Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
{\

Pim flowin’ it

TIF
69F

a SUNNY AND

HIGH
LOW

——% WINDY

Volume: 105 No.100

Pk TT
eae SA LM LESS
“g declared income?

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

WAKE UP!

Try our

Big Breakfast Sandwich

The Tribune |:

=USA TODAY.



SEE PAGE FIFTEEN



Two HiNled |

norrific crash



THE 1993 OLDSMOBILE ROYALE after my accident.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Three-car collision
claims lives of two men

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A HORRIFIC three-car colli-
sion in East Street claimed the
lives of two young men yesterday
morning.

Emergency services could not
save the 23-year-old driver and
27-year-old passenger from the
twisted wreck of a brown 1993
Oldsmobile Royale after it collid-











m@ REPORTS OF
SHOOTING

REPORTS reached The
Tribune late last night that a
man was shot dead by police
in the Pride Estates area.

More details will appear
in tomorrow’s Tribune.

ed with an SUV at the junction of
East Street and Cox Way before it
spun around to hit another car
travelling in the opposite direc-
tion.

Police say the Oldsmobile was
travelling north in East Street
when it collided with a 2003 GMC
Envoy as it arrived at the junction
with East Street while going east
along Cox Way.

The sudden impact spun the
Oldsmobile around to hit a white
1994 Toyota Windom as the driver
was attempting to make a right
turn into Cox Way while travel-
ling south on East Street.

The Oldsmobile driver was
slammed into the windscreen
smashing a hole in the glass, and
flung to the back of the car as the
left side of the vehicle, the driver’s

SEE page nine

All Canon Inks & All Mita Inks

muita

eZ
Ter ee
Buy One & Get ae

Offer Good While Supplies Last

Stop in TODAY and LOOK for the
BOSS Target for MORE great DEALS!





Green

Parrot

patron stabbed
and beaten

Man is attacked while
leaving East Bay Street bar

m By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A VICIOUS stabbing near-
ly claimed the life of a Green
Parrot patron as he was leav-
ing the bar and grill in East
Bay Street on Friday night.

The 28-year-old man was
beaten and his neck was sliced
open when a group of young
men attacked him as he was
getting into his friend’s car at
around 10pm.

He told The Tribune he
recognised three of the men
and condemned police for not
reporting the incident to the
media to seek public assistance
in apprehending the criminals.

The group of six men, all
thought to be around 25 years
old, had been drinking in the
parking lot and called out lewd
and derogatory comments to
his companion, a young
woman, as she waited in the
car.



But when the man went to
get into the car they directed
their abuse at him.

One of the thugs pushed
him to the ground and all six
started a fist fight with him
before slicing his neck open as
a crowd of people stood idly
by, The Tribune was told.

The woman recognised
three of the men from high
school.

She said: “When he was on
the ground bleeding, one of
them ran over and kicked him.
He was on his stomach and he
rolled over and his eyes
opened, and I knew then there
was something terribly wrong.
I think they realised he was
seriously hurt and they got out
of there.”

The six men fled in a red
Dodge Charger and a dark
blue Nissan Maxima, she said.

Only then did security staff

SEE page nine

Woman raped and robbed

FLAMES WERE ACCELERATED by dry and windy weather as they licked
across a farmland property in Gladstone Road on Saturday night.

Firefighters on three engines worked for around four hours to extinguish
the blaze as it threatened stacks of shredded paper, oil drums, trucks and
tractors on the property just 100 metres south of the Ministry of Agri-
culture’s Gladstone Road Agricultural Centre (GRAC).

The property owner tried to assist firefighters by using his own hose to
wet stacks of paper as the fire crept nearer, and helped them access water
on the property when supplies on the fire engines were running low.

When a light rain fell it did not help to extinguish the flames as windy
weather added fuel to the fire.

e SEE PAGE TWO

Former MP

by man posing as customer

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — A woman was raped and robbed on Saturday
after being lured by a male caller to the Summerville Drive area.

Assistant Supt Welbourne Bootle reported that the incident
occurred around 9.40pm when a 27-year-old clothing vendor
received a call from a male customer who was inquiring about
buying items from her.

The woman told police she went to an address on Summerville

James Knowles
dies age 66

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FAMILY and friends gath-
ered yesterday to mourn the
death of former Long Island
MP James “Jimmy” Knowles.

The 66-year-old died at home
on Saturday night at around
8pm.

A 25-year parliamentary vet-
eran who left parliament in
May, 2002, after being defeated
at the polls by current MP for
Long Island, Larry Cartwright,
Mr Knowles had been battling
melanoma, a form of skin can-
cer, for five years.

SEE page nine

Quiznos

eR COREL Ce

Over half of
WSC water

9)

OVER half of all water
bought for distribution by
the Water and Sewerage
Corporation ends up trick-
ling into the ground or being
pilfered, a junior minister
has claimed.

Minister of State for Pub-
lic Utilities Phenton Ney-
mour, commenting on the
corporation’s dire need for
an additional $11 million
taxpayer “bail out” this year,
said it is the “worst kind of
travesty that in New Provi-
dence the corporation buys
twice as much water as it
sells each day”.

SEE page eight



Viese S$)

GREAR sre

Drive that the male caller had given to her.

SEE page nine

Government tight-lipped on
Turks and Caicos call for petition

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.met

THE Bahamian government
has not yet given any official
indication if it will support the
Turks and Caicos Islands in its
premier’s calls for CARICOM
countries to petition against
Britain’s recommendation that
direct rule be imposed on the
islands, premier-elect Galmore
Williams said yesterday.

His comments came two days
after he and embattled Turks

SOME

cy 295

egg + ve oT your Gna ood

a sa ate

e, nace

, a OF thar

PRICES MAY WARY



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

and Caicos premier Michael
Misick met with Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham and Oppo-
sition members in Nassau in an
attempt to gain local support
against the British government’s
plan.

Meanwhile, PLP parliamen-
tarians, led by their leader Perry
Christie, were in Providencialies,
Turks and Caicos, “on a fact
finding mission” yesterday,
according to former foreign
affairs minister Fred Mitchell.

SEE page eight

iJ





PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS











New

Arrivals

THESE DRAMATIC PICTURES show
firefighters tackling a blaze which swept
farmland property in Gladstone Road
on Saturday night. Flames threatened
shredded paper, oil drums, trucks and tractors
on the property near the Ministry of Agriculture’s
Gladstone Road Agricultural Centre (GRAC).

Felipé Major
/Tribune staff

Festive

Pink

sf be.

The’ Sweeting's

EVERY DAY

une

SPOCY (THLLAM - THA
TEGGIE DELITE
TURRET BREAST & BLACK FOREST HAM
BLT - COLD CUT COmao
MEATEMLL WAM) MARA
QWEN ROMSTED CHICWEN BREAST
ITALIAN ELT - TORRE? BREAST
TLAGH FOREST HAM

DAI 2009

@

Jumping jacks.

Madeira Shopping Plaza ° Tel: 328-0703
Marathon Mall ¢ Tel: 393-6113
RND Plaza, Freeport ¢ Tel: 351-3274

REGULAR

FOOTLONGS

Three women, two
men arrested after
firearms discovered

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FIREARMS found in three Nassau homes led to the arrest of three
women and two men over the weekend.

Search warrants executed at homes in Pinewood Gardens, Kennedy
Sub-division and the Market Street area on Friday and Saturday
uncovered dangerous firearms and live ammunition.

Police say Drug Enforcement Unit officers were searching the home
of a 22-year-old woman in Pinewood Gardens at around 12pm on
Friday when she picked up a blanket and a .9mm handgun with five live
rounds of ammunition fell to the floor. She was arrested and is in
police custody.

A 40 handgun was found in a baby chair in a Kennedy Sub-division
home when officers searched it at around 8pm on Friday, leading to the
arrest of a 29-year-old man.

When police executed a third search warrant at a housing rental unit
in Market Street around lam on Saturday, they discovered another .40

handgun, with seven live rounds of ammunition.
Aman and two women were arrested.
All of those arrested are being questioned in police custody on sus-

picion of illegal firearm possession.

Bahamian man and girlfriend tried to leave
Turks and Caicos with cocaine taped on bodies

mg By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A BAHAMIAN man and his
girlfriend tried to win leniency
from a Turks and Caicos judge
last week after being caught try-
ing to leave the island with over
$40,000 worth of cocaine taped
on their bodies.

Attorney Lloyd Rodney told
Magistrate Clifton Warner that
defendant Spence Vincent Dean
Junior, 39, had ten children aged
between 19 years and eight
months for whom he is the sole
breadwinner.

Meanwhile, Mary Asha Sawh,
age 20, was said to look after her
sick mother’s business and was
seen praying with a Bible before
the court session.

However, Magistrate Warner
disregarded calls for the pair to
suffer only a fine and sentenced
them to four years in a Grand
Turk prison, one year short of the
maximum five-year sentence,
according to the Turks and Caicos

Times. They admitted possessing
cocaine with intent to supply but
were also charged with attempted
fraudulent evasion as they had
sought to evade customs by trying
to leave the country with the
drugs undeclared and undetect-
ed.

According to reports in the
island’s media, Mr Dean and Ms
Sawh were picked up by police
as they prepared to board a
Bahamasair flight at Providen-
ciales International Airport.

They were found to have four
kilograms and seven ounces of
cocaine vacuum sealed and taped
to their bodies beneath several
layers of clothing.

Mr Dean, a sales manager, had
the drugs attached to his
abdomen, while Ms Sawh, an
administrator, had them taped to
her legs.

Total value of the drugs, had
they reached the street, was
$41,960.

The pair were charged after a
three-day investigation.

Boy, 16, shot in the stomach

A 16-YEAR-OLD boy was shot in the stomach near Wulff Road and
Claridge Road at around 1am on Saturday.

The boy was taken to hospital and is said to be in stable condition.

Police have launched an investigation.

Anyone with information should call police on 919/911, the Central
Detective Unit on 502-9930/9991 or Crime Stoppers anonymously on

328-8477.

Sa

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!
AT PARTICIPATING STORES





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

o In brief PM hopeful that Emerald Bay price
reduction will attract investors

Man arrested i in
connection with
armed robbery

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grandi
Bahama police arrested one of }
two suspects in connection with }
an armed robbery at Dundee

Bay Apartments on Friday.

Police received information }
that two armed robbers fled the }
scene, escaping in a green- }
coloured vehicle, licensed 43732. }

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle
said officers on patrol spotted }
the vehicle in Redwood Lane. }
Police were able to apprehend }
one suspect, a 22-year-old }

Freeport resident.

ASP Bootle said an all-points ;
bulletin has been issued for the }
second suspect, 27-year-old
Erold Demetrius Miller, who is }

wanted for armed robbery.

M@ POLICE ARRESTED a }
27-year-old Watkins Lane man
who was allegedly found in pos- }
session of various stolen items. }

According to Mr Bootle,

police went to Kwan Yin Apart- }
ments around 4.26am on Sun- }
day where they discovered var- }
ious stolen items, including an I- }
POD, cellular phones and other :

items.

Persons who have had items
stolen should report to police ;
headquarters to identify prop- }

erty recovered by police.

@ IN RESPONSE to con- }
cerns of residents at the Coral :
Beach Hotel, ASP Bootle said }
police have increased its patrols ;
in the area. He said two mat- }
ters occurred near the Condo- }

minium on Coral Way.

He reported that there have }
been a total of five matters }
reported - two armed robberies }
and three robberies — from Jan- :

uary to the present.

Mr Bootle said suspects have :
been arrested and charged in }
connection with four of those }

matters.

Tribune managing
editor to speak
on ratio about
Tynes furore

THE TRIBUNE’S man-
aging editor John Marquis
will speak on radio tonight
about the furore surround-
ing his Insight article on
Chauncey Tynes Sr.

In an exclusive hour-
long interview with Jeff
Lloyd on Star 106.5FM
Radio, the veteran news-
man talks about the
importance of journalism
in modern society - and
the role of The Tribune in
Keeping society on track.

Marquis’s explosive
interview with Chauncey
Tynes Sr., in which the for-
mer PLP treasurer claimed
his son was murdered
because he knew too much
about Sir Lynden Pin-
dling’s links with drug czar
Joe Lehder, sparked off
two weeks of controversy.

In tonight’s show, Mar-
quis talks about his news-
paper background, his
work in the Bahamas, and
the principles which guide
his professional life.

He also addresses the
Tynes story and says how
important it is for such
topics to be debated intel-
ligently.

¢ Jeff Lloyd’s
programme is on
from 4.30pm-6.00pm

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IAA Ta)

Bh OB ir ay

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

WITH the effect of the eco-
nomic downturn on Exuma made
“more difficult” by the uncertain-
ty surrounding the future of Emer-
ald Bay Resort, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham expressed opti-
mism that a reduction in the offer-
ing price of the property will
attract more potential purchasers.

Noting the “tremendous eco-
nomic growth and prosperity”
experienced by Exuma after the
Emerald Bay Resort investment
came to the islands, including a
“residential and commercial con-
struction boom”, Mr Ingraham
said the “situation has now
changed.”

However, he said a group of
interested investors are currently in
discussion with the company
charged with disposing of the prop-
erty and more may be on the way.

The prime minister was address-
ing Exuma Chamber of Com-
merce on Friday evening.

He said he “remains hopeful”
for Exuma’s economy in light of
this and recent meetings the gov-
ernment has had with the devel-
opers of Norman’s Cay and
“active negotiations” which are
underway with investors interest-
ed in developing Crab Cay, Exu-
ma.

Bubbles from 65¢
Marbles $1.00
Wind up toys

Squishy Balls

Plastic Eggs
$950

Hubert Ingraham

“The government is hopeful
that the Norman’s Cay
Development Group will be able
to finalise its funding package to
facilitate the upscale resort devel-
opment.

“T note also that the develop-
ments foreseen for Norman’s Cay
and Crab Cay will be in line with
smaller, environmentally compat-
ible developments preferred by
my government.

“Though smaller, these devel-
opments will, I believe, increase
employment levels and business
opportunities while at the same
time offering a more intimate, cul-
turally rich, and less environmen-
tally intrusive experience to our

C ) The ae

Bunnies, Chicks
&Lambs = from

Pretty Ballerina Bunnie

Oo Egg Decorating Kits
WV Decorations

Easter Lillies
|

Easter Crafts

r~ « Easter Baking Pans & Decorations

Bar TL 5 ersiel a

Home Fabrics

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[247] 327-3080


























F
"a

Hd

ei

aT

Wh
Lil

ee et —

rn

Solid Wood

822-2157



guests,” said the prime minister.

Emerald Bay is in receivership
at present, with PriceWaterHouse
Coopers appointed liquidators.

It has been in this position since
April, 2007, after defaulting on
loan repayments.

Mr Ingraham told the Cham-
ber: “As a result of funding for
the development involving deriv-
atives, arrangements now notori-
ous for contributing to the global
financial crisis, Mitsui, an insur-
ance entity based in Japan, now
has the ability to dispose of the
property.

“At an earlier time, the reserve
price set for the property proved
unattractive for many potential
developers and operators of resort
properties.

Impact

“More recently, following the
impact of the turbulence in the
international financial markets on
the global economic environment,
Mitsui has signalled its willingness
to dispose of the property for a
reduced sum provided the offer
includes satisfactory commitments
for the completion of the devel-
opment as required by us.

“This should increase the num-
ber of parties now interested in
acquiring the property. A group
of interested investors is now in
discussion with Mitsui’s represen-

Easter Baskets from § 2°99
Basket Bags 10 for $750

Easter Grass

$425, 5



3 pc Queen Post Bed
1peDresser ,

1 pe Mirr

2 pc Nightst

1 pc 5 Drawer

Financing Available Thr



Providing technology that works.

tn Micronet

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

56 MADEIRA STREET, PALMDALE
242.928.3040 « WWW.MICRONET.BS

TOSHIBA

Leading Innawathon >>>
Multifunction Copiers

tative,” he said.

According to the prime minis-
ter, developers have been made
aware that required approvals are
conditional on not only financial
capability to acquire the property
and meet commitments to staff
but also “to fund the refurbish-
ment of the hotel, upgrade and
maintain the premier standard of
the golf course, complete the mari-
na facility and complete the build-
out and maintenance of the Emer-
ald Bay Development.”

“The government is firmly com-
mitted to seeing the Emerald Bay
succeed. We will commit capital
resources to provide funding for
additional public infrastructure to
accommodate Exuma’s develop-
ment,” said Mr Ingraham.

The prime minister noted that
the difficulties facing Exuma’s
major resort property reflect those
affecting existing and would-be
developments all over the
Bahamas.

“The Ritz Carlton project on
Rose Island, Ginn at West End,
Grand Bahama, and Royal Island
off North Eleuthera are all exam-
ples of superior quality develop-

ments being undertaken by rep-
utable developers with sound
financial credentials which came
to a standstill as a result of the
current financial crisis.

Economy

“Kerzner International, a
proven investor and employer in
our economy, has postponed its
plans for the construction of a sec-
ond marina village and timeshare
resort at Hurricane Hole, and laid
off 800 persons in November.

“And the Baha Mar project, in
which much hope had been placed
came to a grinding halt,” said Mr
Ingraham.

He added that the redevelop-
ment of the Royal Oasis property
in Freeport “is also not going any-
where.”

“The slowdown and even ces-
sation of direct foreign investment
in many instances have been due
to the fact that investors are
unable to raise funding from banks
- not even for high quality invest-
ment purposes,” added the prime
minister.

M ] D W AY HOME IMPROVEMENTS

“Where Our Quality & Experience Shine!”

Specializing in:

Roofing, Home Maintenance, Painting & Varnishing,

Pressure & Mildew Cleaning, Roof Painting, Water
Proofing, Plumbing, Window Cleaning, Drywall
Installation, Replace Rotten Woodwork,

Laminate Floor, Tiling, Repair

Cracks to Concrete Walls

DUO ONO Cea yay
Tel: 242-324-2153 » Cell 432-3561 * P.O. Box SP -60315

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Moet Tromouas Rretoaanoy & Cini Ever, on Tun Jon & Far!
lasealy

“. Oey Promo aL, Coane Sos Cans & UPoLemoy CA Se.

* Canpet Upholstery, Sione and Marhic Cleaning c&

Resoraio Specialist.

« Prochom Cleaning sysneme removes. Canepa Heavy
Sua, Hescteren, ‘Lireaec, Watermarks and Sisire inom
Cupecting & Farmitire, restoring thom to like acw

afb Trectios of replacemenn of.

Cape, Sofa's, Lowa. Chairs, Dining Chains, Cars,

Toa, Groen, Ties, Marte & Some

Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist

Siartle Polishiag. Resioration & Cane
* Weed Floor Resteralion

fuiieted Stent Tech Profesional Cootracior

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594

AS LAL, Ae Oo

PRCHEM SYSTEM (enn)

COVEY WE CAN CRT airy
eR eT Tat ° RIT ee bare ST * WBE LT, Oe
+ pap sera con

PAUL ELD IAGO SEOEL

LLOVE TOU,

a 2
a.

le li A ee

a ee



*

EFFECTIVE MARCH re 2008

CE TOWTEHNGUNTIN ———_e | e10 [RE [AR [e0_[ 05 |
yesmecoone ite [wean | Le [fo |

—_ fetes

SmMEETFIGHTER = sg FIGHTER

reat [ae [WA [eo [es [ros

men ERR SMADEAGoES TOME r | 1:08 | ead | NA | eos | 90 [ross |
SuMmoG MLLOKARE | 00 | as | WA_| eno | 8:25 [10045 |
pm PAOTHER? | 20 | nas | NA | ecto | an [180 |
tanec | ats | an | Nk | ets | [rt |



eevee 6 - m3)! eS

OF WW! GALLE RO NEMA

sone] et [a0 [NK |e 0 we

Si pe 4:00 | 00 | Wik | 10:00

Por fo a | || eat [eae |

~ 380-FLIX _





PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

This is not a time for politics as usual

IT RAN INTO an Indian businessman friend
last week and he said something to me that
really struck a chord: “This is the first time I’ve
ever visited the United States when I feel like
yow’re acting like an immature democracy.”

‘You know what he meant: We’re in a once-a-
century financial crisis, and yet we’ve actually
descended into politics worse than usual. There
don’t seem to be any adults at the top — nobody
acting larger than the moment, nobody being
impelled by anything deeper than the last news
cycle. Instead, Congress is slapping together
punitive tax laws overnight like some banana
republic, our president is getting in trouble
cracking jokes on Jay Leno comparing his bowl-
ing skills to a Special Olympian, and the oppo-
sition party is behaving as if its only priority is to
deflate President Barack Obama’s popularity.

I saw Eric Cantor, a Republican House
leader, on CNBC the other day, and the entire
interview consisted of him trying to exploit the
AIG situation for partisan gain without one
constructive thought. I just kept staring at him
and thinking: “Do you not have kids? Do you
not have a pension that you’re worried about?
Do you live in some gated community where all
the banks will be okay, even if our biggest banks
go under? Do you think your party automati-
cally wins if the country loses? What are you
thinking?”

If you want to guarantee that America
becomes a mediocre nation, then just keep vil-
ifying every public figure struggling to find a way
out of this crisis who stumbles once — like
Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner or AIG’s
$1-a-year fill-in CEO, Ed Liddy — and yow’ll
ensure that no capable person enlists in gov-
ernment.

You will ensure that every bank that has tak-
en public money will try to get rid of it as fast it
can, so as not to come under scrutiny, even
though that would weaken their balance sheets
and make them less able to lend money. And
you will ensure that we’ll never get out of this
banking crisis, because the solution depends
on getting private money funds to team up with
the government to buy up toxic assets — and
fund managers are growing terrified of any col-
laboration with government.

Obama missed a huge teaching opportunity
with AIG. Those bonuses were an outrage. The
public’s anger was justified. But rather than
fanning those flames and letting Congress run
riot, the president should have said: “T’'ll handle
this.”

He should have gone on national TV and
had the fireside chat with the country that is
long overdue. That’s a talk where he lays out
exactly how deep the crisis we are in is, exactly
















CHURCH OR OFFICE SPACE

47’ x 40’

Set up with elevated stage, students
chairtables, speakers system,
shower & toilets - Carpet - office.
Above Swiss Pastry Shop, Plaza Del Sol.

$1960p/m - Ph: 324-2619 ask for Mr Ginter

WANTED

A FEW GOOD DRIVERS

Applicants must be least 25 years of age,
self-motivated, disciplined, reliable, and
willing to work. You must possess the

following:

A good attitude

how much sacrifice we’re all going to have to
make to get out of it, and then calls on those
AIG brokers — and everyone else who, in our
rush to heal our banking system, may have got
bonuses they did not deserve — and tells them
that their president is asking them to return
their bonuses “for the sake of the country.”

Had Obama given AIG’s American brokers
a reputation to live up to, a great national mis-
sion to join, I’d bet anything we’d have got
most of our money back voluntarily. Inspiring
conduct has so much more of an impact than
coercing it. And it would have elevated the
president to where he belongs — above the
angry gaggle in Congress.

“There is nothing more powerful than inspi-
rational leadership that unleashes principled
behaviour for a great cause,” said Dov Seid-
man, the CEO of LRN, which helps companies
build ethical cultures, and the author of the
book “How.” What makes a company or a gov-
ernment “sustainable,” he added, is not when it
adds more coercive rules and regulations to
control behaviours. “It is when its employees or
citizens are propelled by values and principles to
do the right things, no matter how difficult the
situation,” said Seidman. “Laws tell you what
you can do. Values inspire in you what you
should do. It’s a leader’s job to inspire in us
those values.”

Right now we have an absence of inspira-
tional leadership. From business we hear about
institutions too big to fail — no matter how
reckless. From bankers we hear about contracts
too sacred to break — no matter how inappro-
priate. And from our immature elected offi-
cials we hear about how it was all “the other
guy’s fault.” Pve never talked to more people in
one week who told me, “You know, I listen to
the news, and I get really depressed.”

Well, help may finally be on the way: One
reason we’ve been sidetracked talking about
bonuses is because the big issue — the real
issue — the president’s comprehensive plan to
remove the toxic assets from our ailing banks,
which is the key to our economic recovery, has
taken a long time to hammer out. So all kinds of
lesser issues and clowns have ballooned in
importance and only confused people in the
vacuum.

Hopefully that plan will be out today, and
hopefully the president will pull the country
together behind it, and hopefully the lawmakers
who have to approve it will remember that this
is not a time for politics as usual — and that our
country, alas, is not too big to fail. Hopefully ...

(This article was written by Thomas L. Fried-
man of the New York Times - c. 2009).



Humbled by
outpouring of
support for
sea turtles ban

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Once again I am humbled
and overwhelmed at the
remarkable outpouring of con-
cern and support the general
public has shown to the plea I
sent out last week Friday
(March 6th) asking for Bahami-
ans to indicate that they sup-
port the total ban of all sea tur-
tles in the Bahamas.

IT could have never dreamed,
in a hundred years, that so
many people would step for-
ward, hundreds of letters and
e-mails have poured in.

The Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety personally delivered 173 let-
ters to the Ministry of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources
today, and in previous days I
know that many e-mails and
faxes have been pouring in.

Today I was so delighted to
read the letter in your paper
from Coldwell Bankers/Light-
bourne Realty where the entire
office staff wrote a collective
letter to support the ban. How
can one adequately say thank
you to the people who go that
extra mile to help?

Hopefully through all this
exposure the Bahamas will
begin to understand what valu-

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



able resources live turtles in the
wild are. I was told today of a
fisherman who boasts that he
knows of a “large hole in the
sea near Andros where there
are hundreds of turtles,” per-
haps an exaggeration, but, he
could make hundreds of dollars
a year taking tourists to dive
that “large hole” and see the
turtles in the wild. Far more
money than he could ever make
killing them. They can only be
killed once; they can be viewed
thousands of times!

When the FIFA convention
is here in May and Miss Uni-
verse is here in August, the eyes
of the world really will be on
us. The press will be

looking for stories. Just imag-
ine if they happen upon one of
those horrific scenes we see all
too often of the large, majestic
turtle flipped over on his back
in the dust, dehydrated, with
“tears” running down the side
of his face, while some of our
fellow Bahamians jeer at him
before they hack him to death.

Will they threaten the foreign
cameramen with violence, a cut-
lass perhaps, as they do if we
try and take pictures? Many of
us saw that unfortunate clip on
face book. Take note, the world
will see it if the foreign press
get wind of this barbaric prac-
tice.

I salute and thank each and
every one of you who has
phoned me, written to the min-
istry, e-mailed, faxed and
offered support. Don’t stop,
don’t give up. Together we can
see our country make the right
decision, one that we can be
proud of.

Let us catch up with Cuba
and protect our natural
resources.

A million thanks to you all
from the bottom of my heart.
This reminds me of the amazing
response you all gave when I
appealed for help for the ani-
mals of Inagua after hurricane
Ike. There are a lot of very good
people out there.

KIM ARANHA

Co-Chairman of

The Bahamas Sea Turtle
Conservation Group.

Nassau,

March 12, 2009.

The unravelling of Bahamian youth

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It is of no small import that I
submit myself to the school of
thought commencing in this
city, to begin to understand the
nuances of psychology driving
the behaviours, character and
value system of this generation,
who now seem on the verge of
flourishing into a catastrophic
disappointment on the land-
scape of Bahamian history.

I sincerely thank you for your
permission, and worthy publi-
cation to briefly address sensi-
tive issues that I think are boil-
ing at the very core of this
unravelling of Bahamian youth.

This nation moved swiftly
from strength to strength in the
sixties, though under colonial
guardianship, culture of the
people decorated the hearts and
minds of every child playing
ring-play, hopscotch, quadrille,
rounders and such through
every dusty street-corner in
Nassau and the family of
islands.

Young tots were groomed, by
older ones, to the affinity of sea-
sonal treasures of top-spinning,



Quality Auto Sales

PRE-OWNED

FUER le

For the best deal in town on
pre-owned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

IN STOCK!
i

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

Some Sales experience - ‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
oe ie ‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
The ability to drive standard shift ‘Oo? SUZUKI XL-7
wenicles ‘07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 5dr
‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK
Bernard Road, between the hours of

‘05 TOYOTA COROLLA
9:00a.m. and 5:00p.m. You will be required

to bring copies of the following items: two aoe, auto et
reference letters, driver’s license, NIB card, be !

LIMITED 2
current police record and two passport #1 ALITG DEALER IM THE BAHAMAS
: EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079
pictures.. Vk our showroom of Gosabtp dete Solar Freeport Ud Gor ered cheghs, Geet Hap, 397-8102
or Accs Moto: Moll. Don Macho Bed, BE7-2 708

Please apply in person at Aquapure on

shooting marbles, kite-flying
and such; healthy competitive
edge was created and polished
in a gentlemanly and respect-
ful manner.

However, in an ironic twist
of history, after seeking and
attaining independence, society
then began to distance itself
from that which had so secure-
ly fostered its growth.

Culture slowly came to be
just an afterthought, the
stepchild of a new progressive
people; hung like conch, bruised
and forgotten, to dry on the
clothesline of change, attractive
only to flies of the past.

When we divest culture of its
human currency, we not only
hurt ourselves, but others too;
poor animals who were once
cherished members of the fam-
ily are now abused casualties of
a society willing to derelict
social responsibility of ensuring
the spiritual transition of cul-
tural inheritance from age to
the next.

We soon began to see
Bahamian adults cheated of
precious legacy: limbo, fire
dance, rake ’n’ scrape, goom-
bay; as disco-mania swept the
world causing hotels and our
own clubs over-the-hill, to begin
to discard these forms of enter-
tainment for the fast buck of
glitter.

Culture was once a princely
feast for the sustenance of our
souls, now it is barely a foot-
note to history in the curricu-
lum of our youth.

We cannot so extricably
move away from something that
is inexorably us. When we begin



to indiscriminately cut branches
from the tree of culture,
because of gross impediments
to vision in the mind of reli-
giosity, we wilfully send trau-
matic shock waves to our spirit
roots.

Who, in a matriarch-driven
society repudiates the com-
monalties that bond girl to
female girl, rather, adult soci-
ety needs to respect and prop-
erly cultivate ringplay; a funda-
mental aspect of our social sci-
ence.

Much more can be said, how-
ever, we must begin to create
‘drama houses’ in every com-
munity; we must positively
exploit Bahamian music; we
need to start mentorship clubs
for girls and boys at age six or
seven because as times become
more slanted, impressions of life
trickle down much faster.

We must clearly define our
destiny as a tangible and viable
attraction to our youth.

We need to wean communi-
ties from the emasculating
learned condition of pandering
and patronage.

We need to identify, and then
strengthen the bare essentials
that form the framework of our
society.

We as a people are resilient,
watchful, kind and true; how-
ever it is time for us to become
progressively pro-active, for it is
now not imaginative that every-
thing we have today, can be
gone by tomorrow.

GREGORY NEELY
Nassau,
March 3, 2009.

M@intague

VILLAGE ROAD NEAR SHIRLEY STREET
Call Us at 394-0323/5 or 394-1377

NOW SELLING

Used Japanese Motor Scooters.
Direct from Japan.
Yamaha Jog, Honda Dio - 50cc/100cc
" Like New " never in an accident.











THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Man wanted
for questioning |
in connection
with murder

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THIS man
is wanted for
questioning
in connection
with the
March 9 mur-
der of Gentry
McPhee in an
Arawak Cay
nightclub.

Ryao
Omar Butler,
otherwise

Ryan Omar Butler

known as ‘Smokey’, 34, is con- :
sidered armed and extremely }

dangerous.

Police say he is slim, has dark i

brown skin, is 5ft 8ins tall,

160lbs, and his last known
address was in Ridgeland Park, }

Nassau.

He is sought by police prob- }
ing the killing of 30-year-old :
McPhee, a Yellow Elder Gar- }
dens resident who was shot in :
the abdomen and hands while in }
The Big Yard nightclub some- :
time after midnight on Monday, i

March 9.

He was rushed to Princess
Margaret Hospital by ambu- }
lance but died shortly after }

arrival.

A 38-year-old woman and :
two men have been questioned }
in connection with the murder. }

Now police are determined }
to speak to Ryan ‘Smokey’ But- }

ler.

If you have any information }
contact the Criminal Detective }
Unit immediately on 502- }
9930/9991 or call 919/911 or }
Crime Stoppers anonymously }

on 328-8477.

STR

PALE tat (aS
USAT See ea Eby
PHONE: 327-6464

Se a Le



(edt)

Colors:
Gold
Silver
Black
White
Light Blue

Rosetta St.



‘significant govt investment’

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SIGNIFICANT capital investment
by government is needed to correct
the problem of rusty water plaguing
residents of eastern New Providence,
according to the state minister for
the environment.

But with the government already
extending a $30 million subsidy - 15
per cent of the country's national
capital development fund - to the
hemorrhaging Water and Sewage
Corporation (WSC) it's an invest-
ment the public treasury may not be
able to make anytime soon. Junior
Minister Phenton Neymour, whose
portfolio includes WSC, said the
problem comes from infrastructure
used for reverse osmosis, which pro-
vides customers with better water
quality. Fixing the rusty water would
require hefty sums from the public
purse to lay new, non-metal pipes.

"Rusty water has been the conse-
quence of a double-edged sword - as
a result of the improved quality of
the water being produced by reverse
osmosis, it also increases the potential
for rusty water," Mr Neymour told
The Tribune.

"And so we have been plagued
with that challenge. The way forward
is the replacement of existing, old
water mains - that are metal - that are
not lined with either concrete or are
not PVC. And this, too, requires sig-
nificant capital investment by the
government, and this is another chal-
lenge the government faces in
improving the quality of product that
we must give and this, too, is coming
out of the public treasury."

During his contribution to the
2008/2009 mid-year budget debate
earlier this month, Mr Neymour out-
lined the dire financial straits con-
straining WSC. He said WSC is los-
ing over $2.2 million annually for
what it pays just to buy water versus
what it bills customers for that water.

And while construction has flour-
ished in the capital over the last few
years, the corporation’s revenue base
has shown only modest annual
growth because so many people use
private wells instead of using gov-
ernment services.

"One thing that must be made
clear - WSC is an organisation that is
requiring a significant portion, 15 per
cent, of the national capital develop-
ment for the Bahamas. However, it is
being paid by all of the Bahamian
people through taxes, but only
approximately 30 per cent of the
Bahamian consumers use that ser-
vice.

"And so 70 per cent of Bahamians
are paying for a service that they do
not receive. The WSC is from a
financial standpoint in the worst posi-
tion it has been in regards to gov-
ernment subsidy," Mr Neymour said
in a recent interview.

In 2004, water sales were $31.1
million and reverse osmosis water
purchases were $6 million, or 19 per
cent of revenue. From 2005 to 2008,
cumulative increases in water sales
totalled $22.7 million, but the cumu-
lative increase in water purchases
over the same period was $41.5 mil-
lion. Today, water purchases repre-
sent over 57 per cent of water rev-
enues as compared to 19 per cent in
2004.

"That does not leave nearly
enough revenues to cover all of the
other costs associated with distribut-
ing water, performing maintenance,
and replacing or extending water
mains.

“This is the major reason why the
corporation’s subsidy needs have
soared," Mr Neymour said during
the debate.

WSC was allocated $19 million in
the 2008/2009 budget, which Mr Ney-
mour said has been virtually exhaust-
ed; $15,028,190 or 79 per cent of that
sum was applied to water purchases
alone.

Another $11 million was given to
the corporation during the mid-year
budget debate. One million of this
will go towards Shirley and Bay
Street redevelopments, which are
necessary for the road paving, while
the majority of remaining $10 mil-
lion will also go towards the puchas-
ing of water, Mr Neymour told The
Tribune.

Decreasing revenue collections
due to non-paying customers had
diminished WSC's cash flow, hin-
dering its ability to pay its bills on
time.

Moving forward, Mr Neymour
said during the mid-year budget
debate, WSC has acquired the assis-
tance of the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank (IDB) under the
Water and Sanitation Initiative, to
assist the Bahamas in the prepara-
tion of a Water and Sanitation Sector
Plan (WSSP).

WSC has also asked that this assis-
tance include a tariff study, updat-
ing the corporation’s financial mod-
elling, and preparing a Corporate
Business Plan.

"The IDB is also assisting with the
development of an appropriate Legal
and Regulatory Framework for the
sector. This assistance is being fund-
ed by non-refundable grants under
the IDB’s AquaFund and the

Ph: 325-3336

INWAP fund respectively.

“The consulting firm Castalia
Strategic Advisors is already in place
working on the Water and Sanita-
tion Sector Plan and has presented to
the ministry a draft plan that sug-
gests an aggressive approach is taken.

“In addition, there is a regional










initiative under the IDB which is
aimed at providing technical co-oper-
ation for improved energy efficiency
in the water and sanitation sector,"
Mr Neymour said.

The Bahamas is one of seven
countries that will benefit from this
technical co-operation.



aA ATMO) Cea aNLe LUNE

JUST WEST OF CITY MARKET, TONIQUE DARLING HIGHWAY

“WE WILL MATCH OR BEAT ANY PRICE IN eT

















2004 Cefiro only $16,900






































Noah Vans
Starting at
$9,900

re.

(aim

* 03’ Honda Civic

$13,900

« 03’ Lexus
$17,900

. a4 Sunty

PMT me) )
to choose from.

ee

(242) 341-2249

FAX: (242) 361-1136

Visit our Website: www-autohl.com

We have thousands of custom promotional products that

Ve mee a ee eee a

We will impress your clients with high quality corporate

pee mele eee ete Titers eile me

See your promotional experts at Suntee EmbroidMe.

Uniforms * Embroidery * Screen Printing « Promotional Products

el aoe eg

East Shirley Street + Ph: 393-1004 + 393-3104 + www.sun-tee.com





PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

Dogs on their best
hehaviour for
Obedience trials

DOGS AND THEIR
OWNERS turned up in
numbers at the Botanical
Gardens this weekend for
the Bahamas Kennel
Club’s 28th International
Dog Show and Obedience
Trials.

Dogs took part in a host
of categories including
best in show and best
potcake.

All major credit cards y

accepted as cash!

€) TOYOTA moving forward

LAND CRUISER PRABO

Get eight people

eee

eS OE
yds

Mackey St 393-8165 ¢ 393-3723
HOURS
Monday - Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
Saturday 8:30am - 1:00pm



TE a toe oe
Land Cruiser Prado 4 x 4

* three engine options: 2.7L 4-cyl,
4.0L V6 or 3.0L turbo diesel

orice ar) elated ta)

overdrive

* power windows, locks & mirrors

* air conditioning
* immobiliser and remote
Peel ial

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD)

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

Cli Ce\ male Le
iV) ira = Bede) Le)

Beebe M sg L.¢-1-]
* dual airbags
PAP) eis

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. 8: Mathes’ Church)
Open Mon to Fri $am - 5:30pm
Sat Bam - |2noon
Tel: 397-1700
E-mail: execmotorialbatelnet.bs
Parts and service guaranteed

Available in Grand Bahama al Qualty Auto Sales (Freeport) * Quoens Here 42-6122 «Abaco Motor Wall, Don Macitay Bled, S872806



READY-MADE FRAMES

A.G. ELECTRIC
COMPANY LID.

Will be

CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING

March 27 & 28
(Friday & Saturday)

WE WILL REOPEN

for business as usual on
Monday, March 30, 2009



THE TRIBUNE













Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Feds: Florida law
interferes with
regulations for Cuba

@ MIAMI



A FLORIDA LAW that would
make it more expensive for travel
agents to book trips to Cuba inter-
feres with existing federal regulation
of travel to the communist island,
according to a report by the USS.
Justice Department, according to
Associated Press.

In the 35-page opinion issued Fri-
day, the Justice Department said the
Sellers of Travel Act also interferes
“with the federal government’s abil-
ity to speak for the United States
with one voice in foreign affairs.”

The law was passed by the Florida
Legislature in 2008 and signed by
Gov. Charlie Crist. It requires travel
agencies that sell trips to Cuba to
post a $250,000 bond with the state
and pay up to $2,500 in annual reg-
istration fees.

More than a dozen Florida-based
travel agencies filed a federal lawsuit
against the state in June to stop the
law from taking effect. They argue
that the law discriminates against
them because it would drive up their
costs.

1 Year Warranty On All Our Bahamian Manufactured Products » 1 Year Warranty

On All Our Bahamian Manufactured Products ¢ 1 Year Warranty On All Our Bahamian Manufactured Products

Aluminium
Products

You Can Trust!

We manufacture
¢ Awning & Single Hung Windows
¢ Colonial & Bahama Storm Shutters
¢ French & Sliding Glass Doors
We have a complete line of
Impact Approved windows and doors!

Syl
San?

1 WEAR WARRANTY F

on ALL our products!

Bahama Top Shutters

ATUMINIUM
UMIUNIUM
MANUFACTURING

COMPANY LIMITED

Tedder Street in Palmdale
Tel: 326-4121
Factory Hours: Mon - Fri 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Email: balmco@batelnet.bs
The Bahamas Oldest and Most Trusted
Manufacturer of Aluminium Windows and Doors!

Colonial Shutters

Patio Sliding Doors



of = .
Pre-Hung French Doors

oS
5
>
fo)
e
=
w
rt)
Ra
9
3.
o
5
E~
o
ij
=
ty
°
-—
E
7)
i
a *
|
ra]
2
£
°
ws
7)
LJ
—h
ry
9
=
5
=
9
3
3
fo)
7
pa
fo)
ec
=
ies
=)
Ra
1]
Es
7)
}
E
9
s
EY
9
°
2
5
ry
a.
a
r}
3
=
°
r
7)

Ayuewey 1e9) |, « Syonpolg pounyoe;nuewW ueIWeYeg ung IIy UE Ayuee sea) |



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 7



OECS should establish joint
regulator, G20 should help
insight |

WORLD VIEW

@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a
Consultant and former
Caribbean Diplomat)

| HE members of the

Organisation of
Eastern Caribbean States
(OECS) should move to
establish immediately two
separate bodies to regulate
domestic non-bank financial
institutions and the offshore
financial services sector.

In turn, these new bodies
should work closely with the
Eastern Caribbean Central
Bank (ECCB).

Financial problems in the
member states of the OECS,
posed by the CL Financial
Group headquartered in
Trinidad and Tobago and the
on-shore and off-shore banks
of R Allen Stanford located
in Antigua, have under-
scored the vital importance
to the economies of these
countries of strong supervi-
sion for both non-bank
financial institutions, such as
insurance companies, and the
offshore financial services
sector.

The problems will worsen
in the coming weeks.

The IMF has warned the
OECS that “waning eco-
nomic growth after a period
of rapid private credit expan-
sion poses a major risk to the
stability of the banking sys-
tem.”

OECS countries, which
are part of the Eastern
Caribbean Currency Union
with a single currency, the
EC dollar, are the indepen-
dent States of Antigua and
Barbuda, St Kitts-Nevis,
Dominica, Grenada, St
Lucia, and St Vincent and
the Grenadines together with
the British Overseas territo-
ries of Anguilla and Mon-
sterrat.

The ECCB is their com-
mon Central Bank.

The cross-border nature
of the financial services sec-
tor emphasises the impor-
tance of cross-border regu-
lation.

Authority

Ideally, it would be best if
a Pan-Caribbean financial
regulatory authority could be
established covering all the
countries that are now mem-
bers of the Caribbean Com-
munity (CARICOM).

But, as I was reminded by
Caribbean and European
Union (EUV) colleagues after
my commentary last week
(“Establish a Caribbean wide
Financial Services Regula-
tor”), the member states of
CARICOM are unlikely to
do so in a hurry.

The members of the
OECS are in a better posi-
tion to establish the two very
necessary joint bodies
because they enjoy deeper
economic integration
arrangements than CARI-
COM.

They already have a single
currency, a single Central
Bank, and a single Court sys-
tem.

Further, none of them can
afford to establish these bod-
ies at an individual national
level, particularly in the cur-
rent situation in which remit-
tances from their nationals
abroad have fallen, receipts
from tourism are in decline,
preferential commodity mar-
kets have been withdrawn,
and construction (that
helped their economies to
grow in the last two years)
has now slowed considerably.

Wid
EXTERMINATORS

ate ah)
PHONE: 322-2157



As an example of part of
the costs each country would
face if it were to try to estab-
lish its own national domestic
bodies, the Prime Minister
of Barbados, David Thomp-
son, told his country’s Par-
liament on March 18th that it
will cost US$2.06 million to
establish, by carly next year,
a Financial Services Com-
mission to regulate the non-
bank financial services insti-
tutions as well as interna-
tional business.

There are two fundamen-
tally important reasons why
the OECS countries should
now move to establish a joint
Financial Services Commis-
sion to regulate the non-
bank domestic sector and a
joint International Financial
Services Authority to super-
vise the off-shore sector.

The first is that they have
to establish machinery for
safeguarding the interests of
their own domestic investors
including persons who invest
in instruments of the non-
bank finance companies, and
the second is that the indus-
trialised countries, such as
the US and UK, are now
moving rapidly to strengthen
their own regulatory bodies
in the wake of the failures to
deal with the practices of
major banks, insurance and
mortgage companies that led
to the current global finan-
cial crisis.

Economies

If all Caribbean countries
do not themselves move in
this direction, not only will
they be uncompetitive in the
global market for financial
services, but their economies
and their local investors will
continue to be exposed to
the problems of non-domes-
tic companies over whom
they exercise no supervision.

The truth is that it would
be an abdication of govern-
mental responsibility to
allow the present situation
to continue.

It is significant that, on
March 18th, the British
Financial Services Authori-
ty, which regulates banks, is
reported to have strongly
supported “calls for the cre-
ation of a pan-European reg-
ulatory body as the only way
to save the European mar-
ket for financial services”.

The Financial Times
reported its Chairman, Lord
Turner, as saying, “We’ve
got to think about how to
run a single market in retail
banking without a European
federal government.”

The countries of CARI-
COM face a similar chal-
lenge, only it is worse.

At least the 27-nation



@ SIR Ronald Sanders

European Union (EU) has a
single market and many of
its members also operate the
Euro as a single currency.

Only strong political will
or a further major catastro-
phe will push CARICOM
fast enough to establish Pan-
Caribbean arrangements.

In this context, no one can
blame countries, such as Bar-
bados, from forging ahead
with the strengthening of its
own financial services super-
vision.

After all, Barbados does
have a vibrant international
financial services sector to
preserve.

But, the point is that the
member states of the OECS,
given their deeper economic
and financial integration, can
move faster than CARICOM
and they should in their own
interest.

They have already estab-
lished a Task Force to
consider their options in light
of the global financial
crisis.

It is headed by the Prime
Minister of St Vincent and
the Grenadines, Ralph Gon-
salves, now a senior Head of
Government and Finance
Minister in the region.

If the OECS and the inter-
national community provide
his Task Force with the
resources, there is no reason
why a blueprint couldn’t be
devised to address many of
the issues facing these very
small and fragile economies
in a meaningful way.

In the height of economic
crises, there is always a ten-
dency by governments,
whether large or small, to
pursue both short-term and
nationalistic solutions.
Invariably, such solutions fail
especially when they origi-
nate with cross-border prob-
lems.

The G20 countries when
they meet in London on
April 2nd, should be asked
to provide the necessary
resources to the Caribbean
— and especially the OECS —
to pay for the joint multi-
nation financial services reg-
ulator that they need and
would allow them to partici-
pate meaningfully in the
global effort.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com





Le.
am
ERA

Dupuch Real Estate

242.422.4677

ken@erabahamas.com www.erabahamas.com





still with Vonage?

onephone gives you everything vonage has and more!

switch now and get 1° month free!

onephone
$19.95

US, Canada,
10 Europe Destinations

what you get?
Residential Basic Plan

jing ludes monthly lines & fees)

MEI
$23.49

In-Plan Calling Destinations

heme eit nag

Teme Mie Ea ey ten

Ait es tia teal

US, Canada, UK

Local Phone Number
ec PORT TAR

FREE

Not available
tT Ded PE

Rs

Local Customer Service
& Support

REET eL

Ree Rue
Calling Flan

Family Istand In-Network
FREE Calls

4&7? 1111 nossqv 688 Th freaport weary. indigonahworks.com WN






HP Computers

we've got it

Custom

COMPUTERS LIMITED

4 Stores at Cable Beach & East Bay St»
t. 242.396.1101 © 242.396.1100

Wwww.customcomputers, bs
solutionsi@customcomputers.bs

NOW IN TWO LOCATIONS!





PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

RAISING A GENERATION TO
TEAD, PROSPER AND TAKE DOMINION IN THE EARTH



PRESENTS

Whney

Ie eadershp
Giobal Summit

“WHEN LEADERS LEAD”



\
Min. Brenda Pratt
Fourncer & ict

30 April - 2"! May, 2009
SanpaLs Roya. BAHAMIAN
Resort & Spa

NASSAU, BAHAMAS



Deborah Bartlett

Luncheon Keynote Speaker 5 ;
Jom - Thursday & Friday nights (Open Sessions}

B:30am - 12:200m Saturday Workshops

1pm - Jom WLLL Global Awards Luncheon

Workshop Facilitators



ow



Stacia Williams Gail McKinney

Dr. Kendal Major Sherika Brown

Register Today at www.wilglobalsummit.com
or call (242) 323-3210 / (242) 325-6310

1 i 6 '





FROM page one

He added: “This effectively
doubles the amount it pays for
this high quality water, which
increases pumping costs
because one has to pump twice
as much water throughout the
island, and if one looks at it
from the revenue side, it halves
the amount of money the cor-
poration could potentially earn
from selling the same amount
of water,” he said.

The corporation is trapped in
a vicious cycle, where the
expensive solution for the situ-
ation - replacement of old pipes
and other infrastructure - is
indefinitely delayed by the high
costs incurred by the WSC part-
ly as a result of the need for
these upgrades.

Yesterday, the minister said
the government hopes that a
private consulting firm will soon
conclude an Inter American
Development Bank study, enti-
tled the Water and Sanitation
Sector Plan, which will help put
the corporation back on the
road to self-sufficiency.

This plan will include a tariff
study, updating the corpora-
tion’s financial modelling and a
corporate business plan. Com-
ing out of this, the government
will determine what changes
will be made to the rate cus-
tomers are charged for water,
which may in the future include
a mechanism taking into con-
sideration the fluctuating cost

WSC water

of energy needed to produce
that water.

However, how the corpora-
tion will secure the funding
needed to undertake the “major
investment” that is needed to
replace dodgy watermains is yet
to be determined.

According to the minister, the
WSC still charges customers for
water at a rate set in 1999,
before expensive reverse osmo-
sis technology - which desali-
nates salt water making it fit for
household use - was primarily
relied upon to quench the coun-
try’s demand for water, which
has also increased as develop-
ment continues apace and the
population expands.

This is despite the fact that
the cost of producing a thou-
sand gallons of water has almost
tripled in the four years up to
September, 2008, from $1.28 per
imperial gallon in 2004 to $3.72.

This means that water pur-
chases, which represented 19
per cent of the WSC’s revenue
in 2004, now eat up 57 per cent
of the corporation’s funds.

Meanwhile, 54 per cent of all
water purchased never reaches
its intended destination.

“In 2004, water sales were
$31.1 million and reverse osmo-
sis water purchases were $6.0
million or 19 per cent of rev-
enues. Over the subsequent
four years from 2005 to
2008, cumulative increases in

Woman raped and robbed
by man posing as customer

FROM page one

Upon arrival, she was accosted by a masked gunman who drove
the woman’s van to a secluded area, where he raped and robbed her
of $500 cash, a cellular phone and her 2001 silver-coloured van.

ASP Bootle said the van was recovered by police on Sunday.

He said the culprit was described as being 5ft 7ins tall of slim
build, with light to medium brown complexion.

Police are appealing to women not to drive alone to a location to

meet strangers.

“Women should always be accompanied by someone, preferably

a male,” said ASP Bootle.
Police are investigating.

@ A 23-YEAR-OLD man was stabbed Friday evening during an
altercation with another man at a nightclub in Hunters.
Police received a report of a stabbing around 10pm on Friday at

the Grobolos Club.

Officers sent to investigate saw a 23-year man suffering from a
stab wound to the upper right shoulder.
The victim was taken to Rand Memorial Hospital, where he

was treated and later discharged.

Mr Bootle said a 24-year-old man is assisting inquiries.

HAVE YOU SUDDENLY FOUND YOURSELF
WITHOUT HEALTH INSURANCE?

WE HAVE THE SOLUTION...

COVERAGE FOR ALL AGES

(From birth to 85 years - renewable for life)

COVERAGE CAN BE ARRANGED
FOR MOST PRE-EXISTING
MEDICAL CONDITIONS *

STARE
Health & Life
393-5529

* Certain terms & conditions apply

Nl
| ATT

Mark Reynolds

INSURANCE BY LLOYD’S
OF LONDON (An A-rated Insurer)

PREMIUMS GUARANTEED
NOT TO INCREASE FOR
NEXT 2 YEARS

LLOYDS

Durell Shearer

Tamara Boyd

WorldwideMedicalTrust

Call one of our agents today!

y

Cyril Peet



water sales totalled $22.7 mil-
lion, but the cumulative increase
in water purchases over the
same period was $41.5 million,”
according to Mr Neymour.

“The corporation is losing
over $2.2 million annually for
what it pays just to buy the
water versus what it bills cus-
tomers for that water, and by
the time one factors or adds in
the cost of building and main-
taining infrastructure to deliv-
er this water to the public, the
cost of paying staff, maintain-
ing offices, reading meters, pro-
ducing bills, the government is
left holding the bag for the bal-
ance,” Mr Neymour said.

“The only solution to this
problem, and one that this gov-
ernment recognises, is to make
substantial investments to
replace old infrastructure and
restructuring the organisation.”

A precipitous rise in energy
costs, also leading to an out-
standing $12.7 million in money
owed by the WSC to private
water suppliers for the year so
far, contributed to the need by
the corporation for an addi-
tional $11 million subsidy in the
mid-year budget.

Added to the money already
allocated to the corporation for
the 2008/2009 fiscal year, it
received the greatest propor-
tion of public subsidy, at $30
million.

“With decreasing revenue
collections and high fixed costs,
particularly with respect to
staffing and water purchases,
the corporation’s cash flow posi-
tion is deteriorating at an accel-
erating rate,” noted Mr Ney-
mour.

In his mid-year budget state-
ment, the prime minister said
that “capital transfers to deficit-
generating public sector enti-
ties is an unsustainable situa-
tion that needs to be
addressed.”

Government
FROM page one

“What we came here to do is
to get the Opposition’s view in
Turks and Caicos on the mat-
ter,” he told The Tribune from
Providenciales.

Asked what the PLP parlia-
mentarians now understand the
Opposition’s position on the
matter to be, Mr Mitchell said
his party’s members were still
“digesting the information” and
it was too early to say.

Turks and Caicos is a UK
dependency but has had its own
government headed by a chief
minister since 1976. The recom-
mendation to impose direct rule
is due to come into effect fol-
lowing the final report of a
Commission of Inquiry
launched by Britain into gov-
ernment corruption on the
islands.

Mr Misick, who has been at
the centre of rampant allega-
tions of misconduct, has agreed
to resign as a result of the
inquiry and Mr Williams was
named as his successor earlier
this month.

Mr Misick has publicly said
his government condemns
Britain’s recommendations to
suspend Cabinet, parliament
and to partially suspend the
nation’s constitution for the next
two years and the drastic signal
of intention by the UK has
attracted great interest in The
Bahamas and across the region.

The action would allow
British Governor Gordon
Wetherall to take over day-to-
day running of the country for
the next two years.

Premier Misick told ZNS that
TCI's sovereignty and democ-
racy must be protected and that
Friday's meeting with Mr Ingra-
ham was a move to get support
from the Bahamas and shed
light on Turks’ plight.

The Tribune understands that
Mr Misick intends to solicit the
court to get the decision
reversed. He is also petitioning
other countries and interna-
tional bodies, including the
United Nations, to intervene on
the country’s behalf.

The Turks and Caicos are, by
deed of entrustment, a member
of CARICOM, whose civil soci-
ety charter calls for democratic
governance.

With the UK a part of the
Commonwealth, members of
which submit to complying with
the Harare principles that call
for regular elections to allow cit-
izens to determine how they are
governed, this could also form
part of the basis of an appeal
against the move.

In a brief phone interview
with The Tribune yesterday,
Foreign Affairs Minister Brent
Symonette declined to comment
on whether the Bahamas would
react to the situation, telling this
newspaper to “speak with the
prime minister tomorrow”
about it.

Another spokesperson for the
prime minister said the govern-
ment would not be making a
statement on the issue.



THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

Yesterday Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said
Mr Knowles played an “important role in the polit-
ical history of the Bahamas and in the affairs of the
Free National Movement.

“He was one of those who contributed to the
building of a unified opposition in the late seventies
and was one of the 11 elected as FNM members of
parliament in 1982.”

He said Mr Knowles “served his country well,
and especially his beloved Long Island.”

“We shall miss him,” he added, stating that “our
hearts go out to Mrs Knowles and other members of
the family and we extend to them our deepest sym-
pathy.”

Geoffrey Knowles, James’ brother, also remem-
bered his brother as a man who was dedicated to
serving the Bahamas and his large family.

“We've lost a very good citizen,” he said. “He
was in politics for basically most of his adult life
and gave tremendous service.”

Mr Knowles said the family was yesterday receiv-
ing many calls of condolences from Long Island
and the United States, where they also have rela-
tives.

James Knowles

with the likelihood that the service will take place on
Friday or Saturday of this week.

The MP, whose father was also an MP, was born
in Nassau and grew up in the Fox Hill area.

Despite constituency boundary changes, Mr
Knowles always represented Long Island in some
form during his 25-year tenure in office. He also
held responsibility for numerous ministerial port-
folios, including agriculture, works and transport.

Geoffrey recalled that the post of Minister of
Agriculture in particular was “right up (James’)
alley” as the family had a strong farming back-
ground.

In his professional capacity, Mr Knowles was a
trained lawyer, articling with Sir Stafford Sands’
law chambers and then going on to work as a con-
sultant with the law firm Alexiou Knowles and Co,
with his brother, Emerick.

Mr Knowles is survived by his wife, Amarylis,
his sons, James Jr and Roman, daughter Kimberley,
his mother Agnes, five brothers (Alex Jr, Emerick,
Patrick, Geoffrey and Charlton) and six sisters
(Jeanne, Ruby, Doris, Yvonne, Deborah and Julie).

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Schooner Bay Project

of Lindroth Development
is looking to hire the following positions:

Registered Nurse

Hydraulic Crane Operator
In order to qualify for either position, proper documentation must be provided.
If you are interested, please either fax your documents to 242-366-2046 or email
to Rayanne.malone@lindroth.cc. All resumes can also be submitted to the Marsh
Harbour Labour Board or mailed to the following address:

Schooner Bay
P.O. Box AB 20016
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

a

Get Pre

pared

Funeral arrangements were being determined

@ MISSING CHILDREN

TWO children were reportedly missing at sea near Adelaide
in south west New Providence yesterday.
Search parties are understood to have found the children’s

boat overturned.

But there was no sign of the children before The Tribune went

to press.

PCM USEC eC

FROM page one

get involved by helping the
bleeding man into her car, The
Tribune was told.

She drove him to the emer-
gency room at Princess Margaret
Hospital where he was given 60
internal and external stitches,
and doctors said he would have
lost his life if the knife had
slipped to cut a vital artery.

A friend of the victim told
The Tribune: “When I saw the
wounds in his neck I could not
believe it. It was disgusting. He
was bleeding profusely and if it
had gone anywhere closer to his
artery there would have been
nothing anyone could have done
for him.

“Tt would have been a differ-
ent story, it would have been a
death for nothing. It would have
been a senseless murder and that
is the scariest part about it.”

She condemned security staff
at The Green Parrot for not
breaking up the fight before it
reached such a dangerous level.

“T don’t know what their job
is if not to make their place
secure,” she said.

“They could have intervened

at any time, but they didn’t, the
girl did, and she got roughed up
a little bit.”

Attempts to contact manage-
ment of The Green Parrot yes-
terday were not answered before
The Tribune went to press, and
calls to police were also not
returned before deadline.

The 28-year-old man,
who does not want to be
identified, is now recovering at
home.

He slammed police for not
informing the public of the inci-
dent and for not publicly identi-
fying his attackers as they walk
free.

He said: “People want to
know when these things happen
and it is not the first thing that
has happened at Green Parrot.”

His friend added: “It’s not
something you would expect to
happen in that environment. It is
not aclub, it’s a bar.

“It’s so sad Nassau is so small
that anywhere you try to go that
is not rowdy, where you want to
go have a nice time, stuff like
this happens.

“Tt just puts you in a differ-
ent mind frame.

“You don’t know what’s going
to happen.”



Two killed

FROM page one

side, was reduced to a mangled
wreck.

The bumper was stripped from
the front of the car and the radia-
tor, engine components and oil
spilled from the frame.

Shocked residents came out of
their houses to attend to victims
after hearing the crash at around
1.50am yesterday.

Emergency crews called for fire-
fighters to use the Jaws of Life to
pull the Oldsmobile driver from
the car, and the 23-year-old
man was pronounced dead at the
scene.

His passenger is said to have
been shouting after the car crash
“How did this happen? How did
this happen?” before he was treat-
ed at the roadside and loaded into
an ambulance. But the man died
soon after he was admitted to
Princess Margaret Hospital.

Friends of the two men, thought
to be from Chippingham in Nas-
sau, started to gather at the scene
and said they had been at a party
with them shortly before the crash.

Young men stood in silent
shock and consoled women who
wailed and screamed in horror at
the roadside.

An ambulance carried the 36-
year-old woman who had been
driving the GMC to PMH in a
responsive condition, and police
say her condition is not life-threat-
ening.

The 34-year-old woman driving
the Toyota escaped the wreckage
with an ankle injury.

Traffic police are continuing
investigations.

ITA Institute of Internal Auditors - Bahamas Chapter

Presents a Half Day Seminar

On:

“Surviving the Economic Crisis”

Speakers:

Raymond Winder, Deloitte & Touche
Greg Bethel, Fidelity Bank (Bak,) Ltd.
Archdeacon James Palacious
Marisa Smith, Bec

Date: Thursday March 26, 2009

Place:

Time:

Cost: $100.00 Members | $110.00 Non-Members

Learn About:

SuperClubs Breezes

« Budgeting & Planning for Retirement
- Refinancing, Re-mortgaging and Maintaining Insurance Coverage
- Retooling by Retraining During / After Job Loss
- Coping Skills During A Recession

CPE Hours: 4 (BICA Approved)

8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. (Continental Breakfast & Lunch included)

Contacts: Edgar 0. Moxey Jr. 302-1449 or L. Sandra Butler 396-6023

Please plan to take advantage of this great opportunity, We encourage you to register early to
secure your seat, and to assist us with our arrangements with the hotel.







for the Stormy

Colonial Shutters
e All custom made shutters are
manufactured to order and take
from 6 to 12 weeks for manufacturing.
¢ Shutters available in 8 standard colors.
* No job is too large or small.

Bahama Top Shutters

Don’t leave it to the last minute to prepare!

Cs
“Oey new

“Senna

MANUFACTURING

COMPANY LIMITED
ALL PRODUCTS MADE TO ORDER AT OUR FACTORY ON TEDDER STREET!

OC] UPA ae Cesta Maelo HUE me
Email: balmco@batelnet.bs



A line up you won’t
soon forget.

‘ne .
| A Tal fo ol las A



Tyreflexs Star Motors is the Exclusive
Authorized Dealer for Mercedes-Benz,
Subaru and Isuzu vehicles

> New & Used Cars & Trucks
> Sales, Parts & Service

Call us today at 325.4961

Visit our showroom on Wulff Rd!

TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS sisirtnoss, 0. 0x1 9123, nossau



PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Sir Lynden Pindling: one of the most

m By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

A oust Sir Lyn-
den Pindling’s influ-

ence has been indelibly cast on
our country’s life as one of the
most dominant figures in the his-
tory of the local political land-
scape and one of the architects
of a modern Bahamas, he was
also seen as an international pari-
ah under whose leadership the
Bahamas became known as a
paradise lost to drug smuggling
and to the highest bidder.

Based on the recent brouhaha
arising from a Tribune (Insight)
article critical of the Bahamas’
first prime minister, who became
known as the ‘Black Moses’, it
appears that even in death there
is a personality cult clinging to



lt E; ades (lark Spots oa

its Perfect!!!

The ullimale facial orcam



Cc

SKIN CARE & BEAUTY CENTRE

ir Morsturizes ive skin...
It Tones the complexion ....

Pertect-Tone.

Noo BD Meuitl Weeyad Avr, Plume! Pigg: 242 18,7 H8 TCD Fas 4-07

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

Sir Lynden’s image.

Under his stewardship, the
Bahamas was led through
tremendous change from major-
ity rule to Independence, to the
establishment of the hotel cor-
poration, the Defence Force, the
construction of schools and COB,
the expansion of the middle class,
the evolution from exchange con-
trol to the Central Bank and the
social innovation and perhaps the
greatest accomplishment of the
old PLP—the National Insurance
Board.

Mr Pindling’s government can
also be heralded for having the
second highest GNP per capita



Hawaii, Fahirtan



COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportuni

Recruitment Officer, Human Resources

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in

the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Recruitment Officer, Human Resources.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Actively recruiting staff through job fairs, focused advertising

and in house posting

Coordinating the testing of applicants

Screening / interviewing of applicants and preparing profiles
for presentation to the HR Manager

Performing all background checks, obtaining references and
transcripts on potential candidates

Preparing job letters, job descriptions and other new hire forms
and documents for review and approval by the HR Manager
Assisting the HR Manager in conducting the welcome and
familiarization program for new hires

Under the guidance of the HR Manager, administer the Bank’s

Employee Referral program
Maintaining the HR Database
Preparation of HR reports

Promoting and maintaining excellent customer service

QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:

Candidates must meet the following criteria:

¢ Possess a Bachelor’s Degree or higher in Human Resources or in
a related discipline from an accredited University
Minimum of four years experience in Human Resources with
a minimum of two years experience in recruiting

Excellent interpersonal skills

Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications
Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organizational and time management skills

Team Player with the ability to add value and strength to the

team and team goals

Honest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines

REMUNERATION PACKAGE:

Commonwealth Bank is a Great place to work! We offer an
exciting work environment with the opportunity for growth and
development. We also offer a competitive compensation package,
reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications,
including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision,
dental and life insurances and a pension plan.



($12,000) in the English-speak-
ing Caribbean at the time of their
defeat in 1992.

However, the former PM also
left a tarnished legacy and sat at
the helm of a government when
drug smuggling, corruption, influ-
ence peddling and money laun-
dering was the order of the day.

Of late, several naive, emo-
tionally-charged party members
and supporters of the late PM —
some of whom are just two-faced
— have sought to be historical
revisionists, distorting the aspects
of history that showed that Sir
Lynden gravely erred while
attempting to canonise him.

Paul Moss, who is rapidly
being seen as a typically dema-
gogic, opportunistic fly-by-night,
ought to have divorced himself
from the recent hoopla sur-
rounding the former PM, instead
of throwing together a headline
seeking, seemingly drunken
demonstration outside The Tri-
bune, where 70 per cent of those
in attendance allegedly had not
read the article or even knew
why they were there. I had
assumed that Mr Moss had read
the report of the 1984 Commis-
sion of Inquiry and as an intelli-
gent, new age politician would
not be found clinging to Pin-
dling’s tattered legacy.

Former PM Perry Christie,
whose proclivity for procrastina-
tion did not get the best of him in
this instance as he quickly called
a press conference, appears to be
clutching to the political magic
seemingly associated with Mr
Pindling’s image.

Sir Lynden annie

In the 1980s, Mr Christie was
fired after he spoke out against
the corruption happening under
Sir Lynden’s watch, so his seem-
ingly delusional outcry after John
Marquis’ article must only have
been to rally his party’s base.

In recent years, in a speech
entitled ‘Pindling and me — A
political/social history’, given to
Felix Bethel’s political science
class at COB, in speaking about
his feelings after the 1984 Com-
mission of Inquiry, Fox Hill MP
Fred Mitchell said:

“I supported Hubert Ingra-
ham and Perry Christie after the
dismissal. I thought that the per-
son who would have resigned and
should have resigned if only to
face a general election ought to
have been Sir Lynden. I thought
he made a terrible blunder by
not doing so. I withdrew any con-
tact with him and wrote publicly





EM ce ett





Ue AE Torey
In Just One Day!

Our DuraBath SSP Bathtubs & Wall Systems
are custom made to cover worn-out bathtubs
and out-of-date wall tiles...

No Mess. No Stress.
No Inconvenience.

www.rebath.com

RE*BATH BAHAMAS

(Manufacturer's Lifetime Warranty).

Telephone
(242) 393-8501

“Authorized Dealer’

DS ee eile mee CEU CURA Wom Matias lms
Open Monday - Friday - 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

i ENTAA, EXTRA

— Shipment
of
Used Cars

US OUT

a New Shipments Arrived

about my dissatisfaction with it.”

As it relates to the Marquis
articles, an elder statesman who
was there at the time soundly dis-
putes Mr Chauncey Tynes’ asser-
tion that their first plan was to
throw Speaker of House, Bobby
Symonette, bodily outside of par-
liament.

“T have no recollection of that.
Our whole idea was to avoid vio-
lence and surely there was no
suggestion to do violence to Bob-
by Symonette. There are a num-
ber of people alive who can attest
to that,” he said.

This gentleman also disputed
Mr Marquis’ commentary that,
the One Man Manifesto was
“drafted by an African national-
ist” and “recommended as a
strategy that national leaders
stuff government departments
with party supporters.”

“IT have the manifesto and it
says nothing about stuffing gov-
ernment departments with party
supporters. In 1970, Pindling
went to Africa and visited a num-
ber of places. Pindling wrote the
Manifesto, not an African, and
in it he quoted President Ken-
neth Kuanda of Zambia, not
Robert Mugabe. The thing is
Kuanda’s quote wasn’t even bril-
liant or insightful. Kuanda quote
said ‘time does come for leaders
of any given revolution, if they
know what they are doing, to
think of starting to remould their
society’. -

It is an absurd notion to give
one man the title of “father of
the nation” when so many others
fought in the struggle and played
leading roles in elevating our
country. In America, although
they did not all agree, they recog-
nise their founding fathers (and
mothers), rather than attempting
to distort history and bestowing
that honour on one person.

Frankly, if I am to go the route
of some Bahamians, if there’s
anyone entitled to be called
“Father of the Nation”, it is Sir
Milo Butler. In terms of the mod-
ern Bahamas, Sir Milo led the

charge even before the PLP came
into existence. He attended the
Independence Conference as the
first Bahamian Governor Gen-
eral designate, he led the fight
against racism and has become a
great symbol of unity.

Others worthy of being cate-
gorised as our founding
fathers/mother are Sir Cecil Wal-
lace-Whitfield, Henry M Taylor,
Sir Randol Fawkes, Arthur Han-
na, Sir Arthur Foulkes, Sir
Kendal Isaacs, Sir Clifford Dar-
ling, Doris Johnson and even Sir
Stafford Sands (for his contribu-
tion to the establishment of our
present economic pillars -
tourism and financial services).

After the 1977 election, the
wheels began falling off the Pin-
dling express. Law and order
broke down as the Bahamas
became a transshipment spot for
the movement of illegal drugs,
with officials ranging from law
enforcement to Cabinet minis-
ters accepting backhanders.

Under Sir Lynden, the
Bahamas lost a generation of
Bahamians to drug addiction and
drug wars, which has spawned
much of the social problems that
continue to haunt the country
today.

According to a PBS report, in
the Pindling era Norman’s Cay
“became a haven of debauchery”
— the Bahamas’ own Sodom and
Gomorrah, where drugs, orgies
and lawlessness were the order
of the day.

Major US media houses esti-
mated that as much as 80 per cent
of the cocaine consumed in the
US at that time came through the
Bahamas. Sir Lynden is alleged
to have been bribed by cocaine
baron Carlos ‘Joe’ Lehder to
allow him usage of Norman’s Cay
for his nefarious activities.

The late Norman Solomon,
then MP for North Eleuthera,
was held at gunpoint and pro-
hibited from moving around Nor-
man’s Cay when he tried to

SEE page 11

Women's Full Figured Fashions

New

* Dresses
* Skirt Sets
* Capris

Eacter

* Blouses & Much Much More

Maderia Shopedne Placa
PO. Bow S55 155
Sasso, Babes

Chan: Mer

Prince Charles D
yook Who's With uy hows

So

Tel: (24
fing (283)

E-mail: sives@conmbeave.com

nL

ive

[Oar a

Mr, Valentine Ferguson

1) Over 25 years Experience in The Travel

Industry

2) Over § years with Air Canada, Pan Am and

American Eagle

3) Over 7 years as a travel agency's travel

consultant

4) Over 7 years as a travel consultant supervisor
with Wide World Travel and Global Exp.

Travel

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing
Bank And Insurance

5) Over 3 years as a Travel Consultant/Manager

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before f
with Morris Travel

March 31, 2009 to:

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
RE: RECRUITMENT OFFICER HR
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073
E-mail address: hr@combankltd.com

So, whatever your travel needs are,
call Mr. Valentine Ferguson at
Convenient Travel and benefit from his
extensive knowledge.

Uae

OPEN FROM 9a.m. - 6p.m.

©2009 CreativeRelations. net

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

CALL 322-1722

“Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for
their interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only
those under consideration will be contacted.”





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 11



dominant figures in our political history

FROM page 10

observe Mr Lehder’s operations.

In 1982, Brian Ross’s explo-
sive investigative report ‘The
Bahamas: A Nation for Sale’
charged Pindling and his govern-
ment with corruption and for
accepting sweeteners from the
international rogue and head of
the Medellin Cartel, Carlos
Lehder.

Lehder used Norman’s Cay,
almost with impunity, as a base
for his cocaine operations.
Although Sir Lynden made a
bizarre appearance on NBC to
refute the report, the world had
become aware of local affairs and
US government officials were
pressing for an investigation.

With this as the backdrop, a
Commission of Inquiry was
appointed in November, 1983.
The Commission’s report found
that corruption and influence-
peddling was rife, that parlia-
mentarians, law enforcement offi-
cials and others had accepted
bribes from drug traffickers and
that Sir Lynden’s bank accounts
of at least $3.5 million were far in
excess of this PM earnings
between 1977 and 1983.

Sir Lynden could give no cred-
ible explanation as to why his
expenditure was eight times his
income and he was not known to
be living off credit. One of Sir
Lynden’s Cabinet ministers was
also found to have been fronting
for the mafia.

Furthermore, the commission
also concluded that during the
Pindling era, a number of Family
Island commissioners may have
taken drug-related inducements
as they showed a “degree of
acquiescence” regarding the
drug trade on their respective
islands.

Following the commission,
former DPM Arthur Hanna
resigned — although his charac-
ter was never in question — and
urged Mr Pindling to do the same
“in the name of common decen-
cy.” Mr Pindling did not.

In 1987, after pursuing a
nationalistic agenda and playing
the race card, Mr Pindling led
the PLP to another electoral vic-
tory with 31 of the 49 House
seats. During that election cam-
paign, he painted the FNM as
traitors who were ready to accede
to the US. He charged that drugs
were an “American mess, so let
them clean it up” and even



accused agencies of the US fed-
eral government of transporting
drugs through the Bahamas at a
rally.

After Sir Lynden’s govern-
ment was defeated in 1992, the
new government discovered cas-
es of impropriety, neglect and fis-
cal mismanagement...and that
they had inherited an economic
recession.

T have also been advised that
the former PM also botched the
formation of the country’s first
airline and that it is because of
this that Bahamasair lags so far
behind today.

According to my source, in
1970 routes were exclusively
assigned to the new Bahamas
Airways, which featured a con-
glomerate of international com-
panies and left the government

with a 25 per cent stake in the
airline.

Apparently, Mr Pindling did
an about-face and gave the same
‘exclusive’ routes to Everette
Bannister’s paper airline —
Bahamas World Airways. The
deal collapsed and Bannister’s
airline never materialised. “We
would have had a jet fleet flying
to New York and other places
long ago, but we have yet to do
so,” the source said.

Indeed, there is more than the
glossed-over side to Pindling’s
legacy. The latter years of the
Pindling era were of total cor-
ruption and it has set a social cul-
ture that still hangs over the
Bahamas today, as many are still
afraid to speak out for fear of
vindictiveness or overt victimisa-
tion.

Even Fred Mitchell made note
of Sir Lynden’s spite in his pre-
sentation when he said: “It (was)
the same for Franklyn Wilson
whose nomination was shocking-
ly taken away from him in 1977
because he had dared to cross
the great man.”

Frankly, although some mile-
stones were achieved in the Pin-
dling years, he contributed to
the destruction of the moral fab-
ric of this country, the rise of
materialism and the encourage-
ment of an attitude of entitle-
ment without work.

He introduced a culture where
there was and continues to be lit-
tle to no accountability in gov-
ernment departments and he
opened the floodgates of the pub-
lic service, leaving it bloated with
idlers and malcontents who have

Unter the dishnguastherd patronage of Their Excellencies, Hom 4rthure 2. Hamna
Govemor General of the Gommonwealih of The Baheenas and Mrs. Hanm

BAHAMAS NATIONAL YOUTH CHOIR




MARCH 3/— APRIL 4. 2009
DUNDAS CENTER FOR

THE PERFORMING ARTS
8:30 PM

SAL | See yo eA

TH

A WW
ONCERT SEASOW

UAL

Tickets: 315.00

April 1- 4,2009
call - 393-3728

Gala: $50.00

March 31

(oockialls & hors d'oeuvres at 7230)

call - 393-3226

r=

quest artist Christine Gangelhotf (flautist), accompanied by Dr.Christy Lee (pianist

é led al Metinguiahed CF ait

On Saturday, March 28", the Montagu Constituency Association
will host a celebratory dinner in honor of its past Members of

Are

Sr Geoffrey sohestone

Sir Kendal Isaacs

Parliament,

1 Heriry Bostwick

1982 - 1997

Sir Orville Tumaquest

Sr Willem Alen Brent Symonette

1997-2002 3 = 2002-2007

From 1967 to 2007, the constituency has had a total of six Representatives. Not

only have these noble sons served Montagu with distinction, but have all gone on
to become nation builders of the highest caliber,

Menta Y ilu Them!

Venue: Montagu Gardens, East Bay Street

Time: 7:30 pm

For further information on the event please contact the constituency

headquarters at (242) 393-0878

1 GS AANA RAAB



poor attitudes and only seem
interested in being on the pay-
roll.

Today, there are still some in
the public sector who have no
intention of doing an honest
day’s work and who see work —
even answering a phone or lifting
a pencil — as an infringement on

their time.

Sir Lynden was a giant of our
times and has had an over-
whelming impact on Bahamas’
history — but history should be
viewed in its entirety, as is seem-
ingly evident since none of the
old PLP have come out to defend
Sir Lynden.




















yD Das






The Bahamas Electricity Corporation




invites Tenders for the repair of Storage Tank #13 at its



Clifton Pier Power Station.



Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158



Tenders are to be addressed to:



Mr. Kevin Basden



General Manager




Bahamas Electricity Corporation



Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads



Nassau, Bahamas





Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before




31st March, 2009



no later than 4:00 p.m.




Submissions should be marked as follows:




Tender No. 683/08




REPAIR OF STORAGE TANK #13



CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION






The Corporation reserves the right to accept or




reject any or all proposals



For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact



Mr. Shevonn N. Cambridge at telephone 302-1208.





Site visit will take place on Thursday, 19th March, 2009 at 9:00 a.m.



at BEC, Clifton Pier Power Station.




EVEN IF IT DOESN’T MOVE
WE WILL TRADE IT IN.

BEST PRICES
EVER SALE!

Thompson Blvd, « Oakes Field
SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED = +. 242.326.6377 £.242.326.6315

®. sanpin@coralwave.com



(OM THE SPOT FINANOING WITH
COMMONWEALTH BANK

INSURANCE AVAILABLE WITH
ADVANTAISE INSURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS LTD.



PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL AND LOCAL SPORTS



RUGBY: SIX NATIONS CHAMPIONSHIP

Ireland capture first
Grand Slam for 61 years



Paul Thomas/AP Photo

THE IRISH team celebrate after beating Wales 17-15 in a Six Nations rugby union international match at the Mil-
lennium Stadium, Cardiff, Saturday March 21, 2009.

Ireland have been crowned Grand Slam cham-
pions for the first time in 61 years after Ronan
O'Gara booted a late drop goal to secure a 17-15
victory over Wales at the Millennium Stadium.

Stephen Jones appeared to have denied Ireland
the clean sweep when he landed a drop-goal of his
own, but O'Gara struck the decisive blow with two
minutes remaining.

Tries from man of the match Brian O'Driscoll
and Tommy Bowe, both within six minutes after the
interval, put Ireland on course for victory in a
nerve-shredding contest.

But four penalties from the superb Jones kept
defending champions Wales, who needed to win by
a minimum of 13 points to retain their title, in
touch as they sought to deny Ireland the clean
sweep. O'Driscoll was delighted after the match.

Meanwhile, England regained the Calcutta Cup
with a 26-12 victory at Twickenham that will pile the
pressure on embattled Scotland coach Frank Had-
den.

France bounced back from their Twickenham
drubbing in emphatic style as a seven-try romp at
the Stadio Flaminio condemned sorry Italy to the

AP Photo/David Davies/PA



IRELAND'S Brian O'Driscoll celebrates with spectators

wooden spoon and a fourth RBS 6 Nations white- after his team beat Wales 17-15 in a Six Nations rug-
by union international match at the Millennium Stadi-

um, Cardiff, Saturday March 21, 2009.

wash. The final score was Italy 8, France 50.





















2008 FORD EXPLORER XLT

7 Passanger XLT, Leather Interior

The zp

NOW $33,800.00

2008 FORD SPORT TRAC
LIMITED - Leather Interior
was $46,186.00
NOW $37,300.00

2008 FORD EDGE SEL
ane:

was $41,670.00
NOW $35,400.00

Available

' | 3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and
licensed and inspected up to birthday.

was $42,116.00
NOW $35,800.00

NOW THAT'S REALLY A

| |(SDeal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

s |
rT E el C2)









AP Photo/David Davies/PA

IRELAND'S Brian O'Driscoll celebrates with the trophy after his team
beat Wales 17-15 in a Six Nations rugby union international match at the
Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Saturday March 21, 2009. Ireland captured
its first Grand Slam in the Six Nations for 61 years by beating Wales 17-
15 on Saturday.

Paul Thomas/AP Photo

IRELAND'S Ronan O'Gara kicks the match winning drop goal during
their Six Nations rugby union international match against Wales at the Mil-
lenium Stadium, Cardiff, Saturday March 21, 2009.

© World sports briefs

AP Photo/Andres Leighton

ENGLAND'S CAPTAIN Andrew Strauss, right, reacts after being bowled by
West Indies’ Kieron Pollard who celebrates behind on the second One-Day
International cricket match in Providence, Guyana, Sunday, March 22,
2009. West Indies won by 21 runs to level the five-match series 1-1.

Nadal downs Murray to take Indian Wells title

@ INDIAN WELLS, California

Rafael Nadal powered his way to a 6-1, 6-2 victory over Andy Mur-
ray on a windy Sunday afternoon at the BNP Paribas Open, winning his
second Indian Wells title in three years. No. 1 Nadal’s low, hard
groundstrokes gave him an edge in the gusty conditions over No. 4 Mur-
ray, whose game relies more on pace and a mix of shots.

Nadal, a 22-year-old Spaniard, added the championship to the Aus-
tralian Open title he won earlier this year, and avenged a loss to even-
tual champion Murray in the Rotterdam final.

lm EUROPEAN
SOCCER ROUNDUP

Liverpool rout
Villa to close
gap on Man
Utd to one point

lm LONDON (AP)

Steven Gerrard scored a hat
trick Sunday, sending Liverpool
past Aston Villa 5-0 and within
a point of first-place Manches-
ter United in the Premier
League.

Having routed United 4-1 last
weekend, Liverpool took full
advantage of the champions los-
ing 2-0 at Fulham on Saturday.
United has 65 points after 29
games; Liverpool has 64 after 30
games. Chelsea, which lost 1-0
at Tottenham on Saturday, has
61. Dirk Kuyt took just eight
minutes to score against a Villa
team that is chasing one of the
four Champions League spots.

Villa’s miserable afternoon at
Anfield was compounded when
USS. goalkeeper Brad Friedel
was sent off for bringing down
Fernando Torres as he surged
forward to meet Xabi Alonso’s
ball. On Saturday, Wayne
Rooney and Paul Scholes were
ejected as Manchester United
lost at Fulham for the first time
since September 1964, a 2-0
defeat Saturday that tightened
the Premier League title race.

Chelsea (18-4-7), which is
four points back of United, lost
1-0 at Tottenham Hotspur, its
first defeat in eight matches
under manager Guus Hiddink.
Luka Modric scored in the 50th
minute for Spurs, which
improved to just 2-23-13 against
Chelsea in league matches since
February 1990.

Fourth-place Arsenal (15-5-
10) got goals from Nicklas
Bendtner, Abou Diaby and
Samir Nasri is a 3-1 win at New-
castle. Stoke earned a 1-0 victo-
ry over Middlesbrough, and
Portsmouth’s prospects of
avoiding relegation were boost-
ed when Peter Crouch beat
American goalkeeper Tim
Howard twice in a 2-1 victory
over Everton.

il
NOTE

FROM page 15

The Bahamas Basketball Fed-
eration has sanctioned the tour-
nament, which is being orga-
nized for primary, junior and
senior high school basketball
teams. The tournament is hon-
oring Johnson, who has dedicat-
ed more than a decade to the
development of women's bas-
ketball in the country. She had
built a reputable foundation at
HO Nash with the Lions’ junior
girls team. Two of her proteges,
Anastasia Moultrie, now teach-
ing at St.

Augustine's College and Tor-
sheka Cox, now at Anatol
Rodgers Junior High School,
are organizing the tournament.

VOLLEYBALL
NPVA RULES CLINIC



THE New Providence Volley-
ball Association will host a vol-
leyball clinic today at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium,
starting at 6 pm.

The clinic is designed to
update all players, coaches,
executives and officials on he
new rules that will be imple-
mented in the league. The
league indicated that they
intend to have all persons pre-
sent for the meeting as this will
ensure that everybody is on par
with the new rules.

cS SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE ¢

RM FRAME

WINDOWS

Nassau's Leading Manufacturer of Vinyl Windows and Vinyl Doors

MARCH MADNESS
$$$ $ALE $$$

HUGE DISCOUNTS ON ALL ORDERS
PLACED DURING THE MONTH OF MARCH

he

Call for your FREE quote or

Come visit our factory located on 74 Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau,

TEL: 1-242-325-6633
FAX: 1-242-325-6638

a ee

ee

i ee ee i ee



TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 13



Vanderpool-Wallace closes out freshman year

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ARIANNA Vanderpool-Wallace
closed out her freshman year at
Auburn University by joining sopho-
more Alana Dillette on the All-Amer-
ican honours at the NCAA Women's
Swimming and Diving Championships
over the weekend at the Texas A&M

Student Rec Center Natatorium. The
duo helped the Tigers finish sixth in
the team standings at the end of the
three-day meet with 281.5 points. Cal-
iforina won with 411.5.
Vanderpool-Wallace swum the first
leg on Auburn's record setting 200
freestyle relay tam of Emile Ewing,
Melissa Marik and Caitlin Ceary that
clocked one minute and 27.45 seconds.
Individually, she was sixth in the B

final of the 50 free for 14th overall in
22.20, which was off her season's best
of 22.10 that lowered her national
record that she set at the Olympic
Games in Beijing, China last year.
Vanderpool-Wallace was also sec-
ond in the B final of the 100 free for
10th overall in a time of 48.11. Geary
won the B final in 47.92.
Vanderpool-Wallace turned in a split
of 21.37 on anchor and Dillette did

23.33 on the third leg as they combined
to lead the Tigers to a fourth place fin-
ish in the A final of the 200 medley
relay in 1:36.88.

The University of Georgia won in
1:36.45.

Vanderpool-Wallace wrapped up
her performance in the 400 freestyle
relay on the first leg. The Tigers placed
fifth in 3:12.75.

California won in 3:09.88 to shatter

the NCAA record of 3:11.05. Individ-
ually, Dillette was seventh in the B
Final of the 100 butterfly in 52.91 for
15th overall.

The B Final was won by Saor
Haruguchi in 52.18.

And Dillette did splits of 23.95 and
52.48 on the third leg as Auburn Uni-
versity posted a victory in the B Final
of the 400 medley relay in 3:31.50.

White and Rolle win national titles

FROM page 15

it was a step in the right direc-
tion as he work his way back on
the national scene.

"T think I have to work on my
bench, but I think if some of the
senior competitors would come
back I can improve on that and
the rest of my lift tremendously,"
said the 28-year-old super-heavy-
weight champion.

Taking a break from body-
building and switching over to
powerlifting was no problem for
Faye Rolle. She breezed through
the competition as a mid-
dleweight lifting a 142.5 squat,
77.5 bench and 137.5 deadlift for
her total of 357.5.

Only rookie Danielle Dennard
had better lifts in the female com-
petition.

"It feels good. It's a change and
it gives me a chance to show off
my talent,” said Rolle, who was
coaxed on the sidelines by her
coach Welligton 'Cat' Sears.

Rolle, the Novice bodybuild-
ing champion who competed with
Jeremy Tucker for the silver at
the Central American and
Caribbean Bodybuilding Cham-
pionships, said she experienced
the most difficulty in her bench.

"If you do how they say you
should do it in the rules, they call
it a no lift,” Rolle said. "I thought
I got the lift, but they called it a
no lift. So I didn't lift the total
weights that I anticipated because
of the no lift."

Having gotten a taste of the
competition, Rolle said that she
will definitely be back in power-
lifting because it will help her
bodybuilding preparation tremen-
dously. She's getting ready to
travel to Grand Bahama for her
first bodybuilding competition in
June before she's on stage for the
Nationals in July.

Also taking advantage of her
bodybuilding background as she
made her debut in powerlifting
was fitness champion Shekera
Mackey. Her total in the light-
weight division was 240. She did a
70 squat, 47.5 bench and 122.5
deadlift. "It's a big change, a big
difference, but I worked hard,"
said Mackey, an accounts assis-
tant who started working out as a
hobby. "Both sports actually keep
me in shape and push me to that
next level.”

Mackey said she didn't have
any problems with any of her lifts
because "they were all a piece of
cake." But she noted that "if I
had some competition in my divi-
sion, I could have done some
more."

One of the most impressive
competitors in the competition
was 16-year-old Kester Bowan,
who was less than 130 pounds.
He won the featherweight divi-
sion with a total of 292.5 after
squatting 95, benching 60 and
deadlifting 137.5.

"The lifts were alright, but I
could have done a lot better," he
said. "I really didn't have any
problems with any of my lifts, but
T hope to go back to my training
and improve on them in the next
competition."The College of the
Bahamas, who continue to make
strides towards its university sta-
tus, had some competitors who
excelled. One of them was
Danielle Dennard, who topped
all of the females with the best
lifts of 145 in the squats, 82.5 in
the bench and 142.5 in the dead-
lift for her toal of 370.

ae)

GOOD PERFORMANCE: Hilton Solomon.



@ THE FINAL RESULTS

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

OT WO) eee Wao) ecm MSIL R

Here's a look at the final results of the Bahamas Powerlifting
Federation's National Powerlifting Championships (the lifts are in

kilos):

Ladies' Division
Featherweight

Tanya Forbes — 62.5 squat, 45 bench, 117 deadlift - total 225.

Lightweight

Shekera Mackey — 70 squat, 47.5 bench, 122.5 deadlift — total 240.

Middleweight

Faye Rolle — 142.5 squat, 77.5 bench, 137.5 deadlift — total 375.5.

Light-heavyweight

Tina Sterling — 60 squat, 60 bench, 110 deadlift — total — 230.

Heavyweight

Danielle Dennard — 145 squat, 82.5 bench, 142.5 deadlift — total - 370.

Men's division
Featherweight

Kester Bowan — 95 squat, 60 bench, 137.5 deadlift — total -

Junior Division

292.5,

Philip Dawkins — 150 squat, 150 bench, 280 dealift — total — 480.

Masters

George Barr — 150 squat, 150 bench, 182.5 deadlift — total -

Middle-heavy

482.5,

Trevor Benjamin — 205 squat, 155.5 bench, 230 deadlift — total — 408.

100 kilo class

Hurricane Bain — 1867.5 squat, 160 bench, 227.5 deadlift — total — 575.

Hilton Solomon — 160 squat, 147.5 bench, 205 deadlift — total -

912.5,

Philip Dawkins — 150 squat, 150 bench, 280 deadlift — total - 480.

Heavyweight

Alponso Canter — 225 squat, 182.5 bench, 250 deadlift — total —

Super-heavyweight

697.5.

Leslie White —- 310 squat, 205 bench, 295 deadlift — total — 810.

George Barr — 150 squat, 150 bench, 182.5 deadlift — total —

"It was pretty good. I enjoyed
it," said Dennard, a 20-year-old
graduate of Bahama Academy of
her sporting debut. "The lifts
were all pretty good. They were
what I wanted. I just think I need
to work on my squat. But with
some more competition, I know I
can do better."

Another COB student who
performed well was Hilton
Solomon in the 100 kilo class. He
got second (512.5) behind Hurri-
cane Bain (575), but he admitted
that it wasn't his best perfor-
mance. "In the squat, I don't
think it was right up there, but in
the bench and the deadlift, they
were right there," he said. "I did-
n't lift what I wanted in the squat,
but I did it in the bench and the
deadlift. I just have to work on
my squat."

Federation's public relations
officer Bob Brown, a former
national champion, said as they
resurrected the sport, they saw
flashes of a number of past body-
builders like Delvin 'Blue' Scott,
Kevin ‘One Ton' Woodside,
Bernard ‘Spinks’ Rolle from
Grand Bahama, Gena Mackey,
Natasha Newbold and Patrice
Curry.

"The menu was great, people

| eal
;

ar eT re Eat

|

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

—
ay
—_—

a

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

aa ATTN Shekera Mackey.

482.5,

showed up as expected and we're
looking forward to the next show
in August,” said Brown, who indi-
cated that by then some of the
veteran powerlifters will be back.

"We go to Freeport next
month and we look to see the
competition moving on to pre-
pare us for the World Champi-
onships.

“So the sport is back and we
are definitely going to be doing a
lot more in the future."



1.0

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New
Providence and the Family Islands including Grand
Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser’) now invites
sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from
schools in accordance with the provisions of the Education Act. Bid
forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of
Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed

envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the
subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Tuesday, 31% March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday, 7 April, 2009 atthe address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel: (242) 327-1530



INDOOR ‘Lys OUTDOOR

ete m cate BOT gd
SPST UR TL ca US

TUTE]
Tg
Tea:
te) EF
dinning chairs
sts]

SOFAS OUTDOOR
if {a
ee TTF
consoles
re tit 3
PT ed

Site Cry
ANTIQUE MONGOLIAN

ASK ABOUT OUR COMPLETE HOME FURNITURE PACKAGES

iss Mee Cte lL



ASM ee elt Re ee Bee di Til le te ie MD Ga aT



PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



NEW PROVIDENCE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION

Angels outshine Cheetahs!

Last year’s champion
cemeeel

ANGELS Sharelle Cash controls the fast break.

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



A closely contested series
throughout, in the third and
deciding game of, one of this sea-
son’s top ranked team’s ensured
there would be no championship
rematch in the women’s division
of the New Providence Women’s
Basketball Association.

With a 67-64 win in the third
and deciding game of the semifi-
nal series, the Boomer G Angels
eliminated last year’s champi-
onship runner-up the Sunshine
Auto Cheetahs Saturday at the
D.W Davis Gymnasium.

The Angels built a seemingly
insurmountable lead over the sec-
ond and third quarters and with-
stood a spirited fourth quarter
effort from the Cheetahs to hold
on for the slim margin of victory.

Outscored

The Cheetahs came out as the
clear aggressors from the tip, and
led by eight first quarter points
from Anastacia Sands took a 24-
17 lead after the opening quar-
ter.

Boomer G took control over
the course of the next two periods
and outscored Sunshine Auto 13-
2 in the second quarter and 27-16
in the third.

They went from being down
seven points at the end of one, to
up 12 points heading into the
fourth quarter for a 22 point turn-



ship runner-up eliminated after 67-64 loss

SUNSHINE’S GUARD Andrey Marton drives to the basket.

around. The Angels gave up just
a single basket in the second to
take a 30-26 lead at intermission.

They ended the fourth on 12-2
run, capped by a Crishanda Kelly
lay-up and took a 57-42 lead into
the final period.

The Cheetah’s staged a late
comeback effort in the fourth
quarter as they outscored the
Angels 22-10 behind Sands and
Audrey Martin.

Kelly and Sharelle Cash paced
the Angels with 17 points apiece.

Sands led all scorers with 28
points while Martin added 20 for
the Cheetahs.

After a 2007-08 season where
they opted out of the NPWBA
for a myriad of reasons, the
Angels have returned to earn a
championship berth against the
pennant winners and defending
champions Johnson’s Lady
Truckers.

The Finals begin with game
one set for Thursday, March 26th
at the D.W Davis Gymnasium.



SUNSHINE’S Latoya Thompson
tries to drive past the defence.

www.atlanticmedicalfunwalk.com

t's time to step up PremierHealth

| |
and sign up! Funwalk 2009: April | 8th

It’s time to step up and sign up to walk a few
miles for smiles and two good causes!

Last year with your help we raised close to
$40,000 for our partner charities. Let's make our

Funwalk 2009 another event to remember!
The walk begins at 6.30 a.m. from Montagu Beach.

There will be a prize draw for participants.
Telephone 326-8191 or email

funwalk@atlantichouse.com.bs for info.

Remember there are two routes, one for those
competitive walkers amongst you and one for the
more “‘leisurely” walker. So there really is no excuse

A

not to come join in the fun!

sd

A
*

A. 15 & Under B. 16-25 C€.26-35 D.36-45

WALK CATEGORIES: Male & Female

E. 46-59 F 60 & Over

Official registration form

Entry Fee: $15.00 Adults / $12.00 Children includes gift pack and T-shirt
Deliver to: Atlantic Medical Insurance, Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, Nassau PO. Box SS-5915
Tel: 326-8191 or fax form to: 326-8 | 89

NAME:

COMPANY/ORGANIZATION:

EMAIL:

T-SHIRT SIZE: (circle choice) Ss M L

RACE CATEGORY: (circle choice) A B Cc D

{Additional entries, duplicate form)

ATLANTIC
= MEDICAL

Our partner charities:
Cancer Society of The Bahamas
Bahamas Diabetic Association

Atlantic Medical is not liable for injuries incurred by participants at this event.

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, PO. Box SS-59 15, Nassau Tel: 326-819 |
Suite 5, Jasmine Corporate Center, East Sunrise Highway, RO. Box F-42655, Freeport Tel: 351-3960

A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life

COLONIAL GROUP
aj INTERNATIONAL

Colonial Group International is
rated A-(Excellent) by AM Best.







NU



BASKETBALL Ryders in the Vince Ferguson
NPBA POSTSEASON Divisional series.

IT'S down to the divisional Sica
final in the New Providence mg By BRENT STUBBS
Basketball Association, starting : : Senior Sports Reporter
tonight at the CI Gibson Gym- ORGANISERS will. bein bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

the second Patricia 'Patty' John-

son Basketball Tournament on

Wednesday at the CI Gibson

Gymnasium, starting at 4 pm.
The tournament will run

nasium.

In the opener, the defending
champions will play the Police
Crimestoppers in the first game
of the John Archer Divisional

ESLIE White and
Novice bodybuild-
ing champion Faye

series. Last year's runners-up through Friday. Rolle dominated
Electro Telecom Cybots will the Bahamas Powerlifting Feder-
play the Sunshine Auto Ruff SEE page 12 ation's ‘Resurrection Day’

National Powerlifting Champi-
onships on Saturday at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Although they didn't compete,
the championships brought out
some of the top bodybuilders and
powerlifters, including pro body-
builders Joel Stubbs and Gena
Mackey, national bodybuilding
champion Jay Darling; former
national powerlifting champions
Kevin Woodside and Natasha

Rolle and Aaron Green, presi-
dent of the newly formed New
Providence Bodybuilding and Fit-
ness Association.

There was enough talent in the
stands to encourage the new core
of powerlifters who took center
stage.

While he was the most experi-
enced competitor on the floor,
White didn't disappoint the
observers as he posted the best
lifts in the competition with a 310
squat, 205 bench and 295 deadlift
for his total of 801.

"T felt pretty good since it's
been about two years since they
held

the last competition,” White
said. "The results I did today was
pretty good for a comeback."

Despite the fact that he didn't
lift some of the weights he had
anticipated on paper, White said

SEE page 13

All Sales Final

(While supplies last)

—" NIG

=

ENTERPRISES LiMiTED

19 Patton Street, Palmdale §
Open Mon-Fri 7:30am-4:30pm Sat 8:00am-3:00pm i
Tel: 326-8453 or 326-5464 Fax: 326-5461

Web: www.bulldersmaiibahamas.com Email: info@bulldersmallbahamas.com

POWER AND THE GLORY

White and Rolle win titles












































i i |

THE FORCE BE WITH YOU: Leslie White powering his way to success.

mae aa aes

Se)

MAW moms Ceti rs HL Cem ele aoa
topped with Zesty Tartar Sauce,
Cheddar Cheese and Crisp Lettuce
all wrapped in a Warm Tortilla.



PAGE 16, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS






































President's Circle

PICTURED (FROM LEFT) are Phillipa Cooper and Bernadette Saunders of the niiicies of Tourism,
Edwina Hudson, Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Royal Hudson, Pedro Young of Royal Holiday
Club and Sonja Albury of the Ministry of Tourism.

Nassau remains the
Hudsons’ happy home

AFTER 24 years, the
Bahamas remains beloved
second home of Royal and
Edwina Hudson.

The couple from Lowell,
Massachusetts, has visited
the Bahamas regularly over
the past quarter century.

They have travelled exten-
sively to other countries, but
are always drawn back to the
Bahamas.

Congratulations on making
the distinguished
British American Financial Have, tried Aruba, |

President's Circle 2009 da, Mexico, but we've always MINISTER OF TOURISM and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

come back here,” said Mr greets Royal and Edwina Hudson and Royal Holiday Club Sales
Hudson. “This is our home — Manager Pedro Young.

Clockwise from top: Resheda Bodie, base.” . . . :
Philp Ferguson, Raleigh Francis, Helen Gardiner, The Hudsons said that sig- trip decided to get married Holiday Club sales manager



nificant memories are tied to in the Bahamas. Pedro Young.
Patrice Rolle and Kimberlene Roberts the Bahamas. The Hudsons’ second “The pape are wonder-
They spent many family daughter is aschool teacher ful,” said Mrs Hudson. “We
holidays in Nassau. with two children. certainly think of them as

They started bringing their She has also enjoyed trips family.”

; Brit S oldest daughter when she to the Bahamas with her The Hudsons spent two
242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com : oe was five. Now she is a 26. family. a
c ena cs a sin TAT-UEMINS | Ahare 2473875 ear-old registered nurse 1S e warm weather, uring the visit, Minister o
eeperl 242-352-7208 Exania 242-F0-1035 | Abace 2f aot American Ln is CNaa re give birth to beautiful beaches and friend- Tourism and Aviation Vin-
twins. ly people that keep the cou- cent Vanderpool-Wallace

In the past, the couple’s ple returning. They said they presented them with an
daughter celebrated high have developed close rela- authentically Bahamian gift
school and college gradua- tionships with staff of their basket and a certificate of
tions here. Later, a friend time share property, West appreciation for their many
from her college graduation Winds II, and with Royal _ visits to the country.

All Gardening Tools & Supplie 5 |
(Except Net Items) \

a March 21 - 28 x

=i Fr
= | aid oe ee em lete* |

Open Mon-Fri 7:00am-4:00pm, Saturday 7:00am-3:00pm
Tel? 323-3973 of 325-3976 Fax: 322-393 /
Web: www. bulldersmalibahamas.com
Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.com





THE TRIBUNE

ul

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



MONDAY,



ine

MARCH 23,



hy

2009





Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life

British Colonial seeks
‘sood title’ confirmation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he British Colonial

Hilton’s ownership com-

pany is seeking a declara-

tory judgment from the

Supreme Court that it has
good title to the downtown Nassau
resort’s land, after attorneys repre-
senting lender FirstCaribbean raised
concerns over a missing document in
the title chain.

The missing document, Tribune
Business can reveal, dates back to the
time when the hotel was owned by the
late Sir Harry Oakes and, subsequent-
ly, his family estate. It relates to a trans-
fer of the Bay Street property’s real
estate assets, upon which a mortgage
was secured, from Lady Oakes’s pri-
vate assets to the family holding com-
pany.

Informed sources close to develop-
ments told Tribune Business that the
Companies Register showed that the
mortgage in question was later dis-
charged. This means there are no liens
or charges on the British Colonial’s
real estate. But what cannot currently
be located is the title document show-
ing the transfer of real estate assets

BISX to unveil small business



THE British Colonial Hilton, Bay Street, New Providence...

from Baroness Oakes to the Oakes
family company.

As a result, it is understood that
Bahamian attorneys representing First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas), which last year complet-
ed a $40 million refinancing for the

British Colonial Development Com-
pany (the Hilton’s immediate owner),
have expressed concern that the miss-
ing document prevents them from issu-
ing an unqualified opinion on title. The
attorneys, believed to be from Higgs &
Johnson, indicated this could poten-

Resort owner seeks declaratory judgment
from Supreme Court that title clean, after
attorneys for lender FirstCaribbean raise
concerns over break in chain dating back
to late Sir Harry Oakes and family

tially jeopardize the mortgage security
that FirstCaribbean obtained for the
loan.

As a result, FirstCaribbean is under-
stood to have demanded that the
British Colonial Development Com-
pany either take out title insurance or
obtain an unqualified opinion that it
has clean title via a Supreme Court
judgment.

The resort’s holding company has
moved to do the latter, and obtain a
declaratory court judgment that the
mortgage holder has clean title. First-
Caribbean’s Barbados headquarters is
understood to have taken direct control
of the situation from its Bahamian sub-
sidiary.

British Colonial Development Com-

Airport financing $45m below target

pany officials are understood to view
the situation more as an administra-
tive matter, and believe it will be
cleared up relatively easily, with no
impact for the downtown Nassau
resort.

Tribune Business was first alerted
to the situation by sources who sug-
gested that the title query had prompt-
ed FirstCaribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) to suspend drawdowns on a
$15 million credit facility that was
financing the British Colonial Hilton’s
current multi-million dollar renova-
tion.

As a result, this newspaper had been
told there were delays in payments to

SEE page 6B

listing plans by

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX) is
planning to unveil “by the end of
this month” its plans for a small
business listing facility on the
exchange, an initiative designed
to give such companies exposure
and a “track record”.

‘end of month’

* Exchange believes
Central Securities
Depository key to
government debt listings

* BISX Global ‘still on tap’
after being readjusted

Keith Davies, BISX’s chief executive, told Tribune Business
that the proposed listings tier would not be “a revenue generator”
for the Bahamian exchange, but was instead being initiated to aid

national development.

He pointed out that a strengthened small business sector led to
a stronger overall economy, given the contribution such companies

made to employment and eco-
nomic development.

Government urged: Beware of

SEE page 7B

benefits ‘scams and abuse’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president has urged
the Government to do its utmost
to prevent “scams and abuse” of
its proposed unemployment ben-
efit scheme, and suggested it
revisit the Employment Act’s sev-
erance pay provisions to prevent
effective “double dipping” by
laid-off staff.

“T think something that needs
to be considered in this unem-

Ex-Grand Bahama Chamber
chief says scheme lets
dishonest employees ‘have
their cake and eat it’
ployment benefit is the potential
for abuse,” Mr D’ Aguilar told
Tribune Business. “I think the
Government, in their haste to get

this on the books, would be wise
to think through a number of sce-

SEE page 2B

Reef Penthouse

Perched atop the luxurious Reef Adantis and boasting approximately 4070

SP of flowing rooms and living area,
moet segght atter lomry unite
comes fully tumisted wiih ckeslaner flalshes ood incledes a

Reefs
such designs,

this Penthouse suite is ome of The
The 3 beckocm siete, one of tao

foyer, dining area, fall kitchen, panoramic opean views and large wrap-
round private balconies, The Beet Penthouse, as they say, is “wonderment
saa a Privacy, exclusive five star service mwoits. Offered by Mano

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA) rede-
velopment’s first financing
round secured $45 million less
than originally targeted, its
structure having to be readjust-
ed to account for global capital
markets weakness and what
appears to have been tepid
international investor demand.

The Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD),
which operates LPIA under a
30-year lease from the Govern-
ment-owned Airport Authority,
confirmed in a statement
released late on Friday after-
noon that it had secured $265
million to fund the first stage






of the airport’s redevelopment —
some $45 million less than the
originally-sought $310 million.

NAD said the financing,
which has come from 16 lenders
and investors, plus the Govern-
ment, consisted of three tranch-
es — a $153 million revolving
bank credit facility; $42 million
senior secured bond; and a $70
million participating debt facil-
ity.

This represents a departure
from the original structuring,
and indicates that international
investor demand for the senior
secured bond, in particular, was
relatively weak.

NAD had hoped to raise $310
million through $140 million in
a revolving bank credit facility;
$90 million in senior secured

bonds; and an $80 million par-
ticipating debt facility.

However, only $42 million or
less than 50 per cent of the
senior secured bonds were ulti-
mately taken up. Capital mar-
kets sources on Friday suggest-
ed to Tribune Business that out
of that $42 million, some $25
million had come from the
Bahamian market - $15 million
denominated in US dollars, and
$10 million in Bahamian dol-
lars.

The plan had originally called
for $70 million of the $90 mil-
lion bond facility to be in US
or other foreign currencies, and
$20 million in Bahamian dol-
lars. It was suggested to Tribune

SEE page 5B

Life Is JUST AS
fragile.

Are you one illness away from financial ruin?














Don't let life’s unexpected challenges shatter your hopes

for peace of mind and family protection.

Stay confident. Stay connected.

BS

Carey Resity at $2 200.000. Wels Listityg #B2B5

Des adont you... Het stalk.
MARIC) CAREY

ian

Vel: 242-677-TAL (8285p 1 Fax: 242-677-8256 Cells 242-387-7015
info (@imariecareyrealty.com | wewsanariocareyrealiy.com

Colinetmperial,

Nassau: 396.2000 356.8300 Freeport: 352.3223
www.colinaimperial.com





PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ee Eee
Consultant sees 40 per cent rise in train course demand

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BUSINESS consultant has
seen a 40 per cent increase in
attendance at work skills train-
ing courses he holds, and told Tri-

bune Business he was increasing-
ly seeing companies run as “one
and two-man band” operations
by their owners because they had
been forced to lay-off all employ-
ees.

Mark Turnquest, principal of

RB\ Bahamas Business
SL) Solutions Ltd

GLORAT PCA OLICY GRD MCA

We would lke to nolify our valued customers that
Mr. Cleveland Saunders

$ no longer employed with Bahamas Business Solutions
Limited and therefore not authorised fo sel or servioe Mero
Products.

Bahamas Busnes Soluflons Limied is the only company

authonsed to sel and service Xerox Products in the Bahamas

dare not kable for any products or services provided by this
individua

XeLOx @



VACANCY NOTICE

the Small Business Resource
Centre, said: “I have personally
seen a 40 per cent increase in my
business in reference to training.
I do a lot of training, and have
found that I’m training a lot of
people fired from their jobs. My
business has increased because a
lot of people want to improve
their skills, their corporate office
and clerical skills.”

This is no bad thing, given that
Bahamians who acquire addi-
tional skills in demand by
employers will position them-
selves for jobs — and potentially
higher salaries — as the economy
moves towards recovery. It will
also improve their economic
mobility.

Mr Turnquest, who is aiming
to organise a National Small Busi-
ness Summit for late May and
early June 2009, told Tribune
Business had had seen a 20 per
cent increase in hotel sector work-
ers who were attending his train-
ing sessions. He explained that
many who had been laid-off had

SCAMS, from 1B

narios where it could be abused.”

The Chamber president said a
prime example of what unem-
ployment benefits should not
become was the Government-
guaranteed educational loan fund
which, in its formative years, was
beset by non-repayments and
loans taken out by persons not
even studying.

“When you’ve got 150,000 peo-
ple thinking of ways to get round
the system, they usually find
them,” Mr D’ Aguilar added. “In
their haste to get this system up
and running, they have to think
about how it could get abused.
You've got to be aware of scams.
Let’s try and close as many loop-
holes as possible.”

A likely loophole to be exploit-
ed, Mr D’ Aguilar said, was where
persons were working more than
one job. The National Insurance
Board (NIB) only required con-
tributions from their primary
employer, the Chamber president
said, meaning that NIB — which
will administer unemployment
benefits — only had records relat-
ing to one job.

In this situation, an employee
could be collecting an unemploy-
ment benefit cheque for their first
job, but still working on their sec-
ond job. Mr D’Aguilar suggest-

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER EXECUTIVE

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Chief Financial Officer.

The job oversees all financial matters of BEC, inclusive of the activities of the Customer Services

Division.

The objectives of this function include, but are not limited to the following:

Financial Management, Accounting & Treasury

Ensure and structure the Corporation’s financial policies, practices and internal controls so that
they are in accordance with the law, generally accepted accounting principles, contractual
commitments, the Corporation’s structure and protect the corporations assets;

Manage BEC’s cash resources to ensure that funds are available to meet the ongoing and future

needs of BEC while minimizing the cost of capital;

Ensure the timely preparation of all financial reports. These include complete financial statements
for presentation to the Board, preparation of budget reports for assisting management decision
making, and development of a yearly projected budget in consultation with other Division heads;
Ensure that the divisions maintain a high standard of efficiency, control, and application of
sound accounting practices and principles along with the adequate trained qualified staff to

achieve these objectives;

Coordinate to ensure that the workflow within the division and cross functionality with all
departments dependent upon the services of the division, are efficient and effective;

* Coordinate the annual budgeting process and present the completed budget for approval;

* Manage external relationships with local and international sources of funds;

Ensure proper and cost effective insurance of BEC’s assets;
Conduct Financial Analysis for the Corporation as requested;

Customer Services

Ensure the accurate and timely meter reading and billing of all customer accounts in New

Providence and the billing of other Family Island Accounts.

Ensure proper management of the revenue and collection recovery activities by effective

management of the Corporation’s Accounts Receivable.

Ensure proper management of the business office services of cashiering and new services, queries

for customers, banking and accounting reconciliation, etc.
Ensure that non-technical losses are kept to a minimum.

Job requirements include:

* A minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Accounting/Finance with professional qualifications (e.g.,

ACCA, CPA) an MBA would be desired.

A minimum of 15+ years of experience in financial accounting, at senior management level.

Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Excellent analytical and organizational skills
Good customer relations skills

Good time management skills

Strong leadership skills

Knowledge of finance, accounting, budgeting and cost control principles including General

Accepted Accounting Principles.

Knowledge of automated financial and accounting reporting systems
Ability to analyze financial data and prepare financial reports, statements, and projections
Extensive knowledge of project management and the ability to oversee a range of projects

simultaneously

Strong human relations skills
Knowledge of industrial relations
Negotiation skills and techniques

Interested persons should apply by submitting a resume addressed to: The AGM-Human Resources
& Training, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau

Bahamas on or before: Wednesday, March 25, 2009.



no college degree or skills devel-
opment, and they were now seek-
ing training in the clerical/secre-
tarial area, especially on Quick-
Books recordkeeping methods.

Mr Turnquest, whose training
programmes are approved by the
Ministry of Education, said many
Bahamians “realise they need to
develop another type of skill”.
He estimated that unemploy-
ment, based on his experience,
was worse than the official 12.1
per cent and 14.1 per cent rates
recorded for New Providence and
Grand Bahama.

As for the small business com-
munity, he told Tribune Business:
“Right now, we are in a rock bot-
tom state. Nothing has changed,
and things have gotten worse.”

However, Mr Turnquest said
he had seen no “significant
increase” in small Bahamian com-
panies going out of business,
largely attributing this to the fact
that “90 per cent” of those that
were going to fold have already
done so.

ed this loophole could be closed
by requiring employers to submit
a list of employees working for
them as a second job.

The Chamber president,
though, said the Government
needed to reassess the severance
pay provisions contained in the
Employment Act. This Act pro-
vides for workers who are termi-
nated with notice, either two
weeks’ pay with or in lieu of
notice, and then two weeks’ pay
for every year worked up to 12
years. This effectively gives laid-
off line staff a maximum 26 weeks
of severance pay.

And, in the case of manage-
ment staff, they get four weeks’
pay with notice or in lieu of
notice, and four weeks pay for
every year worked up to 12 years.
This means the maximum statu-
tory payment they receive is 13
months.

Yet unemployment benefit will
add to this. Mr D’Aguilar said:
“When the Employment Act was
crafted it gave, in certain
instances, quite a generous sev-
erance portion because there was
no unemployment insurance.
Now that there is this unemploy-
ment component, one would
expect the Government, at some
stage, to revisit the severance
component of the Employment
Act.

“One would at least expect that
to be on the table for negotiation,
because it appears to be double
dipping. I think the benefits are

THI

Those that remained were now
“battle tested”, and Mr Turnquest
said: “I’ve seen more of the one
man bands. Many retail outlets
have only one person working in
the shop, and that’s the entrepre-
neur; the owner. The two to three
staff that were also working there
previously have been laid-off.”

When it came to his Small
Business Summit, scheduled for
May 21, May 25-28, and June 2-4,
Mr Turnquest said it aimed to
focus the national development
agenda on small businesses, iden-
tifying opportunities they can take
advantage of, along with business
strategies and models.

Accusing the Government of
adopting a “myopic approach” to
small business development in the
Bahamas, Mr Turnquest said:
“They’re not innovative or cre-
ative at all. “The Government has
done nothing at all in relation to
small business development in the
Bahamas. It cannot wait for them.
My main intention is to seek leg-
islative change in how small busi-

getting to the stage where they
are too generous.”

The Chamber president sug-
gested that the Government revis-
it the unemployment benefit
scheme one year after it was ini-
tiated to close any loopholes that
arose. He did, though, praise the
Government for stipulating in the
draft legislation that unemploy-
ment benefit could only be
received by those who con-
tributed, thus encouraging every-
one to pay.

Christopher Lowe, the former
Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce president, said he
objected to workers still receiving
seven of the 13 weeks’ worth of
unemployment benefit they were
entitled to even if they were dis-
missed with cause, such as steal-
ing or breaching company rules.

“You can’t have your cake and
eat it as well,” Mr Lowe told Tri-
bune Business. “We’re creating
scenarios where not only do we
reward people for doing nothing,
but for doing wrong.”

Asked for his views on the pro-
posed scheme, he added: “I don’t
like it one bit. It reeks of political
panic. It’s really amazing how the
Government can shuffle money
around willy nilly, based on polit-
ical needs as opposed to national
needs.

“T am definitely against people
collecting unemployment benefit
who've been fired for fraud, theft,
tardiness and their own fault.”

Mr Lowe said the unemploy-

BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMA RCE,
BARLASLAS DEVELOPMENT BANK PRESENT

ness needs to be given priority
treatment. We need to be proac-
tive, not reactive.”

He added that for small busi-
ness development in the Bahamas
to succeed, there had to be a
major change in mindset — not
just in the Government, but also
among entrepreneurs themselves
and financial/lending institutions.

“We need to identify what
Bahamian entrepreneurs need to
be skilled in to compete in the
world,” Mr Turnquest said. “Give
us an opportunity to take advan-
tage of future goals.

“The Government is borrow-
ing money to give people cheese
and bread. What about the busi-
nesses? Invest in the businesses,
let the businesses grow and hire
people. The economy has to
grow. There is no new money
coming in for entrepreneurial
ventures. They’re giving people
money to buy clothing and food.
But they’re still unemployed and
there’s no economic develop-
ment.”

ment benefit scheme appeared to
be a “fair accompli”, because he
and other employers had not
been consulted on, or informed
about, how it would work and its
proposed creation through
amendments to the National
Insurance Act and accompany-
ing regulations.

Due to this lack of information,
he said he could not explain to
his 100 employees at Kelly’s
(Freeport) why the Government
was mandating this additional
deduction from their salary
cheques.

“I’m not entirely against some
sort of unemployment benefit.
But for God’s sake, give us some-
thing tangible to read so we can
assist the Government in avoiding
pitfalls they are bound to make in
the implementation of such a pro-
gramme,” Mr Lowe said.

Meanwhile, he said NIB was
“in effect, making employers the
policing agents” when it came to
employee benefit claims through
the requirement that they fill out
its new form, Med-4. Mr Lowe
suggested that this had been
introduced to combat the inade-
quacies of the Med-1 form filled
out by employees, as many were
able to beat the system and claim
benefits while still working.

“T find it very incongruous that
they’re adding more benefits
when NIB cannot manage the
benefits it’s supposed to provide
now. Nor can they enforce con-
tributions,” Mr Lowe said.

uabdareed Thera bipaineat Fnak

LS. EMBASSY bk

PHI

BUSINESS EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR

Tuesday, March 315t,2009 + 8:00 a.m. 2:20 p.m.

REGE TRATION NET ORE IMG

INVOCATION, PRAYER &
MATPORLAL JN THES

INTRODUCTION & MODERATOR

11:30

* The Britich Colonial Hilton

PANEL DISCUS SiON Il

* SURVIVING THE ECONOMIC

RECESSION"

* Ken Kerr (Providence Advis!
* Barry Malcolm (Scotiabank Basar led!

: Philip Simon, Executive Qirector

Bohan: Channes af Gonmece

WELCOME REMARKS.
« Dionrsio D Aguile, Prosicent
Bahonas Chamber of Goammerce
* Doron Cash, Charon
Bahamas Geveropment Rank

» James Smith {Colina financial dovsaors)

LUNCHEON PRESENTATION

“THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC THREATS THE
GLOBAL ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY!”

"Ronald Langston, (Forme) National
Oirector ofthe Minority Susiness

QCevelop ment agemoy (BOA Of

* Timothy Zanrge-Brown, Change’

a Affairsa.i, OU. Enebersny

230
Fidelipy Rank

1015 COFFEE BREAK

10:30 PANEL D1S0USS10NI

“REASONS TO REJOICE IN RECESSION"
= Gregory Bethel, Presicerr,

Department ot Commerce

PANEL DE CUSSPON Ill

* POSITIONED FOR SUOOES 5. BEYOND

THE RECES SON WHAT'S MEXTE*
"Larry Gibson {Gonial Pension Senices}

"Chester Cooper (British Americar

Faranackd

Raymond Winder (Define & Touche}

330 CLOSING

* POG, AZ
PROTECTING YOUR INVES TMENT ‘
* Peter Miller (Gatianurs Devedopyment

Sank

*Khaalis Rolle (Masa Winter Ferries)
*ingpector Sandra Miller
{Royal Bohanuas Bolice Force!

Registration Fee: $ 100,00

Please F.5. VP:

Contact: The Chamber of Commerce

Teh 322-2145 of e-mail: register@thebaham aschamber.com





THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 3B



Restaurant files action
against West Bay hotel

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE OWNERS of Coco-nuts
Bahama Grill have taken legal
action against their former land-
lords, the owners of West Bay
Street’s El Greco Hotel, filing a
Supreme Court writ claiming
damages due to alleged negli-
gence and misrepresentations.

Coco-nuts closed its doors last
Wednesday, shutting down the
space they had leased for two
years from El Greco’s owners,
Harry and Mike Pikramenos.

Coco-nuts’ owners, the Fergu-
son brothers, alleged that when

they acquired El] Greco’s for-
lease space they were promised
access to a balcony area within
the hotel, which they claim was
reneged upon.

Alleged

They also alleged they were
promised a suitable parking area
for their patrons, which the writ
claims was to be purchased by El
Greco, but never was in two
years. The Fergusons are also
alleging that the landlords would
provide the upkeep of the prop-
erty, which was supposedly not
honoured.

The Ferguson brothers also

released letters sent to the Pikra-
menos’s attorneys, and produced
what were purported return
receipts, signed by the El Greco
owners, to show they had made
12 months’ worth of rental pay-
ments in full. The Pikramenos’s
had alleged they had been late
with lease payments.

In their legal action, they are
claiming damages due to an
alleged loss of business attrib-
uted to inadequate parking for
patrons and lack of access to the
balcony for private engagements
and smoking; alleged towing
costs and costs of drain repairs;
and additional costs allegedly
incurred because of the land-

lord’s failure to allow “quiet
enjoyment of the demised
premises”.

Harry Pikramenos on Wednes-
day denied the Fergusons claims
of being driven from the proper-
ty, saying he believes that the
business was a victim of the econ-
omy.

Mr Pikramenos said operating
El Greco without a restaurant
will have a negative effect on
business, but said Coco-nuts
would be replaced as soon as pos-
sible. “Yes it will hurt the hotel to
have no restaurant attached to
it, but we will find someone else
in the restaurant business,” said
Mr Pikramenos.

Financial sector sound in face of CLICO, OECD pressures

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE BAHAMAS financial
services industry is sound, the

minister of state for finance told
Tribune Business, despite CLI-
CO (Bahamas) collapse into liq-
uidation and fears of a new offen-
sive about to be nted against the
international financial services

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

SAFENS LTD

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No. 45 of 2000), the Dissolution of SAFENS LTD has

been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was

the 16th day of March, 2009.

L :
i
Por Cortina! Lipeanaen, re

Liqguitutar



sector.

Zhivargo Liang told Tribune
Business that the Government
was continuously monitoring
developments and language com-
ing from the Organisation for
Economic Co-Operation and
Development (OECD) countries,
who have recently began a clarion
call for the end of “tax havens”.

The Government has held con-
sultative meetings with members
of the Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) in order to
determine what steps this country
should take to avoid being placed
on another blacklist.

“We have a continuous dia-
logue with the industry through
the BFSB, continuous dialogue
about a whole range of issues in
the financial services sector, and
this would certainly been one of
them. As I said before, we are
monitoring the situation and we’ll
make determinations in due
course, and when we do, I’m sure
you and all the others will know,”
said Mr Laing.

The CLICO (Bahamas) situa-
tion has raised concerns about
the ability level of regulatory bod-
ies in the Bahamas to supervise
their industries, and their coop-
eration with regulatory bodies
across the Caribbean.

The bailout of CLICO
(Bahamas) parent company, CL

Vacation in Paradise.

Only MGT?

aad per person double occupancy.

Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only.

Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus:
+ Complimentary continental breakfast datly
+» Junior Suites with King-size or two double beds
* Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,

coffee maker, hair dryer

* Kids 15 and under, free

© Pool with swim “up bar

Limited-time offer! Reserve today /
Call 242-363-3680

*$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. - Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. - Sat. Maximum
four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on
standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.

Financial, by the Trinidad gov-
ernment caused a shockwave
across several Caribbean nations
where the conglomerate had
operations.

The Bahamas-based operation
was petitioned into provisional
liquidation this year due to its
insolvency, because it was unable
to pay claims of $2.6 million in
the Turks and Caicos Islands. Yet
it had been under the microscope
of the Registrar of Insurance
Companies since 2004.

“Issues related to CLICO were
picked up since 2004, so I don’t
know about falling through the
cracks; it was a matter of having
spotted an issue and raising it,”
said Mr Laing. “In regulating, the
first issue is to spot a problem,
the second issue is to address a
problem, and the third issue is to
act on an issue. The problem was
spotted from 2004. It was
addressed to the extent of holding
meetings since 2004, but only act-
ed on in recent times.”

Mr Laing said regional and
international regulatory bodies
exist to help jurisdictions “police”
themselves “and take advantage
of commerce.”

“That’s what’s going to happen
and it’s going to happen in many
areas including insurance, where
the regulators are seeing they
need to work,” he added.




INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



Yvette Bethel
presents



Reinvent Your Career

Saturday, March 28th, 2009
1:00pm - 3:00pm

Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre, Ist Floor

Cost: $150

For more information contact:
Phone: 341-5860 or Email: kken@orgsoul.com

ORGANIZATIONAL

Master Technici

ee Le

ELECTRONICS

ROCK-BOTTOM CLEARANCE

SALE

Over 100 items on Clearance!

celery eee eed a eee ee eee ee ee

Panasonic 42” Fixed TV Wall Mount
BYTE sie eh im hls

Avanti Induction Hotplate
McA eTO leu em Racers tole eC
PVE eelae Ce turds

Toshiba 27” DVD/VCR Combo TV

Sony 27” TV

Whirlpool Duet Electric Dryer
Whirlpool Gold Series 30” Black Cooktop

Ta em ete meee hemes eel) ele)

$25.00

Pe lrat |)
haw ee
eee
$315.25
Art
ler emt
$1,200.00
TDR 8)
$510.00

Meta s ieeeeee ee s e e ee

Gl Rte Dee Te

Clearance items

discounted up to 40

Village Rd., Open Mon. thru Sat. 8:30am 'til $:30pm
PH: 393-5310, www.mastertechbahamas.com

eee eee mee em





PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Treasury’s toxic asset plan
could cost $1 trillion

@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The Obama administration’s
latest attempt to tackle the
banking crisis and get loans
flowing to families and busi-
nesses will create a new gov-
ernment entity, the Public-Pri-
vate Investment Program, to
help purchase as much as $1 tril-
lion in toxic assets on banks’

books.

The new effort, to be
unveiled Monday, will be fol-
lowed the next day with release
of the administration’s broad
framework for overhauling the
financial system to ensure that
the current crisis — the worst in
seven decades — is not repeat-
ed.

A key part of that regulatory
framework will give the gov-
ernment new resolution author-
ity to take over troubled insti-






©




IOM International Organization for Migration
OIM Organisation Internationale pour les Migrations



OIM Organizacion Internacional para las Migraciones





Vacancy Announcement






The International Organization for Migration is



seeking a highly qualified National Officer to head




its new program in Nassau, Bahamas. The



incumbent will manage a program to promote



reintegration of recently returned Bahamian nationals.




The successful candidate will have a University




degree, preferably in Political Science, Law,



International Affairs, psychology or social work; a



minimum of eight years of relevant experience



required, preferably in the area of social work and




program management; strong writing abilities and



a good background in program administration




desirable. Salary commensurate with responsibility






and experience.

For a full description of the position please visit:

tutions that would pose a threat
to the entire financial system if
they failed.

Administration officials
believe this new power will save
taxpayers money and avoid the
type of controversy that erupted
last week when insurance giant
American International Group
paid employees of its troubled
financial products unit $165 mil-
lion in bonuses even though the
company had received more
than $170 billion in support
from the federal government.

Under the new powers being
sought by the administration,
the treasury secretary could
only seize a firm with the agree-
ment of the president and the
Federal Reserve.

Once in the equivalent of a
conservatorship, the treasury
secretary would have the power
to limit payments to creditors
and to break contracts govern-
ing executive compensation, a
power that was lacking in the
AIG case.

The plan on toxic assets will
use the resources of the $700
billion bank bailout fund, the
Federal Reserve and the Fed-
eral Deposit Insurance Corp.

The initiative will seek to
entice private investors, includ-
ing big hedge funds, to partici-
pate by offering billions of dol-
lars in low-interest loans to
finance the purchases. The gov-
ernment will share the risks if
the assets fall further in price.

When Geithner released the
initial outlines of the adminis-
tration’s overhaul of the bank
rescue program on Feb. 10, the
markets took a nosedive. The
Dow Jones industrial average
plunged by 380 points as
investors expressed disappoint-




www.iom.int/unitedstates/vacancies/vacancies.htm

For the stories





Please submit your CV and a letter of interest to

behind the news,






VNO209Bahamas@iom. int

read Insight
on Mondays

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN

DIVISION

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

IMPORTANT NOTICE

2009 APPLICATION FORMS ARE
NOW AVAILABLE

SCHOLARSHIP /LOAN TYPE

ALL BAHAMAS MERIT SCHOLARSHIP
NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP
NATIONAL ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIP
NATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOLARSHIP

NATIONAL GRANT

EDUCATION GUARANTEE LOAN FUND PROGRAMME

GERACE RESEARCH CENTRE SCHOLARSHIP
FINANCIAL COMMUNITY ADVANCED TECHNICAL
TRUST SCHOLARSHIP

DEADLINE

APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008

MAY 29, 2008

ment about a lack of details.

Christina Romer, head of the
Council of Economic Advisers,
said Sunday that it’s important
for investors to know that the
administration is bringing a full
array of programs to confront
the problem.

“TI don’t think Wall Street is
expecting the silver bullet,” she
said on CNN’s “State of the
Union.” “This is one more
piece. It’s a crucial piece to get
these toxic assets off, but it is
just part of it and there will be
more to come.”

But private economists said
investors may still have doubts
about whether the government
has adequate resources to prop-
erly fund the plan and whether
private investors will be attract-
ed to participate, especially after
last week’s uproar concerning
the AIG bonuses, which has
added to the anti-Wall Street
feelings in the country.

Romer said the new toxic
asset program would utilize
around $100 billion from the
$700 billion bailout fund, leav-
ing the fund close to being
tapped out.

Mark Zandi, an economist at
Moody’s Economy.com, esti-
mated that the government will
need an additional $400 billion
to adequately deal with the tox-
ic asset problem, seen by many
analysts as key to finally resolv-
ing the banking crisis.

Zandi said the administration
has no choice but to rely heavi-
ly on government resources
because of the urgency of get-
ting soured real estate loans and
troubled asset-backed securities
off the books of banks so that
they can resume more normal
lending to consumers and busi-
nesses.

“This is a start and we will
see how far it goes, but I believe
they will have to go back to
Congress for more money,” he
said.

The Public-Private Invest-
ment Program that will be cre-
ated was viewed as performing

the same functions — selling
bonds to finance purchases of
bad assets — as a similar orga-
nization did for the Resolution
Trust Corp., which was created
to dispose of bad real estate
assets in the savings and loan
crisis of the 1980s.

According to administration
and industry officials, the toxic
asset program will have three
major parts:

—A public-private partner-
ship to back private investors’
purchases of bad assets, with
government support coming
from the $700 billion bailout
fund. The government would
match private investors dollar
for dollar and share any profits
equally.

—Expansion of a recently
launched Fed program that pro-
vides loans for investors to buy
securities backed by consumer
debt as a way to increase the
availability of auto loans, stu-
dent loans and credit card debt.
Under Geithner’s plan for the
toxic assets, that $1 trillion pro-
gram would be expanded to
support purchases of toxic
assets.

—Use of the FDIC, which
insures bank deposits, to sup-
port purchases of toxic assets,
tapping into this agency’s exper-
tise in closing down failed banks
and disposing of bad assets.

Some industry officials said
hedge funds and other big
investors are likely to be more
leery of accepting the govern-
ment’s enticements to purchase
these assets, fearing tighter gov-
ernment restraints in such areas
as executive compensation.

Administration officials, how-
ever, insisted Sunday that a dis-
tinction needed to be made
between companies getting
heavy support from the bailout
programs and investors who are
being asked to help dispose of
troubled assets.

Romer said the partnership
with the private sector will help
ensure that the government
doesn’t overpay for the toxic

assets that it will be purchasing.

“This isn’t just another hand-
out to banks,” she said on CNN.
“We very much have the tax-
payers’ interest in mind.”

The administration’s
revamped program for toxic
assets is the latest in a string of
banking initiatives which have
also included efforts to deal
with mortgage foreclosures,
boost lending to small busi-
nesses and unfreeze the market
for many types of consumer
loans.

In addition, the nation’s 19
biggest banks are undergoing
intensive examinations by reg-
ulators that are due to be com-
pleted by the end of April to
determine whether they have
sufficient capital reserves to
withstand an even more severe
recession. Those that do not will
be able to get more support
from the government.

The overhaul of financial reg-
ulation will be revealed by Gei-
thner in testimony he is sched-
uled to give Tuesday and Thurs-
day before the House Financial
Services Committee.

In addition to the expanded
authority to seize big institu-
tions that pose a risk to the
entire system, the administra-
tion is also expected to offer
more general proposals on lim-
iting excesses seen in executive
compensation in recent years,
where the rewards prodded
extreme risk-taking.

The regulatory plan is also
expected to include a major
change that gives the Federal
Reserve more powers to over-
see systemic risks to the entire
financial system.

The administration is working
to unveil its proposed regulato-
ry changes in advance of a
meeting of the Group of 20 eco-
nomic leaders, which Obama
will attend on April 2 in Lon-
don. European nations have
complained that lax financial
regulations in the United States
set the stage for the current
financial crisis.

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

MANAGER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

One of our major clients seeks to recruit a qualified information technology professional
with experience in financial and customer service applications for the above position.

QUALIFICATIONS:

* Masters of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

* Eight or more years experience including hands-on technical experience and
two years minimum managing an information technology department in a large
organization with a complex, multi-vendor, multi-platform and distributed
computing environment
Visionary who can analyze problems within the context of corporate strategy,
balancing the consideration of facts, priorities, resources, constraints and

alternatives

RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Lead, monitor and develop a team of information technology professionals to
deliver customer focused service and set performance expectations to achieve

excellence

Manage the development, implementation and day-to-day operations of the
Information Technology department
Actively contribute to the tactical and strategic development of information
technology to support the organization’s business needs

Accountable for the successful delivery to agreed time scales and within budget of
departmental projects or programmes
Assist accounting and engineering departments in ensuring accurate and timely

NATIONAL AWARD / BURSARY
TEACHER EDUCATION GRANT

MAY 29, 2009

reparation of reports
MAY 29, 2009 ie :

REQUIREMENTS:
This is a senior position that will require a professional with very extensive
experience in supervising and controlling computer professionals in financial,
customer services and engineering applications.
Strong management and communications skills
Strong technical and troubleshooting skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure
Solid understanding of business operations and strategic planning

Application forms must be properly completed,

WITH ALL REQUIRED INFORMATION ATTACHED
and returned ON OR BEFORE the deadline to the

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION

APPLICATION FORMS RECEIVED AFTER THE
DEADLINE
WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED

COMPENSATION:
Attractive salary and other benefits will be commensurate with training and experience.

PLEASE VISIT OR CONTACT THE SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL Eire any on ecient een

LOAN DIVISION, MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, FOR APPLICATION
FORMS AND/OR FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: IT MANAGER 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

APPLICATION FORMS CAN ALSO BE OBTAINED FROM OUR
WEBSITE AT www. bahamaseducation.com

Private & Confidential





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 5B



Airport financing $45m below target

FROM page 1B

Business that the Bahamian
component of the bond facility
was “oversubscribed”, but that
Citibank, which was acting as
placement agent, had to take a
large component of the remain-
der due to weak international
investor demand.

As for the participating debt
facility, some $50 million of the
$70 million raised was taken up
by the Government. The Gov-
ernment effectively underwrote
the entire LPIA financing
effort, given that there was little
prior demand for the partici-
pating debt facility.

If that facility had not been
placed, then the whole LPIA
financing initiative could have
been stalled. Raising the par-
ticipating debt was a condition
precedent for the financing to
go ahead, because the $80 mil-
lion was required to re-finance a
previous loan of the same
amount taken out by the Air-
port Authority, which had a sev-
en-year payment term.

Tribune Business also under-
stands that NAD ultimately had
to increase the interest rate
coupon attached to the senior
secured bonds to 8.5 per cent,
up from an initial 8 per cent,
thus giving investors a greater
rate of return. It is also under-
stood that NAD is aiming to

break ground for construction
work on LPIA’s first redevel-
opment phase by July this year.

The first phase involves the
construction of a new 247,000
square foot US departures ter-
minal on land immediately adja-
cent to the existing terminal to
its western side. A further one
million square feet of asphalt
runway apron, expanded park-
ing facilities and new roads will
also be constructed. The new
departures terminal is expect-
ed to be completed by 20100.

Stewart Steeves, NAD’s vice-
president of finance, and its
chief financial officer, said in a
statement: “We were able to
raise $40.1 million in $B, $194.9
million in $US and $30 million
available in either $B or $US
for our expansion project. We
anticipate opening the new ter-
minal in early 2011 and will then
seek subsequent funding for
stages two and three.”

“We are pleased to announce
that funding for stage one of
the LPIA terminal redevelop-
ment programme is complete.
This represents the beginning
of an exciting chapter in the his-
tory of aviation in the
Bahamas.”

So far, more than $11 million
has been spent on capital
improvements at LPIA, includ-
ing upgraded washrooms, roof

IN THE ESTATE OF THOMAS ALLISON
AUGUSTUS CLEARE SR late of Joe Farrington

Road in the Eastern District

in the Island of New

Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of

the Bahamas.

Deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any
claims against the above-named Estate are required, on
or before the 10th day of April, A.D. 2009 to send their
names and addresses, and particulars of their debts or
claims, to the undersigned, and if so required by notice
in writing from the undersigned, to come in and prove
such debts or claims, or in default thereof they will be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution AND all
persons indebted to the said Estate are asked to pay their
respective debts to the undersigned at once.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the expiration
of the mentioned above, the assets of the late THOMAS

ALLISON AUGUSTUS CLEARE

SR_ will be

distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Administrator

shall then have had notice.

Dated this 20th day of March, A.D., 2009

c/o PYFROM & CO

Attorneys for the Administrator,

No.58 Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N 8958,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.

repairs, a new baggage system,
and baggage carousel and park-
ing lot improvements.

Financial advisers aplenty
were at NAD’s offices on Fri-
day to sign for their respective
bond allocations on behalf of
themselves and their clients.

In a previous interview with
Tribune Business, Frank Wat-
son, the Airport Authority’s
chairman, confirmed that the
financing had been restructured
so that the first phase was seek-
ing less than the original $310
million.

He added that the Airport
Authority and NAD had
reduced the $310 million they
were seeking after dropping
plans to, in the first financing
round, also raise some funds to
enable the second phase con-
struction to start immediately
the first phase was finished.

“For the time being, we’re
going to fund the first phase,”
Mr Watson said. “Included in
the borrowing we were doing
for the first phase would have
been some funds to start the
second phase, while we were
negotiating the remaining
financing. We had to drop that
because of the requirements
Fitch was asking for.”

Mr Watson said NAD and
the Airport Authority had
dropped plans to obtain a cred-

it rating for the senior secured
bonds from Fitch, the interna-

tional credit rating agency,
because the requirements it

MUST SELL

VACANT LAND
WINTON HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
Lot #4, Block 1

wanted to impose were too
onerous.

All the parcel of land containing 15,589 sq. ft. on the southern side
of Woodland Way, and about 350 feet east of Culberts Hill.

Zoning is for single-family residential homes, all the utility services
are available. The site is located 5 miles from downtown Nassau,
1 mile from shopping center and 1 mile from the nearest school.

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before April 10, 2009.

For further information, please contact us @ 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608



VACANCY NOTICE

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the position of

Director, responsib

le for the operations, development and execution of strategic and tactical plans of its

Customer Service Department.

The successful candidate is expected to manage the account activities of approximately 30,000
customers, including metering, billings, credit, collections and a 24-hour call center.

The applicant must have strong communication, problem solving and trouble shooting skills with
demonstrated decision-making ability and leadership.

Applicants must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Accounting or Equivalent;
5 years supervisory experience in billing and collections in a high volume utility environment, banking
or its equivalent and a track record of reducing arrears.

Qualified applicants may apply to:-

THE DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMITED

KOM Ca eM rie lie Mm Srlie tien
OR BY EMAIL: hrdept@gb-power.com

P.O. BOX F-40888 Y | f
*

CRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

Se aT ore

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS



MARCH 31, 2009

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
RAH AKIAS SATION AL DRA AGEN Y

PUBLIC NOTICE

TESDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF DRLAGS AND
RELATED Poets

save 30%

on newspaper & radio
Elev cia(siale

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and
Related Items for the Public Hospitals Authority
and the Minestry of Health, Che Commonwealth
of The Bahan.



LIMITED TIME OFFER

The which inchuddes
mstructhon to the lenderers along w ith other
relevant information, can be collected from the
Rahamas National Drug Agency, Market &
McPherson Streets, beginning from Friday 20",

March 2009 trom 9 am — 5 pin.

Tender Document,

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a
envelope or package identified as
“Tender for the Supply of Drog and Related
tems” and addressed to

soaked

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third ‘Terrace, West Centerville
P.O, Box N-8200
Nass. The Bahan

Electronic and hard copies must be received at
the abowe address on of before Spm Friday,
April 24", 2008 A copy of a valid business
litense and Nationals Insurance Certificate

must accompany all propasals,

The Public Hoapitals Authority reserves the neh
te rejcet any or all Tenders).

Director

stimulus 242.322.4652





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SINE eee
British Colonial seeks ‘good title’ confirmation

FROM page 1B

the project’s contractors. How-
ever, Tribune Business has been
told by informed sources that
there is no suspension to the
drawdowns, and the renovation
project continues as planned.

“The renovation went
ahead,” one source said.

The current ‘clean title’ issue

is somewhat strange, given that
previous purchasers and
financiers of the British Colo-
nial Hilton, such as Ron Kel-
ly’s RHK Capital investment
vehicle, and Scotiabank

(Bahamas), and their attorneys
seemingly expressed no con-
cerns. They are likely to have
been reassured by Companies

Registry documents showing
the mortgage discharge.

The British Colonial Devel-
opment Company’s Board,
along with resort management,
have been focused on the ongo-
ing $15 million upgrade to the
existing hotel property as their
top priority.

Following a settlement with

former joint venture marina
partner, Island Global Yacht-
ing, the company is still eyeing a
multi-million dollar develop-
ment on land adjacent to the
current downtown Nassau
resort, although the “mix” of
uses has yet to be determined
and no formal scheme has yet
been submitted to the Govern-

ment.

Dr Jurg Gassmann, who is
also a non-executive director of
British Colonial Development
Company’s largest sharehold-
er, Adurion Capital, previously
told Tribune Business that any
development on the undevel-
oped land immediately to the
hotel’s west would “to a large

extent be independent of the
hotel”.

“The plan always was to have
some offices, some residential
and/or a hotel,” he said. “The
Government would like to see
some hotel and residential. That
combination is still very much
the plan, but what the relative
share will be is something that

we’ve actively been looking at
for a while.

“That’s the thinking that’s
been going on for a while now —
what should the mix be? The
undeveloped land is very much
to one side. Whatever develop-
ment happens next door can,
and probably will be, to a large
extent independent of the hotel.
Once we have a plan formed,
we'll have to have discussions
with the banks and the Gov-
ernment.”














Legal Notice

NOTICE
RAINY RESOURCES LTD.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OLIVE INVESTMENT
GROUP LTD.

— 4 —

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

— «—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138



138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of RAINY RESOURCES LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of OLIVE INVESTMENT GROUP LID.

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
KITEN INTERNATIONAL, INC.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator) ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator) Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), KITEN INTERNATIONAL, INC. is in dissolution.
Ms. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, PO. Box
N-3026, Nassau Bahamas. All persons having claims against
the above-named company are required to send their names ad-
dresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator
before the 18th day of April, 2009.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JJW HOLDINGS LTD.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BUDYONNY HOLDINGS INC.

— — — §—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BUDYONNY HOLDINGS INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of JJW HOLDINGS LTD. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FULLUCK
COMPANY LIMITED

me -—

Company has therefore been struck off the Register. the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. jane
(Liquidator)

(Liquidator) (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of FULLUCK COMPANY LIMITED has

. been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
Legal Notice

NOTICE
SHALESA OVERSEAS LTD.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PUNCAK INC.

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

Ss =o
? ARGOSA CORP. INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (Liquidator)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of PUNCAK INC. has been completed; a Cer-

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SHALESA OVERSEAS LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NIVI HOLDINGS CORP.

tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. has therefore been struck off the Register.

— f}—

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

cr AL”
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 19 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,654.52 | CHG -0.53 | %CHG -0.03 | YTD -57.84 | YTD % -3.38
FINDEX: CLOSE 811.37 | YTD -2.82% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $
Abaco Markets 1.45 1.45 0.070
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.992
Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.244
Benchmark 0.63 0.63 -0.877
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.105
Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.055
Cable Bahamas 13.95 13.95 1.309
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NIVI HOLDINGS CORP. has been com-

EG CAPITAL MARKELS pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Morey 21 Work

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

1.39
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.31

30.0
43.1
10.7
24.0
14.8

0.118
0.438
0.099 16.0
0.240 9.0

0.598 13.0
0.322 34.2
0.794 13.2
0.337 15.0
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6

13.5
11.0
55.6

2.83
6.48
1.74

2.83
6.48
1.58
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50

2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.05
1.00
0.30
5.50

2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
0.00 0.00 0.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8988 -1.40 -3.35
1.4432 0.67 4.37
3.3201 -1.94 -11.33
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0440 0.80
1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAGNOLIA OVERSEAS LTD.

9,000

0.00 280 0.407
0.952
0.180
Interest Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

100.00

EPS $ #
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

52wk-Low Symbol Weekly Vol. P/E
Bahamas Supermarkets : f : s : ‘
Garibbean Crossings (Pref) Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
ings

4.540
0.000

0.002

0.000
0.000
0.000

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
RND Holdings

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MAGNOLIA OVERSEAS LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

Fund Name Div $ Yiela %
Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund

28-Feb-09
28-Feb-09
6-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-0O7
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

1.3041
2.9230
1.3828
3.3201
11.8789
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-13.33
4.40
3.64
4.40

0.56
-3.59

0.00

0.06

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Des 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 7B



BISX to unveil small
business listing plans
by ‘end of month’

FROM page 1B

“Small business is moving
along. We have plans drafted
on that. We’re testing our
assumptions to make sure we’re
moving in the right direction,”
Mr Davies told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We have promised to
make a statement by the end of
this month as to what our plans
are.

“We want to provide a list-
ing facility to provide exposure
for these entities, as well as
bring them into a regulated
environment to give them a
track record. We’ve got to find
a way to help them thrive, pros-
per and also grow.”

The BISX chief executive
explained that developing a
small business listing facility was
“very tricky, because these are
entities that do not have the
ability to garner the support of
a financial adviser, but at the
same time we want them to
flourish”.

As for other operational ini-
tiatives, Mr Davies said BISX
was working on “potentially
some debt and preference
share” listings to join the ones it
already has. He added, though,
that the exchange’s fund listings
facility was likely to be “very
quiet” in 2009, as mutual and
hedge funds readjusted and re-
positioned themselves in the
wake of ongoing financial mar-
ket turmoil.

BISX’s development of a
Central Securities Depository
(CSD), which will handle all
trading, clearing and settlement
functions, plus function as a cen-
tral database for all share regis-
ters, is seen as key in finally
enticing the Government to list
all its debt securities — govern-
ment-registered stock and Trea-
sury Bills being the main two —
on the exchange.

“The Government debt secu-
rities market is going to be
addressed with the establish-
ment of a Central Securities
Depository (CSD),” Mr Davies
explained. “With the establish-
ment of that, it will address the
concerns the Government has,
revenues will expand and we
will be able to approach things
properly and move forward. We
have every expectation that will
happen soon.”

Meanwhile, Mr Davies said
the exchange’s BISX Global
venture — where it provided the
listing and trading platform, and
acted as a joint venture partner
with major global institutions
focusing on product develop-
ment — was “still on tap” despite
having to be readjusted to
account for the global econom-
ic downturn.

“We’ve had to readjust

because, quite honestly, the
world has changed right before
our eyes,” Mr Davies said.
“There was one entity we were
dealing with quite comfortably,
and the next thing we knew, its
entire management changed
and the company was in trou-
ble.

“We've refined it. We had a
number of contingency plans,
and thank God we had them.
We were able to switch gears,
change focus and re-tool.”

Mr Davies said this had
allowed BISX to demonstrate
its qualities to potential BISX
Global partners. He added that
the exchange would “reevalu-
ate where we want to go in the
second quarter this year” with
BISX Global.

“This is still on target to
achieve what we set out to do,”
he added.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIRDFORTH

INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
— ii
#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of BIRDFORTH INVESTMENTS PTE.
LID. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has

been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



PRICEVWATERHOUSE( GOPERS

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

Purpose

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) will provide technology vision and leadership in the
development and implementation of information technology (IT) programmes. He/she will
lead the planning and implementation of enterprise information systems to support business
operations and achieve more effective and cost beneficial enterprise-wide IT operations.

Essential Functions

e Establish guidelines and programmes for effective IT management.
¢ Provide data processing services required.

¢ Recommend long and short range management information systems plans and budgets.

e Approve staff recommendations on major systems development and/or research

projects.

Establish strategic policy for planning, development, and design of information needs.
Research management information systems hardware and software including applicable
vendor applications, data base management, and operational control packages.

Sets policies to ensure privacy and security of data processing facilities.

Establish guidelines and programmes for effective database management utilisation.
Consult with and advise department heads on IT management needs and problems.
Demonstrate continuous effort to improve operations, decrease turnaround times,
streamline work processes, and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality

customer service.

Education, Experience and Necessary Qualifications
Minimum of 3 years of experience with increasing responsibilities for management and
support of information systems and IT; direct management of a major IT operation is
preferred. Experience should also include exposure to both shared and outsourced solutions,
as well as support of in-house information and communication systems in a multi-site client-
server environment. Specific experience with financial and human resource management

STEP

STEP

Society of Trust & Estate Practitioners (Bahamas)

fn conjunction with
The dzseciation af laternational Banks dt Trust Companies in The Bahanias (ALaT)
and
The Bohontaz Finacial Services Board (RF AB)

Presents a
TRUST WORKSHOP
wilh
24 Ola Buildin,
Jar
Tras! Proctioters dag That ont Bae Poke Lawyers
Fivancie! Rervines inher Sicdasleeiracaaahe ley aaa of Extaue Proming

David Brawabill OC

Topic coverage:

Review af Bahamian Trirst Legislarioa - Focus an Trevtee dct amd Chodce af Governing Caw Act
Drafting Trirat Deeds — Forces on Orafitgg of Special Provision Charnes and for “Future Prohlears”
Cpwdave of Recent Trt Cases
Care Srwily

i. Broweddil's priciee ancetipaiaed af aipecti of vat and related conipany matfars, with parteulir
eephenis oo /etanrational (reat, Me fe the douedar and eelfer of fhe Joureal of infernevene! Trost and Corporate
Paoeng jordans), and a member of STEP, sending on tbe lederoaiiona Commities

Tine F230 ae fo Jee "FSR? die Afoonton, Afarele 2, 20K
Date: Thwradoy, ddlrch 24, 2 To: Robrr Oa, STEP Tel: 223-0872
Voaue; “SSRI COLONEL ALTON Or robprisigokobamor, ang

Seni pike S00 pee pa

© Koepone hereqeired by deadline steied aboer oy accomrecedsijers will bee lirmiiedl

Tisdale

The vhews and apinioes espreseed bey presenters af STEP-spomsonel events or ia STEPspansered pablicaiiens: are ant
feccarlhy the viet mad opioids af STEP, le alflcers, or aay of its cemilioca members lin partici, the fect Ghat STEP
may previce a ferem fer, or may cherries facilisi the euprenien al, wach views ged epinions sheald mei be interpreted to
mean ar imply that STEP acnepts, adap, or enon rages the aoneplance or opie af any af cach views: and opinions ether
wholly af in part.

- ART ss JG BAHAMAS

PND} uss Pre

STEP BAHAMAS, Goodman's Bay Corporte Centre, Ist FL. PO. Box 6-1 Tie, Nivesau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-66 12 * Fam: (242) 226-77 * robyniiistepbahamas.ong

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

PROCUREMENT FOR SCHOOL
FURNITURE FOR NEW SCHOOLS &
REPLACEMENTS 2009-2010

The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’”) now invites
sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement of School Furniture
for New Schools and Replacements.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from the
Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education, Headquarters,

Thompson Blvd. from Wednesday 18 th March, 2009, and obtain further

information systems is a plus. Other skills required include:
information, at the second address given below.
¢ Familiarity with: desktop, notebook, handheld, and server computer hardware; local
and wide area network design, implementation, and operation; operating systems such
as Windows, OS/400, Unix, and Linux; and computer peripherals such as printers,
monitors, modems and other equipment.
Knowledge of office productivity software programmes such as word processing,
spreadsheet programmes, databases, and communications software.
Ability to: analyse and resolve complex issues, both logical and interpersonal; and
negotiate and defuse conflict.
Effective verbal and written communications skills and effective presentation skills, all
geared toward coordination and education.
Self-motivator, independent, cooperative, flexible and creative.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
bided on (“School Furniture-New Schools & Replacements”).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address,
or before Monday, 6 th April, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not
be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Required Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:
Requires a master’s degree in Computer Science, Business Administration or a related field or
equivalent experience. Comprehensive knowledge of:
Data processing methods and procedures, and computer software systems.
Systems design and development process, including requirements analysis, feasibility
studies, software design, programming, pilot testing, installation, evaluation and
operational management.
Business process analysis and redesign.
Design, management, and operation of managed IT systems

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday 7 th April, 2009 at the first address below.

(1) The Chairman Tender
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

Proven skills in: negotiating with vendors, contractors, and others; budget preparation and
monitoring; management and leadership; and communication.

Demonstrated ability to: relate to all levels of the user community; be a team player
that motivates and educates other team members; plan, implement and support systems
in a complex education environment; set and manage priorities; comprehend complex,
technical subjects; translate technical language to lay audiences; and link and apply complex
technologies to business strategies.

Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education

P.O. Box N-3913/4

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tele: (242) 502-8571

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: CIO 0647
P.O. Box N-3910

Nassau, Bahamas The Ministry reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders



Private & Confidential



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





GOP predicts doomsday
if Obama budget passed.

@ By PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Congressional Republicans on














For the stories
TAT RUT CS
BAS
on Mondays

New Previdence

Lot #1246 03, 0s00sq.
fo wv hse 2 TS Taq. A
Coealden Ware Der,
Golden Gates #2
(Appraised Valaec
&24-4,5-45_1b}

Wacunt loq at47
(10,5 57sq. fhe
Piunnings Dr d& Roy
West Lane Souchenn
Heights Sih
(Appraised Valo
S90 000,00)

Lot 83" 100°
wihuildings (1,04¢sq.
RoMiraecle Touch Auto
Care Center-Fos Hill Rd
(Appraised Vulme
$149.2 50.1

Lert (Sth x 1G]
wi'beueldange 0/41 23g. IL-
Deveuus St (Appraised
Walue 31 290 00.0)

Lots #29 & fad,
(30° ho" & Alk &T
wihusldinmge 0,14 Deu
&.—Matthew St. Masada
Village (Appraised
Walue 5145.01. te)

Los #45 & AG
(120s 100") whine
Silver Pale Ln Imperial
Fark (Appraised Vahue
S3035,.6541, 10)

Lot iss (S0°“o0")
wihse |t42sq. fi.-
Sundlower (south)
Sunshine Pork Sub Hse
Sh (Appraised ¥alec
$129,000, (105

Lot # il choy "x hoa"»
wihse 2.0265q. f.-
Sumsec Ridge Or,
Surmece Ridge Sub Hee
STS (Appraised Value
S Dib 6 Ce

Waecant bor #302,

(8 bo sg, 10 eens of
less-Rubey Ave
Winton Meadows Suh
a2 (Appraised Valeec
SSS A11G Oh)

Loar S17S (six beh
wha SO Req, M.-0ld
Cedar St Yellow Elder
(Appraised Valme
S62 BO

Lor #3 & 84, BIk #47
(30°% P00" yp owedeplex fe

ac LApp reais
Waluoe S12 20,00e1, 0)
Agdres
2. Beach front lot O00
Fro w/biiildiag 2,14
S.-—Pinders Mangrawe
Cay Andros
(Appraised Volme
S Tip ea
Lot 4,3445q. fi.
widuplics bur ldinge
1. T4aq. ft-Fresh Creek
Andros (Appraised
Salmec 544.6441. 10)
Crasd Hahama
Li #2001715 08q. 1.)
wise 2, 09100. ft
Bik#8, Section @2-Seo0
Crull Dr, Bahama Reet?
Wacht & Cauntry Club
Sub Gound Balen
(Appraised Vabue
S25 0,1O Ob)

. Vacant lor ea, Rik au
(14.39 7sq. iL
Yorkshire Dr, Bahamia
Wiest Replat Cand
Bahai (Appraised
Walue SIS 00 00)

Sunday predicted a doomsday
scenario of crushing debt and
eventual federal bankruptcy if
President Barack Obama’s mas-
sive spending blueprint wins
passage.

But a White House adviser
dismissed the negative assess-
ments, saying she is “incredibly
confident” that the president’s
policies will “do the job” for the
economy.

White House Council of Eco-
nomic Advisers chairwoman
Christina Romer insisted that
the nation’s flailing economy
will be rebounding by 2010.

Administration officials —

and the president himself —
have taken a cheerier tone
despite economic indicators that
are anything but positive.

“T have every expectation, as
do private forecasters, that we
will bottom out this year and
actually be growing again by the
end of the year,” Romer said.

Senate Republicans predicted
$20 trillion annual deficits and a
weakened dollar if Obama and
his Democratic allies get their
proposed $3.6 trillion budget
plan passed.

“The practical implications of
this is bankruptcy for the Unit-
ed States,” said Sen. Judd

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P-O.Box S-303-4
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel:(242) 327-578V327-5793-6
Fax:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www. bahamasdevelopmenthbank,.com

Properites

» Vacant Lot a8 Blk #12
Unit #3 (1 1.2508q.
iL}Heney Ave Derby
Sub Gined Bahaensa
(Appraised Value
Se 2000)

7. Lot #45 B
LLCs 10 ee tse
Duplex-Melson Ral
Poinciana Gardens
Grand Bohoma
[4 pqeraised Valine
5 en

it. Lor WaT (sa'n 150"
wi sixples 2-sborey
apartment building &
Church 3,40 Deg, ft-
Martin Town, Rings
Sub Eight Mile Rock
Grand Bohoma
[4 pqeraised WV ali
SELL, 2G ey

» Cot wil room hotel
5,O1sq. fi. aon 4.00
acres of beach frene-
High Rock Ceramd
Bahama (Appraised
Wabue £1, 000,000, 00)

1 Vacant lot #13, Blk
a0 Lint #3
{22.75 2ag. 1.1457" on
manal fromt-Dagenhan
Circle & Ingrave Dr
Emerakd Bea
Cirand Hahama

(Appraised Value
S110, 060 G0

. Vacant lor #21, Blk a
(14. 161sq. 1, -
Watertal! Dr &ealeo rsa:
Village Seb Grand
Bohama (Appraised
Wabi SO)

. Lor#®is, Blk #15 Lin
07 (90°. L257" )}-Derby
Sub Grand Bahama
(Apqeraised Wale
S230 ee)

23. Vacant lot #25, Bik

ffs. fi.)
Cutwabter Lo Shanon
Counpry ¢ ‘lok Suh
Cirand Bahama
(Appraised Waluwe
STA 00h1.ie0)

. Wasnt hor 4 ae
section 2A
(BS "x 025") Pabmeri Dr
Grand Bahama East
(Appraised Value
SS A

- Lor #2 20 00sg. 11
wibaildimg complies ab
coin Larned rome
Qucens Highway

tines Rick
Ong Cpanel
Bahama (Appraised
Value £1 78,60 iy
Abaco
6. Lor #34 F (6, S0sg
fb wey briphlios
foundation 2,7 Bsg.
fi.—-Murphy Town
“chen q A pepe i saoel
Walie $2489, O01)
27. Vacant lot #6 (2 acres)
Fox Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
SS Ube Oe)

26. Lor #31 £15,090. Th
w' building —NMurphy
oan Abaco
[Apqera ised Wali
SOUT ALTA
Portion aflear #64
(13 000sq. f.1-Fromt Sa
Munphy Town “Abaco
[Appraiser WV allie
SPOT SA Oe
Lot #55 (6.9 0syq. f.4
wi building Murphy
Doan Alec
LA pera ised Wali
S275.)

» Lot #45 ps Teo
wi La room mocbel
3, O0sq. f.-Sandy
Point Abaco
LApera isa Valine
SARS, TOG 0)

2. Lot 87.) 20sqg. Fe. wid

oi | shoraape
heilding totaling
4, 18659. f.-Sand
Banks Treasure Cay
Abaco qk pp iised
Waal Sa Se

Eleuthera

» Property J1' whse= Lord St Taprum
Bay Eleuthera
(Appraised Valine
S 40000 10)

- Vetent porpon of ber
87 (50°x 110" >}-West
Janes Cisberm
Eleuthera (Appraised
Walue SR AG)

Cat Bebe

» Vacant 6.5 acres of
land=Aurthur’s Town,
Car Island ¢ Appraised
Walue BV RAG Ob)
Lot wil 2 roc motel
1.29 acres—Acrthur"s
Town Cac island
(Appraised Walmc
$6 30 it, eh

cocks

aT. Vacant lor #=
(643, 2006q. ft }-Moss
Town Exar
(Appraised Walue
S11G, 1800p
38, Lot (30. 40sq. Bw
small heoce! 4,3 2bsq. fit.
4 eeclusive beach-
Forbes Hill Esxaene
(Appraised Value
460.000.0605
tlor Freel
16 Mba. 1LeOceanic
id Bahama Sond Sec
#3 Exum (App ee ieee
Wahuec S080 24.0)
30), Vacant lor 405
{EO"x 1227)
Commodore Rd
Elizakeih Harbour Esc.
Esurance
Wahue $45 00h, ie

Gregg, R-N.H. “There’s no oth-
er way around it. If we main-
tain the proposals which are in
this budget over the 10-year
period that this budget covers,
this country will go bankrupt.
People will not buy our debt;
our dollar will become deval-
ued.”

Sen. Susan Collins, a Maine
Republican who sided with
Obama on his $787 billion eco-
nomic stimulus plan, said she
couldn’t support the White
House plan this time.

“It would double the public
debt in 5 years, triple it in 10
years. ... That is not sustainable.
It poses a threat to the basic
health of our economy,” Collins
said.

Sen. Richard Shelby of
Alabama, the top Republican
on the banking committee, said
Obama would have to scale
back his budget, given a Con-
gressional Budget Office report
Friday that the president’s bud-





get would produce $9.3 trillion
in deficits over the next decade
— more than four times the
deficits of Republican George
W. Bush’s presidency.

Shelby predicted that num-
ber could reach $20 trillion in
coming years as Obama guides
the country to “the fast road to
financial destruction.”

The CBO predicted a deficit
of $2.3 trillion worse than what
the administration projected.
Romer downplayed those num-
bers.

“There is a question whether
CBO is right. So we know that
forecasts — both of what the
economy is going to do and of
what the budget deficits are
going to do — are highly uncer-
tain,” she said.

Asked the level of her confi-
dence in an improving econo-
my, Romer was concise:
“Incredibly confident. ... We
absolutely think that they are
going to do the job for the

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

OREM GROUP S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, OREM GROUP S.A., has been Dissolved
and struck off the Register according to the Certificate of
Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the 6th

day of February, 2009.

Mikhail Nechvolodov,
Business Address,
LLC “PRAVO VYBORA” 109316
Volgogradsky Prospect,
2, Moscow, Russian Federation
Liquidator

American economy.”

Vice President Joe Biden’s
economic adviser said the
administration was open to
negotiate with lawmakers. “We
don’t expect these folks to sign
on the dotted line,” Jared Bern-
stein said.

However, he added, “What
we do expect and what we are
going to stand very firm on,
because this president, this vice
president have made this clear,
that there are these priorities
that brought them to the dance
here: energy reform, health care
reform, education, all done in
the context of a budget that cuts
the deficit in half over our first
term.”

Bernstein spoke on ABC’s
“This Week.” Romer spoke on
“Fox News Sunday” and CNN’s
“Face the Nation.” Shelby
spoke on “Fox News Sunday.”
Gregg appeared on CNN’s
“State of the Union.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

EXCITING AND CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITIES FOR

YOUNG BAHAMIANS

Imagine a career which will take you to the workd’s most fascinating ports and far flung
destinations, A Maritime career coud take you there.

Do you have, or are likely te have, $ BOCSE passes, including Math, FhysiexCombined Sciemee
and English Language at grade ‘C’ or above?

Have you obtained, or do you expect to achieve, a combined SAT score of at least 15007

Are you physically fit?

Are you betoveen the ages of 16 amd 21) years?

Ii you have answered KES to the questions abive then read on.

The Bahamas Maritime Authority is once again offering attractive scholarships to young
academically sound Bahamians who are keen to train for am exciting and challenging career im the

Maritime Industry which is gaining increasing national importance.

These generous scholarships are inclusive of tuition, fees, course material, accommedation and
transportation costs, Commencing in September 2M) succesful candidates will follow a 4 year
degree programme at the California Maritime Academy, a unique campos of the California State
University. Upen completion of the degree, the qualified officers will be expected to serve on hoard
4 Bahamian flagged vessel for at least 2 years providing the solid foundation on which to build
their Maritime careers.

Further intormation and application forms can
be obtained from Mire Erma Rahming Mackey,
Deputy Director, Rahamas Maritime Authority,
Mans Corperaie Centre, West Bay Street, PO

Box N-t679, Navsau, Bahamas, email:
smackevialhahamasmaritime.com, te: 396 5772
fax: 356 S389. Completed applications must
be submitted im person or by post, with copies
Of academic certilicatentranscripts and proof
of Bahamian citirenship, ne later than 31°
March, 2009. Interviews will take place in
Nassau during the last week jim April,

455 ETS

Vehicles

(1) 03 edge Carvan
11596 Fond Explorer

(1) 97 Deedge Stratos
11301 Hweada H-1 Van

Wessels
20° 41996) Robolo Vessel wil 15 BLP Ev
43° 1.98%) SMeeth Carolina Hull “Vessel
52° (107%) Hatbers Vee! (MW Boddy
S1° 41980) Deteeder Vessel |Equiliay)
40 Custom Sieel Hull Vessel (Miss Kristy) (101 Kia Bus 12 Seater
94° Sicel Hull Golf Coast Shrimp Treveeler Vessel (1378 Let Pord Boom Truck
SER with ¢t) Wat Deel eng eee Seece Charlo) (1192 Hveadai H-1] Van SVX
crew Stee Hall (120) MY Lise JL (li 06 Hegada H-1 Van SX alee
(1901 Kitchen Tandem Cherckee Trailer
(1500 Fond Ranger Truck
1599 Ford F250 Truck
(132 GMC Arigsdic Drill Thick

inrade engine

wees! bors a rece engine requiring installation. And
can be wipe al Bredtond “artes, Greed Bahar

19° (1989) Fiterglass Sports Wessel (Hull) Only)
60 (SR 2) Dekeadler Vessel (ucen Vashi)

63° (19R*] Deseo Marine Wesse!| Meweer Oreens)

Steel Buildigg T's 3" Six 06) Winders, Teo (i) Entry Doors, Two (2) 3°s10" Kollop Deers Whiste
trimoved Glee Aperoved plums and enginecrimg draings are available $30,000.00

The publec is inveled to suber

J004, Nassau, bakamas atte

Seaked bids marked’ “Tender™ ts: Kahans Ciewclopment Bank, Fl, Hes M-

‘inancial Conbtreller, fad bads will oot be accepéed or telephone 327-
$780 for additeonal infornnati Please note that all bids on the aforementioned properties and sescts
should be received ba oron March 23, 200%. The Bobames Dewelogment Bomk reserves the righa bo reject
any ofall otfcrs AW assers are sold as is,







MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009



PLP leader Perry Christie dismissed

as “‘tall-tales and garbage” the heartfelt
views of elderly Bahamian father,
Chauncey Tynes Sr, who lost his pilot
son to the drug trade 25 years ago and
believes that Sir Lynden Pindling was
being paid off by drug czar Joe Lehder.
Yet in 1984, Christie and his Cabinet
colleague Hubert Ingraham were both
fired by Pindling for their objections
to his government's corrupt links to
drug traffickers. At the time, Christie
condemned the international shame
that Pindling’s government brought

on the Bahamas and wanted the prime
minister to resign.

In light of Mr Christie’s contradictory
comments, INSIGHT is inviting him to
explain how Pindling came to spend at
least EIGHT TIMES his declared income
during the seven years between 1977
and 1983 - the height of the drug era,
when Lehder was using Norman's Cay
in the Exumas as his drug base.

The Tribune is prepared to hand over
the first two pages of next week’s
INSIGHT section to Mr Christie so that
he can explain, in the fullest detail,
where he thinks Pindling got the money
to live way beyond his means at a time
when this country was being described
by the international media as “a nation
for sale.” Read on...

@ By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

ir Lynden Pindling always

had a taste for the good

life. Once he was in power,

it took no time at all for

him to adopt a penchant
for extravagance that might have
brought a blush to the faces even of his
colonial predecessors.

When a delivery boy called at Pin-
dling’s mansion, he was directed to
the tradesmen’s entrance, from which
emerged a uniformed maid of a kind
last seen in English country houses a
century ago.

The liveried flunkey, who wore a
bonnet, pinafore and skirt to remind
her of her station, was a throwback
to the days when Dukes and Lords
ran vast estates. She was servitude
personified, like something out of
Brideshead Revisited or Upstairs
Downstairs.

“T found it very strange, and quite
amusing,” the now grown-up delivery
boy told Insight. “It didn’t seem quite
right for someone who was supposed
to be a man of the people.”

An engineer who thoughtfully tried
to tell the prime minister how to start
his newly-installed generator was
roundly berated. “I have people to do
that kind of thing for me,” said Pin-
dling haughtily.

Then, pointing to his shimmering
Rolls Royce parked outside his home,
he said: “Do you see that Rolls
Royce? I don’t know how to drive
that, either, because I have someone

bad



The stories behind the news

A question for PLP
leader Perry Christie:



PINDLING’S taste for the high life was reflected in this Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, a gift from the PLP in 1973. It cost $42,000 -
today the same style of car bought new would set you back $250,000...

to do it for me.”

Hostile though he liked to be seen
towards the English colonial types
who held sway in the Bahamas for 300
years, Pindling was never averse to
adopting their mannerisms, their
lifestyle, their honours and their
inborn contempt for the lower orders.

Like them, according to a former
PLP parliamentarian, he was always
intent on keeping the people dumb, a
strategy guaranteed to prolong power
for his government at the expense of
everyone else.

By 1973, when the PLP bought him
his first two-toned Silver Shadow, Pin-
dling was mentally primed to become
a Third World dictator whose radical
instincts — if, indeed, he ever had any
— were already part of his political
history.

From 1977 onwards, and right up
to the point when he was called to
account by the Commission of Inquiry
into drug trafficking in 1984, the prime
minister was on a roll as the flashy,
high-living leader of a country that
was not only scared to death of him,
but also effectively up for sale to some
of the most vicious criminals in the
world.

All of this is very interesting in light
of Mr Perry Christie’s comments last
week, when he cruelly and callously
dismissed the heartfelt sentiments of
an elderly Bahamian who suffered
greatly from the effects of the drug
trade.

Mr Christie knew Pindling well at
the relevant time. He was a close polit-
ical colleague who witnessed the lavish
way the prime minister lived his life

and grew suspicious of his govern-
ment’s corrupt links with the cocaine
trafficking trade.

By 1984, when the commission
exposed the rancid nature of the Pin-
dling government, Christie and his law
partner Hubert Ingraham had heard
and seen enough. They were ready to
quit their Cabinet posts in disgust.

Typically, the cunning prime minis-
ter beat them to it. By firing both in a
pre-emptive strike which shifted the
burden of guilt from himself, he was
left in a position to wreak yet more
havoc in the Bahamas for eight more
awful years.

In light of Mr Christie’s apparently
contradictory position on this vitally
important matter, The Tribune is will-
ing to offer him two pages of space in
next week’s Insight section so that he
can explain to the Bahamian people
how he thinks his boss got the money
to live at such a level.

Before he sits down to his keyboard,
let me offer a few choice details —
and the convincing conclusions of the
commission which, in the words of a
reporter of the day, “failed to give the
prime minister a clean bill of health.”

Since Chauncey Tynes Sr — a
sprightly former PLP treasurer of 88
who looks considerably younger than
his years — spoke out last week, say-
ing his son was killed because he knew
too much about the links between Pin-
dling and Lehder, others in a position
to know have come out wholeheart-
edly in support of his version of
events.

One of them is a prominent Nas-
sau attorney who, for professional rea-

Features include:

1.6- of 1.8-litre 4-cylinder engine
Automatic tranamission

Air conditioning

Power windows, locks and mirrors

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOVOTA DEALER

sons, does not want to be named. He
said: “I know for certain that every-
thing Mr Tynes said about Pindling’s
relationship with Joe Lehder is true.

“The prime minister did meet
Lehder on many occasions, he did go
partying on Norman’s Cay, and he did
receive regular consignments of cash
from Lehder in return for his co-oper-
ation. Of that there is no doubt.”

Another source has emerged to con-
firm that, in addition to Chauncey
Tynes Jr carrying regular pay-offs to
Pindling from Lehder, a member of
Pindling’s own Cabinet made deliv-
eries every Monday morning.

And it is recorded elsewhere,
including the book The Cocaine Wars
by former London Sunday Times jour-
nalist Paul Eddy, that Pindling’s bag-
man and fixer Everette Bannister reg-
ularly handed over containers full of
cash to Pindling courtesy of Lehder
and other drug interests.

In fact, Bannister — who called Pin-
dling “a greedy little motherf....r”
behind his back — told associates that
the prime minister wanted to be “cut
in” on everything when it came to pay-
offs and kickbacks.

Most decisively of all, Lehder him-
self was later to tell American law
enforcement agencies that he paid Pin-
dling for his complicity in the drug
trade passing through the Bahamas,
as did others associated with the oper-
ation.

The fact that Pindling lived well
beyond his means for many years —
the years when Lehder’s shameful
drug trafficking operation was in full
swing on Norman’s Cay — was never

INSIGHT



RL Tey



contested during the 1984 commis-
sion.

An investigator who probed deeply
into Pindling’s financial affairs was
the one who concluded that his out-
goings during this period were EIGHT
TIMES his declared income. And that
was only the money recorded in bank
accounts. Unlisted cash transactions
would possibly have taken the figure
much higher.

One ex-politician told INSIGHT
last week that Pindling’s parliamen-
tary salary at the time was insufficient
even to cover the mortgage payments
on his new mansion-style home, which
represented a gigantic leap up the
property ladder from his modest bun-
galow in Soldier Road.

Money was pouring into Pindling’s
coffers from somewhere, and it wasn’t
all from well-wishers, as they were a
fast diminishing force increasingly dis-
illusioned by the PLP government’s
squalid behaviour.

Media veterans perplexed by
Christie’s intemperate attack on The
Tribune and Mr Tynes told Insight
that the PLP leader should by now
have been in a position to confirm
that all the allegations made about
Pindling and Lehder were correct.

They said former Archbishop of the
West Indies, Drexel Gomez, one of
the most respected figures in the
Anglican church, pointed out at the
time that $3.5 million paid to Sir Lyn-
den “raised great suspicion.”

The top churchman also said expla-
nations given for some of the financial
transactions involving Pindling were
“not truthful” so he found it impossi-
ble to say the payments were not drug-
related.

After 500 witnesses, more than nine
months of hearings and 23,000 pages
of testimony, the commission was
unable to give Sir Lynden the green
light when it came to his personal cul-
pability.

Commissioners differed on whether
the money was drug-related, but the
majority report which was unable to
establish a firm link with Lehder was
interpreted by the PLP as vindication.

However, lawyer Kendal Isaacs,
leader of the FNM at the time, said:
“On the evidence that we have heard

SEE next page

CG TOYOTA moving forward

Driver front cirbeg & front passenger airbag
4-wheel anttlock brake system [ABS]
Remote keyless entry

Antitheft system with engine immobilizer
AM/FM CD MP3 player

Backed by a 3-year/'60,000 mile factory warranty.

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. 51. Mathew": Church)
Open Mon to Fri Sam - 3:30pm
Sat $am - 12noon

Tel: 397-1700

@

E-mail; execmotaria@batelnet.bs

Parts and service guaranteed

Available in Grand Bab area ot Quality Aulo Sake (Freeport) «weene Hey, 2bc-9 12d + Abaco kotor Mell, Den Mackay Bird. 367-25 18





PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

A question for PLP leader Perry Christie:

there can be no question that
the prime minister and his col-
leagues, with only one or two
exceptions, have been found
guilty.”

More importantly, the com-
mission concluded that the
Bahamas was overwhelmed by

drug abuse and riddled with
corruption, a situation over
which Pindling had presided for
many years.

Tribune reporter Nicki Kelly
wrote at the time: “Some of Sir
Lynden’s closest friends and
political associates have been

aoa!

DOUBLE

FILET O' FISH

— —

WORLD'S

BURGUNDY 5 Ltr.

CHABLIS SLTrr.

CRISP WHITE 5Lrr.
FRUITY RED SANGRIA 5Lrr.

SUNSET BLUSH

Distributed by:

a.
= =z

Se

BRISTOL



8 |

e era
UL. Wank les*

char

5 LTR.

POPULAR

linked to drug pay-offs, money
laundering and influence ped-
dling.”

For drug smugglers to have
operated so openly, “corruption
must have reached to a senior
level of government”, the com-
mission reported.

Bishop Gomez’s conclusions
were reinforced last week by
Mr Tynes’ dramatic disclosures.
He said he feared his pilot son
was killed because he knew too
much about Pindling and his
associations with Lehder.

At the time, Chauncey Tynes
Jr was due to appear in court
on charges related to a DC-3
aircraft found at Nassau Inter-
national Airport loaded with
cocaine. It’s not hard to imagine
the kind of panic that caused
among those with something to
hide.

Mr Tynes blamed Pindling
indirectly for his son’s death,
saying the drug era which the
prime minister had allowed to
infect the country had claimed
many young lives.

He also said his son,
Chauncey Jr., had told him of
cash payments he brought to
Nassau from Lehder for Pin-
dling and a senior police offi-
cer.

On several occasions, his son
had taken boxes of cash direct-
ly to Pindling, he claimed. And
he had also flown Pindling to
Grand Bahama for a secret
meeting with Lehder and to
Norman’s Cay, the idyllic isle
polluted by Lehder’s “army” of
traffickers and enforcers.

A former minister, a former
senator and an intimate friend
of Pindling’s — Everette Ban-
nister — were among those the
report said had accepted large
bribes from drug traffickers.
The commission recommended
that the Attorney General take
action against all three.

Agriculture Minister George
Smith and Youth Minister
Kendal Nottage, whom the
commission found had —
“whether he realised it or not”
— fronted for a member of the
American Mafia, quit their
posts.

Their resignations were part
of a shake-up triggered by a six-
part Miami Herald series head-
lined ‘A Nation for Sale’.

Shortly afterwards Cabinet

ik

Special Introductory Price
$ 18

l lame arts

3

Fach,

GREY GGOSE

BACARDI

WINES & SPIRITS



ee ler. Plosd Tidings Ui,

®

THE PaTRON

Srikins Cisura

AMA TEs

ministers Perry Christie and
Hubert Ingraham were fired for
supporting deputy prime min-
ister Arthur Hanna’s attempt
to force Pindling to resign. Han-
na resigned when Pindling
refused to go.

Earlier the NBC American
TV network claimed that Pin-
dling and certain Cabinet min-
isters were receiving $100,000
a month in drug pay-offs.

This fits in with evidence now
emerging from Mr Tynes and
other sources which suggests
that Pindling was receiving reg-
ular consignments of cash from
Lehder, often in boxes contain-
ing $50,000 or more.

Indeed, information now
forthcoming in the wake of Mr
Tynes’ revelations offers total
vindication of Bishop Gomez’s
admirable stand all those years

ago.

Robert Ellicott QC, chief
counsel to the commission, told
a newspaper in his native Aus-
tralia after the inquiry: “You
can see, in the Bahamas, a small
community where the greed for
money suddenly descended on
them. Big money was used to
bribe police, government offi-
cials, politicians and ordinary
people to the point where cor-
ruption just became part of the
economy.”

One Australian publication
showed an aerial shot of Pin-
dling’s “mansion on the hill”
over the caption: “Though the
average Bahamian earns less
than $4,000 a year, Prime Min-
ister Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling
has done very well for himself.”

After the commission report
was published, the widespread
view was that Pindling had been
receiving cash from Lehder,
especially in light of his failure
to give satisfactory explanations
for the huge disparity between
his official income and his actu-
al outgoings. In some cases, Pin-
dling told the commission he
simply couldn’t remember
where huge deposits into his
bank account had come from.

Dr John McCartney, chair-
man of the Vanguard political
movement, was so outraged by
the commission’s disclosures
that he declared “trouble is
brewing” if Pindling failed to
resign.

Referring to a disturbance
outside the House of Assem-
bly, Dr McCartney said: “The
politics of confrontation will
intensify in this society as long
as Pindling stays, and although
we were lucky recently in that
no-one was seriously hurt in the
demonstrations, this luck will
not hold forever.

“Hopefully, Sir Lynden and
the pro-Pindling segment of
party officials will see that the
handwriting is on the wall —
save our country from this
nightmare.”

Pointing to Pindling’s detri-
mental effect on foreign invest-
ment, he added: “Who will
invest in a country where there
is growing social turmoil and
where the prime minister has
lost the respect of the majority
of his people?

“Tt is obvious to all but the
blind that the prime minister is
incapable of ever regaining the
respect of the people,” he
added.

Evangelist Rex Major chimed
in with his belief that Pindling
had brought dishonour on the
country. “We feel ashamed,” he
said, “We feel a sense of dis-
grace.”

And a constitutional lawyer
told The Tribune that Pindling
should quit because - as prime
minister - he had to be held
accountable, under the West-
minster form of government,
for the actions of his ministers.

Two of the commissioners,
James Smith and Edwin Willes,
said in their report that Pin-
dling’s expenditure in the years
from 1977 had far exceeded his
income.

However, they added, none
of the known sources of funds
made available to them
appeared to have been drug-
related. As for unidentified
deposits, the sources of which
were still unknown, there was
no evidence before the com-
mission upon which they could

form an opinion as to whether
they were drug-related.

Archbishop Gomez, then a
bishop, refused to sign the find-
ings of his commission col-
leagues, saying: “It is certainly
feasible that all of these pay-
ments could have been made
from non drug-related sources.
But in my opinion, the circum-
stances raise great suspicion and
I find it impossible to say the
payments were all non drug-
related.”

The constitutional lawyer said
the real point, however, was
that Pindling was found to have
received very large amounts of
money from people whose tes-
timony did not impress the com-
missioners as reliable.

“The sum which Mr Everette
Bannister admitted he paid to
the prime minister under the
disarming description of a ‘find-
er’s fee’ alone, in my opinion,
convicts the prime minister and
with him all his ministers under
the rule of collective responsi-
bility.

“The finder’s fee - of which a
mere $334,000 was paid by Ban-
nister to Pindling - was paid
because a government board
(National Economic Council)
of which the prime minister was
a participating - and, no doubt,
dominating - member, gave its
assent to the transfer of own-
ership of the Paradise Island
Bridge to foreigners.”

In the lawyer’s opinion, that
transaction alone - from which
Pindling gleaned personal ben-
efit - was enough to condemn
him and justify the resignations
of himself and his entire gov-
ernment.

Whether the funds came from
drugs was irrelevant, he said.
“Pindling simply had no right
to receive the funds, whether
they came from drugs or Sun-
day School collections.”

At the same time that the
lawyer was offering his opin-
ions, a placard demonstration
closed down Paradise Island
Bridge as irate Bahamians
declared en masse that “the
chief is a thief.”

They blamed Pindling not
only for selling the bridge to
foreigners, but also taking a
huge cut from the proceeds for
himself.

Mr Isaacs, meanwhile,
declared that Pindling had lost
the moral authority to govern.

“Tf we are not careful, we are
going to produce a corrupt gen-
eration of young Bahamians,”
he said. “This is a fight - not
just by the FNM - but by all
good thinking people against
evil and corruption. This is a
fight we have to win because if
we lose, the Bahamas loses,” he
said.

Janet Bostwick, MP for
Yamacraw, said some people
had likened Pindling to the vil-
lainous American president
Richard Nixon. “But Nixon was
an angel compared to Pindling,”
she said, “We are ruled by ban-
dits.”

In the light of all this, Mr
Tynes’ claims do not seem out
of place. In fact, they slot in
comfortably with a pattern of
suspicion developing around the
government at the time. Put
bluntly, the PLP government of
the day - with the obvious
exceptions - was seen as a
bunch of villains who needed
to be inside Fox Hill.

Had Mr Tynes and others
been ready to testify in 1984 -
especially with regard to first-
hand evidence about the pay-
offs to Pindling - there is little
doubt that the commissioners
would have reached a more
robust, and condemnatory, con-
clusion.

However, the climate of fear
created by Pindling during the
first 15 years of his administra-
tion was such that most people
kept their mouths shut.

And Chauncey Tynes Sr
would almost certainly have
been influenced by the fate of
his son.

What we do know for sure is
that the Pindling government’s
corrosive influence led the
Bahamas into a culture of drug-
taking, corruption and crooked-
ness which persists to this day.

Nicki Kelly’s Tribune article



of January 9, 1985, accurately
foreshadowed what we see now
in the Bahamas - a land where a
sense of entitlement and a lack
of accountability have led to a
total moral collapse.

“The level of violence has cat-
apulted the Bahamas to a place
among Interpol’s list of the ten
most crime-ridden countries,”
she wrote.

“The question now is whether
Sir Lynden’s badly tarnished
image can carry him through
until the next general election in
1987.”

In fact, it did. Unhappily for
the Bahamas, Pindling managed
to clinch victory in that poll and
condemn the country to five
more years of decline. His poli-
cy of keeping the people dumb
had paid off resoundingly. They
were so dumb, in fact, that they
re-elected a pariah prime min-
ister whose reputation among
fellow western leaders had
plummeted to zero.

It’s interesting to note that
the British prime minister, Mar-
garet Thatcher, who had once
regarded Pindling as a post-
colonial success story, did not
wish to be photographed along-
side him once the story of the
drug era surfaced in the inter-
national press.

By the time he was finally
ousted, in 1992, the country was
morally and financially exhaust-
ed, and Pindling was being
depicted openly in the interna-
tional media as little more than
a Third World thug with a reck-
less lust for riches that eclipsed
all other considerations.

As the reality of Pindling’s
awful regime is revisited, raked
over and revealed, intelligent
young Bahamians will be won-
dering why the PLP is so eager
to preserve his “legacy”, what-
ever that legacy turns out to be.

Christie’s hysterical condem-
nation of Mr Tynes sounded
more like the strangulated cry
of a desperate man than the
measured response of a ratio-
nal party leader.

And Senator Allyson May-
nard-Gibson’s suggestion that
the libel laws should be extend-
ed to protect the dead - thus
rendering the likes of Pindling
immune from proper scrutiny -
was so asinine that one won-
ders whether her brain was
properly engaged at the time.

Wise political observers, of
course, know full well why PLP
leaders are so frantic in their
determination to clutch hold of
this tarnished talisman of yes-
teryear.

The plain truth is that they
have nothing else. No ideas, no
leadership, no noticeable abili-
ty, no vision, few principles, no
plan and a support system
founded on society’s dimmest
and dumbest.

As Bahamians become more
savvy, more sophisticated and
more informed, it is inevitable
that the PLP will become
increasingly irrelevant. Only the
terminally ignorant, the incur-
ably stupid, are swallowing the
Pindling myth nowadays.

One of the party’s own for-
mer stalwarts, Edmund Moxey,
told Insight: “After the ‘revo-
lution’ (in 1967), I wanted to let
the people fly, but Pindling
wanted to keep them dumb.”
Like Frangois ‘Papa Doc’ Duva-
lier in neighbouring Haiti, Pin-
dling believed the people should
remain childlike in their devo-
tion to the maximum leader.

The overwhelmingly positive
response Insight has received
to its story about Chauncey
Tynes indicates that Bahamians
have now moved forward
towards a new age of enlight-
enment. They are not as dumb
as many of them used to be, and
they are no longer ready to
absorb unquestioningly the
disingenuous nonsense that Mr
Christie tried to foist upon them
last week.

As the Bahamas moves for-
ward another crucial step, the
PLP remains mired in its preju-
dices and its inability to face the
facts. Does the country actually
need them anymore?

¢ What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT



Readers have their say...

Re: The tragic young pilot
who knew too much

DEAR Mr Marquis: My
father was one to testify about
what transpired at Norman’s
Cay in the Exumas. I follow all
your articles with great interest
(and admiration) and, of course,
this one brings up many sad
memories of what took place
as early as 1978 when my father
and mother managed High-
borne’s Cay in the Exumas.

I kept his diaries safe, hop-
ing one day to take the time to
read through them and your
recent article on Tynes Jr
forced me to begin reading
them for documented
dates/events which you may
wish to refer to as you take this
issue forward.

I am noting dates/events for
you and hope to e-mail you lat-
er today.

1978/79 destroyed my
father...emotionally and physi-
cally, he was never the same
after he left the cay in
despair. He loved his country,
worked hard at Bahamas Air-
ways for many years, and was a
very proud and steadfast
man. The final straw came
when he flew into Nassau to
speak with his good acquain-
tance who was a high-ranking
officer in the force. I recall the
words the official said to him:
"Capt., there is nothing I can
do, “The Man himself” has given
orders!”

I work with
youngsters/teenagers/young
adults within areas such as Balls
Alley (one of the many hell-
holes) and what L.O.P. has
done to this country has and
continues to destroy many gen-
erations of Bahamians. Those
who stood with him in the PLP
are equally abominable and
responsible for the destruction
of our country.

EXPOSE THEM ALL...dig
deeper and may they bow their
heads in shame!

— 8S, Nassau

In a typical lawyerly fashion,
Mr Christie tried, but failed, to
defend the wrongdoing of his
client, the former PM.

1) Who else would know pre-
cisely the details and the subse-
quent grief experienced by par-
ents who warned their son not
to continue his trips? Yet Mr
Christie dismisses the parents’
accounts of those missions.
How would Mr Christie feel if
his son or daughter met such a
fatal outcome?

The Norman’s Cay opera-
tions have been cited in local
and foreign news such that
nearly every Bahamian adult
during the said period was
aware of the behaviour of the
drug lords in The Bahamas. I
believe Mr Tynes.

2) Regarding the birth
record, will Mr Christie please
advise why, in relatively recent
times, the birth of an infant was
not recorded until after that
infant was 12 years of age?
Even persons who were born
earlier, say in the early 1900s
and earlier, had their births
recorded. If the birth took place
at the Bahamas General Hos-
pital (now named Princess Mar-
garet Hospital) don't you think
that the birth would have been
recorded?

3). "Freedom of Speech" was
ushered in by the FNM Gov-
ernment in 1992. Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham, to his credit,
brought into existence the real
democracy to these islands. As
a result of the shackles off the
mind, people prospered,
became entrepreneurs, and new
businesses were opened by
Bahamians. Recently, a colum-
nist in another newspaper had
to remind a caller to one of the

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



The ‘Tribune

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

loNSs WITH JOE LEADER AND 4 FISDLINe)

The tragic young Dilo |
Who knew too much

Porcnis



THE FRONT PAGE of the March 9 edition of /NS/GHT...

ST MN De leeMuvouly
IE RINCOVIMMY DMO ITE ILS
tried, but failed, to defend
the wrongdoing of his
client, the former PM.”

radio stations licensed by the
Ingraham government that it
was the Right Honourable Mr
Hubert Ingraham who made it
possible for him to speak, albeit
badly, about the P.M. The caller
could not do it, neither would
such talk have been permitted
over the one station, Radio
ZNS, prior to the 1992 election.
I myself had occasion to call
ZNS to advise the news anchor,
Ms Yvette Stuart, that a one-
sided story attacking then
leader, Mr Ingraham, without
his response, was not journalism
at all, but an insult to our intel-
ligence. I invited her to think
of herself in such a position.

—Shirlea resident



She agreed with me.

For the information of
younger persons, Bahamians
had been muzzled as to what
they could say. Otherwise they
would have suffered the conse-
quences, in similar manner as
Mr Christie's cold retort about
the editor of the news story
under discussion. For Bahami-
ans, retaliation would have
extended to family members
with economic consequences —
no government contracts or
jobs ever.

— Shirlea resident

Just a kind word to let you
know that there are clear and

Y Care’s

Maat

Ss

Attention: Church Men, Bankers,
Lawyers!
Men Dress Shirts

Reg.$30.00

Sale $19.99

Men Casual Pants
1/2 price
Men Jeans
2 for $30.00 reg. 1 @ $19.99

Rivers End and Jerzees
Men Polo Shirts
3 for $20.00 reg.$14.99

—

PHONES: LOCATIONS:
323-4153 Bahama Avenue & Acklins Street
322-5528 East Street South Sir Charles Hotel
324-6413 Prince Charlas Drive Careys Shopping Centre

at az : », |
ay * * 5 Fy
BA B20

We sell wholesale/retail cards and
GSM sim Cards, For more info call
Theo @ 324-6413



InsI

FEEDBACK

fair-minded Bahamians in this
country who support and
defend your rights to challenge
and awaken the dull and shal-
low opportunists who wish to
use this opportunity for their
selfish ulterior motives. Rather
than analysing and dealing with
the issue presented, the clowns
and jokers do what works best
for them among those whom
they use for their political ben-
efits and self-aggrandise-
ment. They avoided the birth
and parentage issue raised in
the article. Instead, they dis-
played the yellow streak that
defines all of them. They
hurled personal insults at you
and Mr Tynes, and his ‘senili-
ty’. You, according to them, are
a racist, who should not be in
this country, simply because
you touched and exposed some-
thing or someone dear to them.

I understand the Bahamas
Christian Council will be seek-
ing an audience with you on this
matter, and to possibly per-
suade you to refrain from writ-
ing on such controversial top-
ics. Mr Marquis, please don't
allow these so-called men of the
cloth to influence how, and
what you must write. I need not
tell you how unprincipled some
of these so-called men of God
are. I wouldn't even trust my
puppy to listen to these guys
from the Bahamas Christian
Council.

The Bahamas needs men of
courage and conviction, not
men who can be bought or
sold. Stand by your convic-
tions. By the way, after all the
fuss and name calling, I'd still
like to know who Lynden Pin-
dling really was, and his real
mother.

— VC, Nassau

I am an 18-year-old College
of The Bahamas freshman. I
personally believe this article is



one well served, for the reading
of the Bahamian public. If we
were to look back in history at
this sort of blindness towards
people who have been seen to
have done good but only
through destruction, we would
see that it is a sizely number.
From Columbus to Sir Lynden
Pindling, both have caused
destruction, but are recognised
in our social studies lesson as
heroes. I believe that the truth
should be taught in our schools
with no sugar-coating. I would
like to tell you that more arti-
cles of this nature should be

produced because we as a
Bahamian public should know
what is happening in our coun-
try.

— T Simms

I was hoping this would be
the subject of your next book! I
thought Mr Christie's com-
ments of yesteryear would
come out — what a joke! First-
ly we have to realise that Pin-
dling knew everything that went
on in this country during his
reign, he made it his business
to know. I believe that when
Mr Christie lost power his fan-
tasies were shattered, realising
his appalling governance would
be exposed. I believe that an
outsider, especially with the
experience, much in The
Bahamas, and integrity of John
Marquis, can be far more objec-
tive than a biased politician,

SEE next page

It's Electric!

Geoffrey Jones has you covered when it comes to
electrical supplies & accessories. Great service
at competitive prices. Come in today!

#14 single wire (500’ roll)..............$49.50 NET

N142 NM Cable (250’ roll)

4” Square box (50)

4” Single Gang Ring (50)

F40D/CW 4 Bulb (30)

1/2” PVC Pipe (100Lts)

1/2” PVC Adapters (100)

1/2” Locknuts (100)

* CASH ONLY

et

©2009 CreativeRelations.n:

$74.25 NET
$55.80 NET
$39.60 NET
$53.10 NET
$64.95 NET
$25.92 NET



Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
Tel: 322-2188/9

Email: Geofflones@comcast.net



East Street Gospel Chapel

Invites You to Attend The
“Jesus Is Still The Answer”

CRUSADE

March 22” - 29"

7:30 - 9:00pm Nightly

i i

Host rr
a Roberts

eee
elie ah Cie) 1S)
Free visual screenings &
“Zk Blood pressure checks

Bus transportation is available, Phone: 322-3874
Come & bring the entire family





PAGE 4C, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

FROM page 3C

whose interest after all is only
votes. I wonder how many
politicians know the meaning
of integrity, let alone put it into
practice. In closing, it would be
interesting to know who wrote,
or was to, the much vaunted
birth certificate, which magi-
cally came to light. Regards.
— No name please

As always Insight provides
the most interesting reading in
this country; it is both revealing
and thought provoking.

I missed your piece on the
young pilot; however, I knew
that it was a good informative
piece because it had lots of peo-
ple “pissed off”. The radio talk
shows were buzzing like bees
with folks trying to save
face. The newspapers a day
after were filled with politicians
trying to right something that
cannot be fixed. And your
response was perfect: you stood
by what you had written
because your source is credi-
ble.

What is so amazing, though,
about this whole thing is
that our leaders in opposition

om

a

TOSHIBA
AND SYLVANIA
LCD FLAT PANEL TV’s

Haier 15”
Model HL15R 720P

Haier 19”
Model HLC19R WITH DVD 720P

$784

Sylvania 19°
LC195SL8

$680

Toshiba 26”
Model 26AV502U

$1,080"

Toshiba 32”
Model 32AV 500U720P

Toshiba 40”
Model 40RV5250 080P

$2,060"

have again failed to realise that
CORRUPTION will no longer
be tolerated. The story proves
that the opposition needs to
stop relying so heavily on the
reputation of Sir Lynden Oscar
Pindling and seek another
angle to make themselves cred-
ible. History can be twisted and
taught to be one thing when it
fact the truth can remain untold
until someone researches
and reveals that truth to the
masses. Like your source, there
are many that can attest to facts
of the true man. The Commis-
sion of Inquiry of the 1980s is
just one of those revelations
and even that was sugar-coat-
ed. Your piece is a reminder
that all that glitters is not gold
and the truth will set us free.
— Sign me Kay

THERE is only one way to
explain the PLP’s extraordinary
reaction to the Insight article
on Chauncey Tynes Sr: the
game is up, and they know it.
With the Pindling myth now
safely dead and buried, the PLP
has nowhere to go. They were
hoping to keep the new gener-
ation of Bahamians as dumb as

When it comes to low-price

brand-name selection.

JWIN LCD Cleaning Wipes uce $7.05

FEEDBACK

they kept the last generation,
but it won’t work anymore,
thanks to The Tribune and Mr
Chauncey Tynes Sr. Welcome
to a new period of enlighten-
ment.

— RR, Nassau

Just wanted to add my con-
gratulations to the hundreds of
others I know you have
received. You are a courageous
and objective man. Please tell
me you might write, from time
to time, some “home thoughts
from abroad”!!!!7???

Warm regards

— Insight follower

Mr Marquis

Excellent responses, just
excellent!

The Tynes Family, along with
many others, have suffered
under Pindling.

electronics, we’re the team to beat.
Shop the weekend of the big game
and see how much you'll save on our

DVD PLAYERS

1080P W/HDMI JD-VD519

$110.00
TOSHIBA

1080P QW/HDMI SD6100

$150.00
COBY Home Theatre

1000W DVD958

$302.00
COBY Home Theatre

450W DVD937

$197.00
JVC Home Theatre

1000W THG40

$372.00

WALL MOUNTS
start at $24.00

TAYLOR INDUSTRIES

SHIRLEY STREET : TEL: 322-8941 - OPEN: MON - FRI 7:30am-4:30pm « SAT 8:00am-12 noon
Visit our web site at www.taylor-industries.com
We Accept VISA, MASTERCARD, SUN CARD & DISCOVER











ASSOGraAtlOn

Te el ce

ENTER TO WIN A



ght

Do you think the politicians
get it? Bahamians are up to
speed on their history.

We know the truth and there
is nothing that can clean up
their past or "SPIN" “after the
fact" that can erase or change
history!

What they did in the past and
today will follow them to their
graves and beyond.

Thank you, thank you, thank
you!

— Maria D Smith



So how was the protest today
at the Tribune? Someone sent
me some pictures and from
what I could see, it looked to
be about 25 persons if that
showed up. Was Paul Moss
there trying to score political
points? What a big joke, only
the truth hurts. Keep up the
great work!

— M-R, Nassau

I WANT to hug you, sir. That
man Pindling caused this coun-
try to sink. In fact, the biggest
downfall of this nation was due
to him. We had no more
respect, no more dignity, and
no more integrity.

The UBP government had
this country together. Under
the UBP the people were hap-
py. The school system was bet-

BMDA show.

Narre
Address
Phone

Cell

ter in those days. Everything
was better under the UBP.

Your article was the truth,
and a lot of people know it is
the truth. Everyone knows that
man was not Bahamian.

Young people don’t know
the good days we had before
Pindling came to power. All he
ever did was preach racism.

— Caller

I KNEW an old man who ran
a sandwich bar off Wulff Road.
He had an oriental wife who
tried for many years to get citi-
zenship during the Pindling era.

The old man told me he was
the fellow who brought Lynden
Pindling ashore aboard his
dinghy after the boy had been
sent from either Jamaica or
Haiti.

Pindling’s father, Arnold Pin-
dling, was on guard duty at
police headquarters that day,
so could not get down to the
waterfront to collect the boy,
so he asked this man to meet
him.

In later years, when his wife
continued to have difficulty get-
ting citizenship, the man decid-
ed to call Pindling direct. He
told him he was the one who
collected him off that boat, yet
he couldn’t get citizenship for
his wife.

Three days later, a govern-
ment official turned up at the
man’s home with a package
containing his wife’s citizenship
documents.

The man in question, who is
now dead, told me this story
himself.

— Taxi-driver



Fill out the attached entry form
and deliver it to The Tribune on
Shirley Street, or place in bins
provided at the BMDA New Car
Show at the Mall at Marathon
by 8pm on Friday, March 27.

I AM proud of you for being
bold enough to air your views.
Please keep it up. There are
ignorant people like myself who
are looking for the light. There
were some empty spaces that
you have filled. I say kudos to
you.

— Woman caller

Just a note to encourage
you. Your work is appreciated
by the enlightened ones. I
understand that about 70 per
cent of the protesters did not
read the Insight article, and
could not give a sound explaina-
tion of what they were protest-
ing against. This causes me to
want to launch a protest against
those who have produced and
cultivated such ignorance.

Keep up the good work. Nev-
er mind the boneheads with big
loud mouths who can't compete
with your intellect, but rather
respond with threats of physical
harm, and deportation
demands. There are people like
me who may not agree with
everythimg that you write, who
still love, and appreciate what
you do. We see the bigger pic-
ture of advanced nationhood
with efficiency at every level of
our ability to function effec-
tively. Continue to challenge
us toward this end, even after
your return to your native Eng-
land. GOOD JOB!

— Velly C

I recently had the opportu-
nity to read the newspaper on
your story published on March
9, 2009. Listening to the talk
shows one would believe that
you wrote all sorts of horrific
lies about Pindling. My husband
and I laugh about the story after
realising that the information
printed was given by various
sorces, primarily Mr Tynes.

In truth I believe that a lot
of persons did not read the sto-
ry and based their opinions on
what others may have told them
or relayed on various talk
shows. I am a young Bahami-
an, and it took my going to col-
lege to find out much about our
Bahamian history, which
included Mr Pindling being
referred to as having been
mixed up with drugs.

I found it interesting that Mr
Pindling's son found an old lady
that recalls Pindling’s mother
being pregnant with him. How-
ever, he did not deny that his
father’s father was a Jamaican
or his mother a Haitian.

We all know that being born
in the Bahamas alone does not
make you a Bahamian, other-
wise all Haitians born here
would automatically be
Bahamian citizens. Further, pri-
or to 1973, anyone born in or
out of the Bahamas received
Bahamian citizenship if that
child's father was a Bahamian.
Personally, I don't see anything
wrong with the article as a sto-
ry. Keep up the good work.
After all, in my opinion it is
great journalism.

— M Bethel




five cheoton for alae fiw

e $1,000 prize will only be redeemable towards
the purchase of a new car from participants at the

Fill out the attached entry form and deliver to Tribume daily through March 27.
Only ORIGINAL newsprint entry forms will be acceptad. Photocopies are not
eligible. Enter as many times as you wish.



PAGE 6C, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

THE TRIBUNE'S



APT 3-G

TM GLAD YOU'RE NOT ) BUT IN THE MEANTIME, L HAVE
TRAVELING TO CHINA { ALOT TO Do AT THE GALLERY.
a TOMMIE

WOW...-OUR LITTLE
GIRL GREW UP
LAST NIGHT!

FOR THOSE POOR
CHEERLEADERS!






TAKE YOUR UMBRELLA-)
IT LOOKS LIKE RAIN.
Re Ewe =

DON'T GET
CARRIED AWAY.--
ZI OUST MADE}

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved

VOU LOOK
1 SEAUTIFUL, PRINCESS-.-
STUNNING, IN FACTL

A COUPLE
ADJUSTMENTS!



IN THESE wl THOUGHT
TROUBLING MY FINANCES BUT NOW
. SIGH...BOTH MY BLMO, IT'S NOT LIKE I'M SINCE WHEN? ECONOMIC TIMES WERE SAFE I'M Not so
WIL AND My IPHONE ) . 2 QUALIFIED TO BE YOUR ww O 2 SURE
ARE BUSTED! I'M SC é V2
BORED, MR. B... JQ oanw 2 —
bs ia SY

Wy

©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

www. kingfeatures.com

aA
















How WouLp W ABSOLUTELY, Let me PUT WF” How WOULD You LIKE To
WHAT WAS THE eS ee |. See ey, THAT INA CONTINUE TO GET DELICIOUS,
eee Peaeeue GO Wit ME WITHOUT A SLIGHTLY NUTRITIOUS, HOME- COOKED
YOU GOT ON TO VIGIT MY DOUBT... DIFFERENT MEALS NIGHT AFTER NIGHT 2
YOUR BIR THTAY 7 MOTHER 2 iy Ww.





(\
te

i

©2009 oy King Features Synd-cate, Inc. World rights reserved





DAO manny weds et or
Jetters. OF More fb Fou mee








TM NOT FIXING! WHATS THE POINT | NOT WHAT A RIP-OFF! T ATE
THIS BEANIE OF A PROPELLER | “STYLE,” | ALL THAT CEREAL, WAITED fri thee letiers shen ber? Ti
DOESNT MAKE BEANIE IF YOU | CERTAININ.| WEEKS AND WEEKS TO GET Makin a word, eg0h ber oy
CANT EVEN FLY THE BEANIE, ASSEMBLED IT Be Dod one: only. Bech myost
WHEN YOU MYSELF, AND THE DUMB mialsaim Lhe cenbee bel ber ami
WEAR IT 27 THING DOESNT EVEN FLY! there mut be ab jews. ome nine-
fetter Word. Mo plurals.
THAT'S TARGET
Cored) 29: Ter mood BS eect
44 for Hire). Paulas
PO.

SATUROAR SS SCAU Ri

win dlipht giem Palos foc
fonlivht fet aw fllgiut Ming
ry pol eee poh pecaeil poll
pla gill ele glint enot hotting
tale Poe beetles lathiliig
heh (eee mee ore

NIGHTFALL tang thing tho



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday





Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.





























































































Z :
2 z Yesterday’s Yesterday’s
- £
= 2 Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer
3 Zz M
uy a zB
$ g = [/8]7]4/5]9]2 3/6
< E Ss [5/6/4[8/3/2/9 7/1 1s (2/78
& V's 2 £ |3l2lel7i6/1[8 5/4 ota 3 82
<= 2 2 B
= : : = [e[3l6l9l2|4|7 1/5 g
&S se ; 8 2 [9[1[5[6|/7/3/4 8/2 Secs
es Ponrn 3 5 & |4|7/2/1|8/5|/6 9/3 1/2 F119
of LOVE SPRING WHEN ALL THE FLOWERS Ditficulty Level *& *& *&*& 3/21 e 7|5/3 4)8)1 6/9 1 26/3
START HATCHIN’” o 2|9/8 1|6|3 4/7 1 ms 4 9/5/14
, Difficulty Level oe ok ek 3/21 6/4/1/13/9/7/5 2/8 8 BN 1 [38/4 2





























ry



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across
1 Neat finish (6) 1
4 Files put in the wrong
order with malicious 2
intent (8)
9 Make a mistake and run 3
for it (6)
10 In the convent it gives 5
preferential treatment (8) 6
12 Boring makers of 7
laws (4)
13 A growing source of 8
opium (5)
14 Just the place to find 11
amusement (4)
17 They have an interest in 15
conversion
schemes (12) 16

20 Motorists and golfers must
do so to begin with (5,2,5) 18
23 High spots of a European

tour (4) 19
24 So the reformed show

spirit (5) 21
25 It's made to last (4)
28 Morning revolution? (8) 22
29 Learned man took the

chair around the front (6) 26
30 Careless example of hit

and run (8) 27

31 Exchanged abuse with a
guard, apparently (6)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Rummy, 4 Gudgeon, 8
Was, 9 Uplifting, 10 Ephesus, 11
Evict, 13 Sapper, 15 Storms, 18
Rinse, 19 Caravan, 21 Billiards, 23
Rye, 24 Dresses, 25 Scene.

Down: 1 Rawness, 2 Misshapen, 3
Yours, 4 Galosh, 5 Deflect, 6 Eli, 7
Night, 12 In reverse, 14 Enemies, 16
Sincere, 17 Scores, 18 Rabid, 20
Roses, 22 Lee.



Down

With which to welcome
honest members (4,4)
Sits reel out, though
unwearied (8)

In extremities they can be
accommodating (4)

Drops from hard work (12)
Gathered to be all right (4)
When I’d get into a
brawl? (6)

They put things on

scales (6)

Monopolise rocks that are
important in building (12)
Women of strange

views (5)

Worn by the widow taken
out by a gardener (5)
Strong drink can lead to a
smash (8)

An exploit indeed to be
beaten (8)

Shrubs for the French
underground (6)

The city may be seen as
part of ancient Greece (6)
No stranger to what dupes
may be? (4)

A stage joke turned
fatuous with the passage
of time (4)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Cycle, 4 Sapling, 8 Net, 9
Crescendo, 10 Acrylic, 11 Odium,
13 Sparse, 15 Confer, 18 Villa, 19
Booklet, 21 Sotto voce, 23 Cue, 24
Annoyed, 25 As yet.

Down: 1 Canvass, 2 Caterwaul, 3
Excel, 4 Sketch, 5 Piccolo, 6 Inn, 7
Groom, 12 In full cry, 14 Shadowy,
16 Retreat, 17 Abroad, 18 Vista, 20
Opera, 22 Tin.

ea ele

Across

1

4

9
10
12

13

14
17
20
23
24
25
28
29
30

31

Vague and wordy
speech (6)
Epoch-making (8)
Haughty (6)
Rebellion (8)

Report of recent
event (4)
Oppressively
dazzling light (5)
Portent (4)

Paradise (6,2,4)
Especially (2,10)
Disposition (4)
US-Canadian lake (5)
Only (4)

Freedom of action (8)
Happen to (6)

Form of

memorial (8)

Lay on (6)

PP
Eeoh &#eiéihte & &
rE Ey tt tt

aaa
‘ER

Down
1 Almost (4-4)
2 Preface (8)
3. Interval of calm (4)
5 Adefect (12)
6 Clip into shape (4)
7
8
1



A dried grape (6)

Convincing (6)

Unexpectedly

(3,2,1,6)

15 Mock attack (5)

16 A forest tree (5)

18 Fabled land of
riches (8)

19 Unswervingly loyal
(4-4)

21 Badge (6)

22 Scene of Tea Party,
1773 (6)

26 To check (4)

27 Consider (4)

ry Ny ao eae



A Self-Imposed Guess

West dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

NORTH
4852
W742
763
#10853
WEST EAST
@K 103 43964
7983 ¥Q 1065
@#KI84 $Q95
&l94 &72
SOUTH
@AQ7
VAKJ
A102
SAK QG
The bidding:
West North East South
Pass Pass Pass 3 NT

Opening lead — four of diamonds.

Many wrong guesses that are
attributed to bad luck turn out, upon
closer inspection, to be the result of
incorrect play.

Consider this deal where South’s
expectations of an easy time at three
notrump were quickly dampened by
the sight of North’s meager contribu-
tion to the partnership assets. All was
not lost, however, since if the miss-
ing clubs divided normally, dummy’s
ten of clubs would provide an entry
with which to try a finesse in hearts
or spades.

Declarer began by ducking the
first two diamonds, taking the ace on

the third round. He then cashed the
A-K-Q of clubs and led a club to the
ten.

In dummy for the one and only
time, South now had to decide which
finesse to attempt. Unfortunately, he
chose a spade, losing the queen to the
king. West cashed his good diamond,
on which declarer discarded a spade,
then exited with a spade to the ace.
But when the A-K of hearts failed to
drop the queen, South had to lose the
last trick for down one.

After he discovered that East held
the heart queen, South lamented his
misfortune in misguessing which
finesse to take, but the outcome was
really his own fault. Had he played
differently, no guess would have
been necessary.

Declarer knew from West’s four-
of-diamonds lead at trick one — pre-
sumably fourth-best — that West had
no more than four diamonds. There-
fore he should have won the second
diamond, preserving the ten for a
later purpose.

Three top clubs are then cashed,
after which South exits with the ten
of diamonds. West wins and takes his
fourth diamond, declarer discarding
a spade. South’s remaining cards at
this point are the A-Q of spades, A-
K-J of hearts and a club.

Whichever suit West now returns
hands South his ninth trick, and the
game is home without having to
resort to any guesswork at all.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EBDY6FN5E_JXQ2NG INGEST_TIME 2011-10-19T20:01:38Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01272
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES





PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Two killed in horrific crash C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.100MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND WINDY HIGH 77F LOW 69F I N S I G H T SEEINSIGHTSECTION S P O R T S How did Pindling spend eight times his declared income? SEEPAGEFIFTEEN White and Rolle win titles n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A HORRIFIC three-car collision in East Street claimed the lives of two young men yesterday morning. Emergency services could not save the 23-year-old driver and 27-year-old passenger from the twisted wreck of a brown 1993 Oldsmobile Royale after it collid e d with an SUV at the junction of East Street and Cox Way before it s pun around to hit another car travelling in the opposite direct ion. Police say the Oldsmobile was travelling north in East Street when it collided with a 2003 GMC Envoy as it arrived at the junctionw ith East Street while going east along Cox Way. The sudden impact spun the Oldsmobile around to hit a white 1994 Toyota Windom as the driver was attempting to make a right turn into Cox Way while travelling south on East Street. The Oldsmobile driver was slammed into the windscreen smashing a hole in the glass, and flung to the back of the car as the left side of the vehicle, the driver’s The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com Try our Big Breakfast Sandwich I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate Green Parrot patron stabbed and beaten n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A VICIOUS stabbing nearly claimed the life of a Green Parrot patron as he was leaving the bar and grill in East Bay Street on Friday night. The 28-year-old man was beaten and his neck was sliced open when a group of young men attacked him as he was getting into his friend’s car at around 10pm. He told The Tribune he recognised three of the men and condemned police for not reporting the incident to the media to seek public assistance in apprehending the criminals. The group of six men, all thought to be around 25 years old, had been drinking in the parking lot and called out lewd and derogatory comments to his companion, a young woman, as she waited in the car. But when the man went to get into the car they directed their abuse at him. One of the thugs pushed him to the ground and all six started a fist fight with him before slicing his neck open as a crowd of people stood idly by, The Tribune was told. The woman recognised three of the men from high school. She said: “When he was on the ground bleeding, one of them ran over and kicked him. He was on his stomach and he rolled over and his eyes opened, and I knew then therew as something terribly wrong. I think they realised he was seriously hurt and they got out of there.” The six men fled in a red Dodge Charger and a dark blue Nissan Maxima, she said. Only then did security staff Man is attacked while leaving East Bay Street bar n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A woman was raped and robbed on Saturday after being lured by a male caller to the Summerville Drive area. Assistant Supt Welbourne Bootle reported that the incident occurred around 9.40pm when a 27-year-old clothing vendor received a call from a male customer who was inquiring about buying items from her. The woman told police she went to an address on Summerville Drive that the male caller had given to her. W oman raped and robbed by man posing as customer Three-car collision c laims liv es of two men SEE page nine THE 1993 OLDSMOBILE ROYALE after the accident. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f F LAMES WERE ACCELERATED b y dry and windy weather as they licked across a farmland property in Gladstone Road on Saturday night. Firefighters on three engines worked for around four hours to extinguish the blaze as it threatened stacks of shredded paper, oil drums, trucks and tractors on the property just 100 metres south of the Ministry of Agriculture’s Gladstone Road Agricultural Centre (GRAC The property owner tried to assist firefighters by using his own hose to wet stacks of paper as the fire crept nearer, and helped them access water on the property when supplies on the fire engines were running low. When a light rain fell it did not help to extinguish the flames as windy weather added fuel to the fire. SEEPAGETWO BLAZETEARSACROSSFARMLANDPROPERTY F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page nine n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net FAMILYand friends gathered yesterday to mourn the death of former Long Island MP James “Jimmy” Knowles. The 66-year-old died at home on Saturday night at around 8pm. A 25-year parliamentary veteran who left parliament in May, 2002, after being defeated at the polls by current MP for Long Island, Larry Cartwright, Mr Knowles had been battling melanoma, a form of skin cancer, for five years. Former MP James Knowles dies age 66 SEE page nine OVER half of all water bought for distribution by the Water and Sewerage Corporation ends up trickling into the ground or being pilfered, a junior minister has claimed. Minister of State for Public Utilities Phenton Ney mour, commenting on the corporation’s dire need for an additional $11 million taxpayer “bail out” this year, said it is the “worst kind of travesty that in New Providence the corporation buys twice as much water as it sells each day”. Over half of WSC water ‘goes to waste’ SEE page eight n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.met THEBahamian government has not yet given any official indication if it will support the Turks and Caicos Islands in its premier’s calls for CARICOM countries to petition against Britain’s recommendation that direct rule be imposed on the islands, premier-elect Galmore Williams said yesterday. His comments came two days after he and embattled Turks and Caicos premier Michael Misick met with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Opposition members in Nassau in an attempt to gain local support against the British government’s plan. Meanwhile, PLP parliamentarians, led by their leader Perry Christie, were in Providencialies, Turks and Caicos, “on a fact finding mission” yesterday, according to former foreign affairs minister Fred Mitchell. SEE page nine Government tight-lipped on Turks and Caicos call for petition SEE page eight n REPORTSOF SHOOTING REPORTS reached The Tribune late last night that a man was shot dead by police in the Pride Estates area. More details will appear in tomorrow’s Tribune .

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net FIREARMS found in three Nassau homes led to the arrest of three women and two men over the weekend. S earch warrants executed at homes in Pinewood Gardens, Kennedy Sub-division and the Market Street area on Friday and Saturday uncovered dangerous firearms and live ammunition. Police say Drug Enforcement Unit officers were searching the home o f a 22-year-old woman in Pinewood Gardens at around 12pm on F riday when she picked up a blanket and a .9mm handgun with five live rounds of ammunition fell to the floor. She was arrested and is in police custody. A .40 handgun was found in a baby chair in a Kennedy Sub-division h ome when officers searched it at around 8pm on Friday, leading to the arrest of a 29-year-old man. When police executed a third search warrant at a housing rental unit in Market Street around 1am on Saturday, they discovered another .40 h andgun, with seven live rounds of ammunition. A man and two women were arrested. All of those arrested are being questioned in police custody on suspicion of illegal firearm possession. A 16-YEAR-OLD boy was shot in the stomach near Wulff Road and C laridge Road at around 1am on Saturday. The boy was taken to hospital and is said to be in stable condition. Police have launched an investigation. Anyone with information should call police on 919/911, the Central Detective Unit on 502-9930/9991 or Crime Stoppers anonymously on 3 28-8477. n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A BAHAMIANman and his girlfriend tried to win leniency from a Turks and Caicos judge last week after being caught try-i ng to leave the island with over $ 40,000 worth of cocaine taped on their bodies. A ttorney Lloyd Rodney told Magistrate Clifton Warner thatd efendant Spence Vincent Dean Junior, 39, had ten children aged b etween 19 years and eight months for whom he is the sole breadwinner. Meanwhile, Mary Asha Sawh, age 20, was said to look after her sick mother’s business and was seen praying with a Bible before t he court session. However, Magistrate Warner d isregarded calls for the pair to suffer only a fine and sentencedt hem to four years in a Grand Turk prison, one year short of them aximum five-year sentence, according to the Turks and Caicos T imes. T hey admitted possessing cocaine with intent to supply but w ere also charged with attempted fraudulent evasion as they had sought to evade customs by trying t o leave the country with the d rugs undeclared and undetected. A ccording to reports in the i sland’s media, Mr Dean and Ms Sawh were picked up by policea s they prepared to board a Bahamasair flight at Providenciales International Airport. T hey were found to have four kilograms and seven ounces of cocaine vacuum sealed and taped to their bodies beneath several layers of clothing. Mr Dean, a sales manager, had the drugs attached to his abdomen, while Ms Sawh, an a dministrator, had them taped to her legs. Total value of the drugs, had t hey reached the street, was $41,960. The pair were charged after a t hree-day investigation. F F O O U U R R H H O O U U R R B B A A T T T T L L E E T T O O P P U U T T O O U U T T G G L L A A D D S S T T O O N N E E R R O O A A D D B B L L A A Z Z E E PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff Boy, 16, shot in the stomach Three women, two men arrested after firearms discovered Bahamian man and girlfriend tried to leave Turks and Caicos with cocaine taped on bodies THESEDRAMATIC PICTURES show firefighters tackling a blaze which swept farmland property in Gladstone Road on Saturday night. Flames threatened shredded paper, oil drums, trucks and tractors o n the property near the Ministry of Agriculture’s G ladstone Road Agricultural Centre (GRAC

PAGE 3

n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net WITHthe effect of the economic downturn on Exuma made “more difficult” by the uncertainty surrounding the future of Emera ld Bay Resort, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham expressed optimism that a reduction in the offering price of the property will attract more potential purchasers. Noting the “tremendous economic growth and prosperity” experienced by Exuma after the Emerald Bay Resort investment c ame to the islands, including a “residential and commercial construction boom”, Mr Ingraham said the “situation has now changed.” However, he said a group of interested investors are currently in discussion with the company charged with disposing of the prope rty and more may be on the way. The prime minister was addressing Exuma Chamber of Commerce on Friday evening. He said he “remains hopeful” for Exuma’s economy in light of this and recent meetings the gov ernment has had with the develo pers of Norman’s Cay and “active negotiations” which are underway with investors interested in developing Crab Cay, Exuma. “The government is hopeful thattheNorman’sCay Development Group will be able to finalise its funding package to facilitate the upscale resort development. “I note also that the developments foreseen for Norman’s Cay and Crab Cay will be in line with smaller, environmentally compatible developments preferred by my government. “Though smaller, these developments will, I believe, increase employment levels and business opportunities while at the same time offering a more intimate, culturally rich, and less environmentally intrusive experience to our g uests,” said the prime minister. Emerald Bay is in receivership at present, with PriceWaterHouse Coopers appointed liquidators. It has been in this position since April, 2007, after defaulting on loan repayments. Mr Ingraham told the Chamber: “As a result of funding for t he development involving derivatives, arrangements now notorious for contributing to the global financial crisis, Mitsui, an insurance entity based in Japan, now has the ability to dispose of the property. “At an earlier time, the reserve price set for the property proved u nattractive for many potential developers and operators of resort properties. Impact “More recently, following the impact of the turbulence in the international financial markets on the global economic environment, Mitsui has signalled its willingness to dispose of the property for a reduced sum provided the offer includes satisfactory commitments for the completion of the development as required by us. “This should increase the number of parties now interested in acquiring the property. A group of interested investors is now in discussion with Mitsui’s represent ative,” he said. According to the prime minister, developers have been made aware that required approvals are conditional on not only financial capability to acquire the property and meet commitments to staff but also “to fund the refurbishment of the hotel, upgrade and m aintain the premier standard of the golf course, complete the marina facility and complete the buildout and maintenance of the Emerald Bay Development.” “The government is firmly committed to seeing the Emerald Bay succeed. We will commit capital resources to provide funding for a dditional public infrastructure to accommodate Exuma’s development,” said Mr Ingraham. The prime minister noted that the difficulties facing Exuma’s major resort property reflect those affecting existing and would-be developments all over the Bahamas. The Ritz Carlton project on Rose Island, Ginn at West End, Grand Bahama, and Royal Island off North Eleuthera are all examples of superior quality developm ents being undertaken by reputable developers with sound financial credentials which came to a standstill as a result of the current financial crisis. Economy “Kerzner International, a proven investor and employer in our economy, has postponed its plans for the construction of a second marina village and timeshare resort at Hurricane Hole, and laid off 800 persons in November. “And the Baha Mar project, in which much hope had been placed came to a grinding halt,” said Mr Ingraham. He added that the redevelopment of the Royal Oasis property in Freeport “is also not going anywhere.” “The slowdown and even cessation of direct foreign investment in many instances have been due to the fact that investors are unable to raise funding from banks not even for high quality investment purposes,” added the prime minister. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Post Bed 3 pc Queen Post Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,950 $3,950 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,150 $4,150Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e PM hopeful that Emerald Bay price reduction will attract investors Hubert Ingraham Man arrested in connection with armed robbery In brief n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORTGrand Bahama police arrested one of two suspects in connection with a n armed robbery at Dundee Bay Apartments on Friday. Police received information that two armed robbers fled the scene, escaping in a greencoloured vehicle, licensed 43732. Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said officers on patrol spotted the vehicle in Redwood Lane. P olice were able to apprehend one suspect, a 22-year-old Freeport resident. ASP Bootle said an all-points bulletin has been issued for the second suspect, 27-year-old Erold Demetrius Miller, who is wanted for armed robbery. n POLICE ARRESTEDa 2 7-year-old Watkins Lane man who was allegedly found in possession of various stolen items. According to Mr Bootle, police went to Kwan Yin Apartments around 4.26am on Sunday where they discovered various stolen items, including an I-P OD, cellular phones and other items. P ersons who have had items stolen should report to police headquarters to identify property recovered by police. n IN RESPONSEto concerns of residents at the Coral Beach Hotel, ASP Bootle saidp olice have increased its patrols in the area. He said two matt ers occurred near the Condominium on Coral Way. He reported that there have been a total of five matters reported two armed robberiesand three robberies – from January to the present. Mr Bootle said suspects have been arrested and charged in connection with four of those matters. T HE T RIBUNE’Smanaging editor John Marquis will speak on radio tonighta bout the furore surrounding his Insight article on Chauncey Tynes Sr. In an exclusive hourl ong interview with Jeff L loyd on Star 106.5FM Radio, the veteran news man talks about the i mportance of journalism in modern society and the role of The Tribune in keeping society on track. Marquis’s explosive interview with Chauncey Tynes Sr., in which the for mer PLP treasurer claimedhis son was murdered because he knew too much about Sir Lynden Pindling’s links with drug czar Joe Lehder, sparked off two weeks of controversy. In tonight’s show, Marquis talks about his newspaper background, his work in the Bahamas, and the principles which guide his professional life. He also addresses the Tynes story and says how important it is for such topics to be debated intelligently. Jeff Lloyd’s programme is on from 4.30pm-6.00pm Tribune managing editor to speakon radio about T ynes furore

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. It is of no small import that I submit myself to the school of thought commencing in this city, to begin to understand the nuances of psychology driving the behaviours, character and value system of this generation, who now seem on the verge of flourishing into a catastrophic disappointment on the landscape of Bahamian history. I sincerely thank you for your permission, and worthy publication to briefly address sensitive issues that I think are boil i ng at the very core of this unravelling of Bahamian youth. T his nation moved swiftly from strength to strength in the sixties, though under colonial guardianship, culture of the people decorated the hearts and minds of every child playing ring-play, hopscotch, quadrille, rounders and such through every dusty street-corner in Nassau and the family of islands. Young tots were groomed, by older ones, to the affinity of sea sonal treasures of top-spinning, shooting marbles, kite-flying and such; healthy competitive edge was created and polished in a gentlemanly and respectful manner. However, in an ironic twist of history, after seeking and attaining independence, society then began to distance itself from that which had so securely fostered its growth. Culture slowly came to be just an afterthought, the stepchild of a new progressive people; hung like conch, bruised and forgotten, to dry on the clothesline of change, attractive only to flies of the past. When we divest culture of its human currency, we not only hurt ourselves, but others too; poor animals who were once cherished members of the fam ily are now abused casualties of a society willing to derelict social responsibility of ensuring the spiritual transition of cultural inheritance from age to the next. We soon began to see Bahamian adults cheated of precious legacy: limbo, fire dance, rake ’n’ scrape, goombay; as disco-mania swept the world causing hotels and our own clubs over-the-hill, to begin to discard these forms of enter tainment for the fast buck of glitter. Culture was once a princely feast for the sustenance of our souls, now it is barely a foot note to history in the curriculum of our youth. We cannot so extricably move away from something that is inexorably us. When we begin to indiscriminately cut branches from the tree of culture, because of gross impediments to vision in the mind of religiosity, we wilfully send traumatic shock waves to our spirit roots. Who, in a matriarch-driven society repudiates the com monalties that bond girl to female girl, rather, adult soci ety needs to respect and properly cultivate ringplay; a fundamental aspect of our social science. Much more can be said, how ever, we must begin to create ‘drama houses’ in every community; we must positively exploit Bahamian music; we need to start mentorship clubs for girls and boys at age six or seven because as times become more slanted, impressions of life trickle down much faster. We must clearly define our destiny as a tangible and viable attraction to our youth. We need to wean communities from the emasculating learned condition of pandering and patronage. We need to identify, and then strengthen the bare essentials that form the framework of our society. We as a people are resilient, watchful, kind and true; how ever it is time for us to become progressively pro-active, for it is now not imaginative that every thing we have today, can be gone by tomorrow. GREGORY NEELY Nassau, March 3, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Once again I am humbled and overwhelmed at the remarkable outpouring of concern and support the general public has shown to the plea I sent out last week Friday (March 6th ans to indicate that they support the total ban of all sea turtles in the Bahamas. I could have never dreamed, in a hundred years, that so many people would step forward, hundreds of letters and e-mails have poured in. The Bahamas Humane Society personally delivered 173 letters to the Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources today, and in previous days I know that many e-mails and faxes have been pouring in. Today I was so delighted to read the letter in your paper from Coldwell Bankers/Lightbourne Realty where the entire office staff wrote a collective letter to support the ban. How can one adequately say thank you to the people who go that extra mile to help? H opefully through all this exposure the Bahamas will begin to understand what valuable resources live turtles in the wild are. I was told today of a fisherman who boasts that he knows of a “large hole in the s ea near Andros where there are hundreds of turtles,” perhaps an exaggeration, but, he could make hundreds of dollars a year taking tourists to dive that “large hole” and see thet urtles in the wild. Far more money than he could ever make killing them. They can only be killed once; they can be viewed thousands of times! When the FIFA convention is here in May and Miss Universe is here in August, the eyes of the world really will be on us. The press will be looking for stories. Just imag i ne if they happen upon one of those horrific scenes we see all too often of the large, majestic turtle flipped over on his back in the dust, dehydrated, with “tears” running down the side of his face, while some of our fellow Bahamians jeer at him before they hack him to death. Will they threaten the foreign cameramen with violence, a cutlass perhaps, as they do if we try and take pictures? Many of us saw that unfortunate clip onf ace book. Take note, the world will see it if the foreign press get wind of this barbaric practice. I salute and thank each and every one of you who has phoned me, written to the ministry, e-mailed, faxed and offered support. Don’t stop, don’t give up. Together we can see our country make the right decision, one that we can be proud of. Let us catch up with Cuba and protect our natural resources. A million thanks to you all f rom the bottom of my heart. This reminds me of the amazing response you all gave when I appealed for help for the animals of Inagua after hurricane Ike. There are a lot of very good people out there. KIM ARANHA Co-Chairman of The Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group. Nassau, March 12, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm I RAN INTO an Indian businessman friend last week and he said something to me that really struck a chord: “This is the first time I’ve e ver visited the United States when I feel like y ou’re acting like an immature democracy.” Y ou know what he meant: We’re in a once-acentury financial crisis, and yet we’ve actually d escended into politics worse than usual. There don’t seem to be any adults at the top nobody a cting larger than the moment, nobody being impelled by anything deeper than the last news cycle. Instead, Congress is slapping together punitive tax laws overnight like some bananar epublic, our president is getting in trouble c racking jokes on Jay Leno comparing his bowling skills to a Special Olympian, and the oppo s ition party is behaving as if its only priority is to deflate President Barack Obama’s popularity. I saw Eric Cantor, a Republican House leader, on CNBC the other day, and the entire interview consisted of him trying to exploit the AIG situation for partisan gain without one constructive thought. I just kept staring at him a nd thinking: “Do you not have kids? Do you not have a pension that you’re worried about? D o you live in some gated community where all the banks will be okay, even if our biggest banksg o under? Do you think your party automatically wins if the country loses? What are you t hinking?” If you want to guarantee that America becomes a mediocre nation, then just keep vil ifying every public figure struggling to find a way out of this crisis who stumbles once like T reasury Secretary Timothy Geithner or AIG’s $1-a-year fill-in CEO, Ed Liddy and you’lle nsure that no capable person enlists in government. Y ou will ensure that every bank that has tak en public money will try to get rid of it as fast it can, so as not to come under scrutiny, even though that would weaken their balance sheets and make them less able to lend money. And y ou will ensure that we’ll never get out of this banking crisis, because the solution dependso n getting private money funds to team up with the government to buy up toxic assets and f und managers are growing terrified of any col laboration with government. Obama missed a huge teaching opportunity with AIG. Those bonuses were an outrage. The public’s anger was justified. But rather than fanning those flames and letting Congress run riot, the president should have said: “I’ll handlet his.” He should have gone on national TV and h ad the fireside chat with the country that is long overdue. That’s a talk where he lays out exactly how deep the crisis we are in is, exactly h ow much sacrifice we’re all going to have to make to get out of it, and then calls on those AIG brokers and everyone else who, in our r ush to heal our banking system, may have got b onuses they did not deserve and tells them t hat their president is asking them to return their bonuses “for the sake of the country.” H ad Obama given AIG’s American brokers a reputation to live up to, a great national miss ion to join, I’d bet anything we’d have got most of our money back voluntarily. Inspiring conduct has so much more of an impact than coercing it. And it would have elevated thep resident to where he belongs above the a ngry gaggle in Congress. “There is nothing more powerful than inspi r ational leadership that unleashes principled behaviour for a great cause,” said Dov Seid m an, the CEO of LRN, which helps companies build ethical cultures, and the author of the book “How.” What makes a company or a government “sustainable,” he added, is not when it adds more coercive rules and regulations to c ontrol behaviours. “It is when its employees or citizens are propelled by values and principles to d o the right things, no matter how difficult the situation,” said Seidman. “Laws tell you whaty ou c an d o. Values inspire in you what you should do. It’s a leader’s job to inspire in us t hose values.” Right now we have an absence of inspirational leadership. From business we hear about institutions too big to fail no matter how reckless. From bankers we hear about contracts t oo sacred to break no matter how inappropriate. And from our immature elected offi c ials we hear about how it was all “the other guy’s fault.” I’ve never talked to more people in o ne week who told me, “You know, I listen to the news, and I get really depressed.” Well, help may finally be on the way: One reason we’ve been sidetracked talking about bonuses is because the big issue the real i ssue the president’s comprehensive plan to remove the toxic assets from our ailing banks,w hich is the key to our economic recovery, has taken a long time to hammer out. So all kinds of l esser issues and clowns have ballooned in importance and only confused people in the vacuum. Hopefully that plan will be out today, and hopefully the president will pull the country together behind it, and hopefully the lawmakers who have to approve it will remember that thisi s not a time for politics as usual and that o ur country , alas, is not too big to fail. Hopefully ... (This article was written by Thomas L. Friedman of the New York Times c. 2009). Humbled by outpouring of support for sea turtles ban LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net This is not a time for politics as usual :$17('$)(:*22''5,9(56 The unravelling of Bahamian youth

PAGE 5

n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net SIGNIFICANTcapital investment by government is needed to correct t he problem of rusty water plaguing residents of eastern New Providence, according to the state minister for the environment. But with the government already extending a $30 million subsidy 15 per cent of the country's national capital development fund to the hemorrhaging Water and SewageC orporation (WSC ment the public treasury may not be able to make anytime soon. Junior Minister Phenton Neymour, whose portfolio includes WSC, said the problem comes from infrastructure used for reverse osmosis, which provides customers with better water quality. Fixing the rusty water wouldr equire hefty sums from the public purse to lay new, non-metal pipes. "Rusty water has been the consequence of a double-edged sword as a result of the improved quality of the water being produced by reverse osmosis, it also increases the potential for rusty water," Mr Neymour told The Tribune . "And so we have been plagued with that challenge. The way forward is the replacement of existing, old water mains that are metal that are not lined with either concrete or are not PVC. And this, too, requires significant capital investment by the government, and this is another challenge the government faces in improving the quality of product that we must give and this, too, is coming out of the public treasury." During his contribution to the 2008/2009 mid-year budget debate earlier this month, Mr Neymour outlined the dire financial straits constraining WSC. He said WSC is losing over $2.2 million annually for what it pays just to buy water versus what it bills customers for that water. And while construction has flourished in the capital over the last few years, the corporation’s revenue base has shown only modest annual growth because so many people use private wells instead of using gov ernment services. "One thing that must be made clear WSC is an organisation that is requiring a significant portion, 15 per cent, of the national capital develop m ent for the Bahamas. However, it is being paid by all of the Bahamian people through taxes, but only approximately 30 per cent of the Bahamian consumers use that ser vice. "And so 70 per cent of Bahamians are paying for a service that they do not receive. The WSC is from a financial standpoint in the worst position it has been in regards to government subsidy," Mr Neymour said in a recent interview. In 2004, water sales were $31.1 million and reverse osmosis water purchases were $6 million, or 19 per cent of revenue. From 2005 to 2008, cumulative increases in water sales totalled $22.7 million, but the cumulative increase in water purchases over the same period was $41.5 million. Today, water purchases represent over 57 per cent of water revenues as compared to 19 per cent in 2004. "That does not leave nearly enough revenues to cover all of the other costs associated with distributing water, performing maintenance, and replacing or extending water mains. “This is the major reason why the corporation’s subsidy needs have soared," Mr Neymour said during the debate. WSC was allocated $19 million in the 2008/2009 budget, which Mr Neymour said has been virtually exhaust ed; $15,028,190 or 79 per cent of that sum was applied to water purchases alone. Another $11 million was given to the corporation during the mid-year budget debate. One million of this will go towards Shirley and Bay Street redevelopments, which are necessary for the road paving, while the majority of remaining $10 million will also go towards the puchasing of water, Mr Neymour told The Tribune . Decreasing revenue collections due to non-paying customers had diminished WSC's cash flow, hindering its ability to pay its bills on time. Moving forward, Mr Neymour said during the mid-year budget debate, WSC has acquired the assistance of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB Water and Sanitation Initiative, to assist the Bahamas in the preparation of a Water and Sanitation Sector Plan (WSSP WSC has also asked that this assistance include a tariff study, updat ing the corporation’s financial mod elling, and preparing a Corporate Business Plan. "The IDB is also assisting with the development of an appropriate Legal and Regulatory Framework for the sector. This assistance is being funded by non-refundable grants under the IDB’s AquaFund and the INWAP fund respectively. “The consulting firm Castalia Strategic Advisors is already in place working on the Water and Sanitation Sector Plan and has presented to the ministry a draft plan that suggests an aggressive approach is taken. “In addition, there is a regional initiative under the IDB which is aimed at providing technical co-operation for improved energy efficiency in the water and sanitation sector," Mr Neymour said. The Bahamas is one of seven countries that will benefit from this technical co-operation. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS P HONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM( DF55) Phenton Neymour Rusty water problem ‘needs significant govt investment’ Man wanted for questioning in connectionw ith murder In brief n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THIS man is wanted for questioning i n connection withthe March 9 murder of Gentry McPhee in an Arawak Cay nightclub. Ryan Omar Butler, o therwise known as ‘Smokey’, 34, is considered armed and extremely dangerous. Police say he is slim, has dark brown skin, is 5ft 8ins tall, 160lbs, and his last known address was in Ridgeland Park, Nassau. H e is sought by police probing the killing of 30-year-old McPhee, a Yellow Elder Gar dens resident who was shot in the abdomen and hands while in The Big Yard nightclub sometime after midnight on Monday, March 9. H e was rushed to Princess Margaret Hospital by ambulance but died shortly after arrival. A 38-year-old woman and two men have been questioned in connection with the murder. Now police are determined to speak to Ryan ‘Smokey’ But-l er. If you have any information contact the Criminal Detective Unit immediately on 5029930/9991 or call 919/911 or Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-8477. Ryan Omar Butler

PAGE 6

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE f f f r f tntfnbbnt"'r%# "&ffrn$#"!! """!!" &"#" $#$"&b!"t bf $*(/(&75,&&203$1
PAGE 7

n By SIR RONALD SANDERS ( The writer is a C onsultant and former Caribbean Diplomat) T HE members of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS establish immediately two separate bodies to regulate d omestic non-bank financial i nstitutions and the offshore f inancial services sector. I n turn, these new bodies s hould work closely with the E astern Caribbean Central Bank (ECCB Financial problems in the member states of the OECS, posed by the CL Financial Group headquartered in Trinidad and Tobago and the o n-shore and off-shore banks of R Allen Stanford located in Antigua, have unders cored the vital importance t o the economies of these c ountries of strong supervision for both non-bank financial institutions, such asi nsurance companies, and the offshore financial services sector. The problems will worsen i n the coming weeks. The IMF has warned the OECS that “waning eco nomic growth after a period o f rapid private credit expansion poses a major risk to the stability of the banking sys t em.” O ECS countries, which are part of the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union with a single currency, theE C dollar, are the indepen dent States of Antigua and Barbuda, St Kitts-Nevis,D ominica, Grenada, St Lucia, and St Vincent and the Grenadines together with the British Overseas territor ies of Anguilla and Mons terrat. The ECCB is their com mon Central Bank. The cross-border nature of the financial services sector emphasises the impor tance of cross-border regulation. Authority Ideally, it would be best if a Pan-Caribbean financial regulatory authority could be established covering all the countries that are now members of the Caribbean Com munity (CARICOM But, as I was reminded by Caribbean and European Union (EU my commentary last week (“Establish a Caribbean wide Financial Services Regulator”), the member states of CARICOM are unlikely to do so in a hurry. The members of the OECS are in a better position to establish the two very necessary joint bodies because they enjoy deeper economic integration arrangements than CARICOM. They already have a single currency, a single Central Bank, and a single Court sys tem. Further, none of them can afford to establish these bodies at an individual national level, particularly in the current situation in which remit tances from their nationals abroad have fallen, receipts from tourism are in decline, preferential commodity mar kets have been withdrawn, and construction (that helped their economies to grow in the last two years) has now slowed considerably. As an example of part of t he costs each country would face if it were to try to establish its own national domestic bodies, the Prime Minister of Barbados, David Thompson, told his country’s Parliament on March 18th that it w ill cost US$2.06 million to e stablish, by early next year, a Financial Services Commission to regulate the nonb ank financial services institutions as well as international business. There are two fundamentally important reasons why the OECS countries should now move to establish a joint F inancial Services Commission to regulate the nonbank domestic sector and a j oint International Financial S ervices Authority to superv ise the off-shore sector. The first is that they have t o establish machinery for s afeguarding the interests of their own domestic investors including persons who invest in instruments of the nonbank finance companies, and the second is that the industrialised countries, such as t he US and UK, are now m oving rapidly to strengthen their own regulatory bodies in the wake of the failures tod eal with the practices of m ajor banks, insurance and mortgage companies that led to the current global financial crisis. Economies If all Caribbean countries d o not themselves move in this direction, not only will they be uncompetitive in the global market for financials ervices, but their economies and their local investors will continue to be exposed to the problems of non-domestic companies over whom they exercise no supervision. The truth is that it would b e an abdication of governm ental responsibility to allow the present situation to continue. It is significant that, on March 18th, the British Financial Services Authority, which regulates banks, is reported to have strongly supported “calls for the creation of a pan-European regulatory body as the only way to save the European market for financial services”. The Financial Times reported its Chairman, Lord Turner, as saying, “We’ve got to think about how to run a single market in retail banking without a European federal government.” The countries of CARICOM face a similar challenge, only it is worse. At least the 27-nation E uropean Union (EU single market and many ofi ts members also operate the E uro as a single currency. Only strong political will or a further major catastrophe will push CARICOM fast enough to establish PanCaribbean arrangements. In this context, no one can b lame countries, such as Barb ados, from forging ahead with the strengthening of its o wn financial services superv ision. A fter all, Barbados does have a vibrant international financial services sector to preserve. But, the point is that the member states of the OECS, given their deeper economic and financial integration, can move faster than CARICOM and they should in their own interest. T hey have already established a Task Force to consider their options in light of the global financial crisis. It is headed by the Prime Minister of St Vincent and the Grenadines, Ralph Gon s alves, now a senior Head of Government and Finance Minister in the region. If the OECS and the inter national community provide his Task Force with the resources, there is no reasonw hy a blueprint couldn’t be d evised to address many of the issues facing these very small and fragile economies in a meaningful way. In the height of economic crises, there is always a ten dency by governments, whether large or small, to pursue both short-term and nationalistic solutions. Invariably, such solutions fail especially when they origi nate with cross-border prob lems. The G20 countries when they meet in London on April 2nd, should be asked to provide the necessary resources to the Caribbean and especially the OECS – to pay for the joint multination financial services regulator that they need and would allow them to participate meaningfully in the global effort. Responses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 7 2 42.422.4677ken@erabahamas.comwww.erabahamas.comD upuch Real Estate w hen no one else can help you sell your home OECS should establish joint regulator, G20 should help WORLDVIEW n S IR Ronald Sanders

PAGE 8

He added: “This effectively doubles the amount it pays for this high quality water,which increases pumping costs because one has to pump twice as muchwater throughout thei sland, and if one looks at it f rom the revenueside, it halves the amount of money the corporation could potentiallyearn from selling the same amount of water,” he said. The corporation is trapped in a vicious cycle, where the e xpensive solution for the situation replacement of old pipes and other infrastructure is indefinitely delayed by the high costs incurred by the WSC part-l y as a result of the need for t hese upgrades. Y esterday, the minister said the government hopes that a private consulting firm will soon conclude an Inter American Development Bank study, enti-t led the Water and Sanitation Sector Plan, which will help put the corporation back on the road to self-sufficiency. This plan will include a tariff study, updating the corpora-t ion’s financial modelling and a corporate business plan. Coming out of this, the governmentw ill determine what changes w ill be made to the rate customers are charged for water, which may in the future include a mechanism taking into consideration the fluctuating cost of energy needed to produce that water. However, how the corporation will secure the funding needed to undertake the “majori nvestment” that is needed to replace dodgy watermains is yet to be determined. According to the minister, the WSC still charges customers for water at a rate set in 1999,b efore expensive reverse osmos is technology which desalinates salt water making it fit for household use was primarily relied upon to quench the country’s demand for water, which has also increased as develop-m ent continues apace and the p opulation expands. This is despite the fact that the cost of producing a thousand gallons of water has almost tripled in the four years up to September, 2008, from $1.28 peri mperial gallon in 2004 to $3.72. This means that water purchases, which represented 19 per cent of the WSC’s revenue in 2004, now eat up 57 per centof the corporation’s funds. M eanwhile, 54 per cent of all water purchased never reaches i ts intended destination. In 2004, water sales were $ 31.1million and reverse osmos is water purchases were $6.0 million or 19 per centof revenues. Over thesubsequent four years from 2005 to 2008,cumulative increases in water sales totalled $22.7 million, but thecumulative increase in water purchases over thes ame periodwas $41.5 million,” a ccording to Mr Neymour. The corporation is losing over$2.2 millionannually for what it pays just to buy the water versuswhat it bills customers for that water, and byt he time one factors oradds in t he cost of building and maintaining infrastructure to deliverthis water to the public, the cost of paying staff, maintainingoffices, reading meters, producing bills, the government is leftholding the bag for the bal-a nce,” Mr Neymour said. “The only solution to this problem, and one that thisgovernment recognises, is to make substantial investments to replaceold infrastructure and restructuring the organisation.” A precipitous rise in energy costs, also leading to an outstanding $12.7 million in money owed by the WSC to private water suppliers for the year so far, contributed to the need by t he corporation for an additional $11 million subsidy in the m id-year budget. A dded to the money already allocated to the corporation for t he 2008/2009 fiscal year, it received the greatest proportion of public subsidy, at $30 m illion. “Withdecreasing revenue c ollections and high fixedcosts, p articularly with respect to s taffing and water purchases, t hecorporation’s cash flow position is deteriorating at an accele rating rate,” noted Mr Neym our. I n his mid-year budget statem ent, the prime minister said that “capital transfers to deficitgenerating public sector entities is an unsustainable situat ion that needs to be a ddressed.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE bf fbffft tn" nntf n r"r tn tn btf U pon arrival, she was accosted by a masked gunman who drove the woman’s van to a secluded area, where he raped and robbed her of $500 cash, a cellular phone and her 2001 silver-coloured van. A SP Bootle said the van was recovered by police on Sunday. He said the culprit was described as being 5ft 7ins tall of slim build, with light to medium brown complexion. P olice are appealing to women not to drive alone to a location to meet strangers. “Women should always be accompanied by someone, preferably a male,” said ASP Bootle. P olice are investigating. n A 23-YEAR-OLD man was stabbed Friday evening during an altercation with another man at a nightclub in Hunters. P olice received a report of a stabbing around 10pm on Friday at the Grobolos Club. Officers sent to investigate saw a 23-year man suffering from a s tab wound to the upper right shoulder. The victim was taken to Rand Memorial Hospital, where he was treated and later discharged. M r Bootle said a 24-year-old man is assisting inquiries. What we came here to do is to get the Opposition’s view in Turks and Caicos on the mat ter,” he told The Tribune from P rovidenciales. Asked what the PLP parliamentarians now understand the O pposition’s position on the matter to be, Mr Mitchell said his party’s members were still digesting the information” and i t was too early to say. Turks and Caicos is a UK dependency but has had its owng overnment headed by a chief minister since 1976. The recommendation to impose direct rulei s due to come into effect fol lowing the final report of a Commission of Inquiryl aunched by Britain into government corruption on the islands. Mr Misick, who has been at t he centre of rampant allegations of misconduct, has agreed to resign as a result of thei nquiry and Mr Williams was named as his successor earlier this month. Mr Misick has publicly said his government condemns Britain’s recommendations to suspend Cabinet, parliament and to partially suspend the nation’s constitution for the next two years and the drastic signal of intention by the UK has attracted great interest in The Bahamas and across the region. The action would allow British Governor Gordon Wetherall to take over day-today running of the country for the next two years. Premier Misick told ZNS that TCI's sovereignty and democ racy must be protected and that Friday's meeting with Mr Ingra ham was a move to get support from the Bahamas and shed light on Turks' plight. The Tribune understands that Mr Misick intends to solicit the court to get the decision reversed. He is also petitioning other countries and interna tional bodies, including the United Nations, to intervene on the country’s behalf. The Turks and Caicos are, by deed of entrustment, a member of CARICOM, whose civil society charter calls for democratic governance. With the UK a part of the Commonwealth, members of which submit to complying with the Harare principles that call for regular elections to allow citizens to determine how they are governed, this could also form part of the basis of an appeal against the move. In a brief phone interview with The Tribune yesterday, Foreign Affairs Minister Brent Symonette declined to comment on whether the Bahamas would react to the situation, telling this newspaper to “speak with the prime minister tomorrow” about it. Another spokesperson for the prime minister said the government would not be making a statement on the issue. FROM page one Woman raped and robbed by man posing as customer FROM page one WSCwater FROM page one Government

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 9 I n order to qualify for either position, proper documentation must be provided. If you are interested, please either fax your documents to 242-366-2046 or email to Rayanne.malone@lindroth.cc. All resumes can also be submitted to the Marsh Harbour Labour Board or mailed to the following address: Schooner Bay P.O. Box AB 20016 Marsh Harbour, Abaco Schooner Bay Project o f Lindroth Development is looking to hire the following positions: R egistered Nurse Hydraulic Crane Operator side, was reduced to a mangled w reck. The bumper was stripped from the front of the car and the radiator, engine components and oil spilled from the frame. Shocked residents came out of their houses to attend to victims a fter hearing the crash at around 1 .50am yesterday. Emergency crews called for firef ighters to use the Jaws of Life to pull the Oldsmobile driver from t he car, and the 23-year-old man was pronounced dead at the scene. H is passenger is said to have b een shouting after the car crash How did this happen? How did this happen?” before he was treate d at the roadside and loaded into an ambulance. But the man died s oon after he was admitted to Princess Margaret Hospital. Friends of the two men, thought to be from Chippingham in Nassau, started to gather at the scene a nd said they had been at a party with them shortly before the crash. Y oung men stood in silent shock and consoled women who w ailed and screamed in horror at the roadside. An ambulance carried the 36year-old woman who had been driving the GMC to PMH in a responsive condition, and police say her condition is not life-threate ning. The 34-year-old woman driving t he Toyota escaped the wreckage with an ankle injury. T raffic police are continuing investigations. Yesterday Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said Mr Knowles played an “important role in the politi cal history of the Bahamas and in the affairs of the F ree National Movement. “He was one of those who contributed to the building of a unified opposition in the late seventies and was one of the 11 elected as FNM members of p arliament in 1982.” He said Mr Knowles “served his country well, and especially his beloved Long Island.” “We shall miss him,” he added, stating that “our h earts go out to Mrs Knowles and other members of t he family and we extend to them our deepest sympathy.” Geoffrey Knowles, James’ brother, also remembered his brother as a man who was dedicated tos erving the Bahamas and his large family. “We’ve lost a very good citizen,” he said. “He was in politics for basically most of his adult life and gave tremendous service.” M r Knowles said the family was yesterday receivi ng many calls of condolences from Long Island and the United States, where they also have relatives. Funeral arrangements were being determined with the likelihood that the service will take place on F riday or Saturday of this week. The MP, whose father was also an MP, was born in Nassau and grew up in the Fox Hill area. Despite constituency boundary changes, Mr Knowles always represented Long Island in somef orm during his 25-year tenure in office. He also held responsibility for numerous ministerial portfolios, including agriculture, works and transport. Geoffrey recalled that the post of Minister of A griculture in particular was “right up (James’ alley” as the family had a strong farming background. In his professional capacity, Mr Knowles was a trained lawyer, articling with Sir Stafford Sands’l aw chambers and then going on to work as a consultant with the law firm Alexiou Knowles and Co, with his brother, Emerick. Mr Knowles is survived by his wife, Amarylis, h is sons, James Jr and Roman, daughter Kimberley, his mother Agnes, five brothers (Alex Jr, Emerick, Patrick, Geoffrey and Charlton) and six sisters (Jeanne, Ruby, Doris, Yvonne, Deborah and Julie get involved by helping the bleeding man into her car, The Tribune was told. S he drove him to the emergency room at Princess Margaret Hospital where he was given 60 internal and external stitches, and doctors said he would havel ost his life if the knife had slipped to cut a vital artery. A friend of the victim told The Tribune : “When I saw the w ounds in his neck I could not believe it. It was disgusting. He was bleeding profusely and if it had gone anywhere closer to his artery there would have been n othing anyone could have done for him. It would have been a differ ent story, it would have been a d eath for nothing. It would have been a senseless murder and that is the scariest part about it.” She condemned security staff at The Green Parrot for not b reaking up the fight before it reached such a dangerous level. I don’t know what their job is if not to make their place s ecure,” she said. “They could have intervened at any time, but they didn’t, the g irl did, and she got roughed up a little bit.” A ttempts to contact manage ment of The Green Parrot yest erday were not answered before T he Tribune w ent to press, and calls to police were also not r eturned before deadline. The 28-year-old man, w ho does not want to be identified, is now recovering ath ome. He slammed police for not i nforming the public of the incident and for not publicly identifying his attackers as they walk f ree. He said: “People want to k now when these things happen and it is not the first thing that h as happened at Green Parrot.” His friend added: “It’s not something you would expect to happen in that environment. It is not a club, it’s a bar. It’s so sad Nassau is so small that anywhere you try to go thati s not rowdy, where you want to go have a nice time, stuff like t his happens. “It just puts you in a differ ent mind frame. “You don’t know what’s going to happen.” Green Parrot patron stabbed and beaten F ROM page one Two killed FROM page one F ROM page one James Knowles n MISSINGCHILDREN TWO children were reportedly missing at sea near Adelaide in south west New Providence yesterday. Search parties are understood to have found the children’s b oat overturned. B ut there was no sign of the children before T he Tribune w ent to press.

PAGE 10

n By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com A LTHOUGH Sir Lynden Pindling’s influence has been indelibly cast on our country’s life as one of the m ost dominant figures in the history of the local political landscape and one of the architectsof a modern Bahamas, he was also seen as an international pari-ah under whose leadership the Bahamas became known as a paradise lost to drug smuggling and to the highest bidder. B ased on the recent brouhaha arising from a Tribune (Insight article critical of the Bahamas’ first prime minister, who became known as the ‘Black Moses’, it appears that even in death there is a personality cult clinging to S ir Lynden’s image. Under his stewardship, the Bahamas was led through tremendous change from majority rule to Independence, to the establishment of the hotel corporation, the Defence Force, the construction of schools and COB, the expansion of the middle class, t he evolution from exchange control to the Central Bank and the social innovation and perhaps the greatest accomplishment of the old PLPthe National Insurance Board. Mr Pindling’s government can also be heralded for having the second highest GNP per capita ( $12,000) in the English-speaking Caribbean at the time of their defeat in 1992. However, the former PM also left a tarnished legacy and sat at the helm of a government when drug smuggling, corruption, influence peddling and money laundering was the order of the day. O f late, several na•ve, emotionally-charged party members and supporters of the late PM some of whom are just two-faced have sought to be historical revisionists, distorting the aspects of history that showed that Sir Lynden gravely erred while attempting to canonise him. P aul Moss, who is rapidly being seen as a typically dema gogic, opportunistic fly-by-night, ought to have divorced himself from the recent hoopla surrounding the former PM, instead of throwing together a headline seeking, seemingly drunken demonstration outside The Tribune, where 70 per cent of those i n attendance allegedly had not read the article or even knew why they were there. I had assumed that Mr Moss had read the report of the 1984 Commis sion of Inquiry and as an intelligent, new age politician would not be found clinging to Pindling’s tattered legacy. Former PM Perry Christie, whose proclivity for procrastination did not get the best of him in this instance as he quickly called a press conference, appears to be clutching to the political magic seemingly associated with Mr Pindling’s image. In the 1980s, Mr Christie was fired after he spoke out against the corruption happening under Sir Lynden’s watch, so his seemingly delusional outcry after John Marquis’ article must only have been to rally his party’s base. In recent years, in a speech entitled ‘Pindling and me A political/social history’, given to Felix Bethel’s political science class at COB, in speaking about his feelings after the 1984 Commission of Inquiry, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell said: “I supported Hubert Ingra ham and Perry Christie after the dismissal.I thought that the person who would have resigned and should have resigned if only to face a general election ought to have been Sir Lynden.I thought he made a terrible blunder by not doing so. I withdrew any contact with him and wrote publicly a bout my dissatisfaction with it.” As it relates to the Marquis articles, an elder statesman who was there at the time soundly disputes Mr Chauncey Tynes’ assertion that their first plan was to throw Speaker of House, Bobby Symonette, bodily outside of parliament. I have no recollection of that. Our whole idea was to avoid violence and surely there was no suggestion to do violence to Bobby Symonette. There are a number of people alive who can attest to that,” he said. This gentleman also disputed Mr Marquis’ commentary that, t he One Man Manifesto was “drafted by an African nationalist” and “recommended as a strategy that national leaders stuff government departments with party supporters.” “I have the manifesto and it says nothing about stuffing government departments with party s upporters. In 1970, Pindling went to Africa and visited a number of places. Pindling wrote the Manifesto, not an African, and in it he quoted President Kenneth Kuanda of Zambia, not Robert Mugabe. The thing is Kuanda’s quote wasn’t even brilliant or insightful. Kuanda quote said ‘time does come for leaders o f any given revolution, if they know what they are doing, to think of starting to remould their society’.” It is an absurd notion to give one man the title of “father of the nation” when so many others fought in the struggle and played leading roles in elevating our c ountry. In America, although they did not all agree, they recognise their founding fathers (and mothers), rather than attempting to distort history and bestowing that honour on one person. Frankly, if I am to go the route of some Bahamians, if there’s anyone entitled to be called Father of the Nation”, it is Sir Milo Butler. In terms of the modern Bahamas, Sir Milo led the c harge even before the PLP came into existence. He attended the Independence Conference as the first Bahamian Governor General designate, he led the fight against racism and has become a great symbol of unity. Others worthy of being categorised as our founding f athers/mother are Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield, Henry M Taylor, Sir Randol Fawkes, Arthur Hanna, Sir Arthur Foulkes, Sir Kendal Isaacs, Sir Clifford Darling, Doris Johnson and even Sir Stafford Sands (for his contribution to the establishment of our present economic pillars t ourism and financial services). After the 1977 election, the wheels began falling off the Pindling express. Law and order broke down as the Bahamas became a transshipment spot for the movement of illegal drugs, with officials ranging from law enforcement to Cabinet minist ers accepting backhanders. Under Sir Lynden, the Bahamas lost a generation of Bahamians to drug addiction and drug wars, which has spawned much of the social problems that continue to haunt the country today. According to a PBS report, in the Pindling era Norman’s Cay became a haven of debauchery” the Bahamas’ own Sodom and Gomorrah, where drugs, orgies and lawlessness were the order of the day. Major US media houses estimated that as much as 80 per cent of the cocaine consumed in the US at that time came through the B ahamas. Sir Lynden is alleged to have been bribed by cocaine baron Carlos ‘Joe’ Lehder to allow him usage of Norman’s Cay for his nefarious activities. The late Norman Solomon, then MP for North Eleuthera, was held at gunpoint and prohibited from moving around Norm an’s Cay when he tried to C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Employment Opportunity Recruitment Officer, Human Resources 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e tC o m m o n w e a l t h B a n k i s t h e p r e m i e r B a h a m i a n B a n k w i t h branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama. W e a r e c o m m i t t e d t o d e l i v e r i n g s u p e r i o r q u a l i t y s e r v i c e , t o training and developing our employees, to creating value for our shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in the community. Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for Recruitment Officer, Human Resources. CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: Actively recruiting staff through job fairs, focused advertising and in house posting Coordinating the testing of applicants Screening / interviewing of applicants and preparing profiles for presentation to the HR Manager Performing all background checks, obtaining references and transcripts on potential candidates Preparing job letters, job descriptions and other new hire forms and documents for review and approval by the HR Manager Assisting the HR Manager in conducting the welcome and familiarization program for new hires Under the guidance of the HR Manager, administer the Bank’s Employee Referral program Maintaining the HR Database Preparation of HR reports Promoting and maintaining excellent customer service QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE: Candidates must meet the following criteria:Possess a Bachelor’s Degree or higher in Human Resources or in a related discipline from an accredited UniversityMinimum of four years experience in Human Resources with a minimum of two years experience in recruitingExcellent interpersonal skills Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applicationsExcellent communication, analytical and reasoning skillsExcellent organizational and time management skillsTeam Player with the ability to add value and strength to the team and team goalsHonest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlinesREMUNERATION PACKAGE: Commonwealth Bank is a Great place to work! We offer an exciting work environment with the opportunity for growth and development. We also offer a competitive compensation package, reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications, including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision, dental and life insurances and a pension plan. Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before March 31, 2009 to: HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT RE: RECRUITMENT OFFICERHR P.O. Box SS-6263 Nassau Bahamas Telefax: (242393-8073 E-mail address:hr@combankltd.com “Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those under consideration will be contacted.” Sir Lynden Pindling:one of the most Y OUNG M AN S V IEW Sir Lynden Pindling SEE page 11

PAGE 11

observe Mr Lehder’s operations. In 1982, Brian Ross’s explosive investigative report ‘The Bahamas: A Nation for Sale’ charged Pindling and his government with corruption and for accepting sweeteners from the international rogue and head of the Medellin Cartel, Carlos Lehder. Lehder used Norman’s Cay, almost with impunity, as a base for his cocaine operations. Although Sir Lynden made a bizarre appearance on NBC to refute the report, the world had become aware of local affairs and US government officials were pressing for an investigation. With this as the backdrop, a Commission of Inquiry was appointed in November, 1983. The Commission’s report found that corruption and influencepeddling was rife, that parliamentarians, law enforcement officials and others had accepted bribes from drug traffickers and that Sir Lynden’s bank accountsof at least $3.5 million were far in excess of this PM earnings between 1977 and 1983. Sir Lynden could give no credible explanation as to why his expenditure was eight times his income and he was not known tobe living off credit. One of Sir Lynden’s Cabinet ministers was also found to have been fronting for the mafia. Furthermore, the commission also concluded that during the Pindling era, a number of Family Island commissioners may have taken drug-related inducementsas they showed a “degree of acquiescence” regarding the drug trade on their respective islands. Following the commission, former DPM Arthur Hanna resigned although his character was never in question and urged Mr Pindling to do the same “in the name of common decency.” Mr Pindling did not. In 1987, after pursuing a nationalistic agenda and playing the race card, Mr Pindling led the PLP to another electoral vic tory with 31 of the 49 House seats. During that election campaign, he painted the FNM as traitors who were ready to accede to the US. He charged that drugs were an “American mess, so let them clean it up” and even a ccused agencies of the US federal government of transporting drugs through the Bahamas at a rally. After Sir Lynden’s government was defeated in 1992, the new government discovered cases of impropriety, neglect and fiscal mismanagement...and that t hey had inherited an economic recession. I have also been advised that the former PM also botched the formation of the country’s first airline and that it is because of this that Bahamasair lags so far behind today. According to my source, in 1 970 routes were exclusively assigned to the new Bahamas Airways, which featured a conglomerate of international companies and left the government w ith a 25 per cent stake in the airline. Apparently, Mr Pindling did an about-face and gave the same ‘exclusive’ routes to Everette Bannister’s paper airline Bahamas World Airways. The deal collapsed and Bannister’s airline never materialised. “We w ould have had a jet fleet flying to New York and other places long ago, but we have yet to do so,” the source said. Indeed, there is more than the glossed-over side to Pindling’s legacy. The latter years of the Pindling era were of total corruption and it has set a social cult ure that still hangs over the Bahamas today, as many are still afraid to speak out for fear of vindictiveness or overt victimisation. E ven Fred Mitchell made note of Sir Lynden’s spite in his presentation when he said: “It (was the same for Franklyn Wilson whose nomination was shockingly taken away from him in 1977 because he had dared to cross the great man.” Frankly, although some miles tones were achieved in the Pindling years, he contributed to the destruction of the moral fabric of this country, the rise of materialism and the encouragement of an attitude of entitlement without work. He introduced a culture where there was and continues to be litt le to no accountability in government departments and he opened the floodgates of the public service, leaving it bloated with idlers and malcontents who have p oor attitudes and only seem interested in being on the payroll. Today, there are still some in the public sector who have no intention of doing an honest day’s work and who see work even answering a phone or liftinga pencil as an infringement on t heir time. Sir Lynden was a giant of our times and has had an overwhelming impact on Bahamas’ history but history should be viewed in its entirety, as is seemingly evident since none of the old PLP have come out to defend Sir Lynden. C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 11 dominant figures in our political history F ROM page 10

PAGE 12

C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONALANDLOCAL SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS IRELAND'S Brian O'Driscoll celebrates with the trophy after his team beat Wales 17-15 in a Six Nations rugby union international match at the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Saturday March 21, 2009. Ireland captured its first Grand Slam in the Six Nations for 61 years by beating Wales 1715 on Saturday. RUGBY: SIXNATIONS CHAMPIONSHIP A P P h o t o / D a v i d D a v i e s / P A A P P h o t o / D a v i d D a v i e s / P A n LONDON (AP Steven Gerrard scored a hat t rick Sunday, sending Liverpool past Aston Villa 5-0 and withina point of first-place Manchester United in the Premier League. H aving routed United 4-1 last weekend, Liverpool took full advantage of the champions losing 2-0 at Fulham on Saturday.U nited has 65 points after 29 games; Liverpool has 64 after 30 games. Chelsea, which lost 1-0 at Tottenham on Saturday, has 61. Dirk Kuyt took just eight m inutes to score against a Villa team that is chasing one of the four Champions League spots. Villa’s miserable afternoon at A nfield was compounded when U.S. goalkeeper Brad Friedel was sent off for bringing down Fernando Torres as he surged forward to meet Xabi Alonso’s b all. On Saturday, Wayne Rooney and Paul Scholes were ejected as Manchester United lost at Fulham for the first time since September 1964, a 2-0d efeat Saturday that tightened t he Premier League title race. Chelsea (18-4-7 four points back of United, lost 1-0 at Tottenham Hotspur, its f irst defeat in eight matches under manager Guus Hiddink. Luka Modric scored in the 50th minute for Spurs, whichi mproved to just 2-23-13 against C helsea in league matches since February 1990. Fourth-place Arsenal (15-510) got goals from Nicklas B endtner, Abou Diaby and Samir Nasri is a 3-1 win at New c astle. Stoke earned a 1-0 victory over Middlesbrough, and P ortsmouth’s prospects of avoiding relegation were boost ed when Peter Crouch beat American goalkeeper Tim Howard twice in a 2-1 victory o ver Everton. THE IRISH team celebrate after beating Wales 17-15 in a Six Nations rugby union international match at the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Saturday March 21, 2009. Ireland capture first Grand Slam for 61 years Ireland have been crowned Grand Slam champions for the first time in 61 years after Ronan O'Gara booted a late drop goal to secure a 17-15 victory over Wales at the Millennium Stadium. Stephen Jones appeared to have denied Ireland the clean sweep when he landed a drop-goal of his own, but O'Gara struck the decisive blow with two minutes remaining. Tries from man of the match Brian O'Driscoll and Tommy Bowe, both within six minutes after the interval, put Ireland on course for victory in a nerve-shredding contest. But four penalties from the superb Jones kept defending champions Wales, who needed to win by a minimum of 13 points to retain their title, in touch as they sought to deny Ireland the clean sweep. O'Driscoll was delighted after the match. Meanwhile, England regained the Calcutta Cup with a 26-12 victory at Twickenham that will pile the pressure on embattled Scotland coach Frank Had den. France bounced back from their Twickenham drubbing in emphatic style as a seven-try romp at the Stadio Flaminio condemned sorry Italy to the wooden spoon and a fourth RBS 6 Nations white wash. The final score was Italy 8, France 50. P a u l T h o m a s / A P P h o t o P a u l T h o m a s / A P P h o t o n E UROPEAN S OCCERROUNDUP Liverpool rout Villa to close gap on Man Utd to one point IRELAND'S Ronan O'Gara kicks the match winning drop goal during their Six Nations rugby union international match against Wales at the Millenium Stadium, Cardiff, Saturday March 21, 2009. The Bahamas Basketball Fed e ration has sanctioned the tour nament, which is being organized for primary, junior and senior high school basketball teams. The tournament is hon o ring Johnson, who has dedicated more than a decade to thed evelopment of women's basketball in the country. She had built a reputable foundation at HO Nash with the Lions' junior girls team. Two of her proteges, Anastasia Moultrie, now teaching at St. Augustine's College and Torsheka Cox, now at Anatol Rodgers Junior High School, are organizing the tournament. THE New Providence Volley ball Association will host a volleyball clinic today at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, starting at 6 pm. The clinic is designed to update all players, coaches, executives and officials on he new rules that will be implemented in the league. The league indicated that they intend to have all persons present for the meeting as this will ensure that everybody is on par with the new rules. VOLLEYBALL NPVARULESCLINIC FROM page 15 SPOR TS NOTES ENGLAND'S CAPTAIN Andrew Strauss, right, reacts after being bowled by West Indies' Kieron Pollard who celebrates behind on the second One-Day International cricket match in Providence, Guyana, Sunday, March 22, 2009. West Indies won by 21 runs to level the five-match series 1-1. W est Indies level five-match series Nadal downs Mur ray to take Indian Wells title World sports briefs A P P h o t o / A n d r e s L e i g h t o n n I NDIAN WELLS, California Rafael Nadal powered his way to a 6-1, 6-2 victory over Andy Mur ray on a windy Sunday afternoon at the BNP Paribas Open, winning his second Indian Wells title in three years. No. 1 Nadal’s low, hard groundstrokes gave him an edge in the gusty conditions over No. 4 Mur ray, whose game relies more on pace and a mix of shots. Nadal, a 22-year-old Spaniard, added the championship to the Australian Open title he won earlier this year, and avenged a loss to eventual champion Murray in the Rotterdam final. I RELAND'S B rian O'Driscoll celebrates with spectators after his team beat Wales 17-15 in a Six Nations rugby union international match at the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Saturday March 21, 2009 .

PAGE 13

n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ARIANNA Vanderpool-Wallace closed out her freshman year at Auburn University by joining sopho-more Alana Dillette on the All-American honours at the NCAA Women's Swimming and Diving Championships over the weekend at the Texas A&M Student Rec Center Natatorium. The duo helped the Tigers finish sixth in the team standings at the end of the three-day meet with 281.5 points. Califorina won with 411.5. Vanderpool-Wallace swum the first leg on Auburn's record setting 200 freestyle relay tam of Emile Ewing, Melissa Marik and Caitlin Ceary that clocked one minute and 27.45 seconds. Individually, she was sixth in the B final of the 50 free for 14th overall in 22.20, which was off her season's best of 22.10 that lowered her national record that she set at the Olympic Games in Beijing, China last year. Vanderpool-Wallace was also second in the B final of the 100 free for 10th overall in a time of 48.11. Geary won the B final in 47.92. Vanderpool-Wallace turned in a split of 21.37 on anchor and Dillette did 23.33 on the third leg as they combined to lead the Tigers to a fourth place finish in the A final of the 200 medley relay in 1:36.88. The University of Georgia won in 1:36.45. Vanderpool-Wallace wrapped up her performance in the 400 freestyle relay on the first leg. The Tigers placed fifth in 3:12.75. California won in 3:09.88 to shatter the NCAA record of 3:11.05. Individually, Dillette was seventh in the B Final of the 100 butterfly in 52.91 for 15th overall. The B Final was won by Saor Haruguchi in 52.18. And Dillette did splits of 23.95 and 52.48 on the third leg as Auburn University posted a victory in the B Final of the 400 medley relay in 3:31.50. it was a step in the right direction as he work his way back on t he national scene. "I think I have to work on my bench, but I think if some of the senior competitors would come b ack I can improve on that and the rest of my lift tremendously," said the 28-year-old super-heavyweight champion. Taking a break from bodyb uilding and switching over to powerlifting was no problem forFaye Rolle. She breezed through the competition as a midd leweight lifting a 142.5 squat, 7 7.5 bench and 137.5 deadlift for h er total of 357.5. Only rookie Danielle Dennard h ad better lifts in the female com petition. " It feels good. It's a change and it gives me a chance to show off my talent," said Rolle, who was coaxed on the sidelines by her coach Welligton 'Cat' Sears. R olle, the Novice bodybuilding champion who competed withJ eremy Tucker for the silver at the Central American and C aribbean Bodybuilding Championships, said she experienced the most difficulty in her bench. "If you do how they say you should do it in the rules, they calli t a no lift," Rolle said. "I thought I got the lift, but they called it a n o lift. So I didn't lift the total weights that I anticipated because o f the no lift." Having gotten a taste of the competition, Rolle said that she will definitely be back in powerlifting because it will help her b odybuilding preparation tremendously. She's getting ready to t ravel to Grand Bahama for her first bodybuilding competition in J une before she's on stage for the Nationals in July. Also taking advantage of her bodybuilding background as she made her debut in powerlifting was fitness champion Shekera Mackey. Her total in the light w eight division was 240. She did a 70 squat, 47.5 bench and 122.5 d eadlift. "It's a big change, a big difference, but I worked hard," said Mackey, an accounts assistant who started working out as a hobby. "Both sports actually keep me in shape and push me to that next level." Mackey said she didn't have any problems with any of her lifts b ecause "they were all a piece of cake." But she noted that "if I had some competition in my division, I could have done some more." One of the most impressive competitors in the competition was 16-year-old Kester Bowan, who was less than 130 pounds. He won the featherweight divi sion with a total of 292.5 after squatting 95, benching 60 and deadlifting 137.5. "The lifts were alright, but I could have done a lot better," he said. "I really didn't have any problems with any of my lifts, butI hope to go back to my training and improve on them in the next competition."The College of the Bahamas, who continue to make strides towards its university status, had some competitors who excelled. One of them was Danielle Dennard, who topped all of the females with the best lifts of 145 in the squats, 82.5 in the bench and 142.5 in the dead lift for her toal of 370. "It was pretty good. I enjoyed it," said Dennard, a 20-year-old g raduate of Bahama Academy of her sporting debut. "The liftsw ere all pretty good. They were what I wanted. I just think I need t o work on my squat. But with some more competition, I know I can do better." A nother COB student who performed well was Hilton S olomon in the 100 kilo class. He got second (512.5 c ane Bain (575 that it wasn't his best performance. "In the squat, I don't think it was right up there, but in the bench and the deadlift, they were right there," he said. "I didn't lift what I wanted in the squat, but I did it in the bench and the deadlift. I just have to work on my squat." Federation's public relations officer Bob Brown, a former national champion, said as they resurrected the sport, they saw flashes of a number of past bodybuilders like Delvin 'Blue' Scott, Kevin 'One Ton' Woodside, Bernard 'Spinks' Rolle from Grand Bahama, Gena Mackey, Natasha Newbold and Patrice Curry. "The menu was great, people showed up as expected and we're looking forward to the next show i n August," said Brown, who indicated that by then some of thev eteran powerlifters will be back. "We go to Freeport next m onth and we look to see the competition moving on to pre pare us for the World Champi-o nships. “So the sport is back and we a re definitely going to be doing a lot more in the future." C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 13 T HEFINALRESULTS Here's a look at the final results of the Bahamas Powerlifting F ederation's National Powerlifting Championships (the lifts are in kilos): Ladies' Division F eatherweight Tanya Forbes – 62.5 squat, 45 bench, 117 deadlift – total 225. Lightweight S hekera Mackey – 70 squat, 47.5 bench, 122.5 deadlift – total 240. Middleweight F aye Rolle – 142.5 squat, 77.5 bench, 137.5 deadlift – total 375.5. Light-heavyweight T ina Sterling – 60 squat, 60 bench, 110 deadlift – total – 230. Heavyweight D anielle Dennard – 145 squat, 82.5 bench, 142.5 deadlift – total – 370. Men's division Featherweight Kester Bowan – 95 squat, 60 bench, 137.5 deadlift – total – 292.5. Junior Division P hilip Dawkins – 150 squat, 150 bench, 280 dealift – total – 480. Masters G eorge Barr – 150 squat, 150 bench, 182.5 deadlift – total – 482.5. Middle-heavy T revor Benjamin – 205 squat, 155.5 bench, 230 deadlift – total – 408. 100 kilo class Hurricane Bain – 1867.5 squat, 160 bench, 227.5 deadlift – total – 575. Hilton Solomon – 160 squat, 147.5 bench, 205 deadlift – total – 512.5. Philip Dawkins – 150 squat, 150 bench, 280 deadlift – total – 480. Heavyweight Alponso Canter – 225 squat, 182.5 bench, 250 deadlift – total – 657.5. Super-heavyweight Leslie White – 310 squat, 205 bench, 295 deadlift – total – 810. G eorge Barr – 150 squat, 150 bench, 182.5 deadlift – total – 482.5. F ROM page 15 White and Rolle win national titles ON A ROLLE: Faye Rolle takes the strain. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f FITNESSCHAMPION: Shekera Mackey. GOOD PERFORMANCE: Hilton Solomon. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Vanderpool-Wallace closes out freshman year

PAGE 14

A closely contested series t hroughout, in the third and d eciding game of, one of this season’s top ranked team’s ensured there would be no championship rematch in the women’s division of the New Providence Women’s Basketball Association. With a 67-64 win in the third and deciding game of the semifi-n al series, the Boomer G Angels e liminated last year’s championship runner-up the Sunshine Auto Cheetahs Saturday at the D.W Davis Gymnasium. The Angels built a seemingly insurmountable lead over the second and third quarters and withstood a spirited fourth quartere ffort from the Cheetahs to hold o n for the slim margin of victory. O O u u t t s s c c o o r r e e d d The Cheetahs came out as the clear aggressors from the tip, and led by eight first quarter points from Anastacia Sands took a 2417 lead after the opening quarter. B oomer G took control over the course of the next two periods and outscored Sunshine Auto 132 in the second quarter and 27-16 i n the third. T hey went from being down seven points at the end of one, to up 12 points heading into thef ourth quarter for a 22 point turnaround. The Angels gave up just a single basket in the second to take a 30-26 lead at intermission. They ended the fourth on 12-2 r un, capped by a Crishanda Kelly lay-up and took a 57-42 lead into the final period. The Cheetah’s staged a late comeback effort in the fourth q uarter as they outscored the A ngels 22-10 behind Sands and A udrey Martin. Kelly and Sharelle Cash paced the Angels with 17 points apiece. Sands led all scorers with 28 p oints while Martin added 20 for the Cheetahs. After a 2007-08 season where t hey opted out of the NPWBA for a myriad of reasons, the Angels have returned to earn a championship berth against the pennant winners and defending c hampions Johnson’s Lady T ruckers. T he Finals begin with game one set for Thursday, March 26th at the D.W Davis Gymnasium. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Premier Health Colonial Group International is rated A-(ExcellentyAM Best. SUNSHINE’S GUARD Andrey Marton drives to the basket. ANGELS Sharelle Cash controls the fast break. NEW PROVIDENCEWOMEN’S BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Angels outshine Cheetahs! PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff Last year’s championship runner-up eliminated after 67-64 loss SUNSHINE’S Latoya Thompson tries to drive past the defence.

PAGE 15

C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 I NSIDE Grand Slam joy for Ireland, see Page 12 Mini Famous Bowl $2.75 n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net L ESLIE White and Novice bodybuilding champion Faye R olle dominated the Bahamas Powerlifting Federation's 'Resurrection Day' National Powerlifting Championships on Saturday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. A lthough they didn't compete, the championships brought out s ome of the top bodybuilders and powerlifters, including pro body builders Joel Stubbs and Gena Mackey, national bodybuilding champion Jay Darling; formern ational powerlifting champions Kevin Woodside and Natasha R olle and Aaron Green, president of the newly formed New P rovidence Bodybuilding and Fitness Association. There was enough talent in the stands to encourage the new core of powerlifters who took centers tage. While he was the most experie nced competitor on the floor, White didn't disappoint theo bservers as he posted the best lifts in the competition with a 310 s quat, 205 bench and 295 deadlift for his total of 801. "I felt pretty good since it's been about two years since they held t he last competition," White said. "The results I did today wasp retty good for a comeback." Despite the fact that he didn't l ift some of the weights he had anticipated on paper, White said POWER AND THE GLORY IT'S down to the divisional f inal in the New Providence Basketball Association, starting tonight at the CI Gibson Gymnasium. In the opener, the defending c hampions will play the Police Crimestoppers in the first game of the John Archer Divisional series. Last year's runners-up E lectro Telecom Cybots will play the Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders in the Vince Ferguson Divisional series. ORGANISERS will begin t he second Patricia 'Patty' Johnson Basketball Tournament on Wednesday at the CI Gibson Gymnasium, starting at 4 pm. The tournament will run t hrough Friday. B ASKETBALL NPBA POSTSEASON BASKETBALL PATTYJOHNSONTOURNEY S EE page 12 NATIONAL POWERLIFTING CHAMPIONSHIPS Felip Major / Tribune staff THE FORCE B E WITH YOU: Leslie White powering his way to success. SEE page 13 White and Rolle win titles sports NOTES

PAGE 16

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE A FTER 24 years, the Bahamas remains beloved s econd home of Royal and E dwina Hudson. T he couple from Lowell, M assachusetts, has visited the Bahamas regularly over the past quarter century. They have travelled extensively to other countries, but are always drawn back to the Bahamas. We’ve tried Aruba, Hawaii, St Martin, Bermuda, Mexico, but we’ve always c ome back here,” said Mr H udson. “This is our home b ase.” The Hudsons said that significant memories are tied tot he Bahamas. They spent many family holidays in Nassau. They started bringing their o ldest daughter when she was five. Now she is a 26year-old registered nurse who is about to give birth tot wins. In the past, the couple’s daughter celebrated highs chool and college graduat ions here. Later, a friend from her college graduation trip decided to get married i n the Bahamas. T he Hudsons’ second d aughter is a school teacher with two children. She has also enjoyed trips t o the Bahamas with her family. It is the warm weather, b eautiful beaches and friendly people that keep the couple returning. They said they have developed close relationships with staff of theirt ime share property, West Winds II, and with Royal Holiday Club sales manager P edro Young. The people are wonder f ul,” said Mrs Hudson. “We certainly think of them as family.” T he Hudsons spent two weeks in Nassau this March. During the visit, Minister ofT ourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace presented them with an authentically Bahamian gift basket and a certificate ofa ppreciation for their many visits to the country. PICTURED (FROM LEFT are Phillipa Cooper and Bernadette Saunders of the Ministry of Tourism, Edwina Hudson, Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Royal Hudson, Pedro Young of Royal Holiday Club and Sonja Albury of the Ministry of Tourism. Nassau remains the Hudsons’ happy home MINISTER OF TOURISM and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace g reets Royal and Edwina Hudson and Royal Holiday Club Sales Manager Pedro Young.

PAGE 17

C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.56 $3.31 $3.60 $UH RX QH O OQHVV Z D\ IUR I LQD QFL DO UXL Q" ' RQ O HW OLI V Q H[SH FWHG FKD OOHQ JHV VKDW WHU\ RXU R SHV I R S HDF R PL QG QGID PLO S URW HFWL RQ6WD F RQI LGH QW WD F RQQ HFW HG 1DV )UH HSRUW ZZZFR OLQD LPS HUL DOFRP n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he British Colonial Hilton’s ownership company is seeking a declaratory judgment from the Supreme Court that it has good title to the downtown Nassau resort’s land, after attorneys repre senting lender FirstCaribbean raised concerns over a missing document in the title chain. The missing document, Tribune Business can reveal, dates back to the time when the hotel was owned by the late Sir Harry Oakes and, subsequently, his family estate. It relates to a transfer of the Bay Street property’s real estate assets, upon which a mortgage was secured, from Lady Oakes’s private assets to the family holding company. Informed sources close to developments told Tribune Business that the Companies Register showed that the mortgage in question was later discharged. This means there are no liens or charges on the British Colonial’s real estate. But what cannot currently be located is the title document showing the transfer of real estate assets from Baroness Oakes to the Oakes family company. As a result, it is understood that Bahamian attorneys representing First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas ed a $40 million refinancing for the British Colonial Development Com pany (the Hilton’s immediate owner have expressed concern that the missing document prevents them from issu ing an unqualified opinion on title. The attorneys, believed to be from Higgs & Johnson, indicated this could potentially jeopardize the mortgage security that FirstCaribbean obtained for the loan. As a result, FirstCaribbean is understood to have demanded that the British Colonial Development Company either take out title insurance or obtain an unqualified opinion that it has clean title via a Supreme Court judgment. The resort’s holding company has moved to do the latter, and obtain a declaratory court judgment that the mortgage holder has clean title. FirstCaribbean’s Barbados headquarters is understood to have taken direct control of the situation from its Bahamian subsidiary. British Colonial Development Company officials are understood to view the situation more as an administrative matter, and believe it will be cleared up relatively easily, with no impact for the downtown Nassau resort. Tribune Business was first alerted to the situation by sources who suggested that the title query had prompted FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas $15 million credit facility that was financing the British Colonial Hilton’s current multi-million dollar renovation. As a result, this newspaper had been told there were delays in payments to British Colonial seeks ‘good title’ confirmation Resort owner seeks declaratory judgment from Supreme Court that title clean, after attorneys for lender FirstCaribbean raise concerns over break in chain dating back to late Sir Harry Oakes and family THE British Colonial Hilton, Bay Street, New Providence... S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX planning to unveil “by the end of this month” its plans for a small business listing facility on the exchange, an initiative designed to give such companies exposure and a “track record”. Keith Davies, BISX’s chief executive, told Tribune Business that the proposed listings tier would not be “a revenue generator” for the Bahamian exchange, but was instead being initiated to aid national development. He pointed out that a strengthened small business sector led to a stronger overall economy, given the contribution such companies made to employment and economic development. BISX to unveil small business listing plans by ‘end of month’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA velopment’s first financing round secured $45 million less than originally targeted, its structure having to be readjusted to account for global capital markets weakness and what appears to have been tepid international investor demand. The Nassau Airport Devel opment Company (NAD which operates LPIA under a 30-year lease from the Govern ment-owned Airport Authority, confirmed in a statement released late on Friday after noon that it had secured $265 million to fund the first stage of the airport’s redevelopment – some $45 million less than the originally-sought $310 million. NAD said the financing, w hich has come from 16 lenders a nd investors, plus the Govern ment, consisted of three tranches – a $153 million revolving bank credit facility; $42 million senior secured bond; and a $70 million participating debt facility. T his represents a departure from the original structuring, and indicates that international investor demand for the senior secured bond, in particular, was relatively weak. NAD had hoped to raise $310 million through $140 million in a revolving bank credit facility; $90 million in senior secured bonds; and an $80 million participating debt facility. However, only $42 million or less than 50 per cent of thes enior secured bonds were ultim ately taken up. Capital mar kets sources on Friday suggested to Tribune Business that out of that $42 million, some $25 million had come from the Bahamian market $15 million denominated in US dollars, and$ 10 million in Bahamian dol lars. The plan had originally called for $70 million of the $90 million bond facility to be in US or other foreign currencies, and $20 million in Bahamian dollars. It was suggested to Tribune Airpor t f inancing $45m belo w tar g et * Exchange believes Central Securities Depository key to government debt listings * BISX Global ‘still on tap’ after being readjusted S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s president has urged the Government to do its utmost to prevent “scams and abuse” of its proposed unemployment benefit scheme, and suggested it revisit the Employment Act’s severance pay provisions to prevent effective “double dipping” by laid-off staff. “I think something that needs to be considered in this unem ployment benefit is the potential for abuse,” Mr D’Aguilar told Tribune Business. “I think the Government, in their haste to get this on the books, would be wise to think through a number of sceGovernment urged: Beware of benefits ‘scams and abuse’ Ex-Grand Bahama Chamber chief says scheme lets dishonest employees ‘have their cake and eat it’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B

PAGE 18

n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A BUSINESS consultant has seen a 40 per cent increase in attendance at work skills training courses he holds, and told Tribune Business he was increasingl y seeing companies run as “one and two-man band” operations by their owners because they had been forced to lay-off all employe es. Mark Turnquest, principal of the Small Business Resource C entre, said: “I have personally seen a 40 per cent increase in my business in reference to training.I do a lot of training, and have f ound that I’m training a lot of people fired from their jobs. My business has increased because a lot of people want to improve their skills, their corporate officea nd clerical skills.” This is no bad thing, given that Bahamians who acquire additional skills in demand by e mployers will position themselves for jobs – and potentially higher salaries – as the economy moves towards recovery. It will also improve their economicm obility. Mr Turnquest, who is aiming to organise a National Small Business Summit for late May and e arly June 2009, told Tribune Business had had seen a 20 per cent increase in hotel sector workers who were attending his training sessions. He explained thatm any who had been laid-off had no college degree or skills develo pment, and they were now seeking training in the clerical/secretarial area, especially on QuickBooks recordkeeping methods. M r Turnquest, whose training programmes are approved by the Ministry of Education, said many Bahamians “realise they need to develop another type of skill”.H e estimated that unemployment, based on his experience, was worse than the official 12.1 per cent and 14.1 per cent rates r ecorded for New Providence and Grand Bahama. As for the small business community, he told Tribune Business: “Right now, we are in a rock bot-t om state. Nothing has changed, and things have gotten worse.” However, Mr Turnquest said he had seen no “significant i ncrease” in small Bahamian companies going out of business, largely attributing this to the fact that per cent” of those that were going to fold have alreadyd one so. Those that remained were now battle tested”, and Mr Turnquest said: “I’ve seen more of the one man bands. Many retail outlets have only one person working in t he shop, and that’s the entrepreneur; the owner. The two to three staff that were also working there previously have been laid-off.” When it came to his Small B usiness Summit, scheduled for May 21, May 25-28, and June 2-4, Mr Turnquest said it aimed to focus the national development a genda on small businesses, identifying opportunities they can take advantage of, along with business strategies and models. Accusing the Government of a dopting a “myopic approach” to small business development in the Bahamas, Mr Turnquest said: “They’re not innovative or crea tive at all. “The Government has done nothing at all in relation to small business development in the Bahamas. It cannot wait for them. My main intention is to seek leg-i slative change in how small business needs to be given priority t reatment. We need to be proactive, not reactive.” He added that for small business development in the Bahamas t o succeed, there had to be a major change in mindset – not just in the Government, but also among entrepreneurs themselves and financial/lending institutions. We need to identify what Bahamian entrepreneurs need to be skilled in to compete in the world,” Mr Turnquest said. “Give u s an opportunity to take advantage of future goals. “The Government is borrowing money to give people cheese and bread. What about the busi-n esses? Invest in the businesses, let the businesses grow and hire people. The economy has to grow. There is no new money c oming in for entrepreneurial ventures. They’re giving people money to buy clothing and food. But they’re still unemployed and there’s no economic develop-m ent.” narios where it could be abused.” The Chamber president said a prime example of what unemployment benefits should not become was the Governmentguaranteed educational loan fund w hich, in its formative years, was beset by non-repayments and l oans taken out by persons not even studying. When you’ve got 150,000 peop le thinking of ways to get round the system, they usually find them,” Mr D’Aguilar added. “In their haste to get this system up a nd running, they have to think about how it could get abused.Y ou’ve got to be aware of scams. Let’s try and close as many looph oles as possible.” A likely loophole to be exploit ed, Mr D’Aguilar said, was where persons were working more than one job. The National Insurance B oard (NIB tributions from their primary e mployer, the Chamber president said, meaning that NIB – which w ill administer unemployment benefits – only had records relat ing to one job. In this situation, an employee could be collecting an unemployment benefit cheque for their first job, but still working on their second job. Mr D’Aguilar suggest e d this loophole could be closed by requiring employers to submit a list of employees working for them as a second job. The Chamber president, though, said the Government n eeded to reassess the severance pay provisions contained in the E mployment Act. This Act provides for workers who are termi-n ated with notice, either two weeks’ pay with or in lieu of n otice, and then two weeks’ pay for every year worked up to 12 years. This effectively gives laido ff line staff a maximum 26 weeks of severance pay. A nd, in the case of management staff, they get four weeks’p ay with notice or in lieu of notice, and four weeks pay for e very year worked up to 12 years. This means the maximum statutory payment they receive is 13 m onths. Yet unemployment benefit will a dd to this. Mr D’Aguilar said: “When the Employment Act was c rafted it gave, in certain instances, quite a generous severance portion because there was no unemployment insurance. Now that there is this unemploym ent component, one would expect the Government, at somes tage, to revisit the severance component of the Employment A ct. “One would at least expect that to be on the table for negotiation, because it appears to be double dipping. I think the benefits are g etting to the stage where they are too generous.” The Chamber president suggested that the Government revisit the unemployment benefit scheme one year after it was init iated to close any loopholes that arose. He did, though, praise the G overnment for stipulating in the draft legislation that unemploy-m ent benefit could only be received by those who cont ributed, thus encouraging everyone to pay. Christopher Lowe, the former G rand Bahama Chamber of Commerce president, said he o bjected to workers still receiving seven of the 13 weeks’ worth ofu nemployment benefit they were entitled to even if they were dism issed with cause, such as stealing or breaching company rules. “You can’t have your cake and e at it as well,” Mr Lowe told Tribune Business. “We’re creatings cenarios where not only do we reward people for doing nothing, b ut for doing wrong.” Asked for his views on the proposed scheme, he added: “I don’t like it one bit. It reeks of political panic. It’s really amazing how the G overnment can shuffle money around willy nilly, based on polit i cal needs as opposed to national needs. I am definitely against people collecting unemployment benefit who’ve been fired for fraud, theft, tardiness and their own fault.” Mr Lowe said the unemploy m ent benefit scheme appeared to be a “fair accompli”, because he and other employers had not been consulted on, or informed about, how it would work and its proposed creation through a mendments to the National Insurance Act and accompany i ng regulations. Due to this lack of information, h e said he could not explain to his 100 employees at Kelly’s ( Freeport) why the Government was mandating this additional deduction from their salary c heques. “I’m not entirely against some s ort of unemployment benefit. But for God’s sake, give us some-t hing tangible to read so we can assist the Government in avoiding p itfalls they are bound to make in the implementation of such a programme,” Mr Lowe said. M eanwhile, he said NIB was “in effect, making employers thep olicing agents” when it came to employee benefit claims through t he requirement that they fill out its new form, Med-4. Mr Lowe suggested that this had been introduced to combat the inadequacies of the Med-1 form filled o ut by employees, as many were able to beat the system and claimb enefits while still working. “I find it very incongruous that t hey’re adding more benefits when NIB cannot manage the benefits it’s supposed to provide now. Nor can they enforce contributions,” Mr Lowe said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Consultant sees 40 per cent rise in train course demand S S C C A A M M S S , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

PAGE 19

n B y CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE BAHAMAS financial s ervices industry is sound, the minister of state for finance told T ribune Business, despite CLICO (Bahamas u idation and fears of a new offensive about to be nted against the i nternational financial services sector. Z hivargo Liang told Tribune Business that the Government w as continuously monitoring developments and language com i ng from the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation andD evelopment (OECD who have recently began a clarion c all for the end of “tax havens”. The Government has held consultative meetings with members o f the Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB d etermine what steps this country should take to avoid being placedo n another blacklist. “We have a continuous dial ogue with the industry through the BFSB, continuous dialogue about a whole range of issues in t he financial services sector, and this would certainly been one oft hem. As I said before, we are monitoring the situation and we’ll m ake determinations in due course, and when we do, I’m sure you and all the others will know,” said Mr Laing. The CLICO (Bahamas t ion has raised concerns about the ability level of regulatory bod i es in the Bahamas to supervise their industries, and their coop e ration with regulatory bodies across the Caribbean. The bailout of CLICO (Bahamas Financial, by the Trinidad gove rnment caused a shockwave across several Caribbean nations w here the conglomerate had operations. T he Bahamas-based operation was petitioned into provisionall iquidation this year due to its insolvency, because it was unable t o pay claims of $2.6 million in the Turks and Caicos Islands. Yet it had been under the microscope o f the Registrar of Insurance Companies since 2004. Issues related to CLICO were picked up since 2004, so I don’tk now about falling through the cracks; it was a matter of having s potted an issue and raising it,” said Mr Laing. “In regulating, the first issue is to spot a problem, t he second issue is to address a problem, and the third issue is toa ct on an issue. The problem was spotted from 2004. It was a ddressed to the extent of holding meetings since 2004, but only acted on in recent times.” Mr Laing said regional and international regulatory bodies e xist to help jurisdictions “police” themselves “and take advantageo f commerce.” “That’s what’s going to happen a nd it’s going to happen in many areas including insurance, where the regulators are seeing they need to work,” he added. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 3B Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today !BSP Job #: CTS-9-N003 JM# 8634 Client: Comfort Suites Description: Stay In Paradise 1/4 pg Bleed: non Color: 1C Black Specs: PDFX1A Mech #3 Date: 2/25/2009 Time: 1:30 Mech Person: GUDimensions: 5.75in x 10.5 in Issue: Nassau Tribune 3/2/2009 Closing: 2/26/09 *$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. G u s U g a r t e 2 / 2 5 4 p m CTS-9-N003_NassauGuardian.indd 2 2/25/09 4:14:07 PM Financial sector sound in face of CLICO, OECD pressures n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE OWNERS of Coco-nuts Bahama Grill have taken legal action against their former landlords, the owners of West Bay Street’s El Greco Hotel, filing a Supreme Court writ claiming damages due to alleged negligence and misrepresentations. Coco-nuts closed its doors last Wednesday, shutting down the space they had leased for two years from El Greco’s owners, Harry and Mike Pikramenos. Coco-nuts’ owners, the Ferguson brothers, alleged that when they acquired El Greco’s forlease space they were promised access to a balcony area within the hotel, which they claim was reneged upon. Alleged They also alleged they were promised a suitable parking area for their patrons, which the writ claims was to be purchased by El Greco, but never was in two years. The Fergusons are also alleging that the landlords would provide the upkeep of the property, which was supposedly not h onoured. The Ferguson brothers also released letters sent to the Pikramenos’s attorneys, and produced what were purported return receipts, signed by the El Greco owners, to show they had made 12 months’ worth of rental payments in full. The Pikramenos’s had alleged they had been late with lease payments. In their legal action, they are claiming damages due to an alleged loss ofbusiness attributed to inadequate parking for patrons and lack of access to the balcony for private engagements and smoking; alleged towing costs and costs of drain repairs; a nd additional costs allegedly incurred because of the landlord’s failure to allow “quiet enjoyment of the demised premises”. Harry Pikramenos on Wednesday denied the Fergusons claims of being driven from the property, saying he believes that the business was a victim of the economy. Mr Pikramenos said operating El Greco without a restaurant will have a negative effect on business, but said Coco-nuts would be replaced as soon as possible. “Yes it will hurt the hotel to have no restaurant attached to it, butwe will find someone else i n the restaurant business,” said Mr Pikramenos. Restaurant files action against West Bay hotel I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

PAGE 20

n By MARTIN CRUTSINGER AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP The Obama administration’s latest attempt to tackle the banking crisis and get loans flowing to families and businesses will create a new government entity, the Public-Private Investment Program, to help purchase as much as $1 trillion in toxic assets on banks’ books. The new effort, to be unveiled Monday, will be followed the next day with release of the administration’s broad framework for overhauling the financial system to ensure that the current crisis the worst in seven decades is not repeat-e d. A key part of that regulatory framework will give the government new resolution authority to take over troubled institutions that would pose a threat to the entire financial system if they failed. Administration officials believe this new power will save taxpayers money and avoid the type of controversy that erupted last week when insurance giant American International Groupp aid employees of its troubled financial products unit $165 million in bonuses even though the company had received more than $170 billion in support from the federal government. Under the new powers being sought by the administration, the treasury secretary could only seize a firm with the agreement of the president and the Federal Reserve. Once in the equivalent of a conservatorship, the treasury secretary would have the power to limit payments to creditors and to break contracts governing executive compensation, a power that was lacking in the AIG case. The plan on toxic assets will use the resources of the $700 billion bank bailout fund, the Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. The initiative will seek to entice private investors, including big hedge funds, to participate by offering billions of dollars in low-interest loans to finance the purchases. The government will share the risks if the assets fall further in price. When Geithner released the initial outlines of the adminis tration’s overhaul of the bank rescue program on Feb. 10, the markets took a nosedive. The Dow Jones industrial average plunged by 380 points asi nvestors expressed disappointment about a lack of details. Christina Romer, head of the Council of Economic Advisers, said Sunday that it’s important for investors to know that the administration is bringing a full array of programs to confront the problem. “I don’t think Wall Street is e xpecting the silver bullet,” she said on CNN’s “State of the Union.” “This is one more piece. It’s a crucial piece to get these toxic assets off, but it is just part of it and there will be more to come.” But private economists said investors may still have doubts about whether the government has adequate resources to properly fund the plan and whether private investors will be attracted to participate, especially after last week’s uproar concerning the AIG bonuses, which has added to the anti-Wall Street feelings in the country. Romer said the new toxic asset program would utilize around $100 billion from the $700 billion bailout fund, leaving the fund close to being tapped out. Mark Zandi, an economist at Moody’s Economy.com, estimated that the government will need an additional $400 billion to adequately deal with the toxic asset problem, seen by many analysts as key to finally resolving the banking crisis. Zandi said the administration has no choice but to rely heavi ly on government resources because of the urgency of getting soured real estate loans and troubled asset-backed securities off the books of banks so that they can resume more normall ending to consumers and businesses. “This is a start and we will see how far it goes, but I believe they will have to go back to Congress for more money,” he said. T he Public-Private Investm ent Program that will be cre ated was viewed as performing the same functions selling bonds to finance purchases of bad assets as a similar organization did for the Resolution Trust Corp., which was created to dispose of bad real estate assets in the savings and loan crisis of the 1980s. According to administration a nd industry officials, the toxic asset program will have three major parts: A public-private partnership to back private investors’ purchases of bad assets, with government support coming from the $700 billion bailout fund. The government would match private investors dollar for dollar and share any profits equally. Expansion of a recently launched Fed program that provides loans for investors to buy securities backed by consumer debt as a way to increase the availability of auto loans, student loans and credit card debt. Under Geithner’s plan for the toxic assets, that $1 trillion program would be expanded to support purchases of toxic assets. Use of the FDIC, which insures bank deposits, to support purchases of toxic assets, tapping into this agency’s expertise in closing down failed banks and disposing of bad assets. Some industry officials said hedge funds and other big investors are likely to be more leery of accepting the govern ment’s enticements to purchase these assets, fearing tighter government restraints in such areas as executive compensation. Administration officials, however, insisted Sunday that a dis t inction needed to be made between companies getting heavy support from the bailout programs and investors who are being asked to help dispose of troubled assets. Romer said the partnership w ith the private sector will help e nsure that the government doesn’t overpay for the toxic assets that it will be purchasing. “This isn’t just another handout to banks,” she said on CNN. “We very much have the taxpayers’ interest in mind.” The administration’s revamped program for toxic assets is the latest in a string of banking initiatives which havea lso included efforts to deal with mortgage foreclosures, boost lending to small businesses and unfreeze the market for many types of consumer loans. In addition, the nation’s 19 biggest banks are undergoing intensive examinations by regulators that are due to be completed by the end of April to determine whether they have sufficient capital reserves to withstand an even more severe recession. Those that do not will be able to get more support from the government. The overhaul of financial regulation will be revealed by Geithner in testimony he is scheduled to give Tuesday and Thursday before the House Financial Services Committee. In addition to the expanded authority to seize big institutions that pose a risk to the entire system, the administration is also expected to offer more general proposals on limiting excesses seen in executive compensation in recent years, where the rewards prodded extreme risk-taking. The regulatory plan is also expected to include a major change that gives the Federal Reserve more powers to oversee systemic risks to the entire financial system. The administration is working t o unveil its proposed regulatory changes in advance of a meeting of the Group of 20 eco nomic leaders, which Obama will attend on April 2 in London. European nations have complained that lax financialr egulations in the United States s et the stage for the current financial crisis. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 6&+2/$56+,3t('8&$7,21$//2$1 ',9,6,210,1,675<('8&$7,21,03257$17,&( $33/,&$7,21)2506$5( 12:$9$,/$%/(6&+2/$56+,3/2$1<3( '($'/,1( $//%$+$0$6(5,7&+2/$56+,3 1$7,21$/(5,7&+2/$56+,3 1$7,21$/$&$'(0,&&+2/$56+,3 1$7,21$/(&+1,&$/&+2/$56+,3 1$7,21$/*5$17 ('8&$7,21*8$5$17((/2$1)81'*5$00( *(5$&((6($5&+&(175(&+2/$56+,3 ),1$1&,$/&20081,7<$'9$1&('(&+1,&$/ 75867&+2/$56+,3 1$7,21$/$:$5'%856$5<$ 7($&+(5('8&$7,21*5$17$$SSOLFDWLRQIRUPVPXVWEHSURSHUO\FRPSOHWHG :,7+$//(48,5(',1)250$7,21$77$&+(' DQGUHWXUQHG’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t&RQGHQWLDO Treasury’s toxic asset plan could cost $1 trillion F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

PAGE 21

Business that the Bahamian component of the bond facility was “oversubscribed”, but that Citibank, which was acting as placement agent, had to take a large component of the remainder due to weak international investor demand. As for the participating debt facility, some $50 million of the $70 million raised was taken up by the Government. The Government effectively underwrote the entire LPIA financing effort, given that there was little prior demand for the participating debt facility. If that facility had not been placed, then the whole LPIA financing initiative could have been stalled. Raising the participating debt was a condition precedent for the financing to go ahead, because the $80 million was required to re-finance a previous loan of the same amount taken out by the Air-port Authority, which had a seven-year payment term. Tribune Business also understands that NAD ultimately had to increase the interest rate coupon attached to the senior secured bonds to 8.5 per cent, up from an initial 8 per cent, thus giving investors a greater rate of return. It is also understood that NAD is aiming to break ground for construction work on LPIA’s first redevelopment phase by July this year. The first phase involves the construction of a new 247,000 square foot US departures terminal on land immediately adjacent to the existing terminal to its western side. A further one million square feet of asphalt runway apron, expanded parking facilities and new roads will also be constructed. The new departures terminal is expected to be completed by 20100. Stewart Steeves, NAD’s vicepresident of finance, and its chief financial officer, said in a statement: “We were able to raise $40.1 million in $B, $194.9 million in $US and $30 million available in either $B or $US for our expansion project. We anticipate opening the new terminal in early 2011 and will then seek subsequent funding for stages two and three.” “We are pleased to announce that funding for stage one of the LPIA terminal redevelopment programme is complete. This represents the beginning of an exciting chapter in the history of aviation in the Bahamas.” So far, more than $11 million has been spent on capital improvements at LPIA, including upgraded washrooms, roof repairs, a new baggage system, and baggage carousel and parking lot improvements. Financial advisers aplenty were at NAD’s offices on Friday to sign for their respective bond allocations on behalf of themselves and their clients. In a previous interview with Tribune Business, Frank Watson, the Airport Authority’s chairman, confirmed that the financing had been restructured so that the first phase was seeking less than the original $310 million. He added that the Airport Authority and NAD had reduced the $310 million they were seeking after dropping plans to, in the first financing round, also raise some funds to enable the second phase construction to start immediately the first phase was finished. “For the time being, we’re going to fund the first phase,” Mr Watson said. “Included in the borrowing we were doing for the first phase would have been some funds to start the second phase, while we were negotiating the remaining financing. We had to drop that because of the requirements Fitch was asking for.” Mr Watson said NAD and the Airport Authority had dropped plans to obtain a credit rating for the senior secured bonds from Fitch, the international credit rating agency, because the requirements it wanted to impose were too onerous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
PAGE 22

the project’s contractors. However, Tribune Business has been told by informed sources that there is no suspension to the drawdowns, and the renovation project continues as planned. “The renovation went ahead,” one source said. The current ‘clean title’ issue is somewhat strange, given that previous purchasers and financiers of the British Colonial Hilton, such as Ron Kelly’s RHK Capital investment vehicle, and Scotiabank (Bahamas seemingly expressed no concerns. They are likely to have been reassured by Companies Registry documents showing the mortgage discharge. The British Colonial Development Company’s Board, along with resort management, have been focused on the ongoing $15 million upgrade to the existing hotel property as their top priority. Following a settlement with former joint venture marina partner, Island Global Yachting, the company is still eyeing a multi-million dollar development on land adjacent to the current downtown Nassau resort, although the “mix” of uses has yet to be determined and no formal scheme has yet been submitted to the Government. Dr Jurg Gassmann, who is also a non-executive director of British Colonial Development Company’s largest shareholder, Adurion Capital, previously told Tribune Business that any development on the undeveloped land immediately to the hotel’s west would “to a large extent be independent of the hotel”. “The plan always was to have some offices, some residential and/or a hotel,” he said. “The Government would like to see some hotel and residential. That combination is still very much the plan, but what the relative share will be is something that we’ve actively been looking at for a while. “That’s the thinking that’s been going on for a while now – what should the mix be? The undeveloped land is very much to one side. Whatever development happens next door can, and probably will be, to a large extent independent of the hotel. Once we have a plan formed, we’ll have to have discussions with the banks and the Government.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.451.450.000.0700.00020.70.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.2440.26028.73.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.25010.71.79% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.002290.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.486.480.008150.4380.05014.80.77% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs1.741.58-0.160.0990.05216.03.29% 3.002.16Doctor's Hospital2.162.160.000.2400.0409.01.85% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.52034.24.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.7940.40013.23.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.05-0.029,0000.3370.15015.02.97% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.002800.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44321.3828Colina Money Market Fund1.44320.674.37 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.739711.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 811.37 | YTD -2.82% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 19 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,654.52 | CHG -0.53 | %CHG -0.03 | YTD -57.84 | YTD % -3.38BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 28-Feb-09 6-Mar-09 31-Jan-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 British Colonial seeks ‘good title’ confirmation F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

PAGE 23

“Small business is moving along. We have plans draftedon that. We’re testing our assumptions to make sure we’re moving in the right direction,”Mr Davies told Tribune Business. “We have promised to make a statement by the end of this month as to what our plans a re. We want to provide a listing facility to provide exposure for these entities, as well as bring them into a regulated environment to give them a track record. We’ve got to find a way to help them thrive, prosper and also grow.” The BISX chief executive explained that developing a small business listing facility was “very tricky, because these are entities that do not have the ability to garner the support of a financial adviser, but at the same time we want them to flourish”. As for other operational initiatives, Mr Davies said BISXw as working on “potentially some debt and preference share” listings to join the ones it already has. He added, though, that the exchange’s fund listings facility was likely to be “veryq uiet” in 2009, as mutual and h edge funds readjusted and repositioned themselves in the wake of ongoing financial market turmoil. BISX’s development of a Central Securities Depository (CSDt rading, clearing and settlement functions, plus function as a central database for all share regis ters, is seen as key in finally enticing the Government to list all its debt securities – govern ment-registered stock and Trea sury Bills being the main two – on the exchange. “The Government debt securities market is going to be addressed with the establishment of a Central Securities Depository (CSD explained. “With the establishment of that, it will address the concerns the Government has, revenues will expand and we will be able to approach things properly and move forward. We have every expectation that will happen soon.” Meanwhile, Mr Davies said the exchange’s BISX Global venture – where it provided the listing and trading platform, and acted as a joint venture partner with major global institutions focusing on product development – was “still on tap” despite having to be readjusted to account for the global economic downturn. “We’ve had to readjust because, quite honestly, the world has changed right before our eyes,” Mr Davies said. “There was one entity we were dealing with quite comfortably, and the next thing we knew, its entire management changed and the company was in trouble. “We’ve refined it. We had a number of contingency plans, and thank God we had them. We were able to switch gears, change focus and re-tool.” Mr Davies said this had allowed BISX to demonstrate its qualities to potential BISX Global partners. He added that the exchange would “reevaluate where we want to go in the second quarter this year” with BISX Global. “This is still on target to achieve what we set out to do,” he added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t&RQGHQWLDO BISX to unveil small business listing plans by ‘end of month’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 24

n By PHILIP ELLIOTT Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP Congressional Republicans on Sunday predicted a doomsday scenario of crushing debt and eventual federal bankruptcy if President Barack Obama’s massive spending blueprint wins passage. But a White House adviser dismissed the negative assessments, saying she is “incredibly confident” that the president’s policies will “do the job” for the economy. White House Council of Economic Advisers chairwoman Christina Romer insisted that the nation’s flailing economy will be rebounding by 2010. Administration officials and the president himself have taken a cheerier tone despite economic indicators that are anything but positive. “I have every expectation, as do private forecasters, that we will bottom out this year and actually be growing again by the end of the year,” Romer said. Senate Republicans predicted $20 trillion annual deficits and a weakened dollar if Obama and his Democratic allies get their proposed $3.6 trillion budget plan passed. “The practical implications of this is bankruptcy for the United States,” said Sen. Judd Gregg, R-N.H. “There’s no other way around it. If we maintain the proposals which are in this budget over the 10-year period that this budget covers, this country will go bankrupt. People will not buy our debt; our dollar will become devalued.” Sen. Susan Collins, a Maine Republican who sided with Obama on his $787 billion economic stimulus plan, said she couldn’t support the White House plan this time. “It would double the public debt in 5 years, triple it in 10 years. ... That is not sustainable. It poses a threat to the basic health of our economy,” Collins said. Sen. Richard Shelby of Alabama, the top Republican on the banking committee, said Obama would have to scale back his budget, given a Congressional Budget Office report F riday that the president’s budget would produce $9.3 trillion in deficits over the next decade more than four times the deficits of Republican George W. Bush’s presidency. Shelby predicted that number could reach $20 trillion in coming years as Obama guides the country to “the fast road to financial destruction.” The CBO predicted a deficit of $2.3 trillion worse than what the administration projected. Romer downplayed those numbers. “There is a question whether CBO is right. So we know that forecasts both of what the economy is going to do and of what the budget deficits are going to do are highly uncertain,” she said. Asked the level of her confidence in an improving economy, Romer was concise: “Incredibly confident. ... We absolutely think that they are g oing to do the job for the American economy.” Vice President Joe Biden’s economic adviser said the administration was open to negotiate with lawmakers. “We don’t expect these folks to sign on the dotted line,” Jared Bernstein said. However, he added, “What we do expect and what we are going to stand very firm on, because this president, this vice president have made this clear, that there are these priorities that brought them to the dance here: energy reform, health care reform, education, all done in the context of a budget that cuts the deficit in half over our first term.” Bernstein spoke on ABC’s “This Week.” Romer spoke on “Fox News Sunday” and CNN’s “Face the Nation.” Shelby spoke on “Fox News Sunday.” Gregg appeared on CNN’s “State of the Union.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ RIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW RI KDVEHHQ'LVVROYHG DQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJWRWKH&HUWLFDWHRI 'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGWKH5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDORQWKH GD\RI)HEUXDU\ 0LNKDLOHFKYRORGRY %XVLQHVV$GGUHVV / /&$ 9ROJRJUDGVN\URVSHFW 0RVFRZXVVLDQ)HGHUDWLRQ /LTXLGDWRU GOP predicts doomsday if Obama budget passed Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y. For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

PAGE 25

INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 The stories behind the news P LP leader Perry Christie dismissed a s “tall-tales and garbage” the heartfelt v iews of elderly Bahamian father, C hauncey Tynes Sr, who lost his pilot son to the drug trade 25 years ago and b elieves that Sir Lynden Pindling was being paid off by drug czar Joe Lehder. Yet in 1984, Christie and his Cabinet colleague Hubert Ingraham were both fired by Pindling for their objections t o his government’ s corrupt links to drug traffickers. At the time, Christie condemned the international shame t hat Pindling’ s government brought on the Bahamas and wanted the prime m inister to resign. I n light of Mr Christie’ s contradictory comments, INSIGHT is inviting him toe xplain how Pindling came to spend at least EIGHT TIMES his declared income d uring the seven years between 1977 and 1983 the height of the drug era, when Lehder was using Norman’ s Cay i n the Exumas as his drug base. The Tribune is prepared to hand over the first two pages of next week’ s I NSIGHT section to Mr Christie so that he can explain, in the fullest detail,w here he thinks Pindling got the money to live way beyond his means at a time w hen this country was being described b y the international media as “a nation for sale.” Read on... n By JOHN MARQUIS Managing Editor S ir Lynden Pindling always had a taste for the good life. Once he was in power, it took no time at all for him to adopt a penchant for extravagance that might have brought a blush to the faces even of his colonial predecessors. When a delivery boy called at Pindling’s mansion, he was directed to the tradesmen’s entrance, from which emerged a uniformed maid of a kind last seen in English country houses a century ago. The liveried flunkey, who wore a bonnet, pinafore and skirt to remind her of her station, was a throwback to the days when Dukes and Lords ran vast estates. She was servitude personified, like something out of Brideshead Revisited or Upstairs Downstairs. “I found it very strange, and quite amusing,” the now grown-up delivery boy told Insight. “It didn’t seem quite right for someone who was supposed to be a man of the people.” An engineer who thoughtfully tried to tell the prime minister how to start his newly-installed generator was roundly berated. “I have people to do that kind of thing for me,” said Pindling haughtily. Then, pointing to his shimmering Rolls Royce parked outside his home, he said: “Do you see that Rolls Royce? I don’t know how to drive that, either, because I have someone to do it for me.” Hostile though he liked to be seen towards the English colonial types who held sway in the Bahamas for 300 years, Pindling was never averse to adopting their mannerisms, their l ifestyle, their honours and their inborn contempt for the lower orders. Like them, according to a former PLP parliamentarian, he was always intent on keeping the people dumb, a strategy guaranteed to prolong power for his government at the expense of everyone else. By 1973, when the PLP bought him his first two-toned Silver Shadow, Pindling was mentally primed to become a Third World dictator whose radical instincts if, indeed, he ever had any were already part of his political history. From 1977 onwards, and right up to the point when he was called to account by the Commission of Inquiry into drug trafficking in 1984, the prime minister was on a roll as the flashy, high-living leader of a country that was not only scared to death of him, but also effectively up for sale to some of the most vicious criminals in the world. All of this is very interesting in light of Mr Perry Christie’s comments last week, when he cruelly and callously dismissed the heartfelt sentiments of an elderly Bahamian who suffered greatly from the effects of the drug trade. Mr Christie knew Pindling well at the relevant time. He was a close political colleague who witnessed the lavish way the prime minister lived his life and grew suspicious of his govern ment’s corrupt links with the cocaine trafficking trade. By 1984, when the commission exposed the rancid nature of the Pindling government, Christie and his law p artner Hubert Ingraham had heard and seen enough. They were ready to quit their Cabinet posts in disgust. Typically, the cunning prime minister beat them to it. By firing both in a pre-emptive strike which shifted the burden of guilt from himself, he was left in a position to wreak yet more havoc in the Bahamas for eight more awful years. In light of Mr Christie’s apparently contradictory position on this vitally important matter, The Tribune is willing to offer him two pages of space in next week’s Insight section so that he can explain to the Bahamian people how he thinks his boss got the money to live at such a level. Before he sits down to his keyboard, let me offer a few choice details and the convincing conclusions of the commission which, in the words of a reporter of the day, “failed to give the prime minister a clean bill of health.” Since Chauncey Tynes Sr a sprightly former PLP treasurer of 88 who looks considerably younger than his years spoke out last week, saying his son was killed because he knew too much about the links between Pindling and Lehder, others in a position to know have come out wholeheartedly in support of his version of events. One of them is a prominent Nassau attorney who, for professional rea sons, does not want to be named. He said: “I know for certain that every thing Mr Tynes said about Pindling’s relationship with Joe Lehder is true. “The prime minister did meet Lehder on many occasions, he did go p artying on Norman’s Cay, and he did receive regular consignments of cash from Lehder in return for his co-oper ation. Of that there is no doubt.” Another source has emerged to confirm that, in addition to Chauncey Tynes Jr carrying regular pay-offs to Pindling from Lehder, a member of Pindling’s own Cabinet made deliv eries every Monday morning. And it is recorded elsewhere, including the book The Cocaine Wars by former London Sunday Times journalist Paul Eddy, that Pindling’s bagman and fixer Everette Bannister regularly handed over containers full of cash to Pindling courtesy of Lehder and other drug interests. In fact, Bannister who called Pindling “a greedy little motherf....r” behind his back told associates that the prime minister wanted to be “cut in” on everything when it came to payoffs and kickbacks. Most decisively of all, Lehder himself was later to tell American law enforcement agencies that he paid Pin dling for his complicity in the drug trade passing through the Bahamas, as did others associated with the operation. The fact that Pindling lived well beyond his means for many years the years when Lehder’s shameful drug trafficking operation was in full swing on Norman’s Cay was never contested during the 1984 commission. An investigator who probed deeply into Pindling’s financial affairs was the one who concluded that his outgoings during this period were EIGHT TIMES his declared income. And that was only the money recorded in bank accounts. Unlisted cash transactions would possibly have taken the figure much higher. One ex-politician told INSIGHT last week that Pindling’s parliamentary salary at the time was insufficient even to cover the mortgage payments on his new mansion-style home, which represented a gigantic leap up the property ladder from his modest bun galow in Soldier Road. Money was pouring into Pindling’s coffers from somewhere, and it wasn’t all from well-wishers, as they were a fast diminishing force increasingly disillusioned by the PLP government’s squalid behaviour. Media veterans perplexed by Christie’s intemperate attack on The Tribune and Mr Tynes told Insight that the PLP leader should by now have been in a position to confirm that all the allegations made about Pindling and Lehder were correct. They said former Archbishop of the West Indies, Drexel Gomez, one of the most respected figures in the Anglican church, pointed out at the time that $3.5 million paid to Sir Lynden “raised great suspicion.” The top churchman also said explanations given for some of the financial transactions involving Pindling were “not truthful” so he found it impossi ble to say the payments were not drugrelated. After 500 witnesses, more than nine months of hearings and 23,000 pages of testimony, the commission was unable to give Sir Lynden the green light when it came to his personal culpability. Commissioners differed on whether the money was drug-related, but the majority report which was unable to establish a firm link with Lehder was interpreted by the PLP as vindication. However, lawyer Kendal Isaacs, leader of the FNM at the time, said: “On the evidence that we have heard A question for PLP leader Perry Christie: SO HOW DID PINDLING SPEND EIGHT TIMES HIS DECLARED INCOME FOR SEVEN YEARS? PINDLING’S taste for the high life was reflected in this Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, a gift from the PLP in 1973. It cost $42,000 t oday the same style of car bought new would set you back $250,000... S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

PAGE 26

there can be no question that the prime minister and his colleagues, with only one or two exceptions, have been found guilty.” More importantly, the commission concluded that the Bahamas was overwhelmed by drug abuse and riddled with corruption, a situation over which Pindling had presided for many years. Tribune reporter Nicki Kelly wrote at the time: “Some of Sir Lynden’s closest friends and political associates have been linked to drug pay-offs, money laundering and influence peddling.” For drug smugglers to have operated so openly, “corruption must have reached to a senior level of government”, the commission reported. Bishop Gomez’s conclusions were reinforced last week by Mr Tynes’ dramatic disclosures. He said he feared his pilot son w as killed because he knew too m uch about Pindling and his a ssociations with Lehder. At the time, Chauncey Tynes Jr was due to appear in court on charges related to a DC-3 aircraft found at Nassau International Airport loaded with cocaine. It’s not hard to imagine the kind of panic that caused among those with something to hide. Mr Tynes blamed Pindling indirectly for his son’s death, saying the drug era which the prime minister had allowed to infect the country had claimed many young lives. He also said his son, Chauncey Jr., had told him of cash payments he brought to Nassau from Lehder for Pindling and a senior police officer. On several occasions, his son had taken boxes of cash directly to Pindling, he claimed. And he had also flown Pindling to Grand Bahama for a secret meeting with Lehder and to Norman’s Cay, the idyllic isle polluted by Lehder’s “army” of traffickers and enforcers. A former minister, a former senator and an intimate friend o f Pindling’s Everette Bannister were among those the r eport said had accepted large bribes from drug traffickers. The commission recommended that the Attorney General take action against all three. A griculture Minister George S mith and Youth Minister Kendal Nottage, whom the commission found had “whether he realised it or not” fronted for a member of the American Mafia, quit their posts. Their resignations were part of a shake-up triggered by a sixpart Miami Herald series headlined ‘A Nation for Sale’. Shortly afterwards Cabinet ministers Perry Christie and Hubert Ingraham were fired for supporting deputy prime minister Arthur Hanna’s attempt to force Pindling to resign. Hanna resigned when Pindling refused to go. Earlier the NBC American T V network claimed that Pind ling and certain Cabinet mini sters were receiving $100,000 a month in drug pay-offs. This fits in with evidence now emerging from Mr Tynes and other sources which suggests that Pindling was receiving regular consignments of cash from Lehder, often in boxes containing $50,000 or more. Indeed, information now forthcoming in the wake of Mr Tynes’ revelations offers total vindication of Bishop Gomez’s admirable stand all those years ago. Robert Ellicott QC, chief counsel to the commission, told a newspaper in his native Australia after the inquiry: “You can see, in the Bahamas, a small community where the greed for money suddenly descended on them. Big money was used to bribe police, government officials, politicians and ordinary people to the point where corruption just became part of the economy.” One Australian publication showed an aerial shot of Pindling’s “mansion on the hill” over the caption: “Though the average Bahamian earns less than $4,000 a year, Prime Minister Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling has done very well for himself.” After the commission report was published, the widespread view was that Pindling had been receiving cash from Lehder, especially in light of his failure to give satisfactory explanations for the huge disparity between his official income and his actual outgoings. In some cases, Pindling told the commission he simply couldn’t remember where huge deposits into his bank account had come from. Dr John McCartney, chairman of the Vanguard political movement, was so outraged by the commission’s disclosures that he declared “trouble is brewing” if Pindling failed to resign. Referring to a disturbance outside the House of Assembly, Dr McCartney said: “The politics of confrontation will intensify in this society as long as Pindling stays, and although we were lucky recently in that no-one was seriously hurt in the demonstrations, this luck will not hold forever. “Hopefully, Sir Lynden and the pro-Pindling segment of party officials will see that the handwriting is on the wall save our country from this nightmare.” Pointing to Pindling’s detrimental effect on foreign investment, he added: “Who will invest in a country where there is growing social turmoil and where the prime minister has lost the respect of the majority of his people? “It is obvious to all but the blind that the prime minister is incapable of ever regaining the respect of the people,” he added. Evangelist Rex Major chimed in with his belief that Pindling had brought dishonour on the country. “We feel ashamed,” he said, “We feel a sense of disgrace.” And a constitutional lawyer told The Tribune that Pindling should quit because as prime minister he had to be held accountable, under the Westminster form of government, for the actions of his ministers. Two of the commissioners, James Smith and Edwin Willes, said in their report that Pindling’s expenditure in the years from 1977 had far exceeded his income. However, they added, none of the known sources of funds made available to them appeared to have been drugrelated. As for unidentified deposits, the sources of which were still unknown, there was no evidence before the com mission upon which they could form an opinion as to whether they were drug-related. Archbishop Gomez, then a bishop, refused to sign the findings of his commission colleagues, saying: “It is certainly feasible that all of these payments could have been made f rom non drug-related sources. B ut in my opinion, the circums tances raise great suspicion and I find it impossible to say the payments were all non drugrelated.” The constitutional lawyer said the real point, however, was that Pindling was found to have received very large amounts of money from people whose testimony did not impress the commissioners as reliable. “The sum which Mr Everette Bannister admitted he paid to the prime minister under the disarming description of a ‘finder’s fee’ alone, in my opinion, convicts the prime minister and with him all his ministers under the rule of collective responsi bility. “The finder’s fee of which a mere $334,000 was paid by Ban nister to Pindling was paid because a government board (National Economic Council of which the prime minister wasa participating and, no doubt, dominating member, gave its assent to the transfer of ownership of the Paradise Island Bridge to foreigners.” In the lawyer’s opinion, that transaction alone from which Pindling gleaned personal benefit was enough to condemn him and justify the resignations of himself and his entire government. Whether the funds came from drugs was irrelevant, he said. “Pindling simply had no right to receive the funds, whether they came from drugs or Sun day School collections.” At the same time that the lawyer was offering his opin ions, a placard demonstration closed down Paradise Island Bridge as irate Bahamians declared en masse that “the chief is a thief.” They blamed Pindling not only for selling the bridge to foreigners, but also taking a huge cut from the proceeds for himself. Mr Isaacs, meanwhile, declared that Pindling had lost the moral authority to govern. “If we are not careful, we are going to produce a corrupt generation of young Bahamians,” he said. “This is a fight not just by the FNM but by all good thinking people against evil and corruption. This is a fight we have to win because if we lose, the Bahamas loses,” he said. Janet Bostwick, MP for Yamacraw, said some people had likened Pindling to the villainous American president Richard Nixon. “But Nixon was an angel compared to Pindling,” she said, “We are ruled by bandits.” In the light of all this, Mr Tynes’ claims do not seem out of place. In fact, they slot in comfortably with a pattern of suspicion developing around the government at the time. Put bluntly, the PLP government of the day with the obvious exceptions was seen as a bunch of villains who needed to be inside Fox Hill. Had Mr Tynes and others been ready to testify in 1984 especially with regard to firsthand evidence about the payoffs to Pindling there is little doubt that the commissioners would have reached a more robust, and condemnatory, conclusion. However, the climate of fear created by Pindling during the first 15 years of his administra tion was such that most people kept their mouths shut. And Chauncey Tynes Sr would almost certainly have been influenced by the fate of his son. What we do know for sure is that the Pindling government’s corrosive influence led the Bahamas into a culture of drugtaking, corruption and crooked ness which persists to this day. Nicki Kelly’s Tribune article of January 9, 1985, accurately foreshadowed what we see now in the Bahamas a land where a sense of entitlement and a lack of accountability have led to a total moral collapse. “The level of violence has catapulted the Bahamas to a place a mong Interpol’s list of the ten m ost crime-ridden countries,” s he wrote. “The question now is whether Sir Lynden’s badly tarnished image can carry him through until the next general election in 1987.” In fact, it did. Unhappily for the Bahamas, Pindling managed to clinch victory in that poll and condemn the country to five more years of decline. His policy of keeping the people dumb had paid off resoundingly. They were so dumb, in fact, that they re-elected a pariah prime minister whose reputation among fellow western leaders had plummeted to zero. It’s interesting to note that the British prime minister, Margaret Thatcher, who had once regarded Pindling as a postcolonial success story, did not wish to be photographed alongside him once the story of the drug era surfaced in the international press. By the time he was finally ousted, in 1992, the country was morally and financially exhausted, and Pindling was being depicted openly in the interna tional media as little more than a Third World thug with a reckless lust for riches that eclipsed all other considerations. As the reality of Pindling’s awful regime is revisited, raked over and revealed, intelligent young Bahamians will be won dering why the PLP is so eager to preserve his “legacy”, whatever that legacy turns out to be. Christie’s hysterical condemnation of Mr Tynes sounded more like the strangulated cry of a desperate man than the measured response of a ratio nal party leader. And Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson’s suggestion that the libel laws should be extended to protect the dead thus rendering the likes of Pindling immune from proper scrutiny was so asinine that one wonders whether her brain was properly engaged at the time. Wise political observers, of course, know full well why PLP leaders are so frantic in their determination to clutch hold of this tarnished talisman of yesteryear. The plain truth is that they have nothing else. No ideas, no leadership, no noticeable ability, no vision, few principles, no plan and a support system founded on society’s dimmest and dumbest. As Bahamians become more savvy, more sophisticated and more informed, it is inevitable that the PLP will become increasingly irrelevant. Only the terminally ignorant, the incurably stupid, are swallowing the Pindling myth nowadays. One of the party’s own former stalwarts, Edmund Moxey, told Insight: “After the ‘revo lution’ (in 1967 the people fly, but Pindling wanted to keep them dumb.” Like Franois ‘Papa Doc’ Duvalier in neighbouring Haiti, Pindling believed the people should remain childlike in their devotion to the maximum leader. The overwhelmingly positive response Insight has received to its story about Chauncey Tynes indicates that Bahamians have now moved forward towards a new age of enlightenment. They are not as dumb as many of them used to be, and they are no longer ready to absorb unquestioningly the disingenuous nonsense that Mr Christie tried to foist upon them last week. As the Bahamas moves for ward another crucial step, the PLP remains mired in its prejudices and its inability to face the facts. Does the country actually need them anymore? W W h h a a t t d d o o y y o o u u t t h h i i n n k k ? ? F F a a x x 3 3 2 2 8 8 2 2 3 3 9 9 8 8 o o r r e e m m a a i i l l j j m m a a r r q q u u i i s s @ @ t t r r i i b b u u n n e e m m e e d d i i a a . . n n e e t t C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE A question for PLP leader Perry Christie: PERRY CHRISTIE

PAGE 27

R R e e : : T T h h e e t t r r a a g g i i c c y y o o u u n n g g p p i i l l o o t t w w h h o o k k n n e e w w t t o o o o m m u u c c h h DEAR Mr Marquis:My f ather was one to testify about what transpired at Norman’s Cay in the Exumas.I follow all your articles with great interest ( and admiration) and, of course, this one brings up many sad memories of what took place as early as 1978 when my father a nd mother managed Highborne's Cay in the Exumas. I kept his diaries safe, hoping one day to take the time to read through them and yourr ecent article on Tynes Jr forced me to begin reading them for documented dates/events which you may wish to refer to as you take this issue forward. I am noting dates/events for you and hope to e-mail you later today. 1 978/79 destroyed my father...emotionally and physic ally, he was never the same after he left the cay in despair.He loved his country, worked hard at Bahamas Air-w ays for many years, and was a very proud and steadfast m an. The final straw came when he flew into Nassau tos peak with his good acquaintance who was a high-ranking o fficer in the force. I recall the words the official said to him: " Capt., there is nothing I can do, ‘The Man himself’ has giveno rders!” I work with youngsters/teenagers/young adults within areas such as Balls A lley (one of the many hellholes) and what L.O.P. has done to this country has and continues to destroy many generations of Bahamians. Those who stood with him in the PLP are equally abominable and responsible for the destruction of our country. EXPOSE THEM ALL...dig deeper and may they bow their heads in shame! S S , , N N a a s s s s a a u u In a typical lawyerly fashion, Mr Christie tried, but failed, to defend the wrongdoing of his client, the former PM. 1) Who else would know prec isely the details and the subsequent grief experienced by parents who warned their son not to continue his trips? Yet MrC hristie dismisses the parents' accounts of those missions. H ow would Mr Christie feel if his son or daughter met such a fatal outcome? The Norman’s Cay operat ions have been cited in local and foreign news such that n early every Bahamian adult during the said period was a ware of the behaviour of the drug lords in The Bahamas. I believe Mr Tynes. 2) Regarding the birth record, will Mr Christie please advise why, in relatively recent times, the birth of an infant was not recorded until after that infant was 12 years of age? Even persons who were born earlier, say in the early 1900s and earlier, had their births recorded. If the birth took place at the Bahamas General Hospital (now named Princess Mar garet Hospital) don't you think that the birth would have been recorded? 3). "Freedom of Speech" was ushered in by the FNM Government in 1992. Prime Minister Ingraham, to his credit, brought into existence the real democracy to these islands. As a result of the shackles off the mind, people prospered, became entrepreneurs, and new businesses were opened by Bahamians. Recently, a columnist in another newspaper had to remind a caller to one of the radio stations licensed by the Ingraham government that itw as the Right Honourable Mr Hubert Ingraham who made it possible for him to speak, albeit badly, about the P.M. The caller could not do it, neither would such talk have been permitted over the one station, Radio ZNS, prior to the 1992 election. I myself had occasion to call ZNS to advise the news anchor, Ms Yvette Stuart, that a onesided story attacking then leader, Mr Ingraham, without his response, was not journalism at all, but an insult to our intel ligence. I invited her to think of herself in such a position. She agreed with me. For the information of y ounger persons, Bahamians had been muzzled as to what they could say. Otherwise they would have suffered the consequences, in similar manner as Mr Christie's cold retort about the editor of the news story under discussion. For Bahamians, retaliation would have extended to family members with economic consequences no government contracts or jobs ever. S S h h i i r r l l e e a a r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t Just a kind word to let you know that there are clear and fair-mindedBahamians in this country who support and defend your rights to challenge and awaken the dull and shallow opportunists who wish to u se this opportunity fortheir selfish ulterior motives.Rather thananalysingand dealing with the issue presented, the clowns and jokers do what works bestf or them among those whom they use for their political benefits and self-aggrandise-m ent.They avoided the birth a ndparentage issue raised in the article.Instead, they displayed the yellow streak that defines all of them.They hurled personal insults at youa nd Mr Tynes, and his ‘senility’.You, according to them, are a racist, who should not be in this country, simply because you touched and exposed something or someone dear to them. I understand the Bahamas Christian Council will be seeki ng an audience with you on this matter, and to possibly persuade you to refrain from writing on such controversial top-i cs.Mr Marquis, please don't allow these so-called men of the c loth to influence how, and what you must write.I need nott ell you how unprincipled some of these so-called men of God are. I wouldn't even trust my puppy to listen to these guys f rom the Bahamas Christian Council. The Bahamas needs men of courage and conviction, not men who can be bought or sold.Stand by your convictions.By the way, after all the fuss and name calling, I'd still like to know who Lynden Pindling really was, and his real mother. V V C C , , N N a a s s s s a a u u I am an 18-year-oldCollege of The Bahamas freshman. Ip ersonally believe this article is one well served, for the reading of the Bahamian public. If we were to look back in history at this sort of blindness towards people who have been seen to h ave donegood but only through destruction, we would see that it is a sizely number. From Columbus to Sir Lynden Pindling, both have causedd estruction, but are recognised in our social studies lesson as heroes. I believe that the truths hould be taught in our schools w ith no sugar-coating. I would like to tell you that more articles of thisnature should be p roduced because we as a Bahamian public should know what is happening in our country. T T S S i i m m m m s s I was hoping this would be the subject of your next book! I t hought Mr Christie's comments of yesteryear would come out what a joke! Firstly we have to realise that Pind ling knew everything that went on in this country during his reign, he made it his business to know. I believe that when Mr Christie lost power his fan-t asies were shattered, realising his appalling governance would be exposed. I believe that an outsider, especially with the experience, much in The Bahamas, and integrity of John Marquis, can be far more objective than a biased politician, C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 3C Email: 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t It’sElectric! Readers have their say... FEEDBACK Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. THE FRONT PAGE of the March 9 edition of INSIGHT ... S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e “In a typical lawyerly fashion, Mr Christie tried, but failed, to defend the wrongdoing of his client, the former PM.” Shirlea resident

PAGE 28

C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 4C, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE whose interest after all is only votes. I wonder how many politicians know the meaning of integrity, let alone put it into practice. In closing, it would be i nteresting to know who wrote, or was to, the much vaunted birth certificate, which magically came to light. Regards. N N o o n n a a m m e e p p l l e e a a s s e e As always Insight provides the most interesting reading in t his country;it is both revealing and thought provoking. I missed your piece on the young pilot; however, I knew that it was a good informativep iece because it had lots of people “pissed off”.Theradio talk shows were buzzing like bees with folks trying to savef ace.The newspapers a day after were filled with politicians trying to right something that cannot be fixed.And your r esponse was perfect: you stood by what you had written because your source is credible. What is so amazing, though, about this whole thing is thatour leaders in opposition have again failed to realise that CORRUPTION will no longer be tolerated.The story proves that the opposition needsto stop relying so heavily on the reputation of Sir Lynden Oscar P indling and seek another angleto make themselves credible.History can be twisted and taught to be one thing when it fact the truth can remain untoldu ntil someone researches andreveals that truth to the masses.Like your source, there a re many that can attest tofacts of the true man.The Commission of Inquiry of the 1980s is just one of those revelations and even thatwas sugar-coat-e d.Your piece is a reminder that all that glitters is not gold and the truth will set us free. S S i i g g n n m m e e K K a a y y THERE is only one way to explain the PLP’s extraordinary reaction to the Insight article o n Chauncey Tynes Sr: the game is up, and they know it. With the Pindling myth now safely dead and buried, the PLP has nowhere to go. They were hoping to keep the new generation of Bahamians as dumb as they kept the last generation, but it won’t work anymore, thanks to The Tribune and Mr C hauncey Tynes Sr. Welcome t o a new period of enlightenment. R R R R , , N N a a s s s s a a u u J ust wanted to add my congratulations to the hundreds of others I know you have received. You are a courageous and objective man. Please tell me you might write, from time to time, some “home thoughts from abroad”!!!!???? W arm regards I I n n s s i i g g h h t t f f o o l l l l o o w w e e r r Mr Marquis E xcellent responses, just excellent! The Tynes Family, along with many others, have suffered under Pindling. Do you think the politicians get it?Bahamians are up to speed on their history. W e know the truth andthere i s nothing that can clean up their pastor "SPIN" "after the fact" that can erase or change history! W hat they did in the past and today will follow them to their graves and beyond. Thank you, thank you, thank you! M M a a r r i i a a D D S S m m i i t t h h So how was the protest today a t the Tribune? Someone sent me some pictures and from what I could see, it looked to be about 25 persons if thats howed up.Was Paul Moss there trying to score political points?What a big joke, only the truth hurts.Keep up the great work! M M R R , , N N a a s s s s a a u u I WANT to hug you, sir. That man Pindling caused this country to sink. In fact, the biggest downfall of this nation was due t o him. We had no more respect, no more dignity, andn o more integrity. The UBP government had this country together. Under the UBP the people were happy. The school system was better in those days. Everything was better under the UBP. Your article was the truth, and a lot of people know it is the truth. Everyone knows that man was not Bahamian. Y oung people don’t know the good days we had before Pindling came to power. All he ever did was preach racism. C C a a l l l l e e r r I KNEW an old man who ran a sandwich bar off Wulff Road. H e had an oriental wife who tried for many years to get citizenship during the Pindling era. The old man told me he was the fellow who brought LyndenP indling ashore aboard his dinghy after the boy had been sent from either Jamaica or Haiti. P indling’s father, Arnold Pindling, was on guard duty at police headquarters that day, so could not get down to the w aterfront to collect the boy, so he asked this man to meet him. In later years, when his wife continued to have difficulty getting citizenship, the man decided to call Pindling direct. He t old him he was the one who collected him off that boat, yeth e couldn’t get citizenship for his wife. Three days later, a government official turned up at the m an’s home with a package containing his wife’s citizenshipd ocuments. The man in question, who is now dead, told me this story himself. T T a a x x i i d d r r i i v v e e r r I AM proud of you for being bold enough to air your views. Please keep it up. There are ignorant people like myself who are looking for the light. There w ere some empty spaces that you have filled. I say kudos to you. W W o o m m a a n n c c a a l l l l e e r r J ust a note to encourage you.Your work is appreciated by the enlightened ones.I u nderstand that about 70 per cent of the protesters did not read the Insight article, and could not give asound explaination of what they were protest-i ng against.This causes me to want to launch a protest against those who have produced and cultivated such ignorance. Keepup the good work.Never mind the boneheads with big loud mouthswho can't compete w ith your intellect, but rather respond with threats of physical harm,and deportation demands.There are people like me who may not agree with everythimgthat you write, who still love, and appreciate what y ou do.We see the bigger picture of advanced nationhoodw ith efficiency at every level of our ability to function effectively.Continue to challenge us toward this end, even after y our return to your native England.GOOD JOB! V V e e l l l l y y C C I recently had the opportunity to read the newspaper on your story published on March9 , 2009. Listening to the talk s hows one would believe that you wrote all sorts of horrific lies about Pindling.My husband and I laugh about the story after realising that the informationp rinted was given by various sorces, primarily Mr Tynes. In truth I believe that a lot of persons did not read the sto-r y and based their opinions on what others may have told them o r relayed on various talk shows. I am a young Bahami a n, and it took my going to college to find out much about ourB ahamian history, which included Mr Pindling being r eferred to as having been mixed up withdrugs. I found it interesting that Mr Pindling's son found an old ladyt hat recalls Pindling’s mother being pregnant with him. However, he did not deny that his father's father was a Jamaicano r his mother a Haitian. We all know that being born i n the Bahamas alone does not make you a Bahamian,otherwise all Haitians born here would automatically beB ahamian citizens. Further, prior to 1973, anyone born in or out of the Bahamas received Bahamian citizenship if that child's father was a Bahamian. Personally, I don't see anything wrong with the article as a story. Keep up the good work. After all, in my opinion it is great journalism. M M B B e e t t h h e e l l FEEDBACK F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 3 3 C C

PAGE 29

APT3-G BLONDIE TIGER order with malicious intent (8 9 Make a mistake and run for it (6 10 In the convent it gives preferential treatment (8 1 2 Boring makers of laws (4 1 3 Agrowing source of o pium (5 1 4 Just the place to find a musement (4 17 They have an interest in c onversion schemes (12 20 Motorists and golfers must d o so to begin with (5,2,5 23 High spots of a European tour (4 24 So the reformed show spirit (5 25 It’s made to last (4 2 8 Morning revolution? (8 2 9 Learned man took the chair around the front (6 30 Careless example of hit a nd run (8 31 Exchanged abuse with a guard, apparently (6 Down 1 With which to welcome honest members (4,4 2 Sits reel out, though unwearied (8 3 In extremities they can be accommodating (4 5 Drops from hard work (12 6 Gathered to be all right (4 7 When I’d get into a brawl? (6 8 They put things on s cales (6 11 Monopolise rocks that are important in building (12 15 Women of strange views (5 16 Worn by the widow taken out by a gardener (5 18 Strong drink can lead to a smash (8 1 9 An exploit indeed to be beaten (8 2 1 Shrubs for the French u nderground (6 22 The city may be seen as p art of ancient Greece (6 26 No stranger to what dupes may be? (4 27 Astage joke turned fatuous with the passage of time (4 Across:1 Rummy, 4 Gudgeon, 8 Was, 9 Uplifting, 10 Ephesus, 11 Evict, 13 Sapper, 15 Storms, 18 Rinse, 19 Caravan, 21 Billiards, 23 Rye, 24 Dresses, 25 Scene. Down:1 Rawness, 2 Misshapen, 3 Yours, 4 Galosh, 5 Deflect, 6 Eli, 7 Night, 12 In reverse, 14 Enemies, 16 Sincere, 17 Scores, 18 Rabid, 20 Roses, 22 Lee. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Cycle, 4 Sapling, 8 Net, 9 Crescendo, 10 Acrylic, 11 Odium, 13 Sparse, 15 Confer, 18 Villa, 19 Booklet, 21 Sotto voce, 23 Cue, 24 Annoyed, 25 As yet. Down:1 Canvass, 2 Caterwaul, 3 Excel, 4 Sketch, 5 Piccolo, 6 Inn, 7 Groom, 12 In full cry, 14 Shadowy, 16 Retreat, 17 Abroad, 18 Vista, 20 Opera, 22 Tin. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 2345678 9 10 1 1 1 21314 1 516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3 031 1 2345678 9 10 1 1 1 21314 1 516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3 031T ribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vague and wordy speech (6 4 Epoch-making (8 9 Haughty (6 10 Rebellion (8 12 Report of recent e vent (4 13 Oppressively d azzling light (5 1 4 Portent (4 1 7 Paradise (6,2,4 20 Especially (2,10 23 Disposition (4 24 US-Canadian lake (5 25 Only (4 28 Freedom of action (8 2 9 Happen to (6 3 0 Form of memorial (8 31 Lay on (6 D own 1 Almost (4-4 2 Preface (8 3 Interval of calm (4 5 Adefect (12 6 Clip into shape (4 7 Adried grape (6 8 Convincing (6 1 1 Unexpectedly (3,2,1,6 15 Mock attack (5 1 6 Aforest tree (5 1 8 Fabled land of riches (8 19 Unswervingly loyal (4-4 2 1 Badge (6 2 2 Scene of Tea Party, 1773 (6 2 6 To check (4 2 7 Consider (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE C RYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Neat finish (6 4 Files put in the wrong order with malicious intent (8 9 Make a mistake and run for it (6 10 In the convent it gives preferential treatment (8 1 2 Boring makers of laws (4 1 3 Agrowing source of o pium (5 1 4 Just the place to find a musement (4 1 7 They have an interest in c onversion schemes (12 20 Motorists and golfers must d o so to begin with (5,2,5 23 High spots of a European tour (4 24 So the reformed show spirit (5 25 It’s made to last (4 2 8 Morning revolution? (8 2 9 Learned man took the c hair around the front (6 30 Careless example of hit a nd run (8 31 Exchanged abuse with a guard, apparently (6 Down 1 With which to welcome honest members (4,4 2 Sits reel out, though unwearied (8 3 In extremities they can be accommodating (4 5 Drops from hard work (12 6 Gathered to be all right (4 7 When I’d get into a brawl? (6 8 They put things on s cales (6 11 Monopolise rocks that are important in building (12 15 Women of strange views (5 16 Worn by the widow taken out by a gardener (5 18 Strong drink can lead to a smash (8 1 9 An exploit indeed to be beaten (8 2 1 Shrubs for the French u nderground (6 2 2 The city may be seen as p art of ancient Greece (6 26 No stranger to what dupes may be? (4 27 Astage joke turned fatuous with the passage of time (4 Across:1 Rummy, 4 Gudgeon, 8 Was, 9 Uplifting, 10 Ephesus, 11 Evict, 13 Sapper, 15 Storms, 18 R inse, 19 Caravan, 21 Billiards, 23 R ye, 24 Dresses, 25 Scene. Down:1 Rawness, 2 Misshapen, 3 Yours, 4 Galosh, 5 Deflect, 6 Eli, 7 N ight, 12 In reverse, 14 Enemies, 16 Sincere, 17 Scores, 18 Rabid, 20 R oses, 22 Lee. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Cycle, 4 Sapling, 8 Net, 9 Crescendo, 10 Acrylic, 11 Odium, 13 Sparse, 15 Confer, 18 Villa, 19 B ooklet, 21 Sotto voce, 23 Cue, 24 A nnoyed, 25 As yet. Down:1 Canvass, 2 Caterwaul, 3 Excel, 4 Sketch, 5 Piccolo, 6 Inn, 7 G room, 12 In full cry, 14 Shadowy, 16 Retreat, 17 Abroad, 18 Vista, 20 O pera, 22 Tin. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 1 1 1 21314 1 516 1 7 1 819 2 0 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 12345678 910 1 1 1 21314 1 516 1 7 1 819 2 0 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vague and wordy speech (6 4 Epoch-making (8 9 Haughty (6 10 Rebellion (8 12 Report of recent event (4 13 Oppressively dazzling light (5 14 Portent (4 17 Paradise (6,2,4 20 Especially (2,10 23 Disposition (4 24 US-Canadian lake (5 25 Only (4 28 Freedom of action (8 29 Happen to (6 30 Form of memorial (8 31 Lay on (6 Down 1 Almost (4-4 2 Preface (8 3 Interval of calm (4 5 Adefect (12 6 Clip into shape (4 7 Adried grape (6 8 Convincing (6 11 Unexpectedly (3,2,1,6 15 Mock attack (5 16 Aforest tree (5 18 Fabled land of riches (8 19 Unswervingly loyal (4-4 21 Badge (6 22 Scene of Tea Party, 1773 (6 26 To check (4 27 Consider (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Neat finish (6 4 Files put in the wrong order with malicious intent (8 9 Make a mistake and run for it (6 10 In the convent it gives preferential treatment (8 12 Boring makers of laws (4 13 Agrowing source of opium (5 14 Just the place to find amusement (4 17 They have an interest in conversion schemes (12 20 Motorists and golfers must do so to begin with (5,2,5 23 High spots of a European tour (4 24 So the reformed show spirit (5 25 It’s made to last (4 28 Morning revolution? (8 29 Learned man took the chair around the front (6 30 Careless example of hit and run (8 31 Exchanged abuse with a guard, apparently (6 Down 1 With which to welcome honest members (4,4 2 Sits reel out, though unwearied (8 3 In extremities they can be accommodating (4 5 Drops from hard work (12 6 Gathered to be all right (4 7 When I’d get into a brawl? (6 8 They put things on scales (6 11 Monopolise rocks that are important in building (12 15 Women of strange views (5 16 Worn by the widow taken out by a gardener (5 18 Strong drink can lead to a smash (8 19 An exploit indeed to be beaten (8 21 Shrubs for the French underground (6 22 The city may be seen as part of ancient Greece (6 26 No stranger to what dupes may be? (4 27 Astage joke turned fatuous with the passage of time (4 Across:1 Rummy, 4 Gudgeon, 8 Was, 9 Uplifting, 10 Ephesus, 11 Evict, 13 Sapper, 15 Storms, 18 Rinse, 19 Caravan, 21 Billiards, 23 Rye, 24 Dresses, 25 Scene. Down:1 Rawness, 2 Misshapen, 3 Yours, 4 Galosh, 5 Deflect, 6 Eli, 7 Night, 12 In reverse, 14 Enemies, 16 Sincere, 17 Scores, 18 Rabid, 20 Roses, 22 Lee. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Cycle, 4 Sapling, 8 Net, 9 Crescendo, 10 Acrylic, 11 Odium, 13 Sparse, 15 Confer, 18 Villa, 19 Booklet, 21 Sotto voce, 23 Cue, 24 Annoyed, 25 As yet. Down:1 Canvass, 2 Caterwaul, 3 Excel, 4 Sketch, 5 Piccolo, 6 Inn, 7 Groom, 12 In full cry, 14 Shadowy, 16 Retreat, 17 Abroad, 18 Vista, 20 Opera, 22 Tin. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vague and wordy speech (6 4 Epoch-making (8 9 Haughty (6 10 Rebellion (8 12 Report of recent event (4 13 Oppressively dazzling light (5 14 Portent (4 17 Paradise (6,2,4 20 Especially (2,10 23 Disposition (4 24 US-Canadian lake (5 25 Only (4 28 Freedom of action (8 29 Happen to (6 30 Form of memorial (8 31 Lay on (6 Down 1 Almost (4-4 2 Preface (8 3 Interval of calm (4 5 Adefect (12 6 Clip into shape (4 7 Adried grape (6 8 Convincing (6 11 Unexpectedly (3,2,1,6 15 Mock attack (5 16 Aforest tree (5 18 Fabled land of riches (8 19 Unswervingly loyal (4-4 21 Badge (6 22 Scene of Tea Party, 1773 (6 26 To check (4 27 Consider (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Neat finish (6 4 Files put in the wrong order with malicious intent (8 9 Make a mistake and run for it (6 10 In the convent it gives preferential treatment (8 12 Boring makers of laws (4 13 Agrowing source of opium (5 14 Just the place to find amusement (4 17 They have an interest in conversion schemes (12 20 Motorists and golfers must do so to begin with (5,2,5 23 High spots of a European tour (4 24 So the reformed show spirit (5 25 It’s made to last (4 28 Morning revolution? (8 29 Learned man took the chair around the front (6 30 Careless example of hit and run (8 31 Exchanged abuse with a guard, apparently (6 Down 1 With which to welcome honest members (4,4 2 Sits reel out, though unwearied (8 3 In extremities they can be accommodating (4 5 Drops from hard work (12 6 Gathered to be all right (4 7 When I’d get into a brawl? (6 8 They put things on scales (6 11 Monopolise rocks that are important in building (12 15 Women of strange views (5 16 Worn by the widow taken out by a gardener (5 18 Strong drink can lead to a smash (8 19 An exploit indeed to be beaten (8 21 Shrubs for the French underground (6 22 The city may be seen as part of ancient Greece (6 26 No stranger to what dupes may be? (4 27 Astage joke turned fatuous with the passage of time (4 Across:1 Rummy, 4 Gudgeon, 8 Was, 9 Uplifting, 10 Ephesus, 11 Evict, 13 Sapper, 15 Storms, 18 Rinse, 19 Caravan, 21 Billiards, 23 Rye, 24 Dresses, 25 Scene. Down:1 Rawness, 2 Misshapen, 3 Yours, 4 Galosh, 5 Deflect, 6 Eli, 7 Night, 12 In reverse, 14 Enemies, 16 Sincere, 17 Scores, 18 Rabid, 20 Roses, 22 Lee. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Cycle, 4 Sapling, 8 Net, 9 Crescendo, 10 Acrylic, 11 Odium, 13 Sparse, 15 Confer, 18 Villa, 19 Booklet, 21 Sotto voce, 23 Cue, 24 Annoyed, 25 As yet. Down:1 Canvass, 2 Caterwaul, 3 Excel, 4 Sketch, 5 Piccolo, 6 Inn, 7 Groom, 12 In full cry, 14 Shadowy, 16 Retreat, 17 Abroad, 18 Vista, 20 Opera, 22 Tin. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 2345678 9 10 11 1 21314 1516 17 1 819 2 0 2 122 232425 2627 2829 3031 1 2345678 9 10 11 1 21314 1516 17 1 819 2 0 2 122 232425 2627 2829 3031 T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vague and wordy speech (6 4 Epoch-making (8 9 Haughty (6 10 Rebellion (8 12 Report of recent event (4 13 Oppressively dazzling light (5 14 Portent (4 17 Paradise (6,2,4 20 Especially (2,10 23 Disposition (4 24 US-Canadian lake (5 25 Only (4 28 Freedom of action (8 29 Happen to (6 30 Form of memorial (8 31 Lay on (6 Down 1 Almost (4-4 2 Preface (8 3 Interval of calm (4 5 Adefect (12 6 Clip into shape (4 7 Adried grape (6 8 Convincing (6 11 Unexpectedly (3,2,1,6 15 Mock attack (5 16 Aforest tree (5 18 Fabled land of riches (8 19 Unswervingly loyal (4-4 21 Badge (6 22 Scene of Tea Party, 1773 (6 26 To check (4 27 Consider (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Neat finish (6 4 Files put in the wrong order with malicious intent (8 9 Make a mistake and run for it (6 10 In the convent it gives preferential treatment (8 12 Boring makers of laws (4 13 Agrowing source of opium (5 14 Just the place to find amusement (4 17 They have an interest in conversion schemes (12 20 Motorists and golfers must do so to begin with (5,2,5 23 High spots of a European tour (4 24 So the reformed show spirit (5 25 It’s made to last (4 28 Morning revolution? (8 29 Learned man took the chair around the front (6 30 Careless example of hit and run (8 31 Exchanged abuse with a guard, apparently (6 Down 1 With which to welcome honest members (4,4 2 Sits reel out, though unwearied (8 3 In extremities they can be accommodating (4 5 Drops from hard work (12 6 Gathered to be all right (4 7 When I’d get into a brawl? (6 8 They put things on scales (6 11 Monopolise rocks that are important in building (12 15 Women of strange views (5 16 Worn by the widow taken out by a gardener (5 18 Strong drink can lead to a smash (8 19 An exploit indeed to be beaten (8 21 Shrubs for the French underground (6 22 The city may be seen as part of ancient Greece (6 26 No stranger to what dupes may be? (4 27 Astage joke turned fatuous with the passage of time (4 Across:1 Rummy, 4 Gudgeon, 8 Was, 9 Uplifting, 10 Ephesus, 11 Evict, 13 Sapper, 15 Storms, 18 Rinse, 19 Caravan, 21 Billiards, 23 Rye, 24 Dresses, 25 Scene. Down:1 Rawness, 2 Misshapen, 3 Yours, 4 Galosh, 5 Deflect, 6 Eli, 7 Night, 12 In reverse, 14 Enemies, 16 Sincere, 17 Scores, 18 Rabid, 20 Roses, 22 Lee. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Cycle, 4 Sapling, 8 Net, 9 Crescendo, 10 Acrylic, 11 Odium, 13 Sparse, 15 Confer, 18 Villa, 19 Booklet, 21 Sotto voce, 23 Cue, 24 Annoyed, 25 As yet. Down:1 Canvass, 2 Caterwaul, 3 Excel, 4 Sketch, 5 Piccolo, 6 Inn, 7 Groom, 12 In full cry, 14 Shadowy, 16 Retreat, 17 Abroad, 18 Vista, 20 Opera, 22 Tin. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vague and wordy speech (6 4 Epoch-making (8 9 Haughty (6 10 Rebellion (8 12 Report of recent event (4 13 Oppressively dazzling light (5 14 Portent (4 17 Paradise (6,2,4 20 Especially (2,10 23 Disposition (4 24 US-Canadian lake (5 25 Only (4 28 Freedom of action (8 29 Happen to (6 30 Form of memorial (8 31 Lay on (6 Down 1 Almost (4-4 2 Preface (8 3 Interval of calm (4 5 Adefect (12 6 Clip into shape (4 7 Adried grape (6 8 Convincing (6 11 Unexpectedly (3,2,1,6 15 Mock attack (5 16 Aforest tree (5 18 Fabled land of riches (8 19 Unswervingly loyal (4-4 21 Badge (6 22 Scene of Tea Party, 1773 (6 26 To check (4 27 Consider (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Neat finish (6 4 Files put in the wrong order with malicious intent (8 9 Make a mistake and run for it (6 10 In the convent it gives preferential treatment (8 12 Boring makers of laws (4 13 Agrowing source of opium (5 14 Just the place to find amusement (4 17 They have an interest in conversion schemes (12 20 Motorists and golfers must do so to begin with (5,2,5 23 High spots of a European tour (4 24 So the reformed show spirit (5 25 It’s made to last (4) 28 Morning revolution? (8 29 Learned man took the chair around the front (6 30 Careless example of hit and run (8 31 Exchanged abuse with a guard, apparently (6 Down 1 With which to welcome honest members (4,4 2 Sits reel out, though unwearied (8 3 In extremities they can be accommodating (4 5 Drops from hard work (12 6 Gathered to be all right (4 7 When I’d get into a brawl? (6 8 They put things on scales (6 11 Monopolise rocks that are important in building (12 15 Women of strange views (5 16 Worn by the widow taken out by a gardener (5 18 Strong drink can lead to a smash (8 19 An exploit indeed to be beaten (8 21 Shrubs for the French underground (6 22 The city may be seen as part of ancient Greece (6 26 No stranger to what dupes may be? (4 27 Astage joke turned fatuous with the passage of time (4 Across:1 Rummy, 4 Gudgeon, 8 Was, 9 Uplifting, 10 Ephesus, 11 Evict, 13 Sapper, 15 Storms, 18 Rinse, 19 Caravan, 21 Billiards, 23 Rye, 24 Dresses, 25 Scene. Down:1 Rawness, 2 Misshapen, 3 Yours, 4 Galosh, 5 Deflect, 6 Eli, 7 Night, 12 In reverse, 14 Enemies, 16 Sincere, 17 Scores, 18 Rabid, 20 Roses, 22 Lee. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Cycle, 4 Sapling, 8 Net, 9 Crescendo, 10 Acrylic, 11 Odium, 13 Sparse, 15 Confer, 18 Villa, 19 Booklet, 21 Sotto voce, 23 Cue, 24 Annoyed, 25 As yet. Down:1 Canvass, 2 Caterwaul, 3 Excel, 4 Sketch, 5 Piccolo, 6 Inn, 7 Groom, 12 In full cry, 14 Shadowy, 16 Retreat, 17 Abroad, 18 Vista, 20 Opera, 22 Tin. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vague and wordy speech (6 4 Epoch-making (8 9 Haughty (6 10 Rebellion (8 12 Report of recent event (4 13 Oppressively dazzling light (5 14 Portent (4 17 Paradise (6,2,4 20 Especially (2,10 23 Disposition (4 24 US-Canadian lake (5 25 Only (4 28 Freedom of action (8 29 Happen to (6 30 Form of memorial (8 31 Lay on (6 Down 1 Almost (4-4 2 Preface (8 3 Interval of calm (4 5 Adefect (12 6 Clip into shape (4 7 Adried grape (6 8 Convincing (6 11 Unexpectedly (3,2,1,6 15 Mock attack (5 16 Aforest tree (5 18 Fabled land of riches (8 19 Unswervingly loyal (4-4 21 Badge (6 22 Scene of Tea Party, 1773 (6 26 To check (4 27 Consider (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Neat finish (6 4 Files put in the wrong order with malicious intent (8 9 Make a mistake and run for it (6 10 In the convent it gives preferential treatment (8 12 Boring makers of laws (4 13 Agrowing source of opium (5 14 Just the place to find amusement (4 17 They have an interest in conversion schemes (12 20 Motorists and golfers must do so to begin with (5,2,5 23 High spots of a European tour (4 24 So the reformed show spirit (5 25 It’s made to last (4 28 Morning revolution? (8 29 Learned man took the chair around the front (6 30 Careless example of hit and run (8 31 Exchanged abuse with a guard, apparently (6 Down 1 With which to welcome honest members (4,4 2 Sits reel out, though unwearied (8 3 In extremities they can be accommodating (4 5 Drops from hard work (12 6 Gathered to be all right (4 7 When I’d get into a brawl? (6 8 They put things on scales (6 11 Monopolise rocks that are important in building (12 15 Women of strange views (5 16 Worn by the widow taken out by a gardener (5 18 Strong drink can lead to a smash (8 19 An exploit indeed to be beaten (8 21 Shrubs for the French underground (6 22 The city may be seen as part of ancient Greece (6 26 No stranger to what dupes may be? (4 27 Astage joke turned fatuous with the passage of time (4 Across:1 Rummy, 4 Gudgeon, 8 Was, 9 Uplifting, 10 Ephesus, 11 Evict, 13 Sapper, 15 Storms, 18 Rinse, 19 Caravan, 21 Billiards, 23 Rye, 24 Dresses, 25 Scene. Down:1 Rawness, 2 Misshapen, 3 Yours, 4 Galosh, 5 Deflect, 6 Eli, 7 Night, 12 In reverse, 14 Enemies, 16 Sincere, 17 Scores, 18 Rabid, 20 Roses, 22 Lee. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Cycle, 4 Sapling, 8 Net, 9 Crescendo, 10 Acrylic, 11 Odium, 13 Sparse, 15 Confer, 18 Villa, 19 Booklet, 21 Sotto voce, 23 Cue, 24 Annoyed, 25 As yet. Down:1 Canvass, 2 Caterwaul, 3 Excel, 4 Sketch, 5 Piccolo, 6 Inn, 7 Groom, 12 In full cry, 14 Shadowy, 16 Retreat, 17 Abroad, 18 Vista, 20 Opera, 22 Tin. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Y esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u Across 1 Vague and wordy speech (6 4 Epoch-making (8 9 Haughty (6 10 Rebellion (8 12 Report of recent event (4 13 Oppressively dazzling light (5 14 Portent (4 17 Paradise (6,2,4 20 Especially (2,10 23 Disposition (4 24 US-Canadian lake (5 25 Only (4 28 Freedom of action (8 29 Happen to (6 30 Form of memorial (8 31 Lay on (6 Down 1 Almost (4-4 2 Preface (8 3 Interval of calm (4 5 Adefect (12 6 Clip into shape (4 7 Adried grape (6 8 Convincing (6 11 Unexpectedly (3,2,1,6 15 Mock attack (5 16 Aforest tree (5 18 Fabled land of riches (8 19 Unswervingly loyal (4-4 21 Badge (6 22 Scene of Tea Party, 1773 (6 26 To check (4 27 Consider (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Neat finish (6 4 Files put in the wrong order with malicious intent (8 9 Make a mistake and run for it (6 10 In the convent it gives preferential treatment (8 12 Boring makers of laws (4 13 Agrowing source of opium (5 14 Just the place to find amusement (4 17 They have an interest in conversion schemes (12 20 Motorists and golfers must do so to begin with (5,2,5 23 High spots of a European tour (4 24 So the reformed show spirit (5 25 It’s made to last (4 28 Morning revolution? (8 29 Learned man took the chair around the front (6 30 Careless example of hit and run (8 31 Exchanged abuse with a guard, apparently (6 Down 1 With which to welcome honest members (4,4 2 Sits reel out, though unwearied (8 3 In extremities they can be accommodating (4 5 Drops from hard work (12 6 Gathered to be all right (4 7 When I’d get into a brawl? (6 8 They put things on scales (6 11 Monopolise rocks that are important in building (12 15 Women of strange views (5 16 Worn by the widow taken out by a gardener (5 18 Strong drink can lead to a smash (8 19 An exploit indeed to be beaten (8 21 Shrubs for the French underground (6 22 The city may be seen as part of ancient Greece (6 26 No stranger to what dupes may be? (4 27 Astage joke turned fatuous with the passage of time (4 Across:1 Rummy, 4 Gudgeon, 8 Was, 9 Uplifting, 10 Ephesus, 11 Evict, 13 Sapper, 15 Storms, 18 Rinse, 19 Caravan, 21 Billiards, 23 Rye, 24 Dresses, 25 Scene. Down:1 Rawness, 2 Misshapen, 3 Yours, 4 Galosh, 5 Deflect, 6 Eli, 7 Night, 12 In reverse, 14 Enemies, 16 Sincere, 17 Scores, 18 Rabid, 20 Roses, 22 Lee. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Cycle, 4 Sapling, 8 Net, 9 Crescendo, 10 Acrylic, 11 Odium, 13 Sparse, 15 Confer, 18 Villa, 19 Booklet, 21 Sotto voce, 23 Cue, 24 Annoyed, 25 As yet. Down:1 Canvass, 2 Caterwaul, 3 Excel, 4 Sketch, 5 Piccolo, 6 Inn, 7 Groom, 12 In full cry, 14 Shadowy, 16 Retreat, 17 Abroad, 18 Vista, 20 Opera, 22 Tin. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 11 121314 1 516 1 7 1819 20 2 122 232425 2627 2829 3031 12345678 910 11 121314 1 516 1 7 1819 20 2 122 232425 2627 2829 3031Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a B Y STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Vague and wordy speech (6 4 Epoch-making (8 9 Haughty (6 10 Rebellion (8 12 Report of recent event (4 13 Oppressively dazzling light (5 14 Portent (4 17 Paradise (6,2,4 20 Especially (2,10 23 Disposition (4 24 US-Canadian lake (5 25 Only (4 28 Freedom of action (8 29 Happen to (6 30 Form of memorial (8 31 Lay on (6 Down 1 Almost (4-4 2 Preface (8 3 Interval of calm (4 5 Adefect (12 6 Clip into shape (4 7 Adried grape (6 8 Convincing (6 11 Unexpectedly (3,2,1,6 15 Mock attack (5 16 Aforest tree (5 18 Fabled land of riches (8 19 Unswervingly loyal (4-4 21 Badge (6 22 Scene of Tea Party, 1773 (6 26 To check (4 27 Consider (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Neat finish (6 4 Files put in the wrong order with malicious intent (8 9 Make a mistake and run for it (6 10 In the convent it gives preferential treatment (8 12 Boring makers of laws (4 13 Agrowing source of opium (5 14 Just the place to find amusement (4 17 They have an interest in conversion schemes (12 20 Motorists and golfers must do so to begin with (5,2,5 23 High spots of a European tour (4 24 So the reformed show spirit (5 25 It’s made to last (4 28 Morning revolution? (8 29 Learned man took the chair around the front (6 30 Careless example of hit and run (8 31 Exchanged abuse with a guard, apparently (6 Down 1 With which to welcome honest members (4,4 2 Sits reel out, though unwearied (8 3 In extremities they can be accommodating (4 5 Drops from hard work (12 6 Gathered to be all right (4 7 When I’d get into a brawl? (6 8 They put things on scales (6 11 Monopolise rocks that are important in building (12 15 Women of strange views (5 16 Worn by the widow taken out by a gardener (5 18 Strong drink can lead to a smash (8 19 An exploit indeed to be beaten (8 21 Shrubs for the French underground (6 22 The city may be seen as part of ancient Greece (6 26 No stranger to what dupes may be? (4 27 Astage joke turned fatuous with the passage of time (4 Across:1 Rummy, 4 Gudgeon, 8 Was, 9 Uplifting, 10 Ephesus, 11 Evict, 13 Sapper, 15 Storms, 18 Rinse, 19 Caravan, 21 Billiards, 23 Rye, 24 Dresses, 25 Scene. Down:1 Rawness, 2 Misshapen, 3 Yours, 4 Galosh, 5 Deflect, 6 Eli, 7 Night, 12 In reverse, 14 Enemies, 16 Sincere, 17 Scores, 18 Rabid, 20 Roses, 22 Lee. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Cycle, 4 Sapling, 8 Net, 9 Crescendo, 10 Acrylic, 11 Odium, 13 Sparse, 15 Confer, 18 Villa, 19 Booklet, 21 Sotto voce, 23 Cue, 24 Annoyed, 25 As yet. Down:1 Canvass, 2 Caterwaul, 3 Excel, 4 Sketch, 5 Piccolo, 6 Inn, 7 Groom, 12 In full cry, 14 Shadowy, 16 Retreat, 17 Abroad, 18 Vista, 20 Opera, 22 Tin. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1 2345678 9 10 11 121314 1516 1 7 1 819 2 0 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 1 2345678 9 10 11 121314 1516 1 7 1 819 2 0 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R P AGE 6C, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE tt r e g a Across 1 Vague and wordy speech (6 4 Epoch-making (8 9 Haughty (6 10 Rebellion (8 1 2 Report of recent event (4 13 Oppressively dazzling light (5 14 Portent (4 1 7 Paradise (6,2,4 2 0 Especially (2,10 2 3 Disposition (4 2 4 US-Canadian lake (5 2 5 Only (4 28 Freedom of action (8 29 Happen to (6 3 0 Form of memorial (8 31 Lay on (6 Down 1 Almost (4-4 2 Preface (8 3 Interval of calm (4 5 Adefect (12 6 Clip into shape (4 7 Adried grape (6 8 Convincing (6 11 Unexpectedly ( 3,2,1,6) 15 Mock attack (5 16 Aforest tree (5 18 Fabled land of riches (8 19 Unswervingly loyal (4-4 21 Badge (6 22 Scene of Tea Party, 1773 (6 26 To check (4 27 Consider (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD A cross 1 Neat finish (6 4 Files put in the wrong o rder with malicious i ntent (8 9 Make a mistake and run f or it (6 1 0 In the convent it gives p referential treatment (8 1 2 Boring makers of l aws (4 13 Agrowing source of o pium (5 1 4 Just the place to find amusement (4 17 They have an interest in c onversion schemes (12 20 Motorists and golfers must d o so to begin with (5,2,5 2 3 High spots of a European tour (4 2 4 So the reformed show s pirit (5 2 5 It’s made to last (4 28 Morning revolution? (8 29 Learned man took the chair around the front (6 3 0 Careless example of hit and run (8 31 Exchanged abuse with a g uard, apparently (6 D own 1 With which to welcome h onest members (4,4 2 Sits reel out, though u nwearied (8 3 In extremities they can be a ccommodating (4 5 Drops from hard work (12 6 Gathered to be all right (4 7 When I’d get into a b rawl? (6 8 They put things on scales (6 1 1 Monopolise rocks that are i mportant in building (12 15 Women of strange v iews (5 1 6 Worn by the widow taken out by a gardener (5 18 Strong drink can lead to a s mash (8 1 9 An exploit indeed to be beaten (8 21 Shrubs for the French u nderground (6 2 2 The city may be seen as part of ancient Greece (6 26 No stranger to what dupes m ay be? (4 2 7 Astage joke turned fatuous with the passage o f time (4 A cross:1 Rummy, 4 Gudgeon, 8 W as, 9 Uplifting, 10 Ephesus, 11 Evict, 13 Sapper, 15 Storms, 18 R inse, 19 Caravan, 21 Billiards, 23 Rye, 24 Dresses, 25 Scene. Down:1 Rawness, 2 Misshapen, 3 Y ours, 4 Galosh, 5 Deflect, 6 Eli, 7 Night, 12 In reverse, 14 Enemies, 16 Sincere, 17 Scores, 18 Rabid, 20 Roses, 22 Lee. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionA cross:1 Cycle, 4 Sapling, 8 Net, 9 C rescendo, 10 Acrylic, 11 Odium, 13 Sparse, 15 Confer, 18 Villa, 19 B ooklet, 21 Sotto voce, 23 Cue, 24 Annoyed, 25 As yet. Down:1 Canvass, 2 Caterwaul, 3 E xcel, 4 Sketch, 5 Piccolo, 6 Inn, 7 Groom, 12 In full cry, 14 Shadowy, 16 Retreat, 17 Abroad, 18 Vista, 20 Opera, 22 Tin. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 2345678 9 10 11 1 21314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 1 2345678 9 10 11 1 21314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerK akuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.


{\

Pim flowin’ it

TIF
69F

a SUNNY AND

HIGH
LOW

——% WINDY

Volume: 105 No.100

Pk TT
eae SA LM LESS
“g declared income?

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

WAKE UP!

Try our

Big Breakfast Sandwich

The Tribune |:

=USA TODAY.



SEE PAGE FIFTEEN



Two HiNled |

norrific crash



THE 1993 OLDSMOBILE ROYALE after my accident.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Three-car collision
claims lives of two men

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A HORRIFIC three-car colli-
sion in East Street claimed the
lives of two young men yesterday
morning.

Emergency services could not
save the 23-year-old driver and
27-year-old passenger from the
twisted wreck of a brown 1993
Oldsmobile Royale after it collid-











m@ REPORTS OF
SHOOTING

REPORTS reached The
Tribune late last night that a
man was shot dead by police
in the Pride Estates area.

More details will appear
in tomorrow’s Tribune.

ed with an SUV at the junction of
East Street and Cox Way before it
spun around to hit another car
travelling in the opposite direc-
tion.

Police say the Oldsmobile was
travelling north in East Street
when it collided with a 2003 GMC
Envoy as it arrived at the junction
with East Street while going east
along Cox Way.

The sudden impact spun the
Oldsmobile around to hit a white
1994 Toyota Windom as the driver
was attempting to make a right
turn into Cox Way while travel-
ling south on East Street.

The Oldsmobile driver was
slammed into the windscreen
smashing a hole in the glass, and
flung to the back of the car as the
left side of the vehicle, the driver’s

SEE page nine

All Canon Inks & All Mita Inks

muita

eZ
Ter ee
Buy One & Get ae

Offer Good While Supplies Last

Stop in TODAY and LOOK for the
BOSS Target for MORE great DEALS!





Green

Parrot

patron stabbed
and beaten

Man is attacked while
leaving East Bay Street bar

m By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A VICIOUS stabbing near-
ly claimed the life of a Green
Parrot patron as he was leav-
ing the bar and grill in East
Bay Street on Friday night.

The 28-year-old man was
beaten and his neck was sliced
open when a group of young
men attacked him as he was
getting into his friend’s car at
around 10pm.

He told The Tribune he
recognised three of the men
and condemned police for not
reporting the incident to the
media to seek public assistance
in apprehending the criminals.

The group of six men, all
thought to be around 25 years
old, had been drinking in the
parking lot and called out lewd
and derogatory comments to
his companion, a young
woman, as she waited in the
car.



But when the man went to
get into the car they directed
their abuse at him.

One of the thugs pushed
him to the ground and all six
started a fist fight with him
before slicing his neck open as
a crowd of people stood idly
by, The Tribune was told.

The woman recognised
three of the men from high
school.

She said: “When he was on
the ground bleeding, one of
them ran over and kicked him.
He was on his stomach and he
rolled over and his eyes
opened, and I knew then there
was something terribly wrong.
I think they realised he was
seriously hurt and they got out
of there.”

The six men fled in a red
Dodge Charger and a dark
blue Nissan Maxima, she said.

Only then did security staff

SEE page nine

Woman raped and robbed

FLAMES WERE ACCELERATED by dry and windy weather as they licked
across a farmland property in Gladstone Road on Saturday night.

Firefighters on three engines worked for around four hours to extinguish
the blaze as it threatened stacks of shredded paper, oil drums, trucks and
tractors on the property just 100 metres south of the Ministry of Agri-
culture’s Gladstone Road Agricultural Centre (GRAC).

The property owner tried to assist firefighters by using his own hose to
wet stacks of paper as the fire crept nearer, and helped them access water
on the property when supplies on the fire engines were running low.

When a light rain fell it did not help to extinguish the flames as windy
weather added fuel to the fire.

e SEE PAGE TWO

Former MP

by man posing as customer

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — A woman was raped and robbed on Saturday
after being lured by a male caller to the Summerville Drive area.

Assistant Supt Welbourne Bootle reported that the incident
occurred around 9.40pm when a 27-year-old clothing vendor
received a call from a male customer who was inquiring about
buying items from her.

The woman told police she went to an address on Summerville

James Knowles
dies age 66

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FAMILY and friends gath-
ered yesterday to mourn the
death of former Long Island
MP James “Jimmy” Knowles.

The 66-year-old died at home
on Saturday night at around
8pm.

A 25-year parliamentary vet-
eran who left parliament in
May, 2002, after being defeated
at the polls by current MP for
Long Island, Larry Cartwright,
Mr Knowles had been battling
melanoma, a form of skin can-
cer, for five years.

SEE page nine

Quiznos

eR COREL Ce

Over half of
WSC water

9)

OVER half of all water
bought for distribution by
the Water and Sewerage
Corporation ends up trick-
ling into the ground or being
pilfered, a junior minister
has claimed.

Minister of State for Pub-
lic Utilities Phenton Ney-
mour, commenting on the
corporation’s dire need for
an additional $11 million
taxpayer “bail out” this year,
said it is the “worst kind of
travesty that in New Provi-
dence the corporation buys
twice as much water as it
sells each day”.

SEE page eight



Viese S$)

GREAR sre

Drive that the male caller had given to her.

SEE page nine

Government tight-lipped on
Turks and Caicos call for petition

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.met

THE Bahamian government
has not yet given any official
indication if it will support the
Turks and Caicos Islands in its
premier’s calls for CARICOM
countries to petition against
Britain’s recommendation that
direct rule be imposed on the
islands, premier-elect Galmore
Williams said yesterday.

His comments came two days
after he and embattled Turks

SOME

cy 295

egg + ve oT your Gna ood

a sa ate

e, nace

, a OF thar

PRICES MAY WARY



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

and Caicos premier Michael
Misick met with Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham and Oppo-
sition members in Nassau in an
attempt to gain local support
against the British government’s
plan.

Meanwhile, PLP parliamen-
tarians, led by their leader Perry
Christie, were in Providencialies,
Turks and Caicos, “on a fact
finding mission” yesterday,
according to former foreign
affairs minister Fred Mitchell.

SEE page eight

iJ


PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS











New

Arrivals

THESE DRAMATIC PICTURES show
firefighters tackling a blaze which swept
farmland property in Gladstone Road
on Saturday night. Flames threatened
shredded paper, oil drums, trucks and tractors
on the property near the Ministry of Agriculture’s
Gladstone Road Agricultural Centre (GRAC).

Felipé Major
/Tribune staff

Festive

Pink

sf be.

The’ Sweeting's

EVERY DAY

une

SPOCY (THLLAM - THA
TEGGIE DELITE
TURRET BREAST & BLACK FOREST HAM
BLT - COLD CUT COmao
MEATEMLL WAM) MARA
QWEN ROMSTED CHICWEN BREAST
ITALIAN ELT - TORRE? BREAST
TLAGH FOREST HAM

DAI 2009

@

Jumping jacks.

Madeira Shopping Plaza ° Tel: 328-0703
Marathon Mall ¢ Tel: 393-6113
RND Plaza, Freeport ¢ Tel: 351-3274

REGULAR

FOOTLONGS

Three women, two
men arrested after
firearms discovered

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FIREARMS found in three Nassau homes led to the arrest of three
women and two men over the weekend.

Search warrants executed at homes in Pinewood Gardens, Kennedy
Sub-division and the Market Street area on Friday and Saturday
uncovered dangerous firearms and live ammunition.

Police say Drug Enforcement Unit officers were searching the home
of a 22-year-old woman in Pinewood Gardens at around 12pm on
Friday when she picked up a blanket and a .9mm handgun with five live
rounds of ammunition fell to the floor. She was arrested and is in
police custody.

A 40 handgun was found in a baby chair in a Kennedy Sub-division
home when officers searched it at around 8pm on Friday, leading to the
arrest of a 29-year-old man.

When police executed a third search warrant at a housing rental unit
in Market Street around lam on Saturday, they discovered another .40

handgun, with seven live rounds of ammunition.
Aman and two women were arrested.
All of those arrested are being questioned in police custody on sus-

picion of illegal firearm possession.

Bahamian man and girlfriend tried to leave
Turks and Caicos with cocaine taped on bodies

mg By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A BAHAMIAN man and his
girlfriend tried to win leniency
from a Turks and Caicos judge
last week after being caught try-
ing to leave the island with over
$40,000 worth of cocaine taped
on their bodies.

Attorney Lloyd Rodney told
Magistrate Clifton Warner that
defendant Spence Vincent Dean
Junior, 39, had ten children aged
between 19 years and eight
months for whom he is the sole
breadwinner.

Meanwhile, Mary Asha Sawh,
age 20, was said to look after her
sick mother’s business and was
seen praying with a Bible before
the court session.

However, Magistrate Warner
disregarded calls for the pair to
suffer only a fine and sentenced
them to four years in a Grand
Turk prison, one year short of the
maximum five-year sentence,
according to the Turks and Caicos

Times. They admitted possessing
cocaine with intent to supply but
were also charged with attempted
fraudulent evasion as they had
sought to evade customs by trying
to leave the country with the
drugs undeclared and undetect-
ed.

According to reports in the
island’s media, Mr Dean and Ms
Sawh were picked up by police
as they prepared to board a
Bahamasair flight at Providen-
ciales International Airport.

They were found to have four
kilograms and seven ounces of
cocaine vacuum sealed and taped
to their bodies beneath several
layers of clothing.

Mr Dean, a sales manager, had
the drugs attached to his
abdomen, while Ms Sawh, an
administrator, had them taped to
her legs.

Total value of the drugs, had
they reached the street, was
$41,960.

The pair were charged after a
three-day investigation.

Boy, 16, shot in the stomach

A 16-YEAR-OLD boy was shot in the stomach near Wulff Road and
Claridge Road at around 1am on Saturday.

The boy was taken to hospital and is said to be in stable condition.

Police have launched an investigation.

Anyone with information should call police on 919/911, the Central
Detective Unit on 502-9930/9991 or Crime Stoppers anonymously on

328-8477.

Sa

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!
AT PARTICIPATING STORES


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

o In brief PM hopeful that Emerald Bay price
reduction will attract investors

Man arrested i in
connection with
armed robbery

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grandi
Bahama police arrested one of }
two suspects in connection with }
an armed robbery at Dundee

Bay Apartments on Friday.

Police received information }
that two armed robbers fled the }
scene, escaping in a green- }
coloured vehicle, licensed 43732. }

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle
said officers on patrol spotted }
the vehicle in Redwood Lane. }
Police were able to apprehend }
one suspect, a 22-year-old }

Freeport resident.

ASP Bootle said an all-points ;
bulletin has been issued for the }
second suspect, 27-year-old
Erold Demetrius Miller, who is }

wanted for armed robbery.

M@ POLICE ARRESTED a }
27-year-old Watkins Lane man
who was allegedly found in pos- }
session of various stolen items. }

According to Mr Bootle,

police went to Kwan Yin Apart- }
ments around 4.26am on Sun- }
day where they discovered var- }
ious stolen items, including an I- }
POD, cellular phones and other :

items.

Persons who have had items
stolen should report to police ;
headquarters to identify prop- }

erty recovered by police.

@ IN RESPONSE to con- }
cerns of residents at the Coral :
Beach Hotel, ASP Bootle said }
police have increased its patrols ;
in the area. He said two mat- }
ters occurred near the Condo- }

minium on Coral Way.

He reported that there have }
been a total of five matters }
reported - two armed robberies }
and three robberies — from Jan- :

uary to the present.

Mr Bootle said suspects have :
been arrested and charged in }
connection with four of those }

matters.

Tribune managing
editor to speak
on ratio about
Tynes furore

THE TRIBUNE’S man-
aging editor John Marquis
will speak on radio tonight
about the furore surround-
ing his Insight article on
Chauncey Tynes Sr.

In an exclusive hour-
long interview with Jeff
Lloyd on Star 106.5FM
Radio, the veteran news-
man talks about the
importance of journalism
in modern society - and
the role of The Tribune in
Keeping society on track.

Marquis’s explosive
interview with Chauncey
Tynes Sr., in which the for-
mer PLP treasurer claimed
his son was murdered
because he knew too much
about Sir Lynden Pin-
dling’s links with drug czar
Joe Lehder, sparked off
two weeks of controversy.

In tonight’s show, Mar-
quis talks about his news-
paper background, his
work in the Bahamas, and
the principles which guide
his professional life.

He also addresses the
Tynes story and says how
important it is for such
topics to be debated intel-
ligently.

¢ Jeff Lloyd’s
programme is on
from 4.30pm-6.00pm

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IAA Ta)

Bh OB ir ay

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

WITH the effect of the eco-
nomic downturn on Exuma made
“more difficult” by the uncertain-
ty surrounding the future of Emer-
ald Bay Resort, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham expressed opti-
mism that a reduction in the offer-
ing price of the property will
attract more potential purchasers.

Noting the “tremendous eco-
nomic growth and prosperity”
experienced by Exuma after the
Emerald Bay Resort investment
came to the islands, including a
“residential and commercial con-
struction boom”, Mr Ingraham
said the “situation has now
changed.”

However, he said a group of
interested investors are currently in
discussion with the company
charged with disposing of the prop-
erty and more may be on the way.

The prime minister was address-
ing Exuma Chamber of Com-
merce on Friday evening.

He said he “remains hopeful”
for Exuma’s economy in light of
this and recent meetings the gov-
ernment has had with the devel-
opers of Norman’s Cay and
“active negotiations” which are
underway with investors interest-
ed in developing Crab Cay, Exu-
ma.

Bubbles from 65¢
Marbles $1.00
Wind up toys

Squishy Balls

Plastic Eggs
$950

Hubert Ingraham

“The government is hopeful
that the Norman’s Cay
Development Group will be able
to finalise its funding package to
facilitate the upscale resort devel-
opment.

“T note also that the develop-
ments foreseen for Norman’s Cay
and Crab Cay will be in line with
smaller, environmentally compat-
ible developments preferred by
my government.

“Though smaller, these devel-
opments will, I believe, increase
employment levels and business
opportunities while at the same
time offering a more intimate, cul-
turally rich, and less environmen-
tally intrusive experience to our

C ) The ae

Bunnies, Chicks
&Lambs = from

Pretty Ballerina Bunnie

Oo Egg Decorating Kits
WV Decorations

Easter Lillies
|

Easter Crafts

r~ « Easter Baking Pans & Decorations

Bar TL 5 ersiel a

Home Fabrics

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[247] 327-3080


























F
"a

Hd

ei

aT

Wh
Lil

ee et —

rn

Solid Wood

822-2157



guests,” said the prime minister.

Emerald Bay is in receivership
at present, with PriceWaterHouse
Coopers appointed liquidators.

It has been in this position since
April, 2007, after defaulting on
loan repayments.

Mr Ingraham told the Cham-
ber: “As a result of funding for
the development involving deriv-
atives, arrangements now notori-
ous for contributing to the global
financial crisis, Mitsui, an insur-
ance entity based in Japan, now
has the ability to dispose of the
property.

“At an earlier time, the reserve
price set for the property proved
unattractive for many potential
developers and operators of resort
properties.

Impact

“More recently, following the
impact of the turbulence in the
international financial markets on
the global economic environment,
Mitsui has signalled its willingness
to dispose of the property for a
reduced sum provided the offer
includes satisfactory commitments
for the completion of the devel-
opment as required by us.

“This should increase the num-
ber of parties now interested in
acquiring the property. A group
of interested investors is now in
discussion with Mitsui’s represen-

Easter Baskets from § 2°99
Basket Bags 10 for $750

Easter Grass

$425, 5



3 pc Queen Post Bed
1peDresser ,

1 pe Mirr

2 pc Nightst

1 pc 5 Drawer

Financing Available Thr



Providing technology that works.

tn Micronet

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

56 MADEIRA STREET, PALMDALE
242.928.3040 « WWW.MICRONET.BS

TOSHIBA

Leading Innawathon >>>
Multifunction Copiers

tative,” he said.

According to the prime minis-
ter, developers have been made
aware that required approvals are
conditional on not only financial
capability to acquire the property
and meet commitments to staff
but also “to fund the refurbish-
ment of the hotel, upgrade and
maintain the premier standard of
the golf course, complete the mari-
na facility and complete the build-
out and maintenance of the Emer-
ald Bay Development.”

“The government is firmly com-
mitted to seeing the Emerald Bay
succeed. We will commit capital
resources to provide funding for
additional public infrastructure to
accommodate Exuma’s develop-
ment,” said Mr Ingraham.

The prime minister noted that
the difficulties facing Exuma’s
major resort property reflect those
affecting existing and would-be
developments all over the
Bahamas.

“The Ritz Carlton project on
Rose Island, Ginn at West End,
Grand Bahama, and Royal Island
off North Eleuthera are all exam-
ples of superior quality develop-

ments being undertaken by rep-
utable developers with sound
financial credentials which came
to a standstill as a result of the
current financial crisis.

Economy

“Kerzner International, a
proven investor and employer in
our economy, has postponed its
plans for the construction of a sec-
ond marina village and timeshare
resort at Hurricane Hole, and laid
off 800 persons in November.

“And the Baha Mar project, in
which much hope had been placed
came to a grinding halt,” said Mr
Ingraham.

He added that the redevelop-
ment of the Royal Oasis property
in Freeport “is also not going any-
where.”

“The slowdown and even ces-
sation of direct foreign investment
in many instances have been due
to the fact that investors are
unable to raise funding from banks
- not even for high quality invest-
ment purposes,” added the prime
minister.

M ] D W AY HOME IMPROVEMENTS

“Where Our Quality & Experience Shine!”

Specializing in:

Roofing, Home Maintenance, Painting & Varnishing,

Pressure & Mildew Cleaning, Roof Painting, Water
Proofing, Plumbing, Window Cleaning, Drywall
Installation, Replace Rotten Woodwork,

Laminate Floor, Tiling, Repair

Cracks to Concrete Walls

DUO ONO Cea yay
Tel: 242-324-2153 » Cell 432-3561 * P.O. Box SP -60315

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Moet Tromouas Rretoaanoy & Cini Ever, on Tun Jon & Far!
lasealy

“. Oey Promo aL, Coane Sos Cans & UPoLemoy CA Se.

* Canpet Upholstery, Sione and Marhic Cleaning c&

Resoraio Specialist.

« Prochom Cleaning sysneme removes. Canepa Heavy
Sua, Hescteren, ‘Lireaec, Watermarks and Sisire inom
Cupecting & Farmitire, restoring thom to like acw

afb Trectios of replacemenn of.

Cape, Sofa's, Lowa. Chairs, Dining Chains, Cars,

Toa, Groen, Ties, Marte & Some

Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist

Siartle Polishiag. Resioration & Cane
* Weed Floor Resteralion

fuiieted Stent Tech Profesional Cootracior

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594

AS LAL, Ae Oo

PRCHEM SYSTEM (enn)

COVEY WE CAN CRT airy
eR eT Tat ° RIT ee bare ST * WBE LT, Oe
+ pap sera con

PAUL ELD IAGO SEOEL

LLOVE TOU,

a 2
a.

le li A ee

a ee



*

EFFECTIVE MARCH re 2008

CE TOWTEHNGUNTIN ———_e | e10 [RE [AR [e0_[ 05 |
yesmecoone ite [wean | Le [fo |

—_ fetes

SmMEETFIGHTER = sg FIGHTER

reat [ae [WA [eo [es [ros

men ERR SMADEAGoES TOME r | 1:08 | ead | NA | eos | 90 [ross |
SuMmoG MLLOKARE | 00 | as | WA_| eno | 8:25 [10045 |
pm PAOTHER? | 20 | nas | NA | ecto | an [180 |
tanec | ats | an | Nk | ets | [rt |



eevee 6 - m3)! eS

OF WW! GALLE RO NEMA

sone] et [a0 [NK |e 0 we

Si pe 4:00 | 00 | Wik | 10:00

Por fo a | || eat [eae |

~ 380-FLIX _


PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

This is not a time for politics as usual

IT RAN INTO an Indian businessman friend
last week and he said something to me that
really struck a chord: “This is the first time I’ve
ever visited the United States when I feel like
yow’re acting like an immature democracy.”

‘You know what he meant: We’re in a once-a-
century financial crisis, and yet we’ve actually
descended into politics worse than usual. There
don’t seem to be any adults at the top — nobody
acting larger than the moment, nobody being
impelled by anything deeper than the last news
cycle. Instead, Congress is slapping together
punitive tax laws overnight like some banana
republic, our president is getting in trouble
cracking jokes on Jay Leno comparing his bowl-
ing skills to a Special Olympian, and the oppo-
sition party is behaving as if its only priority is to
deflate President Barack Obama’s popularity.

I saw Eric Cantor, a Republican House
leader, on CNBC the other day, and the entire
interview consisted of him trying to exploit the
AIG situation for partisan gain without one
constructive thought. I just kept staring at him
and thinking: “Do you not have kids? Do you
not have a pension that you’re worried about?
Do you live in some gated community where all
the banks will be okay, even if our biggest banks
go under? Do you think your party automati-
cally wins if the country loses? What are you
thinking?”

If you want to guarantee that America
becomes a mediocre nation, then just keep vil-
ifying every public figure struggling to find a way
out of this crisis who stumbles once — like
Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner or AIG’s
$1-a-year fill-in CEO, Ed Liddy — and yow’ll
ensure that no capable person enlists in gov-
ernment.

You will ensure that every bank that has tak-
en public money will try to get rid of it as fast it
can, so as not to come under scrutiny, even
though that would weaken their balance sheets
and make them less able to lend money. And
you will ensure that we’ll never get out of this
banking crisis, because the solution depends
on getting private money funds to team up with
the government to buy up toxic assets — and
fund managers are growing terrified of any col-
laboration with government.

Obama missed a huge teaching opportunity
with AIG. Those bonuses were an outrage. The
public’s anger was justified. But rather than
fanning those flames and letting Congress run
riot, the president should have said: “T’'ll handle
this.”

He should have gone on national TV and
had the fireside chat with the country that is
long overdue. That’s a talk where he lays out
exactly how deep the crisis we are in is, exactly
















CHURCH OR OFFICE SPACE

47’ x 40’

Set up with elevated stage, students
chairtables, speakers system,
shower & toilets - Carpet - office.
Above Swiss Pastry Shop, Plaza Del Sol.

$1960p/m - Ph: 324-2619 ask for Mr Ginter

WANTED

A FEW GOOD DRIVERS

Applicants must be least 25 years of age,
self-motivated, disciplined, reliable, and
willing to work. You must possess the

following:

A good attitude

how much sacrifice we’re all going to have to
make to get out of it, and then calls on those
AIG brokers — and everyone else who, in our
rush to heal our banking system, may have got
bonuses they did not deserve — and tells them
that their president is asking them to return
their bonuses “for the sake of the country.”

Had Obama given AIG’s American brokers
a reputation to live up to, a great national mis-
sion to join, I’d bet anything we’d have got
most of our money back voluntarily. Inspiring
conduct has so much more of an impact than
coercing it. And it would have elevated the
president to where he belongs — above the
angry gaggle in Congress.

“There is nothing more powerful than inspi-
rational leadership that unleashes principled
behaviour for a great cause,” said Dov Seid-
man, the CEO of LRN, which helps companies
build ethical cultures, and the author of the
book “How.” What makes a company or a gov-
ernment “sustainable,” he added, is not when it
adds more coercive rules and regulations to
control behaviours. “It is when its employees or
citizens are propelled by values and principles to
do the right things, no matter how difficult the
situation,” said Seidman. “Laws tell you what
you can do. Values inspire in you what you
should do. It’s a leader’s job to inspire in us
those values.”

Right now we have an absence of inspira-
tional leadership. From business we hear about
institutions too big to fail — no matter how
reckless. From bankers we hear about contracts
too sacred to break — no matter how inappro-
priate. And from our immature elected offi-
cials we hear about how it was all “the other
guy’s fault.” Pve never talked to more people in
one week who told me, “You know, I listen to
the news, and I get really depressed.”

Well, help may finally be on the way: One
reason we’ve been sidetracked talking about
bonuses is because the big issue — the real
issue — the president’s comprehensive plan to
remove the toxic assets from our ailing banks,
which is the key to our economic recovery, has
taken a long time to hammer out. So all kinds of
lesser issues and clowns have ballooned in
importance and only confused people in the
vacuum.

Hopefully that plan will be out today, and
hopefully the president will pull the country
together behind it, and hopefully the lawmakers
who have to approve it will remember that this
is not a time for politics as usual — and that our
country, alas, is not too big to fail. Hopefully ...

(This article was written by Thomas L. Fried-
man of the New York Times - c. 2009).



Humbled by
outpouring of
support for
sea turtles ban

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Once again I am humbled
and overwhelmed at the
remarkable outpouring of con-
cern and support the general
public has shown to the plea I
sent out last week Friday
(March 6th) asking for Bahami-
ans to indicate that they sup-
port the total ban of all sea tur-
tles in the Bahamas.

IT could have never dreamed,
in a hundred years, that so
many people would step for-
ward, hundreds of letters and
e-mails have poured in.

The Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety personally delivered 173 let-
ters to the Ministry of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources
today, and in previous days I
know that many e-mails and
faxes have been pouring in.

Today I was so delighted to
read the letter in your paper
from Coldwell Bankers/Light-
bourne Realty where the entire
office staff wrote a collective
letter to support the ban. How
can one adequately say thank
you to the people who go that
extra mile to help?

Hopefully through all this
exposure the Bahamas will
begin to understand what valu-

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



able resources live turtles in the
wild are. I was told today of a
fisherman who boasts that he
knows of a “large hole in the
sea near Andros where there
are hundreds of turtles,” per-
haps an exaggeration, but, he
could make hundreds of dollars
a year taking tourists to dive
that “large hole” and see the
turtles in the wild. Far more
money than he could ever make
killing them. They can only be
killed once; they can be viewed
thousands of times!

When the FIFA convention
is here in May and Miss Uni-
verse is here in August, the eyes
of the world really will be on
us. The press will be

looking for stories. Just imag-
ine if they happen upon one of
those horrific scenes we see all
too often of the large, majestic
turtle flipped over on his back
in the dust, dehydrated, with
“tears” running down the side
of his face, while some of our
fellow Bahamians jeer at him
before they hack him to death.

Will they threaten the foreign
cameramen with violence, a cut-
lass perhaps, as they do if we
try and take pictures? Many of
us saw that unfortunate clip on
face book. Take note, the world
will see it if the foreign press
get wind of this barbaric prac-
tice.

I salute and thank each and
every one of you who has
phoned me, written to the min-
istry, e-mailed, faxed and
offered support. Don’t stop,
don’t give up. Together we can
see our country make the right
decision, one that we can be
proud of.

Let us catch up with Cuba
and protect our natural
resources.

A million thanks to you all
from the bottom of my heart.
This reminds me of the amazing
response you all gave when I
appealed for help for the ani-
mals of Inagua after hurricane
Ike. There are a lot of very good
people out there.

KIM ARANHA

Co-Chairman of

The Bahamas Sea Turtle
Conservation Group.

Nassau,

March 12, 2009.

The unravelling of Bahamian youth

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It is of no small import that I
submit myself to the school of
thought commencing in this
city, to begin to understand the
nuances of psychology driving
the behaviours, character and
value system of this generation,
who now seem on the verge of
flourishing into a catastrophic
disappointment on the land-
scape of Bahamian history.

I sincerely thank you for your
permission, and worthy publi-
cation to briefly address sensi-
tive issues that I think are boil-
ing at the very core of this
unravelling of Bahamian youth.

This nation moved swiftly
from strength to strength in the
sixties, though under colonial
guardianship, culture of the
people decorated the hearts and
minds of every child playing
ring-play, hopscotch, quadrille,
rounders and such through
every dusty street-corner in
Nassau and the family of
islands.

Young tots were groomed, by
older ones, to the affinity of sea-
sonal treasures of top-spinning,



Quality Auto Sales

PRE-OWNED

FUER le

For the best deal in town on
pre-owned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

IN STOCK!
i

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

Some Sales experience - ‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
oe ie ‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
The ability to drive standard shift ‘Oo? SUZUKI XL-7
wenicles ‘07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 5dr
‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK
Bernard Road, between the hours of

‘05 TOYOTA COROLLA
9:00a.m. and 5:00p.m. You will be required

to bring copies of the following items: two aoe, auto et
reference letters, driver’s license, NIB card, be !

LIMITED 2
current police record and two passport #1 ALITG DEALER IM THE BAHAMAS
: EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079
pictures.. Vk our showroom of Gosabtp dete Solar Freeport Ud Gor ered cheghs, Geet Hap, 397-8102
or Accs Moto: Moll. Don Macho Bed, BE7-2 708

Please apply in person at Aquapure on

shooting marbles, kite-flying
and such; healthy competitive
edge was created and polished
in a gentlemanly and respect-
ful manner.

However, in an ironic twist
of history, after seeking and
attaining independence, society
then began to distance itself
from that which had so secure-
ly fostered its growth.

Culture slowly came to be
just an afterthought, the
stepchild of a new progressive
people; hung like conch, bruised
and forgotten, to dry on the
clothesline of change, attractive
only to flies of the past.

When we divest culture of its
human currency, we not only
hurt ourselves, but others too;
poor animals who were once
cherished members of the fam-
ily are now abused casualties of
a society willing to derelict
social responsibility of ensuring
the spiritual transition of cul-
tural inheritance from age to
the next.

We soon began to see
Bahamian adults cheated of
precious legacy: limbo, fire
dance, rake ’n’ scrape, goom-
bay; as disco-mania swept the
world causing hotels and our
own clubs over-the-hill, to begin
to discard these forms of enter-
tainment for the fast buck of
glitter.

Culture was once a princely
feast for the sustenance of our
souls, now it is barely a foot-
note to history in the curricu-
lum of our youth.

We cannot so extricably
move away from something that
is inexorably us. When we begin



to indiscriminately cut branches
from the tree of culture,
because of gross impediments
to vision in the mind of reli-
giosity, we wilfully send trau-
matic shock waves to our spirit
roots.

Who, in a matriarch-driven
society repudiates the com-
monalties that bond girl to
female girl, rather, adult soci-
ety needs to respect and prop-
erly cultivate ringplay; a funda-
mental aspect of our social sci-
ence.

Much more can be said, how-
ever, we must begin to create
‘drama houses’ in every com-
munity; we must positively
exploit Bahamian music; we
need to start mentorship clubs
for girls and boys at age six or
seven because as times become
more slanted, impressions of life
trickle down much faster.

We must clearly define our
destiny as a tangible and viable
attraction to our youth.

We need to wean communi-
ties from the emasculating
learned condition of pandering
and patronage.

We need to identify, and then
strengthen the bare essentials
that form the framework of our
society.

We as a people are resilient,
watchful, kind and true; how-
ever it is time for us to become
progressively pro-active, for it is
now not imaginative that every-
thing we have today, can be
gone by tomorrow.

GREGORY NEELY
Nassau,
March 3, 2009.

M@intague

VILLAGE ROAD NEAR SHIRLEY STREET
Call Us at 394-0323/5 or 394-1377

NOW SELLING

Used Japanese Motor Scooters.
Direct from Japan.
Yamaha Jog, Honda Dio - 50cc/100cc
" Like New " never in an accident.








THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Man wanted
for questioning |
in connection
with murder

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THIS man
is wanted for
questioning
in connection
with the
March 9 mur-
der of Gentry
McPhee in an
Arawak Cay
nightclub.

Ryao
Omar Butler,
otherwise

Ryan Omar Butler

known as ‘Smokey’, 34, is con- :
sidered armed and extremely }

dangerous.

Police say he is slim, has dark i

brown skin, is 5ft 8ins tall,

160lbs, and his last known
address was in Ridgeland Park, }

Nassau.

He is sought by police prob- }
ing the killing of 30-year-old :
McPhee, a Yellow Elder Gar- }
dens resident who was shot in :
the abdomen and hands while in }
The Big Yard nightclub some- :
time after midnight on Monday, i

March 9.

He was rushed to Princess
Margaret Hospital by ambu- }
lance but died shortly after }

arrival.

A 38-year-old woman and :
two men have been questioned }
in connection with the murder. }

Now police are determined }
to speak to Ryan ‘Smokey’ But- }

ler.

If you have any information }
contact the Criminal Detective }
Unit immediately on 502- }
9930/9991 or call 919/911 or }
Crime Stoppers anonymously }

on 328-8477.

STR

PALE tat (aS
USAT See ea Eby
PHONE: 327-6464

Se a Le



(edt)

Colors:
Gold
Silver
Black
White
Light Blue

Rosetta St.



‘significant govt investment’

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SIGNIFICANT capital investment
by government is needed to correct
the problem of rusty water plaguing
residents of eastern New Providence,
according to the state minister for
the environment.

But with the government already
extending a $30 million subsidy - 15
per cent of the country's national
capital development fund - to the
hemorrhaging Water and Sewage
Corporation (WSC) it's an invest-
ment the public treasury may not be
able to make anytime soon. Junior
Minister Phenton Neymour, whose
portfolio includes WSC, said the
problem comes from infrastructure
used for reverse osmosis, which pro-
vides customers with better water
quality. Fixing the rusty water would
require hefty sums from the public
purse to lay new, non-metal pipes.

"Rusty water has been the conse-
quence of a double-edged sword - as
a result of the improved quality of
the water being produced by reverse
osmosis, it also increases the potential
for rusty water," Mr Neymour told
The Tribune.

"And so we have been plagued
with that challenge. The way forward
is the replacement of existing, old
water mains - that are metal - that are
not lined with either concrete or are
not PVC. And this, too, requires sig-
nificant capital investment by the
government, and this is another chal-
lenge the government faces in
improving the quality of product that
we must give and this, too, is coming
out of the public treasury."

During his contribution to the
2008/2009 mid-year budget debate
earlier this month, Mr Neymour out-
lined the dire financial straits con-
straining WSC. He said WSC is los-
ing over $2.2 million annually for
what it pays just to buy water versus
what it bills customers for that water.

And while construction has flour-
ished in the capital over the last few
years, the corporation’s revenue base
has shown only modest annual
growth because so many people use
private wells instead of using gov-
ernment services.

"One thing that must be made
clear - WSC is an organisation that is
requiring a significant portion, 15 per
cent, of the national capital develop-
ment for the Bahamas. However, it is
being paid by all of the Bahamian
people through taxes, but only
approximately 30 per cent of the
Bahamian consumers use that ser-
vice.

"And so 70 per cent of Bahamians
are paying for a service that they do
not receive. The WSC is from a
financial standpoint in the worst posi-
tion it has been in regards to gov-
ernment subsidy," Mr Neymour said
in a recent interview.

In 2004, water sales were $31.1
million and reverse osmosis water
purchases were $6 million, or 19 per
cent of revenue. From 2005 to 2008,
cumulative increases in water sales
totalled $22.7 million, but the cumu-
lative increase in water purchases
over the same period was $41.5 mil-
lion. Today, water purchases repre-
sent over 57 per cent of water rev-
enues as compared to 19 per cent in
2004.

"That does not leave nearly
enough revenues to cover all of the
other costs associated with distribut-
ing water, performing maintenance,
and replacing or extending water
mains.

“This is the major reason why the
corporation’s subsidy needs have
soared," Mr Neymour said during
the debate.

WSC was allocated $19 million in
the 2008/2009 budget, which Mr Ney-
mour said has been virtually exhaust-
ed; $15,028,190 or 79 per cent of that
sum was applied to water purchases
alone.

Another $11 million was given to
the corporation during the mid-year
budget debate. One million of this
will go towards Shirley and Bay
Street redevelopments, which are
necessary for the road paving, while
the majority of remaining $10 mil-
lion will also go towards the puchas-
ing of water, Mr Neymour told The
Tribune.

Decreasing revenue collections
due to non-paying customers had
diminished WSC's cash flow, hin-
dering its ability to pay its bills on
time.

Moving forward, Mr Neymour
said during the mid-year budget
debate, WSC has acquired the assis-
tance of the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank (IDB) under the
Water and Sanitation Initiative, to
assist the Bahamas in the prepara-
tion of a Water and Sanitation Sector
Plan (WSSP).

WSC has also asked that this assis-
tance include a tariff study, updat-
ing the corporation’s financial mod-
elling, and preparing a Corporate
Business Plan.

"The IDB is also assisting with the
development of an appropriate Legal
and Regulatory Framework for the
sector. This assistance is being fund-
ed by non-refundable grants under
the IDB’s AquaFund and the

Ph: 325-3336

INWAP fund respectively.

“The consulting firm Castalia
Strategic Advisors is already in place
working on the Water and Sanita-
tion Sector Plan and has presented to
the ministry a draft plan that sug-
gests an aggressive approach is taken.

“In addition, there is a regional










initiative under the IDB which is
aimed at providing technical co-oper-
ation for improved energy efficiency
in the water and sanitation sector,"
Mr Neymour said.

The Bahamas is one of seven
countries that will benefit from this
technical co-operation.



aA ATMO) Cea aNLe LUNE

JUST WEST OF CITY MARKET, TONIQUE DARLING HIGHWAY

“WE WILL MATCH OR BEAT ANY PRICE IN eT

















2004 Cefiro only $16,900






































Noah Vans
Starting at
$9,900

re.

(aim

* 03’ Honda Civic

$13,900

« 03’ Lexus
$17,900

. a4 Sunty

PMT me) )
to choose from.

ee

(242) 341-2249

FAX: (242) 361-1136

Visit our Website: www-autohl.com

We have thousands of custom promotional products that

Ve mee a ee eee a

We will impress your clients with high quality corporate

pee mele eee ete Titers eile me

See your promotional experts at Suntee EmbroidMe.

Uniforms * Embroidery * Screen Printing « Promotional Products

el aoe eg

East Shirley Street + Ph: 393-1004 + 393-3104 + www.sun-tee.com


PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

Dogs on their best
hehaviour for
Obedience trials

DOGS AND THEIR
OWNERS turned up in
numbers at the Botanical
Gardens this weekend for
the Bahamas Kennel
Club’s 28th International
Dog Show and Obedience
Trials.

Dogs took part in a host
of categories including
best in show and best
potcake.

All major credit cards y

accepted as cash!

€) TOYOTA moving forward

LAND CRUISER PRABO

Get eight people

eee

eS OE
yds

Mackey St 393-8165 ¢ 393-3723
HOURS
Monday - Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
Saturday 8:30am - 1:00pm



TE a toe oe
Land Cruiser Prado 4 x 4

* three engine options: 2.7L 4-cyl,
4.0L V6 or 3.0L turbo diesel

orice ar) elated ta)

overdrive

* power windows, locks & mirrors

* air conditioning
* immobiliser and remote
Peel ial

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD)

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

Cli Ce\ male Le
iV) ira = Bede) Le)

Beebe M sg L.¢-1-]
* dual airbags
PAP) eis

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. 8: Mathes’ Church)
Open Mon to Fri $am - 5:30pm
Sat Bam - |2noon
Tel: 397-1700
E-mail: execmotorialbatelnet.bs
Parts and service guaranteed

Available in Grand Bahama al Qualty Auto Sales (Freeport) * Quoens Here 42-6122 «Abaco Motor Wall, Don Macitay Bled, S872806



READY-MADE FRAMES

A.G. ELECTRIC
COMPANY LID.

Will be

CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING

March 27 & 28
(Friday & Saturday)

WE WILL REOPEN

for business as usual on
Monday, March 30, 2009



THE TRIBUNE













Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Feds: Florida law
interferes with
regulations for Cuba

@ MIAMI



A FLORIDA LAW that would
make it more expensive for travel
agents to book trips to Cuba inter-
feres with existing federal regulation
of travel to the communist island,
according to a report by the USS.
Justice Department, according to
Associated Press.

In the 35-page opinion issued Fri-
day, the Justice Department said the
Sellers of Travel Act also interferes
“with the federal government’s abil-
ity to speak for the United States
with one voice in foreign affairs.”

The law was passed by the Florida
Legislature in 2008 and signed by
Gov. Charlie Crist. It requires travel
agencies that sell trips to Cuba to
post a $250,000 bond with the state
and pay up to $2,500 in annual reg-
istration fees.

More than a dozen Florida-based
travel agencies filed a federal lawsuit
against the state in June to stop the
law from taking effect. They argue
that the law discriminates against
them because it would drive up their
costs.

1 Year Warranty On All Our Bahamian Manufactured Products » 1 Year Warranty

On All Our Bahamian Manufactured Products ¢ 1 Year Warranty On All Our Bahamian Manufactured Products

Aluminium
Products

You Can Trust!

We manufacture
¢ Awning & Single Hung Windows
¢ Colonial & Bahama Storm Shutters
¢ French & Sliding Glass Doors
We have a complete line of
Impact Approved windows and doors!

Syl
San?

1 WEAR WARRANTY F

on ALL our products!

Bahama Top Shutters

ATUMINIUM
UMIUNIUM
MANUFACTURING

COMPANY LIMITED

Tedder Street in Palmdale
Tel: 326-4121
Factory Hours: Mon - Fri 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Email: balmco@batelnet.bs
The Bahamas Oldest and Most Trusted
Manufacturer of Aluminium Windows and Doors!

Colonial Shutters

Patio Sliding Doors



of = .
Pre-Hung French Doors

oS
5
>
fo)
e
=
w
rt)
Ra
9
3.
o
5
E~
o
ij
=
ty
°
-—
E
7)
i
a *
|
ra]
2
£
°
ws
7)
LJ
—h
ry
9
=
5
=
9
3
3
fo)
7
pa
fo)
ec
=
ies
=)
Ra
1]
Es
7)
}
E
9
s
EY
9
°
2
5
ry
a.
a
r}
3
=
°
r
7)

Ayuewey 1e9) |, « Syonpolg pounyoe;nuewW ueIWeYeg ung IIy UE Ayuee sea) |
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 7



OECS should establish joint
regulator, G20 should help
insight |

WORLD VIEW

@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a
Consultant and former
Caribbean Diplomat)

| HE members of the

Organisation of
Eastern Caribbean States
(OECS) should move to
establish immediately two
separate bodies to regulate
domestic non-bank financial
institutions and the offshore
financial services sector.

In turn, these new bodies
should work closely with the
Eastern Caribbean Central
Bank (ECCB).

Financial problems in the
member states of the OECS,
posed by the CL Financial
Group headquartered in
Trinidad and Tobago and the
on-shore and off-shore banks
of R Allen Stanford located
in Antigua, have under-
scored the vital importance
to the economies of these
countries of strong supervi-
sion for both non-bank
financial institutions, such as
insurance companies, and the
offshore financial services
sector.

The problems will worsen
in the coming weeks.

The IMF has warned the
OECS that “waning eco-
nomic growth after a period
of rapid private credit expan-
sion poses a major risk to the
stability of the banking sys-
tem.”

OECS countries, which
are part of the Eastern
Caribbean Currency Union
with a single currency, the
EC dollar, are the indepen-
dent States of Antigua and
Barbuda, St Kitts-Nevis,
Dominica, Grenada, St
Lucia, and St Vincent and
the Grenadines together with
the British Overseas territo-
ries of Anguilla and Mon-
sterrat.

The ECCB is their com-
mon Central Bank.

The cross-border nature
of the financial services sec-
tor emphasises the impor-
tance of cross-border regu-
lation.

Authority

Ideally, it would be best if
a Pan-Caribbean financial
regulatory authority could be
established covering all the
countries that are now mem-
bers of the Caribbean Com-
munity (CARICOM).

But, as I was reminded by
Caribbean and European
Union (EUV) colleagues after
my commentary last week
(“Establish a Caribbean wide
Financial Services Regula-
tor”), the member states of
CARICOM are unlikely to
do so in a hurry.

The members of the
OECS are in a better posi-
tion to establish the two very
necessary joint bodies
because they enjoy deeper
economic integration
arrangements than CARI-
COM.

They already have a single
currency, a single Central
Bank, and a single Court sys-
tem.

Further, none of them can
afford to establish these bod-
ies at an individual national
level, particularly in the cur-
rent situation in which remit-
tances from their nationals
abroad have fallen, receipts
from tourism are in decline,
preferential commodity mar-
kets have been withdrawn,
and construction (that
helped their economies to
grow in the last two years)
has now slowed considerably.

Wid
EXTERMINATORS

ate ah)
PHONE: 322-2157



As an example of part of
the costs each country would
face if it were to try to estab-
lish its own national domestic
bodies, the Prime Minister
of Barbados, David Thomp-
son, told his country’s Par-
liament on March 18th that it
will cost US$2.06 million to
establish, by carly next year,
a Financial Services Com-
mission to regulate the non-
bank financial services insti-
tutions as well as interna-
tional business.

There are two fundamen-
tally important reasons why
the OECS countries should
now move to establish a joint
Financial Services Commis-
sion to regulate the non-
bank domestic sector and a
joint International Financial
Services Authority to super-
vise the off-shore sector.

The first is that they have
to establish machinery for
safeguarding the interests of
their own domestic investors
including persons who invest
in instruments of the non-
bank finance companies, and
the second is that the indus-
trialised countries, such as
the US and UK, are now
moving rapidly to strengthen
their own regulatory bodies
in the wake of the failures to
deal with the practices of
major banks, insurance and
mortgage companies that led
to the current global finan-
cial crisis.

Economies

If all Caribbean countries
do not themselves move in
this direction, not only will
they be uncompetitive in the
global market for financial
services, but their economies
and their local investors will
continue to be exposed to
the problems of non-domes-
tic companies over whom
they exercise no supervision.

The truth is that it would
be an abdication of govern-
mental responsibility to
allow the present situation
to continue.

It is significant that, on
March 18th, the British
Financial Services Authori-
ty, which regulates banks, is
reported to have strongly
supported “calls for the cre-
ation of a pan-European reg-
ulatory body as the only way
to save the European mar-
ket for financial services”.

The Financial Times
reported its Chairman, Lord
Turner, as saying, “We’ve
got to think about how to
run a single market in retail
banking without a European
federal government.”

The countries of CARI-
COM face a similar chal-
lenge, only it is worse.

At least the 27-nation



@ SIR Ronald Sanders

European Union (EU) has a
single market and many of
its members also operate the
Euro as a single currency.

Only strong political will
or a further major catastro-
phe will push CARICOM
fast enough to establish Pan-
Caribbean arrangements.

In this context, no one can
blame countries, such as Bar-
bados, from forging ahead
with the strengthening of its
own financial services super-
vision.

After all, Barbados does
have a vibrant international
financial services sector to
preserve.

But, the point is that the
member states of the OECS,
given their deeper economic
and financial integration, can
move faster than CARICOM
and they should in their own
interest.

They have already estab-
lished a Task Force to
consider their options in light
of the global financial
crisis.

It is headed by the Prime
Minister of St Vincent and
the Grenadines, Ralph Gon-
salves, now a senior Head of
Government and Finance
Minister in the region.

If the OECS and the inter-
national community provide
his Task Force with the
resources, there is no reason
why a blueprint couldn’t be
devised to address many of
the issues facing these very
small and fragile economies
in a meaningful way.

In the height of economic
crises, there is always a ten-
dency by governments,
whether large or small, to
pursue both short-term and
nationalistic solutions.
Invariably, such solutions fail
especially when they origi-
nate with cross-border prob-
lems.

The G20 countries when
they meet in London on
April 2nd, should be asked
to provide the necessary
resources to the Caribbean
— and especially the OECS —
to pay for the joint multi-
nation financial services reg-
ulator that they need and
would allow them to partici-
pate meaningfully in the
global effort.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com





Le.
am
ERA

Dupuch Real Estate

242.422.4677

ken@erabahamas.com www.erabahamas.com





still with Vonage?

onephone gives you everything vonage has and more!

switch now and get 1° month free!

onephone
$19.95

US, Canada,
10 Europe Destinations

what you get?
Residential Basic Plan

jing ludes monthly lines & fees)

MEI
$23.49

In-Plan Calling Destinations

heme eit nag

Teme Mie Ea ey ten

Ait es tia teal

US, Canada, UK

Local Phone Number
ec PORT TAR

FREE

Not available
tT Ded PE

Rs

Local Customer Service
& Support

REET eL

Ree Rue
Calling Flan

Family Istand In-Network
FREE Calls

4&7? 1111 nossqv 688 Th freaport weary. indigonahworks.com WN






HP Computers

we've got it

Custom

COMPUTERS LIMITED

4 Stores at Cable Beach & East Bay St»
t. 242.396.1101 © 242.396.1100

Wwww.customcomputers, bs
solutionsi@customcomputers.bs

NOW IN TWO LOCATIONS!


PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

RAISING A GENERATION TO
TEAD, PROSPER AND TAKE DOMINION IN THE EARTH



PRESENTS

Whney

Ie eadershp
Giobal Summit

“WHEN LEADERS LEAD”



\
Min. Brenda Pratt
Fourncer & ict

30 April - 2"! May, 2009
SanpaLs Roya. BAHAMIAN
Resort & Spa

NASSAU, BAHAMAS



Deborah Bartlett

Luncheon Keynote Speaker 5 ;
Jom - Thursday & Friday nights (Open Sessions}

B:30am - 12:200m Saturday Workshops

1pm - Jom WLLL Global Awards Luncheon

Workshop Facilitators



ow



Stacia Williams Gail McKinney

Dr. Kendal Major Sherika Brown

Register Today at www.wilglobalsummit.com
or call (242) 323-3210 / (242) 325-6310

1 i 6 '





FROM page one

He added: “This effectively
doubles the amount it pays for
this high quality water, which
increases pumping costs
because one has to pump twice
as much water throughout the
island, and if one looks at it
from the revenue side, it halves
the amount of money the cor-
poration could potentially earn
from selling the same amount
of water,” he said.

The corporation is trapped in
a vicious cycle, where the
expensive solution for the situ-
ation - replacement of old pipes
and other infrastructure - is
indefinitely delayed by the high
costs incurred by the WSC part-
ly as a result of the need for
these upgrades.

Yesterday, the minister said
the government hopes that a
private consulting firm will soon
conclude an Inter American
Development Bank study, enti-
tled the Water and Sanitation
Sector Plan, which will help put
the corporation back on the
road to self-sufficiency.

This plan will include a tariff
study, updating the corpora-
tion’s financial modelling and a
corporate business plan. Com-
ing out of this, the government
will determine what changes
will be made to the rate cus-
tomers are charged for water,
which may in the future include
a mechanism taking into con-
sideration the fluctuating cost

WSC water

of energy needed to produce
that water.

However, how the corpora-
tion will secure the funding
needed to undertake the “major
investment” that is needed to
replace dodgy watermains is yet
to be determined.

According to the minister, the
WSC still charges customers for
water at a rate set in 1999,
before expensive reverse osmo-
sis technology - which desali-
nates salt water making it fit for
household use - was primarily
relied upon to quench the coun-
try’s demand for water, which
has also increased as develop-
ment continues apace and the
population expands.

This is despite the fact that
the cost of producing a thou-
sand gallons of water has almost
tripled in the four years up to
September, 2008, from $1.28 per
imperial gallon in 2004 to $3.72.

This means that water pur-
chases, which represented 19
per cent of the WSC’s revenue
in 2004, now eat up 57 per cent
of the corporation’s funds.

Meanwhile, 54 per cent of all
water purchased never reaches
its intended destination.

“In 2004, water sales were
$31.1 million and reverse osmo-
sis water purchases were $6.0
million or 19 per cent of rev-
enues. Over the subsequent
four years from 2005 to
2008, cumulative increases in

Woman raped and robbed
by man posing as customer

FROM page one

Upon arrival, she was accosted by a masked gunman who drove
the woman’s van to a secluded area, where he raped and robbed her
of $500 cash, a cellular phone and her 2001 silver-coloured van.

ASP Bootle said the van was recovered by police on Sunday.

He said the culprit was described as being 5ft 7ins tall of slim
build, with light to medium brown complexion.

Police are appealing to women not to drive alone to a location to

meet strangers.

“Women should always be accompanied by someone, preferably

a male,” said ASP Bootle.
Police are investigating.

@ A 23-YEAR-OLD man was stabbed Friday evening during an
altercation with another man at a nightclub in Hunters.
Police received a report of a stabbing around 10pm on Friday at

the Grobolos Club.

Officers sent to investigate saw a 23-year man suffering from a
stab wound to the upper right shoulder.
The victim was taken to Rand Memorial Hospital, where he

was treated and later discharged.

Mr Bootle said a 24-year-old man is assisting inquiries.

HAVE YOU SUDDENLY FOUND YOURSELF
WITHOUT HEALTH INSURANCE?

WE HAVE THE SOLUTION...

COVERAGE FOR ALL AGES

(From birth to 85 years - renewable for life)

COVERAGE CAN BE ARRANGED
FOR MOST PRE-EXISTING
MEDICAL CONDITIONS *

STARE
Health & Life
393-5529

* Certain terms & conditions apply

Nl
| ATT

Mark Reynolds

INSURANCE BY LLOYD’S
OF LONDON (An A-rated Insurer)

PREMIUMS GUARANTEED
NOT TO INCREASE FOR
NEXT 2 YEARS

LLOYDS

Durell Shearer

Tamara Boyd

WorldwideMedicalTrust

Call one of our agents today!

y

Cyril Peet



water sales totalled $22.7 mil-
lion, but the cumulative increase
in water purchases over the
same period was $41.5 million,”
according to Mr Neymour.

“The corporation is losing
over $2.2 million annually for
what it pays just to buy the
water versus what it bills cus-
tomers for that water, and by
the time one factors or adds in
the cost of building and main-
taining infrastructure to deliv-
er this water to the public, the
cost of paying staff, maintain-
ing offices, reading meters, pro-
ducing bills, the government is
left holding the bag for the bal-
ance,” Mr Neymour said.

“The only solution to this
problem, and one that this gov-
ernment recognises, is to make
substantial investments to
replace old infrastructure and
restructuring the organisation.”

A precipitous rise in energy
costs, also leading to an out-
standing $12.7 million in money
owed by the WSC to private
water suppliers for the year so
far, contributed to the need by
the corporation for an addi-
tional $11 million subsidy in the
mid-year budget.

Added to the money already
allocated to the corporation for
the 2008/2009 fiscal year, it
received the greatest propor-
tion of public subsidy, at $30
million.

“With decreasing revenue
collections and high fixed costs,
particularly with respect to
staffing and water purchases,
the corporation’s cash flow posi-
tion is deteriorating at an accel-
erating rate,” noted Mr Ney-
mour.

In his mid-year budget state-
ment, the prime minister said
that “capital transfers to deficit-
generating public sector enti-
ties is an unsustainable situa-
tion that needs to be
addressed.”

Government
FROM page one

“What we came here to do is
to get the Opposition’s view in
Turks and Caicos on the mat-
ter,” he told The Tribune from
Providenciales.

Asked what the PLP parlia-
mentarians now understand the
Opposition’s position on the
matter to be, Mr Mitchell said
his party’s members were still
“digesting the information” and
it was too early to say.

Turks and Caicos is a UK
dependency but has had its own
government headed by a chief
minister since 1976. The recom-
mendation to impose direct rule
is due to come into effect fol-
lowing the final report of a
Commission of Inquiry
launched by Britain into gov-
ernment corruption on the
islands.

Mr Misick, who has been at
the centre of rampant allega-
tions of misconduct, has agreed
to resign as a result of the
inquiry and Mr Williams was
named as his successor earlier
this month.

Mr Misick has publicly said
his government condemns
Britain’s recommendations to
suspend Cabinet, parliament
and to partially suspend the
nation’s constitution for the next
two years and the drastic signal
of intention by the UK has
attracted great interest in The
Bahamas and across the region.

The action would allow
British Governor Gordon
Wetherall to take over day-to-
day running of the country for
the next two years.

Premier Misick told ZNS that
TCI's sovereignty and democ-
racy must be protected and that
Friday's meeting with Mr Ingra-
ham was a move to get support
from the Bahamas and shed
light on Turks’ plight.

The Tribune understands that
Mr Misick intends to solicit the
court to get the decision
reversed. He is also petitioning
other countries and interna-
tional bodies, including the
United Nations, to intervene on
the country’s behalf.

The Turks and Caicos are, by
deed of entrustment, a member
of CARICOM, whose civil soci-
ety charter calls for democratic
governance.

With the UK a part of the
Commonwealth, members of
which submit to complying with
the Harare principles that call
for regular elections to allow cit-
izens to determine how they are
governed, this could also form
part of the basis of an appeal
against the move.

In a brief phone interview
with The Tribune yesterday,
Foreign Affairs Minister Brent
Symonette declined to comment
on whether the Bahamas would
react to the situation, telling this
newspaper to “speak with the
prime minister tomorrow”
about it.

Another spokesperson for the
prime minister said the govern-
ment would not be making a
statement on the issue.
THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

Yesterday Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said
Mr Knowles played an “important role in the polit-
ical history of the Bahamas and in the affairs of the
Free National Movement.

“He was one of those who contributed to the
building of a unified opposition in the late seventies
and was one of the 11 elected as FNM members of
parliament in 1982.”

He said Mr Knowles “served his country well,
and especially his beloved Long Island.”

“We shall miss him,” he added, stating that “our
hearts go out to Mrs Knowles and other members of
the family and we extend to them our deepest sym-
pathy.”

Geoffrey Knowles, James’ brother, also remem-
bered his brother as a man who was dedicated to
serving the Bahamas and his large family.

“We've lost a very good citizen,” he said. “He
was in politics for basically most of his adult life
and gave tremendous service.”

Mr Knowles said the family was yesterday receiv-
ing many calls of condolences from Long Island
and the United States, where they also have rela-
tives.

James Knowles

with the likelihood that the service will take place on
Friday or Saturday of this week.

The MP, whose father was also an MP, was born
in Nassau and grew up in the Fox Hill area.

Despite constituency boundary changes, Mr
Knowles always represented Long Island in some
form during his 25-year tenure in office. He also
held responsibility for numerous ministerial port-
folios, including agriculture, works and transport.

Geoffrey recalled that the post of Minister of
Agriculture in particular was “right up (James’)
alley” as the family had a strong farming back-
ground.

In his professional capacity, Mr Knowles was a
trained lawyer, articling with Sir Stafford Sands’
law chambers and then going on to work as a con-
sultant with the law firm Alexiou Knowles and Co,
with his brother, Emerick.

Mr Knowles is survived by his wife, Amarylis,
his sons, James Jr and Roman, daughter Kimberley,
his mother Agnes, five brothers (Alex Jr, Emerick,
Patrick, Geoffrey and Charlton) and six sisters
(Jeanne, Ruby, Doris, Yvonne, Deborah and Julie).

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Schooner Bay Project

of Lindroth Development
is looking to hire the following positions:

Registered Nurse

Hydraulic Crane Operator
In order to qualify for either position, proper documentation must be provided.
If you are interested, please either fax your documents to 242-366-2046 or email
to Rayanne.malone@lindroth.cc. All resumes can also be submitted to the Marsh
Harbour Labour Board or mailed to the following address:

Schooner Bay
P.O. Box AB 20016
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

a

Get Pre

pared

Funeral arrangements were being determined

@ MISSING CHILDREN

TWO children were reportedly missing at sea near Adelaide
in south west New Providence yesterday.
Search parties are understood to have found the children’s

boat overturned.

But there was no sign of the children before The Tribune went

to press.

PCM USEC eC

FROM page one

get involved by helping the
bleeding man into her car, The
Tribune was told.

She drove him to the emer-
gency room at Princess Margaret
Hospital where he was given 60
internal and external stitches,
and doctors said he would have
lost his life if the knife had
slipped to cut a vital artery.

A friend of the victim told
The Tribune: “When I saw the
wounds in his neck I could not
believe it. It was disgusting. He
was bleeding profusely and if it
had gone anywhere closer to his
artery there would have been
nothing anyone could have done
for him.

“Tt would have been a differ-
ent story, it would have been a
death for nothing. It would have
been a senseless murder and that
is the scariest part about it.”

She condemned security staff
at The Green Parrot for not
breaking up the fight before it
reached such a dangerous level.

“T don’t know what their job
is if not to make their place
secure,” she said.

“They could have intervened

at any time, but they didn’t, the
girl did, and she got roughed up
a little bit.”

Attempts to contact manage-
ment of The Green Parrot yes-
terday were not answered before
The Tribune went to press, and
calls to police were also not
returned before deadline.

The 28-year-old man,
who does not want to be
identified, is now recovering at
home.

He slammed police for not
informing the public of the inci-
dent and for not publicly identi-
fying his attackers as they walk
free.

He said: “People want to
know when these things happen
and it is not the first thing that
has happened at Green Parrot.”

His friend added: “It’s not
something you would expect to
happen in that environment. It is
not aclub, it’s a bar.

“It’s so sad Nassau is so small
that anywhere you try to go that
is not rowdy, where you want to
go have a nice time, stuff like
this happens.

“Tt just puts you in a differ-
ent mind frame.

“You don’t know what’s going
to happen.”



Two killed

FROM page one

side, was reduced to a mangled
wreck.

The bumper was stripped from
the front of the car and the radia-
tor, engine components and oil
spilled from the frame.

Shocked residents came out of
their houses to attend to victims
after hearing the crash at around
1.50am yesterday.

Emergency crews called for fire-
fighters to use the Jaws of Life to
pull the Oldsmobile driver from
the car, and the 23-year-old
man was pronounced dead at the
scene.

His passenger is said to have
been shouting after the car crash
“How did this happen? How did
this happen?” before he was treat-
ed at the roadside and loaded into
an ambulance. But the man died
soon after he was admitted to
Princess Margaret Hospital.

Friends of the two men, thought
to be from Chippingham in Nas-
sau, started to gather at the scene
and said they had been at a party
with them shortly before the crash.

Young men stood in silent
shock and consoled women who
wailed and screamed in horror at
the roadside.

An ambulance carried the 36-
year-old woman who had been
driving the GMC to PMH in a
responsive condition, and police
say her condition is not life-threat-
ening.

The 34-year-old woman driving
the Toyota escaped the wreckage
with an ankle injury.

Traffic police are continuing
investigations.

ITA Institute of Internal Auditors - Bahamas Chapter

Presents a Half Day Seminar

On:

“Surviving the Economic Crisis”

Speakers:

Raymond Winder, Deloitte & Touche
Greg Bethel, Fidelity Bank (Bak,) Ltd.
Archdeacon James Palacious
Marisa Smith, Bec

Date: Thursday March 26, 2009

Place:

Time:

Cost: $100.00 Members | $110.00 Non-Members

Learn About:

SuperClubs Breezes

« Budgeting & Planning for Retirement
- Refinancing, Re-mortgaging and Maintaining Insurance Coverage
- Retooling by Retraining During / After Job Loss
- Coping Skills During A Recession

CPE Hours: 4 (BICA Approved)

8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. (Continental Breakfast & Lunch included)

Contacts: Edgar 0. Moxey Jr. 302-1449 or L. Sandra Butler 396-6023

Please plan to take advantage of this great opportunity, We encourage you to register early to
secure your seat, and to assist us with our arrangements with the hotel.







for the Stormy

Colonial Shutters
e All custom made shutters are
manufactured to order and take
from 6 to 12 weeks for manufacturing.
¢ Shutters available in 8 standard colors.
* No job is too large or small.

Bahama Top Shutters

Don’t leave it to the last minute to prepare!

Cs
“Oey new

“Senna

MANUFACTURING

COMPANY LIMITED
ALL PRODUCTS MADE TO ORDER AT OUR FACTORY ON TEDDER STREET!

OC] UPA ae Cesta Maelo HUE me
Email: balmco@batelnet.bs



A line up you won’t
soon forget.

‘ne .
| A Tal fo ol las A



Tyreflexs Star Motors is the Exclusive
Authorized Dealer for Mercedes-Benz,
Subaru and Isuzu vehicles

> New & Used Cars & Trucks
> Sales, Parts & Service

Call us today at 325.4961

Visit our showroom on Wulff Rd!

TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS sisirtnoss, 0. 0x1 9123, nossau
PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Sir Lynden Pindling: one of the most

m By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

A oust Sir Lyn-
den Pindling’s influ-

ence has been indelibly cast on
our country’s life as one of the
most dominant figures in the his-
tory of the local political land-
scape and one of the architects
of a modern Bahamas, he was
also seen as an international pari-
ah under whose leadership the
Bahamas became known as a
paradise lost to drug smuggling
and to the highest bidder.

Based on the recent brouhaha
arising from a Tribune (Insight)
article critical of the Bahamas’
first prime minister, who became
known as the ‘Black Moses’, it
appears that even in death there
is a personality cult clinging to



lt E; ades (lark Spots oa

its Perfect!!!

The ullimale facial orcam



Cc

SKIN CARE & BEAUTY CENTRE

ir Morsturizes ive skin...
It Tones the complexion ....

Pertect-Tone.

Noo BD Meuitl Weeyad Avr, Plume! Pigg: 242 18,7 H8 TCD Fas 4-07

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

Sir Lynden’s image.

Under his stewardship, the
Bahamas was led through
tremendous change from major-
ity rule to Independence, to the
establishment of the hotel cor-
poration, the Defence Force, the
construction of schools and COB,
the expansion of the middle class,
the evolution from exchange con-
trol to the Central Bank and the
social innovation and perhaps the
greatest accomplishment of the
old PLP—the National Insurance
Board.

Mr Pindling’s government can
also be heralded for having the
second highest GNP per capita



Hawaii, Fahirtan



COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportuni

Recruitment Officer, Human Resources

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in

the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Recruitment Officer, Human Resources.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Actively recruiting staff through job fairs, focused advertising

and in house posting

Coordinating the testing of applicants

Screening / interviewing of applicants and preparing profiles
for presentation to the HR Manager

Performing all background checks, obtaining references and
transcripts on potential candidates

Preparing job letters, job descriptions and other new hire forms
and documents for review and approval by the HR Manager
Assisting the HR Manager in conducting the welcome and
familiarization program for new hires

Under the guidance of the HR Manager, administer the Bank’s

Employee Referral program
Maintaining the HR Database
Preparation of HR reports

Promoting and maintaining excellent customer service

QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:

Candidates must meet the following criteria:

¢ Possess a Bachelor’s Degree or higher in Human Resources or in
a related discipline from an accredited University
Minimum of four years experience in Human Resources with
a minimum of two years experience in recruiting

Excellent interpersonal skills

Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications
Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organizational and time management skills

Team Player with the ability to add value and strength to the

team and team goals

Honest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines

REMUNERATION PACKAGE:

Commonwealth Bank is a Great place to work! We offer an
exciting work environment with the opportunity for growth and
development. We also offer a competitive compensation package,
reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications,
including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision,
dental and life insurances and a pension plan.



($12,000) in the English-speak-
ing Caribbean at the time of their
defeat in 1992.

However, the former PM also
left a tarnished legacy and sat at
the helm of a government when
drug smuggling, corruption, influ-
ence peddling and money laun-
dering was the order of the day.

Of late, several naive, emo-
tionally-charged party members
and supporters of the late PM —
some of whom are just two-faced
— have sought to be historical
revisionists, distorting the aspects
of history that showed that Sir
Lynden gravely erred while
attempting to canonise him.

Paul Moss, who is rapidly
being seen as a typically dema-
gogic, opportunistic fly-by-night,
ought to have divorced himself
from the recent hoopla sur-
rounding the former PM, instead
of throwing together a headline
seeking, seemingly drunken
demonstration outside The Tri-
bune, where 70 per cent of those
in attendance allegedly had not
read the article or even knew
why they were there. I had
assumed that Mr Moss had read
the report of the 1984 Commis-
sion of Inquiry and as an intelli-
gent, new age politician would
not be found clinging to Pin-
dling’s tattered legacy.

Former PM Perry Christie,
whose proclivity for procrastina-
tion did not get the best of him in
this instance as he quickly called
a press conference, appears to be
clutching to the political magic
seemingly associated with Mr
Pindling’s image.

Sir Lynden annie

In the 1980s, Mr Christie was
fired after he spoke out against
the corruption happening under
Sir Lynden’s watch, so his seem-
ingly delusional outcry after John
Marquis’ article must only have
been to rally his party’s base.

In recent years, in a speech
entitled ‘Pindling and me — A
political/social history’, given to
Felix Bethel’s political science
class at COB, in speaking about
his feelings after the 1984 Com-
mission of Inquiry, Fox Hill MP
Fred Mitchell said:

“I supported Hubert Ingra-
ham and Perry Christie after the
dismissal. I thought that the per-
son who would have resigned and
should have resigned if only to
face a general election ought to
have been Sir Lynden. I thought
he made a terrible blunder by
not doing so. I withdrew any con-
tact with him and wrote publicly





EM ce ett





Ue AE Torey
In Just One Day!

Our DuraBath SSP Bathtubs & Wall Systems
are custom made to cover worn-out bathtubs
and out-of-date wall tiles...

No Mess. No Stress.
No Inconvenience.

www.rebath.com

RE*BATH BAHAMAS

(Manufacturer's Lifetime Warranty).

Telephone
(242) 393-8501

“Authorized Dealer’

DS ee eile mee CEU CURA Wom Matias lms
Open Monday - Friday - 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

i ENTAA, EXTRA

— Shipment
of
Used Cars

US OUT

a New Shipments Arrived

about my dissatisfaction with it.”

As it relates to the Marquis
articles, an elder statesman who
was there at the time soundly dis-
putes Mr Chauncey Tynes’ asser-
tion that their first plan was to
throw Speaker of House, Bobby
Symonette, bodily outside of par-
liament.

“T have no recollection of that.
Our whole idea was to avoid vio-
lence and surely there was no
suggestion to do violence to Bob-
by Symonette. There are a num-
ber of people alive who can attest
to that,” he said.

This gentleman also disputed
Mr Marquis’ commentary that,
the One Man Manifesto was
“drafted by an African national-
ist” and “recommended as a
strategy that national leaders
stuff government departments
with party supporters.”

“IT have the manifesto and it
says nothing about stuffing gov-
ernment departments with party
supporters. In 1970, Pindling
went to Africa and visited a num-
ber of places. Pindling wrote the
Manifesto, not an African, and
in it he quoted President Ken-
neth Kuanda of Zambia, not
Robert Mugabe. The thing is
Kuanda’s quote wasn’t even bril-
liant or insightful. Kuanda quote
said ‘time does come for leaders
of any given revolution, if they
know what they are doing, to
think of starting to remould their
society’. -

It is an absurd notion to give
one man the title of “father of
the nation” when so many others
fought in the struggle and played
leading roles in elevating our
country. In America, although
they did not all agree, they recog-
nise their founding fathers (and
mothers), rather than attempting
to distort history and bestowing
that honour on one person.

Frankly, if I am to go the route
of some Bahamians, if there’s
anyone entitled to be called
“Father of the Nation”, it is Sir
Milo Butler. In terms of the mod-
ern Bahamas, Sir Milo led the

charge even before the PLP came
into existence. He attended the
Independence Conference as the
first Bahamian Governor Gen-
eral designate, he led the fight
against racism and has become a
great symbol of unity.

Others worthy of being cate-
gorised as our founding
fathers/mother are Sir Cecil Wal-
lace-Whitfield, Henry M Taylor,
Sir Randol Fawkes, Arthur Han-
na, Sir Arthur Foulkes, Sir
Kendal Isaacs, Sir Clifford Dar-
ling, Doris Johnson and even Sir
Stafford Sands (for his contribu-
tion to the establishment of our
present economic pillars -
tourism and financial services).

After the 1977 election, the
wheels began falling off the Pin-
dling express. Law and order
broke down as the Bahamas
became a transshipment spot for
the movement of illegal drugs,
with officials ranging from law
enforcement to Cabinet minis-
ters accepting backhanders.

Under Sir Lynden, the
Bahamas lost a generation of
Bahamians to drug addiction and
drug wars, which has spawned
much of the social problems that
continue to haunt the country
today.

According to a PBS report, in
the Pindling era Norman’s Cay
“became a haven of debauchery”
— the Bahamas’ own Sodom and
Gomorrah, where drugs, orgies
and lawlessness were the order
of the day.

Major US media houses esti-
mated that as much as 80 per cent
of the cocaine consumed in the
US at that time came through the
Bahamas. Sir Lynden is alleged
to have been bribed by cocaine
baron Carlos ‘Joe’ Lehder to
allow him usage of Norman’s Cay
for his nefarious activities.

The late Norman Solomon,
then MP for North Eleuthera,
was held at gunpoint and pro-
hibited from moving around Nor-
man’s Cay when he tried to

SEE page 11

Women's Full Figured Fashions

New

* Dresses
* Skirt Sets
* Capris

Eacter

* Blouses & Much Much More

Maderia Shopedne Placa
PO. Bow S55 155
Sasso, Babes

Chan: Mer

Prince Charles D
yook Who's With uy hows

So

Tel: (24
fing (283)

E-mail: sives@conmbeave.com

nL

ive

[Oar a

Mr, Valentine Ferguson

1) Over 25 years Experience in The Travel

Industry

2) Over § years with Air Canada, Pan Am and

American Eagle

3) Over 7 years as a travel agency's travel

consultant

4) Over 7 years as a travel consultant supervisor
with Wide World Travel and Global Exp.

Travel

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing
Bank And Insurance

5) Over 3 years as a Travel Consultant/Manager

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before f
with Morris Travel

March 31, 2009 to:

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
RE: RECRUITMENT OFFICER HR
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073
E-mail address: hr@combankltd.com

So, whatever your travel needs are,
call Mr. Valentine Ferguson at
Convenient Travel and benefit from his
extensive knowledge.

Uae

OPEN FROM 9a.m. - 6p.m.

©2009 CreativeRelations. net

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

CALL 322-1722

“Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for
their interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only
those under consideration will be contacted.”


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 11



dominant figures in our political history

FROM page 10

observe Mr Lehder’s operations.

In 1982, Brian Ross’s explo-
sive investigative report ‘The
Bahamas: A Nation for Sale’
charged Pindling and his govern-
ment with corruption and for
accepting sweeteners from the
international rogue and head of
the Medellin Cartel, Carlos
Lehder.

Lehder used Norman’s Cay,
almost with impunity, as a base
for his cocaine operations.
Although Sir Lynden made a
bizarre appearance on NBC to
refute the report, the world had
become aware of local affairs and
US government officials were
pressing for an investigation.

With this as the backdrop, a
Commission of Inquiry was
appointed in November, 1983.
The Commission’s report found
that corruption and influence-
peddling was rife, that parlia-
mentarians, law enforcement offi-
cials and others had accepted
bribes from drug traffickers and
that Sir Lynden’s bank accounts
of at least $3.5 million were far in
excess of this PM earnings
between 1977 and 1983.

Sir Lynden could give no cred-
ible explanation as to why his
expenditure was eight times his
income and he was not known to
be living off credit. One of Sir
Lynden’s Cabinet ministers was
also found to have been fronting
for the mafia.

Furthermore, the commission
also concluded that during the
Pindling era, a number of Family
Island commissioners may have
taken drug-related inducements
as they showed a “degree of
acquiescence” regarding the
drug trade on their respective
islands.

Following the commission,
former DPM Arthur Hanna
resigned — although his charac-
ter was never in question — and
urged Mr Pindling to do the same
“in the name of common decen-
cy.” Mr Pindling did not.

In 1987, after pursuing a
nationalistic agenda and playing
the race card, Mr Pindling led
the PLP to another electoral vic-
tory with 31 of the 49 House
seats. During that election cam-
paign, he painted the FNM as
traitors who were ready to accede
to the US. He charged that drugs
were an “American mess, so let
them clean it up” and even



accused agencies of the US fed-
eral government of transporting
drugs through the Bahamas at a
rally.

After Sir Lynden’s govern-
ment was defeated in 1992, the
new government discovered cas-
es of impropriety, neglect and fis-
cal mismanagement...and that
they had inherited an economic
recession.

T have also been advised that
the former PM also botched the
formation of the country’s first
airline and that it is because of
this that Bahamasair lags so far
behind today.

According to my source, in
1970 routes were exclusively
assigned to the new Bahamas
Airways, which featured a con-
glomerate of international com-
panies and left the government

with a 25 per cent stake in the
airline.

Apparently, Mr Pindling did
an about-face and gave the same
‘exclusive’ routes to Everette
Bannister’s paper airline —
Bahamas World Airways. The
deal collapsed and Bannister’s
airline never materialised. “We
would have had a jet fleet flying
to New York and other places
long ago, but we have yet to do
so,” the source said.

Indeed, there is more than the
glossed-over side to Pindling’s
legacy. The latter years of the
Pindling era were of total cor-
ruption and it has set a social cul-
ture that still hangs over the
Bahamas today, as many are still
afraid to speak out for fear of
vindictiveness or overt victimisa-
tion.

Even Fred Mitchell made note
of Sir Lynden’s spite in his pre-
sentation when he said: “It (was)
the same for Franklyn Wilson
whose nomination was shocking-
ly taken away from him in 1977
because he had dared to cross
the great man.”

Frankly, although some mile-
stones were achieved in the Pin-
dling years, he contributed to
the destruction of the moral fab-
ric of this country, the rise of
materialism and the encourage-
ment of an attitude of entitle-
ment without work.

He introduced a culture where
there was and continues to be lit-
tle to no accountability in gov-
ernment departments and he
opened the floodgates of the pub-
lic service, leaving it bloated with
idlers and malcontents who have

Unter the dishnguastherd patronage of Their Excellencies, Hom 4rthure 2. Hamna
Govemor General of the Gommonwealih of The Baheenas and Mrs. Hanm

BAHAMAS NATIONAL YOUTH CHOIR




MARCH 3/— APRIL 4. 2009
DUNDAS CENTER FOR

THE PERFORMING ARTS
8:30 PM

SAL | See yo eA

TH

A WW
ONCERT SEASOW

UAL

Tickets: 315.00

April 1- 4,2009
call - 393-3728

Gala: $50.00

March 31

(oockialls & hors d'oeuvres at 7230)

call - 393-3226

r=

quest artist Christine Gangelhotf (flautist), accompanied by Dr.Christy Lee (pianist

é led al Metinguiahed CF ait

On Saturday, March 28", the Montagu Constituency Association
will host a celebratory dinner in honor of its past Members of

Are

Sr Geoffrey sohestone

Sir Kendal Isaacs

Parliament,

1 Heriry Bostwick

1982 - 1997

Sir Orville Tumaquest

Sr Willem Alen Brent Symonette

1997-2002 3 = 2002-2007

From 1967 to 2007, the constituency has had a total of six Representatives. Not

only have these noble sons served Montagu with distinction, but have all gone on
to become nation builders of the highest caliber,

Menta Y ilu Them!

Venue: Montagu Gardens, East Bay Street

Time: 7:30 pm

For further information on the event please contact the constituency

headquarters at (242) 393-0878

1 GS AANA RAAB



poor attitudes and only seem
interested in being on the pay-
roll.

Today, there are still some in
the public sector who have no
intention of doing an honest
day’s work and who see work —
even answering a phone or lifting
a pencil — as an infringement on

their time.

Sir Lynden was a giant of our
times and has had an over-
whelming impact on Bahamas’
history — but history should be
viewed in its entirety, as is seem-
ingly evident since none of the
old PLP have come out to defend
Sir Lynden.




















yD Das






The Bahamas Electricity Corporation




invites Tenders for the repair of Storage Tank #13 at its



Clifton Pier Power Station.



Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158



Tenders are to be addressed to:



Mr. Kevin Basden



General Manager




Bahamas Electricity Corporation



Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads



Nassau, Bahamas





Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before




31st March, 2009



no later than 4:00 p.m.




Submissions should be marked as follows:




Tender No. 683/08




REPAIR OF STORAGE TANK #13



CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION






The Corporation reserves the right to accept or




reject any or all proposals



For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact



Mr. Shevonn N. Cambridge at telephone 302-1208.





Site visit will take place on Thursday, 19th March, 2009 at 9:00 a.m.



at BEC, Clifton Pier Power Station.




EVEN IF IT DOESN’T MOVE
WE WILL TRADE IT IN.

BEST PRICES
EVER SALE!

Thompson Blvd, « Oakes Field
SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED = +. 242.326.6377 £.242.326.6315

®. sanpin@coralwave.com



(OM THE SPOT FINANOING WITH
COMMONWEALTH BANK

INSURANCE AVAILABLE WITH
ADVANTAISE INSURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS LTD.
PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL AND LOCAL SPORTS



RUGBY: SIX NATIONS CHAMPIONSHIP

Ireland capture first
Grand Slam for 61 years



Paul Thomas/AP Photo

THE IRISH team celebrate after beating Wales 17-15 in a Six Nations rugby union international match at the Mil-
lennium Stadium, Cardiff, Saturday March 21, 2009.

Ireland have been crowned Grand Slam cham-
pions for the first time in 61 years after Ronan
O'Gara booted a late drop goal to secure a 17-15
victory over Wales at the Millennium Stadium.

Stephen Jones appeared to have denied Ireland
the clean sweep when he landed a drop-goal of his
own, but O'Gara struck the decisive blow with two
minutes remaining.

Tries from man of the match Brian O'Driscoll
and Tommy Bowe, both within six minutes after the
interval, put Ireland on course for victory in a
nerve-shredding contest.

But four penalties from the superb Jones kept
defending champions Wales, who needed to win by
a minimum of 13 points to retain their title, in
touch as they sought to deny Ireland the clean
sweep. O'Driscoll was delighted after the match.

Meanwhile, England regained the Calcutta Cup
with a 26-12 victory at Twickenham that will pile the
pressure on embattled Scotland coach Frank Had-
den.

France bounced back from their Twickenham
drubbing in emphatic style as a seven-try romp at
the Stadio Flaminio condemned sorry Italy to the

AP Photo/David Davies/PA



IRELAND'S Brian O'Driscoll celebrates with spectators

wooden spoon and a fourth RBS 6 Nations white- after his team beat Wales 17-15 in a Six Nations rug-
by union international match at the Millennium Stadi-

um, Cardiff, Saturday March 21, 2009.

wash. The final score was Italy 8, France 50.





















2008 FORD EXPLORER XLT

7 Passanger XLT, Leather Interior

The zp

NOW $33,800.00

2008 FORD SPORT TRAC
LIMITED - Leather Interior
was $46,186.00
NOW $37,300.00

2008 FORD EDGE SEL
ane:

was $41,670.00
NOW $35,400.00

Available

' | 3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and
licensed and inspected up to birthday.

was $42,116.00
NOW $35,800.00

NOW THAT'S REALLY A

| |(SDeal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

s |
rT E el C2)









AP Photo/David Davies/PA

IRELAND'S Brian O'Driscoll celebrates with the trophy after his team
beat Wales 17-15 in a Six Nations rugby union international match at the
Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Saturday March 21, 2009. Ireland captured
its first Grand Slam in the Six Nations for 61 years by beating Wales 17-
15 on Saturday.

Paul Thomas/AP Photo

IRELAND'S Ronan O'Gara kicks the match winning drop goal during
their Six Nations rugby union international match against Wales at the Mil-
lenium Stadium, Cardiff, Saturday March 21, 2009.

© World sports briefs

AP Photo/Andres Leighton

ENGLAND'S CAPTAIN Andrew Strauss, right, reacts after being bowled by
West Indies’ Kieron Pollard who celebrates behind on the second One-Day
International cricket match in Providence, Guyana, Sunday, March 22,
2009. West Indies won by 21 runs to level the five-match series 1-1.

Nadal downs Murray to take Indian Wells title

@ INDIAN WELLS, California

Rafael Nadal powered his way to a 6-1, 6-2 victory over Andy Mur-
ray on a windy Sunday afternoon at the BNP Paribas Open, winning his
second Indian Wells title in three years. No. 1 Nadal’s low, hard
groundstrokes gave him an edge in the gusty conditions over No. 4 Mur-
ray, whose game relies more on pace and a mix of shots.

Nadal, a 22-year-old Spaniard, added the championship to the Aus-
tralian Open title he won earlier this year, and avenged a loss to even-
tual champion Murray in the Rotterdam final.

lm EUROPEAN
SOCCER ROUNDUP

Liverpool rout
Villa to close
gap on Man
Utd to one point

lm LONDON (AP)

Steven Gerrard scored a hat
trick Sunday, sending Liverpool
past Aston Villa 5-0 and within
a point of first-place Manches-
ter United in the Premier
League.

Having routed United 4-1 last
weekend, Liverpool took full
advantage of the champions los-
ing 2-0 at Fulham on Saturday.
United has 65 points after 29
games; Liverpool has 64 after 30
games. Chelsea, which lost 1-0
at Tottenham on Saturday, has
61. Dirk Kuyt took just eight
minutes to score against a Villa
team that is chasing one of the
four Champions League spots.

Villa’s miserable afternoon at
Anfield was compounded when
USS. goalkeeper Brad Friedel
was sent off for bringing down
Fernando Torres as he surged
forward to meet Xabi Alonso’s
ball. On Saturday, Wayne
Rooney and Paul Scholes were
ejected as Manchester United
lost at Fulham for the first time
since September 1964, a 2-0
defeat Saturday that tightened
the Premier League title race.

Chelsea (18-4-7), which is
four points back of United, lost
1-0 at Tottenham Hotspur, its
first defeat in eight matches
under manager Guus Hiddink.
Luka Modric scored in the 50th
minute for Spurs, which
improved to just 2-23-13 against
Chelsea in league matches since
February 1990.

Fourth-place Arsenal (15-5-
10) got goals from Nicklas
Bendtner, Abou Diaby and
Samir Nasri is a 3-1 win at New-
castle. Stoke earned a 1-0 victo-
ry over Middlesbrough, and
Portsmouth’s prospects of
avoiding relegation were boost-
ed when Peter Crouch beat
American goalkeeper Tim
Howard twice in a 2-1 victory
over Everton.

il
NOTE

FROM page 15

The Bahamas Basketball Fed-
eration has sanctioned the tour-
nament, which is being orga-
nized for primary, junior and
senior high school basketball
teams. The tournament is hon-
oring Johnson, who has dedicat-
ed more than a decade to the
development of women's bas-
ketball in the country. She had
built a reputable foundation at
HO Nash with the Lions’ junior
girls team. Two of her proteges,
Anastasia Moultrie, now teach-
ing at St.

Augustine's College and Tor-
sheka Cox, now at Anatol
Rodgers Junior High School,
are organizing the tournament.

VOLLEYBALL
NPVA RULES CLINIC



THE New Providence Volley-
ball Association will host a vol-
leyball clinic today at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium,
starting at 6 pm.

The clinic is designed to
update all players, coaches,
executives and officials on he
new rules that will be imple-
mented in the league. The
league indicated that they
intend to have all persons pre-
sent for the meeting as this will
ensure that everybody is on par
with the new rules.

cS SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE ¢

RM FRAME

WINDOWS

Nassau's Leading Manufacturer of Vinyl Windows and Vinyl Doors

MARCH MADNESS
$$$ $ALE $$$

HUGE DISCOUNTS ON ALL ORDERS
PLACED DURING THE MONTH OF MARCH

he

Call for your FREE quote or

Come visit our factory located on 74 Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau,

TEL: 1-242-325-6633
FAX: 1-242-325-6638

a ee

ee

i ee ee i ee
TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 13



Vanderpool-Wallace closes out freshman year

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ARIANNA Vanderpool-Wallace
closed out her freshman year at
Auburn University by joining sopho-
more Alana Dillette on the All-Amer-
ican honours at the NCAA Women's
Swimming and Diving Championships
over the weekend at the Texas A&M

Student Rec Center Natatorium. The
duo helped the Tigers finish sixth in
the team standings at the end of the
three-day meet with 281.5 points. Cal-
iforina won with 411.5.
Vanderpool-Wallace swum the first
leg on Auburn's record setting 200
freestyle relay tam of Emile Ewing,
Melissa Marik and Caitlin Ceary that
clocked one minute and 27.45 seconds.
Individually, she was sixth in the B

final of the 50 free for 14th overall in
22.20, which was off her season's best
of 22.10 that lowered her national
record that she set at the Olympic
Games in Beijing, China last year.
Vanderpool-Wallace was also sec-
ond in the B final of the 100 free for
10th overall in a time of 48.11. Geary
won the B final in 47.92.
Vanderpool-Wallace turned in a split
of 21.37 on anchor and Dillette did

23.33 on the third leg as they combined
to lead the Tigers to a fourth place fin-
ish in the A final of the 200 medley
relay in 1:36.88.

The University of Georgia won in
1:36.45.

Vanderpool-Wallace wrapped up
her performance in the 400 freestyle
relay on the first leg. The Tigers placed
fifth in 3:12.75.

California won in 3:09.88 to shatter

the NCAA record of 3:11.05. Individ-
ually, Dillette was seventh in the B
Final of the 100 butterfly in 52.91 for
15th overall.

The B Final was won by Saor
Haruguchi in 52.18.

And Dillette did splits of 23.95 and
52.48 on the third leg as Auburn Uni-
versity posted a victory in the B Final
of the 400 medley relay in 3:31.50.

White and Rolle win national titles

FROM page 15

it was a step in the right direc-
tion as he work his way back on
the national scene.

"T think I have to work on my
bench, but I think if some of the
senior competitors would come
back I can improve on that and
the rest of my lift tremendously,"
said the 28-year-old super-heavy-
weight champion.

Taking a break from body-
building and switching over to
powerlifting was no problem for
Faye Rolle. She breezed through
the competition as a mid-
dleweight lifting a 142.5 squat,
77.5 bench and 137.5 deadlift for
her total of 357.5.

Only rookie Danielle Dennard
had better lifts in the female com-
petition.

"It feels good. It's a change and
it gives me a chance to show off
my talent,” said Rolle, who was
coaxed on the sidelines by her
coach Welligton 'Cat' Sears.

Rolle, the Novice bodybuild-
ing champion who competed with
Jeremy Tucker for the silver at
the Central American and
Caribbean Bodybuilding Cham-
pionships, said she experienced
the most difficulty in her bench.

"If you do how they say you
should do it in the rules, they call
it a no lift,” Rolle said. "I thought
I got the lift, but they called it a
no lift. So I didn't lift the total
weights that I anticipated because
of the no lift."

Having gotten a taste of the
competition, Rolle said that she
will definitely be back in power-
lifting because it will help her
bodybuilding preparation tremen-
dously. She's getting ready to
travel to Grand Bahama for her
first bodybuilding competition in
June before she's on stage for the
Nationals in July.

Also taking advantage of her
bodybuilding background as she
made her debut in powerlifting
was fitness champion Shekera
Mackey. Her total in the light-
weight division was 240. She did a
70 squat, 47.5 bench and 122.5
deadlift. "It's a big change, a big
difference, but I worked hard,"
said Mackey, an accounts assis-
tant who started working out as a
hobby. "Both sports actually keep
me in shape and push me to that
next level.”

Mackey said she didn't have
any problems with any of her lifts
because "they were all a piece of
cake." But she noted that "if I
had some competition in my divi-
sion, I could have done some
more."

One of the most impressive
competitors in the competition
was 16-year-old Kester Bowan,
who was less than 130 pounds.
He won the featherweight divi-
sion with a total of 292.5 after
squatting 95, benching 60 and
deadlifting 137.5.

"The lifts were alright, but I
could have done a lot better," he
said. "I really didn't have any
problems with any of my lifts, but
T hope to go back to my training
and improve on them in the next
competition."The College of the
Bahamas, who continue to make
strides towards its university sta-
tus, had some competitors who
excelled. One of them was
Danielle Dennard, who topped
all of the females with the best
lifts of 145 in the squats, 82.5 in
the bench and 142.5 in the dead-
lift for her toal of 370.

ae)

GOOD PERFORMANCE: Hilton Solomon.



@ THE FINAL RESULTS

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

OT WO) eee Wao) ecm MSIL R

Here's a look at the final results of the Bahamas Powerlifting
Federation's National Powerlifting Championships (the lifts are in

kilos):

Ladies' Division
Featherweight

Tanya Forbes — 62.5 squat, 45 bench, 117 deadlift - total 225.

Lightweight

Shekera Mackey — 70 squat, 47.5 bench, 122.5 deadlift — total 240.

Middleweight

Faye Rolle — 142.5 squat, 77.5 bench, 137.5 deadlift — total 375.5.

Light-heavyweight

Tina Sterling — 60 squat, 60 bench, 110 deadlift — total — 230.

Heavyweight

Danielle Dennard — 145 squat, 82.5 bench, 142.5 deadlift — total - 370.

Men's division
Featherweight

Kester Bowan — 95 squat, 60 bench, 137.5 deadlift — total -

Junior Division

292.5,

Philip Dawkins — 150 squat, 150 bench, 280 dealift — total — 480.

Masters

George Barr — 150 squat, 150 bench, 182.5 deadlift — total -

Middle-heavy

482.5,

Trevor Benjamin — 205 squat, 155.5 bench, 230 deadlift — total — 408.

100 kilo class

Hurricane Bain — 1867.5 squat, 160 bench, 227.5 deadlift — total — 575.

Hilton Solomon — 160 squat, 147.5 bench, 205 deadlift — total -

912.5,

Philip Dawkins — 150 squat, 150 bench, 280 deadlift — total - 480.

Heavyweight

Alponso Canter — 225 squat, 182.5 bench, 250 deadlift — total —

Super-heavyweight

697.5.

Leslie White —- 310 squat, 205 bench, 295 deadlift — total — 810.

George Barr — 150 squat, 150 bench, 182.5 deadlift — total —

"It was pretty good. I enjoyed
it," said Dennard, a 20-year-old
graduate of Bahama Academy of
her sporting debut. "The lifts
were all pretty good. They were
what I wanted. I just think I need
to work on my squat. But with
some more competition, I know I
can do better."

Another COB student who
performed well was Hilton
Solomon in the 100 kilo class. He
got second (512.5) behind Hurri-
cane Bain (575), but he admitted
that it wasn't his best perfor-
mance. "In the squat, I don't
think it was right up there, but in
the bench and the deadlift, they
were right there," he said. "I did-
n't lift what I wanted in the squat,
but I did it in the bench and the
deadlift. I just have to work on
my squat."

Federation's public relations
officer Bob Brown, a former
national champion, said as they
resurrected the sport, they saw
flashes of a number of past body-
builders like Delvin 'Blue' Scott,
Kevin ‘One Ton' Woodside,
Bernard ‘Spinks’ Rolle from
Grand Bahama, Gena Mackey,
Natasha Newbold and Patrice
Curry.

"The menu was great, people

| eal
;

ar eT re Eat

|

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

—
ay
—_—

a

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

aa ATTN Shekera Mackey.

482.5,

showed up as expected and we're
looking forward to the next show
in August,” said Brown, who indi-
cated that by then some of the
veteran powerlifters will be back.

"We go to Freeport next
month and we look to see the
competition moving on to pre-
pare us for the World Champi-
onships.

“So the sport is back and we
are definitely going to be doing a
lot more in the future."



1.0

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New
Providence and the Family Islands including Grand
Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser’) now invites
sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from
schools in accordance with the provisions of the Education Act. Bid
forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of
Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed

envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the
subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Tuesday, 31% March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday, 7 April, 2009 atthe address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel: (242) 327-1530



INDOOR ‘Lys OUTDOOR

ete m cate BOT gd
SPST UR TL ca US

TUTE]
Tg
Tea:
te) EF
dinning chairs
sts]

SOFAS OUTDOOR
if {a
ee TTF
consoles
re tit 3
PT ed

Site Cry
ANTIQUE MONGOLIAN

ASK ABOUT OUR COMPLETE HOME FURNITURE PACKAGES

iss Mee Cte lL



ASM ee elt Re ee Bee di Til le te ie MD Ga aT
PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



NEW PROVIDENCE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION

Angels outshine Cheetahs!

Last year’s champion
cemeeel

ANGELS Sharelle Cash controls the fast break.

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



A closely contested series
throughout, in the third and
deciding game of, one of this sea-
son’s top ranked team’s ensured
there would be no championship
rematch in the women’s division
of the New Providence Women’s
Basketball Association.

With a 67-64 win in the third
and deciding game of the semifi-
nal series, the Boomer G Angels
eliminated last year’s champi-
onship runner-up the Sunshine
Auto Cheetahs Saturday at the
D.W Davis Gymnasium.

The Angels built a seemingly
insurmountable lead over the sec-
ond and third quarters and with-
stood a spirited fourth quarter
effort from the Cheetahs to hold
on for the slim margin of victory.

Outscored

The Cheetahs came out as the
clear aggressors from the tip, and
led by eight first quarter points
from Anastacia Sands took a 24-
17 lead after the opening quar-
ter.

Boomer G took control over
the course of the next two periods
and outscored Sunshine Auto 13-
2 in the second quarter and 27-16
in the third.

They went from being down
seven points at the end of one, to
up 12 points heading into the
fourth quarter for a 22 point turn-



ship runner-up eliminated after 67-64 loss

SUNSHINE’S GUARD Andrey Marton drives to the basket.

around. The Angels gave up just
a single basket in the second to
take a 30-26 lead at intermission.

They ended the fourth on 12-2
run, capped by a Crishanda Kelly
lay-up and took a 57-42 lead into
the final period.

The Cheetah’s staged a late
comeback effort in the fourth
quarter as they outscored the
Angels 22-10 behind Sands and
Audrey Martin.

Kelly and Sharelle Cash paced
the Angels with 17 points apiece.

Sands led all scorers with 28
points while Martin added 20 for
the Cheetahs.

After a 2007-08 season where
they opted out of the NPWBA
for a myriad of reasons, the
Angels have returned to earn a
championship berth against the
pennant winners and defending
champions Johnson’s Lady
Truckers.

The Finals begin with game
one set for Thursday, March 26th
at the D.W Davis Gymnasium.



SUNSHINE’S Latoya Thompson
tries to drive past the defence.

www.atlanticmedicalfunwalk.com

t's time to step up PremierHealth

| |
and sign up! Funwalk 2009: April | 8th

It’s time to step up and sign up to walk a few
miles for smiles and two good causes!

Last year with your help we raised close to
$40,000 for our partner charities. Let's make our

Funwalk 2009 another event to remember!
The walk begins at 6.30 a.m. from Montagu Beach.

There will be a prize draw for participants.
Telephone 326-8191 or email

funwalk@atlantichouse.com.bs for info.

Remember there are two routes, one for those
competitive walkers amongst you and one for the
more “‘leisurely” walker. So there really is no excuse

A

not to come join in the fun!

sd

A
*

A. 15 & Under B. 16-25 C€.26-35 D.36-45

WALK CATEGORIES: Male & Female

E. 46-59 F 60 & Over

Official registration form

Entry Fee: $15.00 Adults / $12.00 Children includes gift pack and T-shirt
Deliver to: Atlantic Medical Insurance, Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, Nassau PO. Box SS-5915
Tel: 326-8191 or fax form to: 326-8 | 89

NAME:

COMPANY/ORGANIZATION:

EMAIL:

T-SHIRT SIZE: (circle choice) Ss M L

RACE CATEGORY: (circle choice) A B Cc D

{Additional entries, duplicate form)

ATLANTIC
= MEDICAL

Our partner charities:
Cancer Society of The Bahamas
Bahamas Diabetic Association

Atlantic Medical is not liable for injuries incurred by participants at this event.

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, PO. Box SS-59 15, Nassau Tel: 326-819 |
Suite 5, Jasmine Corporate Center, East Sunrise Highway, RO. Box F-42655, Freeport Tel: 351-3960

A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life

COLONIAL GROUP
aj INTERNATIONAL

Colonial Group International is
rated A-(Excellent) by AM Best.




NU



BASKETBALL Ryders in the Vince Ferguson
NPBA POSTSEASON Divisional series.

IT'S down to the divisional Sica
final in the New Providence mg By BRENT STUBBS
Basketball Association, starting : : Senior Sports Reporter
tonight at the CI Gibson Gym- ORGANISERS will. bein bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

the second Patricia 'Patty' John-

son Basketball Tournament on

Wednesday at the CI Gibson

Gymnasium, starting at 4 pm.
The tournament will run

nasium.

In the opener, the defending
champions will play the Police
Crimestoppers in the first game
of the John Archer Divisional

ESLIE White and
Novice bodybuild-
ing champion Faye

series. Last year's runners-up through Friday. Rolle dominated
Electro Telecom Cybots will the Bahamas Powerlifting Feder-
play the Sunshine Auto Ruff SEE page 12 ation's ‘Resurrection Day’

National Powerlifting Champi-
onships on Saturday at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Although they didn't compete,
the championships brought out
some of the top bodybuilders and
powerlifters, including pro body-
builders Joel Stubbs and Gena
Mackey, national bodybuilding
champion Jay Darling; former
national powerlifting champions
Kevin Woodside and Natasha

Rolle and Aaron Green, presi-
dent of the newly formed New
Providence Bodybuilding and Fit-
ness Association.

There was enough talent in the
stands to encourage the new core
of powerlifters who took center
stage.

While he was the most experi-
enced competitor on the floor,
White didn't disappoint the
observers as he posted the best
lifts in the competition with a 310
squat, 205 bench and 295 deadlift
for his total of 801.

"T felt pretty good since it's
been about two years since they
held

the last competition,” White
said. "The results I did today was
pretty good for a comeback."

Despite the fact that he didn't
lift some of the weights he had
anticipated on paper, White said

SEE page 13

All Sales Final

(While supplies last)

—" NIG

=

ENTERPRISES LiMiTED

19 Patton Street, Palmdale §
Open Mon-Fri 7:30am-4:30pm Sat 8:00am-3:00pm i
Tel: 326-8453 or 326-5464 Fax: 326-5461

Web: www.bulldersmaiibahamas.com Email: info@bulldersmallbahamas.com

POWER AND THE GLORY

White and Rolle win titles












































i i |

THE FORCE BE WITH YOU: Leslie White powering his way to success.

mae aa aes

Se)

MAW moms Ceti rs HL Cem ele aoa
topped with Zesty Tartar Sauce,
Cheddar Cheese and Crisp Lettuce
all wrapped in a Warm Tortilla.
PAGE 16, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS






































President's Circle

PICTURED (FROM LEFT) are Phillipa Cooper and Bernadette Saunders of the niiicies of Tourism,
Edwina Hudson, Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Royal Hudson, Pedro Young of Royal Holiday
Club and Sonja Albury of the Ministry of Tourism.

Nassau remains the
Hudsons’ happy home

AFTER 24 years, the
Bahamas remains beloved
second home of Royal and
Edwina Hudson.

The couple from Lowell,
Massachusetts, has visited
the Bahamas regularly over
the past quarter century.

They have travelled exten-
sively to other countries, but
are always drawn back to the
Bahamas.

Congratulations on making
the distinguished
British American Financial Have, tried Aruba, |

President's Circle 2009 da, Mexico, but we've always MINISTER OF TOURISM and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

come back here,” said Mr greets Royal and Edwina Hudson and Royal Holiday Club Sales
Hudson. “This is our home — Manager Pedro Young.

Clockwise from top: Resheda Bodie, base.” . . . :
Philp Ferguson, Raleigh Francis, Helen Gardiner, The Hudsons said that sig- trip decided to get married Holiday Club sales manager



nificant memories are tied to in the Bahamas. Pedro Young.
Patrice Rolle and Kimberlene Roberts the Bahamas. The Hudsons’ second “The pape are wonder-
They spent many family daughter is aschool teacher ful,” said Mrs Hudson. “We
holidays in Nassau. with two children. certainly think of them as

They started bringing their She has also enjoyed trips family.”

; Brit S oldest daughter when she to the Bahamas with her The Hudsons spent two
242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com : oe was five. Now she is a 26. family. a
c ena cs a sin TAT-UEMINS | Ahare 2473875 ear-old registered nurse 1S e warm weather, uring the visit, Minister o
eeperl 242-352-7208 Exania 242-F0-1035 | Abace 2f aot American Ln is CNaa re give birth to beautiful beaches and friend- Tourism and Aviation Vin-
twins. ly people that keep the cou- cent Vanderpool-Wallace

In the past, the couple’s ple returning. They said they presented them with an
daughter celebrated high have developed close rela- authentically Bahamian gift
school and college gradua- tionships with staff of their basket and a certificate of
tions here. Later, a friend time share property, West appreciation for their many
from her college graduation Winds II, and with Royal _ visits to the country.

All Gardening Tools & Supplie 5 |
(Except Net Items) \

a March 21 - 28 x

=i Fr
= | aid oe ee em lete* |

Open Mon-Fri 7:00am-4:00pm, Saturday 7:00am-3:00pm
Tel? 323-3973 of 325-3976 Fax: 322-393 /
Web: www. bulldersmalibahamas.com
Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.com


THE TRIBUNE

ul

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



MONDAY,



ine

MARCH 23,



hy

2009





Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life

British Colonial seeks
‘sood title’ confirmation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he British Colonial

Hilton’s ownership com-

pany is seeking a declara-

tory judgment from the

Supreme Court that it has
good title to the downtown Nassau
resort’s land, after attorneys repre-
senting lender FirstCaribbean raised
concerns over a missing document in
the title chain.

The missing document, Tribune
Business can reveal, dates back to the
time when the hotel was owned by the
late Sir Harry Oakes and, subsequent-
ly, his family estate. It relates to a trans-
fer of the Bay Street property’s real
estate assets, upon which a mortgage
was secured, from Lady Oakes’s pri-
vate assets to the family holding com-
pany.

Informed sources close to develop-
ments told Tribune Business that the
Companies Register showed that the
mortgage in question was later dis-
charged. This means there are no liens
or charges on the British Colonial’s
real estate. But what cannot currently
be located is the title document show-
ing the transfer of real estate assets

BISX to unveil small business



THE British Colonial Hilton, Bay Street, New Providence...

from Baroness Oakes to the Oakes
family company.

As a result, it is understood that
Bahamian attorneys representing First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas), which last year complet-
ed a $40 million refinancing for the

British Colonial Development Com-
pany (the Hilton’s immediate owner),
have expressed concern that the miss-
ing document prevents them from issu-
ing an unqualified opinion on title. The
attorneys, believed to be from Higgs &
Johnson, indicated this could poten-

Resort owner seeks declaratory judgment
from Supreme Court that title clean, after
attorneys for lender FirstCaribbean raise
concerns over break in chain dating back
to late Sir Harry Oakes and family

tially jeopardize the mortgage security
that FirstCaribbean obtained for the
loan.

As a result, FirstCaribbean is under-
stood to have demanded that the
British Colonial Development Com-
pany either take out title insurance or
obtain an unqualified opinion that it
has clean title via a Supreme Court
judgment.

The resort’s holding company has
moved to do the latter, and obtain a
declaratory court judgment that the
mortgage holder has clean title. First-
Caribbean’s Barbados headquarters is
understood to have taken direct control
of the situation from its Bahamian sub-
sidiary.

British Colonial Development Com-

Airport financing $45m below target

pany officials are understood to view
the situation more as an administra-
tive matter, and believe it will be
cleared up relatively easily, with no
impact for the downtown Nassau
resort.

Tribune Business was first alerted
to the situation by sources who sug-
gested that the title query had prompt-
ed FirstCaribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) to suspend drawdowns on a
$15 million credit facility that was
financing the British Colonial Hilton’s
current multi-million dollar renova-
tion.

As a result, this newspaper had been
told there were delays in payments to

SEE page 6B

listing plans by

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX) is
planning to unveil “by the end of
this month” its plans for a small
business listing facility on the
exchange, an initiative designed
to give such companies exposure
and a “track record”.

‘end of month’

* Exchange believes
Central Securities
Depository key to
government debt listings

* BISX Global ‘still on tap’
after being readjusted

Keith Davies, BISX’s chief executive, told Tribune Business
that the proposed listings tier would not be “a revenue generator”
for the Bahamian exchange, but was instead being initiated to aid

national development.

He pointed out that a strengthened small business sector led to
a stronger overall economy, given the contribution such companies

made to employment and eco-
nomic development.

Government urged: Beware of

SEE page 7B

benefits ‘scams and abuse’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president has urged
the Government to do its utmost
to prevent “scams and abuse” of
its proposed unemployment ben-
efit scheme, and suggested it
revisit the Employment Act’s sev-
erance pay provisions to prevent
effective “double dipping” by
laid-off staff.

“T think something that needs
to be considered in this unem-

Ex-Grand Bahama Chamber
chief says scheme lets
dishonest employees ‘have
their cake and eat it’
ployment benefit is the potential
for abuse,” Mr D’ Aguilar told
Tribune Business. “I think the
Government, in their haste to get

this on the books, would be wise
to think through a number of sce-

SEE page 2B

Reef Penthouse

Perched atop the luxurious Reef Adantis and boasting approximately 4070

SP of flowing rooms and living area,
moet segght atter lomry unite
comes fully tumisted wiih ckeslaner flalshes ood incledes a

Reefs
such designs,

this Penthouse suite is ome of The
The 3 beckocm siete, one of tao

foyer, dining area, fall kitchen, panoramic opean views and large wrap-
round private balconies, The Beet Penthouse, as they say, is “wonderment
saa a Privacy, exclusive five star service mwoits. Offered by Mano

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA) rede-
velopment’s first financing
round secured $45 million less
than originally targeted, its
structure having to be readjust-
ed to account for global capital
markets weakness and what
appears to have been tepid
international investor demand.

The Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD),
which operates LPIA under a
30-year lease from the Govern-
ment-owned Airport Authority,
confirmed in a statement
released late on Friday after-
noon that it had secured $265
million to fund the first stage






of the airport’s redevelopment —
some $45 million less than the
originally-sought $310 million.

NAD said the financing,
which has come from 16 lenders
and investors, plus the Govern-
ment, consisted of three tranch-
es — a $153 million revolving
bank credit facility; $42 million
senior secured bond; and a $70
million participating debt facil-
ity.

This represents a departure
from the original structuring,
and indicates that international
investor demand for the senior
secured bond, in particular, was
relatively weak.

NAD had hoped to raise $310
million through $140 million in
a revolving bank credit facility;
$90 million in senior secured

bonds; and an $80 million par-
ticipating debt facility.

However, only $42 million or
less than 50 per cent of the
senior secured bonds were ulti-
mately taken up. Capital mar-
kets sources on Friday suggest-
ed to Tribune Business that out
of that $42 million, some $25
million had come from the
Bahamian market - $15 million
denominated in US dollars, and
$10 million in Bahamian dol-
lars.

The plan had originally called
for $70 million of the $90 mil-
lion bond facility to be in US
or other foreign currencies, and
$20 million in Bahamian dol-
lars. It was suggested to Tribune

SEE page 5B

Life Is JUST AS
fragile.

Are you one illness away from financial ruin?














Don't let life’s unexpected challenges shatter your hopes

for peace of mind and family protection.

Stay confident. Stay connected.

BS

Carey Resity at $2 200.000. Wels Listityg #B2B5

Des adont you... Het stalk.
MARIC) CAREY

ian

Vel: 242-677-TAL (8285p 1 Fax: 242-677-8256 Cells 242-387-7015
info (@imariecareyrealty.com | wewsanariocareyrealiy.com

Colinetmperial,

Nassau: 396.2000 356.8300 Freeport: 352.3223
www.colinaimperial.com


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ee Eee
Consultant sees 40 per cent rise in train course demand

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BUSINESS consultant has
seen a 40 per cent increase in
attendance at work skills train-
ing courses he holds, and told Tri-

bune Business he was increasing-
ly seeing companies run as “one
and two-man band” operations
by their owners because they had
been forced to lay-off all employ-
ees.

Mark Turnquest, principal of

RB\ Bahamas Business
SL) Solutions Ltd

GLORAT PCA OLICY GRD MCA

We would lke to nolify our valued customers that
Mr. Cleveland Saunders

$ no longer employed with Bahamas Business Solutions
Limited and therefore not authorised fo sel or servioe Mero
Products.

Bahamas Busnes Soluflons Limied is the only company

authonsed to sel and service Xerox Products in the Bahamas

dare not kable for any products or services provided by this
individua

XeLOx @



VACANCY NOTICE

the Small Business Resource
Centre, said: “I have personally
seen a 40 per cent increase in my
business in reference to training.
I do a lot of training, and have
found that I’m training a lot of
people fired from their jobs. My
business has increased because a
lot of people want to improve
their skills, their corporate office
and clerical skills.”

This is no bad thing, given that
Bahamians who acquire addi-
tional skills in demand by
employers will position them-
selves for jobs — and potentially
higher salaries — as the economy
moves towards recovery. It will
also improve their economic
mobility.

Mr Turnquest, who is aiming
to organise a National Small Busi-
ness Summit for late May and
early June 2009, told Tribune
Business had had seen a 20 per
cent increase in hotel sector work-
ers who were attending his train-
ing sessions. He explained that
many who had been laid-off had

SCAMS, from 1B

narios where it could be abused.”

The Chamber president said a
prime example of what unem-
ployment benefits should not
become was the Government-
guaranteed educational loan fund
which, in its formative years, was
beset by non-repayments and
loans taken out by persons not
even studying.

“When you’ve got 150,000 peo-
ple thinking of ways to get round
the system, they usually find
them,” Mr D’ Aguilar added. “In
their haste to get this system up
and running, they have to think
about how it could get abused.
You've got to be aware of scams.
Let’s try and close as many loop-
holes as possible.”

A likely loophole to be exploit-
ed, Mr D’ Aguilar said, was where
persons were working more than
one job. The National Insurance
Board (NIB) only required con-
tributions from their primary
employer, the Chamber president
said, meaning that NIB — which
will administer unemployment
benefits — only had records relat-
ing to one job.

In this situation, an employee
could be collecting an unemploy-
ment benefit cheque for their first
job, but still working on their sec-
ond job. Mr D’Aguilar suggest-

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER EXECUTIVE

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Chief Financial Officer.

The job oversees all financial matters of BEC, inclusive of the activities of the Customer Services

Division.

The objectives of this function include, but are not limited to the following:

Financial Management, Accounting & Treasury

Ensure and structure the Corporation’s financial policies, practices and internal controls so that
they are in accordance with the law, generally accepted accounting principles, contractual
commitments, the Corporation’s structure and protect the corporations assets;

Manage BEC’s cash resources to ensure that funds are available to meet the ongoing and future

needs of BEC while minimizing the cost of capital;

Ensure the timely preparation of all financial reports. These include complete financial statements
for presentation to the Board, preparation of budget reports for assisting management decision
making, and development of a yearly projected budget in consultation with other Division heads;
Ensure that the divisions maintain a high standard of efficiency, control, and application of
sound accounting practices and principles along with the adequate trained qualified staff to

achieve these objectives;

Coordinate to ensure that the workflow within the division and cross functionality with all
departments dependent upon the services of the division, are efficient and effective;

* Coordinate the annual budgeting process and present the completed budget for approval;

* Manage external relationships with local and international sources of funds;

Ensure proper and cost effective insurance of BEC’s assets;
Conduct Financial Analysis for the Corporation as requested;

Customer Services

Ensure the accurate and timely meter reading and billing of all customer accounts in New

Providence and the billing of other Family Island Accounts.

Ensure proper management of the revenue and collection recovery activities by effective

management of the Corporation’s Accounts Receivable.

Ensure proper management of the business office services of cashiering and new services, queries

for customers, banking and accounting reconciliation, etc.
Ensure that non-technical losses are kept to a minimum.

Job requirements include:

* A minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Accounting/Finance with professional qualifications (e.g.,

ACCA, CPA) an MBA would be desired.

A minimum of 15+ years of experience in financial accounting, at senior management level.

Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Excellent analytical and organizational skills
Good customer relations skills

Good time management skills

Strong leadership skills

Knowledge of finance, accounting, budgeting and cost control principles including General

Accepted Accounting Principles.

Knowledge of automated financial and accounting reporting systems
Ability to analyze financial data and prepare financial reports, statements, and projections
Extensive knowledge of project management and the ability to oversee a range of projects

simultaneously

Strong human relations skills
Knowledge of industrial relations
Negotiation skills and techniques

Interested persons should apply by submitting a resume addressed to: The AGM-Human Resources
& Training, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau

Bahamas on or before: Wednesday, March 25, 2009.



no college degree or skills devel-
opment, and they were now seek-
ing training in the clerical/secre-
tarial area, especially on Quick-
Books recordkeeping methods.

Mr Turnquest, whose training
programmes are approved by the
Ministry of Education, said many
Bahamians “realise they need to
develop another type of skill”.
He estimated that unemploy-
ment, based on his experience,
was worse than the official 12.1
per cent and 14.1 per cent rates
recorded for New Providence and
Grand Bahama.

As for the small business com-
munity, he told Tribune Business:
“Right now, we are in a rock bot-
tom state. Nothing has changed,
and things have gotten worse.”

However, Mr Turnquest said
he had seen no “significant
increase” in small Bahamian com-
panies going out of business,
largely attributing this to the fact
that “90 per cent” of those that
were going to fold have already
done so.

ed this loophole could be closed
by requiring employers to submit
a list of employees working for
them as a second job.

The Chamber president,
though, said the Government
needed to reassess the severance
pay provisions contained in the
Employment Act. This Act pro-
vides for workers who are termi-
nated with notice, either two
weeks’ pay with or in lieu of
notice, and then two weeks’ pay
for every year worked up to 12
years. This effectively gives laid-
off line staff a maximum 26 weeks
of severance pay.

And, in the case of manage-
ment staff, they get four weeks’
pay with notice or in lieu of
notice, and four weeks pay for
every year worked up to 12 years.
This means the maximum statu-
tory payment they receive is 13
months.

Yet unemployment benefit will
add to this. Mr D’Aguilar said:
“When the Employment Act was
crafted it gave, in certain
instances, quite a generous sev-
erance portion because there was
no unemployment insurance.
Now that there is this unemploy-
ment component, one would
expect the Government, at some
stage, to revisit the severance
component of the Employment
Act.

“One would at least expect that
to be on the table for negotiation,
because it appears to be double
dipping. I think the benefits are

THI

Those that remained were now
“battle tested”, and Mr Turnquest
said: “I’ve seen more of the one
man bands. Many retail outlets
have only one person working in
the shop, and that’s the entrepre-
neur; the owner. The two to three
staff that were also working there
previously have been laid-off.”

When it came to his Small
Business Summit, scheduled for
May 21, May 25-28, and June 2-4,
Mr Turnquest said it aimed to
focus the national development
agenda on small businesses, iden-
tifying opportunities they can take
advantage of, along with business
strategies and models.

Accusing the Government of
adopting a “myopic approach” to
small business development in the
Bahamas, Mr Turnquest said:
“They’re not innovative or cre-
ative at all. “The Government has
done nothing at all in relation to
small business development in the
Bahamas. It cannot wait for them.
My main intention is to seek leg-
islative change in how small busi-

getting to the stage where they
are too generous.”

The Chamber president sug-
gested that the Government revis-
it the unemployment benefit
scheme one year after it was ini-
tiated to close any loopholes that
arose. He did, though, praise the
Government for stipulating in the
draft legislation that unemploy-
ment benefit could only be
received by those who con-
tributed, thus encouraging every-
one to pay.

Christopher Lowe, the former
Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce president, said he
objected to workers still receiving
seven of the 13 weeks’ worth of
unemployment benefit they were
entitled to even if they were dis-
missed with cause, such as steal-
ing or breaching company rules.

“You can’t have your cake and
eat it as well,” Mr Lowe told Tri-
bune Business. “We’re creating
scenarios where not only do we
reward people for doing nothing,
but for doing wrong.”

Asked for his views on the pro-
posed scheme, he added: “I don’t
like it one bit. It reeks of political
panic. It’s really amazing how the
Government can shuffle money
around willy nilly, based on polit-
ical needs as opposed to national
needs.

“T am definitely against people
collecting unemployment benefit
who've been fired for fraud, theft,
tardiness and their own fault.”

Mr Lowe said the unemploy-

BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMA RCE,
BARLASLAS DEVELOPMENT BANK PRESENT

ness needs to be given priority
treatment. We need to be proac-
tive, not reactive.”

He added that for small busi-
ness development in the Bahamas
to succeed, there had to be a
major change in mindset — not
just in the Government, but also
among entrepreneurs themselves
and financial/lending institutions.

“We need to identify what
Bahamian entrepreneurs need to
be skilled in to compete in the
world,” Mr Turnquest said. “Give
us an opportunity to take advan-
tage of future goals.

“The Government is borrow-
ing money to give people cheese
and bread. What about the busi-
nesses? Invest in the businesses,
let the businesses grow and hire
people. The economy has to
grow. There is no new money
coming in for entrepreneurial
ventures. They’re giving people
money to buy clothing and food.
But they’re still unemployed and
there’s no economic develop-
ment.”

ment benefit scheme appeared to
be a “fair accompli”, because he
and other employers had not
been consulted on, or informed
about, how it would work and its
proposed creation through
amendments to the National
Insurance Act and accompany-
ing regulations.

Due to this lack of information,
he said he could not explain to
his 100 employees at Kelly’s
(Freeport) why the Government
was mandating this additional
deduction from their salary
cheques.

“I’m not entirely against some
sort of unemployment benefit.
But for God’s sake, give us some-
thing tangible to read so we can
assist the Government in avoiding
pitfalls they are bound to make in
the implementation of such a pro-
gramme,” Mr Lowe said.

Meanwhile, he said NIB was
“in effect, making employers the
policing agents” when it came to
employee benefit claims through
the requirement that they fill out
its new form, Med-4. Mr Lowe
suggested that this had been
introduced to combat the inade-
quacies of the Med-1 form filled
out by employees, as many were
able to beat the system and claim
benefits while still working.

“T find it very incongruous that
they’re adding more benefits
when NIB cannot manage the
benefits it’s supposed to provide
now. Nor can they enforce con-
tributions,” Mr Lowe said.

uabdareed Thera bipaineat Fnak

LS. EMBASSY bk

PHI

BUSINESS EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR

Tuesday, March 315t,2009 + 8:00 a.m. 2:20 p.m.

REGE TRATION NET ORE IMG

INVOCATION, PRAYER &
MATPORLAL JN THES

INTRODUCTION & MODERATOR

11:30

* The Britich Colonial Hilton

PANEL DISCUS SiON Il

* SURVIVING THE ECONOMIC

RECESSION"

* Ken Kerr (Providence Advis!
* Barry Malcolm (Scotiabank Basar led!

: Philip Simon, Executive Qirector

Bohan: Channes af Gonmece

WELCOME REMARKS.
« Dionrsio D Aguile, Prosicent
Bahonas Chamber of Goammerce
* Doron Cash, Charon
Bahamas Geveropment Rank

» James Smith {Colina financial dovsaors)

LUNCHEON PRESENTATION

“THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC THREATS THE
GLOBAL ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY!”

"Ronald Langston, (Forme) National
Oirector ofthe Minority Susiness

QCevelop ment agemoy (BOA Of

* Timothy Zanrge-Brown, Change’

a Affairsa.i, OU. Enebersny

230
Fidelipy Rank

1015 COFFEE BREAK

10:30 PANEL D1S0USS10NI

“REASONS TO REJOICE IN RECESSION"
= Gregory Bethel, Presicerr,

Department ot Commerce

PANEL DE CUSSPON Ill

* POSITIONED FOR SUOOES 5. BEYOND

THE RECES SON WHAT'S MEXTE*
"Larry Gibson {Gonial Pension Senices}

"Chester Cooper (British Americar

Faranackd

Raymond Winder (Define & Touche}

330 CLOSING

* POG, AZ
PROTECTING YOUR INVES TMENT ‘
* Peter Miller (Gatianurs Devedopyment

Sank

*Khaalis Rolle (Masa Winter Ferries)
*ingpector Sandra Miller
{Royal Bohanuas Bolice Force!

Registration Fee: $ 100,00

Please F.5. VP:

Contact: The Chamber of Commerce

Teh 322-2145 of e-mail: register@thebaham aschamber.com


THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 3B



Restaurant files action
against West Bay hotel

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE OWNERS of Coco-nuts
Bahama Grill have taken legal
action against their former land-
lords, the owners of West Bay
Street’s El Greco Hotel, filing a
Supreme Court writ claiming
damages due to alleged negli-
gence and misrepresentations.

Coco-nuts closed its doors last
Wednesday, shutting down the
space they had leased for two
years from El Greco’s owners,
Harry and Mike Pikramenos.

Coco-nuts’ owners, the Fergu-
son brothers, alleged that when

they acquired El] Greco’s for-
lease space they were promised
access to a balcony area within
the hotel, which they claim was
reneged upon.

Alleged

They also alleged they were
promised a suitable parking area
for their patrons, which the writ
claims was to be purchased by El
Greco, but never was in two
years. The Fergusons are also
alleging that the landlords would
provide the upkeep of the prop-
erty, which was supposedly not
honoured.

The Ferguson brothers also

released letters sent to the Pikra-
menos’s attorneys, and produced
what were purported return
receipts, signed by the El Greco
owners, to show they had made
12 months’ worth of rental pay-
ments in full. The Pikramenos’s
had alleged they had been late
with lease payments.

In their legal action, they are
claiming damages due to an
alleged loss of business attrib-
uted to inadequate parking for
patrons and lack of access to the
balcony for private engagements
and smoking; alleged towing
costs and costs of drain repairs;
and additional costs allegedly
incurred because of the land-

lord’s failure to allow “quiet
enjoyment of the demised
premises”.

Harry Pikramenos on Wednes-
day denied the Fergusons claims
of being driven from the proper-
ty, saying he believes that the
business was a victim of the econ-
omy.

Mr Pikramenos said operating
El Greco without a restaurant
will have a negative effect on
business, but said Coco-nuts
would be replaced as soon as pos-
sible. “Yes it will hurt the hotel to
have no restaurant attached to
it, but we will find someone else
in the restaurant business,” said
Mr Pikramenos.

Financial sector sound in face of CLICO, OECD pressures

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE BAHAMAS financial
services industry is sound, the

minister of state for finance told
Tribune Business, despite CLI-
CO (Bahamas) collapse into liq-
uidation and fears of a new offen-
sive about to be nted against the
international financial services

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

SAFENS LTD

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No. 45 of 2000), the Dissolution of SAFENS LTD has

been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was

the 16th day of March, 2009.

L :
i
Por Cortina! Lipeanaen, re

Liqguitutar



sector.

Zhivargo Liang told Tribune
Business that the Government
was continuously monitoring
developments and language com-
ing from the Organisation for
Economic Co-Operation and
Development (OECD) countries,
who have recently began a clarion
call for the end of “tax havens”.

The Government has held con-
sultative meetings with members
of the Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) in order to
determine what steps this country
should take to avoid being placed
on another blacklist.

“We have a continuous dia-
logue with the industry through
the BFSB, continuous dialogue
about a whole range of issues in
the financial services sector, and
this would certainly been one of
them. As I said before, we are
monitoring the situation and we’ll
make determinations in due
course, and when we do, I’m sure
you and all the others will know,”
said Mr Laing.

The CLICO (Bahamas) situa-
tion has raised concerns about
the ability level of regulatory bod-
ies in the Bahamas to supervise
their industries, and their coop-
eration with regulatory bodies
across the Caribbean.

The bailout of CLICO
(Bahamas) parent company, CL

Vacation in Paradise.

Only MGT?

aad per person double occupancy.

Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only.

Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus:
+ Complimentary continental breakfast datly
+» Junior Suites with King-size or two double beds
* Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,

coffee maker, hair dryer

* Kids 15 and under, free

© Pool with swim “up bar

Limited-time offer! Reserve today /
Call 242-363-3680

*$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. - Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. - Sat. Maximum
four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on
standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.

Financial, by the Trinidad gov-
ernment caused a shockwave
across several Caribbean nations
where the conglomerate had
operations.

The Bahamas-based operation
was petitioned into provisional
liquidation this year due to its
insolvency, because it was unable
to pay claims of $2.6 million in
the Turks and Caicos Islands. Yet
it had been under the microscope
of the Registrar of Insurance
Companies since 2004.

“Issues related to CLICO were
picked up since 2004, so I don’t
know about falling through the
cracks; it was a matter of having
spotted an issue and raising it,”
said Mr Laing. “In regulating, the
first issue is to spot a problem,
the second issue is to address a
problem, and the third issue is to
act on an issue. The problem was
spotted from 2004. It was
addressed to the extent of holding
meetings since 2004, but only act-
ed on in recent times.”

Mr Laing said regional and
international regulatory bodies
exist to help jurisdictions “police”
themselves “and take advantage
of commerce.”

“That’s what’s going to happen
and it’s going to happen in many
areas including insurance, where
the regulators are seeing they
need to work,” he added.




INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



Yvette Bethel
presents



Reinvent Your Career

Saturday, March 28th, 2009
1:00pm - 3:00pm

Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre, Ist Floor

Cost: $150

For more information contact:
Phone: 341-5860 or Email: kken@orgsoul.com

ORGANIZATIONAL

Master Technici

ee Le

ELECTRONICS

ROCK-BOTTOM CLEARANCE

SALE

Over 100 items on Clearance!

celery eee eed a eee ee eee ee ee

Panasonic 42” Fixed TV Wall Mount
BYTE sie eh im hls

Avanti Induction Hotplate
McA eTO leu em Racers tole eC
PVE eelae Ce turds

Toshiba 27” DVD/VCR Combo TV

Sony 27” TV

Whirlpool Duet Electric Dryer
Whirlpool Gold Series 30” Black Cooktop

Ta em ete meee hemes eel) ele)

$25.00

Pe lrat |)
haw ee
eee
$315.25
Art
ler emt
$1,200.00
TDR 8)
$510.00

Meta s ieeeeee ee s e e ee

Gl Rte Dee Te

Clearance items

discounted up to 40

Village Rd., Open Mon. thru Sat. 8:30am 'til $:30pm
PH: 393-5310, www.mastertechbahamas.com

eee eee mee em


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Treasury’s toxic asset plan
could cost $1 trillion

@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The Obama administration’s
latest attempt to tackle the
banking crisis and get loans
flowing to families and busi-
nesses will create a new gov-
ernment entity, the Public-Pri-
vate Investment Program, to
help purchase as much as $1 tril-
lion in toxic assets on banks’

books.

The new effort, to be
unveiled Monday, will be fol-
lowed the next day with release
of the administration’s broad
framework for overhauling the
financial system to ensure that
the current crisis — the worst in
seven decades — is not repeat-
ed.

A key part of that regulatory
framework will give the gov-
ernment new resolution author-
ity to take over troubled insti-






©




IOM International Organization for Migration
OIM Organisation Internationale pour les Migrations



OIM Organizacion Internacional para las Migraciones





Vacancy Announcement






The International Organization for Migration is



seeking a highly qualified National Officer to head




its new program in Nassau, Bahamas. The



incumbent will manage a program to promote



reintegration of recently returned Bahamian nationals.




The successful candidate will have a University




degree, preferably in Political Science, Law,



International Affairs, psychology or social work; a



minimum of eight years of relevant experience



required, preferably in the area of social work and




program management; strong writing abilities and



a good background in program administration




desirable. Salary commensurate with responsibility






and experience.

For a full description of the position please visit:

tutions that would pose a threat
to the entire financial system if
they failed.

Administration officials
believe this new power will save
taxpayers money and avoid the
type of controversy that erupted
last week when insurance giant
American International Group
paid employees of its troubled
financial products unit $165 mil-
lion in bonuses even though the
company had received more
than $170 billion in support
from the federal government.

Under the new powers being
sought by the administration,
the treasury secretary could
only seize a firm with the agree-
ment of the president and the
Federal Reserve.

Once in the equivalent of a
conservatorship, the treasury
secretary would have the power
to limit payments to creditors
and to break contracts govern-
ing executive compensation, a
power that was lacking in the
AIG case.

The plan on toxic assets will
use the resources of the $700
billion bank bailout fund, the
Federal Reserve and the Fed-
eral Deposit Insurance Corp.

The initiative will seek to
entice private investors, includ-
ing big hedge funds, to partici-
pate by offering billions of dol-
lars in low-interest loans to
finance the purchases. The gov-
ernment will share the risks if
the assets fall further in price.

When Geithner released the
initial outlines of the adminis-
tration’s overhaul of the bank
rescue program on Feb. 10, the
markets took a nosedive. The
Dow Jones industrial average
plunged by 380 points as
investors expressed disappoint-




www.iom.int/unitedstates/vacancies/vacancies.htm

For the stories





Please submit your CV and a letter of interest to

behind the news,






VNO209Bahamas@iom. int

read Insight
on Mondays

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN

DIVISION

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

IMPORTANT NOTICE

2009 APPLICATION FORMS ARE
NOW AVAILABLE

SCHOLARSHIP /LOAN TYPE

ALL BAHAMAS MERIT SCHOLARSHIP
NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP
NATIONAL ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIP
NATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOLARSHIP

NATIONAL GRANT

EDUCATION GUARANTEE LOAN FUND PROGRAMME

GERACE RESEARCH CENTRE SCHOLARSHIP
FINANCIAL COMMUNITY ADVANCED TECHNICAL
TRUST SCHOLARSHIP

DEADLINE

APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008

MAY 29, 2008

ment about a lack of details.

Christina Romer, head of the
Council of Economic Advisers,
said Sunday that it’s important
for investors to know that the
administration is bringing a full
array of programs to confront
the problem.

“TI don’t think Wall Street is
expecting the silver bullet,” she
said on CNN’s “State of the
Union.” “This is one more
piece. It’s a crucial piece to get
these toxic assets off, but it is
just part of it and there will be
more to come.”

But private economists said
investors may still have doubts
about whether the government
has adequate resources to prop-
erly fund the plan and whether
private investors will be attract-
ed to participate, especially after
last week’s uproar concerning
the AIG bonuses, which has
added to the anti-Wall Street
feelings in the country.

Romer said the new toxic
asset program would utilize
around $100 billion from the
$700 billion bailout fund, leav-
ing the fund close to being
tapped out.

Mark Zandi, an economist at
Moody’s Economy.com, esti-
mated that the government will
need an additional $400 billion
to adequately deal with the tox-
ic asset problem, seen by many
analysts as key to finally resolv-
ing the banking crisis.

Zandi said the administration
has no choice but to rely heavi-
ly on government resources
because of the urgency of get-
ting soured real estate loans and
troubled asset-backed securities
off the books of banks so that
they can resume more normal
lending to consumers and busi-
nesses.

“This is a start and we will
see how far it goes, but I believe
they will have to go back to
Congress for more money,” he
said.

The Public-Private Invest-
ment Program that will be cre-
ated was viewed as performing

the same functions — selling
bonds to finance purchases of
bad assets — as a similar orga-
nization did for the Resolution
Trust Corp., which was created
to dispose of bad real estate
assets in the savings and loan
crisis of the 1980s.

According to administration
and industry officials, the toxic
asset program will have three
major parts:

—A public-private partner-
ship to back private investors’
purchases of bad assets, with
government support coming
from the $700 billion bailout
fund. The government would
match private investors dollar
for dollar and share any profits
equally.

—Expansion of a recently
launched Fed program that pro-
vides loans for investors to buy
securities backed by consumer
debt as a way to increase the
availability of auto loans, stu-
dent loans and credit card debt.
Under Geithner’s plan for the
toxic assets, that $1 trillion pro-
gram would be expanded to
support purchases of toxic
assets.

—Use of the FDIC, which
insures bank deposits, to sup-
port purchases of toxic assets,
tapping into this agency’s exper-
tise in closing down failed banks
and disposing of bad assets.

Some industry officials said
hedge funds and other big
investors are likely to be more
leery of accepting the govern-
ment’s enticements to purchase
these assets, fearing tighter gov-
ernment restraints in such areas
as executive compensation.

Administration officials, how-
ever, insisted Sunday that a dis-
tinction needed to be made
between companies getting
heavy support from the bailout
programs and investors who are
being asked to help dispose of
troubled assets.

Romer said the partnership
with the private sector will help
ensure that the government
doesn’t overpay for the toxic

assets that it will be purchasing.

“This isn’t just another hand-
out to banks,” she said on CNN.
“We very much have the tax-
payers’ interest in mind.”

The administration’s
revamped program for toxic
assets is the latest in a string of
banking initiatives which have
also included efforts to deal
with mortgage foreclosures,
boost lending to small busi-
nesses and unfreeze the market
for many types of consumer
loans.

In addition, the nation’s 19
biggest banks are undergoing
intensive examinations by reg-
ulators that are due to be com-
pleted by the end of April to
determine whether they have
sufficient capital reserves to
withstand an even more severe
recession. Those that do not will
be able to get more support
from the government.

The overhaul of financial reg-
ulation will be revealed by Gei-
thner in testimony he is sched-
uled to give Tuesday and Thurs-
day before the House Financial
Services Committee.

In addition to the expanded
authority to seize big institu-
tions that pose a risk to the
entire system, the administra-
tion is also expected to offer
more general proposals on lim-
iting excesses seen in executive
compensation in recent years,
where the rewards prodded
extreme risk-taking.

The regulatory plan is also
expected to include a major
change that gives the Federal
Reserve more powers to over-
see systemic risks to the entire
financial system.

The administration is working
to unveil its proposed regulato-
ry changes in advance of a
meeting of the Group of 20 eco-
nomic leaders, which Obama
will attend on April 2 in Lon-
don. European nations have
complained that lax financial
regulations in the United States
set the stage for the current
financial crisis.

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

MANAGER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

One of our major clients seeks to recruit a qualified information technology professional
with experience in financial and customer service applications for the above position.

QUALIFICATIONS:

* Masters of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

* Eight or more years experience including hands-on technical experience and
two years minimum managing an information technology department in a large
organization with a complex, multi-vendor, multi-platform and distributed
computing environment
Visionary who can analyze problems within the context of corporate strategy,
balancing the consideration of facts, priorities, resources, constraints and

alternatives

RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Lead, monitor and develop a team of information technology professionals to
deliver customer focused service and set performance expectations to achieve

excellence

Manage the development, implementation and day-to-day operations of the
Information Technology department
Actively contribute to the tactical and strategic development of information
technology to support the organization’s business needs

Accountable for the successful delivery to agreed time scales and within budget of
departmental projects or programmes
Assist accounting and engineering departments in ensuring accurate and timely

NATIONAL AWARD / BURSARY
TEACHER EDUCATION GRANT

MAY 29, 2009

reparation of reports
MAY 29, 2009 ie :

REQUIREMENTS:
This is a senior position that will require a professional with very extensive
experience in supervising and controlling computer professionals in financial,
customer services and engineering applications.
Strong management and communications skills
Strong technical and troubleshooting skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure
Solid understanding of business operations and strategic planning

Application forms must be properly completed,

WITH ALL REQUIRED INFORMATION ATTACHED
and returned ON OR BEFORE the deadline to the

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION

APPLICATION FORMS RECEIVED AFTER THE
DEADLINE
WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED

COMPENSATION:
Attractive salary and other benefits will be commensurate with training and experience.

PLEASE VISIT OR CONTACT THE SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL Eire any on ecient een

LOAN DIVISION, MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, FOR APPLICATION
FORMS AND/OR FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: IT MANAGER 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

APPLICATION FORMS CAN ALSO BE OBTAINED FROM OUR
WEBSITE AT www. bahamaseducation.com

Private & Confidential


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 5B



Airport financing $45m below target

FROM page 1B

Business that the Bahamian
component of the bond facility
was “oversubscribed”, but that
Citibank, which was acting as
placement agent, had to take a
large component of the remain-
der due to weak international
investor demand.

As for the participating debt
facility, some $50 million of the
$70 million raised was taken up
by the Government. The Gov-
ernment effectively underwrote
the entire LPIA financing
effort, given that there was little
prior demand for the partici-
pating debt facility.

If that facility had not been
placed, then the whole LPIA
financing initiative could have
been stalled. Raising the par-
ticipating debt was a condition
precedent for the financing to
go ahead, because the $80 mil-
lion was required to re-finance a
previous loan of the same
amount taken out by the Air-
port Authority, which had a sev-
en-year payment term.

Tribune Business also under-
stands that NAD ultimately had
to increase the interest rate
coupon attached to the senior
secured bonds to 8.5 per cent,
up from an initial 8 per cent,
thus giving investors a greater
rate of return. It is also under-
stood that NAD is aiming to

break ground for construction
work on LPIA’s first redevel-
opment phase by July this year.

The first phase involves the
construction of a new 247,000
square foot US departures ter-
minal on land immediately adja-
cent to the existing terminal to
its western side. A further one
million square feet of asphalt
runway apron, expanded park-
ing facilities and new roads will
also be constructed. The new
departures terminal is expect-
ed to be completed by 20100.

Stewart Steeves, NAD’s vice-
president of finance, and its
chief financial officer, said in a
statement: “We were able to
raise $40.1 million in $B, $194.9
million in $US and $30 million
available in either $B or $US
for our expansion project. We
anticipate opening the new ter-
minal in early 2011 and will then
seek subsequent funding for
stages two and three.”

“We are pleased to announce
that funding for stage one of
the LPIA terminal redevelop-
ment programme is complete.
This represents the beginning
of an exciting chapter in the his-
tory of aviation in the
Bahamas.”

So far, more than $11 million
has been spent on capital
improvements at LPIA, includ-
ing upgraded washrooms, roof

IN THE ESTATE OF THOMAS ALLISON
AUGUSTUS CLEARE SR late of Joe Farrington

Road in the Eastern District

in the Island of New

Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of

the Bahamas.

Deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any
claims against the above-named Estate are required, on
or before the 10th day of April, A.D. 2009 to send their
names and addresses, and particulars of their debts or
claims, to the undersigned, and if so required by notice
in writing from the undersigned, to come in and prove
such debts or claims, or in default thereof they will be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution AND all
persons indebted to the said Estate are asked to pay their
respective debts to the undersigned at once.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the expiration
of the mentioned above, the assets of the late THOMAS

ALLISON AUGUSTUS CLEARE

SR_ will be

distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Administrator

shall then have had notice.

Dated this 20th day of March, A.D., 2009

c/o PYFROM & CO

Attorneys for the Administrator,

No.58 Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N 8958,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.

repairs, a new baggage system,
and baggage carousel and park-
ing lot improvements.

Financial advisers aplenty
were at NAD’s offices on Fri-
day to sign for their respective
bond allocations on behalf of
themselves and their clients.

In a previous interview with
Tribune Business, Frank Wat-
son, the Airport Authority’s
chairman, confirmed that the
financing had been restructured
so that the first phase was seek-
ing less than the original $310
million.

He added that the Airport
Authority and NAD had
reduced the $310 million they
were seeking after dropping
plans to, in the first financing
round, also raise some funds to
enable the second phase con-
struction to start immediately
the first phase was finished.

“For the time being, we’re
going to fund the first phase,”
Mr Watson said. “Included in
the borrowing we were doing
for the first phase would have
been some funds to start the
second phase, while we were
negotiating the remaining
financing. We had to drop that
because of the requirements
Fitch was asking for.”

Mr Watson said NAD and
the Airport Authority had
dropped plans to obtain a cred-

it rating for the senior secured
bonds from Fitch, the interna-

tional credit rating agency,
because the requirements it

MUST SELL

VACANT LAND
WINTON HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
Lot #4, Block 1

wanted to impose were too
onerous.

All the parcel of land containing 15,589 sq. ft. on the southern side
of Woodland Way, and about 350 feet east of Culberts Hill.

Zoning is for single-family residential homes, all the utility services
are available. The site is located 5 miles from downtown Nassau,
1 mile from shopping center and 1 mile from the nearest school.

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before April 10, 2009.

For further information, please contact us @ 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608



VACANCY NOTICE

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the position of

Director, responsib

le for the operations, development and execution of strategic and tactical plans of its

Customer Service Department.

The successful candidate is expected to manage the account activities of approximately 30,000
customers, including metering, billings, credit, collections and a 24-hour call center.

The applicant must have strong communication, problem solving and trouble shooting skills with
demonstrated decision-making ability and leadership.

Applicants must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Accounting or Equivalent;
5 years supervisory experience in billing and collections in a high volume utility environment, banking
or its equivalent and a track record of reducing arrears.

Qualified applicants may apply to:-

THE DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMITED

KOM Ca eM rie lie Mm Srlie tien
OR BY EMAIL: hrdept@gb-power.com

P.O. BOX F-40888 Y | f
*

CRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

Se aT ore

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS



MARCH 31, 2009

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
RAH AKIAS SATION AL DRA AGEN Y

PUBLIC NOTICE

TESDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF DRLAGS AND
RELATED Poets

save 30%

on newspaper & radio
Elev cia(siale

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and
Related Items for the Public Hospitals Authority
and the Minestry of Health, Che Commonwealth
of The Bahan.



LIMITED TIME OFFER

The which inchuddes
mstructhon to the lenderers along w ith other
relevant information, can be collected from the
Rahamas National Drug Agency, Market &
McPherson Streets, beginning from Friday 20",

March 2009 trom 9 am — 5 pin.

Tender Document,

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a
envelope or package identified as
“Tender for the Supply of Drog and Related
tems” and addressed to

soaked

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third ‘Terrace, West Centerville
P.O, Box N-8200
Nass. The Bahan

Electronic and hard copies must be received at
the abowe address on of before Spm Friday,
April 24", 2008 A copy of a valid business
litense and Nationals Insurance Certificate

must accompany all propasals,

The Public Hoapitals Authority reserves the neh
te rejcet any or all Tenders).

Director

stimulus 242.322.4652


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SINE eee
British Colonial seeks ‘good title’ confirmation

FROM page 1B

the project’s contractors. How-
ever, Tribune Business has been
told by informed sources that
there is no suspension to the
drawdowns, and the renovation
project continues as planned.

“The renovation went
ahead,” one source said.

The current ‘clean title’ issue

is somewhat strange, given that
previous purchasers and
financiers of the British Colo-
nial Hilton, such as Ron Kel-
ly’s RHK Capital investment
vehicle, and Scotiabank

(Bahamas), and their attorneys
seemingly expressed no con-
cerns. They are likely to have
been reassured by Companies

Registry documents showing
the mortgage discharge.

The British Colonial Devel-
opment Company’s Board,
along with resort management,
have been focused on the ongo-
ing $15 million upgrade to the
existing hotel property as their
top priority.

Following a settlement with

former joint venture marina
partner, Island Global Yacht-
ing, the company is still eyeing a
multi-million dollar develop-
ment on land adjacent to the
current downtown Nassau
resort, although the “mix” of
uses has yet to be determined
and no formal scheme has yet
been submitted to the Govern-

ment.

Dr Jurg Gassmann, who is
also a non-executive director of
British Colonial Development
Company’s largest sharehold-
er, Adurion Capital, previously
told Tribune Business that any
development on the undevel-
oped land immediately to the
hotel’s west would “to a large

extent be independent of the
hotel”.

“The plan always was to have
some offices, some residential
and/or a hotel,” he said. “The
Government would like to see
some hotel and residential. That
combination is still very much
the plan, but what the relative
share will be is something that

we’ve actively been looking at
for a while.

“That’s the thinking that’s
been going on for a while now —
what should the mix be? The
undeveloped land is very much
to one side. Whatever develop-
ment happens next door can,
and probably will be, to a large
extent independent of the hotel.
Once we have a plan formed,
we'll have to have discussions
with the banks and the Gov-
ernment.”














Legal Notice

NOTICE
RAINY RESOURCES LTD.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OLIVE INVESTMENT
GROUP LTD.

— 4 —

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

— «—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138



138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of RAINY RESOURCES LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of OLIVE INVESTMENT GROUP LID.

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
KITEN INTERNATIONAL, INC.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator) ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator) Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), KITEN INTERNATIONAL, INC. is in dissolution.
Ms. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, PO. Box
N-3026, Nassau Bahamas. All persons having claims against
the above-named company are required to send their names ad-
dresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator
before the 18th day of April, 2009.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JJW HOLDINGS LTD.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BUDYONNY HOLDINGS INC.

— — — §—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BUDYONNY HOLDINGS INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of JJW HOLDINGS LTD. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FULLUCK
COMPANY LIMITED

me -—

Company has therefore been struck off the Register. the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. jane
(Liquidator)

(Liquidator) (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of FULLUCK COMPANY LIMITED has

. been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
Legal Notice

NOTICE
SHALESA OVERSEAS LTD.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PUNCAK INC.

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

Ss =o
? ARGOSA CORP. INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (Liquidator)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of PUNCAK INC. has been completed; a Cer-

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SHALESA OVERSEAS LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NIVI HOLDINGS CORP.

tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. has therefore been struck off the Register.

— f}—

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

cr AL”
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 19 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,654.52 | CHG -0.53 | %CHG -0.03 | YTD -57.84 | YTD % -3.38
FINDEX: CLOSE 811.37 | YTD -2.82% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $
Abaco Markets 1.45 1.45 0.070
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.992
Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.244
Benchmark 0.63 0.63 -0.877
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.105
Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.055
Cable Bahamas 13.95 13.95 1.309
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NIVI HOLDINGS CORP. has been com-

EG CAPITAL MARKELS pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Morey 21 Work

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

1.39
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.31

30.0
43.1
10.7
24.0
14.8

0.118
0.438
0.099 16.0
0.240 9.0

0.598 13.0
0.322 34.2
0.794 13.2
0.337 15.0
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6

13.5
11.0
55.6

2.83
6.48
1.74

2.83
6.48
1.58
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50

2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.05
1.00
0.30
5.50

2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
0.00 0.00 0.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8988 -1.40 -3.35
1.4432 0.67 4.37
3.3201 -1.94 -11.33
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0440 0.80
1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAGNOLIA OVERSEAS LTD.

9,000

0.00 280 0.407
0.952
0.180
Interest Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

100.00

EPS $ #
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

52wk-Low Symbol Weekly Vol. P/E
Bahamas Supermarkets : f : s : ‘
Garibbean Crossings (Pref) Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
ings

4.540
0.000

0.002

0.000
0.000
0.000

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
RND Holdings

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MAGNOLIA OVERSEAS LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

Fund Name Div $ Yiela %
Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund

28-Feb-09
28-Feb-09
6-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-0O7
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

1.3041
2.9230
1.3828
3.3201
11.8789
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-13.33
4.40
3.64
4.40

0.56
-3.59

0.00

0.06

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Des 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 7B



BISX to unveil small
business listing plans
by ‘end of month’

FROM page 1B

“Small business is moving
along. We have plans drafted
on that. We’re testing our
assumptions to make sure we’re
moving in the right direction,”
Mr Davies told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We have promised to
make a statement by the end of
this month as to what our plans
are.

“We want to provide a list-
ing facility to provide exposure
for these entities, as well as
bring them into a regulated
environment to give them a
track record. We’ve got to find
a way to help them thrive, pros-
per and also grow.”

The BISX chief executive
explained that developing a
small business listing facility was
“very tricky, because these are
entities that do not have the
ability to garner the support of
a financial adviser, but at the
same time we want them to
flourish”.

As for other operational ini-
tiatives, Mr Davies said BISX
was working on “potentially
some debt and preference
share” listings to join the ones it
already has. He added, though,
that the exchange’s fund listings
facility was likely to be “very
quiet” in 2009, as mutual and
hedge funds readjusted and re-
positioned themselves in the
wake of ongoing financial mar-
ket turmoil.

BISX’s development of a
Central Securities Depository
(CSD), which will handle all
trading, clearing and settlement
functions, plus function as a cen-
tral database for all share regis-
ters, is seen as key in finally
enticing the Government to list
all its debt securities — govern-
ment-registered stock and Trea-
sury Bills being the main two —
on the exchange.

“The Government debt secu-
rities market is going to be
addressed with the establish-
ment of a Central Securities
Depository (CSD),” Mr Davies
explained. “With the establish-
ment of that, it will address the
concerns the Government has,
revenues will expand and we
will be able to approach things
properly and move forward. We
have every expectation that will
happen soon.”

Meanwhile, Mr Davies said
the exchange’s BISX Global
venture — where it provided the
listing and trading platform, and
acted as a joint venture partner
with major global institutions
focusing on product develop-
ment — was “still on tap” despite
having to be readjusted to
account for the global econom-
ic downturn.

“We’ve had to readjust

because, quite honestly, the
world has changed right before
our eyes,” Mr Davies said.
“There was one entity we were
dealing with quite comfortably,
and the next thing we knew, its
entire management changed
and the company was in trou-
ble.

“We've refined it. We had a
number of contingency plans,
and thank God we had them.
We were able to switch gears,
change focus and re-tool.”

Mr Davies said this had
allowed BISX to demonstrate
its qualities to potential BISX
Global partners. He added that
the exchange would “reevalu-
ate where we want to go in the
second quarter this year” with
BISX Global.

“This is still on target to
achieve what we set out to do,”
he added.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIRDFORTH

INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
— ii
#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of BIRDFORTH INVESTMENTS PTE.
LID. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has

been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



PRICEVWATERHOUSE( GOPERS

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

Purpose

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) will provide technology vision and leadership in the
development and implementation of information technology (IT) programmes. He/she will
lead the planning and implementation of enterprise information systems to support business
operations and achieve more effective and cost beneficial enterprise-wide IT operations.

Essential Functions

e Establish guidelines and programmes for effective IT management.
¢ Provide data processing services required.

¢ Recommend long and short range management information systems plans and budgets.

e Approve staff recommendations on major systems development and/or research

projects.

Establish strategic policy for planning, development, and design of information needs.
Research management information systems hardware and software including applicable
vendor applications, data base management, and operational control packages.

Sets policies to ensure privacy and security of data processing facilities.

Establish guidelines and programmes for effective database management utilisation.
Consult with and advise department heads on IT management needs and problems.
Demonstrate continuous effort to improve operations, decrease turnaround times,
streamline work processes, and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality

customer service.

Education, Experience and Necessary Qualifications
Minimum of 3 years of experience with increasing responsibilities for management and
support of information systems and IT; direct management of a major IT operation is
preferred. Experience should also include exposure to both shared and outsourced solutions,
as well as support of in-house information and communication systems in a multi-site client-
server environment. Specific experience with financial and human resource management

STEP

STEP

Society of Trust & Estate Practitioners (Bahamas)

fn conjunction with
The dzseciation af laternational Banks dt Trust Companies in The Bahanias (ALaT)
and
The Bohontaz Finacial Services Board (RF AB)

Presents a
TRUST WORKSHOP
wilh
24 Ola Buildin,
Jar
Tras! Proctioters dag That ont Bae Poke Lawyers
Fivancie! Rervines inher Sicdasleeiracaaahe ley aaa of Extaue Proming

David Brawabill OC

Topic coverage:

Review af Bahamian Trirst Legislarioa - Focus an Trevtee dct amd Chodce af Governing Caw Act
Drafting Trirat Deeds — Forces on Orafitgg of Special Provision Charnes and for “Future Prohlears”
Cpwdave of Recent Trt Cases
Care Srwily

i. Broweddil's priciee ancetipaiaed af aipecti of vat and related conipany matfars, with parteulir
eephenis oo /etanrational (reat, Me fe the douedar and eelfer of fhe Joureal of infernevene! Trost and Corporate
Paoeng jordans), and a member of STEP, sending on tbe lederoaiiona Commities

Tine F230 ae fo Jee "FSR? die Afoonton, Afarele 2, 20K
Date: Thwradoy, ddlrch 24, 2 To: Robrr Oa, STEP Tel: 223-0872
Voaue; “SSRI COLONEL ALTON Or robprisigokobamor, ang

Seni pike S00 pee pa

© Koepone hereqeired by deadline steied aboer oy accomrecedsijers will bee lirmiiedl

Tisdale

The vhews and apinioes espreseed bey presenters af STEP-spomsonel events or ia STEPspansered pablicaiiens: are ant
feccarlhy the viet mad opioids af STEP, le alflcers, or aay of its cemilioca members lin partici, the fect Ghat STEP
may previce a ferem fer, or may cherries facilisi the euprenien al, wach views ged epinions sheald mei be interpreted to
mean ar imply that STEP acnepts, adap, or enon rages the aoneplance or opie af any af cach views: and opinions ether
wholly af in part.

- ART ss JG BAHAMAS

PND} uss Pre

STEP BAHAMAS, Goodman's Bay Corporte Centre, Ist FL. PO. Box 6-1 Tie, Nivesau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-66 12 * Fam: (242) 226-77 * robyniiistepbahamas.ong

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

PROCUREMENT FOR SCHOOL
FURNITURE FOR NEW SCHOOLS &
REPLACEMENTS 2009-2010

The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’”) now invites
sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement of School Furniture
for New Schools and Replacements.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from the
Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education, Headquarters,

Thompson Blvd. from Wednesday 18 th March, 2009, and obtain further

information systems is a plus. Other skills required include:
information, at the second address given below.
¢ Familiarity with: desktop, notebook, handheld, and server computer hardware; local
and wide area network design, implementation, and operation; operating systems such
as Windows, OS/400, Unix, and Linux; and computer peripherals such as printers,
monitors, modems and other equipment.
Knowledge of office productivity software programmes such as word processing,
spreadsheet programmes, databases, and communications software.
Ability to: analyse and resolve complex issues, both logical and interpersonal; and
negotiate and defuse conflict.
Effective verbal and written communications skills and effective presentation skills, all
geared toward coordination and education.
Self-motivator, independent, cooperative, flexible and creative.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
bided on (“School Furniture-New Schools & Replacements”).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address,
or before Monday, 6 th April, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not
be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Required Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:
Requires a master’s degree in Computer Science, Business Administration or a related field or
equivalent experience. Comprehensive knowledge of:
Data processing methods and procedures, and computer software systems.
Systems design and development process, including requirements analysis, feasibility
studies, software design, programming, pilot testing, installation, evaluation and
operational management.
Business process analysis and redesign.
Design, management, and operation of managed IT systems

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday 7 th April, 2009 at the first address below.

(1) The Chairman Tender
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

Proven skills in: negotiating with vendors, contractors, and others; budget preparation and
monitoring; management and leadership; and communication.

Demonstrated ability to: relate to all levels of the user community; be a team player
that motivates and educates other team members; plan, implement and support systems
in a complex education environment; set and manage priorities; comprehend complex,
technical subjects; translate technical language to lay audiences; and link and apply complex
technologies to business strategies.

Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education

P.O. Box N-3913/4

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tele: (242) 502-8571

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: CIO 0647
P.O. Box N-3910

Nassau, Bahamas The Ministry reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders



Private & Confidential
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





GOP predicts doomsday
if Obama budget passed.

@ By PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Congressional Republicans on














For the stories
TAT RUT CS
BAS
on Mondays

New Previdence

Lot #1246 03, 0s00sq.
fo wv hse 2 TS Taq. A
Coealden Ware Der,
Golden Gates #2
(Appraised Valaec
&24-4,5-45_1b}

Wacunt loq at47
(10,5 57sq. fhe
Piunnings Dr d& Roy
West Lane Souchenn
Heights Sih
(Appraised Valo
S90 000,00)

Lot 83" 100°
wihuildings (1,04¢sq.
RoMiraecle Touch Auto
Care Center-Fos Hill Rd
(Appraised Vulme
$149.2 50.1

Lert (Sth x 1G]
wi'beueldange 0/41 23g. IL-
Deveuus St (Appraised
Walue 31 290 00.0)

Lots #29 & fad,
(30° ho" & Alk &T
wihusldinmge 0,14 Deu
&.—Matthew St. Masada
Village (Appraised
Walue 5145.01. te)

Los #45 & AG
(120s 100") whine
Silver Pale Ln Imperial
Fark (Appraised Vahue
S3035,.6541, 10)

Lot iss (S0°“o0")
wihse |t42sq. fi.-
Sundlower (south)
Sunshine Pork Sub Hse
Sh (Appraised ¥alec
$129,000, (105

Lot # il choy "x hoa"»
wihse 2.0265q. f.-
Sumsec Ridge Or,
Surmece Ridge Sub Hee
STS (Appraised Value
S Dib 6 Ce

Waecant bor #302,

(8 bo sg, 10 eens of
less-Rubey Ave
Winton Meadows Suh
a2 (Appraised Valeec
SSS A11G Oh)

Loar S17S (six beh
wha SO Req, M.-0ld
Cedar St Yellow Elder
(Appraised Valme
S62 BO

Lor #3 & 84, BIk #47
(30°% P00" yp owedeplex fe

ac LApp reais
Waluoe S12 20,00e1, 0)
Agdres
2. Beach front lot O00
Fro w/biiildiag 2,14
S.-—Pinders Mangrawe
Cay Andros
(Appraised Volme
S Tip ea
Lot 4,3445q. fi.
widuplics bur ldinge
1. T4aq. ft-Fresh Creek
Andros (Appraised
Salmec 544.6441. 10)
Crasd Hahama
Li #2001715 08q. 1.)
wise 2, 09100. ft
Bik#8, Section @2-Seo0
Crull Dr, Bahama Reet?
Wacht & Cauntry Club
Sub Gound Balen
(Appraised Vabue
S25 0,1O Ob)

. Vacant lor ea, Rik au
(14.39 7sq. iL
Yorkshire Dr, Bahamia
Wiest Replat Cand
Bahai (Appraised
Walue SIS 00 00)

Sunday predicted a doomsday
scenario of crushing debt and
eventual federal bankruptcy if
President Barack Obama’s mas-
sive spending blueprint wins
passage.

But a White House adviser
dismissed the negative assess-
ments, saying she is “incredibly
confident” that the president’s
policies will “do the job” for the
economy.

White House Council of Eco-
nomic Advisers chairwoman
Christina Romer insisted that
the nation’s flailing economy
will be rebounding by 2010.

Administration officials —

and the president himself —
have taken a cheerier tone
despite economic indicators that
are anything but positive.

“T have every expectation, as
do private forecasters, that we
will bottom out this year and
actually be growing again by the
end of the year,” Romer said.

Senate Republicans predicted
$20 trillion annual deficits and a
weakened dollar if Obama and
his Democratic allies get their
proposed $3.6 trillion budget
plan passed.

“The practical implications of
this is bankruptcy for the Unit-
ed States,” said Sen. Judd

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P-O.Box S-303-4
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel:(242) 327-578V327-5793-6
Fax:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www. bahamasdevelopmenthbank,.com

Properites

» Vacant Lot a8 Blk #12
Unit #3 (1 1.2508q.
iL}Heney Ave Derby
Sub Gined Bahaensa
(Appraised Value
Se 2000)

7. Lot #45 B
LLCs 10 ee tse
Duplex-Melson Ral
Poinciana Gardens
Grand Bohoma
[4 pqeraised Valine
5 en

it. Lor WaT (sa'n 150"
wi sixples 2-sborey
apartment building &
Church 3,40 Deg, ft-
Martin Town, Rings
Sub Eight Mile Rock
Grand Bohoma
[4 pqeraised WV ali
SELL, 2G ey

» Cot wil room hotel
5,O1sq. fi. aon 4.00
acres of beach frene-
High Rock Ceramd
Bahama (Appraised
Wabue £1, 000,000, 00)

1 Vacant lot #13, Blk
a0 Lint #3
{22.75 2ag. 1.1457" on
manal fromt-Dagenhan
Circle & Ingrave Dr
Emerakd Bea
Cirand Hahama

(Appraised Value
S110, 060 G0

. Vacant lor #21, Blk a
(14. 161sq. 1, -
Watertal! Dr &ealeo rsa:
Village Seb Grand
Bohama (Appraised
Wabi SO)

. Lor#®is, Blk #15 Lin
07 (90°. L257" )}-Derby
Sub Grand Bahama
(Apqeraised Wale
S230 ee)

23. Vacant lot #25, Bik

ffs. fi.)
Cutwabter Lo Shanon
Counpry ¢ ‘lok Suh
Cirand Bahama
(Appraised Waluwe
STA 00h1.ie0)

. Wasnt hor 4 ae
section 2A
(BS "x 025") Pabmeri Dr
Grand Bahama East
(Appraised Value
SS A

- Lor #2 20 00sg. 11
wibaildimg complies ab
coin Larned rome
Qucens Highway

tines Rick
Ong Cpanel
Bahama (Appraised
Value £1 78,60 iy
Abaco
6. Lor #34 F (6, S0sg
fb wey briphlios
foundation 2,7 Bsg.
fi.—-Murphy Town
“chen q A pepe i saoel
Walie $2489, O01)
27. Vacant lot #6 (2 acres)
Fox Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
SS Ube Oe)

26. Lor #31 £15,090. Th
w' building —NMurphy
oan Abaco
[Apqera ised Wali
SOUT ALTA
Portion aflear #64
(13 000sq. f.1-Fromt Sa
Munphy Town “Abaco
[Appraiser WV allie
SPOT SA Oe
Lot #55 (6.9 0syq. f.4
wi building Murphy
Doan Alec
LA pera ised Wali
S275.)

» Lot #45 ps Teo
wi La room mocbel
3, O0sq. f.-Sandy
Point Abaco
LApera isa Valine
SARS, TOG 0)

2. Lot 87.) 20sqg. Fe. wid

oi | shoraape
heilding totaling
4, 18659. f.-Sand
Banks Treasure Cay
Abaco qk pp iised
Waal Sa Se

Eleuthera

» Property J1' whse= Lord St Taprum
Bay Eleuthera
(Appraised Valine
S 40000 10)

- Vetent porpon of ber
87 (50°x 110" >}-West
Janes Cisberm
Eleuthera (Appraised
Walue SR AG)

Cat Bebe

» Vacant 6.5 acres of
land=Aurthur’s Town,
Car Island ¢ Appraised
Walue BV RAG Ob)
Lot wil 2 roc motel
1.29 acres—Acrthur"s
Town Cac island
(Appraised Walmc
$6 30 it, eh

cocks

aT. Vacant lor #=
(643, 2006q. ft }-Moss
Town Exar
(Appraised Walue
S11G, 1800p
38, Lot (30. 40sq. Bw
small heoce! 4,3 2bsq. fit.
4 eeclusive beach-
Forbes Hill Esxaene
(Appraised Value
460.000.0605
tlor Freel
16 Mba. 1LeOceanic
id Bahama Sond Sec
#3 Exum (App ee ieee
Wahuec S080 24.0)
30), Vacant lor 405
{EO"x 1227)
Commodore Rd
Elizakeih Harbour Esc.
Esurance
Wahue $45 00h, ie

Gregg, R-N.H. “There’s no oth-
er way around it. If we main-
tain the proposals which are in
this budget over the 10-year
period that this budget covers,
this country will go bankrupt.
People will not buy our debt;
our dollar will become deval-
ued.”

Sen. Susan Collins, a Maine
Republican who sided with
Obama on his $787 billion eco-
nomic stimulus plan, said she
couldn’t support the White
House plan this time.

“It would double the public
debt in 5 years, triple it in 10
years. ... That is not sustainable.
It poses a threat to the basic
health of our economy,” Collins
said.

Sen. Richard Shelby of
Alabama, the top Republican
on the banking committee, said
Obama would have to scale
back his budget, given a Con-
gressional Budget Office report
Friday that the president’s bud-





get would produce $9.3 trillion
in deficits over the next decade
— more than four times the
deficits of Republican George
W. Bush’s presidency.

Shelby predicted that num-
ber could reach $20 trillion in
coming years as Obama guides
the country to “the fast road to
financial destruction.”

The CBO predicted a deficit
of $2.3 trillion worse than what
the administration projected.
Romer downplayed those num-
bers.

“There is a question whether
CBO is right. So we know that
forecasts — both of what the
economy is going to do and of
what the budget deficits are
going to do — are highly uncer-
tain,” she said.

Asked the level of her confi-
dence in an improving econo-
my, Romer was concise:
“Incredibly confident. ... We
absolutely think that they are
going to do the job for the

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

OREM GROUP S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, OREM GROUP S.A., has been Dissolved
and struck off the Register according to the Certificate of
Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the 6th

day of February, 2009.

Mikhail Nechvolodov,
Business Address,
LLC “PRAVO VYBORA” 109316
Volgogradsky Prospect,
2, Moscow, Russian Federation
Liquidator

American economy.”

Vice President Joe Biden’s
economic adviser said the
administration was open to
negotiate with lawmakers. “We
don’t expect these folks to sign
on the dotted line,” Jared Bern-
stein said.

However, he added, “What
we do expect and what we are
going to stand very firm on,
because this president, this vice
president have made this clear,
that there are these priorities
that brought them to the dance
here: energy reform, health care
reform, education, all done in
the context of a budget that cuts
the deficit in half over our first
term.”

Bernstein spoke on ABC’s
“This Week.” Romer spoke on
“Fox News Sunday” and CNN’s
“Face the Nation.” Shelby
spoke on “Fox News Sunday.”
Gregg appeared on CNN’s
“State of the Union.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

EXCITING AND CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITIES FOR

YOUNG BAHAMIANS

Imagine a career which will take you to the workd’s most fascinating ports and far flung
destinations, A Maritime career coud take you there.

Do you have, or are likely te have, $ BOCSE passes, including Math, FhysiexCombined Sciemee
and English Language at grade ‘C’ or above?

Have you obtained, or do you expect to achieve, a combined SAT score of at least 15007

Are you physically fit?

Are you betoveen the ages of 16 amd 21) years?

Ii you have answered KES to the questions abive then read on.

The Bahamas Maritime Authority is once again offering attractive scholarships to young
academically sound Bahamians who are keen to train for am exciting and challenging career im the

Maritime Industry which is gaining increasing national importance.

These generous scholarships are inclusive of tuition, fees, course material, accommedation and
transportation costs, Commencing in September 2M) succesful candidates will follow a 4 year
degree programme at the California Maritime Academy, a unique campos of the California State
University. Upen completion of the degree, the qualified officers will be expected to serve on hoard
4 Bahamian flagged vessel for at least 2 years providing the solid foundation on which to build
their Maritime careers.

Further intormation and application forms can
be obtained from Mire Erma Rahming Mackey,
Deputy Director, Rahamas Maritime Authority,
Mans Corperaie Centre, West Bay Street, PO

Box N-t679, Navsau, Bahamas, email:
smackevialhahamasmaritime.com, te: 396 5772
fax: 356 S389. Completed applications must
be submitted im person or by post, with copies
Of academic certilicatentranscripts and proof
of Bahamian citirenship, ne later than 31°
March, 2009. Interviews will take place in
Nassau during the last week jim April,

455 ETS

Vehicles

(1) 03 edge Carvan
11596 Fond Explorer

(1) 97 Deedge Stratos
11301 Hweada H-1 Van

Wessels
20° 41996) Robolo Vessel wil 15 BLP Ev
43° 1.98%) SMeeth Carolina Hull “Vessel
52° (107%) Hatbers Vee! (MW Boddy
S1° 41980) Deteeder Vessel |Equiliay)
40 Custom Sieel Hull Vessel (Miss Kristy) (101 Kia Bus 12 Seater
94° Sicel Hull Golf Coast Shrimp Treveeler Vessel (1378 Let Pord Boom Truck
SER with ¢t) Wat Deel eng eee Seece Charlo) (1192 Hveadai H-1] Van SVX
crew Stee Hall (120) MY Lise JL (li 06 Hegada H-1 Van SX alee
(1901 Kitchen Tandem Cherckee Trailer
(1500 Fond Ranger Truck
1599 Ford F250 Truck
(132 GMC Arigsdic Drill Thick

inrade engine

wees! bors a rece engine requiring installation. And
can be wipe al Bredtond “artes, Greed Bahar

19° (1989) Fiterglass Sports Wessel (Hull) Only)
60 (SR 2) Dekeadler Vessel (ucen Vashi)

63° (19R*] Deseo Marine Wesse!| Meweer Oreens)

Steel Buildigg T's 3" Six 06) Winders, Teo (i) Entry Doors, Two (2) 3°s10" Kollop Deers Whiste
trimoved Glee Aperoved plums and enginecrimg draings are available $30,000.00

The publec is inveled to suber

J004, Nassau, bakamas atte

Seaked bids marked’ “Tender™ ts: Kahans Ciewclopment Bank, Fl, Hes M-

‘inancial Conbtreller, fad bads will oot be accepéed or telephone 327-
$780 for additeonal infornnati Please note that all bids on the aforementioned properties and sescts
should be received ba oron March 23, 200%. The Bobames Dewelogment Bomk reserves the righa bo reject
any ofall otfcrs AW assers are sold as is,




MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009



PLP leader Perry Christie dismissed

as “‘tall-tales and garbage” the heartfelt
views of elderly Bahamian father,
Chauncey Tynes Sr, who lost his pilot
son to the drug trade 25 years ago and
believes that Sir Lynden Pindling was
being paid off by drug czar Joe Lehder.
Yet in 1984, Christie and his Cabinet
colleague Hubert Ingraham were both
fired by Pindling for their objections
to his government's corrupt links to
drug traffickers. At the time, Christie
condemned the international shame
that Pindling’s government brought

on the Bahamas and wanted the prime
minister to resign.

In light of Mr Christie’s contradictory
comments, INSIGHT is inviting him to
explain how Pindling came to spend at
least EIGHT TIMES his declared income
during the seven years between 1977
and 1983 - the height of the drug era,
when Lehder was using Norman's Cay
in the Exumas as his drug base.

The Tribune is prepared to hand over
the first two pages of next week’s
INSIGHT section to Mr Christie so that
he can explain, in the fullest detail,
where he thinks Pindling got the money
to live way beyond his means at a time
when this country was being described
by the international media as “a nation
for sale.” Read on...

@ By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

ir Lynden Pindling always

had a taste for the good

life. Once he was in power,

it took no time at all for

him to adopt a penchant
for extravagance that might have
brought a blush to the faces even of his
colonial predecessors.

When a delivery boy called at Pin-
dling’s mansion, he was directed to
the tradesmen’s entrance, from which
emerged a uniformed maid of a kind
last seen in English country houses a
century ago.

The liveried flunkey, who wore a
bonnet, pinafore and skirt to remind
her of her station, was a throwback
to the days when Dukes and Lords
ran vast estates. She was servitude
personified, like something out of
Brideshead Revisited or Upstairs
Downstairs.

“T found it very strange, and quite
amusing,” the now grown-up delivery
boy told Insight. “It didn’t seem quite
right for someone who was supposed
to be a man of the people.”

An engineer who thoughtfully tried
to tell the prime minister how to start
his newly-installed generator was
roundly berated. “I have people to do
that kind of thing for me,” said Pin-
dling haughtily.

Then, pointing to his shimmering
Rolls Royce parked outside his home,
he said: “Do you see that Rolls
Royce? I don’t know how to drive
that, either, because I have someone

bad



The stories behind the news

A question for PLP
leader Perry Christie:



PINDLING’S taste for the high life was reflected in this Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, a gift from the PLP in 1973. It cost $42,000 -
today the same style of car bought new would set you back $250,000...

to do it for me.”

Hostile though he liked to be seen
towards the English colonial types
who held sway in the Bahamas for 300
years, Pindling was never averse to
adopting their mannerisms, their
lifestyle, their honours and their
inborn contempt for the lower orders.

Like them, according to a former
PLP parliamentarian, he was always
intent on keeping the people dumb, a
strategy guaranteed to prolong power
for his government at the expense of
everyone else.

By 1973, when the PLP bought him
his first two-toned Silver Shadow, Pin-
dling was mentally primed to become
a Third World dictator whose radical
instincts — if, indeed, he ever had any
— were already part of his political
history.

From 1977 onwards, and right up
to the point when he was called to
account by the Commission of Inquiry
into drug trafficking in 1984, the prime
minister was on a roll as the flashy,
high-living leader of a country that
was not only scared to death of him,
but also effectively up for sale to some
of the most vicious criminals in the
world.

All of this is very interesting in light
of Mr Perry Christie’s comments last
week, when he cruelly and callously
dismissed the heartfelt sentiments of
an elderly Bahamian who suffered
greatly from the effects of the drug
trade.

Mr Christie knew Pindling well at
the relevant time. He was a close polit-
ical colleague who witnessed the lavish
way the prime minister lived his life

and grew suspicious of his govern-
ment’s corrupt links with the cocaine
trafficking trade.

By 1984, when the commission
exposed the rancid nature of the Pin-
dling government, Christie and his law
partner Hubert Ingraham had heard
and seen enough. They were ready to
quit their Cabinet posts in disgust.

Typically, the cunning prime minis-
ter beat them to it. By firing both in a
pre-emptive strike which shifted the
burden of guilt from himself, he was
left in a position to wreak yet more
havoc in the Bahamas for eight more
awful years.

In light of Mr Christie’s apparently
contradictory position on this vitally
important matter, The Tribune is will-
ing to offer him two pages of space in
next week’s Insight section so that he
can explain to the Bahamian people
how he thinks his boss got the money
to live at such a level.

Before he sits down to his keyboard,
let me offer a few choice details —
and the convincing conclusions of the
commission which, in the words of a
reporter of the day, “failed to give the
prime minister a clean bill of health.”

Since Chauncey Tynes Sr — a
sprightly former PLP treasurer of 88
who looks considerably younger than
his years — spoke out last week, say-
ing his son was killed because he knew
too much about the links between Pin-
dling and Lehder, others in a position
to know have come out wholeheart-
edly in support of his version of
events.

One of them is a prominent Nas-
sau attorney who, for professional rea-

Features include:

1.6- of 1.8-litre 4-cylinder engine
Automatic tranamission

Air conditioning

Power windows, locks and mirrors

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOVOTA DEALER

sons, does not want to be named. He
said: “I know for certain that every-
thing Mr Tynes said about Pindling’s
relationship with Joe Lehder is true.

“The prime minister did meet
Lehder on many occasions, he did go
partying on Norman’s Cay, and he did
receive regular consignments of cash
from Lehder in return for his co-oper-
ation. Of that there is no doubt.”

Another source has emerged to con-
firm that, in addition to Chauncey
Tynes Jr carrying regular pay-offs to
Pindling from Lehder, a member of
Pindling’s own Cabinet made deliv-
eries every Monday morning.

And it is recorded elsewhere,
including the book The Cocaine Wars
by former London Sunday Times jour-
nalist Paul Eddy, that Pindling’s bag-
man and fixer Everette Bannister reg-
ularly handed over containers full of
cash to Pindling courtesy of Lehder
and other drug interests.

In fact, Bannister — who called Pin-
dling “a greedy little motherf....r”
behind his back — told associates that
the prime minister wanted to be “cut
in” on everything when it came to pay-
offs and kickbacks.

Most decisively of all, Lehder him-
self was later to tell American law
enforcement agencies that he paid Pin-
dling for his complicity in the drug
trade passing through the Bahamas,
as did others associated with the oper-
ation.

The fact that Pindling lived well
beyond his means for many years —
the years when Lehder’s shameful
drug trafficking operation was in full
swing on Norman’s Cay — was never

INSIGHT



RL Tey



contested during the 1984 commis-
sion.

An investigator who probed deeply
into Pindling’s financial affairs was
the one who concluded that his out-
goings during this period were EIGHT
TIMES his declared income. And that
was only the money recorded in bank
accounts. Unlisted cash transactions
would possibly have taken the figure
much higher.

One ex-politician told INSIGHT
last week that Pindling’s parliamen-
tary salary at the time was insufficient
even to cover the mortgage payments
on his new mansion-style home, which
represented a gigantic leap up the
property ladder from his modest bun-
galow in Soldier Road.

Money was pouring into Pindling’s
coffers from somewhere, and it wasn’t
all from well-wishers, as they were a
fast diminishing force increasingly dis-
illusioned by the PLP government’s
squalid behaviour.

Media veterans perplexed by
Christie’s intemperate attack on The
Tribune and Mr Tynes told Insight
that the PLP leader should by now
have been in a position to confirm
that all the allegations made about
Pindling and Lehder were correct.

They said former Archbishop of the
West Indies, Drexel Gomez, one of
the most respected figures in the
Anglican church, pointed out at the
time that $3.5 million paid to Sir Lyn-
den “raised great suspicion.”

The top churchman also said expla-
nations given for some of the financial
transactions involving Pindling were
“not truthful” so he found it impossi-
ble to say the payments were not drug-
related.

After 500 witnesses, more than nine
months of hearings and 23,000 pages
of testimony, the commission was
unable to give Sir Lynden the green
light when it came to his personal cul-
pability.

Commissioners differed on whether
the money was drug-related, but the
majority report which was unable to
establish a firm link with Lehder was
interpreted by the PLP as vindication.

However, lawyer Kendal Isaacs,
leader of the FNM at the time, said:
“On the evidence that we have heard

SEE next page

CG TOYOTA moving forward

Driver front cirbeg & front passenger airbag
4-wheel anttlock brake system [ABS]
Remote keyless entry

Antitheft system with engine immobilizer
AM/FM CD MP3 player

Backed by a 3-year/'60,000 mile factory warranty.

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. 51. Mathew": Church)
Open Mon to Fri Sam - 3:30pm
Sat $am - 12noon

Tel: 397-1700

@

E-mail; execmotaria@batelnet.bs

Parts and service guaranteed

Available in Grand Bab area ot Quality Aulo Sake (Freeport) «weene Hey, 2bc-9 12d + Abaco kotor Mell, Den Mackay Bird. 367-25 18


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

A question for PLP leader Perry Christie:

there can be no question that
the prime minister and his col-
leagues, with only one or two
exceptions, have been found
guilty.”

More importantly, the com-
mission concluded that the
Bahamas was overwhelmed by

drug abuse and riddled with
corruption, a situation over
which Pindling had presided for
many years.

Tribune reporter Nicki Kelly
wrote at the time: “Some of Sir
Lynden’s closest friends and
political associates have been

aoa!

DOUBLE

FILET O' FISH

— —

WORLD'S

BURGUNDY 5 Ltr.

CHABLIS SLTrr.

CRISP WHITE 5Lrr.
FRUITY RED SANGRIA 5Lrr.

SUNSET BLUSH

Distributed by:

a.
= =z

Se

BRISTOL



8 |

e era
UL. Wank les*

char

5 LTR.

POPULAR

linked to drug pay-offs, money
laundering and influence ped-
dling.”

For drug smugglers to have
operated so openly, “corruption
must have reached to a senior
level of government”, the com-
mission reported.

Bishop Gomez’s conclusions
were reinforced last week by
Mr Tynes’ dramatic disclosures.
He said he feared his pilot son
was killed because he knew too
much about Pindling and his
associations with Lehder.

At the time, Chauncey Tynes
Jr was due to appear in court
on charges related to a DC-3
aircraft found at Nassau Inter-
national Airport loaded with
cocaine. It’s not hard to imagine
the kind of panic that caused
among those with something to
hide.

Mr Tynes blamed Pindling
indirectly for his son’s death,
saying the drug era which the
prime minister had allowed to
infect the country had claimed
many young lives.

He also said his son,
Chauncey Jr., had told him of
cash payments he brought to
Nassau from Lehder for Pin-
dling and a senior police offi-
cer.

On several occasions, his son
had taken boxes of cash direct-
ly to Pindling, he claimed. And
he had also flown Pindling to
Grand Bahama for a secret
meeting with Lehder and to
Norman’s Cay, the idyllic isle
polluted by Lehder’s “army” of
traffickers and enforcers.

A former minister, a former
senator and an intimate friend
of Pindling’s — Everette Ban-
nister — were among those the
report said had accepted large
bribes from drug traffickers.
The commission recommended
that the Attorney General take
action against all three.

Agriculture Minister George
Smith and Youth Minister
Kendal Nottage, whom the
commission found had —
“whether he realised it or not”
— fronted for a member of the
American Mafia, quit their
posts.

Their resignations were part
of a shake-up triggered by a six-
part Miami Herald series head-
lined ‘A Nation for Sale’.

Shortly afterwards Cabinet

ik

Special Introductory Price
$ 18

l lame arts

3

Fach,

GREY GGOSE

BACARDI

WINES & SPIRITS



ee ler. Plosd Tidings Ui,

®

THE PaTRON

Srikins Cisura

AMA TEs

ministers Perry Christie and
Hubert Ingraham were fired for
supporting deputy prime min-
ister Arthur Hanna’s attempt
to force Pindling to resign. Han-
na resigned when Pindling
refused to go.

Earlier the NBC American
TV network claimed that Pin-
dling and certain Cabinet min-
isters were receiving $100,000
a month in drug pay-offs.

This fits in with evidence now
emerging from Mr Tynes and
other sources which suggests
that Pindling was receiving reg-
ular consignments of cash from
Lehder, often in boxes contain-
ing $50,000 or more.

Indeed, information now
forthcoming in the wake of Mr
Tynes’ revelations offers total
vindication of Bishop Gomez’s
admirable stand all those years

ago.

Robert Ellicott QC, chief
counsel to the commission, told
a newspaper in his native Aus-
tralia after the inquiry: “You
can see, in the Bahamas, a small
community where the greed for
money suddenly descended on
them. Big money was used to
bribe police, government offi-
cials, politicians and ordinary
people to the point where cor-
ruption just became part of the
economy.”

One Australian publication
showed an aerial shot of Pin-
dling’s “mansion on the hill”
over the caption: “Though the
average Bahamian earns less
than $4,000 a year, Prime Min-
ister Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling
has done very well for himself.”

After the commission report
was published, the widespread
view was that Pindling had been
receiving cash from Lehder,
especially in light of his failure
to give satisfactory explanations
for the huge disparity between
his official income and his actu-
al outgoings. In some cases, Pin-
dling told the commission he
simply couldn’t remember
where huge deposits into his
bank account had come from.

Dr John McCartney, chair-
man of the Vanguard political
movement, was so outraged by
the commission’s disclosures
that he declared “trouble is
brewing” if Pindling failed to
resign.

Referring to a disturbance
outside the House of Assem-
bly, Dr McCartney said: “The
politics of confrontation will
intensify in this society as long
as Pindling stays, and although
we were lucky recently in that
no-one was seriously hurt in the
demonstrations, this luck will
not hold forever.

“Hopefully, Sir Lynden and
the pro-Pindling segment of
party officials will see that the
handwriting is on the wall —
save our country from this
nightmare.”

Pointing to Pindling’s detri-
mental effect on foreign invest-
ment, he added: “Who will
invest in a country where there
is growing social turmoil and
where the prime minister has
lost the respect of the majority
of his people?

“Tt is obvious to all but the
blind that the prime minister is
incapable of ever regaining the
respect of the people,” he
added.

Evangelist Rex Major chimed
in with his belief that Pindling
had brought dishonour on the
country. “We feel ashamed,” he
said, “We feel a sense of dis-
grace.”

And a constitutional lawyer
told The Tribune that Pindling
should quit because - as prime
minister - he had to be held
accountable, under the West-
minster form of government,
for the actions of his ministers.

Two of the commissioners,
James Smith and Edwin Willes,
said in their report that Pin-
dling’s expenditure in the years
from 1977 had far exceeded his
income.

However, they added, none
of the known sources of funds
made available to them
appeared to have been drug-
related. As for unidentified
deposits, the sources of which
were still unknown, there was
no evidence before the com-
mission upon which they could

form an opinion as to whether
they were drug-related.

Archbishop Gomez, then a
bishop, refused to sign the find-
ings of his commission col-
leagues, saying: “It is certainly
feasible that all of these pay-
ments could have been made
from non drug-related sources.
But in my opinion, the circum-
stances raise great suspicion and
I find it impossible to say the
payments were all non drug-
related.”

The constitutional lawyer said
the real point, however, was
that Pindling was found to have
received very large amounts of
money from people whose tes-
timony did not impress the com-
missioners as reliable.

“The sum which Mr Everette
Bannister admitted he paid to
the prime minister under the
disarming description of a ‘find-
er’s fee’ alone, in my opinion,
convicts the prime minister and
with him all his ministers under
the rule of collective responsi-
bility.

“The finder’s fee - of which a
mere $334,000 was paid by Ban-
nister to Pindling - was paid
because a government board
(National Economic Council)
of which the prime minister was
a participating - and, no doubt,
dominating - member, gave its
assent to the transfer of own-
ership of the Paradise Island
Bridge to foreigners.”

In the lawyer’s opinion, that
transaction alone - from which
Pindling gleaned personal ben-
efit - was enough to condemn
him and justify the resignations
of himself and his entire gov-
ernment.

Whether the funds came from
drugs was irrelevant, he said.
“Pindling simply had no right
to receive the funds, whether
they came from drugs or Sun-
day School collections.”

At the same time that the
lawyer was offering his opin-
ions, a placard demonstration
closed down Paradise Island
Bridge as irate Bahamians
declared en masse that “the
chief is a thief.”

They blamed Pindling not
only for selling the bridge to
foreigners, but also taking a
huge cut from the proceeds for
himself.

Mr Isaacs, meanwhile,
declared that Pindling had lost
the moral authority to govern.

“Tf we are not careful, we are
going to produce a corrupt gen-
eration of young Bahamians,”
he said. “This is a fight - not
just by the FNM - but by all
good thinking people against
evil and corruption. This is a
fight we have to win because if
we lose, the Bahamas loses,” he
said.

Janet Bostwick, MP for
Yamacraw, said some people
had likened Pindling to the vil-
lainous American president
Richard Nixon. “But Nixon was
an angel compared to Pindling,”
she said, “We are ruled by ban-
dits.”

In the light of all this, Mr
Tynes’ claims do not seem out
of place. In fact, they slot in
comfortably with a pattern of
suspicion developing around the
government at the time. Put
bluntly, the PLP government of
the day - with the obvious
exceptions - was seen as a
bunch of villains who needed
to be inside Fox Hill.

Had Mr Tynes and others
been ready to testify in 1984 -
especially with regard to first-
hand evidence about the pay-
offs to Pindling - there is little
doubt that the commissioners
would have reached a more
robust, and condemnatory, con-
clusion.

However, the climate of fear
created by Pindling during the
first 15 years of his administra-
tion was such that most people
kept their mouths shut.

And Chauncey Tynes Sr
would almost certainly have
been influenced by the fate of
his son.

What we do know for sure is
that the Pindling government’s
corrosive influence led the
Bahamas into a culture of drug-
taking, corruption and crooked-
ness which persists to this day.

Nicki Kelly’s Tribune article



of January 9, 1985, accurately
foreshadowed what we see now
in the Bahamas - a land where a
sense of entitlement and a lack
of accountability have led to a
total moral collapse.

“The level of violence has cat-
apulted the Bahamas to a place
among Interpol’s list of the ten
most crime-ridden countries,”
she wrote.

“The question now is whether
Sir Lynden’s badly tarnished
image can carry him through
until the next general election in
1987.”

In fact, it did. Unhappily for
the Bahamas, Pindling managed
to clinch victory in that poll and
condemn the country to five
more years of decline. His poli-
cy of keeping the people dumb
had paid off resoundingly. They
were so dumb, in fact, that they
re-elected a pariah prime min-
ister whose reputation among
fellow western leaders had
plummeted to zero.

It’s interesting to note that
the British prime minister, Mar-
garet Thatcher, who had once
regarded Pindling as a post-
colonial success story, did not
wish to be photographed along-
side him once the story of the
drug era surfaced in the inter-
national press.

By the time he was finally
ousted, in 1992, the country was
morally and financially exhaust-
ed, and Pindling was being
depicted openly in the interna-
tional media as little more than
a Third World thug with a reck-
less lust for riches that eclipsed
all other considerations.

As the reality of Pindling’s
awful regime is revisited, raked
over and revealed, intelligent
young Bahamians will be won-
dering why the PLP is so eager
to preserve his “legacy”, what-
ever that legacy turns out to be.

Christie’s hysterical condem-
nation of Mr Tynes sounded
more like the strangulated cry
of a desperate man than the
measured response of a ratio-
nal party leader.

And Senator Allyson May-
nard-Gibson’s suggestion that
the libel laws should be extend-
ed to protect the dead - thus
rendering the likes of Pindling
immune from proper scrutiny -
was so asinine that one won-
ders whether her brain was
properly engaged at the time.

Wise political observers, of
course, know full well why PLP
leaders are so frantic in their
determination to clutch hold of
this tarnished talisman of yes-
teryear.

The plain truth is that they
have nothing else. No ideas, no
leadership, no noticeable abili-
ty, no vision, few principles, no
plan and a support system
founded on society’s dimmest
and dumbest.

As Bahamians become more
savvy, more sophisticated and
more informed, it is inevitable
that the PLP will become
increasingly irrelevant. Only the
terminally ignorant, the incur-
ably stupid, are swallowing the
Pindling myth nowadays.

One of the party’s own for-
mer stalwarts, Edmund Moxey,
told Insight: “After the ‘revo-
lution’ (in 1967), I wanted to let
the people fly, but Pindling
wanted to keep them dumb.”
Like Frangois ‘Papa Doc’ Duva-
lier in neighbouring Haiti, Pin-
dling believed the people should
remain childlike in their devo-
tion to the maximum leader.

The overwhelmingly positive
response Insight has received
to its story about Chauncey
Tynes indicates that Bahamians
have now moved forward
towards a new age of enlight-
enment. They are not as dumb
as many of them used to be, and
they are no longer ready to
absorb unquestioningly the
disingenuous nonsense that Mr
Christie tried to foist upon them
last week.

As the Bahamas moves for-
ward another crucial step, the
PLP remains mired in its preju-
dices and its inability to face the
facts. Does the country actually
need them anymore?

¢ What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT



Readers have their say...

Re: The tragic young pilot
who knew too much

DEAR Mr Marquis: My
father was one to testify about
what transpired at Norman’s
Cay in the Exumas. I follow all
your articles with great interest
(and admiration) and, of course,
this one brings up many sad
memories of what took place
as early as 1978 when my father
and mother managed High-
borne’s Cay in the Exumas.

I kept his diaries safe, hop-
ing one day to take the time to
read through them and your
recent article on Tynes Jr
forced me to begin reading
them for documented
dates/events which you may
wish to refer to as you take this
issue forward.

I am noting dates/events for
you and hope to e-mail you lat-
er today.

1978/79 destroyed my
father...emotionally and physi-
cally, he was never the same
after he left the cay in
despair. He loved his country,
worked hard at Bahamas Air-
ways for many years, and was a
very proud and steadfast
man. The final straw came
when he flew into Nassau to
speak with his good acquain-
tance who was a high-ranking
officer in the force. I recall the
words the official said to him:
"Capt., there is nothing I can
do, “The Man himself” has given
orders!”

I work with
youngsters/teenagers/young
adults within areas such as Balls
Alley (one of the many hell-
holes) and what L.O.P. has
done to this country has and
continues to destroy many gen-
erations of Bahamians. Those
who stood with him in the PLP
are equally abominable and
responsible for the destruction
of our country.

EXPOSE THEM ALL...dig
deeper and may they bow their
heads in shame!

— 8S, Nassau

In a typical lawyerly fashion,
Mr Christie tried, but failed, to
defend the wrongdoing of his
client, the former PM.

1) Who else would know pre-
cisely the details and the subse-
quent grief experienced by par-
ents who warned their son not
to continue his trips? Yet Mr
Christie dismisses the parents’
accounts of those missions.
How would Mr Christie feel if
his son or daughter met such a
fatal outcome?

The Norman’s Cay opera-
tions have been cited in local
and foreign news such that
nearly every Bahamian adult
during the said period was
aware of the behaviour of the
drug lords in The Bahamas. I
believe Mr Tynes.

2) Regarding the birth
record, will Mr Christie please
advise why, in relatively recent
times, the birth of an infant was
not recorded until after that
infant was 12 years of age?
Even persons who were born
earlier, say in the early 1900s
and earlier, had their births
recorded. If the birth took place
at the Bahamas General Hos-
pital (now named Princess Mar-
garet Hospital) don't you think
that the birth would have been
recorded?

3). "Freedom of Speech" was
ushered in by the FNM Gov-
ernment in 1992. Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham, to his credit,
brought into existence the real
democracy to these islands. As
a result of the shackles off the
mind, people prospered,
became entrepreneurs, and new
businesses were opened by
Bahamians. Recently, a colum-
nist in another newspaper had
to remind a caller to one of the

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



The ‘Tribune

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

loNSs WITH JOE LEADER AND 4 FISDLINe)

The tragic young Dilo |
Who knew too much

Porcnis



THE FRONT PAGE of the March 9 edition of /NS/GHT...

ST MN De leeMuvouly
IE RINCOVIMMY DMO ITE ILS
tried, but failed, to defend
the wrongdoing of his
client, the former PM.”

radio stations licensed by the
Ingraham government that it
was the Right Honourable Mr
Hubert Ingraham who made it
possible for him to speak, albeit
badly, about the P.M. The caller
could not do it, neither would
such talk have been permitted
over the one station, Radio
ZNS, prior to the 1992 election.
I myself had occasion to call
ZNS to advise the news anchor,
Ms Yvette Stuart, that a one-
sided story attacking then
leader, Mr Ingraham, without
his response, was not journalism
at all, but an insult to our intel-
ligence. I invited her to think
of herself in such a position.

—Shirlea resident



She agreed with me.

For the information of
younger persons, Bahamians
had been muzzled as to what
they could say. Otherwise they
would have suffered the conse-
quences, in similar manner as
Mr Christie's cold retort about
the editor of the news story
under discussion. For Bahami-
ans, retaliation would have
extended to family members
with economic consequences —
no government contracts or
jobs ever.

— Shirlea resident

Just a kind word to let you
know that there are clear and

Y Care’s

Maat

Ss

Attention: Church Men, Bankers,
Lawyers!
Men Dress Shirts

Reg.$30.00

Sale $19.99

Men Casual Pants
1/2 price
Men Jeans
2 for $30.00 reg. 1 @ $19.99

Rivers End and Jerzees
Men Polo Shirts
3 for $20.00 reg.$14.99

—

PHONES: LOCATIONS:
323-4153 Bahama Avenue & Acklins Street
322-5528 East Street South Sir Charles Hotel
324-6413 Prince Charlas Drive Careys Shopping Centre

at az : », |
ay * * 5 Fy
BA B20

We sell wholesale/retail cards and
GSM sim Cards, For more info call
Theo @ 324-6413



InsI

FEEDBACK

fair-minded Bahamians in this
country who support and
defend your rights to challenge
and awaken the dull and shal-
low opportunists who wish to
use this opportunity for their
selfish ulterior motives. Rather
than analysing and dealing with
the issue presented, the clowns
and jokers do what works best
for them among those whom
they use for their political ben-
efits and self-aggrandise-
ment. They avoided the birth
and parentage issue raised in
the article. Instead, they dis-
played the yellow streak that
defines all of them. They
hurled personal insults at you
and Mr Tynes, and his ‘senili-
ty’. You, according to them, are
a racist, who should not be in
this country, simply because
you touched and exposed some-
thing or someone dear to them.

I understand the Bahamas
Christian Council will be seek-
ing an audience with you on this
matter, and to possibly per-
suade you to refrain from writ-
ing on such controversial top-
ics. Mr Marquis, please don't
allow these so-called men of the
cloth to influence how, and
what you must write. I need not
tell you how unprincipled some
of these so-called men of God
are. I wouldn't even trust my
puppy to listen to these guys
from the Bahamas Christian
Council.

The Bahamas needs men of
courage and conviction, not
men who can be bought or
sold. Stand by your convic-
tions. By the way, after all the
fuss and name calling, I'd still
like to know who Lynden Pin-
dling really was, and his real
mother.

— VC, Nassau

I am an 18-year-old College
of The Bahamas freshman. I
personally believe this article is



one well served, for the reading
of the Bahamian public. If we
were to look back in history at
this sort of blindness towards
people who have been seen to
have done good but only
through destruction, we would
see that it is a sizely number.
From Columbus to Sir Lynden
Pindling, both have caused
destruction, but are recognised
in our social studies lesson as
heroes. I believe that the truth
should be taught in our schools
with no sugar-coating. I would
like to tell you that more arti-
cles of this nature should be

produced because we as a
Bahamian public should know
what is happening in our coun-
try.

— T Simms

I was hoping this would be
the subject of your next book! I
thought Mr Christie's com-
ments of yesteryear would
come out — what a joke! First-
ly we have to realise that Pin-
dling knew everything that went
on in this country during his
reign, he made it his business
to know. I believe that when
Mr Christie lost power his fan-
tasies were shattered, realising
his appalling governance would
be exposed. I believe that an
outsider, especially with the
experience, much in The
Bahamas, and integrity of John
Marquis, can be far more objec-
tive than a biased politician,

SEE next page

It's Electric!

Geoffrey Jones has you covered when it comes to
electrical supplies & accessories. Great service
at competitive prices. Come in today!

#14 single wire (500’ roll)..............$49.50 NET

N142 NM Cable (250’ roll)

4” Square box (50)

4” Single Gang Ring (50)

F40D/CW 4 Bulb (30)

1/2” PVC Pipe (100Lts)

1/2” PVC Adapters (100)

1/2” Locknuts (100)

* CASH ONLY

et

©2009 CreativeRelations.n:

$74.25 NET
$55.80 NET
$39.60 NET
$53.10 NET
$64.95 NET
$25.92 NET



Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
Tel: 322-2188/9

Email: Geofflones@comcast.net



East Street Gospel Chapel

Invites You to Attend The
“Jesus Is Still The Answer”

CRUSADE

March 22” - 29"

7:30 - 9:00pm Nightly

i i

Host rr
a Roberts

eee
elie ah Cie) 1S)
Free visual screenings &
“Zk Blood pressure checks

Bus transportation is available, Phone: 322-3874
Come & bring the entire family


PAGE 4C, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

FROM page 3C

whose interest after all is only
votes. I wonder how many
politicians know the meaning
of integrity, let alone put it into
practice. In closing, it would be
interesting to know who wrote,
or was to, the much vaunted
birth certificate, which magi-
cally came to light. Regards.
— No name please

As always Insight provides
the most interesting reading in
this country; it is both revealing
and thought provoking.

I missed your piece on the
young pilot; however, I knew
that it was a good informative
piece because it had lots of peo-
ple “pissed off”. The radio talk
shows were buzzing like bees
with folks trying to save
face. The newspapers a day
after were filled with politicians
trying to right something that
cannot be fixed. And your
response was perfect: you stood
by what you had written
because your source is credi-
ble.

What is so amazing, though,
about this whole thing is
that our leaders in opposition

om

a

TOSHIBA
AND SYLVANIA
LCD FLAT PANEL TV’s

Haier 15”
Model HL15R 720P

Haier 19”
Model HLC19R WITH DVD 720P

$784

Sylvania 19°
LC195SL8

$680

Toshiba 26”
Model 26AV502U

$1,080"

Toshiba 32”
Model 32AV 500U720P

Toshiba 40”
Model 40RV5250 080P

$2,060"

have again failed to realise that
CORRUPTION will no longer
be tolerated. The story proves
that the opposition needs to
stop relying so heavily on the
reputation of Sir Lynden Oscar
Pindling and seek another
angle to make themselves cred-
ible. History can be twisted and
taught to be one thing when it
fact the truth can remain untold
until someone researches
and reveals that truth to the
masses. Like your source, there
are many that can attest to facts
of the true man. The Commis-
sion of Inquiry of the 1980s is
just one of those revelations
and even that was sugar-coat-
ed. Your piece is a reminder
that all that glitters is not gold
and the truth will set us free.
— Sign me Kay

THERE is only one way to
explain the PLP’s extraordinary
reaction to the Insight article
on Chauncey Tynes Sr: the
game is up, and they know it.
With the Pindling myth now
safely dead and buried, the PLP
has nowhere to go. They were
hoping to keep the new gener-
ation of Bahamians as dumb as

When it comes to low-price

brand-name selection.

JWIN LCD Cleaning Wipes uce $7.05

FEEDBACK

they kept the last generation,
but it won’t work anymore,
thanks to The Tribune and Mr
Chauncey Tynes Sr. Welcome
to a new period of enlighten-
ment.

— RR, Nassau

Just wanted to add my con-
gratulations to the hundreds of
others I know you have
received. You are a courageous
and objective man. Please tell
me you might write, from time
to time, some “home thoughts
from abroad”!!!!7???

Warm regards

— Insight follower

Mr Marquis

Excellent responses, just
excellent!

The Tynes Family, along with
many others, have suffered
under Pindling.

electronics, we’re the team to beat.
Shop the weekend of the big game
and see how much you'll save on our

DVD PLAYERS

1080P W/HDMI JD-VD519

$110.00
TOSHIBA

1080P QW/HDMI SD6100

$150.00
COBY Home Theatre

1000W DVD958

$302.00
COBY Home Theatre

450W DVD937

$197.00
JVC Home Theatre

1000W THG40

$372.00

WALL MOUNTS
start at $24.00

TAYLOR INDUSTRIES

SHIRLEY STREET : TEL: 322-8941 - OPEN: MON - FRI 7:30am-4:30pm « SAT 8:00am-12 noon
Visit our web site at www.taylor-industries.com
We Accept VISA, MASTERCARD, SUN CARD & DISCOVER











ASSOGraAtlOn

Te el ce

ENTER TO WIN A



ght

Do you think the politicians
get it? Bahamians are up to
speed on their history.

We know the truth and there
is nothing that can clean up
their past or "SPIN" “after the
fact" that can erase or change
history!

What they did in the past and
today will follow them to their
graves and beyond.

Thank you, thank you, thank
you!

— Maria D Smith



So how was the protest today
at the Tribune? Someone sent
me some pictures and from
what I could see, it looked to
be about 25 persons if that
showed up. Was Paul Moss
there trying to score political
points? What a big joke, only
the truth hurts. Keep up the
great work!

— M-R, Nassau

I WANT to hug you, sir. That
man Pindling caused this coun-
try to sink. In fact, the biggest
downfall of this nation was due
to him. We had no more
respect, no more dignity, and
no more integrity.

The UBP government had
this country together. Under
the UBP the people were hap-
py. The school system was bet-

BMDA show.

Narre
Address
Phone

Cell

ter in those days. Everything
was better under the UBP.

Your article was the truth,
and a lot of people know it is
the truth. Everyone knows that
man was not Bahamian.

Young people don’t know
the good days we had before
Pindling came to power. All he
ever did was preach racism.

— Caller

I KNEW an old man who ran
a sandwich bar off Wulff Road.
He had an oriental wife who
tried for many years to get citi-
zenship during the Pindling era.

The old man told me he was
the fellow who brought Lynden
Pindling ashore aboard his
dinghy after the boy had been
sent from either Jamaica or
Haiti.

Pindling’s father, Arnold Pin-
dling, was on guard duty at
police headquarters that day,
so could not get down to the
waterfront to collect the boy,
so he asked this man to meet
him.

In later years, when his wife
continued to have difficulty get-
ting citizenship, the man decid-
ed to call Pindling direct. He
told him he was the one who
collected him off that boat, yet
he couldn’t get citizenship for
his wife.

Three days later, a govern-
ment official turned up at the
man’s home with a package
containing his wife’s citizenship
documents.

The man in question, who is
now dead, told me this story
himself.

— Taxi-driver



Fill out the attached entry form
and deliver it to The Tribune on
Shirley Street, or place in bins
provided at the BMDA New Car
Show at the Mall at Marathon
by 8pm on Friday, March 27.

I AM proud of you for being
bold enough to air your views.
Please keep it up. There are
ignorant people like myself who
are looking for the light. There
were some empty spaces that
you have filled. I say kudos to
you.

— Woman caller

Just a note to encourage
you. Your work is appreciated
by the enlightened ones. I
understand that about 70 per
cent of the protesters did not
read the Insight article, and
could not give a sound explaina-
tion of what they were protest-
ing against. This causes me to
want to launch a protest against
those who have produced and
cultivated such ignorance.

Keep up the good work. Nev-
er mind the boneheads with big
loud mouths who can't compete
with your intellect, but rather
respond with threats of physical
harm, and deportation
demands. There are people like
me who may not agree with
everythimg that you write, who
still love, and appreciate what
you do. We see the bigger pic-
ture of advanced nationhood
with efficiency at every level of
our ability to function effec-
tively. Continue to challenge
us toward this end, even after
your return to your native Eng-
land. GOOD JOB!

— Velly C

I recently had the opportu-
nity to read the newspaper on
your story published on March
9, 2009. Listening to the talk
shows one would believe that
you wrote all sorts of horrific
lies about Pindling. My husband
and I laugh about the story after
realising that the information
printed was given by various
sorces, primarily Mr Tynes.

In truth I believe that a lot
of persons did not read the sto-
ry and based their opinions on
what others may have told them
or relayed on various talk
shows. I am a young Bahami-
an, and it took my going to col-
lege to find out much about our
Bahamian history, which
included Mr Pindling being
referred to as having been
mixed up with drugs.

I found it interesting that Mr
Pindling's son found an old lady
that recalls Pindling’s mother
being pregnant with him. How-
ever, he did not deny that his
father’s father was a Jamaican
or his mother a Haitian.

We all know that being born
in the Bahamas alone does not
make you a Bahamian, other-
wise all Haitians born here
would automatically be
Bahamian citizens. Further, pri-
or to 1973, anyone born in or
out of the Bahamas received
Bahamian citizenship if that
child's father was a Bahamian.
Personally, I don't see anything
wrong with the article as a sto-
ry. Keep up the good work.
After all, in my opinion it is
great journalism.

— M Bethel




five cheoton for alae fiw

e $1,000 prize will only be redeemable towards
the purchase of a new car from participants at the

Fill out the attached entry form and deliver to Tribume daily through March 27.
Only ORIGINAL newsprint entry forms will be acceptad. Photocopies are not
eligible. Enter as many times as you wish.
PAGE 6C, MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

THE TRIBUNE'S



APT 3-G

TM GLAD YOU'RE NOT ) BUT IN THE MEANTIME, L HAVE
TRAVELING TO CHINA { ALOT TO Do AT THE GALLERY.
a TOMMIE

WOW...-OUR LITTLE
GIRL GREW UP
LAST NIGHT!

FOR THOSE POOR
CHEERLEADERS!






TAKE YOUR UMBRELLA-)
IT LOOKS LIKE RAIN.
Re Ewe =

DON'T GET
CARRIED AWAY.--
ZI OUST MADE}

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved

VOU LOOK
1 SEAUTIFUL, PRINCESS-.-
STUNNING, IN FACTL

A COUPLE
ADJUSTMENTS!



IN THESE wl THOUGHT
TROUBLING MY FINANCES BUT NOW
. SIGH...BOTH MY BLMO, IT'S NOT LIKE I'M SINCE WHEN? ECONOMIC TIMES WERE SAFE I'M Not so
WIL AND My IPHONE ) . 2 QUALIFIED TO BE YOUR ww O 2 SURE
ARE BUSTED! I'M SC é V2
BORED, MR. B... JQ oanw 2 —
bs ia SY

Wy

©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

www. kingfeatures.com

aA
















How WouLp W ABSOLUTELY, Let me PUT WF” How WOULD You LIKE To
WHAT WAS THE eS ee |. See ey, THAT INA CONTINUE TO GET DELICIOUS,
eee Peaeeue GO Wit ME WITHOUT A SLIGHTLY NUTRITIOUS, HOME- COOKED
YOU GOT ON TO VIGIT MY DOUBT... DIFFERENT MEALS NIGHT AFTER NIGHT 2
YOUR BIR THTAY 7 MOTHER 2 iy Ww.





(\
te

i

©2009 oy King Features Synd-cate, Inc. World rights reserved





DAO manny weds et or
Jetters. OF More fb Fou mee








TM NOT FIXING! WHATS THE POINT | NOT WHAT A RIP-OFF! T ATE
THIS BEANIE OF A PROPELLER | “STYLE,” | ALL THAT CEREAL, WAITED fri thee letiers shen ber? Ti
DOESNT MAKE BEANIE IF YOU | CERTAININ.| WEEKS AND WEEKS TO GET Makin a word, eg0h ber oy
CANT EVEN FLY THE BEANIE, ASSEMBLED IT Be Dod one: only. Bech myost
WHEN YOU MYSELF, AND THE DUMB mialsaim Lhe cenbee bel ber ami
WEAR IT 27 THING DOESNT EVEN FLY! there mut be ab jews. ome nine-
fetter Word. Mo plurals.
THAT'S TARGET
Cored) 29: Ter mood BS eect
44 for Hire). Paulas
PO.

SATUROAR SS SCAU Ri

win dlipht giem Palos foc
fonlivht fet aw fllgiut Ming
ry pol eee poh pecaeil poll
pla gill ele glint enot hotting
tale Poe beetles lathiliig
heh (eee mee ore

NIGHTFALL tang thing tho



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday





Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.





























































































Z :
2 z Yesterday’s Yesterday’s
- £
= 2 Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer
3 Zz M
uy a zB
$ g = [/8]7]4/5]9]2 3/6
< E Ss [5/6/4[8/3/2/9 7/1 1s (2/78
& V's 2 £ |3l2lel7i6/1[8 5/4 ota 3 82
<= 2 2 B
= : : = [e[3l6l9l2|4|7 1/5 g
&S se ; 8 2 [9[1[5[6|/7/3/4 8/2 Secs
es Ponrn 3 5 & |4|7/2/1|8/5|/6 9/3 1/2 F119
of LOVE SPRING WHEN ALL THE FLOWERS Ditficulty Level *& *& *&*& 3/21 e 7|5/3 4)8)1 6/9 1 26/3
START HATCHIN’” o 2|9/8 1|6|3 4/7 1 ms 4 9/5/14
, Difficulty Level oe ok ek 3/21 6/4/1/13/9/7/5 2/8 8 BN 1 [38/4 2





























ry



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across
1 Neat finish (6) 1
4 Files put in the wrong
order with malicious 2
intent (8)
9 Make a mistake and run 3
for it (6)
10 In the convent it gives 5
preferential treatment (8) 6
12 Boring makers of 7
laws (4)
13 A growing source of 8
opium (5)
14 Just the place to find 11
amusement (4)
17 They have an interest in 15
conversion
schemes (12) 16

20 Motorists and golfers must
do so to begin with (5,2,5) 18
23 High spots of a European

tour (4) 19
24 So the reformed show

spirit (5) 21
25 It's made to last (4)
28 Morning revolution? (8) 22
29 Learned man took the

chair around the front (6) 26
30 Careless example of hit

and run (8) 27

31 Exchanged abuse with a
guard, apparently (6)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Rummy, 4 Gudgeon, 8
Was, 9 Uplifting, 10 Ephesus, 11
Evict, 13 Sapper, 15 Storms, 18
Rinse, 19 Caravan, 21 Billiards, 23
Rye, 24 Dresses, 25 Scene.

Down: 1 Rawness, 2 Misshapen, 3
Yours, 4 Galosh, 5 Deflect, 6 Eli, 7
Night, 12 In reverse, 14 Enemies, 16
Sincere, 17 Scores, 18 Rabid, 20
Roses, 22 Lee.



Down

With which to welcome
honest members (4,4)
Sits reel out, though
unwearied (8)

In extremities they can be
accommodating (4)

Drops from hard work (12)
Gathered to be all right (4)
When I’d get into a
brawl? (6)

They put things on

scales (6)

Monopolise rocks that are
important in building (12)
Women of strange

views (5)

Worn by the widow taken
out by a gardener (5)
Strong drink can lead to a
smash (8)

An exploit indeed to be
beaten (8)

Shrubs for the French
underground (6)

The city may be seen as
part of ancient Greece (6)
No stranger to what dupes
may be? (4)

A stage joke turned
fatuous with the passage
of time (4)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Cycle, 4 Sapling, 8 Net, 9
Crescendo, 10 Acrylic, 11 Odium,
13 Sparse, 15 Confer, 18 Villa, 19
Booklet, 21 Sotto voce, 23 Cue, 24
Annoyed, 25 As yet.

Down: 1 Canvass, 2 Caterwaul, 3
Excel, 4 Sketch, 5 Piccolo, 6 Inn, 7
Groom, 12 In full cry, 14 Shadowy,
16 Retreat, 17 Abroad, 18 Vista, 20
Opera, 22 Tin.

ea ele

Across

1

4

9
10
12

13

14
17
20
23
24
25
28
29
30

31

Vague and wordy
speech (6)
Epoch-making (8)
Haughty (6)
Rebellion (8)

Report of recent
event (4)
Oppressively
dazzling light (5)
Portent (4)

Paradise (6,2,4)
Especially (2,10)
Disposition (4)
US-Canadian lake (5)
Only (4)

Freedom of action (8)
Happen to (6)

Form of

memorial (8)

Lay on (6)

PP
Eeoh &#eiéihte & &
rE Ey tt tt

aaa
‘ER

Down
1 Almost (4-4)
2 Preface (8)
3. Interval of calm (4)
5 Adefect (12)
6 Clip into shape (4)
7
8
1



A dried grape (6)

Convincing (6)

Unexpectedly

(3,2,1,6)

15 Mock attack (5)

16 A forest tree (5)

18 Fabled land of
riches (8)

19 Unswervingly loyal
(4-4)

21 Badge (6)

22 Scene of Tea Party,
1773 (6)

26 To check (4)

27 Consider (4)

ry Ny ao eae



A Self-Imposed Guess

West dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

NORTH
4852
W742
763
#10853
WEST EAST
@K 103 43964
7983 ¥Q 1065
@#KI84 $Q95
&l94 &72
SOUTH
@AQ7
VAKJ
A102
SAK QG
The bidding:
West North East South
Pass Pass Pass 3 NT

Opening lead — four of diamonds.

Many wrong guesses that are
attributed to bad luck turn out, upon
closer inspection, to be the result of
incorrect play.

Consider this deal where South’s
expectations of an easy time at three
notrump were quickly dampened by
the sight of North’s meager contribu-
tion to the partnership assets. All was
not lost, however, since if the miss-
ing clubs divided normally, dummy’s
ten of clubs would provide an entry
with which to try a finesse in hearts
or spades.

Declarer began by ducking the
first two diamonds, taking the ace on

the third round. He then cashed the
A-K-Q of clubs and led a club to the
ten.

In dummy for the one and only
time, South now had to decide which
finesse to attempt. Unfortunately, he
chose a spade, losing the queen to the
king. West cashed his good diamond,
on which declarer discarded a spade,
then exited with a spade to the ace.
But when the A-K of hearts failed to
drop the queen, South had to lose the
last trick for down one.

After he discovered that East held
the heart queen, South lamented his
misfortune in misguessing which
finesse to take, but the outcome was
really his own fault. Had he played
differently, no guess would have
been necessary.

Declarer knew from West’s four-
of-diamonds lead at trick one — pre-
sumably fourth-best — that West had
no more than four diamonds. There-
fore he should have won the second
diamond, preserving the ten for a
later purpose.

Three top clubs are then cashed,
after which South exits with the ten
of diamonds. West wins and takes his
fourth diamond, declarer discarding
a spade. South’s remaining cards at
this point are the A-Q of spades, A-
K-J of hearts and a club.

Whichever suit West now returns
hands South his ninth trick, and the
game is home without having to
resort to any guesswork at all.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.