Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

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Volume: 105 No.102

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Global United

Justice Lyons
under fire
over handling
of court case

A SENIOR Supreme Court
judge’s conduct has been ques-
tioned over his handling of a con-
tentious court case that is now
being heard by another senior
judge.

In a written judgment handed
down by Senior Justice Anita
Allen yesterday, Justice John
Lyons was accused of sharing
“more than a friendship” with the
sister of Daniel Ferguson, an
accountant Justice Lyons had
appointed to make a report in a
case he was hearing up to Septem-
ber last year.

Mr Ferguson’s sister also assist-
ed her brother with preparing doc-



uments for the case, said Justice
Allen as she decided whether to
recuse herself from hearing the
matter “on the ground of apparent
bias.”

SEE page 12
Minister wants higher ‘likely to return’ figures

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE 81 per cent of visitors to the Bahamas in 2007 believing they
were “likely” to return to the country again within the next five years,
Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool Wallace yesterday said this figure
is “nowhere near where it needs to be.”

In the 2007 Exit Survey report compiled by the Ministry of Tourism —

SEE page 12

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Never start your

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remember the smart choice is
Insurance Management.
Smart people you can trust.

i

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

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Hew Providena | Graed Patong | Abate «= eather =| Exum

HQ) se pus: ca sec etane [Re pe



DESPITE CONTINUED calls for residents to ss the Bahamas clean, some people are still not cand the
message. This heap of garbage at a roadside yesterday illustrates that some are continuing to use parts of
New Providence as a dumping ground.

aoe ATRL
Ambassatior expects
‘damaging’ Commission
mT as aC
Turks and Caicos

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

FORMER ~ Bahamian
Ambassador to CARICOM
Leonard Archer expects the
final Commission of Inquiry
report into claims of corrup-
tion in the Turks and Caicos
Islands to be more damaging
than interim findings.

However, he believes the
Bahamas and CARICOM
should mediate talks between
Britain and Turks and Caicos
to ensure that a proposed sus-
pension of democratic gover-
nance on the islands is as short
as possible.

Mr Archer, who held the
post from 1992 to 2008, sees

SEE page 12



i Bkaline Major/Tribune staff

No sign of
protesters on

Cove Beach

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PROTESTERS who threat-
ened to descend on Cove Beach
in front of the Atlantis resort to
put an end to “apartheid-like
restrictions” were nowhere to be
seen yesterday.

It is not known whether it was
the windy weather or a lack of
interest that inhibited the mas-
sive protest beach vendor Paul
Rolle and his supporter Jeffrey
Davis were hoping for, but as
choppy waters lapped the shore at
noon, there was not a protester in
sight.

Mr Rolle and Mr Davis had
published several public notices
inviting Bahamians to attend a
‘Big B-day bash’ at the beach
from 10am and told beachgoers
they would take them by boat to
the beach at the western end of
Paradise Island.

Mr Rolle told The Tribune he

SEE page 11

CEO blames

closure on
FNM politics

Former PLP candidate
makes ‘witch hunt’ claim

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

GLOBAL United CEO Jackson Ritchie blamed government
and the politics of the FNM for him having to close his business by
the end of the week.

In a press statement, Mr Ritchie, a former PLP candidate, said
that since this political persecution of his company began, he has
been forced to lay off more than 160 Bahamian staff. If this witch-
hunt continued, he said, he would have no other option but to bring
a discrimination lawsuit against the Minister of Finance, the Comp-
troller of Customs and the Public Treasury.

Mr Ritchie said he had made numerous attempts to personally
speak to or meet with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in his
capacity as Minister of Finance but all efforts were rebuffed.

As a former PLP candidate for Clifton in the 2007 general elec-
tion, Mr Ritchie said he is convinced that the objection of Mr
Ingraham’s government is not to recover outstanding taxes, but “to
destroy another PLP, no matter the cost.”

Up until 2007, Mr Ritchie said, Global United Limited (GUL)
was paying between $70 to $80 million a year into the public trea-
sury on behalf of various clients.

At any one time the company would be more than five to seven
per cent outstanding in its obligations to the government, which by

SEE page 12



THIS out-of-date medication was eee given to a patient.

Authorities: out-of-date medication
is not being administered to patients

DANGEROUS out-of-date
medication is not being adminis-
tered to diabetics patients at the
Elizabeth Estates Clinic pharmacy
health authorities have claimed in
response to an article in yester-
day’s Tribune.

The Ministry of Health and
Department of Public Health have
launched an investigation into the
assertion made by a diabetic
woman who said the pharmacy
gave her Humulin insulin with an
October 2007 expiration date on
February 2, and again on March
18 this year.

The mother-of-two, who has
had diabetes for 20 years, told The
Tribune she was unaware that the
medicine had expired when she

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took it in February and it caused
her blood sugar levels to rise,
inducing nausea, dizziness and leg
cramps.

Her blood sugar levels returned
to normal when she bought insulin
from another pharmacy.

However, when she returned
to Elizabeth Estates six weeks lat-
er to fill another prescription she
noticed the medication was out-
of-date, and realised the insulin
given to her in February was from
the same expired batch.

She said: “I could have slipped
into a coma and died.

“And I am sure there are other

SEE page 12

S

Marathon Mall ¢ 393-4155 « Mon-Fri 10am-8pm ® Sat 10am-9pm ¢ All major credit cards accepted. Sorry no debit cards accepted.



NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

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PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff













KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Death Notice For

DAVANAND |

Y Vee lS...
iat ; — ' = = y 7 :
J e .
LA A ui
"Dave" is =~
McDONALD MORE THAN 150 children from Winnebago High School from Illinois travelling on Carnival Sensation played a
in Rawson square yesterday.
EDILALL, 27 —
pe io







of Dunmore Avenuc,| Re
Chippingham and
formerly of Jumbey
Street, Pinewood
Gardens, Nassau, The
Bahamas died at the Princess Margaret Hospital,
Shirley Street, Nassau, on Sunday, 22nd March,
2009.

He is survived by his parents, Kemraj "Allan"
and Gwendolyn Edilall, his sister, Priadashni
"Pria" Edilall, brothers, Keiran and Kristen
Edilall, grandparents, Herman and Viola
Burrows and Kimraine Edilall, nieces, Kemren
and Kaylen Edilall, his nephew, Kemraj Edilall,
aunts, Miriam Proctor, Marjorie Archer and
Nadira Jafar, uncles, Rajesh Edilall, Praim Jafar
and Robert Archer, special friend, Kaisha
Hanchell, numerous cousins and many other
relatives and friends including, Junise and
Shericka Edilall.

Funeral service will be held at St. Gregory's
Anglican Church, Carmichael Road, Nassau,
on Saturday, 28th March, 2009 at 2:00p.m.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home

Mentaqu

eating ff f Htinguiihen! Pay

THE CARIBBEAN GOSPEL MUSIC

On Saturday, March 28", the Montagu Constituency Association M A RL | N
will host a celebratory dinner in honor of its past Members of
—AWARDS—
Parliament.

MARLIN AWARDS 2009

a mit’ ( SUNDAY MARCH 297) @ 7PM
bel : i . ' TT , pent The Diplomat Center Carmichael Road
i) , \ TICKETS:
hw. |

In aavance « a e voor ®

a $25 in ad $30 at the D VIP $40
Hosted by: Jamie Thomas (Tempo “Rise & Shine”)

Sir Geoffrey fohestone = Sir Kendalisaacs «=. Henry Bestwick «= Sir Cndlle Turnquest «Sir Willam Alen Brent Symonette DRESS CODE: Formal

TICKET OUTLETS:
e 100% Bible & Gift Shop (Marathon Mall & Madeira Street) ¢ Juke Box (Marathon Mall)
e Faith Life Book & Music Center (Carmichael Road) ¢ Bucks Gospel (Wulff Road)

From 1967 to 2007, the constituency has had a total of six Representatives. Not * The Christian Bookshop (Rosetta Street)
# Logos Book Store (Harbour Bay Shopping Center)

1967 - 1972 1972-1977 1977 -1982 1982 - 1957 1997-2002 = 2002 - 2007

only have these noble sons served Montagu with distinction, but have all gone on
to become nation builders of the highest caliber,

Montage Salute Trem!

Venue: Montagu Gardens, East Bay Street

Time: 7:30 pm

For further information on the event please contact the constituency : e
headquarters at (242) 393-0878 CREST momma nr gi

[Som

ESCA LDA KINGS BERIT Y



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Meeting of
police leaders
held in Grant
Bahama

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The
Bahamas hosted the Interna-
tional Association of Chiefs
of Police GACP) 2009 Com-
munity Policing Committee
for its mid-year meeting.

The two-day meeting was
held in Grand Bahama on
Friday.

The group was then hosted
to a farewell social at Taino
Beach on Saturday.

Chief Russell Laines, pres-
ident of IACP, attended the
meeting along with a number
of police leaders, professors
and representatives from
business communities
throughout the United
States, Canada and the
Bahamas.

Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson said the
meeting in Freeport is a
“true testament of the collec-
tive desire to develop crime
prevention strategies and to
build a global alliance to
wipe out the scourge of
crime and violence.”

He noted that community
policing is an important
strategy to combating crime.

“In policing, there is a
global shift occurring that
announces the necessity to
move into the community.

“While there are economic
pressures to move in this
direction, there are far better
reasons that must also be
considered,” Mr Ferguson
said.

Partnerships

Commissioner Ferguson
said that community policing
not only creates partner-
ships, but gives the public a
sense of safety.

“The Royal Bahamas
Police Force has recognised
for sometime that effective
policing will result when
partnerships are created with
the different sections of the
community,” he said.

He noted that the neigh-
bourhood policing pro-
gramme gives members of
the community a greater
voice in the way officers
police their areas.

“By all quantitative and
qualitative community polic-
ing measures, the RBPF
neighbourhood community
policing programme has
been a success.”

Mr Ferguson said that offi-
cers and citizens have seen a
positive change in attitudes,
which has facilitated commu-
nication and reduced citizen
complaints about police per-
sonnel.

The International Associa-
tion of Chiefs of Police is the
world's oldest and largest
non-profit membership
organisation of police execu-
tives, with over 20,000 mem-
bers in more than 89 differ-
ent countries.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
DOE LEAL
AO TeU
PP Teak
322-2197



DEPLORABLE!

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ACKLINS residents are con-
demning the “deplorable” state
of several long stretches of road
on the island that have cost
locals time, money and peace
of mind for over a decade.

Huge ditches and potholes in
the worn-down road leading
from Spring Point, Acklins,
where the airport is located, are
a major hazard and source of
frustration to drivers who are
constantly having to send off to
Nassau for new parts to repair
their damaged cars.

Meanwhile, the chronically
rundown state of the thorough-
fare also draws the attention of
visitors — many of whom come
to Acklins to go bonefishing —
as it is “the first thing they see
when they get to the airport”,
noted an employee of a local
fishing lodge.

A $3.4 million contract signed
in September 2006 to pave the
route, which residents say was
“scraped” in 1996 but never
repaved, was cancelled by the
FNM government after the May
2007 election.

Yesterday, a 36-year-old Snug
Corner resident said the road
works are still desperately need-
ed.

Illustrating her point, she
explained that she has to put
aside an hour to drive to the
airport — a trip which would
take 20 minutes or less if the
stretch of road were paved.

“You have to be really care-
ful, drive real slow. My car and
other people’s cars are low. If
your car miss and go in one of
those holes you ain’t got no car
left,” said the Snug Corner res-
ident.

Acklins residents say huge
ditches and potholes are a
major hazard on island roads



By AOI Avan (L011 86S

She added that just last week
a National Insurance Board
employee driving a jeep along
the road broke the axle after
falling into one of the many
deep drops.

“T want the prime minister to
drive on this road,” said the 36-
year-old.

The local bonefishing lodge
employee agreed.

“Tt ain’t playin’ bad — it bad!
If you’re pregnant and you use
that road you'll lose the baby!”
she declared.

Tourists

“Every time the tourists come
here they always wonder why
it is how it is; they ask ‘Well
who’s the MP for this area?’”

Residents say the issue is a
top priority for many on the
island — but despite the island’s
MP Alfred Gray being aware
of the condition of the road and
raising the matter in parliament,

nothing has been done.

The September 2006 contract
signed by former Minister of
Works Bradley Roberts cov-
ered the rebuilding of 26 miles
of road in southern Acklins,
covering the affected drive
between Sprint Point and Salina
Point.

However, the contract, signed
with New Providence-based
Caribbean Asphalt and local
Acklins contractors M and R
Road Builders, was cancelled
by the FNM when it won the
May, 2007, general election.

Former FNM Works Minis-
ter Earl Deveaux told parlia-
ment in late 2007 that the con-
tract was awarded without com-
petitive bidding and that, prior
to its cancellation, there was
concern over whether it would
be completed.

In February, 2008, Mr
Roberts claimed the contrac-
tors involved had taken legal
action against the government,
and were being represented by
MP for the area and attorney,
Mr Gray.

The Tribune tried to reach
Mr Gray yesterday but he was
said to be in court. A message
left at his office was not
returned up to press time.

Minister of Works Neko
Grant was in Cabinet. Messages
left for Mr Grant and his per-
manent secretary Colin Higgs
were also not returned up to
press time.



Introducing Crusoe,
the Rum Cay manatee

RUM Cay is now the tempo-
rary home of a surprise visitor —
a manatee which the locals
named "Crusoe" after fiction-
al castaway Robinson Crusoe.

The manatee was discovered
in the Rum Cay marina early
one afternoon last week. Dr
Dan Vernon was called to the
scene after a tear in the animal’s
tail was noticed.

When Dr Dan and Mrs Ver-
non arrived, the manatee was
so still that onlookers thought it
was dead.

Lettuce

Dr Dan sent for lettuce from
Last Chance grocery store, in
the hope that it might revive
the manatee, then dashed home
to call Sea World and the Uni-
versity of Florida’s marine biol-
ogy department.

Eventually, he was put in
touch with the Bahamas Marine
Mammal Research Organisa-
tion (BMMRO) in Nassau,
which informed him that the
most important thing was to
make sure the manatee drank
fresh water.

Concerned Rum Cay resi-
dents are still in contact with
the BMMRO and are hoping
they can persuade the organi-
sation to come rescue the ani-
mal. It is believed that it is an
Antillean Manatee and could
have come from Cuba, Florida
or Puerto Rico.








































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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Bahamians must know the truth

“A YOUNG nation cannot be founded on
myths and unthinking idolatry, it has to be based
on facts. All nations have to face this,” John
Marquis, managing editor of The Tribune for
the past 10 years told a radio audience as his
enemies counted the days for his departure.

Mr Marquis, creator of “Insight”, a weekly
Tribune column that examines the news behind
the news, has attracted a large circle of devoted
fans, at the same time mashing the sensitive
corns of many politicians, who blame the PLP
government for not revoking his work permit
and sending him packing when it had the oppor-
tunity.

Chaffing under the sharp pen of this hard-hit-
ting journalist, the question of whether free
speech is a privilege or a right came to a head
when Mr Marquis dared write the story of an
aging father who wanted to get the burden of his
son’s death off his chest. The father told Mr
Marquis that he was convinced that his son was
murdered during the drug era of the eighties
because he knew too much about the association
of the late prime minister Sir Lynden Pindling
with Colombian drug kingpin Carlos “Joe”
Lehder, who had hunkered down at Norman’s
Cay, turning it into his headquarters for the
transshipment of drugs to the US. Here Mr
Chauncey Tynes, Sr, himself a loyal PLP and
one time treasurer of the party, was directing his
rapier at the “Father of the Nation”, whose
reputation loyal PLP supporters have tried to
sanitise over the years, stopping just short of
canonising him.

There was no question that Mr Marquis
would take on the challenge. Nor was there
any question that he would leave any stone
unturned to try to discover the truth.

Mr Marquis, himself a man of the people,
readily admits that when he first arrived in the
Bahamas in the sixties at the age of 22 his nat-
ural sympathies were with the PLP. He wanted
them to succeed. He wanted Sir Lynden to suc-
ceed. However, he soon discovered that the
people’s leader was seriously flawed, and that
the society over which he ruled were too fright-
ened to challenge him.

On August 29, 1969, the late Sir Etienne
Dupuch, then publisher of this newspaper and
an early mentor of Mr Marquis, took the young
journalist to his Rotary Club to give his farewell
address to this “frightened society.” At the end
of his speech a Rotarian thanked Mr Marquis
for his fearless address, noted that he would be
leaving for good at the end of that year and
acknowledged that “when he goes this society
will suffer a great loss.”

Thirty years later Mr Marquis decided that he
wanted to end his journalistic career at The
Tribune — a newspaper in whose ethos and
philosophy of “being bound to swear to the
dogmas of no master” he admired. However, on















obcat

PA
ahamas

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his return he found that truth was still stumbling
in the public square and “honesty finds no place
there.” Again he took up the challenge and
encouraged a young group of Bahamian jour-
nalists to do the same. This time he will leave
behind him young men and women who will
ask questions, who will probe until they find
the Truth, who will demand a higher standard of
honesty and good government from their lead-
ers.

Today’s young Bahamians want to know the
truth of their past. They are tired of the pabu-
lum that they have been served from their birth.
When the PLP came to power on January 10,
1967 they seemed to think that the history of this
country started with them. They swept the past
aside and started to recreate their own story.
Nothing happened unless it started with them —
or that is how it seemed as their fable of “In the
beginning was the PLP and the PLP was with
Pindling and the PLP was Pindling” unfolded —
the rest of us, like the late Carlton Francis, were
cast into hell fire if we protested.

In his interview on the Jeff Lloyd radio pro-
gramme Tuesday, Mr Marquis acknowledged
that Sir Lynden in fact did much good for the
Bahamas for about 10 years up until the advent
of the drug era of the eighties. We also agree
that Sir Lynden Pindling is to be recognised,
especially for introducing majority rule.

However, four months after the PLP came to
power the older heads at The Tribune knew
that in the future there would be a another
dimension to the Pindling story.

In May 1967 The Miami Herald reported
that Pindling’s name was linked with an SEC
investigation when New York businessman
Lewis L Colasurdo, owner of Crescent, testified
that he met Mr Pindling in a Miami cocktail
lounge after he was elected Premier, and gave
him $127,000 in cash as interest payment on a $2
million loan from Six M’s of which Mr Pindling
was president.

Mr Pindling, as he then was, vehemently
denied the accusations, US officials were embar-
rassed to be seen attacking the leader of a new-
ly elected, popular black government, Colasur-
do quickly retracted his testimony, pleaded mis-
taken identity in a dark cocktail lounge where
the transaction was alleged to have taken place.
He said the money was given to a Venezuelan
by the name of Torres, not a Bahamian by the
name of Pindling.

The matter was quickly dropped. But for
The Tribune the first pattern had been stitched
into life’s quilt, and over the years we have fol-
lowed its winding, devious journey.

Today’s generation of Bahamians are entitled
to sift through historical facts for themselves.
They can then make their own judgment about
their country’s story without their elders breath-
ing down their neck with fairy tales.



Parents are
training their
daughters to
be prostitutes

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I attended the Junior High
School track and field meet on
Wednesday at Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium, which was well attended
by an enthusiastic bunch. But
apart from good participation
and high energy, there was one
thing that was a glaring and dis-
tasteful observation. We have
completely vacated the moral
high ground, we have aban-
doned the pride that was
instilled in us by our forefathers
and we have sold our daughters
on the altar of ignorance and
being fashionable. The old gate
post has been dug up and dis-
carded.

I was embarrassed for the
young girls who cannot be any
older than thirteen max. The

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



norm seemed to have been to
wear a blouse that would show
at least 70 per cent of their
breasts, all in clear view.

These vulnerable girls have
unwittingly been set up by their
parents to be vulgar, loose, and
void of self respect. This kind
of dressing only invites trouble,
because the young boy who
came from an equally slack
home will stop at nothing to
touch and feel a girl without her
permission.

But observing these children,
I quickly realised that the par-
ents could care less, because a
woman who has a mentality

akin to a prostitute could only
teach her daughter what she
knows and nothing more.

I cry shame on the parents
who purchased these disgusting
clothing, pretending to give
their children what they in fact
could not wear in front of their
parents in the past. But I guess
that is too old fashion.

This is not cute and only a
breathing ground for extreme
painful and embarrassing
results. The parents of those
girls will reap a whirlwind
because they sowed the wind.
There is time to correct this.

Parents should “catch them-
selves” and start dressing these
young girls like ladies.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
March, 2009.

Livingstone B Johnson — an example
to be followed by every generation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The phrase “a prophet is without honour in his
own country” certainly proves true in respect of
His Excellency Ambassador Livingstone B John-
son (deceased).

It is a terrible pity that we do not honour our
own. His Excellency’s life can and ought to be held
up as an example to be followed by this generation
and those to come.

He was born of humble beginnings in his beloved
island Exuma. Through hard work, discipline,
integrity and commitment to noble principles, he
rose to the highest heights nationally and interna-
tionally.

His Excellency was one of the quiet heroes of
Majority Rule. As well as running for Parliament, he
was the lawyer for the Civil Service Union, (now the
BCPOU) and served in the Senate.

He was an architect and interior designer of the
modern Bahamas. Many Bahamians were opposed
to Independence.

They felt that we could not represent ourselves
and they said so publicly, including in Parliament.
The newly independent nation needed men pre-
pared to represent the nation in international arenas.
At this time, His Excellency was a named partner in
a very well established and lucrative law firm (Isaacs,
Johnson and Co), which was then regarded as one of
the most successful law firms in The Bahamas. When
called upon, His Excellency again responded to
national service. At great personal sacrifice, he left

his law firm to serve as The Bahamas’ first Ambas-
sador to the United States of America, the United
Nations and the High Commissioner to Canada.
He was the first and only Bahamian to hold all of
those posts at the same time. He and his supportive
and charming wife, Charmaine, represented The
Bahamas with great distinction. Many internation-
al luminaries commented on his intellect, charm
and diplomacy. He is one of the reasons that the
transition to a respected sovereign independent
nation was so smooth.

Notwithstanding all of his tremendous success-
es, His Excellency remained a humble family man
and a gentleman in every sense of the word.

As one of his Godchildren, I can say that no one
could have had a better Godfather. He always found
time to encourage others.

Today we try to teach our children about hard
work, delayed gratification, kindness, gentleness,
excellence, patriotism, discipline, integrity, service
and other nation building attributes. We need only
to hold up the life and example of His Excellency
Ambassador Livingstone B Johnson.

The Bahamas owes him a tremendous debt of
gratitude. I thank his wife, Charmaine, and his sur-
viving children, Anita and Dianne for supporting
him while he served his country and thereafter.

May his soul rest in peace.

ALLYSON MAYNARD GIBSON
Nassau,
March 17, 2009.

Is it day, month, year — or month, day year?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have been wondering if
the management of the Royal
Bank think we live in Ameri-
ca, or in the world. It is the

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heritage of the Bahamas to
write the date in the interna-
tional form, but every time I
ask for new cheques I do not
know if it will be day month
year or month day year.

To follow American logic
they should say 7/24. I did
complain one time only to be
told by the printer that they
had been instructed to print
month day year, but lo and
behold next time, much to my
gratification, I received
cheques printed day month
year.

As you must have seen even
the mighty Americans print,
day month year, on their inter-
national forms. But it will not

worry me, when I receive my
cheques wrongly printed, I will
just put a line through month
day year and carry on the
international way.

Of course it would be much
easier if the Government offi-
cially endorsed the interna-
tional way, but that is asking a
bit much.

All computers coming into
the country should be so
adjusted, instead of silly little
faces coming up to tell you
don't know how to tell the
date.

WALTER EG GRATTAN
Nassau,
February, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

‘Highest honour’ for
Bahamian student

US High Court
rejects Cuban i
militant’s appeal :

m@ WASHINGTON

THE USS. Supreme
Court has turned down
Cuban militant Luis Posada
Carriles’ attempt to have
immigration fraud charges
thrown out because the
government used trickery
and deceit to build a case
against him, according to
Associated Press.

The justices, in an order
Monday, are letting stand a
ruling by the federal
appeals court in New
Orleans, Louisiana, that the
81-year-old anti-Castro mil-
itant should stand trial on
charges that he lied to fed-
eral authorities in his 2005
bid to become a U.S. citi-
zen.

Earlier, U.S. District
Judge Kathleen Cardone in
E] Paso, Texas, dismissed
the criminal charges
because the government
used the pretext of a natu-
ralization interview to build
the case against Posada.

The Cuban-born citizen
of Venezuela is wanted in
the South American coun-
try on charges that he
orchestrated the 1976
bombing of a Cuban jetlin-
er. He has denied any
wrongdoing.

Posada was arrested in
the United States on a civil
immigration violation in
May 2005 after sneaking
into the country from Mexi-
co about two months earli-
er. Posada, a former CIA
operative and U.S. Army
officer, has claimed that he
was brought across the bor-
der into Texas by a
smuggler, but federal
authorities have alleged
that he sailed from Mexico
to Florida.

Venezuela wants to
extradite Posada from the
United States so that he can
stand trial for the airliner
bombing.

He has been living freely
in Miami since 2007.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A TENTH generation Bahami-
an student has proved it is possible
to rise above the ranks by simply
doing what needs to be done, as
he will be bestowed the highest
honour at the 75th anniversary of
his former Naval academy next
week.

In just three years at the Admi-
ral Farragut Academy in St
Petersburg, Florida, William
Saunders III, or ‘AJ’, of High
Vista, Nassau, once a notorious
‘naughty boy’ at Xavier’s Lower
School, has made such great
accomplishments that he will be
named among the top students of
the prestigious military academy.

Bob and Jack Morris, 1951
graduates of the academy, nomi-
nated the young Bahamian for the
honour, not just because of his
outstanding achievements, but
because people liked him.

His nomination was approved
by the discerning Alumni Asso-
ciation and his name will be
engraved on a plaque and fixed
to the Admiral Farragut Capstan
among the academy’s finest grad-
uates.

AJ said the honour would nev-
er have been possible if he had
not been picked out by military
leader Captain Thomas McClle-
land from the mass of tenth grade,
bottom rank seamen to be a Mid-
dle School Officer in charge of
the sixth, seventh and eighth
graders in the dormitory and some
day line companies.

And AJ’s success spiraled from
there.

He worked his way up in the
Key and Lion's Clubs to become
president of both community ser-
vice organisations in his senior
year.

He captained the sailing, soc-
cer, and track and field teams, and
as his responsibilities snowballed,
AJ was awarded the position of
Battalion Adjutant (BA) and
became the third in command of
the school in his senior year.

His role as BA meant AJ was
head of all the school dormito-
ries, and played a leading cere-
monial role when the school
staged parades several times a
year.

But AJ remained cool under

William Saunders III set to graduate
from prestigious military academy

pressure, thrived on his commit-
ments and always enjoyed his
work.

So much so that he was
astounded to learn he had been
chosen for the highest school hon-
our.

“When I was there I was just
doing a job,” he said. “It’s not like
I was trying to get all this, I was
just doing what I needed to do.

“T was just following orders like
the simple soldier I am.”

But AJ’s work did not go with-
out reward, even during his time
at the academy.

Astronaut

He was privileged to meet
astronaut Charlie Duke, the 1953
Admiral Farragut graduate who
went on the Apollo 16 mission to
the moon in 1972, and donated a
chunk of moon rock to his for-
mer high school.

And at age 16 he piloted a
plane when former US presidents
Ronald Reagan and George Bush
Sr visited the school, as he had
obtained his pilot’s licence before
he could drive.

Proud parents William Saun-
ders Jr, known as 'BJ', and Susan
Saunders, are thrilled by their
son’s achievements since he left
Nassau to fulfil his dreams of
being a pilot in the armed forces.

Mr Saunders said he is particu-
larly grateful to June Hutchinson,
the Xavier’s Lower School coun-
sellor who encouraged AJ to be
good when he was coping with his
parents divorce, and getting into
trouble for setting up wrestling
matches between warring pupils
and charging young spectators for
tickets.

“She guided William along the
right path, gave him a lot of inspi-
ration when he thought divorces
were bad,” Mr Saunders said.

“If it wasn't for her foundation
he wouldn't be where he is.”

Upon graduation, AJ achieved
his boyhood dream — he won a
scholarship to the US Naval
Academy, a privilege for only
1,200 of the 80,000 annual appli-

Bahamians urged to
apply for e-Passport
ahead of summer rush

DEPUTY Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette is advising
Bahamians whose passports
are set to expire this year to
apply for the e-Passport now,
in an effort to avoid the tradi-
tional summer rush at the Pass-

port Office.

If your passport does not
expire this year it can still be
used for travel, even if you
have already applied for the
ePassport, Mr Symonette said.

Around 2,800 ePassports
were issued in February. Since
the system was implemented in
December 2007, an estimated
17,000 Bahamians have been

issued the ePassport.

Sein In

passports and visas are resis-
tant to fraudulent use, includ-
ing the use of lost or stolen
passports,” Mr Symonette said.

The passport is
upgraded from a simple paper
document to one containing
biometric information on facial
characteristics and fingerprints.
Each passport holder is
required to have a National
Insurance number.

In 1994, the Bahamas gov-
ernment began exploring the
process of upgrading passports
and other travel documents.
On December 22, 2006 the
government signed a contract
with
Greenville, South Carolina-

being

Indusa Global, a

cants from across the United
States, but in the end he decided
to turn it down so he can bring
his skills home.

He is now studying airport
management and aviation busi-
ness at Embry Riddle Aeronauti-
cal University and hopes to return
to the Bahamas to work in
tourism and transportation at the
airports and in the family busi-
ness, Majestic Tours.

Although it was tough, AJ says
his time at Admiral Farragut
Academy has given him a firm
foundation for life.

“It’s a great school, a great
place to learn and it teaches you
so many life lessons,” he said.

“It gets hard, especially if you
have a certain degree of rank,
because not only are you dealing
with your school work, but you
are dealing with the military side,
running a bunch of military activ-
ities, and I had sports on top of
that.

“Tf you don’t watch out it could
pile up on you, but if you do what
needs to be done it is fine.

“Tf I didn’t enjoy what I was
doing I would have slowed down,
but I loved what I did, I loved
helping people and making people
better and making myself better at
the same time.

“Tt was just a good time. It was
the best three years of my life. I
have no regrets about what I did
there, or going there, and I total-
ly encourage anybody to go.”

AJ is grateful to his roommate
Thomas Deetr, dormitory head
Calvin Brown, coach Nick Hillary,
and teacher Andrew Forrester for
helping him along the way.

He is looking forward to reunit-
ing with all of his former teachers
and classmates over a week of
anniversary celebrations, including
the unveiling of his name on a
plaque in the Capstan on April 3.

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“Due to the increased usage
of the ePassport, Bahamians are advised
to go in. We want Bahamians to check
their passports and if they are travelling in
June or July, to go and apply for the
ePassport and avoid the summer rush,”
Mr Symonette said.

He said the Passport Office will make
the necessary adjustment to accommodate
the expected high volume of applications
and process them in a timely manner.

Those whose passports expire after the
summer are advised to apply for the ePass-
port towards the end of the year.

As of January, 2009, passport offices in
Grand Bahama and Abaco began issuing
the ePassport through the Passport Office
in New Providence, which is the central
printing station for all Bahamian ePass-
ports.

Mr Symonette said the Consulate Gen-
eral’s Office in Miami is being expanded
to accommodate the volume of ePassport
applications there.

The International Civil Aviation Organ-
isation (ICAO), of which the Bahamas is a
member, mandated that all countries issue
machine readable passports by 2010.

The ePassport was officially launched
on December 5, 2007 in a move to increase
protection against identity theft, heighten
aviation security and combat illegal immi-
gration.

“The security of our identity and travel
documents is of paramount importance to
us. We must ensure, therefore, that our



based information technology
development and consulting firm, for an
estimated $12.7 million to provide four
systems to initiate the project.

The project included an ePassport
issuance system, a machine readable visa
system, an e-Identification issuance sys-
tem (smart cards for holders of work per-
mits, spousal permits, home owners
residence permits, permanent residence),
and a border control management
system.

“By this initiative, the Bahamas will be
ICAO compliant.

“We have had to and will undertake sev-
eral actions and activities to facilitate our
ePassport and machine readable visa ini-
tiative, and to ensure that our transition
occurs as smoothly as possible,” Mr
Symonette said.

In addition, a system for the generation
and management of digital security keys to
protect the data stored in the passports
and cards was also implemented.

The machine readable document pro-
ject is a joint initiative involving the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs, the Department of
Immigration (Ministry of National Secu-
rity), and the data processing unit of the
Ministry of Finance.

Mr Symonette is urging Bahamians to
keep their passports in a safe place. He
said everyone should photocopy the first
four pages of the document in case it is
one day lost or stolen, as this will help in
the issuance of a new passport.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Foundation launched to assist blind |7

and visually impaired children

THE Bahamas Foundation for
Blind and Visually Impaired Chil-
dren was officially launched last
week Thursday at the Salvation
Army Church on Mackey Street.

According to Barsha Smith,
president of BFBVIC and mother
of a blind son, the foundation seeks
to ensure that all blind or visually
impaired children in the Bahamas
have adequate access to medical,
financial, rehabilitative, psycho-
logical and educational resources.

“We will provide emotional sup-
port, being there to listen when a
parent wants to talk, supporting
that parent from the time the initial
diagnosis is given in the hospital
through to home visits.

“We will also focus on preven-
tion and early detection of vision
problems in children, educating
parents about their child’s physical
condition and treatment and will
work closely with the government,
the Ministry of Education and the
Salvation Army’s Erin Gilmour
School to ensure that assistive tools
and rehabilitation therapy are
readily available, accessible and
affordable to blind and visually
impaired children,” Mrs Smith
said.

The foundation’s projects will
include:

¢ A national registry for blind
and visually impaired children

¢ An educational newsletter for
parents

¢ Parent retreats and seminars

¢ On-call personnel and home
visits

¢ A resource unit to provide par-
enting information

¢ Braille books, toys and assis-
tive aids

The foundation also aims to
highlight the accomplishments of
blind and visually impaired chil-
dren through an annual awards
banquet.

Speaking at the launch, Minister
of State for Labour and Social
Development Loretta Butler-
Turner said World Health Organ-
isation statistics indicate that every
year the number of persons

FOUNDATION PRESIDENT Barsha S



Dominique Thompson

mith and Loretta Butler-Turner,
Minister of State for Labour and Social Development.

becoming blind increases by 1 to 2
million worldwide, however, 75
per cent of blindness is either treat-
able or preventable with early
intervention.

Noting that the Disability
Affairs Division also provides
adaptive aids and learning tech-
nologies for persons experiencing
vision loss, she congratulated BFB-
VIC on its formation and pledged
the government’s support through
the enactment of legislation that
will protect the rights of persons
with disabilities.

“The government is committed
not only to the provision of pre-
ventative health-care but also to

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ensuring equal access and full par-
ticipation in every aspect of our
society,” Mrs Butler-Turner said.

“Tam extremely pleased to
report that the special committee
comprised of key leaders of per-

sons with disabilities and officers of

the Disabilities Affairs Division
completed their recommendations
including those submitted by stake-
holders to the necessary changes to
the proposed disability legislation,”
she said.

However, she pointed out, it is
impossible to effectively provide
the necessary preventative pro-

grammes and services without :

proper statistical data.

“Realising the urgency of cor-
recting this deficiency, the Dis-
ability Affairs Division has initiat-
ed a nationwide registration drive

to develop a national registry of i

all persons with disabilities living in
the Bahamas. I understand that
the foundation will also endeav-

our to establish a national registry ;

for bind and visually impaired chil-
dren which I hope will be included
in our national registry,” Mrs But-
ler-Turner said.

Parents of blind and visually
impaired children can attend meet-
ings of the Bahamas Foundation
for Blind and Visually Impaired
Children (BFBVIC) at the Salva-
tion Army Adult Blind Workshop
on the third Thursday of every
month at 6pm.



THE CAT ISLAND team discusses rebuttal strategy at the 2008
National High School Debating Championships. The lone member
from that squad, Giovanno Bowe (2nd from left) will lead his team in
this year’s competition.

Cat Island and
Long Island set
for debating final

THE National High School Debating Championship
scheduled for Thursday, April 23, 2009 will feature Cat
Island contending with Long Island for debating suprema-
cy and the victory trophy.

Cat Island is also hoping to repeat as the champion, hav-
ing won last year against Doris Johnson Senior High
School.

In the semi-finals round, the Cat Island team defeated the
Eleuthera team while Long Island won over
Kingsway Academy, the only remaining team from New
Providence.

The topic for both semi-final competitions was “be it
resolved that enough effort has been made to educate soci-
ety on family values and the laws of society.”

The competition is a marquee event on most of the senior
schools’ calendars in both public and independent high
schools in New Providence, Grand Bahama and the Fami-
ly Islands.

Sixteen school teams participated in this year’s debate.

History

Eula Gaitor, chief training officer of student services in the
Ministry of Education and coordinator of the event, said this
is only the second time in the ten-year history of the debat-
ing championship that two Family Island teams have con-
tested in the final round.

The only other time that this feat was achieved was when
two Grand Bahama teams competed against each other in
the final round.

“This achievement shows that we have many competent
and intelligent students in all of our islands.

“It also shows the success of the quality of education
that our children are receiving because all of the teams
have done a tremendous job in debating their points of
view.

“The research and presentation of the speeches has been
first class and we are looking forward to a fiercely contest-
ed final round,” Ms Gaitor said.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Wilson City Power Station

Transmission Circuits
Wilson City, Abaco

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before

9th April, 2009

no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 701/09

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The Corporation reserves the right to

accept or reject any or all proposals.

For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact
Mr. Wayne Farquharson at telephone 302-1216.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 7





An indelible part of the
Sir Lynden Pindling legacy

Jest over 20 years ago, a
group of top British inves-

tigative journalists left their jobs at
the Sunday Times to piece togeth-
er the fantastic tale of the cocaine
trade in Colombia, the Bahamas
and Miami.

Their explosive 1988 book —
the Cocaine Wars — described
how Carlos Lehder, the Colom-
bian cartel's chief transporter, took
control of an island in the Exu-
mas "while the government of
Prime Minister Sir Lynden Pin-
dling did its best to help him feel at
home.”

The story goes back to the ear-
ly 1970s. Within a year of inde-
pendence, Bahamian police were
warning that drug trafficking was a
"serious problem," a US Senate
report noted, "and by 1979, that
problem was a crisis....both nar-
cotics smuggling and government
corruption grew at an extraordi-
nary rate."

One famous Miami-based traf-
ficker, nicknamed Kojak, told the
Senate investigation that he had
paid off Bahamian authorities
"from the lowest ranking officers
to the highest politicians.” In fact,
the chief of the Bahamas’ police
drug task force, ACP Howard
Smith, was on Kojak's regular pay-
roll, according to testimony. From
all of the evidence, said the 1984
Commission of Inquiry report into
drug smuggling, “we have con-
cluded on the balance of proba-
bilities that ACP Smith corruptly
accepted bribes from known drug
smugglers.”

"The security of this country is
being threatened by armed for-
eign criminals," a confidential
report noted in early 1979. "The
Bahamas is being deluged with
drugs."

And the plain fact is that all of
the evidence collected over the
years has identified two men —
both now dead — as chiefly
responsible for this unfortunate
state of affairs. They were Prime
Minister Sir Lynden Pindling and
his cigar-chomping crony, Everette
Bannister.

According to the authors of the
Cocaine Wars, "it is fair to assume
that they both felt they were owed
something by the Bahamas
because, when the time was right,
they pursued those schemes with
the rapaciousness of creditors out
to collect a debt long overdue."

As the book notes, "If in 1979
there was an incursion of armed
criminals, by 1980 it had become
an invasion."

A review of Sir Lynden's per-
sonal finances by the 1984 Com-
mission of Inquiry in Nassau found
that he had spent eight times his
reported total earnings from 1977
to 1984. According to the Inquiry:
"The prime minister and Lady
Pindling have received at least
$57.3 million in cash. Explanations
for some of these deposits were
given... but could not be verified."

Other investigations turned up
even more startling evidence. Wit-
nesses told of the “incalculable
millions of dollars taken and
received by every corrupt official
and politician in Everette Bannis-
ter's pocket—and by ‘the Man’,
the prime minister who always got
his share.”

Gorman Bannister, the son of
Pindling's longtime "consultant"
and bag man, was one of those
who helped the authors of the
Cocaine Wars write their story. He
also testified before a US Senate
subcommittee in 1987.

The sheer scale of corruption
was unprecedented. As former
PLP parliamentarian Edmund
Moxey said during the Commis-
sion of Inquiry, "Pindling and his
crew make the Bay Street Boys
look like schoolchildren." And a
report by the US State Depart-
ment concluded that the drug
trade accounted for at least 10 per
cent of the Bahamian economy,
including political payoffs, over-
heads and investments.

Everette Bannister had
returned to the Bahamas from the
US after the PLP won the 1967
general election. His influence
began to grow when fugitive
American financier Robert Vesco
moved to Nassau in 1972 and set
up a dummy bank to channel
bribes and payoffs to PLP bigwigs
so he could avoid extradition. Ban-
nister's connections proved helpful
in this regard.

Within a year the bank had
advanced $50 million in unsecured
loans that were never repaid, the
US Senate report said. And Ban-
nister had gained a reputation as
someone who could provide access
to the top for the right price.

Norman's Cay lies about 50
miles from Nassau, just outside
the boundaries of the Exuma Cays
Land and Sea Park. The island
was touted as a headquarters for
the park by the 1958 scientific sur-
vey that recommended the cre-
ation of the Bahamas National
Trust. It was a popular anchorage
for visiting yachts and was first
developed in the mid-1960s as a
small residential community with a

—_

f

C

clubhouse and marina.

According to Phil Kniskern, a
developer quoted in the 1991 book
Turning the Tide by Sidney Kirk-
patrick, "Norman's is special...Ten
minutes after landing you can be
bonefishing in the pond, or diving
on the reef. And it's only 19 min-
utes from Nassau and a little over
an hour from Miami."

In other words — an out of the
way yet strategic location. And in
1978 a Bahamian company called
International Dutch Resources
began buying up land there. IDR
was set up for Lehder by a regular
trust company in Nassau, which
managed his working capital. And
Kniskern, along with all the other
lawful residents, was eventually
forced to leave Norman's Cay.

By the end of 1979, the island
was home to Lehder's gangsters,
who drove ordinary visitors away
at gunpoint. Lehder built a large
hangar with cocaine storage fac-
ulties. A 3,300-foot runway was
protected by radar, bodyguards
and attack dogs for the fleet of
aircraft under his command.
Cocaine shipments from Colombia
arrived on the island every hour of
every day, and Lehder's personal
wealth mounted into the billions.

Witnesses at Lehder's 1988 tri-
alin the US said Pindling was paid
$88,000 on the 22nd of each month
to protect the Norman's Cay base,
and Everette Bannister collected
the money personally. Bannister
was later indicted in the US for
funneling bribes from drug smug-
glers to Bahamian officials. Here's
an excerpt from his son's Senate
testimony:

Senator Kerry. Did your father
warn Carlos Lehder of the police
raid on Norman's Cay?

Mr Bannister. Yes.

Senator Kerry. Do you want
to describe that?

Mr Bannister. Well, as I recall,
he just made a phone call to Car-
los letting him know, well, police
are going.

Senator Kerry. You heard the
phone call?

Mr Bannister. Oh, yes, yes, yes
yes ... I know my father did call
him one time and told him, "Lis-
ten, the police are going to raid
Norman's Cay on a certain day,
clean it up." And when they went
there, they didn't find...anything.

When opposition parliamen-
tarian, Norman Solomon, began
to complain to Bahamian and US
authorities about the situation, his
car was blown up. According to
Gorman, Lehder boasted that he
was behind the bombing and his
father, Everette, viewed Lender's
decision to bomb Solomon as
appropriate.

All this led to a 1982 meeting
between Vice President George
H W Bush, US Admiral Daniel
Murphy and Prime Minister Pin-
dling, at which the Norman's Cay
problem was raised. The Senate
report said the vice president
showed Pindling a computer print-
out of CIA surveillance of Nor-
man's Cay and told him the island
resembled O'Hare Airport
because of its activity.

Lehder also boasted to the
Colombian media about his
involvement in drug trafficking at
Norman's Cay and about his gift of
hundreds of thousands of dollars
to the ruling Progressive Liberal
Party in the Bahamas. So his oper-
ation could hardly have been con-
sidered secret. And it was certain-
ly known to Pindling.

This house of cards came crash-
ing down on September 5, 1983,
when NBC News exposed the
Norman's Cay scandal and direct-
ly implicated the Bahamian gov-
ernment in Lehder's operations.
The NBC broadcast and the
resulting outcry in the Bahamas
led to the establishment of the
Commission of Inquiry.

Informers for the US Drug
Enforcement Administration have
also testified that in 1980 and 1981
Pindling spent occasional week-
ends partying down at Norman's
Cay with Lehder and his gang, and
the CIA was said to be holding
the photographic evidence to
prove it.

So the story that sparked the
recent controversy over Pindling's
legacy can hardly be considered
"explosive" or "outrageous"
today. Even if Sir Lynden was not
complicit in the death of Chauncey
Tynes Jr, he was certainly a causal
factor in a lot of other tragedies
across the length and breadth of
the Bahamas over many years.

Allyson Maynard Gibson's pre-
tence at shock horror that Sir Lyn-
den's name had been "sullied” and
"desecrated" by the recent Tri-
bune article is pure political the-
atre. No matter how you look at it,
the corruption of an entire soci-
ety and generations lost to drug

abuse and organised crime are an
indelible part of the Pindling lega-
cy. Face it. Deal with it.

The key point for us today is
that PLP leaders have never fully
digested the lessons from this dis-
astrous period of Bahamian his-
tory, which they themselves led.
The contradictions within the par-
ty arising from the large-scale
criminality exposed by multiple
investigations have never been
dealt with frankly. They have sim-
ply been brushed under the rug
— as the most recent self-right-
eous outcries from PLP quarters
so clearly demonstrate.

And that is precisely why the
party is in such a fix today. It lost a
large degree of legitimacy and cred-
ibility in the 1980s when the country
was sold out to foreign gangsters.
And it wasted a golden opportuni-
ty to claw back some of that legiti-
macy and respect when it was unex-
pectedly re-elected in 2003.

ever

than

—
oO
oo)
y
oO
Om




Sir Lynden Pindling

Although PLP leader Perry
Christie was one of three cabinet
ministers who initially recoiled at
massive official corruption under
Pindling's leadership (Hubert
Ingraham and Arthur Hanna were
the others), he is one of those now
trying to avoid dealing with that
despicable legacy. And if he does-
n't deal with it, who will?

As we said, it is a legacy that
has yet to be processed by the
PLP. The strategy is to cling to
Pindling's achievement of majori-

ty rule and independence and
ignore all the rest. By ignoring it, it
will eventually go away as people
get older and memories fade. This
is nothing but a public relations
scam that will do nothing to
resolve the party's inherent con-
tradictions.

Perhaps the best example to
draw the point is that of the retired
PLP cabinet minister from Exu-
ma who was found to have rou-
tinely accepted gifts and payoffs
from the Lehder operation and to
have been a "lackey" for Everette
Bannister (but later acquitted in
the courts). He was appointed to a
prestigious government job by the
Christie administration in 2002
and now submits statesmanlike
essays to the press on the future of
Exuma, as if the 1970s and 80s had
never happened.

And although we can agree
that all of us may bear some
responsibility for what happened
in those days, and all of us may
have benefited to some degree —
wittingly or not — it is the handful
of men and women who were
large and in charge who must
accept most of the blame. Many
are still around and can easily
make their voices heard in the
right way.

As we noted in an earlier article

on political prospects for the PLP
after the 2007 defeat (see
www.bahamapundit.com), it has
been said that “All political parties
die at last of swallowing their own
lies.” It remains to be seen
whether the PLP will be able to
achieve the fundamental reform
that it seems to require, or
whether it will fatally choke on its
own self-delusion.

Sources:

1984 Commission of Inquiry
Report.

1988 Report of the US Senate
Subcommittee on Narcotics, Ter-
rorism and International Opera-
tions.

1988 US State Department
Report on International Narcotics
Control.

1988, The Cocaine Wars, by
Paul Eddy, Hugo Sabogal, Sara
Walden. Published by W W Nor-
ton.

1991, Turning the Tide, by Sid-
ney Kirkpatrick and Peter Abra-
hams, published by Penguin
Group.

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

Butler’s Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Official
Funeral Announcement

for the former MP of Long Island
and Cabinet Minister,

JAMES
FRANKLIN
KNOWLES,

66

will be held on Friday,
March 27th, 2009 at
11:00 a.m., at Christ
Church Cathedral,
George Street.

Officiating will be
Archdeacon Keith
Cartwright, Fr. Michael Gittens and Fr. Crosley

Walkine. Interment will follow in St. Anne’s
Cemetery, Fox Hill.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Amarylis
Knowles, two sons; James A. Knowles and Roman
Knowles, one daughter; Kimberly Knowles, his
mother; Agnes Knowles of Texas, six brothers; Alex
Jr., Emerick, Patrick, Geoffrey, Charlton and Eric
Knowles, six sisters; Ethlyn Virginia Pinder, Ruby
Louise Collins of West Palm Beach Florida, Ruth
Yvonne Knowles of Dallas Texas, Deborah Susan
Knowles and Julianna Green of Rowlett Texas, one
uncle; Hilbert Burrington Pinder, numerous nieces
and nephews, in-laws; Mavis and Joey Treco,
William (Bill) Pinder, Richard Anderson Sr., Shirley,
Brenda, Rosa, Linda and Lolitta Knowles, James
Green, Predensia Fox, Bernadette Darville, Jennifer
Cartwright, a host of other relatives and friends and
special thanks and appreciation to his many doctors.

Mr. Knowles will lie in state at the House of
Assembly on Thursday, March 26, from 9:00am
until 5:00pm. In lieu of flowers the family has
requested that donations be made to the Cancer
Society, P. O. Box SS-6539, in memory of James
Knowles.

Funeral Services are being handled by Butlers’
Funeral Home & Crematorium, Ernest and York
Streets.



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COROLLA had

THE TRIBUNE



Candidate selection

process is undemocratic

m@ By OMAR ARCHER

Biyervwnere you turn these
days voters are increasingly more
outspoken about their disappointment with
various members of parliament. They feel
that their concerns are not being met, main-
ly because there is a serious disconnect
between themselves and their sitting rep-
resentatives. One major reason for this
evolves from the candidate selection
process.

I feel that the current process of selection
is undemocratic. It’s like serving meat toa
vegetarian and telling him/her to eat it or
starve. That’s not democracy, that’s dicta-
torship. Take for example the system of
primaries in the United States which began
in the early 20th century. This process was
established to mainly democratise the inter-
nal workings of all political parties, so as to
end the practice of candidates being hand-
picked by appointed party committees, as
has been done by all political parties here in
the Bahamas for decades. This process is
inherently flawed. It is unconstitutional and
defeats the very purpose of a democracy.

This is why I am now hereby proposing a
Constituent Act. The sole purpose of this

YOUR SAY

Act from the perspective of a free and
democratic society, is to ensure that ALL
candidates are chosen via a ballot by the
voters/constituents in their respective com-
munities in an open and fair democratic
process. The now existing process leaves
far too much room for manipulation of this
very important process and must be
changed immediately. The existing process
has over the past discriminated against var-
ious proposed candidates for many different
reasons — namely, the candidates were too
outspoken, or he or she is disliked by certain
influential committee members. Political
discrimination has no place in a free and
democratic society where the lives and well
being of the citizens are at stake. This is a
very serious problem with Bahamian poli-
tics today and must be corrected before the
next general election in 2012.

The existing process is nonsensical; the
power of selection should be given to the
constituents and not allowed to be contin-
ually hijacked by petty internal party poli-



tics. Choosing candidates via a committee
and presenting them at “take it or leave it”
conventions is no longer acceptable,
because it blatantly puts a limitation on the
choice of the Bahamian voting electorate
which is unacceptable in a democracy. With-
out the proposed Constituent Act, voters —
in particular grass root voters — will con-
tinue to have no say as to who is elected to
serve in such capacity.

Tam now proposing that all parties nom-
inate via this democratic process, thus
embracing the shifting of power from inter-
nal petty party politics, to the actual con-
stituents. The suffocating influence of par-
ty leaders will be severely weakened and
rightfully so. Political parties must be run as
democratic institutions and not like pri-
vately owned businesses. The ideal purpose
of this proposed Act would be to find the
candidate who would fearlessly represent
his/her constituents and address their needs
publicly with conviction. In this respect, the
Bahamas’ candidates selection process is
dangerously flawed and needs to be cor-
rected immediately. This is the answer to
those politicians who think they are entitled
to office no matter what.

Isay let the people decide — not the par-



AT ' Hany

\

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Patrick Hanna/BIS

THIRTY-THREE young women received recognition awards at the annual Debutante Awards Ceremony held at
Government House on Wednesday, March 18. Seated from left are Fredericka Hamilton, committee
member; Governor General Arthur Hanna and Cristina Johnson, president of the Bahamas Debutante Foundation

Young women

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FLANKED by family
members, friends and well-
wishers, 33 young women
received recognition at the
annual Bahamas Debutante
Foundation awards ceremo-
ny Wednesday evening.

The ceremony was held at
Government House and was
hosted by Governor General
Arthur Hanna who told the
debutantes that the event sig-
nalled a milestone in their
lives.

“Debutantes, surely this
programme has inspired and

provided for you great incen-
tives for continued success in
the area of social develop-
ment.

“T challenge you to run
with the baton and make a
positive influence among
your peers,” the Governor
General said.

After being exposed to six
months of social and educa-
tional training, including
essay and talent competitions,
the young ladies are poised
to fully contribute to their
communities.

The Governor General not-
ed that having gone through
the programme, the debu-
tantes would be able to posi-

Obama, astronauts talk

up green energy in call

m@ CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

THE 10 ORBITING astronauts talked up green energy with
President Barack Obama on Tuesday, describing the benefits that
will come from the international space station’s new solar wings,

according to Associated Press.

Obama told the astronauts aboard the linked station-shuttle
complex that he was extraordinarily proud of their work over the
past week. He wanted to know how they installed the solar panels
and what the impact of that power would bring.

“We're investing back here on the ground a whole array of solar
and other renewable energy projects and so to find out that you’re
doing this up at the space station is particularly exciting,” Obama

said.

Obama’s first budget plan released last month moves to shift the
nation from reliance on foreign oil to developing clean-energy
technologies, such as solar and wind power.

Last week at the space station, the final set of solar wings doubled
the amount of power available for science experiments and will help
support a larger crew in a few months, the astronauts said.

tively impact their peers.

“You have been exposed
to many areas such as eti-
quette, personal grooming,
public speaking, health and
hygiene, road safety, spiritual
and moral development,
women’s rights and many
others,” he said.

“These are vital areas
which will advance your
development as positive
young ladies.”

President of the Bahamas
Debutante Foundation Cristi-
na Johnson said the awards
ceremony is the kick-off to
the main event which is the
Debutante Ball slated for
April 4.

“We decided to separate
the two events because it
would have been too long if
we had both at the same
time,” Ms Johnson said.

“Also, many parents had
never been to Government
House, therefore this was also
an opportunity for them to
come here and meet the Gov-
ernor General.”

She explained that
although enrollment in the
programme this year was low-
er than usual due to the
downturn in the economy,
she was pleased with the
number of persons who par-
ticipated.

“We know that the tough
times may have made it diffi-
cult to pay the $250 fee
required for the programme,
however we were happy that
many persons were able to
participate,” she said.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Appeals court upholds
verdict against Iverson

NBA Today

i By The Associated Press

SCOREBOARD

Wednesday, March 25

Boston at Orlando (8 pm
EDT). The Atlantic Division-
leading Celtics have a one-
game lead over Southeast
Division-leading Orlando for
second place in the Eastern
Conference.

STARS

Monday

—Flip Murray, Hawks,
scored a season-best 30 points
as Atlanta won its season-
high eighth straight home
game, beating Minnesota 109-
97

—Dwight Howard, Magic,
had 29 points and 14
rebounds as Orlando beat
New York 106-102.

—Dwyane Wade, Heat,
scored 27 points to top his
own team single-season
record — plus added eight
assists as Miami easily beat
Memphis 94-82.

—Andre Miller, 76ers, had
27 points and 10 rebounds
and scored the go-ahead bas-
ket with 1:56 remaining in
overtime as Philadelphia ral-
lied for a 114-108 win over
Portland.

—Ben Gordon, Bulls,
scored all of his 21 pomts in
the second half — including
seven in the final 3 1/2 min-
utes — to lead Chicago to a
101-99 win at Washington.

SOARING HAWKS

The Atlanta Hawks beat
the Minnesota Timberwolves
109-97 on Monday night to
win their season-high eighth
straight home game. It was
Atlanta’s eighth win in nine
games overall, and the Hawks
are 28-7 at Philips Arena. The
home streak is the longest for
Atlanta since Nov. 12, 1996-
Feb. 12, 1997, when the
Hawks won 20 in row.

MIAMI MILESTONE

Dwyane Wade broke his
own Miami Heat single-sea-
son scoring record Monday,
topping the mark set in the
2005-06 championship season.
Wade’s fourth point against
the Memphis Grizzlies gave
him 2,041 this season, one
more than he managed in 75
games three seasons ago.
Monday was Wade’s 69th
appearance of the season. He
got the record-setter on a
layup with 10 minutes left in
the opening quarter, giving
Miami a 9-0 lead.

COLLAPSING KNICKS
Nate Robinson scored 19
points on just 6-of-23 shooting
for New York, which dropped

its fifth straight, 106-102 to
Orlando, in a late-season col-
lapse after entertaining hopes
of a playoff spot a week ago.
The Knicks honored former
players at halftime, including
Patrick Ewing, Willis Reed,
Bernard King and Walt Fra-
zier, then extended their dis-
mal present by clinching an
eighth straight losing season,
tying a franchise worst.

LOOKING GOOD

Kevin Garnett played 18
minutes, hitting all five field-
goal attempts while scoring 12
points as the Boston Celtics
pulled away for a 90-77 win
over the Los Angeles Clip-
pers on Monday night. He
added two rebounds and two
assists in his third game back
since missing 13 with a
sprained right knee.

SUNS SHINE

Grant Hill hit a 12-foot
jumper in the lane to break a
tie with 58.6 seconds remain-
ing, then added a free throw
with 6.2 seconds left to help
Phoenix extend its season-
high winning streak to five
games in a 118-115 victory
over Denver on Monday
night.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Antawn Jamison had 34
points and 12 rebounds for
Washington, which has lost
five straight after a 101-99 loss
to Chicago on Monday night.
.. Carmelo Anthony led Den-
ver with 29 points in a 118-115
loss at Phoenix, but missed a
3-pointer in the final second.

SPEAKING

“That’s what I do, baby. ’m
Shaq-ovich. We needed them.
TP’'m known that when you
really need them, I’m going to
make them.” — Phoenix’s
Shaquille O’Neal, who played
only 24 minutes because of
foul trouble, had six of his 19
points in the final 5:04, when
he made four of five free
throws in the Suns’ 118-115
win over Denver on Monday
night. O’Neal made seven of
eight free throws in the game.

lm By NEDRA PICKLER
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
NBA star Allen Iverson must
pay $260,000 for standing idly
by and watching his bodyguard
beat up another man in a 2005
bar fight, a federal appeals
court ruled Tuesday.

The U.S. Court of Appeals
for the District of Columbia
Circuit rejected the Detroit
Pistons guard’s attempt to
throw out the verdict decided
by a jury in 2007.

Bar patron Marlin Godfrey
accused Iverson’s bodyguard,
Jason Kane, of punching, kick-
ing and hitting him with a bot-
tle because he refused to
vacate the VIP section at
Washington club Eyebar to
make way for the basketball
star and his entourage. God-
frey suffered a concussion, a
ruptured eardrum, a burst
blood vessel in his eye, a torn

ALLEN IVERSON is seen during a game against the Milwaukee Bucks,

in Auburn Hills, Mich...

(AP Photo: Paul Sancya)

rotator cuff, cuts and bruises,
and emotional injuries.

A three-judge appeals court
panel wrote that Iverson
stayed out of the fray in the
back corner of the VIP area,
standing on a couch or bench
and observing.

“The evidence in this case
supported the jury’s finding
that Kane attacked Godfrey
in a fight that lasted several
minutes, and that Iverson
stood and watched without
attempting to do anything to
stop the beating,” the decision
said.

Godfrey and another
patron, David Anthony Kit-
trell, sued Iverson for $20 mil-
lion, but the jury decided not
to award punitive damages
and only compensate Godfrey
$10,000 for his medical bills
and $250,000 for pain and suf-
fering. The jury did not find
either of the men liable for
assaulting Kittrell.



With 12 games left, no
for Wade to rest

time

@ By TIM REYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer

MIAMI (AP) — Miami’s
Erik Spoelstra has a simple plan
for how he’ll manage a stiff and
sore Dwyane Wade as the Heat
make their playoff push.

“Play him,” the first-year
Heat coach said.

Wade is at the point in the
season where the little aches
and pains are becoming bigger
aches and pains. He’s spending
extra time in the training room,
getting ice baths, even had his
personal trainer Tim Grover
visit from Chicago for a few
days recently to go along with
the daily guidance Wade gets
from the Heat medical staff.

But with 12 games left in a
22-day span starting Wednes-
day night in Indiana — a place
where Wade has never won as a
pro, losing all seven times he’s
taken the court there — there’s
no time for a break.

“Once you start playing, your
adrenaline gets going and every-
thing’s fine,” said Wade, the
league’s leading scorer (29.9
points) and MVP candidate. “I
think it’s the beginning of games
when you've got to get yourself
going. ... | was running all
around the court, I was trying to
make sure we didn’t get lost or
fall asleep with the game going
slow. That makes you all
aware.”

With the Southeast Division
race essentially decided weeks
ago — Orlando can officially
clinch on Wednesday — the
Heat have been left to contend
for the No. 4 playoff spot in the
Eastern Conference.

And in that race, there’s little
room for slippage.

Atlanta (42-29) has control
of the race for the No. 4 seed
and home-court advantage in
the first round, holding a 3 1/2-
game lead over the Heat. The
Hawks have 11 games remain-
ing, meaning Miami has one
game in hand.

Miami (38-32) is 1 1/2 games
ahead of Philadelphia (36-33)
for the No. 6 spot, and three
games up on Detroit (34-35),
which currently holds down the
seventh seed in the East playoff
bracket.

It all means that Spoelstra is
leaving nothing to chance.
That’s one of the reasons why,
even with Miami up by double
digits in the fourth quarter
against lowly Memphis on Mon-
day night, he put Wade back
into the game in the fourth



DWYANE WADE watches the game against the Utah Jazz in the fourth quarter in Miami. (AP Photo: Alan Diaz)

quarter.

“T would have taken those
minutes. I wanted some more
rest,” Wade said. “But I play
with a young team. All year, I
don’t have the luxury of sitting
out fourth quarters. One day,
we will get back to that. But
right now, we’re not there.
We've got to try to get the win.”

Wade missed his first game
of the season last Wednesday
in Boston, after a strained right
hip flexor — that led to some
stiffness in his groin — left him
sidelined. In the four games
before Miami played the
Celtics, Wade logged 50 min-
utes in a double-overtime win
over Chicago, 37 minutes in a
home win over Boston, 52 1/2
minutes in a triple-overtime
epic win over Utah, then 34
minutes the next day in a loss at
Philadelphia.

Without him, the Heat lost
112-108 in overtime to Boston.

The stretch that Wade is on
now represents one of the
longest of his life without an
extended break from competi-
tive basketball.

He was shut down late last
season, as the Heat sputtered
to the worst record in the NBA,
because of knee pain. Wade
began training for last summer’s
Beijing Olympics in May,
played the whole way through

8 British sports to lose
$73m in Olympic funds

LONDON (AP) — Eight British sports will lose $73 million in
funding ahead of the 2012 London Olympics, part of an effort to
concentrate on events with the best chance to medal.

UK Sports says Tuesday that fencing, handball, table tennis,
shooting, volleyball, water polo, weightlifting and wrestling will have
their budgets slashed by more than half.

Britain did not win medals in any of those events at the Beijing

Games.

Shooting will be hardest hit, with a budget cut of 76 percent. UK
Sport says the cuts were needed because of the economic downturn

and a lack of private sponsorship.

late August while helping the
Americans win a gold medal,
then started camp with the Heat
just a couple of weeks later.

His body might need a break,
but if Wade gets his way, he
won’t be getting one for at least
another few weeks.

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NFL passes
four player
safety rules

lm By BARRY WILNER
AP Football Writer

DANA POINT, Calif. (AP)
— NFL owners have passed
four player safety rules for next
season. One of them is the elim-
ination of blindside helmet-to-
helmet blocks.

The changes came Tuesday
at the NFL meetings in Califor-
nia.

The new rules state that the
initial force of a blindside block
can’t be delivered by a helmet,
forearm or shoulder to an oppo-
nent’s head or neck. An illegal
blindside block will bring a 15-
yard penalty.

Initial contact to the head of a
defenseless receiver also will
draw a 15-yard penalty.

On kickoffs, no blocking
wedge of more than two players
will be allowed. Also, the kick-
ing team can’t have more than
five players bunched together
pursuing an onside kick.

Pacquiao
2008 fighter
of year by
BWAA vote

NEW YORK (AP) — Man-
ny Pacquiao has been voted
fighter of the year by the Box-
ing Writers Association of
America after a dominating win
over Oscar De La Hoya.

Joe Calzaghe was runner-up,
but voted manager of the year
Tuesday for guiding his own
career. The undefeated former
super middleweight champion
recently retired.

Pacquiao won three times in
2008, highlighted by his stop-
page of De La Hoya. Pacquiao’s
trainer, Freddie Roach, was a
voted trainer of the year, the
third time he has won the
award.

The super batamweight rub-
ber match between Israel
Vazquez and Rafael Marquez
was chosen fight of the year.
Vazquez won the fight by split
decision.

The awards will be presented
at the annual BWAA dinner
June 12 in New York.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Legacy Baseball League
holds opening ceremonies

LEGACY Baseball League
kicked-off its 2009 season at the
beginning of March, but held
its opening ceremonies on
March 21.

It’s president, Steve Burrows,
talked about the tremendous
growth in their girls softball
programme which has expand-
ed to the east and west Grand
Bahama.

He also spoke about their
growth in baseball, which was
evident in capturing two divi-
sions in the BBF Andre
Rodgers National Baseball
Championships in June 2008.

Legacy won the Coach Pitch
Division and the High School
16-18 Division over the three
major power houses in baseball
— Freedom Farm, JBLN &
Grand Bahama.

Present at the opening cere-
monies was August "Auggic"
Campbell (Full Football Schol-
arship to Duke University this
Fall).

Burrows told the children at
the end of his speech, that they
have a role model in Campbell.
“He sat right where you are
many years ago. Through hard
work and dedication you can
be in the same position,” Bur-
rows said.

Burrows also promised the
many parents and supporters
of Legacy that they will be
bringing back home three divi-
sions from the upcoming 2009
National Baseball Champi-
onship.

Also in attendance from the
BBF was president Craig
Kemp, secretary general
Theodore Sweeting and 4th
vice president (Grand Bahama)
Alonzo "Chumpy” Pratt.

Kemp thanked the Legacy
executives for their ongoing
development of baseball on
Grand Bahama and encour-
aged them to continue to build
on their success.

Kemp also presented Legacy
with their 2008 Championship
Diamond Banners (Coach
Division) and High School (16-
18) Division.

Kemp, Sweeting, national
team manager Patrick Knowles
Sr (Team Bahamas 15-16),
coach Alonzo Pratt (Team
Bahamas Men’s National

Team) and Coach Opi Taylor
(Team Bahamas 16-18), con-
ducted try-outs for the young
men in Grand Bahama on
March 22 from 2pm to Spm to
afford them a fair opportunity
to be selected to one of the
national teams traveling this
summer.

Many of the young men had
a great showing and the teams
will definitely have a national
makeup.

The Federation indicated
that they are extremely proud
and excited to advise that 95
per cent of the 16-18 team and
the senior men’s team present-
ly attend high school or college
in the US.

The executive committee and
the coaching staff feel very con-
fident these two teams will do
very well this summer.

In the 15-16 Zone Tourna-
ment, the Bahamas is coming
off a 3rd place finish in 2008.

There are high expectations
for this team as all the mem-
bers have had international
exposure from previous tour-
naments.

National teams traveling this
summer:

TEAM BAHAMAS 16-18

e XII Latin American
Regional Big League Tourna-
ment 2009 June 19-28, Mara-
caibo, Venezuela (Countries
participating: Aruba, Bahamas,
Colombia, Curacao,
Guatemala, Panama, Puerto
Rico, Dominican Republic,
USVI and Venezuela)

TEAM BAHAMAS 15-16

PONY Caribbean Zone
Championship July 6-12, Guar-
bo, Puerto Rico (Countries par-
ticipating: Bahamas, Domini-
can Republic, Panama, USVI,
Puerto Rico)

TEAM BAHAMAS Men’s
National Team

World Baseball Challenge,
July 16-26, Prince George,
Canada (Countries: Team
Bahamas, Team Canada, Team
Croatia, Chinese Taipei, Ger-
many Team USA, Professional
Teams: Reno Astros & Host
Prince George Axemen)

Slowey pitches five sharp
innings, has three RBIs

JUPITER, Fla. (AP) —
Twins right-hander Kevin
Slowey was dominant on the
mound Tuesday, and he
looked pretty good as a batter,
too.

Slowey pitched five effec-
tive innings and helped his
cause with two hits and three
RBIs, leading the Minnesota
Twins to an 8-1 victory over
the Florida Marlins.

“It was pretty comedic to
them that I walk up there and
swing and the ball finds the
grass somewhere,” Slowey
said after going 2-for-2 with a
double.

Slowey, who allowed a run
and two hits while striking out
five, had a bases-loaded sin-
gle in the first inning off right-
hander Chris Volstad and then
ripped a double to left in the
third to score two more runs.

“That was pretty crazy. He
doesn’t even hit in the regular
season,” Volstad said.

Slowey, who had two hits in
eight at-bats last year, had no
explanation for his offensive
prowess.

“The first couple of weeks
of camp we bunt and swing in
the cages,” he said. “You kind
of leave that to the guys who
get paid to doit.”

But Slowey, the Twins’ No.
3 starter, was most happy
about throwing 48 of his 66
pitches for strikes. He has
allowed just one walk in 14 1-
3 innings this spring.

“T don’t like walking guys,”
said Slowey, who allowed 24
walks in 160 1-3 innings last

KEVIN SLOWEY takes a warm-up toss during the spring training
\game against the Florida Marlins in Jupiter, Fla. Tuesday...

year while going 12-11 with a
3.99 ERA. “When it gets to
2-0 or 3-1, Ineed to be able to
make a good pitch. It’s got to
be a strike. So far it has
worked out.”

Volstad had his roughest
outing of the spring, allowing
four runs — three earned — in
four innings. He also walked
three batters after walking just
two in 18 innings coming in.

“He’s human,” manager
Fredi Gonzalez said. “He was
not as sharp as he has been in

(AP Photo: Richard Drew)

the past but those things hap-
pen in spring training. He’s
got a couple of more outings.
We'll get him back on track.”

Dan Uggla homered for the
Marlins, his fourth this spring.

Notes: The Marlins
optioned right-hander Ryan
Tucker to Triple-A New
Orleans.

The Marlins are off
Wednesday but left-hander
Andrew Miller will start in a
minor league game against the
Cardinals.



Cycling series to continue today

THE New Providence
Cycling Association is sched-
uled to continue its Wednes-
day afternoon series today at
6:30pm at the one-mile nation-
al track at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex.

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Classic’ race is set to take
place. The event is open to all
competitors and there is a reg-
istration fee.

On Sunday back at Baillou
Hills, the track series is slated
to kick off starting at 4 pm.
There will be a one-lap timed
trial, two-lap sprint race and

a 15-lap race.

The Wednesday evening
track series will conclude at
the end of April. The awards
presentation will be held 5pm
May 3 at Workers House.
Awards for outstanding
cyclists in 2008 will also be pre-
sented.

Brazil striker Robinho
wants Pele apology

MANCHESTER, England
(AP) — Robinho is demanding
a retraction and apology after
Pele said the Brazilian striker
had a drug problem.

Robinho, who plays for Man-
chester City in the Premier
League, threatens legal action if
the soccer great does not com-
ply. Pele also implicated Ronal-
do, another Brazilian star, in his
comments to a Brazilian radio
station last week.

“A formal retraction from
Pele will be requested, if what
he said was not misinterpreted
by the media that published it,”
according to a statement on
Robinho’s Web site Tuesday.
“And if Pele does not come for-
ward, he will have to deal with
his very unfortunate comment
in court.”

Guilhereme Prado, a
spokesman for Ronaldo’s
Brazilian club, Corinthians, said
the veteran striker had no com-
ment.

Pele’s remarks appeared to
suggest that any transgression
was in the past.

“It’s unfair to talk of drugs in
football just because of one or

Robinho (

two cases, as happened with
Ronaldo and Robinho, who had
that problem,” Pele said.

Pele helped Brazil win three
World Cups before retiring in
1977. Since then, he has done
promotional work for a credit
card company and Viagra.

“Robinho is upset and disap-
pointed at Pele, who seems to
have forgotten the great idol he
was,” the Web site statement
added. “It appears Pele must
be reading sensationalist
(media) to come up with such a
wrongful statement.”



UEFA looks

at luxury tax
to cur teams’
spending

m@ By JAN M OLSEN
Associated Press
Writer

COPENHAGEN (AP)
— European soccer’s gov-
erning body has looked at
Major League Baseball’s
luxury tax policy for inspira-
tion as it seeks to control
spending.

“The devil is in adapting
these rules to a European
context,” UEFA
spokesman William Gail-
lard said Tuesday in a tele-
phone interview with The
Associated Press.

The MLB system works
by taxing free-spending
clubs on all they spend
above a set payroll. If the
luxury tax idea found favor,
big spending soccer clubs
would have to pay their tax
before being allowed to
play in the Champions
League and the second-tier
UEFA Cup, renamed the
Europa League next sea-
son.

The Union of European
Football Associations also
has looked at salary caps
and player drafts, which
works in the fixed nature of
American sports leagues
but not the pyramid struc-
ture of European soccer,
where the bottom teams are
relegated to a lower division
and top minor league clubs
are promoted.

“T don’t think a luxury tax
should be treated any more
seriously than some of the
things that have been pro-
posed over the last month,”
Chelsea chief executive
Peter Kenyon said at a news
conference in New York to
announce his club’s summer
USS. tour. “We believe as
clubs and as the European
club association (that)
financing of clubs are issues
for clubs and that governing
bodies should again concen-
trate very much on the
organization structures and
the licensing structures they
are currently implement-
ing.”

AC Milan organizing
director Umberto Gandini,
sitting next to Kenyon,
echoed that view.

“UEFA and the clubs are
looking at other experi-
ences and, obviously, you
are very familiar with the
system you have in the
American sports, salary
caps and collective bargain-
ing agreement situations,
and we will look at that,” he
said. “Clubs have to look
around themselves and find
the right way to control the
spiraling costs. ... There is a
debate inside and outside
the organization. And we
are sure we are going to get
to a common understanding
when the right problems
will be targeted.”

UEFA is determined to
reform the business side of
football’s elite clubs in its
campaign for “financial fair
play.” It fears that clubs are
running up excessive debts
to chase success in the
Champions League.

© Associated Press Writer
Graham Dunbar in Geneva
and AP Sports Writer
Ronald Blum in New York
contributed to this report

FIFA and UEFA reject
WADA drug-testing rule

@ By JAN M OLSEN
Associated Press Writer

COPENHAGEN (AP) —
Tension escalated Tuesday
between the soccer’s most pow-
erful bodies and the World
Anti-Doping Agency in a dis-
pute over out-of-competition
drug testing.

FIFA and the Union of
European Football Associa-
tions called on WADA to
reconsider its whereabouts rule,
which took effect Jan. 1 and
requires elite-level athletes in
registered testing pools to give
drug-testers three months’
notice of their location for one
hour each day.

WADA director general
David Howman said the rule

could not be negotiated until
the end of the year and foot-
ball would have to fall into line.

“The rules are in place and if
you don’t follow the rules then,
of course, we have to report
that information to our board,”
Howman told The Associated
Press in a telephone interview.

FIFA and UEFA say there
are “fundamental differences”
between individual athletes and
players or teams. FIFA and
UEFA said they “do not accept
that controls be undertaken
during the short holiday period
of players, in order to respect
their private life.”

The confrontational state-
ment came four days after
FIFA president Sepp Blatter
insisted that soccer should not

be held to the strictest stan-
dards of the new code.

“T don’t understand or com-
prehend the criticism,” How-
man said. “Other team sports
have got whereabouts systems
in place and it seems to be
working. I would hope that our
constructive partnership with
FIFA will endure and they will
sit down with us and talk it
through.”

In Belgium, 65 athletes have
started court proceedings
against the new out-of-compe-
tition testing rule, citing the
European Convention on
Human Rights.

e Associated Press Writer
Graham Dunbar in Geneva
contributed to this report



THE TRIBUNE

Spor

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25,

PAGE 11



ts

2009

wy

Ae



Bia

Key hoping to

Shine on international circuit

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

wo years ago, she

earned her profes-

sional status as the

overall female cham-
pion at the Central American and
Caribbean Bodybuilding & Fit-
ness Championships.

But like big Joel Stubbs, who
got his status in 2004, Gena
Mackey is hoping that this will
be the year that they both shine
on the international bodybuilding
circuit.

While Stubbs has enjoyed a
great deal of success, including
getting splashed across a number
of magazines as he gains a lot
attention for his huge back poses,
Mackey is just getting into the
flow of things.

“Tve been training hard and
getting ready for my first inter-
national show in August,” said
Mackey, as she viewed the
Bahamas Powerlifting Federa-
tion’s National Powerlifting
Championships on Saturday at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
with Stubbs.

From August 14-15, Mackey is
scheduled to be competing at the
Europa Super Show Sports and
Supplement Expo Champi-
onships. Immediately after that
show, Mackey is slated to travel
to Austin, Texas, to compete in
September.

“Tm going to be ready this
year,” Mackey said. “I want to
take that seventh down to at least
a third or a fourth place. One
way or the other, I will work my
butt off this year.”

Since making the transition
from an amateur pro, Mackey
said she has had to go through
the growing pains, but she has
made the adjustment and now
she feels she’s ready to step up
the ladder.

“T just needed more definition
and cuts in my legs. That was my
weaknesses last year,” she said.
“Everything else was right in
place. That was what threw me
off.”

Not too disappointed in her
performances, Mackey said she
went back to the drawing board,
training with Stubbs and she’s
now focused on rebuilding all
over again.

At this time, the former soc-
cer player turned bodybuilder,
said she’s pleased with where
she’s at in her training and she’s
confident that she will be a com-
petitor to watch this year.

Already developing a name for
himself, Stubbs competed in the
Atlantic City Bodybuilding
Championships last year where
he was fifth in the men’s open,
just missing the qualification for
Mr Olympia by one spot.

‘Douggie’

m By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THERB’S a popular phrase
coined by Roman author & his-
torian Titus Livius that says:
“Better late than never.”

Although honoured by having
the softball park renamed after
him by the Bahamas Govern-
ment a couple years ago, Dudley
‘Douggie’ Smith said he will not
be happy until he sees it in print.

During the homecoming cel-
ebrations over the Easter holi-
day weekend, a local self-help
committee in Eleuthera, headed
by Betty Taylor-Sands, is hop-
ing to finally erect the official
sign that will bear the name of
the Dudley ‘Douggie’ Smith
Softball Park.

“One of the problems we had
was our (softball) organisation
is not as functional as it should
be,” said Ronnie Horton, one of
the persons who is working dili-
gently to make the sign a reality.

“We built the park and did a
lot of things to it until it was
named in honour of Douggie.
Then we took a step back. We
didn’t do anything since. We put
up a sign that says softball park,
but we never got it done official-

ly.”



JOEL STUBBS & GENA MACKEY (right) are hoping that 2009 will be the year when they both shine on the inter-
national bodybuilding circuit...

This year, Stubbs has vowed
to use the experience to his
advantage.

“The judges were able to
encourage me to keep doing
what I’m doing because they see
too that my time is here,” Stubbs
said.

“T figure in every sport you
have to pay your dues. I think
I’ve paid my dues, so it’s time for
Bahamians to watch a Mr
Olympia Show or watch a top
notch show and see Joel Stubbs
on stage representing the
Bahamas.”

Stubbs, a Bahamasair pilot by
profession, was hoping to open

his season by representing the
Bahamas at the New York Men’s
Professional Championships in
New York on May 16, but he’s
not sure if he will make the trip.

“T recently had the flu and asa
result of that, I was bed-ridden
for two weeks and my weight and
size went down,” he said. “Right
now I’m trying to eat myself back
up to my regular competing size
again.

“T’ve already resumed my
training regimen. The deadline
to register is the last week in
April. Providing all goes well by
the end of April, I will put the
contract in and represent my

country.”

The former basketball player
said if he doesn’t make the trip to
New York, he will definitely com-
pete in a series of events that will
prepare him for another shot at
Mr Olympia.

From August 7-8, he will com-
pete in the Tampa Men’s Pro
from August 7-8; the Europa
Super Show Sports and Supple-
ment Expo Championships from
August 14-15; the Houston Men’s
Pro on August 22 and the
Atlantic City Men’s Pro Show in
New Jersey from September 11-
12.

As an incentive, Stubbs is also

featured regularly in both Muscle
Magazine and the Muscle Asy-
lum Project. In the magazine,
Stubbs is featured in each edi-
tion with his own column pro-
viding tips on how to get fit.

He serves as a spokesman for
Muscle Asylum Project, which
enables Stubbs to further expose
the Bahamas on the internation-
al scene.

Talking about the scene,
Stubbs said he was quite
impressed with what he saw from
the new competitors who came
out to compete in the National
Powerlifting Championships on
Saturday.

But he advised athletes that
powerlifting is definitely the best
training background that they can
all take advantage of to improve
their skills.

Mackey, on the other hand,
said she was hoping to see a lot
more women participating as
there are a lot of them working
out in the gym.

But of course, she noted that
she didn’t expect to see her
replacement just yet because she
left an awesome work ethic
behind in the amateur ranks.

Smith softball park sign to make it official

Horton, a local businessman
and close friend of Smith, said
they have been building a con-
crete base and Taylor-Sands has
been working on getting the
name printed on the sign that
will be mounted for all to see.

“It’s all voluntary work,” he
said. “In fact, Douggie should-
n’t be doing any work, but he’s
right there with us everyday
helping out. It’s a small compact
community, so we’re just trying
to get it done.”

This weekend, Horton said
they are trying to finalise all of
the details for the ceremony that
will take place during the home-
coming celebrations.

Smith, a Bahamas National
and International Softball Fed-
eration Hall of Famer, said it’s
good to finally see that his name
is going to be placed on the sta-
dium.

“It makes you feel great,” he
said. “They always say it’s better
late than never, so I think this is
the appropriate time. It’s a good
time for it because a lot of people
will see it when they come home
for the homecoming.”

In addition to Taylor-Sands
and Horton, Smith said he’s
thankful to persons like Leo
McSweeney, the local govern-
ment board and a number of oth-

er persons who have chipped in
to help out.

In his retirement years, Smith
said he doesn’t have anything to
look forward to. But he said
everytime he passes the stadium,
which is not too far from his res-
idence, he will always be able to
share a smile when he looks at
his name on the sign.

“T think I will have to pinch
myself too and say ‘look what
you have accomplished,’” he
chuckled. “Growing up as a little
boy, you never thought in your
wildest dream that something
like this would happen to you, a
poor little fellow coming out of
the community.”

For 38 years, Smith had one
of the most illustrious careers as
a softball/baseball player com-
ing from the Family Islands.
Having gotten started in 1960,
Smith played through 1998.

During that time, he also
played in the New York Mets
Farm System in the Major
League in the 1970/71 season. A
jammed shoulder injury and a
broken finger prevented him
from playing beyond that peri-
od.

“The week I was going to
Double A, we were playing in
Covington, Virginia and I was
on second base and the coach on

third base was telling me ‘you’re
all right, you’re all right’ as I took
a big lead,” Smith recalled.

“But the pitcher picked me off
as I tried to get back to second
base and I jammed my shoulder
and broke my finger.”

On his return home, Smith
began playing on the national
softball team. His first year was
in 1972 and he played up until
1998, mostly as a player.

In 1980, Smith said he enjoyed
his fondest memory when the
Bahamas played in a 19-inning
game in Tacoma, Washington,
against New Zealand. He was
the catcher for ace Richard ‘the
Lion-Heart’ Johnson.

“In the 15th inning, the Lion-
Heart threw a pitch outside and
I blocked it with my chest and
kept the runner on base. We
went on to win the game and I
got a three minute standing ova-
tion,” Smith reflected.

The Bahamas, managed by
Sidney ‘Bobby Baylor’ Fernan-
der, went on to win the game 2-1.

Looking back at his career,
Smith said he’s pleased with
what he has been able to accom-
plish. But he indicated that he’s
even more enthused about what
is ahead of him with his name
finally going up on the stadium in
his homeland.

Appeals court
upholds
verdict

against Al...
See page 9





BAHAMIANS AT
HURRICANE
INVITATIONAL

A NUMBER of Bahamian
athletes competed this past
weekend in the Hurricanes Invi-
tational at the University of Mia-
mi in Coral Gables, but their
results were not posted in Mon-
day’s edition of Tribune Sports.
Here’s a look at their perfor-
mances:

e JVente Deveaux, compet-
ing unattached, turned in the
best performance as he won the
men’s triple jump with a leap of
49-feet, 7 1/4-inches.

¢ In the men’s 100m, Derek
Carey, competing for the
Bahamas, was fifth in 10.93 sec-
onds, while Wayne Major, com-
peting unattached, was 11th in
11.03.

¢ In the 200, Brandon Miller,
competing unattached, was 12th
in 21.91 after he finished third
in the third of five heats. Also
in his heat was Major, who got
fourth in 22.86 for 27th overall.
Miller picked up a third place
finish in the men’s 400 in 48.39
after he won the second of six
heats.

¢ Douglas Bell, unattached,
was 16th in 50.43;

¢ Demetrius Emmanuel, rep-
resenting the Bahamas, was 25th
in 52.49 and

¢ Tino Thompson, unattached,
was 34th in 54.99.

¢ Kenneth Wallace-Whitfield,
competing unattached, was sixth
in the men’s 800 in 1:58.19, fol-
lowed closely behind by Thomp-
son in 1:58.33. Emmanuel did not
finish the race.

¢ In the 400 hurdles, Kayuse
Burrows, representing the
Bahamas, ran 54.81 for fifth
place.

NPBA PLAYOFFS

THE New Providence Bas-
ketball Association opened its
best-of-five semifinal playoff on
Monday night at the CI Gibson
Gymnasium. The defending
champions Commonwealth
Bank Giants and runners-up
Electro Telecom Cybots took
leads in their respective series.

The Giants came out with a
slim 92-91 decision over the
Police Crimestoppers. Jeremy
Hutchinson had a game high 30,
Mark Hanna added 20 and
Michael ‘Ferley’ Bain chipped in
with 16.

For the Crimestoppers,
Valentino Richardson had 23,
Terrance Brown had 19 and Ver-
non Stubbs contributed 10.

In an intense battle that
extended to who had the most
fans in the stands, Brian Baker
had a game high 30 and Nelson
‘Mandella’ Joseph added 24 as
the Cybots pulled off a 107-102
victory over the Sunshine Auto
Ruff Ryders.

In a losing effort, Kevin Smith
had 26 and Kristano Johnson
added 24. Game two of both
series will be played tonight at
CI Gibson.

MASTERS TRACK MEET

THE Masters Softball Asso-
ciation, headed by Foster
Dorsett, is scheduled to hold a
meeting tonight in the confer-
ence room of the Ministry of
Education on Thompson Boule-
vard at 7pm. All members and
those former athletes who wish
to become a member of the asso-
ciation, are invited.

UR a
ae eel
Te Pela

ey





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Britain's proposed plan to suspend the executive
and legislative branches of the Turks and Caicos
Government as the best thing it can do to correct
the problems plaguing the small British overseas
territory.

During any subsequent talks with the two parties,
CARICOM and the Bahamas, should work to
ensure that Turks and Caicos (TCI) has some say in
the day-to-day running of the country, he said. He
also suggested that the Bahamas offer to help craft
stricter legislation for TCI, that would allow it to
govern itself more effectively once the proposed
suspension period ends.

"The Turks and Caicos is still a dependent and
Britain has the power to suspend (TCI's) Consti-
tution to do what it feels is right in order to set right
what they see as being wrong in the colony, because
for the rest of the world if anything goes wrong in
Turks and Caicos, they see Britain as being respon-
sible.

"What the Bahamas and CARICOM can dois to
one, intercede on behalf of the people of Turks so
that the period of suspension can be as short as
possible, and offer to assist Britain to come up
with the kinds of procedures that would be neces-
sary to allow the colony to regain its government.
And I think the people of Turks need to also have
a say in what their future relationship will be like
with Britain,” said Mr Archer during an interview
with The Tribune yesterday.

Britain's announcement came after an interim
Commission of Inquiry report on the British Over-
seas Territory found a "high probability” of cor-

FROM page one

was hoping for a massive demon-

Protesters

Former CARICOM Ambassatior
expects ‘damaging’ final
Commission of Inquiry report |

ruption among the upper echelons of the govern- }
ment. i

The move would suspend the executive and leg- }
islative branches of the TCI Government and allow ;
British Governor Gordon Wetherell to run the :
day-to-day affairs of the country for two years. Itis
expected to come into effect once the British pre- }
sent their final report on the inquiry — probably by }
April 30. i

"We haven't seen the final report, but if what }
we're hearing from the interim report is what's in
the final report means (there are) serious prob- }
lems in Turks and Caicos. While simply getting rid :
of one party, or the premier might be temporary
solution there are other deep seated problems that }
need to be taken care of ...In the past they haven't :
been interested in independence but maybe this i
episode will give them a change of heart, but they
need new policies so they don't fall into the same
situation," said Mr Archer. :

In a release issued yesterday, the new leader of i
TCI's governing party Premier Galmo Williams
criticised Britain's decision, saying it was not the }
best move for TCI. i

He acknowledged the recommendations in the i
interim report, which exposed "weaknesses" in the
administration, but said these should be remedied }
with new legislation and scrutiny by TCI's :
government with oversight from Britain, not direct i
rule. i

to go along and ‘secure the }
beaches for the future genera- }
tions’. i

He said: “Bahamians in Nas-

FROM page one

the latest survey of its kind — 81 per cent of visitors to
“the Bahamas overall” say they would be “likely” to
return, while a lower 50.7 per cent say they would be
“very likely” to come back to the islands.

Meanwhile, only seven per cent of the 9,009 visitors
who completed the survey told the Ministry that they
believed it “not at all likely” that they would revisit
the Bahamas in the following one to five years.

Intent to revisit the Bahamas was highest among vis-
itors to the Out Islands in 2007, 67 per cent of whom said
they would be “very likely” to come back, while a tiny
two per cent said that it was “not at all likely.”

This corresponded with another disclosure — that the
Out Islands rated better than Nassau/New Providence
and Grand Bahama in the minds of stopover visitors
when it came to all important elements such as hotel
rooms, food in hotels, beaches, climate and attitudes.

While these seemingly high “likely to return” fig-
ures would appear an encouraging sign during an indus-
try downturn, Minister of Tourism Vincent Vander-
pool Wallace was not gloating yesterday.

FROM page one

people out there who have it and
are unaware they have been taking

Medication

Minister on figures

In reality, “the sustainability of high levels of return
based on experience and references doesn’t begin to
happen until you reach around somewhere in the mid-
90s (per cent),” he explained.

“So (at 81 per cent) you’re nowhere near where
you need to be in order to get the kind of level of auto-
matic returns based on experience and recommenda-
tions.”

Presenting the Ministry of Tourism’s new strategic
direction last year, Mr Vanderpool Wallace committed
the ministry to making much better use of data gathered
from tourists via tools such as the exit surveys, which
seek to discover the nature of visitors’ stay, their demo-
graphic characteristics, their level of satisfaction and
their expenditure while in The Bahamas.

Such tools allow the Ministry to determine whether
it is getting closer to its stated aim of giving visitors a
“delightful experience” that compels them to go home
and tell others that “it’s better in The Bahamas.”

Trends revealed in the surveys now also factor direct-
ly into how funding is allocated in the ministry.

Health and the Department of
Public Health also wish to inform
the public that the recruitment of

stration, but Atlantis security
staff guarding the beach in front
of the exclusive Cove resort with
its private residences, hotel
rooms, swimming pools and
beach cabanas, told The Tribune
they had seen no sign of protest-
ers yesterday morning.

One security guard said: “The
law is that they can come to the

=

high water mark, so my concern
is anything above the high water
mark, which is private property.
“And we have security out
here every day, so no-one will
go past the high water mark.”
Paul Rolle has scheduled three
further events at Cove Beach
throughout the year and has
invited all ‘patriotic’ Bahamians

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sau especially are facing dis- ;
placement, chaos and lack of }
recreation and family activities :
as foreign ‘exclusive’ investments }
continue to rob us of our }

birthrights.

“No way is this more evident :
than at our public beaches that }
have been ‘strong armed’ away }

from us by some resorts.”

WYNDHAM WASSAU RESORT
CABLE BEACH



it.

“Tt is the Ministry of Health’s
mandate to provide quality health-
care for the citizens of this country,
but giving diabetics expired insulin
isn’t quality healthcare,” she said.

Health authorities maintain pre-
liminary investigations prove there
are adequate supplies of several
types of insulin in stock at the Eliz-
abeth Estates Clinic pharmacy, and
the earliest expiration date of these
medicines is October 2009, while
most expire in 2010 or 2011.

But the investigation has yet to
prove how pharmacists at the Eliz-
abeth Estates Clinic could have
given the 44-year-old insulin which
had expired over a year ago, and
possibly administered it to hun-
dreds of other diabetics.

A spokesman for the Ministry
of Health and Department of Pub-
lic Health said the Ministry is doing
a number of things to help achieve
its mandate to deliver quality
healthcare and provide access to
appropriate medication for all.

He said: “The Ministry of

five additional pharmacists is being
aggressively pursued.

“Tt is expected that they will be
in post by early May 2009, to fur-
ther improve access to and the
dispensing of pharmaceutical sup-
plies within the Community Clin-
Ics.

“This and the recent upgrade of
service delivery at the Princess
Margaret Hospital Pharmacy are
among the initiatives ensuring the
Bahamian public continues to
receive the highest quality of
healthcare service.”

FROM page one

any business standard is more than acceptable, he
said.

However, after agreeing to take the nomination
for the PLP, Mr Ritchie said he was informed that
“FNM operatives in the Ministry of Finance” would
use his company’s outstanding balance with Customs
to attack him.

Indeed, Mr Ritchie said, it was only a few days lat-
er when he was issued a letter — not from the Comp-
troller of Customs but from a previously unknown
employee — who demanded full and immediate pay-
ment.

“As the company did not have the resources to
meet this demand it relied upon its bank, First
Caribbean International Bank (FCIB), to continue
allowing its overdraft facility to go as high as $5 million
and issued cheques based on this.

“Without notice in mid-2007 the bank, which holds
well over $200 million in assets as security, suddenly
hardened its policy and returned hundreds of cheques.
The majority of these were replaced within a short
period of time with certified cheques,” he said.

In addition, Mr Ritchie said the Ministry of Finance
had Customs put GUL on a cash basis and demanded
“payment in advance for all services.”

“This severely damaged the company’s cash flow
and caused it to fall behind in its payment to other ven-

Global United CEO

dors who then also demanded cash in advance. In
addition to causing a great loss of business, in the lat-
er part of 2008, these events led to the company falling
behind in its payments to the bank,” he said.

Over the past 18 months, Mr Ritchie said GUL
made several offers to settle its outstanding bill with
Customs — all of which were rejected, first by the
same previously unknown employee of the Public
Treasury and then by the Comptroller of Customs.

“Instead the Minister of Finance initiated legal pro-
ceedings and appeared bent on following these
through to the end no matter what. Instead of wasting
time fighting the lawsuits, the company continued to
search for ways to arrange payments to the govern-
ment in order to settle the outstanding fees.

“Tt is to be noted that if the government had con-
tinued to allow GUL to operate as was the estab-
lished practice, the current situation would never have
arisen and once it did occur, had they accepted one of
the earlier payment plans offered, the balance would
have already been significantly paid down,” he said.

However, as previously stated, Mr Ritchie insists
that instead of working with the company to keep it
afloat, the government, more particularly the prime
minister, “has a totally different agenda than collect-
ing public funds.”

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FROM page one

Justice Lyons had eventually
recused himself from the case,
which involved the distribution of
funds between business partners,
on the basis that he did not have
time to hear the matter.

However, attorneys involved in
the case told Justice Allen that Jus-
tice Lyons had “literally forced”
the appointment of the accountant
on them.

They said that Justice Lyons
“threatened” to walk out of court
if they did not agree to the appoint-
ment.

Justice Allen has ordered the
names of the litigants in the case
sealed.

“The transcript of October 11,
2007 is replete with references to
the judge threatening to leave the
case if the appointment (of the
accountant) was not agreed and at
one point got up to leave when
counsel begged him to have a seat.
The judge was asked by counsel if
it was an ultimatum to which he
responded ‘you bet it is’,” Justice
Allen said in the judgment.

According to the judgment, on
the first day of the hearing, the
accountant was asked and denied
that he had a social relationship
with Senior Justice Lyons.

Then, on the second day of
cross-examination, he was asked
whether a relative of his had any
relationship with Senior Justice
Lyons to which he responded that
“he didn’t get into his sister’s busi-
ness but he knew that she and the

Judge's conduct

judge were friends.”

“Tt was only then that I made
the connection between the
accountant and information which
was in the public domain for some
time, that the judge had more than
a friendship with a woman who up
to that point I did not know was
the accountant’s sister,” Justice
Allen stated in the ruling.

In an attempt to ensure trans-
parency in her conduct as a judicial
officer and as the judge who was to
determine whether the accoun-
tant’s report should be approved,
Justice Allen said she informed
counsel that she was aware of this
information.

The ruling, which the Justice
delivered yesterday, was in rela-
tion to a request by lawyers for
one of the litigants that Justice
Allen recuse herself from the case
because of her knowledge of Jus-
tice Lyon’s relationship with the
accountant’s sister, which might
have prejudiced her judgment as to
whether the accountant’s report
would have been valid.

The findings of Mr Ferguson’s
report is being disputed by parties
and is now the subject of a hearing
before Justice Allen.

“Counsel informed me that they
were also aware of the informa-
tion and had brought up the issue
between them before the appoint-
ment of the accountant but did not
raise it with the judge,” Justice

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Allen said.

She said that counsel for one of
the litigants asserted at the hearing
of the application for her recusal,
that because the other lawyer did
not object to the appointment of
Daniel Ferguson, he waived his
right to object now.

“(Council for A) maintained
that he had not raised the issue
because Justice Lyons had literal-
ly forced the appointment on them,
threatening to walk out of court if
they did not agree to the appoint-
ment,” Justice Allen said.

She further noted that during
the hearing before her, the accoun-
tant admitted that he had only
“gathered documents and put
them into piles and did not exam-
ine them to see what was missing
from his second interim report and
that his only attempt to identify
them was in the final report.

“He also admitted that he did
not identify which of the missing
documents was relevant to the cal-
culation of the balancing payment.
He also agreed that he had made
no effort to compel the produc-
tion of any missing documents by
reference to the court.”

Justice Allen noted in her judg-
ment that she had expressed to
counsel her concerns about the
appointment of the accountant and
the integrity of the report. She also
noted that she had inquired
whether given the circumstances
and in the interest of time, counsel
would be minded to make any con-
cessions in relation to the report.

“T said further that if there were
no concessions regarding the
report I was minded to dispense
with hearing, the evidence of the
parties and their experts on the
issue of the approval of the report
as I had previously directed and
seek to complete just the cross-
examination of the accountant by
the parties and then determine
whether to approve the report,”
Justice Allen stated in the judg-
ment.

Senior Justice Allen ruled yes-
terday against an application for
her to recuse herself from the hear-
ing.

“Having ascertained all of the
circumstances which have bearing
on the suggestion that I am biased,
and having asked myself whether a
fair minded observer informed of
all the circumstances would con-
clude that there was a real possi-
bility that I was biased, the
resounding reply is no. I have no
doubt that I can objectively decide
the issue before me,” Senior Jus-
tice Allen stated.

Alan Stenfield, QC, along with
Michael Scott, represents client A,
Anthony deGarr Robinson, QC,
along with Randol Dorsett, repre-
sents client B, attorney Brian
Moree represents client C, while
Nicholas Lavender, QC, along with
attorney Wayne Munroe, repre-
sents client D. The identities of
the parties involved were not dis-
closed.





‘Stand-out’ project t

THE TRIBUNE

usine

WEDNESDAY,

MARCH 25,



2009

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net



invest further $200m

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he mothballing of
numerous major
Caribbean-based
resort developments
will “make Albany and the
Bahamas stand out even more”,
the development’s managing part-
ner told Tribune Business yester-
day, with a further $200 million
set to be spend on the project’s
first phase between now and its
planned summer 2010 opening.
Christopher Anand said a silver
lining to the current global finan-
cial crisis, which had dried up
debt financing and pre-sales for



CHRISTOPHER ANAND

Likely Morton sale
hits Inagua rebuild

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A DECISION on whether to
fully rebuild Morton Salt’s Inagua
facility has been delayed due to
the impending sale of the com-
pany’s ultimate parent, Tribune
Business has been told, with the
buyer already planning to sell the
Bahamian company as part of a
potential $1.5 billion deal.

Morton Salt’s ultimate parent,
US-based Rohm & Haas, had
been due to decide on whether
to invest a multi-million dollar
sum in rebuilding the Inagua
operation by the 2009 first quarter
end, but the latter’s spokesman,
George Bochanski, told Tribune

Business that “things have got a
little bit more cloudy than they
have been in the past”.

Explaining that no decision had
been taken, Mr Bochanski added:
“Lately, Dow has been talking
about a possible sale of Morton.
Until all that gets sorted out, I
don’t expect Morton manage-
ment will make a decision any
time soon.

“It’s really going to be up to
Dow to determine the future of
the whole business. I wouldn’t
certainly expect anything new
until the deal between Dow and
Rohm & Haas closes. There
won’t be any information com-

SEE page 3B

Benefit scheme raises tax
and bureaucracy fear

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s pro-
posed unemployment benefit
will burden the Bahamian busi-
ness community with more
bureaucracy and taxes at a time
when it can least afford it, one
executive said yesterday, and
force all companies to change
their computer payroll systems.

Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor
Company’s (NMC) operations
manager, who is also a senior
executive with the Nassau Insti-
tute think-tank, told Tribune
Business he was concerned that
the proposed unemployment
benefit scheme would, in con-
junction with the growing
national debt, rising fiscal deficit
and the National Insurance
Board’s (NIB) projected short-


























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

falls, increasingly burden future
Bahamian generations.

Tribune Business has
obtained a copy of the proposed
amendments to the National
Insurance Act, and its accom-
panying Benefits and Assistance
Regulations, which indicate the
unemployment benefit scheme
and its attendant reforms are
more wide-ranging than previ-
ously revealed.

For instance, workers who
are “kept on short-time” and
suffer a loss of employment
earnings - meaning workers
working a reduced work week -
where their income is reduced
to less than half their average
insurable weekly earnings, will
receive unemployment benefit.

And when employers termi-
nate an employee’s service, they
will expose themselves to a $500
fine and summary conviction if
they fail to complete the appro-
priate NIB-approved form, or
fail to give it to the employee of
send it to the Board within one
week of the termination date.

Any continuing failure to
comply will result in the
employer incurring a $200 per
day fine for each day the
form(s) are outstanding.

“T think that the last thing we
need is to set up a system that
drags the country down in the
future, as it has done in other
countries with welfare systems,”
Mr Lowe told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“Already, you’ve got to
change your computer system.
There are more forms, and if
you don’t fill in that form it’s a
$200 per day fine.”

Among those eligible for the
Government’s proposed unem-

SEE page 2B

* Albany developers target summer 2010 opening for first phase

* Working to close $200m worth of real estate sales, and
hoping to seamlessly move into $400-$500m worth of
Marina Residences construction once pre-sales targets hit

* Some 20-30 firms working on construction, and several
hundred workers, 90% of whom are Bahamian

many planned Caribbean mixed-
use resort developments, was that
it “rationalised” development in
the region and curbed a poten-
tial product oversupply - some-
thing that will benefit well-
financed projects such as Albany.

“We have become aware of 27
projects, pretty major projects,

that have been pulled or can-
celled in the Caribbean and Mex-
ico over the last 12 months,” Mr
Anand told Tribune Business.
“Only the absolute strongest will
survive, and we are lucky to be in
the situation we are in.

SEE page 3B

Miami firm is ‘optimistic’
on Bahamas realty sales

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Former US senator
said to be behind
A MIAMI-based marketing com- Paradise Is Mine
pany advertising land for sale in
Rum Cay told Tribune Business yesterday that it was “optimistic”
about the success of its South Beach-based business called Paradise is
Mine, which is thought to be connected to former US senator, Billy

Wayne Davis.

Lawrence Fowler, a Paradise Is Mine spokesman, told this newspa-
per that his marketing company “markets for land in the Bahamas”.

This comes as Bahamian real estate is being lauded as a “gold mine”
and touted for defying market odds by resisting devaluation, while the
popped housing bubble in the US destroyed property resale prices.

Officials from the Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREA) told
this paper Monday that they would look into the claims of the US-based
sales centre pushing Bahamian property. The President of BREA

said that only agents who held their
licenses were eligible to sell prop- SRE page 4B

Make ita pee

ROYAL FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

@C Global United facing

Friday shut down

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GLOBAL United, the shipping
agent and logistics business run
by former PLP election candidate
Jackson Ritchie, yesterday said it
was likely to cease operations and
lay-off all remaining staff this Fri-
day in the face of a winding-up
threat from the Government over
unpaid taxes, a senior minister
describing as “absolutely bogus”
the firm’s claims of political per-
secution.

Captain Ritchie, in a statement
issued to the media, accused the
Government of ‘victimising’
Global United because of his
political affiliation, refusing all
the company’s efforts to settle its
outstanding multi-million dollar
customs duties and departure tax
bill in an effort to force it out of
business.

He revealed that the Attorney
General’s Office had served
Global United with four statuto-
ry demands in relation to some
$6 million allegedly owed to the
Customs Department and the
Public Treasury, threatening that
unless the outstanding sums were
paid in full by tomorrow (Thurs-
day, March 26) it would petition
for the company’s winding-up.

As a result, Captain Ritchie
said that if no alternative solu-
tion could be found, “the compa-
ny will have to terminate the
remaining staff, hand over all
assets to the bank and close its
doors permanently on Friday,
March 27”. This would add to the
160 Bahamian staff already ter-
minated by Global United over
the past two years.

Yet Zhivargo Laing, minister
of state for finance, yesterday
described Mr Ritchie’s claims of
political persecution and victimi-
sation as “absolutely bogus”, say-

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* Troubled company facing
winding-up threat from
Attorney General’s Office
if $6m unpaid tax bill
not met by tomorrow

* Company's former PLP
election candidate head
claims government
persecution

* Laing slams allegations as
‘absolutely bogus’, with
government ‘more than
gracious’ over substantial
sums owed

* FirstCaribbean has security
over $20m worth of
company assets, and
would head creditor list,
which includes
Colinalmperial

ing the issue was simply one
where Global United had failed
to pay “substantial sums” in taxes.
As aresult, the Government had
been forced to take action to col-
lect what was due from it.

Mr Laing said Captain Ritchie
had agreed a payments schedule
for the outstanding taxes with the
Customs Department, but had
failed to deliver on what he had
promised.

And the minister said that
efforts to collect Global United’s
outstanding tax bill had begun
under the former PLP adminis-
tration, before the current FNM
government took power on May

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

WALTON INTERNATIONAL LTD.
(Company number 55,015B)

An International Business Company

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137(4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000 notice is hereby given that the voluntary winding-up
and dissolution of the Company commenced on the 23rd day of
March, 2009 and that Pine Limited of Devonshire House, Queen
Street, P.O. Box N-8176 Nassau, Bahamas has been appointed
Liquidator.

Dated this 23rd day of March, 2009

Pine Limited
Liquidator

IN THE ESTATE OF JOE LEWO late of 4200 Down Point
Lane, Windermere, Orange County, Florida, USA

DECEASED

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims
against the above-named Estate are required, on or before
15th April, A.D., 2009 to send their names and addresses, and
particulars of their debts or claims, to the undersigned, and if
SO required by notice in writing from the undersigned, to come
in and prove such debts or claims, or in default thereof they will
be excluded from the benefit of any distribution AND all persons
indebted to the said Estate are asked to pay their respective debts
to the undersigned immediately.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that at the expiration of the
date mentioned above, the assets of the late JOE LEWO will
be distributed among the persons entitled thereto having regard
only to the claims of which the Personal Representative shall then
have had notice.

Dated this 24th day of March, A.D., 2009.

C/O Jerome E. Pyfrom & Co.
Attorneys for the Executor
2â„¢ Floor Charlotte House

Shirley and Charlotte Streets

P. Q. Box N-3950
Nassau, Bahamas



THE TRIBUNE



@ ROYAL FIDELITY MARKET WRA

@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

THERE was an increase in
trading momentum last week, as
investors traded in four out of
the 25 listed securities, of which
one declined and three remained
unchanged. There were no
advancers in the market last
week.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 31,506 shares
changed hands, representing an
increase of 10,585 shares or 51
per cent, versus the previous
week's trading volume of 20,921
shares.

Focol Holdings (FCL) was the
volume leader last week with
14,000 shares trading, its stock
ending the week unchanged at
$5.07.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
was the big decliner, trading
11,630 shares, its share price
falling by $0.08 to end last week
at $6.48.

BOND MARKET

Investors traded $67,000 (par
value), Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
Series D Notes (FBB15) Due
2015.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

Freeport Concrete Company
(FCC) released first quarter
results as at November 30, 2008,
reporting a net loss of $220,000
for the quarter, compared to a

net loss of $74,000 in the first

quarter of the previous year.
The company's management

indicated that total sales rev-



The Bahamian Stock Market

enues of $3.4 million were down FINDEX 811.61 YTD (-2.78%)
by 8.6 per cent quarter-over-
quarter, due to reduced sales in BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

its Home Centre and concrete SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
division. Management said they
were actively pursuing ways to AML $1.45 $- 0 -15.20%
raise additional capital to pur- BBL $0.63 $- 0 -4.55%
chase inventory, which would BOB $7.00 Ve 0 8.38%
increase sales at the Home Cen- BPF $11.00 $- 0 -6.78%
tre. BSL 9.58 - 0 -5.99%
FCL’s gross profit of $778,000 BWL oe 5 i 0 0.00%
declined by about $246,000 or 24 CAB $13.95 $- 0 -0.57%
per cent, from the 2007 first = CB $6.48 $-0.08 11,630 -7.43%
quarter. Total expenses of CHL $2.83 o 229 0.00%
$886,000 also declined by 10 per CIB $10.45 $- 0 0.00%
cent die te lower operating Few $-0.02 0 -30.67%
costs. Total assets of $6.6 million - 2 9
: DHS $2.16 $ 0 15.29%
increased by $9,000 or 1 per cent FAM $7.76 $- 0 -0.51%
from the fiscal 2008 year-end, FBB $2.37 $- 0 0.00%
due to an increase in the com- FCC $0.30 $- 0 0.00%
pany's fixed assets. Total liabili- FCL $5.07 $- 14.000 -1.93%
ties of $5.3 million also increased FCLB $1. 00 $ 0 i 0 00%
by $273,000 or 5.4 per cent from FIN : ‘ nae
fiscal 2008. $11.00 $- 0 -7.33%
ICD $5.50 $- 5,647 -10.28%
: ’ JSJ $10.50 $- 0 -5.41%
Private Placement Offerings PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%,

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced that it will be extend-
ing the deadline of its private
placement offering. The pre-
ferred shares will be paying a
dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per
cent, payable semi-annually.

Dividend Notes:

Finance Corporation of The
Bahamas (FIN) has declared a
dividend of $0.13 per share,
payable on March 30, 2009, to

all shareholders of record date
March 23, 2009.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
has declared a dividend of $0.05
per share, payable on March 31,
2009, to all shareholders of
record date March 13, 2009.

Cable Bahamas (CAB) has

declared a dividend of $0.07 per
share, payable on March 31,
2009, to all shareholders of
record date March 19, 2009.

Consolidated Water Company
(CWCB) has declared a dividend
of $0.013 per share, payable on
May 7, 2009, to all shareholders
of record date April 1, 2009.

Benefit scheme raises tax and bureaucracy fear

FROM page 1B

ployment benefit scheme are
those who have been unem-
ployed since July 1, 2006, well
before the current economic
downturn started.

Mr Lowe yesterday also
objected to the fact that the pro-
posed Act amendments and
regulations made the responsi-
ble minister “all-powerful” by
giving them the sole discretion
to decide when to extend the
maximum duration a person
could receive unemployment
benefit for.

Arguing that the proposed
unemployment benefit scheme
represented another tax on the



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business community and
employed workers, Mr Lowe
questioned why the Govern-
ment was seeking to introduce it
when the economy was locked
into a recession and companies
were already overburdened by a
deteriorating financial picture.

“Why implement this thing
when everything is on a down-
ward spiral?” Mr Lowe asked.
“That was one of the things that
extended the Great Depression
in the US, government man-
dates at a time when business
were losing business. But they
know better.

“What about the unintended
consequences? You shift the
burden, and businesses say:
“This is another expense, we
must cut back.’ If a person
comes in, looking for work, that
1 per cent could be the differ-
ence between being hired or
not.”

The Government is initially
proposing to finance the unem-
ployment benefit scheme with a
$20 million transfer from NIB’s
medical benefits branch. If that
sum is exhausted before the
mandatory contributions
become law, then the scheme

would be supplemented from
the consolidated fund.

The 1 per cent that Mr Lowe
is referring to is the mandatory
1 per cent of insurable wage
contribution that is expected to
finance the unemployment ben-
efit long-term, split 50/50
between employer and employ-
6é,
As regards the timing of this
funding mechanism’s introduc-
tion, Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation’s
(BECon) president, told Tri-
bune Business last week that
while the Government wanted
to implement it from January
1, 2010, it had made it clear the
timeline was not set in stone.

Mr Nutt said it was “subject
to the state of the economy. If
the economy doesn’t improve
and gets worse, they would con-
sider delaying the contribution
aspect of it.

“But if a lot of money is com-
ing out of the Consolidated
Fund, the Government might
not be able to afford to keep
paying it out, and have to intro-
duce mandatory contributions
sooner.”

Mr Nutt and Dionisio

were kis beac reg rachel astit

Area Viealth bana

D’ Aguilar, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce’s president,
have both backed the unem-
ployment benefit scheme’s
introduction as a necessary
social stimulus to prevent
increased suffering among the
jobless and their dependents -
albeit with reservations about
the current proposal’s structure.

The BECon president added
that while the unemployment
contributions “wouldn’t be
viewed as a huge burden”, they
were an additional cost that
businesses would have to bear.

“Tt is something that can have
an effect on struggling and mar-
ginal businesses, which is unfor-
tunate,” Mr Nutt added. “But it
is something that is overdue and
will provide benefits to our soci-
ety as a whole.”

Mr Lowe, though, appeared
to disagree. He told Tribune
Business: “If I was in their [gov-
ernment’s] position, my inten-
tions might be the same. But
would I implement a system
that burdens future generations
of Bahamians? I doubt it. I
might be voted out of office,
but I would choose political
leadership over vote getting.”

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THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 3B



Vehicle retention
aid repair shops

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE AUTO repair business
could emerge as a relatively
recession-proof business, Tri-
bune Business was told yester-

day, with more people con-
cerned with the upkeep of the
vehicles they have rather than
the purchase of a new one.
Tim Cartwright, service
manager of Cartwright’s
Garage, told Tribune Business
that the company have not

Likely Morton

sale hits Inagua
rebuild

FROM page 1B

ing out of Morton until then. Ulti-
mately, it will be down to Dow
to make a decision as the new
owner.”

That deal is due to close on
April 1, 2009. Yet Bloomberg has
reported that Dow aims to raise
$4 billion to help pay for the deal,
including $1.5 billion from sell-
ing Chicago-headquartered Mor-
ton International, Morton Salt’s
parent company.

Dow will also issue $4.3 billion
of debt and cut costs by $400 mil-
lion more than previously esti-
mated, partly by eliminating an

additional 3,500 jobs, mostly at
Rohm & Haas.

Changed

Mr Bochanski said “nothing
has changed substantively” as it
relates to Morton Salt’s Inagua
operation since it was heavily
damaged by Hurricane Ike, with
executives operating from tem-
porary offices.

“There’s full employment, no
one has been laid off, and sub-
stantively the status quo remains
until a decision is taken,” Mr
Bochanski said.

‘Stand-out’ project to

invest further $200m



FROM page 1B

“In the long-run, it will make
Albany and the Bahamas stand
out even more. It’s rationalised
the pace of development that was
going on, which was unsustain-
able. I don’t believe there was the
demand to justify the supply com-
ing on the market.”

Although there were fewer
buyers in the market, Mr Anand
said that situation could change
very rapidly if consumer confi-
dence returned regarding the
state of the world economy and
US stock market.

Supply, on the other hand, had
“dropped more than demand”,
and took much longer to recover.
All of which is set to benefit the
likes of Albany, which will seem-
ingly be perfectly positioned to
capture the economic upturn, and
exploit the lack of product avail-
ability throughout the Caribbean.

“Albany will be one of the
strongest of projects, which will
be great for the Bahamas,” Mr
Anand said, adding that demand
for this nation’s real estate was
also likely to receive a boost as
people used such investments to
hedge against future inflation.

Inflation is an increasing con-
cern, especially in developed
nations such as the US and UK,
as governments expand fiscal
spending and the money supply in
a bid to ward off inflation.

Meanwhile, Mr Anand told
Tribune Business yesterday that
Albany’s investors had invested
“about $200 million” into the pro-
ject’s first phase to date, with
another $200 million set to come.

The first phase involves
Albany’s infrastructure and key
amenities, such as its golf course
and 71-slip marina, and Mr
Anand said the latter was set to
be “look finished” by June. The
channel and concreting were both
“70 per cent” complete”, while
the golf course was “well beyond
50 per cent complete”.

The course was currently being
grassed, with irrigation and shap-
ing already complete on many
holes. The tender for Albany’s
water park had also gone out to

bid.

The number of construction
workers on-site at Albany, some
90 per cent of whom were
Bahamians, was in the “hundreds
and growing by the day”.

“The vertical construction will
really ramp up this summer,” Mr
Anand added. “We’re in full
swing starting this summer. We’re
doing some site work and moving
some utilities that need to be
moved to move fully ahead.”

The Albany managing partner
said some 25 hotel cottages were
at various stages of vertical con-
struction, with another 15 set to
start shortly.

“We're shooting for a summer
2010 opening of all the amenities,
the hotel cottages,” in Phase One,
Mr Anand said, explaining that
if pre-sales targets were met, the
developers would seamlessly roll
into $400-$500 million worth of
phase two construction on the
Marina Residences.

“We are getting ready to be in
a position to launch the Marina
Residences,” Mr Anand said.
“We have to get some pre-sales
goals done, but we think it could
happen and are optimistic. If the
world stabilises and improves, I
think we can get it done.

“It will take 12-15 months to
get those goals done. If the world
is OK we will get it done, but if
not it won’t be for lack of trying.

“In an ideal world, we would
be starting next summer. That
could start a chain reaction of
$400-$500 million worth of con-
struction, which is more than in
phase one. We’ve got to execute
phase one, and then get into posi-
tion to execute phase two.”

Mr Anand added that Albany
was “in the process of closing”
around $200 million worth of real
estate sales, having been boost-
ed by its 80-strong founders pro-
gramme, all of whom had stuck
with the development.

The major investors in Albany
are the Tavistock Group, the
investment vehicle for Lyford
Cay-based billionaire Joe Lewis,
and world-famous golfers Tiger
Woods and Ernie Els.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

RC SM dT
aM
Me IR) rere ya CEL



seen a decline in vehicle ser-
vicing business compared to
2008, but instead experienced
the same fluctuations that have
always defined revenue flow.

“There hasn’t been anything
noticeable. Some weeks it’s
down, some weeks it’s back to
normal, but nothing over-
whelming,” Mr Cartwright
said.

However, he added that
some individuals are holding
out on their regular service.
“Some people, I have to beg
them to come in,” he said.

A manager at Nassau Repair
Shop told Tribune Business
that they had seen that, when
there was an economic down-
turn, people focus on car
repairs rather than replace-
ment.

He said it was important for
people to get their oil changed
regularly and repair things
such as mufflers and radiators,
because they cannot afford to
purchase a new vehicle.

Ivan Ferguson, owner of
Fergie’s Tune-Up on Jennie
Street, said this time of year
has been traditionally slow for
his business, but that he
expects things to pick up after
the Easter season.

He was not quite sure

ane

Sucomsshul candedate tor the Financial Controller position must hare at least feo yoars professional public accounting experience.
must hold a CRA, CA, 004 or other professional designation recognized by the Bahannas

The position of Financial Controller vw
Company and will be expected to implement and continually develop systems of internal coniro

whether more people will ser-
vice their vehicles rather than
buy new ones, but was posi-
tive about his business keep-
ing up with the competition.

“Some people are regular
with their service and some
people are not, but I haven’t
seen a drastic change like
that,” said Mr Ferguson.

New car sales have been
down across New Providence,
and suppliers of General
Motors and Ford Vehicles
were watching the US media
closely last year to see if their
manufacturers would be dri-
ven under by that country’s
failing economy.

Only one repair shop that
spoke to Tribune Business said
“business is definitely down”.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



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PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Global United facing Friday shut down

FROM page 1B

3, 2007.

“What is absolutely incredible is how
he [Mr Ritchie] was able to amass that
level of indebtedness to the Government,
when other people in this society would
be flabbergasted to incur even 10 per
cent of that,” Mr Laing said.

Describing the sums owed by Global
United, on behalf of shipping and cruise
line clients such as Carnival and Royal-
Caribbean as “substantial”, Mr Laing
added: “He had entered into an arrange-
ment with the Comptroller of Customs
for some payment, which was seemingly
supported by his bank. That fell through.

“It’s an unfortunate circumstance, it
really is, but it’s quite incredible that Mr
Ritchie makes this argument for the
defence of his situation.

“Taxes are due. That he does not deny.
They have been due for some time. They
have been accrued for some time, and
efforts were made to collect them prior to
the election. It’s incredible.”

Mr Laing said: “I think he [Mr Ritchie]
would have to concede that the Govern-
ment has been more than gracious in tol-
erating his business relationship with the
Government in relation to Customs. It
has been more than gracious.”

In his statement yesterday, Captain
Ritchie said Global United had paid
between $70-$80 million to the Public
Treasury on behalf of its clients every
year up to 2007, and “at any one time
be no more than 5-7 per cent outstanding
in its obligations to the Government”.

He alleged, though, that Global Unit-
ed problems began when he accepted
the PLP nomination for Clifton in the

Miami firm is ‘optimistic’
on Bahamas realty sales

FROM page 1B

2007 general election, claiming he
received a call that ‘FNM operatives’ in
the Ministry of Finance would use the
company’s outstanding tax bill to attack
him.

Captain Ritchie then alleged that he
received a letter from a Public Treasury
employee demanding immediate pay-
ment, which Global United was unable to
meet.

The company resorted to its bank,
FirstCaribbean International Bank
(Bahamas), which held security - via a
floating and fixed mortgage debenture -
over $20 million worth of Global Unit-
ed’s assets. The bank allowed the com-
pany’s overdraft to reach $5 million, and
issued cheques on it.

Captain Ritchie yesterday claimed the
bank then “suddenly hardened” its posi-
tion in mid-2007, returning “hundreds of
cheques”. These had to be replaced by
certified cheques, at a time when the
Ministry of Finance and Customs placed
Global United on a cash-in-advance basis
for all service payments.

This, Captain Ritchie argued, dam-
aged Global United’s cash flow, and
caused it to fall behind on vendor/sup-
plier payments, causing them to also
demand cash in advance. Outlining the
troubled nature of Global United’s busi-
ness, Captain Ritchie said that in 2008
the company lost clients and fell behind
in its bank payments.

He accused the Treasury and Customs
Department of rejecting all attempts to
settle with Global United over the out-
standing taxes over the past 18 months,
and said: “If the Government had con-
tinued to allow Global United to operate

as was the established practice, the cur-
rent situation would never have arisen.

“Once it did occur, had they accepted
the earlier payment plan offered, the bal-
ance would have already been signifi-
cantly paid down.”

FirstCaribbean had engaged KPMG,
the accounting firm, to help Global Unit-
ed restructure and develop a debt repay-
ment plan.

Captain Ritchie said the Attorney
General’s Office rejected the plan, and
argued that its winding-up threat was
“very strange”, given that FirstCaribbean
had positioned itself as the secured, pre-
ferred creditor in the event of liquida-
tion. This, he suggested, would give the
bank first call on the company’s assets
and leave the Government with nothing,
although that is by no means certain.

Several Tribune Business sources yes-
terday backed the Government’s posi-
tion, suggesting that Global United’s real
problems stemmed from the fact it had
expanded too far, too fast, and taken on
an ultimately unsustainable debt burden
from FirstCaribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) as a result.

The company had been unable to gen-
erate the cash flow and liquidity to ser-
vice the debt load, while management
did not obtain the efficiencies and syn-
ergies from the acquired businesses to
make the expansion work, sources sug-
gested, implying that Mr Ritchie’s alle-
gations were a “smokescreen” and
attempt to divert blame.

“It was all leveraged and he didn’t
have the cash flow,” one source alleged.
“There was no real consideration given to
managing the acquisitions.”

Tribune Business revealed last month
how Global United had placed its Air-
port Industrial Park headquarters up for
sale for $1.8 million, and that its Global
United store at Sandyport was set to
close (it has now done so). Captain
Ritchie has also placed his personal res-
idence at Sandyport on the market.

Global United began life as Freeport-
based Tanja Enterprises. But Captain
Ritchie embarked on headlong expan-
sion in 2004, becoming the main ship-
ping agent in Freeport by acquiring Unit-
ed Shipping.

It followed that up the following year
with the purchase of Nassau-based Glob-
al Customs Brokers & Trucking and
World Bound Couriers, enabling it to
enter the New Providence market as a
major player in the shipping agency, dis-
tribution and logistics and transporta-
tion business.

At the height of his ambitions, Captain
Ritchie also agreed a deal to purchase
Discovery Cruise Line, although that ulti-
mately fell through.

Among Global United’s other credi-
tors are its preference shareholders. They
include Colinalmperial Insurance Com-
pany, which had $2-$3 million worth of
preference shares that it inherited from
the Imperial Life purchase, and Edward
Fitzgerald, father of PLP Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald.

Mr Fitzgerald Snr is understood to
have received $1 million worth of pref-
erence shares as part payment for selling
Global Customs Brokers & Trucking to
Global United. However, it is under-
stood that the company defaulted on pay-
ing the preference share dividends, and



(The Tribune}

dei aie tilem kt tl tet a) ieee
Everywhere The Buyers Are!

*
‘4

erty in this nation.

In an release published on
Monday, the Paradise Is Mine
company unveiled its plans to
open a ‘sales centre’ in South
Beach “to exclusively market
Bahamas properties”.





However, a release published
online on March 15 names ‘Par-
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The release also said that Par-

NOTICE

ge em mre me Ca)






Please be advised that the Master Treasurer, Sir George Newman,
is scheduled to visit New Providence from 2nd - 7th April 2009.



adise is Mine “has agreed as part
of this process to name the streets
and beaches after the first resi-
dents”.

Three of the beach front lots
advertised on the company’s web-
site, which seem to be empty
plots, marked “subject property”
have already been tagged sold,
while eight seem to still be on the
market.

According to Mr Fowler, sev-
eral different persons, presum-
ably foreigners, own the plots of
land advertised on his company’s
site, However, he could not say
who exactly owned them.

Billy Davis, who purports to

Paradise Is Mine’s director of
sales, had previously confirmed
to them that Mr Davis was the
developer behind the website and
its real estate venture. However,
Mr Rover declined to confirm this
when contacted by Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday.

It has been long argued that
much of the land in Rum Cay has
been purchased by foreigners
without clean title, although there
is nothing to suggest this is the
case with the land Paradise Is
Mine is marketing.

In an article published by this
paper in 2007, it was revealed that
there was strong suspicion that

that these investors will realise nothing if
the company is wound-up.

Sources also told Tribune Business
that Global United was hurt when the
current government abandoned a $3-$4
million deal to purchase the company’s
Freeport headquarters for a new Cus-
toms Department headquarters. That
sale would have improved the compa-
ny’s cash flow and liquidity.

Captain Ritchie declined to respond
to aseries of detailed questions e-mailed
to him by Tribune Business yesterday,
only saying: “All of the questions will be
answered in subsequent releases. We
have documentation to support every-
thing we have said and will make it avail-
able to the press and the population at
large in due course.”

He said in his release that it was sus-
picious that Global United was being
forced to pay-up, when other businesses
received more lenient treatment on out-
standing taxes and fees.

This was rejected by Mr Laing, who
said the Government was making exten-
sive efforts to collect from all who owed
it funds.

“Mr Ritchie would have to know that
efforts to secure funds he owed to the
Government commenced prior to the
election, as was confirmed to him by the
then-secretary of revenue, Ehurd Cun-
ningham, in a meeting he had not long
after the election,” Mr Laing added.

“It’s absolute nonsense. The extent to
which Mr Ritchie was indebted to the
Government represented funds he had
collected on behalf of his clients, essen-
tially trust funds. It’s a significant breach
of customs practice.”

/



2
iizZ-





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JAMES VINCENT of
SOUTH BEACH DRIVE, P.O. BOX SB-51712, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 18 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTIAN JULIE of 9TH
AVENUE FT. LAUDERDALE 33304 is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 18 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MALLISSA NICOLE
EVANS of Nassau Village, PO. Box N-4447, intend to
change my name to MELISSA NICOLE EVANS. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.









scores of Americans had sunk
tens of thousands of dollars into
pieces of land they don’t have
clean title to, walking away with
title deeds that will have no stand-
ing in a court of law.

own large plots of land on Rum
Cay, is believed to own at least
one of the plots offered by Par-
adise is Mine.

Realtors spoken to by Tribune
Business have said Ted Rover,

PME Peer ECR ce Ue Rm mech AOR pAt tice
Peele Gems el ON ROMA RSI On

All members are asked to contact:
Elaine Bullard @ 325-3693 for further information

GEOPAK SERVICES
LIMITED (MIDAS)

Will be

= ins
Colina

Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited
Class “A” Preference Shares

The Board of Directors of Colina
Holdings Bahamas Limited (CHBL) is
pleased to announce that a Preference
Share Dividend for the period
January 1, 2009 to March 31, 2009 will
be paid to the Class “A” Preference
Shareholders of record of CHBL on the
31st day of March 2009.

CLOSED on FRIDAY
MARCH 27th, 2009.

For the funeral of
Mr. James Knowles.

Payment will be made through the
Company’s Registrar and_ Transfer
Agent, CFAL Ltd., within 10 business

We will reopen days of the record date.

for business as usual on
SATURDAY, MARCH 28th, 2009.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

NOTICE

Notice
GRASE INTERNATIONAL CORP

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 235 of the Companies Act,

1992, as Amended, Notice is hereby given that:- Incorporated under the International Business

Companies Act, 2000 of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas registered in the Register of Companies under
the Registration Number 116498.

1. SAFRA INTERNATIONAL HOLDING LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation (In Voluntary Liquidation) is in dissolution.

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
GUILFORD INVESTMENT GROUP LTD. is in dissolu-
tion. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be con-
tacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets,
Nassau Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
3rd April, 2009.

. Proceedings to wind-up and dissolve the Company were

commenced on the 12th day of March A.D, 2009. (In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the liquidation of the
Company is complete and the Company has been struck
off the Register of Companies maintained by the
Registrar General.

. Dr. Wilder Gonzalez Penino whose address is Bayside
Executive Park, West Bay Street and Blake Road,
Building ITI, Ground Floor CB-10998, Nassau, Bahamas
is the Liquidator of the Company for the purpose of such
dissolution.

Dated this 12th day of March, 2009.

i
fi

i a am 2
ae maa) Cte
WILLIAMS LAW CHAMBERS
Regintersd Agent

ei
fi
r - E
i. od if — ;
ALA MEME
LiQnmuaTon

Esther Capra De San Ignacio
Liquidator



THE TRIBUNE

@ By KRISTEN A LEE
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Lower
fuel prices, cost-cutting and oth-
er one-time benefits helped
cruise operator Carnival Corp.
raise its profit 10 percent in its
fiscal first quarter, far exceeding
Wall Street’s expectations, the
company reported Tuesday.

Carnival has maintained
strong booking volumes by
slashing cruise prices. The Mia-
mi-based company lowered its
forecast for fiscal 2009 earnings,
however, in part because prices
have remained weak for cruises
booked for the second half of
this year.

“Given the significant slow-
down in the global economy, I
think it is fair to say that this
has been one of the most chal-
lenging booking environments
we have ever experienced,” said
Vice Chairman and Chief Oper-
ating Officer Howard Frank
during a conference call with
investors.

For the quarter that ended
February 28, earnings grew to
$260 million, or 33 cents per
share. That’s up from $236 mil-
lion, or 30 cents per share, a
year ago.

Carnival said its revenue fell
nine per cent to $2.86 billion,
from $3.15 billion in the first
fiscal quarter of 2008.

Analysts polled by Thomson
Reuters forecast earnings of 19
cents per share on revenue of
$2.87 billion.

The cruise line has achieved a

10 per cent year-over-year
increase in bookings but was
forced to slash prices to “levels
not seen in recent years,” Frank
said. “It was strong volumes
against very lousy rates,” Chair-
man and Chief Executive Micky
Arison added with a laugh.

Bookings for the most expen-
sive cruises, particularly those
to remote regions of Alaska,
have fallen further than less
expensive Caribbean jaunts.
The company also noted that it
plans to reduce its capacity for
cruises to Alaska in 2010.

Carnival said budget-con-
scious vacationers also cut
spending on gambling, shore
excursions, shopping and photos
during their cruises, although
they continued to spend on spas
and drinks.

On the other side of the bal-
ance sheet, a 45 per cent drop in
fuel prices saved the cruise line
21 cents per share. The
improved results also included
two one-time gains totaling $32
million: One was from cutting
an income tax reserve that was
no longer needed and they oth-
er from terminating a lease-out
and lease-back deal involving
troubled insurer American
International Group Inc.

Carnival also held down con-
trollable costs through a vari-
ety of measures, such as rene-
gotiating with its vendors,
reducing its fuel consumption
and cutting back on some pro-
jects.

“Carnival’s revised guidance
highlights the difficult pricing

environment the industry cur-
rently faces,” said Barclays Cap-
ital analyst Felicia Hendrix in
a note to investors. “However, it
also underscores managemen-
t’s impressive ability to cut costs
even in a difficult environment.”

Carnival now expects 2009
earnings to range from $2.10 to
$2.30 per share, down from its
previous guidance range of







$2.25 to $2.75 per share.

For the second quarter, Car-
nival predicted earnings in the
range of 30 cents to 32 cents per
share, down from 49 per share
in the prior year.

Analysts forecast full-year
earnings of $2.18 per share and
a second-quarter profit of 33
cents per share.

“As expected, 2009 will be a

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:









“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 20
Lexington Estates Subdivision situated in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
Family Residence consisting of (3) bedrooms and (2) bathrooms.








Property Size: 7,296 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,164 sq. ft.





This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS






LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 3005”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday








27th March, 2009.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 5B
Carnival books higher 1Q profit but cuts outlook

challenging year for the indus-
try, but it is encouraging that
consumers are willing to spend
money on attractively priced
vacations,” said Susquehanna
Financial Group’s Robert
LaFleur.

At the end of the first quar-
ter, Carnival reported $3.7 bil-
lion of liquidity and said it will
not need new financing for

2009. The company noted it will
continue to look for opportu-
nities to improve its liquidity.

Carnival shares slipped 48
cents, or 2.1 per cent, to $22.83
in afternoon trading, after gain-
ing as much as seven per cent
early in the session.

The stock has traded between
$14.85 and $43.54 during the
past 52 weeks.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 45
Silvergate Subdivision situated in the Southern District of the
islands of New Providence, one of the island of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Duplex,
each unit consisting of (2) bedrooms (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 5,258 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,748 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS

LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 3107”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday

27th March, 2009.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being a portion of
Crown Grant A4-60, off Carmichael Road, situated in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence one of the islands of
the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon Duplex
with each unit consisting of (2) bedrooms (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 4,988 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,830 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 2916”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
So FINCO

ne
NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 69, 70
and 71, Bartlett’s Addition situated in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
family residence consisting of (5) bedrooms (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 9,300 sq. ft.
Building Size: 2,716 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 8069”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
So FINCO

RBC

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 5,
Lexington Estates Subdivision situated in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
Family Residence consisting of (3) bedrooms and (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 7,410 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,350 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 1911”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 85 Golden
Gates No. 2 Subdivision situated in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is vacant land.

Property Size: 5,736 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 2917”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
1 FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT Unit being Unit No. 6 of the Condominium called
and known as “The Pavilion” in Westward Villas Subdivision,
situated in the Western District of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a Residence consisting of (1) bedroom (1) bathroom.

Living Area: 652 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 3760”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lots No. 6,
Carroll’s Cove Subdivision situated in the Western District of
the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
family residence consisting of (2) bedrooms (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 977 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 3063”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.



RBC
No FINCO

ie
NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being part of a 36 Acre
tract of land situate on Cowpen Road in the Western District of
the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Triplex
with 3 unit consisting of (1) bedroom and (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 5,394 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,575 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 0312”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being a portion of the
Crown Allotment No. 63 situate in the vicinity of Sunset Park
in the Western District of the Island of New Providence one of
the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a Duplex with 2 units consisting of (2) bedrooms and
(1) bathroom.

Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,640 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 0130”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 8,
Allotment No. 56 East of Sea Breeze Estates, situated in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon
is a Single family residence consisting of (3) bedrooms (2)
bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,547 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,543 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 2484”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune



ERIKA ROBINSON, owner of Don’ Woch Nuttin
Restaurant, wants to change the way the average
Bahamian looks at healthy cuisine and cater to
those who want a healthy meal alternative.





m@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net



eating habits until
someone they
trust invites them
to try something

BAHAMIANS are known for different. My

restaurant is about

their love of all things buttered, giving and we get
gravy smothered and fried. How- _ back in return. We

ever, Erika Robinson, owner of

try to give five star
service to every-

Don’ Woch Nuttin Restaurant one who walks
also known as Hawkins Hill through that need
everyone 1s (reat-
House of Pancakes, located on ed the santé.” Mé
Hawkins Hill, wants to change Robinson said.
the way the average Bahamian Faithful cus-

looks at healthy cuisine and cater

tomer, Felicity
Ingraham, said she

to those who want a healthy has been coming

meal alternative.

From comfort foods such as
her cinnamon French toast and
tasty home style banana pan-
cakes to her scrambled or
grilled tofu dishes, Don’ Woch
Nuttin caters to every pallet
with a desire for good food.
Breakfast is served all day for
those who enjoy breakfast
meals.

The atmosphere is very
homely and quaint. Walking
into Don’ Woch Nuttin imme-
diately is just like walking into
your grandmother’s kitchen.
There is a sleepy but friendly
cat, by the name of Curious
who poses as the security guard
because of the down home feel-
ing Ms Robinson is trying to
give her customers.

“My kitchen is open because
of the vegetarian menu. I want
my vegetarians to be able to see
how their food is being pre-
pared. It also offers a homely
feeling and customers feel like
this is their kitchen,” Ms Robin-
son said.

Ms Robinson said getting into
the restaurant business was
pretty much a no-brainer for
her. Although she never went to
school to cook, she is an artist
and sees cooking as just anoth-
er element of art.

“Cooking is just art. It is just
another element of who I am. I
decided to get into the restau-
rant business because I have a
selective diet- a vegetarian diet.
There was really no where for
me to eat. Most people do not
really take care or concern
about how vegetarian food is
prepared,” Ms Robinson said.

Ms Robinson said her cus-
tomers are really the ones who
make her business into the fam-
ily atmosphere that she wants
to achieve.

“My customers are my
biggest supporters. Everything
is by word of mouth. Bahamians
in general really do not change

to the Don’ Woch

Nuttin Restaurant

since its beginning

in the Carmichael
Road area.

“T always told people it was
the very best breakfast place in
the capitol. In addition to them
being a breakfast place, as a
reporter, I did a story during a
hurricane and they got together
and helped out people that
needed help in a way that was
even more substantial than
some of the larger companies.
So from then I decided to stick
with them because I saw that it
was more than just a place to
get good food but there were
people there who cared about
the community. Now I do not
have to worry about food
cooked with a ton of grease but
I found food that is cooked with
love,” Ms Ingraham said.

As everyday is different, Ms
Robinson said she tries to have
a personal, healthy touch with
all her customers.

“We are small and we can-
not compete with the bigger
companies. Therefore I try to
offer something different- some-
thing that I am passionate
about. We are very health con-
scious here and do not use a lot
of oil based products. Instead,
we use a lot of soy based prod-
ucts such as tofu, veggie burg-
ers, soy margarine, BBQ tofu,
curry veggies and many more,”
Ms Robinson said.

In her efforts to sustain her
passion for organic foods, Ms
Robinson said she has even
started her own garden just for
the restaurant.

“We try to use more organic
based vegetables. So in short
order we will be able to be self
sufficient. We have sour trees
coming up and blossoming,
green peppers, tomatoes, corn,
and cauliflower. Everything
here is authentic and that is
what people taste and see where
they come to Don’ Woch Nut-
tin,” Ms Robinson said.

BMDA 20th Annual New Car Show - Friday, March 27 & Saturday, March 28 - Mall at Marathon

alreliterse VOtOn Dealers
MORE tion
invite you to

ENTER TO WIN A

ae UG,

be ee a

towards the purchase of a new vehicle! The $1,000 prize will only be redeemable towards
_ the purchase of a new car from participants at the
BMDA show.



Fill out the attached entry form
and deliver it to The Tribune on
Shirley Street, or place in bins

- provided at the BMDA New Car
» Show at the Mall at Marathon
by 8pm on Friday, March 27.









Your choice for the family



Fill out the attached entry form and deliver to Tribune daily through March 27.
Only ORIGINAL newsprint entry forms will be accepted. Photocopies are not
eligible. Enter as many times as you wish.

Name



Address

Phone

Cell





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 9B



ENTERTAINMENT



The Tribune







SETTING THE STAGE FOR

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

WITH music, artistry, and free-
dom of expression becoming a way
of life and vessel for many young
people to propel their inner
thoughts, one local promoter is
doing her part in creating the stage
for just that.

Nadine Thomas-Brown is a local television,
print, and entertainment personality who
explained that her choice to highlight all forms
of expression comes from a long standing inter-
est in the arts.

Originally from Kingston, Jamaica, Nadine
said while growing up she spent every year tak-
ing part in various national festivals, which was
a crucial part of molding the person she has
become.

“T remember as a small child being involved in
many art forms, we used to dance in the nation-
al stadium, and we’d be performing dances from
different cultures, it was just really exciting.”

She said apart from the performing arts, she
was also a violinist for the Jamaican orchestra
and the reggae philharmonic orchestra.

Nadine added that although at one time play-
ing the violin was probably the most important
thing in her life, her gradual transition into oth-
er artistic avenues seemed a natural progres-
sion when it happened.

“Pve acted in plays, ’ve modeled, some-
times I wonder what have I not done.”

Reflecting on her move from Jamaica to Nas-
sau, Nadine said about 13 years ago she decided
to move here because of her marriage to a
Bahamian and to also pursue a career in teach-
ing.

“When I came here I had just graduated
from university, and I had gotten a teaching
job under the Ministry of Education where I
taught at CH Reeves for three years.”

She said while there, she established a talent
club that met every Saturday, and was able to
draw in dozens of students from the surrounding
area to watch fashion shows, singing competi-
tions, and other talent events intended to show
her students that there were countless oppor-
tunities available should they pursue a career in
the arts.

“Some of them didn’t even know they could
do these things, and others never even realised
how much fun it could be to simply express
themselves.”

After eventually leaving teaching, Nadine
realised that there was still more to be done in
the way of creating a platform for young and
unique artists.

At that time she said she visited various
established spoken word groups including
Coombi which was organised by Giovanni Stau-
rt, and Verse Place by Obadiah Michael Smith.
As those groups slowly phased out, Nadine said
she still yearned to see impromptu style per-

Ua
READY 10 GEL

ORS dal

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor




THE talented step team of Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity is set to descend onto the BET stage
for the annual Spring Bling “Get to Stepping”
competition to be held in Riviera Beach, Florida
this weekend marking the first time that an inter-
national fraternity has been invited to partici-
pate in the prestigious event.

Kenny Moss, one of the brothers of the six
member strong stepping team set to leave Nassau
on Friday, said that this is a definite honour and
privilege not only for the fraternity but really for
the country given the fact that participation is
by invitation only.

“We had to summit an application to BET
along with a video showcasing a compilation of
our latest performances. This was the second
year that I submitted an application. Last year, we
did not make it, but this year, we were invited. So
you can imagine that this is a real thrill especial-
ly given the fact that only five teams were select-
ed in our category and we were selected out of the
thousands of footage that they saw and we are the
only international fraternity invited to attend.”

Mr Moss said that this is a chance for the fra-
ternity to promote the Bahamas on an interna-

formances.

She also had a brief stint as a reporter at
the Nassau Guardian.

She said that while some people felt that “
Bahamians hate Bahamian music, Bahamians
hate Bahamian performers,” she feels that if
Bahamians are not seeing them in the paper
or on television, they will not know about them.
She said this was a major motivator to the even-
tual start of Roots and Culture.

“Somebody approached me, and said they
wanted to start a poetry night at their place,
and wanted me to host it.” After accepting that
proposal, Nadine said Poetic Release at Café
Habana became her pet project.

“The idea that I had was to make it a forum
for art, although a lot of poets turned out ini-
tially, that project evolved to something far
more diverse.”

After some time, Nadine said she released
herself from the project which had grown too
large for her, and later moved on to other spo-
ken word projects including Meeting Place held
at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, and then
Express Yourself at the Island Club.

Eventually relocated to the Hub on Bay
Street, Nadine said the Express Yourself move-
ment has morphed into something she is defi-
nitely proud to attach her name to.

Afro-DZ-iaC was another joint project that
was a great stepping stone for her to not just
share her passion for spoken word perfor-
mances, but also a chance to work with some of
her favorite girls in the local entertainment
sphere. She along with Bodine Johnson, and
Belinda Pierre decided that they wanted to cre-
ate an event where they could recite poetry
without boundaries.

“The concept was to put on a show with no
censorship, and it would be all about (erotic)
poetry.”

Not necessarily just about the female anato-
my, Nadine said that the mini-event was more
about women being free to express themselves
with no interruptions.

Apart from the Express Yourself night held
every Wednesday at the Hub, Nadine has now
broken ground in the local television industry in
the form of her new show titled Roots and Cul-
ture.

“T like the way entertainment is evolving,
there are people like F.DOT, Bodine Johnson,
Lyrically Blessed, Tada, Zolton, Baygon, Sketch,
SoSo Man, and even El Pedrino, these people
are killing it and people deserve to know about
them, that’s the purpose behind Roots and Cul-
ture.”

The show which premiered on Cable 12 can
be seen on Fridays at 10pm, and at 7.30pm on
Saturdays.

Also behind the upcoming Street Fair
planned for Rawson Square next month, Nadine
is truly setting the pace for entertainment on the
local front.

As a fixture in the local entertainment scene,
Nadine said it is simply a joy to see people just
like her working hard to take their talent to the
next level, and being a part of that in any shape
or form is her way of sharing the music with
the people.

THE STEP team of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity is set to
perform on the BET stage for the annual Spring Bling
“Get to Stepping” competition. This marks the first
time that an international fraternity has been invited
to participate in the event.

tional stage and said that the opportunity should
provide a strong foundation for great things to
happen particularly given the tremendous audi-
ence that BET attracts. The event will air this
weekend on the cable channel.

“You never know who will see the competition
when it airs and what doors this may open.”

SEE page 10







Nadine

Thomas-Brown

3








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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009



ARTS

THE TRIBUNE





FROM page nine

He added that the winner of
the contest will receive brag-
ging rights which for fraterni-
ties is priceless. He added that
the team will perform a combi-
nation of new and past moves in
the competition and will seek
to bring a very Bahamian/
Caribbean flair to their perfor-
mance by dressing in Androsia
shirts and straw hats as well as
stepping to Bahamian and
Caribbean music.

“We are looking to do very
well,” he said.

Although this is the group’s
first time on the BET stage, it is
not the first time that they have
competited against foreign
teams.

For the past two years, the
group has placed second in the
Stepping on the Shores step
show competition held in Nas-
sau. With this year’s competi-
tion scheduled for May, Mr
Moss said that it is a redemption
year and that they are ready to
claim that title.

i hye

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net



IF you’re looking for something fun and
interesting to do this weekend, your choic-
es are truly limitless. From concerts, art
shows, and even a beer-fest, Tribune Fea-
tures iS serving you our weekly top five
picks for the must do’s around town.

41. [In just three days, Tempo and BET Jazz
personality Empress Jeanille will set off the
6th annual Reggae All Stars concert at Clif-
ford Park. The event will feature a myriad of
local and Caribbean artist including Sizzla,
Capleton, TaDa and others, and is set to
begin at 11pm. Tickets are on sale at the
Marley Resort and Juke Box at a cost of
$60 VIP, and $100 backstage if purchased
before the day of the show.

2. Also on Saturday, Burns House is host-
ing its 3rd annual Beer-Fest at the Butler
and Sands grounds on JFK Drive. Begin-





| THIS 1967 Mustang was judged in the 2-B Class antiqu modified vehicles from 1949 to 1968.

22ND ANNUAL ANTIQUE

THE 22nd annual Antique Car Show
recently showcased on Arawak Cay,

i proved a true car lovers’ paradise as

i dozens of locals turned up to see some

i of the island’s best kept antique rides.
ning at 3pm, patrons will be offered a6 for More than 60 vehicles were on display
$10 special of many of the common brands showing some technical details of these

carried by Burns House including Guinness, :
Heineken, Colt 45, Red Stripe, Corrs light,
and many others. With an entrance fee of

$5, this event will be an easy chance to
unwind over the weekend.

3. The Express Yourself movement is host- §
ing a concert at the Hub art centre on
Shirley Street April 1. Performing will be an

interesting blend of local musicians, artists,

and poets. The event which starts at9pm,
has a cover charge of $10, and promises to |
be a true artistic night.

4. Organisers of the Reggae All Stars are
hosting a pre-concert sailaway on Friday,
where attendants will have a chance to

meet some of the performers forthe con- ;
cert including Capleton and others. Docking :
at Potters Cay Dock, the Tikki Island boat
will begin boarding at 8pm, and will leave at :
9. Tickets are priced at $10 in advance and :
$15 at the dock, and can be purchase at the
Marley Resorts or the Juke Box. i

5. Transforming Spaces 2009 is scheduled:
for this Saturday and Sunday. Persons will
be able to view some of the country’s top
artists at nine different galleries over the
course of one weekend. Tickets are priced
at $30 and available at the National Art
Gallery, Doongalik Studio, and the Ladder
gallery. The opening night which is this Fri-
day, will include a movie screening on Raw- |
son Square at 7.30pm, and later a party at
the Hub.





“ re]

THIS 1984 Camaro is owned by Lester Cash, the winner of the People’s Choice Award.

retro rides.

Ending with a total of ten divisions,
winners included Dereck Cleare’s 1946
Packard, Murray Forde’s 1940 Ford
Deluxe Coupe, William Whiteland’s
1955 Austin Healy, Don Aranha’s 1961
Corvette, Don Hunt’s 1985 Mercedes,
Andrew Hepburn’s 1985 Mercedes,
Don Aranha’s 1965 Chevy Pickup, Don-
ald Pinder’s 2003 Corvette 50th
Anniversary retro ride, and Lester
Cash’s 1986 Chevrolet Camaro winning
the people’s choice.

Troy Rodgers/Photo





# i 5 i \
VOLUNEERS of the 2008 Islands of the World Fashion Week
enjoy fruits of thier labor at a party held in thier honor.

Islands of the
World Fashion
Week thanks
volunteers

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

FINE wine, delicious cuisine and good conversation were the
order of the evening as the team that helped pull off the inau-
gural Islands of the World Fashion Week came together to cel-
ebrate its amazing success.

Volunteers, models and staff recently enjoyed the at home
hospitality of President of Mode Iles Ltd., Owen Bethel, who
was deeply appreciative of all the efforts and dedication given
by so many.

“We certainly appreciate all that you have put into it,” he
said. "There has been a core of executive workers who executed
[the event] but the real success came as a result of your input.
This is a small way of showing you that we really do appreciate
your efforts.”

And, the great
effort definitely paid
off. Islands of the
World Fashion Week
(IWFW) has been
nominated in the
"best fashion
show/week attended”
category of the 2009
Caribbean Fashion
Awards. The ceremo-
ny will be held in Bar-
bados on April 11.

For volunteer,
Treneil Hanna,
IWFW 2009 can't
come soon enough.

"Being one of the
Fashion Trade stu-
dents they opted for
me to go into the
sewing room and I got
to work with other
designers such as
Kevan Hall," said Mr
Hanna. "I got to be behind the scenes dressing models- it was
so much fun. I am excited that Mr Bethel would honour us for
being there because we were just doing what we love-fashion."

While Mr Hanna's only disappointment was that he was
not one of the designers in the 2008 showcase, he does plan on
applying again this year.

"T would expect IWFW 2009 to be like last year’s show but
times three," he said.

Mode Iles Ltd., also gave special recognition to top volunteer
staff and students who made their contributions to [WFW.

"The staff and students of the Bahamas Technical and





Vocational Institute (BTVI) are to be commended for hav-
ing come in and done everything they did in such a short peri-
od,” said Mr Bethel. "They did get a lot of commendations
from the designers so we will recognise them in another
form.”

Mr Bethel also rewarded the volunteers who gave an
extra effort in making the show a success. Volunteers who
went above and beyond the call of duty received special
gifts courtesy of BahaRetreat and The Beauty Spot.

“T asked [the coordinators] to recommend those persons
within their areas who went beyond the call of duty and
really excelled in terms of what was required," he said. "I
must say that I have gotten great and strong reactions because
everyone did very well and I have to recognise that. However,
there had to be probably one or two who stood out. So while
we would recognise those who really I think went far beyond
the call of duty, it is clear that the success of the event was a
result of a team effort."

The promotional video for
IWFW was also premiered at
the party. It showcased 15 of
the 33 island designers and
four guest designers who pre-
sented at the 2008 IWFW
showcase. The video is now
available to the public. A video
of the entire 2008 showcase
will be ready by August, just in
time for potential distribution
for the Miss Universe Pageant.

Mr Bethel said he looks for-
ward to working with the
group for the 2009 showcase
slated for November 4-8.

"T think we are beginning to
feel or become, as it were, one
family and as we grow and
develop in this way, we truly
will move the fashion industry
in The Bahamas to the next
_ a level.”






THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25th, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MariINE FORECAST














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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

bes

ee
a ‘ oa hy .





JANOU CHOUKROUN’S (pictured below) shows her appreciation of the
environment and love of the ocean through a 20 piece art exhibition. The
pieces comprise mostly of decorated mirrors, frames, and book stands.



Eating healthy
at Don’ Woch

see page eight

|
W

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Feature Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

EMBRACING the elements of earth
and water, this week’s featured artist
is proving that beauty and art can be
found all around us especially when
we take the time to look.



Janou Choukroun is a Moroccan born,
French educated, and Spanish resident, who
has allowed her appreciation of the envi-
ronment and love of the ocean to inspire her
20 piece art exhibition.

Comprising mostly of decorated mirrors,
frames, and book stands, Janou said she
attempts to not just create a work of art,
but to also tell stories in her designs

In one of her favorite creations, which is
made from dried leaves, tree stems, ribbon,
and shells, Janou described one of the shells
in the piece as a rare find.

“A few years ago, I was in Italy and the
shell was given to me by an Italian fisher-
man who said the shell was passed on to
him by his father, who described the shell as
more than 100 years old.”

She explained: “Unlike other pieces that
I have seen, my creations are unique
because I set the mosaic stones in a way
that they enter each other, all for a smoother

Setting the
Stage for roots
and culture

see page nine



The Tribune SECTION B e



look.”

Janou who is self taught, said she has
been in love with seashells from since she
was a child. With some of the shells in her
possession since childhood, she said her
everyday job is walking the beach and shop-
ping for new and uniquely shaped shells.

With the shell only being a part of the
overall pieces, Janou said when most people
see her work, their first reaction is simply
“Wow. 2?

“Every mirror is unique, some of them
necessitated numerous hours of research
and patience as well as the work.

“The big pieces have taken more than
two weeks each to satisfactory completion,
but the essential difficulty has been to gath-
er beautiful shells which nowadays are more
and more rare to find on islands.”

The pieces which are like a glowing rain-
bow of pastels are coloured with rich
browns, oranges, soft pinks, luminescent
whites, lavenders, and silvers.

Apart from the colorful ribbons and
feathers, Janou has a unique sense of diver-
sity where she has incorporate several types
of shells.

They include pear] oysters, conch, cham-
bered nautilus, snail shells, Irish flat scallop,
whelks, starfish, and Mexican flat shells.

The exhibition which starts tomorrow at
the Anthaya Art gallery next to Sbarros
Cable Beach, will run until Sunday, during
which time visitors will have a chance to
view and discuss the pieces with Janou.









Earth Hour
set again
for this
Saturday

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THIS Saturday major
cities around the globe will
take part in an hour long
recognition of earth hour,
which means lights out for a
full 60 minutes.

First started in Sidney
Australia in 2007, nearly 2.2
million homes and business-
es contributed that year to
recognising the importance
of establishing global initia-
tives to combat global
warming.

Nearly 83 countries this
year have already commit-
ted to the initiative, and are
pledging a vote for planet
Earth in the first ever global
election between global
warming and earth.

From 8.30pm to 9.30pm,
participants will turn their
light switches off, and
remain in darkness for a
cause.

In the end, organisers are
aiming for 1 billion partici-

Nearly 83 countries
this year have already
committed to the initia-
tive, and are pledging
a vote for planet Earth

in the first ever global
election between glob-
al warming and earth.





pants, and if successful will
deliver their results to world
leaders at the Global Cli-
mate Change Conference in
Copenhagen later this year.

That conference will help
to determine official gov-
ernment policies against
global warming which will
eventually replace the
Kyoto Protocol.

On the local front, the
Four Seasons in Exuma has
already committed to this
cause, along with all offices
of the Ministry of Tourism.

Minister for Tourism
Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said yesterday, that his
ministry is more than excit-
ed to take part in this
endeavour.

“This initiative is very
important, and we think
that we need to get to the
stage where we conduct
similar projects.

“We in the Ministry of
Tourism have even started
within our own organisation
doing things to introduce
ways of conserving energy,
because in the end we in
the island communities are
most affected by environ-
ment changes”



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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Judge’s conduct is questioned C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.102WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND WINDY HIGH 77F LOW 66F F E A T U R E S SEE ‘THEARTS’ SECTION S P O R T S Reflecting on art exhibition SEEPAGEELEVEN Stubbs and Mackey hoping to shine A SENIOR Supreme Court judge’s conduct has been questioned over his handling of a con tentious court case that is now being heard by another senior judge. In a written judgment handed down by Senior Justice Anita Allen yesterday, Justice John Lyons was accused of sharing “more than a friendship” with the sister of Daniel Ferguson, an accountant Justice Lyons had appointed to make a report in a case he was hearing up to September last year. Mr Ferguson’s sister also assist ed her brother with preparing documents for the case, said Justice Allen as she decided whether to recuse herself from hearing the matter “on the ground of apparent bias.” Justice L yons under fire over handling of court case The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR D OUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com T ry our B ig Breakfast Sandwich BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E D ESPITECONTINUED c alls for residents to keep the Bahamas clean, some people are still not getting the message. This heap of garbage at a roadside yesterday illustrates that some are continuing to use parts of New Providence as a dumping ground. GARB AGEBLOTSTHELANDSCAPE F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 12 n By PAUL G TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net GLOBAL United CEO Jackson Ritchie blamed government and the politics of the FNM for him having to close his business by the end of the week. In a press statement, Mr Ritchie, a former PLP candidate, said that since this political persecution of his company began, he has been forced to lay off more than 160 Bahamian staff. If this witch-h unt continued, he said, he would have no other option but to bring a discrimination lawsuit against the Minister of Finance, the Comp troller of Customs and the Public Treasury. Mr Ritchie said he had made numerous attempts to personally speak to or meet with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in his capacity as Minister of Finance but all efforts were rebuffed. As a former PLP candidate for Clifton in the 2007 general elec tion, Mr Ritchie said he is convinced that the objection of Mr Ingraham’s government is not to recover outstanding taxes, but “to d estroy another PLP, no matter the cost.” Up until 2007, Mr Ritchie said, Global United Limited (GUL was paying between $70 to $80 million a year into the public treasury on behalf of various clients. At any one time the company would be more than five to seven per cent outstanding in its obligations to the government, which by Global United CEO blames closure on FNM politics Former PLP candidate makes ‘witch hunt’ claim DANGEROUS out-of-date medication is not being administered to diabetics patients at the Elizabeth Estates Clinic pharmacy health authorities have claimed in response to an article in yester day’s Tribune . The Ministry of Health and Department of Public Health have launched an investigation into the assertion made by a diabetic woman who said the pharmacy gave her Humulin insulin with an October 2007 expiration date on February 2, and again on March 18 this year. The mother-of-two, who has had diabetes for 20 years, told The Tribune she was unaware that the medicine had expired when she took it in February and it caused her blood sugar levels to rise, inducing nausea, dizziness and leg cramps. Her blood sugar levels returned to normal when she bought insulin from another pharmacy. However, when she returned to Elizabeth Estates six weeks lat er to fill another prescription she noticed the medication was outof-date, and realised the insulin given to her in February was from the same expired batch. She said: “I could have slipped into a coma and died. “And I am sure there are other SEE page 12 THIS out-of-date medication was allegedly given to a patient. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Authorities:out-of-date medication is not being administered to patients SEE page 12 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net DESPITE 81 per cent of visitors to the Bahamas in 2007 believing they were “likely” to return to the country again within the next five years, Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool Wallace yesterday said this figure is “nowhere near where it needs to be.” In the 2007 Exit Survey report compiled by the Ministry of Tourism Minister wants higher ‘likely to return’ figures SEE page 12 n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net FORMER Bahamian Ambassador to CARICOM Leonard Archer expects the final Commission of Inquiry report into claims of corruption in the Turks and Caicos Islands to be more damaging than interim findings. However, he believes the Bahamas and CARICOM should mediate talks between Britain and Turks and Caicos to ensure that a proposed sus pension of democratic governance on the islands is as short as possible. Mr Archer, who held the post from 1992 to 2008, sees Former CARICOM Ambassador expects ‘damaging’ Commission of Inquiry report into Turks and Caicos SEE page 12 n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net PROTESTERS who threat ened to descend on Cove Beach in front of the Atlantis resort to put an end to “apartheid-like restrictions” were nowhere to be seen yesterday. It is not known whether it was the windy weather or a lack of interest that inhibited the massive protest beach vendor Paul Rolle and his supporter Jeffrey Davis were hoping for, but as choppy waters lapped the shore at noon, there was not a protester in sight. Mr Rolle and Mr Davis had published several public notices inviting Bahamians to attend a ‘Big B-day bash’ at the beach from 10am and told beachgoers they would take them by boat to the beach at the western end of Paradise Island. Mr Rolle told The Tribune he No sign of pr otesters on Cove Beach SEE page 11

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE CREATING A SENSATION PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff M ORE THAN 1 50 children from Winnebago High School from Illinois travelling on Carnival Sensation played i n Rawson square yesterday. Illinois schoolchildren play in RawsonSquare

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $4,210 $4,210 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,410 $4,410Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n Meeting of police leaders held in Grand Bahama In brief n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net ACKLINSresidents are condemning the “deplorable” state o f several long stretches of road on the island that have cost locals time, money and peace of mind for over a decade. Huge ditches and potholes in the worn-down road leading from Spring Point, Acklins, where the airport is located, area major hazard and source of frustration to drivers who are constantly having to send off to Nassau for new parts to repair their damaged cars. Meanwhile, the chronically rundown state of the thoroughfare also draws the attention of visitors – many of whom come to Acklins to go bonefishing – as it is “the first thing they see when they get to the airport”, noted an employee of a local fishing lodge. A $3.4 million contract signed in September 2006 to pave the route, which residents say was “scraped” in 1996 but never repaved, was cancelled by the FNM government after the May 2007 election. Yesterday, a 36-year-old Snug Corner resident said the road works are still desperately needed. Illustrating her point, she explained that she has to put aside an hour to drive to the airport – a trip which would take 20 minutes or less if the stretch of road were paved. “You have to be really careful, drive real slow. My car and other people’s cars are low. If y our car miss and go in one of those holes you ain’t got no car left,” said the Snug Corner resident. She added that just last week a National Insurance Board employee driving a jeep along the road broke the axle after falling into one of the many deep drops. “I want the prime minister to drive on this road,” said the 36year-old. The local bonefishing lodge employee agreed. “It ain’t playin’ bad – it bad! If you’re pregnant and you use that road you’ll lose the baby!” she declared. T T o o u u r r i i s s t t s s “Every time the tourists come here they always wonder why it is how it is; they ask ‘Well who’s the MP for this area?’” Residents say the issue is a top priority for many on the island – but despite the island’s MP Alfred Gray being aware of the condition of the road and raising the matter in parliament, n othing has been done. The September 2006 contract signed by former Minister of Works Bradley Roberts covered the rebuilding of 26 miles of road in southern Acklins, covering the affected drive between Sprint Point and Salina Point. However, the contract, signed with New Providence-based Caribbean Asphalt and local Acklins contractors M and R Road Builders, was cancelled by the FNM when it won the May, 2007, general election. Former FNM Works Minister Earl Deveaux told parliament in late 2007 that the contract was awarded without competitive bidding and that, prior to its cancellation, there was concern over whether it would be completed. In February, 2008, Mr Roberts claimed the contractors involved had taken legal action against the government, and were being represented by MP for the area and attorney, Mr Gray. T he Tribune t ried to reach M r Gray yesterday but he was s aid to be in court. A message left at his office was not returned up to press time. Minister of Works Neko Grant was in Cabinet. Messages left for Mr Grant and his per-m anent secretary Colin Higgs w ere also not returned up to press time. n B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The Bahamas hosted the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP munity Policing Committee for its mid-year meeting. T he two-day meeting was h eld in Grand Bahama on Friday. The group was then hosted t o a farewell social at Taino Beach on Saturday. C hief Russell Laines, president of IACP, attended the m eeting along with a number of police leaders, professors a nd representatives from business communities throughout the United States, Canada and the Bahamas. P olice Commissioner Reginald Ferguson said the m eeting in Freeport is a “true testament of the collec-t ive desire to develop crime prevention strategies and to build a global alliance to wipe out the scourge of crime and violence.” H e noted that community policing is an important strategy to combating crime. “In policing, there is a global shift occurring that announces the necessity tom ove into the community. “While there are economic p ressures to move in this direction, there are far betterr easons that must also be considered,” Mr Ferguson said. P P a a r r t t n n e e r r s s h h i i p p s s Commissioner Ferguson s aid that community policing not only creates partner ships, but gives the public a sense of safety. “The Royal Bahamas Police Force has recognised for sometime that effective policing will result when partnerships are created with t he different sections of the community,” he said. He noted that the neigh bourhood policing pro gramme gives members of the community a greater voice in the way officers police their areas. “By all quantitative and qualitative community policing measures, the RBPF neighbourhood community policing programme has been a success.” Mr Ferguson said that officers and citizens have seen a positive change in attitudes, which has facilitated communication and reduced citizen complaints about police personnel. The International Association of Chiefs of Police is the world's oldest and largest non-profit membership organisation of police execu tives, with over 20,000 members in more than 89 differ ent countries. RUM Cay is now the tempo rary home of a surprise visitor – a manatee which the locals named "Crusoe" after fiction al castaway Robinson Crusoe. The manatee was discovered in the Rum Cay marina early one afternoon last week. Dr Dan Vernon was called to the scene after a tear in the animal’s tail was noticed. When Dr Dan and Mrs Vernon arrived, the manatee was so still that onlookers thought it was dead. L L e e t t t t u u c c e e Dr Dan sent for lettuce from Last Chance grocery store, in the hope that it might revive the manatee, then dashed home to call Sea World and the Uni versity of Florida’s marine biology department. Eventually, he was put in touch with the Bahamas Marine Mammal Research Organisation (BMMRO which informed him that the most important thing was to make sure the manatee drank fresh water. Concerned Rum Cay residents are still in contact with the BMMRO and are hoping they can persuade the organisation to come rescue the ani mal. It is believed that it is an Antillean Manatee and could have come from Cuba, Florida or Puerto Rico. DEPLORABLE! Acklins residents say huge ditches and potholes are a major hazard on island roads Bradley Roberts Intr oducing Crusoe, the Rum Cay manatee Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I have been wondering if the management of the Royal Bank think we live in Ameri ca, or in the world. It is the heritage of the Bahamas to write the date in the interna tional form, but every time I ask for new cheques I do not know if it will be day month year or month day year. To follow American logic they should say 7/24. I did complain one time only to be told by the printer that they had been instructed to print month day year, but lo and behold next time, much to my gratification, I received cheques printed day month year. As you must have seen even the mighty Americans print, day month year, on their international forms. But it will not worry me, when I receive my cheques wrongly printed, I will just put a line through month day year and carry on the international way. Of course it would be much easier if the Government officially endorsed the interna tional way, but that is asking a bit much. All computers coming into the country should be so adjusted, instead of silly little faces coming up to tell you don't know how to tell the date. WALTER EG GRATTAN Nassau, February, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. I attended the Junior High School track and field meet on Wednesday at Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium, which was well attendedby an enthusiastic bunch. But apart from good participation and high energy, there was one thing that was a glaring and distasteful observation. We have completely vacated the moral high ground, we have abandoned the pride that was instilled in us by our forefathers and we have sold our daughters on the altar of ignorance and being fashionable. The old gate post has been dug up and discarded. I was embarrassed for the young girls who cannot be any older than thirteen max. The norm seemed to have been to wear a blouse that would show at least 70 per cent of their breasts, all in clear view. These vulnerable girls have unwittingly been set up by their parents to be vulgar, loose, and void of self respect. This kind of dressing only invites trouble, because the young boy who came from an equally slack home will stop at nothing to touch and feel a girl without her permission. But observing these children, I quickly realised that the par e nts could care less, because a woman who has a mentality akin to a prostitute could only teach her daughter what she knows and nothing more. I cry shame on the parents who purchased these disgusting clothing, pretending to give their children what they in fact could not wear in front of their parents in the past. But I guess that is too old fashion. This is not cute and only a breathing ground for extreme painful and embarrassing results. The parents of those girls will reap a whirlwind because they sowed the wind. There is time to correct this. Parents should “catch themselves” and start dressing these young girls like ladies. IVOINE W INGRAHAM Nassau, March, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm “A YOUNG nation cannot be founded on m yths and unthinking idolatry, it has to be based on facts. All nations have to face this,” John Marquis, managing editor of The Tribune for the past 10 years told a radio audience as his e nemies counted the days for his departure. Mr Marquis, creator of “Insight”, a weekly T ribune column that examines the news behind the news, has attracted a large circle of devotedf ans, at the same time mashing the sensitive corns of many politicians, who blame the PLP government for not revoking his work permit and sending him packing when it had the opportunity. Chaffing under the sharp pen of this hard-hitting journalist, the question of whether frees peech is a privilege or a right came to a head w hen Mr Marquis dared write the story of an a ging father who wanted to get the burden of his son’s death off his chest. The father told Mr Marquis that he was convinced that his son was murdered during the drug era of the eighties b ecause he knew too much about the association of the late prime minister Sir Lynden Pindling with Colombian drug kingpin Carlos “Joe” Lehder, who had hunkered down at Norman’s C ay, turning it into his headquarters for the transshipment of drugs to the US. Here Mr C hauncey Tynes, Sr, himself a loyal PLP and one time treasurer of the party, was directing his r apier at the “Father of the Nation”, whose reputation loyal PLP supporters have tried to s anitise over the years, stopping just short of canonising him. T here was no question that Mr Marquis would take on the challenge. Nor was there any question that he would leave any stone unturned to try to discover the truth. Mr Marquis, himself a man of the people, readily admits that when he first arrived in the Bahamas in the sixties at the age of 22 his natural sympathies were with the PLP. He wanted them to succeed. He wanted Sir Lynden to succeed. However, he soon discovered that the people’s leader was seriously flawed, and that t he society over which he ruled were too frightened to challenge him. O n August 29, 1969, the late Sir Etienne Dupuch, then publisher of this newspaper and a n early mentor of Mr Marquis, took the young journalist to his Rotary Club to give his farewell a ddress to this “frightened society.” At the end of his speech a Rotarian thanked Mr Marquis for his fearless address, noted that he would be leaving for good at the end of that year and acknowledged that “when he goes this society will suffer a great loss.” Thirty years later Mr Marquis decided that he wanted to end his journalistic career at The Tribune a newspaper in whose ethos and philosophy of “being bound to swear to the dogmas of no master” he admired. However, on his return he found that truth was still stumbling i n the public square and “honesty finds no place there.” Again he took up the challenge and encouraged a young group of Bahamian journalists to do the same. This time he will leave b ehind him young men and women who will ask questions, who will probe until they findt he Truth, who will demand a higher standard of honesty and good government from their lead-e rs. Today’s young Bahamians want to know the truth of their past. They are tired of the pabulum that they have been served from their birth. When the PLP came to power on January 10, 1967 they seemed to think that the history of this country started with them. They swept the pasta side and started to recreate their own story. N othing happened unless it started with them o r that is how it seemed as their fable of “In the beginning was the PLP and the PLP was with Pindling and the PLP was Pindling” unfolded the rest of us, like the late Carlton Francis, were c ast into hell fire if we protested. In his interview on the Jeff Lloyd radio pro gramme Tuesday, Mr Marquis acknowledged that Sir Lynden in fact did much good for the B ahamas for about 10 years up until the advent of the drug era of the eighties. We also agree t hat Sir Lynden Pindling is to be recognised, especially for introducing majority rule. H owever, four months after the PLP came to power the older heads at The Tribune knew t hat in the future there would be a another dimension to the Pindling story. I n May 1967 The Miami Herald reported that Pindling’s name was linked with an SEC investigation when New York businessman Lewis L Colasurdo, owner of Crescent, testified that he met Mr Pindling in a Miami cocktail lounge after he was elected Premier, and gave him $127,000 in cash as interest payment on a $2 million loan from Six M’s of which Mr Pindling was president. Mr Pindling, as he then was, vehemently denied the accusations, US officials were embar r assed to be seen attacking the leader of a newly elected, popular black government, Colasur d o quickly retracted his testimony, pleaded mis taken identity in a dark cocktail lounge where t he transaction was alleged to have taken place. He said the money was given to a Venezuelan b y the name of Torres, not a Bahamian by the name of Pindling. The matter was quickly dropped. But for The Tribune the first pattern had been stitched into life’s quilt, and over the years we have fol lowed its winding, devious journey. Today’s generation of Bahamians are entitled to sift through historical facts for themselves. They can then make their own judgment about their country’s story without their elders breath ing down their neck with fairy tales. Parents are training their daughters to be prostitutes LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Bahamians must know the truth :$17('$)(:*22''5,9(56 EDITOR, The Tribune. The phrase “a prophet is without honour in his own country” certainly proves true in respect of H is Excellency Ambassador Livingstone B Johnson (deceased I t is a terrible pity that we do not honour our own. His Excellency’s life can and ought to be held up as an example to be followed by this generation and those to come. He was born of humble beginnings in his beloved island Exuma. Through hard work, discipline, integrity and commitment to noble principles, he r ose to the highest heights nationally and internationally. H is Excellency was one of the quiet heroes of Majority Rule. As well as running for Parliament, he was the lawyer for the Civil Service Union, (now the BCPOU) and served in the Senate. He was an architect and interior designer of the m odern Bahamas. Many Bahamians were opposed to Independence. T hey felt that we could not represent ourselves and they said so publicly, including in Parliament. The newly independent nation needed men prepared to represent the nation in international arenas. At this time, His Excellency was a named partner in a very well established and lucrative law firm (Isaacs, Johnson and Co), which was then regarded as one of t he most successful law firms in The Bahamas. When called upon, His Excellency again responded to national service. At great personal sacrifice, he left his law firm to serve as The Bahamas’ first Ambassador to the United States of America, the United Nations and the High Commissioner to Canada. He was the first and only Bahamian to hold all of t hose posts at the same time. He and his supportive and charming wife, Charmaine, represented TheB ahamas with great distinction. Many international luminaries commented on his intellect, charm and diplomacy. He is one of the reasons that the transition to a respected sovereign independent nation was so smooth. Notwithstanding all of his tremendous successes, His Excellency remained a humble family man a nd a gentleman in every sense of the word. As one of his Godchildren, I can say that no one c ould have had a better Godfather. He always found time to encourage others. Today we try to teach our children about hard work, delayed gratification, kindness, gentleness, excellence, patriotism, discipline, integrity, servicea nd other nation building attributes. We need only to hold up the life and example of His ExcellencyA mbassador Livingstone B Johnson. The Bahamas owes him a tremendous debt of gratitude. I thank his wife, Charmaine, and his surviving children, Anita and Dianne for supporting him while he served his country and thereafter. May his soul rest in peace. A LLYSON MAYNARD GIBSON Nassau, March 17, 2009. Livingstone B Johnson – an example to be followed by every generation Is it day, month, year – or month, day year?

PAGE 5

n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net ATENTHgeneration Bahamian student has proved it is possible to rise above the ranks by simply doing what needs to be done, as he will be bestowed the highest honour at the 75th anniversary of his former Naval academy nextw eek. In just three years at the Admiral Farragut Academy in St Petersburg, Florida, William Saunders III, or ‘AJ’, of High Vista, Nassau, once a notorious ‘naughty boy’ at Xavier’s Lower School, has made such great accomplishments that he will ben amed among the top students of the prestigious military academy. Bob and Jack Morris, 1951 graduates of the academy, nominated the young Bahamian for the honour, not just because of his outstanding achievements, but because people liked him. His nomination was approved by the discerning Alumni Association and his name will be engraved on a plaque and fixed to the Admiral Farragut Capstan among the academy’s finest graduates. AJ said the honour would never have been possible if he had not been picked out by military leader Captain Thomas McClleland from the mass of tenth grade, bottom rank seamen to be a Middle School Officer in charge of the sixth, seventh and eighth graders in the dormitory and some day line companies. And AJ’s success spiraled from there. He worked his way up in the Key and Lion's Clubs to become president of both community service organisations in his senior year. He captained the sailing, socc er, and track and field teams, and as his responsibilities snowballed, AJ was awarded the position of Battalion Adjutant (BA became the third in command of the school in his senior year. His role as BA meant AJ was head of all the school dormitories, and played a leading cerem onial role when the school staged parades several times a year. But AJ remained cool under pressure, thrived on his commitments and always enjoyed his work. So much so that he was astounded to learn he had been chosen for the highest school honour. “When I was there I was just doing a job,” he said. “It’s not like I was trying to get all this, I was just doing what I needed to do. “I was just following orders like the simple soldier I am.” But AJ’s work did not go without reward, even during his time at the academy. Astronaut He was privileged to meet a stronaut Charlie Duke, the 1953 Admiral Farragut graduate who went on the Apollo 16 mission to the moon in 1972, and donated a chunk of moon rock to his former high school. And at age 16 he piloted a plane when former US presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush Sr visited the school, as he had o btained his pilot’s licence before he could drive. Proud parents William Saunders Jr, known as 'BJ', and Susan Saunders, are thrilled by their son’s achievements since he left Nassau to fulfil his dreams of being a pilot in the armed forces. Mr Saunders said he is particul arly grateful to June Hutchinson, the Xavier’s Lower School counsellor who encouraged AJ to be good when he was coping with his parents divorce, and getting into trouble for setting up wrestling matches between warring pupils and charging young spectators for tickets. She guided William along the right path, gave him a lot of inspiration when he thought divorces were bad,” Mr Saunders said. “If it wasn't for her foundation he wouldn't be where he is.” Upon graduation, AJ achieved his boyhood dream – he won a scholarship to the US NavalA cademy, a privilege for only 1,200 of the 80,000 annual applicants from across the United States, but in the end he decided to turn it down so he can bring his skills home. He is now studying airport management and aviation business at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University and hopes to return to the Bahamas to work in tourism and transportation at the airports and in the family business, Majestic Tours. Although it was tough, AJ says his time at Admiral Farragut Academy has given him a firm foundation for life. “It’s a great school, a great place to learn and it teaches you so many life lessons,” he said. “It gets hard, especially if you have a certain degree of rank, because not only are you dealing with your school work, but you are dealing with the military side, running a bunch of military activities, and I had sports on top of that. “If you don’t watch out it could pile up on you, but if you do what needs to be done it is fine. “If I didn’t enjoy what I was doing I would have slowed down, but I loved what I did, I loved helping people and making people better and making myself better at the same time. “It was just a good time. It was the best three years of my life. I have no regrets about what I did there, or going there, and I totally encourage anybody to go.” AJ is grateful to his roommate Thomas Deetr, dormitory head Calvin Brown, coach Nick Hillary, and teacher Andrew Forrester for helping him along the way. He is looking forward to reuniting with all of his former teachers and classmates over a week of anniversary celebrations, including the unveiling of his name on a plaque in the Capstan on April 3. DEPUTY Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette is advising Bahamians whose passports are set to expire this year to apply for the e-Passport now, in an effort to avoid the tradi tional summer rush at the Passport Office. If your passport does not expire this year it can still be used for travel, even if you have already applied for the ePassport, Mr Symonette said. Around 2,800 ePassports were issued in February. Since the system was implemented in December 2007, an estimated 17,000 Bahamians have been issued the ePassport. “Due to the increased usage of the ePassport, Bahamians are advised to go in. We want Bahamians to check their passports and if they are travelling inJune or July, to go and apply for the ePassport and avoid the summer rush,” Mr Symonette said. He said the Passport Office will make the necessary adjustment to accommodate the expected high volume of applications and process them in a timely manner. Those whose passports expire after the summer are advised to apply for the ePass port towards the end of the year. As of January, 2009, passport offices in Grand Bahama and Abaco began issuing the ePassport through the Passport Office in New Providence, which is the central printing station for all Bahamian ePass ports. Mr Symonette said the Consulate General’s Office in Miami is being expanded to accommodate the volume of ePassport applications there. The International Civil Aviation Organ isation (ICAO member, mandated that all countries issue machine readable passports by 2010. The ePassport was officially launched on December 5, 2007 in a move to increase protection against identity theft, heighten aviation security and combat illegal immi gration. “The security of our identity and travel documents is of paramount importance to us. We must ensure, therefore, that our passports and visas are resis tant to fraudulent use, including the use of lost or stolen passports,” Mr Symonette said. The passport is being upgraded from a simple paper document to one containing biometric information on facial characteristics and fingerprints. Each passport holder is required to have a National Insurance number. In 1994, the Bahamas gov ernment began exploring the process of upgrading passports and other travel documents. On December 22, 2006 the government signed a contract with Indusa Global, a Greenville, South Carolinabased information technology development and consulting firm, for an estimated $12.7 million to provide four systems to initiate the project. The project included an ePassport issuance system, a machine readable visa system, an e-Identification issuance system (smart cards for holders of work per mits, spousal permits, home owners residence permits, permanent residence), and a border control management system. “By this initiative, the Bahamas will be ICAO compliant. “We have had to and will undertake several actions and activities to facilitate our ePassport and machine readable visa initiative, and to ensure that our transition occurs as smoothly as possible,” Mr Symonette said. In addition, a system for the generation and management of digital security keys to protect the data stored in the passports and cards was also implemented. The machine readable document pro ject is a joint initiative involving the Min istry of Foreign Affairs, the Department of Immigration (Ministry of National Security), and the data processing unit of the Ministry of Finance. Mr Symonette is urging Bahamians to keep their passports in a safe place. He said everyone should photocopy the first four pages of the document in case it is one day lost or stolen, as this will help in the issuance of a new passport. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 5 )25$/(:(//(67$%/,6+(' )851,785(t $33/,$1&(%86,1(666(5,286,148,5,(6 21/<&$// )25)857+(5,1 Bahamians urged to apply for e-Passport ahead of summer rush Brent Symonette In brief ‘Highest honour’ for Bahamian student William Saunders III set to graduate from prestigious military academy HIGHESTHONOUR: William Saunders III n WASHINGTON THEU.S. Supreme Court has turned down Cuban militant Luis Posada Carriles' attempt to have immigration fraud charges thrown out because theg overnment used trickery and deceit to build a case against him, according to Associated Press. The justices, in an order Monday, are letting stand a ruling by the federal a ppeals court in New O rleans, Louisiana, that the 81-year-old anti-Castro militant should stand trial on charges that he lied to fed-e ral authorities in his 2005 b id to become a U.S. citiz en. Earlier, U.S. District Judge Kathleen Cardone in El Paso, Texas, dismissed the criminal chargesb ecause the government used the pretext of a naturalization interview to build the case against Posada. The Cuban-born citizen of Venezuela is wanted in the South American coun t ry on charges that he orchestrated the 1976 bombing of a Cuban jetlin-e r. He has denied any wrongdoing. Posada was arrested in t he United States on a civil i mmigration violation in May 2005 after sneaking into the country from Mexic o about two months earlier. Posada, a former CIA operative and U.S. Armyo fficer, has claimed that he w as brought across the border into Texas by a s muggler, but federal a uthorities have alleged that he sailed from Mexico to Florida. V enezuela wants to e xtradite Posada from the United States so that he can stand trial for the airliner bombing. He has been living freely in Miami since 2007. US High Court rejects Cuban militant's appeal

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TheBahamasElectricityCorporation TenderWilsonCityPowerStation TransmissionCircuits Wilson City, AbacoTheBahamasElectricityCorporation invites Tenders for the above named services. Biddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe &RUSRUDWLRQ$GPLQLVWUDWLRQIFH%OXH+LOOt7XFNHURDGV Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 Tendersaretobeaddressedto: Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas DeadlinefordeliverytoBEC:onorbefore 9thApril,2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. Submissions should be marked as follows: Tender No. 701/09 :,/621&,7<:(5$7,21$160,66,21&,5&8,76 WILSON CITY, ABACO TheCorporationreservestherightto accept or reject any or all proposals. )RUDOOHQTXLULHVUHJDUGLQJWKHWHQGHUVDQGVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW Mr. Wayne Farquharson at telephone 302-1216. THE Bahamas Foundation for Blind and Visually Impaired Children was officially launched last week Thursday at the Salvation Army Church on Mackey Street. According to Barsha Smith, president of BFBVIC and mother of a blind son, the foundation seeks to ensure that all blind or visually impaired children in the Bahamas have adequate access to medical, financial, rehabilitative, psychological and educational resources. “We will provide emotional support, being there to listen when a parent wants to talk, supporting that parent from the time the initial diagnosis is given in the hospital through to home visits. “We will also focus on prevention and early detection of vision problems in children, educating parents about their child’s physical condition and treatment and will work closely with the government, the Ministry of Education and the Salvation Army’s Erin Gilmour School to ensure that assistive tools and rehabilitation therapy are readily available, accessible and affordable to blind and visually impaired children,” Mrs Smith said. The foundation’s projects will include: A national registry for blind and visually impaired children An educational newsletter for p arents Parent retreats and seminars On-call personnel and home visits A resource unit to provide parenting information Braille books, toys and assistive aids The foundation also aims to highlight the accomplishments of blind and visually impaired children through an annual awards banquet. Speaking at the launch, Minister of State for Labour and Social Development Loretta ButlerTurner said World Health Organisation statistics indicate that every year the number of persons becoming blind increases by 1 to 2 million worldwide, however, 75 per cent of blindness is either treatable or preventable with early intervention. Noting that the Disability Affairs Division also provides adaptive aids and learning technologies for persons experiencing vision loss, she congratulated BFBVIC on its formation and pledged the government’s support through the enactment of legislation that will protect the rights of persons with disabilities. “The government is committed not only to the provision of preventative health-care but also to ensuring equal access and full participation in every aspect of our society,” Mrs Butler-Turner said. “I am extremely pleased to report that the special committee comprised of key leaders of persons with disabilities and officers of the Disabilities Affairs Division completed their recommendations including those submitted by stakeholders to the necessary changes to the proposed disability legislation,” she said. However, she pointed out, it is impossible to effectively provide the necessary preventative programmes and services without proper statistical data. “Realising the urgency of correcting this deficiency, the Disability Affairs Division has initiated a nationwide registration drive to develop a national registry of all persons with disabilities living in the Bahamas. I understand that the foundation will also endeavour to establish a national registry for bind and visually impaired children which I hope will be included in our national registry,” Mrs Butler-Turner said. Parents of blind and visually impaired children can attend meetings of the Bahamas Foundation for Blind and Visually Impaired Children (BFBVIC tion Army Adult Blind Workshop on the third Thursday of everym onth at 6pm. THE National High School Debating Championship scheduled for Thursday, April 23, 2009 will feature Cat I sland contending with Long Island for debating supremac y and the victory trophy. C at Island is also hoping to repeat as the champion, having won last year against Doris Johnson Senior High S chool. I n the semi-finals round, the Cat Island team defeated the Eleuthera team while Long Island won over Kingsway Academy, the only remaining team from New Providence. The topic for both semi-final competitions was “be it resolved that enough effort has been made to educate society on family values and the laws of society.” T he competition is a marquee event on most of the senior s chools’ calendars in both public and independent high schools in New Providence, Grand Bahama and the Famil y Islands. S ixteen school teams participated in this year’s debate. History E ula Gaitor, chief training officer of student services in the Ministry of Education and coordinator of the event, said this is only the second time in the ten-year history of the debat-i ng championship that two Family Island teams have contested in the final round. T he only other time that this feat was achieved was when two Grand Bahama teams competed against each other in the final round. “This achievement shows that we have many competent a nd intelligent students in all of our islands. “It also shows the success of the quality of education that our children are receiving because all of the teamsh ave done a tremendous job in debating their points of v iew. “The research and presentation of the speeches has been first class and we are looking forward to a fiercely contested final round,” Ms Gaitor said. Foundation launched to assist blind and visually impaired children FOUNDATION PRESIDENT Barsha Smith and Loretta Butler-Turner, Minister of State for Labour and Social Development. D o m i n i q u e T h o m p s o n T HE CAT ISLAND t eam discusses rebuttal strategy at the 2008 N ational High School Debating Championships. The lone member from that squad, Giovanno Bowe (2nd from left this year’s competition. Cat Island and Long Island set for debating final

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J UST over 20 years ago, a group of top British investigative journalists left their jobs at the Sunday Times to piece together the fantastic tale of the cocaine trade in Colombia, the Bahamasand Miami. Their explosive 1988 book the Cocaine Wars described how Carlos Lehder, the Colombian cartel's chief transporter, took control of an island in the Exumas "while the government of Prime Minister Sir Lynden Pindling did its best to help him feel at home." The story goes back to the early 1970s. Within a year of independence, Bahamian police were warning that drug trafficking was a "serious problem," a US Senate report noted, "and by 1979, that problem was a crisis....both narcotics smuggling and government corruption grew at an extraordinary rate." One famous Miami-based trafficker, nicknamed Kojak, told the Senate investigation that he had paid off Bahamian authorities "from the lowest ranking officers to the highest politicians." In fact, the chief of the Bahamas’ police drug task force, ACP Howard Smith, was on Kojak's regular payroll, according to testimony. From all of the evidence, said the 1984 Commission of Inquiry report into drug smuggling, “we have concluded on the balance of proba bilities that ACP Smith corruptly accepted bribes from known drug smugglers.” "The security of this country is being threatened by armed foreign criminals," a confidential report noted in early 1979. "The Bahamas is being deluged with drugs." And the plain fact is that all of the evidence collected over the years has identified two men both now dead as chiefly responsible for this unfortunate state of affairs. They were Prime Minister Sir Lynden Pindling and his cigar-chomping crony, Everette Bannister. According to the authors of the Cocaine Wars , "it is fair to assume that they both felt they were owed something by the Bahamas because, when the time was right, they pursued those schemes with the rapaciousness of creditors outto collect a debt long overdue." As the book notes, "If in 1979 there was an incursion of armed criminals, by 1980 it had become an invasion." A review of Sir Lynden's personal finances by the 1984 Commission of Inquiry in Nassau found that he had spent eight times his reported total earnings from 1977 to 1984. According to the Inquiry: "The prime minister and Lady Pindling have received at least $57.3 million in cash. Explanations for some of these deposits were given... but could not be verified." Other investigations turned up even more startling evidence. Witnesses told of the "incalculable millions of dollars taken and received by every corrupt official and politician in Everette Bannis ter's pocketand by 'the Man', the prime minister who always got his share." Gorman Bannister, the son of Pindling's longtime "consultant" and bag man, was one of those who helped the authors of the Cocaine Wars write their story. He also testified before a US Senate subcommittee in 1987. The sheer scale of corruption was unprecedented. As former PLP parliamentarian Edmund Moxey said during the Commission of Inquiry, "Pindling and his crew make the Bay Street Boys look like schoolchildren." And a report by the US State Depart ment concluded that the drug trade accounted for at least 10 per cent of the Bahamian economy, including political payoffs, over heads and investments. Everette Bannister had returned to the Bahamas from the US after the PLP won the 1967 general election. His influence began to grow when fugitive American financier Robert Vesco moved to Nassau in 1972 and set up a dummy bank to channel bribes and payoffs to PLP bigwigs so he could avoid extradition. Ban nister's connections proved helpful in this regard. Within a year the bank had advanced $50 million in unsecured loans that were never repaid, the US Senate report said. And Bannister had gained a reputation as someone who could provide access to the top for the right price. Norman's Cay lies about 50 miles from Nassau, just outside the boundaries of the Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park. The island was touted as a headquarters for the park by the 1958 scientific survey that recommended the cre ation of the Bahamas National Trust. It was a popular anchorage for visiting yachts and was first developed in the mid-1960s as a small residential community with a clubhouse and marina. According to Phil Kniskern, a developer quoted in the 1991 book Turning the Tide by Sidney Kirkpatrick, "Norman's is special...Ten minutes after landing you can be bonefishing in the pond, or diving on the reef. And it's only 19 minutes from Nassau and a little over an hour from Miami." In other words an out of the way yet strategic location. And in 1978 a Bahamian company called International Dutch Resources began buying up land there. IDR was set up for Lehder by a regular trust company in Nassau, which managed his working capital. And Kniskern, along with all the other lawful residents, was eventually forced to leave Norman's Cay. By the end of 1979, the island was home to Lehder's gangsters, who drove ordinary visitors away at gunpoint. Lehder built a large hangar with cocaine storage faculties. A 3,300-foot runway was protected by radar, bodyguards and attack dogs for the fleet of aircraft under his command. Cocaine shipments from Colombia arrived on the island every hour of every day, and Lehder's personal wealth mounted into the billions. Witnesses at Lehder's 1988 trial in the US said Pindling was paid $88,000 on the 22nd of each month to protect the Norman's Cay base, and Everette Bannister collected the money personally. Bannister was later indicted in the US for funneling bribes from drug smug glers to Bahamian officials. Here's an excerpt from his son's Senate testimony: Senator Kerry . Did your father warn Carlos Lehder of the police raid on Norman's Cay? Mr Bannister . Yes. Senator Kerry . Do you want to describe that? Mr Bannister . Well, as I recall, he just made a phone call to Carlos letting him know, well, police are going. Senator Kerry . You heard the phone call? Mr Bannister . Oh, yes, yes, yes yes ... I know my father did call him one time and told him, "Listen, the police are going to raid Norman's Cay on a certain day, clean it up." And when they went there, they didn't find...anything. When opposition parliamentarian, Norman Solomon, began to complain to Bahamian and US authorities about the situation, his car was blown up. According to Gorman, Lehder boasted that he was behind the bombing and his father, Everette, viewed Lender's decision to bomb Solomon as appropriate. All this led to a 1982 meeting between Vice President George H W Bush, US Admiral Daniel Murphy and Prime Minister Pin dling, at which the Norman's Cay problem was raised. The Senate report said the vice president showed Pindling a computer printout of CIA surveillance of Norman's Cay and told him the island resembled O'Hare Airport because of its activity. Lehder also boasted to the Colombian media about his involvement in drug trafficking at Norman's Cay and about his gift of hundreds of thousands of dollars to the ruling Progressive Liberal Party in the Bahamas. So his operation could hardly have been con sidered secret. And it was certain ly known to Pindling. This house of cards came crashing down on September 5, 1983, when NBC News exposed the Norman's Cay scandal and directly implicated the Bahamian government in Lehder's operations. The NBC broadcast and the resulting outcry in the Bahamas led to the establishment of the Commission of Inquiry. Informers for the US Drug Enforcement Administration have also testified that in 1980 and 1981 Pindling spent occasional week ends partying down at Norman's Cay with Lehder and his gang, and the CIA was said to be holding the photographic evidence to prove it. So the story that sparked the recent controversy over Pindling's legacy can hardly be considered "explosive" or "outrageous" today. Even if Sir Lynden was not complicit in the death of Chauncey Tynes Jr, he was certainly a causal factor in a lot of other tragedies across the length and breadth of the Bahamas over many years. Allyson Maynard Gibson's pretence at shock horror that Sir Lynden's name had been "sullied" and "desecrated" by the recent Tri bune article is pure political the atre. No matter how you look at it, the corruption of an entire soci ety and generations lost to drug abuse and organised crime are an indelible part of the Pindling legacy. Face it. Deal with it. The key point for us today is that PLP leaders have never fully digested the lessons from this disastrous period of Bahamian history, which they themselves led. The contradictions within the party arising from the large-scale criminality exposed by multiple investigations have never been dealt with frankly. They have simply been brushed under the rug as the most recent self-righteous outcries from PLP quarters so clearly demonstrate. And that is precisely why the party is in such a fix today. It lost a large degree of legitimacy and credibility in the 1980s when the country was sold out to foreign gangsters. And it wasted a golden opportunity to claw back some of that legitimacy and respect when it was unexpectedly re-elected in 2003. Although PLP leader Perry Christie was one of three cabinet ministers who initially recoiled at massive official corruption under Pindling's leadership (Hubert Ingraham and Arthur Hanna were the others), he is one of those now trying to avoid dealing with that despicable legacy. And if he doesn't deal with it, who will? As we said, it is a legacy that has yet to be processed by the PLP. The strategy is to cling to Pindling's achievement of majority rule and independence and ignore all the rest. By ignoring it, it will eventually go away as people get older and memories fade. This is nothing but a public relations scam that will do nothing to resolve the party's inherent contradictions. Perhaps the best example to draw the point is that of the retired PLP cabinet minister from Exuma who was found to have routinely accepted gifts and payoffs from the Lehder operation and to have been a "lackey" for Everette Bannister (but later acquitted in the courts). He was appointed to a prestigious government job by the Christie administration in 2002 and now submits statesmanlike essays to the press on the future of Exuma, as if the 1970s and 80s had never happened. And although we can agree that all of us may bear some responsibility for what happened in those days, and all of us may have benefited to some degree wittingly or not it is the handful of men and women who were large and in charge who must accept most of the blame. Many are still around and can easily make their voices heard in the right way. As we noted in an earlier article on political prospects for the PLP after the 2007 defeat (see www.bahamapundit.com), it has been said that “All political parties die at last of swallowing their own lies.” It remains to be seen whether the PLP will be able to achieve the fundamental reform that it seems to require, or whether it will fatally choke on its own self-delusion. Sources: 1984 Commission of Inquiry Report. 1988 Report of the US Senate Subcommittee on Narcotics, Terrorism and International Operations. 1988 US State Department Report on International Narcotics Control. 1988, The Cocaine Wars, by Paul Eddy, Hugo Sabogal, Sara Walden. Published by W W Norton. 1991, Turning the Tide, by Sidney Kirkpatrick and Peter Abrahams, published by Penguin Group. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 7 An indelible part of the Sir Lynden Pindling legacy Sir Lynden Pindling

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n By BETTY VEDRINE Bahamas Information Services FLANKED by family members, friends and wellwishers, 33 young women received recognition at the annual Bahamas Debutante Foundation awards ceremony Wednesday evening. The ceremony was held at Government House and was hosted by Governor General Arthur Hanna who told the debutantes that the event signalled a milestone in their lives. “Debutantes, surely this programme has inspired and provided for you great incen tives for continued success in the area of social develop ment. “I challenge you to run with the baton and make a positive influence among your peers,” the Governor General said. After being exposed to six months of social and educational training, including essay and talent competitions, the young ladies are poised to fully contribute to their communities. The Governor General not ed that having gone through the programme, the debu tantes would be able to positively impact their peers. “You have been exposed to many areas such as eti quette, personal grooming, public speaking, health and hygiene, road safety, spiritual and moral development, women’s rights and many others,” he said. “These are vital areas which will advance your development as positive young ladies.” President of the Bahamas Debutante Foundation Cristina Johnson said the awards ceremony is the kick-off to the main event which is the Debutante Ball slated for April 4. “We decided to separate the two events because it would have been too long if we had both at the same time,” Ms Johnson said. “Also, many parents had never been to Government House, therefore this was also an opportunity for them to come here and meet the Gov ernor General.” She explained that although enrollment in the programme this year was low er than usual due to the downturn in the economy, she was pleased with the number of persons who participated. “We know that the tough times may have made it difficult to pay the $250 fee required for the programme, however we were happy that many persons were able to participate,” she said. C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By OMAR ARCHER E VERYWHEREyou turn these d ays voters are increasingly more o utspoken about their disappointment with various members of parliament. They feel that their concerns are not being met, mainly because there is a serious disconnect between themselves and their sitting representatives. One major reason for thise volves from the candidate selection process. I feel that the current process of selection is undemocratic. It’s like serving meat to a vegetarian and telling him/her to eat it or starve. That’s not democracy, that’s dictatorship. Take for example the system ofp rimaries in the United States which began in the early 20th century. This process was e stablished to mainly democratise the internal workings of all political parties, so as to e nd the practice of candidates being handpicked by appointed party committees, as has been done by all political parties here in the Bahamas for decades. This process is inherently flawed. It is unconstitutional andd efeats the very purpose of a democracy. This is why I am now hereby proposing a Constituent Act. The sole purpose of this Act from the perspective of a free and democratic society, is to ensure that ALLc andidates are chosen via a ballot by the v oters/constituents in their respective communities in an open and fair democratic process. The now existing process leaves far too much room for manipulation of this very important process and must be c hanged immediately. The existing process h as over the past discriminated against vari ous proposed candidates for many different reasons – namely, the candidates were too outspoken, or he or she is disliked by certain influential committee members. Politicald iscrimination has no place in a free and democratic society where the lives and well being of the citizens are at stake. This is a v ery serious problem with Bahamian polit ics today and must be corrected before the next general election in 2012. The existing process is nonsensical; the p ower of selection should be given to the constituents and not allowed to be continually hijacked by petty internal party polit ics. Choosing candidates via a committee and presenting them at “take it or leave it” conventions is no longer acceptable, because it blatantly puts a limitation on the choice of the Bahamian voting electorate which is unacceptable in a democracy. With-o ut the proposed Constituent Act, voters – i n particular grass root voters –will continue to have no say as to who is elected to serve in such capacity. I am now proposing that all parties nominate via this democratic process, thus e mbracing the shifting of power from internal petty party politics, to the actual cons tituents. The suffocating influence of party leaders will be severely weakened and rightfully so. Political parties must be run as democratic institutions and not like privately owned businesses. The ideal purposeo f this proposed Act would be to find the c andidate who would fearlessly represent h is/her constituents and address their needs p ublicly with conviction. In this respect, the Bahamas’ candidates selection process is dangerously flawed and needs to be cor-r ected immediately. This is the answer to those politicians who think they are entitledt o office no matter what. I say let the people decide – not the part y. Candidate selection process is undemocratic Y OUR S AY THIRTY-THREE young women received recognition awards at the annual Debutante Awards Ceremony held at G overnment House on Wednesday, March 18. Seated from left are Fredericka Hamilton, committee member; Governor General Arthur Hanna and Cristina Johnson, president of the Bahamas Debutante Foundation Young women honoured at annual debutante awards ceremony P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S n CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. THE 10 ORBITING astronauts talked up green energy with President Barack Obama on Tuesday, describing the benefits that will come from the international space station’s new solar wings, according to Associated Press. Obama told the astronauts aboard the linked station-shuttle complex that he was extraordinarily proud of their work over the past week. He wanted to know how they installed the solar panels and what the impact of that power would bring. “We’re investing back here on the ground a whole array of solar and other renewable energy projects and so to find out that you’re doing this up at the space station is particularly exciting,” Obama said. Obama’s first budget plan released last month moves to shift the nation from reliance on foreign oil to developing clean-energy technologies, such as solar and wind power. Last week at the space station, the final set of solar wings doubled the amount of power available for science experiments and will help support a larger crew in a few months, the astronauts said. Obama, astronauts talk up green energy in call

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n By TIM REYNOLDS AP Sports Writer MIAMI (AP Erik Spoelstra has a simple plan for how he’ll manage a stiff and sore Dwyane Wade as the Heat make their playoff push. “Play him,” the first-year Heat coach said. Wade is at the point in the season where the little aches and pains are becoming bigger aches and pains. He’s spending extra time in the training room, getting ice baths, even had his personal trainer Tim Grover visit from Chicago for a few days recently to go along with the daily guidance Wade gets from the Heat medical staff. But with 12 games left in a 22-day span starting Wednesday night in Indiana a place where Wade has never won as a pro, losing all seven times he’s taken the court there there’s no time for a break. “Once you start playing, your adrenaline gets going and everything’s fine,” said Wade, the league’s leading scorer (29.9 points) and MVP candidate. “I think it’s the beginning of games when you’ve got to get yourself going. ... I was running all around the court, I was trying to make sure we didn’t get lost or fall asleep with the game going slow. That makes you all aware.” With the Southeast Division race essentially decided weeks ago Orlando can officially clinch on Wednesday the Heat have been left to contend for the No. 4 playoff spot in the Eastern Conference. And in that race, there’s little room for slippage. Atlanta (42-29 of the race for the No. 4 seed and home-court advantage in the first round, holding a 3 1/2game lead over the Heat. The Hawks have 11 games remaining, meaning Miami has one game in hand. Miami (38-32 ahead of Philadelphia (36-33 for the No. 6 spot, and three games up on Detroit (34-35 which currently holds down the seventh seed in the East playoff bracket. It all means that Spoelstra is leaving nothing to chance. That’s one of the reasons why, even with Miami up by double digits in the fourth quarter against lowly Memphis on Mon day night, he put Wade back into the game in the fourth quarter. I would have taken those minutes. I wanted some more rest,” Wade said. “But I play with a young team. All year, I don’t have the luxury of sitting out fourth quarters. One day, we will get back to that. But right now, we’re not there. We’ve got to try to get the win.” Wade missed his first game of the season last Wednesday in Boston, after a strained right hip flexor that led to some stiffness in his groin left him sidelined. In the four games before Miami played the Celtics, Wade logged 50 min utes in a double-overtime win over Chicago, 37 minutes in a home win over Boston, 52 1/2 minutes in a triple-overtime epic win over Utah, then 34 minutes the next day in a loss at Philadelphia. Without him, the Heat lost 112-108 in overtime to Boston. The stretch that Wade is on now represents one of the longest of his life without an extended break from competitive basketball. He was shut down late last season, as the Heat sputtered to the worst record in the NBA, because of knee pain. Wade began training for last summer’s Beijing Olympics in May, played the whole way through late August while helping the A mericans win a gold medal, then started camp with the Heat just a couple of weeks later. His body might need a break, but if Wade gets his way, he won’t be getting one for at least another few weeks. “We have to be smart about i t,” Spoelstra said. “...He feels not 100 percent, probably not anywhere near it. But as long as we can maintain that, we’ll keep on playing him. And it takes him a while to get loose, but he’s still explosive.” n By BARRY WILNER AP Football Writer DANA POINT, Calif. (AP NFL owners have passed four player safety rules for next season. One of them is the elimination of blindside helmet-tohelmet blocks. The changes came Tuesday at the NFL meetings in California. The new rules state that the initial force of a blindside block can’t be delivered by a helmet, forearm or shoulder to an opponent’s head or neck. An illegal blindside block will bring a 15yard penalty. Initial contact to the head of a defenseless receiver also will draw a 15-yard penalty. On kickoffs, no blocking wedge of more than two players will be allowed. Also, the kicking team can’t have more than five players bunched together pursuing an onside kick. NFL passes four player safety rules C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 9 Appeals court upholds verdict against Iverson n By NEDRA PICKLER Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP NBA star Allen Iverson must pay $260,000 for standing idly by and watching his bodyguard beat up another man in a 2005 bar fight, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit rejected the Detroit Pistons guard’s attempt to throw out the verdict decided by a jury in 2007. Bar patron Marlin Godfrey accused Iverson’s bodyguard, Jason Kane, of punching, kicking and hitting him with a bottle because he refused to v acate the VIP section at Washington club Eyebar to make way for the basketball star and his entourage. Godfrey suffered a concussion, a ruptured eardrum, a burst blood vessel in his eye, a torn rotator cuff, cuts and bruises, and emotional injuries. A three-judge appeals court panel wrote that Iverson stayed out of the fray in the back corner of the VIP area, standing on a couch or bench and observing. “The evidence in this case supported the jury’s finding that Kane attacked Godfrey in a fight that lasted several minutes, and that Iverson stood and watched without attempting to do anything to stop the beating,” the decision said. Godfrey and another patron, David Anthony Kittrell, sued Iverson for $20 million, but the jury decided not t o award punitive damages a nd only compensate Godfrey $ 10,000 for his medical bills and $250,000 for pain and suffering. The jury did not find either of the men liable for assaulting Kittrell. ALLEN IVERSON is seen during a game against the Milwaukee Bucks, in Auburn Hills, Mich... (AP Photo: Paul Sancya n By The Associated Press S S C C O O R R E E B B O O A A R R D D Wednesday, March 25 Boston at Orlando (8 pm EDT). The Atlantic Divisionleading Celtics have a one-g ame lead over Southeast Division-leading Orlando for second place in the Eastern Conference. S S T T A A R R S S Monday Flip Murray, Hawks, scored a season-best 30 points as Atlanta won its seasonhigh eighth straight home game, beating Minnesota 10997. Dwight Howard, Magic, had 29 points and 14 rebounds as Orlando beat New York 106-102. Dwyane Wade, Heat, scored 27 points to top his o wn team single-season record plus added eight assists as Miami easily beat Memphis 94-82. Andre Miller, 76ers, had 27 points and 10 rebounds a nd scored the go-ahead bask et with 1:56 remaining in overtime as Philadelphia rallied for a 114-108 win over P ortland. Ben Gordon, Bulls, scored all of his 21 points in the second half including seven in the final 3 1/2 minu tes to lead Chicago to a 1 01-99 win at Washington. S S O O A A R R I I N N G G H H A A W W K K S S The Atlanta Hawks beat the Minnesota Timberwolves 109-97 on Monday night to w in their season-high eighth s traight home game. It was A tlanta’s eighth win in nine games overall, and the Hawksa re 28-7 at Philips Arena. The h ome streak is the longest for Atlanta since Nov. 12, 1996Feb. 12, 1997, when the Hawks won 20 in row. M M I I A A M M I I M M I I L L E E S S T T O O N N E E Dwyane Wade broke his own Miami Heat single-season scoring record Monday, topping the mark set in the 2005-06 championship season. W ade’s fourth point against t he Memphis Grizzlies gave h im 2,041 this season, one more than he managed in 75g ames three seasons ago. M onday was Wade’s 69th appearance of the season. He got the record-setter on a layup with 10 minutes left in the opening quarter, giving M iami a 9-0 lead. C C O O L L L L A A P P S S I I N N G G K K N N I I C C K K S S Nate Robinson scored 19 points on just 6-of-23 shooting for New York, which dropped i ts fifth straight, 106-102 to O rlando, in a late-season col lapse after entertaining hopes of a playoff spot a week ago. T he Knicks honored former players at halftime, including P atrick Ewing, Willis Reed, Bernard King and Walt Frazier, then extended their dismal present by clinching an eighth straight losing season, tying a franchise worst. L L O O O O K K I I N N G G G G O O O O D D Kevin Garnett played 18 minutes, hitting all five fieldgoal attempts while scoring 12 points as the Boston Celtics pulled away for a 90-77 win over the Los Angeles Clip pers on Monday night. He added two rebounds and two assists in his third game back since missing 13 with a sprained right knee. S S U U N N S S S S H H I I N N E E Grant Hill hit a 12-foot jumper in the lane to break a tie with 58.6 seconds remaining, then added a free throw with 6.2 seconds left to help Phoenix extend its seasonhigh winning streak to five games in a 118-115 victory over Denver on Monday night. S S T T R R O O N N G G I I N N D D E E F F E E A A T T Antawn Jamison had 34 points and 12 rebounds for Washington, which has lost five straight after a 101-99 loss to Chicago on Monday night. ... Carmelo Anthony led Denver with 29 points in a 118-115 loss at Phoenix, but missed a 3-pointer in the final second. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G “That’s what I do, baby. I’m Shaq-ovich. We needed them. I’m known that when you really need them, I’m going to make them.” Phoenix’s Shaquille O’Neal, who played only 24 minutes because of foul trouble, had six of his 19 points in the final 5:04, when he made four of five free throws in the Suns’ 118-115 win over Denver on Monday night. O’Neal made seven of eight free throws in the game. NBA Today NEW YORK (AP ny Pacquiao has been voted fighter of the year by the Box ing Writers Association of America after a dominating win over Oscar De La Hoya. Joe Calzaghe was runner-up, but voted manager of the year Tuesday for guiding his own career. The undefeated former super middleweight champion recently retired. Pacquiao won three times in 2008, highlighted by his stoppage of De La Hoya. Pacquiao’s trainer, Freddie Roach, was a voted trainer of the year, the third time he has won the award. The super batamweight rubber match between Israel Vazquez and Rafael Marquez was chosen fight of the year. Vazquez won the fight by split decision. The awards will be presented at the annual BWAA dinner June 12 in New York. Pacquiao 2008 fighter of year by BWAA vote LONDON (AP funding ahead of the 2012 London Olympics, part of an effort to concentrate on events with the best chance to medal. UK Sports says Tuesday that fencing, handball, table tennis, shooting, volleyball, water polo, weightlifting and wrestling will have their budgets slashed by more than half. Britain did not win medals in any of those events at the Beijing Games. Shooting will be hardest hit, with a budget cut of 76 percent. UK Sport says the cuts were needed because of the economic downturn and a lack of private sponsorship. 8 British sports to lose $73m in Olympic funds I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s With 12 games left, no time for Wade to rest DWYANE WADE watches the game against the Utah Jazz in the fourth quarter in Miami. (AP Photo: Alan Diaz

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Slowey pitches five sharp innings, has three RBIs Cycling series to continue today C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS LEGACY Baseball League kicked-off its 2009 season at the beginning of March, but held its opening ceremonies onM arch 21. I t’s president, Steve Burrows, t alked about the tremendous growth in their girls softball p rogramme which has expanded to the east and west Grand Bahama. He also spoke about their growth in baseball, which wase vident in capturing two divisions in the BBF Andre Rodgers National BaseballC hampionships in June 2008. L egacy won the Coach Pitch Division and the High School 16-18 Division over the three major power houses in baseball Freedom Farm, JBLN & Grand Bahama. P resent at the opening cerem onies was August "Auggie" Campbell (Full Football Schola rship to Duke University this F all). B urrows told the children at the end of his speech, that they h ave a role model in Campbell. “He sat right where you are m any years ago. Through hard work and dedication you canb e in the same position,” Burrows said. B urrows also promised the many parents and supporters o f Legacy that they will be b ringing back home three divisions from the upcoming 2009 N ational Baseball Champio nship. A lso in attendance from the BBF was president Craig Kemp, secretary general Theodore Sweeting and 4th vice president (Grand Bahama Alonzo "Chumpy" Pratt. Kemp thanked the Legacy e xecutives for their ongoing d evelopment of baseball on Grand Bahama and encoura ged them to continue to build o n their success. Kemp also presented Legacy with their 2008 Championship Diamond Banners (CoachD ivision) and High School (161 8) Division. Kemp, Sweeting, national team manager Patrick Knowles Sr (Team Bahamas 15-16 coach Alonzo Pratt (Team B ahamas Men’s National Team) and Coach Opi Taylor (Team Bahamas 16-18 ducted try-outs for the young men in Grand Bahama onM arch 22 from 2pm to 5pm to a fford them a fair opportunity t o be selected to one of the national teams traveling this s ummer. Many of the young men had a great showing and the teams will definitely have a national makeup. T he Federation indicated that they are extremely proud and excited to advise that 95p er cent of the 16-18 team and t he senior men’s team presently attend high school or college in the US. The executive committee and the coaching staff feel very confident these two teams will do v ery well this summer. I n the 15-16 Zone Tournament, the Bahamas is coming o ff a 3rd place finish in 2008. T here are high expectations f or this team as all the mem bers have had international e xposure from previous tournaments. National teams traveling this s ummer: T EAM BAHAMAS 16-18 XII Latin American R egional Big League Tournam ent 2009 June 19-28, Maracaibo, Venezuela (Countries p articipating: Aruba, Bahamas, C olombia, Curacao, G uatemala, Panama, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, USVI and Venezuela) TEAM BAHAMAS 15-16 PONY Caribbean Zone Championship July 6-12, Guarb o, Puerto Rico (Countries part icipating: Bahamas, Dominican Republic, Panama, USVI, P uerto Rico) TEAM BAHAMAS Men’s National Team World Baseball Challenge, J uly 16-26, Prince George, C anada (Countries: Team Bahamas, Team Canada, Team Croatia, Chinese Taipei, Ger many Team USA, Professional Teams: Reno Astros & Host P rince George Axemen) Legacy Baseball League holds opening ceremonies n By JAN M OLSEN Associated Press W riter COPENHAGEN (AP European soccer’s governing body has looked at Major League Baseball’s luxury tax policy for inspiration as it seeks to control spending. The devil is in adapting these rules to a European context,” UEFA s pokesman William Gaillard said Tuesday in a telephone interview with The Associated Press. The MLB system works b y taxing free-spending c lubs on all they spend a bove a set payroll. If the l uxury tax idea found favor, big spending soccer clubs would have to pay their tax before being allowed to play in the Champions League and the second-tierU EFA Cup, renamed the Europa League next sea son. T he Union of European Football Associations alsoh as looked at salary caps and player drafts, whichw orks in the fixed nature of American sports leagues but not the pyramid structure of European soccer, where the bottom teams are relegated to a lower divisiona nd top minor league clubs are promoted. “I don’t think a luxury tax s hould be treated any more seriously than some of the t hings that have been pro posed over the last month,” Chelsea chief executive P eter Kenyon said at a news conference in New York to a nnounce his club’s summer U.S. tour. “We believe as clubs and as the European club association (that financing of clubs are issues f or clubs and that governing bodies should again concen trate very much on the organization structures and the licensing structures they are currently implement i ng.” AC Milan organizing d irector Umberto Gandini, sitting next to Kenyon, e choed that view. UEFA and the clubs are looking at other experi ences and, obviously, you are very familiar with the system you have in the American sports, salary caps and collective bargaining agreement situations, and we will look at that,” he said. “Clubs have to look around themselves and find the right way to control the spiraling costs. ... There is a debate inside and outside the organization. And we are sure we are going to get to a common understanding when the right problems will be targeted.” UEFA is determined to reform the business side of football’s elite clubs in its campaign for “financial fair play.” It fears that clubs are running up excessive debts to chase success in the Champions League. Associated Press Writer Graham Dunbar in Geneva and AP Sports Writer Ronald Blum in New York contributed to this report UEFA looks at luxury tax to curb teams’ spending n By JAN M OLSEN Associated Press Writer COPENHAGEN (AP Tension escalated Tuesday between the soccer’s most powerful bodies and the World Anti-Doping Agency in a dis pute over out-of-competition drug testing. FIFA and the Union of European Football Associa tions called on WADA to reconsider its whereabouts rule, which took effect Jan. 1 and requires elite-level athletes in registered testing pools to give drug-testers three months’ notice of their location for one hour each day. WADA director general David Howman said the rule could not be negotiated until the end of the year and football would have to fall into line. “The rules are in place and if you don’t follow the rules then, of course, we have to report that information to our board,” Howman told The Associated Press in a telephone interview. FIFA and UEFA say there are “fundamental differences” between individual athletes and players or teams. FIFA and UEFA said they “do not accept that controls be undertaken during the short holiday period of players, in order to respect their private life.” The confrontational state ment came four days after FIFA president Sepp Blatter insisted that soccer should not be held to the strictest standards of the new code. “I don’t understand or com prehend the criticism,” Howman said. “Other team sports have got whereabouts systems in place and it seems to be working. I would hope that our constructive partnership with FIFA will endure and they will sit down with us and talk it through.” In Belgium, 65 athletes have started court proceedings against the new out-of-compe tition testing rule, citing the European Convention on Human Rights. Associated Press Writer Graham Dunbar in Geneva contributed to this report FIFA and UEFA reject WADA drug-testing rule M ANCHESTER, England (AP a retraction and apology after P ele said the Brazilian striker had a drug problem. Robinho, who plays for Manchester City in the Premier League, threatens legal action if the soccer great does not com ply. Pele also implicated Ronal do, another Brazilian star, in his comments to a Brazilian radio station last week. “A formal retraction from Pele will be requested, if what he said was not misinterpreted by the media that published it,” according to a statement on Robinho’s Web site Tuesday. “And if Pele does not come for ward, he will have to deal with his very unfortunate comment in court.” Guilhereme Prado, a spokesman for Ronaldo’s Brazilian club, Corinthians, said the veteran striker had no com ment. Pele’s remarks appeared to suggest that any transgression was in the past. “It’s unfair to talk of drugs in football just because of one or two cases, as happened with Ronaldo and Robinho, who had that problem,” Pele said. Pele helped Brazil win three World Cups before retiring in 1977. Since then, he has done promotional work for a credit card company and Viagra. “Robinho is upset and disap pointed at Pele, who seems to have forgotten the great idol he was,” the Web site statement added. “It appears Pele must be reading sensationalist (media wrongful statement.” Brazil striker Robinho wants Pele apology Robinho (AP THE New Providence Cycling Association is sched uled to continue its Wednes d ay afternoon series today at 6:30pm at the one-mile nation al track at the Baillou Hills S porting Complex. Then on Saturday at 7:40am at Jaws Beach, the ‘Unknown Classic’ race is set to take place. The event is open to all competitors and there is a reg i stration fee. On Sunday back at Baillou Hills, the track series is slated t o kick off starting at 4 pm. There will be a one-lap timed trial, two-lap sprint race and a 15-lap race. The Wednesday evening track series will conclude att he end of April. The awards presentation will be held 5pm May 3 at Workers House. A wards for outstanding cyclists in 2008 will also be presented. J UPITER, Fla. (AP T wins right-hander Kevin Slowey was dominant on the mound Tuesday, and he looked pretty good as a batter, too. Slowey pitched five effective innings and helped hisc ause with two hits and three RBIs, leading the Minnesota Twins to an 8-1 victory over the Florida Marlins. “It was pretty comedic to them that I walk up there and swing and the ball finds theg rass somewhere,” Slowey said after going 2-for-2 with a double. Slowey, who allowed a run and two hits while striking out five, had a bases-loaded sing le in the first inning off righthander Chris Volstad and then r ipped a double to left in the t hird to score two more runs. “That was pretty crazy. He d oesn’t even hit in the regular season,” Volstad said. Slowey, who had two hits in e ight at-bats last year, had no explanation for his offensivep rowess. The first couple of weeks o f camp we bunt and swing in t he cages,” he said. “You kind of leave that to the guys who g et paid to do it.” B ut Slowey, the Twins’ No. 3 starter, was most happy a bout throwing 48 of his 66 pitches for strikes. He has allowed just one walk in 14 13 innings this spring. I don’t like walking guys,” s aid Slowey, who allowed 24 walks in 160 1-3 innings last y ear while going 12-11 with a 3 .99 ERA. “When it gets to 2-0 or 3-1, I need to be able to make a good pitch. It’s got tob e a strike. So far it has worked out.” Volstad had his roughest o uting of the spring, allowing f our runs three earned in four innings. He also walked three batters after walking just t wo in 18 innings coming in. “He’s human,” manager Fredi Gonzalez said. “He wasn ot as sharp as he has been in t he past but those things happ en in spring training. He’s got a couple of more outings. We’ll get him back on track.” D an Uggla homered for the Marlins, his fourth this spring. Notes: The Marlins o ptioned right-hander Ryan T ucker to Triple-A New Orleans. The Marlins are off W ednesday but left-hander Andrew Miller will start in a minor league game against theC ardinals. KEVIN SLOWEY takes a warm-up toss during the spring training \game against the Florida Marlins in Jupiter, Fla. Tuesday... ( AP Photo: Richard Drew)

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n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T wo years ago, she e arned her professional status as the overall female champion at the Central American and Caribbean Bodybuilding & Fit n ess Championships. B ut like big Joel Stubbs, who got his status in 2004, Gena Mackey is hoping that this will b e the year that they both shine on the international bodybuilding circuit. While Stubbs has enjoyed a great deal of success, including getting splashed across a number of magazines as he gains a lota ttention for his huge back poses, Mackey is just getting into the flow of things. “I’ve been training hard and getting ready for my first intern ational show in August,” said Mackey, as she viewed the Bahamas Powerlifting Federa tion’s National PowerliftingC hampionships on Saturday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium with Stubbs. From August 14-15, Mackey is scheduled to be competing at the Europa Super Show Sports and Supplement Expo Champi onships. Immediately after that show, Mackey is slated to travel to Austin, Texas, to compete in September. “I’m going to be ready this y ear,” Mackey said. “I want to t ake that seventh down to at least a third or a fourth place. One way or the other, I will work my butt off this year.” Since making the transition from an amateur pro, Mackey said she has had to go through the growing pains, but she hasm ade the adjustment and now she feels she’s ready to step up the ladder. I just needed more definition and cuts in my legs. That was my weaknesses last year,” she said. “Everything else was right in place. That was what threw me off.” Not too disappointed in her performances, Mackey said she went back to the drawing board, training with Stubbs and she’s now focused on rebuilding all over again. At this time, the former soccer player turned bodybuilder, said she’s pleased with where she’s at in her training and she’s confident that she will be a com petitor to watch this year. Already developing a name for himself, Stubbs competed in the Atlantic City Bodybuilding Championships last year where he was fifth in the men’s open, just missing the qualification for Mr Olympia by one spot. This year, Stubbs has vowed to use the experience to his advantage. “The judges were able to encourage me to keep doing what I’m doing because they see too that my time is here,” Stubbs said. “I figure in every sport you have to pay your dues. I think I’ve paid my dues, so it’s time for Bahamians to watch a Mr Olympia Show or watch a top notch show and see Joel Stubbs on stage representing the Bahamas.” Stubbs, a Bahamasair pilot by profession, was hoping to open his season by representing the Bahamas at the New York Men’s Professional Championships in New York on May 16, but he’s not sure if he will make the trip. “I recently had the flu and as a result of that, I was bed-ridden for two weeks and my weight and size went down,” he said. “Right now I’m trying to eat myself back up to my regular competing size again. “I’ve already resumed my training regimen. The deadline to register is the last week in April. Providing all goes well by the end of April, I will put the contract in and represent my country.” The former basketball player said if he doesn’t make the trip to New York, he will definitely compete in a series of events that will prepare him for another shot at Mr Olympia. From August 7-8, he will compete in the Tampa Men’s Pro from August 7-8; the Europa Super Show Sports and Supplement Expo Championships from August 14-15; the Houston Men’s Pro on August 22 and the Atlantic City Men’s Pro Show in New Jersey from September 1112. As an incentive, Stubbs is also featured regularly in both Muscle M agazine and the Muscle Asyl um Project. In the magazine, Stubbs is featured in each edition with his own column pro viding tips on how to get fit. He serves as a spokesman for Muscle Asylum Project, which enables Stubbs to further expose the Bahamas on the international scene. Talking about the scene, Stubbs said he was quite impressed with what he saw from the new competitors who came out to compete in the National Powerlifting Championships on S aturday. But he advised athletes that powerlifting is definitely the best training background that they can all take advantage of to improve their skills. Mackey, on the other hand, said she was hoping to see a lot more women participating as there are a lot of them working out in the gym. But of course, she noted that she didn’t expect to see her replacement just yet because she left an awesome work ethic behind in the amateur ranks. n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THERE’S a popular phrase coined by Roman author & historian Titus Livius that says: “Better late than never.” Although honoured by having the softball park renamed after him by the Bahamas Government a couple years ago, Dudley ‘Douggie’ Smith said he will not be happy until he sees it in print. During the homecoming cel ebrations over the Easter holiday weekend, a local self-help committee in Eleuthera, headed by Betty Taylor-Sands, is hoping to finally erect the official sign that will bear the name of the Dudley ‘Douggie’ Smith Softball Park. “One of the problems we had was our (softball is not as functional as it should be,” said Ronnie Horton, one of the persons who is working diligently to make the sign a reality. “We built the park and did a lot of things to it until it was named in honour of Douggie. Then we took a step back. We didn’t do anything since. We put up a sign that says softball park, but we never got it done official ly.” Horton, a local businessman and close friend of Smith, said they have been building a con crete base and Taylor-Sands has been working on getting the name printed on the sign that will be mounted for all to see. “It’s all voluntary work,” he said. “In fact, Douggie should n’t be doing any work, but he’s right there with us everyday helping out. It’s a small compact community, so we’re just trying to get it done.” This weekend, Horton said they are trying to finalise all of the details for the ceremony that will take place during the home coming celebrations. Smith, a Bahamas National and International Softball Federation Hall of Famer, said it’s good to finally see that his name is going to be placed on the sta dium. “It makes you feel great,” he said. “They always say it’s better late than never, so I think this is the appropriate time. It’s a good time for it because a lot of people will see it when they come home for the homecoming.” In addition to Taylor-Sands and Horton, Smith said he’s thankful to persons like Leo McSweeney, the local govern ment board and a number of other persons who have chipped in to help out. In his retirement years, Smith said he doesn’t have anything to look forward to. But he said everytime he passes the stadium, which is not too far from his res idence, he will always be able to share a smile when he looks at his name on the sign. “I think I will have to pinch myself too and say ‘look what you have accomplished,’” he chuckled. “Growing up as a little boy, you never thought in your wildest dream that something like this would happen to you, a poor little fellow coming out of the community.” For 38 years, Smith had one of the most illustrious careers as a softball/baseball player coming from the Family Islands. Having gotten started in 1960, Smith played through 1998. During that time, he also played in the New York Mets Farm System in the Major League in the 1970/71 season. A jammed shoulder injury and a broken finger prevented him from playing beyond that period. “The week I was going to Double A, we were playing in Covington, Virginia and I was on second base and the coach on third base was telling me ‘you’re all right, you’re all right’ as I took a big lead,” Smith recalled. “But the pitcher picked me off as I tried to get back to second base and I jammed my shoulder and broke my finger.” On his return home, Smith began playing on the national softball team. His first year was in 1972 and he played up until 1998, mostly as a player. In 1980, Smith said he enjoyed his fondest memory when the Bahamas played in a 19-inning game in Tacoma, Washington, against New Zealand. He was the catcher for ace Richard ‘the Lion-Heart’ Johnson. “In the 15th inning, the LionHeart threw a pitch outside and I blocked it with my chest and kept the runner on base. We went on to win the game and I got a three minute standing ova tion,” Smith reflected. The Bahamas, managed by Sidney ‘Bobby Baylor’ Fernander, went on to win the game 2-1. Looking back at his career, Smith said he’s pleased with what he has been able to accomplish. But he indicated that he’s even more enthused about what is ahead of him with his name finally going up on the stadium in his homeland. C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 9 International sports news B B A A H H A A M M I I A A N N S S A A T T H H U U R R R R I I C C A A N N E E I I N N V V I I T T A A T T I I O O N N A A L L A NUMBER of Bahamian athletes competed this past weekend in the Hurricanes Invitational at the University of Mia-m i in Coral Gables, but their results were not posted in Monday’s edition of Tribune Sports . Here’s a look at their performances: J’Vente Deveaux, competing unattached, turned in the best performance as he won the men’s triple jump with a leap of 49-feet, 7 1/4-inches. In the men’s 100m, Derek C arey, competing for the B ahamas, was fifth in 10.93 seconds, while Wayne Major, competing unattached, was 11th in 11.03. In the 200, Brandon Miller, c ompeting unattached, was 12th in 21.91 after he finished third in the third of five heats. Also in his heat was Major, who gotf ourth in 22.86 for 27th overall. M iller picked up a third place finish in the men’s 400 in 48.39a fter he won the second of six heats. Douglas Bell, unattached, was 16th in 50.43; Demetrius Emmanuel, repr esenting the Bahamas, was 25th in 52.49 and Tino Thompson, unattached, was 34th in 54.99. Kenneth Wallace-Whitfield, c ompeting unattached, was sixth in the men’s 800 in 1:58.19, followed closely behind by Thompson in 1:58.33. Emmanuel did not f inish the race. In the 400 hurdles, Kayuse Burrows, representing the B ahamas, ran 54.81 for fifth p lace. N N P P B B A A P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S THE New Providence Bask etball Association opened its b est-of-five semifinal playoff on Monday night at the CI Gibson Gymnasium. The defending champions CommonwealthB ank Giants and runners-up Electro Telecom Cybots took leads in their respective series. The Giants came out with a slim 92-91 decision over the Police Crimestoppers. Jeremy Hutchinson had a game high 30, Mark Hanna added 20 and Michael ‘Ferley’ Bain chipped in with 16. For the Crimestoppers, Valentino Richardson had 23, Terrance Brown had 19 and Ver n on Stubbs contributed 10. In an intense battle that extended to who had the most fans in the stands, Brian Baker had a game high 30 and Nelson Mandella’ Joseph added 24 as the Cybots pulled off a 107-102 victory over the Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders. In a losing effort, Kevin Smith had 26 and Kristano Johnson added 24. Game two of both series will be played tonight at C I Gibson. M M A A S S T T E E R R S S T T R R A A C C K K M M E E E E T T THE Masters Softball Association, headed by Foster Dorsett, is scheduled to hold a meeting tonight in the confer ence room of the Ministry of Education on Thompson Boulevard at 7pm. All members and those former athletes who wish to become a member of the association, are invited. IN BRIEF Appeals court upholds verdict against AI... See page 9 ‘Douggie’ Smith softball park sign to make it official Stubbs and Mackey hoping to shine on international circuit JOEL STUBBS & GENA MACKEY (right national bodybuilding circuit...

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Justice Lyons had eventually recused himself from the case, which involved the distribution of funds between business partners, on the basis that he did not have time to hear the matter. However, attorneys involved in the case told Justice Allen that Justice Lyons had “literally forced” the appointment of the accountant on them. They said that Justice Lyons “threatened” to walk out of court if they did not agree to the appointment. Justice Allen has ordered the names of the litigants in the case sealed. “The transcript of October 11, 2007 is replete with references to the judge threatening to leave the case if the appointment (of the accountant) was not agreed and at one point got up to leave when counsel begged him to have a seat. The judge was asked by counsel if it was an ultimatum to which he responded ‘you bet it is’,” Justice Allen said in the judgment. According to the judgment, on the first day of the hearing, the accountant was asked and denied that he had a social relationship with Senior Justice Lyons. Then, on the second day of cross-examination, he was asked whether a relative of his had any relationship with Senior Justice Lyons to which he responded that “he didn’t get into his sister’s business but he knew that she and the judge were friends.” “It was only then that I made the connection between the accountant and information which was in the public domain for some time, that the judge had more than a friendship with a woman who up to that point I did not know was the accountant’s sister,” Justice Allen stated in the ruling. In an attempt to ensure trans parency in her conduct as a judicial officer and as the judge who was to determine whether the accountant’s report should be approved, Justice Allen said she informed counsel that she was aware of this information. The ruling, which the Justice delivered yesterday, was in rela tion to a request by lawyers for one of the litigants that Justice Allen recuse herself from the case because of her knowledge of Jus tice Lyon’s relationship with the accountant’s sister, which might have prejudiced her judgment as to whether the accountant’s report would have been valid. The findings of Mr Ferguson’s report is being disputed by parties and is now the subject of a hearing before Justice Allen. “Counsel informed me that they were also aware of the informa tion and had brought up the issue between them before the appointment of the accountant but did not raise it with the judge,” Justice Allen said. She said that counsel for one of the litigants asserted at the hearing of the application for her recusal, that because the other lawyer did not object to the appointment of Daniel Ferguson, he waived his right to object now. “(Council for A that he had not raised the issue because Justice Lyons had literally forced the appointment on them, threatening to walk out of court if they did not agree to the appointment,” Justice Allen said. She further noted that during the hearing before her, the accoun tant admitted that he had only “gathered documents and put them into piles and did not examine them to see what was missing from his second interim report and that his only attempt to identify them was in the final report. “He also admitted that he did not identify which of the missing documents was relevant to the calculation of the balancing payment. He also agreed that he had made no effort to compel the production of any missing documents by reference to the court.” Justice Allen noted in her judg ment that she had expressed to counsel her concerns about the appointment of the accountant and the integrity of the report. She also noted that she had inquired whether given the circumstances and in the interest of time, counsel would be minded to make any concessions in relation to the report. “I said further that if there were no concessions regarding the report I was minded to dispense with hearing, the evidence of the parties and their experts on the issue of the approval of the report as I had previously directed and seek to complete just the crossexamination of the accountant by the parties and then determine whether to approve the report,” Justice Allen stated in the judgment. Senior Justice Allen ruled yesterday against an application for her to recuse herself from the hearing. “Having ascertained all of the circumstances which have bearing on the suggestion that I am biased, and having asked myself whether a fair minded observer informed of all the circumstances would conclude that there was a real possibility that I was biased, the resounding reply is no. I have no doubt that I can objectively decide the issue before me,” Senior Justice Allen stated. Alan Stenfield, QC, along with Michael Scott, represents client A, Anthony deGarr Robinson, QC, along with Randol Dorsett, repre sents client B, attorney Brian Moree represents client C, while Nicholas Lavender, QC, along with attorney Wayne Munroe, represents client D. The identities of the parties involved were not disclosed. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Mini Famous Bowl $2.75 the latest survey of its kind 81 per cent of visitors to “the Bahamas overall” say they would be “likely” to return, while a lower 50.7 per cent say they would be “very likely” to come back to the islands. Meanwhile, only seven per cent of the 9,009 visitors who completed the survey told the Ministry that they believed it “not at all likely” that they would revisit the Bahamas in the following one to five years. Intent to revisit the Bahamas was highest among visitors to the Out Islands in 2007, 67 per cent of whom said they would be “very likely” to come back, while a tiny two per cent said that it was “not at all likely.” This corresponded with another disclosure that the Out Islands rated better than Nassau/New Providence and Grand Bahama in the minds of stopover visitors when it came to all important elements such as hotel rooms, food in hotels, beaches, climate and attitudes. While these seemingly high “likely to return” figures would appear an encouraging sign during an industry downturn, Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool Wallace was not gloating yesterday. In reality, “the sustainability of high levels of return based on experience and references doesn’t begin to happen until you reach around somewhere in the mid90s (per cent “So (at 81 per cent you need to be in order to get the kind of level of automatic returns based on experience and recommendations.” Presenting the Ministry of Tourism’s new strategic direction last year, Mr Vanderpool Wallace committed the ministry to making much better use of data gathered from tourists via tools such as the exit surveys, which seek to discover the nature of visitors’ stay, their demographic characteristics, their level of satisfaction and their expenditure while in The Bahamas. Such tools allow the Ministry to determine whether it is getting closer to its stated aim of giving visitors a “delightful experience” that compels them to go home and tell others that “it’s better in The Bahamas.” Trends revealed in the surveys now also factor directly into how funding is allocated in the ministry. Britain's proposed plan to suspend the executive and legislative branches of the Turks and Caicos Government as the best thing it can do to correct the problems plaguing the small British overseas territory. During any subsequent talks with the two parties, CARICOM and the Bahamas, should work to ensure that Turks and Caicos (TCI the day-to-day running of the country, he said. He also suggested that the Bahamas offer to help craft stricter legislation for TCI, that would allow it to govern itself more effectively once the proposed suspension period ends. "The Turks and Caicos is still a dependent and Britain has the power to suspend (TCI's tution to do what it feels is right in order to set right what they see as being wrong in the colony, because for the rest of the world if anything goes wrong in Turks and Caicos, they see Britain as being responsible. "What the Bahamas and CARICOM can do is to one, intercede on behalf of the people of Turks so that the period of suspension can be as short as possible, and offer to assist Britain to come up with the kinds of procedures that would be necessary to allow the colony to regain its government. And I think the people of Turks need to also have a say in what their future relationship will be like with Britain," said Mr Archer during an interview with The Tribune yesterday. Britain's announcement came after an interim Commission of Inquiry report on the British Overseas Territory found a "high probability" of corr uption among the upper echelons of the government. The move would suspend the executive and legislative branches of the TCI Government and allow British Governor Gordon Wetherell to run the day-to-day affairs of the country for two years. It is expected to come into effect once the British present their final report on the inquiry probably by April 30. " We haven't seen the final report, but if what we're hearing from the interim report is what's in the final report means (there are lems in Turks and Caicos. While simply getting rid of one party, or the premier might be temporary solution there are other deep seated problems that need to be taken care of In the past they haven't been interested in independence but maybe this episode will give them a change of heart, but they n eed new policies so they don't fall into the same situation," said Mr Archer. In a release issued yesterday, the new leader of TCI's governing party Premier Galmo Williams criticised Britain's decision, saying it was not the best move for TCI. He acknowledged the recommendations in the interim report, which exposed "weaknesses" in the administration, but said these should be remedied w ith new legislation and scrutiny by TCI's government with oversight from Britain, not direct rule. was hoping for a massive demonstration, but Atlantis security staff guarding the beach in front of the exclusive Cove resort with its private residences, hotel rooms, swimming pools and beach cabanas, told The Tribune they had seen no sign of proteste rs yesterday morning. One security guard said: “The law is that they can come to the h igh water mark, so my concern is anything above the high water mark, which is private property. “And we have security out here every day, so no-one will go past the high water mark.” Paul Rolle has scheduled three further events at Cove Beach throughout the year and has i nvited all ‘patriotic’ Bahamians to go along and ‘secure the beaches for the future genera tions’. H e said: “Bahamians in Nassau especially are facing displacement, chaos and lack of recreation and family activities as foreign ‘exclusive’ investments continue to rob us of our birthrights. “No way is this more evident than at our public beaches that h ave been ‘strong armed’ away from us by some resorts.” any business standard is more than acceptable, he said. However, after agreeing to take the nomination for the PLP, Mr Ritchie said he was informed that “FNM operatives in the Ministry of Finance” would use his company’s outstanding balance with Customs to attack him. Indeed, Mr Ritchie said, it was only a few days later when he was issued a letter not from the Comp troller of Customs but from a previously unknown employee who demanded full and immediate payment. “As the company did not have the resources to meet this demand it relied upon its bank, First Caribbean International Bank (FCIB allowing its overdraft facility to go as high as $5 million and issued cheques based on this. “Without notice in mid-2007 the bank, which holds well over $200 million in assets as security, suddenly hardened its policy and returned hundreds of cheques. The majority of these were replaced within a short period of time with certified cheques,” he said. In addition, Mr Ritchie said the Ministry of Finance had Customs put GUL on a cash basis and demanded “payment in advance for all services.” “This severely damaged the company’s cash flow and caused it to fall behind in its payment to other vendors who then also demanded cash in advance. In addition to causing a great loss of business, in the later part of 2008, these events led to the company falling behind in its payments to the bank,” he said. Over the past 18 months, Mr Ritchie said GUL made several offers to settle its outstanding bill with Customs all of which were rejected, first by the same previously unknown employee of the Public Treasury and then by the Comptroller of Customs. “Instead the Minister of Finance initiated legal proceedings and appeared bent on following these through to the end no matter what. Instead of wasting time fighting the lawsuits, the company continued to search for ways to arrange payments to the govern ment in order to settle the outstanding fees. “It is to be noted that if the government had continued to allow GUL to operate as was the established practice, the current situation would never have arisen and once it did occur, had they accepted one of the earlier payment plans offered, the balance would have already been significantly paid down,” he said. However, as previously stated, Mr Ritchie insists that instead of working with the company to keep it afloat, the government, more particularly the prime minister, “has a totally different agenda than collect ing public funds.” SEEBUSINESSFRONTPAGE people out there who have it and are unaware they have been taking it. “It is the Ministry of Health’s mandate to provide quality healthcare for the citizens of this country, but giving diabetics expired insulin isn’t quality healthcare,” she said. Health authorities maintain preliminary investigations prove there are adequate supplies of several types of insulin in stock at the Elizabeth Estates Clinic pharmacy, and the earliest expiration date of these medicines is October 2009, while most expire in 2010 or 2011. But the investigation has yet to prove how pharmacists at the Elizabeth Estates Clinic could haveg iven the 44-year-old insulin which had expired over a year ago, and possibly administered it to hundreds of other diabetics. A spokesman for the Ministry of Health and Department of Public Health said the Ministry is doing a number of things to help achieve its mandate to deliver quality healthcare and provide access to a ppropriate medication for all. He said: “The Ministry of Health and the Department of Public Health also wish to inform the public that the recruitment of five additional pharmacists is being aggressively pursued. “It is expected that they will be in post by early May 2009, to further improve access to and the dispensing of pharmaceutical supplies within the Community Clinics. “This and the recent upgrade of service delivery at the Princess Margaret Hospital Pharmacy are among the initiatives ensuring the Bahamian public continues to receive the highest quality of healthcare service.” Judge’ s conduct FROM page one FROM page one Protesters FROM page one F ormer CARICOM Ambassador expects ‘damaging’ final Commission of Inquiry report FROM page one Global United CEO FROM page one Medication FROM page one Minister on figures

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Miami firm is ‘optimistic’ on Bahamas realty sales n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A DECISION on whether to fully rebuild Morton Salt’s Inagua f acility has been delayed due to the impending sale of the com-p any’s ultimate parent, Tribune Business has been told, with the b uyer already planning to sell the Bahamian company as part of a potential $1.5 billion deal. Morton Salt’s ultimate parent, US-based Rohm & Haas, had b een due to decide on whether to invest a multi-million dollar s um in rebuilding the Inagua operation by the 2009 first quarter e nd, but the latter’s spokesman, George Bochanski, told Tribune B usiness that “things have got a little bit more cloudy than they have been in the past”. Explaining that no decision had been taken, Mr Bochanski added: Lately, Dow has been talking about a possible sale of Morton.U ntil all that gets sorted out, I don’t expect Morton manage m ent will make a decision any time soon. “It’s really going to be up to Dow to determine the future of the whole business. I wouldn’t c ertainly expect anything new until the deal between Dow andR ohm & Haas closes. There won’t be any information com n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T h e mothballing of numerous major Caribbean-based resort developments w ill “make Albany and the B ahamas stand out even more”, the development’s managing partner told Tribune Business yesterd ay, with a further $200 million set to be spend on the project’s f irst phase between now and its planned summer 2010 opening. Christopher Anand said a silver lining to the current global financial crisis, which had dried upd ebt financing and pre-sales for many planned Caribbean mixeduse resort developments, was that it “rationalised” development int he region and curbed a potential product oversupply something that will benefit wellfinanced projects such as Albany. “We have become aware of 27 p rojects, pretty major projects, that have been pulled or cancelled in the Caribbean and Mexico over the last 12 months,” MrA nand told Tribune Business. “Only the absolute strongest will survive, and we are lucky to be in the situation we are in. CHRISTOPHER ANAND n B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor GLOBAL United, the shipping agent and logistics business runb y former PLP election candidate Jackson Ritchie, yesterday said it was likely to cease operations and lay-off all remaining staff this Frid ay in the face of a winding-up t hreat from the Government over unpaid taxes, a senior minister describing as “absolutely bogus” the firm’s claims of political persecution. C aptain Ritchie, in a statement issued to the media, accused the Government of ‘victimising’ Global United because of his political affiliation, refusing allt he company’s efforts to settle its outstanding multi-million dollarc ustoms duties and departure tax bill in an effort to force it out of b usiness. He revealed that the Attorney General’s Office had served Global United with four statutory demands in relation to some$ 6 million allegedly owed to the Customs Department and theP ublic Treasury, threatening that unless the outstanding sums were p aid in full by tomorrow (Thursday, March 26) it would petition f or the company’s winding-up. As a result, Captain Ritchie said that if no alternative solution could be found, “the compa ny will have to terminate the r emaining staff, hand over all assets to the bank and close itsd oors permanently on Friday, March 27”. This would add to the 1 60 Bahamian staff already ter minated by Global United over the past two years. Yet Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, yesterday d escribed Mr Ritchie’s claims of political persecution and victimis ation as “absolutely bogus”, say ing the issue was simply one where Global United had failed to pay “substantial sums” in taxes. A s a result, the Government had been forced to take action to col-l ect what was due from it. Mr Laing said Captain Ritchie h ad agreed a payments schedule for the outstanding taxes with the Customs Department, but had failed to deliver on what he had promised. A nd the minister said that efforts to collect Global United’so utstanding tax bill had begun under the former PLP administ ration, before the current FNM government took power on May n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Government’s proposed unemployment benefit will burden the Bahamian business community with more bureaucracy and taxes at a time when it can least afford it, one executive said yesterday, and force all companies to change their computer payroll systems. Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor Company’s (NMC manager, who is also a senior executive with the Nassau Insti tute think-tank, told Tribune Business he was concerned that the proposed unemployment benefit scheme would, in conjunction with the growing national debt, rising fiscal deficit and the National Insurance Board’s (NIB falls, increasingly burden future Bahamian generations. Tribune Business has obtained a copy of the proposed amendments to the National Insurance Act, and its accompanying Benefits and Assistance Regulations, which indicate the unemployment benefit scheme and its attendant reforms are more wide-ranging than previously revealed. For instance, workers who are “kept on short-time” and suffer a loss of employment earnings meaning workers working a reduced work week where their income is reduced to less than half their average insurable weekly earnings, will receive unemployment benefit. And when employers terminate an employee’s service, they will expose themselves to a $500 fine and summary conviction if they fail to complete the appropriate NIB-approved form, or fail to give it to the employee of send it to the Board within one week of the termination date. Any continuing failure to comply will result in the employer incurring a $200 per day fine for each day the form(s “I think that the last thing we need is to set up a system that drags the country down in the future, as it has done in other countries with welfare systems,” Mr Lowe told Tribune Busi ness. “Already, you’ve got to change your computer system. There are more forms, and if you don’t fill in that form it’s a $200 per day fine.” Among those eligible for the Government’s proposed unemC M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.56 $3.31 $3.60 Benef it sc heme r aises tax and bureaucracy fear S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B Global United facing Friday shut down * Troubled company facing w inding-up threat from Attorney General’s Office if $6m unpaid tax bill not met by tomorrow * Company’s former PLP e lection candidate head claims government p ersecution * Laing slams allegations as absolutely bogus’, with g overnment ‘more than gracious’ over substantial s ums owed * FirstCaribbean has security o ver $20m worth of company assets, and would head creditor list, w hich includes ColinaImperial ‘Stand-out’ project to invest further $200m * Albany developers target summer 2010 opening for first phase * Working to close $200m worth of real estate sales, and hoping to seamlessly move into $400-$500m worth of Marina Residences construction once pre-sales targets hit * Some 20-30 firms working on construction, and several h undred workers, 90% of whom are Bahamian Likely Morton sale hits Inagua rebuild n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net A MIAMI-based marketing company advertising land for sale in Rum Cay told Tribune Business yesterday that it was “optimistic” a bout the success of its South Beach-based business called Paradise is Mine, which is thought to be connected to former US senator, BillyW ayne Davis. Lawrence Fowler, a Paradise Is Mine spokesman, told this newspap er that his marketing company “markets for land in the Bahamas”. This comes as Bahamian real estate is being lauded as a “gold mine” and touted for defying market odds by resisting devaluation, while the popped housing bubble in the US destroyed property resale prices. Officials from the Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREA t his paper Monday that they would look into the claims of the US-based sales centre pushing Bahamian property. The President of BREA s aid that only agents who held their licenses were eligible to sell propF ormer US senator said to be behind P aradise Is Mine S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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ployment benefit scheme are those who have been unemployed since July 1, 2006, well before the current economic downturn started. Mr Lowe yesterday also objected to the fact that the pro posed Act amendments and regulations made the responsible minister “all-powerful” by giving them the sole discretion to decide when to extend the maximum duration a person could receive unemployment benefit for. Arguing that the proposed unemployment benefit scheme represented another tax on the business community and employed workers, Mr Lowe questioned why the Government was seeking to introduce it when the economy was locked into a recession and companies were already overburdened by a deteriorating financial picture. “Why implement this thing when everything is on a down ward spiral?” Mr Lowe asked. “That was one of the things that extended the Great Depression in the US, government mandates at a time when business were losing business. But they know better. “What about the unintended consequences? You shift theb urden, and businesses say: This is another expense, we must cut back.’ If a person comes in, looking for work, that1 per cent could be the difference between being hired or not.” The Government is initially p roposing to finance the unem ployment benefit scheme with a $20 million transfer from NIB’s medical benefits branch. If that sum is exhausted before the mandatory contributions become law, then the scheme would be supplemented from the consolidated fund. The 1 per cent that Mr Lowe is referring to is the mandatory1 per cent of insurable wage contribution that is expected to finance the unemployment benefit long-term, split 50/50 between employer and employ ee. As regards the timing of this funding mechanism’s introduction, Brian Nutt, the Bahamas Employers Confederation’s (BECon bune Business last week that while the Government wanted to implement it from January 1, 2010, it had made it clear thet imeline was not set in stone. M r Nutt said it was “subject to the state of the economy. If the economy doesn’t improve and gets worse, they would consider delaying the contribution aspect of it. “But if a lot of money is com i ng out of the Consolidated Fund, the Government might not be able to afford to keep paying it out, and have to introduce mandatory contributions sooner.” Mr Nutt and Dionisio D’Aguilar, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s president, have both backed the unemployment benefit scheme’s introduction as a necessary social stimulus to prevent increased suffering among the jobless and their dependents albeit with reservations about the current proposal’s structure. The BECon president added that while the unemployment contributions “wouldn’t be viewed as a huge burden”, they were an additional cost that businesses would have to bear. “It is something that can have an effect on struggling and mar ginal businesses, which is unfor t unate,” Mr Nutt added. “But it i s something that is overdue and will provide benefits to our society as a whole.” Mr Lowe, though, appeared to disagree. He told Tribune Business: “If I was in their [government’s] position, my inten t ions might be the same. But would I implement a system that burdens future generations of Bahamians? I doubt it. I might be voted out of office, but I would choose political leadership over vote getting.” n By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets THERE was an increase in t rading momentum last week, as investors traded in four out of the 25 listed securities, of which one declined and three remained unchanged. There were no a dvancers in the market last week. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 31,506 shares c hanged hands, representing an increase of 10,585 shares or 51 per cent, versus the previous week's trading volume of 20,921 shares. F ocol Holdings (FCL w as the volume leader last week with 1 4,000 shares trading, its stock ending the week unchanged at $ 5.07. Commonwealth Bank (CBL was the big decliner, trading 11,630 shares, its share price falling by $0.08 to end last week a t $6.48. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T I nvestors traded $67,000 (par value), Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Series D Notes (FBB15 2 015. C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S E E a a r r n n i i n n g g s s R R e e l l e e a a s s e e s s : : Freeport Concrete Company ( FCC) r eleased first quarter r esults as at November 30, 2008, r eporting a net loss of $220,000 for the quarter, compared to a n et loss of $74,000 in the first quarter of the previous year. The company's management indicated that total sales revenues of $3.4 million were down b y 8.6 per cent quarter-overquarter, due to reduced sales in i ts Home Centre and concrete division. Management said they were actively pursuing ways tor aise additional capital to purchase inventory, which would increase sales at the Home Centre. FCL’s gross profit of $778,000 d eclined by about $246,000 or 24 per cent, from the 2007 first quarter. Total expenses of $886,000 also declined by 10 per cent due to lower operating c osts. Total assets of $6.6 million increased by $9,000 or 1 per cent f rom the fiscal 2008 year-end, due to an increase in the company's fixed assets. Total liabilities of $5.3 million also increased by $273,000 or 5.4 per cent from fiscal 2008. P P r r i i v v a a t t e e P P l l a a c c e e m m e e n n t t O O f f f f e e r r i i n n g g s s FOCOL Holdings (FCL a nnounced that it will be extendi ng the deadline of its private placement offering. The preferred shares will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per c ent, payable semi-annually. D D i i v v i i d d e e n n d d N N o o t t e e s s : : Finance Corporation of The Bahamas (FIN d ividend of $0.13 per share, p ayable on March 30, 2009, to all shareholders of record date March 23, 2009. C ommonwealth Bank (CBL h as declared a dividend of $0.05 per share, payable on March 31, 2 009, to all shareholders of record date March 13, 2009. Cable Bahamas (CAB has declared a dividend of $0.07 per share, payable on March 31, 2 009, to all shareholders of r ecord date March 19, 2009. Consolidated Water Company ( CWCB) h as declared a dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on May 7, 2009, to all shareholders of record date April 1, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP The Bahamian Stock Market F F I I N N D D E E X X 8 8 1 1 1 1 . . 6 6 1 1 Y Y T T D D ( ( 2 2 . . 7 7 8 8 % % ) ) B B I I S S X X C C L L O O S S I I N N G G C C H H A A N N G G E E V V O O L L U U M M E E Y Y T T D D P P R R I I C C E E S S Y Y M M B B O O L L P P R R I I C C E E C C H H A A N N G G E E AML$1.45 $-0-15.20% BBL$0.63 $-0-4.55% BOB$7.00 $-0-8.38% BPF$11.00 $-0-6.78% BSL$9.58 $-0-5.99% BWL$3.15 $-00.00% CAB$13.95$-0-0.57% CBL$6.48 $-0.08 11,630-7.43% CHL$2.83 $-2290.00% CIB$10.45 $-00.00% CWCB$1.56$-0.020-30.67% DHS$2.16 $-0-15.29% FAM$7.76 $-0-0.51% FBB$2.37$-00.00% FCC$0.30 $-00.00% FCL$5.07 $-14,000-1.93% FCLB$1.00$-00.00% FIN$11.00$-0-7.33% ICD$5.50 $-5,647-10.28% JSJ$10.50 $-0-5.41% P RE$10.00 $-00.00% Benefit scheme raises tax and bureaucracy fear F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 3B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net T HE AUTO repair business c ould emerge as a relatively recession-proof business, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with more people conc erned with the upkeep of the vehicles they have rather than the purchase of a new one. T im Cartwright, service manager of Cartwright’s Garage, told Tribune Business t hat the company have not seen a decline in vehicle serv icing business compared to 2008, but instead experienced the same fluctuations that have a lways defined revenue flow. “There hasn’t been anything noticeable. Some weeks it’s d own, some weeks it’s back to normal, but nothing overwhelming,” Mr Cartwright said. H owever, he added that some individuals are holding out on their regular service. Some people, I have to beg them to come in,” he said. A manager at Nassau Repair S hop told Tribune Business that they had seen that, when there was an economic downt urn, people focus on car repairs rather than replacement. H e said it was important for people to get their oil changed regularly and repair things s uch as mufflers and radiators, b ecause they cannot afford to p urchase a new vehicle. I van Ferguson, owner of Fergie’s Tune-Up on Jennie Street, said this time of year h as been traditionally slow for his business, but that he expects things to pick up after t he Easter season. H e was not quite sure whether more people will serv ice their vehicles rather than buy new ones, but was positive about his business keepi ng up with the competition. “Some people are regular with their service and some p eople are not, but I haven’t seen a drastic change like that,” said Mr Ferguson. New car sales have been d own across New Providence, and suppliers of General Motors and Ford Vehicles w ere watching the US media closely last year to see if their manufacturers would be driv en under by that country’s failing economy. Only one repair shop that s poke to Tribune Business said “business is definitely down”. Vehicle retention aid repair shops In the long-run, it will make Albany and the Bahamas stand out even more. It’s rationalised the pace of development that was going on, which was unsustaina ble. I don’t believe there was the demand to justify the supply com-i ng on the market.” Although there were fewer b uyers in the market, Mr Anand said that situation could change very rapidly if consumer confi dence returned regarding the state of the world economy and U S stock market. Supply, on the other hand, had dropped more than demand”, and took much longer to recover. A ll of which is set to benefit the likes of Albany, which will seemingly be perfectly positioned to capture the economic upturn, and exploit the lack of product availability throughout the Caribbean. “Albany will be one of the strongest of projects, which will be great for the Bahamas,” Mr Anand said, adding that demand for this nation’s real estate was also likely to receive a boost as people used such investments to hedge against future inflation. Inflation is an increasing con cern, especially in developed nations such as the US and UK, as governments expand fiscal spending and the money supply in a bid to ward off inflation. Meanwhile, Mr Anand told Tribune Business yesterday that Albany’s investors had invested “about $200 million” into the pro ject’s first phase to date, with another $200 million set to come. The first phase involves Albany’s infrastructure and key amenities, such as its golf course and 71-slip marina, and Mr Anand said the latter was set to be “look finished” by June. The channel and concreting were both per cent” complete”, while the golf course was “well beyond 50 per cent complete”. The course was currently being grassed, with irrigation and shaping already complete on many holes. The tender for Albany’s water park had also gone out to bid. T he number of construction workers on-site at Albany, some 90 per cent of whom were Bahamians, was in the “hundreds and growing by the day”. The vertical construction will really ramp up this summer,” Mr A nand added. “We’re in full swing starting this summer. We’re d oing some site work and moving some utilities that need to be moved to move fully ahead.” The Albany managing partner said some 25 hotel cottages were at various stages of vertical con struction, with another 15 set to s tart shortly. “We’re shooting for a summer 2 010 opening of all the amenities, the hotel cottages,” in Phase One, M r Anand said, explaining that if pre-sales targets were met, the developers would seamlessly roll into $400-$500 million worth of phase two construction on the Marina Residences. “We are getting ready to be in a position to launch the Marina Residences,” Mr Anand said. “We have to get some pre-sales goals done, but we think it could happen and are optimistic. If the world stabilises and improves, I think we can get it done. “It will take 12-15 months to get those goals done. If the world is OK we will get it done, but if not it won’t be for lack of trying. “In an ideal world, we would be starting next summer. That could start a chain reaction of $400-$500 million worth of construction, which is more than in phase one. We’ve got to execute phase one, and then get into position to execute phase two.” Mr Anand added that Albany was “in the process of closing” around $200 million worth of real estate sales, having been boosted by its 80-strong founders programme, all of whom had stuck with the development. The major investors in Albany are the Tavistock Group, the investment vehicle for Lyford Cay-based billionaire Joe Lewis, and world-famous golfers Tiger Woods and Ernie Els. ‘Stand-out’ pr oject to invest further $200m F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B ing out of Morton until then. Ultimately, it will be down to Dow to make a decision as the new owner.” T hat deal is due to close on April 1, 2009. Yet Bloomberg hasr eported that Dow aims to raise $4 billion to help pay for the deal, i ncluding $1.5 billion from selling Chicago-headquartered Morton International, Morton Salt’s parent company. Dow will also issue $4.3 billion o f debt and cut costs by $400 million more than previously esti-m ated, partly by eliminating an additional 3,500 jobs, mostly at R ohm & Haas. Changed M r Bochanski said “nothing h as changed substantively” as it relates to Morton Salt’s Inagua o peration since it was heavily damaged by Hurricane Ike, with e xecutives operating from temporary offices. There’s full employment, no one has been laid off, and subs tantively the status quo remains until a decision is taken,” Mr Bochanski said. Likely Morton sale hits Inagua rebuild F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!

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e rty in this nation. In an release published on M onday, the Paradise Is Mine company unveiled its plans to o pen a ‘sales centre’ in South Beach “to exclusively market Bahamas properties”. H owever, a release published online on March 15 names ‘Paradise is Mine’ as a “development on the beautiful island of Rum Cay”, saying the company “prov ided land for sale with a unique twist”. T he release also said that Para dise is Mine “has agreed as part of this process to name the streets and beaches after the first residents”. Three of the beach front lots a dvertised on the company’s website, which seem to be emptyp lots, marked “subject property” have already been tagged sold, w hile eight seem to still be on the market. According to Mr Fowler, several different persons, presumably foreigners, own the plots of l and advertised on his company’s site,. However, he could not say w ho exactly owned them. Billy Davis, who purports to o wn large plots of land on Rum Cay, is believed to own at least one of the plots offered by Paradise is Mine. Realtors spoken to by Tribune B usiness have said Ted Rover, P aradise Is Mine’s director of sales, had previously confirmed to them that Mr Davis was the developer behind the website and its real estate venture. However, M r Rover declined to confirm this when contacted by Tribune Busi n ess yesterday. It has been long argued that m uch of the land in Rum Cay has been purchased by foreigners without clean title, although there is nothing to suggest this is the case with the land Paradise Is M ine is marketing. In an article published by this p aper in 2007, it was revealed that there was strong suspicion that s cores of Americans had sunk tens of thousands of dollars into pieces of land they don’t have clean title to, walking away with title deeds that will have no stand i ng in a court of law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olina Holdings Bahamas Limited Class “A” Preference Shares The Board of Directors of Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited (CHBL pleased toannounce that a Preference Share Dividend for the period January 1, 2009 to March 31, 2009 will be paid to the Class “A” Preference Shareholders of recordof CHBL on the 31st day of March 2009. Payment will be made through the Company’s Registrar and Transfer Agent, CFAL Ltd., within 10 business days of the record date. 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW 0$//,66$1,&2/( (9$16 RI1DVVDX9LOODJH3%R[LQWHQGWR FKDQJHQDPHWR 0(/,66$1,&2/((9$16 ,IWKHUH DUHDQ\REMHFWLRQVWRWKLVFKDQJHRIQDPH'HHG3ROO \RXPD\ZULWHVXFKREMHFWLRQVWRWKH &KLHI3DVVSRUW 2IFHU31DVVDX%DKDPDVQRODWHU WKDQWKLUW\GD\VDIWHUWKHGDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLV QRWLFH Global United facing Friday shut down 3, 2007. “What is absolutely incredible is how h e [Mr Ritchie] was able to amass that level of indebtedness to the Government, when other people in this society would be flabbergasted to incur even 10 perc ent of that,” Mr Laing said. Describing the sums owed by Global United, on behalf of shipping and cruise line clients such as Carnival and RoyalCaribbean as “substantial”, Mr Laing a dded: “He had entered into an arrangement with the Comptroller of Customs for some payment, which was seemingly supported by his bank. That fell through. It’s an unfortunate circumstance, it really is, but it’s quite incredible that Mr Ritchie makes this argument for the defence of his situation. “Taxes are due. That he does not deny. T hey have been due for some time. They have been accrued for some time, and efforts were made to collect them prior to the election. It’s incredible.” M r Laing said: “I think he [Mr Ritchie] would have to concede that the Government has been more than gracious in tolerating his business relationship with the Government in relation to Customs. It h as been more than gracious.” In his statement yesterday, Captain Ritchie said Global United had paid between $70-$80 million to the PublicT reasury on behalf of its clients every y ear up to 2007, and “at any one time be no more than 5-7 per cent outstanding in its obligations to the Government”. He alleged, though, that Global United problems began when he acceptedt he PLP nomination for Clifton in the 2007 general election, claiming he received a call that ‘FNM operatives’ in the Ministry of Finance would use the company’s outstanding tax bill to attack him. Captain Ritchie then alleged that he received a letter from a Public Treasury e mployee demanding immediate payment, which Global United was unable to meet. The company resorted to its bank, FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas floating and fixed mortgage debenture over $20 million worth of Global United’s assets. The bank allowed the comp any’s overdraft to reach $5 million, and issued cheques on it. Captain Ritchie yesterday claimed the bank then “suddenly hardened” its position in mid-2007, returning “hundreds of cheques”. These had to be replaced by certified cheques, at a time when the Ministry of Finance and Customs placed Global United on a cash-in-advance basis f or all service payments. This, Captain Ritchie argued, damaged Global United’s cash flow, and caused it to fall behind on vendor/supplier payments, causing them to also demand cash in advance. Outlining the troubled nature of Global United’s business, Captain Ritchie said that in 2008 the company lost clients and fell behind i n its bank payments. H e accused the Treasury and Customs Department of rejecting all attempts tos ettle with Global United over the out standing taxes over the past 18 months, a nd said: “If the Government had continued to allow Global United to operate as was the established practice, the current situation would never have arisen. “Once it did occur, had they accepted the earlier payment plan offered, the balance would have already been significantly paid down.” FirstCaribbean had engaged KPMG, t he accounting firm, to help Global United restructure and develop a debt repayment plan. Captain Ritchie said the Attorney General’s Office rejected the plan, and argued that its winding-up threat was “very strange”, given that FirstCaribbean had positioned itself as the secured, preferred creditor in the event of liquidat ion. This, he suggested, would give the bank first call on the company’s assets and leave the Government with nothing, although that is by no means certain. Several Tribune Business sources yesterday backed the Government’s position, suggesting that Global United’s real problems stemmed from the fact it had expanded too far, too fast, and taken on a n ultimately unsustainable debt burden from FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas The company had been unable to generate the cash flow and liquidity to service the debt load, while management did not obtain the efficiencies and synergies from the acquired businesses to make the expansion work, sources sugg ested, implying that Mr Ritchie’s alleg ations were a “smokescreen” and attempt to divert blame. It was all leveraged and he didn’t have the cash flow,” one source alleged. There was no real consideration given to managing the acquisitions.” Tribune Business revealed last month how Global United had placed its Airport Industrial Park headquarters up for sale for $1.8 million, and that its Global United store at Sandyport was set to close (it has now done so Ritchie has also placed his personal resi dence at Sandyport on the market. Global United began life as Freeportbased Tanja Enterprises. But Captain Ritchie embarked on headlong expansion in 2004, becoming the main shipping agent in Freeport by acquiring United Shipping. It followed that up the following year with the purchase of Nassau-based Globa l Customs Brokers & Trucking and World Bound Couriers, enabling it to enter the New Providence market as a major player in the shipping agency, distribution and logistics and transportation business. At the height of his ambitions, Captain Ritchie also agreed a deal to purchase Discovery Cruise Line, although that ultim ately fell through. Among Global United’s other creditors are its preference shareholders. They include ColinaImperial Insurance Company, which had $2-$3 million worth of preference shares that it inherited from the Imperial Life purchase, and Edward Fitzgerald, father of PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald. M r Fitzgerald Snr is understood to h ave received $1 million worth of preference shares as part payment for sellingG lobal Customs Brokers & Trucking to Global United. However, it is unders tood that the company defaulted on paying the preference share dividends, and that these investors will realise nothing if the company is wound-up. Sources also told Tribune Business that Global United was hurt when the current government abandoned a $3-$4 million deal to purchase the company’s Freeport headquarters for a new Cust oms Department headquarters. That sale would have improved the company’s cash flow and liquidity. Captain Ritchie declined to respond to a series of detailed questions e-mailed to him by Tribune Business yesterday, only saying: “All of the questions will be answered in subsequent releases. We have documentation to support everyt hing we have said and will make it available to the press and the population at large in due course.” He said in his release that it was suspicious that Global United was being forced to pay-up, when other businesses received more lenient treatment on outstanding taxes and fees. This was rejected by Mr Laing, who s aid the Government was making extensive efforts to collect from all who owed it funds. “Mr Ritchie would have to know that efforts to secure funds he owed to the Government commenced prior to the election, as was confirmed to him by the then-secretary of revenue, Ehurd Cunningham, in a meeting he had not long a fter the election,” Mr Laing added. It’s absolute nonsense. The extent to which Mr Ritchie was indebted to theG overnment represented funds he had collected on behalf of his clients, essent ially trust funds. It’s a significant breach of customs practice.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Miami firm is ‘optimistic’ on Bahamas realty sales F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By KRISTEN A LEE AP Business Writer NEW YORK (AP fuel prices, cost-cutting and other one-time benefits helped cruise operator Carnival Corp. raise its profit 10 percent in its fiscal first quarter, far exceeding Wall Street’s expectations, the company reported Tuesday. Carnival has maintained strong booking volumes by slashing cruise prices. The Miami-based company lowered its forecast for fiscal 2009 earnings, however, in part because prices have remained weak for cruises booked for the second half of this year. “Given the significant slowdown in the global economy, I think it is fair to say that this has been one of the most challenging booking environments we have ever experienced,” said Vice Chairman and Chief Operating Officer Howard Frank during a conference call with investors. For the quarter that ended February 28, earnings grew to $260 million, or 33 cents per share. That’s up from $236 million, or 30 cents per share, a year ago. Carnival said its revenue fell nine per cent to $2.86 billion, from $3.15 billion in the first fiscal quarter of 2008. Analysts polled by Thomson Reuters forecast earnings of 19 cents per share on revenue of $2.87 billion. The cruise line has achieved a 10 per cent year-over-year increase in bookings but was forced to slash prices to “levels not seen in recent years,” Frank said. “It was strong volumes a gainst very lousy rates,” Chairm an and Chief Executive Micky A rison added with a laugh. Bookings for the most expensive cruises, particularly those to remote regions of Alaska, have fallen further than less expensive Caribbean jaunts. The company also noted that it plans to reduce its capacity for cruises to Alaska in 2010. Carnival said budget-conscious vacationers also cut spending on gambling, shore excursions, shopping and photos during their cruises, although they continued to spend on spas and drinks. On the other side of the balance sheet, a 45 per cent drop in fuel prices saved the cruise line 21 cents per share. The improved results also included two one-time gains totaling $32 million: One was from cutting an income tax reserve that was no longer needed and they other from terminating a lease-out and lease-back deal involving troubled insurer American International Group Inc. Carnival also held down controllable costs through a varie ty of measures, such as reneg otiating with its vendors, r educing its fuel consumption and cutting back on some projects. “Carnival’s revised guidance highlights the difficult pricing environment the industry currently faces,” said Barclays Capital analyst Felicia Hendrix in a note to investors. “However, it also underscores management ’s impressive ability to cut costs e ven in a difficult environment.” C arnival now expects 2009 earnings to range from $2.10 to $2.30 per share, down from its previous guidance range of $2.25 to $2.75 per share. For the second quarter, Carnival predicted earnings in the range of 30 cents to 32 cents per share, down from 49 per share i n the prior year. A nalysts forecast full-year e arnings of $2.18 per share and a second-quarter profit of 33 cents per share. “As expected, 2009 will be a challenging year for the industry, but it is encouraging that consumers are willing to spend money on attractively priced vacations,” said Susquehanna F inancial Group’s Robert L aFleur. A t the end of the first quarter, Carnival reported $3.7 billion of liquidity and said it will not need new financing for 2009. The company noted it will continue to look for opportunities to improve its liquidity. Carnival shares slipped 48 cents, or 2.1 per cent, to $22.83 i n afternoon trading, after gaini ng as much as seven per cent e arly in the session. The stock has traded between $14.85 and $43.54 during the past 52 weeks. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 5B Carnival books higher 1Q profit but cuts outlook

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F rom comfort foods such as h er cinnamon French toast and tasty home style banana pancakes to her scrambled or grilled tofu dishes, Don’ Woch Nuttin caters to every pallet with a desire for good food. Breakfast is served all day for those who enjoy breakfast meals. The atmosphere is very homely and quaint. Walking into Don’ Woch Nuttin immediately is just like walking into your grandmother’s kitchen. There is a sleepy but friendly cat, by the name of Curious who poses as the security guard because of the down home feel ing Ms Robinson is trying to give her customers. “My kitchen is open because of the vegetarian menu. I want my vegetarians to be able to see how their food is being prepared. It also offers a homely feeling and customers feel like this is their kitchen,” Ms Robinson said. Ms Robinson said getting into the restaurant business was pretty much a no-brainer for her. Although she never went to school to cook, she is an artist and sees cooking as just anoth er element of art. “Cooking is just art. It is just another element of who I am. I decided to get into the restau rant business because I have a selective dieta vegetarian diet. There was really no where for me to eat. Most people do not really take care or concern about how vegetarian food is prepared,” Ms Robinson said. Ms Robinson said her cus tomers are really the ones who make her business into the fam ily atmosphere that she wants to achieve. “My customers are my biggest supporters. Everything is by word of mouth. Bahamians in general really do not change eating habits until someone they trust invites them to try something different. My restaurant is about giving and we get back in return. We try to give five star service to everyone who walks through that dooreveryone is treated the same,” Ms Robinson said. Faithful customer, Felicity Ingraham, said she has been coming to the Don’ Woch Nuttin Restaurant since its beginning in the Carmichael Road area. “I always told people it was the very best breakfast place in the capitol. In addition to them being a breakfast place, as a reporter, I did a story during a hurricane and they got together and helped out people that needed help in a way that was even more substantial than some of the larger companies. So from then I decided to stick with them because I saw that it was more than just a place to get good food but there were people there who cared about the community. Now I do not have to worry about food cooked with a ton of grease butI found food that is cooked with love,” Ms Ingraham said. As everyday is different, Ms Robinson said she tries to havea personal, healthy touch with all her customers. “We are small and we cannot compete with the bigger companies. Therefore I try to offer something differentsomething that I am passionate about. We are very health con scious here and do not use a lot of oil based products. Instead, we use a lot of soy based products such as tofu, veggie burgers, soy margarine, BBQ tofu,c urry veggies and many more,” Ms Robinson said. In her efforts to sustain her passion for organic foods, Ms Robinson said she has even started her own garden just for the restaurant. We try to use more organic b ased vegetables. So in short order we will be able to be self sufficient. We have sour trees coming up and blossoming, green peppers, tomatoes, corn, and cauliflower. Everything here is authentic and that is what people taste and see where they come to Don’ Woch Nuttin,” Ms Robinson said. C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T h e T r i b u n e n By ALEX MISSICK T ribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net BAHAMIANS are known for their love of all things buttered, g ravy smothered and fried. However, Erika Robinson, owner of Don’ Woch Nuttin Restaurant a lso known as Hawkins Hill House of Pancakes, located on Hawkins Hill, wants to change t he way the average Bahamian looks at healthy cuisine and cater to those who want a healthym eal alternative. DON’ WOCH NUTTIN ERIKA ROBINSON, owner of Don’ Woch Nuttin Restaurant, wants to change the way the average Bahamian looks at healthy cuisine and cater to those who want a healthy meal alternative.

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Nadine Thomas-Brown is a local television, print, and entertainment personality who explained that her choice to highlight all forms of expression comes from a long standing interest in the arts. Originally from Kingston, Jamaica, Nadine said while growing up she spent every year tak-i ng part in various national festivals, which was a crucial part of molding the person she has become. “I remember as a small child being involved in many art forms, we used to dance in the national stadium, and we’d be performing dances from different cultures, it was just really exciting.” S he said apart from the performing arts, she w as also a violinist for the Jamaican orchestra and the reggae philharmonic orchestra. Nadine added that although at one time playing the violin was probably the most important thing in her life, her gradual transition into other artistic avenues seemed a natural progression when it happened. I’ve acted in plays, I’ve modeled, some times I wonder what have I not done.” Reflecting on her move from Jamaica to Nassau, Nadine said about 13 years ago she decided to move here because of her marriage to a Bahamian and to also pursue a career in teach ing. “When I came here I had just graduated from university, and I had gotten a teaching job under the Ministry of Education where I taught at CH Reeves for three years.” She said while there, she established a talent club that met every Saturday, and was able to draw in dozens of students from the surrounding area to watch fashion shows, singing competi tions, and other talent events intended to show her students that there were countless opportunities available should they pursue a career in the arts. “Some of them didn’t even know they could do these things, and others never even realised how much fun it could be to simply express themselves.” After eventually leaving teaching, Nadine realised that there was still more to be done in the way of creating a platform for young and unique artists. At that time she said she visited various established spoken word groups including Coombi which was organised by Giovanni Staurt, and Verse Place by Obadiah Michael Smith. As those groups slowly phased out, Nadine said she still yearned to see impromptu style performances. She also had a brief stint as a reporter at the Nassau Guardian. She said that while some people felt that “ Bahamians hate Bahamian music, Bahamians hate Bahamian performers,” she feels that if Bahamians are not seeing them in the paper or on television, they will not know about them. She said this was a major motivator to the event ual start of Roots and Culture. Somebody approached me, and said they w anted to start a poetry night at their place, and wanted me to host it.” After accepting that proposal, Nadine said Poetic Release at Caf Habana became her pet project. “The idea that I had was to make it a forum for art, although a lot of poets turned out initially, that project evolved to something far more diverse.” After some time, Nadine said she released herself from the project which had grown too large for her, and later moved on to other spoken word projects including Meeting Place held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, and then Express Yourself at the Island Club. Eventually relocated to the Hub on Bay Street, Nadine said the Express Yourself move ment has morphed into something she is defi nitely proud to attach her name to. Afro-DZ-iaC was another joint project that was a great stepping stone for her to not just share her passion for spoken word performances, but also a chance to work with some of her favorite girls in the local entertainment sphere. She along with Bodine Johnson, and Belinda Pierre decided that they wanted to cre ate an event where they could recite poetry without boundaries. “The concept was to put on a show with no censorship, and it would be all about (erotic poetry.” Not necessarily just about the female anato my, Nadine said that the mini-event was more about women being free to express themselves with no interruptions. Apart from the Express Yourself night held every Wednesday at the Hub, Nadine has now broken ground in the local television industry in the form of her new show titled Roots and Culture. “I like the way entertainment is evolving, there are people like F.DOT, Bodine Johnson, Lyrically Blessed, Tada, Zolton, Baygon, Sketch, SoSo Man, and even El Pedrino, these people are killing it and people deserve to know about them, that’s the purpose behind Roots and Culture.” The show which premiered on Cable 12 can be seen on Fridays at 10pm, and at 7.30pm on Saturdays. Also behind the upcoming Street Fair planned for Rawson Square next month, Nadine is truly setting the pace for entertainment on the local front. As a fixture in the local entertainment scene, Nadine said it is simply a joy to see people just like her working hard to take their talent to the next level, and being a part of that in any shape or form is her way of sharing the music with the people. roots & C M Y K C M Y K ENTERTAINMENT THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 9B T h e T r i b u n e n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net W ITH music, artistry, and freedom of expression becoming a way of life and vessel for many young p eople to propel their inner thoughts, one local promoter is doing her part in creating the stage f or just that. SETTING THE STAGE FOR culture n By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL Tribune Features Editor THE talented step team of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity is set to descend onto the BET stage for the annual Spring Bling “Get to Stepping” competition to be held in Riviera Beach, Florida this weekend marking the first time that an international fraternity has been invited to participate in the prestigious event. Kenny Moss, one of the brothers of the six member strong stepping team set to leave Nassau on Friday, said that this is a definite honour and privilege not only for the fraternity but really for the country given the fact that participation is by invitation only. “We had to summit an application to BET along with a video showcasing a compilation of our latest performances. This was the second year that I submitted an application. Last year, we did not make it, but this year, we were invited. So you can imagine that this is a real thrill especially given the fact that only five teams were selected in our category and we were selected out of the thousands of footage that they saw and we are the only international fraternity invited to attend.” Mr Moss said that this is a chance for the fra ternity to promote the Bahamas on an international stage and said that the opportunity should provide a strong foundation for great things to happen particularly given the tremendous audience that BET attracts. The event will air this weekend on the cable channel. “You never know who will see the competition when it airs and what doors this may open.” FRATERNITY READ Y T O GET T O S TEPPIN’ THE STEP team of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity is set to perform on the BET stage for the annual Spring Bling “Get to Stepping” competition. This marks the first time that an international fraternity has been invited to participate in the event. SEE page 10 N adine Thomas-Brown

PAGE 20

C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter FINE wine, delicious cuisine and good conversation were the order of the evening as the team that helped pull off the inaugural Islands of the World Fashion Week came together to celebrate its amazing success. Volunteers, models and staff recently enjoyed the at home hospitality of President of Mode Iles Ltd., Owen Bethel, who was deeply appreciative of all the efforts and dedication given by so many. “We certainly appreciate all that you have put into it," he s aid. "There has been a core of executive workers who executed [the event] but the real success came as a result of your input. This is a small way of showing you that we really do appreciate your efforts.” And, the great effort definitely paid off. Islands of the World Fashion Week (IWFW nominated in the "best fashion show/week attended" category of the 2009 Caribbean Fashion Awards. The ceremony will be held in Barbados on April 11. For volunteer, Treneil Hanna, IWFW 2009 can't come soon enough. "Being one of the Fashion Trade stu dents they opted for me to go into the sewing room and I got to work with other designers such as Kevan Hall," said Mr Hanna. "I got to be behind the scenes dressing modelsit was so much fun. I am excited that Mr Bethel would honour us for being there because we were just doing what we love-fashion." While Mr Hanna's only disappointment was that he was not one of the designers in the 2008 showcase, he does plan on applying again this year. "I would expect IWFW 2009 to be like last year’s show but times three," he said. Mode Iles Ltd., also gave special recognition to top volunteer staff and students who made their contributions to IWFW. "The staff and students of the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI ing come in and done everything they did in such a short peri od," said Mr Bethel. "They did get a lot of commendations from the designers so we will recognise them in another form.” Mr Bethel also rewarded the volunteers who gave an extra effort in making the show a success. Volunteers who went above and beyond the call of duty received special gifts courtesy of BahaRetreat and The Beauty Spot. “I asked [the coordinators] to recommend those persons within their areas who went beyond the call of duty and really excelled in terms of what was required," he said. "I must say that I have gotten great and strong reactions because everyone did very well and I have to recognise that. However, there had to be probably one or two who stood out. So while we would recognise those who really I think went far beyond the call of duty, it is clear that the success of the event was a result of a team effort." The promotional video for IWFW was also premiered at the party. It showcased 15 of the 33 island designers and four guest designers who presented at the 2008 IWFW showcase. The video is now available to the public. A video of the entire 2008 showcase will be ready by August, just in time for potential distribution for the Miss Universe Pageant. Mr Bethel said he looks for ward to working with the group for the 2009 showcase slated for November 4-8. "I think we are beginning to feel or become, as it were, one family and as we grow and develop in this way, we truly will move the fashion industry in The Bahamas to the next level." Islands of the World Fashion Week thanks volunteers VOLUNEERS of the 2008 Islands of the World Fashion Week e njoy fruits of thier labor at a party held in thier honor. He added that the winner of the contest will receive bragging rights which for fraternities is priceless. He added that the team will perform a combination of new and past moves in the competition and will seek to bring a very Bahamian/ Caribbean flair to their performance by dressing in Androsia shirts and straw hats as well as stepping to Bahamian and Caribbean music. “We are looking to do very well,” he said. Although this is the group’s first time on the BET stage, it is not the first time that they have competited against foreign teams. For the past two years, the group has placed second in the Stepping on the Shores step show competition held in Nas sau. With this year’s competition scheduled for May, Mr Moss said that it is a redemption year and that they are ready to claim that title. F ROM page nine FRATERNITY READY TO GET TO STEPPIN’ n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net I F you’re looking for something fun and interesting to do this weekend, your choices are truly limitless. From concerts, art shows, and even a beer-fest, Tribune Fea tures is serving you our weekly top five picks for the must do’s around town. 1. In just three days, Tempo and BET Jazz personality Empress Jeanille will set off the 6th annual Reggae All Stars concert at Clifford Park. The event will feature a myriad of local and Caribbean artist including Sizzla, Capleton, TaDa and others, and is set to begin at 11pm. Tickets are on sale at the Marley Resort and Juke Box at a cost of $60 VIP, and $100 backstage if purchased before the day of the show. 2. Also on Saturday, Burns House is hosting its 3rd annual Beer-Fest at the Butler and Sands grounds on JFK Drive. Beginning at 3pm, patrons will be offered a 6 for $10 special of many of the common brands carried by Burns House including Guinness, Heineken, Colt 45, Red Stripe, Corrs light, and many others. With an entrance fee of $5, this event will be an easy chance to unwind over the weekend. 3. The Express Yourself movement is hosting a concert at the Hub art centre on Shirley Street April 1. Performing will be an interesting blend of local musicians, artists, and poets. The event which starts at 9pm, has a cover charge of $10, and promises to be a true artistic night. 4. Organisers of the Reggae All Stars are hosting a pre-concert sailaway on Friday, where attendants will have a chance to meet some of the performers for the concert including Capleton and others. Docking at Potters Cay Dock, the Tikki Island boat will begin boarding at 8pm, and will leave at 9. Tickets are priced at $10 in advance and $15 at the dock, and can be purchase at the Marley Resorts or the Juke Box. 5. Transforming Spaces 2009 is scheduled for this Saturday and Sunday. Persons will be able to view some of the country’s top artists at nine different galleries over the course of one weekend. Tickets are priced at $30 and available at the National Art Gallery, Doongalik Studio, and the Ladder gallery. The opening night which is this Friday, will include a movie screening on Rawson Square at 7.30pm, and later a party at the Hub. THINGS 2 DO THIS 1984 Camaro is owned by Lester Cash, the winner of the People’s Choice Award. THIS 1967 Mustang was judged in the 2-B Class antiqu modified vehicles from 1949 to 1968. 22ND ANNUAL ANTIQUE CAR SHOW T r o y R o d g e r s / P h o t o THE 22nd annual Antique Car Show recently showcased on Arawak Cay, proved a true car lovers’ paradise as dozens of locals turned up to see some of the island’s best kept antique rides. More than 60 vehicles were on display showing some technical details of these retro rides. Ending with a total of ten divisions, winners included Dereck Cleare’s 1946 Packard, Murray Forde’s 1940 Ford Deluxe Coupe, William Whiteland’s 1955 Austin Healy, Don Aranha’s 1961 Corvette, Don Hunt’s 1985 Mercedes, Andrew Hepburn’s 1985 Mercedes, Don Aranha’s 1965 Chevy Pickup, Don ald Pinder’s 2003 Corvette 50th Anniversary retro ride, and Lester Cash’s 1986 Chevrolet Camaro winning the people’s choice.

PAGE 21

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 57F/14C Low: 60F/16C Low: 66F/19C Low: 67 F/19C Low: 67F/19C Low: 70F/21C Low: 66 F/19C Low: 57F/14C High: 79F/26C High: 80F/27C High: 79 F/26C High: 77F/25C High: 80F/27C High: 78 F/26 High: 77F/25C Low: 58F/14C High: 73 F/23C Low: 61 F/16 High: 75 F/24CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 60F/16C High: 80F/27C Low: 66 F/19C High: 77F/25C Low: 57 F/14C High: 73F/23C Low: 60 F/16C High: 77F/25C Low: 63F/17C High: 81 F/27C Low: 61F/16C High: 77 F/25C Low: 62 F/17C High: 79F/26C Low: 64F/18C High: 82F/28C Low: 63 F/17C High: 80F/27C High: 73F/23CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25TH, 2009, PAGE 11BTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Partly sunny and windy . Mainly clear and breezy. Brilliant sunshine.Bright sunshine and breezy. Windy in the morning; mostly sunny. High: 77 Low: 66 High: 79 High: 82 High: 85 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Sunny, breezy and humid. High: 86 Low: 70 Low: 71 Low: 72 AccuWeather RealFeel 76F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 64F 75-68F 82-74F 92-75F 98-78F Low: 72 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 75F/24C Low .................................................... 66F/19C Normal high ...................................... 80F/26C Normal low ........................................ 66F/19C Last year's high .................................. 86F/30C Last year's low .................................. 72F/22C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................2.07"Normal year to date ......................................4.78" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU New First Full Last Mar . 26 Apr . 2 Apr . 9 Apr . 17 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:09 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:23 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 6:18 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 6:41 p.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 7:46 a.m.2.61:33 a.m.0.0 7:59 p.m.2.81:45 p.m.0.0 8:25 a.m.2.72:15 a.m.0.0 8:38 p.m.3.02:23 p.m.-0.1 9:04 a.m.2.72:57 a.m.-0.1 9:18 p.m. 3.13:01 p.m.-0.1 9:44 a.m. 2.63:40 a.m.-0.1 10:01 p.m. 3.1 3:40 p.m.-0.1 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 90/3272/22s91/3270/21s Amsterdam49/940/4r47/843/6r Ankara, Turkey52/1136/2pc50/1034/1c Athens61/1645/7sh57/1350/10c Auckland68/2055/12s69/2054/12s Bangkok94/3478/25c93/3376/24pc Barbados84/2874/23pc84/2874/23sh Barcelona59/1550/10s60/1548/8s Beijing63/1736/2s64/1737/2s Beirut64/1755/12c65/1856/13pc Belgrade44/636/2pc48/839/3r Berlin37/228/-2c41/534/1pc Bermuda 61/1655/12sh64/1758/14pc Bogota66/1848/8r64/1747/8r Brussels48/837/2r48/836/2r Budapest43/634/1pc46/734/1shBuenos Aires 82/2766/18pc82/2766/18pc Cairo73/2257/13s76/2458/14s Calcutta 98/3677/25s99/3777/25pc Calgar y22/-59/-12sn35/119/-7s Cancun84/2868/20pc87/3069/20s Caracas79/2665/18pc83/2868/20tCasablanca 77/25 55/12 pc 74/2355/12pc Copenhagen 37/228/-2s40/437/2pc Dublin50/1043/6pc52/1139/3shFrankfurt 43/6 37/2r46/737/2r Geneva37/235/1sn42/541/5sn Halifax38/324/-4c42/529/-1pcHavana 82/27 61/16 pc86/3065/18s Helsinki28/-214/-10sf28/-212/-11c Hong Kong 70/2164/17r72/2268/20sh Islamabad77/2554/12pc85/2959/15pc Istanbul59/1536/2sh48/843/6pcJerusalem 58/1441/5s62/1646/7pc Johannesburg 75/23 54/12pc77/2556/13pc Kingston 84/28 73/22pc83/2873/22pc Lima83/2865/18pc83/2864/17c London 52/11 41/5 sh52/1139/3r Madrid72/2236/2s75/2337/2s Manila95/3579/26pc85/2975/23sh Mexico City79/2652/11t78/2547/8pc Monterrey95/3570/21pc101/3870/21sMontreal 45/732/0s48/836/2c Moscow 36/228/-2sn36/221/-6sf Munich35/133/0sn39/332/0sn Nairobi90/3257/13s88/3158/14pc New Delhi84/2861/16pc90/3264/17s Oslo 33/021/-6sn35/124/-4sf Paris 50/1039/3r52/1141/5r Prague37/234/1c43/635/1sn Rio de Janeiro80/2672/22sh81/2773/22s Riyadh77/2558/14pc81/2759/15pc Rome57/1343/6s59/1545/7sh St. Thomas 83/28 72/22s82/2770/21sh San Juan84/2866/18t87/3066/18pc San Salvador90/3266/18s88/3172/22pc Santiago84/2850/10s84/2852/11s Santo Domingo82/2764/17pc82/2765/18pc Sao Paulo75/2362/16pc74/2364/17pc Seoul 43/631/0sh46/728/-2s Stockholm32/021/-6pc34/125/-3pc Sydney82/2768/20pc82/2763/17pc T aipei 71/21 59/15pc76/2466/18pc Tokyo54/1241/5sh52/1139/3pc Toronto48/838/3r48/836/2r Trinidad84/2873/22t81/2772/22t Vancouver44/635/1pc48/837/2rVienna 37/2 33/0sn47/838/3r Warsaw36/227/-2sf37/230/-1pc Winnipeg27/-221/-6sn34/118/-7sf HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayThursdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Thursday:E at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:E at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Thursday:E at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:E at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Thursday:E at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 60/1537/2s57/1334/1sh Anchorage36/227/-2sn39/329/-1pc Atlanta 64/17 53/11r66/1856/13r Atlantic City48/835/1s47/841/5r Baltimore51/1038/3s48/842/5rBoston 48/8 36/2s48/836/2pc Buffalo52/1146/7pc52/1136/2r Charleston, SC70/2156/13pc72/2258/14t Chicago52/1133/0c53/1134/1pcCleveland 54/12 42/5sh55/1234/1r Dallas66/1852/11t75/2355/12pc Denver46/724/-4c34/116/-8sn Detroit53/1136/2r52/1134/1c Honolulu80/2669/20s81/2768/20sHouston 76/24 64/17 t81/2765/18pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayThursday T odayThursday T odayThursday Indianapolis 58/1442/5t54/1240/4r Jacksonville76/2457/13pc77/2557/13pc Kansas City 60/15 41/5s60/1538/3sh Las Vegas74/2350/10s72/2252/11s Little Rock66/1849/9c66/1859/15pcLos Angeles 78/25 54/12s74/2354/12s Louisville64/1749/9t59/1546/7r Memphis69/2055/12c67/1959/15r Miami80/2665/18pc80/2670/21s Minneapolis 44/6 29/-1c47/828/-2r Nashville68/2052/11r71/2153/11r New Orleans79/2666/18r81/2767/19t New York50/1040/4s44/641/5r Oklahoma City62/1644/6c72/2238/3pc Orlando 79/26 59/15 pc83/2862/16s Philadelphia52/1136/2s47/842/5r Phoenix81/2755/12s81/2753/11pc Pittsburgh53/1142/5sh57/1339/3r Portland, OR50/1036/2r56/1338/3pc Raleigh-Durham 52/1147/8sh60/1551/10r St. Louis58/1447/8pc61/1649/9pcSalt Lake City 50/1032/0sh44/626/-3sf San Antonio 82/27 63/17 t86/3060/15pc San Diego68/2055/12s65/1855/12s San Francisco62/1650/10pc67/1950/10sSeattle 50/1036/2r50/1038/3pc T allahassee 71/2157/13pc74/2358/14pc Tampa80/2663/17pc82/2763/17s Tucson76/2447/8s78/2547/8s Washington, DC50/1043/6pc48/844/6r UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries SnowIce AccuWeather.com

PAGE 22

Janou Choukroun is a Moroccan born, French educated, and Spanish resident, who has allowed her appreciation of the environment and love of the ocean to inspire her 20 piece art exhibition. Comprising mostly of decorated mirrors, frames, and book stands, Janou said she attempts to not just create a work of art, but to also tell stories in her designs In one of her favorite creations, which is made from dried leaves, tree stems, ribbon, and shells, Janou described one of the shells in the piece as a rare find. “A few years ago, I was in Italy and the shell was given to me by an Italian fisherman who said the shell was passed on to him by his father, who described the shell as more than 100 years old.” She explained: “Unlike other pieces that I have seen, my creations are unique because I set the mosaic stones in a way that they enter each other, all for a smoother look.” Janou who is self taught, said she has been in love with seashells from since she was a child. With some of the shells in her possession since childhood, she said her everyday job is walking the beach and shop ping for new and uniquely shaped shells. With the shell only being a part of the overall pieces, Janou said when most people see her work, their first reaction is simply “Wow.” “Every mirror is unique, some of them necessitated numerous hours of research and patience as well as the work. “The big pieces have taken more than two weeks each to satisfactory completion, but the essential difficulty has been to gath er beautiful shells which nowadays are more and more rare to find on islands.” The pieces which are like a glowing rainbow of pastels are coloured with rich browns, oranges, soft pinks, luminescent whites, lavenders, and silvers. Apart from the colorful ribbons and feathers, Janou has a unique sense of diversity where she has incorporate several types of shells. They include pearl oysters, conch, chambered nautilus, snail shells, Irish flat scallop, whelks, starfish, and Mexican flat shells. The exhibition which starts tomorrow at the Anthaya Art gallery next to Sbarros Cable Beach, will run until Sunday, during which time visitors will have a chance to view and discuss the pieces with Janou. M I R R R O C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E Eating healthy at Don’ Woch Nuttin See page eight WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 Setting the stage for roots and culture S ee page nine n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Feature Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net EMBRACING the elements of earth and w at er, this week’s featured artist is proving that beauty and art can be f ound all around us especially when w e t ak e t he time t o look . MIRROR n By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THIS Saturday major cities around the globe will take part in an hour long recognition of earth hour, which means lights out for a full 60 minutes. First started in Sidney Australia in 2007, nearly 2.2 million homes and businesses contributed that year to recognising the importance of establishing global initiatives to combat global warming. Nearly 83 countries this year have already committed to the initiative, and are pledging a vote for planet Earth in the first ever global election between global warming and earth. From 8.30pm to 9.30pm, participants will turn their light switches off, and remain in darkness for a cause. In the end, organisers are aiming for 1 billion participants, and if successful will deliver their results to world leaders at the Global Cli mate Change Conference in Copenhagen later this year. That conference will help to determine official gov ernment policies against global warming which will eventually replace the Kyoto Protocol. On the local front, the Four Seasons in Exuma has already committed to this cause, along with all offices of the Ministry of Tourism. Minister for Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said yesterday, that his ministry is more than excited to take part in this endeavour. “This initiative is very important, and we think that we need to get to the stage where we conduct similar projects. “We in the Ministry of Tourism have even started within our own organisation doing things to introduce ways of conserving energy, because in the end we in the island communities are most affected by environment changes” Earth Hour set again for this Saturday JANOU CHOUKROUN’S (pictured below environment and love of the ocean through a 20 piece art exhibition. The pieces comprise mostly of decorated mirrors, frames, and book stands. Nearly 83 countries this year have already committed to the initia tive, and are pledging a vote for planet Earth in the first ever global election between global warming and earth.


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

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Global United

Justice Lyons
under fire
over handling
of court case

A SENIOR Supreme Court
judge’s conduct has been ques-
tioned over his handling of a con-
tentious court case that is now
being heard by another senior
judge.

In a written judgment handed
down by Senior Justice Anita
Allen yesterday, Justice John
Lyons was accused of sharing
“more than a friendship” with the
sister of Daniel Ferguson, an
accountant Justice Lyons had
appointed to make a report in a
case he was hearing up to Septem-
ber last year.

Mr Ferguson’s sister also assist-
ed her brother with preparing doc-



uments for the case, said Justice
Allen as she decided whether to
recuse herself from hearing the
matter “on the ground of apparent
bias.”

SEE page 12
Minister wants higher ‘likely to return’ figures

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE 81 per cent of visitors to the Bahamas in 2007 believing they
were “likely” to return to the country again within the next five years,
Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool Wallace yesterday said this figure
is “nowhere near where it needs to be.”

In the 2007 Exit Survey report compiled by the Ministry of Tourism —

SEE page 12

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DESPITE CONTINUED calls for residents to ss the Bahamas clean, some people are still not cand the
message. This heap of garbage at a roadside yesterday illustrates that some are continuing to use parts of
New Providence as a dumping ground.

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Ambassatior expects
‘damaging’ Commission
mT as aC
Turks and Caicos

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

FORMER ~ Bahamian
Ambassador to CARICOM
Leonard Archer expects the
final Commission of Inquiry
report into claims of corrup-
tion in the Turks and Caicos
Islands to be more damaging
than interim findings.

However, he believes the
Bahamas and CARICOM
should mediate talks between
Britain and Turks and Caicos
to ensure that a proposed sus-
pension of democratic gover-
nance on the islands is as short
as possible.

Mr Archer, who held the
post from 1992 to 2008, sees

SEE page 12



i Bkaline Major/Tribune staff

No sign of
protesters on

Cove Beach

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PROTESTERS who threat-
ened to descend on Cove Beach
in front of the Atlantis resort to
put an end to “apartheid-like
restrictions” were nowhere to be
seen yesterday.

It is not known whether it was
the windy weather or a lack of
interest that inhibited the mas-
sive protest beach vendor Paul
Rolle and his supporter Jeffrey
Davis were hoping for, but as
choppy waters lapped the shore at
noon, there was not a protester in
sight.

Mr Rolle and Mr Davis had
published several public notices
inviting Bahamians to attend a
‘Big B-day bash’ at the beach
from 10am and told beachgoers
they would take them by boat to
the beach at the western end of
Paradise Island.

Mr Rolle told The Tribune he

SEE page 11

CEO blames

closure on
FNM politics

Former PLP candidate
makes ‘witch hunt’ claim

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

GLOBAL United CEO Jackson Ritchie blamed government
and the politics of the FNM for him having to close his business by
the end of the week.

In a press statement, Mr Ritchie, a former PLP candidate, said
that since this political persecution of his company began, he has
been forced to lay off more than 160 Bahamian staff. If this witch-
hunt continued, he said, he would have no other option but to bring
a discrimination lawsuit against the Minister of Finance, the Comp-
troller of Customs and the Public Treasury.

Mr Ritchie said he had made numerous attempts to personally
speak to or meet with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in his
capacity as Minister of Finance but all efforts were rebuffed.

As a former PLP candidate for Clifton in the 2007 general elec-
tion, Mr Ritchie said he is convinced that the objection of Mr
Ingraham’s government is not to recover outstanding taxes, but “to
destroy another PLP, no matter the cost.”

Up until 2007, Mr Ritchie said, Global United Limited (GUL)
was paying between $70 to $80 million a year into the public trea-
sury on behalf of various clients.

At any one time the company would be more than five to seven
per cent outstanding in its obligations to the government, which by

SEE page 12



THIS out-of-date medication was eee given to a patient.

Authorities: out-of-date medication
is not being administered to patients

DANGEROUS out-of-date
medication is not being adminis-
tered to diabetics patients at the
Elizabeth Estates Clinic pharmacy
health authorities have claimed in
response to an article in yester-
day’s Tribune.

The Ministry of Health and
Department of Public Health have
launched an investigation into the
assertion made by a diabetic
woman who said the pharmacy
gave her Humulin insulin with an
October 2007 expiration date on
February 2, and again on March
18 this year.

The mother-of-two, who has
had diabetes for 20 years, told The
Tribune she was unaware that the
medicine had expired when she

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took it in February and it caused
her blood sugar levels to rise,
inducing nausea, dizziness and leg
cramps.

Her blood sugar levels returned
to normal when she bought insulin
from another pharmacy.

However, when she returned
to Elizabeth Estates six weeks lat-
er to fill another prescription she
noticed the medication was out-
of-date, and realised the insulin
given to her in February was from
the same expired batch.

She said: “I could have slipped
into a coma and died.

“And I am sure there are other

SEE page 12

S

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NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Ue V0] ergy mm ltteer ce ce oe) AUN Maso
ya YU v Buje &

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff













KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Death Notice For

DAVANAND |

Y Vee lS...
iat ; — ' = = y 7 :
J e .
LA A ui
"Dave" is =~
McDONALD MORE THAN 150 children from Winnebago High School from Illinois travelling on Carnival Sensation played a
in Rawson square yesterday.
EDILALL, 27 —
pe io







of Dunmore Avenuc,| Re
Chippingham and
formerly of Jumbey
Street, Pinewood
Gardens, Nassau, The
Bahamas died at the Princess Margaret Hospital,
Shirley Street, Nassau, on Sunday, 22nd March,
2009.

He is survived by his parents, Kemraj "Allan"
and Gwendolyn Edilall, his sister, Priadashni
"Pria" Edilall, brothers, Keiran and Kristen
Edilall, grandparents, Herman and Viola
Burrows and Kimraine Edilall, nieces, Kemren
and Kaylen Edilall, his nephew, Kemraj Edilall,
aunts, Miriam Proctor, Marjorie Archer and
Nadira Jafar, uncles, Rajesh Edilall, Praim Jafar
and Robert Archer, special friend, Kaisha
Hanchell, numerous cousins and many other
relatives and friends including, Junise and
Shericka Edilall.

Funeral service will be held at St. Gregory's
Anglican Church, Carmichael Road, Nassau,
on Saturday, 28th March, 2009 at 2:00p.m.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home

Mentaqu

eating ff f Htinguiihen! Pay

THE CARIBBEAN GOSPEL MUSIC

On Saturday, March 28", the Montagu Constituency Association M A RL | N
will host a celebratory dinner in honor of its past Members of
—AWARDS—
Parliament.

MARLIN AWARDS 2009

a mit’ ( SUNDAY MARCH 297) @ 7PM
bel : i . ' TT , pent The Diplomat Center Carmichael Road
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a $25 in ad $30 at the D VIP $40
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From 1967 to 2007, the constituency has had a total of six Representatives. Not * The Christian Bookshop (Rosetta Street)
# Logos Book Store (Harbour Bay Shopping Center)

1967 - 1972 1972-1977 1977 -1982 1982 - 1957 1997-2002 = 2002 - 2007

only have these noble sons served Montagu with distinction, but have all gone on
to become nation builders of the highest caliber,

Montage Salute Trem!

Venue: Montagu Gardens, East Bay Street

Time: 7:30 pm

For further information on the event please contact the constituency : e
headquarters at (242) 393-0878 CREST momma nr gi

[Som

ESCA LDA KINGS BERIT Y
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Meeting of
police leaders
held in Grant
Bahama

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The
Bahamas hosted the Interna-
tional Association of Chiefs
of Police GACP) 2009 Com-
munity Policing Committee
for its mid-year meeting.

The two-day meeting was
held in Grand Bahama on
Friday.

The group was then hosted
to a farewell social at Taino
Beach on Saturday.

Chief Russell Laines, pres-
ident of IACP, attended the
meeting along with a number
of police leaders, professors
and representatives from
business communities
throughout the United
States, Canada and the
Bahamas.

Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson said the
meeting in Freeport is a
“true testament of the collec-
tive desire to develop crime
prevention strategies and to
build a global alliance to
wipe out the scourge of
crime and violence.”

He noted that community
policing is an important
strategy to combating crime.

“In policing, there is a
global shift occurring that
announces the necessity to
move into the community.

“While there are economic
pressures to move in this
direction, there are far better
reasons that must also be
considered,” Mr Ferguson
said.

Partnerships

Commissioner Ferguson
said that community policing
not only creates partner-
ships, but gives the public a
sense of safety.

“The Royal Bahamas
Police Force has recognised
for sometime that effective
policing will result when
partnerships are created with
the different sections of the
community,” he said.

He noted that the neigh-
bourhood policing pro-
gramme gives members of
the community a greater
voice in the way officers
police their areas.

“By all quantitative and
qualitative community polic-
ing measures, the RBPF
neighbourhood community
policing programme has
been a success.”

Mr Ferguson said that offi-
cers and citizens have seen a
positive change in attitudes,
which has facilitated commu-
nication and reduced citizen
complaints about police per-
sonnel.

The International Associa-
tion of Chiefs of Police is the
world's oldest and largest
non-profit membership
organisation of police execu-
tives, with over 20,000 mem-
bers in more than 89 differ-
ent countries.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
DOE LEAL
AO TeU
PP Teak
322-2197



DEPLORABLE!

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ACKLINS residents are con-
demning the “deplorable” state
of several long stretches of road
on the island that have cost
locals time, money and peace
of mind for over a decade.

Huge ditches and potholes in
the worn-down road leading
from Spring Point, Acklins,
where the airport is located, are
a major hazard and source of
frustration to drivers who are
constantly having to send off to
Nassau for new parts to repair
their damaged cars.

Meanwhile, the chronically
rundown state of the thorough-
fare also draws the attention of
visitors — many of whom come
to Acklins to go bonefishing —
as it is “the first thing they see
when they get to the airport”,
noted an employee of a local
fishing lodge.

A $3.4 million contract signed
in September 2006 to pave the
route, which residents say was
“scraped” in 1996 but never
repaved, was cancelled by the
FNM government after the May
2007 election.

Yesterday, a 36-year-old Snug
Corner resident said the road
works are still desperately need-
ed.

Illustrating her point, she
explained that she has to put
aside an hour to drive to the
airport — a trip which would
take 20 minutes or less if the
stretch of road were paved.

“You have to be really care-
ful, drive real slow. My car and
other people’s cars are low. If
your car miss and go in one of
those holes you ain’t got no car
left,” said the Snug Corner res-
ident.

Acklins residents say huge
ditches and potholes are a
major hazard on island roads



By AOI Avan (L011 86S

She added that just last week
a National Insurance Board
employee driving a jeep along
the road broke the axle after
falling into one of the many
deep drops.

“T want the prime minister to
drive on this road,” said the 36-
year-old.

The local bonefishing lodge
employee agreed.

“Tt ain’t playin’ bad — it bad!
If you’re pregnant and you use
that road you'll lose the baby!”
she declared.

Tourists

“Every time the tourists come
here they always wonder why
it is how it is; they ask ‘Well
who’s the MP for this area?’”

Residents say the issue is a
top priority for many on the
island — but despite the island’s
MP Alfred Gray being aware
of the condition of the road and
raising the matter in parliament,

nothing has been done.

The September 2006 contract
signed by former Minister of
Works Bradley Roberts cov-
ered the rebuilding of 26 miles
of road in southern Acklins,
covering the affected drive
between Sprint Point and Salina
Point.

However, the contract, signed
with New Providence-based
Caribbean Asphalt and local
Acklins contractors M and R
Road Builders, was cancelled
by the FNM when it won the
May, 2007, general election.

Former FNM Works Minis-
ter Earl Deveaux told parlia-
ment in late 2007 that the con-
tract was awarded without com-
petitive bidding and that, prior
to its cancellation, there was
concern over whether it would
be completed.

In February, 2008, Mr
Roberts claimed the contrac-
tors involved had taken legal
action against the government,
and were being represented by
MP for the area and attorney,
Mr Gray.

The Tribune tried to reach
Mr Gray yesterday but he was
said to be in court. A message
left at his office was not
returned up to press time.

Minister of Works Neko
Grant was in Cabinet. Messages
left for Mr Grant and his per-
manent secretary Colin Higgs
were also not returned up to
press time.



Introducing Crusoe,
the Rum Cay manatee

RUM Cay is now the tempo-
rary home of a surprise visitor —
a manatee which the locals
named "Crusoe" after fiction-
al castaway Robinson Crusoe.

The manatee was discovered
in the Rum Cay marina early
one afternoon last week. Dr
Dan Vernon was called to the
scene after a tear in the animal’s
tail was noticed.

When Dr Dan and Mrs Ver-
non arrived, the manatee was
so still that onlookers thought it
was dead.

Lettuce

Dr Dan sent for lettuce from
Last Chance grocery store, in
the hope that it might revive
the manatee, then dashed home
to call Sea World and the Uni-
versity of Florida’s marine biol-
ogy department.

Eventually, he was put in
touch with the Bahamas Marine
Mammal Research Organisa-
tion (BMMRO) in Nassau,
which informed him that the
most important thing was to
make sure the manatee drank
fresh water.

Concerned Rum Cay resi-
dents are still in contact with
the BMMRO and are hoping
they can persuade the organi-
sation to come rescue the ani-
mal. It is believed that it is an
Antillean Manatee and could
have come from Cuba, Florida
or Puerto Rico.








































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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Bahamians must know the truth

“A YOUNG nation cannot be founded on
myths and unthinking idolatry, it has to be based
on facts. All nations have to face this,” John
Marquis, managing editor of The Tribune for
the past 10 years told a radio audience as his
enemies counted the days for his departure.

Mr Marquis, creator of “Insight”, a weekly
Tribune column that examines the news behind
the news, has attracted a large circle of devoted
fans, at the same time mashing the sensitive
corns of many politicians, who blame the PLP
government for not revoking his work permit
and sending him packing when it had the oppor-
tunity.

Chaffing under the sharp pen of this hard-hit-
ting journalist, the question of whether free
speech is a privilege or a right came to a head
when Mr Marquis dared write the story of an
aging father who wanted to get the burden of his
son’s death off his chest. The father told Mr
Marquis that he was convinced that his son was
murdered during the drug era of the eighties
because he knew too much about the association
of the late prime minister Sir Lynden Pindling
with Colombian drug kingpin Carlos “Joe”
Lehder, who had hunkered down at Norman’s
Cay, turning it into his headquarters for the
transshipment of drugs to the US. Here Mr
Chauncey Tynes, Sr, himself a loyal PLP and
one time treasurer of the party, was directing his
rapier at the “Father of the Nation”, whose
reputation loyal PLP supporters have tried to
sanitise over the years, stopping just short of
canonising him.

There was no question that Mr Marquis
would take on the challenge. Nor was there
any question that he would leave any stone
unturned to try to discover the truth.

Mr Marquis, himself a man of the people,
readily admits that when he first arrived in the
Bahamas in the sixties at the age of 22 his nat-
ural sympathies were with the PLP. He wanted
them to succeed. He wanted Sir Lynden to suc-
ceed. However, he soon discovered that the
people’s leader was seriously flawed, and that
the society over which he ruled were too fright-
ened to challenge him.

On August 29, 1969, the late Sir Etienne
Dupuch, then publisher of this newspaper and
an early mentor of Mr Marquis, took the young
journalist to his Rotary Club to give his farewell
address to this “frightened society.” At the end
of his speech a Rotarian thanked Mr Marquis
for his fearless address, noted that he would be
leaving for good at the end of that year and
acknowledged that “when he goes this society
will suffer a great loss.”

Thirty years later Mr Marquis decided that he
wanted to end his journalistic career at The
Tribune — a newspaper in whose ethos and
philosophy of “being bound to swear to the
dogmas of no master” he admired. However, on















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his return he found that truth was still stumbling
in the public square and “honesty finds no place
there.” Again he took up the challenge and
encouraged a young group of Bahamian jour-
nalists to do the same. This time he will leave
behind him young men and women who will
ask questions, who will probe until they find
the Truth, who will demand a higher standard of
honesty and good government from their lead-
ers.

Today’s young Bahamians want to know the
truth of their past. They are tired of the pabu-
lum that they have been served from their birth.
When the PLP came to power on January 10,
1967 they seemed to think that the history of this
country started with them. They swept the past
aside and started to recreate their own story.
Nothing happened unless it started with them —
or that is how it seemed as their fable of “In the
beginning was the PLP and the PLP was with
Pindling and the PLP was Pindling” unfolded —
the rest of us, like the late Carlton Francis, were
cast into hell fire if we protested.

In his interview on the Jeff Lloyd radio pro-
gramme Tuesday, Mr Marquis acknowledged
that Sir Lynden in fact did much good for the
Bahamas for about 10 years up until the advent
of the drug era of the eighties. We also agree
that Sir Lynden Pindling is to be recognised,
especially for introducing majority rule.

However, four months after the PLP came to
power the older heads at The Tribune knew
that in the future there would be a another
dimension to the Pindling story.

In May 1967 The Miami Herald reported
that Pindling’s name was linked with an SEC
investigation when New York businessman
Lewis L Colasurdo, owner of Crescent, testified
that he met Mr Pindling in a Miami cocktail
lounge after he was elected Premier, and gave
him $127,000 in cash as interest payment on a $2
million loan from Six M’s of which Mr Pindling
was president.

Mr Pindling, as he then was, vehemently
denied the accusations, US officials were embar-
rassed to be seen attacking the leader of a new-
ly elected, popular black government, Colasur-
do quickly retracted his testimony, pleaded mis-
taken identity in a dark cocktail lounge where
the transaction was alleged to have taken place.
He said the money was given to a Venezuelan
by the name of Torres, not a Bahamian by the
name of Pindling.

The matter was quickly dropped. But for
The Tribune the first pattern had been stitched
into life’s quilt, and over the years we have fol-
lowed its winding, devious journey.

Today’s generation of Bahamians are entitled
to sift through historical facts for themselves.
They can then make their own judgment about
their country’s story without their elders breath-
ing down their neck with fairy tales.



Parents are
training their
daughters to
be prostitutes

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I attended the Junior High
School track and field meet on
Wednesday at Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium, which was well attended
by an enthusiastic bunch. But
apart from good participation
and high energy, there was one
thing that was a glaring and dis-
tasteful observation. We have
completely vacated the moral
high ground, we have aban-
doned the pride that was
instilled in us by our forefathers
and we have sold our daughters
on the altar of ignorance and
being fashionable. The old gate
post has been dug up and dis-
carded.

I was embarrassed for the
young girls who cannot be any
older than thirteen max. The

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



norm seemed to have been to
wear a blouse that would show
at least 70 per cent of their
breasts, all in clear view.

These vulnerable girls have
unwittingly been set up by their
parents to be vulgar, loose, and
void of self respect. This kind
of dressing only invites trouble,
because the young boy who
came from an equally slack
home will stop at nothing to
touch and feel a girl without her
permission.

But observing these children,
I quickly realised that the par-
ents could care less, because a
woman who has a mentality

akin to a prostitute could only
teach her daughter what she
knows and nothing more.

I cry shame on the parents
who purchased these disgusting
clothing, pretending to give
their children what they in fact
could not wear in front of their
parents in the past. But I guess
that is too old fashion.

This is not cute and only a
breathing ground for extreme
painful and embarrassing
results. The parents of those
girls will reap a whirlwind
because they sowed the wind.
There is time to correct this.

Parents should “catch them-
selves” and start dressing these
young girls like ladies.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
March, 2009.

Livingstone B Johnson — an example
to be followed by every generation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The phrase “a prophet is without honour in his
own country” certainly proves true in respect of
His Excellency Ambassador Livingstone B John-
son (deceased).

It is a terrible pity that we do not honour our
own. His Excellency’s life can and ought to be held
up as an example to be followed by this generation
and those to come.

He was born of humble beginnings in his beloved
island Exuma. Through hard work, discipline,
integrity and commitment to noble principles, he
rose to the highest heights nationally and interna-
tionally.

His Excellency was one of the quiet heroes of
Majority Rule. As well as running for Parliament, he
was the lawyer for the Civil Service Union, (now the
BCPOU) and served in the Senate.

He was an architect and interior designer of the
modern Bahamas. Many Bahamians were opposed
to Independence.

They felt that we could not represent ourselves
and they said so publicly, including in Parliament.
The newly independent nation needed men pre-
pared to represent the nation in international arenas.
At this time, His Excellency was a named partner in
a very well established and lucrative law firm (Isaacs,
Johnson and Co), which was then regarded as one of
the most successful law firms in The Bahamas. When
called upon, His Excellency again responded to
national service. At great personal sacrifice, he left

his law firm to serve as The Bahamas’ first Ambas-
sador to the United States of America, the United
Nations and the High Commissioner to Canada.
He was the first and only Bahamian to hold all of
those posts at the same time. He and his supportive
and charming wife, Charmaine, represented The
Bahamas with great distinction. Many internation-
al luminaries commented on his intellect, charm
and diplomacy. He is one of the reasons that the
transition to a respected sovereign independent
nation was so smooth.

Notwithstanding all of his tremendous success-
es, His Excellency remained a humble family man
and a gentleman in every sense of the word.

As one of his Godchildren, I can say that no one
could have had a better Godfather. He always found
time to encourage others.

Today we try to teach our children about hard
work, delayed gratification, kindness, gentleness,
excellence, patriotism, discipline, integrity, service
and other nation building attributes. We need only
to hold up the life and example of His Excellency
Ambassador Livingstone B Johnson.

The Bahamas owes him a tremendous debt of
gratitude. I thank his wife, Charmaine, and his sur-
viving children, Anita and Dianne for supporting
him while he served his country and thereafter.

May his soul rest in peace.

ALLYSON MAYNARD GIBSON
Nassau,
March 17, 2009.

Is it day, month, year — or month, day year?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have been wondering if
the management of the Royal
Bank think we live in Ameri-
ca, or in the world. It is the

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heritage of the Bahamas to
write the date in the interna-
tional form, but every time I
ask for new cheques I do not
know if it will be day month
year or month day year.

To follow American logic
they should say 7/24. I did
complain one time only to be
told by the printer that they
had been instructed to print
month day year, but lo and
behold next time, much to my
gratification, I received
cheques printed day month
year.

As you must have seen even
the mighty Americans print,
day month year, on their inter-
national forms. But it will not

worry me, when I receive my
cheques wrongly printed, I will
just put a line through month
day year and carry on the
international way.

Of course it would be much
easier if the Government offi-
cially endorsed the interna-
tional way, but that is asking a
bit much.

All computers coming into
the country should be so
adjusted, instead of silly little
faces coming up to tell you
don't know how to tell the
date.

WALTER EG GRATTAN
Nassau,
February, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

‘Highest honour’ for
Bahamian student

US High Court
rejects Cuban i
militant’s appeal :

m@ WASHINGTON

THE USS. Supreme
Court has turned down
Cuban militant Luis Posada
Carriles’ attempt to have
immigration fraud charges
thrown out because the
government used trickery
and deceit to build a case
against him, according to
Associated Press.

The justices, in an order
Monday, are letting stand a
ruling by the federal
appeals court in New
Orleans, Louisiana, that the
81-year-old anti-Castro mil-
itant should stand trial on
charges that he lied to fed-
eral authorities in his 2005
bid to become a U.S. citi-
zen.

Earlier, U.S. District
Judge Kathleen Cardone in
E] Paso, Texas, dismissed
the criminal charges
because the government
used the pretext of a natu-
ralization interview to build
the case against Posada.

The Cuban-born citizen
of Venezuela is wanted in
the South American coun-
try on charges that he
orchestrated the 1976
bombing of a Cuban jetlin-
er. He has denied any
wrongdoing.

Posada was arrested in
the United States on a civil
immigration violation in
May 2005 after sneaking
into the country from Mexi-
co about two months earli-
er. Posada, a former CIA
operative and U.S. Army
officer, has claimed that he
was brought across the bor-
der into Texas by a
smuggler, but federal
authorities have alleged
that he sailed from Mexico
to Florida.

Venezuela wants to
extradite Posada from the
United States so that he can
stand trial for the airliner
bombing.

He has been living freely
in Miami since 2007.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A TENTH generation Bahami-
an student has proved it is possible
to rise above the ranks by simply
doing what needs to be done, as
he will be bestowed the highest
honour at the 75th anniversary of
his former Naval academy next
week.

In just three years at the Admi-
ral Farragut Academy in St
Petersburg, Florida, William
Saunders III, or ‘AJ’, of High
Vista, Nassau, once a notorious
‘naughty boy’ at Xavier’s Lower
School, has made such great
accomplishments that he will be
named among the top students of
the prestigious military academy.

Bob and Jack Morris, 1951
graduates of the academy, nomi-
nated the young Bahamian for the
honour, not just because of his
outstanding achievements, but
because people liked him.

His nomination was approved
by the discerning Alumni Asso-
ciation and his name will be
engraved on a plaque and fixed
to the Admiral Farragut Capstan
among the academy’s finest grad-
uates.

AJ said the honour would nev-
er have been possible if he had
not been picked out by military
leader Captain Thomas McClle-
land from the mass of tenth grade,
bottom rank seamen to be a Mid-
dle School Officer in charge of
the sixth, seventh and eighth
graders in the dormitory and some
day line companies.

And AJ’s success spiraled from
there.

He worked his way up in the
Key and Lion's Clubs to become
president of both community ser-
vice organisations in his senior
year.

He captained the sailing, soc-
cer, and track and field teams, and
as his responsibilities snowballed,
AJ was awarded the position of
Battalion Adjutant (BA) and
became the third in command of
the school in his senior year.

His role as BA meant AJ was
head of all the school dormito-
ries, and played a leading cere-
monial role when the school
staged parades several times a
year.

But AJ remained cool under

William Saunders III set to graduate
from prestigious military academy

pressure, thrived on his commit-
ments and always enjoyed his
work.

So much so that he was
astounded to learn he had been
chosen for the highest school hon-
our.

“When I was there I was just
doing a job,” he said. “It’s not like
I was trying to get all this, I was
just doing what I needed to do.

“T was just following orders like
the simple soldier I am.”

But AJ’s work did not go with-
out reward, even during his time
at the academy.

Astronaut

He was privileged to meet
astronaut Charlie Duke, the 1953
Admiral Farragut graduate who
went on the Apollo 16 mission to
the moon in 1972, and donated a
chunk of moon rock to his for-
mer high school.

And at age 16 he piloted a
plane when former US presidents
Ronald Reagan and George Bush
Sr visited the school, as he had
obtained his pilot’s licence before
he could drive.

Proud parents William Saun-
ders Jr, known as 'BJ', and Susan
Saunders, are thrilled by their
son’s achievements since he left
Nassau to fulfil his dreams of
being a pilot in the armed forces.

Mr Saunders said he is particu-
larly grateful to June Hutchinson,
the Xavier’s Lower School coun-
sellor who encouraged AJ to be
good when he was coping with his
parents divorce, and getting into
trouble for setting up wrestling
matches between warring pupils
and charging young spectators for
tickets.

“She guided William along the
right path, gave him a lot of inspi-
ration when he thought divorces
were bad,” Mr Saunders said.

“If it wasn't for her foundation
he wouldn't be where he is.”

Upon graduation, AJ achieved
his boyhood dream — he won a
scholarship to the US Naval
Academy, a privilege for only
1,200 of the 80,000 annual appli-

Bahamians urged to
apply for e-Passport
ahead of summer rush

DEPUTY Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette is advising
Bahamians whose passports
are set to expire this year to
apply for the e-Passport now,
in an effort to avoid the tradi-
tional summer rush at the Pass-

port Office.

If your passport does not
expire this year it can still be
used for travel, even if you
have already applied for the
ePassport, Mr Symonette said.

Around 2,800 ePassports
were issued in February. Since
the system was implemented in
December 2007, an estimated
17,000 Bahamians have been

issued the ePassport.

Sein In

passports and visas are resis-
tant to fraudulent use, includ-
ing the use of lost or stolen
passports,” Mr Symonette said.

The passport is
upgraded from a simple paper
document to one containing
biometric information on facial
characteristics and fingerprints.
Each passport holder is
required to have a National
Insurance number.

In 1994, the Bahamas gov-
ernment began exploring the
process of upgrading passports
and other travel documents.
On December 22, 2006 the
government signed a contract
with
Greenville, South Carolina-

being

Indusa Global, a

cants from across the United
States, but in the end he decided
to turn it down so he can bring
his skills home.

He is now studying airport
management and aviation busi-
ness at Embry Riddle Aeronauti-
cal University and hopes to return
to the Bahamas to work in
tourism and transportation at the
airports and in the family busi-
ness, Majestic Tours.

Although it was tough, AJ says
his time at Admiral Farragut
Academy has given him a firm
foundation for life.

“It’s a great school, a great
place to learn and it teaches you
so many life lessons,” he said.

“It gets hard, especially if you
have a certain degree of rank,
because not only are you dealing
with your school work, but you
are dealing with the military side,
running a bunch of military activ-
ities, and I had sports on top of
that.

“Tf you don’t watch out it could
pile up on you, but if you do what
needs to be done it is fine.

“Tf I didn’t enjoy what I was
doing I would have slowed down,
but I loved what I did, I loved
helping people and making people
better and making myself better at
the same time.

“Tt was just a good time. It was
the best three years of my life. I
have no regrets about what I did
there, or going there, and I total-
ly encourage anybody to go.”

AJ is grateful to his roommate
Thomas Deetr, dormitory head
Calvin Brown, coach Nick Hillary,
and teacher Andrew Forrester for
helping him along the way.

He is looking forward to reunit-
ing with all of his former teachers
and classmates over a week of
anniversary celebrations, including
the unveiling of his name on a
plaque in the Capstan on April 3.

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“Due to the increased usage
of the ePassport, Bahamians are advised
to go in. We want Bahamians to check
their passports and if they are travelling in
June or July, to go and apply for the
ePassport and avoid the summer rush,”
Mr Symonette said.

He said the Passport Office will make
the necessary adjustment to accommodate
the expected high volume of applications
and process them in a timely manner.

Those whose passports expire after the
summer are advised to apply for the ePass-
port towards the end of the year.

As of January, 2009, passport offices in
Grand Bahama and Abaco began issuing
the ePassport through the Passport Office
in New Providence, which is the central
printing station for all Bahamian ePass-
ports.

Mr Symonette said the Consulate Gen-
eral’s Office in Miami is being expanded
to accommodate the volume of ePassport
applications there.

The International Civil Aviation Organ-
isation (ICAO), of which the Bahamas is a
member, mandated that all countries issue
machine readable passports by 2010.

The ePassport was officially launched
on December 5, 2007 in a move to increase
protection against identity theft, heighten
aviation security and combat illegal immi-
gration.

“The security of our identity and travel
documents is of paramount importance to
us. We must ensure, therefore, that our



based information technology
development and consulting firm, for an
estimated $12.7 million to provide four
systems to initiate the project.

The project included an ePassport
issuance system, a machine readable visa
system, an e-Identification issuance sys-
tem (smart cards for holders of work per-
mits, spousal permits, home owners
residence permits, permanent residence),
and a border control management
system.

“By this initiative, the Bahamas will be
ICAO compliant.

“We have had to and will undertake sev-
eral actions and activities to facilitate our
ePassport and machine readable visa ini-
tiative, and to ensure that our transition
occurs as smoothly as possible,” Mr
Symonette said.

In addition, a system for the generation
and management of digital security keys to
protect the data stored in the passports
and cards was also implemented.

The machine readable document pro-
ject is a joint initiative involving the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs, the Department of
Immigration (Ministry of National Secu-
rity), and the data processing unit of the
Ministry of Finance.

Mr Symonette is urging Bahamians to
keep their passports in a safe place. He
said everyone should photocopy the first
four pages of the document in case it is
one day lost or stolen, as this will help in
the issuance of a new passport.

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THE TRIBUNE



Foundation launched to assist blind |7

and visually impaired children

THE Bahamas Foundation for
Blind and Visually Impaired Chil-
dren was officially launched last
week Thursday at the Salvation
Army Church on Mackey Street.

According to Barsha Smith,
president of BFBVIC and mother
of a blind son, the foundation seeks
to ensure that all blind or visually
impaired children in the Bahamas
have adequate access to medical,
financial, rehabilitative, psycho-
logical and educational resources.

“We will provide emotional sup-
port, being there to listen when a
parent wants to talk, supporting
that parent from the time the initial
diagnosis is given in the hospital
through to home visits.

“We will also focus on preven-
tion and early detection of vision
problems in children, educating
parents about their child’s physical
condition and treatment and will
work closely with the government,
the Ministry of Education and the
Salvation Army’s Erin Gilmour
School to ensure that assistive tools
and rehabilitation therapy are
readily available, accessible and
affordable to blind and visually
impaired children,” Mrs Smith
said.

The foundation’s projects will
include:

¢ A national registry for blind
and visually impaired children

¢ An educational newsletter for
parents

¢ Parent retreats and seminars

¢ On-call personnel and home
visits

¢ A resource unit to provide par-
enting information

¢ Braille books, toys and assis-
tive aids

The foundation also aims to
highlight the accomplishments of
blind and visually impaired chil-
dren through an annual awards
banquet.

Speaking at the launch, Minister
of State for Labour and Social
Development Loretta Butler-
Turner said World Health Organ-
isation statistics indicate that every
year the number of persons

FOUNDATION PRESIDENT Barsha S



Dominique Thompson

mith and Loretta Butler-Turner,
Minister of State for Labour and Social Development.

becoming blind increases by 1 to 2
million worldwide, however, 75
per cent of blindness is either treat-
able or preventable with early
intervention.

Noting that the Disability
Affairs Division also provides
adaptive aids and learning tech-
nologies for persons experiencing
vision loss, she congratulated BFB-
VIC on its formation and pledged
the government’s support through
the enactment of legislation that
will protect the rights of persons
with disabilities.

“The government is committed
not only to the provision of pre-
ventative health-care but also to

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ensuring equal access and full par-
ticipation in every aspect of our
society,” Mrs Butler-Turner said.

“Tam extremely pleased to
report that the special committee
comprised of key leaders of per-

sons with disabilities and officers of

the Disabilities Affairs Division
completed their recommendations
including those submitted by stake-
holders to the necessary changes to
the proposed disability legislation,”
she said.

However, she pointed out, it is
impossible to effectively provide
the necessary preventative pro-

grammes and services without :

proper statistical data.

“Realising the urgency of cor-
recting this deficiency, the Dis-
ability Affairs Division has initiat-
ed a nationwide registration drive

to develop a national registry of i

all persons with disabilities living in
the Bahamas. I understand that
the foundation will also endeav-

our to establish a national registry ;

for bind and visually impaired chil-
dren which I hope will be included
in our national registry,” Mrs But-
ler-Turner said.

Parents of blind and visually
impaired children can attend meet-
ings of the Bahamas Foundation
for Blind and Visually Impaired
Children (BFBVIC) at the Salva-
tion Army Adult Blind Workshop
on the third Thursday of every
month at 6pm.



THE CAT ISLAND team discusses rebuttal strategy at the 2008
National High School Debating Championships. The lone member
from that squad, Giovanno Bowe (2nd from left) will lead his team in
this year’s competition.

Cat Island and
Long Island set
for debating final

THE National High School Debating Championship
scheduled for Thursday, April 23, 2009 will feature Cat
Island contending with Long Island for debating suprema-
cy and the victory trophy.

Cat Island is also hoping to repeat as the champion, hav-
ing won last year against Doris Johnson Senior High
School.

In the semi-finals round, the Cat Island team defeated the
Eleuthera team while Long Island won over
Kingsway Academy, the only remaining team from New
Providence.

The topic for both semi-final competitions was “be it
resolved that enough effort has been made to educate soci-
ety on family values and the laws of society.”

The competition is a marquee event on most of the senior
schools’ calendars in both public and independent high
schools in New Providence, Grand Bahama and the Fami-
ly Islands.

Sixteen school teams participated in this year’s debate.

History

Eula Gaitor, chief training officer of student services in the
Ministry of Education and coordinator of the event, said this
is only the second time in the ten-year history of the debat-
ing championship that two Family Island teams have con-
tested in the final round.

The only other time that this feat was achieved was when
two Grand Bahama teams competed against each other in
the final round.

“This achievement shows that we have many competent
and intelligent students in all of our islands.

“It also shows the success of the quality of education
that our children are receiving because all of the teams
have done a tremendous job in debating their points of
view.

“The research and presentation of the speeches has been
first class and we are looking forward to a fiercely contest-
ed final round,” Ms Gaitor said.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Wilson City Power Station

Transmission Circuits
Wilson City, Abaco

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before

9th April, 2009

no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 701/09

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The Corporation reserves the right to

accept or reject any or all proposals.

For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact
Mr. Wayne Farquharson at telephone 302-1216.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 7





An indelible part of the
Sir Lynden Pindling legacy

Jest over 20 years ago, a
group of top British inves-

tigative journalists left their jobs at
the Sunday Times to piece togeth-
er the fantastic tale of the cocaine
trade in Colombia, the Bahamas
and Miami.

Their explosive 1988 book —
the Cocaine Wars — described
how Carlos Lehder, the Colom-
bian cartel's chief transporter, took
control of an island in the Exu-
mas "while the government of
Prime Minister Sir Lynden Pin-
dling did its best to help him feel at
home.”

The story goes back to the ear-
ly 1970s. Within a year of inde-
pendence, Bahamian police were
warning that drug trafficking was a
"serious problem," a US Senate
report noted, "and by 1979, that
problem was a crisis....both nar-
cotics smuggling and government
corruption grew at an extraordi-
nary rate."

One famous Miami-based traf-
ficker, nicknamed Kojak, told the
Senate investigation that he had
paid off Bahamian authorities
"from the lowest ranking officers
to the highest politicians.” In fact,
the chief of the Bahamas’ police
drug task force, ACP Howard
Smith, was on Kojak's regular pay-
roll, according to testimony. From
all of the evidence, said the 1984
Commission of Inquiry report into
drug smuggling, “we have con-
cluded on the balance of proba-
bilities that ACP Smith corruptly
accepted bribes from known drug
smugglers.”

"The security of this country is
being threatened by armed for-
eign criminals," a confidential
report noted in early 1979. "The
Bahamas is being deluged with
drugs."

And the plain fact is that all of
the evidence collected over the
years has identified two men —
both now dead — as chiefly
responsible for this unfortunate
state of affairs. They were Prime
Minister Sir Lynden Pindling and
his cigar-chomping crony, Everette
Bannister.

According to the authors of the
Cocaine Wars, "it is fair to assume
that they both felt they were owed
something by the Bahamas
because, when the time was right,
they pursued those schemes with
the rapaciousness of creditors out
to collect a debt long overdue."

As the book notes, "If in 1979
there was an incursion of armed
criminals, by 1980 it had become
an invasion."

A review of Sir Lynden's per-
sonal finances by the 1984 Com-
mission of Inquiry in Nassau found
that he had spent eight times his
reported total earnings from 1977
to 1984. According to the Inquiry:
"The prime minister and Lady
Pindling have received at least
$57.3 million in cash. Explanations
for some of these deposits were
given... but could not be verified."

Other investigations turned up
even more startling evidence. Wit-
nesses told of the “incalculable
millions of dollars taken and
received by every corrupt official
and politician in Everette Bannis-
ter's pocket—and by ‘the Man’,
the prime minister who always got
his share.”

Gorman Bannister, the son of
Pindling's longtime "consultant"
and bag man, was one of those
who helped the authors of the
Cocaine Wars write their story. He
also testified before a US Senate
subcommittee in 1987.

The sheer scale of corruption
was unprecedented. As former
PLP parliamentarian Edmund
Moxey said during the Commis-
sion of Inquiry, "Pindling and his
crew make the Bay Street Boys
look like schoolchildren." And a
report by the US State Depart-
ment concluded that the drug
trade accounted for at least 10 per
cent of the Bahamian economy,
including political payoffs, over-
heads and investments.

Everette Bannister had
returned to the Bahamas from the
US after the PLP won the 1967
general election. His influence
began to grow when fugitive
American financier Robert Vesco
moved to Nassau in 1972 and set
up a dummy bank to channel
bribes and payoffs to PLP bigwigs
so he could avoid extradition. Ban-
nister's connections proved helpful
in this regard.

Within a year the bank had
advanced $50 million in unsecured
loans that were never repaid, the
US Senate report said. And Ban-
nister had gained a reputation as
someone who could provide access
to the top for the right price.

Norman's Cay lies about 50
miles from Nassau, just outside
the boundaries of the Exuma Cays
Land and Sea Park. The island
was touted as a headquarters for
the park by the 1958 scientific sur-
vey that recommended the cre-
ation of the Bahamas National
Trust. It was a popular anchorage
for visiting yachts and was first
developed in the mid-1960s as a
small residential community with a

—_

f

C

clubhouse and marina.

According to Phil Kniskern, a
developer quoted in the 1991 book
Turning the Tide by Sidney Kirk-
patrick, "Norman's is special...Ten
minutes after landing you can be
bonefishing in the pond, or diving
on the reef. And it's only 19 min-
utes from Nassau and a little over
an hour from Miami."

In other words — an out of the
way yet strategic location. And in
1978 a Bahamian company called
International Dutch Resources
began buying up land there. IDR
was set up for Lehder by a regular
trust company in Nassau, which
managed his working capital. And
Kniskern, along with all the other
lawful residents, was eventually
forced to leave Norman's Cay.

By the end of 1979, the island
was home to Lehder's gangsters,
who drove ordinary visitors away
at gunpoint. Lehder built a large
hangar with cocaine storage fac-
ulties. A 3,300-foot runway was
protected by radar, bodyguards
and attack dogs for the fleet of
aircraft under his command.
Cocaine shipments from Colombia
arrived on the island every hour of
every day, and Lehder's personal
wealth mounted into the billions.

Witnesses at Lehder's 1988 tri-
alin the US said Pindling was paid
$88,000 on the 22nd of each month
to protect the Norman's Cay base,
and Everette Bannister collected
the money personally. Bannister
was later indicted in the US for
funneling bribes from drug smug-
glers to Bahamian officials. Here's
an excerpt from his son's Senate
testimony:

Senator Kerry. Did your father
warn Carlos Lehder of the police
raid on Norman's Cay?

Mr Bannister. Yes.

Senator Kerry. Do you want
to describe that?

Mr Bannister. Well, as I recall,
he just made a phone call to Car-
los letting him know, well, police
are going.

Senator Kerry. You heard the
phone call?

Mr Bannister. Oh, yes, yes, yes
yes ... I know my father did call
him one time and told him, "Lis-
ten, the police are going to raid
Norman's Cay on a certain day,
clean it up." And when they went
there, they didn't find...anything.

When opposition parliamen-
tarian, Norman Solomon, began
to complain to Bahamian and US
authorities about the situation, his
car was blown up. According to
Gorman, Lehder boasted that he
was behind the bombing and his
father, Everette, viewed Lender's
decision to bomb Solomon as
appropriate.

All this led to a 1982 meeting
between Vice President George
H W Bush, US Admiral Daniel
Murphy and Prime Minister Pin-
dling, at which the Norman's Cay
problem was raised. The Senate
report said the vice president
showed Pindling a computer print-
out of CIA surveillance of Nor-
man's Cay and told him the island
resembled O'Hare Airport
because of its activity.

Lehder also boasted to the
Colombian media about his
involvement in drug trafficking at
Norman's Cay and about his gift of
hundreds of thousands of dollars
to the ruling Progressive Liberal
Party in the Bahamas. So his oper-
ation could hardly have been con-
sidered secret. And it was certain-
ly known to Pindling.

This house of cards came crash-
ing down on September 5, 1983,
when NBC News exposed the
Norman's Cay scandal and direct-
ly implicated the Bahamian gov-
ernment in Lehder's operations.
The NBC broadcast and the
resulting outcry in the Bahamas
led to the establishment of the
Commission of Inquiry.

Informers for the US Drug
Enforcement Administration have
also testified that in 1980 and 1981
Pindling spent occasional week-
ends partying down at Norman's
Cay with Lehder and his gang, and
the CIA was said to be holding
the photographic evidence to
prove it.

So the story that sparked the
recent controversy over Pindling's
legacy can hardly be considered
"explosive" or "outrageous"
today. Even if Sir Lynden was not
complicit in the death of Chauncey
Tynes Jr, he was certainly a causal
factor in a lot of other tragedies
across the length and breadth of
the Bahamas over many years.

Allyson Maynard Gibson's pre-
tence at shock horror that Sir Lyn-
den's name had been "sullied” and
"desecrated" by the recent Tri-
bune article is pure political the-
atre. No matter how you look at it,
the corruption of an entire soci-
ety and generations lost to drug

abuse and organised crime are an
indelible part of the Pindling lega-
cy. Face it. Deal with it.

The key point for us today is
that PLP leaders have never fully
digested the lessons from this dis-
astrous period of Bahamian his-
tory, which they themselves led.
The contradictions within the par-
ty arising from the large-scale
criminality exposed by multiple
investigations have never been
dealt with frankly. They have sim-
ply been brushed under the rug
— as the most recent self-right-
eous outcries from PLP quarters
so clearly demonstrate.

And that is precisely why the
party is in such a fix today. It lost a
large degree of legitimacy and cred-
ibility in the 1980s when the country
was sold out to foreign gangsters.
And it wasted a golden opportuni-
ty to claw back some of that legiti-
macy and respect when it was unex-
pectedly re-elected in 2003.

ever

than

—
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oo)
y
oO
Om




Sir Lynden Pindling

Although PLP leader Perry
Christie was one of three cabinet
ministers who initially recoiled at
massive official corruption under
Pindling's leadership (Hubert
Ingraham and Arthur Hanna were
the others), he is one of those now
trying to avoid dealing with that
despicable legacy. And if he does-
n't deal with it, who will?

As we said, it is a legacy that
has yet to be processed by the
PLP. The strategy is to cling to
Pindling's achievement of majori-

ty rule and independence and
ignore all the rest. By ignoring it, it
will eventually go away as people
get older and memories fade. This
is nothing but a public relations
scam that will do nothing to
resolve the party's inherent con-
tradictions.

Perhaps the best example to
draw the point is that of the retired
PLP cabinet minister from Exu-
ma who was found to have rou-
tinely accepted gifts and payoffs
from the Lehder operation and to
have been a "lackey" for Everette
Bannister (but later acquitted in
the courts). He was appointed to a
prestigious government job by the
Christie administration in 2002
and now submits statesmanlike
essays to the press on the future of
Exuma, as if the 1970s and 80s had
never happened.

And although we can agree
that all of us may bear some
responsibility for what happened
in those days, and all of us may
have benefited to some degree —
wittingly or not — it is the handful
of men and women who were
large and in charge who must
accept most of the blame. Many
are still around and can easily
make their voices heard in the
right way.

As we noted in an earlier article

on political prospects for the PLP
after the 2007 defeat (see
www.bahamapundit.com), it has
been said that “All political parties
die at last of swallowing their own
lies.” It remains to be seen
whether the PLP will be able to
achieve the fundamental reform
that it seems to require, or
whether it will fatally choke on its
own self-delusion.

Sources:

1984 Commission of Inquiry
Report.

1988 Report of the US Senate
Subcommittee on Narcotics, Ter-
rorism and International Opera-
tions.

1988 US State Department
Report on International Narcotics
Control.

1988, The Cocaine Wars, by
Paul Eddy, Hugo Sabogal, Sara
Walden. Published by W W Nor-
ton.

1991, Turning the Tide, by Sid-
ney Kirkpatrick and Peter Abra-
hams, published by Penguin
Group.

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

Butler’s Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Official
Funeral Announcement

for the former MP of Long Island
and Cabinet Minister,

JAMES
FRANKLIN
KNOWLES,

66

will be held on Friday,
March 27th, 2009 at
11:00 a.m., at Christ
Church Cathedral,
George Street.

Officiating will be
Archdeacon Keith
Cartwright, Fr. Michael Gittens and Fr. Crosley

Walkine. Interment will follow in St. Anne’s
Cemetery, Fox Hill.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Amarylis
Knowles, two sons; James A. Knowles and Roman
Knowles, one daughter; Kimberly Knowles, his
mother; Agnes Knowles of Texas, six brothers; Alex
Jr., Emerick, Patrick, Geoffrey, Charlton and Eric
Knowles, six sisters; Ethlyn Virginia Pinder, Ruby
Louise Collins of West Palm Beach Florida, Ruth
Yvonne Knowles of Dallas Texas, Deborah Susan
Knowles and Julianna Green of Rowlett Texas, one
uncle; Hilbert Burrington Pinder, numerous nieces
and nephews, in-laws; Mavis and Joey Treco,
William (Bill) Pinder, Richard Anderson Sr., Shirley,
Brenda, Rosa, Linda and Lolitta Knowles, James
Green, Predensia Fox, Bernadette Darville, Jennifer
Cartwright, a host of other relatives and friends and
special thanks and appreciation to his many doctors.

Mr. Knowles will lie in state at the House of
Assembly on Thursday, March 26, from 9:00am
until 5:00pm. In lieu of flowers the family has
requested that donations be made to the Cancer
Society, P. O. Box SS-6539, in memory of James
Knowles.

Funeral Services are being handled by Butlers’
Funeral Home & Crematorium, Ernest and York
Streets.



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THE TRIBUNE



Candidate selection

process is undemocratic

m@ By OMAR ARCHER

Biyervwnere you turn these
days voters are increasingly more
outspoken about their disappointment with
various members of parliament. They feel
that their concerns are not being met, main-
ly because there is a serious disconnect
between themselves and their sitting rep-
resentatives. One major reason for this
evolves from the candidate selection
process.

I feel that the current process of selection
is undemocratic. It’s like serving meat toa
vegetarian and telling him/her to eat it or
starve. That’s not democracy, that’s dicta-
torship. Take for example the system of
primaries in the United States which began
in the early 20th century. This process was
established to mainly democratise the inter-
nal workings of all political parties, so as to
end the practice of candidates being hand-
picked by appointed party committees, as
has been done by all political parties here in
the Bahamas for decades. This process is
inherently flawed. It is unconstitutional and
defeats the very purpose of a democracy.

This is why I am now hereby proposing a
Constituent Act. The sole purpose of this

YOUR SAY

Act from the perspective of a free and
democratic society, is to ensure that ALL
candidates are chosen via a ballot by the
voters/constituents in their respective com-
munities in an open and fair democratic
process. The now existing process leaves
far too much room for manipulation of this
very important process and must be
changed immediately. The existing process
has over the past discriminated against var-
ious proposed candidates for many different
reasons — namely, the candidates were too
outspoken, or he or she is disliked by certain
influential committee members. Political
discrimination has no place in a free and
democratic society where the lives and well
being of the citizens are at stake. This is a
very serious problem with Bahamian poli-
tics today and must be corrected before the
next general election in 2012.

The existing process is nonsensical; the
power of selection should be given to the
constituents and not allowed to be contin-
ually hijacked by petty internal party poli-



tics. Choosing candidates via a committee
and presenting them at “take it or leave it”
conventions is no longer acceptable,
because it blatantly puts a limitation on the
choice of the Bahamian voting electorate
which is unacceptable in a democracy. With-
out the proposed Constituent Act, voters —
in particular grass root voters — will con-
tinue to have no say as to who is elected to
serve in such capacity.

Tam now proposing that all parties nom-
inate via this democratic process, thus
embracing the shifting of power from inter-
nal petty party politics, to the actual con-
stituents. The suffocating influence of par-
ty leaders will be severely weakened and
rightfully so. Political parties must be run as
democratic institutions and not like pri-
vately owned businesses. The ideal purpose
of this proposed Act would be to find the
candidate who would fearlessly represent
his/her constituents and address their needs
publicly with conviction. In this respect, the
Bahamas’ candidates selection process is
dangerously flawed and needs to be cor-
rected immediately. This is the answer to
those politicians who think they are entitled
to office no matter what.

Isay let the people decide — not the par-



AT ' Hany

\

-
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1
1

Patrick Hanna/BIS

THIRTY-THREE young women received recognition awards at the annual Debutante Awards Ceremony held at
Government House on Wednesday, March 18. Seated from left are Fredericka Hamilton, committee
member; Governor General Arthur Hanna and Cristina Johnson, president of the Bahamas Debutante Foundation

Young women

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FLANKED by family
members, friends and well-
wishers, 33 young women
received recognition at the
annual Bahamas Debutante
Foundation awards ceremo-
ny Wednesday evening.

The ceremony was held at
Government House and was
hosted by Governor General
Arthur Hanna who told the
debutantes that the event sig-
nalled a milestone in their
lives.

“Debutantes, surely this
programme has inspired and

provided for you great incen-
tives for continued success in
the area of social develop-
ment.

“T challenge you to run
with the baton and make a
positive influence among
your peers,” the Governor
General said.

After being exposed to six
months of social and educa-
tional training, including
essay and talent competitions,
the young ladies are poised
to fully contribute to their
communities.

The Governor General not-
ed that having gone through
the programme, the debu-
tantes would be able to posi-

Obama, astronauts talk

up green energy in call

m@ CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

THE 10 ORBITING astronauts talked up green energy with
President Barack Obama on Tuesday, describing the benefits that
will come from the international space station’s new solar wings,

according to Associated Press.

Obama told the astronauts aboard the linked station-shuttle
complex that he was extraordinarily proud of their work over the
past week. He wanted to know how they installed the solar panels
and what the impact of that power would bring.

“We're investing back here on the ground a whole array of solar
and other renewable energy projects and so to find out that you’re
doing this up at the space station is particularly exciting,” Obama

said.

Obama’s first budget plan released last month moves to shift the
nation from reliance on foreign oil to developing clean-energy
technologies, such as solar and wind power.

Last week at the space station, the final set of solar wings doubled
the amount of power available for science experiments and will help
support a larger crew in a few months, the astronauts said.

tively impact their peers.

“You have been exposed
to many areas such as eti-
quette, personal grooming,
public speaking, health and
hygiene, road safety, spiritual
and moral development,
women’s rights and many
others,” he said.

“These are vital areas
which will advance your
development as positive
young ladies.”

President of the Bahamas
Debutante Foundation Cristi-
na Johnson said the awards
ceremony is the kick-off to
the main event which is the
Debutante Ball slated for
April 4.

“We decided to separate
the two events because it
would have been too long if
we had both at the same
time,” Ms Johnson said.

“Also, many parents had
never been to Government
House, therefore this was also
an opportunity for them to
come here and meet the Gov-
ernor General.”

She explained that
although enrollment in the
programme this year was low-
er than usual due to the
downturn in the economy,
she was pleased with the
number of persons who par-
ticipated.

“We know that the tough
times may have made it diffi-
cult to pay the $250 fee
required for the programme,
however we were happy that
many persons were able to
participate,” she said.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Appeals court upholds
verdict against Iverson

NBA Today

i By The Associated Press

SCOREBOARD

Wednesday, March 25

Boston at Orlando (8 pm
EDT). The Atlantic Division-
leading Celtics have a one-
game lead over Southeast
Division-leading Orlando for
second place in the Eastern
Conference.

STARS

Monday

—Flip Murray, Hawks,
scored a season-best 30 points
as Atlanta won its season-
high eighth straight home
game, beating Minnesota 109-
97

—Dwight Howard, Magic,
had 29 points and 14
rebounds as Orlando beat
New York 106-102.

—Dwyane Wade, Heat,
scored 27 points to top his
own team single-season
record — plus added eight
assists as Miami easily beat
Memphis 94-82.

—Andre Miller, 76ers, had
27 points and 10 rebounds
and scored the go-ahead bas-
ket with 1:56 remaining in
overtime as Philadelphia ral-
lied for a 114-108 win over
Portland.

—Ben Gordon, Bulls,
scored all of his 21 pomts in
the second half — including
seven in the final 3 1/2 min-
utes — to lead Chicago to a
101-99 win at Washington.

SOARING HAWKS

The Atlanta Hawks beat
the Minnesota Timberwolves
109-97 on Monday night to
win their season-high eighth
straight home game. It was
Atlanta’s eighth win in nine
games overall, and the Hawks
are 28-7 at Philips Arena. The
home streak is the longest for
Atlanta since Nov. 12, 1996-
Feb. 12, 1997, when the
Hawks won 20 in row.

MIAMI MILESTONE

Dwyane Wade broke his
own Miami Heat single-sea-
son scoring record Monday,
topping the mark set in the
2005-06 championship season.
Wade’s fourth point against
the Memphis Grizzlies gave
him 2,041 this season, one
more than he managed in 75
games three seasons ago.
Monday was Wade’s 69th
appearance of the season. He
got the record-setter on a
layup with 10 minutes left in
the opening quarter, giving
Miami a 9-0 lead.

COLLAPSING KNICKS
Nate Robinson scored 19
points on just 6-of-23 shooting
for New York, which dropped

its fifth straight, 106-102 to
Orlando, in a late-season col-
lapse after entertaining hopes
of a playoff spot a week ago.
The Knicks honored former
players at halftime, including
Patrick Ewing, Willis Reed,
Bernard King and Walt Fra-
zier, then extended their dis-
mal present by clinching an
eighth straight losing season,
tying a franchise worst.

LOOKING GOOD

Kevin Garnett played 18
minutes, hitting all five field-
goal attempts while scoring 12
points as the Boston Celtics
pulled away for a 90-77 win
over the Los Angeles Clip-
pers on Monday night. He
added two rebounds and two
assists in his third game back
since missing 13 with a
sprained right knee.

SUNS SHINE

Grant Hill hit a 12-foot
jumper in the lane to break a
tie with 58.6 seconds remain-
ing, then added a free throw
with 6.2 seconds left to help
Phoenix extend its season-
high winning streak to five
games in a 118-115 victory
over Denver on Monday
night.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Antawn Jamison had 34
points and 12 rebounds for
Washington, which has lost
five straight after a 101-99 loss
to Chicago on Monday night.
.. Carmelo Anthony led Den-
ver with 29 points in a 118-115
loss at Phoenix, but missed a
3-pointer in the final second.

SPEAKING

“That’s what I do, baby. ’m
Shaq-ovich. We needed them.
TP’'m known that when you
really need them, I’m going to
make them.” — Phoenix’s
Shaquille O’Neal, who played
only 24 minutes because of
foul trouble, had six of his 19
points in the final 5:04, when
he made four of five free
throws in the Suns’ 118-115
win over Denver on Monday
night. O’Neal made seven of
eight free throws in the game.

lm By NEDRA PICKLER
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
NBA star Allen Iverson must
pay $260,000 for standing idly
by and watching his bodyguard
beat up another man in a 2005
bar fight, a federal appeals
court ruled Tuesday.

The U.S. Court of Appeals
for the District of Columbia
Circuit rejected the Detroit
Pistons guard’s attempt to
throw out the verdict decided
by a jury in 2007.

Bar patron Marlin Godfrey
accused Iverson’s bodyguard,
Jason Kane, of punching, kick-
ing and hitting him with a bot-
tle because he refused to
vacate the VIP section at
Washington club Eyebar to
make way for the basketball
star and his entourage. God-
frey suffered a concussion, a
ruptured eardrum, a burst
blood vessel in his eye, a torn

ALLEN IVERSON is seen during a game against the Milwaukee Bucks,

in Auburn Hills, Mich...

(AP Photo: Paul Sancya)

rotator cuff, cuts and bruises,
and emotional injuries.

A three-judge appeals court
panel wrote that Iverson
stayed out of the fray in the
back corner of the VIP area,
standing on a couch or bench
and observing.

“The evidence in this case
supported the jury’s finding
that Kane attacked Godfrey
in a fight that lasted several
minutes, and that Iverson
stood and watched without
attempting to do anything to
stop the beating,” the decision
said.

Godfrey and another
patron, David Anthony Kit-
trell, sued Iverson for $20 mil-
lion, but the jury decided not
to award punitive damages
and only compensate Godfrey
$10,000 for his medical bills
and $250,000 for pain and suf-
fering. The jury did not find
either of the men liable for
assaulting Kittrell.



With 12 games left, no
for Wade to rest

time

@ By TIM REYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer

MIAMI (AP) — Miami’s
Erik Spoelstra has a simple plan
for how he’ll manage a stiff and
sore Dwyane Wade as the Heat
make their playoff push.

“Play him,” the first-year
Heat coach said.

Wade is at the point in the
season where the little aches
and pains are becoming bigger
aches and pains. He’s spending
extra time in the training room,
getting ice baths, even had his
personal trainer Tim Grover
visit from Chicago for a few
days recently to go along with
the daily guidance Wade gets
from the Heat medical staff.

But with 12 games left in a
22-day span starting Wednes-
day night in Indiana — a place
where Wade has never won as a
pro, losing all seven times he’s
taken the court there — there’s
no time for a break.

“Once you start playing, your
adrenaline gets going and every-
thing’s fine,” said Wade, the
league’s leading scorer (29.9
points) and MVP candidate. “I
think it’s the beginning of games
when you've got to get yourself
going. ... | was running all
around the court, I was trying to
make sure we didn’t get lost or
fall asleep with the game going
slow. That makes you all
aware.”

With the Southeast Division
race essentially decided weeks
ago — Orlando can officially
clinch on Wednesday — the
Heat have been left to contend
for the No. 4 playoff spot in the
Eastern Conference.

And in that race, there’s little
room for slippage.

Atlanta (42-29) has control
of the race for the No. 4 seed
and home-court advantage in
the first round, holding a 3 1/2-
game lead over the Heat. The
Hawks have 11 games remain-
ing, meaning Miami has one
game in hand.

Miami (38-32) is 1 1/2 games
ahead of Philadelphia (36-33)
for the No. 6 spot, and three
games up on Detroit (34-35),
which currently holds down the
seventh seed in the East playoff
bracket.

It all means that Spoelstra is
leaving nothing to chance.
That’s one of the reasons why,
even with Miami up by double
digits in the fourth quarter
against lowly Memphis on Mon-
day night, he put Wade back
into the game in the fourth



DWYANE WADE watches the game against the Utah Jazz in the fourth quarter in Miami. (AP Photo: Alan Diaz)

quarter.

“T would have taken those
minutes. I wanted some more
rest,” Wade said. “But I play
with a young team. All year, I
don’t have the luxury of sitting
out fourth quarters. One day,
we will get back to that. But
right now, we’re not there.
We've got to try to get the win.”

Wade missed his first game
of the season last Wednesday
in Boston, after a strained right
hip flexor — that led to some
stiffness in his groin — left him
sidelined. In the four games
before Miami played the
Celtics, Wade logged 50 min-
utes in a double-overtime win
over Chicago, 37 minutes in a
home win over Boston, 52 1/2
minutes in a triple-overtime
epic win over Utah, then 34
minutes the next day in a loss at
Philadelphia.

Without him, the Heat lost
112-108 in overtime to Boston.

The stretch that Wade is on
now represents one of the
longest of his life without an
extended break from competi-
tive basketball.

He was shut down late last
season, as the Heat sputtered
to the worst record in the NBA,
because of knee pain. Wade
began training for last summer’s
Beijing Olympics in May,
played the whole way through

8 British sports to lose
$73m in Olympic funds

LONDON (AP) — Eight British sports will lose $73 million in
funding ahead of the 2012 London Olympics, part of an effort to
concentrate on events with the best chance to medal.

UK Sports says Tuesday that fencing, handball, table tennis,
shooting, volleyball, water polo, weightlifting and wrestling will have
their budgets slashed by more than half.

Britain did not win medals in any of those events at the Beijing

Games.

Shooting will be hardest hit, with a budget cut of 76 percent. UK
Sport says the cuts were needed because of the economic downturn

and a lack of private sponsorship.

late August while helping the
Americans win a gold medal,
then started camp with the Heat
just a couple of weeks later.

His body might need a break,
but if Wade gets his way, he
won’t be getting one for at least
another few weeks.

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“We have to be smart about
it,” Spoelstra said. “...He feels
not 100 percent, probably not
anywhere near it. But as long
as we can maintain that, we’ll
keep on playing him. And it
takes him a while to get loose,
but he’s still explosive.”

..

= ee





ahamas

~~ ae

NFL passes
four player
safety rules

lm By BARRY WILNER
AP Football Writer

DANA POINT, Calif. (AP)
— NFL owners have passed
four player safety rules for next
season. One of them is the elim-
ination of blindside helmet-to-
helmet blocks.

The changes came Tuesday
at the NFL meetings in Califor-
nia.

The new rules state that the
initial force of a blindside block
can’t be delivered by a helmet,
forearm or shoulder to an oppo-
nent’s head or neck. An illegal
blindside block will bring a 15-
yard penalty.

Initial contact to the head of a
defenseless receiver also will
draw a 15-yard penalty.

On kickoffs, no blocking
wedge of more than two players
will be allowed. Also, the kick-
ing team can’t have more than
five players bunched together
pursuing an onside kick.

Pacquiao
2008 fighter
of year by
BWAA vote

NEW YORK (AP) — Man-
ny Pacquiao has been voted
fighter of the year by the Box-
ing Writers Association of
America after a dominating win
over Oscar De La Hoya.

Joe Calzaghe was runner-up,
but voted manager of the year
Tuesday for guiding his own
career. The undefeated former
super middleweight champion
recently retired.

Pacquiao won three times in
2008, highlighted by his stop-
page of De La Hoya. Pacquiao’s
trainer, Freddie Roach, was a
voted trainer of the year, the
third time he has won the
award.

The super batamweight rub-
ber match between Israel
Vazquez and Rafael Marquez
was chosen fight of the year.
Vazquez won the fight by split
decision.

The awards will be presented
at the annual BWAA dinner
June 12 in New York.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Legacy Baseball League
holds opening ceremonies

LEGACY Baseball League
kicked-off its 2009 season at the
beginning of March, but held
its opening ceremonies on
March 21.

It’s president, Steve Burrows,
talked about the tremendous
growth in their girls softball
programme which has expand-
ed to the east and west Grand
Bahama.

He also spoke about their
growth in baseball, which was
evident in capturing two divi-
sions in the BBF Andre
Rodgers National Baseball
Championships in June 2008.

Legacy won the Coach Pitch
Division and the High School
16-18 Division over the three
major power houses in baseball
— Freedom Farm, JBLN &
Grand Bahama.

Present at the opening cere-
monies was August "Auggic"
Campbell (Full Football Schol-
arship to Duke University this
Fall).

Burrows told the children at
the end of his speech, that they
have a role model in Campbell.
“He sat right where you are
many years ago. Through hard
work and dedication you can
be in the same position,” Bur-
rows said.

Burrows also promised the
many parents and supporters
of Legacy that they will be
bringing back home three divi-
sions from the upcoming 2009
National Baseball Champi-
onship.

Also in attendance from the
BBF was president Craig
Kemp, secretary general
Theodore Sweeting and 4th
vice president (Grand Bahama)
Alonzo "Chumpy” Pratt.

Kemp thanked the Legacy
executives for their ongoing
development of baseball on
Grand Bahama and encour-
aged them to continue to build
on their success.

Kemp also presented Legacy
with their 2008 Championship
Diamond Banners (Coach
Division) and High School (16-
18) Division.

Kemp, Sweeting, national
team manager Patrick Knowles
Sr (Team Bahamas 15-16),
coach Alonzo Pratt (Team
Bahamas Men’s National

Team) and Coach Opi Taylor
(Team Bahamas 16-18), con-
ducted try-outs for the young
men in Grand Bahama on
March 22 from 2pm to Spm to
afford them a fair opportunity
to be selected to one of the
national teams traveling this
summer.

Many of the young men had
a great showing and the teams
will definitely have a national
makeup.

The Federation indicated
that they are extremely proud
and excited to advise that 95
per cent of the 16-18 team and
the senior men’s team present-
ly attend high school or college
in the US.

The executive committee and
the coaching staff feel very con-
fident these two teams will do
very well this summer.

In the 15-16 Zone Tourna-
ment, the Bahamas is coming
off a 3rd place finish in 2008.

There are high expectations
for this team as all the mem-
bers have had international
exposure from previous tour-
naments.

National teams traveling this
summer:

TEAM BAHAMAS 16-18

e XII Latin American
Regional Big League Tourna-
ment 2009 June 19-28, Mara-
caibo, Venezuela (Countries
participating: Aruba, Bahamas,
Colombia, Curacao,
Guatemala, Panama, Puerto
Rico, Dominican Republic,
USVI and Venezuela)

TEAM BAHAMAS 15-16

PONY Caribbean Zone
Championship July 6-12, Guar-
bo, Puerto Rico (Countries par-
ticipating: Bahamas, Domini-
can Republic, Panama, USVI,
Puerto Rico)

TEAM BAHAMAS Men’s
National Team

World Baseball Challenge,
July 16-26, Prince George,
Canada (Countries: Team
Bahamas, Team Canada, Team
Croatia, Chinese Taipei, Ger-
many Team USA, Professional
Teams: Reno Astros & Host
Prince George Axemen)

Slowey pitches five sharp
innings, has three RBIs

JUPITER, Fla. (AP) —
Twins right-hander Kevin
Slowey was dominant on the
mound Tuesday, and he
looked pretty good as a batter,
too.

Slowey pitched five effec-
tive innings and helped his
cause with two hits and three
RBIs, leading the Minnesota
Twins to an 8-1 victory over
the Florida Marlins.

“It was pretty comedic to
them that I walk up there and
swing and the ball finds the
grass somewhere,” Slowey
said after going 2-for-2 with a
double.

Slowey, who allowed a run
and two hits while striking out
five, had a bases-loaded sin-
gle in the first inning off right-
hander Chris Volstad and then
ripped a double to left in the
third to score two more runs.

“That was pretty crazy. He
doesn’t even hit in the regular
season,” Volstad said.

Slowey, who had two hits in
eight at-bats last year, had no
explanation for his offensive
prowess.

“The first couple of weeks
of camp we bunt and swing in
the cages,” he said. “You kind
of leave that to the guys who
get paid to doit.”

But Slowey, the Twins’ No.
3 starter, was most happy
about throwing 48 of his 66
pitches for strikes. He has
allowed just one walk in 14 1-
3 innings this spring.

“T don’t like walking guys,”
said Slowey, who allowed 24
walks in 160 1-3 innings last

KEVIN SLOWEY takes a warm-up toss during the spring training
\game against the Florida Marlins in Jupiter, Fla. Tuesday...

year while going 12-11 with a
3.99 ERA. “When it gets to
2-0 or 3-1, Ineed to be able to
make a good pitch. It’s got to
be a strike. So far it has
worked out.”

Volstad had his roughest
outing of the spring, allowing
four runs — three earned — in
four innings. He also walked
three batters after walking just
two in 18 innings coming in.

“He’s human,” manager
Fredi Gonzalez said. “He was
not as sharp as he has been in

(AP Photo: Richard Drew)

the past but those things hap-
pen in spring training. He’s
got a couple of more outings.
We'll get him back on track.”

Dan Uggla homered for the
Marlins, his fourth this spring.

Notes: The Marlins
optioned right-hander Ryan
Tucker to Triple-A New
Orleans.

The Marlins are off
Wednesday but left-hander
Andrew Miller will start in a
minor league game against the
Cardinals.



Cycling series to continue today

THE New Providence
Cycling Association is sched-
uled to continue its Wednes-
day afternoon series today at
6:30pm at the one-mile nation-
al track at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex.

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at Jaws Beach, the ‘Unknown

















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Classic’ race is set to take
place. The event is open to all
competitors and there is a reg-
istration fee.

On Sunday back at Baillou
Hills, the track series is slated
to kick off starting at 4 pm.
There will be a one-lap timed
trial, two-lap sprint race and

a 15-lap race.

The Wednesday evening
track series will conclude at
the end of April. The awards
presentation will be held 5pm
May 3 at Workers House.
Awards for outstanding
cyclists in 2008 will also be pre-
sented.

Brazil striker Robinho
wants Pele apology

MANCHESTER, England
(AP) — Robinho is demanding
a retraction and apology after
Pele said the Brazilian striker
had a drug problem.

Robinho, who plays for Man-
chester City in the Premier
League, threatens legal action if
the soccer great does not com-
ply. Pele also implicated Ronal-
do, another Brazilian star, in his
comments to a Brazilian radio
station last week.

“A formal retraction from
Pele will be requested, if what
he said was not misinterpreted
by the media that published it,”
according to a statement on
Robinho’s Web site Tuesday.
“And if Pele does not come for-
ward, he will have to deal with
his very unfortunate comment
in court.”

Guilhereme Prado, a
spokesman for Ronaldo’s
Brazilian club, Corinthians, said
the veteran striker had no com-
ment.

Pele’s remarks appeared to
suggest that any transgression
was in the past.

“It’s unfair to talk of drugs in
football just because of one or

Robinho (

two cases, as happened with
Ronaldo and Robinho, who had
that problem,” Pele said.

Pele helped Brazil win three
World Cups before retiring in
1977. Since then, he has done
promotional work for a credit
card company and Viagra.

“Robinho is upset and disap-
pointed at Pele, who seems to
have forgotten the great idol he
was,” the Web site statement
added. “It appears Pele must
be reading sensationalist
(media) to come up with such a
wrongful statement.”



UEFA looks

at luxury tax
to cur teams’
spending

m@ By JAN M OLSEN
Associated Press
Writer

COPENHAGEN (AP)
— European soccer’s gov-
erning body has looked at
Major League Baseball’s
luxury tax policy for inspira-
tion as it seeks to control
spending.

“The devil is in adapting
these rules to a European
context,” UEFA
spokesman William Gail-
lard said Tuesday in a tele-
phone interview with The
Associated Press.

The MLB system works
by taxing free-spending
clubs on all they spend
above a set payroll. If the
luxury tax idea found favor,
big spending soccer clubs
would have to pay their tax
before being allowed to
play in the Champions
League and the second-tier
UEFA Cup, renamed the
Europa League next sea-
son.

The Union of European
Football Associations also
has looked at salary caps
and player drafts, which
works in the fixed nature of
American sports leagues
but not the pyramid struc-
ture of European soccer,
where the bottom teams are
relegated to a lower division
and top minor league clubs
are promoted.

“T don’t think a luxury tax
should be treated any more
seriously than some of the
things that have been pro-
posed over the last month,”
Chelsea chief executive
Peter Kenyon said at a news
conference in New York to
announce his club’s summer
USS. tour. “We believe as
clubs and as the European
club association (that)
financing of clubs are issues
for clubs and that governing
bodies should again concen-
trate very much on the
organization structures and
the licensing structures they
are currently implement-
ing.”

AC Milan organizing
director Umberto Gandini,
sitting next to Kenyon,
echoed that view.

“UEFA and the clubs are
looking at other experi-
ences and, obviously, you
are very familiar with the
system you have in the
American sports, salary
caps and collective bargain-
ing agreement situations,
and we will look at that,” he
said. “Clubs have to look
around themselves and find
the right way to control the
spiraling costs. ... There is a
debate inside and outside
the organization. And we
are sure we are going to get
to a common understanding
when the right problems
will be targeted.”

UEFA is determined to
reform the business side of
football’s elite clubs in its
campaign for “financial fair
play.” It fears that clubs are
running up excessive debts
to chase success in the
Champions League.

© Associated Press Writer
Graham Dunbar in Geneva
and AP Sports Writer
Ronald Blum in New York
contributed to this report

FIFA and UEFA reject
WADA drug-testing rule

@ By JAN M OLSEN
Associated Press Writer

COPENHAGEN (AP) —
Tension escalated Tuesday
between the soccer’s most pow-
erful bodies and the World
Anti-Doping Agency in a dis-
pute over out-of-competition
drug testing.

FIFA and the Union of
European Football Associa-
tions called on WADA to
reconsider its whereabouts rule,
which took effect Jan. 1 and
requires elite-level athletes in
registered testing pools to give
drug-testers three months’
notice of their location for one
hour each day.

WADA director general
David Howman said the rule

could not be negotiated until
the end of the year and foot-
ball would have to fall into line.

“The rules are in place and if
you don’t follow the rules then,
of course, we have to report
that information to our board,”
Howman told The Associated
Press in a telephone interview.

FIFA and UEFA say there
are “fundamental differences”
between individual athletes and
players or teams. FIFA and
UEFA said they “do not accept
that controls be undertaken
during the short holiday period
of players, in order to respect
their private life.”

The confrontational state-
ment came four days after
FIFA president Sepp Blatter
insisted that soccer should not

be held to the strictest stan-
dards of the new code.

“T don’t understand or com-
prehend the criticism,” How-
man said. “Other team sports
have got whereabouts systems
in place and it seems to be
working. I would hope that our
constructive partnership with
FIFA will endure and they will
sit down with us and talk it
through.”

In Belgium, 65 athletes have
started court proceedings
against the new out-of-compe-
tition testing rule, citing the
European Convention on
Human Rights.

e Associated Press Writer
Graham Dunbar in Geneva
contributed to this report
THE TRIBUNE

Spor

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25,

PAGE 11



ts

2009

wy

Ae



Bia

Key hoping to

Shine on international circuit

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

wo years ago, she

earned her profes-

sional status as the

overall female cham-
pion at the Central American and
Caribbean Bodybuilding & Fit-
ness Championships.

But like big Joel Stubbs, who
got his status in 2004, Gena
Mackey is hoping that this will
be the year that they both shine
on the international bodybuilding
circuit.

While Stubbs has enjoyed a
great deal of success, including
getting splashed across a number
of magazines as he gains a lot
attention for his huge back poses,
Mackey is just getting into the
flow of things.

“Tve been training hard and
getting ready for my first inter-
national show in August,” said
Mackey, as she viewed the
Bahamas Powerlifting Federa-
tion’s National Powerlifting
Championships on Saturday at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
with Stubbs.

From August 14-15, Mackey is
scheduled to be competing at the
Europa Super Show Sports and
Supplement Expo Champi-
onships. Immediately after that
show, Mackey is slated to travel
to Austin, Texas, to compete in
September.

“Tm going to be ready this
year,” Mackey said. “I want to
take that seventh down to at least
a third or a fourth place. One
way or the other, I will work my
butt off this year.”

Since making the transition
from an amateur pro, Mackey
said she has had to go through
the growing pains, but she has
made the adjustment and now
she feels she’s ready to step up
the ladder.

“T just needed more definition
and cuts in my legs. That was my
weaknesses last year,” she said.
“Everything else was right in
place. That was what threw me
off.”

Not too disappointed in her
performances, Mackey said she
went back to the drawing board,
training with Stubbs and she’s
now focused on rebuilding all
over again.

At this time, the former soc-
cer player turned bodybuilder,
said she’s pleased with where
she’s at in her training and she’s
confident that she will be a com-
petitor to watch this year.

Already developing a name for
himself, Stubbs competed in the
Atlantic City Bodybuilding
Championships last year where
he was fifth in the men’s open,
just missing the qualification for
Mr Olympia by one spot.

‘Douggie’

m By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THERB’S a popular phrase
coined by Roman author & his-
torian Titus Livius that says:
“Better late than never.”

Although honoured by having
the softball park renamed after
him by the Bahamas Govern-
ment a couple years ago, Dudley
‘Douggie’ Smith said he will not
be happy until he sees it in print.

During the homecoming cel-
ebrations over the Easter holi-
day weekend, a local self-help
committee in Eleuthera, headed
by Betty Taylor-Sands, is hop-
ing to finally erect the official
sign that will bear the name of
the Dudley ‘Douggie’ Smith
Softball Park.

“One of the problems we had
was our (softball) organisation
is not as functional as it should
be,” said Ronnie Horton, one of
the persons who is working dili-
gently to make the sign a reality.

“We built the park and did a
lot of things to it until it was
named in honour of Douggie.
Then we took a step back. We
didn’t do anything since. We put
up a sign that says softball park,
but we never got it done official-

ly.”



JOEL STUBBS & GENA MACKEY (right) are hoping that 2009 will be the year when they both shine on the inter-
national bodybuilding circuit...

This year, Stubbs has vowed
to use the experience to his
advantage.

“The judges were able to
encourage me to keep doing
what I’m doing because they see
too that my time is here,” Stubbs
said.

“T figure in every sport you
have to pay your dues. I think
I’ve paid my dues, so it’s time for
Bahamians to watch a Mr
Olympia Show or watch a top
notch show and see Joel Stubbs
on stage representing the
Bahamas.”

Stubbs, a Bahamasair pilot by
profession, was hoping to open

his season by representing the
Bahamas at the New York Men’s
Professional Championships in
New York on May 16, but he’s
not sure if he will make the trip.

“T recently had the flu and asa
result of that, I was bed-ridden
for two weeks and my weight and
size went down,” he said. “Right
now I’m trying to eat myself back
up to my regular competing size
again.

“T’ve already resumed my
training regimen. The deadline
to register is the last week in
April. Providing all goes well by
the end of April, I will put the
contract in and represent my

country.”

The former basketball player
said if he doesn’t make the trip to
New York, he will definitely com-
pete in a series of events that will
prepare him for another shot at
Mr Olympia.

From August 7-8, he will com-
pete in the Tampa Men’s Pro
from August 7-8; the Europa
Super Show Sports and Supple-
ment Expo Championships from
August 14-15; the Houston Men’s
Pro on August 22 and the
Atlantic City Men’s Pro Show in
New Jersey from September 11-
12.

As an incentive, Stubbs is also

featured regularly in both Muscle
Magazine and the Muscle Asy-
lum Project. In the magazine,
Stubbs is featured in each edi-
tion with his own column pro-
viding tips on how to get fit.

He serves as a spokesman for
Muscle Asylum Project, which
enables Stubbs to further expose
the Bahamas on the internation-
al scene.

Talking about the scene,
Stubbs said he was quite
impressed with what he saw from
the new competitors who came
out to compete in the National
Powerlifting Championships on
Saturday.

But he advised athletes that
powerlifting is definitely the best
training background that they can
all take advantage of to improve
their skills.

Mackey, on the other hand,
said she was hoping to see a lot
more women participating as
there are a lot of them working
out in the gym.

But of course, she noted that
she didn’t expect to see her
replacement just yet because she
left an awesome work ethic
behind in the amateur ranks.

Smith softball park sign to make it official

Horton, a local businessman
and close friend of Smith, said
they have been building a con-
crete base and Taylor-Sands has
been working on getting the
name printed on the sign that
will be mounted for all to see.

“It’s all voluntary work,” he
said. “In fact, Douggie should-
n’t be doing any work, but he’s
right there with us everyday
helping out. It’s a small compact
community, so we’re just trying
to get it done.”

This weekend, Horton said
they are trying to finalise all of
the details for the ceremony that
will take place during the home-
coming celebrations.

Smith, a Bahamas National
and International Softball Fed-
eration Hall of Famer, said it’s
good to finally see that his name
is going to be placed on the sta-
dium.

“It makes you feel great,” he
said. “They always say it’s better
late than never, so I think this is
the appropriate time. It’s a good
time for it because a lot of people
will see it when they come home
for the homecoming.”

In addition to Taylor-Sands
and Horton, Smith said he’s
thankful to persons like Leo
McSweeney, the local govern-
ment board and a number of oth-

er persons who have chipped in
to help out.

In his retirement years, Smith
said he doesn’t have anything to
look forward to. But he said
everytime he passes the stadium,
which is not too far from his res-
idence, he will always be able to
share a smile when he looks at
his name on the sign.

“T think I will have to pinch
myself too and say ‘look what
you have accomplished,’” he
chuckled. “Growing up as a little
boy, you never thought in your
wildest dream that something
like this would happen to you, a
poor little fellow coming out of
the community.”

For 38 years, Smith had one
of the most illustrious careers as
a softball/baseball player com-
ing from the Family Islands.
Having gotten started in 1960,
Smith played through 1998.

During that time, he also
played in the New York Mets
Farm System in the Major
League in the 1970/71 season. A
jammed shoulder injury and a
broken finger prevented him
from playing beyond that peri-
od.

“The week I was going to
Double A, we were playing in
Covington, Virginia and I was
on second base and the coach on

third base was telling me ‘you’re
all right, you’re all right’ as I took
a big lead,” Smith recalled.

“But the pitcher picked me off
as I tried to get back to second
base and I jammed my shoulder
and broke my finger.”

On his return home, Smith
began playing on the national
softball team. His first year was
in 1972 and he played up until
1998, mostly as a player.

In 1980, Smith said he enjoyed
his fondest memory when the
Bahamas played in a 19-inning
game in Tacoma, Washington,
against New Zealand. He was
the catcher for ace Richard ‘the
Lion-Heart’ Johnson.

“In the 15th inning, the Lion-
Heart threw a pitch outside and
I blocked it with my chest and
kept the runner on base. We
went on to win the game and I
got a three minute standing ova-
tion,” Smith reflected.

The Bahamas, managed by
Sidney ‘Bobby Baylor’ Fernan-
der, went on to win the game 2-1.

Looking back at his career,
Smith said he’s pleased with
what he has been able to accom-
plish. But he indicated that he’s
even more enthused about what
is ahead of him with his name
finally going up on the stadium in
his homeland.

Appeals court
upholds
verdict

against Al...
See page 9





BAHAMIANS AT
HURRICANE
INVITATIONAL

A NUMBER of Bahamian
athletes competed this past
weekend in the Hurricanes Invi-
tational at the University of Mia-
mi in Coral Gables, but their
results were not posted in Mon-
day’s edition of Tribune Sports.
Here’s a look at their perfor-
mances:

e JVente Deveaux, compet-
ing unattached, turned in the
best performance as he won the
men’s triple jump with a leap of
49-feet, 7 1/4-inches.

¢ In the men’s 100m, Derek
Carey, competing for the
Bahamas, was fifth in 10.93 sec-
onds, while Wayne Major, com-
peting unattached, was 11th in
11.03.

¢ In the 200, Brandon Miller,
competing unattached, was 12th
in 21.91 after he finished third
in the third of five heats. Also
in his heat was Major, who got
fourth in 22.86 for 27th overall.
Miller picked up a third place
finish in the men’s 400 in 48.39
after he won the second of six
heats.

¢ Douglas Bell, unattached,
was 16th in 50.43;

¢ Demetrius Emmanuel, rep-
resenting the Bahamas, was 25th
in 52.49 and

¢ Tino Thompson, unattached,
was 34th in 54.99.

¢ Kenneth Wallace-Whitfield,
competing unattached, was sixth
in the men’s 800 in 1:58.19, fol-
lowed closely behind by Thomp-
son in 1:58.33. Emmanuel did not
finish the race.

¢ In the 400 hurdles, Kayuse
Burrows, representing the
Bahamas, ran 54.81 for fifth
place.

NPBA PLAYOFFS

THE New Providence Bas-
ketball Association opened its
best-of-five semifinal playoff on
Monday night at the CI Gibson
Gymnasium. The defending
champions Commonwealth
Bank Giants and runners-up
Electro Telecom Cybots took
leads in their respective series.

The Giants came out with a
slim 92-91 decision over the
Police Crimestoppers. Jeremy
Hutchinson had a game high 30,
Mark Hanna added 20 and
Michael ‘Ferley’ Bain chipped in
with 16.

For the Crimestoppers,
Valentino Richardson had 23,
Terrance Brown had 19 and Ver-
non Stubbs contributed 10.

In an intense battle that
extended to who had the most
fans in the stands, Brian Baker
had a game high 30 and Nelson
‘Mandella’ Joseph added 24 as
the Cybots pulled off a 107-102
victory over the Sunshine Auto
Ruff Ryders.

In a losing effort, Kevin Smith
had 26 and Kristano Johnson
added 24. Game two of both
series will be played tonight at
CI Gibson.

MASTERS TRACK MEET

THE Masters Softball Asso-
ciation, headed by Foster
Dorsett, is scheduled to hold a
meeting tonight in the confer-
ence room of the Ministry of
Education on Thompson Boule-
vard at 7pm. All members and
those former athletes who wish
to become a member of the asso-
ciation, are invited.

UR a
ae eel
Te Pela

ey


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Britain's proposed plan to suspend the executive
and legislative branches of the Turks and Caicos
Government as the best thing it can do to correct
the problems plaguing the small British overseas
territory.

During any subsequent talks with the two parties,
CARICOM and the Bahamas, should work to
ensure that Turks and Caicos (TCI) has some say in
the day-to-day running of the country, he said. He
also suggested that the Bahamas offer to help craft
stricter legislation for TCI, that would allow it to
govern itself more effectively once the proposed
suspension period ends.

"The Turks and Caicos is still a dependent and
Britain has the power to suspend (TCI's) Consti-
tution to do what it feels is right in order to set right
what they see as being wrong in the colony, because
for the rest of the world if anything goes wrong in
Turks and Caicos, they see Britain as being respon-
sible.

"What the Bahamas and CARICOM can dois to
one, intercede on behalf of the people of Turks so
that the period of suspension can be as short as
possible, and offer to assist Britain to come up
with the kinds of procedures that would be neces-
sary to allow the colony to regain its government.
And I think the people of Turks need to also have
a say in what their future relationship will be like
with Britain,” said Mr Archer during an interview
with The Tribune yesterday.

Britain's announcement came after an interim
Commission of Inquiry report on the British Over-
seas Territory found a "high probability” of cor-

FROM page one

was hoping for a massive demon-

Protesters

Former CARICOM Ambassatior
expects ‘damaging’ final
Commission of Inquiry report |

ruption among the upper echelons of the govern- }
ment. i

The move would suspend the executive and leg- }
islative branches of the TCI Government and allow ;
British Governor Gordon Wetherell to run the :
day-to-day affairs of the country for two years. Itis
expected to come into effect once the British pre- }
sent their final report on the inquiry — probably by }
April 30. i

"We haven't seen the final report, but if what }
we're hearing from the interim report is what's in
the final report means (there are) serious prob- }
lems in Turks and Caicos. While simply getting rid :
of one party, or the premier might be temporary
solution there are other deep seated problems that }
need to be taken care of ...In the past they haven't :
been interested in independence but maybe this i
episode will give them a change of heart, but they
need new policies so they don't fall into the same
situation," said Mr Archer. :

In a release issued yesterday, the new leader of i
TCI's governing party Premier Galmo Williams
criticised Britain's decision, saying it was not the }
best move for TCI. i

He acknowledged the recommendations in the i
interim report, which exposed "weaknesses" in the
administration, but said these should be remedied }
with new legislation and scrutiny by TCI's :
government with oversight from Britain, not direct i
rule. i

to go along and ‘secure the }
beaches for the future genera- }
tions’. i

He said: “Bahamians in Nas-

FROM page one

the latest survey of its kind — 81 per cent of visitors to
“the Bahamas overall” say they would be “likely” to
return, while a lower 50.7 per cent say they would be
“very likely” to come back to the islands.

Meanwhile, only seven per cent of the 9,009 visitors
who completed the survey told the Ministry that they
believed it “not at all likely” that they would revisit
the Bahamas in the following one to five years.

Intent to revisit the Bahamas was highest among vis-
itors to the Out Islands in 2007, 67 per cent of whom said
they would be “very likely” to come back, while a tiny
two per cent said that it was “not at all likely.”

This corresponded with another disclosure — that the
Out Islands rated better than Nassau/New Providence
and Grand Bahama in the minds of stopover visitors
when it came to all important elements such as hotel
rooms, food in hotels, beaches, climate and attitudes.

While these seemingly high “likely to return” fig-
ures would appear an encouraging sign during an indus-
try downturn, Minister of Tourism Vincent Vander-
pool Wallace was not gloating yesterday.

FROM page one

people out there who have it and
are unaware they have been taking

Medication

Minister on figures

In reality, “the sustainability of high levels of return
based on experience and references doesn’t begin to
happen until you reach around somewhere in the mid-
90s (per cent),” he explained.

“So (at 81 per cent) you’re nowhere near where
you need to be in order to get the kind of level of auto-
matic returns based on experience and recommenda-
tions.”

Presenting the Ministry of Tourism’s new strategic
direction last year, Mr Vanderpool Wallace committed
the ministry to making much better use of data gathered
from tourists via tools such as the exit surveys, which
seek to discover the nature of visitors’ stay, their demo-
graphic characteristics, their level of satisfaction and
their expenditure while in The Bahamas.

Such tools allow the Ministry to determine whether
it is getting closer to its stated aim of giving visitors a
“delightful experience” that compels them to go home
and tell others that “it’s better in The Bahamas.”

Trends revealed in the surveys now also factor direct-
ly into how funding is allocated in the ministry.

Health and the Department of
Public Health also wish to inform
the public that the recruitment of

stration, but Atlantis security
staff guarding the beach in front
of the exclusive Cove resort with
its private residences, hotel
rooms, swimming pools and
beach cabanas, told The Tribune
they had seen no sign of protest-
ers yesterday morning.

One security guard said: “The
law is that they can come to the

=

high water mark, so my concern
is anything above the high water
mark, which is private property.
“And we have security out
here every day, so no-one will
go past the high water mark.”
Paul Rolle has scheduled three
further events at Cove Beach
throughout the year and has
invited all ‘patriotic’ Bahamians

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sau especially are facing dis- ;
placement, chaos and lack of }
recreation and family activities :
as foreign ‘exclusive’ investments }
continue to rob us of our }

birthrights.

“No way is this more evident :
than at our public beaches that }
have been ‘strong armed’ away }

from us by some resorts.”

WYNDHAM WASSAU RESORT
CABLE BEACH



it.

“Tt is the Ministry of Health’s
mandate to provide quality health-
care for the citizens of this country,
but giving diabetics expired insulin
isn’t quality healthcare,” she said.

Health authorities maintain pre-
liminary investigations prove there
are adequate supplies of several
types of insulin in stock at the Eliz-
abeth Estates Clinic pharmacy, and
the earliest expiration date of these
medicines is October 2009, while
most expire in 2010 or 2011.

But the investigation has yet to
prove how pharmacists at the Eliz-
abeth Estates Clinic could have
given the 44-year-old insulin which
had expired over a year ago, and
possibly administered it to hun-
dreds of other diabetics.

A spokesman for the Ministry
of Health and Department of Pub-
lic Health said the Ministry is doing
a number of things to help achieve
its mandate to deliver quality
healthcare and provide access to
appropriate medication for all.

He said: “The Ministry of

five additional pharmacists is being
aggressively pursued.

“Tt is expected that they will be
in post by early May 2009, to fur-
ther improve access to and the
dispensing of pharmaceutical sup-
plies within the Community Clin-
Ics.

“This and the recent upgrade of
service delivery at the Princess
Margaret Hospital Pharmacy are
among the initiatives ensuring the
Bahamian public continues to
receive the highest quality of
healthcare service.”

FROM page one

any business standard is more than acceptable, he
said.

However, after agreeing to take the nomination
for the PLP, Mr Ritchie said he was informed that
“FNM operatives in the Ministry of Finance” would
use his company’s outstanding balance with Customs
to attack him.

Indeed, Mr Ritchie said, it was only a few days lat-
er when he was issued a letter — not from the Comp-
troller of Customs but from a previously unknown
employee — who demanded full and immediate pay-
ment.

“As the company did not have the resources to
meet this demand it relied upon its bank, First
Caribbean International Bank (FCIB), to continue
allowing its overdraft facility to go as high as $5 million
and issued cheques based on this.

“Without notice in mid-2007 the bank, which holds
well over $200 million in assets as security, suddenly
hardened its policy and returned hundreds of cheques.
The majority of these were replaced within a short
period of time with certified cheques,” he said.

In addition, Mr Ritchie said the Ministry of Finance
had Customs put GUL on a cash basis and demanded
“payment in advance for all services.”

“This severely damaged the company’s cash flow
and caused it to fall behind in its payment to other ven-

Global United CEO

dors who then also demanded cash in advance. In
addition to causing a great loss of business, in the lat-
er part of 2008, these events led to the company falling
behind in its payments to the bank,” he said.

Over the past 18 months, Mr Ritchie said GUL
made several offers to settle its outstanding bill with
Customs — all of which were rejected, first by the
same previously unknown employee of the Public
Treasury and then by the Comptroller of Customs.

“Instead the Minister of Finance initiated legal pro-
ceedings and appeared bent on following these
through to the end no matter what. Instead of wasting
time fighting the lawsuits, the company continued to
search for ways to arrange payments to the govern-
ment in order to settle the outstanding fees.

“Tt is to be noted that if the government had con-
tinued to allow GUL to operate as was the estab-
lished practice, the current situation would never have
arisen and once it did occur, had they accepted one of
the earlier payment plans offered, the balance would
have already been significantly paid down,” he said.

However, as previously stated, Mr Ritchie insists
that instead of working with the company to keep it
afloat, the government, more particularly the prime
minister, “has a totally different agenda than collect-
ing public funds.”

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FROM page one

Justice Lyons had eventually
recused himself from the case,
which involved the distribution of
funds between business partners,
on the basis that he did not have
time to hear the matter.

However, attorneys involved in
the case told Justice Allen that Jus-
tice Lyons had “literally forced”
the appointment of the accountant
on them.

They said that Justice Lyons
“threatened” to walk out of court
if they did not agree to the appoint-
ment.

Justice Allen has ordered the
names of the litigants in the case
sealed.

“The transcript of October 11,
2007 is replete with references to
the judge threatening to leave the
case if the appointment (of the
accountant) was not agreed and at
one point got up to leave when
counsel begged him to have a seat.
The judge was asked by counsel if
it was an ultimatum to which he
responded ‘you bet it is’,” Justice
Allen said in the judgment.

According to the judgment, on
the first day of the hearing, the
accountant was asked and denied
that he had a social relationship
with Senior Justice Lyons.

Then, on the second day of
cross-examination, he was asked
whether a relative of his had any
relationship with Senior Justice
Lyons to which he responded that
“he didn’t get into his sister’s busi-
ness but he knew that she and the

Judge's conduct

judge were friends.”

“Tt was only then that I made
the connection between the
accountant and information which
was in the public domain for some
time, that the judge had more than
a friendship with a woman who up
to that point I did not know was
the accountant’s sister,” Justice
Allen stated in the ruling.

In an attempt to ensure trans-
parency in her conduct as a judicial
officer and as the judge who was to
determine whether the accoun-
tant’s report should be approved,
Justice Allen said she informed
counsel that she was aware of this
information.

The ruling, which the Justice
delivered yesterday, was in rela-
tion to a request by lawyers for
one of the litigants that Justice
Allen recuse herself from the case
because of her knowledge of Jus-
tice Lyon’s relationship with the
accountant’s sister, which might
have prejudiced her judgment as to
whether the accountant’s report
would have been valid.

The findings of Mr Ferguson’s
report is being disputed by parties
and is now the subject of a hearing
before Justice Allen.

“Counsel informed me that they
were also aware of the informa-
tion and had brought up the issue
between them before the appoint-
ment of the accountant but did not
raise it with the judge,” Justice

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Allen said.

She said that counsel for one of
the litigants asserted at the hearing
of the application for her recusal,
that because the other lawyer did
not object to the appointment of
Daniel Ferguson, he waived his
right to object now.

“(Council for A) maintained
that he had not raised the issue
because Justice Lyons had literal-
ly forced the appointment on them,
threatening to walk out of court if
they did not agree to the appoint-
ment,” Justice Allen said.

She further noted that during
the hearing before her, the accoun-
tant admitted that he had only
“gathered documents and put
them into piles and did not exam-
ine them to see what was missing
from his second interim report and
that his only attempt to identify
them was in the final report.

“He also admitted that he did
not identify which of the missing
documents was relevant to the cal-
culation of the balancing payment.
He also agreed that he had made
no effort to compel the produc-
tion of any missing documents by
reference to the court.”

Justice Allen noted in her judg-
ment that she had expressed to
counsel her concerns about the
appointment of the accountant and
the integrity of the report. She also
noted that she had inquired
whether given the circumstances
and in the interest of time, counsel
would be minded to make any con-
cessions in relation to the report.

“T said further that if there were
no concessions regarding the
report I was minded to dispense
with hearing, the evidence of the
parties and their experts on the
issue of the approval of the report
as I had previously directed and
seek to complete just the cross-
examination of the accountant by
the parties and then determine
whether to approve the report,”
Justice Allen stated in the judg-
ment.

Senior Justice Allen ruled yes-
terday against an application for
her to recuse herself from the hear-
ing.

“Having ascertained all of the
circumstances which have bearing
on the suggestion that I am biased,
and having asked myself whether a
fair minded observer informed of
all the circumstances would con-
clude that there was a real possi-
bility that I was biased, the
resounding reply is no. I have no
doubt that I can objectively decide
the issue before me,” Senior Jus-
tice Allen stated.

Alan Stenfield, QC, along with
Michael Scott, represents client A,
Anthony deGarr Robinson, QC,
along with Randol Dorsett, repre-
sents client B, attorney Brian
Moree represents client C, while
Nicholas Lavender, QC, along with
attorney Wayne Munroe, repre-
sents client D. The identities of
the parties involved were not dis-
closed.


‘Stand-out’ project t

THE TRIBUNE

usine

WEDNESDAY,

MARCH 25,



2009

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net



invest further $200m

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he mothballing of
numerous major
Caribbean-based
resort developments
will “make Albany and the
Bahamas stand out even more”,
the development’s managing part-
ner told Tribune Business yester-
day, with a further $200 million
set to be spend on the project’s
first phase between now and its
planned summer 2010 opening.
Christopher Anand said a silver
lining to the current global finan-
cial crisis, which had dried up
debt financing and pre-sales for



CHRISTOPHER ANAND

Likely Morton sale
hits Inagua rebuild

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A DECISION on whether to
fully rebuild Morton Salt’s Inagua
facility has been delayed due to
the impending sale of the com-
pany’s ultimate parent, Tribune
Business has been told, with the
buyer already planning to sell the
Bahamian company as part of a
potential $1.5 billion deal.

Morton Salt’s ultimate parent,
US-based Rohm & Haas, had
been due to decide on whether
to invest a multi-million dollar
sum in rebuilding the Inagua
operation by the 2009 first quarter
end, but the latter’s spokesman,
George Bochanski, told Tribune

Business that “things have got a
little bit more cloudy than they
have been in the past”.

Explaining that no decision had
been taken, Mr Bochanski added:
“Lately, Dow has been talking
about a possible sale of Morton.
Until all that gets sorted out, I
don’t expect Morton manage-
ment will make a decision any
time soon.

“It’s really going to be up to
Dow to determine the future of
the whole business. I wouldn’t
certainly expect anything new
until the deal between Dow and
Rohm & Haas closes. There
won’t be any information com-

SEE page 3B

Benefit scheme raises tax
and bureaucracy fear

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s pro-
posed unemployment benefit
will burden the Bahamian busi-
ness community with more
bureaucracy and taxes at a time
when it can least afford it, one
executive said yesterday, and
force all companies to change
their computer payroll systems.

Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor
Company’s (NMC) operations
manager, who is also a senior
executive with the Nassau Insti-
tute think-tank, told Tribune
Business he was concerned that
the proposed unemployment
benefit scheme would, in con-
junction with the growing
national debt, rising fiscal deficit
and the National Insurance
Board’s (NIB) projected short-


























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

falls, increasingly burden future
Bahamian generations.

Tribune Business has
obtained a copy of the proposed
amendments to the National
Insurance Act, and its accom-
panying Benefits and Assistance
Regulations, which indicate the
unemployment benefit scheme
and its attendant reforms are
more wide-ranging than previ-
ously revealed.

For instance, workers who
are “kept on short-time” and
suffer a loss of employment
earnings - meaning workers
working a reduced work week -
where their income is reduced
to less than half their average
insurable weekly earnings, will
receive unemployment benefit.

And when employers termi-
nate an employee’s service, they
will expose themselves to a $500
fine and summary conviction if
they fail to complete the appro-
priate NIB-approved form, or
fail to give it to the employee of
send it to the Board within one
week of the termination date.

Any continuing failure to
comply will result in the
employer incurring a $200 per
day fine for each day the
form(s) are outstanding.

“T think that the last thing we
need is to set up a system that
drags the country down in the
future, as it has done in other
countries with welfare systems,”
Mr Lowe told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“Already, you’ve got to
change your computer system.
There are more forms, and if
you don’t fill in that form it’s a
$200 per day fine.”

Among those eligible for the
Government’s proposed unem-

SEE page 2B

* Albany developers target summer 2010 opening for first phase

* Working to close $200m worth of real estate sales, and
hoping to seamlessly move into $400-$500m worth of
Marina Residences construction once pre-sales targets hit

* Some 20-30 firms working on construction, and several
hundred workers, 90% of whom are Bahamian

many planned Caribbean mixed-
use resort developments, was that
it “rationalised” development in
the region and curbed a poten-
tial product oversupply - some-
thing that will benefit well-
financed projects such as Albany.

“We have become aware of 27
projects, pretty major projects,

that have been pulled or can-
celled in the Caribbean and Mex-
ico over the last 12 months,” Mr
Anand told Tribune Business.
“Only the absolute strongest will
survive, and we are lucky to be in
the situation we are in.

SEE page 3B

Miami firm is ‘optimistic’
on Bahamas realty sales

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Former US senator
said to be behind
A MIAMI-based marketing com- Paradise Is Mine
pany advertising land for sale in
Rum Cay told Tribune Business yesterday that it was “optimistic”
about the success of its South Beach-based business called Paradise is
Mine, which is thought to be connected to former US senator, Billy

Wayne Davis.

Lawrence Fowler, a Paradise Is Mine spokesman, told this newspa-
per that his marketing company “markets for land in the Bahamas”.

This comes as Bahamian real estate is being lauded as a “gold mine”
and touted for defying market odds by resisting devaluation, while the
popped housing bubble in the US destroyed property resale prices.

Officials from the Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREA) told
this paper Monday that they would look into the claims of the US-based
sales centre pushing Bahamian property. The President of BREA

said that only agents who held their
licenses were eligible to sell prop- SRE page 4B

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@C Global United facing

Friday shut down

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GLOBAL United, the shipping
agent and logistics business run
by former PLP election candidate
Jackson Ritchie, yesterday said it
was likely to cease operations and
lay-off all remaining staff this Fri-
day in the face of a winding-up
threat from the Government over
unpaid taxes, a senior minister
describing as “absolutely bogus”
the firm’s claims of political per-
secution.

Captain Ritchie, in a statement
issued to the media, accused the
Government of ‘victimising’
Global United because of his
political affiliation, refusing all
the company’s efforts to settle its
outstanding multi-million dollar
customs duties and departure tax
bill in an effort to force it out of
business.

He revealed that the Attorney
General’s Office had served
Global United with four statuto-
ry demands in relation to some
$6 million allegedly owed to the
Customs Department and the
Public Treasury, threatening that
unless the outstanding sums were
paid in full by tomorrow (Thurs-
day, March 26) it would petition
for the company’s winding-up.

As a result, Captain Ritchie
said that if no alternative solu-
tion could be found, “the compa-
ny will have to terminate the
remaining staff, hand over all
assets to the bank and close its
doors permanently on Friday,
March 27”. This would add to the
160 Bahamian staff already ter-
minated by Global United over
the past two years.

Yet Zhivargo Laing, minister
of state for finance, yesterday
described Mr Ritchie’s claims of
political persecution and victimi-
sation as “absolutely bogus”, say-

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* Troubled company facing
winding-up threat from
Attorney General’s Office
if $6m unpaid tax bill
not met by tomorrow

* Company's former PLP
election candidate head
claims government
persecution

* Laing slams allegations as
‘absolutely bogus’, with
government ‘more than
gracious’ over substantial
sums owed

* FirstCaribbean has security
over $20m worth of
company assets, and
would head creditor list,
which includes
Colinalmperial

ing the issue was simply one
where Global United had failed
to pay “substantial sums” in taxes.
As aresult, the Government had
been forced to take action to col-
lect what was due from it.

Mr Laing said Captain Ritchie
had agreed a payments schedule
for the outstanding taxes with the
Customs Department, but had
failed to deliver on what he had
promised.

And the minister said that
efforts to collect Global United’s
outstanding tax bill had begun
under the former PLP adminis-
tration, before the current FNM
government took power on May

SEE page 4B

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Top-of-the-Hill, Mackey Street
PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

WALTON INTERNATIONAL LTD.
(Company number 55,015B)

An International Business Company

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137(4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000 notice is hereby given that the voluntary winding-up
and dissolution of the Company commenced on the 23rd day of
March, 2009 and that Pine Limited of Devonshire House, Queen
Street, P.O. Box N-8176 Nassau, Bahamas has been appointed
Liquidator.

Dated this 23rd day of March, 2009

Pine Limited
Liquidator

IN THE ESTATE OF JOE LEWO late of 4200 Down Point
Lane, Windermere, Orange County, Florida, USA

DECEASED

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims
against the above-named Estate are required, on or before
15th April, A.D., 2009 to send their names and addresses, and
particulars of their debts or claims, to the undersigned, and if
SO required by notice in writing from the undersigned, to come
in and prove such debts or claims, or in default thereof they will
be excluded from the benefit of any distribution AND all persons
indebted to the said Estate are asked to pay their respective debts
to the undersigned immediately.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that at the expiration of the
date mentioned above, the assets of the late JOE LEWO will
be distributed among the persons entitled thereto having regard
only to the claims of which the Personal Representative shall then
have had notice.

Dated this 24th day of March, A.D., 2009.

C/O Jerome E. Pyfrom & Co.
Attorneys for the Executor
2â„¢ Floor Charlotte House

Shirley and Charlotte Streets

P. Q. Box N-3950
Nassau, Bahamas



THE TRIBUNE



@ ROYAL FIDELITY MARKET WRA

@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

THERE was an increase in
trading momentum last week, as
investors traded in four out of
the 25 listed securities, of which
one declined and three remained
unchanged. There were no
advancers in the market last
week.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 31,506 shares
changed hands, representing an
increase of 10,585 shares or 51
per cent, versus the previous
week's trading volume of 20,921
shares.

Focol Holdings (FCL) was the
volume leader last week with
14,000 shares trading, its stock
ending the week unchanged at
$5.07.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
was the big decliner, trading
11,630 shares, its share price
falling by $0.08 to end last week
at $6.48.

BOND MARKET

Investors traded $67,000 (par
value), Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
Series D Notes (FBB15) Due
2015.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

Freeport Concrete Company
(FCC) released first quarter
results as at November 30, 2008,
reporting a net loss of $220,000
for the quarter, compared to a

net loss of $74,000 in the first

quarter of the previous year.
The company's management

indicated that total sales rev-



The Bahamian Stock Market

enues of $3.4 million were down FINDEX 811.61 YTD (-2.78%)
by 8.6 per cent quarter-over-
quarter, due to reduced sales in BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

its Home Centre and concrete SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
division. Management said they
were actively pursuing ways to AML $1.45 $- 0 -15.20%
raise additional capital to pur- BBL $0.63 $- 0 -4.55%
chase inventory, which would BOB $7.00 Ve 0 8.38%
increase sales at the Home Cen- BPF $11.00 $- 0 -6.78%
tre. BSL 9.58 - 0 -5.99%
FCL’s gross profit of $778,000 BWL oe 5 i 0 0.00%
declined by about $246,000 or 24 CAB $13.95 $- 0 -0.57%
per cent, from the 2007 first = CB $6.48 $-0.08 11,630 -7.43%
quarter. Total expenses of CHL $2.83 o 229 0.00%
$886,000 also declined by 10 per CIB $10.45 $- 0 0.00%
cent die te lower operating Few $-0.02 0 -30.67%
costs. Total assets of $6.6 million - 2 9
: DHS $2.16 $ 0 15.29%
increased by $9,000 or 1 per cent FAM $7.76 $- 0 -0.51%
from the fiscal 2008 year-end, FBB $2.37 $- 0 0.00%
due to an increase in the com- FCC $0.30 $- 0 0.00%
pany's fixed assets. Total liabili- FCL $5.07 $- 14.000 -1.93%
ties of $5.3 million also increased FCLB $1. 00 $ 0 i 0 00%
by $273,000 or 5.4 per cent from FIN : ‘ nae
fiscal 2008. $11.00 $- 0 -7.33%
ICD $5.50 $- 5,647 -10.28%
: ’ JSJ $10.50 $- 0 -5.41%
Private Placement Offerings PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%,

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced that it will be extend-
ing the deadline of its private
placement offering. The pre-
ferred shares will be paying a
dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per
cent, payable semi-annually.

Dividend Notes:

Finance Corporation of The
Bahamas (FIN) has declared a
dividend of $0.13 per share,
payable on March 30, 2009, to

all shareholders of record date
March 23, 2009.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
has declared a dividend of $0.05
per share, payable on March 31,
2009, to all shareholders of
record date March 13, 2009.

Cable Bahamas (CAB) has

declared a dividend of $0.07 per
share, payable on March 31,
2009, to all shareholders of
record date March 19, 2009.

Consolidated Water Company
(CWCB) has declared a dividend
of $0.013 per share, payable on
May 7, 2009, to all shareholders
of record date April 1, 2009.

Benefit scheme raises tax and bureaucracy fear

FROM page 1B

ployment benefit scheme are
those who have been unem-
ployed since July 1, 2006, well
before the current economic
downturn started.

Mr Lowe yesterday also
objected to the fact that the pro-
posed Act amendments and
regulations made the responsi-
ble minister “all-powerful” by
giving them the sole discretion
to decide when to extend the
maximum duration a person
could receive unemployment
benefit for.

Arguing that the proposed
unemployment benefit scheme
represented another tax on the



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business community and
employed workers, Mr Lowe
questioned why the Govern-
ment was seeking to introduce it
when the economy was locked
into a recession and companies
were already overburdened by a
deteriorating financial picture.

“Why implement this thing
when everything is on a down-
ward spiral?” Mr Lowe asked.
“That was one of the things that
extended the Great Depression
in the US, government man-
dates at a time when business
were losing business. But they
know better.

“What about the unintended
consequences? You shift the
burden, and businesses say:
“This is another expense, we
must cut back.’ If a person
comes in, looking for work, that
1 per cent could be the differ-
ence between being hired or
not.”

The Government is initially
proposing to finance the unem-
ployment benefit scheme with a
$20 million transfer from NIB’s
medical benefits branch. If that
sum is exhausted before the
mandatory contributions
become law, then the scheme

would be supplemented from
the consolidated fund.

The 1 per cent that Mr Lowe
is referring to is the mandatory
1 per cent of insurable wage
contribution that is expected to
finance the unemployment ben-
efit long-term, split 50/50
between employer and employ-
6é,
As regards the timing of this
funding mechanism’s introduc-
tion, Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation’s
(BECon) president, told Tri-
bune Business last week that
while the Government wanted
to implement it from January
1, 2010, it had made it clear the
timeline was not set in stone.

Mr Nutt said it was “subject
to the state of the economy. If
the economy doesn’t improve
and gets worse, they would con-
sider delaying the contribution
aspect of it.

“But if a lot of money is com-
ing out of the Consolidated
Fund, the Government might
not be able to afford to keep
paying it out, and have to intro-
duce mandatory contributions
sooner.”

Mr Nutt and Dionisio

were kis beac reg rachel astit

Area Viealth bana

D’ Aguilar, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce’s president,
have both backed the unem-
ployment benefit scheme’s
introduction as a necessary
social stimulus to prevent
increased suffering among the
jobless and their dependents -
albeit with reservations about
the current proposal’s structure.

The BECon president added
that while the unemployment
contributions “wouldn’t be
viewed as a huge burden”, they
were an additional cost that
businesses would have to bear.

“Tt is something that can have
an effect on struggling and mar-
ginal businesses, which is unfor-
tunate,” Mr Nutt added. “But it
is something that is overdue and
will provide benefits to our soci-
ety as a whole.”

Mr Lowe, though, appeared
to disagree. He told Tribune
Business: “If I was in their [gov-
ernment’s] position, my inten-
tions might be the same. But
would I implement a system
that burdens future generations
of Bahamians? I doubt it. I
might be voted out of office,
but I would choose political
leadership over vote getting.”

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THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 3B



Vehicle retention
aid repair shops

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE AUTO repair business
could emerge as a relatively
recession-proof business, Tri-
bune Business was told yester-

day, with more people con-
cerned with the upkeep of the
vehicles they have rather than
the purchase of a new one.
Tim Cartwright, service
manager of Cartwright’s
Garage, told Tribune Business
that the company have not

Likely Morton

sale hits Inagua
rebuild

FROM page 1B

ing out of Morton until then. Ulti-
mately, it will be down to Dow
to make a decision as the new
owner.”

That deal is due to close on
April 1, 2009. Yet Bloomberg has
reported that Dow aims to raise
$4 billion to help pay for the deal,
including $1.5 billion from sell-
ing Chicago-headquartered Mor-
ton International, Morton Salt’s
parent company.

Dow will also issue $4.3 billion
of debt and cut costs by $400 mil-
lion more than previously esti-
mated, partly by eliminating an

additional 3,500 jobs, mostly at
Rohm & Haas.

Changed

Mr Bochanski said “nothing
has changed substantively” as it
relates to Morton Salt’s Inagua
operation since it was heavily
damaged by Hurricane Ike, with
executives operating from tem-
porary offices.

“There’s full employment, no
one has been laid off, and sub-
stantively the status quo remains
until a decision is taken,” Mr
Bochanski said.

‘Stand-out’ project to

invest further $200m



FROM page 1B

“In the long-run, it will make
Albany and the Bahamas stand
out even more. It’s rationalised
the pace of development that was
going on, which was unsustain-
able. I don’t believe there was the
demand to justify the supply com-
ing on the market.”

Although there were fewer
buyers in the market, Mr Anand
said that situation could change
very rapidly if consumer confi-
dence returned regarding the
state of the world economy and
US stock market.

Supply, on the other hand, had
“dropped more than demand”,
and took much longer to recover.
All of which is set to benefit the
likes of Albany, which will seem-
ingly be perfectly positioned to
capture the economic upturn, and
exploit the lack of product avail-
ability throughout the Caribbean.

“Albany will be one of the
strongest of projects, which will
be great for the Bahamas,” Mr
Anand said, adding that demand
for this nation’s real estate was
also likely to receive a boost as
people used such investments to
hedge against future inflation.

Inflation is an increasing con-
cern, especially in developed
nations such as the US and UK,
as governments expand fiscal
spending and the money supply in
a bid to ward off inflation.

Meanwhile, Mr Anand told
Tribune Business yesterday that
Albany’s investors had invested
“about $200 million” into the pro-
ject’s first phase to date, with
another $200 million set to come.

The first phase involves
Albany’s infrastructure and key
amenities, such as its golf course
and 71-slip marina, and Mr
Anand said the latter was set to
be “look finished” by June. The
channel and concreting were both
“70 per cent” complete”, while
the golf course was “well beyond
50 per cent complete”.

The course was currently being
grassed, with irrigation and shap-
ing already complete on many
holes. The tender for Albany’s
water park had also gone out to

bid.

The number of construction
workers on-site at Albany, some
90 per cent of whom were
Bahamians, was in the “hundreds
and growing by the day”.

“The vertical construction will
really ramp up this summer,” Mr
Anand added. “We’re in full
swing starting this summer. We’re
doing some site work and moving
some utilities that need to be
moved to move fully ahead.”

The Albany managing partner
said some 25 hotel cottages were
at various stages of vertical con-
struction, with another 15 set to
start shortly.

“We're shooting for a summer
2010 opening of all the amenities,
the hotel cottages,” in Phase One,
Mr Anand said, explaining that
if pre-sales targets were met, the
developers would seamlessly roll
into $400-$500 million worth of
phase two construction on the
Marina Residences.

“We are getting ready to be in
a position to launch the Marina
Residences,” Mr Anand said.
“We have to get some pre-sales
goals done, but we think it could
happen and are optimistic. If the
world stabilises and improves, I
think we can get it done.

“It will take 12-15 months to
get those goals done. If the world
is OK we will get it done, but if
not it won’t be for lack of trying.

“In an ideal world, we would
be starting next summer. That
could start a chain reaction of
$400-$500 million worth of con-
struction, which is more than in
phase one. We’ve got to execute
phase one, and then get into posi-
tion to execute phase two.”

Mr Anand added that Albany
was “in the process of closing”
around $200 million worth of real
estate sales, having been boost-
ed by its 80-strong founders pro-
gramme, all of whom had stuck
with the development.

The major investors in Albany
are the Tavistock Group, the
investment vehicle for Lyford
Cay-based billionaire Joe Lewis,
and world-famous golfers Tiger
Woods and Ernie Els.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

RC SM dT
aM
Me IR) rere ya CEL



seen a decline in vehicle ser-
vicing business compared to
2008, but instead experienced
the same fluctuations that have
always defined revenue flow.

“There hasn’t been anything
noticeable. Some weeks it’s
down, some weeks it’s back to
normal, but nothing over-
whelming,” Mr Cartwright
said.

However, he added that
some individuals are holding
out on their regular service.
“Some people, I have to beg
them to come in,” he said.

A manager at Nassau Repair
Shop told Tribune Business
that they had seen that, when
there was an economic down-
turn, people focus on car
repairs rather than replace-
ment.

He said it was important for
people to get their oil changed
regularly and repair things
such as mufflers and radiators,
because they cannot afford to
purchase a new vehicle.

Ivan Ferguson, owner of
Fergie’s Tune-Up on Jennie
Street, said this time of year
has been traditionally slow for
his business, but that he
expects things to pick up after
the Easter season.

He was not quite sure

ane

Sucomsshul candedate tor the Financial Controller position must hare at least feo yoars professional public accounting experience.
must hold a CRA, CA, 004 or other professional designation recognized by the Bahannas

The position of Financial Controller vw
Company and will be expected to implement and continually develop systems of internal coniro

whether more people will ser-
vice their vehicles rather than
buy new ones, but was posi-
tive about his business keep-
ing up with the competition.

“Some people are regular
with their service and some
people are not, but I haven’t
seen a drastic change like
that,” said Mr Ferguson.

New car sales have been
down across New Providence,
and suppliers of General
Motors and Ford Vehicles
were watching the US media
closely last year to see if their
manufacturers would be dri-
ven under by that country’s
failing economy.

Only one repair shop that
spoke to Tribune Business said
“business is definitely down”.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



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THE TRIBUNE



Global United facing Friday shut down

FROM page 1B

3, 2007.

“What is absolutely incredible is how
he [Mr Ritchie] was able to amass that
level of indebtedness to the Government,
when other people in this society would
be flabbergasted to incur even 10 per
cent of that,” Mr Laing said.

Describing the sums owed by Global
United, on behalf of shipping and cruise
line clients such as Carnival and Royal-
Caribbean as “substantial”, Mr Laing
added: “He had entered into an arrange-
ment with the Comptroller of Customs
for some payment, which was seemingly
supported by his bank. That fell through.

“It’s an unfortunate circumstance, it
really is, but it’s quite incredible that Mr
Ritchie makes this argument for the
defence of his situation.

“Taxes are due. That he does not deny.
They have been due for some time. They
have been accrued for some time, and
efforts were made to collect them prior to
the election. It’s incredible.”

Mr Laing said: “I think he [Mr Ritchie]
would have to concede that the Govern-
ment has been more than gracious in tol-
erating his business relationship with the
Government in relation to Customs. It
has been more than gracious.”

In his statement yesterday, Captain
Ritchie said Global United had paid
between $70-$80 million to the Public
Treasury on behalf of its clients every
year up to 2007, and “at any one time
be no more than 5-7 per cent outstanding
in its obligations to the Government”.

He alleged, though, that Global Unit-
ed problems began when he accepted
the PLP nomination for Clifton in the

Miami firm is ‘optimistic’
on Bahamas realty sales

FROM page 1B

2007 general election, claiming he
received a call that ‘FNM operatives’ in
the Ministry of Finance would use the
company’s outstanding tax bill to attack
him.

Captain Ritchie then alleged that he
received a letter from a Public Treasury
employee demanding immediate pay-
ment, which Global United was unable to
meet.

The company resorted to its bank,
FirstCaribbean International Bank
(Bahamas), which held security - via a
floating and fixed mortgage debenture -
over $20 million worth of Global Unit-
ed’s assets. The bank allowed the com-
pany’s overdraft to reach $5 million, and
issued cheques on it.

Captain Ritchie yesterday claimed the
bank then “suddenly hardened” its posi-
tion in mid-2007, returning “hundreds of
cheques”. These had to be replaced by
certified cheques, at a time when the
Ministry of Finance and Customs placed
Global United on a cash-in-advance basis
for all service payments.

This, Captain Ritchie argued, dam-
aged Global United’s cash flow, and
caused it to fall behind on vendor/sup-
plier payments, causing them to also
demand cash in advance. Outlining the
troubled nature of Global United’s busi-
ness, Captain Ritchie said that in 2008
the company lost clients and fell behind
in its bank payments.

He accused the Treasury and Customs
Department of rejecting all attempts to
settle with Global United over the out-
standing taxes over the past 18 months,
and said: “If the Government had con-
tinued to allow Global United to operate

as was the established practice, the cur-
rent situation would never have arisen.

“Once it did occur, had they accepted
the earlier payment plan offered, the bal-
ance would have already been signifi-
cantly paid down.”

FirstCaribbean had engaged KPMG,
the accounting firm, to help Global Unit-
ed restructure and develop a debt repay-
ment plan.

Captain Ritchie said the Attorney
General’s Office rejected the plan, and
argued that its winding-up threat was
“very strange”, given that FirstCaribbean
had positioned itself as the secured, pre-
ferred creditor in the event of liquida-
tion. This, he suggested, would give the
bank first call on the company’s assets
and leave the Government with nothing,
although that is by no means certain.

Several Tribune Business sources yes-
terday backed the Government’s posi-
tion, suggesting that Global United’s real
problems stemmed from the fact it had
expanded too far, too fast, and taken on
an ultimately unsustainable debt burden
from FirstCaribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) as a result.

The company had been unable to gen-
erate the cash flow and liquidity to ser-
vice the debt load, while management
did not obtain the efficiencies and syn-
ergies from the acquired businesses to
make the expansion work, sources sug-
gested, implying that Mr Ritchie’s alle-
gations were a “smokescreen” and
attempt to divert blame.

“It was all leveraged and he didn’t
have the cash flow,” one source alleged.
“There was no real consideration given to
managing the acquisitions.”

Tribune Business revealed last month
how Global United had placed its Air-
port Industrial Park headquarters up for
sale for $1.8 million, and that its Global
United store at Sandyport was set to
close (it has now done so). Captain
Ritchie has also placed his personal res-
idence at Sandyport on the market.

Global United began life as Freeport-
based Tanja Enterprises. But Captain
Ritchie embarked on headlong expan-
sion in 2004, becoming the main ship-
ping agent in Freeport by acquiring Unit-
ed Shipping.

It followed that up the following year
with the purchase of Nassau-based Glob-
al Customs Brokers & Trucking and
World Bound Couriers, enabling it to
enter the New Providence market as a
major player in the shipping agency, dis-
tribution and logistics and transporta-
tion business.

At the height of his ambitions, Captain
Ritchie also agreed a deal to purchase
Discovery Cruise Line, although that ulti-
mately fell through.

Among Global United’s other credi-
tors are its preference shareholders. They
include Colinalmperial Insurance Com-
pany, which had $2-$3 million worth of
preference shares that it inherited from
the Imperial Life purchase, and Edward
Fitzgerald, father of PLP Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald.

Mr Fitzgerald Snr is understood to
have received $1 million worth of pref-
erence shares as part payment for selling
Global Customs Brokers & Trucking to
Global United. However, it is under-
stood that the company defaulted on pay-
ing the preference share dividends, and



(The Tribune}

dei aie tilem kt tl tet a) ieee
Everywhere The Buyers Are!

*
‘4

erty in this nation.

In an release published on
Monday, the Paradise Is Mine
company unveiled its plans to
open a ‘sales centre’ in South
Beach “to exclusively market
Bahamas properties”.





However, a release published
online on March 15 names ‘Par-
adise is Mine’ as a “development
on the beautiful island of Rum
Cay”, saying the company “pro-
vided land for sale with a unique
twist”.

The release also said that Par-

NOTICE

ge em mre me Ca)






Please be advised that the Master Treasurer, Sir George Newman,
is scheduled to visit New Providence from 2nd - 7th April 2009.



adise is Mine “has agreed as part
of this process to name the streets
and beaches after the first resi-
dents”.

Three of the beach front lots
advertised on the company’s web-
site, which seem to be empty
plots, marked “subject property”
have already been tagged sold,
while eight seem to still be on the
market.

According to Mr Fowler, sev-
eral different persons, presum-
ably foreigners, own the plots of
land advertised on his company’s
site, However, he could not say
who exactly owned them.

Billy Davis, who purports to

Paradise Is Mine’s director of
sales, had previously confirmed
to them that Mr Davis was the
developer behind the website and
its real estate venture. However,
Mr Rover declined to confirm this
when contacted by Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday.

It has been long argued that
much of the land in Rum Cay has
been purchased by foreigners
without clean title, although there
is nothing to suggest this is the
case with the land Paradise Is
Mine is marketing.

In an article published by this
paper in 2007, it was revealed that
there was strong suspicion that

that these investors will realise nothing if
the company is wound-up.

Sources also told Tribune Business
that Global United was hurt when the
current government abandoned a $3-$4
million deal to purchase the company’s
Freeport headquarters for a new Cus-
toms Department headquarters. That
sale would have improved the compa-
ny’s cash flow and liquidity.

Captain Ritchie declined to respond
to aseries of detailed questions e-mailed
to him by Tribune Business yesterday,
only saying: “All of the questions will be
answered in subsequent releases. We
have documentation to support every-
thing we have said and will make it avail-
able to the press and the population at
large in due course.”

He said in his release that it was sus-
picious that Global United was being
forced to pay-up, when other businesses
received more lenient treatment on out-
standing taxes and fees.

This was rejected by Mr Laing, who
said the Government was making exten-
sive efforts to collect from all who owed
it funds.

“Mr Ritchie would have to know that
efforts to secure funds he owed to the
Government commenced prior to the
election, as was confirmed to him by the
then-secretary of revenue, Ehurd Cun-
ningham, in a meeting he had not long
after the election,” Mr Laing added.

“It’s absolute nonsense. The extent to
which Mr Ritchie was indebted to the
Government represented funds he had
collected on behalf of his clients, essen-
tially trust funds. It’s a significant breach
of customs practice.”

/



2
iizZ-





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JAMES VINCENT of
SOUTH BEACH DRIVE, P.O. BOX SB-51712, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 18 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTIAN JULIE of 9TH
AVENUE FT. LAUDERDALE 33304 is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 18 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MALLISSA NICOLE
EVANS of Nassau Village, PO. Box N-4447, intend to
change my name to MELISSA NICOLE EVANS. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.









scores of Americans had sunk
tens of thousands of dollars into
pieces of land they don’t have
clean title to, walking away with
title deeds that will have no stand-
ing in a court of law.

own large plots of land on Rum
Cay, is believed to own at least
one of the plots offered by Par-
adise is Mine.

Realtors spoken to by Tribune
Business have said Ted Rover,

PME Peer ECR ce Ue Rm mech AOR pAt tice
Peele Gems el ON ROMA RSI On

All members are asked to contact:
Elaine Bullard @ 325-3693 for further information

GEOPAK SERVICES
LIMITED (MIDAS)

Will be

= ins
Colina

Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited
Class “A” Preference Shares

The Board of Directors of Colina
Holdings Bahamas Limited (CHBL) is
pleased to announce that a Preference
Share Dividend for the period
January 1, 2009 to March 31, 2009 will
be paid to the Class “A” Preference
Shareholders of record of CHBL on the
31st day of March 2009.

CLOSED on FRIDAY
MARCH 27th, 2009.

For the funeral of
Mr. James Knowles.

Payment will be made through the
Company’s Registrar and_ Transfer
Agent, CFAL Ltd., within 10 business

We will reopen days of the record date.

for business as usual on
SATURDAY, MARCH 28th, 2009.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

NOTICE

Notice
GRASE INTERNATIONAL CORP

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 235 of the Companies Act,

1992, as Amended, Notice is hereby given that:- Incorporated under the International Business

Companies Act, 2000 of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas registered in the Register of Companies under
the Registration Number 116498.

1. SAFRA INTERNATIONAL HOLDING LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation (In Voluntary Liquidation) is in dissolution.

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
GUILFORD INVESTMENT GROUP LTD. is in dissolu-
tion. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be con-
tacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets,
Nassau Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
3rd April, 2009.

. Proceedings to wind-up and dissolve the Company were

commenced on the 12th day of March A.D, 2009. (In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the liquidation of the
Company is complete and the Company has been struck
off the Register of Companies maintained by the
Registrar General.

. Dr. Wilder Gonzalez Penino whose address is Bayside
Executive Park, West Bay Street and Blake Road,
Building ITI, Ground Floor CB-10998, Nassau, Bahamas
is the Liquidator of the Company for the purpose of such
dissolution.

Dated this 12th day of March, 2009.

i
fi

i a am 2
ae maa) Cte
WILLIAMS LAW CHAMBERS
Regintersd Agent

ei
fi
r - E
i. od if — ;
ALA MEME
LiQnmuaTon

Esther Capra De San Ignacio
Liquidator
THE TRIBUNE

@ By KRISTEN A LEE
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Lower
fuel prices, cost-cutting and oth-
er one-time benefits helped
cruise operator Carnival Corp.
raise its profit 10 percent in its
fiscal first quarter, far exceeding
Wall Street’s expectations, the
company reported Tuesday.

Carnival has maintained
strong booking volumes by
slashing cruise prices. The Mia-
mi-based company lowered its
forecast for fiscal 2009 earnings,
however, in part because prices
have remained weak for cruises
booked for the second half of
this year.

“Given the significant slow-
down in the global economy, I
think it is fair to say that this
has been one of the most chal-
lenging booking environments
we have ever experienced,” said
Vice Chairman and Chief Oper-
ating Officer Howard Frank
during a conference call with
investors.

For the quarter that ended
February 28, earnings grew to
$260 million, or 33 cents per
share. That’s up from $236 mil-
lion, or 30 cents per share, a
year ago.

Carnival said its revenue fell
nine per cent to $2.86 billion,
from $3.15 billion in the first
fiscal quarter of 2008.

Analysts polled by Thomson
Reuters forecast earnings of 19
cents per share on revenue of
$2.87 billion.

The cruise line has achieved a

10 per cent year-over-year
increase in bookings but was
forced to slash prices to “levels
not seen in recent years,” Frank
said. “It was strong volumes
against very lousy rates,” Chair-
man and Chief Executive Micky
Arison added with a laugh.

Bookings for the most expen-
sive cruises, particularly those
to remote regions of Alaska,
have fallen further than less
expensive Caribbean jaunts.
The company also noted that it
plans to reduce its capacity for
cruises to Alaska in 2010.

Carnival said budget-con-
scious vacationers also cut
spending on gambling, shore
excursions, shopping and photos
during their cruises, although
they continued to spend on spas
and drinks.

On the other side of the bal-
ance sheet, a 45 per cent drop in
fuel prices saved the cruise line
21 cents per share. The
improved results also included
two one-time gains totaling $32
million: One was from cutting
an income tax reserve that was
no longer needed and they oth-
er from terminating a lease-out
and lease-back deal involving
troubled insurer American
International Group Inc.

Carnival also held down con-
trollable costs through a vari-
ety of measures, such as rene-
gotiating with its vendors,
reducing its fuel consumption
and cutting back on some pro-
jects.

“Carnival’s revised guidance
highlights the difficult pricing

environment the industry cur-
rently faces,” said Barclays Cap-
ital analyst Felicia Hendrix in
a note to investors. “However, it
also underscores managemen-
t’s impressive ability to cut costs
even in a difficult environment.”

Carnival now expects 2009
earnings to range from $2.10 to
$2.30 per share, down from its
previous guidance range of







$2.25 to $2.75 per share.

For the second quarter, Car-
nival predicted earnings in the
range of 30 cents to 32 cents per
share, down from 49 per share
in the prior year.

Analysts forecast full-year
earnings of $2.18 per share and
a second-quarter profit of 33
cents per share.

“As expected, 2009 will be a

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:









“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 20
Lexington Estates Subdivision situated in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
Family Residence consisting of (3) bedrooms and (2) bathrooms.








Property Size: 7,296 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,164 sq. ft.





This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS






LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 3005”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday








27th March, 2009.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 5B
Carnival books higher 1Q profit but cuts outlook

challenging year for the indus-
try, but it is encouraging that
consumers are willing to spend
money on attractively priced
vacations,” said Susquehanna
Financial Group’s Robert
LaFleur.

At the end of the first quar-
ter, Carnival reported $3.7 bil-
lion of liquidity and said it will
not need new financing for

2009. The company noted it will
continue to look for opportu-
nities to improve its liquidity.

Carnival shares slipped 48
cents, or 2.1 per cent, to $22.83
in afternoon trading, after gain-
ing as much as seven per cent
early in the session.

The stock has traded between
$14.85 and $43.54 during the
past 52 weeks.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 45
Silvergate Subdivision situated in the Southern District of the
islands of New Providence, one of the island of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Duplex,
each unit consisting of (2) bedrooms (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 5,258 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,748 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS

LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 3107”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday

27th March, 2009.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being a portion of
Crown Grant A4-60, off Carmichael Road, situated in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence one of the islands of
the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon Duplex
with each unit consisting of (2) bedrooms (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 4,988 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,830 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 2916”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
So FINCO

ne
NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 69, 70
and 71, Bartlett’s Addition situated in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
family residence consisting of (5) bedrooms (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 9,300 sq. ft.
Building Size: 2,716 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 8069”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
So FINCO

RBC

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 5,
Lexington Estates Subdivision situated in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
Family Residence consisting of (3) bedrooms and (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 7,410 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,350 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 1911”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 85 Golden
Gates No. 2 Subdivision situated in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is vacant land.

Property Size: 5,736 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 2917”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
1 FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT Unit being Unit No. 6 of the Condominium called
and known as “The Pavilion” in Westward Villas Subdivision,
situated in the Western District of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a Residence consisting of (1) bedroom (1) bathroom.

Living Area: 652 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 3760”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lots No. 6,
Carroll’s Cove Subdivision situated in the Western District of
the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
family residence consisting of (2) bedrooms (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 977 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 3063”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.



RBC
No FINCO

ie
NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being part of a 36 Acre
tract of land situate on Cowpen Road in the Western District of
the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Triplex
with 3 unit consisting of (1) bedroom and (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 5,394 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,575 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 0312”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being a portion of the
Crown Allotment No. 63 situate in the vicinity of Sunset Park
in the Western District of the Island of New Providence one of
the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a Duplex with 2 units consisting of (2) bedrooms and
(1) bathroom.

Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,640 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 0130”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 8,
Allotment No. 56 East of Sea Breeze Estates, situated in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon
is a Single family residence consisting of (3) bedrooms (2)
bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,547 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,543 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 2484”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th March, 2009.
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune



ERIKA ROBINSON, owner of Don’ Woch Nuttin
Restaurant, wants to change the way the average
Bahamian looks at healthy cuisine and cater to
those who want a healthy meal alternative.





m@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net



eating habits until
someone they
trust invites them
to try something

BAHAMIANS are known for different. My

restaurant is about

their love of all things buttered, giving and we get
gravy smothered and fried. How- _ back in return. We

ever, Erika Robinson, owner of

try to give five star
service to every-

Don’ Woch Nuttin Restaurant one who walks
also known as Hawkins Hill through that need
everyone 1s (reat-
House of Pancakes, located on ed the santé.” Mé
Hawkins Hill, wants to change Robinson said.
the way the average Bahamian Faithful cus-

looks at healthy cuisine and cater

tomer, Felicity
Ingraham, said she

to those who want a healthy has been coming

meal alternative.

From comfort foods such as
her cinnamon French toast and
tasty home style banana pan-
cakes to her scrambled or
grilled tofu dishes, Don’ Woch
Nuttin caters to every pallet
with a desire for good food.
Breakfast is served all day for
those who enjoy breakfast
meals.

The atmosphere is very
homely and quaint. Walking
into Don’ Woch Nuttin imme-
diately is just like walking into
your grandmother’s kitchen.
There is a sleepy but friendly
cat, by the name of Curious
who poses as the security guard
because of the down home feel-
ing Ms Robinson is trying to
give her customers.

“My kitchen is open because
of the vegetarian menu. I want
my vegetarians to be able to see
how their food is being pre-
pared. It also offers a homely
feeling and customers feel like
this is their kitchen,” Ms Robin-
son said.

Ms Robinson said getting into
the restaurant business was
pretty much a no-brainer for
her. Although she never went to
school to cook, she is an artist
and sees cooking as just anoth-
er element of art.

“Cooking is just art. It is just
another element of who I am. I
decided to get into the restau-
rant business because I have a
selective diet- a vegetarian diet.
There was really no where for
me to eat. Most people do not
really take care or concern
about how vegetarian food is
prepared,” Ms Robinson said.

Ms Robinson said her cus-
tomers are really the ones who
make her business into the fam-
ily atmosphere that she wants
to achieve.

“My customers are my
biggest supporters. Everything
is by word of mouth. Bahamians
in general really do not change

to the Don’ Woch

Nuttin Restaurant

since its beginning

in the Carmichael
Road area.

“T always told people it was
the very best breakfast place in
the capitol. In addition to them
being a breakfast place, as a
reporter, I did a story during a
hurricane and they got together
and helped out people that
needed help in a way that was
even more substantial than
some of the larger companies.
So from then I decided to stick
with them because I saw that it
was more than just a place to
get good food but there were
people there who cared about
the community. Now I do not
have to worry about food
cooked with a ton of grease but
I found food that is cooked with
love,” Ms Ingraham said.

As everyday is different, Ms
Robinson said she tries to have
a personal, healthy touch with
all her customers.

“We are small and we can-
not compete with the bigger
companies. Therefore I try to
offer something different- some-
thing that I am passionate
about. We are very health con-
scious here and do not use a lot
of oil based products. Instead,
we use a lot of soy based prod-
ucts such as tofu, veggie burg-
ers, soy margarine, BBQ tofu,
curry veggies and many more,”
Ms Robinson said.

In her efforts to sustain her
passion for organic foods, Ms
Robinson said she has even
started her own garden just for
the restaurant.

“We try to use more organic
based vegetables. So in short
order we will be able to be self
sufficient. We have sour trees
coming up and blossoming,
green peppers, tomatoes, corn,
and cauliflower. Everything
here is authentic and that is
what people taste and see where
they come to Don’ Woch Nut-
tin,” Ms Robinson said.

BMDA 20th Annual New Car Show - Friday, March 27 & Saturday, March 28 - Mall at Marathon

alreliterse VOtOn Dealers
MORE tion
invite you to

ENTER TO WIN A

ae UG,

be ee a

towards the purchase of a new vehicle! The $1,000 prize will only be redeemable towards
_ the purchase of a new car from participants at the
BMDA show.



Fill out the attached entry form
and deliver it to The Tribune on
Shirley Street, or place in bins

- provided at the BMDA New Car
» Show at the Mall at Marathon
by 8pm on Friday, March 27.









Your choice for the family



Fill out the attached entry form and deliver to Tribune daily through March 27.
Only ORIGINAL newsprint entry forms will be accepted. Photocopies are not
eligible. Enter as many times as you wish.

Name



Address

Phone

Cell


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009, PAGE 9B



ENTERTAINMENT



The Tribune







SETTING THE STAGE FOR

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

WITH music, artistry, and free-
dom of expression becoming a way
of life and vessel for many young
people to propel their inner
thoughts, one local promoter is
doing her part in creating the stage
for just that.

Nadine Thomas-Brown is a local television,
print, and entertainment personality who
explained that her choice to highlight all forms
of expression comes from a long standing inter-
est in the arts.

Originally from Kingston, Jamaica, Nadine
said while growing up she spent every year tak-
ing part in various national festivals, which was
a crucial part of molding the person she has
become.

“T remember as a small child being involved in
many art forms, we used to dance in the nation-
al stadium, and we’d be performing dances from
different cultures, it was just really exciting.”

She said apart from the performing arts, she
was also a violinist for the Jamaican orchestra
and the reggae philharmonic orchestra.

Nadine added that although at one time play-
ing the violin was probably the most important
thing in her life, her gradual transition into oth-
er artistic avenues seemed a natural progres-
sion when it happened.

“Pve acted in plays, ’ve modeled, some-
times I wonder what have I not done.”

Reflecting on her move from Jamaica to Nas-
sau, Nadine said about 13 years ago she decided
to move here because of her marriage to a
Bahamian and to also pursue a career in teach-
ing.

“When I came here I had just graduated
from university, and I had gotten a teaching
job under the Ministry of Education where I
taught at CH Reeves for three years.”

She said while there, she established a talent
club that met every Saturday, and was able to
draw in dozens of students from the surrounding
area to watch fashion shows, singing competi-
tions, and other talent events intended to show
her students that there were countless oppor-
tunities available should they pursue a career in
the arts.

“Some of them didn’t even know they could
do these things, and others never even realised
how much fun it could be to simply express
themselves.”

After eventually leaving teaching, Nadine
realised that there was still more to be done in
the way of creating a platform for young and
unique artists.

At that time she said she visited various
established spoken word groups including
Coombi which was organised by Giovanni Stau-
rt, and Verse Place by Obadiah Michael Smith.
As those groups slowly phased out, Nadine said
she still yearned to see impromptu style per-

Ua
READY 10 GEL

ORS dal

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor




THE talented step team of Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity is set to descend onto the BET stage
for the annual Spring Bling “Get to Stepping”
competition to be held in Riviera Beach, Florida
this weekend marking the first time that an inter-
national fraternity has been invited to partici-
pate in the prestigious event.

Kenny Moss, one of the brothers of the six
member strong stepping team set to leave Nassau
on Friday, said that this is a definite honour and
privilege not only for the fraternity but really for
the country given the fact that participation is
by invitation only.

“We had to summit an application to BET
along with a video showcasing a compilation of
our latest performances. This was the second
year that I submitted an application. Last year, we
did not make it, but this year, we were invited. So
you can imagine that this is a real thrill especial-
ly given the fact that only five teams were select-
ed in our category and we were selected out of the
thousands of footage that they saw and we are the
only international fraternity invited to attend.”

Mr Moss said that this is a chance for the fra-
ternity to promote the Bahamas on an interna-

formances.

She also had a brief stint as a reporter at
the Nassau Guardian.

She said that while some people felt that “
Bahamians hate Bahamian music, Bahamians
hate Bahamian performers,” she feels that if
Bahamians are not seeing them in the paper
or on television, they will not know about them.
She said this was a major motivator to the even-
tual start of Roots and Culture.

“Somebody approached me, and said they
wanted to start a poetry night at their place,
and wanted me to host it.” After accepting that
proposal, Nadine said Poetic Release at Café
Habana became her pet project.

“The idea that I had was to make it a forum
for art, although a lot of poets turned out ini-
tially, that project evolved to something far
more diverse.”

After some time, Nadine said she released
herself from the project which had grown too
large for her, and later moved on to other spo-
ken word projects including Meeting Place held
at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, and then
Express Yourself at the Island Club.

Eventually relocated to the Hub on Bay
Street, Nadine said the Express Yourself move-
ment has morphed into something she is defi-
nitely proud to attach her name to.

Afro-DZ-iaC was another joint project that
was a great stepping stone for her to not just
share her passion for spoken word perfor-
mances, but also a chance to work with some of
her favorite girls in the local entertainment
sphere. She along with Bodine Johnson, and
Belinda Pierre decided that they wanted to cre-
ate an event where they could recite poetry
without boundaries.

“The concept was to put on a show with no
censorship, and it would be all about (erotic)
poetry.”

Not necessarily just about the female anato-
my, Nadine said that the mini-event was more
about women being free to express themselves
with no interruptions.

Apart from the Express Yourself night held
every Wednesday at the Hub, Nadine has now
broken ground in the local television industry in
the form of her new show titled Roots and Cul-
ture.

“T like the way entertainment is evolving,
there are people like F.DOT, Bodine Johnson,
Lyrically Blessed, Tada, Zolton, Baygon, Sketch,
SoSo Man, and even El Pedrino, these people
are killing it and people deserve to know about
them, that’s the purpose behind Roots and Cul-
ture.”

The show which premiered on Cable 12 can
be seen on Fridays at 10pm, and at 7.30pm on
Saturdays.

Also behind the upcoming Street Fair
planned for Rawson Square next month, Nadine
is truly setting the pace for entertainment on the
local front.

As a fixture in the local entertainment scene,
Nadine said it is simply a joy to see people just
like her working hard to take their talent to the
next level, and being a part of that in any shape
or form is her way of sharing the music with
the people.

THE STEP team of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity is set to
perform on the BET stage for the annual Spring Bling
“Get to Stepping” competition. This marks the first
time that an international fraternity has been invited
to participate in the event.

tional stage and said that the opportunity should
provide a strong foundation for great things to
happen particularly given the tremendous audi-
ence that BET attracts. The event will air this
weekend on the cable channel.

“You never know who will see the competition
when it airs and what doors this may open.”

SEE page 10







Nadine

Thomas-Brown

3








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Clean Team Wipes. Circle the items on ~
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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009



ARTS

THE TRIBUNE





FROM page nine

He added that the winner of
the contest will receive brag-
ging rights which for fraterni-
ties is priceless. He added that
the team will perform a combi-
nation of new and past moves in
the competition and will seek
to bring a very Bahamian/
Caribbean flair to their perfor-
mance by dressing in Androsia
shirts and straw hats as well as
stepping to Bahamian and
Caribbean music.

“We are looking to do very
well,” he said.

Although this is the group’s
first time on the BET stage, it is
not the first time that they have
competited against foreign
teams.

For the past two years, the
group has placed second in the
Stepping on the Shores step
show competition held in Nas-
sau. With this year’s competi-
tion scheduled for May, Mr
Moss said that it is a redemption
year and that they are ready to
claim that title.

i hye

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net



IF you’re looking for something fun and
interesting to do this weekend, your choic-
es are truly limitless. From concerts, art
shows, and even a beer-fest, Tribune Fea-
tures iS serving you our weekly top five
picks for the must do’s around town.

41. [In just three days, Tempo and BET Jazz
personality Empress Jeanille will set off the
6th annual Reggae All Stars concert at Clif-
ford Park. The event will feature a myriad of
local and Caribbean artist including Sizzla,
Capleton, TaDa and others, and is set to
begin at 11pm. Tickets are on sale at the
Marley Resort and Juke Box at a cost of
$60 VIP, and $100 backstage if purchased
before the day of the show.

2. Also on Saturday, Burns House is host-
ing its 3rd annual Beer-Fest at the Butler
and Sands grounds on JFK Drive. Begin-





| THIS 1967 Mustang was judged in the 2-B Class antiqu modified vehicles from 1949 to 1968.

22ND ANNUAL ANTIQUE

THE 22nd annual Antique Car Show
recently showcased on Arawak Cay,

i proved a true car lovers’ paradise as

i dozens of locals turned up to see some

i of the island’s best kept antique rides.
ning at 3pm, patrons will be offered a6 for More than 60 vehicles were on display
$10 special of many of the common brands showing some technical details of these

carried by Burns House including Guinness, :
Heineken, Colt 45, Red Stripe, Corrs light,
and many others. With an entrance fee of

$5, this event will be an easy chance to
unwind over the weekend.

3. The Express Yourself movement is host- §
ing a concert at the Hub art centre on
Shirley Street April 1. Performing will be an

interesting blend of local musicians, artists,

and poets. The event which starts at9pm,
has a cover charge of $10, and promises to |
be a true artistic night.

4. Organisers of the Reggae All Stars are
hosting a pre-concert sailaway on Friday,
where attendants will have a chance to

meet some of the performers forthe con- ;
cert including Capleton and others. Docking :
at Potters Cay Dock, the Tikki Island boat
will begin boarding at 8pm, and will leave at :
9. Tickets are priced at $10 in advance and :
$15 at the dock, and can be purchase at the
Marley Resorts or the Juke Box. i

5. Transforming Spaces 2009 is scheduled:
for this Saturday and Sunday. Persons will
be able to view some of the country’s top
artists at nine different galleries over the
course of one weekend. Tickets are priced
at $30 and available at the National Art
Gallery, Doongalik Studio, and the Ladder
gallery. The opening night which is this Fri-
day, will include a movie screening on Raw- |
son Square at 7.30pm, and later a party at
the Hub.





“ re]

THIS 1984 Camaro is owned by Lester Cash, the winner of the People’s Choice Award.

retro rides.

Ending with a total of ten divisions,
winners included Dereck Cleare’s 1946
Packard, Murray Forde’s 1940 Ford
Deluxe Coupe, William Whiteland’s
1955 Austin Healy, Don Aranha’s 1961
Corvette, Don Hunt’s 1985 Mercedes,
Andrew Hepburn’s 1985 Mercedes,
Don Aranha’s 1965 Chevy Pickup, Don-
ald Pinder’s 2003 Corvette 50th
Anniversary retro ride, and Lester
Cash’s 1986 Chevrolet Camaro winning
the people’s choice.

Troy Rodgers/Photo





# i 5 i \
VOLUNEERS of the 2008 Islands of the World Fashion Week
enjoy fruits of thier labor at a party held in thier honor.

Islands of the
World Fashion
Week thanks
volunteers

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

FINE wine, delicious cuisine and good conversation were the
order of the evening as the team that helped pull off the inau-
gural Islands of the World Fashion Week came together to cel-
ebrate its amazing success.

Volunteers, models and staff recently enjoyed the at home
hospitality of President of Mode Iles Ltd., Owen Bethel, who
was deeply appreciative of all the efforts and dedication given
by so many.

“We certainly appreciate all that you have put into it,” he
said. "There has been a core of executive workers who executed
[the event] but the real success came as a result of your input.
This is a small way of showing you that we really do appreciate
your efforts.”

And, the great
effort definitely paid
off. Islands of the
World Fashion Week
(IWFW) has been
nominated in the
"best fashion
show/week attended”
category of the 2009
Caribbean Fashion
Awards. The ceremo-
ny will be held in Bar-
bados on April 11.

For volunteer,
Treneil Hanna,
IWFW 2009 can't
come soon enough.

"Being one of the
Fashion Trade stu-
dents they opted for
me to go into the
sewing room and I got
to work with other
designers such as
Kevan Hall," said Mr
Hanna. "I got to be behind the scenes dressing models- it was
so much fun. I am excited that Mr Bethel would honour us for
being there because we were just doing what we love-fashion."

While Mr Hanna's only disappointment was that he was
not one of the designers in the 2008 showcase, he does plan on
applying again this year.

"T would expect IWFW 2009 to be like last year’s show but
times three," he said.

Mode Iles Ltd., also gave special recognition to top volunteer
staff and students who made their contributions to [WFW.

"The staff and students of the Bahamas Technical and





Vocational Institute (BTVI) are to be commended for hav-
ing come in and done everything they did in such a short peri-
od,” said Mr Bethel. "They did get a lot of commendations
from the designers so we will recognise them in another
form.”

Mr Bethel also rewarded the volunteers who gave an
extra effort in making the show a success. Volunteers who
went above and beyond the call of duty received special
gifts courtesy of BahaRetreat and The Beauty Spot.

“T asked [the coordinators] to recommend those persons
within their areas who went beyond the call of duty and
really excelled in terms of what was required," he said. "I
must say that I have gotten great and strong reactions because
everyone did very well and I have to recognise that. However,
there had to be probably one or two who stood out. So while
we would recognise those who really I think went far beyond
the call of duty, it is clear that the success of the event was a
result of a team effort."

The promotional video for
IWFW was also premiered at
the party. It showcased 15 of
the 33 island designers and
four guest designers who pre-
sented at the 2008 IWFW
showcase. The video is now
available to the public. A video
of the entire 2008 showcase
will be ready by August, just in
time for potential distribution
for the Miss Universe Pageant.

Mr Bethel said he looks for-
ward to working with the
group for the 2009 showcase
slated for November 4-8.

"T think we are beginning to
feel or become, as it were, one
family and as we grow and
develop in this way, we truly
will move the fashion industry
in The Bahamas to the next
_ a level.”



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25th, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MariINE FORECAST














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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2009

bes

ee
a ‘ oa hy .





JANOU CHOUKROUN’S (pictured below) shows her appreciation of the
environment and love of the ocean through a 20 piece art exhibition. The
pieces comprise mostly of decorated mirrors, frames, and book stands.



Eating healthy
at Don’ Woch

see page eight

|
W

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Feature Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

EMBRACING the elements of earth
and water, this week’s featured artist
is proving that beauty and art can be
found all around us especially when
we take the time to look.



Janou Choukroun is a Moroccan born,
French educated, and Spanish resident, who
has allowed her appreciation of the envi-
ronment and love of the ocean to inspire her
20 piece art exhibition.

Comprising mostly of decorated mirrors,
frames, and book stands, Janou said she
attempts to not just create a work of art,
but to also tell stories in her designs

In one of her favorite creations, which is
made from dried leaves, tree stems, ribbon,
and shells, Janou described one of the shells
in the piece as a rare find.

“A few years ago, I was in Italy and the
shell was given to me by an Italian fisher-
man who said the shell was passed on to
him by his father, who described the shell as
more than 100 years old.”

She explained: “Unlike other pieces that
I have seen, my creations are unique
because I set the mosaic stones in a way
that they enter each other, all for a smoother

Setting the
Stage for roots
and culture

see page nine



The Tribune SECTION B e



look.”

Janou who is self taught, said she has
been in love with seashells from since she
was a child. With some of the shells in her
possession since childhood, she said her
everyday job is walking the beach and shop-
ping for new and uniquely shaped shells.

With the shell only being a part of the
overall pieces, Janou said when most people
see her work, their first reaction is simply
“Wow. 2?

“Every mirror is unique, some of them
necessitated numerous hours of research
and patience as well as the work.

“The big pieces have taken more than
two weeks each to satisfactory completion,
but the essential difficulty has been to gath-
er beautiful shells which nowadays are more
and more rare to find on islands.”

The pieces which are like a glowing rain-
bow of pastels are coloured with rich
browns, oranges, soft pinks, luminescent
whites, lavenders, and silvers.

Apart from the colorful ribbons and
feathers, Janou has a unique sense of diver-
sity where she has incorporate several types
of shells.

They include pear] oysters, conch, cham-
bered nautilus, snail shells, Irish flat scallop,
whelks, starfish, and Mexican flat shells.

The exhibition which starts tomorrow at
the Anthaya Art gallery next to Sbarros
Cable Beach, will run until Sunday, during
which time visitors will have a chance to
view and discuss the pieces with Janou.









Earth Hour
set again
for this
Saturday

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THIS Saturday major
cities around the globe will
take part in an hour long
recognition of earth hour,
which means lights out for a
full 60 minutes.

First started in Sidney
Australia in 2007, nearly 2.2
million homes and business-
es contributed that year to
recognising the importance
of establishing global initia-
tives to combat global
warming.

Nearly 83 countries this
year have already commit-
ted to the initiative, and are
pledging a vote for planet
Earth in the first ever global
election between global
warming and earth.

From 8.30pm to 9.30pm,
participants will turn their
light switches off, and
remain in darkness for a
cause.

In the end, organisers are
aiming for 1 billion partici-

Nearly 83 countries
this year have already
committed to the initia-
tive, and are pledging
a vote for planet Earth

in the first ever global
election between glob-
al warming and earth.





pants, and if successful will
deliver their results to world
leaders at the Global Cli-
mate Change Conference in
Copenhagen later this year.

That conference will help
to determine official gov-
ernment policies against
global warming which will
eventually replace the
Kyoto Protocol.

On the local front, the
Four Seasons in Exuma has
already committed to this
cause, along with all offices
of the Ministry of Tourism.

Minister for Tourism
Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said yesterday, that his
ministry is more than excit-
ed to take part in this
endeavour.

“This initiative is very
important, and we think
that we need to get to the
stage where we conduct
similar projects.

“We in the Ministry of
Tourism have even started
within our own organisation
doing things to introduce
ways of conserving energy,
because in the end we in
the island communities are
most affected by environ-
ment changes”