Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WAKE UP!

he Tribune |

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PARTLY
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Volume: 105 No.98

BISX moves
back to

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SS 3

ocVEre

Victim receives
fatal injury

in foodstore
parking lot

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A MAN who died in hospital
a day after receiving a severe
beating, leaving him with
injuries to the head, has become
the country's latest homicide
victim.

According to a statement by
Press Liaison Officer Assistant
Superintendent Walter Evans,
46-year-old Bradley Smith was
in the area of Wulff and Village
Roads around 6 pm Tuesday
when he received his fatal
injury.

Yesterday family of the vic-
tim said Smith was beaten to
death in a foodstore’s parking
lot. Speaking to ZNS, Smith's
brother appealed to the public
to come forward with informa-
tion that could lead to an arrest.

Police said the victim was tak-
en to hospital where he died
sometime before 8 o’clock
Wednesday night.

ASP Evans did not release
the circumstances surrounding
Smith's injury but said police
were treating his death as a
homicide.

SEE page 10

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

FUNERAL SERVICE — Mrs
Nancy Kelly, widow of David
Kelly for whom funeral ser-
vices were held at Christ
Church Cathedral yesterday
afternoon, is pictured with
her eldest son, Andrew, her
granddaughter Avery, who
read verses from Ecclesi-
astes at her grandfather’s
funeral, and Shelle Kelly,
Mrs Kelly’s daughter-in-law
and wife of her second son,
Gregory. Mr Kelly, 76, own-
er of Kelly's Home Centre,
Marathon Mall, died in New
York on March 11.

e SEE PAGE TWO

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

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Man dies after
heating























BASRA locates boats

used by crew involved

in iguana slaughter,
conch harvesting

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

SAILBOATS used by crew
involved in the slaughter of a
protected iguana and harvest-
ing of juvenile conch have been
located by the Bahamas Air Sea
Rescue Association.

‘Miss Emily’ and ‘Gone
Away’ were pictured in a series
of photographs on social net-
working site Facebook along-
side ‘Sea Monkey’, the sailboat
owned by Alexander David
Rust, 24, from Indiana, and
Vanessa Star Palm, 23, from Illi-
nois, who were fined $1,000 last
month for crimes against the
environment.

Rust and Palm were pictured
with two others hauling in a
dinghy filled with juvenile conch
and grilling and eating a pro-
tected iguana in Allan’s Cay,
Exuma.

Although Rust was fined

SEE page 10

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SEE PAGE FIFTEEN

PLP hopeful claims
Kerzner’s ‘voluntary
unpaid vacation’

goes against the

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Employment Act

Paul Moss says workers
are in Catch-22 position

KERZNER International’s call for

SEE page nine

AS THE image of the late
Sir Lynden Pindling contin-
ues to be questioned, the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party is set to
hold a special church service
on March 22 to honour the
birth of the ‘Father of the
Nation’ at Bethel Baptist
Church on Meeting Street

Claim that man died
because hospital staff
took more than 40
minutes to respond

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

more than 40 minutes to attend to him.
THE QUEEN’S STAIRCASE
(above) was the site of

the fatal fall. SEE page 10

OTM CLE elie Tie
ignoring environmental hazards

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

DAYS after a Delta airlines pilot was overheard reporting a
“ten to fifteen mile long” oil slick off the Northern coast of New
Providence, two locals fishing the waters off western New Prov-
idence fear authorities are ignoring the environmental hazards.

Alex Callender and her husband were fishing near Clifton
Pier on Sunday when they suddenly noticed the wake behind their
boat in which they were trawling started “bubbling brown.”

“We said, ‘Oh my God, we’re in oil!” recalled Mrs Callender.

SEE page nine



CORONADO

FA. WN



A MAN died when he fell on the
Queen’s Staircase because, claimed an }
eyewitness, nearby hospital staff took :

Pastor Kevin Cooper said he watched

2,500 non-unionised workers to take “vol-
untary unpaid vacation” goes against the
Employment Act and is “tantamount to
coercion,” it was claimed yesterday.

PLP political hopeful Paul Moss yes-
terday said that the workers are in a
“Catch-22 position because if they decline
to forego the vacation pay, chances are
they will be made redundant. This is tantamount to coercion
and this too should be frowned upon.”

Earlier this week, Atlantis owners Kerzner International
announced that the request was put to employees, mainly

Paul Moss

PLP to hold service honouring Sir Lynden’s birth

at 10am.

The sermon is currently slat-
ed to be led by Rev Timothy
Stuart and the leader of the
party, Perry Christie, is also
expected to address the con-
gregation.

SEE page 10

New investors

i trading in equity

shares for more

stable bonds

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

AMIDST investor worry
over the stability of the local
market new investors are trad-
ing in equity shares for more
stable bonds, according to
some financial advisers.

It's a trend they say is typical
during periods of recession and
volatility, as investors who are
looking for a bigger short-term
bang for their buck lean
towards more reliable and
lucrative government bonds.

"Generally speaking after
the volatility you had in the
stock market in the last year
and a half, that has been some-
what of a movement for some
time now. Where people are
actually trying to systematical-
ly reduce their equity expo-

SEE page 10

|

Buildings souppiies

“For 50 years Coronado Paint has been
the choice of painting professionals,

providing paints with lasting performance

and consistant quality.”





NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

Wulff Road
Opposite Mackey Street
Tel: 393-0512, 393-8006,

OR 393-3513

Open Monday to Friday 7am - 4pm

Saturday 7am - 3pm



PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



y paving far





GOVERNOR-GENERAL AD
Hanna attends the funeral ser-
vice of David Kelly at Christ
Church Cathedral yesterday
afternoon. Sitting behind him
is Dame Marguerite Pindling
(in blue hat) and to her right is
Education Minister Carl Bethel.
Top inset: David Kelly.

ee aie at he

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gene ee

SANDWICH

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SHRIMP

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

CORNELIA IOLA MILATOS

of Nassau, The Bahamas who passed
away on 15th March, 2009 will be held
at The Chapel of Love, Kemp's Funeral
Home Limited, Palmdale Avenue and
Bradley Street, Nassau on Friday, 20th
March, 2009 at 10:30 a.m.

THE VENERABLE Keith Cartwright gave
the sermon yesterday.

Minister Earl Pinder will officiate and
interment will follow in The Western
Cemetery, Nassau Street, Nassau.

Mrs. Milatos is survived by her husband,

George Milatos; three children, Ivan and

Andre Chestnut and Caroline Percentie;
five grandchildren, Danielle Porceddu and Adrian Chestnut, Chelsea,
Andre and Kristen Chestnut; two brothers, Robert and Charles Hall,
11 sisters-in-law, Irene Klidaras, Evdokia Kefalianos,Maria Vallas,
Balaso , Evangelia, Niki, Poli and Maryanne Milatos, Florence Carey,
Zula Carroll and Olive Knowles; 7 brothers-in-law, Nikolas, Nioti,
Dimitri, Thanasi Milatos, Yianni Klidaras, Christos Kefalianos and
Skellarios Vallas; one daughter-in-law, Linda Chestnut and one son-
in-law, Wesley Percentie; caretaker, Lois Lee; many nieces and nephews
and a many other relatives and friends, especially Kimberly Bethel
Themelis and Irene Cathopoulis, Anne and Eugene Higgs, Patricia,
Maria and Peter Mousis, the attending doctors and staff of Doctor's
Hospital, the staff of the Walk in Medical Clinic and the staff of John's
Department Store.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Cancer Society of
The Bahamas, P.O.Box S.S. 6539, Nassau, The Bahamas, or left with
the family at the Service for the Cancer Society of The Bahamas, in
Memory of Mrs. Cornelia Iola Milatos.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, on
Thursday, 19th March, 2009 from
5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue,
Palmdale, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.















ewell to David Kelly

Hundreds, including govt ministers,
turn out to pay their last respects

FAMILY said their final
farewells to David Kelly, CBE,
yesterday as he was laid to rest
in a private service at St Anne’s
Church cemetery following a
public service attended by his
friends at Christ Church Cathe-
dral, George Street.

Hundreds, including staff and
management of Kelly’s Home
Centre and several government
ministers, attended the service
to pay their last respects.

In celebration of Mr Kelly’s
love of bright colours and love
of life, mourners were asked not
to dress in black.

The service was attended by
Governor-general Arthur Han-
na, Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette and Mrs
Symonette, National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest,
Education Minister Carl Bethel,
Mrs Allyson Maynard Gibson,
Lady Marguerite Pindling, and
other members of the House
and Senate.

Tribute

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, Senate President Lynn
Holowesko, Major General
Joseph Franklin of the US
Army, Godfrey Lightbourn,
Suzanne Black, and Barry J
Packington paid tribute to Mr
Kelly. Sir Orville Turnquest
read the intercessions, and Mr
Kelly’s granddaughter Avery
Anne Kelly, read a verse from
Ecclesiastes, while his grandson
Jordan Ross Kelly read Psalm
23. Mrs Nikita Wells sang
“Beneath My Wings.”

Rev Patrick Adderley, Dean
of Nassau; Rev Keith
Cartwright, Archdeacon of the
Southern Bahamas; Rev Father
Michael Gittens, priest vicar of
Christ Church Cathedral; and
Rev Crosley Walkine, rector of
St Anne’s Church, officiated at
the service.

After the ceremony, a police

LYNN HOLOWESKO, president of the

Senate, reads a tribute.

ASS COUT CLL

under way again



THE Sir John Templeton
Essay Competition is under-
way again this year.

The competition is open to
all junior and senior high
school students. It is based on
Sir John Templeton’s book,
Worldwide Laws of Life,
which offers codes of conduct
based on the Bible. The com-
petition is being organised by
the Ministry of Education’s
writing unit. The junior divi-
sion essay topics are:

¢ Crime doesn’t pay

e If at first you don’t suc-
ceed, try and try again

The Senior Division topics
are:

¢ You choose the path you
want to walk down

¢ Whatever you have, you
must use it or lose it

The deadline for submis-
sions is March 20 and the win-
ners will be announced in
April.

Each competitor must select
one topic from the appropriate
category and essays must be
between 300 and 500 words
long. All essays must be sub-
mitted to the candidate’s
respective school office. The
schools will submit the top five
essays to the writing unit on
March 20.



ares

7
a

THE BODY of David Albert Kelly is laid to rest yesterday at Christ Church

Cathedral.

escort led the hearse to the
cemetery.

Mr Kelly, proprietor of Kel-
ly’s Home Centre and a well-
known philanthropist, died on
March 11 in a hospital in New
York just two weeks shy of his
77th birthday.

During a routine shopping
trip to New York, on which he
was accompanied by his wife
Nancy, Mr Kelly developed
chest pains and went to the New

Cathedral.

0 In brief

York Presbyterian Hospital for
a check-up. Mr Kelly, who had
pre-existing heart condition,
underwent surgery and later fell
into a coma. A spokesperson
for the family told The Tribune
that he did not suffer at the end.

Mr Kelly’s family, including
his wife Nancy, his three sons
Andrew, Gregory and Scott;
and his daughters-in-law Can-
dy and Shelle, were at his side
when he passed away.



PALLBEARERS take the body of David Kelly out of Christ Church

Two in police custody after
marijuana found in home

TWO persons are in police custody after officers found
nearly one pound of marijuana in a home in Yamacraw

Beach Estates.

On Wednesday, officers of the Drug Enforcement Unit,
armed with a search warrant, went to the Yamacraw Beach
Estates home after 3pm. Officers found seven clear plastic
bags which contained just under one pound of marijuana,
Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said.

Subsequently, a 39-year-old man and a 31-year-old woman
who were home at the time were taken into custody. The
drugs have a local street value of just under $1,500.

Investigations continue.

Tourist fined for drug offence

A 36-year-old American tourist was fined $500 yesterday
after pleading guilty to a marijuana possession charge.

Zina Andrews Downs of South Carolina appeared before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane charged

with possession of marijuana.

Police claimed that on Tuesday, while at Cabbage Beach,
they found Downs in possession of a homemade cigarette and
a clear plastic bag containing a quantity of marijuana. Downs
told police that a taxi driver had taken him to an unknown
place where he had purchased the marijuana and tobacco for

$90.

Downs, who pleaded guilty to the charge, was fined $500.
Failure to pay the fine will result in a term of six months

imprisonment.



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Son of Anglican Archdeacon back in
court on firearm, ammunition charges

0 In brief

Tradewinds
2003 comes |
to a close

AFTER two weeks of
intensive military training at

the Defence Force Coral Har- }

bor Base, Tradewinds 2009
was Officially brought to a
close.

designed to develop and
encourage partnerships and
common professional prac-
tices among law enforcement
officials in the region,
involved US personnel from
the Marine Corps, Coast
Guard, Army, Navy, Air
Force and National Guard, as
well as Naval Criminal Inves-
tigative Scene (NCIS) offi-
cers.

More than a dozen coun-
tries were represented at this
year’s exercise.

Attending the closing cere-
mony were Commander of
the Defence Force Com-
modore Clifford Scavella,
Charge d’Affairs at the US
Embassy Timothy Zuniga-
Brown, Director of Stability
for the US Army National
Guard Major General James
Champion and other highly
decorated officers and ser-
vicemen from various partner
nations.

advance regional stability,
build professionalism within
military forces, and foster

multinational and interagency i

relations,” said Commodore
Scavella, addressing
participants at the closing cer-
emony.

“Regional innovations were }
shared, and response capabili- :

ties strengthened towards
combating transnational
threats and regional crisis.
This year was unique, as
emphasis was placed on com-
mand centre operations, haz-
ardous material management,
and crime-scene integrity and
evidence collection.”

Progressive Young Liberals chairman
criticises Tribune’s Pindling articles

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE chairman of the Pro-
gressive Young Liberals Viraj
Perpall yesterday chimed in with
his view on the controversy sur-
rounding the legacy of the late
Sir Lynden Pindling, calling The
Tribune’s recent articles “very
distasteful” considering the con-
tributions the “Father of the
Nation” made to building the
modern Bahamas.

In a press statement issued
yesterday, Mr Perpall said that
he could not see how any young
person who has read the articles
could go on to develop an appre-
ciation of their country or a sense
of patriotism.

In the last few weeks a number
of PLPs have jumped to the
defence of Sir Lynden’s legacy,
following an explosive Insight
article written by The Tribune’s
managing editor John Marquis.
The article quoted former PLP
treasurer Chauncey Tynes Sr,
who claimed the former prime
minister was complicit in the
notorious drug trade of the
1980s.

A follow-up called into ques-
tion the nationality of the for-
mer prime minister, citing
sources who claim that Sir Lyn-
den was in fact born in Jamaica
in the small town of Cotton Tree.

“T personally do not see how
the articles help with the dis-
course, debate and discussion as
to how we will move this nation
on the greater success and solve
the ills we currently face,” Mr
Perpall said.

“To me they only seem to
bring about issues that lead to
speculation and doubt and hon-
estly where does that get us?
Does it build the country? It
doesn’t.

“Personally I have a degree in
journalism and have worked as a
journalist at the Tribune, the
Nassau Guardian, and The
Bahama Journal and while I one
100 per cent believe in freedom
of the press, I feel that that free-
dom does not negate it from its
responsibility to guard those

The joint initiative, which is

“Tradewinds 2009 sought to

Sa Aem Leste



@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE 24-year-old son of Anglican Archdea-
con Etienne Bowleg was back in court yester-
day morning in connection with a high-speed
chase in which police were shot at.

Etienne Bowleg IJ, of Twynam Heights,
appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel
in Court Eight, Bank Lane yesterday, where he
was arraigned on multiple firearm and ammu-
nition charges.

During his arraignment yesterday, Bowleg
was not required to plead to four counts of
possession of a firearm with the intent to endan-
ger life and four counts of possession of a
firearm with the intent to resist lawful arrest.

It is alleged that on Monday, March 16, Bow-
leg was in possession of a handgun with the
intent to endanger the lives of Reserve Con-
stable 26 Dennis Clarke, Reserve Constable

775 Patrick Minnis, Woman Police Constable
2895 Shenique Ford and Sergeant 987 Alexan-
der Pierre.

Bowleg, who is being represented by attor-
neys Murrio Ducille and Willie Moss, opted to
have the matters heard in the Magistrate’s
Court.

It is also alleged that Bowleg caused damage
to a blue 2007 Ford Crown Victoria in the
amount of $500.

Inspector Ercell Dorsette, the prosecutor,
asked the court to join that charge to the afore-
mentioned eight charges. Bowleg not required
to plead to the additional charge.

The prosecution raised no objection to Bow-
leg being granted bail.

According to attorney Moss, Bowleg recent-
ly graduated from college and took the Medical
College Admissions Test (MCAT).

Magistrate Bethel granted Bowleg bail in
the sum of $30,000 with two sureties, on con-

dition that he not leave the jurisdiction until the
completion of the preliminary inquiry, surren-
der his travel documents and report
to the Elizabeth Estates Police Station every
Monday, Wednesday and Saturday before 6pm.

The case has been adjourned to September
23.

In addition to these charges, Bowleg was
granted bail $7,500 on ammunition and drugs
charges.

It is alleged that he was found in possession
of two unfired 9mm rounds, one unfired .380
round and one gram of marijuana.

Bowleg pleaded not guilty to these charges.

The case was adjourned to September 28 for
trial.

According to reports, police pursued a black
2003 Ford Expedition from Wulff Road to the
Tonique Williams-Darling Highway after shots
were fired from the vehicle around 9pm on
Monday.

BPSU president accused of lack of interest

in airport security screening staff concerns



BAHAMAS Public Service
Union President John Pinder was
yesterday accused of not being
interested in the work-related con-
cerns of security screening staff at
the airport because “few of them
voted for him”.

One screener working at the
Lynden Pindling International Air-
port said demoralised workers
have been hoping that Mr Pinder
would act on their disappointment
over a number of issues — including
delayed increment payments,
penalties for taking sick days or
refusing to work overtime, and a
substandard working environment
— but to no avail.

“When people send in a sick slip
they are threatened with their jobs.
Human resources never asks the
people why they’re falling sick and
we’re entitled to 20 days sick days
per annum,” said the screener.
“Morale is really low right now.”
Human resources officials and

find itself in a newspaper because
newspapers and members of the
press are responsible for pro-
tecting, defending and inform-
ing the moral conscience of soci-
ety.

“Pindling goes beyond poli-
tics. This is a man whom Hubert
Ingraham, the man who removed
him from power, hailed him in
his death as ‘the greatest
Bahamian who ever lived.’

The FNM also saw fit to place
his face on the one dollar bill
soon after his death. I say that
to say that he goes far beyond
partisan politics and the PLP.

“He is to most if not all, the
father of this nation and should
be respected and revered in
death”.

While admitting that he does
not expect anyone to have any
particular affection for Sir Lyn-
den or any other political leader
past or present, Mr Perpall said
the country ought to still respect

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management have been “passing
the buck” between each other over
the delayed salary payments, it is
alleged.

The screener estimated that she
has lost out on between $700 and
$800 a year since payments were
first withheld in 2007.

Around 50 staff work in the
security screening section.

Unhappy

The disgruntled employees said
they are also unhappy about the
condition of the room in which
they work, particularly the “con-
crete floor which gets very dusty”.

It is also claimed that staff are
upset because hiring practices are
not in accordance with regulations.
They say positions are not
advertised internally before being
filled.

“They have qualified people on

those who have fought to make
the Bahamas a better nation for
all.

“Thousands of young people
and Bahamians have Pindling to
thank because it was under his
leadership and prime ministerial
administration that the College
of the Bahamas was established.
This is an entity that services
much of the tertiary educational
needs of this nation today and
has been doing so for the past
three decades. That is only one
from the plethora of things this
man did.

“These young people also
have him to thank for bringing
the first majority government to
power and for bringing our
nation into sovereignty. There
could be no greater gift a prime
minister can give than to give his
people citizenship in their own
nation and Lynden Pindling did
this and he should be honoured
for such,” he said.

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staff but they refuse to transfer
people,” one screener said.

Meanwhile, there are ongoing
concerns over the handling of a
tuberculosis scare last year, in
which one security screener con-
tracted the disease and 10 others
were exposed.

It is claimed that Mr Pinder met
with them on March 3 and
promised to come back the fol-
lowing week, but never returned.

“He is really not concerned

bune, they called for the removal of
the fire chief and other key man-
agement officers.

The union president Mr Pinder
later said he was satisfied that a
meeting between Airport Author-
ity heads and management at the
fire station was successful in avert-
ing industrial action.

Calls for union Mr Pinder and
director of security at the Airport
Authority Osborne Ferguson were
not returned up to press time.







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about staff at the airport authority.
He told them staff he only received
27 votes from staff at airport
authority,” the screener said. “It
seems like nothing happens unless
you go to the press.”

The complaints come just over a
month after several officers sta-
tioned at the Airport Fire Station
claimed their unit was being run
like a “petty shop”, and was rife
with nepotism.

In an interview with The Tri-

Call for director of Labour to resign

THE president of the Bahamas Commercial Stores Supermarket
Warehouse Worker’s Union yesterday called for the resignation of the
director of Labour for what he termed “interference” with the union.

The director, Harcourt Brown, is due to hold a press conference
today to respond to the BCSWWU president’s claims, which were
made in a press conference Wednesday morning.

In a barely comprehensible statement issued to the press containing
an abundance of grammatical errors, union president Elgin Douglas
accused Mr Brown of “interfering with the rights of the union and its
members.”

However, one union member contacting The Tribune yesterday
said that the union is behind the director of labour and many members
think it is Mr Douglas who should go.

Elections have apparently not been held in the union since its for-
mation in the 1980s, with Mr Douglas remaining president since this
time. “He is incompetent,” said the member, who wished to remain
anonymous.



However, Mr Douglas, in his comments issued to the media , said the

Viraj Perpall

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director of labour is “not fair” and “has his own agenda.”

“Mr Harcourt Brown is one of the worst Director of Labour ever sit
in the Labour Department,” wrote Mr Douglas.

He said the union “write Minister of Labour under Section 13 Chap-
ter 3 21 of Industrial Relations Act to call and urgent meeting with the
parties” (sic).

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~~ 380-FLIX _

things that are sacred to the
nation,” he said.

Sir Lynden Pindling’s legacy,
he said, is one of those sacred
things.

“T personally don’t feel such
sentiments about a national fig-
ure of such prominence should





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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

David Kelly loved his fellow man

EVEN THE elements shed a tear as family
and friends drove to Christ Church Cathedral
yesterday afternoon to attend the funeral of a
successful businessman who always extended
a helping hand to this community’s less fortu-
nate.

“It’s so sad about Mr Kelly,” said a young
woman who walked up to us Tuesday after-
noon as we waited for our luggage at the foot of
a carousel at Lynden Pindling International
Airport. We had both just arrived from Miami.
We didn’t know her, but she knew our husband
who often spent much time at Kelly’s Home
Centre.

She was speaking of David Albert Charles
Kelly, CBE, who with his wife, Nancy, owned
Kelly’s Home Centre in Marathon Mall.

The young lady was on her way to Halifax —
“T always wanted to go back to school,” she
said, “but I stayed at Kellys for 10 years only
because of Mr and Mrs Kelly.” However, on
learning of Mr Kelly’s sudden death in New
York, she turned around and returned home for
the funeral. After the funeral she plans to set out
again for Halifax and a course which she is now
taking to equip her to work with young children.
“Something that I have always wanted to do,”
she explained.

“T don’t know how they are going to manage
at Kelly’s without him,” she said, “but Mrs Kel-
ly is a very strong woman and they have three
wonderful sons.”

She said she had never known anyone like
David Kelly. He was the strength, “the bea-
con” behind the business. He was a fine exam-
ple to his staff, no job was too lowly for him, she
continued. If there was an area to be cleaned, he
would take a broom and sweep it. “He really
had a fine work ethic.” He taught by example.
“He was always there for us; he always had
time to hear our problems, to help us. If any-
thing went wrong it was Mr Kelly we turned to.
I just can’t imagine anything without him. He
was a good man.”

In his sermon Venerable Keith Cartwright
talked of David Kelly’s generosity. He told how
last year he went into Kellys and announced
to Mr Kelly that because of the devastation
done in the southern Bahamas by the hurri-
cane that had just passed through, he needed
every generator in the store. Mr Kelly gave him
all the generators he needed and never sent a
bill. When the priest asked him about it, he
casually brushed it aside and in his deep voice
and with a wry smile said: Don’t you worry,
Geoff Johnstone and my brother, Godfrey,
don’t know it yet, but they will help me pay for
them!

“In four decades and with wife Nancy’s influ-
ence and equal hard work, more recently with
all three sons in the business, Kelly’s has been
transformed from a dark storefront on Bay
Street with shelves jammed with nuts and bolts
into a 50,000 square foot retail emporium,”
recorded the write-up in his obituary. “In 1988,
Nancy and David took the biggest risk of their
business lives moving the store from its familiar
Bay Street location where its window once dis-
played Triumph sports cars to the new Mall at
M a r a t h ° n :

“Today the store and its warehouse employ
more than 300 persons and one of David’s great-
est satisfactions was the knowledge that every
employee enjoyed health insurance, a pension
plan and could participate in profit-sharing.
Like his home, The Columns, so close to where
he was born, the store gave him roots and he
gave back, nurturing it with a work ethic that
rubbed off on others, and a sense of decency
and equality that extended to everyone in the
store.”

Senate President Lynn Holowesko talked
of the courage of the couple in the uncertain
days of the eighties. “To have borrowed money
to make such a substantial investment in an
area that was just beginning to grow, and to
commit to being the anchor for the first major
shopping mall in The Bahamas seems an easy
decision in hindsight. But it was a big gamble
and a huge investment some 21 years ago.”

From Queen’s College, David joined his two
older brothers at McDonogh School, a military
academy in Maryland, where in 1950 he was
voted the best wrestler in the state of Mary-
land and was the recipient of the Babe Ruth
Award for sportsmanship. However, he did not
want to go on to university. Anxious to return to
the family business, he came home at the age of
19 to join his father in Kelly’s on Bay Street. The
following year, his father was dead. David was
20, his brother Basil, 22, who also joined the
business, was left with their mother, to contin-
ue Kelly’s. Many years later Basil sold his share
to David, and Kelly’s Home Centre in Marathon
is the result of David and Nancy’s years of hard
work. Today, David Kelly leaves a most capable
business savvy wife, and three well trained sons
— with far more training and experience than
he had when he succeeded his father. It is now
up to them to carry on their father’s tradition of
courage, integrity, fairplay and generosity.

As for their father, the angel will write in his
book of gold that, like the ancient Abou Ben
Adhem, David Kelly was one who “loved his
fellow men.”



Farmers Cay
needs a police
patrol car

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have some friends who live
on the beautiful island of Farm-
ers Cay. All in all this is a very
nice community, but last year
it suffered a blow and the
effects are still being felt and
the hurt is still in the process of
healing.

This island recorded the only
murder in the cays ever!

This in itself is mind-blowing
but the police force is taking
their usual nonchalant attitude
toward it.

For years the people of Farm-
ers Cay have been asking for a

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



patrol car for the island but up
to this date there is not one
there. The folks believe that a
better police presence would
have done a lot to prevent this
and other crimes and misbe-
haviour on the cay.

Every other cay has a police
car, but the cay that needs it the
most does not have one.

Every time the police need
to do any investigation they

have to put a civilians’ vehicle
or life in danger to do this, I do
not think this is good policing
and it puts the officers at a dis-
advantage. Farmers Cay has
one disadvantage in that it hous-
es workers from the other cays
and a lot of these people are
not from Farmers Cay.

It is difficult for the police to
have any presence when they
have to walk everywhere.

MRS SILENCE
DO-GOOD
Exuma,
Bahamas,
March 16, 2009.

The death of young Chauncey Tynes

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Chauncey had choice yes he did, he choose to
be in the employment of a known drug lord,
which made him an associate drug dealer.

He could have said to his dad anything to make
him feel less shame if the hazards of his occupa-

tion caught up with him.

Chauncey was not the first to meet this strange
fate, and would not be the last, let us remember
now no trace of these men nor the plane was
ever found to the best of your knowledge.

What does this tell us, two things they could be

dead or in hiding.

This story has been told over and over with
the missing/deaths of many young Bahamian
men, who have chosen to walk this road.

I was never a big fan of Sir Lynden, but I feel

when we start highlighting the few negatives over
the many positives, we too are leading our youth

into thinking many negative things.

I strongly feel you, editor, could have high-
lighted the life of Mr Livingston B Johnson on
your front page and in more depth, than this sto-
ry which will only end with our youth listening to
many foolish arguments which have revolved
from this article, not to mention the unnecessary
stress this will cause to many who foolishly spend
their time discussing this topic.

It is like did Mrs Moree received monies from

the insurance company or not, we have to be

trying to use him as a scape goat to ease the

shame Chauncey placed upon this family is

uncalled for.

Yes we want our children to know our past, but

Nassau,

March, 2009.

careful how to tell the story of the past, it was an
“il fated death of a drug dealer” and may God
have mercy on his soul.

STEPHEN TURNQUEST

Revelations bring out worst in PLP leadership

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The recent revelations by Mr
Chauncey Tynes Senior about
his late son and Lynden Pin-
dling, has in my opinion brought
out the worst in the present

A valuable lesson for
STS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re:Insight/Tribune, March
9, 2009
Students of journalism

interested in fair, balanced
and substantiated content
will find this article to be
highly instructional.

KENNETH W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,

March 13, 2009.



leadership of the PLP.

Firstly, as a Bahamian, I am
insulted by Senator Maynard-
Gibson who has suggested boy-
cotting The Tribune for its
recent insightful article about
Chauncey Tynes Jr., Lynden
Pindling, drug kingpins, secret
flights under the cover of utter
darkness, and so on and so
forth.

Mrs. Maynard-Gibson prob-
ably meets her Tribune in her
office daily, and that would not
stop anytime soon, yet she is
advocating that dim-witted
Bahamians cease buying The
Tribune because it will essen-
tially illuminate them to the
truth about the late Sir Lynden
Oscar Pindling.

Senator Maynard-Gibson is
out of touch with the people of
this nation, and reality.

This will cost the PLP dearly
in the next election.

Then, we have Perry Christie
who insists that victimizing and

intimidating, and drug-dirtied
Lynden Pindling is the Father of
our Nation when Pindling’s
status as a Bahamian has not
been publicly verified to this
date. This too will cost the PLP
to lose badly next election.

And now we have Paul Moss
— who just arrived in the PLP -
defending something that he
knows nothing about.

The PLP has become exactly
what Lynden Pindling wanted
Bahamians to be and that’s con-
spicuously unintelligent and
unacquainted. How poetic.

DENNIS DAMES

Bahamian of the soil, born
PMH Nassau, Bahamas

January 17, 1966 to Wilmore
Dames and Shirley Beneby-
Dames.

Nassau,
March 14, 2009



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MEMORIAL SERVICE

Joseph Frank
BONCZEK,
60,

of Lake Worth, FL, passed away

on Saturday, February 28, 2009

after suffering a courageous

year long battle with cancer.
Joe was born im Elwna, OH on May 19. 1948, but spent
most of his life in South Florida. He enjoyed a 35 vear
career with AT&T's the Real Yellow Pages yet his life
revolved around loving his family and friends. Joe lowed
to entertain, Whether if was on stace m meht clubs of
high school musicals, or just going to someone's house
for a party, He was known to bring out his guitar and
entertain anyone and evervone at a moments notice. Joe
was preceded in death by lus father, Joseph: brother,
Robert; and sisters. Ann Mane and Kathleen Bonezek
Dehow. He is survived by his loving wife of 3% years,
Barbara; his son Zack and his wife Tracy and their two
children, Hannah and Hailey: his daughter, Aleece and
husband, Mark Campbell and their children, Chloe,
Pevton and Colin; his mother, Ann; and sisters, Mary
Felix and Sr. Joanne Bonczek, SND. A memorial service
will be held on Sunday, March 22, 2009 at Sacred Heart
Roman Catholic Church at 10:30 a.m, In lieu of lowers,
the family asks that memorial contnibutions be made to
Food for the Poor, 6401 Lyons Road, Coconut Creek, FL
33073 to help build a house for a poor family in Haiti —



#67173, in Joe's memory.



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



NIB Fund stands
at $1.6 billion

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The National
Insurance Board Fund now stands
at $1.6 billion, NIB senior manager
W Moss told Rotarians.

“All but a small portion of that is
invested right here in the Bahamas.
I am pleased to report Rotarians
that there have been zero losses to
the National Insurance Fund as a
result of the on-going global finan-
cial crisis,” he said.

Mr Moss noted that government
intends to amend the National
Insurance Act and Regulations to
provide for the addition of unem-
ployment benefits to Bahamians.

He said the Prime Minister is
expected to travel to Grand
Bahama on Wednesday to discuss
the programme with community
leaders at the Our Lucaya Resort.

On Monday, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham announced that
government has taken $20 million
from the National Insurance Med-
ical Branch Fund to provide unem-
ployment benefits to some 10,000
unemployed and underemployed
persons in the country.

Mr Moss also noted that the NIB
provides many other benefits to
Bahamians that help to stimulate
the Bahamian economy.

He reported that the Board has
paid out over $150 million in bene-
fits and assistance, in 2008.

During February 2009, he said
that close to 28,000 pensioners
received National Insurance bene-
fits or assistance, which along with
the payments of STB such as sick-
ness and maternity account for
some $13 million that was paid out
just in that month alone.

Mr Moss said the National Insur-
ance Board’s primary objective, as
mandated by The National Insur-
ance Act is to provide partial
income replacement for workers
when they are unable to work tem-
porarily because of illness.

He stressed that in order for the
Board to be able to deliver on this
partial income replacement
promised to workers, NIB must col-
lect contributions from self-
employed persons and from
employers on behalf of their
employees.

“Now this process of paying
monthly contributions for some self-
employed persons and some
employers can become overbear-
ing if not paid on a timely basis and
allowed to go unchecked for sever-
al months, or even years.”

Recently, NIB has taken steps to
collect millions of outstanding
national insurance contributions
that are owed by delinquent
employers.

Mr Moss explains that once a
business opens in the Bahamas and
starts operation it has 10 days to be
registered with NIB.

After the business is registered, it
is assigned national insurance num-
bers for the business and its employ-
ees.

Mr Moss said businesses are
expected to keep proper payroll
and business records as required
under Section 42 of the National
Insurance Act, which states that:
“Every employer and self-employed
person shall at all times keep and
maintain in his business premises
or place the following records...b)
Payroll and other records connect-
ed therewith, which would serve to
prove the correctness of the entries
on the contributions made; and c)
the records relating to the payment
of such contributions to The
Board(C.10).”

“The Act makes it an offence for
employers and self-employed per-
sons who fail to keep or produce
records when requested to do so by
the Board.

“The National Insurance Board
encourages all business owners and
self-employed persons to keep good
accounting records.”

According to Mr Moss, the board
has implemented new procedures
as it relates to the processing of sick-
ness claims for employees.

He said NIB has introduced a
new form called Med 4, which is
now needed for the processing of
sickness claims.

“With this form employers are
asked to verify the period that their
employees are going to be off from
work, as a result of sickness or
maternity leave.

“This form must be signed off by
the employer and submitted along
with any sickness or maternity
claims being made by an employed
person.”

Mr Moss said claims will not be
processed if the new form is not
completed by the employer.

He gave several reasons for the
implementation of this new form.

¢ Employees would submit sick-
ness claims to National Insurance

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and remain at work and we all
know that one must be away from
work in order to receive benefit
payments from National Insurance
— for example the disablement
benefit.

¢ Some employees would submit
a claim and stay off from work for
part of the period and return to
work before the period submitted to
National Insurance has expired.

Mr Moss said the Med 4 Form
would also make the employers

aware that their employees are
making a claim to NIB so they can
make adjustments where necessary
with their salaries.

He said the National Insurance
Act provides the employer the right
to adjust their employees’ salary by
deducting the amount of benefit
paid to employees.

Mr Moss said that no contribu-
tion payment is due while an
employee is on sick leave.

He said employers and persons

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to download Registration and Claim
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He said it was important that per-
sons continue to support the NIB
programme so that it will continue
to grow for future generations of
Bahamians.

Happy

Prison holds first quarterly




STS ESTA

HER MAJESTY’S PRISON held its first quar-
terly visitors meeting for 2009 on Monday at the pris-
on’s security processing centre.

In attendance were the Superintendent of Prisons
Dr Elliston Rahming and other senior staff who
gave members of the public an opportunity to
express their concerns, ideas and recommendations.

“The meeting was well attended by friends and
loved ones at inmates of Her Majesty’s Prisons.
Recommendations were made, ideas were shared
and most importantly clarity was given to those individuals who need-
ed it on any subject relative to their relatives’ confinement,” said the
prison in a statement.

It said Dr Rahming encourages this kind of “positive dialogue” and
remains committed to Minister of National Security Tommy Turn-
quest’s vision of bringing reform to HMP.

Dr Rahming said he realises that the families of inmates have a piv-
otal role to play in creating reform as they too have a direct impact on
the lives of their incarcerated relatives.

According to Dr Rahming, through communication, “we can bet-
ter understand each other which is crucial for paving the way for
better relations.”

214t Birthday
ROBYN SWABY

God4 « Ph caretig Henttie

For you created my inmost being; you knit me
together in my mother's womb. | praise you because
lam fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are
wonderful, 1 know that full well. My frame was not
hidden from you when | was made in the secret place.
When | was woven together in the depths of the earth,
your eyes saw my unformed body, All the days
ardained for me were written in vour book before one
of them came to be (Psalm 1359-13-16)

Dr Elliston
Rahming

From our very first day on March 16, 1988, there has
been one litth girl who consistently made her
presence felt. Her name is Robyn and she is now a 71
year old beauty with a striking personality and a
tierce confidence to shine. She tells me with her smile
that all is well. She speaks with elegance, is poised;
always composed and exudes strength for her two
brothers who adores her ,

Robyn God has given you a very keen mind and a
quick study for learning making you a valuable asset
to and for our family, friends and community at large,
You always enjoyed learning new things especially in
the sports arena where you were the original member
of the Johnson & Wales University Women's
Basketball team. You were actually the program's
very first recruit who scored over 1,000 points and
will go down in JWU's history as being the top 3 point
shooter in Women's Basketball. You are ranked #72 in
the USCAA Conference for 3 point shooting. You
have also excelled in the classroom and is a 2005-2009
nominee for the WALA Scholar- Athlete All American
Team. Robyn has completed her Bachelor of Science
in Forensic Accounting and will further obtain her
Masters Degree in Finance.

CONGRATULATIONS Robyn Swaby, Daddy's Baby
from Mommy, Nicholas & David

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





‘Destined for greatness’

“Where there is no vision the
people perish.”
Proverbs 29:18a, AV.
“T never look back!”
Evangelist Billy Graham

m By REV DRJ
EMMETTE WEIR

| HIS is a response to Mr

Errington Watkins’ novel
claims concerning the circumstances
of the early years of Sir Lynden Pin-
dling.

One of the most enduring lessons
that my late mother, Eunice
Jeanette Weir, a brilliant Bahamian
educator, “drummed” into me, was
the utter importance of written doc-



umentation. Indeed, so insistent was
she upon this principle that if I were
to write to her while I was studying
abroad as a young man, she was
sure to reply with a letter that
included corrections of my errors
in spelling or grammar! Moreover,
this lesson was certainly reinforced
by my professors in studies at the
tertiary level in Jamaica, the United
States and in Scotland. It is precise-
ly for this reason that when it comes
to the dates of the most important
events in the life of an individual -

Teanple Christian High Vehcod

Pa ia i A

TEACHING VACANCIES

Temple Christian
applications

Art Teacher

Spanish Teacher

Applicant must:
A.

Elementary School
from qualified
2009-2010 school year for:

invites

teachers for the

(Grades 1-6)
(Grades 1-6)

Be a born-again practicing Christian who
is willing to subscribe to the Statement of
Faith of Temple Chrisitian Schools.

Have an Associates and or Bachelor’s
Degress in Education from a recognized
College or University in the area of

specialization.

Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or

Diploma.

D: Be willing to contribute to the school’s extra

curricular program.

Application must be made in writing with full
Curriculum Vitae, a recent colored photograph and
three references should be sent to:

The Principal
Temple Christian School
Collins Avenue
P.O.Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas



birth, baptism, marriage and death,
we depend not on oral statements
based on that fragile ability known
as “memory”, but on written docu-
mentation, whether to be found in
letters, a diary, a church vestry, gov-
ernment registration, library or on
the hard drive of a computer! For as
the Chinese (who invented paper
and ink) have put it:

“THE WEAKEST INK IS
STRONGER THAN THE
STRONGEST MEMORY”

I therefore could not help apply-
ing this principle to the latest claim
made by Mr. Errington Watkins
with regard to the birth and early
life of Sir Lynden Pindling - that he
was born of a Jamaican mother and
was sent to Jamaica for the early
years of his education. Whatever
may be one's “take” on this claim,
it certainly begs the question, “Why
has the good gentleman waited to
suggest it until all the principals
involved (who could either have
refuted or reinforced same) have
passed away from this life? It would
certainly have had much more
weight had it been stated earlier.
More profoundly however, it lacks
documentation and as such does
not merit very serious considera-
tion, not in terms of historicity or
definitive academic research.

Thus, my purpose here must be
clearly defined. It is not my inten-
tion to engage in a “tit-for- tat” dis-
cussion with Mr. Watkins on the
origins of “the Father of the nation.”

For, as will be demonstrated, such
discussions are neither very benefi-
cial nor edifying. As a member of
the “older generation” (although
not quite as “senior” as Mr.
Watkins) yet with many years of
experience and observation, I would
just like to give “my side of the sto-
ry,” leaving the reader to be the
judge. In undertaking this task, I
shall make every effort to document
my statements with dates given as
accurately as I can. With these
caveats, I proceed with this endeav-
our.

On January 10, 1967 I was a
young Methodist Minister serving
in the Coke Circuit, Kingston,
Jamaica, where the late Wilfred
Easton was the Superintendent
Minister. I vividly recall, along with
my longtime friend and colleague
in the Ministry of The Methodist
Church, the Rev. Dr. Colin Archer,
‘tuning into ZNS to listen to the
results of the General Election “at
home.” Often it was hard to hear
ZNS clearly, but on that night, it
came over “loud and clear” on that
ancient “hot tube” radio. We were

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glad and joined in the rejoicing
about the coming of Majority Rule.

Many Jamaicans I met, spoke
with pride about the Premier of the
Bahamas, a young man with
Jamaican roots. As a Marriage Offi-
cer, it was my privilege to officiate at
many marriages in Jamaica.
Amongst those, there was one
which stands out in my memory. In
counseling a young couple I recall
that the bride-to-be (an attractive,
intelligent young lady) was named
Jacinth Pindling! “You have the
same surname as our Premier, Mr.
Lynden Pindling!” I said. “Yes!
He's my cousin,” she replied beam-
ing with pride. I cannot remember
the name of the groom. I can never
forget that beautiful bride who evi-
dently, was related to the premier of
my homeland.

Now in all those deliberations, in
discussions with Jamaicans in gen-
eral, and with Sir Lynden's cousin in
particular, there was never any men-
tion by anyone of the claims made
by Mr. Watkins. Not a single person
mentioned that he had been to
school there, and while they all
knew that although his father was
Jamaican, his mother was assumed
to be Bahamian. In fact as I reflect
upon those experiences in Jamaica,
Ican recall nothing to convince me
of the authenticity of Mr. Watkins’
claims. Don't get me wrong! I'm
not asserting whether they are true
or false. All I'm saying is that on
the basis of my own experiences
and discussions with Jamaicans back
in the late sixties and early seventies,
I have no reason to place any cre-
dence in them. Let me continue.

I studied at The United Theo-
logical College of the West
Indies, Kingston, Jamaica from 1959
-63. The only other Bahamian who
studied along with me at seminary
in those days was the late Rev. Dr.
Charles Smith. (The Rev. Dr. Philip
Rahming joined us later). Charles
remained a good friend of mine
until his passing, and I can say that
he was meticulous when it came to
the use of facts and I came to
depend upon the authenticity of his
word. Now I was present and heard
with my own ears the Rev. Dr.
Charles Smith declare unequivo-
cally that a nurse who was a mem-
ber of Zion Baptist Church, testified
that she knew when a pregnant Mrs.
Pindling “was heavy with Lynden.”
Whose report should I believe?
Whose report do you believe?
What's my take on this matter? My
advice is simply. Don’t go there!
Don’t go there unless you have doc-
umentary evidence to support your
claim.

Why? Because in the final analy-
sis what really matters in evaluating
the legacy of any individual is not
the circumstances of his/her birth,
but what that person did with the
gifts and talents with which the cre-
ator endowed them.

Or, to put it another way, what
really matters in the life of any per-
son, is not where he or she has come
from, but the direction in which that
person is moving.

Yes, the answer to this all impor-
tant question determines whether
he/she is on the way to meaning-
less mediocrity, or is indeed des-
tined for greatness.

May I continue?

Early in September 1970, I
arrived in New York on my way to
Christian Theological Seminary,
Indiana, to pursue studies for my
Masters degree in Theology. It was
a time when racial tensions were
high in the wake of the assassination
of that great Civil Rights Leader,
Martin Luther King Jr. I shall never
forget the manner in which I was
greeted by a tall, husky Black man
(then, “negro” was an outdated
expression and the term “African -
American” had not yet been
coined), who met me. When I told
him I was from the “sunny
Bahamas,” he replied, acidly, “Man,
you shoulda stayed where you was!”
He really was suggesting that Amer-
ica at that time was no place for a
young person to study.

Now my dear reader, if you told
me then that a “skinny teenager
from Hawaii with a funny name,

the son of a Black father and White
American mother would one day
be President of the United States, I
would have replied, “Man, you must
be crazy!” (or words to that effect).
Yes no one back then could con-
ceive of a Barack Obama electrify-
ing crowds with the powerful motto.
“Yes we can!” and becoming the
first black man to occupy the White
House, not as a servant or visitor
but as “Mr. President!” I never
imagined in my wildest dreams that
I would live to see an African-
American President. And that is
why, as I pointed out in the book,
“Obama in Prophecy” already a
best seller abroad and soon to be
released in the Bahamas, I was
amongst the old men who wept
while young people of all nations
rejoiced on November 4th, when
Barack Obama was indeed elected
first African-American President of
the USA.

In my reviews of Obama's
books, I point out that Barack Oba-
ma was groomed and prepared to
serve in a unique manner. From
early in life when his mother woke
him up at 4 am to give him lessons
(English), he had a strong sense of
determination to lead. And when I
saw him on TV and heard him
speak with such confidence, then I
knew for sure that he was a young
man “destined for greatness.”

Upon completion of my doctor-
al studies abroad, in October 1981,
Ireturned home and was appointed
to serve on the Juvenile Panel. It
was then that I came into contact
with a young Minister of Govern-
ment appointed by Sir Lynden Pin-
dling, then Prime Minister of an
Independent young nation. It mat-
tered to me not a whit that he hailed
from a small settlement in Abaco
and that his parents were not mar-
ried to each other. What mattered
was the confident, determined, pur-
poseful manner in which he
approached his responsibilities, and
noting these qualities, I concluded
that here was another young man
who was destined for greatness! I
refer to none other that our Prime
Minister, the Rt Honourable
Hubert Alexander Ingraham.

I began this contribution by
emphasizing the absolute impor-
tance of documentation, asserting
that statements made by persons
must be “backed up “by documen-
tary evidence if they are to be taken
seriously.

The validity of this principle rein-
forced in academic research, was
confirmed in yet another experi-
ence of my sojourn in Jamaica.

While serving as a young Minis-
ter in the Spanish Town — Linstead
Circuit back in the mid-sixties — I
received a letter from an elderly
gentleman who had migrated from
Jamaica while in his youth. He was
nearly at the age of retirement and
was in dire need of documentation
as to the date of his birth. Yes he
knew, but he could not prove his
age to “the powers that be.” He
wrote me, desperately requesting
documentation of the date of his
birth. After diligent research of the
Church and State records (including
a visit to the registry in Jamaica's
ancient capital, Spanish Town), I
was able to find his birth certificate.
He wrote me a letter of great appre-
ciation. Indeed so satisfied was he
that he sent me money for “my pas-
tor's discretionary fund,” which I
used to help a number of persons in
need. The birth of the gentleman
was over a century ago, during the
days of Booker T. Washington!

Yes, documentary evidence is
all that really matters. With refer-
ence again to Sir Lynden Pindling,
what matters is documentary evi-
dence — the birth certificate in the
registry of the Government of the
Bahamas. That it was recorded
when he was seventeen years of age
matters not one bit. As a marriage
officer for nearly forty years, I have
seen birth certificates recorded
when individuals were in their twen-
ties and older. The official position
then is that which is recorded in the
Registry. All else can only be
regarded as unreliable oral sugges-
tions, rumours and old wives tales!

Let's then get then beyond all
these stories and opinions and

s

Rev Dr J Emmette Weir

undocumented legends about the
birth of Sir Lynden. Unless and until
documentary evidence to the con-
trary is produced, the official and
relevant data is that to be found in
the Registry. To act in any other
way is to show scant respect for our
own Bahamian institutions! Yes,
what is important about Sir Lyn-
den Pindling (and indeed about
every great Bahamian of the past) is
not the circumstances of birth, but
the contribution that he and they
made for the advancement of the
people of our beloved Bahamaland.

When the evil Roman Emperor,
Nero embarked upon a policy of
persecuting the early Christians at
Rome, Peter was fleeing from that
great city, capital of the Roman
Empire. On his way, he had a vision
of The Christ who challenged him
“Quo vadis? Whither goest thou?”
Had the Apostle not returned to
Rome to suffer along with the
Christians there, he would not have
fulfilled the ministry to which he
was called by The Master.

And now, my dear reader, what
about you? You know of the
achievements of Joseph, the
Israelite slave, who rose to become
Pharaoh's viceroy in ancient Egypt
(Genesis 37, 39-45), of Barack
(“Blessed one”) who came from a
boyhood in Hawaii to occupy the
White House, and of Hubert
Alexander, who developed from
the boy in Abaco to become the
Prime Minister of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas.

Dear reader, as I approach the
conclusion of this communication,
need I remind you of the sterling,
exemplary achievements of:

¢ Joseph, the dreamer, the
Israelite Patriarch, who rose from
slavery to become the Prime Minis-
ter of Egypt?

¢ Barack, who rose from boy-
hood in Hawaii to occupy the White
House in Washington?

¢ Roland, the boy from the Cur-
rent, Eleuthera, who ascended to
become the first Premier of our
young nation?

¢ Lynden, who came from East
Street to serve as the first Prime
Minister of an independent
Bahamas?

¢ Cecil, one of the greatest polit-
ical leaders our nation has ever seen,
whom I remember being a “big
boy” when growing up on West
Street, Nassau.

e Perry “the Valley Boy” who
became Prime Minister.

¢ Orville, who moved from a big
house on Hay Street, to the Big
House on Mount Fitzwilliam.

¢ Or - Hubert, who came from a
small settlement in Abaco, to be
called for the third time, to serve as
Prime Minister of our Beloved
Bahamaland?

I think not! No, my dear reader, I
need not remind you of the achieve-
ments of these eight great men; for
you know of them. What is my
responsibility at this juncture, how-
ever, is to remind you that the most
important question for you is that
put to the fugitive Peter, when
instructed by the Master to return to
Rome, “Whither goest thou?”

For the answer you give to this
all important question (by your own
words and deeds) will determine
whether you are on the destructive
road to death, the death of your
ambtions, aspirations and dreams,
or whether you are destined for
greatness — the greatness to be
realised when your vision is in align-
ment with the plan designed for you
by the great Architect.

Let your light so shine before
men that they may see your good
works and glorify your Father which
and glorify your father which is in
heaven.” (MATT. 5:16, A.V.)



FOR SALE BY OWNER

HIGH POINT ESTATES

WELL ESTABLISHED GATED COMMUNITY LOCATED NEAR

SOON TO BE DEVELOPED
BAHAMAR RESORT

DUPLEX LOT 62 X130 IN PRIME LOCATION

$125,000.00

MULTI-FAMILY LOT -11,192 sq.ft. HILL TOP

$140,000.00

5%--DOWN - FINANCING CAN BE ARRANGED

FOR MORE INFO. CALL JIMMY
425-8075 OR 322-8858





PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

LIS senior

students head ©
off to Europe ¥

LUCAYA International
School students along with
their teacher Sydney Watson
are pictured at the Grand
Bahama International Air-
port last weekend embarking
on their European school
trip.

The students have been
fundraising for their excur-
sion since early last year and
will visit many of the places

The group will travel to
Italy and Greece and visit
such famous places as the
Vatican, the Colosseum,
Greek theatre, the Parthenon
and many more well-known
and historic attractions.

The students and their
teacher will be away for over
a week and their trip is a part
of the school's goal to teach
children to be internationally
minded and well-rounded








_—



—.
4

ea as

7 Pet

ue

they have studied during their

time at LIS. individuals.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
BOLLINGEN HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SEB FAMILY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
APPAKAESHA LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLEAR GLASS HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp.
Bahamas.

Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Photo courtesy of LIS School

bg

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RICHLANDS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAROULA-THEO LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CORONA ELLINGTON INC.

—*

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CORONA ELLINGTON INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





Rotary Club
makes donation
to the Bahamas
Diabetic
Association

THE ROTARY CLUB of East
Nassau made its annual dona-
tion to the Bahamas Diabetic
Association. Pictured is club
president Brian Moodie and
president-elect Michelle Rassin
presenting a cheque for $6000
to Bradley Cooper of the BDA.

Astronauts successfully
install set of solar wings

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

SPACEWALKING astronauts
installed the last set of solar wings
at the international space station
Thursday, accomplishing the top
job of shuttle Discovery’s mis-
sion, according to Associated
Press.

Steven Swanson and Richard
Arnold II struggled with some
cable connections, but managed
to hook everything up.

“It wasn’t quite as smooth as
we had hoped, but those guys did
a great job,” astronaut Joseph
Acaba told Mission Control.

The next milestone will be
today, when the folded-up solar
wings are unfurled.

Manpower was needed inside
and out to attach the $300 mil-

lion segment to the space station.
Swanson and Arnold helped their
colleagues inside the shuttle-space
station complex cautiously move
the 31,000-pound, 45-foot-long
girder into position with a robot-
ic arm.

“Keep coming,” one of the
spacewalkers said. “It really looks
good to me.”

The actual attachment
occurred an hour into the space-
walk, and the hookups were com-
pleted two hours later.

Discovery delivered the new
wings earlier this week. It’s the
final of solar wings to be installed
at the 10-year-old space station
and will bring it to full power.

It’s also the last major Ameri-
can-made piece of the space sta-
tion.

?

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WAKEUP LOCK INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ETOILE LUMINEUSE INC.

0

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ETOILE LUMINEUSE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

They moved swiftly to
manoeuvre out of the dirty spill,
which they estimated to be
around one square mile in size,
and sent The Tribune pho-
tographs of the thick brown
sludge which subsequently coated
their fishing equipment.

“Tt took us a while to get out of
it,” she said.

The couple reported the inci-
dent to the Department of Envi-
ronmental Health, but Mrs Cal-
lender said she did not get the
impression that the matter was
taken seriously.

“The man who they said was
responsible for that area said he
did not know anything about it
and he didn’t seem too both-
ered,” said Mrs Callender,
adding: “It’s just not acceptable.”

Mrs Callender’s experience
took place a day prior to the

Environmental hazards

alleged reporting of another
major hazard by a Delta airline
pilot to the Air Traffic Control
tower at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

A concerned member of the
public informed this newspaper
that he had overheard a radio
transmission by the pilot indicat-
ing that he had spotted a “ten to
fifteen mile long” slick off the
northern side of New Providence
as he had piloted the aircraft over
the area.

However, so far none of the
authorities contacted by The Tri-
bune, including an air traffic ser-
vices official, Minister of the
Environment, Earl Deveaux, and
a member of the country’s
national Oil Spill Contingency
Response Committee, were able
to confirm knowledge of the

incident.

Mr Deveaux indicated that
Port Authority controller Cap-
tain Anthony Allen has primary
responsibility for organising a
response to such incidents, how-
ever messages left for Captain
Allens since Tuesday have not
been returned.

Pollution of coastal waters by
oil has the potential to threaten
marine and birdlife.

In the wake of a photograph
showing an oil slick hundreds of
feet long along the coast paral-
lel to the Clifton Pier power plant
in June 2007, State Minister for
Public Utilities, Phenton Ney-
mour, announced that the Gov-
ernment had spent half a million
dollars on oil response equipment
intended to help mitigate such
hazards in that area in the future.







ABACOMARKETS

Chairman’s Report — Q4, 2008

We are pleased to report to you that our fourth quarter results continue to show steady, positive
improvements among our performing locations in the midst of challenging market conditions - as
we record a net profit of $1.531m for the quarter and $2m for the year. These results, which were
driven in large part by the significant increase in sales - up 17.1% over the same period the previous
year, validate our commitment to the basics of our business to bring about steady progress in key
areas of our operations. Now, more than ever, our customers are looking for real, noticeable value
on basic, everyday items. Our ‘price cuts’ and club specials are delivering that value and the
increase in customer transactions reflects positive response to them. In addition to the increase in
sales, the Company’s expenses continued to be carefully managed - reducing slightly as a percentage
of sales despite ever-increasing costs - with utilities, in particular, continuing to rise with an
increase of over $750k for the year. We are also beginning to see an improvement in our shrink
management as our gross margin increase of 0.9% was also driven by a reduction in shrink as a
percentage of sales by 20% - though the absolute shrink dollar amount remained the same as the
previous year. Our Domino’s Pizza franchise sales also remain strong with efficiencies and savings
from the closure of East Bay St. store bringing immediate results as the franchise retained a
majority of sales from that location.

As reported recently, we also made the very difficult decision to close Cost Right Abaco, Abaco
Markets started in Abaco - and this decision to close Cost Right Abaco was something we have
struggled with for a long time - trying so many different options and investing a lot of money to
make it work. However, we were just not getting enough support to sustain the investment and
focus there. While we were very disappointed to close Cost Right Abaco, we are obviously
responsible to do what is best for the Company as a whole - particularly given the current
economic environment which requires the focus and dedication of all our resources to ensure that
the great steps we have made toward stability are safeguarded.

This has been a tough year to operate in a market experiencing significant challenges. Despite the
challenges, however, we are finally realizing the economies of scale, improved group buying and
efficiencies among our performing locations we have sought in recent years, which is translating
into steadily improving results. Our customers are seeing the difference and we are confident that
you, our valued shareholders, will note the changes in our position and it is the result of a lot of
things coming together. As indicated earlier, we do expect a continued softening of the economy
in the coming quarters which is likely to impact our results. However, the concerted focus on
driving sales through pricing, controlling expenses and continuing to improve our shrink, that has
delivered the stability our Company needed, remains our priority operating in the current market
conditions.

R. Craig Symonette
Match 18, 2009

ABACOMARKETS

UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE QUARTER ENDED JANUARY 31, 2009

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

FROM page one

managers, so the company can “meet its bank
covenants and financial obligations” and be in
a “position of strength moving forward.”

Senior vice-president of public affairs at
Atlantis, Ed Fields, said the move was an
“effort to avoid other more painful methods
such as pay cuts or additional lay-offs.”

Mr Moss, in a statement, said: “How is it
that Kerzner could ask/demand that workers
take an unpaid vacation when the Employ-
ment Act is very clear that vacation time is to
be paid for?”

The businessman and attorney, also an aspir-
ing contender for the deputy leadership of the
PLP, called on the Minister of Labour “to look
into this matter to ensure that those that refuse
Kerzner’s invitation are not terminated.”

“Whilst I understand the shrinkage of the
economy, we are talking about a company that
spent in excess of $30 million on the opening of
its new hotel in Dubai just a few months ago
and now they are hypocritical in asking staff to
take a cut.

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

PLP hopeful claims
Kerzner’s ‘voluntary unpaid
vacation’ goes against the
Employment Act

“It is setting the wrong example and is anal-
ogous to the big bonuses paid by AIG execu-
tives in a downed economy with money from
tax payers,” he added.

Kerzner International described the exer-
cise as part of a broader “cost-containment”
effort being implemented at its resorts world-
wide.

Mr Fields said that at the same time, 20 staff
members at the company’s Fort Lauderdale
office were laid off and some unfilled positions
were removed from the pay roll.

The company continues to “aggressively take
steps” to expand its revenue, added the
spokesman.

The move comes four months after the com-
pany let go 800 workers from the resort in
November, in the wake of falling occupancy
levels and booking forecasts.

Year Ended
January 31, 2009

Year Ended
January 31, 2008





Sales $ 91,180 82,777
Cost of sales (64,461) (58,134)
Gross profit 26,719 24,643
Selling, general and administrative expenses (24,035) (22,092)
Other operating income 383 394
Net operating profit 3,067 2,945
Gain on disposal of investment - 150
Pre-opening costs (24) (120)
Property revaluation write-back (note 5) 56 -
Interest expense (283) (203)
Dividends on preference shares (620) (807)
Net profit on continuing operations 2,196 1,965
Gain on disposal of subsidiary - 39
Restructuring reserve (250) 350
Net profit/(loss) on discontinuing operations 58 (177)
Net profit $ 2,004 2177
Profit per share $0.127 $0.138

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Year ended
January 31, 2009

Year ended
January 31, 2008





Net profit for period $ 2,004 2,177
Net cash provided by operating activities 6,575 710
Net cash (used in)/provided by investing activities (4,077) 3,354
Net cash provided by/(used in) financing activities 99 (5,195)
Increase/(decrease) in cash $ 2,597 (1,131)
ABACO MARKETS LIMITED
EXPLANATORY NOTES

TO INTERIM UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Quarter Ended January 31, 2009

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards using the same accounting policies and methods of computation as
the Consolidated Financial Statements included in the 2007 Annual Report.

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Abaco Markets Limited
(“the Company”) and its significant wholly owned subsidiaries: AML Foods (Nassau)
Limited, Cost Right Nassau Limited, Solomon’s Club (Freeport) Limited, Thompson
Wholesale Limited and Caribbean Franchise Holdings Limited.

2. DISCONTINUING OPERATIONS

On March 9, 2009, the Company ceased operations in Cost Right Abaco. Accordingly,
the assets and liabilities of Cost Right Abaco are treated as discontinuing as of January

31, 2009.

3. PREFERENCE SHARES













January 31, January 31,

2009 2008

Assets $ 30,343 26,197

Liabilities (18,055) (16,499)

Equity $ 12,288 9,698

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Quarter Ended Quarter Ended

January 31, 2009 January 31, 2008

Sales $ 26,457 22,599
Cost of sales (18,687) (16,154)

Gross profit 7,770 6,445
Selling, general and administrative expenses (5,984) (5,561)

Other operating income 116 123

Net operating profit 1,902 1,007
Pre-opening costs - (9)

Property revaluation write-back (note 5) 56 -
Interest expense (80) (35)
Dividends on preference shares (136) (189)

Net profit on continuing operations 1,742 774

Restructuring reserve (250) -
Net profit/(loss) on discontinuing operations 39 (146)

Net profit $ 1,531 628

Profit per share $0.097 $0.040

The Company made total redemptions of $810,000 on Class A preference shares and
$300,000 on Class B preference shares during the year ended January 31, 2009.

On October 17, 2008, the Company agreed with its Class B preference shareholders to
restructure their shares by extending the maturity date from December 31, 2012 to
December 31, 2013. In addition, the Class B preference shareholders agreed to subscribe
for an additional $1.25m of shares. These funds were used to redeem in full the
outstanding Class A preference shares.

CAPITAL ASSETS

On July 3, 2008 the Company completed the purchase of a property on Queen’s Highway
in Freeport for $2.4m. The purchase was partly financed through a loan from Royal
Bank of Canada in amount of $2m bearing the interest of 7% and payable over five years.
Solomon’s Freeport has occupied this property since December 2004.

An appraisal of the property determined a value of $3m. The difference between
appraised value and purchase cost was recorded in the property revaluation surplus in
amount of $601,000.

REVALUATION SURPLUS
A revaluation exercise was performed for Thompson Boulevard property appraising its

value at $3m and resulting in a write-back of previous revaluation charge in amount of
$56,000. In addition, property revaluation surplus was increased by $193,000.

ORDINARY SHARES

On January 31, 2009 the Company canceled unused stock options as of that date. As a
result of this, total number of issued ordinary shares decreased by 208,000.

At the close of business on January 31, 2009, total number of issued ordinary shares was
15,599,211.

Copies of a full set of the unaudited financial statements can be obtained from
Ms.Brendalee Gibson, at Abaco Markets Corporate Offices at Town Centre Mall, Blue
Hill Road, Nassau, The Bahamas, tel. I 242 325 21 22.



PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

New investors trading in equity

PLP to hold service honouring

Sit Lynden Pindling's birth

FROM page one

Preceding the church service,
members of the PLP, with Sir Lyn-
den’s widow Dame Marguerite, will
also lay a wreath at Sir Lynden’s
grave site.

The recent furor surrounding Sir
Lynden was sparked over the past
two weeks following an explosive
Insight article written by The Tri-
bune’s managing editor John Mar-
quis. The article, the result of an
interview with a former PLP trea-

surer, claimed that the former Prime |



Minister received money from drug i =
king pin Joe Lehder, who had his SCE

headquarters in Norman’s Cay. Mr
Chauncey Tynes, Sr, also believes

that his pilot son, Chauncey, Jr, who is alleged to have
flown money shipments for Joe Lehder at Norman’s }
Cay to Sir Lynden, was killed because he knew too :

much.

Additionally, another front-page article called into
question the nationality of the former Prime Minister,
citing sources who claim that Sir Lynden was in fact

born in Jamaica in the small town of Cotton Tree.

shares for more stable bonds

FROM page one

sure in favour of more bond and in some
instances even cash.

"That's typical after periods of volatility,
so I can say that there has been interest in
doing that," said Vice-president of Colonial
Pension Services Larry Gibson.

This move would be a good one for per-
sons close to retirement who need a quick
return on their investment, he said. But for
younger investors, who may be cautious
about investing in this current climate he
advised them to wait the storm out.

"If you're a young person with a very
long time to retirement, the empirical evi-
dence suggests that you should ride it out.
Because you are buying in essence the
stocks at a huge discount, given their
declines, you're actually bringing down the
average costs and in the long term you
would be rewarded for it. After this reces-
sion is done and we are on the road to
recovery, you would look back on this peri-
od and say this is a period where you got
phenomenal value."

According to one adviser, government
bonds are especially attractive because they
can be easily resold before the bond reach-
es maturity — without a penalty.

President of CFAL Anthony Ferguson
said he hasn't seen a huge number of sea-
soned investors moving from equity shares
to bonds. He said it is a route new investors
are taking because of concerns over the
economy and company earnings over the
next 12 to 18 months.

"Most new money is heading into the
bond market and you have select investors
who see opportunities or see undervalued
securities, who are quietly picking up under-
valued equity securities. | wouldn't say that
people are moving from equity to bonds, I
think what people are doing is, new invest-
ments or new cash that they have they are
buying more bonds and preference shares.

Last year, equity markets on the
Bahamas Investment and Securities
Exchange (BISX) were down by about 17
per cent. But unlike international counter-
parts, the local exchange market is shielded
from the economic crisis crippling sectors
abroad, according to insiders.

Still, the recent provisional liquidation
of insurance company CLICO (Bahamas)
and the current economic downturn have
some investors worried about losing their
finances. But Mr Gibson said the two cir-
cumstances are completely independent
and should not cloud investors’ decisions.

"They're different things — whether
you're in a recession or whether you're in an
expansion, they are individual companies
that are either poorly managed or make
mistakes. So that's not purely driven by the
current market cycles, it's driven by lack
of adherence to diversification and risk
management principals.

His advice to investors in the current cli-
mate — continue to invest in the local mar-
ket but research prospective companies
first.

"There are still good, well-managed com-
panies out there that even though their
price has gone down over the long-term —
10 years or more — you would be well com-
pensated.

“Tf your investment horizon is short, then
clearly you need to be more cautious,” he
said.

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Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

CAROLINE DELORIS
"Eloise" BAIN, 80

of Springfield Road, Fox
Dale, Fox Hill will be held
on Saturday, March 21st,
3:00 p.m. at. St. Gregory's
Anglican Church,
Carmichael Road.
Archdeacon James
Palacious and Fr. Colin
Saunders will officiate.
Interment will follow in
Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, John. F. Kennedy
Drive.

Precious memories will forever live in the hearts of
her father, Marshall Higgs; sons, Bradford Joseph
Coleman and Charles Bain; daughters, Verlene D.
Palacious, Alexandrea G. Bain, Clara Y. Stuart and
Mary E. Levarity; daughter-in-law, Tanya Bain; sons-
in-law, Eugene Palacious and Leo Levarity; two
brothers, Vincent and Benson Higgs; two sisters,
Cynthia Higgs-Stubbs and Coral Huyler; sisters-in-
law, Delcine and Gail Higgs; grand daughters, Anzwa
Johnson and Mirada Johnson, Nickara Roberts, Anna-
clara Stuart, Tamara Brennen and Leatrice Levarity;
grandsons, Antonio Roberts, Stevie Brennen, Bradford
Coleman Jr. and Ahmad Bain; great grandchildren,
Tifari, Ziya, Nyamekye, Nyara, Dave, Eugena, Lacoia,
Samara, Tamara, Tarrell, Marion, Nikita, Britany and
Marquill, Keano and Breanna Roberts; numerous nieces
and nephews including Kermit, Lewis, Benjamin and
Naomi Stubbs, Jackie and Clarence Winter, Don and
Roger Brown, Rosita Duvalier, Nedda Wright, Lauren
Kemp, Marva Burrows, Gwendolyn Davis, Melvern
and Karen Brown, Andrew and Raquel Huyler, Temille
Huyler-Brown, Keva Rolle, Kevin Stuart, Kayla and
Katisha Stubbs, Benson Jr., Sherman, Travis and
Marshall Higgs; friends including Olivia Levarity,
Florence Levarity, Greg, Marion, Elizabeth and Roberts,
Laverne, Dion, Doyle, Avon, Faye and Shandra
Sainders, Nicole Knowles, Barbara Weech and Errol
Smith; godchildren, Kermitt Stuart, Anvar Roberts and
Harvett Marshall.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Friday from 12:00
noon to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. and at the church from 1:30 p.m. until
service



Claim that man died because hospital staff
took more than 40 minutes to respond

FROM page one

the man lose buckets of blood on
the historic stone steps as he fran-
tically called for ambulance ser-
vices stationed at the Princess
Margaret Hospital less than 100 ft
away.

The pastor ran to the man as
soon as he fell at around 3pm on
Tuesday. He said he had seen the
man, who was wearing a yellow
shirt and khaki trousers, waiting
anxiously for a prescription in the
Princess Margaret Hospital Clin-
ic as pharmacy staff idly gossiped
among themselves.

As he left the clinic in a hurry,
Rev Cooper said the man, who
has not as yet been identified by
police, walked up the Queen’s
Staircase and fell on the platform
about half-way up at around 3pm
on Tuesday.

Pastor Cooper rushed to his
side as he was lying face forward
on the steps, moaning. He said his
nose was broken, the bones in his

forehead were broken and blood
and puss were pouring out of a
gash on the left side of his head.

He called 911 repeatedly and
ran to the hospital where he
shouted for staff to find a doctor
for the dying man who he esti-
mates was around 50 years
old.

But Pastor Cooper said securi-
ty and administration staff seemed
to be in no hurry to help, and the
doctor took his time as he walked
up the steps.

“When the doctor looked at
him he moved him on his back
the blood was just dripping out
of the gash on the top left of his
forehead,” Pastor Cooper said.

“There were like three sink fulls
of blood and puss on the ground.”

The doctor took the man’s
pulse and confirmed he was living,
but he continued to lose blood,
and consciousness, for another 15
minutes before paramedics
arrived with a stretcher, Pastor
Cooper said.

He was finally taken to hospital
45 minutes after he fell, Pastor
Cooper claims.

“Tt wasn’t the fall that was fatal,
it was their negligence, and slow
response that killed the man,” he
alleged.

“He would have been messed
up because of the fall, but he died
because he lost so much blood
and because they didn’t react fast
enough.

“It’s not like they did every-
thing they could, they didn’t do
anything.

“That man died because it was
their fault.

“They don’t care and this can-
not go on.”

Princess Margaret Hospital did
not respond to calls before The
Tribune went to press.

Dr Davidson Hepburn from the
Department Antiquities, Monu-
ments and Museums Corporation
(AMMC) confirmed on Wednes-
day the steps are consistently
maintained and are in good repair.

Man dies after severe beating

FROM page one

"Police are sure of the circumstances sur-
rounding this incident and have launched an
intensive investigation," ASP Evans said yester-

day.

Smith is a resident of Williams Lane, off Kemp

Road.

His death marks the second homicide this week
and the sixteenth for the year, according to ASP

Evans.

On Sunday, a game of dominoes turned dead-
ly when a man was shot in the head during a
brazen daylight attack. The victim, Mark 'Scab-
by’ Daniels, was playing dominoes with friends

outside a building on Finlayson Street when a
gunman approached and shot him in the head.

1c.

at the scene.

When police arrived a short time later —
around 1pm — they found Daniels on the porch
of a single story white and green wooden building
where he reportedly worked as an auto-mechan-

The father-of-five, said to be in his mid-30s,
was found lying on his back dressed in a black
short-sleeved shirt and short green trousers.

Emergency personnel pronounced him dead

Family and friends converged on the house
and screamed in anguish as officials carried
Daniels’ body away.

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BASRA locates
boats used by
crew involved in
iguana slaughter,
conch harvesting

FROM page one

$800 for possession of unde-
veloped conch and $200 for
possession of an iguana, Palm
was excused by George
Town, Exuma magistrate
Ivan Ferguson, and the other
two men pictures have so far
escaped arrest.

But BASRA has provided
new information which could
lead to their apprehension.

BASRA operations man-
ager Captain Chris Lloyd said
both ‘Miss Emily’ and ‘Gone
Away’ are still in the
Bahamas.

Capt Lloyd identified “Miss
Emily’ in the Facebook pic-
tures as he had previously
approached the captain for
illegally flying a Jolly Roger
pirate flag when anchored in
Nassau Harbour.

He said the boat moved
from Nassau harbour for
some time, but has now
returned.

‘Gone Away’ is reportedly
chartering sailboat trips out
of the Abacos.

Capt Lloyd said: “I talked
to cruisers who met these
boats in the Biminis and they
assure me these young peo-
ple are not cruisers, but cow-
boys.

“The photos (on Face-
book) circulated locally and
made available to the press
also show an illegal speargun
in the dinghy.

“This I feel is the biggest
offence of all, equal to an
unlicenced firearm.”

Police have been alerted
about the whereabouts of the
sailboats but have not said
they are any closer to appre-
hending them.

Executive director of the
Bahamas National Trust Eric
Carey said: “It’s not dead yet.
It may fade away but some
people are still interested in it
and they are outraged.

“Unfortunately the reality
is that most of them are not
caught and everybody pleads
ignorance.

“But the Bahamas does
have a number of laws and
regulations in place that
relate to the marine environ-
ment and we want to throw
the book at people. We
should aggressively seek to
pursue these individuals.”

Rust and Palm were seen
in Joe Sound, north Long
Island last month by boaters
who said they were bragging
without remorse about eat-
ing protected wildlife to oth-
er sailboaters. They are said
to have sailed “Sea Monkey’
south to Conception Island,
Rum Cay and Clarence
Town.

Casuarina McKinney Lam-
bert, executive director of the
Bahamas Reef Environment
Educational Foundation
(BREEP), said: “I have
heard several other people
describe how these people
were laughing about getting
off so lightly.

“Tt is really a disgrace and
people who behave in this
way, and violate our laws
should not be welcome in our
country.

“Tenorance is no excuse;
the fines were laughably
small given the crimes com-
mitted and they will serve as
no deterrent at all.”



PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

21ST BAAA’S NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS DIVISIONAL RANKINGS

SAC on top at the









































end of (la aie i JUNIOR GIRLS iP 1) Harbour Island 9 C.R Walker 4
V ? Queen’s College 20 SEU (0 re vee : Preston Albury 3
i St. Augustine’s 14 }4) Doris Johnson S.C Bootle 1
FROM page 15 : C.H Reeves 13 9 Bishop Michael Eldon 7 Anatol Rodgers {
eae : Long Island 1 i C.1 Gibson 5
Rolle set a new mark in the ; Bishop Michael Eldon 10 5 i Brame SENIOR BOYS
narrowly surpassed the 15-year : L-W Young 6 ws i: Augustine's 375 = C.V Bethel 22
old mark of 4:58.74 set in 1994 by North Andros 6 3 4H 0 NE h 03, os St. Augustine’s 19
Lucille Guerrier. i St. Andrew’s 6 2 AF Br 50 bs Jack Hayward 13
Rolle finished well ahead of i St. Anne’s 5 Ca Noch roe . \) C.C Sweeting 11
the field in 4:58.46s. ? Moore’s Island 5 - ed Mae NCA 10
Other record breakers on the : Central Eleuthera 4 a Preston H. Albury 13 8 Temple Christian 10
dey included S.C Melherson's ; Zion Christian 3 eae | : Long Island 9
Avery Thompson in the Junior | Coakley 3 S.C McPherson 10 6 LN Coakley 7
Boys’ javelin and Bishop Michael } 7 0 Nash 1 TA Thompson 10 i) Baris Johnscr 6
Eldon’s Johnathon Farquharson } | Queen’s College 8.5 6
in the Intermediate Boys’ 100m, : C.H Reeves 8 i) C.1 Gibson 5
and Leonardo Ferguson in the ; INTERMEDIATE GIRLS L.N Coakley 8 ) St. John’s 4
Senior Boys’ Shot Put. : St. Augustine’s 47.5 Long Island 7 iy Moore’s Island 3
Thompson’s throw of 43.40m : Queen’s College 16 _ Chuch of God 9 ci Abaco Central 2
beat the year old mark of 36.97m : C.V Bethel | St. Andrew’s 5 u Jordan Prince William 1

set by Marcus Russell, Far-
quharson’s time of 10.72s easily }
beat the 18-year old mark of :
10.71s set by Quinton Bain, and }
Ferguson’s throw of 14.81m was i
barely challenged by the remain-
der of the field to take hold of

the event record.

In the final event of the day, }
the Senior Boys’ 100m, a heated }
battle produced the country’s }
first pair of qualifiers for the }
upcoming Junior Pan Am ‘

Games.

Temple Christian’s Warren }
Fraser and SAC’s Marcus }
Thompson finished in that order }
and surpassed the standard of ;

10.60s.

Fraser claimed the National
title in 10.50s while Thompson }

finished in 10.55s.

The three-day meet continues }
today, with day two expected to }
feature highlights on the track }
with the finals of the 3000m :
Steeplechase, sprint hurdles, }
400m and in the field the triple }
jump, high jump, long jump and i





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of the international players in a
bid to try and assemble wher-
ever possible the best national
team in their quest to make a
run at qualifying for the 2012
Olympic Games in London.

But Hepburn said they don’t
have a shortage of players to
accomplish that feat. Their prob-
lem is and will continue to be
finding the financial resources
to achieve their goal.

“When we reach to Centro,
it’s a fight for us because of
countries like Cuba, Puerto
Rico, US Virgin Islands,
Jamaica and others,” Hepburn
said.

“We’ve competed with them.
In fact our last team fought well.
We’ve been losing to Cuba by
four points the most and we
held Puerto Rico right to the
fourth quarter where the point
deferential showed where they
won by about seven or so.”

The challenge, according to
Hepburn, is that the players are
spread so “far and wide” which

makes it difficult for the federa-
tion to assemble the collegiate
and professional players to come
together.

“Guys are saying to us that
they can’t come home because
of contractual agreement or
summer classes,” Hepburn said.
“We attempted year before last
to finance bringing the guys
home.

“But it’s a very costly venture
to assemble the national team
consisting of your best players.
We attempted it, the finances
fell through, but this is some-
thing that we will continue to
do.”

Storr took it further and said
that with team sports, as
opposed to track and field, it’s
easy to get an athlete to qualify
in the 100 metres for the
Olympics as it is for a national
team.

“Tf a guy is in Greece, how
am I going to ask him to come
home and I cannot pay him
when he gets home?” Storr said.
“If we want to take 20 guys into
Exuma for one month, is this

Intelligent. Creative.

country willing to support that?

“This is something that this
country have to understand.
Until we can get that financing,
it’s going to be very difficult to
get the best players in this coun-
try together.”

To those players who are
based at home and have been
discouraged over the years
because they come out and try
out for the team and they are
eventually replaced by the inter-
national players, Hepburn said
he sympathised with them.

“T always tell them that’s the
reality of sports. You’re look-
ing for your best and you want
to take your best,” Hepburn
said. “So when you have a better
player show up late and he may
have indicated or you may have
indicated an interest in him,
when he comes, you want to
make provisions for him.

“But I don’t think it was bla-
tant. It’s not something that was
already planned. A guy comes
home because we leave the win-
dow open for him. If his skills
surpass the guy that is here, the

coach would take him.”

Hepburn said they were going
to invite the top players to come
out and try out for the team to
ensure that they were going to
be able to field the best team.

The only way the federation
can get around it and not dis-
courage the players, Hepburn
said they will probably take a
look at forming a A and B team.

And Storr said there was no
reason why the federation
couldn’t have a standing nation-
al home team that could be in
place to compete against the vis-
iting teams that came in to play
in exhibition games.

“Most of these players come
home, they get fat and out of
shape and then they blame the
coaches,” Storr said. “Don’t get
me wrong, we have enough tal-
ent at home to represent this
country.”

But he said if the local players
didn’t bring their game up to
standard, they would continue
to get left behind when the
international players came home
to try out.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



Nos

BASEBALL

JBLN SCHEDUL

e Here’s a look at the Junior Baseball League of Nassau’s
schedule of games this weekend at the St. Andrew’s Field of
Dreams:

TEE BALL

Saturday

11 am Raptors vs Sand Gnats; 1 pm Grasshoppers vs
Sidewinders; 3 pm Knights vs Blue Claws.

COACH PITCH

10 am Angels vs Astros; 12:30 pm Blue Jays vs Cubs; 3 pm
Athletics vs Diamond Backs.

MINOR LEAGUE

10 am Red Sox vs Royals; 12:30 pm Mets vs Rays.
MAJOR LEAGUE

12:30 pm Reds vs Mariners; 3 pm Indians vs Marlins.
JUNIOR LEAGUE

10 am Dodgers vs Twins; 12:30 pm Yankees vs Cardinals.
SENIOR LEAGUE

3 pm (Saturday) Pirates vs Rangers.

3 pm (Sunday) Tigers vs Phillies.











SPECIAL athletes from
Nassau will travel to Grand
Bahama this weekend to par-
ticipate in the annual Tennis
Tournament, according to
Special Olympics Director,
Basil Christie.

Ten athletes, coached by
Bradley Bain, have been
training diligently all year for
this special event, and are
excited about the opportuni-
ty to bring home their share
of medals.

During the course of the
year Special Olympics
Bahamas organises competi-
tions in all of the sports
offered.

The tennis tournament is
the first of the year.

In May, the annual Nation-
al Games features the sports

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS

Special athletes prepare for tennis



COACH Bradley Bain with athletes Kevin Archer and Zekuumba Major.

Photo/Basil Christie.

of Bocce, Track & Field and
Swimming. In June, the ath-

letes participate in a Judo
tournament. In December,

Special Olympics will host the
annual Caribbean Invitation-
al Basketball Tournament.

This is the 14th year for the
Tennis Tournament and
Loretta Parris, Director for
Special Olympics in Grand
Bahama, promised that this
will be the best one ever.

The 25-member team in
Grand Bahama is coached by
Olivia Mackey, who boasts of
the strength of her team and
is proud of the progress her
team has made over the
years.

The all-day event is sched-
uled to begin at 9 am at the
Kwan Yin tennis courts and
the public is invited to show
up to cheer the athletes on
and witness their athletic
skills in this sport.

THOMPSON TRADING YOUTH CUP WINNERS



e The 'Mid-Week Track Series’ began under dark clouds, but

the track cyclists came out ready to ride. The youth took over
and began the event; all indications told us this series would be }
very exciting. :
The standard has been set.

Robert the 'Penetrator’ Bethell has blazed the track and all
other cyclists will have to gear up as the track races will get

hot!!! The quote for these track events is 'Take No Prisoners’.
Results:

Two-lap Time Trial (1/2 mile) — Robert Bethell, 1min 15.05 sec;

Henry Kline, Imin 16.41 sec; Robert Butler, Imin 21.15 sec;
Peter Graham, *lmin 24.22 sec; Antinece Simmons, *1min
30.41 sec; Justin Minnis, *lmin 30.81 sec; Amanda Graham,
Imin 34.81 sec; Hayden Graham, *Imin 40.34 sec; Larry Rus-
sell, 2min 04.12 sec.

The public is invited to come out and join the fun every
Wednesday at the race track starting at 6 pm.

BASKETBALL

BSC SCHEDUL

e Here’s a look at the schedule of games on Saturday in the
Baptist Sports Council’s 2009 Joyce Minus Basketball Classic
at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex:

Court One — 10 am Latter-Day No.2 vs Faith United (15); 11
am Golden Gates vs Latter-Day Saints (15); Noon Golden
Gates vs Latter-Day (19); 1 pm Golden Gates No.2 vs Mercy
Seat (19); 2 pm City of Praise vs Pilgrim (M); 3 pm Latter-Day
Saints vs Ebenezer (M); 4 pm Christian Tabernacle vs Calvary
Bible (M).

Court Two — 10 am Macedonia vs Temple Fellowship (15); 11
am Temple Fellowship vs Miracle Working COG (19); Noon











Macedonia vs Golden Gates (L); 1 pm Golden Gates vs Christ-

ian Tabernacle (M); 2 pm Church of the Nazarene vs Evange-
listic Center (M); 3 pm New Bethlehem vs Bahamas Harvest
(M)

Calebrating a Disinguished Sout



Stefano A. Johnson/Tribune staff

Members of the Doris Johnson Marlins rugby team pose after winning the recent Thompson Trading
Youth Cup recently. The team defeated Queens College in the finals, with a score of 15-10. Pictured,
from left, are Sean Kemp, Assistant Coach Andy Bodie, Patrick Johnson, Branden Thompson,
Michael Clarke, Ajayi Clarke, James Rollins, Charles Martin, George Pratt and Coach Kevin Salabie.

On Saturday, March 28", the Montagu Constituency Association
will host a celebratory dinner in honor of its past Members of

Parliament.

—

hw.

Sir Geoffrey Johnstone

Sir Kendal Isaacs J. Henry Bostwick Sir Orville Turnquest

1967 - 1972 1972 - 1977 1977 -1982 1982 - 1997

Sir William Allen

Brent Symonette

1997-2002 2002-2007

From 1967 to 2007, the constituency has had a total of six Representatives. Not

only have these noble sons served Montagu with distinction, but have all gone on

to become nation builders of the highest caliber.
CY |
Nentagu lites Them!

Venue: Montagu Gardens, East Bay Street

Time: 7:30 pm

For further information on the event please contact the constituency
headquarters at (242) 393-0878



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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS







¢ Here’s a complete list of
the Bahamas Basketball
Federation’s 2009 National
Team Coaching Staff:
Junior Male Technical
Director — Reggie Forbes.
Junior/Senior Women
Technical Director — Felix
‘Fly’ Musgrove.

CADET UNDER-15 GIRLS

Head coach — Felix ‘Fly’
Musgrove. :
Assistant coaches — Anasta-
cia Moultrie and Jurelle :
Nairn.

CADET UNDER-15 BOYS ;
Head coach — Quentin Hall.
Assistant coach — Scott :
Forbes. ;
Manager — Donnie Culmer. }

JUNIOR UNDER-16 MALE
Head coach — Chevy Sim-
mons.

Assistant coaches— Darrel :
Sears (Grand Bahama) and }
Wayde Watson. i

JUNIOR UNDER-16 FEMALE :
Head coach —- Sherrell Cash :
Assistant coaches — Ter- i
rance McSweeney and Kel- }
ley Albury. é

SENIOR WOMEN

Head coach — Dr. Linda
Davis.

Assistant coaches — Char-
lene Smith and Yolette
McPhee (Grand Bahama).

SENIOR MEN i
Head coach — Charlie ‘Soft-
ly’ Robbins (Grand :
Bahama).

Assistant coaches — Kevin
‘KJ’ Johnson, Norris Bain
(Grand Bahama) and

Mario Bowleg.

BBF heads to Bimini

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Basketball Federation
men’s national round robin championship
will be going to Bimini, while the ladies’
series will be played in Grand Bahama.

Federation president Lawrence Hep-
burn made the announcement yesterday
in the foyer of the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium. He was accompanied by secre-
tary general Sharon ‘the General’ Storr
and assistant secretary Jerelle Nairn.

In releasing the calendar of events for
2009 and the coaching staff for the vari-
ous national teams, Hepburn said
because of the economic crisis that the
country is in, some of their events may
not be accomplished.

But he indicated that they are eager to
travel to Bimini from April 24-26 at the
new Gateway Gymnasium, commonly
referred to as “Laker’s Heaven.”

Taking the title from a popular song,
the tournament will be dubbed: “You
Never Get a Licking Til You Go Down
to Bimini.”

A total of nine teams from the affiliat-
ed associations of San Salvador,
Eleuthera, Grand Bahama, Exuma, Aba-
co, Inagua, New Providence, Cat Island
and North Andros have all expressed an
interest in participating.

“We're really looking forward to hav-
ing a great national championship in
Bimini,” Hepburn said. “As you know,
Bimini has one of the finest facilities and
great entertainment.

“So teams coming down will really
enjoy themselves and the people of Bimi-
ni will certainly enjoy having the
Bahamas Basketball Federation’s Nation-
al Championships there.”

As for the women’s championship,



BAHAMAS Basketball Federation president Lawrence Hepburn (center) announced plans for the 2009 season. At left is assistant secretary Jerelle
Nairn and at right is secretary general Sharon ‘the General’ Storr.

Hepburn said they wanted to also host it
on Bimini at the same time as the men’s,
but he said they just won’t have suffi-
cient time to stage all of the games over
the three-day period.

Unlike the men’s, the women’s cham-
pionship will take the form of an invita-
tional over the May 1-3.

According to Hepburn, the top three
teams from the New Providence Wom-
en’s Basketball Association, three teams
from Grand Bahama and one from

Eleuthera have been invited to partici-
pate.

“We want to encourage our associa-
tions to do more in terms of promoting
female basketball,” Hepburn said. “Right
now, we will go to an invitational for-
mat.”

If all of the teams show up, Hepburn
said they should have a very competitive
tournament on both islands.

Hepburn said they were still looking
for a title for the ladies’ tournament.

Additionally, Hepburn said the feder-
ation will be hosting a number of certifi-
cation courses to ensure that both the
coaches and the officials are properly
developed.

Both clinics will be hosted in May.

Also in May, Hepburn revealed that
the federation will host an NAIA All-
Star team, the Haiti, Cayman Islands
and Jamaican All-Star, as well as a Pri-
mary School Basketball Association’s
Championships.

Federation select national coaches

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH there is some
uncertainly as to whether or not
all of the international tourna-
ments will be held this year, the

Bahamas Basketball Federation
have assembled its core of
coaches to get the national
teams ready.

At a press conference yester-
day in the foyer of the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium, federation
president Lawrence Hepburn
said the coaching staff will com-
prise of both the junior and
senior national teams.

nament will be the Cadet
Under-15 girls heading to the
Centro Basketball Cadet from
June 3-7 in Ciudad, Victoria,
Mexico. The team will be head-
ed by Felix ‘Fly’ Musgrove.
And over the same time in
Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico for
the boys’ Centro Basket Cadet,
the team will be managed by
Donnie Culmer. The head

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MERINE DOVALUS
of BALFOUR AVENUE, P.O.BOX N-720, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13* day of
MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BRYCE VALENTINO BRAYNEN
#146B GLADSTONE TERRACE, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th day of
MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

BAHAMAS IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT





CELEBRATES IT’S 70TH YEAR ANNIVERSARY UNDER THE TEEME
“HISTORIC PAST, DYNAMIC FUTURE”
WITH A FUN/RUN/WALK











DATE:21ST MARCH 2009
TIME:7;00AM

REGISTRATION FORM









Last Name: First Name:



Street Address:



Phone No: (__) Email Address

Date of Birth: / / Gender (circleone); MF

Shirt Size (circle one): S M LG XL XXL Event: (circle one): 4.0 Mile Run

4.0 Mile Walk

Emergency Contact: Name: Phone No:



Waiver:
I know that walking/running during a Fun Run/Walk is a potentially hazardous activity. I should not participate
unless I am medically able and properly trained. Lagree to abide by any decision made by a Fun Run/Walk official
relative to my ability to safely complete the Fun Run/Walk. I assume all risk associated with participating in this
event, including but not limited to falls, contact with other participants, the effects of weather, including traffic and
conditions of the course, all such risk being known and understood by me. Having read this waiver and knowing
these facts and as my consideration of your accepting my entry, I, for myself and anyone entitled to act in my
behalf, waive and release: Bahamas Immigration, all sponsors and volunteers, and any representatives and
successors from all claims or liabilities of any kind arising from my participation in this event.

Signature: Date:



(Parent or guardian must sign if participant is under 18 years of age)

Registration Fees $10.00: (March 21" 2009: Fun Run/Walk Event Day Registration is
from 6am — 6:45am)

CATEGORIES AWARDS

UNDER 14 TROPHIES FOR 1ST PLACE
WINNERS IN
UNDER 20
20-45

45 AND ABOVE
PLACE



EACH CATEGORY





EDALS FOR 2ND &3RD
NNERS IN EACH CATEGORY





ROUTE:

The Fun Run/ Walk will commence 7:00am at Immigration’s head quarters,
Hawkins Hill traveling north to Bay Street, east on Bay Street to Montague, West
on to Shirley Street and back to Hawkins Hill, thus completing a four (4) mile Fun
Run/ Walk.



The first international tour-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KERLINE ESTIME of BLUE
HILL ROAD, P.O. BOX N-4922, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20 day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE is hereby given that ADDERLY TIBO of ST.
ALBANS DRIVE, BUILDING #24, APT#7, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 20 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that |, SAINT FIDEL SYLVERIAN
TURNQUEST of Township of Govenors Harbour in the Island
of Eleuthera, The Bahamas c/o P.O.Box EL-25051, intend to
change my name to SOPHIE SYLVERIAN TURNQUEST If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH MCINTOSH of
PINEWOOD GARDENS, P.O.BOX N-720, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13" day of
MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, KEVIN INGRAHAM of the
North Western District of the Island of New Providence intend to
change my name from KEVIN INGRAHAM to KEVIN LAURAND
INGRAHAM If there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

coach will be Quentin Hall from

Grand Bahama.

In July, the under-16 male
will travel to the Centro Bas-
ketball at a site yet to be named.
The head coach of the team will
be Chevy Simmons.

And the junior under-16 girls
will also compete in the Centro
Basketball. Sherelle Cash will
travel as the head coach.

The Bahamas won both the
junior girls and boys tourna-
ment last year to earn the rights
to travel this year.

With the Bahamas being a
possible host for the women’s
Caribbean Basketball Champi-
onships, the federation have
selected Dr. Linda Davis as the
women’s head coach.

There’s no venue or date for
the men, but the federation has
selected Charlie ‘Softly’ Rob-
bins from Grand Bahama of the
men’s team.

¢ Look at the box for a com-

not held, Hepburn said the
senior men’s team will move on
to play in the Centro Basket in
Puerto Rico after finishing
fourth at the last tournament.

The ladies, however, did not
qualify for the Centro Basket.

Sharon Storr, secretary gen-
eral of the federation, said the
federation has gone through a
vigorous selection progress in
putting the coaching staff
together.

“We’ve not put any stipula-
tions on when their terms will
end and the reason is because
we’re a new federation coming
in,” Storr said. “But if you look
at the coaching staff, there’s
been some movement, but some
positive movement in our think-
ing to where we want to be
when we start qualifying again.”

As for the qualifying process
that they have to go through,
Hepburn said the federation

plete list of the coaching staff
for all of the teams.

will definitely be looking at all

SEE page 12

If the CBC Tournaments are

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSIE DORESTIN of
THE BLUFF, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 20" day of March,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DESIREE ELISA PARKER of
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my son’s name to LAMONT
ZION PARKER to LAMONT ZION PARKER-DAMES If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-
742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUVINA RAVOL of
MACKEY STREET, P.O. BOX N-7060, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 20 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MONIQUE ASTWOOD of 165
KALANDAR ST.,#C-3, OPA LOCKA, FL.,U.S.A.,FL 33054
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





ee








FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

INSIDE ¢ Local sports news

SAC on top at the
end of day one



Tim Glarke/Tribune Staff

NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS CHAMPIONSHIP
|

y





@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH three days to deter-
mine the top high school track
and field athletes in the country,
perennial Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations cham-
pions sit atop the leaderboard in
several divisions after day one.

After day one of the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associa-
tions’ 21st National High School
Championships, the St.
Augustine’s College Big Red
Machine dominated the leader-
board, heading four of the six
contested divisions.

The 21-time Bahamas Associ-
ation of Athletic Associations
champions lead both the Junior
and Intermediate Boys along
with the Intermediate and Senior
Boys.

The Queen’s College Comets
and C.R Walker Knights head
the remaining divisions, with the
Comets leading the Junior Girls
and the Knights outfront in the
Senior Boys.

The Big Red Machine holds
their most commanding advan-
tage in the Intermediate Girls’
division with 47.5 points, 31.5
points ahead of the Comets’ 16.

In the Senior Girls’ SAC leads
the field with 57 points, 23 points
ahead of the Knights’ 34 and in
the Junior Boys’ boast a 14.5
point advantage with 37.5 points
ahead of the H.O Nash Lions’
23.

The Big Red Machine
received a number of standout

performances from a well bal-
anced team in the sprints, middle
distance, in the field and a pair of
record breaking outings from
Byron Ferguson and Hughnique
Rolle.

Ferguson set a new record in

BBF
HEADS TO
BIMINI

the Junior Boys Javelin with a
heave of 56.65m.

The two-sport star, also a soft-
ball standout, beat the previous
mark of 53.17m set by Eljin Mor-

SEE page 12



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ODYSSEY AVIATION, FOUNDING

"YELLOW JERSEY" SPONSOR OF RIDE
READIES LARGE TEAM FOR APRIL 4TH

Since the inception of the Ride for Hope Odyssey Aviation Bahamas has consistently been one of
its most generous corporate supporters. Here is their Ride for Hope experience in their own words.

The driving force behind Odyssey Aviation’s sponsorship is our President, Mr. Steven Kelly. “Our
dedication and support to the success of the Ride for Hope over the course of the past three years
has been on many different levels. The significance of this event and the impact that cancer has
on so many lives will continue to drive Odyssey Aviation’s role in ensuring the continued success

of this great charity.”

Less than 5 weeks before the inaugural Ride for Hope in 2006, Mr. Kelly decided that Odyssey would
not only step up to the plate as a good corporate citizen and help sponsor such a worthy event but it
would also field a team of riders.

The wheels were quickly set in motion and in a matter of days the first Odyssey team came together.
Employees, family and friends were eager to participate. All we needed were cycling jerseys to look
the part, and—oh yes—we also needed to train!

We quickly encouraged aviation industry friends and colleagues to pledge their support in helping
make a difference. Companies in the US which had ties to The Bahamas soon fell in place to help us
raise money to fight cancer and make the Ride for Hope the most successful, one-day charity in The
Bahamas today.

As event sponsors, the financial support of seven corporations from the US has helped Odyssey
Aviation generate enormous financial support for this event over the years. Pledging their sponsorship
again for 2009, most have participated in each of the past 3 years. Since the inception of the Ride for
Hope, members of Team Odyssey Aviation have collectively contributed over $150,000 to the monies
raised by participants. Additionally, through monetary and in-kind contributions, Odyssey Aviation
Bahamas and its generous partners have contributed tens of thousand of dollars to the success of this
great cause.

Over the years, Team Odyssey Aviation has included a total of 53 riders and more than two dozen
volunteers. They act as support during the rides following team members in vehicles and keeping them
well hydrated and fueled.

Our GM, William Holowesko, reports, “We are very excited and well on track for another successful
fund raising effort for the 2009 event. So far we have a committed team of 26 riders, our largest
yet, with the youngest being 8 and the oldest being 54. There is great satisfaction in knowing that
collectively we have played a large role in helping make a difference in the lives of many Bahamians
suffering from cancer.”





PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





MINISTER OF EDUCATION Carl Bethel (centre) and Archbishop of Nassau Rev Patrick Pinder (right) look
at plans for the new Aquinas College as president of Woslee Construction Ashley Glinton points out cer-

tain buildings.

Minister Bethel
tours new Aquinas
College campus site

m@ By ERIC ROSE

MINISTER of Education Carl
Bethel led senior ministry officials
and Catholic education stakehold-
ers on a tour of the new Aquinas
College campus site on Gladstone
Road on Wednesday, calling the
progress made so far “wonderful.”

“In these hard economic times it
is really uplifting to come and see
not only a building site, but a build-
ing site that is being aggressively
pursued at the very highest stan-
dards,” Minister Bethel said.

“Tf you look around you will see
that not only is the quality of the
work at an extremely high level,
but also the technology that is
being used by these Bahamian
builders is at the highest level.”

Mr Bethel said the contractors
learned to use such new technolo-
gy while working on major con-
struction jobs.

“They have been able to learn,
assimilate, and now, to apply all

of these skills in other jobs
throughout our country, so we see
an example here of the quality of
their work,” he said.

Construction started in October
2008 and is expected to be com-
pleted in July 2009, with about 500
students expected to use the cam-
pus. President of Woslee Con-
struction Ashley Glinton, who
directed the tour, said it is a very
aggressive schedule.

“The quality of work is second-
to-none and I must congratulate
the subcontractors who have
been working on the project,” he
said.

Archbishop of Nassau Rev
Patrick Pinder joined the group on
the tour and pointed out various
areas of interest to them.

“This year is the 120th anniver-
sary of Catholic Education in the
Bahamas and this particular
endeavour that we are undertaking
this year is but one more expres-
sion of the vitality of Catholic edu-

cation in the Bahamas and our
continued commitment to the
social development of this coun-
try,” Archbishop Pinder said.

Minister Bethel said that he was
also “gratified” to see that the
Roman Catholic Board of Educa-
tion has embraced, in such an
aggressive way, the whole concept
of the diversification of education
through enhanced technology
training with three science labs,
auto repair and other vocational
training courses available on the
new campus.

He said: “All of these are aimed
at equipping thousands and new
generations of young Bahamians
with a full range of skills necessary
to assist more and more Bahami-
ans to assume greater positions of
ownership in the Bahamian econ-
omy so that we are no longer
focusing in education upon merely
creating good workers, but to cre-
ate good citizens and good corpo-
rate and business leaders.”

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Letisha Henderson/BIS

MINISTER OF EDUCATION Carl Bethel (centre) looks on as Archbishop of Nassau Rev Patrick Pinder
(right) points out an area on the new Aquinas College campus. To the left of Minister Bethel is president
of Woslee Construction Ashley Glinton.

Construction progresses on

Magistrates Court Cores

m@ By KATHRYN
CAMPBELL
Bahamas Information
Services

WORK on the completion
of the Magistrates Court Com-
plex on Nassau and South
Streets has recommenced and
is steadily progressing. Public
Works and Transport Minister
Neko Grant recently led a
team of ministry officials to
inspect the progress to date.

Copeland Moxey, senior
architect with the Ministry of
Works, said work on the struc-
ture began in February. He
said the complex comprises a
two-storey structure that will
house a total of 12 courts.

Six courts, holding cells,
administrative offices, and a
police station will be located
on the ground floor. The sec-
ond floor will accommodate
juvenile and family courts, two
civil courts, library space and
support offices. The attic will
consist of two additional
courts and office spaces.

Mr Moxey said the remain-
ing major work to be com-
pleted includes landscaping,
parking, plumbing, electrical,
air-conditioning and installa-



Letisha Henderson/BIS

PUBLIC WORKS and Transport
Neko Grant (left) and perma-
nent secretary Colin Higgs
stand on the steps outside the
Magistrates Court Complex
presently under construction on
Nassau and South Streets.

tion of a back-up generator
system.

Adler Minus of Adler Con-
struction was awarded the
over $6.4 million contract for
construction of the complex.
The work is expected to be
completed in a year’s time. Mr

Pm lovin’ it







i
NEKO GRANT, Minister of Pub-
lic Works and Transport, chats
with director Gordon Major as
he points to one of the rooms
on the ground floor of the Mag-
istrates Court Complex present-
ly being constructed on Nassau
and South Streets.

Minus said his company ini-
tially met extremely filthy con-
ditions on the interior and
exterior of the court structure
and had to hire a company to
do extermination and general
cleaning. “While starting the
job was difficult, we are com-
fortable and confident now
that we are on track with
putting the job on schedule.
We anticipate a lot of sub-
work that will speed up the
process of the job tremen-
dously,” he said.

Mr Minus said that the attic
has been poured and his com-
pany is working with the engi-
neers and architect on final
designs for the metal roof. He
explained that the original
plan was for the roof to be
made of wood.

“We’re in the final stages of
pricing a metal roof. We hope
to mobilise that by the end of
this week. It has a six-week
delivery time. We’re hoping
that if all goes on schedule
once the roof is here, we can
put the complete job back on
schedule,” he said.

The project management
team includes Richard Green
and Martin Minus, and sub-
contractors James Morley of
Professional Maintenance Ser-
vices, Lauren Basden of Bas-
den Elevator, Ossie Neymour
and James Bain.

your

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.







Abaco
Markets’ 4%

of revenue
profits target

* Company ‘still not where
we need to be’ despite
144% fourth quarter net
income rise, almost
bringing it level with prior
year comparatives, driven
by 17.1% sales rise

* BlSx-listed retail group
‘six to nine months ahead’
of liquidity goal, eyeing
‘net cash position’ on
ongoing basis for first time
in three-six months

* Writes off $126,000
receivable owed by Ken
Hutton group on Cost
Right Turks deal

* Expecting Domino's
Pizza net income to rise in
this fiscal year

CENT Fone



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Abaco Markets’ president
yesterday said the company’s
financial performance was ‘still
not where we need it to be”
despite recording a 144 per cent
net income increase during its
fiscal 2009 fourth quarter, with
the retail group “working
towards” its ultimate target of a
net profit equivalent to 4 per
cent of annual net sales.

Gavin Watchorn said the
BISX-listed group’s continuing
operations, which exclude the
now-closed Cost Right Abaco,
had generated net profits for
the year to January 31, 2009,
that were equivalent to 2.6 per
cent of net revenues. Including
the ceased businesses, the figure
had been “just above 2 per
cent”.

Abaco Markets had generat-
ed net income of $1.533 million
for the three months to Janu-
ary 31, 2009, compared to
$628,000 the year before.

SEE page 5B

Shippers see
10% container
volume decline

* But others say ‘no
decline in revenue’

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
robards@tribunemedia.net

SOME Bahamas-based
shipping companies yesterday
reported a 10 per cent decline
in twenty-foot equipment unit
(TEU) container shipments
into Nassau for the year-to-
date, but others said they had
seen “no decline in revenue”.

Garth Rolle, port manager
at Tropical Shipping, told Tri-
bune Business that container
volumes had been fluctuating
as global fuel prices continu-
ally rose and fell.

SEE page 6B

THE TRIBUNE

USINCSS

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



FRIDAY,

MARCH 20,



BISX moves back

to downtown Bay

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas Internation-
al Securities Exchange (BISX)
is “soon” moving back into
downtown Nassau’s financial
centre through its new home
in the Bay Street property
housing FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas)
branch, as the exchange pre-
pares to expand staff in prepa-
ration for new business
streams.

Keith Davies, BISX’s chief
executive, told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that while he
could not provide a firm date
for the exchange’s move from
its existing Village Road base,
due to the fact that final work
on its new first floor premises
was ongoing, the property was
set to be renamed 50
Exchange Place.

He explained that BISX
needed expanded premises to
cope with the new business
streams it expected to handle
this year, with the exchange

set to take over the whole first
floor. Apart from the
exchange itself, Mr Davies
said the new headquarters
would also be home to its
BISX Global initiative and “a
third business” related to its
planned Central Securities
Depository (CSD).

Downtown

“BISX is moving back into
the downtown area, the pre-
mier financial centre of the
Bahamas,” Mr Davies told
Tribune Business. “The new
location is downtown in the
old Barclays building, now the
FirstCaribbean building, on
Bay Street, and we’re moving
on to the first floor. We erect-
ed our sign in the lobby of that
building yesterday.”

The BISX chief executive
explained that the exchange
needed to move from the
building it currently shares
with FTC (Fast Track Con-
struction) because “over the
course of this year, BISX will

Government pledges
‘more independence’
for telecom regulator

* Acknowledges need for ‘wholesale change to the
effectiveness, efficiency and independence’ of
enlarged communications industry supervisor

* Unveils plans for Utilities Regulation &
Competition Authority to replace PUC, with focus
on transparency and bringing in ‘international

skills’

* Five Acts to be repealed fully or partially, and
replaced by three new pieces of legislation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government yesterday
pledged that the new Bahamian
communications industry regu-
lator will have “greater inde-
pendence” from it and be more
transparent, plus staffed by per-
sonnel with “international reg-
ulatory skills”, its financing
based on revenues levied as a
percentage of licensee income.

Unveiling the responses to
the consultation on telecom-
munications/communications
regulatory reform, the Govern-
ment and its Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC)
privatisation committee
received “general support”
from telecoms operators on its
proposal to create a “new, con-
verged and strengthened” reg-
ulator that would supervise not
only their industry but all com-
munications sectors - such as
radio and television.

Replace

Such a regulator would likely
replace the existing Public Util-
ities Commission (PUC), which
only supervises the telecoms
industry.

At various stages in its nine-
year, the PUC has come under
fire from various parties for an
alleged lack of independence
from government, and failing
to regulate the industry effec-
tively.

In its response to the consul-
tation feedback, the Govern-
ment confirmed that it planned
to fully or partially repeal the
PUC Acct, the Telecommunica-
tions Act, the Television Regu-
latory Authority Act, the BTC
Act and the Broadcasting Act.

In the PUC’s case, it would
be replaced by a Utilities Reg-
ulation and Competition
Authority (URCA), which

SEE page 7B

for a better life

~ healtheare

be expanding its complement
of employees, hopefully as we
experience an uptick in our
ability to provide services to
the business we already have”

Apart from BISX Global,
he added: “We must plan for
developments to come and be
ready to execute them. There
will be a third business in
there, which we will announce
when it comes into existence.
It’s related to the Central
Securities Depository we are
developing as well. We need
new premises for equipment
and growth potential. We see
an expansion of operations.”

Mr Davies said BISX was
looking to add another three
to four persons, based on its
analysis of current employee
needs, and the extra staff
needed as additional business
came on stream. Two employ-
ees were likely to be added in
the short-term, and another
two at a later date.

BISX’s first stay in down-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission.
from the daily report.



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Dismissed staff:

Still eligible for
unemployment
benefit funding

BECon chief expresses concern over
proposed scheme, but acknowledges it is
‘overdue’ and will provide wider social benefits

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas Employers Confederation’s (BECon) pres-
ident yesterday expressed concern that workers who either
quit or were dismissed with just cause from their jobs would
still qualify for a portion of the Government’s proposed
unemployment benefit programme, although he com-
mended the scheme as “overdue” and “providing benefits
to our society as a whole”.

Brian Nutt acknowledged that unemployment benefits
were a key plank that had been missing from the Bahamas’
social security package, and needed to be implemented,
but detailed several concerns that the business community
had with the scheme as currently proposed.

He explained to Tribune Business that “one of our con-
cerns” was that all unemployed persons would be eligible to
participate in the scheme and receive some level of benefits,
regardless of whether they lost their job through their own

SEE page 2B

Restoration shows century-
old site is far from ‘Scrap’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



A CENTURY-old building at the corner of downtown Nas-
sau’s Dowdeswell and Deveaux Streets has received a high-
priced facelift, while preserving the legacy built-up by a sandwich
shop owner who operated out of the premises for almost 56
years.

The building, which houses The Architectural Studio, The
Scrapbook Cottage and The Studio Deli, and opens next month,
was once the home of a young Long Island man and his family,
and is said to be almost 114-years-old.

Michael Moss, owner of the building and partner in The
Architectural Studio, told Tribune Business that a lady name Mrs

SEE page 4B

FAMILY GUARDIAN

Da INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





BISX moves bac
to downtown Bay

renee



FROM page 1B

town Nassau, when it was based at the
British Colonial Hilton’s Centre of Com-
merce, was not a happy one. The
exchange and its then-senior executives
were criticised for over-spending on rent,
salaries and other expenses, especially
when anticipated business streams failed
to materialise, and BISX plunged into
heavy losses.

Bailout

That ultimately resulted in a govern-
ment bailout, via the Central Bank of the
Bahamas, but the exchange has since
regained a more solid financial footing.

Mr Davies said yesterday that whereas
the first foray into downtown had been
based on anticipated future business
streams - the listing and trading of gov-
ernment debt securities, and privatisa-
tions of the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC) and other public
utilities - the current move was “predi-
cated on business in hand”.

While the past had been based on busi-
ness and revenue streams that never

materialised, Mr Davies said the new
move was founded on “collaboration with
existing members, as well as new part-
ners. This is not based on what we’d like
to see. It’s done on the premise of what
we See.

“There is a small element of what is to
come, but that is grounded on what has
been done and we see a clear path to
growth. This is more realism grounded,
and is part of the ‘small steps’ philosophy
[ve been employing for years.”

Mr Davies added that BISX was “still
pretty close” to the break even point
financially, although it was not there yet,
and he would “not be comfortable” until
the exchange had passed that point.

“What I’ve always said is that one of
the things we want to do is get some of
the business streams we’ve been talking
about to the bottom line,” he added. “The
sooner we do that, it will put the compa-
ny in a good position to weather difficult
economic times.

“The company needs to develop the
business streams it has planned to con-
tribute to the building of its bottom line.
We do need to turn on and develop these
business streams.”

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said Mr.
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Assured Financial

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Agents and Brokers Limited, agents for:

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A new Insurance Brokerage company is
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new company, Assured Financial Services

Insurance Agents and Brokers Limited.

The company is headed by Dashwell E.
Flowers, a well known and highly regarded
insurance industry professional who has
been in the business for some twenty four
most of which have been in senior
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Dismissed staff:
Still eligible for

unemployment
benefit funding

FROM page 1B

fault or factors such as redundancy.

Mr Nutt said employees who were dismissed by companies for
cause, such as breaching regulations or stealing, would not be dis-
qualified from receiving unemployment benefits for the entire 13-
week (three month) stretch during which they will be eligible to
receive them.

“Those persons are deemed to be disqualified,” Mr Nutt said of
Bahamian workers dismissed for cause, “but the disqualification
period will not be more than six weeks. A person fired for com-
mitting theft will receive seven weeks of benefits, because the dis-
qualification will affect only six weeks of benefits.”

Mr Nutt said the unemployment benefit scheme, which the Gov-
ernment hoped to implement from April 20, 2009, onwards, would
be legislated via amendments to the National Insurance Act and its
accompanying regulations.

The BECon president said he wanted the National Insurance Act
to be brought into line “with current labour standards”, as it talked
about dividing benefits over six days instead of a five-day work
week.

And a further concern, Mr Nutt explained, was that the unem-
ployment benefit scheme would, in the long-term, place an extra
burden on employers to fund it when they had already been man-
dated, by the Employment Act, to provide notice pay (severance or
termination pay) to laid-off employees based on their years of
service.

For line staff, this amounts to two weeks’ pay with or in lieu of
notice, and two weeks for every year worked up to six months’
worth of pay. For managerial staff, it is one month’s pay with
notice or in lieu of notice, and one month’s pay for each year
worked up to 12 months (one year).

As aresult, Mr Nutt said BECon had “asked the question” as to
whether - given that employers had already handed over these
funds to laid-off staff - unemployment benefit kicked in immediately
that their employment ceased, or if it started after their severance
pay period expired.

Jeopardy

If it was immediately, Mr Nutt suggested that this might place the
unemployment benefit’s sustainability in “more” jeopardy. “If the
benefits are to kick-in two weeks after an individual stops working,
the Government should revisit the Employment Act and amend
notice, and do some offsetting” between notice pay and unem-
ployment benefit,” Mr Nutt suggested.

Under the proposed unemployment benefit scheme, benefits
will be paid two weeks in arrears. This means that, if the scheme
comes into effect on April 20, the first benefits would be paid on
May 4, 2009.

The proposed scheme, although initially financed by $20 million
transferred from the National Insurance Board’s (NIB) medical
benefits branch, and supplemented by the Government’s consoli-
dated fund if needed, will in the long-term be financed by employ-
er/employee contributions.

These will be split 50/50 between employer and employee, and in
total be equivalent to 1 per cent of the insurable wage ceiling.
Given that current NIB contributions were 8.8 per cent, split 5.4 per
cent/3.4 per cent between employer/employee, Mr Nutt said the
unemployment benefit contribution would take this to 5.9 per
cent/3.9 per cent or 9.8 per cent in total.

The BECon president said his only other concern regarding the
scheme related to workers still in employment over the age of 65.
Unemployment benefit was only available to those aged under
65, but employers were still expected to contribute to the scheme
on behalf of those above this age, even though the workers in
question did not have to.

Mr Nutt said he was told this was an “oversight”, and would be
corrected before the National Insurance Act amendments were tak-
en to Parliament.

The BECon president acknowledged that unemployment bene-
fits were, along with “medical benefits, health insurance wise”,
which the Government was looking to provide through its pre-
scription drug programme, were the two missing strands from the
Bahamas’ social security programme.

Mr Nutt said the proposed benefits were “half of what the ben-
efits are in Barbados”, where the scheme was funded by a 1.5 per
cent contribution and provided 60 per cent of the insurable wage as
compared to the Bahamas’ 50 per cent.

The Bahamas’ scheme would provide benefits for 13 weeks, and
if the initial $20 million was exhausted, the Government will sub-
sidise it from the Consolidated Fund until the employer/employee
contributions were legislated.

While the Government was looking to introduce this by January
1, 2010, the timing would depend on the economy.

NT
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Comporny

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following
items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for
the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRAC] BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 3B





IDB survey: Bahamas to lead
On per capita income growth

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

One-third of Caribbean and Latin Ameri-
can leaders surveyed by the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) believe the
Bahamas’ per capita income will experience
the fastest growth of all nations in the region
over the next three years, with only Peru
expected to experience greater growth of 34.6
per cent.

The somewhat surprising survey, which
polled 317 government and private sector lead-
ers in Latin America and the Caribbean, found
that most expected average per capita income
growth of 7.6 per cent across the region

between 2009-2012.

When it came to the Bahamas, one-third of
those surveyed felt this nation would experi-
ence a fall in per capita income over that peri-
od, one-third felt it would see moderate growth
the same, and one-third felt it would see fast
growth.

Dependency

The Bahamas was also predicted to increase
its dependency on financing from internation-
al organisations by 66.7 per cent over that same
three-year period, with only one-third thinking
its dependency on funding sources on the IMF
would little change.

EU lowers hopes for
trade deal at G-20 talks

One-third of respondents also predicted that
the Government’s influence on the economy
would increase between 2009-2012, while 66.7
per cent felt this would drop.

“Leaders in the region expect governments
to maintain or increase their influence in the
economy, and they named fighting poverty
and inequality as their top developmental chal-
lenge in the next four years, closely followed by
reducing violence and crime and improving
the quality of education,” the survey said.

“The survey shows that leaders in Latin
America and the Caribbean are very worried
about the world economy and the possible
impacts of the crisis on poverty,” said president
of the IDB, Luis Alberto Moreno.

“Multilateral organisations such as the IDB
have an important anti-cyclical role to play
and they must step up their support even more
in coming years to meet the region’s growing
needs.”

The findings revealed that 92 per cent of the
economic leaders in the region expect GDP
to grow less or slightly above the increase in
population. More than two thirds of those lead-
ers surveyed expected per capita income to
fall in the next four years.

According to the release, the IDB will debate
the findings of the survey at the 50th annual
meeting of its board of governors in Medellin
Colombia on the 27th of this month.

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,

FO.Box M-30354
Nassan, Bahamas

Tels(242) 327-5780 327-S793-6

m BRUSSELS

The European Union's top offi-
cial said Thursday he doesn't
expect a breakthrough on a glob-
al trade deal in talks among world
leaders next month, according to
the Associated Press.

European Commission Presi-
dent Jose Manuel Barroso said
the EU wants a World Trade
Organization pact that could com-
bat the current recession by help-
ing to halt falling trade.

"But I don't know honestly if
our partners are ready as we are,"
he said, referring to the United
States and India, who could not
agree to a compromise during
crunch negotiations last year.

He said European nations
would ask the Group of 20 lead-
ing world economies at a London
summit on April 1-2 "to agree on
a standstill, so no introduction of
any protectionist measures until
we come to a conclusion of the
Doha trade talks." Emerging
economies Brazil, Russia, India
and China called last week on the
G20 summit to move toward a
deal on trade.

Brazil and China have reaped
major gains from the last two
decades of freer trade with richer
nations that have helped them lift
millions out of poverty and take a
bolder stance on the world stage.

The sudden plunge in exports
has curbed their rapid growth —
and also badly hurt the world's
biggest exporter, Germany, which
depended almost entirely on high
global demand in recent years for
its cars and machinery to com-
pensate for sluggish consumption
at home.

But it is unclear how ready the
USS. is to strike a new trade deal.
President Barack Obama has said
little about his commitment to
freer global trade. Europeans
worry that a Democratic admin-
istration might be more protec-
tionist and set up trade barriers to
support American firms. The U.S.
Senate on Wednesday confirmed
Ron Kirk as the U.S. new trade
representative. He said he did not
come to the job with "deal fever"
and would look out for Ameri-
can workers. Barroso said EU
nations would likely call Friday

for the G20 summit to find ways
to help trade by making more
credit available to exporters and
importers — an idea put forward
by British Prime Minister Gor-
don Brown.

"This recession combined with
.. areal recession of trade is one
of this reasons why this crisis is
assuming a greater magnitude,"
he said.

Czech Prime Minister Mirek
Topolanek, who leads talks
between EU leaders as the cur-
rent EU president, said the bloc
was also ready to significantly
increase funding for the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund.

He would not give a figure but
leaders are likely to back at least
doubling the IMF's resources to
$500 billion — and to contribute
more than $75 billion of their
money.

EU nations are also likely to
call for a major reform to the IMF
that would give more of a say to
emerging countries and see it play
a stronger role as a watchdog over
the global financial system.

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£65, 14 0b»

Lar e4ai wR

ChOR"% | 507) wehse Ae
Duples-Melson Rd

F clana Cardems
Ciramd Balin
(Appraised Value
£96. 00 0p

Lac ft?) ¢Sh'x i) S30")
a SiN phew 2-se ores
uparbeemt building a
Church 3.40¢0sq. f.
Wartin Down, Rimgs
Suh Eaghs Mahe Rice
Crand Balhae
(Appraised Value
S20 DLT)

Lae we! 1 ron heel
SM00sg_ ft on 499
pores of beach fromt-
High Reek Cirane
Eaters (Apes ised
Wolee 31.0 00 cen
Wacond bot #13, Blk
FAS, Limit ea

(22,75 2eq. 145° om
canal front-Dagenham
Circke & Ingroawe Gr
Emerald Bay Suh
Grand Ewha
(Appraised Value

S17 DUP hy)

Wace bow a2i, Blk #9

. Low #45 poor bei)

wld room neotel
4,0 0sq. ft.-Sandy
Poist Abaco
{Appraised Value
S485, 700.00)

building 1 t
1.1 Sting. ft.-Sand
Banks Treasure Cay
Abaco (Agqpra isl
Value S260, 205.108)
Ekeathern
Property 30101
whee Lond Sa Tapruin
Bay Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
Se) Oe ay

. Vacant ponion of lot

27 ({50"x f 10" }—-Weat
James. (Cisbern
Ekeuthera (Appraised
Wahue S01 Ae)
tad Dela rial

Waceamt 6.5 acres of
land=Aunthur's Toewm
iat Island (Apapraised
Vahue S00), oy)
Lot wil roo motel
1.39 pores Arthur's
Town (oar Island
(Appraised Walue
S50, Op

Exam

37. Wacent lor #3

(65. 7O0sg. A. 1-Moas
Town Exum.

(Appraised Value
SL 10,1 RA ahp

3E. Loa C30 ADs, Mo ww
emall habel 4 S20sq_ ft
& exclusive beoch-
Forbes Hill Externe
(Appraised Value
S140 008.00)

39 Vaca lot #1231
(6. 600sq. 1 -Ohoeamic
Rd Bahama Sound ec
43 Exuma (Appraised
abe S 0H. 0 S41.)

4 Vacant low #5
(20's 1227)
Commodore Rud
Flizahbech Harhour Fst
Eacuma Lago p raised
Volee S450 060,060)

Cl4, ba lq. fh)
Wabertall Dr Seahorse
e Sub Cirand
Shree (A pq ised
WVoloe 340,108.00)
Lor Ais, Alk #145 Unit
#3 (Al's 125 °)—-Derhs
Sub Grand Bahan
(Appraised Value
SES A
3. Wace low als. Blk
LS a 17 Botesq. fi}
Cutwater Ln Shasnom
Country lub Sul
Ciranmd Ratha
(Appraised Value
S58, 1 bp

24. Waeang log #424

MANAGER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

$129 0060.10)

Loceil ¢ tT s Tes
wihhar DOT bag. f-
Sunset Ridpe Dr.
Sumset Ridge Sub Hse
Sle (Appraised Valme
$206,000, 0)

Vacant bar #202,

(8 Adiieg. 2 neore mom
lea o-Hibgg ye AL rt
Winton Meadows Sub
a2 (Appraised Value
SAS bOI)

Ler tiryea ral *slia's
whore DO3sq. f.-Cd
Cedar St Yellow Elder
(Appraised ¥ alec ia
6 SOE ection 2B

Lots #3 de wh, Blk #47 n125°$-Palomeri Or
(30"s 00) widuples & Ciramd Pian East
renil shop 1,3 faq, A,- (Appraised Value
Fuortees Sa Nasa S50 00, 0)

Villace (Appraised Lat 62 (20,0005. fi)
Valine 212000011 w'building complex a
Andras coin Laundromat

. Beach front lot 9,000sq, Queens Highway
Ft whuilding 2, )00sq. Holmes Rock
A.—Pinders Mangrove Commonmage larand
Cav Adios

Katie ( Apeprs iscal

(Appraised Value Walme 3178.50.00)
S200 0h.) Abuce

} Let 43440. fi

Loar a34 E (6,20tsq.
we diples beilding

1 A pele
=“ “i alnom 2.78 c
1.0 74s. th.-Fresh Cnnek ae : Ta =
Andros (Appraised MU py Pawn
aloe 5946-401. 091)

Anno (Ap praked
re , <7 i

Grand Bahama Wales 354,296)

» Lot #20 (17,1 SOng. thy

. Macunt bot 6 (2 acres]
whse 200s. fi. 7 From Dave mA mco
Bikes, Section 42-Sea (Appraised Vale
Taull De, Babar Recl 508,098.08) ae ee “
Wacht & Country Club Lat #51 (15000sq. 1
Sab Grand Bahama wi building-Mumphy
{Appraised Value Town Abaco ;

S2HG, (Ay (Appraised Value
. Vacant lot # 2%, Bik #9 51024 21h)
(14,39 7sq. fi

Portion of lot io

CIS 0G eg. fh -eFrond St
Yorkshire Or, Kale ! pm
Weel Replat Gerad

Murphys Tavern A Base
; Pret
Bahama (Appraised Sees vam

Walue S25. 0400p

S29, 2 Sh}

Lao e335 (6.0 Deg, hh
«building —Murphy
Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
ERT UT SA}

One of our major clients seeks to recruit a qualified information technology professional
with experience in financial and customer service applications for the above position.

QUALIFICATIONS:

* Masters of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

* Eight or more years experience including hands-on technical experience and
two years minimum managing an information technology department in a large
organization with a complex, multi-vendor, multi-platform and distributed
computing environment
Visionary who can analyze problems within the context of corporate strategy,
balancing the consideration of facts, priorities, resources, constraints and
alternatives

RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Lead, monitor and develop a team of information technology professionals to
deliver customer focused service and set performance expectations to achieve
excellence
Manage the development, implementation and day-to-day operations of the
Information Technology department
Actively contribute to the tactical and strategic development of information
technology to support the organization’s business needs
Accountable for the successful delivery to agreed time scales and within budget of
departmental projects or programmes
Assist accounting and engineering departments in ensuring accurate and timely
preparation of reports

REQUIREMENTS:

* This is a senior position that will require a professional with very extensive
experience in supervising and controlling computer professionals in financial,
customer services and engineering applications.

Strong management and communications skills

Strong technical and troubleshooting skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure

Solid understanding of business operations and strategic planning

ASSETS
Webiches

(1) 09 Dodge Caravan

Wessels
2" (1996) Robolo Vessel wil 15 HP Ewineude eagime
12" (1989) North Carolina Holl Yew (1p Ford Explorer
$2° (1979) Hatters Wessel (MV Huddy) (1) 87 Din ge Sarams
SL* (1981) Defender Ves! (Equiliry 4 {1} 00 Hyundai H-0 wae
20° Cesta See Hell Wesel (Miss Rrisey) Then Ria Bus b2 Seater
4° Steel Hall Gulf Coast Shrimp Trawler Verse! 1) 7S LS Ferd Boom Truck
()9R0) with (25 Voboo Diesel engine (See Charbetics (1500 Hrundai H-1] Van SVX
22° Sing ht Sonew Sine) Holl (1) Sey) AY Lise 2, (0) Ayundksi H-0 Wan SC (Silvers
a nee: engines requir 1stallation. And (1) 00 Rischen Toader Cherokee Trailer
can be wiew aft Beadierd Marine, Grand Bahama (1) Oo Pood Ranger Truck
I
a

COMPENSATION:
Attractive salary and other benefits will be commensurate with training and experience.

: : : ween | bb
Written applications should be addressed to: cab
19° (1989) Piterglass Sports Vessel (Hall Only) be? Pood F250 Tineck
Sq 1982) Defender Vere! Mucen Varsha} rijgadier Dri Tock
= 6° (1980) Desco Marme Vessel (Suwert Drewes

{ip BD Ce

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: IT MANAGER 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Stoel Building TH 2" Six fh) Windows, Dwe (2) Fatry Doors, Teo (tp) S21" Relleg Doors Whise
frimeed Aloe Appr? plans and engimeoring drawings ary available 550,000.00

The public is invited to submit Seated bids marked “Tender” to Bohames Developmen: Bank, Pc. Box N-
POS4 “acs, Rahwives atneation Fi cial Controller, faced hide will got be accepoed of telephone S27-
STE0 for additional infomation. Please note that all bids on the aforanenisoned peopertees and as=cts
should be received by or on Miarch 25, 2009. The Gahamas Developmess Bank reserves the right to reject
any or all otters. Al assets are sank ag lis,

Private & Confidential





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Restoration shows century-
old site is far from ‘Scrap’





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from people
who are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are
raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in the
area or have won an award. If so, call
us on 322-1986 and share your story.

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
RAH ATAS SATION AL DRI AGEN y

PUBLIC NOTICE

TESDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF DRIAGS ANT
RELATED Poe hts

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and
Related Items for the Public Hospitals Authority
une The Minestry of Health, The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas.
The Tender Document, which includes
mstructin to the Tenderers along w ith other
relevant information, can be collected from the
Bahamas National Drug Agency, Market &
McPherson Streets, beginning from Friday 20",
March 2009 trom 9 am — 5 pm.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a
sealed envelope or package identified as
“Tender for the Supply of Drog and Related
Items” and addressed to

Managing, Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third ‘Verrace, West Centerville
P.O). Box N-8200

FROM page 1B

Chase operated a popular
sandwich shop, opened in the
1950s, out of a section of the
building that was added as a
petty shop by the original
owners in 1930.

He said that when Mrs
Chase became too old to oper-
ate the shop any longer in
2006, it remained vacant until
last year, when he decided to
transform it into a deli.

Mr Moss said he had a
vision to turn the entire build-
ing, which was originally a res-
idence with a wrap-around
porch and verandah, into a
retail and office space.

When he acquired the
building in 2002, having rent-
ed office space in it since 1997,
he began plans to rework the
structure and modernise the
building.

Mr Moss thought diversify-
ing the space and getting oth-
er businesses into it would
maximise its potential.

“It’s too much space for just
an architectural firm,” he said.
“This was just two porches, so
I said: “Why don’t I utilise this
space for something’ I thought
it was just enough space to
turn it into retail space.”

operator of The Scrapbook
Cottage, said her scrapbook-
ing business has been doing
well in the seven months that
it has been open.

Quaint

She finds the location bene-
ficial because of its central
location and the quaint, home-
ly space that Mr Moss created.

“I wanted to have that
warm feeling,” she said.

Ms Pratt said that scrap-
booking has become a grow-
ing craze in the Bahamas, and
after years of her own scrap-
booking, decided to share her
knowledge of the hobby with
others.

“There is so much more to
scrapbooking than the papers
and the stickers we grew up
with,” she said.

She also has a dedicated
room upstairs in the building
where she teaches lessons in
scrapbooking during the week
and at weekends, where inter-
ested individuals create their
own personalised projects.

Now, Ms Pratt is looking
forward to using the new deli
to add a new offering to her
product.

“I’ve been waiting for
Michael to complete the deli
and we’re going to implement
‘Come Scrap’ on your lunch
break,” she said.



“It’s too much
space for just an
architectural firm,”
he said. “This was
just two porches, so
I said: ‘Why don’t I
utilise this space for
something’ I
thought it was just
enough space to
turn it into retail
space.”



Michael Moss

MUST SELL

VACANT LAND
WINTON HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

Lot #4, Block 1

Nassau. The Bahamas Because the building was

listed as a historic landmark,
Mr Moss received incentives
such as a 25-year exemption
from real property tax, and
exemptions from customs duty
for materials used in the
restoration and repair of the
building.

Now, two successful busi-
nesses operate out of the new-
ly-renovated building, and Mr
Moss is hoping that the deli
will be the third.

Kiesha Pratt, owner and

All the parcel of land containing 15,589 sq. ft. on the southern side
of Woodland Way, and about 350 feet east of Culberts Hill.

Electronic and hard copies must be received at
the abowe addresa on or before Spm Friday,
April 74" ZUR, A copy of a valid business
license and Nationals Insurance Certificate

must accompany all proposals,

Zoning is for single-family residential homes, all the utility services
are available. The site is located 5 miles from downtown Nassau,

se oe dE , 1 mile from shopping center and 1 mile from the nearest school.
The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the neht

to reject any or all Tenders).
Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before April 10, 2009.

Director



For further information, please contact us @ 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608

VACANCY NOTICE

PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Public Relations & Corporate Programs
Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and implementation of a
strategic public relations and communication program together with the effective and efficient
planning and execution of all corporate events and activities.

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

Assists in the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate Programs plan to
support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;

Oversees the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations programs, plan and
budget;

Assists with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation and where necessary
the wider community;

Prepares and distributes the Corporation’s Annual Report;

Directs press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press releases, photographs,
fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management and media representatives;
Coordinates the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion surveys;
Provides assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in writing speeches,
preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;

Evaluates and assesses customer complaints and queries and disseminates information to
management;

Aids in the development, implementation and management of all external communication
efforts;

Is proactive in identifying opportunities to improve the image of the Corporation to its employees
and in the community at large;

Coordinates Marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the external Public
Relations Firms and the Media;

Identifies and liaises with service providers to secure speakers, presenters and entertainment
for Corporate events;

Liaises with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e. awards, invitations,
prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as necessary and maintain an inventory
of the same;

Prepares and distributes all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices) relative to Corporate
activities, as necessary;

Creates and updates all Standard Operating Procedures for all activities, as necessary;
Ensures timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of bills for all events
and activities as necessary;

Works closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that there is global
publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate activities;
Ensures that websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company newsletter and internal PA
system are used for the communication of information relative to corporate activities/events;

PROCUREMENT FOR SCHOOL
FURNITURE FOR NEW SCHOOLS &
REPLACEMENTS 2009-2010

The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’”) now invites
sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement of School Furniture
for New Schools and Replacements.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from the
Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education, Headquarters,
Thompson Blvd. from Wednesday 18 th March, 2009, and obtain further
information, at the second address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
bided on (“School Furniture-New Schools & Replacements”).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address,
or before Monday, 6 th April, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not
be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday 7 th April, 2009 at the first address below.
Job requirements include:
(1) The Chairman Tender
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

* A minimum ofa Bachelors degree in Public Relations/ Journalism/Marketing/Business
Administration/Business Communication, or equivalent.
A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisory/Management level.
Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform to prescribed
style and format;
Ability to effectively present information to senior and Executive management and public
groups,
Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing
Experience in managing special events and activities
Excellent time management and organizational skills
Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills
Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications.
Good analytical skills.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability

Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education

P.O. Box N-3913/4

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tele: (242) 502-8571

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The
Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: April 1st, 2009.

The Ministry reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders





THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 5B

Abaco Markets’ 4% of revenue profits target

FROM page 1B

The more than doubling of
net income for the period
almost enabled the retail group
to claw profits for the full-year
back in line with prior year
comparatives, but in the end the
company fell just short at $2
million, an 8.1 per cent decrease
on fiscal 2008’s $2.177 million.

Mr Watchorn said that
despite Abaco Markets’ rela-
tively strong financial showing
given the economic environ-
ment, and especially in the
fourth quarter, the company’s
reaction was “tempered”.

“Tt’s still not where we need it
to be,” he told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We have a target we’re
working towards, and need to
be producing a net profit of 4
per cent of net revenues. It’s a
good industry model.

“We think we can possibly
get that above 3 per cent this
year, and then gradually move
towards our target.”

Meanwhile, Mr Watchorn
said the improved sales perfor-
mance had placed Aback Mar-
kets “six to nine months” ahead
of where it had planned to be
on its drive to enhance group
liquidity/cash flow.

He explained that in another
three to six months, the BISX-
listed retail group was likely to
be in a net cash position, on an
ongoing basis, for the first time
as opposed to a net overdraft
position.

Mr Watchorn said the last
restructuring of its preference
share debt had aided the liq-
uidity drive. It did not have to
repay a previously scheduled
$250,000 in principal to the pref-
erence shareholders last Sep-
tember, as previously required,
freeing up capital for opera-
tional purposes.

The first scheduled prefer-
ence share repayment is
$350,000 in March 2010, and
Abaco Markets has already
placed more than $500,000 in a
redemption fund to meet this -
and is adding a further $90,000
every month.

Mr Watchorn said Abaco
Markets should “have well
over” enough money in its
redemption fund to pay more
than a year’s worth of prefer-

ence share redemptions when
they start next year.

“That’s allowed us to move
much further ahead on our liq-
uidity programme than we
expected, and in the next three
to six months we hope to be in a
net cash position, on an ongoing
basis, as opposed to a net over-
draft position,” said Mr
Watchorn. “We had not expect-
ed to be where we are for
another six to nine months.
Cash is king.

“This is the closest we’ve ever
been to a net cash position,” he
added, explaining that two years
ago Abaco Markets had been
running a $5-$6 million net
overdraft position.

Income

The company’s full-year net
income would have exceeded
the 2008 fiscal comparatives had
it not been for two one-time
charges taken in the fourth
quarter.

The first was the $250,000
associated with the closure of
Cost Right Abaco, some 60-70
per cent of which was staff sev-
erance pay. The other was the
writedown of $126,000 still
owed on a $200,000 outstand-
ing balance by former John S
George and Freeport Concrete
chief executive, Ken Hutton,
for the purchase of the Cost
Right store in Turks & Caicos
two years ago.

“When we did the transac-
tion, part of it was a receivable,”
Mr Watchorn said. “We are in
discussions with the party to try
and restructure it in some way.
It was just prudent for us to pro-
vide for it in full, given that the
store is no longer in operation.”

Abaco Markets’ fourth quar-
ter profit increase was driven
largely by a 17.1 per cent year-
over-year sales increase, with
group-wide sales for the three
months hitting $26.46 million
through a 13 per cent rise in
customer transaction volumes.

Mr Watchorn said this trend
had continued into the 2010 first
quarter, adding: “Our February
numbers look very, very good.
They’re significantly above last
year. Our sales growth has con-
tinued into the New Year and
into March.

“Christmas went pretty well

sales wise for us. We were prob-
ably up consistently 10 per cent.
But the main move in the fourth
quarter financials for us was
November and December. It
was those two months that real-
ly contributed to the increase.”

He attributed the increase in
customer traffic and transac-
tions, and the corresponding
increase in sales revenues, to
Abaco Markets’ campaign to
offer consumers ‘real value’ in
terms of quality products at a
competitive price via deals such
as its ‘price cuts’ and ‘club spe-
cials’.

“We've had a very strong
campaign to try to offer value to
our customers when things are
not the best in the economy,
and customers have responded
to that through the significant
increase in transactions that
we’ve had, which has accounted
for most of the sales increase,”
Mr Watchorn said.

“We’ve been able to increase
customer traffic and increase
sales, while controlling costs and
inventory shrinkage, and the
difference has dropped down
to the bottom line. That’s what’s
happened, and it began to hap-
pen for us in September and
October last year.”

Expense and inventory
shrinkage controls had enabled
Abaco Markets to reduce prices
without sacrificing margins.
“Our margins have increased,”
Mr Watchorn explained,
“because we were able to main-
tain shrinkage in dollar terms,
and sales rose, so our overall
gross margins improved because
shrinkage as a percentage of
sales was down.

“We did a much better job of
buying, and we’ve been able to
harness buying power as a
group. We’re buying as a group,
not as individual stores. That’s
produced synergies in terms of
logistics and lower prices by
purchasing as a group. We’ve
moved pretty aggressively over
the last six months to increase
commodities buying as a
group.”

Gross margins improved as a
percentage of sales by 0.9 per
cent, as shrink as a percentage
of sales fell by 20 per cent, the
absolute value remaining the
same in dollar terms.

Meanwhile, Mr Watchorn

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

said the company’s Domino’s
Pizza franchise was performing
well, with the closure of its East
Bay Street outlet having
reduced costs without costing
much business. While some
walk-in customers had been
lost, that outlet’s business by-
and-large had been transferred
to other Domino’s branches.

“We're able to have that busi-
ness without the costs,” Mr
Watchorn said. “Overall, Domi-
no’s top line will be a little bit
reduced this year because we
won’t have East Bay Street, but
we expect the bottom line to
improve over last year.

“Domino’s has experienced
pretty much the same trends as
the food side - a lot more peo-
ple are coming in, and customer
transactions are increasing.”

For the 2009 fourth quarter,
Abaco Markets said expenses
were at 22.6 per cent of sales, a
drop from the prior year’s 24.6
per cent. For the full year, util-
ity costs were up by $750,000,
while 2010 first quarter liquidi-
ty may be impacted temporari-
ly by business licence fee pay-
ments. “This has been a tough
year to operate in a market
experiencing significant chal-
lenges,” said Craig Symonette,
Abaco Markets chief executive
and chairman.

“Despite the challenges, how-
ever, we are finally realising the
economies of scale, improved
group buying and efficiencies
among our locations we have
sought in recent years, which is
translating into steadily improv-
ing results. Our customers are
seeing the difference, our share-
holders certainly will note the
changes in our position and it’s
the result of a lot of things com-
ing together.

“As reported earlier, we do
expect a continued softening of
the economy in the coming
quarters, which is likely to
impact our results. However,
the concerted focus on driving
sales through pricing, control-
ling expenses and continuing to
improve our shrink that has
delivered the stability our com-
pany needed remains our pri-
ority operating in the current
market conditions.”

$3 Bahamas Business
L/ Solutions Ltd, _

LRA TECAMOD OGY DL ERED LOCAL

Ny our valued customers that
Wt canes Saunders

| 0 longer employed wih Bahamas Business Solutions
Limited and thereore not authorised to sel or sence Xerx
Products,

Bahamas Business Solutions Limited is the only company

authorised to of nd service Xerox Products in the Bahamas

and are not Kable for any products or servioes provided by this
Individual



Purpose

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) will provide technology vision and leadership in the
development and implementation of information technology (IT) programmes. He/she will
lead the planning and implementation of enterprise information systems to support business
operations and achieve more effective and cost beneficial enterprise-wide IT operations.

Essential Functions

¢ Establish guidelines and programmes for effective IT management.

¢ Provide data processing services required.

* Recommend long and short range management information systems plans and budgets.

¢ Approve staff recommendations on major systems development and/or research
projects.
Establish strategic policy for planning, development, and design of information needs.
Research management information systems hardware and software including applicable
vendor applications, data base management, and operational control packages.
Sets policies to ensure privacy and security of data processing facilities.
Establish guidelines and programmes for effective database management utilisation.
Consult with and advise department heads on IT management needs and problems.
Demonstrate continuous effort to improve operations, decrease turnaround times,
streamline work processes, and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality
customer service.

Education, Experience and Necessary Qualifications

Minimum of 3 years of experience with increasing responsibilities for management and
support of information systems and IT; direct management of a major IT operation is
preferred. Experience should also include exposure to both shared and outsourced solutions,
as well as support of in-house information and communication systems in a multi-site client-
server environment. Specific experience with financial and human resource management
information systems is a plus. Other skills required include:

¢ Familiarity with: desktop, notebook, handheld, and server computer hardware; local
and wide area network design, implementation, and operation; operating systems such
as Windows, OS/400, Unix, and Linux; and computer peripherals such as printers,
monitors, modems and other equipment.
Knowledge of office productivity software programmes such as word processing,
spreadsheet programmes, databases, and communications software.
Ability to: analyse and resolve complex issues, both logical and interpersonal; and
negotiate and defuse conflict.
Effective verbal and written communications skills and effective presentation skills, all
geared toward coordination and education.
Self-motivator, independent, cooperative, flexible and creative.

Required Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:
Requires a master’s degree in Computer Science, Business Administration or a related field or
eet alo experience. Comprehensive knowledge of:
Data processing methods and procedures, and computer software systems.
Systems design and development process, including requirements analysis, feasibility
studies, software design, programming, pilot testing, installation, evaluation and
operational management.
Business process analysis and redesign.
Design, management, and operation of managed IT systems

Proven skills in: negotiating with vendors, contractors, and others; budget preparation and
monitoring; management and leadership; and communication.

Demonstrated ability to: relate to all levels of the user community; be a team player
that motivates and educates other team members; plan, implement and support systems
in a complex education environment; set and manage priorities; comprehend complex,
technical subjects; translate technical language to lay audiences; and link and apply complex
technologies to business strategies.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: CIO 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Private & Confidential



VACANCY NOTICE
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER EXECUTIVE

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Chief Financial Officer.

The job oversees all financial matters of BEC, inclusive of the activities of the Customer Services
Division.

The objectives of this function include, but are not limited to the following:
Financial Management, Accounting & Treasury

Ensure and structure the Corporation’s financial policies, practices and internal controls so that
they are in accordance with the law, generally accepted accounting principles, contractual
commitments, the Corporation’s structure and protect the corporations assets;

Manage BEC’s cash resources to ensure that funds are available to meet the ongoing and future
needs of BEC while minimizing the cost of capital;

Ensure the timely preparation of all financial reports. These include complete financial statements
for presentation to the Board, preparation of budget reports for assisting management decision
making, and development of a yearly projected budget in consultation with other Division heads;
Ensure that the divisions maintain a high standard of efficiency, control, and application of
sound accounting practices and principles along with the adequate trained qualified staff to
achieve these objectives;

Coordinate to ensure that the workflow within the division and cross functionality with all
departments dependent upon the services of the division, are efficient and effective;
Coordinate the annual budgeting process and present the completed budget for approval;
Manage external relationships with local and international sources of funds;

Ensure proper and cost effective insurance of BEC’s assets;

Conduct Financial Analysis for the Corporation as requested;

Customer Services

Ensure the accurate and timely meter reading and billing of all customer accounts in New
Providence and the billing of other Family Island Accounts.

Ensure proper management of the revenue and collection recovery activities by effective
management of the Corporation’s Accounts Receivable.

Ensure proper management of the business office services of cashiering and new services, queries
for customers, banking and accounting reconciliation, etc.

Ensure that non-technical losses are kept to a minimum.

Job requirements include:

* A minimum ofa Bachelors Degree in Accounting/Finance with professional qualifications (e.g.,
ACCA, CPA) an MBA would be desired.
A minimum of 15+ years of experience in financial accounting, at senior management level.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Excellent analytical and organizational skills
Good customer relations skills
Good time management skills
Strong leadership skills
Knowledge of finance, accounting, budgeting and cost control principles including General
Accepted Accounting Principles.
Knowledge of automated financial and accounting reporting systems
Ability to analyze financial data and prepare financial reports, statements, and projections
Extensive knowledge of project management and the ability to oversee a range of projects
simultaneously
Strong human relations skills
Knowledge of industrial relations
Negotiation skills and techniques

Interested persons should apply by submitting a resume addressed to: The AGM-Human Resources
& Training, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau
Bahamas on or before: Wednesday, March 25, 2009.





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Shippers see 10% container volume decline

* But others say ‘no
decline in revenue’

NOTICE
REDWOOD INTERNATIONAL
TRADING LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.

2000 REDWOOD INTERNATIONAL TRADING

LIMITED. is in dissolution as of March 18, 2009

Irene Anastasiou of 18 Pindarou, 3095 Limassol,

Cyprus is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice

NOTICE
MEILEN S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

FROM page one

He said business was “defi-
nitely down” and operating
costs up, but that shipments
four days per week continued.

Mr Rolle said many other
shipping companies had seen

the same 10 per cent decrease
in business, in terms of con-
tainer throughput volume, and
revealed that there had been a
decline in high-end imports
coming into the Bahamas.
“What you’re going to be
seeing in the market is the
higher-end product diminish-

NOTICE
MIDWAY MANAGEMENT LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000 MIDWAY MANAGEMENT LIMITED. is in
dissolution as of March 18, 2009

Christina Goodman of Griva Digeni 80, Swepco
Court, Floor 6, Flat 52,3101 Limassol, Cyprus is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice

NOTICE
IMPACT HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ing, and people are going to
get more of the less branded
products,” he said.

Another container shipping
company official told Tribune
Business that their business
was “subject to the same
volatility of any business, as
market forces impact the sec-
tor”.

However, some companies
who regularly ship goods from
Miami said they had seen
either a minimal or no decline
at all in container throughput
volume.

Revenue

Seaboard Marine’s insides
sales coordinator, Oralee
Deveaux, said the company
had not seen a decrease in rev-
enue.

She added that Seaboard
Marine had restructured its
rates in order to compensate
for changes in the economy,
and in order to remain com-
petitive.

“We are hanging in there in
terms of cutbacks,” she said.

The retail sector was expect-
ed to experience a contraction
due to the economic crisis, but
some major shipping compa-
nies who move freight to the
Bahamas from Miami say they
have seen little change from





“What you’re
going to be
seeing in the
market is the
higher-end
product
diminishing,
and people are
going to get
more of the less
branded
products.”



previous years.

Ms Deveaux said Seaboard
Marine had seen a tremen-
dous increase in grocery ship-
ments from Miami.

A Betty K representative
said: “This part of the season
is comparative to last year.”
He said the company was
keeping a watchful eye on fuel
costs.

Seaboard Marine said they
did not foresee any cutbacks
or lay-offs in the future.
“We're not going anywhere,”
said Ms Deveaux.




Clan

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SUN SPRINKLES INC.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator) (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of SUN SPRINKLES INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Legal Notice Legal Notice

NOTICE
RATIONAL INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

NOTICE
BIRKA INT’L COMPANY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TSK HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

CIMT s&s 1.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

PMiorery 21 Work

cr »”A LL” cre} 1.
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 19 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,654.52 | CHG -0.53 | %CHG -0.03 | YTD -57.84 | YTD % -3.38
FINDEX: CLOSE 811.37 | YTD -2.82% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW _BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $

1.39 Abaco Markets 1.45 1.45 0.070
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00
7.00 Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37
12.61 Cable Bahamas 13.95 13.95
2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83
4.80 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.48 6.48
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs 1.74 1.58

0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.309
0.118
0.438
0.099
0.240
0.598
0.322
0.794
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

2.16 Doctor's Hospital 2.16 2.16
6.02 Famguard Fe = 7.76
11.00 Finco 11.00 11.00
10.45 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45 10.45
5.00 Focol (S) 5.07 5.05
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 . 280
8.60 J. S. Johnsen 10.50 10.50
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 -
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

Securit Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

FBB17 0.00 1%

FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%

FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00 0.000
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35 0.001
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ecoocoosoooocoeoeog
OoOnoooonooooocooog

9,000

99999999999999990

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

S2wk-Low Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

-0.041 0.300
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.000
0.000

ABDAB 31.72 33.26 29.00
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED) 0.00 0.00 0.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA _ Vv YTD% Last 12 Months Div $
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8988 -1.40 -3.35
1.4432 0.67 4.37
3.3201 -1.94 -11.33
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.1005 0.06 -13.33
1.0440 0.80 4.40
1.0364 0.33 3.64
1.0452 0.76 4.40
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

4.540
0.000
0.002
Fund Name Yield %
Colina Bond Fund
2.9230 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3828 Colina Money Market Fund
3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

28-Feb-09
28-Feb-09
6-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

1.3041

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close
Today's Close - Cu
Change - Change i
Daily Vol. - Num
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

nte
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meanin gful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

raded today

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UTRECHT INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 7B



Government pledges ‘more independence’ for telecom regulator

FROM page 1B

would be created by an Act of
the same name.

This Act is part of a three-
strong proposed legislative
package unveiled yesterday, the
other two pieces being the
Communications Bill and a
Utilities Appeal Tribunal Bill.

The Government acknowl-
edged the need for “wholesale
change to the effectiveness, effi-
ciency and independence of the
URCA” was required, “not
only to ensure that the sector
is properly regulated but also
to ensure that the sector as a
whole has confidence that
URCA will not be subject to
political or other interference”.

To that end, the Government
promised: “A great deal of
effort is being focused on ensur-
ing that the necessary skills
(including international regula-
tory skills) and resources will
be available, that efficient and
effective internal processes are
in place and that URCA will
continue to act in the transpar-
ent, consultative and decisive
manner with which the Goy-
ernment has embarked on the
liberalisation process.

“For example, the URCA
Act will include provisions for
greater transparency and inde-
pendence from government and
other stakeholders, and a com-
mitment to greater openness
through publishing a plan for
the year and reporting on past
performance.”

The Government also
promised that, in the absence
of an overall Competition Act
and an existing authority to reg-
ulate this area, competition
powers “including merger pro-
visions” would be included in
the proposed Communications
Act. This would allow the
URCA to act as competition
regulator for that sector alone,



“The suggestions of a code of ethics
and prohibitions on staff movements
are ones the Government is actively

considering.”



until a wider Competition Act
was in place.

The Government dismissed
BTC’s call for the communica-
tions sector regulation to focus
entirely on anti-competitive
actions already taken by sector
operators, instead opting for a
proactive “light-touch regula-
tory regime” that dealt with
concerns prior to those events
occurring.

In its feedback, BTC said it
supported “the recruitment of
employees from outside of the
Bahamas in order to prevent
bias by the regulator....

“On the issue of ethics, BTC
suggests that staff working for
the regulator should be held to
a minimum standard of profes-
sional and ethical behaviour,
and a code on conflicts of inter-
est, such as enshrined in the
Bahraini Telecommunications
Law, might be one way to
ensure this.”

BTC urged that regulatory
enforcement powers be
strengthened, along with the
ability of operators to appeal
the decisions and fines it levied.
It warned, though, that the judi-
ciary had a “lack of expertise”
in dealing with telecoms issues.

Cable Bahamas backed BTC,
urging: “In the interests of inde-
pendence, employees of [tele-
coms] licensees should not be
able to join the regulator for a
specified time period after leav-
ing the licensee, and there
should be a further period dur-
ing which that former employee
could not work on a case involv-
ing their former employer.”

It also urged that “predatory

pricing and other anticompeti-
tive practices be prohibited”. In
response, the Government said:
“The suggestions of a code of
ethics and prohibitions on staff
movements are ones the Gov-
ernment is actively consider-
ing.”

Systems Resource Group
(SRG), parent of IndiGo Net-
works, supported the proposed
regulator in general, but
expressed concern over the lack
of detail.

When it came to financing the
regulator, all three Bahamian



telecoms operators and Digicel
agreed that the URCA’s costs
should be borne by all licensees.

BTC urged that licence fees
be used solely to cover the reg-
ulator’s costs, that no govern-
ment subsidy be required to
meet these, and that fees be
levied on a “non-discriminatory
basis”.

Concern

The state-owned telecoms
provider expressed concern that
“assessing fees base on turnover
can result in bias in the fees col-
lected”, arguing that revenues
generated by telecoms opera-
tors were higher than those pro-
duced by other utilities, such as
electricity and water.

BTC also urged that the per-
centage fee levied upon
licensees be varied, given that
the URCA could carry over

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NIEVA INDUSTRIES LTD.













— f,—



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138





(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NIEVA INDUSTRIES LTD. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the










Company has therefore been struck off the Register.












ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)











surpluses from previous years.

Meanwhile, SRG argued that
the proposal to levy fees based
on licensee turnover was
“flawed due to the regulator
having no incentive to keep
costs low”.

It argued that the regulator
had to be kept accountable,
ensuring it met international
benchmarks, while “certain ser-
vices should be subject to a
higher fee rate to reflect the
greater regulatory burden
required to oversee these ser-
vices”.

SRG suggested that broad-
casters fell within this catego-
ry, while Voice over Internet
Protocol (VoIP) services also
needed to be considered. “Local
VoIP providers should not have
to pay licence fees if foreign
VoIP providers do not pay,”
SRG added.

Financing disputes was also

raised as an issue by SRG,
expressing concerns - in a thin-
ly-veiled reference to BTC -
“about the costs that would
arise were the incumbent to
start vexatious regulatory dis-
putes against a smaller rival.

“SRG also believes that if
operators are paying licence
fees based on revenues, they
should be relieved from paying
taxes through business
licences.”

The Government, though,
suggested that the proposal to
levy different fees on different
telecoms services was “too dif-
ficult to implement”.

It explained: “It would
require determining revenue by
service type in a converged
world in which services are
often bundled. This is not real-
istic and not supported by inter-
national best practice.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CORDAY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HORNBILL HALLS INC.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HORNBILL HALLS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HEALTHY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OESTORPHIO INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JIGGER III LTD.

— 4, —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of JIGGER III LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WIDONWIDE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SONY ET KALY CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
HOT PASTY LTD.

— ¢, —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HOT PASTY LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ENKLE INVESTMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FAYD HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



THE TRIBUNE



THE WEATHER RE

“oO

5-Day FORECAST







FRIDAY, MARCH 20 2009 - PAGE 8B





ealil

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



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7 AK a a Low | MODERATE | HicH } V.MIGH EX. Amsterdam 45/7 38/3 s 52/11 41 s Saturday: _NE at 12-25 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
"lla ORLANDO BN Ankara, Turkey 39/3 25/3 s 46/7 30/-1 pe ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73°F
High: 78° F/26°C ee Parlty cloudy with a Partly cloudy, a Partly sunny, a Mostly sunny, a Clouds and sun, a Windy with a shower The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 57/13 49/9 pe 56/12 45/7 Saturday: Eat 5-10 Knots 9-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
a Lowe erin ; 4 spotty shower. shower; breezy. shower; breezy. shower; windy. shower possible. possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 68/20 59/15 pc 68/20 56/13 pc
S High: 78° High: 77° High: 77° High: 78° Bangkok 88/31 77/25 sh 91/32 79/26 sh ri
L N Barbados 85/29 75/23 pc imeem TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
c 7 t High: 79° Low: 70° Low: 67° Low: 68° Low: 69° Low: 70° se ye ey cade
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High: 82° F/28° C ‘* Lb 80°-65° F LL 74°-64°F | 80°-67° F High __Ht.(ft.)_ Low _Ht.(ff. Beirut 63/17 55/12. po 67/19 BIG s y
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ps @ WEST PALM BEACH \ Last year's NIG My seas esedaeeateessesne 82° F/28° C SUN ay Ty ity Cancun 81/27 66/18 sh 84/28 67/19 pc
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Boston 40/4 27/-2 pe 48/8 320 s Los Angeles 70/21 56/13 pc 66/18 5442 pc St. Louis 56/13 38/3 po 55/12 42/5 c . Ean a ae 81/27 73/22 - 86/30 73/22 x INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
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Chicago 46/7 34/1 po 5512 36/2 c Miami 80/26 66/18 pc 78/25 63/17 pc San Diego 65/18 56/13 po 65/18 56/13 pc Low. 70°F21°C Trinidad 80/97 79/99 t Bt/07 74/93 t o =
Cleveland 44/6 25/-3 po 52/11 31/0 s Minneapolis 50/10 38/3 pc 56/13 37/2 c Sanfrancisco 61/16 5010 pc 60/45 48/8 1 ae nELaaae Ta ~ Hew Providence Grond Beheme bhaco Fleuthera Evo
Dallas 70/21 54/12 po 74/23 59/15 pc Nashville 59/15 35/1 s 62/16 40/4 pc _ Seattle 52/11 38/3 6 ©6110 39/3 ich 30/3 97/-2 sf 44/6 38/3 ¢ i sida th SL Is IATA Tac (240) 20-1860 | Bl TD BN4N4
Denver 72/22 39/3 pe 71/21 40/4 pc New Orleans 72/22 57/13 s 72/22 56/13 pc Tallahassee 78/25 48/8 pe 74/23 44/6 pc Warsaw 36/2 23/-5 sf 39/3 30/-1 c (iat) (ti) (i) (142) lh )
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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Man dies after severe beating C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.98FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 79F LOW 68F SEEBUSINESSFRONTPAGE S P O R T S BISXmoves back to downtown Bay SEEPAGEFIFTEEN Track and field news n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A MAN who died in hospital a day after receiving a severe beating, leaving him with injuries to the head, has become the country's latest homicide victim. According to a statement by Press Liaison Officer Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans, 46-year-old Bradley Smith was in the area of Wulff and Village R oads around 6 pm Tuesday w hen he received his fatal i njury. Y esterday family of the victim said Smith was beaten to death in a foodstore’s parking lot. Speaking to ZNS, Smith's brother appealed to the public to come forward with information that could lead to an arrest. Police said the victim was tak en to hospital where he died sometime before 8 o’clock Wednesday night. ASP Evans did not release the circumstances surrounding Smith's injury but said police were treating his death as a homicide. V ictim receives fatal injury in foodstore parking lot The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com Try our Big Breakfast Sandwich Mini Famous Bowl $2.75 BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , M A R C H 2 0 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 4 . 6 8 $ 4 . 5 1 $ 4 . 6 9T h e i n f o r m a t i o n c o n t a i n e d i s f r o m a t h i r d p a r t y a n d T h e T r i b u n e c a n n o t b e h e l d r e s p o n s i b l e f o r e r r o r s a n d / o r o m i s s i o n f r o m t h e d a i l y r e p o r t . $ 3 . 5 6 $ 3 . 3 1 $ 3 . 6 0 f o r a b e t t e r l i f eH E A L T H I N S U R A N C ES A L E S O F F I C E S : N A S S A U I F R E E P O R T I A B A C O I E L E U T H E R A I E X U M A I C O R P O R A T E C E N T R E : E A S T B A Y S T R E E T I w w w . f a m g u a r d b a h a m a s . c o m c a l l u s t o d a y a t 3 9 6 1 3 0 0 A S U B S I D I A R Y O F h e a l t h c a r e m e d i c a l f u n d r a i s e r s l o n g l i n e s a t c l i n i c s i n d e b t f o r l i f ec u s t o m i z e d h e a l t h p l a n w i t h 2 4 / 7 c u s t o m e r s e r v i c e D i s m i s s e d s t a f f : S t i l l e l i g i b l e f o r u n e m p l o y m e n t b e n e f i t f u n d i n g A b a c o M a r k e t s 4 % o f r e v e n u e p r o f i t s t a r g e tnB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e G o v e r n m e n t y e s t e r d a y p l e d g e d t h a t t h e n e w B a h a m i a n c o m m u n i c a t i o n s i n d u s t r y r e g u l a t o r w i l l h a v e g r e a t e r i n d e p e n d e n c e f r o m i t a n d b e m o r e t r a n s p a r e n t , p l u s s t a f f e d b y p e r s o n n e l w i t h i n t e r n a t i o n a l r e g u l a t o r y s k i l l s , i t s f i n a n c i n g b a s e d o n r e v e n u e s l e v i e d a s a p e r c e n t a g e o f l i c e n s e e i n c o m e . U n v e i l i n g t h e r e s p o n s e s t o t h e c o n s u l t a t i o n o n t e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s / c o m m u n i c a t i o n s r e g u l a t o r y r e f o r m , t h e G o v e r n m e n t a n d i t s B a h a m a s T e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s C o m p a n y ( B T C ) p r i v a t i s a t i o n c o m m i t t e e r e c e i v e d g e n e r a l s u p p o r t f r o m t e l e c o m s o p e r a t o r s o n i t s p r o p o s a l t o c r e a t e a n e w , c o n v e r g e d a n d s t r e n g t h e n e d r e g u l a t o r t h a t w o u l d s u p e r v i s e n o t o n l y t h e i r i n d u s t r y b u t a l l c o m m u n i c a t i o n s s e c t o r s s u c h a s r a d i o a n d t e l e v i s i o n .R e p l a c eS u c h a r e g u l a t o r w o u l d l i k e l y r e p l a c e t h e e x i s t i n g P u b l i c U t i l i t i e s C o m m i s s i o n ( P U C ) , w h i c h o n l y s u p e r v i s e s t h e t e l e c o m s i n d u s t r y . A t v a r i o u s s t a g e s i n i t s n i n e y e a r , t h e P U C h a s c o m e u n d e r f i r e f r o m v a r i o u s p a r t i e s f o r a n a l l e g e d l a c k o f i n d e p e n d e n c e f r o m g o v e r n m e n t , a n d f a i l i n g t o r e g u l a t e t h e i n d u s t r y e f f e c t i v e l y . I n i t s r e s p o n s e t o t h e c o n s u l t a t i o n f e e d b a c k , t h e G o v e r n m e n t c o n f i r m e d t h a t i t p l a n n e d t o f u l l y o r p a r t i a l l y r e p e a l t h e P U C A c t , t h e T e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s A c t , t h e T e l e v i s i o n R e g u l a t o r y A u t h o r i t y A c t , t h e B T C A c t a n d t h e B r o a d c a s t i n g A c t . I n t h e P U C s c a s e , i t w o u l d b e r e p l a c e d b y a U t i l i t i e s R e g u l a t i o n a n d C o m p e t i t i o n A u t h o r i t y ( U R C A ) , w h i c h G o v e r n m e n t p l e d g e s m o r e i n d e p e n d e n c e f o r t e l e c o m r e g u l a t o r * A c k n o w l e d g e s n e e d f o r w h o l e s a l e c h a n g e t o t h e e f f e c t i v e n e s s , e f f i c i e n c y a n d i n d e p e n d e n c e o f e n l a r g e d c o m m u n i c a t i o n s i n d u s t r y s u p e r v i s o r * U n v e i l s p l a n s f o r U t i l i t i e s R e g u l a t i o n & C o m p e t i t i o n A u t h o r i t y t o r e p l a c e P U C , w i t h f o c u s o n t r a n s p a r e n c y a n d b r i n g i n g i n i n t e r n a t i o n a l s k i l l s * F i v e A c t s t o b e r e p e a l e d f u l l y o r p a r t i a l l y , a n d r e p l a c e d b y t h r e e n e w p i e c e s o f l e g i s l a t i o nS E E p a g e 7 BnB y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r r o b a r d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t S O M E B a h a m a s b a s e d s h i p p i n g c o m p a n i e s y e s t e r d a y r e p o r t e d a 1 0 p e r c e n t d e c l i n e i n t w e n t y f o o t e q u i p m e n t u n i t ( T E U ) c o n t a i n e r s h i p m e n t s i n t o N a s s a u f o r t h e y e a r t o d a t e , b u t o t h e r s s a i d t h e y h a d s e e n n o d e c l i n e i n r e v e n u e . G a r t h R o l l e , p o r t m a n a g e r a t T r o p i c a l S h i p p i n g , t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t c o n t a i n e r v o l u m e s h a d b e e n f l u c t u a t i n g a s g l o b a l f u e l p r i c e s c o n t i n u a l l y r o s e a n d f e l l . S h i p p e r s s e e 1 0 % c o n t a i n e r v o l u m e d e c l i n e* B u t o t h e r s s a y n o d e c l i n e i n r e v e n u e S E E p a g e 6 B nB y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r c r o b a r d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t A C E N T U R Y o l d b u i l d i n g a t t h e c o r n e r o f d o w n t o w n N a s s a u s D o w d e s w e l l a n d D e v e a u x S t r e e t s h a s r e c e i v e d a h i g h p r i c e d f a c e l i f t , w h i l e p r e s e r v i n g t h e l e g a c y b u i l t u p b y a s a n d w i c h s h o p o w n e r w h o o p e r a t e d o u t o f t h e p r e m i s e s f o r a l m o s t 5 6 y e a r s . 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G a v i n W a t c h o r n s a i d t h e B I S X l i s t e d g r o u p s c o n t i n u i n g o p e r a t i o n s , w h i c h e x c l u d e t h e n o w c l o s e d C o s t R i g h t A b a c o , h a d g e n e r a t e d n e t p r o f i t s f o r t h e y e a r t o J a n u a r y 3 1 , 2 0 0 9 , t h a t w e r e e q u i v a l e n t t o 2 . 6 p e r c e n t o f n e t r e v e n u e s . I n c l u d i n g t h e c e a s e d b u s i n e s s e s , t h e f i g u r e h a d b e e n j u s t a b o v e 2 p e r c e n t . A b a c o M a r k e t s h a d g e n e r a t e d n e t i n c o m e o f $ 1 . 5 3 3 m i l l i o n f o r t h e t h r e e m o n t h s t o J a n u a r y 3 1 , 2 0 0 9 , c o m p a r e d t o $ 6 2 8 , 0 0 0 t h e y e a r b e f o r e . S E E p a g e 4 B * C o m p a n y s t i l l n o t w h e r e w e n e e d t o b e d e s p i t e 1 4 4 % f o u r t h q u a r t e r n e t i n c o m e r i s e , a l m o s t b r i n g i n g i t l e v e l w i t h p r i o r y e a r c o m p a r a t i v e s , d r i v e n b y 1 7 . 1 % s a l e s r i s e * B I S X l i s t e d r e t a i l g r o u p s i x t o n i n e m o n t h s a h e a d o f l i q u i d i t y g o a l , e y e i n g n e t c a s h p o s i t i o n o n o n g o i n g b a s i s f o r f i r s t t i m e i n t h r e e s i x m o n t h s * W r i t e s o f f $ 1 2 6 , 0 0 0 r e c e i v a b l e o w e d b y K e n H u t t o n g r o u p o n C o s t R i g h t T u r k s d e a l * E x p e c t i n g D o m i n o s P i z z a n e t i n c o m e t o r i s e i n t h i s f i s c a l y e a r G a v i n W a t c h o r nS E E p a g e 5 B nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e B a h a m a s E m p l o y e r s C o n f e d e r a t i o n s ( B E C o n ) p r e s i d e n t y e s t e r d a y e x p r e s s e d c o n c e r n t h a t w o r k e r s w h o e i t h e r q u i t o r w e r e d i s m i s s e d w i t h j u s t c a u s e f r o m t h e i r j o b s w o u l d s t i l l q u a l i f y f o r a p o r t i o n o f t h e G o v e r n m e n t s p r o p o s e d u n e m p l o y m e n t b e n e f i t p r o g r a m m e , a l t h o u g h h e c o m m e n d e d t h e s c h e m e a s o v e r d u e a n d p r o v i d i n g b e n e f i t s t o o u r s o c i e t y a s a w h o l e . B r i a n N u t t a c k n o w l e d g e d t h a t u n e m p l o y m e n t b e n e f i t s w e r e a k e y p l a n k t h a t h a d b e e n m i s s i n g f r o m t h e B a h a m a s s o c i a l s e c u r i t y p a c k a g e , a n d n e e d e d t o b e i m p l e m e n t e d , b u t d e t a i l e d s e v e r a l c o n c e r n s t h a t t h e b u s i n e s s c o m m u n i t y h a d w i t h t h e s c h e m e a s c u r r e n t l y p r o p o s e d . H e e x p l a i n e d t o T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t o n e o f o u r c o n c e r n s w a s t h a t a l l u n e m p l o y e d p e r s o n s w o u l d b e e l i g i b l e t o p a r t i c i p a t e i n t h e s c h e m e a n d r e c e i v e s o m e l e v e l o f b e n e f i t s , r e g a r d l e s s o f w h e t h e r t h e y l o s t t h e i r j o b t h r o u g h t h e i r o w n B E C o n c h i e f e x p r e s s e s c o n c e r n o v e r p r o p o s e d s c h e m e , b u t a c k n o w l e d g e s i t i s o v e r d u e a n d w i l l p r o v i d e w i d e r s o c i a l b e n e f i t s S E E p a g e 2 B nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e B a h a m a s I n t e r n a t i o n a l S e c u r i t i e s E x c h a n g e ( B I S X ) i s s o o n m o v i n g b a c k i n t o d o w n t o w n N a s s a u s f i n a n c i a l c e n t r e t h r o u g h i t s n e w h o m e i n t h e B a y S t r e e t p r o p e r t y h o u s i n g F i r s t C a r i b b e a n I n t e r n a t i o n a l B a n k ( B a h a m a s ) b r a n c h , a s t h e e x c h a n g e p r e p a r e s t o e x p a n d s t a f f i n p r e p a r a t i o n f o r n e w b u s i n e s s s t r e a m s . K e i t h D a v i e s , B I S X s c h i e f e x e c u t i v e , t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s y e s t e r d a y t h a t w h i l e h e c o u l d n o t p r o v i d e a f i r m d a t e f o r t h e e x c h a n g e s m o v e f r o m i t s e x i s t i n g V i l l a g e R o a d b a s e , d u e t o t h e f a c t t h a t f i n a l w o r k o n i t s n e w f i r s t f l o o r p r e m i s e s w a s o n g o i n g , t h e p r o p e r t y w a s s e t t o b e r e n a m e d 5 0 E x c h a n g e P l a c e . H e e x p l a i n e d t h a t B I S X n e e d e d e x p a n d e d p r e m i s e s t o c o p e w i t h t h e n e w b u s i n e s s s t r e a m s i t e x p e c t e d t o h a n d l e t h i s y e a r , w i t h t h e e x c h a n g e s e t t o t a k e o v e r t h e w h o l e f i r s t f l o o r . A p a r t f r o m t h e e x c h a n g e i t s e l f , M r D a v i e s s a i d t h e n e w h e a d q u a r t e r s w o u l d a l s o b e h o m e t o i t s B I S X G l o b a l i n i t i a t i v e a n d a t h i r d b u s i n e s s r e l a t e d t o i t s p l a n n e d C e n t r a l S e c u r i t i e s D e p o s i t o r y ( C S D ) .D D o o w w n n t t o o w w n n B I S X i s m o v i n g b a c k i n t o t h e d o w n t o w n a r e a , t h e p r e m i e r f i n a n c i a l c e n t r e o f t h e B a h a m a s , M r D a v i e s t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s . T h e n e w l o c a t i o n i s d o w n t o w n i n t h e o l d B a r c l a y s b u i l d i n g , n o w t h e F i r s t C a r i b b e a n b u i l d i n g , o n B a y S t r e e t , a n d w e r e m o v i n g o n t o t h e f i r s t f l o o r . W e e r e c t e d o u r s i g n i n t h e l o b b y o f t h a t b u i l d i n g y e s t e r d a y . T h e B I S X c h i e f e x e c u t i v e e x p l a i n e d t h a t t h e e x c h a n g e n e e d e d t o m o v e f r o m t h e b u i l d i n g i t c u r r e n t l y s h a r e s w i t h F T C ( F a s t T r a c k C o n s t r u c t i o n ) b e c a u s e o v e r t h e c o u r s e o f t h i s y e a r , B I S X w i l l b e e x p a n d i n g i t s c o m p l e m e n t o f e m p l o y e e s , h o p e f u l l y a s w e e x p e r i e n c e a n u p t i c k i n o u r a b i l i t y t o p r o v i d e s e r v i c e s t o t h e b u s i n e s s w e a l r e a d y h a v e A p a r t f r o m B I S X G l o b a l , h e a d d e d : W e m u s t p l a n f o r d e v e l o p m e n t s t o c o m e a n d b e r e a d y t o e x e c u t e t h e m . T h e r e w i l l b e a t h i r d b u s i n e s s i n t h e r e , w h i c h w e w i l l a n n o u n c e w h e n i t c o m e s i n t o e x i s t e n c e . I t s r e l a t e d t o t h e C e n t r a l S e c u r i t i e s D e p o s i t o r y w e a r e d e v e l o p i n g a s w e l l . W e n e e d n e w p r e m i s e s f o r e q u i p m e n t a n d g r o w t h p o t e n t i a l . W e s e e a n e x p a n s i o n o f o p e r a t i o n s . M r D a v i e s s a i d B I S X w a s l o o k i n g t o a d d a n o t h e r t h r e e t o f o u r p e r s o n s , b a s e d o n i t s a n a l y s i s o f c u r r e n t e m p l o y e e n e e d s , a n d t h e e x t r a s t a f f n e e d e d a s a d d i t i o n a l b u s i n e s s c a m e o n s t r e a m . T w o e m p l o y e e s w e r e l i k e l y t o b e a d d e d i n t h e s h o r t t e r m , a n d a n o t h e r t w o a t a l a t e r d a t e . B I S X s f i r s t s t a y i n d o w n B I S X m o v e s b a c k t o d o w n t o w n B a y S E E p a g e 2 B B U S I N E S S PLP hopeful claims Kerzner’s ‘voluntary unpaid vacation’ goes against the Employment Act n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net KERZNER International’s call for 2,500 non-unionised workers to take “voluntary unpaid vacation” goes against the Employment Act and is “tantamount to coercion,” it was claimed yesterday. PLP political hopeful Paul Moss yesterday said that the workers are in a “Catch-22 position because if they decline to forego the vacation pay, chances are they will be made redundant. This is tantamount to coercion and this too should be frowned upon.” Earlier this week, Atlantis owners Kerzner International announced that the request was put to employees, mainly Paul Moss says workers are in Catch-22 position SEE page 10 FUNERAL SERVICE – Mrs Nancy Kelly, widow of David Kelly for whom funeral services were held at Christ Church Cathedral yesterday afternoon, is pictured with her eldest son, Andrew, her granddaughter Avery, who read verses from Ecclesiastes at her grandfather’s funeral, and Shelle Kelly, Mrs Kelly’s daughter-in-law and wife of her second son, Gregory. Mr Kelly, 76, owner of Kelly’s Home Centre, Marathon Mall, died in New York on March 11. SEEPAGETWO F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f FUNERAL SER VICE FORDAVIDKELLY Paul Moss SEE page nine AS THE image of the late S ir Lynden Pindling contin ues to be questioned, the Prog ressive Liberal Party is set to hold a special church service on March 22 to honour the birth of the ‘Father of the Nation’ at Bethel Baptist Church on Meeting Street at 10am. T he sermon is currently slat ed to be led by Rev Timothy S tuart and the leader of the party, Perry Christie, is also expected to address the congregation. PLP to hold ser vice honouring Sir Lynden’s birth SEE page 10 n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net SAILBOATS used by crew involved in the slaughter of a protected iguana and harvest ing of juvenile conch have been located by the Bahamas Air Sea Rescue Association. ‘Miss Emily’ and ‘Gone Away’ were pictured in a series of photographs on social networking site Facebook along side ‘Sea Monkey’, the sailboat owned by Alexander David Rust, 24, from Indiana, and Vanessa Star Palm, 23, from Illi nois, who were fined $1,000 last month for crimes against the environment. Rust and Palm were pictured with two others hauling in a dinghy filled with juvenile conch and grilling and eating a pro tected iguana in Allan’s Cay, Exuma. Although Rust was fined SEE page 10 BASRA locates boats used by crew involved in iguana slaughter , conch harvesting n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net DAYS after a Delta airlines pilot was overheard reporting a “ten to fifteen mile long” oil slick off the Northern coast of New Providence, two locals fishing the waters off western New Prov idence fear authorities are ignoring the environmental hazards. Alex Callender and her husband were fishing near Clifton Pier on Sunday when they suddenly noticed the wake behind their boat in which they were trawling started “bubbling brown.” “We said, ‘Oh my God, we’re in oil!’” recalled Mrs Callender. Fears that authorities are ignoring environmental hazards SEE page nine n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A MAN died when he fell on the Queen’s Staircase because, claimed an eyewitness, nearby hospital staff took more than 40 minutes to attend to him. Pastor Kevin Cooper said he watched Claim that man died because hospital staff took more than 40 minutes to respond SEE page 10 THE QUEEN’S STAIRCASE (above the fatal fall. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net AMIDST investor worry over the stability of the local market new investors are trad ing in equity shares for more stable bonds, according to some financial advisers. It's a trend they say is typical during periods of recession and volatility, as investors who are looking for a bigger short-term bang for their buck lean towards more reliable and lucrative government bonds. "Generally speaking after the volatility you had in the stock market in the last year and a half, that has been somewhat of a movement for some time now. Where people are actually trying to systematical ly reduce their equity expo New investors trading in equity shares for more stable bonds SEE page 10

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TWO persons are in police custody after officers found nearly one pound of marijuana in a home in Yamacraw Beach Estates. On Wednesday, officers of the Drug Enforcement Unit, armed with a search warrant, went to the Yamacraw Beach Estates home after 3pm. Officers found seven clear plastic bags which contained just under one pound of marijuana, Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said. Subsequently, a 39-year-old man and a 31-year-old woman who were home at the time were taken into custody. The drugs have a local street value of just under $1,500. Investigations continue. A 36-year-old American tourist was fined $500 yesterday after pleading guilty to a marijuana possession charge. Zina Andrews Downs of South Carolina appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane charged with possession of marijuana. Police claimed that on Tuesday, while at Cabbage Beach, they found Downs in possession of a homemade cigarette anda clear plastic bag containing a quantity of marijuana. Downs told police that a taxi driver had taken him to an unknown place where he had purchased the marijuana and tobacco for $90. Downs, who pleaded guilty to the charge, was fined $500. Failure to pay the fine will result in a term of six months imprisonment. FAMILY said their final farewells to David Kelly, CBE, yesterday as he was laid to rest in a private service at St Anne’s Church cemetery following a public service attended by his friends at Christ Church Cathedral, George Street. Hundreds, including staff and management of Kelly’s Home Centre and several government ministers, attended the service to pay their last respects. I n celebration of Mr Kelly’s l ove of bright colours and love of life, mourners were asked not to dress in black. The service was attended by Governor-general Arthur Hanna, Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette and Mrs Symonette, National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest, Education Minister Carl Bethel, Mrs Allyson Maynard Gibson, Lady Marguerite Pindling, and other members of the House and Senate. T T r r i i b b u u t t e e Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, Senate President Lynn Holowesko, Major General Joseph Franklin of the US Army, Godfrey Lightbourn, Suzanne Black, and Barry J Packington paid tribute to Mr Kelly. Sir Orville Turnquest read the intercessions, and Mr Kelly’s granddaughter Avery Anne Kelly, read a verse from Ecclesiastes, while his grandson Jordan Ross Kelly read Psalm 23. Mrs Nikita Wells sang “Beneath My Wings.” R ev Patrick Adderley, Dean of Nassau; Rev Keith Cartwright, Archdeacon of the Southern Bahamas; Rev Father Michael Gittens, priest vicar of Christ Church Cathedral; and Rev Crosley Walkine, rector ofS t Anne’s Church, officiated at t he service. After the ceremony, a police escort led the hearse to the cemetery. Mr Kelly, proprietor of Kelly’s Home Centre and a wellknown philanthropist, died on March 11 in a hospital in New York just two weeks shy of his 77th birthday. During a routine shopping trip to New York, on which he was accompanied by his wife Nancy, Mr Kelly developed chest pains and went to the New York Presbyterian Hospital for a check-up. Mr Kelly, who had pre-existing heart condition, underwent surgery and later fell into a coma. A spokesperson for the family told The Tribune that he did not suffer at the end. Mr Kelly’s family, including his wife Nancy, his three sons Andrew, Gregory and Scott; and his daughters-in-law Can dy and Shelle, were at his side when he passed away. THE Sir John Templeton Essay Competition is underway again this year. The competition is open to all junior and senior high school students. It is based on Sir John Templeton’s book, Worldwide Laws of Life , which offers codes of conduct based on the Bible. The com petition is being organised by the Ministry of Education’s writing unit. The junior divi sion essay topics are: Crime doesn’t pay If at first you don’t succeed, try and try again The Senior Division topics are: You choose the path you want to walk down Whatever you have, you must use it or lose it The deadline for submissions is March 20 and the winners will be announced in April. Each competitor must select one topic from the appropriate category and essays must be between 300 and 500 words long. All essays must be submitted to the candidate’s respective school office. The schools will submit the top five essays to the writing unit on March 20. PHOTOS: F elip Major / Tribune staff Saying farewell to David Kelly GOVERNOR-GENERAL AD Hanna attends the funeral service of David Kelly at Christ Church Cathedral yesterday afternoon. Sitting behind him is Dame Marguerite Pindling (in blue hat Education Minister Carl Bethel. Top inset: David Kelly. Hundreds, including govt ministers, turn out to pay their last respects LYNN HOLOWESKO, president of the Senate, reads a tribute. THE BODY of David Albert Kelly is laid to rest yesterday at Christ Church Cathedral. T wo in police custody after marijuana found in home Tourist fined for drug offence In br ief T HE VENERABLE K eith Cartwright gave the sermon yesterday. PALLBEARERS take the body of David Kelly out of Christ Church Cathedral. Essay competition under way again

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n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net THE chairman of the Pro gressive Young Liberals VirajP erpall yesterday chimed in with his view on the controversy surrounding the legacy of the late S ir Lynden Pindling, calling T he Tribune’s recent articles “very distasteful” considering the con-t ributions the “Father of the Nation” made to building the modern Bahamas. I n a press statement issued yesterday, Mr Perpall said that he could not see how any young person who has read the articlesc ould go on to develop an appreciation of their country or a sense of patriotism. In the last few weeks a number of PLPs have jumped to the defence of Sir Lynden’s legacy, following an explosive Insight article written by The Tribune’s managing editor John Marquis. The article quoted former PLP treasurer Chauncey Tynes Sr, who claimed the former prime minister was complicit in the notorious drug trade of the 1980s. A follow-up called into ques tion the nationality of the for mer prime minister, citing sources who claim that Sir Lyn-den was in fact born in Jamaica in the small town of Cotton Tree. “I personally do not see how the articles help with the discourse, debate and discussion as to how we will move this nation on the greater success and solve the ills we currently face,” Mr Perpall said. “To me they only seem to bring about issues that lead to speculation and doubt and honestly where does that get us? Does it build the country? It doesn’t. “Personally I have a degree in journalism and have worked as a journalist at the Tribune, the Nassau Guardian, and The Bahama Journal and while I one 100 per cent believe in freedomof the press, I feel that that freedom does not negate it from its responsibility to guard those things that are sacred to the nation,” he said. Sir Lynden Pindling’s legacy, he said, is one of those sacred things. “I personally don’t feel such sentiments about a national fig ure of such prominence should find itself in a newspaper because newspapers and members of the press are responsible for protecting, defending and inform i ng the moral conscience of soci ety. “Pindling goes beyond politics. This is a man whom Hubert Ingraham, the man who removed him from power, hailed him in his death as ‘the greatest Bahamian who ever lived.’ The FNM also saw fit to place h is face on the one dollar bill soon after his death. I say that t o say that he goes far beyond partisan politics and the PLP. “He is to most if not all, the father of this nation and should be respected and revered in death”. While admitting that he does not expect anyone to have any particular affection for Sir Lynden or any other political leader past or present, Mr Perpall said the country ought to still respect those who have fought to make the Bahamas a better nation for all. “Thousands of young people a nd Bahamians have Pindling to thank because it was under his leadership and prime ministerial administration that the College of the Bahamas was established. This is an entity that services much of the tertiary educational needs of this nation today and has been doing so for the pastt hree decades. That is only one from the plethora of things this m an did. “These young people also have him to thank for bringing the first majority government to power and for bringing our nation into sovereignty. There could be no greater gift a prime minister can give than to give his people citizenship in their own nation and Lynden Pindling did this and he should be honoured for such,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 3 AFTER two weeks of intensive military training at the Defence Force Coral Har-bor Base, Tradewinds 2009 was officially brought to a close. The joint initiative, which is designed to develop and encourage partnerships and common professional prac-tices among law enforcement officials in the region, involved US personnel from the Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Army, Navy, Air Force and National Guard, as well as Naval Criminal Investigative Scene (NCIS cers. More than a dozen countries were represented at this year’s exercise. Attending the closing ceremony were Commander of the Defence Force Commodore Clifford Scavella, Charge d’Affairs at the US Embassy Timothy ZunigaBrown, Director of Stability for the US Army National Guard Major General James Champion and other highly decorated officers and servicemen from various partner nations. “Tradewinds 2009 sought to advance regional stability, build professionalism within military forces, and foster multinational and interagency relations,” said Commodore Scavella, addressing participants at the closing ceremony. “Regional innovations were shared, and response capabilities strengthened towards combating transnational threats and regional crisis. This year was unique, as emphasis was placed on command centre operations, hazardous material management, and crime-scene integrity and evidence collection.” Son of Anglican Archdeacon back in court on firearm, ammunition charges Progressive Young Liberals chairman criticises Tribune’s Pindling articles Viraj Perpall BAHAMASPublic Service Union President John Pinder was yesterday accused of not being interested in the work-related concerns of security screening staff at the airport because “few of them voted for him”. One screener working at the L ynden Pindling International Airport said demoralised workers have been hoping that Mr Pinder would act on their disappointment over a number of issues – including delayed increment payments, penalties for taking sick days or refusing to work overtime, and a substandard working environment but to no avail. “When people send in a sick slip they are threatened with their jobs. Human resources never asks the people why they’re falling sick and we’re entitled to 20 days sick days per annum,” said the screener. “Morale is really low right now.” Human resources officials and management have been “passing the buck” between each other over the delayed salary payments, it is alleged. The screener estimated that she has lost out on between $700 and $800 a year since payments were first withheld in 2007. A round 50 staff work in the security screening section. Unhappy The disgruntled employees said they are also unhappy about the condition of the room in which they work, particularly the “concrete floor which gets very dusty”. It is also claimed that staff are upset because hiring practices are not in accordance with regulations. They say positions are not advertised internally before being filled. “They have qualified people on staff but they refuse to transfer people,” one screener said. Meanwhile, there are ongoing concerns over the handling of a tuberculosis scare last year, in which one security screener contracted the disease and 10 others were exposed. I t is claimed that Mr Pinder met with them on March 3 and promised to come back the following week, but never returned. “He is really not concerned about staff at the airport authority. He told them staff he only received 27 votes from staff at airport authority,” the screener said. “It seems like nothing happens unless you go to the press.” The complaints come just over a month after several officers stationed at the Airport Fire Station claimed their unit was being run like a “petty shop”, and was rife with nepotism. In an interview with The Tri bune, they called for the removal of the fire chief and other key management officers. The union president Mr Pinder later said he was satisfied that a meeting between Airport Authority heads and management at the fire station was successful in avert i ng industrial action. Calls for union Mr Pinder and director of security at the Airport Authority Osborne Ferguson were not returned up to press time. THEpresident of the Bahamas Commercial Stores Supermarket Warehouse Worker’s Union yesterday called for the resignation of the director of Labour for what he termed “interference” with the union. The director, Harcourt Brown, is due to hold a press conference today to respond to the BCSWWU president’s claims, which were made in a press conference Wednesday morning. In a barely comprehensible statement issued to the press containing an abundance of grammatical errors, union president Elgin Douglas accused Mr Brown of “interfering with the rights of the union and its members.” However, one union member contacting The Tribune yesterday said that the union is behind the director of labour and many members think it is Mr Douglas who should go. Elections have apparently not been held in the union since its for mation in the 1980s, with Mr Douglas remaining president since this time. “He is incompetent,” said the member, who wished to remain anonymous. However, Mr Douglas, in his comments issued to the media , said the director of labour is “not fair” and “has his own agenda.” “Mr Harcourt Brown is one of the worst Director of Labour ever sit in the Labour Department,” wrote Mr Douglas. He said the union “write Minister of Labour under Section 13 Chap ter 3 21 of Industrial Relations Act to call and urgent meeting with the parties” (sic n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE 24-year-old son of Anglican Archdeacon Etienne Bowleg was back in court yesterday morning in connection with a high-speed chase in which police were shot at. Etienne Bowleg II, of Twynam Heights, appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court Eight, Bank Lane yesterday, where he was arraigned on multiple firearm and ammunition charges. During his arraignment yesterday, Bowleg was not required to plead to four counts of possession of a firearm with the intent to endanger life and four counts of possession of a firearm with the intent to resist lawful arrest. It is alleged that on Monday, March 16, Bowleg was in possession of a handgun with the intent to endanger the lives of Reserve Constable 26 Dennis Clarke, Reserve Constable 775 Patrick Minnis, Woman Police Constable 2895 Shenique Ford and Sergeant 987 Alexander Pierre. Bowleg, who is being represented by attorneys Murrio Ducille and Willie Moss, opted to have the matters heard in the Magistrate’s Court. It is also alleged that Bowleg caused damage to a blue 2007 Ford Crown Victoria in the amount of $500. Inspector Ercell Dorsette, the prosecutor, asked the court to join that charge to the aforementioned eight charges. Bowleg not required to plead to the additional charge. The prosecution raised no objection to Bowleg being granted bail. According to attorney Moss, Bowleg recently graduated from college and took the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT Magistrate Bethel granted Bowleg bail in the sum of $30,000 with two sureties, on condition that he not leave the jurisdictionuntilthe completion of the preliminary inquiry, surrender his travel documentsandreport to the Elizabeth Estates Police Stationevery Monday, Wednesday and Saturday before 6pm. Thecasehasbeen adjourned to September 23. In addition to these charges, Bowleg was granted bail $7,500 on ammunition and drugs charges. It is alleged that he was found in possession of two unfired 9mm rounds, one unfired .380 round and one gram of marijuana. Bowleg pleaded not guilty to these charges. The case was adjourned to September 28 for trial. According to reports, police pursued a black 2003 Ford Expedition from Wulff Road to the Tonique Williams-Darling Highway after shots were fired from the vehicle around 9pm on Monday. Call for director of Labour to resign BPSU president accused of lack of interest in airport security screening staff concerns J ohn Pinder Tradewinds 2009 comes to a close In brief Etienne Bowleg II

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EDITOR, The Tribune . The recent revelations by Mr Chauncey Tynes Senior about his late son and Lynden Pin dling, has in my opinion brought out the worst in the present leadership of the PLP. Firstly, as a Bahamian, I am insulted by Senator MaynardGibson who has suggested boycotting The Tribune for its recent insightful article aboutC hauncey Tynes Jr., Lynden Pindling, drug kingpins, secret flights under the cover of utter darkness, and so on and so forth. Mrs. Maynard-Gibson probably meets her Tribune in hero ffice daily, and that would not stop anytime soon, yet she is advocating that dim-witted Bahamians cease buying The Tribune because it will essentially illuminate them to the truth about the late Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling. Senator Maynard-Gibson is out of touch with the people of this nation, and reality. This will cost the PLP dearly in the next election. Then, we have Perry Christie who insists that victimizing and intimidating, and drug-dirtied Lynden Pindling is the Father of our Nation when Pindling’s s tatus as a Bahamian has not been publicly verified to this date. This too will cost the PLP to lose badly next election. And now we have Paul Moss who just arrived in the PLP – defending something that he knows nothing about. The PLP has become exactly what Lynden Pindling wanted Bahamians to be and that’s con spicuously unintelligent and unacquainted. How poetic. DENNIS DAMES Bahamian of the soil, born PMH Nassau, Bahamas January 17, 1966 to Wilmore Dames and Shirley BenebyDames. Nassau, March 14, 2009 E DITOR, The Tribune. I have some friends who live on the beautiful island of Farmers Cay. All in all this is a very nice community, but last year it suffered a blow and the effects are still being felt and the hurt is still in the process of healing. This island recorded the only murder in the cays ever! This in itself is mind-blowing but the police force is taking their usual nonchalant attitude toward it. F or years the people of Farmers Cay have been asking for a patrol car for the island but up to this date there is not one there. The folks believe that a better police presence would have done a lot to prevent this and other crimes and misbehaviour on the cay. Every other cay has a police car, but the cay that needs it the most does not have one. Every time the police need to do any investigation they h ave to put a civilians’ vehicle or life in danger to do this, I do not think this is good policing and it puts the officers at a disadvantage. Farmers Cay has one disadvantage in that it houses workers from the other cays and a lot of these people are not from Farmers Cay. It is difficult for the police to have any presence when they have to walk everywhere. MRS SILENCE DO-GOOD Exuma, B ahamas, March 16, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm EVEN THE elements shed a tear as family a nd friends drove to Christ Church Cathedral yesterday afternoon to attend the funeral of a successful businessman who always extended a helping hand to this community’s less fortunate. It’s so sad about Mr Kelly,” said a young woman who walked up to us Tuesday afternoon as we waited for our luggage at the foot of a carousel at Lynden Pindling International Airport. We had both just arrived from Miami. We didn’t know her, but she knew our husband w ho often spent much time at Kelly’s Home Centre. S he was speaking of David Albert Charles Kelly, CBE, who with his wife, Nancy, ownedK elly’s Home Centre in Marathon Mall. The young lady was on her way to Halifax “I always wanted to go back to school,” she s aid, “but I stayed at Kellys for 10 years only because of Mr and Mrs Kelly.” However, on learning of Mr Kelly’s sudden death in New York, she turned around and returned home for the funeral. After the funeral she plans to set out a gain for Halifax and a course which she is now taking to equip her to work with young children. “Something that I have always wanted to do,”s he explained. “I don’t know how they are going to manage a t Kelly’s without him,” she said, “but Mrs Kelly is a very strong woman and they have three wonderful sons.” S he said she had never known anyone like David Kelly. He was the strength, “the bea c on” behind the business. He was a fine example to his staff, no job was too lowly for him, she continued. If there was an area to be cleaned, he w ould take a broom and sweep it. “He really had a fine work ethic.” He taught by example. He was always there for us; he always had time to hear our problems, to help us. If anything went wrong it was Mr Kelly we turned to. I just can’t imagine anything without him. He was a good man. ” I n his sermon Venerable Keith Cartwright talked of David Kelly’s generosity. He told how last year he went into Kellys and announced t o Mr Kelly that because of the devastation done in the southern Bahamas by the hurricane that had just passed through, he needed every generator in the store. Mr Kelly gave him all the generators he needed and never sent a bill. When the priest asked him about it, he casually brushed it aside and in his deep voice and with a wry smile said: Don’t you worry, Geoff Johnstone and my brother, Godfrey, don’t know it yet, but they will help me pay for them! “In four decades and with wife Nancy’s influence and equal hard work, more recently with all three sons in the business, Kelly’s has been t ransformed from a dark storefront on Bay Street with shelves jammed with nuts and bolts i nto a 50,000 square foot retail emporium,” recorded the write-up in his obituary. “In 1988, N ancy and David took the biggest risk of their business lives moving the store from its familiar B ay Street location where its window once displayed Triumph sports cars to the new Mall at Marathon. “Today the store and its warehouse employ more than 300 persons and one of David’s greatest satisfactions was the knowledge that every employee enjoyed health insurance, a pension plan and could participate in profit-sharing. Like his home, The Columns, so close to where he was born, the store gave him roots and he gave back, nurturing it with a work ethic that rubbed off on others, and a sense of decency a nd equality that extended to everyone in the s tore.” Senate President Lynn Holowesko talked of the courage of the couple in the uncertaind ays of the eighties. “To have borrowed money to make such a substantial investment in an area that was just beginning to grow, and to c ommit to being the anchor for the first major shopping mall in The Bahamas seems an easy decision in hindsight. But it was a big gamble a nd a huge investment some 21 years ago.” From Queen’s College, David joined his two older brothers at McDonogh School, a military a cademy in Maryland, where in 1950 he was voted the best wrestler in the state of Mary land and was the recipient of the Babe Ruth Award for sportsmanship. However, he did not want to go on to university. Anxious to return to t he family business, he came home at the age of 1 9 to join his father in Kelly’s on Bay Street. The following year, his father was dead. David was 20, his brother Basil, 22, who also joined the business, was left with their mother, to continue Kelly’s. Many years later Basil sold his share t o David, and Kelly’s Home Centre in Marathon is the result of David and Nancy’s years of hard work. Today, David Kelly leaves a most capable business savvy wife, and three well trained sons with far more training and experience than he had when he succeeded his father. It is now up to them to carry on their father’s tradition of courage, integrity, fairplay and generosity. As for their father, the angel will write in his book of gold that, like the ancient Abou Ben Adhem, David Kelly was one who “loved his fellow men.” Farmers Cay needs a police patrol car LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net David Kelly loved his fellow man :$17('$)(:*22''5,9(56 EDITOR, The Tribune. Chauncey had choice yes he did, he choose to be in the employment of a known drug lord, which made him an associate drug dealer. He could have said to his dad anything to make him feel less shame if the hazards of his occupation caught up with him. Chauncey was not the first to meet this strange fate, and would not be the last, let us remembern ow no trace of these men nor the plane was ever found to the best of your knowledge. What does this tell us, two things they could be dead or in hiding. This story has been told over and over with the missing/deaths of many young Bahamian men, who have chosen to walk this road. I was never a big fan of Sir Lynden, but I feel trying to use him as a scape goat to ease the shame Chauncey placed upon this family is uncalled for. Yes we want our children to know our past, but when we start highlighting the few negatives over the many positives, we too are leading our youth into thinking many negative things. I strongly feel you, editor, could have highlighted the life of Mr Livingston B Johnson on your front page and in more depth, than this story which will only end with our youth listening to many foolish arguments which have revolved from this article, not to mention the unnecessary stress this will cause to many who foolishly spend their time discussing this topic. It is like did Mrs Moree received monies from the insurance company or not, we have to be careful how to tell the story of the past, it was an “ill fated death of a drug dealer” and may God have mercy on his soul. STEPHEN TURNQUEST Nassau, March, 2009. The death of young Chauncey Tynes EDITOR, The Tribune. R e:Insight/Tribune, March 9, 2009 Students of journalism interested in fair, balanced and substantiated content will find this article to be h ighly instructional. KENNETH W KNOWLES, MD Nassau, March 13, 2009. A valuable lesson for journalism students Revelations bring out worst in PLP leadership

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The National Insurance Board Fund now stands at $1.6 billion, NIB senior manager W Moss told Rotarians. “All but a small portion of that is invested right here in the Bahamas. I am pleased to report Rotarians that there have been zero losses to the National Insurance Fund as a result of the on-going global financial crisis,” he said. Mr Moss noted that government intends to amend the National Insurance Act and Regulations to provide for the addition of unemployment benefits to Bahamians. He said the Prime Minister is expected to travel to Grand Bahama on Wednesday to discuss the programme with community leaders at the Our Lucaya Resort. On Monday, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced that government has taken $20 million from the National Insurance Medical Branch Fund to provide unemployment benefits to some 10,000 unemployed and underemployed persons in the country. Mr Moss also noted that the NIB provides many other benefits to Bahamians that help to stimulate the Bahamian economy. He reported that the Board has paid out over $150 million in benefits and assistance, in 2008. During February 2009, he said that close to 28,000 pensioners received National Insurance benefits or assistance, which along with the payments of STB such as sick ness and maternity account for some $13 million that was paid out just in that month alone. Mr Moss said the National Insurance Board’s primary objective, as mandated by The National Insur ance Act is to provide partial income replacement for workers when they are unable to work temporarily because of illness. H e stressed that in order for the Board to be able to deliver on this partial income replacement promised to workers, NIB must col lect contributions from selfemployed persons and from employers on behalf of their employees. “Now this process of paying monthly contributions for some selfemployed persons and some employers can become overbearing if not paid on a timely basis and allowed to go unchecked for several months, or even years.” Recently, NIB has taken steps to collect millions of outstanding national insurance contributions that are owed by delinquent employers. Mr Moss explains that once a business opens in the Bahamas and starts operation it has 10 days to be registered with NIB. After the business is registered, it is assigned national insurance num bers for the business and its employees. Mr Moss said businesses are expected to keep proper payrolland business records as required under Section 42 of the National Insurance Act, which states that: “Every employer and self-employed person shall at all times keep and maintain in his business premises or place the following recordsb) Payroll and other records connected therewith, which would serve to prove the correctness of the entries on the contributions made; and c) the records relating to the payment of such contributions to The Board(C.10 “The Act makes it an offence for employers and self-employed per sons who fail to keep or produce records when requested to do so by the Board. “The National Insurance Board encourages all business owners and self-employed persons to keep good accounting records.” According to Mr Moss, the board has implemented new procedures as it relates to the processing of sickness claims for employees. He said NIB has introduced a new form called Med 4, which is now needed for the processing of sickness claims. “With this form employers are asked to verify the period that their employees are going to be off from work, as a result of sickness or maternity leave. “This form must be signed off by the employer and submitted along with any sickness or maternity claims being made by an employed person.” Mr Moss said claims will not be processed if the new form is not completed by the employer. He gave several reasons for the implementation of this new form. Employees would submit sick ness claims to National Insurance and remain at work and we all know that one must be away from work in order to receive benefit payments from National Insurance for example the disablement benefit. Some employees would submit a claim and stay off from work for part of the period and return to work before the period submitted to National Insurance has expired. Mr Moss said the Med 4 Form would also make the employers aware that their employees are making a claim to NIB so they can make adjustments where necessary with their salaries. He said the National Insurance Act provides the employer the right to adjust their employees’ salary by deducting the amount of benefit paid to employees. Mr Moss said that no contribution payment is due while an employee is on sick leave. He said employers and persons can visit NIB website at www.Nibbahamas.com to view the entire National Insurance Act 1972, annual reports, the 7th Actuarial Review Report, NIB’s Pension Commission Report, Leaflets on NIB Benefits, to download Registration and Claim Forms, etc. He said it was important that persons continue to support the NIB programme so that it will continue to grow for future generations of Bahamians. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 5 bf fbffft tn" nntf n r"r tn tn btf HER MAJESTY’S PRISONheld its first quarterly visitors meeting for 2009 on Monday at the prison’s security processing centre. In attendance were the Superintendent of Prisons Dr Elliston Rahming and other senior staff who gave members of the public an opportunity to express their concerns, ideas and recommendations. “The meeting was well attended by friends and loved ones at inmates of Her Majesty’s Prisons. Recommendations were made, ideas were shared and most importantly clarity was given to those individuals who needed it on any subject relative to their relatives’ confinement,” said the prison in a statement. It said Dr Rahming encourages this kind of “positive dialogue” and remains committed to Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest’s vision of bringing reform to HMP. Dr Rahming said he realises that the families of inmates have a pivotal role to play in creating reform as they too have a direct impact on the lives of their incarcerated relatives. According to Dr Rahming, through communication, “we can better understand each other which is crucial for paving the way for better relations.” Prison holds first quarterly visitors meeting of 2009 Dr Elliston Rahming NIB Fund stands at $1.6 billion

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“Where there is no vision the people perish.” P roverbs 29:18a, AV. “I never look back!” Evangelist Billy Graham n By REV DR J EMMETTE WEIR T HIS is a response to Mr E rrington Watkins’ novel claims concerning the circumstancesof the early years of Sir Lynden Pind ling. One of the most enduring lessons that my late mother, Eunice Jeanette Weir, a brilliant Bahamian educator, “drummed” into me, was the utter importance of written docu mentation. Indeed, so insistent was she upon this principle that if I were to write to her while I was studying abroad as a young man, she was s ure to reply with a letter that included corrections of my errors in spelling or grammar! Moreover, t his lesson was certainly reinforced by my professors in studies at the tertiary level in Jamaica, the United S tates and in Scotland. It is precisely for this reason that when it comes to the dates of the most important events in the life of an individual birth, baptism, marriage and death, we depend not on oral statements b ased on that fragile ability known as “memory”, but on written documentation, whether to be found in l etters, a diary, a church vestry, government registration, library or on the hard drive of a computer! For as t he Chinese (who invented paper and ink) have put it: “THE WEAKEST INK IS STRONGER THAN THE STRONGEST MEMORY” I therefore could not help applying this principle to the latest claim made by Mr. Errington Watkinsw ith regard to the birth and early life of Sir Lynden Pindling that he was born of a Jamaican mother andw as sent to Jamaica for the early y ears of his education. Whatever may be one's “take” on this claim, it certainly begs the question, “Why h as the good gentleman waited to suggest it until all the principals involved (who could either have refuted or reinforced same) have p assed away from this life? It would certainly have had much more weight had it been stated earlier. M ore profoundly however, it lacks documentation and as such does not merit very serious consideration, not in terms of historicity ord efinitive academic research. Thus, my purpose here must be c learly defined. It is not my intention to engage in a “tit-fortat” disc ussion with Mr. Watkins on the o rigins of “the Father of the nation.” For, as will be demonstrated, such discussions are neither very beneficial nor edifying. As a member oft he “older generation” (although n ot quite as “senior” as Mr. Watkins) yet with many years of e xperience and observation, I would just like to give “my side of the sto ry,” leaving the reader to be the judge. In undertaking this task, I shall make every effort to document m y statements with dates given as accurately as I can. With these c aveats, I proceed with this endeav o ur. On January 10, 1967 I was a young Methodist Minister serving in the Coke Circuit, Kingston,J amaica, where the late Wilfred Easton was the Superintendent M inister. I vividly recall, along with my longtime friend and colleague in the Ministry of The MethodistC hurch, the Rev. Dr. Colin Archer, 'tuning into ZNS to listen to the results of the General Election “at home.” Often it was hard to hear ZNS clearly, but on that night, it c ame over “loud and clear” on that ancient “hot tube” radio. We were glad and joined in the rejoicing about the coming of Majority Rule. M any Jamaicans I met, spoke with pride about the Premier of the Bahamas, a young man with J amaican roots. As a Marriage Officer, it was my privilege to officiate at many marriages in Jamaica. A mongst those, there was one which stands out in my memory. In counseling a young couple I recall that the bride-to-be (an attractive, intelligent young lady) was named Jacinth Pindling! “You have the same surname as our Premier, Mr.L ynden Pindling!” I said. “Yes! He's my cousin,” she replied beaming with pride. I cannot remembert he name of the groom. I can never forget that beautiful bride who evidently, was related to the premier ofm y homeland. N ow in all those deliberations, in discussions with Jamaicans in general, and with Sir Lynden's cousin in p articular, there was never any mention by anyone of the claims made by Mr. Watkins. Not a single person mentioned that he had been to s chool there, and while they all knew that although his father was Jamaican, his mother was assumed t o be Bahamian. In fact as I reflect upon those experiences in Jamaica, I can recall nothing to convince me of the authenticity of Mr. Watkins’c laims. Don't get me wrong! I'm not asserting whether they are true o r false. All I'm saying is that on the basis of my own experiences a nd discussions with Jamaicans back i n the late sixties and early seventies, I have no reason to place any credence in them. Let me continue. I s tudied at The United Theological College of the West I ndies, Kingston, Jamaica from 1959 -63. The only other Bahamian who studied along with me at seminary in those days was the late Rev. Dr. Charles Smith. (The Rev. Dr. Philip R ahming joined us later). Charles remained a good friend of mine u ntil his passing, and I can say that h e was meticulous when it came to the use of facts and I came to depend upon the authenticity of his word. Now I was present and heardw ith my own ears the Rev. Dr. Charles Smith declare unequivo c ally that a nurse who was a mem ber of Zion Baptist Church, testified that she knew when a pregnant Mrs.P indling “was heavy with Lynden.” Whose report should I believe? Whose report do you believe? What's my take on this matter? My advice is simply. Don’t go there! D on’t go there unless you have doc umentary evidence to support your c laim. Why? Because in the final analysis what really matters in evaluating t he legacy of any individual is not the circumstances of his/her birth, but what that person did with the gifts and talents with which the cre ator endowed them. O r, to put it another way, what really matters in the life of any pers on, is not where he or she has come from, but the direction in which that person is moving. Yes, the answer to this all important question determines whether he/she is on the way to meaningless mediocrity, or is indeed destined for greatness. May I continue? E arly in September 1970, I arrived in New York on my way to Christian Theological Seminary, Indiana, to pursue studies for my Masters degree in Theology. It wasa time when racial tensions were h igh in the wake of the assassination of that great Civil Rights Leader, Martin Luther King Jr. I shall never forget the manner in which I was greeted by a tall, husky Black man (then, “negro” was an outdated expression and the term “African American” had not yet been coined), who met me. When I told him I was from the “sunny Bahamas,” he replied, acidly, “Man, you shoulda stayed where you was!” He really was suggesting that Amer ica at that time was no place for a young person to study. Now my dear reader, if you told me then that a “skinny teenager from Hawaii with a funny name, the son of a Black father and White American mother would one day b e President of the United States, I would have replied, “Man, you must be crazy!” (or words to that effect Y es no one back then could conceive of a Barack Obama electrifying crowds with the powerful motto. Yes we can!” and becoming the first black man to occupy the White House, not as a servant or visitor but as “Mr. President!” I never imagined in my wildest dreams that I would live to see an AfricanAmerican President. And that isw hy, as I pointed out in the book, “Obama in Prophecy” already a best seller abroad and soon to ber eleased in the Bahamas, I was amongst the old men who wept while young people of all nationsr ejoiced on November 4th, when B arack Obama was indeed elected first African-American President of the USA. I n my reviews of Obama's books, I point out that Barack Obama was groomed and prepared to serve in a unique manner. From e arly in life when his mother woke him up at 4 am to give him lessons (English d etermination to lead. And when I saw him on TV and heard him speak with such confidence, then I knew for sure that he was a youngm an “destined for greatness.” Upon completion of my doctora l studies abroad, in October 1981, I returned home and was appointed t o serve on the Juvenile Panel. It w as then that I came into contact with a young Minister of Government appointed by Sir Lynden Pindling, then Prime Minister of anI ndependent young nation. It matt ered to me not a whit that he hailed from a small settlement in Abaco a nd that his parents were not mar ried to each other. What mattered was the confident, determined, purposeful manner in which he approached his responsibilities, and n oting these qualities, I concluded that here was another young man w ho was destined for greatness! I r efer to none other that our Prime Minister, the Rt Honourable Hubert Alexander Ingraham. I began this contribution by e mphasizing the absolute impor tance of documentation, asserting t hat statements made by persons must be “backed up “by documen tary evidence if they are to be takens eriously. The validity of this principle rein forced in academic research, was confirmed in yet another experi ence of my sojourn in Jamaica. W hile serving as a young Minis ter in the Spanish Town Linstead C ircuit back in the mid-sixties I received a letter from an elderly gentleman who had migrated from J amaica while in his youth. He was nearly at the age of retirement and was in dire need of documentation as to the date of his birth. Yes he knew, but he could not prove his a ge to “the powers that be.” He wrote me, desperately requesting d ocumentation of the date of his birth. After diligent research of the Church and State records (includinga visit to the registry in Jamaica's ancient capital, Spanish Town), I was able to find his birth certificate. He wrote me a letter of great appreciation. Indeed so satisfied was he that he sent me money for “my pas-t or's discretionary fund,” which I used to help a number of persons in need. The birth of the gentleman was over a century ago, during the days of Booker T. Washington! Y es, documentary evidence is a ll that really matters. With reference again to Sir Lynden Pindling, what matters is documentary evi dence the birth certificate in the registry of the Government of the Bahamas. That it was recorded when he was seventeen years of age matters not one bit. As a marriage officer for nearly forty years, I have seen birth certificates recorded when individuals were in their twen ties and older. The official position then is that which is recorded in the Registry. All else can only be regarded as unreliable oral sugges tions, rumours and old wives tales! Let's then get then beyond all these stories and opinions and undocumented legends about the b irth of Sir Lynden. Unless and until documentary evidence to the contrary is produced, the official and r elevant data is that to be found in the Registry. To act in any other way is to show scant respect for our own Bahamian institutions! Yes, what is important about Sir Lynden Pindling (and indeed about every great Bahamian of the past) is n ot the circumstances of birth, but t he contribution that he and they made for the advancement of the people of our beloved Bahamaland. When the evil Roman Emperor, Nero embarked upon a policy of persecuting the early Christians at R ome, Peter was fleeing from that great city, capital of the Roman Empire. On his way, he had a vision o f The Christ who challenged him “Quo vadis? Whither goest thou?” Had the Apostle not returned to R ome to suffer along with the Christians there, he would not have fulfilled the ministry to which hew as called by The Master. And now, my dear reader, what about you? You know of the a chievements of Joseph, the I sraelite slave, who rose to become P haraoh's viceroy in ancient Egypt (Genesis 37, 39-45 ( “Blessed one”) who came from a boyhood in Hawaii to occupy the White House, and of Hubert A lexander, who developed from t he boy in Abaco to become the P rime Minister of the Common wealth of the Bahamas. Dear reader, as I approach the conclusion of this communication, n eed I remind you of the sterling, exemplary achievements of: Joseph, the dreamer, the I sraelite Patriarch, who rose from slavery to become the Prime Minis-t er of Egypt? Barack, who rose from boyhood in Hawaii to occupy the White H ouse in Washington? Roland, the boy from the Current, Eleuthera, who ascended to become the first Premier of our young nation? Lynden, who came from East Street to serve as the first PrimeM inister of an independent Bahamas? Cecil, one of the greatest politi cal leaders our nation has ever seen, whom I remember being a “big boy” when growing up on WestS treet, Nassau. Perry “the Valley Boy” who b ecame Prime Minister. Orville, who moved from a big house on Hay Street, to the BigH ouse on Mount Fitzwilliam. Or Hubert, who came from a s mall settlement in Abaco, to be called for the third time, to serve as Prime Minister of our Beloved Bahamaland? I think not! No, my dear reader, I need not remind you of the achieve ments of these eight great men; for you know of them. What is my responsibility at this juncture, how-e ver, is to remind you that the most important question for you is that put to the fugitive Peter, wheni nstructed by the Master to return to Rome, “Whither goest thou?” For the answer you give to this all important question (by your own words and deeds) will determine whether you are on the destructive road to death, the death of your ambtions, aspirations and dreams, or whether you are destined for greatness the greatness to be realised when your vision is in align ment with the plan designed for you by the great Architect. Let your light so shine before men that they may see your good works and glorify your Father which and glorify your father which is in heaven.” (MATT. 5:16, A.V. C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 1LDJDUD&KULVLWLDQ&RPPXQLW\ RIFKRRO1&&RIIHUVDFDGHPLFH[FHOOHQFHLQDIDPLO\OLNH DWPRVSKHUHLQVSLULQJOLIHORQJOHDUQHUV VVFKPROO#QLDJDUDFFFRP 3ULYDWHFKRROHVWDEOLVKHGLQ 5LFKWUDGLWLRQDQGKHULWDJH &RHGXFDWLRQDO'D\DQGHVLGHQWLDO (OHPHQWDU\LGGOHDQGHFRQGDU\FKRROV 6DIHIDPLO\OLNHHQYLURQPHQW 'HGLFDWHGIDFXOW\DQGVPDOOFODVVVL]HV &RPSUHKHQVLYHFRFXUULFXODUDQGUHVLGHQWLDO SURJUDPV &KDPSLRQVKLSSRUWVHDPV 'LVWLQJXLVKHGXQLYHUVLW\SODFHPHQW VWXGHQWVIURPFRXQWULHV %HDXWLIXOFDPSXVQHDULDJDUD)DOOV +,*+,17(67$7(6:(//(67$%/,6+('*$7('&20081,7
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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q WKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-DQXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV LUCAYA International School students along with t heir teacher Sydney Watson a re pictured at the Grand Bahama International Airport last weekend embarking on their European school trip. The students have been f undraising for their excursion since early last year and will visit many of the places they have studied during their time at LIS. The group will travel to Italy and Greece and visit s uch famous places as the V atican, the Colosseum, Greek theatre, the Parthenon and many more well-known and historic attractions. The students and their teacher will be away for overa week and their trip is a part of the school's goal to teach children to be internationally minded and well-rounded individuals. THE ROTARY CLUB of East N assau made its annual donation to the Bahamas Diabetic A ssociation. Pictured is club president Brian Moodie and president-elect Michelle Rassin p resenting a cheque for $6000 to BradleyCooper of the BDA. P h o t o c o u r t e s y o f L I S S c h o o l LIS senior students head off to Europe LIS senior students head off to Europe LIS senior students head off to Europe LIS senior students head off to Europe LIS senior students head off to Europe LIS senior students head off to Europe LIS senior students head off to Europe LIS senior students head off to Europe LIS senior students head off to Europe LIS senior students head off to Europe Rotary Club makes donation to the Bahamas Diabetic Association n CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. SPACEWALKINGastronauts installed the last set of solar wings at the international space station Thursday, accomplishing the top job of shuttle Discovery’s mis sion, according to Associated Press. Steven Swanson and Richard Arnold II struggled with some cable connections, but managed to hook everything up. “It wasn’t quite as smooth as we had hoped, but those guys did a great job,” astronaut Joseph Acaba told Mission Control. The next milestone will be today, when the folded-up solar wings are unfurled. Manpower was needed inside and out to attach the $300 mil lion segment to the space station. Swanson and Arnold helped their colleagues inside the shuttle-space station complex cautiously move the 31,000-pound, 45-foot-long girder into position with a robotic arm. “Keep coming,” one of the spacewalkers said. “It really looks good to me.” The actual attachment occurred an hour into the spacewalk, and the hookups were completed two hours later. Discovery delivered the new wings earlier this week. It’s the final of solar wings to be installed at the 10-year-old space station and will bring it to full power. It’s also the last major American-made piece of the space station. Astronauts successfully install set of solar wings

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 59F/15C Low: 60F/16C Low: 63 F/17C Low: 65 F/18 Low: 64 F/18C Low: 68 F/20C Low: 70F/21C Low: 64 F/18 High: 78F/26C High: 82F/28C High: 80F/27C High: 78F/26C High: 80F/27C High: 78F/26C High: 79F/26C Low: 66F/19C High: 77F/25C Low: 69 F/21C High: 79F/26CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 67 F/19C High: 83F/28C Low: 68F/20C High: 79 F/26C Low: 64F/18C High: 77F/25C Low: 68 F/20 High: 81F/27C Low: 71 F/22C High: 85F/29C Low: 68 F/20C High: 81 F/27C Low: 69F/21C High: 84F/29C Low: 70 F/21 High: 85F/29C Low: 69F/21C High: 82 F/28C High: 75 F/24 CFREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 20 2009 PAGE 8BTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Parlty cloudy with a spotty shower. Partly cloudy , a shower; breezy . Partly sunny , a shower; breezy . Mostly sunny , a shower; windy . Clouds and sun, a shower possible. High: 79 Low: 70 High: 78 High: 77 High: 77 AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel Windy with a shower possible. High: 78 Low: 67 Low: 68 Low: 69 AccuWeather RealFeel 82 The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 70F 80-65F 74-64F 71-65F 80 F Low: 70 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY ALMANAC High ..................................................84F/29C Low ....................................................68F/20C Normal high ......................................79F/26C Normal low ........................................66F/19C Last year's high ..................................82F/28C Last year's low ..................................71F/21C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.15" Year to date ..................................................1.13" Normal year to date ......................................4.50" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU New First Full Last Mar . 26 Apr. 2Apr. 9Apr. 17 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:14 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:21 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 3:21 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 2:07 p.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 3:49 a.m.2.310:04 a.m.0.6 4:01 p.m.2.010:11 p.m.0.5 4:48 a.m. 2.310:58 a.m.0.5 5:01 p.m. 2.111:10 p.m.0.4 5:40 a.m.2.411:46 a.m.0.4 5:53 p.m.2.3----6:25 a.m.2.512:02 a.m.0.3 6:38 p.m.2.512:28 p.m.0.3 WORLDCITIES Acapulco90/3270/21s89/3170/21s Amsterdam45/738/3s52/1141/5sAnkara, T urkey39/325/-3s46/730/-1pc Athens57/1349/9pc55/1245/7r Auckland68/2059/15pc68/2056/13pc Bangkok88/3177/25sh91/3279/26shBarbados 85/2975/23pc84/2874/23s Barcelona61/1643/6s56/1342/5s Beijing65/1844/6s70/2139/3c Beirut63/1755/12pc67/1961/16sBelgrade 40/4 29/-1sh46/731/0c Berlin 42/5 32/0pc49/936/2pc Bermuda66/1862/16r68/2057/13r Bogota66/1847/8r64/1746/7r Brussels50/1034/1s54/1236/2pcBudapest 45/728/-2sh50/1030/-1s Buenos Aires82/2766/18pc86/3070/21s Cairo73/2253/11pc76/2459/15s Calcutta95/3578/25s95/3576/24s Calgary52/1126/-3pc46/720/-6c Cancun81/2766/18sh84/2867/19pc Caracas78/2566/18pc83/2868/20t Casablanca75/2358/14pc76/2458/14pc Copenhagen 43/640/4pc47/840/4pc Dublin52/1139/3pc54/1241/5pc Frankfurt 48/8 30/-1 pc54/1236/2pc Geneva 50/10 30/-1 s51/1031/0s Halifax29/-110/-12pc34/116/-8s Havana81/2761/16pc79/2659/15pc Helsinki32/025/-3sn30/-121/-6snHong Kong 79/2672/22s77/2572/22pc Islamabad80/2653/11t83/2857/13pc Istanbul46/741/5pc54/1246/7cJerusalem 56/13 42/5sh66/1847/8s Johannesburg70/2154/12t75/2351/10s Kingston82/2773/22sh83/2874/23sh Lima84/2866/18pc83/2866/18c London55/1234/1pc58/1439/3pc Madrid73/2237/2s72/2237/2s Manila 92/33 72/22 s91/3276/24s Mexico City 73/22 46/7pc72/2246/7pc Monterrey 81/2761/16pc83/2862/16pc Montreal30/-121/-6s43/623/-5pc Moscow36/228/-2sn36/223/-5sn Munich 33/0 23/-5 sf39/330/-1c Nairobi 90/32 57/13pc89/3158/14s New Delhi95/3561/16c88/3158/14pc Oslo39/331/0c43/632/0pc Paris 50/1032/0s54/1234/1pc Prague36/221/-6c40/434/1pc Rio de Janeiro 80/2672/22pc79/2672/22sh Riyadh90/3264/17pc93/3368/20s Rome 52/11 36/2 sh48/836/2pc St. Thomas82/2772/22s83/2872/22s San Juan91/3268/20pc94/3468/20s San Salvador91/3266/18s90/3272/22s Santiago88/3154/12s88/3150/10s Santo Domingo 84/28 68/20 sh81/2768/20sh Sao Paulo 75/2363/17c75/2362/16t Seoul63/1737/2s62/1645/7pc Stockholm43/634/1pc39/332/0pc Sydney82/2761/16s78/2564/17sT aipei 81/27 73/22pc86/3073/22pc T okyo57/1345/7r58/1449/9s Toronto37/223/-5s49/931/0s T rinidad 82/2772/22t81/2774/23t Vancouver48/838/3r46/738/3pc Vienna39/327/-2sf44/638/3s Warsaw36/223/-5sf39/330/-1cWinnipeg 42/5 30/-1 pc47/834/1c HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C T odaySaturdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow , i -ice, Pr cp-precipitation, T r -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO T oday:ENE at 12-25 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles73F Saturday: NE at 12-25 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles73F Today:ENE at 12-25 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles73F Saturday:NE at 12-25 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles73F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles73F Saturday:E at 5-10 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles73F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 62/16 48/8t71/2147/8t Anchorage25/-39/-12s22/-511/-11pc Atlanta 66/1841/5s63/1740/4s Atlantic City47/822/-5pc50/1029/-1s Baltimore 47/8 29/-1 pc 52/1133/0s Boston 40/427/-2pc48/832/0s Buffalo40/424/-4s48/828/-2s Charleston, SC65/1840/4pc63/1740/4s Chicago46/734/1pc55/1236/2c Cleveland44/625/-3pc52/1131/0sDallas 70/21 54/12 pc74/2359/15pc Denver72/2239/3pc71/2140/4pcDetroit 44/630/-1pc53/1136/2pc Honolulu79/2669/20s81/2770/21s Houston78/2557/13pc76/2460/15pc HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/C F/CF/C High LowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C High LowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodaySaturday T odaySaturday T odaySaturday Indianapolis 50/10 33/0s57/1339/3c Jacksonville70/2149/9pc64/1745/7pc Kansas City 58/1444/6pc63/1744/6r Las Vegas84/2855/12pc80/2656/13pc Little Rock 62/16 45/7 s 65/1846/7pc Los Angeles 70/2156/13pc66/1854/12pc Louisville54/1234/1s63/1743/6c Memphis64/1744/6s65/1849/9pc Miami80/2666/18pc78/2563/17pc Minneapolis50/1038/3pc56/1337/2cNashville 59/15 35/1 s62/1640/4pc New Orleans72/2257/13s72/2256/13pc New Y ork40/434/1pc53/1137/2s Oklahoma City66/1852/11pc74/2353/11pc Orlando78/2557/13pc73/2254/12pc Philadelphia46/729/-1pc51/1034/1s Phoenix89/3162/16c86/3059/15s Pittsburgh44/626/-3pc54/1230/-1s Portland, OR 56/1339/3r54/1240/4c Raleigh-Durham 55/12 30/-1pc57/1332/0s St. Louis56/1338/3pc55/1242/5c Salt Lake City 68/20 45/7 pc 66/18 44/6 pc San Antonio80/2659/15pc73/2261/16pc San Diego 65/18 56/13pc65/1856/13pc San Francisco 61/16 50/10 pc 60/1548/8r Seattle 52/1138/3r51/1039/3c Tallahassee78/2548/8pc74/2344/6pc Tampa82/2760/15pc79/2656/13pcT ucson84/2858/14pc81/2753/11s W ashington, DC 48/8 33/0pc58/1436/2s UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-storms Rain FlurriesSnow Ice AccuW eather.com

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 9 C hairmans Report Q4, 2008 We are pleased to report to you that our fourth quarter results continue to show steady, positive i mprovements among our performing locations in the midst of challenging market conditions as we record a net profit of $1.531m for the quarter and $2m for the year. These results, which were driven inlarge part by the significant increase in sales -up 17.1% over the same periodthe previous year, validate our commitment to the basics of our business to bring about steady progress in key areas of our operations. Now, more than ever, our customers are looking for real, noticeable value on basic, everyday items. Our price cuts and club specials are delivering that value and the increase in customer transactions reflects positive response to them. In addition to the increase in sales, the Companys expenses continued to be carefully managed reducing slightly as a percentage of sales despite ever-increasing costs with utilities, in particular, continuing to rise with an increase of over $750k for the year. We are also beginning to see an improvement in our shrink management as our gross margin increase of 0.9% was also driven by a reduction in shrink as a p ercentage of sales by 20% though the absolute shrink dollaramount remained the same as the p revious year. Our Dominos Pizza franchise sales also remain strong with efficiencies and savings f rom the closure of East Bay St. store bringing immediate results as the franchise retained a m ajority of sales from that location. As reported recently, we also made thevery difficultdecision to close Cost Right Abaco. Abaco Markets started in Abaco and this decision to close Cost Right Abaco was something we have struggled with for a long time trying so many different options and investing a lot of money to make it work. However, we were just not getting enough support to sustain the investment and focus there. While we were very disappointed to close Cost Right Abaco, we are obviously responsible to do what is best for the Company as a whole particularly given the current economic environment which requires the focus and dedication of all our resources to ensure that the great steps we have made toward stability are safeguarded. T his has been a tough year to operate in a market experiencing significant challenges. Despite the c hallenges, however, we are finally realizing the economies of scale, improved group buyingand e fficiencies among our performing locations we have sought in recent years, which is translating i nto steadily improving results. Our customers are seeing the difference and we are confident that you, our valued shareholders, will note the changes in our position and it is the result of a lot of things coming together. As indicated earlier, we do expect a continued softening of the economy in the coming quarters which is likely to impact our results. However, the concerted focus on driving sales through pricing, controlling expenses and continuing to improve our shrink, that has delivered the stability our Company needed, remainsour priority operating in the current market conditions. R. Craig Symonette March 18, 2009 CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET ( Expressed in thousands ofBahamiandollars) January 31, January 31, 2009 2008 Assets $ 30,343 26,197 Liabilities (18,055(16,499 Equity $ 12,288 9,698 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (Expressed in thousands ofBahamiandollars) Quarter Ended Quarter Ended January 31, 2009January 31, 2008 Sales $ 26,457 22,599 Cost of sales (18,687) (16,154) Gross profit 7,7706,445 Selling, general and administrative expenses(5,984(5,561 Other operating income116123 Net operatingprofit1,9021,007 Pre-opening costs (9 Property revaluation write-back (note 5) 56 Interest expense (80(35 Dividends on preference shares (136) (189) Net profit on continuingoperations1,742774 Restructuring reserve(250Net profit/(loss) on discontinuing operations 39 (146 Net profit $1,531628 Profit per share $0.097 $0.040 (Expressed in thousands ofBahamiandollars) Year Ended Year Ended January 31, 2009January 31, 2008 S ales $ 91,180 82,777 C ost of sales (64,461) (58,134) Gross profit 26,719 24,643 S elling, general and administrative expenses(24,035)(22,092) Other operating income383394 Net operatingprofit3,0672,945 Gain on disposal of investment -150 Pre-opening costs (24(120 Property revaluation write-back (note 5) 56 I nterest expense (283(203 Dividends on preference shares (620) (807) Net profit on continuingoperations2,1961,965 Gain on disposal ofsubsidiary -39 Restructuring reserve(250350 Net profit/(loss) on discontinuing operations 58 (177 Net profit $2,0042,177 Profit per share $0.127 $0.138 C ONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (Expressed in thousands ofBahamiandollars) Year ended Year ended January 31, 2009January 31, 2008 Net profit for period $ 2,004 2,177 Net cash provided by operating activities 6,575 710 Net cash (usedin)/providedby investing activities (4,077) 3,354 Net cashprovided by/(used in) financing activities99(5,195) Increase/(decrease) in cash $ 2,597 (1,131 ABACO MARKETS LIMITED EXPLANATORY NOTES TO INTERIM UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Quarter Ended January 31, 2009 1.ACCOUNTING POLICIES These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards using the same accounting policies and methods of computation as the Consolidated Financial Statements included in the 2007 Annual Report. The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Abaco Markets Limited (the Company) and its significant wholly owned subsidiaries: AML Foods (Nassau Limited, Cost Right Nassau Limited, Solomons Club (Freeport) Limited, Thompson Wholesale Limited and Caribbean Franchise Holdings Limited. 2.DISCONTINUING OPERATIONS On March 9, 2009, the Company ceased operations in Cost Right Abaco. Accordingly, the assets and liabilities of Cost Right Abaco are treated as discontinuing as of January 31, 2009. 3.PREFERENCE SHARES The Companymade total redemptions of $810,000 on Class A preference shares and $300,000on Class B preference shares during the year ended January 31, 2009. On October 17, 2008, the Company agreed with its Class B preference shareholders to restructure their shares by extending the maturity date from December 31, 2012 to December 31, 2013. In addition, the Class B preference shareholders agreed to subscribe for an additional $1.25m of shares. These funds were used toredeem in full the outstanding Class A preference shares. 4.CAPITAL ASSETS On July 3, 2008 the Company completed the purchase of a property on Queen’s Highway in Freeport for $2.4m. The purchase was partly financed through a loan from Royal Bank of Canada in amount of$2m bearing the interest of 7% and payable over five years. Solomon’s Freeport has occupied this property since December 2004. An appraisal of the property determined a value of $3m. The difference between appraised value and purchase cost was recorded in the property revaluation surplus in amount of $601,000. 5.REVALUATION SURPLUS A revaluation exercise was performed for Thompson Boulevard property appraising its value at $3mand resulting in a write-back of previous revaluation charge in amount of $56,000. In addition, property revaluation surplus was increased by $193,000. 6.ORDINARY SHARES On January 31, 2009 the Company canceled unused stock options as of that date. As a result of this, total number of issued ordinary shares decreased by 208,000. At the close of business on January 31, 2009, total number of issuedordinary shares was 15,599,211. Copies of a full set of the unaudited financial statements can be obtained from Ms.Brendalee Gibson, at Abaco Markets Corporate Offices at Town Centre Mall, Blue Hill Road, Nassau, The Bahamas, tel. 1 242 325 21 22. UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE QUARTER ENDED JANUARY 31, 2009 managers, so the company can “meet its bank covenants and financial obligations” and be ina “position of strength moving forward.” Senior vice-president of public affairs at Atlantis, Ed Fields, said the move was an “effort to avoid other more painful methods such as pay cuts or additional lay-offs.” Mr Moss, in a statement, said: “How is it that Kerzner could ask/demand that workers take an unpaid vacation when the Employment Act is very clear that vacation time is to be paid for?” The businessman and attorney, also an aspiring contender for the deputy leadership of the PLP, called on the Minister of Labour “to look into this matter to ensure that those that refuse Kerzner’s invitation are not terminated.” “Whilst I understand the shrinkage of the economy, we are talking about a company that spent in excess of $30 million on the opening of its new hotel in Dubai just a few months ago and now they are hypocritical in asking staff to take a cut. “It is setting the wrong example and is analogous to the big bonuses paid by AIG executives in a downed economy with money from tax payers,” he added. Kerzner International described the exerc ise as part of a broader “cost-containment” e ffort being implemented at its resorts worldw ide. Mr Fields said that at the same time, 20 staff members at the company’s Fort Lauderdale office were laid off and some unfilled positions were removed from the pay roll. The company continues to “aggressively take steps” to expand its revenue, added the spokesman. The move comes four months after the company let go 800 workers from the resort in November, in the wake of falling occupancy levels and booking forecasts. They moved swiftly to manoeuvre out of the dirty spill, which they estimated to be around one square mile in size, and sent The Tribune photographs of the thick brown sludge which subsequently coated their fishing equipment. “It took us a while to get out of it,” she said. The couple reported the incident to the Department of Environmental Health, but Mrs Callender said she did not get the impression that the matter was taken seriously. “The man who they said was responsible for that area said he did not know anything about it and he didn’t seem too bothered,” said Mrs Callender, adding: “It’s just not acceptable.” Mrs Callender’s experience took place a day prior to the alleged reporting of another major hazard by a Delta airline pilot to the Air Traffic Control tower at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. A concerned member of the public informed this newspaper that he had overheard a radio transmission by the pilot indicating that he had spotted a “ten to fifteen mile long” slick off the northern side of New Providence as he had piloted the aircraft over the area. However, so far none of the authorities contacted by The Tribune , including an air traffic services official, Minister of the Environment, Earl Deveaux, and a member of the country’s national Oil Spill Contingency Response Committee, were able to confirm knowledge of the incident. Mr Deveaux indicated that Port Authority controller Captain Anthony Allen has primary responsibility for organising a response to such incidents, however messages left for Captain Allens since Tuesday have not been returned. Pollution of coastal waters by oil has the potential to threaten marine and birdlife. In the wake of a photograph showing an oil slick hundreds of feet long along the coast parallel to the Clifton Pier power plant in June 2007, State Minister for Public Utilities, Phenton Neymour, announced that the Government had spent half a million dollars on oil response equipment intended to help mitigate such hazards in that area in the future. F ROM page one Environmental hazards F ROM page one P LP hopeful claims Kerzner’s ‘voluntary unpaid vacation’ goes against the E mployment Act

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE "Police are sure of the circumstances surrounding this incident and have launched an intensive investigation," ASP Evans said yester day. Smith is a resident of Williams Lane, off Kemp Road. His death marks the second homicide this week and the sixteenth for the year, according to ASP Evans. On Sunday, a game of dominoes turned deadly when a man was shot in the head during a brazen daylight attack. The victim, Mark 'Scabby' Daniels, was playing dominoes with friends outside a building on Finlayson Street when a gunman approached and shot him in the head. When police arrived a short time later around 1pm they found Daniels on the porch of a single story white and green wooden building where he reportedly worked as an auto-mechanic. The father-of-five, said to be in his mid-30s, was found lying on his back dressed in a black short-sleeved shirt and short green trousers. Emergency personnel pronounced him dead at the scene. Family and friends converged on the house and screamed in anguish as officials carried Daniels’ body away. $800 for possession of undeveloped conch and $200 for possession of an iguana, Palm was excused by George Town, Exuma magistrate Ivan Ferguson, and the other two men pictures have so far escaped arrest. But BASRA has provided new information which could lead to their apprehension. BASRA operations man ager Captain Chris Lloyd said both ‘Miss Emily’ and ‘Gone Away’ are still in the Bahamas. Capt Lloyd identified ‘Miss Emily’ in the Facebook pictures as he had previously approached the captain for illegally flying a Jolly Roger pirate flag when anchored in Nassau Harbour. He said the boat moved from Nassau harbour for some time, but has now returned. ‘Gone Away’ is reportedly chartering sailboat trips out of the Abacos. Capt Lloyd said: “I talked to cruisers who met these boats in the Biminis and theya ssure me these young people are not cruisers, but cowboys. “The photos (on Facebook) circulated locally and made available to the press also show an illegal speargun in the dinghy. “This I feel is the biggest offence of all, equal to an unlicenced firearm.” Police have been alerted about the whereabouts of the sailboats but have not said they are any closer to apprehending them. Executive director of the Bahamas National Trust Eric Carey said: “It’s not dead yet. It may fade away but some people are still interested in it and they are outraged. “Unfortunately the reality is that most of them are not caught and everybody pleads ignorance. “But the Bahamas does have a number of laws and regulations in place that relate to the marine environment and we want to throw the book at people. We should aggressively seek to pursue these individuals.” Rust and Palm were seen in Joe Sound, north Long Island last month by boaters who said they were bragging without remorse about eating protected wildlife to other sailboaters. They are said to have sailed ‘Sea Monkey’ south to Conception Island, Rum Cay and Clarence Town. Casuarina McKinney Lambert, executive director of the Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation (BREEF heard several other people describe how these people were laughing about getting off so lightly. “It is really a disgrace and people who behave in this way, and violate our laws should not be welcome in our country. “Ignorance is no excuse; the fines were laughably small given the crimes committed and they will serve as no deterrent at all.” Preceding the church service, members of the PLP, with Sir Lynden’s widow Dame Marguerite, willa lso lay a wreath at Sir Lynden’s grave site. The recent furor surrounding Sir Lynden was sparked over the pasttwo weeks following an explosive I nsight article written by T he Tribune’s managing editor John Marquis. The article, the result of an interview with a former PLP treasurer, claimed that the former PrimeM inister received money from drug king pin Joe Lehder, who had his headquarters in Norman’s Cay. Mr Chauncey Tynes, Sr, also believest hat his pilot son, Chauncey, Jr, who is alleged to have flown money shipments for Joe Lehder at Norman’s C ay to Sir Lynden, was killed because he knew too much. Additionally, another front-page article called into q uestion the nationality of the former Prime Minister, citing sources who claim that Sir Lynden was in fact born in Jamaica in the small town of Cotton Tree. the man lose buckets of blood on the historic stone steps as he fran-t ically called for ambulance services stationed at the PrincessM argaret Hospital less than 100 ft away. T he pastor ran to the man as soon as he fell at around 3pm on Tuesday. He said he had seen the man, who was wearing a yellow shirt and khaki trousers, waiting anxiously for a prescription in the Princess Margaret Hospital Clin i c as pharmacy staff idly gossiped among themselves. A s he left the clinic in a hurry, Rev Cooper said the man, who h as not as yet been identified by police, walked up the Queen’s Staircase and fell on the platform about half-way up at around 3pm on Tuesday. Pastor Cooper rushed to his side as he was lying face forward o n the steps, moaning. He said his nose was broken, the bones in his f orehead were broken and blood and puss were pouring out of ag ash on the left side of his head. He called 911 repeatedly and r an to the hospital where he shouted for staff to find a doctor for the dying man who he estimates was around 50 years old. B ut Pastor Cooper said security and administration staff seemedt o be in no hurry to help, and the doctor took his time as he walked up the steps. “When the doctor looked at him he moved him on his back t he blood was just dripping out of the gash on the top left of hisf orehead,” Pastor Cooper said. “There were like three sink fulls o f blood and puss on the ground.” The doctor took the man’s pulse and confirmed he was living, but he continued to lose blood, and consciousness, for another 15 m inutes before paramedics arrived with a stretcher, PastorC ooper said. H e was finally taken to hospital 45 minutes after he fell, PastorC ooper claims. “It wasn’t the fall that was fatal, i t was their negligence, and slow response that killed the man,” he alleged. “He would have been messed up because of the fall, but he diedb ecause he lost so much blood and because they didn’t react faste nough. “It’s not like they did everything they could, they didn’t do anything. “That man died because it was t heir fault. “They don’t care and this can n ot go on.” Princess Margaret Hospital did n ot respond to calls before T he Tribune went to press. Dr Davidson Hepburn from the Department Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation ( AMMC) confirmed on Wednesday the steps are consistentlym aintained and are in good repair. sure in favour of more bond and in some instances even cash. "That's typical after periods of volatility, so I can say that there has been interest in doing that," said Vice-president of Colonial Pension Services Larry Gibson. This move would be a good one for persons close to retirement who need a quick return on their investment, he said. But for younger investors, who may be cautious about investing in this current climate he advised them to wait the storm out. "If you're a young person with a very long time to retirement, the empirical evidence suggests that you should ride it out. Because you are buying in essence the stocks at a huge discount, given their declines, you're actually bringing down the average costs and in the long term you would be rewarded for it. After this recession is done and we are on the road to recovery, you would look back on this period and say this is a period where you got phenomenal value." According to one adviser, government bonds are especially attractive because they can be easily resold before the bond reaches maturity without a penalty. President of CFAL Anthony Ferguson said he hasn't seen a huge number of seasoned investors moving from equity shares to bonds. He said it is a route new investors are taking because of concerns over the economy and company earnings over the next 12 to 18 months. "Most new money is heading into the bond market and you have select investors who see opportunities or see undervalued securities, who are quietly picking up undervalued equity securities. I wouldn't say that people are moving from equity to bonds, I think what people are doing is, new investments or new cash that they have they are buying more bonds and preference shares. Last year, equity markets on the Bahamas Investment and Securities Exchange (BISX per cent. But unlike international counterparts, the local exchange market is shielded f rom the economic crisis crippling sectors a broad, according to insiders. Still, the recent provisional liquidation of insurance company CLICO (Bahamas and the current economic downturn have some investors worried about losing their finances. But Mr Gibson said the two circumstances are completely independent and should not cloud investors' decisions. "They're different things whether you're in a recession or whether you're in an expansion, they are individual companies that are either poorly managed or make mistakes. So that's not purely driven by the current market cycles, it's driven by lack of adherence to diversification and risk management principals. His advice to investors in the current climate continue to invest in the local market but research prospective companies first. "There are still good, well-managed companies out there that even though their price has gone down over the long-term 10 years or more you would be well compensated. “If your investment horizon is short, then c learly you need to be more cautious," he s aid. F ROM page one New investors trading in equity shares for more stable bonds Claim that man died because hospital staff took more than 40 minutes to respond FROM page one Man dies after sever e beating FROM page one BASRA locates boats used by crew involved in iguana slaughter, conch harvesting F ROM page one PLP to hold service honouring Sir Lynden Pindling’s birth F ROM page one SIRLYNDEN P INDLING

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JUNIOR GIRLS Queen’s College20 St. Augustine’s 14 C.H Reeves13 Long Island 11 Bishop Michael Eldon10T .A Thompson10 L .W Young6 N orth Andros6 St. Andrew’s6 St. Anne’s5 Moore’s Island5 Central Eleuthera4 Zion Christian3 L.N Coakley3 H.O Nash1 INTERMEDIATE GIRLS St. Augustine’s47.5 Queen’s College16 C.V Bethel15 T .A Thompson14 T emple Christian10 North Andros9.5 C.I Gibson9 Anatol Rodgers8 N.C.A8 Moore’s Island6 S.C Bootle4 A.F Adderley3 Preston H. Albury2 C.R Walker2 Bishop Michael Eldon1 S ENIOR GIRLS S t. Augustine’s57 C .R Walker34 Queen’s College13 L .N Coakley13 Jack Hayward10 C.V Bethel9 Eight Mile Rock9 H arbour Island9 C.C Sweeting8 Doris Johnson7 Bishop Michael Eldon7C .I Gibson5 N .C.A3 J UNIOR BOYS St. Augustine’s37.5 H.O Nash23 A.F Adderley20 North Andros15P reston H. Albury13 Zion Christian10 S.C McPherson10 T.A Thompson10 Queen’s College8.5C .H Reeves8 L.N Coakley8 Long Island7 Chuch of God5 St. Andrew’s5 B ishop Michael Eldon5 Westminster5 Abaco Central4 L.W Young1 INTERMEDIATE BOYS St. Augustine’s25 B ishop Michael Eldon18 C.V Bethel16 L.N Coakley10 G.H.S10 Abaco Central9C entral Eleuthera8 Jack Hayward8 St. John’s6 Doris Johnson6 Queen’s College6S outh Andros6 S.C McPherson6 C.I Gibson5 St. Anne’s4 Long Island4 C .R Walker4 P reston Albury3 S.C Bootle1 Anatol Rodgers1 SENIOR BOYS C .R Walker41 C .V Bethel22 S t. Augustine’s19 Jack Hayward13 C.C Sweeting11 N.C.A10 Temple Christian10 Long Island9 L.N Coakley7 Doris Johnson6 C.I Gibson5 St. John’s 4 Moore’s Island3 Abaco Central 2 Jordan Prince William1 C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t 322-2188/9 Ill o f the international players in a bid to try and assemble wherever possible the best national team in their quest to make a run at qualifying for the 2012 Olympic Games in London. But Hepburn said they don’t h ave a shortage of players to accomplish that feat. Their problem is and will continue to be finding the financial resources to achieve their goal. “When we reach to Centro, it’s a fight for us because of countries like Cuba, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands, Jamaica and others,” Hepburn said. “We’ve competed with them. In fact our last team fought well. We’ve been losing to Cuba by four points the most and we held Puerto Rico right to the fourth quarter where the point deferential showed where they won by about seven or so.” The challenge, according to Hepburn, is that the players are spread so “far and wide” which makes it difficult for the federation to assemble the collegiate and professional players to come together. “Guys are saying to us that they can’t come home because of contractual agreement or summer classes,” Hepburn said. “We attempted year before last to finance bringing the guys home. “But it’s a very costly venture to assemble the national team consisting of your best players. We attempted it, the finances fell through, but this is some thing that we will continue to do.” Storr took it further and said that with team sports, as opposed to track and field, it’s easy to get an athlete to qualify in the 100 metres for the Olympics as it is for a national team. “If a guy is in Greece, how am I going to ask him to come home and I cannot pay him when he gets home?” Storr said. “If we want to take 20 guys into Exuma for one month, is this country willing to support that? “This is something that this country have to understand. Until we can get that financing, it’s going to be very difficult to get the best players in this coun try together.” To those players who are based at home and have been discouraged over the years because they come out and try out for the team and they are eventually replaced by the inter national players, Hepburn said he sympathised with them. “I always tell them that’s the reality of sports. You’re looking for your best and you want to take your best,” Hepburn said. “So when you have a better player show up late and he may have indicated or you may have indicated an interest in him, when he comes, you want to make provisions for him. “But I don’t think it was blatant. It’s not something that was already planned. A guy comes home because we leave the window open for him. If his skills surpass the guy that is here, the coach would take him.” Hepburn said they were going to invite the top players to come out and try out for the team to ensure that they were going to be able to field the best team. The only way the federation can get around it and not discourage the players, Hepburn said they will probably take a look at forming a A and B team. And Storr said there was no reason why the federation couldn’t have a standing national home team that could be in place to compete against the vis iting teams that came in to play in exhibition games. “Most of these players come home, they get fat and out of shape and then they blame the coaches,” Storr said. “Don’t get me wrong, we have enough tal ent at home to represent this country.” But he said if the local players didn’t bring their game up to standard, they would continue to get left behind when the international players came home to try out. FROM page 14 Federation select national coaches B AAA NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS rison in 2001. Rolle set a new mark in the Senior Girls’ 1500m when she narrowly surpassed the 15-year old mark of 4:58.74 set in 1994 by Lucille Guerrier. Rolle finished well ahead of the field in 4:58.46s. Other record breakers on the day included S.C McPherson’s Avery Thompson in the Junior Boys’ javelin and Bishop Michael Eldon’s Johnathon Farquharson in the Intermediate Boys’ 100m, and Leonardo Ferguson in the Senior Boys’ Shot Put. Thompson’s throw of 43.40m beat the year old mark of 36.97m set by Marcus Russell, Farquharson’s time of 10.72s easily beat the 18-year old mark of 10.71s set by Quinton Bain, and Ferguson’s throw of 14.81m was barely challenged by the remainder of the field to take hold of the event record. In the final event of the day, the Senior Boys’ 100m, a heated battle produced the country’s first pair of qualifiers for the upcoming Junior Pan Am Games. Temple Christian’s Warren Fraser and SAC’s Marcus Thompson finished in that order and surpassed the standard of 10.60s. Fraser claimed the National title in 10.50s while Thompson finished in 10.55s. The three-day meet continues today, with day two expected to feature highlights on the track with the finals of the 3000m Steeplechase, sprint hurdles, 400m and in the field the triple jump, high jump, long jump and shot put in various divisions. SAC on top at the end of day one F ROM page 15 21ST BAAA’S NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS DIVISIONAL RANKINGS AFTER day one of the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations’ 21st National High School Championships, the St. Augustine’s College Big Red Machine dominated the leaderboard, heading four of the six contested divisions.

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 13 BASEBALL JBLN SCHEDULE Here’s a look at the Junior Baseball League of Nassau’s schedule of games this weekend at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams: T T E E E E B B A A L L L L S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 11 am Raptors vs Sand Gnats; 1 pm Grasshoppers vs Sidewinders; 3 pm Knights vs Blue Claws. C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H 10 am Angels vs Astros; 12:30 pm Blue Jays vs Cubs; 3 pm Athletics vs Diamond Backs. M M I I N N O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E 10 am Red Sox vs Royals; 12:30 pm Mets vs Rays. M M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E 12:30 pm Reds vs Mariners; 3 pm Indians vs Marlins. J J U U N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E 10 am Dodgers vs Twins; 12:30 pm Yankees vs Cardinals. S S E E N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E 3 pm (Saturday 3 pm (Sunday CYCLING NPCA TRACK RESULTS The 'Mid-Week Track Series' began under dark clouds, but the track cyclists came out ready to ride. The youth took over and began the event; all indications told us this series would bev ery exciting. The standard has been set. Robert the 'Penetrator' Bethell has blazed the track and all other cyclists will have to gear up as the track races will get h ot!!! The quote for these track events is 'Take No Prisoners'. Results: Two-lap Time Trial (1/2 mile Henry Kline, 1min 16.41 sec; Robert Butler, 1min 21.15 sec; Peter Graham, *1min 24.22 sec; Antinece Simmons, *1min 30.41 sec; Justin Minnis, *1min 30.81 sec; Amanda Graham, 1min 34.81 sec; Hayden Graham, *1min 40.34 sec; Larry Rus-s ell, 2min 04.12 sec. The public is invited to come out and join the fun every Wednesday at the race track starting at 6 pm. BASKETBALL B SC SCHEDULE Here’s a look at the schedule of games on Saturday in the Baptist Sports Council’s 2009 Joyce Minus Basketball Classic at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex: C C o o u u r r t t O O n n e e – 10 am Latter-Day No.2 vs Faith United (15 am Golden Gates vs Latter-Day Saints (15 Gates vs Latter-Day (19 Seat (19M Saints vs Ebenezer (M B ible (M C C o o u u r r t t T T w w o o – 10 am Macedonia vs Temple Fellowship (15 am Temple Fellowship vs Miracle Working COG (19 Macedonia vs Golden Gates (L ian Tabernacle (M listic Center (M (M sports NOTES SPECIAL athletes from Nassau will travel to Grand Bahama this weekend to participate in the annual TennisT ournament, according to Special Olympics Director, Basil Christie. Ten athletes, coached by Bradley Bain, have been training diligently all year fort his special event, and are e xcited about the opportunity to bring home their share of medals. During the course of the year Special OlympicsB ahamas organises competitions in all of the sports offered. T he tennis tournament is the first of the year. In May, the annual Nationa l Games features the sports o f Bocce, Track & Field and Swimming. In June, the athl etes participate in a Judo tournament. In December, Special Olympics will host the annual Caribbean Invitational Basketball Tournament. This is the 14th year for the Tennis Tournament and Loretta Parris, Director for Special Olympics in Grand Bahama, promised that this will be the best one ever. T he 25-member team in G rand Bahama is coached by Olivia Mackey, who boasts of t he strength of her team and is proud of the progress her team has made over the years. The all-day event is scheduled to begin at 9 am at the Kwan Yin tennis courts and the public is invited to show up to cheer the athletes on and witness their athletic skills in this sport. THOMPSON TRADING YOUTH CUP WINNERS Special athletes prepare for tennis M embers of the Doris Johnson Marlins rugby team pose after winning the recent Thompson Trading Youth Cup recently. The team defeated Queens College in the finals, with a score of 15-10. Pictured, from left, are Sean Kemp, Assistant Coach Andy Bodie, Patrick Johnson, Branden Thompson, Michael Clarke, Ajayi Clarke, James Rollins, Charles Martin, George Pratt and Coach Kevin Salabie. S t e f a n o A . J o h n s o n / T r i b u n e s t a f f C OACH B radley Bain with athletes Kevin Archer and Zekuumba Major. P hoto/Basil Christie.

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ALTHOUGH there is some uncertainly as to whether or not all of the international tourna ments will be held this year, the Bahamas Basketball Federation have assembled its core of coaches to get the national teams ready. At a press conference yesterday in the foyer of the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, federation president Lawrence Hepburn said the coaching staff will com prise of both the junior and senior national teams. The first international tournament will be the Cadet Under-15 girls heading to the Centro Basketball Cadet from June 3-7 in Ciudad, Victoria, Mexico. The team will be headed by Felix ‘Fly’ Musgrove. And over the same time in Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico for the boys’ Centro Basket Cadet, the team will be managed by Donnie Culmer. The head coach will be Quentin Hall from Grand Bahama. In July, the under-16 male will travel to the Centro Basketball at a site yet to be named. The head coach of the team will be Chevy Simmons. And the junior under-16 girls will also compete in the Centro Basketball. Sherelle Cash will travel as the head coach. The Bahamas won both the junior girls and boys tournament last year to earn the rights to travel this year. With the Bahamas being a possible host for the women’s Caribbean Basketball Champi onships, the federation have selected Dr. Linda Davis as the women’s head coach. There’s no venue or date for the men, but the federation has selected Charlie ‘Softly’ Robbins from Grand Bahama of the men’s team. Look at the box for a complete list of the coaching staff for all of the teams. If the CBC Tournaments are not held, Hepburn said the senior men’s team will move on to play in the Centro Basket in Puerto Rico after finishing fourth at the last tournament. The ladies, however, did not qualify for the Centro Basket. Sharon Storr, secretary gen eral of the federation, said the federation has gone through a vigorous selection progress in putting the coaching staff together. “We’ve not put any stipulations on when their terms will end and the reason is because we’re a new federation coming in,” Storr said. “But if you look at the coaching staff, there’s been some movement, but some positive movement in our thinking to where we want to be when we start qualifying again.” As for the qualifying process that they have to go through, Hepburn said the federation will definitely be looking at all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n By RENALDO DORSETT S ports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net WITHthree days to determine the top high school track and field athletes in the country, perennial Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations champions sit atop the leaderboard in s everal divisions after day one. A fter day one of the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations’ 21st National High School Championships, the St. Augustine’s College Big Red Machine dominated the leaderboard, heading four of the six contested divisions. The 21-time Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations champions lead both the Junior and Intermediate Boys along with the Intermediate and Senior B oys. T he Queen’s College Comets a nd C.R Walker Knights head the remaining divisions, with the Comets leading the Junior Girls and the Knights outfront in the Senior Boys. The Big Red Machine holds their most commanding advantage in the Intermediate Girls’ division with 47.5 points, 31.5 points ahead of the Comets’ 16. In the Senior Girls’ SAC leads the field with 57 points, 23 points ahead of the Knights’ 34 and in the Junior Boys’ boast a 14.5 point advantage with 37.5 points ahead of the H.O Nash Lions’ 23. The Big Red Machine received a number of standout performances from a well balanced team in the sprints, middle distance, in the field and a pair of record breaking outings from Byron Ferguson and Hughnique Rolle. Ferguson set a new record in the Junior Boys Javelin with a heave of 56.65m. The two-sport star, also a softball standout, beat the previous mark of 53.17m set by Eljin MorC M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 I NSIDE Local sports news NCA’s Leonardo Ferguson set a new record in senior boys shot put with a throw of 14.81m. BBF HEADS TO B IMINI T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 12 SAC on top at the end of day one B AAA 21 ST N ATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS CHAMPIONSHIP

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n B y KATHRYN C AMPBELL Bahamas Information Services WORK on the completion of the Magistrates Court Com p lex on Nassau and South S treets has recommenced and is steadily progressing. Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant recently led at eam of ministry officials to inspect the progress to date. Copeland Moxey, senior a rchitect with the Ministry of Works, said work on the structure began in February. He said the complex comprises at wo-storey structure that will h ouse a total of 12 courts. Six courts, holding cells, administrative offices, and a police station will be located on the ground floor. The sec ond floor will accommodate j uvenile and family courts, two c ivil courts, library space and s upport offices. The attic will consist of two additional courts and office spaces. Mr Moxey said the remain ing major work to be completed includes landscaping, parking, plumbing, electrical, air-conditioning and installat ion of a back-up generator system. Adler Minus of Adler Con struction was awarded the over $6.4 million contract for construction of the complex. The work is expected to be completed in a year’s time. Mr C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By ERIC ROSE MINISTER of Education Carl Bethel led senior ministry officials and Catholic education stakeholders on a tour of the new Aquinas College campus site on Gladstone Road on Wednesday, calling the progress made so far “wonderful.” “In these hard economic times it is really uplifting to come and see not only a building site, but a building site that is being aggressively pursued at the very highest standards,” Minister Bethel said. “If you look around you will see that not only is the quality of thework at an extremely high level, but also the technology that is being used by these Bahamian builders is at the highest level.” Mr Bethel said the contractors learned to use such new technolo gy while working on major con struction jobs. “They have been able to learn, assimilate, and now, to apply all of these skills in other jobs throughout our country, so we see an example here of the quality of their work,” he said. Construction started in October 2008 and is expected to be completed in July 2009, with about 500 students expected to use the cam-p us. President of Woslee Construction Ashley Glinton, who directed the tour, said it is a very aggressive schedule. “The quality of work is secondto-none and I must congratulate the subcontractors who have been working on the project,” he said. A rchbishop of Nassau Rev Patrick Pinder joined the group on the tour and pointed out various areas of interest to them. “This year is the 120th anniver sary of Catholic Education in the Bahamas and this particular endeavour that we are undertaking this year is but one more express ion of the vitality of Catholic edu cation in the Bahamas and our continued commitment to the social development of this country,” Archbishop Pinder said. Minister Bethel said that he was also “gratified” to see that the Roman Catholic Board of Education has embraced, in such ana ggressive way, the whole concept of the diversification of education through enhanced technology training with three science labs, auto repair and other vocational training courses available on the new campus. He said: “All of these are aimed at equipping thousands and new g enerations of young Bahamians with a full range of skills necessary to assist more and more Bahamians to assume greater positions of ownership in the Bahamian econ omy so that we are no longer focusing in education upon merely creating good workers, but to create good citizens and good corpor ate and business leaders.” MINISTER OF EDUCATION Carl Bethel (centre ( right) points out an area on the new Aquinas College campus. To the left of Minister Bethel is president of Woslee Construction Ashley Glinton. L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S Minister Bethel tours new Aquinas College campus site M INISTER OF EDUCATION C arl Bethel (centreright a t plans for the new Aquinas College as president of Woslee Construction Ashley Glinton points out cert ain buildings. P UBLIC WORKS a nd Transport N eko Grant (left nent secretary Colin Higgs s tand on the steps outside the M agistrates Court Complex presently under construction on Nassau and South Streets. N EKO GRANT , Minister of Public Works and Transport, chats with director Gordon Major ash e points to one of the rooms o n the ground floor of the Mag istrates Court Complex present ly being constructed on Nassau and South Streets. Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . Construction progresses on Magistrates Court Complex L etisha Henderson / BIS Minus said his company initially met extremely filthy conditions on the interior ande xterior of the court structure and had to hire a company to do extermination and generalc leaning. “While starting the job was difficult, we are com fortable and confident now that we are on track with p utting the job on schedule. W e anticipate a lot of subwork that will speed up the process of the job tremen d ously,” he said. Mr Minus said that the attic has been poured and his company is working with the engineers and architect on final designs for the metal roof. He explained that the original plan was for the roof to be made of wood. “We’re in the final stages of pricing a metal roof. We hope to mobilise that by the end of this week. It has a six-week delivery time. We’re hoping that if all goes on schedule once the roof is here, we can put the complete job back on schedule,” he said. The project management team includes Richard Green and Martin Minus, and subcontractors James Morley of Professional Maintenance Ser vices, Lauren Basden of Basden Elevator, Ossie Neymour and James Bain.

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.56 $3.31 $3.60 for a better lifeHEALTH INSURANCE SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com call us today at 396-1300 A SUBSIDIARY OF A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating healthcare medical fund raisers long lines at clinics in debt for lifecustomized health plan with 24/7 customer service Dismissed staff: Still eligible for unemployment benefit funding Abaco Markets’ 4% of revenue profits target n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Government yesterday pledged that the new Bahamian communications industry regulator will have “greater inde pendence” from it and be more transparent, plus staffed by personnel with “international regulatory skills”, its financing based on revenues levied as a percentage of licensee income. Unveiling the responses to the consultation on telecommunications/communications regulatory reform, the Government and its Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC privatisation committee received “general support” from telecoms operators on its proposal to create a “new, con verged and strengthened” regulator that would supervise not only their industry but all communications sectors such as radio and television. R R e e p p l l a a c c e e Such a regulator would likely replace the existing Public Utilities Commission (PUC only supervises the telecoms industry. At various stages in its nineyear, the PUC has come under fire from various parties for an alleged lack of independence from government, and failing to regulate the industry effectively. In its response to the consultation feedback, the Government confirmed that it planned to fully or partially repeal the PUC Act, the Telecommunications Act, the Television Regulatory Authority Act, the BTC Act and the Broadcasting Act. In the PUC’s case, it would be replaced by a Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA Government pledges ‘more independence’ for telecom regulator * Acknowledges need for ‘wholesale change to the effectiveness, efficiency and independence’ of enlarged communications industry supervisor * Unveils plans for Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority to replace PUC, with focus on transparency and bringing in ‘international skills’ * Five Acts to be repealed fully or partially , and replaced by three new pieces of legislation SEE page 7B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter robards@tribunemedia.net SOME Bahamas-based shipping companies yesterday reported a 10 per cent decline in twenty-foot equipment unit (TEU into Nassau for the year-todate, but others said they had seen “no decline in revenue”. Garth Rolle, port manager at Tropical Shipping, told Tri bune Business that container volumes had been fluctuating as global fuel prices continu ally rose and fell. Shippers see 10% container volume decline * But other s sa y ‘no dec line in r e v en ue’ SEE page 6B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net A CENTURY-old building at the corner of downtown Nassau’s Dowdeswell and Deveaux Streets has received a highpriced facelift, while preserving the legacy built-up by a sandwichs hop owner who operated out of the premises for almost 56 years. The building, which houses The Architectural Studio, The Scrapbook Cottage and The Studio Deli, and opens next month, was once the home of a young Long Island man and his family,a nd is said to be almost 114-years-old. Michael Moss, owner of the building and partner in The Architectural Studio, told Tribune Business that a lady name Mrs Restoration shows centur yold site is far fr om ‘Scrap’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Abaco Markets’ president yesterday said the company’s financial performance was ‘still not where we need it to be” despite recording a 144 per cent net income increase during its fiscal 2009 fourth quarter, with the retail group “working towards” its ultimate target of a net profit equivalent to 4 per cent of annual net sales. Gavin Watchorn said the BISX-listed group’s continuing operations, which exclude the now-closed Cost Right Abaco, had generated net profits for the year to January 31, 2009, that were equivalent to 2.6 per cent of net revenues. Including the ceased businesses, the figure had been “just above 2 per cent”. Abaco Markets had generated net income of $1.533 million for the three months to January 31, 2009, compared to $628,000 the year before. SEE page 4B * Company ‘still not where we need to be’ despite 144% fourth quarter net income rise, almost bringing it level with prior year comparatives, driven by 17.1% sales rise * BISX-listed retail group ‘six to nine months ahead’ of liquidity goal, eyeing ‘net cash position’ on ongoing basis for first time in three-six months * Writes off $126,000 receivable owed by Ken Hutton group on Cost Right Turks deal * Expecting Domino’s Pizza net income to rise in this fiscal year Gavin Watchorn SEE page 5B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Bahamas Employers Confederation’s (BECon ident yesterday expressed concern that workers who either quit or were dismissed with just cause from their jobs would still qualify for a portion of the Government’s proposed unemployment benefit programme, although he commended the scheme as “overdue” and “providing benefits to our society as a whole”. Brian Nutt acknowledged that unemployment benefits were a key plank that had been missing from the Bahamas’ social security package, and needed to be implemented, but detailed several concerns that the business community had with the scheme as currently proposed. He explained to Tribune Business that “one of our con cerns” was that all unemployed persons would be eligible to participate in the scheme and receive some level of benefits, regardless of whether they lost their job through their own BECon chief expresses concern over proposed scheme, but acknowledges it is ‘overdue’ and will provide wider social benefits S EE page 2B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX i s “soon” moving back into downtown Nassau’s financial centre through its new home in the Bay Street property h ousing FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas branch, as the exchange pre-p ares to expand staff in preparation for new business s treams. Keith Davies, BISX’s chief executive, told Tribune Busin ess y esterday that while he could not provide a firm date for the exchange’s move from its existing Village Road base, due to the fact that final worko n its new first floor premises was ongoing, the property was set to be renamed 50 E xchange Place. He explained that BISX needed expanded premises toc ope with the new business streams it expected to handle t his year, with the exchange set to take over the whole first f loor. Apart from the exchange itself, Mr Davies said the new headquartersw ould also be home to its BISX Global initiative and “a third business” related to itsp lanned Central Securities Depository (CSD D D o o w w n n t t o o w w n n BISX is moving back into the downtown area, the prem ier financial centre of the Bahamas,” Mr Davies told Tribune Business . “The new l ocation is downtown in the old Barclays building, now the F irstCaribbean building, on Bay Street, and we’re moving on to the first floor. We erect e d our sign in the lobby of that building yesterday.” The BISX chief executive explained that the exchange needed to move from theb uilding it currently shares with FTC (Fast Track Construction) because “over the course of this year, BISX will be expanding its complement o f employees, hopefully as we experience an uptick in our ability to provide services tot he business we already have” Apart from BISX Global, he added: “We must plan ford evelopments to come and be ready to execute them. There w ill be a third business in there, which we will announce when it comes into existence.I t’s related to the Central Securities Depository we are d eveloping as well. We need new premises for equipment and growth potential. We seea n expansion of operations.” Mr Davies said BISX was l ooking to add another three to four persons, based on its analysis of current employeen eeds, and the extra staff needed as additional business came on stream. Two employ ees were likely to be added in the short-term, and anothert wo at a later date. BISX’s first stay in downBISX moves back to downtown Bay S EE page 2B

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town Nassau, when it was based at the British Colonial Hilton’s Centre of Com-m erce, was not a happy one. The exchange and its then-senior executives were criticised for over-spending on rent, salaries and other expenses, especiallyw hen anticipated business streams failed to materialise, and BISX plunged into h eavy losses. Bailout That ultimately resulted in a governm ent bailout, via the Central Bank of the Bahamas, but the exchange has since regained a more solid financial footing. M r Davies said yesterday that whereas the first foray into downtown had been b ased on anticipated future business streams the listing and trading of government debt securities, and privatisa-t ions of the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC utilities the current move was “predicated on business in hand”. W hile the past had been based on business and revenue streams that never materialised, Mr Davies said the new move was founded on “collaboration withe xisting members, as well as new partn ers. This is not based on what we’d like to see. It’s done on the premise of what we see. “There is a small element of what is to come, but that is grounded on what has been done and we see a clear path to growth. This is more realism grounded, and is part of the ‘small steps’ philosophyI ’ve been employing for years.” M r Davies added that BISX was “still pretty close” to the break even point f inancially, although it was not there yet, a nd he would “not be comfortable” until the exchange had passed that point. What I’ve always said is that one of t he things we want to do is get some of the business streams we’ve been talking about to the bottom line,” he added. “The sooner we do that, it will put the compan y in a good position to weather difficult economic times. “The company needs to develop the business streams it has planned to cont ribute to the building of its bottom line. We do need to turn on and develop these business streams.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following items: %XLOGLQJVWUXFWXUHH[WHULRUHQYHORSHH[WHULRUFDQRSLHVDQG UHODWHGVXEWUDGHSDFNDJHV *HQHUDO5HTXLUHPHQWVIRU*HQHUDO&RQWUDFWLQJVHUYLFHVIRU WKHRYHUDOOSURMHFWDQG &RQVWUXFWLRQ0DQDJHPHQW)HHIRUWHQGHULQJWKHEDODQFHRI VXEWUDGHDQGVXSSOLHUZRUNSDFNDJHVDWDODWHUGDWH The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e. mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are notincluded in this Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230 General Contractor in 2009. The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room located at the NAD Project office. TENDERC-230 General Contract, Stage 1Contact: TRACI BRISBYContract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project Ph: (24224217 P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE fault or factors such as redundancy. Mr Nutt said employees who were dismissed by companies for cause, such as breaching regulations or stealing, would not be disqualified from receiving unemployment benefits for the entire 13week (three month receive them. “Those persons are deemed to be disqualified,” Mr Nutt said of Bahamian workers dismissed for cause, “but the disqualification period will not be more than six weeks. A person fired for committing theft will receive seven weeks of benefits, because the dis-q ualification will affect only six weeks of benefits.” Mr Nutt said the unemployment benefit scheme, which the Government hoped to implement from April 20, 2009, onwards, would be legislated via amendments to the National Insurance Act and its accompanying regulations. The BECon president said he wanted the National Insurance Act to be brought into line “with current labour standards”, as it talked about dividing benefits over six days instead of a five-day work week. And a further concern, Mr Nutt explained, was that the unemployment benefit scheme would, in the long-term, place an extra burden on employers to fund it when they had already been mandated, by the Employment Act, to provide notice pay (severance or termination pay) to laid-off employees based on their years of service. For line staff, this amounts to two weeks’ pay with or in lieu of notice, and two weeks for every year worked up to six months’ worth of pay. For managerial staff, it is one month’s pay with notice or in lieu of notice, and one month’s pay for each year worked up to 12 months (one year As a result, Mr Nutt said BECon had “asked the question” as to whether given that employers had already handed over these funds to laid-off staff unemployment benefit kicked in immediately that their employment ceased, or if it started after their severance pay period expired. J J e e o o p p a a r r d d y y If it was immediately, Mr Nutt suggested that this might place the unemployment benefit’s sustainability in “more” jeopardy. “If the benefits are to kick-in two weeks after an individual stops working, the Government should revisit the Employment Act and amend notice, and do some offsetting” between notice pay and unemployment benefit,” Mr Nutt suggested. Under the proposed unemployment benefit scheme, benefits will be paid two weeks in arrears. This means that, if the scheme comes into effect on April 20, the first benefits would be paid on May 4, 2009. The proposed scheme, although initially financed by $20 million transferred from the National Insurance Board’s (NIBb enefits branch, and supplemented by the Government’s consolid ated fund if needed, will in the long-term be financed by employer/employee contributions. These will be split 50/50 between employer and employee, and in total be equivalent to 1 per cent of the insurable wage ceiling. Given that current NIB contributions were 8.8 per cent, split 5.4 per cent/3.4 per cent between employer/employee, Mr Nutt said the unemployment benefit contribution would take this to 5.9 perc ent/3.9 per cent or 9.8 per cent in total. The BECon president said his only other concern regarding the scheme related to workers still in employment over the age of 65. Unemployment benefit was only available to those aged under 65, but employers were still expected to contribute to the scheme on behalf of those above this age, even though the workers in question did not have to. Mr Nutt said he was told this was an “oversight”, and would be corrected before the National Insurance Act amendments were tak en to Parliament. The BECon president acknowledged that unemployment benefits were, along with “medical benefits, health insurance wise”, which the Government was looking to provide through its prescription drug programme, were the two missing strands from the Bahamas’ social security programme. Mr Nutt said the proposed benefits were “half of what the benefits are in Barbados”, where the scheme was funded by a 1.5 per cent contribution and provided 60 per cent of the insurable wage as compared to the Bahamas’ 50 per cent. The Bahamas’ scheme would provide benefits for 13 weeks, and if the initial $20 million was exhausted, the Government will sub sidise it from the Consolidated Fund until the employer/employee contributions were legislated. While the Government was looking to introduce this by January 1, 2010, the timing would depend on the economy. Dismissed staff: Still eligible for unemployment benefit funding F ROM page 1B Keith Davies BISX moves back to downtown Bay F ROM page 1B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 3B 0$1$*(5,17,217(&+12/2*< 2QHRIRXUPDMRUFOLHQWVVHHNVWRUHFUXLWTXDOLHGLQIRUPDWLRQWHFKQRORJ\SURIHVVLRQDO ZLWKH[SHULHQFHLQQDQFLDODQGFXVWRPHUVHUYLFHDSSOLFDWLRQVIRUWKHDERYHSRVLWLRQ 48$/,),&$7,216 0DVWHUVRIFLHQFHGHJUHHLQ&RPSXWHUFLHQFHRUHTXLYDOHQW (LJKWRUPRUH\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQFOXGLQJKDQGVRQWHFKQLFDOH[SHULHQFHDQG WZR\HDUVPLQLPXPPDQDJLQJDQLQIRUPDWLRQWHFKQRORJ\GHSDUWPHQWLQODUJH RUJDQL]DWLRQZLWKFRPSOH[PXOWLYHQGRUPXOWLSODWIRUPDQGGLVWULEXWHG FRPSXWLQJHQYLURQPHQW 9LVLRQDU\ZKRFDQDQDO\]HSUREOHPVZLWKLQWKHFRQWH[WRIFRUSRUDWHVWUDWHJ\ EDODQFLQJWKHFRQVLGHUDWLRQRIIDFWVSULRULWLHVUHVRXUFHVFRQVWUDLQWVDQG DOWHUQDWLYHV 5(63216,%,/,7,(6 /HDGPRQLWRUDQGGHYHORSWHDPRILQIRUPDWLRQWHFKQRORJ\SURIHVVLRQDOVWR GHOLYHUFXVWRPHUIRFXVHGVHUYLFHDQGVHWSHUIRUPDQFHH[SHFWDWLRQVWRDFKLHYH H[FHOOHQFH 0DQDJHWKHGHYHORSPHQWLPSOHPHQWDWLRQDQGGD\WRGD\RSHUDWLRQVRIWKH ,QIRUPDWLRQ7HFKQRORJ\GHSDUWPHQW $FWLYHO\FRQWULEXWHWRWKHWDFWLFDODQGVWUDWHJLFGHYHORSPHQWRILQIRUPDWLRQ WHFKQRORJ\WRVXSSRUWWKHRUJDQL]DWLRQVEXVLQHVVQHHGV $FFRXQWDEOHIRUWKHVXFFHVVIXOGHOLYHU\WRDJUHHGWLPHVFDOHVDQGZLWKLQEXGJHWRI GHSDUWPHQWDOSURMHFWVRUSURJUDPPHV $VVLVWDFFRXQWLQJDQGHQJLQHHULQJGHSDUWPHQWVLQHQVXULQJDFFXUDWHDQGWLPHO\ SUHSDUDWLRQRIUHSRUWV 5(48,5(0(176 7KLVLVVHQLRUSRVLWLRQWKDWZLOOUHTXLUHSURIHVVLRQDOZLWKYHU\H[WHQVLYH H[SHULHQFHLQVXSHUYLVLQJDQGFRQWUROOLQJFRPSXWHUSURIHVVLRQDOVLQQDQFLDO FXVWRPHUVHUYLFHVDQGHQJLQHHULQJDSSOLFDWLRQV 6WURQJPDQDJHPHQWDQGFRPPXQLFDWLRQVVNLOOV 6WURQJWHFKQLFDODQGWURXEOHVKRRWLQJVNLOOVDQGH[SHULHQFH $ELOLW\WRZRUNXQGHUSUHVVXUH 6ROLGXQGHUVWDQGLQJRIEXVLQHVVRSHUDWLRQVDQGVWUDWHJLFSODQQLQJ &203(16$7,21 $WWUDFWLYHVDODU\DQGRWKHUEHQHWVZLOOEHFRPPHQVXUDWHZLWKWUDLQLQJDQGH[SHULHQFH :ULWWHQDSSOLFDWLRQVVKRXOGEHDGGUHVVHGWR3ULFHZDWHUKRXVH&RRSHUV 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV 3ULYDWHt&RQGHQWLDO n BRUSSELS The European Union's top offic ial said Thursday he doesn't expect a breakthrough on a globa l trade deal in talks among world l eaders next month, a ccording to t he ssociated Press . E uropean Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso said t he EU wants a World Trade Organization pact that could comb at the current recession by helpi ng to halt falling trade. " But I don't know honestly if our partners are ready as we are," he said, referring to the United S tates and India, who could not agree to a compromise during crunch negotiations last year. He said European nations would ask the Group of 20 leading world economies at a London summit on April 1-2 "to agree on a standstill, so no introduction of any protectionist measures until we come to a conclusion of the Doha trade talks." Emerging economies Brazil, Russia, India and China called last week on the G20 summit to move toward a deal on trade. Brazil and China have reaped major gains from the last two decades of freer trade with richer n ations that have helped them lift m illions out of poverty and take a bolder stance on the world stage. The sudden plunge in exports h as curbed their rapid growth and also badly hurt the world's biggest exporter, Germany, which depended almost entirely on highg lobal demand in recent years for its cars and machinery to compensate for sluggish consumption at home. But it is unclear how ready the U .S. is to strike a new trade deal. President Barack Obama has said little about his commitment to f reer global trade. Europeans w orry that a Democratic admin istration might be more protec tionist and set up trade barriers to support American firms. The U.S. Senate on Wednesday confirmed R on Kirk as the U.S. new trade r epresentative. He said he did not come to the job with "deal fever" and would look out for Ameri-c an workers. Barroso said EU nations would likely call Friday for the G20 summit to find ways to help trade by making more credit available to exporters and i mporters an idea put forward by British Prime Minister Gordon Brown. "This recession combined with ... a real recession of trade is oneo f this reasons why this crisis is assuming a greater magnitude," h e said. Czech Prime Minister Mirek Topolanek, who leads talks between EU leaders as the curr ent EU president, said the bloc was also ready to significantlyi ncrease funding for the Internat ional Monetary Fund. He would not give a figure but leaders are likely to back at least doubling the IMF's resources to $500 billion and to contributem ore than $75 billion of their money. E U nations are also likely to call for a major reform to the IMF that would give more of a say to emerging countries and see it playa stronger role as a watchdog over the global financial system. n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter One-third of Caribbean and Latin American leaders surveyed by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB Bahamas’ per capita income will experiencet he fastest growth of all nations in the region over the next three years, with only Peru expected to experience greater growth of 34.6p er cent. T he somewhat surprising survey, which polled 317 government and private sector leade rs in Latin America and the Caribbean, found that most expected average per capita income g rowth of 7.6 per cent across the region between 2009-2012. W hen it came to the Bahamas, one-third of those surveyed felt this nation would experience a fall in per capita income over that period, one-third felt it would see moderate growth the same, and one-third felt it would see fast growth. D D e e p p e e n n d d e e n n c c y y T he Bahamas was also predicted to increase its dependency on financing from international organisations by 66.7 per cent over that same t hree-year period, with only one-third thinking i ts dependency on funding sources on the IMF w ould little change. One-third of respondents also predicted that t he Government’s influence on the economy would increase between 2009-2012, while 66.7 per cent felt this would drop. “Leaders in the region expect governments to maintain or increase their influence in the economy, and they named fighting poverty and inequality as their top developmental challenge in the next four years, closely followed by reducing violence and crime and improving t he quality of education,” the survey said. “The survey shows that leaders in Latin America and the Caribbean are very worried a bout the world economy and the possible i mpacts of the crisis on poverty,” said president o f the IDB, Luis Alberto Moreno. “Multilateral organisations such as the IDB have an important anti-cyclical role to play and they must step up their support even more in coming years to meet the region’s growing n eeds.” T he findings revealed that 92 per cent of the economic leaders in the region expect GDP to grow less or slightly above the increase in population. More than two thirds of those leaders surveyed expected per capita income to fall in the next four years. According to the release, the IDB will debate t he findings of the survey at the 50th annual meeting of its board of governors in Medellin Colombia on the 27th of this month. IDB survey: Bahamas to lead on per capita income growth EU lowers hopes for trade deal at G-20 talks

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Chase operated a popular sandwich shop, opened in the 1950s, out of a section of the building that was added as ap etty shop by the original owners in 1930. He said that when Mrs Chase became too old to oper-a te the shop any longer in 2006, it remained vacant until last year, when he decided tot ransform it into a deli. Mr Moss said he had a v ision to turn the entire building, which was originally a residence with a wrap-aroundp orch and verandah, into a retail and office space. W hen he acquired the building in 2002, having rente d office space in it since 1997, he began plans to rework the s tructure and modernise the building. Mr Moss thought diversifyi ng the space and getting other businesses into it would maximise its potential. “It’s too much space for just an architectural firm,” he said. This was just two porches, so I said: ‘Why don’t I utilise this space for something’ I thoughti t was just enough space to turn it into retail space.” B ecause the building was listed as a historic landmark, Mr Moss received incentives s uch as a 25-year exemption from real property tax, and exemptions from customs dutyf or materials used in the restoration and repair of the building. Now, two successful businesses operate out of the new-l y-renovated building, and Mr Moss is hoping that the deli will be the third. K iesha Pratt, owner and operator of The Scrapbook C ottage, said her scrapbooking business has been doing well in the seven months that it has been open. Q Q u u a a i i n n t t She finds the location beneficial because of its central location and the quaint, homely space that Mr Moss created. I wanted to have that warm feeling,” she said. Ms Pratt said that scrapb ooking has become a growing craze in the Bahamas, and a fter years of her own scrapbooking, decided to share her knowledge of the hobby witho thers. “There is so much more to s crapbooking than the papers and the stickers we grew up with,” she said. She also has a dedicated room upstairs in the buildingw here she teaches lessons in scrapbooking during the week and at weekends, where interested individuals create their own personalised projects. Now, Ms Pratt is looking f orward to using the new deli to add a new offering to her product. I’ve been waiting for Michael to complete the deli a nd we’re going to implement ‘Come Scrap’ on your lunch break,” she said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Restoration shows centuryold site is far from ‘Scrap’ FROM page 1B Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you arer aising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call u s on 322-1986 and share your story. “It’s too much space for just an architectural firm,” h e said. “This was j ust two porches, so I said: ‘Why don’t I utilise this space for something’ It hought it was just e nough space to turn it into retail space.” M ichael Moss

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The more than doubling of net income for the period almost enabled the retail group to claw profits for the full-year back in line with prior year comparatives, but in the end the company fell just short at $2 million, an 8.1 per cent decrease on fiscal 2008’s $2.177 million. Mr Watchorn said that despite Abaco Markets’ relatively strong financial showing given the economic environment, and especially in the fourth quarter, the company’s reaction was “tempered”. “It’s still not where we need it to be,” he told Tribune Business. “We have a target we’re working towards, and need to be producing a net profit of 4 per cent of net revenues. It’s a good industry model. We think we can possibly g et that above 3 per cent this year, and then gradually move towards our target.” Meanwhile, Mr Watchorn said the improved sales performance had placed Aback Markets “six to nine months” ahead of where it had planned to be on its drive to enhance group liquidity/cash flow. He explained that in another three to six months, the BISXlisted retail group was likely to be in a net cash position, on an ongoing basis, for the first timeas opposed to a net overdraft position. Mr Watchorn said the last restructuring of its preference share debt had aided the liquidity drive. It did not have to repay a previously scheduled $250,000 in principal to the preference shareholders last September, as previously required, freeing up capital for opera tional purposes. The first scheduled preference share repayment is $350,000 in March 2010, and Abaco Markets has already placed more than $500,000 in a redemption fund to meet this and is adding a further $90,000 every month. Mr Watchorn said Abaco Markets should “have wellover” enough money in its redemption fund to pay more than a year’s worth of preference share redemptions when they start next year. “That’s allowed us to move much further ahead on our liquidity programme than we expected, and in the next three to six months we hope to be in a net cash position, on an ongoing basis, as opposed to a net overdraft position,” said Mr Watchorn. “We had not expecte d to be where we are for a nother six to nine months. Cash is king. “This is the closest we’ve ever been to a net cash position,” he added, explaining that two years ago Abaco Markets had been running a $5-$6 million net overdraft position. I ncome The company’s full-year net income would have exceeded the 2008 fiscal comparatives had it not been for two one-time charges taken in the fourth quarter. T he first was the $250,000 a ssociated with the closure of C ost Right Abaco, some 60-70 per cent of which was staff severance pay. The other was the writedown of $126,000 still owed on a $200,000 outstanding balance by former John S George and Freeport Concrete chief executive, Ken Hutton, for the purchase of the Cost Right store in Turks & Caicos two years ago. “When we did the transaction, part of it was a receivable,” M r Watchorn said. “We are in d iscussions with the party to try and restructure it in some way. It was just prudent for us to provide for it in full, given that the store is no longer in operation.” Abaco Markets’ fourth quar ter profit increase was driven largely by a 17.1 per cent yearover-year sales increase, with group-wide sales for the three months hitting $26.46 million through a 13 per cent rise in customer transaction volumes. Mr Watchorn said this trend had continued into the 2010 first quarter, adding: “Our February numbers look very, very good. They’re significantly above last year. Our sales growth has con tinued into the New Year and into March. “Christmas went pretty well sales wise for us. We were probably up consistently 10 per cent. But the main move in the fourth quarter financials for us was November and December. It was those two months that really contributed to the increase.” He attributed the increase in customer traffic and transactions, and the corresponding increase in sales revenues, to A baco Markets’ campaign to o ffer consumers ‘real value’ in terms of quality products at a competitive price via deals such as its ‘price cuts’ and ‘club specials’. “We’ve had a very strong campaign to try to offer value to our customers when things are not the best in the economy, and customers have responded to that through the significant increase in transactions that we’ve had, which has accounted for most of the sales increase,” Mr Watchorn said. “We’ve been able to increase customer traffic and increase s ales, while controlling costs and i nventory shrinkage, and the d ifference has dropped down to the bottom line. That’s what’s happened, and it began to hap pen for us in September and October last year.” Expense and inventory shrinkage controls had enabled Abaco Markets to reduce prices without sacrificing margins. “Our margins have increased,” Mr Watchorn explained, “because we were able to maintain shrinkage in dollar terms, a nd sales rose, so our overall g ross margins improved because shrinkage as a percentage of sales was down. “We did a much better job of buying, and we’ve been able to harness buying power as a group. We’re buying as a group, not as individual stores. That’s produced synergies in terms of logistics and lower prices by purchasing as a group. We’ve moved pretty aggressively over the last six months to increase commodities buying as a group.” Gross margins improved as a percentage of sales by 0.9 per cent, as shrink as a percentage of sales fell by 20 per cent, the absolute value remaining the same in dollar terms. Meanwhile, Mr Watchorn said the company’s Domino’s Pizza franchise was performing well, with the closure of its East Bay Street outlet having reduced costs without costing much business. While some walk-in customers had been lost, that outlet’s business byand-large had been transferred to other Domino’s branches. “We’re able to have that busin ess without the costs,” Mr W atchorn said. “Overall, Domino’s top line will be a little bit reduced this year because we won’t have East Bay Street, but we expect the bottom line to improve over last year. “Domino’s has experienced pretty much the same trends as the food side a lot more people are coming in, and customer transactions are increasing.” For the 2009 fourth quarter, Abaco Markets said expenses were at 22.6 per cent of sales, a drop from the prior year’s 24.6 per cent. For the full year, utility costs were up by $750,000, w hile 2010 first quarter liquidit y may be impacted temporaril y by business licence fee payments. “This has been a tough year to operate in a market experiencing significant challenges,” said Craig Symonette, Abaco Markets chief executive and chairman. “Despite the challenges, however, we are finally realising the economies of scale, improved group buying and efficiencies among our locations we have sought in recent years, which is t ranslating into steadily improvi ng results. Our customers are seeing the difference, our shareholders certainly will note the changes in our position and it’s the result of a lot of things coming together. “As reported earlier, we do expect a continued softening of the economy in the coming quarters, which is likely to impact our results. However, the concerted focus on driving sales through pricing, controlling expenses and continuing to improve our shrink that has delivered the stability our company needed remains our priority operating in the current market conditions.”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t&RQGHQWLDO F ROM page 1B Abaco Markets’ 4% of revenue profits target

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He said business was “definitely down” and operating costs up, but that shipmentsf our days per week continued. Mr Rolle said many other shipping companies had seen the same 10 per cent decrease in business, in terms of container throughput volume, andr evealed that there had been a decline in high-end imports coming into the Bahamas. “What you’re going to be seeing in the market is theh igher-end product diminishing, and people are going to get more of the less branded products,” he said. A nother container shipping company official told Tribune Business that their business was “subject to the same volatility of any business, asm arket forces impact the sector”. However, some companies who regularly ship goods from Miami said they had seene ither a minimal or no decline at all in container throughput volume. Revenue S eaboard Marine’s insides sales coordinator, Oralee Deveaux, said the companyh ad not seen a decrease in revenue. S he added that Seaboard Marine had restructured its rates in order to compensatef or changes in the economy, and in order to remain competitive. We are hanging in there in terms of cutbacks,” she said. T he retail sector was expected to experience a contraction due to the economic crisis, buts ome major shipping companies who move freight to the B ahamas from Miami say they have seen little change from previous years. M s Deveaux said Seaboard Marine had seen a tremendous increase in grocery ship-m ents from Miami. A Betty K representative s aid: “This part of the season is comparative to last year.” He said the company wask eeping a watchful eye on fuel costs. S eaboard Marine said they did not foresee any cutbacks or lay-offs in the future. We’re not going anywhere,” said Ms Deveaux. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.451.450.000.0700.00020.70.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.2440.26028.73.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.25010.71.79% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.002290.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.486.480.008150.4380.05014.80.77% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs1.741.58-0.160.0990.05216.03.29% 3.002.16Doctor's Hospital2.162.160.000.2400.0409.01.85% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.52034.24.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.7940.40013.23.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.05-0.029,0000.3370.15015.02.97% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8 .205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.002800.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44321.3828Colina Money Market Fund1.44320.674.37 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.739711.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525F INDEX: CLOSE 811.37 | YTD -2.82% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 19 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,654.52 | CHG -0.53 | %CHG -0.03 | YTD -57.84 | YTD % -3.38BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 28-Feb-09 6-Mar-09 31-Jan-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Shippers see 10% container volume decline * But others say ‘no decline in revenue’ FROM page one “What you’re going to be seeing in the market is the higher-end product diminishing, and people are going to get more of the less branded products.” I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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would be created by an Act of the same name. This Act is part of a threestrong proposed legislative package unveiled yesterday, the other two pieces being the Communications Bill and a Utilities Appeal Tribunal Bill. The Government acknowledged the need for “wholesale change to the effectiveness, efficiency and independence of the URCA” was required, “not only to ensure that the sector is properly regulated but also to ensure that the sector as a whole has confidence that URCA will not be subject to political or other interference”. To that end, the Government promised: “A great deal of effort is being focused on ensuring that the necessary skills (including international regulatory skills) and resources will be available, that efficient and effective internal processes are in place and that URCA will continue to act in the transparent, consultative and decisive manner with which the Government has embarked on the liberalisation process. “For example, the URCA Act will include provisions for greater transparency and independence from government and other stakeholders, and a commitment to greater openness through publishing a plan for the year and reporting on past performance.” The Government also promised that, in the absence of an overall Competition Act and an existing authority to regulate this area, competition powers “including merger provisions” would be included in the proposed Communications Act. This would allow the URCA to act as competition regulator for that sector alone, until a wider Competition Act was in place. The Government dismissed BTC’s call for the communications sector regulation to focus entirely on anti-competitive actions already taken by sector operators, instead opting for a proactive “light-touch regulatory regime” that dealt with concerns prior to those events occurring. In its feedback, BTC said it supported “the recruitment of employees from outside of the Bahamas in order to prevent bias by the regulator.... “On the issue of ethics, BTC suggests that staff working for the regulator should be held to a minimum standard of professional and ethical behaviour, a nd a code on conflicts of interest, such as enshrined in the Bahraini Telecommunications Law, might be one way to ensure this.” BTC urged that regulatory enforcement powers be strengthened, along with the ability of operators to appeal the decisions and fines it levied. It warned, though, that the judiciary had a “lack of expertise” in dealing with telecoms issues. Cable Bahamas backed BTC, urging: “In the interests of independence, employees of [telecoms] licensees should not be able to join the regulator for a specified time period after leaving the licensee, and there should be a further period during which that former employee could not work on a case involv ing their former employer.” It also urged that “predatory pricing and other anticompetitive practices be prohibited”. In response, the Government said: “The suggestions of a code of ethics and prohibitions on staff movements are ones the Government is actively considering.” Systems Resource Group (SRG works, supported the proposed regulator in general, but expressed concern over the lack of detail. When it came to financing the regulator, all three Bahamian telecoms operators and Digicel agreed that the URCA’s costs s hould be borne by all licensees. BTC urged that licence fees be used solely to cover the regulator’s costs, that no government subsidy be required to meet these, and that fees be levied on a “non-discriminatory basis”. Concern The state-owned telecoms provider expressed concern that “assessing fees base on turnover can result in bias in the fees collected”, arguing that revenues generated by telecoms operators were higher than those produced by other utilities, such as electricity and water. BTC also urged that the percentage fee levied upon licensees be varied, given that the URCA could carry over surpluses from previous years. Meanwhile, SRG argued that t he proposal to levy fees based on licensee turnover was “flawed due to the regulator having no incentive to keep costs low”. It argued that the regulator had to be kept accountable, ensuring it met international benchmarks, while “certain services should be subject to a higher fee rate to reflect the greater regulatory burden required to oversee these services”. SRG suggested that broadcasters fell within this category, while Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP needed to be considered. “Local VoIP providers should not have to pay licence fees if foreign VoIP providers do not pay,” SRG added. Financing disputes was also raised as an issue by SRG, expressing concerns in a thinl y-veiled reference to BTC - “about the costs that would arise were the incumbent to start vexatious regulatory disputes against a smaller rival. “SRG also believes that if operators are paying licence fees based on revenues, they should be relieved from paying taxes through business licences.” The Government, though, suggested that the proposal to levy different fees on different telecoms services was “too difficult to implement”. It explained: “It would require determining revenue by service type in a converged world in which services are often bundled. This is not realistic and not supported by international best practice.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 7B /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG )HEUXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Government pledges ‘more independence’ for telecom regulator F ROM page 1B The suggestions of a code of ethics and prohibitions on staff movements are ones the Government is actively considering.”


WAKE UP!

he Tribune |

(W\ ns
=USA TODAY

Pim flowin’ it

79F
68F

PARTLY
SUNNY

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.98

BISX moves
back to

=| downtown Bay





SS 3

ocVEre

Victim receives
fatal injury

in foodstore
parking lot

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A MAN who died in hospital
a day after receiving a severe
beating, leaving him with
injuries to the head, has become
the country's latest homicide
victim.

According to a statement by
Press Liaison Officer Assistant
Superintendent Walter Evans,
46-year-old Bradley Smith was
in the area of Wulff and Village
Roads around 6 pm Tuesday
when he received his fatal
injury.

Yesterday family of the vic-
tim said Smith was beaten to
death in a foodstore’s parking
lot. Speaking to ZNS, Smith's
brother appealed to the public
to come forward with informa-
tion that could lead to an arrest.

Police said the victim was tak-
en to hospital where he died
sometime before 8 o’clock
Wednesday night.

ASP Evans did not release
the circumstances surrounding
Smith's injury but said police
were treating his death as a
homicide.

SEE page 10

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

FUNERAL SERVICE — Mrs
Nancy Kelly, widow of David
Kelly for whom funeral ser-
vices were held at Christ
Church Cathedral yesterday
afternoon, is pictured with
her eldest son, Andrew, her
granddaughter Avery, who
read verses from Ecclesi-
astes at her grandfather’s
funeral, and Shelle Kelly,
Mrs Kelly’s daughter-in-law
and wife of her second son,
Gregory. Mr Kelly, 76, own-
er of Kelly's Home Centre,
Marathon Mall, died in New
York on March 11.

e SEE PAGE TWO

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

eS
ea!
a:

SPUN Sy

Man dies after
heating























BASRA locates boats

used by crew involved

in iguana slaughter,
conch harvesting

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

SAILBOATS used by crew
involved in the slaughter of a
protected iguana and harvest-
ing of juvenile conch have been
located by the Bahamas Air Sea
Rescue Association.

‘Miss Emily’ and ‘Gone
Away’ were pictured in a series
of photographs on social net-
working site Facebook along-
side ‘Sea Monkey’, the sailboat
owned by Alexander David
Rust, 24, from Indiana, and
Vanessa Star Palm, 23, from Illi-
nois, who were fined $1,000 last
month for crimes against the
environment.

Rust and Palm were pictured
with two others hauling in a
dinghy filled with juvenile conch
and grilling and eating a pro-
tected iguana in Allan’s Cay,
Exuma.

Although Rust was fined

SEE page 10

re Gy ee |

Cis ea Ic
MUS Ra

EH Deep base









SEE PAGE FIFTEEN

PLP hopeful claims
Kerzner’s ‘voluntary
unpaid vacation’

goes against the

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Employment Act

Paul Moss says workers
are in Catch-22 position

KERZNER International’s call for

SEE page nine

AS THE image of the late
Sir Lynden Pindling contin-
ues to be questioned, the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party is set to
hold a special church service
on March 22 to honour the
birth of the ‘Father of the
Nation’ at Bethel Baptist
Church on Meeting Street

Claim that man died
because hospital staff
took more than 40
minutes to respond

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

more than 40 minutes to attend to him.
THE QUEEN’S STAIRCASE
(above) was the site of

the fatal fall. SEE page 10

OTM CLE elie Tie
ignoring environmental hazards

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

DAYS after a Delta airlines pilot was overheard reporting a
“ten to fifteen mile long” oil slick off the Northern coast of New
Providence, two locals fishing the waters off western New Prov-
idence fear authorities are ignoring the environmental hazards.

Alex Callender and her husband were fishing near Clifton
Pier on Sunday when they suddenly noticed the wake behind their
boat in which they were trawling started “bubbling brown.”

“We said, ‘Oh my God, we’re in oil!” recalled Mrs Callender.

SEE page nine



CORONADO

FA. WN



A MAN died when he fell on the
Queen’s Staircase because, claimed an }
eyewitness, nearby hospital staff took :

Pastor Kevin Cooper said he watched

2,500 non-unionised workers to take “vol-
untary unpaid vacation” goes against the
Employment Act and is “tantamount to
coercion,” it was claimed yesterday.

PLP political hopeful Paul Moss yes-
terday said that the workers are in a
“Catch-22 position because if they decline
to forego the vacation pay, chances are
they will be made redundant. This is tantamount to coercion
and this too should be frowned upon.”

Earlier this week, Atlantis owners Kerzner International
announced that the request was put to employees, mainly

Paul Moss

PLP to hold service honouring Sir Lynden’s birth

at 10am.

The sermon is currently slat-
ed to be led by Rev Timothy
Stuart and the leader of the
party, Perry Christie, is also
expected to address the con-
gregation.

SEE page 10

New investors

i trading in equity

shares for more

stable bonds

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

AMIDST investor worry
over the stability of the local
market new investors are trad-
ing in equity shares for more
stable bonds, according to
some financial advisers.

It's a trend they say is typical
during periods of recession and
volatility, as investors who are
looking for a bigger short-term
bang for their buck lean
towards more reliable and
lucrative government bonds.

"Generally speaking after
the volatility you had in the
stock market in the last year
and a half, that has been some-
what of a movement for some
time now. Where people are
actually trying to systematical-
ly reduce their equity expo-

SEE page 10

|

Buildings souppiies

“For 50 years Coronado Paint has been
the choice of painting professionals,

providing paints with lasting performance

and consistant quality.”





NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

Wulff Road
Opposite Mackey Street
Tel: 393-0512, 393-8006,

OR 393-3513

Open Monday to Friday 7am - 4pm

Saturday 7am - 3pm
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



y paving far





GOVERNOR-GENERAL AD
Hanna attends the funeral ser-
vice of David Kelly at Christ
Church Cathedral yesterday
afternoon. Sitting behind him
is Dame Marguerite Pindling
(in blue hat) and to her right is
Education Minister Carl Bethel.
Top inset: David Kelly.

ee aie at he

HOT & SPICY
gene ee

SANDWICH

iL

eee Oa A
SHRIMP

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

CORNELIA IOLA MILATOS

of Nassau, The Bahamas who passed
away on 15th March, 2009 will be held
at The Chapel of Love, Kemp's Funeral
Home Limited, Palmdale Avenue and
Bradley Street, Nassau on Friday, 20th
March, 2009 at 10:30 a.m.

THE VENERABLE Keith Cartwright gave
the sermon yesterday.

Minister Earl Pinder will officiate and
interment will follow in The Western
Cemetery, Nassau Street, Nassau.

Mrs. Milatos is survived by her husband,

George Milatos; three children, Ivan and

Andre Chestnut and Caroline Percentie;
five grandchildren, Danielle Porceddu and Adrian Chestnut, Chelsea,
Andre and Kristen Chestnut; two brothers, Robert and Charles Hall,
11 sisters-in-law, Irene Klidaras, Evdokia Kefalianos,Maria Vallas,
Balaso , Evangelia, Niki, Poli and Maryanne Milatos, Florence Carey,
Zula Carroll and Olive Knowles; 7 brothers-in-law, Nikolas, Nioti,
Dimitri, Thanasi Milatos, Yianni Klidaras, Christos Kefalianos and
Skellarios Vallas; one daughter-in-law, Linda Chestnut and one son-
in-law, Wesley Percentie; caretaker, Lois Lee; many nieces and nephews
and a many other relatives and friends, especially Kimberly Bethel
Themelis and Irene Cathopoulis, Anne and Eugene Higgs, Patricia,
Maria and Peter Mousis, the attending doctors and staff of Doctor's
Hospital, the staff of the Walk in Medical Clinic and the staff of John's
Department Store.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Cancer Society of
The Bahamas, P.O.Box S.S. 6539, Nassau, The Bahamas, or left with
the family at the Service for the Cancer Society of The Bahamas, in
Memory of Mrs. Cornelia Iola Milatos.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, on
Thursday, 19th March, 2009 from
5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue,
Palmdale, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.















ewell to David Kelly

Hundreds, including govt ministers,
turn out to pay their last respects

FAMILY said their final
farewells to David Kelly, CBE,
yesterday as he was laid to rest
in a private service at St Anne’s
Church cemetery following a
public service attended by his
friends at Christ Church Cathe-
dral, George Street.

Hundreds, including staff and
management of Kelly’s Home
Centre and several government
ministers, attended the service
to pay their last respects.

In celebration of Mr Kelly’s
love of bright colours and love
of life, mourners were asked not
to dress in black.

The service was attended by
Governor-general Arthur Han-
na, Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette and Mrs
Symonette, National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest,
Education Minister Carl Bethel,
Mrs Allyson Maynard Gibson,
Lady Marguerite Pindling, and
other members of the House
and Senate.

Tribute

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, Senate President Lynn
Holowesko, Major General
Joseph Franklin of the US
Army, Godfrey Lightbourn,
Suzanne Black, and Barry J
Packington paid tribute to Mr
Kelly. Sir Orville Turnquest
read the intercessions, and Mr
Kelly’s granddaughter Avery
Anne Kelly, read a verse from
Ecclesiastes, while his grandson
Jordan Ross Kelly read Psalm
23. Mrs Nikita Wells sang
“Beneath My Wings.”

Rev Patrick Adderley, Dean
of Nassau; Rev Keith
Cartwright, Archdeacon of the
Southern Bahamas; Rev Father
Michael Gittens, priest vicar of
Christ Church Cathedral; and
Rev Crosley Walkine, rector of
St Anne’s Church, officiated at
the service.

After the ceremony, a police

LYNN HOLOWESKO, president of the

Senate, reads a tribute.

ASS COUT CLL

under way again



THE Sir John Templeton
Essay Competition is under-
way again this year.

The competition is open to
all junior and senior high
school students. It is based on
Sir John Templeton’s book,
Worldwide Laws of Life,
which offers codes of conduct
based on the Bible. The com-
petition is being organised by
the Ministry of Education’s
writing unit. The junior divi-
sion essay topics are:

¢ Crime doesn’t pay

e If at first you don’t suc-
ceed, try and try again

The Senior Division topics
are:

¢ You choose the path you
want to walk down

¢ Whatever you have, you
must use it or lose it

The deadline for submis-
sions is March 20 and the win-
ners will be announced in
April.

Each competitor must select
one topic from the appropriate
category and essays must be
between 300 and 500 words
long. All essays must be sub-
mitted to the candidate’s
respective school office. The
schools will submit the top five
essays to the writing unit on
March 20.



ares

7
a

THE BODY of David Albert Kelly is laid to rest yesterday at Christ Church

Cathedral.

escort led the hearse to the
cemetery.

Mr Kelly, proprietor of Kel-
ly’s Home Centre and a well-
known philanthropist, died on
March 11 in a hospital in New
York just two weeks shy of his
77th birthday.

During a routine shopping
trip to New York, on which he
was accompanied by his wife
Nancy, Mr Kelly developed
chest pains and went to the New

Cathedral.

0 In brief

York Presbyterian Hospital for
a check-up. Mr Kelly, who had
pre-existing heart condition,
underwent surgery and later fell
into a coma. A spokesperson
for the family told The Tribune
that he did not suffer at the end.

Mr Kelly’s family, including
his wife Nancy, his three sons
Andrew, Gregory and Scott;
and his daughters-in-law Can-
dy and Shelle, were at his side
when he passed away.



PALLBEARERS take the body of David Kelly out of Christ Church

Two in police custody after
marijuana found in home

TWO persons are in police custody after officers found
nearly one pound of marijuana in a home in Yamacraw

Beach Estates.

On Wednesday, officers of the Drug Enforcement Unit,
armed with a search warrant, went to the Yamacraw Beach
Estates home after 3pm. Officers found seven clear plastic
bags which contained just under one pound of marijuana,
Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said.

Subsequently, a 39-year-old man and a 31-year-old woman
who were home at the time were taken into custody. The
drugs have a local street value of just under $1,500.

Investigations continue.

Tourist fined for drug offence

A 36-year-old American tourist was fined $500 yesterday
after pleading guilty to a marijuana possession charge.

Zina Andrews Downs of South Carolina appeared before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane charged

with possession of marijuana.

Police claimed that on Tuesday, while at Cabbage Beach,
they found Downs in possession of a homemade cigarette and
a clear plastic bag containing a quantity of marijuana. Downs
told police that a taxi driver had taken him to an unknown
place where he had purchased the marijuana and tobacco for

$90.

Downs, who pleaded guilty to the charge, was fined $500.
Failure to pay the fine will result in a term of six months

imprisonment.
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Son of Anglican Archdeacon back in
court on firearm, ammunition charges

0 In brief

Tradewinds
2003 comes |
to a close

AFTER two weeks of
intensive military training at

the Defence Force Coral Har- }

bor Base, Tradewinds 2009
was Officially brought to a
close.

designed to develop and
encourage partnerships and
common professional prac-
tices among law enforcement
officials in the region,
involved US personnel from
the Marine Corps, Coast
Guard, Army, Navy, Air
Force and National Guard, as
well as Naval Criminal Inves-
tigative Scene (NCIS) offi-
cers.

More than a dozen coun-
tries were represented at this
year’s exercise.

Attending the closing cere-
mony were Commander of
the Defence Force Com-
modore Clifford Scavella,
Charge d’Affairs at the US
Embassy Timothy Zuniga-
Brown, Director of Stability
for the US Army National
Guard Major General James
Champion and other highly
decorated officers and ser-
vicemen from various partner
nations.

advance regional stability,
build professionalism within
military forces, and foster

multinational and interagency i

relations,” said Commodore
Scavella, addressing
participants at the closing cer-
emony.

“Regional innovations were }
shared, and response capabili- :

ties strengthened towards
combating transnational
threats and regional crisis.
This year was unique, as
emphasis was placed on com-
mand centre operations, haz-
ardous material management,
and crime-scene integrity and
evidence collection.”

Progressive Young Liberals chairman
criticises Tribune’s Pindling articles

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE chairman of the Pro-
gressive Young Liberals Viraj
Perpall yesterday chimed in with
his view on the controversy sur-
rounding the legacy of the late
Sir Lynden Pindling, calling The
Tribune’s recent articles “very
distasteful” considering the con-
tributions the “Father of the
Nation” made to building the
modern Bahamas.

In a press statement issued
yesterday, Mr Perpall said that
he could not see how any young
person who has read the articles
could go on to develop an appre-
ciation of their country or a sense
of patriotism.

In the last few weeks a number
of PLPs have jumped to the
defence of Sir Lynden’s legacy,
following an explosive Insight
article written by The Tribune’s
managing editor John Marquis.
The article quoted former PLP
treasurer Chauncey Tynes Sr,
who claimed the former prime
minister was complicit in the
notorious drug trade of the
1980s.

A follow-up called into ques-
tion the nationality of the for-
mer prime minister, citing
sources who claim that Sir Lyn-
den was in fact born in Jamaica
in the small town of Cotton Tree.

“T personally do not see how
the articles help with the dis-
course, debate and discussion as
to how we will move this nation
on the greater success and solve
the ills we currently face,” Mr
Perpall said.

“To me they only seem to
bring about issues that lead to
speculation and doubt and hon-
estly where does that get us?
Does it build the country? It
doesn’t.

“Personally I have a degree in
journalism and have worked as a
journalist at the Tribune, the
Nassau Guardian, and The
Bahama Journal and while I one
100 per cent believe in freedom
of the press, I feel that that free-
dom does not negate it from its
responsibility to guard those

The joint initiative, which is

“Tradewinds 2009 sought to

Sa Aem Leste



@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE 24-year-old son of Anglican Archdea-
con Etienne Bowleg was back in court yester-
day morning in connection with a high-speed
chase in which police were shot at.

Etienne Bowleg IJ, of Twynam Heights,
appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel
in Court Eight, Bank Lane yesterday, where he
was arraigned on multiple firearm and ammu-
nition charges.

During his arraignment yesterday, Bowleg
was not required to plead to four counts of
possession of a firearm with the intent to endan-
ger life and four counts of possession of a
firearm with the intent to resist lawful arrest.

It is alleged that on Monday, March 16, Bow-
leg was in possession of a handgun with the
intent to endanger the lives of Reserve Con-
stable 26 Dennis Clarke, Reserve Constable

775 Patrick Minnis, Woman Police Constable
2895 Shenique Ford and Sergeant 987 Alexan-
der Pierre.

Bowleg, who is being represented by attor-
neys Murrio Ducille and Willie Moss, opted to
have the matters heard in the Magistrate’s
Court.

It is also alleged that Bowleg caused damage
to a blue 2007 Ford Crown Victoria in the
amount of $500.

Inspector Ercell Dorsette, the prosecutor,
asked the court to join that charge to the afore-
mentioned eight charges. Bowleg not required
to plead to the additional charge.

The prosecution raised no objection to Bow-
leg being granted bail.

According to attorney Moss, Bowleg recent-
ly graduated from college and took the Medical
College Admissions Test (MCAT).

Magistrate Bethel granted Bowleg bail in
the sum of $30,000 with two sureties, on con-

dition that he not leave the jurisdiction until the
completion of the preliminary inquiry, surren-
der his travel documents and report
to the Elizabeth Estates Police Station every
Monday, Wednesday and Saturday before 6pm.

The case has been adjourned to September
23.

In addition to these charges, Bowleg was
granted bail $7,500 on ammunition and drugs
charges.

It is alleged that he was found in possession
of two unfired 9mm rounds, one unfired .380
round and one gram of marijuana.

Bowleg pleaded not guilty to these charges.

The case was adjourned to September 28 for
trial.

According to reports, police pursued a black
2003 Ford Expedition from Wulff Road to the
Tonique Williams-Darling Highway after shots
were fired from the vehicle around 9pm on
Monday.

BPSU president accused of lack of interest

in airport security screening staff concerns



BAHAMAS Public Service
Union President John Pinder was
yesterday accused of not being
interested in the work-related con-
cerns of security screening staff at
the airport because “few of them
voted for him”.

One screener working at the
Lynden Pindling International Air-
port said demoralised workers
have been hoping that Mr Pinder
would act on their disappointment
over a number of issues — including
delayed increment payments,
penalties for taking sick days or
refusing to work overtime, and a
substandard working environment
— but to no avail.

“When people send in a sick slip
they are threatened with their jobs.
Human resources never asks the
people why they’re falling sick and
we’re entitled to 20 days sick days
per annum,” said the screener.
“Morale is really low right now.”
Human resources officials and

find itself in a newspaper because
newspapers and members of the
press are responsible for pro-
tecting, defending and inform-
ing the moral conscience of soci-
ety.

“Pindling goes beyond poli-
tics. This is a man whom Hubert
Ingraham, the man who removed
him from power, hailed him in
his death as ‘the greatest
Bahamian who ever lived.’

The FNM also saw fit to place
his face on the one dollar bill
soon after his death. I say that
to say that he goes far beyond
partisan politics and the PLP.

“He is to most if not all, the
father of this nation and should
be respected and revered in
death”.

While admitting that he does
not expect anyone to have any
particular affection for Sir Lyn-
den or any other political leader
past or present, Mr Perpall said
the country ought to still respect

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management have been “passing
the buck” between each other over
the delayed salary payments, it is
alleged.

The screener estimated that she
has lost out on between $700 and
$800 a year since payments were
first withheld in 2007.

Around 50 staff work in the
security screening section.

Unhappy

The disgruntled employees said
they are also unhappy about the
condition of the room in which
they work, particularly the “con-
crete floor which gets very dusty”.

It is also claimed that staff are
upset because hiring practices are
not in accordance with regulations.
They say positions are not
advertised internally before being
filled.

“They have qualified people on

those who have fought to make
the Bahamas a better nation for
all.

“Thousands of young people
and Bahamians have Pindling to
thank because it was under his
leadership and prime ministerial
administration that the College
of the Bahamas was established.
This is an entity that services
much of the tertiary educational
needs of this nation today and
has been doing so for the past
three decades. That is only one
from the plethora of things this
man did.

“These young people also
have him to thank for bringing
the first majority government to
power and for bringing our
nation into sovereignty. There
could be no greater gift a prime
minister can give than to give his
people citizenship in their own
nation and Lynden Pindling did
this and he should be honoured
for such,” he said.

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staff but they refuse to transfer
people,” one screener said.

Meanwhile, there are ongoing
concerns over the handling of a
tuberculosis scare last year, in
which one security screener con-
tracted the disease and 10 others
were exposed.

It is claimed that Mr Pinder met
with them on March 3 and
promised to come back the fol-
lowing week, but never returned.

“He is really not concerned

bune, they called for the removal of
the fire chief and other key man-
agement officers.

The union president Mr Pinder
later said he was satisfied that a
meeting between Airport Author-
ity heads and management at the
fire station was successful in avert-
ing industrial action.

Calls for union Mr Pinder and
director of security at the Airport
Authority Osborne Ferguson were
not returned up to press time.







= a

—— : -
aes i
: = Ti: = -

a

about staff at the airport authority.
He told them staff he only received
27 votes from staff at airport
authority,” the screener said. “It
seems like nothing happens unless
you go to the press.”

The complaints come just over a
month after several officers sta-
tioned at the Airport Fire Station
claimed their unit was being run
like a “petty shop”, and was rife
with nepotism.

In an interview with The Tri-

Call for director of Labour to resign

THE president of the Bahamas Commercial Stores Supermarket
Warehouse Worker’s Union yesterday called for the resignation of the
director of Labour for what he termed “interference” with the union.

The director, Harcourt Brown, is due to hold a press conference
today to respond to the BCSWWU president’s claims, which were
made in a press conference Wednesday morning.

In a barely comprehensible statement issued to the press containing
an abundance of grammatical errors, union president Elgin Douglas
accused Mr Brown of “interfering with the rights of the union and its
members.”

However, one union member contacting The Tribune yesterday
said that the union is behind the director of labour and many members
think it is Mr Douglas who should go.

Elections have apparently not been held in the union since its for-
mation in the 1980s, with Mr Douglas remaining president since this
time. “He is incompetent,” said the member, who wished to remain
anonymous.



However, Mr Douglas, in his comments issued to the media , said the

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director of labour is “not fair” and “has his own agenda.”

“Mr Harcourt Brown is one of the worst Director of Labour ever sit
in the Labour Department,” wrote Mr Douglas.

He said the union “write Minister of Labour under Section 13 Chap-
ter 3 21 of Industrial Relations Act to call and urgent meeting with the
parties” (sic).

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things that are sacred to the
nation,” he said.

Sir Lynden Pindling’s legacy,
he said, is one of those sacred
things.

“T personally don’t feel such
sentiments about a national fig-
ure of such prominence should





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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

David Kelly loved his fellow man

EVEN THE elements shed a tear as family
and friends drove to Christ Church Cathedral
yesterday afternoon to attend the funeral of a
successful businessman who always extended
a helping hand to this community’s less fortu-
nate.

“It’s so sad about Mr Kelly,” said a young
woman who walked up to us Tuesday after-
noon as we waited for our luggage at the foot of
a carousel at Lynden Pindling International
Airport. We had both just arrived from Miami.
We didn’t know her, but she knew our husband
who often spent much time at Kelly’s Home
Centre.

She was speaking of David Albert Charles
Kelly, CBE, who with his wife, Nancy, owned
Kelly’s Home Centre in Marathon Mall.

The young lady was on her way to Halifax —
“T always wanted to go back to school,” she
said, “but I stayed at Kellys for 10 years only
because of Mr and Mrs Kelly.” However, on
learning of Mr Kelly’s sudden death in New
York, she turned around and returned home for
the funeral. After the funeral she plans to set out
again for Halifax and a course which she is now
taking to equip her to work with young children.
“Something that I have always wanted to do,”
she explained.

“T don’t know how they are going to manage
at Kelly’s without him,” she said, “but Mrs Kel-
ly is a very strong woman and they have three
wonderful sons.”

She said she had never known anyone like
David Kelly. He was the strength, “the bea-
con” behind the business. He was a fine exam-
ple to his staff, no job was too lowly for him, she
continued. If there was an area to be cleaned, he
would take a broom and sweep it. “He really
had a fine work ethic.” He taught by example.
“He was always there for us; he always had
time to hear our problems, to help us. If any-
thing went wrong it was Mr Kelly we turned to.
I just can’t imagine anything without him. He
was a good man.”

In his sermon Venerable Keith Cartwright
talked of David Kelly’s generosity. He told how
last year he went into Kellys and announced
to Mr Kelly that because of the devastation
done in the southern Bahamas by the hurri-
cane that had just passed through, he needed
every generator in the store. Mr Kelly gave him
all the generators he needed and never sent a
bill. When the priest asked him about it, he
casually brushed it aside and in his deep voice
and with a wry smile said: Don’t you worry,
Geoff Johnstone and my brother, Godfrey,
don’t know it yet, but they will help me pay for
them!

“In four decades and with wife Nancy’s influ-
ence and equal hard work, more recently with
all three sons in the business, Kelly’s has been
transformed from a dark storefront on Bay
Street with shelves jammed with nuts and bolts
into a 50,000 square foot retail emporium,”
recorded the write-up in his obituary. “In 1988,
Nancy and David took the biggest risk of their
business lives moving the store from its familiar
Bay Street location where its window once dis-
played Triumph sports cars to the new Mall at
M a r a t h ° n :

“Today the store and its warehouse employ
more than 300 persons and one of David’s great-
est satisfactions was the knowledge that every
employee enjoyed health insurance, a pension
plan and could participate in profit-sharing.
Like his home, The Columns, so close to where
he was born, the store gave him roots and he
gave back, nurturing it with a work ethic that
rubbed off on others, and a sense of decency
and equality that extended to everyone in the
store.”

Senate President Lynn Holowesko talked
of the courage of the couple in the uncertain
days of the eighties. “To have borrowed money
to make such a substantial investment in an
area that was just beginning to grow, and to
commit to being the anchor for the first major
shopping mall in The Bahamas seems an easy
decision in hindsight. But it was a big gamble
and a huge investment some 21 years ago.”

From Queen’s College, David joined his two
older brothers at McDonogh School, a military
academy in Maryland, where in 1950 he was
voted the best wrestler in the state of Mary-
land and was the recipient of the Babe Ruth
Award for sportsmanship. However, he did not
want to go on to university. Anxious to return to
the family business, he came home at the age of
19 to join his father in Kelly’s on Bay Street. The
following year, his father was dead. David was
20, his brother Basil, 22, who also joined the
business, was left with their mother, to contin-
ue Kelly’s. Many years later Basil sold his share
to David, and Kelly’s Home Centre in Marathon
is the result of David and Nancy’s years of hard
work. Today, David Kelly leaves a most capable
business savvy wife, and three well trained sons
— with far more training and experience than
he had when he succeeded his father. It is now
up to them to carry on their father’s tradition of
courage, integrity, fairplay and generosity.

As for their father, the angel will write in his
book of gold that, like the ancient Abou Ben
Adhem, David Kelly was one who “loved his
fellow men.”



Farmers Cay
needs a police
patrol car

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have some friends who live
on the beautiful island of Farm-
ers Cay. All in all this is a very
nice community, but last year
it suffered a blow and the
effects are still being felt and
the hurt is still in the process of
healing.

This island recorded the only
murder in the cays ever!

This in itself is mind-blowing
but the police force is taking
their usual nonchalant attitude
toward it.

For years the people of Farm-
ers Cay have been asking for a

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



patrol car for the island but up
to this date there is not one
there. The folks believe that a
better police presence would
have done a lot to prevent this
and other crimes and misbe-
haviour on the cay.

Every other cay has a police
car, but the cay that needs it the
most does not have one.

Every time the police need
to do any investigation they

have to put a civilians’ vehicle
or life in danger to do this, I do
not think this is good policing
and it puts the officers at a dis-
advantage. Farmers Cay has
one disadvantage in that it hous-
es workers from the other cays
and a lot of these people are
not from Farmers Cay.

It is difficult for the police to
have any presence when they
have to walk everywhere.

MRS SILENCE
DO-GOOD
Exuma,
Bahamas,
March 16, 2009.

The death of young Chauncey Tynes

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Chauncey had choice yes he did, he choose to
be in the employment of a known drug lord,
which made him an associate drug dealer.

He could have said to his dad anything to make
him feel less shame if the hazards of his occupa-

tion caught up with him.

Chauncey was not the first to meet this strange
fate, and would not be the last, let us remember
now no trace of these men nor the plane was
ever found to the best of your knowledge.

What does this tell us, two things they could be

dead or in hiding.

This story has been told over and over with
the missing/deaths of many young Bahamian
men, who have chosen to walk this road.

I was never a big fan of Sir Lynden, but I feel

when we start highlighting the few negatives over
the many positives, we too are leading our youth

into thinking many negative things.

I strongly feel you, editor, could have high-
lighted the life of Mr Livingston B Johnson on
your front page and in more depth, than this sto-
ry which will only end with our youth listening to
many foolish arguments which have revolved
from this article, not to mention the unnecessary
stress this will cause to many who foolishly spend
their time discussing this topic.

It is like did Mrs Moree received monies from

the insurance company or not, we have to be

trying to use him as a scape goat to ease the

shame Chauncey placed upon this family is

uncalled for.

Yes we want our children to know our past, but

Nassau,

March, 2009.

careful how to tell the story of the past, it was an
“il fated death of a drug dealer” and may God
have mercy on his soul.

STEPHEN TURNQUEST

Revelations bring out worst in PLP leadership

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The recent revelations by Mr
Chauncey Tynes Senior about
his late son and Lynden Pin-
dling, has in my opinion brought
out the worst in the present

A valuable lesson for
STS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re:Insight/Tribune, March
9, 2009
Students of journalism

interested in fair, balanced
and substantiated content
will find this article to be
highly instructional.

KENNETH W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,

March 13, 2009.



leadership of the PLP.

Firstly, as a Bahamian, I am
insulted by Senator Maynard-
Gibson who has suggested boy-
cotting The Tribune for its
recent insightful article about
Chauncey Tynes Jr., Lynden
Pindling, drug kingpins, secret
flights under the cover of utter
darkness, and so on and so
forth.

Mrs. Maynard-Gibson prob-
ably meets her Tribune in her
office daily, and that would not
stop anytime soon, yet she is
advocating that dim-witted
Bahamians cease buying The
Tribune because it will essen-
tially illuminate them to the
truth about the late Sir Lynden
Oscar Pindling.

Senator Maynard-Gibson is
out of touch with the people of
this nation, and reality.

This will cost the PLP dearly
in the next election.

Then, we have Perry Christie
who insists that victimizing and

intimidating, and drug-dirtied
Lynden Pindling is the Father of
our Nation when Pindling’s
status as a Bahamian has not
been publicly verified to this
date. This too will cost the PLP
to lose badly next election.

And now we have Paul Moss
— who just arrived in the PLP -
defending something that he
knows nothing about.

The PLP has become exactly
what Lynden Pindling wanted
Bahamians to be and that’s con-
spicuously unintelligent and
unacquainted. How poetic.

DENNIS DAMES

Bahamian of the soil, born
PMH Nassau, Bahamas

January 17, 1966 to Wilmore
Dames and Shirley Beneby-
Dames.

Nassau,
March 14, 2009



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MEMORIAL SERVICE

Joseph Frank
BONCZEK,
60,

of Lake Worth, FL, passed away

on Saturday, February 28, 2009

after suffering a courageous

year long battle with cancer.
Joe was born im Elwna, OH on May 19. 1948, but spent
most of his life in South Florida. He enjoyed a 35 vear
career with AT&T's the Real Yellow Pages yet his life
revolved around loving his family and friends. Joe lowed
to entertain, Whether if was on stace m meht clubs of
high school musicals, or just going to someone's house
for a party, He was known to bring out his guitar and
entertain anyone and evervone at a moments notice. Joe
was preceded in death by lus father, Joseph: brother,
Robert; and sisters. Ann Mane and Kathleen Bonezek
Dehow. He is survived by his loving wife of 3% years,
Barbara; his son Zack and his wife Tracy and their two
children, Hannah and Hailey: his daughter, Aleece and
husband, Mark Campbell and their children, Chloe,
Pevton and Colin; his mother, Ann; and sisters, Mary
Felix and Sr. Joanne Bonczek, SND. A memorial service
will be held on Sunday, March 22, 2009 at Sacred Heart
Roman Catholic Church at 10:30 a.m, In lieu of lowers,
the family asks that memorial contnibutions be made to
Food for the Poor, 6401 Lyons Road, Coconut Creek, FL
33073 to help build a house for a poor family in Haiti —



#67173, in Joe's memory.
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



NIB Fund stands
at $1.6 billion

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The National
Insurance Board Fund now stands
at $1.6 billion, NIB senior manager
W Moss told Rotarians.

“All but a small portion of that is
invested right here in the Bahamas.
I am pleased to report Rotarians
that there have been zero losses to
the National Insurance Fund as a
result of the on-going global finan-
cial crisis,” he said.

Mr Moss noted that government
intends to amend the National
Insurance Act and Regulations to
provide for the addition of unem-
ployment benefits to Bahamians.

He said the Prime Minister is
expected to travel to Grand
Bahama on Wednesday to discuss
the programme with community
leaders at the Our Lucaya Resort.

On Monday, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham announced that
government has taken $20 million
from the National Insurance Med-
ical Branch Fund to provide unem-
ployment benefits to some 10,000
unemployed and underemployed
persons in the country.

Mr Moss also noted that the NIB
provides many other benefits to
Bahamians that help to stimulate
the Bahamian economy.

He reported that the Board has
paid out over $150 million in bene-
fits and assistance, in 2008.

During February 2009, he said
that close to 28,000 pensioners
received National Insurance bene-
fits or assistance, which along with
the payments of STB such as sick-
ness and maternity account for
some $13 million that was paid out
just in that month alone.

Mr Moss said the National Insur-
ance Board’s primary objective, as
mandated by The National Insur-
ance Act is to provide partial
income replacement for workers
when they are unable to work tem-
porarily because of illness.

He stressed that in order for the
Board to be able to deliver on this
partial income replacement
promised to workers, NIB must col-
lect contributions from self-
employed persons and from
employers on behalf of their
employees.

“Now this process of paying
monthly contributions for some self-
employed persons and some
employers can become overbear-
ing if not paid on a timely basis and
allowed to go unchecked for sever-
al months, or even years.”

Recently, NIB has taken steps to
collect millions of outstanding
national insurance contributions
that are owed by delinquent
employers.

Mr Moss explains that once a
business opens in the Bahamas and
starts operation it has 10 days to be
registered with NIB.

After the business is registered, it
is assigned national insurance num-
bers for the business and its employ-
ees.

Mr Moss said businesses are
expected to keep proper payroll
and business records as required
under Section 42 of the National
Insurance Act, which states that:
“Every employer and self-employed
person shall at all times keep and
maintain in his business premises
or place the following records...b)
Payroll and other records connect-
ed therewith, which would serve to
prove the correctness of the entries
on the contributions made; and c)
the records relating to the payment
of such contributions to The
Board(C.10).”

“The Act makes it an offence for
employers and self-employed per-
sons who fail to keep or produce
records when requested to do so by
the Board.

“The National Insurance Board
encourages all business owners and
self-employed persons to keep good
accounting records.”

According to Mr Moss, the board
has implemented new procedures
as it relates to the processing of sick-
ness claims for employees.

He said NIB has introduced a
new form called Med 4, which is
now needed for the processing of
sickness claims.

“With this form employers are
asked to verify the period that their
employees are going to be off from
work, as a result of sickness or
maternity leave.

“This form must be signed off by
the employer and submitted along
with any sickness or maternity
claims being made by an employed
person.”

Mr Moss said claims will not be
processed if the new form is not
completed by the employer.

He gave several reasons for the
implementation of this new form.

¢ Employees would submit sick-
ness claims to National Insurance

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FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 822-2157



and remain at work and we all
know that one must be away from
work in order to receive benefit
payments from National Insurance
— for example the disablement
benefit.

¢ Some employees would submit
a claim and stay off from work for
part of the period and return to
work before the period submitted to
National Insurance has expired.

Mr Moss said the Med 4 Form
would also make the employers

aware that their employees are
making a claim to NIB so they can
make adjustments where necessary
with their salaries.

He said the National Insurance
Act provides the employer the right
to adjust their employees’ salary by
deducting the amount of benefit
paid to employees.

Mr Moss said that no contribu-
tion payment is due while an
employee is on sick leave.

He said employers and persons

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Report, NIB’s Pension Commission
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to download Registration and Claim
Forms, etc.

He said it was important that per-
sons continue to support the NIB
programme so that it will continue
to grow for future generations of
Bahamians.

Happy

Prison holds first quarterly




STS ESTA

HER MAJESTY’S PRISON held its first quar-
terly visitors meeting for 2009 on Monday at the pris-
on’s security processing centre.

In attendance were the Superintendent of Prisons
Dr Elliston Rahming and other senior staff who
gave members of the public an opportunity to
express their concerns, ideas and recommendations.

“The meeting was well attended by friends and
loved ones at inmates of Her Majesty’s Prisons.
Recommendations were made, ideas were shared
and most importantly clarity was given to those individuals who need-
ed it on any subject relative to their relatives’ confinement,” said the
prison in a statement.

It said Dr Rahming encourages this kind of “positive dialogue” and
remains committed to Minister of National Security Tommy Turn-
quest’s vision of bringing reform to HMP.

Dr Rahming said he realises that the families of inmates have a piv-
otal role to play in creating reform as they too have a direct impact on
the lives of their incarcerated relatives.

According to Dr Rahming, through communication, “we can bet-
ter understand each other which is crucial for paving the way for
better relations.”

214t Birthday
ROBYN SWABY

God4 « Ph caretig Henttie

For you created my inmost being; you knit me
together in my mother's womb. | praise you because
lam fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are
wonderful, 1 know that full well. My frame was not
hidden from you when | was made in the secret place.
When | was woven together in the depths of the earth,
your eyes saw my unformed body, All the days
ardained for me were written in vour book before one
of them came to be (Psalm 1359-13-16)

Dr Elliston
Rahming

From our very first day on March 16, 1988, there has
been one litth girl who consistently made her
presence felt. Her name is Robyn and she is now a 71
year old beauty with a striking personality and a
tierce confidence to shine. She tells me with her smile
that all is well. She speaks with elegance, is poised;
always composed and exudes strength for her two
brothers who adores her ,

Robyn God has given you a very keen mind and a
quick study for learning making you a valuable asset
to and for our family, friends and community at large,
You always enjoyed learning new things especially in
the sports arena where you were the original member
of the Johnson & Wales University Women's
Basketball team. You were actually the program's
very first recruit who scored over 1,000 points and
will go down in JWU's history as being the top 3 point
shooter in Women's Basketball. You are ranked #72 in
the USCAA Conference for 3 point shooting. You
have also excelled in the classroom and is a 2005-2009
nominee for the WALA Scholar- Athlete All American
Team. Robyn has completed her Bachelor of Science
in Forensic Accounting and will further obtain her
Masters Degree in Finance.

CONGRATULATIONS Robyn Swaby, Daddy's Baby
from Mommy, Nicholas & David

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





‘Destined for greatness’

“Where there is no vision the
people perish.”
Proverbs 29:18a, AV.
“T never look back!”
Evangelist Billy Graham

m By REV DRJ
EMMETTE WEIR

| HIS is a response to Mr

Errington Watkins’ novel
claims concerning the circumstances
of the early years of Sir Lynden Pin-
dling.

One of the most enduring lessons
that my late mother, Eunice
Jeanette Weir, a brilliant Bahamian
educator, “drummed” into me, was
the utter importance of written doc-



umentation. Indeed, so insistent was
she upon this principle that if I were
to write to her while I was studying
abroad as a young man, she was
sure to reply with a letter that
included corrections of my errors
in spelling or grammar! Moreover,
this lesson was certainly reinforced
by my professors in studies at the
tertiary level in Jamaica, the United
States and in Scotland. It is precise-
ly for this reason that when it comes
to the dates of the most important
events in the life of an individual -

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birth, baptism, marriage and death,
we depend not on oral statements
based on that fragile ability known
as “memory”, but on written docu-
mentation, whether to be found in
letters, a diary, a church vestry, gov-
ernment registration, library or on
the hard drive of a computer! For as
the Chinese (who invented paper
and ink) have put it:

“THE WEAKEST INK IS
STRONGER THAN THE
STRONGEST MEMORY”

I therefore could not help apply-
ing this principle to the latest claim
made by Mr. Errington Watkins
with regard to the birth and early
life of Sir Lynden Pindling - that he
was born of a Jamaican mother and
was sent to Jamaica for the early
years of his education. Whatever
may be one's “take” on this claim,
it certainly begs the question, “Why
has the good gentleman waited to
suggest it until all the principals
involved (who could either have
refuted or reinforced same) have
passed away from this life? It would
certainly have had much more
weight had it been stated earlier.
More profoundly however, it lacks
documentation and as such does
not merit very serious considera-
tion, not in terms of historicity or
definitive academic research.

Thus, my purpose here must be
clearly defined. It is not my inten-
tion to engage in a “tit-for- tat” dis-
cussion with Mr. Watkins on the
origins of “the Father of the nation.”

For, as will be demonstrated, such
discussions are neither very benefi-
cial nor edifying. As a member of
the “older generation” (although
not quite as “senior” as Mr.
Watkins) yet with many years of
experience and observation, I would
just like to give “my side of the sto-
ry,” leaving the reader to be the
judge. In undertaking this task, I
shall make every effort to document
my statements with dates given as
accurately as I can. With these
caveats, I proceed with this endeav-
our.

On January 10, 1967 I was a
young Methodist Minister serving
in the Coke Circuit, Kingston,
Jamaica, where the late Wilfred
Easton was the Superintendent
Minister. I vividly recall, along with
my longtime friend and colleague
in the Ministry of The Methodist
Church, the Rev. Dr. Colin Archer,
‘tuning into ZNS to listen to the
results of the General Election “at
home.” Often it was hard to hear
ZNS clearly, but on that night, it
came over “loud and clear” on that
ancient “hot tube” radio. We were

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glad and joined in the rejoicing
about the coming of Majority Rule.

Many Jamaicans I met, spoke
with pride about the Premier of the
Bahamas, a young man with
Jamaican roots. As a Marriage Offi-
cer, it was my privilege to officiate at
many marriages in Jamaica.
Amongst those, there was one
which stands out in my memory. In
counseling a young couple I recall
that the bride-to-be (an attractive,
intelligent young lady) was named
Jacinth Pindling! “You have the
same surname as our Premier, Mr.
Lynden Pindling!” I said. “Yes!
He's my cousin,” she replied beam-
ing with pride. I cannot remember
the name of the groom. I can never
forget that beautiful bride who evi-
dently, was related to the premier of
my homeland.

Now in all those deliberations, in
discussions with Jamaicans in gen-
eral, and with Sir Lynden's cousin in
particular, there was never any men-
tion by anyone of the claims made
by Mr. Watkins. Not a single person
mentioned that he had been to
school there, and while they all
knew that although his father was
Jamaican, his mother was assumed
to be Bahamian. In fact as I reflect
upon those experiences in Jamaica,
Ican recall nothing to convince me
of the authenticity of Mr. Watkins’
claims. Don't get me wrong! I'm
not asserting whether they are true
or false. All I'm saying is that on
the basis of my own experiences
and discussions with Jamaicans back
in the late sixties and early seventies,
I have no reason to place any cre-
dence in them. Let me continue.

I studied at The United Theo-
logical College of the West
Indies, Kingston, Jamaica from 1959
-63. The only other Bahamian who
studied along with me at seminary
in those days was the late Rev. Dr.
Charles Smith. (The Rev. Dr. Philip
Rahming joined us later). Charles
remained a good friend of mine
until his passing, and I can say that
he was meticulous when it came to
the use of facts and I came to
depend upon the authenticity of his
word. Now I was present and heard
with my own ears the Rev. Dr.
Charles Smith declare unequivo-
cally that a nurse who was a mem-
ber of Zion Baptist Church, testified
that she knew when a pregnant Mrs.
Pindling “was heavy with Lynden.”
Whose report should I believe?
Whose report do you believe?
What's my take on this matter? My
advice is simply. Don’t go there!
Don’t go there unless you have doc-
umentary evidence to support your
claim.

Why? Because in the final analy-
sis what really matters in evaluating
the legacy of any individual is not
the circumstances of his/her birth,
but what that person did with the
gifts and talents with which the cre-
ator endowed them.

Or, to put it another way, what
really matters in the life of any per-
son, is not where he or she has come
from, but the direction in which that
person is moving.

Yes, the answer to this all impor-
tant question determines whether
he/she is on the way to meaning-
less mediocrity, or is indeed des-
tined for greatness.

May I continue?

Early in September 1970, I
arrived in New York on my way to
Christian Theological Seminary,
Indiana, to pursue studies for my
Masters degree in Theology. It was
a time when racial tensions were
high in the wake of the assassination
of that great Civil Rights Leader,
Martin Luther King Jr. I shall never
forget the manner in which I was
greeted by a tall, husky Black man
(then, “negro” was an outdated
expression and the term “African -
American” had not yet been
coined), who met me. When I told
him I was from the “sunny
Bahamas,” he replied, acidly, “Man,
you shoulda stayed where you was!”
He really was suggesting that Amer-
ica at that time was no place for a
young person to study.

Now my dear reader, if you told
me then that a “skinny teenager
from Hawaii with a funny name,

the son of a Black father and White
American mother would one day
be President of the United States, I
would have replied, “Man, you must
be crazy!” (or words to that effect).
Yes no one back then could con-
ceive of a Barack Obama electrify-
ing crowds with the powerful motto.
“Yes we can!” and becoming the
first black man to occupy the White
House, not as a servant or visitor
but as “Mr. President!” I never
imagined in my wildest dreams that
I would live to see an African-
American President. And that is
why, as I pointed out in the book,
“Obama in Prophecy” already a
best seller abroad and soon to be
released in the Bahamas, I was
amongst the old men who wept
while young people of all nations
rejoiced on November 4th, when
Barack Obama was indeed elected
first African-American President of
the USA.

In my reviews of Obama's
books, I point out that Barack Oba-
ma was groomed and prepared to
serve in a unique manner. From
early in life when his mother woke
him up at 4 am to give him lessons
(English), he had a strong sense of
determination to lead. And when I
saw him on TV and heard him
speak with such confidence, then I
knew for sure that he was a young
man “destined for greatness.”

Upon completion of my doctor-
al studies abroad, in October 1981,
Ireturned home and was appointed
to serve on the Juvenile Panel. It
was then that I came into contact
with a young Minister of Govern-
ment appointed by Sir Lynden Pin-
dling, then Prime Minister of an
Independent young nation. It mat-
tered to me not a whit that he hailed
from a small settlement in Abaco
and that his parents were not mar-
ried to each other. What mattered
was the confident, determined, pur-
poseful manner in which he
approached his responsibilities, and
noting these qualities, I concluded
that here was another young man
who was destined for greatness! I
refer to none other that our Prime
Minister, the Rt Honourable
Hubert Alexander Ingraham.

I began this contribution by
emphasizing the absolute impor-
tance of documentation, asserting
that statements made by persons
must be “backed up “by documen-
tary evidence if they are to be taken
seriously.

The validity of this principle rein-
forced in academic research, was
confirmed in yet another experi-
ence of my sojourn in Jamaica.

While serving as a young Minis-
ter in the Spanish Town — Linstead
Circuit back in the mid-sixties — I
received a letter from an elderly
gentleman who had migrated from
Jamaica while in his youth. He was
nearly at the age of retirement and
was in dire need of documentation
as to the date of his birth. Yes he
knew, but he could not prove his
age to “the powers that be.” He
wrote me, desperately requesting
documentation of the date of his
birth. After diligent research of the
Church and State records (including
a visit to the registry in Jamaica's
ancient capital, Spanish Town), I
was able to find his birth certificate.
He wrote me a letter of great appre-
ciation. Indeed so satisfied was he
that he sent me money for “my pas-
tor's discretionary fund,” which I
used to help a number of persons in
need. The birth of the gentleman
was over a century ago, during the
days of Booker T. Washington!

Yes, documentary evidence is
all that really matters. With refer-
ence again to Sir Lynden Pindling,
what matters is documentary evi-
dence — the birth certificate in the
registry of the Government of the
Bahamas. That it was recorded
when he was seventeen years of age
matters not one bit. As a marriage
officer for nearly forty years, I have
seen birth certificates recorded
when individuals were in their twen-
ties and older. The official position
then is that which is recorded in the
Registry. All else can only be
regarded as unreliable oral sugges-
tions, rumours and old wives tales!

Let's then get then beyond all
these stories and opinions and

s

Rev Dr J Emmette Weir

undocumented legends about the
birth of Sir Lynden. Unless and until
documentary evidence to the con-
trary is produced, the official and
relevant data is that to be found in
the Registry. To act in any other
way is to show scant respect for our
own Bahamian institutions! Yes,
what is important about Sir Lyn-
den Pindling (and indeed about
every great Bahamian of the past) is
not the circumstances of birth, but
the contribution that he and they
made for the advancement of the
people of our beloved Bahamaland.

When the evil Roman Emperor,
Nero embarked upon a policy of
persecuting the early Christians at
Rome, Peter was fleeing from that
great city, capital of the Roman
Empire. On his way, he had a vision
of The Christ who challenged him
“Quo vadis? Whither goest thou?”
Had the Apostle not returned to
Rome to suffer along with the
Christians there, he would not have
fulfilled the ministry to which he
was called by The Master.

And now, my dear reader, what
about you? You know of the
achievements of Joseph, the
Israelite slave, who rose to become
Pharaoh's viceroy in ancient Egypt
(Genesis 37, 39-45), of Barack
(“Blessed one”) who came from a
boyhood in Hawaii to occupy the
White House, and of Hubert
Alexander, who developed from
the boy in Abaco to become the
Prime Minister of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas.

Dear reader, as I approach the
conclusion of this communication,
need I remind you of the sterling,
exemplary achievements of:

¢ Joseph, the dreamer, the
Israelite Patriarch, who rose from
slavery to become the Prime Minis-
ter of Egypt?

¢ Barack, who rose from boy-
hood in Hawaii to occupy the White
House in Washington?

¢ Roland, the boy from the Cur-
rent, Eleuthera, who ascended to
become the first Premier of our
young nation?

¢ Lynden, who came from East
Street to serve as the first Prime
Minister of an independent
Bahamas?

¢ Cecil, one of the greatest polit-
ical leaders our nation has ever seen,
whom I remember being a “big
boy” when growing up on West
Street, Nassau.

e Perry “the Valley Boy” who
became Prime Minister.

¢ Orville, who moved from a big
house on Hay Street, to the Big
House on Mount Fitzwilliam.

¢ Or - Hubert, who came from a
small settlement in Abaco, to be
called for the third time, to serve as
Prime Minister of our Beloved
Bahamaland?

I think not! No, my dear reader, I
need not remind you of the achieve-
ments of these eight great men; for
you know of them. What is my
responsibility at this juncture, how-
ever, is to remind you that the most
important question for you is that
put to the fugitive Peter, when
instructed by the Master to return to
Rome, “Whither goest thou?”

For the answer you give to this
all important question (by your own
words and deeds) will determine
whether you are on the destructive
road to death, the death of your
ambtions, aspirations and dreams,
or whether you are destined for
greatness — the greatness to be
realised when your vision is in align-
ment with the plan designed for you
by the great Architect.

Let your light so shine before
men that they may see your good
works and glorify your Father which
and glorify your father which is in
heaven.” (MATT. 5:16, A.V.)



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WELL ESTABLISHED GATED COMMUNITY LOCATED NEAR

SOON TO BE DEVELOPED
BAHAMAR RESORT

DUPLEX LOT 62 X130 IN PRIME LOCATION

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

LIS senior

students head ©
off to Europe ¥

LUCAYA International
School students along with
their teacher Sydney Watson
are pictured at the Grand
Bahama International Air-
port last weekend embarking
on their European school
trip.

The students have been
fundraising for their excur-
sion since early last year and
will visit many of the places

The group will travel to
Italy and Greece and visit
such famous places as the
Vatican, the Colosseum,
Greek theatre, the Parthenon
and many more well-known
and historic attractions.

The students and their
teacher will be away for over
a week and their trip is a part
of the school's goal to teach
children to be internationally
minded and well-rounded








_—



—.
4

ea as

7 Pet

ue

they have studied during their

time at LIS. individuals.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
BOLLINGEN HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SEB FAMILY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
APPAKAESHA LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLEAR GLASS HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp.
Bahamas.

Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Photo courtesy of LIS School

bg

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RICHLANDS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAROULA-THEO LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CORONA ELLINGTON INC.

—*

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CORONA ELLINGTON INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





Rotary Club
makes donation
to the Bahamas
Diabetic
Association

THE ROTARY CLUB of East
Nassau made its annual dona-
tion to the Bahamas Diabetic
Association. Pictured is club
president Brian Moodie and
president-elect Michelle Rassin
presenting a cheque for $6000
to Bradley Cooper of the BDA.

Astronauts successfully
install set of solar wings

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

SPACEWALKING astronauts
installed the last set of solar wings
at the international space station
Thursday, accomplishing the top
job of shuttle Discovery’s mis-
sion, according to Associated
Press.

Steven Swanson and Richard
Arnold II struggled with some
cable connections, but managed
to hook everything up.

“It wasn’t quite as smooth as
we had hoped, but those guys did
a great job,” astronaut Joseph
Acaba told Mission Control.

The next milestone will be
today, when the folded-up solar
wings are unfurled.

Manpower was needed inside
and out to attach the $300 mil-

lion segment to the space station.
Swanson and Arnold helped their
colleagues inside the shuttle-space
station complex cautiously move
the 31,000-pound, 45-foot-long
girder into position with a robot-
ic arm.

“Keep coming,” one of the
spacewalkers said. “It really looks
good to me.”

The actual attachment
occurred an hour into the space-
walk, and the hookups were com-
pleted two hours later.

Discovery delivered the new
wings earlier this week. It’s the
final of solar wings to be installed
at the 10-year-old space station
and will bring it to full power.

It’s also the last major Ameri-
can-made piece of the space sta-
tion.

?

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WAKEUP LOCK INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ETOILE LUMINEUSE INC.

0

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ETOILE LUMINEUSE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

They moved swiftly to
manoeuvre out of the dirty spill,
which they estimated to be
around one square mile in size,
and sent The Tribune pho-
tographs of the thick brown
sludge which subsequently coated
their fishing equipment.

“Tt took us a while to get out of
it,” she said.

The couple reported the inci-
dent to the Department of Envi-
ronmental Health, but Mrs Cal-
lender said she did not get the
impression that the matter was
taken seriously.

“The man who they said was
responsible for that area said he
did not know anything about it
and he didn’t seem too both-
ered,” said Mrs Callender,
adding: “It’s just not acceptable.”

Mrs Callender’s experience
took place a day prior to the

Environmental hazards

alleged reporting of another
major hazard by a Delta airline
pilot to the Air Traffic Control
tower at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

A concerned member of the
public informed this newspaper
that he had overheard a radio
transmission by the pilot indicat-
ing that he had spotted a “ten to
fifteen mile long” slick off the
northern side of New Providence
as he had piloted the aircraft over
the area.

However, so far none of the
authorities contacted by The Tri-
bune, including an air traffic ser-
vices official, Minister of the
Environment, Earl Deveaux, and
a member of the country’s
national Oil Spill Contingency
Response Committee, were able
to confirm knowledge of the

incident.

Mr Deveaux indicated that
Port Authority controller Cap-
tain Anthony Allen has primary
responsibility for organising a
response to such incidents, how-
ever messages left for Captain
Allens since Tuesday have not
been returned.

Pollution of coastal waters by
oil has the potential to threaten
marine and birdlife.

In the wake of a photograph
showing an oil slick hundreds of
feet long along the coast paral-
lel to the Clifton Pier power plant
in June 2007, State Minister for
Public Utilities, Phenton Ney-
mour, announced that the Gov-
ernment had spent half a million
dollars on oil response equipment
intended to help mitigate such
hazards in that area in the future.







ABACOMARKETS

Chairman’s Report — Q4, 2008

We are pleased to report to you that our fourth quarter results continue to show steady, positive
improvements among our performing locations in the midst of challenging market conditions - as
we record a net profit of $1.531m for the quarter and $2m for the year. These results, which were
driven in large part by the significant increase in sales - up 17.1% over the same period the previous
year, validate our commitment to the basics of our business to bring about steady progress in key
areas of our operations. Now, more than ever, our customers are looking for real, noticeable value
on basic, everyday items. Our ‘price cuts’ and club specials are delivering that value and the
increase in customer transactions reflects positive response to them. In addition to the increase in
sales, the Company’s expenses continued to be carefully managed - reducing slightly as a percentage
of sales despite ever-increasing costs - with utilities, in particular, continuing to rise with an
increase of over $750k for the year. We are also beginning to see an improvement in our shrink
management as our gross margin increase of 0.9% was also driven by a reduction in shrink as a
percentage of sales by 20% - though the absolute shrink dollar amount remained the same as the
previous year. Our Domino’s Pizza franchise sales also remain strong with efficiencies and savings
from the closure of East Bay St. store bringing immediate results as the franchise retained a
majority of sales from that location.

As reported recently, we also made the very difficult decision to close Cost Right Abaco, Abaco
Markets started in Abaco - and this decision to close Cost Right Abaco was something we have
struggled with for a long time - trying so many different options and investing a lot of money to
make it work. However, we were just not getting enough support to sustain the investment and
focus there. While we were very disappointed to close Cost Right Abaco, we are obviously
responsible to do what is best for the Company as a whole - particularly given the current
economic environment which requires the focus and dedication of all our resources to ensure that
the great steps we have made toward stability are safeguarded.

This has been a tough year to operate in a market experiencing significant challenges. Despite the
challenges, however, we are finally realizing the economies of scale, improved group buying and
efficiencies among our performing locations we have sought in recent years, which is translating
into steadily improving results. Our customers are seeing the difference and we are confident that
you, our valued shareholders, will note the changes in our position and it is the result of a lot of
things coming together. As indicated earlier, we do expect a continued softening of the economy
in the coming quarters which is likely to impact our results. However, the concerted focus on
driving sales through pricing, controlling expenses and continuing to improve our shrink, that has
delivered the stability our Company needed, remains our priority operating in the current market
conditions.

R. Craig Symonette
Match 18, 2009

ABACOMARKETS

UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE QUARTER ENDED JANUARY 31, 2009

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

FROM page one

managers, so the company can “meet its bank
covenants and financial obligations” and be in
a “position of strength moving forward.”

Senior vice-president of public affairs at
Atlantis, Ed Fields, said the move was an
“effort to avoid other more painful methods
such as pay cuts or additional lay-offs.”

Mr Moss, in a statement, said: “How is it
that Kerzner could ask/demand that workers
take an unpaid vacation when the Employ-
ment Act is very clear that vacation time is to
be paid for?”

The businessman and attorney, also an aspir-
ing contender for the deputy leadership of the
PLP, called on the Minister of Labour “to look
into this matter to ensure that those that refuse
Kerzner’s invitation are not terminated.”

“Whilst I understand the shrinkage of the
economy, we are talking about a company that
spent in excess of $30 million on the opening of
its new hotel in Dubai just a few months ago
and now they are hypocritical in asking staff to
take a cut.

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

PLP hopeful claims
Kerzner’s ‘voluntary unpaid
vacation’ goes against the
Employment Act

“It is setting the wrong example and is anal-
ogous to the big bonuses paid by AIG execu-
tives in a downed economy with money from
tax payers,” he added.

Kerzner International described the exer-
cise as part of a broader “cost-containment”
effort being implemented at its resorts world-
wide.

Mr Fields said that at the same time, 20 staff
members at the company’s Fort Lauderdale
office were laid off and some unfilled positions
were removed from the pay roll.

The company continues to “aggressively take
steps” to expand its revenue, added the
spokesman.

The move comes four months after the com-
pany let go 800 workers from the resort in
November, in the wake of falling occupancy
levels and booking forecasts.

Year Ended
January 31, 2009

Year Ended
January 31, 2008





Sales $ 91,180 82,777
Cost of sales (64,461) (58,134)
Gross profit 26,719 24,643
Selling, general and administrative expenses (24,035) (22,092)
Other operating income 383 394
Net operating profit 3,067 2,945
Gain on disposal of investment - 150
Pre-opening costs (24) (120)
Property revaluation write-back (note 5) 56 -
Interest expense (283) (203)
Dividends on preference shares (620) (807)
Net profit on continuing operations 2,196 1,965
Gain on disposal of subsidiary - 39
Restructuring reserve (250) 350
Net profit/(loss) on discontinuing operations 58 (177)
Net profit $ 2,004 2177
Profit per share $0.127 $0.138

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Year ended
January 31, 2009

Year ended
January 31, 2008





Net profit for period $ 2,004 2,177
Net cash provided by operating activities 6,575 710
Net cash (used in)/provided by investing activities (4,077) 3,354
Net cash provided by/(used in) financing activities 99 (5,195)
Increase/(decrease) in cash $ 2,597 (1,131)
ABACO MARKETS LIMITED
EXPLANATORY NOTES

TO INTERIM UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Quarter Ended January 31, 2009

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards using the same accounting policies and methods of computation as
the Consolidated Financial Statements included in the 2007 Annual Report.

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Abaco Markets Limited
(“the Company”) and its significant wholly owned subsidiaries: AML Foods (Nassau)
Limited, Cost Right Nassau Limited, Solomon’s Club (Freeport) Limited, Thompson
Wholesale Limited and Caribbean Franchise Holdings Limited.

2. DISCONTINUING OPERATIONS

On March 9, 2009, the Company ceased operations in Cost Right Abaco. Accordingly,
the assets and liabilities of Cost Right Abaco are treated as discontinuing as of January

31, 2009.

3. PREFERENCE SHARES













January 31, January 31,

2009 2008

Assets $ 30,343 26,197

Liabilities (18,055) (16,499)

Equity $ 12,288 9,698

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Quarter Ended Quarter Ended

January 31, 2009 January 31, 2008

Sales $ 26,457 22,599
Cost of sales (18,687) (16,154)

Gross profit 7,770 6,445
Selling, general and administrative expenses (5,984) (5,561)

Other operating income 116 123

Net operating profit 1,902 1,007
Pre-opening costs - (9)

Property revaluation write-back (note 5) 56 -
Interest expense (80) (35)
Dividends on preference shares (136) (189)

Net profit on continuing operations 1,742 774

Restructuring reserve (250) -
Net profit/(loss) on discontinuing operations 39 (146)

Net profit $ 1,531 628

Profit per share $0.097 $0.040

The Company made total redemptions of $810,000 on Class A preference shares and
$300,000 on Class B preference shares during the year ended January 31, 2009.

On October 17, 2008, the Company agreed with its Class B preference shareholders to
restructure their shares by extending the maturity date from December 31, 2012 to
December 31, 2013. In addition, the Class B preference shareholders agreed to subscribe
for an additional $1.25m of shares. These funds were used to redeem in full the
outstanding Class A preference shares.

CAPITAL ASSETS

On July 3, 2008 the Company completed the purchase of a property on Queen’s Highway
in Freeport for $2.4m. The purchase was partly financed through a loan from Royal
Bank of Canada in amount of $2m bearing the interest of 7% and payable over five years.
Solomon’s Freeport has occupied this property since December 2004.

An appraisal of the property determined a value of $3m. The difference between
appraised value and purchase cost was recorded in the property revaluation surplus in
amount of $601,000.

REVALUATION SURPLUS
A revaluation exercise was performed for Thompson Boulevard property appraising its

value at $3m and resulting in a write-back of previous revaluation charge in amount of
$56,000. In addition, property revaluation surplus was increased by $193,000.

ORDINARY SHARES

On January 31, 2009 the Company canceled unused stock options as of that date. As a
result of this, total number of issued ordinary shares decreased by 208,000.

At the close of business on January 31, 2009, total number of issued ordinary shares was
15,599,211.

Copies of a full set of the unaudited financial statements can be obtained from
Ms.Brendalee Gibson, at Abaco Markets Corporate Offices at Town Centre Mall, Blue
Hill Road, Nassau, The Bahamas, tel. I 242 325 21 22.
PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

New investors trading in equity

PLP to hold service honouring

Sit Lynden Pindling's birth

FROM page one

Preceding the church service,
members of the PLP, with Sir Lyn-
den’s widow Dame Marguerite, will
also lay a wreath at Sir Lynden’s
grave site.

The recent furor surrounding Sir
Lynden was sparked over the past
two weeks following an explosive
Insight article written by The Tri-
bune’s managing editor John Mar-
quis. The article, the result of an
interview with a former PLP trea-

surer, claimed that the former Prime |



Minister received money from drug i =
king pin Joe Lehder, who had his SCE

headquarters in Norman’s Cay. Mr
Chauncey Tynes, Sr, also believes

that his pilot son, Chauncey, Jr, who is alleged to have
flown money shipments for Joe Lehder at Norman’s }
Cay to Sir Lynden, was killed because he knew too :

much.

Additionally, another front-page article called into
question the nationality of the former Prime Minister,
citing sources who claim that Sir Lynden was in fact

born in Jamaica in the small town of Cotton Tree.

shares for more stable bonds

FROM page one

sure in favour of more bond and in some
instances even cash.

"That's typical after periods of volatility,
so I can say that there has been interest in
doing that," said Vice-president of Colonial
Pension Services Larry Gibson.

This move would be a good one for per-
sons close to retirement who need a quick
return on their investment, he said. But for
younger investors, who may be cautious
about investing in this current climate he
advised them to wait the storm out.

"If you're a young person with a very
long time to retirement, the empirical evi-
dence suggests that you should ride it out.
Because you are buying in essence the
stocks at a huge discount, given their
declines, you're actually bringing down the
average costs and in the long term you
would be rewarded for it. After this reces-
sion is done and we are on the road to
recovery, you would look back on this peri-
od and say this is a period where you got
phenomenal value."

According to one adviser, government
bonds are especially attractive because they
can be easily resold before the bond reach-
es maturity — without a penalty.

President of CFAL Anthony Ferguson
said he hasn't seen a huge number of sea-
soned investors moving from equity shares
to bonds. He said it is a route new investors
are taking because of concerns over the
economy and company earnings over the
next 12 to 18 months.

"Most new money is heading into the
bond market and you have select investors
who see opportunities or see undervalued
securities, who are quietly picking up under-
valued equity securities. | wouldn't say that
people are moving from equity to bonds, I
think what people are doing is, new invest-
ments or new cash that they have they are
buying more bonds and preference shares.

Last year, equity markets on the
Bahamas Investment and Securities
Exchange (BISX) were down by about 17
per cent. But unlike international counter-
parts, the local exchange market is shielded
from the economic crisis crippling sectors
abroad, according to insiders.

Still, the recent provisional liquidation
of insurance company CLICO (Bahamas)
and the current economic downturn have
some investors worried about losing their
finances. But Mr Gibson said the two cir-
cumstances are completely independent
and should not cloud investors’ decisions.

"They're different things — whether
you're in a recession or whether you're in an
expansion, they are individual companies
that are either poorly managed or make
mistakes. So that's not purely driven by the
current market cycles, it's driven by lack
of adherence to diversification and risk
management principals.

His advice to investors in the current cli-
mate — continue to invest in the local mar-
ket but research prospective companies
first.

"There are still good, well-managed com-
panies out there that even though their
price has gone down over the long-term —
10 years or more — you would be well com-
pensated.

“Tf your investment horizon is short, then
clearly you need to be more cautious,” he
said.

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. Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

CAROLINE DELORIS
"Eloise" BAIN, 80

of Springfield Road, Fox
Dale, Fox Hill will be held
on Saturday, March 21st,
3:00 p.m. at. St. Gregory's
Anglican Church,
Carmichael Road.
Archdeacon James
Palacious and Fr. Colin
Saunders will officiate.
Interment will follow in
Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, John. F. Kennedy
Drive.

Precious memories will forever live in the hearts of
her father, Marshall Higgs; sons, Bradford Joseph
Coleman and Charles Bain; daughters, Verlene D.
Palacious, Alexandrea G. Bain, Clara Y. Stuart and
Mary E. Levarity; daughter-in-law, Tanya Bain; sons-
in-law, Eugene Palacious and Leo Levarity; two
brothers, Vincent and Benson Higgs; two sisters,
Cynthia Higgs-Stubbs and Coral Huyler; sisters-in-
law, Delcine and Gail Higgs; grand daughters, Anzwa
Johnson and Mirada Johnson, Nickara Roberts, Anna-
clara Stuart, Tamara Brennen and Leatrice Levarity;
grandsons, Antonio Roberts, Stevie Brennen, Bradford
Coleman Jr. and Ahmad Bain; great grandchildren,
Tifari, Ziya, Nyamekye, Nyara, Dave, Eugena, Lacoia,
Samara, Tamara, Tarrell, Marion, Nikita, Britany and
Marquill, Keano and Breanna Roberts; numerous nieces
and nephews including Kermit, Lewis, Benjamin and
Naomi Stubbs, Jackie and Clarence Winter, Don and
Roger Brown, Rosita Duvalier, Nedda Wright, Lauren
Kemp, Marva Burrows, Gwendolyn Davis, Melvern
and Karen Brown, Andrew and Raquel Huyler, Temille
Huyler-Brown, Keva Rolle, Kevin Stuart, Kayla and
Katisha Stubbs, Benson Jr., Sherman, Travis and
Marshall Higgs; friends including Olivia Levarity,
Florence Levarity, Greg, Marion, Elizabeth and Roberts,
Laverne, Dion, Doyle, Avon, Faye and Shandra
Sainders, Nicole Knowles, Barbara Weech and Errol
Smith; godchildren, Kermitt Stuart, Anvar Roberts and
Harvett Marshall.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Friday from 12:00
noon to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. and at the church from 1:30 p.m. until
service



Claim that man died because hospital staff
took more than 40 minutes to respond

FROM page one

the man lose buckets of blood on
the historic stone steps as he fran-
tically called for ambulance ser-
vices stationed at the Princess
Margaret Hospital less than 100 ft
away.

The pastor ran to the man as
soon as he fell at around 3pm on
Tuesday. He said he had seen the
man, who was wearing a yellow
shirt and khaki trousers, waiting
anxiously for a prescription in the
Princess Margaret Hospital Clin-
ic as pharmacy staff idly gossiped
among themselves.

As he left the clinic in a hurry,
Rev Cooper said the man, who
has not as yet been identified by
police, walked up the Queen’s
Staircase and fell on the platform
about half-way up at around 3pm
on Tuesday.

Pastor Cooper rushed to his
side as he was lying face forward
on the steps, moaning. He said his
nose was broken, the bones in his

forehead were broken and blood
and puss were pouring out of a
gash on the left side of his head.

He called 911 repeatedly and
ran to the hospital where he
shouted for staff to find a doctor
for the dying man who he esti-
mates was around 50 years
old.

But Pastor Cooper said securi-
ty and administration staff seemed
to be in no hurry to help, and the
doctor took his time as he walked
up the steps.

“When the doctor looked at
him he moved him on his back
the blood was just dripping out
of the gash on the top left of his
forehead,” Pastor Cooper said.

“There were like three sink fulls
of blood and puss on the ground.”

The doctor took the man’s
pulse and confirmed he was living,
but he continued to lose blood,
and consciousness, for another 15
minutes before paramedics
arrived with a stretcher, Pastor
Cooper said.

He was finally taken to hospital
45 minutes after he fell, Pastor
Cooper claims.

“Tt wasn’t the fall that was fatal,
it was their negligence, and slow
response that killed the man,” he
alleged.

“He would have been messed
up because of the fall, but he died
because he lost so much blood
and because they didn’t react fast
enough.

“It’s not like they did every-
thing they could, they didn’t do
anything.

“That man died because it was
their fault.

“They don’t care and this can-
not go on.”

Princess Margaret Hospital did
not respond to calls before The
Tribune went to press.

Dr Davidson Hepburn from the
Department Antiquities, Monu-
ments and Museums Corporation
(AMMC) confirmed on Wednes-
day the steps are consistently
maintained and are in good repair.

Man dies after severe beating

FROM page one

"Police are sure of the circumstances sur-
rounding this incident and have launched an
intensive investigation," ASP Evans said yester-

day.

Smith is a resident of Williams Lane, off Kemp

Road.

His death marks the second homicide this week
and the sixteenth for the year, according to ASP

Evans.

On Sunday, a game of dominoes turned dead-
ly when a man was shot in the head during a
brazen daylight attack. The victim, Mark 'Scab-
by’ Daniels, was playing dominoes with friends

outside a building on Finlayson Street when a
gunman approached and shot him in the head.

1c.

at the scene.

When police arrived a short time later —
around 1pm — they found Daniels on the porch
of a single story white and green wooden building
where he reportedly worked as an auto-mechan-

The father-of-five, said to be in his mid-30s,
was found lying on his back dressed in a black
short-sleeved shirt and short green trousers.

Emergency personnel pronounced him dead

Family and friends converged on the house
and screamed in anguish as officials carried
Daniels’ body away.

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BASRA locates
boats used by
crew involved in
iguana slaughter,
conch harvesting

FROM page one

$800 for possession of unde-
veloped conch and $200 for
possession of an iguana, Palm
was excused by George
Town, Exuma magistrate
Ivan Ferguson, and the other
two men pictures have so far
escaped arrest.

But BASRA has provided
new information which could
lead to their apprehension.

BASRA operations man-
ager Captain Chris Lloyd said
both ‘Miss Emily’ and ‘Gone
Away’ are still in the
Bahamas.

Capt Lloyd identified “Miss
Emily’ in the Facebook pic-
tures as he had previously
approached the captain for
illegally flying a Jolly Roger
pirate flag when anchored in
Nassau Harbour.

He said the boat moved
from Nassau harbour for
some time, but has now
returned.

‘Gone Away’ is reportedly
chartering sailboat trips out
of the Abacos.

Capt Lloyd said: “I talked
to cruisers who met these
boats in the Biminis and they
assure me these young peo-
ple are not cruisers, but cow-
boys.

“The photos (on Face-
book) circulated locally and
made available to the press
also show an illegal speargun
in the dinghy.

“This I feel is the biggest
offence of all, equal to an
unlicenced firearm.”

Police have been alerted
about the whereabouts of the
sailboats but have not said
they are any closer to appre-
hending them.

Executive director of the
Bahamas National Trust Eric
Carey said: “It’s not dead yet.
It may fade away but some
people are still interested in it
and they are outraged.

“Unfortunately the reality
is that most of them are not
caught and everybody pleads
ignorance.

“But the Bahamas does
have a number of laws and
regulations in place that
relate to the marine environ-
ment and we want to throw
the book at people. We
should aggressively seek to
pursue these individuals.”

Rust and Palm were seen
in Joe Sound, north Long
Island last month by boaters
who said they were bragging
without remorse about eat-
ing protected wildlife to oth-
er sailboaters. They are said
to have sailed “Sea Monkey’
south to Conception Island,
Rum Cay and Clarence
Town.

Casuarina McKinney Lam-
bert, executive director of the
Bahamas Reef Environment
Educational Foundation
(BREEP), said: “I have
heard several other people
describe how these people
were laughing about getting
off so lightly.

“Tt is really a disgrace and
people who behave in this
way, and violate our laws
should not be welcome in our
country.

“Tenorance is no excuse;
the fines were laughably
small given the crimes com-
mitted and they will serve as
no deterrent at all.”
PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

21ST BAAA’S NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS DIVISIONAL RANKINGS

SAC on top at the









































end of (la aie i JUNIOR GIRLS iP 1) Harbour Island 9 C.R Walker 4
V ? Queen’s College 20 SEU (0 re vee : Preston Albury 3
i St. Augustine’s 14 }4) Doris Johnson S.C Bootle 1
FROM page 15 : C.H Reeves 13 9 Bishop Michael Eldon 7 Anatol Rodgers {
eae : Long Island 1 i C.1 Gibson 5
Rolle set a new mark in the ; Bishop Michael Eldon 10 5 i Brame SENIOR BOYS
narrowly surpassed the 15-year : L-W Young 6 ws i: Augustine's 375 = C.V Bethel 22
old mark of 4:58.74 set in 1994 by North Andros 6 3 4H 0 NE h 03, os St. Augustine’s 19
Lucille Guerrier. i St. Andrew’s 6 2 AF Br 50 bs Jack Hayward 13
Rolle finished well ahead of i St. Anne’s 5 Ca Noch roe . \) C.C Sweeting 11
the field in 4:58.46s. ? Moore’s Island 5 - ed Mae NCA 10
Other record breakers on the : Central Eleuthera 4 a Preston H. Albury 13 8 Temple Christian 10
dey included S.C Melherson's ; Zion Christian 3 eae | : Long Island 9
Avery Thompson in the Junior | Coakley 3 S.C McPherson 10 6 LN Coakley 7
Boys’ javelin and Bishop Michael } 7 0 Nash 1 TA Thompson 10 i) Baris Johnscr 6
Eldon’s Johnathon Farquharson } | Queen’s College 8.5 6
in the Intermediate Boys’ 100m, : C.H Reeves 8 i) C.1 Gibson 5
and Leonardo Ferguson in the ; INTERMEDIATE GIRLS L.N Coakley 8 ) St. John’s 4
Senior Boys’ Shot Put. : St. Augustine’s 47.5 Long Island 7 iy Moore’s Island 3
Thompson’s throw of 43.40m : Queen’s College 16 _ Chuch of God 9 ci Abaco Central 2
beat the year old mark of 36.97m : C.V Bethel | St. Andrew’s 5 u Jordan Prince William 1

set by Marcus Russell, Far-
quharson’s time of 10.72s easily }
beat the 18-year old mark of :
10.71s set by Quinton Bain, and }
Ferguson’s throw of 14.81m was i
barely challenged by the remain-
der of the field to take hold of

the event record.

In the final event of the day, }
the Senior Boys’ 100m, a heated }
battle produced the country’s }
first pair of qualifiers for the }
upcoming Junior Pan Am ‘

Games.

Temple Christian’s Warren }
Fraser and SAC’s Marcus }
Thompson finished in that order }
and surpassed the standard of ;

10.60s.

Fraser claimed the National
title in 10.50s while Thompson }

finished in 10.55s.

The three-day meet continues }
today, with day two expected to }
feature highlights on the track }
with the finals of the 3000m :
Steeplechase, sprint hurdles, }
400m and in the field the triple }
jump, high jump, long jump and i





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Machine dominated the leaderboard, heading four of the six contested divisions.



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FROM page 14

of the international players in a
bid to try and assemble wher-
ever possible the best national
team in their quest to make a
run at qualifying for the 2012
Olympic Games in London.

But Hepburn said they don’t
have a shortage of players to
accomplish that feat. Their prob-
lem is and will continue to be
finding the financial resources
to achieve their goal.

“When we reach to Centro,
it’s a fight for us because of
countries like Cuba, Puerto
Rico, US Virgin Islands,
Jamaica and others,” Hepburn
said.

“We’ve competed with them.
In fact our last team fought well.
We’ve been losing to Cuba by
four points the most and we
held Puerto Rico right to the
fourth quarter where the point
deferential showed where they
won by about seven or so.”

The challenge, according to
Hepburn, is that the players are
spread so “far and wide” which

makes it difficult for the federa-
tion to assemble the collegiate
and professional players to come
together.

“Guys are saying to us that
they can’t come home because
of contractual agreement or
summer classes,” Hepburn said.
“We attempted year before last
to finance bringing the guys
home.

“But it’s a very costly venture
to assemble the national team
consisting of your best players.
We attempted it, the finances
fell through, but this is some-
thing that we will continue to
do.”

Storr took it further and said
that with team sports, as
opposed to track and field, it’s
easy to get an athlete to qualify
in the 100 metres for the
Olympics as it is for a national
team.

“Tf a guy is in Greece, how
am I going to ask him to come
home and I cannot pay him
when he gets home?” Storr said.
“If we want to take 20 guys into
Exuma for one month, is this

Intelligent. Creative.

country willing to support that?

“This is something that this
country have to understand.
Until we can get that financing,
it’s going to be very difficult to
get the best players in this coun-
try together.”

To those players who are
based at home and have been
discouraged over the years
because they come out and try
out for the team and they are
eventually replaced by the inter-
national players, Hepburn said
he sympathised with them.

“T always tell them that’s the
reality of sports. You’re look-
ing for your best and you want
to take your best,” Hepburn
said. “So when you have a better
player show up late and he may
have indicated or you may have
indicated an interest in him,
when he comes, you want to
make provisions for him.

“But I don’t think it was bla-
tant. It’s not something that was
already planned. A guy comes
home because we leave the win-
dow open for him. If his skills
surpass the guy that is here, the

coach would take him.”

Hepburn said they were going
to invite the top players to come
out and try out for the team to
ensure that they were going to
be able to field the best team.

The only way the federation
can get around it and not dis-
courage the players, Hepburn
said they will probably take a
look at forming a A and B team.

And Storr said there was no
reason why the federation
couldn’t have a standing nation-
al home team that could be in
place to compete against the vis-
iting teams that came in to play
in exhibition games.

“Most of these players come
home, they get fat and out of
shape and then they blame the
coaches,” Storr said. “Don’t get
me wrong, we have enough tal-
ent at home to represent this
country.”

But he said if the local players
didn’t bring their game up to
standard, they would continue
to get left behind when the
international players came home
to try out.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



Nos

BASEBALL

JBLN SCHEDUL

e Here’s a look at the Junior Baseball League of Nassau’s
schedule of games this weekend at the St. Andrew’s Field of
Dreams:

TEE BALL

Saturday

11 am Raptors vs Sand Gnats; 1 pm Grasshoppers vs
Sidewinders; 3 pm Knights vs Blue Claws.

COACH PITCH

10 am Angels vs Astros; 12:30 pm Blue Jays vs Cubs; 3 pm
Athletics vs Diamond Backs.

MINOR LEAGUE

10 am Red Sox vs Royals; 12:30 pm Mets vs Rays.
MAJOR LEAGUE

12:30 pm Reds vs Mariners; 3 pm Indians vs Marlins.
JUNIOR LEAGUE

10 am Dodgers vs Twins; 12:30 pm Yankees vs Cardinals.
SENIOR LEAGUE

3 pm (Saturday) Pirates vs Rangers.

3 pm (Sunday) Tigers vs Phillies.











SPECIAL athletes from
Nassau will travel to Grand
Bahama this weekend to par-
ticipate in the annual Tennis
Tournament, according to
Special Olympics Director,
Basil Christie.

Ten athletes, coached by
Bradley Bain, have been
training diligently all year for
this special event, and are
excited about the opportuni-
ty to bring home their share
of medals.

During the course of the
year Special Olympics
Bahamas organises competi-
tions in all of the sports
offered.

The tennis tournament is
the first of the year.

In May, the annual Nation-
al Games features the sports

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS

Special athletes prepare for tennis



COACH Bradley Bain with athletes Kevin Archer and Zekuumba Major.

Photo/Basil Christie.

of Bocce, Track & Field and
Swimming. In June, the ath-

letes participate in a Judo
tournament. In December,

Special Olympics will host the
annual Caribbean Invitation-
al Basketball Tournament.

This is the 14th year for the
Tennis Tournament and
Loretta Parris, Director for
Special Olympics in Grand
Bahama, promised that this
will be the best one ever.

The 25-member team in
Grand Bahama is coached by
Olivia Mackey, who boasts of
the strength of her team and
is proud of the progress her
team has made over the
years.

The all-day event is sched-
uled to begin at 9 am at the
Kwan Yin tennis courts and
the public is invited to show
up to cheer the athletes on
and witness their athletic
skills in this sport.

THOMPSON TRADING YOUTH CUP WINNERS



e The 'Mid-Week Track Series’ began under dark clouds, but

the track cyclists came out ready to ride. The youth took over
and began the event; all indications told us this series would be }
very exciting. :
The standard has been set.

Robert the 'Penetrator’ Bethell has blazed the track and all
other cyclists will have to gear up as the track races will get

hot!!! The quote for these track events is 'Take No Prisoners’.
Results:

Two-lap Time Trial (1/2 mile) — Robert Bethell, 1min 15.05 sec;

Henry Kline, Imin 16.41 sec; Robert Butler, Imin 21.15 sec;
Peter Graham, *lmin 24.22 sec; Antinece Simmons, *1min
30.41 sec; Justin Minnis, *lmin 30.81 sec; Amanda Graham,
Imin 34.81 sec; Hayden Graham, *Imin 40.34 sec; Larry Rus-
sell, 2min 04.12 sec.

The public is invited to come out and join the fun every
Wednesday at the race track starting at 6 pm.

BASKETBALL

BSC SCHEDUL

e Here’s a look at the schedule of games on Saturday in the
Baptist Sports Council’s 2009 Joyce Minus Basketball Classic
at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex:

Court One — 10 am Latter-Day No.2 vs Faith United (15); 11
am Golden Gates vs Latter-Day Saints (15); Noon Golden
Gates vs Latter-Day (19); 1 pm Golden Gates No.2 vs Mercy
Seat (19); 2 pm City of Praise vs Pilgrim (M); 3 pm Latter-Day
Saints vs Ebenezer (M); 4 pm Christian Tabernacle vs Calvary
Bible (M).

Court Two — 10 am Macedonia vs Temple Fellowship (15); 11
am Temple Fellowship vs Miracle Working COG (19); Noon











Macedonia vs Golden Gates (L); 1 pm Golden Gates vs Christ-

ian Tabernacle (M); 2 pm Church of the Nazarene vs Evange-
listic Center (M); 3 pm New Bethlehem vs Bahamas Harvest
(M)

Calebrating a Disinguished Sout



Stefano A. Johnson/Tribune staff

Members of the Doris Johnson Marlins rugby team pose after winning the recent Thompson Trading
Youth Cup recently. The team defeated Queens College in the finals, with a score of 15-10. Pictured,
from left, are Sean Kemp, Assistant Coach Andy Bodie, Patrick Johnson, Branden Thompson,
Michael Clarke, Ajayi Clarke, James Rollins, Charles Martin, George Pratt and Coach Kevin Salabie.

On Saturday, March 28", the Montagu Constituency Association
will host a celebratory dinner in honor of its past Members of

Parliament.

—

hw.

Sir Geoffrey Johnstone

Sir Kendal Isaacs J. Henry Bostwick Sir Orville Turnquest

1967 - 1972 1972 - 1977 1977 -1982 1982 - 1997

Sir William Allen

Brent Symonette

1997-2002 2002-2007

From 1967 to 2007, the constituency has had a total of six Representatives. Not

only have these noble sons served Montagu with distinction, but have all gone on

to become nation builders of the highest caliber.
CY |
Nentagu lites Them!

Venue: Montagu Gardens, East Bay Street

Time: 7:30 pm

For further information on the event please contact the constituency
headquarters at (242) 393-0878



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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS







¢ Here’s a complete list of
the Bahamas Basketball
Federation’s 2009 National
Team Coaching Staff:
Junior Male Technical
Director — Reggie Forbes.
Junior/Senior Women
Technical Director — Felix
‘Fly’ Musgrove.

CADET UNDER-15 GIRLS

Head coach — Felix ‘Fly’
Musgrove. :
Assistant coaches — Anasta-
cia Moultrie and Jurelle :
Nairn.

CADET UNDER-15 BOYS ;
Head coach — Quentin Hall.
Assistant coach — Scott :
Forbes. ;
Manager — Donnie Culmer. }

JUNIOR UNDER-16 MALE
Head coach — Chevy Sim-
mons.

Assistant coaches— Darrel :
Sears (Grand Bahama) and }
Wayde Watson. i

JUNIOR UNDER-16 FEMALE :
Head coach —- Sherrell Cash :
Assistant coaches — Ter- i
rance McSweeney and Kel- }
ley Albury. é

SENIOR WOMEN

Head coach — Dr. Linda
Davis.

Assistant coaches — Char-
lene Smith and Yolette
McPhee (Grand Bahama).

SENIOR MEN i
Head coach — Charlie ‘Soft-
ly’ Robbins (Grand :
Bahama).

Assistant coaches — Kevin
‘KJ’ Johnson, Norris Bain
(Grand Bahama) and

Mario Bowleg.

BBF heads to Bimini

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Basketball Federation
men’s national round robin championship
will be going to Bimini, while the ladies’
series will be played in Grand Bahama.

Federation president Lawrence Hep-
burn made the announcement yesterday
in the foyer of the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium. He was accompanied by secre-
tary general Sharon ‘the General’ Storr
and assistant secretary Jerelle Nairn.

In releasing the calendar of events for
2009 and the coaching staff for the vari-
ous national teams, Hepburn said
because of the economic crisis that the
country is in, some of their events may
not be accomplished.

But he indicated that they are eager to
travel to Bimini from April 24-26 at the
new Gateway Gymnasium, commonly
referred to as “Laker’s Heaven.”

Taking the title from a popular song,
the tournament will be dubbed: “You
Never Get a Licking Til You Go Down
to Bimini.”

A total of nine teams from the affiliat-
ed associations of San Salvador,
Eleuthera, Grand Bahama, Exuma, Aba-
co, Inagua, New Providence, Cat Island
and North Andros have all expressed an
interest in participating.

“We're really looking forward to hav-
ing a great national championship in
Bimini,” Hepburn said. “As you know,
Bimini has one of the finest facilities and
great entertainment.

“So teams coming down will really
enjoy themselves and the people of Bimi-
ni will certainly enjoy having the
Bahamas Basketball Federation’s Nation-
al Championships there.”

As for the women’s championship,



BAHAMAS Basketball Federation president Lawrence Hepburn (center) announced plans for the 2009 season. At left is assistant secretary Jerelle
Nairn and at right is secretary general Sharon ‘the General’ Storr.

Hepburn said they wanted to also host it
on Bimini at the same time as the men’s,
but he said they just won’t have suffi-
cient time to stage all of the games over
the three-day period.

Unlike the men’s, the women’s cham-
pionship will take the form of an invita-
tional over the May 1-3.

According to Hepburn, the top three
teams from the New Providence Wom-
en’s Basketball Association, three teams
from Grand Bahama and one from

Eleuthera have been invited to partici-
pate.

“We want to encourage our associa-
tions to do more in terms of promoting
female basketball,” Hepburn said. “Right
now, we will go to an invitational for-
mat.”

If all of the teams show up, Hepburn
said they should have a very competitive
tournament on both islands.

Hepburn said they were still looking
for a title for the ladies’ tournament.

Additionally, Hepburn said the feder-
ation will be hosting a number of certifi-
cation courses to ensure that both the
coaches and the officials are properly
developed.

Both clinics will be hosted in May.

Also in May, Hepburn revealed that
the federation will host an NAIA All-
Star team, the Haiti, Cayman Islands
and Jamaican All-Star, as well as a Pri-
mary School Basketball Association’s
Championships.

Federation select national coaches

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH there is some
uncertainly as to whether or not
all of the international tourna-
ments will be held this year, the

Bahamas Basketball Federation
have assembled its core of
coaches to get the national
teams ready.

At a press conference yester-
day in the foyer of the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium, federation
president Lawrence Hepburn
said the coaching staff will com-
prise of both the junior and
senior national teams.

nament will be the Cadet
Under-15 girls heading to the
Centro Basketball Cadet from
June 3-7 in Ciudad, Victoria,
Mexico. The team will be head-
ed by Felix ‘Fly’ Musgrove.
And over the same time in
Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico for
the boys’ Centro Basket Cadet,
the team will be managed by
Donnie Culmer. The head

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MERINE DOVALUS
of BALFOUR AVENUE, P.O.BOX N-720, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13* day of
MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BRYCE VALENTINO BRAYNEN
#146B GLADSTONE TERRACE, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th day of
MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

BAHAMAS IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT





CELEBRATES IT’S 70TH YEAR ANNIVERSARY UNDER THE TEEME
“HISTORIC PAST, DYNAMIC FUTURE”
WITH A FUN/RUN/WALK











DATE:21ST MARCH 2009
TIME:7;00AM

REGISTRATION FORM









Last Name: First Name:



Street Address:



Phone No: (__) Email Address

Date of Birth: / / Gender (circleone); MF

Shirt Size (circle one): S M LG XL XXL Event: (circle one): 4.0 Mile Run

4.0 Mile Walk

Emergency Contact: Name: Phone No:



Waiver:
I know that walking/running during a Fun Run/Walk is a potentially hazardous activity. I should not participate
unless I am medically able and properly trained. Lagree to abide by any decision made by a Fun Run/Walk official
relative to my ability to safely complete the Fun Run/Walk. I assume all risk associated with participating in this
event, including but not limited to falls, contact with other participants, the effects of weather, including traffic and
conditions of the course, all such risk being known and understood by me. Having read this waiver and knowing
these facts and as my consideration of your accepting my entry, I, for myself and anyone entitled to act in my
behalf, waive and release: Bahamas Immigration, all sponsors and volunteers, and any representatives and
successors from all claims or liabilities of any kind arising from my participation in this event.

Signature: Date:



(Parent or guardian must sign if participant is under 18 years of age)

Registration Fees $10.00: (March 21" 2009: Fun Run/Walk Event Day Registration is
from 6am — 6:45am)

CATEGORIES AWARDS

UNDER 14 TROPHIES FOR 1ST PLACE
WINNERS IN
UNDER 20
20-45

45 AND ABOVE
PLACE



EACH CATEGORY





EDALS FOR 2ND &3RD
NNERS IN EACH CATEGORY





ROUTE:

The Fun Run/ Walk will commence 7:00am at Immigration’s head quarters,
Hawkins Hill traveling north to Bay Street, east on Bay Street to Montague, West
on to Shirley Street and back to Hawkins Hill, thus completing a four (4) mile Fun
Run/ Walk.



The first international tour-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KERLINE ESTIME of BLUE
HILL ROAD, P.O. BOX N-4922, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20 day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE is hereby given that ADDERLY TIBO of ST.
ALBANS DRIVE, BUILDING #24, APT#7, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 20 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that |, SAINT FIDEL SYLVERIAN
TURNQUEST of Township of Govenors Harbour in the Island
of Eleuthera, The Bahamas c/o P.O.Box EL-25051, intend to
change my name to SOPHIE SYLVERIAN TURNQUEST If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH MCINTOSH of
PINEWOOD GARDENS, P.O.BOX N-720, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13" day of
MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, KEVIN INGRAHAM of the
North Western District of the Island of New Providence intend to
change my name from KEVIN INGRAHAM to KEVIN LAURAND
INGRAHAM If there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

coach will be Quentin Hall from

Grand Bahama.

In July, the under-16 male
will travel to the Centro Bas-
ketball at a site yet to be named.
The head coach of the team will
be Chevy Simmons.

And the junior under-16 girls
will also compete in the Centro
Basketball. Sherelle Cash will
travel as the head coach.

The Bahamas won both the
junior girls and boys tourna-
ment last year to earn the rights
to travel this year.

With the Bahamas being a
possible host for the women’s
Caribbean Basketball Champi-
onships, the federation have
selected Dr. Linda Davis as the
women’s head coach.

There’s no venue or date for
the men, but the federation has
selected Charlie ‘Softly’ Rob-
bins from Grand Bahama of the
men’s team.

¢ Look at the box for a com-

not held, Hepburn said the
senior men’s team will move on
to play in the Centro Basket in
Puerto Rico after finishing
fourth at the last tournament.

The ladies, however, did not
qualify for the Centro Basket.

Sharon Storr, secretary gen-
eral of the federation, said the
federation has gone through a
vigorous selection progress in
putting the coaching staff
together.

“We’ve not put any stipula-
tions on when their terms will
end and the reason is because
we’re a new federation coming
in,” Storr said. “But if you look
at the coaching staff, there’s
been some movement, but some
positive movement in our think-
ing to where we want to be
when we start qualifying again.”

As for the qualifying process
that they have to go through,
Hepburn said the federation

plete list of the coaching staff
for all of the teams.

will definitely be looking at all

SEE page 12

If the CBC Tournaments are

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSIE DORESTIN of
THE BLUFF, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 20" day of March,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DESIREE ELISA PARKER of
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my son’s name to LAMONT
ZION PARKER to LAMONT ZION PARKER-DAMES If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-
742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUVINA RAVOL of
MACKEY STREET, P.O. BOX N-7060, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 20 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MONIQUE ASTWOOD of 165
KALANDAR ST.,#C-3, OPA LOCKA, FL.,U.S.A.,FL 33054
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of March, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


ee








FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

INSIDE ¢ Local sports news

SAC on top at the
end of day one



Tim Glarke/Tribune Staff

NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS CHAMPIONSHIP
|

y





@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH three days to deter-
mine the top high school track
and field athletes in the country,
perennial Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations cham-
pions sit atop the leaderboard in
several divisions after day one.

After day one of the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associa-
tions’ 21st National High School
Championships, the St.
Augustine’s College Big Red
Machine dominated the leader-
board, heading four of the six
contested divisions.

The 21-time Bahamas Associ-
ation of Athletic Associations
champions lead both the Junior
and Intermediate Boys along
with the Intermediate and Senior
Boys.

The Queen’s College Comets
and C.R Walker Knights head
the remaining divisions, with the
Comets leading the Junior Girls
and the Knights outfront in the
Senior Boys.

The Big Red Machine holds
their most commanding advan-
tage in the Intermediate Girls’
division with 47.5 points, 31.5
points ahead of the Comets’ 16.

In the Senior Girls’ SAC leads
the field with 57 points, 23 points
ahead of the Knights’ 34 and in
the Junior Boys’ boast a 14.5
point advantage with 37.5 points
ahead of the H.O Nash Lions’
23.

The Big Red Machine
received a number of standout

performances from a well bal-
anced team in the sprints, middle
distance, in the field and a pair of
record breaking outings from
Byron Ferguson and Hughnique
Rolle.

Ferguson set a new record in

BBF
HEADS TO
BIMINI

the Junior Boys Javelin with a
heave of 56.65m.

The two-sport star, also a soft-
ball standout, beat the previous
mark of 53.17m set by Eljin Mor-

SEE page 12



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ODYSSEY AVIATION, FOUNDING

"YELLOW JERSEY" SPONSOR OF RIDE
READIES LARGE TEAM FOR APRIL 4TH

Since the inception of the Ride for Hope Odyssey Aviation Bahamas has consistently been one of
its most generous corporate supporters. Here is their Ride for Hope experience in their own words.

The driving force behind Odyssey Aviation’s sponsorship is our President, Mr. Steven Kelly. “Our
dedication and support to the success of the Ride for Hope over the course of the past three years
has been on many different levels. The significance of this event and the impact that cancer has
on so many lives will continue to drive Odyssey Aviation’s role in ensuring the continued success

of this great charity.”

Less than 5 weeks before the inaugural Ride for Hope in 2006, Mr. Kelly decided that Odyssey would
not only step up to the plate as a good corporate citizen and help sponsor such a worthy event but it
would also field a team of riders.

The wheels were quickly set in motion and in a matter of days the first Odyssey team came together.
Employees, family and friends were eager to participate. All we needed were cycling jerseys to look
the part, and—oh yes—we also needed to train!

We quickly encouraged aviation industry friends and colleagues to pledge their support in helping
make a difference. Companies in the US which had ties to The Bahamas soon fell in place to help us
raise money to fight cancer and make the Ride for Hope the most successful, one-day charity in The
Bahamas today.

As event sponsors, the financial support of seven corporations from the US has helped Odyssey
Aviation generate enormous financial support for this event over the years. Pledging their sponsorship
again for 2009, most have participated in each of the past 3 years. Since the inception of the Ride for
Hope, members of Team Odyssey Aviation have collectively contributed over $150,000 to the monies
raised by participants. Additionally, through monetary and in-kind contributions, Odyssey Aviation
Bahamas and its generous partners have contributed tens of thousand of dollars to the success of this
great cause.

Over the years, Team Odyssey Aviation has included a total of 53 riders and more than two dozen
volunteers. They act as support during the rides following team members in vehicles and keeping them
well hydrated and fueled.

Our GM, William Holowesko, reports, “We are very excited and well on track for another successful
fund raising effort for the 2009 event. So far we have a committed team of 26 riders, our largest
yet, with the youngest being 8 and the oldest being 54. There is great satisfaction in knowing that
collectively we have played a large role in helping make a difference in the lives of many Bahamians
suffering from cancer.”


PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





MINISTER OF EDUCATION Carl Bethel (centre) and Archbishop of Nassau Rev Patrick Pinder (right) look
at plans for the new Aquinas College as president of Woslee Construction Ashley Glinton points out cer-

tain buildings.

Minister Bethel
tours new Aquinas
College campus site

m@ By ERIC ROSE

MINISTER of Education Carl
Bethel led senior ministry officials
and Catholic education stakehold-
ers on a tour of the new Aquinas
College campus site on Gladstone
Road on Wednesday, calling the
progress made so far “wonderful.”

“In these hard economic times it
is really uplifting to come and see
not only a building site, but a build-
ing site that is being aggressively
pursued at the very highest stan-
dards,” Minister Bethel said.

“Tf you look around you will see
that not only is the quality of the
work at an extremely high level,
but also the technology that is
being used by these Bahamian
builders is at the highest level.”

Mr Bethel said the contractors
learned to use such new technolo-
gy while working on major con-
struction jobs.

“They have been able to learn,
assimilate, and now, to apply all

of these skills in other jobs
throughout our country, so we see
an example here of the quality of
their work,” he said.

Construction started in October
2008 and is expected to be com-
pleted in July 2009, with about 500
students expected to use the cam-
pus. President of Woslee Con-
struction Ashley Glinton, who
directed the tour, said it is a very
aggressive schedule.

“The quality of work is second-
to-none and I must congratulate
the subcontractors who have
been working on the project,” he
said.

Archbishop of Nassau Rev
Patrick Pinder joined the group on
the tour and pointed out various
areas of interest to them.

“This year is the 120th anniver-
sary of Catholic Education in the
Bahamas and this particular
endeavour that we are undertaking
this year is but one more expres-
sion of the vitality of Catholic edu-

cation in the Bahamas and our
continued commitment to the
social development of this coun-
try,” Archbishop Pinder said.

Minister Bethel said that he was
also “gratified” to see that the
Roman Catholic Board of Educa-
tion has embraced, in such an
aggressive way, the whole concept
of the diversification of education
through enhanced technology
training with three science labs,
auto repair and other vocational
training courses available on the
new campus.

He said: “All of these are aimed
at equipping thousands and new
generations of young Bahamians
with a full range of skills necessary
to assist more and more Bahami-
ans to assume greater positions of
ownership in the Bahamian econ-
omy so that we are no longer
focusing in education upon merely
creating good workers, but to cre-
ate good citizens and good corpo-
rate and business leaders.”

All Gardening Tools & Supplies

(Except Net Items)

March 21 - 28
Building the Bahamas!

FYP - 188 Wulff Road
Open Mon-Fri 7:00am-4:00pm, Saturday 7:00am-3:00pm
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Email: info@buildersmalibahamas.com





Letisha Henderson/BIS

MINISTER OF EDUCATION Carl Bethel (centre) looks on as Archbishop of Nassau Rev Patrick Pinder
(right) points out an area on the new Aquinas College campus. To the left of Minister Bethel is president
of Woslee Construction Ashley Glinton.

Construction progresses on

Magistrates Court Cores

m@ By KATHRYN
CAMPBELL
Bahamas Information
Services

WORK on the completion
of the Magistrates Court Com-
plex on Nassau and South
Streets has recommenced and
is steadily progressing. Public
Works and Transport Minister
Neko Grant recently led a
team of ministry officials to
inspect the progress to date.

Copeland Moxey, senior
architect with the Ministry of
Works, said work on the struc-
ture began in February. He
said the complex comprises a
two-storey structure that will
house a total of 12 courts.

Six courts, holding cells,
administrative offices, and a
police station will be located
on the ground floor. The sec-
ond floor will accommodate
juvenile and family courts, two
civil courts, library space and
support offices. The attic will
consist of two additional
courts and office spaces.

Mr Moxey said the remain-
ing major work to be com-
pleted includes landscaping,
parking, plumbing, electrical,
air-conditioning and installa-



Letisha Henderson/BIS

PUBLIC WORKS and Transport
Neko Grant (left) and perma-
nent secretary Colin Higgs
stand on the steps outside the
Magistrates Court Complex
presently under construction on
Nassau and South Streets.

tion of a back-up generator
system.

Adler Minus of Adler Con-
struction was awarded the
over $6.4 million contract for
construction of the complex.
The work is expected to be
completed in a year’s time. Mr

Pm lovin’ it







i
NEKO GRANT, Minister of Pub-
lic Works and Transport, chats
with director Gordon Major as
he points to one of the rooms
on the ground floor of the Mag-
istrates Court Complex present-
ly being constructed on Nassau
and South Streets.

Minus said his company ini-
tially met extremely filthy con-
ditions on the interior and
exterior of the court structure
and had to hire a company to
do extermination and general
cleaning. “While starting the
job was difficult, we are com-
fortable and confident now
that we are on track with
putting the job on schedule.
We anticipate a lot of sub-
work that will speed up the
process of the job tremen-
dously,” he said.

Mr Minus said that the attic
has been poured and his com-
pany is working with the engi-
neers and architect on final
designs for the metal roof. He
explained that the original
plan was for the roof to be
made of wood.

“We’re in the final stages of
pricing a metal roof. We hope
to mobilise that by the end of
this week. It has a six-week
delivery time. We’re hoping
that if all goes on schedule
once the roof is here, we can
put the complete job back on
schedule,” he said.

The project management
team includes Richard Green
and Martin Minus, and sub-
contractors James Morley of
Professional Maintenance Ser-
vices, Lauren Basden of Bas-
den Elevator, Ossie Neymour
and James Bain.

your

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.




Abaco
Markets’ 4%

of revenue
profits target

* Company ‘still not where
we need to be’ despite
144% fourth quarter net
income rise, almost
bringing it level with prior
year comparatives, driven
by 17.1% sales rise

* BlSx-listed retail group
‘six to nine months ahead’
of liquidity goal, eyeing
‘net cash position’ on
ongoing basis for first time
in three-six months

* Writes off $126,000
receivable owed by Ken
Hutton group on Cost
Right Turks deal

* Expecting Domino's
Pizza net income to rise in
this fiscal year

CENT Fone



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Abaco Markets’ president
yesterday said the company’s
financial performance was ‘still
not where we need it to be”
despite recording a 144 per cent
net income increase during its
fiscal 2009 fourth quarter, with
the retail group “working
towards” its ultimate target of a
net profit equivalent to 4 per
cent of annual net sales.

Gavin Watchorn said the
BISX-listed group’s continuing
operations, which exclude the
now-closed Cost Right Abaco,
had generated net profits for
the year to January 31, 2009,
that were equivalent to 2.6 per
cent of net revenues. Including
the ceased businesses, the figure
had been “just above 2 per
cent”.

Abaco Markets had generat-
ed net income of $1.533 million
for the three months to Janu-
ary 31, 2009, compared to
$628,000 the year before.

SEE page 5B

Shippers see
10% container
volume decline

* But others say ‘no
decline in revenue’

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
robards@tribunemedia.net

SOME Bahamas-based
shipping companies yesterday
reported a 10 per cent decline
in twenty-foot equipment unit
(TEU) container shipments
into Nassau for the year-to-
date, but others said they had
seen “no decline in revenue”.

Garth Rolle, port manager
at Tropical Shipping, told Tri-
bune Business that container
volumes had been fluctuating
as global fuel prices continu-
ally rose and fell.

SEE page 6B

THE TRIBUNE

USINCSS

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



FRIDAY,

MARCH 20,



BISX moves back

to downtown Bay

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas Internation-
al Securities Exchange (BISX)
is “soon” moving back into
downtown Nassau’s financial
centre through its new home
in the Bay Street property
housing FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas)
branch, as the exchange pre-
pares to expand staff in prepa-
ration for new business
streams.

Keith Davies, BISX’s chief
executive, told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that while he
could not provide a firm date
for the exchange’s move from
its existing Village Road base,
due to the fact that final work
on its new first floor premises
was ongoing, the property was
set to be renamed 50
Exchange Place.

He explained that BISX
needed expanded premises to
cope with the new business
streams it expected to handle
this year, with the exchange

set to take over the whole first
floor. Apart from the
exchange itself, Mr Davies
said the new headquarters
would also be home to its
BISX Global initiative and “a
third business” related to its
planned Central Securities
Depository (CSD).

Downtown

“BISX is moving back into
the downtown area, the pre-
mier financial centre of the
Bahamas,” Mr Davies told
Tribune Business. “The new
location is downtown in the
old Barclays building, now the
FirstCaribbean building, on
Bay Street, and we’re moving
on to the first floor. We erect-
ed our sign in the lobby of that
building yesterday.”

The BISX chief executive
explained that the exchange
needed to move from the
building it currently shares
with FTC (Fast Track Con-
struction) because “over the
course of this year, BISX will

Government pledges
‘more independence’
for telecom regulator

* Acknowledges need for ‘wholesale change to the
effectiveness, efficiency and independence’ of
enlarged communications industry supervisor

* Unveils plans for Utilities Regulation &
Competition Authority to replace PUC, with focus
on transparency and bringing in ‘international

skills’

* Five Acts to be repealed fully or partially, and
replaced by three new pieces of legislation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government yesterday
pledged that the new Bahamian
communications industry regu-
lator will have “greater inde-
pendence” from it and be more
transparent, plus staffed by per-
sonnel with “international reg-
ulatory skills”, its financing
based on revenues levied as a
percentage of licensee income.

Unveiling the responses to
the consultation on telecom-
munications/communications
regulatory reform, the Govern-
ment and its Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC)
privatisation committee
received “general support”
from telecoms operators on its
proposal to create a “new, con-
verged and strengthened” reg-
ulator that would supervise not
only their industry but all com-
munications sectors - such as
radio and television.

Replace

Such a regulator would likely
replace the existing Public Util-
ities Commission (PUC), which
only supervises the telecoms
industry.

At various stages in its nine-
year, the PUC has come under
fire from various parties for an
alleged lack of independence
from government, and failing
to regulate the industry effec-
tively.

In its response to the consul-
tation feedback, the Govern-
ment confirmed that it planned
to fully or partially repeal the
PUC Acct, the Telecommunica-
tions Act, the Television Regu-
latory Authority Act, the BTC
Act and the Broadcasting Act.

In the PUC’s case, it would
be replaced by a Utilities Reg-
ulation and Competition
Authority (URCA), which

SEE page 7B

for a better life

~ healtheare

be expanding its complement
of employees, hopefully as we
experience an uptick in our
ability to provide services to
the business we already have”

Apart from BISX Global,
he added: “We must plan for
developments to come and be
ready to execute them. There
will be a third business in
there, which we will announce
when it comes into existence.
It’s related to the Central
Securities Depository we are
developing as well. We need
new premises for equipment
and growth potential. We see
an expansion of operations.”

Mr Davies said BISX was
looking to add another three
to four persons, based on its
analysis of current employee
needs, and the extra staff
needed as additional business
came on stream. Two employ-
ees were likely to be added in
the short-term, and another
two at a later date.

BISX’s first stay in down-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission.
from the daily report.



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Dismissed staff:

Still eligible for
unemployment
benefit funding

BECon chief expresses concern over
proposed scheme, but acknowledges it is
‘overdue’ and will provide wider social benefits

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas Employers Confederation’s (BECon) pres-
ident yesterday expressed concern that workers who either
quit or were dismissed with just cause from their jobs would
still qualify for a portion of the Government’s proposed
unemployment benefit programme, although he com-
mended the scheme as “overdue” and “providing benefits
to our society as a whole”.

Brian Nutt acknowledged that unemployment benefits
were a key plank that had been missing from the Bahamas’
social security package, and needed to be implemented,
but detailed several concerns that the business community
had with the scheme as currently proposed.

He explained to Tribune Business that “one of our con-
cerns” was that all unemployed persons would be eligible to
participate in the scheme and receive some level of benefits,
regardless of whether they lost their job through their own

SEE page 2B

Restoration shows century-
old site is far from ‘Scrap’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



A CENTURY-old building at the corner of downtown Nas-
sau’s Dowdeswell and Deveaux Streets has received a high-
priced facelift, while preserving the legacy built-up by a sandwich
shop owner who operated out of the premises for almost 56
years.

The building, which houses The Architectural Studio, The
Scrapbook Cottage and The Studio Deli, and opens next month,
was once the home of a young Long Island man and his family,
and is said to be almost 114-years-old.

Michael Moss, owner of the building and partner in The
Architectural Studio, told Tribune Business that a lady name Mrs

SEE page 4B

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Da INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





BISX moves bac
to downtown Bay

renee



FROM page 1B

town Nassau, when it was based at the
British Colonial Hilton’s Centre of Com-
merce, was not a happy one. The
exchange and its then-senior executives
were criticised for over-spending on rent,
salaries and other expenses, especially
when anticipated business streams failed
to materialise, and BISX plunged into
heavy losses.

Bailout

That ultimately resulted in a govern-
ment bailout, via the Central Bank of the
Bahamas, but the exchange has since
regained a more solid financial footing.

Mr Davies said yesterday that whereas
the first foray into downtown had been
based on anticipated future business
streams - the listing and trading of gov-
ernment debt securities, and privatisa-
tions of the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC) and other public
utilities - the current move was “predi-
cated on business in hand”.

While the past had been based on busi-
ness and revenue streams that never

materialised, Mr Davies said the new
move was founded on “collaboration with
existing members, as well as new part-
ners. This is not based on what we’d like
to see. It’s done on the premise of what
we See.

“There is a small element of what is to
come, but that is grounded on what has
been done and we see a clear path to
growth. This is more realism grounded,
and is part of the ‘small steps’ philosophy
[ve been employing for years.”

Mr Davies added that BISX was “still
pretty close” to the break even point
financially, although it was not there yet,
and he would “not be comfortable” until
the exchange had passed that point.

“What I’ve always said is that one of
the things we want to do is get some of
the business streams we’ve been talking
about to the bottom line,” he added. “The
sooner we do that, it will put the compa-
ny in a good position to weather difficult
economic times.

“The company needs to develop the
business streams it has planned to con-
tribute to the building of its bottom line.
We do need to turn on and develop these
business streams.”

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said Mr.
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A new Insurance Brokerage company is
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The company is headed by Dashwell E.
Flowers, a well known and highly regarded
insurance industry professional who has
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Dismissed staff:
Still eligible for

unemployment
benefit funding

FROM page 1B

fault or factors such as redundancy.

Mr Nutt said employees who were dismissed by companies for
cause, such as breaching regulations or stealing, would not be dis-
qualified from receiving unemployment benefits for the entire 13-
week (three month) stretch during which they will be eligible to
receive them.

“Those persons are deemed to be disqualified,” Mr Nutt said of
Bahamian workers dismissed for cause, “but the disqualification
period will not be more than six weeks. A person fired for com-
mitting theft will receive seven weeks of benefits, because the dis-
qualification will affect only six weeks of benefits.”

Mr Nutt said the unemployment benefit scheme, which the Gov-
ernment hoped to implement from April 20, 2009, onwards, would
be legislated via amendments to the National Insurance Act and its
accompanying regulations.

The BECon president said he wanted the National Insurance Act
to be brought into line “with current labour standards”, as it talked
about dividing benefits over six days instead of a five-day work
week.

And a further concern, Mr Nutt explained, was that the unem-
ployment benefit scheme would, in the long-term, place an extra
burden on employers to fund it when they had already been man-
dated, by the Employment Act, to provide notice pay (severance or
termination pay) to laid-off employees based on their years of
service.

For line staff, this amounts to two weeks’ pay with or in lieu of
notice, and two weeks for every year worked up to six months’
worth of pay. For managerial staff, it is one month’s pay with
notice or in lieu of notice, and one month’s pay for each year
worked up to 12 months (one year).

As aresult, Mr Nutt said BECon had “asked the question” as to
whether - given that employers had already handed over these
funds to laid-off staff - unemployment benefit kicked in immediately
that their employment ceased, or if it started after their severance
pay period expired.

Jeopardy

If it was immediately, Mr Nutt suggested that this might place the
unemployment benefit’s sustainability in “more” jeopardy. “If the
benefits are to kick-in two weeks after an individual stops working,
the Government should revisit the Employment Act and amend
notice, and do some offsetting” between notice pay and unem-
ployment benefit,” Mr Nutt suggested.

Under the proposed unemployment benefit scheme, benefits
will be paid two weeks in arrears. This means that, if the scheme
comes into effect on April 20, the first benefits would be paid on
May 4, 2009.

The proposed scheme, although initially financed by $20 million
transferred from the National Insurance Board’s (NIB) medical
benefits branch, and supplemented by the Government’s consoli-
dated fund if needed, will in the long-term be financed by employ-
er/employee contributions.

These will be split 50/50 between employer and employee, and in
total be equivalent to 1 per cent of the insurable wage ceiling.
Given that current NIB contributions were 8.8 per cent, split 5.4 per
cent/3.4 per cent between employer/employee, Mr Nutt said the
unemployment benefit contribution would take this to 5.9 per
cent/3.9 per cent or 9.8 per cent in total.

The BECon president said his only other concern regarding the
scheme related to workers still in employment over the age of 65.
Unemployment benefit was only available to those aged under
65, but employers were still expected to contribute to the scheme
on behalf of those above this age, even though the workers in
question did not have to.

Mr Nutt said he was told this was an “oversight”, and would be
corrected before the National Insurance Act amendments were tak-
en to Parliament.

The BECon president acknowledged that unemployment bene-
fits were, along with “medical benefits, health insurance wise”,
which the Government was looking to provide through its pre-
scription drug programme, were the two missing strands from the
Bahamas’ social security programme.

Mr Nutt said the proposed benefits were “half of what the ben-
efits are in Barbados”, where the scheme was funded by a 1.5 per
cent contribution and provided 60 per cent of the insurable wage as
compared to the Bahamas’ 50 per cent.

The Bahamas’ scheme would provide benefits for 13 weeks, and
if the initial $20 million was exhausted, the Government will sub-
sidise it from the Consolidated Fund until the employer/employee
contributions were legislated.

While the Government was looking to introduce this by January
1, 2010, the timing would depend on the economy.

NT
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Comporny

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following
items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for
the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRAC] BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 3B





IDB survey: Bahamas to lead
On per capita income growth

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

One-third of Caribbean and Latin Ameri-
can leaders surveyed by the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) believe the
Bahamas’ per capita income will experience
the fastest growth of all nations in the region
over the next three years, with only Peru
expected to experience greater growth of 34.6
per cent.

The somewhat surprising survey, which
polled 317 government and private sector lead-
ers in Latin America and the Caribbean, found
that most expected average per capita income
growth of 7.6 per cent across the region

between 2009-2012.

When it came to the Bahamas, one-third of
those surveyed felt this nation would experi-
ence a fall in per capita income over that peri-
od, one-third felt it would see moderate growth
the same, and one-third felt it would see fast
growth.

Dependency

The Bahamas was also predicted to increase
its dependency on financing from internation-
al organisations by 66.7 per cent over that same
three-year period, with only one-third thinking
its dependency on funding sources on the IMF
would little change.

EU lowers hopes for
trade deal at G-20 talks

One-third of respondents also predicted that
the Government’s influence on the economy
would increase between 2009-2012, while 66.7
per cent felt this would drop.

“Leaders in the region expect governments
to maintain or increase their influence in the
economy, and they named fighting poverty
and inequality as their top developmental chal-
lenge in the next four years, closely followed by
reducing violence and crime and improving
the quality of education,” the survey said.

“The survey shows that leaders in Latin
America and the Caribbean are very worried
about the world economy and the possible
impacts of the crisis on poverty,” said president
of the IDB, Luis Alberto Moreno.

“Multilateral organisations such as the IDB
have an important anti-cyclical role to play
and they must step up their support even more
in coming years to meet the region’s growing
needs.”

The findings revealed that 92 per cent of the
economic leaders in the region expect GDP
to grow less or slightly above the increase in
population. More than two thirds of those lead-
ers surveyed expected per capita income to
fall in the next four years.

According to the release, the IDB will debate
the findings of the survey at the 50th annual
meeting of its board of governors in Medellin
Colombia on the 27th of this month.

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,

FO.Box M-30354
Nassan, Bahamas

Tels(242) 327-5780 327-S793-6

m BRUSSELS

The European Union's top offi-
cial said Thursday he doesn't
expect a breakthrough on a glob-
al trade deal in talks among world
leaders next month, according to
the Associated Press.

European Commission Presi-
dent Jose Manuel Barroso said
the EU wants a World Trade
Organization pact that could com-
bat the current recession by help-
ing to halt falling trade.

"But I don't know honestly if
our partners are ready as we are,"
he said, referring to the United
States and India, who could not
agree to a compromise during
crunch negotiations last year.

He said European nations
would ask the Group of 20 lead-
ing world economies at a London
summit on April 1-2 "to agree on
a standstill, so no introduction of
any protectionist measures until
we come to a conclusion of the
Doha trade talks." Emerging
economies Brazil, Russia, India
and China called last week on the
G20 summit to move toward a
deal on trade.

Brazil and China have reaped
major gains from the last two
decades of freer trade with richer
nations that have helped them lift
millions out of poverty and take a
bolder stance on the world stage.

The sudden plunge in exports
has curbed their rapid growth —
and also badly hurt the world's
biggest exporter, Germany, which
depended almost entirely on high
global demand in recent years for
its cars and machinery to com-
pensate for sluggish consumption
at home.

But it is unclear how ready the
USS. is to strike a new trade deal.
President Barack Obama has said
little about his commitment to
freer global trade. Europeans
worry that a Democratic admin-
istration might be more protec-
tionist and set up trade barriers to
support American firms. The U.S.
Senate on Wednesday confirmed
Ron Kirk as the U.S. new trade
representative. He said he did not
come to the job with "deal fever"
and would look out for Ameri-
can workers. Barroso said EU
nations would likely call Friday

for the G20 summit to find ways
to help trade by making more
credit available to exporters and
importers — an idea put forward
by British Prime Minister Gor-
don Brown.

"This recession combined with
.. areal recession of trade is one
of this reasons why this crisis is
assuming a greater magnitude,"
he said.

Czech Prime Minister Mirek
Topolanek, who leads talks
between EU leaders as the cur-
rent EU president, said the bloc
was also ready to significantly
increase funding for the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund.

He would not give a figure but
leaders are likely to back at least
doubling the IMF's resources to
$500 billion — and to contribute
more than $75 billion of their
money.

EU nations are also likely to
call for a major reform to the IMF
that would give more of a say to
emerging countries and see it play
a stronger role as a watchdog over
the global financial system.

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS @

Sew Providence

Lot #1246 (3 000sq.

Ho wavhse FEAT say. f,-
Celden Wa Dr
Galden Gates #2
(Appraised Value
5244,5-05. ie)

Vacant lot #147
(10,457sq. fi.»

Pelion s Dr ae Rion
Weat Lame Souler
Heights Sub
(Appraised Value
SOOO ah)

Lowe &2"s 1 Oe"
wi buildings (1 04+Osy
1.) Miracle Touch Awbo
Care Center-Fox Hill Rad
(Appraitod Valeg
£149 20,00)

Lorqs0"x i ho")
weibuibdi om 1, | Peay. th-
Dera SoA praised
Waloe S189 000,00)

Lots #29 & #40,
(320° 11'S? Ak F47
wibuildiog 1, 120s.
ft.—Matthew St. Massau
Willege (Appraised
Wali 3145 4000M)@1)

Love #5 & AG
(1S0°% LOO") wihse
Silwer Pabm Lin Inperial
Park (Appraise! Value
$313.6 541,00)

Lot #135 (50's ob"})
Wiha | S424q. f-
SUmMtovweer foouh

rk Sek Hse

Fax:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www. bahamasdevelopmenthbank.com

» Wacund Lot #3 Blk #12

Unit #3 q1 bt S0sg
f.i—-Henny Awe Derhy
Suh Ciranel Aalbers
(Appraised Value
£65, 14 0b»

Lar e4ai wR

ChOR"% | 507) wehse Ae
Duples-Melson Rd

F clana Cardems
Ciramd Balin
(Appraised Value
£96. 00 0p

Lac ft?) ¢Sh'x i) S30")
a SiN phew 2-se ores
uparbeemt building a
Church 3.40¢0sq. f.
Wartin Down, Rimgs
Suh Eaghs Mahe Rice
Crand Balhae
(Appraised Value
S20 DLT)

Lae we! 1 ron heel
SM00sg_ ft on 499
pores of beach fromt-
High Reek Cirane
Eaters (Apes ised
Wolee 31.0 00 cen
Wacond bot #13, Blk
FAS, Limit ea

(22,75 2eq. 145° om
canal front-Dagenham
Circke & Ingroawe Gr
Emerald Bay Suh
Grand Ewha
(Appraised Value

S17 DUP hy)

Wace bow a2i, Blk #9

. Low #45 poor bei)

wld room neotel
4,0 0sq. ft.-Sandy
Poist Abaco
{Appraised Value
S485, 700.00)

building 1 t
1.1 Sting. ft.-Sand
Banks Treasure Cay
Abaco (Agqpra isl
Value S260, 205.108)
Ekeathern
Property 30101
whee Lond Sa Tapruin
Bay Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
Se) Oe ay

. Vacant ponion of lot

27 ({50"x f 10" }—-Weat
James. (Cisbern
Ekeuthera (Appraised
Wahue S01 Ae)
tad Dela rial

Waceamt 6.5 acres of
land=Aunthur's Toewm
iat Island (Apapraised
Vahue S00), oy)
Lot wil roo motel
1.39 pores Arthur's
Town (oar Island
(Appraised Walue
S50, Op

Exam

37. Wacent lor #3

(65. 7O0sg. A. 1-Moas
Town Exum.

(Appraised Value
SL 10,1 RA ahp

3E. Loa C30 ADs, Mo ww
emall habel 4 S20sq_ ft
& exclusive beoch-
Forbes Hill Externe
(Appraised Value
S140 008.00)

39 Vaca lot #1231
(6. 600sq. 1 -Ohoeamic
Rd Bahama Sound ec
43 Exuma (Appraised
abe S 0H. 0 S41.)

4 Vacant low #5
(20's 1227)
Commodore Rud
Flizahbech Harhour Fst
Eacuma Lago p raised
Volee S450 060,060)

Cl4, ba lq. fh)
Wabertall Dr Seahorse
e Sub Cirand
Shree (A pq ised
WVoloe 340,108.00)
Lor Ais, Alk #145 Unit
#3 (Al's 125 °)—-Derhs
Sub Grand Bahan
(Appraised Value
SES A
3. Wace low als. Blk
LS a 17 Botesq. fi}
Cutwater Ln Shasnom
Country lub Sul
Ciranmd Ratha
(Appraised Value
S58, 1 bp

24. Waeang log #424

MANAGER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

$129 0060.10)

Loceil ¢ tT s Tes
wihhar DOT bag. f-
Sunset Ridpe Dr.
Sumset Ridge Sub Hse
Sle (Appraised Valme
$206,000, 0)

Vacant bar #202,

(8 Adiieg. 2 neore mom
lea o-Hibgg ye AL rt
Winton Meadows Sub
a2 (Appraised Value
SAS bOI)

Ler tiryea ral *slia's
whore DO3sq. f.-Cd
Cedar St Yellow Elder
(Appraised ¥ alec ia
6 SOE ection 2B

Lots #3 de wh, Blk #47 n125°$-Palomeri Or
(30"s 00) widuples & Ciramd Pian East
renil shop 1,3 faq, A,- (Appraised Value
Fuortees Sa Nasa S50 00, 0)

Villace (Appraised Lat 62 (20,0005. fi)
Valine 212000011 w'building complex a
Andras coin Laundromat

. Beach front lot 9,000sq, Queens Highway
Ft whuilding 2, )00sq. Holmes Rock
A.—Pinders Mangrove Commonmage larand
Cav Adios

Katie ( Apeprs iscal

(Appraised Value Walme 3178.50.00)
S200 0h.) Abuce

} Let 43440. fi

Loar a34 E (6,20tsq.
we diples beilding

1 A pele
=“ “i alnom 2.78 c
1.0 74s. th.-Fresh Cnnek ae : Ta =
Andros (Appraised MU py Pawn
aloe 5946-401. 091)

Anno (Ap praked
re , <7 i

Grand Bahama Wales 354,296)

» Lot #20 (17,1 SOng. thy

. Macunt bot 6 (2 acres]
whse 200s. fi. 7 From Dave mA mco
Bikes, Section 42-Sea (Appraised Vale
Taull De, Babar Recl 508,098.08) ae ee “
Wacht & Country Club Lat #51 (15000sq. 1
Sab Grand Bahama wi building-Mumphy
{Appraised Value Town Abaco ;

S2HG, (Ay (Appraised Value
. Vacant lot # 2%, Bik #9 51024 21h)
(14,39 7sq. fi

Portion of lot io

CIS 0G eg. fh -eFrond St
Yorkshire Or, Kale ! pm
Weel Replat Gerad

Murphys Tavern A Base
; Pret
Bahama (Appraised Sees vam

Walue S25. 0400p

S29, 2 Sh}

Lao e335 (6.0 Deg, hh
«building —Murphy
Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
ERT UT SA}

One of our major clients seeks to recruit a qualified information technology professional
with experience in financial and customer service applications for the above position.

QUALIFICATIONS:

* Masters of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

* Eight or more years experience including hands-on technical experience and
two years minimum managing an information technology department in a large
organization with a complex, multi-vendor, multi-platform and distributed
computing environment
Visionary who can analyze problems within the context of corporate strategy,
balancing the consideration of facts, priorities, resources, constraints and
alternatives

RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Lead, monitor and develop a team of information technology professionals to
deliver customer focused service and set performance expectations to achieve
excellence
Manage the development, implementation and day-to-day operations of the
Information Technology department
Actively contribute to the tactical and strategic development of information
technology to support the organization’s business needs
Accountable for the successful delivery to agreed time scales and within budget of
departmental projects or programmes
Assist accounting and engineering departments in ensuring accurate and timely
preparation of reports

REQUIREMENTS:

* This is a senior position that will require a professional with very extensive
experience in supervising and controlling computer professionals in financial,
customer services and engineering applications.

Strong management and communications skills

Strong technical and troubleshooting skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure

Solid understanding of business operations and strategic planning

ASSETS
Webiches

(1) 09 Dodge Caravan

Wessels
2" (1996) Robolo Vessel wil 15 HP Ewineude eagime
12" (1989) North Carolina Holl Yew (1p Ford Explorer
$2° (1979) Hatters Wessel (MV Huddy) (1) 87 Din ge Sarams
SL* (1981) Defender Ves! (Equiliry 4 {1} 00 Hyundai H-0 wae
20° Cesta See Hell Wesel (Miss Rrisey) Then Ria Bus b2 Seater
4° Steel Hall Gulf Coast Shrimp Trawler Verse! 1) 7S LS Ferd Boom Truck
()9R0) with (25 Voboo Diesel engine (See Charbetics (1500 Hrundai H-1] Van SVX
22° Sing ht Sonew Sine) Holl (1) Sey) AY Lise 2, (0) Ayundksi H-0 Wan SC (Silvers
a nee: engines requir 1stallation. And (1) 00 Rischen Toader Cherokee Trailer
can be wiew aft Beadierd Marine, Grand Bahama (1) Oo Pood Ranger Truck
I
a

COMPENSATION:
Attractive salary and other benefits will be commensurate with training and experience.

: : : ween | bb
Written applications should be addressed to: cab
19° (1989) Piterglass Sports Vessel (Hall Only) be? Pood F250 Tineck
Sq 1982) Defender Vere! Mucen Varsha} rijgadier Dri Tock
= 6° (1980) Desco Marme Vessel (Suwert Drewes

{ip BD Ce

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: IT MANAGER 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Stoel Building TH 2" Six fh) Windows, Dwe (2) Fatry Doors, Teo (tp) S21" Relleg Doors Whise
frimeed Aloe Appr? plans and engimeoring drawings ary available 550,000.00

The public is invited to submit Seated bids marked “Tender” to Bohames Developmen: Bank, Pc. Box N-
POS4 “acs, Rahwives atneation Fi cial Controller, faced hide will got be accepoed of telephone S27-
STE0 for additional infomation. Please note that all bids on the aforanenisoned peopertees and as=cts
should be received by or on Miarch 25, 2009. The Gahamas Developmess Bank reserves the right to reject
any or all otters. Al assets are sank ag lis,

Private & Confidential


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Restoration shows century-
old site is far from ‘Scrap’





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from people
who are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are
raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in the
area or have won an award. If so, call
us on 322-1986 and share your story.

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
RAH ATAS SATION AL DRI AGEN y

PUBLIC NOTICE

TESDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF DRIAGS ANT
RELATED Poe hts

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and
Related Items for the Public Hospitals Authority
une The Minestry of Health, The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas.
The Tender Document, which includes
mstructin to the Tenderers along w ith other
relevant information, can be collected from the
Bahamas National Drug Agency, Market &
McPherson Streets, beginning from Friday 20",
March 2009 trom 9 am — 5 pm.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a
sealed envelope or package identified as
“Tender for the Supply of Drog and Related
Items” and addressed to

Managing, Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third ‘Verrace, West Centerville
P.O). Box N-8200

FROM page 1B

Chase operated a popular
sandwich shop, opened in the
1950s, out of a section of the
building that was added as a
petty shop by the original
owners in 1930.

He said that when Mrs
Chase became too old to oper-
ate the shop any longer in
2006, it remained vacant until
last year, when he decided to
transform it into a deli.

Mr Moss said he had a
vision to turn the entire build-
ing, which was originally a res-
idence with a wrap-around
porch and verandah, into a
retail and office space.

When he acquired the
building in 2002, having rent-
ed office space in it since 1997,
he began plans to rework the
structure and modernise the
building.

Mr Moss thought diversify-
ing the space and getting oth-
er businesses into it would
maximise its potential.

“It’s too much space for just
an architectural firm,” he said.
“This was just two porches, so
I said: “Why don’t I utilise this
space for something’ I thought
it was just enough space to
turn it into retail space.”

operator of The Scrapbook
Cottage, said her scrapbook-
ing business has been doing
well in the seven months that
it has been open.

Quaint

She finds the location bene-
ficial because of its central
location and the quaint, home-
ly space that Mr Moss created.

“I wanted to have that
warm feeling,” she said.

Ms Pratt said that scrap-
booking has become a grow-
ing craze in the Bahamas, and
after years of her own scrap-
booking, decided to share her
knowledge of the hobby with
others.

“There is so much more to
scrapbooking than the papers
and the stickers we grew up
with,” she said.

She also has a dedicated
room upstairs in the building
where she teaches lessons in
scrapbooking during the week
and at weekends, where inter-
ested individuals create their
own personalised projects.

Now, Ms Pratt is looking
forward to using the new deli
to add a new offering to her
product.

“I’ve been waiting for
Michael to complete the deli
and we’re going to implement
‘Come Scrap’ on your lunch
break,” she said.



“It’s too much
space for just an
architectural firm,”
he said. “This was
just two porches, so
I said: ‘Why don’t I
utilise this space for
something’ I
thought it was just
enough space to
turn it into retail
space.”



Michael Moss

MUST SELL

VACANT LAND
WINTON HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

Lot #4, Block 1

Nassau. The Bahamas Because the building was

listed as a historic landmark,
Mr Moss received incentives
such as a 25-year exemption
from real property tax, and
exemptions from customs duty
for materials used in the
restoration and repair of the
building.

Now, two successful busi-
nesses operate out of the new-
ly-renovated building, and Mr
Moss is hoping that the deli
will be the third.

Kiesha Pratt, owner and

All the parcel of land containing 15,589 sq. ft. on the southern side
of Woodland Way, and about 350 feet east of Culberts Hill.

Electronic and hard copies must be received at
the abowe addresa on or before Spm Friday,
April 74" ZUR, A copy of a valid business
license and Nationals Insurance Certificate

must accompany all proposals,

Zoning is for single-family residential homes, all the utility services
are available. The site is located 5 miles from downtown Nassau,

se oe dE , 1 mile from shopping center and 1 mile from the nearest school.
The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the neht

to reject any or all Tenders).
Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before April 10, 2009.

Director



For further information, please contact us @ 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608

VACANCY NOTICE

PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Public Relations & Corporate Programs
Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and implementation of a
strategic public relations and communication program together with the effective and efficient
planning and execution of all corporate events and activities.

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

Assists in the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate Programs plan to
support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;

Oversees the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations programs, plan and
budget;

Assists with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation and where necessary
the wider community;

Prepares and distributes the Corporation’s Annual Report;

Directs press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press releases, photographs,
fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management and media representatives;
Coordinates the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion surveys;
Provides assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in writing speeches,
preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;

Evaluates and assesses customer complaints and queries and disseminates information to
management;

Aids in the development, implementation and management of all external communication
efforts;

Is proactive in identifying opportunities to improve the image of the Corporation to its employees
and in the community at large;

Coordinates Marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the external Public
Relations Firms and the Media;

Identifies and liaises with service providers to secure speakers, presenters and entertainment
for Corporate events;

Liaises with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e. awards, invitations,
prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as necessary and maintain an inventory
of the same;

Prepares and distributes all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices) relative to Corporate
activities, as necessary;

Creates and updates all Standard Operating Procedures for all activities, as necessary;
Ensures timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of bills for all events
and activities as necessary;

Works closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that there is global
publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate activities;
Ensures that websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company newsletter and internal PA
system are used for the communication of information relative to corporate activities/events;

PROCUREMENT FOR SCHOOL
FURNITURE FOR NEW SCHOOLS &
REPLACEMENTS 2009-2010

The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’”) now invites
sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement of School Furniture
for New Schools and Replacements.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from the
Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education, Headquarters,
Thompson Blvd. from Wednesday 18 th March, 2009, and obtain further
information, at the second address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
bided on (“School Furniture-New Schools & Replacements”).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address,
or before Monday, 6 th April, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not
be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday 7 th April, 2009 at the first address below.
Job requirements include:
(1) The Chairman Tender
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

* A minimum ofa Bachelors degree in Public Relations/ Journalism/Marketing/Business
Administration/Business Communication, or equivalent.
A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisory/Management level.
Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform to prescribed
style and format;
Ability to effectively present information to senior and Executive management and public
groups,
Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing
Experience in managing special events and activities
Excellent time management and organizational skills
Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills
Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications.
Good analytical skills.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability

Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education

P.O. Box N-3913/4

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tele: (242) 502-8571

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The
Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: April 1st, 2009.

The Ministry reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders


THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 5B

Abaco Markets’ 4% of revenue profits target

FROM page 1B

The more than doubling of
net income for the period
almost enabled the retail group
to claw profits for the full-year
back in line with prior year
comparatives, but in the end the
company fell just short at $2
million, an 8.1 per cent decrease
on fiscal 2008’s $2.177 million.

Mr Watchorn said that
despite Abaco Markets’ rela-
tively strong financial showing
given the economic environ-
ment, and especially in the
fourth quarter, the company’s
reaction was “tempered”.

“Tt’s still not where we need it
to be,” he told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We have a target we’re
working towards, and need to
be producing a net profit of 4
per cent of net revenues. It’s a
good industry model.

“We think we can possibly
get that above 3 per cent this
year, and then gradually move
towards our target.”

Meanwhile, Mr Watchorn
said the improved sales perfor-
mance had placed Aback Mar-
kets “six to nine months” ahead
of where it had planned to be
on its drive to enhance group
liquidity/cash flow.

He explained that in another
three to six months, the BISX-
listed retail group was likely to
be in a net cash position, on an
ongoing basis, for the first time
as opposed to a net overdraft
position.

Mr Watchorn said the last
restructuring of its preference
share debt had aided the liq-
uidity drive. It did not have to
repay a previously scheduled
$250,000 in principal to the pref-
erence shareholders last Sep-
tember, as previously required,
freeing up capital for opera-
tional purposes.

The first scheduled prefer-
ence share repayment is
$350,000 in March 2010, and
Abaco Markets has already
placed more than $500,000 in a
redemption fund to meet this -
and is adding a further $90,000
every month.

Mr Watchorn said Abaco
Markets should “have well
over” enough money in its
redemption fund to pay more
than a year’s worth of prefer-

ence share redemptions when
they start next year.

“That’s allowed us to move
much further ahead on our liq-
uidity programme than we
expected, and in the next three
to six months we hope to be in a
net cash position, on an ongoing
basis, as opposed to a net over-
draft position,” said Mr
Watchorn. “We had not expect-
ed to be where we are for
another six to nine months.
Cash is king.

“This is the closest we’ve ever
been to a net cash position,” he
added, explaining that two years
ago Abaco Markets had been
running a $5-$6 million net
overdraft position.

Income

The company’s full-year net
income would have exceeded
the 2008 fiscal comparatives had
it not been for two one-time
charges taken in the fourth
quarter.

The first was the $250,000
associated with the closure of
Cost Right Abaco, some 60-70
per cent of which was staff sev-
erance pay. The other was the
writedown of $126,000 still
owed on a $200,000 outstand-
ing balance by former John S
George and Freeport Concrete
chief executive, Ken Hutton,
for the purchase of the Cost
Right store in Turks & Caicos
two years ago.

“When we did the transac-
tion, part of it was a receivable,”
Mr Watchorn said. “We are in
discussions with the party to try
and restructure it in some way.
It was just prudent for us to pro-
vide for it in full, given that the
store is no longer in operation.”

Abaco Markets’ fourth quar-
ter profit increase was driven
largely by a 17.1 per cent year-
over-year sales increase, with
group-wide sales for the three
months hitting $26.46 million
through a 13 per cent rise in
customer transaction volumes.

Mr Watchorn said this trend
had continued into the 2010 first
quarter, adding: “Our February
numbers look very, very good.
They’re significantly above last
year. Our sales growth has con-
tinued into the New Year and
into March.

“Christmas went pretty well

sales wise for us. We were prob-
ably up consistently 10 per cent.
But the main move in the fourth
quarter financials for us was
November and December. It
was those two months that real-
ly contributed to the increase.”

He attributed the increase in
customer traffic and transac-
tions, and the corresponding
increase in sales revenues, to
Abaco Markets’ campaign to
offer consumers ‘real value’ in
terms of quality products at a
competitive price via deals such
as its ‘price cuts’ and ‘club spe-
cials’.

“We've had a very strong
campaign to try to offer value to
our customers when things are
not the best in the economy,
and customers have responded
to that through the significant
increase in transactions that
we’ve had, which has accounted
for most of the sales increase,”
Mr Watchorn said.

“We’ve been able to increase
customer traffic and increase
sales, while controlling costs and
inventory shrinkage, and the
difference has dropped down
to the bottom line. That’s what’s
happened, and it began to hap-
pen for us in September and
October last year.”

Expense and inventory
shrinkage controls had enabled
Abaco Markets to reduce prices
without sacrificing margins.
“Our margins have increased,”
Mr Watchorn explained,
“because we were able to main-
tain shrinkage in dollar terms,
and sales rose, so our overall
gross margins improved because
shrinkage as a percentage of
sales was down.

“We did a much better job of
buying, and we’ve been able to
harness buying power as a
group. We’re buying as a group,
not as individual stores. That’s
produced synergies in terms of
logistics and lower prices by
purchasing as a group. We’ve
moved pretty aggressively over
the last six months to increase
commodities buying as a
group.”

Gross margins improved as a
percentage of sales by 0.9 per
cent, as shrink as a percentage
of sales fell by 20 per cent, the
absolute value remaining the
same in dollar terms.

Meanwhile, Mr Watchorn

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

said the company’s Domino’s
Pizza franchise was performing
well, with the closure of its East
Bay Street outlet having
reduced costs without costing
much business. While some
walk-in customers had been
lost, that outlet’s business by-
and-large had been transferred
to other Domino’s branches.

“We're able to have that busi-
ness without the costs,” Mr
Watchorn said. “Overall, Domi-
no’s top line will be a little bit
reduced this year because we
won’t have East Bay Street, but
we expect the bottom line to
improve over last year.

“Domino’s has experienced
pretty much the same trends as
the food side - a lot more peo-
ple are coming in, and customer
transactions are increasing.”

For the 2009 fourth quarter,
Abaco Markets said expenses
were at 22.6 per cent of sales, a
drop from the prior year’s 24.6
per cent. For the full year, util-
ity costs were up by $750,000,
while 2010 first quarter liquidi-
ty may be impacted temporari-
ly by business licence fee pay-
ments. “This has been a tough
year to operate in a market
experiencing significant chal-
lenges,” said Craig Symonette,
Abaco Markets chief executive
and chairman.

“Despite the challenges, how-
ever, we are finally realising the
economies of scale, improved
group buying and efficiencies
among our locations we have
sought in recent years, which is
translating into steadily improv-
ing results. Our customers are
seeing the difference, our share-
holders certainly will note the
changes in our position and it’s
the result of a lot of things com-
ing together.

“As reported earlier, we do
expect a continued softening of
the economy in the coming
quarters, which is likely to
impact our results. However,
the concerted focus on driving
sales through pricing, control-
ling expenses and continuing to
improve our shrink that has
delivered the stability our com-
pany needed remains our pri-
ority operating in the current
market conditions.”

$3 Bahamas Business
L/ Solutions Ltd, _

LRA TECAMOD OGY DL ERED LOCAL

Ny our valued customers that
Wt canes Saunders

| 0 longer employed wih Bahamas Business Solutions
Limited and thereore not authorised to sel or sence Xerx
Products,

Bahamas Business Solutions Limited is the only company

authorised to of nd service Xerox Products in the Bahamas

and are not Kable for any products or servioes provided by this
Individual



Purpose

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) will provide technology vision and leadership in the
development and implementation of information technology (IT) programmes. He/she will
lead the planning and implementation of enterprise information systems to support business
operations and achieve more effective and cost beneficial enterprise-wide IT operations.

Essential Functions

¢ Establish guidelines and programmes for effective IT management.

¢ Provide data processing services required.

* Recommend long and short range management information systems plans and budgets.

¢ Approve staff recommendations on major systems development and/or research
projects.
Establish strategic policy for planning, development, and design of information needs.
Research management information systems hardware and software including applicable
vendor applications, data base management, and operational control packages.
Sets policies to ensure privacy and security of data processing facilities.
Establish guidelines and programmes for effective database management utilisation.
Consult with and advise department heads on IT management needs and problems.
Demonstrate continuous effort to improve operations, decrease turnaround times,
streamline work processes, and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality
customer service.

Education, Experience and Necessary Qualifications

Minimum of 3 years of experience with increasing responsibilities for management and
support of information systems and IT; direct management of a major IT operation is
preferred. Experience should also include exposure to both shared and outsourced solutions,
as well as support of in-house information and communication systems in a multi-site client-
server environment. Specific experience with financial and human resource management
information systems is a plus. Other skills required include:

¢ Familiarity with: desktop, notebook, handheld, and server computer hardware; local
and wide area network design, implementation, and operation; operating systems such
as Windows, OS/400, Unix, and Linux; and computer peripherals such as printers,
monitors, modems and other equipment.
Knowledge of office productivity software programmes such as word processing,
spreadsheet programmes, databases, and communications software.
Ability to: analyse and resolve complex issues, both logical and interpersonal; and
negotiate and defuse conflict.
Effective verbal and written communications skills and effective presentation skills, all
geared toward coordination and education.
Self-motivator, independent, cooperative, flexible and creative.

Required Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:
Requires a master’s degree in Computer Science, Business Administration or a related field or
eet alo experience. Comprehensive knowledge of:
Data processing methods and procedures, and computer software systems.
Systems design and development process, including requirements analysis, feasibility
studies, software design, programming, pilot testing, installation, evaluation and
operational management.
Business process analysis and redesign.
Design, management, and operation of managed IT systems

Proven skills in: negotiating with vendors, contractors, and others; budget preparation and
monitoring; management and leadership; and communication.

Demonstrated ability to: relate to all levels of the user community; be a team player
that motivates and educates other team members; plan, implement and support systems
in a complex education environment; set and manage priorities; comprehend complex,
technical subjects; translate technical language to lay audiences; and link and apply complex
technologies to business strategies.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: CIO 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Private & Confidential



VACANCY NOTICE
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER EXECUTIVE

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Chief Financial Officer.

The job oversees all financial matters of BEC, inclusive of the activities of the Customer Services
Division.

The objectives of this function include, but are not limited to the following:
Financial Management, Accounting & Treasury

Ensure and structure the Corporation’s financial policies, practices and internal controls so that
they are in accordance with the law, generally accepted accounting principles, contractual
commitments, the Corporation’s structure and protect the corporations assets;

Manage BEC’s cash resources to ensure that funds are available to meet the ongoing and future
needs of BEC while minimizing the cost of capital;

Ensure the timely preparation of all financial reports. These include complete financial statements
for presentation to the Board, preparation of budget reports for assisting management decision
making, and development of a yearly projected budget in consultation with other Division heads;
Ensure that the divisions maintain a high standard of efficiency, control, and application of
sound accounting practices and principles along with the adequate trained qualified staff to
achieve these objectives;

Coordinate to ensure that the workflow within the division and cross functionality with all
departments dependent upon the services of the division, are efficient and effective;
Coordinate the annual budgeting process and present the completed budget for approval;
Manage external relationships with local and international sources of funds;

Ensure proper and cost effective insurance of BEC’s assets;

Conduct Financial Analysis for the Corporation as requested;

Customer Services

Ensure the accurate and timely meter reading and billing of all customer accounts in New
Providence and the billing of other Family Island Accounts.

Ensure proper management of the revenue and collection recovery activities by effective
management of the Corporation’s Accounts Receivable.

Ensure proper management of the business office services of cashiering and new services, queries
for customers, banking and accounting reconciliation, etc.

Ensure that non-technical losses are kept to a minimum.

Job requirements include:

* A minimum ofa Bachelors Degree in Accounting/Finance with professional qualifications (e.g.,
ACCA, CPA) an MBA would be desired.
A minimum of 15+ years of experience in financial accounting, at senior management level.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Excellent analytical and organizational skills
Good customer relations skills
Good time management skills
Strong leadership skills
Knowledge of finance, accounting, budgeting and cost control principles including General
Accepted Accounting Principles.
Knowledge of automated financial and accounting reporting systems
Ability to analyze financial data and prepare financial reports, statements, and projections
Extensive knowledge of project management and the ability to oversee a range of projects
simultaneously
Strong human relations skills
Knowledge of industrial relations
Negotiation skills and techniques

Interested persons should apply by submitting a resume addressed to: The AGM-Human Resources
& Training, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau
Bahamas on or before: Wednesday, March 25, 2009.


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Shippers see 10% container volume decline

* But others say ‘no
decline in revenue’

NOTICE
REDWOOD INTERNATIONAL
TRADING LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.

2000 REDWOOD INTERNATIONAL TRADING

LIMITED. is in dissolution as of March 18, 2009

Irene Anastasiou of 18 Pindarou, 3095 Limassol,

Cyprus is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice

NOTICE
MEILEN S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

FROM page one

He said business was “defi-
nitely down” and operating
costs up, but that shipments
four days per week continued.

Mr Rolle said many other
shipping companies had seen

the same 10 per cent decrease
in business, in terms of con-
tainer throughput volume, and
revealed that there had been a
decline in high-end imports
coming into the Bahamas.
“What you’re going to be
seeing in the market is the
higher-end product diminish-

NOTICE
MIDWAY MANAGEMENT LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000 MIDWAY MANAGEMENT LIMITED. is in
dissolution as of March 18, 2009

Christina Goodman of Griva Digeni 80, Swepco
Court, Floor 6, Flat 52,3101 Limassol, Cyprus is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice

NOTICE
IMPACT HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ing, and people are going to
get more of the less branded
products,” he said.

Another container shipping
company official told Tribune
Business that their business
was “subject to the same
volatility of any business, as
market forces impact the sec-
tor”.

However, some companies
who regularly ship goods from
Miami said they had seen
either a minimal or no decline
at all in container throughput
volume.

Revenue

Seaboard Marine’s insides
sales coordinator, Oralee
Deveaux, said the company
had not seen a decrease in rev-
enue.

She added that Seaboard
Marine had restructured its
rates in order to compensate
for changes in the economy,
and in order to remain com-
petitive.

“We are hanging in there in
terms of cutbacks,” she said.

The retail sector was expect-
ed to experience a contraction
due to the economic crisis, but
some major shipping compa-
nies who move freight to the
Bahamas from Miami say they
have seen little change from





“What you’re
going to be
seeing in the
market is the
higher-end
product
diminishing,
and people are
going to get
more of the less
branded
products.”



previous years.

Ms Deveaux said Seaboard
Marine had seen a tremen-
dous increase in grocery ship-
ments from Miami.

A Betty K representative
said: “This part of the season
is comparative to last year.”
He said the company was
keeping a watchful eye on fuel
costs.

Seaboard Marine said they
did not foresee any cutbacks
or lay-offs in the future.
“We're not going anywhere,”
said Ms Deveaux.




Clan

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SUN SPRINKLES INC.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator) (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of SUN SPRINKLES INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Legal Notice Legal Notice

NOTICE
RATIONAL INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

NOTICE
BIRKA INT’L COMPANY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TSK HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

CIMT s&s 1.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

PMiorery 21 Work

cr »”A LL” cre} 1.
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 19 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,654.52 | CHG -0.53 | %CHG -0.03 | YTD -57.84 | YTD % -3.38
FINDEX: CLOSE 811.37 | YTD -2.82% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW _BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $

1.39 Abaco Markets 1.45 1.45 0.070
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00
7.00 Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37
12.61 Cable Bahamas 13.95 13.95
2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83
4.80 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.48 6.48
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs 1.74 1.58

0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.309
0.118
0.438
0.099
0.240
0.598
0.322
0.794
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

2.16 Doctor's Hospital 2.16 2.16
6.02 Famguard Fe = 7.76
11.00 Finco 11.00 11.00
10.45 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45 10.45
5.00 Focol (S) 5.07 5.05
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 . 280
8.60 J. S. Johnsen 10.50 10.50
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 -
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

Securit Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

FBB17 0.00 1%

FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%

FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00 0.000
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35 0.001
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ecoocoosoooocoeoeog
OoOnoooonooooocooog

9,000

99999999999999990

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

S2wk-Low Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

-0.041 0.300
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.000
0.000

ABDAB 31.72 33.26 29.00
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED) 0.00 0.00 0.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA _ Vv YTD% Last 12 Months Div $
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8988 -1.40 -3.35
1.4432 0.67 4.37
3.3201 -1.94 -11.33
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.1005 0.06 -13.33
1.0440 0.80 4.40
1.0364 0.33 3.64
1.0452 0.76 4.40
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

4.540
0.000
0.002
Fund Name Yield %
Colina Bond Fund
2.9230 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3828 Colina Money Market Fund
3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

28-Feb-09
28-Feb-09
6-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

1.3041

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close
Today's Close - Cu
Change - Change i
Daily Vol. - Num
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

nte
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meanin gful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

raded today

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UTRECHT INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2009, PAGE 7B



Government pledges ‘more independence’ for telecom regulator

FROM page 1B

would be created by an Act of
the same name.

This Act is part of a three-
strong proposed legislative
package unveiled yesterday, the
other two pieces being the
Communications Bill and a
Utilities Appeal Tribunal Bill.

The Government acknowl-
edged the need for “wholesale
change to the effectiveness, effi-
ciency and independence of the
URCA” was required, “not
only to ensure that the sector
is properly regulated but also
to ensure that the sector as a
whole has confidence that
URCA will not be subject to
political or other interference”.

To that end, the Government
promised: “A great deal of
effort is being focused on ensur-
ing that the necessary skills
(including international regula-
tory skills) and resources will
be available, that efficient and
effective internal processes are
in place and that URCA will
continue to act in the transpar-
ent, consultative and decisive
manner with which the Goy-
ernment has embarked on the
liberalisation process.

“For example, the URCA
Act will include provisions for
greater transparency and inde-
pendence from government and
other stakeholders, and a com-
mitment to greater openness
through publishing a plan for
the year and reporting on past
performance.”

The Government also
promised that, in the absence
of an overall Competition Act
and an existing authority to reg-
ulate this area, competition
powers “including merger pro-
visions” would be included in
the proposed Communications
Act. This would allow the
URCA to act as competition
regulator for that sector alone,



“The suggestions of a code of ethics
and prohibitions on staff movements
are ones the Government is actively

considering.”



until a wider Competition Act
was in place.

The Government dismissed
BTC’s call for the communica-
tions sector regulation to focus
entirely on anti-competitive
actions already taken by sector
operators, instead opting for a
proactive “light-touch regula-
tory regime” that dealt with
concerns prior to those events
occurring.

In its feedback, BTC said it
supported “the recruitment of
employees from outside of the
Bahamas in order to prevent
bias by the regulator....

“On the issue of ethics, BTC
suggests that staff working for
the regulator should be held to
a minimum standard of profes-
sional and ethical behaviour,
and a code on conflicts of inter-
est, such as enshrined in the
Bahraini Telecommunications
Law, might be one way to
ensure this.”

BTC urged that regulatory
enforcement powers be
strengthened, along with the
ability of operators to appeal
the decisions and fines it levied.
It warned, though, that the judi-
ciary had a “lack of expertise”
in dealing with telecoms issues.

Cable Bahamas backed BTC,
urging: “In the interests of inde-
pendence, employees of [tele-
coms] licensees should not be
able to join the regulator for a
specified time period after leav-
ing the licensee, and there
should be a further period dur-
ing which that former employee
could not work on a case involv-
ing their former employer.”

It also urged that “predatory

pricing and other anticompeti-
tive practices be prohibited”. In
response, the Government said:
“The suggestions of a code of
ethics and prohibitions on staff
movements are ones the Gov-
ernment is actively consider-
ing.”

Systems Resource Group
(SRG), parent of IndiGo Net-
works, supported the proposed
regulator in general, but
expressed concern over the lack
of detail.

When it came to financing the
regulator, all three Bahamian



telecoms operators and Digicel
agreed that the URCA’s costs
should be borne by all licensees.

BTC urged that licence fees
be used solely to cover the reg-
ulator’s costs, that no govern-
ment subsidy be required to
meet these, and that fees be
levied on a “non-discriminatory
basis”.

Concern

The state-owned telecoms
provider expressed concern that
“assessing fees base on turnover
can result in bias in the fees col-
lected”, arguing that revenues
generated by telecoms opera-
tors were higher than those pro-
duced by other utilities, such as
electricity and water.

BTC also urged that the per-
centage fee levied upon
licensees be varied, given that
the URCA could carry over

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NIEVA INDUSTRIES LTD.













— f,—



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138





(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NIEVA INDUSTRIES LTD. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the










Company has therefore been struck off the Register.












ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)











surpluses from previous years.

Meanwhile, SRG argued that
the proposal to levy fees based
on licensee turnover was
“flawed due to the regulator
having no incentive to keep
costs low”.

It argued that the regulator
had to be kept accountable,
ensuring it met international
benchmarks, while “certain ser-
vices should be subject to a
higher fee rate to reflect the
greater regulatory burden
required to oversee these ser-
vices”.

SRG suggested that broad-
casters fell within this catego-
ry, while Voice over Internet
Protocol (VoIP) services also
needed to be considered. “Local
VoIP providers should not have
to pay licence fees if foreign
VoIP providers do not pay,”
SRG added.

Financing disputes was also

raised as an issue by SRG,
expressing concerns - in a thin-
ly-veiled reference to BTC -
“about the costs that would
arise were the incumbent to
start vexatious regulatory dis-
putes against a smaller rival.

“SRG also believes that if
operators are paying licence
fees based on revenues, they
should be relieved from paying
taxes through business
licences.”

The Government, though,
suggested that the proposal to
levy different fees on different
telecoms services was “too dif-
ficult to implement”.

It explained: “It would
require determining revenue by
service type in a converged
world in which services are
often bundled. This is not real-
istic and not supported by inter-
national best practice.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CORDAY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HORNBILL HALLS INC.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HORNBILL HALLS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HEALTHY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OESTORPHIO INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JIGGER III LTD.

— 4, —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of JIGGER III LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WIDONWIDE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SONY ET KALY CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
HOT PASTY LTD.

— ¢, —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HOT PASTY LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ENKLE INVESTMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FAYD HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
THE TRIBUNE



THE WEATHER RE

“oO

5-Day FORECAST







FRIDAY, MARCH 20 2009 - PAGE 8B





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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



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’ Le - Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
f ! a Mt % 2s High = Low W High Low W WASSAU ‘Today. ENEat12-25Knots O-2Feet 10-20Miles 73°F |
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f ~ in. . . Acapulco 90/32 70/21 s 89/31 70/21 S FREEPORT Today: ENE at 12-25 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
7 AK a a Low | MODERATE | HicH } V.MIGH EX. Amsterdam 45/7 38/3 s 52/11 41 s Saturday: _NE at 12-25 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
"lla ORLANDO BN Ankara, Turkey 39/3 25/3 s 46/7 30/-1 pe ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73°F
High: 78° F/26°C ee Parlty cloudy with a Partly cloudy, a Partly sunny, a Mostly sunny, a Clouds and sun, a Windy with a shower The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 57/13 49/9 pe 56/12 45/7 Saturday: Eat 5-10 Knots 9-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
a Lowe erin ; 4 spotty shower. shower; breezy. shower; breezy. shower; windy. shower possible. possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 68/20 59/15 pc 68/20 56/13 pc
S High: 78° High: 77° High: 77° High: 78° Bangkok 88/31 77/25 sh 91/32 79/26 sh ri
L N Barbados 85/29 75/23 pc imeem TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
c 7 t High: 79° Low: 70° Low: 67° Low: 68° Low: 69° Low: 70° se ye ey cade
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High: 82° F/28° C ‘* Lb 80°-65° F LL 74°-64°F | 80°-67° F High __Ht.(ft.)_ Low _Ht.(ff. Beirut 63/17 55/12. po 67/19 BIG s y
Low: 60° F/16°C ek 7 The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 3:49am. 23 10:04am. 06 Belgrade 40/4 29/-1 sh 467 31/0 c
Pe @ ? : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 401pm. 20 10:11pm. 05 Berlin 42/5 32/0 po 49/9 36/2 pc
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a | a 5:01pm. 2.1 11:10pm. 0.4 Bogota 66/18 47/8 + 6417 46/7 + Billings
3 il Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunday 54d0am. 04 1146am. 04 Brussels 50/10 34/1 s 54/12 36/2 pc
ee Temperature 553pm. 2.3 = Budapest 45/7 28/-2 sh 50/10 30/-1 s
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f oa “XK an ow. 66° F/I Normal high... 7ergppc OO | Oe 95/35 78/25 s 95/35 76/24 s
, tye Normal low 66° F/19° C Calgary 52/11 26/-3 pce 46/7 20/-6 c
ps @ WEST PALM BEACH \ Last year's NIG My seas esedaeeateessesne 82° F/28° C SUN ay Ty ity Cancun 81/27 66/18 sh 84/28 67/19 pc
High: 80° F/27° C Ns Last year's low Giese eens 71° F/21°C ; Caracas 78/25 66/18 pc 83/28 68/20 t Los Angeles
Low: 63° F/17°C = = Precipitation _ ee oi a.m. Lena obese ae am. Casablanca 75/23 58/14 pc 76/24 58/14 pc 70/56
f As of 2 p.m. yesterday o.....c.ccceeceeeeeeeee 0.15" unsel....... ‘<1 p.m. Moonset..... “U/ p.m. Copenhagen 43/6 40/4 pc 47/8 40/4 pc
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Ar Year to date . New First Full ast Dublin 52/11 39/3 pc 5412 415 pc
High: 78° F/26° C @ High: 75° F/24° C Normal year to date... ceeseccssessecsteesneeres 4.50" : a os Frankfurt 48/8 30/-1 pc 5412 36/2 pe
Low: 65° F/18°C Low: 64° F/18°C i Geneva 50/10 30/-1 s 51/10 31/0 s
ln AccuWeather.com om Halifax 29/-1 10/-12 pc 34/1 16/-8 Seas
“ @ -_— Forecasts and graphics provided by Ec: an Havana 81/27 61/16 pc 79/26 59/15 pe T-storms aoiee
. MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.26 Apr.2 = Apr.9 = Apr.17__—Helsinki 32/0 25/-3 sn 30/-1 21/6 sn Rain
; ELEUTHERA Fronts
High: 80° F/27° C Hong Kong 79/26 72/22 s 77/25 72/22 pe Flurries Colds"
Low:64°F/18°C NASSAU High: 79° F/26° C Islamabad 80/26 53/11 t 83/28 57/13 pc Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
Ar ow: 64°F/1 : fs a Low: 69° F/21°C ISTIRGTII 46/7 44/5 vc 54/12 AGIT c Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm diiefiteniite
N High: 79 F/26°C i P Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary fMangunlille
Low: 70° F/21°C Jerusalem 5613 42/5 sh 66/18 47/8 s
oe an a Johannesburg 70/21 54/12 t 75/23 51/0 s -10s| -0s {03 10s 20s (B0si) 40s
KEY WEST CATISLAND Kingston 82/27 73/22 sh 83/28 74/23 sh
High: 78° F/26°C i wT LOLAN Lima 84/28 66/18 pc 83/28 66/18 c
Low: 68° F/20°C High: 77° F/25° C London 55/12 34/1 pe 58/14 39/3. pe
: al =F Low: 64° F/18°C Madrid 7o22MOT as 72/22 37/2 s
Manila 92/33 72/22 s 91/32 76/24 s } 0) ‘e) SU Cc
i Mexico City 73/22 46/7 pc 72/22 46/7 pc aN 'T | IN real N is
GREATEXUMA Monterrey 81/27 61/16 pc 83/28 62/16 pc
SAN SALVADOR Montreal 30/-1 21/-6 s 43/6 23/-5 pc
High: 79° F/26° C cao epys Moscow 36/2 28/-2 sn 36/2 23/-5 sn
{ Low: 68° F/20° C eee Munich 33/0 23/-5 sf 39/3 30/-1 ¢
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS : Nairobi 90/32 57/13 pe 89/31 58/14 s
highs and tonights's lows. High: 82° F/28° C © New Delhi 95/35 61/16 c 88/31 58/14 pc e V cole Ss OUTr
Low: 69° F/21°C Oslo 39/3 31/0 ¢ 43/6 32/0 pe }
Prague ye? 2150 ~~ 404 34/1 po CII, without us:
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 80/26 72/22 pc 79/26 72/22 sh ; ‘
igh: 81° F/27° Riyadh 90/32 64/17 pe 93/33 68/20 s ; , oI
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Today Saturday Today Saturtay Today Satintay MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 82/27 72/22 s 83/28 72/22 s ; 12 Smart choice is
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 84° F/29° C San Juan 91/32 68/20 pc 94/34 68/20 s M
Fc FIC FC FIC Fc FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC rar Low: 69° F/21°C ee alee oo s alee es s | su ee anagement.
Albuquerque 62/16 48/8 t 71/21 47/8 t Indianapolis 50/10 33/0 s 5713 39/3 c Philadelphia 46/7 29/-1 pe 51/10 341 s antiago s s
Anchorage 25/-3 Q-12 s 22/-5 11/11 pe Jacksonville 70/21 49/9 pc 64/17 45/7 pc Phoenix 89/31 6216 c 86/30 59/15 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 84/28 68/20 sh 81/27 68/20 sh ; people you can trust.
Atlanta 66/18 41/5 s 63/17 40/4 s Kansas City 58/14 44/6 po 6317 44/6 1 Pittsburgh 44/6 26/-3 po 54/12 30/1 s RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:85°F/29°c - _ ae — C ne — t
Atlantic City 47/8 22/-5 po 50M0 29/-1 s Las Vegas 84/28 55/12 po 80/26 56/13 pc Portland, OR 56/13 39/3 r 54/12 40/4 c High: 83° F/28° C Low: 71° F/22°C Srakkal oan a : on "8 a pe
Baltimore 47/8 29/-1 pe 52/11 33/0 s — LittleRock 62/16 45/7 s 65/18 46/7 pc Raleigh-Durham 55/12 30/-1 pc 57/13 32/0 s Low:67°F/19°C AC ae Pony. RIE o- roe RA
Boston 40/4 27/-2 pe 48/8 320 s Los Angeles 70/21 56/13 pc 66/18 5442 pc St. Louis 56/13 38/3 po 55/12 42/5 c . Ean a ae 81/27 73/22 - 86/30 73/22 x INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Buffalo 40/4 24/-4 5 48/8 28/-2 s Louisville 5412 341 s 63/17 43/6 c Salt Lake City 68/20 45/7 pe 66/18 44/6 pc GREATINAGUA MY Tala B73 oe aa aoe
Charleston, SC 65/18 40/4 pe 63/17 40/4 5s Memphis 64/17 44 s 65/18 49 pc SanAntonio 80/26 59/15 pc 73/22 61/16 pc High:85° F/29° C Tara 97/2 23/-5 ¢ 19/9 31/0 § (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 46/7 34/1 po 5512 36/2 c Miami 80/26 66/18 pc 78/25 63/17 pc San Diego 65/18 56/13 po 65/18 56/13 pc Low. 70°F21°C Trinidad 80/97 79/99 t Bt/07 74/93 t o =
Cleveland 44/6 25/-3 po 52/11 31/0 s Minneapolis 50/10 38/3 pc 56/13 37/2 c Sanfrancisco 61/16 5010 pc 60/45 48/8 1 ae nELaaae Ta ~ Hew Providence Grond Beheme bhaco Fleuthera Evo
Dallas 70/21 54/12 po 74/23 59/15 pc Nashville 59/15 35/1 s 62/16 40/4 pc _ Seattle 52/11 38/3 6 ©6110 39/3 ich 30/3 97/-2 sf 44/6 38/3 ¢ i sida th SL Is IATA Tac (240) 20-1860 | Bl TD BN4N4
Denver 72/22 39/3 pe 71/21 40/4 pc New Orleans 72/22 57/13 s 72/22 56/13 pc Tallahassee 78/25 48/8 pe 74/23 44/6 pc Warsaw 36/2 23/-5 sf 39/3 30/-1 c (iat) (ti) (i) (142) lh )
Honcli «796 6/20 5 BET TOL1 & OahomaCiy GSB 52/11 po 7423 SQI1 po Tucson «BARB Sd pe BURT SUI s. ee es a ————
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Houston 78/25 57/13 pe 76/24 60/15 pe Orlando 78/25 57/13 pe 73/22 54/12 pce Washington,DC 48/8 33/0 pc 58/14 36/2 s Neh eee