Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

AAR
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DoUMeS Of MISSIN
boys found at sea

Community
eriel-stricken
alter tragic
end to search

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

TRAGEDY befell a close-knit
community after the lifeless bod-
ies of two missing boys were
pulled from the waters off Ade-
laide Beach yesterday.

The community, which mount-
ed a neighbourhood search for
the boys, was left grief-stricken
and filled with questions after the
sudden deaths of the two youth.
The boys, best friends Rovan
Smith, 9, and Craig Stubbs, 10,
were reported missing Sunday
evening.

According to reports, the boys
pulled a small blue skiff, which
reportedly had a hole in the bot-
tom, from the bushes before tak-
ing it out to sea. It is believed the
boys drowned in the rough tide
which carried them out into the
current.

Shortly after 11 am yesterday,
screams of anguish rang through
the air as Rovan's body was
brought ashore by a neighbour-
hood search party, which includ-
ed area MP Kendal Wright, his
face bloody from an apparent

SEE page six

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

EMOTIONAL
RELATIVES of
10-year-old

Craig Stubbs
come ashore as

a neighbourhood
search party
looks for his body.

e SEE PAGE TWO
FOR MORE PHOTOS

Major Freeport retailer
to lay off 21 of its staff

mw By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A MAJOR Freeport retailer,
owned by publicly-listed Freeport
Concrete, late yesterday
announced it was laying-off 21
staff, with its chairman and land-
lord agreeing to “subsidise the
rent for the next several months”
to aid its profitability and prevent

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more redundancies.

Ray Simpson, chief executive
of BISX-listed Freeport Concrete,
said the lay-offs took place yes-
terday with immediate effect, with
another worker taking early
retirement.

He explained that the down-
sizing was related to the worsen-
ing condition of the Freeport
economy, and the need for both
Freeport Concrete and the Home
Centre to further reduce costs
after paring back its monthly
operating expenses to the “bare

SEE page eight

ery Ki e Ny

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SPARKS could fly today
when a group of disgruntled
locals attempt to stage a “big
birthday bash” on Atlantis’
private Cove Beach in protest
of what they say are
“apartheid like” restrictions
placed on access to the beach
by the resort’s owners.

SEE page seven



Severely injured former basketball

Star still seeking justice 19 years on

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

NEARLY two decades after a devastating car crash left him crippled

for life, a former local basketball star is still seeking justice.

Lawyers for former local basketball star Daniel Williams, have filed
a “notice of motion” in the Supreme Court seeking an order to have

SEE page six



CSE b aii)
PCED eel

ae ar



The Bahamas
‘likely to wait for
unified position in
Turks and Caicos’
before decision

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas is likely to hold off
on reacting to the controversial polit-
ical situation in the Turks and Caicos
until the island’s governing and oppo-
sition parties “come to a unified posi-
tion” on the United Kingdom’s dras-
tic announcement, it has been sug-

gested.

PLP MP and former foreign affairs
minister Fred Mitchell, who met with
opposition People’s Democratic
Movement (PDM) members in Prov-
idenciales, Turks and Caicos on Sun-
day, said the PDM do not want to be

FORMER PREMIER
Michael Misick
officially stood down
yesterday. (AP)

seen to downplay serious accusations

of corruption levelled at the governing party by the British by
voicing objection to the recommendation that democratic
governance be suspended for two years in the twin island

nation.

“On the ground many of their supporters feel that what
the British did in terms of the corruption issues are correct. The
opposition want to be careful that they don’t be seen, when
arguing for democratic governance, that they don’t end up sup-
porting government on the corruption issue. They need to
sort out how they can approach that issue,” said Mr Mitchell.

Last week the UK, which has been conducting a Commis-
sion of Inquiry into rampant allegations of corruption in the
British Overseas Territory, announced that it intends to sus-
pend the executive and legislative branches of the TCI Gov-

SEE page seven

Diabetic woman
given out-of-date
medication

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia. net



Managing Editor

_ of Tribune hits out

at critics calling
for his removal

: mM By MEGAN REYNOLDS

A DIABETIC woman whose
life was put at risk when she was }
given out-of-date medication by a }
government-run pharmacy is con- }
cerned hundreds of others may }
also be in danger.

Insulin given to the 44-year-old }
by the pharmacy in Elizabeth :
Estates expired in October 2007,
more than a year before it was }
given to her in February and
again last week.

The woman has been diabetic i
for 20 years and is totally depen- :
dent on insulin injections two to }
three times a day to control sugar }
levels in her bloodstream. :

But when she took the expired }
insulin in February, her blood }
sugar levels shot up, making her }
feel nauseous, light-headed and }
with cramps in her legs. i

Confused by how her blood :
sugar could be rising, the Nassau
woman removed starch and sugar }
from her diet, but her blood sug-
ar levels continued to soar. i

After three weeks of feeling ill, :
the mother-of-two bought more }
insulin at a private pharmacy and
her blood sugar levels soon }

SEE page six

elem ge] ea ts eel atel= hay DebtSAVER

* Debt consolidation with built-in savings
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ND BAHAMA,

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

TRIBUNE Managing Editor

? John Marquis, in a radio inter-
? view yesterday, hit out at critics
:? who have called for his removal
? over a controversial Insight article
? published on Monday, March 9.

Mr Marquis told Jeff Lloyd, on

? Star 106.5FM’s “Jeffrey”, that he
: will not be intimidated by threats
? to remove his work permit for
? simply doing his job.

His investigative article

? sparked controversy when the

Insight article entitled, “The trag-
ic young pilot who knew too
much”, was published two weeks
ago, as it linked the mysterious

i disappearance of pilot Chauncey
i Tynes Jr in 1983 with former
? leader Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling
? and his connection to drug czar
? Carlos “Joe” Lehder.

Fervent supporters of Sir Lyn-

? den as “Father of the Nation”
? protested outside The Tribune’s
? Shirley Street offices last Tues-

SEE page eight





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







BILL REID, Director of the National
Hurricane Centre in Miami, Florida,
explains how critical Hurricane Hunters

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

OFFICIALS and the media got a first-hand look at a
United States Air Force C-1 hurricane hunter plane at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport yesterday dur-
ing the Caribbean Hurricane Awareness Tour.

The aircraft, operated by US Air Force reserve officers,
flies at about 10,000 feet above the eye of a hurricane.

This allows meteorologists and storm trackers to get a
forecast which is 20 to 30 per cent more accurate than
one which is reached by just using satellites alone.

This accuracy is particularly important in gauging a
storm's path and analysing potential evacuation areas,
officials said.

_

Weapon

are in storm forecasting after touring

the aircraft.

Tim Clarke/
Tribune staff



"Hurricane hunters are like our biggest weapon in our
arsenal for diagnosing what's going on with a hurricane. We
obviously use satellites to track them when they're starting
up, moving across the Atlantic, but we use computer mod-
els now to make the best forecast, and the better the data
we can gather, the better the initial conditions that we put
into those computer forecasts.

"Therefore flying the plane into the hurricane gives us
that data," Bill Reid, director of the National Hurricane



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LOCAL NEWS



COLONEL Dave Boris (second from the left) and US Air Force
Reserve Officers explain storm tracking pocedures to Minis-
ter of Environment Earl Deveaux during a tour of a C-1 Hur-
ricane Hunter.

Centre, said after the tour yesterday. Environment Min-
ister Earl Deveaux extended his thanks to the US gov-
ernment for the partnership, adding that instruments like

A RELATIVE holds up a photo of
10-year-old Craig Stubbs, who
drowned on Adelaide Beach.

ne oo
GRIEF — the aftermath of th
tragedy.

YS a



Poe

OFFICIALS AND MEDIA LOOK AT US AIR FORCE PLANE USED FOR TRACKING STORMS

THE HURRICANE HUNTER

the hurricane hunter are vital for detecting weather con-
ditions as early as possible to ensure the country is fully pre-
pared.

Director of the Department of Meteorology Arthur
Rolle said the hurricane hunter crew has consistently pro-
vided local meteorologists with data for storm tracking.

And although the upcoming storm season is predicted to
be relatively mild, having accurate forecasts is essential in
hurricane preparedness, Mr Rolle added.

Efforts

Colonel Dave Borsi, of the US Air-Force, said com-
bined efforts with the US Department of Defence allows
the base to operate 10 C-1 planes.

He said storm tracking plays a vital role in minimising the
amount of damage to life and property a hurricane can
inflict. "We know sometimes that we are impacting the air-
waves and airline traffic, but getting into those storms,
getting that data back is critical, it's crucial," he said.

According to a member of the US’ National Hurricane
Centre, only four hurricane hunters have been lost while
tracking storms since the mission took off in 1944.

After the official tour yesterday morning, which coin-
cided with the 59th annual World Meteorological Day,
groups of local children were scheduled to tour the aircraft
before it makes stops later this week in Mexico and
Trinidad and Tobago.

m PHOTOS:
Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



THE MOTHER of 10-year-old Craig Stubbs seen supported by friends and
relatives as a search party looked for her son's body.

A UNITED
STATES Coast
Guard helicopter
patrolled the
Adelaide Beach
area yesterday
in search of best
friends Rovan
Smith, 9, and
Craig Stubbs,
10, who were
reported miss-
ing on Sunday
evening.



Na at is

ee et a



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



© In brief

Kiwanians
urged to
attend March
26 meeting

The Kiwanis Club of Over-
The-Hill’s weekly meeting
will be held on Thursday,
March 26 at 8pm at Holy
Cross Community Centre on
Soldier Road.

Philip Stubbs, chairman of
the Securities Commission of
the Bahamas, will address the
club. He will speak about the
Securities Commission, its
role and challenges.

District governor Sharon
Dunn will be visiting the club.
All Kiwanians and their
guests are welcome to attend.

Cuba: US
embargo ‘still
Standing’
despite law

m HAVANA

Cuba’s state-controlled media
on Monday downplayed eased
US. rules on family ties with
Cuba, calling the measure a
defeat for the communist gov-
ernment’s foes that still left
Washington’s 47-year-old trade
embargo intact, according to the
Associated Press. The article in
the Communist Party newspa-
per Granma was the first offi-
cial mention of the Cuba claus-
es in a package signed into law
by President Barack Obama on
March 11 — nearly two weeks
prior. The law rolled back limits
on family travel and remittances
imposed by the Bush Adminis-
tration, effectively allowing
Americans with relatives in
Cuba to visit once a year, stay
as long as they wish and spend
up to $179 a day. The changes
only remain in effect until the
fiscal year ends Sept. 30.

Granma said the changes
“represent the first setback for
the anti-Cuban mafia and its
representatives in Congress,”
but added that “in practice, they
don’t affect the siege that suc-
cessive administrations have
maintained against our people.”

USS. law still bars most trade
with and travel to Cuba.

“These steps don’t restore
the rights of Cuban residents of
the United States to travel
freely to Cuba or approve the
rights of citizens of that country
to visit a neighboring island,” it
said. President Barack Obama
has said he is open to talks with
Cuban leaders, though he said
he does not yet favor lifting the
USS. embargo. Cuban officials
have sometimes criticized Oba-
ma, but have been far less hos-
tile than they were toward ex-
President George W. Bush.

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MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ...........

Plunging property value fears

Concern over building of New Providence
Road Improvement Project’s Corridor 18

Neko Grant



@ RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

RESIDENTS of West Bay
Street are concerned that the
construction of the New Provi-
dence Road Improvement Pro-
ject’s Corridor 18, and what
many feel is the impending relo-
cation of the container port to
Arawak Cay, will drastically
reduce property values in the
area.

Minister of Works Neko
Grant said his ministry has
received several complaints
from residents about the pro-
ject and is in the process of
responding.

However, he pointed out that
all of the appropriate notices
were posted and no part of the
road improvement plans have
changed.

“Personally I think it is a bit
of overreaction on the part of
some people and at the end of
the day we have to look at
what’s best for the common
good,” Mr Grant said.

On December 15 last year,
the NPRIP was relaunched with
the signing of a contract for
completion of the road works

between the government of the
Bahamas and Jose Cartellone
Construction Company.
Funding for the project was
provided from the Inter-Amer-
ican Development Bank (IDB)
in the amount of $100 million.
Corridor 18, which com-
mences on West Bay Street and
continues along to Saunders
Beach, will cost $2.3 million.
William Wong, president of
the Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
clation, said that there was no
real way to actually determine
how the situation will affect
property values at this point.
“Even the affect the place-
ment of the container port at
Arawak Cay would have on
property values in the area
would depend heavily on the

SaUMDERS BEACH

re-routing of the roads and how
it would alleviate traffic in that
area,” he said.

Solution

While Mr Wong said that it
was a good decision for gov-
ernment to remove the con-
tainer ports from the Bay Street
area, he added that the ideal
solution would have been to
place the facilities in the Clifton
Cay area.

“There is just no way of
knowing how it’s going to
impact the people in the area,
that’s if it’s not re-routed prop-
erly. This would affect the
whole Grove, Perpall Tract and
Vista Marina area,” Mr Wong
said.

Services suspended after New
BROMUS NCR VEL OM UES



See eee eereeeneneree P4

NEW Providence is experiencing a significant
water shortage which has resulted in the suspen-
sion of services, particularly in the southern part
of the island.

The Water and Sewerage Corporation report-
ed yesterday that the capital’s water supply is
presently being “severely negatively” impacted by
strong sea swells.

The swells, which are expected to subside by
today or tomorrow, are preventing the move-
ment of the vessel MT Titus, which provides
around 30 per cent of the New Providence’s
water supply.

As a consequence, water conservation mea-
sures are being taken in the form of reduction in
pressure during the overnight hours and during
the daytime off-peak hours in some areas.

The corporation said that it will do all in its
power to limit these conservation measures. How-
ever, the severity and length of time that these
measures will remain in place is subject to the ear-
ly restoration of the daily shipping operation.

Residents of southern New Providence, includ-
ing but not limited to the communities of Gold-
en Gates, South Beach, Pinewood Gardens and
surrounding areas, reported that they had no
water yesterday morning.

“Corporation personnel have restored sup-

Plpe.o0, Osc

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plies to those affected areas and will work to
avoid a recurrence today.

“The corporation sincerely apologises for the
inconvenience this is causing our customers and
we are working to restore our supply to normal
operating levels at the earliest opportunity,” the
WSC said in a press statement.

Barge

The MT Titus usually makes one trip per day,
bringing around three million gallons of water to
the capital.

However, since last Thursday, the barge has
only been able to make two trips to New Provi-
dence. The last trip was on Saturday.

“Presently our system demand is approximately
10.5 million imperial gallons per day and our
New Providence supply sources (desalination
plants and well-fields) total approximately nine
million imperial gallons per day, therefore with-
out the daily Titus delivery there is a supply
deficit of approximately 1.5 million imperial gal-
lons per day that has to be made up via conser-
vation measures as our strategic storage levels
(which are used to make up any short-term sup-
ply shortfalls) are low due to recent supply chal-
lenges,” the WSC said.



Minister for the Environment
Earl Deveaux said that when
the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank and government
went into discussions about the
NRIP, there were a number of




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environmental issues addressed
particularly surrounding the
Perpall Tract well fields.

In order to mitigate these
environmental issues a protect-
ed area was proposed to secure
the integrity of the well fields.

“The road corridors were
agreed upon based on a con-
sensus that this would cause
minimum environmental

impact. Corridor 18 was the
best way we could prevent any
serious environment or eco-
nomic impact to the area along
with providing a huge public
space at Saunder’s Beach,” the
minister said.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Geithner scores points, faces more risks

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House
says it does not live or die by the ups and downs
of the stock market. But others do. And on
Monday, that was good for Timothy Geithner.

With credit markets frozen, a public in high
dudgeon and a Congress on a populist crusade,
President Barack Obama's Treasury secretary
needed a bit of an uptick. He got it Monday
when the Dow Jones industrial average shot
up nearly 500 points after he unveiled his pri-
vate-public partnership to help relieve banks
of the toxic assets that have plunged the finan-
cial system into its crisis.

But Geithner still has lots to prove — to
financial markets, to Congress and to Americans
seething over executive bonuses and dimin-
ished 401k retirement accounts.

Unpaid back taxes cost him votes in the Sen-
ate during his confirmation. Bonuses for exec-
utives at embattled American International
Group Inc. drew Republican calls for his resig-
nation. And the Wall Street that proved so
friendly on Monday could just as easily turn on
him as it did last month when his broad outlines
for a rescue plan landed with a thud.

No stranger to tough times, Geithner this
week faces yet another test of his short Cabinet
tenure. The multi-tasking Geithner is not only
rolling out a new relief plan for banks, he's also
juggling an overhaul of the regulatory regime for
the financial sector, facing a couple of poten-
tially contentious hearings before Congress,
and planning the agenda for the April 2 summit
of top foreign leaders in London.

So far, so good.

"He fed the beast enough details to keep
the beast happy — today, today," said Robert
Litan, senior fellow for economic studies at the
Brookings Institution, emphasizing the fickle
nature of the stock market. "It's a very hungry
beast and it's a very forgetful beast."

Last month, Obama in a televised news con-
ference promised Geithner would unveil details
of a banking rescue. When Geithner offered
only a sketch of a plan in a badly reviewed
speech, the markets tanked.

This time, Geithner easily spelled out details
of the plan off-camera to a roomful of reporters
at Treasury and granted an interview to CNBC.
Then Obama placed his own stamp on the plan,
making brief televised remarks at the White
House with Geithner and Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke at his side.

"This is one more element that is going to be
absolutely critical in getting credit flowing
again,” Obama said. "It's not going to happen
overnight. There's still great fragility in the
financial systems. But we think that we are
moving in the right direction.”

The rescue plan might still need a good sales
pitch. The Dow's surge notwithstanding, Gei-
thner and the administration are facing an ide-
ological attack from the left and the right. Rep.

Eric Cantor of Virginia, the second-ranking
Republican leader in the House, called the plan
"fundamentally flawed."

"In it's current form, Secretary Geithner's
plan is a shell game that hides the true cost of
the programme from the taxpayers that will be
asked to pay for it," Cantor said.

And liberal economist Paul Krugman, whose
views as a columnist for The New York Times
influence opinion in Congress, said the plan
was "more than disappointing” in his Monday
column. "In fact," he added, "it fills me with a
sense of despair." He called for the govern-
ment to take temporary control of insolvent
banks. "That's what Sweden did in the early
1990s," he wrote.

The Obama administration has not hidden its
disdain for Krugman's criticisms, and Geithner
made his clear on Monday. "We are the United
States of America," he said tartly. "We are not
Sweden."

Moreover, Congress's attempts to rein in
compensation for companies that receive finan-
cial aid has made some private investors wary of
entering into a partnership with the federal gov-
ernment. Geithner will be walking that tight
rope today when he testifies before the House
Financial Services Committee.

The hearing is billed as an examination of the
$165 million in bonus payments made last week
to employees of AIG's Financial Products divi-
sion. The House last week overwhelmingly
approved legislation setting a 90 per cent tax on
bonuses for employees of firms that receive
financial aid. Over the weekend, Obama's eco-
nomic team warned of possible dangers with
such a targeted tax measure. Geithner, doubt-
less, will be asked to explain.

Sitting with Geithner at the witness table
will be Bernanke and William Dudley, president
and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of New
York. The Fed, a source of AIG's federal assis-
tance, was aware of the bonuses and concluded
they were legally binding.

On Thursday, Geithner will testify before
the House Financial Services Committee again,
this time to unveil the administration's pro-
posed overhaul to financial sector regulations.
The administration and Congress and working
on a series of fronts, including increased over-
sight and controls of previously unregulated
markets such as hedge and private equity funds.
Lawmakers and the administration also have
embraced the idea of an overarching regula-
tor, such as the Fed, that would oversee financial
firms that could pose risks to the entire banking
system. Risk has become the by-word of the
current financial crisis. As Geithner empha-
sized Monday, too much risk caused it, too little
risk is perpetuating it. And for Geithner, the
risks don't seem to end.

(This article was written by Jim Kuhnhenn,

Associated Press Writer).





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Bahamians
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discontent on
Mr Marquis

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To The Tribune Staff and the
People of the Bahamas concern-
ing the events that took place
Tuesday, March 17th, outside the
Tribune building:

The political passion within
the Bahamian people is absolute-
ly praise worthy. However, even
the most earnest and honestly
well meant intentions come to
nothing if they are misdirected. I
am familiar with both The Tri-
bune’s reporting of the occasion,
as well as Mr. Lincoln Bain’s cov-
erage in his show ‘Controversy
TV’, and it seems that what is
really at issue is the residing dis-
content within the Black Bahami-
an population with the “other”;
the perceived foreign oppressor.
As Mr. Bain rightly pointed out,
“For some out here [at the
protest], this is the Bahamas, vers-
es the old colonist government of
England.”

The cruelty and injustice of
Colonialism is undeniable, and
that it is perhaps the single most
disruptive and lingering crimes
against all of humanity I should
think makes it a matter of con-
tention for the Bahamian people,
and rightly so. But perhaps it
would be better if the people of
this country keep in mind that it
was not a crime exclusive to
either Bahamians, or Africans but
to all non-Anglo (and non-Fran-
co for that matter) peoples of the
Earth, regardless of particular
ethnicity, and thus is not a matter
that can effectively be addressed
on a merely local level.

The outrage of the Bahamian
people at the comments made
against Sir Lynden Pindling were,
I think, not so much the result of
any unjust allegations (or facts),
but that some ‘non-Bahamian’,
some ‘white Englishman’ Mr.
Marquis made them. The
Bahamian people disregard Mr.
Marquis’s residence within the
country, as well as his contribu-
tions to the society through The
Tribune. Because he is white the
Bahamian people refuse to accept
him as a Bahamian. Though he
is not my concern, it is perhaps
understandable then if he him-
self retains his British heritage;
in fact there is little else he can do
against such a single-minded prej-
udiced society.

The society remains limited in
this manner simply because it
cannot move past the injustices
in its history. This is by no means
pleading the case for the British
Government, or saying that what
they did should be forgotten.
Quite the opposite. But if
Bahamians want to address these
problems and move forward into
a progressive future, then they

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must actually aim their discon-
tent appropriately, and the appro-
priate focus of such an address is
not with small local figures like
Mr Marquis.

The Queen of England, Eliza-
beth IIT, is still, even now, the
Supreme Leader and Head of the
Bahamas, as her successors were
before her. Undemocratically she
remains sovereign over all the
Bahamian people; a position
guaranteed her by the crimes of
Her past government, and the
short-sightedness of the Bahami-
an people themselves.

Whether or not Mr Marquis
comes or goes that fact remains
and if Bahamians sincerely wish
to finally rid themselves of the
bitter taste of an oppressive and
unremorseful regime, then what
they need to do is dispose of that
useless heirloom which, within a
single individual, signifies all the
crimes against the Bahamian peo-
ple, as well as their fellow
oppressed globally.

I would like to say that I trust,
but I sincerely hope that this
country’s children do not have to
live under the same oppression
that our parents and their par-
ents before them had to live
under.

Until that day I remain.

S.C.B.

Nassau,

March 20, 2009.

(This letter writer dwells on
the so-called past crimes com-
mitted against this country and
its people by the British Govern-
ment and its monarch. It would
be interesting to know what these
crimes were and to balance them
against the tremendous heritage
the British left this country from
the day in 1717 when Woodes
Rogers, the first Royal governor,
drove out the pirates and restored
commerce. Later administrations
instituted a system of education,
established the Westminster sys-
tem of parliamentary government
and gave us a judiciary of which
at one time we could be proud.

(Often it was the British
administrator who protected
black Bahamians against the bru-
tality of their own, both black and
white. And that is where history
becomes clouded when persons
who know little about our history
presume to pontificate.

(We recommend the reading
of the “Land of the Pink Pearl,” a
book written by L D Powles, a
barrister-at-law of the Inner Tem-
ple and magistrate in the
Bahamas in the late 19th century.
As this book was banned for dis-
tribution in the Bahamas because
of its subject matter and the per-
sonalities involved, we do not
know if a copy is available at the
Nassau Public Library.

(Before Magistrate Powles, an
Irishman, took up his post here in
the late 19th century he readily
admitted: “When I left England I
knew next to nothing of the
coloured race, and I do not sup-
pose I had exchanged a dozen
words with a black man or
woman in my life.”

(When he arrived in the
Bahamas he determined to rem-
edy this omission as he was “sin-
cerely anxious to do them jus-
tice.” He said that he “took every
available means to acquaint” him-
self with their “true character,
and the conditions under which
they lived.”

“It did not surprise me,” he
wrote, “to find that assaults by
men upon women were very com-
mon among them, knowing how
common they are among our own
lower classes at home, but I
thought they were too leniently
dealt with in the Police Court in
Nassau.”

(His mistake was that he was
determined to right that wrong.
One day he announced from the
bench that he would send any
man who came before him for
assaulting a woman straight to jail
without the option of a fine. In
one month he sent three black
men to jail for such an assault.
However, the following month a
“delicate-looking black girl” came
to him requesting equal justice.
She was the servant in the home
of a white man, who beat her,
“and turned her out of doors
without paying her wages.”

(As a true Irishman, trained
in the British tradition that all
persons, regardless of race or gen-
der, are equal before the law, he
heard her case and sentenced her
white master to a month in
prison. The only evidence against
the master was her own word and
the word of three black persons
who had witnessed the beating.
Blacks were delighted with the
magistrate, many whites were
outraged, blaming Powles for rais-
ing the race issue. Scurrilous let-
ters and newspaper articles were
written by an influential group of
Bahamians against him. Eventu-
ally a small group of powerful
white locals forced him out of the
country — a performance the
PLP now wish they could repeat
against Mr Marquis. The House
of Assembly refused to pay Mag-
istrate Powles’ passage back to
England, leaving him in financial
embarrassment. He had “started
the race question, and therefore
his usefulness in the colony was at
an end,” he was told. He was run
out of the country “for adminis-
tering even-handed justice
between black and white.”

(When we talk about crimes
against the Bahamian people we
would be well advised to look to
our own, not the Monarch and
former British administrators. —
Ed).



Racism and
Rwanda

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: There’s no such thing
as a black racist (Tribune
March 17, 2009).

Ever heard of Rwanda?

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,

March 17, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 5



°inbrief Gunman shot

dead by police
after car chase

Baliamas Association
of Consulting neers
pleased with Chinese
Balia Mar agreement

THE Bahamas Association
of Consulting Engineers said }

it is “very pleased” that an
agreement has been reached
with the Chinese govern-
ment to make the Baha Mar
development project a reali-
ty.

Said the association in a
statement: “We recognise
that this milestone under-
standing between the con-
cerned parties could not
have materialised at a more
auspicious moment in time.
Notwithstanding the agree-

ments are preliminary at this :

juncture, the organisation
desires to see this project
move forward expeditious-
ly.”

The association said it

hopes that during the prelim-

inary agreement discussions
with the Chinese govern-
ment, the question of local

engineers contributing to the }

project will be raised.

It said engineering con-
sulting firms are ready to
partner with Baha Mar, the

Chinese government, and the :

Bahamas government to

move the multi-billion resort :

project forward.

PMH improvements.

praised by patients

PATIENTS are praising
dramatic improvements at

Princess Margaret Hospital’s i

public pharmacy.

The improvements follow
a string of complaints pub-
lished in The Tribune over

recent weeks about poor ser- }

vice and long delays.
Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis has respond-
ed to public calls for better
service with new opening
hours and extra staff.
Activist Rodney Moncur,
who voiced concern about
the pharmacy several weeks

ago, said: “There is no doubt :

things are much better now.
IT applaud Dr Minnis for
responding so quickly.”
The pharmacy is now
open from 8am-9pm on
weekdays (9am-1pm on Sat-
urdays) with a drop-off ser-
vice between 8am-noon and
collections up to 9pm.
Patients’ representative
Michelle Ferguson was on
hand yesterday to explain
the improved services and

take names of senior citizens }

and disabled persons await-
ing medication.

She and colleague Lydia
Adderley are among staff
who will ensure patients’
concerns are addressed.

One patient said yester-
day: “Things are much more
smooth and professional
now.”

A wheelchair ramp has
also been installed to
improve access for disabled
patients.

TROPICAL
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A HIGH-SPEED chase in
the area of Pride Estates on
Sunday night led to a police
officer shooting and killing an
unidentified gunman.

The incident occurred after
9pm when a concerned citizen
called the police control room
to report that his car had been
hit by a white Cadillac while
driving along John F Kennedy
Drive.

The caller told police that
the Cadillac did not stop, but
Kept on driving.

Police then dispatched a
unit to investigate.

The officers caught up to
the Cadillac on Fire Trail
Road and tried to stop the
car.

However, the driver of the
Cadillac kept going and even-
tually turned into Allen Drive

in Pride Estates and drove to
the end of that road. The
police gave chase.

After the Cadillac came to a
standstill, two men got of the
car.

The passenger produced a
firearm, Asst Commissioner
of Police Hulan Hanna said.

The armed man reportedly
started shooting at the police
and the officers returned fire,
hitting the man in the upper
torso and fatally wounding
him.

None of the police officers
were injured during the gun-
fight.

Police are still searching for
the other person in the Cadil-
lac.

An island-wide manhunt
has been launched, Mr Hanna
said.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bodies of missing boys found at sea

FROM page one

injury to the head. Around 2.30
pm yesterday Defence Force
officers found Craig's lifeless
body about a quarter mile out
to sea.

When The Tribune arrived at
the scene yesterday morning,
emotional relatives and dozens
of concerned residents converged
in disbelief while a neighbour-
hood search party of about 20
waded about a mile out to sea

in the low tide for signs of the
two boys. Private boats hired by
family and a US Coast Guard
helicopter and the RBDF also
combed the area.

The small blue skiff the boys
used to go out to sea, had been
pulled onshore the night before.

Rovan's family described him
as an active, fun-loving boy who
enjoyed exploring the beach near
his home. The third grade Clar-

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2009.

Street, Pinewood

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Bahamas died at the Princess Margaret Hospital,
Shirley Street, Nassau, on Sunday, 22nd March,

He is survived by his parents, Kemraj "Allan"
and Gwendolyn Edilall, his sister, Priadashni
"Pria" Edilall, brothers, Keiran and Kristen
Edilall, grandparents, Herman and Viola
Burrows and Kimraine Edilall, nieces, Kemren
and Kaylen Edilall, his nephew, Kemraj Edilall,
aunts, Miriam Proctor, Marjorie Archer and
Nadira Jafar, uncles, Rajesh Edilall, Praim Jafar
and Robert Archer, special friend, Kaisha
Hanchell, numerous cousins and many other
relatives and friends including, Junise and

Shericka Edilall.

Funeral service will be held at St. Gregory's
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on Saturday, 28th March, 2009 at 11:00a.m.

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idge Primary student was an avid
swimmer, his aunt Rosie told
The Tribune. She said the boys
went to the beach to find a crab
shell for Rovan's school project
on the fateful afternoon.

Craig's grandmother, Barbara
Morrison, said Craig lived in Vic-
toria Gardens, but often spent
the weekends with her at her
Adelaide home. After working
the late-shift on Saturday, she
last saw Craig Sunday morning
after making him breakfast.

"T told him go and eat the
breakfast and I make sure told
him that if he going anywhere,
let somebody know where he
going, and the children always
play right 'round here in this vil-
lage”.

Shortly after 1 pm Sunday, she
said her brother awoke her and
that's when the family realised
Craig, a student of Garvin Tynes
Primary, was not at home. After
calls around the neighbourhood,
it was discovered that Rovan was
also missing, which prompted a
neighbourhood search on Sun-
day.

As police arrived on the scene
and tried to cordon off the area
around noon, the large group,
which had started to gather from

early yesterday morning, became
agitated. Grieving relatives loud-
ly protested that the police
should have sent divers to comb
the area Sunday evening for the
boys.

"The people from Adelaide
find their body — not a police
diver come out here to look fa’
the body — and they want to
run the people from about Ade-
laide. I think that's really poor,"
said Idela Brown, a family friend

Assistant Superintendent Wal-
ter Evans commended the close-
knit community for their efforts
yesterday. He said police and
RBDF officers responded to the
call for the missing boys Sunday
night, but their search proved
fruitless.

One resident of the area
believes the boys may have seen
a robbery in the area shortly
before their deaths. However,
ASP Evans said he was not
aware of any robbery in the area
on Sunday.

Up to press time their deaths
were classified as drownings.
While an autopsy is scheduled
to determine an official cause of
death, police do not suspect foul

play.

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FROM page one

returned to normal.

Out-of-date medication

It was not until she returned to the Elizabeth Estates clinic to buy
more of the medicine last week that she noticed it had expired in
2007, and realised the insulin that had made her ill in February was from

the same out of date batch.

She told The Tribune that she is concerned that hundreds of other
diabetics might also have been taking the expired medication and

their lives could be at risk.

She said: “Supposing I was unable to go to the private pharmacy and
kept taking the expired one, and I ended up in intensive care and

dying?

“For them to issue one and then another a month-and-a-half later is
not right; it means a lot of persons have been issued these expired med-

ications.

“It’s carelessness. It should be picked up, and I’m sure I’m not the
only person to get these expired medications.”

The diabetic woman believes she was saved by paying attention to
her diet, her blood sugar levels, and finding alternative medication when
the previous insulin did not seem to be working.

Had she not been so conscientious, she said: “I could have slipped

into a coma and died.”

She added: “I really got upset when I found out.
“Tt is the Ministry of Health’s mandate to provide quality healthcare
for the citizens of this country, but giving diabetics expired insulin

isn’t quality healthcare.

“T don’t know what’s going on. If there are other ways of saving mon-
ey you don’t cut costs by putting other people’s lives at risk.

“The government needs to do better, and the only way they will do
something about it is to put it in the papers, because when you go to
them they ignore you, and I am sure there are other people out there
who have it and are unaware they have been taking it.”

The Ministry of Health is investigating the incident.

FROM page one

Mario Bowe — the man accuse
of causing Williams’ injuries —
committed to prison for failing to
obey a court order since 2006.

Williams starred on the local
basketball scene until a devastat-
ing accident on January 22, 1990
left him a paraplegic and ulti-
mately changed his life forever.
Williams was the front seat pas-
senger in a Nissan Sunny carry-
ing five young people when a big
Bronco truck reportedly ran a red
light on Collins Avenue and
slammed into the car. Williams,
then 20, suffered two broken
bones in his neck in addition to
spinal damage. The injury left him
paralysed and confined to a
wheelchair, with his hands severe-
ly contorted and his legs useless.
Since then Williams has been
dependent on National Insurance
pay-outs and hand-outs from sym-
pathisers.

Williams won a default judg-
ment against Bowe — the truck
driver — and subsequently a judg-
ment for damages of nearly
$318,000. That judgment has yet
to be enforced as Mr Bowe has
never appeared on an order of
examination by the court to deter-
mine his assets. Lawyer Peter
Maynard, who with lawyer Jason
Maynard, represent Williams in
the personal injury matter,

severely injured

appeared before Justice Neville
Adderley yesterday afternoon on
the notice of motion which was
filed in January of this year.
Bowe’s lawyer Damian Gomez,
who appeared with Roger Gomez
Jr, told the court that his client
contends that he was never served
with any writ, order of examina-
tion or any of the other relevant
documents regarding the nearly
two decades old matter, despite
Mr Maynard’s statements to the
contrary. Mr Gomez argued yes-
terday that on that basis his client
is entitled to have the application
dismissed and all other orders set
aside. Mr Maynard, however, read
several affidavits to the court that
stated occasions when Mr Bowe
was allegedly served with the rel-
evant court documents. On one
occasion it was claimed that the
documents were thrown at Mr
Bowe’s feet after he had refused
to accept them.

Mr Gomez, however, submit-
ted that his client contends that
some of those persons were not
telling the truth.

He also pointed out that his
client claims that he has been out
of work for four years and has
only $1,000 to his name. The case
was adjourned to Monday, June
22, at 10 am.

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agreement with their advertising contract, all queries
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Advertisers with quenes or complaints are urged to
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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 7



Turks and Caicos

FROM page one

ernment and allow British Gov-
ernor Gordon Wetherell to run
the day-to-day affairs of the coun-
try for two years.

PLP leader Perry Christie, Mr
Mitchell and members of the par-
ty’s foreign affairs committee,
travelled to the Turks and Caicos
over the weekend “to find out
what their views are and how in
any way we could assist.”

“The government side (Pro-
gressive National Party) clearly
wants some assistance (from the
PDM). They’ve been quite strong
about the whole issue of democ-
ratic governance, but the oppo-
sition has some concerns about
things other than what Govern-
ment does, matters internally.
What’s left is that they have to
discuss this internally and then
they'll sort out their position and
they'll let us know,” Mr Mitchell
said of the outcome of the PLP
meeting with the PDM.

Meanwhile, former Premier
Michael Misick officially stood
down yesterday — slightly earlier
than originally planned — to
allow his premier-elect, Galmo
Williams to take over the running
of the country for the time being.

In a statement announcing his
departure, Mr Misick said the
moment “certainly ring(s) with a
degree of finality, not only for me
as your premier, but for the polit-
ical and economic progress of the
Turks and Caicos Islands as a

whole.”

He said that the move by the
British will “take (TCD back to
a time we had thought long past
in which we had to endure the
indignity of colonial interfer-
ence with our rights as free peo-
ple.”

Defending his government’s
achievements while in office, Mr
Misick added that he would “take
every step open to me” to oppose
the suspension of the constitu-
tion.

Mr Misick and his then pre-
mier-elect, Galmo Williams, vis-
ited Nassau last Friday to meet
with Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, who is also on the
CARICOM bureau, and Opposi-
tion members in order to raise
awareness of the island’s plight.

Mr Misick has described the
UK’s intention, which is due to
come into effect when the British
present their final report on the
inquiry — probably by April 30
— as “draconian..modern-day
colonialism” and suggested other
countries and international bodies
should lobby the British on behalf
of the Turks and Caicos.

Mr Mitchell noted yesterday
that while it would not be the
opposition in the Bahamas, but
the Government that would make
any statement that should be
made about the situation, the
PLP is “always concerned about



PLP MP and former foreign affairs
minister Fred Mitchell.

issues of democratic governance”
and is happy to help “frame the
debate” for the TCI.

However, he added: “I think
everyone wants us to be sensitive
to the internal affairs of the coun-
try.”

On Sunday Deputy Prime Min-
ister and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette declined
to comment on what the Gov-
ernment’s position on the UK’s
expressed intention to impose
direct rule.

A spokesperson for the Prime
Minister said he would not be
making a statement on the issue.

FROM page one

Beach vendor Paul Rolle and Jeffrey Davis are
organising the event and informed members of the
media and the public, by advertisements in the press,
that they will be providing water transportation to
the beach for anyone who wishes to participate from
10am today.

There they plan to gather before making a public
statement about their opposition to the restriction
placed on access to the beach — located at the west-
ern end of Cabbage beach on Paradise Island in
front of the luxurious Cove tower of the Atlantis
resort.

Yesterday, senior vice president of public affairs
at Atlantis, Ed Fields, said Kerzner International’s
position on the matter is “very clear”: That Mr Rolle
“is using the emotional issue of beach access to fur-
ther his own selfish monetary gain.”

Noting that for a number of years, Mr Rolle “has
enjoyed a very lucrative contract with Atlantis,
which allows him to rent umbrellas at Atlantis
Beach,” the Atlantis spokesman said today’s event
“is not about access to the beach.”

“This is about Mr Rolle’s attempt to force us to
grant him permission to rent umbrellas on The Cove
Beach (and) while public access to beaches is accom-
modated, the right to restrict commerce is reserved.”

Mr Fields added that Atlantis “hopes that the
general public is not supportive of any actions tak-
en by Mr. Rolle that negatively impacts the already
fragile tourism industry.”

In a statement delivered to The Tribune yesterday
entitled, “Taking back our public beaches”, Mr

f

~



Private Atlantis beach

Rolle and Mr Davis call on “all patriotic Bahamians
to join us to secure the beaches for future genera-
tions.”

Their action comes two months after an Atlantis
executive, responding to similar assertions by attor-
ney Paul Moss in a letter seen by The Tribune, not-
ed that there is no legal requirement for Kerzner
International to allow any member of the public to
access beaches in front of property it owns on Par-
adise Island.

Giselle Pyfrom, senior vice president and gener-
al counsel for the resort, told Mr Moss, who had spo-
ken out on behalf of Mr Rolle, that she was “not able
to agree” that the public has a right to “unfettered
access” under the law to the Cove Beach, or to any
beach attached to private property in the Bahamas.

“Access to and over property that we own is a
matter for our sole discretion,” she wrote.

The legal counsel added that where the company
does allow members of the public to access the
beach, as it does on Cabbage beach, this is despite
having no legal requirement to do so beyond the
mean high water mark.

Since that letter was published, Mr Rolle who
originally asserted that “all beaches in the Bahamas
are public”, called on Government to “‘set the record
straight” in terms of the law.

At the same time, he said, he is hoping for a “mas-
sive demonstration” at the Cove beach to protest the
lack of access that has manifested itself in his
removal from the property on previous occasions.

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www.btcbahamas.com >
a ll

PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

bone” during the past two years.

Mr Simpson said reducing payroll costs would
free up further positive cash flow to enable the
Home Centre to increase its inventory purchases.

He explained that Freeport Concrete’s chairman,
Hannes Babak, who is also the current chair of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority’s (GBPA) Port
Group Ltd affiliate, “has agreed to subsidise the
rent for the next several months in an effort to help
our profitability in order to keep the remaining staff
employed during these hard economic times.”

Mr Babak is also the Home Centre’s landlord.
The retailer is also reorganising its store format to
“focus on key products.”

The Home Centre lay-offs are related both to
the current economic downturn and the financial
condition of its parent company. Freeport Con-
crete’s accumulated deficit, at its financial year-end
of August 31, 2008, was $5.789 million, meaning
that this is the total sum it has lost ever since it
came into existence.

At that balance sheet date, Freeport Concrete’s
external auditors, KPMG, had noted that the com-
pany’s current liabilities exceeded its current assets
by $2.607 million. However, the company was still
considered a going concern because of its positive
cash flow, ability to obtain supplier credit, and gen-
eration of positive cash flow.

Major Freeport retailer

quarter loss that almost trebled to $220,000, a 197 per
cent increase against the prior year’s $74,000 loss.

In a previous interview with Tribune Business,
Mr Simpson explained that Freeport Concrete was
still plagued by the need to raise additional capital to
finance inventory purchases for its Home Centre
retail format. Currently, Mr Simpson said the outlet
was losing business because it was unable to pur-
chase enough stock to meet customer demand.

“We need more cash,” he told Tribune Business
yesterday. “It’s as simple as that. If we don’t get it,
we will keep running out of inventory in the Home
Centre. Without the cash, we can’t get the invento-
ry we need.”

Mr Simpson wrote in his first quarter note to
shareholders: “A key factor affecting our financial
performance is that we need to raise additional cap-
ital to be able to purchase more inventory, which will
drive up sales at the Home Centre.

“Despite the poor economic climate in Grand
Bahama, we see that there is still business we could
get. However, we are losing sales because we are
constantly running out of inventory due to the fact
that our foreign vendors are not giving us the same
level of credit we enjoyed prior to the recession in
the US. and our operating line of credit at the bank
is fully utilised.”



The company subsequently incurred a 2009 first

FROM page one

day in a demonstration organised
by PLP constituency hopeful Paul
Moss to condemn the British edi-
tor for abusing his “privilege” of
free speech by discrediting the
legacy of Sir Lynden.

However, Mr Marquis argued
that freedom of speech is a right,
not a privilege.

He said: “I am a working jour-
nalist doing my job and if you
think free speech is a privilege
you have a problem.

“Free speech is a right under
the law, not a privilege, and Mr
Moss, who I gather is some kind
of lawyer, ought to know these
things.”

Mr Marquis defended his arti-
cle as telling the story of an
upstanding Bahamian, Chauncey
Tynes Sr, who approached him
seeking justice for his son. It was
not a story, said Mr Marquis, that
he had gone in search of.

And justice, he said, is hard to
come by in the Bahamas where a
number of ordinary citizens are
denied the right to a fair trial
because of the way political, reli-
gious and masonic affiliations
have had a profoundly detrimen-
tal affect on the judicial system.

Mr Marquis said: “Ordinary
Bahamians come to me to look
for justice and I have given them
justice in a form several times,
and they thank me for it.

“This story was not sought by
me, this story came to me from
an ordinary Bahamian man who
wanted to get something off his

Managing Editor

chest, and he came to me because
he knew that he could trust me,
and that trust has been built up.”

Newspapers, and particularly
The Tribune, is an institution ded-
icated to fighting the cause of the
ordinary man, Mr Marquis said.

And although his article has
ignited emotive responses from
Sir Lynden’s faithful followers,
Mr Marquis said he has heard lit-
tle factual evidence to disprove
any of the allegations made
against the former leader.

He said: “Not a single contem-
porary of Sir Lynden has actually
come out to defend him other
than Perry Christie who has made
a statement which is in total con-
tradiction of everything he said
25 years before.

“And the reason is because it is
indefensible, and I think it has
had a very detrimental affect on
Bahamian society.”

He argued that the role of the
press is to report things, comment
on things, and to tell the truth, to
make people think, stimulate
inquiry, reaction, and to get
response.

He said: “If it was not for The
Tribune this country would have
gone belly-up a long time ago,
because The Tribune keeps things
on track.

“T believe in its ethos, I believe
in its philosophy, ‘Being bound
to swear to the dogmas of no mas-
ter’, and I think it has done a
tremendous job.”

The Tribune has become the
undisputed market leader and
defied global trends with an 80
per cent rise in sales over the last
ten years, which Mr Marquis
attributes to creating an interest-
ing and provocative newspaper
prepared to take on the issues.

“It’s well written and it tells the
truth,” he said.

“It doesn’t avoid categories of
stories that other newspapers do.
We cover all stories of all cate-
gories.

“We are doing the right job for
the Bahamas and this great little
country has benefited from what
we have done.”

As the managing editor pre-
pares to retire in May he said he is
confident about leaving the news-
paper in the hands of a team of
bright young Bahamian journal-
ists.

“We have an extremely good
staff and I am quite happy to hand
over the paper to them because I
am sure they are ready to carry on
the fight for freedom of speech
and ensure that politicians do not
browbeat the public,” he said.

“T don’t allow myself to be
pushed around by anybody.
Nobody can intimidate me.

“The working journalist is right
there on the front line asking
tough questions and making life
uncomfortable for politicians.

“When I get criticised by politi-
cians I don’t lose sleep over it, I
am deeply satisfied.

“That is really what being a
good journalist is. If they were
praising me I would have a real
problem, believe me.”

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



‘Golden girl’ third
in 400 at Hurricane

Invitational
FROM page 11

will open up in the 100m on
April 11 at the University of
Miami, but she won’t run her
first 200m until April 23.

Also racing in the 400m was
Kristy White, a Bahamian
sophomore at UM who was
timed in 56.77 for tenth place
overall after she got fifth in heat
two.

As for White, who came
home to try out for the Olympic
team last year, Ferguson-
McKenzie said she ran well,
coming off an indoor season
that saw her just miss qualifying
for the NCAA Championships.

“She’s coming along. She ran
a pretty good time in the 400,
but her best event is the 200.
She will also run the 100, so
she’s coming along,” Ferguson-
McKenzie said.

With this being the IAAF
World Championship year, Fer-
guson-McKenzie said she’s not
sure if White will come home
in June for the trials because of
the hectic schedule she has with
her major in medicine.

“She just has to come and get
it done and then go back and
study,” said Ferguson-McKen-
zie. “But it all depends on her
schedule because she has to
take the MCAT this year.”

Another Bahamian, Tiavan-
nia “Tia’ Thompson, competing
unattached, was fourth in the
women’s 100m hurdles. She ran
14.32. Yanique Booth won the
race in 13.67.

The Star Trackers Track Club
had a number of athletes who
competed at the meet, but the
results of their events were not
available up to press time last
night.

The majority of those athletes
will be competing this weekend
at the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations’ final tri-
als for the Carifta Games that is
scheduled to be held in St Lucia
over the holiday weekend.

Ferguson-McKenzie, who
won the Austin Sealy award as
the most outstanding athlete in
her final appearance in 1995,
had these words of advice for
the aspiring athletes trying out
for the team.

“Don’t stress out. It’s always
easy when you go in there with
a qualifying time,” she said.
“Just go out there and have fun.
Nobody is going to give you
anything, so you just have to go
out there and perform.”

Meanwhile, over at the
Louisiana Classics Collegiate
Invite in Lafayette, Louisiana,
Grand Bahamian Olympian
Michael Mathieu opened up his
season in the men’s 100.

Competing as a member of
the Tiger Olympians, Mathieu
ran 10.51 seconds for second
place. Gabriel Mvumvure of
Louisiana State University won
the race in 10.43.

Mathieu, who ran on the sec-
ond leg of the Bahamas men’s 4
x 400 relay team that won the
silver in August ‘08 at the Bei-
jing Olympic Games in China,
also anchored the Tigers
Olympians to first place in the 4
x 4 relay in 3:09.97.

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‘Baby Boy Rolle dies at 65

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

KIRKLAND ‘Baby Boy’
Rolle, who fought twice for the
British Commonwealth light
heavyweight title, will probably
be remembered as one of the
Bahamas’ best professional box-
ers.

The 65-year-old Bahamian
light-heavy and heavyweight
champion died over the week-
end.

Listed at 6-feet, Rolle
amassed an impressive win-loss-
draw ring record of 36-17-4 dur-
ing a span that covered two
decades from 1960-1982.

Back in the early stages of
boxing, competitors were best
known by their nicknames and
hardly anybody remembered
what Rolle’s first name was.

But you called the name
“Baby Boy’ Rolle and just about
everybody could recall his
tremendous ability in the ring.

“In my opinion, Baby was one
of the greatest Bahamian fight-
ers of his generation,” said for-
mer cruiserweight champion Pat
‘the Centreville Assassin’ Stra-
chan.

“JT met him in the early 70s
and he was always a nice per-
son, always likable and he got
along with everyone in the gym.
He was a sparring partner at one
time for former world champion
(Mohammed) Ali when he was
in his heyday.”



‘BABY BOY’ Rolle (left), who fought twice for the British Commonwealth
light heavyweight title, will probably be remembered as one of the
Bahamas’ best professional boxers...

Strachan and Rolle had a
memorable fight on December
26, 1980, that went the distance
before Strachan was awarded a
10 round decision on points.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



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That was Rolle’s second to
last fight before he retired. He
came back two years later and
won a 10-round decision over
Carl Baker on Mars Bay,

Andros, on April 11, 1982, to
close out his career.

Rolle, who started his pro
career on July 4, 1960, with a
four-round knockout over Kid
Anthony, reeled off four straight
victories before he drew a 10-
round bout with legendary
Wellington “Boston Blackie’
Miller on February 5, 1965.

On March 25, 1971, Rolle
knocked out Rennie Pinder in
the fifth round of their sched-
uled 12 round bout for the
Bahamas light heavyweight title.

On July 9 that same year,
Rolle moved up to the heavy-
weight division and secured a
TKO in round eight of their
scheduled 12-round bout over
Bert Perry for the Bahamas title.

Two years later, Rolle trav-
eled to Nottingham, Nottingh-
mashire, United Kingdom where
he fought John Conteh for the
British Commonwealth light
heavyweight title.

Conteh, however, won the 15-
round bout on points, 15-3, at
the Ice Rink.

Then on March 26, 1976,
Rolle traveled to Brisbane,
Queenland, Australia where he
fought Tony Mundine for anoth-
er shot at the Commonwealth
British title.

Again, he fell short, this time
getting stopped in the third of
the scheduled 15- round bout at
the Festive Hall by Mundine.

Rolle, according to Ray Minus
Jr, was a Bahamian boxing icon.

“He was probably the tough-

est Bahamian fighter of his
time,” Minus Jr reflected. “You
could hit him with a sledge ham-
mer and he will still come at you.

“Knocking out Baby Boy
Rolle was a real challenge. I
knew that he was a tough fight-
er. I knew he had some real
tough rivalries with heavy-
weights like Boston Blackie and
Bert Perry. He was a Bahamian
champion.”

As a youngster coming into
the sport, Minus Jr said he got to
watch Rolle at the trail end of
his career and he was very
impressed with what he saw.

“My amateur boxing club,
Champion Boxing Club, hon-
oured Baby Boy Rolle in the
late 1990s at the stadium and he
was very excited,” Minus Jr said.

As a person, Minus Jr said
Rolle was always a gentleman
to him and the many young box-
ers coming up through the club.
In fact, Minus Jr said when the
club was located next to his
home off Wulff Road, Rolle
made frequent visits to help
train the boxers.

“He always wanted to help
out because he was well skilled
with the sport,” Minus Jr said.
“He will be missed because of
what he did for the sport.”

Tribune Sports and former
sports writer Godfrey ‘Goofy’
Brown extend condolences to
his family, including his brother
Henry ‘Goatman’ Rolle, who
promoted a number of profes-
sional fights.

SAC top school of ‘08-09’ track and field season

WITH a dominating perfor-
mance at the nation’s top inter-
school track and field meet, one
perennial track and field pow-
erhouse cemented their status
as the top school of the 2008-09
season.

The St Augustine’s College
Big Red Machines obliterated
the competition at the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associ-
ations’ 21st edition of the
National High School Champi-
onships, capturing five of the
six contested divisions.

They swept the three girls’
divisions (junior, intermediate,
senior), while also claiming the
junior and intermediate boys.



(ee |) | |

The C R Walker Knights
staved off the complete six divi-
sion sweep by the Big Red
Machines, by taking the senior
boys division.

With a balanced effort of
record breaking performances
on the track and in the field,
the Big Red Machines led four
divisions after the first day of
competition and never relin-
quished their advantage over
the course of the three- day
meet.

Powered by a star studded
middle distance programme fea-
turing Hughnique Rolle and
Audley Carey, SAC totaled 742
points in all divisions.



Rolle dominated the senior
girls, claiming gold in the 800m,
1500m and 3000m. Her time of
4:58.46 set a new national high
school record in the 1500m.

Carey doubled in both the
800m and 1500m.

Other highlights from the
2009 National Champions
included Byron Ferguson and
Marcus Thompson who quali-
fied for international competi-
tion.

Ferguson set a new high
school national record in inter-
mediate boys’ javelin throw
while Thompson qualified for
the Junior Pan Am Games in
the senior boys’ 100m.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS
INBRIEF



SPORTS



MASTERS SOFTBALL LEAGUE



Championship series is set

THE Masters Softball League’s best-
of-five championship series is set.

It will be played between the defend-
ing champions William Contrcution
Jets and the Micholette Strokers.

The series will begin on Saturday at
2 pm at the Archdeacon William
Thompson Softball Park at the South-
ern Recreation Grounds. Game two
will be played on Sunday at the same
time.

William Construction had to go the
full three games before they clinched
their series against the Six Pack Abs
with a 9-8 nipping on Sunday. Six
Packs evened the series on Saturday
with a 9-7 decision.

Micholette, however, completed a

two-game sweep over the Alco
Raiders on Saturday with a 15-2 vic-
tory.

¢ Here’s a summary of the three
games played:

William Construction 9, Six Packs
8: Brad Smith had a perfect 3-for-3
day with a home run, driving in a total
of five runs and scoring wice to lead
the Jets.

Gary ‘Super’ Johnson was 3-for-4
with a double, a RBI and three runs,
while Anthony ‘Hod Dog’ Pearce wax
2-for-3 with a double and two RBI.

Danny Stubbs was the winning pitch-
er. Joe Miller suffered the loss.

Dennis Davis went 3-for-4 with two
runs and Larry Thompson was 2-for-2

with a RBI, scoring a run.

Six Pack 9, William Construction 7:
Frederick Saunders went 2-for-3 with
three RBI as the Abs avoided a clean
sweep by the Jets on Saturda.

Spurgeon Johnson helped out by
going 2-for-4 with a RBI; Larry
Thompson was 1-for-3 with a double,
two RBI and two runs and Joe
Demeritte was 2-for-4 with a run.

Joe Miller was the winning pitcher.
Bertie Murray Sr got the loss.

Brad Smith was 2-for-4 with a RBI
and two runs and Sonny ‘Jiggy’ Haven
was 1-for-3 with a RBI and a run
scored.

Micholette 15, Alco 2: Ronald ‘Big
Boy’ Saunders had a perfect 4-for-4

day with a double, triple and three
runs scored as the Strokers completed
a two-game sweep to advance to the
final.

Culbert ‘Buster’ Evans helped out
by going 2-for-4 with two homers, four
RBIs and two runs; Lester Dean was 2-
for-4 with a double, a RBI and three
runs and Adlai ‘Mossah’ Moss was 4-
for-5 with a double, a RBI and two
runs.

Clayton Smith got the win on the
mound. Glenroy ‘Flo’ Saunders suf-
fered the loss.

Anthony ‘Rakes-And-Scrape’ Bowe
was 2-for-2 with a run and Kendal Fer-
guson was 1-for-3 with a homer, a RBI
and a run.



THE standings in both the
19-and-under and 15-and-
under divisions in the Baptist
Sports Council’s 2009 Joyce
Minus Basketball Classic is
turning out to be an interest-
ing one.

A number of games were
played on Saturday at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex. Here’s a look at those
games played and the impli-
cations to the standings.

Temple Fellowship 27,
Macedonia 26 (15): Kenrico
Lockhart scored the game’s
winning basket and Jonathan
Gordon had 10 points to lead
Temple Fellowship as they
extended their front-running
lead in the 15-and-under to 5-
i

Macedonia, who got nine
from James Rolle, fell to 3-2.

Faith United 26, Latter-Day
No.2 23 (15): Delano Forbes
scored nine points to lead
Faith United as they improved
to 3-2 in the 15-and-under
division.

Rodrico Tate had nine in
the loss for Latter-Day No.2,
who dropped to 2-2.

Latter-Day No.2 26, Miracle

TSK IR ren

Basketball Classic

Working Church of God 19
(15): Darron Smith scored 12
points to lead Latter-Day
No.2 as they rebounded from
an earlier loss to improve their
record to 3-2 in the 15-and-
under division.

Andre Green had eight in
a losing effort for Miracle
Working Church of God as
they fell to 2-3.

Golden Gates 29, Latter-
Day No.1 23 (15): Neil Sands
had a game high 17 as Golden
Gates improved their 15-and-
under record to 3-1 to remain
in second place.

Iyndrick Storr had nine in

the loss for Latter-Day No.1,
who fell to 2-3.

Latter-Day 36, Golden
Gates No.1 28 (19): Darron
Finley, Kenneth Pratt and
Teran Greenslade provided
the spark for Latter-Day as
their 19-and-under team
improved to 3-1.

Austin McKenzie scored 15
in the loss for Golden Gates
No.1, who dropped to 2-3.

Miracle Working Church of
God 43, Temple Fellowship
42: Allen Curry scored 12 and
Darron Martin had 10 to pro-
vide a 1-2 punch for Miracle
Working Church of God as



they improved to 3-2 in the
19-and-under division.

Marvin Albury and Kevin
Burrows had 11 and 10 respec-
tively for Temple Fellowship,
who dropped to 2-2.

Mercy Seat 44, Golden
Gates No.2 34 (19): In the
biggest upset of the day,
Leonardo Demeritte scored a
game high 20 points as Mercy
Seat won their first game in
six tries in the 19-and-under
division.

Mel Johnson led Golden
Gates No.2 with 10 as they fell
to 2-2.

¢ In the men’s division, only

one game was played before
the rain came pouring down.
In that game, Christian Taber-
nacle knocked voff Golden
Gates 40-21 to take sole pos-
session of first place in the
vice-president division at 3-0.
Golden Gates dropped to
1-1.
¢ Here’s a look at the sched-
ule of games on tap this Sat-
urday:
Court One - 10 am Miracle
Working COG vs Latter-
Day No.2 (15); 11 am Latter-
Day Saints vs Macedonia
(15); Noon Golden Gates vs
First Baptist (19); 1 pm Lat-
ter-Day Saints vs Golden
Gates No.2 (19); 2 pm BIBA
vs Ebenezer (M); 3 pm
Golden Gates vs Church of
the Nazarene (M).
Court Two - 10 am Faith
United vs Golden Gates
(15); 11 am Temple Fellow-
ship vs First Baptist (15);
Noon Faith United vs Tem-
ple Fellowship (19); 1 pm
Golden Gates vs Macedonia
(19); 2 pm Christian Taber-
nacle vs New Bethlehem
(M); 3 pm Pilgrim vs First
Baptist (M)

OM WRT Es

Teams

Men's President
First Baptist

Temple Fellowship
Latter-Day Saints
City of Praise

BIBA

Ebenezer

Pilgrim

Men's Vice-President
Christian Tabernacle
New Bethlehem
Evangelistic Center
Golden Gates
Bahamas Harvest
Church of the Nazarene
Calvary Bible
19-And-Under
Latter-Day Saints
First Baptist
Macedonia

SOrRrPNWh =

CORrPrPrPNW

PRWNHNRRO =

NNNrRrROO

BASEBALL
JBLN UPDATE

¢ Results of games played
in the Junior Baseball
League of Nassau over the
weekend at Freedom
Farm are as follows:

TEE BALL

Raptors def. Sand Gnats
26-22
Sidewinders
Grasshoppers 12-9
Knights def. Blue Claws
25-13

COACH PITCH

Angels def. Astros 29-23
Cubs def. Blue Jays 21-7
Athletics def. Diamond-
backs 16-10

MINOR LEAGUE

Red Sox def. Royals 11-5
Mets def. Rays 14-4
MAJOR LEAGUE
Mariners def. Reds 11-10
Marlins def. Indians 3-2
JUNIOR LEAGUE
Dodgers def. Twins 6-4
Yankees def. Cardinals 19-
6

SENIOR LEAGUE
Pirates and Rangers
played to 1-1 tie.

Tigers def. Phillies 10-0

def.

SOFTBALL
McKCKLEWHITE
RECUPERATING

DAVE ‘Billy’ McKckle-
white, one of the most
dominating softball play-
ers from Eleuthera, is
improving in Male Med-
ical II of the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital.
McKclewhite, who was
one of the most feared
sluggers at the plate as he
played for Governor’s
Harbour and the Beck’s
Hustlers, suffers from dia-
betes. Last week he had
one of his legs amputated.
Tribune Sports as well as
former sports writer God-
frey ‘Goofy’ Brown wishes
McKcklewhite a speedy
recovery.

SOFTBALL
SYMONETTE PASSED
AWAY

SOUTHPAW pitcher
Edmund ‘Beef’? Symon-
ette, who starred for the
Big Red Machines of St
Augustine’s College, was
killed recently in a car
accident in his hometown
of Eleuthera.

Symonette pitched on a
number of championship
games for SAC, including
the one in 1971 when the
Big Red Machines were
the underdogs.

That year, SAC eliminated
Queen’s College and the
late Colyn ‘Josey Whales’
Russell in the semifinal
before they went on to
beat Aquinas College and
Kirk Griffin in the final.
On returning home to

Eleuthera, Symonette
played for the Rock Sound
Heroes and the Heineken
Stars.

Symonette was driving his
truck on Queen’s Highway
when he skid off the road
and was killed on the
scene.

Condolences are extend-
ed from The Tribune
Sports Department as well
as former sports writer
Godfrey ‘Goofy’ Brown to
the family of the late

Miracle Working COG
Golden Gates No.2
Temple Fellowship
Faith United

Golden Gates

Mercy Seat
15-And-Under
Temple Fellowship
Golden Gates
Macedonia

Faith United
Latter-Day No.2

First Baptist
Latter-Day

Miracle Working COG
Zion South Beach

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Bako has four hits as
Cubs rout Athletics

m PHOENIX

Paul Bako had four hits and three RBIs even though he had his first
at-bat in the sixth inning, and the Chicago Cubs roughed up Dana Eve-
land in a 20-5 win over the Oakland Athletics on Monday.

Derrek Lee hit his first homer of spring training and Ryan Theriot
went 3-for-3 with two RBIs and scored two runs for Chicago. Jake Fox,
Reed Johnson and Bobby Scales each had three RBIs.

Eveland, the A’s likely opening-day starter, gave up five runs in four
innings. He allowed eight of the Cubs’ 24 hits.

“T couldn’t put guys away,” Eveland said. “I'd get ahead and then
miss my spot and catch a lot of the plate.”

It was the second straight start in which Eveland was hit hard. The
previous outing was in a minor league game. He said he feels a sense
of urgency to get better results as the start of the season nears.

“T have high expectations of myself this late in the spring,” he said.
“T’ve got two more starts down here. I need to get locked and ready to
go for Game 1.”

Edgar Gonzalez, who is in the running for a spot in the A’s rotation
only got two outs while giving up eight hits and seven runs. He has
allowed 13 runs in 3 1-3 innings over his past two outings and has a 12.75
ERA this spring.

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NOW THATS REALLY AT 23 (Deal

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 11
r |

TUESDAY, MARCH 24,




2009

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

Golden girl’ Debbie Fer-
guson-McKenzie, known
for her versatility as a
sprinter, opened her 2009
outdoor season with a
third place finish in the 400m.

Competing on the Adidas
team in the Hurricane Invita-
tional over the weekend at the
University of Miami (their train-
ing site) in Coral Gables, Florida,
Ferguson-McKenzie clocked
53.93 seconds.

“For an opener, it was kind of
easy, but I didn’t run the time I
wanted, but I still want to cele-
brate the positive I got from it
at the end,” said Ferguson-
McKenzie, who ran her first
400m in about three years.

“J felt very strong at the end. I
didn’t super die, so ’m happy
with that. Being a sprinter, we
normally go all out and just die. I
went out sort of easy and I built
on my transition phrase from the
first 200 to the second,” said Fer-
guson-McKenzie.

Ajoke Odumosu, of Nike, won
the race in 53.00, followed by
Ashlee Kidd in 52.13.

The performance, according to
Ferguson-McKenzie, proved how
strong she is at this point in the
season. So she’s excited about

DEBBIE FERGUSON-
McKENZIE



SAC top
school of ‘08-
09’ track and

field season...
See page 9

en girl’ third in 400
icane Invitational

¢ Olympian Michael Mathieu second
in 100, first in 4x400 relay

¢ Bahamian sophomore Kristy White
finishes 10th overall

ca ae
Michael Mathieu

her potential down the road.

“Twas actually supposed to run
a 4x100 and a 4x400, but we
couldn’t find anybody to run the
4x400, so I was forced to run an
open 400,” she said.

“The difference between a
4x400 and a 400, it’s different.
When you get the stick in your
hand, you could split a faster time
than you do when you run an
open 400. But I only ran the 4



x400 because we didn’t have a
full team.”

Ferguson-McKenzie also got a
chance to test her speed, running
on the third leg of the South
Florida Elite 4x100 relay team
that posted a winning time of
44.15.

The other members of the
team included Jamaicans Sheryl
Morgan and Sherry-Ann Brooks
on the first two legs and Ameri-
can Lauryn Williams on anchor.

“We’re super excited about
this weekend coming up. We get
a chance to run a 4x100 this
weekend and hopefully a 4x400
in Orlando,” Ferguson-McKenzie
said.

“Lauryn, myself, Veronica
Campbell and Aileen Bailey will
run together,” she said. “Hope-
fully we can make it happen. So
I’m very excited.”

Ferguson-McKenzie, who
skipped the entire indoor season,

SEE page 9

CRAVEN’S BAKERY

Market Street South
7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Monday - Saturday

Phone: (242) 326-4246

Now taking orders for the

following:

EASTER SPECIALS

Hot Cross Buns

Twist Donut

8” Cheese Cake

(Cherry or Pineapple topping)

Easter Bread

French Bread

$10.00 Per Doz.
$ 8.40 Per Doz.

$35.00 Each

$ 3.00 Per Loaf

$ 1.00 Per Loaf

Sale ends April 9th, 2009

“We bake fresh from scratch everyday to give
you the best for a whole lot less.”









Contractors aim
to ‘raise the har’

* $150k IDB initiative seeks to
give Bahamian construction
industry ‘more authority’ by
developing standard contract
forms in line with international
standards, recognised by
Bahamian law

* BCA chief: ‘We're finding that
it’s an impediment, not having
this Contractors Bill, the industry
not being properly licensed and
regulated, not having the forms
and professional approach to a
number of the contracts’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian Contractors
Association (BCA) is hoping
that a $150,000 grant initiative
with the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank (IDB) will “raise
the bar” for the sector by
enabling it to develop interna-
tionally-accepted contracts and
other documents, eliminating
the industry’s reliance on Amer-
ican-authored forms.

Stephen Wrinkle, the BCA’s
president, said it was “becoming
increasingly important” to have
contracts and other documents
that were “accepted interna-
tionally and able to be regulat-
ed by Bahamian law”, because
they were an essential ingredi-
ent in the ability of Bahamian
contractors to win major jobs -
particularly from foreign devel-
opers.

“Right now, we use Ameri-
can Institute of Architects doc-
uments for construction con-
tracts,” Mr Wrinkle told Tri-
bune Business. “We need to
have our own documents, and
can then move forward with
them, while adapting them to
suit international needs.

“Tt gives us some authority in
the industry. In this day and
age, we should not be depen-
dent on American Institute of
Architects forms and docu-
ments. We should have our own
documents.”

Among the documents the
IDB project would look to
amend were contract forms,
procurement documents, and
change order requirements.

Mr Wrinkle explained that
having contracts that were in
line with international con-
struction industry standards, but
also recognised under Bahami-
an law, would give contractors a
greater degree of legal protec-
tion should disputes arise with
developers.

The BCA president said this
had happened with the con-
tracts issued for Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport’s
(LPIA) redevelopment, as they
specified that they would be
“governed by Bahamian law”
with this nation as the first juris-
diction for legal recourse.

“Every contract executed in
this country should be governed
by Bahamian law, not New
York law or whatever state they

SEE page 4B

THE TRIBUNE

usine

TUESDAY,



MARCH 24,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Resort placed in receivership

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

former corner-

stone of

Bimini’s

tourism indus-

try, the Bimini
Big Game Resort, has been put
into receivership and will most
likely go into foreclosure, the
Chief Councillor for the Bimini
District told Tribune Business
yesterday. Meanwhile, employ-
ees displaced by the resort’s
abrupt shut-down are still await-
ing promised back-pay from its
owner.

Lloyd Edgecombe said yes-
terday that he was scheduled to
meet with representatives of
KPMG, the accounting firm act-
ing as receivers for the resort,

ROYAL FIDELITY

* Chief councillor confirms KPMG appointed receivers for still-closed
Bimini Big Game Resort, and says sale of distressed property likely

who will assess the property,
protect its assets and ultimately
determine its fate.

Mr Edgecombe said he
believed the receivers were ulti-
mately likely to place the Bimi-
ni Big Game Resort on the mar-
Ket for sale.

He added that a Cayman
Islands-based insurance com-
pany financed the resort via a
mortgage theyt held on the
property, and were most likely
the ones to have placed it into
the hands of KPMG after call-
ing in the debenture on it.

“The people who had the
loan on the place, they are not
involved in hotel operations,

and I think they might eventu-
ally put the place up for sale,”
said Mr Edgecombe. “Hopeful-
ly we'll get some buyers to open
the place and pay the employ-
ees and start up the business.”
The resort closed near year-
end 2008, when its management
allegedly packed up and left
without telling staff where they
were going or informing the
Government that lay-offs and
its closure were imminent.
The Bimini Big Game
Resort’s owner is understood
to be a CalifOrnia-based Amer-
ican, who was attempting to find
new refinancing to keep the
resort open and pay his financial

backers. That appears not to
have happened.

When management left,
workers were given $100 and
letters stating what they were
owed by the company. They
were told this payment would
be forthcoming at a later date.
However, nothing has been
heard since.

There has also been specula-
tion that the Bimini Big Game
Resort ran up an unpaid
$500,000 BEC bill before clos-
ing.

The resort has frequently
been heralded as a backbone of

SEE page 4B



Realtors to probe Miami firm selling Bahamian property

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Real Estate Association’s
(BREA) president yesterday pledged that it
would look into a website promoting the
opening of a Miami-based sales centre that
will sell Bahamian real estate, pointing out
that only BREA-licenses agents could sell
land and property in this nation.

In a statement issued yesterday, the Par-
adise Is Mine company unveiled plans to
open a ‘sales centre’ in South Beach, Miami,
“to exclusively market Bahamas proper-
ties”.

"This is a tremendous market opportunity
for us," said Ted Rover, director of sales for
Paradise Is Mine. “Who wouldn't want

oceanfront property and a second home on
a spectacular tropical paradise? At the end
of the day this is not really that hard to sell.

"There are millions of tourists who visit
Miami Beach every year, and we feel that
this is a perfect venue to promote the
Bahamas.

"In the current global economic reces-
sion, Bahamas real estate prices have
remained stable, which is truly remarkable.
The Bahamas is a tremendous alternative
for investors with money on the sideline, not
to mention that it's a great place to have a
second home. Opening a sales centre is very
strategic and should pay dividends for the
company.”

Paradise Is Mine said its US sales centre
for the Bahamas was set to open in early

summer of 2009. The company is under-
stood to be focused on real estate sales on
Rum Cay, an island that has attracted more
than its fair share of controversy as it relates
to land disputes.

It is understood that Paradise Is Mine is
the company that earlier this year sent out
a press release stating that it had sold land
on Rum Cay to Ray Lewis, the Baltimore
Ravens and Pro Bowl linebacker.

Responding to the release’s appearance,
William Wong, BREA’s president, told Tri-
bune Business: “We’re trying to deal with
that right now. Only Bahamians licensed
by BREA are licensed to sell real estate in
the Bahamas right now.”

SEE page 4B

Small resorts see business downturn

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

SMALL hotels have seen
significant declines in business
this winter season, several told
Tribune Business yesterday,
but the Ministry of Tourism
has reported a surprisingly bet-
ter season than was previously
predicted.

Dean Spychalla, general
manager of the Nassau Palm
Resort on West Bay Street,

week that the popular college-
student-getaway season will be
fairly good, though down from
previous years.

She said the negative public-
ity surrounding the ongoing
‘drug wars’ in Mexico may
have given the Bahamas an
added boost as a destination of
choice for Spring Breakers.

“T think the Bahamas, and
Nassau in particular, has been
able to benefit from that,” she
said. “There are places like
SuperClubs Breezes that are

sold out.”

However, many small
Bahamian hotels say they are
still missing their piece of the
pie.

West Bay hotel manager,
Raj Reddy, said there had been
a substantial decline in busi-
ness compared to last year.

The West Bay hotel, next to
the Chez Willie restaurant, is
know to have many Bahamian
and foreign patrons. However,
Mr Reddy said business has
been down across the board.

Laurice Adderley, customer
supervisor at the Corner Motel
in Carmichael Road, told Tri-
bune Business that things had
gone downhill after the eco-
nomic downturn impacted con-
sumer confidence throughout
the Bahamas.

She said the hotel received
mostly Bahamian guests, but
its typically busy winter season
could have been better.

Ms Adderley said even their
popular dance nights have seen
a decline.



told Tribune Business that his
hotel had seen a 33 per cent
decline in business compared
to the same time last year.

“We're certainly feeling the
pinch,” he said. “We’re at
probably two-thirds of the
occupancy that we enjoyed last
year.”

Mr Spychalla said he did not
want to get into the specifics
of the hotel’s occupancy dur-
ing this Spring Break season,
but contends that it was down
versus last year, due to the
world economic crisis. But he
added that the hotel has not
had to lay-off staff to date.

Vernice Walkine, the Min-
istry of Tourism’s director-gen-
eral, told Tribune Business last

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Money at Work

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Baha Mar’s
revenues
15-18% off
forecast

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

REVENUES at (|
Baha Mar’s two
Cable Beach
resort properties
are running 15-18
per cent behind
forecast for the
peak 2009 winter
season, Tribune
Business was told
yesterday, with
downward pres-
sure on room rates
impacting Bahamian resort’s
margins and daily room yields.

Robert Sands, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s president,
who is also a senior Baha Mar
executive, told this newspaper:
“Speaking specifically for our
properties, the winter season is
probably close to an aggregate,
for us, of 15-18 per cent down
on our Budget for revenues.

“The bottom line is that we’re
behind on revenue compar-
isons, both to last year and to



SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Creating the right culture for success

TODAY’S column is inspired
by an article that appeared in
the Harvard Business Review
back in early 2006. It was enti-
tled What Holds the Modern
Company Together, and it

explored the concept of ‘corpo-
rate culture’...what it is and its
various types.

I thought that this topic is
particularly relevant today,
especially in light of the ongoing

new!

DOUBLE

FILET O' FISH

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outrage surrounding AIG and
its payment of obscene corpo-
rate bonuses, while at the same
time begging the US govern-
ment for billions of dollars of
taxpayer ‘handouts’.

Understanding

corporate culture?

The authors had this to say
in defining corporate culture:
“Culture, in a word is commu-
nity. It is an outcome of how
people relate one to another.
Communities exist at work just
as they do outside the commer-
cial arena. Like families - vil-
lages, schools, clubs and busi-
nesses - rest on patterns of
social interaction that sustain
them over time or are their
undoing. They are built on
shared interests and mutual
obligations, and thrive on coop-
eration and friendships.”

Dimensions of human

relationships

The authors further suggested
that the ‘patterns of social inter-
action’ should be examined in
two dimensions, which they
define as sociability and soli-
darity.

Sociability was defined as the
measure of sincere friendliness
among members of a commu-
nity (in the case of a business —
staff). In business, it was recog-
nised that high sociability had
benefits such as the fact that
most employees feel working in
such an environment was enjoy-
able. This, in turn, is believed
to improve morale and team-
work. However, a drawback to
high levels of sociability was a
view that poor performance
may be tolerated because every-
body is chummy with each oth-
er. This results in the best com-
promise being applied to prob-
lems as opposed to the best
solutions.

Solidarity, on the other hand,
is a measure of a community’s
(staff) ability to work together
effectively regardless of per-
sonal ties. The article says that:
“Solidarity generates a high
degree of strategic focus, swift
response to competitive threats,
and intolerance of poor perfor-
mance. It can also result in a
degree of ruthlessness.” Also,

Financial

Focus

By Larry Gibson

an additional drawback to high
levels of solidarity was stated
as: “Strategic focus is good as
long as it zeroes in on the right
strategy. But if the strategy is
not the right one, it is the equiv-
alent of corporate suicide.
Organisations can charge right
over the cliff with great effi-
ciency if they do the wrong
things well”.

Types of Corporate Cultures

The authors then went on to
identify four types of corporate
culture using the dimensions of
sociability and solidarity — which
were:

1. The Networked Organisa-
tion: (High Sociability, Low Sol-
idarity)

In a networked organisation,
people frequently stop to talk
in the hallways. They tend to
socialise after hours and some-
times interact ‘like family’ out-
side the job place. Networked
cultures are characterised not
by a lack of hierarchy, but by a
profusion of ways to get around
it.

Their low levels of solidarity
mean that managers often have
trouble getting functions or
operating units to cooperate.
Finally, a networked organisa-
tion is usually so political that
individuals and cliques spend
much of their time pursuing
personal agendas.

2. The Mercenary Organisa-
tion: (Low Sociability, High Sol-
idarity)

The mercenary organisation
is low on ‘hobnobbing’ and is
intensely focused on business
matters. In this type of envi-



ronment, individual interests
coincide with corporate objec-
tives, and those objectives are
often linked to a clear percep-
tion of the ‘enemy’ and the
steps required for beating it.

Mercenary organisations are
also characterised by a clear
separation of work and social
life. Employees rarely frater-
nize outside of the office, and
when they do, it is usually at a
business-related event. Such
organisations are generally
intolerant of poor performance,
and those not contributing are
fired or given explicit instruc-
tions on how to improve, with a
firm deadline to change. Peo-
ple stay with high solidarity
companies for as long as their
personal needs are met, and
then they move on. Employees
are disinclined to cooperate,
share information or exchange
new or creative ideas.

3. The Fragmented Organisa-
tion: (Low Sociability, Low Sol-
idarity)

Employees of fragmented
organisations display a low con-
sciousness of organisational
membership. They often believe
that they work for themselves,
or they identify with occupa-
tional groups — usually profes-
sional.

Asked at a party what he
does for a living, for instance, a
doctor at a major teaching hos-
pital that happens to have this
culture might reply: “I am a sur-
geon”, leaving out the name of
the institution where he is
employed. The lack of interre-
latedness extends to behaviour
on the job. People may work
with their door shut, be secre-

tive about their projects and
progress or, in extreme cases,
they try to sabotage the work
of colleagues through gossip,
rumor or unfair criticism.

4. The Communal Organisa-
tion: (High Sociability, High Sol-
idarity)

Often found in small, fast
growing, entrepreneurial start-
ups, employees and founders of
communal organisations are
close friends. This usually
extends outside the job. Com-
munal cultures can also be
found in mature companies in
which employees have worked
together for long periods of
time.

Employees in communal
organisations tend to possess a
high consciousness of organisa-
tional membership(for exam-
ple, it is said that some Nike
employees proudly have
‘swooshes’ (the Nike logo) tat-
tooed on themselves). The high
solidarity of communal cultures
is often demonstrated through
an equitable sharing of risks and
rewards among employees, and
such organisations place a high
value on fairness and justice.

In communal organisations,
employees are very clear about
competition — they know their
competitors, what they do well,
their weaknesses and very often
what they need to do to stay
ahead of the pack.

Is there one right culture

for every organisation?

It is not surprising that many
executives see the communal
organisation as the ideal. I
would venture to also say that in
many cases, the type of organi-
sation an executive manages
could be very different from the
type of organisation that
employees consider themselves
to be working in. This is pre-
cisely the reason why effective
internal and external commu-
nication within an organisation
is SO important.

Clearly, there is no universal
(or correct) culture for every
organisation. It is also recog-
nised that because of the

SEE next page

Happy

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Request for Tender for Security Tess at
The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute campuses
at Old Trail Road, and Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas

The Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute (B.T.V.I.) now
invites sealed bids for the provision of Security Services at The Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Institute campuses at Old Trail Road, and Wulff
Road Nassau, Bahamas.

The Contract is for a period of twelve (12) months in the first
instance and interested security firms are invited to submit Tenders
with comprehensive details of their proposal for security operations for
a twenty-four period starting at 6:00 a.m. daily (including weekends
and holidays). The Contract will be awarded to the applicant providing
the most economical and acceptable Tender for the full duration of the
contract period.

*Car rentals at US
locations in Florida.
Taxes not included.
Some restrictions
apply.

Interested Bidders may inspect campuses between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Collection of the
specification and bidding documents can be obtained from the Reception
Desk at B.T.V.I., Old Trail Road between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:00
p.m., Monday through Friday beginning Monday, 16" March, 2009 and
obtain further information at the second address given below.

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Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “Tender for
Security, Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute” and delivered
to the attention of:-
One bedroom suite
aioe The Chairman of the Tenders’ Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach
P. O. Box N-3017
Nassau, Bahamas

The Manager

Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute
Old Trail Road

P. O. Box N-4934

Nassau, Bahamas

Bids must be received by 4:00 p.m. on Friday, 3% April, 2009
accompanied by an endorsed copy of a current Business Licence.

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Persons who submit Tenders are invited to a public opening of bids at
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Beach on Tuesday, 14" April, 2009.

B.T.V.I. reserves the right to reject any or all Bids.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 3B





Government still assessing
dismissed worker benefits

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT is
still considering whether to
allow workers dismissed for just
cause to collect unemployment
benefit, the minister of labour
and social development said, as
it is still ironing out ‘kinks’ in
the proposed scheme.

Dion Foulkes told Tribune
Business, amid concerns from
the Bahamas Employers Con-
federation’s (BECon) president,
Brian Nutt, that the scheme was
still being mulled over and is
still “in the consultation stage”.

The minister said concerns
were raised by Mr Nutt regard-
ing a disqualification provision
within the scheme that still
allowed for a worker dismissed
from a job with just cause — such
as stealing or breaching com-
pany rules - or who simply quit
to still be eligible for seven of
the maximum 13 weeks’ worth
of benefits.

“That was raised by him at
both meetings, the one in Nas-
sau and the one in Freeport,
and is something that we have
under consideration,” said Mr
Foulkes.

The scheme, according to Mr
Foulkes, proposes to deny six

ie.

WTO OLUTR Csts

weeks of the 13 weeks of bene-
fit payments to those workers
who met the criteria for dis-
qualification.

“It is an entitlement
scheme,” he said. “Persons
made unemployed are entitled
to the benefit. If you meet cer-
tain criteria you are entitled to
it.”

However, Mr Foulkes told
Tribune Business that these cri-
teria would have to be given
further consideration, as an
employer’s decision to dismiss
an employee would be a sub-
jective process.

“Whether we can disqualify



a person who made all the pay-
ments just like everybody else,
who made the contributions to
National Insurance and now
they are unemployed for a rea-
son that the employer states was
a gross infraction of their rules —
we're giving it further consid-
eration,” he said.

The scheme’s initial funding
of $20 million will be extracted
from the National Insurance
Board’s medical benefit plan,
and subsequently supplemented
by the government’s consoli-
dated fund if needed.

So that the scheme does not
become a revolving door for
unemployed persons, they are
given a one-time payment. In
order to qualify again, that per-
son would have to be duly
employed for one year in order
to receive the 13-week payment
again.

In the long-term the scheme
will be financed, through
amendments to the National
Insurance Act, by contributions
split 50/50 between employer
and employee, and be equiva-
lent to 1 per cent of the insur-
able wage ceiling.

“National insurance is very
confident that the programme
can be sustained with the 1 per
cent contribution. The only
question is when that will kick

Creating the right
culture for success



dynamic environments in which
modern businesses operate,
companies very often have to
transform their corporate cul-
ture to keep pace with the
demands of their markets.
Companies that fail to recog-
mise and accept. this
reality...often perish.

One of the significant failures
of modern mergers and acqui-
sitions has been the fact that
the new management often fails
to understand that implement-
ing a new corporate culture for
anew combined entity requires
a lot more work than simply
stating what you wish it to be.
Decency and integrity still mat-
ters to most employees and cus-
tomers.

For the stories
hehind the news,
read Mnsight
on Mondays

=e
NAD

Nassau Airport
Devolopment Company

Conclusion

At the end of the day, man-
agement’s ultimate responsibil-
ity is to allocate capital and
resources in a way which pro-
duces business success, and cor-
porate culture, therefore, is the
environment in which those
results are produced. For some
companies, corporate culture is
designed, developed and imple-
mented strategically, while in
others it is simply a by-product
of factors such as the persona of
the chief executive (or other
senior managers).

Studies continuously suggest
that managing your corporate
culture to suit your particular
type of business and its busi-
ness environment is critical to
long term success. Managers
must know how to assess their
own culture and whether it fits
their competitive environment,
and only then can they develop
techniques and strategies to
transform their culture for the
better.

However, there must be
recognition that the business
environment has changed, and
that the wasteful practices of
the past decade will no longer

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following

items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;
* General Requirements for General Contracting services for

the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (ie.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.



Contact: TRACI BRISBY
Contract & Procurement Manager
LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117

P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

be tolerated. Companies like

AIG must rise to the challenge

to quickly change their corpo-

rate culture to one that more in

line with the realities of today.
Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas),
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs

in,” said Mr Foulkes.
“With the downturn in the
economy now, you don’t want

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Government will have to make
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to add any additional burden
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National Insurance and the

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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Resort placed in receivership Realtors to probe Miami firm
selling Bahamian property

FROM page 1B

Bimini’s economy, becoming a
tourist haven over the years
with its marina a fishing boat
Mecca during that season.

The property boasts two
restaurants, and was due to
undergo renovations to add lux-
ury rooms, scuba operations,
gift shops, a gourmet food mar-
ket, a bait and tackle shop, a
spa and a game room.

Now, its electricity is shut off
and, according to Mr Edge-
combe, the marina’s 103 slips
that can secure vessels up to 120
feet in length are empty.

Residents of Bimini are hop-
ing that the receivers will be

able to jump-start the resort
when it is handed over to them.
However, Mr Edgecombe con-
tends that reopening the resort
could become extremely costly
for KPMG, with no surety of
acquiring a profit.

He added that due to the
resort’s more than six-month
closure, the property would
have to undergo minor renova-
tions.

“We hope that we’ll line up
some people who might be
interested, who could come up
with some money — as you
know it’s difficult at this time
to get money from anywhere,”
said Mr Edgecombe. “But, Big
Game has always been a prof-

WASTE - ED

TIDBITS FOR
NEWSPAPER PUBLICATION

Litter pollution is the most visible form of pollution.
Litter immediately creates a negative impression. All
the litter you see in our community comes from people
like me and you. People can be catgorized by their

litter behavior.

Which are you?

* Willfull arrogants-usually litter in Bain Town but

not in Cable Beach

* Ignorants-these people are unaware of a link
between the environment and their littering

* Inconvenients-proper disposal is too hard, to much
trouble, someone else’s problem

* No-litterers-emvironmentally conscious, don’t litter

(EPA Australia)

A MESSAGE FROM THE MINISTRY OF
THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES



——_

VACANCY NOTICE

itable thing.”

He added that Bimini has
been “catching a lil’ hell” since
the global economic downturn
began to affect the local econo-
my, but said Biminites have
come together to ride out the
economic tsunami collectively.

“It’s easier to absorb these
kinds of things (Bimini Big
Game Resort’s Closure) than
anywhere else because there are
a lot of families involved and
we try to help one another in
any which way,” he said.

However, Mr Edgecombe
said the busy season will be lost
this year, as far as the Bimini
Big Game Resort is concerned.

He said, though, that Bimini
residents are looking towards
the next three to four months
for a spike in visitor numbers,
even without the resort.

“Tf the weather is good, peo-
ple will come,” Mr Edgecombe
said. “March is a terrible month
as far as the weather is con-
cerned, but we’re looking for-
ward to a good summer.”

BAHA MAR, from 1B

Budget. There is still softness
in the market.”

While he was unable to speak
specifically to what other
Bahamian resort properties
were experiencing, Mr Sands
told Tribune Business that “the
most significant” impact being
experienced by the sector was
on its “ability to yield a strong
average [daily room] rate, which
is creating the problem for rev-
enue earnings”.

The BHA president
explained that there were “a lot
of people trading down”, mean-
ing that those tourists who were
travelling were increasingly
seeking value, and exploiting
the economic and hotel sector
downturn to obtain discounted
room rates and packages.

“In the last week or two,
we’ve seen some glimpses of an
increase in demand, but we’re
still not yielding the average
rates forecast or achieved last
year,” said Mr Sands.

“The reality is that there’s a

PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Public Relations & Corporate Programs

Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and implementation of a
strategic public relations and communication program together with the effective and efficient
planning and execution of all corporate events and activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Assists in the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate Programs plan to
support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;
Oversees the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations programs, plan and

budget;

Assists with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation and where necessary

the wider community;

Prepares and distributes the Corporation’s Annual Report;
Directs press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press releases, photographs,
fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management and media representatives;
Coordinates the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion surveys;
Provides assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in writing speeches,

preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;
Evaluates and assesses customer complaints and queries and disseminates information to

management;

Aids in the development, implementation and management of all external communication

efforts;

Is proactive in identifying opportunities to improve the image of the Corporation to its employees
and in the community at large;
Coordinates Marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the external Public
Relations Firms and the Media;
Identifies and liaises with service providers to secure speakers, presenters and entertainment

for Corporate events;

Liaises with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e. awards, invitations,
prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as necessary and maintain an inventory

of the same;

Prepares and distributes all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices) relative to Corporate

activities, as necessary;

Creates and updates all Standard Operating Procedures for all activities, as necessary;
Ensures timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of bills for all events

and activities as necessary;

Works closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that there is global

publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate activities;
Ensures that websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company newsletter and internal PA
system are used for the communication of information relative to corporate activities/events;

Job requirements include:

* A minimum ofa Bachelors degree in Public Relations/ Journalism/Marketing/Business
Administration/Business Communication, or equivalent.
A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisory/Management level.
Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform to prescribed

style and format;

Ability to effectively present information to senior and Executive management and public

groups;

Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing
Experience in managing special events and activities
Excellent time management and organizational skills
Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills

Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications.

Good analytical skills.

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The
Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: April 1st, 2009.



FROM page 1B

However, Bahamas-based
developers are allowed to sell
the real estate and properties
that they themselves con-
struct, and it is possible that
this is what Paradise Is Mine is
doing.

Mr Wong said that when-
ever BREA received infor-
mation suggesting that foreign
realtors were selling Bahami-
an real estate without a
licence, its monitoring com-
mittee dealt with it. He added
that often, when the situation
was explained and brought to
the attention of the alleged
offender, they stopped their
activities.

Meanwhile, Mr Wong said
BREA had met with Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for

tremendous effort being put
into maintaining rate integrity,
but the demand for package
pricing and more value is having
a significant impact on average
daily room rates, and that
results in a significant reduction
in revenues achieved from room
sales.”

While some resorts were feel-
ing the pressure more than oth-
ers, Mr Sands explained that
the Bahamian hotel sector was
also witnessing “downward
pressure on occupancy levels”
Both that and revenues were
behind last year and 2009 bud-
get forecasts.

The factors impacting the
Bahamian hotel industry are no
mystery. The main ones are the
US and world economic reces-
sion, and the subsequent fall-
off in consumer and traveller
confidence. There has also been
a sharp drop in convention and
group business, with no US
firms wanting the stigma
attached to sending staff abroad
to foreign conferences. This
then manifested itself in rate
reductions and the search for
value deals.

“All these items have con-
tributed to a softness in the

CONTRACTORS,
from 1B

obtained their financing from,”
Mr Wrinkle explained.

“Tf any contractor or supplier
has a legitimate lien or com-
plaint with a developer, they
will have the security of know-
ing it will be dealt with in the
Bahamian court system. They
will not have to go abroad to
seek damages or court deci-
sions.

“By having this grant from
the IDB, it will enable us to
move to the next level and get
to international standards.”

The proposed IDB project,
which will cost $225,000 in total,
is designed to strengthen the
BCA. Mr Wrinkle said the
financing would “be utilised for
implementing the standards and
testing procedures for the
licensing requirements of the
Contractors Bill, and for the
improvements in the opera-
tional ability of the BCA within

finance, to convey its concerns
over the removal of the
$35,000 real property tax ceil-
ing, which it felt had resulted
in potentially higher tax pay-
ments for wealthy clients -
something that could impact
the international and second
home buyer sector.

The BREA president said
Mr Laing had promised that
the Government would take
into account the real estate
industry’s concerns when con-
ducting its 2009-2010 Budget
preparation exercise, but
made no promises of a policy
amendment or reversal.

“The minister was very
accommodating, and he said
we will have to wait and see
when the Budget comes in
May,” Mr Wong said. “I think
they were aware of what the

market that has yet to reverse
itself,” Mr Sands said. “There
has been an increase in call vol-
umes for April and May. That
has not manifested itself into
an increase in bookings, but the
call volumes indicate there is
an upward trend.”

The industry was not count-
ing on this to increase bookings
just yet, with hotel properties
focusing instead on controlling
expenses and costs during
“what will be a shorter winter
season this year”.

Mr Sands explained that
while the peak winter tourism
season traditionally lasted from
early February until Easter,
some two-and-a-half to three
months, this year it might have
shortened to the March-first
week in April, a six-week peri-
od.

“Tt’s fair to say most hotels
are unlikely to reach Budget
forecasts for this period, based
on what happened in January
and February,” Mr Sands said.

“Tt would appears that there’s
not been any overwhelming
strengthening, certainly for Jan-
uary and February. If there’s
any strengthening, even at a
lower yield, it will be for March

the Bahamas”.

The project is also designed
to aid the BCA, and wider
Bahamian construction indus-
try, in dealing with internation-
al trade agreements that might
impact the sector, such as the
Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) signed last year
with the European Union (EU).

The proposed IDB-led initia-
tive also aims “to strengthen
our ties and relationship with
the other Caribbean construc-
tion associations”, Mr Wrinkle
said. “Since CARICOM signed
the EPA together, it puts all the
CARICOM countries in the
same basket with regards to
construction.”

Mr Wrinkle said the imple-
mentation of international stan-
dard contract documents in the
Bahamas, coupled with the
hoped-for passing of the Con-
tractors Bill and its licensing
regime, would enhance the sec-

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issues were, and are going to
look at it very carefully to see
if they can be accommodated.

“They’re going to look at it
and see if they can accommo-
date some of our concerns.
But he made no promises.”

Mr Laing had pointed out
that the real property tax ceil-
ing’s removal had coincided
with a revaluation exercise
conducted by the real proper-
ty tax unit.

“T agree with him that a lot
of properties were underval-
ued, and that’s why people are
screaming,” Mr Wong said.
He added that BREA realised
the Government had critical
revenue-raising needs, espe-
cially at a time of recession
when it was trying to finance
numerous stimulus pro-
grammes.

and the first week in April.”

That could have major impli-
cations for the hotel industry’s
financial position for the
remainder of 2009, given that
the sector has traditionally
relied on profits and cash flow
generated during the peak win-
ter season to allow it to get
through the ‘slow season’, par-
ticularly August-October.

“The reality is that the results
attained in the winter season
determine the adjustments the
company may have to make for
the rest of the year,” Mr Sands
said.

“We tend to make the over-
whelming majority of cash flow
during the traditionally strong
winter period.”

He added: “This could be a
long year. Most properties are
trying as best they can to try
and ride out this very difficult
period. Every day is a challenge.
But every day obviously creates
opportunities to look at ways
to maintain positive cash flow,
to generate positive cash flow.

“Your top line revenue is the
basis on which you start, and
once that shrinks it has a direct
impact on your profit and loss
statement.”

tor’s competitiveness by pro-
viding Bahamian contractors
with recognised certification.

“Tt shows we’ve gained a lev-
el of competence and compli-
ance that will enable us to par-
ticipate at a high level,” Mr
Wrinkle told Tribune Business.
“At the moment, international
contractors do not really know
the ability and status of the
Bahamian construction indus-
try in general.

“Tt makes it difficult for those
international firms to identify
capable and competent con-
tractor, and sub-contractor, in
the Bahamas without having
some acceptable standards to
evaluate them.

“We’re experiencing that
with the Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD) con-
tracts. There’s a lot of interna-
tional interest in the work,
because of the scope and bond-
ing requirements.

“We’re finding that it’s an
impediment, not having this
Contractors Bill, the industry
not being properly licensed and
regulated, not having the forms
and professional approach to a
number of the contracts.

“Tt really lowers the bar for
us, and we want to raise the bar
for ourselves. The IDB grant
will enable us to raise the bar.”

Mr Wrinkle added, though,
that the proposed IDB project
would not proceed until the
final draft of the Contractors
Bill was released by the Gov-
ernment to ensure the two
worked in step as a comple-
ment, and did not conflict with
each other.

The BCA president said the
Association was “aggressively
pursuing” the passing of the
Contractors Bill by Parliament.
The draft legislation is current-
ly in the Ministry of Works, and
the BCA was pushing for all
work to be completed so that
the Bill could go to Cabinet.

The Contractors Bill, when
finally passed, will introduce a
formalised standards and testing
regime for the first time, so that
all contractors in every trade -
plumbers, masons, carpenters,
electricians - can be licensed at
one of four different levels.

“The Government will regis-
ter the contractor and issue the
licence, but it has no interest in
doing the courses and the train-
ing. They prefer that the BCA
administer the courses and the
testing,” Mr Wrinkle said.

“Once the contractor passes
the test, it will require the Gov-
ernment to review the applica-
tion and issue the licence.”



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 5B





European bank officer in Nassau

A LOAN officer from the
European Investment Bank
(EIB) has visited the Bahamas
to explain the financing options
it offers to business operators
and financial institutions.

Inmaculada Riba Soto, loan
officer in the Caribbean and
Pacific Division of the Euro-
pean Investment Bank (EIB),
met with members of the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s Small and Medium
Enterprises Support Unit
(SMESU) on Monday, March
16, at the Inter-American
Development Bank’s (IDB)
East Bay Street offices.

Ms Soto also visited the
Chamber prior to the meeting,
where she met with Philip
Simon, its executive director,
Khaalis Rolle, the first vice-
president, Gershan Major, sec-
ond vice-president and chair-
man of the Chamber’s globali-
sation committee, Yvette Sands,
Chamber director and chair-
person of the Chamber’s energy
and environment committee,
along with Hank Ferguson,
director of the Chamber’s Small
and Medium Enterprises Sup-
port Unit (SMESU).

“Institutions like the EIB, the
IDB and the IC (Inter-Ameri-
can Investment Corporation)
have increasingly extended their
reach and product offerings into
the private sector from tradi-
tionally public sector driven
projects over the last few years.
This obviously represents a shift
in policy geared towards the
wider business communities in
the countries that they serve.
We are pleased to receive Ms
Soto and the EIB to explore
any possibility for greater finan-
cial assistance to the Bahami-
an business community, partic-
ularly small and medium sized
enterprises who may need it the
most,” Mr Simon said.

Mr. Major pointed to the





THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s Small and Medium Enterprises Support Unit (SMESU) hosted Inmac-
ulada Riba Soto, loan officer for the Caribbean and Pacific Division of the European Investment Bank, who is pic-
tured along with, from L to R: Yvette Sands, Chamber director and chairperson of the Chamber’s energy and envi-
ronment committee; Khaalis Rolle, first vice-president; Gershan Major, second vice-president and chairman of
the Chamber’s globalisation committee; and Philip Simon, executive director of the Chamber.

important role the European
Investment Bank had played as
a development partner in the
Bahamas over the past 30 years
through the Cotonou Partner-
ship Agreement, which was
signed in 2000, and followed the
Lome Convention of 1975.

“The bank, over the course
of this 30-year relationship, has
supplemented the benefits
received under the various con-
ventions by providing loans with
preferential terms of just over
50 million Euros,” Mr Major
said.

Much of this funding was
used to support developments
undertaken by the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation and the
Water and Sewerage Corpora-
tion.

“Today our relationship is
changing; we have just com-
pleted a new trade agreement
with the Europeans, known to
you as the EPA or Economic
Partnership Agreement. The
agreement speaks to reciprocity,

(Photo: Anastasia Stubbs/Visionaire Marketing)

liberalisation and is designed
with the hope of increasing our
capacity and abilities to become
competitive in an increasingly
globalised world,” Mr Major
said.

“Today, the EIB is once
again making itself available as
a partner, and we remain hope-
ful that there will be opportu-
nities and benefits to this con-
tinued partnership.”

Ms Soto said the bank, which
is owned by 27 member states
of the European Union with
Germany, France, the UK and
Italy being the largest share-
holders, lent 58 billion euros in
2008.

The EIB supports projects
that deliver sustainable eco-
nomic, social and environmental
benefits. Within the Caribbean
region, Ms Soto explained that

the bank puts special emphasis
on projects in three areas:
improvement of regional inte-
gration through better infra-
structure, promotion of the use
of renewable energy and cli-
mate change mitigation, and
development of the private sec-
tor through credit lines for small
and medium enterprises to
financial intermediaries.

Following the meeting, Ms
Soto commented: “This has
been a great opportunity for me
to get in touch with the busi-
ness community in the Bahamas
to assess the need for financ-
ing, and to try and understand
how the EIB can help the busi-
ness community in the coun-
try.”

LEGAL

Cable expands
dividend 16%

CABLE Bahamas is planning
to increase its 2009 first quarter
dividend by 16 per cent, from
$0.06 per share to $0.07 per
share, due to the company’s
earning momentums “carrying
through to the first quarter of
2009”.

Among the steps the compa-
ny said it had taken to boost
profitability were its new Coral-
Wave e-mail platform, Pronto!;
an increased sales presence;
enhanced customer retention
efforts; direct dialing for cus-
tomer installation and customer
trouble calls; compensation tied
to the company’s growth; an
expanded customer care facility;
and an upgraded broadband
core network and data centre.

TICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

NOTICE is hereby given that NEVILLETON
PARAGUE of 8 Maria Galante Road, P.O.
Box CR-56836, Nassau, Bahamas is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 27%
day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship,

Notice

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 235 of the
International Business Companies Act, 1992, as Amended,
Notice is hereby given that:-

1. SAPRA INTERNATIONAL HOLDING LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation) is in dissolution.

. Proceedings to wind-up and dissolve the Company were
commenced on the 12th day of March A.D, 2009.

. Dr. Wilder Gonzalez Penino whose address is Bayside
Executive Park, West Bay Street and Blake Road,
Building ITI, Ground Floor CB-10998, Nassau, Bahamas
is the Liquidator of the Company for the purpose of such
dissolution.

WILLIAMS LAW CHAMBERS
Registered Agent

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b) and
(c) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000
NOTICE is hereby given that, ROLING MANAGE-
MENT LIMITED is in dissolution and that the date of
commencement of the dissolution is the 13th day of March
A.D. 2009.

Enervo Administration Limited
Liquidators
Montague Sterling Centre
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3924
Nassau, The Bahamas

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUVINA REVOL of
Mackey Street, P.O. Box N-7060, Nassau, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 24" day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA JEAN-LOUIS of FARM
ROAD and CENTREVILLE CONSTIUVENCY one of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24" day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

MARIS SERVICES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, MARIS SERVICES INC., has been dissolved
and struck off the Register according to the Certificate of
Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the 6th

day of March, 2009.

Mikhail Nechvolodov,
Business Address,
LLC “PRAVO VYBORA” 109316,
Volgogradsky Prospect,
2, Moscow, Russian Federation
Liquidator

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
FARRINGDON INVESTMENTS LTD. is in dissolution.
Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and par-
ticulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
27th March, 2009.





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PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

MENOPAUSE for many women is
considered the single most signifi-
cant biological change signifying
an end to fertility and youth, and
unfortunately in some cases can
mean an end to sexual appeal and

desire as well.

While women spend their 20s, 30s, and even 40s
focused on raising a family, building a successful
career, or even celebrating the joys of woman-
hood, for many, menopause when it does happen
is like a thief robbing them of the feelings, desires,
and functions which in many ways are synony-
mous with womanhood- the effects of which can
prove extremely dramatic not just for the woman,
but also for her partner.

For many men the initial reaction can range
anywhere from bewilderness to extreme uncer-
tainty in the relationship. Unaware of the physi-
cal and emotional roller-coaster experienced by
his mate, most men are simply baffled by the
sudden and frankly scary changes women go
through as a result of menopause, which undoubt-
edly affects all sectors of the relationship includ-
ing sex.

Tribune Health spoke with Dr Richard Bridge-
water of the Southern Community Medical Cen-
tre, a board certified Obstetrician and Gynecol-
ogist (OBGYN) who explained that while
menopause naturally causes a reduction in over-
all sexual desire for most women, it does not
mean that they are sentenced to a life void of
sexual pleasure. He said that the first step in
overcoming menopause is to identify initial
changes.

Contrary to the common belief that menopause
is a one shot deal, Dr Bridgewater said like every
other cycle that occurs in the human body
menopause too has a preamble.

Known as perimenopause, this is the phase
where the woman will begin to notice menopause
related changes. On the inside, her ovaries
become less conducive to reproduction, and estro-
gen and progesterone levels begin to decrease.

“Estrogen is the female hormone responsible
for a woman’s ability to be nurturing, her ability
to be more intimate, it’s responsible for her hour
glass shape, sense of femininity, and sensitivity
during intercourse,” Dr Bridgewater said.

However as the ovaries become less productive,
an automatic decrease in estrogen levels occur,
and on the exterior a woman will begin to expe-
rience hot flashes, mood swings, uncontrollable
crying spells, fluctuating sex drive, and in some
cases still see a monthly period. In women 45
and older, perimenopause can begin, but in many
cases there are specific factors which may con-
tribute to a more overt experience.

Dr Bridgewater said in some studies, the exter-
nal effects of perimenopause can be more dra-
matic for a slender Caucasian female than for a
full figured dark skinned woman. Generally how-
ever, common factors include but are not limited
to weight, diet, stress, life styles, other pre-exist-
ing conditions, and one’s approach to menopause.

Although the effects of menopause are

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unavoidable, Dr Bridgewater suggests that the
mind over matter approach to maintaining sexu-
al pleasure and quality of life may help some
women in overcoming menopause with fewer
hurdles.

Another significant change is the frequency of
Atrophic Vaginitis. He said as menopause is com-
monly associated with reduced sexual pleasure
and desire, some women may refuse to address
their discomfort during sex, which could be to
their detriment.

Atrophic Vaginitis is a condition where the
lining of the vagina may become dry and inflamed
because of the thinning and shrinking of the vagi-
nal tissue and overall diameter, all of which is
associated with lowered estrogen levels.

As women go through menopause, the vagina
goes through a continuous shrinking process
which can affect sex, urination, and sensitivity.

With less natural lubrication in the vagina, and
less pleasurable sensitivity due to menopause,
Dr Bridgewater said the friction of sex can
become discomforting and out right painful for
some women, leading to many post menopausal
women walking away from sexual activity all
together.

The important thing to remember according
to Dr Bridgewater, is that seeing a doctor regu-
larly can tremendously reduce the affects and
occurrence of atrophic vaginitis and other condi-
tions.

Now available are various treatments as well as
hormone replacement therapy. According to Dr
Bridgewater, replacing female hormones once
produced by the body has proven to be one of the
most effective means of combating menopause
related changes.

He also suggested that women who are going
through menopause increase their vitamin D
intake, which combined with some additional sun
exposure, can reduce the possibility of another
menopause related disorder known as osteoscle-
rosis.

The condition which is a gradual increase in
bone density, commonly occurs in post

SEE page nine




CONTRARY to the common belief that menopause is a
one shot deal, Dr Bridgewater said like every other
cycle that occurs in the human body menopause too
has a preamble.





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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 9B



a eV





Are yousteps
away from injury?
Ask your feet :

I HAVE encountered many
persons whose feet continue }
to hurt but they choose to}
ignore it. I say, don't ignore it }
because your feet are trying }
to tell you something. One }
person puts it like this, “well }
the pain comes and goes so I}
never think it is serious.” ;

If you experience any pains }
in your feet, you need to know }
that your feet are trying to say }
something to you. As always, }
your feet are the foundation }
of your body and without ai
strong foundation your body is }
likely to crumble. Treating }
your feet well by getting fre-
quent pedicures is an oppor-
tunity to pay attention to their
condition and alert you to
‘warning signs’.

WARNING SIGNS?

Calluses - which are simply }
a hardening of the skin, are }
sometimes seen as nature's }
way of protecting the tissues }
below from steady abrasions }
or pressures from the body. :
When calluses develop they
are often found on pressure- }
sensitive parts of the foot, such :
as under the ball of the feet }
or under the big toe joint. ;
They can be sore and even }
painful, much like having a }
pebble under your foot. Cal- ;
luses are sometimes a sign of i
foot imbalance or of a more }
serious problem concealed }
inside the foot. ;

Corns - there are two main :
types: Hard and Soft. The hard :
corn usually starts as red skin,
followed by a coating of callus,
which develops into a hard }
corn. Most hard corns develop
on the side of the little toe, }
but are also found in other }
places where there is steady :
pressure and abrasion. Hard
corns are almost always caused
by shoes of the wrong size or }
shape or fit. On the other
hand, the soft corn is always :
found between the web of the }
toes, usually between the }
fourth and fifth toes. A soft
corn is white and damp. It can }
also be very painful. It is}
caused by a constant squeezing :
together of the toes as a result :
of shoes too short or narrow at }
the toes. The bones of the toes
rub together and bring on the ;
soft corn. ;

Hammer toes - claw-like :
toes looking very much like }
the head of a hammer. This :
condition usually affects the ;
second toe and at times the }
third toe. It is believed that an :
acquired hammer toe can be }
the result of constant wearing }
of shoes with pointed toes, or
too short or narrow. It is also ;
believed that causes can also }
be genetic or hereditary. Ham- :
mer toes can be successfully ;
corrected by simple surgical }
treatment. However, a foot }
with hammer toes should be }
fitted in the right size and type }
of shoe, with a deep toe box. }
Proper fit is a must to avoid }
painful conditions associated }
with hammer toes. :

Bunion - or ‘Hallux Valgus' }
suggest that the big toe or }
great toe bends in an outward }
direction towards the second }
toe. This deformity can be }
accompanied by severe inflam- }
mation to the side of the big }
toe. Swelling and pain or sore-
ness can also be felt in the }
area. These distressing symp- }
toms are caused by a constant }
abrasion of the shoe against }
the bursa sac at the side of the }
big toe. There again, the cor- i
rection of a bunion can be }
done thorough the services of }
a podiatrist. ;

Morton's Neuroma - pain,
burning, tingling, or numbness }
that occurs between the third }
and fourth toes and in the ball }
of your foot may be caused by }
a growth around the nerves.

* Bernadette D. Gibson, a :
Board Certified Pedorthist, is the :
proprietor of Foot Solutions, a :
health and wellness franchise that :
focuses on foot care and proper :
shoe fit, located in the Sandyport :
Plaza, Nassau. i

The views expressed are those of :
the author and does not necessar- 3
ily represent those of Foot Solu-
tions Incorporated or any of its :
subsidiary and/or affiliated compa- i
nies. Please direct any questions :
or comments to nassau@footso- :
lutions.com or 327-FEET (3338). }

EATING bran or whole grain cereal at breakfast can
significantly boost your fiber intake in just one meal.





@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

FIBER is the indigestible part of a
plant. It is in whole grains, fruits,
nuts, legumes, vegetables and
beans. However, with the normal
Bahamian diet consisting of things
filled with starches, butter and
grease we hardly ever get enough
fiber which is causing a rise in the
amount of colon cancer cases in

the country.

Now that the fiber trend is
catching on, and people are
becoming more aware, it can
also be found added to foods
such as yogurt, soy milk and pas-
ta. Other foods pause to pay a
toll along the gastrointestinal
highway, but fiber zips through
E-ZPass style because the body
can not digest it. Like seat fillers
at any event, fiber fills a void
and then vanishes when some-
thing better takes its place.

According to Doctor of Nat-
ural Health and Certified Colon
Hydrothereapist, Joyce Adder-
ley, there are two kinds of fiber:
soluble and insoluble.

“Soluble fiber is made up of
polysaccharides (carbohydrates
that contain three or more mol-
ecules of simple carbohydrates)
and it does not dissolve in water.
It has a beneficial effect on the
body chemistry, such as lower-
ing blood cholesterol and blood
sugar levels. Good sources
include: oat or oat bran, legumes
(dried beans and peas), and
many fruits and vegetables such
as carrots and bananas. It tends
to hide inside foods--the flesh
of apples, the grain of rice inside
the hull. It is what gives cooked
vegetables their soft, mushy
quality. Insoluble fiber is main-
ly made up of plant cell walls,
and it cannot be dissolved in
water. Good sources of insolu-

Surviving menopause
FROM page eight

menopausal women, and can
lead to frequent fractures, and
wheel chair confinement.

Also associated with pre-
menopause are hysterectomies,
often necessary for benign con-
ditions, which can affect a
women just entering her sexual
prime to a women approaching
menopause. For whatever rea-
son, hormone therapy is also
advised, especially for younger
patients.

“A 30-year-old who may
have had a hysterectomy would
have more pronounced symp-
toms of premenopause, because
her body is still very much
reliant on estrogen,” Dr Bridge-
water said.

Added with regular visits to
an OBGYN, adopting healthier
lifestyles, and monitoring body
changes resulting from
menopause, most women can
ride through menopause rela-
tively smoothly.

As for maintaining sexual
desire and pleasure, traditional
rules still apply. Dr Bridgewa-
ter gave this advice: Communi-
cate with your partner to make
them aware of the changes in
your body, give yourself more
time during foreplay to get your
body in the mode, and use a
water based lubricant to add to
increased sexual pleasure.

"
=
==

ble fiber (wheat

bran, whole
wheat flour, and
products made
from them, skins
from various
fruits and veg-
etables, leafy
greens, and cru-
ciferous vegeta-
bles (cauliflower,
broccoli and
Brussels
sprouts). Insolu-
ble fiber may
help to regulate
bowel move-
ments. It bulks
up as it absorbs
liquid in the
stomach; the bulk pushes waste
down and out of your system.
Insoluble fiber is usually found
in the skins and outer parts of
foods, and it's what gives many
their tough, chewy texture. Basi-
cally, it speeds up the passage
of material through your diges-

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tive tract and sweeps out all the
toxins in your body,” Mrs
Adderley said.

As long as you are eating nat-
ural foods, you will reap the bel-
ly-filling benefits of both kinds
of fiber. By taking up space in
your stomach, fiber foils
overeating by making you feel
too stuffed to keep snacking.

While you are enjoying the
satisfaction of a full stomach,
you can gloat over the fact that
it likely took fewer calories to
achieve that feeling: Foods that
pack a lot of fiber can help low-
er your carbohydrate intake.

“Fiber keeps the entire gas-
trointestinal system functioning
smoothly. As the fiber absorbs
water it makes fecal matter
bulkier, less dense, and easier
to pass along the digestive tract.
This decreases the amount of
time that food waste spends
inside the body and may reduce
the risk of infection or cell
changes due to carcinogens that

(

d

are produced when some foods,
particularly meat, degrade,” Mrs
Adderley said.

Mrs Adderley stressed that
fiber is important because it has
an influence on the digestion
process from start to finish.

“Dr Dennis Burkitt was the
first researcher to connect a
high-fiber diet with better
health. He noticed that people
eating a traditional African diet
in rural areas had almost no dia-
betes, irritable bowel syndrome,
constipation, diverticular dis-
ease, colon cancer, or heart dis-
ease. Dietary fiber may also help
prevent obesity by slowing down
digestion and the release of glu-
cose and insulin. Fiber has been
shown to normalise serum cho-
lesterol levels,” Mrs Adderley
said.

Mrs Adderley said Bahami-
ans need to realise the impor-
tance of fiber in their diets and
their overall health.

“If we continue to eat our

Bahamian diet of peas & rice,
macaroni & cheese, potato salad
and fried chicken, with little or
no fruits and veggies then, I
would agree that we do not get
sufficient fiber. For one to have
a fiber filled diet one should eat
a minimum of five fruits and veg-
etables every day. More is better.
They are rich in fiber, vitamins,
minerals, trace nutrients, fluids,
and vitality. Eat whole grains
such as wholewheat, brown rice,
oatmeal, millet, amaranth,
quinoa, and rye. Eat bran or
whole grain cereal at breakfast;
they can significantly boost your
fiber intake in just one meal.
Beans and peas are also loaded
with healthful fibers. They are
a low-fat protein source, and
their soluble fiber and sitosterols
may help normalise cholesterol
levels. An ideal intake of fiber is
a minimum of 35 grams a day.
Provided the right foods are eat-
en, this level can easily be
achieved,” Mrs Adderley said.

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Holding employees in a higher vision of themselves

At the start of my career as a man-
ager, another manager told me that it
is important to hold employees in a
higher vision than they can hold them-
selves. She advocated seeing their
potential when employees are unable
or too afraid to see how far they can
go.

As a new manager, I decided to put
this advice into action. I created stretch
projects for my team members to ensure
that in addition to their routine respon-
sibilities, they were given opportunities
to grow and evolve into leadership roles.

I took the advice literally, so at first I
attempted to see everyone in a higher
vision. I found that there were some
employees who could rise to the occa-
sion and there were others who were
completely frustrated by the process.
Employees became frustrated because
they became obsessed with trying to
rise to the challenge not wanting to dis-
appoint me. What was happening was
that I was unwittingly applying uncon-
structive pressure because I was unable
to recalibrate my expectations after
employees demonstrated that my expec-
tations were inappropriate.

So here are a few tips I learned that



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE question of whether or not the
late Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling, former
Prime Minister of the Bahamas was
born in Jamaica and if he was paid to
turn a blind eye to drug-trading activ-
ities in Norman’s Cay during the 80
and early 90s, remains a touchy subject
for many Bahamians.

Just last week, an emotional protest
took place outside The Tribune where
a group of Bahamians waving plac-
ards called for an apology and resig-
nation of managing editor John Mar-
quis because of his scandalous arti-
cles on the late Prime Minister.

In this Barber Shop, we ask to what
extent do these recent allegations have
on the general perception of the for-
mer leader, and whether or not now is
the time for such stories.

Setting the stage at Cameron’s
Clean Cuts, a small group of men give
their take on the issues.

First up was 31-year-old Barber Ken
Dames from the Baillou Hills area,
who said the article which alleged Sir
Lynden’s knowledge of drug-dealing
activity during his leadership is disre-
spectful.

“Sir Lynden Pindling is a man who
has done great things for this coun-
try, he might not have been a perfect
man, but I think we all know that.

“To have this article come out after
Sir Lynden’s death, and from John
Marquis who we had some problems
with in journalism in this country in
the past, I think his actions are just
disrespectful.”

Mr Dames went on to say that he
thinks Mr Marquis was wrong in going
to a grieving man, Chauncey Tynes
Sr, and said the aging man is still upset
at the mysterious death of his son.

“Mr Tynes has no closure, they have
still not found the body, but what they
gat to realise is Chauncey Tynes Jr
did some things that wasn’t right. He
associated with some people that he
knew were undesirables, people like
Carlos ‘Joe’ Lehder, who he would
have known to be alleged drug deal-
ers.”

Mr Dames explained that if Mr
Tynes Jr made the decision to still
work for such a character, and to then
go missing, “that’s the kind of conse-
quence that follows that kind of life.”

33-year-old Taffie Darling from
Robinson Road said although there
are certain freedoms of writing enti-
tled to any journalist, his concern is
that now is not the appropriate time to
discuss the issue.

“The Bahamas right now is facing a
recession, so for him to come now and
write about Sir Lynden whether they
are true or not, is a waste of time.”

However Mr Darling suggested that
there is nothing special or unique
about this alleged drug trade involve-
ment and illicit activity by the former
PM.

“If he really wants to talk about cor-
ruption, then he needs to go further
back, because it didn’t just start with

aD iy

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can help you to hold your employees in
a balanced vision of their potential:

1. Avoid projecting your strengths
and weaknesses onto your employees.
You will only frustrate them if you
expect them to be able to do what you
do well. In other words, know your
employees (KYE). Know that their
strengths and weaknesses, likes and dis-
likes, values, motivators and demotiva-
tors and personality all factor into the
balancing process.

2. Sometimes a weakness is exactly
what it is. A weakness! While you may
see some improvement when you give
employees opportunities to grow, know
when to stop expecting improvement
in the areas of weakness. Instead, focus
on the employee's strengths. This will
build their confidence and motivation.

3. Don't penalise employees if they
are unsuccessful at a stretch project.
Perhaps your assessment of their poten-
tial in a particular competence was
incorrect so don't give up on them.
Developing employees is a trial and
error process so test them in other areas
of competence. Avoid writing them
off.

4, Put the stretch project in perspec-
tive. If you penalise employees at
appraisal time because they failed at a
stretch project even if they performed
their mandated duties very well,
remember you may sabotage your
efforts to develop your team. They
won't trust you to allow them to make
mistakes.

5. Sometimes employees have the
potential to go to the next level but
they don't have the will. Depending on
the reason for the lack of will, you may
not be able to persuade them to go to
the next level. For instance, I once
met a front line employee who was a
natural leader with the technical com-
petencies to train incoming employees
and even managers but he refused pro-
motion after promotion. He demon-
strated the talent but did not have the
will to go to the next level. This can

happen if a person doesn't want the
extra responsibility of supervising oth-
ers or they may have goals outside the
workplace.

6. See your team as a whole entity.
Sometimes employees appointed to a
position do not possess all the skills
necessary to perform satisfactorily.
While right placement is optimal,
sometimes it is not immediately possi-
ble so some leaders see the team in a
higher vision of itself, creatively har-
nessing the strengths of the members of
the team in order to create synergy.

Everyone is Part of the Equation

Managers are not the only ones
responsible for holding employees in a
higher vision of themselves. As an
employee you may tend to complain
about or be wary of your coworkers.
While sometimes your assessment may
be accurate, it doesn't mean the
employee is a write off. It could mean
that with your help, and the help of
others (assuming the employee's will-
ingness to receive help) you can help
turn the situation around.

Corporate memory can be long and
unforgiving. As an employee, if you do
your part in forgiving coworkers for
their mistakes and reach out to sup-

port each other you can help trans-
form your team.

Holding employees in a higher vision
of themselves is an important skill pos-
sessed by top performing leaders and
employees. If you focus on developing
members of your team you can create
a higher performing team and
inevitably, you will be able to perform
at an even higher level.

Whether you are a leader or employ-
ee, when considering developing your
fellow employees you should take a
long hard look in the mirror. Ask
yourself if you demonstrate the behay-
iors you expect from your employees
or coworkers? What is your real agen-
da? Can your team trust you? Do
you demonstrate behaviours that indi-
cate you care more about your success
than the success of others? The
answers to these questions will impact
your effectiveness.

e Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational
Soul, an HR Consulting and Leadership
Development company. If you are inter-
ested in exploring how you can create
higher performing team leaders, you
contact her at www.orgsoul.com.

Sir Lynden Pindling.”

Mr Darling alleges that in the hay-
days of the United Bahamian Party
(UBP), there existed instances of rum
running, and the stealing of land,
which he said should be written about
if the overall intent by Mr Marquis
was to identify corruption and wrong
doing.

“If you weigh the good against the
bad, Sir Lynden has done a lot of
good, and the whole talk about him is
not relevant at this time...and he
‘John Marquis’ is just a journalist look-
ing for some boost in his career.”

Patron Keith Baker from Stapleton
Gardens explained, that just because
Sir Lynden was at the helm of the
helm of the Bahamas’ independence,
all Bahamians should react to the
recent articles identifying him as a
crony of the Colombian drug lord Mr
Lehder.

“Sir Lynden has done a whole lot in
the Bahamian community, and when
you find someone from the outside
coming and mentioning negative
things about him, then the whole
Bahamian community is going to
react.

“Even if it’s relevant or not, Sir Lyn-
den is our forefather and we don’t
care or give a squat what he might
have done.”

Proprietor 33-year-old Cameron
Lubin from Fox Hill added, that apart
from this issue being irrelevant at this
time, there is a negative message that
many young people are getting.

“Young people are now thinking
that it pays off to do wrong, although
we are not condoning that behaviour,
I think more scrutiny needs to go into
articles on our leaders.”

Patron 27-year-old Jamal Strachan,
said nine years after Sir Lynden’s
death is too late to attempt to bring
shame on his name or that of his fam-
ily.

“Whatever he did then, even if it
comes out that it was so, you really
have to just leave him in God’s hands
because we all gat to be judged for
ourselves.”

On the issue of whether Sir Lynden
was Bahamian or not, Mr Strachan
said it is another closed minded view
on life practiced by many Bahamians.

Mr Strachan said: “It doesn’t matter
where a person is from, as long as they
are doing things for the people like
Pindling and even like President Oba-
ma, it shouldn’t matter.”

I just feel at the end of the day, all
politicians need to be held account-
able for whatever they do, a lot of
these MPs feel they are so high and
mighty and are not suppose to answer
to the people, and that is wrong.”

Mr Strachan said as long as MPs are
more responsible for their actions and
are truly operating for the good of the
people, then there would be no reason
to debate someone’s practice after
they are dead and gone.

¢ To comment on this topic or to have
your barber shop featured in a future arti-
cle, lallen@tribunemedia.net.

“Mr Tynes
has no clo-
sure, they
have still not
found the
body, but
what they
gat to realise
is Chauncey
Tynes Jr did
some things
that wasn’t
fu td eee

da Lets)

“Young
people are
Paton nvmd ovbavsebareg
that it pays
off to do
wrong,
although we
are not
(crop ateloy avn etss
that behav-
iour, I think
more scrutiny
needs to go
into articles
on our .”

CAMERON LUBIN



“Tt doesn’t
matter
aa aKe) wears
person is
from, as long
PISMO OC eaar TA
doing things
for the peo-
ple like Pin-
dling and
Aare DNs
President
Obama, it
shouldn’t
matter.”

JAMAL STRACHAN

Histatussin DM

_ Spa-la-la party

FROM page 12

“Just playing around and
doing fun girl stuff with my
daughter inspired me. I
thought about doing a spa
party for little girls,” Mrs Paul
said

Mrs Paul’s daughter,
Gabrielle, said she enjoys the
parties and that most of her
friends describe the party as
their best party ever.

“The most enjoyable part
for me is the relaxing part of
soaking my feet for a pedi-
cure with rose petals in the
water and applying the straw-
berry whipped cream facial
mask. I also like listening to
the spa music playing which is
like ocean sounds etc. I liked
that there were kids’ maga-
zines to look at and enjoy,
and that I got to wear a nice
robe,” Gabrielle said.

Mrs Paul said the young
ladies also get body and foot
scrubs. Girls can make their
own lotion, as well as tiara
shaped place cards in spa kit.

“They can get a chocolate
mask and strawberry masks-
it’s basically just whip cream.
Most of them even like to eat
it off so it has very kid friend-
ly ingredients,” Mrs Paul said.

Mrs Paul said she eventu-
ally would like to turn her
business into a store so that
little girls and their moms can
have access to everything for
a girl’s world.

“JT do someday want to turn
it into a store whereas I would
be able to have the parties in
the store and retail girly items
as well. I think spa parties are
great for any occasion- espe-
cially sleepovers for little girls.
I have clients who expressed
that it is different, fun and
small. We do not cater to
more than 12 girls and a min-
imum of 4 to 5, just so the
child can have more of her
closer friends enjoying a spa
day with her,” Mrs Paul said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



COUGH SUPPRESSANT & RESPIRATORY DECONGESTANT













THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT k 4 = ([f7

5-Day FORECAST

TUESDAY, MARCH 24tTn, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST





















































y aa ~ Today Wednesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
yy | oe = — v as High = Low W High =Low W NASSAU Today: E at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
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“ a ~ A \W@ Low | MODERATE | HIGH |v. HIGH Amsterdam 46/7 37/2 sh 49/9 40/4 + Wednesday: E at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
———~ ORLANDO \ Ankara, Turkey 52/11 28/-2 pe 82/11 34/1 pe ABACO ‘Today: E at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Ai eh ree ppd Variable clouds, a Partly cloudy, a Sunny and windy. Mostly sunny and Mostly sunny, breezy Partly sunny, breezy The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 58/14 49/9 s 60/15 41/5 sh Wednesday: E at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
0 Lew:56°FA2°C Ya ss shower; windy. shower; windy. nice. and warm. and warm. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 69/20 55/12 s 68/20 55/12 s
4 : : ; val. 770 vay: 7Q° tah: 99° Tay: OO Bangkok 92/33 78/25 pc 91/382 78/25 t
; - @ lle. High: 77 High: 79 High: 82 High: 85 Bases Scam
e d ee es os oe Seue : one pc 84/28 74/23 pc
TAMPA be i High: 78 Low: 68 Low: 66 Low: 70 Low: 71 Low: 70 SESS Barcelona 63/17 44/6 s sis 50/10 pc VA a
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High: 82° F/28° C ey ¢ 7A°-66° F 76°-69° F 81°-71° F High HtL(ft.) Low Ht ty — Belling SH2 26/2" pe SB BERS
Low: 57° F/14°C ! -. ee The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 7:07am. 26 12:49am. 0.2 ae se ae 2 vulils ae _
ie @ 0 on elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 7:19pm. 2.7 1:07 p.m. 0.1 an e 30/3 97/-2 2m 37/2 30/-1 ;
: \ - -
| 2 , as Cee Wednesday’40am. 26 33am. 00 Bermuda 59/15 51/10 sh 61/16 55/12 sh
4 a | 759p.m. 28 1:45pm. 0.0 Bogota 65/18 48/8 sh 66/18 48/8 r
A i. ad Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday 82am. 27 2i5am. 00 Brussels 46/7 36/2 sh 48/8 36/2 +
( 4 ABACO Temperature 8:38 p.m. 3.0 2:23pm. -0.1 Budapest 47/8 27/-2 © 48/8 34/1 s
f i: i. High: 74° F/23° C HIGH sistance ea taaeaen, 75° F/24° C Friday 04am. 27 267am. 01 Buenos Aires 84/28 66/18 s 84/28 68/20 s
” 7 LOW vce 66° F/19° C y ‘ : . Cairo 70/21 54/12 pc 73/22 57/13 s
ra y ll. > Low: 59° F/15°C Normal high 80° F/26° C aha Calcutta 96/35 78/25 pc 94/34 77/25 s
oS ES
is . Normal low . 66° F/19° C Calgary 41/5 21/-6 pe 25/-3 15/-9 sn
poe , @ WEST PALM BEACH a . Last year's High... ssnsrsreneensse 86° F/30° C SUN Ay Ty yf Cancun 32/27 64/17 pc 86/30 67/19 s
Low: 64° F/18°C a Precipitation ug er 7 a.m. La bib - am. Casablanca 76/24 62/6 pc 80/26 55/12 pc 76/52
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .o..0..c.ceecceceeeeeeee 0.00" unsel....... -4op.m. Moonset..... “40 p.m. Copenhagen 37/2 31/0 pc 40/4 33/0 sh .
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date New First Full Last Dublin 52/11 44/5 5 5010 415 pc
RE @ High: 73° F/23° C Normal year to date oo... 4.72" den j Frankfurt 48/8 34/1 sh 43/6 36/2 r
ow: 65° F/18° i 7 Low:57°F/14°C APE: Geneva 38/3 33/0 sh 37/2 36/2 sn
“han AccuWeather.com wa Halifax 35/1 24/-6 sn 30/3 26/-3 pc aa
he @ AY Forecasts and graphics provided by S ; Negi Havana 81/27 61/16 pe 84/28 61/16 s Showers 79/67
S MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.26 Apr. 2 pr. 9 Apr. 17 Helsinki 27/-2 16/-8 c 28/-2 12/-11 pe T-storms
=» High: 79° F/26° C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 77/25 64/17 t 72/22 66/18 Rain Cold Gents.
AY Low: 64° F/18°C NASSAU High: TT’ F/2s° c Islamabad 80/26 59/15 1 82/27 56/13 ¢ Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Warm X High: 78° F/26°C Low:61° FA6°C Istanbul 57/13 44/6 s 56/13 36/2 + Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. a
> Low: 68° F/20°C Jerusalem 5140 41/5 sh 58/14 415 s Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. tatlonary Mengeaih-
a4 : Johannesburg 76/24 54/12 pc 75/23 54/12 pc
@ Kingston 82/27 72/22 sh gd/28 73/22 sh -os 0s!) 10s (20s (BOS!) 40s
WE CATISLAND
High: 78° F/26° C YX \N —_ = 3 -s Lima 83/28 65/18 pc 83/28 65/18 ¢
Low: 68° F/20°C High: 75° F/24” London 52/11 41/5 s 52/11 39/3 sh
4 @ Low: 59° F/15°C Madrid 70/21 37/2 s 72/22 37/2 s
Manila 91/32 77/25 c 86/30 75/23 +r
-* Mexico City 81/27 52/11 t 77/25 49/9 t O IN| S IN| a
ie oe Monterrey 95/35 66/18 pc 95/35 67/19 s AUT U RA E
_ GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 39/3 19/-7 s 45/77 37/2 s
r High: 77° F/25° C Hi h:77° F/25°C Moscow 32/0 25/-3 sn 36/2 27/-2 sn
vv“ Low:67°F/19°C Lewe2°FATC Munich 36/2 32/0 sn 35/1 33/0 sn
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ANDROS ; Nairobi 90/32 57/13 s 90/32 57/13 s

highs and tonights's lows.



a oO o “om ‘ce ma “on Gus Never start your |
5 5 5 MMOmlMe VV.
Praae 38/3 30/-1 a 36/2 33/0 a CNAME It O t US °



LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 80/26 74/23 80/26 72/22 +
High: 78° F/26° C Riyadh 89/31 62/16 s 77/25 60/15 pc
Ceara erie: MAYAGUANA aT ee ee ee ee outo Insurance,
t. Thomas s s = + aca 44 < 2
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday = ny VE
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W i High: 80° F/27° C oF a aia rs a oe Toman smart oe 1S
Fic F/C FIC FIC Fic F/C Fic FIC Fic F/C Fic FIC Low: 62° F/17°C an aly ad or 8 pe nsurance MI anagemen ’
Albuquerque 6146 37/2 po 61/16 37/2 s Indianapolis 68/20 52/11 pe 5945 426 t Philadelphia 4718 320 s 52/11 36/2 s Santiago 84/28 52/11 s 86/30 50/10 s ~ . Race
Anchorage 32/0 24/-4 ¢ 36/2 25/-3 sn Jacksonville 73/22 53/11 pc 73/22 57/13 pc Phoenix 78/25 5412 s 81/27 S5/12 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 82/27 66/18 sh 82/27 66/18 sh Smart p ople you can trust.
Atlanta 68/20 5140 pc 6146 53/11 sh KansasCity 58/14 35/1 t 5915 41/5 s Pittsburgh 55/12 32/0 s 56/13 42/5 sh RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:82°F/28°c = _ Te orm: pe pers ca ¢ De F MO :
Atlantic City 4677 24/-4 s 5010 34/1 s Las Vegas 72/22 47/8 s 75/23 53/11 s Portland,OR 53/41 40/4 c 53/11 36/2 sh High: 79° F/26° C Low: 64° F/18°C eaaUnal Oa pe SaBUEDEI C ——
Baltimore 46/7 28/-2 s 5412 40/4 pc Little Rock 6719 48/8 t 68/20 46/7 pc Raleigh-Durham 55/12 38/3 pe 52/11 44/6 c Low.62°F/A17°C =< * a ol ie sn ea tea pc : O
Boston 40/4 30/-1 pe 48/8 344 s LosAngeles 76/24 52/1 s 78/25 52/1 s St. Louis 68/20 45/77 t S945 43/6 pe , on ae TSHERSET ie “aOR ee * INSURANCE M AN AGEMENT
Buffalo 44/6 30/-1 pc 52/11 38/3 pc Louisville 72/22 56/13 po 64/17 46/7 ¢t Salt Lake City 48/8 34/1 pce 50/10 32/0 sh GREAT INAGUA vr Tuva aes Te ra ’
Charleston, SC 71/21 50/10 pc 66/18 56/13 pc Memphis 72/22 52/11 c 66/18 5241 pc SanAntonio 78/25 59/15 pc 75/23 65/18 t High:81°F/27°C Tan cE SeSTETTES I LJ] (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
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Dallas 70/21 48/8 t 69/20 55/12 t Nashville 74/23 52/11 po 68/20 48/8 t Seattle 5010 40/4 c 5010 36/2 r+ ca 40/4 31/0 sn 43/6 40/4 t j , t :
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THE TRIBUNE

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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

AAR
EAN
TS teed

PEST ete te

DoUMeS Of MISSIN
boys found at sea

Community
eriel-stricken
alter tragic
end to search

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

TRAGEDY befell a close-knit
community after the lifeless bod-
ies of two missing boys were
pulled from the waters off Ade-
laide Beach yesterday.

The community, which mount-
ed a neighbourhood search for
the boys, was left grief-stricken
and filled with questions after the
sudden deaths of the two youth.
The boys, best friends Rovan
Smith, 9, and Craig Stubbs, 10,
were reported missing Sunday
evening.

According to reports, the boys
pulled a small blue skiff, which
reportedly had a hole in the bot-
tom, from the bushes before tak-
ing it out to sea. It is believed the
boys drowned in the rough tide
which carried them out into the
current.

Shortly after 11 am yesterday,
screams of anguish rang through
the air as Rovan's body was
brought ashore by a neighbour-
hood search party, which includ-
ed area MP Kendal Wright, his
face bloody from an apparent

SEE page six

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

EMOTIONAL
RELATIVES of
10-year-old

Craig Stubbs
come ashore as

a neighbourhood
search party
looks for his body.

e SEE PAGE TWO
FOR MORE PHOTOS

Major Freeport retailer
to lay off 21 of its staff

mw By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A MAJOR Freeport retailer,
owned by publicly-listed Freeport
Concrete, late yesterday
announced it was laying-off 21
staff, with its chairman and land-
lord agreeing to “subsidise the
rent for the next several months”
to aid its profitability and prevent

The Taste

on

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ae arias
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ENE ETERS

more redundancies.

Ray Simpson, chief executive
of BISX-listed Freeport Concrete,
said the lay-offs took place yes-
terday with immediate effect, with
another worker taking early
retirement.

He explained that the down-
sizing was related to the worsen-
ing condition of the Freeport
economy, and the need for both
Freeport Concrete and the Home
Centre to further reduce costs
after paring back its monthly
operating expenses to the “bare

SEE page eight

ery Ki e Ny

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SPARKS could fly today
when a group of disgruntled
locals attempt to stage a “big
birthday bash” on Atlantis’
private Cove Beach in protest
of what they say are
“apartheid like” restrictions
placed on access to the beach
by the resort’s owners.

SEE page seven



Severely injured former basketball

Star still seeking justice 19 years on

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

NEARLY two decades after a devastating car crash left him crippled

for life, a former local basketball star is still seeking justice.

Lawyers for former local basketball star Daniel Williams, have filed
a “notice of motion” in the Supreme Court seeking an order to have

SEE page six



CSE b aii)
PCED eel

ae ar



The Bahamas
‘likely to wait for
unified position in
Turks and Caicos’
before decision

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas is likely to hold off
on reacting to the controversial polit-
ical situation in the Turks and Caicos
until the island’s governing and oppo-
sition parties “come to a unified posi-
tion” on the United Kingdom’s dras-
tic announcement, it has been sug-

gested.

PLP MP and former foreign affairs
minister Fred Mitchell, who met with
opposition People’s Democratic
Movement (PDM) members in Prov-
idenciales, Turks and Caicos on Sun-
day, said the PDM do not want to be

FORMER PREMIER
Michael Misick
officially stood down
yesterday. (AP)

seen to downplay serious accusations

of corruption levelled at the governing party by the British by
voicing objection to the recommendation that democratic
governance be suspended for two years in the twin island

nation.

“On the ground many of their supporters feel that what
the British did in terms of the corruption issues are correct. The
opposition want to be careful that they don’t be seen, when
arguing for democratic governance, that they don’t end up sup-
porting government on the corruption issue. They need to
sort out how they can approach that issue,” said Mr Mitchell.

Last week the UK, which has been conducting a Commis-
sion of Inquiry into rampant allegations of corruption in the
British Overseas Territory, announced that it intends to sus-
pend the executive and legislative branches of the TCI Gov-

SEE page seven

Diabetic woman
given out-of-date
medication

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia. net



Managing Editor

_ of Tribune hits out

at critics calling
for his removal

: mM By MEGAN REYNOLDS

A DIABETIC woman whose
life was put at risk when she was }
given out-of-date medication by a }
government-run pharmacy is con- }
cerned hundreds of others may }
also be in danger.

Insulin given to the 44-year-old }
by the pharmacy in Elizabeth :
Estates expired in October 2007,
more than a year before it was }
given to her in February and
again last week.

The woman has been diabetic i
for 20 years and is totally depen- :
dent on insulin injections two to }
three times a day to control sugar }
levels in her bloodstream. :

But when she took the expired }
insulin in February, her blood }
sugar levels shot up, making her }
feel nauseous, light-headed and }
with cramps in her legs. i

Confused by how her blood :
sugar could be rising, the Nassau
woman removed starch and sugar }
from her diet, but her blood sug-
ar levels continued to soar. i

After three weeks of feeling ill, :
the mother-of-two bought more }
insulin at a private pharmacy and
her blood sugar levels soon }

SEE page six

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ND BAHAMA,

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

TRIBUNE Managing Editor

? John Marquis, in a radio inter-
? view yesterday, hit out at critics
:? who have called for his removal
? over a controversial Insight article
? published on Monday, March 9.

Mr Marquis told Jeff Lloyd, on

? Star 106.5FM’s “Jeffrey”, that he
: will not be intimidated by threats
? to remove his work permit for
? simply doing his job.

His investigative article

? sparked controversy when the

Insight article entitled, “The trag-
ic young pilot who knew too
much”, was published two weeks
ago, as it linked the mysterious

i disappearance of pilot Chauncey
i Tynes Jr in 1983 with former
? leader Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling
? and his connection to drug czar
? Carlos “Joe” Lehder.

Fervent supporters of Sir Lyn-

? den as “Father of the Nation”
? protested outside The Tribune’s
? Shirley Street offices last Tues-

SEE page eight


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







BILL REID, Director of the National
Hurricane Centre in Miami, Florida,
explains how critical Hurricane Hunters

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

OFFICIALS and the media got a first-hand look at a
United States Air Force C-1 hurricane hunter plane at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport yesterday dur-
ing the Caribbean Hurricane Awareness Tour.

The aircraft, operated by US Air Force reserve officers,
flies at about 10,000 feet above the eye of a hurricane.

This allows meteorologists and storm trackers to get a
forecast which is 20 to 30 per cent more accurate than
one which is reached by just using satellites alone.

This accuracy is particularly important in gauging a
storm's path and analysing potential evacuation areas,
officials said.

_

Weapon

are in storm forecasting after touring

the aircraft.

Tim Clarke/
Tribune staff



"Hurricane hunters are like our biggest weapon in our
arsenal for diagnosing what's going on with a hurricane. We
obviously use satellites to track them when they're starting
up, moving across the Atlantic, but we use computer mod-
els now to make the best forecast, and the better the data
we can gather, the better the initial conditions that we put
into those computer forecasts.

"Therefore flying the plane into the hurricane gives us
that data," Bill Reid, director of the National Hurricane



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LOCAL NEWS



COLONEL Dave Boris (second from the left) and US Air Force
Reserve Officers explain storm tracking pocedures to Minis-
ter of Environment Earl Deveaux during a tour of a C-1 Hur-
ricane Hunter.

Centre, said after the tour yesterday. Environment Min-
ister Earl Deveaux extended his thanks to the US gov-
ernment for the partnership, adding that instruments like

A RELATIVE holds up a photo of
10-year-old Craig Stubbs, who
drowned on Adelaide Beach.

ne oo
GRIEF — the aftermath of th
tragedy.

YS a



Poe

OFFICIALS AND MEDIA LOOK AT US AIR FORCE PLANE USED FOR TRACKING STORMS

THE HURRICANE HUNTER

the hurricane hunter are vital for detecting weather con-
ditions as early as possible to ensure the country is fully pre-
pared.

Director of the Department of Meteorology Arthur
Rolle said the hurricane hunter crew has consistently pro-
vided local meteorologists with data for storm tracking.

And although the upcoming storm season is predicted to
be relatively mild, having accurate forecasts is essential in
hurricane preparedness, Mr Rolle added.

Efforts

Colonel Dave Borsi, of the US Air-Force, said com-
bined efforts with the US Department of Defence allows
the base to operate 10 C-1 planes.

He said storm tracking plays a vital role in minimising the
amount of damage to life and property a hurricane can
inflict. "We know sometimes that we are impacting the air-
waves and airline traffic, but getting into those storms,
getting that data back is critical, it's crucial," he said.

According to a member of the US’ National Hurricane
Centre, only four hurricane hunters have been lost while
tracking storms since the mission took off in 1944.

After the official tour yesterday morning, which coin-
cided with the 59th annual World Meteorological Day,
groups of local children were scheduled to tour the aircraft
before it makes stops later this week in Mexico and
Trinidad and Tobago.

m PHOTOS:
Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



THE MOTHER of 10-year-old Craig Stubbs seen supported by friends and
relatives as a search party looked for her son's body.

A UNITED
STATES Coast
Guard helicopter
patrolled the
Adelaide Beach
area yesterday
in search of best
friends Rovan
Smith, 9, and
Craig Stubbs,
10, who were
reported miss-
ing on Sunday
evening.



Na at is

ee et a
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



© In brief

Kiwanians
urged to
attend March
26 meeting

The Kiwanis Club of Over-
The-Hill’s weekly meeting
will be held on Thursday,
March 26 at 8pm at Holy
Cross Community Centre on
Soldier Road.

Philip Stubbs, chairman of
the Securities Commission of
the Bahamas, will address the
club. He will speak about the
Securities Commission, its
role and challenges.

District governor Sharon
Dunn will be visiting the club.
All Kiwanians and their
guests are welcome to attend.

Cuba: US
embargo ‘still
Standing’
despite law

m HAVANA

Cuba’s state-controlled media
on Monday downplayed eased
US. rules on family ties with
Cuba, calling the measure a
defeat for the communist gov-
ernment’s foes that still left
Washington’s 47-year-old trade
embargo intact, according to the
Associated Press. The article in
the Communist Party newspa-
per Granma was the first offi-
cial mention of the Cuba claus-
es in a package signed into law
by President Barack Obama on
March 11 — nearly two weeks
prior. The law rolled back limits
on family travel and remittances
imposed by the Bush Adminis-
tration, effectively allowing
Americans with relatives in
Cuba to visit once a year, stay
as long as they wish and spend
up to $179 a day. The changes
only remain in effect until the
fiscal year ends Sept. 30.

Granma said the changes
“represent the first setback for
the anti-Cuban mafia and its
representatives in Congress,”
but added that “in practice, they
don’t affect the siege that suc-
cessive administrations have
maintained against our people.”

USS. law still bars most trade
with and travel to Cuba.

“These steps don’t restore
the rights of Cuban residents of
the United States to travel
freely to Cuba or approve the
rights of citizens of that country
to visit a neighboring island,” it
said. President Barack Obama
has said he is open to talks with
Cuban leaders, though he said
he does not yet favor lifting the
USS. embargo. Cuban officials
have sometimes criticized Oba-
ma, but have been far less hos-
tile than they were toward ex-
President George W. Bush.

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MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ...........

Plunging property value fears

Concern over building of New Providence
Road Improvement Project’s Corridor 18

Neko Grant



@ RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

RESIDENTS of West Bay
Street are concerned that the
construction of the New Provi-
dence Road Improvement Pro-
ject’s Corridor 18, and what
many feel is the impending relo-
cation of the container port to
Arawak Cay, will drastically
reduce property values in the
area.

Minister of Works Neko
Grant said his ministry has
received several complaints
from residents about the pro-
ject and is in the process of
responding.

However, he pointed out that
all of the appropriate notices
were posted and no part of the
road improvement plans have
changed.

“Personally I think it is a bit
of overreaction on the part of
some people and at the end of
the day we have to look at
what’s best for the common
good,” Mr Grant said.

On December 15 last year,
the NPRIP was relaunched with
the signing of a contract for
completion of the road works

between the government of the
Bahamas and Jose Cartellone
Construction Company.
Funding for the project was
provided from the Inter-Amer-
ican Development Bank (IDB)
in the amount of $100 million.
Corridor 18, which com-
mences on West Bay Street and
continues along to Saunders
Beach, will cost $2.3 million.
William Wong, president of
the Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
clation, said that there was no
real way to actually determine
how the situation will affect
property values at this point.
“Even the affect the place-
ment of the container port at
Arawak Cay would have on
property values in the area
would depend heavily on the

SaUMDERS BEACH

re-routing of the roads and how
it would alleviate traffic in that
area,” he said.

Solution

While Mr Wong said that it
was a good decision for gov-
ernment to remove the con-
tainer ports from the Bay Street
area, he added that the ideal
solution would have been to
place the facilities in the Clifton
Cay area.

“There is just no way of
knowing how it’s going to
impact the people in the area,
that’s if it’s not re-routed prop-
erly. This would affect the
whole Grove, Perpall Tract and
Vista Marina area,” Mr Wong
said.

Services suspended after New
BROMUS NCR VEL OM UES



See eee eereeeneneree P4

NEW Providence is experiencing a significant
water shortage which has resulted in the suspen-
sion of services, particularly in the southern part
of the island.

The Water and Sewerage Corporation report-
ed yesterday that the capital’s water supply is
presently being “severely negatively” impacted by
strong sea swells.

The swells, which are expected to subside by
today or tomorrow, are preventing the move-
ment of the vessel MT Titus, which provides
around 30 per cent of the New Providence’s
water supply.

As a consequence, water conservation mea-
sures are being taken in the form of reduction in
pressure during the overnight hours and during
the daytime off-peak hours in some areas.

The corporation said that it will do all in its
power to limit these conservation measures. How-
ever, the severity and length of time that these
measures will remain in place is subject to the ear-
ly restoration of the daily shipping operation.

Residents of southern New Providence, includ-
ing but not limited to the communities of Gold-
en Gates, South Beach, Pinewood Gardens and
surrounding areas, reported that they had no
water yesterday morning.

“Corporation personnel have restored sup-

Plpe.o0, Osc

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plies to those affected areas and will work to
avoid a recurrence today.

“The corporation sincerely apologises for the
inconvenience this is causing our customers and
we are working to restore our supply to normal
operating levels at the earliest opportunity,” the
WSC said in a press statement.

Barge

The MT Titus usually makes one trip per day,
bringing around three million gallons of water to
the capital.

However, since last Thursday, the barge has
only been able to make two trips to New Provi-
dence. The last trip was on Saturday.

“Presently our system demand is approximately
10.5 million imperial gallons per day and our
New Providence supply sources (desalination
plants and well-fields) total approximately nine
million imperial gallons per day, therefore with-
out the daily Titus delivery there is a supply
deficit of approximately 1.5 million imperial gal-
lons per day that has to be made up via conser-
vation measures as our strategic storage levels
(which are used to make up any short-term sup-
ply shortfalls) are low due to recent supply chal-
lenges,” the WSC said.



Minister for the Environment
Earl Deveaux said that when
the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank and government
went into discussions about the
NRIP, there were a number of




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environmental issues addressed
particularly surrounding the
Perpall Tract well fields.

In order to mitigate these
environmental issues a protect-
ed area was proposed to secure
the integrity of the well fields.

“The road corridors were
agreed upon based on a con-
sensus that this would cause
minimum environmental

impact. Corridor 18 was the
best way we could prevent any
serious environment or eco-
nomic impact to the area along
with providing a huge public
space at Saunder’s Beach,” the
minister said.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Geithner scores points, faces more risks

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House
says it does not live or die by the ups and downs
of the stock market. But others do. And on
Monday, that was good for Timothy Geithner.

With credit markets frozen, a public in high
dudgeon and a Congress on a populist crusade,
President Barack Obama's Treasury secretary
needed a bit of an uptick. He got it Monday
when the Dow Jones industrial average shot
up nearly 500 points after he unveiled his pri-
vate-public partnership to help relieve banks
of the toxic assets that have plunged the finan-
cial system into its crisis.

But Geithner still has lots to prove — to
financial markets, to Congress and to Americans
seething over executive bonuses and dimin-
ished 401k retirement accounts.

Unpaid back taxes cost him votes in the Sen-
ate during his confirmation. Bonuses for exec-
utives at embattled American International
Group Inc. drew Republican calls for his resig-
nation. And the Wall Street that proved so
friendly on Monday could just as easily turn on
him as it did last month when his broad outlines
for a rescue plan landed with a thud.

No stranger to tough times, Geithner this
week faces yet another test of his short Cabinet
tenure. The multi-tasking Geithner is not only
rolling out a new relief plan for banks, he's also
juggling an overhaul of the regulatory regime for
the financial sector, facing a couple of poten-
tially contentious hearings before Congress,
and planning the agenda for the April 2 summit
of top foreign leaders in London.

So far, so good.

"He fed the beast enough details to keep
the beast happy — today, today," said Robert
Litan, senior fellow for economic studies at the
Brookings Institution, emphasizing the fickle
nature of the stock market. "It's a very hungry
beast and it's a very forgetful beast."

Last month, Obama in a televised news con-
ference promised Geithner would unveil details
of a banking rescue. When Geithner offered
only a sketch of a plan in a badly reviewed
speech, the markets tanked.

This time, Geithner easily spelled out details
of the plan off-camera to a roomful of reporters
at Treasury and granted an interview to CNBC.
Then Obama placed his own stamp on the plan,
making brief televised remarks at the White
House with Geithner and Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke at his side.

"This is one more element that is going to be
absolutely critical in getting credit flowing
again,” Obama said. "It's not going to happen
overnight. There's still great fragility in the
financial systems. But we think that we are
moving in the right direction.”

The rescue plan might still need a good sales
pitch. The Dow's surge notwithstanding, Gei-
thner and the administration are facing an ide-
ological attack from the left and the right. Rep.

Eric Cantor of Virginia, the second-ranking
Republican leader in the House, called the plan
"fundamentally flawed."

"In it's current form, Secretary Geithner's
plan is a shell game that hides the true cost of
the programme from the taxpayers that will be
asked to pay for it," Cantor said.

And liberal economist Paul Krugman, whose
views as a columnist for The New York Times
influence opinion in Congress, said the plan
was "more than disappointing” in his Monday
column. "In fact," he added, "it fills me with a
sense of despair." He called for the govern-
ment to take temporary control of insolvent
banks. "That's what Sweden did in the early
1990s," he wrote.

The Obama administration has not hidden its
disdain for Krugman's criticisms, and Geithner
made his clear on Monday. "We are the United
States of America," he said tartly. "We are not
Sweden."

Moreover, Congress's attempts to rein in
compensation for companies that receive finan-
cial aid has made some private investors wary of
entering into a partnership with the federal gov-
ernment. Geithner will be walking that tight
rope today when he testifies before the House
Financial Services Committee.

The hearing is billed as an examination of the
$165 million in bonus payments made last week
to employees of AIG's Financial Products divi-
sion. The House last week overwhelmingly
approved legislation setting a 90 per cent tax on
bonuses for employees of firms that receive
financial aid. Over the weekend, Obama's eco-
nomic team warned of possible dangers with
such a targeted tax measure. Geithner, doubt-
less, will be asked to explain.

Sitting with Geithner at the witness table
will be Bernanke and William Dudley, president
and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of New
York. The Fed, a source of AIG's federal assis-
tance, was aware of the bonuses and concluded
they were legally binding.

On Thursday, Geithner will testify before
the House Financial Services Committee again,
this time to unveil the administration's pro-
posed overhaul to financial sector regulations.
The administration and Congress and working
on a series of fronts, including increased over-
sight and controls of previously unregulated
markets such as hedge and private equity funds.
Lawmakers and the administration also have
embraced the idea of an overarching regula-
tor, such as the Fed, that would oversee financial
firms that could pose risks to the entire banking
system. Risk has become the by-word of the
current financial crisis. As Geithner empha-
sized Monday, too much risk caused it, too little
risk is perpetuating it. And for Geithner, the
risks don't seem to end.

(This article was written by Jim Kuhnhenn,

Associated Press Writer).





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Bahamians
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discontent on
Mr Marquis

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To The Tribune Staff and the
People of the Bahamas concern-
ing the events that took place
Tuesday, March 17th, outside the
Tribune building:

The political passion within
the Bahamian people is absolute-
ly praise worthy. However, even
the most earnest and honestly
well meant intentions come to
nothing if they are misdirected. I
am familiar with both The Tri-
bune’s reporting of the occasion,
as well as Mr. Lincoln Bain’s cov-
erage in his show ‘Controversy
TV’, and it seems that what is
really at issue is the residing dis-
content within the Black Bahami-
an population with the “other”;
the perceived foreign oppressor.
As Mr. Bain rightly pointed out,
“For some out here [at the
protest], this is the Bahamas, vers-
es the old colonist government of
England.”

The cruelty and injustice of
Colonialism is undeniable, and
that it is perhaps the single most
disruptive and lingering crimes
against all of humanity I should
think makes it a matter of con-
tention for the Bahamian people,
and rightly so. But perhaps it
would be better if the people of
this country keep in mind that it
was not a crime exclusive to
either Bahamians, or Africans but
to all non-Anglo (and non-Fran-
co for that matter) peoples of the
Earth, regardless of particular
ethnicity, and thus is not a matter
that can effectively be addressed
on a merely local level.

The outrage of the Bahamian
people at the comments made
against Sir Lynden Pindling were,
I think, not so much the result of
any unjust allegations (or facts),
but that some ‘non-Bahamian’,
some ‘white Englishman’ Mr.
Marquis made them. The
Bahamian people disregard Mr.
Marquis’s residence within the
country, as well as his contribu-
tions to the society through The
Tribune. Because he is white the
Bahamian people refuse to accept
him as a Bahamian. Though he
is not my concern, it is perhaps
understandable then if he him-
self retains his British heritage;
in fact there is little else he can do
against such a single-minded prej-
udiced society.

The society remains limited in
this manner simply because it
cannot move past the injustices
in its history. This is by no means
pleading the case for the British
Government, or saying that what
they did should be forgotten.
Quite the opposite. But if
Bahamians want to address these
problems and move forward into
a progressive future, then they

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must actually aim their discon-
tent appropriately, and the appro-
priate focus of such an address is
not with small local figures like
Mr Marquis.

The Queen of England, Eliza-
beth IIT, is still, even now, the
Supreme Leader and Head of the
Bahamas, as her successors were
before her. Undemocratically she
remains sovereign over all the
Bahamian people; a position
guaranteed her by the crimes of
Her past government, and the
short-sightedness of the Bahami-
an people themselves.

Whether or not Mr Marquis
comes or goes that fact remains
and if Bahamians sincerely wish
to finally rid themselves of the
bitter taste of an oppressive and
unremorseful regime, then what
they need to do is dispose of that
useless heirloom which, within a
single individual, signifies all the
crimes against the Bahamian peo-
ple, as well as their fellow
oppressed globally.

I would like to say that I trust,
but I sincerely hope that this
country’s children do not have to
live under the same oppression
that our parents and their par-
ents before them had to live
under.

Until that day I remain.

S.C.B.

Nassau,

March 20, 2009.

(This letter writer dwells on
the so-called past crimes com-
mitted against this country and
its people by the British Govern-
ment and its monarch. It would
be interesting to know what these
crimes were and to balance them
against the tremendous heritage
the British left this country from
the day in 1717 when Woodes
Rogers, the first Royal governor,
drove out the pirates and restored
commerce. Later administrations
instituted a system of education,
established the Westminster sys-
tem of parliamentary government
and gave us a judiciary of which
at one time we could be proud.

(Often it was the British
administrator who protected
black Bahamians against the bru-
tality of their own, both black and
white. And that is where history
becomes clouded when persons
who know little about our history
presume to pontificate.

(We recommend the reading
of the “Land of the Pink Pearl,” a
book written by L D Powles, a
barrister-at-law of the Inner Tem-
ple and magistrate in the
Bahamas in the late 19th century.
As this book was banned for dis-
tribution in the Bahamas because
of its subject matter and the per-
sonalities involved, we do not
know if a copy is available at the
Nassau Public Library.

(Before Magistrate Powles, an
Irishman, took up his post here in
the late 19th century he readily
admitted: “When I left England I
knew next to nothing of the
coloured race, and I do not sup-
pose I had exchanged a dozen
words with a black man or
woman in my life.”

(When he arrived in the
Bahamas he determined to rem-
edy this omission as he was “sin-
cerely anxious to do them jus-
tice.” He said that he “took every
available means to acquaint” him-
self with their “true character,
and the conditions under which
they lived.”

“It did not surprise me,” he
wrote, “to find that assaults by
men upon women were very com-
mon among them, knowing how
common they are among our own
lower classes at home, but I
thought they were too leniently
dealt with in the Police Court in
Nassau.”

(His mistake was that he was
determined to right that wrong.
One day he announced from the
bench that he would send any
man who came before him for
assaulting a woman straight to jail
without the option of a fine. In
one month he sent three black
men to jail for such an assault.
However, the following month a
“delicate-looking black girl” came
to him requesting equal justice.
She was the servant in the home
of a white man, who beat her,
“and turned her out of doors
without paying her wages.”

(As a true Irishman, trained
in the British tradition that all
persons, regardless of race or gen-
der, are equal before the law, he
heard her case and sentenced her
white master to a month in
prison. The only evidence against
the master was her own word and
the word of three black persons
who had witnessed the beating.
Blacks were delighted with the
magistrate, many whites were
outraged, blaming Powles for rais-
ing the race issue. Scurrilous let-
ters and newspaper articles were
written by an influential group of
Bahamians against him. Eventu-
ally a small group of powerful
white locals forced him out of the
country — a performance the
PLP now wish they could repeat
against Mr Marquis. The House
of Assembly refused to pay Mag-
istrate Powles’ passage back to
England, leaving him in financial
embarrassment. He had “started
the race question, and therefore
his usefulness in the colony was at
an end,” he was told. He was run
out of the country “for adminis-
tering even-handed justice
between black and white.”

(When we talk about crimes
against the Bahamian people we
would be well advised to look to
our own, not the Monarch and
former British administrators. —
Ed).



Racism and
Rwanda

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: There’s no such thing
as a black racist (Tribune
March 17, 2009).

Ever heard of Rwanda?

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,

March 17, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 5



°inbrief Gunman shot

dead by police
after car chase

Baliamas Association
of Consulting neers
pleased with Chinese
Balia Mar agreement

THE Bahamas Association
of Consulting Engineers said }

it is “very pleased” that an
agreement has been reached
with the Chinese govern-
ment to make the Baha Mar
development project a reali-
ty.

Said the association in a
statement: “We recognise
that this milestone under-
standing between the con-
cerned parties could not
have materialised at a more
auspicious moment in time.
Notwithstanding the agree-

ments are preliminary at this :

juncture, the organisation
desires to see this project
move forward expeditious-
ly.”

The association said it

hopes that during the prelim-

inary agreement discussions
with the Chinese govern-
ment, the question of local

engineers contributing to the }

project will be raised.

It said engineering con-
sulting firms are ready to
partner with Baha Mar, the

Chinese government, and the :

Bahamas government to

move the multi-billion resort :

project forward.

PMH improvements.

praised by patients

PATIENTS are praising
dramatic improvements at

Princess Margaret Hospital’s i

public pharmacy.

The improvements follow
a string of complaints pub-
lished in The Tribune over

recent weeks about poor ser- }

vice and long delays.
Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis has respond-
ed to public calls for better
service with new opening
hours and extra staff.
Activist Rodney Moncur,
who voiced concern about
the pharmacy several weeks

ago, said: “There is no doubt :

things are much better now.
IT applaud Dr Minnis for
responding so quickly.”
The pharmacy is now
open from 8am-9pm on
weekdays (9am-1pm on Sat-
urdays) with a drop-off ser-
vice between 8am-noon and
collections up to 9pm.
Patients’ representative
Michelle Ferguson was on
hand yesterday to explain
the improved services and

take names of senior citizens }

and disabled persons await-
ing medication.

She and colleague Lydia
Adderley are among staff
who will ensure patients’
concerns are addressed.

One patient said yester-
day: “Things are much more
smooth and professional
now.”

A wheelchair ramp has
also been installed to
improve access for disabled
patients.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
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A HIGH-SPEED chase in
the area of Pride Estates on
Sunday night led to a police
officer shooting and killing an
unidentified gunman.

The incident occurred after
9pm when a concerned citizen
called the police control room
to report that his car had been
hit by a white Cadillac while
driving along John F Kennedy
Drive.

The caller told police that
the Cadillac did not stop, but
Kept on driving.

Police then dispatched a
unit to investigate.

The officers caught up to
the Cadillac on Fire Trail
Road and tried to stop the
car.

However, the driver of the
Cadillac kept going and even-
tually turned into Allen Drive

in Pride Estates and drove to
the end of that road. The
police gave chase.

After the Cadillac came to a
standstill, two men got of the
car.

The passenger produced a
firearm, Asst Commissioner
of Police Hulan Hanna said.

The armed man reportedly
started shooting at the police
and the officers returned fire,
hitting the man in the upper
torso and fatally wounding
him.

None of the police officers
were injured during the gun-
fight.

Police are still searching for
the other person in the Cadil-
lac.

An island-wide manhunt
has been launched, Mr Hanna
said.

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THE TRIBUNE



Bodies of missing boys found at sea

FROM page one

injury to the head. Around 2.30
pm yesterday Defence Force
officers found Craig's lifeless
body about a quarter mile out
to sea.

When The Tribune arrived at
the scene yesterday morning,
emotional relatives and dozens
of concerned residents converged
in disbelief while a neighbour-
hood search party of about 20
waded about a mile out to sea

in the low tide for signs of the
two boys. Private boats hired by
family and a US Coast Guard
helicopter and the RBDF also
combed the area.

The small blue skiff the boys
used to go out to sea, had been
pulled onshore the night before.

Rovan's family described him
as an active, fun-loving boy who
enjoyed exploring the beach near
his home. The third grade Clar-

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j formerly of Jumbey

2009.

Street, Pinewood

Gardens, Nassau, The
Bahamas died at the Princess Margaret Hospital,
Shirley Street, Nassau, on Sunday, 22nd March,

He is survived by his parents, Kemraj "Allan"
and Gwendolyn Edilall, his sister, Priadashni
"Pria" Edilall, brothers, Keiran and Kristen
Edilall, grandparents, Herman and Viola
Burrows and Kimraine Edilall, nieces, Kemren
and Kaylen Edilall, his nephew, Kemraj Edilall,
aunts, Miriam Proctor, Marjorie Archer and
Nadira Jafar, uncles, Rajesh Edilall, Praim Jafar
and Robert Archer, special friend, Kaisha
Hanchell, numerous cousins and many other
relatives and friends including, Junise and

Shericka Edilall.

Funeral service will be held at St. Gregory's
Anglican Church, Carmichael Road, Nassau,
on Saturday, 28th March, 2009 at 11:00a.m.

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idge Primary student was an avid
swimmer, his aunt Rosie told
The Tribune. She said the boys
went to the beach to find a crab
shell for Rovan's school project
on the fateful afternoon.

Craig's grandmother, Barbara
Morrison, said Craig lived in Vic-
toria Gardens, but often spent
the weekends with her at her
Adelaide home. After working
the late-shift on Saturday, she
last saw Craig Sunday morning
after making him breakfast.

"T told him go and eat the
breakfast and I make sure told
him that if he going anywhere,
let somebody know where he
going, and the children always
play right 'round here in this vil-
lage”.

Shortly after 1 pm Sunday, she
said her brother awoke her and
that's when the family realised
Craig, a student of Garvin Tynes
Primary, was not at home. After
calls around the neighbourhood,
it was discovered that Rovan was
also missing, which prompted a
neighbourhood search on Sun-
day.

As police arrived on the scene
and tried to cordon off the area
around noon, the large group,
which had started to gather from

early yesterday morning, became
agitated. Grieving relatives loud-
ly protested that the police
should have sent divers to comb
the area Sunday evening for the
boys.

"The people from Adelaide
find their body — not a police
diver come out here to look fa’
the body — and they want to
run the people from about Ade-
laide. I think that's really poor,"
said Idela Brown, a family friend

Assistant Superintendent Wal-
ter Evans commended the close-
knit community for their efforts
yesterday. He said police and
RBDF officers responded to the
call for the missing boys Sunday
night, but their search proved
fruitless.

One resident of the area
believes the boys may have seen
a robbery in the area shortly
before their deaths. However,
ASP Evans said he was not
aware of any robbery in the area
on Sunday.

Up to press time their deaths
were classified as drownings.
While an autopsy is scheduled
to determine an official cause of
death, police do not suspect foul

play.

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FROM page one

returned to normal.

Out-of-date medication

It was not until she returned to the Elizabeth Estates clinic to buy
more of the medicine last week that she noticed it had expired in
2007, and realised the insulin that had made her ill in February was from

the same out of date batch.

She told The Tribune that she is concerned that hundreds of other
diabetics might also have been taking the expired medication and

their lives could be at risk.

She said: “Supposing I was unable to go to the private pharmacy and
kept taking the expired one, and I ended up in intensive care and

dying?

“For them to issue one and then another a month-and-a-half later is
not right; it means a lot of persons have been issued these expired med-

ications.

“It’s carelessness. It should be picked up, and I’m sure I’m not the
only person to get these expired medications.”

The diabetic woman believes she was saved by paying attention to
her diet, her blood sugar levels, and finding alternative medication when
the previous insulin did not seem to be working.

Had she not been so conscientious, she said: “I could have slipped

into a coma and died.”

She added: “I really got upset when I found out.
“Tt is the Ministry of Health’s mandate to provide quality healthcare
for the citizens of this country, but giving diabetics expired insulin

isn’t quality healthcare.

“T don’t know what’s going on. If there are other ways of saving mon-
ey you don’t cut costs by putting other people’s lives at risk.

“The government needs to do better, and the only way they will do
something about it is to put it in the papers, because when you go to
them they ignore you, and I am sure there are other people out there
who have it and are unaware they have been taking it.”

The Ministry of Health is investigating the incident.

FROM page one

Mario Bowe — the man accuse
of causing Williams’ injuries —
committed to prison for failing to
obey a court order since 2006.

Williams starred on the local
basketball scene until a devastat-
ing accident on January 22, 1990
left him a paraplegic and ulti-
mately changed his life forever.
Williams was the front seat pas-
senger in a Nissan Sunny carry-
ing five young people when a big
Bronco truck reportedly ran a red
light on Collins Avenue and
slammed into the car. Williams,
then 20, suffered two broken
bones in his neck in addition to
spinal damage. The injury left him
paralysed and confined to a
wheelchair, with his hands severe-
ly contorted and his legs useless.
Since then Williams has been
dependent on National Insurance
pay-outs and hand-outs from sym-
pathisers.

Williams won a default judg-
ment against Bowe — the truck
driver — and subsequently a judg-
ment for damages of nearly
$318,000. That judgment has yet
to be enforced as Mr Bowe has
never appeared on an order of
examination by the court to deter-
mine his assets. Lawyer Peter
Maynard, who with lawyer Jason
Maynard, represent Williams in
the personal injury matter,

severely injured

appeared before Justice Neville
Adderley yesterday afternoon on
the notice of motion which was
filed in January of this year.
Bowe’s lawyer Damian Gomez,
who appeared with Roger Gomez
Jr, told the court that his client
contends that he was never served
with any writ, order of examina-
tion or any of the other relevant
documents regarding the nearly
two decades old matter, despite
Mr Maynard’s statements to the
contrary. Mr Gomez argued yes-
terday that on that basis his client
is entitled to have the application
dismissed and all other orders set
aside. Mr Maynard, however, read
several affidavits to the court that
stated occasions when Mr Bowe
was allegedly served with the rel-
evant court documents. On one
occasion it was claimed that the
documents were thrown at Mr
Bowe’s feet after he had refused
to accept them.

Mr Gomez, however, submit-
ted that his client contends that
some of those persons were not
telling the truth.

He also pointed out that his
client claims that he has been out
of work for four years and has
only $1,000 to his name. The case
was adjourned to Monday, June
22, at 10 am.

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Directory Publications Queries

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BIC would like to advise the general public that in
agreement with their advertising contract, all queries
or complaints for the 2009 Bahamas, Grand Bahama
and Abaco Telephone Directories must be received
on or before March 31st 2009.

Advertisers with quenes or complaints are urged to
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Nassau Office

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 7



Turks and Caicos

FROM page one

ernment and allow British Gov-
ernor Gordon Wetherell to run
the day-to-day affairs of the coun-
try for two years.

PLP leader Perry Christie, Mr
Mitchell and members of the par-
ty’s foreign affairs committee,
travelled to the Turks and Caicos
over the weekend “to find out
what their views are and how in
any way we could assist.”

“The government side (Pro-
gressive National Party) clearly
wants some assistance (from the
PDM). They’ve been quite strong
about the whole issue of democ-
ratic governance, but the oppo-
sition has some concerns about
things other than what Govern-
ment does, matters internally.
What’s left is that they have to
discuss this internally and then
they'll sort out their position and
they'll let us know,” Mr Mitchell
said of the outcome of the PLP
meeting with the PDM.

Meanwhile, former Premier
Michael Misick officially stood
down yesterday — slightly earlier
than originally planned — to
allow his premier-elect, Galmo
Williams to take over the running
of the country for the time being.

In a statement announcing his
departure, Mr Misick said the
moment “certainly ring(s) with a
degree of finality, not only for me
as your premier, but for the polit-
ical and economic progress of the
Turks and Caicos Islands as a

whole.”

He said that the move by the
British will “take (TCD back to
a time we had thought long past
in which we had to endure the
indignity of colonial interfer-
ence with our rights as free peo-
ple.”

Defending his government’s
achievements while in office, Mr
Misick added that he would “take
every step open to me” to oppose
the suspension of the constitu-
tion.

Mr Misick and his then pre-
mier-elect, Galmo Williams, vis-
ited Nassau last Friday to meet
with Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, who is also on the
CARICOM bureau, and Opposi-
tion members in order to raise
awareness of the island’s plight.

Mr Misick has described the
UK’s intention, which is due to
come into effect when the British
present their final report on the
inquiry — probably by April 30
— as “draconian..modern-day
colonialism” and suggested other
countries and international bodies
should lobby the British on behalf
of the Turks and Caicos.

Mr Mitchell noted yesterday
that while it would not be the
opposition in the Bahamas, but
the Government that would make
any statement that should be
made about the situation, the
PLP is “always concerned about



PLP MP and former foreign affairs
minister Fred Mitchell.

issues of democratic governance”
and is happy to help “frame the
debate” for the TCI.

However, he added: “I think
everyone wants us to be sensitive
to the internal affairs of the coun-
try.”

On Sunday Deputy Prime Min-
ister and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette declined
to comment on what the Gov-
ernment’s position on the UK’s
expressed intention to impose
direct rule.

A spokesperson for the Prime
Minister said he would not be
making a statement on the issue.

FROM page one

Beach vendor Paul Rolle and Jeffrey Davis are
organising the event and informed members of the
media and the public, by advertisements in the press,
that they will be providing water transportation to
the beach for anyone who wishes to participate from
10am today.

There they plan to gather before making a public
statement about their opposition to the restriction
placed on access to the beach — located at the west-
ern end of Cabbage beach on Paradise Island in
front of the luxurious Cove tower of the Atlantis
resort.

Yesterday, senior vice president of public affairs
at Atlantis, Ed Fields, said Kerzner International’s
position on the matter is “very clear”: That Mr Rolle
“is using the emotional issue of beach access to fur-
ther his own selfish monetary gain.”

Noting that for a number of years, Mr Rolle “has
enjoyed a very lucrative contract with Atlantis,
which allows him to rent umbrellas at Atlantis
Beach,” the Atlantis spokesman said today’s event
“is not about access to the beach.”

“This is about Mr Rolle’s attempt to force us to
grant him permission to rent umbrellas on The Cove
Beach (and) while public access to beaches is accom-
modated, the right to restrict commerce is reserved.”

Mr Fields added that Atlantis “hopes that the
general public is not supportive of any actions tak-
en by Mr. Rolle that negatively impacts the already
fragile tourism industry.”

In a statement delivered to The Tribune yesterday
entitled, “Taking back our public beaches”, Mr

f

~



Private Atlantis beach

Rolle and Mr Davis call on “all patriotic Bahamians
to join us to secure the beaches for future genera-
tions.”

Their action comes two months after an Atlantis
executive, responding to similar assertions by attor-
ney Paul Moss in a letter seen by The Tribune, not-
ed that there is no legal requirement for Kerzner
International to allow any member of the public to
access beaches in front of property it owns on Par-
adise Island.

Giselle Pyfrom, senior vice president and gener-
al counsel for the resort, told Mr Moss, who had spo-
ken out on behalf of Mr Rolle, that she was “not able
to agree” that the public has a right to “unfettered
access” under the law to the Cove Beach, or to any
beach attached to private property in the Bahamas.

“Access to and over property that we own is a
matter for our sole discretion,” she wrote.

The legal counsel added that where the company
does allow members of the public to access the
beach, as it does on Cabbage beach, this is despite
having no legal requirement to do so beyond the
mean high water mark.

Since that letter was published, Mr Rolle who
originally asserted that “all beaches in the Bahamas
are public”, called on Government to “‘set the record
straight” in terms of the law.

At the same time, he said, he is hoping for a “mas-
sive demonstration” at the Cove beach to protest the
lack of access that has manifested itself in his
removal from the property on previous occasions.

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www.btcbahamas.com >
a ll

PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

bone” during the past two years.

Mr Simpson said reducing payroll costs would
free up further positive cash flow to enable the
Home Centre to increase its inventory purchases.

He explained that Freeport Concrete’s chairman,
Hannes Babak, who is also the current chair of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority’s (GBPA) Port
Group Ltd affiliate, “has agreed to subsidise the
rent for the next several months in an effort to help
our profitability in order to keep the remaining staff
employed during these hard economic times.”

Mr Babak is also the Home Centre’s landlord.
The retailer is also reorganising its store format to
“focus on key products.”

The Home Centre lay-offs are related both to
the current economic downturn and the financial
condition of its parent company. Freeport Con-
crete’s accumulated deficit, at its financial year-end
of August 31, 2008, was $5.789 million, meaning
that this is the total sum it has lost ever since it
came into existence.

At that balance sheet date, Freeport Concrete’s
external auditors, KPMG, had noted that the com-
pany’s current liabilities exceeded its current assets
by $2.607 million. However, the company was still
considered a going concern because of its positive
cash flow, ability to obtain supplier credit, and gen-
eration of positive cash flow.

Major Freeport retailer

quarter loss that almost trebled to $220,000, a 197 per
cent increase against the prior year’s $74,000 loss.

In a previous interview with Tribune Business,
Mr Simpson explained that Freeport Concrete was
still plagued by the need to raise additional capital to
finance inventory purchases for its Home Centre
retail format. Currently, Mr Simpson said the outlet
was losing business because it was unable to pur-
chase enough stock to meet customer demand.

“We need more cash,” he told Tribune Business
yesterday. “It’s as simple as that. If we don’t get it,
we will keep running out of inventory in the Home
Centre. Without the cash, we can’t get the invento-
ry we need.”

Mr Simpson wrote in his first quarter note to
shareholders: “A key factor affecting our financial
performance is that we need to raise additional cap-
ital to be able to purchase more inventory, which will
drive up sales at the Home Centre.

“Despite the poor economic climate in Grand
Bahama, we see that there is still business we could
get. However, we are losing sales because we are
constantly running out of inventory due to the fact
that our foreign vendors are not giving us the same
level of credit we enjoyed prior to the recession in
the US. and our operating line of credit at the bank
is fully utilised.”



The company subsequently incurred a 2009 first

FROM page one

day in a demonstration organised
by PLP constituency hopeful Paul
Moss to condemn the British edi-
tor for abusing his “privilege” of
free speech by discrediting the
legacy of Sir Lynden.

However, Mr Marquis argued
that freedom of speech is a right,
not a privilege.

He said: “I am a working jour-
nalist doing my job and if you
think free speech is a privilege
you have a problem.

“Free speech is a right under
the law, not a privilege, and Mr
Moss, who I gather is some kind
of lawyer, ought to know these
things.”

Mr Marquis defended his arti-
cle as telling the story of an
upstanding Bahamian, Chauncey
Tynes Sr, who approached him
seeking justice for his son. It was
not a story, said Mr Marquis, that
he had gone in search of.

And justice, he said, is hard to
come by in the Bahamas where a
number of ordinary citizens are
denied the right to a fair trial
because of the way political, reli-
gious and masonic affiliations
have had a profoundly detrimen-
tal affect on the judicial system.

Mr Marquis said: “Ordinary
Bahamians come to me to look
for justice and I have given them
justice in a form several times,
and they thank me for it.

“This story was not sought by
me, this story came to me from
an ordinary Bahamian man who
wanted to get something off his

Managing Editor

chest, and he came to me because
he knew that he could trust me,
and that trust has been built up.”

Newspapers, and particularly
The Tribune, is an institution ded-
icated to fighting the cause of the
ordinary man, Mr Marquis said.

And although his article has
ignited emotive responses from
Sir Lynden’s faithful followers,
Mr Marquis said he has heard lit-
tle factual evidence to disprove
any of the allegations made
against the former leader.

He said: “Not a single contem-
porary of Sir Lynden has actually
come out to defend him other
than Perry Christie who has made
a statement which is in total con-
tradiction of everything he said
25 years before.

“And the reason is because it is
indefensible, and I think it has
had a very detrimental affect on
Bahamian society.”

He argued that the role of the
press is to report things, comment
on things, and to tell the truth, to
make people think, stimulate
inquiry, reaction, and to get
response.

He said: “If it was not for The
Tribune this country would have
gone belly-up a long time ago,
because The Tribune keeps things
on track.

“T believe in its ethos, I believe
in its philosophy, ‘Being bound
to swear to the dogmas of no mas-
ter’, and I think it has done a
tremendous job.”

The Tribune has become the
undisputed market leader and
defied global trends with an 80
per cent rise in sales over the last
ten years, which Mr Marquis
attributes to creating an interest-
ing and provocative newspaper
prepared to take on the issues.

“It’s well written and it tells the
truth,” he said.

“It doesn’t avoid categories of
stories that other newspapers do.
We cover all stories of all cate-
gories.

“We are doing the right job for
the Bahamas and this great little
country has benefited from what
we have done.”

As the managing editor pre-
pares to retire in May he said he is
confident about leaving the news-
paper in the hands of a team of
bright young Bahamian journal-
ists.

“We have an extremely good
staff and I am quite happy to hand
over the paper to them because I
am sure they are ready to carry on
the fight for freedom of speech
and ensure that politicians do not
browbeat the public,” he said.

“T don’t allow myself to be
pushed around by anybody.
Nobody can intimidate me.

“The working journalist is right
there on the front line asking
tough questions and making life
uncomfortable for politicians.

“When I get criticised by politi-
cians I don’t lose sleep over it, I
am deeply satisfied.

“That is really what being a
good journalist is. If they were
praising me I would have a real
problem, believe me.”

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Marina Village, Paradise Island 363-1551 « Bay Street, Nassau 325-4083


TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



‘Golden girl’ third
in 400 at Hurricane

Invitational
FROM page 11

will open up in the 100m on
April 11 at the University of
Miami, but she won’t run her
first 200m until April 23.

Also racing in the 400m was
Kristy White, a Bahamian
sophomore at UM who was
timed in 56.77 for tenth place
overall after she got fifth in heat
two.

As for White, who came
home to try out for the Olympic
team last year, Ferguson-
McKenzie said she ran well,
coming off an indoor season
that saw her just miss qualifying
for the NCAA Championships.

“She’s coming along. She ran
a pretty good time in the 400,
but her best event is the 200.
She will also run the 100, so
she’s coming along,” Ferguson-
McKenzie said.

With this being the IAAF
World Championship year, Fer-
guson-McKenzie said she’s not
sure if White will come home
in June for the trials because of
the hectic schedule she has with
her major in medicine.

“She just has to come and get
it done and then go back and
study,” said Ferguson-McKen-
zie. “But it all depends on her
schedule because she has to
take the MCAT this year.”

Another Bahamian, Tiavan-
nia “Tia’ Thompson, competing
unattached, was fourth in the
women’s 100m hurdles. She ran
14.32. Yanique Booth won the
race in 13.67.

The Star Trackers Track Club
had a number of athletes who
competed at the meet, but the
results of their events were not
available up to press time last
night.

The majority of those athletes
will be competing this weekend
at the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations’ final tri-
als for the Carifta Games that is
scheduled to be held in St Lucia
over the holiday weekend.

Ferguson-McKenzie, who
won the Austin Sealy award as
the most outstanding athlete in
her final appearance in 1995,
had these words of advice for
the aspiring athletes trying out
for the team.

“Don’t stress out. It’s always
easy when you go in there with
a qualifying time,” she said.
“Just go out there and have fun.
Nobody is going to give you
anything, so you just have to go
out there and perform.”

Meanwhile, over at the
Louisiana Classics Collegiate
Invite in Lafayette, Louisiana,
Grand Bahamian Olympian
Michael Mathieu opened up his
season in the men’s 100.

Competing as a member of
the Tiger Olympians, Mathieu
ran 10.51 seconds for second
place. Gabriel Mvumvure of
Louisiana State University won
the race in 10.43.

Mathieu, who ran on the sec-
ond leg of the Bahamas men’s 4
x 400 relay team that won the
silver in August ‘08 at the Bei-
jing Olympic Games in China,
also anchored the Tigers
Olympians to first place in the 4
x 4 relay in 3:09.97.

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‘Baby Boy Rolle dies at 65

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

KIRKLAND ‘Baby Boy’
Rolle, who fought twice for the
British Commonwealth light
heavyweight title, will probably
be remembered as one of the
Bahamas’ best professional box-
ers.

The 65-year-old Bahamian
light-heavy and heavyweight
champion died over the week-
end.

Listed at 6-feet, Rolle
amassed an impressive win-loss-
draw ring record of 36-17-4 dur-
ing a span that covered two
decades from 1960-1982.

Back in the early stages of
boxing, competitors were best
known by their nicknames and
hardly anybody remembered
what Rolle’s first name was.

But you called the name
“Baby Boy’ Rolle and just about
everybody could recall his
tremendous ability in the ring.

“In my opinion, Baby was one
of the greatest Bahamian fight-
ers of his generation,” said for-
mer cruiserweight champion Pat
‘the Centreville Assassin’ Stra-
chan.

“JT met him in the early 70s
and he was always a nice per-
son, always likable and he got
along with everyone in the gym.
He was a sparring partner at one
time for former world champion
(Mohammed) Ali when he was
in his heyday.”



‘BABY BOY’ Rolle (left), who fought twice for the British Commonwealth
light heavyweight title, will probably be remembered as one of the
Bahamas’ best professional boxers...

Strachan and Rolle had a
memorable fight on December
26, 1980, that went the distance
before Strachan was awarded a
10 round decision on points.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



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That was Rolle’s second to
last fight before he retired. He
came back two years later and
won a 10-round decision over
Carl Baker on Mars Bay,

Andros, on April 11, 1982, to
close out his career.

Rolle, who started his pro
career on July 4, 1960, with a
four-round knockout over Kid
Anthony, reeled off four straight
victories before he drew a 10-
round bout with legendary
Wellington “Boston Blackie’
Miller on February 5, 1965.

On March 25, 1971, Rolle
knocked out Rennie Pinder in
the fifth round of their sched-
uled 12 round bout for the
Bahamas light heavyweight title.

On July 9 that same year,
Rolle moved up to the heavy-
weight division and secured a
TKO in round eight of their
scheduled 12-round bout over
Bert Perry for the Bahamas title.

Two years later, Rolle trav-
eled to Nottingham, Nottingh-
mashire, United Kingdom where
he fought John Conteh for the
British Commonwealth light
heavyweight title.

Conteh, however, won the 15-
round bout on points, 15-3, at
the Ice Rink.

Then on March 26, 1976,
Rolle traveled to Brisbane,
Queenland, Australia where he
fought Tony Mundine for anoth-
er shot at the Commonwealth
British title.

Again, he fell short, this time
getting stopped in the third of
the scheduled 15- round bout at
the Festive Hall by Mundine.

Rolle, according to Ray Minus
Jr, was a Bahamian boxing icon.

“He was probably the tough-

est Bahamian fighter of his
time,” Minus Jr reflected. “You
could hit him with a sledge ham-
mer and he will still come at you.

“Knocking out Baby Boy
Rolle was a real challenge. I
knew that he was a tough fight-
er. I knew he had some real
tough rivalries with heavy-
weights like Boston Blackie and
Bert Perry. He was a Bahamian
champion.”

As a youngster coming into
the sport, Minus Jr said he got to
watch Rolle at the trail end of
his career and he was very
impressed with what he saw.

“My amateur boxing club,
Champion Boxing Club, hon-
oured Baby Boy Rolle in the
late 1990s at the stadium and he
was very excited,” Minus Jr said.

As a person, Minus Jr said
Rolle was always a gentleman
to him and the many young box-
ers coming up through the club.
In fact, Minus Jr said when the
club was located next to his
home off Wulff Road, Rolle
made frequent visits to help
train the boxers.

“He always wanted to help
out because he was well skilled
with the sport,” Minus Jr said.
“He will be missed because of
what he did for the sport.”

Tribune Sports and former
sports writer Godfrey ‘Goofy’
Brown extend condolences to
his family, including his brother
Henry ‘Goatman’ Rolle, who
promoted a number of profes-
sional fights.

SAC top school of ‘08-09’ track and field season

WITH a dominating perfor-
mance at the nation’s top inter-
school track and field meet, one
perennial track and field pow-
erhouse cemented their status
as the top school of the 2008-09
season.

The St Augustine’s College
Big Red Machines obliterated
the competition at the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associ-
ations’ 21st edition of the
National High School Champi-
onships, capturing five of the
six contested divisions.

They swept the three girls’
divisions (junior, intermediate,
senior), while also claiming the
junior and intermediate boys.



(ee |) | |

The C R Walker Knights
staved off the complete six divi-
sion sweep by the Big Red
Machines, by taking the senior
boys division.

With a balanced effort of
record breaking performances
on the track and in the field,
the Big Red Machines led four
divisions after the first day of
competition and never relin-
quished their advantage over
the course of the three- day
meet.

Powered by a star studded
middle distance programme fea-
turing Hughnique Rolle and
Audley Carey, SAC totaled 742
points in all divisions.



Rolle dominated the senior
girls, claiming gold in the 800m,
1500m and 3000m. Her time of
4:58.46 set a new national high
school record in the 1500m.

Carey doubled in both the
800m and 1500m.

Other highlights from the
2009 National Champions
included Byron Ferguson and
Marcus Thompson who quali-
fied for international competi-
tion.

Ferguson set a new high
school national record in inter-
mediate boys’ javelin throw
while Thompson qualified for
the Junior Pan Am Games in
the senior boys’ 100m.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS
INBRIEF



SPORTS



MASTERS SOFTBALL LEAGUE



Championship series is set

THE Masters Softball League’s best-
of-five championship series is set.

It will be played between the defend-
ing champions William Contrcution
Jets and the Micholette Strokers.

The series will begin on Saturday at
2 pm at the Archdeacon William
Thompson Softball Park at the South-
ern Recreation Grounds. Game two
will be played on Sunday at the same
time.

William Construction had to go the
full three games before they clinched
their series against the Six Pack Abs
with a 9-8 nipping on Sunday. Six
Packs evened the series on Saturday
with a 9-7 decision.

Micholette, however, completed a

two-game sweep over the Alco
Raiders on Saturday with a 15-2 vic-
tory.

¢ Here’s a summary of the three
games played:

William Construction 9, Six Packs
8: Brad Smith had a perfect 3-for-3
day with a home run, driving in a total
of five runs and scoring wice to lead
the Jets.

Gary ‘Super’ Johnson was 3-for-4
with a double, a RBI and three runs,
while Anthony ‘Hod Dog’ Pearce wax
2-for-3 with a double and two RBI.

Danny Stubbs was the winning pitch-
er. Joe Miller suffered the loss.

Dennis Davis went 3-for-4 with two
runs and Larry Thompson was 2-for-2

with a RBI, scoring a run.

Six Pack 9, William Construction 7:
Frederick Saunders went 2-for-3 with
three RBI as the Abs avoided a clean
sweep by the Jets on Saturda.

Spurgeon Johnson helped out by
going 2-for-4 with a RBI; Larry
Thompson was 1-for-3 with a double,
two RBI and two runs and Joe
Demeritte was 2-for-4 with a run.

Joe Miller was the winning pitcher.
Bertie Murray Sr got the loss.

Brad Smith was 2-for-4 with a RBI
and two runs and Sonny ‘Jiggy’ Haven
was 1-for-3 with a RBI and a run
scored.

Micholette 15, Alco 2: Ronald ‘Big
Boy’ Saunders had a perfect 4-for-4

day with a double, triple and three
runs scored as the Strokers completed
a two-game sweep to advance to the
final.

Culbert ‘Buster’ Evans helped out
by going 2-for-4 with two homers, four
RBIs and two runs; Lester Dean was 2-
for-4 with a double, a RBI and three
runs and Adlai ‘Mossah’ Moss was 4-
for-5 with a double, a RBI and two
runs.

Clayton Smith got the win on the
mound. Glenroy ‘Flo’ Saunders suf-
fered the loss.

Anthony ‘Rakes-And-Scrape’ Bowe
was 2-for-2 with a run and Kendal Fer-
guson was 1-for-3 with a homer, a RBI
and a run.



THE standings in both the
19-and-under and 15-and-
under divisions in the Baptist
Sports Council’s 2009 Joyce
Minus Basketball Classic is
turning out to be an interest-
ing one.

A number of games were
played on Saturday at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex. Here’s a look at those
games played and the impli-
cations to the standings.

Temple Fellowship 27,
Macedonia 26 (15): Kenrico
Lockhart scored the game’s
winning basket and Jonathan
Gordon had 10 points to lead
Temple Fellowship as they
extended their front-running
lead in the 15-and-under to 5-
i

Macedonia, who got nine
from James Rolle, fell to 3-2.

Faith United 26, Latter-Day
No.2 23 (15): Delano Forbes
scored nine points to lead
Faith United as they improved
to 3-2 in the 15-and-under
division.

Rodrico Tate had nine in
the loss for Latter-Day No.2,
who dropped to 2-2.

Latter-Day No.2 26, Miracle

TSK IR ren

Basketball Classic

Working Church of God 19
(15): Darron Smith scored 12
points to lead Latter-Day
No.2 as they rebounded from
an earlier loss to improve their
record to 3-2 in the 15-and-
under division.

Andre Green had eight in
a losing effort for Miracle
Working Church of God as
they fell to 2-3.

Golden Gates 29, Latter-
Day No.1 23 (15): Neil Sands
had a game high 17 as Golden
Gates improved their 15-and-
under record to 3-1 to remain
in second place.

Iyndrick Storr had nine in

the loss for Latter-Day No.1,
who fell to 2-3.

Latter-Day 36, Golden
Gates No.1 28 (19): Darron
Finley, Kenneth Pratt and
Teran Greenslade provided
the spark for Latter-Day as
their 19-and-under team
improved to 3-1.

Austin McKenzie scored 15
in the loss for Golden Gates
No.1, who dropped to 2-3.

Miracle Working Church of
God 43, Temple Fellowship
42: Allen Curry scored 12 and
Darron Martin had 10 to pro-
vide a 1-2 punch for Miracle
Working Church of God as



they improved to 3-2 in the
19-and-under division.

Marvin Albury and Kevin
Burrows had 11 and 10 respec-
tively for Temple Fellowship,
who dropped to 2-2.

Mercy Seat 44, Golden
Gates No.2 34 (19): In the
biggest upset of the day,
Leonardo Demeritte scored a
game high 20 points as Mercy
Seat won their first game in
six tries in the 19-and-under
division.

Mel Johnson led Golden
Gates No.2 with 10 as they fell
to 2-2.

¢ In the men’s division, only

one game was played before
the rain came pouring down.
In that game, Christian Taber-
nacle knocked voff Golden
Gates 40-21 to take sole pos-
session of first place in the
vice-president division at 3-0.
Golden Gates dropped to
1-1.
¢ Here’s a look at the sched-
ule of games on tap this Sat-
urday:
Court One - 10 am Miracle
Working COG vs Latter-
Day No.2 (15); 11 am Latter-
Day Saints vs Macedonia
(15); Noon Golden Gates vs
First Baptist (19); 1 pm Lat-
ter-Day Saints vs Golden
Gates No.2 (19); 2 pm BIBA
vs Ebenezer (M); 3 pm
Golden Gates vs Church of
the Nazarene (M).
Court Two - 10 am Faith
United vs Golden Gates
(15); 11 am Temple Fellow-
ship vs First Baptist (15);
Noon Faith United vs Tem-
ple Fellowship (19); 1 pm
Golden Gates vs Macedonia
(19); 2 pm Christian Taber-
nacle vs New Bethlehem
(M); 3 pm Pilgrim vs First
Baptist (M)

OM WRT Es

Teams

Men's President
First Baptist

Temple Fellowship
Latter-Day Saints
City of Praise

BIBA

Ebenezer

Pilgrim

Men's Vice-President
Christian Tabernacle
New Bethlehem
Evangelistic Center
Golden Gates
Bahamas Harvest
Church of the Nazarene
Calvary Bible
19-And-Under
Latter-Day Saints
First Baptist
Macedonia

SOrRrPNWh =

CORrPrPrPNW

PRWNHNRRO =

NNNrRrROO

BASEBALL
JBLN UPDATE

¢ Results of games played
in the Junior Baseball
League of Nassau over the
weekend at Freedom
Farm are as follows:

TEE BALL

Raptors def. Sand Gnats
26-22
Sidewinders
Grasshoppers 12-9
Knights def. Blue Claws
25-13

COACH PITCH

Angels def. Astros 29-23
Cubs def. Blue Jays 21-7
Athletics def. Diamond-
backs 16-10

MINOR LEAGUE

Red Sox def. Royals 11-5
Mets def. Rays 14-4
MAJOR LEAGUE
Mariners def. Reds 11-10
Marlins def. Indians 3-2
JUNIOR LEAGUE
Dodgers def. Twins 6-4
Yankees def. Cardinals 19-
6

SENIOR LEAGUE
Pirates and Rangers
played to 1-1 tie.

Tigers def. Phillies 10-0

def.

SOFTBALL
McKCKLEWHITE
RECUPERATING

DAVE ‘Billy’ McKckle-
white, one of the most
dominating softball play-
ers from Eleuthera, is
improving in Male Med-
ical II of the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital.
McKclewhite, who was
one of the most feared
sluggers at the plate as he
played for Governor’s
Harbour and the Beck’s
Hustlers, suffers from dia-
betes. Last week he had
one of his legs amputated.
Tribune Sports as well as
former sports writer God-
frey ‘Goofy’ Brown wishes
McKcklewhite a speedy
recovery.

SOFTBALL
SYMONETTE PASSED
AWAY

SOUTHPAW pitcher
Edmund ‘Beef’? Symon-
ette, who starred for the
Big Red Machines of St
Augustine’s College, was
killed recently in a car
accident in his hometown
of Eleuthera.

Symonette pitched on a
number of championship
games for SAC, including
the one in 1971 when the
Big Red Machines were
the underdogs.

That year, SAC eliminated
Queen’s College and the
late Colyn ‘Josey Whales’
Russell in the semifinal
before they went on to
beat Aquinas College and
Kirk Griffin in the final.
On returning home to

Eleuthera, Symonette
played for the Rock Sound
Heroes and the Heineken
Stars.

Symonette was driving his
truck on Queen’s Highway
when he skid off the road
and was killed on the
scene.

Condolences are extend-
ed from The Tribune
Sports Department as well
as former sports writer
Godfrey ‘Goofy’ Brown to
the family of the late

Miracle Working COG
Golden Gates No.2
Temple Fellowship
Faith United

Golden Gates

Mercy Seat
15-And-Under
Temple Fellowship
Golden Gates
Macedonia

Faith United
Latter-Day No.2

First Baptist
Latter-Day

Miracle Working COG
Zion South Beach

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Bako has four hits as
Cubs rout Athletics

m PHOENIX

Paul Bako had four hits and three RBIs even though he had his first
at-bat in the sixth inning, and the Chicago Cubs roughed up Dana Eve-
land in a 20-5 win over the Oakland Athletics on Monday.

Derrek Lee hit his first homer of spring training and Ryan Theriot
went 3-for-3 with two RBIs and scored two runs for Chicago. Jake Fox,
Reed Johnson and Bobby Scales each had three RBIs.

Eveland, the A’s likely opening-day starter, gave up five runs in four
innings. He allowed eight of the Cubs’ 24 hits.

“T couldn’t put guys away,” Eveland said. “I'd get ahead and then
miss my spot and catch a lot of the plate.”

It was the second straight start in which Eveland was hit hard. The
previous outing was in a minor league game. He said he feels a sense
of urgency to get better results as the start of the season nears.

“T have high expectations of myself this late in the spring,” he said.
“T’ve got two more starts down here. I need to get locked and ready to
go for Game 1.”

Edgar Gonzalez, who is in the running for a spot in the A’s rotation
only got two outs while giving up eight hits and seven runs. He has
allowed 13 runs in 3 1-3 innings over his past two outings and has a 12.75
ERA this spring.

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NOW THATS REALLY AT 23 (Deal

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 11
r |

TUESDAY, MARCH 24,




2009

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

Golden girl’ Debbie Fer-
guson-McKenzie, known
for her versatility as a
sprinter, opened her 2009
outdoor season with a
third place finish in the 400m.

Competing on the Adidas
team in the Hurricane Invita-
tional over the weekend at the
University of Miami (their train-
ing site) in Coral Gables, Florida,
Ferguson-McKenzie clocked
53.93 seconds.

“For an opener, it was kind of
easy, but I didn’t run the time I
wanted, but I still want to cele-
brate the positive I got from it
at the end,” said Ferguson-
McKenzie, who ran her first
400m in about three years.

“J felt very strong at the end. I
didn’t super die, so ’m happy
with that. Being a sprinter, we
normally go all out and just die. I
went out sort of easy and I built
on my transition phrase from the
first 200 to the second,” said Fer-
guson-McKenzie.

Ajoke Odumosu, of Nike, won
the race in 53.00, followed by
Ashlee Kidd in 52.13.

The performance, according to
Ferguson-McKenzie, proved how
strong she is at this point in the
season. So she’s excited about

DEBBIE FERGUSON-
McKENZIE



SAC top
school of ‘08-
09’ track and

field season...
See page 9

en girl’ third in 400
icane Invitational

¢ Olympian Michael Mathieu second
in 100, first in 4x400 relay

¢ Bahamian sophomore Kristy White
finishes 10th overall

ca ae
Michael Mathieu

her potential down the road.

“Twas actually supposed to run
a 4x100 and a 4x400, but we
couldn’t find anybody to run the
4x400, so I was forced to run an
open 400,” she said.

“The difference between a
4x400 and a 400, it’s different.
When you get the stick in your
hand, you could split a faster time
than you do when you run an
open 400. But I only ran the 4



x400 because we didn’t have a
full team.”

Ferguson-McKenzie also got a
chance to test her speed, running
on the third leg of the South
Florida Elite 4x100 relay team
that posted a winning time of
44.15.

The other members of the
team included Jamaicans Sheryl
Morgan and Sherry-Ann Brooks
on the first two legs and Ameri-
can Lauryn Williams on anchor.

“We’re super excited about
this weekend coming up. We get
a chance to run a 4x100 this
weekend and hopefully a 4x400
in Orlando,” Ferguson-McKenzie
said.

“Lauryn, myself, Veronica
Campbell and Aileen Bailey will
run together,” she said. “Hope-
fully we can make it happen. So
I’m very excited.”

Ferguson-McKenzie, who
skipped the entire indoor season,

SEE page 9

CRAVEN’S BAKERY

Market Street South
7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Monday - Saturday

Phone: (242) 326-4246

Now taking orders for the

following:

EASTER SPECIALS

Hot Cross Buns

Twist Donut

8” Cheese Cake

(Cherry or Pineapple topping)

Easter Bread

French Bread

$10.00 Per Doz.
$ 8.40 Per Doz.

$35.00 Each

$ 3.00 Per Loaf

$ 1.00 Per Loaf

Sale ends April 9th, 2009

“We bake fresh from scratch everyday to give
you the best for a whole lot less.”






Contractors aim
to ‘raise the har’

* $150k IDB initiative seeks to
give Bahamian construction
industry ‘more authority’ by
developing standard contract
forms in line with international
standards, recognised by
Bahamian law

* BCA chief: ‘We're finding that
it’s an impediment, not having
this Contractors Bill, the industry
not being properly licensed and
regulated, not having the forms
and professional approach to a
number of the contracts’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian Contractors
Association (BCA) is hoping
that a $150,000 grant initiative
with the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank (IDB) will “raise
the bar” for the sector by
enabling it to develop interna-
tionally-accepted contracts and
other documents, eliminating
the industry’s reliance on Amer-
ican-authored forms.

Stephen Wrinkle, the BCA’s
president, said it was “becoming
increasingly important” to have
contracts and other documents
that were “accepted interna-
tionally and able to be regulat-
ed by Bahamian law”, because
they were an essential ingredi-
ent in the ability of Bahamian
contractors to win major jobs -
particularly from foreign devel-
opers.

“Right now, we use Ameri-
can Institute of Architects doc-
uments for construction con-
tracts,” Mr Wrinkle told Tri-
bune Business. “We need to
have our own documents, and
can then move forward with
them, while adapting them to
suit international needs.

“Tt gives us some authority in
the industry. In this day and
age, we should not be depen-
dent on American Institute of
Architects forms and docu-
ments. We should have our own
documents.”

Among the documents the
IDB project would look to
amend were contract forms,
procurement documents, and
change order requirements.

Mr Wrinkle explained that
having contracts that were in
line with international con-
struction industry standards, but
also recognised under Bahami-
an law, would give contractors a
greater degree of legal protec-
tion should disputes arise with
developers.

The BCA president said this
had happened with the con-
tracts issued for Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport’s
(LPIA) redevelopment, as they
specified that they would be
“governed by Bahamian law”
with this nation as the first juris-
diction for legal recourse.

“Every contract executed in
this country should be governed
by Bahamian law, not New
York law or whatever state they

SEE page 4B

THE TRIBUNE

usine

TUESDAY,



MARCH 24,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Resort placed in receivership

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

former corner-

stone of

Bimini’s

tourism indus-

try, the Bimini
Big Game Resort, has been put
into receivership and will most
likely go into foreclosure, the
Chief Councillor for the Bimini
District told Tribune Business
yesterday. Meanwhile, employ-
ees displaced by the resort’s
abrupt shut-down are still await-
ing promised back-pay from its
owner.

Lloyd Edgecombe said yes-
terday that he was scheduled to
meet with representatives of
KPMG, the accounting firm act-
ing as receivers for the resort,

ROYAL FIDELITY

* Chief councillor confirms KPMG appointed receivers for still-closed
Bimini Big Game Resort, and says sale of distressed property likely

who will assess the property,
protect its assets and ultimately
determine its fate.

Mr Edgecombe said he
believed the receivers were ulti-
mately likely to place the Bimi-
ni Big Game Resort on the mar-
Ket for sale.

He added that a Cayman
Islands-based insurance com-
pany financed the resort via a
mortgage theyt held on the
property, and were most likely
the ones to have placed it into
the hands of KPMG after call-
ing in the debenture on it.

“The people who had the
loan on the place, they are not
involved in hotel operations,

and I think they might eventu-
ally put the place up for sale,”
said Mr Edgecombe. “Hopeful-
ly we'll get some buyers to open
the place and pay the employ-
ees and start up the business.”
The resort closed near year-
end 2008, when its management
allegedly packed up and left
without telling staff where they
were going or informing the
Government that lay-offs and
its closure were imminent.
The Bimini Big Game
Resort’s owner is understood
to be a CalifOrnia-based Amer-
ican, who was attempting to find
new refinancing to keep the
resort open and pay his financial

backers. That appears not to
have happened.

When management left,
workers were given $100 and
letters stating what they were
owed by the company. They
were told this payment would
be forthcoming at a later date.
However, nothing has been
heard since.

There has also been specula-
tion that the Bimini Big Game
Resort ran up an unpaid
$500,000 BEC bill before clos-
ing.

The resort has frequently
been heralded as a backbone of

SEE page 4B



Realtors to probe Miami firm selling Bahamian property

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Real Estate Association’s
(BREA) president yesterday pledged that it
would look into a website promoting the
opening of a Miami-based sales centre that
will sell Bahamian real estate, pointing out
that only BREA-licenses agents could sell
land and property in this nation.

In a statement issued yesterday, the Par-
adise Is Mine company unveiled plans to
open a ‘sales centre’ in South Beach, Miami,
“to exclusively market Bahamas proper-
ties”.

"This is a tremendous market opportunity
for us," said Ted Rover, director of sales for
Paradise Is Mine. “Who wouldn't want

oceanfront property and a second home on
a spectacular tropical paradise? At the end
of the day this is not really that hard to sell.

"There are millions of tourists who visit
Miami Beach every year, and we feel that
this is a perfect venue to promote the
Bahamas.

"In the current global economic reces-
sion, Bahamas real estate prices have
remained stable, which is truly remarkable.
The Bahamas is a tremendous alternative
for investors with money on the sideline, not
to mention that it's a great place to have a
second home. Opening a sales centre is very
strategic and should pay dividends for the
company.”

Paradise Is Mine said its US sales centre
for the Bahamas was set to open in early

summer of 2009. The company is under-
stood to be focused on real estate sales on
Rum Cay, an island that has attracted more
than its fair share of controversy as it relates
to land disputes.

It is understood that Paradise Is Mine is
the company that earlier this year sent out
a press release stating that it had sold land
on Rum Cay to Ray Lewis, the Baltimore
Ravens and Pro Bowl linebacker.

Responding to the release’s appearance,
William Wong, BREA’s president, told Tri-
bune Business: “We’re trying to deal with
that right now. Only Bahamians licensed
by BREA are licensed to sell real estate in
the Bahamas right now.”

SEE page 4B

Small resorts see business downturn

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

SMALL hotels have seen
significant declines in business
this winter season, several told
Tribune Business yesterday,
but the Ministry of Tourism
has reported a surprisingly bet-
ter season than was previously
predicted.

Dean Spychalla, general
manager of the Nassau Palm
Resort on West Bay Street,

week that the popular college-
student-getaway season will be
fairly good, though down from
previous years.

She said the negative public-
ity surrounding the ongoing
‘drug wars’ in Mexico may
have given the Bahamas an
added boost as a destination of
choice for Spring Breakers.

“T think the Bahamas, and
Nassau in particular, has been
able to benefit from that,” she
said. “There are places like
SuperClubs Breezes that are

sold out.”

However, many small
Bahamian hotels say they are
still missing their piece of the
pie.

West Bay hotel manager,
Raj Reddy, said there had been
a substantial decline in busi-
ness compared to last year.

The West Bay hotel, next to
the Chez Willie restaurant, is
know to have many Bahamian
and foreign patrons. However,
Mr Reddy said business has
been down across the board.

Laurice Adderley, customer
supervisor at the Corner Motel
in Carmichael Road, told Tri-
bune Business that things had
gone downhill after the eco-
nomic downturn impacted con-
sumer confidence throughout
the Bahamas.

She said the hotel received
mostly Bahamian guests, but
its typically busy winter season
could have been better.

Ms Adderley said even their
popular dance nights have seen
a decline.



told Tribune Business that his
hotel had seen a 33 per cent
decline in business compared
to the same time last year.

“We're certainly feeling the
pinch,” he said. “We’re at
probably two-thirds of the
occupancy that we enjoyed last
year.”

Mr Spychalla said he did not
want to get into the specifics
of the hotel’s occupancy dur-
ing this Spring Break season,
but contends that it was down
versus last year, due to the
world economic crisis. But he
added that the hotel has not
had to lay-off staff to date.

Vernice Walkine, the Min-
istry of Tourism’s director-gen-
eral, told Tribune Business last

Make it a reality.

Prime Income Fund

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

Baha Mar’s
revenues
15-18% off
forecast

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

REVENUES at (|
Baha Mar’s two
Cable Beach
resort properties
are running 15-18
per cent behind
forecast for the
peak 2009 winter
season, Tribune
Business was told
yesterday, with
downward pres-
sure on room rates
impacting Bahamian resort’s
margins and daily room yields.

Robert Sands, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s president,
who is also a senior Baha Mar
executive, told this newspaper:
“Speaking specifically for our
properties, the winter season is
probably close to an aggregate,
for us, of 15-18 per cent down
on our Budget for revenues.

“The bottom line is that we’re
behind on revenue compar-
isons, both to last year and to



SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Creating the right culture for success

TODAY’S column is inspired
by an article that appeared in
the Harvard Business Review
back in early 2006. It was enti-
tled What Holds the Modern
Company Together, and it

explored the concept of ‘corpo-
rate culture’...what it is and its
various types.

I thought that this topic is
particularly relevant today,
especially in light of the ongoing

new!

DOUBLE

FILET O' FISH

1
jj

ae
ae



outrage surrounding AIG and
its payment of obscene corpo-
rate bonuses, while at the same
time begging the US govern-
ment for billions of dollars of
taxpayer ‘handouts’.

Understanding

corporate culture?

The authors had this to say
in defining corporate culture:
“Culture, in a word is commu-
nity. It is an outcome of how
people relate one to another.
Communities exist at work just
as they do outside the commer-
cial arena. Like families - vil-
lages, schools, clubs and busi-
nesses - rest on patterns of
social interaction that sustain
them over time or are their
undoing. They are built on
shared interests and mutual
obligations, and thrive on coop-
eration and friendships.”

Dimensions of human

relationships

The authors further suggested
that the ‘patterns of social inter-
action’ should be examined in
two dimensions, which they
define as sociability and soli-
darity.

Sociability was defined as the
measure of sincere friendliness
among members of a commu-
nity (in the case of a business —
staff). In business, it was recog-
nised that high sociability had
benefits such as the fact that
most employees feel working in
such an environment was enjoy-
able. This, in turn, is believed
to improve morale and team-
work. However, a drawback to
high levels of sociability was a
view that poor performance
may be tolerated because every-
body is chummy with each oth-
er. This results in the best com-
promise being applied to prob-
lems as opposed to the best
solutions.

Solidarity, on the other hand,
is a measure of a community’s
(staff) ability to work together
effectively regardless of per-
sonal ties. The article says that:
“Solidarity generates a high
degree of strategic focus, swift
response to competitive threats,
and intolerance of poor perfor-
mance. It can also result in a
degree of ruthlessness.” Also,

Financial

Focus

By Larry Gibson

an additional drawback to high
levels of solidarity was stated
as: “Strategic focus is good as
long as it zeroes in on the right
strategy. But if the strategy is
not the right one, it is the equiv-
alent of corporate suicide.
Organisations can charge right
over the cliff with great effi-
ciency if they do the wrong
things well”.

Types of Corporate Cultures

The authors then went on to
identify four types of corporate
culture using the dimensions of
sociability and solidarity — which
were:

1. The Networked Organisa-
tion: (High Sociability, Low Sol-
idarity)

In a networked organisation,
people frequently stop to talk
in the hallways. They tend to
socialise after hours and some-
times interact ‘like family’ out-
side the job place. Networked
cultures are characterised not
by a lack of hierarchy, but by a
profusion of ways to get around
it.

Their low levels of solidarity
mean that managers often have
trouble getting functions or
operating units to cooperate.
Finally, a networked organisa-
tion is usually so political that
individuals and cliques spend
much of their time pursuing
personal agendas.

2. The Mercenary Organisa-
tion: (Low Sociability, High Sol-
idarity)

The mercenary organisation
is low on ‘hobnobbing’ and is
intensely focused on business
matters. In this type of envi-



ronment, individual interests
coincide with corporate objec-
tives, and those objectives are
often linked to a clear percep-
tion of the ‘enemy’ and the
steps required for beating it.

Mercenary organisations are
also characterised by a clear
separation of work and social
life. Employees rarely frater-
nize outside of the office, and
when they do, it is usually at a
business-related event. Such
organisations are generally
intolerant of poor performance,
and those not contributing are
fired or given explicit instruc-
tions on how to improve, with a
firm deadline to change. Peo-
ple stay with high solidarity
companies for as long as their
personal needs are met, and
then they move on. Employees
are disinclined to cooperate,
share information or exchange
new or creative ideas.

3. The Fragmented Organisa-
tion: (Low Sociability, Low Sol-
idarity)

Employees of fragmented
organisations display a low con-
sciousness of organisational
membership. They often believe
that they work for themselves,
or they identify with occupa-
tional groups — usually profes-
sional.

Asked at a party what he
does for a living, for instance, a
doctor at a major teaching hos-
pital that happens to have this
culture might reply: “I am a sur-
geon”, leaving out the name of
the institution where he is
employed. The lack of interre-
latedness extends to behaviour
on the job. People may work
with their door shut, be secre-

tive about their projects and
progress or, in extreme cases,
they try to sabotage the work
of colleagues through gossip,
rumor or unfair criticism.

4. The Communal Organisa-
tion: (High Sociability, High Sol-
idarity)

Often found in small, fast
growing, entrepreneurial start-
ups, employees and founders of
communal organisations are
close friends. This usually
extends outside the job. Com-
munal cultures can also be
found in mature companies in
which employees have worked
together for long periods of
time.

Employees in communal
organisations tend to possess a
high consciousness of organisa-
tional membership(for exam-
ple, it is said that some Nike
employees proudly have
‘swooshes’ (the Nike logo) tat-
tooed on themselves). The high
solidarity of communal cultures
is often demonstrated through
an equitable sharing of risks and
rewards among employees, and
such organisations place a high
value on fairness and justice.

In communal organisations,
employees are very clear about
competition — they know their
competitors, what they do well,
their weaknesses and very often
what they need to do to stay
ahead of the pack.

Is there one right culture

for every organisation?

It is not surprising that many
executives see the communal
organisation as the ideal. I
would venture to also say that in
many cases, the type of organi-
sation an executive manages
could be very different from the
type of organisation that
employees consider themselves
to be working in. This is pre-
cisely the reason why effective
internal and external commu-
nication within an organisation
is SO important.

Clearly, there is no universal
(or correct) culture for every
organisation. It is also recog-
nised that because of the

SEE next page

Happy

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Request for Tender for Security Tess at
The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute campuses
at Old Trail Road, and Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas

The Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute (B.T.V.I.) now
invites sealed bids for the provision of Security Services at The Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Institute campuses at Old Trail Road, and Wulff
Road Nassau, Bahamas.

The Contract is for a period of twelve (12) months in the first
instance and interested security firms are invited to submit Tenders
with comprehensive details of their proposal for security operations for
a twenty-four period starting at 6:00 a.m. daily (including weekends
and holidays). The Contract will be awarded to the applicant providing
the most economical and acceptable Tender for the full duration of the
contract period.

*Car rentals at US
locations in Florida.
Taxes not included.
Some restrictions
apply.

Interested Bidders may inspect campuses between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Collection of the
specification and bidding documents can be obtained from the Reception
Desk at B.T.V.I., Old Trail Road between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:00
p.m., Monday through Friday beginning Monday, 16" March, 2009 and
obtain further information at the second address given below.

A Staybridge special:

Free Breakfast Buffet
Laundry Service
Happy Hour

Tae

SUITES

Two bedroom suite
sleeps 8

Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “Tender for
Security, Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute” and delivered
to the attention of:-
One bedroom suite
aioe The Chairman of the Tenders’ Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach
P. O. Box N-3017
Nassau, Bahamas

The Manager

Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute
Old Trail Road

P. O. Box N-4934

Nassau, Bahamas

Bids must be received by 4:00 p.m. on Friday, 3% April, 2009
accompanied by an endorsed copy of a current Business Licence.

'Cail your travel agent or
COTTE Family Island - Toll Free

242-377-5505 | 1-242-300-8359

Persons who submit Tenders are invited to a public opening of bids at
the Ministry of Finance, in the Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building, Cable
Beach on Tuesday, 14" April, 2009.

B.T.V.I. reserves the right to reject any or all Bids.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 3B





Government still assessing
dismissed worker benefits

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT is
still considering whether to
allow workers dismissed for just
cause to collect unemployment
benefit, the minister of labour
and social development said, as
it is still ironing out ‘kinks’ in
the proposed scheme.

Dion Foulkes told Tribune
Business, amid concerns from
the Bahamas Employers Con-
federation’s (BECon) president,
Brian Nutt, that the scheme was
still being mulled over and is
still “in the consultation stage”.

The minister said concerns
were raised by Mr Nutt regard-
ing a disqualification provision
within the scheme that still
allowed for a worker dismissed
from a job with just cause — such
as stealing or breaching com-
pany rules - or who simply quit
to still be eligible for seven of
the maximum 13 weeks’ worth
of benefits.

“That was raised by him at
both meetings, the one in Nas-
sau and the one in Freeport,
and is something that we have
under consideration,” said Mr
Foulkes.

The scheme, according to Mr
Foulkes, proposes to deny six

ie.

WTO OLUTR Csts

weeks of the 13 weeks of bene-
fit payments to those workers
who met the criteria for dis-
qualification.

“It is an entitlement
scheme,” he said. “Persons
made unemployed are entitled
to the benefit. If you meet cer-
tain criteria you are entitled to
it.”

However, Mr Foulkes told
Tribune Business that these cri-
teria would have to be given
further consideration, as an
employer’s decision to dismiss
an employee would be a sub-
jective process.

“Whether we can disqualify



a person who made all the pay-
ments just like everybody else,
who made the contributions to
National Insurance and now
they are unemployed for a rea-
son that the employer states was
a gross infraction of their rules —
we're giving it further consid-
eration,” he said.

The scheme’s initial funding
of $20 million will be extracted
from the National Insurance
Board’s medical benefit plan,
and subsequently supplemented
by the government’s consoli-
dated fund if needed.

So that the scheme does not
become a revolving door for
unemployed persons, they are
given a one-time payment. In
order to qualify again, that per-
son would have to be duly
employed for one year in order
to receive the 13-week payment
again.

In the long-term the scheme
will be financed, through
amendments to the National
Insurance Act, by contributions
split 50/50 between employer
and employee, and be equiva-
lent to 1 per cent of the insur-
able wage ceiling.

“National insurance is very
confident that the programme
can be sustained with the 1 per
cent contribution. The only
question is when that will kick

Creating the right
culture for success



dynamic environments in which
modern businesses operate,
companies very often have to
transform their corporate cul-
ture to keep pace with the
demands of their markets.
Companies that fail to recog-
mise and accept. this
reality...often perish.

One of the significant failures
of modern mergers and acqui-
sitions has been the fact that
the new management often fails
to understand that implement-
ing a new corporate culture for
anew combined entity requires
a lot more work than simply
stating what you wish it to be.
Decency and integrity still mat-
ters to most employees and cus-
tomers.

For the stories
hehind the news,
read Mnsight
on Mondays

=e
NAD

Nassau Airport
Devolopment Company

Conclusion

At the end of the day, man-
agement’s ultimate responsibil-
ity is to allocate capital and
resources in a way which pro-
duces business success, and cor-
porate culture, therefore, is the
environment in which those
results are produced. For some
companies, corporate culture is
designed, developed and imple-
mented strategically, while in
others it is simply a by-product
of factors such as the persona of
the chief executive (or other
senior managers).

Studies continuously suggest
that managing your corporate
culture to suit your particular
type of business and its busi-
ness environment is critical to
long term success. Managers
must know how to assess their
own culture and whether it fits
their competitive environment,
and only then can they develop
techniques and strategies to
transform their culture for the
better.

However, there must be
recognition that the business
environment has changed, and
that the wasteful practices of
the past decade will no longer

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following

items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;
* General Requirements for General Contracting services for

the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (ie.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.



Contact: TRACI BRISBY
Contract & Procurement Manager
LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117

P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

be tolerated. Companies like

AIG must rise to the challenge

to quickly change their corpo-

rate culture to one that more in

line with the realities of today.
Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas),
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs

in,” said Mr Foulkes.
“With the downturn in the
economy now, you don’t want

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Government will have to make
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to add any additional burden
on employees or employers, so
National Insurance and the

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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Resort placed in receivership Realtors to probe Miami firm
selling Bahamian property

FROM page 1B

Bimini’s economy, becoming a
tourist haven over the years
with its marina a fishing boat
Mecca during that season.

The property boasts two
restaurants, and was due to
undergo renovations to add lux-
ury rooms, scuba operations,
gift shops, a gourmet food mar-
ket, a bait and tackle shop, a
spa and a game room.

Now, its electricity is shut off
and, according to Mr Edge-
combe, the marina’s 103 slips
that can secure vessels up to 120
feet in length are empty.

Residents of Bimini are hop-
ing that the receivers will be

able to jump-start the resort
when it is handed over to them.
However, Mr Edgecombe con-
tends that reopening the resort
could become extremely costly
for KPMG, with no surety of
acquiring a profit.

He added that due to the
resort’s more than six-month
closure, the property would
have to undergo minor renova-
tions.

“We hope that we’ll line up
some people who might be
interested, who could come up
with some money — as you
know it’s difficult at this time
to get money from anywhere,”
said Mr Edgecombe. “But, Big
Game has always been a prof-

WASTE - ED

TIDBITS FOR
NEWSPAPER PUBLICATION

Litter pollution is the most visible form of pollution.
Litter immediately creates a negative impression. All
the litter you see in our community comes from people
like me and you. People can be catgorized by their

litter behavior.

Which are you?

* Willfull arrogants-usually litter in Bain Town but

not in Cable Beach

* Ignorants-these people are unaware of a link
between the environment and their littering

* Inconvenients-proper disposal is too hard, to much
trouble, someone else’s problem

* No-litterers-emvironmentally conscious, don’t litter

(EPA Australia)

A MESSAGE FROM THE MINISTRY OF
THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES



——_

VACANCY NOTICE

itable thing.”

He added that Bimini has
been “catching a lil’ hell” since
the global economic downturn
began to affect the local econo-
my, but said Biminites have
come together to ride out the
economic tsunami collectively.

“It’s easier to absorb these
kinds of things (Bimini Big
Game Resort’s Closure) than
anywhere else because there are
a lot of families involved and
we try to help one another in
any which way,” he said.

However, Mr Edgecombe
said the busy season will be lost
this year, as far as the Bimini
Big Game Resort is concerned.

He said, though, that Bimini
residents are looking towards
the next three to four months
for a spike in visitor numbers,
even without the resort.

“Tf the weather is good, peo-
ple will come,” Mr Edgecombe
said. “March is a terrible month
as far as the weather is con-
cerned, but we’re looking for-
ward to a good summer.”

BAHA MAR, from 1B

Budget. There is still softness
in the market.”

While he was unable to speak
specifically to what other
Bahamian resort properties
were experiencing, Mr Sands
told Tribune Business that “the
most significant” impact being
experienced by the sector was
on its “ability to yield a strong
average [daily room] rate, which
is creating the problem for rev-
enue earnings”.

The BHA president
explained that there were “a lot
of people trading down”, mean-
ing that those tourists who were
travelling were increasingly
seeking value, and exploiting
the economic and hotel sector
downturn to obtain discounted
room rates and packages.

“In the last week or two,
we’ve seen some glimpses of an
increase in demand, but we’re
still not yielding the average
rates forecast or achieved last
year,” said Mr Sands.

“The reality is that there’s a

PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Public Relations & Corporate Programs

Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and implementation of a
strategic public relations and communication program together with the effective and efficient
planning and execution of all corporate events and activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Assists in the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate Programs plan to
support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;
Oversees the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations programs, plan and

budget;

Assists with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation and where necessary

the wider community;

Prepares and distributes the Corporation’s Annual Report;
Directs press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press releases, photographs,
fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management and media representatives;
Coordinates the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion surveys;
Provides assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in writing speeches,

preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;
Evaluates and assesses customer complaints and queries and disseminates information to

management;

Aids in the development, implementation and management of all external communication

efforts;

Is proactive in identifying opportunities to improve the image of the Corporation to its employees
and in the community at large;
Coordinates Marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the external Public
Relations Firms and the Media;
Identifies and liaises with service providers to secure speakers, presenters and entertainment

for Corporate events;

Liaises with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e. awards, invitations,
prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as necessary and maintain an inventory

of the same;

Prepares and distributes all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices) relative to Corporate

activities, as necessary;

Creates and updates all Standard Operating Procedures for all activities, as necessary;
Ensures timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of bills for all events

and activities as necessary;

Works closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that there is global

publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate activities;
Ensures that websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company newsletter and internal PA
system are used for the communication of information relative to corporate activities/events;

Job requirements include:

* A minimum ofa Bachelors degree in Public Relations/ Journalism/Marketing/Business
Administration/Business Communication, or equivalent.
A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisory/Management level.
Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform to prescribed

style and format;

Ability to effectively present information to senior and Executive management and public

groups;

Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing
Experience in managing special events and activities
Excellent time management and organizational skills
Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills

Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications.

Good analytical skills.

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The
Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: April 1st, 2009.



FROM page 1B

However, Bahamas-based
developers are allowed to sell
the real estate and properties
that they themselves con-
struct, and it is possible that
this is what Paradise Is Mine is
doing.

Mr Wong said that when-
ever BREA received infor-
mation suggesting that foreign
realtors were selling Bahami-
an real estate without a
licence, its monitoring com-
mittee dealt with it. He added
that often, when the situation
was explained and brought to
the attention of the alleged
offender, they stopped their
activities.

Meanwhile, Mr Wong said
BREA had met with Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for

tremendous effort being put
into maintaining rate integrity,
but the demand for package
pricing and more value is having
a significant impact on average
daily room rates, and that
results in a significant reduction
in revenues achieved from room
sales.”

While some resorts were feel-
ing the pressure more than oth-
ers, Mr Sands explained that
the Bahamian hotel sector was
also witnessing “downward
pressure on occupancy levels”
Both that and revenues were
behind last year and 2009 bud-
get forecasts.

The factors impacting the
Bahamian hotel industry are no
mystery. The main ones are the
US and world economic reces-
sion, and the subsequent fall-
off in consumer and traveller
confidence. There has also been
a sharp drop in convention and
group business, with no US
firms wanting the stigma
attached to sending staff abroad
to foreign conferences. This
then manifested itself in rate
reductions and the search for
value deals.

“All these items have con-
tributed to a softness in the

CONTRACTORS,
from 1B

obtained their financing from,”
Mr Wrinkle explained.

“Tf any contractor or supplier
has a legitimate lien or com-
plaint with a developer, they
will have the security of know-
ing it will be dealt with in the
Bahamian court system. They
will not have to go abroad to
seek damages or court deci-
sions.

“By having this grant from
the IDB, it will enable us to
move to the next level and get
to international standards.”

The proposed IDB project,
which will cost $225,000 in total,
is designed to strengthen the
BCA. Mr Wrinkle said the
financing would “be utilised for
implementing the standards and
testing procedures for the
licensing requirements of the
Contractors Bill, and for the
improvements in the opera-
tional ability of the BCA within

finance, to convey its concerns
over the removal of the
$35,000 real property tax ceil-
ing, which it felt had resulted
in potentially higher tax pay-
ments for wealthy clients -
something that could impact
the international and second
home buyer sector.

The BREA president said
Mr Laing had promised that
the Government would take
into account the real estate
industry’s concerns when con-
ducting its 2009-2010 Budget
preparation exercise, but
made no promises of a policy
amendment or reversal.

“The minister was very
accommodating, and he said
we will have to wait and see
when the Budget comes in
May,” Mr Wong said. “I think
they were aware of what the

market that has yet to reverse
itself,” Mr Sands said. “There
has been an increase in call vol-
umes for April and May. That
has not manifested itself into
an increase in bookings, but the
call volumes indicate there is
an upward trend.”

The industry was not count-
ing on this to increase bookings
just yet, with hotel properties
focusing instead on controlling
expenses and costs during
“what will be a shorter winter
season this year”.

Mr Sands explained that
while the peak winter tourism
season traditionally lasted from
early February until Easter,
some two-and-a-half to three
months, this year it might have
shortened to the March-first
week in April, a six-week peri-
od.

“Tt’s fair to say most hotels
are unlikely to reach Budget
forecasts for this period, based
on what happened in January
and February,” Mr Sands said.

“Tt would appears that there’s
not been any overwhelming
strengthening, certainly for Jan-
uary and February. If there’s
any strengthening, even at a
lower yield, it will be for March

the Bahamas”.

The project is also designed
to aid the BCA, and wider
Bahamian construction indus-
try, in dealing with internation-
al trade agreements that might
impact the sector, such as the
Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) signed last year
with the European Union (EU).

The proposed IDB-led initia-
tive also aims “to strengthen
our ties and relationship with
the other Caribbean construc-
tion associations”, Mr Wrinkle
said. “Since CARICOM signed
the EPA together, it puts all the
CARICOM countries in the
same basket with regards to
construction.”

Mr Wrinkle said the imple-
mentation of international stan-
dard contract documents in the
Bahamas, coupled with the
hoped-for passing of the Con-
tractors Bill and its licensing
regime, would enhance the sec-

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issues were, and are going to
look at it very carefully to see
if they can be accommodated.

“They’re going to look at it
and see if they can accommo-
date some of our concerns.
But he made no promises.”

Mr Laing had pointed out
that the real property tax ceil-
ing’s removal had coincided
with a revaluation exercise
conducted by the real proper-
ty tax unit.

“T agree with him that a lot
of properties were underval-
ued, and that’s why people are
screaming,” Mr Wong said.
He added that BREA realised
the Government had critical
revenue-raising needs, espe-
cially at a time of recession
when it was trying to finance
numerous stimulus pro-
grammes.

and the first week in April.”

That could have major impli-
cations for the hotel industry’s
financial position for the
remainder of 2009, given that
the sector has traditionally
relied on profits and cash flow
generated during the peak win-
ter season to allow it to get
through the ‘slow season’, par-
ticularly August-October.

“The reality is that the results
attained in the winter season
determine the adjustments the
company may have to make for
the rest of the year,” Mr Sands
said.

“We tend to make the over-
whelming majority of cash flow
during the traditionally strong
winter period.”

He added: “This could be a
long year. Most properties are
trying as best they can to try
and ride out this very difficult
period. Every day is a challenge.
But every day obviously creates
opportunities to look at ways
to maintain positive cash flow,
to generate positive cash flow.

“Your top line revenue is the
basis on which you start, and
once that shrinks it has a direct
impact on your profit and loss
statement.”

tor’s competitiveness by pro-
viding Bahamian contractors
with recognised certification.

“Tt shows we’ve gained a lev-
el of competence and compli-
ance that will enable us to par-
ticipate at a high level,” Mr
Wrinkle told Tribune Business.
“At the moment, international
contractors do not really know
the ability and status of the
Bahamian construction indus-
try in general.

“Tt makes it difficult for those
international firms to identify
capable and competent con-
tractor, and sub-contractor, in
the Bahamas without having
some acceptable standards to
evaluate them.

“We’re experiencing that
with the Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD) con-
tracts. There’s a lot of interna-
tional interest in the work,
because of the scope and bond-
ing requirements.

“We’re finding that it’s an
impediment, not having this
Contractors Bill, the industry
not being properly licensed and
regulated, not having the forms
and professional approach to a
number of the contracts.

“Tt really lowers the bar for
us, and we want to raise the bar
for ourselves. The IDB grant
will enable us to raise the bar.”

Mr Wrinkle added, though,
that the proposed IDB project
would not proceed until the
final draft of the Contractors
Bill was released by the Gov-
ernment to ensure the two
worked in step as a comple-
ment, and did not conflict with
each other.

The BCA president said the
Association was “aggressively
pursuing” the passing of the
Contractors Bill by Parliament.
The draft legislation is current-
ly in the Ministry of Works, and
the BCA was pushing for all
work to be completed so that
the Bill could go to Cabinet.

The Contractors Bill, when
finally passed, will introduce a
formalised standards and testing
regime for the first time, so that
all contractors in every trade -
plumbers, masons, carpenters,
electricians - can be licensed at
one of four different levels.

“The Government will regis-
ter the contractor and issue the
licence, but it has no interest in
doing the courses and the train-
ing. They prefer that the BCA
administer the courses and the
testing,” Mr Wrinkle said.

“Once the contractor passes
the test, it will require the Gov-
ernment to review the applica-
tion and issue the licence.”
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 5B





European bank officer in Nassau

A LOAN officer from the
European Investment Bank
(EIB) has visited the Bahamas
to explain the financing options
it offers to business operators
and financial institutions.

Inmaculada Riba Soto, loan
officer in the Caribbean and
Pacific Division of the Euro-
pean Investment Bank (EIB),
met with members of the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s Small and Medium
Enterprises Support Unit
(SMESU) on Monday, March
16, at the Inter-American
Development Bank’s (IDB)
East Bay Street offices.

Ms Soto also visited the
Chamber prior to the meeting,
where she met with Philip
Simon, its executive director,
Khaalis Rolle, the first vice-
president, Gershan Major, sec-
ond vice-president and chair-
man of the Chamber’s globali-
sation committee, Yvette Sands,
Chamber director and chair-
person of the Chamber’s energy
and environment committee,
along with Hank Ferguson,
director of the Chamber’s Small
and Medium Enterprises Sup-
port Unit (SMESU).

“Institutions like the EIB, the
IDB and the IC (Inter-Ameri-
can Investment Corporation)
have increasingly extended their
reach and product offerings into
the private sector from tradi-
tionally public sector driven
projects over the last few years.
This obviously represents a shift
in policy geared towards the
wider business communities in
the countries that they serve.
We are pleased to receive Ms
Soto and the EIB to explore
any possibility for greater finan-
cial assistance to the Bahami-
an business community, partic-
ularly small and medium sized
enterprises who may need it the
most,” Mr Simon said.

Mr. Major pointed to the





THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s Small and Medium Enterprises Support Unit (SMESU) hosted Inmac-
ulada Riba Soto, loan officer for the Caribbean and Pacific Division of the European Investment Bank, who is pic-
tured along with, from L to R: Yvette Sands, Chamber director and chairperson of the Chamber’s energy and envi-
ronment committee; Khaalis Rolle, first vice-president; Gershan Major, second vice-president and chairman of
the Chamber’s globalisation committee; and Philip Simon, executive director of the Chamber.

important role the European
Investment Bank had played as
a development partner in the
Bahamas over the past 30 years
through the Cotonou Partner-
ship Agreement, which was
signed in 2000, and followed the
Lome Convention of 1975.

“The bank, over the course
of this 30-year relationship, has
supplemented the benefits
received under the various con-
ventions by providing loans with
preferential terms of just over
50 million Euros,” Mr Major
said.

Much of this funding was
used to support developments
undertaken by the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation and the
Water and Sewerage Corpora-
tion.

“Today our relationship is
changing; we have just com-
pleted a new trade agreement
with the Europeans, known to
you as the EPA or Economic
Partnership Agreement. The
agreement speaks to reciprocity,

(Photo: Anastasia Stubbs/Visionaire Marketing)

liberalisation and is designed
with the hope of increasing our
capacity and abilities to become
competitive in an increasingly
globalised world,” Mr Major
said.

“Today, the EIB is once
again making itself available as
a partner, and we remain hope-
ful that there will be opportu-
nities and benefits to this con-
tinued partnership.”

Ms Soto said the bank, which
is owned by 27 member states
of the European Union with
Germany, France, the UK and
Italy being the largest share-
holders, lent 58 billion euros in
2008.

The EIB supports projects
that deliver sustainable eco-
nomic, social and environmental
benefits. Within the Caribbean
region, Ms Soto explained that

the bank puts special emphasis
on projects in three areas:
improvement of regional inte-
gration through better infra-
structure, promotion of the use
of renewable energy and cli-
mate change mitigation, and
development of the private sec-
tor through credit lines for small
and medium enterprises to
financial intermediaries.

Following the meeting, Ms
Soto commented: “This has
been a great opportunity for me
to get in touch with the busi-
ness community in the Bahamas
to assess the need for financ-
ing, and to try and understand
how the EIB can help the busi-
ness community in the coun-
try.”

LEGAL

Cable expands
dividend 16%

CABLE Bahamas is planning
to increase its 2009 first quarter
dividend by 16 per cent, from
$0.06 per share to $0.07 per
share, due to the company’s
earning momentums “carrying
through to the first quarter of
2009”.

Among the steps the compa-
ny said it had taken to boost
profitability were its new Coral-
Wave e-mail platform, Pronto!;
an increased sales presence;
enhanced customer retention
efforts; direct dialing for cus-
tomer installation and customer
trouble calls; compensation tied
to the company’s growth; an
expanded customer care facility;
and an upgraded broadband
core network and data centre.

TICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

NOTICE is hereby given that NEVILLETON
PARAGUE of 8 Maria Galante Road, P.O.
Box CR-56836, Nassau, Bahamas is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 27%
day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship,

Notice

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 235 of the
International Business Companies Act, 1992, as Amended,
Notice is hereby given that:-

1. SAPRA INTERNATIONAL HOLDING LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation) is in dissolution.

. Proceedings to wind-up and dissolve the Company were
commenced on the 12th day of March A.D, 2009.

. Dr. Wilder Gonzalez Penino whose address is Bayside
Executive Park, West Bay Street and Blake Road,
Building ITI, Ground Floor CB-10998, Nassau, Bahamas
is the Liquidator of the Company for the purpose of such
dissolution.

WILLIAMS LAW CHAMBERS
Registered Agent

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b) and
(c) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000
NOTICE is hereby given that, ROLING MANAGE-
MENT LIMITED is in dissolution and that the date of
commencement of the dissolution is the 13th day of March
A.D. 2009.

Enervo Administration Limited
Liquidators
Montague Sterling Centre
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3924
Nassau, The Bahamas

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUVINA REVOL of
Mackey Street, P.O. Box N-7060, Nassau, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 24" day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA JEAN-LOUIS of FARM
ROAD and CENTREVILLE CONSTIUVENCY one of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24" day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

MARIS SERVICES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, MARIS SERVICES INC., has been dissolved
and struck off the Register according to the Certificate of
Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the 6th

day of March, 2009.

Mikhail Nechvolodov,
Business Address,
LLC “PRAVO VYBORA” 109316,
Volgogradsky Prospect,
2, Moscow, Russian Federation
Liquidator

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
FARRINGDON INVESTMENTS LTD. is in dissolution.
Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and par-
ticulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
27th March, 2009.





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PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

MENOPAUSE for many women is
considered the single most signifi-
cant biological change signifying
an end to fertility and youth, and
unfortunately in some cases can
mean an end to sexual appeal and

desire as well.

While women spend their 20s, 30s, and even 40s
focused on raising a family, building a successful
career, or even celebrating the joys of woman-
hood, for many, menopause when it does happen
is like a thief robbing them of the feelings, desires,
and functions which in many ways are synony-
mous with womanhood- the effects of which can
prove extremely dramatic not just for the woman,
but also for her partner.

For many men the initial reaction can range
anywhere from bewilderness to extreme uncer-
tainty in the relationship. Unaware of the physi-
cal and emotional roller-coaster experienced by
his mate, most men are simply baffled by the
sudden and frankly scary changes women go
through as a result of menopause, which undoubt-
edly affects all sectors of the relationship includ-
ing sex.

Tribune Health spoke with Dr Richard Bridge-
water of the Southern Community Medical Cen-
tre, a board certified Obstetrician and Gynecol-
ogist (OBGYN) who explained that while
menopause naturally causes a reduction in over-
all sexual desire for most women, it does not
mean that they are sentenced to a life void of
sexual pleasure. He said that the first step in
overcoming menopause is to identify initial
changes.

Contrary to the common belief that menopause
is a one shot deal, Dr Bridgewater said like every
other cycle that occurs in the human body
menopause too has a preamble.

Known as perimenopause, this is the phase
where the woman will begin to notice menopause
related changes. On the inside, her ovaries
become less conducive to reproduction, and estro-
gen and progesterone levels begin to decrease.

“Estrogen is the female hormone responsible
for a woman’s ability to be nurturing, her ability
to be more intimate, it’s responsible for her hour
glass shape, sense of femininity, and sensitivity
during intercourse,” Dr Bridgewater said.

However as the ovaries become less productive,
an automatic decrease in estrogen levels occur,
and on the exterior a woman will begin to expe-
rience hot flashes, mood swings, uncontrollable
crying spells, fluctuating sex drive, and in some
cases still see a monthly period. In women 45
and older, perimenopause can begin, but in many
cases there are specific factors which may con-
tribute to a more overt experience.

Dr Bridgewater said in some studies, the exter-
nal effects of perimenopause can be more dra-
matic for a slender Caucasian female than for a
full figured dark skinned woman. Generally how-
ever, common factors include but are not limited
to weight, diet, stress, life styles, other pre-exist-
ing conditions, and one’s approach to menopause.

Although the effects of menopause are

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unavoidable, Dr Bridgewater suggests that the
mind over matter approach to maintaining sexu-
al pleasure and quality of life may help some
women in overcoming menopause with fewer
hurdles.

Another significant change is the frequency of
Atrophic Vaginitis. He said as menopause is com-
monly associated with reduced sexual pleasure
and desire, some women may refuse to address
their discomfort during sex, which could be to
their detriment.

Atrophic Vaginitis is a condition where the
lining of the vagina may become dry and inflamed
because of the thinning and shrinking of the vagi-
nal tissue and overall diameter, all of which is
associated with lowered estrogen levels.

As women go through menopause, the vagina
goes through a continuous shrinking process
which can affect sex, urination, and sensitivity.

With less natural lubrication in the vagina, and
less pleasurable sensitivity due to menopause,
Dr Bridgewater said the friction of sex can
become discomforting and out right painful for
some women, leading to many post menopausal
women walking away from sexual activity all
together.

The important thing to remember according
to Dr Bridgewater, is that seeing a doctor regu-
larly can tremendously reduce the affects and
occurrence of atrophic vaginitis and other condi-
tions.

Now available are various treatments as well as
hormone replacement therapy. According to Dr
Bridgewater, replacing female hormones once
produced by the body has proven to be one of the
most effective means of combating menopause
related changes.

He also suggested that women who are going
through menopause increase their vitamin D
intake, which combined with some additional sun
exposure, can reduce the possibility of another
menopause related disorder known as osteoscle-
rosis.

The condition which is a gradual increase in
bone density, commonly occurs in post

SEE page nine




CONTRARY to the common belief that menopause is a
one shot deal, Dr Bridgewater said like every other
cycle that occurs in the human body menopause too
has a preamble.





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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 9B



a eV





Are yousteps
away from injury?
Ask your feet :

I HAVE encountered many
persons whose feet continue }
to hurt but they choose to}
ignore it. I say, don't ignore it }
because your feet are trying }
to tell you something. One }
person puts it like this, “well }
the pain comes and goes so I}
never think it is serious.” ;

If you experience any pains }
in your feet, you need to know }
that your feet are trying to say }
something to you. As always, }
your feet are the foundation }
of your body and without ai
strong foundation your body is }
likely to crumble. Treating }
your feet well by getting fre-
quent pedicures is an oppor-
tunity to pay attention to their
condition and alert you to
‘warning signs’.

WARNING SIGNS?

Calluses - which are simply }
a hardening of the skin, are }
sometimes seen as nature's }
way of protecting the tissues }
below from steady abrasions }
or pressures from the body. :
When calluses develop they
are often found on pressure- }
sensitive parts of the foot, such :
as under the ball of the feet }
or under the big toe joint. ;
They can be sore and even }
painful, much like having a }
pebble under your foot. Cal- ;
luses are sometimes a sign of i
foot imbalance or of a more }
serious problem concealed }
inside the foot. ;

Corns - there are two main :
types: Hard and Soft. The hard :
corn usually starts as red skin,
followed by a coating of callus,
which develops into a hard }
corn. Most hard corns develop
on the side of the little toe, }
but are also found in other }
places where there is steady :
pressure and abrasion. Hard
corns are almost always caused
by shoes of the wrong size or }
shape or fit. On the other
hand, the soft corn is always :
found between the web of the }
toes, usually between the }
fourth and fifth toes. A soft
corn is white and damp. It can }
also be very painful. It is}
caused by a constant squeezing :
together of the toes as a result :
of shoes too short or narrow at }
the toes. The bones of the toes
rub together and bring on the ;
soft corn. ;

Hammer toes - claw-like :
toes looking very much like }
the head of a hammer. This :
condition usually affects the ;
second toe and at times the }
third toe. It is believed that an :
acquired hammer toe can be }
the result of constant wearing }
of shoes with pointed toes, or
too short or narrow. It is also ;
believed that causes can also }
be genetic or hereditary. Ham- :
mer toes can be successfully ;
corrected by simple surgical }
treatment. However, a foot }
with hammer toes should be }
fitted in the right size and type }
of shoe, with a deep toe box. }
Proper fit is a must to avoid }
painful conditions associated }
with hammer toes. :

Bunion - or ‘Hallux Valgus' }
suggest that the big toe or }
great toe bends in an outward }
direction towards the second }
toe. This deformity can be }
accompanied by severe inflam- }
mation to the side of the big }
toe. Swelling and pain or sore-
ness can also be felt in the }
area. These distressing symp- }
toms are caused by a constant }
abrasion of the shoe against }
the bursa sac at the side of the }
big toe. There again, the cor- i
rection of a bunion can be }
done thorough the services of }
a podiatrist. ;

Morton's Neuroma - pain,
burning, tingling, or numbness }
that occurs between the third }
and fourth toes and in the ball }
of your foot may be caused by }
a growth around the nerves.

* Bernadette D. Gibson, a :
Board Certified Pedorthist, is the :
proprietor of Foot Solutions, a :
health and wellness franchise that :
focuses on foot care and proper :
shoe fit, located in the Sandyport :
Plaza, Nassau. i

The views expressed are those of :
the author and does not necessar- 3
ily represent those of Foot Solu-
tions Incorporated or any of its :
subsidiary and/or affiliated compa- i
nies. Please direct any questions :
or comments to nassau@footso- :
lutions.com or 327-FEET (3338). }

EATING bran or whole grain cereal at breakfast can
significantly boost your fiber intake in just one meal.





@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

FIBER is the indigestible part of a
plant. It is in whole grains, fruits,
nuts, legumes, vegetables and
beans. However, with the normal
Bahamian diet consisting of things
filled with starches, butter and
grease we hardly ever get enough
fiber which is causing a rise in the
amount of colon cancer cases in

the country.

Now that the fiber trend is
catching on, and people are
becoming more aware, it can
also be found added to foods
such as yogurt, soy milk and pas-
ta. Other foods pause to pay a
toll along the gastrointestinal
highway, but fiber zips through
E-ZPass style because the body
can not digest it. Like seat fillers
at any event, fiber fills a void
and then vanishes when some-
thing better takes its place.

According to Doctor of Nat-
ural Health and Certified Colon
Hydrothereapist, Joyce Adder-
ley, there are two kinds of fiber:
soluble and insoluble.

“Soluble fiber is made up of
polysaccharides (carbohydrates
that contain three or more mol-
ecules of simple carbohydrates)
and it does not dissolve in water.
It has a beneficial effect on the
body chemistry, such as lower-
ing blood cholesterol and blood
sugar levels. Good sources
include: oat or oat bran, legumes
(dried beans and peas), and
many fruits and vegetables such
as carrots and bananas. It tends
to hide inside foods--the flesh
of apples, the grain of rice inside
the hull. It is what gives cooked
vegetables their soft, mushy
quality. Insoluble fiber is main-
ly made up of plant cell walls,
and it cannot be dissolved in
water. Good sources of insolu-

Surviving menopause
FROM page eight

menopausal women, and can
lead to frequent fractures, and
wheel chair confinement.

Also associated with pre-
menopause are hysterectomies,
often necessary for benign con-
ditions, which can affect a
women just entering her sexual
prime to a women approaching
menopause. For whatever rea-
son, hormone therapy is also
advised, especially for younger
patients.

“A 30-year-old who may
have had a hysterectomy would
have more pronounced symp-
toms of premenopause, because
her body is still very much
reliant on estrogen,” Dr Bridge-
water said.

Added with regular visits to
an OBGYN, adopting healthier
lifestyles, and monitoring body
changes resulting from
menopause, most women can
ride through menopause rela-
tively smoothly.

As for maintaining sexual
desire and pleasure, traditional
rules still apply. Dr Bridgewa-
ter gave this advice: Communi-
cate with your partner to make
them aware of the changes in
your body, give yourself more
time during foreplay to get your
body in the mode, and use a
water based lubricant to add to
increased sexual pleasure.

"
=
==

ble fiber (wheat

bran, whole
wheat flour, and
products made
from them, skins
from various
fruits and veg-
etables, leafy
greens, and cru-
ciferous vegeta-
bles (cauliflower,
broccoli and
Brussels
sprouts). Insolu-
ble fiber may
help to regulate
bowel move-
ments. It bulks
up as it absorbs
liquid in the
stomach; the bulk pushes waste
down and out of your system.
Insoluble fiber is usually found
in the skins and outer parts of
foods, and it's what gives many
their tough, chewy texture. Basi-
cally, it speeds up the passage
of material through your diges-

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tive tract and sweeps out all the
toxins in your body,” Mrs
Adderley said.

As long as you are eating nat-
ural foods, you will reap the bel-
ly-filling benefits of both kinds
of fiber. By taking up space in
your stomach, fiber foils
overeating by making you feel
too stuffed to keep snacking.

While you are enjoying the
satisfaction of a full stomach,
you can gloat over the fact that
it likely took fewer calories to
achieve that feeling: Foods that
pack a lot of fiber can help low-
er your carbohydrate intake.

“Fiber keeps the entire gas-
trointestinal system functioning
smoothly. As the fiber absorbs
water it makes fecal matter
bulkier, less dense, and easier
to pass along the digestive tract.
This decreases the amount of
time that food waste spends
inside the body and may reduce
the risk of infection or cell
changes due to carcinogens that

(

d

are produced when some foods,
particularly meat, degrade,” Mrs
Adderley said.

Mrs Adderley stressed that
fiber is important because it has
an influence on the digestion
process from start to finish.

“Dr Dennis Burkitt was the
first researcher to connect a
high-fiber diet with better
health. He noticed that people
eating a traditional African diet
in rural areas had almost no dia-
betes, irritable bowel syndrome,
constipation, diverticular dis-
ease, colon cancer, or heart dis-
ease. Dietary fiber may also help
prevent obesity by slowing down
digestion and the release of glu-
cose and insulin. Fiber has been
shown to normalise serum cho-
lesterol levels,” Mrs Adderley
said.

Mrs Adderley said Bahami-
ans need to realise the impor-
tance of fiber in their diets and
their overall health.

“If we continue to eat our

Bahamian diet of peas & rice,
macaroni & cheese, potato salad
and fried chicken, with little or
no fruits and veggies then, I
would agree that we do not get
sufficient fiber. For one to have
a fiber filled diet one should eat
a minimum of five fruits and veg-
etables every day. More is better.
They are rich in fiber, vitamins,
minerals, trace nutrients, fluids,
and vitality. Eat whole grains
such as wholewheat, brown rice,
oatmeal, millet, amaranth,
quinoa, and rye. Eat bran or
whole grain cereal at breakfast;
they can significantly boost your
fiber intake in just one meal.
Beans and peas are also loaded
with healthful fibers. They are
a low-fat protein source, and
their soluble fiber and sitosterols
may help normalise cholesterol
levels. An ideal intake of fiber is
a minimum of 35 grams a day.
Provided the right foods are eat-
en, this level can easily be
achieved,” Mrs Adderley said.

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Holding employees in a higher vision of themselves

At the start of my career as a man-
ager, another manager told me that it
is important to hold employees in a
higher vision than they can hold them-
selves. She advocated seeing their
potential when employees are unable
or too afraid to see how far they can
go.

As a new manager, I decided to put
this advice into action. I created stretch
projects for my team members to ensure
that in addition to their routine respon-
sibilities, they were given opportunities
to grow and evolve into leadership roles.

I took the advice literally, so at first I
attempted to see everyone in a higher
vision. I found that there were some
employees who could rise to the occa-
sion and there were others who were
completely frustrated by the process.
Employees became frustrated because
they became obsessed with trying to
rise to the challenge not wanting to dis-
appoint me. What was happening was
that I was unwittingly applying uncon-
structive pressure because I was unable
to recalibrate my expectations after
employees demonstrated that my expec-
tations were inappropriate.

So here are a few tips I learned that



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE question of whether or not the
late Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling, former
Prime Minister of the Bahamas was
born in Jamaica and if he was paid to
turn a blind eye to drug-trading activ-
ities in Norman’s Cay during the 80
and early 90s, remains a touchy subject
for many Bahamians.

Just last week, an emotional protest
took place outside The Tribune where
a group of Bahamians waving plac-
ards called for an apology and resig-
nation of managing editor John Mar-
quis because of his scandalous arti-
cles on the late Prime Minister.

In this Barber Shop, we ask to what
extent do these recent allegations have
on the general perception of the for-
mer leader, and whether or not now is
the time for such stories.

Setting the stage at Cameron’s
Clean Cuts, a small group of men give
their take on the issues.

First up was 31-year-old Barber Ken
Dames from the Baillou Hills area,
who said the article which alleged Sir
Lynden’s knowledge of drug-dealing
activity during his leadership is disre-
spectful.

“Sir Lynden Pindling is a man who
has done great things for this coun-
try, he might not have been a perfect
man, but I think we all know that.

“To have this article come out after
Sir Lynden’s death, and from John
Marquis who we had some problems
with in journalism in this country in
the past, I think his actions are just
disrespectful.”

Mr Dames went on to say that he
thinks Mr Marquis was wrong in going
to a grieving man, Chauncey Tynes
Sr, and said the aging man is still upset
at the mysterious death of his son.

“Mr Tynes has no closure, they have
still not found the body, but what they
gat to realise is Chauncey Tynes Jr
did some things that wasn’t right. He
associated with some people that he
knew were undesirables, people like
Carlos ‘Joe’ Lehder, who he would
have known to be alleged drug deal-
ers.”

Mr Dames explained that if Mr
Tynes Jr made the decision to still
work for such a character, and to then
go missing, “that’s the kind of conse-
quence that follows that kind of life.”

33-year-old Taffie Darling from
Robinson Road said although there
are certain freedoms of writing enti-
tled to any journalist, his concern is
that now is not the appropriate time to
discuss the issue.

“The Bahamas right now is facing a
recession, so for him to come now and
write about Sir Lynden whether they
are true or not, is a waste of time.”

However Mr Darling suggested that
there is nothing special or unique
about this alleged drug trade involve-
ment and illicit activity by the former
PM.

“If he really wants to talk about cor-
ruption, then he needs to go further
back, because it didn’t just start with

aD iy

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can help you to hold your employees in
a balanced vision of their potential:

1. Avoid projecting your strengths
and weaknesses onto your employees.
You will only frustrate them if you
expect them to be able to do what you
do well. In other words, know your
employees (KYE). Know that their
strengths and weaknesses, likes and dis-
likes, values, motivators and demotiva-
tors and personality all factor into the
balancing process.

2. Sometimes a weakness is exactly
what it is. A weakness! While you may
see some improvement when you give
employees opportunities to grow, know
when to stop expecting improvement
in the areas of weakness. Instead, focus
on the employee's strengths. This will
build their confidence and motivation.

3. Don't penalise employees if they
are unsuccessful at a stretch project.
Perhaps your assessment of their poten-
tial in a particular competence was
incorrect so don't give up on them.
Developing employees is a trial and
error process so test them in other areas
of competence. Avoid writing them
off.

4, Put the stretch project in perspec-
tive. If you penalise employees at
appraisal time because they failed at a
stretch project even if they performed
their mandated duties very well,
remember you may sabotage your
efforts to develop your team. They
won't trust you to allow them to make
mistakes.

5. Sometimes employees have the
potential to go to the next level but
they don't have the will. Depending on
the reason for the lack of will, you may
not be able to persuade them to go to
the next level. For instance, I once
met a front line employee who was a
natural leader with the technical com-
petencies to train incoming employees
and even managers but he refused pro-
motion after promotion. He demon-
strated the talent but did not have the
will to go to the next level. This can

happen if a person doesn't want the
extra responsibility of supervising oth-
ers or they may have goals outside the
workplace.

6. See your team as a whole entity.
Sometimes employees appointed to a
position do not possess all the skills
necessary to perform satisfactorily.
While right placement is optimal,
sometimes it is not immediately possi-
ble so some leaders see the team in a
higher vision of itself, creatively har-
nessing the strengths of the members of
the team in order to create synergy.

Everyone is Part of the Equation

Managers are not the only ones
responsible for holding employees in a
higher vision of themselves. As an
employee you may tend to complain
about or be wary of your coworkers.
While sometimes your assessment may
be accurate, it doesn't mean the
employee is a write off. It could mean
that with your help, and the help of
others (assuming the employee's will-
ingness to receive help) you can help
turn the situation around.

Corporate memory can be long and
unforgiving. As an employee, if you do
your part in forgiving coworkers for
their mistakes and reach out to sup-

port each other you can help trans-
form your team.

Holding employees in a higher vision
of themselves is an important skill pos-
sessed by top performing leaders and
employees. If you focus on developing
members of your team you can create
a higher performing team and
inevitably, you will be able to perform
at an even higher level.

Whether you are a leader or employ-
ee, when considering developing your
fellow employees you should take a
long hard look in the mirror. Ask
yourself if you demonstrate the behay-
iors you expect from your employees
or coworkers? What is your real agen-
da? Can your team trust you? Do
you demonstrate behaviours that indi-
cate you care more about your success
than the success of others? The
answers to these questions will impact
your effectiveness.

e Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational
Soul, an HR Consulting and Leadership
Development company. If you are inter-
ested in exploring how you can create
higher performing team leaders, you
contact her at www.orgsoul.com.

Sir Lynden Pindling.”

Mr Darling alleges that in the hay-
days of the United Bahamian Party
(UBP), there existed instances of rum
running, and the stealing of land,
which he said should be written about
if the overall intent by Mr Marquis
was to identify corruption and wrong
doing.

“If you weigh the good against the
bad, Sir Lynden has done a lot of
good, and the whole talk about him is
not relevant at this time...and he
‘John Marquis’ is just a journalist look-
ing for some boost in his career.”

Patron Keith Baker from Stapleton
Gardens explained, that just because
Sir Lynden was at the helm of the
helm of the Bahamas’ independence,
all Bahamians should react to the
recent articles identifying him as a
crony of the Colombian drug lord Mr
Lehder.

“Sir Lynden has done a whole lot in
the Bahamian community, and when
you find someone from the outside
coming and mentioning negative
things about him, then the whole
Bahamian community is going to
react.

“Even if it’s relevant or not, Sir Lyn-
den is our forefather and we don’t
care or give a squat what he might
have done.”

Proprietor 33-year-old Cameron
Lubin from Fox Hill added, that apart
from this issue being irrelevant at this
time, there is a negative message that
many young people are getting.

“Young people are now thinking
that it pays off to do wrong, although
we are not condoning that behaviour,
I think more scrutiny needs to go into
articles on our leaders.”

Patron 27-year-old Jamal Strachan,
said nine years after Sir Lynden’s
death is too late to attempt to bring
shame on his name or that of his fam-
ily.

“Whatever he did then, even if it
comes out that it was so, you really
have to just leave him in God’s hands
because we all gat to be judged for
ourselves.”

On the issue of whether Sir Lynden
was Bahamian or not, Mr Strachan
said it is another closed minded view
on life practiced by many Bahamians.

Mr Strachan said: “It doesn’t matter
where a person is from, as long as they
are doing things for the people like
Pindling and even like President Oba-
ma, it shouldn’t matter.”

I just feel at the end of the day, all
politicians need to be held account-
able for whatever they do, a lot of
these MPs feel they are so high and
mighty and are not suppose to answer
to the people, and that is wrong.”

Mr Strachan said as long as MPs are
more responsible for their actions and
are truly operating for the good of the
people, then there would be no reason
to debate someone’s practice after
they are dead and gone.

¢ To comment on this topic or to have
your barber shop featured in a future arti-
cle, lallen@tribunemedia.net.

“Mr Tynes
has no clo-
sure, they
have still not
found the
body, but
what they
gat to realise
is Chauncey
Tynes Jr did
some things
that wasn’t
fu td eee

da Lets)

“Young
people are
Paton nvmd ovbavsebareg
that it pays
off to do
wrong,
although we
are not
(crop ateloy avn etss
that behav-
iour, I think
more scrutiny
needs to go
into articles
on our .”

CAMERON LUBIN



“Tt doesn’t
matter
aa aKe) wears
person is
from, as long
PISMO OC eaar TA
doing things
for the peo-
ple like Pin-
dling and
Aare DNs
President
Obama, it
shouldn’t
matter.”

JAMAL STRACHAN

Histatussin DM

_ Spa-la-la party

FROM page 12

“Just playing around and
doing fun girl stuff with my
daughter inspired me. I
thought about doing a spa
party for little girls,” Mrs Paul
said

Mrs Paul’s daughter,
Gabrielle, said she enjoys the
parties and that most of her
friends describe the party as
their best party ever.

“The most enjoyable part
for me is the relaxing part of
soaking my feet for a pedi-
cure with rose petals in the
water and applying the straw-
berry whipped cream facial
mask. I also like listening to
the spa music playing which is
like ocean sounds etc. I liked
that there were kids’ maga-
zines to look at and enjoy,
and that I got to wear a nice
robe,” Gabrielle said.

Mrs Paul said the young
ladies also get body and foot
scrubs. Girls can make their
own lotion, as well as tiara
shaped place cards in spa kit.

“They can get a chocolate
mask and strawberry masks-
it’s basically just whip cream.
Most of them even like to eat
it off so it has very kid friend-
ly ingredients,” Mrs Paul said.

Mrs Paul said she eventu-
ally would like to turn her
business into a store so that
little girls and their moms can
have access to everything for
a girl’s world.

“JT do someday want to turn
it into a store whereas I would
be able to have the parties in
the store and retail girly items
as well. I think spa parties are
great for any occasion- espe-
cially sleepovers for little girls.
I have clients who expressed
that it is different, fun and
small. We do not cater to
more than 12 girls and a min-
imum of 4 to 5, just so the
child can have more of her
closer friends enjoying a spa
day with her,” Mrs Paul said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



COUGH SUPPRESSANT & RESPIRATORY DECONGESTANT










THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT k 4 = ([f7

5-Day FORECAST

TUESDAY, MARCH 24tTn, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST





















































y aa ~ Today Wednesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
yy | oe = — v as High = Low W High =Low W NASSAU Today: E at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
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“ a ~ A \W@ Low | MODERATE | HIGH |v. HIGH Amsterdam 46/7 37/2 sh 49/9 40/4 + Wednesday: E at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
———~ ORLANDO \ Ankara, Turkey 52/11 28/-2 pe 82/11 34/1 pe ABACO ‘Today: E at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Ai eh ree ppd Variable clouds, a Partly cloudy, a Sunny and windy. Mostly sunny and Mostly sunny, breezy Partly sunny, breezy The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 58/14 49/9 s 60/15 41/5 sh Wednesday: E at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
0 Lew:56°FA2°C Ya ss shower; windy. shower; windy. nice. and warm. and warm. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 69/20 55/12 s 68/20 55/12 s
4 : : ; val. 770 vay: 7Q° tah: 99° Tay: OO Bangkok 92/33 78/25 pc 91/382 78/25 t
; - @ lle. High: 77 High: 79 High: 82 High: 85 Bases Scam
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TAMPA be i High: 78 Low: 68 Low: 66 Low: 70 Low: 71 Low: 70 SESS Barcelona 63/17 44/6 s sis 50/10 pc VA a
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High: 82° F/28° C ey ¢ 7A°-66° F 76°-69° F 81°-71° F High HtL(ft.) Low Ht ty — Belling SH2 26/2" pe SB BERS
Low: 57° F/14°C ! -. ee The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 7:07am. 26 12:49am. 0.2 ae se ae 2 vulils ae _
ie @ 0 on elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 7:19pm. 2.7 1:07 p.m. 0.1 an e 30/3 97/-2 2m 37/2 30/-1 ;
: \ - -
| 2 , as Cee Wednesday’40am. 26 33am. 00 Bermuda 59/15 51/10 sh 61/16 55/12 sh
4 a | 759p.m. 28 1:45pm. 0.0 Bogota 65/18 48/8 sh 66/18 48/8 r
A i. ad Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday 82am. 27 2i5am. 00 Brussels 46/7 36/2 sh 48/8 36/2 +
( 4 ABACO Temperature 8:38 p.m. 3.0 2:23pm. -0.1 Budapest 47/8 27/-2 © 48/8 34/1 s
f i: i. High: 74° F/23° C HIGH sistance ea taaeaen, 75° F/24° C Friday 04am. 27 267am. 01 Buenos Aires 84/28 66/18 s 84/28 68/20 s
” 7 LOW vce 66° F/19° C y ‘ : . Cairo 70/21 54/12 pc 73/22 57/13 s
ra y ll. > Low: 59° F/15°C Normal high 80° F/26° C aha Calcutta 96/35 78/25 pc 94/34 77/25 s
oS ES
is . Normal low . 66° F/19° C Calgary 41/5 21/-6 pe 25/-3 15/-9 sn
poe , @ WEST PALM BEACH a . Last year's High... ssnsrsreneensse 86° F/30° C SUN Ay Ty yf Cancun 32/27 64/17 pc 86/30 67/19 s
Low: 64° F/18°C a Precipitation ug er 7 a.m. La bib - am. Casablanca 76/24 62/6 pc 80/26 55/12 pc 76/52
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .o..0..c.ceecceceeeeeeee 0.00" unsel....... -4op.m. Moonset..... “40 p.m. Copenhagen 37/2 31/0 pc 40/4 33/0 sh .
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date New First Full Last Dublin 52/11 44/5 5 5010 415 pc
RE @ High: 73° F/23° C Normal year to date oo... 4.72" den j Frankfurt 48/8 34/1 sh 43/6 36/2 r
ow: 65° F/18° i 7 Low:57°F/14°C APE: Geneva 38/3 33/0 sh 37/2 36/2 sn
“han AccuWeather.com wa Halifax 35/1 24/-6 sn 30/3 26/-3 pc aa
he @ AY Forecasts and graphics provided by S ; Negi Havana 81/27 61/16 pe 84/28 61/16 s Showers 79/67
S MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.26 Apr. 2 pr. 9 Apr. 17 Helsinki 27/-2 16/-8 c 28/-2 12/-11 pe T-storms
=» High: 79° F/26° C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 77/25 64/17 t 72/22 66/18 Rain Cold Gents.
AY Low: 64° F/18°C NASSAU High: TT’ F/2s° c Islamabad 80/26 59/15 1 82/27 56/13 ¢ Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Warm X High: 78° F/26°C Low:61° FA6°C Istanbul 57/13 44/6 s 56/13 36/2 + Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. a
> Low: 68° F/20°C Jerusalem 5140 41/5 sh 58/14 415 s Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. tatlonary Mengeaih-
a4 : Johannesburg 76/24 54/12 pc 75/23 54/12 pc
@ Kingston 82/27 72/22 sh gd/28 73/22 sh -os 0s!) 10s (20s (BOS!) 40s
WE CATISLAND
High: 78° F/26° C YX \N —_ = 3 -s Lima 83/28 65/18 pc 83/28 65/18 ¢
Low: 68° F/20°C High: 75° F/24” London 52/11 41/5 s 52/11 39/3 sh
4 @ Low: 59° F/15°C Madrid 70/21 37/2 s 72/22 37/2 s
Manila 91/32 77/25 c 86/30 75/23 +r
-* Mexico City 81/27 52/11 t 77/25 49/9 t O IN| S IN| a
ie oe Monterrey 95/35 66/18 pc 95/35 67/19 s AUT U RA E
_ GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 39/3 19/-7 s 45/77 37/2 s
r High: 77° F/25° C Hi h:77° F/25°C Moscow 32/0 25/-3 sn 36/2 27/-2 sn
vv“ Low:67°F/19°C Lewe2°FATC Munich 36/2 32/0 sn 35/1 33/0 sn
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ANDROS ; Nairobi 90/32 57/13 s 90/32 57/13 s

highs and tonights's lows.



a oO o “om ‘ce ma “on Gus Never start your |
5 5 5 MMOmlMe VV.
Praae 38/3 30/-1 a 36/2 33/0 a CNAME It O t US °



LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 80/26 74/23 80/26 72/22 +
High: 78° F/26° C Riyadh 89/31 62/16 s 77/25 60/15 pc
Ceara erie: MAYAGUANA aT ee ee ee ee outo Insurance,
t. Thomas s s = + aca 44 < 2
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday = ny VE
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W i High: 80° F/27° C oF a aia rs a oe Toman smart oe 1S
Fic F/C FIC FIC Fic F/C Fic FIC Fic F/C Fic FIC Low: 62° F/17°C an aly ad or 8 pe nsurance MI anagemen ’
Albuquerque 6146 37/2 po 61/16 37/2 s Indianapolis 68/20 52/11 pe 5945 426 t Philadelphia 4718 320 s 52/11 36/2 s Santiago 84/28 52/11 s 86/30 50/10 s ~ . Race
Anchorage 32/0 24/-4 ¢ 36/2 25/-3 sn Jacksonville 73/22 53/11 pc 73/22 57/13 pc Phoenix 78/25 5412 s 81/27 S5/12 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 82/27 66/18 sh 82/27 66/18 sh Smart p ople you can trust.
Atlanta 68/20 5140 pc 6146 53/11 sh KansasCity 58/14 35/1 t 5915 41/5 s Pittsburgh 55/12 32/0 s 56/13 42/5 sh RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:82°F/28°c = _ Te orm: pe pers ca ¢ De F MO :
Atlantic City 4677 24/-4 s 5010 34/1 s Las Vegas 72/22 47/8 s 75/23 53/11 s Portland,OR 53/41 40/4 c 53/11 36/2 sh High: 79° F/26° C Low: 64° F/18°C eaaUnal Oa pe SaBUEDEI C ——
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Charleston, SC 71/21 50/10 pc 66/18 56/13 pc Memphis 72/22 52/11 c 66/18 5241 pc SanAntonio 78/25 59/15 pc 75/23 65/18 t High:81°F/27°C Tan cE SeSTETTES I LJ] (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
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Detroit B42 38/3 c 53/11 40/4 + New York 46/77 36/2 s 52/41 40/4 s Tampa 82/27 60/15 po 80/26 63/17 pc hy winnipeg 94/1 28/5 sn S04. AEE oh ‘ nin ees
Honolulu 81/27 70/21 pc 80/26 69/20 pc Oklahoma City 66/18 38/3 pce 61/16 44/6 pc Tucson 75/23 45/7 § 76/24 47/8 s VW es : _ 7 7 _
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THE TRIBUNE

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A MAJORFreeport retailer, owned by publicly-listed Freeport Concrete, lateyesterday announced it was laying-off 21 staff, with its chairman and landlord agreeing to “subsidise the rent for the next several months” to aid its profitability and prevent more redundancies. Ray Simpson, chief executive of BISX-listed Freeport Concrete, said the lay-offs took place yesterday with immediate effect, with another worker taking early retirement. He explained that the down sizing was related to the worsening condition of the Freeport economy, and the need for both Freeport Concrete and the Home Centre to further reduce costs after paring back its monthly operating expenses to the “bare N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Bodies of missing boys found at sea C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.101TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDS, SHOWER HIGH 78F LOW 68F F E A T U R E S S EEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S Spa La La Party SEEPAGEELEVEN Debbie third in the 400m n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net TRAGEDY befell a close-knit community after the lifeless bod ies of two missing boys were pulled from the waters off Adelaide Beach yesterday. The community, which mounted a neighbourhood search for the boys, was left grief-stricken and filled with questions after the sudden deaths of the two youth. The boys, best friends Rovan Smith, 9, and Craig Stubbs, 10, were reported missing Sunday evening. According to reports, the boys pulled a small blue skiff, which reportedly had a hole in the bottom, from the bushes before taking it out to sea. It is believed the boys drowned in the rough tide which carried them out into the current. Shortly after 11 am yesterday, screams of anguish rang through the air as Rovan's body was brought ashore by a neighbour hood search party, which included area MP Kendal Wright, his face bloody from an apparent Community grief-stricken after tragic end to search The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR D OUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com B AHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas is likely to hold off on reacting to the controversial political situation in the Turks and Caicos until the island’s governing and oppo sition parties “come to a unified position” on the United Kingdom’s dras tic announcement, it has been sug g ested. PLP MP and former foreign affairs minister Fred Mitchell, who met with opposition People’s Democratic Movement (PDM idenciales, Turks and Caicos on Sun day, said the PDM do not want to be seen to downplay serious accusations of corruption levelled at the governing party by the British byv oicing objection to the recommendation that democratic governance be suspended for two years in the twin island nation. “On the ground many of their supporters feel that what the British did in terms of the corruption issues are correct. The opposition want to be careful that they don’t be seen, when arguing for democratic governance, that they don’t end up supporting government on the corruption issue. They need to sort out how they can approach that issue,” said Mr Mitchell. Last week the UK, which has been conducting a Commis sion of Inquiry into rampant allegations of corruption in the British Overseas Territory, announced that it intends to sus pend the executive and legislative branches of the TCI GovEMOTIONAL R ELATIVES o f 1 0-year-old C raig Stubbs come ashore as a neighbourhoods earch party looks for his body. SEEPAGETWO FORMOREPHOTOS T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page seven F ORMER PREMIER Michael Misick officially stood downy esterday. (AP The Bahamas ‘likely to wait for unified position in Turks and Caicos’ before decision SEE page six Major Freeport retailer to la y off 21 of its staff n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter NEARLY two decades after a devastating car crash left him crippled for life, a former local basketball star is still seeking justice. Lawyers for former local basketball star Daniel Williams, have filed a “notice of motion” in the Supreme Court seeking an order to have SEE page six Sever ely injur ed for mer basketball star still seeking justice 19 years on SEE page eight n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net SPARKS could fly today when a group of disgruntled locals attempt to stage a “big birthday bash” on Atlantis’ private Cove Beach in protest of what they say are “apartheid like” restrictions placed on access to the beach by the resort’s owners. Locals to attempt to stage party on private Atlantis beach today SEE page seven n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A DIABETIC woman whose life was put at risk when she was given out-of-date medication by a government-run pharmacy is concerned hundreds of others may also be in danger. Insulin given to the 44-year-old by the pharmacy in Elizabeth Estates expired in October 2007, more than a year before it was given to her in February and again last week. The woman has been diabetic for 20 years and is totally depen dent on insulin injections two to three times a day to control sugar levels in her bloodstream. But when she took the expired insulin in February, her blood sugar levels shot up, making her feel nauseous, light-headed and with cramps in her legs. Confused by how her blood sugar could be rising, the Nassau woman removed starch and sugar from her diet, but her blood sugar levels continued to soar. After three weeks of feeling ill, the mother-of-two bought more insulin at a private pharmacy and her blood sugar levels soon Diabetic woman given out-of-date medication SEE page six n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net TRIBUNE Managing Editor John Marquis, in a radio inter view yesterday, hit out at critics who have called for his removal over a controversial Insight article published on Monday, March 9. Mr Marquis told Jeff Lloyd, on Star 106.5FM’s “Jeffrey”, that he will not be intimidated by threats to remove his work permit for simply doing his job. His investigative article sparked controversy when the Insight article entitled, “The tragic young pilot who knew too much”, was published two weeks ago, as it linked the mysterious disappearance of pilot Chauncey Tynes Jr in 1983 with former leader Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling and his connection to drug czar Carlos “Joe” Lehder. Fervent supporters of Sir Lynden as “Father of the Nation” protested outside The Tribune’s Shirley Street offices last TuesManaging Editor of Tribune hits out at critics calling for his removal SEE page eight

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net OFFICIALS and the media got a first-hand look at a United States Air Force C-1 hurricane hunter plane at the Lynden Pindling International Airport yesterday during the Caribbean Hurricane Awareness Tour. T he aircraft, operated by US Air Force reserve officers, flies at about 10,000 feet above the eye of a hurricane. This allows meteorologists and storm trackers to get a forecast which is 20 to 30 per cent more accurate thano ne which is reached by just using satellites alone. This accuracy is particularly important in gauging a storm's path and analysing potential evacuation areas, officials said. W W e e a a p p o o n n "Hurricane hunters are like our biggest weapon in our arsenal for diagnosing what's going on with a hurricane. Weo bviously use satellites to track them when they're starting up, moving across the Atlantic, but we use computer models now to make the best forecast, and the better the data we can gather, the better the initial conditions that we put into those computer forecasts. " Therefore flying the plane into the hurricane gives us that data," Bill Reid, director of the National Hurricane Centre, said after the tour yesterday. Environment Minister Earl Deveaux extended his thanks to the US government for the partnership, adding that instruments like the hurricane hunter are vital for detecting weather cond itions as early as possible to ensure the country is fully prepared. Director of the Department of Meteorology Arthur Rolle said the hurricane hunter crew has consistently provided local meteorologists with data for storm tracking. And although the upcoming storm season is predicted to be relatively mild, having accurate forecasts is essential in hurricane preparedness, Mr Rolle added. E E f f f f o o r r t t s s Colonel Dave Borsi, of the US Air-Force, said combined efforts with the US Department of Defence allows the base to operate 10 C-1 planes. He said storm tracking plays a vital role in minimising the amount of damage to life and property a hurricane can inflict. "We know sometimes that we are impacting the airwaves and airline traffic, but getting into those storms, g etting that data back is critical, it's crucial," he said. According to a member of the US’ National Hurricane Centre, only four hurricane hunters have been lost while tracking storms since the mission took off in 1944. After the official tour yesterday morning, which coincided with the 59th annual World Meteorological Day, groups of local children were scheduled to tour the aircraft before it makes stops later this week in Mexico and Trinidad and Tobago. COLONEL Dave Boris (second from the left Reserve Officers explain storm tracking pocedures to Minister of Environment Earl Deveaux during a tour of a C-1 Hurricane Hunter. n PHOTOS: Tim Clarke /Tribune staff THEHURRICANEHUNTER THE MOTHER of 10-year-old Craig Stubbs seen supported by friends and relatives as a search party looked for her son's body. A RELATIVE holds up a photo of 10-year-old Craig Stubbs, who drowned on Adelaide Beach. GRIEF – the aftermath of the Adelaide Beach drowning tragedy. BILL REID , Director of the National Hurricane Centre in Miami, Florida, explains how critical Hurricane Hunters are in storm forecasting after touring the aircraft. PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/ Tribune staff O FFICIALSANDMEDIALOOKAT US A IR F ORCEPLANEUSEDFORTRACKINGSTORMS GRIEFOVERDROWNINGTRAGEDY A UNITED STATES Coast Guard helicopter patrolled the Adelaide Beach area yesterday in search of best friends Rovan Smith, 9, and Craig Stubbs, 10, who were reported miss ing on Sunday evening. See story on Front Page

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n RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net RESIDENTS of West Bay Street are concerned that the construction of the New Providence Road Improvement Project’s Corridor 18, and what many feel is the impending relocation of the container port to Arawak Cay, will drastically reduce property values in the area. Minister of Works Neko Grant said his ministry has received several complaints from residents about the project and is in the process of responding. However, he pointed out that all of the appropriate notices were posted and no part of the road improvement plans have changed. “Personally I think it is a bit of overreaction on the part of some people and at the end of the day we have to look at what’s best for the common good,” Mr Grant said. On December 15 last year, the NPRIP was relaunched with the signing of a contract for completion of the road works between the government of the Bahamas and Jose Cartellone Construction Company. Funding for the project was provided from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB in the amount of $100 million. Corridor 18, which com mences on West Bay Street andc ontinues along to Saunders B each, will cost $2.3 million. W illiam Wong, president of the Bahamas Real Estate Association, said that there was no real way to actually determine how the situation will affect property values at this point. Even the affect the place m ent of the container port at Arawak Cay would have on property values in the area would depend heavily on the re-routing of the roads and how it would alleviate traffic in that area,” he said. S S o o l l u u t t i i o o n n While Mr Wong said that it was a good decision for gov ernment to remove the con-t ainer ports from the Bay Street a rea, he added that the ideal s olution would have been to place the facilities in the Clifton Cay area. “There is just no way of knowing how it’s going to impact the people in the area,t hat’s if it’s not re-routed prop e rly. This would affect the whole Grove, Perpall Tract and Vista Marina area,” Mr Wong said. Minister for the Environment Earl Deveaux said that when the Inter-American Development Bank and government went into discussions about the NRIP, there were a number of environmental issues addressed particularly surrounding the Perpall Tract well fields. In order to mitigate these environmental issues a protected area was proposed to secure the integrity of the well fields. “The road corridors were agreed upon based on a consensus that this would cause minimum environmental impact. Corridor 18 was the best way we could prevent any serious environment or economic impact to the area along with providing a huge public space at Saunder’s Beach,” the minister said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 3 INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News...............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports...............................................P9,10,11 Advt .........................................................P12 BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION Business.........................................P1,2,3,4,5 Comics........................................................P6 Advt............................................................P7 Woman...........................................P8,9,10,12 Weather.....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES K iwanians u rged to attend March 2 6 meeting Cuba: US embargo ‘still standing’ despite law In brief The Kiwanis Club of OverThe-Hill’s weekly meeting will be held on Thursday, March 26 at 8pm at Holy Cross Community Centre on Soldier Road. Philip Stubbs, chairman of the Securities Commission of the Bahamas, will address the club. He will speak about the Securities Commission, its role and challenges. District governor Sharon Dunn will be visiting the club. All Kiwanians and their guests are welcome to attend. Plunging property value fears Concern over building of New Providence Road Improvement Project’s Corridor 18 Neko Grant Earl Deveaux NEW Providence is experiencing a significant water shortage which has resulted in the suspen sion of services, particularly in the southern part o f the island. T he Water and Sewerage Corporation report ed yesterday that the capital’s water supply is presently being “severely negatively” impacted by strong sea swells. The swells, which are expected to subside by today or tomorrow, are preventing the movement of the vessel MT Titus, which provides around 30 per cent of the New Providence’s water supply. As a consequence, water conservation measures are being taken in the form of reduction in pressure during the overnight hours and during the daytime off-peak hours in some areas. The corporation said that it will do all in its power to limit these conservation measures. How ever, the severity and length of time that these measures will remain in place is subject to the ear ly restoration of the daily shipping operation. Residents of southern New Providence, including but not limited to the communities of Gold en Gates, South Beach, Pinewood Gardens and surrounding areas, reported that they had no water yesterday morning. “Corporation personnel have restored supplies to those affected areas and will work to avoid a recurrence today. “The corporation sincerely apologises for the i nconvenience this is causing our customers and w e are working to restore our supply to normal operating levels at the earliest opportunity,” the WSC said in a press statement. B B a a r r g g e e The MT Titus usually makes one trip per day, bringing around three million gallons of water to the capital. However, since last Thursday, the barge has only been able to make two trips to New Providence. The last trip was on Saturday. “Presently our system demand is approximately 10.5 million imperial gallons per day and our New Providence supply sources (desalination plants and well-fields) total approximately nine million imperial gallons per day, therefore with out the daily Titus delivery there is a supply deficit of approximately 1.5 million imperial gallons per day that has to be made up via conser vation measures as our strategic storage levels (which are used to make up any short-term sup ply shortfalls) are low due to recent supply challenges,” the WSC said. Services suspended after New Providence water shortage n HAVANA Cuba’s state-controlled media on Monday downplayed eased U .S. rules on family ties with Cuba, calling the measure a d efeat for the communist government’s foes that still leftW ashington’s 47-year-old trade embargo intact, according to the A ssociated Press . The article in the Communist Party newspaper Granma was the first official mention of the Cuba clauses in a package signed into lawb y President Barack Obama on March 11 nearly two weeksp rior. The law rolled back limits on family travel and remittances i mposed by the Bush Adminis tration, effectively allowing Americans with relatives in Cuba to visit once a year, stay as long as they wish and spend u p to $179 a day. The changes only remain in effect until thef iscal year ends Sept. 30. Granma said the changes represent the first setback for the anti-Cuban mafia and its representatives in Congress,” but added that “in practice, they don’t affect the siege that succ essive administrations have maintained against our people.” U .S. law still bars most trade with and travel to Cuba. These steps don’t restore the rights of Cuban residents of the United States to travel freely to Cuba or approve the rights of citizens of that country t o visit a neighboring island,” it said. President Barack Obama h as said he is open to talks with Cuban leaders, though he said h e does not yet favor lifting the U.S. embargo. Cuban officials have sometimes criticized Obama, but have been far less hostile than they were toward exPresident George W. Bush.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. To The Tribune Staff and the People of the Bahamas concerning the events that took place T uesday, March 17th, outside t he Tribune building: The political passion within the Bahamian people is absolutely praise worthy. However, even the most earnest and honestly well meant intentions come to nothing if they are misdirected. I am familiar with both The Trib une’s reporting of the occasion, a s well as Mr. Lincoln Bain’s coverage in his show ‘Controversy T , and it seems that what is r eally at issue is the residing discontent within the Black Bahamian population with the “ other” ; the perceived foreign oppressor. A s Mr. Bain rightly pointed out, “For some out here [at the p rotest], this is the Bahamas, verses the old colonist government of E ngland.” T he cruelty and injustice of Colonialism is undeniable, and that it is perhaps the single most disruptive and lingering crimesa gainst all of humanity I should think makes it a matter of cont ention for the Bahamian people, and rightly so. But perhaps it w ould be better if the people of this country keep in mind that it was not a crime exclusive to either Bahamians, or Africans but to all non-Anglo (and non-Franco for that matter) peoples of the Earth, regardless of particular ethnicity, and thus is not a matter that can effectively be addressed o n a merely local level. The outrage of the Bahamian people at the comments made against Sir Lynden Pindling were,I think, not so much the result of any unjust allegations (or facts but that some ‘non-Bahamian’ , some ‘white Englishman’ Mr. Marquis made them. The B ahamian people disregard Mr. Marquis’s residence within the country, as well as his contribu tions to the society through The Tribune. Because he is white the Bahamian people refuse to accept him as a Bahamian. Though he is not my concern, it is perhaps understandable then if he him s elf retains his British heritage; in fact there is little else he can do against such a single-minded prejudiced society. The society remains limited in this manner simply because it cannot move past the injustices in its history. This is by no means pleading the case for the British Government, or saying that what they did should be forgotten. Quite the opposite. But if Bahamians want to address these problems and move forward intoa progressive future, then they must actually aim their discontent appropriately, and the appropriate focus of such an address is not with small local figures like M r Marquis. The Queen of England, Elizabeth II, is still, even now, the Supreme Leader and Head of the Bahamas, as her successors were b efore her. Undemocratically she r emains sovereign over all the Bahamian people; a position g uaranteed her by the crimes of Her past government, and the s hort-sightedness of the Bahamian people themselves. W hether or not Mr Marquis comes or goes that fact remains a nd if Bahamians sincerely wish to finally rid themselves of the bitter taste of an oppressive and unremorseful regime, then what they need to do is dispose of thatu seless heirloom which, within a single individual, signifies all thec rimes against the Bahamian people, as well as their fellow o ppressed globally. I would like to say that I trust, but I sincerely hope that this country’s children do not have to live under the same oppression t hat our parents and their parents before them had to liveu nder. Until that day I remain. S .C.B. Nassau, March 20, 2009. (This letter writer dwells on t he so-called past crimes committed against this country and i ts people by the British Govern ment and its monarch. It would b e interesting to know what these crimes were and to balance them against the tremendous heritage the British left this country from the day in 1717 when Woodes R ogers, the first Royal governor, drove out the pirates and restored c ommerce. Later administrations instituted a system of education, e stablished the Westminster system of parliamentary government and gave us a judiciary of which at one time we could be proud. (Often it was the British administrator who protected black Bahamians against the bru-t ality of their own, both black and white. And that is where history becomes clouded when persons who know little about our history presume to pontificate. ( We recommend the reading of the “Land of the Pink Pearl,” a b ook written by L D Powles, a barrister-at-law of the Inner Temple and magistrate in the Bahamas in the late 19th century. As this book was banned for dis tribution in the Bahamas because of its subject matter and the personalities involved, we do not know if a copy is available at the Nassau Public Library. (Before Magistrate Powles, an Irishman, took up his post here in the late 19th century he readily admitted: “When I left England I knew next to nothing of the coloured race, and I do not suppose I had exchanged a dozen words with a black man or woman in my life.” (When he arrived in the Bahamas he determined to remedy this omission as he was “sincerely anxious to do them justice.” He said that he “took every a vailable means to acquaint” himself with their “true character, and the conditions under which they lived.” “It did not surprise me,” he wrote, “to find that assaults by men upon women were very common among them, knowing how common they are among our own l ower classes at home, but I t hought they were too leniently dealt with in the Police Court in N assau.” ( His mistake was that he was determined to right that wrong. One day he announced from the bench that he would send any m an who came before him for assaulting a woman straight to jail w ithout the option of a fine. In one month he sent three black m en to jail for such an assault. H owever, the following month a “delicate-looking black girl” came to him requesting equal justice. She was the servant in the homeo f a white man, who beat her, “and turned her out of doors w ithout paying her wages.” (As a true Irishman, trained i n the British tradition that all persons, regardless of race or gen der, are equal before the law, he heard her case and sentenced her white master to a month in prison. The only evidence against the master was her own word and the word of three black persons who had witnessed the beating. B lacks were delighted with the magistrate, many whites were outraged, blaming Powles for raising the race issue. Scurrilous let ters and newspaper articles were written by an influential group of Bahamians against him. Eventually a small group of powerful white locals forced him out of the c ountry a performance the PLP now wish they could repeat against Mr Marquis. The House of Assembly refused to pay Magistrate Powles’ passage back to England, leaving him in financial embarrassment. He had “started the race question, and therefore his usefulness in the colony was at a n end,” he was told. He was run out of the country “for adminis tering even-handed justice between black and white.” (When we talk about crimes against the Bahamian people we would be well advised to look to our own, not the Monarch and former British administrators. Ed). C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON (AP says it does not live or die by the ups and downso f the stock market. But others do. And on Monday, that was good for Timothy Geithner. W ith credit markets frozen, a public in high dudgeon and a Congress on a populist crusade,P resident Barack Obama's Treasury secretary n eeded a bit of an uptick. He got it Monday w hen the Dow Jones industrial average shot u p nearly 500 points after he unveiled his private-public partnership to help relieve banks o f the toxic assets that have plunged the financial system into its crisis. B ut Geithner still has lots to prove to financial markets, to Congress and to Americanss eething over executive bonuses and dimin ished 401k retirement accounts. U npaid back taxes cost him votes in the Senate during his confirmation. Bonuses for executives at embattled American International G roup Inc. drew Republican calls for his resignation. And the Wall Street that proved so f riendly on Monday could just as easily turn on him as it did last month when his broad outlines f or a rescue plan landed with a thud. No stranger to tough times, Geithner this week faces yet another test of his short Cabinet tenure. The multi-tasking Geithner is not only rolling out a new relief plan for banks, he's also juggling an overhaul of the regulatory regime for the financial sector, facing a couple of potent ially contentious hearings before Congress, and planning the agenda for the April 2 summito f top foreign leaders in London. So far, so good. " He fed the beast enough details to keep the beast happy today, today," said Robert Litan, senior fellow for economic studies at the Brookings Institution, emphasizing the fickle nature of the stock market. "It's a very hungry b east and it's a very forgetful beast." Last month, Obama in a televised news conf erence promised Geithner would unveil details of a banking rescue. When Geithner offered o nly a sketch of a plan in a badly reviewed speech, the markets tanked. This time, Geithner easily spelled out details of the plan off-camera to a roomful of reporters at Treasury and granted an interview to CNBC. T hen Obama placed his own stamp on the plan, making brief televised remarks at the WhiteH ouse with Geithner and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke at his side. " This is one more element that is going to be absolutely critical in getting credit flowing a gain," Obama said. "It's not going to happen overnight. There's still great fragility in the financial systems. But we think that we are moving in the right direction." The rescue plan might still need a good sales p itch. The Dow's surge notwithstanding, Geithner and the administration are facing an ide ological attack from the left and the right. Rep. Eric Cantor of Virginia, the second-ranking Republican leader in the House, called the plan" fundamentally flawed." "In it's current form, Secretary Geithner's p lan is a shell game that hides the true cost of the programme from the taxpayers that will bea sked to pay for it," Cantor said. A nd liberal economist Paul Krugman, whose v iews as a columnist for The New York Times i nfluence opinion in Congress, said the plan was "more than disappointing" in his Monday c olumn. "In fact," he added, "it fills me with a sense of despair." He called for the governm ent to take temporary control of insolvent banks. "That's what Sweden did in the early1 990s," he wrote. The Obama administration has not hidden its d isdain for Krugman's criticisms, and Geithner made his clear on Monday. "We are the United States of America," he said tartly. "We are not S weden." Moreover, Congress's attempts to rein in c ompensation for companies that receive finan cial aid has made some private investors wary of e ntering into a partnership with the federal gov ernment. Geithner will be walking that tight rope today when he testifies before the House Financial Services Committee. The hearing is billed as an examination of the $165 million in bonus payments made last week to employees of AIG's Financial Products divis ion. The House last week overwhelmingly approved legislation setting a 90 per cent tax onb onuses for employees of firms that receive financial aid. Over the weekend, Obama's econ omic team warned of possible dangers with such a targeted tax measure. Geithner, doubtless, will be asked to explain. Sitting with Geithner at the witness table will be Bernanke and William Dudley, president a nd CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The Fed, a source of AIG's federal assis-t ance, was aware of the bonuses and concluded they were legally binding. O n Thursday, Geithner will testify before the House Financial Services Committee again, this time to unveil the administration's pro posed overhaul to financial sector regulations. The administration and Congress and working o n a series of fronts, including increased over sight and controls of previously unregulatedm arkets such as hedge and private equity funds. Lawmakers and the administration also have e mbraced the idea of an overarching regulator, such as the Fed, that would oversee financial f irms that could pose risks to the entire banking system. Risk has become the by-word of the current financial crisis. As Geithner emphasized Monday, too much risk caused it, too little risk is perpetuating it. And for Geithner, ther isks don't seem to end. (This article was written by Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press Writer). Bahamians should not focus discontent on Mr Marquis LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Geithner scores points, faces more risks :$17('$)(:*22''5,9(56 EDITOR, The Tribune. Re: There’s no such thing as a black racist (Tribune March 17, 2009). Ever heard of Rwanda? KEN W KNOWLES, MD Nassau, March 17, 2009. Racism and Rwanda

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A HIGH-SPEEDchase in t he area of Pride Estates on S unday night led to a police o fficer shooting and killing an unidentified gunman. The incident occurred after 9pm when a concerned citizen called the police control room to report that his car had been hit by a white Cadillac while driving along John F Kennedy Drive. T he caller told police that the Cadillac did not stop, but kept on driving. Police then dispatched a u nit to investigate. The officers caught up to the Cadillac on Fire Trail R oad and tried to stop the c ar. H owever, the driver of the Cadillac kept going and eventually turned into Allen Drive in Pride Estates and drove to t he end of that road. The p olice gave chase. A fter the Cadillac came to a standstill, two men got of the car. The passenger produced a firearm, Asst Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna said. The armed man reportedly started shooting at the police and the officers returned fire,h itting the man in the upper torso and fatally wounding him. None of the police officers w ere injured during the gunfight. Police are still searching for t he other person in the Cadill ac. A n island-wide manhunt has been launched, Mr Hanna said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 5 )25$/(:(//(67$%/,6+(' )851,785(t $33/,$1&(%86,1(666(5,286,148,5,(6 21/<&$// )25)857+(5,1 P ATIENTS are praising dramatic improvements at Princess Margaret Hospital’s public pharmacy. T he improvements follow a string of complaints published in The Tribune over r ecent weeks about poor service and long delays. H ealth Minister Dr H ubert Minnis has respond ed to public calls for better service with new openingh ours and extra staff. A ctivist Rodney Moncur, who voiced concern about the pharmacy several weeksa go, said: “There is no doubt things are much better now.I applaud Dr Minnis for r esponding so quickly.” The pharmacy is now open from 8am-9pm on weekdays (9am-1pm on Sat u rdays) with a drop-off ser vice between 8am-noon and collections up to 9pm. Patients’ representative Michelle Ferguson was on hand yesterday to explain the improved services and t ake names of senior citizens and disabled persons await ing medication. S he and colleague Lydia Adderley are among staff who will ensure patients’ concerns are addressed. One patient said yesterday: “Things are much more smooth and professionaln ow.” A wheelchair ramp has also been installed to improve access for disabled patients. THE Bahamas Association o f Consulting Engineers said it is “very pleased” that an agreement has been reached with the Chinese government to make the Baha Mar development project a reality. Said the association in a statement: “We recognise t hat this milestoneunderstanding between the concerned parties could not have materialised at a more auspicious moment in time. Notwithstanding the agreements are preliminary at this juncture, the organisation desires to see this project m ove forward expeditiously.” The association said it hopes that during the preliminary agreement discussions with the Chinese government, the question of local engineers contributing to the project will be raised. It said engineering cons ulting firms are ready to partner with Baha Mar, the Chinese government, and the Bahamas government to move the multi-billion resort project forward. Bahamas Association of Consulting Engineers pleased with Chinese Baha Mar agreement PMH improvements praised by patients In brief THEBODY of the unidentified gunman is removed from the scene on Sunday night. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Gunman shot dead by police after car chase W INNER OF THE 12TH ANNUAL BAHAMAS NATIONAL SPELLING BEE COMPETITION Abeni Deveaux, an eighth grade student of St Augustine's College is pictured on Sunday, March 22, 2009 at SuperClubs Breezes. Also pictured from left are Kevin Basden, gen e ral manager of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Minister of Education Carl Bethel, permanent secretary Elma Garraway and act ing director of Education Lionel Sands. P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S Abeni Deveaux creates a buzz at spelling bee

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injury to the head. Around 2.30 pm yesterday Defence Force officers found Craig's lifeless body about a quarter mile out to sea. When The Tribune arrived at the scene yesterday morning, emotional relatives and dozens of concerned residents converged in disbelief while a neighbourhood search party of about 20 waded about a mile out to sea in the low tide for signs of the two boys. Private boats hired by family and a US Coast Guard helicopter and the RBDF also combed the area. The small blue skiff the boys used to go out to sea, had been pulled onshore the night before. Rovan's family described him as an active, fun-loving boy who enjoyed exploring the beach near his home. The third grade Claridge Primary student was an avid swimmer, his aunt Rosie told The Tribune. She said the boys went to the beach to find a crab shell for Rovan's school project on the fateful afternoon. Craig's grandmother, Barbara Morrison, said Craig lived in Victoria Gardens, but often spent the weekends with her at her Adelaide home. After working the late-shift on Saturday, she last saw Craig Sunday morning after making him breakfast. "I told him go and eat the breakfast and I make sure told him that if he going anywhere, let somebody know where he going, and the children always play right 'round here in this village". Shortly after 1 pm Sunday, she said her brother awoke her and that's when the family realised Craig, a student of Garvin Tynes Primary, was not at home. After calls around the neighbourhood, it was discovered that Rovan was also missing, which prompted a neighbourhood search on Sunday. As police arrived on the scene and tried to cordon off the area around noon, the large group, which had started to gather from early yesterday morning, became agitated. Grieving relatives loudly protested that the police should have sent divers to comb the area Sunday evening for the boys. "The people from Adelaide find their body not a police diver come out here to look fa' the body and they want to run the people from about Adelaide. I think that's really poor," said Idela Brown, a family friend. Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans commended the closeknit community for their efforts yesterday. He said police and RBDF officers responded to the call for the missing boys Sunday night, but their search proved fruitless. One resident of the area believes the boys may have seen a robbery in the area shortly before their deaths. However, ASP Evans said he was not aware of any robbery in the area on Sunday. Up to press time their deaths were classified as drownings. While an autopsy is scheduled to determine an official cause of death, police do not suspect foul play. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* )$67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP Mario Bowe the man accused of causing Williams’ injuries committed to prison for failing to obey a court order since 2006. Williams starred on the local basketball scene until a devastating accident on January 22, 1990 left him a paraplegic and ultimately changed his life forever. Williams was the front seat passenger in a Nissan Sunny carrying five young people when a big Bronco truck reportedly ran a red light on Collins Avenue and slammed into the car. Williams, then 20, suffered two broken bones in his neck in addition to spinal damage. The injury left him paralysed and confined to a wheelchair, with his hands severely contorted and his legs useless. Since then Williams has been dependent on National Insurance pay-outs and hand-outs from sympathisers. Williams won a default judgment against Bowe the truck driver and subsequently a judg ment for damages of nearly $318,000. That judgment has yet to be enforced as Mr Bowe has never appeared on an order of examination by the court to determine his assets. Lawyer Peter Maynard, who with lawyer Jason Maynard, represent Williams in the personal injury matter, a ppeared before Justice Neville Adderley yesterday afternoon on the notice of motion which was filed in January of this year. Bowe’s lawyer Damian Gomez, who appeared with Roger Gomez Jr, told the court that his client contends that he was never served with any writ, order of examinat ion or any of the other relevant documents regarding the nearly two decades old matter, despite Mr Maynard’s statements to the contrary. Mr Gomez argued yesterday that on that basis his client is entitled to have the application dismissed and all other orders set aside. Mr Maynard, however, read s everal affidavits to the court that stated occasions when Mr Bowe was allegedly served with the relevant court documents. On one occasion it was claimed that the documents were thrown at Mr Bowe’s feet after he had refused to accept them. Mr Gomez, however, submit t ed that his client contends that some of those persons were not telling the truth. He also pointed out that his client claims that he has been out of work for four years and has only $1,000 to his name. The case was adjourned to Monday, June 22, at 10 am. returned to normal. It was not until she returned to the Elizabeth Estates clinic to buy more of the medicine last week that she noticed it had expired in 2007, and realised the insulin that had made her ill in February was from the same out of date batch. She told The Tribune that she is concerned that hundreds of other diabetics might also have been taking the expired medication and their lives could be at risk. She said: “Supposing I was unable to go to the private pharmacy and kept taking the expired one, and I ended up in intensive care and dying? “For them to issue one and then another a month-and-a-half later is not right; it means a lot of persons have been issued these expired medications. “It’s carelessness. It should be picked up, and I’m sure I’m not the only person to get these expired medications.” The diabetic woman believes she was saved by paying attention to her diet, her blood sugar levels, and finding alternative medication when the previous insulin did not seem to be working. Had she not been so conscientious, she said: “I could have slipped into a coma and died.” She added: “I really got upset when I found out. “It is the Ministry of Health’s mandate to provide quality healthcare for the citizens of this country, but giving diabetics expired insulin isn’t quality healthcare. “I don’t know what’s going on. If there are other ways of saving money you don’t cut costs by putting other people’s lives at risk. “The government needs to do better, and the only way they will do something about it is to put it in the papers, because when you go to them they ignore you, and I am sure there are other people out there who have it and are unaware they have been taking it.” The Ministry of Health is investigating the incident. FROM page one Bodies of missing boys found at sea Out-of-date medication F ROM page one FROM page one Severely injured

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 7 Beach vendor Paul Rolle and Jeffrey Davis are organising the event and informed members of the media and the public, by advertisements in the press, that they will be providing water transportation to the beach for anyone who wishes to participate from 10am today. T here they plan to gather before making a public statement about their opposition to the restriction p laced on access to the beach located at the western end of Cabbage beach on Paradise Island in front of the luxurious Cove tower of the Atlantis resort. Yesterday, senior vice president of public affairs at Atlantis, Ed Fields, said Kerzner International’s position on the matter is “very clear”: That Mr Rolle “is using the emotional issue of beach access to fur ther his own selfish monetary gain.” N oting that for a number of years, Mr Rolle “has enjoyed a very lucrative contract with Atlantis, which allows him to rent umbrellas at Atlantis Beach,” the Atlantis spokesman said today’s event “is not about access to the beach.” “This is about Mr Rolle’s attempt to force us to grant him permission to rent umbrellas on The Cove Beach (and modated, the right to restrict commerce is reserved.” Mr Fields added that Atlantis “hopes that the general public is not supportive of any actions tak en by Mr. Rolle that negatively impacts the already fragile tourism industry.” In a statement delivered to The Tribune yesterday entitled, “Taking back our public beaches”, Mr Rolle and Mr Davis call on “all patriotic Bahamians to join us to secure the beaches for future generations.” Their action comes two months after an Atlantis executive, responding to similar assertions by attorney Paul Moss in a letter seen by The Tribune , noted that there is no legal requirement for Kerzner International to allow any member of the public to access beaches in front of property it owns on Paradise Island. Giselle Pyfrom, senior vice president and general counsel for the resort, told Mr Moss, who had spoken out on behalf of Mr Rolle, that she was “not able to agree” that the public has a right to “unfettered access” under the law to the Cove Beach, or to any beach attached to private property in the Bahamas. “Access to and over property that we own is a matter for our sole discretion,” she wrote. The legal counsel added that where the company does allow members of the public to access the beach, as it does on Cabbage beach, this is despite having no legal requirement to do so beyond the mean high water mark. Since that letter was published, Mr Rolle who originally asserted that “all beaches in the Bahamas are public”, called on Government to “set the record straight” in terms of the law. At the same time, he said, he is hoping for a “mas sive demonstration” at the Cove beach to protest the lack of access that has manifested itself in his removal from the property on previous occasions. ernment and allow British Governor Gordon Wetherell to run the day-to-day affairs of the country for two years. PLP leader Perry Christie, Mr Mitchell and members of the party’s foreign affairs committee, travelled to the Turks and Caicos over the weekend “to find out what their views are and how in any way we could assist.” “The government side (Progressive National Party) clearly wants some assistance (from the PDM). They’ve been quite strong about the whole issue of democratic governance, but the opposition has some concerns about things other than what Government does, matters internally. What’s left is that they have to discuss this internally and then they’ll sort out their position and they’ll let us know,” Mr Mitchell said of the outcome of the PLP meeting with the PDM. Meanwhile, former Premier Michael Misick officially stood down yesterday slightly earlier than originally planned to allow his premier-elect, Galmo Williams to take over the running of the country for the time being. In a statement announcing his departure, Mr Misick said the moment “certainly ring(s degree of finality, not only for me as your premier, but for the political and economic progress of theTurks and Caicos Islands as a whole.” He said that the move by the British will “take (TCI a time we had thought long past in which we had to endure the indignity of colonial interference with our rights as free people.” Defending his government’s achievements while in office, Mr Misick added that he would “take every step open to me” to oppose the suspension of the constitution. Mr Misick and his then premier-elect, Galmo Williams, visited Nassau last Friday to meet with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who is also on the CARICOM bureau, and Opposition members in order to raise awareness of the island’s plight. Mr Misick has described the UK’s intention, which is due to come into effect when the British present their final report on the inquiry probably by April 30 as “draconian..modern-day colonialism” and suggested other countries and international bodies should lobby the British on behalf of the Turks and Caicos. Mr Mitchell noted yesterday that while it would not be the opposition in the Bahamas, but the Government that would make any statement that should be made about the situation, the PLP is “always concerned about issues of democratic governance” and is happy to help “frame the debate” for the TCI. However, he added: “I think everyone wants us to be sensitive to the internal affairs of the country.” On Sunday Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette declined to comment on what the Government’s position on the UK’s expressed intention to impose direct rule. A spokesperson for the Prime Minister said he would not be making a statement on the issue. FROM page one Turks and Caicos PLP MP and former foreign affairs minister Fred Mitchell. FROM page one Private Atlantis beach

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TENDER NOTICESFORDIRECTORYPUBLICATIONST ENDER PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENTS The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders f rom the general public who wish to advertise in our premium spots on the 2010 Telephone Directories. I nterested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head O f fice located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be m arked, “ T ENDER FOR PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENT to the attention of: Mr. I Kirk Griffin Acting President & CEO T he Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited # 21 John F. Kennedy Drive P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas TENDER PRINTING AND DELIVERY OF T ELEPHONE DIRECTORIES The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders from experienced companies to provide services for the printing and delivery of the 2010 and 2011 Telephone Directories. I nterested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head O ffice located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. B ids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be marked, T ENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES to the attentionof: Mr. I Kirk Griffin Acting President & CEO T he Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited #21 John F. Kennedy Drive P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas TENDER GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES COVER DESIGNS The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders f rom experienced companies to provide Graphic Artist services for the 2010 Telephone Directories. Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. B ids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be m arked, “ T ENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES COVER DESIGNS to the attention of: Mr. I Kirk Griffin A cting President & CEO The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited #21 John F. Kennedy Drive P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas TENDER GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES DISPLAY ADS The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders from experienced companies or individuals to provide Graphic Artist services for the 2010 Telephone Directories. Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be marked, “ TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES DISPLAY ADS to the attention of: Mr. I Kirk Griffin Acting President & CEO The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited #21 John F. Kennedy Drive P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas TENDER CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL NARRATIVES SERVICES The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders from experienced companies or individuals to provide Creative Writing and Sectional Narratives services for the 2010 Telephone Directories. Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be marked, “ TENDER FOR CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL NARRATIVES SERVICES to the attention of: Mr. I Kirk Griffin Acting President & CEO The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited #21 John F. Kennedy Drive P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas bone” during the past two years. Mr Simpson said reducing payroll costs would free up further positive cash flow to enable the Home Centre to increase its inventory purchases. He explained that Freeport Concrete’s chairman, H annes Babak, who is also the current chair of the Grand Bahama Port Authority’s (GBPA Group Ltd affiliate, “has agreed to subsidise the rent for the next several months in an effort to help our profitability in order to keep the remaining staff employed during these hard economic times.” Mr Babak is also the Home Centre’s landlord. The retailer is also reorganising its store format to “focus on key products.” T he Home Centre lay-offs are related both to the current economic downturn and the financial condition of its parent company. Freeport Concrete’s accumulated deficit, at its financial year-end of August 31, 2008, was $5.789 million, meaning that this is the total sum it has lost ever since it came into existence. At that balance sheet date, Freeport Concrete’s external auditors, KPMG, had noted that the comp any’s current liabilities exceeded its current assets by $2.607 million. However, the company was still considered a going concern because of its positive cash flow, ability to obtain supplier credit, and generation of positive cash flow. The company subsequently incurred a 2009 first quarter loss that almost trebled to $220,000, a 197 per cent increase against the prior year’s $74,000 loss. In a previous interview with Tribune Business, Mr Simpson explained that Freeport Concrete was still plagued by the need to raise additional capital to finance inventory purchases for its Home Centre retail format. Currently, Mr Simpson said the outlet was losing business because it was unable to purchase enough stock to meet customer demand. “We need more cash,” he told Tribune Business yesterday. “It’s as simple as that. If we don’t get it, we will keep running out of inventory in the Home Centre. Without the cash, we can’t get the inventory we need.” Mr Simpson wrote in his first quarter note to shareholders: “A key factor affecting our financial performance is that we need to raise additional capital to be able to purchase more inventory, which will drive up sales at the Home Centre. “Despite the poor economic climate in Grand Bahama, we see that there is still business we could get. However, we are losing sales because we are constantly running out of inventory due to the fact that our foreign vendors are not giving us the same level of credit we enjoyed prior to the recession in the US. and our operating line of credit at the bank is fully utilised.” day in a demonstration organised by PLP constituency hopeful Paul Moss to condemn the British editor for abusing his “privilege” of free speech by discrediting the legacy of Sir Lynden. However, Mr Marquis argued that freedom of speech is a right, not a privilege. He said: “I am a working journalist doing my job and if you think free speech is a privilege you have a problem. “Free speech is a right under the law, not a privilege, and Mr Moss, who I gather is some kind of lawyer, ought to know these things.” Mr Marquis defended his article as telling the story of an upstanding Bahamian, Chauncey Tynes Sr, who approached him seeking justice for his son. It was not a story, said Mr Marquis, that he had gone in search of. And justice, he said, is hard to come by in the Bahamas where a number of ordinary citizens are denied the right to a fair trial because of the way political, religious and masonic affiliations have had a profoundly detrimental affect on the judicial system. Mr Marquis said: “Ordinary B ahamians come to me to look for justice and I have given them justice in a form several times, and they thank me for it. “This story was not sought by me, this story came to me from an ordinary Bahamian man who wanted to get something off his chest, and he came to me because h e knew that he could trust me, and that trust has been built up.” Newspapers, and particularly The Tribune , is an institution dedicated to fighting the cause of the ordinary man, Mr Marquis said. And although his article has ignited emotive responses from S ir Lynden’s faithful followers, Mr Marquis said he has heard little factual evidence to disprove any of the allegations made against the former leader. He said: “Not a single contem porary of Sir Lynden has actually come out to defend him other than Perry Christie who has made a statement which is in total contradiction of everything he said 25 years before. “And the reason is because it is indefensible, and I think it has had a very detrimental affect on Bahamian society.” He argued that the role of the press is to report things, comment o n things, and to tell the truth, to make people think, stimulate inquiry, reaction, and to get response. He said: “If it was not for The Tribune this country would have gone belly-up a long time ago, because The Tribune keeps things on track. I believe in its ethos, I believe in its philosophy, ‘Being bound to swear to the dogmas of no mas ter’, and I think it has done a tremendous job.” T he Tribune h as become the undisputed market leader and defied global trends with an 80 per cent rise in sales over the last ten years, which Mr Marquis attributes to creating an interest ing and provocative newspaper prepared to take on the issues. “It’s well written and it tells the truth,” he said. It doesn’t avoid categories of stories that other newspapers do. We cover all stories of all categories. “We are doing the right job for the Bahamas and this great little country has benefited from what we have done.” As the managing editor prep ares to retire in May he said he is confident about leaving the newspaper in the hands of a team of bright young Bahamian journalists. “We have an extremely good staff and I am quite happy to hand over the paper to them because I am sure they are ready to carry on t he fight for freedom of speech and ensure that politicians do not browbeat the public,” he said. “I don’t allow myself to be pushed around by anybody. Nobody can intimidate me. “The working journalist is right there on the front line asking tough questions and making life uncomfortable for politicians. “When I get criticised by politi cians I don’t lose sleep over it, I am deeply satisfied. “That is really what being a good journalist is. If they were praising me I would have a real problem, believe me.” FROM page one Major Freeport retailer Managing Editor FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 9 AdderleyLanovia D. AlgreenBarbara Deanne AliDenise S. AllenAnishka Jaunita AndersonSamantha T. ArcherPatrice ArmbristerTamu N. AubergMelissa D. BeauchandRolanda BethelKenya P. Bethell BonimyChakita Braithwaite BraveWiselene Brennen Bullard Burrows Carey Cartwright CashApryll J. Clarke Cleare Collie Cooper Curtis Darville Dean DeleveauxDereka F. Dorsette Edgecombe Estwick Eulin Evans Ferguson Fernander Forbes Fowler FoxCherez N. FranksGina Alicia Lashann Lanovia D. Barbara Deanne Denise S. Anishka Jaunita Samantha T. Patrice Tamu N. Melissa D. Rolanda Kenya P. Dollene Peaches Chakita Joan Wiselene Deshon Lashan K. Nakeisha K. Monalisa M. Cheyenne M. Apryll J. Deidre A. Jaminia J. Pamela L. Angela N.T. Cynthia Shantell Torrianna L. Camille C. Dereka F. Dianette L. Mary Selina A L Antoyeka Prenette S. Kimra M. Jonelle Aanica S Marcia F. Cherez N. Gina Alicia Lashann GaitorLesley (Tammy Gibson Gilbert Graham Gray GreenRobynn I. Griffin GrimesValron S. Handfield Hanna Heastie Hinsey Ingraham Johnson Kemp Knowles Lamb Lees Lewis Lockhart Sands Saunders Sawyer Selver Seymour Smith Stewart Storr Stubbs Sturrup Swaby Sweeting Symmonette ThompsonMcquessa I.Thompson/RolleWilliamsYasmin N. WilsonLa-Keisha Woodside Lesley (TammyPrenell D. Shakera L. Samantha Kenisha M. Robynn I. Esther Valron S.Maryann (TamikaRanel J.Anasieya CharisoNgaio F. Kenya S. Jacklyn S. Nicolette D. Kimberley V. Vanessa G. Mayleene N. Selecia L.C. Lynaire A. Jenell L. Psyche T. Carina Marie Melissa Erica Kayla Patrina Gingha Marissa Sheila Sherrell A. Stephanie A. Carmetta M. Tamika K. Mcquessa I.Dedrie M.Yasmin N. La-Keisha Sherell Golden girl’ third in 400 at Hurricane Invitational will open up in the 100m on April 11 at the University of Miami, but she won’t run her first 200m until April 23. Also racing in the 400m was Kristy White, a Bahamian sophomore at UM who was timed in 56.77 for tenth place overall after she got fifth in heat two. As for White, who came home to try out for the Olympic team last year, FergusonMcKenzie said she ran well, coming off an indoor season that saw her just miss qualifying for the NCAA Championships. “She’s coming along. She ran a pretty good time in the 400, but her best event is the 200. She will also run the 100, so she’s coming along,” FergusonMcKenzie said. With this being the IAAF World Championship year, Ferguson-McKenzie said she’s not sure if White will come home in June for the trials because of the hectic schedule she has with her major in medicine. “She just has to come and get it done and then go back and study,” said Ferguson-McKenzie. “But it all depends on her schedule because she has to take the MCAT this year.” Another Bahamian, Tiavannia ‘Tia’ Thompson, competing unattached, was fourth in the women’s 100m hurdles. She ran 14.32. Yanique Booth won the race in 13.67. The Star Trackers Track Club had a number of athletes who competed at the meet, but the results of their events were not available up to press time last night. The majority of those athletes will be competing this weekend at the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations’ final tri als for the Carifta Games that is scheduled to be held in St Luciao ver the holiday weekend. Ferguson-McKenzie, who won the Austin Sealy award as the most outstanding athlete in her final appearance in 1995,had these words of advice for the aspiring athletes trying outf or the team. “Don’t stress out. It’s always easy when you go in there witha qualifying time,” she said. “Just go out there and have fun. Nobody is going to give you anything, so you just have to goo ut there and perform.” Meanwhile, over at the Louisiana Classics Collegiate Invite in Lafayette, Louisiana, Grand Bahamian Olympian Michael Mathieu opened up his season in the men’s 100. Competing as a member of the Tiger Olympians, Mathieuran 10.51 seconds for second place. Gabriel Mvumvure of Louisiana State University won the race in 10.43. Mathieu, who ran on the second leg of the Bahamas men’s 4 x 400 relay team that won the silver in August at the Bei jing Olympic Games in China, also anchored the Tigers Olympians to first place in the 4x 4 relay in 3:09.97. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net KIRKLAND ‘Baby Boy’ Rolle, who fought twice for the British Commonwealth light heavyweight title, will probably be remembered as one of the Bahamas’ best professional boxers. The 65-year-old Bahamian light-heavy and heavyweight champion died over the weekend. Listed at 6-feet, Rolle amassed an impressive win-lossdraw ring record of 36-17-4 during a span that covered two decades from 1960-1982. Back in the early stages of boxing, competitors were best known by their nicknames and hardly anybody remembered what Rolle’s first name was. But you called the name ‘Baby Boy’ Rolle and just about everybody could recall his t remendous ability in the ring. “In my opinion, Baby was one of the greatest Bahamian fighters of his generation,” said former cruiserweight champion Pat ‘the Centreville Assassin’ Strachan. “I met him in the early 70s and he was always a nice person, always likable and he got along with everyone in the gym.H e was a sparring partner at one time for former world champion( Mohammed) Ali when he was in his heyday.” Strachan and Rolle had a m emorable fight on December 26, 1980, that went the distance before Strachan was awarded a 10 round decision on points. That was Rolle’s second to l ast fight before he retired. He came back two years later and won a 10-round decision over Carl Baker on Mars Bay, Andros, on April 11, 1982, to close out his career. Rolle, who started his pro career on July 4, 1960, with a four-round knockout over Kid Anthony, reeled off four straight victories before he drew a 10round bout with legendaryW ellington ‘Boston Blackie’ Miller on February 5, 1965. On March 25, 1971, Rolle knocked out Rennie Pinder in the fifth round of their scheduled 12 round bout for the Bahamas light heavyweight title. On July 9 that same year, Rolle moved up to the heavyweight division and secured a TKO in round eight of theirs cheduled 12-round bout over Bert Perry for the Bahamas title. T wo years later, Rolle traveled to Nottingham, Nottinghm ashire, United Kingdom where he fought John Conteh for the British Commonwealth light heavyweight title. C onteh, however, won the 15round bout on points, 15-3, at t he Ice Rink. Then on March 26, 1976, Rolle traveled to Brisbane, Queenland, Australia where he fought Tony Mundine for another shot at the Commonwealth British title. Again, he fell short, this time getting stopped in the third of the scheduled 15round bout at the Festive Hall by Mundine. Rolle, according to Ray Minus Jr, was a Bahamian boxing icon. “He was probably the toughest Bahamian fighter of his time,” Minus Jr reflected. “You could hit him with a sledge hammer and he will still come at you. “Knocking out Baby Boy Rolle was a real challenge. I knew that he was a tough fighter. I knew he had some realt ough rivalries with heavyweights like Boston Blackie and Bert Perry. He was a Bahamian champion.” As a youngster coming into the sport, Minus Jr said he got to watch Rolle at the trail end of his career and he was very impressed with what he saw. “My amateur boxing club, Champion Boxing Club, hon-o ured Baby Boy Rolle in the late 1990s at the stadium and hew as very excited,” Minus Jr said. As a person, Minus Jr said R olle was always a gentleman to him and the many young boxers coming up through the club. In fact, Minus Jr said when the c lub was located next to his home off Wulff Road, Rolle m ade frequent visits to help train the boxers. “He always wanted to help out because he was well skilled with the sport,” Minus Jr said. “He will be missed because of what he did for the sport.” Tribune Sports and former sports writer Godfrey ‘Goofy’ Brown extend condolences to his family, including his brother Henry ‘Goatman’ Rolle, who promoted a number of professional fights. ‘Baby Boy’ Rolle dies at 65 BABY BOY’ R olle (left light heavyweight title, will probably be remembered as one of the Bahamas’ best professional boxers... WITH a dominating perfor mance at the nation’s top interschool track and field meet, one perennial track and field powerhouse cemented their status as the top school of the 2008-09 season. The St Augustine’s College Big Red Machines obliterated the competition at the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations’ 21st edition of the National High School Championships, capturing five of the six contested divisions. They swept the three girls’ divisions (junior, intermediate, senior), while also claiming the junior and intermediate boys. The C R Walker Knights staved off the complete six division sweep by the Big Red Machines, by taking the senior boys division. With a balanced effort of record breaking performances on the track and in the field, the Big Red Machines led four divisions after the first day of competition and never relinquished their advantage over the course of the threeday meet. Powered by a star studded middle distance programme featuring Hughnique Rolle and Audley Carey, SAC totaled 742 points in all divisions. Rolle dominated the senior girls, claiming gold in the 800m, 1500m and 3000m. Her time of 4:58.46 set a new national high school record in the 1500m. Carey doubled in both the 800m and 1500m. Other highlights from the 2009 National Champions included Byron Ferguson and Marcus Thompson who qualified for international competition. Ferguson set a new high school national record in inter mediate boys’ javelin throw while Thompson qualified for the Junior Pan Am Games in the senior boys’ 100m. SAC top school of -09’ track and field season A MEMBER of SAC’s Big Red Machines in action... F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS BASEBALL JBLN UPDATE Results of games played in the Junior Baseball League of Nassau over the weekend at Freedom Farm are as follows: TEE BALL Raptors def. Sand Gnats 26-22 Sidewinders def. G rasshoppers 12-9 Knights def. Blue Claws 25-13 C OACH PITCH A ngels def. Astros 29-23 Cubs def. Blue Jays 21-7 Athletics def. Diamondbacks 16-10 M INOR LEAGUE R ed Sox def. Royals 11-5 Mets def. Rays 14-4 M AJOR LEAGUE M ariners def. Reds 11-10 Marlins def. Indians 3-2 JUNIOR LEAGUE Dodgers def. Twins 6-4 Yankees def. Cardinals 196 S ENIOR LEAGUE Pirates and Rangers played to 1-1 tie. Tigers def. Phillies 10-0 SOFTBALL McKCKLEWHITE RECUPERATING D AVE ‘Billy’ McKcklew hite, one of the most d ominating softball playe rs from Eleuthera, is improving in Male Medical II of the Princess Margaret Hospital. McKclewhite, who waso ne of the most feared sluggers at the plate as he played for Governor’s Harbour and the Beck’s Hustlers, suffers from dia betes. Last week he had one of his legs amputated. Tribune Sports as well as former sports writer Godfrey ‘Goofy’ Brown wishes McKcklewhite a speedy r ecovery. SOFTBALL S YMONETTE PASSED AWAY SOUTHPAW pitcher Edmund ‘Beef’ Symone tte, who starred for the B ig Red Machines of St Augustine’s College, was k illed recently in a car accident in his hometown of Eleuthera. Symonette pitched on a number of championship g ames for SAC, including the one in 1971 when theB ig Red Machines were the underdogs. That year, SAC eliminated Queen’s College and the late Colyn ‘Josey Whales’ Russell in the semifinal before they went on to beat Aquinas College and Kirk Griffin in the final. On returning home to Eleuthera, Symonette played for the Rock Sound Heroes and the Heineken Stars. Symonette was driving his truck on Queen’s Highway when he skid off the road and was killed on the scene. Condolences are extended from The Tribune Sports Department as well as former sports writer Godfrey ‘Goofy’ Brown to the family of the late Symonette. SPORTS IN BRIEF Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. THE Masters Softball League’s bestof-five championship series is set. I t will be played between the defending champions William Contrcution Jets and the Micholette Strokers. The series will begin on Saturday at 2 pm at the Archdeacon WilliamT hompson Softball Park at the Southern Recreation Grounds. Game two will be played on Sunday at the same time. William Construction had to go the f ull three games before they clinched their series against the Six Pack Abs w ith a 9-8 nipping on Sunday. Six Packs evened the series on Saturday w ith a 9-7 decision. Micholette, however, completed a two-game sweep over the Alco Raiders on Saturday with a 15-2 vic-t ory. Here’s a summary of the three games played: William Construction 9, Six Packs 8: Brad Smith had a perfect 3-for-3 d ay with a home run, driving in a total of five runs and scoring wice to lead the Jets. Gary ‘Super’ Johnson was 3-for-4 with a double, a RBI and three runs,w hile Anthony ‘Hod Dog’ Pearce wax 2-for-3 with a double and two RBI. D anny Stubbs was the winning pitcher. Joe Miller suffered the loss. D ennis Davis went 3-for-4 with two runs and Larry Thompson was 2-for-2 with a RBI, scoring a run. Six Pack 9, William Construction 7: F rederick Saunders went 2-for-3 with three RBI as the Abs avoided a clean sweep by the Jets on Saturda. Spurgeon Johnson helped out by going 2-for-4 with a RBI; LarryT hompson was 1-for-3 with a double, two RBI and two runs and Joe Demeritte was 2-for-4 with a run. Joe Miller was the winning pitcher. Bertie Murray Sr got the loss. B rad Smith was 2-for-4 with a RBI and two runs and Sonny ‘Jiggy’ Haven w as 1-for-3 with a RBI and a run scored. M icholette 15, Alco 2: R onald ‘Big Boy’ Saunders had a perfect 4-for-4 day with a double, triple and three runs scored as the Strokers completeda two-game sweep to advance to the final. Culbert ‘Buster’ Evans helped out by going 2-for-4 with two homers, four RBIs and two runs; Lester Dean was 2-f or-4 with a double, a RBI and three runs and Adlai ‘Mossah’ Moss was 4for-5 with a double, a RBI and two runs. Clayton Smith got the win on the m ound. Glenroy ‘Flo’ Saunders suffered the loss. A nthony ‘Rakes-And-Scrape’ Bowe was 2-for-2 with a run and Kendal Ferg uson was 1-for-3 with a homer, a RBI and a run. THE standings in both the 1 9-and-under and 15-andunder divisions in the Baptist Sports Council’s 2009 JoyceM inus Basketball Classic is turning out to be an interesti ng one. A number of games were played on Saturday at theB aillou Hills Sporting Complex. Here’s a look at those games played and the implications to the standings. Temple Fellowship 27, M acedonia 26 (15 K enrico Lockhart scored the game’s winning basket and JonathanG ordon had 10 points to lead Temple Fellowship as they e xtended their front-running lead in the 15-and-under to 51. M acedonia, who got nine from James Rolle, fell to 3-2. F aith United 26, Latter-Day No.2 23 (15 scored nine points to leadF aith United as they improved to 3-2 in the 15-and-under division. Rodrico Tate had nine in the loss for Latter-Day No.2,w ho dropped to 2-2. Latter-Day No.2 26, Miracle W orking Church of God 19 (15 Darron Smith scored 12 points to lead Latter-Day N o.2 as they rebounded from an earlier loss to improve their record to 3-2 in the 15-and-u nder division. Andre Green had eight in a losing effort for Miracle Working Church of God as they fell to 2-3. G olden Gates 29, LatterDay No.1 23 (15 Neil Sands had a game high 17 as Golden Gates improved their 15-andunder record to 3-1 to remaini n second place. Iyndrick Storr had nine in t he loss for Latter-Day No.1, who fell to 2-3. Latter-Day 36, Golden G ates No.1 28 (19 D arron Finley, Kenneth Pratt and Teran Greenslade providedt he spark for Latter-Day as their 19-and-under team i mproved to 3-1. Austin McKenzie scored 15 in the loss for Golden GatesN o.1, who dropped to 2-3. Miracle Working Church of God 43, Temple Fellowship 42: Allen Curry scored 12 and Darron Martin had 10 to pro-v ide a 1-2 punch for Miracle Working Church of God as t hey improved to 3-2 in the 19-and-under division. Marvin Albury and Kevin B urrows had 11 and 10 respectively for Temple Fellowship, who dropped to 2-2. M ercy Seat 44, Golden Gates No.2 34 (19 In the b iggest upset of the day, Leonardo Demeritte scored a game high 20 points as MercyS eat won their first game in six tries in the 19-and-under division. Mel Johnson led Golden Gates No.2 with 10 as they fellt o 2-2. In the men’s division, only one game was played before t he rain came pouring down. In that game, Christian Tabernacle knocked voff GoldenG ates 40-21 to take sole possession of first place in the v ice-president division at 3-0. Golden Gates dropped to 1-1. Here’s a look at the schedule of games on tap this Saturday: Court One 10 am Miracle Working COG vs Latter-D ay No.2 (15 Day Saints vs Macedonia (15F irst Baptist (19 ter-Day Saints vs Golden G ates No.2 (19 vs Ebenezer (M Golden Gates vs Church oft he Nazarene (M Court Two 10 am Faith U nited vs Golden Gates (15 ship vs First Baptist (15 N oon Faith United vs Tem ple Fellowship (19 Golden Gates vs Macedonia (19 nacle vs New Bethlehem ( M); 3 pm Pilgrim vs First Baptist (M MASTERSSOFTBALLLEAGUE Championship series is set BAPTIST SPORTS COUNCIL UPDATE THE TEAM STANDINGS Teams W L Pct.GB Men's President First Baptist 2 0 1 ,000 Temple Fellowship31.7501/2 L atter-Day Saints21.6661/2 C ity of Praise 12.33311/2 BIBA 1 3.2502 Ebenezer 0 1 .00011/2 Pilgrim01.00011/2 Men's Vice-President Christian Tabernacle301,000New Bethlehem201,0001/2 Evangelistic Center11.50011/2 Golden Gates11.50011/2 Bahamas Harvest 1 2.33311/2 Church of the Nazarene12.33311/2 Calvary Bible02.0002 19-And-Under Latter-Day Saints31.750First Baptist21.6661/2 Macedonia32.6001/2 Miracle Working COG32.6001/2 Golden Gates No.222.5001 Temple Fellowship 2 2.5001 Faith United 11.5001 Golden Gates 23.40011/2 Mercy Seat15.1663 15-And-Under Temple Fellowship51.833Golden Gates31.7501 Macedonia 3 2 .600 11/2 Faith United32.60011/2 Latter-Day No.2 32.60011/2 First Baptist22.5002 Latter-Day23.40021/2 Miracle Working COG23.40021/2 Zion South Beach 1 7 .125 5 Interesting stage in Basketball Classic n PHOENIX Paul Bako had four hits and three RBIs even though he had his first at-bat in the sixth inning, and the Chicago Cubs roughed up Dana Eveland in a 20-5 win over the Oakland Athletics on Monday. Derrek Lee hit his first homer of spring training and Ryan Theriot went 3-for-3 with two RBIs and scored two runs for Chicago. Jake Fox, Reed Johnson and Bobby Scales each had three RBIs. Eveland, the A’s likely opening-day starter, gave up five runs in four innings. He allowed eight of the Cubs’ 24 hits. “I couldn’t put guys away,” Eveland said. “I’d get ahead and then miss my spot and catch a lot of the plate.” It was the second straight start in which Eveland was hit hard. The previous outing was in a minor league game. He said he feels a sense of urgency to get better results as the start of the season nears. “I have high expectations of myself this late in the spring,” he said. “I’ve got two more starts down here. I need to get locked and ready to go for Game 1.” Edgar Gonzalez, who is in the running for a spot in the A’s rotation only got two outs while giving up eight hits and seven runs. He has allowed 13 runs in 3 1-3 innings over his past two outings and has a 12.75 ERA this spring. Bako has four hits as Cubs rout Athletics

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C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 9 ‘Baby Boy’ Rolle dies at 65... n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net Golden girl’ Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, known for her versatility as a sprinter, opened her 2009 outdoor season with a third place finish in the 400m. Competing on the Adidas team in the Hurricane Invitational over the weekend at the University of Miami (their training site) in Coral Gables, Florida, Ferguson-McKenzie clocked 53.93 seconds. “For an opener, it was kind of easy, but I didn’t run the time I wanted, but I still want to celebrate the positive I got from it at the end,” said FergusonMcKenzie, who ran her first 400m in about three years. “I felt very strong at the end. I didn’t super die, so I’m happy with that. Being a sprinter, we normally go all out and just die. I went out sort of easy and I built on my transition phrase from the first 200 to the second,” said Ferguson-McKenzie. Ajoke Odumosu, of Nike, won the race in 53.00, followed by Ashlee Kidd in 52.13. The performance, according to Ferguson-McKenzie, proved how strong she is at this point in the season. So she’s excited about her potential down the road. “I was actually supposed to run a 4x100 and a 4x400, but we couldn’t find anybody to run the 4x400, so I was forced to run an open 400,” she said. “The difference between a 4x400 and a 400, it’s different. When you get the stick in your hand, you could split a faster time than you do when you run an open 400. But I only ran the 4 x400 because we didn’t have a full team.” Ferguson-McKenzie also got a chance to test her speed, running on the third leg of the South Florida Elite 4x100 relay team that posted a winning time of 44.15. The other members of the team included Jamaicans Sheryl Morgan and Sherry-Ann Brooks on the first two legs and American Lauryn Williams on anchor. We’re super excited about t his weekend coming up. We get a chance to run a 4x100 this weekend and hopefully a 4x400 in Orlando,” Ferguson-McKenzie said. “Lauryn, myself, Veronica Campbell and Aileen Bailey willr un together,” she said. “Hopefully we can make it happen. So I’m very excited.” Ferguson-McKenzie, who skipped the entire indoor season, ‘Golden girl’ third in 400 at Hurricane Invitational Olympian Michael Mathieu second in 100, first in 4x400 relay Bahamian sophomore Kristy White finishes 10th overall DEBBIE FERGUSONMcKENZIE S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 Michael Mathieu SAC top school of 09’ track and field season... S ee page 9

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Real Estate Association’s (BREA would look into a website promoting the opening of a Miami-based sales centre that will sell Bahamian real estate, pointing out that only BREA-licenses agents could sell land and property in this nation. In a statement issued yesterday, the Par adise Is Mine company unveiled plans to open a ‘sales centre’ in South Beach, Miami, “to exclusively market Bahamas proper ties”. "This is a tremendous market opportunity for us," said Ted Rover, director of sales for Paradise Is Mine. “Who wouldn't want oceanfront property and a second home on a spectacular tropical paradise? At the end of the day this is not really that hard to sell. "There are millions of tourists who visit Miami Beach every year, and we feel that this is a perfect venue to promote the Bahamas. "In the current global economic reces sion, Bahamas real estate prices have remained stable, which is truly remarkable. The Bahamas is a tremendous alternative for investors with money on the sideline, not to mention that it's a great place to have a second home. Opening a sales centre is very strategic and should pay dividends for the company.” Paradise Is Mine said its US sales centre for the Bahamas was set to open in early summer of 2009. The company is understood to be focused on real estate sales on Rum Cay, an island that has attracted more than its fair share of controversy as it relates to land disputes. It is understood that Paradise Is Mine is the company that earlier this year sent outa press release stating that it had sold land on Rum Cay to Ray Lewis, the Baltimore Ravens and Pro Bowl linebacker. Responding to the release’s appearance, William Wong, BREA’s president, told Tri bune Business: “We’re trying to deal with that right now. Only Bahamians licensed by BREA are licensed to sell real estate in the Bahamas right now.” n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net SMALL hotels have seen significant declines in business this winter season, several told Tribune Business yesterday, but the Ministry of Tourism has reported a surprisingly bet t er season than was previously predicted. Dean Spychalla, general manager of the Nassau Palm Resort on West Bay Street, told Tribune Business that his hotel had seen a 33 per cent decline in business compared to the same time last year. “We’re certainly feeling the pinch,” he said. “We’re at probably two-thirds of the occupancy that we enjoyed last year.” Mr Spychalla said he did not want to get into the specifics of the hotel’s occupancy dur ing this Spring Break season, but contends that it was down versus last year, due to the world economic crisis. But he added that the hotel has not had to lay-off staff to date. Vernice Walkine, the Ministry of Tourism’s director-gen eral, told Tribune Business last week that the popular collegestudent-getaway season will be fairly good, though down from previous years. She said the negative public ity surrounding the ongoing ‘drug wars’ in Mexico may h ave given the Bahamas an a dded boost as a destination of choice for Spring Breakers. “I think the Bahamas, and Nassau in particular, has been able to benefit from that,” she said. “There are places like SuperClubs Breezes that are sold out.” However, many small Bahamian hotels say they are still missing their piece of the pie. West Bay hotel manager, Raj Reddy, said there had been a substantial decline in busin ess compared to last year. The West Bay hotel, next to the Chez Willie restaurant, is know to have many Bahamian and foreign patrons. However, Mr Reddy said business has been down across the board. Laurice Adderley, customer supervisor at the Corner Motel in Carmichael Road, told Tribune Business that things had gone downhill after the eco nomic downturn impacted consumer confidence throughout t he Bahamas. S he said the hotel received mostly Bahamian guests, but its typically busy winter season could have been better. Ms Adderley said even their popular dance nights have seena decline. C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.56 $3.31 $3.60 #r$'$!("t !t)## "#!""#! nftnn#!!$$$ * $150k IDB initiative seeks to g ive Bahamian construction i ndustry ‘more authority’ by d eveloping standard contract f orms in line with international s tandards, recognised by Bahamian law * BCA chief: ‘We’re finding that it’s an impediment, not having this Contractors Bill, the industry not being properly licensed and regulated, not having the forms and professional approach to a number of the contracts’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamian Contractors Association (BCA that a $150,000 grant initiative with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB the bar” for the sector by enabling it to develop internationally-accepted contracts and other documents, eliminating the industry’s reliance on American-authored forms. Stephen Wrinkle, the BCA’s president, said it was “becoming increasingly important” to have contracts and other documents that were “accepted internationally and able to be regulated by Bahamian law”, because they were an essential ingredi ent in the ability of Bahamian contractors to win major jobs particularly from foreign devel opers. “Right now, we use American Institute of Architects documents for construction contracts,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. “We need to have our own documents, and can then move forward with them, while adapting them to suit international needs. “It gives us some authority in the industry. In this day andage, we should not be dependent on American Institute of Architects forms and docu ments. We should have our own documents.” Among the documents the IDB project would look to amend were contract forms, procurement documents, and change order requirements. Mr Wrinkle explained that having contracts that were in line with international con struction industry standards, but also recognised under Bahamian law, would give contractors a greater degree of legal protection should disputes arise with developers. The BCA president said this had happened with the con tracts issued for Lynden Pin dling International Airport’s (LPIA specified that they would be “governed by Bahamian law” with this nation as the first jurisdiction for legal recourse. “Every contract executed in this country should be governed by Bahamian law, not New York law or whatever state they Contractors aim to ‘raise the bar’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Small resorts see business downturn n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor R EVENUES at B aha Mar’s two Cable Beach resort properties are running 15-18 per cent behind forecast for the peak 2009 winter season, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with downward pressure on room rates impacting Bahamian resort’s m argins and daily room yields. Robert Sands, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s president, who is also a senior Baha Mar executive, told this newspaper: “Speaking specifically for our properties, the winter season is probably close to an aggregate, for us, of 15-18 per cent down on our Budget for revenues. “The bottom line is that we’re behind on revenue comparisons, both to last year and to Baha Mar’s revenues 15-18% off forecast n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A former cornerstone of Bimini’s tourism industry, the Bimini Big Game Resort, has been put into receivership and will most likely go into foreclosure, the Chief Councillor for the Bimini District told Tribune Business yesterday. Meanwhile, employees displaced by the resort’s abrupt shut-down are still awaiting promised back-pay from its owner. Lloyd Edgecombe said yesterday that he was scheduled to meet with representatives of K PMG, the accounting firm acting as receivers for the resort, who will assess the property, protect its assets and ultimately determine its fate. Mr Edgecombe said he believed the receivers were ultimately likely to place the Bimini Big Game Resort on the market for sale. He added that a Cayman Islands-based insurance company financed the resort via a mortgage theyt held on the property, and were most likely the ones to have placed it into the hands of KPMG after calling in the debenture on it. “The people who had the loan on the place, they are not involved in hotel operations, and I think they might eventually put the place up for sale,” said Mr Edgecombe. “Hopefully we’ll get some buyers to open the place and pay the employees and start up the business.” The resort closed near yearend 2008, when its management allegedly packed up and left without telling staff where they were going or informing the Government that lay-offs and its closure were imminent. The Bimini Big Game Resort’s owner is understood to be a Calif0rnia-based American, who was attempting to find new refinancing to keep the resort open and pay his financial backers. That appears not to have happened. When management left, workers were given $100 and letters stating what they were owed by the company. They were told this payment would be forthcoming at a later date. However, nothing has been heard since. There has also been speculation that the Bimini Big Game Resort ran up an unpaid $500,000 BEC bill before closing. The resort has frequently been heralded as a backbone of Resort placed in receivership * Chief councillor confirms KPMG appointed receivers for still-closed Bimini Big Game Resort, and says sale of distressed property likely S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Sands Realtors to probe Miami firm selling Bahamian property

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TODAY’S column is inspired by an article that appeared in the Harvard Business Review back in early 2006. It was entitled What Holds the Modern Company Together , and it explored the concept of ‘corporate culture’what it is and its various types. I thought that this topic is particularly relevant today, especially in light of the ongoing outrage surrounding AIG and its payment of obscene corporate bonuses, while at the same time begging the US government for billions of dollars of taxpayer ‘handouts’. U U n n d d e e r r s s t t a a n n d d i i n n g g c c o o r r p p o o r r a a t t e e c c u u l l t t u u r r e e ? ? The authors had this to say in defining corporate culture: “Culture, in a word is community. It is an outcome of how people relate one to another. Communities exist at work just as they do outside the commercial arena. Like families villages, schools, clubs and businesses rest on patterns of social interaction that sustain them over time or are their undoing. They are built on shared interests and mutual obligations, and thrive on cooperation and friendships.” D D i i m m e e n n s s i i o o n n s s o o f f h h u u m m a a n n r r e e l l a a t t i i o o n n s s h h i i p p s s The authors further suggested that the ‘patterns of social interaction’ should be examined in two dimensions, which they define as sociability and solidarity. Sociability was defined as the measure of sincere friendliness among members of a community (in the case of a business – staff). In business, it was recognised that high sociability had benefits such as the fact that most employees feel working in such an environment was enjoyable. This, in turn, is believed to improve morale and teamwork. However, a drawback to high levels of sociability was a view that poor performance may be tolerated because everybody is chummy with each other. This results in the best com promise being applied to problems as opposed to the best solutions. Solidarity, on the other hand, is a measure of a community’s( staff) ability to work together effectively regardless of personal ties. The article says that: “Solidarity generates a high degree of strategic focus, swift response to competitive threats, and intolerance of poor perfor m ance. It can also result in a degree of ruthlessness.” Also, an additional drawback to high levels of solidarity was stated as: “Strategic focus is good as long as it zeroes in on the right strategy. But if the strategy is not the right one, it is the equivalent of corporate suicide. Organisations can charge right over the cliff with great efficiency if they do the wrong things well”. T T y y p p e e s s o o f f C C o o r r p p o o r r a a t t e e C C u u l l t t u u r r e e s s The authors then went on to identify four types of corporate culture using the dimensions of sociability and solidarity – which were: 1. The Networked Organisa tion: (High Sociability, Low Solidarity) In a networked organisation, people frequently stop to talk in the hallways. They tend to socialise after hours and sometimes interact ‘like family’ outside the job place. Networked cultures are characterised not by a lack of hierarchy, but by a profusion of ways to get around it. Their low levels of solidarity mean that managers often have trouble getting functions or operating units to cooperate. Finally, a networked organisation is usually so political that individuals and cliques spend much of their time pursuing personal agendas. 2. The Mercenary Organisation: (Low Sociability, High Sol idarity) The mercenary organisation is low on ‘hobnobbing’ and isi ntensely focused on business matters. In this type of environment, individual interests coincide with corporate objectives, and those objectives are often linked to a clear perception of the ‘enemy’ and the steps required for beating it. Mercenary organisations are also characterised by a clear separation of work and social life. Employees rarely fraternize outside of the office, and when they do, it is usually at a business-related event. Such organisations are generally intolerant of poor performance, and those not contributing are fired or given explicit instructions on how to improve, with a firm deadline to change. People stay with high solidarity companies for as long as their personal needs are met, and then they move on. Employees are disinclined to cooperate, share information or exchange new or creative ideas. 3. The Fragmented Organisation: (Low Sociability, Low Solidarity) Employees of fragmented organisations display a low consciousness of organisational membership. They often believe that they work for themselves, or they identify with occupa tional groups – usually professional. Asked at a party what he does for a living, for instance, a doctor at a major teaching hos pital that happens to have this culture might reply: “I am a surgeon”, leaving out the name of the institution where he is employed. The lack of interrelatedness extends to behaviouro n the job. People may work with their door shut, be secretive about their projects and progress or, in extreme cases, they try to sabotage the work of colleagues through gossip, rumor or unfair criticism. 4. The Communal Organisation: (High Sociability, High Solidarity) Often found in small, fast growing, entrepreneurial startups, employees and founders of communal organisations are close friends. This usually extends outside the job. Communal cultures can also be found in mature companies in which employees have worked together for long periods of time. Employees in communal organisations tend to possess a high consciousness of organisational membership(for example, it is said that some Nike employees proudly have ‘swooshes’ (the Nike logo tooed on themselves). The high solidarity of communal cultures is often demonstrated through an equitable sharing of risks and rewards among employees, and such organisations place a high value on fairness and justice. In communal organisations, employees are very clear about competition – they know their competitors, what they do well, their weaknesses and very often what they need to do to stay ahead of the pack. I I s s t t h h e e r r e e o o n n e e r r i i g g h h t t c c u u l l t t u u r r e e f f o o r r e e v v e e r r y y o o r r g g a a n n i i s s a a t t i i o o n n ? ? It is not surprising that many executives see the communal organisation as the ideal. I would venture to also say that in many cases, the type of organisation an executive manages could be very different from the type of organisation that employees consider themselves to be working in. This is pre cisely the reason why effective internal and external commu-n ication within an organisation is so important. Clearly, there is no universal (or correct organisation. It is also recognised that because of the C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE &20021:($/7+)+(%$+$0$6 *29(510(17,&( 7+(%$+$0$6(&+1,&$/t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f7KH&RQWUDFWZLOOEHDZDUGHGWRWKHDSSOLFDQWSURYLGLQJ WKHPRVWHFRQRPLFDODQGDFFHSWDEOH7HQGHUIRUWKHIXOOGXUDWLRQRIWKH FRQWUDFWSHULRG ,QWHUHVWHG%LGGHUVPD\LQVSHFWFDPSXVHVEHWZHHQWKHKRXUV RIWR0RQGD\WKURXJK)ULGD\&ROOHFWLRQRIWKH VSHFLFDWLRQDQGELGGLQJGRFXPHQWVFDQEHREWDLQHGIURPWKH5HFHSWLRQ 'HVNDW%2OG7UDLORDGEHWZHHQWKHKRXUVRI 0RQGD\WKURXJK)ULGD\EHJLQQLQJ0RQGD\WK0DUFKDQG REWDLQIXUWKHULQIRUPDWLRQDWWKHVHFRQGDGGUHVVJLYHQEHORZ %LGVPXVWEHVXEPLWWHGLQVHDOHGHQYHORSHVPDUNHG HQGHUIRU 6HFXULW\%DKDPDV7HFKQLFDODQG9RFDWLRQDO,QVWLWXWH DQGGHOLYHUHG WRWKHDWWHQWLRQRI 7KH&KDLUPDQRIWKHHQGHUV%RDUG 0LQLVWU\RI)LQDQFH &HFLO:DOODFH:KLWHOG%XLOGLQJ &DEOH%HDFK 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV 7KHDQDJHU %DKDPDVHFKQLFDODQGRFDWLRQDO,QVWLWXWH 2OGUDLORDG 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV %LGVPXVWEHUHFHLYHGRQ)ULGD\UG$SULO DFFRPSDQLHGE\DQHQGRUVHGFRS\RIDFXUUHQW%XVLQHVV/LFHQFH 3HUVRQVZKRVXEPLW7HQGHUVDUHLQYLWHGWRSXEOLFRSHQLQJRIELGVDW WKH0LQLVWU\RI)LQDQFHLQWKH &HFLO:DOODFH:KLWHOG%XLOGLQJ&DEOH %HDFKRQXHVGD\WK %,UHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRUHMHFWDQ\RUDOO%LGV Creating the right culture for success Financial Focus By Larry Gibson S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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d ynamic environments in which modern businesses operate, companies very often have to transform their corporate cul-ture to keep pace with the demands of their markets. Companies that fail to recognise and accept this realityoften perish. One of the significant failures of modern mergers and acqui sitions has been the fact that the new management often failsto understand that implementing a new corporate culture fora new combined entity requires a lot more work than simply stating what you wish it to be. Decency and integrity still matters to most employees and customers. C C o o n n c c l l u u s s i i o o n n At the end of the day, management’s ultimate responsibility is to allocate capital and resources in a way which pro duces business success, and corporate culture, therefore, is the environment in which those results are produced. For some companies, corporate culture is designed, developed and imple mented strategically, while in others it is simply a by-product of factors such as the persona of the chief executive (or other senior managers). Studies continuously suggest that managing your corporate culture to suit your particular type of business and its business environment is critical to long term success. Managers must know how to assess their own culture and whether it fits their competitive environment, and only then can they develop techniques and strategies to transform their culture for the better. However, there must be recognition that the business environment has changed, and that the wasteful practices of the past decade will no longer b e tolerated. Companies like AIG must rise to the challenge to quickly change their corporate culture to one that more in line with the realities of today. Until next week N N B B : : L L a a r r r r y y R R . . G G i i b b s s o o n n , , a a C C h h a a r r t t e e r r e e d d F F i i n n a a n n c c i i a a l l A A n n a a l l y y s s t t , , i i s s v v i i c c e e p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t p p e e n n s s i i o o n n s s , , C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l P P e e n n s s i i o o n n s s S S e e r r v v i i c c e e s s ( ( B B a a h h a a m m a a s s ) ) , , a a w w h h o o l l l l y y o o w w n n e e d d s s u u b b s s i i d d i i a a r r y y o o f f C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l G G r r o o u u p p I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l , , w w h h i i c c h h o o w w n n s s A A t t l l a a n n t t i i c c M M e e d d i i c c a a l l I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e a a n n d d i i s s a a m m a a j j o o r r s s h h a a r r e e h h o o l l d d e e r r o o f f S S e e c c u u r r i i t t y y & & G G e e n n e e r r a a l l I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e C C o o m m p p a a n n y y i i n n t t h h e e B B a a h h a a m m a a s s . . T T h h e e v v i i e e w w s s e e x x p p r r e e s s s s e e d d a a r r e e t t h h o o s s e e o o f f t t h h e e a a u u t t h h o o r r a a n n d d d d o o n n o o t t n n e e c c e e s s s s a a r r i i l l y y r r e e p p r r e e s s e e n n t t t t h h o o s s e e o o f f C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l G G r r o o u u p p I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l o o r r a a n n y y o o f f i i t t s s s s u u b b s s i i d d i i a a r r y y a a n n d d / / o o r r a a f f f f i i l l i i a a t t e e d d c c o o m m p p a a n n i i e e s s . . P P l l e e a a s s e e d d i i r r e e c c t t a a n n y y q q u u e e s s t t i i o o n n s s o o r r c c o o m m m m e e n n t t s s t t o o r r l l g g i i b b s s o o n n @ @ a a t t l l a a n n t t i i c c h h o o u u s s e e . . c c o o m m . . b b s s n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE GOVERNMENT is still considering whether to allow workers dismissed for just cause to collect unemployment benefit, the minister of labour and social development said, as it is still ironing out ‘kinks’ in the proposed scheme. Dion Foulkes told Tribune Business, amid concerns from the Bahamas Employers Confederation’s (BECon Brian Nutt, that the scheme was still being mulled over and is still “in the consultation stage”. The minister said concerns were raised by Mr Nutt regarding a disqualification provision within the scheme that still allowed for a worker dismissed from a job with just cause – such as stealing or breaching company rules or who simply quit to still be eligible for seven of the maximum 13 weeks’ worth of benefits. “That was raised by him at both meetings, the one in Nassau and the one in Freeport, and is something that we have under consideration,” said Mr Foulkes. The scheme, according to Mr Foulkes, proposes to deny six w eeks of the 13 weeks of benef it payments to those workers who met the criteria for disqualification. “It is an entitlement scheme,” he said. “Persons made unemployed are entitled to the benefit. If you meet certain criteria you are entitled to it.” However, Mr Foulkes told Tribune Business that these criteria would have to be givenf urther consideration, as an employer’s decision to dismiss an employee would be a subjective process. “Whether we can disqualify a person who made all the payments just like everybody else, who made the contributions to National Insurance and now they are unemployed for a reason that the employer states was a gross infraction of their rules – we’re giving it further consideration,” he said. The scheme’s initial funding of $20 million will be extracted from the National Insurance Board’s medical benefit plan, and subsequently supplemented by the government’s consolidated fund if needed. So that the scheme does not become a revolving door for unemployed persons, they are given a one-time payment. In order to qualify again, that person would have to be duly employed for one year in order to receive the 13-week payment again. In the long-term the scheme will be financed, through amendments to the National Insurance Act, by contributions split 50/50 between employer and employee, and be equivalent to 1 per cent of the insurable wage ceiling. “National insurance is very confident that the programme can be sustained with the 1 per cent contribution. The only question is when that will kick in,” said Mr Foulkes. “With the downturn in the economy now, you don’t want to add any additional burden on employees or employers, so National Insurance and the Government will have to make a determination when that is to kick in.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 3B Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following items: %XLOGLQJVWUXFWXUHH[WHULRUHQYHORSHH[WHULRUFDQRSLHVDQG UHODWHGVXEWUDGHSDFNDJHV *HQHUDO5HTXLUHPHQWVIRU*HQHUDO&RQWUDFWLQJVHUYLFHVIRU WKHRYHUDOOSURMHFWDQG &RQVWUXFWLRQ0DQDJHPHQW)HHIRUWHQGHULQJWKHEDODQFHRI VXEWUDGHDQGVXSSOLHUZRUNSDFNDJHVDWDODWHUGDWH The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e. mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are notincluded in this Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230 General Contractor in 2009. The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room located at the NAD Project office. TENDERC-230 General Contract, Stage 1Contact: TRACI BRISBYContract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project Ph: (24224217 P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs +,*+,17(67$7(6:(//(67$%/,6+('*$7('&20081,7
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Bimini’s economy, becoming a tourist haven over the years with its marina a fishing boat Mecca during that season. The property boasts two restaurants, and was due to undergo renovations to add luxury rooms, scuba operations, gift shops, a gourmet food market, a bait and tackle shop, a spa and a game room. Now, its electricity is shut off and, according to Mr Edgecombe, the marina’s 103 slips that can secure vessels up to 120 feet in length are empty. Residents of Bimini are hoping that the receivers will be a ble to jump-start the resort w hen it is handed over to them. However, Mr Edgecombe contends that reopening the resort could become extremely costly for KPMG, with no surety of acquiring a profit. He added that due to the resort’s more than six-month closure, the property would have to undergo minor renovations. “We hope that we’ll line up some people who might be interested, who could come up with some money – as you know it’s difficult at this time to get money from anywhere,” said Mr Edgecombe. “But, Big Game has always been a profi table thing.” H e added that Bimini has been “catching a lil’ hell” since the global economic downturn began to affect the local economy, but said Biminites have come together to ride out the economic tsunami collectively. “It’s easier to absorb these kinds of things (Bimini Big Game Resort’s Closure) than anywhere else because there are a lot of families involved and we try to help one another in any which way,” he said. However, Mr Edgecombe said the busy season will be lost this year, as far as the Bimini Big Game Resort is concerned. He said, though, that Bimini residents are looking towards the next three to four months for a spike in visitor numbers, even without the resort. “If the weather is good, people will come,” Mr Edgecombe said. “March is a terrible month as far as the weather is concerned, but we’re looking forward to a good summer.” Budget. There is still softness in the market.” While he was unable to speak specifically to what other Bahamian resort properties were experiencing, Mr Sands told Tribune Business that “the most significant” impact being experienced by the sector was on its “ability to yield a strong average [daily room] rate, which is creating the problem for revenue earnings”. The BHA president explained that there were “a lot of people trading down”, meaning that those tourists who were travelling were increasingly seeking value, and exploiting the economic and hotel sector downturn to obtain discounted room rates and packages. “In the last week or two, we’ve seen some glimpses of an increase in demand, but we’re still not yielding the average rates forecast or achieved last year,” said Mr Sands. “The reality is that there’s a t remendous effort being put i nto maintaining rate integrity, b ut the demand for package pricing and more value is havinga significant impact on average daily room rates, and that results in a significant reduction in revenues achieved from room sales.” While some resorts were feeling the pressure more than others, Mr Sands explained that the Bahamian hotel sector was also witnessing “downward pressure on occupancy levels” Both that and revenues were behind last year and 2009 budget forecasts. The factors impacting the Bahamian hotel industry are no mystery. The main ones are the US and world economic reces sion, and the subsequent falloff in consumer and traveller confidence. There has also beena sharp drop in convention and group business, with no US firms wanting the stigma attached to sending staff abroad to foreign conferences. This then manifested itself in rate reductions and the search for value deals. “All these items have contributed to a softness in the m arket that has yet to reverse i tself,” Mr Sands said. “There h as been an increase in call volumes for April and May. That has not manifested itself into an increase in bookings, but the call volumes indicate there is an upward trend.” The industry was not counting on this to increase bookings just yet, with hotel properties focusing instead on controlling expenses and costs during “what will be a shorter winter season this year”. Mr Sands explained that while the peak winter tourism season traditionally lasted from early February until Easter, some two-and-a-half to three months, this year it might have shortened to the March-first week in April, a six-week period. “It’s fair to say most hotels are unlikely to reach Budget forecasts for this period, based on what happened in January and February,” Mr Sands said. “It would appears that there’s not been any overwhelming strengthening, certainly for January and February. If there’s any strengthening, even at a lower yield, it will be for March a nd the first week in April.” T hat could have major impli c ations for the hotel industry’s financial position for the remainder of 2009, given that the sector has traditionally relied on profits and cash flow generated during the peak winter season to allow it to get through the ‘slow season’, particularly August-October. “The reality is that the results attained in the winter season determine the adjustments the company may have to make for the rest of the year,” Mr Sands said. “We tend to make the overwhelming majority of cash flow during the traditionally strong winter period.” He added: “This could be a long year. Most properties are trying as best they can to try and ride out this very difficult period. Every day is a challenge. But every day obviously creates opportunities to look at ways to maintain positive cash flow, to generate positive cash flow. “Your top line revenue is the basis on which you start, and once that shrinks it has a direct impact on your profit and loss statement.” obtained their financing from,” Mr Wrinkle explained. “If any contractor or supplier has a legitimate lien or com-p laint with a developer, they will have the security of knowing it will be dealt with in the Bahamian court system. They will not have to go abroad to seek damages or court decis ions. By having this grant from t he IDB, it will enable us to move to the next level and get to international standards.” The proposed IDB project, which will cost $225,000 in total, is designed to strengthen the BCA. Mr Wrinkle said the financing would “be utilised for implementing the standards and testing procedures for the licensing requirements of the Contractors Bill, and for the improvements in the operational ability of the BCA within the Bahamas”. The project is also designed to aid the BCA, and wider Bahamian construction industry, in dealing with internation al trade agreements that might impact the sector, such as the Economic Partnership Agree ment (EPA with the European Union (EU The proposed IDB-led initia tive also aims “to strengthen our ties and relationship with the other Caribbean construction associations”, Mr Wrinkle said. “Since CARICOM signed the EPA together, it puts all the CARICOM countries in the same basket with regards to construction.” Mr Wrinkle said the implementation of international standard contract documents in the Bahamas, coupled with the hoped-for passing of the Contractors Bill and its licensing regime, would enhance the sec tor’s competitiveness by providing Bahamian contractors with recognised certification. “It shows we’ve gained a level of competence and compli ance that will enable us to participate at a high level,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. “At the moment, international contractors do not really know the ability and status of the Bahamian construction industry in general. “It makes it difficult for those international firms to identify capable and competent contractor, and sub-contractor, in the Bahamas without having some acceptable standards to evaluate them. “We’re experiencing that with the Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD tracts. There’s a lot of interna tional interest in the work, because of the scope and bond ing requirements. “We’re finding that it’s an impediment, not having this Contractors Bill, the industry not being properly licensed and regulated, not having the forms and professional approach to a number of the contracts. “It really lowers the bar for us, and we want to raise the bar for ourselves. The IDB grant will enable us to raise the bar.” Mr Wrinkle added, though, that the proposed IDB project would not proceed until the final draft of the Contractors Bill was released by the Government to ensure the two worked in step as a complement, and did not conflict with each other. The BCA president said the Association was “aggressively pursuing” the passing of the Contractors Bill by Parliament. The draft legislation is currently in the Ministry of Works, and the BCA was pushing for all work to be completed so that the Bill could go to Cabinet. The Contractors Bill, when finally passed, will introduce a formalised standards and testing regime for the first time, so that all contractors in every trade plumbers, masons, carpenters, electricians can be licensed at one of four different levels. “The Government will register the contractor and issue the licence, but it has no interest in doing the courses and the training. They prefer that the BCA administer the courses and the testing,” Mr Wrinkle said. “Once the contractor passes the test, it will require the Government to review the application and issue the licence.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE :KLFKDUH\RX" :LOOIXOODUURJDQWVXVXDOO\OLWWHULQ%DLQ7RZQEXW QRWLQ&DEOH%HDFK ,JQRUDQWVWKHVHSHRSOHDUHXQDZDUHRIDOLQN EHWZHHQWKHHQYLURQPHQWDQGWKHLUOLWWHULQJ ,QFRQYHQLHQWVSURSHUGLVSRVDOLVWRRKDUGWRPXFK WURXEOHVRPHRQHHOVHVSUREOHP ROLWWHUHUVHPYLURQPHQWDOO\FRQVFLRXVGRQWOLWWHU (3$$XVWUDOLDf C C O O N N T T R R A A C C T T O O R R S S , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B B B A A H H A A M M A A R R , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B Resort placed in receivership F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Realtors to probe Miami firm selling Bahamian property However, Bahamas-based developers are allowed to sell the real estate and properties that they themselves construct, and it is possible that this is what Paradise Is Mine is doing. Mr Wong said that whenever BREA received information suggesting that foreign realtors were selling Bahamian real estate without a licence, its monitoring committee dealt with it. He added that often, when the situation was explained and brought to the attention of the alleged offender, they stopped their activities. Meanwhile, Mr Wong said BREA had met with Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, to convey its concerns over the removal of the $35,000 real property tax ceiling, which it felt had resulted in potentially higher tax payments for wealthy clients something that could impact the international and second home buyer sector. The BREA president said Mr Laing had promised that the Government would take into account the real estate industry’s concerns when conducting its 2009-2010 Budget preparation exercise, but made no promises of a policy amendment or reversal. “The minister was very accommodating, and he said we will have to wait and see when the Budget comes in May,” Mr Wong said. “I think they were aware of what the issues were, and are going to look at it very carefully to see if they can be accommodated. “They’re going to look at it and see if they can accommodate some of our concerns. But he made no promises.” Mr Laing had pointed out that the real property tax ceiling’s removal had coincided with a revaluation exercise conducted by the real property tax unit. “I agree with him that a lot of properties were undervalued, and that’s why people are screaming,” Mr Wong said. He added that BREA realised the Government had critical revenue-raising needs, especially at a time of recession when it was trying to finance numerous stimulus programmes. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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Cable expands dividend 16% A LOAN officer from the European Investment Bank (EIB to explain the financing options it offers to business operators and financial institutions. Inmaculada Riba Soto, loan officer in the Caribbean and Pacific Division of the Euro-pean Investment Bank (EIB met with members of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s Small and Medium Enterprises Support Unit ( SMESU) on Monday, March 1 6, at the Inter-American Development Bank’s (IDB East Bay Street offices. Ms Soto also visited the Chamber prior to the meeting, where she met with Philip Simon, its executive director, Khaalis Rolle, the first vicepresident, Gershan Major, second vice-president and chairman of the Chamber’s globalisation committee, Yvette Sands, Chamber director and chairperson of the Chamber’s energy and environment committee, along with Hank Ferguson, director of the Chamber’s Small and Medium Enterprises Support Unit (SMESU “Institutions like the EIB, the IDB and the IIC (Inter-American Investment Corporation) have increasingly extended their reach and product offerings into the private sector from traditionally public sector driven projects over the last few years.This obviously represents a shift in policy geared towards the wider business communities in the countries that they serve. We are pleased to receive Ms Soto and the EIB to explorea ny possibility for greater financial assistance to the Bahami-an business community, particularly small and medium sized enterprises who may need it the most,” Mr Simon said. Mr. Major pointed to the important role the European Investment Bank had played as a development partner in the Bahamas over the past 30 years through the Cotonou Partnership Agreement, which was signed in 2000, and followed the Lome Convention of 1975. “The bank, over the course of this 30-year relationship, has supplemented the benefits received under the various conventions by providing loans with preferential terms of just over 50 million Euros,” Mr Major said. Much of this funding was used to support developments undertaken by the Bahamas Electricity Corporation and the Water and Sewerage Corporation . “Today our relationship is changing; we have just completed a new trade agreement with the Europeans, known to you as the EPA or Economic Partnership Agreement. The agreement speaks to reciprocity, liberalisation and is designed with the hope of increasing our capacity and abilities to become competitive in an increasingly globalised world,” Mr Major said. “Today, the EIB is once again making itself available as a partner, and we remain hopeful that there will be opportu nities and benefits to this continued partnership.” Ms Soto said the bank, which is owned by 27 member states of the European Union with Germany, France, the UK and Italy being the largest shareholders, lent 58 billion euros in 2008. The EIB supports projects that deliver sustainable economic, social and environmental benefits. Within the Caribbean region, Ms Soto explained that the bank puts special emphasis on projects in three areas: improvement of regional integration through better infrastructure, promotion of the use of renewable energy and climate change mitigation, and development of the private sector through credit lines for small and medium enterprises to financial intermediaries. Following the meeting, Ms Soto commented: “This has been a great opportunity for me t o get in touch with the busin ess community in the Bahamas to assess the need for financing, and to try and understand how the EIB can help the business community in the country.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 5B 0$5,6(59,&(6,1& 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ RIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW RI 0$5,66(59,&(6,1& KDVEHHQGLVVROYHG DQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJWRWKH&HUWLFDWHRI 'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGE\WKHHJLVWUDU*HQHUDORQWKHWK 0LNKDLOHFKYRORGRY %XVLQHVV$GGUHVV //&$ 9ROJRJUDGVN\URVSHFW RVFRZXVVLDQ)HGHUDWLRQ /LTXLGDWRU CABLE Bahamas is planning to increase its 2009 first quarter dividend by 16 per cent, from $0.06 per share to $0.07 per share, due to the company’s earning momentums “carrying through to the first quarter of 2009”. Among the steps the company said it had taken to boost profitability were its new CoralWave e-mail platform, Pronto!; an increased sales presence; enhanced customer retention efforts; direct dialing for customer installation and customer trouble calls; compensation tied to the company’s growth; an expanded customer care facility; and an upgraded broadband core network and data centre. European bank officer in Nassau THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s Small and Medium Enterprises Support Unit (SMESU ulada Riba Soto, loan officer for the Caribbean and Pacific Division of the European Investment Bank, who is pictured along with, from L to R: Yvette Sands, Chamber director and chairperson of the Chamber’s energy and environment committee; Khaalis Rolle, first vice-president; Gershan Major, second vice-president and chairman of the Chamber’s globalisation committee; and Philip Simon, executive director of the Chamber. (Photo: Anastasia Stubbs/Visionaire Marketing

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C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE health BODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e MENOPAUSE Surviving n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net M ENOPAUSE for many women is considered the single most significant biological change signifying an end to fertility and youth, and unfortunately in some cases can mean an end to sexual appeal and desire as well. While women spend their 20s, 30s, and even 40s focused on raising a family, building a successful career, or even celebrating the joys of womanhood, for many, menopause when it does happen is like a thief robbing them of the feelings, desires, and functions which in many ways are synonymous with womanhoodthe effects of which can prove extremely dramatic not just for the woman, but also for her partner. For many men the initial reaction can range anywhere from bewilderness to extreme uncertainty in the relationship. Unaware of the physic al and emotional roller-coaster experienced by h is mate, most men are simply baffled by the s udden and frankly scary changes women go through as a result of menopause, which undoubtedly affects all sectors of the relationship including sex. Tribune Health spoke with Dr Richard Bridgewater of the Southern Community Medical Centre, a board certified Obstetrician and Gynecologist (OBGYN menopause naturally causes a reduction in overall sexual desire for most women, it does not mean that they are sentenced to a life void of sexual pleasure. He said that the first step in overcoming menopause is to identify initial changes. Contrary to the common belief that menopause is a one shot deal, Dr Bridgewater said like every other cycle that occurs in the human body menopause too has a preamble. Known as perimenopause, this is the phase where the woman will begin to notice menopause related changes. On the inside, her ovaries become less conducive to reproduction, and estro gen and progesterone levels begin to decrease. “Estrogen is the female hormone responsible for a woman’s ability to be nurturing, her ability to be more intimate, it’s responsible for her hour glass shape, sense of femininity, and sensitivity during intercourse,” Dr Bridgewater said. However as the ovaries become less productive, an automatic decrease in estrogen levels occur, and on the exterior a woman will begin to expe rience hot flashes, mood swings, uncontrollable crying spells, fluctuating sex drive, and in some cases still see a monthly period. In women 45 and older, perimenopause can begin, but in many cases there are specific factors which may contribute to a more overt experience. Dr Bridgewater said in some studies, the external effects of perimenopause can be more dramatic for a slender Caucasian female than for a full figured dark skinned woman. Generally however, common factors include but are not limited to weight, diet, stress, life styles, other pre-existing conditions, and one’s approach to menopause. Although the effects of menopause are unavoidable, Dr Bridgewater suggests that the mind over matter approach to maintaining sexual pleasure and quality of life may help some women in overcoming menopause with fewer hurdles. Another significant change is the frequency of Atrophic Vaginitis. He said as menopause is commonly associated with reduced sexual pleasure and desire, some women may refuse to address their discomfort during sex, which could be to their detriment. Atrophic Vaginitis is a condition where the lining of the vagina may become dry and inflamed because of the thinning and shrinking of the vaginal tissue and overall diameter, all of which is associated with lowered estrogen levels. As women go through menopause, the vagina goes through a continuous shrinking process which can affect sex, urination, and sensitivity. With less natural lubrication in the vagina, and less pleasurable sensitivity due to menopause, Dr Bridgewater said the friction of sex can become discomforting and out right painful for some women, leading to many post menopausal women walking away from sexual activity all together. The important thing to remember according to Dr Bridgewater, is that seeing a doctor regularly can tremendously reduce the affects and occurrence of atrophic vaginitis and other conditions. Now available are various treatments as well as hormone replacement therapy. According to Dr Bridgewater, replacing female hormones once produced by the body has proven to be one of the most effective means of combating menopause related changes. He also suggested that women who are going through menopause increase their vitamin D intake, which combined with some additional sun exposure, can reduce the possibility of another menopause related disorder known as osteosclerosis. The condition which is a gradual increase in bone density, commonly occurs in post R EVVING YOUR SEX DRIVE BACK IN GEAR AFTER MENOPAUSE SEE page nine CONTRARY to the common belief that menopause is a one shot deal, Dr Bridgewater said like every other cycle that occurs in the human body menopause too has a preamble.

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Now that the fiber trend is catching on, and people are becoming more aware, it can also be found added to foods such as yogurt, soy milk and pasta. Other foods pause to pay a toll along the gastrointestinal highway, but fiber zips through E-ZPass style because the body can not digest it. Like seat fillers at any event, fiber fills a void and then vanishes when some thing better takes its place. According to Doctor of Natural Health and Certified Colon Hydrothereapist, Joyce Adder ley, there are two kinds of fiber: soluble and insoluble. “Soluble fiber is made up of polysaccharides (carbohydrates that contain three or more molecules of simple carbohydrates) and it does not dissolve in water. It has a beneficial effect on the body chemistry, such as lowering blood cholesterol and blood sugar levels. Good sources i nclude: oat or oat bran, legumes (dried beans and peas many fruits and vegetables such as carrots and bananas. It tends to hide inside foods--the flesh of apples, the grain of rice inside the hull. It is what gives cooked vegetables their soft, mushy quality. Insoluble fiber is main ly made up of plant cell walls, and it cannot be dissolved in water. Good sources of insoluble fiber (wheat bran, whole wheat flour, and products made from them, skins from various fruits and vegetables, leafy greens, and cruciferous vegetables (cauliflower, broccoli and Brussels sprouts). Insoluble fiber may help to regulate bowel move ments. It bulks up as it absorbs liquid in the stomach; the bulk pushes waste down and out of your system. Insoluble fiber is usually found in the skins and outer parts of foods, and it's what gives many their tough, chewy texture. Basi cally, it speeds up the passage of material through your digestive tract and sweeps out all the toxins in your body,” Mrs Adderley said. As long as you are eating natural foods, you will reap the belly-filling benefits of both kinds of fiber. By taking up space in your stomach, fiber foils overeating by making you feel too stuffed to keep snacking. While you are enjoying the satisfaction of a full stomach, you can gloat over the fact that it likely took fewer calories to achieve that feeling: Foods that pack a lot of fiber can help low er your carbohydrate intake. “Fiber keeps the entire gas trointestinal system functioning smoothly. As the fiber absorbs water it makes fecal matter bulkier, less dense, and easier to pass along the digestive tract. This decreases the amount of time that food waste spends inside the body and may reduce the risk of infection or cell changes due to carcinogens that are produced when some foods, particularly meat, degrade,” Mrs Adderley said. Mrs Adderley stressed that fiber is important because it has an influence on the digestion process from start to finish. “Dr Dennis Burkitt was the first researcher to connect a high-fiber diet with better health. He noticed that people eating a traditional African diet in rural areas had almost no dia betes, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, diverticular disease, colon cancer, or heart dis ease. Dietary fiber may also help prevent obesity by slowing down digestion and the release of glucose and insulin. Fiber has been shown to normalise serum cholesterol levels,” Mrs Adderley said. Mrs Adderley said Bahamians need to realise the impor tance of fiber in their diets and their overall health. “If we continue to eat our Bahamian diet of peas & rice, macaroni & cheese, potato salad and fried chicken, with little or no fruits and veggies then, I would agree that we do not get sufficient fiber. For one to havea fiber filled diet one should eat a minimum of five fruits and vegetables every day. More is better. They are rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals, trace nutrients, fluids, and vitality. Eat whole grains such as wholewheat, brown rice, oatmeal, millet, amaranth, quinoa, and rye. Eat bran or whole grain cereal at breakfast; they can significantly boost your fiber intake in just one meal. Beans and peas are also loaded with healthful fibers. They area low-fat protein source, and their soluble fiber and sitosterols may help normalise cholesterol levels. An ideal intake of fiber isa minimum of 35 grams a day. Provided the right foods are eat en, this level can easily be achieved,” Mrs Adderley said. n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net FIBER is the indigestible part of a plant. It is in whole grains, fruits, nuts, legumes, vegetables and b eans. However, with the normal B ahamian die t consisting of t hings f illed with starches, butter and gr ease w e har dly ever get enough fiber which is causing a rise in the amount of colon cancer cases in the country. C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009, PAGE 9B I HAVE encountered many persons whose feet continue to hurt but they choose to ignore it. I say, don't ignore it because your feet are trying to tell you something. One person puts it like this, “well the pain comes and goes so I never think it is serious.” If you experience any pains in your feet, you need to know that your feet are trying to say something to you. As always, your feet are the foundation o f your body and without a s trong foundation your body is l ikely to crumble. Treating your feet well by getting frequent pedicures is an opportunity to pay attention to their condition and alert you to 'warning signs'. WARNING SIGNS? Calluses which are simply a hardening of the skin, are sometimes seen as nature's way of protecting the tissues below from steady abrasions or pressures from the body. When calluses develop they are often found on pressuresensitive parts of the foot, such as under the ball of the feetor under the big toe joint. They can be sore and even painful, much like having a pebble under your foot. Calluses are sometimes a sign of foot imbalance or of a more serious problem concealed inside the foot. Corns there are two main types: Hard and Soft. The hard corn usually starts as red skin, followed by a coating of callus, which develops into a hard corn. Most hard corns develop on the side of the little toe, but are also found in other places where there is steady pressure and abrasion. Hard corns are almost always causedby shoes of the wrong size or shape or fit. On the other hand, the soft corn is always found between the web of the toes, usually between the fourth and fifth toes. A soft corn is white and damp. It can also be very painful. It is caused by a constant squeezing together of the toes as a result of shoes too short or narrow at the toes. The bones of the toes rub together and bring on the soft corn. Hammer toes claw-like toes looking very much like the head of a hammer. This condition usually affects the second toe and at times the third toe. It is believed that an acquired hammer toe can be the result of constant wearing of shoes with pointed toes, or too short or narrow. It is also believed that causes can also be genetic or hereditary. Hammer toes can be successfully corrected by simple surgical treatment. However, a foot with hammer toes should be fitted in the right size and type of shoe, with a deep toe box. Proper fit is a must to avoid painful conditions associated with hammer toes. Bunion or 'Hallux Valgus' suggest that the big toe or great toe bends in an outward direction towards the second toe. This deformity can be accompanied by severe inflammation to the side of the big toe. Swelling and pain or soreness can also be felt in the area. These distressing symptoms are caused by a constant abrasion of the shoe against the bursa sac at the side of the big toe. There again, the correction of a bunion can be done thorough the services of a podiatrist. Morton's Neuroma pain, burning, tingling, or numbness that occurs between the third and fourth toes and in the ball of your foot may be caused by a growth around the nerves. Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau. The views expressed are those of the author and does not necessarily represent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to nassau@footso lutions.com or 327-FEET (3338 By BERNADETTE GIBSON Are you steps away from injury? Ask your feet Surviving menopause menopausal women, and can lead to frequent fractures, and wheel chair confinement. Also associated with premenopause are hysterectomies, often necessary for benign con ditions, which can affect a women just entering her sexual prime to a women approaching menopause. For whatever reason, hormone therapy is also advised, especially for younger patients. “A 30-year-old who may have had a hysterectomy would have more pronounced symptoms of premenopause, because her body is still very much reliant on estrogen,” Dr Bridgewater said. Added with regular visits to an OBGYN, adopting healthier lifestyles, and monitoring body changes resulting from menopause, most women can ride through menopause rela tively smoothly. As for maintaining sexual desire and pleasure, traditional rules still apply. Dr Bridgewater gave this advice: Communicate with your partner to make them aware of the changes in your body, give yourself more time during foreplay to get your body in the mode, and use a water based lubricant to add to increased sexual pleasure. FROM page eight More fiber please ! EATING bran or whole grain cereal at breakfast can significantly boost your fiber intake in just one meal.

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n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net T HE question of whether or not the late Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling, former Prime Minister of the Bahamas wasb orn in Jamaica and if he was paid to turn a blind eye to drug-trading activities in Norman’s Cay during the 80a nd early 90s, remains a touchy subject for many Bahamians. Just last week, an emotional protest took place outside The Tribune where a group of Bahamians waving placa rds called for an apology and resig nation of managing editor John Marquis because of his scandalous arti-c les on the late Prime Minister. In this Barber Shop, we ask to what e xtent do these recent allegations have on the general perception of the for mer leader, and whether or not now is t he time for such stories. Setting the stage at Cameron’s Clean Cuts, a small group of men give their take on the issues. First up was 31-year-old Barber Ken D ames from the Baillou Hills area, who said the article which alleged Sir Lynden’s knowledge of drug-dealing activity during his leadership is disrespectful. Sir Lynden Pindling is a man who has done great things for this country, he might not have been a perfect man, but I think we all know that. “To have this article come out after Sir Lynden’s death, and from John Marquis who we had some problems with in journalism in this country in the past, I think his actions are just disrespectful.” Mr Dames went on to say that he thinks Mr Marquis was wrong in going to a grieving man, Chauncey Tynes Sr, and said the aging man is still upset at the mysterious death of his son. “Mr Tynes has no closure, they have still not found the body, but what they gat to realise is Chauncey Tynes Jr did some things that wasn’t right. He associated with some people that he knew were undesirables, people like Carlos ‘Joe’ Lehder, who he would have known to be alleged drug deal ers.” Mr Dames explained that if Mr Tynes Jr made the decision to stillwork for such a character, and to then go missing, “that’s the kind of conse quence that follows that kind of life.” 33-year-old Taffie Darling from Robinson Road said although there are certain freedoms of writing enti tled to any journalist, his concern is that now is not the appropriate time to discuss the issue. “The Bahamas right now is facing a recession, so for him to come now and write about Sir Lynden whether theyare true or not, is a waste of time.” However Mr Darling suggested that there is nothing special or unique about this alleged drug trade involvement and illicit activity by the former PM. “If he really wants to talk about corruption, then he needs to go further back, because it didn’t just start with S ir Lynden Pindling.” Mr Darling alleges that in the haydays of the United Bahamian Party (UBP running, and the stealing of land,w hich he said should be written about if the overall intent by Mr Marquis was to identify corruption and wrong doing. “If you weigh the good against the b ad, Sir Lynden has done a lot of good, and the whole talk about him is n ot relevant at this timeand he ‘John Marquis’ is just a journalist look ing for some boost in his career.” P atron Keith Baker from Stapleton Gardens explained, that just because S ir Lynden was at the helm of the helm of the Bahamas’ independence, all Bahamians should react to ther ecent articles identifying him as a crony of the Colombian drug lord Mr Lehder. “Sir Lynden has done a whole lot in the Bahamian community, and wheny ou find someone from the outside coming and mentioning negative things about him, then the whole Bahamian community is going to react. Even if it’s relevant or not, Sir Lynden is our forefather and we don’t care or give a squat what he mighth ave done.” Proprietor 33-year-old Cameron L ubin from Fox Hill added, that apart from this issue being irrelevant at this time, there is a negative message that many young people are getting. “Young people are now thinking that it pays off to do wrong, although we are not condoning that behaviour,I think more scrutiny needs to go into articles on our leaders.” Patron 27-year-old Jamal Strachan, said nine years after Sir Lynden’s death is too late to attempt to bring shame on his name or that of his family. “Whatever he did then, even if it comes out that it was so, you really have to just leave him in God’s hands because we all gat to be judged for ourselves.” On the issue of whether Sir Lynden was Bahamian or not, Mr Strachan said it is another closed minded view on life practiced by many Bahamians. Mr Strachan said: “It doesn’t matter where a person is from, as long as they are doing things for the people like Pindling and even like President Obama, it shouldn’t matter.” I just feel at the end of the day, all politicians need to be held accountable for whatever they do, a lot of these MPs feel they are so high and mighty and are not suppose to answer to the people, and that is wrong.” Mr Strachan said as long as MPs are more responsible for their actions and are truly operating for the good of the people, then there would be no reason to debate someone’s practice after they are dead and gone. To comment on this topic or to have your barber shop featured in a future article, lallen@tribunemedia.net. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE At the start of my career as a manager, another manager told me that it is important to hold employees in a higher vision than they can hold themselves. She advocated seeing their potential when employees are unable or too afraid to see how far they cango. As a new manager, I decided to put this advice into action. I created stretch projects for my team members to ensure that in addition to their routine responsibilities, they were given opportunitiesto grow and evolve into leadership roles. I took the advice literally, so at first I attempted to see everyone in a higher vision. I found that there were some employees who could rise to the occasion and there were others who were completely frustrated by the process. Employees became frustrated because they became obsessed with trying torise to the challenge not wanting to disappoint me. What was happening was that I was unwittingly applying unconstructive pressure because I was unable to recalibrate my expectations after employees demonstrated that my expectations were inappropriate. So here are a few tips I learned that can help you to hold your employees in a balanced vision of their potential: 1. Avoid projecting your strengths and weaknesses onto your employees. You will only frustrate them if you expect them to be able to do what you do well. In other words, know your employees (KYE strengths and weaknesses, likes and dislikes, values, motivators and demotivat ors and personality all factor into the balancing process. 2. Sometimes a weakness is exactly what it is. A weakness! While you may see some improvement when you give employees opportunities to grow, know when to stop expecting improvement in the areas of weakness. Instead, focus on the employee's strengths. This will build their confidence and motivation. 3. Don't penalise employees if they are unsuccessful at a stretch project. Perhaps your assessment of their potential in a particular competence was incorrect so don't give up on them. Developing employees is a trial and error process so test them in other areas of competence. Avoid writing them off. 4. Put the stretch project in perspective. If you penalise employees at appraisal time because they failed at a stretch project even if they performed their mandated duties very well, remember you may sabotage your efforts to develop your team. They won't trust you to allow them to make mistakes. 5. Sometimes employees have the potential to go to the next level but they don't have the will. Depending on the reason for the lack of will, you may not be able to persuade them to go to the next level. For instance, I once met a front line employee who was a natural leader with the technical competencies to train incoming employees and even managers but he refused promotion after promotion. He demonstrated the talent but did not have the will to go to the next level. This can happen if a person doesn't want the extra responsibility of supervising others or they may have goals outside the workplace. 6. See your team as a whole entity. Sometimes employees appointed to a position do not possess all the skills necessary to perform satisfactorily. While right placement is optimal, sometimes it is not immediately possible so some leaders see the team in a higher vision of itself, creatively harnessing the strengths of the members of the team in order to create synergy. Everyone is Part of the Equation Managers are not the only ones responsible for holding employees in a higher vision of themselves. As an employee you may tend to complain about or be wary of your coworkers. While sometimes your assessment may be accurate, it doesn't mean the employee is a write off. It could mean that with your help, and the help of others (assuming the employee's willingness to receive help) you can help turn the situation around. Corporate memory can be long and unforgiving. As an employee, if you do your part in forgiving coworkers for their mistakes and reach out to support each other you can help transform your team. Holding employees in a higher vision of themselves is an important skill possessed by top performing leaders and employees. If you focus on developing members of your team you can createa higher performing team and inevitably, you will be able to perform at an even higher level. Whether you are a leader or employee, when considering developing your fellow employees you should take a long hard look in the mirror. Ask yourself if you demonstrate the behaviors you expect from your employees or coworkers? What is your real agenda? Can your team trust you? Do you demonstrate behaviours that indicate you care more about your success than the success of others? The answers to these questions will impact your effectiveness. Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational Soul, an HR Consulting and Leadership Development company. If you are interested in exploring how you can create higher performing team leaders, you contact her at www.orgsoul.com. By YVETTE BETHEL Holding employees in a higher vision of themselves “Just playing around and doing fun girl stuff with my daughter inspired me. I thought about doing a spa party for little girls,” Mrs Paul said Mrs Paul’s daughter, Gabrielle, said she enjoys the parties and that most of her friends describe the party as their best party ever. “The most enjoyable part for me is the relaxing part of soaking my feet for a pedicure with rose petals in the water and applying the strawberry whipped cream facial mask. I also like listening to the spa music playing which is like ocean sounds etc. I liked that there were kids’ maga zines to look at and enjoy, and that I got to wear a nice robe,” Gabrielle said. Mrs Paul said the young ladies also get body and foot scrubs. Girls can make their own lotion, as well as tiara shaped place cards in spa kit. “They can get a chocolate mask and strawberry masksit’s basically just whip cream. Most of them even like to eat it off so it has very kid friendly ingredients,” Mrs Paul said. M rs Paul said she eventually would like to turn her business into a store so that little girls and their moms can have access to everything for a girl’s world. “I do someday want to turn it into a store whereas I would be able to have the parties in the store and retail girly items as well. I think spa parties are great for any occasionespe cially sleepovers for little girls. I have clients who expressed that it is different, fun and small. We do not cater to more than 12 girls and a minimum of 4 to 5, just so the child can have more of her closer friends enjoying a spa day with her,” Mrs Paul said. Spa-la-la party F ROM page 12 Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . THE BARBERSHOP Does it matter what Pindling did now that he’s dead? K EN DAMES Mr Tynes h as no closure, they have still not f ound the body, but w hat they gat to realise i s Chauncey Tynes Jr did some things that wasn’t right...” CAMERON LUBIN “Young people are now thinking that it pays off to do wrong, although we are not condoning that behaviour, I think more scrutiny needs to go into articles on our .” JAMAL STRACHAN “It doesn’t matter where a person is from, as long as they are doing things for the peo ple like Pindling and even like President Obama, it shouldn’t matter.”

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 56F/13C Low: 57F/14C Low: 64F/18C Low: 65 F/18C Low: 64F/18C Low: 68F/20C Low: 68 F/20C Low: 57F/14C High: 78F/26C High: 82F/28C High: 77 F/25C High: 77F/25C High: 79F/26C High: 78 F/26 High: 78F/26C Low: 59F/15C High: 74 F/23C Low: 61 F/16 High: 77 F/25CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 62F/17C High: 79F/26C Low: 67 F/19C High: 77F/25C Low: 59 F/15C High: 75F/24C Low: 62 F/17C High: 77F/25C Low: 64F/18C High: 82 F/28C Low: 61F/16C High: 78 F/26C Low: 62 F/17C High: 80F/27C Low: 67F/19C High: 81F/27C Low: 62 F/17C High: 80F/27C High: 73F/23CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 24TH, 2009, PAGE 11BTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Variable clouds, a shower; windy . Partly cloudy, a shower; windy. Sunny and windy.Mostly sunny and nice. Mostly sunny, breezy and warm. High: 78 Low: 68 High: 77 High: 79 High: 82 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, breezy and warm. High: 85 Low: 66 Low: 70 Low: 71 AccuWeather RealFeel 80F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 65F 74-66F 76-69F 81-71F 87-73F Low: 70 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 75F/24C Low .................................................... 66F/19C Normal high ...................................... 80F/26C Normal low ........................................ 66F/19C Last year's high .................................. 86F/30C Last year's low .................................. 71F/22C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................2.07"Normal year to date ......................................4.72" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU New First Full Last Mar . 26 Apr . 2 Apr . 9 Apr . 17 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:10 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:23 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 5:45 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 5:46 p.m. Today W ednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 7:07 a.m.2.612:49 a.m.0.2 7:19 p.m.2.71:07 p.m.0.1 7:46 a.m.2.61:33 a.m.0.0 7:59 p.m.2.81:45 p.m.0.0 8:25 a.m.2.72:15 a.m.0.0 8:38 p.m. 3.02:23 p.m.-0.1 9:04 a.m. 2.72:57 a.m.-0.1 9:18 p.m. 3.1 3:01 p.m.-0.1 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 90/3272/22s90/3271/21s Amsterdam46/737/2sh49/940/4r Ankara, Turkey52/1128/-2pc52/1134/1pc Athens58/1449/9s60/1541/5sh Auckland69/2055/12s68/2055/12s Bangkok92/3378/25pc91/3278/25t Barbados85/2974/23pc84/2874/23pc Barcelona63/1744/6s59/1550/10pc Beijing54/1236/2pc66/1837/2s Beirut60/1555/12sh61/1655/12sh Belgrade45/733/0sn44/636/2sn Berlin39/327/-2sn37/230/-1sf Bermuda 59/1551/10sh61/1655/12sh Bogota65/1848/8sh66/1848/8r Brussels46/736/2sh48/836/2r Budapest47/827/-2c48/834/1sBuenos Aires 84/2866/18s84/2868/20s Cairo70/2154/12pc73/2257/13s Calcutta 96/3578/25pc94/3477/25s Calgar y41/521/-6pc25/-315/-9sn Cancun82/2764/17pc86/3067/19s Caracas78/2565/18pc84/2868/20cCasablanca 76/24 62/16 pc 80/2655/12pc Copenhagen 37/231/0pc40/433/0sh Dublin52/1141/5r50/1041/5pcFrankfurt 48/8 34/1sh43/636/2r Geneva38/333/0sh37/236/2sn Halifax35/121/-6sn39/326/-3pcHavana 81/27 61/16 pc84/2861/16s Helsinki27/-216/-8c28/-212/-11pc Hong Kong 77/2564/17t72/2266/18r Islamabad80/2659/15r82/2756/13c Istanbul57/1344/6s56/1336/2rJerusalem 51/1041/5sh58/1441/5s Johannesburg 76/24 54/12pc75/2354/12pc Kingston 82/27 72/22sh84/2873/22sh Lima83/2865/18pc83/2865/18c London 52/11 41/5 s52/1139/3sh Madrid70/2137/2s72/2237/2s Manila91/3277/25c86/3075/23r Mexico City81/2752/11t77/2549/9t Monterrey95/3566/18pc95/3567/19sMontreal 39/319/-7s45/737/2s Moscow 32/025/-3sn36/227/-2sn Munich36/232/0sn35/133/0sn Nairobi90/3257/13s90/3257/13s New Delhi91/3266/18pc88/3164/17c Oslo 36/217/-8pc37/223/-5c Paris 52/1139/3pc50/1041/5r Prague38/330/-1sn36/233/0sn Rio de Janeiro80/2674/23r80/2672/22r Riyadh89/3162/16s77/2560/15pc Rome58/1436/2sh59/1537/2s St. Thomas 81/27 72/22sh80/2672/22sh San Juan82/2763/17t88/3164/17t San Salvador91/3268/20s89/3171/21pc Santiago84/2852/11s86/3050/10s Santo Domingo82/2766/18sh82/2766/18sh Sao Paulo75/2362/16pc75/2362/16c Seoul 41/528/-2pc43/628/-2c Stockholm32/021/-6sn36/225/-3pc Sydney82/2764/17pc84/2866/18pc T aipei 70/21 64/17r73/2263/17pc Tokyo59/1547/8c55/1246/7r Toronto38/333/0pc45/741/5r Trinidad84/2873/22t84/2874/23t Vancouver46/736/2sh46/732/0pcVienna 40/4 31/0sn43/640/4r Warsaw38/328/-2sn34/127/-2sf Winnipeg34/123/-5sn30/-116/-8sn HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayWednesdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Wednesday:E at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:E at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Wednesday:E at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:E at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Wednesday:E at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 61/1637/2pc61/1637/2s Anchorage32/024/-4c36/225/-3sn Atlanta 68/20 51/10pc61/1653/11sh Atlantic City46/724/-4s50/1034/1s Baltimore46/728/-2s54/1240/4pcBoston 40/4 30/-1pc48/834/1s Buffalo44/630/-1pc52/1138/3pc Charleston, SC71/2150/10pc66/1856/13pc Chicago64/1743/6t50/1035/1cCleveland 54/12 38/3pc56/1342/5sh Dallas70/2148/8t69/2055/12t Denver46/725/-3pc52/1126/-3pc Detroit54/1238/3c53/1140/4r Honolulu81/2770/21pc80/2669/20pcHouston 78/25 64/17 t76/2460/15t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayWednesday T odayWednesday T odayWednesday Indianapolis 68/2052/11pc59/1542/5t Jacksonville73/2253/11pc73/2257/13pc Kansas City 58/14 35/1t59/1541/5s Las Vegas72/2247/8s75/2353/11s Little Rock67/1948/8t68/2046/7pcLos Angeles 76/24 52/11s78/2552/11s Louisville72/2256/13pc64/1746/7t Memphis72/2252/11c66/1852/11pc Miami79/2667/19pc80/2667/19pc Minneapolis 54/12 35/1t41/529/-1c Nashville74/2352/11pc68/2048/8t New Orleans78/2562/16t76/2463/17t New York46/736/2s52/1140/4s Oklahoma City66/1838/3pc61/1644/6pc Orlando 78/25 57/13 pc79/2659/15pc Philadelphia47/832/0s52/1136/2s Phoenix78/2554/12s81/2755/12s Pittsburgh55/1232/0s56/1342/5sh Portland, OR53/1140/4c53/1136/2sh Raleigh-Durham 55/1238/3pc52/1144/6c St. Louis68/2045/7t59/1543/6pcSalt Lake City 48/834/1pc50/1032/0sh San Antonio 78/25 59/15 pc75/2365/18t San Diego69/2053/11s70/2155/12s San Francisco64/1748/8s64/1750/10pcSeattle 50/1040/4c50/1036/2r T allahassee 77/2555/12pc75/2357/13pc Tampa82/2760/15pc80/2663/17pc Tucson75/2345/7s76/2447/8s Washington, DC48/833/0s51/1041/5pc UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms Rain FlurriesSnow Ice AccuWeather.com

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C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, MARCH 24, 2009 s pa -l al a A spa party for girls, ages 5 to12 makes a great birthday celebration or even a fun play date. Spa La La Party provides spa services for little girls which includes a full slate of pampering from facials, manicures, candy buffets, bathrobes, and spa music, down to the cucumbers on their eyes. “We come to the client. Everything is usually hot pink, so the girls get plush hot pink robes as soon as they arrive to the spa. It can be done as a sleep over as well. They get teen magazines while they are waiting and a mini spa kit. The invitations are personalised with the birthday girl’s picture on it-everything is personalised for the birthday girl and her friends,” Mrs Paul said. Although there are not any specific themes just yet for the spa parties, Mrs Paul said she has been thinking about possibly doing a princess or fairy themed spa party in the near future. The going rates for these luxurious parties, range from $30 per girl and includes set up of complete decor of chair coveringspink sashes etc., a spa kit complete with a pair of pedi slippers, make up application kit and more, spa ser vices of facial, manicure, pedicure and use of robes. Mrs Paul said her inspiration for doing the spa parties for little girls and not adults, is from her own daughter. n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net MOTHERS in the 21st Century who have daughters may find it hard to please their pr incesses f or a special occasion in a t ec hnology clustered world. Gone are the days when little girls could play dress up and ha v e t ea par tiesbeing r eal gir l y -girls. This is t he spark that Letisha “Sparkle” Paul from Spa La La Party for Girls wants to bring back. p a r t y Bringing out the diva in little girls SEE page 10 LETISHA PAUL and her inspiration for Spa Parties for girls, her daughter Gabrielle. Spa Parties for girls caters to every little girls dream birthday or pajama party to pamper the princess they truly are.