott & Harvey Lockhart | his loving and devoted wife of thirty six years Evangelist Roselyn Marshall;
and Clinton Munroe; Aunts: Helen Saunders, Enid Lockhart, Verlina |
Maycock, Genesta Lockhart, Veronica Pintard, Ethel Wilson, Florinda }
Hepburn, Olga Lockhart, Katie Lockhart, Louise, Miriam and Velma Curling; }
Uncles: Cecil and Aubrey Curling, Granville Hepburn, Tony and Perry }

: in-law: Alice Stuart, Gwendlyn, Emily, Ann and Nece Newbold; brothers-
Lockhart; mother-in-law: Grace Strachan; sisters-in-law: Norma Curling | sala * a Then = ps

and Donnell Forbes; brothers-in-law: Selywn, Andrew, Dwight & Kevin; } eee
nieces: Chatara, Shania, Nikita, Angel, Selena, Medelia, Jada, Sheila, Asia, {
Danielle, Jada and Emmaline,; Nephews: Norvian, Stancio, Lesean, Etienne, |
Hollis, Raje, Charles, Amhad, Duvaughn, Leeshad, and Jayden; godmother: }
Percilla Bridgewater Johnson; god children: Lil Melvin, Scottie, Ayesha, }
Maneisa and Lester Jr.; cousins including: Rochelle, Diana, Glenise, Geisha, ;
Eugene, Sandra, Clover, Florence, Arenita, Nehemiah, Melvin, Marilyn, :
Laurette, Prieta, Arnold, Mizpah, Anatol, Cleo, Louis, Cyd, Sophia, Henry, |
Luther, Joel, Melbert, Maryann, Carl, Ena, Elliott, Godfrey, Mavis, Kathleen, ;
Cynthia, Theodore, Diantha, Horace, Francis, Gertrude, Elsie, Laron, Levitte, }
Linda, Tamara, Elveta, Mike, Maxine, Melanie, Margaret, Miriam, Coretta, |
Margo, Carol, Cecelia, Carlton, Ellis, Patricia, Clarice, Shirley, Ricardo, |
Sabarina, Dolly, Edgar, Helena, Bentley, Elvis, Vernon, Calvin, Faye, Dulcie, | Eylamae Armbrister and family, Ms. Rosie Morgan and family, Arthur
Carla, Dr. Duvaughn, Omar, Desmond, Bertram, Ken, Dr. Llewlyn, Natanya, }

Gail & Amelia; Other relatives and friends including: Harry, Steve, Alvin, ee
Christin, Ronnie, Raphael, Oscar, Joe, Eugene, Chris, Drexel, Etienne, Lem,
Herman, Luther Pinder, Sonia, Bentley Brown, Leslie Rahming, Vince, r
Cheryl Lightbourn & Family, Pauline Maycock & Family, Agie, Angela, :
Leander, Craig, Wesley, Adrian, Verva Wallace & Family, Burnell Munroe |
& Family, Neta Lockhart & Family, Percy Wilson & Family, Cephas Maycock :
& Family, Phicol, Alpheus, Daniel, Kervin, Julian, Bernadette, Patricia, ;
Jennifer, Kermit, Nardo, Marlie, Camille, Shanice, Dr. Justin, Karen, Pearl, |
Percy Roberts, Frederico, Libia, Dr. Kirk Culmer, Dr. Anna Moxey, Father |
Keith Cartwright, Mike Cartwright & Family, Yisell, Jewel, Angelique,
Neka, Bishop Ros Davis & Family, Ada Munroe & Family, The Nesbitt, ;
Maycock, Lockhart, Hepburn, Wilson, Munroe, Moxey, Pintard, Armbrister, }
Hinsey, Wallace and Joffre Family, Staff of C & S Steel, Staff of Lockhart $time.
& Munroe, Staff of Accident & Emergency and Male Medical I and the ;

entire Ragged Island community.

Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary
i & Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Rods on Friday from 10:00am
: to 6:00 pm and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 am until service time.

CLYDE ALEXANDER

MARSHALL
Affectionately Called ‘Pa’,
63

of Nassau Village will be held on Saturday,
March 28th, 2009 at 9:30 am at New
Dimension Ministries, Joe Farrington
Road. Officiating will be Rev. Victor
Johnson, assisted by other ministers of
the gospel. Interment will be in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Roads.

Left to cherish his precious memories is

sons: D.C. 1422 Anton “Ram-z” Marshall, Kendrick “fishy” and Anthony
“show” Marshall; grandchildren: Valdez, Kendrick Jr., Joey, Anwour and
Brazille Marshall; brothers: Lionel, Charles and William Marshall; sisters:
Melva and Barbara Marshall; one daughter-in-law: Valarie Marshall; sisters-

Cecil Newbold of Exuma; nephews: Travis Fowler, Demetrius, Dion, David,
Marco Marshall, James, Andrew, Shakero McPhee, Ricardo, Nardo Newbold,
Neil Newton, Gregory Lightbourne; nieces: Natasha Smith, Shonell Marshall-
Knowles, Giselle Andrews, Joyce Lord, Bernadette, Dion, Rhonda, Shandamin
Marshall Jan, Judy and Michelle Newbold, Ethlyne Dezentil, WCPL- 2445
Natasha Black, Latoya, Lynette, Isis., numerous grand nieces and nephews,
one god child: Cleo Hall; other relatives and friends including: Patsy
Bridgewater and family, Dorathy Fernader, Yvonne Clarke and family,
Terrecita Taylor-Rolle and family, Shelia Taylor and family, Nakera Taylor
and family, Antoinette Rolle and family, Maxwell and Helen Butler and
family, Basil Marshall, Susan Marshall and family, Brendalee Lunn and
family, Michelle Colebrooke and family, Ronnette Charles and family,

Carey and Family, Charlene Thompson and family, Fredricka Thompson
and family, (BEC) Baillou Hill Road Compound, Bain Town Community,
Dr. Moxey and Staff, Dr. Grimes, Dr. Srikanth Garikaparthi, Dr. K.J.A
Rodgers, especially Nurse Margaret Limage, Nurses and staff of the Doctors
Hospital, Lewis Orthopedic and staff, Pastor and organization of New
Dimensions, and family of the greater Bethel Cathedral, and the Nassau
Village Family.

May his Soul rest in Peace.

Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary
and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00
am to 6:00 pm and at the church on Saturday from 7:30 am until service





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 21

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 » Fax: (242) 340-8034

iy RVICES FOR

UNERAL SE

@ Church Family of Cat Island; Merlean Stubbs and family, Nurse
# Jessie Smith, Nurse Julie Mackey, Kay Criswell, Dianne
= Knowles, Shawn Dawkins, Father Arlington Bartlett, Apostle
= Leon Wallace and Voice of Deliverance Church Family, Strategic
2 Planning and Policy Branch of the Royal Bahamas Police Force

OF ORANGE CREEK, CAT and a host of other relatives and the staff and family at The

ISLAND WILL BE HELD ON :
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2009 :
AT 11:00 A.M. AT ST. AGNES }
ANGLICAN CHURCH, BLUE }
HILL ROAD, NASSAU, NEW !
PROVIDENCE. OFFICIATING !
WILL BE THE VENERABLE }
ARCHDEACON I. RANFURLY BROWN ASSISTED BY }
FATHER BERNARD BEEN AND DEACON NEIL NAIRN. !
INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN THE ST. AGNES:
CHURCH CEMETERY, NASSAU STREET, NASSAU, NEW :

HUBERT
HEPBURN, 79

PROVIDENCE.

Olive Bowles, Carnetta Newbold, Elvina O’Brien, Cyril Stubbs,

Rand Memorial Hospital, Grand Bahama: Dr. Forbes, Dr.
Williams, Dr. Edwards, Dr. Amadasun, Ms. Cherlyn Bain
(PNO), Mrs. Audrey Rolle (DPNO) The staff at Accident and
Emergency Dept and Male Medical Ward, the staff and family
at Presbyterian Hospital-Matthews, North Carolina, the staff at
Amron Homecare Agency, North Carolina, the whole community
of Cat Island especially the settlements of Orange Creek, Arthurs
Town and Bennets Harbour.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “IRENIC SUITE” OF
RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND
CREMATORIUM LTD., ROBINSON AND SOLDIER

= ROADS, NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE ON FRIDAY

bs a ' re ? FROM 10:00 AM TO 6:00 P.M. AND AT THE CHURCH ON
His light has gone out but his memories will live on in the 3

hearts of his wife; Ilene Hepburn; daughters: Nursing Officer
Barbara Hepburn of Grand Bahama, Angela Hepburn, Registered i
Nurse Norma Hepburn-Brown of North Carolina, Woman 3
Detective/Sergeant 1887 Princess A. Hepburn of Grand Bahama,
Woman Corporal 2203 Tanya Hepburn of Nassau; sons: Prince :
Hepburn Sr. of Grand Bahama, Nathaniel Hepburn and Hulet :
Hepburn; son-in-law: Ronnie Brown; daughter-in-law: Pearline :
Hepburn; sisters: Laverna Hepburn of Cat Island and Susanna :
Hepburn of Nassau; grandchildren: Lashaun ”Jermico”, :
Stephon, Stephen Jr. “PJ”, Picard, Daeneyl, Ta’Ray, Janai, :
Branique, Janiah, Princess, Princeka, Prince Jr., Aaron, Perez, !
Ronnie Jr. and Decypress; great grandchildren: Lashaun Jr.,
Angela, Ian and Damek; aunts: Martha Stubbs, Verdora Stubbs, :
Marina Stubbs uncles: Frank Stubbs, Elsworth Munnings and
Ike Munnnings; brothers-in-law: Samuel and James Cambridge, :
Joshua Rolle; Sisters-in-law: Levinia Campbell, Nathalee :
Burrows, Irene Rolle, Ruby and Rosamae Cambridge; nephews: :
Thomas Stubbs, Elliott, and Edward Smith, Rodney, Rudy, i
Tony, John, Stanley, Charles Jr.; nieces: Madeline Stuart, :
Sarah, Anita, Naomi, Wendy, Ann, Alfreda and Jenniemae;
numerous other relatives: Edmund Stubbs, Paul and Charles :
King, Whitlean Woodside, Allan Brown, Miriam Webb, Hannah

; 2 friends too numerous to mention.
Dames, Shirley Ambrose, Mrs. Alma Adams, Cora Ann Burrows, i

SATURDAY FROM 10:00 A.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

DEATH NOTICE

MR. THEODORE
ROLLE, 43

of Johnson Road, Fox Hill, died at
the Princess Margaret Hospital on
Tuesday, March 24th, 2009.

He is survived by his sisters,
Jacqueline Coakley, Theresa Butler,
Brendalee Minus; adopted sister:
Linda Williams; brothers: Avery,
Franklyn, Brian, Mario Rolle;
numerous nieces and nephews and a host of other relatives and

, ) , Funeral announcements will be announced at a later date.
Allison Stuart, Peter Scavella, The Stubbs Family, The King

Family, The Webb Family, and The Cambridge Family; :
numerous friends: Father Chester Burton and The Anglican :





PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

re Cacnclniem Po”

FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral eae pee of a B., Bahamas

Telephone: an) ae fue 4 242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 » Fax: (242) 373-3005

Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

.0. Box CB-1207,
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

PEDRO
OCTAVIOUS
“Op”
ROLLE, 57

\ — } Ri of Imperial Park, Freeport,

\* _- Grand Bahama will be held

on Saturday, March 28th 2009

; = at 10:00 am at Holy Cross
ee Charch, Highbury Park. Officiating will be
Father Norman Lightbourne, assisted by other ministers
of the gospel. Interment will follow in Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

He is survived by: his wife, Valderine Stubbs-Rolle;
sons: Domek Rolle, Javardo Rolle; daughter: Doneka
Rolle; mother: Ruth Rolle; brothers: Leslie Rolle,
Michael Rolle, Godfrey Rolle; sisters: Melvern Wood,
Patrica Rolle, Paula Marshall, Marilyn John Carolyn
Strchan, Denise Clarke; daughter-in-law: Cyprianna
Rolle; father-in-law: Ruben Stubbs Aunts: Enid Sawyer,
Anamae Dorsette; Uncles: Felix Seymour, Hermon
Sawyer; sisters-in-law: Gloria Rolle, Hartlyn Rolle,
Lorraine Rolle, Sanna Rolle, Bethsheba Adderley,
Brendalee Gray, Judyann Stubbs, Rosetta Duncombe,
Vernetta Stubbs, Martha Johnson, Barbara Stubbs;
brothers-in-law: Hubert Marshall, Henry John, Paul
Clarke, Mario Strachan, James Adderley, Jerome
Stubbs, Alfred Stubbs, Caleb Stubbs, Virgil Gray,
Patrick Duncombe, Robert Johnson; numerous nieces
and nephews, other relatives and friends including:
James Bostwick, Durward Bostwick, Alvin Johnson,
Paul Pratt, Hewitt Whylly, Rudy Sands, Clifton Gaitor,
and the entire staff of the ministry of Education Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

May his soul rest in peace.

Viewing will be held in the Irenic Suite at Restview
Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier
Roads on Friday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and at the
church on Saturday from 8:30 m to service time.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bemeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ° TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Mark Anthony Quint
"Scabbie" Bowe, 47

a resident of Douglas Road,
Tropical Gardens, will be held
at St. Peter's Native Baptist
Church, Gambier Village, on
Saturday at 11 :00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Henry
Thurston, assisted by Rev. Dr.
Sandra Knowles. Interment
follows in Church's Cemetery,
Gambier Village.

Left to cherish his memories

are his 2 sisters: Rochelle

Taylor & Tanya Bowe; 5
brothers: James Knowles, Trevor Taylor, Elijah "Wongy"
Bowe, Ricardo & Tyree Bowe; 5 sisters-in-law: Trestian
Taylor, Jennifer Knowles, Catherine Bowe, Melanie Bowe
& Gail Bowe; aunts: Isabel Pratt, Deaconess Margaret
Taylor, Mariana Fernander, Marion Lewis, Ivy Taylor,
Elizabeth Allen & Inez Taylor; uncles: Roger Taylor,
Alexander Arlington Allen, James Fernander, Ansal Pratt
& Uncle Ozzie Francis; nieces: Jenika & Jessica Knowles,
Katelyn & Rikki Bowe; nephews: Lance, Oneel &
Alexander Knowles, Trevino Taylor, Renaldo, Tyree Jr.
& Mekel Bowe; 1 grand nephew: Jaden Williams;
numerous cousins: Carolyn Major & family, Audrey
Lightbourne, Stephanie, Maria, Denise, Laura Charlton,
Nancy, Florince, Emily, Jan, Clarrise, Tariell, Grethine,
Brendalyn, Scharra, Lucymae, Eulinda, Tracy, Nadia,
Kim, Casandra, Challon, Juith Taylor, Gledine, Tonya,
Alexander Fernander, Everett Thurston, Cyril Thurston,
Kevin Taylor, George, Craig, Derrick Taylor, Otarro, DJ.;
adopted sisters: Cypriana Ambrister, Catherine Woodside,
Charine Jackson, Arnett & Pat Ferguson; other relatives
& friends including: Donnie Pratt, Edward Dean, Doreen
Pratt, Lawren, Calvese Walkes, Ronnie Pratt, Cleran
Washorn & Garvin, Nadia Pratt, Patricia Ferguson, Wayne
Smith, Allan Cenataus, Virginia Pratt, Doniska & Ashton
Pratt, International Free & Excepted Modern Mason &
Order of The Eastern Stars family, Gambier Clinic family,
St. Peter's Native Baptist family, Last Man Standing family,
Gambier Association family, Michael Clear, Raggs &
family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 23

Aemeritte’s HFuneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Florence Elizabeth Lightbourne, 93 |

: and The Holy Spirit Anglican Church Family, Cannon Samuel and

i Ann Sturrup, The British Colonial Hilton Hotel Team Members,

a resident of Rosalind Street off; Especially The Finance Department including Mr. Peter Webster,

Tyler Street, Chippingham & : Richard Sanchez, Majestic Tours Family especially Mr. B. William,

: Bill Saunders, The Ocean Club Staff, The American Eagle Staff,

Caicos Island, will be held at St. } The Cafe Martinique Staff, The Fire Branch of the Royal Bahamas

Francis Xavier Cathedral, West Hill : Police Force, Pastor Shameka Morley and The Church Family of

Street, on Saturday at 10:45 a.m. Anointed To Reign, Corner Stone Church Church of Chicago Family,

Officiating wil be Fr. Glen Nixon. { 4 ntione and Jonika J oseph, The Taylor Family, Stephen and Glenda

Interment follows in the Catholic j Laroda, Barabbas and Maureen Woodside, Mizpah Pratt and Family,

Cemetery, Infant View Road. Dr. Gertrude Holder, (Home Physician) Princess Margaret Hospital

i Female Medical Two, Doctors and Nurses, Dr. Ada Thompson, Dr.

Left to cherish her memory are her Bethel, Dr. Mike and Aggie (U.K.), Marina Glinton and Family,

loving Children and their spouses } David and Gertude Young & Family, Stefanie Edgecombe, Mikiayla

Henry and Anna Brooks, Patricia ; Dames, Kennita Saunders and Christine Sukie, Barabbas and Tribe

and Stanley Babb; Grandchildren | Family, The Gaza Family and The Entire Chippingham Community.

and their spouses: Theresa and }

Robert Moncur, Vincent, Everetta Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

: Market Street from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the

formerly of Grand Turk, Turks &

Florence and Anntone Brooks, Anthony and Peggy Pratt, Edward

and Jane Pratt, Dwayne and Stephanie Pratt, Joy, James Pratt, Sonia } éturch Tram 10:00 aan. miiil service tine,

and Deion Rolle, Monique Lugo, Stanley Jr. and Stanell Babb, Ericka |
and Toby Barrett (Germany), Elena and Jason Smith, Erin and Ean :

McQuay (Tallahassee, Fl.); Son-in-law: Livingston Pratt, Daughter- }
in-law: Harriet McQuay (Tallahassee, Fl.); Great Grandchildren: } ‘
| Leslie Wendell "Bats" Fowler Sands, 54
Rolle, Fendi, Anntone Jr., Ashton and Aiden Brooks, Anthony and
Tonia Pratt, Dwayne Jr., Dominic and Jade Lugo, Jordan Richardson
(Ft. Lauderdale), Wellington Jr. and Harrington Bastian, Joy and }
Elisha Culmer, Sean Brice, Davoynne, Jerino and James Jr., Austin, :
Dallas, Tyler and Kali Barrett (Germany); Nieces, Nephews and :
Cousins: Shirley Smith (Freeport), Elizabeth Frith, Lillian and }
Neville Adams and their families (Grand Turk), Denise, Vanessa ;
and Sean Smith (Freeport) and Lou Malcolm and Madge Williams }
and their families, Florence Lightbourne and Rosemary Simons and_
their families (Grand Turk), Helena Williams and family (Grand }
Turk), Edith Been and her family of Grand Bahama, The Children :
of the late Jane Francis and Many other family members and :
acquaintances in Grand Turk. Other Relatives and Friends: Norma }
Lighbourne and Family, Godfrey and Carmetta Basden & Family, :
Rudolph and Marina Basden and Family, Patrick and Linda Basden }
& Family, Frances Basden and Family, The Tucker Family, Vivian, }
Carolyn and Gloria Young & Family, Randolph and Nurse Judy :
Minnis & Family, Lenny and Patricia Jarvis & Family, Louise Gibson
and Family, Mrs. Thelma Ford and Family, Stafford and Joan Coakley : va pi
& Family, Mrs. Flora Hanna and Family, Kendal and Hynah Major } Lorraine, Rebecca, Patricia, Jannah, Deborah, Laverne & Philippa
& Family, Gwenth Lockhart and Family, Mildred Hinsey and Family, : 1° . .
Gertrude Demeritte and Family, Melvina Gibson and Family, Garnell, | Brian & Paul Fowler; 2 brothers-in-law: Barry Wallace & Kermit
Cresval and Edith, Dustan Babb and Family, The Scavella Family,

Sybil Butler and Family, Estelle Brown and Family, Nicole and | Fowler & Mrs. Hortense Sands; numerous nieces & nephews, cousins

Soiban Riley, Emma Miller and Family (Ft. Lauderdale), Emma } & other relatives & friends too many to mention.
Golden and Family (Ft. Lauderdale), Margaret Sands and Family, :
Basil and Monique McQuay & Family, The Quant Family, Tash }
McShane (Chicago), Judith Strapp, Ericka Lamm, Maygen Smith, :
Pastor Person of Chicago, Illinois, Fr. Glen Nixon and The Entire | ra 9 a.m.-12:00 noon & at the church from 1 :00 p.m. until service
i time.

Roberts Jr., Regene Moncur, Tanisha Brown, Shantiaque and Kobe

Family of St. Francis Xavier Cathedral, Father Gromes and The

Entire St. Joseph Parish Family, Rev. Harry Ward and Mrs. Ward

a resident of Brazilita Street,
Pinewood Gardens, will be held at
The New Redeemed Tabernacle
Church of God in Christ, Refuge
Court off Cowpen Road, on
Saturday at 2:00 p.m. Officiating
will be Pastor Ishmael Grant,
assisted by Superintendent Joseph
Cunningham. Interment follows in
Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail
Road.

Left to cherish his memories are
his wife: Enid Sands; 1 daughter:
Precious Sands; 2 sons: Bryan &
Brenden Sands; father-in-law:
Audley Bain; 10 sisters: Miriam Callender, Wendy Ramsey, Josephine,

Fowler; 7 brothers: Rudy Sands, Charles, Prince, John, Andrew,

Ramsey; 3 sisters-in-law: Mrs. Annamae Blyden, Mrs. Patricia

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
Market Street, from 10 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday





PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Aemeritte’s Funeral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET °¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Elizabeth "Queenie" Glinton Roberts, 78 :

a resident of Mackey Street, & |
formerly of Long Island will be :
held at Sacred Heart Catholic |
Church, Shirley Street, on }
Saturday at 10:00 a.m. :
Officiating will be Fr. Mel :
Taylor. Interment follows in :
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier |

Road.
She will be

Family, The Fox Family, Joyce and Family

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral |
Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on : ; . :
i & family, The Robinson Family, The Braynen Family Joy,
i Melinda Carter & Family, Donna M. Harding-Lee, Nadia
i Johnson, Anastcia Dorsette, Anastcia Strachan, Mikihlo
: Strachan, Donna Harding-Lee & Co., We Care Stone Co.
: family, Shirlea, Judy, Theresa, Verlene, Sandra, Georgiana
: Cedar Pamme Gere Cartwright, Lynette and Lennox Cartwright,
. ; : : Drexel Curry, Bernadette Dames, Eric Guff Knowles and
Wesley Methodist Church, Baillou Hill Road, on Saturday at : family, the Gibson family union, Seaboard Marine family,
? Lana Simmons, Francis Clarke and family, Desiree Taylor,
? Kenneth Bain, Portia Rolle, Amanda Stubbs, Wesley Methodist
? Church family, Bain and Grants Town family, Oncology Clinic,
: Dr. Turnquest, Dr. Tracy Roberts and Female Medical I & 2

Left to cherish her loving memories are her mother: Maria } other family and friends too numerous to mention.

Gibson; daughter: Kiyshanna Kenrese Gibson-Hepburn; son- |

Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

Pherioa Lorraine "Fighty" Gibson, 52

a resident of Wellington Street, will be held at Grants Town
11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev. L. Carla R. Culmer, assisted

by Brother Jamicko Forde. Interment follows in Western
Cemetery, Nassau Street.

in-law: Marvin Hepburn; grandchildren: Kiyshanti, Kiyerra

Sherry Dames, Paulette Bowleg Josephine, Debra and Latisha;

lovingly }

remembered by her Husband: }

Leland Roberts; Sisters: Jaleeta |

Brown and lcelyn Rolle; }
Brothers: Fred and Lionel Glinton; Sisters-in-law: Patricia and :
Maud Glinton; Nieces: Helen Adderley, Mary Canter, Lorraine :
Strachan, Sherry Baptiste, Rosemary Pratt, Wendy Finlayson, }
Shelly Fredericka, Winifred, Michelle, and Barbara Glinton, |
Sandra and Margaret Stubbs, Elizabeth Cartalla; Nephews: |
Hilton Jr. and Charles Adderley, Fred Jr., Anthony and Patrick }
Glinton, Kenneth, Calvin, Charles and Godfrey Brown, Sidney }
and Kirkland Glinton and Terry Pugh; Other relatives and }
friends: Harold Pinto, Redwin Grant, Maureen Duvalier, : The Family of the late Shirley Gibson The Family of the late
Christopher Adderley, Omar Archer, Andrea Adderley, Judith :
Adderley and family, The McKinney Family, The Archer }
Family, The Rahming Family, The Henfield Family, The Adams y : ; ;
Family, The Pratt Family, The Adderley Family, The Clarke | Stubbs & Family, Henrietta & family, Bishop Albert & Karen
: Hepburn & family, Pamela Rolle & family, Vernita McKenzie
? & family, Thelma Thompson & family, Rebekah Hanna, Ruby

Sylbert,Gladstone, Edward,

John and Barry; Aunts, Pearl

Johnson, Irma Johnson, Sylvia

Saunders and Janette Styles;

Uncles, Rufus Fawkes, Revy

Fawkes;Nieces & Nephews,

Samuel, Ti-Ron, Jermaine,

Rhonda, Tyrell, Gem, Quinton,

Ryan, Jennifer, Dominique,

| Stephon, Donald Jr., Donette,

Donesha, Simone, Marcia,

Crystal, Mark Jr., Marco,

Matio, Mario, Candi, Tameka,

Jahmark, Erica, Nyssa, Tonnell,

Damien; Grand Nieces & Nephews, Barrington, Jermaine Jr.,
Sophia, Erica, Daniel, Joshua, Symia, Desmonique, Shantaniece,
Nathan, Dwight Jr., Dreyon, Drexell, Errin, Dominique, Javon
and Vantell; Sister-in-law, Leash Gibson; A host ofrelatives
and Friends, Peggy Lundy & Family, Yvonne Rolle & Family,
Florence Greenslade & Family, Karen Andrews & Family,
Mimi Greenslade Basil, Kendal, Oswald Greenslade, Dereck
Thompson & family, Nelson Cooper & family, The Family of
Pearl Johnson, The family of Irma Johnson, the Family of
Sylvia Saunders, the Family of The late Victoria Robinson,

George Gibson, Rochelle Smith S Family Lisa Fernander,
Drucilla Rhodriquez & Family, Agatha Williams & Family,
Drucilla Munnings & family, Donna Neely & Family Merlene

Hepburn & Family, Enid Baker & family, Mavis Miller, Lucene
Wilmott & Family, Carla Coakley & family, Antoine Adams

pice ' Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte'’s Funeral
& Symia Hepburn; Sisters: Pamela Williams, Clarice Gibson, ! Home, Market Street, from 10am - 6pm on Friday and on
’ : Saturday at the church from 10am until service time.
Brothers: Howard, Lionel, Donald, Gregory, Mark, :





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 25

Armeritte’s Funeral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Reverend Mother Rowena Green, 72

God of Prophecy Englerston,

Saturday at 11

Memories of you will forever }
live in the remain in the hearts } |
of: Your Husband, John Livingston Greene; son: Edwin Thomas

Bastian; Daughter: Kay Nell Gould; Grandsons: Thomas Jr.,

Taneko, Jamaal Bastian and Jeriel Gould; Grand daughters: |

i Evang. Colamae Collymore, Mrs. Mavis Burrows and family,
: Sheila Munroe and family, Carolyn McPhee and family, Arlington

: Higgs,
ae . sania : neighbourhood of Bozene Town.

0 ee a eo Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

East Street & Prophecy Way, on : Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at

:00 a.m. }
Officiating will be Bishop :
Elgarnet B. Rahming & Pastor }
Andrew Brown, assisted by other :
Ministers of the Gospel. }
Interment follows in Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive. :

Rev. Hayden Dean and family and the entire

the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

Isabell Lakeisha Burrows-Higgs, 32

) aresident of Windsor Lane West,
will be held at Christian

| Tabernacle, Robinson Road, on
Saturday at 2:00 p.m. Officiating
will be Pastor Anthony Johnson.
Interment follows in Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard
Roads.

Keturah Gould, Bianca Carmen Bastian and Jhanae Winter, and : |—

two great-grandchildren, Great Grands: Thomas Jr., Thomeo,

Kaiian and Taneko Bastian Jr., Brothers & Sister-in-law: John : pe
and Vernencha Nesbitt, Joseph Smith of Freeport, Sisters & 3
Brother-in-law: Rev. Lozier Roker, Martha Hanson and Victor :
Hanson of Weston, Florida and Ruth Miller (adopted sister) ; |
Brother-in-law: Garth Greene and wife Val Greene; Sisters-in- }
law: Shirley and Angela Greene; One Aunt: Lucene Sears; one

uncle: Ervin Ferguson Sr., Nephews and Nieces: Albert Nesbitt
and Anne Carey, Thaddeus and Kenton Roker, Valencia Greene
and Macushala Thompson, Ernestine and Lyndon Stuart and
the remainder of the Stuart Family, Cecile Ferguson of Atlanta,
Georgia, George and Georgia Hanson of Weston, Florida,
Christine, Rhana and Raquel Greene; A host of other relatives
and friends including Dr. Eugene Grey, Jenniemae Sears, Ervin
Ferguson Jr. , Mother Mabel Arnett and family, Mother Doreen
Brown and family, Min. Laura Benson and family, Sis. Jackie
Clarke and family, Sis. Violet Delancey & family, Margaret
Smith & family, Loretta Lewis & Family, Cynthia Roberts and
family, Grenelda Bodie and family, Evang. Rosetta Scavella
and family, Mother Ford and family; Joan Bethel and family,
Hopeful Hanna and family, Juva McPhee and family, Merril

Bullard and family, Marilyn Edwards and family; Ginette Cireus
(Bernie), Rhonda, Sherry and Olive Bastian, Linda Turnquest,
Kim Robinson, Doretta Bethal and family, Genova McPhee and
family, Pastor Charles Johnson and Family, Pastor Andrew &

worshippers of Church of the Divine Resurrection, Officers and
members of I Am The Way Ministries, Single Mothers United,

Cherished memories will remain
with her three sons Antone
Higgs, Terrance and Christopher
Cartwright; father, Benson
we Higgs; three sisters, Lynette
Burrows, Eunice and Andera
Scully; ten brothers Davon, Torry, Jeffrey-Ricardo Ellis, Andy

? Scully, Benson Jr, Sherod, Travis, Dale, Marshall and Deshawn
: Higgs; grandmother, Loretta Burrows; grandfather, Marshall
: Higgs; five nephews, Kevin and Torry Ellis Jr., Justine Curry,
: Jermaine Thurston Jr., Christin Saunders; two nieces Torria and
? Lashan Ellis; four uncles Amos and Hilton Burrows, Vincent
: Higgs, and Aubrey Davis; eight aunts; Inez Gibson, Hestine
: Adderley, Mavis Pierre, Mizpah Bannister, Zilpha Burrows,
: Carolyn Knowles, Coral Huyler, and Leona Turner; two
? granduncles David Pratt, Rubin Daniels; two grandaunts Edith
: Pratt and Cynthia Stubbs; Cousins; John, Heston, Harrison,
? Lionel, Tiko, Jamal, Deangelo, Jermaine, Jonathan, Kenny,
: Aldean, Debra, Genise, Chrystal, Eileen, Jennifer, Maryanne,
i Theresa, Daphne, Glenda, Loretta, Tammy, Lashinka, Kristin,
: Johnea, Genesis, Vedra, Dorel, and Stacy. Other friends and
Hanna and family; Min. Pamela Pierre and family, Pandora :

relatives including, Shakara Bethel, John Adderley, Victoria

: Burrows, Jonathan Knowles; the Ellis, Woodside, Thurston,
: Cunningham, Pratt, Higgs, Darling Lane and Windsor Lane
: families, Texaco, Burger King, Bennegins and other friends and
: family members too numerous to mention.

Min. Naquel Brown, and the Church of God of Prophecy Wulff :
Road family, Prophetess Gayle Brown, Ministers and the true }

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday from
: 9-12:00 noon & at the church from 1:00 p.m. until service time.





PAGE 26, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Hemeritie’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Cecil Hilton Bain, 72

a resident of Lower Bogue, Eleuthera,
will be held at Charles Wesley |
Methodist Church, Lower Bogue,

Eleuthera, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m.

Officiating will be Pastor William }
Higgs, assisted by Pastor Ednol Cash }
& Rev. Godfrey Bethell. Interment :
follows in Lower Bogue Public }

Cemetery.

The radiance of Cecil's smile will }
always glow in the hearts of his }
Children: Rodney Bain, Tiffany |
Edwards and Yvette and Cecil Bain }

oo nde Besner aa eee : J ohnelle, Juanita, John Jr., Sanae, Darren and J ohnneisha Ferguson, Shonelle
aad Leander Bain, Natharis. Nathaniel | King, Jessica Golden, Eugene Ferguson, Jr. Raymond, Vito, Dametris, Brenda,
; : : Kristie, Dentley, Lilliiando, Silvio and Athena Russell, Halson Deveaux,

Warner; Sons-in-Law: Kevin Edwards and Michael Warner; Daughter-in- een mena aca ee ox ii — se ae a and
Law: Denise Deveaux Bain; Special friend & Caregiver: Angela Cash; } cal - ac : a ee an a fae ° tke. a A nl del
Stepchild: Keva Cash; Brothers: Eric, Delton, Pastor Lester William Bain : Delaice, Chaana, Setaatinn mo Raheny ere ey —— d Denia
and, Exskine Iain, Sister: Gladys Kelly, Sylvia Noss aud Barbata Baim, Lewis, Patrece Rolle, Keva Bastian, Maryanne and Flood Pearce; 28 great

i grand children, Brandon Williams, Christian Adderley, Armad and Rashad

a: : . : i Abraham, Lovely Lewis, Italia, Allisa, Arjah, Nardo and Kalin Bastian
Lillian, Michelle, Sandra, Karen, Dorothy, Jacqueline, Garnell, Julieth, | ? y 2 2 neta : ?

1 - : . . a : ..” £ Shonelle and Jontae' Clarke, Destinee and Saniya Ferguson, Rojae and Malachi
Debeah, Debbie. Senor, |-auetne, Saitned, Isis, Muemique, Sheers, Smems, i Russell, Malik, Donneisha and Wynsome Penn, Destiny and Vonzell Strachan,

? Christopher Curry, Rolano Dames and Mackenlee Ferguson and Mia Sawyer,

: : . . - 4 Lyric Williams, Tyrell and Ronnalee Delancy; Nineteen nieces, Arabell Black
Spurgeon, Terrance, Colin, Tyrone, Mario, Elkin Ryan, Elvis, Damaris, - Drea sei : y> : ? ?

ead Bais ? Doramae Charlton, Chrissie Verville, Mallory Lightbourne, Roselyn and
Emmamuel, Lester, Benjamin Ferguson, Leonard, Alpheus, Perkins; Numerous | Barta Collis, Francie Carey, Ena Rolle, Karina Darling, Belty Dixen, Susett

: A k : - | Searcy, Louvella Geratt, Barbara Jones, Nita Hooks, Rosa Osborne, Arva
Marisha, Darron, Tamika, Latario, Arsenio, Shakessa, Sharetta, Andretti, | ay 2 aN > ?

‘ 1 ee py! ; . a a > ¢ Chipman, Edwa Dollar, Ethelle Anderson, Kim Heard, Karen Jackson, Judy
Dace), Seka, Lathe, Butiey, 1 Aa Deen, Tae, Rosi i Rolle and Sharrea Coley; Twelve nephews, Halon Nottage, James Moss,

! Hansel, Alfred and Washington Collie, Christopher, Gary Mark and Dr.

Kayln. Close relatives and friends including, Rev. Dorothy Bain, Errol, Fates 7 nts te tetas Leon and eae ae a
Kenneth, Lana, Patrice, Karen, Mark, Hilverson, Fred, Chuck, Alicia, Deidre, en al a ne atten d cece eee a Ws i ae its
Rudolph, Kennedy, Karen, Simone, Wellington, Franklin, Steven, Ronald, : ee ee ene ee ee oe

Thelma, Pastor Ednol & Emerald Cash & Family and the members of the : oe : : : aes
Charles Wesley Methodist Church in Lower Bogue, Eleuthera, Bishop Dudley isnt nn a ee Actors Chetes
Kelly é& family, Geneva-Cash, Melina Culmer, Evelyn Johnson, thristiele Relatives and Friends, Keith Aranah and Family, William Bastian, Sharon
i Ferguson, Barbara Ferguson, Freda Ferguson, Japhet Ferguson, Reginald and
; Sherman Manley, Elmer and Patrick Bethel, Bishop Joseph Swann and Family,
: Mr. Frederik Gottlieb & Family, Robert Sweeting & Family, Gayle Hepburn,
? Lomette Albury, Anna Taylor Eustace Penn & Family, Olive Dixon, Machiko
. : - . i Bootle, Basil & Sarah Rahming, Berline Johnson and Family, Manfred Martin
Princess Margaret Hospital and a host of other relatives and friends too Be Family, Everette & Lee Bart, Bishop Glitter Hentield and Family, Ma,
i Modesta Smith & Family, Pastor Stafford Symonette & Family, Archdeacon
; s ‘tal -at _ Cornell Moss & Family, Lillian Scott & Family, Selena Sweeting & Family,
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market ; ° . ; ; ; :
. - : i Charlene Reid, Rosie Malone & Family, Don Mills & Family, Evelyn Smith

Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Thursday & on Friday at the church in Lower | & Family, Eloise Swain & Family, Dr. & Mrs. Swana & staff at Marsh
: Harbour Government Clinic, St. John's & St. Martin's Church Family, the
i entire communities of Spring City, Treasure Cay, Black Wood & Coopers

: Town Community.

and Oneil; Great Grandchild: Michael

Brothers-In-Law: Clayton Kelly, Hasting Moss and Basil Sweeting; Sisters-
in-Law: Viona, Cynthia, Leatha and Patricia Bain; Nieces: Vernell, Melvern,

Rochelle, Erica, Margurie, Keva, Naquita, Darcel, Leotha, Annamae, Lynette,
Leonarda, Lyndell and Lashae; Nephews; Mecal, Edward, Delton, Errol,

Grand Nieces and Nephews, including Shantae, Sahara, Domique, Nadia,

Adrianna, Teria, Shandia, Donnovan, Antay, Andreo, Thorand, Delano, Doyle,
Kayana, Frankie, Devon, Mecal, Leashan, Charles, Kennique, Travis, Brian,

Johnson, Stedman Johnson, Donnie Kelly, Bernard Johnson, Ezekiel, George,
Sam, Eddie Minnis, the McPhee family and the entire Neilly, Johnson, Cash,
Albury, Kelly, families of Lower Boque, Eleuthera, the entire communities
of Lower Bogue, Upper Bogue, Bluff, Current, Eleuthera, Dr, Grimes, Dr.
Clarke and Nurse Hanna, the Doctors & Nurses of the Trauma Section of

numerous to mention.

Bogue, Eleuthera from 7pm until service time on Saturday.

Robert Nathaniel "Bob" Ferguson, 93

held at St. John The Baptist Anglican

Church, Marsh Harbour, Abaco on

Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will

be Rev. Fr. Earl Hepburn, assisted by

Archdeacon Cornell Moss. Interment

follows in Dundas Town Public
| Cemetery, Abaco.

Left with cherished memories are his
eleven daughters, Lula Tyskiewcz,
Myrtis Russell, Agatha, Donnalee,
Ronnalee, Wynsome, Nicola and
Geraldine Ferguson; Adopted
daughters, Margie Balliou, Michelle
Pickstock and Alfreda Sears; Five sons,
John, Eugene, Cedric and Fritz
Ferguson and adopted son, Gary Bethel:
Fourty six grand children, Maxine,

of Hollywood, Florida, Alfrancis East, Alicia Dollar, Inez Rolle and Shirley

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
i Street, from 10am-6pm on on Thursday & on Friday at the church in Abaco
i from 5:00 p.m. until service time on Saturday.

a resident of Spring City, Abaco & formerly of Hard Hill, Acklins will be !





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 27

Aemeritie’s Funeral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET « P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Cassiemae Rolle, 55

a resident of The Bluff, South |
Andros, will be held at Saint }
James Native Baptist Church, St.
James Road, on Saturday at 11 :
:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev. }
Dr. Michael Symonette, assisted ;
by Rev. Fairdale Smith & Rev. |
Charles Rolle. Interment follows |
| in Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail :

| Road.

Left to cherish her memory and :
mourn her passing are Her }
Mother: Inez Rolle; Daughter: :
Ione Hepburn-Hart; Grandson: } ; ae : v
: Andrew and Christopher Williams; Three Sisters: Jacqueline

Bartlette, Doretta Rolle, Stephen Rolle, Alice Cunningham, Ivy Woodside, Kayla Hepburn, & Andrea; Uncles & Aunts: Retired

Rolle, and Luther Rolle; Nieces & Nephews, Deidre Johnson,

Lisa, Yuki, Ken, Ezekiel Jr., Niven, RaaSheed, Garland & Yasmine ; : : : ° ’
? and Craig Walkine, Rufus, Grifford, Vernice Walkine, Julianne,
: Emily Cornish, Linda Stubbs, Cary Smith, Roslyn; Nephews and
i Nieces: Latasha & Karrison Lewis, Clyde II, Clyde III, Patrice,

: ' : Kayshel, Ellarese, Tiffany, Jamaal, Deandra, Dwayne Jr. Christina,
anid Clara; Renta, Kiylon, Se'veny Stephen It. Chaver, Panl, : Delvon, Leon, Leo, Rokara, Larenzo, Miracle, Dondre and Andrew
& De'Vere Tinker, Justin and Alair Cunningham; Jimeka, Brittany, | Jr.; Godmother: Anginette Walkine; In-laws: Andrew Woodside,
James Jr. and Jasmine Bartlette. Grand Nieces & Nephews - : Joan, Delerese, Veronica Gray & Delores Roxburgh, Kimone,
: Samuel, Cornette, Loriann, Earl & Bomana Gray; Cousins: Moses

Wernesna Hepburn: Maruell Mayevdl, Breeah, Lanesss, Granton, Deveaux, Deborah Watson, Kim & Brian Woodside, Shevaughn

: ; . . Smith, Shanice & David Taylor, Jamiko, Wilfred Jr. & Travis Smith,
eh ee : Inspector Clifford Daxon, Lieutenant Henry Daxon & David Daxon,

. . . . . ? Rachael Mackey, Charles Jr., Hesley, Tammy & Shaquille Walkine;
Chantinese, Anaia, Nivena, Ken jr., Yanyce, Adaia and Mealek : Carolyn Cambridge, Keisha, Naquita, Justin, Ashley, David Jr.,

? Aneisha, Ashton & Ashanique, other relatives and friends including:

: : ‘ re i Ingrid & family, Judy & family, Audrey & family, Rosalie Taylor
Euthal Green; Brothers-in Law, Rev Ezekiel Williams, James i & family, Charlotte Rahming, Helen Smith & Family, Cleveland

Bartlette, Benson Cunningham and Bernard Rolle; Sisters-in-Law, ;

a oe ne tate ree rete Uncle - aa ance Lopez & family, Golden Gates World Outreach Church family,
CP TEM Ves SDC ITeneS Ulat ae 100 MUMeTous bo Menven ah, Jewel Flowers & Family, The Woodside family, Shasha Stevens &
i family. Ricky Sealy & family, Francita Gould & family, Marilyn

: Saunders, Janice Edgecombe & Family, Verlyn Scavella, Velma

Neely, Louise Smith, Anna Forbes; Edison and Winfield Rolle, i Moss & Family, Rebecca Henfield, Veronica Culmer & family,

Wilbert Moss Jr. & family, Claudia Woodside, Louise Clarke &
: family, Gloria Moss, Mary Russell, Patsy & Sarah Jones, Mr.

Rolle, Florceta Gibson Leotha Brown, Ezekiel and Alfred Johnson, ; Sweeting & The Bahamas Hot Mix Staff, Pastor David McPhee &

Remilda Smith and Viola Adderley, Enith and Victoria Smith, | family, E. P. Roberts Primary School family, The Royal Bahamas
i Police Force family, Doctors and staff of P.M.H. Male Orthopedic
i ward and a host of other relatives and friends too numerous to

: mention.

Calin Hart; Siblings, Velma Williams, Litfield Rolle, Sandra

Williams, Bonita Rolle, Deidra, Britney, Jasmine and Sanchez
Bartlett; Maxwell Jr. & Veronica, Alonso, Monique, Jason, Jermaine,
Lorraine; Jacinta, Kishka, Wesley, Labraun & Farrah, Ellsworth

Rasheed, Alex and Sarah Rolle; Lanika & Garth Brown, Shalesha

Chaz, Michael, Tamika, Maxwell 3rd. and Precious, Jamaal,
Black, Emmanuel Moss, Lashara Johnson, Kendece, RaaSheeda,

Williams, Moniqua, Gabriella Gardina and Dedrie Brown; Aunts:
Francita, Luella, Harriette Rolle and Miriam Green; Uncle: Rev.

but among whom are: Kendal, Raheser & Sheryl Smith, Rev.
Theophilus and Blooming, Lofton, Glenwood, Jennymae, Patson

Audrey Smith, Euthal Green Jr., Rose Green-Thompson, Helen,
Doris Kemp, Morine, Clyde, Magnola, Eloise, Sanford and Herman

Orthneil Lewis, Thomas "Tommy" Rolle" Sharon Andrews,
Melvern Rolle, Juanita Forbes, William & Willamae Hepburn and
Caleb Hart.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday from
10:00 a.m. until service time.

Eugene Franklyn Williams, 46

a resident of Carmichael Road,
will be held at Gold Gates World
Outreach Ministries, on Saturday
at 3:00 p.m. Officiating will be
Bishop Ros Davis, assisted by

| other Ministers. Interment follows
in Lakeview Memorial Gardens,
John F. Kennedy Drive.

Franklyn was preceded in death
by his Mother, Mildred Althea
Walkine-Williams. He leaves to
cherish his memory; his Wife,
Shashana Williams; Four
Brothers: Clyde, Sgt. 1445 Elvis,

Superintendent Charles & Renee Walkine, Cleveland & Pam
Walkine, Vivian Moss, Marina Moss of Perrine, Florida, Michael

& Joy Nixon & family, Bishop Roston Davis & Family, Deacon

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
: Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday from
? 9-1 :00 p.m. & at the church from 2:00 p.m. until service time.





PAGE 28, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Hemeritie’s Huneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Mrs. Shirley Agnes Johnson, 70

Golden Gates #1, will be held

Saturday at 10:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Fr. Joseph

Soldier Road.

Left to Cherish her memories |

her children: (5 sons) Patrick, }

| Anthony of Montreal Canada, }

~ Brian, Ricardo and Dwayne :

Johnson; (2 daughters) Cheryl Maycock, Charlene Johnson }
(predeceased); 3 Brothers: Wesley, George & James Newbold; :
3 Sisters: Margarite & Veronica Newbold and Rosalie Rolle; }
15 Grand Children: Terell, Anitra & Anthony Maycock Jr. , }
Terran , Patasha, Sania , Aliyah , Kim of Montreal Canada, :
Keith, Uralee, Dwaynell, Dwayne Jr., Lashanti, Jeron, :
Clintaniqua; 1 Great-Grand: Tania Williams-Johnson; Son- }
in-law: Anthony Maycock; 4 Daughters-in-law: Deborah, }
Monique of Montreal, Canada, Zelma & Audrey Johnson; 4 ;
Adopted Children: Sharon Miller, Ted Rolle, Wellington |
Culmer & Charles Anderson; 2 Adopted Sisters: Ruth Sears }
and Corene Roll; 3 Sisters-in-law: Shirley, Eunice and Juliet; :

1 Brother-in-law: Edison Johnson; 23 Nieces: Patricia Morley,
Jackie Deveaux, Daphne, Anita, Deidre Scavellea, Michaela,
Vanessa, Deandra Newbold, Barbara, Portia, Brenda, Tina,
Lisa, Georgina, Cypriana Bethel, Janet Ferguson, Nancy
Johnson, Kay Gardiner, Barbara Jane Johnson, Zena Sturrup;

6 Cousins: Ella Johnson, Gloria Lightbourne, Sidney Jones,
Andrea Bethel, Sandra, Denis, Catrina Miller; Special Friends:
Barbara Richards, Paulette Brown, Judy Simion, Sandra
Pickstock, Merle McPhee, Eunice Green-Fernander, Crystabel
Griffin, Yvonne Armbrister, Caroline Blatch, Delphine Boyd,
Orlando Dosema; Numerous Friends and Relatives: Eldrige
Morley, Yvette Sweeting, Carmitta Rolle, Lordrina Burrows,
Charles Johnson and family, Kayla Douglas, Carmen Jones,

Family, The staff of Main Operating Theatre, The staff of

Family and Friends of St. Margaret Anglican Church, Bishop

i Teuton Stubbs & Family, Doris Adderley of Fresh Creek
: Andros, The Bay Street Straw Vendors, Corene Rolle &

‘dent of Bamb t. Family, Ruth Sears and Family, Mother Forbes & Family and
ee : Ruth Pratt and Family, Estermae Larrimore & Donell Rolle
at St. Margaret's Anglican ; 2nd Family.

Church, K Road, bes , .

? Home, Market Street, from 10 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday &

Mycklewhyte. Interment : on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

follows in Woodlawn Gardens, |

Marishka Ann Rolle, 29

a resident of Bartlett Street off
Johnson Road, will be held at
St. Ann's Parish, Fox Hill, on
Saturday at 10:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Fr. Crosley
Walkine. Interment follows Fox
Hill Cemetery, Fox Hill.

Left to cherish her memories
are her husband: Simon Rolle
Sr.; 1 daughter: Anishka Rolle;
3 sons: Simon Jr., Raymond and
little Angel Rueben Rolle;
mother: Caroline Edgecombe;
father: Eilas Griffin; 10 sisters:

: Tiffany Brown, Patrica Rolle, Renae Sweeting, Debbie, Patrice,
: Latoya, Tamara, Elanqua, Shaneicka & Nikita Griffin; mother-
in-law: Gloria Rolle; father-in-law: Paul Rolle Sr.; 3 sisters-
: in-law: Rosalie, Pauline & Veronica Rolle; 6 brothers-inlaw:
: Alfred, Joel, Paul Jr. & Harold Rolle, Nevis Sweeting &

Sabrina Conliffe; 12 nephews: Ricardo & Jermaine Rolle, } Vilius; 4 aunts: Sharon, Carmell, Zelma & Vanessa,; 3 uncles:

Dominick & Jamaal Newbold, Derek, Kyle, Ricardo, Nat, } Edward, Jemeriah & Sterling; 3 grand aunts: Wilhemina
Cleveland, Van Johnson, Edison (Kim) Johnson, Robert :

Johnso; 4 Godchildren: Maris Sands, Laura, Linda & Dudley; Olga Clarke; numerous cousins: Sanovia, Shantell, Sherika,

: Tia, Marcia, Crystal, Elizabeth, Keston, Sherkera, Shernika,
Kirklyn, Deleko, Deandra, Eugene, Syslee, Daniel, Ventoi &
: Jordon; other relatives & friends: Judy (Godmother), Michelle,
? Michael Jr., Indy, Cathy, Lorenda, Pria, Tagh, Judy, the entire
: staff of F. M. L., the entire staff of Sul-Mar Construction,
: Rev. Fr. Crosley & Janet Walkine, Catechist Albert Rolle &
: the entire Johnson Road Community. Special thanks to Damian
: Flower, Kingley Munroe & the staff of F.M.L.
Shavanno Mullings, Mr. & Mrs. Baker, The Rolle Avenue :

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Accident & Emergency at P.M.H, The Golden Gates Family, } Home, Market Street, from 10 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday &

: on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

Sargent of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Elsiemae Burrows &





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 29

Hemeritie’s Funeral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Edith Elmira "Maredie" Wilson, 77 |

: Irene, Mary, Betty, Fanny, Sylvia, Shirley, Rita, Ina, Jane & Wilfred
i Major, Olive Seymour & family, Meg & Eddie Burrows, Shelly, Gia,

a resident of Matthew Town, Inagua i Cyril, Angie Kelly, Francis Shingler & Lila Peters (Ft. Laud.), Ida
i Brown, Ruth Hield, Idella Knowles, Roselie Smith, Aunt Ester,
Bloneva Balfour, Lashann Strachan, Cestine & Berkley Finley, Patricia
Wesley Methodist Church, Malcolm
Road, on Saturday at 1:00 p.m. }
Officiating will be Rev. Edward }
Sykes, Rev. John Stubbs & other }
i Powell, Symonette, Lightbourne, Harris, Moultrie, Mills, Thomas,
follows in Woodlawn Gardens, / Fulford, Lewis, Handfield, Jennings & Stubbs families in Turks &
? Caicos and Inagua Communities; Judith Cartwright, Marlene Taylor,
? Road Traffic Department (Nassau); Superior Water Sports (Freeport),
She is survived by 7 daughters: i John Bull Stores (Nassau), Bristol Wines (Nassau), The Wesley
Suzette, Delores, Deborah &

Charmaine Wilson; Patsy Seymour, }

Joan Rolle, Brendalee Smith; 2

SOUS: Livingston and Barry Wilson.

6 adopted sons: Howard Smith, Harold, Wilfred,Clayvon, Andre &
Lathen Seymour; 7 adopted daughters: Helena Dean, Maud Carroll, }
Vivien Ellis, Barbara Hanna, McNelly Rolle, Cynthia Bascombe and
Elvina Adderley; 4 sisters: Patricia Clare (New York), Muriel Williams |
(Palm Beach), Joan Stubbs (Freeport), Camille Brown (Nassau); 2 ;
brothers: Alfred Clare Jr. & Hosea Seymour; 35 grandchildren: Stevie, ;
Sean, Sterling, Sheldon, Shamia, Darnel, Shane, Darvin, Italia, Lavard, |
Daval, Gerard, Suzette, Dexter, Nathalie, Debreca, Deshron, Kyle, |
Stanley, Rachel, Breniko, Brenique, Barissa, Errol Jr., Tempestt, |
Khambrel, Ikell, Duran, Tiaja, Barcardra, Bria, Geoffrey Jr., Genoseshia,
Baron, Gerrard Jr.; 23 great-grandchildren: Simorne, Steven Jr., Tia, ;
Rushawnte', Shanez, Kadhija, Kiashia, Kenaz, Rayshano, Kadeem, ;
Sheldon Jr., Precious, Melek, Sheldonte', Ternajah, Jasmine, Skyler, |
Dexter Jr., Debria, Jeremy Jr., Landre', Labron, Nyrel, Nigel; Daughters-
in-law: Myrtle and Laverne Wilson; Sons-in-law: Errol Seymour, }
Lloyd Rolle, Ike Smith and Geoffrey Knowles. 1 aunt: Gertrude
Chisholm (Miami, Fla.); Sisters-in-law: Marjorie Grant and Sharon }
Clare; Brothers-in-law: Rev. John Stubbs and Kevin Brown (Freeport); :
Granddaughters-in-law: Ruth, Joyce, Nadia, Nicole and Maquella; }
Special Cousins (like sisters): Annie Brooks & family; Dora Henfield |
& family, Macedes Harvey & family, Violet Styles (New York), }
Numerous nieces & nephews: Richard, Penny & Lyle, Wayne, Marsha, }
Trevor & Angie, Johnny, Tahesha, Jason, Jonetta, & Sean, Gen, }
Cynthia, Davene, Paula & Peter, Merlene, Melbert, Marvin & Sophie,
Mark Darryl, Dion & Damian; Shane, Estelle, Kevin, Kyano & ;} & Charles Eneas; 17 grand & 10 great grandchildren; other relatives
: & friends including: Ezekiel & Iris Johnson, David & Lester Carey,

Patrice, Orman, Debra, Freddy, Junior, Michael, Nicky, Rev. John ! Deacon Frank Carey, Deacon Vera Rolle, Basil Rolle, Pastor George

Malcolm, Llewlyn, Janet, Don, Genie, Eleanor, Wilfred, Lloyd, Tabby, i Berry, Deacon Tyrone Flowers, Teresita Rolle, Nathalie & Edgar

Bell, Keith, Judy, Melvin & Patricia, Margaret, Shirley, Oswald, Sam. { Bonimy, Vernal Pinder, Kenneth Knowles, Antoine Connely of Freeport,

\ i Grand Bahama, Stafford Bain, Meurice Wallace, Eustace Knowles,
Blythe, Wilma, Cheryl, Brenda, Wally Clare, Bill, Ed, Butch, Evan }

& formerly of South Caicos, Turks
& Caicos Island, will be held at

Ministers of the Gospel. Interment

Soldier Road.

Kemeshia; Kathy, Billy, Pat, Gloria, Monica, Rev. Livingstone Malcolm,

& Henry Wilson; Numerous Cousins & other relatives: Bethel, Maria,
Clare, Diane, Judith, Netty, Dwayne, Derrick, Sally, Llewlyn &

Kenny & Arbie Basden, Eva Moxey, Henry McIntosh, Allison, Cardrin

Williams; Extra Special family friends: Dorothy & Pearl Ingraham,

Dickenson, Thea & Patylee Malcolm, Tina Fisher, Pearl Harvey,
Norma, Welly, Gen, Doreen, Cheryl, Quin, Ms. McKinney, Dimples,
Vera Fox, The Hanchel, Seymour, Wilson, Basden, Brooks, Glintons,
Saunders, Clare, Malcolm, Harvey, Simmons, Gibson, Williams,

Methodist Church (Inagua), St. Paul's & St. David's Methodist Churches
(Grand Bahama), The Inagua Clinic Staff; Princess Margaret Female
Medical 2, Nurse Munroe & Dr. Campbell.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
Market Street, from 10 a.m. -6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday from
9-11:00 a.m. & at the church from 12:00 noon until service time.

Ellworth Edison Pinder,
aka "Eddie, Lizzard, Old Man", 65

a resident of St. Bart Road, Golden
Gates #2, will be held at Golden
Gates World Outreach Ministries,
Carmichael Road, on Sunday at 2:30
p.m. Officiating will be Bishop Ros
L. Davis. Interment follows in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK
Drive.

Left to cherish his memories are his
wife: Dolores Pinder; 3 sons: Edison
Jr., Christopher & Vernard Pinder;
3 daughters: Sandra Hanna, Ellistine
Farrington & Elsbeth Pinder; 2
sisters: Andrea & Elzena Eneas; 4
brothers: Leslie Hyler, Kendal, John

Shirley McDonald Brennen, Bishop Ros L. & Rev. Althea Davis &

' Golden Gates World Outreach Ministries Church family.
Cleveland Lightbourne; Hattie, Elaine, Beatrice, Winkie, Lil, Jay,

i Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
& Talcur, Myrtis, Debbie, Nobie, Carol, Tina, Franklyn Earl & Bea } Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Saturday & on Sunday from 9-
Clare, Patrice & Margaret Chisholm, Annis Kemp; God Children: |

Harold & Wilfred Seymour, Tracy Rolle & Yolanda Mills, Judy }

12:30 p.m. & at the church from 1:30 p.m. until service time.





PAGE 30, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Aemeritte’s Huneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Ruthland "Buster" Colebrooke, 74

by Sis. Tezel Anderson. Interment

Street.

Joycelyn Colebrooke; his

children; nephews and nieces,

Bain, Terecita and Sidney Pinder of Freeport GB, Veronica
Wilkinson, Judy Burrows, Sandra Cox, Anthony Barton, Kevin

Leona Munnings, Telma Cooper, Mildred Ball, Naomi Deveaux,

and Melly Price a host of grand nephews and nieces, the Lily of
the Valley Corner Neighbourhood and Friends.

at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

Edmund Oscar "Beef' Symonette, 56

a resident of Rock Sound,

Episcopal Church, Queens

Highway, Rock Sound, Eleuthera,
: Tina & Lance Munnings, Lorna Sweeting & family, Basil Sands

on Saturday at 11:00 a.m.

Officiating will be Pastor Thelma :
? Knowles & family, Kano Thompson & family, Myrtle Ferguson &
i family.

in Yellow Ground Cemetery, :

i Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
? Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Thursday & on Friday at the
: church in Rock Sound, Eleuthera from 6:00 p.m. until service time
: on Saturday.

Wiliiamson, assisted by Rev
Gregory Clarke. Interment follows

Yellow Ground Road, Eleuthera.

| Left to cherish his fond memories
are his wife, Delena Symonette;

: children, Abigail, Carla, Kate, Edmund Symonette Jr, adopted
: daughter Antonya Miller; granddaughter, Carlissa Seymour; sisters,

. . : Ida Symonette, Patricia Saunders and Margaret Johnson; brothers
ea sonieie of Serie Edgar & Anslom Symonette; mother-in law, Susan Hall; brothers-
Creel Mavis aeell be held at : in-law, Tony Symonette, William Johnson, Mannasah, Jack, Mack,
Wesley Methodist Church, : J@m¢s & Leroy Hall; sisters-in-law, Florance and Rosemary
Baillion Hill Road. on Thurs day Symonette, Dorothy Gomez, Edith, Iva, Leonora & Ella Hall, Mary
at 11 C8 aan Offici ating will be : Sands, Alsada Leary; Uncle, Samuel Sands; aunts, Viola Sands &
Rev, L. Cada B Culmer assisted | Florence Symonette of Goulds, Florida, Olivia Symonette & Edna

a . : i Horton of Rock Sound; cousin, Ernestine Johnson, Avis Pyfrom,

: : Alvine Sands, Althea Gibson, Evelyn Deal, Leroy & Raneld
follows in Wesley Cemetery, West ? Knowles, Lillian Nixon, Sandra Roberts, Charlene, Stephen, Andrew

: and Marcus Symonette, Erma & Collimae Sands, Anthony & Garth

eas : Sands, Myrtle Knowles, Minard, Sidney, Frederick, Eddie & Roger,
oo. ae sh agen : Naomi Davis, Marie Saunders, Mayfield Young, Emily, Clifford,
: : Robert, Tommy, Michael & Jeff Sands, Florina Sands, Philip Sands,

: : Louise Turnquest, Helen Smith, Anthony, Norman, Roger, Claritha
dauphiss, sheryl Grant beur Brand & Marsha Symonette of Goulds Florida, Robert, Mency, Eric &

. . . . : Greg Maynard, Sonya Francis, Larry Forbes, Dorraine Deveaux,
Lavern and Stephanie Bain, Elverton and Jayne Bain, Wilfred and ; " ' :
Terry Bain, Nelson and Paula Mae Bain, Norman Bain, Michael | yoo ee ann a ene net Deon Semonctie. Raphael
and Theresa Bain, Edwina Bain, Marion Williams, Jacaqueline Jason & Myron Johnson, Donavon & Terrell Davis, Desmond,
Darron, Johnathan, Chavez & Anthony Hall, Marine Seaman Of
‘oat oT: bn : i The Royal Bahamas Defence Force, Dulon, Nathanial Hall, Leroy
Higgins, Donna Marie Higgs. Cousins:Rev. Kenris Carey, Audrey ; : : '
3 «a i Hall Jr., Javon Leary, Danero & James Sands, Antanette Sands,
Deveaus, Devers! Perusen, Constance Munnines, Falticia sawyer, Margarete Hill, Gurtrude & Marcia Saunders, Teres Nain, Laverne

Rhona Reily, Vivian Deveaux, Lavarity Deveaux, Steve Deveaux é& Peter Budgewsiler, Gwen Symonetic of Freeport, Vashi

ene hiss: Eee! Levee MF, Fein hain es, eee vielen, Bethel, Tamika Rahming, Deidre Nelson, Shenique Moxey, Meredith

i Miller, Abigail Johnson, Shantia, Philipa, Debora, Kenya, Erica,
Jamilee, Ginger, Bianca, Karissa, Ivana, Latera, Lawrencia,

. : tat i Shakendria, Mackeba, Dellaresse, Delpha, Janay & Shameka Hall,
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, } lee Oe ene a lal ee eal
Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Wednesday & on Thursday Monty, ie Tay on a goddaughter, Harniqua Bo a very
i special friend, Veronica Ferguson of Abaco; a host of other relatives
: and friends, Pat Maynard and family, Helen Davis & family, Casey
: Evans, James "Boosey" Hall & family, Customs Officer Scrivens,
? Rosemary of Nassau, William Campbell & family, Charles Johnson,
: Telmage Knowles, Alveta & Vandolyn Sands, Patsy Taylor &
: family, the staff of the Rock Sound Public Clinic, Errol Sands &
: family, Arthur Sands & family, Mary Lloyd & family, Jack Hilton
Eleuthera, will be held at Allen :
Chapel African Methodist }
: Young, Norris Carey, Cloyd & Breon Leary & family, Harry Horton

Symonette, Monica Lloyd, Gretchen Saunders, Shelly & James

& family, Arnold Knowles & family, Douglas Smith & family,
Gloria McSweeny & family, Alley Knowles & family, Lincoln

& family, Godfrey Deveaux & family, Johnlee Ferguson & family,
& family, Alison Major & family, Mary Lloyd & family, Kenneth





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Evergreen Mortuary

EXCELLENT IN THE SERVICE WE PROVIDE

For all of your Funeral Service Needs,
We will be pleased to serve you with hoor,

Tel: 242-204-7999
Fax: 242.994 7900
Jdhers: 242-541-4009
or 322-3242
Ce: 565-97 SE

DENALEE E, PENN L.P.DakE,
MANAGING FUNERAL DIRECTOR

Mackey Sancel South
(Oppesite Minute luller) Masao, Bieheamas

MEMORIAL SERVICE

A private
memorial service
will be held in

memory of the late

LEON
"Crow"
FORBES, 65

of Eastwood Estates, on Friday March 27
2009. Officiating will be Emmanuel Pratt.

Left to cherish fond memories are his son:
Teon Forbes; One (1) Brother: Ervin Forbes;
Three (3) Sisters: Eleanor and Brendamae
Forbes and Orient Edgecombe; Twelve (12)
Nephews: Alexander "Cassie: Oswald, Elgin
and Emmanuel Forbes, Sandy, Lavade,
Carlos, Deon, Tavon, Dominique, Del
Shannon and Shabass. Eleven (11 )-Nieces:
Willimae, Patricia, Rochell, Leanora,
Shamala, Latese, Latonya, Shantel, Ahanell
and Shandiera; A host of other relatives and
friends too numerous to mention.

Funeral Arrangements are entrusted to
Evergreen Mortuary, Mackey Street.

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 31

er Cruneral Chapel

, “Where the river lies still.
24 HOURS ADAY
“he erring The Bahamas WP oh Pride”
FRANK M. Coors R- Funeral Director
“Professanal Peapis (Fb Care’

Sania eee cape Aweimne
10 Bee GT 2905
‘Na iran, * Ba oe ay

Tekephone: (242) 356-3721

Cellular; (242) 395-8951

FUNERAL SERVICE

RICHARD
"Dick"
LLOYD SANDS, 81

of North Palmetto Point, Eleuthera,
will be held on Saturday morning
at llam, at Bible Truth Hall, North
Palmetto Point. Officiating will be
Douglas Thompson, assisted by
Jason Thompson and interment will
follow in Saint Margaret View
Cemetery, North Palmetto Point.

Cockburn Town
San Satpader, Babaenas
Telephone:
(242) 331-2642

He is survived by his wife, Louise Sands; six sons, Joseph Deal,
Gladstone, Richard, Melvin, Gregory, Harry and Dexter Sands;
four daughters, Everlyn Stuart, Albertha and Judy Culmer and
Sally Rahming; one brother, Kingsley Sands; four sisters, Joquater
Bowe, Olga Porter, Shirley Rolle, Genieve Bethel and Mispah
Evans; sixteen grandsons, Randy Stuart, Don and Dennis Culmer,
Hance, Baron, Joseph, Vincent Shaun and Keith Deal, Adrian,
Devryn, Owen and Tree, Greg, Dennis and Harry; sixteen grand
daughters, Alma, Paula, Roslyn, Stacey, Castella, Susan, Rochelle,
Bridgette, Marcia, Roshea, Samaria, Roquel, Cielle, Sanchester,
Harriott and Adrea; fifteen great grandsons, Ashmond, Colin,
Joel, Kalyn, Devin, Huey, Dennis, Lorenzo, Ellis, Joshua, Hance,
Baron, B.J., Ricardo, Jaden; twenty one great grandchildren,
Simone, Nia, Breanne, Tiara, Aliasa, Aliajah, Diamond, Dawn,
Ciona, Ashley, Tashudra, Tiajia, Tyrin, Shiphrah, Baronique,
Yvontise, Montoya, Nakitia, Miracle, Ieasha and Keira; nieces
and nephews, family and friends including, Priscilla Stuart, Addie
Culmer, Ena Thompson and Corrine Sands, Maitland Bethel,
Arthur Rolle and Aldon Evans, Alfreda Deal, Brenda, Rose and
Denise Sands, Gerald Culmer, Silkirk Thompson, Martha Sands,
James Bain Junior, Charles Cooper, Umie, Dalia, Allison, Christine
Higgs, Joshua Culmer and family, Dewitt Carey and Branville
Thompson, Bernice Thompson and family, Clarie Bethel and
family, Erdman Deal and family, Garth Culmer, Leon Thompson
and family, officers and members of the Salvation Army, officers
and members of the Methodist Church, Reverend Godfrey Bethel
and family, the staff of Palmetto Point Clinic, Nurse Debbie Deal
and the staff of the Rock Sound Clinic and the community of
Palmetto Point.

Friends may pay their respects at Riverside Funeral Chapel,
Market Street and Bimini Avenue, on Thursday from 10am to
7pm and at the church in North Palmetoo Point, from 7pm on
Friday until service time on Saturday.





PAGE 32, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

7 GateWany MMGAOT IAL Funes al Chea

Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D.

President/Managing Director

Pel, [buss (Ache) $4 a pa bape
Ath i luuie Coll; Pe zh epay fed | a ge5 4)
old, went: i Pee] bp

ml |e els Bahamas, Turks & Cacios Island

ay npesep tg ene
Keyl Slescienees

all aft Facet)
"Higherrserulce}isithe

hdehdachdel SERVICES FOR

a reisdent of Grand Turk, Turks &
Caicos Island will be held on Saturday,

| 28th March, 2009 at 10:30 a.m. at
Southwest Cathedral Church Of God;
Officiating will be Pastor Lynden
Knowles: assisted by: Pastor Perry R.

| Cunninghamand interment will follow
in Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery,
Soldier Road. Services entrusted to
Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel,
Mount Royal Avenue and Kenwood
Street.

He is survived by his wife: Gwendolyn Williams; four daughters,
Deborah Gilbert, Rochelle Scavella, Christine Major-Williams and
Ismeralda Williams; eight sons: Shawn, Devroy, Lavelle, Dave,
Maceo Sr and Wayne Williams, Hurley Forbes of Grand Turk and
Tristen Sands; one sister: Louise Williams of Grand Turk; two
brothers: Alfred Williams of Nassau and Edgar Williams of Grand
Turk; two sons-in-laws: Derick Gilbert and Dwaine Scavella; six
daughters-in-laws: Pamela, Rosie, Cherrin, Natasha, Gina and Julian
Williams; twenty grand children: DiShawn, LaShawna, ShawnJay,
D’Nero, Dillon, D’Naja, Shawna-Gay, Maceo Jr, Mateo, Akua, Seth
and Ghana Williams, Donnavan, Donathan and Don, LaTara Young,
Tyrone and Tetrakosio Rahming, Ta’Mah Scavella and Wayne Jr.;

ten nephews: Richard Williams of Washington DC, Franklyn
“Blicky”, Orvie, Bill, Robert, Lee Oswald and Hurd Stevenson of
Grand Turk, Sinclair, Darrin and Mark Williams of Nassau; six
nieces: Mary Williams of Freeport Grand Bahama, Dorothea Williams
of Miami, Florida, Betty Swan of Grand Turk, Fiona, Stacy and
Tammy Williams of Nassau; three brothers-in-laws: Earl Higgs of
Provodenciales, Paul and Hartwell Higgs of Nassau; cousins; Lillian,
Clifford, Clinton, and Benjamin Williams, Lillian Strachan, Veronica
Mackey, Helen Dean, Howard Miller, Aurelia Butler, Jacob Shaw,
Olive Carey, Jennifer Jones, Betty Smith, Ernest Moore, Marjorie
Godet, Monica Jones, Larry and Alfred Swan. Other Relatives and
Friends including: Noel Hamilton, Worrington Parker, King, Benson,
Rev, Shawn Gardiner, John Gilbert, Mr Rolle, Steve Culmer, Wellie,
Renea, Marcelle, Conrad Jennings, Maurice Henchell, Johnny Wood,
Samuel Lightbourne, Stanley Williams, George Thomas Arthur and
Hettie Garland of Grand Turk, Richard Dickenson, Percy Williams,

William Lightbourne, James and Marge Williams, Rev Dr Enith !

Ellis, Leila Farrington, Joe & Jane Williams, John Kemp, Paul Hall;
Bamboo Town Families: The Miller’s, The Nairn’s, The Hepburn’s,
Ms Johnson and Mrs Worrell, the staff of Shirley Street Post Office,
the Public Library Mackey Street, Tropical Shipping, Massage by
Canaan, Riu Hotel Paradise Island, Princess Margaret hospital Male
Medical I and I, PMH Dialysis Unit and a host of other relatives
and friends too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Friday,
March 27th, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday,
from 9:30 a.m. until service time at the church.

Phillip Barrington King, 53

a reisdent of Lobster Avenue Golden
Gates No.1 will be held on Saturday,
28th March, 2009 at 2:00 p.m. at
Transfiguration Baptist Church;
Officiating will be Rev’d Dr. Stephen
Thompson: assisted by: Rev’d Basil
Johnson and interment will follow in

| Southern Cemetery Cowpen and
_.| Spikenard Roads . Services entrusted
"| to Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel,
| Mount Royal Avenue and Kenwood

He is survived by his adopted mother:
Brenda Watson, his uncle Oscar Johnson Sr., his sister Gertrude
Evans, his cousins Bradley Sr., Christal, Bradley Jr., Hebron, Dianne
and Ernie Watson, Karen Pinder, Vernita Thompson, Italia, Oscar
Jr., and Dr. Daniel Johnson, Cora Cooper, Cathleen Hassan, Gladys
Sands, Elcina Knowles, Dorcus Johnson, Joseph, Michael, Phillip
and Charles Stubbs, Gloria Walkes, Diana Rolle, Isaac and Cedric
Lightbourne Bridgette, Elsworth, Nkrumah and Ken Johnson, other
family and friends including Anthony Ferguson, Bob Saunders,
Leonie Taylor (Auntie), Joel Smith, Perry Saunders, Patrick, Jerrad,
Agatha King, Kenny Collie, Minara Cooper, Sydney Lightbourne
and the Watling Street family.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Friday,
March 27th, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday,
from 1:00 p.m. until service time at the church.





The Tribune



RELIGION

Thursday, March 26, 2009 ® PG 33

LAZARUS AND THE
RESURRECTION!

Text: John Chapters 11:1 - 12:11

Much Scripture has been written to attest that the

resurrection of the dead is promised. Paul used this

fact to gain an advantage, and defend himself at

Jerusalem. “When Paul perceived that the one part

Pastor Ben Baile were Sadducees, and the other Pharisees, he cried
The Prophetic V. y out in the council, Men and brethren, | am a Pharisee,
€ rropnetic Voice | _the son of a Pharisee: of the hope and resurrection

P. O. Box N-9518 of the dead | am called in question (Acts 23:6).”
Nassau, Bahamas

Tpv.inc@coralwave.com | The big question which haunts men, women, and

children is this - Job asked, “If a man die, shall he
live again? (Job 14:14)” Then answered his own question, “Though after
my mF worms desiroy this body, yet in my flesh shall | see God (Job
19:26).”

The Apostle John provided a living, and credible eyewitness account of
Jesus’ use of God’s Power of Attorney and His Ability to assuredly deliver
what He caused to be promised in resurrecting Lazarus from the dead
based on God’s Promissory Note.

There was a certain sick one, Lazarus of Bethany, the brother of Mary and
her sister Martha (it was that Mary who anointed the Lord with ointment
and wiped His feet with her hair, whose brother Lazarus was sick.) Then his
sisters sent to Him, saying, Lord, behold, he whom You love is sick. When
Jesus heard, He said, this sickness is not to death, but for the glory of God,
so that the Son of God might be glorified by it. Jesus received a message
that Lazarus was sick, but chose not go to him. The point we make here,
is; the sick may die unless healers visit them. We are sometimes restrained
from attending, to allow God to get the greater Glory.

Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus. Therefore, when He had
heard that he was sick, He remained two days in the place where He was;
and in verse 11, called Lazarus ‘Friend.’ Then Jesus said to them plainly,
Lazarus is dead. Jesus said to Martha, | am the Resurrection and the Life!
He who believes in Me, though he die, yet he shall live. Whoever lives and
believes in Me shall never die. Do you believe this? Jesus wept!

Jesus said, take away the stone. Martha, the sister of him who died, said
to Him, Lord, by this time he stinks. It is the fourth day; Jesus answered
her, did | not say to you that if you would believe, you would see the glory
of God? Jesus cried with a loud voice, Lazarus, Come Here! (Outside!)
He who had died came out, bound hand and foot with sheets, and his face
was bound with a cloth. When the Voice of Eternal Life called Lazarus,
death was forced to release him and escort him to the mouth of the grave.

The foregoing action is reminiscent of 1 Thessalonians 4:16, “The Lord
himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the
archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise
first.” Christ, The Resurrection called Lazarus from death as proof that
once you believe The Truth; your life can be restored, because, He was
also The Life. Jesus said to him, | Am the Way, the Truth, and the Life: no
man cometh to the Father, but by Me (John 14:6). Jesus said to the thief
on the cross, Truly, | say to you, today you shall be with me in Paradise
(Luke 23:43).

Scriptures hereunder, taken in context; and paraphrased against similar
Roman spectacles shouts to open-minded readers, “He led a parade out
of Hell.” Observe, “Christ has once suffered for sins, that he might bring
us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit: he
also went and preached to the spirits in prison (Hell): For this cause was
the gospel preached also to them that are dead, that they might be judged
according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit: He led
captivity captive, and gave gifts unto men.”

Jesus said, untie him and let him go! (We are invited to get involved in
removing ‘Friend’s’ stink, and messy restraints.) Then many of the Jews
who came to Mary, and had seen the things which Jesus did, believed on
Him. Then a great crowd of the Jews learned that He was there. They did
not come for Jesus’ sake only, but also that they might see Lazarus, whom
He had raised from the dead. Nevertheless, the chief priests consulted that
they might put Lazarus to death also, because many of the Jews went away
and believed on Jesus because of him.

Are you ready to receive The Resurrection as Lazarus did?





RELIGION

PG 34 © Thursday, March 26, 2009 The Tribune

Islam

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas has for
many years asserted
the title of being a
Christian nation, a

characteristic supported

by the abundance of
churches in virtually all

communities throughout

these islands.





Where many Bahamians are devout
Christians because of traditional beliefs
passed on through many generations, the say-
ing which suggested that there’s a church on
every corner would rarely be thought to
include a mosque.

However, there is a growing Muslim popu-
lation within the Bahamas, which is estimated
at around 3,500 followers.

The mosque which has become the univer-
sal symbol of the Muslim faith and Islamic
centre, is easily identified by its elaborate old
world golden tips and commonly white exte-
rior.

Literally a place for worship, the interior
of most mosques are rarely cluttered with
pews or chairs. The mosque is a simple place
commonly complemented with carpet or
mats, allowing followers to visit and pray to
their God known as Allah.

Unlike the Christian faith where the word
‘God’ refers to a trinity comprising of the
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, the Muslim
‘Allah’ refers to one God in the most basic,
simple, and elementary meaning of the word.

Also unlike the Christian faith where a
pastor, bishop, or deacon may reside as the
hierarch, in the Muslim world the mosque
leader is known as an Ameer.

a

RB

Faisal Hepburn is the Ameer of the Islamic
Centre and Mosque on Carmichael Road,
and said that contrary to the common belief
that Muslim is new to these island, history
tells of a far different story.

Dating back to 1831, Mr Hepburn said a
letter now housed in the Government public
records office was written to the then
Governor Sir James Carmichael Smyth by a
liberated Slave. The letter which was written
in Arabic, is also said to include passages
from the Islamic Bible known as the Qur’an.

It is believed to be from Abul Keli who
was an African prince of the Ibo tribe cap-
tured by slave traders and taken from his
home to be sold as a potential slave.

Mr Hepburn explained the ship which
Abul was being transported on was soon
intercepted by the Royal Navy and brought
to the Bahamas.

Mr Hepburn referenced from the book The
History of The Bahamas by local author
Michael Craton: “Taking into account the
usual shipping routes, it is probable that most
of the Bahamian Negroes came from the
more northerly parts of Africa. There were
found the brown-skinned Mandingoes,

SEE page 39





The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, March 26, 2009® PG 35

Entertainers and Superstars

The religious churches that we see
today, are not the churches of which
Yeshuwa Messiah (Jesus the Christ)
was referring to in Matt.16:18 whom
he gave all power (dunamis- doo '-nam-
is) and authority (exousia) to. The
enemy is quite aware that his time is
limited therefore he has pulled another
tricky deceptive move on many per-
sons who are seeking to worship
Father Yahweh. This move is to infil-
trate and contaminate / pervert any
form or act of worship that is to be ren-
dered unto the Father. Through erro-
neous religious beliefs and the many
different denominations it seems as if
the enemy's plans and the gates of hell
are victories; but thanks be to the
Father that's not the case, because if it
was possible even God's very elect
would be deceived by this plan of the
enemy.

The ancient religious system has set
up / established thousands of churches
that are nothing more than places of
entertainment where local and interna-
tional religious superstars; gather to
entertain itching ear Christians. It's sad
to confess this fact, but if we are going
to be honest, we can not deny that
some of the same acts and performanc-
es which are displayed in the secular
entertainment world are seen in the
church today.

The word of God, which is the
church's constitution, has become so
debatable in that churches are divided
by the very same word which is suppose
to unite and strengthen the church,
(wow). That's the power of religion.

Whenever a ministering gift brings







PASTOR
ALLEN

some form of clarity or revelation of
God's word or a new song to the
church; immediately the religious
mind-set puts the gifted person or per-
sons on pedestals thereby making them
superstars and entertainers, rather than
servants of God to the body of the
Messiah.

Religious leaders both locally and
internationally have done a very good
job in promoting themselves to the
church world via; television, radio,
books, etc. Insomuch that these super-
stars can go into a region and do just as
much or even more spiritual damage
than the enemy himself; this can mostly
be attributed to the fact that the
churches are filled with emotionally
driven Christians, rather than spiritual-
ly mature disciples of Yeshuwa
Messiah.

The Apostle Paul admonished his
spiritual son / disciple “Timothy” in
2Tim.2:15 Study to thy self approved
unto God, a workman that need not be
ashamed, rightly dividing the word of
truth.

If the Apostle told Timothy “to right-
ly divide the word of truth” then, I sub-
mit to you that even though it is God's
word; then it can also be wrongly divid-
ed?

The enemy will always give way or
make room for emotional, religious
practices where Christians can be
entertained with a few hours of good
music, singing and dancing as well as
with a good screaming, hacking and
hopping preacher. To the contrary
wherever sound Bible teaching is pres-
ent, there will be few people, because
this sort of spiritual environment pro-
duces disciples of God's word.
Disciples are those, whom religious
leaders cannot hoodwink and bamboo-
zle with emotional entertainment. The
religious churches and their leaders
have done grave injustice to the body
of Messiah; insomuch that the world of
which the church was suppose to
impact and influence, has flipped the
script, and is now impacting and influ-
encing the church.

What's mostly disturbing about these
entertainment centers / religious
churches and their superstars (especial-
ly) U.S. foreign superstars; is that
whenever these superstars and enter-
tainers depart, they leave the Bahamas
financially loaded. Meanwhile the poor,
foolish congregation is left stripped
clean as they are told to wait on and
believe God for their financial break-
through. Is God pleased with this sort
of behavior? HELL no.

Watch this!

Religion, tradition and Christianity
promote man and their teachings which
always result in the fleecing of their fol-
lowers. Discipleship promotes
Yeshuwa Messiah through the obedi-
ence of His teachings and exalts the

Father and His kingdom.

In the kingdom of God there is only
one star and He is Yeshuwa Messiah, in
the world of religion there are many
stars of whom the Christian churches
exalt and promote. In stardom there is
always competition for the spotlight;
this is another reasons why we've got so
many powerless churches and denomi-
nations in our land today.

In some cases church leaders have
become so territorial, threatened and
insecure that they've sought to sup-
press, stifle, hinder and even kill any
potential gifts that emerge within their
congregation; which may gain some
form of recognition or attention.

Religious leaders mind-set and men-
tality is as such, “I'm the Bishop,
Apostle or Pastor of this church, if any
honor is to be given around here it
should be given to me”

Rather than training and preparing
the young up-coming ministers to fur-
ther advance the kingdom of God, this
type of weak leadership is selfish and is
not of God. The Father is calling for
and restoring order and integrity back
into His house, so despite all the good
that a local church may have done in
the past; if their heart was not right or
they may have had ulterior motives,
their pay day is at hand. Study
(Matt.7:22, 23) and hear what Yeshuwa
says to such church leaders.

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.441-2021 or 225-3850

THE 36th Annual
ACM conference was
held on March 19-

* 21st. This year’s theme
was, Men: Launch out
in Faith. The speakers
included Larry

=3 Gibson, Deputy
Commissioner of
Police, Ellison
Greenslade, Fr
Sebastian Campbell
and Bishop Laish
Boyd. The conference
climaxed with a pro-
cession from St

| Barnabas Church to St
_ Agnes where a thanks-
giving service was
held. Other partici-
pants included Cannon
Basil Tynes,
Archdeacon Etienne
Bowleg, Archdeacon
Keith Cartwright and Fr
Atma Budhu. Photos
show delegates attend-
ing the conference.

Keith Major Sr./Photo



PG 36 ® Thursday, March 26, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

Baptist ministry to liberated Africans

THE Baptist Missionary Magazine
of 1861 containing letters from all
parts of the world provides some fas-
cinating insights into the work and
compassion of the dedicated mission-
aries in the field. The letters of Rev
John Davey highlights his ministry
amidst the Liberated Africans in the
Bahamas:

“Mr Davey has communicated to
us the incidents of the wrecking of a
slaver on Abaco Island, and the set-
tlement in the Bahamas of the poor
enslaved Africans released from
bondage by this “act of God”. The
regulations adopted for their distri-
bution among the inhabitants seem
wise and just, and are adapted to
secure the well-being of the folk thus
thrown on the kindness of the people
of the Bahamas. They are to be set-
tled as apprentices, servants, or
labourers. The persons taking them
into employment must repay the
Government the amount expended
on clothing them. Children under
thirteen years of age must have suffi-
cient food and clothing provided for
them; and on their reaching the age
of sixteen, the current wages are to be
paid to them. Their employers must
also undertake to send them regular-
ly to a Sunday school. Africans above
fifteen years of age are to have wages
after two years service. If ladies take
the young girls into their service, they
are not to discharge them until other
situations have been found for them,
except in cases of misconduct, or the



} LAWLOR

interference of the public magistrate.

Mr. Davey's letter is dated
September 25,1860

“A slaver (Heroina) has been
wrecked within this colony at
Lanyard's Cay, between the Hole in
the Wall and Cherokee Sound,
Abaco, and her cargo of living beings
brought to this port. She was from
Congo and had nearly 400 slaves on
board when taken, consisting of men,
women, and children. They were of
all ages, from the infant at the breast
to persons in appearance of forty
years of age. They lay off the public
abutment in three wrecking
schooners, nearly a whole day, in a
state of nudity and disease - a revolt-
ing sight to many of the inhabitants.
As soon as their arrival had become
known, many of the Congoes [settled
in New Providence earlier] went to
see them, inquiring from what locali-
ty they had come, and whether they
knew anything about their relations.
One woman found her own sister,
and another her niece. Food and
some rough clothing having been
provided by the Government, they

were ordered to Athol Island, the
quarantine station. They remained
there seven or eight days

"In the course of a fortnight the
whole of them were disposed of, and
a notice published to the effect that
the arrangement which had been
made would owe its permanent valid-
ity solely to the approval of Her
Majesty's Government.

“After two distributions there were
still several poor children left; we
took two, a boy and a girl, their ages
being set down at seven and twelve;
so that though we had to purchase
them, it will be evident that we shall
only have to care for them until they
can take care of themselves.

“You will be pleased to hear that
my chapel (Bethel) continues crowd-
ed to the doors on Sunday evenings,
and that many inquirers are anxious
to be baptised; but as I am now con-
templating a visit to Andros Island, I
cannot attend to either of those
works at present. At one of the set-
tlements on Andros there are 7 or 8
persons waiting for baptism. Thus
does God encourage my work.”

Extracts from a further letter
from Davey in January 1861:
"Probably you are aware that we
hold evening classes - sixty have been
coming - I have now formed them
into classes for the purpose of
instructing them out of the Scriptures
in the fundamental doctrines of the
Christian faith.

At the close of the year we held a
watch-night service. That service this
year was particularly well attended,
and was more than usually solemn.
We held it as we always do, at Bethel;
and seats had to be placed in the
aisles for the accommodation of the
people. Mr Rae (the Presbyterian
Minister) was with us, and gave a
suitable address.

Last Tuesday we held a Special
Missionary Meeting, at which all the
speeches except one, were by native
Africans. We have lately had an
importation of copies of Yoruba
Testaments and three of the brethren
had copies and read from them. This
greatly interested the Africans who
were present. And if you had been
among us you would have rejoiced at
the hearty pleasure that their country
people had the scripture in their own
language. There is a great deal of
warmth in the piety of the Africans,
and some of them long to return to
their own land, to make known to
their countrymen the blessed doc-
trines they have embraced.”

The Liberated Yoruba Africans
were from Portuguese slavers cap-
tured much earlier and they had obvi-
ously attempted to keep their lan-
guage and culture alive. The Congoes
from the Heroina were the last
recorded settlement of the 6098
Liberated Africans in the Bahamas.

(Next time: Part 23 - Bahamian
Methodists Protest)

Ce
Is the glass half full or halt empty?

WELL, speaking for myself, I
would like to think that the glass is
half full at all times, as opposed to
empty, wouldn't you? The only prob-
lem is, we go through way too many
seasons in life, to be confident with
this thought.

Life can be like the weather chan-
nel, one minute there are torrential
rains and gusty winds, and then five
hours pass, to find an improved condi-
tion of sunny skies, with a few clouds.
Such a wild ride.

I recall an American pastor, TD
Jakes, once explaining to his congre-
gation, that the oxymorons of life
leave us, with 'ugly problems in beau-
tiful places’. We experience the best
and worst of times, all at the same



time, and can become really disheart-
ened because of it. To truly appreciate
this, all one would have to do is take a
look around our country, and the
world. There are persons who would
like to celebrate the birth of a child,
but hesitate, with the ever lurking fear
of job loss, then there are persons who
feel they may break down because of
stress, but then they realise that their

relationship with God is the strongest
it's ever been and instead decide to
rejoice.

To answer the question, which is
also the title of this article, everyone's
glass is always half full. If water is nec-
essary for life and life is what we make
it, then if we keep on living with posi-
tive outlooks and we never quit, we
are always pouring more life into our
glass, as we quench our thirst through-
out life's journey- thus, never allowing
for the ‘empty’ illusion that tends to
hide, and discredit all the beauty of
our present.

In closing, may God continue to
bless you all and fill your glasses to
overflowing.

"Rejoice in the Lord always. I will

say it again: Rejoice! Let your gentle-
ness be evident to all. The Lord is
near. Do not be anxious about any-
thing, but in everything, by prayer and
petition, with thanksgiving, present
your requests to God.

And the peace of God, which tran-
scends all understanding, will guard
your hearts and your minds in Christ
Jesus."

Philippians 4:4-7 (N.I.V)

¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
writer and poet, currently residing in
Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to
the article can be sent to
fearless247@gmail.com.



The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, March 26, 2009 ® PG 37

Lively Stone Church members dedicate their house to the Lord

= a ci ri "|
i]
Ta

, c el



MEMBERS of the Lively Stone
Church of God recently dedicated
their newly constructed and furnished
sanctuary on Knowles Drive near the
Tonique Williams Darling Highway.

The occasion marked many years of
goal setting, fund raising and determi-
nation by church members and was a
dream realised, said head pastor
Bishop Godfrey K. Hepburn

Bishop Robert McPhee, General
Superintendent of the Highway
Church of God Bahamas, presided
over the act of dedication. The sermon
was delivered by Bishop Alphonso
Scott, pastor of the Lively Stone
Church of God, St. Louis; Missouri.
Bishop Scott reminded the church that
humility must continue to be at the
forefront of ministry.

The Lively Stone Church of God has
existed for the past ten years. Upon its
inception, the church was located in a
rented facility on Jennie Street.
Through God's grace and the faithful-
ness of the members and supporters of
the ministry, the Knowles Drive prop-
erty was purchased in 2003 and mem-
bers worshipped under a tent at that
site while the sanctuary and office
units were being constructed.

Now that they are in their new facil-
ity, Lively Stone members have accept-
ed the mandate to seek the lost and to
provide an environment for spiritual
growth. The church extends a warm
welcome to residents of the surround-
ing areas and looks forward to working
with community leaders to develop
youth and young adult initiatives.





PG 38 ® Thursday, March 26, 2009



RELIGION

ADAM MCCLENDON, the first spirituality Ph.D. student at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, talks about the pro-
gram on the school's campus in Louisville, Ky., Friday, March 6, 2009. McClendon will spend the next five years in class

work and on research of the subject.

PhD program explores
Christian spirituality

m LOUISVILLE, Ky.

A NEW doctorate program at a con-
servative Baptist seminary will explore
the life lessons of the Bible at a time
when self-help spirituality is being
popularized by celebrities like Oprah.

The spirituality doctorate at
Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary arrives at a time when the
cultural interest in spirituality — and
disinterest in organized religion — is
growing, said Michael Haykin, a
church history professor in the semi-
nary’s Ph.D. program.

“The way the word (spirituality) is
used broadly in our culture, it’s very
eclectic and it can mean whatever a
person wants it to mean,” Haykin said.
“So we’re trying to ground it in a cer-
tain context.”

Scholars disagree on how to define
the term. But it is widely used to refer
to devotional practices of religion and
the interior individual experiences of
believers, according to the book
“Christian Spirituality: An

Introduction,” by Protestant scholar
Alister E. McGrath.

Spirituality differs from a purely aca-
demic, objective or detached approach
to religion, which focuses on identify-
ing key religious beliefs and practices
rather than delving into how people
experience and practice their faith,
McGrath wrote.

Christian spirituality, he wrote, “con-
cerns the quest for a fulfilled and
authentic Christian existence, involv-
ing the bringing together of the funda-
mental ideas of Christianity and the
whole experience of living on the basis
of and within the scope of the Christian
faith.”

From Beatle George Harrison’s
embrace of Hare Krishna in the 1960s
to Madonna’s advocating of Kabbalah
three decades later, celebrities have
played a major role in introducing less-
er-known and non-Christian spiritual
practices to the public. Haykin said
Americans were not familiar with
Kabbalah, a form of Jewish mysticism,
before Madonna began talking about it

in her music.

Biblical Spirituality.

Whitney said his review of the book }
“The Secret,” touted by Oprah on her :
talk show, is the most-read article on }
his Web site. But he said many media- } the di i Paul
driven forms of spirituality leave out } & DIOcena Tl SPORES Ia tae

God and Jesus in exchange for a focus :

on the individual.

God “kind of cafeteria-style
Heaven, yes, no thanks on the hell.”
Evangelical and

Warren’s best-selling book

planet, you must begin with God.”



Ed Reinke/AP Photo

The Tribune

By The Associated Press

RUBASHKIN ASKS COURT TO ACCOMMODATE
OBSERVANCE OF JEWISH HOLIDAYS IN

AGRIPROCESSORS CASE
| M_DES MOINES, lowa

THE former chief executive of an

embattled kosher slaughterhouse who
? has been charged with fraud, money
: laundering and other crimes is asking

a judge to plan court proceedings so

they don’t conflict with Jewish holi-

days.
In the notice filed Monday, attor-

: neys for Sholom Rubashkin said their
? client has “carefully reviewed his faith
? calendar” with his rabbi. The list

? includes about 30 days for religious

? observance or preparation during

? which he asked that court proceed-

: ings not be held.

Rubashkin, 49, is scheduled to

i stand trial in September.

The former manager of

? Agriprocessors Inc. in Postville faces

97 counts of immigration violations,

bank fraud, money laundering and
: other charges.

CATHOLIC BISHOP BOYCOTTS ANTI-ABORTION
EVENT WITH GOP CHAIRMAN STEELE

i MEVANSVILLE, Ind.

ROMAN Catholic Bishop Gerald
Gettelfinger plans to boycott an anti-
abortion group’s annual dinner because

of the views of the keynote speaker,
? Michael Steele, the new chairman of
i the Republican National Committee.

Steele, a Catholic, said in an inter-

i view with GQ magazine that abortion

Ds eae ? was “an individual choice.” He later
Spirituality is such a buzz word :

today, .” said Don Whitney, founder and : believes Roe v. Wade should be over-
president of the seminary’s Center for } tine

said that he opposes abortion and

Gettelfinger, head of the Diocese of
Evansville, spoke to Steele by phone
last week and has received a copy of
the GOP chairman’s statement, said

Leingang.
However, the bishop said abortion

Whitney said too many Americans, opponents should remain unequivocal

Christians included, want to accept : ; : :
P ? not done so in the GQ interview.

in stating those beliefs, and Steele had

Gettelfinger has attended the

traditional : Vanderburgh County Right to Life din-

Christians have been fighting the self-
help movement since the 1960s, argu- }
ing that obsession with individual bet-
terment is at odds with Christian }
teachings. Evangelical pastor Rick }
“The }
Purpose Drive Life” opens with the }
words, “It’s not about you. If you want :
to know why you were placed on this }
? not respond to a request for comment.

ner every year for at least a decade,
Leingang said. This year’s dinner, set
for April 16, also features Alaska Gov.
Sarah Palin.

Steele, the former lieutenant gover-
nor of Maryland, was elected head of
the GOP national committee less than
two months ago. A spokesman for the
Republican National Committee did



The Tribune

ef 6
'R 8
“S 8 Sacks

SHARING many of the same beliefs as Christians, Muslims believe
in the books of the previous prophets including the "Torah" which
was sent to Moses, the "Zaboor" (Psalms) which were given to
David, the "Injeel" (Gospel) which was given to Jesus, and the
Qur'an which was given to Muhammad.

Unlocking the
history of Islam

FROM page 34

Fulani and Hausa.”

Mr Hepburn said: “It is a historical and sociological fact
that the Mandingoes, Fulani and Hausa tribes are predomi-
nantly Muslim.”

More recently, the Islamic faith was said to re-emerge in
the Bahamas during the 1970s where a group of Bahamian
college students had been converted to Muslims while study-
ing abroad.

From that basic movement which over the years has grown
in membership, the message of Islam is slowly making its way
back into the mainstream as a recognised faith.

“This practice of Islam based on the pristine purity, today
is how we practiced with the acceptance and clear under-
standing of the Salaf.

“To this day, we are holding fast to that concept despite all
the changes that we adopted as we interrelated with various
Muslim groups and organizations over the years.”

Mr Hepburn explained that when the Islamic movement
was cemented in the late 70s, it was formed under the name
Jamaat-ul-Islaam.

Sharing many of the same beliefs as Christians, Muslims
believe in the books of the previous prophets including the
"Torah" which was sent to Moses, the "Zaboor" (Psalms)
which were given to David, the "Injeel" (Gospel) which was
given to Jesus, and the Qur'an which was given to
Muhammad.

However, Muslims are told that the previous scriptures
were tampered with by mankind and the Bible should only be
accepted in as far as it is confirmed by the Qur'an.

With limited media presence and other challenges, Mr
Hepburn explained that Islam is still facing an upward move-
ment in sharing the word of the Qur’an.

However in time, he is confident that Allah’s word will
reach those that seek it.

RELIGION

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Thursday, March 26, 2009 ® PG 39





PG 40 © Thursday, March 26, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune

ane is ie
_ ies | | : | ee

ST GEORGE’S ACM pictured presenting a portrait of all the Anglican Churches in the Diocese to the Church. SIMEON Dawkins, Fr Kingsley Knowles-Rector and David Ferguson.

ACM RECOGNIZES SOME
OF IT’S OUTSTANDING

>> During the ACM
and ACW installa-
tion service at St
George's Anglican
Church in the Valley
-outgoing president,
David Ferguson
recognised some of
the members for the
unselfish and dedi-
cated service to the
branch and to the
Church at large.
They were Roscow
Davies, Leslie Smith,
Simeon Dawkins,
Herbert Marshall
and the youngest
member Burton
Conyers.





St George Communication Ministry
/Photos

BURTON Conyers, Fr Kingsley Knowles-Rector and David Ferguson.

HERBERT Marshall, Fr Kingsley Knowles-Rector and David Ferguson.





Full Text


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USS

rTM et
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

Disastrous’ govt
revenue collection

PM: we are
going through
very rough time

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

GOVERNMENT revenue col-
lection for the first three months
of 2009 has been “disastrous”,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
told parliament yesterday.

“We are going through a very
rough time. Government revenue
is down substantially. What would
have applied in December of last
year...1n December of last year
you'd have been able to say, “Well
the revenue is not what we expect
it to be, but it’s roughly what we
collected the year before.’

“We couldn’t make such a
claim today. January, February
and March have been disastrous!
Terrible!” exclaimed Mr Ingra-
ham.

The major slippage in govern-
ment income comes just a month
after Mr Ingraham told parlia-
ment that, while revenue for the
first six months of the 2008/2009
fiscal year (up to December,
2008) was weak, “remarkably” it
was still “largely in line” with col-
lections over the first six months
of the 2007/2008 fiscal year.

Speaking on the mid-year bud-
get, he warned that the country is
facing “the most challenging glob-
al economic environment that the
vast majority of Bahamians have
ever witnessed.”

The knock on effects of this on
Bahamian economic performance

SEE page 15

kL
pee Ee lL

THE WORKERS stage their protest against their employer yesterday.

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ABOUT two dozen angry Chinese work-
ers contracted by a local construction firm to
rebuild the T G Glover Primary School
protested against alleged mistreatment by
their employer yesterday.

The men held placards outside the site on
Horse Shoe Drive which all read "E R Han-

Investigations into



na no pay Chinese money” and alleged —
through an interpreter — that the company
owes them months of back pay, that they
are not provided with sufficient food rations,
that drinking water is not provided at the
site and that their rights are being violated. It
was also claimed that the group has been
threatened with deportation when they com-
plain about their working conditions.

apparent teen suicide

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
Police are continuing their inves-
tigations into the apparent sui-



cide of a 15-year-old male who
was found hanging in a bedroom
of his family’s residence in West
End.

The teen, who is a student at
Eight Mile Rock High School,
was discovered Tuesday evening
hanging in a back closet with a
necktie around his neck.

Police have not released the
identity of the victim, who is a
resident of the Bight, West End.

“We are not releasing the name
of the victim at this time as all
family members have not been
notified,” said Assistant Superin-
tendent Welbourne Bootle.

Mr Bootle said police received
information around 7.50pm Tues-
day of an alleged suicide and dis-
patched officers to the scene to
investigate.

“The Police...found the lifeless
body of a 15-year-old black male
lying on his back in a closet.
Members of his family were try-
ing to revive him,” he said.

ASP Bootle said Dr Khan

SEE page 14



}e]s SUNCI]/ayse[ WIL

SEE page 14
























The Bahamas
Re A RK
pressure on
‘tax havens’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

REACTING to height-
ened global pressure on so-
called tax havens, the
Bahamas has signalled to
Europe and the Organisation
for Economic Cooperation
and Development its readi-
ness “as a matter of priority”
to accommodate evolving
standards on tax transparen-
cy and information exchange.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham told parliament
yesterday that it is appropri-
ate, in light of statements
made this month by other

SEE page 13

Cynthia Pratt’s
husband Joseph
dies age 70

JOSEPH PRATT is pictured with Cynthia Pratt

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

JOSEPH Pratt, husband of Cynthia Pratt deputy leader of the
PLP and former deputy Prime Minister, died yesterday as a
result of complications associated with long term illnesses.

He was 70 years old.

Mrs Pratt left the House of Assembly to be at his bedside in
a private medical ward at the Princess Margaret Hospital yes-
terday afternoon where she spent what became her last moments
with her husband of 36 years.

She left the hospital at around Spm, and had arrived home
when doctors called to say Mr Pratt was not responsive and had
to be resuscitated.

Although he recovered from the first resuscitation, by the time
Mrs Pratt returned to the hospital, doctors were resuscitating
him again, but were not successful.

Mr Pratt had suffered from a number of complicated illness-
es, including diabetes, hypertension, renal failure, poor circu-
lation and Alzheimer’s disease in the last six years.

SEE page 14

Global United CEO hoped for
payment plan for owed $8m



m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

GLOBAL United CEO
Jackson Ritchie said he hoped
commonsense would have pro-
pelled government to agree toa
payment plan for the nearly $8
million that his company owed
the Customs Department
instead of taking an “all or
nothing” approach, which ulti-
mately will force the brokerage
firm out of business.

Stating that government had
rejected or ignored every

attempt to establish a payment
plan, Mr Ritchie said it is obvi-
ous that if the company is
wound up, government would
get nothing.

In a letter sent to other inter-
ested parties involved in GUL,
First Caribbean Bank, through
its lawyers said that the assets of
the company if realised in the
current economic climate,
“especially on a fire sale basis”
would not be sufficient to meet
its debt.

“The principals of the com-

SEE page 15

Bid to ‘persuade’ the British govt to

shorten Turks and Caicos suspension

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham said that
the Bahamas and other CARICOM countries
will intervene on behalf of the Turks and Caicos
Islands and seek to “persuade” the British gov-
ernment to give some consideration to short-
ening the island’s constitutional suspension if
government and opposition leaders in TCI can
agree on “certain things.”

The prime minister said that the Bahamas is
proposing that each country of CARICOM
make separate representations to the British

SEE page 12

Po Cer eo



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@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

INFURIATED property own-
ers in the Vista Marina subdivi-
sion are demanding answers from
government, as they claim the
development of a multi-million
dollar highway is proceeding both
around and within the boundaries
of their properties.

Summoning the press to her
home near Saunders Beach, Dr
Madeline Sawyer — joined by
neighbours Michelle Campbell
and Telvern Dean — said that the
proposed corridor 18 highway will
encroach on private properties,
pollute the area with noisy vehi-
cles, and endanger the lives of
people in the community with the
speeding traffic it is bound to
attract.

While the project will no doubt
depreciate the value of her prop-
erty, Dr Sawyer said she is more
concerned with the noise pollu-
tion that she will face as the high-
way will pass within a few feet of
her home. “I’m concerned about
the environmental pollution and
I’m concerned about the possi-
bility of flooding. As you know,
this area is very prone to flooding
and when the building was built
the property had to be built up
to provide a slope. And I’m con-
cerned that this advantage is
going to be taken away and it
means therefore that this area will
be prone to flooding. And then
lastly, I am really concerned
about safety because that road
comes really close to the proper-
ty line and I’m concerned that
the mixed traffic of tractor trailers
and smaller vehicles can come off
that road and right into the prop-
erty,” she said.

Initial discussions on the road
work, Dr Sawyer said, focused on
the need to add a lane to Bay
Street to create more parking for
visitors to Saunders Beach.

While this measure was wel-
comed by all, new proposals first
mentioned at a recent town meet-
ing — including a new corridor, a
roundabout and a parking facility
— did not go down well with resi-
dents, she said.

“The new road now being pro-
posed I knew nothing about until
Mrs Campbell here called me a
few weeks ago to ask me what I



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

mage item Residents vent fury
7 | plan

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

DR MADELINE SAWYER (left) along with Telvern Dean and Michelle
Campbell inform the press of their concerns with the proposed highway
that is slated to be built in the area of Vista Marina, West Bay Street.

SITE of controversy
thought about this road. So I said,
‘what road?’ So she said this road
is coming right across your prop-
erty,” Dr Sawyer said.

Horrified

Having received a fax from Mrs
Campbell outlining the project-
ed path of the new highway, Dr
Sawyer said she was “horrified.”

According to information the
trio have gathered in their inves-
tigations into the matter, it seems
that corridor 18 is scheduled to
be the main access route from
John F Kennedy Drive to the new
proposed container port that is
set to be established on a new
man-made island off the shore of
Saunders Beach.

Under the current plan, the 72-
acre island would be accessed by
a corridor or bridge that would
begin at the proposed new round-
about on Saunders Beach. The
island would also be connected
to Arawak Cay by another cause-
way on its eastern end.

As Corridor Five, which will
lead traffic from John F Kennedy
Drive to Bay Street, is set to cross
a natural pond and wildlife
reserve, (which is outlined on the
community plans as a ‘green
space’ area) Mrs Campbell said it

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seems as if the government cares
very little about what they destroy
in pursuance of the road project.

“We talk to people in the
neighbourhood every evening
when we go around and not one
person I talked to knew the full
extent of what was happening.
It’s like you know a little but you
don’t know enough to connect
the dots to know exactly what the
government is doing. I have a
problem with that. I mean, we
live here. We’re affected by this.

“Also, the government talks
about a stimulus for the country.
When I went to the Ministry of
Works, and I do not have a prob-
lem with foreigners but the
majority of the people there are
foreigners. And then the compa-
ny that is constructing the road
is Jose Cartellone. They’re from
Argentina. Then the consultants
are English. Who is going to be
stimulated?” she asked.

Mrs Campbell said she spoke
to one Bahamian connected to
the project who said he was hired
to cut some bush in the area at $4
a hour. “That is about $160 a
week! So who is being stimulat-
ed? I do not know,” she said.

On Monday, Minister of Works
Neko Grant said he felt there has
been “‘a bit of a overreaction” to
the project.

Insisting that government has
to look at “what’s best for the
common good”, Mr Grant admit-
ted that his ministry has received
a number of complaints and is “in
the process of responding.”

However, he pointed out that
all of appropriate notices were
posted and no part of the road
improvement plans have changed.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



© In brief

Prosecutors
giving Anna
Nicole case
new look



Mark J. Terrill, file/AP Photo

TRAGIC: In this Dec. 1, 2004 file
photo, Anna Nicole Smith poses
for a photo as she arrives for the
VH1 "Big in '04" awards in Los
Angeles.

m FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.

Prosecutors in South Florida
are taking a fresh look at evi-
dence in the 2007 death of
actress-model Anna Nicole
Smith.

Broward County prosecu-
tors met recently with authori-
ties in Los Angeles and the
California Department of Jus-
tice, said a spokesman for
State Attorney Michael Satz.

That follows the indictment
March 13 in California of
Smith’s former boyfriend
Howard K. Stern and two doc-
tors on charges of conspiring
to illegally prescribe drugs for
Smith.

Evidence

Broward County prosecu-
tors want to see if any evi-
dence in that case might lead
to a new investigation in Flori-
da. Smith died Feb. 8, 2007, in
Florida after collapsing at a
hotel. She was 39. Her death
was ruled an accidental drug
overdose.

The Seminole Police
Department, which handled
Smith’s case because it tran-
spired on tribal land, said it
had provided prosecutors and
authorities in California with
investigative materials, but
had no plans to reopen the
case itself.

“The tribe has completed its
case and it’s closed,” said
spokesman Gary Bitner.

Call for investigation
into judge’s conduct

National Jubilee Coalition demands probe into Justice Lyons’ actions

THE National Jubilee Coali-
tion is calling for an investigation
into the conduct of Senior Justice
John Lyons whose actions when
handling a contentious court case
were recently called into question.

In a statement released yester-
day, the Coalition said anyone
associated with the judicial sys-
tem should be “beyond the slight-
est reproach” and demanded an
appropriate investigation into Jus-
tice Lyons’ decision.

“Any hint that a sitting judge
might be compromised in any way
warrants the appropriate atten-
tion and investigation.

“The pervasive crime problem
in our Bahamas is exacerbated by
an ever revolving justice system
that seems unable to deliver swift
justice,” the statement said.

The call came a day after a writ-
ten judgment handed down by
Senior Justice Anita Allen — who
is now hearing the case — claimed
that Justice Lyons shared “more
than a friendship” with the sister
of Daniel Ferguson, an accoun-
tant Justice Lyons had appointed
to make a report in a case he was
hearing up to September last year.

Mr Ferguson’s sister also assist-
ed her brother with preparing
documents for the case, said Jus-
tice Allen as she decided whether
or not to recuse herself from hear-



ing the matter “on
the ground of
apparent bias”
because of her
knowledge of this
matter.

Sane Justice Lyons
ates had eventually
Hall recused himself

from the case,
which involved the
distribution of funds between
business partners, on the basis
that he did not have time to hear
the matter. However, attorneys
involved in the case told Justice
Allen that Justice Lyons had “lit-
erally forced” the appointment of
the accountant on them. They said
that Justice Lyons “threatened”
to walk out of court if they did
not agree to the appointment.

Sealed

Justice Allen has ordered the
names of the litigants in the case
sealed.

According to the judgment, on
the first day of the hearing, the
accountant was asked and denied
that he had a social relationship
with Senior Justice Lyons.

Then, on the second day of
cross-examination, he was asked
whether a relative of his had any
relationship with Senior Justice

Lyons to which he responded that
“he didn’t get into his sister’s busi-
ness but he knew that she and the
judge were friends.”

“Tt was only then that I made
the connection between the
accountant and information which
was in the public domain for some
time, that the judge had more
than a friendship with a woman
who up to that point I did not
know was the accountant’s sister,”
Justice Allen stated in the ruling,
which was handed down on
March 24. In an attempt to ensure
transparency in her conduct as a
judicial officer and as the judge
who was to determine whether
the accountant’s report should be
approved, Justice Allen said she
informed counsel that she was
aware of this information.

The ruling was in relation to a
request by lawyers for one of the
litigants that Justice Allen recuse
herself from the case because of
her knowledge of Justice Lyon’s
relationship with the accountant’s
sister, which might have preju-
diced her judgment as to whether
the accountant’s report would
have been valid. The National
Jubilee Coalition consists of Bish-
op Simeon Hall, president, Dr
Philip McPhee, vice-president and
Dr Keith Russell, Grand Bahama
regional director.

Questions raised about apparent outrage over Pindling articles

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Outrage expressed by PLP MPs over articles
recently written about the legacy of Sir Lynden Pin-
dling is out of step with their alleged complacency 12
years ago when the former prime minister gave his
last address to parliament, a former PLP deputy

chairman suggested yesterday.

MP for Golden Isles Charles Maynard, now an
FNM parliamentarian, stirred up a hornet’s nest in
the House of Assembly yesterday when he accused
PLP parliamentary candidates of not bothering to do
their bit to honour Sir Lynden on the day he left
political life. Later submitting to a request to with-
draw his allegation, as he could provide no sub-
stantiating evidence for his version of events, Mr
Maynard concluded by stating that whether or not
the details could be proven, the fact remained that
barely any PLPs turned out to rally around Sir Lyn-
den, as requested by the party. “The point is made
— you cannot wait until 12 years later and then get
passionate for the father of the nation. When the
father of the nation needed you, you weren’t there!”

Mr Maynard claimed.

The MP accused the PLP of “taking credit for the
old PLP when it’s convenient” but when it is not con-

venient, saying “that’s not us.”

He claimed that in 1997, shortly before Sir Lynden
was due to make his last address to parliament, then
party chairman Obie Wilchcombe contacted him
and suggested that it would be a good idea if he
were to organise for “thousands” of supporters to



gather outside parliament.

“T said I thought it was a
good idea,” Mr Maynard told
the House of Assembly.

The then deputy chairman
claimed he contacted all of the
people who had just run as

EMICSMNEM Ee] candidates in the 1997 general

election, suggesting that they

could contact all of their supporters and tell them to

silastic.

come along, as this would be the easiest way of
organising such a crowd. But Mr Maynard claimed
the reception the idea received was less than enthu-

“They all told me they couldn’t do it. (They sug-
gested) we should just let Sir Lynden go,” he said.

His allegation caused several PLP MPs who ran in
the 1997 election to jump up on a point of order and
claim they were never contacted by Mr Maynard for
such a reason. Along with Yamacraw MP Melanie
Griffin, Bain and Grants Town MP Bernard Not-
tage, MICAL MP Alfred Gray, and St Thomas
More MP Frank Smith loudly accused Mr Maynard
of “telling an untruth.”

But Mr Maynard continued: “They can get up —

but there was no one there. I was embarrassed,

completely embarrassed. It was the father of the
nation, giving his last address to parliament, and

no one wanted to stand with him.” In an interview

with The Tribune outside parliament, Mr Wilch-
combe, now MP for West End and Bimini, admitted
that he “did give those instructions” to Mr May-
nard in 1997, however he said he “wasn’t aware of
what happened and the details” beyond that point.

Murder trial jurors told: prosecutors convinced witness to lie

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ONE of the three men charged
in the February 2006 murder of
businessman Keith Carey told the
jury yesterday that prosecutors
had convinced a key witness to
lie and that the trial was preju-
diced. In an unsworn statement
from the prisoner’s dock, murder
accused Dwight Knowles told the
jury that prosecutors had dropped
a conspiracy to commit armed
robbery charge against their star
witness Vaughn Carey — a cousin
of the victim — so that he would
implicate Knowles in the murder.

Knowles said that during a con-
versation in prison earlier this
year, Carey had told him that he
had met with prosecutors, who
had offered him the same deal
Knowles had once been offered.

At the first trial, Knowles had
appeared as a witness for the
prosecution but was charged in
connection with the murder after
testifying that police had coached
him to give a false statement.

“T just feel like this whole trial
is prejudiced,” Knowles said,
adding that after turning himself
over to police on March 7, he was
taken to the Central Detective
Unit. Knowles claimed that he
was placed in a cell at the back of
the unit and while there, heard a
person screaming, “I tell yall I
don’t know them.”

Knowles told the jury he saw
officers drag his co-accused Jamal
Glinton out of a room with a plas-
tic bag over his head, and that
Glinton was struggling to breathe
and appeared to be having a
seizure. Knowles said that he was
removed from the cell and placed
in a “torture chamber” where he
was shown five different witness
statements. The accused claimed
that police told him what to say in
his statement, and that the
coached statement did not impli-
cate him in Carey’s murder.
Knowles said that he was

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promised by police that he would
“get off” in a month’s time and
would be a key prosecution wit-
ness. He said the officers asked
whether he wanted to have an
attorney present, but he declined.
He added that he feared police
brutality. According to Knowles,
he was asked by Cecil Hilton, his
attorney at the time, to contact
him before giving any statement.
Knowles said he never mur-
dered anyone and never commit-
ted or conspired to commit armed
robbery.
At the first trial, he said, pros-
ecutors asked him to lie about
Vaughn Carey because they

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wanted Carey convicted. Knowles
said when he refused to do this,
prosecutors threatened to have a
witness tell lies about him.
Attorney Cecil Hilton was
called to the stand as a witness
for Knowles. He said Knowles
came to his office on March 7
after informing the attorney that
he wanted to turn himself in to
police. He said Knowles claimed
he was innocent. Mr Hilton said
he phoned the Central Detective
Unit and two police officers came
to his office to arrest Knowles.
The attorney said he told
Knowles that if he simply repeat-
ed what he had said earlier, he

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would have nothing to worry
about.

Mr Hilton said that at no time
during his visits with Knowles did
the accused ever claim police bru-
talised him. He also denied ever
telling Knowles he needed to be
present when the accused was
being interviewed by police.

The trial into the February
2006 murder of businessman Kei-
th Carey began on February 15
before Justice Jon Isaacs. Jamal
Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight
Knowles are charged with the
murder as well as armed robbery
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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited, ‘Time to put
the brakes

on speeding

bus drivers



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 EDITOR, The Tribune. if these same policemen could
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352 OB Ia Mere monitor the driving habits of
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387 ZOOM! Whoosh! our jitney drivers. And what I,

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Bahamas filled with unthinking people

UNTHINKING people don’t like to hear
anything that might force them to question their
perception of life. They hide within their cocoon
of comfortable beliefs, and turn apoplectic
should anyone suggest that their views might be
wrong or could be open to other interpreta-
tions.

The Bahamas is filled with such unthinking
people — particularly diehard party supporters
who shout their approval even before the party
hack on the political platform has finished his
sentence. Sir Lynden was constantly surround-
ed and buoyed up and maintained in power for
25 years by such supporters. And now in death
he has been turned into an icon with a halo
around his head — “The Father of the Nation.”

However, a new generation of Bahamians
who want to know more about this “Father of
the Nation” — warts and all — have been ask-
ing questions ever since Mr Chauncey Tynes
Sr told Tribune Managing Editor John Mar-
quis the story of his pilot son who disappeared
from the radar 36 years ago. No one bothered to
investigate his disappearance, but Mr Tynes,
Sr, a once loyal PLP supporter and party official,
is convinced that the young pilot knew too much
about Sir Lynden’s relations with drug kingpin
Carlos “Joe” Lehder, who transshipped drugs to
the US from his headquarters on Norman’s Cay
in the Exumas. Young Chauncey had to be
eliminated, according to his father.

Mr Tynes remained silent all these years,
but now in the winter of his life, he turned to Mr
Marquis to share his doubts, hopeful that with
his pen the editor could correct the myths. There
has been no public outcry against Mr Tynes or
his story, but Pindling supporters and some par-
ty leaders want the writer of the “Insight” arti-
cle — “The tragic young pilot who knew too
much” — to be driven from the country, work
permit revoked. According to the Marquis crit-
ics no foreigner in this country has the democ-
ratic right of free speech — as long as they are
here that speech is a “privilege.” And if they
know what is good for them they had better
express their opinions with care. Mr Marquis, a
fearless journalist, never learned that lesson.

Under the Pindling regime this right of free
speech was even denied Bahamians, which
meant that anyone who criticised Pindling dur-
ing his administration did so at their peril. Too
many remained silent.

After publication of the 1984 Commission of
Inquiry report into drug smuggling, which was a
shocking revelation in which only half of the
truth was told, Evangelist Rex Major, entered
the pulpit on April 28, 1985, the Commission
report, the Bible and Constitution in hand, and
roundly condemned the materialism and greed
that had shamed this country. The sermon was

Sirst Baptist Church

269 Market St. South = BO. Box N-T864 © Nossau, Bohomas

“Give God what's RIGHT,

broadcast. Before the broadcast ended a mem-
ber of the public called the church and warned
the evangelist to “shut up.”

This group of Bahamians, who stopped their
ears to the Truth, did not want to accept that
they and their leaders had sinned against God
and in the words of the evangelist “we’ve (as a
people) lied and cheated.”

“We have called red black and blue green —
we have mixed everything up! We’ve confused
truth!” he said.

Evangelist Major expressed his disgust that
we would have in our House of Assembly “men
whose names have been so tainted and whose
characters are so tinged that we wonder how
they could sleep.”

One of these was Lynden Oscar Pindling,
the Father of the Nation.

Today young Bahamians want to know the
truth and today there are still many Bahamians
of that generation who know the truth, but dur-
ing the Pindling administration were too afraid
to tell it.

Even during the Commission of Inquiry there
were many who were too afraid to go before the
Commission with valuable information. We
recall one man, tormented by his conscience
and paralysed by fear, who existed in a state of
confusion. He had important information, infor-
mation that the Commission desperately need-
ed. And so he consulted us, giving us permission
to go to the Commission on his behalf. He felt
more secure having been summoned by the
Commission rather than having volunteered.
He took the stand and honestly answered lead-
ing counsel Robert Ellicott’s questions.

And then there was the pilot. This pilot had
told us how he had flown Pindling to Norman’s
Cay to meet Lehder. When he took the stand he
denied that he had landed at Norman’s Cay.
Later we asked him why he had lied to the
Commission.

He said that he had been asked the question
in such a way that it had allowed him to tell
the truth, although he knew that he was mis-
leading the Commissioners. You see although
he had landed the plane, he had never left the
aircraft and so he had never landed on Nor-
man’s Cay.

Bahamians were terrified to talk. Although
the Commissioners extracted a terrible story, a
disgraceful story that in some way touched all
strata of society, the full story of how our lead-
ers failed us has never been told.

Some of these people with full knowledge
are still alive and if we are to be true to our his-
tory — and with nothing now to fear — it is
their duty to tell what life was really like in
those days and what really did happen to turn
these beautiful islands into “a nation for sale.”



Screech! What is all this
noise? Well, Editor, those are
the sounds I recently heard
while riding a 15A Route bus
recently.

The bus was going so fast, I
could hear the “zoom” of the
engine.

The bus was passing so
many cars, I could hear the
“whoosh” of the wind.

The bus had to stop so sud-
denly so many times, I could
hear the “screech” of the
brakes. What was going on?

Well, editor, PI tell you.
You see, this particular bus
was engaged in a racing game
with another 15A Route bus.
Both of these drivers wanted
to be the first bus to pick up
waiting customers along this
route, and at the same time
they wanted to deliver bus rid-
ers to their destination as fast
as they possibly could.

On this bus I was riding, the
driver and his helper vocifer-
ously encouraged passengers
to disembark as fast as they
could.

Those two even dumped an
elderly lady off the bus and
suggested that she take the
bus behind us because they
had decided that it would not
be in their best (financial)

letters@tribunemedia net



interest to deliver her to her
destination, which she had
announced on entering the
bus would be at the end of the
route.

Along the route, the driver
even passed a line of cars at a
red traffic light and proceeded
to pass the red light; all in an
effort to win the racing game.
And all the while, the driver’s
helper was egging him on- go
faster, pass more cars, run all
the traffic lights.

I needn’t remind you, Edi-
tor, that this whole ordeal
transpired on public trans-
portation.

And all these dangerous
manoeuvres were being per-
formed while there were pas-
sengers on the bus! Can you
believe that!?

In another letter to the edi-
tor from myself I suggested
that the commissioner of
police deploy armed plain-
clothes policemen to random-
ly ride jitneys to alleviate the
fears of bus drivers as well as
passengers concerning the
crime that occurs on our pub-
lic transportation.

It would go a long way also

and we all went through that
particular day would have lit-
tle chance of happening on
our streets. We deserve bet-
ter than that.

And don’t think that this
was an isolated incident.

This speeding, and overtak-
ing cars, and passing red traf-
fic lights go on all the time.

And what I have been
advised is that the passengers
on our bus would not even
have been covered by insur-
ance, because we didn’t pay
the driver as we entered the
bus.

According to my sources,
only paying customers are
covered by the jitney’s insur-
ance carriers in the event of a
serious accident. We came
close to that that day.

I call on The Commissioner
of Police, The Controller of
Road Traffic Department, and
The Government of The
Bahamas to take control of
this out of control situation on
our streets with a view to mak-
ing it safe to drive and take
the bus in Nassau again.

MARVIN G
LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,

March 17, 2009.

Why are we left in the dark?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I recently spoke to Mr Neko
Grant the MP for the area for
Royal Bahamia Estates, who
informed me that the reason
for the blackout in the Royal
Bahamia area was due to an
outstanding bill of some
$66.000 in arrears.

He told me that he pleaded
with an hierarchy member
from the Grand Bahama Pow-
er Co in November of 2008 to
keep the power on through
the Christmas period which
they did, we the residents say
thank you.

Mr Grant told me that he
had a meeting with Mr

THE GARDEN HILLS
CONSTITUENCY

Frankie Sands the President
of the Association on this
issue.

To date our streets have
been in total darkness for
more the two months, we have
heard nothing regarding what
needs to be done in restoring
and correcting this vexing
matter, does the Association
need a bail out?

My suggestion would be
that if you are unable to carry
out your duties, then arrange
to turn the area over to the

Port Authority, my under-
standing is that, Malibu Reef
when they were faced with a
similar matter they turned it
over to the Grand Bahama
Port Authority. Is that a hard
decision to make?

Do we have to wait for an
approaching election to have
our street lights turned on?

KELLY D BURROWS
Freeport, GB
March, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 5



Unemployment benefits

come a big step closer

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

As joblessness hits a 15-year high, unemployment
benefits eagerly awaited by thousands of Bahamians
came a step closer to being issued yesterday.

A Bill was passed in the House of Assembly
which, when it comes into effect, will amend the
National Insurance Act to include a provision for
unemployment pay-outs. The Bill was supported
by both government and opposition MPs.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said the provi-
sion — which the government hopes to bring into
effect by April 1, 2009 — will bring the National
Insurance Board a step closer to becoming what it
was envisioned to be when implemented in 1970.

Under the amendment, unemployed people who
have contributed to the National Insurance Fund will
receive payments equivalent to 40 per cent of their
insurable wage for 13 to 26 weeks.

The government expects that by January 2010
employees and employers will jointly contribute to
a National Insurance Unemployment Benefit Fund.

“Tt will provide much relief in society,” said leader
of government business in the House, Tommy Turn-
quest.

Leader of opposition business Dr Bernard Not-
tage stated that while some may “seek to besmirch”
the legacy of the PLP with “scandalous and nasty
allegations” it is thanks to the PLP that the Nation-



yy al Insurance scheme, currently
BF nolding assets of $1. 5 billion,
exists.

He said the PLP supports the
Bill as it is “the right thing to
do now and at any time.”

However, the MP added that
the opposition “have some con-
ditions (they’d) like to see met
and some alternative suggestions
we'd like to make” during the
debate on the proposal, expect-
ed to take place next week,
when the details and regulations also will be pre-
sented.

HUBERT
INGRAHAM

Concerned

He suggested the party is particularly concerned
that self-employed people should also be able to
access benefits. Mr Ingraham responded that if Dr
Nottage could identify such a system anywhere else
in the world, he would consider it.

Mr Ingraham said that in keeping with the gov-
ernment’s commitment to “bringing to fruition the
original object and purpose” of National Insurance,
it is hoped that by April or May, the Chronic Disease
Prescription Drug Bill also will be passed.

The Bill will provide for free essential medications
for people suffering from any of a number of cata-
strophic illnesses.

bi-partisan approach seen as key to tackling problems

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

BI-PARTISAN discussions
are crucial to tackling the eco-
nomic and social problems
plaguing the country, PLP
deputy leadership contender
Philip ‘Brave’ Davis said yes-
terday.

Workable solutions to the
recession, mounting levels of
crime and the problem of illegal
immigration will only be
achieved through co-operation,
he said.

"There is the concern of
severe downturn in our econo-
my, which regretfully, will get
somewhat worse before it gets
better. In these present circum-
stances, there is little sense in
attempting to affix blame here
or there especially when it is
obvious that the root causes
come from the outside," he said.

Other challenges include
establishing an effective nation-
al healthcare system, building a
new straw market, completing
the New Providence Road
Improvement Project and ensur-
ing there is proper infrastruc-



shut

ture on every Family Island, he
said. "We are all aware that
these cannot be achieved
overnight or in the next year or
two but let us begin, and we can
begin by sitting together as con-
cerned Bahamians," he said.

Focus

Mr Davis said the opposition
must now focus on identifying
the needs and concerns of the
public.

At the PLP’s next convention
in October or November, Fort
Charlotte MP Alfred Sears,
West End and Bimini MP Obie
Wilchcombe, Paul Moss and Mr
Davis are expected to vie for
the deputy leader post. Yester-
day, Mr Davis told The Tribune
he feels he is the best man for
the job.

"T think I am a unifier, a team
player, I think this is the time
when our party needs someone
who's going to bring everybody
together as opposed to being
divisive. Not to say that these

men have been divisive, but my

track record is one of service to
my organisation, one of keep-
ing people together and ensur-

pectacular

ass

layaway!

ing that wounds are healed
rather than opened.”

If elected to the post, topmost
on Mr Davis’ agenda will be ral-
lying the party’s supporter base.

"The first thing we need to
do is to shore up all our branch-
es, shore up our support and
then inspire the Bahamian peo-
ple (to) the view that they
always have held, that we are
the best party for them in the
Bahamas,” he said.

"I will be running for the
deputy leader and then if the
post of leadership comes up, I'll
consider running for that too,”
he added.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Some CLICO policy holders
claim lack of support from MPs |

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A large num-
ber of CLICO policy holders
met in Grand Bahama to dis-
cuss a number of concerns —
including what they say is a lack
of support from their MPs.

Rev Dr Philip McPhee, pastor
of Mount Calvary Baptist Cathe-
dral and vice-president of the
Bahamas National Baptist Con-
vention, said policy holders are
very worried and want some
kind of support from their rep-
resentatives.

None of the six Grand
Bahama MPs have attended
either of the two meetings held
for policy holders in Freeport



since CLICO collapsed several
weeks ago.

Rev McPhee revealed that let-
ters have been mailed on behalf
of policy holders to every mem-
ber of parliament in the country.

“When your people are in
trouble you need to go there and
be with them,” he said. “People
just want to know they are
standing with them, that’s all
they want to know.

“People elected them and
they have an obligation to be
with their people. They were
with them when they needed
votes,” said Rev McPhee.

Bishop Simeon Hall, pastor
of New Covenant Baptist
Church, and Bishop Sobig
Kemp, president of Grand
Bahama Christian Council, were

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Rev Kemp said he requested
a meeting with State Minister of
Finance Zhivargo Laing and is
still awaiting a response.

Rev McPhee said: “I am con-
cerned about the hurt I see and
hear in people’s voices. They are
very concerned and very wor-
ried.”

Policy holder Vincent Ewing
said he was upset that MPs and
cabinet ministers have not come
out to support them.

“T went to the same school as
an MP in Freeport and I con-
tacted him on his cellular phone
and he said he would get back to
me. I had to wait on Bishop Hall
and Rev McPhee from New
Providence to come to
Freeport,” said the concerned
father.

Mr Ewing’s insurance was
prepaid and covered himself and
his family.

Patrice Davis, another policy-
holder, said she is unable to use
her insurance card when pur-
chasing medication.

“T went to the pharmacy to
purchase my medication which
initially cost me $24 and I had to
pay $68. It is hard,” she said.

Rev Hall told policy holders
to continue to pay their premi-
ums as the prime minister has
urged.

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CHINA’S AMBASSADOR to the Bahamas Hu Dingxian (centre) and BAIC executive chairman Edison Key
were happy with products from Mel Wells’ farm.

Abaco impresses
China’s Ambassador

MARSH HARBOUR,
Abaco — Abaco stands to ben-
efit from assistance in agricul-
ture from the Chinese gov-
ernment.

“Chinese techniques in agri-
culture are suitable for the
Bahamas and cooperation
between our two countries can
be mutually beneficial,” said
Hu Dingxian, Ambassador of
the People’s Republic of Chi-

na to the Bahamas.
Ambassador Hu, first sec-
retary Tan Jian and a team
from the Bahamas Agricul-
tural and Industrial Corpora-
tion (BAIC) and the Inter-
American Institute for Coop-
eration on Agriculture toured
Abaco farmlands on Tuesday.
Hosted by BAIC executive
chairman and Member of Par-
liament for South Abaco Edi-

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son Key, Mr Hu was wel-
comed by the island’s admin-
istrators, chief councillors,
local government officials and
the Ministry of Agriculture
and Marine Resources.

“T have a very good impres-
sion of this beautiful island,”
said Mr Hu.

“The people are so friendly
and hospitable. There is great
potential for agriculture here.
You have everything — love-
ly weather and natural condi-
tions.”

China’s Vice Premier Hui
Liangyu and Bahamas Minis-
ter of Agriculture and Marine
Resources Lawrence
Cartwright recently signed a
Memorandum of Under-
standing on agricultural coop-
eration.

“My Premier laid a good
foundation during his visit,”
said the Ambassador. “Now
we need to lay the bricks on
this foundation.

“After this study tour, we
will discuss with officials of
the Ministry of Agriculture
and BAIC and see what spe-
cific fields we can cooperate
on. We are looking forward
to that.”

Ambassador Hu was also
taken on a tour of the new
Spring City community, the
Treasure Cay resort and the
proposed sites of the Abaco
craft centre, farmers market
and industrial park among
others.

Mr Key said, “Mr Hu has
expressed great interest in
assisting us — helping us to get

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“We requested some trac-
tors and maybe this trip will
be the means of obtaining
some assistance. They have
the technology. We can bene-
fit tremendously from what
they might have to offer on
the technical side.”

In north and south Abaco,
BAIC is preparing more than
1,000 acres of its arable land
for lease at $25 per acre, per
year to Bahamians interested
in food production.

“There is a lot of interest in
agriculture here,” said Mr
Key. “People are really hyped
up about the prospects of food
production and food security
for the country. I believe
down the road it will pay great
dividends.”

Mr Key also took the
opportunity to show off the
resurrected Spring City com-
munity south of Marsh Har-
bour. It was created during
the heyday of agriculture to
accommodate farm workers.
When agriculture waned, it
fell dormant and started to
deteriorate.

With the basic infrastruc-
ture already in place, the gov-
ernment is now putting in 100
new homes. It will be further
expanded by 88 acres which
will provide more than 200
lots.

“That is going to be a
tremendous boost for south
Abaco,” said Mr Key.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Goals for 2009 police plan outlined

New Celebration —

Cruise Line sails
from Nassau to
Fort Lauderdale

CELEBRATION Cruise
Line’s new ship is expected
to bring up to 3,600 cruise
passengers to Nassau on a
weekly basis.

While some of the pas-
sengers will bring additional
business to the hotels, those
not staying overnight will
spend eight to ten hours in
Nassau, shopping, dining
and participating in other
tourist activities.

Celebration Cruise Line
began operations out of
Port Everglades with the
March 16 sailing of the MS
Bahamas Celebration.

The official inaugural sail-
ing will be on April 3 with a
ceremony in Nassau on
April 4. The new cruise line
will depart Nassau every
Tuesday, Thursday and Sat-
urday, and from Port Ever-
glades, Florida, every Mon-
day, Wednesday and Fri-
day. Sunday is a day at sea.

At nearly 700 feet and
over 35,000 gross tonnage,
the MS Bahamas Celebra-
tion will hold up to 1,500
passengers.

With its classic European
style, the ship was ready to
begin sailing out of south
Florida after being pur-
chased in 2008, but Celebra-
tion Cruise Holdings want-
ed to first add some more
amenities to the former
Norwegian vessel MS Prins-
esse Ragnhild.

The MS Bahamas Cele-
bration has four restaurants,
a 630-seat nightclub, multi-
ple lounges, a casino, a com-
plete spa, a fitness room,
three children’s clubs with
age-appropriate electronic
games and activities, a pool
for adults and a pirate-
themed pool with a 180-foot
slide for children.

The cruise also offers a
variety of live music and
shows, as well as
snorkelling, sightseeing
tours and beach resort
excursions.

Free-style dining allows
passengers to dine when
and where they want. The
options include a classic
American restaurant, an all-
you-can-eat Brazilian-style
steakhouse and buffet, and
a casual Italian restaurant,
all as part of the cruise
price. For individuals look-
ing for more upscale dining,
the elegant Cove restaurant
is available at an additional
cost.

The MS Bahamas Cele-
bration is available for cruis-
es and transportation
departing from Nassau
three nights a week.

Nassau passengers will
get the full cruise experi-
ence with accommodations,
food and entertainment
included in the price of the
cruise. Rates start at $97
each way. There are a limit-
ed number of smaller cabins
at $74.

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A SIGNIFICANT reduction in
the number of murders, house
break-ins, armed robberies and
auto thefts is one of the 13 goals
outlined as priority in the 2009
Royal Bahamas Police Force Polic-
ing Plan, Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest said.

Mr Turnquest said crime statis-
tics show that homicides, armed
robberies, house and shop break-

(SEATED R-L): JANET Johnson, chairman; Eric Carey, Sheila Bethel;

ins and auto theft continue to pre-
sent challenges.

“There are also many illegal
firearms on our streets and illicit
drugs and drug trafficking which
lend support to crime and crimi-
nality,” he said.

Mr Turnquest said while the
number of murders —15 — com-
mitted in the Bahamas for the first
three months of 2009 is slightly



(standing r-l) former CARICOM Ambassador Leonard Archer and Peter
Goudie. Missing from the photograph is Carlton Wright.

International Cultural Festival
back by popular demand

AFTER a year’s hiatus, plans are underway for staging the Inter-
national Cultural Festival, sponsored by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
and Immigration, at the Botanical Gardens, Chippenham.

The event is scheduled to be held on October 17 and 18.

The idea for the 14th Annual International Cultural Festival
stemmed from the celebration of United Nations Day which original-
ly only consisted of a flag- raising ceremony for all participating coun-

tries.

Chairman of the International Committee’s board of directors Janet
Johnson said that to amplify the message, organisers are forging links
with other UN oriented activities including Zonta’s 23rd Annual Ecu-
menical Church Service at Christ Church Cathedral; Rotary’s 12th
Annual Model United Nations Sessions; Zonta’s 15th Annual United
Nations Essay Contest, and new this year, Islands of the World Fash-
ion Week, which will showcase cultural and eco-fashions from around
the world, under the auspices of UNESCO.

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lower than last year’s numbers, the
number remains “unacceptably
high.”

“Internationally, the benchmark
annual rate for murders/homicides
should not exceed five per
100,000 of population,” Mr Turn-
quest said.

“Using a population base of
350,000 people, the Bahamas’ rate
should not exceed 18 murders per
annum. Last year, there were 72
murders or 21 per 100,000. Obvi-
ously, we still have a lot of work to
do.”

The National Security Minister
said the use of firearms feature in
many of the murders and armed

robberies being committed in the
country.

He said law enforcement offi-
cials have been doing a “‘yeoman’s
job” in removing the illegal
weapons from the streets.

Mr Turnquest said statistics
reveal that there has been a decline
in the number of armed robberies
committed in the Bahamas over
the first three months of the year,
with 117 cases of reported armed
robberies, compared to 123 for the
same period last year.

He said the decline has also
occurred in the number of house
and shop break-ins and auto thefts.
Mr Turnquest said there have been

378 reported cases of house break-
ins for the first three months of
2009 compared to 480 last year;
192 cases of shop break-ins com-
pared to 225 for the same period in
2008, and 137 cases of stolen vehi-
cles as compared to 232 for the
same period last year.

“While there have been some
improvements in these areas, the
number of incidents is still too
high,” Mr Turnquest said.

The National Security Minister
said the Royal Bahamas Police
Force has implemented a number
of strategies designed to reduce
the number of house and shop
break-ins and armed robberies.

SNA








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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Se TTS EE
Building a green economy

This is the fourth in a series of articles discussing the potential opportunities for the
Bahamas in the emerging green economy. The writer, Colin Lightbourn, is a real estate
business owner, developer and past president of the Bahamas National Trust. To
comment, discuss and submit ideas about these articles, visit: www.thegreenislands.com

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own reason.

The whole of society will
prosper to the degree that
rights are protected and indi-
viduals are free.

The collapse of the world’s
natural resources poses one
of the greatest risks to indi-

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vidual freedom, as people
cannot make decisions freely
if they are constrained by
physical circumstances.

For example, the lack of
safe drinking water and san-
itation can be seen as the
root cause of a great deal of

hunger, disease and
poverty around the world
today.

In the Bahamas, fishery
stocks are the staple food
source for most Family
Islanders and any threat to
supplies poses a great risk to
the welfare and heritage of
these communities.

A green economy can inte-
grate the economic growth
of the islands and manage
valuable resources at the
same time.

However, before such an
economy can take root, there
must be a commitment from
government, so that individ-
uals can feel confident about
investing and working in this
emerging market.

The government has a
responsibility to ensure that
future generations of
Bahamians have access to
the country’s natural
resources, and can do so by
planning, developing and
adhering to an overarching
environmental policy, com-
plete with specific guidelines
and stipulations.

New economic processes
must be designed, and new
policies written, so that
incentives for ecological con-
duct are built into everyday
economic life.

Some areas where the gov-
ernment can be influential
are:

hee

best for the Bahamas.

° Consistent zoning

regulations

Bahamians have become
used to the mis-match of
warchouses in residential
neighbourhoods and con-
tainer ports in the heart of
our tourist hub. Without
strict zoning regulations indi-
viduals will build whatever
can maximise their specific
property or business value in
the short term, eventually
eroding the overall aesthetic
value of the area. While cor-
recting this problem, the gov-
ernment can take steps to
promote a green economy.
For example, incentives can
be afforded to certain zon-
ing areas that invest in alter-
native technology, manufac-
turing and agriculture.

e An expanded national
park and protected area
system
The Bahamas is well below



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the world average for pro-
tected areas as a percentage
of overall territory. Offshore
national parks serve as giant
natural nurseries for the
replenishment of fishery
stocks, while protected areas
on land allow for the effec-
tive management of water
reservoirs.

¢ Tax incentives

While it is the industry of
the future, green technology
is still in its relative infancy
and requires incentives to
attract the private sector.
Import/export, business and
property tax incentives must
be created to entice busi-
nesses to invest capital.

¢ Environmental Bonds
The new trend of mixed-
use resort and real estate

SEE page nine

YOUR CONNECTIONPTO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

Directory Publications Queries
and Complaints

BIC would like to advise the general public that in
agreement with their advertising contract, all queries
or complaints for the 200% Bahamas, Grand Bahama
and Abaco Telephone Directories must be received
on or before March 31st 2009.

Advertisers with quernes or complaints are urged to
contact the Directory publications department im-

mediately at the following addresses:

Nassau Office

summerwinds Plaza, Tonique Williams-Darling Hwy
TEL: 242-322-9183-8 * FAX 242-322-9195
Email: yellowpages@btcbahamas.com

Grand Bahama Office
Government Complex, Mall Drive
TEL: 242-352-2336/8 » FAX: 242-352-2431
Email: yellowpages@btcbahamas.com

Family Island
customers can contact us al
TEL: 242-300-1997
Email: yellowpages@btcbahamas.com

www.btcbahamas.com
a, j


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 9



All points bulletin released for
teacher accused of molestation

— the role of Government |



“New economic
processes must
be designed, and
new policies
written, so
that incentives
for ecological
conduct are built
into everyday
economic life.”



FROM page eight

developments requires that
projects have a bond in place
to ensure that crucial infra-
structure is completed.
Throughout the Bahamas we
see situations where devel-
opers cither begin clear cut-
ting and digging prior to nec-
essary approvals or fail to
reach the level of pre-sales
necessary to complete their
projects. When the projects
come to a halt, left behind
are large tracts of butchered
land, destroyed water reser-
voirs and dashed hopes of
locals who see their eco-
nomic future sink with the
project. An environmental
bond will give the govern-
ment the ability to replenish
the damaged area to the
extent physically and natu-
rally feasible and hold devel-
Opers more accountable for
their work.

° A green hotel rating
system

While a rating system can
apply to just about any busi-
ness, hotels and real estate
developments are likely the
immediate forms of econom-
ic growth in the Family
Islands.

Similar to the five-star
label (recently increased to
Six Stars) that is used world-
wide when assessing the qual-
ity of a resort, a green rating
system will assess the degree
to which developments

CONSISTENT ZONING contributes to value over the long term

adhere to sustainable build-
ing and management policies.
In addition to the initial rat-
ing, recommendations can be
given to improve the rating
which can ultimately help
struggling operators to
improve their bottom line by
cutting costs and increasing
their marketability.

¢ Business and

development

procedures manual

In order to maintain the
integrity and consistency of
any effort to develop the
Family Islands in a more sus-
tainable manner, the gov-
ernment will have to be the
enforcer of such policies. A
business guide to green
development, policies and
procedures can offer this to
businesses and also keep the
government consistent with
its own policies.

¢ International Promotion
and Public Relations
An effort by the Bahamas
to go greener in the devel-
opment of the Family Islands

who can sell your home?

242.422.4677

ken@erabahamas.com

www.erabahamas.com

will be its own free interna-
tional ad campaign. The
international press are look-
ing for success stories which
reveal that the green renais-
sance is not a fantasy ideolo-
gy or ‘Hollywood buzz’, but
the dawning of a new age of
economic freedom and self-
sufficiency. A little country
like the Bahamas can make a
big impact with the help of
the international media.

¢ Foster Bahamian

involvement

By most definitions, the
green effort is not just about
how we build, live and man-
age food and water, but also
includes the effort to build
economic and social inde-
pendence in local communi-
ties. Making the opportuni-
ties available to Bahamians is
paramount to success.

There is no doubt that the
government will have to be a
central figure in any success-
ful effort to build self-suffi-
cient economies in the Fam-
ily Islands. There are more

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than enough business people
both locally and internation-
ally that are interested in
doing business throughout
the islands, however, high
costs, political bureaucracy,
red tape and the lack of any
real plan for the future keep
most uncomfortable about
making the investment. It is
the governments’ lead and
vision that will win the con-
fidence of investors and
spawn a new wave of innov-
ative business thinkers who
are both fiscally responsible
and environmentally and
socially conscious. In a world
of increasing volatility, self-
sufficiency is more crucial
than ever to a small country
like the Bahamas and the
technology to power and run
small island communities, if
not already developed, is on
the immediate horizon. The
Bahamas does not have to
be a spectator and follower
in the next global revolution,
but can be an active partici-
pant and promoter of build-
ing a cleaner and healthier
planet for future generations.

m By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Grand Bahama

? Police have issued an all points bul-
: letin for the former Eight Mile Rock
? High School teacher who is wanted
: in connection with the alleged
? molestation of two former male stu-
? dents.

Andre Birbal, a 46-year-old

? Trinidadian national, is wanted by
i police for questioning in connec-
? tion with alleged unnatural sexual
? intercourse.

Mr Birbal was an art teacher at

i Eight Mile Rock High for several
: years. Police believe that he is no
? longer in the country.

Allegations of sexual molesta-

? tion first surfaced in January when
? School PTA president Troy Gar-
i vey expressed concerns about
? alleged sexual abuse of two former
: male students.

It is alleged the abuse started

while boys were in the seventh
? grade and lasted for eight years.

The young men also claimed that

i the teacher allegedly made them
? strip while he took nude pho-
: tographs of them, wearing only a
? hard hat and tool belt.






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The victims, who are both 19,
have filed complaints with the
police.

Ministry of Education officials in
Freeport removed Mr Birbal from
the school while it conducted an
investigation into the allegations.

He was sent to New Providence
and placed on probationary leave,
pending the outcome of investiga-
tions.

After police concluded its inves-
tigations, the matter was forwarded
to the Attorney-General Office’s
for determination.

However, before a determina-
tion was made, Mr Birbal resigned
from the Ministry of Education and
has left the country.

Police are searching for Mr Bir-
bal, who is described as 5 feet, 7
inches tall of slim build and weighs
about 150 to 200 lbs.

He has light complexion, brown
eyes and short length hair.

According to police, Mr Birbal
is considered armed and extremely
dangerous and should be
approached with caution.

Anyone with information con-
cerning the whereabouts of Mr Bir-
bal is asked to contact police at 352-
1919, 351-9111, 351-9991, 352-8351,
352-9076, and 350-3125 or, 911.




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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Call for donkeys to be protected
from locals shooting them for meat

INAGUA’s wild donkeys
must be protected from
locals who shoot them for
meat, animal welfare cam-
paigners demanded yester-
day.

Between 45 and 60 don-
Keys a year are killed to pro-
duce donkey steaks and
7 stew, one source claimed,
# BABY DONKEY ventures out of ith heads and offal being
left in the bush, causing dis-
tress for the island’s few
tourists.

The donkeys, reckoned to
be progeny of herds brought
into the Bahamas to work
the salt industry in the 19th
century, are among Inagua’s
wildlife attractions.

The once trusting creatures
have traditionally been one
of the draws - along with
Inagua’s flamingo flock — for
foreign visitors.

But in recent times killing
by locals has escalated to a
point where animal welfare
experts fear the island’s don-
key population is under

The Annual General Meeting 5, cscs these anima
of the Bahamas National Trust Sees |i
will be held on Thursday
April 2, 2009
at 6:30pm

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don’t want in the bush, and
sometimes even on the
roads.”

Some concerned visitors
say they have found heads,
legs and innards on bush
pathways used by bird-
watchers and other visitors
drawn to the island’s wild
areas.

“I would say there are up
to 5,000 donkeys on the
island,” said a source, “they
used to go into town at one
time, but they have become
wary of humans since the
shootings began.

“It is a shame because the
donkey herd is one of the
few assets of that desolate
place.”

He said locals kill donkeys
for their own food, but there
was also a market outside
Inagua, with one or two



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Bahamas National Trust



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Bahamian restaurants offer-
ing donkey steaks and don-
key stew.

“It’s time for these animals
to be protected,” he said.
“Some argue that they are
not native to the Bahamas,

that they were brought in
from outside, but that’s rub-
bish ... they have been here a
long time.

“They should get the same
protection as flamingoes,
Bahamian parrots and other

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unusual creatures in these
remote areas.”

Representatives of the
Bahamas National Trust
could not be reached for
comment up to press time
yesterday.

Shuttle undocks
from space station
after eight days

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

AFTER eight days together,
space shuttle Discovery pulled away
from the international space station
Wednesday, ending a successful
effort to boost electrical power and
science research at the orbiting out-
post, according to Associated Press.

The two spacecraft went sepa-
rate ways as they soared above the
Indian Ocean. The undocking puts
Discovery and its seven-member
crew on course for a Saturday
touchdown.

“Godspeed,” called out the space
station’s skipper, Mike Fincke. He
added: “Come again.”

NASA was eager to see the space
station with its new glistening pair of
solar wings following Discovery’s
departure. The shuttle took a vic-
tory lap around the station, primar-
ily for picture-taking. But because
there was no television availability
during the flyaround, Mission Con-
trol and the rest of the world had to
wait for the astronauts to beam
down the recorded video views.

With the installation last week of
the final set of solar wings, the space
station finally resembles the artist
renderings from years past, bal-
anced with four wings on both sides.

NASA expects the extra electri-
cal power to drastically increase the
amount of research in the various
labs that make up the 220-mile-high
outpost.

“You made the space station
much better than it was before,”
Fincke told the shuttle astronauts
just before their departure. “You
gave us more power, symmetry —
which is not to be underrated —
and you gave us a new crew mem-
ber.”

That new member, Japanese
astronaut Koichi Wakata, remained
behind on the space station with
Fincke and a Russian cosmonaut.

Sandra Magnus, whom Wakata
replaced, kept waving as she disap-
peared down the hatch and float-
ed into Discovery.

Wednesday marked her
131st day in space; she moved
into the space station in mid-
November.
THE TRIBUNE



Coastal Awareness Committee to focus
on habitat destruction, pollution effects

THE Coastal Awareness Com-
mittee of the Bahamas, a group of
stakeholders from the private and
public sectors with an interest in
promoting sustainable develop-
ment, has announced the focus for
their campaign in 2009 — the effects
that habitat destruction and pol-
lution have on the country’s coastal
environment.

“Habitat destruction and pollu-
tion are major issues affecting our
coastal zones in the Bahamas,”
said Earlston McPhee, chairman
of the National Coastal Aware-
ness Committee and director of
sustainable tourism development
for the Ministry of Tourism.

“Many plants and animals
depend on coastal habitats for their
nutrition, shelter and breeding
habitat. The destruction of these
habitats can lead to declines in sea
turtle and seabird populations as
well as destroying nursery areas
for conch, crawfish and grouper.
Additionally, they can negatively
impact the clarity of our sea
bathing water and pristine beaches
thus affecting our important
tourism sector as well as local
recreation. Our committee will
focus on the effects of climate
change and pollution on our
coastal resources and determine
what we can do as Bahamians to
help combat these issues. Our goal
is to educate the public and to offer
real solutions to people that col-
lectively will help us as a develop-
ing country and as a tourist desti-
nation,” he said.

The National Coastal Aware-

Tae



THE NATIONAL COASTAL AWARENESS COMMITTEE i is planning a large
number of activities during the month of April to help create an awareness
of the threats affecting the Bahamas’ coastal areas.

ness Committee, which is now is its
fifth year, has increased the num-
ber of activities scheduled for April
which is officially National Coastal
Awareness Month in the Bahamas.
The public is invited to participate.

The Committee will host, in col-
laboration with its strategic part-
ners both in the public and private
sectors the following: National
public service announcement cam-
paigns on television, radio and
print media; a lecture at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas on March 30;
two extensive clean-ups of Nassau
Harbour on Saturday April 4 and
Saturday April 25; beach clean-
ups that will include the removal of
invasive plants and the planting of
native trees; an educational marine

=,

exhibition at the Marathon Mall
from April 27 through May 9 that
will feature a travelling exhibit cre-
ated by Florida State University
entitled “Our Reefs — Caribbean
Connections”; erection of banners
throughout participating islands in
the Bahamas; primary and sec-
ondary school competitions with
a submission deadline of May 15;
field trips with Dolphin Encounters
on Blue Lagoon Island, Dive Stu-
art Cove, the Bahamas National
Trust and Blackbeard’s Cay have
been arranged to provide students
with an opportunity to learn about
protecting the coasts and enjoy the
marine wonders of the Bahamas.
There will also be a national T-
shirt day on Friday, April 24.

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THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS

As this is a national initiative,
beach clean-ups and other coastal
awareness activities are planned
for the islands of Abaco, Andros,
Bimini, Eleuthera, Grand Bahama,
Exuma and San Salvador.

The 2009 Coastal Awareness
Committee includes members
from the following organisations:
Ministry of Tourism; Bahamas
Environment Science and Tech-
nology Commission (BEST);
Bahamas Hotel Association;
Bahamas National Trust; Bahamas
Reef Environment Educational
Foundation (BREEF); Broad-
casting Corporation of the
Bahamas; College of the Bahamas;
Department of Environmental
Health Services; Department of
Marine Resources; Dive Stuart
Cove ; Dolphin Encounters; the
Nature Conservancy; Ministry of
Education, Science and Technolo-
gy; the College of the Bahamas,
and the University of the West
Indies

“Our coastal and marine
resources help shape our nation’s
character and its distinctive per-
sonality,” said Mr McPhee.

“All beneficiaries of the tourism
industry must take an interest and
active role in conserving our nat-
ural resources, particularly in grow-
ing Small Island Developing States
(SIDS) like the Bahamas.

“As we depend on the tourism
industry, the economic sustain-
ability of the Bahamas hinges on
our ability to maintain the natural
beauty of these islands that attracts
millions to our shores.”

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Bid to ‘persuade’ the British govt to
shorten Turks and Caicos suspension




















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FROM page one

government, provided that
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parties in the Turks and Caicos
to agree on a “set of things.”

“In my discussions with both
sides I gathered that they can
agree upon some items and
whether they can agree on all I
do not know.

“But whatever they can
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British government to give
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ceeding for, certainly not the

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length of time, and in some
cases not undertaking some of
the measures proposed,” Mr
Ingraham said.

Opposition Leader Perry
Christie said that the PLP were
in support of what the prime
minister said.

Delegation

Mr Christie led a delegation
to Turks and Caicos on Sun-
day and met with the Opposi-
tion for discussions with the
Opposition having met with
the Premier and his delegation
in New Providence the previ-
ous Friday.

“(We) join with (the prime
minister) in the hope that the
Bahamas and other countries
could bring a return to the con-
stitutional government as it
was based on what we know
and all that we have heard pri-
or to the period of two years
that have been stated,” Mr
Christie said.

On March 16 the Interim
Report of the Turks and
Caicos Commission of Inquiry
into possible corruption or oth-
er dishonesty in relation to
past and present elected mem-
bers of the legislature in recent
years was made public.

It had been released to the
Governor of the TCI on Feb-
ruary 28.

The Commissioner recom-
mended in the Interim Report
“the suspension of the entire
Constitution for an indetermi-

nate period, to replace the
democratic process presently
provided by the Cabinet and
the House of Assembly with
direct rule from Westminster,
acting through the Governor
with, but not bound by, the
advice of an Advisory Execu-
tive Council.”

An Order in Council was
subsequently made on March
18 and was laid before the
British Parliament on Wednes-
day, March 25. The Order will
continue in force for a period
of two years from the date of
its commencement unless it is
revoked earlier, or continued
in force, by a further Order in
Council. Once given effect, the
Order in Council will suspend
certain provisions of the Con-
stitution of the TCI relating to
ministerial government and the
House of Assembly. It will also
remove trial by jury and
enlarge the franchise to the
disadvantage of the TCI peo-
ple.

In a written statement yes-
terday CARICOM said that its
members who strongly uphold
the exercise of democracy, do
not believe that good gover-
nance, the rule of law and rep-
resentative democracy can be
ensured or strengthened by
constitutional suspension in
the TCI and a return to direct
rule by the colonial power
through its governor.

“These provisions threaten
the democratic process in the
TCI by terminating the exis-
tence of the Cabinet and dis-

solving the elected Legislature,
in effect thwarting the will of
the people of the TCI. Fur-
thermore, the power, duty or
function of the Cabinet and
the House of Assembly would
now be completely exercised
or performed by the Governor
in his or her discretion with-
out any effective checks and
balances or general oversight
by the TCI people,” CARI-
COM said.

Report

However, CARICOM said
that it is fully aware of the
“scathing nature” of the Inter-
im Report with regard to the
present governance in the TCI
and conscious of the serious-
ness of the situation.

However, it believes that the
time between the Order in
Council being laid in the
British Parliament and the
publication of the final Report
of the Commission of Inquiry
provides a window of oppor-
tunity for the Governing and
Opposition parties to come
together in the national inter-
est as well as for deeper reflec-
tion by all involved in order to
come up with a solution that
will minimize constitutional
disruption.

CARICOM said that it
believes that this could be
done even while providing
some immediate safeguards
against the abuses related in
the Interim Report.

Unaher the distinguished patronage of Thea Excolbancies, Hon «uthur DO. Hanna
Govemor General of the Gommomwealth of The Bahamas and Mrs. Hanne

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 13



LOCAL NEWS

The Bahamas reacts to
pressure on ‘tax Havens’

FROM page one

countries providing financial ser-
vices expressing their intention
to enhance their co-operation in
this regard, that the Bahamas
also “reaffirm” its commitment
to do so ahead of the April 2
meeting of the Group of 20
nations and the OECD in Lon-
don.

In a move that will reassure
financial services professionals
and former Attorney General
Alfred Sears who proposed that
The Bahamas must make a pol-
icy statement in advance of the
G-20 gathering in order to avoid
being unduly penalised or “iso-
lated”, Mr Ingraham said a
release indicating the same was
being forwarded to Europe and
the OECD at 11am yesterday.

Illustrating further willingness
to please those countries, like the
UK, which have been pushing
for so-called tax havens to elim-
inate much of the secrecy that
shrouds their operations, Mr
Ingraham told parliament that
The Bahamas would “as a matter
of priority...enter into negotia-
tions” to “conclude appropriate
arrangements to accommodate
OECD standards” on trans-
parency.

“There are a number of out-
standing requests for The
Bahamas to enter into agree-
ments which provide for the
exchange of information. Each
requests from each country will
be considered on an individual
basis,” he stated.

At present The Bahamas only
has one Tax Information
Exchange Agreement — and
that with the United States. Mr
Ingraham did not say which oth-
er countries were seeking such
agreements.

Describing the context in
which the message being issued
to the global community was pre-
pared, Mr Ingraham said it came
after “wide consultation with
members of The Bahamas finan-
cial services board (BFSB), the
association of international banks
and trusts (AIBT) and the
financial services industry gen-
erally.”

And he suggested that The
Bahamas’ readiness to respond
to further demands for informa-
tion and transparency had
matured after it saw that other
countries with which it is in com-
petition were now being
forced to adhere to the same
standards.

In a March 2002 letter from
then Minister of Finance William
Allen The Bahamas’ relayed its
commitment to the OECD that
it would — as Mr Ingraham yes-
terday described it — “be a
responsible member of the inter-
national community...and a
responsible financial services cen-
tre,” but also proposed some of
its own conditions to the OECD.

Among these, Mr Allen wrote,
was that the Bahamas considers
a “level playing field” among all
OECD member countries and
non-member jurisdictions with
which it is in competition in the
field of cross border financial ser-
vices “to be critical to its eco-
nomic interest.”

Yesterday, Mr Ingraham said:
“Over the past few weeks much
has been reported...about the
efforts of the governments that
make up the Organisation for
Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD) to
require greater standards of
transparency and exchange of
information between countries,
most especially countries offering
or providing financial services.”

“Greater standards of trans-
parency and exchange of infor-
mation are evolving to become
the international standards
applicable to all countries.

“Many countries have now
indicated their adoption of the
standards being required and
soon to be applied by the OECD
for transparency and exchange
of information.”

Earlier this month, Caribbean
jurisdictions signalling their
acceptance of the OECD’s
“evolving standards” in their
financial services industries
included the Cayman Islands,
Bermuda and the British Virgin
Islands.

The European countries of
Austria, Andorra, Belgium,
Monaco, Switzerland, Lichten-
stein and the Channel Islands of
Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of
Man also sent messages to the
OECD stating their willingness
to comply.

Their shift in attitudes came
after the global banking collapse
caused fresh and focused scruti-
ny to be trained on so-called
international tax havens.

Britain’s Prime Minister Gor-
don Brown has been among
those leading the call for an end
to such centres, which, at a time
when governments are scram-
bling to find ways to boost their
dwindling tax revenues, are being
blamed for facilitating wealthy
citizens of countries such as
Britain to evade taxation in their
own countries.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Cynthia Pratt's

FROM page one

He had both of his legs ampu-
tated at PMH recently, was
unable to eat solid food, and
doctors had little hope of seeing
any improvement in his condi-
tion.

When at his bedside yester-
day ‘Mother’ Pratt said Mr Pratt
opened his eyes to see her, but
was unable to speak.

She said: “He was sort of
reaching for me and indicating
for me to hold his hand, which I
did, and when I looked at him he
had deteriorated so much
because he had lost so much
weight.”

Mts Pratt told her St Cecilia
constituents in a press confer-
ence last week how her hus-
band’s deteriorating health has
been her primary concern as he
has not only been her husband,
but her best friend.

Speaking to The Tribune from
the hospital yesterday, Mrs Pratt
said: “He’s been such a good
husband, very supportive. He

iNew cu



loved his country.

“He wanted what was best for
the country. Everything I
attempted to do he supported
me. Even when I went to col-
lege he stayed home and kept
the children until I returned.”

A statement issued by the
PLP party last night said: “In his

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own right, Joseph ‘Joe’ Pratt was i
a long standing supporter of }
deep conviction and most serious }
commitment to our party and its ;

core principles.

“As the husband of our }
deputy leader he has been }
unstinting and passionate in his }
devotion to his wife both pri- :
vately and publicly; first when }
she was elected to Parliament }
and ultimately, when she made
history by becoming the first }
woman to hold the office of }

Deputy Prime Minister.

“Joe Pratt could always be }
seen at her side, or sitting in the i
gallery of the House of Assem- }
bly whenever she made a major }
presentation, or on the campaign }
trail in St Cecilia where they }
lived and where his wife was the }

Parliamentary representative,

always supporting and encour- }

aging her efforts and her work.

“He was a man of great :
strength and unquestioned com- }
mitment to our political cause }
and one who displayed incredi- }
ble love for his wife and his fam-

ily.

our beloved Deputy Leader,

Cynthia Pratt, during this time of :

great loss and grief.

“Our prayers are with her, and
their children and their entire }

family.”




“We stand in solidarity with

stage protest

FROM page one

Yesterday officers from the
RBPF's Special Intelligence
Branch (SIB) were called to the
scene to take statements from
the interpreter, a representative
from the Chinese Embassy, and
E R Hanna.

The group alleged they were
paid three weeks ago for work
completed in November but
have not been paid for subse-
quent labour. They reportedly
stopped working on March 3,
2009 because they were unsure
if their work permits were valid,
according to the group's inter-
preter, Louis.

Speaking for the group, Louis
said the men want payment due
to them — reportedly “about
$40,000 per worker” — before
they return to their homeland.
He said the group feels their
rights are being violated
because the company has pos-
session of their passports and
work permits. He also claimed
the group has been harassed by
police officers in what he
believes is an attempt to silence

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nthe

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the repair of Storage Tank #13 at its
Clifton Pier Power Station.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before

31st March, 2009

no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 683/08
REPAIR OF STORAGE TANK #13
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all proposals
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Shevonn N, Cambridge at telephone 302-1208.

Site visit will take place on Thursday, 19th March, 2009 at 9:00 a.m.
at BEC, Clifton Pier Power Station.

their complaints.

"Since we stopped work, four
times policemen come to our
house wanting to get rid of me
because I'm the only one who
speaks English. If they get rid of
me, policemen (can) carry them
away or immigration (can) get
them away without pay, that's
the situation,” he said.

Through their interpreter
some claimed that sometimes
they were only fed breakfast
and dinner while performing
strenuous work on the site.

Speaking to The Tribune
after yesterday's demonstration,
E R Hanna representative
Tameka Hanna denied these
accusations. She said the com-
pany was "astounded" to hear
the workers’ complaints that
they had not been paid.

She said E R Hanna had
paid what was owed to the
workers and that any discrep-
ancy lay with an international
company that was responsible
for payment of a portion of the
workers’ wages.

She also dismissed claims of
insufficient food and mistreat-
ment saying for the past two
years the workers were ade-
quately housed in a company
facility and fed three times a
day and that fresh drinking
water is available at the site.

And in spite of the workers’
strike, she said the company
continues to house and feed
them.

During the interview, Ms
Hanna said the company
remained in discussions with the
Chinese workers through an
independent translator to
bring some resolution to the sit-
uation.

However she said the com-
pany will seek to have the work-
ers’ permits revoked because of
their recent conduct. She said
the company had been working
with Immigration to get the
documents renewed, but would
move to reverse this because
the workers violated their con-
tract when they stopped work-
ing.

Odessa G

s husband dies. Chinese workers _ Investigations

into apparent
— teen suicide

FROM page one

examined that the body and
pronounced the young man
dead at the scene.

According to police
reports, the deceased was
last seen alive at around
6pm on Tuesday when he
was involved in an alterca-
tion with a family member.

He then locked himself in
a bedroom. Family mem-
bers later forced the door
open and discovered the
body in the closet.

Ministry of Education
officials, including the
school psychologist, met
with staff at the Eight Mile
Rock High School to offer
counseling.

School Principal Ben-
jamin Stubbs said the stu-
dent’s death has saddened
many persons at the school.

He said the incident is
one of several unfortunate
incidents that have occurred
at the school in recent
months.

BURGLARY AND
ARMED ROBBERY

Police are investigating a
burglary and armed robbery
that occurred at a residence
in the Malibu Reef Subdivi-
sion early Wednesday
morning.

ASP Bootle reported that
a resident of Malibu Reef
was at home around 2am
when his southern living
room door was kicked in by
three masked men.

The suspects — one armed
with a shotgun and the oth-
er with a machine gun —
demanded cash.

The victim was robbed of
one dark blue Motorola cel-
lular phone, valued at $300.

One of the gunmen is
described as being 5ft, 9ins
tall of slim build with dark
complexion. The other is
also described as 5ft 9ins
tall of medium build with
dark complexion. The sus-
pects were wearing dark
clothing.

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THE TRIBUNE

FROM page one

pany have assured the bank of
its viability and its ability to
meet all its obligations in the
fullness of time if allowed to
continue to operate. In lieu of
appointing a receiver or pursu-
ing any of its other remedies as
a mortgagee, the bank has
allowed the company to contin-
ue in operation pending a busi-
ness review,” the letter read.

However, as outlined in a let-
ter dated January 28, 2008, the
Ministry of Finance rejected Mr
Ritchie’s offer, and demanded
payment in full.

“Some of these charges relate
to years 2006 and early 2007
and sufficient time has already
been extended,” the ministry
wrote.

“In addition, cruise ship oper-
ators have already paid these
amounts to your company. In
your letter, you indicated that
the amount owed amounts to
$4,822,444.40. This amount does
not include part lists, diesel,
overtime and transportation. In
a letter to us, dated November
5, 2007, Customs indicated that
you had owed $5,426,452.76
plus dishonoured cheques of
$2,614,817.79. Please explain the
discrepancy,” the ministry
demanded.

Representing Mr Ritchie,
attorney Philip Davis informed
The Tribune yesterday that
GUL was simply asking gov-
ernment to hold off on collect-
ing their debt at this time; or at

Revenue
collection

FROM page one

and prospects are “evident and
stark,” he noted.

Pointing to a $51.6 million rev-
enue shortfall for the first six
months of the 2008/2009 fiscal
year, he revealed that Govern-
ment was seeking to arrange a
$200 million loan to cover its costs
and was not planning on cutting
back on current expenditure.

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 15
Global United CEO hoped for

payment plan for owed $8m

the very least agree to a pay-
ment plan that would keep the
company’s doors open and
Bahamians employed.

However, as outlined by the
court documents between the
Treasury of the Bahamas and
Global United Limited, the
company received substantial
monies on behalf of the Trea-
sury for docking fees, departure
taxes and tonnage charges that
were never handed over.

In a press statement issued to

the media on Tuesday, Mr
Ritchie — a former PLP nomi-
nee for the Clifton constituency
— said that he felt that the
actions by government were
designed primarily to force his
company out of business rather
than collecting outstanding
duties.

As a result, he said, the com-
pany is expected to close its
doors tomorrow and terminate
the remaining staff at its loca-
tions.

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The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Wilson City Power Station
Transmission Circuits

Wilson City, Abaco

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before

9th April, 2009

no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 701/09

WILSON CITY POWER STATION TRANSMISSION CIRCUITS

WILSON CITY, ABACO

The Corporation reserves the right to
accept or reject any or all proposals.
For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact
Mr. Wayne Farquharson at telephone 302-1216.







FOUR CONNECTION fo THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER NOTICES FOR DIRECTORY PUBLICATIONS

TENDER - PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENTS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from the general public who wish to advertise in our premium spots on the 2010
Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENT" to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - PRINTING AND DELIVERY OF
TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies to provide services for the printing and delivery
of the 2010 and 2011 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES” to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - COVER DESIGNS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies to provide Graphic Artist services for the 2010
Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - COVER DESIGNS” to the
attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - DISPLAY ADS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies or individuals to provide Graphic Artist services
for the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, "TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - DISPLAY ADS" to the atten-
tion. of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL
NARRATIVES SERVICES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies or individuals to provide Creative Writing and
Sectional Narratives services for the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL NARRATIVES
SERVICES" to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

www.btcbahamas.com
tl ll


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Goodell wants longer regular season

lm By BARRY WILNER
AP Football Writer

DANA POINT, Calif. (AP) — Roger Good-
ell wants the NFL regular season to expand to
17 or 18 games.

The commissioner hopes to have a proposal
to present to league owners in May. The matter
was discussed at length during the NFL meet-

and counting

ings that ended Wednesday.

Goodell said the league has not broached
the subject with its broadcast partners or the
players’ union, and nothing could be done with-
out a new labor agreement.

The league now plays a 16-game season. A
longer schedule, perhaps by 2011, would mean
fewer preseason games. Goodell said the league
doesn’t need four exhibition games anymore.

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IN THIS August 27, 2007 file photo, Atlanta Falcons football player Michael Vick leaves federal court after plead-
ing guilty to a dogfighting charge in Richmond, Va.

(AP Photo: Steve Helber)

Vick leaves
federal prison

@ By LARRY O’DELL
Associated Press Writer

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) —
Suspended NFL star Michael
Vick has left a federal lockup
in Kansas, apparently bound for
Virginia to appear at a bank-
ruptcy hearing next week.

The U.S. Bureau of Prisons
Web site showed Wednesday
that Vick was no longer at the
federal penitentiary in Leaven-
worth, Kan. It listed his status as
“in transit.”

It was not clear when he left,
or where he was. But two weeks
ago, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge
Frank Santoro demanded that
Vick to testify at an April 2
hearing in Newport News about
whether his Chapter 11 bank-
ruptcy plan should be con-
firmed. Another judge issued a
court order directing federal
marshals to bring the former

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Atlanta Falcons quarterback to
Virginia for the hearing.

Bureau of Prisons spokes-
woman Victoria Joseph said
bureau policy prohibits disclo-
sure of the prisoner’s destina-
tion until after he arrives. Vick-
*s attorneys did not immediate-
ly return phone messages left
by The Associated Press.

Vick is serving 23 months for
bankrolling a dogfighting con-
spiracy. He is eligible to move
into home confinement no ear-
lier than May 21 and is sched-
uled to be released from cus-
tody on July 20.

Vick will likely be kept in a
southeastern Virginia jail until
the hearing, but it wasn’t known
which one. Newport News Sher-
iff Gabe Morgan said he had
not been notified that Vick
would be staying in the city jail,
but it was possible Vick and fed-
eral marshals would show up

unannounced.

The judge overseeing Vick’s
bankruptcy case rejected the
idea of allowing testimony by
video hookup, saying he needed
Vick in the courtroom so he
could assess his demeanor and
credibility.

Vick’s plan for paying his
creditors is based largely on his
intention to resume his NFL
career. Vick was suspended
indefinitely after his 2007 indict-
ment, and NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell has said he will
review Vick’s status after he is
released.

The Falcons still hold the con-
tract rights to Vick but have
said they will try to trade him.
Vick’s bankruptcy plan would
allow him to keep the first
$750,000 of his annual pay.
After that, a percentage would
go to his creditors based on a
sliding scale.

Cooper to head

Carifta coaches

FROM page 19

tance. Most of the events when
it comes to what we have to do
on the field, I think the coaches
on the team can handle it,” he
said.

“One of the things we are
asking this weekend, we need
the total support of the
Bahamas behind our team at
the trials first. We can not just
say we will send the team out
and hope that they will bring
something back if we do not
give the support.”

The BAAA Carifta Trials is
scheduled for this weekend at
the Thomas A Robinson Stadi-
um.

According to press relations
officer Kermit Taylor, just
under 30 athletes have met
qualifications thus far.

Last year, the Bahamas field-
ed 64 athletes for the Carifta
games in St Kitts.

BAAA president Curt
Hollingsworth said the cross
section of coaches will provide
the team with the best oppor-
tunity to succeed.

“One of the misconceptions
that lingers around in the coach-
ing community is that specialty
coaches when it comes to
national teams. I believe every
coach and every administrative
member plays one significant
role, and that is to manage the
athletes,” he said.

“We do not expect for coach-
es to try and change or tamper
with an athlete’s technique or
skill within a week or two prior
to competition. Our responsi-
bility basically is to motivate,
encourage and to manage these



athletes for the pending days
leading up to travel.”

Hollingsworth said from the
meet and with the guidance of
coaches and the selection com-
mittee the best possible team
will be traveling to St Lucia.

“We will field the best, the
most qualified and the most
competent athletes that we can
field this weekend. At the end
of the day we will give as many
of our kids as possible the
opportunity to participate in
these games. I am a believer in
standards but I also believe that
those children who train hard
and have an opportunity to per-
form, we always have a surprise
in store for that. So we will do
our best to give everyone an
opportunity.”

Regarding collegiate and
absentee athletes being selected
to this year’s squad, he said
preference will be given to ath-
letes who qualify locally.

“Tf athletes qualify locally in
those events, the collegiate ath-
letes or athletes absent from the
country will not be considered
at that time. Those athletes that
qualified locally outright will be
given first choice. We have
invited all our absentee athletes
to attend these trials and there
are quite a number of them,”
he said.

“Right now we have high
jumpers that have qualified and
when you look at Raymond
Higgs for example, I understand
he might not be able to get here
for the trials. Raymond Higgs is
a gold medallist from the last
Carifta Games, but if we have
local qualifiers in the event then
they would be going to Carif-
ta.”
TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 17



SPORTS

SPORT eee
Annual Pattie Johnson
-ball tourney underway

NBA Today

By The Associated Press

SCOREBOARD

Thursday, March 26

Los Angeles Lakers at Detroit
(7:30 pm EDT). Winners of three
in a row, the Lakers face the Pis-
tons, who are playing without
Allen Iverson, Rasheed Wallace
and Richard Hamilton.

STARS

Tuesday

—Kirk Hinrich, Bulls, scored
24 points filling in for injured
Derrick Rose, and Chicago beat
Detroit 99-91 to pull within a
game of the seventh-place Pis-
tons in the Eastern Conference.

—Tony Parker, Spurs, scored
30 points and the Spurs finally
won a close finish in San Anto-
nio, beating Golden State 107-
106.

— Deron Williams and Ron-
nie Brewer, Jazz. Williams had
19 points and 12 assists, and
Brewer scored 12 of his 17 points
in the second half of Utah’s 99-86
win over Houston.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Monta Ellis scored 27 points in
Golden State’s 107-106 loss at
San Antonio on Tuesday night.

Kevin Durant had 24 points in
Oklahoma City’s 107-89 loss to
the Los Angeles Lakers.

Tayshaun Prince and Will
Bynum scored 20 points each in
Detroit’s 99-91 loss at Chicago.

Aaron Brooks scored 20
points and Shane Battier added
18 in Houston’s 99-86 loss at
Utah.

STREAK STOPPER

Roger Mason sank the go-
ahead jumper with 23.8 seconds
left and the Spurs dodged their
second three-game skid of the
season after last-minute losses
against Boston and Houston last
week, beating Golden State 107-
106.

EASY WIN

The Lakers beat Oklahoma
City 107-89 while leading from
start to finish for the ninth time
this season. All five starters were
given a rest for the final 8 min-
utes.

ROSE RESTS

Rookie of the Year candidate
Derrick Rose sat out the Chica-
go Bulls’ 99-91 win over the
Detroit Pistons because of a
bruised right wrist. Rose missed
his first game after being injured
on a dunk attempt in the first
half of Monday’s 101-99 victory
at Washington. X-rays and an
MRI revealed no structural dam-
age. Kirk Hinrich scored 24
points as his fill in.

SPEAKING

“By no means is Kirk a back-
up point guard. But we’ve got
the best backup point guard in
the league.”

— Chicago’s John Salmons
about teammate Kirk Hinrich,
who scored 24 points filling in
for injured Derrick Rose in the
Bulls’ 99-91 won over Detroit on
Tuesday

THE annual Pattie Johnson
basketball tournament, featur-
ing primary, junior and senior
girls from a cross section of
schools, got underway yester-
day at the C I Gibson Gymnasi-
um, with the tournament’s
namesake leading her team to
one of the most impressive per-
formances of the afternoon.

Junior Girls

HO Nash Lions - 43

SAC Big Red Machine - 9

The GSSSA Champions got
out to a blistering start, gaining
a 20-0 advantage at the end of
the first quarter to cruise to the
most lopsided win of the tour-
nament thus far.

With their vaunted full court
trap, the Lions forced eight
turnovers in the opening quarter
in route to the insurmountable
margin and led 26-4 at the half.

The Big Red Machine’s first
basket came with 2:40 left to
play in the second quarter when
Jada Saunders scored in the lane
on a short jumper.

With the Lions’ starters back
on the floor to begin the third

quarter, they opened on an 8-0
run.

A Lakishna Munroe basket
gave them a 38-5 lead heading
into the final period.

H O Nash got their biggest
lead of the game on a Kaleisha
Laing three pointer early in the
fourth quarter which gave them
a 41-5 advantage.

Randya Kemp led the Lions
with 10 points, Laing finished
with nine, Khadijah Moncur and
Regine Curtis added six apiece
while Munroe finished with
four.

Senior Girls

CI Gibson Rattlers - 29

Freedom Warriors - 0

The Rattlers held serve on
their home floor with a domi-
nant performance to begin their
tournament run.

Robin Gibson led all scorers
with 16 points while Danielle
Taylor added 10 points in the
win.

CR Walker Knights - 24
St John’s Giants - 20
The Giants never recovered

after a sluggish scoreless first
quarter and the Knights capi-
talized with timely baskets in
the fourth quarter to cling to the
win.

With star wing player Male-
sha Peterson on the bench for
the beginning of the game, the
Knights relied on a concentrat-
ed defensive effort to take a 9-0
lead after the first quarter.

The Giants’ first baskets came
on a pair of free throws by Dar-
rinique Young early in the sec-
ond quarter, but they failed to
gain significant ground on the
margin as a Tamika Martin
jumper gave the Knights a 13-6
lead at the half.

The BAISS runners-up con-
tinued to chip away at the lead
with a pair of free throws by
Taneka Sandiford trimming the
deficit 15-12.

Peterson followed with a pair
of baskets to stop the run and
the Knights took a 19-15 lead
into the final quarter.

The Giants again trimmed the
deficit to three in the final peri-
od, 20-17, but the Knights
answered with a timely 6-0 run

to seal the win.

Martin led all scorers with
eight points while Peterson
added six. Caryn Moss and
Young led the Giants with six
points apiece.

NCA Crusaders - 13

Prince William Falcons - 12

The Crusaders nearly relin-
quished a lead they held for
more than three and a half quar-
ters but with a key late game
defensive stand held on for the
opening day win.

In a low scoring affair, the
Crusaders led 5-2 after the
opening quarter, 7-4 at the half
and 11-8 heading into the fourth.

The Falcons opened the
fourth on a 4-0 run and gained
their first lead of the game, 12-
11 on a Ranel Ferguson lay-up.

Leanna Johnson responded
to give the Crusaders a 13-12
advantage ad the game’s final
score with 2:42 left to play.

Ferguson had an opportuni-
ty to win the game when she
was fouled on a jumper with 4.8
seconds remaining but missed
both shots at the line.

England to face West Indies

ENGLAND’S cricket captain Andrew Strauss drinks a sports beverage after batting in the nets during training at Kensington Oval in Bridgetown,
Barbados, Wednesday. England will face West Indies in a third One-Day International cricket match on Friday...

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ANTIQUE MONGOLIAN

Former house-
keeper sues
Kole Bryant,

his wife

SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) —
Kobe Bryant’s former house-
keeper is suing the NBA star and
his wife, contending she was
“harassed and humiliated,”
denied health insurance and
forced to quit because of “intol-
erable” working conditions.

In one instance, Maria
Jimenez says Bryant’s wife
ordered her to put her hand ina
container of dog waste to
retrieve the price tag of a blouse.

Jimenez filed suit Friday in
Orange County Superior Court.
She says in court papers that
Vanessa Bryant “badgered,
harassed and humiliated” her in
front of Bryant, the couple’s chil-
dren and others. She said the
couple failed to provide health
coverage, as promised when she
was hired. She said she didn’t
learn she didn’t have it until she
became ill and sought medical
attention.

The action seeks unspecified
general, punitive and special
damages, as well as back pay and
overtime Jimenez says she is
owed. The lawsuit was first
reported by tmz.com.

Rob Pelinka, agent for the Los
Angeles Lakers star, did not
immediately return a call.

Jimenez wasn’t fired but her
lawyer said she was wrongly dis-
charged because Bryant’s wife
made it impossible for her to
continue working at the couple’s
Orange County home.

“She quit but because the
working conditions were intol-
erable,” attorney William Vogel-
er said Wednesday. “We allege it
was a Violation of labour laws
that protect people from working
in unhealthy situations.”

In court papers, Jimenez says
she went to work for the Bryants
in September 2007 and left in
March 2008. Almost immediate-
ly upon starting work, “Vanessa
began a continuing pattern of
verbally abusing and demeaning
her.” Jimenez said she was called
lazy, slow, dumb, a liar and was
cursed and screamed at.

After Jimenez told Kobe
Bryant she wanted to quit he
talked her out of it and elicited
an apology from his wife, court
papers said. But then, she said,
the abuse began again.

According to the papers,
Vanessa Bryant screamed at
Jimenez for putting an expen-
sive blouse in the Bryants’
clothes washer. “Then Vanessa
demanded that Maria put her
hand in a bag of dog feces to
retrieve the price tag for the
blouse.”

Although she gave notice,
Jimenez said, Vanessa Bryant
demanded that she work until
her next pay day to cover the
$690 cost of the blouse. Jimenez
said she did.

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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS

















































THE CARIBBEAN GOSPEL MUSIC

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Players want fair

consideration
in selection of
national teams

THE Bahamas Basketball
Federation last week released
the names of its new coaching
staff for both the junior and
senior men and women nation-
al teams that will play in a num-
ber of tournaments this sum-
mer.

Unlike in the past when
American King Rice was invit-
ed to serve as the men’s head
coach, the federation has decid-
ed to stick strictly to Bahamian
coaches. The list is split
between coaches from New
Providence and Grand
Bahama.

Over the years, however,
players have been reluctant to
come out and try out for the
teams because of who was
coaching and the manner in
which the teams were selected.
In the latter case, locally based
players have complained that
they attended every practice
only to be cut at the eleventh
hour for one of the interna-
tionally based players when
they came home.

Is it fair, players have asked?

Federation executives feel so.

They claim that in most of
those cases, they have gotten
prior commitment from the
internationally based players
that they will be coming home
to travel with the team and so
they left their spot open for
them.

The problem, however, is
that it should be made clear as
to the number of spots that are
open to the local players.
Maybe, in hindsight, the feder-
ation should only be inviting
players to fill those spots that
they need.

Unless, as the federation
states, they should have a local-
ly based national team in place

Carifta team trials this weekend

can easily

rely onto ||
play gy
whenever ||
they have |
an exhibi-
tion game
to be
played
instead of
calling on
the club
teams to
get ready. ff

Like

every oth- OPINION

that they STUBBS



er team
sport, it
will be an
enormous undertaking for the
federation to put together a
national team that will com-
prise of the vast amount of tal-
ent that we have spread across
the world.

In order for the Bahamas to
take another crack at qualifying
for the Tournament of Ameri-
cas, which serves as the basis
for entry into the Olympic
Games, the federation will
need all of the players avail-
able to accomplish the feat.

In the meantime, we do have
the regional tournaments to
participate in and that is where
the focus of the federation is.
Obviously, the locally players
will be in the forefront as the
federation assembles the teams.

So the federation is encour-
aging those players who have
been invited out to come and
make their presence felt. They
are assuring them that once
they put their best foot for-

CABLE BEACH
Sdhappimng Carre
VA reed pa

ward, they will be considered
for team selection.

And that's all the players are
asking for - a fair consideration
for team selection.

CARIFTA SELECTION

THIS is a big weekend for
the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations. They will
hold the final trials for the
Carifta team that will travel to
St Lucia over the Easter holi-
day weekend.

The trials will take place on
Friday and Saturday at the
Thomas A Robinson Track and
Field Stadium. On Sunday, the
BAAA 1s expected to ratify the
team and announce the squad.

With the management team
already selected (see story),
you can bet that it will be
another long and tedious
process that the BAAA will
engage in as coaches attempt
to justify why their athletes
should be included on the
team.

The BAAA will definitely
try to put together the best
team possible to compete at the
games, but the team should
only be selected based on the
athletes’ performances in rela-
tionship to the qualifying stan-
dards.

So let’s hope that the athletes
go out this weekend and per-
form at their best so that they
can secure their spots on the
team and not have to worry
about whether or not their
coaches can get them on or not.

Either they've done the nec-
essary work to make it or they
will get left home.

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THE TRIBUNE

S
b
T

PAGE 19



ts

HURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

s hundreds of

athletes dili-

gently prepare

for an opportu-

nity to qualify
for the top junior track and field
meet of the region, the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations revealed the
team of coaches that will lead
the national squad into compe-
tition.

Bradley Cooper has been
chosen to head the team of
coaches for the 39th annual
Carifta Track and Field Cham-
pionships, April 9-14 in St
Lucia.

Cooper, widely regarded as
the greatest thrower in Bahami-
an track and field history, brings
a résumé filled with two
Olympic qualifications, an
NCAA championship and over
two decades of coaching expe-

39th track and field championships
set for April 9-14 in St Lucia

rience.

Cooper will be assisted by the
team of Sandra Laing, Antonio
Saunders, Wendell Collie and
Dexter Bodie. Ray Hepburn is
the team manager while
Stephanie Higgs will serve as
assistant manager.

Cooper said the return to
national coaching on the junior
circuit should be a seamless
transition with the perfor-
mances he has seen from the
athletes in the past weeks.

“It has been quite a while
since I have been in the junior
circuit working with athletes on
the international scene, but
locally I have been doing it
quite a bit,” he said. “After
watching the athletes over the
last couple of weeks and watch-
ing their performances, the

times, the distances they are
throwing, I am very happy to
say that as far as the Bahamas’
team is concerned we will go
and do our best and try not just
to bring medals but try to get
the maximum performance and
personal best out of all our ath-
letes.”

Cooper said he is confident
in the team’s coaching ability
and emplored parents to offer
their continued support for the
athletes in the weeks leading up
to Carifta.

“We have a few other coach-
es from the association that will
be traveling down and if I need
any volunteers they have said
they will be happy to give assis-

SEE page 16B

Good start for junior tennis
players against best in region

JUNIORS representing the
Bahamas on the international
tennis circuit got off to a suc-
cessful start against the best
players in the region.

The three member junior
Davis Cup team of Jonathan
Taylor, Kevin Major and
Ondre Cargill and the three
member junior Fed Cup team
of Gabrielle Moxey, Erin Stra-
chan and Simone Pratt each
recorded wins in their respec-
tive tournaments in Santo
Domingo, Dominican Repub-
lic.

The junior Fed Cup team
took their opening round
match over the Dominican
Republic, 2-1.

After Moxey lost her open-
ing round match to Michelle
Valdez (7-5,6-2), Pratt took
her singles effort over Loudres
Bernardez (6-2,6-0) and Mox-





ey and Pratt returned to defeat
Valdez and Pamela Peguero
in doubles.

They won their second series
of the day over Panama, 2-1.

After Moxey lost a hard
fought three set match to Ros-
alie Chavez (4-6,6-0,6-3), Pratt
scored a win over Alma
Espinosa (6-3,6-2) and the duo
took the doubles match over
Chavez and Espinosa (7-5,7-
5)

The team heads group four
which also includes Panama,
Jamaica and the host team
Dominican Republic.

The junior Davis Cup team
swept their opening series
against Jamaica, 3-0.

Major took Rowland
Phillips in straight sets (6-1,7-
6), Cargill won (6-2,6-0) over
Jordan Harris while Major and
Taylor beat Phillips and Joe-



seph Ross in doubles (6-1,6-
ey
They returned later to sweep
Haiti 3-0 in their second series.

Cargill again breezed to an
easy win, (6-2,6-1) over Elize
Delva, Taylor got by Fabibio
Villard (2-6,7-5,6-3), while
Cargill and Major defeated
Delva and Nicolson St Louis in
doubles (6-0,6-3).

The Bahamas heads group
two which also includes
Jamaica, Haiti, and Costa
Rica.

The North/Central Ameri-
can and Caribbean pre-quali-
fying event for both teams will
continue until March 28.

The winning teams for both
the Fed Cup and Davis Cup
squads will join Canada, Mex-
ico and the United States in
the final qualifying event, May
1-3 in Boca Raton, Florida.



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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS


















































THE Hub, a downtown art
gallery, has launched a mural
project to begin transforming an
area which many people
describe as desolate and desert-
ed.

The intent of the mural work-
shop is to give the building
which The Hub occupies on
East Bay Street a sorely needed
“facelift.”

The workshop is facilitated by
Margot Bethel, a local artist and
designer with an interest in
advancing the “green move-
ment.”

Her co-facilitator, Suanne
McGregor, is a visiting artist
from Toronto, Canada, who has
designed large-scale indoor and

i outdoor mural art as part of her
T he sig Vi of great things fo eo me extensive professional career.

‘ “We at The Hub are con-
vinced that now is the time to
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 21



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



NY art exhibit takes Chelsea to Havana

m@ By ANITA SNOW
HAVANA

The profiles of President
Obama and a young Fidel Cas-
tro, cut from a flat wooden
board painted red, are unmis-
takable, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

Leaning against the wall of
Havana's Museo Nacional de
Bellas Artes before installation,
the two sides that form "Cas-
trobama" by New York artist
Padraig Tarrant, will be joined
into a single head with Castro
looking to one side and Oba-
ma to the other.

The piece is among more
than 30 often whimsical works
by American artists being
mounted this week for a major
exposition that hopes to ride
the wave of growing support for
better U.S.-Cuba relations
under the Obama administra-
tion. Opening Saturday and
running through May 17, the
"Chelsea Visits Havana" exhib-
it will be the largest collective
display of contemporary Amer-
ican art in Cuba in nearly 25
years.

"Tt would be wonderful if an
opening between the two coun-
tries could start with art,"
Alberto Magnan, the exhibit's
American curator, said as work-
ers inside the exhibition space
used drills and hammers to
open wooden crates containing
the works.

Hopes are high among some
people on both sides of the
Florida Straits for warmer ties
between the United States and
Cuba under Obama. The two
countries have not had diplo-
matic relations for nearly five
decades, and the Bush adminis-
tration significantly tightened
trade and travel restrictions,
making art and other cultural
exchanges increasingly difficult
in recent years.

Coinciding with the 10th
Havana Biennial, the exhibit
includes other images the
Cuban public will recognize.

There's a jigsaw-puzzle por-
trait of Ernesto "Che" Guevara,
called "Black Che,” by
Christoph Draeger. "New
Mount Rushmore," by Long-
Bin Chen, is a sculpture made
with New York City Yellow

Javier Galeano/AP Photo



A WORKER paints a wall next to a sculpture by New York artist Padraig Tarrant called "Castrobama’ at the National Museum of Fine Arts in Havana, Friday, March 20, 2009. The piece is
part of the "Chelsea Visits Havana" exhibit, the largest collective display of contemporary American art in Cuba in nearly a quarter-century.

presidents featured at Mount
Rushmore, plus Obama.

Artist Doug Young, who was
helping open the crates, said he
was installing a Cold Era-style
sculpture of a desk designed by
the U.S. military decades ago
to launch Titan I nuclear mis-
siles. The desk features a huge
white launch button.

"This has been a great chance
to visit Havana, which is like
the South Bronx and Disney-
land all wrapped up into one,”
said the 35-year-old artist,
whose work from the Roebling
Hall Gallery in New York's
Chelsea neighborhood is being
shown outside the United States
for the first time.

The exhibit includes works

by 30 artists from more than
two dozen Chelsea galleries,
including the Jack Shainman,
Loretta Lux, Charles Cowles
and Lehmann Maupin galleries.

Admission

Organizers say thousands of
Cubans and foreign visitors are
expected to see the exhibit dur-
ing its stay. Admission to the
museum is about 4 cents for
Cubans and $5.40 for foreigners.

The show was the idea of
Cuban-born American curator
Magnan, who left the island
when he was 5 and has been
back numerous times in recent
years.

Pages of the four American

The 47-year-old sits on the



m@ By ANDREW WHALEN
LIMA, Peru

A guilty verdict against former Peruvian Pres-
ident Alberto Fujimori in his murder and kid-
napping trial would only strengthen his party in
presidential elections in 2011, his daughter said in
an interview Tuesday, according to the Associat-
ed Press.

Keiko Fujimori, considered a possible front-
runner in the presidential vote at the head of her
jailed father's party, told The Associated Press she
expects her father to be acquitted but that the
opposite verdict would generate solidarity for his
political movement.

"My father's true sentencing will come in the
2011 elections, in which the people will decide if
Alberto Fujimori is innocent or not,” said Keiko
Fujimori, a Peruvian lawmaker who received
more votes than any other congressional candi-
date in the 2006 elections.

The 33-year-old has not officially announced
her presidential candidacy but she said she is
traveling across the Andean nation to build sup-
port for a pro-Fujimori political coalition called
Fuerza 2011, or Strength 2011.

A recent Ipsos Apoyo poll of voting prefer-
ences for 2011 presidential elections showed
Keiko Fujimori in a tie with Lima Mayor Luis
Castaneda, each with 19 percent support. The
poll was conducted in 16 cities and had a margin
for error of 3.1 percentage points.

Alberto Fujimori, 70, faces up to 30 years in
prison on charges of murder and kidnapping for
allegedly authorizing a military death squad
responsible for two massacres and several kid-
nappings in the early 1990s.

He denies authorizing a dirty war against the
Shining Path and its sympathizers, and says he had
no knowledge of death squad activity until after
the massacres.

A verdict by the three-judge panel is expected
next month.

Running for more than a year, the televised
trial has stirred mixed emotions in a country
where many still admire Fujimori and credit him
with leading the country out of an economic cri-
sis and defeating a bloody Maoist insurgency. A
truth commission found that nearly 70,000 people

were killed in the 20-year conflict, almost a third
by the military.

But critics refer to Fujimori's 10-year presi-
dency as "the dictatorship,” a government marked
by corruption and human rights abuses.

A recent Universidad de Lima poll in Peru's
capital found that 71 percent believe Fujimori is
guilty. The poll was published on March 10. It sur-
veyed 6.3 people in Lima with a margin for error
of 4 percentage points.

Fujimori fled to his ancestral Japan in 2000
and faxed in his resignation amid a corruption
scandal involving his spymaster Vladimiro Mon-
tesinos, currently jailed for corruption and run-
ning drugs to Colombian rebels.

Analysts say many Peruvians could see a vote
for Keiko as a vote for a Fujimori presidency
free of the shadow of Montesinos, whom some
believe came to be more powerful than Fujimori

himself.
Mistake

Keiko said the biggest mistake of her father's
presidency was his association with Montesinos,
on whom she pinned the government's corrup-
tion. "Corruption attacked the Fujimori govern-
ment, as it attacked others, but in this case we
would be relentless and never allow that type of
scourge to undermine” a future presidency, Keiko
said.

But critics say Keiko — who served as first
lady after her parents’ divorce — was too close to
his government to start afresh, pointing to alle-
gations that she used taxpayer dollars to pay for
a U.S. college education. Keiko testified before
congress on the charges in 2001, but the allega-
tions were never proven.

Keiko has said in the past that she would par-
don her father if he is found guilty and she wins
the presidency, but she told the AP that a pardon
won't be necessary as she expects him to be found
innocent.

Both sides are expected to appeal the verdict.

"If they find my father guilty, I believe we are
going to see more and more solidarity toward
him, the family and the movement,” Keiko said.

Fujimori's party currently has 13 seats in Peru's
120-member congress.

board of directors of the
exhibit's sponsor, Fundacion
Amistad, a U.S.-based nonprofit
organization that promotes
exchanges and understanding
between Americans and
Cubans.

He and his wife, Dara Metz,
own the Magnan Projects Gal-
ley in Chelsea.

"It's time for a change, espe-
cially now with the new Oba-
ma administration,” Magnan
said. "At least he’s open to
talks."

Obama has said he is open to
discussions between American
and Cuban officials, and during
his campaign promised to lift
travel and remittance restric-
tions on people in the United

States with relatives on the
island. Congress recently passed
legislation, which Obama signed
into law that will allow family
visits to the island every year
rather than every three years.

Because of the United States’
unilateral trade embargo on
Cuba, and other tough restric-
tions, showing any American
art in Cuba is rare.

Lesser works, brought to the
island by the artists in their suit-
cases, sometimes are exhibited.

The exhibit's local curator,
Abelardo Maena, who oversees
the international collection at
the Bellas Artes museum, said
the last group show by Ameri-
can artists in Cuba, "Beyond
the Blockade," was shown at

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in Havana in early 2005.

But that was a solo show.
And because tight enforcement
under President Bush's admin-
istration slowed down approvals
for direct shipment from the
United States, the works had to
be shipped through Canada.

The "Chelsea Visits Havana"
works were shipped directly to
Cuba through Miami early this
month without any significant
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Magnan said.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 23



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Zimbabwe's prime minister
ready to return to work

gm By ANGUS SHAW
HARARE, Zimbabwe

Prices in Zimbabwe have
started to fall after years of dev-
astating inflation that left the
national currency nearly worth-
less — a rare piece of good
news for an economy that
remains a shambles, according
to the Associated Press.

Prices of goods bought in
USS. dollars — Zimbabwe's new
official currency — declined by
3 percent since January, the
state statistical office said Tues-
day.

The figures were announced
as Zimbabwean Prime Minis-
ter Morgan Tsvangirai returned
home after a week in neighbor-
ing South Africa, where he
spent time with his children fol-
lowing his wife's death in a road
crash. He said he was ready to
get back to work.

Until the Zimbabwe dollar
became virtually obsolete in
recent weeks, Zimbabwe's last
official inflation rate in the local
currency was given as 231 mil-
lion percent in August, by far
the highest in the world.

Moffat Nyoni, head of the
Central Statistical Office, said
items priced at an average of
$100 (?73) in January cost $97
(271) this month.

No official annual U.S. dol-
lar inflation figure was calculat-
ed, Nyoni told reporters. And
the situation is complex,
because dollars are not readily
available. But some Zimbab-
weans get money from relatives
or friends working abroad, and
the government recently began
paying civil servants in dollar
vouchers.

The switch to the American
currency in recent months saw
fluctuations in prices slowly
decline through as imported
goods, mainly from South

Easy Credit VO Interest.






Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP Photo

A PORTRAIT of Susan, the late wife of Zimbabwe's prime minister Morgan Tsvangirai, is placed near her cof-
fin during a church service in Harare, Tuesday, March, 10, 2009. Tsvangirai was attending a church service in
memory of his wife Susan who was killed in a car accident last week. Zimbabwe's long history of political vio-
lence blamed on Mugabe's forces fueled speculation that Friday's crash, in which the prime minister was slight-
ly injured, was not an accident. Tsvangirai tried to quell the rumors Monday, saying at a news conference there

was "no foul play" in the crash.

Africa, became more widely
available.

But chronic shortages of hard
currency, food, gasoline and
most basic goods have contin-
ued alongside the collapse of
water, power and public health
utilities. Zimbabwe industries
have reported a decline in pro-
duction of up to 90 percent.

In several years of political
and economic turmoil an esti-
mated 4 million Zimbabweans,
a quarter of the population,
have fled to neighboring South
Africa and to Australia, Europe
and the United States.

The money they send to fam-
ilies at home is cited as the
biggest source of hard currency.

About 7 million Zimbab-

weans — most without access
to hard currency — are receiv-
ing food handouts from foreign
donors and charities in the for-
mer regional breadbasket.
Tsvangirai was sworn in as
prime minister last month under
a unity government deal meant
to end nearly a year of political
impasse. The government has
been troubled from the start,
with its members struggling to
overcome a decade of mistrust.
The death of Tsvangirai's wife
March 6 further slowed the
work of government. Tsvangirai
was slightly injured in the crash.
His deputy, Thokozani Khupe,
has been acting prime minister.
"I'm happy to be back home.
I'm well," Tsvangirai told

reporters Tuesday. "I’m look-
ing forward to getting back for
work." He has a Cabinet meet-
ing Thursday, as well as a ses-
sion with businesspeople to dis-
cuss reviving the tourism indus-
try.

Tsvangirai returned on a
flight that also carried the top
Norwegian development offi-
cial, Eric Solhein. He was begin-
ning a three-day trip during
which he was to talk with
Tsvangirai and other leaders
from the three parties in the
unity government.

"I'm here for international
cooperation following the for-
mation of (the) unity govern-
ment,” Solhein told reporters
at the airport. "We would like



SUPPORTERS cheer Zimbabwe's Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai,
right, during his tour of Harare's main government hospital, in Harare, Zim-
babwe, Friday, Feb. 27, 2009. In his first public appearance since joining
the unity government, the longtime opposition leader toured Harare's main
hospital. On Saturday Tsvangirai will attend a birthday bash for President
Robert Mugabe in a rare show of unity.



A NURSE attends to a patient in Harare's main government hospital, as
Zimbabwe's Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, not seen, visits the ward,
in Harare, Zimbabwe, Friday, Feb. 27, 2009. In his first public appearance
since joining the unity government, the longtime opposition leader toured
Harare's main hospital Friday. Tsvangirai said about US$ 1.5 million is
needed to revamp the rundown hospital. The new coalition government is
faced with the world's highest official inflation rate, a hunger crisis and a
cholera epidemic that has killed nearly 4,000 people since August.

to see the release of political
prisoners and the return of the
rule of law."

The international community
has been helping Zimbabwe
cope with a cholera and hunger
emergency, but withholding sig-
nificant development aid until it
sees President Robert Mugabe
cede real power to Tsvangirai,
his longtime rival.

The United Nations on Tues-
day released updated cholera
data.

The number of cholera cases
and cholera deaths in Zimbab-
we has been falling, U.N. asso-
ciate spokesman Farhan Haq
said at U.N. headquarters in
New York.

While the number is still high,

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the World Health Organization
reported that in the week end-
ing March 14, 2,076 cholera cas-
es were reported, down from
3,812 cases the previous week
and over 8,000 cases per week
at the beginning of February,
he said. The number of fatalities
also decreased from 6 percent
of those infected in January to
2.3 percent in the week ending
March 14, Haq said.

Mugabe, in power since inde-
pendence from Britain in 1980,
is accused of ruining a once
prosperous nation's economy
and trampling its citizens’
democratic rights. He remains
president under a power-shar-
ing deal brokered by leaders of
neighboring countries.

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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Renewable energy project

could hurt environment



m@ By MEERA SELVA
SLIMBRIDGE, England

In this broad gray estuary,
where thousands of migratory
birds shelter and wildlife lovers
walk, it's a battle of nature ver-
sus future, reports the Associat-
ed Press.

Environmentalists want to
build the world's largest renew-
able energy plant here to gen-
erate clean power, in what
would be Britain's biggest pub-
lic construction project since the
Channel Tunnels were com-
pleted 15 years ago. But con-
versationists want to protect the
mudflats and Atlantic salt
marshes, which sustain ducks,
swans and geese.

The plans for the dam on the
border between England and
Wales highlight the collision of
two environmentally sensitive
goals — protecting wildlife ver-
sus reducing dependence on
fossil fuels. The gigantic scale
of the $28 billion project has
only increased the stakes.

"Birds have been coming
here for generations, " said
James Lees, a gamekeeper at
Slimbridge, a nature reserve the
size of New York's Central Park
on the banks of the Severn
Estuary. "They fly thousands of
miles (kilometers) and know
they can shelter here. It's irre-
placeable.”

The proposed dam, one of a
shortlist of five green energy
proposals, would be made up
of a 10-mile-long (16-kilome-
ter-long) wall built across the
Severn Estuary, a broad stretch
of water that narrows into trib-
utaries meandering through
bucolic villages with names like
Tintern, Dursley and Tenbury
Wells. The wall will hold back
these immense tides, then
release the water through a
series of turbines to generate
electricity.

Some environmental groups
want the government to con-
sider a smaller system of tidal
"reefs" — reversible turbines
placed on the estuary floor to
generate power while the tide
moves in and out.

"Of course we want to fight
climate change. But we want to
fight it with technology that
doesn't destroy natural habi-

| | ee

tat,” said Martin Harper at con-
servation group Royal Society
for the Protection of Birds. "A
lot of people assume the birds
will simply find somewhere else
to go. They won't. It takes them
years to find a feeding ground."

Though small tidal mills have
been used to generate power in
southern England since the
Middle Ages, the potential for
environmental degradation has
hampered further construction
and discouraged larger projects.
A report by the World Energy
Council said there are several
suitable sites in the world, but
large capital costs and environ-
mental impact have made politi-
cians hesitate.

Biggest

The Cardiff-Weston project
would be the biggest of its kind.
Britain plans to derive 15 per-
cent of its energy from renew-
ables by 2020, and a successful
tidal power plan here could gen-
erate up to 8.6 gigawatts of
power or the equivalent of eight
coal-fired power stations — or 5
percent of Britain's needs.

A similar plant at La Rance
in northern France built in the
1960s, is comparable, but the
dam there generates just 240
megawatts of electricity — 35
times less than what Severn
could do.

Since there's little to compare
it to, no one is exactly sure what
the impact of the Severn dam
will be.

The government acknowl-
edges the project could wipe
out nearly 50,000 acres (20,235
hectares) along the estuary but
promises to set land aside else-
where to compensate. Conser-
vationists say much of the land
is irreplaceable, especially at the
Slimbridge reserve, founded 65
years ago by Sir Peter Scott, son
of the famous Antarctic explor-
er.

This peaceful stretch of
marshland about 120 miles (193
kilometers) west of London is
one of the country's most pop-
ular reserves, attracting hun-
dreds on sunny days.

Local birdspotters bring
flasks of tea and sandwiches
wrapped in paper and sit for
hours in wooden hides or sheds,



watching kingfishers and
curlews through the mist. On a
good day, they may see a pere-
grine falcon perched on a rock,
looking out for wigeon and dun-
lin.

Wardens worry that a dam
downstream would disturb the
tides that bring in food for the
60,000 migratory and wintering
birds each year. The Royal Soci-
ety for the Protection of Birds
also says that the dam will harm
the estimated 30,000 salmon
and other fish that swim
through the broad estuary to
reach their spawning grounds
in adjacent rivers.

The dam could also affect
local industry. Around 20 miles
(32 kilometers) down river from
Slimbridge, operators at the
deep-water port in the industri-
al city of Bristol fear the project
could reduce water levels and
limit the number of ships com-
ing in.

"The biggest ships will not be
able to get through,” said
Patrick Kearon at the Bristol
Ports Company, which admin-
isters the port.

"We could look at solutions,
like putting in locks to control
water levels, but they will still be
a deterrent to our customers as
they slow down shipping and
generate delays.”

But others say the case
against the Cardiff-Weston dam
is overstated.

Hydroelectric engineer Tom
Shaw suggests the dam will in
fact take some of the sediment
out of the water and make it
less muddy for birds and ships.

Unwilling to commit to either
side, the government has agreed
to fund further research into
tidal reefs. In the meantime, it
will continue consultations on
other smaller projects, which
include proposals for smaller
dams at narrower points of the
estuary and for tidal lagoons,
or smaller-scale turbines that
operate with less water.

With an election likely next
year, a decision on such a mas-
sive project is unlikely soon.

While the debate rages on,
the moorhens, oyster catchers
and white-fronted geese con-
tinue to waddle and swoop in
the rich Simbridge mud —
while they still can.

SE TO ie

Pakistan's top
judge back after

years of turmoil



Emilio Morenatti/AP Photo

SUPPORTERS of Chief Justice Iftiknar Mohammed Chaudhry dance as he arrives at the Supreme Court com-
pound in Islamabad, Pakistan, Tuesday, March 24, 2009. The Pakistani chief justice whose ouster sparked
tremendous political turmoil made a celebrated return to his office Tuesday following calls for reconcilia-
tion and a strong judiciary by the country's president, who had long blocked the judge's reinstatement.

m@ By NAHAL TOOSI
ISLAMABAD

Pakistan's supreme court chief justice called
for an end to judicial corruption after returning to
bench for the first time in two years — brought
back to resolve a political crisis that showed the
country’s volatility as the fight against terrorism
intensifies, according to the Associated Press.

Judge Iftikhar Mohammed Chaudhry also
faced demands Tuesday to investigate the disap-
pearance of hundreds of people believed detained
by security forces since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist
attacks in the United States.

Chaudhry, hailed by supporters as a fearless
and independent justice, was dismissed two years
ago by then-President Pervez Musharraf, spawn-
ing protests by lawyers that helped oust the U.S.-
backed military ruler in 2008.

Musharraf's successor, Asif Ali Zardari, had
resisted demands to reinstate Chaudhry, appar-
ently out of fears he may examine a deal that
has provided Zardari protection from prosecution
on corruption claims.

Relented



Emilio Morenatti/AP Photo

PAKISTANI POLICE officers escort the Chief Justice
of Pakistan Iftiknar Mohammed Chaudhry, center,
as he arrives at the Supreme Court compound in
Islamabad, Pakistan, on Tuesday, March 24, 2009.

several hundred people believed detained during
Musharraf's rule.

The issue could prove embarrassing to the
United States because some of the missing may
have been turned over to American authorities.
The U.S. Embassy in Islamabad declined com-
ment. The wife of one alleged victim, Zahida
Sharif, said she had new hope that Chaudhry
would investigate the case of her husband, a doc-



? tor who vanished in 2005 in the northwest city of
= Zardari relented this month, but only after ee a ys
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THE TRIBUNE





O In brief

Czech gov.
loses no-
Confidence vote

m@ PRAGUE

THE Czech government
collapsed Tuesday after los-
ing a parliamentary no-con-
fidence vote over its han-
dling of the economic crisis.

It was a huge embarrass-
ment for Prime Minister
Mirek Topolanek, coming
just days before a planned
visit by President Barack
Obama and midway through
the Czech Republic’s six-
month European Union
presidency.

The lower house of Par-
liament voted 101-96 to
declare no confidence in the
three-party coalition gov-
ernment, after four law-
makers broke rank with
their parties and voted with
the opposition. Three legis-
lators were absent from the
vote.

It was the first time a gov-
ernment has been ousted by
parliament since the coun-
try came to existence after
the 1993 split of Czechoslo-
vakia.

Topolanek said he could
resign after a planned trip
to Brussels on Wednesday.
“T take the vote into account
and will act according to the
Constitution,” he said.

There has been no indi-
cation of whom President
Vaclav Klaus might choose

to form a new Cabinet. If

three attempts to form a
government fail, early elec-
tions must be called.
Topolanek’s minority
coalition took charge in Jan-

uary 2007, after months of

difficult negotiations fol-
lowing 2006 general elec-
tions that resulted in no
clear winner.

The government has
struggled to resolve deep
divisions within Parliament
over whether to allow com-
ponents of a U.S. missile
defense shield on Czech ter-
ritory, and whether to adopt
the EU reform treaty to
streamline decision-making
in the bloc.

In recent months, opposi-
tion lawmakers also said
they became frustrated with
the government’s response
to the global economic slow-
down. Before the crisis, the
Czech Republic’s export-
oriented economy had been
growing fast, but the coun-
try is expected to enter a
recession this year. Annual
industrial output fell 23.3
percent in January.

The opposition said the
government acted too late
and did too little — approv-
ing a stimulus package only
last month worth 70 billion
koruna ($3.5 billion), includ-
ing measures for invest-
ments in ecology and infra-
structure along with tax cuts
and loan guarantees.

get food

@ UNITED NATIONS

MORE than one million
people in Darfur will not get
their food rations starting in
May if Sudan and the United
Nations can’t fill gaps left by
the expulsion of more than a
dozen foreign aid groups, a
joint U.N.-Sudanese assess-
ment team said Tuesday,
according to the Associated
Press.

Even if other relief organi-
zations in the region help, those
are “Band-Aid solutions, not
long-term solutions,” John
Holmes, the U.N.’s top human-
itarian official, said.

Sudan expelled 13 foreign aid
organizations and closed three
local ones this month after the
International Criminal Court
in the Netherlands issued an
arrest warrant for President
Omar al-Bashir for war crimes
and crimes against humanity in
the western region of Darfur.

Sudan’s government refuses
to have any dealings with the
court and has accused the aid
groups of collaborating with its
case. The groups deny it, and
they warn of a humanitarian
crisis in Darfur without their
presence.

The U.N.-Sudanese assess-
ment team toured Darfur from
March 11-19 after the groups
were expelled.

About 1.1 million people now
dependent on food aid will not
receive their rations starting in
May if the aid gaps aren’t filled,
the U.N. humanitarian coordi-
nator in Sudan, Ameerah Haq,
said on behalf of the team.

She warned that money will
run out within four weeks for
spare parts and fuel needed to
provide drinking water for
850,000 people.

And more than 600,000 peo-
ple are in danger of not getting
materials needed to build shel-
ters before the upcoming rainy
season, Haq said.

“The risks are high,” Holmes
told reporters Tuesday. “The
key tests still lie ahead.”

He described the summary of
the assessment tour, which had
to be signed by both the U.N.
and Sudan, as a compromise
document — but he denied that
the U.N. was downplaying the
potential dangers to try to mol-
lify al-Bashir.

Holmes said the aid gaps
would not immediately lead to
the deaths of hundreds of thou-
sands of people, but said it is
“something where the issues
build up over time.”

The summary, signed by Haq
and the head of Sudan’s
Humanitarian Aid Commission,
says the government and the
U.N. will continue working
together with existing aid orga-
nizations in Darfur to ensure

South Africa peace
conference postponed
over Dalai Lama

mg JOHANNESBURG

ORGANIZERS shelved a
peace conference meant to
show how sports can bring peo-
ple and nations together
because South Africa’s gov-
ernment — fearing trouble
with China — won’t allow the
Dalai Lama to attend.

South Africa’s soccer offi-
cials and a grandson of Nelson
Mandela, who were putting
Friday’s conference together,
announced Tuesday it was
postponed indefinitely because
the Dalai Lama had been
barred.

The conference had been in
doubt since South Africa’s gov-
ernment said a day earlier the
Dalai Lama was not welcome,
prompting condemnation and a
boycott by retired Cape Town
Archbishop Desmond Tutu
and others.

Queen Rania of Jordan, the
entire Nobel Peace Commit-
tee, other laureates and Hol-
lywood actress Charlize
Theron, a native of South
Africa, had been among those
confirmed to attend.

Friday’s conference was
intended to highlight ways soc-
cer can promote peace, and all
Nobel peace laureates had
been invited, along with world
statesmen and celebrities. Irvin
Khoza, who is chairman of the
South African committee orga-



Ashwini Bhatia/AP Photo

IN this Tuesday March 10,
2009, file photo, Tibetan spiritu-
al leader, the Dalai Lama,
speaks to the media on the 50th
anniversary of the Tibetan
uprising against Chinese rule
that sent him into exile, in
Dharmsala, India.

nizing the 2010 World Cup,
also heads the professional soc-
cer league that was arranging
and funding the conference.

Organizers said they hoped
to hold the event when the
Dalai Lama could attend, and
that they hoped that would be
before the World Cup. South
Africa’s tournament will be the
first in Africa.

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 25

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

“that civilians in need can con-
tinue to receive lifesaving food,
health care, shelter, and water
and sanitation.”

Holmes also said security
remains a top concern after a
39-year-old Sudanese relief
worker was shot dead at his
home in western Darfur on
Monday by gunmen who came
looking to steal satellite phones.

And less than two weeks ago,
three foreign aid workers and
one local colleague were kid-
napped in Darfur by what one
local governor called a group
seeking to retaliate for the
court’s warrant for al-Bashir.
The Doctors Without Borders
workers were released three
days later.

Nicole Widdersheim, head of
Oxfam International’s New
York office, said some of the
places her group worked before
being expelled — such as the
overcrowded Kalma camp in
southern Darfur that houses
88,000 refugees — are facing
severe water shortages.

She said women are lining up
for hours to get tiny rations of
water because only hand pumps
are still working, while over-
flowing waste is increasing the
risk of serious outbreaks of
cholera and diarrhea. When the
rainy season arrives many peo-
ple living in flood-prone areas
will be “at extreme risk” of
death or illness because of flim-
sy shelters and overflowing
latrines, she said.

“Current stop-gap measures
will only be effective for a short
time,” Widdersheim said,
adding that the U.N.-Sudanese
assessment overlooked “enor-
mous gaps and needs in the rest
of northern Sudan.”

~ 1 million in Sudan won’
aid from May



Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
UNAMID force commander Gen. Martin Agwai, center is seen through two peacekeepers as he arrives

at the Kas military base near the southern Darfur town of Kas, Sudan, Tuesday, March 24, 2009. Gen.
Agwai conducted a one day field trip that included two of his operating UNAMID military units in the

Darfur remote towns of Kas and Nertiti.

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PAGE 28, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



mg JERUSALEM

CHANTS of “Disgrace, disgrace!”
echoed through the convention hall as a
divided Labor Party voted to join the
incoming government of Benjamin
Netanyahu, a leading skeptic about talks
with the Palestinians, according to the
Associated Press.

Defense Minister Ehud Barak pushed
through the proposal Tuesday despite
angry opposition from party activists who
feared Labor would give only a superficial
gloss to a government little interested in
moving toward peace.

“We are entering this government ... as
a wagging tail, no more than that,”
declared one opponent, lawmaker Shelly
Yacimovich, warning that joining the coali-
tion would make Labor an accessory to a
coalition of hard-liners.

The decision, by a 680-507 vote, paves
the way for a broader government than
the narrow and hawkish one Netanyahu
would otherwise have had to settle for,
increasing his chances of gaining interna-
tional acceptance and avoiding potential
friction with the Obama administration.

Still, the vote could split the party as
opponents signaled Tuesday they might
join the opposition at the first sign of
Israeli foot-dragging over peacemaking.

Labor’s move gives Netanyahu’s coali-
tion a majority of 66 in the 120-seat par-
liament. Barak was set to remain defense
minister, a key position in the new Cabi-
net, that could allow Labor to promote
peace efforts with the Palestinians.

On the other hand, the expected
appointment of Avigdor Lieberman as
foreign minister could overshadow
Barak’s input. Lieberman is widely per-
ceived as a racist because of his demands
that Israel’s minority Arabs take a loyalty
oath or forfeit their citizenship.

On Tuesday, Jewish extremists
marched through the northern Israeli-



Centrist Lahor joining new Israeli government |

Dan Balilty/AP Photo

A MEMBER of Israel's Labor Party gestures during the speech of leader Ehud Barak, during a meeting of the party's central committee in
Tel Aviv, Tuesday, March 24, 2009. Prime Minister designate Benjamin Netanyahu reached a preliminary agreement Tuesday that would
bring the centrist Labor Party into his coalition, an important step toward moderating the emerging government. Labor Party activists
gathered Tuesday afternoon to vote on the deal, which calls on the government to pursue peace negotiations with the Palestinians.

Arab town of Umm el-Fahm, demanding
residents show loyalty to Israel and setting
off stone-throwing protests by Arab
youths that police dispersed with stun
grenades and tear gas. No serious injuries
were reported, but residents denounced
the march on one of Israel’s largest Arab
communities.

In Israel, the prime minister sets the

tone for his government, and Netanyahu
remains deeply skeptical about negotia-
tions with the Palestinians. The past year
of U.S.-backed talks have produced no
discernible results, because the leadership
of both sides appeared too weak to make
the necessary concessions on vital issues
like borders, refugees and settlements.
Netanyahu claims the Palestinians are

not ready for statehood and suggests eco-
nomic development instead. The Pales-
tinians reject that and have received the
backing of Secretary of State Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton. She emphasized several
times during a visit here this month that
the Obama administration’s goal is cre-
ation of a Palestinian state that would live
in peace next to Israel.

Morocco clamps down on Shiites

@ RABAT, Morocco

MOROCCO’S government is
clamping down on homosexual-
ity and alleged Shiite propagan-
da, saying it will tackle any group
that threatens moral and reli-
gious values in the Sunni Arab
kingdom, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

A weekend statement from
the Interior Ministry about

defending those values came
after Morocco cut diplomatic ties
with Iran and accused it of trying
to spread Shiite Islam in the
North African country.

Several independent media
last week urged Morocco to
grant more freedom of speech
to gay activists. An Interior Min-
istry official, speaking only on
condition of anonymity because
of ministry rules, said Tuesday

that the statement referred to
the promotion of homosexuality.

“Certain media are taking a
stand for certain ignominious
behaviors, which is a provoca-
tion for the national public opin-
ion,” the statement said on Sat-
urday. “Any act contrary to
moral or religious values will be
repressed.”

Though they coincide, the
twin moves against Shiite Islam

A 7
Ts Oar eh

at

‘and B



and gay advocates did not
appear to be related. Earlier this
month, Rabat severed diplo-
matic relations with Iran, accus-
ing the Shiite Muslim republic
of trying to spread its faith in
Morocco.

Rights groups have
denounced the clampdown, say-
ing it is an unusual step for
Morocco — a nation mostly
known for tolerance and open-
ness within the Arab world.

Rights groups say about a
dozen people have since been
arrested in working class neigh-
borhoods of northern Morocco
towns on suspicion they had con-
verted to Shiite Islam.

The Moroccan Association for
Human Rights warned that “the
war being waged by Morocco
against belonging to the Shiite
rite” is against the country’s
strong move recently toward
democracy and civil liberties.

Recent reports in the pro-gov-
ernment press accuse Iran of
using Shiite Islam to undermine
the stability of moderate Arab

states. Several media quoted
unidentified government offi-
cials as alleging Iran is trying to
create a rift between moderate,
pro-U.S. Arab states like Moroc-
co or Saudi Arabia, and more
hardline states like Syria.

Iran’s influence has been ris-
ing in the Arab world, and some
in Morocco worry that Tehran
could use Shiite Islam to pro-
mote its cause. Iran denies this.
The Iranian Foreign Ministry
has said it was surprised at
Rabat’s decision to sever diplo-
matic ties.

On Saturday, authorities
closed down the Iraqi school in
Rabat, the capital. The closure
was triggered by a complaint by
parents complaining the school
was promoting Shiite Islam,
Moroccan media reported.

The school taught about 400
children, mostly Moroccans. The
Education Ministry said in a
statement that the school was
closed because “the pedagogy ...
was contrary to the law” on pri-
vate education in Morocco.

Pm lovin’ it



0 In brief

China calls for
hew global
ClUrrency

| MBEIJING

CHINA is calling for a

? new global currency to
? replace the dominant dollar,
i showing a growing assertive-
? ness on revamping the world
? economy ahead of next
? week’s London summit on
? the financial crisis, accord-
i ing to the Associated Press.

The surprise proposal by

i Beijing’s central bank gov-
? ernor reflects unease about
i its vast holdings of U.S. gov-
? ernment bonds and adds to

Chinese pressure to overhaul
a global financial system
dominated by the dollar and

i Western governments. Both
? the United States and the
? European Union brushed off
? the idea.

The world economic crisis

? shows the “inherent vulner-

abilities and systemic risks in

? the existing international
i monetary system,” Gov.
? Zhou Xiaochuan said in an
? essay released Monday by
? the bank. He recommended
? creating a currency made up

a basket of global currencies
and controlled by the Inter-

national Monetary Fund and
: said it would help “to

achieve the objective of safe-

guarding global economic

and financial stability.”
Zhou did not mention the
dollar by name. But in an

? unusual step, the essay was
? published in both Chinese and
? English, making clear it was
? meant for a foreign audience.

China has long been

uneasy about relying on the

dollar for the bulk of its

? trade and to store foreign
i? reserves. Premier Wen
? Jiabao publicly appealed to
? Washington this month to

avoid any response to the cri-

i sis that might weaken the

dollar and the value of Bei-

i jing’s estimated $1 trillion in
i Treasuries and other U.S.
? government debt.

For decades, the dollar has

? been the world’s most wide-
? ly used currency. Many gov-
: ernments hold a large por-
? tion of their reserves in dol-
i lars. Crude oil and many
? commodities are priced in

dollars. Business deals
around the world are done

in dollars.

But the financial crisis has

i highlighted how America’s
? economic problems — and
? by extension the dollar — can
? wreak havoc on nations

around the world. China is in
a bind. To keep the value of

i its currency steady — some
? say undervalued — the Chi-
? nese government has to recy-
? cle its huge trade surpluses,

and the biggest, most liquid

: option for investing them is
? U.S. government debt.

To better insulate coun-

? tries from the ills of one
? country or one currency,
? Zhou said the IMF should
i create a “reserve currency”
? based on shares in the body
i? held by its 185 member
? nations, known as special

drawing rights, or SDRs.
He said it also should be

? used for trade, pricing com-
? modities and accounting, not
? just government finance.

In Washington, U.S. Trea-

sury Secretary Timothy Gei-
? thner and Federal Reserve

Chairman Ben Bernanke
appeared to dismiss China’s

proposal during a congres-
? sional hearing Tuesday.

The two key U.S. econom-

ic officials were asked by

Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-

} Minn., if they would “cate-
? gorically renounce the Unit-
? ed States moving away from
? the dollar and going to a
? global currency,” and both
? said they would.

And the European Union’s

top economy official said the

dollar’s role as the interna-

i tional reserve currency is
? secure despite China’s pro-
? posal.

“Everybody agrees also

: that the present world reserve
? currency, the dollar, is there

and will continue to be there

for a long period of time,”
? EU Commissioner Joaquin
? Almunia said Tuesday after

a meeting of the European
Commission.
Zhou also called for chang-

ing how SDRs are valued.

Currently, they are based on

i the value of four currencies
? — the dollar, euro, yen and
? British pound. “The basket
? of currencies forming the
i basis for SDR valuation
i? should be expanded to
? include currencies of all major
? economies,” he wrote.
Money Safe.
Money Fast.

THE TRIBUNE

ine

THURSDAY,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



# Bank of The Bahamas

IRB TEHRWMATIOBM AL
MARCH 26.
Online at

BankBahamas Online.com



Ministry rejected
Global’s $150,000
per month offer

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GLOBAL
United in early
2008 offered to
pay the Cus-
toms Depart-
ment $150,000
per month
over a three-
year period in
an attempt to
settle an out-
standing
$4.918 million
tax bill, but this was rejected by
the Ministry of Finance, which
wanted payment in full.

In January 15, 2008, letter to
Customs Comptroller Anthony
Adderley, Global United’s pres-
ident and chief executive, Jack-
son Ritchie, offered to pay the
outstanding customs duty over a
three-year period at an annual
interest rate of 5 per cent, while
the company sought outside
investor capital and financing
to pay off the debt in one lump
sum.

Stating that the non-recurring
balance owed to Customs was
then $4.918 million, Mr Ritchie
wrote: “We have been, and are
still, negotiating with several
funding sources to raise the req-
uisite funds to liquidate this bal-
ance as well as to provide for
working capital for the compa-
ny’s expansion plans.

“We believe that we will
obtain the financing for these
purposes, which we are certain
that we will do during the cur-

rene



Government wanted
payment in full, with
some taxes owed back
as far as 2006, and
claimed real amount
owed was $8m

rent calendar year, at which
time we will retire the amount
of the non-recurring liability to
you. In the meantime, we con-
sider it an urgent priority to reg-
ularise our position with you
until we can accomplish that
objective.”

Outlining his planned pay-
ment schedule, Mr Ritchie said:
“We propose to pay the
Bahamas Customs Department,
via certified cheques, monthly
payments in the amount of
$150,000 each for the period
that will not exceed the current
calendar year.

“The monthly payment is
computed to amortise the entire
amount outstanding - $4.918
million - over three years at an
annual interest rate of 5 per
cent or $147,404 per month. We
will undertake to pay off the
outstanding balance by way of a
lump sum payment, once we
obtain the aforementioned
financing.”

Mr Ritchie added that Glob-
al United had made arrange-
ments for its clients to pay Cus-
toms directly, thus avoiding
remittance delays, while the

SEE page 12B

Ginn denies buyer
lawsuit allegations

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

obby Ginn and

the holding com-

pany behind the

$4.9 billion Ginn

sur mer resort
project have emphatically
denied allegations contained in
a lawsuit filed by seven real
estate buyers at the Grand
Bahama West End project that
they failed to “disclose material
facts” regarding the property
purchases.

In a lawsuit filed in the Mid-
dle District Court of Florida,
the seven lot buyers alleged that
Bobby Ginn, Ginn-LA West
End, Ginn Financial Services,
Stewart Title Company and oth-
ers had failed to disclose that
in acquiring the project’s real
estate from the Grand Bahama
Hotel Company, they “may not
hold” clean title to about 80
acres of the 2,100 acre site.

“The property reports failed
to disclose that Section 7 (d) of
the Grand Bahama Hotel Com-
pany contract provided that
Ginn Development was ‘aware
of the existence of litigation
styled Angela Williams vs
Grand Bahama Properties ltd,
West End Resorts Ltd, Old
Bahama Bay Management Ltd
and Old Bahama Community
Association ltd, and that Ginn
Development ‘agreed to accept
title to the property subject to
litigation’,” the lawsuit alleged.

The property owners also

* Real estate buyers allege company failed
to disclose material facts on title and
financing for West End development

* Claim only funds available were $134m
for canal and infrastructure, and $36m
for golf course, both in escrow

alleged that Ginn failed to
reveal information on its finan-
cial condition, claiming that
“the only funds set aside for the
development of the Versailles
sur mer subdivision consisted
of a $124 million escrow to fund
the remaining canal and infra-
structure, and a $36 million
escrow to complete one golf
course”.

Some of the property owners
alleged that Ginn had either
refused, or failed to acknowl-
edge, their attempts to with-
draw from the real estate pur-
chases and recover their funds.

And the property owners also
alleged that Ginn’s property
reports had failed to provide
information on their likely
Bahamas real property tax lia-
bilities, especially by not includ-
ing annual tax cost estimates.

They claimed that Ginn’s
property reports also failed to
disclose the existence of a $675
million lending facility from a
syndicate put together by Cred-
it Suisse, and the implications

Bahamas ‘now has to find new model’ in financial sector

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas “now has to
find a new model” for its finan-
cial services industry in the

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



wake of yes-
terday’s state-
ment by the
Government
that it was
ready to com-
ply with the
G-20/OECD’s
tax demands,
with its com-
petitors’ rush
to compliance
meaning that
the ‘level play-
ing field’ required for this
nation’s 2002 commitment to
kick-in was now in place.

Michael Paton, a former
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) chairman, yes-
terday told Tribune Business
that Bahamian-based clients
and institutions should not pan-
ic in the face of the new global
regulatory landscape, as there
would be a “transition period”
before any new Tax Informa-
tion Exchange Agreements
(TIEAs) signed by this nation
came into effect.

He urged that the Govern-
ment not rush headlong into
signing purely TIEAs, and

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* Former BESB chair says yesterday’s commitment inevitable, given that

‘level playing field’ condition 2002 position based on had been met
* Says Bahamas ‘had little choice’, and focus must move to repositioning sector
* Urges government to focus on investment, double tax treaties as well as TIEAs
* Industry urged not to panic, as has transition time and no retroactive measures

instead explore how the
Bahamas could maximise reci-
procal benefits from these bilat-
eral arrangements via alterna-
tive agreements, such as invest-

Features:

ment and double taxation
treaties.

SEE page 4B

that a mortgage or lien over the
West End property might have
for them.

“The plaintiff property
reports failed to include mater-
ial facts concerning the manner
of recording a conveyance deed
in the Bahamas and the related
risks to a purchaser,” the lot
owners alleged.

“The plaintiff property
reports fail to inform prospec-
tive purchasers that the con-
veyance deeds for lots pur-
chased in the Versailles sur mer
subdivision were not routinely
recorded until several months
after the closing dates for the
sale of those lots.

“The fact that the conveyance
deeds for lots purchased in the
Versailles sur mer subdivision
were routinely not recorded
until several months following
the closing date for the sale of
those lots was material, because
a reasonable prospective pur-
chaser would consider that fact
important in making a decision
whether to purchase a lot.”



Scotiabank
moves to
flismiss claim
by the Chut
llevelopers

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SCOTIABANK (Bahamas)
has filed a motion to dismiss the
counterclaim filed by the devel-
opers of a $250 million Bahami-
an-based resort project, alleg-
ing that their claims were “in
direct conflict” with the $45 mil-
lion loan agreement they had
guaranteed.

The bank, in its motion to dis-
miss the counterclaim submit-
ted by Walter McCrory and
Bob Moss, two of the principals
behind the Berry Islands-based
Chub Cay resort project,
alleged that both had admitted
executing two agreements at the
heart of the dispute - a $4 mil-
lion payment guarantee, and a
guarantee that the project
should be completed.

Scotiabank (Bahamas)
alleged that in their “scatter-
shot of defences and counter-
claims”, Messrs McCrory and
Moss had based their arguments
exclusively on Florida law,
“seven though the applicable
choice of law under the agree-
ments is the law of the
Bahamas”. The bank and its
attorneys argued that this was
another reason the counter-
claim should be dismissed.

SEE page 12B

‘Drastic changes’
underway at NIB

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE National Insurance Board

Board ‘trying to remove
politics as much as possible’

(NIB) is “changing drastically in the way it does business”, a mem-
ber of its Board told Tribune Business, with its directors “trying to
remove politics” from the way it is governed.

Responding to concerns raised
about NIB’s ability to administer

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Facing the threat from cyber crime

IN the age of Facebook,
MySpace, Twitter and other
social networking websites, and
the increase in identity theft and
credit card fraud involving the
use of computers and computer
programmes, it is important to

recognise the legislative devel-
opments in the Bahamas to
address these issues.

The Computer Misuse Act
2003 was enacted in June 2003,
to be used alongside, in certain
instances, the Data Protection

(Privacy of Personal Informa-
tion) Act 2003, and to provide
for six offences related to or
arising from the unlawful inter-
ference with computers and
their security systems.

The Act is based primarily on

The Annual General Meeting of the
Bahamas Real Estate Association will
be held on Tuesday, March 31st 2009,
at 12:30p.m. The Luncheon will be

held at Poop Deck, West Bay Street.
Luncheon reservations are priced at
$30.00 per person.

The Annual Election of Officers and
Directors will be conducted at the
Annual General Meeting.
Only members in good standing are
eligible to vote in the elections.

For further information you can
contact the BREA’S Office at:

325-4942 / 356-4578



the guidelines for the regula-
tion of computer misuse and
crimes established by the Euro-
pean Council and the Organi-
sation for Economic Coopera-
tion and Development
(OECD), which have been
adopted by about 30 countries
worldwide.

With regard to the six
offences mentioned within the
Act, it is important to note that,
in relation to such offences and
as enforced in other criminal
offences, any attempt, incite-
ment, solicitation, abetment or
conspiracy to commit these
offences will be punishable to
the same extent as the commis-
sion of the full offences under
the Act.

Additionally, it should be
emphasised that the Act applies
to any of the six offences, once
it can be proven that the
accused person was physically
in the Bahamas at the material
time of the offence, or the com-
puter programme or data was
in the Bahamas at the material
time.

Legal proceedings related to
or involving the six offences
may be brought within 12
months of the date that suffi-
cient evidence (in the opinion of
the Attorney General) warrants
prosecution. However, no
action may be brought, under
the Act, three years after the
commission of any of the six
offences.

The offences include the fol-
lowing:

* Unauthorised access to
computer material

* Access with the intent to
commit or facilitate the com-
mission of an offence

* Unauthorised modification
of computer material

* Unauthorised use or inter-
ception of computer service

* Unauthorised obstruction
of use of computer

* Unauthorised disclosure of
access codes

Unauthorised access to

computer material

Any unauthorised person,
who knowingly or deliberately
intends to access information
or programmes held in a com-
puter, with the knowledge that
such access is unauthorised, will
be guilty of this offence and
liable on summary conviction
to a maximum fine of $5,000 or
six months imprisonment or
both for a first offence. In the
case of a second or subsequent
conviction for the offence, the
fine and prison term are dou-
bled. This offence is designed
primarily to prevent and min-
imise the antics and actions of
hackers, whose purpose for
unauthorised access to comput-
er material is mostly recre-
ational.

Access with the intent to

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commit or facilitate the com-
mission of an offence

This offence is committed by
any person who uses a comput-
er to gain access to any pro-
gramme or data held in another
computer, with the intent to
commit an offence (whether by
himself or by any other person)
that may involve property,
fraud, dishonesty or causes bod-
ily harm. This is punishable on
conviction for a term of two or
more years imprisonment.

The access to computer pro-
grammes or data may be autho-
rised or unauthorised, and the
commission of the offence does
not have to occur at the same
time as the access to the pro-
gramme or data.

Any person found guilty of
this offence will be liable on
summary conviction to a maxi-
mum fine of $10,000, three
years imprisonment or both.

Unauthorised modification

of computer material

Any person who deliberately
or knowingly causes the unau-
thorised modification of the
contents of any computer will
be guilty of this offence. This is
notwithstanding the fact that
the data or programme held in
the computer, which may have
been affected by the unautho-
rised modification, was not the
data or programme of the com-
puter that may have been orig-
inally used or targeted by that
person.

The penalty for this offence is
a maximum fine of $10,000, one
year’s imprisonment or both.
On subsequent conviction(s) of
the offence, the fine and prison
term are doubled.

Where damage is caused as
a result of this offence, a person
convicted will be liable to pay a
maximum fine of $20,000 or
face imprisonment for a maxi-
mum term of three years or
both.

Under the provisions of the
Act, “damage” is defined as:
“Any impairment to a comput-
er or the integrity or availabili-
ty of data, a programme or sys-
tem, or information, that causes
economic loss aggregating
$10,000 in value or such other
amount as the Minister may, by
notice published in the Gazette,
prescribe, except that any such
loss incurred or accrued more

a by Tyrone Fitzgerald
ba

than one year after the date of
the offence in question shall not
be taken into account.”

Other definitions include:

* Damage that modifies or
impairs, or potentially modifies
or impairs, the medical exami-
nation, diagnosis, treatment or
care of one or more persons

* Damage that causes or
threatens physical injury or
death to any person

* Damage threatens public
health or public safety

* Damage that threatens
physical damage to a computer

Unauthorised use or inter-
ception of computer service

Any person who knowingly
secures unauthorised access to a
computer for the purpose of
obtaining, directly or indirectly,
any computer service, or inter-
cepts or causes to be intercept-
ed, without authority - directly
or indirectly - any function of a
computer by use of a device for
such interception, or uses or
causes to be used, directly or
indirectly, the computer for the
purpose of committing an
offence involving such access or
interception, will be guilty of
this offence.

The offence carries a penalty
of a maximum fine of $10,000 or
imprisonment for a maximum
term of three years or both.
Upon subsequent conviction of
the offence, there is a maximum
fine of $20,000, a maximum
term of three years or both.
With regard to any damage
caused a result of this offence, a
maximum fine of $50,000 is
required to be paid, imprison-
ment of a maximum term of five
years or both.

Unauthorised obstruction

of use of computer

This offence relates to any
person who, knowingly and
without authority or lawful
excuse, interferes with, inter-
rupts or obstructs the lawful use
or functioning of a computer,
or impedes or prevents access to
any programme or data stored
in a computer.

This particular provision of
the Act is aimed at preventing
and minimising acts of sabotage,

SEE page 6B

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THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 3B





Tax exchange talks ‘a matter of priority

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT is set
to begin negotiations with coun-
tries requesting Tax Informa-
tion Exchange Agreements
(TIEAs) “as a matter of priori-
ty”, and is committed to adopt-
ing advances in OECD stan-
dards, the Prime Minister said
yesterday.

The Government released its
long-anticipated position state-
ment, effectively pledging to ful-
fill its 2002 commitments and
committing the Bahamas to
greater co-operation on tax
matters and transparency, after
mounting pressure from the
Organisation for Economic
Cooperation and Development
(OECD) and G-20 nations
effectively left this nation with
little choice other than to fol-
low suit.

Mr Ingraham, who is also
Minister of Finance, said that
after meetings with the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB), the Association
of International Banks and
Trusts (AIBT) and the wider
financial services industry, the
Bahamas was prepared to “reaf-
firm its commitment” to engage
in tax information exchange and
OECD standards of trans-
parency.

Aswiftly approaching April 2
G-20 meeting in London is also
likely the reason for the Gov-
ernment’s need to state its posi-
tion on the growing campaign
targeting so called ‘tax havens’.
Other international financial
centres, similar to the Bahamas,
have already committed to
adhering to evolving OECD
standards.

“It is clear that the OECD
standards of transparency and
exchange of information are
being accepted by OECD mem-
ber countries ,and by those non-
member jurisdictions which pro-
vide financial services similar
to those provided in the
Bahamas,” said Mr Ingraham.

The main proponents for the
dismantling of offshore finan-
cial services centres, the US and
UK, have recently heightened
their commitment to extinguish
what they see as tax aversion

PM Hubert Ingraham



harboured by these nations.

International financial cen-
tres have even been fingered as
key players in the global finan-
cial meltdown, though many
believe they are being used by
those bigger countries as
“scapegoats” to blow smoke
over the real issues in their own
countries.

Shortly after Mr Ingraham
completed his address to the
House, the contents of his
speech appeared on foreign
news wires, underscoring the
importance of the Bahamas’
commitment to its responsibili-
ties.

“Tt has always been the posi-
tion of my government that the
Bahamas will be a responsible
member of the international
community. It has always been
the position of my government
that the Bahamas will be a
responsible financial services
centre,” said Mr Ingraham.

A letter from the then-Minis-
ter of Finance, Sir William
Allen, to the OECD secretary-
general in 2002, pledged a will-
ingness on the Bahamas’ part
to engage in greater trans-
parency and tax information
exchange, provided all other
nations adopted the same stan-
dards and timelines. The
Bahamas added that its com-
mitment was contingent on it
not being placed on a list of
“Un-cooperative tax havens,
nor subject to any framework
of coordinated defensive mea-

sures.”

The letter included an annex
that outlined commitments the
Bahamas was prepared to make
incrementally by December 31,
2005.

It stated that: “The Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas
agrees to the effective exchange
of information for criminal tax
matters, which shall become
effective for the first tax year
after 31 December, 2003. As
regards the effective exchange
of information for civil tax mat-
ters, this will become effective
for the first tax year after 31
December, 2005.

“Such exchanges shall be
achieved under negotiated tax
information exchange agree-
ments that require the effective
exchange of information in spe-
cific tax matters pursuant to a
specific request. The tax infor-
mation exchange agreements
will define the tax matters cov-
ered, and include protections
against unauthorised disclosures
or unauthorised use of infor-
mation.

“In a case involving informa-
tion required for the investiga-
tion and prosecution of criminal
tax matters, information shall
be provided without the
requirement that the conduct
being investigated must consti-
tute a crime in the Bahamas.”

The commitments made by
the Bahamas in the letter, to
exchange tax information with
other countries, is at the centre
of the renewed interest in regu-
lating offshore financial centres.
Many OECD jurisdictions say
they are denied millions in tax
revenues each year because
they are hidden in the so called
‘tax havens’.

Mr Ingraham said in his
address that he is satisfied that
the Bahamas has made neces-
sary steps to establish a ‘level
playing field’.

And with other so called ‘tax
havens’ committing themselves
to OECD standards, he
explained: “It is appropriate,
therefore, that the Bahamas
takes this opportunity, as the
OECD and G-20 countries
meet in London, to reaffirm its
commitments to international
standards of transparency and
exchange of information as

Congratulations
Mrs. Coralie Adderley

accepted by, and applied, to all
member countries of the
OECD and to the majority of
financial centres.”

signaled a willingness to in
applying the OECD’s evolving
standards are Austria, Andorra,
Belgium, Monaco, Switzerland,

Isle of Man and Guernsey. And
in this country’s region, the Cay-
man Islands, the British Virgin
Islands and Bermuda.

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PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Public Relations & Corporate Programs

Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and implementation of a
strategic public relations and communication program together with the effective and efficient
planning and execution of all corporate events and activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Assists in the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate Programs plan to
support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;
Oversees the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations programs, plan and

budget;

Assists with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation and where necessary

the wider community;

Prepares and distributes the Corporation’s Annual Report;

Directs press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press releases, photographs,
fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management and media representatives;
Coordinates the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion surveys;
Provides assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in writing speeches,
preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;

Evaluates and assesses customer complaints and queries and disseminates information to
management;

Aids in the development, implementation and management of all external communication
efforts;

Is proactive in identifying opportunities to improve the image of the Corporation to its employees
and in the community at large;

Coordinates Marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the external Public
Relations Firms and the Media;

Identifies and liaises with service providers to secure speakers, presenters and entertainment
for Corporate events;

Liaises with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e. awards, invitations,
prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as necessary and maintain an inventory
of the same;

Prepares and distributes all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices) relative to Corporate
activities, as necessary;

Creates and updates all Standard Operating Procedures for all activities, as necessary;
Ensures timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of bills for all events
and activities as necessary;

Works closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that there is global
publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate activities;
Ensures that websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company newsletter and internal PA
system are used for the communication of information relative to corporate activities/events;

One Snaueday, March 22, Mrs. Corale L. daderley, Chief Hospital Administrator at the Princes Margaret Hospital,

wes inducted asa Fellow in the American College of Healthcare Professionals, an international

nis 7 4 r i a4 wil. bl ‘ i i Pr | oa Og
profesional society of rmare than 30,00 healthcare executives mina send inespitals anid healthcare system,

ACHE is known for its prestigions credentialing and educational programs and has nore than 80 chapters. In
addition to years of experience in healthcare management, applicants mast pas the Botrd of Governors
Exonination ox Healthcare Management te become a Fellow. Fellows ave described ax leaders in their

organizations and the field. They are actively imvotven in healthcare and civic organizations,

Mis, Adderley began her professional career at the Princess Margaret Hospital in 1986, She bas alto svorbed at Job requirements include:

m I-J 1.3. . a] I vs - ~or r PP J .
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre; and as C ‘hie| Operating Cificer at Doctors Hospitat far a nnmber of years, A-piinniianicde a Bachetots deeteetin pablie:Retouans/ euinatinniMameine Busnes
Administration/Business Communication, or equivalent.

A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisory/Management level.
Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform to prescribed
style and format;

Ability to effectively present information to senior and Executive management and public
groups;

Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing
Experience in managing special events and activities

Excellent time management and organizational skills

Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills

Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications.
Good analytical skills.

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability

graduate of Andrews Academy, Berrien Springs, Mu higan: Mrs, Adderley obtained a Bachelor's snd Master's
degree it Hospital Aaministration from Florida International University.

Born in South America to Bahamian missionary parents, Des. Wendell and Alther McMillen, Mrs. Addertey
enjoys serving reals, and sharing her avealth of experience with staff colleagues, and ber two siblings, Mrs, Laurel
Long, Aasistamt Vice President for Human Resonces at the University of Alabama, and Wendell R. McMillan If
Mis, Adderley has devoted ler enitive professional lie 0 the delivery of quality healthvare, She is married to Esha

Adderley.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The
Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: April Ist, 2009.

Congratulations Coralie, H’e love yaw!


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



T= 1" =) | =<~)~
‘now has to find new model in financial sector

Bahamas

FROM page 1B

Mr Paton said the Bahamas
“had little choice” but to fol-
low other international finan-
cial centres in announcing it
would enhance co-operation on
greater transparency and tax
information exchange, given
that its main rivals - Switzer-

land, Luxembourg, Singapore,
Hong Kong, the Cayman
Islands and Bermuda et al - had
already done so.

This meant, he explained,
that the condition the Bahamas
had set in its 2002 letter to the
Organisation for Economic Co-
Operation and Development
(OECD), which was for there to
be a ‘level playing field’ on tax

KINGSWAY ACADEMY
ELEMENTARY

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Kingsway Academy will

be

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for students wishing to enter grades

2,3.and 6on MONDAY, APRIL6,
2009. Parents are asked to collect

Application Forms

from the

Elementary School office before
the testing date from 8:30a.m. to

4:00p.m.

For further information contact
the school at telephone numbers
324-5049, 324-2158, or 324-6269



matters among all jurisdictions
before it provided greater co-
operation, was now in place.
“T think the Government
really had little choice, as our
2002 commitment was a valid
commitment, subject to valid
conditions being met,” Mr
Paton told Tribune Business.
“T think that has been met,
in that competitor countries
have endorsed the OECD’s
standards for transparency and
information exchange. It came
to the point where we were
called upon to fulfill our 2002
commitment, and now we have
to do so. The die was cast in

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Mr Paton said the fulfillment
of the ‘level playing field’ con-
dition, where all countries
would commit to and imple-
ment the same standards at the
same time, had - at the end -
“come a lot quicker than some
of us had thought”.

The rush was caused by a
combination of pressures,
including President Barack
Obama’s ascendancy to the
White House, which placed
renewed momentum behind the
Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act he
sponsored as a senator and the
OECD’s ‘harmful tax practices’

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drive. Then there was the glob-
al financial crisis, and the scape-
goating of international finan-
cial centres by other G-20
nations, particularly the UK,
France and Germany, for this.

Mr Paton added: “It doesn’t
surprise me that that is the deci-
sion they [the Government]
took today. I think the indus-
try now has to come out and
support that.

“T think we would have found
ourselves very isolated had we
not supported the endorsement
[of OECD/G-2- tax information
exchange/transparency stan-
dards]. The challenge for us
now is to develop a strategic
plan for how the Bahamas posi-
tions itself in this new environ-
ment, because I believe we still
have an opportunity for the
Bahamas to position itself as a
strong international financial
centre in the Western Hemi-
sphere.”

In his address to the House of
Assembly, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said the Gov-
ernment intended to enter
negotiations with nations who
had made outstanding requests
for TIEAs with the Bahamas
“as a matter of priority”.

The OECD has already made
noises about creating another
‘blacklist’ for countries who
have not entered 12 or more
TIEAs with its members, and
the Bahamas to date has only
signed one such agreement with
the US.

The Bahamas public position,
published yesterday, said: “The
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas notes significant
recent progress towards the
adoption of standards on tax
transparency and information
exchange set by the Organisa-
tion for Economic Co-opera-
tion and Development.

“The Bahamas reaffirms its
commitment recorded ina
March 2002 agreement between
The Bahamas and the OECD.

“The Bahamas recognises sig-
nificant advances in commit-
ments to broader application of
OECD standards of trans-
parency. The Bahamas is ready
to negotiate and conclude
appropriate arrangements to
accommodate these OECD
standards.”

Mr Paton told Tribune Busi-
ness that despite the inevitable
long-term changes this would
mean for the Bahamas’ inter-

national financial services mod-
el, he was looking at the situa-
tion from a ‘glass half full, not
half-empty’ viewpoint.

While the Bahamas had to
move with “haste” to craft a
strategy for its medium and
long-term repositioning, the for-
mer BFSB chairman said this
nation should not rush, like the
Isle of Man had done, into sign-
ing just TIEAs with anyone
who presented themselves.

Suggesting that the Bahamas
also seek investment treaties
and double tax treaties, Mr
Paton added: “There should be
room to negotiate bilateral
agreements in good faith, which
would give the OECD states
what they want and what the
Bahamas wants and needs. It’s
not a one-size fits all TIEA that
we should be forced to accept.

“T think there’s going to be
some uneasiness and tension,
but at the end of the day the
decision was pre-made in 2002.”

Mr Paton added that it would
take time for the Bahamas to
agree any new TIEAs, and
there would then be a transi-
tion period before they came
into effect. Nor would they be
retroactive, he said, pointing to
the US TIEA, which came into
effect from criminal matters two
to three years after it was
signed, with civil matters tak-
ing effect after another three
years.

“The message to go out to
clients and banks is that there is
a transition period, your past
affairs are protected. It’s a ques-
tioning of positioning for the
future. We now have to swim
in a brave new world.”

Had the Bahamas not made a
public position statement, Mr
Paton said this nation may “find
ourselves in a league of nations
we would not want to find our-
selves in”.

He added: “We in the
Bahamas have always regard-
ed ourselves as a top tier finan-
cial centre, and that does come
with obligations. We rode the
old model as long as we could,
and now have to find a new
model, which I’m confident we
can.

“Tm not a pessimist. I’m san-
guine about the future. We just
have to buy into a new business
model. It would not be good if
people come out and criticise
now, because the choice was
made years ago.”

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New
Providence and the Family Islands including Grand
Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the Purchaser”) now invites
sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from
schools in accordance with the provisions of the Education Act. Bid
forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of
Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00

p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the

subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Tuesday, 31 March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday, 7" April, 2009 at the address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-1530


THE TRIBUNE



Commission manager
passes securities exam

AN assistant manager for
market surveillance at the
Securities Commission of the
Bahamas, Narissa L. Taylor,
has passed the Canadian
Securities Course (CSC)
exams after studying at the
Nassau-based Securities
Training Institute (STI).

Ms Albury, STIs course
administrator, said: “The CSC
provides a very comprehen-
sive coverage of investment
products and markets, and can
provide a gateway to a
rewarding career in financial
services.”

® Ms Taylor is pictured with
Michael Miller, director of
STI Global Education.

‘Drastic

FROM page 1B

the Government’s proposed
unemployment scheme, given
the difficulties it has in coping
with its existing benefits pack-
age, Brian Nutt said: “I really
feel the National Insurance
Board is changing drastically in
the way it does business, the
checks and balances being put
in place, and it’s moving in the
right direction.”

Mr Nutt, who is also the
Bahamas Employers Confeder-
ation’s (BECon) president, said
that when the unemployment
benefit scheme was presented
to the press last week, he felt
the way in which Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham referred to
Patrick Ward, the current NIB
chairman, was significant.

“One of the things I found
interesting is that the Prime

Minister said Mr Ward was the
first non-politician to chair
NIB,” Mr Nutt said. “[?’'m on
the Board, and can say that all
the Board members are look-
ing at NIB as a business.

“We try to remove politics as
much as possible from the
Board. A number of initiatives
are being taken to improve
management.”

He added: “I think progress is
being made. There’s still a long
way to go, but in the adminis-
tration of the NIB, and the
work of employees, you’re
going to see some improvement
for some time to come.”

Under the proposed unem-
ployment benefit scheme, ben-
efits will be paid two weeks in
arrears. This means that, if the
scheme comes into effect on
April 20, the first benefits would
be paid on May 4, 2009.

The proposed scheme,
although initially financed by

A peel of poor life ond Me Balemar aoe 17
er tt meu ard

Anniversary

ale

March 27th -April 1st, 2009



changes’ underway at NIB

$20 million transferred from the
National Insurance Board’s
(NIB) medical benefits branch,
and supplemented by the Gov-
ernment’s consolidated fund if
needed, will in the long-term be
financed by employer/employee
contributions.

These will be split 50/50
between employer and employ-
ee, and in total be equivalent
to 1 per cent of the insurable
wage ceiling. Given that current
NIB contributions were 8.8 per
cent, split 5.4 per cent/3.4 per
cent between employer/employ-
ee, Mr Nutt said the unemploy-
ment benefit contribution
would take this to 5.9 per
cent/3.9 per cent or 9.8 per cent
in total.

Tribune Business has
obtained a copy of the proposed
amendments to the National
Insurance Act, and its accom-
panying Benefits and Assistance
Regulations, which indicate the

%

off

* Except on red tagged and net items

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 5B

NOTICE

Deum ic cm ra emu Ml

Please be advised that the Master Treasurer, Sir George Newman,
eerolere NOR ORV Cia Amt U enema mmr aun le rAulice

A Lecture/Dinner Gala is scheduled for Friday, 3rd April 2009,
at the Balmoral Club, Stanford Drive @ 7pm Sharp.

All members are asked to contact:
PSECU El Rew P eee ee Bm atm ORE LOE]

To: Clients of the late

David Bethel

Please contact the

Bahamas Bar Association

Office at telephone:
242-326-3276

TYREFLEX
STAR MOTORS

Will be

unemployment benefit scheme
and its attendant reforms are
more wide-ranging than previ-
ously revealed.

For instance, workers who
are “kept on short-time” and
suffer a loss of employment
earnings - meaning workers
working a reduced work week -
where their income is reduced
to less than half their average
insurable weekly earnings, will
receive unemployment benefit.

And when employers termi-
nate an employee’s service, they
will expose themselves to a $500
fine and summary conviction if
they fail to complete the appro-
priate NIB-approved form, or
fail to give it to the employee of
send it to the Board within one
week of the termination date.

Any continuing failure to
comply will result in the
employer incurring a $200 per
day fine for each day the
form(s) are outstanding.

CLOSED on FRIDAY
MARCH 27th, 2009.

For the funeral of
Mr. James Knowles.

We will reopen
for business as usual on
MONDAY, MARCH 30th, 2009.



Housewares
China & Gifts

Home Decor

Stationery
Lawn & Telco Tp
Linens 4 FRE

Ba by Balloons
Paint

Toys

We would like to thank our valued
CERAM LULL ML Ca
PO OMe TR 4

Great Years... Thanks!
House,

ie VE mote

Mall at Marathon
Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:00pm

Tel: oo 393-4002 teed 9:00am-9:00pm

. & Candies

Hoppy
Kelly

“The Easter Bunny”
Saturday March 28th
Ipm - 4pm

Fax: (242) 393-4096 asa

n
Senne ater ee ce


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Facing the threat from cyber crime

FROM page 2B

and the introduction of com-
puter viruses to computer sys-
tems.

The penalty for this offence is
a maximum fine of $10,000, a
maximum term of three years
imprisonment or both. Upon

subsequent conviction for this
offence, there is a maximum
fine of $20,000, a maximum
term of five years imprisonment
or both.

Any damage which may
result from such an offence will
require payment of a maximum
fine of $50,000, a maximum

term of five years imprisonment
or both.

Unauthorised disclosure of
access codes

Any person who, knowingly
and without authority, discloses
any password, access code or
any other means of gaining

access to any programme or
data held in a computer, for
wrongful gain, an unlawful pur-
pose or disclosing such infor-
mation knowing that it is likely
to cause wrongful loss to any
person, will be guilty of this
offence.

The penalty for this offence is




























Legal Notice

NOTICE
PEORIA INVESTMENTS PTE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
XETTERIDGE INVESTMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 12th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas. Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

VACANCY NOTICE

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the position of
Director, responsible for the operations, development and execution of strategic and tactical plans of its
Customer Service Department.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

The successful candidate is expected to manage the account activities of approximately 30,000
customers, including metering, billings, credit, collections and a 24-hour call center.

The applicant must have strong communication, problem solving and trouble shooting skills with
demonstrated decision-making ability and leadership.

Applicants must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Accounting or Equivalent;
5 years supervisory experience in billing and collections in a high volume utility environment, banking
or its equivalent and a track record of reducing arrears.

Qualified applicants may apply to:-

THE DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES
GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMITED
P.O. BOX F-40888
KLE Co UM ree mms rien
OR BY EMAIL: hrdept@gb-power.com

wy

CRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY
iia (aoe Saar | Aaa Sagal

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS
MARCH 31, 2009

Favny Fay

eh A) ze

Saturday, April 18th 2009

REGISTER NOW!

Te leo hoe
Cate of Birth

Shit sire (cece ore) Sma Mein

Lange Funning ( |
et

Emergency Goniaci: Name, Telephone

PF a

ROUTE: Starting at Tropical Shipping, head east on East Bay 351; over the west bridge
io the east bridge; back to Nassau; East on East Bay St: South on Village Ad_; Wasi on
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dee eRe asl e Ma Me Re Me me seers te Ms MM Tel Ma eT}

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related te the Fun ak The unceegaed on behal of particinet andthe participants perboral reprmeseriaives, aasigrae
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the pertecipant's property or regulting in the participant's death in respect of this Fun Aun'Vietk. The participant is fully eeere
of the fee ed heed isheerecd in perticipatins inthe Fon Rowe acd elects te volurtarty compete anc sepume a) thee
reg

aT.
ary to

a maximum fine of $10,000, a
maximum term of three years
imprisonment or both. Upon
subsequent conviction, a maxi-
mum fine of $20,000 or a maxi-
mum term of five years impris-
onment or both.

The Act also makes provision
for more severe penalties in
instances where an offence
under the act involves a “pro-
tected computer” (meaning a
computer used for security,
defence, international relations,
law enforcement, communica-
tions infrastructure, public util-
ities, medical or essential ser-
vices). The penalty in such
instances will be a maximum
fine of $100,000, a maximum
term of 20 years imprisonment
or both.

The Act also gives the police
wide powers of search and
seizure (inclusive of access to
information and computers
involved in the offence), under
certain specified conditions, and
the court has the power to order
forfeiture of any property that
was in possession or under the
control of a person convicted
on an offence under the Act.
This is particularly where such
property was used or intended
to be used for the purpose of

committing or facilitating the
commission of the offence.

©2005. Tyrone L.E. Fitzger-
ald. All rights reserved.

NB: The information con-
tained in this article does not
constitute nor is it a substitute
for legal advice. Persons reading
this article and/or column, gen-
erally, are encouraged to seek
the relevant legal advice and
assistance regarding issues that
may affect them and may relate
to the information presented.

Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an
attorney with Fitzgerald &
Fitzgerald. Should you have any
comments regarding this arti-
cle, you may contact Mr Fitzger-
ald at Suite 212, Lagoon Court
Building, Olde Towne Mall at
Sandyport, West Bay St., P. O.
Box CB-11173, Nassau,
Bahamas or at tyrone@tle-
fitzgeraldgroup.com.

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



Legal Notice

NOTICE
MMVIII VERITAS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PREMIER STAR INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

PVA IN
Oi

Bahamasair Employees
Provident Fund

will be held on
Tuesday, April 28th, 2009

at

The Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Worker’s Union
Building
WORKER’S HOUSE at 7:30p.m.

Important matters, including the External
Audit Report for 2008 will be discussed

ALL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO ATTEND
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 7B





White House looks for
3.6trn budget support

m@ By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The White House sought yes-
terday to stress the positive in a
looming fight with Congress
over a $3.6 trillion budget, saying
blueprints put forth by Democ-
ratic allies hew closely to Presi-
dent Barack Obama’s priorities.

Budget director Peter Orszag
told reporters that companion
fiscal 2010 blueprints emerging
from the House and Senate bud-
get panels will bolster adminis-
tration efforts to give a higher
priority to education and clean
energy programs as well as tak-
ing into account Obama’s desire
to overhaul health care.

Obama has been hearing
increasingly vocal opposition to
the blueprint he sent to Con-
gress last month, however, and
he arranged to travel to Capitol
Hill later Wednesday to meet
with Democrats. Some of the
Opposition on spending, partic-
ularly, has come from moderate
to conservative members of his
own party. For their part,
Republicans have almost uni-

versally assailed his spending
plan as overly ambitious, saying
that it would dump trillions in
debt on future generations.

The budget panels, in fact,
submitted plans that would dis-
card Obama’s signature $400 tax
credit for most workers after it
expires at the end of next year.
According to their budget out-
line, that tax break could only
be extended if other taxes are
raised to pay for it.

In a conference call with
reporters in advance of Obama’s
Hill visit, Orszag said the pro-
posals coming from the budget
panels mirror Obama’s. And he
said the administration was
studying ways to simplify the
U.S. tax code, seeking to close
loopholes with an eye toward
further budget savings.

Meanwhile, House Minority
Whip Eric Cantor charged that
Obama’s budget is “so far out
of the mainstream” that even
members of Obama’s own party
are reluctant to support it.

The Virginia Republican said
it puts too many taxes on busi-
nesses and said that policymak-
ers must “provide relief to the

www.atlanticmedicalfunwalk.com

job creators.”

Both the House and Senate
budget chairmen have been
forced by worsening deficit esti-
mates to scale back Obama’s
requests for domestic programs,
while deeply controversial rev-
enues from his global warming
initiative won’t be included
either.

Senate Budget Committee
Chairman Kent Conrad, D-
N.D., announced a budget blue-
print Tuesday that would scrap
Obama’s signature tax cut after
2010 while employing some
sleight of hand to cut the annual
budget deficit to a sustainable
level.

Conrad promises to reduce
the deficit from a projected $1.7
trillion this year to a still-high
$508 billion in 2014. Along the
way, the Senate plan would have
Obama’s “Making Work Pay”
tax credit, delivering $400 tax
cuts to most workers and $800 to
couples, expire at the end of
next year. Those tax cuts were
included in Obama’s stimulus
package.

In the House, Budget Chair-
man John Spratt Jr., D-S.C., said

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NAME:

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his companion blueprint would
employ fast-track procedures to
allow Obama’s overhaul of the
USS. health care system to pass
Congress without the threat of a
GOP filibuster in the Senate.

Democrats point out that
Obama inherited an unprece-
dented fiscal mess caused by the
recession and the taxpayer-
financed bailout of Wall Street.
Rather than retrenching, how-
ever, they still promise to award
big budget increases to educa-
tion and clean energy programs,
while assuming Obama’s plans
to overhaul the U.S. health care
system advance.

“The best way to bring our
deficit down in the long run is ...
with a budget that leads to broad
economic growth by moving
from an era of borrow and
spend to one where we save and
invest,” Obama said in a Tues-
day night news conference.

It’s also becoming clear that
Obama’s controversial global
warming initiative has experi-
enced a setback, as neither
House nor Senate Democrats
are directly incorporating into
their budget plans Obama’s con-

troversial “cap-and-trade” sys-
tem for auctioning permits to
emit greenhouse gases.

Obama’s budget has ignited a
firestorm on Capitol Hill, with
Republicans assailing it for
record spending and budget
deficits. Democrats are gener-
ally supportive, though some
have sticker shock over the
deficit figures.

Conrad’s plan was released in
the wake of new Congressional
Budget Office estimates that
predicted Obama’s plan would
produce alarming estimates of
red ink — $9.3 trillion over 10
years and a deficit of $749 billion
in 2014. Obama’s budget
promises a $570 billion deficit
in that year, and to get below
that figure Conrad was forced
to make a series of difficult
choices.

Conrad said his budget makes
room for Obama’s hopes to
deliver health care to the unin-
sured. He said the plan would
not add to the deficit over the
long haul.

In grappling with the deficit,
Conrad would cut Obama’s pro-
posed increases for next year for

domestic agencies funded by
lawmakers to growth of about
$27 billion, or 6 percent. Over
five years, the savings from Oba-
ma’s budget would be $160 bil-
lion.

But Conrad also makes sev-
eral shaky assumptions, espe-
cially that Congress will raise
taxes by about $114 billion over
2013-14 to make sure middle-
class taxpayers won’t get hit by
the alternative minimum tax. He
also saves $87 billion by promis-
ing Congress will come up with
spending cuts or new revenues
to avoid cuts in Medicare pay-
ments to doctors.

Both problems have been
fixed in recent years by using
deficit dollars.

Under Congress’ arcane pro-
cedures, the annual congres-
sional budget resolution is a
nonbinding measure that sets
the terms for follow-up legisla-
tion.

Neither budget includes Oba-
ma’s $250 billion set-aside for
more bailouts of banks and oth-
er firms.

Cantor was interviewed on
NBC’s “Today” show.

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PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE




























































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[—~SCSéUSINESS.
White House seeks

rapid firm collapse
legislation

Bm By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

THE administration wants
Congress to act quickly on leg-
islation that would give it
sweeping new powers to seize
financial firms whose collapse
could jeopardize the U.S.
economy, Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner said
Wednesday.

In a speech in New York,
Geithner said the country
should never again be faced
with having to choose between
a meltdown of the financial
system and massive taxpayer
bailouts.

The new legislation, which
Geithner said will be sent to
Congress this week, would
give the administration the
power to take over financial
institutions like troubled insur-
ance giant American Interna-
tional Group Inc.

That would give the admin-
istration the same authority to
seize nonbank financial com-
panies as federal regulators
have with insolvent banks.

“One of the key lessons of
the current crisis is that desta-
bilizing dangers can come
from financial institutions
beyond banks, but our current
regulatory system provides few
ways to deal with these risks,”
Geithner said in remarks to
the Council on Foreign Rela-
tions.

In response to a question,
Geithner said he had not seen
arecent article by the head of
China’s central bank, Zhou
Xiaochuan, in which he called
for a new currency to eventu-
ally replace the dollar as the
world’s major reserve curren-
cy. But Geithner praised Zhou
and said he looked forward to
reading the article. Those com-
ments immediately sent the
dollar plunging on world cur-

rency markets.

In an effort to contain the
damage, Roger Altman, a for-
mer deputy Treasury secretary
in the Clinton administration,
asked Geithner later to clarify
his comments, asking if he had
meant to imply that the dollar
should no longer be the
world’s major reserve curren-
cy.
Geithner said he did not see
any immediate change in the
dollar’s position. “I think the
dollar remains the world’s
dominant reserve currency and
I think that it is likely to
remain (in that position) for
some time,” he said.

The House Financial Ser-
vices Committee could take up
the new financial regulatory
legislation as early as next
week. The administration is
hoping to use the public out-
rage over $165 million in
bonuses provided to AIG,
after it had received more than
$180 billion in government
support, to win congressional
approval for the new powers.

Geithner is scheduled to tes-
tify before the House commit-
tee on Thursday and will out-
line the administration’s pro-
posals for an overhaul of the
entire financial regulatory
structure. The legislation will
seek to limit risk-taking at
firms that could set off severe
damage and will raise regula-
tory requirements to make
sure banks have sufficient
resources to withstand an eco-
nomic downturn, he said.

The administration in the
coming weeks also will pro-
pose new and stronger rules to
protect consumers and
investors against financial
fraud and abuse.

“These will help us deal in
the future with threats like the
practices in subprime lending
that kicked off the current cri-
sis,” Geithner said.

GEOPAK SERVICES
LIMITED (MIDAS)

Will be

CLOSED on FRIDAY
MARCH 27th, 2009.

For the funeral of
Mr. James Knowles.

We will reopen
for business as usual on
SATURDAY, MARCH 28th, 2009.

IOM International Organization for Migration
OIM Organisation Internationale pour les Migrations
OIM Organizacion Internacional para las Migraciones

Vacancy Announcement

The International Organization for Migration is
seeking a highly qualified National Officer to head
its new program in Nassau, Bahamas. The
incumbent will manage a program to promote
reintegration of recently returned Bahamian nationals.
The successful candidate will have a University
degree, preferably in Political Science, Law,
International Affairs, psychology or social work; a
minimum of eight years of relevant experience
required, preferably in the area of social work and
program management; strong writing abilities and
a good background in program administration
desirable. Salary commensurate with responsibility

and experience.

For a full description of the position please visit:
www.iom.int/unitedstates/vacancies/vacancies.htm

Please submit your CV and a letter of interest to
VNO209Bahamas@iom. int
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 9B



a | 2.
EU chief: Obama economic plans ‘a road to hell’

@ By RAF CASERT
Associated Press Writer

STRASBOURG, France
(AP) — The president of the
European Union slammed
President Barack Obama’s
plans to have the U.S. spend its
way out of recession as “a road
to hell,” underscoring Euro-
pean differences with Wash-
ington ahead of a crucial sum-
mit next week on fixing the
world economy.

Other European politicians
kept their distance from the
blunt remarks by Czech Prime
Minister Mirek Topolanek, with
some reproaching the Czech
leader for his strong language
and others reaffirming their
good diplomatic ties with the
US

Topolanek, whose country
currently holds the rotating EU
presidency, told the European
Parliament on Wednesday that
Obama’s massive stimulus
package and banking bailout
“will undermine the liquidity of
the global financial market.”
European governments, led
by France and Germany, say
the focus should be on tighter
financial regulation, while the
USS. is pushing for larger eco-
nomic stimulus plans — but



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

THI



nobody has so far escalated the
rhetoric to such strident levels.

Topolanek’s remarks are the
strongest criticism so far from a
European leader as the 27-
nation bloc sticks to its position
that its member countries are
already spending enough to
stimulate demand.

The remark highlights the dif-
ficulties leaders may face com-
ing up with a common approach
at the April 2 summit in Lon-
don among leaders of the
Group of 20 industrialized and
leading developing countries.

The host of the summit,
British Prime Minister Gordon
Brown, praised Obama on
Tuesday for his willingness to
work with Europe on reforming
the global economy in the run-
up to the G-20 summit.

The United States plans to
spend heavily to try and lift its
economy out of recession with a
$787 billion economic stimulus
plan of tax rebates, health and
welfare benefits, as well as extra
energy and infrastructure
spending.

To encourage banks to lend
again, the government will also
pump $1 trillion into the finan-
cial system by buying up trea-
sury bonds and mortgage secu-
rities in an effort to clear some



of the “toxic assets” — deval-
ued and untradeable assets —
from banks’ balance sheets.

Topolanek, whose govern-
ment lost a vote of confidence
Tuesday but who will remain
EU president until a new Czech
government is established,
bluntly said that “the United
States did not take the right
path.”.

He slammed the U.S.’ widen-
ing budget deficit and protec-
tionist trade measures — such
as the “Buy America” policies
included in the stimulus bill,
although Obama has said he
Opposes protectionism in prin-
ciple.

Topolanek said that “all of
these steps, these combinations
and permanency is the road to
hell.”

“We need to read the history
books and the lessons of histo-
ry and the biggest success of the
(EU) is the refusal to go this
way,” he said.

“Americans will need liquid-
ity to finance all their measures
and they will balance this with
the sale of their bonds but this
will undermine the liquidity of
the global financial market,”
said Topolanek.

Since the EU presidency is
expected to always to take the

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CRANLEIGH PROPERTIES LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, CRANLEIGH PROPERTIES LIMITED, has
been dissolved and struck off the Register according to
the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar

General on the 18th day of March, 2009.

Simon John Harman
Equity Trust House
29-30 The Parade
St. Helier, Jersey,
JE1 1EQ
Liquidator

i, Fldaarees Thevslopeneat Mak

BA HLALAS COHAMBPER OF COMALERCE, LLS. EMBASSY &
BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK PRESENT

THI

BUSINESS EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009 + &:00a.m.-2:30p.m. * The British Colonial Hilton



AGENDA

REGS TRATION NETW ORR ING

IWC ATIC, PRAY EDR &
NATIONAL ANTHEMS.

INTRODUCTION & hiODER ATOR

11:30 =PANEL DISCUSSION Il

* SURI VINNG THE ECONO iC

RECESSION"

* Ken Keer (Providence Ady ios)
* Barry Malcolm (Seonabank Saban fed}

* Philip Simeon, Executive Oyector

fatannas Chantbeys of Commence

WELCOME REMARKS
* Dienrale DiAguiee, President
fahanras Chanrbey of Gonmernce
+*Dorron Cosh, Ghainan
Saharnas Deve dornear Bonk

* Janes Somith (Colin Fluor tal Advisors)

LUNCHEON PRESENTATION

“THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC THREAT! THE
GLOBAL ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY!"

« Tine hy 2ifiga-Grown, Change”

a Affairs}. U5, Ennely

* REASONS TO RENCE IN RECESSION’
+ Gregery Bethel, Presider,

Figtel Ay Paral

COFFEE BREAK

PANEL DISCUSSION

*Renald Langston, Fone) National
Orectorolthe Minanity Fusiness
Devalop ment Agency (EAL OLS
Qepartmernt of Gamers

PANEL DISCUSSION Ill

* POSITIONED FOR SUCCES 5, BEYOND

THE RECESS10N WHAT'S MEXT!“
* Larry Gibson (Cobia! Beacon Senines!

* Cheater Cooper (Hritih Ameriant

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‘Raymond Winder (Deteine & Touche)

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PROTECTING YOUR INVES THIENT °
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Contact: The Chamber of Commerce

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sensitivities of the member
nations into account, the state-
ment was daring and alarmed
other European leaders, who
moved quickly to mend fences
with Washington.

Martin Schulz, leader of the
Socialist group in the European
parliament, said it was “not the
level on which the EU ought to
be operating with the United
States.”

“You have not understood
what the task of the EU presi-
dency is,” he told Topolanek in
the debate.

European Commission Pres-
ident Jose Manuel Barroso also
weighed in with a tribute to
trans-Atlantic cooperation.

“T really believe it is not a
helpful debate, as I see some-
times, to try to suggest that
Americans and Europeans are
coming with very different
approaches to the crisis,” he
told legislators. “On the con-
trary, what we are seeing is
increased convergence.”

Although German Chancel-
lor Angela Merkel has warned
against a spending race and said
that ever bigger bailouts would
create too much of a budgetary
risk, French President Nicolas
Sarkozy said Tuesday he is pre-
pared to support the economy
with a new spending package
that may go down well in Wash-
ington.

Obama insisted Tuesday that
his massive budget proposal is
moving the nation down the

BE

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Al

right path and will help the ail-
ing economy grow again. “This
budget is inseparable from this
recovery,” he said, “because it is
what lays the foundation for a
secure and lasting prosperity.”

Obama also claimed early
progress in his aggressive cam-
paign to lead the United States
out of its worst economic crisis
in 70 years and declared that
despite obstacles ahead, the
U.S. is “moving in the right
direction.”

Barber Shop and Day Spa

We have immediate openings ( commission or booth
rental jin a friendly and safe covironment for | stylist, 1
nail technician, | barber, |] aesthetician and | massape
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Lot #4, Block 1

All the parcel of land containing 15,589 sq. ft. on the southern side
of Woodland Way, and about 350 feet east of Culberts Hill.

Zoning is for single-family residential homes, all the utility services
are available. The site is located 5 miles from downtown Nassau,
1 mile from shopping center and 1 mile from the nearest school.

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
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To reach us on or before April 10, 2009.

For further information, please contact us @ 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608

Cetedinating if Chitin yi hea if “i

On Saturday, March 28", the Montagu Constituency Association

will host a celebratory dinner in honor of its past Members of

Mead

Sr Geoffrey lohestone

Sor Kendal (seacs

Parliament,

| Raney Bestwick

1982 - 1997

Sar Cinilie Tumguest

Sr Willam Alen Brent Symonette

1997-2002 = 2002-2007

From 1967 to 2007, the constituency has had a total of six Representatives. Not

only have these noble sons served Montagu with distinction, but have all gone on
to become nation builders of the highest caliber.

OU, rf’ re
Montagu Salutes Them!

Venue: Montagu Gardens, East Bay Street

Time: 7:30 pm

For further information on the event please contact the constituency

headquarters at (242) 393-0878


THE TRIBUNE

@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Orders to U.S. factories for big-
ticket manufactured goods and
new homes sales both rose
unexpectedly in February, but
economists said the gains were
unlikely to last as the recession
persists.

The Commerce Department
said Wednesday that orders for
durable goods — manufactured
products expected to last at
least three years — increased
3.4 per cent last month, much
better than the two per cent fall
economists expected. It was the
first advance after a record six
straight declines and the
strongest one-month gain in 14
months.

The department also reported
that new home sales rose to a
seasonally adjusted annual rate
of 337,000 from an upwardly
revised January figure of
322,000. The results, while bet-
ter than the drop to 300,000
units that analysts expected, still
were the second-worst on
record. Even after the revision
to January’s results, the month
remained the worst on records
dating to 1963.

But Wall Street rose on the
better-than-expected govern-
ment data. The Dow Jones
industrial average added about
150 points in midday trading
and broader indicators also
gained.

Last month’s strength in

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 11B

US new home
sales increase

durable goods orders was led
by asurge in orders for military
aircraft “and parts, which shot

2.4 per cent. Demand for
machinery, computers and fab-
ricated metal products also rose.

Still, the rebound in both fac-
tory orders and new home sales
may be temporary. Upticks in
retail sales and housing starts
last month, along with a private
sector group’s index of leading
economic indicators dropping
less than expected were wel-
comed, but none were viewed
as sustainable given all the
problems facing the economy.
And a large drop in durable
goods orders in January was
revised even lower, bolstering
estimates that February data
represented a blip.

“The worst of the drop in
(home) sales is over but a sus-
tained recovery, still less price
stability, is a way off still,” Ian
Shepherdson, chief U.S. econo-
mist at High Frequency Eco-
nomics, wrote in a note to
clients.

He was even more skeptical
of a rebound in durable goods.
Noting the steep downward
revisions in January and that
half of last month’s gains came
from defense, Shepherdson said
the rise in orders was welcome,
but “much less impressive than
it looks at first sight and it can-
not possibly last.”

RBS Greenwich Capital ana-
lyst David Ader agreed.
“Durable goods was firmer than
expected but with the caveats
of downward revisions and the

To advertise in The Tribune -
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
Me IR) Perey a BTL

bounce ... coming on the heels
of several months of weakness
.. and we don’t see an effort to
interpret it as a sign the eco-
nomic bottom is in,” he wrote in
a note.

Manufacturers have been bat-
tered by the current recession
— already the longest in a quar-
ter-century — as demand for
cars, airplanes, household appli-
ances, furniture and other large
goods shrinks both in the U.S.
and overseas.

The government is scheduled
to report Thursday on the over-
all economy. Economists
believe that data will show the
economy falling at an annual
rate of 6.5 per cent in the final
three months of last year, even
deeper than the 6.2 per cent
drop in the gross domestic prod-
uct reported a month ago.

Economists believe the GDP
fell just as sharply in the cur-
rent quarter and likely will keep
contracting until the second half
of this year.

Still, orders for durable goods
excluding the pears trans-
portation sector rose 3.9 per
cent last month, easily beating
the two-per cent drop that econ-
omists expected.

But despite the big surge in
demand for military aircraft,
overall orders for transporta-
tion products fell 0.8 per cent
in February. Demand for com-
mercial aircraft plunged 28.9
per cent after a huge increase in
January. Orders for autos and
auto parts dipped 0.6 per cent as
that industry’s struggles persist.

Detroit’s General Motors
Corp. and Chrysler LLC are
restructuring operations in
hopes of securing billions more
in federal aid.

In areas of strength, orders
for heavy machinery surged 13.5
per cent in February, demand
for computers rose 10.1 per cent
and orders for fabricated metal
products edged up 1.5 per cent.

e AP Real Estate Writer
Alan Zibel contributed to this
report.

PRICEWATERHOUsE(COPERS

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

Purpose

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) will provide technology vision and leadership in the
development and implementation of information technology (IT) programmes. He/she will
lead the planning and implementation of enterprise information systems to support business
operations and achieve more effective and cost beneficial enterprise-wide IT operations.

Essential Functions

e Establish guidelines and programmes for effective IT management.
Provide data processing, services required.
Recommend long and short range management information systems plans and budgets.
Approve staff recommendations on major systems development and/or research
projects.
Establish strategic policy for planning, development, and design of information needs.
Research management information systems hardware and software including applicable
vendor applications, data base management, and operational control packages.
Sets policies to ensure privacy and security of data processing facilities.
Establish guidelines and programmes for effective database management utilisation.
Consult with and advise department heads on IT management needs and problems.
Demonstrate continuous effort to improve operations, decrease turnaround times,
streamline work processes, and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality
customer service.

Education, Experience and Necessary Qualifications

Minimum of 3 years of experience with increasing responsibilities for management and
support of information tems and IT; direct management of a major IT operation is
preferred. Experience should also include exposure to both shared and outsourced solutions,
as well as support of in-house information and communication systems in a multi-site client-
server environment. Specific experience with financial and human resource management
information systems is a plus. Other skills required include:

e Familiarity with: desktop, notebook, handheld, and server computer hardware; local
and wide area network design, implementation, and operation; operating systems such
as Windows, OS/400, Unix, and Linux; and computer peripherals such as printers,
monitors, modems and other equipment.

Knowledge of office productivity software programmes such as word processing,
spreadsheet programmes, databases, and communications software.

Ability to: analyse and resolve complex issues, both logical and interpersonal; and
negotiate and defuse conflict.

Effective verbal and written communications skills and effective presentation skills, all
geared toward coordination and education.

Self-motivator, independent, cooperative, flexible and creative.

Required Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:
Requires a master’s degree in Computer Science, Business Administration or a related field or
equry alent experience. Comprehensive knowledge of:
Data processing methods and procedures, and computer software systems.
Systems design and development process, including requirements analysis, feasibility
studies, software design, programming, pilot testing, installation, evaluation and
operational management.
Business process analysis and redesign.
Design, management, and operation of managed IT

Proven skills in: negotiating with vendors, contractors, and others; budget preparation and
monitoring; management and leadership; and communication.

Demonstrated ability to: relate to all levels of the user community; be a team player
that motivates and educates other team members; plan, implement and support systems
in a complex education environment; set and manage priorities, comprehend complex,
technical subjects; translate technical language to lay audiences; and link and apply complex
technologies to business strategies.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: CIO 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Private & Confidential


PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Real Estate

Wee ee eo Sa eT





THOM Uc eteg tah Lae

ee ep ee Are!

Legal Notice
NOTICE

JOGURT LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(A4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, JOGURT LIMITED. is in dissolution as of
March 20, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice
NOTICE

BELLMORE MARKETING LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(A4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, BELLMORE MARKETING LTD. is in
dissolution as of March 20, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



GN-841

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

Ministry of Public Works & Transport
Tender For Paving Works
West Bay St/Marlborough St./Navy Lion Rd./
Bay St./ East Bay St. -
(Blake Rd. eastward to Mackey St.)

Interested Contractors are invited to tender for the
Paving Works on West Bay Street/Marlborough Sitreet/
Navy Lion Road/ Bay Street/ East Bay Street between
Blake Road and Mackey Sireet.

The Tender Document may be collected at:

Civil Engineering Section
Department of Public Works
ist Floor East Wing
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive
Nassau, Bahamas

Sealed Tender submissions are to be deposited in the
Tender Box located at:

Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor
Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received no later than
10:00 a.m., Tuesday, 31st March, 2009.

Tenderers are invited to attend the Tender opening at
10:00 a.m., Tuesday, 31st March 2009 at the Tenders
Board.

Signed
Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary



Ministry rejected
Global’s $150,000
per month offer

FROM page IB

firm was “making current pay-
ments.... on a timely basis for
all current transactions and
believe that these arrangements
will enhance both the reporting
and payment arrangements.”

Mr Ritchie’s suggestion was
rejected in a letter sent to him
13 days later, not by the Cus-
toms Comptroller but a Min-
istry of Finance official, Joseph
Mullings, writing on behalf of
financial secretary to the Trea-
sury.

Mr Mulling said the Ministry
of Finance had “rejected” the
proposal and was demanding
payment in full. He added:
“Some of these charges relate to
years 2006 and early 2007, and
sufficient time has already been
extended. In addition, cruise
ship operators have already
paid these amounts to your
company.”

Mr Mullings also asked Mr
Ritchie to explain the discrep-

ancy between the $4.918 mil-
lion quoted in his letter, and the
$5.426 million Customs said
Global United owed, in addi-
tion to $2.615 million worth of
dishonoured cheques, making
for a grand total of more than
$8 million.

Replying that same day, Mr
Ritchie said some $108,000 had
been paid on the dishonoured
cheques, reducing the out-
standing sum owed to $4.7 mil-
lion. He again appealed for
leniency and acceptance of the
payment plan, which was reject-
ed by Customs in a letter on
February 14, 2008.

Business sources yesterday
expressed surprise that Mr
Ritchie had gone public with
the dispute, viewing it as a last-
ditch, crude attempt to appeal
to the Bahamian public and
hope that this would stay the
Attorney General’s Office’s
hand in moving to wind-up
Global United.

It is unlikely to succeed, with
the Government having served
a statutory demand for payment

by today, meaning that Global
United will likely have to close
its doors and cease operations
tomorrow. Other sources also
suggested it was a “smoke-
screen” to divert attention from
the real causes of Global Unit-
ed’s woes.

Several Tribune Business
sources had previously backed
the Government’s position, sug-
gesting that Global United’s
real problems stemmed from
the fact it had expanded too far,
too fast, and taken on an ulti-
mately unsustainable debt bur-
den from FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas) as a
result.

Tribune Business revealed
last month how Global United
had placed its Airport Industri-
al Park headquarters up for sale
for $1.8 million, and that its
Global United store at Sandy-
port was set to close (it has now
done so). Captain Ritchie has
also placed his personal resi-
dence at Sandyport on the mar-
Ket.

Global United began life as

Freeport-based Tanja Enter-
prises. But Captain Ritchie
embarked on headlong expan-
sion in 2004, becoming the main
shipping agent in Freeport by
acquiring United Shipping.

It followed that up the fol-
lowing year with the purchase
of Nassau-based Global Cus-
toms Brokers & Trucking and
World Bound Couriers,
enabling it to enter the New
Providence market as a major
player in the shipping agency,
distribution and logistics and
transportation business.

At the height of his ambi-
tions, Captain Ritchie also
agreed a deal to purchase Dis-
covery Cruise Line, although
that ultimately fell through.

Among Global United’s oth-
er creditors are its preference
shareholders. They include Col-
inalmperial Insurance Compa-
ny, which had $2-$3 million
worth of preference shares that
it inherited from the Imperial
Life purchase, and Edward
Fitzgerald, father of PLP Sena-
tor Jerome Fitzgerald.

Scotiabank moves to dismiss claim by the Chub developers

FROM page IB

In its motion, Scotiabank
(Bahamas) alleged: “The bank
commenced this action against
the defendants for judgment
under two separate guarantees
relating to a $45 million loan,
which was made by the bank to
two Bahamian entities for the
construction and development
of specified improvements on
Chub Cay in the Bahamas.”

Scotiabank (Bahamas)
alleged that the two Bahamian
borrowing entities, Chub Cay
Associates and Chub Cay
Resorts, entered the project
financing agreement on July 28,
2006.

It claimed Messrs McCrory
and Moss had guaranteed the
two companies’ repayment
obligations up to a $4 million
maximum limit. They also
allegedly entered into a com-
pletion guarantee, pledging that
construction of the Chub Cay
project was to be completed by
December 31, 2007. That guar-
antee was said to be partially
secured by a standby letter of
credit worth $4 million.

Pointing out that Mr Moss
owned a Florida-based con-
struction company that was the
main contractor for Chub Cay,
Scotiabank (Bahamas) alleged
that it was his company’s esti-
mate in support of loan draw-
down request that showed “the
cost of completion of the project
is not less than $38.6 million.

“At present, the borrowers

owe the bank [Scotiabank]
unpaid principal in the amount
of $44. 011 million, together
with accrued interest, cost and
expense.”

Scotiabank (Bahamas)
alleged that Messrs McCrory
and Moss, in their counterclaim,
had ignored the fact that both
the loan agreement and com-
pletion guarantee were gov-
erned by Bahamian law as the
primary jurisdiction. Instead,
they had based their defence on
Florida’s version of the Uni-
form Commercial Code.

However, Scotiabank
(Bahamas) alleged that “the
loan is being extended by a
Bahamian bank, to Bahamian
borrowers, for development of
exclusively Bahamian real prop-
erty, and that is secured by a
mortgage upon real Bahamian
property

“Here, the defendants have
not even attempted to allege
any claims (or defences) under
Bahamas law, nor have they
alleged that Bahamas law con-
travenes any Florida public pol-
icy. Instead, they rely solely
upon Florida law, notwith-
standing that the facility agree-
ment and completion guaran-
tee each contain explicit
Bahamas choice of law provi-
sions, and the dispute between
the parties arises from a loan
transaction among Bahamian
corporations........

“Because defendants assert
no claims or defences under
Bahamian law, their claims

GN-842

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

SALE OF 2007
UPDATES OF LAWS

The Cabinet Office announces the sale of the
2007 Updates of the Statute Law and Subsidiary
Legislation of The Bahamas at the Government
Publications Office, Bay Street. Sale of the
compact discs commences with immediate effect
while sale of the Loose-Leaf Pages will begin on
20th April, 2009. These versions contain legislation
up to the period ending 31st December, 2007.

Cost are as follow:

Loose-Leaf Updates (Inserts) - $350.00 per set

Compact Discs

- $200.00

Government Publications Office is also offering
for sale a limited quantity of the 1987 Statute
Laws and Subsidiary Legislation together with
copies of the 2002 and 2004 CD versions of the
laws. As a package, the cost is $600.00 and the
CDs sold separately are $50 and $100

respectively.



should be dismissed for failure
to state a claim, and the related
affirmative defences stricken.”

In their counterclaim, Messrs
McCrory and Moss had alleged
that Scotiabank (Bahamas) had
already “been paid to the full
extent of what it can recover
under the” guarantee through
accessing the pledged stand-by
letter of credit.

While admitting that they
were guarantors and “that all
payments called for by the
agreement have not been
made”, Messrs McCrory and
Moss denied they were liable
for the $4 million guarantee.

They further alleged that
their obligations were limited
to this guarantee, and denied
that a guarantee to complete
the Chub Cay project had been
part of the terms.

Messrs McCrory and Moss
alleged that they and Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) had “agreed
to limit [their] completion oblig-
ations to certain construction

- bee
oe ae

projects on Chub Cay. For
instance, the corporate borrow-
ers did not broadly and uncon-
ditionally commit to construct
an entire 800 acre mega project
in the Bahamas, irrespective of
whether customers actually
materialised to make purchases
in the project”.

The duo also denied Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) assertion “that
all portions of Chub Cay Club
resort remain incomplete and
subject to deterioration.

“Defendants affirmatively
assert that some villas, a marina,
extensive infrastructure and
other aspects of Chub Cay Club
resort were constructed and not
subject to deterioration. Defen-
dants deny that completion of
the portions of the Chub Cay
Club Resort that the facility
agreement requires to be com-
pleted will cost $38 million.”

The Chub Cay project is cur-
rently in the care of receivers
appointed by Scotiabank
(Bahamas).

OFFICE OF THE
DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER AND
MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

The Ministry Of Foreign Affairs Offers

For Sale

The following vehicles:

(1) 1997 Ford Crown Victoria (Black)
S/N ZFALP73W5VX163226

(2) 1998 Ford Crown Victoria (Black)
S/N 2FAFP73W3NX123466
License #1775

Sealed Tenders may be addressed to:

The Permanent Secretary
Ministry Of Foreign Affairs

P.O. Box N-3746

Nassau, The Bahamas

or

Hand delivered to the Ministry located
on the 2nd Floor, Goodman’s Bay
Corporate Center West Bay Street.

The vehicles may be viewed at the
Ministry’s Headquarters, East Hill Street,
9am - Spm Monday - Friday. Deadline
for submission of tenders is 31st March,
2009.

The Ministry reserves the right to reject

any or all tenders.


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 13B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

Investment Opportunity Must Sell Lot No. 217
Pinewood Gardens Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft, being Lot
No. 217 of the Subdivision known as Pinewood Gardens, the
said subdivision situated in the Southern District of New
Providence Bahamas. Located on this property is a structure
comprising of an approximately 20 yr old single family residence
consisting of 992 sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-
bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, kitchen, drive
way and walk way. The land is on a grade and level and
appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility
of flooding. The grounds are fairly kept and yard is open.

Appraisal: $127,988.00

Traveling south on East Street to the junction of Soldier Road, make a left at the light then turn right into Kennedy
Subdivision, go all the way to T-junction, turn right then first left then right again toward Mount Tabor Church building,
after passing Mount Tabor take first left (sapodilla blvd), the subject house is about 400 yards on the right painted yellow
trimmed green, with green and white door.

LOT NO. #7, BOILING HOLE SUBDIVISION

All that piece parcel or lot of land and inprovements situated

on the Island of Eleuthera, North of Governor’s Harbour,

comprising of Lot No. 7 in the Boiling Hole Subdivision and

comprising of approximately 10,000 sq. ft., this site

encompasses a 17 years old duplex with each unit consisting

| of 2-bedrooms; 1 bathroom, frontroom, diningroom and kitchen

with a gross floor area of approximately 1,474.20 sq. ft. and

covered porch area of approximately 164.70 sq. ft. this duplex

was built in accordance with the plan and specification as

approved, and at a standard that was aecepnls to the Ministry Of Public Works. This structure is in good condition.
Each apartment could be rented at $800.00 per month. The land is landscaped and planted with ficus trees, but

needs some manicuring.
APPRAISAL: $138,989.00

Exuma Lot No. 7720A, Bahama Sound # 11

| All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of
approximately 10,000 sq ft, being lot 7720a, situated in a
registered subdivision known as Bahama Sound of Exuma
Section 11. Situated on this property is a 9 yrs old single
storey residence consisting of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms,
livingroom, diningroom & kitchen, with approximately 1,563
sq. ft. of enclosed living space. The building is structurally
sound & is generally in good condition. The lot is rectangular
in shape. No adverse site conditions were noted

Appraisal: $185,636.50

Property located about 2 3/4 miles southeastwardly of the settlement of George Town. Painted pink trimmed white.

Lot No. 235 Twynam Heights Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 8,534 sq ft, being Lot
% | #235, of the subdivision known as Twynam Heights. The
. - » | said subdivision situated in the eastern district of New
EE = 7 = mes Providence. Located on this property is an approximately
6yr old single family residence consisting of approximately
1,826 sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-bedrooms, 3
-baths, living, dining, kitchen & carport. the land is on a
grade & level; & appears to be sufficiently elevated to
disallow the possibility of flooding. The grounds are fairly
kept, with improvments including walkway, driveway & front boundary wall.

Appraisal: $344,422.30

Traveling east on Prince Charles, turn right at Super Value Food Store, then 1st left to t-junction, turn left at
junction then right & the property will be the 6th on the left side of the road painted blue trimmed white.

e/a 19) a
March 26, 2009

WINTON MEADOWS (Lot No. 382)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having
an area of 8,300 sq. ft. being lot No. 382
situated in the subdivision known as Winton
Meadows, the said subdivision situated in
the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, Bahamas. This property is
comprised of a 24 year old single family
residence with an attached efficiency
(formerly the carport) consisting of
approximately 2,675 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area, front porch-198 sq. ft., back patio-380.
The building is a two storey house. Besides
the efficiency apartment, the house is comprised of 3-bedrooms, 3-bathrooms, inclusive of a master bedroom
suite upstairs. Foyer, front room, dining room, family room, powder room, utility room, breakfast nook and
kitchen downstairs. Climate control is provided by ducted central air conditioning, with air circulation
enhanced by ceiling fans and other amenities. Quality of construction: Average. Standard of maintenance:
Average. Effective age: seven years (7) the land is on flat terrain; however the site appears to be sufficiently
elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding under normal weather condition, including annual heavy
rainy periods. The grounds are well kept, with improvements including neatly maintained lawns with flowering
trees, and a concrete garden/storage shed, which is located in the backyard. The yard is enclosed along the
sides with chain-link fencing, and concrete block walls that are topped with metal railings, and metal gates
at the front and back.

APPRAISAL: $343,072.50

Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive, pass the streetlight at Fox Hill Road until you get to Meadows
Boulevard, turn right onto Meadows Boulevard, go south and take the 4th left, then Ist right. The subject
house is the 2nd house on the left side painted beige trimmed white.

Crown Allotment 67, Murphy Town Abaco

All that parcel of land having an approximate area of 9,300
sq ft, being lot #67a, a portion of the murphy town crown
allotment # 67. Located on this property is a single storey
wooden residence with a total living area of approximately
1,850 sq, ft & consisting of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms,
living/dining kitchen 2-car garage & covered porch. Additional
floor space is available within roof dormers. Exterior walls
are of wood overlain with hardi board siding or concrete
duraboard siding. interior walls are of gypsum wallboard
siding. Construction demonstrates above average quality
workmanship however minor aesthetic improvement is still
needed. Landscaping has commenced, but not yet completed. The property is level with no immediate flooding
danger. All major utilities are within 100ft of the subject site.

Appraisal: $241,200.00
This proerty is situated off Bay Street Drive, Murphy Town.

VACANT PROPERTY

Lot No. 45, South Westridge Subdivision

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land having an area of 41,490 sq, ft being lot #45 of the subdivision
known as south Westridge, the said subdivision situated in the western district of New Providence Bahamas.
This property is zonned single family/residential area. The land is slightly elevated & appears to be sufficiently
elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.

Appraisal: $342,292.00

Travelling west on JFK turn left into South Westridge (pink wall), travel to the 2nd corner left & turn left at the
tjunction. The subject property will be about the 3rd on the left side of the road.

For conditions of sale and other information contact 326-1771 ¢ Fax 356-3851

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

MANAGER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

One of our major clients seeks to recruit a qualified information technology professional
with experience in financial and customer service applications for the above position.

QUALIFICATIONS:

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

* Masters of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

* Eight or more years experience including hands-on technical experience and
two years minimum managing an information technology department in a large
organization with a complex, multi-vendor, multi-platform and distributed
computing environment
Visionary who can analyze problems within the context of corporate strategy,
balancing the consideration of facts, priorities, resources, constraints and
alternatives

RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Lead, monitor and develop a team of information technology professionals to
deliver customer focused service and set performance expectations to achieve
excellence
Manage the development, implementation and day-to-day operations of the
Information Technology department
Actively contribute to the tactical and strategic development of information
technology to support the organization’s business needs
Accountable for the successful delivery to agreed time scales and within budget of
departmental projects or programmes
Assist accounting and engineering departments in ensuring accurate and timely
preparation of reports

REQUIREMENTS:

* This is a senior position that will require a professional with very extensive
experience in supervising and controlling computer professionals in financial,
customer services and engineering applications.

Strong management and communications skills

Strong technical and troubleshooting skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure

Solid understanding of business operations and strategic planning

COMPENSATION:
Attractive salary and other benefits will be commensurate with training and experience.

Written applications should be addressed to:

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: IT MANAGER 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Private & Confidential

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

PROCUREMENT FOR SCHOOL
FURNITURE FOR NEW SCHOOLS &
REPLACEMENTS 2009-2010

The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’”) now invites
sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement of School Furniture
for New Schools and Replacements.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from the
Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education, Headquarters,
Thompson Blvd. from Wednesday 18 th March, 2009, and obtain further
information, at the second address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
bided on (“School Furniture-New Schools & Replacements”).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address,
or before Monday, 6 th April, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not
be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday 7 th April, 2009 at the first address below.

(1) The Chairman Tender
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education

P.O. Box N-3913/4

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tele: (242) 502-8571

The Ministry reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME CIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Funeral Service For

Davanand
“Dave”? McDonald
Edilall, 27

of Dunmore Avenue,
Chippingham and formerly of
Jumbey Street, Pinewood
Gardens, Nassau, The Bahamas,

| will be held at St. Gregory’s

_ | Anglican Church, Carmichael
| Road, Nassau, on Saturday, 28th

i March, 2009 at 2:00p.m.

Reverend Father Atma Budhu

assisted by Reverend Marie

Roach will officiate and
interment will follow in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F. Kennedy
Drive, Nassau.

He is survived by his parents: Kemraj “Allan” and Gwendolyn Edilall;
one (1) sister: Priadashni “Pria” Edilall; two (2) brothers: Keiran and
Kristen Edilall; grandparents: Herman and Viola Burrows of Long Island
and Kimranie Edilall of New York; two (2) sisters-in-law: Junise and
Shericka Edilall; four (4) aunts: Miriam Procter, Marjorie Archer, Nadira
Jafar and Patrina Edilall both of New York; three (3) uncles: Rajesh
Edilall, Praim Jafar of New York and Robert Archer; two (2) nieces:
Kemren and Kaylen Edilall; one (1) nephew: Kemraj Edilall; Special
Friend: Kaisha Hanchell; numerous cousins: Keisha and Kenneth McPhee,
Anya and Ricardo Gomez, Melanie and Stephen Johnson, Ariana and
Ryan Jafar, Ashley and Brandon Edilall, Vijay Punwasi, Kenisha and
Kenneth McPhee Jr., Ricardo Gomez Jr., and Jaylin Johnson; three (3)
grandaunts: Dora Turnquest, Lucrusha and Ethlyn Burrows; one (1)
granduncle: Virginus Burrows; Godparents: Deslie Miller, Virginia
Woodside and Prescott Burrows; other relatives including: Janet Minnis,
Larone Russell, Shawn and Bianca Minnis, Angie Punwasi and Family,
Prince and Ethlyn Turnquest and Family, Carol and Durell Shearer and
Family, Morgan and Ruth Turnquest and Family, Peter and Ellamae
Turnquest and Family, Kendal and Noel Turnquest, Gloria and Monsell
Turnquest and Family, Henry Burrows Jr. and Family, Alistair Burrows,
Alice Missick, Della Mack, John Smith and Nellena Burrows; Denise
Gordon and Family, Arlene Smith and Family, Idamae Farrington and
Family, Patricia Archer, Dr. Earle and Melanie Farrington, Rev. Dr. Colin
and Marjorie Archer, Albert and Alexandra Archer and Family, Donald
and Deborah Archer and Family, Danny and Catherine Persaud and
Family, Rohan and Bernadette Metholall, Tony and Regina Mohabir and
family, Fr. Atma and Lavinia Budhu and Family, and the St. Gregory’s
Anglican Church Family; close friends: Wellington McIntosh, Robin
Fowler, Duan Cole, Rupert Mackey, Roderick Mackey, Harry McKinney,
Dereck Taylor, Leslie Miller, Thia Bethel, Amanda Smith, Denardo
Coverly, Staff of Platos, Staff of Atlantis, Prince Williams High School-
Class of ‘97 and ‘99, The Butler’s Service Family, Imperial Club Family,
The Chippingham Family, The Pinewood Family, The Long Island and
Black Point Exuma Family, and many others too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp’s Funeral Home Limited, 22
Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, on Friday from 10:00a.m. to 7:00p.m and
on Saturday from 10:00a.m. to 12:00 noon and at the church from
1:00p.m. until service time.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Mr. Samuel Knowles Jr.
and the family of the late

MRS. VALERIE
DAVIS-KNOWLES

wish to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to
all those who called, visited, prayed, offered words of
comfort, sent cards, floral arrangements/wreaths, food,
drinks, or assisted in any way during Val’s illness and
her death.

Special thanks to Bishop Delton Fernander and the
members of New Destiny Baptist Cathedral, Butler’s
Funeral Home, Dr. Ricky Davis and family, Dr. Theodore
Turnquest and staff, Dr. Beverton R. Moxey, Dr.
Farquharson, Dr. Johnson, Frank Hanna and staff, Ms.
Geneva McIntosh and family, Ms. Joanne Pinder, Mrs.
Melony Woodside, SB Fashion, Mrs. Janet Farrington
and family, Mr. Phillip ‘Brave’ Davis, Mr. Alfred Sears,
staff of Woodlawn Gardens.

A very, very, special thanks to Ms. Ursula Dean for
putting everything together.

~ Ney God bless you all.~


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 3
2% In Loving Memory
wi eh, = >






a “ — re F
: JA obert Roderick Turnquest
= 1927-1999

Today marks ten years since you left us
With much wise counsel

| Simple yet poignant s Fig)

C9 Time eases pain

| Ete, We remember you with love. PEP.

(Dc ; The Family CS ‘Se Oy.




PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Se Lo Ung MW mca oY

Matriarch Angela Major McSweeney
Sunrise September 1st, 1928
Sunset March 26th 2006

God saw you were getting tired
And a cure was not to be,
So he put his arms around you
And whispered, * Come to me"
it has been three years now
Silent tears still flow
No one would ever know
How much | miss you so

The tamily of the late SANDRA COLLETTE “PEACHIE" MCSWEENEY

THOMPSON wishes to. csxpress our, sincere thanks and appreciation to all

those who called, visited; prayed, offered words of comfort, sent cards,

If tears could build a stairway. floral arrangaments during her illnass. and racent daath.
And memories a lane

I'd walk right up to Heaven and
Bring you home again

No farewell words were spoken

You were gone before we know it
And only God knows.

Special thanks goes to the staff of the Female Medical Ward 1, and
especially the professional, dedicated and caring doctors and nurses of the
Intensive Gare Unit (ICU) Princess Margaret Hospital. Archdeacon E.
Etienne Bowleg, Fr Buck Johnson and Fr. John Kabiga and the entire
congregation of The Most Holy Trinfty Anglican Church; The staff of
Deparment of Physical Planning; Management and staff of CasaBlanca
Casing. Providenicales, Turks & Caicos: Managment and staff of Delta
Airline: Mrs: Hill and siaff of Cedar Crest Funéral Home; Hon. Tommy A.
Turngues!, Minister for National Security, MP for Mi. Moriah Constinwancy:
Pastor C. Alexander Willams 177 JP. Abundant Lite Ministries Intemational,
Providencales, Turks & Caicos and Ms. Maltise Rigby, Freeport Grand
Bahama

Precious memories would forever linger in the hearts of
her children, Carmell, Stephanie, Rudolph and Terrance,
grand children, great grand children, sister Alfreda
Butler, family members and friends.



MAY GOD BLESS YOU

Ynina Weonury| | | INLOVING MEMORY |
: a e AFRO Al ~ OF





ay TELEFAR LAURA BAIN

[ [ I | March 10, 1974 to March 29, 2008
E ‘Ls E N: UME S Vihar it means fo love you, you give us love in fullest measure, your
APRIL 28. 1913 - MARCH 25. 2008 care, Deviation and memories to treasure, your beautiful smile and

genie expressions of love, I brakes our hearts fo see you go but
mother you did not go alone for part of ws went wilh you. You are in
our thoughts everyday To some you may be forgotfen, but to
those whe have loved you, your mentary will forever fast.

A Mother's Love is like a Rose that never fades away.
Mother, We will see you again one sweet

; day on that Glad Re-union Day. Left to cherish her Memories, her children; Jennifer Bain, Herman
With fond and loving memories, children, Bain, Edison Bain, Monica Allen, Lerlene Carey, Enna Williams,
grandchildren, great grandchildren, Frances Johnson and Ruby Fowler; grand children; great grand

| & great great grandchildren children; great great grand children; sisters; nieces; nephews, The Zion
Baptist Church Family, East & Shirley St. and family and frends.

FAMILY AND FRIENDS To well loved to be forgotten.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 5

ee Ress 5 se oe

March16, 1979 - March 29, 2003

Six long empty years have gone
by, six years oe natow pain, A
loving, warm, and wonderful

son, brother, and friend. In the

short time that you were loaned

to us, you taught us so much and

touched the hearts of so many. |
never stop thinking of you, my

tears continue to dv | have to
believe that your destiny has

been fulfilled, and it was time to

go; no good-byes, no tomorrows,

only yesterdays

| Miss You
Love Mom

To some you may be forgotten,
to others a part of the past, But
to those of us who loved and lost
you, your mOry will always
ast.

Lovingly and deeply missed by
your mom Ann Bease. stepfather
Bob Bease, dad Michael Scott
brothers, Jamie and Conor, sister
Sasha, The Andrean Community,
Cable 12 staff and all those who
still hold you close to their
hearts.


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

DOUGLAS ERSKINE

19th Nov., 1930 - 31st Jan., 2009

We give God thanks for placing

so many wonderful people in our

lives. You have demonstrated your
care, compassion and love. Your prayers, words of
comfort, encouragement and support have helped us
to stay focused during these challenging times. We
appreciate everything that you have done for us. Words
are never sufficient to express our innermost feelings.
Please be assured that your involvement with us is
fully noted. For whatever you did to console our hearts,



we sincerely thank you. @ | |
% a a DEANDRE DION SAUNDERS
~ The Erskine Family ~ "ie ih " Sh ortman"
1987 - 2009

Time speeds on, one month has passed
Since death its gloom, its shadow, cast
Within our home, where all seemed bright,
And took from us a shinning light,

We miss that light, and ever will,

His vacant place there is none to fill.
Down here we mourn, but not in vain,
For up in heaven we will meet again.

The family of the Late Deandre Dion Saunders wish to
express their sincere thanks and ap, ation for all

have offered words of comfort, sympathetic
gestures, prayers, sent floral arrangements or wreaths,
visited our home and who have been so thoughtful and
caring during our time of bereavement. Special thanks
to Monsignor Preston Moss, Fr. Noel Clarke, Deacon
Raymond Forbes and the Faith Community of St
Anselm's Catholic Church, Management and Staff of
Vaughn O. Jones Memonal Center, Management and
Staff of Kerzner Intemational especially The Water
Features Department, Mr. Percy “Vola” Francis and the
Shell Saxons Superstars, the Fox Hill Congos and
Funtime Junkanoo Groups, The Francis Avenue
Family, the Hon. Fred Mitchell, Senator Dr. Jacinta
Higgs, Staff of the Attorney General's Office, the entire
Fox Hill Community, and the Doctors and Nurses of
ae and Emergency of the Princess Margaret

ospital.

i y z
" = a eee |


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Card of Thanks

Minister Richard Herman Munroe
1936 - 2009

Gratitude is not a human achievernent
Gratitude is a divine treasure
Granted to us
By the inner Pilot within us
The Absolute Supreme-author unknown

The family of the late Minister Richard Herman Munroe wishes
to express our profound thanks and appreciation to our relatives,
friends, co-workers and neighbors for all acts of kindness
shown. We gratefully ae knowled ge-- Bishop Delton Fernander
and the New Destiny Family especially- Reverends Clarence and
Tyrone Knowles and Alice Lockhart, Minister Ezra Dean,
Elders Mary Scott and Dorothy King and Deacon Stephan
Edgecombe, Father Atma Budhu and the 5t. Gregory's Anglican
Church Family especially Mrs. Shirley McDonald, Apostle
Raymond Wells and the Living Waters Church Family, Deacon
Neil Nairn & Family, The Honorable Desmond Bannister,
Minister of Youth & Sports, Most Worshipful Calvin Wallace
Grand master of the Most Worshipful Prince of Peace Grand
Lodge and Queen Bethesada Grand Chapter, The Commodore,
Officers and member of the Nassau Sailing Association, the
Commodere, Officers and members of the Bahamas Boat
Owners Association Mr. Bertram Knowles and the staff of
Caribbean World Trading, The Staff of the Ministry of
Education, especially the Supply Department, Mr. James
Wallace and the Staff of the Sailor's Choice Restaurant, the
Management and Staff of Colina General Insurance Company,
Mrs. Donella Bodie and the staff of the Department of Public
Service, Mrs. Mary Reckley and the Staff of First Caribbean
Bank, Thompson Boulevard= and Ms. Rendra Major, the Human
Resources Department of Atlantis Hotel, the Management and
Staff of Munroe's Landscaping, ‘The Management and Stat? of
Cedar Crest Funeral Home, Mrs. Michelle Dames and family,
Henry & Shirley Saunders, Rozalia Bowe, Orintha Nesbitt,
Laverne & Brenda Lockhart, Charles & Willamae Seortt, the
neighbors and friends of Crab Apple Road and Penny Bank
Community.

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 7

CARD OF THANKS

Our dear wife, mother, daugh-

ter, sister, frend and co-

worker, gone but not forgot:

ten. Your legacy lives on

forever in our hearts. Sleep

“an "Percis" and take your rest
until we meet again.

When" 9 Wu
“When i must leave Pte
For a lithe while
Please do not grieve
And shed wild tears
And hug your sorrow to you
Through the years,

But start out bravely
With a gallant smile:
And for my sake
And in my name
Live on and do
All things the same,
One empty days,

But fill each waking hour
In useful ways,
Reach out your hand
In comfort and in cheer
And | in turn will comfort you
And old you near;
And never, never
Be afraid to die,

For | am waiting for you in the sky,

Helen Steinar Ace
We the family, of the laie Percis Cambridge would like 19 extend hearttalt thanks
to all those persons who have shown act of Kindness or shared words of comtart
during our time of bereavement,

Special thanks to; The Golden Gates Church of Christ Family, The Independance
Drive Church of God Family Gospel Truth Tabernacle Church of God Inc, Family
Administrators and Staff at the Princess Margaret Hospital, The Staff of the Private
Medical Ward The Bamboo Town Family New Bight and Hatchet Bay Communities
Staff at The Continuing Education Department, C.0.6, Staff at the Ministry of
Agnculture and Marine Resources Staff at ZNS and Jones Communication The
Maintenance department of the Royal Bahamas Police Force Staff of the
Physician Alliance Ltd and all her dear friends and patients whose lives she have
touch over the years,
Please know that we are forever grateful and may the
blessings of God be with you.


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Vaughn O. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”

JUDITH DIANN
RODGERS, 51

of #17 Seagrape Avenue, Seabreeze
Estates, will be held on Saturday, March :
28th, 2009 at 1lam, at Pilgrim Baptist :
Temple, St. James Road. Officiating :
will be Bishop E. Randy Fraser, assisted }
by other Ministers of the gosepl. :
Interment will follow in Woodlawn :

Gardens, Soldier Road.

Precious memories will forever linger

in the hearts of her beloved mother, |
Dot A. Rodgers; eight brothers, Leo, Sidney, Terrance, Don, Michael, :
Roy, Audley and Bernard Rodgers; ten sisters, Jacqueline Davis of :
New York, Ginger Grant of New Jersey, Gillian Rodgers, Gina |
Lightbourne, Min. Lindell Johnson, Teresta-Harrison, Debra Davis, |
Brenda White, Audrey of Miami and Patrice Rodgers; fifty-one nephews, :
Alfred Jr., Sidney Sean and Stephen Davis York, Burton Lawrence, |
Leo Jr., Letravino, Leron Leandrew, Juan, Tawari, Ron, Elder Lawrence, !

: law, Tara; great grandchildren, Patrick II, Tafarl, Nyah and Kami;

Kriston, Kahlin, Sean Gerrod, Jamal, Justin, Don, Darren and Zavion : brothers, Garneth, William and Hayward; sisters, Romilda of Orlando,

Rodgers, Maurice and Demitrie Grant of New Jersey, Mickell, Clint, : Florida, Hortense, Iris of West End, Grand Bahama and Ulease; sisters-

Anwar, Doncolleon, Darrio, Rasheim Rodgers, Anthony, Anwar and : in-law, Rowena, Mary, Vera, Amelia and Sheba; brother-in-law, Albert

Antwuan Lightbourne, Garth, Arton and Unchea Harrisons, Remado, : Hall; nephews, Loran, Oral, Derek, Edwin, Howard, Gary, Q. of

Garvin, Ricardo, Marvin and Lashon Rodgers, Roy, Jeremy, Renard | Freeport, Paul, Raymond, Hubert, Dennis, Kenneth, Kirkwood, Jeffery,

and Dion White, Ivory Johnson, Terrance and Leevan Archer, Trevor : Tyrone of Opa-Locka, Florida, Goldenboy of Detroit, Michael, Johnny,

Edgecombe, Kirk Young, Nelson Barret, Roskeino Neely and Neil : Robert, David, Alphonso, Franz, Charles and Sean; nieces, Agatha,

Andrews, Shamon Rodgers Edgecombe; thirty-one nieces, Antonia ! )arilyn. Cheryl. Sheila. D S ‘
: : : yn, Cheryl, Sheila, Dawn, Suzette, Shandell, Audrey, Judy, Sylvia,
and Anthonice Lightbourne, Monea, Breja, Wendy, Vernell and Ursula : Patrice, Vanessa of Orlando, Florida, Yvette, Geraldine, Leeann, Sandra,

Rodgers, Lecheryl Barret, Leona Young, Levonne Neely, Lashone :} pamela, Rena, Fern, Kim, Judy, Rosie, Diane, Christine, Barbara, and

Terrel, Dawn and Amorie Rodgers, Gale Andrews, Tanya, Nedra, Linda, : ] eshan; numerous relatives and friends including, Rev. Fr. James

Sheryl, Shareelle, Ineisy, Arlene, Claienestic, Jennifer and Rekia : Moultrie, Oscar and Mary Jessie of Miami, Florida, the Greene family,

Rodgers, Shanika and Renette White, Lynresha and Ivernique Johnson, } the Burrows family, Fernando Knowles and family, Drexel Rahming

Sharon Harrison, Eve Arhcer and Stacy (Laurice Bernard); eight aunts, + ang family, Hubert Rahming, the Deah family, Dr. Sears and family,

Deloris Sherman, Patricia Jervis, Eleanor Elliot, Roslyn Johnson, Anita the Walkine family, Bishop Cannel Swain and family, Mae Davis and

Cooper, Leah Moss, Gertrude Rodgers and Evelyn Hepburn; four ! family, Dirk Simmons and family, George Duncanson, Noel Allen,

uncles, Gerth Knowles, Brooks Sherman, Robert Elliot and Paul Cooper : Brenda Duvalier, St. Margaret's Church family, Doctors and Nursing

and a host of other relatives and friends including, Rev. Carol and | graff at Princess Margaret Hospital.

Helen Johnson, George and Carolyn Rodgers, Sheila Albury, Sonja :
and Sidnell Cox, Karen Albury, Anthony Lightbourn, the Nassau Vilage ; Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O. Jones Memorial

Community, Sophia, the Munnings family, Kim, Dorothy Johnson, + Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street on Tuesday from 9:00 a.m. to

Dorothy Clarke, Charles, Leo, Sam, George and Stanley Rodgers, Ellen : 9.99 p.m. and at the church on Tuesday from 3:00 p.m. to service time.

Forebs, Lorena Rolle, Marsha Fox, Judy Bastian, Kenneth and Sandra :

Fox and the Seabreeze family.

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O. Jones Memorial
* Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm
: and at the churchon Saturday from 10am to service time.

MRS. EDNA M.
GREENE, 80

of #11 Lucien Road, Pyfrom Addition
and formerly of Deals, Long Island will
be held on Tuesday, March 31, 2009 at
4:00 p.m. at St. Margaret's Anglican
Church, Kemp Road. Officiating will
be Rev. Fr. Joseph Mycklewhyte and
Rev. Angela Palacious. Cremation will
follow.

Left to cherish her memories are her
grandson, Patrick; grand daughter-in-

Wulff Road and Primrose Street,
Cpposite Studio of Draperies
Telephone: 326-9800/1 ¢ 24 Hour Emergency 434-9220/380-8077


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009, PAGE 9

f
MCSE? 3

FUNERAL DIRECTORS"
“Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless of financial condition.”

7th Terrace, Collins Avenue * (242) 356-2187 *
P.O. Box GT-2679 * Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

GODFREY TAMAR
MURPHY, 16

of #4 Bird Road, will be held on Saturday, |
March 28th, 2009 at 10am at Christ |
Community Church, Bellot Road. |
Officiating will be Dr. Deanza |
Cunningham and Pastor Ellison |
Greenslade. Interment will be made in |
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F. |

Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish his memories are his father, |
Godfrey Murphy II; mother, Tiffany |

McPhee; adopted parents, Ian and Clarice |
Clarke; grandparents, Patrick and Laverne McPhee, Godfrey and Louise |
Murphy; adopted grandparents, Maurice and Hestermae Clarke; great |
grandparents, Beverley Smith and Lillian Saunders; sisters, Tanaz Scott, |
Tarell McPhee, Kian Clarke, Nikisha and Godneka Murphy; brothers, |
Kwanzaa and Koa Clarke, Tarez Scott, Savion McPhee, Travis and Roberto |
Murphy; niece, Zarria Murphy; aunts, Alexandria McPhee, Sabrina Clarke, |
Nakeesha Turnquest, Sisco Smith, Erica Walford, Karla Hield, Claudine |
Collie, Samantha Hamilton; uncles, Kevin, Patrick Jr., Marco and Owen |
McPhee, Maurice, Silbert and Billy Clarke, Raymond Rahming, Don and |
Marlon Murphy; grand aunts, Eugenia Thurston, Edna Roker, Bernadette |
Rolle, Stephanie Edwards, Andrea Francis, Paulette Godet, Charlotte and |
Venus Carey, Sarah Sturrup, Clarice Cartwright, Marion and Lisa Saunders, |
Grace Douglas, Harriot Butterfield, Brenda Romer, Idamae Brown, Gracelyn |
Ferguson, Merl Smith, Enid Burnside, Gretel Mather, Ethelyn Hield, |
Pandora Miller, Francita Gibson, Barbara Maxine, Carmen Smith, Judy |
Prosper; grand uncles, Bradley Russell, Henry Thurston, Charles, Edwin, |
Dwight, Derek and Deno Pratt, Robert, Ted and Derick Saunders, Bursil |
Duvalier, Clifton Cartwright, Andrew Sturrup, Derick Edwards, Jeffery |
Francis, Marco Godet, Rudolph Cornish and Henson Prosper; godparents, |
Tony and Marvin Missick, Tyrone Stuart; numerous cousins including, |
Dericka Nottage, Indira Newbold, Lynn Brown, Jessica and Janae Francis, |
N'aila Hamilton, Dorlan, D'Rian and Daniel Collie, Krystal and Kendra |
Carey; numerous other relatives and friends including, Christ Community |
Church, Bible Truth Ministry, Cousin McPhee Cathedral, The Saunders, |
Carey, Collie and Thurston families, Mrs Pearl Strachan and family, Gwenith |
Smith and family, Cleveland Stuart and family, Eulease Smith and family, |
Rebecca Bethel, Rev. Leon Burrows and family, Spurgeon Lightbourne |
and family, Miss Betty Bowe and family, Nola Stuart and family, Mr. Val :
Butler and family, Nola Jolly and family, Elsie Roker and family, Milton |
Russell and family, Rev. Ruth Saunders and family, Livingston Barr and |
family, Gwendolyn Smith and family, Sabrina Saunders and family, Ruth |
Evans and family, Patrick Smith and family of Freeport, Bahamas, Principal |
staff and students of High School and the graduating class of 2010, The |
Stapledon School family, C.C.C. Youth J.A.M., the Sunset Park Community, |

the Market Street and West End Ave. family and many many others too
numerous to mention.

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at Ferguson's Funeral
Directors, 7th Terrace Collins Avenue on Thursday from 10am to 5pm and
at the church on Saturday from 9am until service time.

MARK WALNER
DANIELS, 34

of Augusta Street will be held on
Saturday, March 28, 2009 at 10:45 a.m.
at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Boyd
Road. Officiating will be Deacon Gregory
Taylor. Interment will be made in The
Catholic Cemetery, Tyler Street.

Left to cherish his memories are parents,
Beryl Marshall and Walner Daniels;
children, Marquell, Mark Jr., Marcus,
Lamar and Omar Daniels; sisters, Theresa
Knowles, Anna Sands, Ruth and Naomi
Smith, Mary, Florence, Malvese, Wilmane,
Monique and Carly Daniels; brothers, Alaxander Symonette, Jeremiah
Stubbs, Joseph, Waldeck, Walnerson and Jean Daniels; nieces, Alexandra,
Stanique, Rickiesha, Shanae, Jereniqua, Candiesha, Tamara, Tatyanna,
Rickera, Raven, Antwonae, Giavantae, Mary and Tatyanna; nephews,
Deangelo, Ricardo Jr., Jerethor, Antwon, Perry Jr., Giovanni, Jeremiah Jr.,
and Ricnardo; grand nephew, Teco; aunt, Lena Williams; uncle, William
Daniels, brothers-in-law, Ricardo Sr., Jeremy, Antwon and Perry Sr.; cousins,
Danina, Valnetta, Kettly, David, Willy, Ricardo, Erica, Shacara, Erick,
Wilna, Rysler, Jade, Kendall Marshall, Rayanna, Davan and Johnny Smith;
numerous other family and friends including, The Black, Cole, Johnson,
Grant, Ward, Coleby, Christie, Miller, Dillet, Bodie, Clark, Saunders, Lamb
and Hart families, Olive, Nicole, Sherry, Adrianna Gibson and family,
Eleanor Maynard and family, Rev. Dr. C.B. Moss and family, Rt. Hon. Dr.
Bernard Nottage and family, Derrick and Rodney Neymour, Ruth Minus
and family, Ken Lightbourne and family, Latoya, Lynden, Lavern and
family, Freddie, Dianne Evans, Wanda, Sandra, Mildred Brown, Lean and
their families, Derrick Cummings and family, Kenrick Delaney and family,
Christine Edmund and family, the communities of Bain Town, Kemp Road
and Nassau Village, the staff of City Market Ltd., the staff of Ministry of
Education, staff of Yellow Elder Primary School, staff of The Cove & Reef
Engineering Department. Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Sands, Mrs Clarice Ranger
and Mr. & Mrs Val Bethel.

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at Ferguson's Funeral
Directors, 7th Terrace, Collins Avenue on Thursday from 10am to 5pm and
at the church on Saturday from 9:45am until service time.


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Michelle Lorraine Douglas, 50:

: Betty Tulloch & family, The Teachers & Students of Kingsway Academy
i Grade 11, The Laboratory Departments of the Princess Margaret & Doctor's

of Sandford Drive will be held on Saturday | Hospitals, Drs. Turnquest & Curling, Oncology Consultants Ltd., Dr.

March 28th, at 10:00 a.m. at Church of | Margo Munroe, The Nurses of the Eye Wing of Princess Margaret Hospital,
; : the family & friends of the Church of God of Prophecy Carmichael Road,
Paulette Johnson and Bishop Hartman L. | the Churches of God of Prophecy, Baillou Hill Road, East Street, Minnie
: s L i Street & Wulff Road, New Providence, The Church of God of Prophecy,
in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F. ? Coral Road, Freeport, The Hepburn, Roker, Burrows & Cox families of
! Coconut Grove, the Cancer Society of the Bah