Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 105 No.97





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BAHAMAS EDITION

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THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

PAINT SALE





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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96-year-old ‘can prove’
Pindling horn in Bahama

Press conference held
by Obie Pindling and
Doris Grant-Strachan

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia. net

NINETY-six-year-old Doris
Grant-Strachan said yesterday
that she was a close friend of the
late Viola Pindling — the mother
of Sir Lynden Pindling — and
could prove that the “Father of
the Nation” was in fact born in
the Bahamas.

Sitting upright in a wheel-chair
at a press conference at her home
on Soldier Road, along with Obie
Pindling, son of Sir Lynden, Mrs
Grant-Strachan recalled that she
first met Viola, whom she affec-
tionately called “Ola” at Mount
Zion Baptist Church. Following
Ola’s marriage to Arnold Pin-
dling in 1929, Mrs Grant-Strachan

said she remembered comment-
ing on the young Mrs Pindling’s
pregnancy, quipping that Ola had
a “weird shape.”

Shortly thereafter, she said, Sir
Lynden was born and she could
recall seeing this very large baby
being pushed around in a baby
carriage by his mother.

The recent furor surrounding
Sir Lynden was sparked over the
past two weeks following an
explosive Insight article written
by The Tribune’s managing editor
John Marquis in an interview with
Chauncey Tynes, Sr, former PLP
treasurer. According to Mr Tynes,
Sr, his pilot son, Chauncey Tynes,
Jr, regularly flew consignments
of cash from drug kingpin Joe

SEE page eight

Tourists who ate iguana
‘bragged about escapades’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TOURISTS who killed and ate an iguana “bragged about their
escapades” over drinks with sailboaters, including those suspected of

killing and eating a pet duck.

Alexander David Rust, 24, from Indiana and Vanessa Star Palm, 23,
from Illinois, were convicted under the Wild Animal Protection Act after
posting pictures of themselves barbecuing and eating an iguana in Exu-
ma on social networking website Facebook.

Rust was fined $200 for the charge of possession of an iguana by an
Exuma magistrate’s court in February, and a further $800 for possession
of undeveloped conch also pictured in their Facebook photo album.

Rust and Palm both pleaded ignorance, and Palm was pardoned

SEE page 14



Mk Ao
See Ee dL

96-YEAR-OLD Doris Grant-Strachan and the son of the late Sir Lynden
Pindling, Obie Pindling, speak to members of the media yesterday at
the Strachans’ residence.

Cost-cutting
exercise at
Atlantis ‘is
necessary’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Judge orders that
provisional liquidator’s
HMMA ALB
handed over to court

mg By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A SUPREME Court judge
yesterday ordered that the
provisional liquidator’s report
regarding the CLICO insur-
ance company be handed over
to the court by tomorrow.

Attorneys representing the
interested parties in the mat-
ter debated extensively before
Justice Cheryl Albury yester-
day on the amount of time
needed to peruse that report
and receive instructions from
their clients on how to pro-
ceed. Attorneys involved in
the matter yesterday
expressed their desire to have
the matter resolved expedi-

SEE page eight

EVEN as Kerzner Internation-
al CEO Sol Kerzner states that
his company is well financed and
without debt problems, a repre-
sentative in the Bahamas yester-
day explained that a cost-cutting
effort affecting 2,500 Atlantis
employees is necessary to “ensure
that the company meets its bank
covenants and financial obliga-
tions.”

That “cost containment exer-
cise” involves non-unionised,
mainly managerial staff at the
resort, who were asked earlier this
week by executives to take two

SEE page 14



te mr FEA





Ie a | eT tr

IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

The Bahamas’
rejection of abolition

of death penalty
disappoints Amnesty

Human rights watchdog resumes call for
govt to issue moratorium on executions

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

HUMAN rights watchdog group Amnesty International is dis-
appointed that the Bahamas has rejected recommendations to
abolish the death penalty and resumed its call for the government
to issue a moratorium on executions.

The group also wants government to repeal all legal provisions
that allow for the death penalty, according to a recent United
Nations Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review on
the Bahamas. Amnesty said while it was pleased that no exe-
cutions were carried out in this country for the past nine years,
the group is worried that death sentences continue to be hand-
ed down. Growing calls in the community for hangings to resume
also have Amnesty concerned.

SEE page 14



Artists believe cancelling
Carifesta will cost Bahamas
chance to boost economy

m By MEGAN the stress of a global
REYNOLDS economic crisis.
Tribune Staff But artists believe
Reporter cancelling the festival
mreynolds@ would cost the Bahamas

tribunemedia. net an opportunity to boost
the economy and be
placed firmly on the cul-
tural map.

COB professor,
writer and arts advocate
turn would cost the Nicolette Bethel said
Bahamas a chance to postponing the 2009
boost its economy CHARLES MAYNARD event would cause the
through tourism and said CARICOM will Bahamas to fall further
cultural development, need to discuss the behind as countries
artists maintain. possibility of cancelling around the world con-

Minister of Culture the Caribbean festival. tinue to develop their
Charles Maynard has arts industries.
said CARICOM will need to dis- She criticised government’s
cuss the possibility of cancelling _ failure to recognise the potential

the Caribbean festival as partici- SEE page eigh t

pating island nations suffer under

CANCELLING Car-
ifesta in the Bahamas
next year because of the
global economic down-



Man accused of shooting
at police appears in court

A 24-YEAR-OLD man of Twynam Heights,
accused of shooting at police officers during a
high speed chase Monday night, was arraigned
in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Etienne Bowleg II, the son of Anglican
Archdeacon Etienne Bowleg, appeared in
Court 1, Bank lane yesterday on weapons and
ammunitions charges. Police have charged
Bowleg with four counts of possession of a JR
firearm with intent to endanger life, four counts
of possession of a firearm with intent to resist [JF
lawful arrest, two counts of possession of J
ammunition, one count of causing damage and
possession of dangerous drugs.

It is alleged that on Monday, March 16, Bowleg was in possession of
a handgun with intent to endanger the lives of Reserve Constable 26
Dennis Clarke, Reserve Constable 775 Patrick Minnis, Woman Police
Constable 2895 Shenique Ford and Sergeant 987 Alexander Pierre. It
is also alleged that Bowleg was in possession of a firearm with intent to

SEE page 14

San Aem Leste MT





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





























































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LOCAL NEWS

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



day.

tice Anita Allen.

proceed.

EDWARD Taylor was acquitted yesterday of the May
2006 murder of Eric McGreggor Jr after an all woman jury
found him not guilty of the charge.

Prosecutors had alleged that Taylor shot McGreggor at
the Pond Wash on Carmichael Road before fleeing in a
Chevrolet Suburban sport utility vehicle on May 18, 2006.

The jury returned with a 9-3 not guilty verdict yester-

The trial was heard before Senior Supreme Court Jus-

During the trial, Taylor dismissed his lawyer V Alfred
Gray after disagreements about how his defence should

Attorneys Sandra Dee Gardiner and Darnell Dorsette
appeared for the prosecution.

€€ ACQUITTED: Edward Taylor pictured yesterday.



MAGISTRATE’S COURT

Five men charged over seizure of
marijuana worth more than $3m

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

FIVE men charged in con-
nection with the seizure of more
than $3 million worth of mari-
juana on Andros last Friday
were arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Marvin Roderick Demeritte,
44, of Pinewood Gardens, Peter
Thompson, 49, of Fresh Creek,
Andros, Mario Percentie, 35,
Herculean Thompson, 53, of
Andros Town, and Nathan
Robinson, 42, of Jamaica, were
arraigned before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel in Court 8, yes-
terday morning. The men have
all been charged with posses-
sion of marijuana with intent to
supply, importation of marijua-

Not guilty pleas to all allegations

na with intent to supply, con-
spiring to possess marijuana
with intent to supply and con-
spiring to import marijuana with
intent to supply. It is alleged
that the men committed the
offences between Tuesday,
March 10, and Sunday, March,

15, 2009.
Bail

The men pleaded not guilty
to all charges. Demeritte, Peter
Thompson and Percentie were
granted bail in the sum of
$100,000. The case was
adjourned to September 2 and

3. Additionally, Teffran Frazier,
31, of Flamingo Gardens, alias
Duran Rolle, and Nathan
Robinson were arraigned on a
separate charge of possession
of marijuana with intent to sup-
ply. Frazier has also been
charged with deceiving a public
officer. It is alleged that he told
for the police that his name was
Duran Rolle. Both men pleaded
not guilty to the charges.

According to police, Drug
Enforcement Unit officers and
Andros police seized more than
$3 million worth of marijuana
during a special operation
launched in Central Andros last
week Friday.

While searching a villa short-
ly after 4pm that day, they
found just over two pounds of
marijuana and arrested several
men.

Based on the information
obtained from those arrests, this
operation continued until Sun-
day when officers went to a dirt
road in Fresh Creek and found
two crocus sacks and a white
five gallon bucket full of mari-
juana.

A short distance away, offi-
cers found an additional 46 cro-
cus sacks, and six white five gal-
lon buckets of marijuana. The
drugs have a total weight of
more than 2,200 pounds and a
local street value of $3,300,000.

The prosecution objected to
bail being granted to Herculean
Thompson on the grounds that
he has matters of a similar
nature pending before the
courts.

The prosecution made the
same submission with regards
to Taffron Frazier and also
objected to bail being granted to
Robinson as he is considered a
flight risk in view of the fact
that he is not a Bahamian citi-
zen. Frazier, Peter Thompson
and Robinson were remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Man dies
after falling
down Queen's
Staircase

PHOTO: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

SCENE OF TRAGEDY: The Queen's
Staircase where a Bahamian died
from a fall.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FATAL fall from the
top of the Queen’s Staircase
claimed the life of a Bahami-
an man on Tuesday.

However, Bahamas Police
were unable to provide The
Tribune with any informa-
tion about the man or how
he fell.

Dr Davidson Herbert at
the Antiquities, Monuments
and Museums Corportation
(AMMC), responsible for
the upkeep and restoration
of buildings and monuments
across the Bahamas, said the
steps are well maintained
and he found them to be in
good condition when he vis-
ited recently.

Ex-Montagu
MPs to he
honoured

THE Montagu Constituen-
cy Association and scores of
Montagu residents say they
are “extremely proud of and
forever grateful for the dis-
tinguished and altruistic rep-
resentation” that its mem-
bers of parliament have pro-
vided over the past 40 years.

From 1967 to 2007, the
counstituency has had a total
of six representatives.

“Not only have these
noble sons served Montagu
with distinction, but they
have each gone on to
become nation builders of
the highest calibre,” said the
association in a statement.

In recognition of their con-
tributions, the constituency
association will host a cele-
batory dinner where each of
the former MPs will be hon-
oured and thanked.

The dinner is scheduled
for Saturday March 28 at the
Montagu Gardens, East Bay
Street.

Further information can
be obtained by contacting
the constituency office at
393-0878.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
eee
PHONE: $22-2157



FORMER TOP FINANCE OFFICIAL JAMES SMITH SPEAKS OUT

Somebody must have
known about CLICO’s

mg By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER top finance offi-
cial yesterday suggested that the
relevant authorities seem to have
fallen short when it came to keep-
ing CLICO (Bahamas) in check.

Given that CLICO was “quite
so upfront” about their foreign
investments, former minister of
state for finance James Smith said
“somebody must have known”
about the company’s risky behav-
iour and even approved it, con-
trary to reports.

“They made it obvious,” he
said.

His comments come days after
Bishop Simeon Hall of the New
Covenant Baptist Church said
there is a “growing sentiment”
among frustrated policy holders,
whom he has counselled, that offi-
cial heads must roll over the fail-
ure of the insurance company.

Shortly after the Registrar of
Insurance Companies issued a
winding up order for CLICO
(Bahamas) due to its insolvency
on February 24, Central Bank
governor Wendy Craigg con-
firmed to The Tribune that
records do not reflect the insurer
applying for, or being granted,
any approval to authorise its ulti-
mately compromising $73.6 mil-
lion investment in a single Florida
real-estate project.

Mr Smith is now “really won-
dering” how this state of affairs
came about. “The company was
quite clear in their audited state-
ments that these investments
were outside the Bahamas — that’s
leading me to believe that at some
point somebody must have raised



the issue.”
“You would
want to regis-
ter the inward
investment and
the outward
investment
with the Cen-

tral Bank
because at
APES Some point

you're going to
have to convert and the Central
Bank will only give permission to
convert if they’d given prior
approval,” he said.

‘Excessive’

Speaking on the issue in par-
liament, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham stated that CLICO
(Bahamas) had been writing
“excessive cash advances” to the
tune of $73.6 million to its sub-
sidiary, CLICO Enterprises Lim-
ited — which in turn invested in
the Florida real estate market —
since 2004. Mr Ingraham sug-
gested that it “appears the com-
pany never sought the required
‘no objection’ approval from the
Bahamas Registrar of Insurance
Companies in connection with its
investments, loans to subsidiaries
or related party transactions.

But Mr Smith said: “The audit-
ed statements would have said
that the assets were invested out-
side of the Bahamas, so it’s there
to see. The question is, once its
seen by the board of directors,
the auditors and the regulators
(Registrar of Insurance Compa-
nies and the Central Bank) some-
one should ask the question, if
it’s not already been asked: “Did

you get the proper authority for
the outward investment?”

Whereas he had initially pre-
sumed the company must have
“hidden” its activities from the
authorities, Mr Smith said that in
actuality, this was not the case.

“The audited statements of the
firm being seen by the regulators
and by the company’s board of
directors, all of them are pre-
sumably responsible bodies and
all of them would’ve raised the
point at some point. It would’ve
been their obligation as a member
of the board or as a regulator to
determine whether or not CLI-
CO had the proper permission.”

This permission would relate
to the Bahamian insurer’s wish
to invest abroad, and to its deci-
sion to invest such a large quan-
tity of funds in one niche product
— the Wellington Preserve Limit-
ed real estate project, rather than
spreading its risk exposure across
a variety of investments.

While some commentators
have suggested CLICO might
have been able to circumvent
Bahamian exchange control reg-
ulations by investing in the US
via its Turks and Caicos branch,
Mr Smith said that this is not the
case, as far as he can tell, as the
same rules apply.

“What it says is a company reg-
istered in the Bahamas has on its
books an investment outside of
the Bahamas — it doesn’t matter if
it goes through the Turks or
through the US — you’re holding
a foreign asset and that’s what
you need permission for,” he said.

A hearing of the application
for the liquidation of CLICO
(Bahamas) got underway in the
Supreme Court yesterday.



We feel exploited by government, say unions

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

TWO Water and Sewage Corporation
unions say they feel “exploited” by govern-
ment after negotiations to renew expired
industrial agreements were suspended.

The unions want a general salary increase in
line with the rising cost of living. They said
WSC employees have not had a general salary
increase in Six years.

Bahamas Utilities, Services and Allied Workers
Union (BUSAWU) president Carmen Kemp said
both sides were about three quarters through the
negotiations when government offered an increase
that the unions refused. Government then took their
offer off the table and suspended the negotiations,
according to union leaders.

But yesterday State Environment Minister Phen-
ton Neymour — who oversees WSC under his port-
folio — said the negotiations were not suspended.
He said that government met with the unions last
week to explain WSC's desperate financial situa-
tion. He added that WSC employees are near those
at the top in terms of salary scales and benefits in the
public service — and that their salaries are on par with
those paid to BTC and BEC workers.

Ata joint press conference held at the WSC com-
pound yesterday, Water and Sewage Management
Union (WSMU) president Ednal Rolle and the
BUSAWU president Ms Kemp said the impasse
concerns the financial aspects of the agreements,
which expired in June, 2007.

Speaking to the media and dozens of union mem-
bers, the union heads conceded that the govern-
ment is grappling with the global economic down-
turn, but said they feel overlooked because govern-
ment recently signed agreements with the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC) and the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company (BTC).

"Both unions have sacrificed dearly to try and















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save this organisation in the years 2004 to
2007. When other organisations, BTC and
BEC, got their increases we got absolutely
nothing; we signed for zero per cent. Today we
think if only the cost of living, the inflation, we
should receive onto our salaries," Ms Kemp
said. "Both unions will stand in unity to do
what it needs to do to make it happen,” she
added. "We sympathise, we know the eco-
nomic situation but we ask that you not
exploit us during these economic times. We've
been long and hard without any general salary
increases in this organisation.”

But Mr Neymour said while government is sensi-
tive to these issues, the unions need to take into
account WSC's financial woes.

"The government is sensitive to the requests being
made by the union, however we feel that the union
needs to become sensitive to the current final situa-
tion of the corporation, of the world, and also take
view of where it is positioned in terms of its benefits
and salaries being afforded versus that of others at
this time. They are among the top in regard to ben-
efits and salaries among our country.

"My advice to the union is to seek ways to improve
the services being provided by the corporation
through more efficient means," he said.

The unions also argued that there was no alloca-
tion in the recent $30 million WSC subsidy for train-
ing, salary increases, or improving the corporation's
efficiency. Mr Neymour explained that of that sum,
about $19 million went strictly to water purchases. Of
the remaining $11 million, $1 million will go to the
renovation of water infrastructure on Shirley Street
and Bay Street, a necessary move in light of the
impending road paving exercises. The vast majority
of remaining $10 million will also go towards pur-
chasing water, which is among government’s most
heavy costs, he said.

BUSAWU is inviting the government to return to
the negotiation table. If this request is not met, the
unions say they are prepared to take further action.

_—— ©) the uttimate



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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
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WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama to face first big leadership test

WHEN YOU hear a sitting U.S. senator call
for brokers to commit suicide, you know that
the anger level in America is reaching a “Bon-
fire of the Vanities,” get-out-the-pitchforks dan-
ger level. It is dangerous for so many reasons,
but most of all because this real anger about
AIG could overwhelm the still really difficult
but critically important things we must do in
the next few weeks to defuse this financial crisis.

Let me be specific: If you didn’t like reading
about AIG employees getting millions in bonus-
es after their company — 80 per cent of which is
owned by U.S. taxpayers — racked up the
biggest quarterly loss in the history of the Milky
Way Galaxy, you’re really not going to like the
bank bailout plan to be rolled out soon by the
Obama team. That plan will begin by using up
the $250 billion or so left in TARP funds to
start removing the toxic assets from the banks.
But ultimately, to get the scale of bank repair we
need, it will likely require some $750 billion
more.

The plan makes sense, and, if done right, it
might even make profits for U.S. taxpayers.
But in this climate of anger, it will take every bit
of political capital in Barack Obama’s piggy
bank — as well as Michelle’s, Sasha’s and Mali-
a’s — to sell it to Congress and the public.

The job can’t be his alone. Everyone who
has a stake in stabilizing and reforming the sys-
tem is going to have to suck it up. And that
starts with the employees at AIG who got the
$165 million in bonuses. They need to volun-
tarily return them. Everyone today is taking a
haircut of some kind or another, and AIG bro-
kers surely can be no exception. We do not
want the U.S. government abrogating contracts
— the rule of law is why everyone around the
world wants to invest in our economy. But tax-
payers should not sit quietly as bonuses are
paid to people who were running an insurance
scheme that would have made Bernie Madoff
smile. The best way out is for the AIG bankers
to take one for the country and give up their
bonuses. I live in Montgomery Country, Md.
The schoolteachers here, who make on average
$67,000 a year, recently voted to voluntarily
give up their five per cent pay raise that was con-
tractually agreed upon for next year, saving our
school system $89 million — so programmes
and teachers would not have to be terminated.
If public schoolteachers can take one for school-
children and fellow teachers, AIG employees
can take one for the country.

Let’s not forget, AIG was basically running an
unregulated hedge fund inside an AAA-rated
insurance company. And — like Madoff, who
was selling phantom stocks — AIG was sell-
ing, in effect, phantom insurance against the

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default of bundled subprime mortgages and
other debt — insurance that AIG had nowhere
near enough capital to back up when bonds
went bust. It was a hedge fund with no hedges.
That’s why taxpayers have had to pay the insur-
ance for AIG — so its bank and government
customers won’t tank and cause even more
harm.

Unfortunately, all the money we have already
spent on AIG and the banks was just to prevent
total system failure. It was just to keep the body
alive. That’s why healing the system will likely
require the rest of the TARP funds, plus the
$750 billion the administration warned Con-
gress in the new budget that it could need.

Best I can piece together, the administra-
tion’s recovery plan — due out shortly — will
look something like this: The U.S. government
will create a facility to buy the toxic mortgages
off the balance sheets of the major banks. They
will be bought by a public-private fund or funds
in which taxpayers will, in effect, be partners
with hedge funds and private equity groups.
The hedge funds will be there to provide exper-
tise in pricing and trading the assets. The tax-
payers will be there to guarantee — gulp —
that the hedge funds won’t lose money if they
take the early risks and to also lend them mon-
ey to make some of the purchases. Taxpayers
will benefit from any profits these partnerships
make. Once the banks sell their toxic assets,
many will need capital, because, while they may
be carrying these assets on their books at 85
cents on the dollar, they initially may have to sell
them for less. So, the government will probably
have to inject capital into more banks to main-
tain their solvency, but once the banks begin to
clear their balance sheets of those toxic assets,
they will likely attract the private capital they
need and relieve the government of having to
put in more.

Will it work? We can only hope. But I know
this for sure: Unless the banks are healed, the
economy can’t lift off, and that bank healing is
not going to happen without another big, broad
taxpayer safety net.

The only person with the clout to sell some-
thing this big is President Obama. The bankers
and Congress will have to help; every citizen will
have to swallow hard.

But ultimately, Obama will have to persuade
people that this is the least unfair and most
effective solution. It will be his first big leader-
ship test. It is coming soon, and it is coming to a
theatre — and a bank — near you.

(This article was written by Thomas L.
Friedman - c.2009 New York Times News
Service).



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Did the PLP
know more
about CLICO than
they are telling?

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE recent unfortunate sit-
uation that CLICO found itself
may have exposed many other
irregularities that would have
been left hidden otherwise. The
handwriting was on the wall for
many years and from all indi-
cations, reared its ugly head as
far back as 2003. But these
events leave a bad taste in the
mouths of most policy holder.

The most frightening thing
about all of this is that all banks
and insurance companies that
are controlled from overseas
should be scrutinised intensely,
in an effort to protect the vul-
nerable Bahamians who are
frightened to death for their
monies that some will never
retrieve from CLICO. Regard-
less of what anyone says pen-
sioners and other investments
could forget it.

Immediately after the bubble
burst the PLP jumped up first to
point fingers, but we all know if
you point one finger, then four
fingers are pointing at you. This
is not just a saying, but what in
fact did happen. I stand to be
corrected but the PLP govern-
ment must have known well in
advance of the deteriorating sit-
uation and did precious little.
They in their usual “laid back”
attitude did nothing, hoping it
would go away. But it didn’t.

I do not have the facts in
front of me but I would ask the

letters@tribunemedia net



then Minister of State in the
Ministry of Finance James
Smith and the then substantive
Minister of Finance, Perry
Gladstone Christie if they knew
that CLICO was showing visible
cracks in its armour? Did the
Ministers suspect that CLICO
might not have been operating
within the laws of the Bahamas?

I would also like to ask if Mr
Smith and Mr Christie were
aware that Clico had already
been under a close watch in oth-
er countries in which they were
doing business?

Did Mr Smith, a former
Governor of the Central Bank,
know that CLICO might have
violated the Central Bank rules
with transactions out of the
Bahamas without the proper
approvals and/or authorisation?

The cute, but very peculiar
thing about Mr Smith is that he
appears to be the most intelli-
gent financial mind in the coun-
try, responding to almost every-
thing that the FNM government
does as if he did better when
he was at the helm.

The Bahamian people expect
nothing less than Mr Smith and
Mr Christie to tell all they know
about CLICO and stop allowing
people to speculate. This would

Constitution will rise above all laws

EDITOR, The Tribune.

When parliament passes a
law against the interests of good
governance then the governor-
general must refuse to assent to
their impropriety.

Some will feel that if the new
police act, now having passed
both the House of Assembly
and the Senate goes to Gov-
ernment House for His Excel-
lency to assent he should exer-
cise his powers under Article:
63 (4) which allows the Gover-
nor-General to ‘withhold’ his
assent to the legislation whether
or not passed.

I find it inexcusable that in
this day any government would
go this far realising what they
propose is probably a serious
matter of constitutionality but
still push-on willy-nilly.

Tenure in official positions in
The Constitution are estab-
lished for judges who on attain-
ing 65 years are required to
resign-retire.

There is no tenure condition
for the Commissioner or the
Deputy Commissioner who

FINALLY AFFORDABLE...

actually interesting under the
Constitution do not or need be
actually serving police officers
— the Constitution simply
clearly says that the Prime Min-
ister, having consulted the
Leader of the Opposition will
advise the Governor-General
to appoint so-and-so to that
position then that is the sole
qualifier. Why is Government
seemingly accepting that they
know their proposed legislation
will be challenged and at a high
cost to the Treasury will be
challenged but of course we do
so love the drama of these mat-
ters.

Will His Excellency, realising
that the Police Bill is not con-
stitutional decline to assent? If
so it will be an interesting
moment in the relations
between Parliament and the
Head of State who has this ulti-
mate Constitutional power.

Let sense prevail — even if
certain people who interesting-
ly are not governed by tenure
(oh what a necessity) might yell
and scream, but the Constitu-
tion will rise above all laws
which is its rightful place.

J MOORE
Nassau,
February 28, 2009.

put the gossip and the anxiety to
rest.

It is imperative that the
leader of the opposition help
some of his own people by
explaining just how efficient or
inefficient the PLP was while
they was in charge of the peo-
ple’s business. Let the people
decide if CLICO just happened
or if it was crumbling years ago
and the PLP did absolutely
nothing.

Then the PLP needs to
explain to the people what to
do if the interested insurance
companies do not include the
people with pre-existing condi-
tions and the older policy hold-
ers. Because common sense dic-
tates that there is no guarantee
that a new arrangement would
include high risk policy hold-
ers.

The PLP also must explain to
all of the hardworking Bahami-
ans, many of them PLP who
invested all of their money and
some who are nearing retire-
ment what they should do. A
large amount of the new invest-
ments appears to have come
after the PLP knew about the
weakening of CLICO.

The PLP must move with
haste to stop this deceptive pol-
itics and speak the truth, which
in the end would set them free.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
March, 2009.

Wine Cet m oy

Bahamians

EDITOR, The Tribune.



I cannot understand people
of the Bahamas. Reference to
the letter from Eugene Carey. I
am glad to note that his farm
appears to be so very successful
as all the other farmers I deal
with are always being pilfered
from. In this case if there are
wild animals interfering with his
farm common sense tells me to
erect a fence around the farm or
put in a thick dense shrubbery
around his property. I under-
stand there was a verbal offer of
fencing, but it was refused
because he would have to pay
to install.

It appears everyone wants
everyone else to do the work.
Bahamians seem to think that
everything is owed to them and
they should reap the benefit. It
starts at the school level when
these children are given sponsor
sheets. What happened to doing
something to earn what you
want. There is no pride in
accomplishment any more.

J CASH
Nassau,
March, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



PLP deputy leadership contenders will ‘spare no expense’ to be ‘last man standing’

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
turnquest@tribunemedia. net



THE deputy leadership race of
the Progressive Liberal Party will
boil down to who is willing and
able to spend the money neces-
sary to ensure that they win a
resounding victory, sources with-
in the party said.

Yesterday, PLP insiders told
The Tribune that the party will
enjoy a tremendous National
Convention in October or

November of
this year when
challengers for
the deputy
position will
“spare no
expense” to
ensure that
they are “the
last man stand-
ing.”

The PLP’s
current deputy
leader, Cynthia Pratt, whose hus-
band is experiencing a number of

ieee cl



medical difficulties at this time,
is expected to step down at the
convention and retire from front-
line politics after three consecu-
tive terms in the House of Assem-
bly.

At this point a number of
would-be deputy leaders, includ-
ing Alfred Sears, Philip “Brave”
Davis, Paul Moss and Obie
Wilchcombe are expected to
throw their hats into the ring.

The person to watch, the
source said, is the “other dark
horse” of the PLP, Paul Moss,

Privy Council rules Japanese immigrant case be remitted to the Court of Appeal

m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

THE Privy Council has ruled
that the case of Atain Takitota, a
Japanese immigrant who was ille-
gally detained in Her Majesty’s
Prison for eight years, be remitted
to the Court of Appeal so that
the amount he should be awarded
for the “long period of wrongful
detention” can be reconsidered.

The London-based Privy
Council in its ruling described the
conditions in Her Majesty’s
Prison as “simply appalling.”

Mr Takitota had appealed the
amount he was originally award-
ed — $500,000 — by the Court
of Appeal.

The Privy Council now ruled
that the final figure for compen-
satory damages should amount
to an overall sum representing
appropriate compensation for the
period of over eight years’ deten-
tion, taking account of the “inhu-
mane conditions and the misery
and distress” suffered by Takito-
ta.

Pending final resolution of the
award, the Council said that it
would be “very desirable” that a
“substantial interim payment” be
given to Takitota.

“The court should determine
what they consider to be an
appropriate figure to reflect com-
pensation for the long period of
wrongful detention of the appel-
lant, taking into account any ele-
ment of aggravation they think
proper, reflecting the conditions
of his detention and, in their own
words, the misery which he
endured,” the Council said.

The Court of Appeal held that
the whole period of Mr Takitota’s
incarceration constituted unlawful
detention and he was awarded
$500,000 in damages — $400,000 of
that being compensatory dam-
ages and $100,000 exemplary
damages.

Mr Takitota arrived in the
Bahamas in the early part of
August 1992 as a lawful entrant,
but within a short time of his

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arrival he lost all his belongings,
including his passport and money.

He was arrested by police offi-
cers on August 12, 1992 for
vagrancy and detained at the
Central Police Station.

He was kept in custody until
October 10, 2000, when he was
released on a bail bond.

Mr Takitota was never charged
with any offence or brought
before a court in the whole of
that period.

The Privy Council said that
sporadic efforts were made to
establish the appellant’s nation-
ality, but it was not accepted by
the Japanese authorities that his
claim to be a Japanese national
was correct, nor was he accepted
to be Chinese.

He simply remained in prison,
with little or no attempt being
made to bring about any resolu-
tion of his situation.

The Court of Appeal pointed
out that the only ground stated
in the detention order was that
his presence in the Bahamas was
“undesirable and not conducive
to the public good.”

The Privy Council said that the
conditions in which Mr Takitota
was detained were “simply
appalling.”

The conditions were described
by Justice Hartman Longley in a
passage of his judgment.

“The plaintiff was made to
sleep on a filthy floor with only a
single blanket in which to cover
himself or attempt to make a bed.
Conditions were hot and steamy
in the summer. There was a bad
mosquito problem. The plaintiff
testified that sometimes he was
so hot that he had to put water on
the floor and lay in it.

“There was no running water in
the facility. The plaintiff was
obliged to urinate and defecate
in a bucket. He said the stench
was such that it made him vomit
on countless occasions causing
him to lose his appetite,” Justice
Longley said in his ruling.

“There were four buckets of
urine and faeces in an 18 by eight
foot room filled with 20 to 35 peo-

ple at any given time. The evi-
dence of the Superintendent of
Prison, Mr Culmer, confirmed
these conditions. The plaintiff had
to endure these conditions for
roughly eight years while sealed
in a room at maximum security
prison with hardened criminals
in Fox Hill. He said, and I am sat-
isfied that it must have happened,
that he had been assaulted and
attacked and taken advantage of
by prisoners and was afraid to use
the bucket provided by the
authorities and so sometimes he
urinated and defecated himself.”

Mr Takitota attempted on at
least three occasions to commit
suicide.

After hospital treatment, he
was again returned to prison,
being transferred after some time
to a minimum security unit and
ultimately in 1998 to a detention
centre.

The Court of Appeal cate-
gorised his treatment not only as
“less than humane,” but as a “fla-
grant misuse/abuse of power.”

The Privy Council said that Mr
Takitota is to have his costs of
the appeal, the costs order of the
Court of Appeal remaining undis-
turbed.

“The sum of $100,000, repre-
senting constitutional or vindica-
tory damages, should remain
undisturbed and should be added
to the amount reassessed for com-
pensatory damages to make up
the final award of damages to the
appellant,” the Privy Council said.

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who is seen as someone with the
personal fortune and “sheer
determination” needed to win.
“Paul is a force to be reckoned
with. He has the means and the
testicular fortitude to go after
what he believes in. And if you
notice, after all the many oppor-
tunities certain people in the par-
ty have had to try and box him in,
he is still out there - vocal and
demonstrating that he is here to

A






stay,” said a source close to the
aspiring politician.

On Tuesday, Mr Moss was the
only noticeable member from the
Opposition who participated in a
demonstration outside of The Tri-
bune condemning the daily for a
series of articles directed at for-
mer Prime Minister Sir Lynden
Pindling.

Despite their pronouncements
of offence and disgust at the arti-

cles, not one sitting member,
many of whom served or worked
with Sir Lynden, turned out, the
source noted.

“But if you look at that demon-
stration, which by the way was
not sanctioned by the PLP, a
good number of people still
turned up. So what does that tell
you? Paul Moss has traction. He
has a following, and that’s all he
needs,” the source said.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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SEMINARS to. assist
Bahamians in coping with
their current financial hard-
ships will be held at all the
Urban Renewal Centres
throughout the New Provi-
dence.

The first in a series of
empowerment seminars was
hosted by the Kemp Road
Centre of the Urban Renewal
Livable Neighbourhood Pro-
gramme, in conjunction with
the North Eastern Pastors
Alliance, at New Lively Hope
Baptist Church on Tuesday.

Centre manager Kolamae
Pedican said the seminar was
a response to pleas from the
community for assistance
regarding issues including
unemployment, depression,
having outstanding loans and
being afraid to contact their
lenders.

“We found ourselves job
hunting for people, coun-
selling people on how to cope
with stress, how to deal with
children who they could not
provide lunch money for and
more,” Ms Pedican said.

“So we thought to bring all
the government agencies
together and have our own
Urban Renewal stimulus plan
where businesses that are hir-
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GUESTS IN ATTENDANCE at an empowerment seminar hosted by the
Kemp Road Centre of the Urban Renewal Livable Neighbourhood Pro-
gramme listen attentively to speaker Patrice Williams-Gordon of Parkgate
Seventh-Day Adventist Ministries on Tuesday, March 17.

who need them. Hopefully we
have provided information
that will assist persons in get-
ting back on track.”

Ella Lewis, New Providence
coordinator of the Urban
Renewal Livable Neighbour-
hood Programme, said the ini-
tiative has a responsibility to
help persons who are hurting
as a result of the downturn in
our economy.

“We are putting on these
seminars throughout New

times by empowering them
and making them think of oth-
er options.”

Mrs Lewis said the seminars
will continue at the Farm
Road Urban Renewal Centre
in April.

Guest speaker Patrice
Williams-Gordon, wife of Pas-
tor Danhugh Gordon of the
Parkgate Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, addressed
those attending on the topic
“tough times don’t last —

Providence at all of our cen- tough people do.”
tres. This is the first of many She said: “Today I’ve lost
that we plan to do along with my job.

our partners to show them
how they can survive in these

“T’ve got to hang my suits
up for a little while. I’ve got to
change my heels for slippers,
instead of a computer I might
need a knife or a machete
because [’'m reorganising
myself.

“But that doesn’t define me,
if you have tough love you will
organise yourself around your
current circumstances.”

Participating agencies in the
seminar were the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force, the
Department of Nursing, the
Ministry of Labour, the
Bahamas Technical Voca-
tional Institute (BTV), the
College of the Bahamas, the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) and McDonald’s
Bahamas.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

BNT hosts lecture on Bg

topic of sea turtles

THE BAHAMAS National
Trust yesterday hosted a lec-
ture by prominent marine
researchers on the topic of sea
turtles in the Bahamas.

The public meeting held at
the BNT’s Retreat featured
internationally renowned sea
turtle researchers Dr Karen
Bjorndal and Dr Alan Bolten
of the Archie Carr Centre for
Sea Turtle Research at the Uni-
versity of Florida.

The topic for the evening was
“Sea Turtles of the Bahamas:
Insights from 30 years of study.”

Following the creation of the
BNT in 1959, concern began to
be expressed for the sea turtles.

Dr Carr initiated a pro-
gramme concerned with the
research of sea turtles, the pro-
tection of their nesting grounds
and their reintroduction to for-
mer nesting grounds.

One of the regions where this
research was being conducted
was at Union Creek, north of
the Inagua National Park.

Three hundred turtles were
sent to Union Creek in 1959 in
an effort to restore this area.

Dr Carleton Ray approached
the Trust’s executive commit-
tee with the idea of Union
Creek being a part of the
National Park system, the result
was the establishment of Union
Creek Reserve in 1963.

Dr Carr was mentor to Dr
Bjorndal and Dr Alan Bolten.

Dr Bjorndal has been study-
ing sea turtles at Union Creek
since 1974 while pursuing her
PhD and returns every year
with her partner Dr Alan
Bolten to continue their long-
term studies on growth and
nutrition.

Green turtles take up resi-
dency in shallow creeks like
Union Creek at about 25cm in
length.

They may remain resident in
a specific creek for a decade or
more.

Union Creek has provided
the world with some of the most
important scientific data on the
endangered green turtle. Sea
turtles face ever-increasing
threats from a staggering array
of sources as human popula-
tions grow, coastal habitats are
developed, and marine habitats

THE TOPIC of the
lecture was Sea
Turtles of the

BE UEUEMe ee] NS
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cent creatures.

Both Dr Bjorndal and Dr
Bolten serve as scientific advis-
ers to the Bahamas National
Trust.

are degraded. Only through
research can people obtain
information necessary to coun-
teract these threats and ensure
the survival of these magnifi-













































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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Lehder in Norman’s Cay to Nas-
sau to pay off Pindling and a
senior police officer. He believed
his son was killed because he
knew too much.

Pindling
Additionally, another front-
page article called into question

the nationality of the former
Prime Minister, citing sources

who claim that Sir Lynden was
in fact born in Jamaica in the
small town of Cotton Tree.
However, despite both of these
claims attorney Obi Pindling, who
represented his family at yester-
day’s press conference, declared

eee ile:

Draft legislation published
for the Communications Sector

The Committee for the Privatisation of BTC has published on the
privatisation website at waw.bteprivatisation.com a package of draft
legislation which collectively would represent a major step forward in
developing the new regulatory environment for communications in The

Bahamas.

The Committee, on behalf of the Government, is now seeking comments

on this

package of

legislation which

includes The Bahamas

Communications Act, which relates specifically to the regulation of the
communications sector; and two acts to set up a new regulator and a
new ad hoe tribunal, namely the Utilities Regulation & Competition

Authority Act, and the Utilities Appeal Tribunal Act.

It is expected that the new acts will be tabled in Parliament in the very
near future. The new framework firmly establishes the ground rules for
the sector going forward, and provides for a more robust regulatory
foundation for sector participants and new investors, including any
potential strategic partners for the 51% interest in BTC.

Town meetings will be held to explain to the general public the
recommendations that the Committee has put forward to the
Government with respect to the regulatory regime including the
proposed legislation. The date and times of these town meetings will be
announced in a subsequent notice.

Comments regarding the draft legislation may be emailed to

info@bteprivatisation.com.










International School



that he would not be taking any
questions on any other matters
relating to his father except the
controversy surrounding his
nationality.

“T am here simply dealing with
aspects of Sir Lynden Pindling,
the son, husband, father and
grandfather and not Sir Lynden
Pindling, the politician. I am not
here to be combative, I am not
here to be adversarial. I am sim-
ply here to lay unmistakable,
undeniable facts on the table con-
cerning my father’s birth and that
is it,” he said.

Mr Pindling said that the
“rumours” surrounding the ques-
tioning of his father’s nationality
is an “old story” — one which he

first recalled hearing in the early
1970’s when it was first raised in
the House of Assembly. Howev-
er, he insists that this was then,
and continues today, to be a polit-
ical distraction that is now being
perpetrated by The Tribune to
discredit his family and the con-
tributions his father made to
the development of the
Bahamas.

PLP Chairwoman, Glenys
Hanna-Martin called on the
nation not to be distracted by the
story surrounding Sir Lynden.

“IT have watched and listened
with interest and dismay to the
recent debate emanating out of
an article written by a foreign
writer for The Tribune about the

origins and historical involvement
of the late Sir Lynden Pindling
in the history of our nation. Iam
firmly of the view that the piv-
otal role played by this man, Lyn-
den Pindling, who led our great
party and who forged our people
into nationhood is one that is
unassailable, the facts speak for
themselves.

“T believe it is important that
we value as a critical component
to our national identity and our
national purpose the incredible
milestones that took us from a
colonized people to a free and
sovereign nation based on equal-
ity in a relatively short period of
time and without bloodshed,” she
said.

FROM page one

tiously.

Attorney Damian Gomez told the court yesterday
that he had not seen the provisional liquidator’s
report and that his clients have been left unable to
make an informed decision on whether to support or
oppose the wind-up order. He said that as a result —
out of caution — they have filed notices to oppose
the order. He added that he and his clients are dis-
turbed by reports in the press that certain creditors
have been paid. Mr Gomez also suggested that a gag
order be issued to restrain those involved in the
case from discussing the matter publicly. Attorney
Sidney Cambridge who is representing the provi-
sional liquidator Craig Gomez of Baker Tilly Gomez
assured the court that the liquidator’s report would
be made available by Friday.

Attorney Godfrey “Pro” Pinder also requested
full disclosure in the matter so that he could advise
his clients on what course of action to take. While he
supported the request for an adjournment in the
case he added that he would require more than 14
days that had been substantially agreed to, in order
for him to meet with the policy holders. He noted
that he, MP for Fort Charlotte, Alfred Sears and MP
for Blue Hills, Sidney Collie represent more than
100 policy holders pro bono. Mr Pinder further not-
ed that many of CLICO’s policy holders may not be
aware that the insurer’s matter is now before the
court. Attorney Sears suggested that the matter be
adjourned for 21 days so that all policy holders
could be properly informed and give instructions
to their counsel. He told the court that some policy
holders on the Family Islands have expressed their
desire to travel to New Providence to give instruc-
tions to their counsel on how they wish to proceed.

Attorney Emerick Knowles of the law firm Alex-
iou Knowles and Co, representing CLICO, told the
court however that the only issue before the court
was whether the company should be wound-up and
whether all that is stated in the petition is true.
Attorney John Wilson, who appeared for the com-
pany BUPA, a CLICO creditor, told the court that

Report on CLICO

any lengthy adjournment in the matter would be
to “no ones advantage.”

Justice Albury, while noting the urgency to get the
matter resolved and the “peculiar circumstances” of
the case, ordered that the provisional liquidator’s
report be submitted to the court by Friday. Justice
Albury also ordered that no statements regarding
what the report entails be published and that any
report regarding the matter be submitted to the
court. The case was adjourned to Friday, March 27,
when parties involved are expected to outline the
position of their clients, as to whether they support
or oppose the windup order.

The death knell came for CLICO (Bahamas)
when the Trinidad government and regulators were
forced to bail out CL Financial, the parent company
of CLICO (Bahamas), which failed to pay out a
guaranteed $57 million loan accounting for 59 per
cent of the Bahamian insurer’s assets at year-end
2007.

That loan, an advance to CLICO (Bahamas)
wholly-owned subsidiary CLICO Enterprises, had
increased to $72 million worth of exposure at year-
end 2008 based on unaudited accounts, the Registrar
of Insurance’s Office said.

CLICO Enterprises had invested the majority
of funds advanced to it in Florida-based real estate
development company Wellington Preserve Real
Estate which suffered more than a 20 per cent
decline in market value at year-end 2007 due to a
collapsing property market.

A winding-up Order was granted by the Supreme
Court on February 24, appointing Mr Craig Gomez
of Baker Tilley Gomez as Provisional Liquidator for
CLICO (Bahamas) Limited (CLICO). The Order
was made following a petition by the Registrar of
Insurance Companies (ORIC) in accordance with
authority granted under Section 41 of the Insur-
ance Act. Attorney David Higgins is representing
the Registrar of Insurance Companies.

FROM page one

of cultural industries and festi-
vals to stimulate the economy by
attracting international artists and
cultural tourists with money to
spend.

She said: “Carifest itself has
never been properly administered
and cost governments a lot of
money, but that is the govern-
ments’ fault, not the festivals

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fault. The potential is huge.

“It would put us on the map
and on a different kind of map, a
map of people who spend money
when they go to a place.”

Ms Bethel said Carifesta would
accelerate investment in artistic
industries and provide the infra-
structure required to develop arts
to an international standard.

Mr Maynard agreed a $3-$10
million investment in infrastruc-
ture for Carifesta would reap
greater profits in the long run.

He said: “It would have been a
launching pad for the cultural
industries across the board and
the beginning of a series of events
to attract visitors to our shores.

“It’s one of the best opportu-
nities because we are a tourist
destination, we have the hotel
rooms, so we could reach out to
the wider international commu-
nity so it would have been very
easy for the Bahamas to make
what they put into it.”

But he said he would under-
stand why CARICOM might
choose to axe the festival in
tough economic times: “An event
like Carifesta, as good as it is for
cultural development and

exchange, when you look at the
bigger picture every government
in the region is complaining
about dropping revenues and is
faced with economic challenges,
and all of these things are reali-
ties.”

Mr Maynard maintains the
Bahamas, which began prepara-
tions to host Carifesta before it
was relocated to Guyana in 2008,
is still prepared to host the festi-
val next year if CARICOM
decides to proceed. And local
artists will be given a prominent
role in developing world-class
venues and organising the event
whenever it takes place.

He said: “As soon as we get a
definite word from CARICOM
we will meet with them to dis-
cuss a way forward.

“The whole cultural commu-
nity and our Ministry was looking
forward to the prospects of what
Carifesta could bring, but it’s not
going to deter us from developing
our cultural industries.

“We are already a prime
tourist destination, but we need
to package our arts in a way that
it would be part of the tourism
product.”

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 9



The Bahamas and Cuba sign

economic and technical agreement

m@ By LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE Bahamas and Cuba
have signed an agreement on
economic and technical co-
operation in health, education
and other areas of expertise for
future projects to be undertak-
en by the Bahamas.

The signing ceremony took
place yesterday at the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs, where
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette and Cuban
Ambassador to the Bahamas
Jose Luis Ponce Caraballo
signed on behalf of their respec-
tive governments.

Mr Symonette thanked the
government of the Republic of
Cuba for its commitment and
continued support as it relates
to the agreement.

“This agreement is a very
important one as it establishes
the basic framework agreement
on economic and technical co-
operation, which is the frame-
work agreement from which
any cooperation project/ agree-
ments would follow,” Mr
Symonette said.

The Bahamas is already
engaged in technical co-opera-
tion with Cuba, specifically in
health and education.

Teachers

In September 2006, the
Agreement of Specialty Teach-
ers between the Ministry of
Education, the Latin American
and Caribbean Pedagogical
Institute and the Republic of
Cuba was signed. This enabled
the Ministry of Education to
engage the services of Cuban
teachers in the public school
system.

The previous two-year agree-
ment expired in September
2000. A one-year extension was
approved in October 2008 to
retain the services of Cuban
teachers until September 2009.

“The Ministry of Education
and the Embassy of Cuba are
engaged in talks with a view to
revising the agreement to
engage the services of Cuban
teachers for a three-year period.
It is hoped that the process
would be concluded shortly,”
Mr Symonette said.

From November 2005 to
December 2006, the govern-
ments of the Bahamas and
Cuba entered into a verbal
agreement known as “Opera-
tion Miracle — Eye Pro-
gramme”, which allowed per-
sons with any form of visual
impairment to obtain medical
assistance from Cuba, free of
charge.

According to the Embassy of
Cuba, more than 500 Bahami-
ans have benefited from the
programme, 399 of whom were
diagnosed with a type of ocu-
lar disease that required surgical
intervention.

In May 2008, as a result of
the Bahamas government’s dec-
laration of its intention to rein-
state the programme, the
Cuban Embassy via diplomatic
channels submitted a draft
Memorandum of Co-operation
between the Cuban Medical
Services and the government of
the Bahamas for the re-imple-
mentation of Operation Mira-
cle.

The Cuban Embassy also for-
warded for consideration, cre-
dentials of an ophthalmologist
and optometrist, who are
expected to be engaged in the
programme.

“The Ministry of Health is
presently reviewing the draft
agreement and it is expected
that the Ministry of Health and
the Cuban Embassy would be in
consultation with respect to the
same,” Mr Symonette said.

He also revealed that there
are other pending agreements
between the Bahamas and the
Republic of Cuba, including:

® an agreement between the
Bahamas Ministry of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources and
the Ministry of Agriculture of
the Republic of Cuba on col-
laboration in the field of plant
quarantine and plant protection

© an agreement between the
Bahamas Ministry of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources and
the Ministry of Agriculture of
the Republic of Cuba on col-
laboration in the fields of ani-
mal quarantine and the controls
and eradication of animal dis-
eases

“A review of these files
revealed that these two agree-
ments were originated by the
Ministry of Agriculture and

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Marine Resources during the
administration of the former
government and were subse-
quently approved by Cabinet,
subject to vetting by the Attor-
ney General’s Office and the
agreed language by both gov-
ernments,” Mr Symonette said.

Ambassador Ponce said that
Cuba remains committed to
rendering assistance to the
Bahamas in any endeavour.

“This agreement proves to
further enhance that co-opera-
tion between both countries,”
he said.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





Building a green economy in the Bahamas:
YOUR SAY

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° This is the third in a series
of articles discussing the poten-
tial opportunities for the
Bahamas in the emerging green
economy. The writer, Colin
Lightbourn, is a real estate
business owner, developer and
past president of the Bahamas
National Trust. To comment,
discuss and submit ideas about
these articles visit: www.the-
greenislands.com

idely regarded

as the sleeping

giant, Andros is

the largest of all
Bahamas islands and contains
the most ecologically rich and
diverse eco-system.

According to Philip Kramer,
the Nature Conservancy's
Caribbean marine programme
director, "To find large popu-
lations of so many rare and
threatened species reinforces
our belief that the west side of
Andros is one of the most eco-
logically intact and pristine
areas remaining in the western
tropical Atlantic.” It has the
third largest barrier reef in the
world, an immense mangrove
and marine estuary system,
numerous documented fish
spawning areas and an exten-
sive underground fresh water
system. Without any human
intervention it is literally the
country’s largest domestic
bread-basket.

American Bob Farmer and
his brother began farming and

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exporting produce from Andros
in the 1950s. In a letter written
to journalist Oswald Brown, the
Parkers say: “We did, in fact,
grow tomatoes as well as straw-

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Mountains, to Andros, and we
farmed jointly with them for 13
years.

“For a 16-year period (we)
supplied the entire United
States and Canada with in
excess of 95 percent of the
cucumbers consumed during
the winter months ... It was a
very successful farming venture,
and one of which very few
Bahamians are aware ... Had
we been allowed to continue
farming, I am confident that
there would now be more than
20,000 acres under cultivation
for export at this time im the
Bahamas.

“We also established a pre-
fabrication plant at North
Andros that produced in excess
of 300 modern residential units
that we erected throughout the
Bahamas. We also constructed
the power plant at Nicholl's
Town and most of the electric
and telephone distribution lines
in North Andros that are now
owned and operated by BEC
and Batelco.”

The farmers’ vision back in
the 1950s is precisely the entre-
preneurial spirit we need in the
Bahamas today. Transporta-
tion, technology and commu-
nication have progressed ten-
fold since this earlier era which
makes the economic potential
even greater. Agriculture in
Andros has made the news

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

The bread basket



is a viable environmental and economic solution...

FROM page 10

quite often over the past year
with various plans and land des-
ignations being proposed.

As an agriculture programme
matures it will require planning,
infrastructure, and packaging
and distribution strategies. It
will also potentially create envi-
ronmental pressure, im partic-
ular, threats to the fresh ground
water system from pesticides
and fertilisers.

Organic farming is a viable
environmental and economic
solution; since 1990 the market
for organic products has grown
at an average of 20 to 25 per
cent per year. According to one
trade association, “organic agri-
culture is a production system
that sustains the health of soils,
ecosystems and people. It relies
on ecological processes, biodi-
versity and cycles adapted to
local conditions, rather than the
use of inputs with adverse
effects. Organic agriculture
combines tradition, innovation
and science to benefit the
shared environment and pro-
mote fair relationships and a
good quality of life for all
involved.”

In the fields of technology
and biological research and
development there is also
unlimited opportunity. This
includes scientific inventions
used in biological and medical
research, production of phar-
maceutical drugs, agriculture,
and energy and water produc-
tion. Specifically, advancements
in technology could more effi-
ciently use the ocean to create
drinking water and the sun’s
energy and tidal currents to
generate electricity. Through
genetic engineering, new meth-
ods of food production can be
harnessed that would be impos-
sible using traditional methods.

One example of genetically
engineered food is “golden
rice”. It was developed for use
in countries where there is a
shortage of dietary vitamin A.
At the beginning of the 21st
century, vitamin A deficiency
(VAD) was responsible for 1-2
million deaths, and 500,000 cas-
es of irreversible blindness most
often in children and pregnant
women. As of 1999 there were

to UNICEF could effectively
eliminate VAD. Some activists
argue against genetic engineer-
ing saying it will lead to the cor-
porate control of the world’s
produce and livestock and the
US and Europe disagree over
its regulation, while others take
a religious position on the issue.
The fact is, as natural resources
continue to decline alternative
methods of food production are
going to become more main-
stream.

We are at the beginning of a
new era of information and
technology primarily focused
around the development of
solutions to the problem of
declining natural resources and
meeting the demands of unsus-
tainable population growth.
Locally, agreements like the
Hotels Encouragement Act and
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment were created to encour-
age investment in the Bahamas
with favorable tax and other
conditions. Using golden rice

as an example, the potential for
the Bahamas is not necessarily
to grow the rice but to foster
an environment to research and
develop the technology that will
have intellectual and licensing
value on an international scale.
The Bahamas, through creative
trade agreements, can become
a vehicle to bring together
inventors, scientists and ven-
ture capitalists who will invest
in these new technologies. The
government and Bahamian
companies can receive distrib-
ution and licensing royalties or
even donate the technology for
humanitarian purposes.

A green economic zone with
benefits for organic agriculture,
aquaculture, manufacturing,
and research and development
can be established. Like the
southern Bahamas, Andros is
an untapped resource with all
the natural tools to build a
bridge to a sustainable future
and empower more Bahamians
to have a greater stake in it.

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 11

PUBLIC NOTICE

Public Consultations on Licensing
and Universal Service Obligations
for the Electronic Communications Sector

The Committee for the Privatisation of BTC is pleased to invite comments
fram members of the public and interested parties on its consultation
documents on a proposed new Licensing Regime and Universal Service
Obligations for the Electronic Communications Sector.

The first consultation document relates to the new licensing regime for
the sector, and covers key areas that will impact companies involved in
the provision of communication services including telephone, internet,
radio, TV and other similar devices.

The second consultation document relates to the Universal Service
Obligation (USO) envisaged for both telecommunications and television
which aims to ensure that more remote areas of The Bahamas continue
to receive specified services at affordable prices. It covers the
establishment of the USO in the new legislation and the funding of the
USO including the establishment of a Universal Service Fund and how
operators will calculate the net cost of providing these services.

The Licensing and USO consultations run for approximately five
weeks from March 79. 2009 to April 20, 2009. Copies of these
documents and the published response to the recent Framework
Consultation are being distributed to the Administrators’ Offices in
the Family Islands and can be obtained from the offices of KPMG in
New Providence and Grand Bahama. Copies can also be downloaded
from the Government’ website at www.bahamas.gov.bs of the
privatisation website at www.btcprivatisation.com and comments
emailed to info@bteprivatisation.com.



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* Certain terms & conditions apply

Mark Reynolds Durell Shearer Tamara Boyd Cyril Peet





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SS EEE ae aS ee
Events leading to protection of natural resources

W ERE it not for a
series of serendipi-

tous events decades ago, many of
the Bahamas’ most precious nat-
ural resources might have been
lost forever. And it all began with
the first attempts at underwater
photography.

The Bahamas featured promi-
nently in early undersea film-
making because of our crystal-
clear, unpolluted waters. The
Williamson Photosphere (whose
rusting hulk lies somewhere in
the national archives), was a sub-
mersible device used to film the
world's first underwater movie in
the Bahamas.

Based on Jules Verne's 20,000
Leagues Under the Sea, this silent
film was a major box office hit
back in 1916.

The photosphere was later
involved in recovering coral from
the Bahamas to build a live reef
display at Chicago's Field Muse-
um of Natural History.

And it served for a time as a
unique underwater post office,
where collectible letters were
stamped and posted from Sea

Floor, Bahamas.

In 1930, after the American
inventors Otis Barton and
William Beebe made headlines
with a record dive off Bermuda in
their newly-developed bathy-
sphere, this submersible became a
star attraction at the Chicago
World's Fair.

And Barton headed for the
Bahamas to shoot a movie called
Titans of the Deep in 1938.

One of the men who worked
on that film was Ilia Tolstoy, a
colourful grandson of the great
19th century Russian writer, Leo
Tolstoy.

He had been a Russian cavalry
officer before emigrating to the
US in 1924, where he became
associated with the New York
Museum of Natural History.

Tolstoy took part in filming



expeditions to the Canadian
wilderness and spent time in
Alaska helping to plan Mount
McKinley National Park.

As a prominent member of the
Explorers Club he was involved
in several film ventures and expe-
ditions around the world experi-
menting with underwater pho-
tography.

And following his work with
Titans of the Deep, he was instru-
mental in setting up Marineland,
the world's first oceanarium
based at St Augustine, Florida.
Originally called Marine Studios,
it was the place where captive
dolphins were bred for the first
time, and it became a fashionable
hangout for writers and film pro-
ducers, as well as a major tourist
attraction.

Tolstoy's most notable exploit

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PUBLIC NOTICE

Directory Publications Queries
and Complaints

BIC would like to advise the general public that in
agreement with their advertising contract, all queries
or complaints for the 2009 Bahamas, Grand Bahama
and Abaco Telephone Directories must be received
on or before March 31st 2009.

Advertisers with quenes or complaints are urged to
contact the Directory publications department im-

mediately at the following addresses:

Nassau Office

summerwinds Plaza, Tonique Williams-Darling Hwy
TEL: 242-322-9183-8 » FAX 242-322-9195
Email: yellowpages@btcbahamas.com

Grand Bahama Office
Government Complex, Mall Drive
TEL: 242-352-2336/8 » FAX: 242-352-2431
Email: yellowpages@bftcbahamas.com

Family Island

customers can contact us at

TEL: 242-300-1997

Email: yellowpages@btcbahamas.com

www.btcbahamas.co

~l a ae,



was a 10-month trek across Tibet
in 1942 as an envoy of the US
government, when he met the
Dalai Lama, who was then bare-
ly seven years old.

Many of his photographs from
that wartime expedition are pre-
sented in a book called A Por-
trait of Lost Tibet by Rosemary
Jones Tung.

After the war, Tolstoy was a
frequent visitor to the Bahamas
and became increasingly con-
cerned about environmental
degradation: "I saw the ghosts of
(extinct) Passenger Pigeons in the
air," he later wrote. And in 1953
he began leveraging his interna-
tional contacts to push the idea of
setting aside some islands in the
Bahamas as protected areas.

At about the same time, a
Columbia University graduate
student named Carleton Ray was
working on a photo book about
marine life (with a fellow student
named Elgin Ciampi).

Like others before them, they
had decided that the Bahamas
was the place for underwater pho-
tography.

"The 1950s were early in the
days of scuba-diving and fish-
watching, and during our visits
we saw some intriguing things,”
Ray wrote in the 1998 edition of
the Bahamas Journal of Science.
"We became aware of so-called
spear-fishing contests, which con-
sisted of contestants piling
speared fish on shore, the winner
being the one with the weighti-
est, wasteful pile. So we began to
think of conservation in terms of
no-take zones and/or underwater
parks. We formulated our
thoughts for the introduction to
(our book), the Underwater
Guide to Marine Life."

LI: the book, Ray called for
some of the best marine
areas to be protected in the same
way that wilderness is protected
on land. These "undersea wilder-
ness areas" would serve as replen-
ishment zones for marine life to
repopulate surrounding areas,
while preserving the beauty of
coral gardens as valuable tourist
attractions and natural laborato-
ries.

"Only one marine protected
area was known to us at the time
(off the Florida Keys), so we sent
drafts of our introduction to influ-
ential conservationists to try out
our idea. Fortunately, one of our
reviewers was Richard Plough (of
the American Museum of Natur-
al History) whom Tolstoy had
also contacted. Plough thought it
self-evident that Ilia and I should
join forces."

In the meantime, Tolstoy had
presented his idea to the British
governor of the Bahamas and had
given a talk at the Chamber of
Commerce in Nassau. "It was
indeed a memorable day when
on February 13, 1956 I received a
letter from the governor con-
firming that the Crown had set
aside approximately 22 miles of
the Exuma Cays (providing that)
some organization would under-
take to explore the possibility fur-
ther and be able to give concrete
recommendations to the Bahami-
an government."

By January 1958 Tolstoy and
Ray had organised their Exuma
expedition. A collection of big-
name conservationists like Robert
Porter Allen of the Audubon
Society and Bahamian experts

Sean
McCarroll
359-2957

Jason
McCarroll
477-7027

like Oris Russell and Herbert
McKinney spent a week travel-
ling by boat from Norman’s Cay
to Conch Cut.

They concluded that the area
had “essentially unspoiled natur-
al conditions with unmodified
associations of plants, animals,
earth processes, and those intan-
gible elements that combine to
give an area its outstanding char-
acter.

"The Exuma Cays park under
consideration should be regarded
as only the beginning of a con-
servation movement that is vital
to the Bahamas as a whole.

“Tt will also be a beginning of a
new concept, integrated land-and-
sea conservation, in which the
Bahamas will take the lead and
show the way to other nations
throughout the world," their
report said.

The survey team called for an
organisation modelled on the
British National Trust to acquire
lands and manage protected areas
throughout the Bahamas.

This organisation — which was
created by parliament in 1959 —
would be the government's advis-
er on conservation matters and
seek to educate Bahamians on
the value of their natural heritage.

And 50 years later, a new Exu-
ma survey has recently been com-
pleted. Tolstoy died in 1970 and a
retired Carleton Ray was unable
to participate this time around,
but a number of Bahamian and
international scientists made the
trip aboard a research vessel
donated by the John G Shedd
Aquarium in Chicago. They
included marine, plant and bird
specialists from the American
Museum of Natural History, the
College of the Bahamas, The
Nature Conservancy and several
Florida universities.

“Our mission was to follow in
the footsteps of the original expe-
dition and do a rapid ecological
assessment of the Exuma park as
it is today,” said Dr Ethan Freid,
a Tampa University botanist with
long experience in the Bahamas.
"We found the vegetation to be
largely intact, although there were
more invasives like Casuarinas
which have to be controlled."

Marine biologist Dr Dan
Brumbaugh of the American
Museum of Natural History said
the park is doing what it was cre-
ated to do: "There are more and
bigger fish than in other areas,
which is reassuring, and there are
good size fish just outside the
park boundaries too. It is dis-
tinctly different from what you
see around New Providence, for
example, and the reefs are health-
ier with more parrot fish present."

Leno Davis of The Nature
Conservancy's Nassau office cited
the presence of garbage washed
ashore on the cays as something
that was difficult for the park war-
dens to control.

And Everton Joseph of the
College of the Bahamas said the
team had found two Kirkland
Warblers — a rare migratory bird
that has never been reported in
the Exumas before.

Herpetologist Sandra Buckner
noted three successful popula-
tions of iguana in the park, where
none had existed 50 years ago.
But all the scientists were con-
cerned about the ecological
impact of a massive population
explosion of hutias.

Once thought to be extinct,
these small mammals that were

>t

242

a favourite food of the Lucayans
were put on several cays years
ago and are now eating them-
selves out of existence.

"There are large areas on
Shroud Cay with no vegetation
as a result," Dr Freid said. "This
is an ecological conundrum as the
hutia is the only endemic land
mammal in the Bahamas, yet it
is radically affecting the environ-
ment. This is something that has
to be carefully managed by the
BNT."

After leaving the Exumas, the
researchers surveyed the Grassy
Cays area of South Andros to
provide documentation for a pro-
posed new national park.

They found the region subject
to intense fishing pressure with
traps, camps and boats every-
where, as well as evidence that
nesting seabirds were being shot.

"There are fewer and smaller
fish and the reefs are subject to
many of the same pressures found
in more populated areas," Dr
Brumbaugh noted.

“There is a small amount of
live coral and lots of disease. It
was kind of sobering to be can-
did."

B ut on land, the scientists
reported that the natur-
al coppice and mangrove forests
were intact except for small
patches of Casuarina that could
easily be removed.

And they found evidence of
iguanas everywhere, indicating
that a new park would be a good
opportunity to protect these
endangered reptiles.

Today, the Bahamas National
Trust administers a network of
more than a dozen national parks
stretching from Abaco and Grand
Bahama in the north to Inagua
in the south.

But as development pressures
grow, there are rising calls for the
government to set aside more of
our natural patrimony.

"This is the time to propose
new areas for protection," BNT
executive director Eric Carey told
me. "And South Andros is defi-
nitely on our list.

“The report of the survey team
will contribute good science to
prove that this area is important
to preserve for future generations,
just as the Exuma park was 50
years ago."

As Carleton Ray put it in his
1998 article, "Serendipitous
events, decades ago, initiated the
Bahamas protected area system
under the jurisdiction of the
BNT...(but) conservation must be
guided by careful strategic plan-
ning involving the application of
the best scientific informa-
tion...while also generating con-
siderable social and political will.

"Protected areas must be seen
as vital future tools—as safe-
guards against overuse and abuse,
as reserves for living and physical
resources, and as places for
research, learning and inspira-
tion.”

(If you want to know more,
check out the photo exhibition
on the BNTs 50 years of work at
the Central Bank downtown from
now through March 27).

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

$865,000
3bd - 3bhth

$830,000





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 13





CLICO crisis: a case of regulatory

EM COMTI Coa anil




m By ALFRED M SEARS

ON THE February 24, 2009 the
Registrar of Insurance petitioned
the Supreme Court of the
Bahamas for the winding-up of
CLICO (Bahamas) Limited
(“CLICO”) because CLICO was
unable to pay claims of US$2.6
million in the Turks and Caicos
Islands and (b) its liabilities were
estimated to exceed its assets by at
least $9 million.

The Supreme Court appointed
Mr Craig Gomez of Baker Tilly
Gomez as Provisional Liquidator
for CLICO.

A hearing of the winding-up
petition (was) scheduled to be
heard (today).

CLICO has branch operations
in Turks and Caicos Islands and
Belize, all supervised by the Reg-
istrar of Insurance in the Bahamas.

The Bahamas accounts for
about 68 per cent of its premiums;
Turks and Caicos Islands for 27
per cent and Belize for five per
cent of total premiums.

There are about 141 employees
in the Bahamas, comprising 90
sales agents and 51 administrative
staff.

CLICO’s portfolio comprises
about 17,297 Life Insurance poli-
cies with annual premiums of $5.1
million; 11,230 accident and sick-
ness health policies with annual
premiums of $3.2 million; 2,689
annuities with annual premiums
of $4.6 million and 7,402 group
policies with annual premiums of
$1.8 million.

The total individual and group
policies amount to some 38,618
with annual premium of $14.8 mil-
lion.

The responsibility for the failure
of CLICO must rest on the pro-
priety of the corporate judgment
exercised by the directors and
manager of the enterprise.

However, I submit that the
Bahamian government was equal-
ly culpable in its persistent failure
to properly regulate CLICO and
make a timely intervention when it
became aware of CLICO’s prob-
lems in order to protect the
Bahamian public.

The Bahamian government
therefore made a mistake in failing
to provide any guarantees of
recovery to the 38,618 Bahamian
policy and annuities holders, since
the failure of CLICO was due, in
part, to the regulatory failure and
the failure of the government to
bring into force the Domestic
Insurance Act which was passed
by Parliament in July 2006.

Mr Ewart Williams, Governor
of the Central Bank of Trinidad
and Tobago, when announcing the
rescue plan of approximately
TT$6 billion for CL Financial
Group (the ultimate beneficial of
CLICO Bahamas) on January 30,
2009, identified the following fac-
tors as causing the financial diffi-
culties of CL Financial and its sub-
sidiaries and affiliates:

e Excessive related-party trans-
actions which carry significant con-
tagion risks.

e An aggressive high-interest
rate resource mobilisation strategy
to finance equally high-risk invest-
ments, much of which are in illiq-
uid assets (including real estate
both in Trinidad and Tobago and
abroad).

e A very high leveraging of the
Group’s assets, which constrains
the potential amount of cash that
could be raised from assets sales.

The government of Trinidad
and Tobago asserted that its ratio-
nale was to avoid any risk of con-
tagion to the financial services sec-
tor of Trinidad, given that CL
Financial controls over TT$100
billion of assets in at least 28 com-
panies located throughout the
Caribbean, with interests in sev-
eral industry sectors including
banking and financial services,
energy, real estate and manufac-
turing and distribution.

Governor Williams said that the
principal objective of the rescue
plan was “to ensure that resources
are available to meet withdrawals
of third-party CIB depositors and
Clico policy holders; to protect the
funds of depositors and policy
holders and in so doing maintain
confidence in Clico and reinforce
confidence in the financial sector
as a whole.”

I suggest that this rationale is
equally applicable to the Bahami-
an policy and annuity holders of
CLICO (Bahamas) Limited.

On February 25, 2009 the Com-
missioner of Insurance of Guyana
was granted a judicial manage-
ment order over CLICO Guyana.

One week later, on March 3,
2009, President Bharrat Jagdeo of
Guyana announced that the
investment of all policyholders in
Guyana will be guaranteed and
requested that policyholders con-
tinue to pay their premiums.

On the March 3, 2009 the Cay-
man Islands Monetary Authority
instructed CLICO (Cayman) Ltd
to stop its public investment activ-
ity until company accounts are
approved by the Authority.

Failure of Government over-
sight

The Bahamian investing public
would have been attracted to CLI-
CO, apart from its attractive rates
of return on investment, by the
general perception that insurance
companies in the Bahamas are
safe because they are regulated
by the Registrar of Insurance.

As a regulated insurance com-
pany, the law requires that: (a)



certain statutory reserves be main-
tained, pursuant to Section 6 of
the Insurance Act (“the Act”); (b)
non-insurance businesses be seg-
regated from insurance business,
pursuant to Sections 15 and 16 of
the Act; (c) there be security of
life policyholders, pursuant to Sec-
tion 17 of the Act; (d) an annual
independent audit of the insur-
ance company be performed, pur-
suant to Section 18 of the Act; the
insurance company submit its
accounts and balance sheet to the
Registrar within six months of the
end of each financial year; a con-
solidated financial report be sub-
mitted where an insurance com-
pany is part of a group of compa-
nies, pursuant to Section 21 of the
Act; all transactions be arms-
length; investments strategy be
diversified in liquid assets.

Section 40 of the Act empowers
the relevant Minister to appoint
any suitable person as an inspector
to investigate the affairs or any
part of the affairs of a registered
insurer if he is satisfied that such
investigation would be in the inter-
est of the policyholders or of per-
sons who may become policy-
holders, at the expense of the
insurer.

Section 52 of the Act prohibits
issuance of a document relating
to insurance which is false or mis-
leading, with a penalty, on sum-
mary conviction, of a fine of $3,000
or to imprisonment for one year or
both.

Section 58 of the Act states that
the Exchange Control Regulations
Act shall apply to the operations
of an insurance company in the
Bahamas.

It is clear from the communica-
tion on CLICO (Bahamas) Limit-
ed to Parliament by Prime Minis-
ter (Hubert) Ingraham on March
2, 2009 that most of the aforesaid
sections of the Insurance Act were
violated.

From the communication, it is
clear that from 2004 to 2007 CLI-
CO had made related party loans
of over $200 million, representing
58.56 per cent of its total assets
and 68 per cent of invested assets
which were taken out of the coun-
try, contrary to Exchange Control
Regulations, ultimately to Welling-
ton Preserve Corporation’s Flori-
da real estate project.

As regulators, the Minister with
responsibility for insurance, now
the Minister of Finance and the
Registrar of Insurance, especially
over the past five years, failed to
enforce the Act with respect to
CLICO.

The Prime Minister and Minis-
ter of Finance, in his communica-
tion, stated that in a prudential
meeting in 2007 the Registrar of
Insurance had demanded that
CLICO return the then $53 mil-
lion to reduce the inter-company
loan balances. CLICO ignored
the demand and the regulators
failed to take any corrective
action.

Upon receipt of the audited
financial statements in July 2007,
highlighting the extent of the real
estate investments, the Registrar
of Insurance sent CLICO a letter
demanding, amongst other things,
that all inter-company loans be
repaid by Friday 9, January 2009.

Again CLICO failed to perform
the actions demanded by the Reg-
istrar of Insurance by the dead-
line and the Minister of Finance
and the Registrar of Insurance
failed to take any corrective
action.

A meeting was scheduled by
CLICO with the Minister of State
for Finance for January 29, 2009.
CLICO rescheduled the meeting
for February 5, 2009.

CLICO failed to attend the
rescheduled meeting. The Minis-
ter of Finance and the Registrar of
Insurance, again failed to take any



7-5. JOHNSON





remedial action.

Incredibly, Prime Minister
Ingraham stated that it only
became clear that CLICO was in
serious trouble on January 30,
2009 when the Central Bank and
the Minister of Finance of
Trinidad and Tobago announced
its rescue plan of TT$6 billion for
CL Financial, the parent company
of CLICO (Bahamas) Limited.

Failure to bring Act into effect

The House of Assembly and the
Senate passed the Domestic Insur-
ance Act in July 2005. It was
recognised by the government and
official Opposition at that time
that the current Insurance Act was
inadequate to regulate effectively
the insurance industry in the
Bahamas.

The new Act gave the Regis-
trar of Insurance, amongst other
things, administrative autonomy
from the Minister of Finance, bet-
ter enforcement powers, estab-
lished stricter reserve require-
ments (along the Canadian stan-
dards) and required investment
diversification.

Having recognised the limita-
tions of the current Act and
moved parliament to enact the
new Domestic Insurance Act, why
has the government failed and/or
refused, from 2005 to the present,
to bring the Domestic Insurance
Act into effect?

The failure of the government
to bring the Domestic Insurance
Act into effect is a grave failure
and also breached the commit-
ment it made to the Caribbean
Financial Task Force (“CFATF”)
when it accepted its Mutual Eval-
uation Report of the financial ser-
vices industry in the Bahamas on
December 23, 2007.

During the assessment of the
Bahamas, it was determined by
the CFATF’s assessment team
that the lack of administrative
autonomy, the power to conduct
inspections and compel the pro-
duction of documents by the Reg-
istrar of Insurance compromised
the anti-money laundering and
anti-terrorist financing system of
the Bahamas. The Bahamian
response was that the new Domes-
tic Insurance Act would soon have
been brought into effect to address
those concerns.

It is now almost two years since
we promised the CFATF to bring
into force the Domestic Insurance
Act and the government has failed
to fulfil this commitment.

According to the immediate for-
mer Registrar of Insurance, Mr
Roger Brown, who said that “I
also believe that if the Domestic
Insurance Act had been in place,
the CLICO matter would not have
developed.” (The Tribune, Busi-
ness Section, page 1, Thursday,
March 12, 2009).

In light of the persistent failure
of the government, over the course
of at least five years, to ensure
CLICO’s compliance with its
statutory obligations when it knew
that CLICO was in breach of the
law impresses a legal duty on the
government to help to make
whole those persons harmed as
result of the regulatory failure.

Further, the failure of the gov-
ernment to bring into force the
Domestic Insurance Act to cure
the systemic weaknesses of regu-
latory infrastructure also imposes
an obligation on the government
to restore those persons harmed
and for whom it had an obligation
to protect.

Recommendations

The Bahamian government,
being aware of the deteriorating
condition of CLICO’s balance
sheet and failing to alert the
Bahamian public or protect their
interest, should guarantee the
recovery of the policy holders and
annuity holders of CLICO.

The government should assume

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Alfred Sears

control of the assets of CLICO,
as it is in the best position to carry
the devalued real estate assets for
a few years, just as the United
States government is proposing to
do by quarantining the toxic US
mortgages with the full knowledge
that the market will rebound.
The government should take
immediate preventive measures
to prevent a recurrence of the
CLICO fiasco and a contagion by
bringing into force the Domestic

Insurance Act to ensure that prop-
er statutory reserves are main-
tained by all insurance companies;
there are no related-party loans
and transactions; there is diversi-
fication in investment portfolios
in liquid assets; there is full trans-
parency and accountability; there
is full compliance with Exchange
Control Regulations.

The government should con-
vene a financial industry/regula-
tors/official Opposition/unions/civ-
il society consultation to conduct
an immediate review of the insur-
ance industry in the Bahamas and
the CARICOM region to recom-
mend additional statutory and reg-
ulatory reforms, in light of the
CLICO failure.

The government should forth-
with propose legislation to the par-
liament to regulate pension funds

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College of Insurance Regulators
to harmonise insurance regulatory
standards, monitoring and coop-
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in the CARICOM region.

The government should estab-
lish a special prosecution team to
investigate and prosecute the per-
sons found to have violated pro-
visions of the Insurance Act, the
Companies Act, the Exchange
Regulations Act and the Penal
Code Act in order to deter future
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PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER NOTICES FOR DIRECTORY PUBLICATIONS

TENDER - PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENTS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from the general public who wish to advertise in our premium spots on the 2010
Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENT” to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - PRINTING AND DELIVERY OF
TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies to provide services for the printing and delivery
of the 2010 and 2011 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES” to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - COVER DESIGNS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies to provide Graphic Artist services for the 2010
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Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - COVER DESIGNS” to the
attention of:

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The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - DISPLAY ADS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies or individuals to provide Graphic Artist services
for the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - DISPLAY ADS” to the atten-
tion of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL
NARRATIVES SERVICES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies or individuals to provide Creative Writing and
Sectional Narratives services for the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL NARRATIVES
SERVICES” to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

www.btcbahamas.com

PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

"Amnesty International is very
disappointed, however, that the
Bahamas rejected a wide range
of recommendations by many
states regarding the death penalty,
including establishing a morato-
rium on executions, to ratify the
Second Optional Protocol to the
International Covenant on Civil
and Political Rights, and to abol-
ish the death penalty.

"Amnesty International takes
this opportunity to reiterate our
call to the government to repeal
all provisions allowing for the
death penalty and to declare a
moratorium on executions," the
statement says.

In a landmark decision deliv-
ered on March 8, 2006, the Privy
Council unanimously struck down
the mandatory death sentence
imposed on those convicted of

Death penalty

that it violated the Constitution.
According to published
reports, the Bahamas hanged 50
men since 1929. Five of them were
hanged under the previous Ingra-
ham administration; 13 were
hanged under the 25-year rule of
the Sir Lynden Pindling govern-
ment; and the others were exe-
cuted between 1929 and 1967.

In 2006, approximately half of
the 28 men on death row at the
prison had been there for five
years or more, including Forrester
Bowe and Trono Davis — two
death row inmates who mounted
the successful legal challenge to
the country’s mandatory death
sentence.

However the punishment of
death still remains on the coun-
try's law books.

Amnesty International also

welcomed the undertaking by the
Bahamas to respond promptly to
concerns raised by several
detainees, which were published
in The Tribune, regarding condi-
tions in the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre.

"Recent reports indicate that
abuses continue to take place at
the facility, and Amnesty Inter-
national urges the Bahamas to act
swiftly on this undertaking and
conduct an independent investi-
gation into recent allegations of
ul-treatment," Amnesty said.

Amnesty also hailed the
Bahamas’ prompt ratification of
two Covenants, and _ the
Bahamas’ willingness to consider
acceding to other human rights
instruments, including the Con-
vention against Torture, its
Optional Protocol, and the Inter-
national Convention on the Pro-
tection of the Rights of all Migrant
Workers and Members of their

murder in the Bahamas, ruling

FROM page one

weeks “voluntary unpaid vacation” this year.

Yesterday, Kerzner International senior vice pres-
ident of public affairs Ed Fields said the move, which
comes four months after the resort laid off 800 work-
ers, was designed as part of “an effort to avoid other
more painful methods such as pay cuts or additional
layoffs.”

“This strategy is a part of a global initiative to
insure that our company will meet our bank covenants
and financial obligations, and to put us in a position
of strength moving forward,” said Mr Fields.

Bank covenants are part of a contractual agreement
entered into by a borrower (in this case Kerzner
International) with a bank from which it is obtaining
a loan to keep their business within specified financial
ratio limits.

According to Mr Fields, the call for non-unionised
staff to take voluntary unpaid vacation is one which
not only affects Bahamas-based Kerzner employees,
but which is being implemented at its various prop-
erties worldwide.

He noted that in addition to this decision, the com-
pany also laid off 20 people from its Fort Lauderdale
office, and some unfilled positions were removed
from the wage roll.

“These measures do not affect line employees in
the casino and security departments at Atlantis,” he
added.

In a separate interview with Reuters news agency,
published yesterday, Sol Kerzner, Chief Executive
Officer of Kerzner International, said that despite a
drop in occupancy rates to an average of 67 or 68 per
cent at most of his resorts worldwide, room rates
were being maintained and the company is “defi-

Families.

Cost-cutting

“We’re making money right now,” Mr Kerzner
told the media as they toured the Mazagan Resort and
Casino, the company’s new seaside resort in Moroc-
co.

He reiterated, however, that the company is putting
on hold all new projects because of the economic
crisis.

In a statement sent to The Tribune, Mr Fields said
that “it is important to note” that while the company
is looking at cost containment, it is also “aggressive-
ly taking steps to expand revenue, through sales and
marketing efforts and special events.”

He suggested that the company is focusing on
being in the best position possible when the global
economy picks up.

“These are times when standing still will not suffice
and Kerzner International worldwide is doing all it
can to make certain that we are standing strong when
the current environment takes a turn for the better,”
he said.

Earlier this week, Minister of Tourism Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace announced that The Bahamas
had enjoyed an 84 per cent increase in overall tourism
arrivals in January 2009 compared with the same
period last year.

However, the majority of these visitors would not
have translated into “heads in beds” as tourism pun-
dits refer to stopover arrivals, as they were primarily
cruise passengers.

According to Mr Vanderpool-Wallace, visitors
coming in by air decreased by 18.7 per cent while
cruise arrivals jumped by 19.9 per cent for the month
—a “remarkable achievement” in the midst of the
major economic woes in the US, the country's major

nitely profitable.”
FROM page one

from the charges while Rust paid
the fines.

But the pair, who were interna-
tionally shamed in newspapers and
on websites around the world, con-
tinued to sail through the
Bahamas on the “Sea Monkey”,
but removed the boat’s name.

They were seen in Joe Sound,
Long Island, where they bragged
about the expensive meal claiming
it was worth it, a source said.

Also enjoying happy hour
drinks at sunset off Long Island
were the Adamo crew, who are
wanted by police for allegedly tres-
passing in Hog Cay, Joe Sound,
where they chased a flock of
endangered West Indian tree
ducks before they captured and
killed a pet rowan.

Pictures of the plucked duck in
the roasting pan ready for the
oven were posted on the Adamo
crew’s Internet blog and spotted
by the Graham family who own
the island where lawyer Peter Gra-

tourism market.

Tourists

ham has encouraged the popula-
tion of West Indian tree ducks to
grow from just three in the late
1960’s to over 1,500 today.

Following their visit the criti-
cally endangered ducks fled the
island and are only now beginning
to return.

The Bahamas National Trust
and police pursued the Adamo
crew for trespass and followed
them to Exuma. They have also
been reported to their marina in
Daytona, US wildlife authorities,
and they have been named and
shamed in the Daytona Beach
News Journal who picked up on
their story in The Tribune.

And while anchored off Joe
Sound last month, the crew are
said to have enjoyed cocktails with
the crews of about eight sailboats,
including Rust and Palm who
appeared far from sorry for their
crimes.

“They were bragging away that
it was an expensive dinner but

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Invites Tenders

for the services described below

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Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

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and site visits, contact
Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236



they enjoyed it,” the source said.

“They were certainly not
remorseful and they were totally
unrepentant.”

The Adamo crew reportedly
told curious sailboaters they had
killed the duck in Hog Cay, and
said it was not a problem because
there are lots of ducks there.

Amanda Graham of Hog Cay,
who was outraged by the attitudes
of disrespectful tourists, said: “A
few hundred dollars and a slap on
the wrist is clearly not enough to
enforce the law. I want to see a
$10,000 fine and the boat confis-
cated.

“These boats are worth over
$100,000 and they could go to the
National Trust or be auctioned off
for the Trust and these people
deported.

“They only pay a few hundred
dollars for a cruising permit and
they are not spending a lot of
money here.

“They are not exactly the stellar
tourist.”

Man accused
FROM page one

resist lawful arrest by the officers.
It is further alleged that he was
found in possession of two
unfired 9mm rounds, one unfired
.380 round and that he caused
damage to a blue 2007 Ford
Crown Victoria in the amount of
$500.

Bowleg pleaded not guilty to
the charge at his arraignment in
Court 1, Bank Lane yesterday.
He was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison and is expected
back in court today for a bail
hearing.

According to reports, police
pursued a black 2003 Ford Expe-
dition from Wulff Road to the
Tonique Williams-Darling High-
way after shots were fired from
the vehicle around 9 pm Monday.

Police investigate
Stabbing incident

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- Grand
Bahama police are investigat-
ing a stabbing incident involving
two women early this week in
the Arden Forest area.

According to Asst Supt Wel-
bourne Bootle, the two women,
whose ages are unknown, were
fighting over a boy.

He said the altercation began
in the Balao Road area and lat-
er continued in the parking lot
of The Hut Restaurant on
Sergeant Major Road, where
one of the women was stabbed
with a knife and the other with
a broken bottle.

ASP Bootle said the women
were taken to Rand Memorial
Hospital for treatment and lat-
er discharged.

Investigations are continuing
into the matter.





Track and
field swings
into high
gear

IT’S that
time of the
year when
track and field
swings into
high gear.

We just wit-
nessed the
Government
Secondary
Schools Sports
Association r
and Bahamas
Association of OPINION
Independent
Secondary
Schools Track and Field Cham-
pionships.

And based on what was
exhibited, there’s still quite a
contrast between the public and
private schools.

For starters, the fan partici-
pation was quite different.

At the GSSSA, there wasn’t
that much show of school pride
as the spectators showed up
dressed in their own clothing,
which didn’t leave any room to
determine who was cheering for
who.

On the other hand, it was
quite evident who was support-
ing who at the BAISS, particu-
larly between the top two pow-
er houses from St Augustine’s
College and Queen’s College.

There was a sea of red for
SAC’s Big Red Machines, who
had its closest showdown in
quite some time from QC’s
Comets, who almost evened out
the stands with their green.

It just seemed as usual that
the private schools had the
greater deal of the fan partici-
pation.

On the track and field, the
competition varied.

While it was obvious that a
lot of the athletes from the pub-
lic schools were competing on
just their raw talent, the private
school athletes were a little
more refined.

In other words, the private
school athletes were a little
more prepared than those from
the public schools. But at the
same token, the public school
athletes had some spectacular
performances just as there were
at the private school meet.

It seemed as if those athletes
from schools who are actively
involved in a track club and
were competing on a weekly
basis were the ones who shined
the most.

This weekend, however, will
be a key factor as the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associ-
ations hosts its 21st National
High School Track and Field
Championships.

The championships will begin
today and run through Satur-
day at the Thomas A Robinson
Stadium. It will bring together
the Grand Bahama and Family
Island schools.

A total of 35 schools have
signed up to participate.

The numbers from the vari-
ous schools are expected to be a
little smaller than those that
competed at the respective
GSSSA and BAISS champi-
onships.

That means that the compe-
tition should be a little more
intense as the coaches are only
expected to use those athletes
who have a chance to score
points.

What we would like to see is
more participation from the
fans in the stands.

It’s a proven fact that athletes
tend to compete at a higher
standard when they know that
there are people cheering them
on.
Not only at stake is the
national title, but there is a
chance for more athletes to
qualify for the national team
that will be going to the Carifta
Games in St Lucia over the
Easter holiday weekend.

The final Carifta trials are
scheduled for next weekend,
but this is a good opportunity
for many of the athletes who
are on the borderline to make
the standards before the final
trials are held.

So let’s rally around and

SEE page 18

STUBBS







Lynch expects

F to be suspended
=

by the NFL...

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



A ZION EAGLES player goes up for a jumpshot over St Bede’s Crushers players last night during the first Phil Smith Primary School Boys’ Basketball Tournament...
See more photos on page 17

St Bede’s Crushers second while Stephen Dillet
defeats Queen’s College for third place

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

relative newcomer to the
local basketball scene
claimed the inaugural
tournament to com-
memorate a legendary sporting icon.

Championship Game

Zion Eagles - 35

St Bede’s Crushers - 30

The Eagles opened the second half
on a 10-0 run and never relinquished
the lead despite a late charge from
the Crushers to claim the 1st Annual
Providence Basketball Club Phil
Smith Primary School Boys’ Tourna-
ment.

The Crushers led 12-9 at the half,
but with the timely run pulled ahead
17-12 with 9:33 remaining.

Donzel Huyler finally ended the
7:20 drought for the Crushers on the
ensuing possession with a jumper from
the free throw line.

Both teams traded baskets late in
the half, and Kyle Turnquest brought
the Crushers within two with a run-
ning lay-up, 23-21 with just under
three minutes remaining.

Givane Bonaby scored in the paint
to give his team a 27-21 lead with 52
seconds remaining but the Crushers
refused to fade.

Turnquest’s three point play
trimmed the Eagles’ deficit, 31-28 with
25 seconds left to play.

After Leslie Rolle’s basket, Nashad

Mackey sealed the win for the Eagles
with an offensive rebound and put-
back off a missed free throw.

Mackey, the tournament’s most
valuable player, finished with a team
high 15 points while Rolle added six
and Bonaby finished with five.

Mackey, who also made the “All-
Tournament Team” said his team
scouted the Crushers and saw things
they would be able to take advantage
of in the championship game.

“We just know we had to play much
harder and play defense on them for
the whole game,” he said. “We just
know we had to stop the cherry-pick-
ing, get back on defense and control

the ball and I knew we would win
today.”

Turnquest led the Crushers and all
scorers with 18 points.

Eagles head coach and standout on
the school’s junior boys’ basketball
team, Philip Hanna, credited his
team’s defensive effort and year round
schedule for their tournament win-
ning performance.

“Despite the fact that we are an
unknown team, a small school, we
showed the Bahamas that we are the
best and we came out here and played
and won this tournament with our

SEE page 17

See page 18



PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009
INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Oden
returns
against
Pacers

@ By CLIFF BRUNT
AP Sports Writer

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
Greg Oden will finally play in
his hometown as a pro.

The 7-foot center is set to
return to the Portland Trail
Blazers’ lineup Wednesday
against the Indiana Pacers after
sitting out for more than a
month with a bone chip in his
left knee, coach Nate McMil-
lan said.

The top pick in the 2007 draft
and former Lawrence North
High School star sat out last
season after microfracture
surgery on his right knee, so he
missed the Trail Blazers’ visit
to Indiana last season.

Oden was hurt in a collision
during a game at Golden State
before the All-Star break.
McMillan said he expects the
former Ohio State star to play
15 to 20 minutes.

Oden is averaging 9.0 and 7.2
rebounds in 46 games this sea-
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SCOREBOARD

Thursday, March 19

Dallas at Atlanta (7 pm
EDT). The Hawks have won
six straight at home while the
Mavericks are in the midst of
playing six of seven games on
the road.

STARS

Tuesday

— LeBron James, Cavaliers,
had 43 points, 12 rebounds and
eight assists and Cleveland
moved to 30-1 at home with a
97-93 win over Orlando.

— Al Horford and Josh
Smith, Hawks. Horford had 23
points and 12 rebounds, and
Smith finished with 21 points
and 10 rebounds in Atlanta’s
sixth straight victory, 119-97
over Sacramento.

— John Salmons, Bulls, tied a
career high with 38 points in
Chicago’s 127-121 victory over
Boston.

— Tony Parker, Spurs, scored
24 points and carried San Anto-
nio to a 93-86 win over Min-
nesota while Tim Duncan sat
out to rest his knees.

— Andre Iguodala, 76ers,
scored 25 points, including a
buzzer-beating 3-pointer, to
help Philadelphia overcome a
14-point fourth-quarter deficit
and stun the Los Angeles Lak-
ers 94-93.

— Monta Ellis and Corey
Maggette, Warriors. Ellis
matched his season high with
29 points, and Maggette had 21
to lead Golden State past the
Los Angeles Clippers 127-120.

STATS

The Hawks are 40-28 over-
all, their highest win total since
1997-98. Coming off an 86-77
loss at Milwaukee on Sunday
in which they set a season low
for points scored, the Celtics set
one for points allowed in a 127-
121 loss at Chicago. Minnesota
continued its misery against the
Spurs, losing for the 14th time in
the last 15 meetings, 93-86.

SCORING

Kobe Bryant managed only
11 points in the Lakers’ 94-93
loss to Philadelphia. He also did
not go to the free throw line.
Joe Johnson finished with 20
points for the Hawks in a 119-97
win over the Kings, ending his
four-game stretch of 30 or more.
Detroit’s Will Bynum set a
career high with 19 points in a
103-101 loss at Dallas. Seven
Utah players scored in double
figures in a 103-88 win over
Washington: Kyle Korver (15);
Carlos Boozer, Ronnie Brewer
and Mehmut Okur (13 each);
Deron Williams (12); and
Andrei Kirilenko and Paul Mill-
sap (10 apiece).

STREAKS
Sacramento has lost all 27
games against the Eastern Con-

TRIBUNE SPORTS

76ers give Lakers one-point stunner

PHILADELPHIA 76ers guard Andre Iguodala (left) celebrates his 3-point shot with teammate Philadelphia 76ers guard Andre Miller (7) to win in the second half against the Los Angeles

(AP Photo: Gus Ruelas)

ference after a 119-97 loss at
Atlanta, which has won six
straight overall, all at home.
Dallas also has been invincible
at home lately, winning its
eighth in a row by beating
Detroit 103-101. Chicago won
its seventh straight at the Unit-
ed Center, 127-121 over Boston.
Utah keeps winning at home,
making Washington its 12th
successive victim, 103-88. Andre
Miller, who turns 33 Thursday,
played in his 513th consecutive
game, the NBA’s longest active
streak, in a 94-93 victory at the
Lakers. The Clippers have lost
six straight on the road and sev-
en in a row at Golden State.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Dwight Howard had 13
points, 15 rebounds and six
blocks for the Magic in a 97-93
loss at Cleveland. Kevin Martin
scored 31 points for Sacramen-
to, which fell 119-97 at Atlanta.
Tayshaun Prince scored 28
points and grabbed seven
rebounds in a 103-101 loss to
Dallas. Paul Pierce hit for 37
points and had seven rebounds
in Boston’s 127-121 loss at
Chicago. Pau Gasol had 25
points, eight rebounds, six
assists and three blocked shots
in the Lakers’ 94-93 loss to the
76ers. Baron Davis scored 29
points in his first game in Oak-
land since opting out of his con-
tract with the Warriors. Al
Thornton had 25 points and
nine rebounds as the Clippers
lost their sixth straight on the
road, 127-120.

FASHIONABLE

Cleveland’s LeBron James
wore green and white Nikes to
celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, then
celebrated a 97-93 win over
Orlando that pushed the Cava-
liers to 30-1 at home. The Mavs
wore their alternate green jer-
seys in honor of St. Patrick’s
Day. So did the Bulls.

SIDELINED

Pistons leading scorer
Richard Hamilton missed the
loss against the Mavericks
because of a nagging groin
problem. Spurs forward Tim
Duncan sat out the win against
Minnesota to rest his knees that
have sporadically troubled the
All-Star this season. Celtics for-
ward Leon Powe left the loss
to the Bulls with a bruised right
knee. Cavaliers forward Wally
Szczerbiak sprained his left
knee in the third period against
Orlando and did not return.
The Celtics dropped to 6-6 since
Kevin Garnett hurt his knee.

SPEAKING

“T can’t imagine 100.”

— Timberwolves coach
Kevin McHale about joining
Spurs coach Gregg Popovich in
the record books for coaching
longevity. A night after
Popovich coached his landmark
1,000th career game, McHale
was coaching his 79th.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays





TRIBUNE SPORTS



Eagles soar
to victory

FROM page 15

defense,” he said. “We continue
to practice year round and
another tournament is coming
up for us pretty soon and we
hope to carry that too.”

e In the third place matchup,
Stephen Dillet defeated
Queen’s College 27-15.

Michael Bethel, named to the
“All-Tournament Team” led
Stephen Dillet with 13 points
while Johnley Rolle added
eight.

Carl Nesbitt, also an “All-
Tournament Team” member,
led the Comets with six points.

Stephen Dillet led 17-7 at the
half and the Comets never came
within eight points in the final
half.

Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister
congratulated each of the par-
ticipants but reminded them of
the greater lesson to learn from
the tournament and its name-

sake.
Win

“Whether you win or not, the
important thing is that you par-
ticipated and that you did your
best,” he said. “It is important
that young men in this country
understand sportsmanship. This
tournament is named after a
great Bahamian, a friend of
mine and wonderful sportsman,
and I encourage you young men
to take the best you can out of
this tournament.”

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TENDER

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the repair of Storage Tank #13 at its
Clifton Pier Power Station.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before

31st March, 2009

no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 683/08
REPAIR OF STORAGE TANK #13
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all proposals
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Shevonn N. Cambridge at telephone 302-1208.

Site visit will take place on Thursday, 19th March, 2009 at 9:00 a.m.
at BEC, Clifton Pier Power Station.



THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 17

LOCAL SPORTS

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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Benitez signs new Liverpool contract

LIVERPOOL, England
(AP) — Liverpool manager
Rafa Benitez has signed a new
contract with the Premier
League team through the
2013-14 season.

Wednesday’s announce-
ment on the club’s Web site
ended uncertainty about the
Spaniard’s future. His previ-
ous contract ran through the
2009-10 season, and in Janu-
ary he rejected an initial deal
that was offered to him by the
club’s American owners.

Benitez’s troubled relation-
ship with chief executive Rick
Parry had been considered to
be a stumbling block, but Par-
ry announced Feb. 27 he will
leave the club at the end of
the season.

“With a club like this and
supporters like this, I could
never say no to staying,” Ben-
itez was quoted as saying on
the team’s Web site. “I always
made clear I wanted to be
here for a long time, and when
I complete my new contract
it will mean I have spent over

a decade in Liverpool.”

Benitez joined Liverpool
from Valencia in 2004 and led
the team to the 2005 Euro-
pean Champions League title.
His team is in the quarterfi-
nals of this season’s Champi-
ons League.

“T know he will continue to
build on his achievements as
he has a tremendous hunger
and desire to bring more suc-
cess to the club — success our
fans and everyone connected
with the club deserves,” Liv-
erpool co-owner Tom Hicks
said in a statement.

George Gillett Jr., Hicks’
partner at Liverpool, has been
less of a fan but recognizes
that Benitez’s talents are
much in demand.

“With Rafa continuing to
manage the team, we can look
forward to more great foot-
ball and success on the pitch,”
Gillett said.

“He has special abilities and
qualities which are admired
here at the club and around
the world.”

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Bills RB Lynch expects
to be suspended by NFL

m By JOHN WAWROW
AP Sports Writer

ORCHARD PARK, N.Y.
(AP) — Bills running back
Marshawn Lynch expects to be
suspended by the NFL for his
latest run-in with the law and
added he’s gotten the message
that the league “won’t tolerate
any more screw-ups” from him.

Delivering a message of
humility and repentance — and
minus the flashy gold grill he
usually wears across his teeth
— Lynch vowed Wednesday
that he’s ready to change his
ways and prepared to accept the
consequences for his actions.

“Tt has kind of sunk in, and I
felt that this was the next step to
letting you guys know that there
will be a change,” Lynch said. “I
never had the intention of get-
ting into trouble or anything
like that. But along the way my
road got rocky, and now you
know it’s time to set my pave-
ment straight.”

The former first-round draft
pick out of California held a 9-
minute news conference in the
Bulls practice facility a day after
meeting with NFL commission-
er Roger Goodell in New York.
The meeting was part of Good-
ell’s review into whether to dis-
cipline Lynch for violating the
league’s personal conduct poli-
cy after he pleaded guilty to a
misdemeanor gun charge in Los
Angeles earlier this month.

Lynch characterized the
meeting with Goodell as a
wake-up call, and said the com-
missioner’s message has sunk
in.
“Something that he stressed
throughout the meeting was
that he will not tolerate any
more screw-ups by me,” Lynch
said, noting he expects to be
suspended for the start of the
regular season because this is
the second time he’s gotten in
trouble with authorities.

“T honestly see a suspension
coming, but that comes with the
consequences,” Lynch said.

He expects a ruling to be

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BUFFALO BILLS running back Marshawn Lynch listens to a reporter’s question during a news conference at the
Ralph Wilson Stadium complex in Orchard Park, N.Y. on Wednesday...

made within 10 days.

Lynch was arrested near Los
Angeles on Feb. 11. In search-
ing a parked car carrying Lynch,
Culver City police found a 9
mm semiautomatic handgun
inside a backpack in the trunk.
Police also found four marijua-
na cigarettes in the car, but no
drug charges were filed.

He pleaded guilty to having a
concealed firearm and was sen-
tenced to 80 hours community
service and three years’ proba-
tion.

It was Lynch’s second run-in
with the law in less than a year.

In June, he pleaded guilty to
a traffic violation and admitted
he was behind the wheel of his
SUV when it sped off from a
downtown Buffalo intersection
after striking a pedestrian, who
sustained minor injuries. Lynch
wasn’t disciplined by the league
for the accident.

“The first time was pretty
much like a slap on the wrist,”
he said. “I feel this time it real-
ly will stick.”

Aware that people might be
skeptical, Lynch said the only
way to prove himself is through
his actions.

“Tcan only show you. It won’t
be nothing that I can say in
words that’ll make you out a
believer,” Lynch said. “You’re
just going to have to see for

yourself.”

Lynch’s willingness to speak
to reporters was already con-
sidered a big change in attitude.
Last season, he made himself
available to the media only
twice, once abruptly ending a
news conference and walking
away after being asked about
the hit-and-run accident.

Lynch was unhappy with how
he was portrayed in the media
following the accident. His
image, though, did take a hit
when he invoked his legal right
by refusing to speak to author-
ities for two weeks until Erie
County District Attorney Frank
Clark issued subpoenas against
Bills players and staff.

On Wednesday, Lynch
described his decision to delay
meeting with authorities as a
mistake, and said it was a rea-
son why he prompted the meet-
ing with Goodell.

“TI know pretty much that
there will be some people look-
ing forward to me messing up
again,” he said. “But I’m just
going to let them know they
shouldn’t hold their breath.”

Should Lynch be suspended,
the Bills will be minus the play-
er who’s led them in rushing
and touchdowns over the past
two seasons.

Last year, he had eight touch-
downs and 1,036 yards on the

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 688/09
BUSSING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Mr. Anthony S. Forbes
at telephone 302-1165



(AP Photo: Don Heupel)

ground, enough to make his first
Pro Bowl appearance as an
injury replacement.

The Bills have a solid backup
in Fred Jackson, though the
team has interviewed several
veteran free agent running
backs over the past three weeks.

Track and
field swings
into high
gear

FROM page 15

come out in large numbers to
cheer on our future stars.

KUDOS TO JOHNSON

Talking about the future
stars, kudos must be given to
Kevin “KJ” Johnson and his
Providence Basketball Club for
organising the first Phil Smith
Primary Boys Basketball Clas-
sic.

The tournament wrapped up
on Wednesday night at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium after
five days of exciting competi-
tion.

If you didn’t attend any of
the sessions, you missed a great
opportunity to watch some of
the top players in the primary
school division compete.

Although he’s renowned for
high school and night league
basketball, it was good to see
some more emphasis placed on
the primary schools.

There was a lot of talent dis-
played during the course of the
tournament, which was set up
similar to the prestigious Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic.

And based on the feedback
from the coaches and those par-
ents who came out to support
the players, they hope that the
tournament can be an annual
one.

I’m sure that the late Smith —
the tournament was named in
his honour - must be looking
down and smiling from ear to
ear for what took place.

Not to be outdone, the pri-
mary school girls will get their
chance to shine when they com-
pete in the Patty Johnson Bas-
ketball Tournament.

The tournament, which will
also features a high school divi-
sion, will run from Wednesday,
March 25 to Friday, March 27 at
the CI Gibson Gymnasium.

Organisers could not have
selected a better person to hon-
our than Patty Johnson, who
has made tremendous strides in
grooming many of our top
female players.

Johnson has enjoyed the most
successful programme of any
division in all sports in high
school, having dominated the
junior girls basketball division
for more than a decade.

Two of her protégés, Anasta-
cia Moultrie, now teaching at
St Augustine’s College, and
Torsheka Cox, teaching at Ana-
tol Rodgers Junior High, are
the organisers of the tourna-
ment. They are both showing
their gratitude to their mentor
for the role she played in their
lives.



THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 19

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



Making it their business
to help the less fortunate

Island Wholesale, Grace Foods International donate to charitable groups



In these difficult economic
times, it has become necessary
for the business community to
assist even more with providing
some of the most basic and criti-
cal needs to those who are less
fortunate in our society.

Island Wholesale, partnering
with Grace Foods International,
manufacturers and distributors of
some of the finest Caribbean
foods and beverages, have
answered this call by donating
to charitable organisations in Nas-
sau, some of its Caribbean Tradi-
tions microwavable meals, which
are a delicious range of mouth-
watering Caribbean specialties
offering the same great taste as
home-prepared meals.

Their donations have gone
directly to places like the Ran-
furly Home for Children (see top
picture — Ranfurly Storeroom)

and the Bilney Lane Children’s
Home (picture inset).

Some donations actually are
spread over the wider communi-
ty.
For example, the 85 case dona-
tion made to Hands for Hunger
was redistributed to feeding pro-
grams at Bethel Baptist Church,
Great Commissions Ministries,
Bahamas PACE, Urban Renew-
al Kemp Road, the Salvation

Army and Coastline Communi-
ty Centre. Island Wholesale and
Grace Foods International have
also sent deliveries of these
microwavable meals to the Kemp
Road Youth Association,
B.A,S.H., the Children’s Emer-
gency Hostel, the First Baptist
Church “Feed the Hungry” pro-
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THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 23



The Rotary Club of West Nassau mentors young men at Programme SURE

ROTARY Club of
West Nassau
members along
with young men
from Programme
SURE.

OVERSEAS NEWS



Top UN official accuses
US of demonizing Iran

@ By Edith M. Lederer
UNITED NATIONS

The outspoken U.N. Gen-
eral Assembly president on
Tuesday accused the United
States of demonizing Iran's
president and criticized the
International Criminal Court
for issuing an arrest warrant
for Sudan's leader on war
crimes charges in Darfur,
according to the Associated
Press,

Miguel d'Escoto Brock-
mann, a Roman Catholic
priest from Nicaragua with
openly leftist views, also reit-
erated that the more he thinks
about the conditions that
Israel imposes on the Pales-
tinians, the more he tends "to
think about apartheid."

During a wide-ranging press
conference, d'Escoto insisted
he wasn't being divisive or
promoting his own agenda —
but was just fulfilling his duty
as president of the 192-mem-
ber General Assembly to
uphold the U.N. Charter and
promote peace and nonvio-
lence. Briefing reporters on
his recent three-week trip that
included a stop in Tehran,
d'Escoto said he was struck
by the great support and
respect for Iran from its neigh-
bors at a summit meeting of
the Economic Cooperation
Organization — a regional
body founded in 1985 by Iran,
Turkey and Pakistan — espe-
cially for helping "to alleviate
the plight" of Afghan refugees
in Iran.

"That was a very wonder-
ful experience to see that, in
contrast to the attitude that
we find, sadly, here where we
are," d'Escoto said.

"IT don't think anyone can
doubt that in our part of the
world ... (President Mah-
moud) Ahmadinejad has been





demonized," he said. "The
United States has been in the
business of the demonization
of people forever and the can-
onization of the worst of dic-
tators."

D'Escoto singled out Ferdi-
nand Marcos of the Philip-
pines, Nicaragua's Anastasio
Samoza and Chile's Augusto
Pinochet."

Asked whether he approved
of Ahmadinejad saying he
wants to wipe a U.N. member
state — Israel — off the map,
d'Escoto said "if he said that,
it's lamentable,” but he quick-
ly added that “words as such
don't kill” and it's the actions
that have to be watched.

"T don't hate Israel, much
less do I hate the Jewish peo-
ple," d'Escoto added. "In fact
they are very high on my list
of people that I love."

Israel

But he said that won't keep
him from criticizing Israeli
actions, especially in the
recent war in Gaza where
some 1,400 Palestinians and
13 Israelis were killed.

D'Escoto served as foreign
minister in the 1980s during
the rule of the Sandinistas,
who aligned themselves with
Fidel Castro and the Soviet
Union.

Since assuming the one-year
General Assembly presiden-
cy in September, he has been
a stern critic of the United
States, and of Israel.

He criticized the United
States on Tuesday for acting
on its own rather than multi-
laterally as the U.N. Charter
calls for, and singled out for-
mer President George W.
Bush for going to war in Iraq
in 2003 without Security
Council approval and for then
accusing the Sudanese gov-

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ernment of committing geno-
cide in Darfur. "The United
States dares to stick its tongue
out to the Security Council
and says you either give me
the green light to commit the
aggression that I want to com-
mit, or I shall declare you
obsolete, irrelevant," d'Esco-
to said.

Mark Kornblau, spokesman
for the U.S. Mission to the
United Nations, when asked
to comment on the criticism
of the US., said: "It's hard to
make sense of Mr. D'Escoto's
increasingly bizarre state-
ments."

D'Escoto called the Inter-
national Criminal Court's
arrest warrant for Sudanese
President Omar al-Bashir for
war crimes and crimes against
humanity “unfortunate” and
"lamentable" because the
African Union and the Arab
League had asked the Securi-
ty Council to delay the war-
rant for a year to pursue peace
efforts in Darfur.

"It helps to deepen the per-
ception that international jus-
tice is racist because this is the
third time that you have some-
thing from the ICC, and for
the third time it has to do with
Africa," d'Escoto said.

MEMBERS of the Rotary
Club of West Nassau spent a
day mentoring the young men
at Programme SURE on
Gladstone Road last month.

The members of the Rotary
Club of West Nassau, with the
assistance of the young men,
put their building skills to use
by constructing six wooden
benches.

Each bench can hold up to
ten persons.

The young men will use the

benches to study and eat their
lunches on breaks.

SURE is an acronym for
Success Ultimately Reassures
Everyone.

Potential

The programme was started
on February 17, 1992 to assist
at-risk male students from the
government secondary schools
in New Providence, to help
them maximise their full

potential. The programme
commenced with nine staff
members and 64 students at
the Industrial Training Cen-
tre on Old Trail Road, which
has since been renamed the
Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute (BTVI).

The Rotary Club of West
Nassau’s president is accoun-
tant Michael Hepburn. The
project was chaired by direc-
tor Delric Beneby.

—
Bush: I won’t criticise Obama

Wee MUO RCOB IMAI (aNe

m@ By ROB GILLIES
CALGARY, Alberta



Former President George W. Bush said he won't
criticize President Barack Obama because Obama
"deserves my silence," and said he plans to write a
book about the 12 toughest decisions he made in
office, according to the Associated Press.

Bush declined to critique the Obama adminis-
tration Tuesday in his first speech since leaving
office. Former Vice President Dick Cheney has
said that Obama's decisions are threatening Amer-

ica's safety.

"I'm not going to spend my time criticizing him.
There are plenty of critics in the arena," Bush

said. "He deserves my silence."

Bush said he wants Obama to succeed and said
it's important that he has that support. Talk-show
host Rush Limbaugh has said he hoped Obama
would fail. "I love my country a lot more than I
love politics," Bush said. "I think it is essential

that he be helped in office."

Bush said that he doesn't know what he will do

in the long term but that he will write a book that
will ask people to consider what they would do if
they had to protect the United State as president.

He said it will be fun to write and that "it's
going to be (about) the 12 toughest decisions I

had to make."

"I'm going to put people in my place, so when
the history of this administration is written at least
there's an authoritarian voice saying exactly what

happened," Bush said.

"I want people to understand what it was like to
sit in the Oval Office and have them come in and
say we have captured Khalid Sheik Mohammed,
the mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, the alleged
killer of a guy named Danny Pearl because he was
simply Jewish, and we think we have information
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Bush didn't specify what the 12 hardest deci-
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Bush was also full of jokes throughout his speech

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Jae C. Hong, File/AP Photo

IN THIS JAN. 20, 2009 file photo, President Barack
Obama and former President George W. Bush stand
for the closing prayer after Obama was sworn in as
the 44th president of the United States of Capitol Hill
in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2009.

and during a question and answer session with
former Canadian Ambassador in Washington
Frank McKenna. He joked that he would do more

speeches to pay for his new house in Dallas.











"T actually paid for a house last fall. I think I'm
the only American to have bought a house in the
fall of 2008," he quipped.

He added that he would do whatever former
first lady Laura Bush asked him to do.

He also said his mother is doing well. Barbara
Bush was released from a Houston hospital Friday,
nine days after undergoing heart surgery.

"Clearly he can't live without her," Bush said of

his father and former President George H.W.

Bush.






















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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





m@ By GREG BLUESTEIN
and LINDSEY TANNER
Associated Press Writers
CHICAGO

urt Perry want-

ed to die. The

thin, pale 26-

year-old has
suffered from a painful neu-
rological disease since child-
hood, forcing him to support
his wobbly legs with a cane.
His stiffly crimped fingers can
hardly grasp a book. The ter-
rifying lapses in breathing
eventually became too much,
pushing him to pick the day
he'd kill himself with an assist-
ed suicide network's help.

Now that authorities have
effectively shut down the Final
Exit Network, Perry said he's
found his reason to live.

"T just feel that this is a huge
setback for the rights of many
to pursue the right to die,” the
suburban Chicago man told
The Associated Press on
Tuesday.

"T felt I've got to speak out
about this," he said, his soft-
spoken speech sometimes
halted by gasps.

Perry was to become the
youngest person to die with
the network's help on Feb. 26,
the day after the Georgia-
based organization's president
and three other members
were arrested in Georgia and
Maryland following an eight-
month investigation there in
which an undercover agent
posing as a suicide-seeker
infiltrated the group.

For now, he has halted his
suicide plans, and Perry said
he's now a crusader for peo-
ple's right to die.

He, along with network
president Ted Goodwin, gave
separate interviews to The AP
on Tuesday defending the
organization.

Perry joined Final Exit a
few years ago and said that
volunteers have given him
support and friendship — and
that they did not encourage
him to choose suicide. But
they would have been present
when he did it.

“These pe

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Right-to-die fight is disabled man's will to live

who are terminally
ill are blessed ina
small way — there’s
a finite time for
their suffering.”



John Amis/AP Photo

TED GOODWIN, former president of the Final Exit Network, is pictured during an interview with an Associated Press reporter, Tuesday, March 17,
2009, in Atlanta. Goodwin was arrested for his role in assisting in a recent Georgia suicide and says he hopes his trial will be a test case validating

the "right-to-die" movement.

"I didn't want to do it on
my own because I feel that
since the Final Exit Network
has been so supportive of me,
giving me encouragement to
continue to live as long as I
can, that it would be sort of
lonely to die on my own," Per-
ry said.

Perry has suffered since
childhood with Charcot-
Marie-Tooth, or CMT disease,
a genetic condition affecting
the nerves that control the
arms and legs.

Perry admits it's rarely life-
threatening, but he said he has
a severe form that affects the
nerves involved in breathing.

He said he dropped out of
high school at age 16 after
school officials failed to

accommodate his condition,
and he's been unable to work.

Goodwin told The AP
Tuesday that people like Per-
ry have as much right to kill
themselves as those near
death.

Blessed

"These people who are ter-
minally ill are blessed in a
small way — there's a finite
time for their suffering,"
Goodwin said, the first time
since his arrest that he's spo-
ken publicly about the orga-
nization he founded in 2004
after his father's 10-year strug-
gle with emphysema.

"But there are many, many
people who are doomed to

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suffer interminably for years.
And why should they not
receive our support as well?"

The group has drawn criti-
cism from some within the
right-to-die movement, includ-
ing Dr. Jack Kevorkian, who
say only doctors should assist
terminally ill people in end-
ing their lives.

Some activists for the dis-
abled worry about others
wielding too much power over
life-and-death issues.

Stephen Drake of the group
Not Dead Yet said assisted
suicide sends the message that
certain people are expendable.

"What you've done is
you're saying that group of
people, their lives have less
value," Drake said.

Goodwin said the group has
helped guide nearly 200 peo-
ple to their deaths.

He said the network never
actively assisted suicide, but
instead offered people sup-
port in their final hours.

"We believe that it is the
right of every mentally com-
petent adult to determine
whether he or she is suffer-
ing,” Goodwin said.

"We do not believe this
should be left to the physi-
cians, church leaders or politi-
cians."

The arrested group mem-
bers have been charged by the
Georgia Bureau of Investiga-
tion with assisted suicide, tam-
pering with evidence and vio-
lating racketeering laws in the

death of a 58-year-old man,
whose doctor said he was can-
cer-free at the time.

GBI has said network mem-
bers were instructed to buy
two new helium tanks and a
hood, known as an "exit bag."

In court papers, investiga-
tors said the group's guides
would hold down its members’
hands to prevent them from
removing the hood — a
charge Goodwin vehemently
denied.

"We do not hold hands
down. We do not cause them
to suffer," he said. "And this
will be proven in a court of
law — I promise you."

Proud

The network claims 3,300
members, donors and volun-
teers nationwide and has long
operated in the open. Good-
win said he was personally
involved in 39 deaths.

"We have not hidden our
goals," he said. "I'm very
proud of our mission."

Authorities have raised con-
cerns over how carefully the
group screens people who
want to die after questions
arose about the death of an
Arizona woman the group
helped in 2007. Police said
Jana Van Voorhis was
depressed but not terminally

ill.

Goodwin said it was "not
inappropriate" for her to die
as she suffered from other ill-
nesses, but he said he tight-
ened the vetting process after
her case.

He said applicants are now
asked to detail their complete
mental history.

Goodwin said that the
specter of prosecution always
loomed, and that the group
knew that one day its work
could make headlines.

"And that day is upon us,"
Goodwin said.

"But it was done with delib-
erateness as a means of mov-
ing the political debate on this
subject to a new high.

“And we hope that this case
will set a precedent in case
law."

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PAGE 26, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

THE TRIBUNE S








fT KNOW YOU CA
DO ANYTHING YOU
PUT YOUR MIND
TO, BUT.





WHY WAS JOE KELLY] I THINK VY HE NEEDS TO MAKE) GARY
HERE, TOMMIE? HEWAS | SOME FRIENDS. / WALKER,
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\ TOUGH AS NAILS!







THOGE GIRLS
HAVE NO IDEA
WHO THEY'RE
LIP AGAINST!






©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights ceserved.

I'M IN
THE MOOD LIKE CHOCOLATE? |.
FOR AN OUTCH CHOCOLATE?
ICE CREAM DARK CHOCOLATE?

WE HAVE VANILLA...
FRENCH VANILLA...
VANILLA FUDGE...

ate, Inc. World rights reserved.





www. kingfeatures.com



©2009 by North America Sy



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GET CAUGHT ON WIFE, HELGA!

PURPOSE!
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*PRET*

T Gor INTO TROLBLE YOU SHOULDNT
WHEN MOM CAUGHT HAVE VONE THAT,
ME DRAWING ON
THE WALL









©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved







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CASE. TLL UST GLUE IT | AMWILE So THE GIVE T CANT BELIEVE ITY Wt ach be

TOGETHER AND INSERT THE Iv! HEY MOM’ ALL ] he Tee on oni Esch must

SWITCH FOR NOU, OK ? DAD FIYED nonmhain te centre ebb ae
SOMETHING ! THAT'S ‘wards in there orost be at leas one pine-

making 4 ower, wach eb ber iy

TAY TARGET
Deealy ol ed 17: vere pone 3; exellent

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with ed lige lite line: lineal linear
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 1 liver weil mailer omer ceeur
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each Tee a x
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty etrtian, PM PMI Pi recall
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



©1989 Universal Press Syndicate





Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.







Fe cunt,
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SAYA ARNY XA 2 :
ANNAN YXENXIYY 5. 5
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a i
2 ([4]8/3]7|1 9[5/6/2 2
5 a [5/2/6|4/3 8|7/1/9| 1 4i6 1/5/24
‘ s fo zitisl2 eleisia! Bee sioe 7 mut 2 9
3 = |6/3/5[9/4 1/2/7/8) Bao oy mols Bs 4
3 & [7\1[8[2/6 5/4/9/3 Go PRS
3 & 2|4/9/8/7 3/6/5/1/ [3 3 M5 9 B2|1 3
= rs 5 = 18/5/2/3/9 7/1/4/6| M1 9/8 BR1l2\4/3 6
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“BUT YOU SAIP BLUE 15 YOUR FAVORITE COLOR.” Difficulty Level RAH ay19 e US Gre ase (5 ty ; : : i :
Difficulty Level * *& 3/19 3/6/4/1/5 2/9/8/7 z































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Across Down
1 Assign that a professional 2 Powerful agency about to Py Tt ty ei ke aa i dicnaest eatin d
; orth dealer. ast’s Jack of hearts with the ace an
dtod tak ber of th Beles
sae else aia ee limes Ca i ey Il La fd North-South vulnerable. drew trumps ending in dummy. After
business (5.9) cast) ey Ty ty Pe end (ee ee] NORTH discarding a heart on the ace of
8 Lag behind, right in the 3 Ovals? Possibly 4AQ72 spades, South played the ace and
rear (5) rounds (5) [i || | | =i ¥83 another club, hoping East had the
9 Well content in 4 Chemical evidence of rey TT ey my Tt ey Ge ve ee ee or on
; . -J-5, Ww Wi j
Wonderland (2) eannabe Sonia (6) i im ee it | WEST EAST At the other table, South, Warren
10 So point out there’s more 5 Fresh air came to the = @K 10853 43964 Rosner, felt that given East’s pre-
than one choice (7) country (7) Pade eed) ee V1i094 ¥KQJ752 emptive bid and West’s raise, the
11 He's riled perhaps, but 6 Excellent, if not fast, way a | ic] ii Li a i Mee é a ere that oe ote 2
: clubs was not good, and that Wes
dees very IIMic (2) lsuipass-olhiers (5) SOUTH was likely to fee more clubs than
12 She turned to stone (6) 7 Wrongly briefed about the ete lil Jina ja i ( o— East. If West held three or more clubs
14 Apretty useless object (6) finish but made VA6 including the K-J-10, there was vir-
17 They object to a point in allies (10) ea il tbe Wd ao ae 752 Lae ene ae a
subject under 8 Showing consideration or The bidding: ihe slarn eoule secninde .
discussion (5) nay berjus banding 110) Repose Hewn North East South West He began just as his counterpart
19 Saw how red wine should 13 General in supreme mt 1% 24 34 39 had, winning the heart lead, drawing
be served (7) command apparently (7) Ni 1 Easy 2 Rower (7) 34 Pass 4¢ Pass trumps and discarding his heart on
Pe ee eee 15 Gambling reversal? (7) N alternative (4,6) 3 General tendency (5) 54 Pass 64 the spade ace. But then, instead of
: ; = B Vast crowd (5) 4 Slickler for details (6) Opening lead — ten of hearts. cashing the ace of clubs, Rosner led
offence (7) 16 Ernest goes out and Oo. This deal occurred in a team con- a low club from dummy to his nine.
22 Diana is out to become a comes in (6) > 9 Quandary (7) 5 Contrary to law (7) test at a recent regional tournament West won with the jack and
nymph (5) 18 Drinking bender (5) ” 10 Muslim month of 6 Rover (5) in came ee ee ue a Heh rae by Seek
23 Famous Western stage 20 Got an order for the a fasting (7) 7 Carefree situation hs de ae fee : abies i: bid ane tags : slory, Still eo
Panne rSiiy ie) enely Islas (2) 11 Pious (5) (4,6) bring in a slam that failed at the other ing that West had the club king and
, : . , : 42 Conclusion (6 8 Relentless! table. , more clubs than East, he led the
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution ( ) y Both declarers reached six dia- queen, hoping East had started with
Across: 1 Bureau, 4 Gannet, 9 Across: 1 Rebuff, 4 Lesson, 9 sari ie cal es monde chess nially tne samen ne Ul
fcermes 40 Tie 9 errr pic 12 Chatesii 10 UME 14 Dregs, 12 well (6) 13 Departure ceremony tion, East making a pre-emptive It did not matter whether West
Phyllis, 13 Porterhouse, 18 Florist, 20 Appease, 13 Tchaikovsky, 18 17 City (5) (4-3) a > i ase theta oe me ae ede a
ee aide nncaent ee 19 Hostile (7) 15 Set aside for At the first table, declarer took club trick, and the slam was home
Mummer, 25 Adapts. Eyesore, 24 Treaty, 25 Ardent. ’ . :
Down: 1 Ballad, 2 Recap, 3 Apricot, 5 = Down: 1 Recede, 2 Brace, 3 21 Atrocious (7) purpose (7) Tomorrow: Bidding quiz.
Alley, 6 Needles, 7 Theism, 8 Freesia, 5 Equip, 6 Setback, 7 22 Factory (5) 16 Thick rope (6) ©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.
Temperature, 14 Opossum, 15 Nerves, 8 Tutankhamen, 14 . :
Opposed, 16 Affirm, 17 Crisis, 19 Codeine, 15 Vermeer, 16 Lancet, 17 23. Risk all in a venture 18 Fetch (5)
Irene, 21 Strip. Advent, 19 Rebut, 21 Broke. (2,3,5) 20 Venomous snake (5)










PAGE 28, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

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If you have amawered FES to the questions aleve then read on,

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Further information and application forms can
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@ wmxhy@bahamasmaritimecom, te: 356 5772
see fax: 356 5889. Completed applications must
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SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Restaurant closure set
to hit West Bay Sireet



m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

COCONUTS, the West Bay Street
restaurant attached to the El Greco hotel,
yesterday closed its doors after paying
almost $250,000 in rent over two years, its
owners claiming they were forced out by
landlords who failed to live up to the
terms of the lease agreement. However,
this was denied by the landlords, who
said the business was a victim of the econ-
omy.

Coconuts part-owner, Erin Ferguson,
told Tribune Business the restaurant had
been forced to break its four-year lease,
with around $24,000 still tied up in secu-
rity deposits and rent. Some 15-20 full-
time staff, and four part-time workers,
face being made redundant.

Mr Ferguson said he and his brother,
Eldin Ferguson, decided to finally give
up the West Bay Street location next to
the former Mayfair Hotel yesterday, giv-
en constant problems with landlords and
El Greco owners, Harry and Mike Pikra-

BIC to ‘reposition

* Coconuts owners cite lease problems with
landlord, despite paying $250,000 in rent, with
$24,000 tied up in deposit and 24 staff futures

uncertain

* Landlords deny claims, and cite problems in

receiving rent

menos, regarding the lease.

“Harry and Mike Pikramenos made
representations to us that they were not
able to fulfill. It was never their inten-
tion for us to succeed in this location,” Mr
Ferguson said.

“It also appeared as though every time
it seemed as though my brother Eldin
and I, two young black Bahamian busi-
nessmen, were becoming successful, the
interference from the Landlords intensi-
fied.”

The brothers argued that they thought
their lease was good, until they were
denied access to areas in the hotel they
claimed they were privy to, and their

patrons’ vehicles were towed from the
street outside the restaurant. Mr Ferguson
said they themselves had paid $700 to
$800 in parking tickets due to their com-
pany car being towed.

“We have never experienced the abili-
ty to grow this business to its potential,”
said Erin Ferguson. It was later deter-
mined that street parking in front of the
restaurant was in legal.

The closure has now displaced as many
as 20 to 25, employees and left the hotel
without a restaurant.

According to Harry Pikramenos, losing

SEE page five

__ BISX firm’s Nassau plant
_ penalties drop74.8% in 2008



Online at

BankBahamas Online.com

Bahamas urged to mandate
corporate pension trustees

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

THE Bahamas should
“give priority” to legislating
that all pension plans be
placed in the care of a cor-
porate trustee, a leading
insurance executive said yes-
terday, arguing that this
would ensure they were
independently policed and
plan assets segregated from
their sponsors.

Guilden Gilbert, a past
Bahamas Insurance Brokers
Association (BIBA) presi-
dent, said that mandating a
corporate trustee for all
Bahamian employer-spon-
sored and individual pension

Insurance executive
says better than
individual trustees

plans would provide greater
protection for all plan bene-
ficiaries.

He added that a corporate
trustee, as opposed to the
individual trustees currently
overseeing many Bahamas-
based pension plans, was
preferable because they had
a much greater asset back-
ing if something happened
to a plan.

“A corporate trustee
should be required, because
you then get the segregation

SEE page six

CLICO (Bahamas): The
key questions and lessons

TRIBUNE BUSINESS OPINION

Blackberry’ device

Moving to complete build-out of
core IP network over next two years

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC)
is “looking to reposition” its
Blackberry product by broad-
ening its appeal to all Bahami-
ans, Tribune Business has
been told, as it moves to com-
plete the build-out of its new
core Internet Protocol (IP)

network within the next two
years.

Marlon Johnson, BTC’s
vice-president of sales and
marketing, said the state-
owned telecommunications
provider was set to push the
‘Blackberry for Life’ concept
over the next several months,
attempting to dispel the
notion that the product was
primarily for use by busi-

nesspersons.

“One of the things that we
will be doing in the coming
months is looking at reposi-
tioning the Blackberry prod-
ucts in the marketplace,” Mr
Johnson told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“We’re trying to re-position
it not only for the busi-
nessperson, but for those per-
sons who want to stay con-
nected. We’re going to re-
position that. That’s going to
be a focus for us.”

A focus on fast-moving
Bahamians, who are always
on the go, appears to be a key
plank in BTC’s marketing
platform, Mr Johnson adding
that the company is also focus-
ing on enhancing download-
able mobile content. This
























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

SEE page four

IVa ee eC alae

« Spacious 4 bedroom / 3 bath
ey

¢ 2,000 sq. ft. of living space

eC a ar ay
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43 acres of tropical landscaping

ere Sty

Pee eT

MAU ROU Te
Peer aa a | CT
CET eae

EUs

« Concierge Service

e Pool & Gazebo

e Mark Knowles Tennis Centre

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; Mi By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

CONSOLIDATED Water

? appears to finally be getting to
? grips with the inefficiencies of
i its Nassau-based Windsor
: reverse osmosis plant, the penal-
? ties it incurred having decreased
? by 74.8 per cent in 2008 com-
? pared to the previous, although
: it was still unable to pass
? $638,000 in diesel costs on to the
? Water & Sewerage Corporation.

The BISX-listed company, in

i its 10-K statement for fiscal 2008,
: which was filed with the US
? Securities & Exchange Com-
? mission (SEC), said the penal-
? ties incurred by its Windsor plant
: “for not meeting diesel fuel and
? electricity efficiencies” specified
: in its contract with the Corpo-
? ration had fallen from $367,257
; and $436,184, respectively, to

Features:

But still hit by 70.2%
rise in diesel costs
during first nine months

$112,622 last year.

The Consolidated Water fil-
ing explained that its contract
with the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration enabled it to invoice
the latter for increased diesel
costs, essentially passing on the
charge, but only if Windsor was
operating at or above specified
efficiencies.

“Our gross profit in 2008 for
our bulk segment was adversely
impacted by our Bahamas oper-
ations, due to additional diesel
costs for our Windsor plant,”
Consolidated Water said.

SEE page seven

LET’S BE CLEAR. The main responsibility for CLI-
CO (Bahamas) collapse into insolvency lies with its
Trinidadian parent, CL Financial, and that company’s
Board and management. The Bahamian company
appears to have been used as the forward operations
post for the high-risk investment strategy of CL Finan-
cial’s chairman, Lawrence Duprey, who in the past
few years embarked on what appears to have been a
grandiose dream to expand beyond the Caribbean and
become a major player on the high-end Florida real
estate scene.

That was ultimately to the detriment of the Bahami-
an policyholders and annuity investors, and was carried
out with little regard as to the consequences for the
plight in which they now find themselves. Yet the
CLICO (Bahamas) tragedy was clearly preventable,
and Tribune Business will now assess what went wrong,
the unanswered questions and what lessons must be
learnt.

REGULATION

The blunt truth: the CLICO (Bahamas) insolvency
represents a regulatory and systemic failure on many
levels. The Government ultimately had no choice but
to send the company to the wall (liquidation), given
that it was insolvent (liabilities exceeded assets by
some $9 million); it was unable to meet a $2.6 mil-
lion claim in the Turks & Caicos Islands; and the fact
that its parent was in financial difficulties, making the
$57 million guarantee holding CLICO (Bahamas) bal-

SEE page two



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



CLICO (Bahamas): The key questions and lessons

FROM page one

ance sheet together, poten-
tially worthless.

Yet events should never
have been allowed to reach
this point.

Tribune Business today
reproduces the headlines
from two previous articles
it published, one from
2007, the other from 2008,
highlighting its concerns,
and those of others, about
CLICO’s potential house
of cards resulting from the
high risk/investment asset
concentration and the par-
ent’s guarantee.

Needless to say, once CL
Financial was taken over
by the Trinidad govern-
ment, the result was a
domino effect - all the oth-
ers fell down.

This newspaper has writ-
ten extensively on the reg-
ulatory failings to date, so
will not got into them all
again.

But, to surmise, the Reg-
istrar of Insurance’s Office
had been talking to CLI-
CO (Bahamas) about its
financial situation since
2004, but failed to enforce

its strictures. The compa-
ny never complied.

THE KEY QUESTIONS:
* Why did the Registrar
of Insurance neither bar
CLICO (Bahamas) from
writing new business, nor
suspend its licence, when
the extent of its Florida
real estate investments
became known, and it
failed to comply with the
regulator’s demands?
Either action would have
got CL Financial’s atten-
tion, and forced its hand.
Instead, it smugly went
on doing what it had been
doing, safe in the knowl-
edge that the Registrar of
Insurance Office’s bark
was far worse than its bite.

* Why, between 2004-
2007, did the Registrar of
Insurance’s Office not raise
the CLICO (Bahamas)
issue with the Minister of
Finance (then-Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie) or his
deputy, James Smith, when

the huge concentration of
assets and exposure to one
investment became known?

* When was the Ingra-
ham administration and its
ministers informed about
the CLICO (Bahamas) sit-
uation?

How quickly did it react,
and what did it do?

All we know for sure on
this to date, is that on
December 22, 2008, CLI-
CO (Bahamas) was
ordered to repay all inter-
company balances by Janu-
ary 9, 2009. A host of other
conditions was imposed,
but all this was too little,
too late.

EXCHANGE CONTROL
AND REGULATORY
CO-OPERATION

From all the available
evidence, it appears that
CLICO (Bahamas) and its
affiliate, CLICO Enter-
prises, never approached
the Central Bank of the
Bahamas to obtain






















































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TRIBUNE BUSINESS OPINION

exchange control approval
for the huge amount of
assets it was investing
Overseas.

Even though they were
required to do this because
the assets were in the name
of Bahamas resident com-
panies, meaning exchange
control laws and regula-
tions were breached.

THE KEY QUESTIONS

* Did the Registrar of
Insurance’s Office ever ask
the Central Bank whether
it had given exchange con-
trol approval for the Flori-
da investments?

* What communication,
if any, took place between
the Central Bank and the
Registrar over CLICO
(Bahamas)?

REGULATORY
RECOMMENDATIONS

* The Domestic Insur-
ance Act must be passed to
give the insurance regula-
tor greater enforcement
teeth.

But this is only part of
the equation. The Regis-
trar of Insurance’s Office
must be beefed up in terms
if staffing, resources and,
most importantly, techni-
cal expertise.

The latter means ensur-
ing the regulator has the
persons with the requisite
insurance sector experi-
ence, such as in-house
actuaries, to extensively
supervise the sector.

* Bahamian regulators
must have the ability to
undertake greater consoli-
dated supervision of for-
eign branches of Bahamas
resident companies.

Most of the money
invested by CLICO
(Bahamas) in the US trav-
elled there via its Turks &
Caicos branch.

Much of CL Financial
and CLICO (Bahamas)
business appears to have
been inter-company book
transfers and related party
dealings, creating a maze
that the liquidator is now
working to unravel.

* Information sharing
between regulators must be
enhanced.

To this end, the consoli-
dation between financial
sector supervisors must be
speeded up.

This must be true consol-
idation, not just occupying
space in the same building,

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

intel)
4 Nm

OD
E |

but a merger in every sense
of the word.

* There must be greater
pan-Caribbean co-opera-
tion and information shar-
ing between the region’s
financial services regula-
tors.

The Bahamian govern-
ment must also discover
whether the Trinidad gov-
ernment will ever make
good the $57 million guar-
antee CL Financial made
to the Bahamian operation.

* CL Financial and CLI-
CO (Bahamas) Boards of
Directors and management
appear to have been one
and the same.

Tribune Business under-
stands all the key decisions
were taken in Trinidad,
with executives in the
Bahamas merely following
and implementing orders.
All the key accounting
documents and Board min-
utes are said to be in
Trinidad.

As a result, the Bahamas
must make it mandatory
for all Bahamas resident
companies to have at least
some Bahamian-based
directors, and different
Boards from that of their
parent.

LIQUIDATION

This was a drastic step,
for sure, and exposed leg-
islative deficiencies. Under
the current Insurance Act,
there is no ‘half-way’
house, where a company
can be petitioned into
receivership/administra-

tion, under a court-
appointed supervisor/man-
ager.

In Tribune Business’s
humble opinion, CLICO
(Bahamas) should have
been placed into this form
of care on the Monday
morning immediately after
its Trinidad parent was
bailed out.

That same day, this
newspaper reported on the
‘major regulatory concerns’
the Bahamian government
had with CLICO
(Bahamas), a further warn-
ing sign that was immedi-
ately interpreted by
attuned investors.

What happened in the
interim - between then and
the provisional liquidation
order on February 24, 2009
- was that those more
sophisticated CLICO
(Bahamas) policyhold-
ers/annuity depositors
cashed in and got their

money out.

Many pulled sums of a
high number out, these
tales having been recount-
ed to Tribune Business.

Of course, this leaves
other Bahamian policy-
holders and investors to
now ‘hold the bag’.

While those clients who
pulled money out probably
obtained a ‘preference’
over other creditors they
probably should not have
received, it appears there
is very little the provision-
al liquidator can do about
it now.

INVESTOR
EDUCATION

Many Bahamians, includ-
ing supposedly sophisticat-
ed ones - company pension
funds, such as the Bahama-
sair Provident Fund and
Broadcasting Corporation
of the Bahamas pension
fund, plus numerous doc-
tors, attorneys and other
professionals - appear to
have been attracted to
CLICO (Bahamas) annu-
ities because they offered
above-market rates of
return via their interest
rates.

They did not equate
reward with risk, namely
the fact that CLICO
(Bahamas) was offering
higher rates than everyone
else because it was desper-
ate to attract new money
into the business.

Shane Gibson, when min-
ister of national insurance,
told the House of Assem-
bly that he often wondered
how CLICO (Bahamas)
could offer such attractive
rates, seemingly without

question.
What this shows is the
need for Bahamian

investors to become better-
educated, and more willing
to ask questions of those
companies to whom they
entrust their long-term and
retirement savings.

As this episode has
shown, THE BEST PRO-
TECTOR FOR BAHAMI-
AN INVESTORS IS
THEMSELVES! Don’t be
frightened to ask questions
that may seem stupid.

This is your money, after
all. Get these companies to
explain themselves in plain
English.

And if you still don’t
understand, get help from
someone you trust who
does.

And if these firms don’t
respond, or provide unsat-
isfactory answers, then
look elsewhere!

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 3B



CLICO client attorneys get
extension on winding-up

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@
tribunemedia.net

ATTORNEYS represent-
ing CLICO (Bahamas) poli-
cyholders whose investments
remain in jeopardy were yes-
terday given nine days by a
Supreme Court judge to meet
with their clients, before
returning to court to advise
whether they would support
or oppose the winding-up
order.

Justice Cheryl Albury
ordered that the provisional
liquidator’s report, being pre-
pared by Baker Tilly Gomez
accountant and partner, Craig
A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, be handed
over to the court by tomor-
row. CLICO (Bahamas)
remains in provisional liqui-
dation, and has yet to be
placed into full liquidation.

Report

Damian Gomez, represent-
ing several CLICO
(Bahamas) clients, told the
court that neither he nor his
clients had seen the provi-
sional liquidator’s report, and
were not able to make an
informed decision on the
winding up order.

He also expressed concern
that the liquidator had paid
out $400,000 to First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) to prevent the
bank from repossessing three
pieces of real estate that it
held a mortgage over.

Tribune Business under-
stands that the liquidator
decided to pay-off First-
Caribbean, which had issued a
demand letter, on the basis
that the real estate involved
was likely worth more than
$400,000.

Allowing the bank to fore-

Company still in
provisional liquidation

close would have deprived
CLICO (Bahamas) policy-
holders and creditors of any
upside they might have
obtained from the liquidator
selling that real estate at a lat-
er date.

Godfrey “Pro” Pinder, who
along with attorneys Alfred
Sears and Sidney Collie, rep-
resents more than 100 policy-
holders, also petitioned for
full disclosure of the provi-
sional liquidator’s report in
order to inform his clients.

Mr Pinder added that there
may be many more policy-
holders who are not aware
that the CLICO (Bahamas)
matter was before the court,
and suggested that the hear-
ing be adjourned for more
than the previously suggest-
ed 14 days.

Mr Sears then suggested a
further seven days be allowed,
for a full 21-day period, so
that policyholders in the Fam-
ily Islands could also be given
ample time to instruct their
attorneys on how they would
like to proceed with the mat-
ter.

Attorney for the troubled

insurer, Emrick Knowles, of
Alexiou, Knowles and Co,
told the court that the only
issue relevant to the hearing
was whether or not the com-
pany should be wound-up and
if all the information cited in
the petition was true.

Contents

Justice Albury ordered that
the contents of the provision-
al liquidator’s report be kept
confidential before it is hand-
ed over, while Mr Gomez
requested that a gag order be
issued in order to constrain
those involved in the case who
might discuss the matter pub-
licly.

The Bahamas-based insur-
er was petitioned into liqui-
dation due to its insolvency
on counts that it was unable
to pay claims of $2.6 million in
the Turks and Caicos Islands,
while its liabilities were esti-
mated to exceed its assets by
at least $9 million.

Consequently, the compa-
ny underwent a provisional
winding up.

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DISTRESSED PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

March 2009

Contact Numbers 393-2004

Lot#8, Blk#18, Seabreeze Estates#3, N.P.
Single Family Residence

4 Bedroom, 3 Bathroom

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1 1758 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $256,956.00

Turn south on Sea Breeze Blvd. From Joe Farrington Road. Turn
through the first corner on the left-hand side, which is Sea Horse
Drive At the T-junction turn right and the property is the 7th property
on the left-hand side.

Lot#1090, Pinewood Gardens, N.P.
Single Family Residence

(3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,314 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $172,000.00

From Bamboo Boulevard and East Street South (by South Beach
Police Station), take the first left, Thatch Palm Avenue, then the
third right, Pasa Apple Street, and the subject property is the
twelfth on the left.

Lot #178, Colony Village Subdivision, N.P.
Split level house w /3 efficiencies
Property Size: 9,300 sq.ft

Building Size: 3,152 sq.ft

Appraised Value:TBA

Enter Colony Village from Prince Charles Drive, heading south

Colony Village Road the property is the last building on the right

iene side before Malaysia Way the corner that leads into Elizabeth
states.

Lot#51A, Albury Street & Dunmore Avenue, Chippingham,N.P
Single Family Residence

(3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 963 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $167,000.00

Travel west along Infant view Road to the Dunmore Avenue turn
left onto Dunmore Avenue, travel south on Dunmore Ave. and the
subject is on the corner of Albury Street and Dunmore Ave. The

house is painted white and trimmed maroone.

Lot#320, Eastwood Estates Subdivision, N.P
Single Family Residence

2 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,110 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $242,000.00

From Prince Charle Drive turn north into Eastwood Estates
Subdivision travel north along Tulip Blvd to the fourth corner on
the left onto Gibben Road and travel west to the third corner right
(Petrea Street) turn right onto Petrea Street and the subject is the
fifth property on the right or the fourth house. House#33 painted
white trimmed white.

Parcel of Land William Grant
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms
Property Size: 12,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 2,756 sq.ft
Appraised Value: TBA

From the intersection of Blue Hill and Carmichael Road travel
south along Blue Hill Road and turn left on corner immediately
opposite St. Vincent Road continue and turn on second paved
street on left and continue around curve to first corner on the left
and the subject property is the second on left.

Lot#2527, Sir Lynden Pindling Estates Subdivision
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size;5,040 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,136 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $172,000.00

Travel west on Charles W. Saunders Highway pass Sadie Curtis
Primary turn left after the school and then an immediate left onto
a dirt road travel west on this road to the T-junction and the subject
is immediately opposite the T-junction. The subject is painted tan
and trimmed tan.

Lot#52, East Park Estates, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
cronetty Size: 5,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 1308 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $14 95,000.00

From Prince Charles Drive and College Gardens Drive travel
south on College gardens Drive, turn left at the T-junction, Pine
barren Road take the first right into East Park Estates, turn right

Lot#14, Skull District, Eleuthera, N.P.
Vacant Land

Property Size:10,000 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $30,500.00

Directions: Eleuthera
Lot#5, Section#2, Gamble Heights, N.P.
Vacant Land

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft
Appraised Value:$45,000.00

From Blue Hill road & the Golden Gates Shopping Centre travel

HOUSES



VACANT LAND



at the T-junction Comfort Lane, bear left on to Maria Ave take the
second left Morning Street then the first right Tea Court and the
subject propert is the second on the left.

Lot 3A, Malcolm Allotment, N.P
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,446 sq.ft
Building Size: 1 079 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $161,100.00

From East Street South travel east along Malcolm Road east to
Winder Terrace turn right and conntinue to Deliverance Way and
turn left continue to Voice of Deliverance Temple and turn left on
unpaved road immediately thereafter and the subject property is
the third on the right. The house is painted green.

Lot#690, Pinewood Gardens, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3-Bedrooms, 2-Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,000 - ft

Building Size: 894 sq.

Appraised Value: si, 000.00 / O.N.O.

Travel east on Charles W. Saunders Highway, turn right onto
Buttonwood (Cleveland Eneas primary School comer), travel North
to the sixth corner on left (Saffron Street}, and the subject property
is the third house on left.



























































Lot#1007 Pinewood Gardens
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 1 ,400 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $1 45,000.00

From the T-junction of Pinewood Drive and Buttonwood Avenue,
travel north on Buttonwood Avenue take the 4th corner on the left
Croton Street the property is the 3rd on left.

Lot#544, oP et Ridge Freeport Grand Bahama
Single Family Residence

4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms

Property Size: 21 ,250 sq.ft

Building Size: 3,164 i

Appraised Value: TB

Directions Not Available

Lot# 1266, Pinewood Gardens, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,035 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $112,000.00

Turn north onto Willow Tree Ave. from Pinewood Drive. Travelling
north on Willow Tree Ave. turn through the 3rd corner on the left
hand side which is Sugar Apple Street and the property is the 8th
lot on the left hand side.

Lot#21, Blk#5, Seabeach Estates, N.P.

Single Family Residence

2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms - House

Two Town Houses - 2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 7,349 sq.ft

Building: 3,740 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $368,019.00

From Sun Resort & West Bay Street, travel east on West second
right Seabeach Boulevard and the subject property is the third lot
on the right.

Lot#1267, Pinewood Gardens
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 1 ,000 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $1 08,000.00

Travel west on Pinewood Drive tum on to Willow Tree Drive which
is the 1st corner on the right side after the Pinewood round about
heading north on Willow Tree Drive take the 3rd corner on the left
side which is Sugar Apple Street and the property is the 7th lot
on the left side the building is yellow trim white.

Lot# 16, Blk # 13 Sea Breeze Estate, NP
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 9,688 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,369 sq.ft

Appraised Value: TBA

Traveling south from the red light intersection at Prince Charles

Drive onto Beatrice Avenue -turn left on first red light (Savanna

Avenue). Then right on Bay Lilly Drive- continuing to 4th corner

on left. The subject property is on the south-west corner and the
building is painted yellow.

south on Blue Hill Road take the second left, faith United Way,
travel for seventy-five feet then there is no road reservation on
the right and the subject property is the third on the right.

Lot# 18 Blk#2 Sea Breeze Estates, NP

Vacant Land

Property Size:8,562 sq.ft

Appraised Value:$105,000.00

From Prince Charles Drive & Beatrice avenue, travel south on
Beatrice Avenue, take the fourth right, Bay Cedar Avenue, then
the fourth left, an Plum Grove, and the subject property is
the second on the left.

APARTMENTS/CONDOMINIUMS

Lot#157, Knotts Boulevard & Zachary Lane Sec.#2, F.P.
Duplex Apartment

Each Unit - 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 19,921 sq.ft

Building Size: 4,320 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $230,000.00 / 0.N.O.

Bahamia Terrace Freeport Grand Bahama

Lot#4, Blk#27 Manton Lane Freeport Grand Bahama
Incomplete Triplex Apartment

2 - (3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms

1 - (1) Bedroom, (1) Bathroom

Property Size:12,196 a

Building Size: 5, 200 s

Appraised Value: $138; 000.00

Freeport Grand Bahama

Lot#18, Evansville Sub., N.P.
Duplex

2-Bedrooms, 1- Bathrooms Each
Property Size: 7,328 sq.ft
Building Size: 1723 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $199,000.00

From Spikenard Rd. travel west along Carmicheal Rd. on the left.
- property is the second on the left. It is painted rust trim with
white.

Lot of Land situate noth of Step Street
Unfinished Triplex Apartment (35% completed)
Each unit 1 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 12, 020 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $150,000.00

From Fox Hill Road turn onto Step Street, travel west on Step
Street and the subject is between Rahming Street and Cockburn
street which is the first right after Rahming Street at the entrance
to an unpaved road access and presently under construction.

Lot#2, Misty Gardens Subdivision, N.P.
Two Storey Townhouse

4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,000sq. ft

Building Size: 2,736 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $234, 000.00/ O.N.O.

The subject property is located 1 mile west of Blue Hill Road on

the southern side of Marshall Road approximately 200 yards north
of the southern shoreline directly opposite lamp pole #65/50.

®Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada










We providing financing to qualified buyers

CONTACT INFORMATION
RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre

â„¢The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada

Lot#25, Section "C", Garden Hills, N.P.
Triplex Apartment

1-2 Bedrooms, 1-Bathroom

2- 1 Bedroom, 1- Bathroom

Property Size: 7,500 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,846 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $490,000.00 O.N.O.

From Global Tiles on East Street South, drive through the side
entrance and directly behind this structure and the subject property
is the split level structure immediately behind it.

Lot#209, Sunshine Park, N.P.
Four Plex Apartment

Property Size: 4,944 sq.ft
Building Size: 2, 200 sq.ft
Appraised Value; $205,000.00

Heading south on Blue Hill Road take the 1st entrance into
Sunshine Park take the 1st corner on left (Murray Street) the
property is the 5th building on left hand side of the street. The
building is blue trim with white.

Lot: Approximately 5,589 sq. ft North of Johnson Road
Duplex Apartment

2-2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom Each

oy Size: 5,589 sq. ft

Building Size: 2, 100 sq. ft

Appraised Value: $288,000.00

Travelling East on Bernard Road, turn north Adderley Street
(Opposite St. Augustine's College), continue north on Adderley
Street ep Step Street (which is on the curve) and make the first
turn right onto Johnson Terrace. Turn onto an unpaved road on
the right (which is the first corner on the right) At the T-junction
turn right (heading south) enter gates of privately owned is a
duplex residence colored gray with white trim.










Lot located Ferguson Street, Bain Town, N.P.
Triplex (2 live-in units and shop}
1-Bedroom, 1 Bathroom Each Unit
ener Size:5,249 sq.ft

Building Size:2, 294 sq.ft

Appraised Value: TBA



Travel west on Poinciana Drive, turn right on to Augusta Street.
Turn though second corner on the right (Ferguson Street). As you
turn on to Ferguson Street, the subject property is located on the
right side of the street.

















PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE










































i
oY mS

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

PROCUREMENT FOR SCHOOL
FURNITURE FOR NEW SCHOOLS &
REPLACEMENTS 2009-2010

The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’’) now invites
sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement of School Furniture
for New Schools and Replacements.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from the
Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education, Headquarters,
Thompson Blvd. from Wednesday 18 th March, 2009, and obtain further
information, at the second address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
bided on (“School Furniture-New Schools & Replacements”).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address,
or before Monday, 6 th April, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not
be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday 7 th April, 2009 at the first address below.

(1) The Chairman Tender
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education

P.O. Box N-3913/4

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tele: (242) 502-8571

The Ministry reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders

ee
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

OPERATIONS MANAGER

The Operations Manager will be responsible for the development, harmonization
and implementation of revised operational policies and procedures throughout
our branch and unit network. The ideal candidate will have strong leadership
and communication skills and bring focus to the operational needs of all
branches by providing support to customer service initiatives, regulatory
reporting and compliance, review of branch administrative controls, as well
as the development of collective operational goals for branch administrative
personnel.

Core Responsibilities:

Contributes to the revision and implementation of the Bank’s policies and
procedures

Reviewing and making recommendations for the improvement in
Management Reporting

Identifying areas of opportunity for improvement of operating efficiency
Prepares and submits Reports on all banking operations to Senior
Management

Monitor Branch performances against approved targets

Monitors compliance of operations with Bank’s policies and procedures,
as well as recommendations made by internal audit and external parties
Ensures Bank is operating in accordance with regulatory requirements
Liaising with departmental heads to maintain database of recommendations
and request of operational changes

Assist in establishing operational objectives and monitoring the achievement
of the objectives

Reviewing operations job descriptions and functions in accordance with
ongoing operational changes.

Job Requirements:

¢ Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.
Knowledge of Banking laws, including requirements of The Central Bank
of The Bahamas which governs Commercial Banking.
Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced environment
Strong supervisory and customer service skills are essential.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include:

Competitive salary and benefits package, commensurate with work experience
and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later than March 31st,
2009 to:

DA # 69842
c/oThe Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com



Safra
executive
passes
Series 7

AN OPERATIONS administrator
at Safra International Bank & Trust,
Vincent G. Bowe, has passed the
Series 7 Exam in the US after study-
ing at the Securities Training Institute
(STD.

Ms Albury, STT’s course adminis-
trator, said: “We are committed to
the development of the Bahamian
capital markets by establishing pro-
grammes for continuing professional
education, and by enhancing the skills
of financial professionals.”

Mr Bowe is pictured.

BIC to ‘reposition
Blackberry’ device

FROM page one

enables clients to download
music and pictures, and send
and receive e-mails, from their
cell phones.

Mr Johnson said this was
designed to provide customers
of BTC’s cellular phone plat-
form with “full utility, allowing
them to make full use of their
phones and get utility”.

Meanwhile, BTC was also
looking to “put more empha-
sis on old school products”
such as its Yellow Pages, plac-
ing it on-line and using this as
a mechanism to reach cus-
tomers and attract more
advertising.

“We're looking to see how
we can use Voice over Inter-
net Protocol (VoIP) products

to increase our market share,
the Vibe,” Mr Johnson added,
explaining that this would be
done within the parameters of
the existing telecommunica-
tions legislation.

“The overriding focus is
making sure all platforms that
serve the customer deliver,”
the BTC executive said. “The
priority is our customer ser-
vice, and that people are com-
fortable with the level of ser-
vice.”

BTC was currently replac-
ing its entire core network
structure with the upgraded
IP infrastructure, a pro-
gramme that will “be done in
phases over several years. It
will take just over two years
and that build-Out’s ongoing
now”.

While emphasising that

VACANCY NOTICE

BTC had received no permits
or approvals to do so, Mr
Johnson said the company was
examining, given that its new
network infrastructure would
allow it to deploy IP TV,
whether a business case and
model could be made for it
eventually entering the TV
market.

“We'll see if a business case
supports us getting into a new
marketplace,” Mr Johnson
added.

He also disclosed that sev-
eral towers had still to be con-
structed on the Family Islands
as part of BTC’s GSM net-
work upgrade.

The company was still in the
“optimisation stage”, testing
and analysing the results of
the §4-$43 million system
upgrade.

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER EXECUTIVE

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Chief Financial Officer.

The job oversees all financial matters of BEC, inclusive of the activities of the Customer Services

Division.

The objectives of this function include, but are not limited to the following:

Financial Management, Accounting & Treasury

Ensure and structure the Corporation’s financial policies, practices and internal controls so that
they are in accordance with the law, generally accepted accounting principles, contractual
commitments, the Corporation’s structure and protect the corporations assets;

Manage BEC’s cash resources to ensure that funds are available to meet the ongoing and future
needs of BEC while minimizing the cost of capital;
Ensure the timely preparation of all financial reports. These include complete financial statements
for presentation to the Board, preparation of budget reports for assisting management decision
making, and development of a yearly projected budget in consultation with other Division heads;
Ensure that the divisions maintain a high standard of efficiency, control, and application of
sound accounting practices and principles along with the adequate trained qualified staff to
achieve these objectives;

* Coordinate to ensure that the workflow within the division and cross functionality with all
departments dependent upon the services of the division, are efficient and effective;

* Coordinate the annual budgeting process and present the completed budget for approval;

* Manage external relationships with local and international sources of funds;

* Ensure proper and cost effective insurance of BEC’s assets;

* Conduct Financial Analysis for the Corporation as requested;

Customer Services

Ensure the accurate and timely meter reading and billing of all customer accounts in New
Providence and the billing of other Family Island Accounts.

Ensure proper management of the revenue and collection recovery activities by effective
management of the Corporation’s Accounts Receivable.

Ensure proper management of the business office services of cashiering and new services, queries
for customers, banking and accounting reconciliation, etc.

Ensure that non-technical losses are kept to a minimum.

Job requirements include:

* A minimum ofa Bachelors Degree in Accounting/Finance with professional qualifications (e.g.,
ACCA, CPA) an MBA would be desired.
A minimum of 15+ years of experience in financial accounting, at senior management level.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Excellent analytical and organizational skills
Good customer relations skills
Good time management skills
Strong leadership skills
Knowledge of finance, accounting, budgeting and cost control principles including General
Accepted Accounting Principles.
Knowledge of automated financial and accounting reporting systems
Ability to analyze financial data and prepare financial reports, statements, and projections
Extensive knowledge of project management and the ability to oversee a range of projects
simultaneously
Strong human relations skills
Knowledge of industrial relations
Negotiation skills and techniques

Interested persons should apply by submitting a resume addressed to: The AGM-Human Resources
& Training, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau
Bahamas on or before: Wednesday, March 25, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 5B



Koyo Erm Ir LON

needs new jobs strategy
















@ WASHINGTON
Associated Press

FORMER Washington
Gov. Gary Locke told sena-
tors considering his nomina-
tion for commerce secretary
Wednesday that the nation
must “rebuild, retool and
reinvent” as it seeks new
strategies for job creation
amid the economic crisis.

“Together we will come up
with innovative solutions to
create jobs that are made in
America and stay in Ameri-
ca,” Locke said.

President Barack Obama’s
third pick to run the Com-
merce Department — his
first two nominees withdrew
— also promised to closely
oversee the 2010 census and
run the enumeration from
the department’s Census
Bureau. Some GOP law-
makers have been critical of
Obama administration com-
ments indicating that the
White House might seek
greater control over the cen-
sus. If confirmed by the Sen-
ate, Locke would lead an
agency with a broad portfolio
that includes many aspects of
international trade, oceans
policy, the transition to digital
television and expanding rur-
al broadband Internet ser-
vice.

“My goal is simple: to car-
ry out the president’s plan for
economic recovery by putting
every part of the Department
of Commerce single-mind-
edly to work on saving
American jobs and creating
family-wage jobs of the
future,” Locke said. “We
must rebuild, retool and rein-
vent our national strategies
for sustained economic suc-

cess.”

Obama turned to the for-
mer two-term Democratic
governor after New Mexico
Gov. Bill Richardson with-
drew amid questions about
the awarding of state con-
tracts and Republican Sen.
Judd Gregg of New Hamp-
shire changed his mind about
working for the Democratic
president.

Locke, 59, told the Senate
Commerce Committee he
would work with a Census
director who would work
with Congress, the adminis-
tration and state leaders “to
make sure you and they are
involved every step of the
way in making this a success-
ful count.”

Committee Chairman Jay
Rockefeller, D-W.Va., said
Locke will face many chal-
lenges but told him, “I think
you understand Main Street.”

Locke faced mostly friend-
ly questions and praise from
the Democratic-led panel,
but several Republicans
reminded him they were
watching the census process
closely.

“My hope is that it is trans-
parent and nonpoliticized,”
said Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchi-
son of Texas, the panel’s
ranking Republican.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-
Wash., recalled that she first
met Locke nearly 20 years
ago when she was a new state
senator and he was chairman
of the state’s House Appro-
priations Committee. Locke
grilled her about a school bus
safety bill — Murray called
it one of the toughest experi-
ences of her career — but
then helped her pass it, she
said.

Restaurant closure set
to hit West Bay Street

FROM page one

the restaurant will mean a hit for the El
Greco, which is presently 90 per cent
occupied. But he said it would be put
back up for rent as soon as it was cleaned
out.

“Yes, it will hurt the hotel to have no
restaurant attached to it, but we will find
someone more astute in the restaurant
business,” he said.

The Fergusons claimed that the hotel
owners began reneging on the terms of
the lease agreement after their restau-
rant, Johnny Canoe, was forced to close

Legal Notice

due to the Baha Mar project. They
believe now that the Pikramenos’s will
try to reestablish Johnny Canoe in the
now vacant space.

However, Mr Pikramenos said those
claims were false. He told Tribune Busi-
ness that all of the claims made against
him and the other owners were com-
pletely unfounded, and called the closing
a “preemptive strike” against them. “I
found out from the media that they were
closing,” he added.

Mr Pikramenos claimed that the Fer-
gusons were often late paying their rent,
and had now left the El Greco with an
outstanding electricity bill.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)

ASHFORD LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act (No. 45 of 2000). ASHFORD LIMITED is in

Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 19th

day of January, 2009.

Cl Accountancy Limited,

of Boatside Business Centre,
Warden, Northumberland,
NE46 4SH.

Liquidator

Help Fill Up Someone Else’s Cup...

» During the month of March, come to any QVS Pharmacy
(Village Road or Seagrapes Shopping Centre) and for
every bottle of Dasani water you buy, partial proceeds

QVS Pharmacy & |))\)\]
Help Us Help The Bahamas.

We would lke to nly our valued customers that
Mr. Cleveland Saunders

$ no longer employed with Bahamas Business Solutions
Limited and therelore not aufnonsed fo sel or service Xerox
Products.

Bahamas Busnes Solutions Lined is the only company
ioe Xerox Products in the Bahamas

rari

ies provided by this

individual.

Xe(OX ®,

will be donated to The Bahamas Red Cross.

On March 22nd, World Water Day, full proceeds from
your water purchases go to the charity.

Village Rd. Shopping Centre
393-2393 or 393-4293

He said the restaurant was simply a
victim of the economy.

“Bottom line is they are victims of a
bad economy,” he said.

“They have always been late on their
rent, and we have had to send out letters
to Brave Davis every month to collect
our rent.”

But Mr Ferguson denied this, and said
the restaurant had been doing well since
its opening and was experiencing a good
year-beginning, with the Spring Break
season promising strong business.

Now, they are looking for a new
space to reopen with their “dedicated”
staff.

KINGSWAY ACADEMY
ELEMENTARY

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Kingsway

Academy will be

holding Entrance Examinations
for students wishing to enter grades

Ze || 2,3.and6on MONDAY, APRIL6,
2009. Parents are asked to collect
Application Forms

from the

Elementary School office before
the testing date from 8:30a.m. to

4:00p.m.

For further information contact
the school at telephone numbers

Seagrapes Shopping Centre
364-5978 or 364-5979

e: info@qvsbahamas.com

324-5049, 324-2158, or 324-6269

Eaew

Saturday, April 18th 2009

REGISTER NOW!

Registort by April13" @ 3:30 p.m.*3 5.00

On fe oa

Leet Mla eres

Acdinees

Te eo ane

Date of Birth

Small

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Emergency Goniact: Neme

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ROUTE: Starting at Tropical Shipping, head east on East Bay St; overthe west bridge
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Ware | cece anc warned thal een phryeace byt
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Sod el cay and/or corporate a pecies whose onopety of DeTeo oe ane ued and 88 other msporsori
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he agects of Trapetal Srippeng
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Ber end toe per ticiped Ss pemoo! reprmesenigived, assign
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penis death in respect of thas Fun Alunifaiic.
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Sauer Parect es @geatucee (ff urces 18 peer oe)





PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





















































COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Request for Tender for Security Te at
The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute campuses
at Old Trail Road, and Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas

The Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute (B.T.V.I.) now
invites sealed bids for the provision of Security Services at The Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Institute campuses at Old Trail Road, and Wulff
Road Nassau, Bahamas.

The Contract is for a period of twelve (12) months in the first
instance and interested security firms are invited to submit Tenders
with comprehensive details of their proposal for security operations for
a twenty-four period starting at 6:00 a.m. daily (including weekends
and holidays). The Contract will be awarded to the applicant providing
the most economical and acceptable Tender for the full duration of the
contract period.

Interested Bidders may inspect campuses between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Collection of the
specification and bidding documents can be obtained from the Reception
Desk at B.T.V.I., Old Trail Road between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:00
p.m., Monday through Friday beginning Monday, 16" March, 2009 and
obtain further information at the second address given below.

Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “Tender for
Security, Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute” and delivered
to the attention of:-

The Chairman of the Tenders’ Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach

P. O. Box N-3017

Nassau, Bahamas

The Manager

Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute
Old Trail Road

P. O. Box N-4934

Nassau, Bahamas

Bids must be received by 4:00 p.m. on Friday, 3% April, 2009
accompanied by an endorsed copy of a current Business Licence.

Persons who submit Tenders are invited to a public opening of bids at
the Ministry of Finance, in the Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building, Cable
Beach on Tuesday, 14" April, 2009.

B.T.V.I. reserves the right to reject any or all Bids.

eee
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

BRANCH MANAGER

The Branch Manager will be responsible for the day to day achievement of
the branch’s sales and service goals. The ideal candidate will have strong
leadership and communication skills and bring focus to the execution of the
branch business plan, inclusive of sales administration and the overall
development of branch staff.

Core Responsibilities:

Responsible for the quality and efficiency of all branch customer service
initiatives for all credit and deposit products and services

Assists in the development of Branch targets for retail sales and operations
Provides leadership in the attainment of all branch sales and service goals,
Ensure that the Branch is operating in accordance with the Bank’s policies
and procedures and all regulatory requirements including but not limited
to Central Bank and AML.

Serves as lead customer service advocate at the branch level

Provides guidance to staff, where necessary on all service matters, ensuring
that customer needs are heard, understood and resolved

Ensuring staff’s awareness and use of bank product information
Responsible for all branch sales initiatives, inclusive of management of
the branch loan and deposit portfolio and mitigating Bank exposure
Responsible for reporting to Senior Management on the overall operations
of the Branch including financial and non-financial matters;

Provides leadership in the personal development of all branch staff through
the articulation and achievement of the Bank’s goals and objectives
Identifies skill deficiencies and opportunities for training for all Branch
staff

Job Requirements:

Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.

Knowledge of Banking laws, including requirements of The Central Bank
of The Bahamas which governs Commercial Banking.

Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced
environment

Strong supervisory and customer service skills are essential.

Excellent verbal and written communication skills.

Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include:

Competitive salary and benefits package commensurate with work experience
and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later than March 31*,
2009 to:

DA# 69842A
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com

Bahamas urged to
mandate corporate
pension trustees

FROM page one

of assets. I think it’s something
that should be given priority,”
Mr Gilbert said. “It doesn’t
matter what happens to the
pension administrator. If the
pension administrator goes
into liquidation, it does not
matter, because the assets are
segregated in a trust and not
tied up in the liquidation.”

Corporate trustees, he
explained, effectively “police
the overall relationship, mak-
ing sure the pension plan is
operated prudently and
according to the plan’s rules.
The trustee can also give
directions to the plan admin-
istrator and the pension man-
ager.”

Governance of Bahamas-
based pension plans has been
thrust into the spotlight fol-
lowing the collapse of CLICO
(Bahamas) into insolvency.
The Broadcasting Corpora-
tion of the Bahamas’ employ-
ee pension plan has come
under scrutiny after the Cor-
poration’s former chairman,
Calsey Johnson, a former
CLICO employee, admitted
receiving a commission from

the insurer in return for intro-
ducing the plan trustees to an
investment in one of the com-
pany’s annuities.

Mr Johnson denied that was
a conflict of interest, and the
pension fund invested
$800,000 that is now tied up
in the CLICO (Bahamas) liq-
uidation. Its trustees consisted
of three ZNS and three union
representatives.

Arguing against the
appointment of individual
trustees to watch over a pen-
sion plan’s operations and
assets, Mr Gilbert said: “By
having a corporate trustee,
you have the deep pockets. If
there’s a problem, such as mis-
management of the pension
assets, at least you have the
corporate trustee to assume
the fiduciary responsibility.

“If there are individual
trustees, you have to rely on
those trustees having assets
equal to that potential expo-
sure.”

Mr Gilbert said that when
he came to the Bahamas in
1997 to set up Atlantic Med-
ical’s pension administration
business, the company’s stan-
dard policy was to provide a

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corporate trustee - separate
from itself - to watch over all
company and individual plans
that it administered.

He added that other
Bahamian pension adminis-
trators offered a corporate
trustee as a service, and point-
ed out that CFAL used a cor-
porate trustee for its Blue
Marlin pension plan.

Mr Gilbert, a partner in
Chandler Gilbert Insurance
Associates, said that when he
was at Atlantic Medical, the
company operated as if pen-
sions legislation had already
been implemented in the
Bahamas, ensuring the com-
pany was in-step with its
Bermuda and Cayman affili-
ates.

“When you look at what
Bermuda and Cayman have
done, both have pensions leg-
islation, and in that legislation
a corporate trustee is an
absolute necessity. It’s legis-
lated that there has to be a
corporate trustee,” he said.

“Pension assets are always
held in trust for the beneficia-
ries, who are the participants
in the pension plan. In every
jurisdiction with pension leg-
islation, there is a corporate
trustee. It’s for the protection
of pension plan participants.”

Mr Gilbert praised the
make-up of the Government-
appointed pension reform
committee, and said he hoped
they would review similar leg-
islation in Bermuda and Cay-
man.

“Those jurisdictions are
very similar to the Bahamas,
and I believe they will recom-
mend that there be a corpo-
rate trustee,” Mr Gilbert said.

Pracevanesoust(ZOPERS

MANAGER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

One of our major clients seeks to recruit a qualified information technology professional
with experience in financial and customer service applications for the above position.

QUALIFICATIONS:

* Masters of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

* Eight or more years experience including hands-on technical experience and
two years minimum managing an information technology department in a large
organization with a complex, multi-vendor, multi-platform and distributed
computing environment
Visionary who can analyze problems within the context of corporate strategy,
balancing the consideration of facts, priorities, resources, constraints and

alternatives

RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Lead, monitor and develop a team of information technology professionals to
deliver customer focused service and set performance expectations to achieve

excellence

Manage the development, implementation and day-to-day operations of the
Information Technology department
Actively contribute to the tactical and strategic development of information
technology to support the organization’s business needs

Accountable for the successful delivery to agreed time scales and within budget of
departmental projects or programmes
Assist accounting and engineering departments in ensuring accurate and timely
preparation of reports

REQUIREMENTS:

This is a senior position that will require a professional with very extensive
experience in supervising and controlling computer professionals in financial,
customer services and engineering applications.
Strong management and communications skills
Strong technical and troubleshooting skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure
Solid understanding of business operations and strategic planning

COMPENSATION:

Attractive salary and other benefits will be commensurate with training and experience.

Written applications should be addressed to:

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: IT MANAGER 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Private & Confidential



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 7B



a | > =~
BISX firm’s Nassau plant

penalties drop74.8% in 2008

FROM page one

“In early 2006, we reconfig-
ured the Windsor plant in order
to mitigate membrane fouling.
However, this reconfiguration
resulted in a decrease in the fuel
efficiency of the Windsor plant
to a level below that required
under our contract with the
Water & Sewerage Corporation,
and as a result, we could not
charge a portion of the Windsor
plant’s diesel costs to the Water
& Sewerage Corporation.

“The impact of this inefficien-
cy was exacerbated by a 70.2 per
cent rise in diesel fuel prices over
the first nine months of 2008 as
compared to same period of
2007. Consequently, our diesel
costs for the Windsor plant for
the nine months ended Septem-
ber 30, 2008. exceeded the
amount that could be billed to
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration by approximately
$638,000.”

In a conference call with Wall
Street analysts, Rick McTaggart,
Consolidated Water’s chief exec-
utive, said the Windsor plant had
generated improved efficiencies
in the 2008 fourth quarter after it
“completely replaced the feed
wells” at the end of the previ-
ous three-month period.

Mr McTaggart added that
Consolidated Water had hired
more “skilled staff” to man the
Windsor facility, adding that he
hoped it would “pay off in
improved operating costs and
operating margins”.

The Consolidated Water fil-
ing with the SEC added: “We
constructed and commissioned
new feed water wells [at Wind-
sor], and replaced the reverse
osmosis membranes on two of
four of our production trains,
effective September 2008.

“These improvements have
allowed us to reverse the plant
reconfiguration, and the results
for the fourth quarter of 2008
indicate that the Windsor plant’s
fuel efficiency has improved.
However, the gross profit for our
Bahamas operations may con-
tinue to be adversely affected by
its diesel costs if these improve-
ments do not maintain the effi-
ciency of the plant at the mini-
mum required by contract.”

While its Bahamas operations
helped drive the overall 21 per
cent growth in Consolidated
Water’s revenues during the 12
months to December 31, 2008,
the Windsor plant’s efficiency
problems helped drive margins
for its bulk segment down to 15

per cent from 17 per cent.

Together with the 7.2 million
gallon per day Blue Hills plant,
the Windsor plant gives Consol-
idated Water the ability to sup-
ply the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration with 9.8 million total
gallons per day.

The company said that in
2008, it supplied the Water &
Sewerage Corporation with
about three billion gallons of
potable water, compared to the
3.2 billion that were supplied in
2007.

Consolidated Water’s third
Bahamas-based plant, located in
Bimini, has the ability to supply
the Bimini Sands Resort and
Bimini Beach Hotel with 115,000
gallons of water per day. In total,
it supplied six million gallons to
the two properties in 2007, com-
pared to four million gallons the
previous year.

“We have also sold water
intermittently to the Water &
Sewerage Corporation from our
Bimini plant when their regular
supply was unavailable. During
2008, we supplied the Water &
Sewerage Corporation with
2.5 million US gallons of water
from our Bimini plant,” Consol-
idated Water said in its SEC fil-
ing.

Meanwhile, despite the liq-
uidity problems its Bahamas
subsidiary was experiencing due
to the continuing build-up of
accounts receivables owed to it
for water supplied to the Water
& Sewerage Corporation, the
BISX-listed company said these
amounts were still fully collec-
table. It had thus made no pro-
vision for these amounts, even
though its own payables were
being impacted by the lack of
cash flow.

The sums owed to Consoli-
dated Water by the Water &
Sewerage Corporation had
increased by $2.9 million during
the 12 months to December 31,
2008, rising from $5.3 million at
the previous year-end to $8.2
million. That sum had declined
slightly during the first two
months of 2009 to $8 million as
at February 28, 2009.

Consolidated Water said in its
10-K filing: “As of December 31,
2007, CW-Bahamas was due
approximately $5.3 million from
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration. During the year ended
December 31, 2008, amounts

Master Technici

APPLIANCES & ELECTRONICS

invoiced by CW-Bahamas to
Water & Sewerage Corporation
for water supplied exceeded
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion’s payments to CW-
Bahamas, and as of Decem-
ber 31, 2008, CW-Bahamas
accounts receivables from Water
& Sewerage Corporation totaled
approximately $8.2 million.

“We have met with represen-
tatives of the Bahamas govern-
ment to inquire as to the rea-
sons for the increase in the
receivables balance since
December 31, 2007. We have
been informed by these govern-
ment representatives that the
delay in paying our accounts
receivables is due to operating
issues within the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation, that the
delay does not reflect any type of
dispute with us with respect to
the amounts owed, and that the
amounts will ultimately be paid
in full. Based upon these com-
munications, we believe that the
accounts receivable from the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
are fully collectible and there-
fore have not provided any
allowance for possible non-pay-
ment of these receivables as of
December 31, 2008.”

But Consolidated Water
added: “CW-Bahamas derived
substantially all of its revenues
from its contract with the Water
& Sewerage Corporation, and is
dependent upon timely collec-
tion of its accounts receivable to
fund its operations.

“On July 31, 2008, CW-
Bahamas issued Water & Sew-
erage Corporation a written
notice of Water & Sewerage
Corporation’s default under the
payment terms of its contract
with CW-Bahamas. During the
year ended December 31, 2008,
CW-Bahamas experienced lig-
uidity issues that required it at
times to extend the payment
dates of its accounts payable.

“If the Water & Sewerage
Corporation does not improve
the timeliness and/or increase
the amounts of its payments to
CW-Bahamas, this subsidiary
may not have sufficient liquidity
to fund its operations. If this
occurs, CW-Bahamas may be
required to cease the production
of water.”

The root core of the problem
is the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration’s financial difficulties.

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ernment increased the Corpo-
ration’s subsidy from $19 mil-
lion to $11 million - a grand total
of $30 million - the majority of
which will go on paying down
the receivables built up with
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The Corporation is now
receiving an estimated 15 per
cent of the Government’s entire
capital spending budget and
heavy taxpayer subsidies, despite
the fact that only 30 per cent of
Bahamians use its services.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 9B

a
Kelloge’s CEO calls for
major food safety reforms

B WASHINGTON
Associated Press

TONY THE TIGER’S boss
says a food safety overhaul
would be Gr-r-reat!

The Kellogg Co.’s top official
is urging lawmakers to revamp
the nation’s food safety system.
The world’s biggest cereal mak-
er — its brands include Frosted
Flakes — lost $70 million in the
recent salmonella outbreak,
after recalling 7 million cases of
peanut butter crackers and
cookies.

CEO David Mackay will tell
Congress on Thursday that the
company wants food safety
placed under a new leader in
the Health and Human Services
department. He also calls for
new requirements that all food
companies have written safety
plans, annual federal inspections
of facilities that make high-risk
foods and other reforms.

Mackay’s strong endorsement
of major changes could boost
President Barack Obama’s
efforts to overhaul the system.
Last week Obama launched a
special review of food safety
programs, which are split
among several departments and

agencies, and rely in some cases
on decades-old laws. Critics say
more funding is needed for
inspections and basic research.
“The recent outbreak illus-
trated that the U.S. food safety
system must be strengthened,”
Mackay said in prepared
remarks for a hearing Thurs-
day. “We believe the key is to
focus on prevention, so that
potential sources of contamina-
tion are identified and properly
addressed before they become
actual food safety problems.”

Statement

A copy of his statement for
the House Energy and Com-
merce Committee was obtained
in advance by The Associated
Press.

The salmonella outbreak has
sickened at least 691 people and
is blamed for nine deaths. The
source was a small Georgia
peanut processing plant, which
allegedly shipped products that
managers knew were contami-
nated with salmonella.

The plant produced not only
peanut butter, but peanut paste,
an ingredient in foods from gra-

NOTICE
OF
CLOSING

In recognition of the funeral of
Mr. David A. C. Kelly, C.B.E.
Betty K. Agencies Limited
Will Close at 1:00p.m.

NT
Thursday, 19th March, 2009

nola bars and dog biscuits, to
ice cream and cake. More than
3,490 products have been
recalled, including some Kel-
logg’s Austin and Keebler
peanut butter sandwich crack-
ers. The Georgia plant has been
shut down and its owner,
Peanut Corp. of America, is
under criminal investigation by
the Justice Department.

Mackay said Kellogg’s had to
recall more than 7 million cases
of crackers and cookies, at a
cost of $65 million to $70 mil-
lion. Kellogg’s began purchasing
peanut paste from Peanut Corp.
in July, 2007, after the supplier
passed Kellogg’s quality checks.

“Audit findings reported no
concerns that the facility may
have had any pathogen-related
issues or any potential contam-
ination,” Mackay said in his
statement. “None of the salmo-
nella or hygiene issues that have
been reported by regulators
over the past several months
were noted in any of the audit
reports provided to Kellogg.”

FDA inspectors swooped
down on the Georgia plant in
January and found multiple san-
itary violations. The problems
included moisture leaks,
improper storage and openings
that could allow rodents into
the facility. FDA tests found
salmonella contamination with-
in the plant. After invoking
bioterrorism laws, the FDA
obtained Peanut Corp. records
that showed the company’s own
tests repeatedly found salmo-
nella in finished products.

How persistent problems at
the Georgia plant managed to
escape the attention of state
inspectors and independent pri-
vate auditors is one of the main
unanswered questions in the
investigation.

Mackay’s call for a food safe-
ty “authority” within HHS
appears similar to legislation
from Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-
Conn. Her plan would take
food safety away from FDA
and give it to a new agency
within the department. The
FDA is responsible for most
foods, while the Agriculture
Department inspects meat and
poultry. DeLauro’s plan would
not affect the USDA.

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

THIS MONTHS TOPIC: Ethics & Critical Care

SPEAKER:
Dr. N'tari Darville

Internal Medicine

LECTURE DATE
Thursday, March 19th ‘09 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP « Seating is Limited * 302-4603

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Ethics & Critical Care
Dr. N*tari Darville

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RSVP:
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Phone: 302-4603

Total Joint Replacement
Dr. Dane Bowe

Urinary Incontinence
Dr. Robin Roberts

Wre®| DOCTORS HOSPITAL





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009



THE TRIBUNE



US consumer prices up 0.4%

Bi By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

CONSUMER prices rose in
February by the largest amount in
seven months as gasoline prices
surged again and clothing costs
jumped the most in nearly two
decades.

But the increase appeared to
ease many economists’ concerns
about dangerous price move-
ments in either direction. The
recession is expected to dampen
any inflation pressures for at least
the rest of this year, while the
slight uptick in prices over the
last two months also has made
the possibility of deflation more
remote. The Labor Department
reported Wednesday that con-
sumer inflation rose 0.4 percent in
February, the biggest one-month
jump since a 0.7 percent rise in
July. Two-thirds of last month’s
increase, which was slightly more
than analysts expected, reflected

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a big jump in gasoline pump
prices.

Meanwhile, the deficit in the
broadest measure of U.S. trade
fell sharply in the final three
months of last year as oil prices
dropped and the recession
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for overseas goods. Economists
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Exports also are falling as the
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Core inflation, which excludes
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The Federal Reserve, which
was wrapping up a two-day meet-
ing on Wednesday, was expect-
ed to keep a Key interest rate at a



record low near zero as Fed offi-
cials continue to believe that the
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the deep recession and severe
financial crisis, not inflation.

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Elise Amendola/AP Photo

SALES associate Sean Sey-
mour, center, checks merchan-
dise as customers shop at the
counter at Eastern Boarder in
Danvers, Mass. Tuesday, March
17, 2009.

BACO celebrates its 10" Anniversary!

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING |"“AGM"
2 LUNA RON MERTEN

Modo porte ceeded fren Fl pone
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NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000)

NESLIN LTD

Registration Number 147357B
(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of 2000) NESLIN
LTD is in Dissolution.

Any person having any claim against NESLIN LTD is required on
or before the 17th day of April, 2009 to send their name, address and
particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the company, or
in default thereof they may have excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made before such claim is approved.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley Street, Nassau, The
Bahamas is the Liquidator of NESLIIN LTD.



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THE TRIBUNE





China denies
Coke bid for
juice company

m@ By JOE McDONALD
AP Business Writer

CHINA denied Coca-Cola
Co.’s closely watched $2.5 bil-
lion bid to buy a major Chi-
nese juice producer Wednes-
day, highlighting Beijing’s
rejection of foreign control
over its top companies even
as they step up acquisitions
abroad.

The refusal to allow the for-
eign acquisition in a non-
strategic business such as fruit
juice could backfire abroad as
state-owned Chinese compa-
nies pursue investments in
mining and other sensitive
industries.

Coca-Cola’s acquisition of
Huiyuan Juice Group Ltd.
was rejected because it would
reduce competition and raise
prices, the Commerce Min-
istry said. But the bid also
provoked an outcry from
nationalists who opposed let-
ting a successful Chinese
brand fall into foreign hands.

“At the end of the day, they
just want to protect their own
brands,” said Renee Tai,
senior vice president for
research at CIMB-GK Securi-
ties Pte. Ltd. in Hong Kong.
“Tf it’s an established brand
with a track record, I think it
will be more difficult for for-
eigners to participate.”

Coca-Cola Chief Executive
Muhtar Kent said Coke would
now focus on existing brands
and innovation of new brands,
including juices.

“We are disappointed, but
we also respect the decision,”
Kent said in a statement.

Kent reiterated the compa-
ny’s plan to invest $2 billion in
China over the next three
years to open new plants and

distribution channels.

A woman who answered the
phone at Huiyuan said no one
was available to comment. A
ministry official, Chen
Rongkai, said there is no way
for Coca-Cola to appeal.

Creating profitable brands

is a key element in the com-
munist government’s devel-
opment strategy, and officials
hope to make Chinese com-
panies more competitive dur-
ing the current economic
slump, in preparation for the
recovery of world growth.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSSETTE JOSEPH of
KEY WEST STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,

and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 12 day of MARCH, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4)(a),
(b) and (c) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000 NOTICE is hereby given that, ROLING
MANAGEMENT LIMITED is in dissolution and
that the date of commencement of the dissolution is
the 13th day of March A.D. 2009.



Enervo Administration Limited
Liquidators
Montague Sterling Centre
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3924
Nassau, The Bahamas

A Ministry of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel
?.0. Box AB207b0, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas



Nea ee

TEACHER POSITIONS

AvP eZ
f

SOT orc La TAL

with BIC. and BGCSE experience in Language Arts, Literature, Mathematics,

Book Keeping, Home Economics, Social Studies

DER ecu Mame a
STM aera Ze a ca

Applicants must be Born Again Christians and adhere to the Statement of Faith of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel.
Teachers must also have at least a Bachelors Degree in Education or a Teacher's Certificate
and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident of the Bahamas with work status,
Qualifying persons are asked to contact the office at
Telephone (242) 201-4771 8:20 AM, - 3:45 P.M. or fax (242) 367-577
or visit our website ~ www.agape-school.com ~ for job or student applications

LLL LL LL LL LLL DOLD LOL OD ED ND OL DOL OD DOL OD Ot Od Ot Od td

Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Book Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values as well as a very high standard of education
and is approved by the Bahamas Ministry of Education.

We seek to train the mind, guide the person, and love the personality,

‘Study to shou thysell approved wntor God...’ 2 “Timothy 2:15



THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 11B

C HOSp,
< "

| :
Auryon

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE OFFICE ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY NOTICE
Deputy Director of Finance

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of Deputy Director of
Finance, Public Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:

Educated to degree level or equivalent; a professionally qualified accountant and member of a
recognized accounting body, (American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, or Association
of Chartered Certified Accountants or Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants); able to
demonstrate five (5) to ten (10) years relevant senior management experience within a large
complex organization; have the ability to demonstrate integrity and effective leadership and
management skills together with proven track record of contributing achievements of strategy and
policy development and implementation.

The successful candidate must possess excellent communication skills and be able to adapt
communication style to suit each activity/staff group; possess strong interpersonal skills and be
able to express a view convincingly coherently, verbally and in writing.

The Deputy Director of Finance will report to the Director of Finance, Corporate Office.

Job Summary: The holder of the post will be required to communicate regularly with a wide range
of senior staff both clinical and non-clinical and staff at all levels within the Authority. He/she must
also build and manage highly effective relationships with local authority partners, the public, the
Public Treasury and the Ministry of Finance.

Duties not limited to the following:

|. Provides high level expertise in the areas of financial management and
corporate governance to the Board that ensures financial strategies are
effectively integrated and aligned within the corporate management
process.

. Plans, controls and monitors the flow of the Authority's funds to ensure
expenditure is contained within budget; produces financial reports as
required by the Board, Managing Director and all its levels of management.

. Leads in the implementation of the Board’s financial strategy and plans;
ensures that appropriate levels of expertise are in place for effective
delivery of financial and management accounting services and that all
statutory and regulatory requirements are met relating to the Authority’s
accounts, including the submission of audited accounts in order to meet
deadlines.

. Reviews and supervises the implementation of financial policies and
supervises approved systems of financial control to ensure the effective use
of resources and compliance with accounting standards; liaises with audit,
both internal and external to ensure systems of control are adequate and
secure; promotes optimum standards of professionalism within the finance
functions to ensure compliance with external standards and best practices.

. Coordinates integrated activities across the Authority and its institutions ensuring
the Board, Managing Director and all Its levels of management has the appropriate
skills and toots to maximize scarce resources so as to deliver sustainable improvements to
patient care.

. Ensures that there is effective coordination across
all elements of the finance functions of the Authority; contributes fully to the
business planning cycle of the Authority; liaises with the relevant key managers and
clinicians to encourage their participation in the process.

. Leads, motivates, develops and trains staff within the department to ensure that
they have the necessary skills to achieve required objectives and to encourage the
development of innovative, creative thinking and team work across the departments.

The post of Deputy Director of Finance is in Salary Scale HATM7 (B) ($48,650 x 800 _ $56,650).
Letters of application and curricula vitae should be submitted to the Director of Human

Resources, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville: or
P. O. Box N-8200, Nassau, Bahamas no later than 26th March, 2009.

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

Purpose

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) will provide technology vision and leadership in the
development and implementation of information technology (IT) programmes. He/she will
lead the planning and implementation of enterprise information systems to support business
operations and achieve more effective and cost beneficial enterprise-wide IT operations.

Essential Functions

e Establish guidelines and programmes for effective IT management.

¢ Provide data processing services required.

¢ Recommend long and short range management information systems plans and budgets.

e Approve staff recommendations on major systems development and/or research
projects.
Establish strategic policy for planning, development, and design of information needs.
Research management information systems hardware and software including applicable
vendor applications, data base management, and operational control packages.
Sets policies to ensure privacy and security of data processing facilities.
Establish guidelines and programmes for effective database management utilisation.
Consult with and advise department heads on IT management needs and problems.
Demonstrate continuous effort to improve operations, decrease turnaround times,
streamline work processes, and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality
customer service.

Education, Experience and Necessary Qualifications

Minimum of 3 years of experience with increasing responsibilities for management and
support of information systems and IT; direct management of a major IT operation is
preferred. Experience should also include exposure to both shared and outsourced solutions,
as well as support of in-house information and communication systems in a multi-site client-
server environment. Specific experience with financial and human resource management
information systems is a plus. Other skills required include:

e Familiarity with: desktop, notebook, handheld, and server computer hardware; local
and wide area network design, implementation, and operation; operating systems such
as Windows, OS/400, Unix, and Linux; and computer peripherals such as printers,
monitors, modems and other equipment.

Knowledge of office productivity software programmes such as word processing,
spreadsheet programmes, databases, and communications software.

Ability to: analyse and resolve complex issues, both logical and interpersonal; and
negotiate and defuse conflict.

Effective verbal and written communications skills and effective presentation skills, all
geared toward coordination and education.

Self-motivator, independent, cooperative, flexible and creative.

Required Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:
Requires a master’s degree in Computer Science, Business Administration or a related field or
equivalent experience. Comprehensive knowledge of:
¢ Data processing methods and procedures, and computer software systems.
Systems design and development process, including requirements analysis, feasibility
studies, software design, programming, pilot testing, installation, evaluation and
operational management.
Business process analysis and redesign.
Design, management, and operation of managed IT systems

Proven skills in: negotiating with vendors, contractors, and others; budget preparation and
monitoring; management and leadership; and communication.

Demonstrated ability to: relate to all levels of the user community; be a team player
that motivates and educates other team members; plan, implement and support systems
in a complex education environment; set and manage priorities; comprehend complex,
technical subjects; translate technical language to lay audiences; and link and apply complex
technologies to business strategies.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: CIO 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Private & Confidential





PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





AIG chief acknowledges
bonuses are ‘distasteful’

Hodes: ‘AIG now stands for arrogance, neompeienes and greed’

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WILFLOW

INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 5th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

oat Tel. 502 23566
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The Registration fee covers the cost of the Fun Run T-shirts pro wi participants
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larting at Tropical Shipping, baad east on East Bay St: over the west bridge to the east bridge: back to Nassau: East on East
Bay St: South on Village Ad.: West on Shirley St: North on Victoria Ave.: East on Bay Street ending at Tropical Shipping

vailable at our front offic é on

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@ By JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press Writer

THE CHIEF executive offi-
cer of failed insurance con-
glomerate AIG acknowledged
Wednesday that the company’s
multimilliion-dollar bonuses
were “distasteful” to many and
had provoked a firestorm of
wrath.

“T share that anger,” Edward
Liddy, chairman and CEO of
the American International
Group Inc., said in testimony
prepared for Congress.

Lawmakers from both parties
expressed fury over the compa-
ny’s behavior. For the Ameri-
can public, AIG now stands for
“arrogance, incompetence and
greed,” said Rep. Paul Hodes,
D-N.H.

Liddy, in his written remarks,
said, “Mistakes were made at
AIG on a scale few could have
every imagined possible.”

But, he also said that the
roughly $165 million in bonuses
paid out over the weekend
should be honored as a legal
commitment of the United
States government, which now
owns 80 percent of the battered
insurer.

“When you owe someone
money, you pay that money
back,” Liddy maintained. “We
at AIG want to believe that we
are all in this together,” said the
man named six months ago to
take over the company as part
of the government rescue. Some
$170 billion in tax money has
now been pledged to AIG.

Meanwhile, the agency that

oversees AIG said that, while
its criticism of the company’s
practices had sharpened over
the past five years, it failed to
recognize the extent of risk
posed by the exotic financial
instruments the insurance com-
pany offered, many of them tied
to a housing market that had
long been rising.

Scott Polakoff, acting direc-
tor of the Office of Thrift Super-
vision, said regulators failed to
accurately predict what would
happen to AIG’s so-called cred-
it default swaps — a form of
insurance — if housing values
collapsed, as they have. “There
are a lot of people walking
around who failed to understand
how bad the real estate market
had gotten,” he said.

Liddy’s stance that the bonus-
es should be honored, no matter
how distasteful, drew sharp
comments from both parties.

It is “time for us to assert our
ownership rights,” said Rep.
Barney Frank, D-Mass., chair-
man of the full Financial Ser-
vices committee. Frank said
Congress will be asking for the
names of the bonus recipients
— and if AIG declines to pro-
vide it, he will convene the com-
mittee to subpoena for the
names. “We do intend to use
our power to get the names,”
he said.

Rep. Scott Garrett of New
Jersey, the senior Republican
on the subcommittee, com-
plained that the administration
still has no exit strategy for dis-
entangling itself from the insur-
ance giant.

HOUSE Capital
Markets,
Insurance and
Government
Sponsored
Enterprises
subcommittee
member Rep.
Brad Miller, D-
N.C. questions
AIG Chairmen
Edward Liddy
during testi-
mony before
the subcom-

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omemmendieer Lic ut

School

“Teach Me, O Lord, Thy Way"..Psalm 119-33

TEACHING VACANCIES

Temple Christian

applications

Art Teacher

Spanish Teacher

Applicant must:

A. Be a born-again practicing Christian who
is willing to subscribe to the Statement of
Faith of Temple Chrisitian Schools.

Elementary School
from qualified
2009-2010 school year for:

invites
teachers for the

(Grades 1-6)
(Grades 1-6)

Have an Associates and or Bachelor’s
Degress in Education from a recognized
College or University in the area of

specialization.

Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or

Diploma.

1D. Be willing to contribute to the school’s extra

curricular program.

Application must be made in writing with full
Curriculum Vitae, a recent colored photograph and
three references should be sent to:

The Principal
Temple Christian School
Collins Avenue
P.O.Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 13B





“Part of me wants to say to
some of the loudest critics,
“What did you expect and why
weren’t you asking more ques-
tions before?’ I would argue that
the real outrage now is the $170
billion of taxpayer moneys that’s
been pumped into this company
and to what effect,” he said.

Rep. Gary Ackerman, D-
N.Y., cited a “tidal wave of
rage” throughout America right
now.

AIG is under fire for $220
million in retention bonuses
paid to employees in its trou-
bled financial products division.
The most recent payment of
$165 million began to be paid
last Friday and caused a furor.

The retention payments —
ranging from $1,000 to nearly
$6.5 million — were put togeth-
er in early 2008, long before
then-Treasury Secretary Henry
Paulson asked Liddy to take
over the company. Liddy him-
self is not getting a bonus and is
only drawing $1 a year in salary.

Liddy also said in his pre-
pared testimony that AIG grew
into an internal hedge fund that
became overexposed to market
risks. AIG is the largest recipi-
ent of federal government emer-
gency assistance.

“No one knows better than I
that AIG has been the recipi-
ent of generous amounts of gov-
ernmental financial aid. We
have been the beneficiary of the
American people’s forbearance
and patience,” he said. But he
also said that “we have to con-
tinue managing our business as
a business — taking account of

the cold realities of competition
for customers, for revenues and
for employees.”

The clamor over compensa-
tion overshadowed AIG’s week-
end disclosure that it used more
than $90 billion in federal aid
to pay out to foreign and domes-
tic banks, including some that
had multibillion-dollar U.S. gov-
ernment bailouts of their own.
AJIG is the single largest recipi-
ent of government assistance —
a company whose financial
transactions were so intricate
and intertwined that it was con-
sidered simply too big to fail.

Orice Williams, director of
financial markets and commu-
nity investment at the Govern-
ment Accountability Office, the
government’s top watchdog
agency, told the panel that the
government’s intervention
helped AIG avoid failure, but
that the company is still strug-
gling to pay back the money.

Market and other conditions
have prevented the insurer from
making significant asset sales,
she testified. She said most
restructuring efforts are still
under way.

Liddy said the company’s new
management team found its
overall structure “too complex,
too unwieldy and too opaque
for its component businesses to
be well managed as one com-
pany.”

He said the new managers
have “addressed our liquidity
crisis and stabilized the compa-
ny’s cash position” and is wind-
ing down the financial products
side of the business.

AC HOSPyy,
AC.
‘Ss

al
an
a

AUTHOR

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG AGENCY

PUBLIC NOT/CE

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF DRUGS AND
RELATED ITEMS

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and
Related Items for the Public Hospitals Authority
and the Ministry of Health, The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas.

The Tender Document, which includes
instruction to the Tenderers along with other
relevant information, can be collected from the
Bahamas National Drug Agency, Market &
McPherson Streets, beginning from Friday a0",
March 2009 from 9 am — 5 pm.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a
sealed envelope or package identified as
“Tender for the Supply of Drug and Related
Items” and addressed to:

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third Terrace, West Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, The Bahamas

Electronic and hard copies must be received at
the above address on or before 5pm Friday,
April 24", 2009. A copy of a valid business
license and Nationals Insurance Certificate
must accompany all proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right
to reject any or all Tender(s).

Director

AIG Chairmen Edward Liddy waits to testify on Capitol Hill in Wash-
ington, Wednesday, march 18, 2009, before the House Capital Mar-
kets, Insurance and Government Sponsored Enterprises subcom-
mittee.
















NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALFRED MARVIN DAWKINS
of LEEWARD EAST, P.O.BOX SB-51218, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12' day of
MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

GN-840

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

Ministry of Public Works & Transport
Tender For Roadworks
North Abaco

Interested Contractors are invited to tender for the
Roadworks in North Abaco, which includes the Queen’s
Highway from Treasure Cay to Crown Haven, and
Settlement Roads of Blackwood, Coopers Town, Wood
Cay, Mount Hope, Fox Town, and Crown Haven.

The Tender Document may be collected at:

Civil Engineering Section
Department of Public Works
1st Floor East Wing
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive
Nassau, Bahamas

Sealed Tender submissions are to be deposited in the
Tender Box located at:

Tenders Board
Ministry of Finanace
3rd Floor
Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received no later than
10:00 a.m., Tuesday, 31st March, 2009.

Tenderers are invited to attend the Tender opening at
10:00 a.m., Tuesday, 31st March 2009 at the Tenders
Board.

Signed
Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Public Works & Transport

VACANCY NOTICE

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the position of
Director, responsible for the operations, development and execution of strategic and tactical plans of its

Customer Service Department.

The successful candidate is expected to manage the account activities of approximately 30,000
customers, including metering, billings, credit, collections and a 24-hour call center.

The applicant must have strong communication, problem solving and trouble shooting skills with
demonstrated decision-making ability and leadership.

Applicants must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Accounting or Equivalent;
5 years supervisory experience in billing and collections in a high volume utility environment, banking
or its equivalent and a track record of reducing arrears.

Qualified applicants may apply to:-

THE DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMITED

P.O. BOX F-40888

KONE CaM Sree Mm Srlie Dien
OR BY EMAIL: hrdept@gb-power.com

wy

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY
Keeping Grand Bahamay Future Bright.

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS

MARCH 31, 2009



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT



Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles
Act Chapter 393 Statute Law of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
parcel or lot of land situate in the Subdivision

Susan Walsh/AP Photo

2008

CLE/QUI/360



known as Englerston in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
being that lot bounded on the NORTH by a
public road known as Balfour Avenue and
running thereon One Hundred feet and Fourty-
Seven hundredths (100.47) on the EAST by
land said to be of Elgin Wright and running
thereon Fifty-Two feet and Seventy-Three
hundredths (52.73) on the SOUTH by land
said to be of Emmanuel Larrimore and running
thereon Ninety-Nine feet and Sixty-Two
hundredths (99.62) and on the WEST by a
public road known as St. Charles Vincent
Street and running thereon Fourty-Six feet and
Thirty-Two hundredths (46.32).

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of MARY
STUBBS.

NOTICE OF PETITION

Take notice that by Petition filed in the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas on the 6" day of March, A.D., 2008
MARY STUBBS of the Subdivision known as
Englerston in the Southern District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas (hereinafter “the
Petitioner”) claims to be the owner in fee simple in
possession of the above captioned piece parcel or lot
of land and has made application to the Supreme Court
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under section
3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959, to have her title to
the said piece parcel or lot of land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in
a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:

1. The Registry of The Supreme Court, Ansbacher
House, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

The Chambers of Cedric L. Parker & Co. No.
9 Rusty Bethel Drive, Nassau, Bahamas.

Take notice that any person having dower or right of
dower or any adverse claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition must on or before the expiry of Thirty
(30) days following final publication of this Notice
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
and the undersigned a Statement of his Claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith together with a plan of the area claimed and
an abstract of title to the said area claimed by him.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of his Claim on or before the Thirtieth (30) day
following final publication of this notice will operate
as a bar to such claim.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Chambers
Neil’s Court
No. 9 Rusty Bethel Drive,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner



PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





US current account deficit drops in ‘08

@ By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
AP Economics Writer

THE deficit in the broadest mea-
sure of U.S. trade fell sharply in 2008
for the second consecutive year, due
partly to a larger surplus in services
trade.

The Commerce Department report-
ed Wednesday that the current account
deficit, which includes investment flows
and other transfers as well as trade,
dropped 7.9 percent to $673.3 billion in
2008 from $731.2 billion in 2007.

Economists expect the improvement
in the U.S. current account to contin-
ue this year, but mostly due to rapid
falls in imports as the recession cuts
into U.S. consumers’ buying power.
Exports are also falling as the global
economy slows, eliminating what had
been a crucial source of sales for U.S.
manufacturers early last year.

The deficit fell to $132.8 billion in
the final three months of last year from
a revised $181.3 billion in the third

quarter, the department said. That was
the lowest since the fourth quarter of
2003 and below what analysts expected.

As a percentage of the economy,
the fourth quarter deficit was 3.7 per-
cent, the lowest since the figure was 3.4
percent in the fourth quarter of 2001.

The United States finances the
deficit by borrowing from foreigners,
so a smaller deficit reduces the need
for such borrowing.

The current account deficit
increased for five straight years before
falling slightly in 2007. The deficit
equalled 4.7 percent of the overall
economy last year, down from 5.3 per-
cent in 2007.

The surplus in services trade, which
includes insurance and financial ser-
vices, travel fees and royalty payments,
increased to $139.7 billion last year
from $119.1 billion in 2007.

The U.S. also saw a sharp increase in
its surplus in international income, the
Commerce Department said, as U.S.
companies paid far less in interest and
dividends to foreign investors last year

than in 2007. The U.S. income surplus
increased to $127.6 billion in 2008 from
$81.7 billion the previous year.

Meanwhile, the deficit in goods
trade fell to $174.1 billion in the fourth
quarter from $216.3 billion in the July-
September period, as a sharp drop in
imports outweighed a decline in U.S.
exports.

That trend is continuing so far this
year. The Commerce Department said
Friday that the trade imbalance
dropped to $36 billion in January, a
decline of 9.7 percent from Decem-
ber and the lowest level since October
2002.

The drop in exports is hurting many
U.S. manufacturers.

Caterpillar Inc., a leading U.S.
exporter, said Tuesday it would lay
off 2,400 employees at five plants in
Illinois, Indiana and Georgia. The
company said in January that its earn-
ings plunged 32 percent in the last
three months of 2008 as global demand
for its mining and construction
machines plummeted.



=

EMPLOYEES, right, of the Caterpillar plant argue with security officers during a
workers’ general assembly in front of the factory in Grenoble, French Alps,
Wednesday, March 18, 2009.



VACANCY FOR DIRECTOR OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS
MINISTRY OF YOUTH, SPORTS AND CULTURE

Applications are invited from suitably qualified officers to fill the position of
Director of Culture, Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture.

Requirements for the post:

Applicants must possess a Master's Degree from an accredited
institution in one of the following disciplines: Liberal Arts, Fine
Arts or Social Science; minimum of eight (8) years post qualification
experience in the development and implementation of cultural,
activities, five (5) years of which should be at supervisory level; or

A Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited institution in one of the
following disciplines: Liberal Arts, Fine Arts or Social Science; minimum
of at least ten (10) years post qualification experience in the development
and implementation of cultural activities, five (5) years of which in a
supervisory capacity.

Knowledge of granting programs and related processes, the development of
cultural industries and a background in management in the cultural sector will
be an asset.

The successful candidate should:

Be a self-starter with strong motivation;

Possess the ability to think strategically and translate goals into
operational objectives;

Have staff supervision experience;
Possess the ability to work independently and in partnership with others;

Possess the ability to build rapport with a wide array of stakeholders and
interests;

Have strong experience working with the private sector and government;
Possess good analytical, writing and communication skills;
Have strong facilitation, presentation and networking skills;

Possess good computer skills and the ability to run an effective office
including financial and records management;

Have sound knowledge of local, national and international cultural/arts
related practices;

Have demonstrated ability to analyze and translate broad Government
directions into strategic policies and programs to develop the cultural,
social and economic potential of Culture and Arts.

Specific duties of the post include:-

Giving objective, evidence — based advice to the Permanent Secretary and
the Minister on issues relating to Culture and the Arts;

Responsibility for research, development, management and
implementation of policies and programs in pursuit of Government
objectives;

Representing the Department at forums and on Boards and Committees
as required;

Serving as an informed link between cultural organizations, individuals
and Government;

Leading and managing the Cultural Grants Programme for cultural
development among Bahamians;

Overseeing the management of the various aspects of the Department of
Culture, including the Junkanoo Museum, the National Centre for the
Performing Arts, the National Dance School, the E. Clement Bethel
National Arts Festival, the National Senior Junkanoo Parades and Junior
Junkanoo Programmes and any other cultural activities designated by
the Government;

Liaising with Community and Heritage Festivals across The Bahamas
and advising them on effective growth and development strategies;
Effective management of the office including staff, financial and records
management;

Coaching, counseling and motivating the staff to maintain efficiency and
productivity; and

Reviewing and completing Employee Performance Appraisal Records.

The salary of the post is in Scale Group 15 $41,600 (x $800) - $47,200, per
annum.

Serving officers must apply through their Heads of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the Ministry of Youth and Culture,
Thompson Boulevard or Department of Public Service, Poinciana Hill Complex,
Meeting Street and should be returned, complete with original qualifications
and documentary proof of relevant experience to reach the Secretary, Public
Service Commission, Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street, no later than
April 3, 2009,

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION

VACANCY FOR DIRECTOR OF YOUTH
MINISTRY OF YOUTH, SPORTS AND CULTURE

Applications are invited from suitably qualified Bahamians to fill the position of
Director of Youth, Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture.

The requirements for the post are:

e A Master’s Degree from an accredited institution in one of the
following disciplines: Community Education and Development,
Social Work and Management.

* Minimum of eight (8) years experience in planning and
administration of youth programme or its equivalent.

The successful applicant will be required to:-
e Report directly to the Permanent Secretary;

e Advise the Government of The Bahamas on matters relating to
youth affairs; and

e Be responsible for the management of the Department of Youth
and all Youth development programmes and projects in the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Culture.

Specific duties of the post include:

e Overseeing liaison relations with all youth organizations officially
recognized by the Ministry of Youth;

e Formulating plans and programmes for Youth Development
Programmes and activities within the agreed policies and strategy
of the Ministry;

e Promoting and executing programmes for individual and community
youth groups;

e Organizing the Department of Youth’s budget in consultation with
the staff of the Department of Youth to achieve the objectives of the
Division;

e Drafting policies to regulate, govern and enhance the systematic
development of youth at local, regional and international level;

e Liaising with Youth Organizations and the National Youth Advisory
Council with respect to planning of activities, scheduling and
regulation of events, and the timely implementation of National
Youth Policy and National Youth Service;

e Supervising the documentation and compilation of records,
statistics and information on youths in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas;

e Advising the Minister on grants to assist youth organizations in
promotion of youth programmes consistent with the national
objectives;

¢ Assisting in the preparation of speeches and Cabinet Papers for the
Department of Youth;

* Coordinating and directing the efforts of all Youth Officers and

technical staff assigned to the Department in New Providence and
the Family Islands;

e Administering and Coordinating National Youth Policy;
e Conducting annual assessment of all staff of the Department;
* Developing the Department's Annual Calendar of Events; and

Liaising with other departments concerning programme initiatives

within the Ministry with respect to the coordination of activities
between the various departments.

The salary of the post is in Scale W3, $41,100.00 x $700.00 - $46,600.00 per
annum. Starting salary will be commensurate with qualification and experience.

Serving Officers must apply through their Head of Department.

Application forms may be obtained from the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture, Thompson Boulevard, or the Department of Public Service, Poinciana
Hill Complex, Meeting Street. They must be returned, complete with original
qualifications and documentary proof of relevant experience, to reach the

Secretary, Public Service Commission, Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street
not later than April 3, 2009.

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION

GN-836

Public Service Commission





Laurent Cipriani/AP Photo



ia THURSDAY, MARCH 19th, 2009, PAGE 15B

THE WEATHER REPORT bgt 2 [| NSURANCE MANAGEMENT

“vy (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

5-Day FORECAST CNG ad ayy ayy ye MONDAY ya NY MARINE FORECAST

























































) ae = Today Friday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
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~ > : : msterdam pe s Friday: § at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73°F
an ORLANDO» ; Ankara, Turkey 39/3 21/-6 sn 41/5 23/5 pc ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
? High:80°F/27°C Pay Sumy with a Partly cloudy. Partly sunny. Some sum a shower Fatty Suny, 2 Para sunny ani a The een coer eis the eal 4 av ann pe alls sie pe Friday: § at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
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Low: 59°F/15°C Ban
. ° ° ° ° gkok 90/32 77/25 t 91/382 77/25 t
G a Som High: 79° Low: 69° fee ase oe ir Pat ase i ae TIDES FOR NASSAU arorey a —e ,
TAMPA a ae iy Rec aaicel eMC alcel rue an a a : lee a : TODAY ) ie aH
High: 79° F/26°C 4 vu iy h | _-88°-68° Fs 79 61 F = A -64 F = High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft. Bairiit 64/17 57/13 s 50/15 52/1 4
Low: 60° F/16°C \ Puy, = The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel a an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 2:45 a.m. 2.3 9:04am. 0.6 Belgrad 42/5 30/-4 42/5 39/0
a @ Ve Tea elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 256p.m. 2.0 9:06pm. 05 Pein 41/5 25-3 7 37/2 96/3 oe
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, a Aumanac ees
a \ — ‘UT p.m. : TT p.m. v. Bogota 6417 47/8 + 6417 47/8 &
am . Z Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 448am. 23 1058am. 05 Brussels 54/12 30/-1 s 50/10 32/0 pc
yr ae \ Temperature 5:01pm. 21 1110pm. 04 Budapest 41/5 32/0 ¢ 44/6 34/1 sh
r, 4 cao % Hi a PUG ect tee se ate Seas 75° F/24° C aan 540am. 24 1id6am 04 Buenos Aires 81/27 64/17 s 82/27 66/18 s
vo ~e. 7 Sed LOW? vicars mene SUNY om, OS Cairo 77/25 S9/15 ¢ 71/21 51/10 pe
- “XK —— Low: 66° F/19°C Normal high ..... To r2e°C = afta 93/33 73/22 s 95/35 73/22 s
} ; et Normal low 65° F/19° C Calgary 55/12 26/-3 ¢ 48/8 28/-2 ¢
Te oe s @ WEST PALM BEACH ms LAST YGERS HIGH ceessovesrveccasarceeseersesseery 79° F/26° C SUN ay Ta tiny Cancun 34/28 68/20 pc 84/28 64/17 pc
’ eo High: 77° F/25° C : LASTYCArSOW crcvvscenncsneenveeraitaey 70° F/21° C Caracas 79/26 67/19 s 83/28 70/21 pc spol
oy Low: 67° F/19°C > * Precipitation Side eee oe a.m. etl es cet am. Casablanca 77/25 58/14 pc 75/23 58/14 ¢ LosTAngeles
ee a -_., As of 2 p.m. yesterday ......cccccssssssssssseeeeee trace unset....... ‘21 p.m. Moonset... .. ‘12 p.m. Copenhagen 44/6 29/1 s 39/3 36/2 pc
he FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT " Year to date New First Fal Last Dublin 53/11 43/6 pc 52/11 39/3 pc
WA ee Bree @ High: 71° F/22° C Normal year to date oo... 4.44" a pe Frankfurt 52/11 28/-2 s 50/10 27/-2 pc
ow: 67° F/19° — Low: 66° F/19°C Geneva 56/13 30/-1 s 50/10 25/3 s
“7 AccuWeather.com Halifax 41/5 24/4 35/1 20/-6 pe eee
& @ MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar. 26 ie 2 Apr. 9 Helsinki 28/-2 19/-7 c 32/0 27/-2 sn fat
High: 77° F/25° C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 82/27 72/22 s 84/28 72/22 s al Fronts
Low: 67° F/19°C NASSAU High: 78° F/26° C Islamabad 86/30 59/15 pc 81/27 54/12 t ising Shown are noon positions of weather systems and sli =9"s
High: 79° F/26° C Low: 67° F/19°C Istanbul 41/5 34/1 + 46/7 39/3 pc Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fina
E . Low: 69° F/21°C Jerusalem 62/16 52/11 ¢ 54/12 36/2 ¢ Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary a
oe y : Johannesburg 70/21 56/13 sh 68/20 54/12 t
KEY WEST al a CATISLAND Kingston 82/27 72/22 sh 83/28 74/23 sh ts is!) 10s
High: 77° F/25°C : = , = Lima 83/28 66/18 pc 84/28 66/18 pc
Low: 69° F/21°C High: 77° F/25° C London S713 36/2 pe S713 34/1 pc
i @ 1 . ~ Low: 63° F/17°C Madrid 73/22 39/3 s 75/23 39/3 s
a Manila 91/32 73/22 pc 89/31 75/23 s
nll }
34 Fe Mexico City 77/25 50/10 pe 75/23 45/7 AUTO INSURANCE
eas GREATEXUMA Monterrey 84/28 59/15 s 82/27 61/16 pc
= 5 SAN SALVADOR Montreal Yee SIME Te 32/0 21/-6 s
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‘ High: 80° F/27° C nao ‘ Moscow 36/2 28/-2 sn 36/2 27/-2 st
~ ie Low: 69°F/21°C fects rin Munich 43/6 25/-3 sh 33/0 20/-6 sn
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS am Nairobi 84/28 57/13 6 89/31 57/13 pe
highs and tonights's lows. High: 82° F/28° C i} New Delhi 91/32 64/17 pe 86/30 61/16 pc EVer St t Ol ] T
Low: 67° F/19°C Oslo 34/1 23/-5 pe 37/2 27/-2 pe
Paris 57/13 34/1 54/12 32/0 po \V,V/ { t !
LONG ISLAND Prague 38/3 26/-3 sn 35/1 21/-6 c me ] O US:
Rio de Janeiro 82/27 72/22 c 80/26 72/22 c
High: 80° F/27° C Riyadh 88/31 63/17 s 91/32 64/17 s
Low: 66° F/19°C Rome 55/12 39/3 sh 50/10 36/2 pc
Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday =} pia et Toras ae ann = oa ian $
High Low W High Low W High Low W High = Low W High Low W High = Low W - igh: 79° fe an Juan pe $s
Ti Fie Fic Fit Fo Fe Fe a “ie Lowe 68" F/20°C San Salvador eige eat? © 9082 722 » eee .
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Anchorage 25/-3 13/-10 pc 25/3 11/-11 pc Jacksonville 76/24 52/11 s 72/22 46/7 pc Phoenix 91/32 6216 s 89/31 6216 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 84/28 68/20 pc 83/28 69/20 sh ople y
Atlanta 74/23 45/7 po 6719 41/5 s Kansas City 62/16 36/2 s 56/13 41/5 pc Pittsburgh 47/8 25/-3 + 1/5 23/-5 po RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:83°F/28°c ha Sone aU et TT ee i =
Atlantic City 52/11 29/-1 r 47/8 25/3 pce Las Vegas 83/28 55/12 pc 84/28 58/14 pc Portland, OR 5743 45/7 + 53/11 303 Fr High: 82° F/28° Low: 69° F/21°C Siakhal aaa ae : on =n S >
Baltimore 56/13 34/1 + 47/8 29/-1 pc Little Rock 60/15 42/5 c 60/15 42/5 s Raleigh-Durham 72/22 39/3 pe 55/12 32/0 pc Low:64°F/18°C Saver eur BSE . ee Bart . INSURANCE M AN AGEMENT
Boston 521 310 1 40/4 27/-2 pc LosAngeles 74/23 56/13 pc 70/21 54/12 pc St. Louis 58/14 383 s 59/15 41/5 pec " a Eau : ae 7
Buffalo 40/4 25/-3 c 39/3 24/-4 pc Louisville 60/15 36/2 r 56/13 34/1 s Salt Lake City 65/18 41/5 pce 65/18 45/7 pc GREAT INAGUA Tokyo 70/21 55/12 s 63/17 45/7 . (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Charleston,SC 73/22 49/9 pe 65/18 40/4 pc Memphis 6417 43/6 46 6417 43/6 s San Antonio 80/26 55/12 po 77/25 57/13 pe High: 79° F/26°C oT 38/3 24/-4 pc 44/6 27/-2 §
Chicago 47/8 26/3 po 46/7 32/0 pce Miami 77/25 64/17 t 79/26 66/18 pc San Diego 68/20 58/14 pc 65/18 56/13 pc Low 71°F22°C Triad cea 7a | aie FSR New baie Grand Bohama Abaco Fleuthera Fyuma
Cleveland 44/6 26/-3 sf 41/5 27/-2 pe Minneapolis 48/8 29/-1 s 53/11 35/1 pe San Francisco 64/17 51/410 pe 61/16 49/9 pc 7 VERIeCINey; 49/9 43/6 + 48/8 38/3 +
Dallas 70/21 50/10 po 71/21 55/12 po Nashville 6216 383 r 61/16 351 s Seattle B21 425 + = S211 388 Fr oe ea one a ae Wee Tels (242) 502640007 Tels (247) 350-3500 } Tels (242) 367-4204 | Te: (242) 332-2802 | Tel (242) 330-2304
Denver 6417 37/2 pe 70/21 39 Cc New Orleans 78/25 59/15 $s 70/21 54/12 s Tallahassee 78/25 50/10 s 78/25 44/6 pe an Warsaw 34/1 27/-2 sn 36/2 28/-2 c ‘Se ete Seen
Honolulu 90/26 69/20 po 79/26 60/20 po Otlahoma cy &3/17 4577 po 62/16 488 pe Tucson «8780 S73 $28 SIZ pe a. unt ee
onolulu pc pc ahoma Ci pc pc ucson $ pc 7
Houston 78/25 56/13 po 75/23 55/12 pe Orlando 80/26 59/15 pc 79/26 57/13 pce Washington,DC 59/15 36/2 r 499 35/1 pe SOE Tecan HE tee nr eae



OBI ATES
RELIGION



} Mk | } The Tribune
mow 4 i



—\y

TA Y, DPD,
707.9

f
P \our choice for the family



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009



Arthur Benson Thomas Barnett Sr.
Sunrise 20th September, 1925
Sunset 17th March, 2008



God saw you were getting tired
And a cure was not to be,

So he put his arms around you and
Whispered, “Come to Me”.
With tearful eyes we watched you
And saw you pass away,
Although we loved you dearly
We could not make you stay.

A Golden Heart stopped beating,
Hard working hands at rest,
God broke our hearts to prove to us,
He only takes the best.

Precious memories live on in the hearts of
his wife, Beryl, children, grandchildren,
nieces, nephews, other family members

and friends.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For Late

Mr. David Albert
Charles Kelly,
C.B.E.

of Nassau, The Bahamas, who

=| died in New York City, New York,

U.S.A. on the 11th March, 2009,

will be held at Christ Church

| Cathedral, George Street, Nassau,

| on Thursday, 19th March, 2009
at 3:00 p.m.

Mr. Kelly is survived by his wife

Nancy Booth Kelly; three sons,
Andrew Jordan Kelly, David Gregory Booth Kelly and Reginald
Scott Kelly; two daughters-in-law, Anne Boushelle Kelly and
Candace Elizabeth Kelly; five grandchildren, Jordan Ross Kelly,
David Oliver Christensen Kelly, Avery Anne Kelly, John (Jack)
Albert Charles Kelly and Katie Marie Kelly; his brother, Godfrey
Kenneth Kelly C.M.G.; his sisters-in-law, Sonia Kelly and Paula
Kelly; his brother-in-law, John Avery Booth, Jr and his wife,
Bonnie Booth; nieces and nephews, Linda Elza and her daughter,
Katherine Elza, Steven Kelly and his wife, Susan Kelly, Gary
Kelly , Lynn Lowe and her husband, Chris Lowe, Karen Kelly,
John Avery Booth, lll, and his wife, Kathleen Booth, Joy Marie
Rousell and her husband James Rousell and Jody Laura Booth-
Seals and her husband, Dave Seals, ; his cousins Betty Kelly
Kenning, O.B.E. and her husband John Kenning,O.B.E., and
George Kelly,M.B.E and his wife Norma Kelly, other relatives
and friends. His brother Basil Trevor Kelly predeceased him.

The Very Reverend Patrick L. Adderley, Dean of Nassau, The
Venerable Keith Cartwright, Archdeacon of the Southern Bahamas,
The Reverend Father Michael Gittens, Priest Vicar, Christ Church
Cathederal, Nassau and The Reverend Crosley N. Walkine, Rector,
St. Anne's Church, Fox Hill, Nassau will officiate and interment
will follow in St Anne's Church Cemetery.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau on Wednesday, 18th March, 2009
from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and on Thursday, 19th March, 2009
from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.

IN CELEBRATION OF DAVID'S LOVE OF BRIGHT COLOURS
AND HIS LOVE OF LIFE, PLEASE DRESS IN BRIGHT
COLOURS.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Lyford Cay
Foundation, Inc., DAVID A. C. KELLY, C.B.E. MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP, P.O.Box N.7776, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale
Avenue, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 3

(CARD OF THANKS

The family of the late Merle E. Wilson-Taylor—



ors , ‘Vy os wishes to express our sincere thanks and
Hg \ * appreciation to all those who called, visited,
he | ie prayed, offered words of comfort, sent cards,

floral arrangements/wreaths, food, drinks, or
_ assisted in anyway during her illness and
_ recent death.








+ Special thanks to the team of medical
| ot doctors and nurses of Female Medical I and II
J ‘ +) Wards at PMH, Mrs. Hamilton & Staff of |
4 Sy Yellow Elder Senior Citizens Day Care Centre,
| 2 Rev. Fr. Dwight Bowe, Fr. Theadore Hunt, Rev.
=<" Fr. Warren Rolle, ACW, Pastoral & Outreach
_ Ministries, the entire St. Mary's Parish family, —
and the Staff at Bethel Brothers Morticians.

Sar Uy (J G od YO (Richly Bless

Vou.





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

Death Notice

el

Mr. Neville Elijah Cartwright-69 years
of Chicago Illi. and formerly of Cartwrights Long Island, died
on Thursday March 5, 2009. He is survived by his wife
Dianna, 2? brothers; Lorin and Eric, 2 sisters; Rosalind (Rosie)
Albury, Virgina (Wirgee) Cartwright, 1 sister-in-law; 2 step
sisters-in-law, 3 aunts; Elva and Edith Knowles and Geneva
Burrows, 5 nephews; Keith Albury, Raymond, Cavan, Ricardo
and Lance Cartwright, 2 nieces; Karen Albury and Denise
Cartwright, 3 grand nephews; 2 grand nieces numerous step
nephews and step nieces and a host of relatives and friends



CARD OF THANKS FOR THE LATE

eer

BRENDA “ROSE” MAZUIR

July 20, 1949 - August 25, 2008

We the family circle of the late Brenda “Rose” Mazuir wish to impart our
heartfelt appreciation to all those who sympathized with us in our recent
bereavement. A huge thank you, to all our relatives and friends, especially who
sent sympathy cards, floral tributes, and attended the funeral service, Special
thanks are also extended to the Rev. Dr, Patrick Smith, Rev. Timothy Stewart,
Rev. Christina Bethel, Rey, Patricia Bethel, Bethel's Praise Team, the Officers and
Members of Bethel Baptist Church, Mrs. Patrice Munroe, Mr. Larry Miller, Mrs.
Delereese Edgecombe, the staff of Coastline Pluming, Shark Bites Restaurant
Atlantis, Purity Bakery, Nassau Beach, Emerald Beach, Britannia Tower,
Atlantis Hotels, Pirates of Nassau, Demeritte's Funeral Home, Woodlawn
Gardens, and the entire Community of John and Market Streets, as well as the
Community of Carmichael Village and Golden Isles.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

CARD OF THANKS FOR THE LATE




Hilma Viola Hanna - Coleby
1930 - 2008

We the family of the late Hilma Viola Hanna - Coleby wish to express our heartfelt
thanks te our many relatives and friends for the prayers, visits, telephone calls. floral
armngements and many wher acts of kindness which were extended to us during our
recent bereavement,

Special thanks goes out io Father Colin Saunders and family, A. C. W. the choir,
ushers and the entire congregration of St. Ambroae Anghean Church, Bridgette
Musgrove, Delerese Edgecombe, Patrice Ferguson, Mr. Kirk Hall, Julie Smith,
Coleby, Hanna, Heastie and Tynes family, Buhamas Immigrntion Stat,
Colinalmpetial Insurince Staff, The Ministry OF Education Staff, Sandyport Security
Department, Breezes Super Club, all the family members who travel from near and
far, the staff of Bethel Brothers Moricians and the staff of Woodlawn Gardens and all
Others (0 MUMeroUs bo mention.

iWay God continue to bless each and everyone of pou.
The Children.

ae St ‘Wher
Loving Memer

‘Cuelyn

March 1, 1933 - March 21, 2008

FORGOTTEN'! NEVER! Friends
may think we have forgotten

when at times they see us smile
Little do they know the heartache
that our smile hides all the while.

Beautiful memories arc wonder-
ful things They last till the
longest day They never wear out
They never get lost and can
never be given away.

To some you may be forgotten To
others a part of the past But to
these who loved and lost you
Your mamary will always last.

Sadly missed in the hearts of the
family, especially Jane, Joyce
Marion, Andrea, Alice & Wanda



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 5

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

WINIFRED
EMILY
CHRISTOFILIS,
95

who died peacefully in New

York on March 7th, 2009 will

be held at St. Francis Xavier's

Cathedral, West Hill Street,

Nassau, The Bahamas on

Saturday, March 21st, 2009
J at 9:00 a.m.

Officiating will be Father Elvado R. Turnquest and burial
will be in The Western Cemetery, Nassau Street, Nassau.

Her husband of nearly 44 years, Jacques Constantin
Christofilis, predeceased her in 1980.

She is survived by children and spouses, Charles and
Judy Christofilis of Mount Joy, Pa., Annette and Bonnie
Christofilis of New York City, Adrienne and Gilbert

Cleare of Nassau, Jacques and Barbara Christofilis of

. Nassau; grandchildren and spouses, Charlene and David

tnufred rate Geffen of Corte Nadera, Ca., Charles and Susan

—_ Christofilis of Lafayette, Ca., Dr. Carol Christofilis of

Born: November 16, 1950 Annandale, N.J., Tammy and Mike Smith of Ft.

Died: December 13, 2008 Lauderdale, Fl., J.C. Christofilis Ill of Los Angeles, Ca.,

Camille and Stephanie Cleare of Nassau; great-

Three months ago we said goodbye to you. A loving grandchildren, Cayley, Matthew and Sarah Geffen, Sunny
Mother, Grandmother, Daughter, Sister, and Friend too. and Samuel Christofilis, Ryan and Paige Smith; sisters-
No matter how much time passes we will never forget in-law, Glika Christofilis and Rowena Christofilis;
your beautiful smile, your compassion for life and the nephews, Jules, Constantine, Tino, Paul and Terrance
love you gave to all of us. We think of you today but that Christofilis; niece, Yvette Christofilis; other relatives and
is nothing new. We thought of you yesterday and will friends include Marianne Razza of Stuart, F1., Paula and
think of you tomorrow too. Our memory is our keepsake Buddy Schichtel of Lake Lure, N.C., and family, Pete
with which we'll never part. God has you in His keeping Manolis and family of New York and Greece, George
and we have you in our hearts. Tzoros and family of Maspeth, N.Y., Karen Carr of White

Your Loving Family Plains, N.Y. Millicent Sullivan , Mary McGinn and Maria

Miranda of N.Y., Linda and Harald Sauer, Agnes Evans,

The Farnily of the late Winifred Ward wishes to express Melissa and Trevor Fox and family all of Nassau and

our sincere gratitude to all who have so generously ex- Eleanor (Sugar) McQuay.

tended their support and concern during our difficult ; ;
time. Words cannot express how truly grateful we are to Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home
each and every one of you. May God continue to richly Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, Nassau on

bless you and your families. Friday, 20th March, 2009 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.





PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Par SY de at

CORNELIA
IOLA MILATOS

of Nassau, The Bahamas
who passed away on 15th
March, 2009 will be held at
The Chapel of Love, Kemp's
Funeral Home Limited,
Palmdale Avenue and
Bradley Street, Nassau on
Friday, 20th March, 2009 at
3:00 p.m.

Minister Earl Pinder will officiate and interment will
follow in The Western Cemetery, Nassau Street, Nassau.

Mrs. Milatos is survived by her husband, George Milatos;
three children, Ivan and Andre Chestnut and Caroline
Percentie; five grandchildren, Danielle Porceddu and
Adrian Chestnut, Chelsea, Andre and Kristen Chestnut;
two brothers, Robert and Charles Hall, 11 sisters-in-law,
Irene Klidaras, Evdokia Kefalianos,Maria Vallas, Balaso
, Evangelia, Niki, Poli and Maryanne Milatos, Florence
Carey, Zula Carroll and Olive Knowles; 7 brothers-in-law,
Nikolas, Nioti, Dimitri, Thanasi Milatos, Yianni Klidaras,
Christos Kefalianos and Skellarios Vallas; one daughter-
in-law, Linda Chestnut and one son-in-law, Wesley
Percentie; caretaker, Lois Lee; many nieces and nephews
and a many other relatives and friends, especially Kimberly
Bethel Themelis and Irene Cathopoulis, Anne and Eugene
Higgs, Patricia, Maria and Peter Mousis, the attending
doctors and staff of Doctor's Hospital, the staff of the Walk
in Medical Clinic and the staff of John's Department Store.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Cancer
Society of The Bahamas, P.O.Box S.S. 6539, Nassau, The
Bahamas, or left with the family at the Service for the
Cancer Society of The Bahamas, in Memory of Mrs.
Cornelia Iola Milatos.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, on Thursday, 19th March, 2009 from
5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22
Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Par SY at

ISABEL MERLE
ROGERS, 97

of Ivanhoe Road, Nassau, The
Bahamas will be held at Trinity
Methodist Church, Trinity
Place and Frederick Street,
Nassau on Saturday, 21st
March, 2009 at 4:00p.m.

Reverend Bill Higgs will
officiate and interment will be
in Ebenezer Methodist
Cemetery, East Shirley Street,
Nassau.

Mrs. Rogers is predeceased by her husband, Glen Raymond
Rogers, her sisters, Doris Bradbee and Bernice Higgs, her
brother, Myron Russell and her son-in-law, Charles Carey Jr.
and is survived by her sons, Glen Raymond Rogers Jr., Thomas
Andrew Rogers, daughters, Joan Marie Carey and Margaret-
Rose Kanitsch, grandsons, Charles Carey III, Louis Kanitsch,
Chris Carey, Raymond Rogers Jr., and Thomas Rogers Jr.,
granddaughters, Anne Kanitsch, Loree Stephens, Kathy
Kanitsch, Elaine Cates, Christine McCully, Rebecca, Annabelle,
Katie and Paige Rogers, great grandchildren, Justin, Jessica
and Ryan Connelly, Diana and Leah Stephens, Rachael, Nathan
and Elizabeth Cates, Georgia and Liam Kanitsch, Megan and
Tan McCully, Luke and Laura Carey, son-in-law, Terry Kanitsch,
daughter-in-law, Ann Rogers; grandsons-in-law, Dave Stephens,
David Cates and Patrick McCully, grand-daughters-in-law,
Karen Carey and Noel Kanitsch many other relatives and
friends including, Joanne Rogers, Wayne and Phyllis Lowe,
Vincent and Shirley Higgs, David Higgs, Peggy Pinder, Gordon
and Maureen Pinder, George and Joyce Bradbee, Merill and
Rosemarie Rogers, Albert and Karen Rogers, Audrey Russell,
Fred and Shiela Kanitsch, Freddie and Cecile Albury, Evelyn
McKenzie, Mr. & Mrs. Jerome Major and special thanks to
Dr. Ian Kelly, Dillas Forbes, Jennifer Bowleg, Marlene King,
Maureen Brown and Tania Knowles and the Staff of Nassau
Glass.

Instead of flowers the family request that donations be sent to
the Bilney Lane Children's Home, P.O. Box N. 205, Nassau,
The Bahamas in memory of Isabel Merle Rogers.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, Nassau on Friday, 20th March,
2009 from 5:30p.m. to 7:00p.m.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Cadar Crest Aumeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street « P.O.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Semi Military Funeral Service

for Retired
Police Sargeant
BYRON LYSANDER
SIMMONS, 83

of Gregory Street Oaksfield,

Nassau and formerly of

George Town, Guyana will be

held on Saturday 21st, March,

2009 at 10:00 a.m. at Christ

the King Parish Church,

Ridgeland Park, West.

Officiating will be Rev'd Fr.

Rodney Burrows, assisted by Rev'd Fr. Ivan Eldon and
Deacon Bradley Miller. Cremation will follow.

He is survived by his loving and wonderful wife of almost
52 years Retired Nurse Miriam Simmons; one sister,
Daphanie Ferdinand of Montreal, Canada; one brothcr-
im-law, Claude Ferninand of Montreal, Canada; six sisters-
in-law, Minerva Rolle, Emerald Johnson, Anita Wilson,
Carol Miller, Dolly McDonald and Rowena Elliston of
New York; one grand-daughter, Vanessa Cunningham;
one grand-son, Antonio Simmons; grand son-in-law,
Willard Cunningham; numerous nieces, nephews,
grandnieces and grandnephews including, Shirley, Candace,
Dawn, Shauna of Montreal, Canada, Tramayne and Theon
of Toronto, Canada, Ruth and Bendt Puester of Hamburg
Germany, Catherine Cooper and family, special friends
including, Nurse Alice Gardiner, Honey Sheilamae
McPhee, Leonard Passard and family, Father Rodney
Burrows, Dudley Seifert Sr. and family, Wealthy Hall and
family, the Sherman family, John Trotman and family,
Dr. Edwin Demeritte, Lerlene Cooper, Norlie Cox, Manera
Hall, Dulcie and Dale Pierce, Mrs Beryl Gray, Maria Lee,
Emmanuel Baptist Church family, Hon. Alfred Sears,
Eloise Smith, Reginald Ferguson Commissioner of Police
and Members of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, Grafton
Ifill, President and Members of the Retired Police Officer's
Association, the Retired Police Officers and a host of
acquaintances and well wishers.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest
Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Friday
from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on
Saturday from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 7

Yager funeral Home Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 ¢ Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MELVIN LEE
MATHER, 67

of Mather Town, Grand Bahama
will be held on Saturday, March
21st 2009, at 11:00 a.m. at Shiloh
Baptist Church, Mather Town,
officiating will be Rev. Leonard
A. Pinder, assisted by other
Ministers. Interment will be made
in the Mather Town Public
Cemetery.

Left with cherished memories are
his son: Nat Mather; two daughters: Linder Mather-Collie and
Tia Mather; one adopted-daughter: Eurella Clarke; two sisters:
Selvera “Selly” Cooper and Bettina Mather; one adopted-brother:
Malachi Cooper; one son-in-law: Fulton Collie; one sister-in-law:
Veronica Russell; six nieces: Veoshe and Ashanti Cooper, Lavel
Duhaney, Natlin and Della Simms and Xandia McKinney; seven
nephews: Dereck Hield, Daslyn Gordon, Lamont and Lorenza
Cooper, Rick Russell, Xavier Cooper and Xario; his cousins:
Preston Mather, Creola Cooper, Jeff and Henderson Mather, Roy
Cooper, Leeland Laing, Beryl Bridgewater, Meril Laing, Melinda
Rollins, Othnell Russell of Abaco, Nelson, Bruce and Alton
McIntosh, Dorcas Mitchell, Ezekiel and Fletcher McIntosh, Jewel
Grant and their families, other relatives and friends including
Henriette “Happy” Clarke Mather, Mario Smith, Frank and Lil
Frank Turnquest, Viola Darling, Elvis Mather, Blanche Mather,
Tommy, Ben and Eric Cooper, Elsaida Cooper, Queenie Mather,
Rosena Verance, Rufus Cooper and family, Iella Mather, Washie
Smith, Leonard Cooper and family, Josephine Mather, Charles
Williams and children, the children of the late Evason and Abby
Mather, Sherly Mather, Sherline Hepburn, Cleomi Clarke, Patsy
Russell, Gladys Newton Collie, Crystal Bostwick, Marilyn and
Dorry MacDonald Cooper, Kathleen Baillou, Leo McIntosh,
Remourn and Linda Lightbourne and children, Thelma Brice and
family, Estelle Faust, Patrick Kemp, Jimmy Delancy, Uncle Fee,
Gurth Knowles of Nassau, Willie Watson of Nassau, Linda
McIntosh of Abaco, Jinks Knowles, Olga, Mikie Mihas, Edith
Edgecombe, Francis Hendfield, the Smith Point family, the
Wilsons, Eddens and Bodies, McIntosh and Russell families of
Abaco, Patricia Fisher Harbour Island, Ned Pritchard, Ambrose
Bullard, the staff of Adnil Marine, his golfing friends and fishing
buddies, friends at Cooper’s Service Station, staff of Lucaya and
Reef Golf course and others too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
Home and Crematorium Limited on Friday from 12:00 noon to
6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until
service time.





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Nicolas Etrin, 27

be held on Saturday, 21

Carmichael

Roads

Cherished Memories will linger in the hearts of his |
Father: Thomas Lustis; Two (2) Sons: Neckson and |
Briandino Joseph; Eight (8) Brothers: Felix Edmond, |
Cloudin, Licien, David, Jean-rene Louisaint, Jackson, |
Nelment and Celondieu Lustis; Five (5) Sisters: Atelene |
Edmond, Adulie Brave, Edith Jean Tamarra and Tania |
Lustis; Thirteen (13) Nieces: Sabine, Karen, Ketsie |
Brave, Fedrina Louisaint, Evodie Jean, Elisheba Jean, |
Lyli Louisaint, Daphne Louisaint, Keisha Louisaint |
and Selingie Lustis; Seven (7) Nephews: Ricky Brave, |
Rashad Edmond, David (Jr), Fadle Lustis, Adlin Lustis, |
Lovenson Lutis, and Onedorfe Lustis; Two (2) Aunts: |
Sophilia Louisaint and Ludia Philistin; Seven (7) |
Uncles: Isbel Louisaint, Jene Louisaint, Fortine |
Pompulis, Cirion Pompulis, Simon Louisaint, Tony |
Lutis and Innosent Philistin; Seventeen (17) Cousins: | : :
Lucia Louisaint, Julianne, Lovina, Odilia, Finicia, | and a host of other relatives and friends to numerous
Enide, Clotide, Lusita, Makeny, Ronald, Tony, Calix, |
Eliplit, Willy, Luke, Paul and Bob; Other relatives |
and friends including: Melonde Joseph; : Rosilia |
Joseph, Ednell , Wibert and Evenol Joseph, Kilmene | AT THE ROCK OF AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL
Brave and Eddy Jean;Lourentin Martin; : Rose, Sandra, |
Evelyn and Gislene Joseph and Keren Martin, Guirlene | FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M. AND ON SATURDAY
Louissaint Jean-marc, Junior, Guerda Frederique, Enel, |
Ammalia and family.And a host of other relatives |

_ and friends to numerous to mention.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT
of Carmichael Road, will |

AT THE ROCK OF AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL

| WULFF ROAD AND PINEDALE ON FRIDAY
March 2009, 10:00 a.m. |

will be held at Ebenezer |
Haitian Baptist Church, |
Road. |:
Officiating Pastor Laurent |
H. Papouloute, assisted by |
Other Ministers of the |
Gospel. Internment: |
Southern Cemetery, |
Cowpen & Spikenard |

FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M. AND ON SATURDAY
AT THE CHURCH FROM 9 A.M UNTIL
SERVICE TIME.

Sainjule Saint-Vil

of, Balls Alley; will be held
on Saturday, 21 March
2009, 10:00 a.m. will be
held at the Calvary
Haitian Baptist Church,
Collins Avenue.
Officiating Pastor Paul
Justin, assisted by Other
Ministers of the
gospel.Internment:
Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen & Spikenard
Roads

He is survived by His: Mother; Daughter: Donel
Sainvil of Nassau,Bahamas; Two (2) Sons; One (1)
Brother: Imel Sainvil; Two (2) Sisters: Marie Vitha
Sainvil and Edline Sainvil; and a host of other relatives
and friends including: Marcellus Lucie, Emmanuel
Lucie, Iler, Riviere, Robert Brown and Scotty Brown;

to mention.
FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT
WULFF ROAD AND PINEDALE ON FRIDAY

AT THE CHURCH FROM 9 A.M UNTIL
SERVICE TIME.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale

Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Blossom Brown, 66

of Fox Hill and formerly of Mansic
Point, Andros, will be held on
Saturday, 21 March 2009, 11:00
a.m. will be held at Five Porches
of Deliverance Center Apostolic
Tabernacle Church, Market Street
and Poinciana Ave. Officiating
Chief Apostle Rodney Roberts,
assisted by Other Ministers of the
gospel. Internment: Old Trail
Cemetery, Abundant Life Road

Those left to mourn the passing

of this remarkable Christian,
Mother, Grandmother, Great-Grandmother, Family
Member and Friend include her, Four (4) Sons: Gregory
Brown, Steve, Ricardo, and Darren Dames; Two(2)
stepchildren: Roscoe Dames & Elizabeth Deveaux; Four
(4) Aunts: Julia, Rachel, Laya and Bella Brown. Four (4)
Daughter In-Laws: Nethiel Roxbury, Cecile, Raquel, and
Nicole Dames. Cousins: Katherine Storr, Cordy & Gladys
Dames ;Fifteen(15) Grand-Children: Tiffany Gibson,
Sheldon Dames, Victoria Dames, Elroy Deveaux, Madison
Mitchell, Stacy Dames, Steve Jr., Stefan and Shaquille Dames,
Darron Dames Jr., Danielle Dames, Shaketra Mckinney,
Shakanah Dames, Ciara Dames and Daria Dames.Six (6)
Great-Grandchildren: Kenson Jr., Akeem Mitchell, Marvin
Jr., Maurisia, Maurisio Dames and Chade’Stubbs; And a host
of other relatives and friends including: Bishop Lawrence
Rolle,Chief Apostle J.Rodney Roberts, Prophet Jamal Rolle,
Mrs. Paula Clarke, Prophetess Dinah Pinder, Desiree Dean,
Mother Ellis, Mother Coakley, Ms Ritchie, Zenemae Johnson,
Sheryl Saunders, Francita Johnson, Cynthia Miller, Harriot
Martin, Ruth Gouge, Lynn Knowles, Anthony Knowles,
Denzee Basden, Paula Clarke, Sharon Lightbourne & Family,
Shanell Williams & Family, Alvin Gardiner, Davis’ Family,
Audley Mitchell & Family, Comfort Street Family, Timothy
Lane Family, Ms Brown and the Credit Union Family, Finco
Bank Family, Physical Plant at The College of the Bahamas,
Staff of Female Medical Ward at Princess Margaret Hospital
including Dr. Christa Wells & Nurse Rolle of the Elizabeth
Estates Clinic.
And a host of other relatives and friends to numerous to
mention.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT AT THE
ROCK OF AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL WULFF ROAD
AND PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M.
AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 10
A.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 9

Ennrald Rioge Mortuaru

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Bloodstone Funeral Service
For

Mrs. Thomazena Helen
Munroe-Bridgewater, 78

of #17 Glendale Subdivision, off Soldier Road
and formerly of Duncan Town, Ragged Island
will be held on Saturday, March 21, 2009 at
10am at Cooper's Terrace Cathedral Church
of God, Cooper's Terrace off Kemp Road.
Bishop Robert McPhee, assisted by other
Ministers will officiate and burial will be in
Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

The Radiance of this “Bloodstone of A Gem” will always glow in the hearts
of her:

Two Sons: Andrew and Julian Bridgewater;

Four Daughters: Helen, Gretta, Nursing Officer Judy of Freeport and Reneé
Bridgewater;

Thirteen Grand Children: Desserio, Danté and D’ Nia Walker, Dereck and
D’ Maury Pratt, Shaquille Coleby, Nadia, D’ Andra, Rolando, Reisha, Tarino,
Shanteria and Cherez Bridgewater;

Three Great Grand Children: Nevaeh and Navario Smith and D’Ondre;

Fifteen Nephews: Calvin, John, Percy, Lester, Basil, Maxwell, Roy, Fredlyn,
D.D, Wayne, Rupert, Elvin Jr., Richard, Theodore and Junior;

Seventeen Nieces: Anne, Eunice, Patsy, Vera, Angela, Vernita, Sandra, Doris,
Sharon, Angie, Daphne, Kathleen, Olivia, Sharlene, Therisita, Carmita and
Sheral;

Two Brothers-in-law: Simon Sr. and Elvin Bridgewater Sr.;

Four Sisters-in-law: Martha Higgs, Verva Wallace, Mae-Helen and Gertrude
Bridgewater;

Other loving family and friends including: John and La-Granville Panza,
enid and Jenesta Lockhart, Rev. Matthias Munroe, the Munroe, Wallace,
Maycock, Lockhart and Armbrister families, the entire Ragged Island
Community, Rev. Robert and sister McPhee, officers and members of the
Cooper’s Terrace Highway Church of God, mother Cartwright, mother Beckford,
mother Malcolm, the Glendale Subdivision Community, Laura Williams,
Dorothy, Pearl, Netta, all the fruit and vegetable vendors.

Special thanks to: The Statfs of the Rand Memorial Hospital, Princess Margaret
Hospital, Mail-Boat, Marathon Branch of the PLP, Senator Jerome Fitzgerald,
New Solid Rock Church of God and the Staff of La-Rose.

Visitation will be in the "Emerald Suite"’ Emerald Ridge Mortuary & Monument
Company Ltd. #20 Claridge Road on Friday, March 20, 2009 trom 1pm to
6pm and at Cooper's Terrace Cathedral Church of God, Cooper's Terrace off
Kemp Road on Saturday, March 21, 2009 from 9am to service time.

Visit our website: www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video
tributes, sign guest book, send condolence, sympathy, share
memories and make funeral arrangements.





PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020° Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 * 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

Rose Rolle, 73

of Lisbon Creek Mangrove Cay Andros }
will be held on Saturday at 2:00 P.M. :
at Christ The King Anglican Church, :
Ridgeland Park West. Officiating will :
be Rev. Fr. Denrick Rolle assisted by
Rev. Fr. Rodney Burrows, Rev. Fr. :
Stephen Davies and Rev. Fr. Rodrick :
Bain. Interment in Woodlawn Gardens,

Soldier Road.

Cherished memories are held by her
loving husband Edward and sons James, :
Freddy, Anthony, Norris, David, }
Andrew, Randy and Richard; adopted daughter Theresa Bannister; : : ; aren ‘
daughters-in-law: Ernestine, Karen, Icelyn, Gina, Dianne, Nicola, | Shaland Fowler; Grandchildren: Clifford Edwards, Jr., Daniel
and Suzane; sisters: Advilda (Cleo) Dean, Louise Tucker, Lillian :
McKenzie, Arimentha Taylor, Veronica Rolle, Shirley, Ruth, Maureen, :

Loretta Taylor; brothers: Wendell Greene, James, Nemiah, Arlington } Sandra Robins, Coral (Neman) Davis, Delores Saunders, Charles

and Samuel Taylor; Aunts: Florence Johnson, Miriam Sands and ; (Driskel) Robins, Grathan and Kirk Robins, Carolyn, Margaret,

Edna Taylor; grandchildren: Jevon, Jamaine, Jameica, Jameison, | Floyd and Zach Smith; Adopted Children: Frances Henfield, Edith

Javaz, Norissa, Fredrica, Chakara, Anthonique, Roslyn, Ashley, Edgecombe; Aunts: Leila Thompson, Carnetta Lightbourne; Uncles:
Edward, Freddie, Willdino, Wilshire, David Jr., Joshua, La-Shan, :
Mareceio, Anthon, Tameko and Dion; great granddaughter: Rigine; :
brothers-in-law: Merthan, Theophilus, John and Alphonso Rolle; :
sisters-in-law: Marina, Maria, Laverne and Joanne Taylor, Ethlyn
Cox, Hilda Miller, Naomi McPhee, Jennetta Moss. Numerous nieces :
and nephews including, children of the late Salome Pennerman, :
children of the late Mable Johnson, Berkley Rolle, Roy Bannister, :
Theresa Seymour, Sherine, Annemarie, Sheila, Daphney, Vernice
and Gregroy. Other relatives and friends including Priscalla Dean, :

Sharon Bastian, Marie Rolle, John, Orman, James and Alexander
Bastian, Evelyn Deveaux, Eulys Strachan, Fearellen Symonette,
Cedric Sweeting, Vivian Rolle, Hessimae Bethel, Rev. and Mrs.

LAST RITES FOR

Francis Gloria Cartwright, 61

of Seven Hills Estates and formerly
of Bailey Town, Bimini will be held
on Saturday at 11:00 A.M. at
Abundant Life Bible Church,
Abundant Life Road. Officiating will
be Pastor Edward Allen assisted by
Other Ministers. Interment in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, J.F.K.
Drive
She is survived by Children: A’ Yanna
Cartwright Clarke, Arianne
Cartwright, Aida Cartwright and

Edwards, Demetre Dickerson and Patricia Lyew; Siblings:
Claudette(Lionel) Rolle, Peggy (Dorset) Rolle, Eleanor, Diane,

Norla Thomas; Best Friend: Naomi Cumberbatch; Nieces: L.
Marressa(Ken), Amadine, Joy (Sammy), Facita, Quasette, Maude,
Ferris (Billy), Montez, Shandy (Dolye), Catina (Robin) Patrenda
(Derick), Nekia (Richard), Cowell, Gwen (Johnny), Charlis,
Cassandra, Sherell, Asha, Melleah; Nephews: Kendric, Mendel
(Nadia), Carlos (Calecha), Tracie, Trevor (Joan), Lorrick (Dekie),
Freeman, Jade (Gala), Hyram, Shawn (Jackie)Marvin, Charlie III,
Justin, ( Godmother: Elva Ellis; Godchildren: Lola Richie, Lavette
Saint; Son-in-law: Ricardo Clarke; Other relatives and friends

including The Descendents of Edith and Thomas, The Descendents
: of Oswald and Eunice, The Descendents of Milcah Rolle, The

Descendents of Bob Robins, The Family of Albertha Russell and

Moses Pennerman, Charles and Mable Bastian, Leona McClean and : Charlotte Dean, Donald Ferguson, Elva Rolle and Family, The

family, Herbert Stuart and Family, Elkahna, Raymond and Jelitha :
Stuart, Cecil Longley and family, Roderick Bain, Gregory and Daphne } Bible Church Family, The Clarke Family and members of Calvary

Davis, Bruce and Catherine Matheson, Alexander, Stephan, John, : : :
Maurice and Tanya Hall, Jackie Goodman, Stephanie Sands, the : aa ee ee . Tae ee
Darville family of Ridgeland Park West, Oral Pinder and Family, : : . ce . aie
Mr, & Mus. Anthony Sweeting and family, Annie McKenzie and | The Edwards Family, The Munroe Family, Judith Theophilus,

family, the Bethel, Hinsey, Glinton, Virgill, Hall, Gibson and Smith
families, the entire congregations of St. David's and All Saints :

Anglican Churches, the entire community of Mangrove Cay Andros. ! Taylor Family and other telatives and tends.

Russell Family, Edison Summer and VOP, The Abundant Life

Sharee Lamm, Verdell Fawkes, The Fowler Family, Miriam Culmer,
Jane White and Family, Twila Perpall, The Dickerson Family, The

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson Road } The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson

and Fifth Street on Friday from 11:00 A.M. until 6:00 P.M. and at }
the church on Saturday from 1:00 P.M until service time. :

Road and Fifth Street on Friday from 11:00 A.M. until 6:00 P.M.
and at the church on Saturday from 10:00 A.M. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 11

Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020¢ Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 ¢ 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

LAST RITES FOR

Ellenor Ellen Curry Ferguson, 83

of Farmer’s Hill Exuma will be held !
on Saturday at 11:00 A.M. at Ebenezer :
Union Baptist Church Farmer’s Hill ;
Exuma. Officiating will be Bishop :
Hartman L. Rolle and Rev. Dr. Irvin :
Clarke assisted by Pastor Wesley L. :
Ferguson and Other Ministers. ;
Interment in The Public Cemetery, :

Farmer’s Hill.

She is survived by adopted sons: Ezra }

Curry, Cyril Rolle, Mervin and :

Reginald Mcphee; Adopted daughter: :
Christine Rolle; Step children: Pastor Wesley and Queen Ferguson, :
Bishop Franklin and Rovena Ferguson, Steve and Carmen Hepburn, }
Clarence and Shirley Armbrister, Eric and Lois Gibson, Herbert :
and Marina Taylor, Merldina Rolle, Veronica Ferguson and Bishop :
Hartman L. Rolle. Grandchildren including, Patronella Rolle, :
Bridgette Armbrister, Janice Gibson, Thalia Micklewhite, Jacqueline
Taylor-Smith, Perry Ferguson, Romeika Ferguson-Adderley, :
Patrick and Debbie Rolle, Chaquell Smith, Tanya Knowles, :
McQuell Curry and Jeff Simon; Nieces: Doralee Roache, Merle :
Rolle and Iriana Mcphee. Grand nieces: Emily Morley, Linda }
Colebrooke, Sandra Mcphee and Nurse Pettiann Demeritte. Grand :
Nephews: Shedrick Mcphee, Kendrick Mcphee Sr. of Miami :
Florida and Mervin Mcphee Jr.; Two brothers in law: Luther and :
Avery Ferguson and two sisters in law, Haley Hanna and Edith }
Ferguson; A host of other relatives and friends including: Elsiemae :
Smith, Juletta Charlton, Icelyn and Merle Curry, Laura Taylor and :

Lawrence Lloyd, Evalena Lloyd, Vernice Bodie, Dorcas

Tency Ferguson and Family, Euthalie Rahming, Minerva Forbes,
Elizabeth Smith, Dr. Ralph Butler PM.H., Dr. Seymour, Dr. C.
Hanna, Dr. Thompson, Nurse Pittson P.M.H., Nurse Carolyn Rolle,
Vincent Andrews, Thomas Smith and Nurse Berthamae (liz)
Andrews, Gladstone Rolle and family, Ethalee Ferguson and
family, The family of the late Reverend Dr. E. C. McKenzie,

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Ramsey
Exuma on Friday from 10:00 A.M. until 6:00 P.M. and at the :

church in Farmer’s Hill on Saturday from 9:30 A.M. until service : Exuma on Friday from 10:00 A.M. until 6:00 P.M. and at the

time.

Ivan Musgrove, 64

of The Hermitage Exuma will be held
on Saturday at 10:00 A.M. at Mt.
Zion Union Baptist Church, Moss
Town Exuma. Officiating will be
Rev. Leslie Curtis assisted by Rev.
Louis Rolle Sr. Interment in The
Hermitage Community Cemetery.

He is survived by his parents: Hosea

and Iva Musgrove; Seven Children:

Carolyn, Vincent, Laura, Jervane,

Darcia, T.C. and Jervano Musgrove;

Three Grandchildren: Jason,
Alexandria, Jervane Jr.; Nine Siblings: Hosea Jr., Reverend
Randy Musgrove, Marilyn, Rose Davis, lona Minnis, Wentworth,
Elizabeth, Patrick, and Francis Musgrove; Nieces and Nephews:
Destiny, Tonette, Shernado, TivarL Shamron, Tonisha (a.k.a.
Tessa), Sandhia, RekeiL Laterio, LaNadia, Gregory, Grabrielle,
Elnicka, Sameka, Katura, Chanteia, Larissa, Shone', Shelice,
Jamaal, Patrick Jr., Alexander, Brenea, Demetrius, and Stephon;
Aunts and Uncles: Felix & Beulah Rolle and children, Johsua
& Althea Rolle and children, Thomas Rolle & children, Lizzy
Rolle & children, and Sarah Rolle & children; Cousins: Rev.
Elon Musgrove, Rev. Rodney Musgrove, Beatrice Bodie and
family, Cleveland Musgrove and the entire family, Hestor Bowe
and family, Rudolph Douglas and family, Valerie and Oralee and
the entire family, and Gary Rolle; In-Laws: Zilpha and Marsha
Musgrove, Patrick Davis, and Bishop Gregory Minnis; Other
relatives and friends including: Annis Musgrove, The officers

: and members of Mt. Zion Union Baptist Church Moss Town,
Shuttleworth and family, Bishop Christopher Ferguson and family, :

The entire community of The Hermitage Exuma, especially Pastor

: Leslie Curtis and the St. Paul's Baptist Church family, Pastor
' Earle Francis, Reverend C. W. Saunders, Rev. Adam J. Brown,
i Rev. A. A. McKenzie, Rev. Cedric Smith, Rev. Irvin Clarke,
: Bursil Musgrove, Oswald Ferguson, and Shirley Bodie & family,
: Elizabeth Rolle and Family, Sabletha Rolle and Family, The
0 €, + family would also like to acknowledge the many relatives and
Mcnolah Curry and family, Reverend Adam Brown and family, } friends of Ivan in Abaco and Grand Bahama. A special thanks
Ruth Smith and family, Zelma Nixon and family, The Community :
of Sugar Cane Lane, Fox Dale, Farmer's Hill and Old Place :

Community and Church of God of Prophecy Exuma District. } Hospital.

goes to Ivan's team of physicians headed by Dr. Robin Roberts
and the staff of The Male Surgical Ward at The Princess Margaret

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Ramsey

‘ church on Saturday from 9:00 A.M. until service time.





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(@) Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

EDITH BLANCHE
DARLING, 81

of Market Street and formerly of |
Matthews, Town, Inagua will be held |
on Saturday March 21st, 11:00 a.m. |
at St. Agnes Anglican Church, Baillou |
Hill Road. Archdeacon I. Ranfurly |
Brown, assisted by Fr. Bernard Been |
and Deacon Neil Nairn will officiate.
Interment will follow in the Southern |
Spikenard Road. |

Cemetery,

She is survived by, 1 Daughter: Judy Deleveaux; 1 Son: Kenneth |
Beckford; | Granddaughter: Turkessa Deleveaux; 6 Grandsons: |
Mark Beckford II of Indiana, Norman Beckford Ill, Auturo Bethel, |
Duane Bethel, Toriano Roberts & Kareem Roberts; 7 Great |
Grandchildren: Mark Beckford III of Indiana, Travon Beckford, |
: Precious memories will forever live in the hearts of her father,
| Marshall Higgs; sons, Bradford Joseph Coleman and Charles
Mae Farrington; 13 Nieces: Edna Hepburn, Rose Fowler, Evelyn |
Frith, Leanna Darville, Geneva Rolle, Henrietta Watson, Ophesian |
Darling, Opal Darling, Monique Darling, Patrice Darling, Vanria |
Darling, Gwenda & Rita Darling; 9 Nephews: Gilton Darling, |
Douglas Darling, Alfred "Cling" Darling, Anthon Darling, Charles:

Tayjha Deleveaux, Ashanti Beckford, Tuere Arnett, Deja Bethel
& Norman Beckford II; 2 Sisters-in-law: Clara Darling & Elsie

Darling Jr., Samuel Darling II, Volrick Higgs, Michael Higgs &

Deborah, Tasma & Kendra Sturrup, Stephanie, Tina Hutchinson,
Desiree, Gertrude, Esther Ferguson, Wendy Wright, Shantel &

Symonette, Darren & Kevin Sturrup, Cpl. 91 Julian Darville &
Andy Darville, Patrick Edwards, Steve, Deon & Junior Smith,

Other Relatives & Friends including: Norman Beckford & family,
The McKinney Family, The Forbes family, The Balfour family,
The Bethel family, The Deleveaux family, The Moss family,

Knowles, Tremain Armett, Brando Glinton, Una Williams, Anthony

Dorsett.

| Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,

#44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on

| Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

CAROLINE DELORIS
"Eloise" BAIN, 80

of Springfield Road, Fox Dale, Fox
Hill will be held on Saturday, March
21st, 2:00 p.m. at. St. Gregory's
Anglican Church, Carmichael Road.
Archdeacon James Palacious and Fr.
Colin Saunders will officiate.
Interment will follow in Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, John. F. Kennedy
Drive.

Bain; daughters, Verlene D. Palacious, Alexandrea G. Bain, Clara
Y. Stuart and Mary E. Levarity; daughter-in-law, Tanya Bain;
sons-in-law, Eugene Palacious and Leo Levarity; two brothers,
Vincent and Benson Higgs; two sisters, Cynthia Higgs-Stubbs
and Coral Huyler; sisters-in-law, Delcine and Gail Higgs; grand

| daughters, Anzwa Johnson and Mirada Johnson, Nickara Roberts,
Percival Curry; 14 Grandnieces: Jenny Morley, Lillian, Tiffany, |

Anna-clara Stuart, Tamara Brennen and Leatrice Levarity;

' grandsons, Antonio Roberts, Stevie Brennen, Bradford Coleman
| Jr. and Ahmad Bain; great grandchildren, Tifari, Ziya, Nyamekye,
Shenique Darling; 25 Grandnephews: Dwight Hepburn, Gregory |
Morley, Anthony Hepburn, Emerson Frith of Chicago, Sammy
Frith, Cordell Cargill, Bradley & Trevor Smith, Gromyko |

Nyara, Dave, Eugena, Lacoia, Samara, Tamara, Tarrell, Marion,
Nikita, Britany and Marquill, Keano and Breanna Roberts;
numerous nieces and nephews including Kermit, Lewis, Benjamin

' and Naomi Stubbs, Jackie and Clarence Winter, Don and Roger
/ Brown, Rosita Duvalier, Nedda Wright, Lauren Kemp, Marva
Maxwell Rolle, Brian, Amos & Sean Rolle, Andrew, Earl & David |
Darling & Amos Cox; Cousins: Esmae Pollard, Shirley Bethel, |
Doris McFall & family, Godfrey Deveaux & family, Helena |
Robinson & family & Ann & Deborah Dean & family of Chicago; |

Burrows, Gwendolyn Davis, Melvern and Karen Brown, Andrew
and Raquel Huyler, Temille Huyler-Brown, Keva Rolle, Kevin
Stuart, Kayla and Katisha Stubbs, Benson Jr., Sherman, Travis
and Marshall Higgs; friends including Olivia Levarity, Florence

| Levarity, Greg, Marion, Elizabeth and Roberts, Laverne, Dion,
: Doyle, Avon, Faye and Shandra Sainders, Nicole Knowles, Barbara
| Weech and Errol Smith; godchildren, Kermitt Stuart, Anvar Roberts
Kathleen Minnis, Valderine Roberts, Ethel Higgs, Michaella |
Whylly, Linda Thompson, Alvina Mortimer, Rosanna Moss, Devia |
| Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
Roberts, Curtis Martin, Latoya Rolle, Theresa Bethel, Donna |
Smith & Family, Grace Francis & Family, Charlotte & Samuel |

and Harvett Marshall.

#44 Nassau Street on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. and
on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and at the church from

| 1:30 p.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

‘© Bethel Brothers Morticians
Stine Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

STATE RECOGNIZED
FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE

Hon. Lovingstone
Basil Johnson,
CBE, BA, D.C.L.,
85

of #3 Newgate Road, Blair Estates will be

held on Friday March 20th, 11:00 a.m. at
Christ Church Cathedral, George Street.

Rev. Fr. Norman Lightbourne, assisted by

Rev. Fr. Ethan Ferguson, and other members

Wim| of the Clergy will officiate. Interment will
‘ follow in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens,

} Soldier Road.

Left to mourn is passing is his: Widow:
Charmian Johnson; Daughters: Anita Johnson-Patty of Kendal, Florida and
Deanne Johnson-Anderson of Washington Grove, Maryland. He was pre-
deceased by his son, Craig. Sons-in-Law; Tony Patty of Kendal, Florida and
Jerry Anderson of Washington Grove, Maryland. Grandchildren: Adriana
Anderson of Washington Grove, Maryland, and Eric Patty of Kendal Florida;
Extended Daughters: Kandi Collie, Presleith McPhee; and Chineraye Ijeoma;
Brothers—in-law, Clifford Culmer, Al McCartney and Henry Sands of Savannah
Sound, Eleuthera; Sisters—in-law: Eileen McCartney and Corliss Culmer; Aunt:
Ida Clarke; Nephews: Myles Culmer, Keith McCartney, Billie McCartney,
Lennox McCartney, Barry McCartney, Garah Leonard Sands, Brian Sands,
Oscar Sands, Keddie Culmer, Philip Culmer, Glen Culmer and Kirk Culmer;
Richard Ingraham of Miami,Florida; Nieces: Gabrielle Culmer, Caroline Culmer,
Tamara Cargill, Lizetta Neuman, Crystal Sands, Ruth Sands, Henrietta Sands,
and Delores Culmer; Patricia Ingraham of Miami, Florida; God-Children:
Obafemi Pindling, Michael Barnett, Allyson Maynard-Gibson, Keith Sands,
Ian Jupp, Krista Nottage, Kevin Archer, Andrew Mosko, David Neil and Father
Humes; Other Relatives and Friends include: Elvin Forester Bodie and Family
of Miami, Florida; Preston McPhee and Family, Jackie Clarke and Family;
Trevor Musgrove and Family; Marcella Musgrove, Angette Pyform and Family;
Almetha Clarke and Family; Verbilee Clarke and Family; Norma Clarke and
Family; Eurella Clarke and Family; Irene Clarke and Family; Harriet Mather
and Family; Cleomi Clarke; Family of the late Neville Clark of The Hermitage,
Exuma; The entire Clarke Family from The Hermitage, Exuma; Pastor Hugh
Roach and Family; Rev. Kendal Nottage and Family; Dr. Bernard Nottage and
Family; Sandra Nottage and Family; The Family of the Late Wellington Johnson;
Hugh Sands and Family; Clarice Granger; Emerald Sands and Family; Sidney
Sinclair Sands and Family; His Excellency the Hon. Arthur. D Hanna and
Family; Sir Orville Turnquest and Family; the Hon. Paul L. Adderley and
Family; Dame Marguerite Pindling and Family; the Hon. Justice Emmanuel
Osadebay and Family; Retired Justice Joseph Strachan and Family; Cyril
Ijeoma and Family; Mrs. Mary Sweetnam and Family; Henry Bostwick QC
and Family; Edward Turner and the Hon. Loretta Butler-Turner and Family;
Canon Neil Roach and Family; Bernard K. Bonamy and Family; Mr. Sam
Campbell and Family; the Culmer, McCartney and Sands Families of Eleuthera;
Autrey Graves and Family; Andrea Archer and Family; Hazel Jupp and Family;
The Rev Dr. Charles. W. Saunders; Jacqueline Major and Family; Ruby Saunders
and Family; Gloria Strachan and Family; Mr. Pat Paul; Nurse Helen Miller
and Nurses; Dr. Cindy Dorsett; Dr. Norad Morgan; Dr. Kimberley Bethel The
Bahamas Bar Association, Bahamas Supermarket Scholarship Committee; The
Hermitage Descendants Association; The All Exuma Association and the Holy
Cross Anglican Parish Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau
Street on Thursday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

There will be no viewing at the Church.

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 13

Bemeritte’s SHuneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 © TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Elaine Jency
Stubbs-Knowles, 61

a resident of Palm
Beach Street & Balfour
Ave., will be held at The
New St. Paul Baptist
Church, Blue Hill Road
& Bias Street, on
Saturday at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev.
Dr. Robert L.
Colebrooke, Apostle
Valentino Williams,
Rev. Kenneth Bain & Rev. Emmett Johnson.
Interment follows in Old Trail Cemetery, Old
Trail Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her 2 sons:
Pedro & Sergio; 1 grand daughter: Ashanti
Wiliams; 3 sisters: Daphne Brown, Norma
Ferguson & Maydon Taylor; 2 brothers: Kingsley
Brown & Philip Stubbs; 3 sisters-inlaw: Icelyn
Colebrooke, Thelma Brown & Dorcas Stubbs;
7 mieces: Sheree, Tamica, Melissa, Jennifer,
Carlessa, Oelereese & Levetta; 11 nephews:
Keno, Sean, Radford, Glenwood, Jevonne,
Clement, Marvin, Eric Jr. & Bernard; other
relatives & friends including: Geoffery Knowles,
Beverley King & family, Marie Major, Alvin
King, Charles King, Emerald Nixon, Rose,
Margretta King & family, Sandra Miller & family,
Gwendlyn, Joanne Cox & family, The Atlantis
Beach Vendors Association, Apostle Valentino
Wallace & the Life Changers Ministries
International Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m.
on Friday & on Saturday at the church from
10:00 a.m. until service time.





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Armerittie’s SHuneral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Agatha Victoria Seymour, 70

a resident of Bay Lily
Drive, Sea Breeze

Estates, & formerly of :
: Charlton, Charles Rubins Sr., Craig Lockhart,
: Autlin Stuart, Roshelle, Audley "Shaft", Tavales,
: Patrick Jr., Kunta, Pedro, Bernard, Christopher
© & Tevin Dean, Kalin Lockhart, Arnold Jr, Drexel,
| Stacey & Ricardo Pinder and Charles Rubins;
Officiating will be Bishop :

Bimini, will be held at
Evangelistic Pentecostal
Church (Bahamas) Inc.,
Pentecostal Way, on
Sunday at 1:30 p.m.

| Neville Hart, assisted by
‘| other Ministers of the
Gospel. Interment
follows in the Church Cemetery.

Left to treasure her memorie., Are: Her one and

only, Bishop Stanley M. Seymour Sister: Syble :
Charlton; Adopted sisters: Gelita Pinder, Coral :
Iris Russell, Mother Patricia Rolleand family,
© Mother Gloria Dawkins, Mother Dorothy Smith

Dean, Idamae David & Brenda "Mama B"
Hanna; Brothers: Audley & Carlton Dean;

Children: Asst. Pastor Stanley W. & Nyoka & :
their children, Stanley, Asher and Cody; Patrice :
: Butler, Willimae McGregor, Pastor Genevieve
‘ Moncur, Apostle Amos Rahming, Evang.
: Willamae Cooper, Church of God family, Greater
: Bethel Cathedral family, Church of Jesus Christ
: of the Apostles Inc family, Revival Faith Mission
' family, Spoken Word International Ministries
: family, Dean family, Seymour family, Moncur
& Rashad; & Evangelistic Pentecostal Church :
: family, Lois Dames & family, Genevieve Dean
'& family, Francis Family & Hart family.
Kim Williams, debbie Moxey, Sisters-in-law: :

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
: Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m.
: on Saturday & on Sunday from 9-11 :30 a.m. &

& James Rolle and their children, Phyllicia,
James Jr., Janiqua, & Jabari; Karen & Jermaine
Burnside and their children, Desmond & Danielle
Gibson & Gabrielle Burnside; Andrew and
Donnell Seymour and their children, Annishka,
Andrew, Drewvan & Regina; Stephen and his
children, Shavana, George, Traves, Travaughn

(Bahamas) Ine. crew: Great Grands: Amari Hill
& Andrew Seymour; God-children: Brian Roker,

Eugie Cadet, Mary Seymour, Murten Simms,
Atlanta Rolle, Preniece Seymour, Vernice Paul,
Francita Seymour, Beatrice Seymour & Eunice
Seymour; Brothers-in-law: Rupert, Garnett &

| Daniel Seymour; Victor Simms; Cousins: Marion
: Palmer and her children, Esmerelda Smith,
: Arness Rubins, Marina & Degrando Franks &
: Patricia Roberts, Thelma Dean & children;

Nephews: Allen, Gentry, Allen Jr. & Joshua

Nieces: Driskell Rubins, Inger Dorsette, Beverley

: Lockhart, Leonie & Sylvia Charlton, Karen,
' Keisha Stuart, Carla, Tina, Corey, Jeryldine,
: Peninsula, Natasia & Theresa Dean, Symphony,
' Keosha, Marge, Stephanie, Pamela, Jerilene,
: Georgette Bodie and Lisa Cleae; Aunts: &

: Uncles: Corine Davis, Bessie Catwright &

Family, Ben & Charles Hart & Family; numerous
relatives and friends: Ellen Knowles and family,

& family, Mother Edna Hart & family, Ms.
Albertha Byer, Mrs. Miriam Curling, Mrs. Ethel

family, Roker family, King family, Hepburn

at the church from 12:30 p.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 15

BArmeritte’s Huneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Gentry Cheran "Gen" Taylor McPhee, 30

a.m. Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Philip B.

daughter: Angelee Gentria McPhee; mother:

Olga Marie Taylor; father: Prince McPhee;

stepmother: Sandra McPhee; mother-in-law:

Yvonne Storr; grandmother: Laura Taylor; |

adopted grandmother: Miriam Saunders; 3

sisters: Nicara Gray, Maria Taylor & Vanessa
Percentie; 3 brothers: Alverdo Rolle, Devardo Taylor & Jeremy Darling;
10 brothers-in-law: Jamaal Gray, Devon Percentie, Charles Perez, Allie :
Storr, Tony, Owen, Dwight, Howard, Smith & Taorian Major; 5 sisters- ;

in-law: Shenell, Baby & Anne Smith, Jamie Taylor & Lavara Rolle; aunts:

Vernese Francis, Marthalee Johnson, Sandra Taylor, Inez Green, Sybil :
Taylor, Valarie Taylor, Rev. Charlene McPhee, Naomi McPhee, Maedawn :
Munroe & Joan Anderson; uncles: Anvil, Simeon, Eric, Rufus & Harold
Taylor, Rev. Dr. Philip McPhee, Gentry McPhee, Petty Officer Kenneth
Saunders & Kingsley Munroe; nieces: Jaeda Gray, Lamia Taylor, Janvania ;
Rolle, Wonya & Carlisa; nephews: Raekwan, Rasmon & Raeshawn Rolle :

& Devardo Taylor Jr.; grandaunts: Evelyn Lloyd, Juletta Charlton, Carrimae
Curry, Naomi McKenzie, Izona Rolle, Eunice Brown, Florence Anderson;
granduncles: Lawrence Lloyd & Edison Deleveaux; numerous cousins
including: Jacontha, Shantel, Indena, Patrick, Cadwell, Vanessa, Erinique,

Brent & Darvin Johnson, Claudius, Kirk & Martin Francis, Damian,
Pratricia & Renaldo Neely, Sherilee Wilson, Jason Rolle, Shenique &
Latoya Clarke, Sharvago, Latisha, Brandon, Brittney & Kevin Greene,
Antonio Mcintosh, Mirand Evans, Manika & Makia Munroe, Lisa Brown,

Clifeen Moncur, Charlene Brown, Tameka Rolle; cousin-in-Iaw: Travis
Evans, Tyrone Brown, Cephas Brown, Meguel Rolle, Wendall Moncur;
other relatives & friends including: Arthur Poitier, Andrea Rodgers, Mrs.
Walkins, Tamara Burrows, Inderia Turston, Shirley & Douglas Storr,
Garvin, Geno, Kevin, Michael Bain, Jeff Ambrose, Tracy, Turnquest &
family, Dino, Romeo, Antonio, Crooked Island Street family, entire staff
of Nassau Dairy, entire staff of Restaurant Bahamas Ltd especially Saunders

Haven, the entire Taxi Drivers family, especially Taxi from RIU Paradise

Education, the entire Barraterre community, Bishop Elijah Knowles &
family, Great Deliverance Church family, Rev. Diana Francis & First
Baptist Church family, Brenda Dames & family, Coralee Lightbourne &

family, Rose McKenzie & family, Dr. Nicholas Hepburn, Ivan, Harold &
Patrick McPhee, Rita King, Cynthia Bain, Elizabeth Stubbs, Princess
Ferguson, Gwendolyn Stuart, Brendamae & Dr. Evernette McPhee, Ronald
Lloyd, Mizpah Strachan, Vercena Simmons, Judymae Chisholm, Betty

especially Alice Grant & Sherry Thurston, Colina Imperial especially

: Cheryl Seymour, Mr. Brooks, Ms. Smith, Ms. Simms & family & Mr.

a resident of Sea Well Manor, will be held | Fortweather.

at Mt. Calvary Baptist Cathedral, Blue Hill i _. ‘ :
: : : : Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Road & Cad Street, on Sauarlay at TO:00 i Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from

McPhee, assisted by Other Ministers of the 9:00 a.m. until service time.

Gospel. Interment follows in Woodlawn :
Gardens, Soldier Road. Left to cherish his :
memories are his wife: Victoria McPhee; ;

Dorothy Patricia Sargent Johnson, 66

a resident of Johnson Road Estates, will be
held at Mount Carey Union Baptist Church,
Fox Hill Road, on Saturday at 11 :00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. A. Enoch
Beckford, assisted by Rev. Warren Anderson
& Elder Theodore Rahming. Interment
follows in Mt. Carey Union Baptist Church
Cemetery.

Treasured memories will forever linger in
the hearts of her loving father: Wilfred
Thompson; husband: Edward Johnson; son:
Edwin Graham; daughters: Michelle Johnson,
Carla Stubbs, Marika Gordon, Sheena and

i Stacey Johnson; sister: Wilhelmina Sargent; brother: Michael Thompson;
i uncle: James Thompson; aunts: Sherry Thompson and Dorabell Sturrup;
i twenty-four (24) grandchildren: Dorcia, Corey, Kelvin Jr., Samuel, Daniel
i Jr., Danique, Anvard, Erin, Kara, Donikia. Travis, Sanchez, Ashala,
Crystal, Sonia, Sherrell, Karen, Debbie, Ryan, Simeon Jr., Anthon, Geraldo, : Demetrius, Tyrique, Rishad, Tashan, Mario, Antias, Martel, Wilnique,
Jermaine, Paulette, Rochelle & Sydina Taylor, Don Brown, Lacalle, Kent, : Cranston, Kenya & Markario; four (4) great grandchildren: Alejandro,
? Rishad Jr., K'licia and Dontaro; three (3) sons-in-law: Daniel Johnson Sr.,
i Kelvin Stubbs Sr. and Mario Gordon Sr.; daughter-in-law: Sherry Johnson;
i grand son-in-law: Gabrielle; nieces: Sharon Timothy, Carmel Clarke,
: Rosemary, Rochelle, Shirellle, Coleen, Prudence, Pauline, Zelma, Lydia,
Philip McPhee Jr, Charlene, Shannon, Chanderella, Andrew, Alteno, : Latoya, Gredessa, Stephanie and Venessa; nephews: Dion, Edward,
Deangelo, Nekell, Rephenie McPhee, Kendida, Kandice & Kandy Saunders, : Jerhmiah, Sterling, Michael Jr., Shawn, Elroy, Clarence, Wilfred, Darron
: and Andy; adopted sisters: Susiemae Dorsette, Paula Gardiner and Freda
i Harris; adopted children: Betsy Duvalier, Roseanna Taylor, Brenda Ferguson,
: Carvan Dorsette, Peggy Smith, Gloria Wallace and Lillard Elliott; godchild:
i Antia Adderley; special cousins: Pauline, Marcella and Sharon of New
i York; other relatives and friends: Rev. Enoch Beckford and Mount Carey
: Family, the Rt. Hon. Perry Gladstone Christie, the entire stalwart council,
: the women’s branch of the Progressive Liberal Party, John Pinder (BPSU
Beach, Mrs. Farrington, Ms. Rolle, Mrs. Woodside, Mrs. Rolle, Mr. Smith, : President) and his entire team, Herbert Brown (Managing Director, PHA),
Mr. Saunders, Ms. Conyers, Ms. Robinson, Ms. Poitier, the entire Arawak : Olive Mackey, Laura Williams, Dorothy Hepburn, the Johnson Road
Cay family including Big Ten, Ohh Andros, Twin Brothers & Sea Food : Family, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, especiaily the staff of Female
? Medical I & 2, Final Hours Family, National Insurance family, Bahamas
Island & Down Town Taxi Drivers, South Western District Ministry of : Customs Family, BEC family, Everlasting Life BaptIst Church Family,
i Bridgeann Smith, Genevieve Strachan, Edris Brice, Agnes Burrows,
; Genesta Adderley and a host of other relatives and friends too numerous
? to mention.

family, Karol Roach & family, Ethel Minus & family, Gloria Smith & ;

i Friends may pay their last respects at the Progressive Liberal Party
i Headquarters, Farrington Road, from 10-3:00 p.m. & at Demeritte's Funeral
: Home, Market Street, from 4-6 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church
! from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

Brown, Yvonne Coakley, Shirley Green, Jenniemae Humes, Rose Rolle, :

Jan, Kendrick, Kenson, Valron, Gia Deleveaux, Mt. Calvary Baptist :

Cathedral family, the Gray family, First Caribbean Bank Harbour Bay





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Demeritte’s SF uneral Some

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Angela Veronica Mackey-
Colebrooke, 47

| Street, Southern
Baptist Church,
on Saturday at 11 :00

be Pastor Perry
Cunningham,

assisted by Minister
Gary Watkins. Interment follows in Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish her memories are her father:
Ernest Mackey; 1 stepdaughter: Shatara

Freeport, Grand Bahama, Anthony Wilmore,
Henry Williamson of Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Nelson Mackey of Chattanooga, Tennessee &

Bahama; 3 aunts: Edna Miller, Jane Rolle &

Henny Rolle of Alburn, Rosetta Parker,

| Bernard Jr.,
' Latonia, Sergio, Shavette & Sharvargo Hanna,
: Lorenzo, Tonyshka, Tonyque, Tony Jr., Tonaz,

| Jared, Kiki & Simeon Mackey, Celeste Rose,

aresident of Barcley ganthon & Anae Bastian, Henry Jr, Henrie,

Teich ‘Il be held | Henrenek, Nakada, Christopher, Darius &

2 ts, W1 1 i | Branequa Williamson; a host of grand nieces
at Gospel Light _& nephews, relatives & family friends
including: Gwendolyn King, Joy, Theresa,
| Cowpen Road & | Leo, Sharmine Morris, Gwendolyn Williams,

ea Deborah Gilbert, Shantel Rolle, Tamara Pinder,

a = ., Marsha McGregor, Wendy, Michael
a.m. Officiating will Cunningham, Ingrid, Arinthia, Sarah, Linda,
| Monique, Shona, Clarise, Princess, Joycelyn,
| Jennifer, Selena, Patrice, Ms.
| Adennakah, Cheryl McPhee, Glenyss Stubbs,
| Mark Demeritte, Janet Watkins & family.
| Special thanks to Kenneth Hepburn & family,
| Jackie Pratt & family, Dellamae Johnson &
' family, Pastor Perry Cunningham & Gospel

' Light Baptist Church Family, Evangelistic
Colebrooke; 5 brothers: Bernard Hanna of _ Temple Family, the Colebrooke family, Nurses

_ & staff of Oncology Center, Nurses on the
| Female Surgical Ward II PMH, Management

_ & staff of Seaside Buffet, KFC Mackey Street,

Tony Mackey; 3 sisters: Donna Bethel of | Mackey's Plumbing, Bahamasair, Freeport

Freeport, Grand Bahama, Lonna & Sandra |
Mackey; 3 sisters-in-law: Rose Hanna of | oe eee amare
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Valarie Mackey of |

Chattanooga, Tennessee & Ursula Mackey; 1 :

brother-in-law: Craig Bethel of Freeport, Grand | Friends may pay their last respects at

| Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street,

Norma Thurston; 2 uncles: George & Crosby | from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday

Wilmore; nieces & nephews: Marvin & Coach at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service

Clarissa Robinson, Raymond & Leon Grant, : oe

Dwight, Shavania, Jeremy,

Edwards,





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 17

Aemeritie’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

DEATH NOTICES

Ruthland "Buster" Colebrooke

of Lily of the Valley Corner & formerly :
of Stafford Creek, Andros, died at his :
residence on Monday 16 March, 2009. He :
is survived by his sisters: Cecilene Bain ;

& Joycelyn Colebrooke; his daughter:
Sheryl Grant; 6 nephews: Lavern, Elverton,
Wilfred, Nelson, Norman & Michael; 5
nieces: Edwina "Donna", Marion,
Jacqueline, Terecita & Veronica & a host
of other relatives & friends.

a resident of St. Barts Road, Golden Gates
#2, died at his residence on Tuesday 10 :
March, 2009. He is survived by his wife: ;
Delores Pinder; children: Sandra, Sophie,
Edison Jr., Christopher, Vernard & Elsbeth;
sisters: Elzena & Andrea; brothers: Kendal, :
John & Charlie Eneas & a host of other :

relatives & friends.

a resident of Bartlett Street off Johnson

Road, died at PMH on Saturday 14 March,
2009. She is survived by her husband:
Simon Rolle; mother: Caroline

Edgecombe; father: Elias Griffin; 4 :
children: Aniska, Simon Jr., Raymond & ;

Reuben Rolle; sisters Tiffany Brown,
Patricia Rolle, Tamara & Ralinka Griffin,
Pemeikma, Latoya, Debbie, Nickie Griffin
of Waterford, Eleuthera.

a resident of Carmichael Road died at

PME on Thisday [2 Muteh, 2000 He a resident of Matthew Town, Inagua & formerly of South Caicos, Turks

: & Caicos Island, died on Friday 13 March, 2009. She is survived by
i her children: Suzette & Delores Wilson, Thomas & Debra Wilson of
: Matthew Town, Inagua, Patricia Seymour & Charmaine Knowles both

is survived by his wife: Shashana
Williams; father: Marshall A. Williams;

Wy] sisters: Jacqueline Williams-Woodside,
74 Kayla Williams-Hepburn & Monique :
Lewis; brothers: Clyde, Sgt. 1445 Elvis ;

Williams, Andrew Williams & Christopher Bahama, Patricia Cleare of Brooklyn, N.Y., Muriel Wilson of West

Palm Beach, FI & Camille Brown; 1 brother: Alfred Cleare Jr. & a host
* of other relatives & friends.

Williams.



Isabell Lakeisha Higgs Burrows, 32

a resident of Windsor Lane West died at
PMH on Thursday 12 March, 2009. She
is survived by her children: Terrance C.
Cartwright & Antone Higgs; father Benson
Higgs; sisters: Eunice, Andera Scully &
Leonette Burrows; brothers: Tony, Davon
& Jeffery Ellis & Andy Scully.

Mark Anthony Quint "Scabie" Bowe, 47

a resident of Gambier Village, died at his
residence on Thursday 12 March, 2009.
He is survived by his 2 sisters: Rochelle
Taylor & Tanya Bowe; brothers: James
Knowles, Trevor Taylor, Terey, Rickie &
Elizah Bowe.

Shirley A. Johnson, 70

a resident of Bamboo Crest, Golden Gates
#1, died at PMH on Sunday 15 March,
2009. She is survived by her 5 sons: Patrick,
Anthony, Brian, Ricardo & Dwayne; 1
daughter: Cheryl Maycock; 3 brothers:
Wesley, George & James Newbold; 3
sisters: Margerite Newbold, Rosalie Rolle
& Veronica Newbold; adopted son: Ted
Rolle; adopted sisters: Ruth Sears & Coreen
Rolle.

Edith Almira Wilson, 77

of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Joan Rolle, Brendalee Smith, Barry Wilson
of Freeport, Grand Bahama; sisters: Joan Stubbs of Freeport, Grand



PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

Commontoealth Funeral Home

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MESILE MICHEL, 68
affectionately called ‘“‘“Man Nes”

of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, will
be held on Saturday 2pm at
International Gospel Mission
Church Marsh Harbour, Abaco.
Bishop Roland Swain, assisted by
Rev Sitoir Pasterain and Bishop
Renaud Francois will officiate and
interment will follow in the Public
Cemetery Marsh Harbour, Abaco.
' | Precious memories are held by;
} Daughters: Moselie, Marise and
Lumenia
Son: Jean Rolet and Stepheson
Brothers: Medicam, Henrikes, Joel, Wilson, Elitama, Aritis
and Nesker
Sisters: Elianise, Lea, Meres and Mrs Chalema
Grandchildren: Jeanette, Vincent, Billy, Gina, Anischka,
Alexandrea, Alexander all of The Bahamas, Junia Miselene,
Kenson and Rony of Haiti, Belanda, Aldoph, Peterson, Handely,
Louis Marie, Jourdina, Sendie, Geph, Saradena, Kedlin,
Malesha, Loudlin and Jennyfa
Nephews: Kelly, Vener, Nissage, Herode, Wisny, Kenson,
David, Bernard, Garry, Devil, Wilkin, Alcide, Sadrack, and
Ebert
Nieces: Wideline, Karline, Yvrose, Ruth, Linda, Eva, Rolanda,
Charline, Marie-Michelle, Nonphie, Ysemane, Delisena,
Micheline, Roselette, Ydialie, Satilia, Gueda, Alourde, Etgar
and Loudine
Sons-in-law: Wilner Theopha, Jean Roland Sainvil and Jean-
Herve Bien-Aime
Daughters-in-law: Loudone Raymonvil and Angelie Alexi
Brother-in-law: Chalema
Sisters-in-law: Adilia, Norilia, Marisema and Lucie
Cousins: Wilman, Amori, Chavane,Kelly, Rose, Kenold,
Henry, Dieufort, Jean, Philippe, Erik, Elisa, Claude, Harry,
Sterlie, Yphodie and many others
Other Relatives and Friends include: Pastor Sitoir Pasterain,
and family, Pastor Robinson Weatherford, Beraca International,
Abaco Ace Hardware staff and the entire community of Marsh
Harbour, Abaco.

,

Relatives and friends may view the remains at the church in
Marsh Harbour on Friday from 7pm to service time on
Saturday. Funeral arrangements are being handled by THE
CHAPEL OF MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH
FUNERAL HOME INDEPENDENCE DRIVE.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

re Ccmaloien Banta?

FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral fice ae, eer G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: ay ae ine 7 p42) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 304-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 » Fax: (242) 373-3005

DEATH NOTICES FOR

MR. CLYDE
MARSHALL, 63

OF NASSAU VILLAGE DIED AT
DOCTOR’S HOSPITAL ON SUNDAY,
MARCH 15TH, 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Evangelist
Roslyn Marshall; sons: Anton Kendrick
and Anthony; sisters: Barbara Marshall
and Melva Marshall: brothers: William,
Charles and Lionel.

Funeral arrangements will announced later.

MR. PEDRO
OCTAVIOUS ROLLE, 57

OF #2 IMPERIAL PARK, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA AND FORMERLY
OF NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE,
DIED AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL, NASSAU, NEW
PROVIDENCE ON SUNDAY, MARCH
15, 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Valderine

Stubbs-Rolle; children: Domek, Javardo
and Doneka; mother: Ruth Rolle; 6 sisters: Paula Marshall, Patricia Rolle,
Melvern Wood, Marilyn John, Carolyn Strachan and Denise Clarke; 3
brothers: Leslie, Michael and Godfrey Rolle, numerous nieces, nephews,
and a host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.

MR. CLARENCE
CURLING, 45

of Golden Gates died at the Princess
Margaret Hospital on March 16th 2009.

He is survived by his wife Gail Curling

‘| Mother: Sheila Curling sons: A’delbert,

—| Chaz, and Trey Curling; adopted daughter:

| Kryzia Maycock; sister: Emmaline,

| Amanda, Sheryl, Avilda, Maketa and

Latoya Curling; adopted sisters: Terriseta

Ward, Yvette Morris, Padrey, Gloria

Wallace; brothers: Lealon, Hollis, William

and Charles Curling; adopted brothers:

Elliott and Harvey Lockhart and Clinton Munroe; numerous nieces and
nephews and a host of other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.



Funeral Arrangements will be announced at a later date.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 19

Resleios Memovial Morluary
and Cremaloiium Limited

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Rodd, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

GAY ELROSE
BOOTLE, 54

of Murphy Town, Abaco will be held
on Sunday, March 22nd, 2009 at 11:00 }
am at Marsh Harbour Seventh Day :
Adventist Church. Officiating will be :
Pastor Patrick Tyrill, assisted by Pastor }
Errol Tinker, Pastor Lawrence Arnett }
and Minister Marvin Mills. Interment :
will follow in the Public Cemetery }
Murphy Town, Abaco, Bahamas. ;}

She is survived by her husband, Wilbut Bootle; sons: Nathan Sr. and
Marvin Bootle; daughters, Emily Davis, Lawanda, Latoya, Loretta }

and Lasonia Bootle; grand children: Nathan Jr., Timothy Jr., Tashaun,

Lynden, Lynario, Tammy, Faith, Gaysha, Tianna and Makaya; son-
in-law: Timothy Davis Sr.; daughters-in-law: Tamika and Sophie :
Bootle; 3 sisters: Violet Smith, Judy Curry and Brenda Cooper; adopted

sister: Edna Kemp; | brother: Michael Levarity; sisters-in-law: } ; ; j ;
i Dwayne, Dwight and David; daughters: Wilma Coin and Lonease

Ernestine, Natasha, Raquel, Sandy and Racquel Bootle and Keva | Ferguson; daughters-in-law: Elizabeth, Victoria and Bernice Ferguson;

McKinney; brothers-in-law: Rodney, Hilly, Emitte, Lester, Johnathan :
and Rocklyn Bootle, Basil McKinney, Charles Bodie, Michael Levarity, :

Set. 1529 Hubert Smith of the Royal Bahamas Police Force and Joe

Curry; uncles: Alphonso McIntosh, George Reckley and Stafford } Jr., Alfred Bridgewater and Patrick Adderley; sisters: Patsy, Ruth,

Cooper and Noel Bootle; aunts: Carnetta Bootle and Barbara Reckley; | Theresa Bridgewater and Cynthia Frith; sisters-in-law: Angela &

nieces and nephews: Don and Jonna Bootle, Sammantha and Quincy } Linda Bridgewater and Janet Adderley; grandmother: Estella

Jones, Shavez, Richia, Rodney Jr., Lavargo, Hilly Jr., Nasasha, i Bridgewater; uncles: Thomas, Felix and Joshua Rolle; aunts: Lucinda

: McKenzie, Shirley Weech, Iva Musgrove, Sara, Lizzie, Althea and
: Eula Rolle; nephews: Theodore, Alex, Christopher, Demetrius, Jason,
i Leonard, Leonardo, Leon, Leanzo, Dominico, Renardo, Ricardo,

Anthony Jr., Julie and Al, Jermaine and Monique, Jasmine, Jigeria, ; Patrick Jr., and Jamal; nieces: Charlene Lunn, Jennymae, Dorothy,

Christine, Chanan Jones, Mavelyn, Chandra Munroe, Molena, Shenique
: Nagelbush, Sasha, Kendra, Rochelle, Charmine, Neka and Kathyann;
family and friends: Iva Duncombe, Eulease Simms, Jim and Charlene, ; 80d-children and other relatives and friends including: Alvin Rolle,

Phil Sapp and family, Rose Neilly, Donna Ferguson and family, Derek | Gary Rolle, Mag Bodie, Donniemae Munroe, Pamela Ferguson,

Williams and family, Donald Smith and family, Tino Clarke and : Salome Farrington, Advilda, Sybil and Chucky, Bishop Patrick and

: Minister Kehfie Rhodriquez, Pastor Danny Simmons, Pastor Alex.
Veronica Cooper, Linda Mills and family, Edith Clarke and family, } All descendants of Jacob and Elizabeth Rolle, Sylvannas & Aurelia

William Swain and family, Karen Antonio and family, Lernis Commish } Bridgewater of Exuma; Josey, Hall, Vera Bain, Edna Miller, Todd,

and family, Jimmy Williams and family, Yvonne Stuart and family, | Moss, Bostwick, Ramsey, Ms. Irene, Frickelton, Gibson, King, Watsons,

Silbert Mills and family, Ada Deaveux and family, Marsh Harbour | Blacks, Forbes, Fawkes, Prophetic Love and Carmichael Bible Church

Govt. Clinic, Marsh Harbour Seventh Day Adventist Church family, i
St. John’s Anglican Church family, Pastor Lawrence Arnett and Soul :
Saving Ministries family, McDonald families of Murphy Town, The

Williams, Mills, Cornish, Hepburn and Sawyer families of Dundas

Town, The McIntosh, Cooper, and Reckley families of Green Turtle | Viewing will be held in the Celestial Suite at Restview Memorial

Cay; and the entire Community of Murphy and Dundas Towns, Marsh } Mortuary, Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am to

Spring City and Green Turtle Cay, Abaco. } 9:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 8:30 a.m. until service time at the

: church.

Marguarie Levarity, Monica Adderley, Minalee Bodie, Mildred,

Emmanique, Azarial, Shaquille, Durrell, Johnathan Jr., DeCarlo,
Rocklyn Jr., Alexis, Deneze, Kelia, Basia, Kendra, Katalyn, Basil Jr.,
Brian, Kirk, Willis, Dennis, Ron, Cindy, Thomas, Trevor, Michael,

Misty, Phylicia and Ashley; god children: Jackie of Miami, Florida.,
Rose Johnson, Terry Saunders, Phillipa Penn and Bradley Swain;

family, Jamal McDonald and family, Kera Simms, Theoda Robinson,

Harbour,

Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suite at Restview Memorial
: Mortuary, Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am until
i 6:00 pm and at the church in Marsh Harbour, Abaco on Saturday from

10:00 am until service time on Sunday.

ORELIA
FERGUSON, 65

of Miller’s Heights, off Carmichael
Road will be held on Saturday morning
at 10:00 am at Enoch Beckford Hall,
Carmichael Road. Officiating will be
Bishop Patrick Rodriquez, assisted by
Pastor Danny Simmons. Interment will
follow in Carmichael Bible Church
Cemetery, Carmichael Road.

Left to cherish precious memories of

mummvy’s life are: her sons: Donavon,

son-in-law: Joshua Coin Sr.; grandchildren: Jasmine, Mark, Josh Jr.,
Dwayne Jr., Joey, Dashante’, Dweshanique, Ryan, Dwenise, Dawson
Moultrie, and D’veia; great-grandson: Darin Warren; brothers: Leonard

Ministries and the Millers Heights Community.

“May Her Soul Continue To Rest In Peace”





PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

ee
and Crematouum Limiled

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Rodd, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 » Fax: (242) 340-8034

late Gladstone Dorsette of Houston, Texas, James and Bertram Cambridge

FUNERAL DOSY FOR

CLIFFORD LEONARD
JOHNSON, 76

} OF #6 SETTLER’S WAY, FREEPORT, }
>| GRAND BAHAMA AND FORMERLY }
©} OF HATCHET BAY, ELEUTHERA }
=| WILL BE HELD ON SATURDAY, }
MARCH 21, 2009 AT 11:00 A.M. AT THE

ST. PAUL’S METHODIST CHURCH,

EAST SUNRISE HIGHWAY AND

BEACHWAY DRIVE, FREEPORT,

GRAND BAHAMA. OFFICIATING
WILL BE REV. THEOPHILUS N. }
ROLLE. INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW }
IN THE GRAND BAHAMA MEMORIAL :
PARK SECTION #2, FROBISHER DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND }

BAHAMA.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Margurita Johnson; sons: Derek,

Dwayne, Dexter, Desmond and Kevin, Clayton Johnson; daughters: Juliette
Foster and Angela Woodside; adopted daughter: Renae Russell; :

grandchildren: Carey and Maria Johnson, Ysamine Miller, Katiushia, Kerano,
Mecose, K’ Tonya and Christian Johnson, De’Ryan Woodside, Kari, Sheraze,

Deontae Ferguson; sisters: Shirley Johnson of Miami, Fla., Myna Gaitor,
Jane Lord, Julie Pennerman, Sandra Johnson and Clothilda Frazier; brothers:
Earl Johnson of Miami, Fla., Duke Johnson and Anthony Frazier; nieces:
Sheila and Francine, Ingrid Gibson, Lorriane, Joy, Monique, Charmine,

Malinda, Ada, Patricia, Precious and Eunishia Gaitor, Tabitha and Kystal |

Lord, Maxine McQueen, Nicole Fernander and Greta Gibson, Erica Wright,

Macine Lightfoot, Althamise Duncombe, Christine Springer, Jacqueline }
Fowler, Paula Rolle, Euletha Strachan, Brenda Daxon, Stephanie Frances and ;

Charmaine Stuart; nephews: Glen, Keith, Cecil Jr. and Keno Johnson, Adam,

Chester, Warren and Scottie Bethel, Charles Jr., Devon, Demetrie, Tony and
Clayton Miller, Henry Wright, Harold Duncombe, Philip Williams, Anthony |
Fowler, Bersil Williams, Andrew Johnson, Cylde Mackey, Robert, Charles

and Dion Strachan, Mervin Fynes and Troy Stubbs; grandnieces: Natasha,

Cashayndra, Shekeya, Shameeka, Abril Dominique, Jasmine and Melissa;
grandnephews: Larry, Roderick, Travis, Jean Jr., Terran, Ian, Dennis, Sheldon
and Acharo; aunts: Rhonda McQueen of Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera, Karen i
Cambridge of New York, Norma Johnson-Cambridge of Houston, Texas; }

daughters-in-law: Cathy, Moksha, Muriel and Tonya Johnson; sons-in-law:

Frederick Foster and Rev. Ortland Woodside; sisters-in-law: Gadelle and
Janice Johnson and Terri Blackhill; brothers-in-law: Eulys Strachan and |
Philip Gaitor; godchildren: Dave Scavella, Glendamae Ranger and Alex }
Roxbury; cousins: George and Janet Cambridge and family, Lida Scavella }
and family, Edna Symonette and family, Willamae Cambridge and family, }
Paul Gibson and family all of Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera, Eleuther Hilton and
family, Gladstone Cambridge and family, Samuel Cleare and family, Elsie
Hanna and Leanora Young both of Miami, Fla., Elizabeth Peoples and family }
of Philadelphia, Pedio, Ian and Tatanisha Williams and families, Leanora and ;
Godfrey Saunders and family, Raymond and Remelda Davis and family, |
Whitney and Jayann Davis and family, Dorothy Davis and Monique }
Lightbourne and family, Millie and Novelette Cambridge, the children of the {

all of New York; Tommy Davis and family, Eugie Turnquest and family,

Andre Taylor and family, Montana Lightbourne, Kenth and Emil Symonette

and family, Joseph and Patrick Johnson and family and a host of other
relatives and friends including: George and Mack Pinder and family, Richard
Dean and family, Henry and Rose Wood and family, Robert Scavella all of
Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera, Blanton Gibson and family, Alerdyce Strachan and
family, Joan Allen, Bernal Russell and family, Wildred Mackey, Buck Johnson
all of Gregory Town, Eleuthera, Tommy Gibson and family of the Bluff,
Eleuthera, Calsy Johnson and family, Carmelan Burrows and family, Kenneth
Kemp and family, Leon Johnson and family, Natalie Hutchinson and family,
Ella Whitfield and family, Philip Johnson and family, John Kemp and family,
Bradford Dames, Adrain Johnson and family, Janice and Cheryl Davis and
family of Atlanta, Livingstone Rolle and family, Charles and Leona Thompson
and family, Ortland Fynes and family, Wade, Lloyd, David, Jeanane and
Bridgette McQueen and families, Glenda and Jeff Wildgoose and family,
Elgin Horton and family, Diane Morgan, Karen Wilson, Doreen, Jack and
Steve Thompson, Renee Fowler, Jason and Barbara Thompson, Charles and
Deborah Cartwright, Sheila Cooper and family, James and Maria Dorsette
and family, Yvonne Ferguson, Mr. and Mrs. Kingsley Bailou, James and
Betty Roxbury, Sheila Francis and family, Keith and Mary Bastian and family,
Doctors and Nurses of the ICU Unit at the Rand Memorial Hospital and the
entire community of Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera.

| VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “PERPETUAL SUITE” OF
Pakiyah and Treco Johnson, Angelique Foster, Yanique Pinder, Chevon }
Russell and Ortnell Pinder; great grandchildren: Ortnell Arkil Pinder and ;

RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM LIMITED,
11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY
FROM 10:00 A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY
FROM 9:30 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

MRS. ROSABELLA
RUSSELL, 69

OF LEWIS YARD, GRAND BAHAMA
DIED AT THE RAND MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON FRIDAY, MARCH 13,
2009.

She is survived by her two daughters:

Marion and Rose Russell; four sons:

Samuel, Bradford, Douglas and Ray

Anthony Russell; seventeen grandchildren;

13 great grandchildren; three sisters; five
brothers; one daughter-in-law; four sisters-in-law, numerous nieces, nephews
and a host of other relatives and friends.

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A LATER
DATE.





THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 21

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES
/E Acco Froreitoet
ASSAU

FREEPORT N

11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 » Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
DEATH ANNOUNCEMENTS

MR. PATRICK DORN
“DON” JOHNSON, 49

MILA CLARITA
SWANN-BURROWS, 87

OF LEWIS YARD, GRAND}

BAHAMA WILL BE HELD ON }
SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2009 AT {
1:00 P.M. AT ST. VINCENT DE }
PAUL CATHOLIC CHURCH, }
» | HUNTER’S, GRAND BAHAMA. }
“>| OFFICIATING WILL BE THE REV’D }

OF #15 MAN-O-WAR CIRCLE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
DIED AT THE PRINCESS
MARGARET HOSPITAL ON

i MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009.
FATHER REGINALD DEMERITTE. i

_| INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN
THE HUNTER’*’S PUBLIC
CEMETERY, HUNTER’S, GRAND BAHAMA.

salar Saae a ienntone sear net i. daughters: Alisa, Raven and Asaunde Johnson; stepchildren: Fabian,
Georee Missiok, Arthemio Held, Carmen; Mantel, Luther, Brenda and | Virgill, Antonio, Parrish and Colette; sisters: Ivy Stuart, Drusilla

Glenda McIntosh, Janette Roosevelt, Yvette, Mario, Michael Scott and
Peggy Clarke both of New York; great grandchildren: Leonard II,
Caleb Sr., Sinead and Alexina Lewis, Dimphion, Natasha, Shenice,
Georgia and Sherice Missick, Dameco Anderson, Maurey Jr., Brian,
Maurissa and Mauresheia Davis, Campbell Jr., Claritta, Shenika and
Clint Walker, Abraham Thompson, Latoya Saunders, Simeon Jr., John,
Amanda, Olivia, Lutisha, Luther Jr., Denzil, Seanique, Seanice, Diah,

D’Sean, Fabian, NaSean, and T’Sean McIntosh, Alexander, Amina and }
Malia Ledee, Calvin Cooper, Ashley Swain, Nigeria, Ashley, Tybirius,
Courtney, Gary, Brandon and Asado Scoot, John Lee, Rhone and Kenya }
Mims, Gwentha Clarke, Roosevelt, McLeod, Josephine Henry, Sabrina }
Williams-Lewis and Marquita Fowler; great-great grandchildren: }
Kashdon, Campbell III, Amanda, Darvin, Ritchie, Nathaniel, Astazia, :
Lofton, Tara, Derrenique, Malik, Ethan, Caleb Jr., Mayakaka, Kai, Nia, i
sister: Maude Swann; nieces and nephews: Oriel, George, Gersham
and Wilton Swann, Jack and Delia Smith, Rosemary, Clarke, Terry }
King, Ethel Rolle Rosetta Swann, Celestina Sidel and Clothilda Missick;
honorary children: Rholanda Higgs-Rule, Georgina Higgs, Sara Lee i
Lewis-Cole, Barbara Grant, Perry Gilbert, Peggy Basden, Father i
Reginald Demeritte, Thalmage, Lionel McIntosh, Whitney “Doc” Bain,
James, Thelma, Noel and Dennis Anderson, Sam Williams and a host ;

of other relatives and friends including: Drucilla Russell, James
Gray, Emily, Grey, Enoch and Bernice Lightbourne, Lou Higgs, Theresa
Strachan, Philip and Mona Edgecombe and Fayma Gibson.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “SERENITY SUITE” OF
RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM
LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT

THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY FROM 11:30 A.M. UNTIL

SERVICE TIME.

He is survived by his wife: Myrtle
Cartwright; father: Stanley Johnson;
stepmother: Winifred Johnson; sons:
Tristan and Tavaris Johnson;

Butterfield and Stanleka Taylor; brothers: Warren, Reunie, Andrew
and Calvin Johnson and Benjamin Lefluer; stepsisters: Marsha Saunders
and Patrice Glinton; stepbrother: Auddis “Auddy” Glinton and a host
of other relatives and friends.

FUNERAL SERVICE WILL BE HELD ON SATURDAY, MARCH

MS. DEZARENE
LORANDA
FERGUSON, 33

OF #49 WEST PIONEER’S WAY,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
DIED AT THE RAND MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON SUNDAY, MARCH
15, 2009.

She is survived by her father: Carl

Ferguson; stepmother: Idamae

Ferguson; 4 sisters: Sharon Major,
Yvette Ferguson, Sarah Swain and Bernice Cooper; 2 brothers: Carl
Jr. and Carven Ferguson; numerous nieces, nephew, aunts, uncles
and a host of other relatives and friends.

i FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A

LATER DATE.





PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

———— ‘

ic satedinur he

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

rortal lineral Chanel

Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D.

re Director

Pel, Iho: Caebey ge
bh ilwue Gall dae }
aU), teats Ue Danae 0

Ilse ji at ielitts

Serving The Entire Bahamas, Turks & Cacios Island

yee ty aed
Keyjta, excellence s]|

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ighergserulcelisithe

me ae SERVICES
LEEANN LAVERNE ADDERLEY, 40

of Burnt Ground, Long Island, will be held
on Saturday, 21th March, 2009 at 2:00 p.m.
at Burnt Ground Gospel Chapel. Officiating
will be Chief Apostle Leon Wallace, and
assisted by Minister Alphonso Shearer and

| Minister Reno Johnson. Interment will be
held at Glintons Public Cemetery,Glintons
Long Island.

Left to cherish her precious memories are
her brothers: Ezekiel Adderley; stepbrothers:
Kenneth, Sharvago, Omar and Dale Taylor;
nieces: Doretha Sweeting, Breanda, Aaliyah
and Shantol; nephews: Renaldo, Geno,
Lynden, Joshua and Lynden Sweeting; sister-in-law: Idella Adderley; uncles:
Oliver Adderley, Eddie McPhee and Ithiel Knowles; aunts: Carrymae
Adderley, Mary McPhee, Martha Knowles and Melda Miller; other relatives
and friends: Ms. Norma Newton, Donald and Susan Demeritte, Mae, Miesha,
Nisha, Ricardo, Don, Wellington, Bert Adderley, Cornelius Miller, Alonzo,
Trevor, Chester, Donald, Pandora, Patrice, Ronnie, Natasha, Conchita,
Marilyn, Arimentha, Marcus, Nina, Dweyvn, Arthur, Paco, Jackie, Wendy,
Elias and Sandevar Sandi, Herbert and Linda Marshall, Vincent and Ivy
McDonald and Lindop McPhee of New York, Gladstone and Daisy McPhee,
Sydney and Arnold McPhee, George Wilson, Gloria Gardiner, Albert and
Juanita Armbrister, Silisteno and Suzette Butterfield, Denise Marshall,
Selina, Lucimae, Carade McPhee and Monalisa Wilson, Agnes Knowles,
Katie and Ellamae, Tanglea Bain, Doyle, Teko, Wilbert,Eugene, Timothy,
Brain, Delorise and Lucille, Leon Miller, Ms. Rebecca Knowles and Simeon;
adopted nieces: Trevonte, Alozinique, Leona and Cinia; special friends:
Charmaine, Kendora, Ian-Marie, Lovina, Joy, Delerise, Pamela, Janice
Adderley, Michael Darville, Uziah, Alexander, Troy, Margaret, Agnes Taylor,
Helen Pratt, David and Patrice Pratt, Alice Taylor and family, Mama Rosa
and Lillian Adderley, Ella Thompson, Orthnell Knowles and family, Beth,
Jessica Rahming and family, Vanria Adderley, William Adderley, Malvise
Adderley, Lula Bethel, Latoya Adderley, Viola Adderley, Sally and family,
The Smith family, The Shearers family, Lillian dean and the entire District
of Northern Long Island other special friends to numerous too mention.

Viewing will be held at Brunt Ground Gospel Chapel, Burnt Ground, Long

Island on Friday, 20th March, 2009 from 2:00 p.m. until service time at the
church. Arrangment will be handle by Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel.

VERONICA MONICA BUTLER-MUNNINGS, 64

a reisdent of Millienium Gardens and formerly of Green Castle, Eleuthera
will be held on Saturday, 21st March, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at Arrow of |

») Deliverance Pentecostal Church; Officiating
will be Dr. Audley Hepburn II assisted by
Other Ministers of the Gospel and interment
will follow in Lakeview Memorial Gardens
and Mausoleums, John F. Kennedy Drive.
Services entrusted to Gateway Memorial
Funeral Chapel, Mount Royal Avenue and
Kenwood Street.

She leaves to treasure her memories are
Cherished memories will forever remain
in the hearts of her:Husband: Alfred
Munnings Sr., Mother: Marion Butler;
Stepmother: Elizabeth Butler; Daughters:
Judymae Butler, Donna Butler-Ohenzawa,
Sharon McIntosh, Laverne Percentie, Bernadette Farrington, Shaniece &
Melanie Albury and Latoya Pratt. Stepdaughter: Claudia Munnings Sons:
Sidney, Ian, Kenneth & Brad Butler, and Alfred Munnings Jr. Sisters: Esther
Smith & Ida Butler Grand Children: Ellison, Pedro, Joel, Akman, Ashton,
Carlos, Clarence, Dreon,Akeem Sr., Darius, Ian Jr., Kehsano, Demetrius,
Franklyn, Paulin, Lewis III, Kelvin Jr., Beron, Willie, Quenten, Kizzy Butler-
Rolle, Ashley, Alex, Brittney, Ianna, Anastacia, Andrea, Danielle, Latika,
Gabrielle, Ariel, Adara, Brianna, Shatarise. Great Grandchildren: Keniece
& Akeem Jr. Son-in-laws: Alexander McIntosh, Andy Percentie, Prince
Ohenzawa, Lewis Farrington I, Vandyke Pratt, Claudius Gaitor. Daughter-
in-law: Gertrude Butler Sister-in-law: Ida Munnings & Uleen Munnings
Brother-in-law:Joe Munnings & George Smith Sr. Uncle: Rudolph Butler
Nieces & Nephews: Anuschka, George Smith Jr., Leechante, Ithamar,
Mychael, Lorenz, Crystal Sands Godmother: Viola Rolle Goddaughters:
Ruth Wright & Naomi Brown Other Relatives & Friends including: Andrea,
Marie, Cynthia, Ulease, Antoinette, Alvena, Lambert, Phillip, Billy, Trevor,
Anthony, Timmy, Clara, Lilly, Rena, Una, Merlease, Christopher, Granville
Smiley Jr., Gregory, Idell, Gertrude, Kevin Miller, Kathleen, Carol, Launa,
Carnetta, Helen, Blanche, Harris, Jestina, Anthony, Boston, James & Prophet
Henry Morley, Dave Sands, Phillip, Conrad & Apostle C.J. Miller, Elizabeth,
Bettymae, Joannamae, Barbaramae, Maxine, Aranese, Sharlene, Marvalene,
Reginald, Doris, Iva, Evelyn, Estabelle, Isabelle, Tony, Norris, Johnny,
Orman, Yvonne, Estella, Carrington, Femena, Isamae, Jerome, Rosalee,
Veona, Betsy, Francine, Angela, Wilton, Delroy & Aladice Richards, Madeline
Richards, Pastor Hubert & Agnes Mackey, Evelyn Whylly & Family,
Winifred Butler & Family, Shavanda Sturrup & Family, Dr. Audley Hepburn
Il & Miracle Convention Cathedral Ministries, Drs. Jay & Euphemia Simms
& Christian Life Church Family, M.P. South Eleuthera, Oswald J. Ingraham,
The entire Green Castle Community, Princess Cay Vendors, Doctors &
Nurses of Female Surgical I & Female Medical II at the Princess Margaret
Hospital.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Friday, March
20th, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday, from 9:30 a.m.
until service time at the church.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

ws | fn,

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 23

EAST SUN @ RISE MORTUARY
“” Nea Commitment to Serve”

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Ivamae Ferguson, 73

of Campbell Avenue, Pyfrom Addition will :
be held on Saturday at 10 a.m. at The Church :
of God of Prophecy, East Street, Tabernacle. :

Officiating will be Bishop Rudolph V. :
Bowe and Pastor Kendal Simmons. |!
Interment will be in Woodlawn Gardens, !

Soldier Road.

She is survived by her husband: Husband:

Bishop Arthur Ferguson;

Three daughters: Judith Maycock, :

Joye Ross, Lisa Berkeley of Orlando, :

Florida; Three sons-in-law: Pastor :

Arthur (Leroy) Maycock, Paul Ross, '

Leslie (Tino) Berkeley of Orlando, :

Florida; Eight Grand-daughters: |:
Lakia Knowles, Krystle, Katrice, !
Kandice, and Karissa Maycock, Courtenee Ross, Tinisa and :
Taysia Berkeley of Orlando, Florida; Seven foster daughters: :
Marylee Lightbourne and Arnette Moss of New Haven, CT, Eulease :
Munroe, Sabrina Francis, Brenda Wilson of Atlanta GA, Angela :
Butler and Barbara Hall; Two Grandsons: Dennis and D’Angelo :
Knowles; Two Sisters: Mayna Hepburn and Cheryl Campbell; :
Four foster sisters: Mavis Seymour, Sandra Stewart, Daphne :
Nixon and Valencia Nottage; Three Aunts: Mayrona Seymour, :
Mary Marshall and Ellen Knowles; Two Uncles: Delegal Seymour :
& Simeon Knowles; Four Brothers-in-law: Brenville Sr, Clarence :
and Vanderson Ferguson and Clement Campbell; Two Sisters- :
in-law: Lily and Barbara Ferguson; Special Friends: Audrey '
Evans, Maud Ferguson, Dorothy Coakley and family; Numerous :
nieces and nephews including: Jeffrey Ferguson and family, :
Trevor and Holly Ferguson, Jerome and Cara Ferguson, Brian :
and Loren Ferguson, Darrell and Debbi Ferguson and Emile |
Ferguson, Chevita and McMahon Campbell, Brenville and Joann :
Ferguson, Melvern and Reuben Hall, Sharon and George Swann, :
Doralee Beneby, Marcia and Jason Griffin, Bernard and Kenneth :
Ferguson, Rose Simmons, Linda Balfour and Brenda Saunders, :
Anne Fowler, Juanita and Charlton Moriey, Barry and Sharon :
Ferguson of Cleveland, TN., Lisa Hawk of Atlanta, GA, Sonji and :
Jerry Robinson of Cleveland, TN., Randy and Teddy Ferguson; :
Special Cousins: Leamorn Seymour, Philip and Jane Gibson, :
Colyn Gibson, Clyde Nixon, Marguerite Bethel, Clyde Knowles, :
Austin and Janice Knowles, Delores and Ben Rolle, Norma, :
Audrey, Barbara, Billy and Joan Allen of New York, Garnell and :
Popmo Miller, Caryla Josey of Florida, Donald Josey and Katrina '
Kleckley of Columbus, OH, Verona, Supt. Steven and Deborah :
and Carlton and Carla Seymour and Michael Seymour, Marilyn ‘:

EAST SUNRIS

fF

and Lenox Major, Lynden and Ingrid Seymour, Laverne and Pastor
Randolph Curtis, Lynette and Donovan Gardiner, Wendy and
Gregory Jones, Janeen Pinder, Sonia Rolle, Denise Wildgoose,
Alexandra Archer, Tyrone Marshall, Michelle Thompson, Malinda
Pratt, Jayne Knowles and family, Delmetta Pratt, Gladys and
Carl Brice, Ricardo Knowles, Rosamund Thrower and Thelma
Pyfrom; Other relatives and friends including: Clifford and
Zoe Galanis and family, Constance and Tex Lunn, Maris Sands,
Steve and Carmen Hepburn, Diana and Anne Hepburn, Florrie
Knowles, Bishop Brice and Advira Thompson, Bishop Elgarnet
and Jacquelyn Rahming, Bishop Rudolph and Veronica Bowe,
Bishop Franklyn and Rovena Ferguson, Bishop Woodley and
Vernique Thompson, Bishop Nelson and Maud Ferguson, Pastor
Kendal and Lorna Simmons, Bishop R. B. Finlayson and family
of Atlanta GA., Dec. Hurai and Cynthia Ferguson, Dec. Herman
and Nora McClain, Dec. Whittington and Eliza Deleveaux, Dec.
Albert and Mable Daxon, Minister Romeo and Beatrice Ferguson,
Minister Desmond and Sheila Peters, Michael Munroe, Shelly
Peters-Ewing and family of Antigua, Rev. Dr. Michael and Hilda
Symonette, Victoria Beneby and family, Marilyn Collie and family,
Livingston and Sharon Deveaux, Minister Herbert and Patricia
Forbes, Fulton and Deidrianna Bain, Jacqueline Clarke, Cleo
Pratt, Craig and Renee Gibson, Darren and Andra Brown, Charlene
and Rodney Stuart, Lorraine Strachan, Brenda Cunningham,
Betty Cox, Clyde and Mary Moss, David and Katherine Beneby,
Felix and Thelma Beneby, Matthew and Denise Rolle, Patrick
and Doreen Musgrove, Cora Colebrooke, Maria Scott, Shirley Allen
& family, Beulah Sands, Seth and Leah Mather, Everette and
Euricka Rolle, Fritz and Sheila Grant, Roberta Hepburn, Winnifred
Wiliamson, Pat Bethel, Eleanor Cartwight, Oralee Whylly, Chris
and Harriet Wallace, Garrett and Rowena Finlayson, Clyde
Finlayson, Inell Williams, Michael Swann, Salathiel Simmons,
Inez Grant, Ophelia Cartwright, Malvese Munnings, Elqueena
Bastian, Marcy Ferguson, the Maycock family, Pastor Jeremiah
and Hortense Ross of Mandeville, JA; the Ross family of England,
Mary Berkeley and family, Evelyn Hibbert, of Derby, England;
Christal Smith, the East Street Church of God of Prophecy family,
Pastors and members of Life Transformation Center, Baillou Hill
Road, Church of God of Prophecy Prayer Band, Pastor Dudley
and Diane Coverley, the C.I. Gibson Senior High School family,
First Caribbean Bank, Doctors Turnquest, Curling and Roberts,
Nurses Butler, Kelphanie and Williams and staff of the Oncology
Clinic, the staff of East Sunrise Mortuary and Woodlawn Gardens.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Street,
Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and at the Tabernacle from 8.30
a.m. on Saturday until service time.

Because of Ivamae’s jubilant life, the family has requested that friends &
families attending the Home Going Service wear light colors.

E MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957

24 hrs. Emergency Service
Cell #: 357-9151 ¢ Beeper: 380-1450 or 380-1117





PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

_~* Vf

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

EAS] EAST SUN @RISE MC ISE MORTUARY

—

“A New Commitment to Serve”

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Rev. Mother Edna Sands, 85

of Palmetto Point, Eleuthera will be !
held on Saturday at 11 a.m. at Full |
Gospel House of God, Palmetto Point, |
Eleuthera. Officiating will be Pastor :
Leonard Culmer. Interment will follow :
in Margaret View Cemetery, Palmetto }

Point.

She is survived by her children: Min. :

Terry Sands, Maurice Sands, Rev. |

Lavina Sands-Culmer, Garry & Dewitt |

Sands; 2 step daughters: Sylvia Roker |

and Cynthia Williams; Grandchildren: |

Maurice Sands Jr., Dwight, David, :

Delora & Jason Sands & Jenell Cummings; Step Grand Children: !
Mario Roker, Janet Major, Angelique Pinder, Miguel Roker, Orchid |
Russell, Hazel McKinney, Kelvin and Joseph Hall; Sisters: Ida
Mae Albury, Dolly Nicholson, Yvonne Thompson, Rose Whitehead :
Austin Knowles Sr., Albert |
One aunt: Jeanie Bethel; 3 :
Daughters-in-law: Jewel, Betty and Jane Sands; 1son-in-law: |
Minister Kirk Culmer & Brice Williams; 1 grand daughter-in-law: |
1 grandson-in-law: Peron Cummings; brother- |
in-law: B. C. Nicholson; 2 sisters-in-law: Garnell Knowles and Iris |
Knowles; Nieces and Nephews: Sandra Evans, Peggy, Corinda, !
Urban, Artie, Andre & Wilson Cooper, Dianne, Kay, Donna :
Thompson, Sandy, Bryan, Lynden Deal, Jackie Deal Russell,
Barbara Darville, Pastor Kay Albury, Phyllis, Joyce Chriss & Dr. !
Hadassah Knowles, Nat, Tyrone, Terman, Tavaras Knowles, Tanya :
Neymour, Abby Knowles; Other relatives and friends: Geraldine |
Ingraham, Marei Johnson, Sheila Cooper, Carolyn Rolle, Pearl :
Edwards, Mr. & Mrs. Maitland Bethel, Viola Nottage, Nelson,
Lilly & Benson Knowles, Pastor Naomi Taylor, Enid Albury, |
Marvin, Garry, Michael, Elaine & Anette Bethel, Renny & Marie :
Thompson, Mona Thompson, Prescola Stewart, Timothy Cary & :
Family (Tarpum Bay), Tony Cooper, (N.Y.) Mary & Errol Ingraham, |
Ted Sands, Wallace Sands, Louise Sands & Family, Erdman Deal
& Family, Addie Culmer & Family, Ena Thompson & Family, !
Hilda Sands, Carles, Alton, Elvis, Dave & Gloria Cooper, Muriel :
Cooper & Family; The family of the late Evie Christie; Barbara |

& Miriam Knowles; 3 Brothers:
Knowles and Clinton Knowles;

Claudell Sands;

Knowles, Armette Hanna, The family of the late Leon Thompson;

The family of the late Valdez Johnson; Maybell Gibson & family,
Mavis Johnson & family, Freda Deal & family, Eunice Pyfrom &
family, Nelson, Allerdyce & Louise Sands, Davina Albury, Olga
Porter, Jackie Bowe, Shirley Rolle, Mizpah Evans, Mr. & Mrs.
Kingsley Sands, Thelma Deveaux, Cassie Cooper, Tessis Stubbs,
God children: Eric Cooper and Calvin Thompson; Church Families:
Pastor Leonard & Min. Stephanie Culmer, Min. Ena Culmer &
family, Pastor Branville & Deacon Laurina Thompson & family,
Sis. Lisa Williams & family, Deaconess Leonardette & family,
Bishop Clifford & Velma Petty, Sis. Nairn, Mr. & Mrs. Ramnauth,
Mr. & Mrs. Livingston Stuart & family, Mrs. Ella Sands, Jen
Ingraham, Chrystal Culmer, Asa Bethel & Family, Sis. Carolyn
Sands, Min. Shannon Clarke, Dr. Walter & Rosie Gibson, Nurse
Desiree Ford of England, Dr. Smith, Dr. Guina, Nurse Debbie
Deal, Nurse Linelle Thompson, Lowell, Ductan, Jack, Mack, Brenda
Cooper, Pastor & Mrs. Kipling Johnson & family, Mrs. Darvelle,
Mrs. Lenora Nixon, Maude McKinney, Evang. Christiana
Thompson, Bishop & Mrs. Dan Nixon, Bishop C. N. Williams,
Evang. Helen Allen, Dr. Mavis Thompson, Bishop Ros Davis,
Pastor Ed Watson, Bishop Wenith Davis, Sen. & Mrs. Johnlee
Ferguson, Minette Clarke, United Servants Abroad, Bro. Don,
Marion, Oliver, Ellen Gibson, Fred Mingo, Erzilla Bethel & Millard
Bethel, Mr. & Mrs. Wesley Ingraham & family, Mr. & Mrs.
Brindley Cooper & family, Garfield Deal & family, Zelma &
Seabreeze Bethel, The family of the late Wandell & Estelle Culmer;
Patricia Archer, Hank Johnson, Butch Johnson, Godfrey Major &
Family, The Hon. Henry & Janet Bostwick & family; The Rt.
Hon. Hubert Ingraham & family (Prime Minister), The Hon. Oswald
Ingraham & family; The Hon. Alvin Smith, Adison Cooper &
family, Pastor Carl Nixon (Wings of Deliverance Church family),
Assembly of God Church family, Wemyss Bight; Assembly of
God Church family (Rock Sound); The Methodist Church family
of James Cistern & Palmetto Point, Eleuthera; Church of God
Church family (Harbour Island), Church of God families in the
Bluff, Lower and Upper Bouge; & The Community of Palmetto
Point and the Entire Island of Eleuthera.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta
Street, Palmdale from noon to 5 p.m. on Thursday and on Friday
from 5 p.m. at the Church in Palmetto Point, Eleuthera to service
time on Saturday.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957
24 hrs. Emergency Service
Cell #: 357-9151 - Beeper: 380-1450 or 380-1117





eV
March 19, 2009

RELIGIOUS
NEES
STORIES
AND
CHURCH
EVENTS





PG 26 ® Thursday, March 19, 2009

Pat Paul



Happy Birthday

Minister Leslie Jerome Knowles |
The World’s Greatest Husband and Father




“The Steps of A Good Man
Are Ordered by The Lord”

You are my lover, my king
and the priest of pur home
wy? From:

(Your Wife - Ramalia
Birthday greetings are
also extended from your
children, Leskeina Gastin,
Lezley and Leslie Knowles
Il, son-in-law Joron Gastin

sneices/ nephews, in-laws
TON LN — .
)and'the Christian Life
~~~ Church Family
Continue to be blessed, we love you and enjoy your day

RELIGION

The Tribune

Religious leaders demand

ACCOUNTABILITY

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

RELIGIOUS leaders are demanding a higher standard of
accountability from businesses and political leaders after the
recent public closure of insurance giant CLICO Bahamas.

Christian Council President
Reverend Patrick Paul said while
authorities try to determine the next
step in the CLICO dilemma, those
who are responsible for compromising
both the policies and livelihood of
affected Bahamians should face conse-
quences.

Rev Paul explained: “The Bahamas
Christian Council is very sympathetic
to those thousands and thousands of
people who would have given their
hard earned money to invest in their
benefit, and to find themselves
presently struggling.”

He said although some may argue
that the church has no business com-
menting on the affairs of a private
business, or the law, “ the church is the
moral compass of the community.”

Rev Paul feels more should have
been done to protect the policy and
annuity holders, especially because the
government is the elected watchdog of
its citizens.

“It is the government’s responsibility
to protect its citizens, as it relates to
criminality, to protect its citizens as it
relates to the economy, we should be
able to depend on our government
because that’s what they were elected
for.”

With many in the community now
debating whether CLICOs liquidation
could have been avoided through
more strict regulations, Rev Paul said
a good place to start the process of
change is with the alleged three year
insurance company auditing policy.

He feels this length of time is
too long, and added that it
would only be fair to stake-
holders in CLICO and other
insurance companies to have
a more frequent audit in
these companies, as to allow
for the exposure of inefficien-
cies should they exist.

Rev Paul said in response to
the CLICO situation and
other socio-economic condi-
tions facing many in the E
community, the Christian
Council has introduced its
national initiative, and is
hoping to forge a stronger
relationship between
those sectors of the com-
munity which affect the i
livelihood of Bahamians. 1
The initiative which is
intended to ultimately create

a fruit and vegetable canning industry,
Rev Paul said should help many who
are now out of work, and will also be a
community project for all to take part
in.

Today, the Christian Council will
present this initiative to 25 leading

“It is the government’s
responsibility to pro-
tect its citizens, as it
relates to criminality,
to protect its citizens
as it relates to the
economy, we should
be able to depend on
our government
because that’s what
they were elected for.”

members of the business community,
where they hope to harness more sup-
port.

In the end, Rev Paul said the church
must return to its original mandate of
strengthening the community and
sharing the word of God, which he
hopes can be achieved through this
and other initiatives.



The Tribune

MEDITATION —

RELIGION

Rescue me

HAVE you ever been in trouble with
the law? If so, do you remember the
flashing lights behind your car, or sirens
screaming and officers jumping out with
weapons ready? Have you ever been on
the run and realised that it was only a
matter of time before the search party
closed in on you? People often turn
themselves in because the pressure is
too great. The expression “you can run
but you can’t hide” becomes a reality.

Have you ever been in trouble with
God’s law? The Ten Commandments
(Ex. 20:1-17) are a list of spiritual and
social requirements which when broken
wreak havoc at many levels. The points
put in a positive way are: Only God is to
be our God, to be worshipped, rever-
enced even in name, and God’s Sabbath
is to be kept as a holy day.

, Pee
+ PALACIOUS

At the next level, there are directives
to honour parents, protect life, and
respect marriage vows, the property of
others, their good name, and to be con-
tent with what you have. The well
known summary is to love God, our
neighbours and ourselves.

Psalm 19: 7-14 highlights the blessing
of God’s Word as a guiding wisdom that
revives the soul (v. 7), rejoices the heart
and gives light to the eyes (v.8.), is bet-

How much longer?

HOW much longer will Bahamians
sit idly and allow the perverted political
and religious systems to hold you
hostage? Almost two years ago, (you)
Bahamians were in high spirits in
preparation for the general elections.
Do you remember? There were motor-
cades and political rallies all over the
place, where your PLP & FNM candi-
dates promised you a bunch of stuff /
lies, of which you’ve swallowed “hook,
line and sinker.”

I’ve come to the very same conclu-
sion as “the powers to be” in this coun-
try which is; “ Bahamians are a people
that are good at crying about their situ-
ations, but are yet too divided to do the
right thing that will bring about positive
change for the entire country; which is
to unite as one man / with one voice in
true repentance before Yahweh.

Being the person that I am, I really
don’t and can’t blame this present gov-
ernment /administration for the consis-
tent deterioration of the country’s eco-
nomic, moral and spiritual status. As a
religious Christian nation with more
churches and bishops, doctors, apos-
tles, etc; than John ever saw, somehow
we’ve conveniently forgot (Gal.6:7. Be
not deceived; God is not mocked: for
whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he
also reap). Now, it is obvious that the
government / politicians don’t know

what to do during these times of cri-
sis, neither do the religious leaders.
Therefore I make no apology in saying
that “there are two types / classes of
people, I will never listen to; (1) politi-
cians and (2) religious leaders”

So when the government and other




PASTOR _
ALLEN _

so-called qualified professionals speak
foolishly about the Bahamian econom-
ic status as it relates to the U.S. econo-
my and as they’re depending on their
night in shining armor (President
Barak Obama) to turn America’s econ-
omy around; I’m asking questions like
“Are the Bahamian people that dumb
or desperate to elect such fools — blind
guides to govern / rule over their
affairs? There will always be a segment
of people that may feel hurt or offend-
ed whenever

truth is being revealed. Many per-
sons as well as the religious and politi-
cal systems were offended at Yeshuwa
Messiah (The Way, The Truth and The
Life, Jn.14:6) because they could not
handle the truth; just like many
Bahamians today as well as the reli-

ter than gold or honey (v. 10) and brings
the reward of enlightenment ( V. 8). It is
a presumptuous sin to be proud and
self-reliant, while secret sins are all
known to God (v. 12-13). We need help
to find wholeness, soundness and
cleansing.

God has to be our strength as our
redeemer in order for us to do better.
Our daily prayer needs to be: “May the
words of my mouth and meditations of
my heart be acceptable in your sight, O
Lord my strength and my redeemer.” (v.
14).

Sin tells us to choose to die smiling,
to trust in our human desires even if it
means that we lose our chance to have
eternal life. “To know better is not to
do better’, and the lure and pull
towards wrong choices often overrules

gious and political systems. As I’ve
stated before, I’m a free man who is
able to speak as the Holy Spirit leads
me too. ’'m not one of your political,
religious church leaders or a product
selling pastor who needs the public’s
financial support; therefore he has to
remain silent on national issues, when
the Father is looking for a voice to
speak out.

What the Bahamas is now experienc-
ing; is nothing more than the harvest
from the seeds of wickedness and cor-
ruption that was sown many years ago
by politicians and religious leaders. In
the natural, even an unskilled farmer is
aware of the fact that if he has planted
a seed and doesn’t want the harvest
which that seed has the ability to pro-
duce; he has to immediately remove /
dig-up the sown seed. With that in
mind, then tell me; how is it that people
(especially) religious church-folks can
conclude that as long as they sing a few
Christian songs, shout Hallelujah once
or twice; that the sown seeds of wicked-
ness and corruption is never to be
heard of again? News Flash! Bahamas,
It’s harvest time: the murders and other
serious crimes that we’re experiencing
are byproducts of the seeds sown years
ago. The fault and responsibility for
havoc that the enemy is wreaking

“Bahamians, in order to secure and
safeguard a better, brighter Bahamas for
your children’s children we’ve got to
come together collectively and seek the face
of Yahweh; the one true God.”

Thursday, March 19, 2009® PG 27



the still small voice that whispers wis-
dom. We say: ‘it is not so bad’, ‘just
one last time’, ‘everyone else is doing
it’, ‘what they don’t know won’t hurt’.
Temptations assail us on every side.
We want to do better, as St Paul says in
Romans 7: 13-25, but we do what is
wrong instead of what we know to be
right. He exclaims: “Wretched man
that I am! Who will rescue me from
this body of death?”

Just as our Lord threw out the
money changers in the temple,
because they desecrated the area of
the temple designated for Gentiles to
worship and pray (John 2:13-22), so
He will throw out our sinful nature
and send the Holy Spirit to fill us and
help us to be holy. All we have to do is
pray: Lord, rescue me.

throughout the Bahamas lies at the
front doors of the religious church;
whereas when the church should have
been crying out against wickedness,
greed and corruption it remain silent as
many of its leaders were busy getting
their share of the pie. Now here we are
today, a nation that the enemy is having
a field day with and the ancient / old-
guard, compromising, religious church
and leaders can’t do anything but stand-
by powerlessly in a reactive mode.
Watch this! It really doesn’t matter how
many religious conferences are held or
how many so-called prophetic (pathet-
ic) words have been spoken over these
islands. Not until we (The Bahamas)
truly return to God and the religious
leaders put down their various reli-
gions, denominations, titles and begin
to love one another will Yahweh hear
our cry and heal our land. 2Chron.7:14:
If my people, which are called by my
name, shall humble themselves, and
pray, and seek my face, and turn from
their wicked ways; then will I hear from
heaven, and will forgive their sin, and
heal their land.

Bahamians, in order to secure and
safeguard a better, brighter Bahamas
for your children’s children we’ve got to
come together collectively and seek the
face of Yahweh; the one true God. Let’s
stop allowing politics and religion to
divide and destroy us. There is no man,
who has and is yet walking this earth
that is perfect in all his ways and doings
except Yeshuwa Messiah.

¢ For questions and comments feel free to
contact us via e-
mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph.441-
2021 or 225-3850. Pastors Matthew &
Brendalee Allen Kingdom Minded
Fellowship Centre Int'l.



PG 28 ® Thursday, March 19,

2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

Learned behaviours vs ministry with compassion

The glory of the
Lord can never be
experienced where

learned behaviours,
and habitual activities
are on stage, in the
name of worship.

The attribute of compassion was a
distinguishing characteristic, and a
rather spectacular aspect of the min-
istry of Jesus Christ, during His earthly
ministry. Just look at the various scrip-
tures which simply announce that,
when this or that happened, Jesus was
moved with compassion...

One of the rich stories which have
taken up permanent residence within
my mind involves that of a well-known
and respected pastor who was a veter-
an minister and a great preacher. His
elderly mother died and shortly after-
wards, he made a statement which got
my full attention! He said, during ser-
mons, that in over thirty years of min-
istry, he had never understood or expe-
rienced sorrow or loss until he lost his
mother. He said that since he became
a pastor, he could not count the num-
ber of funerals he had conducted or the
number of members he had consoled
for losing loved ones. However, he
never experienced how this felt until
his own mother had died.

I always think about this story to

Attention

IT was the most exaggerated experi-
ence of my life. This is how I reflect on
my time while living a life rooted in
finding pleasure from secular trends,
such as clubbing. Although I was able
to avoid the more harmful and popular
debauchery, having started my party
career at the ‘seasoned’ age of nine-
teen, I've seen and heard enough to
make me an indirect participant, with
the slight luck of being able to dodge
comparison, to William Shakespeare's
Lady Macbeth.

I was like most teenagers who grew
up mesmerised by the club scene, after
all tt was colorful, mysterious, warm
and seemingly genuine. To pause and
compare it with the forbidden fruit in
the Garden of Eden, would not be
stretching; it looked delicious, but after
the first bite, it left a rancid after taste.
The first time you get your all-access
pass to experience these idiocies, let's
hope you are at least eighteen or nine-
teen, the older the better. This way you
may still have a fighting chance to free
yourself of such nonsense. Now, that's



DR ALBERT S.

remind me how much of ministry can
be performed on the level of learned
behaviour (or in other words, by habit,
rote learning or by practise). All of the
words are the same, and the actions are
the same, but the mind is not engaged
and no feelings are involved.

This reminds me of Jesus’ response
to the religious leaders of the day, the
Scribes and Pharisees. Quoting the
prophet Elijah, he said: “This people
honoureth me with their lips, but their
heart is far from me.”

It is a ‘heart’ thing! On the occasion
of a worship service or mass, one has
only to look around and think. So
much going on seems to be routine,
habitual, learned behaviours, display
of people's natural talents, skills and
gifts (to sing, play instruments, wave
their hands on cue, or otherwise per-
form, ‘going through the motions’, but
the Holy Spirit is likely not present
because this is where God draws a line
in the sand--He will not share His glory
with another, (Isaiah 42:8), especially
human beings, and where learned
behaviours are being exhibited and
displayed, He (the Holy Spirit) isn't
needed. It is like an accountant draw-
ing a trial balance--he/she can do that
thinking about how he will be with his

family that evening or what she is
going to prepare for dinner that night.
It becomes second nature--one of the
many functions that the sub-conscious
can pretty much handle all by itself!

The glory of the Lord can never be
experienced where learned behav-
iours, and habitual activities are on
stage, in the name of worship. My late
grand daddy used to say, “God ain't no
poppy show...”, and one of the senior
saints used to ask, “You expect God to
bless your mess?”

What is compassion? It was tender-
ness in the emotion. Something went
beyond the natural situations and
touched the heart of Jesus.
Compassion happens when your words
of consolation to the bereaved actually
touch your heart (and are not just
learned words flowing from your brain,
or elsewhere). Compassion begins to
happen when yeur spirit becomes
deeply engaged. It is when you begin
to care, not just saying that you care. It
involves emulation--for you to feel
how the foreigner among you feels. It
moves us to mercy, sacrifice, benevo-
lence and actions to help remedy situa-
tions which have turned sour.

Quite recently I was speaking with a
banking officer outside a bank. It was
clear to me that he, personally, had no
sympathy for persons who had lost jobs
and had on-going salary deductions
from banks like the one for which he
worked. He took great pains to tell me
about another banking chain which
constantly encouraged certain types of
workers to get loans by salary deduc-

- Secular believers



not to say someone who starts much
younger, at age fourteen or fifteen
would certainly become a statistic, it's
just that they would clearly struggle
more with the process of moving on
and growing up in Christ. They may
eventually become believers, however,
while still battling secular mentalities,
because they would have begun
indulging in secular sin, when too
young, to know the importance of
tmplementing a well rounded, Godly
and healthy discipline in their lives.
For those believers whom this
applies, you must at times miss your
former lifestyle, as it can still charm it's
way back into your life through music,
the Internet, an old friend or even a
photo. Being a believer can really take

it's toll on our imperfect human minds
and bodies, however, one of the first
things as new and old believers we
need to acknowledge is, that we are not
perfect. But we can be perfect in
Christ, by the choices we make, even if,
we find ourselves occasionally back-
sliding. God gave us this free will. My
prayer for you who may be tempted to
give up, is to not give in to your secular
desires, but instead put His desires
first.

In closing, may you continue to find
solace in Him.

"This is the message we have heard
from him and declare to you: God is
light; in him there is no darkness at all.
Tf we claim to have fellowship with
him yet walk in the darkness, we lie
and do not live by the truth. But if we
walk in the light, as he is in the light,
we have fellowship with one another,
and the blood of Jesus, his Son, puri-
fies us from all sin."

“1 John 1:5-7 (N.LV)

tions. He said that bank had targeted
persons employed by certain employ-
ers. He was neither sorry for the per-
sons (who he felt should have been
more sensible and rational) nor for the
bank, which, according to him, even
figured projected tips at 100 per cent
into their calculations to determine
consumer loan eligibility. This banker
was obviously void of compassion.

This made me think of the church,
leaders and laity alike. It seems that
people have a lot of encouragement
and counseling skills, but what about
compassion? It's like decreeing and
declaring to the redundant worker, as
per James 2:16 in the Bible, “Be thou
fed”; “May your house be full of gro-
ceries, in Jesus' name.” “I decree and
declare a job for you,” God bless you;
then sending the persons away, empty
handed. Compassion moved Jesus to
action. Compassion ought to move the
pastors and members to action in these
tough economic times.

I conclude with the passage from
Matthew 25: 41-45, which concludes
with “Inasmuch as ye did it not to one
of the least of these, ye did it not to
me.”

¢ Albert S. Ferguson, B.Sc., hons, MBA,
Ph.D., J.P. is an ordained minister of reli-
gion of 30 years, an author, educator,
musician, transformational leader and a
‘Jabourer together with God’. Address
comments to e-mail
albertsferguson@gmail.com or write to P
O Box EE-16333, Nassau,Bahamas

Being a believer

can really take

it's toll on our
imperfect human
minds and bodies,
however, one of the
first things as new
and old believers we
need to acknowledge
is, that we are

not perfect.



The Tribune

THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

RELIGION

Thursday, March 19, 2009 ® PG 29




PART 21

Anglican history during the 19th century

C F Pascoe gives an_ historical
account of two hundred years of the
Society for the Propagation of the
Gospel from 1701 to 1900 based on a
digest of the Society's records. His sec-
tion on the Bahamas makes very inter-
esting reading - the following extract
takes us through the 19th Century:

“By 1807 the number of the S.P.G.
Missionaries was reduced to one - the
Rev. R. Roberts of New Providence. M
Groombridge died in 1804: Mr Rose in
1804, and Mr Jenkins in 1806, removed
to Jamaica and Mr Richards to
England about 1805

The Clergymen aided by the Society
during the period 1836 to 1844: E. J.
Rogers and C. Neale, 1836-44; P. S.
Aldrich 1840; F T Todrig 1841-42; W
Gray, 1844. None of the Bahamas cler-
gy appear to have been aided by the
Society until 1835, when, as a part of
the diocese of Jamaica (founded 1824)
the islands began to participate in the
Negro Education Fund. The Colonial
Legislature co-operated with the
Society, but at the end of eight years
the supply of clergy still remained
inadequate.

Of the fourteen parishes or rectories
into which the islands were divided,
only four were wholly and three par-
tially endowed, and in some of the Out
Islands there was 'not a single religious
teacher of any class whatever.’

In New Providence, the Bishop of
Jamaica confirmed nearly 400 persons
in 1845. Three years later he held what
appears to be the first ordination in
that part of his diocese, two priests and
two deacons being ordained, and the



“eomtmee” ; JIM
LAWLOR

number of Clergy thus raised to six-
teen. The labours of the missionaries
were very arduous, one of them having
no less than seven islands under his
care. To visit these and to go from one
station to another preaching and bap-
tising the children was something like a
shepherd setting his mark upon his
sheep and then letting them go in the
wilderness. In some remote districts
the people retained a strong attach-
ment to the Church of England,
notwithstanding her long neglect of
them. Many natives came forward and
offered their services gratuitously as
catechists; and in one island, an old
man of seventy ‘walked fifty miles in
order to partake of the holy feast.’
The formation of the Bahamas into a
separate See in 1861 was followed by
the death of its first Bishop, Dr
Caulfield, within a few months of his
consecration. The thirteen years of the
episcopate of Bishop Venables (his
successor) were, for the most part,
years of disendowment, destruction of
church property by hurricane, paralysis
of trade, intense poverty, and consider-
able emigration. Yet the Church pro-
gressed. Between 1867 and 1874 forty-
five churches were built or restored.
At the time of Bishop Venables’
appointment, the Society's Missions

Being a person
others can trust

TRUST is crucial in any type of
relationship, whether it be within a
family, business, a church congrega-
tion or in a friendship. When this
important foundation exists, strong,
positive relationships are built and
fed by encouragement and consisten-
cy. People who receive a high level
of trust have developed their charac-
ter and earn the right to be trusted.

Trust depends very little upon a
person's name, his status in life, how
much money he has in the bank, or
his position. The key to consistent
and dependable trust lies in the char-
acter of the person who leads.
Whether he leads a service club,
business establishment, in the home
or in a church he is responsible for

}) BISHOP V_



being trustworthy. We have to prove
by example that we are as good as
our word. There is absolutely no
other way to establish a reputation
for being trustworthy except to be
trusty.

When we disciple others it is
important to be what we teach or ask
others to do. This is a crucial truth:
We teach others what we know, but
we reproduce what we are. I quote

were all in the Out Islands, which were
absolutely unable to maintain their
own Clergy. 'I think the Society can
hardly have realised the missionary
character of the work done here,'
wrote the Bishop, ‘nor the insufficien-
cy of our local resources for carrying
on that work’ Of the Biminis he said:
‘the inhabitants seem almost the most
degraded people that I have yet visit-
ed. This perhaps may be accounted for
by these two islands being a great ren-
dezvous for wreckers.'

In Providence itself an instance of
practical heathenism came under his
notice. 'Three men were digging on the
solid rock on the south side of the
island, and had been engaged in this
way for eight years off and on because
an Obeah woman had told them of a
treasure hidden there’.

In 1868 the Bishop obtained a
church ship, the Message of Peace.
Writing of the first visit in her, which
was to Andros Island, he said: 'T cannot
speak too highly of the labours of Mr
Sweeting the coloured catechist of the
district. The morality of the people
here bears a striking contrast to that of
other Out Island settlements.’ One
poor girl who heard of the Bishop's
arrival followed him from station to
station in order to be confirmed, her
confirmation costing her 'a journey of
56 miles, 44 accomplished on foot' over
rugged roads with two creeks to ford.

The cyclone of 1866, which over-
threw nearly one half of the churches
in the diocese, was followed by dises-
tablishment and disendowment in
1869, the immediate effect of which

the words of a noted writer: “Your
children pay more attention to what
you do than what you say.” During
my many years in the workplace, I
have yet to find the person, whatever
his or her station in life who did not
perform better when he or she
knows that they are trusted by their
peers.

Years ago Bishop Able Mazore
tells of a critical period in his life
when he had been asked by his peo-
ple to lead the African National
Council. They had faith in his lead-
ership and trusted his judgment. He
knew that all previous leaders of
Rhodesia who had been critical of
unjust government policies towards
black Rhodesians had been deported
from the country, put in a restricted
camp, or killed. He struggled with
this decision and prayed as he had
never prayed before. During the
time he was struggling with his deci-
sion, a trusted friend handed him this
poem:

was that in one island alone
(Eleuthera) five congregations were
for a time without a clergyman. The
use of a church ship was advocated by
Archdeacon Trew in 1845 as one
method of meeting the lamentable
Spiritual destitution then existing in the
Bahamas. Yet even in the next year a
new station was opened there among
the coloured people, the first services
being held in a small hut and in the
dark for no candle could be procured.’

With the death of Bishop Venables
in October, 1876, the episcopal income,
hitherto derived from the State,
ceased. In the opinion of the physi-
cians, the Bishop's illness was the
result upon a frame not naturally
robust, of continuous travel, irregular
and often unwholesome food, constant
care and unceasing mental labour.
From his death-bed he sent a message
to the Society to save the diocese from
‘being blotted out of Christendom.’
The Society's response was the guaran-
tee of an allowance of £200 per annum,
which was continued to his successor
until 1881, by which time an endow-
ment of £10,000 had been provided.
Towards raising and increasing this
fund the Society contributed £1,500 Gn
1876-82), and for the permanent main-
tenance of the Clergy £1,000 Gin 1873-
88).

Under Bishops Cramer Roberts
(1878-85) and E. T. Churton (1886- -
1900) the diocese has made encourag-
ing progress.

(Next time - Part 22 - Baptist Ministry
to Liberated Africans)

“People are unreasonable, illogical, and
self-centered - love them anyway!

If you do good, people will accuse you of
selfish ulterior motives - do good anyway!
If you are successful you will win false
friends and true enemies - succeed anyway!
The good you do today will be forgotten
tomorrow - do good anyway!
Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable
- be honest and frank anyway!”

The biggest people with the
biggest ideas can be shot down by
the smallest people with the smallest
minds - think big anyway!

What you spend years building
may be destroyed overnight - build
anyway!

Give the world the best you've got
and you'll get kicked in the teeth -
give the world the best you've got
anyway!

There are enough critics in the
world, what we need more of are
cheerleaders.”



PG 30 @ Thursday, March 19, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune

Tr OT MOLL SO











@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THE white dress, the limo ride, the food and de
a lot goes into making a wedding day spectacula
However, once the bouquet has been tossed and
last song played, marriage's rap starts to go do
the tubes. There are rumors of fights to end all fights
and all marriages eventually ending in divorce, but
there is a lot of good that can debunk the myth that
saying “I Do” is a big “don't.”

The first few months of most
marriages is easy. This phase is
most commonly known as the
"honeymoon phase" and may
last up to a year. The honeymoon
phase exists because the couple
is enjoying the significant advan-
tages of being married: living
together, being together con-
stantly, looking toward the future
as a team, sexual intimacy, and
trust. The honeymoon phase is
also aided by the effects of
romantic love, which tend to
mask problems and differences.
The honeymoon period starts to
end as the couple comes to the
realisation that marriage lasts a
lifetime.

What most couples do not
realise, especially those who
marry before 30, is that marriage
is a lifetime commitment. This
commitment can have a tremen-
dous number of advantages: sta-
bility, financial strength, unity,
etc. However, it can have a
paralysing disadvantage if one or
both parties decide to abuse the
commitment.

Technically, marriage is like
getting a job for the rest of your
life and you can not be fired.
Most people will continue to do
a good job, but a few people
would take that message as an
excuse to become extremely lazy.
Marriage can cause the same
effect. Both partners have to
work hard to avoid complacency.

Most young couples also fail to
realise that in marriage every-
thing is shared. Sharing means
that every major decision
involves a team decision. If both
parties do not agree, then con-
flict arises. Most people enjoy
having a certain amount of free-
dom in their lives. Marriage
instead forces a great deal of
compromise. If two people have
different spending habits
(Husband likes saving money
and wife likes spending it), it can
cause immense strain.

Another situation that most
young couples do not think
about is that marriage involves
being with the same person for
long periods of time. While the
couple is still "in love," this is

easy. Once romantic love’s effects

wear off and the relationship is
driven more by friendship than
sexual attraction, little habits can
become irritating. Countering
this natural effect requires skill
and creativity.

However, 28 year old Patricia
Davis, said she has been married
for three years, had her ups and
downs but has grown to find
many benefits of being married.

“Unconditional love, stability
and consistency-You don’t have
to worry about dating or break-
ing up. There is one person you
love and will love you for the
rest of your life. I like the whole
idea of companionship, until
death do us part,” Mrs Davis
said.

Mrs Davis also explained that
there is a lower cost of living. A
married couple tends to have
more free time and/or more
money because the cost and
work of a household are shared
by two.

Mrs Davis said there are times
however, when arguments arise
in her marriage but the confi-
dence of the partnership over-
comes these issues.

“There are times when you
feel like bashing the person’s
head in, but I like the fact that I
can spend my life with someone
and have security, that confi-
dence. It is very reassuring to
know that there is a person who
loves you and only you no matter
what and who lives to be with
you. That sort of commitment
can give you a tremendous com-
fort and confidence. There are
some instances where you have
to give more to get, but you
realise that one day it is going to
be returned to you.”



ONCE romantic love’s
effects wear off and the
relationship is driven more
by friendship than sexual
attraction, little habits can
become irritating.



The Tribune

Senior Saints
celebrate eight
years of ministry

THE Senior Saints of
Bethel Baptist Church will
be celebrating eight years of
ministry on March 22 under
the theme “God’s constant
help, our lives are a testimo-
ny of what God has done.”

The ministry began in
March of 2001 and was a
vision of Pastor Timothy
Stewart to have something
for the Seniors of Bethel
Baptist Church. He invited
seven of the older retired
members to meet with him.
They included: Doris
Gomez, Gwen Hanna,
Nathalie Hutcheson, Joseph
Blyden (deceased),
Reginald Austin, Allan
Robinson, and Reginald
Sands. As they met with
Pastor Stewart, he outlined
his vision to them and
encouraged them to have a
more active role in the
church instead of just stay-
ing at home and coming out
only on Sundays. After a
long a discussion, the Senior
Saints gave Pastor Stewart





an assurance that even at
their age, they will still do
the Master’s work.

The objective for this
ministry is to encourage all
seniors regardless of reli-
gious denomination to join
in fellowship where they will
continue to serve God and
give Him thanks for all the
blessings He has bestowed
upon their lives from day to
day.

The membership has
grown for eight to over
eighty. The very first mem-
ber to join the Bethel’s
Senior Saints came from an
Anglican Church. She heard
the announcement on the
radio and she is still with the
group to this day, and they
also have members from
other religious groups.

Members of the Senior
Saints, minister to the sick
and shut-in by assisting with
purchasing medication, by
calling, praying, encourag-
ing, and visiting them when
possible.













RELIGION Thursday, March 19, 2009 ® PG 31









NEW LEADERS SEEK TO REVITALIZE

CONSERVATIVE JUDAISM

m@ NEW YORK

A Philadelphia-area rabbi
is in line to become the new
executive vice president of
the United Synagogue of
Conservative Judaism — part
of a leadership overhaul that
movement officials hope will
help restore the footing of
what was once was the
largest branch of Judaism in
the U.S., according to the
Associated Press.

Rabbi Steven Wernick, 41,
spiritual leader since 2001 of
Adath Israel in Merion
Station, Pa., will assume the
position heading the move-
ment’s congregational branch
pending negotiations and
board approval.

In a news release, the
group called Wernick an
innovator, community-
builder and successful

fundraiser who turned
around a dwindling congre-
gation. Wernick “has said
that he hopes to move
United Synagogue in the
direction of ever-greater
responsiveness, engagement,
and transparency,” the organ-
ization said.

Conservative Judaism is
viewed as a middle ground
between the more liberal
Reform and conservative
Orthodox movements.
Studies show the movement
is aging and has fallen behind
the Reform movement in
numbers.

About 26 percent of the
American adult Jewish popu-
lation identified as
Conservative in the 2000-
2001 National Jewish
Population Survey, compared
with 35 percent who called
themselves Reform.





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PG 32 ® Thursday, March 19, 2009

St George's and St Paul's celebrate

Members of the parish of St George's
Church, New Providence and the
parish of St Paul's, Long Island, recent-
ly celebrated the 25th anniversary of
their companion relationship when
more than forty persons travelled from
the valley parish to Long Island to
attend the patronal festival of St Paul's
Church in Clarence Town, Long Island.

"The service was the culmuniation
of a weekend of activities in Long
Island which has been our tradition
since the establishment of the reala-
tionship some twenty-five years ago,"
said Adrian Archer, St George's church
administrator.

"Those activites included a recep-
tion at the rectory of St Paul's hosted
by Fr and Mrs Pratt, a joint concert of
music featuring voices from St
George's Choir, the choir of St.John's,
Buckley's Long Island and a number of
other soloists in the community and a
tour of the local spots on the Island."
An overflowing crowd from across the
island joined by the parishioners from
Nassau filled St Paul's for the concele-
brated mass on the feast day of St Paul
where Fr Kingsley Knowles, rector of
St George's Church preached the ser-
mon.
"This relationship is probably
among the longest and strongest in the
diocese," said Mr Archer. "It's founder,
and late rector of St George's, the
Rev'd Canon N.W.Dudley Strachan
would be pleased to know that we are
continuing this relactionship which we
hold so dear and we look forward to the
visit of the members of St Paul's to
Nassau this coming April to continue
the celebration of this anniversary
when we celebate the Feast of St
George, our patron saint."

ton

RELIGION

o © Tag &

=



20 years of



The Tribune



2

eatin



1. THE clergy for the
event included Fr Mark
Fox, St Peter's Parish,
North Long Island, Fr
Earnest Pratt, rector, St
Paul's Parish, Fr
Kingsley Knowles, St
George's, Rev'd Dr
Roland Hamilton, St
George's and Rev'd
Paulette Cartwright, St
Paul's Parish.

2. MEMBERS of the
choir of St George's and
John's Buckley's Long
island after the joint
concert.

3.THE contingent that
travlled from Nassau to
St. Paul's, Long Island.



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THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

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96-year-old ‘can prove’
Pindling horn in Bahama

Press conference held
by Obie Pindling and
Doris Grant-Strachan

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia. net

NINETY-six-year-old Doris
Grant-Strachan said yesterday
that she was a close friend of the
late Viola Pindling — the mother
of Sir Lynden Pindling — and
could prove that the “Father of
the Nation” was in fact born in
the Bahamas.

Sitting upright in a wheel-chair
at a press conference at her home
on Soldier Road, along with Obie
Pindling, son of Sir Lynden, Mrs
Grant-Strachan recalled that she
first met Viola, whom she affec-
tionately called “Ola” at Mount
Zion Baptist Church. Following
Ola’s marriage to Arnold Pin-
dling in 1929, Mrs Grant-Strachan

said she remembered comment-
ing on the young Mrs Pindling’s
pregnancy, quipping that Ola had
a “weird shape.”

Shortly thereafter, she said, Sir
Lynden was born and she could
recall seeing this very large baby
being pushed around in a baby
carriage by his mother.

The recent furor surrounding
Sir Lynden was sparked over the
past two weeks following an
explosive Insight article written
by The Tribune’s managing editor
John Marquis in an interview with
Chauncey Tynes, Sr, former PLP
treasurer. According to Mr Tynes,
Sr, his pilot son, Chauncey Tynes,
Jr, regularly flew consignments
of cash from drug kingpin Joe

SEE page eight

Tourists who ate iguana
‘bragged about escapades’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TOURISTS who killed and ate an iguana “bragged about their
escapades” over drinks with sailboaters, including those suspected of

killing and eating a pet duck.

Alexander David Rust, 24, from Indiana and Vanessa Star Palm, 23,
from Illinois, were convicted under the Wild Animal Protection Act after
posting pictures of themselves barbecuing and eating an iguana in Exu-
ma on social networking website Facebook.

Rust was fined $200 for the charge of possession of an iguana by an
Exuma magistrate’s court in February, and a further $800 for possession
of undeveloped conch also pictured in their Facebook photo album.

Rust and Palm both pleaded ignorance, and Palm was pardoned

SEE page 14



Mk Ao
See Ee dL

96-YEAR-OLD Doris Grant-Strachan and the son of the late Sir Lynden
Pindling, Obie Pindling, speak to members of the media yesterday at
the Strachans’ residence.

Cost-cutting
exercise at
Atlantis ‘is
necessary’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Judge orders that
provisional liquidator’s
HMMA ALB
handed over to court

mg By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A SUPREME Court judge
yesterday ordered that the
provisional liquidator’s report
regarding the CLICO insur-
ance company be handed over
to the court by tomorrow.

Attorneys representing the
interested parties in the mat-
ter debated extensively before
Justice Cheryl Albury yester-
day on the amount of time
needed to peruse that report
and receive instructions from
their clients on how to pro-
ceed. Attorneys involved in
the matter yesterday
expressed their desire to have
the matter resolved expedi-

SEE page eight

EVEN as Kerzner Internation-
al CEO Sol Kerzner states that
his company is well financed and
without debt problems, a repre-
sentative in the Bahamas yester-
day explained that a cost-cutting
effort affecting 2,500 Atlantis
employees is necessary to “ensure
that the company meets its bank
covenants and financial obliga-
tions.”

That “cost containment exer-
cise” involves non-unionised,
mainly managerial staff at the
resort, who were asked earlier this
week by executives to take two

SEE page 14



te mr FEA





Ie a | eT tr

IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

The Bahamas’
rejection of abolition

of death penalty
disappoints Amnesty

Human rights watchdog resumes call for
govt to issue moratorium on executions

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

HUMAN rights watchdog group Amnesty International is dis-
appointed that the Bahamas has rejected recommendations to
abolish the death penalty and resumed its call for the government
to issue a moratorium on executions.

The group also wants government to repeal all legal provisions
that allow for the death penalty, according to a recent United
Nations Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review on
the Bahamas. Amnesty said while it was pleased that no exe-
cutions were carried out in this country for the past nine years,
the group is worried that death sentences continue to be hand-
ed down. Growing calls in the community for hangings to resume
also have Amnesty concerned.

SEE page 14



Artists believe cancelling
Carifesta will cost Bahamas
chance to boost economy

m By MEGAN the stress of a global
REYNOLDS economic crisis.
Tribune Staff But artists believe
Reporter cancelling the festival
mreynolds@ would cost the Bahamas

tribunemedia. net an opportunity to boost
the economy and be
placed firmly on the cul-
tural map.

COB professor,
writer and arts advocate
turn would cost the Nicolette Bethel said
Bahamas a chance to postponing the 2009
boost its economy CHARLES MAYNARD event would cause the
through tourism and said CARICOM will Bahamas to fall further
cultural development, need to discuss the behind as countries
artists maintain. possibility of cancelling around the world con-

Minister of Culture the Caribbean festival. tinue to develop their
Charles Maynard has arts industries.
said CARICOM will need to dis- She criticised government’s
cuss the possibility of cancelling _ failure to recognise the potential

the Caribbean festival as partici- SEE page eigh t

pating island nations suffer under

CANCELLING Car-
ifesta in the Bahamas
next year because of the
global economic down-



Man accused of shooting
at police appears in court

A 24-YEAR-OLD man of Twynam Heights,
accused of shooting at police officers during a
high speed chase Monday night, was arraigned
in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Etienne Bowleg II, the son of Anglican
Archdeacon Etienne Bowleg, appeared in
Court 1, Bank lane yesterday on weapons and
ammunitions charges. Police have charged
Bowleg with four counts of possession of a JR
firearm with intent to endanger life, four counts
of possession of a firearm with intent to resist [JF
lawful arrest, two counts of possession of J
ammunition, one count of causing damage and
possession of dangerous drugs.

It is alleged that on Monday, March 16, Bowleg was in possession of
a handgun with intent to endanger the lives of Reserve Constable 26
Dennis Clarke, Reserve Constable 775 Patrick Minnis, Woman Police
Constable 2895 Shenique Ford and Sergeant 987 Alexander Pierre. It
is also alleged that Bowleg was in possession of a firearm with intent to

SEE page 14

San Aem Leste MT





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





























































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LOCAL NEWS

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



day.

tice Anita Allen.

proceed.

EDWARD Taylor was acquitted yesterday of the May
2006 murder of Eric McGreggor Jr after an all woman jury
found him not guilty of the charge.

Prosecutors had alleged that Taylor shot McGreggor at
the Pond Wash on Carmichael Road before fleeing in a
Chevrolet Suburban sport utility vehicle on May 18, 2006.

The jury returned with a 9-3 not guilty verdict yester-

The trial was heard before Senior Supreme Court Jus-

During the trial, Taylor dismissed his lawyer V Alfred
Gray after disagreements about how his defence should

Attorneys Sandra Dee Gardiner and Darnell Dorsette
appeared for the prosecution.

€€ ACQUITTED: Edward Taylor pictured yesterday.



MAGISTRATE’S COURT

Five men charged over seizure of
marijuana worth more than $3m

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

FIVE men charged in con-
nection with the seizure of more
than $3 million worth of mari-
juana on Andros last Friday
were arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Marvin Roderick Demeritte,
44, of Pinewood Gardens, Peter
Thompson, 49, of Fresh Creek,
Andros, Mario Percentie, 35,
Herculean Thompson, 53, of
Andros Town, and Nathan
Robinson, 42, of Jamaica, were
arraigned before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel in Court 8, yes-
terday morning. The men have
all been charged with posses-
sion of marijuana with intent to
supply, importation of marijua-

Not guilty pleas to all allegations

na with intent to supply, con-
spiring to possess marijuana
with intent to supply and con-
spiring to import marijuana with
intent to supply. It is alleged
that the men committed the
offences between Tuesday,
March 10, and Sunday, March,

15, 2009.
Bail

The men pleaded not guilty
to all charges. Demeritte, Peter
Thompson and Percentie were
granted bail in the sum of
$100,000. The case was
adjourned to September 2 and

3. Additionally, Teffran Frazier,
31, of Flamingo Gardens, alias
Duran Rolle, and Nathan
Robinson were arraigned on a
separate charge of possession
of marijuana with intent to sup-
ply. Frazier has also been
charged with deceiving a public
officer. It is alleged that he told
for the police that his name was
Duran Rolle. Both men pleaded
not guilty to the charges.

According to police, Drug
Enforcement Unit officers and
Andros police seized more than
$3 million worth of marijuana
during a special operation
launched in Central Andros last
week Friday.

While searching a villa short-
ly after 4pm that day, they
found just over two pounds of
marijuana and arrested several
men.

Based on the information
obtained from those arrests, this
operation continued until Sun-
day when officers went to a dirt
road in Fresh Creek and found
two crocus sacks and a white
five gallon bucket full of mari-
juana.

A short distance away, offi-
cers found an additional 46 cro-
cus sacks, and six white five gal-
lon buckets of marijuana. The
drugs have a total weight of
more than 2,200 pounds and a
local street value of $3,300,000.

The prosecution objected to
bail being granted to Herculean
Thompson on the grounds that
he has matters of a similar
nature pending before the
courts.

The prosecution made the
same submission with regards
to Taffron Frazier and also
objected to bail being granted to
Robinson as he is considered a
flight risk in view of the fact
that he is not a Bahamian citi-
zen. Frazier, Peter Thompson
and Robinson were remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Man dies
after falling
down Queen's
Staircase

PHOTO: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

SCENE OF TRAGEDY: The Queen's
Staircase where a Bahamian died
from a fall.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FATAL fall from the
top of the Queen’s Staircase
claimed the life of a Bahami-
an man on Tuesday.

However, Bahamas Police
were unable to provide The
Tribune with any informa-
tion about the man or how
he fell.

Dr Davidson Herbert at
the Antiquities, Monuments
and Museums Corportation
(AMMC), responsible for
the upkeep and restoration
of buildings and monuments
across the Bahamas, said the
steps are well maintained
and he found them to be in
good condition when he vis-
ited recently.

Ex-Montagu
MPs to he
honoured

THE Montagu Constituen-
cy Association and scores of
Montagu residents say they
are “extremely proud of and
forever grateful for the dis-
tinguished and altruistic rep-
resentation” that its mem-
bers of parliament have pro-
vided over the past 40 years.

From 1967 to 2007, the
counstituency has had a total
of six representatives.

“Not only have these
noble sons served Montagu
with distinction, but they
have each gone on to
become nation builders of
the highest calibre,” said the
association in a statement.

In recognition of their con-
tributions, the constituency
association will host a cele-
batory dinner where each of
the former MPs will be hon-
oured and thanked.

The dinner is scheduled
for Saturday March 28 at the
Montagu Gardens, East Bay
Street.

Further information can
be obtained by contacting
the constituency office at
393-0878.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
eee
PHONE: $22-2157



FORMER TOP FINANCE OFFICIAL JAMES SMITH SPEAKS OUT

Somebody must have
known about CLICO’s

mg By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER top finance offi-
cial yesterday suggested that the
relevant authorities seem to have
fallen short when it came to keep-
ing CLICO (Bahamas) in check.

Given that CLICO was “quite
so upfront” about their foreign
investments, former minister of
state for finance James Smith said
“somebody must have known”
about the company’s risky behav-
iour and even approved it, con-
trary to reports.

“They made it obvious,” he
said.

His comments come days after
Bishop Simeon Hall of the New
Covenant Baptist Church said
there is a “growing sentiment”
among frustrated policy holders,
whom he has counselled, that offi-
cial heads must roll over the fail-
ure of the insurance company.

Shortly after the Registrar of
Insurance Companies issued a
winding up order for CLICO
(Bahamas) due to its insolvency
on February 24, Central Bank
governor Wendy Craigg con-
firmed to The Tribune that
records do not reflect the insurer
applying for, or being granted,
any approval to authorise its ulti-
mately compromising $73.6 mil-
lion investment in a single Florida
real-estate project.

Mr Smith is now “really won-
dering” how this state of affairs
came about. “The company was
quite clear in their audited state-
ments that these investments
were outside the Bahamas — that’s
leading me to believe that at some
point somebody must have raised



the issue.”
“You would
want to regis-
ter the inward
investment and
the outward
investment
with the Cen-

tral Bank
because at
APES Some point

you're going to
have to convert and the Central
Bank will only give permission to
convert if they’d given prior
approval,” he said.

‘Excessive’

Speaking on the issue in par-
liament, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham stated that CLICO
(Bahamas) had been writing
“excessive cash advances” to the
tune of $73.6 million to its sub-
sidiary, CLICO Enterprises Lim-
ited — which in turn invested in
the Florida real estate market —
since 2004. Mr Ingraham sug-
gested that it “appears the com-
pany never sought the required
‘no objection’ approval from the
Bahamas Registrar of Insurance
Companies in connection with its
investments, loans to subsidiaries
or related party transactions.

But Mr Smith said: “The audit-
ed statements would have said
that the assets were invested out-
side of the Bahamas, so it’s there
to see. The question is, once its
seen by the board of directors,
the auditors and the regulators
(Registrar of Insurance Compa-
nies and the Central Bank) some-
one should ask the question, if
it’s not already been asked: “Did

you get the proper authority for
the outward investment?”

Whereas he had initially pre-
sumed the company must have
“hidden” its activities from the
authorities, Mr Smith said that in
actuality, this was not the case.

“The audited statements of the
firm being seen by the regulators
and by the company’s board of
directors, all of them are pre-
sumably responsible bodies and
all of them would’ve raised the
point at some point. It would’ve
been their obligation as a member
of the board or as a regulator to
determine whether or not CLI-
CO had the proper permission.”

This permission would relate
to the Bahamian insurer’s wish
to invest abroad, and to its deci-
sion to invest such a large quan-
tity of funds in one niche product
— the Wellington Preserve Limit-
ed real estate project, rather than
spreading its risk exposure across
a variety of investments.

While some commentators
have suggested CLICO might
have been able to circumvent
Bahamian exchange control reg-
ulations by investing in the US
via its Turks and Caicos branch,
Mr Smith said that this is not the
case, as far as he can tell, as the
same rules apply.

“What it says is a company reg-
istered in the Bahamas has on its
books an investment outside of
the Bahamas — it doesn’t matter if
it goes through the Turks or
through the US — you’re holding
a foreign asset and that’s what
you need permission for,” he said.

A hearing of the application
for the liquidation of CLICO
(Bahamas) got underway in the
Supreme Court yesterday.



We feel exploited by government, say unions

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

TWO Water and Sewage Corporation
unions say they feel “exploited” by govern-
ment after negotiations to renew expired
industrial agreements were suspended.

The unions want a general salary increase in
line with the rising cost of living. They said
WSC employees have not had a general salary
increase in Six years.

Bahamas Utilities, Services and Allied Workers
Union (BUSAWU) president Carmen Kemp said
both sides were about three quarters through the
negotiations when government offered an increase
that the unions refused. Government then took their
offer off the table and suspended the negotiations,
according to union leaders.

But yesterday State Environment Minister Phen-
ton Neymour — who oversees WSC under his port-
folio — said the negotiations were not suspended.
He said that government met with the unions last
week to explain WSC's desperate financial situa-
tion. He added that WSC employees are near those
at the top in terms of salary scales and benefits in the
public service — and that their salaries are on par with
those paid to BTC and BEC workers.

Ata joint press conference held at the WSC com-
pound yesterday, Water and Sewage Management
Union (WSMU) president Ednal Rolle and the
BUSAWU president Ms Kemp said the impasse
concerns the financial aspects of the agreements,
which expired in June, 2007.

Speaking to the media and dozens of union mem-
bers, the union heads conceded that the govern-
ment is grappling with the global economic down-
turn, but said they feel overlooked because govern-
ment recently signed agreements with the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC) and the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company (BTC).

"Both unions have sacrificed dearly to try and















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save this organisation in the years 2004 to
2007. When other organisations, BTC and
BEC, got their increases we got absolutely
nothing; we signed for zero per cent. Today we
think if only the cost of living, the inflation, we
should receive onto our salaries," Ms Kemp
said. "Both unions will stand in unity to do
what it needs to do to make it happen,” she
added. "We sympathise, we know the eco-
nomic situation but we ask that you not
exploit us during these economic times. We've
been long and hard without any general salary
increases in this organisation.”

But Mr Neymour said while government is sensi-
tive to these issues, the unions need to take into
account WSC's financial woes.

"The government is sensitive to the requests being
made by the union, however we feel that the union
needs to become sensitive to the current final situa-
tion of the corporation, of the world, and also take
view of where it is positioned in terms of its benefits
and salaries being afforded versus that of others at
this time. They are among the top in regard to ben-
efits and salaries among our country.

"My advice to the union is to seek ways to improve
the services being provided by the corporation
through more efficient means," he said.

The unions also argued that there was no alloca-
tion in the recent $30 million WSC subsidy for train-
ing, salary increases, or improving the corporation's
efficiency. Mr Neymour explained that of that sum,
about $19 million went strictly to water purchases. Of
the remaining $11 million, $1 million will go to the
renovation of water infrastructure on Shirley Street
and Bay Street, a necessary move in light of the
impending road paving exercises. The vast majority
of remaining $10 million will also go towards pur-
chasing water, which is among government’s most
heavy costs, he said.

BUSAWU is inviting the government to return to
the negotiation table. If this request is not met, the
unions say they are prepared to take further action.

_—— ©) the uttimate



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~ 380-FLIX _
PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama to face first big leadership test

WHEN YOU hear a sitting U.S. senator call
for brokers to commit suicide, you know that
the anger level in America is reaching a “Bon-
fire of the Vanities,” get-out-the-pitchforks dan-
ger level. It is dangerous for so many reasons,
but most of all because this real anger about
AIG could overwhelm the still really difficult
but critically important things we must do in
the next few weeks to defuse this financial crisis.

Let me be specific: If you didn’t like reading
about AIG employees getting millions in bonus-
es after their company — 80 per cent of which is
owned by U.S. taxpayers — racked up the
biggest quarterly loss in the history of the Milky
Way Galaxy, you’re really not going to like the
bank bailout plan to be rolled out soon by the
Obama team. That plan will begin by using up
the $250 billion or so left in TARP funds to
start removing the toxic assets from the banks.
But ultimately, to get the scale of bank repair we
need, it will likely require some $750 billion
more.

The plan makes sense, and, if done right, it
might even make profits for U.S. taxpayers.
But in this climate of anger, it will take every bit
of political capital in Barack Obama’s piggy
bank — as well as Michelle’s, Sasha’s and Mali-
a’s — to sell it to Congress and the public.

The job can’t be his alone. Everyone who
has a stake in stabilizing and reforming the sys-
tem is going to have to suck it up. And that
starts with the employees at AIG who got the
$165 million in bonuses. They need to volun-
tarily return them. Everyone today is taking a
haircut of some kind or another, and AIG bro-
kers surely can be no exception. We do not
want the U.S. government abrogating contracts
— the rule of law is why everyone around the
world wants to invest in our economy. But tax-
payers should not sit quietly as bonuses are
paid to people who were running an insurance
scheme that would have made Bernie Madoff
smile. The best way out is for the AIG bankers
to take one for the country and give up their
bonuses. I live in Montgomery Country, Md.
The schoolteachers here, who make on average
$67,000 a year, recently voted to voluntarily
give up their five per cent pay raise that was con-
tractually agreed upon for next year, saving our
school system $89 million — so programmes
and teachers would not have to be terminated.
If public schoolteachers can take one for school-
children and fellow teachers, AIG employees
can take one for the country.

Let’s not forget, AIG was basically running an
unregulated hedge fund inside an AAA-rated
insurance company. And — like Madoff, who
was selling phantom stocks — AIG was sell-
ing, in effect, phantom insurance against the

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default of bundled subprime mortgages and
other debt — insurance that AIG had nowhere
near enough capital to back up when bonds
went bust. It was a hedge fund with no hedges.
That’s why taxpayers have had to pay the insur-
ance for AIG — so its bank and government
customers won’t tank and cause even more
harm.

Unfortunately, all the money we have already
spent on AIG and the banks was just to prevent
total system failure. It was just to keep the body
alive. That’s why healing the system will likely
require the rest of the TARP funds, plus the
$750 billion the administration warned Con-
gress in the new budget that it could need.

Best I can piece together, the administra-
tion’s recovery plan — due out shortly — will
look something like this: The U.S. government
will create a facility to buy the toxic mortgages
off the balance sheets of the major banks. They
will be bought by a public-private fund or funds
in which taxpayers will, in effect, be partners
with hedge funds and private equity groups.
The hedge funds will be there to provide exper-
tise in pricing and trading the assets. The tax-
payers will be there to guarantee — gulp —
that the hedge funds won’t lose money if they
take the early risks and to also lend them mon-
ey to make some of the purchases. Taxpayers
will benefit from any profits these partnerships
make. Once the banks sell their toxic assets,
many will need capital, because, while they may
be carrying these assets on their books at 85
cents on the dollar, they initially may have to sell
them for less. So, the government will probably
have to inject capital into more banks to main-
tain their solvency, but once the banks begin to
clear their balance sheets of those toxic assets,
they will likely attract the private capital they
need and relieve the government of having to
put in more.

Will it work? We can only hope. But I know
this for sure: Unless the banks are healed, the
economy can’t lift off, and that bank healing is
not going to happen without another big, broad
taxpayer safety net.

The only person with the clout to sell some-
thing this big is President Obama. The bankers
and Congress will have to help; every citizen will
have to swallow hard.

But ultimately, Obama will have to persuade
people that this is the least unfair and most
effective solution. It will be his first big leader-
ship test. It is coming soon, and it is coming to a
theatre — and a bank — near you.

(This article was written by Thomas L.
Friedman - c.2009 New York Times News
Service).



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Did the PLP
know more
about CLICO than
they are telling?

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE recent unfortunate sit-
uation that CLICO found itself
may have exposed many other
irregularities that would have
been left hidden otherwise. The
handwriting was on the wall for
many years and from all indi-
cations, reared its ugly head as
far back as 2003. But these
events leave a bad taste in the
mouths of most policy holder.

The most frightening thing
about all of this is that all banks
and insurance companies that
are controlled from overseas
should be scrutinised intensely,
in an effort to protect the vul-
nerable Bahamians who are
frightened to death for their
monies that some will never
retrieve from CLICO. Regard-
less of what anyone says pen-
sioners and other investments
could forget it.

Immediately after the bubble
burst the PLP jumped up first to
point fingers, but we all know if
you point one finger, then four
fingers are pointing at you. This
is not just a saying, but what in
fact did happen. I stand to be
corrected but the PLP govern-
ment must have known well in
advance of the deteriorating sit-
uation and did precious little.
They in their usual “laid back”
attitude did nothing, hoping it
would go away. But it didn’t.

I do not have the facts in
front of me but I would ask the

letters@tribunemedia net



then Minister of State in the
Ministry of Finance James
Smith and the then substantive
Minister of Finance, Perry
Gladstone Christie if they knew
that CLICO was showing visible
cracks in its armour? Did the
Ministers suspect that CLICO
might not have been operating
within the laws of the Bahamas?

I would also like to ask if Mr
Smith and Mr Christie were
aware that Clico had already
been under a close watch in oth-
er countries in which they were
doing business?

Did Mr Smith, a former
Governor of the Central Bank,
know that CLICO might have
violated the Central Bank rules
with transactions out of the
Bahamas without the proper
approvals and/or authorisation?

The cute, but very peculiar
thing about Mr Smith is that he
appears to be the most intelli-
gent financial mind in the coun-
try, responding to almost every-
thing that the FNM government
does as if he did better when
he was at the helm.

The Bahamian people expect
nothing less than Mr Smith and
Mr Christie to tell all they know
about CLICO and stop allowing
people to speculate. This would

Constitution will rise above all laws

EDITOR, The Tribune.

When parliament passes a
law against the interests of good
governance then the governor-
general must refuse to assent to
their impropriety.

Some will feel that if the new
police act, now having passed
both the House of Assembly
and the Senate goes to Gov-
ernment House for His Excel-
lency to assent he should exer-
cise his powers under Article:
63 (4) which allows the Gover-
nor-General to ‘withhold’ his
assent to the legislation whether
or not passed.

I find it inexcusable that in
this day any government would
go this far realising what they
propose is probably a serious
matter of constitutionality but
still push-on willy-nilly.

Tenure in official positions in
The Constitution are estab-
lished for judges who on attain-
ing 65 years are required to
resign-retire.

There is no tenure condition
for the Commissioner or the
Deputy Commissioner who

FINALLY AFFORDABLE...

actually interesting under the
Constitution do not or need be
actually serving police officers
— the Constitution simply
clearly says that the Prime Min-
ister, having consulted the
Leader of the Opposition will
advise the Governor-General
to appoint so-and-so to that
position then that is the sole
qualifier. Why is Government
seemingly accepting that they
know their proposed legislation
will be challenged and at a high
cost to the Treasury will be
challenged but of course we do
so love the drama of these mat-
ters.

Will His Excellency, realising
that the Police Bill is not con-
stitutional decline to assent? If
so it will be an interesting
moment in the relations
between Parliament and the
Head of State who has this ulti-
mate Constitutional power.

Let sense prevail — even if
certain people who interesting-
ly are not governed by tenure
(oh what a necessity) might yell
and scream, but the Constitu-
tion will rise above all laws
which is its rightful place.

J MOORE
Nassau,
February 28, 2009.

put the gossip and the anxiety to
rest.

It is imperative that the
leader of the opposition help
some of his own people by
explaining just how efficient or
inefficient the PLP was while
they was in charge of the peo-
ple’s business. Let the people
decide if CLICO just happened
or if it was crumbling years ago
and the PLP did absolutely
nothing.

Then the PLP needs to
explain to the people what to
do if the interested insurance
companies do not include the
people with pre-existing condi-
tions and the older policy hold-
ers. Because common sense dic-
tates that there is no guarantee
that a new arrangement would
include high risk policy hold-
ers.

The PLP also must explain to
all of the hardworking Bahami-
ans, many of them PLP who
invested all of their money and
some who are nearing retire-
ment what they should do. A
large amount of the new invest-
ments appears to have come
after the PLP knew about the
weakening of CLICO.

The PLP must move with
haste to stop this deceptive pol-
itics and speak the truth, which
in the end would set them free.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
March, 2009.

Wine Cet m oy

Bahamians

EDITOR, The Tribune.



I cannot understand people
of the Bahamas. Reference to
the letter from Eugene Carey. I
am glad to note that his farm
appears to be so very successful
as all the other farmers I deal
with are always being pilfered
from. In this case if there are
wild animals interfering with his
farm common sense tells me to
erect a fence around the farm or
put in a thick dense shrubbery
around his property. I under-
stand there was a verbal offer of
fencing, but it was refused
because he would have to pay
to install.

It appears everyone wants
everyone else to do the work.
Bahamians seem to think that
everything is owed to them and
they should reap the benefit. It
starts at the school level when
these children are given sponsor
sheets. What happened to doing
something to earn what you
want. There is no pride in
accomplishment any more.

J CASH
Nassau,
March, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



PLP deputy leadership contenders will ‘spare no expense’ to be ‘last man standing’

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
turnquest@tribunemedia. net



THE deputy leadership race of
the Progressive Liberal Party will
boil down to who is willing and
able to spend the money neces-
sary to ensure that they win a
resounding victory, sources with-
in the party said.

Yesterday, PLP insiders told
The Tribune that the party will
enjoy a tremendous National
Convention in October or

November of
this year when
challengers for
the deputy
position will
“spare no
expense” to
ensure that
they are “the
last man stand-
ing.”

The PLP’s
current deputy
leader, Cynthia Pratt, whose hus-
band is experiencing a number of

ieee cl



medical difficulties at this time,
is expected to step down at the
convention and retire from front-
line politics after three consecu-
tive terms in the House of Assem-
bly.

At this point a number of
would-be deputy leaders, includ-
ing Alfred Sears, Philip “Brave”
Davis, Paul Moss and Obie
Wilchcombe are expected to
throw their hats into the ring.

The person to watch, the
source said, is the “other dark
horse” of the PLP, Paul Moss,

Privy Council rules Japanese immigrant case be remitted to the Court of Appeal

m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

THE Privy Council has ruled
that the case of Atain Takitota, a
Japanese immigrant who was ille-
gally detained in Her Majesty’s
Prison for eight years, be remitted
to the Court of Appeal so that
the amount he should be awarded
for the “long period of wrongful
detention” can be reconsidered.

The London-based Privy
Council in its ruling described the
conditions in Her Majesty’s
Prison as “simply appalling.”

Mr Takitota had appealed the
amount he was originally award-
ed — $500,000 — by the Court
of Appeal.

The Privy Council now ruled
that the final figure for compen-
satory damages should amount
to an overall sum representing
appropriate compensation for the
period of over eight years’ deten-
tion, taking account of the “inhu-
mane conditions and the misery
and distress” suffered by Takito-
ta.

Pending final resolution of the
award, the Council said that it
would be “very desirable” that a
“substantial interim payment” be
given to Takitota.

“The court should determine
what they consider to be an
appropriate figure to reflect com-
pensation for the long period of
wrongful detention of the appel-
lant, taking into account any ele-
ment of aggravation they think
proper, reflecting the conditions
of his detention and, in their own
words, the misery which he
endured,” the Council said.

The Court of Appeal held that
the whole period of Mr Takitota’s
incarceration constituted unlawful
detention and he was awarded
$500,000 in damages — $400,000 of
that being compensatory dam-
ages and $100,000 exemplary
damages.

Mr Takitota arrived in the
Bahamas in the early part of
August 1992 as a lawful entrant,
but within a short time of his

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arrival he lost all his belongings,
including his passport and money.

He was arrested by police offi-
cers on August 12, 1992 for
vagrancy and detained at the
Central Police Station.

He was kept in custody until
October 10, 2000, when he was
released on a bail bond.

Mr Takitota was never charged
with any offence or brought
before a court in the whole of
that period.

The Privy Council said that
sporadic efforts were made to
establish the appellant’s nation-
ality, but it was not accepted by
the Japanese authorities that his
claim to be a Japanese national
was correct, nor was he accepted
to be Chinese.

He simply remained in prison,
with little or no attempt being
made to bring about any resolu-
tion of his situation.

The Court of Appeal pointed
out that the only ground stated
in the detention order was that
his presence in the Bahamas was
“undesirable and not conducive
to the public good.”

The Privy Council said that the
conditions in which Mr Takitota
was detained were “simply
appalling.”

The conditions were described
by Justice Hartman Longley in a
passage of his judgment.

“The plaintiff was made to
sleep on a filthy floor with only a
single blanket in which to cover
himself or attempt to make a bed.
Conditions were hot and steamy
in the summer. There was a bad
mosquito problem. The plaintiff
testified that sometimes he was
so hot that he had to put water on
the floor and lay in it.

“There was no running water in
the facility. The plaintiff was
obliged to urinate and defecate
in a bucket. He said the stench
was such that it made him vomit
on countless occasions causing
him to lose his appetite,” Justice
Longley said in his ruling.

“There were four buckets of
urine and faeces in an 18 by eight
foot room filled with 20 to 35 peo-

ple at any given time. The evi-
dence of the Superintendent of
Prison, Mr Culmer, confirmed
these conditions. The plaintiff had
to endure these conditions for
roughly eight years while sealed
in a room at maximum security
prison with hardened criminals
in Fox Hill. He said, and I am sat-
isfied that it must have happened,
that he had been assaulted and
attacked and taken advantage of
by prisoners and was afraid to use
the bucket provided by the
authorities and so sometimes he
urinated and defecated himself.”

Mr Takitota attempted on at
least three occasions to commit
suicide.

After hospital treatment, he
was again returned to prison,
being transferred after some time
to a minimum security unit and
ultimately in 1998 to a detention
centre.

The Court of Appeal cate-
gorised his treatment not only as
“less than humane,” but as a “fla-
grant misuse/abuse of power.”

The Privy Council said that Mr
Takitota is to have his costs of
the appeal, the costs order of the
Court of Appeal remaining undis-
turbed.

“The sum of $100,000, repre-
senting constitutional or vindica-
tory damages, should remain
undisturbed and should be added
to the amount reassessed for com-
pensatory damages to make up
the final award of damages to the
appellant,” the Privy Council said.

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who is seen as someone with the
personal fortune and “sheer
determination” needed to win.
“Paul is a force to be reckoned
with. He has the means and the
testicular fortitude to go after
what he believes in. And if you
notice, after all the many oppor-
tunities certain people in the par-
ty have had to try and box him in,
he is still out there - vocal and
demonstrating that he is here to

A






stay,” said a source close to the
aspiring politician.

On Tuesday, Mr Moss was the
only noticeable member from the
Opposition who participated in a
demonstration outside of The Tri-
bune condemning the daily for a
series of articles directed at for-
mer Prime Minister Sir Lynden
Pindling.

Despite their pronouncements
of offence and disgust at the arti-

cles, not one sitting member,
many of whom served or worked
with Sir Lynden, turned out, the
source noted.

“But if you look at that demon-
stration, which by the way was
not sanctioned by the PLP, a
good number of people still
turned up. So what does that tell
you? Paul Moss has traction. He
has a following, and that’s all he
needs,” the source said.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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SEMINARS to. assist
Bahamians in coping with
their current financial hard-
ships will be held at all the
Urban Renewal Centres
throughout the New Provi-
dence.

The first in a series of
empowerment seminars was
hosted by the Kemp Road
Centre of the Urban Renewal
Livable Neighbourhood Pro-
gramme, in conjunction with
the North Eastern Pastors
Alliance, at New Lively Hope
Baptist Church on Tuesday.

Centre manager Kolamae
Pedican said the seminar was
a response to pleas from the
community for assistance
regarding issues including
unemployment, depression,
having outstanding loans and
being afraid to contact their
lenders.

“We found ourselves job
hunting for people, coun-
selling people on how to cope
with stress, how to deal with
children who they could not
provide lunch money for and
more,” Ms Pedican said.

“So we thought to bring all
the government agencies
together and have our own
Urban Renewal stimulus plan
where businesses that are hir-
ing would be here for those

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GUESTS IN ATTENDANCE at an empowerment seminar hosted by the
Kemp Road Centre of the Urban Renewal Livable Neighbourhood Pro-
gramme listen attentively to speaker Patrice Williams-Gordon of Parkgate
Seventh-Day Adventist Ministries on Tuesday, March 17.

who need them. Hopefully we
have provided information
that will assist persons in get-
ting back on track.”

Ella Lewis, New Providence
coordinator of the Urban
Renewal Livable Neighbour-
hood Programme, said the ini-
tiative has a responsibility to
help persons who are hurting
as a result of the downturn in
our economy.

“We are putting on these
seminars throughout New

times by empowering them
and making them think of oth-
er options.”

Mrs Lewis said the seminars
will continue at the Farm
Road Urban Renewal Centre
in April.

Guest speaker Patrice
Williams-Gordon, wife of Pas-
tor Danhugh Gordon of the
Parkgate Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, addressed
those attending on the topic
“tough times don’t last —

Providence at all of our cen- tough people do.”
tres. This is the first of many She said: “Today I’ve lost
that we plan to do along with my job.

our partners to show them
how they can survive in these

“T’ve got to hang my suits
up for a little while. I’ve got to
change my heels for slippers,
instead of a computer I might
need a knife or a machete
because [’'m reorganising
myself.

“But that doesn’t define me,
if you have tough love you will
organise yourself around your
current circumstances.”

Participating agencies in the
seminar were the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force, the
Department of Nursing, the
Ministry of Labour, the
Bahamas Technical Voca-
tional Institute (BTV), the
College of the Bahamas, the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) and McDonald’s
Bahamas.

and counting!”

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

BNT hosts lecture on Bg

topic of sea turtles

THE BAHAMAS National
Trust yesterday hosted a lec-
ture by prominent marine
researchers on the topic of sea
turtles in the Bahamas.

The public meeting held at
the BNT’s Retreat featured
internationally renowned sea
turtle researchers Dr Karen
Bjorndal and Dr Alan Bolten
of the Archie Carr Centre for
Sea Turtle Research at the Uni-
versity of Florida.

The topic for the evening was
“Sea Turtles of the Bahamas:
Insights from 30 years of study.”

Following the creation of the
BNT in 1959, concern began to
be expressed for the sea turtles.

Dr Carr initiated a pro-
gramme concerned with the
research of sea turtles, the pro-
tection of their nesting grounds
and their reintroduction to for-
mer nesting grounds.

One of the regions where this
research was being conducted
was at Union Creek, north of
the Inagua National Park.

Three hundred turtles were
sent to Union Creek in 1959 in
an effort to restore this area.

Dr Carleton Ray approached
the Trust’s executive commit-
tee with the idea of Union
Creek being a part of the
National Park system, the result
was the establishment of Union
Creek Reserve in 1963.

Dr Carr was mentor to Dr
Bjorndal and Dr Alan Bolten.

Dr Bjorndal has been study-
ing sea turtles at Union Creek
since 1974 while pursuing her
PhD and returns every year
with her partner Dr Alan
Bolten to continue their long-
term studies on growth and
nutrition.

Green turtles take up resi-
dency in shallow creeks like
Union Creek at about 25cm in
length.

They may remain resident in
a specific creek for a decade or
more.

Union Creek has provided
the world with some of the most
important scientific data on the
endangered green turtle. Sea
turtles face ever-increasing
threats from a staggering array
of sources as human popula-
tions grow, coastal habitats are
developed, and marine habitats

THE TOPIC of the
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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Lehder in Norman’s Cay to Nas-
sau to pay off Pindling and a
senior police officer. He believed
his son was killed because he
knew too much.

Pindling
Additionally, another front-
page article called into question

the nationality of the former
Prime Minister, citing sources

who claim that Sir Lynden was
in fact born in Jamaica in the
small town of Cotton Tree.
However, despite both of these
claims attorney Obi Pindling, who
represented his family at yester-
day’s press conference, declared

eee ile:

Draft legislation published
for the Communications Sector

The Committee for the Privatisation of BTC has published on the
privatisation website at waw.bteprivatisation.com a package of draft
legislation which collectively would represent a major step forward in
developing the new regulatory environment for communications in The

Bahamas.

The Committee, on behalf of the Government, is now seeking comments

on this

package of

legislation which

includes The Bahamas

Communications Act, which relates specifically to the regulation of the
communications sector; and two acts to set up a new regulator and a
new ad hoe tribunal, namely the Utilities Regulation & Competition

Authority Act, and the Utilities Appeal Tribunal Act.

It is expected that the new acts will be tabled in Parliament in the very
near future. The new framework firmly establishes the ground rules for
the sector going forward, and provides for a more robust regulatory
foundation for sector participants and new investors, including any
potential strategic partners for the 51% interest in BTC.

Town meetings will be held to explain to the general public the
recommendations that the Committee has put forward to the
Government with respect to the regulatory regime including the
proposed legislation. The date and times of these town meetings will be
announced in a subsequent notice.

Comments regarding the draft legislation may be emailed to

info@bteprivatisation.com.










International School



that he would not be taking any
questions on any other matters
relating to his father except the
controversy surrounding his
nationality.

“T am here simply dealing with
aspects of Sir Lynden Pindling,
the son, husband, father and
grandfather and not Sir Lynden
Pindling, the politician. I am not
here to be combative, I am not
here to be adversarial. I am sim-
ply here to lay unmistakable,
undeniable facts on the table con-
cerning my father’s birth and that
is it,” he said.

Mr Pindling said that the
“rumours” surrounding the ques-
tioning of his father’s nationality
is an “old story” — one which he

first recalled hearing in the early
1970’s when it was first raised in
the House of Assembly. Howev-
er, he insists that this was then,
and continues today, to be a polit-
ical distraction that is now being
perpetrated by The Tribune to
discredit his family and the con-
tributions his father made to
the development of the
Bahamas.

PLP Chairwoman, Glenys
Hanna-Martin called on the
nation not to be distracted by the
story surrounding Sir Lynden.

“IT have watched and listened
with interest and dismay to the
recent debate emanating out of
an article written by a foreign
writer for The Tribune about the

origins and historical involvement
of the late Sir Lynden Pindling
in the history of our nation. Iam
firmly of the view that the piv-
otal role played by this man, Lyn-
den Pindling, who led our great
party and who forged our people
into nationhood is one that is
unassailable, the facts speak for
themselves.

“T believe it is important that
we value as a critical component
to our national identity and our
national purpose the incredible
milestones that took us from a
colonized people to a free and
sovereign nation based on equal-
ity in a relatively short period of
time and without bloodshed,” she
said.

FROM page one

tiously.

Attorney Damian Gomez told the court yesterday
that he had not seen the provisional liquidator’s
report and that his clients have been left unable to
make an informed decision on whether to support or
oppose the wind-up order. He said that as a result —
out of caution — they have filed notices to oppose
the order. He added that he and his clients are dis-
turbed by reports in the press that certain creditors
have been paid. Mr Gomez also suggested that a gag
order be issued to restrain those involved in the
case from discussing the matter publicly. Attorney
Sidney Cambridge who is representing the provi-
sional liquidator Craig Gomez of Baker Tilly Gomez
assured the court that the liquidator’s report would
be made available by Friday.

Attorney Godfrey “Pro” Pinder also requested
full disclosure in the matter so that he could advise
his clients on what course of action to take. While he
supported the request for an adjournment in the
case he added that he would require more than 14
days that had been substantially agreed to, in order
for him to meet with the policy holders. He noted
that he, MP for Fort Charlotte, Alfred Sears and MP
for Blue Hills, Sidney Collie represent more than
100 policy holders pro bono. Mr Pinder further not-
ed that many of CLICO’s policy holders may not be
aware that the insurer’s matter is now before the
court. Attorney Sears suggested that the matter be
adjourned for 21 days so that all policy holders
could be properly informed and give instructions
to their counsel. He told the court that some policy
holders on the Family Islands have expressed their
desire to travel to New Providence to give instruc-
tions to their counsel on how they wish to proceed.

Attorney Emerick Knowles of the law firm Alex-
iou Knowles and Co, representing CLICO, told the
court however that the only issue before the court
was whether the company should be wound-up and
whether all that is stated in the petition is true.
Attorney John Wilson, who appeared for the com-
pany BUPA, a CLICO creditor, told the court that

Report on CLICO

any lengthy adjournment in the matter would be
to “no ones advantage.”

Justice Albury, while noting the urgency to get the
matter resolved and the “peculiar circumstances” of
the case, ordered that the provisional liquidator’s
report be submitted to the court by Friday. Justice
Albury also ordered that no statements regarding
what the report entails be published and that any
report regarding the matter be submitted to the
court. The case was adjourned to Friday, March 27,
when parties involved are expected to outline the
position of their clients, as to whether they support
or oppose the windup order.

The death knell came for CLICO (Bahamas)
when the Trinidad government and regulators were
forced to bail out CL Financial, the parent company
of CLICO (Bahamas), which failed to pay out a
guaranteed $57 million loan accounting for 59 per
cent of the Bahamian insurer’s assets at year-end
2007.

That loan, an advance to CLICO (Bahamas)
wholly-owned subsidiary CLICO Enterprises, had
increased to $72 million worth of exposure at year-
end 2008 based on unaudited accounts, the Registrar
of Insurance’s Office said.

CLICO Enterprises had invested the majority
of funds advanced to it in Florida-based real estate
development company Wellington Preserve Real
Estate which suffered more than a 20 per cent
decline in market value at year-end 2007 due to a
collapsing property market.

A winding-up Order was granted by the Supreme
Court on February 24, appointing Mr Craig Gomez
of Baker Tilley Gomez as Provisional Liquidator for
CLICO (Bahamas) Limited (CLICO). The Order
was made following a petition by the Registrar of
Insurance Companies (ORIC) in accordance with
authority granted under Section 41 of the Insur-
ance Act. Attorney David Higgins is representing
the Registrar of Insurance Companies.

FROM page one

of cultural industries and festi-
vals to stimulate the economy by
attracting international artists and
cultural tourists with money to
spend.

She said: “Carifest itself has
never been properly administered
and cost governments a lot of
money, but that is the govern-
ments’ fault, not the festivals

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fault. The potential is huge.

“It would put us on the map
and on a different kind of map, a
map of people who spend money
when they go to a place.”

Ms Bethel said Carifesta would
accelerate investment in artistic
industries and provide the infra-
structure required to develop arts
to an international standard.

Mr Maynard agreed a $3-$10
million investment in infrastruc-
ture for Carifesta would reap
greater profits in the long run.

He said: “It would have been a
launching pad for the cultural
industries across the board and
the beginning of a series of events
to attract visitors to our shores.

“It’s one of the best opportu-
nities because we are a tourist
destination, we have the hotel
rooms, so we could reach out to
the wider international commu-
nity so it would have been very
easy for the Bahamas to make
what they put into it.”

But he said he would under-
stand why CARICOM might
choose to axe the festival in
tough economic times: “An event
like Carifesta, as good as it is for
cultural development and

exchange, when you look at the
bigger picture every government
in the region is complaining
about dropping revenues and is
faced with economic challenges,
and all of these things are reali-
ties.”

Mr Maynard maintains the
Bahamas, which began prepara-
tions to host Carifesta before it
was relocated to Guyana in 2008,
is still prepared to host the festi-
val next year if CARICOM
decides to proceed. And local
artists will be given a prominent
role in developing world-class
venues and organising the event
whenever it takes place.

He said: “As soon as we get a
definite word from CARICOM
we will meet with them to dis-
cuss a way forward.

“The whole cultural commu-
nity and our Ministry was looking
forward to the prospects of what
Carifesta could bring, but it’s not
going to deter us from developing
our cultural industries.

“We are already a prime
tourist destination, but we need
to package our arts in a way that
it would be part of the tourism
product.”

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 9



The Bahamas and Cuba sign

economic and technical agreement

m@ By LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE Bahamas and Cuba
have signed an agreement on
economic and technical co-
operation in health, education
and other areas of expertise for
future projects to be undertak-
en by the Bahamas.

The signing ceremony took
place yesterday at the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs, where
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette and Cuban
Ambassador to the Bahamas
Jose Luis Ponce Caraballo
signed on behalf of their respec-
tive governments.

Mr Symonette thanked the
government of the Republic of
Cuba for its commitment and
continued support as it relates
to the agreement.

“This agreement is a very
important one as it establishes
the basic framework agreement
on economic and technical co-
operation, which is the frame-
work agreement from which
any cooperation project/ agree-
ments would follow,” Mr
Symonette said.

The Bahamas is already
engaged in technical co-opera-
tion with Cuba, specifically in
health and education.

Teachers

In September 2006, the
Agreement of Specialty Teach-
ers between the Ministry of
Education, the Latin American
and Caribbean Pedagogical
Institute and the Republic of
Cuba was signed. This enabled
the Ministry of Education to
engage the services of Cuban
teachers in the public school
system.

The previous two-year agree-
ment expired in September
2000. A one-year extension was
approved in October 2008 to
retain the services of Cuban
teachers until September 2009.

“The Ministry of Education
and the Embassy of Cuba are
engaged in talks with a view to
revising the agreement to
engage the services of Cuban
teachers for a three-year period.
It is hoped that the process
would be concluded shortly,”
Mr Symonette said.

From November 2005 to
December 2006, the govern-
ments of the Bahamas and
Cuba entered into a verbal
agreement known as “Opera-
tion Miracle — Eye Pro-
gramme”, which allowed per-
sons with any form of visual
impairment to obtain medical
assistance from Cuba, free of
charge.

According to the Embassy of
Cuba, more than 500 Bahami-
ans have benefited from the
programme, 399 of whom were
diagnosed with a type of ocu-
lar disease that required surgical
intervention.

In May 2008, as a result of
the Bahamas government’s dec-
laration of its intention to rein-
state the programme, the
Cuban Embassy via diplomatic
channels submitted a draft
Memorandum of Co-operation
between the Cuban Medical
Services and the government of
the Bahamas for the re-imple-
mentation of Operation Mira-
cle.

The Cuban Embassy also for-
warded for consideration, cre-
dentials of an ophthalmologist
and optometrist, who are
expected to be engaged in the
programme.

“The Ministry of Health is
presently reviewing the draft
agreement and it is expected
that the Ministry of Health and
the Cuban Embassy would be in
consultation with respect to the
same,” Mr Symonette said.

He also revealed that there
are other pending agreements
between the Bahamas and the
Republic of Cuba, including:

® an agreement between the
Bahamas Ministry of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources and
the Ministry of Agriculture of
the Republic of Cuba on col-
laboration in the field of plant
quarantine and plant protection

© an agreement between the
Bahamas Ministry of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources and
the Ministry of Agriculture of
the Republic of Cuba on col-
laboration in the fields of ani-
mal quarantine and the controls
and eradication of animal dis-
eases

“A review of these files
revealed that these two agree-
ments were originated by the
Ministry of Agriculture and

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Marine Resources during the
administration of the former
government and were subse-
quently approved by Cabinet,
subject to vetting by the Attor-
ney General’s Office and the
agreed language by both gov-
ernments,” Mr Symonette said.

Ambassador Ponce said that
Cuba remains committed to
rendering assistance to the
Bahamas in any endeavour.

“This agreement proves to
further enhance that co-opera-
tion between both countries,”
he said.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





Building a green economy in the Bahamas:
YOUR SAY

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° This is the third in a series
of articles discussing the poten-
tial opportunities for the
Bahamas in the emerging green
economy. The writer, Colin
Lightbourn, is a real estate
business owner, developer and
past president of the Bahamas
National Trust. To comment,
discuss and submit ideas about
these articles visit: www.the-
greenislands.com

idely regarded

as the sleeping

giant, Andros is

the largest of all
Bahamas islands and contains
the most ecologically rich and
diverse eco-system.

According to Philip Kramer,
the Nature Conservancy's
Caribbean marine programme
director, "To find large popu-
lations of so many rare and
threatened species reinforces
our belief that the west side of
Andros is one of the most eco-
logically intact and pristine
areas remaining in the western
tropical Atlantic.” It has the
third largest barrier reef in the
world, an immense mangrove
and marine estuary system,
numerous documented fish
spawning areas and an exten-
sive underground fresh water
system. Without any human
intervention it is literally the
country’s largest domestic
bread-basket.

American Bob Farmer and
his brother began farming and

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exporting produce from Andros
in the 1950s. In a letter written
to journalist Oswald Brown, the
Parkers say: “We did, in fact,
grow tomatoes as well as straw-

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berries for export to the US
rather successfully. Then, in
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Mountains, to Andros, and we
farmed jointly with them for 13
years.

“For a 16-year period (we)
supplied the entire United
States and Canada with in
excess of 95 percent of the
cucumbers consumed during
the winter months ... It was a
very successful farming venture,
and one of which very few
Bahamians are aware ... Had
we been allowed to continue
farming, I am confident that
there would now be more than
20,000 acres under cultivation
for export at this time im the
Bahamas.

“We also established a pre-
fabrication plant at North
Andros that produced in excess
of 300 modern residential units
that we erected throughout the
Bahamas. We also constructed
the power plant at Nicholl's
Town and most of the electric
and telephone distribution lines
in North Andros that are now
owned and operated by BEC
and Batelco.”

The farmers’ vision back in
the 1950s is precisely the entre-
preneurial spirit we need in the
Bahamas today. Transporta-
tion, technology and commu-
nication have progressed ten-
fold since this earlier era which
makes the economic potential
even greater. Agriculture in
Andros has made the news

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

The bread basket



is a viable environmental and economic solution...

FROM page 10

quite often over the past year
with various plans and land des-
ignations being proposed.

As an agriculture programme
matures it will require planning,
infrastructure, and packaging
and distribution strategies. It
will also potentially create envi-
ronmental pressure, im partic-
ular, threats to the fresh ground
water system from pesticides
and fertilisers.

Organic farming is a viable
environmental and economic
solution; since 1990 the market
for organic products has grown
at an average of 20 to 25 per
cent per year. According to one
trade association, “organic agri-
culture is a production system
that sustains the health of soils,
ecosystems and people. It relies
on ecological processes, biodi-
versity and cycles adapted to
local conditions, rather than the
use of inputs with adverse
effects. Organic agriculture
combines tradition, innovation
and science to benefit the
shared environment and pro-
mote fair relationships and a
good quality of life for all
involved.”

In the fields of technology
and biological research and
development there is also
unlimited opportunity. This
includes scientific inventions
used in biological and medical
research, production of phar-
maceutical drugs, agriculture,
and energy and water produc-
tion. Specifically, advancements
in technology could more effi-
ciently use the ocean to create
drinking water and the sun’s
energy and tidal currents to
generate electricity. Through
genetic engineering, new meth-
ods of food production can be
harnessed that would be impos-
sible using traditional methods.

One example of genetically
engineered food is “golden
rice”. It was developed for use
in countries where there is a
shortage of dietary vitamin A.
At the beginning of the 21st
century, vitamin A deficiency
(VAD) was responsible for 1-2
million deaths, and 500,000 cas-
es of irreversible blindness most
often in children and pregnant
women. As of 1999 there were

to UNICEF could effectively
eliminate VAD. Some activists
argue against genetic engineer-
ing saying it will lead to the cor-
porate control of the world’s
produce and livestock and the
US and Europe disagree over
its regulation, while others take
a religious position on the issue.
The fact is, as natural resources
continue to decline alternative
methods of food production are
going to become more main-
stream.

We are at the beginning of a
new era of information and
technology primarily focused
around the development of
solutions to the problem of
declining natural resources and
meeting the demands of unsus-
tainable population growth.
Locally, agreements like the
Hotels Encouragement Act and
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment were created to encour-
age investment in the Bahamas
with favorable tax and other
conditions. Using golden rice

as an example, the potential for
the Bahamas is not necessarily
to grow the rice but to foster
an environment to research and
develop the technology that will
have intellectual and licensing
value on an international scale.
The Bahamas, through creative
trade agreements, can become
a vehicle to bring together
inventors, scientists and ven-
ture capitalists who will invest
in these new technologies. The
government and Bahamian
companies can receive distrib-
ution and licensing royalties or
even donate the technology for
humanitarian purposes.

A green economic zone with
benefits for organic agriculture,
aquaculture, manufacturing,
and research and development
can be established. Like the
southern Bahamas, Andros is
an untapped resource with all
the natural tools to build a
bridge to a sustainable future
and empower more Bahamians
to have a greater stake in it.

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 11

PUBLIC NOTICE

Public Consultations on Licensing
and Universal Service Obligations
for the Electronic Communications Sector

The Committee for the Privatisation of BTC is pleased to invite comments
fram members of the public and interested parties on its consultation
documents on a proposed new Licensing Regime and Universal Service
Obligations for the Electronic Communications Sector.

The first consultation document relates to the new licensing regime for
the sector, and covers key areas that will impact companies involved in
the provision of communication services including telephone, internet,
radio, TV and other similar devices.

The second consultation document relates to the Universal Service
Obligation (USO) envisaged for both telecommunications and television
which aims to ensure that more remote areas of The Bahamas continue
to receive specified services at affordable prices. It covers the
establishment of the USO in the new legislation and the funding of the
USO including the establishment of a Universal Service Fund and how
operators will calculate the net cost of providing these services.

The Licensing and USO consultations run for approximately five
weeks from March 79. 2009 to April 20, 2009. Copies of these
documents and the published response to the recent Framework
Consultation are being distributed to the Administrators’ Offices in
the Family Islands and can be obtained from the offices of KPMG in
New Providence and Grand Bahama. Copies can also be downloaded
from the Government’ website at www.bahamas.gov.bs of the
privatisation website at www.btcprivatisation.com and comments
emailed to info@bteprivatisation.com.



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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SS EEE ae aS ee
Events leading to protection of natural resources

W ERE it not for a
series of serendipi-

tous events decades ago, many of
the Bahamas’ most precious nat-
ural resources might have been
lost forever. And it all began with
the first attempts at underwater
photography.

The Bahamas featured promi-
nently in early undersea film-
making because of our crystal-
clear, unpolluted waters. The
Williamson Photosphere (whose
rusting hulk lies somewhere in
the national archives), was a sub-
mersible device used to film the
world's first underwater movie in
the Bahamas.

Based on Jules Verne's 20,000
Leagues Under the Sea, this silent
film was a major box office hit
back in 1916.

The photosphere was later
involved in recovering coral from
the Bahamas to build a live reef
display at Chicago's Field Muse-
um of Natural History.

And it served for a time as a
unique underwater post office,
where collectible letters were
stamped and posted from Sea

Floor, Bahamas.

In 1930, after the American
inventors Otis Barton and
William Beebe made headlines
with a record dive off Bermuda in
their newly-developed bathy-
sphere, this submersible became a
star attraction at the Chicago
World's Fair.

And Barton headed for the
Bahamas to shoot a movie called
Titans of the Deep in 1938.

One of the men who worked
on that film was Ilia Tolstoy, a
colourful grandson of the great
19th century Russian writer, Leo
Tolstoy.

He had been a Russian cavalry
officer before emigrating to the
US in 1924, where he became
associated with the New York
Museum of Natural History.

Tolstoy took part in filming



expeditions to the Canadian
wilderness and spent time in
Alaska helping to plan Mount
McKinley National Park.

As a prominent member of the
Explorers Club he was involved
in several film ventures and expe-
ditions around the world experi-
menting with underwater pho-
tography.

And following his work with
Titans of the Deep, he was instru-
mental in setting up Marineland,
the world's first oceanarium
based at St Augustine, Florida.
Originally called Marine Studios,
it was the place where captive
dolphins were bred for the first
time, and it became a fashionable
hangout for writers and film pro-
ducers, as well as a major tourist
attraction.

Tolstoy's most notable exploit

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PUBLIC NOTICE

Directory Publications Queries
and Complaints

BIC would like to advise the general public that in
agreement with their advertising contract, all queries
or complaints for the 2009 Bahamas, Grand Bahama
and Abaco Telephone Directories must be received
on or before March 31st 2009.

Advertisers with quenes or complaints are urged to
contact the Directory publications department im-

mediately at the following addresses:

Nassau Office

summerwinds Plaza, Tonique Williams-Darling Hwy
TEL: 242-322-9183-8 » FAX 242-322-9195
Email: yellowpages@btcbahamas.com

Grand Bahama Office
Government Complex, Mall Drive
TEL: 242-352-2336/8 » FAX: 242-352-2431
Email: yellowpages@bftcbahamas.com

Family Island

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was a 10-month trek across Tibet
in 1942 as an envoy of the US
government, when he met the
Dalai Lama, who was then bare-
ly seven years old.

Many of his photographs from
that wartime expedition are pre-
sented in a book called A Por-
trait of Lost Tibet by Rosemary
Jones Tung.

After the war, Tolstoy was a
frequent visitor to the Bahamas
and became increasingly con-
cerned about environmental
degradation: "I saw the ghosts of
(extinct) Passenger Pigeons in the
air," he later wrote. And in 1953
he began leveraging his interna-
tional contacts to push the idea of
setting aside some islands in the
Bahamas as protected areas.

At about the same time, a
Columbia University graduate
student named Carleton Ray was
working on a photo book about
marine life (with a fellow student
named Elgin Ciampi).

Like others before them, they
had decided that the Bahamas
was the place for underwater pho-
tography.

"The 1950s were early in the
days of scuba-diving and fish-
watching, and during our visits
we saw some intriguing things,”
Ray wrote in the 1998 edition of
the Bahamas Journal of Science.
"We became aware of so-called
spear-fishing contests, which con-
sisted of contestants piling
speared fish on shore, the winner
being the one with the weighti-
est, wasteful pile. So we began to
think of conservation in terms of
no-take zones and/or underwater
parks. We formulated our
thoughts for the introduction to
(our book), the Underwater
Guide to Marine Life."

LI: the book, Ray called for
some of the best marine
areas to be protected in the same
way that wilderness is protected
on land. These "undersea wilder-
ness areas" would serve as replen-
ishment zones for marine life to
repopulate surrounding areas,
while preserving the beauty of
coral gardens as valuable tourist
attractions and natural laborato-
ries.

"Only one marine protected
area was known to us at the time
(off the Florida Keys), so we sent
drafts of our introduction to influ-
ential conservationists to try out
our idea. Fortunately, one of our
reviewers was Richard Plough (of
the American Museum of Natur-
al History) whom Tolstoy had
also contacted. Plough thought it
self-evident that Ilia and I should
join forces."

In the meantime, Tolstoy had
presented his idea to the British
governor of the Bahamas and had
given a talk at the Chamber of
Commerce in Nassau. "It was
indeed a memorable day when
on February 13, 1956 I received a
letter from the governor con-
firming that the Crown had set
aside approximately 22 miles of
the Exuma Cays (providing that)
some organization would under-
take to explore the possibility fur-
ther and be able to give concrete
recommendations to the Bahami-
an government."

By January 1958 Tolstoy and
Ray had organised their Exuma
expedition. A collection of big-
name conservationists like Robert
Porter Allen of the Audubon
Society and Bahamian experts

Sean
McCarroll
359-2957

Jason
McCarroll
477-7027

like Oris Russell and Herbert
McKinney spent a week travel-
ling by boat from Norman’s Cay
to Conch Cut.

They concluded that the area
had “essentially unspoiled natur-
al conditions with unmodified
associations of plants, animals,
earth processes, and those intan-
gible elements that combine to
give an area its outstanding char-
acter.

"The Exuma Cays park under
consideration should be regarded
as only the beginning of a con-
servation movement that is vital
to the Bahamas as a whole.

“Tt will also be a beginning of a
new concept, integrated land-and-
sea conservation, in which the
Bahamas will take the lead and
show the way to other nations
throughout the world," their
report said.

The survey team called for an
organisation modelled on the
British National Trust to acquire
lands and manage protected areas
throughout the Bahamas.

This organisation — which was
created by parliament in 1959 —
would be the government's advis-
er on conservation matters and
seek to educate Bahamians on
the value of their natural heritage.

And 50 years later, a new Exu-
ma survey has recently been com-
pleted. Tolstoy died in 1970 and a
retired Carleton Ray was unable
to participate this time around,
but a number of Bahamian and
international scientists made the
trip aboard a research vessel
donated by the John G Shedd
Aquarium in Chicago. They
included marine, plant and bird
specialists from the American
Museum of Natural History, the
College of the Bahamas, The
Nature Conservancy and several
Florida universities.

“Our mission was to follow in
the footsteps of the original expe-
dition and do a rapid ecological
assessment of the Exuma park as
it is today,” said Dr Ethan Freid,
a Tampa University botanist with
long experience in the Bahamas.
"We found the vegetation to be
largely intact, although there were
more invasives like Casuarinas
which have to be controlled."

Marine biologist Dr Dan
Brumbaugh of the American
Museum of Natural History said
the park is doing what it was cre-
ated to do: "There are more and
bigger fish than in other areas,
which is reassuring, and there are
good size fish just outside the
park boundaries too. It is dis-
tinctly different from what you
see around New Providence, for
example, and the reefs are health-
ier with more parrot fish present."

Leno Davis of The Nature
Conservancy's Nassau office cited
the presence of garbage washed
ashore on the cays as something
that was difficult for the park war-
dens to control.

And Everton Joseph of the
College of the Bahamas said the
team had found two Kirkland
Warblers — a rare migratory bird
that has never been reported in
the Exumas before.

Herpetologist Sandra Buckner
noted three successful popula-
tions of iguana in the park, where
none had existed 50 years ago.
But all the scientists were con-
cerned about the ecological
impact of a massive population
explosion of hutias.

Once thought to be extinct,
these small mammals that were

>t

242

a favourite food of the Lucayans
were put on several cays years
ago and are now eating them-
selves out of existence.

"There are large areas on
Shroud Cay with no vegetation
as a result," Dr Freid said. "This
is an ecological conundrum as the
hutia is the only endemic land
mammal in the Bahamas, yet it
is radically affecting the environ-
ment. This is something that has
to be carefully managed by the
BNT."

After leaving the Exumas, the
researchers surveyed the Grassy
Cays area of South Andros to
provide documentation for a pro-
posed new national park.

They found the region subject
to intense fishing pressure with
traps, camps and boats every-
where, as well as evidence that
nesting seabirds were being shot.

"There are fewer and smaller
fish and the reefs are subject to
many of the same pressures found
in more populated areas," Dr
Brumbaugh noted.

“There is a small amount of
live coral and lots of disease. It
was kind of sobering to be can-
did."

B ut on land, the scientists
reported that the natur-
al coppice and mangrove forests
were intact except for small
patches of Casuarina that could
easily be removed.

And they found evidence of
iguanas everywhere, indicating
that a new park would be a good
opportunity to protect these
endangered reptiles.

Today, the Bahamas National
Trust administers a network of
more than a dozen national parks
stretching from Abaco and Grand
Bahama in the north to Inagua
in the south.

But as development pressures
grow, there are rising calls for the
government to set aside more of
our natural patrimony.

"This is the time to propose
new areas for protection," BNT
executive director Eric Carey told
me. "And South Andros is defi-
nitely on our list.

“The report of the survey team
will contribute good science to
prove that this area is important
to preserve for future generations,
just as the Exuma park was 50
years ago."

As Carleton Ray put it in his
1998 article, "Serendipitous
events, decades ago, initiated the
Bahamas protected area system
under the jurisdiction of the
BNT...(but) conservation must be
guided by careful strategic plan-
ning involving the application of
the best scientific informa-
tion...while also generating con-
siderable social and political will.

"Protected areas must be seen
as vital future tools—as safe-
guards against overuse and abuse,
as reserves for living and physical
resources, and as places for
research, learning and inspira-
tion.”

(If you want to know more,
check out the photo exhibition
on the BNTs 50 years of work at
the Central Bank downtown from
now through March 27).

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 13





CLICO crisis: a case of regulatory

EM COMTI Coa anil




m By ALFRED M SEARS

ON THE February 24, 2009 the
Registrar of Insurance petitioned
the Supreme Court of the
Bahamas for the winding-up of
CLICO (Bahamas) Limited
(“CLICO”) because CLICO was
unable to pay claims of US$2.6
million in the Turks and Caicos
Islands and (b) its liabilities were
estimated to exceed its assets by at
least $9 million.

The Supreme Court appointed
Mr Craig Gomez of Baker Tilly
Gomez as Provisional Liquidator
for CLICO.

A hearing of the winding-up
petition (was) scheduled to be
heard (today).

CLICO has branch operations
in Turks and Caicos Islands and
Belize, all supervised by the Reg-
istrar of Insurance in the Bahamas.

The Bahamas accounts for
about 68 per cent of its premiums;
Turks and Caicos Islands for 27
per cent and Belize for five per
cent of total premiums.

There are about 141 employees
in the Bahamas, comprising 90
sales agents and 51 administrative
staff.

CLICO’s portfolio comprises
about 17,297 Life Insurance poli-
cies with annual premiums of $5.1
million; 11,230 accident and sick-
ness health policies with annual
premiums of $3.2 million; 2,689
annuities with annual premiums
of $4.6 million and 7,402 group
policies with annual premiums of
$1.8 million.

The total individual and group
policies amount to some 38,618
with annual premium of $14.8 mil-
lion.

The responsibility for the failure
of CLICO must rest on the pro-
priety of the corporate judgment
exercised by the directors and
manager of the enterprise.

However, I submit that the
Bahamian government was equal-
ly culpable in its persistent failure
to properly regulate CLICO and
make a timely intervention when it
became aware of CLICO’s prob-
lems in order to protect the
Bahamian public.

The Bahamian government
therefore made a mistake in failing
to provide any guarantees of
recovery to the 38,618 Bahamian
policy and annuities holders, since
the failure of CLICO was due, in
part, to the regulatory failure and
the failure of the government to
bring into force the Domestic
Insurance Act which was passed
by Parliament in July 2006.

Mr Ewart Williams, Governor
of the Central Bank of Trinidad
and Tobago, when announcing the
rescue plan of approximately
TT$6 billion for CL Financial
Group (the ultimate beneficial of
CLICO Bahamas) on January 30,
2009, identified the following fac-
tors as causing the financial diffi-
culties of CL Financial and its sub-
sidiaries and affiliates:

e Excessive related-party trans-
actions which carry significant con-
tagion risks.

e An aggressive high-interest
rate resource mobilisation strategy
to finance equally high-risk invest-
ments, much of which are in illiq-
uid assets (including real estate
both in Trinidad and Tobago and
abroad).

e A very high leveraging of the
Group’s assets, which constrains
the potential amount of cash that
could be raised from assets sales.

The government of Trinidad
and Tobago asserted that its ratio-
nale was to avoid any risk of con-
tagion to the financial services sec-
tor of Trinidad, given that CL
Financial controls over TT$100
billion of assets in at least 28 com-
panies located throughout the
Caribbean, with interests in sev-
eral industry sectors including
banking and financial services,
energy, real estate and manufac-
turing and distribution.

Governor Williams said that the
principal objective of the rescue
plan was “to ensure that resources
are available to meet withdrawals
of third-party CIB depositors and
Clico policy holders; to protect the
funds of depositors and policy
holders and in so doing maintain
confidence in Clico and reinforce
confidence in the financial sector
as a whole.”

I suggest that this rationale is
equally applicable to the Bahami-
an policy and annuity holders of
CLICO (Bahamas) Limited.

On February 25, 2009 the Com-
missioner of Insurance of Guyana
was granted a judicial manage-
ment order over CLICO Guyana.

One week later, on March 3,
2009, President Bharrat Jagdeo of
Guyana announced that the
investment of all policyholders in
Guyana will be guaranteed and
requested that policyholders con-
tinue to pay their premiums.

On the March 3, 2009 the Cay-
man Islands Monetary Authority
instructed CLICO (Cayman) Ltd
to stop its public investment activ-
ity until company accounts are
approved by the Authority.

Failure of Government over-
sight

The Bahamian investing public
would have been attracted to CLI-
CO, apart from its attractive rates
of return on investment, by the
general perception that insurance
companies in the Bahamas are
safe because they are regulated
by the Registrar of Insurance.

As a regulated insurance com-
pany, the law requires that: (a)



certain statutory reserves be main-
tained, pursuant to Section 6 of
the Insurance Act (“the Act”); (b)
non-insurance businesses be seg-
regated from insurance business,
pursuant to Sections 15 and 16 of
the Act; (c) there be security of
life policyholders, pursuant to Sec-
tion 17 of the Act; (d) an annual
independent audit of the insur-
ance company be performed, pur-
suant to Section 18 of the Act; the
insurance company submit its
accounts and balance sheet to the
Registrar within six months of the
end of each financial year; a con-
solidated financial report be sub-
mitted where an insurance com-
pany is part of a group of compa-
nies, pursuant to Section 21 of the
Act; all transactions be arms-
length; investments strategy be
diversified in liquid assets.

Section 40 of the Act empowers
the relevant Minister to appoint
any suitable person as an inspector
to investigate the affairs or any
part of the affairs of a registered
insurer if he is satisfied that such
investigation would be in the inter-
est of the policyholders or of per-
sons who may become policy-
holders, at the expense of the
insurer.

Section 52 of the Act prohibits
issuance of a document relating
to insurance which is false or mis-
leading, with a penalty, on sum-
mary conviction, of a fine of $3,000
or to imprisonment for one year or
both.

Section 58 of the Act states that
the Exchange Control Regulations
Act shall apply to the operations
of an insurance company in the
Bahamas.

It is clear from the communica-
tion on CLICO (Bahamas) Limit-
ed to Parliament by Prime Minis-
ter (Hubert) Ingraham on March
2, 2009 that most of the aforesaid
sections of the Insurance Act were
violated.

From the communication, it is
clear that from 2004 to 2007 CLI-
CO had made related party loans
of over $200 million, representing
58.56 per cent of its total assets
and 68 per cent of invested assets
which were taken out of the coun-
try, contrary to Exchange Control
Regulations, ultimately to Welling-
ton Preserve Corporation’s Flori-
da real estate project.

As regulators, the Minister with
responsibility for insurance, now
the Minister of Finance and the
Registrar of Insurance, especially
over the past five years, failed to
enforce the Act with respect to
CLICO.

The Prime Minister and Minis-
ter of Finance, in his communica-
tion, stated that in a prudential
meeting in 2007 the Registrar of
Insurance had demanded that
CLICO return the then $53 mil-
lion to reduce the inter-company
loan balances. CLICO ignored
the demand and the regulators
failed to take any corrective
action.

Upon receipt of the audited
financial statements in July 2007,
highlighting the extent of the real
estate investments, the Registrar
of Insurance sent CLICO a letter
demanding, amongst other things,
that all inter-company loans be
repaid by Friday 9, January 2009.

Again CLICO failed to perform
the actions demanded by the Reg-
istrar of Insurance by the dead-
line and the Minister of Finance
and the Registrar of Insurance
failed to take any corrective
action.

A meeting was scheduled by
CLICO with the Minister of State
for Finance for January 29, 2009.
CLICO rescheduled the meeting
for February 5, 2009.

CLICO failed to attend the
rescheduled meeting. The Minis-
ter of Finance and the Registrar of
Insurance, again failed to take any



7-5. JOHNSON





remedial action.

Incredibly, Prime Minister
Ingraham stated that it only
became clear that CLICO was in
serious trouble on January 30,
2009 when the Central Bank and
the Minister of Finance of
Trinidad and Tobago announced
its rescue plan of TT$6 billion for
CL Financial, the parent company
of CLICO (Bahamas) Limited.

Failure to bring Act into effect

The House of Assembly and the
Senate passed the Domestic Insur-
ance Act in July 2005. It was
recognised by the government and
official Opposition at that time
that the current Insurance Act was
inadequate to regulate effectively
the insurance industry in the
Bahamas.

The new Act gave the Regis-
trar of Insurance, amongst other
things, administrative autonomy
from the Minister of Finance, bet-
ter enforcement powers, estab-
lished stricter reserve require-
ments (along the Canadian stan-
dards) and required investment
diversification.

Having recognised the limita-
tions of the current Act and
moved parliament to enact the
new Domestic Insurance Act, why
has the government failed and/or
refused, from 2005 to the present,
to bring the Domestic Insurance
Act into effect?

The failure of the government
to bring the Domestic Insurance
Act into effect is a grave failure
and also breached the commit-
ment it made to the Caribbean
Financial Task Force (“CFATF”)
when it accepted its Mutual Eval-
uation Report of the financial ser-
vices industry in the Bahamas on
December 23, 2007.

During the assessment of the
Bahamas, it was determined by
the CFATF’s assessment team
that the lack of administrative
autonomy, the power to conduct
inspections and compel the pro-
duction of documents by the Reg-
istrar of Insurance compromised
the anti-money laundering and
anti-terrorist financing system of
the Bahamas. The Bahamian
response was that the new Domes-
tic Insurance Act would soon have
been brought into effect to address
those concerns.

It is now almost two years since
we promised the CFATF to bring
into force the Domestic Insurance
Act and the government has failed
to fulfil this commitment.

According to the immediate for-
mer Registrar of Insurance, Mr
Roger Brown, who said that “I
also believe that if the Domestic
Insurance Act had been in place,
the CLICO matter would not have
developed.” (The Tribune, Busi-
ness Section, page 1, Thursday,
March 12, 2009).

In light of the persistent failure
of the government, over the course
of at least five years, to ensure
CLICO’s compliance with its
statutory obligations when it knew
that CLICO was in breach of the
law impresses a legal duty on the
government to help to make
whole those persons harmed as
result of the regulatory failure.

Further, the failure of the gov-
ernment to bring into force the
Domestic Insurance Act to cure
the systemic weaknesses of regu-
latory infrastructure also imposes
an obligation on the government
to restore those persons harmed
and for whom it had an obligation
to protect.

Recommendations

The Bahamian government,
being aware of the deteriorating
condition of CLICO’s balance
sheet and failing to alert the
Bahamian public or protect their
interest, should guarantee the
recovery of the policy holders and
annuity holders of CLICO.

The government should assume

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Alfred Sears

control of the assets of CLICO,
as it is in the best position to carry
the devalued real estate assets for
a few years, just as the United
States government is proposing to
do by quarantining the toxic US
mortgages with the full knowledge
that the market will rebound.
The government should take
immediate preventive measures
to prevent a recurrence of the
CLICO fiasco and a contagion by
bringing into force the Domestic

Insurance Act to ensure that prop-
er statutory reserves are main-
tained by all insurance companies;
there are no related-party loans
and transactions; there is diversi-
fication in investment portfolios
in liquid assets; there is full trans-
parency and accountability; there
is full compliance with Exchange
Control Regulations.

The government should con-
vene a financial industry/regula-
tors/official Opposition/unions/civ-
il society consultation to conduct
an immediate review of the insur-
ance industry in the Bahamas and
the CARICOM region to recom-
mend additional statutory and reg-
ulatory reforms, in light of the
CLICO failure.

The government should forth-
with propose legislation to the par-
liament to regulate pension funds

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in the Bahamas to protect the sav-
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As the leading offshore financial
centre in the Caribbean, the
Bahamas should offer to provide
facilities and secretariat for the
headquarters of a CARICOM
College of Insurance Regulators
to harmonise insurance regulatory
standards, monitoring and coop-
eration to protect consumers with-
in the CARICOM region.

The government should estab-
lish a special prosecution team to
investigate and prosecute the per-
sons found to have violated pro-
visions of the Insurance Act, the
Companies Act, the Exchange
Regulations Act and the Penal
Code Act in order to deter future
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YOUR CONNECTIONSTO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER NOTICES FOR DIRECTORY PUBLICATIONS

TENDER - PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENTS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from the general public who wish to advertise in our premium spots on the 2010
Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENT” to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - PRINTING AND DELIVERY OF
TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies to provide services for the printing and delivery
of the 2010 and 2011 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES” to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - COVER DESIGNS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies to provide Graphic Artist services for the 2010
Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - COVER DESIGNS” to the
attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - DISPLAY ADS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies or individuals to provide Graphic Artist services
for the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - DISPLAY ADS” to the atten-
tion of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL
NARRATIVES SERVICES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies or individuals to provide Creative Writing and
Sectional Narratives services for the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL NARRATIVES
SERVICES” to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

www.btcbahamas.com

PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

"Amnesty International is very
disappointed, however, that the
Bahamas rejected a wide range
of recommendations by many
states regarding the death penalty,
including establishing a morato-
rium on executions, to ratify the
Second Optional Protocol to the
International Covenant on Civil
and Political Rights, and to abol-
ish the death penalty.

"Amnesty International takes
this opportunity to reiterate our
call to the government to repeal
all provisions allowing for the
death penalty and to declare a
moratorium on executions," the
statement says.

In a landmark decision deliv-
ered on March 8, 2006, the Privy
Council unanimously struck down
the mandatory death sentence
imposed on those convicted of

Death penalty

that it violated the Constitution.
According to published
reports, the Bahamas hanged 50
men since 1929. Five of them were
hanged under the previous Ingra-
ham administration; 13 were
hanged under the 25-year rule of
the Sir Lynden Pindling govern-
ment; and the others were exe-
cuted between 1929 and 1967.

In 2006, approximately half of
the 28 men on death row at the
prison had been there for five
years or more, including Forrester
Bowe and Trono Davis — two
death row inmates who mounted
the successful legal challenge to
the country’s mandatory death
sentence.

However the punishment of
death still remains on the coun-
try's law books.

Amnesty International also

welcomed the undertaking by the
Bahamas to respond promptly to
concerns raised by several
detainees, which were published
in The Tribune, regarding condi-
tions in the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre.

"Recent reports indicate that
abuses continue to take place at
the facility, and Amnesty Inter-
national urges the Bahamas to act
swiftly on this undertaking and
conduct an independent investi-
gation into recent allegations of
ul-treatment," Amnesty said.

Amnesty also hailed the
Bahamas’ prompt ratification of
two Covenants, and _ the
Bahamas’ willingness to consider
acceding to other human rights
instruments, including the Con-
vention against Torture, its
Optional Protocol, and the Inter-
national Convention on the Pro-
tection of the Rights of all Migrant
Workers and Members of their

murder in the Bahamas, ruling

FROM page one

weeks “voluntary unpaid vacation” this year.

Yesterday, Kerzner International senior vice pres-
ident of public affairs Ed Fields said the move, which
comes four months after the resort laid off 800 work-
ers, was designed as part of “an effort to avoid other
more painful methods such as pay cuts or additional
layoffs.”

“This strategy is a part of a global initiative to
insure that our company will meet our bank covenants
and financial obligations, and to put us in a position
of strength moving forward,” said Mr Fields.

Bank covenants are part of a contractual agreement
entered into by a borrower (in this case Kerzner
International) with a bank from which it is obtaining
a loan to keep their business within specified financial
ratio limits.

According to Mr Fields, the call for non-unionised
staff to take voluntary unpaid vacation is one which
not only affects Bahamas-based Kerzner employees,
but which is being implemented at its various prop-
erties worldwide.

He noted that in addition to this decision, the com-
pany also laid off 20 people from its Fort Lauderdale
office, and some unfilled positions were removed
from the wage roll.

“These measures do not affect line employees in
the casino and security departments at Atlantis,” he
added.

In a separate interview with Reuters news agency,
published yesterday, Sol Kerzner, Chief Executive
Officer of Kerzner International, said that despite a
drop in occupancy rates to an average of 67 or 68 per
cent at most of his resorts worldwide, room rates
were being maintained and the company is “defi-

Families.

Cost-cutting

“We’re making money right now,” Mr Kerzner
told the media as they toured the Mazagan Resort and
Casino, the company’s new seaside resort in Moroc-
co.

He reiterated, however, that the company is putting
on hold all new projects because of the economic
crisis.

In a statement sent to The Tribune, Mr Fields said
that “it is important to note” that while the company
is looking at cost containment, it is also “aggressive-
ly taking steps to expand revenue, through sales and
marketing efforts and special events.”

He suggested that the company is focusing on
being in the best position possible when the global
economy picks up.

“These are times when standing still will not suffice
and Kerzner International worldwide is doing all it
can to make certain that we are standing strong when
the current environment takes a turn for the better,”
he said.

Earlier this week, Minister of Tourism Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace announced that The Bahamas
had enjoyed an 84 per cent increase in overall tourism
arrivals in January 2009 compared with the same
period last year.

However, the majority of these visitors would not
have translated into “heads in beds” as tourism pun-
dits refer to stopover arrivals, as they were primarily
cruise passengers.

According to Mr Vanderpool-Wallace, visitors
coming in by air decreased by 18.7 per cent while
cruise arrivals jumped by 19.9 per cent for the month
—a “remarkable achievement” in the midst of the
major economic woes in the US, the country's major

nitely profitable.”
FROM page one

from the charges while Rust paid
the fines.

But the pair, who were interna-
tionally shamed in newspapers and
on websites around the world, con-
tinued to sail through the
Bahamas on the “Sea Monkey”,
but removed the boat’s name.

They were seen in Joe Sound,
Long Island, where they bragged
about the expensive meal claiming
it was worth it, a source said.

Also enjoying happy hour
drinks at sunset off Long Island
were the Adamo crew, who are
wanted by police for allegedly tres-
passing in Hog Cay, Joe Sound,
where they chased a flock of
endangered West Indian tree
ducks before they captured and
killed a pet rowan.

Pictures of the plucked duck in
the roasting pan ready for the
oven were posted on the Adamo
crew’s Internet blog and spotted
by the Graham family who own
the island where lawyer Peter Gra-

tourism market.

Tourists

ham has encouraged the popula-
tion of West Indian tree ducks to
grow from just three in the late
1960’s to over 1,500 today.

Following their visit the criti-
cally endangered ducks fled the
island and are only now beginning
to return.

The Bahamas National Trust
and police pursued the Adamo
crew for trespass and followed
them to Exuma. They have also
been reported to their marina in
Daytona, US wildlife authorities,
and they have been named and
shamed in the Daytona Beach
News Journal who picked up on
their story in The Tribune.

And while anchored off Joe
Sound last month, the crew are
said to have enjoyed cocktails with
the crews of about eight sailboats,
including Rust and Palm who
appeared far from sorry for their
crimes.

“They were bragging away that
it was an expensive dinner but

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 682/09
STORAGE TANK #11
CLEANING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236



they enjoyed it,” the source said.

“They were certainly not
remorseful and they were totally
unrepentant.”

The Adamo crew reportedly
told curious sailboaters they had
killed the duck in Hog Cay, and
said it was not a problem because
there are lots of ducks there.

Amanda Graham of Hog Cay,
who was outraged by the attitudes
of disrespectful tourists, said: “A
few hundred dollars and a slap on
the wrist is clearly not enough to
enforce the law. I want to see a
$10,000 fine and the boat confis-
cated.

“These boats are worth over
$100,000 and they could go to the
National Trust or be auctioned off
for the Trust and these people
deported.

“They only pay a few hundred
dollars for a cruising permit and
they are not spending a lot of
money here.

“They are not exactly the stellar
tourist.”

Man accused
FROM page one

resist lawful arrest by the officers.
It is further alleged that he was
found in possession of two
unfired 9mm rounds, one unfired
.380 round and that he caused
damage to a blue 2007 Ford
Crown Victoria in the amount of
$500.

Bowleg pleaded not guilty to
the charge at his arraignment in
Court 1, Bank Lane yesterday.
He was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison and is expected
back in court today for a bail
hearing.

According to reports, police
pursued a black 2003 Ford Expe-
dition from Wulff Road to the
Tonique Williams-Darling High-
way after shots were fired from
the vehicle around 9 pm Monday.

Police investigate
Stabbing incident

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- Grand
Bahama police are investigat-
ing a stabbing incident involving
two women early this week in
the Arden Forest area.

According to Asst Supt Wel-
bourne Bootle, the two women,
whose ages are unknown, were
fighting over a boy.

He said the altercation began
in the Balao Road area and lat-
er continued in the parking lot
of The Hut Restaurant on
Sergeant Major Road, where
one of the women was stabbed
with a knife and the other with
a broken bottle.

ASP Bootle said the women
were taken to Rand Memorial
Hospital for treatment and lat-
er discharged.

Investigations are continuing
into the matter.


Track and
field swings
into high
gear

IT’S that
time of the
year when
track and field
swings into
high gear.

We just wit-
nessed the
Government
Secondary
Schools Sports
Association r
and Bahamas
Association of OPINION
Independent
Secondary
Schools Track and Field Cham-
pionships.

And based on what was
exhibited, there’s still quite a
contrast between the public and
private schools.

For starters, the fan partici-
pation was quite different.

At the GSSSA, there wasn’t
that much show of school pride
as the spectators showed up
dressed in their own clothing,
which didn’t leave any room to
determine who was cheering for
who.

On the other hand, it was
quite evident who was support-
ing who at the BAISS, particu-
larly between the top two pow-
er houses from St Augustine’s
College and Queen’s College.

There was a sea of red for
SAC’s Big Red Machines, who
had its closest showdown in
quite some time from QC’s
Comets, who almost evened out
the stands with their green.

It just seemed as usual that
the private schools had the
greater deal of the fan partici-
pation.

On the track and field, the
competition varied.

While it was obvious that a
lot of the athletes from the pub-
lic schools were competing on
just their raw talent, the private
school athletes were a little
more refined.

In other words, the private
school athletes were a little
more prepared than those from
the public schools. But at the
same token, the public school
athletes had some spectacular
performances just as there were
at the private school meet.

It seemed as if those athletes
from schools who are actively
involved in a track club and
were competing on a weekly
basis were the ones who shined
the most.

This weekend, however, will
be a key factor as the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associ-
ations hosts its 21st National
High School Track and Field
Championships.

The championships will begin
today and run through Satur-
day at the Thomas A Robinson
Stadium. It will bring together
the Grand Bahama and Family
Island schools.

A total of 35 schools have
signed up to participate.

The numbers from the vari-
ous schools are expected to be a
little smaller than those that
competed at the respective
GSSSA and BAISS champi-
onships.

That means that the compe-
tition should be a little more
intense as the coaches are only
expected to use those athletes
who have a chance to score
points.

What we would like to see is
more participation from the
fans in the stands.

It’s a proven fact that athletes
tend to compete at a higher
standard when they know that
there are people cheering them
on.
Not only at stake is the
national title, but there is a
chance for more athletes to
qualify for the national team
that will be going to the Carifta
Games in St Lucia over the
Easter holiday weekend.

The final Carifta trials are
scheduled for next weekend,
but this is a good opportunity
for many of the athletes who
are on the borderline to make
the standards before the final
trials are held.

So let’s rally around and

SEE page 18

STUBBS







Lynch expects

F to be suspended
=

by the NFL...

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



A ZION EAGLES player goes up for a jumpshot over St Bede’s Crushers players last night during the first Phil Smith Primary School Boys’ Basketball Tournament...
See more photos on page 17

St Bede’s Crushers second while Stephen Dillet
defeats Queen’s College for third place

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

relative newcomer to the
local basketball scene
claimed the inaugural
tournament to com-
memorate a legendary sporting icon.

Championship Game

Zion Eagles - 35

St Bede’s Crushers - 30

The Eagles opened the second half
on a 10-0 run and never relinquished
the lead despite a late charge from
the Crushers to claim the 1st Annual
Providence Basketball Club Phil
Smith Primary School Boys’ Tourna-
ment.

The Crushers led 12-9 at the half,
but with the timely run pulled ahead
17-12 with 9:33 remaining.

Donzel Huyler finally ended the
7:20 drought for the Crushers on the
ensuing possession with a jumper from
the free throw line.

Both teams traded baskets late in
the half, and Kyle Turnquest brought
the Crushers within two with a run-
ning lay-up, 23-21 with just under
three minutes remaining.

Givane Bonaby scored in the paint
to give his team a 27-21 lead with 52
seconds remaining but the Crushers
refused to fade.

Turnquest’s three point play
trimmed the Eagles’ deficit, 31-28 with
25 seconds left to play.

After Leslie Rolle’s basket, Nashad

Mackey sealed the win for the Eagles
with an offensive rebound and put-
back off a missed free throw.

Mackey, the tournament’s most
valuable player, finished with a team
high 15 points while Rolle added six
and Bonaby finished with five.

Mackey, who also made the “All-
Tournament Team” said his team
scouted the Crushers and saw things
they would be able to take advantage
of in the championship game.

“We just know we had to play much
harder and play defense on them for
the whole game,” he said. “We just
know we had to stop the cherry-pick-
ing, get back on defense and control

the ball and I knew we would win
today.”

Turnquest led the Crushers and all
scorers with 18 points.

Eagles head coach and standout on
the school’s junior boys’ basketball
team, Philip Hanna, credited his
team’s defensive effort and year round
schedule for their tournament win-
ning performance.

“Despite the fact that we are an
unknown team, a small school, we
showed the Bahamas that we are the
best and we came out here and played
and won this tournament with our

SEE page 17

See page 18
PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009
INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Oden
returns
against
Pacers

@ By CLIFF BRUNT
AP Sports Writer

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
Greg Oden will finally play in
his hometown as a pro.

The 7-foot center is set to
return to the Portland Trail
Blazers’ lineup Wednesday
against the Indiana Pacers after
sitting out for more than a
month with a bone chip in his
left knee, coach Nate McMil-
lan said.

The top pick in the 2007 draft
and former Lawrence North
High School star sat out last
season after microfracture
surgery on his right knee, so he
missed the Trail Blazers’ visit
to Indiana last season.

Oden was hurt in a collision
during a game at Golden State
before the All-Star break.
McMillan said he expects the
former Ohio State star to play
15 to 20 minutes.

Oden is averaging 9.0 and 7.2
rebounds in 46 games this sea-
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@ By The Associated Press
SCOREBOARD

Thursday, March 19

Dallas at Atlanta (7 pm
EDT). The Hawks have won
six straight at home while the
Mavericks are in the midst of
playing six of seven games on
the road.

STARS

Tuesday

— LeBron James, Cavaliers,
had 43 points, 12 rebounds and
eight assists and Cleveland
moved to 30-1 at home with a
97-93 win over Orlando.

— Al Horford and Josh
Smith, Hawks. Horford had 23
points and 12 rebounds, and
Smith finished with 21 points
and 10 rebounds in Atlanta’s
sixth straight victory, 119-97
over Sacramento.

— John Salmons, Bulls, tied a
career high with 38 points in
Chicago’s 127-121 victory over
Boston.

— Tony Parker, Spurs, scored
24 points and carried San Anto-
nio to a 93-86 win over Min-
nesota while Tim Duncan sat
out to rest his knees.

— Andre Iguodala, 76ers,
scored 25 points, including a
buzzer-beating 3-pointer, to
help Philadelphia overcome a
14-point fourth-quarter deficit
and stun the Los Angeles Lak-
ers 94-93.

— Monta Ellis and Corey
Maggette, Warriors. Ellis
matched his season high with
29 points, and Maggette had 21
to lead Golden State past the
Los Angeles Clippers 127-120.

STATS

The Hawks are 40-28 over-
all, their highest win total since
1997-98. Coming off an 86-77
loss at Milwaukee on Sunday
in which they set a season low
for points scored, the Celtics set
one for points allowed in a 127-
121 loss at Chicago. Minnesota
continued its misery against the
Spurs, losing for the 14th time in
the last 15 meetings, 93-86.

SCORING

Kobe Bryant managed only
11 points in the Lakers’ 94-93
loss to Philadelphia. He also did
not go to the free throw line.
Joe Johnson finished with 20
points for the Hawks in a 119-97
win over the Kings, ending his
four-game stretch of 30 or more.
Detroit’s Will Bynum set a
career high with 19 points in a
103-101 loss at Dallas. Seven
Utah players scored in double
figures in a 103-88 win over
Washington: Kyle Korver (15);
Carlos Boozer, Ronnie Brewer
and Mehmut Okur (13 each);
Deron Williams (12); and
Andrei Kirilenko and Paul Mill-
sap (10 apiece).

STREAKS
Sacramento has lost all 27
games against the Eastern Con-

TRIBUNE SPORTS

76ers give Lakers one-point stunner

PHILADELPHIA 76ers guard Andre Iguodala (left) celebrates his 3-point shot with teammate Philadelphia 76ers guard Andre Miller (7) to win in the second half against the Los Angeles

(AP Photo: Gus Ruelas)

ference after a 119-97 loss at
Atlanta, which has won six
straight overall, all at home.
Dallas also has been invincible
at home lately, winning its
eighth in a row by beating
Detroit 103-101. Chicago won
its seventh straight at the Unit-
ed Center, 127-121 over Boston.
Utah keeps winning at home,
making Washington its 12th
successive victim, 103-88. Andre
Miller, who turns 33 Thursday,
played in his 513th consecutive
game, the NBA’s longest active
streak, in a 94-93 victory at the
Lakers. The Clippers have lost
six straight on the road and sev-
en in a row at Golden State.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Dwight Howard had 13
points, 15 rebounds and six
blocks for the Magic in a 97-93
loss at Cleveland. Kevin Martin
scored 31 points for Sacramen-
to, which fell 119-97 at Atlanta.
Tayshaun Prince scored 28
points and grabbed seven
rebounds in a 103-101 loss to
Dallas. Paul Pierce hit for 37
points and had seven rebounds
in Boston’s 127-121 loss at
Chicago. Pau Gasol had 25
points, eight rebounds, six
assists and three blocked shots
in the Lakers’ 94-93 loss to the
76ers. Baron Davis scored 29
points in his first game in Oak-
land since opting out of his con-
tract with the Warriors. Al
Thornton had 25 points and
nine rebounds as the Clippers
lost their sixth straight on the
road, 127-120.

FASHIONABLE

Cleveland’s LeBron James
wore green and white Nikes to
celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, then
celebrated a 97-93 win over
Orlando that pushed the Cava-
liers to 30-1 at home. The Mavs
wore their alternate green jer-
seys in honor of St. Patrick’s
Day. So did the Bulls.

SIDELINED

Pistons leading scorer
Richard Hamilton missed the
loss against the Mavericks
because of a nagging groin
problem. Spurs forward Tim
Duncan sat out the win against
Minnesota to rest his knees that
have sporadically troubled the
All-Star this season. Celtics for-
ward Leon Powe left the loss
to the Bulls with a bruised right
knee. Cavaliers forward Wally
Szczerbiak sprained his left
knee in the third period against
Orlando and did not return.
The Celtics dropped to 6-6 since
Kevin Garnett hurt his knee.

SPEAKING

“T can’t imagine 100.”

— Timberwolves coach
Kevin McHale about joining
Spurs coach Gregg Popovich in
the record books for coaching
longevity. A night after
Popovich coached his landmark
1,000th career game, McHale
was coaching his 79th.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays


TRIBUNE SPORTS



Eagles soar
to victory

FROM page 15

defense,” he said. “We continue
to practice year round and
another tournament is coming
up for us pretty soon and we
hope to carry that too.”

e In the third place matchup,
Stephen Dillet defeated
Queen’s College 27-15.

Michael Bethel, named to the
“All-Tournament Team” led
Stephen Dillet with 13 points
while Johnley Rolle added
eight.

Carl Nesbitt, also an “All-
Tournament Team” member,
led the Comets with six points.

Stephen Dillet led 17-7 at the
half and the Comets never came
within eight points in the final
half.

Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister
congratulated each of the par-
ticipants but reminded them of
the greater lesson to learn from
the tournament and its name-

sake.
Win

“Whether you win or not, the
important thing is that you par-
ticipated and that you did your
best,” he said. “It is important
that young men in this country
understand sportsmanship. This
tournament is named after a
great Bahamian, a friend of
mine and wonderful sportsman,
and I encourage you young men
to take the best you can out of
this tournament.”

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TENDER

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the repair of Storage Tank #13 at its
Clifton Pier Power Station.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before

31st March, 2009

no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 683/08
REPAIR OF STORAGE TANK #13
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all proposals
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Shevonn N. Cambridge at telephone 302-1208.

Site visit will take place on Thursday, 19th March, 2009 at 9:00 a.m.
at BEC, Clifton Pier Power Station.



THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 17

LOCAL SPORTS

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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Benitez signs new Liverpool contract

LIVERPOOL, England
(AP) — Liverpool manager
Rafa Benitez has signed a new
contract with the Premier
League team through the
2013-14 season.

Wednesday’s announce-
ment on the club’s Web site
ended uncertainty about the
Spaniard’s future. His previ-
ous contract ran through the
2009-10 season, and in Janu-
ary he rejected an initial deal
that was offered to him by the
club’s American owners.

Benitez’s troubled relation-
ship with chief executive Rick
Parry had been considered to
be a stumbling block, but Par-
ry announced Feb. 27 he will
leave the club at the end of
the season.

“With a club like this and
supporters like this, I could
never say no to staying,” Ben-
itez was quoted as saying on
the team’s Web site. “I always
made clear I wanted to be
here for a long time, and when
I complete my new contract
it will mean I have spent over

a decade in Liverpool.”

Benitez joined Liverpool
from Valencia in 2004 and led
the team to the 2005 Euro-
pean Champions League title.
His team is in the quarterfi-
nals of this season’s Champi-
ons League.

“T know he will continue to
build on his achievements as
he has a tremendous hunger
and desire to bring more suc-
cess to the club — success our
fans and everyone connected
with the club deserves,” Liv-
erpool co-owner Tom Hicks
said in a statement.

George Gillett Jr., Hicks’
partner at Liverpool, has been
less of a fan but recognizes
that Benitez’s talents are
much in demand.

“With Rafa continuing to
manage the team, we can look
forward to more great foot-
ball and success on the pitch,”
Gillett said.

“He has special abilities and
qualities which are admired
here at the club and around
the world.”

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Bills RB Lynch expects
to be suspended by NFL

m By JOHN WAWROW
AP Sports Writer

ORCHARD PARK, N.Y.
(AP) — Bills running back
Marshawn Lynch expects to be
suspended by the NFL for his
latest run-in with the law and
added he’s gotten the message
that the league “won’t tolerate
any more screw-ups” from him.

Delivering a message of
humility and repentance — and
minus the flashy gold grill he
usually wears across his teeth
— Lynch vowed Wednesday
that he’s ready to change his
ways and prepared to accept the
consequences for his actions.

“Tt has kind of sunk in, and I
felt that this was the next step to
letting you guys know that there
will be a change,” Lynch said. “I
never had the intention of get-
ting into trouble or anything
like that. But along the way my
road got rocky, and now you
know it’s time to set my pave-
ment straight.”

The former first-round draft
pick out of California held a 9-
minute news conference in the
Bulls practice facility a day after
meeting with NFL commission-
er Roger Goodell in New York.
The meeting was part of Good-
ell’s review into whether to dis-
cipline Lynch for violating the
league’s personal conduct poli-
cy after he pleaded guilty to a
misdemeanor gun charge in Los
Angeles earlier this month.

Lynch characterized the
meeting with Goodell as a
wake-up call, and said the com-
missioner’s message has sunk
in.
“Something that he stressed
throughout the meeting was
that he will not tolerate any
more screw-ups by me,” Lynch
said, noting he expects to be
suspended for the start of the
regular season because this is
the second time he’s gotten in
trouble with authorities.

“T honestly see a suspension
coming, but that comes with the
consequences,” Lynch said.

He expects a ruling to be

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BUFFALO BILLS running back Marshawn Lynch listens to a reporter’s question during a news conference at the
Ralph Wilson Stadium complex in Orchard Park, N.Y. on Wednesday...

made within 10 days.

Lynch was arrested near Los
Angeles on Feb. 11. In search-
ing a parked car carrying Lynch,
Culver City police found a 9
mm semiautomatic handgun
inside a backpack in the trunk.
Police also found four marijua-
na cigarettes in the car, but no
drug charges were filed.

He pleaded guilty to having a
concealed firearm and was sen-
tenced to 80 hours community
service and three years’ proba-
tion.

It was Lynch’s second run-in
with the law in less than a year.

In June, he pleaded guilty to
a traffic violation and admitted
he was behind the wheel of his
SUV when it sped off from a
downtown Buffalo intersection
after striking a pedestrian, who
sustained minor injuries. Lynch
wasn’t disciplined by the league
for the accident.

“The first time was pretty
much like a slap on the wrist,”
he said. “I feel this time it real-
ly will stick.”

Aware that people might be
skeptical, Lynch said the only
way to prove himself is through
his actions.

“Tcan only show you. It won’t
be nothing that I can say in
words that’ll make you out a
believer,” Lynch said. “You’re
just going to have to see for

yourself.”

Lynch’s willingness to speak
to reporters was already con-
sidered a big change in attitude.
Last season, he made himself
available to the media only
twice, once abruptly ending a
news conference and walking
away after being asked about
the hit-and-run accident.

Lynch was unhappy with how
he was portrayed in the media
following the accident. His
image, though, did take a hit
when he invoked his legal right
by refusing to speak to author-
ities for two weeks until Erie
County District Attorney Frank
Clark issued subpoenas against
Bills players and staff.

On Wednesday, Lynch
described his decision to delay
meeting with authorities as a
mistake, and said it was a rea-
son why he prompted the meet-
ing with Goodell.

“TI know pretty much that
there will be some people look-
ing forward to me messing up
again,” he said. “But I’m just
going to let them know they
shouldn’t hold their breath.”

Should Lynch be suspended,
the Bills will be minus the play-
er who’s led them in rushing
and touchdowns over the past
two seasons.

Last year, he had eight touch-
downs and 1,036 yards on the

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 688/09
BUSSING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Mr. Anthony S. Forbes
at telephone 302-1165



(AP Photo: Don Heupel)

ground, enough to make his first
Pro Bowl appearance as an
injury replacement.

The Bills have a solid backup
in Fred Jackson, though the
team has interviewed several
veteran free agent running
backs over the past three weeks.

Track and
field swings
into high
gear

FROM page 15

come out in large numbers to
cheer on our future stars.

KUDOS TO JOHNSON

Talking about the future
stars, kudos must be given to
Kevin “KJ” Johnson and his
Providence Basketball Club for
organising the first Phil Smith
Primary Boys Basketball Clas-
sic.

The tournament wrapped up
on Wednesday night at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium after
five days of exciting competi-
tion.

If you didn’t attend any of
the sessions, you missed a great
opportunity to watch some of
the top players in the primary
school division compete.

Although he’s renowned for
high school and night league
basketball, it was good to see
some more emphasis placed on
the primary schools.

There was a lot of talent dis-
played during the course of the
tournament, which was set up
similar to the prestigious Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic.

And based on the feedback
from the coaches and those par-
ents who came out to support
the players, they hope that the
tournament can be an annual
one.

I’m sure that the late Smith —
the tournament was named in
his honour - must be looking
down and smiling from ear to
ear for what took place.

Not to be outdone, the pri-
mary school girls will get their
chance to shine when they com-
pete in the Patty Johnson Bas-
ketball Tournament.

The tournament, which will
also features a high school divi-
sion, will run from Wednesday,
March 25 to Friday, March 27 at
the CI Gibson Gymnasium.

Organisers could not have
selected a better person to hon-
our than Patty Johnson, who
has made tremendous strides in
grooming many of our top
female players.

Johnson has enjoyed the most
successful programme of any
division in all sports in high
school, having dominated the
junior girls basketball division
for more than a decade.

Two of her protégés, Anasta-
cia Moultrie, now teaching at
St Augustine’s College, and
Torsheka Cox, teaching at Ana-
tol Rodgers Junior High, are
the organisers of the tourna-
ment. They are both showing
their gratitude to their mentor
for the role she played in their
lives.
THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 19

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



Making it their business
to help the less fortunate

Island Wholesale, Grace Foods International donate to charitable groups



In these difficult economic
times, it has become necessary
for the business community to
assist even more with providing
some of the most basic and criti-
cal needs to those who are less
fortunate in our society.

Island Wholesale, partnering
with Grace Foods International,
manufacturers and distributors of
some of the finest Caribbean
foods and beverages, have
answered this call by donating
to charitable organisations in Nas-
sau, some of its Caribbean Tradi-
tions microwavable meals, which
are a delicious range of mouth-
watering Caribbean specialties
offering the same great taste as
home-prepared meals.

Their donations have gone
directly to places like the Ran-
furly Home for Children (see top
picture — Ranfurly Storeroom)

and the Bilney Lane Children’s
Home (picture inset).

Some donations actually are
spread over the wider communi-
ty.
For example, the 85 case dona-
tion made to Hands for Hunger
was redistributed to feeding pro-
grams at Bethel Baptist Church,
Great Commissions Ministries,
Bahamas PACE, Urban Renew-
al Kemp Road, the Salvation

Army and Coastline Communi-
ty Centre. Island Wholesale and
Grace Foods International have
also sent deliveries of these
microwavable meals to the Kemp
Road Youth Association,
B.A,S.H., the Children’s Emer-
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OVERSEAS NEWS



Top UN official accuses
US of demonizing Iran

@ By Edith M. Lederer
UNITED NATIONS

The outspoken U.N. Gen-
eral Assembly president on
Tuesday accused the United
States of demonizing Iran's
president and criticized the
International Criminal Court
for issuing an arrest warrant
for Sudan's leader on war
crimes charges in Darfur,
according to the Associated
Press,

Miguel d'Escoto Brock-
mann, a Roman Catholic
priest from Nicaragua with
openly leftist views, also reit-
erated that the more he thinks
about the conditions that
Israel imposes on the Pales-
tinians, the more he tends "to
think about apartheid."

During a wide-ranging press
conference, d'Escoto insisted
he wasn't being divisive or
promoting his own agenda —
but was just fulfilling his duty
as president of the 192-mem-
ber General Assembly to
uphold the U.N. Charter and
promote peace and nonvio-
lence. Briefing reporters on
his recent three-week trip that
included a stop in Tehran,
d'Escoto said he was struck
by the great support and
respect for Iran from its neigh-
bors at a summit meeting of
the Economic Cooperation
Organization — a regional
body founded in 1985 by Iran,
Turkey and Pakistan — espe-
cially for helping "to alleviate
the plight" of Afghan refugees
in Iran.

"That was a very wonder-
ful experience to see that, in
contrast to the attitude that
we find, sadly, here where we
are," d'Escoto said.

"IT don't think anyone can
doubt that in our part of the
world ... (President Mah-
moud) Ahmadinejad has been





demonized," he said. "The
United States has been in the
business of the demonization
of people forever and the can-
onization of the worst of dic-
tators."

D'Escoto singled out Ferdi-
nand Marcos of the Philip-
pines, Nicaragua's Anastasio
Samoza and Chile's Augusto
Pinochet."

Asked whether he approved
of Ahmadinejad saying he
wants to wipe a U.N. member
state — Israel — off the map,
d'Escoto said "if he said that,
it's lamentable,” but he quick-
ly added that “words as such
don't kill” and it's the actions
that have to be watched.

"T don't hate Israel, much
less do I hate the Jewish peo-
ple," d'Escoto added. "In fact
they are very high on my list
of people that I love."

Israel

But he said that won't keep
him from criticizing Israeli
actions, especially in the
recent war in Gaza where
some 1,400 Palestinians and
13 Israelis were killed.

D'Escoto served as foreign
minister in the 1980s during
the rule of the Sandinistas,
who aligned themselves with
Fidel Castro and the Soviet
Union.

Since assuming the one-year
General Assembly presiden-
cy in September, he has been
a stern critic of the United
States, and of Israel.

He criticized the United
States on Tuesday for acting
on its own rather than multi-
laterally as the U.N. Charter
calls for, and singled out for-
mer President George W.
Bush for going to war in Iraq
in 2003 without Security
Council approval and for then
accusing the Sudanese gov-

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ernment of committing geno-
cide in Darfur. "The United
States dares to stick its tongue
out to the Security Council
and says you either give me
the green light to commit the
aggression that I want to com-
mit, or I shall declare you
obsolete, irrelevant," d'Esco-
to said.

Mark Kornblau, spokesman
for the U.S. Mission to the
United Nations, when asked
to comment on the criticism
of the US., said: "It's hard to
make sense of Mr. D'Escoto's
increasingly bizarre state-
ments."

D'Escoto called the Inter-
national Criminal Court's
arrest warrant for Sudanese
President Omar al-Bashir for
war crimes and crimes against
humanity “unfortunate” and
"lamentable" because the
African Union and the Arab
League had asked the Securi-
ty Council to delay the war-
rant for a year to pursue peace
efforts in Darfur.

"It helps to deepen the per-
ception that international jus-
tice is racist because this is the
third time that you have some-
thing from the ICC, and for
the third time it has to do with
Africa," d'Escoto said.

MEMBERS of the Rotary
Club of West Nassau spent a
day mentoring the young men
at Programme SURE on
Gladstone Road last month.

The members of the Rotary
Club of West Nassau, with the
assistance of the young men,
put their building skills to use
by constructing six wooden
benches.

Each bench can hold up to
ten persons.

The young men will use the

benches to study and eat their
lunches on breaks.

SURE is an acronym for
Success Ultimately Reassures
Everyone.

Potential

The programme was started
on February 17, 1992 to assist
at-risk male students from the
government secondary schools
in New Providence, to help
them maximise their full

potential. The programme
commenced with nine staff
members and 64 students at
the Industrial Training Cen-
tre on Old Trail Road, which
has since been renamed the
Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute (BTVI).

The Rotary Club of West
Nassau’s president is accoun-
tant Michael Hepburn. The
project was chaired by direc-
tor Delric Beneby.

—
Bush: I won’t criticise Obama

Wee MUO RCOB IMAI (aNe

m@ By ROB GILLIES
CALGARY, Alberta



Former President George W. Bush said he won't
criticize President Barack Obama because Obama
"deserves my silence," and said he plans to write a
book about the 12 toughest decisions he made in
office, according to the Associated Press.

Bush declined to critique the Obama adminis-
tration Tuesday in his first speech since leaving
office. Former Vice President Dick Cheney has
said that Obama's decisions are threatening Amer-

ica's safety.

"I'm not going to spend my time criticizing him.
There are plenty of critics in the arena," Bush

said. "He deserves my silence."

Bush said he wants Obama to succeed and said
it's important that he has that support. Talk-show
host Rush Limbaugh has said he hoped Obama
would fail. "I love my country a lot more than I
love politics," Bush said. "I think it is essential

that he be helped in office."

Bush said that he doesn't know what he will do

in the long term but that he will write a book that
will ask people to consider what they would do if
they had to protect the United State as president.

He said it will be fun to write and that "it's
going to be (about) the 12 toughest decisions I

had to make."

"I'm going to put people in my place, so when
the history of this administration is written at least
there's an authoritarian voice saying exactly what

happened," Bush said.

"I want people to understand what it was like to
sit in the Oval Office and have them come in and
say we have captured Khalid Sheik Mohammed,
the mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, the alleged
killer of a guy named Danny Pearl because he was
simply Jewish, and we think we have information
on further attacks on the United States.”

Bush didn't specify what the 12 hardest deci-
sions were but said Iraq is better off without Sad-

dam Hussein in power.

Bush was also full of jokes throughout his speech

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Jae C. Hong, File/AP Photo

IN THIS JAN. 20, 2009 file photo, President Barack
Obama and former President George W. Bush stand
for the closing prayer after Obama was sworn in as
the 44th president of the United States of Capitol Hill
in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2009.

and during a question and answer session with
former Canadian Ambassador in Washington
Frank McKenna. He joked that he would do more

speeches to pay for his new house in Dallas.











"T actually paid for a house last fall. I think I'm
the only American to have bought a house in the
fall of 2008," he quipped.

He added that he would do whatever former
first lady Laura Bush asked him to do.

He also said his mother is doing well. Barbara
Bush was released from a Houston hospital Friday,
nine days after undergoing heart surgery.

"Clearly he can't live without her," Bush said of

his father and former President George H.W.

Bush.






















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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





m@ By GREG BLUESTEIN
and LINDSEY TANNER
Associated Press Writers
CHICAGO

urt Perry want-

ed to die. The

thin, pale 26-

year-old has
suffered from a painful neu-
rological disease since child-
hood, forcing him to support
his wobbly legs with a cane.
His stiffly crimped fingers can
hardly grasp a book. The ter-
rifying lapses in breathing
eventually became too much,
pushing him to pick the day
he'd kill himself with an assist-
ed suicide network's help.

Now that authorities have
effectively shut down the Final
Exit Network, Perry said he's
found his reason to live.

"T just feel that this is a huge
setback for the rights of many
to pursue the right to die,” the
suburban Chicago man told
The Associated Press on
Tuesday.

"T felt I've got to speak out
about this," he said, his soft-
spoken speech sometimes
halted by gasps.

Perry was to become the
youngest person to die with
the network's help on Feb. 26,
the day after the Georgia-
based organization's president
and three other members
were arrested in Georgia and
Maryland following an eight-
month investigation there in
which an undercover agent
posing as a suicide-seeker
infiltrated the group.

For now, he has halted his
suicide plans, and Perry said
he's now a crusader for peo-
ple's right to die.

He, along with network
president Ted Goodwin, gave
separate interviews to The AP
on Tuesday defending the
organization.

Perry joined Final Exit a
few years ago and said that
volunteers have given him
support and friendship — and
that they did not encourage
him to choose suicide. But
they would have been present
when he did it.

“These pe

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Right-to-die fight is disabled man's will to live

who are terminally
ill are blessed ina
small way — there’s
a finite time for
their suffering.”



John Amis/AP Photo

TED GOODWIN, former president of the Final Exit Network, is pictured during an interview with an Associated Press reporter, Tuesday, March 17,
2009, in Atlanta. Goodwin was arrested for his role in assisting in a recent Georgia suicide and says he hopes his trial will be a test case validating

the "right-to-die" movement.

"I didn't want to do it on
my own because I feel that
since the Final Exit Network
has been so supportive of me,
giving me encouragement to
continue to live as long as I
can, that it would be sort of
lonely to die on my own," Per-
ry said.

Perry has suffered since
childhood with Charcot-
Marie-Tooth, or CMT disease,
a genetic condition affecting
the nerves that control the
arms and legs.

Perry admits it's rarely life-
threatening, but he said he has
a severe form that affects the
nerves involved in breathing.

He said he dropped out of
high school at age 16 after
school officials failed to

accommodate his condition,
and he's been unable to work.

Goodwin told The AP
Tuesday that people like Per-
ry have as much right to kill
themselves as those near
death.

Blessed

"These people who are ter-
minally ill are blessed in a
small way — there's a finite
time for their suffering,"
Goodwin said, the first time
since his arrest that he's spo-
ken publicly about the orga-
nization he founded in 2004
after his father's 10-year strug-
gle with emphysema.

"But there are many, many
people who are doomed to

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suffer interminably for years.
And why should they not
receive our support as well?"

The group has drawn criti-
cism from some within the
right-to-die movement, includ-
ing Dr. Jack Kevorkian, who
say only doctors should assist
terminally ill people in end-
ing their lives.

Some activists for the dis-
abled worry about others
wielding too much power over
life-and-death issues.

Stephen Drake of the group
Not Dead Yet said assisted
suicide sends the message that
certain people are expendable.

"What you've done is
you're saying that group of
people, their lives have less
value," Drake said.

Goodwin said the group has
helped guide nearly 200 peo-
ple to their deaths.

He said the network never
actively assisted suicide, but
instead offered people sup-
port in their final hours.

"We believe that it is the
right of every mentally com-
petent adult to determine
whether he or she is suffer-
ing,” Goodwin said.

"We do not believe this
should be left to the physi-
cians, church leaders or politi-
cians."

The arrested group mem-
bers have been charged by the
Georgia Bureau of Investiga-
tion with assisted suicide, tam-
pering with evidence and vio-
lating racketeering laws in the

death of a 58-year-old man,
whose doctor said he was can-
cer-free at the time.

GBI has said network mem-
bers were instructed to buy
two new helium tanks and a
hood, known as an "exit bag."

In court papers, investiga-
tors said the group's guides
would hold down its members’
hands to prevent them from
removing the hood — a
charge Goodwin vehemently
denied.

"We do not hold hands
down. We do not cause them
to suffer," he said. "And this
will be proven in a court of
law — I promise you."

Proud

The network claims 3,300
members, donors and volun-
teers nationwide and has long
operated in the open. Good-
win said he was personally
involved in 39 deaths.

"We have not hidden our
goals," he said. "I'm very
proud of our mission."

Authorities have raised con-
cerns over how carefully the
group screens people who
want to die after questions
arose about the death of an
Arizona woman the group
helped in 2007. Police said
Jana Van Voorhis was
depressed but not terminally

ill.

Goodwin said it was "not
inappropriate" for her to die
as she suffered from other ill-
nesses, but he said he tight-
ened the vetting process after
her case.

He said applicants are now
asked to detail their complete
mental history.

Goodwin said that the
specter of prosecution always
loomed, and that the group
knew that one day its work
could make headlines.

"And that day is upon us,"
Goodwin said.

"But it was done with delib-
erateness as a means of mov-
ing the political debate on this
subject to a new high.

“And we hope that this case
will set a precedent in case
law."

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PAGE 26, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

THE TRIBUNE S








fT KNOW YOU CA
DO ANYTHING YOU
PUT YOUR MIND
TO, BUT.





WHY WAS JOE KELLY] I THINK VY HE NEEDS TO MAKE) GARY
HERE, TOMMIE? HEWAS | SOME FRIENDS. / WALKER,
5 JUST LONELY. ARE YOU
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--- I'M SMART,
I'M CONFIDENT,

I'M ATHLETIC AND
\ TOUGH AS NAILS!







THOGE GIRLS
HAVE NO IDEA
WHO THEY'RE
LIP AGAINST!






©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights ceserved.

I'M IN
THE MOOD LIKE CHOCOLATE? |.
FOR AN OUTCH CHOCOLATE?
ICE CREAM DARK CHOCOLATE?

WE HAVE VANILLA...
FRENCH VANILLA...
VANILLA FUDGE...

ate, Inc. World rights reserved.





www. kingfeatures.com



©2009 by North America Sy



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T Gor INTO TROLBLE YOU SHOULDNT
WHEN MOM CAUGHT HAVE VONE THAT,
ME DRAWING ON
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©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved







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le lilerd ar he cn kr

Turgut from Lhe lier shin here? In
See



DAD, CAN YOU THIS ISNT TOO BAD. You THERE! Good AS NEW /
FIX MY BEANIE ? JUST SNAPPED THE BATTERY NOW JUST LET THIS SIT You FIXED IT!
CASE. TLL UST GLUE IT | AMWILE So THE GIVE T CANT BELIEVE ITY Wt ach be

TOGETHER AND INSERT THE Iv! HEY MOM’ ALL ] he Tee on oni Esch must

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SOMETHING ! THAT'S ‘wards in there orost be at leas one pine-

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Deealy ol ed 17: vere pone 3; exellent

Bd for more). Botution
Chambers tacsccos.

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with ed lige lite line: lineal linear
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 1 liver weil mailer omer ceeur
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each Tee a x
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty etrtian, PM PMI Pi recall
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



©1989 Universal Press Syndicate





Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.







Fe cunt,
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SAYA ARNY XA 2 :
ANNAN YXENXIYY 5. 5
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Ae XK = 5
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a i
2 ([4]8/3]7|1 9[5/6/2 2
5 a [5/2/6|4/3 8|7/1/9| 1 4i6 1/5/24
‘ s fo zitisl2 eleisia! Bee sioe 7 mut 2 9
3 = |6/3/5[9/4 1/2/7/8) Bao oy mols Bs 4
3 & [7\1[8[2/6 5/4/9/3 Go PRS
3 & 2|4/9/8/7 3/6/5/1/ [3 3 M5 9 B2|1 3
= rs 5 = 18/5/2/3/9 7/1/4/6| M1 9/8 BR1l2\4/3 6
° = 33 Gl
“BUT YOU SAIP BLUE 15 YOUR FAVORITE COLOR.” Difficulty Level RAH ay19 e US Gre ase (5 ty ; : : i :
Difficulty Level * *& 3/19 3/6/4/1/5 2/9/8/7 z































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ah Rara Avis
Across Down
1 Assign that a professional 2 Powerful agency about to Py Tt ty ei ke aa i dicnaest eatin d
; orth dealer. ast’s Jack of hearts with the ace an
dtod tak ber of th Beles
sae else aia ee limes Ca i ey Il La fd North-South vulnerable. drew trumps ending in dummy. After
business (5.9) cast) ey Ty ty Pe end (ee ee] NORTH discarding a heart on the ace of
8 Lag behind, right in the 3 Ovals? Possibly 4AQ72 spades, South played the ace and
rear (5) rounds (5) [i || | | =i ¥83 another club, hoping East had the
9 Well content in 4 Chemical evidence of rey TT ey my Tt ey Ge ve ee ee or on
; . -J-5, Ww Wi j
Wonderland (2) eannabe Sonia (6) i im ee it | WEST EAST At the other table, South, Warren
10 So point out there’s more 5 Fresh air came to the = @K 10853 43964 Rosner, felt that given East’s pre-
than one choice (7) country (7) Pade eed) ee V1i094 ¥KQJ752 emptive bid and West’s raise, the
11 He's riled perhaps, but 6 Excellent, if not fast, way a | ic] ii Li a i Mee é a ere that oe ote 2
: clubs was not good, and that Wes
dees very IIMic (2) lsuipass-olhiers (5) SOUTH was likely to fee more clubs than
12 She turned to stone (6) 7 Wrongly briefed about the ete lil Jina ja i ( o— East. If West held three or more clubs
14 Apretty useless object (6) finish but made VA6 including the K-J-10, there was vir-
17 They object to a point in allies (10) ea il tbe Wd ao ae 752 Lae ene ae a
subject under 8 Showing consideration or The bidding: ihe slarn eoule secninde .
discussion (5) nay berjus banding 110) Repose Hewn North East South West He began just as his counterpart
19 Saw how red wine should 13 General in supreme mt 1% 24 34 39 had, winning the heart lead, drawing
be served (7) command apparently (7) Ni 1 Easy 2 Rower (7) 34 Pass 4¢ Pass trumps and discarding his heart on
Pe ee eee 15 Gambling reversal? (7) N alternative (4,6) 3 General tendency (5) 54 Pass 64 the spade ace. But then, instead of
: ; = B Vast crowd (5) 4 Slickler for details (6) Opening lead — ten of hearts. cashing the ace of clubs, Rosner led
offence (7) 16 Ernest goes out and Oo. This deal occurred in a team con- a low club from dummy to his nine.
22 Diana is out to become a comes in (6) > 9 Quandary (7) 5 Contrary to law (7) test at a recent regional tournament West won with the jack and
nymph (5) 18 Drinking bender (5) ” 10 Muslim month of 6 Rover (5) in came ee ee ue a Heh rae by Seek
23 Famous Western stage 20 Got an order for the a fasting (7) 7 Carefree situation hs de ae fee : abies i: bid ane tags : slory, Still eo
Panne rSiiy ie) enely Islas (2) 11 Pious (5) (4,6) bring in a slam that failed at the other ing that West had the club king and
, : . , : 42 Conclusion (6 8 Relentless! table. , more clubs than East, he led the
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution ( ) y Both declarers reached six dia- queen, hoping East had started with
Across: 1 Bureau, 4 Gannet, 9 Across: 1 Rebuff, 4 Lesson, 9 sari ie cal es monde chess nially tne samen ne Ul
fcermes 40 Tie 9 errr pic 12 Chatesii 10 UME 14 Dregs, 12 well (6) 13 Departure ceremony tion, East making a pre-emptive It did not matter whether West
Phyllis, 13 Porterhouse, 18 Florist, 20 Appease, 13 Tchaikovsky, 18 17 City (5) (4-3) a > i ase theta oe me ae ede a
ee aide nncaent ee 19 Hostile (7) 15 Set aside for At the first table, declarer took club trick, and the slam was home
Mummer, 25 Adapts. Eyesore, 24 Treaty, 25 Ardent. ’ . :
Down: 1 Ballad, 2 Recap, 3 Apricot, 5 = Down: 1 Recede, 2 Brace, 3 21 Atrocious (7) purpose (7) Tomorrow: Bidding quiz.
Alley, 6 Needles, 7 Theism, 8 Freesia, 5 Equip, 6 Setback, 7 22 Factory (5) 16 Thick rope (6) ©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.
Temperature, 14 Opossum, 15 Nerves, 8 Tutankhamen, 14 . :
Opposed, 16 Affirm, 17 Crisis, 19 Codeine, 15 Vermeer, 16 Lancet, 17 23. Risk all in a venture 18 Fetch (5)
Irene, 21 Strip. Advent, 19 Rebut, 21 Broke. (2,3,5) 20 Venomous snake (5)







PAGE 28, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

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THURSDAY,

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SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Restaurant closure set
to hit West Bay Sireet



m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

COCONUTS, the West Bay Street
restaurant attached to the El Greco hotel,
yesterday closed its doors after paying
almost $250,000 in rent over two years, its
owners claiming they were forced out by
landlords who failed to live up to the
terms of the lease agreement. However,
this was denied by the landlords, who
said the business was a victim of the econ-
omy.

Coconuts part-owner, Erin Ferguson,
told Tribune Business the restaurant had
been forced to break its four-year lease,
with around $24,000 still tied up in secu-
rity deposits and rent. Some 15-20 full-
time staff, and four part-time workers,
face being made redundant.

Mr Ferguson said he and his brother,
Eldin Ferguson, decided to finally give
up the West Bay Street location next to
the former Mayfair Hotel yesterday, giv-
en constant problems with landlords and
El Greco owners, Harry and Mike Pikra-

BIC to ‘reposition

* Coconuts owners cite lease problems with
landlord, despite paying $250,000 in rent, with
$24,000 tied up in deposit and 24 staff futures

uncertain

* Landlords deny claims, and cite problems in

receiving rent

menos, regarding the lease.

“Harry and Mike Pikramenos made
representations to us that they were not
able to fulfill. It was never their inten-
tion for us to succeed in this location,” Mr
Ferguson said.

“It also appeared as though every time
it seemed as though my brother Eldin
and I, two young black Bahamian busi-
nessmen, were becoming successful, the
interference from the Landlords intensi-
fied.”

The brothers argued that they thought
their lease was good, until they were
denied access to areas in the hotel they
claimed they were privy to, and their

patrons’ vehicles were towed from the
street outside the restaurant. Mr Ferguson
said they themselves had paid $700 to
$800 in parking tickets due to their com-
pany car being towed.

“We have never experienced the abili-
ty to grow this business to its potential,”
said Erin Ferguson. It was later deter-
mined that street parking in front of the
restaurant was in legal.

The closure has now displaced as many
as 20 to 25, employees and left the hotel
without a restaurant.

According to Harry Pikramenos, losing

SEE page five

__ BISX firm’s Nassau plant
_ penalties drop74.8% in 2008



Online at

BankBahamas Online.com

Bahamas urged to mandate
corporate pension trustees

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

THE Bahamas should
“give priority” to legislating
that all pension plans be
placed in the care of a cor-
porate trustee, a leading
insurance executive said yes-
terday, arguing that this
would ensure they were
independently policed and
plan assets segregated from
their sponsors.

Guilden Gilbert, a past
Bahamas Insurance Brokers
Association (BIBA) presi-
dent, said that mandating a
corporate trustee for all
Bahamian employer-spon-
sored and individual pension

Insurance executive
says better than
individual trustees

plans would provide greater
protection for all plan bene-
ficiaries.

He added that a corporate
trustee, as opposed to the
individual trustees currently
overseeing many Bahamas-
based pension plans, was
preferable because they had
a much greater asset back-
ing if something happened
to a plan.

“A corporate trustee
should be required, because
you then get the segregation

SEE page six

CLICO (Bahamas): The
key questions and lessons

TRIBUNE BUSINESS OPINION

Blackberry’ device

Moving to complete build-out of
core IP network over next two years

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC)
is “looking to reposition” its
Blackberry product by broad-
ening its appeal to all Bahami-
ans, Tribune Business has
been told, as it moves to com-
plete the build-out of its new
core Internet Protocol (IP)

network within the next two
years.

Marlon Johnson, BTC’s
vice-president of sales and
marketing, said the state-
owned telecommunications
provider was set to push the
‘Blackberry for Life’ concept
over the next several months,
attempting to dispel the
notion that the product was
primarily for use by busi-

nesspersons.

“One of the things that we
will be doing in the coming
months is looking at reposi-
tioning the Blackberry prod-
ucts in the marketplace,” Mr
Johnson told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“We’re trying to re-position
it not only for the busi-
nessperson, but for those per-
sons who want to stay con-
nected. We’re going to re-
position that. That’s going to
be a focus for us.”

A focus on fast-moving
Bahamians, who are always
on the go, appears to be a key
plank in BTC’s marketing
platform, Mr Johnson adding
that the company is also focus-
ing on enhancing download-
able mobile content. This
























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

SEE page four

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ey

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ere Sty

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; Mi By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

CONSOLIDATED Water

? appears to finally be getting to
? grips with the inefficiencies of
i its Nassau-based Windsor
: reverse osmosis plant, the penal-
? ties it incurred having decreased
? by 74.8 per cent in 2008 com-
? pared to the previous, although
: it was still unable to pass
? $638,000 in diesel costs on to the
? Water & Sewerage Corporation.

The BISX-listed company, in

i its 10-K statement for fiscal 2008,
: which was filed with the US
? Securities & Exchange Com-
? mission (SEC), said the penal-
? ties incurred by its Windsor plant
: “for not meeting diesel fuel and
? electricity efficiencies” specified
: in its contract with the Corpo-
? ration had fallen from $367,257
; and $436,184, respectively, to

Features:

But still hit by 70.2%
rise in diesel costs
during first nine months

$112,622 last year.

The Consolidated Water fil-
ing explained that its contract
with the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration enabled it to invoice
the latter for increased diesel
costs, essentially passing on the
charge, but only if Windsor was
operating at or above specified
efficiencies.

“Our gross profit in 2008 for
our bulk segment was adversely
impacted by our Bahamas oper-
ations, due to additional diesel
costs for our Windsor plant,”
Consolidated Water said.

SEE page seven

LET’S BE CLEAR. The main responsibility for CLI-
CO (Bahamas) collapse into insolvency lies with its
Trinidadian parent, CL Financial, and that company’s
Board and management. The Bahamian company
appears to have been used as the forward operations
post for the high-risk investment strategy of CL Finan-
cial’s chairman, Lawrence Duprey, who in the past
few years embarked on what appears to have been a
grandiose dream to expand beyond the Caribbean and
become a major player on the high-end Florida real
estate scene.

That was ultimately to the detriment of the Bahami-
an policyholders and annuity investors, and was carried
out with little regard as to the consequences for the
plight in which they now find themselves. Yet the
CLICO (Bahamas) tragedy was clearly preventable,
and Tribune Business will now assess what went wrong,
the unanswered questions and what lessons must be
learnt.

REGULATION

The blunt truth: the CLICO (Bahamas) insolvency
represents a regulatory and systemic failure on many
levels. The Government ultimately had no choice but
to send the company to the wall (liquidation), given
that it was insolvent (liabilities exceeded assets by
some $9 million); it was unable to meet a $2.6 mil-
lion claim in the Turks & Caicos Islands; and the fact
that its parent was in financial difficulties, making the
$57 million guarantee holding CLICO (Bahamas) bal-

SEE page two



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



CLICO (Bahamas): The key questions and lessons

FROM page one

ance sheet together, poten-
tially worthless.

Yet events should never
have been allowed to reach
this point.

Tribune Business today
reproduces the headlines
from two previous articles
it published, one from
2007, the other from 2008,
highlighting its concerns,
and those of others, about
CLICO’s potential house
of cards resulting from the
high risk/investment asset
concentration and the par-
ent’s guarantee.

Needless to say, once CL
Financial was taken over
by the Trinidad govern-
ment, the result was a
domino effect - all the oth-
ers fell down.

This newspaper has writ-
ten extensively on the reg-
ulatory failings to date, so
will not got into them all
again.

But, to surmise, the Reg-
istrar of Insurance’s Office
had been talking to CLI-
CO (Bahamas) about its
financial situation since
2004, but failed to enforce

its strictures. The compa-
ny never complied.

THE KEY QUESTIONS:
* Why did the Registrar
of Insurance neither bar
CLICO (Bahamas) from
writing new business, nor
suspend its licence, when
the extent of its Florida
real estate investments
became known, and it
failed to comply with the
regulator’s demands?
Either action would have
got CL Financial’s atten-
tion, and forced its hand.
Instead, it smugly went
on doing what it had been
doing, safe in the knowl-
edge that the Registrar of
Insurance Office’s bark
was far worse than its bite.

* Why, between 2004-
2007, did the Registrar of
Insurance’s Office not raise
the CLICO (Bahamas)
issue with the Minister of
Finance (then-Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie) or his
deputy, James Smith, when

the huge concentration of
assets and exposure to one
investment became known?

* When was the Ingra-
ham administration and its
ministers informed about
the CLICO (Bahamas) sit-
uation?

How quickly did it react,
and what did it do?

All we know for sure on
this to date, is that on
December 22, 2008, CLI-
CO (Bahamas) was
ordered to repay all inter-
company balances by Janu-
ary 9, 2009. A host of other
conditions was imposed,
but all this was too little,
too late.

EXCHANGE CONTROL
AND REGULATORY
CO-OPERATION

From all the available
evidence, it appears that
CLICO (Bahamas) and its
affiliate, CLICO Enter-
prises, never approached
the Central Bank of the
Bahamas to obtain






















































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TRIBUNE BUSINESS OPINION

exchange control approval
for the huge amount of
assets it was investing
Overseas.

Even though they were
required to do this because
the assets were in the name
of Bahamas resident com-
panies, meaning exchange
control laws and regula-
tions were breached.

THE KEY QUESTIONS

* Did the Registrar of
Insurance’s Office ever ask
the Central Bank whether
it had given exchange con-
trol approval for the Flori-
da investments?

* What communication,
if any, took place between
the Central Bank and the
Registrar over CLICO
(Bahamas)?

REGULATORY
RECOMMENDATIONS

* The Domestic Insur-
ance Act must be passed to
give the insurance regula-
tor greater enforcement
teeth.

But this is only part of
the equation. The Regis-
trar of Insurance’s Office
must be beefed up in terms
if staffing, resources and,
most importantly, techni-
cal expertise.

The latter means ensur-
ing the regulator has the
persons with the requisite
insurance sector experi-
ence, such as in-house
actuaries, to extensively
supervise the sector.

* Bahamian regulators
must have the ability to
undertake greater consoli-
dated supervision of for-
eign branches of Bahamas
resident companies.

Most of the money
invested by CLICO
(Bahamas) in the US trav-
elled there via its Turks &
Caicos branch.

Much of CL Financial
and CLICO (Bahamas)
business appears to have
been inter-company book
transfers and related party
dealings, creating a maze
that the liquidator is now
working to unravel.

* Information sharing
between regulators must be
enhanced.

To this end, the consoli-
dation between financial
sector supervisors must be
speeded up.

This must be true consol-
idation, not just occupying
space in the same building,

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

intel)
4 Nm

OD
E |

but a merger in every sense
of the word.

* There must be greater
pan-Caribbean co-opera-
tion and information shar-
ing between the region’s
financial services regula-
tors.

The Bahamian govern-
ment must also discover
whether the Trinidad gov-
ernment will ever make
good the $57 million guar-
antee CL Financial made
to the Bahamian operation.

* CL Financial and CLI-
CO (Bahamas) Boards of
Directors and management
appear to have been one
and the same.

Tribune Business under-
stands all the key decisions
were taken in Trinidad,
with executives in the
Bahamas merely following
and implementing orders.
All the key accounting
documents and Board min-
utes are said to be in
Trinidad.

As a result, the Bahamas
must make it mandatory
for all Bahamas resident
companies to have at least
some Bahamian-based
directors, and different
Boards from that of their
parent.

LIQUIDATION

This was a drastic step,
for sure, and exposed leg-
islative deficiencies. Under
the current Insurance Act,
there is no ‘half-way’
house, where a company
can be petitioned into
receivership/administra-

tion, under a court-
appointed supervisor/man-
ager.

In Tribune Business’s
humble opinion, CLICO
(Bahamas) should have
been placed into this form
of care on the Monday
morning immediately after
its Trinidad parent was
bailed out.

That same day, this
newspaper reported on the
‘major regulatory concerns’
the Bahamian government
had with CLICO
(Bahamas), a further warn-
ing sign that was immedi-
ately interpreted by
attuned investors.

What happened in the
interim - between then and
the provisional liquidation
order on February 24, 2009
- was that those more
sophisticated CLICO
(Bahamas) policyhold-
ers/annuity depositors
cashed in and got their

money out.

Many pulled sums of a
high number out, these
tales having been recount-
ed to Tribune Business.

Of course, this leaves
other Bahamian policy-
holders and investors to
now ‘hold the bag’.

While those clients who
pulled money out probably
obtained a ‘preference’
over other creditors they
probably should not have
received, it appears there
is very little the provision-
al liquidator can do about
it now.

INVESTOR
EDUCATION

Many Bahamians, includ-
ing supposedly sophisticat-
ed ones - company pension
funds, such as the Bahama-
sair Provident Fund and
Broadcasting Corporation
of the Bahamas pension
fund, plus numerous doc-
tors, attorneys and other
professionals - appear to
have been attracted to
CLICO (Bahamas) annu-
ities because they offered
above-market rates of
return via their interest
rates.

They did not equate
reward with risk, namely
the fact that CLICO
(Bahamas) was offering
higher rates than everyone
else because it was desper-
ate to attract new money
into the business.

Shane Gibson, when min-
ister of national insurance,
told the House of Assem-
bly that he often wondered
how CLICO (Bahamas)
could offer such attractive
rates, seemingly without

question.
What this shows is the
need for Bahamian

investors to become better-
educated, and more willing
to ask questions of those
companies to whom they
entrust their long-term and
retirement savings.

As this episode has
shown, THE BEST PRO-
TECTOR FOR BAHAMI-
AN INVESTORS IS
THEMSELVES! Don’t be
frightened to ask questions
that may seem stupid.

This is your money, after
all. Get these companies to
explain themselves in plain
English.

And if you still don’t
understand, get help from
someone you trust who
does.

And if these firms don’t
respond, or provide unsat-
isfactory answers, then
look elsewhere!

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 3B



CLICO client attorneys get
extension on winding-up

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@
tribunemedia.net

ATTORNEYS represent-
ing CLICO (Bahamas) poli-
cyholders whose investments
remain in jeopardy were yes-
terday given nine days by a
Supreme Court judge to meet
with their clients, before
returning to court to advise
whether they would support
or oppose the winding-up
order.

Justice Cheryl Albury
ordered that the provisional
liquidator’s report, being pre-
pared by Baker Tilly Gomez
accountant and partner, Craig
A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, be handed
over to the court by tomor-
row. CLICO (Bahamas)
remains in provisional liqui-
dation, and has yet to be
placed into full liquidation.

Report

Damian Gomez, represent-
ing several CLICO
(Bahamas) clients, told the
court that neither he nor his
clients had seen the provi-
sional liquidator’s report, and
were not able to make an
informed decision on the
winding up order.

He also expressed concern
that the liquidator had paid
out $400,000 to First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) to prevent the
bank from repossessing three
pieces of real estate that it
held a mortgage over.

Tribune Business under-
stands that the liquidator
decided to pay-off First-
Caribbean, which had issued a
demand letter, on the basis
that the real estate involved
was likely worth more than
$400,000.

Allowing the bank to fore-

Company still in
provisional liquidation

close would have deprived
CLICO (Bahamas) policy-
holders and creditors of any
upside they might have
obtained from the liquidator
selling that real estate at a lat-
er date.

Godfrey “Pro” Pinder, who
along with attorneys Alfred
Sears and Sidney Collie, rep-
resents more than 100 policy-
holders, also petitioned for
full disclosure of the provi-
sional liquidator’s report in
order to inform his clients.

Mr Pinder added that there
may be many more policy-
holders who are not aware
that the CLICO (Bahamas)
matter was before the court,
and suggested that the hear-
ing be adjourned for more
than the previously suggest-
ed 14 days.

Mr Sears then suggested a
further seven days be allowed,
for a full 21-day period, so
that policyholders in the Fam-
ily Islands could also be given
ample time to instruct their
attorneys on how they would
like to proceed with the mat-
ter.

Attorney for the troubled

insurer, Emrick Knowles, of
Alexiou, Knowles and Co,
told the court that the only
issue relevant to the hearing
was whether or not the com-
pany should be wound-up and
if all the information cited in
the petition was true.

Contents

Justice Albury ordered that
the contents of the provision-
al liquidator’s report be kept
confidential before it is hand-
ed over, while Mr Gomez
requested that a gag order be
issued in order to constrain
those involved in the case who
might discuss the matter pub-
licly.

The Bahamas-based insur-
er was petitioned into liqui-
dation due to its insolvency
on counts that it was unable
to pay claims of $2.6 million in
the Turks and Caicos Islands,
while its liabilities were esti-
mated to exceed its assets by
at least $9 million.

Consequently, the compa-
ny underwent a provisional
winding up.

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DISTRESSED PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

March 2009

Contact Numbers 393-2004

Lot#8, Blk#18, Seabreeze Estates#3, N.P.
Single Family Residence

4 Bedroom, 3 Bathroom

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1 1758 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $256,956.00

Turn south on Sea Breeze Blvd. From Joe Farrington Road. Turn
through the first corner on the left-hand side, which is Sea Horse
Drive At the T-junction turn right and the property is the 7th property
on the left-hand side.

Lot#1090, Pinewood Gardens, N.P.
Single Family Residence

(3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,314 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $172,000.00

From Bamboo Boulevard and East Street South (by South Beach
Police Station), take the first left, Thatch Palm Avenue, then the
third right, Pasa Apple Street, and the subject property is the
twelfth on the left.

Lot #178, Colony Village Subdivision, N.P.
Split level house w /3 efficiencies
Property Size: 9,300 sq.ft

Building Size: 3,152 sq.ft

Appraised Value:TBA

Enter Colony Village from Prince Charles Drive, heading south

Colony Village Road the property is the last building on the right

iene side before Malaysia Way the corner that leads into Elizabeth
states.

Lot#51A, Albury Street & Dunmore Avenue, Chippingham,N.P
Single Family Residence

(3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 963 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $167,000.00

Travel west along Infant view Road to the Dunmore Avenue turn
left onto Dunmore Avenue, travel south on Dunmore Ave. and the
subject is on the corner of Albury Street and Dunmore Ave. The

house is painted white and trimmed maroone.

Lot#320, Eastwood Estates Subdivision, N.P
Single Family Residence

2 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,110 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $242,000.00

From Prince Charle Drive turn north into Eastwood Estates
Subdivision travel north along Tulip Blvd to the fourth corner on
the left onto Gibben Road and travel west to the third corner right
(Petrea Street) turn right onto Petrea Street and the subject is the
fifth property on the right or the fourth house. House#33 painted
white trimmed white.

Parcel of Land William Grant
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms
Property Size: 12,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 2,756 sq.ft
Appraised Value: TBA

From the intersection of Blue Hill and Carmichael Road travel
south along Blue Hill Road and turn left on corner immediately
opposite St. Vincent Road continue and turn on second paved
street on left and continue around curve to first corner on the left
and the subject property is the second on left.

Lot#2527, Sir Lynden Pindling Estates Subdivision
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size;5,040 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,136 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $172,000.00

Travel west on Charles W. Saunders Highway pass Sadie Curtis
Primary turn left after the school and then an immediate left onto
a dirt road travel west on this road to the T-junction and the subject
is immediately opposite the T-junction. The subject is painted tan
and trimmed tan.

Lot#52, East Park Estates, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
cronetty Size: 5,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 1308 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $14 95,000.00

From Prince Charles Drive and College Gardens Drive travel
south on College gardens Drive, turn left at the T-junction, Pine
barren Road take the first right into East Park Estates, turn right

Lot#14, Skull District, Eleuthera, N.P.
Vacant Land

Property Size:10,000 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $30,500.00

Directions: Eleuthera
Lot#5, Section#2, Gamble Heights, N.P.
Vacant Land

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft
Appraised Value:$45,000.00

From Blue Hill road & the Golden Gates Shopping Centre travel

HOUSES



VACANT LAND



at the T-junction Comfort Lane, bear left on to Maria Ave take the
second left Morning Street then the first right Tea Court and the
subject propert is the second on the left.

Lot 3A, Malcolm Allotment, N.P
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,446 sq.ft
Building Size: 1 079 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $161,100.00

From East Street South travel east along Malcolm Road east to
Winder Terrace turn right and conntinue to Deliverance Way and
turn left continue to Voice of Deliverance Temple and turn left on
unpaved road immediately thereafter and the subject property is
the third on the right. The house is painted green.

Lot#690, Pinewood Gardens, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3-Bedrooms, 2-Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,000 - ft

Building Size: 894 sq.

Appraised Value: si, 000.00 / O.N.O.

Travel east on Charles W. Saunders Highway, turn right onto
Buttonwood (Cleveland Eneas primary School comer), travel North
to the sixth corner on left (Saffron Street}, and the subject property
is the third house on left.



























































Lot#1007 Pinewood Gardens
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 1 ,400 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $1 45,000.00

From the T-junction of Pinewood Drive and Buttonwood Avenue,
travel north on Buttonwood Avenue take the 4th corner on the left
Croton Street the property is the 3rd on left.

Lot#544, oP et Ridge Freeport Grand Bahama
Single Family Residence

4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms

Property Size: 21 ,250 sq.ft

Building Size: 3,164 i

Appraised Value: TB

Directions Not Available

Lot# 1266, Pinewood Gardens, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,035 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $112,000.00

Turn north onto Willow Tree Ave. from Pinewood Drive. Travelling
north on Willow Tree Ave. turn through the 3rd corner on the left
hand side which is Sugar Apple Street and the property is the 8th
lot on the left hand side.

Lot#21, Blk#5, Seabeach Estates, N.P.

Single Family Residence

2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms - House

Two Town Houses - 2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 7,349 sq.ft

Building: 3,740 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $368,019.00

From Sun Resort & West Bay Street, travel east on West second
right Seabeach Boulevard and the subject property is the third lot
on the right.

Lot#1267, Pinewood Gardens
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 1 ,000 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $1 08,000.00

Travel west on Pinewood Drive tum on to Willow Tree Drive which
is the 1st corner on the right side after the Pinewood round about
heading north on Willow Tree Drive take the 3rd corner on the left
side which is Sugar Apple Street and the property is the 7th lot
on the left side the building is yellow trim white.

Lot# 16, Blk # 13 Sea Breeze Estate, NP
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 9,688 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,369 sq.ft

Appraised Value: TBA

Traveling south from the red light intersection at Prince Charles

Drive onto Beatrice Avenue -turn left on first red light (Savanna

Avenue). Then right on Bay Lilly Drive- continuing to 4th corner

on left. The subject property is on the south-west corner and the
building is painted yellow.

south on Blue Hill Road take the second left, faith United Way,
travel for seventy-five feet then there is no road reservation on
the right and the subject property is the third on the right.

Lot# 18 Blk#2 Sea Breeze Estates, NP

Vacant Land

Property Size:8,562 sq.ft

Appraised Value:$105,000.00

From Prince Charles Drive & Beatrice avenue, travel south on
Beatrice Avenue, take the fourth right, Bay Cedar Avenue, then
the fourth left, an Plum Grove, and the subject property is
the second on the left.

APARTMENTS/CONDOMINIUMS

Lot#157, Knotts Boulevard & Zachary Lane Sec.#2, F.P.
Duplex Apartment

Each Unit - 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 19,921 sq.ft

Building Size: 4,320 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $230,000.00 / 0.N.O.

Bahamia Terrace Freeport Grand Bahama

Lot#4, Blk#27 Manton Lane Freeport Grand Bahama
Incomplete Triplex Apartment

2 - (3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms

1 - (1) Bedroom, (1) Bathroom

Property Size:12,196 a

Building Size: 5, 200 s

Appraised Value: $138; 000.00

Freeport Grand Bahama

Lot#18, Evansville Sub., N.P.
Duplex

2-Bedrooms, 1- Bathrooms Each
Property Size: 7,328 sq.ft
Building Size: 1723 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $199,000.00

From Spikenard Rd. travel west along Carmicheal Rd. on the left.
- property is the second on the left. It is painted rust trim with
white.

Lot of Land situate noth of Step Street
Unfinished Triplex Apartment (35% completed)
Each unit 1 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 12, 020 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $150,000.00

From Fox Hill Road turn onto Step Street, travel west on Step
Street and the subject is between Rahming Street and Cockburn
street which is the first right after Rahming Street at the entrance
to an unpaved road access and presently under construction.

Lot#2, Misty Gardens Subdivision, N.P.
Two Storey Townhouse

4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,000sq. ft

Building Size: 2,736 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $234, 000.00/ O.N.O.

The subject property is located 1 mile west of Blue Hill Road on

the southern side of Marshall Road approximately 200 yards north
of the southern shoreline directly opposite lamp pole #65/50.

®Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada










We providing financing to qualified buyers

CONTACT INFORMATION
RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre

â„¢The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada

Lot#25, Section "C", Garden Hills, N.P.
Triplex Apartment

1-2 Bedrooms, 1-Bathroom

2- 1 Bedroom, 1- Bathroom

Property Size: 7,500 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,846 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $490,000.00 O.N.O.

From Global Tiles on East Street South, drive through the side
entrance and directly behind this structure and the subject property
is the split level structure immediately behind it.

Lot#209, Sunshine Park, N.P.
Four Plex Apartment

Property Size: 4,944 sq.ft
Building Size: 2, 200 sq.ft
Appraised Value; $205,000.00

Heading south on Blue Hill Road take the 1st entrance into
Sunshine Park take the 1st corner on left (Murray Street) the
property is the 5th building on left hand side of the street. The
building is blue trim with white.

Lot: Approximately 5,589 sq. ft North of Johnson Road
Duplex Apartment

2-2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom Each

oy Size: 5,589 sq. ft

Building Size: 2, 100 sq. ft

Appraised Value: $288,000.00

Travelling East on Bernard Road, turn north Adderley Street
(Opposite St. Augustine's College), continue north on Adderley
Street ep Step Street (which is on the curve) and make the first
turn right onto Johnson Terrace. Turn onto an unpaved road on
the right (which is the first corner on the right) At the T-junction
turn right (heading south) enter gates of privately owned is a
duplex residence colored gray with white trim.










Lot located Ferguson Street, Bain Town, N.P.
Triplex (2 live-in units and shop}
1-Bedroom, 1 Bathroom Each Unit
ener Size:5,249 sq.ft

Building Size:2, 294 sq.ft

Appraised Value: TBA



Travel west on Poinciana Drive, turn right on to Augusta Street.
Turn though second corner on the right (Ferguson Street). As you
turn on to Ferguson Street, the subject property is located on the
right side of the street.














PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE










































i
oY mS

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

PROCUREMENT FOR SCHOOL
FURNITURE FOR NEW SCHOOLS &
REPLACEMENTS 2009-2010

The Ministry of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’’) now invites
sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement of School Furniture
for New Schools and Replacements.

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from the
Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education, Headquarters,
Thompson Blvd. from Wednesday 18 th March, 2009, and obtain further
information, at the second address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
bided on (“School Furniture-New Schools & Replacements”).

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address,
or before Monday, 6 th April, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not
be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidder(s) or their Representative (s) who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday 7 th April, 2009 at the first address below.

(1) The Chairman Tender
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education

P.O. Box N-3913/4

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tele: (242) 502-8571

The Ministry reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders

ee
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

OPERATIONS MANAGER

The Operations Manager will be responsible for the development, harmonization
and implementation of revised operational policies and procedures throughout
our branch and unit network. The ideal candidate will have strong leadership
and communication skills and bring focus to the operational needs of all
branches by providing support to customer service initiatives, regulatory
reporting and compliance, review of branch administrative controls, as well
as the development of collective operational goals for branch administrative
personnel.

Core Responsibilities:

Contributes to the revision and implementation of the Bank’s policies and
procedures

Reviewing and making recommendations for the improvement in
Management Reporting

Identifying areas of opportunity for improvement of operating efficiency
Prepares and submits Reports on all banking operations to Senior
Management

Monitor Branch performances against approved targets

Monitors compliance of operations with Bank’s policies and procedures,
as well as recommendations made by internal audit and external parties
Ensures Bank is operating in accordance with regulatory requirements
Liaising with departmental heads to maintain database of recommendations
and request of operational changes

Assist in establishing operational objectives and monitoring the achievement
of the objectives

Reviewing operations job descriptions and functions in accordance with
ongoing operational changes.

Job Requirements:

¢ Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.
Knowledge of Banking laws, including requirements of The Central Bank
of The Bahamas which governs Commercial Banking.
Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced environment
Strong supervisory and customer service skills are essential.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include:

Competitive salary and benefits package, commensurate with work experience
and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later than March 31st,
2009 to:

DA # 69842
c/oThe Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com



Safra
executive
passes
Series 7

AN OPERATIONS administrator
at Safra International Bank & Trust,
Vincent G. Bowe, has passed the
Series 7 Exam in the US after study-
ing at the Securities Training Institute
(STD.

Ms Albury, STT’s course adminis-
trator, said: “We are committed to
the development of the Bahamian
capital markets by establishing pro-
grammes for continuing professional
education, and by enhancing the skills
of financial professionals.”

Mr Bowe is pictured.

BIC to ‘reposition
Blackberry’ device

FROM page one

enables clients to download
music and pictures, and send
and receive e-mails, from their
cell phones.

Mr Johnson said this was
designed to provide customers
of BTC’s cellular phone plat-
form with “full utility, allowing
them to make full use of their
phones and get utility”.

Meanwhile, BTC was also
looking to “put more empha-
sis on old school products”
such as its Yellow Pages, plac-
ing it on-line and using this as
a mechanism to reach cus-
tomers and attract more
advertising.

“We're looking to see how
we can use Voice over Inter-
net Protocol (VoIP) products

to increase our market share,
the Vibe,” Mr Johnson added,
explaining that this would be
done within the parameters of
the existing telecommunica-
tions legislation.

“The overriding focus is
making sure all platforms that
serve the customer deliver,”
the BTC executive said. “The
priority is our customer ser-
vice, and that people are com-
fortable with the level of ser-
vice.”

BTC was currently replac-
ing its entire core network
structure with the upgraded
IP infrastructure, a pro-
gramme that will “be done in
phases over several years. It
will take just over two years
and that build-Out’s ongoing
now”.

While emphasising that

VACANCY NOTICE

BTC had received no permits
or approvals to do so, Mr
Johnson said the company was
examining, given that its new
network infrastructure would
allow it to deploy IP TV,
whether a business case and
model could be made for it
eventually entering the TV
market.

“We'll see if a business case
supports us getting into a new
marketplace,” Mr Johnson
added.

He also disclosed that sev-
eral towers had still to be con-
structed on the Family Islands
as part of BTC’s GSM net-
work upgrade.

The company was still in the
“optimisation stage”, testing
and analysing the results of
the §4-$43 million system
upgrade.

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER EXECUTIVE

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Chief Financial Officer.

The job oversees all financial matters of BEC, inclusive of the activities of the Customer Services

Division.

The objectives of this function include, but are not limited to the following:

Financial Management, Accounting & Treasury

Ensure and structure the Corporation’s financial policies, practices and internal controls so that
they are in accordance with the law, generally accepted accounting principles, contractual
commitments, the Corporation’s structure and protect the corporations assets;

Manage BEC’s cash resources to ensure that funds are available to meet the ongoing and future
needs of BEC while minimizing the cost of capital;
Ensure the timely preparation of all financial reports. These include complete financial statements
for presentation to the Board, preparation of budget reports for assisting management decision
making, and development of a yearly projected budget in consultation with other Division heads;
Ensure that the divisions maintain a high standard of efficiency, control, and application of
sound accounting practices and principles along with the adequate trained qualified staff to
achieve these objectives;

* Coordinate to ensure that the workflow within the division and cross functionality with all
departments dependent upon the services of the division, are efficient and effective;

* Coordinate the annual budgeting process and present the completed budget for approval;

* Manage external relationships with local and international sources of funds;

* Ensure proper and cost effective insurance of BEC’s assets;

* Conduct Financial Analysis for the Corporation as requested;

Customer Services

Ensure the accurate and timely meter reading and billing of all customer accounts in New
Providence and the billing of other Family Island Accounts.

Ensure proper management of the revenue and collection recovery activities by effective
management of the Corporation’s Accounts Receivable.

Ensure proper management of the business office services of cashiering and new services, queries
for customers, banking and accounting reconciliation, etc.

Ensure that non-technical losses are kept to a minimum.

Job requirements include:

* A minimum ofa Bachelors Degree in Accounting/Finance with professional qualifications (e.g.,
ACCA, CPA) an MBA would be desired.
A minimum of 15+ years of experience in financial accounting, at senior management level.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Excellent analytical and organizational skills
Good customer relations skills
Good time management skills
Strong leadership skills
Knowledge of finance, accounting, budgeting and cost control principles including General
Accepted Accounting Principles.
Knowledge of automated financial and accounting reporting systems
Ability to analyze financial data and prepare financial reports, statements, and projections
Extensive knowledge of project management and the ability to oversee a range of projects
simultaneously
Strong human relations skills
Knowledge of industrial relations
Negotiation skills and techniques

Interested persons should apply by submitting a resume addressed to: The AGM-Human Resources
& Training, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau
Bahamas on or before: Wednesday, March 25, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 5B



Koyo Erm Ir LON

needs new jobs strategy
















@ WASHINGTON
Associated Press

FORMER Washington
Gov. Gary Locke told sena-
tors considering his nomina-
tion for commerce secretary
Wednesday that the nation
must “rebuild, retool and
reinvent” as it seeks new
strategies for job creation
amid the economic crisis.

“Together we will come up
with innovative solutions to
create jobs that are made in
America and stay in Ameri-
ca,” Locke said.

President Barack Obama’s
third pick to run the Com-
merce Department — his
first two nominees withdrew
— also promised to closely
oversee the 2010 census and
run the enumeration from
the department’s Census
Bureau. Some GOP law-
makers have been critical of
Obama administration com-
ments indicating that the
White House might seek
greater control over the cen-
sus. If confirmed by the Sen-
ate, Locke would lead an
agency with a broad portfolio
that includes many aspects of
international trade, oceans
policy, the transition to digital
television and expanding rur-
al broadband Internet ser-
vice.

“My goal is simple: to car-
ry out the president’s plan for
economic recovery by putting
every part of the Department
of Commerce single-mind-
edly to work on saving
American jobs and creating
family-wage jobs of the
future,” Locke said. “We
must rebuild, retool and rein-
vent our national strategies
for sustained economic suc-

cess.”

Obama turned to the for-
mer two-term Democratic
governor after New Mexico
Gov. Bill Richardson with-
drew amid questions about
the awarding of state con-
tracts and Republican Sen.
Judd Gregg of New Hamp-
shire changed his mind about
working for the Democratic
president.

Locke, 59, told the Senate
Commerce Committee he
would work with a Census
director who would work
with Congress, the adminis-
tration and state leaders “to
make sure you and they are
involved every step of the
way in making this a success-
ful count.”

Committee Chairman Jay
Rockefeller, D-W.Va., said
Locke will face many chal-
lenges but told him, “I think
you understand Main Street.”

Locke faced mostly friend-
ly questions and praise from
the Democratic-led panel,
but several Republicans
reminded him they were
watching the census process
closely.

“My hope is that it is trans-
parent and nonpoliticized,”
said Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchi-
son of Texas, the panel’s
ranking Republican.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-
Wash., recalled that she first
met Locke nearly 20 years
ago when she was a new state
senator and he was chairman
of the state’s House Appro-
priations Committee. Locke
grilled her about a school bus
safety bill — Murray called
it one of the toughest experi-
ences of her career — but
then helped her pass it, she
said.

Restaurant closure set
to hit West Bay Street

FROM page one

the restaurant will mean a hit for the El
Greco, which is presently 90 per cent
occupied. But he said it would be put
back up for rent as soon as it was cleaned
out.

“Yes, it will hurt the hotel to have no
restaurant attached to it, but we will find
someone more astute in the restaurant
business,” he said.

The Fergusons claimed that the hotel
owners began reneging on the terms of
the lease agreement after their restau-
rant, Johnny Canoe, was forced to close

Legal Notice

due to the Baha Mar project. They
believe now that the Pikramenos’s will
try to reestablish Johnny Canoe in the
now vacant space.

However, Mr Pikramenos said those
claims were false. He told Tribune Busi-
ness that all of the claims made against
him and the other owners were com-
pletely unfounded, and called the closing
a “preemptive strike” against them. “I
found out from the media that they were
closing,” he added.

Mr Pikramenos claimed that the Fer-
gusons were often late paying their rent,
and had now left the El Greco with an
outstanding electricity bill.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)

ASHFORD LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act (No. 45 of 2000). ASHFORD LIMITED is in

Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 19th

day of January, 2009.

Cl Accountancy Limited,

of Boatside Business Centre,
Warden, Northumberland,
NE46 4SH.

Liquidator

Help Fill Up Someone Else’s Cup...

» During the month of March, come to any QVS Pharmacy
(Village Road or Seagrapes Shopping Centre) and for
every bottle of Dasani water you buy, partial proceeds

QVS Pharmacy & |))\)\]
Help Us Help The Bahamas.

We would lke to nly our valued customers that
Mr. Cleveland Saunders

$ no longer employed with Bahamas Business Solutions
Limited and therelore not aufnonsed fo sel or service Xerox
Products.

Bahamas Busnes Solutions Lined is the only company
ioe Xerox Products in the Bahamas

rari

ies provided by this

individual.

Xe(OX ®,

will be donated to The Bahamas Red Cross.

On March 22nd, World Water Day, full proceeds from
your water purchases go to the charity.

Village Rd. Shopping Centre
393-2393 or 393-4293

He said the restaurant was simply a
victim of the economy.

“Bottom line is they are victims of a
bad economy,” he said.

“They have always been late on their
rent, and we have had to send out letters
to Brave Davis every month to collect
our rent.”

But Mr Ferguson denied this, and said
the restaurant had been doing well since
its opening and was experiencing a good
year-beginning, with the Spring Break
season promising strong business.

Now, they are looking for a new
space to reopen with their “dedicated”
staff.

KINGSWAY ACADEMY
ELEMENTARY

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Kingsway

Academy will be

holding Entrance Examinations
for students wishing to enter grades

Ze || 2,3.and6on MONDAY, APRIL6,
2009. Parents are asked to collect
Application Forms

from the

Elementary School office before
the testing date from 8:30a.m. to

4:00p.m.

For further information contact
the school at telephone numbers

Seagrapes Shopping Centre
364-5978 or 364-5979

e: info@qvsbahamas.com

324-5049, 324-2158, or 324-6269

Eaew

Saturday, April 18th 2009

REGISTER NOW!

Registort by April13" @ 3:30 p.m.*3 5.00

On fe oa

Leet Mla eres

Acdinees

Te eo ane

Date of Birth

Small

FSht size [circle one)

Emergency Goniact: Neme

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E-mail acdress

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ROUTE: Starting at Tropical Shipping, head east on East Bay St; overthe west bridge
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Ware | cece anc warned thal een phryeace byt
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Sod el cay and/or corporate a pecies whose onopety of DeTeo oe ane ued and 88 other msporsori
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Sesion, Maer and Gee wtors

related fo the Fon Au vi¥elk
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he agects of Trapetal Srippeng
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Ber end toe per ticiped Ss pemoo! reprmesenigived, assign
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penis death in respect of thas Fun Alunifaiic.
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Sauer Parect es @geatucee (ff urces 18 peer oe)


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





















































COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Request for Tender for Security Te at
The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute campuses
at Old Trail Road, and Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas

The Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute (B.T.V.I.) now
invites sealed bids for the provision of Security Services at The Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Institute campuses at Old Trail Road, and Wulff
Road Nassau, Bahamas.

The Contract is for a period of twelve (12) months in the first
instance and interested security firms are invited to submit Tenders
with comprehensive details of their proposal for security operations for
a twenty-four period starting at 6:00 a.m. daily (including weekends
and holidays). The Contract will be awarded to the applicant providing
the most economical and acceptable Tender for the full duration of the
contract period.

Interested Bidders may inspect campuses between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Collection of the
specification and bidding documents can be obtained from the Reception
Desk at B.T.V.I., Old Trail Road between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:00
p.m., Monday through Friday beginning Monday, 16" March, 2009 and
obtain further information at the second address given below.

Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “Tender for
Security, Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute” and delivered
to the attention of:-

The Chairman of the Tenders’ Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach

P. O. Box N-3017

Nassau, Bahamas

The Manager

Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute
Old Trail Road

P. O. Box N-4934

Nassau, Bahamas

Bids must be received by 4:00 p.m. on Friday, 3% April, 2009
accompanied by an endorsed copy of a current Business Licence.

Persons who submit Tenders are invited to a public opening of bids at
the Ministry of Finance, in the Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building, Cable
Beach on Tuesday, 14" April, 2009.

B.T.V.I. reserves the right to reject any or all Bids.

eee
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

BRANCH MANAGER

The Branch Manager will be responsible for the day to day achievement of
the branch’s sales and service goals. The ideal candidate will have strong
leadership and communication skills and bring focus to the execution of the
branch business plan, inclusive of sales administration and the overall
development of branch staff.

Core Responsibilities:

Responsible for the quality and efficiency of all branch customer service
initiatives for all credit and deposit products and services

Assists in the development of Branch targets for retail sales and operations
Provides leadership in the attainment of all branch sales and service goals,
Ensure that the Branch is operating in accordance with the Bank’s policies
and procedures and all regulatory requirements including but not limited
to Central Bank and AML.

Serves as lead customer service advocate at the branch level

Provides guidance to staff, where necessary on all service matters, ensuring
that customer needs are heard, understood and resolved

Ensuring staff’s awareness and use of bank product information
Responsible for all branch sales initiatives, inclusive of management of
the branch loan and deposit portfolio and mitigating Bank exposure
Responsible for reporting to Senior Management on the overall operations
of the Branch including financial and non-financial matters;

Provides leadership in the personal development of all branch staff through
the articulation and achievement of the Bank’s goals and objectives
Identifies skill deficiencies and opportunities for training for all Branch
staff

Job Requirements:

Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.

Knowledge of Banking laws, including requirements of The Central Bank
of The Bahamas which governs Commercial Banking.

Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced
environment

Strong supervisory and customer service skills are essential.

Excellent verbal and written communication skills.

Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include:

Competitive salary and benefits package commensurate with work experience
and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later than March 31*,
2009 to:

DA# 69842A
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com

Bahamas urged to
mandate corporate
pension trustees

FROM page one

of assets. I think it’s something
that should be given priority,”
Mr Gilbert said. “It doesn’t
matter what happens to the
pension administrator. If the
pension administrator goes
into liquidation, it does not
matter, because the assets are
segregated in a trust and not
tied up in the liquidation.”

Corporate trustees, he
explained, effectively “police
the overall relationship, mak-
ing sure the pension plan is
operated prudently and
according to the plan’s rules.
The trustee can also give
directions to the plan admin-
istrator and the pension man-
ager.”

Governance of Bahamas-
based pension plans has been
thrust into the spotlight fol-
lowing the collapse of CLICO
(Bahamas) into insolvency.
The Broadcasting Corpora-
tion of the Bahamas’ employ-
ee pension plan has come
under scrutiny after the Cor-
poration’s former chairman,
Calsey Johnson, a former
CLICO employee, admitted
receiving a commission from

the insurer in return for intro-
ducing the plan trustees to an
investment in one of the com-
pany’s annuities.

Mr Johnson denied that was
a conflict of interest, and the
pension fund invested
$800,000 that is now tied up
in the CLICO (Bahamas) liq-
uidation. Its trustees consisted
of three ZNS and three union
representatives.

Arguing against the
appointment of individual
trustees to watch over a pen-
sion plan’s operations and
assets, Mr Gilbert said: “By
having a corporate trustee,
you have the deep pockets. If
there’s a problem, such as mis-
management of the pension
assets, at least you have the
corporate trustee to assume
the fiduciary responsibility.

“If there are individual
trustees, you have to rely on
those trustees having assets
equal to that potential expo-
sure.”

Mr Gilbert said that when
he came to the Bahamas in
1997 to set up Atlantic Med-
ical’s pension administration
business, the company’s stan-
dard policy was to provide a

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corporate trustee - separate
from itself - to watch over all
company and individual plans
that it administered.

He added that other
Bahamian pension adminis-
trators offered a corporate
trustee as a service, and point-
ed out that CFAL used a cor-
porate trustee for its Blue
Marlin pension plan.

Mr Gilbert, a partner in
Chandler Gilbert Insurance
Associates, said that when he
was at Atlantic Medical, the
company operated as if pen-
sions legislation had already
been implemented in the
Bahamas, ensuring the com-
pany was in-step with its
Bermuda and Cayman affili-
ates.

“When you look at what
Bermuda and Cayman have
done, both have pensions leg-
islation, and in that legislation
a corporate trustee is an
absolute necessity. It’s legis-
lated that there has to be a
corporate trustee,” he said.

“Pension assets are always
held in trust for the beneficia-
ries, who are the participants
in the pension plan. In every
jurisdiction with pension leg-
islation, there is a corporate
trustee. It’s for the protection
of pension plan participants.”

Mr Gilbert praised the
make-up of the Government-
appointed pension reform
committee, and said he hoped
they would review similar leg-
islation in Bermuda and Cay-
man.

“Those jurisdictions are
very similar to the Bahamas,
and I believe they will recom-
mend that there be a corpo-
rate trustee,” Mr Gilbert said.

Pracevanesoust(ZOPERS

MANAGER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

One of our major clients seeks to recruit a qualified information technology professional
with experience in financial and customer service applications for the above position.

QUALIFICATIONS:

* Masters of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

* Eight or more years experience including hands-on technical experience and
two years minimum managing an information technology department in a large
organization with a complex, multi-vendor, multi-platform and distributed
computing environment
Visionary who can analyze problems within the context of corporate strategy,
balancing the consideration of facts, priorities, resources, constraints and

alternatives

RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Lead, monitor and develop a team of information technology professionals to
deliver customer focused service and set performance expectations to achieve

excellence

Manage the development, implementation and day-to-day operations of the
Information Technology department
Actively contribute to the tactical and strategic development of information
technology to support the organization’s business needs

Accountable for the successful delivery to agreed time scales and within budget of
departmental projects or programmes
Assist accounting and engineering departments in ensuring accurate and timely
preparation of reports

REQUIREMENTS:

This is a senior position that will require a professional with very extensive
experience in supervising and controlling computer professionals in financial,
customer services and engineering applications.
Strong management and communications skills
Strong technical and troubleshooting skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure
Solid understanding of business operations and strategic planning

COMPENSATION:

Attractive salary and other benefits will be commensurate with training and experience.

Written applications should be addressed to:

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: IT MANAGER 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Private & Confidential
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 7B



a | > =~
BISX firm’s Nassau plant

penalties drop74.8% in 2008

FROM page one

“In early 2006, we reconfig-
ured the Windsor plant in order
to mitigate membrane fouling.
However, this reconfiguration
resulted in a decrease in the fuel
efficiency of the Windsor plant
to a level below that required
under our contract with the
Water & Sewerage Corporation,
and as a result, we could not
charge a portion of the Windsor
plant’s diesel costs to the Water
& Sewerage Corporation.

“The impact of this inefficien-
cy was exacerbated by a 70.2 per
cent rise in diesel fuel prices over
the first nine months of 2008 as
compared to same period of
2007. Consequently, our diesel
costs for the Windsor plant for
the nine months ended Septem-
ber 30, 2008. exceeded the
amount that could be billed to
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration by approximately
$638,000.”

In a conference call with Wall
Street analysts, Rick McTaggart,
Consolidated Water’s chief exec-
utive, said the Windsor plant had
generated improved efficiencies
in the 2008 fourth quarter after it
“completely replaced the feed
wells” at the end of the previ-
ous three-month period.

Mr McTaggart added that
Consolidated Water had hired
more “skilled staff” to man the
Windsor facility, adding that he
hoped it would “pay off in
improved operating costs and
operating margins”.

The Consolidated Water fil-
ing with the SEC added: “We
constructed and commissioned
new feed water wells [at Wind-
sor], and replaced the reverse
osmosis membranes on two of
four of our production trains,
effective September 2008.

“These improvements have
allowed us to reverse the plant
reconfiguration, and the results
for the fourth quarter of 2008
indicate that the Windsor plant’s
fuel efficiency has improved.
However, the gross profit for our
Bahamas operations may con-
tinue to be adversely affected by
its diesel costs if these improve-
ments do not maintain the effi-
ciency of the plant at the mini-
mum required by contract.”

While its Bahamas operations
helped drive the overall 21 per
cent growth in Consolidated
Water’s revenues during the 12
months to December 31, 2008,
the Windsor plant’s efficiency
problems helped drive margins
for its bulk segment down to 15

per cent from 17 per cent.

Together with the 7.2 million
gallon per day Blue Hills plant,
the Windsor plant gives Consol-
idated Water the ability to sup-
ply the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration with 9.8 million total
gallons per day.

The company said that in
2008, it supplied the Water &
Sewerage Corporation with
about three billion gallons of
potable water, compared to the
3.2 billion that were supplied in
2007.

Consolidated Water’s third
Bahamas-based plant, located in
Bimini, has the ability to supply
the Bimini Sands Resort and
Bimini Beach Hotel with 115,000
gallons of water per day. In total,
it supplied six million gallons to
the two properties in 2007, com-
pared to four million gallons the
previous year.

“We have also sold water
intermittently to the Water &
Sewerage Corporation from our
Bimini plant when their regular
supply was unavailable. During
2008, we supplied the Water &
Sewerage Corporation with
2.5 million US gallons of water
from our Bimini plant,” Consol-
idated Water said in its SEC fil-
ing.

Meanwhile, despite the liq-
uidity problems its Bahamas
subsidiary was experiencing due
to the continuing build-up of
accounts receivables owed to it
for water supplied to the Water
& Sewerage Corporation, the
BISX-listed company said these
amounts were still fully collec-
table. It had thus made no pro-
vision for these amounts, even
though its own payables were
being impacted by the lack of
cash flow.

The sums owed to Consoli-
dated Water by the Water &
Sewerage Corporation had
increased by $2.9 million during
the 12 months to December 31,
2008, rising from $5.3 million at
the previous year-end to $8.2
million. That sum had declined
slightly during the first two
months of 2009 to $8 million as
at February 28, 2009.

Consolidated Water said in its
10-K filing: “As of December 31,
2007, CW-Bahamas was due
approximately $5.3 million from
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration. During the year ended
December 31, 2008, amounts

Master Technici

APPLIANCES & ELECTRONICS

invoiced by CW-Bahamas to
Water & Sewerage Corporation
for water supplied exceeded
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion’s payments to CW-
Bahamas, and as of Decem-
ber 31, 2008, CW-Bahamas
accounts receivables from Water
& Sewerage Corporation totaled
approximately $8.2 million.

“We have met with represen-
tatives of the Bahamas govern-
ment to inquire as to the rea-
sons for the increase in the
receivables balance since
December 31, 2007. We have
been informed by these govern-
ment representatives that the
delay in paying our accounts
receivables is due to operating
issues within the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation, that the
delay does not reflect any type of
dispute with us with respect to
the amounts owed, and that the
amounts will ultimately be paid
in full. Based upon these com-
munications, we believe that the
accounts receivable from the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
are fully collectible and there-
fore have not provided any
allowance for possible non-pay-
ment of these receivables as of
December 31, 2008.”

But Consolidated Water
added: “CW-Bahamas derived
substantially all of its revenues
from its contract with the Water
& Sewerage Corporation, and is
dependent upon timely collec-
tion of its accounts receivable to
fund its operations.

“On July 31, 2008, CW-
Bahamas issued Water & Sew-
erage Corporation a written
notice of Water & Sewerage
Corporation’s default under the
payment terms of its contract
with CW-Bahamas. During the
year ended December 31, 2008,
CW-Bahamas experienced lig-
uidity issues that required it at
times to extend the payment
dates of its accounts payable.

“If the Water & Sewerage
Corporation does not improve
the timeliness and/or increase
the amounts of its payments to
CW-Bahamas, this subsidiary
may not have sufficient liquidity
to fund its operations. If this
occurs, CW-Bahamas may be
required to cease the production
of water.”

The root core of the problem
is the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration’s financial difficulties.

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lion to $11 million - a grand total
of $30 million - the majority of
which will go on paying down
the receivables built up with
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The Corporation is now
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 9B

a
Kelloge’s CEO calls for
major food safety reforms

B WASHINGTON
Associated Press

TONY THE TIGER’S boss
says a food safety overhaul
would be Gr-r-reat!

The Kellogg Co.’s top official
is urging lawmakers to revamp
the nation’s food safety system.
The world’s biggest cereal mak-
er — its brands include Frosted
Flakes — lost $70 million in the
recent salmonella outbreak,
after recalling 7 million cases of
peanut butter crackers and
cookies.

CEO David Mackay will tell
Congress on Thursday that the
company wants food safety
placed under a new leader in
the Health and Human Services
department. He also calls for
new requirements that all food
companies have written safety
plans, annual federal inspections
of facilities that make high-risk
foods and other reforms.

Mackay’s strong endorsement
of major changes could boost
President Barack Obama’s
efforts to overhaul the system.
Last week Obama launched a
special review of food safety
programs, which are split
among several departments and

agencies, and rely in some cases
on decades-old laws. Critics say
more funding is needed for
inspections and basic research.
“The recent outbreak illus-
trated that the U.S. food safety
system must be strengthened,”
Mackay said in prepared
remarks for a hearing Thurs-
day. “We believe the key is to
focus on prevention, so that
potential sources of contamina-
tion are identified and properly
addressed before they become
actual food safety problems.”

Statement

A copy of his statement for
the House Energy and Com-
merce Committee was obtained
in advance by The Associated
Press.

The salmonella outbreak has
sickened at least 691 people and
is blamed for nine deaths. The
source was a small Georgia
peanut processing plant, which
allegedly shipped products that
managers knew were contami-
nated with salmonella.

The plant produced not only
peanut butter, but peanut paste,
an ingredient in foods from gra-

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nola bars and dog biscuits, to
ice cream and cake. More than
3,490 products have been
recalled, including some Kel-
logg’s Austin and Keebler
peanut butter sandwich crack-
ers. The Georgia plant has been
shut down and its owner,
Peanut Corp. of America, is
under criminal investigation by
the Justice Department.

Mackay said Kellogg’s had to
recall more than 7 million cases
of crackers and cookies, at a
cost of $65 million to $70 mil-
lion. Kellogg’s began purchasing
peanut paste from Peanut Corp.
in July, 2007, after the supplier
passed Kellogg’s quality checks.

“Audit findings reported no
concerns that the facility may
have had any pathogen-related
issues or any potential contam-
ination,” Mackay said in his
statement. “None of the salmo-
nella or hygiene issues that have
been reported by regulators
over the past several months
were noted in any of the audit
reports provided to Kellogg.”

FDA inspectors swooped
down on the Georgia plant in
January and found multiple san-
itary violations. The problems
included moisture leaks,
improper storage and openings
that could allow rodents into
the facility. FDA tests found
salmonella contamination with-
in the plant. After invoking
bioterrorism laws, the FDA
obtained Peanut Corp. records
that showed the company’s own
tests repeatedly found salmo-
nella in finished products.

How persistent problems at
the Georgia plant managed to
escape the attention of state
inspectors and independent pri-
vate auditors is one of the main
unanswered questions in the
investigation.

Mackay’s call for a food safe-
ty “authority” within HHS
appears similar to legislation
from Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-
Conn. Her plan would take
food safety away from FDA
and give it to a new agency
within the department. The
FDA is responsible for most
foods, while the Agriculture
Department inspects meat and
poultry. DeLauro’s plan would
not affect the USDA.

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Dr. Robin Roberts

Wre®| DOCTORS HOSPITAL


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009



THE TRIBUNE



US consumer prices up 0.4%

Bi By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

CONSUMER prices rose in
February by the largest amount in
seven months as gasoline prices
surged again and clothing costs
jumped the most in nearly two
decades.

But the increase appeared to
ease many economists’ concerns
about dangerous price move-
ments in either direction. The
recession is expected to dampen
any inflation pressures for at least
the rest of this year, while the
slight uptick in prices over the
last two months also has made
the possibility of deflation more
remote. The Labor Department
reported Wednesday that con-
sumer inflation rose 0.4 percent in
February, the biggest one-month
jump since a 0.7 percent rise in
July. Two-thirds of last month’s
increase, which was slightly more
than analysts expected, reflected

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a big jump in gasoline pump
prices.

Meanwhile, the deficit in the
broadest measure of U.S. trade
fell sharply in the final three
months of last year as oil prices
dropped and the recession
reduced U.S. consumers’ demand
for overseas goods. Economists
expect the improvement in the
USS. current account to continue
this year, but mostly due to rapid
falls in imports.

Exports also are falling as the
global economy slows, eliminating
what had been a crucial source
of sales for U.S. manufacturers
early last year.

Core inflation, which excludes
food and energy, rose 0.2 percent
in February, also slightly higher
than the 0.1 percent rise econo-
mists expected.

The Federal Reserve, which
was wrapping up a two-day meet-
ing on Wednesday, was expect-
ed to keep a Key interest rate at a



record low near zero as Fed offi-
cials continue to believe that the
biggest problems at present are
the deep recession and severe
financial crisis, not inflation.

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mour, center, checks merchan-
dise as customers shop at the
counter at Eastern Boarder in
Danvers, Mass. Tuesday, March
17, 2009.

BACO celebrates its 10" Anniversary!

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING |"“AGM"
2 LUNA RON MERTEN

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oby pod ep cone wall by chk Foe

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000)

NESLIN LTD

Registration Number 147357B
(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of 2000) NESLIN
LTD is in Dissolution.

Any person having any claim against NESLIN LTD is required on
or before the 17th day of April, 2009 to send their name, address and
particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the company, or
in default thereof they may have excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made before such claim is approved.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley Street, Nassau, The
Bahamas is the Liquidator of NESLIIN LTD.



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THE TRIBUNE





China denies
Coke bid for
juice company

m@ By JOE McDONALD
AP Business Writer

CHINA denied Coca-Cola
Co.’s closely watched $2.5 bil-
lion bid to buy a major Chi-
nese juice producer Wednes-
day, highlighting Beijing’s
rejection of foreign control
over its top companies even
as they step up acquisitions
abroad.

The refusal to allow the for-
eign acquisition in a non-
strategic business such as fruit
juice could backfire abroad as
state-owned Chinese compa-
nies pursue investments in
mining and other sensitive
industries.

Coca-Cola’s acquisition of
Huiyuan Juice Group Ltd.
was rejected because it would
reduce competition and raise
prices, the Commerce Min-
istry said. But the bid also
provoked an outcry from
nationalists who opposed let-
ting a successful Chinese
brand fall into foreign hands.

“At the end of the day, they
just want to protect their own
brands,” said Renee Tai,
senior vice president for
research at CIMB-GK Securi-
ties Pte. Ltd. in Hong Kong.
“Tf it’s an established brand
with a track record, I think it
will be more difficult for for-
eigners to participate.”

Coca-Cola Chief Executive
Muhtar Kent said Coke would
now focus on existing brands
and innovation of new brands,
including juices.

“We are disappointed, but
we also respect the decision,”
Kent said in a statement.

Kent reiterated the compa-
ny’s plan to invest $2 billion in
China over the next three
years to open new plants and

distribution channels.

A woman who answered the
phone at Huiyuan said no one
was available to comment. A
ministry official, Chen
Rongkai, said there is no way
for Coca-Cola to appeal.

Creating profitable brands

is a key element in the com-
munist government’s devel-
opment strategy, and officials
hope to make Chinese com-
panies more competitive dur-
ing the current economic
slump, in preparation for the
recovery of world growth.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSSETTE JOSEPH of
KEY WEST STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,

and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 12 day of MARCH, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4)(a),
(b) and (c) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000 NOTICE is hereby given that, ROLING
MANAGEMENT LIMITED is in dissolution and
that the date of commencement of the dissolution is
the 13th day of March A.D. 2009.



Enervo Administration Limited
Liquidators
Montague Sterling Centre
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3924
Nassau, The Bahamas

A Ministry of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel
?.0. Box AB207b0, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas



Nea ee

TEACHER POSITIONS

AvP eZ
f

SOT orc La TAL

with BIC. and BGCSE experience in Language Arts, Literature, Mathematics,

Book Keeping, Home Economics, Social Studies

DER ecu Mame a
STM aera Ze a ca

Applicants must be Born Again Christians and adhere to the Statement of Faith of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel.
Teachers must also have at least a Bachelors Degree in Education or a Teacher's Certificate
and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident of the Bahamas with work status,
Qualifying persons are asked to contact the office at
Telephone (242) 201-4771 8:20 AM, - 3:45 P.M. or fax (242) 367-577
or visit our website ~ www.agape-school.com ~ for job or student applications

LLL LL LL LL LLL DOLD LOL OD ED ND OL DOL OD DOL OD Ot Od Ot Od td

Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Book Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values as well as a very high standard of education
and is approved by the Bahamas Ministry of Education.

We seek to train the mind, guide the person, and love the personality,

‘Study to shou thysell approved wntor God...’ 2 “Timothy 2:15



THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 11B

C HOSp,
< "

| :
Auryon

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE OFFICE ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY NOTICE
Deputy Director of Finance

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of Deputy Director of
Finance, Public Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:

Educated to degree level or equivalent; a professionally qualified accountant and member of a
recognized accounting body, (American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, or Association
of Chartered Certified Accountants or Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants); able to
demonstrate five (5) to ten (10) years relevant senior management experience within a large
complex organization; have the ability to demonstrate integrity and effective leadership and
management skills together with proven track record of contributing achievements of strategy and
policy development and implementation.

The successful candidate must possess excellent communication skills and be able to adapt
communication style to suit each activity/staff group; possess strong interpersonal skills and be
able to express a view convincingly coherently, verbally and in writing.

The Deputy Director of Finance will report to the Director of Finance, Corporate Office.

Job Summary: The holder of the post will be required to communicate regularly with a wide range
of senior staff both clinical and non-clinical and staff at all levels within the Authority. He/she must
also build and manage highly effective relationships with local authority partners, the public, the
Public Treasury and the Ministry of Finance.

Duties not limited to the following:

|. Provides high level expertise in the areas of financial management and
corporate governance to the Board that ensures financial strategies are
effectively integrated and aligned within the corporate management
process.

. Plans, controls and monitors the flow of the Authority's funds to ensure
expenditure is contained within budget; produces financial reports as
required by the Board, Managing Director and all its levels of management.

. Leads in the implementation of the Board’s financial strategy and plans;
ensures that appropriate levels of expertise are in place for effective
delivery of financial and management accounting services and that all
statutory and regulatory requirements are met relating to the Authority’s
accounts, including the submission of audited accounts in order to meet
deadlines.

. Reviews and supervises the implementation of financial policies and
supervises approved systems of financial control to ensure the effective use
of resources and compliance with accounting standards; liaises with audit,
both internal and external to ensure systems of control are adequate and
secure; promotes optimum standards of professionalism within the finance
functions to ensure compliance with external standards and best practices.

. Coordinates integrated activities across the Authority and its institutions ensuring
the Board, Managing Director and all Its levels of management has the appropriate
skills and toots to maximize scarce resources so as to deliver sustainable improvements to
patient care.

. Ensures that there is effective coordination across
all elements of the finance functions of the Authority; contributes fully to the
business planning cycle of the Authority; liaises with the relevant key managers and
clinicians to encourage their participation in the process.

. Leads, motivates, develops and trains staff within the department to ensure that
they have the necessary skills to achieve required objectives and to encourage the
development of innovative, creative thinking and team work across the departments.

The post of Deputy Director of Finance is in Salary Scale HATM7 (B) ($48,650 x 800 _ $56,650).
Letters of application and curricula vitae should be submitted to the Director of Human

Resources, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville: or
P. O. Box N-8200, Nassau, Bahamas no later than 26th March, 2009.

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

Purpose

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) will provide technology vision and leadership in the
development and implementation of information technology (IT) programmes. He/she will
lead the planning and implementation of enterprise information systems to support business
operations and achieve more effective and cost beneficial enterprise-wide IT operations.

Essential Functions

e Establish guidelines and programmes for effective IT management.

¢ Provide data processing services required.

¢ Recommend long and short range management information systems plans and budgets.

e Approve staff recommendations on major systems development and/or research
projects.
Establish strategic policy for planning, development, and design of information needs.
Research management information systems hardware and software including applicable
vendor applications, data base management, and operational control packages.
Sets policies to ensure privacy and security of data processing facilities.
Establish guidelines and programmes for effective database management utilisation.
Consult with and advise department heads on IT management needs and problems.
Demonstrate continuous effort to improve operations, decrease turnaround times,
streamline work processes, and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality
customer service.

Education, Experience and Necessary Qualifications

Minimum of 3 years of experience with increasing responsibilities for management and
support of information systems and IT; direct management of a major IT operation is
preferred. Experience should also include exposure to both shared and outsourced solutions,
as well as support of in-house information and communication systems in a multi-site client-
server environment. Specific experience with financial and human resource management
information systems is a plus. Other skills required include:

e Familiarity with: desktop, notebook, handheld, and server computer hardware; local
and wide area network design, implementation, and operation; operating systems such
as Windows, OS/400, Unix, and Linux; and computer peripherals such as printers,
monitors, modems and other equipment.

Knowledge of office productivity software programmes such as word processing,
spreadsheet programmes, databases, and communications software.

Ability to: analyse and resolve complex issues, both logical and interpersonal; and
negotiate and defuse conflict.

Effective verbal and written communications skills and effective presentation skills, all
geared toward coordination and education.

Self-motivator, independent, cooperative, flexible and creative.

Required Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:
Requires a master’s degree in Computer Science, Business Administration or a related field or
equivalent experience. Comprehensive knowledge of:
¢ Data processing methods and procedures, and computer software systems.
Systems design and development process, including requirements analysis, feasibility
studies, software design, programming, pilot testing, installation, evaluation and
operational management.
Business process analysis and redesign.
Design, management, and operation of managed IT systems

Proven skills in: negotiating with vendors, contractors, and others; budget preparation and
monitoring; management and leadership; and communication.

Demonstrated ability to: relate to all levels of the user community; be a team player
that motivates and educates other team members; plan, implement and support systems
in a complex education environment; set and manage priorities; comprehend complex,
technical subjects; translate technical language to lay audiences; and link and apply complex
technologies to business strategies.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
RE: CIO 0647
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

Private & Confidential


PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





AIG chief acknowledges
bonuses are ‘distasteful’

Hodes: ‘AIG now stands for arrogance, neompeienes and greed’

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WILFLOW

INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 5th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

oat Tel. 502 23566
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ee

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SATURDAY ¢ APRIL 18", 2009 ¢ 6 a.m.
with Tropical Shipping & Biggest Loser Program
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The Registration fee covers the cost of the Fun Run T-shirts pro wi participants
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E mile Race Route

larting at Tropical Shipping, baad east on East Bay St: over the west bridge to the east bridge: back to Nassau: East on East
Bay St: South on Village Ad.: West on Shirley St: North on Victoria Ave.: East on Bay Street ending at Tropical Shipping

vailable at our front offic é on

Pores a

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@ By JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press Writer

THE CHIEF executive offi-
cer of failed insurance con-
glomerate AIG acknowledged
Wednesday that the company’s
multimilliion-dollar bonuses
were “distasteful” to many and
had provoked a firestorm of
wrath.

“T share that anger,” Edward
Liddy, chairman and CEO of
the American International
Group Inc., said in testimony
prepared for Congress.

Lawmakers from both parties
expressed fury over the compa-
ny’s behavior. For the Ameri-
can public, AIG now stands for
“arrogance, incompetence and
greed,” said Rep. Paul Hodes,
D-N.H.

Liddy, in his written remarks,
said, “Mistakes were made at
AIG on a scale few could have
every imagined possible.”

But, he also said that the
roughly $165 million in bonuses
paid out over the weekend
should be honored as a legal
commitment of the United
States government, which now
owns 80 percent of the battered
insurer.

“When you owe someone
money, you pay that money
back,” Liddy maintained. “We
at AIG want to believe that we
are all in this together,” said the
man named six months ago to
take over the company as part
of the government rescue. Some
$170 billion in tax money has
now been pledged to AIG.

Meanwhile, the agency that

oversees AIG said that, while
its criticism of the company’s
practices had sharpened over
the past five years, it failed to
recognize the extent of risk
posed by the exotic financial
instruments the insurance com-
pany offered, many of them tied
to a housing market that had
long been rising.

Scott Polakoff, acting direc-
tor of the Office of Thrift Super-
vision, said regulators failed to
accurately predict what would
happen to AIG’s so-called cred-
it default swaps — a form of
insurance — if housing values
collapsed, as they have. “There
are a lot of people walking
around who failed to understand
how bad the real estate market
had gotten,” he said.

Liddy’s stance that the bonus-
es should be honored, no matter
how distasteful, drew sharp
comments from both parties.

It is “time for us to assert our
ownership rights,” said Rep.
Barney Frank, D-Mass., chair-
man of the full Financial Ser-
vices committee. Frank said
Congress will be asking for the
names of the bonus recipients
— and if AIG declines to pro-
vide it, he will convene the com-
mittee to subpoena for the
names. “We do intend to use
our power to get the names,”
he said.

Rep. Scott Garrett of New
Jersey, the senior Republican
on the subcommittee, com-
plained that the administration
still has no exit strategy for dis-
entangling itself from the insur-
ance giant.

HOUSE Capital
Markets,
Insurance and
Government
Sponsored
Enterprises
subcommittee
member Rep.
Brad Miller, D-
N.C. questions
AIG Chairmen
Edward Liddy
during testi-
mony before
the subcom-

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omemmendieer Lic ut

School

“Teach Me, O Lord, Thy Way"..Psalm 119-33

TEACHING VACANCIES

Temple Christian

applications

Art Teacher

Spanish Teacher

Applicant must:

A. Be a born-again practicing Christian who
is willing to subscribe to the Statement of
Faith of Temple Chrisitian Schools.

Elementary School
from qualified
2009-2010 school year for:

invites
teachers for the

(Grades 1-6)
(Grades 1-6)

Have an Associates and or Bachelor’s
Degress in Education from a recognized
College or University in the area of

specialization.

Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or

Diploma.

1D. Be willing to contribute to the school’s extra

curricular program.

Application must be made in writing with full
Curriculum Vitae, a recent colored photograph and
three references should be sent to:

The Principal
Temple Christian School
Collins Avenue
P.O.Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 13B





“Part of me wants to say to
some of the loudest critics,
“What did you expect and why
weren’t you asking more ques-
tions before?’ I would argue that
the real outrage now is the $170
billion of taxpayer moneys that’s
been pumped into this company
and to what effect,” he said.

Rep. Gary Ackerman, D-
N.Y., cited a “tidal wave of
rage” throughout America right
now.

AIG is under fire for $220
million in retention bonuses
paid to employees in its trou-
bled financial products division.
The most recent payment of
$165 million began to be paid
last Friday and caused a furor.

The retention payments —
ranging from $1,000 to nearly
$6.5 million — were put togeth-
er in early 2008, long before
then-Treasury Secretary Henry
Paulson asked Liddy to take
over the company. Liddy him-
self is not getting a bonus and is
only drawing $1 a year in salary.

Liddy also said in his pre-
pared testimony that AIG grew
into an internal hedge fund that
became overexposed to market
risks. AIG is the largest recipi-
ent of federal government emer-
gency assistance.

“No one knows better than I
that AIG has been the recipi-
ent of generous amounts of gov-
ernmental financial aid. We
have been the beneficiary of the
American people’s forbearance
and patience,” he said. But he
also said that “we have to con-
tinue managing our business as
a business — taking account of

the cold realities of competition
for customers, for revenues and
for employees.”

The clamor over compensa-
tion overshadowed AIG’s week-
end disclosure that it used more
than $90 billion in federal aid
to pay out to foreign and domes-
tic banks, including some that
had multibillion-dollar U.S. gov-
ernment bailouts of their own.
AJIG is the single largest recipi-
ent of government assistance —
a company whose financial
transactions were so intricate
and intertwined that it was con-
sidered simply too big to fail.

Orice Williams, director of
financial markets and commu-
nity investment at the Govern-
ment Accountability Office, the
government’s top watchdog
agency, told the panel that the
government’s intervention
helped AIG avoid failure, but
that the company is still strug-
gling to pay back the money.

Market and other conditions
have prevented the insurer from
making significant asset sales,
she testified. She said most
restructuring efforts are still
under way.

Liddy said the company’s new
management team found its
overall structure “too complex,
too unwieldy and too opaque
for its component businesses to
be well managed as one com-
pany.”

He said the new managers
have “addressed our liquidity
crisis and stabilized the compa-
ny’s cash position” and is wind-
ing down the financial products
side of the business.

AC HOSPyy,
AC.
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al
an
a

AUTHOR

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG AGENCY

PUBLIC NOT/CE

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF DRUGS AND
RELATED ITEMS

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and
Related Items for the Public Hospitals Authority
and the Ministry of Health, The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas.

The Tender Document, which includes
instruction to the Tenderers along with other
relevant information, can be collected from the
Bahamas National Drug Agency, Market &
McPherson Streets, beginning from Friday a0",
March 2009 from 9 am — 5 pm.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a
sealed envelope or package identified as
“Tender for the Supply of Drug and Related
Items” and addressed to:

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third Terrace, West Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, The Bahamas

Electronic and hard copies must be received at
the above address on or before 5pm Friday,
April 24", 2009. A copy of a valid business
license and Nationals Insurance Certificate
must accompany all proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right
to reject any or all Tender(s).

Director

AIG Chairmen Edward Liddy waits to testify on Capitol Hill in Wash-
ington, Wednesday, march 18, 2009, before the House Capital Mar-
kets, Insurance and Government Sponsored Enterprises subcom-
mittee.
















NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALFRED MARVIN DAWKINS
of LEEWARD EAST, P.O.BOX SB-51218, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12' day of
MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

GN-840

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

Ministry of Public Works & Transport
Tender For Roadworks
North Abaco

Interested Contractors are invited to tender for the
Roadworks in North Abaco, which includes the Queen’s
Highway from Treasure Cay to Crown Haven, and
Settlement Roads of Blackwood, Coopers Town, Wood
Cay, Mount Hope, Fox Town, and Crown Haven.

The Tender Document may be collected at:

Civil Engineering Section
Department of Public Works
1st Floor East Wing
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive
Nassau, Bahamas

Sealed Tender submissions are to be deposited in the
Tender Box located at:

Tenders Board
Ministry of Finanace
3rd Floor
Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received no later than
10:00 a.m., Tuesday, 31st March, 2009.

Tenderers are invited to attend the Tender opening at
10:00 a.m., Tuesday, 31st March 2009 at the Tenders
Board.

Signed
Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Public Works & Transport

VACANCY NOTICE

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the position of
Director, responsible for the operations, development and execution of strategic and tactical plans of its

Customer Service Department.

The successful candidate is expected to manage the account activities of approximately 30,000
customers, including metering, billings, credit, collections and a 24-hour call center.

The applicant must have strong communication, problem solving and trouble shooting skills with
demonstrated decision-making ability and leadership.

Applicants must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Accounting or Equivalent;
5 years supervisory experience in billing and collections in a high volume utility environment, banking
or its equivalent and a track record of reducing arrears.

Qualified applicants may apply to:-

THE DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMITED

P.O. BOX F-40888

KONE CaM Sree Mm Srlie Dien
OR BY EMAIL: hrdept@gb-power.com

wy

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY
Keeping Grand Bahamay Future Bright.

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS

MARCH 31, 2009



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT



Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles
Act Chapter 393 Statute Law of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
parcel or lot of land situate in the Subdivision

Susan Walsh/AP Photo

2008

CLE/QUI/360



known as Englerston in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
being that lot bounded on the NORTH by a
public road known as Balfour Avenue and
running thereon One Hundred feet and Fourty-
Seven hundredths (100.47) on the EAST by
land said to be of Elgin Wright and running
thereon Fifty-Two feet and Seventy-Three
hundredths (52.73) on the SOUTH by land
said to be of Emmanuel Larrimore and running
thereon Ninety-Nine feet and Sixty-Two
hundredths (99.62) and on the WEST by a
public road known as St. Charles Vincent
Street and running thereon Fourty-Six feet and
Thirty-Two hundredths (46.32).

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of MARY
STUBBS.

NOTICE OF PETITION

Take notice that by Petition filed in the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas on the 6" day of March, A.D., 2008
MARY STUBBS of the Subdivision known as
Englerston in the Southern District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas (hereinafter “the
Petitioner”) claims to be the owner in fee simple in
possession of the above captioned piece parcel or lot
of land and has made application to the Supreme Court
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under section
3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959, to have her title to
the said piece parcel or lot of land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in
a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:

1. The Registry of The Supreme Court, Ansbacher
House, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

The Chambers of Cedric L. Parker & Co. No.
9 Rusty Bethel Drive, Nassau, Bahamas.

Take notice that any person having dower or right of
dower or any adverse claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition must on or before the expiry of Thirty
(30) days following final publication of this Notice
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
and the undersigned a Statement of his Claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith together with a plan of the area claimed and
an abstract of title to the said area claimed by him.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of his Claim on or before the Thirtieth (30) day
following final publication of this notice will operate
as a bar to such claim.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Chambers
Neil’s Court
No. 9 Rusty Bethel Drive,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner
PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





US current account deficit drops in ‘08

@ By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
AP Economics Writer

THE deficit in the broadest mea-
sure of U.S. trade fell sharply in 2008
for the second consecutive year, due
partly to a larger surplus in services
trade.

The Commerce Department report-
ed Wednesday that the current account
deficit, which includes investment flows
and other transfers as well as trade,
dropped 7.9 percent to $673.3 billion in
2008 from $731.2 billion in 2007.

Economists expect the improvement
in the U.S. current account to contin-
ue this year, but mostly due to rapid
falls in imports as the recession cuts
into U.S. consumers’ buying power.
Exports are also falling as the global
economy slows, eliminating what had
been a crucial source of sales for U.S.
manufacturers early last year.

The deficit fell to $132.8 billion in
the final three months of last year from
a revised $181.3 billion in the third

quarter, the department said. That was
the lowest since the fourth quarter of
2003 and below what analysts expected.

As a percentage of the economy,
the fourth quarter deficit was 3.7 per-
cent, the lowest since the figure was 3.4
percent in the fourth quarter of 2001.

The United States finances the
deficit by borrowing from foreigners,
so a smaller deficit reduces the need
for such borrowing.

The current account deficit
increased for five straight years before
falling slightly in 2007. The deficit
equalled 4.7 percent of the overall
economy last year, down from 5.3 per-
cent in 2007.

The surplus in services trade, which
includes insurance and financial ser-
vices, travel fees and royalty payments,
increased to $139.7 billion last year
from $119.1 billion in 2007.

The U.S. also saw a sharp increase in
its surplus in international income, the
Commerce Department said, as U.S.
companies paid far less in interest and
dividends to foreign investors last year

than in 2007. The U.S. income surplus
increased to $127.6 billion in 2008 from
$81.7 billion the previous year.

Meanwhile, the deficit in goods
trade fell to $174.1 billion in the fourth
quarter from $216.3 billion in the July-
September period, as a sharp drop in
imports outweighed a decline in U.S.
exports.

That trend is continuing so far this
year. The Commerce Department said
Friday that the trade imbalance
dropped to $36 billion in January, a
decline of 9.7 percent from Decem-
ber and the lowest level since October
2002.

The drop in exports is hurting many
U.S. manufacturers.

Caterpillar Inc., a leading U.S.
exporter, said Tuesday it would lay
off 2,400 employees at five plants in
Illinois, Indiana and Georgia. The
company said in January that its earn-
ings plunged 32 percent in the last
three months of 2008 as global demand
for its mining and construction
machines plummeted.



=

EMPLOYEES, right, of the Caterpillar plant argue with security officers during a
workers’ general assembly in front of the factory in Grenoble, French Alps,
Wednesday, March 18, 2009.



VACANCY FOR DIRECTOR OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS
MINISTRY OF YOUTH, SPORTS AND CULTURE

Applications are invited from suitably qualified officers to fill the position of
Director of Culture, Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture.

Requirements for the post:

Applicants must possess a Master's Degree from an accredited
institution in one of the following disciplines: Liberal Arts, Fine
Arts or Social Science; minimum of eight (8) years post qualification
experience in the development and implementation of cultural,
activities, five (5) years of which should be at supervisory level; or

A Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited institution in one of the
following disciplines: Liberal Arts, Fine Arts or Social Science; minimum
of at least ten (10) years post qualification experience in the development
and implementation of cultural activities, five (5) years of which in a
supervisory capacity.

Knowledge of granting programs and related processes, the development of
cultural industries and a background in management in the cultural sector will
be an asset.

The successful candidate should:

Be a self-starter with strong motivation;

Possess the ability to think strategically and translate goals into
operational objectives;

Have staff supervision experience;
Possess the ability to work independently and in partnership with others;

Possess the ability to build rapport with a wide array of stakeholders and
interests;

Have strong experience working with the private sector and government;
Possess good analytical, writing and communication skills;
Have strong facilitation, presentation and networking skills;

Possess good computer skills and the ability to run an effective office
including financial and records management;

Have sound knowledge of local, national and international cultural/arts
related practices;

Have demonstrated ability to analyze and translate broad Government
directions into strategic policies and programs to develop the cultural,
social and economic potential of Culture and Arts.

Specific duties of the post include:-

Giving objective, evidence — based advice to the Permanent Secretary and
the Minister on issues relating to Culture and the Arts;

Responsibility for research, development, management and
implementation of policies and programs in pursuit of Government
objectives;

Representing the Department at forums and on Boards and Committees
as required;

Serving as an informed link between cultural organizations, individuals
and Government;

Leading and managing the Cultural Grants Programme for cultural
development among Bahamians;

Overseeing the management of the various aspects of the Department of
Culture, including the Junkanoo Museum, the National Centre for the
Performing Arts, the National Dance School, the E. Clement Bethel
National Arts Festival, the National Senior Junkanoo Parades and Junior
Junkanoo Programmes and any other cultural activities designated by
the Government;

Liaising with Community and Heritage Festivals across The Bahamas
and advising them on effective growth and development strategies;
Effective management of the office including staff, financial and records
management;

Coaching, counseling and motivating the staff to maintain efficiency and
productivity; and

Reviewing and completing Employee Performance Appraisal Records.

The salary of the post is in Scale Group 15 $41,600 (x $800) - $47,200, per
annum.

Serving officers must apply through their Heads of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the Ministry of Youth and Culture,
Thompson Boulevard or Department of Public Service, Poinciana Hill Complex,
Meeting Street and should be returned, complete with original qualifications
and documentary proof of relevant experience to reach the Secretary, Public
Service Commission, Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street, no later than
April 3, 2009,

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION

VACANCY FOR DIRECTOR OF YOUTH
MINISTRY OF YOUTH, SPORTS AND CULTURE

Applications are invited from suitably qualified Bahamians to fill the position of
Director of Youth, Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture.

The requirements for the post are:

e A Master’s Degree from an accredited institution in one of the
following disciplines: Community Education and Development,
Social Work and Management.

* Minimum of eight (8) years experience in planning and
administration of youth programme or its equivalent.

The successful applicant will be required to:-
e Report directly to the Permanent Secretary;

e Advise the Government of The Bahamas on matters relating to
youth affairs; and

e Be responsible for the management of the Department of Youth
and all Youth development programmes and projects in the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Culture.

Specific duties of the post include:

e Overseeing liaison relations with all youth organizations officially
recognized by the Ministry of Youth;

e Formulating plans and programmes for Youth Development
Programmes and activities within the agreed policies and strategy
of the Ministry;

e Promoting and executing programmes for individual and community
youth groups;

e Organizing the Department of Youth’s budget in consultation with
the staff of the Department of Youth to achieve the objectives of the
Division;

e Drafting policies to regulate, govern and enhance the systematic
development of youth at local, regional and international level;

e Liaising with Youth Organizations and the National Youth Advisory
Council with respect to planning of activities, scheduling and
regulation of events, and the timely implementation of National
Youth Policy and National Youth Service;

e Supervising the documentation and compilation of records,
statistics and information on youths in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas;

e Advising the Minister on grants to assist youth organizations in
promotion of youth programmes consistent with the national
objectives;

¢ Assisting in the preparation of speeches and Cabinet Papers for the
Department of Youth;

* Coordinating and directing the efforts of all Youth Officers and

technical staff assigned to the Department in New Providence and
the Family Islands;

e Administering and Coordinating National Youth Policy;
e Conducting annual assessment of all staff of the Department;
* Developing the Department's Annual Calendar of Events; and

Liaising with other departments concerning programme initiatives

within the Ministry with respect to the coordination of activities
between the various departments.

The salary of the post is in Scale W3, $41,100.00 x $700.00 - $46,600.00 per
annum. Starting salary will be commensurate with qualification and experience.

Serving Officers must apply through their Head of Department.

Application forms may be obtained from the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture, Thompson Boulevard, or the Department of Public Service, Poinciana
Hill Complex, Meeting Street. They must be returned, complete with original
qualifications and documentary proof of relevant experience, to reach the

Secretary, Public Service Commission, Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street
not later than April 3, 2009.

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION

GN-836

Public Service Commission





Laurent Cipriani/AP Photo
ia THURSDAY, MARCH 19th, 2009, PAGE 15B

THE WEATHER REPORT bgt 2 [| NSURANCE MANAGEMENT

“vy (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

5-Day FORECAST CNG ad ayy ayy ye MONDAY ya NY MARINE FORECAST

























































) ae = Today Friday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
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an ORLANDO» ; Ankara, Turkey 39/3 21/-6 sn 41/5 23/5 pc ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
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} ; et Normal low 65° F/19° C Calgary 55/12 26/-3 ¢ 48/8 28/-2 ¢
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’ eo High: 77° F/25° C : LASTYCArSOW crcvvscenncsneenveeraitaey 70° F/21° C Caracas 79/26 67/19 s 83/28 70/21 pc spol
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ee a -_., As of 2 p.m. yesterday ......cccccssssssssssseeeeee trace unset....... ‘21 p.m. Moonset... .. ‘12 p.m. Copenhagen 44/6 29/1 s 39/3 36/2 pc
he FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT " Year to date New First Fal Last Dublin 53/11 43/6 pc 52/11 39/3 pc
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“7 AccuWeather.com Halifax 41/5 24/4 35/1 20/-6 pe eee
& @ MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar. 26 ie 2 Apr. 9 Helsinki 28/-2 19/-7 c 32/0 27/-2 sn fat
High: 77° F/25° C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 82/27 72/22 s 84/28 72/22 s al Fronts
Low: 67° F/19°C NASSAU High: 78° F/26° C Islamabad 86/30 59/15 pc 81/27 54/12 t ising Shown are noon positions of weather systems and sli =9"s
High: 79° F/26° C Low: 67° F/19°C Istanbul 41/5 34/1 + 46/7 39/3 pc Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fina
E . Low: 69° F/21°C Jerusalem 62/16 52/11 ¢ 54/12 36/2 ¢ Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary a
oe y : Johannesburg 70/21 56/13 sh 68/20 54/12 t
KEY WEST al a CATISLAND Kingston 82/27 72/22 sh 83/28 74/23 sh ts is!) 10s
High: 77° F/25°C : = , = Lima 83/28 66/18 pc 84/28 66/18 pc
Low: 69° F/21°C High: 77° F/25° C London S713 36/2 pe S713 34/1 pc
i @ 1 . ~ Low: 63° F/17°C Madrid 73/22 39/3 s 75/23 39/3 s
a Manila 91/32 73/22 pc 89/31 75/23 s
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eas GREATEXUMA Monterrey 84/28 59/15 s 82/27 61/16 pc
= 5 SAN SALVADOR Montreal Yee SIME Te 32/0 21/-6 s
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~ ie Low: 69°F/21°C fects rin Munich 43/6 25/-3 sh 33/0 20/-6 sn
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS am Nairobi 84/28 57/13 6 89/31 57/13 pe
highs and tonights's lows. High: 82° F/28° C i} New Delhi 91/32 64/17 pe 86/30 61/16 pc EVer St t Ol ] T
Low: 67° F/19°C Oslo 34/1 23/-5 pe 37/2 27/-2 pe
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LONG ISLAND Prague 38/3 26/-3 sn 35/1 21/-6 c me ] O US:
Rio de Janeiro 82/27 72/22 c 80/26 72/22 c
High: 80° F/27° C Riyadh 88/31 63/17 s 91/32 64/17 s
Low: 66° F/19°C Rome 55/12 39/3 sh 50/10 36/2 pc
Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday =} pia et Toras ae ann = oa ian $
High Low W High Low W High Low W High = Low W High Low W High = Low W - igh: 79° fe an Juan pe $s
Ti Fie Fic Fit Fo Fe Fe a “ie Lowe 68" F/20°C San Salvador eige eat? © 9082 722 » eee .
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Anchorage 25/-3 13/-10 pc 25/3 11/-11 pc Jacksonville 76/24 52/11 s 72/22 46/7 pc Phoenix 91/32 6216 s 89/31 6216 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 84/28 68/20 pc 83/28 69/20 sh ople y
Atlanta 74/23 45/7 po 6719 41/5 s Kansas City 62/16 36/2 s 56/13 41/5 pc Pittsburgh 47/8 25/-3 + 1/5 23/-5 po RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:83°F/28°c ha Sone aU et TT ee i =
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Baltimore 56/13 34/1 + 47/8 29/-1 pc Little Rock 60/15 42/5 c 60/15 42/5 s Raleigh-Durham 72/22 39/3 pe 55/12 32/0 pc Low:64°F/18°C Saver eur BSE . ee Bart . INSURANCE M AN AGEMENT
Boston 521 310 1 40/4 27/-2 pc LosAngeles 74/23 56/13 pc 70/21 54/12 pc St. Louis 58/14 383 s 59/15 41/5 pec " a Eau : ae 7
Buffalo 40/4 25/-3 c 39/3 24/-4 pc Louisville 60/15 36/2 r 56/13 34/1 s Salt Lake City 65/18 41/5 pce 65/18 45/7 pc GREAT INAGUA Tokyo 70/21 55/12 s 63/17 45/7 . (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Charleston,SC 73/22 49/9 pe 65/18 40/4 pc Memphis 6417 43/6 46 6417 43/6 s San Antonio 80/26 55/12 po 77/25 57/13 pe High: 79° F/26°C oT 38/3 24/-4 pc 44/6 27/-2 §
Chicago 47/8 26/3 po 46/7 32/0 pce Miami 77/25 64/17 t 79/26 66/18 pc San Diego 68/20 58/14 pc 65/18 56/13 pc Low 71°F22°C Triad cea 7a | aie FSR New baie Grand Bohama Abaco Fleuthera Fyuma
Cleveland 44/6 26/-3 sf 41/5 27/-2 pe Minneapolis 48/8 29/-1 s 53/11 35/1 pe San Francisco 64/17 51/410 pe 61/16 49/9 pc 7 VERIeCINey; 49/9 43/6 + 48/8 38/3 +
Dallas 70/21 50/10 po 71/21 55/12 po Nashville 6216 383 r 61/16 351 s Seattle B21 425 + = S211 388 Fr oe ea one a ae Wee Tels (242) 502640007 Tels (247) 350-3500 } Tels (242) 367-4204 | Te: (242) 332-2802 | Tel (242) 330-2304
Denver 6417 37/2 pe 70/21 39 Cc New Orleans 78/25 59/15 $s 70/21 54/12 s Tallahassee 78/25 50/10 s 78/25 44/6 pe an Warsaw 34/1 27/-2 sn 36/2 28/-2 c ‘Se ete Seen
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OBI ATES
RELIGION



} Mk | } The Tribune
mow 4 i



—\y

TA Y, DPD,
707.9

f
P \our choice for the family
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009



Arthur Benson Thomas Barnett Sr.
Sunrise 20th September, 1925
Sunset 17th March, 2008



God saw you were getting tired
And a cure was not to be,

So he put his arms around you and
Whispered, “Come to Me”.
With tearful eyes we watched you
And saw you pass away,
Although we loved you dearly
We could not make you stay.

A Golden Heart stopped beating,
Hard working hands at rest,
God broke our hearts to prove to us,
He only takes the best.

Precious memories live on in the hearts of
his wife, Beryl, children, grandchildren,
nieces, nephews, other family members

and friends.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For Late

Mr. David Albert
Charles Kelly,
C.B.E.

of Nassau, The Bahamas, who

=| died in New York City, New York,

U.S.A. on the 11th March, 2009,

will be held at Christ Church

| Cathedral, George Street, Nassau,

| on Thursday, 19th March, 2009
at 3:00 p.m.

Mr. Kelly is survived by his wife

Nancy Booth Kelly; three sons,
Andrew Jordan Kelly, David Gregory Booth Kelly and Reginald
Scott Kelly; two daughters-in-law, Anne Boushelle Kelly and
Candace Elizabeth Kelly; five grandchildren, Jordan Ross Kelly,
David Oliver Christensen Kelly, Avery Anne Kelly, John (Jack)
Albert Charles Kelly and Katie Marie Kelly; his brother, Godfrey
Kenneth Kelly C.M.G.; his sisters-in-law, Sonia Kelly and Paula
Kelly; his brother-in-law, John Avery Booth, Jr and his wife,
Bonnie Booth; nieces and nephews, Linda Elza and her daughter,
Katherine Elza, Steven Kelly and his wife, Susan Kelly, Gary
Kelly , Lynn Lowe and her husband, Chris Lowe, Karen Kelly,
John Avery Booth, lll, and his wife, Kathleen Booth, Joy Marie
Rousell and her husband James Rousell and Jody Laura Booth-
Seals and her husband, Dave Seals, ; his cousins Betty Kelly
Kenning, O.B.E. and her husband John Kenning,O.B.E., and
George Kelly,M.B.E and his wife Norma Kelly, other relatives
and friends. His brother Basil Trevor Kelly predeceased him.

The Very Reverend Patrick L. Adderley, Dean of Nassau, The
Venerable Keith Cartwright, Archdeacon of the Southern Bahamas,
The Reverend Father Michael Gittens, Priest Vicar, Christ Church
Cathederal, Nassau and The Reverend Crosley N. Walkine, Rector,
St. Anne's Church, Fox Hill, Nassau will officiate and interment
will follow in St Anne's Church Cemetery.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau on Wednesday, 18th March, 2009
from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and on Thursday, 19th March, 2009
from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.

IN CELEBRATION OF DAVID'S LOVE OF BRIGHT COLOURS
AND HIS LOVE OF LIFE, PLEASE DRESS IN BRIGHT
COLOURS.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Lyford Cay
Foundation, Inc., DAVID A. C. KELLY, C.B.E. MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP, P.O.Box N.7776, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale
Avenue, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 3

(CARD OF THANKS

The family of the late Merle E. Wilson-Taylor—



ors , ‘Vy os wishes to express our sincere thanks and
Hg \ * appreciation to all those who called, visited,
he | ie prayed, offered words of comfort, sent cards,

floral arrangements/wreaths, food, drinks, or
_ assisted in anyway during her illness and
_ recent death.








+ Special thanks to the team of medical
| ot doctors and nurses of Female Medical I and II
J ‘ +) Wards at PMH, Mrs. Hamilton & Staff of |
4 Sy Yellow Elder Senior Citizens Day Care Centre,
| 2 Rev. Fr. Dwight Bowe, Fr. Theadore Hunt, Rev.
=<" Fr. Warren Rolle, ACW, Pastoral & Outreach
_ Ministries, the entire St. Mary's Parish family, —
and the Staff at Bethel Brothers Morticians.

Sar Uy (J G od YO (Richly Bless

Vou.


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

Death Notice

el

Mr. Neville Elijah Cartwright-69 years
of Chicago Illi. and formerly of Cartwrights Long Island, died
on Thursday March 5, 2009. He is survived by his wife
Dianna, 2? brothers; Lorin and Eric, 2 sisters; Rosalind (Rosie)
Albury, Virgina (Wirgee) Cartwright, 1 sister-in-law; 2 step
sisters-in-law, 3 aunts; Elva and Edith Knowles and Geneva
Burrows, 5 nephews; Keith Albury, Raymond, Cavan, Ricardo
and Lance Cartwright, 2 nieces; Karen Albury and Denise
Cartwright, 3 grand nephews; 2 grand nieces numerous step
nephews and step nieces and a host of relatives and friends



CARD OF THANKS FOR THE LATE

eer

BRENDA “ROSE” MAZUIR

July 20, 1949 - August 25, 2008

We the family circle of the late Brenda “Rose” Mazuir wish to impart our
heartfelt appreciation to all those who sympathized with us in our recent
bereavement. A huge thank you, to all our relatives and friends, especially who
sent sympathy cards, floral tributes, and attended the funeral service, Special
thanks are also extended to the Rev. Dr, Patrick Smith, Rev. Timothy Stewart,
Rev. Christina Bethel, Rey, Patricia Bethel, Bethel's Praise Team, the Officers and
Members of Bethel Baptist Church, Mrs. Patrice Munroe, Mr. Larry Miller, Mrs.
Delereese Edgecombe, the staff of Coastline Pluming, Shark Bites Restaurant
Atlantis, Purity Bakery, Nassau Beach, Emerald Beach, Britannia Tower,
Atlantis Hotels, Pirates of Nassau, Demeritte's Funeral Home, Woodlawn
Gardens, and the entire Community of John and Market Streets, as well as the
Community of Carmichael Village and Golden Isles.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

CARD OF THANKS FOR THE LATE




Hilma Viola Hanna - Coleby
1930 - 2008

We the family of the late Hilma Viola Hanna - Coleby wish to express our heartfelt
thanks te our many relatives and friends for the prayers, visits, telephone calls. floral
armngements and many wher acts of kindness which were extended to us during our
recent bereavement,

Special thanks goes out io Father Colin Saunders and family, A. C. W. the choir,
ushers and the entire congregration of St. Ambroae Anghean Church, Bridgette
Musgrove, Delerese Edgecombe, Patrice Ferguson, Mr. Kirk Hall, Julie Smith,
Coleby, Hanna, Heastie and Tynes family, Buhamas Immigrntion Stat,
Colinalmpetial Insurince Staff, The Ministry OF Education Staff, Sandyport Security
Department, Breezes Super Club, all the family members who travel from near and
far, the staff of Bethel Brothers Moricians and the staff of Woodlawn Gardens and all
Others (0 MUMeroUs bo mention.

iWay God continue to bless each and everyone of pou.
The Children.

ae St ‘Wher
Loving Memer

‘Cuelyn

March 1, 1933 - March 21, 2008

FORGOTTEN'! NEVER! Friends
may think we have forgotten

when at times they see us smile
Little do they know the heartache
that our smile hides all the while.

Beautiful memories arc wonder-
ful things They last till the
longest day They never wear out
They never get lost and can
never be given away.

To some you may be forgotten To
others a part of the past But to
these who loved and lost you
Your mamary will always last.

Sadly missed in the hearts of the
family, especially Jane, Joyce
Marion, Andrea, Alice & Wanda
THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 5

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

WINIFRED
EMILY
CHRISTOFILIS,
95

who died peacefully in New

York on March 7th, 2009 will

be held at St. Francis Xavier's

Cathedral, West Hill Street,

Nassau, The Bahamas on

Saturday, March 21st, 2009
J at 9:00 a.m.

Officiating will be Father Elvado R. Turnquest and burial
will be in The Western Cemetery, Nassau Street, Nassau.

Her husband of nearly 44 years, Jacques Constantin
Christofilis, predeceased her in 1980.

She is survived by children and spouses, Charles and
Judy Christofilis of Mount Joy, Pa., Annette and Bonnie
Christofilis of New York City, Adrienne and Gilbert

Cleare of Nassau, Jacques and Barbara Christofilis of

. Nassau; grandchildren and spouses, Charlene and David

tnufred rate Geffen of Corte Nadera, Ca., Charles and Susan

—_ Christofilis of Lafayette, Ca., Dr. Carol Christofilis of

Born: November 16, 1950 Annandale, N.J., Tammy and Mike Smith of Ft.

Died: December 13, 2008 Lauderdale, Fl., J.C. Christofilis Ill of Los Angeles, Ca.,

Camille and Stephanie Cleare of Nassau; great-

Three months ago we said goodbye to you. A loving grandchildren, Cayley, Matthew and Sarah Geffen, Sunny
Mother, Grandmother, Daughter, Sister, and Friend too. and Samuel Christofilis, Ryan and Paige Smith; sisters-
No matter how much time passes we will never forget in-law, Glika Christofilis and Rowena Christofilis;
your beautiful smile, your compassion for life and the nephews, Jules, Constantine, Tino, Paul and Terrance
love you gave to all of us. We think of you today but that Christofilis; niece, Yvette Christofilis; other relatives and
is nothing new. We thought of you yesterday and will friends include Marianne Razza of Stuart, F1., Paula and
think of you tomorrow too. Our memory is our keepsake Buddy Schichtel of Lake Lure, N.C., and family, Pete
with which we'll never part. God has you in His keeping Manolis and family of New York and Greece, George
and we have you in our hearts. Tzoros and family of Maspeth, N.Y., Karen Carr of White

Your Loving Family Plains, N.Y. Millicent Sullivan , Mary McGinn and Maria

Miranda of N.Y., Linda and Harald Sauer, Agnes Evans,

The Farnily of the late Winifred Ward wishes to express Melissa and Trevor Fox and family all of Nassau and

our sincere gratitude to all who have so generously ex- Eleanor (Sugar) McQuay.

tended their support and concern during our difficult ; ;
time. Words cannot express how truly grateful we are to Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home
each and every one of you. May God continue to richly Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, Nassau on

bless you and your families. Friday, 20th March, 2009 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Par SY de at

CORNELIA
IOLA MILATOS

of Nassau, The Bahamas
who passed away on 15th
March, 2009 will be held at
The Chapel of Love, Kemp's
Funeral Home Limited,
Palmdale Avenue and
Bradley Street, Nassau on
Friday, 20th March, 2009 at
3:00 p.m.

Minister Earl Pinder will officiate and interment will
follow in The Western Cemetery, Nassau Street, Nassau.

Mrs. Milatos is survived by her husband, George Milatos;
three children, Ivan and Andre Chestnut and Caroline
Percentie; five grandchildren, Danielle Porceddu and
Adrian Chestnut, Chelsea, Andre and Kristen Chestnut;
two brothers, Robert and Charles Hall, 11 sisters-in-law,
Irene Klidaras, Evdokia Kefalianos,Maria Vallas, Balaso
, Evangelia, Niki, Poli and Maryanne Milatos, Florence
Carey, Zula Carroll and Olive Knowles; 7 brothers-in-law,
Nikolas, Nioti, Dimitri, Thanasi Milatos, Yianni Klidaras,
Christos Kefalianos and Skellarios Vallas; one daughter-
in-law, Linda Chestnut and one son-in-law, Wesley
Percentie; caretaker, Lois Lee; many nieces and nephews
and a many other relatives and friends, especially Kimberly
Bethel Themelis and Irene Cathopoulis, Anne and Eugene
Higgs, Patricia, Maria and Peter Mousis, the attending
doctors and staff of Doctor's Hospital, the staff of the Walk
in Medical Clinic and the staff of John's Department Store.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Cancer
Society of The Bahamas, P.O.Box S.S. 6539, Nassau, The
Bahamas, or left with the family at the Service for the
Cancer Society of The Bahamas, in Memory of Mrs.
Cornelia Iola Milatos.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, on Thursday, 19th March, 2009 from
5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22
Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Par SY at

ISABEL MERLE
ROGERS, 97

of Ivanhoe Road, Nassau, The
Bahamas will be held at Trinity
Methodist Church, Trinity
Place and Frederick Street,
Nassau on Saturday, 21st
March, 2009 at 4:00p.m.

Reverend Bill Higgs will
officiate and interment will be
in Ebenezer Methodist
Cemetery, East Shirley Street,
Nassau.

Mrs. Rogers is predeceased by her husband, Glen Raymond
Rogers, her sisters, Doris Bradbee and Bernice Higgs, her
brother, Myron Russell and her son-in-law, Charles Carey Jr.
and is survived by her sons, Glen Raymond Rogers Jr., Thomas
Andrew Rogers, daughters, Joan Marie Carey and Margaret-
Rose Kanitsch, grandsons, Charles Carey III, Louis Kanitsch,
Chris Carey, Raymond Rogers Jr., and Thomas Rogers Jr.,
granddaughters, Anne Kanitsch, Loree Stephens, Kathy
Kanitsch, Elaine Cates, Christine McCully, Rebecca, Annabelle,
Katie and Paige Rogers, great grandchildren, Justin, Jessica
and Ryan Connelly, Diana and Leah Stephens, Rachael, Nathan
and Elizabeth Cates, Georgia and Liam Kanitsch, Megan and
Tan McCully, Luke and Laura Carey, son-in-law, Terry Kanitsch,
daughter-in-law, Ann Rogers; grandsons-in-law, Dave Stephens,
David Cates and Patrick McCully, grand-daughters-in-law,
Karen Carey and Noel Kanitsch many other relatives and
friends including, Joanne Rogers, Wayne and Phyllis Lowe,
Vincent and Shirley Higgs, David Higgs, Peggy Pinder, Gordon
and Maureen Pinder, George and Joyce Bradbee, Merill and
Rosemarie Rogers, Albert and Karen Rogers, Audrey Russell,
Fred and Shiela Kanitsch, Freddie and Cecile Albury, Evelyn
McKenzie, Mr. & Mrs. Jerome Major and special thanks to
Dr. Ian Kelly, Dillas Forbes, Jennifer Bowleg, Marlene King,
Maureen Brown and Tania Knowles and the Staff of Nassau
Glass.

Instead of flowers the family request that donations be sent to
the Bilney Lane Children's Home, P.O. Box N. 205, Nassau,
The Bahamas in memory of Isabel Merle Rogers.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, Nassau on Friday, 20th March,
2009 from 5:30p.m. to 7:00p.m.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Cadar Crest Aumeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street « P.O.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Semi Military Funeral Service

for Retired
Police Sargeant
BYRON LYSANDER
SIMMONS, 83

of Gregory Street Oaksfield,

Nassau and formerly of

George Town, Guyana will be

held on Saturday 21st, March,

2009 at 10:00 a.m. at Christ

the King Parish Church,

Ridgeland Park, West.

Officiating will be Rev'd Fr.

Rodney Burrows, assisted by Rev'd Fr. Ivan Eldon and
Deacon Bradley Miller. Cremation will follow.

He is survived by his loving and wonderful wife of almost
52 years Retired Nurse Miriam Simmons; one sister,
Daphanie Ferdinand of Montreal, Canada; one brothcr-
im-law, Claude Ferninand of Montreal, Canada; six sisters-
in-law, Minerva Rolle, Emerald Johnson, Anita Wilson,
Carol Miller, Dolly McDonald and Rowena Elliston of
New York; one grand-daughter, Vanessa Cunningham;
one grand-son, Antonio Simmons; grand son-in-law,
Willard Cunningham; numerous nieces, nephews,
grandnieces and grandnephews including, Shirley, Candace,
Dawn, Shauna of Montreal, Canada, Tramayne and Theon
of Toronto, Canada, Ruth and Bendt Puester of Hamburg
Germany, Catherine Cooper and family, special friends
including, Nurse Alice Gardiner, Honey Sheilamae
McPhee, Leonard Passard and family, Father Rodney
Burrows, Dudley Seifert Sr. and family, Wealthy Hall and
family, the Sherman family, John Trotman and family,
Dr. Edwin Demeritte, Lerlene Cooper, Norlie Cox, Manera
Hall, Dulcie and Dale Pierce, Mrs Beryl Gray, Maria Lee,
Emmanuel Baptist Church family, Hon. Alfred Sears,
Eloise Smith, Reginald Ferguson Commissioner of Police
and Members of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, Grafton
Ifill, President and Members of the Retired Police Officer's
Association, the Retired Police Officers and a host of
acquaintances and well wishers.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest
Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Friday
from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on
Saturday from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 7

Yager funeral Home Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 ¢ Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MELVIN LEE
MATHER, 67

of Mather Town, Grand Bahama
will be held on Saturday, March
21st 2009, at 11:00 a.m. at Shiloh
Baptist Church, Mather Town,
officiating will be Rev. Leonard
A. Pinder, assisted by other
Ministers. Interment will be made
in the Mather Town Public
Cemetery.

Left with cherished memories are
his son: Nat Mather; two daughters: Linder Mather-Collie and
Tia Mather; one adopted-daughter: Eurella Clarke; two sisters:
Selvera “Selly” Cooper and Bettina Mather; one adopted-brother:
Malachi Cooper; one son-in-law: Fulton Collie; one sister-in-law:
Veronica Russell; six nieces: Veoshe and Ashanti Cooper, Lavel
Duhaney, Natlin and Della Simms and Xandia McKinney; seven
nephews: Dereck Hield, Daslyn Gordon, Lamont and Lorenza
Cooper, Rick Russell, Xavier Cooper and Xario; his cousins:
Preston Mather, Creola Cooper, Jeff and Henderson Mather, Roy
Cooper, Leeland Laing, Beryl Bridgewater, Meril Laing, Melinda
Rollins, Othnell Russell of Abaco, Nelson, Bruce and Alton
McIntosh, Dorcas Mitchell, Ezekiel and Fletcher McIntosh, Jewel
Grant and their families, other relatives and friends including
Henriette “Happy” Clarke Mather, Mario Smith, Frank and Lil
Frank Turnquest, Viola Darling, Elvis Mather, Blanche Mather,
Tommy, Ben and Eric Cooper, Elsaida Cooper, Queenie Mather,
Rosena Verance, Rufus Cooper and family, Iella Mather, Washie
Smith, Leonard Cooper and family, Josephine Mather, Charles
Williams and children, the children of the late Evason and Abby
Mather, Sherly Mather, Sherline Hepburn, Cleomi Clarke, Patsy
Russell, Gladys Newton Collie, Crystal Bostwick, Marilyn and
Dorry MacDonald Cooper, Kathleen Baillou, Leo McIntosh,
Remourn and Linda Lightbourne and children, Thelma Brice and
family, Estelle Faust, Patrick Kemp, Jimmy Delancy, Uncle Fee,
Gurth Knowles of Nassau, Willie Watson of Nassau, Linda
McIntosh of Abaco, Jinks Knowles, Olga, Mikie Mihas, Edith
Edgecombe, Francis Hendfield, the Smith Point family, the
Wilsons, Eddens and Bodies, McIntosh and Russell families of
Abaco, Patricia Fisher Harbour Island, Ned Pritchard, Ambrose
Bullard, the staff of Adnil Marine, his golfing friends and fishing
buddies, friends at Cooper’s Service Station, staff of Lucaya and
Reef Golf course and others too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
Home and Crematorium Limited on Friday from 12:00 noon to
6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until
service time.


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Nicolas Etrin, 27

be held on Saturday, 21

Carmichael

Roads

Cherished Memories will linger in the hearts of his |
Father: Thomas Lustis; Two (2) Sons: Neckson and |
Briandino Joseph; Eight (8) Brothers: Felix Edmond, |
Cloudin, Licien, David, Jean-rene Louisaint, Jackson, |
Nelment and Celondieu Lustis; Five (5) Sisters: Atelene |
Edmond, Adulie Brave, Edith Jean Tamarra and Tania |
Lustis; Thirteen (13) Nieces: Sabine, Karen, Ketsie |
Brave, Fedrina Louisaint, Evodie Jean, Elisheba Jean, |
Lyli Louisaint, Daphne Louisaint, Keisha Louisaint |
and Selingie Lustis; Seven (7) Nephews: Ricky Brave, |
Rashad Edmond, David (Jr), Fadle Lustis, Adlin Lustis, |
Lovenson Lutis, and Onedorfe Lustis; Two (2) Aunts: |
Sophilia Louisaint and Ludia Philistin; Seven (7) |
Uncles: Isbel Louisaint, Jene Louisaint, Fortine |
Pompulis, Cirion Pompulis, Simon Louisaint, Tony |
Lutis and Innosent Philistin; Seventeen (17) Cousins: | : :
Lucia Louisaint, Julianne, Lovina, Odilia, Finicia, | and a host of other relatives and friends to numerous
Enide, Clotide, Lusita, Makeny, Ronald, Tony, Calix, |
Eliplit, Willy, Luke, Paul and Bob; Other relatives |
and friends including: Melonde Joseph; : Rosilia |
Joseph, Ednell , Wibert and Evenol Joseph, Kilmene | AT THE ROCK OF AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL
Brave and Eddy Jean;Lourentin Martin; : Rose, Sandra, |
Evelyn and Gislene Joseph and Keren Martin, Guirlene | FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M. AND ON SATURDAY
Louissaint Jean-marc, Junior, Guerda Frederique, Enel, |
Ammalia and family.And a host of other relatives |

_ and friends to numerous to mention.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT
of Carmichael Road, will |

AT THE ROCK OF AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL

| WULFF ROAD AND PINEDALE ON FRIDAY
March 2009, 10:00 a.m. |

will be held at Ebenezer |
Haitian Baptist Church, |
Road. |:
Officiating Pastor Laurent |
H. Papouloute, assisted by |
Other Ministers of the |
Gospel. Internment: |
Southern Cemetery, |
Cowpen & Spikenard |

FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M. AND ON SATURDAY
AT THE CHURCH FROM 9 A.M UNTIL
SERVICE TIME.

Sainjule Saint-Vil

of, Balls Alley; will be held
on Saturday, 21 March
2009, 10:00 a.m. will be
held at the Calvary
Haitian Baptist Church,
Collins Avenue.
Officiating Pastor Paul
Justin, assisted by Other
Ministers of the
gospel.Internment:
Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen & Spikenard
Roads

He is survived by His: Mother; Daughter: Donel
Sainvil of Nassau,Bahamas; Two (2) Sons; One (1)
Brother: Imel Sainvil; Two (2) Sisters: Marie Vitha
Sainvil and Edline Sainvil; and a host of other relatives
and friends including: Marcellus Lucie, Emmanuel
Lucie, Iler, Riviere, Robert Brown and Scotty Brown;

to mention.
FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT
WULFF ROAD AND PINEDALE ON FRIDAY

AT THE CHURCH FROM 9 A.M UNTIL
SERVICE TIME.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale

Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Blossom Brown, 66

of Fox Hill and formerly of Mansic
Point, Andros, will be held on
Saturday, 21 March 2009, 11:00
a.m. will be held at Five Porches
of Deliverance Center Apostolic
Tabernacle Church, Market Street
and Poinciana Ave. Officiating
Chief Apostle Rodney Roberts,
assisted by Other Ministers of the
gospel. Internment: Old Trail
Cemetery, Abundant Life Road

Those left to mourn the passing

of this remarkable Christian,
Mother, Grandmother, Great-Grandmother, Family
Member and Friend include her, Four (4) Sons: Gregory
Brown, Steve, Ricardo, and Darren Dames; Two(2)
stepchildren: Roscoe Dames & Elizabeth Deveaux; Four
(4) Aunts: Julia, Rachel, Laya and Bella Brown. Four (4)
Daughter In-Laws: Nethiel Roxbury, Cecile, Raquel, and
Nicole Dames. Cousins: Katherine Storr, Cordy & Gladys
Dames ;Fifteen(15) Grand-Children: Tiffany Gibson,
Sheldon Dames, Victoria Dames, Elroy Deveaux, Madison
Mitchell, Stacy Dames, Steve Jr., Stefan and Shaquille Dames,
Darron Dames Jr., Danielle Dames, Shaketra Mckinney,
Shakanah Dames, Ciara Dames and Daria Dames.Six (6)
Great-Grandchildren: Kenson Jr., Akeem Mitchell, Marvin
Jr., Maurisia, Maurisio Dames and Chade’Stubbs; And a host
of other relatives and friends including: Bishop Lawrence
Rolle,Chief Apostle J.Rodney Roberts, Prophet Jamal Rolle,
Mrs. Paula Clarke, Prophetess Dinah Pinder, Desiree Dean,
Mother Ellis, Mother Coakley, Ms Ritchie, Zenemae Johnson,
Sheryl Saunders, Francita Johnson, Cynthia Miller, Harriot
Martin, Ruth Gouge, Lynn Knowles, Anthony Knowles,
Denzee Basden, Paula Clarke, Sharon Lightbourne & Family,
Shanell Williams & Family, Alvin Gardiner, Davis’ Family,
Audley Mitchell & Family, Comfort Street Family, Timothy
Lane Family, Ms Brown and the Credit Union Family, Finco
Bank Family, Physical Plant at The College of the Bahamas,
Staff of Female Medical Ward at Princess Margaret Hospital
including Dr. Christa Wells & Nurse Rolle of the Elizabeth
Estates Clinic.
And a host of other relatives and friends to numerous to
mention.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT AT THE
ROCK OF AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL WULFF ROAD
AND PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M.
AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 10
A.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2009, PAGE 9

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Bloodstone Funeral Service
For

Mrs. Thomazena Helen
Munroe-Bridgewater, 78

of #17 Glendale Subdivision, off Soldier Road
and formerly of Duncan Town, Ragged Island
will be held on Saturday, March 21, 2009 at
10am at Cooper's Terrace Cathedral Church
of God, Cooper's Terrace off Kemp Road.
Bishop Robert McPhee, assisted by other
Ministers will officiate and burial will be in
Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

The Radiance of this “Bloodstone of A Gem” will always glow in the hearts
of her:

Two Sons: Andrew and Julian Bridgewater;

Four Daughters: Helen, Gretta, Nursing Officer Judy of Freeport and Reneé
Bridgewater;

Thirteen Grand Children: Desserio, Danté and D’ Nia Walker, Dereck and
D’ Maury Pratt, Shaquille Coleby, Nadia, D’ Andra, Rolando, Reisha, Tarino,
Shanteria and Cherez Bridgewater;

Three Great Grand Children: Nevaeh and Navario Smith and D’Ondre;

Fifteen Nephews: Calvin, John, Percy, Lester, Basil, Maxwell, Roy, Fredlyn,
D.D, Wayne, Rupert, Elvin Jr., Richard, Theodore and Junior;

Seventeen Nieces: Anne, Eunice, Patsy, Vera, Angela, Vernita, Sandra, Doris,
Sharon, Angie, Daphne, Kathleen, Olivia, Sharlene, Therisita, Carmita and
Sheral;

Two Brothers-in-law: Simon Sr. and Elvin Bridgewater Sr.;

Four Sisters-in-law: Martha Higgs, Verva Wallace, Mae-Helen and Gertrude
Bridgewater;

Other loving family and friends including: John and La-Granville Panza,
enid and Jenesta Lockhart, Rev. Matthias Munroe, the Munroe, Wallace,
Maycock, Lockhart and Armbrister families, the entire Ragged Island
Community, Rev. Robert and sister McPhee, officers and members of the
Cooper’s Terrace Highway Church of God, mother Cartwright, mother Beckford,
mother Malcolm, the Glendale Subdivision Community, Laura Williams,
Dorothy, Pearl, Netta, all the fruit and vegetable vendors.

Special thanks to: The Statfs of the Rand Memorial Hospital, Princess Margaret
Hospital, Mail-Boat, Marathon Branch of the PLP, Senator Jerome Fitzgerald,
New Solid Rock Church of God and the Staff of La-Rose.

Visitation will be in the "Emerald Suite"’ Emerald Ridge