Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.96

FEATURES

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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

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BAHAMAS BIGGEST



a Pang protes
outsine The Tribune

Demonstration
held following
article on former
prime minister

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PROTESTERS rallied outside
The Tribune office yesterday
defending the reputation of the
late Sir Lynden Pindling who was
discredited in an article by man-
aging editor John Marquis.

The protest continued for a lit-
tle over an hour, during which
political activist and PLP hopeful
Paul Moss shouted orders from a
loudspeaker for the crowd to
“keep moving” along Shirley
Street and Deveaux Street.

He said the 40 Bahamians who
joined his cause to vindicate the
“Father of the Nation” repre-
sented thousands more who were
too afraid to be there, and
claimed the group would return
later in the day with more pro-
testers.

But rather than returning to
The Tribune, the modest group
of young men and women, who
clutched white placards accusing
Mr Marquis of being racist and
hating Bahamians, moved to the
Eastern Parade on East Bay

SEE page six

PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE
TO SPACE RESTRICTIONS,
LARRY SMITH’S TOUGH CALL

COLUMN WILL APPEAR IN
TOMORROW’S TRIBUNE



SOME OF THE PROTESTERS stand outside of The Tribune yesterday.

Former govt official backs

article, says the protest
was ‘a waste of time’

A FORMER government }
official who had first-hand
knowledge of Sir Lynden Pin- ;
dling’s close links with drugs }
king Joe Lehder said last night :
that yesterday’s protest out-
side The Tribune was “a waste

of time.”

He said the demonstrators }
didn’t know the facts and that }
the Insight article which }
sparked the protest was “right ;

on the button.”

The official, who made fre- :
quent visits to Norman’s Cay }

SEE page six

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Body found on boat
near Potters Cay dock

m@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN’S body was discov-
ered onboard a boat moored
near the Potters Cay dock yes-
terday morning.

Police were alerted to the dis-
covery shortly after 10am.

Police press liaison officer
ASP Walter Evans said the
man, who has not yet been
identified, was found dead in
the cabin of the vessel wearing a
white T-shirt and underwear.

Police pulled the 26-foot red
and white boat near the south-
ern side of the Potter’s Cay
dock yesterday morning and
searched it for clues while
dozens of curious onlookers
stood by. It is believed that the
man lived on the vessel.

“The body has been there
definitely over 12 hours because
of the physical signs of deterio-
ration which is quite notice-
able,” ASP Evans said.

SEE page eight

Reginald Ferguson appointed
as Commissioner of oes

THE Cabinet Office

yesterday

announced the appointment of Reginald
Ferguson to the post of Commissioner of
Police by Governor General Arthur Hanna,
on the recommendation of Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham following consultation
with Opposition Leader Perry Christie.
The appointment is with effect from

Monday, March 16.

Mr Ferguson assumed duties as Acting
Commissioner of Police on November 21,
2007 upon former Commissioner of Police

Paul Farquharson’s commencement of pre-

retirement leave.

He becomes the fifth Commissioner of

SEE page eight

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Gunshots
fired in
high-speed
car chase

Man in custody after
dramatic pursuit

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

GUNSHOTS were fired through the streets of New Prov-
idence in a high speed chase from Wulff Road to the Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway on Monday night.

Police called for backup to pursue a black 2003 Ford Expe-
dition, with registration plate 99, when shots were fired from
the sports utility vehicle (SUV) in Wulff Road at around

9pm.

More gunshots were aimed at the caravan of police cars as
they pursued the SUV along Moore Avenue, Palm Beach
Street, Robinson Road and the East West Highway.

SEE page six



Former AG: both Christie and
Ingraham administrations did
not properly regulate CLICO

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

FORMER Attorney
General Alfred Sears
admitted that both the
Christie and Ingraham
adminisrations fell
down on the job by
not properly regulating trou-
bled CLICO (Bahamas).

He made this statement dur-
ing a meeting organised by



Alfred Sears

Bishop Simeon Hall of
New Covenant Baptist
Church where CLICO
policy holders inde-
pendently met to dis-
cuss their mounting
concerns over the
future of their invest-
ments.

“It also represents a
failure of the Bahami-
an government and
that is unfortunately
under the Progressive Liberal
Party as well as the Free

SEE page eight

$3, million worth of
marijuana is seized

POLICE in Andros seized more than $3 million worth of marijuana
during a special operation on the island.

According to police reports, Drug Enforcement Unit officers and
Andros police launched the operation in Central Andros last week Fri-

day.

While searching a villa shortly after 4pm that day, they found just
over two pounds of marijuana and arrested several men.
Based on the information obtained from those arrests, this operation

continued until Sunday.

Around 3pm, officers went to a dirt road in Fresh Creek and found
two crocus sacks and a white five gallon bucket full of marijuana.

A short distance away, officers found an additional 46 crocus sacks,
and six white five gallon buckets of marijuana.

Aman who was nearby fled when he saw the officers coming.

He was caught and arrested. In all, eight Bahamian men and one
Jamaican man were arrested in connection with the finds.

Police believe that the two discoveries are connected.

The drugs have a total weight of more than 2,200 pounds and a

local street value of $3,300,000.



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



More than 20
Haitian immigrants
are apprehended

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

OFFICIALS apprehended
more than 20 Haitian immi-
grants after a 30-foot wooden
sloop ran aground in water off
the South Beach area early yes-
terday morning.

Authorities were tipped off
after a concerned citizen spotted
the immigrants as they attempt-
ed to make landfall in the Mar-
shall Road area around Sam.

Up to press time last night,
27 immigrants had been caught
- including three women, 23 men
and a 14-year-old boy - Director

of Immigration Jack Thompson
told The Tribune.

Mr Thompson said officials
do not know the exact number
of migrants who were on board
the sloop, but believe that there
were about 50 passengers.

Officers were still combing
the area yesterday afternoon in
an effort to capture any remain-
ing migrants.

"We have to continue our due
diligence and see whether we
can find them," Mr Thompson
said.

Those who were apprehended
were taken to the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre, how-
ever, the immigration director

THIS HAITIAN SLOOP ran
aground near the South Beach

early yesterday morning.
Immigration officials estimate
that there were around 50
migrants on board, 27 have
been apprehended so far.





Felipé Major/Tribune staff

said they will be swiftly repatri-
ated.

"We are making every effort
to repatriate these people right
away. We are going to have
them repatriated at the earliest
possible time consistent with the
policy for speedy, orderly and
timely repatriation,” he said.



‘ig f k i , .
PIECES OF CLOTHING were left behind in the trees by the immigrants
who attempted to make landfall in the area of South Beach yesterday.





HAITIAN IMMIGRANTS look on as they are taken to the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre yesterday.

ROSANNA SEABORN TODD

Born on the 25th October, 1912 in Montreal, Quebec, Rosanna Seaborn Todd
passed away peacefully at her Lyford Cay residence on March 14th, 2009.

Ms. Todd was the daughter of Dr. John Lancelot Todd, a specialist in tropical
medicine and grand-daughter of Sir Edward Seaborn Clouston, once vice
president of the Bank of Montreal. She grew up in Senneville, Quebec and went
to finishing school in South Carolina where she became a close, life long friend
of Doris Duke. Soon after finishing school Ms. Todd attended the Royal Academy
of Dramatic Art in London and spent years acting with the Festival Theatre in
Cambridge, and the Westminster Theater in London. During the war Ms. Todd
joined the Royal Canadian Army and worked for the Red Cross in London.

Upon her return to Canada in 1947 Ms. Todd founded the “Open Playhouse
Theatre” in Mt. Royal, Montreal where she produced and starred in many of
the plays. The Open Playhouse Theatre launched some notable careers, one
being that of Christopher Plummer who had his first role there —unpaid !

Having her own film production company, Rosanna Todd produced and acted
in various films from the early 1950s to her last movie Hotel de L’ Avenier in
2004. In the 1960s she came to the Bahamas and built her beloved home “La
Feullie” in Lyford Cay. From here she traveled the world, and produced two
plays for local theatre. She starred in “Driving Miss Daisy” in the Dundas Centre
for Performing Arts in 1992.

For the past 30 years Ms. Todd researched the Canadian rebellion of 1837 and
the reforms that followed. She wanted to make a film that showed this important
event in Canadian history and how two different people and cultures have
learned to live together as one nation. Sadly, her dream never became reality.

Ms. Todd will be missed by her many friends and relatives, in the Bahamas and
around the world.



THIS DINGHY
} was used by
some Haitian
immigrants to
come ashore
yesterday
morning.



Government officials to
take part in Ride for Hope

MEMBERS of government
are taking part in this year's
record-setting Ride For Hope
in Eleuthera on April 4.

Minister of Health Hubert
Minnis will open the 4th annu-
al event at 9.30am at the stag-
ing area which will be set up
outside the North Eleuthera
Airport.

Minister of Sports Desmond
Bannister, President of the
Senate Lynn Holowesko, and
Speaker of the House Alvin
Smith will all ride to raise
money for cancer care and
treatment programmes in the
Bahamas.

Mr Bannister said he is look-
ing forward to being part of
the Ride For Hope this year.

“T'm delighted to participate
as a rider and support this
most worthy cause," he said.

Mrs Holowesko, who has
taken part in each ride of the
past three years, said, “The
Ride For Hope is an inspira-
tion to all involved and pro-
vides crucial financial and
moral support to those afflict-
ed with this terrible disease.”

Alvin Smith, Member of
Parliament for North
Eleuthera, opened the event
last year by commending the



DESMOND BANNISTER, Lynn Holowesko and Alvin Smith will all take part

Ride For Hope participants
and organisers. He highlighted
the importance of their contri-
bution to cancer care and
expressed his delight that the
Ride takes place on the beau-
tiful island of Eleuthera.

This year, Mr Smith will be
on a bike joining more than
300 riders on the road as they
pedal through his constituency.

Ride for Hope is a charitable
bike-a-thon designed to
accommodate people of all
ages and cycling abilities. Rid-
ers solicit sponsors for dona-
tions.

“The Ride is open to every-
one — the young and young at
heart, seasoned cyclists, raw

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Pee omeee

Editorial/Letters To The Editor

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



beginners, weekend warriors,
kids, moms and dads, grand-
parents — it's not a race,”
organisers said.

It does matters not if a par-
ticipant rides one mile or 100
miles, whether a person pedals
slowly or like the wind.

“For spectators and partici-
pants alike it's awe inspiring
to see children as young as 3
years old peddling their little
tricycles down the road,”
organisers said.

Last year, eight-year-old
Liam Holowesko rode for 50
miles.

Jay Major, now 14, has cov-
ered 100 miles in each Ride
For Hope.

“Not only are the children
made aware of the purpose of
their ride - that they’re raising
money for cancer care and
soliciting sponsors themselves
- but through their direct par-
ticipation they are learning the
importance of being involved
and giving back to their com-
munity,” said Mrs Holowesko.

“They are learning that
together we can make a differ-
ence.”

Susan Larson, co-chairman
of Ride For Hope, said she is
very pleased with the govern-
ment's level of participation
this year. “Not only do we
have Ministers Minnis and
Bannister, the Speaker of the
House, and the President of
the Senate joining forces with
us this year, but many other
government ministers and offi-
cials are also participating
through their individual spon-
sorships of their fellow House
or Senate members,” she said.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Cynthia Pratt reveals husband
has had both legs amputated

Chauncey —
Tynes Sr
laughs off
claims of |
‘dementia’

CHAUNCEY TYNES
SR., the former PLP trea-
surer who sparked the con-
troversy over Sir Lynden
Pindling and drug king Joe
Lehder, has laughed off
suggestions that he’s “in
dementia” - as alleged by
ex-minister Fred Mitchell.

“Tain’t there yet!” Mr
Tynes told The Tribune
after Mitchell’s remarks to
a Fox Hill meeting were
reported in the press.

In fact, 88-year-old Mr
Tynes, who looks after his
disabled wife, is regarded
by associates as remark-
ably sprightly and bright-
minded for his age.

And he has no regrets
for speaking out in an
Insight article about the
drug era which claimed the
life of his son, Chauncey
Tynes Jr.

Mr Tynes’ claim that
Chauncey Jr was killed
because he knew too much
about the links between
Sir Lynden Pindling and
Joe Lehder has caused
panic in the PLP.

Mitchell lashed out at
The Tribune, and especial-
ly its managing editor John
Marquis, who he described
as “a paid journalistic
assassin.”

Yesterday, Mr Marquis
said: “It’s an insult to cast
aspersions on Mr Tynes’s
mental state. In fact, he is
avery bright, articulate
man. I only hope I sound
half as good when I’m 88.”

m@ By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

FORMER deputy prime
minister Cynthia Pratt fought
back tears as she revealed to
the nation yesterday that her
70-year-old husband Joseph
Pratt has had both legs ampu-
tated at the Princess Margaret
Hospital.

Describing it as the most
difficult decision she has ever
faced, Mrs Pratt said she was
informed by doctors last week
that her husband was dying
and that she had two choices -
either amputate his second leg
or let him die in peace.

As a wife and a friend for so
many years, Mrs Pratt said
she could not sit by and watch
her husband die.

“So putting a pen to paper
was one of the most difficult
things I have done in my life;
to sign that consent form for
them to amputate his second
leg.

“He now lies in hospital
with both legs amputated.
This is very difficult for me.
Very difficult,” she said.

Describing Joseph as not
just her husband but also her
best friend, Mrs Pratt said that
as a very “hands-on repre-
sentative”, she wanted to
explain to her constituents
why she has been somewhat
distant in the past few weeks.

“T have not been able to get
around to my constituents as I
ordinarily would do. So many

1d



AN EMOTIONAL Cynthia Pratt, MP for St Cecilia, briefs the media on her husband’s health oon morning.

of them probably might won-
der, ‘well what has happened
to Mother Pratt?’ I want to
apologise to them because I
was not able to get around the
way I have done in the past
and that is simply because of
health reasons.”

About a month ago Mrs
Pratt revealed that doctors
were not optimistic about the
condition of her husband,
who suffers from diabetes.

Last week, he had his sec-

PLP Deputy ‘is still the
sitting MP for St Cecilia’

she said.

ond leg amputated and in the
past few days, Mrs Pratt said,
the doctors have not given her
anything to be hopeful about.

“I thought it necessary for
me to let my constituents
know so they would under-
stand why I have actually
been somewhat preoccupied.
I want to thank them for
understanding and I want to
thank them for their continu-
al prayers and support.

“My husband is presently
in the private medical ward.
Again he has not been in the
best of health according to the
doctors.

“But I still believe God, and
I still have faith in God that
they will bring him through,”
she said.

Noting how important it is
that she speak to her con-
stituents, Mrs Pratt said her

importance to me,” she said.

Breaking down in tears,
Mrs Pratt said that her hus-
band — who is suffering from
diabetes, hypertension, poor
circulation and alzheimer’s —
is not as coherent as she
would like him to be.

“But he is still alive,” she
said. “And so to the many
churches and well-wishers
who have come forth and the
scores of Bahamians who
have sent their best wishes, I
want to publicly thank them,”
she said.

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@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

respect for the people of St
Cecilia compels her to thank
them profusely for confiding
their trust in her for three
terms.

“These are special people,
and they are unique, and we
have a bond. It is not easy to
separate us. And I thought it
was important for me to come
to them so they can hear it
from me, so there would be
no questions asked as to why
Mother Pratt is not available
for certain things.

“I certainly would like to
perform a little bit better, but
sometimes circumstances alter
cases, and in this case, my hus-

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Mrs Pratt added that she is extremely proud
to be a part of the PLP as it is a party that
serves the Bahamian people.

PLP Deputy leader Cynthia Pratt asserted
yesterday that she still is the sitting member
of parliament for the St Cecilia constituency.

In the face of continuing unrest within the
ranks of the party, she said the PLP is one of the
greatest political organisations in the history
of the Bahamas.

“In every organisation there are challenges.
In every organisation there are fall-outs,” Mrs
Pratt said. “The PLP is no different.

“Even in your home there is fall-out. Some-
times the son wants to go one way and the
daughter wants to go another. But that does not
change the fact that the PLP is one of greatest

Colleagues

“The PLP is about service to the people.
That’s all I’m interested in. And so I want to say
to my colleagues, to encourage them that their
service is not in vain. In every organisation you
would make mistakes. Every human being
would make mistakes. But you learn from that
mistake.

What is important is that we serve the
Bahamian people to the best of our ability in
integrity, in honesty, and at the end of the day
the Bahamian people can say that Mother Pratt

political parties this country has ever seen,”

has tried,” she said.

PM won’t act on threat to tax

havens ‘at other people’s timing’




@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net



AMID calls for the govern-
ment to be proactive in address-
ing the growing threat to offshore
tax havens, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said he will
“not be driven” to act on the issue
“at other people’s timing”.

When asked to respond to calls
from financial service executives
for the government to issue a
public policy statement pledging
greater co-operation on interna-
tional tax matters, he quipped: “TI
love it when people tell me how
to do my job.”

“T think I know how to do my
job. I’ve got the experience to do
the job and I will do what’s best
for the Bahamas, I'll do it in a
timely manner, but I will not be
driven to do it at other people’s
timing,” said Mr Ingraham, in an
interview with The Tribune
before entering Cabinet.

On Monday, industry profes-
sionals told Tribune Business they
feel that in light of threatening
declarations recently made by
industrialised nations on the issue
of “tax havens” like the Bahamas,
it is urgent that the Bahamas act
swiftly to ensure its second indus-
try is not unduly penalised.

With the group of 20 nations
(G20) due to meet on April 2,
and the tax haven “problem” high
on the agenda, one such source,
said: “There has to be a serious
policy statement by the Bahamas
government before April 2 ... We
are one of the very few who have
not taken a position, like the



majority of international finan-
cial centres have done, and made
it known.”

In the last week jurisdictions
including Switzerland, the Cay-
man Islands, Bermuda and
Liechtenstein all committed to
further international co-opera-
tion on tax matters in response
to international pressure from
countries keen to collect more tax
and overhaul their financial sec-
tors in the wake of the global eco-
nomic downturn.

As for whether the Bahamas
intends to take any action or
make a statement to the interna-
tional community prior to April 2,
Mr Ingraham said yesterday the
government will “make its deci-
sion known in due course.”

Solutions

During the mid year budget
debate he affirmed that this coun-
try is facing a “renewed threat”
from industrialised countries as
they seek a solution to the global
financial crisis.

Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing went on to sug-
gest outside parliament that hav-
ing passed legislation since 2000
to “further shore up” its compli-
ance with international standards,
any response from the Bahamas
would be more a matter of ensur-
ing “we are regarded as a well-
regulated jurisdiction.”

Former attorney general
Alfred Sears yesterday asserted
that the government ministers’
statements thus far “do not
demonstrate a clarity of appreci-

ation of the harm.”

“Tf they are engaged in behind-
the-scenes maneuvering, then tell
me what you are doing, and if you
are not doing anything, the
Bahamas cannot afford inaction.”

The Fort Charlotte MP said
that with the Bahamas having
been listed “inaccurately” in the
Stop Tax Haven Abuse Bill which
was re-introduced in the US Con-
gress in early March as a “secrecy
tax haven engaged in unfair tax
practices” he hopes the govern-
ment is seeking to “engage in a
very vigorous diplomatic exer-
cise” to inform the US that the
description of the Bahamas as
such a jurisdiction is inappropri-
ate.

“Tt would do a grave injustice
to the Bahamas if it is passed.
What a responsible government
would do, is to engage the inter-
national community to clarify our
position. The Bahamas should be
held as a model,” he said.

Mr Sears added that Bahamas
must begin the process of negoti-
ating tax information exchange
agreements with nations other
than the United States and in the
long term “reframe its financial
services sector as a jurisdiction
which is not so much premised
on confidentiality but on quality
of service (and) diversity of finan-
cial products.”

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MEN

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 « Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com



or Elegance



PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama’s education plan: Stunning in scope

THE United States spends more on edu-
cating its children from kindergarten through
high school than most other industrialized
nations. Yet for all that, measured against
their peers, American children fair poorly,
ranking in the middle of students in 30 coun-
tries in science and in the last third in math-
ematics.

It’s a long-standing problem that educa-
tors have increasingly fretted about, without
managing to arouse the American people
out of their indifference to the costly imbal-
ance between money put in and achieve-
ments put out.

President George W. Bush tried to address
the issue with his No Child Left Behind ini-
tiative that sounded better than it performed.
It was designed to set national standards
against which school performances across
the land could be accurately measured and
compared.

One unintended consequence was to rein-
force the tendency to provide education that
was, in the words of a researcher, “a mile
wide and an inch deep” by teaching to the
tests, overloading students with information
while not requiring them to “master essential
concepts and information.”

It led to strenuous efforts to get every lag-
ging student to pass the tests that President
Obama characterized as a destructive “race to
the bottom.”

Now Obama has proposed an educational
reform stunning in the comprehensiveness
of its reach and the vastness of the $100 bil-
lion-plus to infuse a system already ingesting
large sums without providing sufficient qual-
ity.

The audacity of his proposal could be, one
can hope, the shocker that shakes up Amer-
ican education. In large part, his administra-
tion, under Education Secretary Arne Dun-
can, would provide monetary incentives to
schools, teachers, administrators and parents
to overcome narrow self-interests or lassi-
tude that have abetted the failures and short-
comings from which this nation suffers.

The president, as did his predecessor, wants
accountability and results. Obama is pre-
pared to pay for it.

Incompetent teachers would be rooted out
and effective ones rewarded in their pay-
checks. Those skilled in math and science

especially would be sought out and given
incentives to enlist and continue as teachers.

Upgrading America’s education to pro-
vide its people with the means to earn a living
in a global economy is as much or possibly
more a sociological and cultural challenge as
an educational one. Schools in which African-
American and Latinos dominate are among
the worst performers. They suffer from
extremely high drop out rates.

To address that aspect, Duncan recently
gave an impressive presentation. In a PBS
interview with Charlie Rose, he not only
stressed the necessity of preparing young
people before kindergarten, a la Head Start
(whose enduring accomplishments have been
questioned), but he also outlined nothing
short of a school revolution.

Duncan would keep schools functioning
not only for the seven or so hours five days a
week as is customary. He wants them to stay
open as much as 14 hours a day, Saturday
and Sunday included. The president wants
the school term extended, suggesting that
summer vacation shrink by a month.

Duncan enthusiastically proposed that
schools could serve as community centres to
which YMCAs, Boys and Girls Clubs and
other non-profits could bring their pro-
grammes, rent free. Those programmes could
include health services and tutorial help to
construct a supportive universe that would
benefit especially students who need it the
most.

As for higher education, “in just a single
generation, America has fallen from second
place to eleventh place in the proportion of
students completing college,” the president
stated. Studies show that the cost of college
has increased far more than the median
income of Americans. Obama offers large
increases in financial aid and grants.

Minorities fail to graduate more than oth-
ers, although according to educators, college
and university performance is diminishing
generally.

Enormous sticker shock is attached to the
Obama proposals. But the facts show that
education demands wide reforms and the
funding to help them happen.

(This article appears courtesy of Harry
Rosenfeld - c.2009 Albany Times Union).



HONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN KIA SUZURI

The Fleming
proposal leaves
much to ponder

EDITOR, The Tribune.

BRITISH banking tycoon
Roddie Fleming’s reportedly
“dashed hopes” to acquire the
Grand Bahama Port Authority is
the latest shot fired in the battle
for control of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority.

In an apparently well-
researched document dated July
2008 and titled “The Flemings
Strategy for Grand Bahama
Island,” the group boasted that
through a “dramatic transforma-
tion” and “reinvention” of
Freeport, “the promise” of the
1955 Hawksbill Creek Agreement
would be “finally” delivered.

Under that agreement, Wal-
lace Groves staked out 114,000
acres at Grand Bahama and
developed the city of Freeport
into a major resort, industrial and
gambling area. In the process he
created The Bahamas’ second
city, building an airport, devel-
oping utilities, schools, roads, and
a hospital.

Whether or not the curtailment
of the Fleming Group’s
grandiose, ‘government-
approved’, development plans
represents a significant lost
opportunity for Grand Bahama
and the rest of The Bahamas, the
document itself provides much
food for thought on a variety of
topical issues.

With so many matters of public
importance entering the public
domain well after the fact, it may
be timely to highlight some of the
more provocative topics
addressed in the Fleming docu-
ment, starting with: The Bahami-
an economy. A vital barometer
of any country’s economic health
is the Gross Domestic Product
(GDP), which measures the value
of all goods and services pro-
duced.

According to Department of
Statistics “provisional figures”, in
2006 “real” GDP in The Bahamas
increased by 19 per cent, com-
pared to 5.96 per cent in 2005.

Baws

letters@tribunemedia net



However, according to the Flem-
ing document, since 1984, The
Bahamas’ GDP, adjusted for
inflation, has actually declined by
nearly 20 per cent, and in “real,
global competitive terms...closer
to 33 per cent.”

According to Fleming, “except
for a period in the late 1990s,”
the Bahamian economy “has
been in a state of gentle decline
for nearly 25 years,” with
Freeport “currently experiencing
the most severe economic down-
turn in 30 years.” If accurate
updates could be obtained of the
two other important indicators of
a country’s economic health —
unemployment figures and the
Consumer Price Index, which
tracks inflation — a truer picture
could be obtained as to exactly
where we’re headed.

Global warming: Over the next
50 to 100 years, due to global
warming, a “likely maximum sea
level rise of six metres — about
20 feet — ‘will permanently inun-
date” most of the Bahamian arch-
ipelago and “reduce Grand
Bahama Island to a handful of
small islands with a landmass of
less than 10 per cent of the cur-
rent island. Under the assumed
scenario, “hundreds of millions
of dollars worth of remediation
engineering will be required at
the harbour, the airport and else-
where.” According to MET offi-
cials, in 1998 the department
installed Sea Level Rise monitors
in Nassau Harbour, at Inagua and
in the Exumas, with one being
placed in Marsh Harbour, but
meaningful results can’t be
obtained for another 10 years. It’s
estimated that a 0.07 inch rise has
taken place. Although the jury is
still out on whether the frequency
of hurricanes will increase, Hur-

ricanes Frances and Jeannee in
2004, demonstrated Grand
Bahama’s “vulnerability to even
single major hurricane events,”
Fleming warned.

Life expectancy: “With the
improved health care anticipat-
ed in the Flemings strategy,” life
expectancy of Bahamians will
increase, and “by 2020, an effec-
tive welfare system will be in
place in the country, funded by
the increased economic growth
precipitated by the Flemings strat-
egy.”

Exchange control: By 2020 or
earlier, “in response to the rela-
tive strength of the emerging
Bahamian economy, Exchange
Control will be scrapped.”

US economy: Will emerge
from current economic downturn
until 2010/2011, but “will proba-
bly not reach previous rapid
growth rates,” and the War on
Terror keeping the economy at
modest levels and possibly stag-
nation from 2010-2020.

New Airport Terminal: To
facilitate scheduled flights from
Europe, Canada and South
America, Fleming would split 50-
50 costs with Hutchison Wham-
poa to build a new non-US inter-
national Terminal.

Cuba: By 2020, normalised
diplomatic and economic rela-
tions between Cuba and the US
will turn Cuba into a tourism des-
tination with which Grand
Bahama, if it remains in its pre-
sent status, “simply cannot suc-
cessful compete.”

Almost five years after the
death of GBPA co-owner
Edward St George, the convolut-
ed legal situation that later devel-
oped is yet to be resolved. Per-
haps, to paraphrase the words of
G K Chesterton, perhaps it isn’t
that the various players can’t see
the solution, it’s just that they
can’t see the problem.

SIMON ARTZI
Nassau,
March 5, 2009.

The challenge of sustained economic stimulus

EDITOR, The Tribune.

We are now at a precarious period for small and
medium size business because access to credit has
become extremely challenging in the Bahamas.

As most of us are aware, this creates a tremendous
void vis-a-vis jobs and growth of jobs.

Notwithstanding, it appears the Government’s
idea of stimulating the economy is from the bot-
tom-up by supporting the individual who has lost his
or her job having initiated various measures now

ongoing.

It is agreeable and extremely important to keep
Bahamians working, however, it is also important to
address the current crisis systemically.

Keeping individuals working is best achieved by
the Government crafting a proactive plan to address
the lack of credit in the marketplace, which would

have operated within the bounds of the laws hereto-

fore.

While it may be politically expedient to appease
individuals collectively, it appears at the root of
Government’s action as a desire to jolt the economy
back to health going forward.

Providing a job for an individual simply affords
that person a means of work to squirrel away cash
given tough times, we actually desire the opposite.
Whereas, the access to credit provided to small and
medium size businesses would perhaps be a more

sustained way to get the economy moving forward,

or grow jobs.

support small and medium size businesses by mak-

ing immediate access to credit available.
Naturally, this should apply solely to well led
businesses that are proven fiscally responsible and

Nassau,
March 2009.

Bahamians should embrace this
new form of communication

R McKENZIE

improve the non employment rate, and maintain

IT remain hopeful the Government would revisit its
position on stimulating the economy by giving
thoughtful consideration to all appropriate solu-
tions and acting swiftly henceforth.

EVV CeUClNOI met

Livingstone B











EDITOR, The Tribune.
bd = Johnson
eS h a oe I just wanted to say that Bahamas Issues is expression of the thoughts
Qo | > and ideas of the Bahamian public. No Government should fear or — EITOR. The Tribune.
= \ . = seek to suppress the expressions of its people. :
= ) ; The very idea of legislation to govern online media and information :
= re Owned Department =H distribution in the Bahamas is amiss. oo ee
It’s also a clear indication of how little is known about the web by Fie te apie 1 neeiOne
=< = those who would seek to have such legislation in place. H lehecon i, ieee 8
= Your Fast Lane to iw Bahamas Issues is an open forum for all Bahamians to come togeth- eae . Aan enn
> » » = er in dialogue to assist in finding solutions to many of the issues facing iis death oh er
PJ Vehicle Purchas! ng EJ our nation. Though you may find some who would invade the forums _ as in spate cane
. = with their own personal agendas (whether political or otherwise) Ihave © a , ‘ee Sa fh
= = ' if, | 5 — ee Le be but a ba ee a — price to pay for a beacon of free meee A ae to
aaa n ' speech and free press in this country. ee
ee a5 ed: Lh i leila des A, I would ask all Bahamians to embrace this new form of communi- _ignity and honour
‘ce Ci ei ea a tae = © cation and information sharing. Divingstone Jolisou-was ason
— TH Pah No, d ay — =m! As we should all be aware that traditional print media is now swift- Of Exuma and possibly one of the
first from that island to have

ly becoming a thing of the past — soon only to be used for nostalgic
purposes and something to hold while drinking a cup of coffee.

There is without a doubt a greater influence in internet media today
than there has ever been and only those who carefully harness this
medium will govern the future of this country.

been called to the Bahamas Bar.
Mr Johnson’s career at the Bar
was distinguished and he repre-
sented many early investors to
the country including the Presi-

somenon. ownpandsvisit= = ————— =
pronline’for-ourespecial— a
oHaggleyPricing” -

i








' oa DELROY MEADOWS dent of Pan American Airlines.
- BahamaslIssues.com When offering for election by a
/ Nassau, person of his race and back-

ground was not very popular, Mr
Johnson chose to defy the pres-
sures of the day and fight an elec-
tion for a seat in Parliament for
his native island. He did not suc-
ceed but he continued to be active
in politics through the Progres-
sive Liberal Party.

When his country became inde-
pendent Mr. Johnson unselfishly
gave up his lucrative law prac-
tice to become the first Bahamian
Ambassador to the United States.
He served his country with dis-
tinction and we all owe him and
his family a debt of gratitude for
his service.

I extend sincere condolences
to his widow Charmaine and his
children.

March 10, 2009.

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March 12, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEMS



Minister ‘has no difficulty’
releasing reports on the
state of Detention Centre

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER OF STATE for
Immigration Branville McCartney
has “no difficulty” releasing the full
reports made to his department on
the state of the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre, he said yester-

day.

Amid allegations — denied by the
Immigration Department — of inhu-
mane treatment, substandard liv-
ing conditions and insufficient food

told the media that the reports
included no evidence to substanti-
ate claims of violence by centre
supervisors, sexual favours for priv-
ileges or insufficient food.

He added that notwithstanding
this, certain recommendations on
the living conditions made by those
visiting the site will be implement-
ed, such as diversifying the menu
and replacing destroyed mattresses.

In an interview with The Tribune
yesterday, Mr McCartney, when
asked when this newspaper will be
able to see copies of the reports in

Man accused of sex with girl under age of 14

A 18-YEAR-OLD man accused

? of having intercourse with a girl
: i under the age of 14 was arraigned
: ina Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Edvardo Rolle, 18, was

? arraigned before Magistrate Der-
rence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane,
: charged with having sexual inter-
? course with a person under 14
} years of age.

It is alleged that Rolle commit-

: ted the offence on March 11, 2009.

Rolle was not required to plead

to the charge and was granted bail
in the sum of $10,000 with one
surety. The case has been
adjourned to June 24 which is
when a preliminary inquiry is
expected to start.

A 28-year-old man was yes-
terday sentenced to pay a $5,000-
fine or serve a year in prison after
being convicted on a drug charge.

Mark Pierre was charged in
October last year with possession
of marijuana with the intent to sup-

ply. According to court dockets,
Pierre was allegedly found in pos-
session of 3.5 grammes of mari-
juana on Wednesday, October 1,
2008.

Pierre, who initially pleaded not
guilty to the charge, was convicted
on the drug charge yesterday.

Magistrate Carolita Bethel sen-
tenced Pierre to pay a fine of
$5,000.

Failure to pay the fine will result
in a year imprisonment.



Diabetes

Free

provisions at the facility, the depart-
ment arranged for several individ-
uals to tour the site and file reports
with officials over a week ago.
The group who toured the centre,

their original form, said “very short-
ly.”

“Td just like an opportunity to
pass it by Cabinet,” he said.

“T have no difficulties in releasing

GLUCOSE TESTING



Branville McCartney

described by the department as an “indepen-
dent body”, consisted of psychologist Dr David
Allen, Director of Social Services, Mellany
Zonicle and Archdeacon James Pallacious.

O inions detainees, and that such claims were “com- Wednesday March 18
p pletely blown out of proportion.” Lowe's Pharmacy er:
. : On March 10, several days prior to the id
oo he, arene a ears department’s press pene ai human Harbour Bay if,
eir opinions on the conditions at the facility pangs : ir
and recommendations for possible improve- ee ee Wednesday March 25 fh

ments.

A diluted report on the findings was pre-
sented to the press, who were denied access to
the original documents, in a press conference
held at the Immigration Department.

In that conference, Immigration director
Jack Thompson, reaffirming the departmen-
t’s commitment to operating transparently,

week.”

them I just want to do it the proper way.” He
said that this should happen within the “next

He reaffirmed that the reports showed no

substantiation of the allegations made by

issued a statement declaring its “concern” for
detainees at the centre in light of reports reach-
ing the media.

It called on the international community to
flood the government with appeals on behalf of
the detainees and resumed its earlier call for
independent reviews of internal investigations
into the claims.

GB Shipyard ‘providing
jobs for an increasing
number of Bahamians’

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Shipyard, which
injects millions annually into
the Freeport economy, is pro-
viding employment for an
increasing number of Bahami-
ans, Carl-Gustaf Rotkirch,
chairman and CEO of the
company said.

He said there are currently
320 Bahamians employed in
various permanent positions,
and recruitment continues
through the shipyard’s
apprenticeship programme.

“Grand Bahama Shipyard
has engaged into actively
developing the apprenticeship
programme for young
Bahamians in cooperation
with BTVI, since 2004.

“There are presently 37
apprentices in various stages
of their four-year apprentice-
ship with the company,” said
Mr Rotkirch.

He noted that the recent
acquisition of the company’s
third dry dock, which was pur-
chased at an investment of
$60 million, will provide addi-
tional educational and train-
ing opportunities for Bahami-
ans in specialised fields of ship
repair.

The shipyard was started in
January 1999 and commenced
training in 2000. It has grown
from earning just a few mil-
lion dollars in revenue to over
$130 million in 2008.

According to Mr Rotkirch,
the installation of the new dry
dock, which is capable of lift-
ing vessels of up to 55,000
tonnes, will greatly impact
business at the shipyard.

In January, Carnival’s Sen-
sation was the first cruise ship
to dock at dry dock three. The
month of January was the
busiest month in the ship-
yard’s history.

“It is the largest in the
region capable of the most
complicated repairs. It can
dock over 70 percent of the
cruise ships sailing in the
region,” said Mr Rotkirch.

“The target is to further
develop Grand Bahama Ship-
yard into the biggest com-

ie
US)

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157



mercial ship repair company
in the region, capable of per-
forming the most complicated
repair upgrade and conver-
sions.”

Royal Caribbean Cruises,
the Carnival Corporation and
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority are joint partners
in the shipyard.

Richard Fain, chairman and
CEO of Royal Caribbean,
said the shipyard’s success in
Freeport has proven all the
doubters wrong.

“Ten years ago, a number
of people had the foresight to
see that we would have an
opportunity to build some-
thing which over a period will
grow and become an impor-
tant benefit to businesses, the
cruise business and other ship-
ping businesses, economies,
and the communities in which
we operate.

“Ten years ago, we were
looking at a situation where
there was an awful a lot of
people who said it couldn’t be
done.

“Over last 10 years we have
proven those doubters wrong.
We have nine ships here
today and I am told it is some-
what of a record,” said Mr
Fain.

He acknowledged Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
and Sir Albert Miller, former
chairman and CEO of the
Port Authority, for their
tremendous support and
cooperation in the shipyard
project.

“We have a wonderful facil-
ity, trained workers, and when
we come back three, five, and
10 years from now, we will
see an even stronger impact
on the economy,” said Mr
Fain.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Gunshots Former govt official backs

a oe article, says the protest
was ‘a waste of time’

VACANCY NOTICE
PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
FROM page one
during Lehder’s stay there in the late 1970s and early 1980s, said he

HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING

personally knew that Pindling, a former PLP minister, and Everette
Bannister and others used Lehder’s own aircraft to fly to and from
Norman’s Cay and George Town, Exuma.

“Tf they attended regattas and the like, they often used Lehder’s
plane,” he said.

“IT knew Joe Lehder and found him to be a pleasant young man.
However, I did not know at that time what he was doing.

“Twas told to give him every courtesy as he was an investor. Pin-
dling and others from the government used Lehder’s transportation
all the time.”

The official said those demonstrating outside The Tribune did not
know the facts.

He said he also knew Chauncey Tynes Jr., the pilot
who went missing in 1983. “He was a pleasant man who brought me
back and forth many times from George Town and Norman’s
Cay.

“When he disappeared, everyone thought there was something
strange going on, as no investigation was carried out to my knowl-
edge.”

The official, who did not wish to be named “for business reasons”,
said planes flying into the cay were often carrying large amounts of
money.

“T would not doubt for one moment that Pindling was being
paid off by Lehder, though I did not see any money transactions
myself,” he said.

“The fact that Pindling used Lehder’s plane so much did suggest
there was a very close relationship,” he added.





































Officers fired shots in return }
and occupants of the Ford }
Expedition reportedly tried to
escape the vehicle as it raced }
away from police. i

A marked police car, a Ford i
Crown Victoria unit, was dam- }
aged by a gunshot during the }
dangerous gunfight. i

And motorists cars were }
damaged as they were forced }
off the road in an effort to
dodge the high-speed chase.

But police finally cornered i
the brazen driver near the }
Environmental Health land- }
fill site in the Tonique }
Williams-Darling Highway. }

Officers found one round of }
live ammunition for a .380
handgun and two live rounds i
of ammunition for a .9mm
handgun upon searching the }
vehicle. i

A 34-year-old man from }
Prince Charles Drive thought
to have been driving the Ford
Expedition was arrested and i
is in police custody. :

Motorists whose cars were }
damaged during the chase are
advised to contact the Central }
Detective Unit on 502-9998.

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Public Relations & Corporate Programs
Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and implementation of a
strategic public relations and communication program together with the effective and efficient
planning and execution of all corporate events and activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Assists in the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate Programs plan to
support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;

Oversees the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations programs, plan and
budget;

Assists with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation and where necessary
the wider community;

Prepares and distributes the Corporation’s Annual Report;

Directs press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press releases, photographs,
fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management and media representatives;
Coordinates the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion surveys;
Provides assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in writing speeches,
preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;

Evaluates and assesses customer complaints and queries and disseminates information to
management;

Aids in the development, implementation and management of all external communication
efforts;

Is proactive in identifying opportunities to improve the image of the Corporation to its employees
and in the community at large;

Coordinates Marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the external Public
Relations Firms and the Media;

Identifies and liaises with service providers to secure speakers, presenters and entertainment



for Corporate events;

Liaises with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e. awards, invitations,
prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as necessary and maintain an inventory
of the same;

Prepares and distributes all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices) relative to Corporate
activities, as necessary;

Creates and updates all Standard Operating Procedures for all activities, as necessary;
Ensures timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of bills for all events
and activities as necessary;

Works closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that there is global
publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate activities;
Ensures that websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company newsletter and internal PA
system are used for the communication of information relative to corporate activities/events;

Job requirements include:

« A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Public Relations/ Journalism/Marketing/Business
Administration/Business Communication, or equivalent.
A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisory/Management level.
Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform to prescribed
style and format;
Ability to effectively present information to senior and Executive management and public
groups;
Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing
Experience in managing special events and activities
Excellent time management and organizational skills
Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills
Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications.
Good analytical skills.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The
Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: April 1st, 2009.

C—O
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

BRANCH MANAGER

The Branch Manager will be responsible for the day to day achievement of
the branch’s sales and service goals. The ideal candidate will have strong
leadership and communication skills and bring focus to the execution of the
branch business plan, inclusive of sales administration and the overall
development of branch staff.

Core Responsibilities:

Responsible for the quality and efficiency of all branch customer service
initiatives for all credit and deposit products and services

Assists in the development of Branch targets for retail sales and operations
Provides leadership in the attainment of all branch sales and service goals,
Ensure that the Branch is operating in accordance with the Bank’s policies
and procedures and all regulatory requirements including but not limited
to Central Bank and AML.

Serves as lead customer service advocate at the branch level

Provides guidance to staff, where necessary on all service matters, ensuring
that customer needs are heard, understood and resolved

Ensuring staff’s awareness and use of bank product information
Responsible for all branch sales initiatives, inclusive of management of
the branch loan and deposit portfolio and mitigating Bank exposure
Responsible for reporting to Senior Management on the overall operations
of the Branch including financial and non-financial matters;

Provides leadership in the personal development of all branch staff through
the articulation and achievement of the Bank’s goals and objectives
Identifies skill deficiencies and opportunities for training for all Branch
staff

Job Requirements:

Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.

Knowledge of Banking laws, including requirements of The Central Bank
of The Bahamas which governs Commercial Banking.

Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced
environment

Strong supervisory and customer service skills are essential.

Excellent verbal and written communication skills.

Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include:

Competitive salary and benefits package commensurate with work experience
and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later than March 31*,
2009 to:

DA# 69842A
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com

NOTICE
OF
FONE:

In recognition of the funeral of
Mr. David A. C. Kelly, C.B.E.
Betty K. Agencies Limited
Will Close at 1:00p.m.

HN
Thursday, 19th March, 2009

@ Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

STATE RECOGNIZED
FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE

Hon. Lovingstone
Basil Johnson,
CBE, BA, D.C.L.,
85

of #3 Newgate Road, Blair Estates
will be held on Friday March 20th,
11:00 a.m. at Christ Church
Cathedral, George Street. Rev. Fr.
Norman Lightbourne, assisted by
Rev. Fr. Ethan Ferguson, and other
»| members of the Clergy will
| officiate. Interment will follow in
|} Woodlawn Memorial Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Left to mourn is passing is his: Widow: Charmian Johnson; Daughters:
Anita Johnson-Patty of Kendal, Florida and Deanne Johnson-Anderson
of Washington Grove, Maryland. He was pre-deceased by his son,
Craig. Sons-in-Law; Tony Patty of Kendal, Florida and Jerry Anderson
of Washington Grove, Maryland. Grandchildren: Adriana Anderson
of Washington Grove, Maryland, and Eric Patty of Kendal Florida;
Extended Daughters: Kandi Collie, Presleith McPhee; and Chineraye
Tjeoma; Brothers—in-law, Clifford Culmer, Al McCartney and Henry
Sands of Savannah Sound, Eleuthera; Sisters—in-law: Eileen McCartney
and Corliss Culmer; Aunt: Ida Clarke; Nephews: Myles Culmer, Keith
McCartney, Billie McCartney, Lennox McCartney, Barry McCartney,
Garah Leonard Sands, Brian Sands, Oscar Sands, Keddie Culmer,
Philip Culmer, Glen Culmer and Kirk Culmer; Richard Ingraham of
Miami,Florida; Nieces: Gabrielle Culmer, Caroline Culmer, Tamara
Cargill, Lizetta Neuman, Crystal Sands, Ruth Sands, Henrietta Sands,
and Delores Culmer; Patricia Ingraham of Miami, Florida; God-
Children: Obafemi Pindling, Michael Barnett, Allyson Maynard-
Gibson, Keith Sands, Ian Jupp, Krista Nottage, Kevin Archer, Andrew
Mosko, David Neil and Father Humes; Other Relatives and Friends
include: Elvin Forester Bodie and Family of Miami, Florida; Preston
McPhee and Family, Jackie Clarke and Family; Trevor Musgrove
and Family; Marcella Musgrove, Angette Pyform and Family; Almetha
Clarke and Family; Verbilee Clarke and Family; Norma Clarke and
Family; Eurella Clarke and Family; Irene Clarke and Family; Harriet
Mather and Family; Cleomi Clarke; Family of the late Neville Clark
of The Hermitage, Exuma; The entire Clarke Family from The
Hermitage, Exuma; Pastor Hugh Roach and Family; Rev. Kendal
Nottage and Family; Dr. Bernard Nottage and Family; Sandra Nottage
and Family; The Family of the Late Wellington Johnson; Hugh Sands
and Family; Clarice Granger; Emerald Sands and Family; Sidney
Sinclair Sands and Family; His Excellency the Hon. Arthur. D Hanna
and Family; Sir Orville Turnquest and Family; the Hon. Paul L.
Adderley and Family; Dame Marguerite Pindling and Family; the
Hon. Justice Emmanuel Osadebay and Family; Retired Justice Joseph
Strachan and Family; Cyril Ijeoma and Family; Mrs. Mary Sweetnam
and Family; Henry Bostwick QC and Family; Edward Turner and
the Hon. Loretta Butler-Turner and Family; Canon Neil Roach and
Family; Bernard K. Bonamy and Family; Mr. Sam Campbell and
Family; the Culmer, McCartney and Sands Families of Eleuthera;
Autrey Graves and Family; Andrea Archer and Family; Hazel Jupp
and Family; The Rev Dr. Charles. W. Saunders; Jacqueline Major
and Family; Ruby Saunders and Family; Gloria Strachan and Family;
Mr. Pat Paul; Nurse Helen Miller and Nurses; Dr. Cindy Dorsett; Dr.
Norad Morgan; Dr. Kimberley Bethel The Bahamas Bar Association,
Bahamas Supermarket Scholarship Committee; The Hermitage
Descendants Association; The All Exuma Association and the Holy
Cross Anglican Parish Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Thursday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

There will be no viewing at the Church.

Protest

FROM page one

Street where they enjoyed bar-
becued food, drinks and loud
music into the afternoon.

The group dispersed from
Eastern Parade before 4pm with-
out resuming their protest.

While outside the office on
Shirley Street, some young pro-
testers were smoking what
appeared to be marijuana while
standing outside the building,
and when they were reported to
police monitoring the protest
they shouted angry threats to
burn down the building. Some
threatened physical harm against
Mr Marquis.

The group’s collective shouts
of: “Sir Lynden”, followed by the
response, “Hero”, could be
heard inside The Tribune office
which shook as protesters
banged on the walls and music
blared from speakers on a flat-
back truck.

Mr Moss said the protesters
cross political divides as all
Bahamians want to stand up for
Sir Lynden’s legacy as the
“Father of the Nation” after Mr
Marquis reported former PLP
treasurer Chauncey Tynes Sr’s
allegations that his pilot son,
Chauncey Tynes Jr, was killed
in 1983 because he knew too
much about links between Pin-
dling and drug czar Carlos “Joe”
Lehder.

“These are people who are
respectful of what he has done
for this country we are trying to
build,” Mr Moss said.

“Sir Lynden is a legacy, a man,
a personality and a character we
galvanise around. No man is per-
fect but we must give him the
kind of respect he deserves.”

Mr Moss criticised The Tri-
bune for publishing second and
third-hand “hearsay” attacking
the late prime minister’s charac-
ter and said any information con-
nected to the young pilot’s mys-
terious disappearance should be
given to police instead, Mr Moss
said.

One protester said the allega-
tions could not be true because
Lehder had been offered time
off his jail term if he implicated
Sir Lynden, but Lehder refused.

Pastor Micklyn Seymour of
Bahamas In Prophecy said the
articles should have been with-
held whether the allegations are
true or false because they have
stirred up ill-feeling that will
divide Bahamian people.

He said: “He needs to leave
the issue alone because it’s touch-
ing people’s hearts.

“We are saying desist from
dividing up people on issues that
are not necessary. It’s doing
more evil than good. He does-
n’t understand the affect it is hav-
ing on people.

“When we have a nation and
we are dealing with the father of
that nation, then the majority of
people are for Sir Lynden.

“Tt’s dividing our people and
the country don’t need it, and
we are disappointed in The Tri-
bune that they would want this
information to stir this.”

Another protester, Glen Rolle,
a pastor at Hillside Restoration
Centre Ministry in Marathon
Road, said: “The argument isn’t
whether it’s true or not but
what’s behind The Tribune’s
effort is to undo and remove a
significant block at the founda-
tion of this nation.”

Mr Marquis said he was
pleased to see that the protest
went off peacefully. “I think
peaceful demonstrations are part
of the democratic process, and I
believe passionately in people
being able to express their
views,” he added.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Dunkin’ Donuts set to

open outlets

DUNKIN' Donuts is set to
open two outlets at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport
this month. Bahamas QSR Lim-
ited, a subsidiary of the Myers
Group of Companies, operates
the coffee giant's Bahamian
franchise. The company
finalised contract agreements
with the Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD) in
January.

The brand is the number one
retailer of hot and iced regular
coffee-by-the-cup in America,
and the largest coffee and
baked goods chain in the world.
In addition to the well-known
coffees, all locations at LPIA
will serve the brand's most pop-
ular signature beverages like
the Dunkaccino, Turbo, Lite
and White Hot Chocolate.

"We are super excited to
have the sandwiches Dunkin’
Donuts aficionados will ask for
such as the waffle breakfast
sandwich and the variety of flat
bread sandwiches," said Tracey
Cash, marketing director for
Dunkin’ Donuts.

"We are happy to have been
awarded the contract and to
have this opportunity to add
Dunkin’ Donuts to the airport
experience,” said Douglas



TRACEY CASH (LEFT), marketing director with Dunkin’ Donuts and Zen-
er Beckford, manager of commercial properties with the Nassau Airport
Development Company, at the new Dunkin' Donuts LPIA store in the US

Departures Lounge.

Sawyer, vice-president and
managing director of the Myers
Group.

The popular brand, now
located in the US Departures
Lounge, will open a second
store this week in the Domes-
tic/International Terminal.

“NAD is delighted to wel-
come Dunkin’ Donuts into the
airport family,” said John

www.atlanticmedicalfunwalk.com

Spinks, vice-president of com-
mercial development for NAD.

The Dunkin’ Donuts brand
is known worldwide with over
7,900 restaurants in 30 coun-
tries.

“This is an exciting first step
towards increasing and improv-
ing the food and beverage
options at the airport,” Mr
Spinks said.

It's time to step up
and sign up!

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE







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Reginald Ferguson
appointed Police
Commissioner

FROM page one

Police in an Independent Bahamas.

“Mr Ferguson was chosen after much reflection and introspec-
tion and assumes command of the Force at a difficult time in his-
tory,” Prime Minister Ingraham said.

Mr Ingraham praised the newly appointed Commissioner of
Police as a man whose character, dedication to duty and honesty
have always been regarded as above reproach.

“These are essential attributes for leadership,” Prime Minister
Ingraham said.

Speaking at the official opening of the RBPF’s Senior Officers
“Day Away” ceremony, Mr Ingraham last night noted that Com-
missioner Ferguson heads the force at a time when “the world is
experiencing perhaps the greatest financial and economic crisis
since the Great Depression with severe consequences for our small
and open economy. And we face unprecedented levels of crime,
high unemployment and a determined criminal element.”

He said it was the commissioner’s task, together with the officers
of the Senior Command, to lead the RBPF through the current peri-
od of transition and restructuring.

Body found on boat
near Potters Cay dock

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093 / 328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5201
or e-mail perdeyi@oob edu,

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).

CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Pees, Conrse Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

Seize the chance for Professional Development and enrol in

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Certification & Certificate Programmes

FROM page one

Although details surrounding
the incident are still sketchy,
investigators have not classified
the man’s death as a homicide,
he said. Several homicide inves-
tigators were initially called to
the scene.

“This has not been classified
as a homicide. We are treating
this really as a suspicious death
until the autopsy has been com-
pleted,” ASP Evans said.
“Based on what we have seen
here there are no physical signs
of trauma to the body, there is
nothing of evidential value on

the vessel which would lead us
in the direction to say that this
was a homicide,” he said.

ASP Evans said that investi-
gators are being assisted by per-
sons who frequent the area,
with information regarding the
man’s identity.

He added: “We are asking
any individual who may have
any information regarding this
incident or any person who may
have frequented the vessel to
assist us particularly with regard
to the identity of this individ-
ual.”

Up to press time yesterday
police said that the man had not
been positively identified.

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The College af the Bahamas reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule amd

Course Moterials.

Former AG: both
Christie and Ingraham
administrations did not

properly regulate CLICO

FROM page one

National Movement. It was recognised in 2004 and before that
the Registrar of Insurance lacks the capacity to properly regu-
late the insurance industry,” Mr Sears said at the meeting on
Monday night.

He added that a group of disgruntled CLICO (Bahamas)
policy and annuity holders have sought legal representation
who may appear in court on their behalf at today's Supreme
Court liquidation hearing.

Mr Sears has offered pro bono assistance to several Bahami-
ans left in a lurch after the Supreme Court ordered a winding-
up of the troubled company on February 24. Lawyer Godfrey
“Pro” Pinder has also offered his services to the group.

Speaking to The Tribune yesterday, Mr Sears added: "It's sad,
people don't know what to do and I've called for the govern-
ment to intervene because many of these people find themselves
in this position because of the failure of the regulator to prop-
erly regulate CLICO."

The group, Mr Sears said yesterday, was left with many unan-
swered questions regarding their legal rights to money invested
in the insurance company, the future of their life savings and the
status of the liquidation.

"It's a distressing situation and I agreed on a pro-bono basis
to represent some of the persons and they are coming in today
(Tuesday) and bringing copies of their documents and so on and
we do anticipate filing notice of intention to appear.

"Nothing has been filed as yet. We're just rendering some
assistance, that would be the most sensible thing in the cir-
cumstances (when) you have scores of people who don't know
what's going on," Mr Sears said.

At the hearing it is expected to be determined from among
those who have entered an appearance whether or not they sup-
port the liquidation process.

Meanwhile, yesterday Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told
The Tribune that CARICOM countries, including the Bahamas,
have agreed that their regulators will meet to ascertain where
CLICO's regional assets are. This comes amid claims from
Guyana that the country invested $34 million in CLICO
(Bahamas).

"In our case its the registrar of insurance and in their case its
various entities, sometimes Central Bank or some other agency,
will meet to gather all the facts together relating to CLICO and
CF Financial, the parent company in Trinidad. They will also
seek to determine what assets these companies have and where
these assets are situated, especially in the region and as soon as
they have done that there will be a meeting of heads of gov-
ernment of the Caribbean community."

That meeting is expected to happen by the end of this month,
Mr Ingraham said provided the respective countries receive
the regulators’ report in time.

Mr Ingraham also dispelled reports that a CLICO (Bahamas)
$50 million loan to foreign affiliates was originally guaranteed
by parent company C F Financial (Trinidad).

“There’s no such thing as a Trinidad guarantee. That’s a mis-
conception that people have. CLICO (Bahamas) did have a $50
million guarantee from the parent company in Trinidad — the
extent to which that is a (worthy) guarantee is an issue to be
determined.”

Yesterday Bishop Hall, who also invested in the company, re-
issued his call for officials to be held accountable for the CLI-
CO (Bahamas) financial mess.

"If you hear the horrific stories coming out of this elderly peo-
ple are horrified because they fear losing their life savings. I
don't see how some of our politicians can sleep and be quiet in
a time like this. Someone should have protected these people
someone in the ministry of finance should take responsibility
that these people were not protected," he argued.



TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 9
SPORTS





BASKETBALL HIGHLIGHTS



ADRIAN MACKEY, of St Bede’s, is fouled as he drives
to the basket...
(Photos by Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

SECTIONS EDITOR
THE TRIBUNE

is seeking a Main Section Editor to design news
pages and write eye-catching head-lines. Solid
journalistic credentials essential, including a keen
news sense, excellent text-editing ability and an
aptitude for supervising staff. Applications please
to:








Managing Editor
The Tribune
P.O.Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas

VACANCY NOTICE
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER EXECUTIVE

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Chief Financial Officer.

Bahamas Agricultural & Industrial Corporation (BAIC)

The job oversees all financial matters of BEC, inclusive of the activities of the Customer Services Presen ts
Division.

The objectives of this function include, but are not limited to the following: Its

Financial Management, Accounting & Treasury SISAL CRAFT TRAINING PROGRAM

Ensure and structure the Corporation’s financial policies, practices and internal controls so that
they are in accordance with the law, generally accepted accounting principles, contractual
commitments, the Corporation’s structure and protect the corporations assets;

Manage BEC’s cash resources to ensure that funds are available to meet the ongoing and future
needs of BEC while minimizing the cost of capital;

Ensure the timely preparation of all financial reports. These include complete financial statements
for presentation to the Board, preparation of budget reports for assisting management decision
making, and development of a yearly projected budget in consultation with other Division heads;

Ensure that the divisions maintain a high standard of efficiency, control, and application of D at ‘
@: March 23-April 3, 2009

sound accounting practices and principles along with the adequate trained qualified staff to
achieve these objectives;

Coordinate to ensure that the workflow within the division and cross functionality with all
departments dependent upon the services of the division, are efficient and effective;
Coordinate the annual budgeting process and present the completed budget for approval;
Manage external relationships with local and international sources of funds;

Ensure proper and cost effective insurance of BEC’s assets;

Conduct Financial Analysis for the Corporation as requested;

Customer Services

Ensure the accurate and timely meter reading and billing of all customer accounts in New
Providence and the billing of other Family Island Accounts.

Ensure proper management of the revenue and collection recovery activities by effective
management of the Corporation’s Accounts Receivable.

Ensure proper management of the business office services of cashiering and new services, queries
for customers, banking and accounting reconciliation, etc.

Ensure that non-technical losses are kept to a minimum.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Accounting/Finance with professional qualifications (e.g.,
ACCA, CPA) an MBA would be desired.

A minimum of 15+ years of experience in financial accounting, at senior management level.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills

Excellent analytical and organizational skills

Good customer relations skills

Good time management skills

Strong leadership skills

Knowledge of finance, accounting, budgeting and cost control principles including General
Accepted Accounting Principles.

Knowledge of automated financial and accounting reporting systems

Ability to analyze financial data and prepare financial reports, statements, and projections
Extensive knowledge of project management and the ability to oversee a range of projects
simultaneously

Strong human relations skills

Knowledge of industrial relations

Negotiation skills and techniques

Interested persons should apply by submitting a resume addressed to: The AGM-Human Resources
& Training, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau
Bahamas on or before: Wednesday, March 25, 2009.

Time: 6:00 - 10:00 p.m. (Daily)
Venue: A. F. Adderley Jr. School Location: Blue Hill Rd. &Yellow Elder
Way

Application Form

Name: P. 0. Box:

Address: - Email:

Tel: Fax:

Age range: O under 15 0 16-25 026-40 041-60 o61-70 O71 andover

Employment Status: Employed © Government Private 0 Self-employed
O Unemployed

Have you completed Previous Training Courses by BAIC? (J Yes LI No
List: Date(s):

E FEE: $100.00

REEEGREREEERTAGE

Contact: Sharae Collie/Pam Deveaux Tel: 322-3740-1 Fax: 322-2123/328-6542





PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Giants sweep
the Wreckers,
advance to the
divisional finals

THE New Providence Bas-
ketball Association (NPBA)
continued its best-of-three play-
offs on Monday night at the CI
Gibson Gymnasium.

In the opener, the defending
champions Commonwealth
Bank Giants advanced to the
divisional finals by completing a
two-game sweep over the Y-
Care Wreckers in a nail-biting
85-83 victory in the clincher.

In the night cap, the young
Johnson Trucking Jumpers
jumped all over the Sunshine
Auto RuffRyders to pull off a
huge 122-116 win to stay alive as
they evened their series at 1-1.

Tonight at the gym, the Elec-
tro Telecom Cybots and the
Coca Cola Explorers are sched-
uled to battle in the third and
decisive game three of their
series. The feature contest
between the Police and the Fox-
ies Pros will also be decided in
game three.

Senior Football Standings

Bahamas Football Association
Senior League Standings 2008

As at March 16, 2009

Team Name P WwW
Pts

Bears FC 11
Caledonia FC 11

Sharks FC 11

Cavalier FC 10

Baha Juniors FC 11
Dynamos FC 11

FC Nassau 11

Recent Results

Sunday, March 15, 2009

1:00 pm Bears FC vs Cavalier FC 2:0
Goalscorers: Steve Jones (Bears FC) 66th; Leslie St. Fleur (Bears FC) 83rd
3:00 pm Baha Juniors FC vs Sharks FC 3:4
Goalscorers: Johnson Jean (Sharks FC) 20th; Chedlet Pierre (Sharks FC ) 23rd;
Duckerno Exlias (Sherks FC) 29th; Michael Sterling (Sharks FC) 85th; Courtney

Arsenal beats Hull 2-1
to reach FA Cup semis

@ By FRANK GRIFFITHS
Associated Press Writer

LONDON (AP) — William
Gallas scored a disputed goal
with five minutes remaining to
give Arsenal a 2-1 victory over
Hull on Tuesday night and a
berth against Chelsea in the FA
Cup semifinals on April 18.

Manchester United faces
Everton the following day at
Wembley in the other semifi-
nal.

Hull went ahead in the 13th
minute when defender Andy
Dawson’s lofted pass found
Nick Barmby in the penalty
area, and Barmby’s shot
deflected off defender Johan
Djourou and looped in over
goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski.

Arsenal tied it in the 75th
after Nicklas Bendtner’s pass
in front of goal was deflected
into the path of Andrei

Barnett (Baha) 59th; Andrew Pratt (Baha) 61st and 70th:

Upcoming Matches

Sunday, March 22, 2009 (Knock-Out Cu

1:00 pm Ladies Exhibition Match

2.0L Automatic - LOADED

was $26,866.00
NOW $22,800.00



Referee: S. Thompson

Referee: W. Nelson

Arshavin, who set up Robin
van Persie for an easy tap-in.

Gallas, stripped of the cap-
taincy earlier this season for
criticizing teammates, scored
the go-ahead goal after Hull
goalkeeper Boaz Myhill came
off his line to punch a long ball
clear. The ball came off
Djourou, and Gallas won a duel
with Dawson, heading the ball
into an empty net.

Replays showed Gallas
appeared to be in an offside
position, and Hull manager Phil
Brown blamed referee Mike
Riley.

“Tt was definitely a mistake
by the officials,”’ Brown said.
“That’s why we’re out of the
FA Cup. Ask Mr. Riley how
much that’s going to cost Hull
City. I don’t think he’d under-
stand. I don’t think he’d care.”

Brown also accused injured
Arsenal captain Cesc Fabregas
of spitting at Hull’s
Brian Horton follow-

ing the match.

“He spat at my
assistant manag-
er down the tun-
nel. That’s their
club captain,”
Brown _— said.
“Hopefully, he’s
proud of himself.
He spat at his
feet.”

Hull defeated
Arsenal 2-1 in
the Premier

onship.

ey three.

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Freedom Academy at the start of the day
to eventually get into the pool champi-

Zion Academy won that game 22-18.

In that game, Leslie Rolle led the way
with nine, Giviane Bonaby had six,
Bernard Munroe four and Nashad Mack-

Kerrano Mackey and Spencer had nine
apiece in the loss for Freedom Academy.

Queen’s College 16, Centerville 14:

Andre Delancy hit two free throws in
the final 25 seconds to push the Comets
ahead 16-13. But with just 2.6 seconds left
on the clock, Troy Casseus hit just one



ARSENAL’S Alexandre Song (top left), battles for the ball with Hull City's
Manucho (bottom left), and goalkeeper Boaz Myhill during the FA Cup Sixth
Round soccer match between Arsenal and Hull City at The Emirates Sta-
dium in London, Tuesday...

(AP Photo: Tom Hevezi)

Emirates Stadium, which
opened in 2006.

League on Sept. 27, only the
second loss for the Gunners at

FROM page 11

for the final score.

Delancy went on to score a game high
eight and Carl Nesbitt had four as Queen’s
College clinched the pool D champi-
onship.

“T expected it to be close, but yesterday
when we played them, I didn’t play Andre
Delancy because of a knee injury,” said
Comets’ coach Jason Edwards.

“Tt’s still kind of sallow, but he wanted
to play. I just couldn’t keep him off the
court. He came up with some big free
throws down the stretch for us.”

Casseus ended up with six and Gre-
mako Symonette and D Rolle both added
three in a losing effort.

WORLDWIDE

BAHAMAS

FUN-RUN-WALK






a
INBRIEF

SAILING
BACARDI CUP

A number of international
boats will be in action at
Montagu Bay starting today
through Saturday as they
compete in the International
Sailing Competition.

The boats will compete in
the Bacardi Cup that will
start today at 11 am and con-
tinue through Thursday.
Then on Thursday through
Saturday, the boats will com-
pete in the Dudley Gamblin
Memorial. A number of
Bahamians will also be com-
peting in the series.

BASEBALL
JBLN UPDATE

e Here’s a look at the
results of the games played
this weekend in the Junior
Baseball League of Nassau
at the St Andrew’s Field of
Dreams.

TEE BALL
Grasshoppers 21, Raptors
12
Knights 13, Sand Gnats 7
Sidewinders 20, Blue
Claws 10
COACH PITCH
Blue Jays 19, Angels 7
Athletics 16, Astros 12
Diamondbacks 13, Cubs 2
MINOR LEAGUE
Red Sox 11, Rays 8
Royals 12, Rockies 6
MAJOR LEAGUE
Indians 4, Reds 3
JUNIOR LEAGUE
Twins 10, Cardinals 9
Dodgers 7, Yankees 6
SENIOR LEAGUE
Phillies 5, Rangers 2
Tigers 10, Pirates 6

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



DATE: March 21st, 2009

TIME: 6:00 am
ROUTE:

start at MONTAGUE, and travel west on East Bay Street to Charlotte Street,
go south on Charlotte Street to Shirley Street, travel east on Shirley Street

back to Montague

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Male and Female
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TELEPHONE: 356-3423





Arsenal beats
Hull 2-1 to
reach FA Cup

semis...
See page 10

ts







MAHESH Bhupathi (front) and
Mark Knowles in the final of the
doubles at the Australian Open...

(AP Photo: Andrew Brownbill)

Knowles,
Bhupathi
eliminated

lm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK Knowles and
Mahesh Bhupathi’s trip to
Indian Wells, California, for
the BNP Paribas Open didn’t
last that long.

The number three seeded
Bahamian-Indian duo got
eliminated in the second
round on Monday night by
Max Mirnyi and Andy Ram
in two straight sets 7-6 (2), 6-4.

Knowles said it was quite a
disappointing loss.

“It was tough. They’re a
tough team. They played
extremely well,” Knowles
said. “It was just one of those
matches that we didn’t get
ahead of them.

“They didn’t really let us
get into the match, so we
couldn’t turn it around.”

With this being the first
Masters Series, the biggest
tournament on the ATP
World Tour outside of the
Grand Slam, Knowles said he
and Bhupathi wanted to put
themselves in a position to
contend for the title.

“The hard courts is our
favourite surface so we’re dis-
appointed in that aspect,” he
said. “We thought we could
have gone far and even possi-
bly win the title.

“But now all we could do is
prepare ourselves for next
week in Miami and hopefully
make up for not doing as well
here and try to contend for
the title there.”

Miami, Florida will be the
site for the second Masters
Series called the Sony Erics-
son Open. As they look ahead
to next week, Knowles said
they certainly have to make
some adjustments.

“Mahesh didn’t play his best
match and everybody is enti-
tled to have a bad game every
now and then,” he said. “He
felt he could have played a lit-
tle bit better and I think we
could have returned serve a
little better.

“But I think a lot had to do
with the way they served.
They served extremely big
and they got in a high per-
centage of first serves and they
really neutralized our return.
So we have to look at playing
a little better in those aspects.”

Depending on how success-
ful they are, Knowles said he
could be coming home for a
couple of days. But he’s hop-
ing that they are right in the
thick of things as they look
forward to winning the title
or at least end up playing
through the weekend.

So far the second-year duo
of Knowles and Bhupathi are
still looking for their first vic-
tory on the tour. They came
close finishing as runners-up at
the Australian Open and were
in the semifinal in Sidney, just
before the first Grand Slam
for the year.

However, they are still
ranked at number two on the
tour behind the American
identical twin brothers of Bob
and Mike Bryan.

Knowles has won a doubles
title this year. That was when
he teamed up with American
Mardy Fish to win in Mem-
phis, Tennessee, after Bhu-
pathi took a week’s break
from the circuit.

KYLE TURNQUEST, of St Bede’s,
drives to the basket yesterday...

See more photos on page 9

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

(Photo: Felipé Major/

Tribune staff)

g By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT’S the St Bede’s Crushers
versus the Queen’s College
Comets and Zion Christian
Academy versus Stephen Dil-
let in the Final Four of the Prov-
idence Basketball Association’s
first Phil Smith Primary School
Basketball Tournament.

The four teams advanced out
of the “Elite Eight” pool cham-
pionships played yesterday at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.
The two winners will go on to
play in the championship game
at the end of tonight.

e Here’s how they got into
the semifinals:

St Bede’s 20, Blairwood

Academy 8:

This one wasn’t much of a
contest as the Crushers crushed
Blairwood on their way to the B
pool championship.

Donzel Huyler had a game
high nine, while Dwight Wheat-
ley and Adrian Mackey both
had four in the win.

“This game wasn’t one that
we played the type of basket-
ball that the Crushers normally
play,” said St Bede’s coach
Ricardo Freemantle.

“The guys were still a little

tired from our house meet yes-
terday (Monday), but we can’t
use that as an excuse. We just
have to come and play our
game tomorrow (today).”

For Blairwood, Jermaine
Higgs scored five and Lejaro
Johnson added three.

Stephen Dillet 19, Kingsway

Academy 14:

The pool C championship
was more keenly contested, but
down the stretch Stephen Dillet
came up with a couple big shots
to stay ahead.

Gage Griffin had six, Michael
Bethel five and McKellen
Major four in the win.

“T felt very good because we
started out very slow. It wasn’t
that we were not getting our
shots, they were just not
falling,” said Stephen Dillet’s
coach Frank Johnson.

“But I told the guys to keep
their head in the game. I know
we will rebound. We put the
pressure on and we got about
eight fast break points on some
steals and we were able to get
back into the game.”

Emmanuel Butler had a
game high 10 in a losing effort.

Zion Academy 36, St. Fran-
cis/Joseph 24:

Nashad Mackey came up
with some clutch plays in the

HERE’S a look at the
matchup of the Final Four
in the Providence Basket-
ball Club’s first Phil Smith
Primary School Boys’ Chal-
lenge today at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium, starting
at 4pm:

® St Bede’s vs Queen’s
College

e Stephen Dillet vs Zion
Academy

second half as he led a spirited
Zion Academy in the pool A
championship.

Mackey finished with a game
high 12, Giviane Beneby had
eight and both Leslie Rolle and
Nathan Ellis helped out with
seven.

Myron Johnson had 11, Bran-
don Wilson eight and Ahkeem
Neilly five in the loss.

It was a double dose of victo-
ry for Zion Academy, who had
to play a tie-breaker against

SEE page 10





OR ea
ase ee
TN Pel

ey





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009



KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For Late

Mr. David Albert Charles Kelly, C.B.E.

a of Nassau, The Bahamas, who died in New

York City, New York, U.S.A. on the 11th
March, 2009, will be held at Christ Church
Cathedral, George Street, Nassau, on
| Thursday, 19th March, 2009 at 3:00 p.m.

/ Mr. Kelly is survived by his wife Nancy

§| Booth Kelly; three sons, Andrew Jordan

Kelly, David Gregory Booth Kelly and

Reginald Scott Kelly; two daughters-in-law,

Anne Boushelle Kelly and Candace Elizabeth

| Kelly; five grandchildren, Jordan Ross Kelly,

David Oliver Christensen Kelly, Avery Anne

Kelly, John (Jack) Albert Charles Kelly and

Katie Marie Kelly; his brother, Godfrey

Kenneth Kelly C.M.G.; his sisters-in-law,

Sonia Kelly and Paula Kelly; his brother-in-law, John Avery Booth, Jr and his

wife, Bonnie Booth; nieces and nephews, Linda Elza and her daughter,

Katherine Elza, Steven Kelly and his wife, Susan Kelly, Gary Kelly , Lynn

Lowe and her husband, Chris Lowe, Karen Kelly, John Avery Booth, Ill, and

his wife, Kathleen Booth, Joy Marie Rousell and her husband James Rousell

and Jody Laura Booth-Seals and her husband, Dave Seals, ; his cousins Betty

Kelly Kenning, O.B.E. and her husband John Kenning,O.B.E., and George

Kelly,M.B.E and his wife Norma Kelly, other relatives and friends. His brother
Basil Trevor Kelly predeceased him.

The Very Reverend Patrick L. Adderley, Dean of Nassau, The Venerable Keith
Cartwright, Archdeacon of the Southern Bahamas, The Reverend Father
Michael Gittens, Priest Vicar, Christ Church Cathederal, Nassau and The
Reverend Crosley N. Walkine, Rector, St. Anne's Church, Fox Hill, Nassau
will officiate and interment will follow in St Anne's Church Cemetery.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale
Avenue, Nassau on Wednesday, 18th March, 2009 from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
and on Thursday, 19th March, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.

IN CELEBRATION OF DAVID'S LOVE OF BRIGHT COLOURS AND HIS
LOVE OF LIFE, PLEASE DRESS IN BRIGHT COLOURS.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Lyford Cay Foundation,
Inc., DAVID A. C. KELLY, C.B.E. MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, P.O.Box
N.7776, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue,
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS





wT)
PICTURED from left are C C Sweeting Senior High School health and family life teacher Carolyn Rolle; perma-

nent secretary in the Ministry of Education Elma Garraway; principal of C C Sweeting Senior High School Delores
Ingraham; Xie-Xiuling, and ZhangMei.




i 3 _ , i
XIE-XIULING, wife of the Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China to the Bahamas, and officials from the

Chinese Embassy visited C C Sweeting Senior High School on Monday, March 16. Pictured is Mrs Xie-Xiuling,
left, speaking with the school’s principal Mrs Delores Ingraham.

PHOTOS: Raymond A Bethel/BIS





THE TRIBUNE



— — =

WEDNESDAY, MARCH



A LUXURY YACHT can be seen on Paradise Island, Bahamas...

18,



2009

Yacht, boat foreclosures likely
huge factor in decline in
pleasure trips to Bahamas

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

expressed con-
cern that it was
not cost effective
to travel to the
Bahamas
because of high
cruising permit |
prices, fuel
prices compared [
to the US and

FORECLOSURES on recreational
boats and yachts are likely to be a huge
factor in the recent 20 per cent decline
in pleasure trips to Bahamian waters,
according to the Director General of
Tourism, while boating experts cited
the high overall costs of travel to the
islands as a factor. other miscella-

Vernice Walkine said a large num- neous docking
ber of individuals in the US lost homes, fees.
boats and other luxury items as the “Bottom line

global economic crisis forced decreased on the thing is ee



spending and promoted debt increas-
es.
“That is a significant part of the dif-
ficulty that we’re faced with,” she said.
Publisher of Southern Boating Mag-
azine Skip Allen said several boaters

they were con-

cerned about the $300 for the cruising
permit and I didn’t disagree with them
about the fuel charge, as far as dollars
were concerned,” he said. “I would
rather be in the Bahamas, even though

“That is a significant
NUON aCeMON NICU UM mI NEALE

we're faced wit

— Vernice Walkine



it costs me a little more, but that’s a
personal opinion and that’s how I figure
it.”

However, Mrs Walkine said she is
not convinced that fuel prices are a hin-
drance to most boaters, as the price per
gallon has fallen substantially since last
summer when the Bahamas again saw a
decrease in the number of private
boaters. “Fuel prices obviously cannot

SEE page 2B



Dunkin’ Donuts’ airport
store to employ about
80 Bahamians

Downtown location set to open in May

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

DUNKIN’ DONUTS and its
Bakery will create employment
for about 80 Bahamians when
its second store in the Lynden
Pindling International airport
opens this week and its down-
town location opens in May,
according to the company’s
Marketing Director.

Tracy Cash told Tribune
Business that Bahamas QSR
brings to the popular US dough-
nut and coffee franchise, a

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



—IDUNKIN’

KDONUTS



wealth of experience for oper-
ating international brands.

The company, a subsidiary of
the Meyers group which also
operates the local KFC brand,
recently acquired the Dunkin’
Donuts brand after it was held
and lost by another local
Bahamian several years ago.

A release issued by the com-
pany said that the brand is the
“number one retailer of hot and
iced regular coffee-by-the-cup
in America, and the largest cof-
fee and baked goods chain in
the world.”

“We are happy to have been
awarded the contract and to
have this opportunity to add
Dunkin’ Donuts to the airport
experience” said Douglas
Sawyer, Vice President and
Managing Director of the
Myers Group.

The Nassau Airport Devel-
opment company said it was
happy to welcome the company
to the airport which joins Tor-
tuga, the Rum Cake retailer
also under the umbrella of the
Meyers Group.

“NAD is delighted to wel-
come Dunkin’ Donuts into the
airport family” said John

SEE page 4B

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Local US tax
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declined

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

overnment has

declined the appli-

cation of a local

lawyer with techni-
cal knowledge of US tax policy,
who was recommended to
replace the Bahamas’ outgoing
representative for the Commit-
tee of Experts on International
Co-operation in Tax Matters,
Tribune Business has learned,
as this country seeks to develop
tax co-operation policy in light
of growing pressure from G20
nations.

The rejection is believed to
be politically motivated.

Ryan Pinder, who told this
paper that he was recommend-
ed to the government by a
“senior civil servant,” said he
was told that his application was
denied because the Ministry of
Finance is interested in filling
the position from within their
organisation.

However, some local eco-
nomic experts say they were
informed that the denial may
have come because of Mr Pin-
der’s association with the PLP

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e Bahamas seeks
to develop tax
co-operation
policy

e Growing
pressure from
G20 nations

through his work with the Pro-
gressive Young Liberals.

According to Mr Pinder, he
would have offered to be a con-
sultant for them at no cost or
for $1 per year, depending on
the government’s requirements.

“They would like an employ-
ee of the ministry or someone in
the public sector,” he said.

As the G20 countries, the
group of the world’s 20 largest
economies, tighten the reins on
so-called “tax haven” countries,
the Bahamas is mulling its

SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

SESS eee
Yacht, boat foreclosures likely huge factor

in decline in pleasure trips to Bahamas









cruising permit and that did-

FROM page 1B
n’t make a lot of sense,” he

be the issue,” she contend- _ said. “Your cruising permit is
ed. only good for one shot.”

UN Sess oS Sa
seen in New Providence































Ta a
a.

A new Insurance Brokerage company is ready to serve
the local market. The partners of APS announce the for-
mation of their new company, Assured Financial
services Insurance Agents and Brokers Limited.

The company is headed by Dashwell E. Flowers, a well
known and highly regarded insurance industry profes
sional who has been in the business for some twenty
four years, most of which have been in senior level posi-
tions. “I welcome the opportunity to provide Bahamians
and residents with the best insurance products from the
country’s leading providers. As a full service broker, we
are dedicated to offering the very best in auto, health,
life, and other insurance products and services,” said
Mr. Flowers, the company's president and chief operat-
ing executive. He added, “We have recruited an execu-
tive team that has over one hundred years of experience
in this business, one of our main focus areas is client
service; emphasizing the building and maintenance of
constructive and rewarding relationships. Excellent
client service means that we are always accessible, not
simply at renewal tine.”

Also part of the executive team, and a partner in AFS, is
Keith L. Major; he serves as director of sales and market-
ing. "During these challenging economic times, it is
important to have partners you can trust. At AFS, due to
our experience in the business, we have considerable
knowledge of the insurance industry and will utilize
this know-how to benefit our clients so that they are
better positioned to secure appropriate insurance dé
coverage," said Mr. Major. Mr. Major previ-

ously served as vice president of mar- ce



Mr Allen said boaters this
year have developed strict
budgets and are willing to
forego travel to the Bahamas
for a more budget friendly
destinations such as the
Florida keys or Ft Laud-
erdale.

He said many private
yachts and fishing boats are
simply opting to stay closer
to home this year.

According to him, boaters
were concerned most about
having to pay a cruising fee
multiple times during the
year if they were to make
several trips back and forth
from the US to the Bahamas.

“Tf they wanted to go over
in April then go back in July
or September it was $900
because of the cost of the




Mrs Walkine said the Min-
istry of Tourism is paying
attention to the boating mar-
ket and has plans to take an
aggressive approach to
attracting business to the
many southern Bahamas
docks that depend on rev-
enue from boaters.

Mr Allen said he and his
magazine are on the side of
the Bahamas when it comes
to bringing business to the
islands.

According to him, South-
ern Boating magazine fea-
tures Rum Cay in its April
edition and is rolling out its
yearly Bahamas edition in
May.

“There are a lot of pluses
to being in the Bahamas,” he
said.

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Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following
items:

-
keting at three local financial
Services companies.

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for
the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (ie.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

Assured = c ane EN Services

INSURANCE AGENTS AND BROKERS

Contact: TRAC] BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

Simply the best choice for all your insurance needs

432 East Bay Street * P.O. Box CR 54288, Nassau Bahamas
242-322-6735 /5 * 242-322-6739 «© Website: www-.afsbahamas.com





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 PAGE 3B





Tourism seeing
better year than was
previously projected,
says Walkine

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE Ministry of Tourism is
seeing a better year so far than
was previously projected,
according to the Director gen-
eral of the Ministry of Tourism,
amid a global recession that
threatened to sink the Tourism
sector this year.

Vernice Walkine told Tri-
bune Business that even though

“".We’re working in terms
of increased advertising presence

in the marketplace by extending
that through to June.”

— Vernice Walkine



1000 to 1200 visitors to Nas-
sau/Paradise Island, and the
recently announced Miss Uni-
verse pageant, expected to draw
thousands, will give the islands
of the Bahamas a much needed
economic boost, according to
Tourism Ministry officials.
Mrs Walkine said the min-
istry has been working tireless-
ly to introduce big things that
will have a tremendous payoff
for the economy and a lot of lit-

the beginning of this year has
been somewhat better than the
Ministry foresaw, it is nowhere
near where it was during the
same time last year.

“We’re doing everything we
can to get our fair share and
then some,” she said. “We’re
working very hard on a num-
ber of fronts. We’re working in
terms of increased advertising
presence in the marketplace by
extending that through to

June.”

“So, we are reaching more
people more frequently across
the United States — reaching
those people who are less affect-
ed by the economic situation.”

Mrs Walkine said she has not
yet received official statistics on
the number of spring break vis-
itors this year, but expects that
the numbers will be fairly good.

According to her, the unfor-
tunate situation in Mexico may

have given the Bahamas an
added boost as a destination of
choice. Mexico is currently
fighting a drug war on its bor-
ders with the US.

“T think the Bahamas, and
Nassau in particular, has been
able to benefit from that,” she
said. “There are places like
Superclubs Breezes that are
sold out.”

The upcoming FIFA Con-
gress, which is expected to bring

tle things that will add up to a
big pay off.

She said the FIFA Congress
and the Miss Universe pageant
will bring the fringe benefit of
international exposure for the
islands of the Bahamas.

Her ministry has also been
working diligently to create
more airlift into Grand Bahama
by creating incentives for car-
riers in an effort to make air-
fare to Freeport competitive.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

COMMON WEALTH CF THE BACAMAS 2IKIE
IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND BOUTTY DIVISION

CLEAR Ma. 0170008

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piewe Parcel or lot of and
and dwelling house thereon comprising five thoussed eight hundred
and twenty-one (3,82 1) square feet being Lot Mo, Three Hondred
and twenty-one (921) of Pyfrom Subdivision Phase U1 situate in the
Faster District of the Island of New Providence one-of the Islands
al The Pishems.

ANTE
IN THE MATTER of dhe Quuieting: Tithes het, 19549
ANI

IM THE MATTER of the Petition of HESL YN FERN ANDER

NOTICE

HESLYN FERMANMOVGR the Petitioner claims to be the owner of the fee
stinpie exivie in powassion of the lot of land and dwelling house described herem
free from incumbrances,

AND the Petitioncr hes made application to the Supreme Court af the sand
Commoneealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Qeteting Tite Act 1949 to
howe her ttle to the said parcel of Land investigated and the nature and extent
therea? detenumed aad deckared ina Certificate of Tile to be
accoedance with the prevvision of the aaid Act

MOTRCE is hereby piven that any peraon keving Deereror right io Dower or
an Adwere Claim oF a clades not recngied is the Petition shall on oe before the
21" day od May ALD, 20M) file ie the Supreme Count and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned 2 statement of hiather claim im the prescribed fem verified by a
Abfidavit io be filed therewith Failures of any gach person bo file and seeve a
staiement of his‘her claim on or before the 21" day of Moy AD, 2008 will operate
as a bar to such claim.

Copies of the plan may be inspected at:

1, The Registry of the Supreme Conrt

2. Michael Hanna & Co.
Ram 2
TREHL Plaza
Tonique Darling Highway
Mew Prvveiomse, Rahaman

Dated the 12" day of March AJ. Me

Althomeys for the Petitoner

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TECHNOLOGY = Fax: 242-328-0049

COMPANY LIMITED

ROYAL = FIDELITY

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IN HOUSE
INVESTMENTS LTD

NOTICE TO
SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of directors of In House Investments Limited has
declared a quarterly dividend for Preferred Shares to all
shareholders of record at March 16, 2009 as follows:

Preferred Shares 7.25% per annum (payment quarterly).
The payment will be made March 31, 2009 through Royal
Fidelity Share Registrars & Transfer Agents Limited in the

usual manner.

$B) Bahamas Business
\SL/ Solutions Ltd

LTR FCAVOCY SGD Le

We would lke to notify our valued customers that
Mr. Cleveland Saunders

Sno longer employed with Bahamas Business Solutions
Limited and therefore not authorised fo sel or service Nerox
Products.

Bahamas Business Solutions Limited is the only company

authonsed to sel and service Xerox Products in the Bahamas

and are not lable for any products or services provided by this
individual

FG CAPTTAL
BROKERAG!

MARKETS
E & ADVISORY SERWVICES

KTP TL. fa mT ST.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 17 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,655.09 | CHG -4.07 | %CHG -0.25 | YTD -57.27 | YTD % -3.34
FINDEX: CLOSE 813.18 | YTD -2.60% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

1.39
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.31
2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

1.45
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.56
1.81
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consclidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Fince

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS $
1.45
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.48
1.78
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. Interest
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00
100.00
100.00

Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

S2wk-Low Bid $
7.92
4.00

0.35

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Ask $
8.42
6.25
0.40

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
RND Holdings

31.72
0.00
0.45

33.26
0.00
0.55

29.00
0.00
0.55

4.540
0.000
0.002

0.000
0.000
0.000

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bend Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

NA Vv
1.3664
2.8988
1.4432

1.3041
2.9230
1.3828
3.3201
11.8789
100.0000
96.4070

3.3201
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

1.0000
9.1005
1.0440
1.0364
1.0452

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

YTD%
0.95
-1.40
0.67
-1.94
0.96
0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.06
0.80
0.33
0.76

Last 12 Months Div $ Yield _%
28-Feb-09
28-Feb-09
6-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

4.40 9-Feb-09

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV -
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

- Trading volume of the prior week

Net Asset Value

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Dunkin’ Donuts’ TT ocal US tax |

airport store to
employ about
80 Bahamians

FROM page 1B

Spinks, Vice President, Com-
mercial Development for NAD.

Dunkin’ Donuts brand is a
ubiquitous US coffee brand,
known worldwide with over
7,900 restaurants in 30 coun-
tries.

The first Bahamas Dunkin’
Donuts branch shut its doors
after a fire destroyed the down-
town building. Shortly after,

other locations followed.

Several other local food com-
panies are also planning to
move their businesses into the
airport to increase food and
beverage options as a part of
the redevelopment.

“This is an exciting first step
towards increasing and improv-
ing the food and beverage
options at the airport,” said Mr
Spinks.

awyer’s

application declined

FROM page 1B

options, while other offshore
financial service centres world-
wide are swiftly moving to com-
ply with Organisation for Eco-
nomic Co-operation and Devel-
opment (OECD) regulations.
Mr Pinder believes that the
Bahamas government should
have been proactive in enter-
ing into more tax information
exchange agreements with
OECD countries and sending
delegations to Washington.
Now, he said, the country has
found itself in a situation where

it is the last to respond.

“Anything we do from here
on out I fear is not going to be
taken seriously, especially in
light of a lot of the other juris-
dictions taking such aggressive
and affirmative measures,” he
said.

“T’ve long been a proponent
of the Bahamas entering into
Tax Information Exchange
Agreements. We pretty much
ignore requests for Tax Infor-
mation Exchange Agreements.”

Economic experts worldwide
have accused the US and UK
of “hypocrisy,” as they engage

in as much of the activities as
those so-called “tax havens”.

Trillion

The US is said to have as
much as $4 trillion in passive
investments, whose portfolios
are not shared with countries
where the investments origi-
nate.

According to Mr Pinder, the
US is addressing this issue and
trying to level the playing field.

He said that should the gov-

ernment comply with OECD
regulations it could gain favour

with entities such as the World
Trade Organisation and The
International Monetary Fund.

“These are all issues that will
be affected if we don’t comply,
if we’re blacklisted and if we’re
deemed to be a rogue nation
and by not having a firm policy
from the government on this
issue and without having the
proper technical ability to
analyse the issues, which I have
offered the government at no
cost, I think by and large we
won't be taken seriously when
are prepared to provide a poli-
cy statement.”



NOTICE

CALYPSO BAHAMAS PIPELINE LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against
the above-named Company are required to
send particulars thereof to the undersigned
clo P. O. Box N-3932, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 30th day of April, A.D., 2009. In default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 16th day of March, AD., 2009.

Mrs. Alison Treco
Liquidator
One Montague Place
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GAMBAS HEIGHTS
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— - —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GAMBAS HEIGHTS INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW ENGISTERN
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— - —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of NEW ENGISTERN INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
IPSKEW MOOR
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— - >_—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of IPSKEW MOOR INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

BLUE MARLIN LNG TERMINAL LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send
particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P. O. Box
N-3932, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 30th day
of April, A.D., 2009. In default thereof they will be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
by the Liquidator.

Dated the 16th day of March, AD., 2009.

Mrs. Alison Treco
Liquidator
One Montague Place
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRAPEVINE TRADING INC.

— - _—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GRAPEVINE TRADING INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ETERNAL BLESSINGS LTD.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ETERNAL BLESSINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ATVICKTON
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— - ——
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of ATVICKTON INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Real Estate



eee ae em RO ee a od

sed Jin ae del

ro Tel: 502 2356 i al

for ad rates



Legal Notice

NOTICE
HAPSBOURNE

INVESTMENTS LTD.
— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HAPSBOURNE INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ETERNAL GLORY LTD.

— £ —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ETERNAL GLORY LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BAMFORTH PLAINES LTD.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BAMFORTH PLAINES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



an
Na,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 5B





Bad year or good, AIG workers got big bonuses

m By STEVENSON JACOBS
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — A Wall
Street firm loses billions of dol-
lars, nearly destroying its busi-
ness and crippling the nation’s
economy. But top executives still
receive huge bonuses?

As crazy as that sounds to most
Americans, paying such bonuses
even after a company suffers big
losses is common practice on Wall
Street, and it’s at the heart of the
outrage surrounding insurer AIG.

Employees of the insurer’s
financial-products unit received
$165 million in so-called “reten-
tion” bonuses — payments
designed to keep valued employ-
ees from quitting. They are paid
out no matter whether the
employee had a great year or a
horrible one.

In Wall Street’s high-stakes
competitive culture, paying top
people to stay in their jobs has
been the norm for years.

“It’s basically a bribe, so your
employees don’t bolt and take
their clients with them,” said
Chuck Collins, a senior scholar
at the Washingon-based Institute
for Policy Studies and an execu-
tive compensation expert.

Even though most bonuses
paid to Wall Street employees are
tied to performance, retention
bonuses have ignited anger since
the government began pouring
billions of dollars into the finan-
cial system to keep banking and
insurance firms from collapsing.

Despite the uproar, the pay-
ments have continued at several
firms, most recently at investment
bank Merrill Lynch.

“It’s part of this Marie
Antoinette syndrome of Wall
Street,” Collins added. “They’re
completely in a bubble, and they
don’t understand how these pay-
ments are perceived.”

They do now.

The bonuses at American
International Group, which is
now nearly 80 per cent owned by
taxpayers, have drawn howls of

outrage from Congress and Pres-
ident Barack Obama. Lambast-
ing the insurance giant for “reck-
lessness and greed,” Obama
pledged to try to rescind payment
of the bonuses.

AIG has argued that retention
bonuses are crucial to pulling the
company out of its crisis. With-
out the bonuses, the company
says, top employees who best
understand AIG’s business would
quit — an assertion that critics of
the payments quickly rejected.

“T’m very skeptical that retain-
ing the people who made the mis-
takes is a good idea,” said Rep.
Barney Frank, chairman of the
House Committee on Financial
Services. “I think we have a
strong case to get some of those
bonuses back.”

Experts say it won’t be easy.

For starters, AIG’s retention
payments were guaranteed in the
executives’ contracts. By breaking
them, AIG says it would risk trig-
gering a wave of employee law-
suits. And the cost of those law-
suits would likely dwarf the size of
the retention bonuses.

One way around the contracts
would be to prove fraud. A 2002
law adopted after the accounting
scandals at Enron and other com-
panies allows publicly traded cor-
porations to take back ill-gotten
compensation.

On Capitol Hill late Tuesday,
House Democrats were consid-
ering proposing new legislation
to authorize Attorney General
Eric Holder to recover bonus
payments like the ones paid by
AIG.

A day earlier in New York,
state Attorney General Andrew
Cuomo subpoenaed information
from AIG to determine whether
the payments made over the past
weekend constitute fraud under
state law.

In a letter Tuesday, Cuomo
said 73 AIG employees received
retention bonuses of $1 million
or more — including 11 who have
since left the company. Cuomo
said the bonus checks were

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

EIC INVEST SA

Notice is hereby given thatin accordance with Section

137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, EIC INVEST SA is in dissolution.
The date of commencement of dissolution was the
11" day of March, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau,
Bahamas is the Liquidator of EIC INVEST SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

THE ISLE OF MAN
COMPANIES (TRANSFER OF DOMICILE) ACT 1998
PRIVATE

L.G.M. LIMITED
COMPANY NUMBER: 071554C

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, in accordance with Section
8 (2)(c)(i), of the Isle of Man Companies (Transfer of
Domicile) Act 1998 that the above company proposes
to apply to the Financial Supervision Commission to
redomicile the above company to the Bahamas and that
unless written objection is made within ten days of the
date of this notice, the Company may be redomiciled.

Dated this 13th day of March 2009.

Director
Pedro Solorzano Garcia

mailed Friday.

“These payments were all
made to individuals in the sub-
sidiary whose performance led to
crushing losses and the near-fail-
ure of AIG,” Cuomo wrote in the
letter to Frank.

“Thus, last week, AIG made
more than 73 millionaires in the
unit which lost so much money
that it brought the firm to its
knees, forcing a taxpayer bailout.
Something is deeply wrong with
this outcome.”

Critics say the government
could have done more to prevent
the AIG bonuses.

Peter Morici, a business pro-
fessor at the University of Mary-
land, said the government could
have forced AIG to re-negotiate
the bonus contracts so employ-
ees would be paid less. He noted
that the government demanded
similar concessions from union-
ized autoworkers before agree-

ing to bail out General Motors,
Ford and Chrysler.

“It seems like no effort was
made to negotiate with the AIG
people and that the government
gave them whatever they want,”
Morici said. “If we forced
autoworkers to take less, we
could have done it with AIG
employees.”

As for AIG’s argument that
failure to pay the bonuses would
send employees running for the
exits, some experts say that would
be just fine. “There’s a lot of
unemployed Wall Street workers
that could be brought in as fresh
blood,” said Stephen Davis, a
senior fellow and expert on cor-
porate governance at Yale Uni-
versity.

Otherwise, Davis said, paying
bonuses to executives of falter-
ing companies risks creating a “a
grab-and-go culture.”

“The danger is that this kind

of culture could spread to other
companies,” he said. “People
could see this as their moment to
get what they can before the gate
closes.”

AIG’s troubles stem from its
business insuring mortgage-
backed securities and other debt
against default. As the credit cri-
sis took hold, that business
imploded. Since September, the
government has shoveled more
than $170 billion into AIG, which
has operations in more than 130
countries.

AIG’s financial products unit
had been led by Joseph Cassano,
who stepped down a year ago
after the division reported a loss
of more than $11 billion on a
book of contracts in the last quar-
ter of 2007.

AIG representatives did not
return calls seeking comment
Tuesday. Spokeswoman Christina
Pretto had said Monday that the

company was in ongoing contact
with Cuomo’s office and would
respond to his requests for infor-
mation.

Retention bonuses on Wall
Street and in other industries are
hardly new. Last month, the Wall
Street Journal reported that Mor-
gan Stanley plans to pay up to $3
billion in retention bonuses to
6,500 brokers in its joint venture
with Smith Barney. Morgan Stan-
ley has received $10 billion in
bailout funds.

In a December survey of 264
companies across a variety of
industries, business consultant
Watson Wyatt Worldwide found
that nine per cent of companies
had added, or expected to add, a
special retention bonus. An addi-
tional 21 per cent were consider-
ing doing so.

¢ Associated Press Writer
Michael Virtanen contributed to
this report from Albany, N_Y.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MILLCROSS MANOR
HOLDINGS LTD.

— ¢ sl
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MILLCROSS MANOR HOLDINGS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

TRINITE INVEST SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 of The International Business
Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, TRINITE INVEST
SA is in dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was the 11" day of March, 2009. Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
TRINITE INVEST SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE
REIGATE VENTURES LTD.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of REIGATE VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PARK AVENUE
HOLDINGS LTD.

— 4, —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PARK AVENUE HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MALMESBURY
VENTURES LTD.

—— 4 ——
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MALMESBURY VENTURES LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

































Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOYLENWORTH
HOLDINGS LTD.

—_— 4 eae
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SOYLENWORTH HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAGIC CHARM
HOLDINGS LTD.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MAGIC CHARM HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAELCHAN TWO
GROUP INC.

—— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MAELCHAN TWO GROUP INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LOTUS CHAMPS LTD.

= /, ee
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LOTUS CHAMPS LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

a Lae

THE TRIBUNE









SOPHIE, SAM
TOLD ME ABOUT
YOUR DECIGION

TO TRY OLIT FOR
CHEERLEADER!



TO TALK ME
OUT OF IT...IVE
MADE MY PECISION!

KS

ee
---JUST
UNDERSTAND?
THAT THESE GIRLS
a
ess



TO TRY TO
DISSUAPE YOUL--

WON'T MAKE IT
EASY FOR YOU!

©2009 by North America Syndicate. Inc.

GREEN COFFEE,
GREEN BURGER,
5| GREEN FRIES, AND A
BOTTLE OF GREEN

(WHOA, DAG, WHAT'S
WITH THE GREEN
FACE?



www.Blondie.com.



XL WouLPN'T
Vo THAT

DRINK THEIZ PIRTY
BATAWATER

‘©ac09 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights “eservec



BUT CONSIDERING MY LIFES
IN SHAMBLES RIGHT NOW,
ae COULDNT You AT
LEAST TAKE THE
BLAME ?

YoU BROKE NOUR BEANIE
MOTOR, NoT ME! I DIDNT
DO ANYTHING /

T DID NOT!



+ SNIFF +
“*SNIFFLE+

T WAS JUST
<| S/TTING HERE!
Yoo YOU BROKE {T

£

© 1989 Universal Press Syndicate



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday









é
=
€
rs
=
es
z
a
g
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©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

‘NOU CAN'T KISS ME, MARGARET. I HAVEN'T

HAD ALL OF MY SHOTS.” Difficulty Level * 4%






















CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across Down
1 Ladies’ man holding an 1 Song and dance gets little




ancient city office (6) publicity (6)
4 Bird to catch on 2 Short summary concerning
horseback (6) headgear (5)
9 Food for cattle in 3 Fruit that’s new to
Switzerland (7) Capri (7)
10 Strange glee | come 5 Marble street (5)
across in Belgium (5) 6 They’re unnecessary,

11 Aspice having no end of pointless, but still

use in savouries (5) pointed (7)

12. Girl who's pill-shy 7 Convert me with this
crying out for belief (6)
treatment (7) 8 It may be taken as an










Across: 1 All-star, 5 Beset, 8 Pay
lip service, 9 Crook, 10 Galileo, 11 18
Vanity, 12 Etched, 15 Bahrain, 17 20
Ambit, 19 At loggerheads, 20 Tawny, 22
21 Hearsay.

Down: 1 Aspic, 2 Lay down the law,
3 Trinket, 4 Resign, 5 Beryl, 6 Spill
the beans, 7 Toehold, 11 Vibrant, 13 24
Trachea, 14 Enmesh, 16 Angry, 18
Tasty.

of London, 9 Alibi, 10 Restful, 11
Digest, 12 Abates, 15 Salutes, 17
Cigar, 19 Inexpressible, 20 Ensue, 21
Depress.

Down: 1 Extra, 2 Bowling alleys, 3 In
ruins, 4 Effort, 5 Gross, 6
Indefatigable, 7 Tingles, 11 Despite,
13 Bucks up, 14 Ascend, 16 Tepee,
18 Reels.

Fanatical (5)

23 Something very

agreement (6)



Pyrenean republic (7) 15

Ascent (5) 16

ugly (7) 17
International 19

Impassioned (6) 21

APT 3-G




ARE YOU SURE YoU DON'T WANT
TO STAY AND FINISH THAT PIZZA,





NO THANKS, TOMMIE.
TWO'S COMPANY,



©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

© 2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. Wartd rights reserved.



YOU TWO KIDS HAVE FUN AND ENJOY

YOUR WEEKEND OFF.

Ti PUT
IT ON MY
“TO po”



HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

V ucarn VY som WHAT A
YOUAVE NURSE WILL S(T, FULL-LENGTH
TO LOSE GIVE YOU DOCTOR MIRROR
WEIGHT / A DIET





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fram Che tiers shea bet? Tin

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nine-leLber wind, Mie pilicala

TODAY'S TARGET

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Chankern = 2) (iT ELITE.

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TESTERDATS SOLUTION
ANCEDORALAN aroma corm
CHa CUD Dom cram harm
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Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer







































13 Fine steak and a drink on indication of health (11)
the house (11) 14 This animal won't always
18 Revised list for a retailer in die a natural death (7)
a growing trade (7) 15 Popped the question after
20 Aprose form that gives work, but not accepted (7) Lu Across Down
difficulties (5) 16 State in a loud and —_l 1 Unexpected 1 Go back (6)
22 Children are a contentious resolute way (6) N refusal (6) 2 Two ofa kind (5)
point (5) 17 Credit is twice provided in > 4 Instructive 3 Sweet-scented
23 Places visited on vacation an emergency (6) ou experience (6) flower (7)
or between vacations (7) 19 She's a bit of a siren, > 9 French vineyard 5 Fit out (5)
24 He acts dumb (6) evidently (5) ” estate (7) 6 A disappointment (7)
25 Converts work into play, 21 Take off from the perhaps (6) runway (5) Lu 11 Lees (5) 8 Egyptian
12 Pacify (7) boy-king, died
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution 13 Russian c.1324 BC (11)
Across: 1 Ebb tide, 5 Glint, 8 Tower eomposer (11) 14 An analgesic (7)

Dutch painter,
1632-75 (7)
Surgical
instrument (6)
Arrival (6)
Disprove by
argument (5)
Penniless (5)















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

ON OO] (HA D/M) o/s
NM ®m BIO!;N/oo;o1;—|o
— OF ©/0/BR/M|N) | 0
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3/18

East dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.

NORTH
40107
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WEST EAST
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SOUTH
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632
#10
The bidding:
East South West North
| & 1 2 26
3 & 4@

Opening lead — four of clubs.

A defender should approach every
deal with the attitude that the oppos-
ing contract can be defeated. This
may sometimes require him to make
what appears to be a suicidal play,
but if that play offers the only hope
of defeating the contract, it must be
made.

Consider East’s dilemma on this
deal. He wins the opening club lead
with the king and must then decide
where the defense can get three more
tricks.

As can be seen, if he tries to cash





































7/6]9/2 : :
913/5/7 5_2/9/1|8 BN6/9
9lgl4l4 NS 3/7/6|/9 BN2 7 9
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A Positive Approach

the club ace, South makes the con-
tract easily. Declarer ruffs, draws
trumps and forces out the A-K of dia-
monds. The defenders cannot attack
hearts effectively from either side
while the diamonds are being estab-
lished, and South eventually disposes
of his heart losers on dummy’s last
two diamonds.

However, East should realize that
South started with a singleton club,
since West almost certainly has four
clubs for his raise. East should fur-
ther adopt the view that his partner is
very likely to have an ace for his bid,
as little else is missing.

The next step is to credit West
with an ace that will allow the con-
tract to be defeated. The possibility
of West’s holding the heart ace is
therefore dismissed, since if he has
that card (and declarer the other two
aces), the most the defenders can
hope to collect is two heart tricks.

Next, East throws out the possibil-
ity of West’s having the trump ace, as
in that case South will end up with 11
tricks,

The only hope thercfore is that
West has the diamond ace. If he also
has exactly three diamonds, the
defense is in business.

Accordingly, at trick two East lays
down the king of diamonds. When it
holds, he leads a second diamond to
West’s ace and then ruffs the dia-
mond return to sink the contract.

Tomorrow: Rara avis.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc,



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



tS





The Tribune

Mr Paul said he decid-
ed to become involved in
the juice making business
full time after he decided
it could be promising and
profitable.

“I worked in engineer-
ing for Bahamasair for
the past four years and I
just recently resigned. It
was too time consuming
and I wanted to put all of
my time and energy into
my business,” Mr Paul
SIG

Na’tya Juice is a com-
pany that manufactures
fruit drinks and smoothes
that started right out of
his mothers’ kitchen.

“My mom had two smoothie flavors that she made
when me and my siblings were younger. I noticed that it
became really popular in the area among neighbors and
friends. I decided one day to bottle it and give out sam-
ples to get feed back from the public. People actually
liked the drinks so I wanted to try and make a product
out of it,” Mr Paul said.

Mr Paul said he added new and interesting flavors to
his mothers’ original batches.

“We have one called
Mama Cassava Carrot
Smoothie, which consists of
bananas, cassava milk and
carrots. Another is called
Bahama Beet, which is a
smoothie made from fresh
beets, bananas, some
coconut milk and a few other
ingredients,” Mr Paul said.

Customers of Na’tya Juice
are not only limited to the
flavors provided, but can
custom design their own fla-
vors.

“With our personal client
base we are giving people
the opportunity to customise
their own drinks by letting us

know what they want,” Mr Paul said.

Mr Paul said he is also on a quest to raise the natural
health awareness of the Bahamian people.

“We are trying to bring juice therapy to the forefront,
which is a standard juicing process that a lot of physi-
cians around the world use. Juice therapy itself has
been around for hundreds of years but it was not given
aname at the time. There are hundreds of diseases out
there that can be cured by juicing practices like drink-
ing lime juice,” Mr Paul said.

MAKING

DREAMS
CO aie:

m@ BY ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

FOLLOWING your dreams is great, and work-
ing hand-in-hand with a partner, family or friends
to accomplish those dreams is even better. One
just needs to be sure that accomplishment is real-
ly in the future of that dream and Jack Paul, own-
er of Na’tya Juice made it clear that is dream
would be a success.

It’s the weekend baby

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemeida.net

FOR many working people,
the weekend is a time to simply

i

FirstCaribbean

unwind, forget about the bumps
and stresses built-up throughout
the last five days, and to just
enjoy friends, good times, and
total relaxation.

One event which over the
years has become synonymous

|

i el i
r . ro

with the start of the weekend, is
known to many as Happy Hour
Friday.

From its humble beginnings
as simply an hour to drink all
you could with a few co-work-
ers at your favorite hangout,

a

Happy Hour Friday has become
the official weekend starter,
where many bars and restaurants
host karaoke parties, network-
ing events, and other trendy
activities all designed to help you
get away from the usual dramas
of life, if only for a few hours.

However, one beverage
provider has upped the ante with
its approach to the happy hour
experience- ‘Get Your Happy
Hour On.’

According to the Burns House
group of companies, the event
features a uniquely designed mix
of wines and spirits which are
centered around the season.

Burns House Distribution and
Franchise Systems (DFS) mar-
keting retail manager Kira Hor-
ton, explained that since the offi-

‘

Ot,

cial launch of the initiative last
year, just about all of its 35 bev-
erage depot locations and affili-
ates have joined the band-wagon
in providing to its customers the
Get Your Happy Hour On dis-
count campaign.

According to Ms Horton, cus-
tomers are able to choose from
three season inspired mixed
liquor specials, which are not just
original blends, but also an
opportunity for those looking to
save a little extra to do so.

“It’s catching on, we have the
fabulous fifty jingle for it, as well
as free sampling at participating
locations.”

The event which is highlighted
at a different location once a
month draws in scores of profes-
sionals and others who are just
excited about the onset of their
two days of freedom.

With this month bringing the
start of spring, Burns House is
offering the March special which
includes The Baileys Hell’s



Kitchen, Absolutely Peachy
Keen, and Campari Wave.

The Baileys Hell’s Kitchen is
made from a mix of original Bai-
leys with Johnnie Walker Red
Label. Although not an obvious
blend, this drink is described as
“pure heaven” as its cool com-
bination has a way of ‘taking you
to ecstasy with all your clothes
on.’

The Absolut inspired mix is a
marriage between Absolut
Peach, Malibu Coconut Rum,
and pineapple juice, which is
without question a colorful fiesta.

Last but not least is the Cam-
pari Wave comprised of regular
Campari and orange juice.

With these beverages sure to
add a flair to any occasion, Burns
House feels it has done its part in
providing exciting and econom-
ically priced drinks to the Happy
Hour crowd. But as always, Ms
Horton insist: “We encourage
you to drink, but to do so
responsibly.”

FOR SALE BY OWNER

HIGH POINT ESTATES

WELL ESTABLISHED GATED COMMUNITY LOCATED NEAR

SOON TO BE DEVELOPED
BAHAMAR RESORT

DUPLEX LOT 62 X130 IN PRIME LOCATION
$125,000.00

MULTI-FAMILY LOT -11,192 sq.ft. HILL TOP

$140,000.00

5%--DOWN - FINANCING CAN BE ARRANGED

ee ee ee

or ml ed ni igh al “a :
irirtes 5 ee EM Tn] ge
2 ee

ee ee

oe ee ea
cel pene mean ea

FOR MORE INFO. CALL JIMMY
425-8075 OR 322-8858

Se ee
|



A ee |



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 9B



ENTERTAINMENT



The Tribune



@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

OILINSHA Coakley, owner of Oilinsha’s Mod-
els and Talents, is getting ready to work his mag-
ic and bring forth beauty, intelligence and style
into the lives of 28 young Bahamians at the sec-
ond installment of Super models of the Bahamas.

Super Models of the
Bahamas has been a life long
dream for Mr Coakley, a 21
year veteran in the modeling,
fashion and entertainment
business. He is not just doing
it as competition, but is
changing lives.

“T mainly wanted to have a
modeling event in order to
help the funding that comes
from the event to lift the
agency to the next level in
terms of finding the best mod-
els out there. There are many
who walk through my agency
and they really don’t want to
be models, they just want to
be seen or they just want to
be in pictures- but this busi-
ness is about getting down
and dirty, working hard and
making a salary. It’s about
being dedicated, being hum-
ble, having a good attitude,
being respectful to your agent
and clients, it is just like any
other job, but the difference
with modeling is your looks-
your look is sold to the
client,” Mr Coakley
explained.

Mr Coakley said he knows
this year’s competition will be
challenging due to many
more youngsters interested in
participating as opposed to
last year.

“The number of contestants
started at 40 and I had to cut
it down because I started
scanning through persons and
right now I can’t accept per-
sons with excuses. Last year
we had Pulse and Elite mod-
els on our panel last year.
These girls and boys are going
abroad to represent the
Bahamas at the highest cal-
iber possible in these model-
ing events. These events they
go to internationally are like
Miss Universe. There are so
many girls and boys compet-
ing, so in that perspective, the
individuals flying out have to
be at the highest caliber possi-
ble,” Mr Coakley said.

Mr Coakley is planning to
increase the level of interna-
tional attention to the
Bahamas and has already
invited international media
such as Essence, GQ, and
SHE magazines, along with
Runwaynews.com to cover
the event.

“This event this year will
take place at the British Colo-
nial Hilton. It will be covered
internationally and stream-
lined with print and electronic
media. The local station, JCN
network will also continue to
carry the reality show that
documents the entire compe-
tition,” Mr Coakley said.

The Bahamian public can
also get a chance to get to
know the models and vote for

MODELS of Supermodels Of the Bahamas show off for the camera

at various events including Islands of the World Fashion Week 2008.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTIAN JULIE of 9TH
AVENUE FT. LAUDERDALE 33304 is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 18 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE is hereby given that JAMES VINCENT of
SOUTH BEACH DRIVE, P.O. BOX SB-51712, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 18 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANGELLA PIERRE-JEROME of
HAWKSBILL, ABACO DRIVE #43, P.O.BOX F41422, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10th day of MARCH, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-
7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



them on the contest’s website
beginning April 1.

Mr Coakley said he will
continue to be dedicated to
putting model hopefuls in the
right atmosphere to meet suc-
cess.

“This business is about
refinement and a very disci-
plined business. A model
must be versatile and be will-
ing to go that extra mile for
the client in order to make
the tens of thousands of dol-
lars and that is what I am try-
ing to do for these young
models.”

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

OPERATIONS MANAGER

The Operations Manager will be responsible for the development, harmonization
and implementation of revised operational policies and procedures throughout
our branch and unit network. The ideal candidate will have strong leadership
and communication skills and bring focus to the operational needs of all
branches by providing support to customer service initiatives, regulatory
reporting and compliance, review of branch administrative controls, as well
as the development of collective operational goals for branch administrative
personnel.

Core Responsibilities:

Contributes to the revision and implementation of the Bank’s policies and
procedures

Reviewing and making recommendations for the improvement in
Management Reporting

Identifying areas of opportunity for improvement of operating efficiency
Prepares and submits Reports on all banking operations to Senior
Management

Monitor Branch performances against approved targets

Monitors compliance of operations with Bank’s policies and procedures,
as well as recommendations made by internal audit and external parties
Ensures Bank is operating in accordance with regulatory requirements
Liaising with departmental heads to maintain database of recommendations
and request of operational changes

Assist in establishing operational objectives and monitoring the achievement
of the objectives

Reviewing operations job descriptions and functions in accordance with
ongoing operational changes.

Job Requirements:

¢ Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.
Knowledge of Banking laws, including requirements of The Central Bank
of The Bahamas which governs Commercial Banking.
Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced environment
Strong supervisory and customer service skills are essential.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include:

Competitive salary and benefits package, commensurate with work experience
and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later than March 31st,
2009 to:

DA # 69842
c/oThe Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com





PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS



Souvenl
de Ayiti

FROM page 12

because I love people, I love }
nature and I somehow find a way :
to record these experiences of i
what I see and what I feel on :

canvas,” Mr Eyma said.

Mr Eyma works mainly from i
the Nassau studio that he shares :
with his wife, Roshanne. His :
original paintings and giclee }
prints can be found in local gal- :
leries and private collections in }
England, Jamaica, and the Unit- :

ed States.

During the late 1980's and ear- :
ly 1990's, he exhibited his work at i
the Central Bank of thei
Bahamas Annual Art Exhibition :
and Competition. He also par- }
ticipated in numerous shows of i
the Longbranch Artists and Arti-
sans. After a decade of absence, }
he returned to his love of paint- }
ing in 2003. At the very first exhi- }
bition of the National Art
Gallery of The Bahamas, one of i
his acrylic paintings "Fort Hill }

Houses" was accepted.

Although Mr Eyma said he
supports any young person inter- :
ested in pursuing art, he wants }
them to be realistic about what ;
? resort was packed with both locals and

they are getting into.

“Tt is sad that the society in }
which we live does not really i
encourage youngsters to become i
what they want to be because of }
i Brooklyn, New York native Omilani per-

their likes and preferences,

everything is geared towards }
making money or becoming }
somebody. I would not encour- }
age any youngster to become the }
proverbial starving artist, but it is
good if they believe they have a }
skill that they can pursue it, }
become good at it and do it not }
so much so because of what oth-
ers are thinking, but because you ?
know this is a way that you can

express yourself,” Mr Eyma said.

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

THIS week in entertainment, its :
art, art, and more art. Tribune Fea- i
tures is bringing you its top five ;
things-to-do list, which begins with :
an hilarious stage performance by :
the one and only crazy Dynamite ;

Daisy.

1.It’s the return of the stage per- :
formance ‘Daisy’s the Valley of The :
Shadow of Death.” The single per- i
formance is scheduled to be held :
at the Holy Trinity Activity Centre :
on Saturday March 28, with the :
show set to begin at 6pm. Tickets :
can be purchased at the One Hun- :
Bible bookstore, or the :
Golden Gates Assembly Church, at i
a price of $25 for adults and $20 for :

dred%

children.

2.The public is invited to join i
Richard Hokemeir at Gray Cliff to :
view his 2009 Photographic Art :
Show. Enjoy the art, warmth and :
beauty of The Bahamas displayed on i
exotic papers from around the }
world. The event will be held this :
Saturday and Sunday, March 21st & :
March 22nd from noon until 8:00 :
p.m. Please also feel free to invite all i
your friends! For details, phone 364- :

4625.

3.The Bahamas Kennel Club is hav- :
ing its 2009 all breed dog show and :
obedience trial this Saturday and :
Sunday. Bringing in dozens of local :
and international dog owners and :
breeds, the event will focus on breed :
authenticity and dog obedience :
training. Set to take place at the :
Botanical Gardens, the event will be :
judged by June and Gerard Penta :
from Pennsylvania, and Harold and :
Rose Doan from Florida. To have
your dog entered or to get more :
detail on this event, dial 3931360 or :
visit www.bahamaskennelclub.org ;

4. The sixth annual Reggae all Stars
annual concert will be held March :

28 at Clifford Park. The Host for :
this reggae lovers event is non oth- i
er than Tempo’s DownTown Island :
personality Empress Jenelle. Artists
slated to perform include Sizzla,

Capelton, I-Rate, Warrior King, lley i
Dread, TaDa, Sammy Star, and an }
array of other local artist and Disc }
Jockey’s. Now on sale at VIP tickets :
are available this week at $40, and :
will increase to $60 next week. They :
are now on sale at the Marley Resort :
or Juke Box, The Backstage tickets :
are now available at a cost of $100, :

and will increase to $150 on the : of musicians on the rise, it is now more

? common to hear an R&B, pop, or even

day of the show.

5. Also happening this week is a entirely by Bahamians.

visual art presentation titled ‘Fire’,

which debuted at Popop art studio F
yesterday. The exhibition which :
embraces people and motion as its :
canvas, will continue until April 7 at :
the same venue. The artists for the :
event include Toby Lunn and Kendal :
Hanna, and more details are available :

at www.popopstudios.com.

TAN ae
WAV aa

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN

Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

REGGAE sensation Tanya Stephens
entertained hundreds of Bahamians
and visitors with her performance
during the highly anticipated “Con-
versations” experience at the Marley

Resort last week.

The event drew a full house and the

visitors anxious for an opportunity to

speak one-on-one with Ms Stephens.
Kicking off the event at around 7.30pm

last Friday, Trinidadian inspired and

formed songs from her sophomore album
“Lyrical Kiss.”

From the popular “Daughter of the
Diaspora,” to her hip hop track “New
Money”, Omilani offered the fans great
entertainment.

Next up was Miami R&B artist Philip
Michael whose sound has been described
as a mix between John Legend and
Anthony Hamilton.

Both artists engaged in conversations
with the audience while on stage, giving
them a first-hand insight into their inspi-
ration to sing, their styles and their ambi-
tions as artists on the rise.

Following these performances, the lev-



el of excitement soared as the crowd got
ready to welcome Tanya Stephens on
stage.

After waiting for more than two hours,
the reggae star finally made her way to the
stage, giving a rousing performance which
featured many of her popular hits.

She performed such hits as “These
Streets”, “It’s a Pity”, “Handle The Ride”,
“Goggle”, “Yu Nuh Ready Fi Dis Yet”,
and “Draw Fi Mi Finger.”

While many fans walked away think-
ing the show a complete success, the pro-
moters did fail to deliver on one of their
major promises, which was to allow mem-
bers of the audience a chance to chat with
the reggae star.

However, Tribune Features spoke with
Ms Stephens last Thursday in an exclusive
interview and she revealed some of her
future career plans.

The performer, who has graced the air-
waves for more than 18 years with her



unique form of addressing social issues,
said her inspiration comes from every-
thing around her.

And although she has been extremely
blessed to have her message heard by
thousands, her ambitions early on did not
include being a singer.

“T never particularly wanted to be an
artist, I used to hang out with people who
wanted to be an artist, but I started out
doing a lot of poetry.”

She said as time passed, she began to
see the power in music, and soon began
performing as a solo music artist.

Having a healthy and long career in
the industry, Tanya said every one of her
albums has been like a storybook or chap-
ter of her life.

From love, to success and even failure,
Tanya said her remedy to any situation is
to sing about it.

Even though she has performed in
almost every major city around the world,



she said she enjoys the comfort of just liv-
ing as a ‘regular person’.

With her 14-year-old daughter Kelly as
her main inspiration, Tanya said life for
her remains grounded because of her
“earth angel.”

The reggae star, who will be releasing a
new album early next year, said that she
anticipates her retirement from the music
industry within the next six years.

She said as she has had a chance to
shine over the past few years, stepping
aside to allow someone else to have their
voice heard seems like the natural thing to
do, “otherwise the industry would become
stagnated.”

When asked what she plans to do after
leaving the industry, Tanya said she hopes
tostart a mentorship programme for chil-
dren in Jamaica where her experience and
knowledge as a parent and artist could in
some way help other youngsters to find
their place in the world.



2 * <
6
ss

A prototype for music’s next generation

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE definition of Bahamian music
has for a long time been confined to the
usual rake-n-scrape, soca, junkanoo, or
calypso beat. However with a new wave

rock track over the airwaves produced

This is especially true for one group
of artists, who feels their choice to
encompass and embrace a wide range of
music genres, as well an array of artistic
personalities under one umbrella, will be
the determining factor in their eventual
success.

Archetype Infinity (AI) is a music pro-

duction, publishing, record label, and
conceptual art powerhouse, which is the
brainchild of Ashley Deveaux supported
by Chris Carey aka Sketch, Davineir
Clarke, and Anastasia Marie Dolli Nel-
son.

Ashley said two years ago when he
first got the vision for Archetype Infinity,
he was at a crossroad forced to choose
between following his vision for the com-
pany, or to pursue a career in medicine
which he had already started.

Deciding to take the risk in a company
and business he knew very little about,
Ashley flew home from Canada at the
beginning of summer 2006, and spent the
next few months reading and learning
all he could about music production and
the intricacies of operating a full circle
media company.

Along the way, Ashley explained he
was introduced to a creative and talented
singer, ironically through his little broth-
er who was Sketch’s classmate.

He has an amazing voice and has been
a part of the AI team ever since.

Ashley said meeting Sketch was a
dream come true, because for the first
time he was able to join forces with some-
one who shared the same vision.

With a large amount of Al’s energy
and resources being focused on estab-
lishing its presence in the local enter-
tainment pool, the group has slowly gar-
nered a significant following, after the
release of the song My Candidate.

Preformed by Sketch, the song speaks
for all guys who have had a crush on a girl
at one time or another, and who are try-
ing to find a way to engage and develop

a relationship with that girl.

According to Ashley: “People have
been promoting it, because we didn’t
really have the funds to put it out there.
It meant a lot to us, because it was num-
ber one because people liked what they
heard.”

He said the work that went into the
song allows you to hear bits of junkanoo
and pop, but more so the junkanoo vibe
oozing from the song, which is similar to
Christmas or Boxing Day.

Toping the 100 Jamz Bahama Hot
Ones for nearly two months, Sketch is
definitely a force to be reckoned on the
local scene.

With a plethora of unreleased materi-
al from a mix of artist, and with big plans
for the future, AI is surely the next big
group to emerge from these islands.



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPO

5-Day FORECAST 7 INDEX ger

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High: 81° F/27°C Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy. Partly sunny. Partly sunny. Partly sunny with a Very windy; partly The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
( re sve > thunderstorm. shower possible. sunny, a shower. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
rt ail . High: 79° High: 79° High: 75° High: 77°
© i rk High: 79° Low: 71° Low: 69° Low: 68° Low: 67° Low: 68° see EE
TAMPA ee ET A
High: 79° F/26°C a a 93°-69° F 73°-63° F 74°-61° F High _HL(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft.
Low: 60° F/16°C : 7. = The 7 eee an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:43am. 24 803am. 06
a @ Z ‘* elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 1:54pm. 20 8:03pm. 05
} \ 9 Zi5am. 23 O0dam. 06
3 Z Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Frida 349am. 23 1004am. 06
| = ty ABACO Temperature . 401 p.m. 2.0 10:11pm. 05
/ Ne” 3 High: 76° F/24° C 7 si snatodsugans«tagndabaaseeteie ciara scoserueie a a Saturday 4-48 am. 73 1058am. 05
y y Ar Low: 68° F/20°C OW varstntstet » F/22° 5:01pm. 21 11:10pm. 04
ag WHE ——— Normal high ... 79° F266 —______________
Naf ie “is ormal low . ° °
4 opp, @WESTPALMBEACH = =(-/\ Last year's hight vcs arrerc | SUE
— High: 80° F/27°C E Last year's lOW occ 72° F/22° C
— Low: 67° FA9°C . Precipitation = =—————_—sSunrise....... 7:16am. Moonrise. .... 1:48 a.m.
rat /_ As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....cccccssseessssseeecssseeeee 0.00" Sunset....... 7:20 p.m. Moonset... . 12:19 p.m.
mart FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT “i Year to date | a a. |
High: 78° F/26° C @ High: 75° F/24° C Normal year to date oo. cceeeeeeeee 4.38" 4
Low: 68° F/20°C Fi Low: 66° F/19°C
iz AccuWeather.com
a @ a - Forecasts and graphics provided by Se 2
; MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.18 Mar.26 Apr.2 Apr. 9
High: 79° F/26° C Fh. 700 F/Qro
Low: 68° F/20° C NASSAU Se as Fae
High: 79° F/26° C aM
: =a Low: 71°F/22°C .
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KEY WEST ‘ << ae CATISLAND
High: Le F/25° C High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 68° F/20° C Low: 63° F/17°C
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~ GREAT EXUMA O SAN SALVADOR
High: 79° F/26° C ith: 24° °
Low: 69°F/21°C eee
. 4 Low: 65°F/18° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 82° F/28° C e
Low: 68° F/20° C
wr
LONGISLAND
Low: 65° F/18°C
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 83° F/28° C
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC Fic FC Low: 66° F/19°C
Albuquerque 74/23 46/7 ~s 70/21 45/7 pe Indianapolis 66/18 39/3 r 54/12 30/-1 pe Philadelphia 65/18 46/7 pe 57/13 344 4+ :
Anchorage 23/-5 10/-12 s 24/-4 11/-11 Jacksonville 73/22 54412 pe 78/25 52/11 s Phoenix 89/31 60/15 s 89/31 62/16 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 70/21 48/8 s 74/23 43/6 sh Kansas City 62/16 36/2 c 61/16 36/2 s Pittsburgh 71/21 42/5 po 45/7 24/-4 + RAGGEDISLAND — High:85°F/29"c
Atlantic City 60/15 45/7 po 56/13 29/-1 + Las Vegas 83/28 53/11 s 83/28 5743 pc Portland, OR 5613 415 c 57/13 43/6 c High: 84° F/29° C Low: 68° F/20°C
Baltimore 66/18 45/7 pe 56/13 341 1 Little Rock 76/24 49/9 s 63/17 42/5 pe Raleigh-Durham 69/20 46/7 s 70/21 39/3 sh Low:65°F/18°C
Boston 56/13 41/ pe 5040 29/-1 Fr Los Angeles 78/25 56/13 s 74/23 56/13 pc St. Louis 68/20 42/5 sh 57/13 388 s . ae.
Buffalo 5412 33/0 1 40/4 22/-5 sf Louisville 72/22 46/7 pe 55/12 36/2 pc Salt Lake City 63/17 39/8 pce 65/18 41/5 pc GREATINAGUA
Charleston, SC 68/20 50/10 pc 73/22 49/9 pc Memphis 76/24 50/10 s 6417 43/6 1 San Antonio 81/27 56/13 s 79/26 55/12 $ High: 84° F/29° C
Chicago 542 33/0 + 47/8 26/-3 pc Miami 79/26 67/19 t 80/26 64/17 pc San Diego 70/21 56/13 pe 68/20 56/13 pc Low. 68° F/20°C
Cleveland 60/115 35/1 r 44/6 26/-3 pc Minneapolis 53/11 27/-2 § 46/7 28/-2 s San Francisco 65/18 49/9 pce 64/17 50/10 pc
Dallas 80/26 55/12 s 70/21 50/10 pc Nashville 72/22 47/8 s 58/14 38/3 5 Seattle B1H0 42/5 4+ 521 42/5 +
Denver 5613 31/0 c 62/16 37/2 pc New Orleans 77/25 5713 s 78/25 56/13 s Tallahassee 79/26 49/9 pe 79/26 50/10 s a
Detroit 5613 34/1 + 44/6 25/-3 pc New York 6317 46/7 pe 52/11 33/0 Fr Tampa 79/26 60/15 pc 79/26 60/15 pc
Honolulu 79/26 68/20 sh 80/26 69/20 pc Oklahoma City 82/27 49/9 s 63/17 45/7 pe Tucson 85/29 52/11 s 87/30 57/13 s — Bo
Houston 78/25 56/13 s 78/25 56/13 pc Orlando 81/27 59/15 pce 82/27 59/15 pc Washington, DC 69/20 47/8 pe 58/14 36/2 r



PAO ODE







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~

Tt TT

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

a EOS

High
F/C
838/31
48/8
43/6
58/14
17/25
93/33
85/29
63/17
79/26
64/17
41/5
43/6
65/18
65/18
52/11
45/7
79/26
73/22
93/33
43/6
84/28
82/27
80/26
43/6
55/12
54/12
58/14
42/5
84/28
32/0
81/27
84/28
47/8
56/13
67/19
83/28
81/27
59/15
70/21
88/31
75/23
86/30
48/8
34/1
44/6
86/30
95/35
37/2
57/13
41/5
81/27
82/27
61/16
83/28
90/32
88/31
90/32
82/27
78/25
64/17
36/2
75/23
86/30
68/20
52/11
86/30
48/8
42/5
37/2
24/-4

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High
F/C
87/30
50/10
39/3
54/12
73/22
91/32
84/28
63/17
61/16
64/17
36/2
41/5
66/18
64/17
52/11
43/6
81/27
77/25
95/35
45/7
85/29
83/28
77/25
44/6
54/12
52/11
56/13
39/3
82/27
28/-2
82/27
86/30
39/3
62/16
68/20
84/28
83/28
57/13
17/25
90/32
73/22
87/30
39/3
36/2
43/6
84/28
92/33
34/1
57/13
39/3
80/26
90/32
54/12
82/27
94/34
90/32
88/31
82/27
74/23
59/15
34/1
82/27
88/31
70/21
43/6
79/26
49/9
40/4
34/1
48/8

Thursday

Low
F/C
74/23
34/1
27/-2
39/3
59/15
75/23
74/23
49/9
37/2
57/13
30/-1
27/-2
63/17

a Bat Gee mae ee

nw
|

pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

SUSAR TH ev

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MarINE FORECAST

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
Thursday: _§ at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
Thursday: _$ at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
Thursday: _$ at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries
BKK] Snow
Ice

-0s 0s 10s 20s /808)) 40s

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Stationary angen.



AUTO INSURANCE

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(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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2. ee










Making Super Models of th
your
(ireams

come true
see page eight




epahamas: season 2



e

\

The Tribune SECTION B ¢ &

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009




ON THE ROAD
TO HATCHET BAY

pretty straight forward

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Full Text


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HIGH
LOW

SUNNY WITH

Volume: 105 No.96

FEATURES

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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

SS
a

Me: Es
BAHAMAS BIGGEST



a Pang protes
outsine The Tribune

Demonstration
held following
article on former
prime minister

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PROTESTERS rallied outside
The Tribune office yesterday
defending the reputation of the
late Sir Lynden Pindling who was
discredited in an article by man-
aging editor John Marquis.

The protest continued for a lit-
tle over an hour, during which
political activist and PLP hopeful
Paul Moss shouted orders from a
loudspeaker for the crowd to
“keep moving” along Shirley
Street and Deveaux Street.

He said the 40 Bahamians who
joined his cause to vindicate the
“Father of the Nation” repre-
sented thousands more who were
too afraid to be there, and
claimed the group would return
later in the day with more pro-
testers.

But rather than returning to
The Tribune, the modest group
of young men and women, who
clutched white placards accusing
Mr Marquis of being racist and
hating Bahamians, moved to the
Eastern Parade on East Bay

SEE page six

PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE
TO SPACE RESTRICTIONS,
LARRY SMITH’S TOUGH CALL

COLUMN WILL APPEAR IN
TOMORROW’S TRIBUNE



SOME OF THE PROTESTERS stand outside of The Tribune yesterday.

Former govt official backs

article, says the protest
was ‘a waste of time’

A FORMER government }
official who had first-hand
knowledge of Sir Lynden Pin- ;
dling’s close links with drugs }
king Joe Lehder said last night :
that yesterday’s protest out-
side The Tribune was “a waste

of time.”

He said the demonstrators }
didn’t know the facts and that }
the Insight article which }
sparked the protest was “right ;

on the button.”

The official, who made fre- :
quent visits to Norman’s Cay }

SEE page six

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When it comes to
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remember the smart choice is
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Smart people

iH

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KE Moe)

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| Eloathere =| Sxunn
uy nett nna sea





Body found on boat
near Potters Cay dock

m@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN’S body was discov-
ered onboard a boat moored
near the Potters Cay dock yes-
terday morning.

Police were alerted to the dis-
covery shortly after 10am.

Police press liaison officer
ASP Walter Evans said the
man, who has not yet been
identified, was found dead in
the cabin of the vessel wearing a
white T-shirt and underwear.

Police pulled the 26-foot red
and white boat near the south-
ern side of the Potter’s Cay
dock yesterday morning and
searched it for clues while
dozens of curious onlookers
stood by. It is believed that the
man lived on the vessel.

“The body has been there
definitely over 12 hours because
of the physical signs of deterio-
ration which is quite notice-
able,” ASP Evans said.

SEE page eight

Reginald Ferguson appointed
as Commissioner of oes

THE Cabinet Office

yesterday

announced the appointment of Reginald
Ferguson to the post of Commissioner of
Police by Governor General Arthur Hanna,
on the recommendation of Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham following consultation
with Opposition Leader Perry Christie.
The appointment is with effect from

Monday, March 16.

Mr Ferguson assumed duties as Acting
Commissioner of Police on November 21,
2007 upon former Commissioner of Police

Paul Farquharson’s commencement of pre-

retirement leave.

He becomes the fifth Commissioner of

SEE page eight

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FERGUSON



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Gunshots
fired in
high-speed
car chase

Man in custody after
dramatic pursuit

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

GUNSHOTS were fired through the streets of New Prov-
idence in a high speed chase from Wulff Road to the Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway on Monday night.

Police called for backup to pursue a black 2003 Ford Expe-
dition, with registration plate 99, when shots were fired from
the sports utility vehicle (SUV) in Wulff Road at around

9pm.

More gunshots were aimed at the caravan of police cars as
they pursued the SUV along Moore Avenue, Palm Beach
Street, Robinson Road and the East West Highway.

SEE page six



Former AG: both Christie and
Ingraham administrations did
not properly regulate CLICO

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

FORMER Attorney
General Alfred Sears
admitted that both the
Christie and Ingraham
adminisrations fell
down on the job by
not properly regulating trou-
bled CLICO (Bahamas).

He made this statement dur-
ing a meeting organised by



Alfred Sears

Bishop Simeon Hall of
New Covenant Baptist
Church where CLICO
policy holders inde-
pendently met to dis-
cuss their mounting
concerns over the
future of their invest-
ments.

“It also represents a
failure of the Bahami-
an government and
that is unfortunately
under the Progressive Liberal
Party as well as the Free

SEE page eight

$3, million worth of
marijuana is seized

POLICE in Andros seized more than $3 million worth of marijuana
during a special operation on the island.

According to police reports, Drug Enforcement Unit officers and
Andros police launched the operation in Central Andros last week Fri-

day.

While searching a villa shortly after 4pm that day, they found just
over two pounds of marijuana and arrested several men.
Based on the information obtained from those arrests, this operation

continued until Sunday.

Around 3pm, officers went to a dirt road in Fresh Creek and found
two crocus sacks and a white five gallon bucket full of marijuana.

A short distance away, officers found an additional 46 crocus sacks,
and six white five gallon buckets of marijuana.

Aman who was nearby fled when he saw the officers coming.

He was caught and arrested. In all, eight Bahamian men and one
Jamaican man were arrested in connection with the finds.

Police believe that the two discoveries are connected.

The drugs have a total weight of more than 2,200 pounds and a

local street value of $3,300,000.



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



More than 20
Haitian immigrants
are apprehended

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

OFFICIALS apprehended
more than 20 Haitian immi-
grants after a 30-foot wooden
sloop ran aground in water off
the South Beach area early yes-
terday morning.

Authorities were tipped off
after a concerned citizen spotted
the immigrants as they attempt-
ed to make landfall in the Mar-
shall Road area around Sam.

Up to press time last night,
27 immigrants had been caught
- including three women, 23 men
and a 14-year-old boy - Director

of Immigration Jack Thompson
told The Tribune.

Mr Thompson said officials
do not know the exact number
of migrants who were on board
the sloop, but believe that there
were about 50 passengers.

Officers were still combing
the area yesterday afternoon in
an effort to capture any remain-
ing migrants.

"We have to continue our due
diligence and see whether we
can find them," Mr Thompson
said.

Those who were apprehended
were taken to the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre, how-
ever, the immigration director

THIS HAITIAN SLOOP ran
aground near the South Beach

early yesterday morning.
Immigration officials estimate
that there were around 50
migrants on board, 27 have
been apprehended so far.





Felipé Major/Tribune staff

said they will be swiftly repatri-
ated.

"We are making every effort
to repatriate these people right
away. We are going to have
them repatriated at the earliest
possible time consistent with the
policy for speedy, orderly and
timely repatriation,” he said.



‘ig f k i , .
PIECES OF CLOTHING were left behind in the trees by the immigrants
who attempted to make landfall in the area of South Beach yesterday.





HAITIAN IMMIGRANTS look on as they are taken to the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre yesterday.

ROSANNA SEABORN TODD

Born on the 25th October, 1912 in Montreal, Quebec, Rosanna Seaborn Todd
passed away peacefully at her Lyford Cay residence on March 14th, 2009.

Ms. Todd was the daughter of Dr. John Lancelot Todd, a specialist in tropical
medicine and grand-daughter of Sir Edward Seaborn Clouston, once vice
president of the Bank of Montreal. She grew up in Senneville, Quebec and went
to finishing school in South Carolina where she became a close, life long friend
of Doris Duke. Soon after finishing school Ms. Todd attended the Royal Academy
of Dramatic Art in London and spent years acting with the Festival Theatre in
Cambridge, and the Westminster Theater in London. During the war Ms. Todd
joined the Royal Canadian Army and worked for the Red Cross in London.

Upon her return to Canada in 1947 Ms. Todd founded the “Open Playhouse
Theatre” in Mt. Royal, Montreal where she produced and starred in many of
the plays. The Open Playhouse Theatre launched some notable careers, one
being that of Christopher Plummer who had his first role there —unpaid !

Having her own film production company, Rosanna Todd produced and acted
in various films from the early 1950s to her last movie Hotel de L’ Avenier in
2004. In the 1960s she came to the Bahamas and built her beloved home “La
Feullie” in Lyford Cay. From here she traveled the world, and produced two
plays for local theatre. She starred in “Driving Miss Daisy” in the Dundas Centre
for Performing Arts in 1992.

For the past 30 years Ms. Todd researched the Canadian rebellion of 1837 and
the reforms that followed. She wanted to make a film that showed this important
event in Canadian history and how two different people and cultures have
learned to live together as one nation. Sadly, her dream never became reality.

Ms. Todd will be missed by her many friends and relatives, in the Bahamas and
around the world.



THIS DINGHY
} was used by
some Haitian
immigrants to
come ashore
yesterday
morning.



Government officials to
take part in Ride for Hope

MEMBERS of government
are taking part in this year's
record-setting Ride For Hope
in Eleuthera on April 4.

Minister of Health Hubert
Minnis will open the 4th annu-
al event at 9.30am at the stag-
ing area which will be set up
outside the North Eleuthera
Airport.

Minister of Sports Desmond
Bannister, President of the
Senate Lynn Holowesko, and
Speaker of the House Alvin
Smith will all ride to raise
money for cancer care and
treatment programmes in the
Bahamas.

Mr Bannister said he is look-
ing forward to being part of
the Ride For Hope this year.

“T'm delighted to participate
as a rider and support this
most worthy cause," he said.

Mrs Holowesko, who has
taken part in each ride of the
past three years, said, “The
Ride For Hope is an inspira-
tion to all involved and pro-
vides crucial financial and
moral support to those afflict-
ed with this terrible disease.”

Alvin Smith, Member of
Parliament for North
Eleuthera, opened the event
last year by commending the



DESMOND BANNISTER, Lynn Holowesko and Alvin Smith will all take part

Ride For Hope participants
and organisers. He highlighted
the importance of their contri-
bution to cancer care and
expressed his delight that the
Ride takes place on the beau-
tiful island of Eleuthera.

This year, Mr Smith will be
on a bike joining more than
300 riders on the road as they
pedal through his constituency.

Ride for Hope is a charitable
bike-a-thon designed to
accommodate people of all
ages and cycling abilities. Rid-
ers solicit sponsors for dona-
tions.

“The Ride is open to every-
one — the young and young at
heart, seasoned cyclists, raw

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Pee omeee

Editorial/Letters To The Editor

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



beginners, weekend warriors,
kids, moms and dads, grand-
parents — it's not a race,”
organisers said.

It does matters not if a par-
ticipant rides one mile or 100
miles, whether a person pedals
slowly or like the wind.

“For spectators and partici-
pants alike it's awe inspiring
to see children as young as 3
years old peddling their little
tricycles down the road,”
organisers said.

Last year, eight-year-old
Liam Holowesko rode for 50
miles.

Jay Major, now 14, has cov-
ered 100 miles in each Ride
For Hope.

“Not only are the children
made aware of the purpose of
their ride - that they’re raising
money for cancer care and
soliciting sponsors themselves
- but through their direct par-
ticipation they are learning the
importance of being involved
and giving back to their com-
munity,” said Mrs Holowesko.

“They are learning that
together we can make a differ-
ence.”

Susan Larson, co-chairman
of Ride For Hope, said she is
very pleased with the govern-
ment's level of participation
this year. “Not only do we
have Ministers Minnis and
Bannister, the Speaker of the
House, and the President of
the Senate joining forces with
us this year, but many other
government ministers and offi-
cials are also participating
through their individual spon-
sorships of their fellow House
or Senate members,” she said.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Cynthia Pratt reveals husband
has had both legs amputated

Chauncey —
Tynes Sr
laughs off
claims of |
‘dementia’

CHAUNCEY TYNES
SR., the former PLP trea-
surer who sparked the con-
troversy over Sir Lynden
Pindling and drug king Joe
Lehder, has laughed off
suggestions that he’s “in
dementia” - as alleged by
ex-minister Fred Mitchell.

“Tain’t there yet!” Mr
Tynes told The Tribune
after Mitchell’s remarks to
a Fox Hill meeting were
reported in the press.

In fact, 88-year-old Mr
Tynes, who looks after his
disabled wife, is regarded
by associates as remark-
ably sprightly and bright-
minded for his age.

And he has no regrets
for speaking out in an
Insight article about the
drug era which claimed the
life of his son, Chauncey
Tynes Jr.

Mr Tynes’ claim that
Chauncey Jr was killed
because he knew too much
about the links between
Sir Lynden Pindling and
Joe Lehder has caused
panic in the PLP.

Mitchell lashed out at
The Tribune, and especial-
ly its managing editor John
Marquis, who he described
as “a paid journalistic
assassin.”

Yesterday, Mr Marquis
said: “It’s an insult to cast
aspersions on Mr Tynes’s
mental state. In fact, he is
avery bright, articulate
man. I only hope I sound
half as good when I’m 88.”

m@ By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

FORMER deputy prime
minister Cynthia Pratt fought
back tears as she revealed to
the nation yesterday that her
70-year-old husband Joseph
Pratt has had both legs ampu-
tated at the Princess Margaret
Hospital.

Describing it as the most
difficult decision she has ever
faced, Mrs Pratt said she was
informed by doctors last week
that her husband was dying
and that she had two choices -
either amputate his second leg
or let him die in peace.

As a wife and a friend for so
many years, Mrs Pratt said
she could not sit by and watch
her husband die.

“So putting a pen to paper
was one of the most difficult
things I have done in my life;
to sign that consent form for
them to amputate his second
leg.

“He now lies in hospital
with both legs amputated.
This is very difficult for me.
Very difficult,” she said.

Describing Joseph as not
just her husband but also her
best friend, Mrs Pratt said that
as a very “hands-on repre-
sentative”, she wanted to
explain to her constituents
why she has been somewhat
distant in the past few weeks.

“T have not been able to get
around to my constituents as I
ordinarily would do. So many

1d



AN EMOTIONAL Cynthia Pratt, MP for St Cecilia, briefs the media on her husband’s health oon morning.

of them probably might won-
der, ‘well what has happened
to Mother Pratt?’ I want to
apologise to them because I
was not able to get around the
way I have done in the past
and that is simply because of
health reasons.”

About a month ago Mrs
Pratt revealed that doctors
were not optimistic about the
condition of her husband,
who suffers from diabetes.

Last week, he had his sec-

PLP Deputy ‘is still the
sitting MP for St Cecilia’

she said.

ond leg amputated and in the
past few days, Mrs Pratt said,
the doctors have not given her
anything to be hopeful about.

“I thought it necessary for
me to let my constituents
know so they would under-
stand why I have actually
been somewhat preoccupied.
I want to thank them for
understanding and I want to
thank them for their continu-
al prayers and support.

“My husband is presently
in the private medical ward.
Again he has not been in the
best of health according to the
doctors.

“But I still believe God, and
I still have faith in God that
they will bring him through,”
she said.

Noting how important it is
that she speak to her con-
stituents, Mrs Pratt said her

importance to me,” she said.

Breaking down in tears,
Mrs Pratt said that her hus-
band — who is suffering from
diabetes, hypertension, poor
circulation and alzheimer’s —
is not as coherent as she
would like him to be.

“But he is still alive,” she
said. “And so to the many
churches and well-wishers
who have come forth and the
scores of Bahamians who
have sent their best wishes, I
want to publicly thank them,”
she said.

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@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

respect for the people of St
Cecilia compels her to thank
them profusely for confiding
their trust in her for three
terms.

“These are special people,
and they are unique, and we
have a bond. It is not easy to
separate us. And I thought it
was important for me to come
to them so they can hear it
from me, so there would be
no questions asked as to why
Mother Pratt is not available
for certain things.

“I certainly would like to
perform a little bit better, but
sometimes circumstances alter
cases, and in this case, my hus-

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Mrs Pratt added that she is extremely proud
to be a part of the PLP as it is a party that
serves the Bahamian people.

PLP Deputy leader Cynthia Pratt asserted
yesterday that she still is the sitting member
of parliament for the St Cecilia constituency.

In the face of continuing unrest within the
ranks of the party, she said the PLP is one of the
greatest political organisations in the history
of the Bahamas.

“In every organisation there are challenges.
In every organisation there are fall-outs,” Mrs
Pratt said. “The PLP is no different.

“Even in your home there is fall-out. Some-
times the son wants to go one way and the
daughter wants to go another. But that does not
change the fact that the PLP is one of greatest

Colleagues

“The PLP is about service to the people.
That’s all I’m interested in. And so I want to say
to my colleagues, to encourage them that their
service is not in vain. In every organisation you
would make mistakes. Every human being
would make mistakes. But you learn from that
mistake.

What is important is that we serve the
Bahamian people to the best of our ability in
integrity, in honesty, and at the end of the day
the Bahamian people can say that Mother Pratt

political parties this country has ever seen,”

has tried,” she said.

PM won’t act on threat to tax

havens ‘at other people’s timing’




@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net



AMID calls for the govern-
ment to be proactive in address-
ing the growing threat to offshore
tax havens, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said he will
“not be driven” to act on the issue
“at other people’s timing”.

When asked to respond to calls
from financial service executives
for the government to issue a
public policy statement pledging
greater co-operation on interna-
tional tax matters, he quipped: “TI
love it when people tell me how
to do my job.”

“T think I know how to do my
job. I’ve got the experience to do
the job and I will do what’s best
for the Bahamas, I'll do it in a
timely manner, but I will not be
driven to do it at other people’s
timing,” said Mr Ingraham, in an
interview with The Tribune
before entering Cabinet.

On Monday, industry profes-
sionals told Tribune Business they
feel that in light of threatening
declarations recently made by
industrialised nations on the issue
of “tax havens” like the Bahamas,
it is urgent that the Bahamas act
swiftly to ensure its second indus-
try is not unduly penalised.

With the group of 20 nations
(G20) due to meet on April 2,
and the tax haven “problem” high
on the agenda, one such source,
said: “There has to be a serious
policy statement by the Bahamas
government before April 2 ... We
are one of the very few who have
not taken a position, like the



majority of international finan-
cial centres have done, and made
it known.”

In the last week jurisdictions
including Switzerland, the Cay-
man Islands, Bermuda and
Liechtenstein all committed to
further international co-opera-
tion on tax matters in response
to international pressure from
countries keen to collect more tax
and overhaul their financial sec-
tors in the wake of the global eco-
nomic downturn.

As for whether the Bahamas
intends to take any action or
make a statement to the interna-
tional community prior to April 2,
Mr Ingraham said yesterday the
government will “make its deci-
sion known in due course.”

Solutions

During the mid year budget
debate he affirmed that this coun-
try is facing a “renewed threat”
from industrialised countries as
they seek a solution to the global
financial crisis.

Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing went on to sug-
gest outside parliament that hav-
ing passed legislation since 2000
to “further shore up” its compli-
ance with international standards,
any response from the Bahamas
would be more a matter of ensur-
ing “we are regarded as a well-
regulated jurisdiction.”

Former attorney general
Alfred Sears yesterday asserted
that the government ministers’
statements thus far “do not
demonstrate a clarity of appreci-

ation of the harm.”

“Tf they are engaged in behind-
the-scenes maneuvering, then tell
me what you are doing, and if you
are not doing anything, the
Bahamas cannot afford inaction.”

The Fort Charlotte MP said
that with the Bahamas having
been listed “inaccurately” in the
Stop Tax Haven Abuse Bill which
was re-introduced in the US Con-
gress in early March as a “secrecy
tax haven engaged in unfair tax
practices” he hopes the govern-
ment is seeking to “engage in a
very vigorous diplomatic exer-
cise” to inform the US that the
description of the Bahamas as
such a jurisdiction is inappropri-
ate.

“Tt would do a grave injustice
to the Bahamas if it is passed.
What a responsible government
would do, is to engage the inter-
national community to clarify our
position. The Bahamas should be
held as a model,” he said.

Mr Sears added that Bahamas
must begin the process of negoti-
ating tax information exchange
agreements with nations other
than the United States and in the
long term “reframe its financial
services sector as a jurisdiction
which is not so much premised
on confidentiality but on quality
of service (and) diversity of finan-
cial products.”

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Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 « Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com



or Elegance
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama’s education plan: Stunning in scope

THE United States spends more on edu-
cating its children from kindergarten through
high school than most other industrialized
nations. Yet for all that, measured against
their peers, American children fair poorly,
ranking in the middle of students in 30 coun-
tries in science and in the last third in math-
ematics.

It’s a long-standing problem that educa-
tors have increasingly fretted about, without
managing to arouse the American people
out of their indifference to the costly imbal-
ance between money put in and achieve-
ments put out.

President George W. Bush tried to address
the issue with his No Child Left Behind ini-
tiative that sounded better than it performed.
It was designed to set national standards
against which school performances across
the land could be accurately measured and
compared.

One unintended consequence was to rein-
force the tendency to provide education that
was, in the words of a researcher, “a mile
wide and an inch deep” by teaching to the
tests, overloading students with information
while not requiring them to “master essential
concepts and information.”

It led to strenuous efforts to get every lag-
ging student to pass the tests that President
Obama characterized as a destructive “race to
the bottom.”

Now Obama has proposed an educational
reform stunning in the comprehensiveness
of its reach and the vastness of the $100 bil-
lion-plus to infuse a system already ingesting
large sums without providing sufficient qual-
ity.

The audacity of his proposal could be, one
can hope, the shocker that shakes up Amer-
ican education. In large part, his administra-
tion, under Education Secretary Arne Dun-
can, would provide monetary incentives to
schools, teachers, administrators and parents
to overcome narrow self-interests or lassi-
tude that have abetted the failures and short-
comings from which this nation suffers.

The president, as did his predecessor, wants
accountability and results. Obama is pre-
pared to pay for it.

Incompetent teachers would be rooted out
and effective ones rewarded in their pay-
checks. Those skilled in math and science

especially would be sought out and given
incentives to enlist and continue as teachers.

Upgrading America’s education to pro-
vide its people with the means to earn a living
in a global economy is as much or possibly
more a sociological and cultural challenge as
an educational one. Schools in which African-
American and Latinos dominate are among
the worst performers. They suffer from
extremely high drop out rates.

To address that aspect, Duncan recently
gave an impressive presentation. In a PBS
interview with Charlie Rose, he not only
stressed the necessity of preparing young
people before kindergarten, a la Head Start
(whose enduring accomplishments have been
questioned), but he also outlined nothing
short of a school revolution.

Duncan would keep schools functioning
not only for the seven or so hours five days a
week as is customary. He wants them to stay
open as much as 14 hours a day, Saturday
and Sunday included. The president wants
the school term extended, suggesting that
summer vacation shrink by a month.

Duncan enthusiastically proposed that
schools could serve as community centres to
which YMCAs, Boys and Girls Clubs and
other non-profits could bring their pro-
grammes, rent free. Those programmes could
include health services and tutorial help to
construct a supportive universe that would
benefit especially students who need it the
most.

As for higher education, “in just a single
generation, America has fallen from second
place to eleventh place in the proportion of
students completing college,” the president
stated. Studies show that the cost of college
has increased far more than the median
income of Americans. Obama offers large
increases in financial aid and grants.

Minorities fail to graduate more than oth-
ers, although according to educators, college
and university performance is diminishing
generally.

Enormous sticker shock is attached to the
Obama proposals. But the facts show that
education demands wide reforms and the
funding to help them happen.

(This article appears courtesy of Harry
Rosenfeld - c.2009 Albany Times Union).



HONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN KIA SUZURI

The Fleming
proposal leaves
much to ponder

EDITOR, The Tribune.

BRITISH banking tycoon
Roddie Fleming’s reportedly
“dashed hopes” to acquire the
Grand Bahama Port Authority is
the latest shot fired in the battle
for control of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority.

In an apparently well-
researched document dated July
2008 and titled “The Flemings
Strategy for Grand Bahama
Island,” the group boasted that
through a “dramatic transforma-
tion” and “reinvention” of
Freeport, “the promise” of the
1955 Hawksbill Creek Agreement
would be “finally” delivered.

Under that agreement, Wal-
lace Groves staked out 114,000
acres at Grand Bahama and
developed the city of Freeport
into a major resort, industrial and
gambling area. In the process he
created The Bahamas’ second
city, building an airport, devel-
oping utilities, schools, roads, and
a hospital.

Whether or not the curtailment
of the Fleming Group’s
grandiose, ‘government-
approved’, development plans
represents a significant lost
opportunity for Grand Bahama
and the rest of The Bahamas, the
document itself provides much
food for thought on a variety of
topical issues.

With so many matters of public
importance entering the public
domain well after the fact, it may
be timely to highlight some of the
more provocative topics
addressed in the Fleming docu-
ment, starting with: The Bahami-
an economy. A vital barometer
of any country’s economic health
is the Gross Domestic Product
(GDP), which measures the value
of all goods and services pro-
duced.

According to Department of
Statistics “provisional figures”, in
2006 “real” GDP in The Bahamas
increased by 19 per cent, com-
pared to 5.96 per cent in 2005.

Baws

letters@tribunemedia net



However, according to the Flem-
ing document, since 1984, The
Bahamas’ GDP, adjusted for
inflation, has actually declined by
nearly 20 per cent, and in “real,
global competitive terms...closer
to 33 per cent.”

According to Fleming, “except
for a period in the late 1990s,”
the Bahamian economy “has
been in a state of gentle decline
for nearly 25 years,” with
Freeport “currently experiencing
the most severe economic down-
turn in 30 years.” If accurate
updates could be obtained of the
two other important indicators of
a country’s economic health —
unemployment figures and the
Consumer Price Index, which
tracks inflation — a truer picture
could be obtained as to exactly
where we’re headed.

Global warming: Over the next
50 to 100 years, due to global
warming, a “likely maximum sea
level rise of six metres — about
20 feet — ‘will permanently inun-
date” most of the Bahamian arch-
ipelago and “reduce Grand
Bahama Island to a handful of
small islands with a landmass of
less than 10 per cent of the cur-
rent island. Under the assumed
scenario, “hundreds of millions
of dollars worth of remediation
engineering will be required at
the harbour, the airport and else-
where.” According to MET offi-
cials, in 1998 the department
installed Sea Level Rise monitors
in Nassau Harbour, at Inagua and
in the Exumas, with one being
placed in Marsh Harbour, but
meaningful results can’t be
obtained for another 10 years. It’s
estimated that a 0.07 inch rise has
taken place. Although the jury is
still out on whether the frequency
of hurricanes will increase, Hur-

ricanes Frances and Jeannee in
2004, demonstrated Grand
Bahama’s “vulnerability to even
single major hurricane events,”
Fleming warned.

Life expectancy: “With the
improved health care anticipat-
ed in the Flemings strategy,” life
expectancy of Bahamians will
increase, and “by 2020, an effec-
tive welfare system will be in
place in the country, funded by
the increased economic growth
precipitated by the Flemings strat-
egy.”

Exchange control: By 2020 or
earlier, “in response to the rela-
tive strength of the emerging
Bahamian economy, Exchange
Control will be scrapped.”

US economy: Will emerge
from current economic downturn
until 2010/2011, but “will proba-
bly not reach previous rapid
growth rates,” and the War on
Terror keeping the economy at
modest levels and possibly stag-
nation from 2010-2020.

New Airport Terminal: To
facilitate scheduled flights from
Europe, Canada and South
America, Fleming would split 50-
50 costs with Hutchison Wham-
poa to build a new non-US inter-
national Terminal.

Cuba: By 2020, normalised
diplomatic and economic rela-
tions between Cuba and the US
will turn Cuba into a tourism des-
tination with which Grand
Bahama, if it remains in its pre-
sent status, “simply cannot suc-
cessful compete.”

Almost five years after the
death of GBPA co-owner
Edward St George, the convolut-
ed legal situation that later devel-
oped is yet to be resolved. Per-
haps, to paraphrase the words of
G K Chesterton, perhaps it isn’t
that the various players can’t see
the solution, it’s just that they
can’t see the problem.

SIMON ARTZI
Nassau,
March 5, 2009.

The challenge of sustained economic stimulus

EDITOR, The Tribune.

We are now at a precarious period for small and
medium size business because access to credit has
become extremely challenging in the Bahamas.

As most of us are aware, this creates a tremendous
void vis-a-vis jobs and growth of jobs.

Notwithstanding, it appears the Government’s
idea of stimulating the economy is from the bot-
tom-up by supporting the individual who has lost his
or her job having initiated various measures now

ongoing.

It is agreeable and extremely important to keep
Bahamians working, however, it is also important to
address the current crisis systemically.

Keeping individuals working is best achieved by
the Government crafting a proactive plan to address
the lack of credit in the marketplace, which would

have operated within the bounds of the laws hereto-

fore.

While it may be politically expedient to appease
individuals collectively, it appears at the root of
Government’s action as a desire to jolt the economy
back to health going forward.

Providing a job for an individual simply affords
that person a means of work to squirrel away cash
given tough times, we actually desire the opposite.
Whereas, the access to credit provided to small and
medium size businesses would perhaps be a more

sustained way to get the economy moving forward,

or grow jobs.

support small and medium size businesses by mak-

ing immediate access to credit available.
Naturally, this should apply solely to well led
businesses that are proven fiscally responsible and

Nassau,
March 2009.

Bahamians should embrace this
new form of communication

R McKENZIE

improve the non employment rate, and maintain

IT remain hopeful the Government would revisit its
position on stimulating the economy by giving
thoughtful consideration to all appropriate solu-
tions and acting swiftly henceforth.

EVV CeUClNOI met

Livingstone B











EDITOR, The Tribune.
bd = Johnson
eS h a oe I just wanted to say that Bahamas Issues is expression of the thoughts
Qo | > and ideas of the Bahamian public. No Government should fear or — EITOR. The Tribune.
= \ . = seek to suppress the expressions of its people. :
= ) ; The very idea of legislation to govern online media and information :
= re Owned Department =H distribution in the Bahamas is amiss. oo ee
It’s also a clear indication of how little is known about the web by Fie te apie 1 neeiOne
=< = those who would seek to have such legislation in place. H lehecon i, ieee 8
= Your Fast Lane to iw Bahamas Issues is an open forum for all Bahamians to come togeth- eae . Aan enn
> » » = er in dialogue to assist in finding solutions to many of the issues facing iis death oh er
PJ Vehicle Purchas! ng EJ our nation. Though you may find some who would invade the forums _ as in spate cane
. = with their own personal agendas (whether political or otherwise) Ihave © a , ‘ee Sa fh
= = ' if, | 5 — ee Le be but a ba ee a — price to pay for a beacon of free meee A ae to
aaa n ' speech and free press in this country. ee
ee a5 ed: Lh i leila des A, I would ask all Bahamians to embrace this new form of communi- _ignity and honour
‘ce Ci ei ea a tae = © cation and information sharing. Divingstone Jolisou-was ason
— TH Pah No, d ay — =m! As we should all be aware that traditional print media is now swift- Of Exuma and possibly one of the
first from that island to have

ly becoming a thing of the past — soon only to be used for nostalgic
purposes and something to hold while drinking a cup of coffee.

There is without a doubt a greater influence in internet media today
than there has ever been and only those who carefully harness this
medium will govern the future of this country.

been called to the Bahamas Bar.
Mr Johnson’s career at the Bar
was distinguished and he repre-
sented many early investors to
the country including the Presi-

somenon. ownpandsvisit= = ————— =
pronline’for-ourespecial— a
oHaggleyPricing” -

i








' oa DELROY MEADOWS dent of Pan American Airlines.
- BahamaslIssues.com When offering for election by a
/ Nassau, person of his race and back-

ground was not very popular, Mr
Johnson chose to defy the pres-
sures of the day and fight an elec-
tion for a seat in Parliament for
his native island. He did not suc-
ceed but he continued to be active
in politics through the Progres-
sive Liberal Party.

When his country became inde-
pendent Mr. Johnson unselfishly
gave up his lucrative law prac-
tice to become the first Bahamian
Ambassador to the United States.
He served his country with dis-
tinction and we all owe him and
his family a debt of gratitude for
his service.

I extend sincere condolences
to his widow Charmaine and his
children.

March 10, 2009.

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March 12, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEMS



Minister ‘has no difficulty’
releasing reports on the
state of Detention Centre

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER OF STATE for
Immigration Branville McCartney
has “no difficulty” releasing the full
reports made to his department on
the state of the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre, he said yester-

day.

Amid allegations — denied by the
Immigration Department — of inhu-
mane treatment, substandard liv-
ing conditions and insufficient food

told the media that the reports
included no evidence to substanti-
ate claims of violence by centre
supervisors, sexual favours for priv-
ileges or insufficient food.

He added that notwithstanding
this, certain recommendations on
the living conditions made by those
visiting the site will be implement-
ed, such as diversifying the menu
and replacing destroyed mattresses.

In an interview with The Tribune
yesterday, Mr McCartney, when
asked when this newspaper will be
able to see copies of the reports in

Man accused of sex with girl under age of 14

A 18-YEAR-OLD man accused

? of having intercourse with a girl
: i under the age of 14 was arraigned
: ina Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Edvardo Rolle, 18, was

? arraigned before Magistrate Der-
rence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane,
: charged with having sexual inter-
? course with a person under 14
} years of age.

It is alleged that Rolle commit-

: ted the offence on March 11, 2009.

Rolle was not required to plead

to the charge and was granted bail
in the sum of $10,000 with one
surety. The case has been
adjourned to June 24 which is
when a preliminary inquiry is
expected to start.

A 28-year-old man was yes-
terday sentenced to pay a $5,000-
fine or serve a year in prison after
being convicted on a drug charge.

Mark Pierre was charged in
October last year with possession
of marijuana with the intent to sup-

ply. According to court dockets,
Pierre was allegedly found in pos-
session of 3.5 grammes of mari-
juana on Wednesday, October 1,
2008.

Pierre, who initially pleaded not
guilty to the charge, was convicted
on the drug charge yesterday.

Magistrate Carolita Bethel sen-
tenced Pierre to pay a fine of
$5,000.

Failure to pay the fine will result
in a year imprisonment.



Diabetes

Free

provisions at the facility, the depart-
ment arranged for several individ-
uals to tour the site and file reports
with officials over a week ago.
The group who toured the centre,

their original form, said “very short-
ly.”

“Td just like an opportunity to
pass it by Cabinet,” he said.

“T have no difficulties in releasing

GLUCOSE TESTING



Branville McCartney

described by the department as an “indepen-
dent body”, consisted of psychologist Dr David
Allen, Director of Social Services, Mellany
Zonicle and Archdeacon James Pallacious.

O inions detainees, and that such claims were “com- Wednesday March 18
p pletely blown out of proportion.” Lowe's Pharmacy er:
. : On March 10, several days prior to the id
oo he, arene a ears department’s press pene ai human Harbour Bay if,
eir opinions on the conditions at the facility pangs : ir
and recommendations for possible improve- ee ee Wednesday March 25 fh

ments.

A diluted report on the findings was pre-
sented to the press, who were denied access to
the original documents, in a press conference
held at the Immigration Department.

In that conference, Immigration director
Jack Thompson, reaffirming the departmen-
t’s commitment to operating transparently,

week.”

them I just want to do it the proper way.” He
said that this should happen within the “next

He reaffirmed that the reports showed no

substantiation of the allegations made by

issued a statement declaring its “concern” for
detainees at the centre in light of reports reach-
ing the media.

It called on the international community to
flood the government with appeals on behalf of
the detainees and resumed its earlier call for
independent reviews of internal investigations
into the claims.

GB Shipyard ‘providing
jobs for an increasing
number of Bahamians’

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Shipyard, which
injects millions annually into
the Freeport economy, is pro-
viding employment for an
increasing number of Bahami-
ans, Carl-Gustaf Rotkirch,
chairman and CEO of the
company said.

He said there are currently
320 Bahamians employed in
various permanent positions,
and recruitment continues
through the shipyard’s
apprenticeship programme.

“Grand Bahama Shipyard
has engaged into actively
developing the apprenticeship
programme for young
Bahamians in cooperation
with BTVI, since 2004.

“There are presently 37
apprentices in various stages
of their four-year apprentice-
ship with the company,” said
Mr Rotkirch.

He noted that the recent
acquisition of the company’s
third dry dock, which was pur-
chased at an investment of
$60 million, will provide addi-
tional educational and train-
ing opportunities for Bahami-
ans in specialised fields of ship
repair.

The shipyard was started in
January 1999 and commenced
training in 2000. It has grown
from earning just a few mil-
lion dollars in revenue to over
$130 million in 2008.

According to Mr Rotkirch,
the installation of the new dry
dock, which is capable of lift-
ing vessels of up to 55,000
tonnes, will greatly impact
business at the shipyard.

In January, Carnival’s Sen-
sation was the first cruise ship
to dock at dry dock three. The
month of January was the
busiest month in the ship-
yard’s history.

“It is the largest in the
region capable of the most
complicated repairs. It can
dock over 70 percent of the
cruise ships sailing in the
region,” said Mr Rotkirch.

“The target is to further
develop Grand Bahama Ship-
yard into the biggest com-

ie
US)

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157



mercial ship repair company
in the region, capable of per-
forming the most complicated
repair upgrade and conver-
sions.”

Royal Caribbean Cruises,
the Carnival Corporation and
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority are joint partners
in the shipyard.

Richard Fain, chairman and
CEO of Royal Caribbean,
said the shipyard’s success in
Freeport has proven all the
doubters wrong.

“Ten years ago, a number
of people had the foresight to
see that we would have an
opportunity to build some-
thing which over a period will
grow and become an impor-
tant benefit to businesses, the
cruise business and other ship-
ping businesses, economies,
and the communities in which
we operate.

“Ten years ago, we were
looking at a situation where
there was an awful a lot of
people who said it couldn’t be
done.

“Over last 10 years we have
proven those doubters wrong.
We have nine ships here
today and I am told it is some-
what of a record,” said Mr
Fain.

He acknowledged Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
and Sir Albert Miller, former
chairman and CEO of the
Port Authority, for their
tremendous support and
cooperation in the shipyard
project.

“We have a wonderful facil-
ity, trained workers, and when
we come back three, five, and
10 years from now, we will
see an even stronger impact
on the economy,” said Mr
Fain.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Gunshots Former govt official backs

a oe article, says the protest
was ‘a waste of time’

VACANCY NOTICE
PUBLIC RELATIONS & CORPORATE PROGRAMS OFFICER
FROM page one
during Lehder’s stay there in the late 1970s and early 1980s, said he

HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING

personally knew that Pindling, a former PLP minister, and Everette
Bannister and others used Lehder’s own aircraft to fly to and from
Norman’s Cay and George Town, Exuma.

“Tf they attended regattas and the like, they often used Lehder’s
plane,” he said.

“IT knew Joe Lehder and found him to be a pleasant young man.
However, I did not know at that time what he was doing.

“Twas told to give him every courtesy as he was an investor. Pin-
dling and others from the government used Lehder’s transportation
all the time.”

The official said those demonstrating outside The Tribune did not
know the facts.

He said he also knew Chauncey Tynes Jr., the pilot
who went missing in 1983. “He was a pleasant man who brought me
back and forth many times from George Town and Norman’s
Cay.

“When he disappeared, everyone thought there was something
strange going on, as no investigation was carried out to my knowl-
edge.”

The official, who did not wish to be named “for business reasons”,
said planes flying into the cay were often carrying large amounts of
money.

“T would not doubt for one moment that Pindling was being
paid off by Lehder, though I did not see any money transactions
myself,” he said.

“The fact that Pindling used Lehder’s plane so much did suggest
there was a very close relationship,” he added.





































Officers fired shots in return }
and occupants of the Ford }
Expedition reportedly tried to
escape the vehicle as it raced }
away from police. i

A marked police car, a Ford i
Crown Victoria unit, was dam- }
aged by a gunshot during the }
dangerous gunfight. i

And motorists cars were }
damaged as they were forced }
off the road in an effort to
dodge the high-speed chase.

But police finally cornered i
the brazen driver near the }
Environmental Health land- }
fill site in the Tonique }
Williams-Darling Highway. }

Officers found one round of }
live ammunition for a .380
handgun and two live rounds i
of ammunition for a .9mm
handgun upon searching the }
vehicle. i

A 34-year-old man from }
Prince Charles Drive thought
to have been driving the Ford
Expedition was arrested and i
is in police custody. :

Motorists whose cars were }
damaged during the chase are
advised to contact the Central }
Detective Unit on 502-9998.

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Public Relations & Corporate Programs
Officer.

This job is responsible for assisting with the planning, development and implementation of a
strategic public relations and communication program together with the effective and efficient
planning and execution of all corporate events and activities.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Assists in the development of a strategic Public Relations and Corporate Programs plan to
support the Corporation’s Mission, Goals and Objectives;

Oversees the implementation of the Corporation’s annual Public Relations programs, plan and
budget;

Assists with the communication of all activities throughout the Corporation and where necessary
the wider community;

Prepares and distributes the Corporation’s Annual Report;

Directs press relations, including activities such as the preparation of press releases, photographs,
fact sheets, and interviews between Executive Management and media representatives;
Coordinates the development and interpretation of employee and public opinion surveys;
Provides assistance to Executive Management and Government officials in writing speeches,
preparing letters and drafting articles to be publicized;

Evaluates and assesses customer complaints and queries and disseminates information to
management;

Aids in the development, implementation and management of all external communication
efforts;

Is proactive in identifying opportunities to improve the image of the Corporation to its employees
and in the community at large;

Coordinates Marketing and all advertising material in collaboration with the external Public
Relations Firms and the Media;

Identifies and liaises with service providers to secure speakers, presenters and entertainment



for Corporate events;

Liaises with vendors on the selection, purchase, delivery of materials i.e. awards, invitations,
prizes, letters, BEC paraphernalia, etc. for all events, as necessary and maintain an inventory
of the same;

Prepares and distributes all documentations (e.g. public and staff notices) relative to Corporate
activities, as necessary;

Creates and updates all Standard Operating Procedures for all activities, as necessary;
Ensures timely preparation of purchase requisitions and prompt receipt of bills for all events
and activities as necessary;

Works closely with the AGM-Human Resources & Training to ensure that there is global
publicity (internal and external), as necessary on all Corporate activities;
Ensures that websites, bulletin boards and other media i.e. company newsletter and internal PA
system are used for the communication of information relative to corporate activities/events;

Job requirements include:

« A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Public Relations/ Journalism/Marketing/Business
Administration/Business Communication, or equivalent.
A minimum of 5 years relevant experience at Supervisory/Management level.
Ability to write speeches, press releases and articles for publication that conform to prescribed
style and format;
Ability to effectively present information to senior and Executive management and public
groups;
Ability to disseminate information effectively, both orally and in writing
Experience in managing special events and activities
Excellent time management and organizational skills
Excellent human relations and interpersonal skills
Computer proficiency in Windows environment and Microsoft applications.
Good analytical skills.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The
Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: April 1st, 2009.

C—O
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

BRANCH MANAGER

The Branch Manager will be responsible for the day to day achievement of
the branch’s sales and service goals. The ideal candidate will have strong
leadership and communication skills and bring focus to the execution of the
branch business plan, inclusive of sales administration and the overall
development of branch staff.

Core Responsibilities:

Responsible for the quality and efficiency of all branch customer service
initiatives for all credit and deposit products and services

Assists in the development of Branch targets for retail sales and operations
Provides leadership in the attainment of all branch sales and service goals,
Ensure that the Branch is operating in accordance with the Bank’s policies
and procedures and all regulatory requirements including but not limited
to Central Bank and AML.

Serves as lead customer service advocate at the branch level

Provides guidance to staff, where necessary on all service matters, ensuring
that customer needs are heard, understood and resolved

Ensuring staff’s awareness and use of bank product information
Responsible for all branch sales initiatives, inclusive of management of
the branch loan and deposit portfolio and mitigating Bank exposure
Responsible for reporting to Senior Management on the overall operations
of the Branch including financial and non-financial matters;

Provides leadership in the personal development of all branch staff through
the articulation and achievement of the Bank’s goals and objectives
Identifies skill deficiencies and opportunities for training for all Branch
staff

Job Requirements:

Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.

Knowledge of Banking laws, including requirements of The Central Bank
of The Bahamas which governs Commercial Banking.

Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced
environment

Strong supervisory and customer service skills are essential.

Excellent verbal and written communication skills.

Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include:

Competitive salary and benefits package commensurate with work experience
and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later than March 31*,
2009 to:

DA# 69842A
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com

NOTICE
OF
FONE:

In recognition of the funeral of
Mr. David A. C. Kelly, C.B.E.
Betty K. Agencies Limited
Will Close at 1:00p.m.

HN
Thursday, 19th March, 2009

@ Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

STATE RECOGNIZED
FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE

Hon. Lovingstone
Basil Johnson,
CBE, BA, D.C.L.,
85

of #3 Newgate Road, Blair Estates
will be held on Friday March 20th,
11:00 a.m. at Christ Church
Cathedral, George Street. Rev. Fr.
Norman Lightbourne, assisted by
Rev. Fr. Ethan Ferguson, and other
»| members of the Clergy will
| officiate. Interment will follow in
|} Woodlawn Memorial Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Left to mourn is passing is his: Widow: Charmian Johnson; Daughters:
Anita Johnson-Patty of Kendal, Florida and Deanne Johnson-Anderson
of Washington Grove, Maryland. He was pre-deceased by his son,
Craig. Sons-in-Law; Tony Patty of Kendal, Florida and Jerry Anderson
of Washington Grove, Maryland. Grandchildren: Adriana Anderson
of Washington Grove, Maryland, and Eric Patty of Kendal Florida;
Extended Daughters: Kandi Collie, Presleith McPhee; and Chineraye
Tjeoma; Brothers—in-law, Clifford Culmer, Al McCartney and Henry
Sands of Savannah Sound, Eleuthera; Sisters—in-law: Eileen McCartney
and Corliss Culmer; Aunt: Ida Clarke; Nephews: Myles Culmer, Keith
McCartney, Billie McCartney, Lennox McCartney, Barry McCartney,
Garah Leonard Sands, Brian Sands, Oscar Sands, Keddie Culmer,
Philip Culmer, Glen Culmer and Kirk Culmer; Richard Ingraham of
Miami,Florida; Nieces: Gabrielle Culmer, Caroline Culmer, Tamara
Cargill, Lizetta Neuman, Crystal Sands, Ruth Sands, Henrietta Sands,
and Delores Culmer; Patricia Ingraham of Miami, Florida; God-
Children: Obafemi Pindling, Michael Barnett, Allyson Maynard-
Gibson, Keith Sands, Ian Jupp, Krista Nottage, Kevin Archer, Andrew
Mosko, David Neil and Father Humes; Other Relatives and Friends
include: Elvin Forester Bodie and Family of Miami, Florida; Preston
McPhee and Family, Jackie Clarke and Family; Trevor Musgrove
and Family; Marcella Musgrove, Angette Pyform and Family; Almetha
Clarke and Family; Verbilee Clarke and Family; Norma Clarke and
Family; Eurella Clarke and Family; Irene Clarke and Family; Harriet
Mather and Family; Cleomi Clarke; Family of the late Neville Clark
of The Hermitage, Exuma; The entire Clarke Family from The
Hermitage, Exuma; Pastor Hugh Roach and Family; Rev. Kendal
Nottage and Family; Dr. Bernard Nottage and Family; Sandra Nottage
and Family; The Family of the Late Wellington Johnson; Hugh Sands
and Family; Clarice Granger; Emerald Sands and Family; Sidney
Sinclair Sands and Family; His Excellency the Hon. Arthur. D Hanna
and Family; Sir Orville Turnquest and Family; the Hon. Paul L.
Adderley and Family; Dame Marguerite Pindling and Family; the
Hon. Justice Emmanuel Osadebay and Family; Retired Justice Joseph
Strachan and Family; Cyril Ijeoma and Family; Mrs. Mary Sweetnam
and Family; Henry Bostwick QC and Family; Edward Turner and
the Hon. Loretta Butler-Turner and Family; Canon Neil Roach and
Family; Bernard K. Bonamy and Family; Mr. Sam Campbell and
Family; the Culmer, McCartney and Sands Families of Eleuthera;
Autrey Graves and Family; Andrea Archer and Family; Hazel Jupp
and Family; The Rev Dr. Charles. W. Saunders; Jacqueline Major
and Family; Ruby Saunders and Family; Gloria Strachan and Family;
Mr. Pat Paul; Nurse Helen Miller and Nurses; Dr. Cindy Dorsett; Dr.
Norad Morgan; Dr. Kimberley Bethel The Bahamas Bar Association,
Bahamas Supermarket Scholarship Committee; The Hermitage
Descendants Association; The All Exuma Association and the Holy
Cross Anglican Parish Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Thursday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

There will be no viewing at the Church.

Protest

FROM page one

Street where they enjoyed bar-
becued food, drinks and loud
music into the afternoon.

The group dispersed from
Eastern Parade before 4pm with-
out resuming their protest.

While outside the office on
Shirley Street, some young pro-
testers were smoking what
appeared to be marijuana while
standing outside the building,
and when they were reported to
police monitoring the protest
they shouted angry threats to
burn down the building. Some
threatened physical harm against
Mr Marquis.

The group’s collective shouts
of: “Sir Lynden”, followed by the
response, “Hero”, could be
heard inside The Tribune office
which shook as protesters
banged on the walls and music
blared from speakers on a flat-
back truck.

Mr Moss said the protesters
cross political divides as all
Bahamians want to stand up for
Sir Lynden’s legacy as the
“Father of the Nation” after Mr
Marquis reported former PLP
treasurer Chauncey Tynes Sr’s
allegations that his pilot son,
Chauncey Tynes Jr, was killed
in 1983 because he knew too
much about links between Pin-
dling and drug czar Carlos “Joe”
Lehder.

“These are people who are
respectful of what he has done
for this country we are trying to
build,” Mr Moss said.

“Sir Lynden is a legacy, a man,
a personality and a character we
galvanise around. No man is per-
fect but we must give him the
kind of respect he deserves.”

Mr Moss criticised The Tri-
bune for publishing second and
third-hand “hearsay” attacking
the late prime minister’s charac-
ter and said any information con-
nected to the young pilot’s mys-
terious disappearance should be
given to police instead, Mr Moss
said.

One protester said the allega-
tions could not be true because
Lehder had been offered time
off his jail term if he implicated
Sir Lynden, but Lehder refused.

Pastor Micklyn Seymour of
Bahamas In Prophecy said the
articles should have been with-
held whether the allegations are
true or false because they have
stirred up ill-feeling that will
divide Bahamian people.

He said: “He needs to leave
the issue alone because it’s touch-
ing people’s hearts.

“We are saying desist from
dividing up people on issues that
are not necessary. It’s doing
more evil than good. He does-
n’t understand the affect it is hav-
ing on people.

“When we have a nation and
we are dealing with the father of
that nation, then the majority of
people are for Sir Lynden.

“Tt’s dividing our people and
the country don’t need it, and
we are disappointed in The Tri-
bune that they would want this
information to stir this.”

Another protester, Glen Rolle,
a pastor at Hillside Restoration
Centre Ministry in Marathon
Road, said: “The argument isn’t
whether it’s true or not but
what’s behind The Tribune’s
effort is to undo and remove a
significant block at the founda-
tion of this nation.”

Mr Marquis said he was
pleased to see that the protest
went off peacefully. “I think
peaceful demonstrations are part
of the democratic process, and I
believe passionately in people
being able to express their
views,” he added.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Dunkin’ Donuts set to

open outlets

DUNKIN' Donuts is set to
open two outlets at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport
this month. Bahamas QSR Lim-
ited, a subsidiary of the Myers
Group of Companies, operates
the coffee giant's Bahamian
franchise. The company
finalised contract agreements
with the Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD) in
January.

The brand is the number one
retailer of hot and iced regular
coffee-by-the-cup in America,
and the largest coffee and
baked goods chain in the world.
In addition to the well-known
coffees, all locations at LPIA
will serve the brand's most pop-
ular signature beverages like
the Dunkaccino, Turbo, Lite
and White Hot Chocolate.

"We are super excited to
have the sandwiches Dunkin’
Donuts aficionados will ask for
such as the waffle breakfast
sandwich and the variety of flat
bread sandwiches," said Tracey
Cash, marketing director for
Dunkin’ Donuts.

"We are happy to have been
awarded the contract and to
have this opportunity to add
Dunkin’ Donuts to the airport
experience,” said Douglas



TRACEY CASH (LEFT), marketing director with Dunkin’ Donuts and Zen-
er Beckford, manager of commercial properties with the Nassau Airport
Development Company, at the new Dunkin' Donuts LPIA store in the US

Departures Lounge.

Sawyer, vice-president and
managing director of the Myers
Group.

The popular brand, now
located in the US Departures
Lounge, will open a second
store this week in the Domes-
tic/International Terminal.

“NAD is delighted to wel-
come Dunkin’ Donuts into the
airport family,” said John

www.atlanticmedicalfunwalk.com

Spinks, vice-president of com-
mercial development for NAD.

The Dunkin’ Donuts brand
is known worldwide with over
7,900 restaurants in 30 coun-
tries.

“This is an exciting first step
towards increasing and improv-
ing the food and beverage
options at the airport,” Mr
Spinks said.

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE







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Reginald Ferguson
appointed Police
Commissioner

FROM page one

Police in an Independent Bahamas.

“Mr Ferguson was chosen after much reflection and introspec-
tion and assumes command of the Force at a difficult time in his-
tory,” Prime Minister Ingraham said.

Mr Ingraham praised the newly appointed Commissioner of
Police as a man whose character, dedication to duty and honesty
have always been regarded as above reproach.

“These are essential attributes for leadership,” Prime Minister
Ingraham said.

Speaking at the official opening of the RBPF’s Senior Officers
“Day Away” ceremony, Mr Ingraham last night noted that Com-
missioner Ferguson heads the force at a time when “the world is
experiencing perhaps the greatest financial and economic crisis
since the Great Depression with severe consequences for our small
and open economy. And we face unprecedented levels of crime,
high unemployment and a determined criminal element.”

He said it was the commissioner’s task, together with the officers
of the Senior Command, to lead the RBPF through the current peri-
od of transition and restructuring.

Body found on boat
near Potters Cay dock

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093 / 328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5201
or e-mail perdeyi@oob edu,

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FROM page one

Although details surrounding
the incident are still sketchy,
investigators have not classified
the man’s death as a homicide,
he said. Several homicide inves-
tigators were initially called to
the scene.

“This has not been classified
as a homicide. We are treating
this really as a suspicious death
until the autopsy has been com-
pleted,” ASP Evans said.
“Based on what we have seen
here there are no physical signs
of trauma to the body, there is
nothing of evidential value on

the vessel which would lead us
in the direction to say that this
was a homicide,” he said.

ASP Evans said that investi-
gators are being assisted by per-
sons who frequent the area,
with information regarding the
man’s identity.

He added: “We are asking
any individual who may have
any information regarding this
incident or any person who may
have frequented the vessel to
assist us particularly with regard
to the identity of this individ-
ual.”

Up to press time yesterday
police said that the man had not
been positively identified.

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Former AG: both
Christie and Ingraham
administrations did not

properly regulate CLICO

FROM page one

National Movement. It was recognised in 2004 and before that
the Registrar of Insurance lacks the capacity to properly regu-
late the insurance industry,” Mr Sears said at the meeting on
Monday night.

He added that a group of disgruntled CLICO (Bahamas)
policy and annuity holders have sought legal representation
who may appear in court on their behalf at today's Supreme
Court liquidation hearing.

Mr Sears has offered pro bono assistance to several Bahami-
ans left in a lurch after the Supreme Court ordered a winding-
up of the troubled company on February 24. Lawyer Godfrey
“Pro” Pinder has also offered his services to the group.

Speaking to The Tribune yesterday, Mr Sears added: "It's sad,
people don't know what to do and I've called for the govern-
ment to intervene because many of these people find themselves
in this position because of the failure of the regulator to prop-
erly regulate CLICO."

The group, Mr Sears said yesterday, was left with many unan-
swered questions regarding their legal rights to money invested
in the insurance company, the future of their life savings and the
status of the liquidation.

"It's a distressing situation and I agreed on a pro-bono basis
to represent some of the persons and they are coming in today
(Tuesday) and bringing copies of their documents and so on and
we do anticipate filing notice of intention to appear.

"Nothing has been filed as yet. We're just rendering some
assistance, that would be the most sensible thing in the cir-
cumstances (when) you have scores of people who don't know
what's going on," Mr Sears said.

At the hearing it is expected to be determined from among
those who have entered an appearance whether or not they sup-
port the liquidation process.

Meanwhile, yesterday Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told
The Tribune that CARICOM countries, including the Bahamas,
have agreed that their regulators will meet to ascertain where
CLICO's regional assets are. This comes amid claims from
Guyana that the country invested $34 million in CLICO
(Bahamas).

"In our case its the registrar of insurance and in their case its
various entities, sometimes Central Bank or some other agency,
will meet to gather all the facts together relating to CLICO and
CF Financial, the parent company in Trinidad. They will also
seek to determine what assets these companies have and where
these assets are situated, especially in the region and as soon as
they have done that there will be a meeting of heads of gov-
ernment of the Caribbean community."

That meeting is expected to happen by the end of this month,
Mr Ingraham said provided the respective countries receive
the regulators’ report in time.

Mr Ingraham also dispelled reports that a CLICO (Bahamas)
$50 million loan to foreign affiliates was originally guaranteed
by parent company C F Financial (Trinidad).

“There’s no such thing as a Trinidad guarantee. That’s a mis-
conception that people have. CLICO (Bahamas) did have a $50
million guarantee from the parent company in Trinidad — the
extent to which that is a (worthy) guarantee is an issue to be
determined.”

Yesterday Bishop Hall, who also invested in the company, re-
issued his call for officials to be held accountable for the CLI-
CO (Bahamas) financial mess.

"If you hear the horrific stories coming out of this elderly peo-
ple are horrified because they fear losing their life savings. I
don't see how some of our politicians can sleep and be quiet in
a time like this. Someone should have protected these people
someone in the ministry of finance should take responsibility
that these people were not protected," he argued.
TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 9
SPORTS





BASKETBALL HIGHLIGHTS



ADRIAN MACKEY, of St Bede’s, is fouled as he drives
to the basket...
(Photos by Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

SECTIONS EDITOR
THE TRIBUNE

is seeking a Main Section Editor to design news
pages and write eye-catching head-lines. Solid
journalistic credentials essential, including a keen
news sense, excellent text-editing ability and an
aptitude for supervising staff. Applications please
to:








Managing Editor
The Tribune
P.O.Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas

VACANCY NOTICE
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER EXECUTIVE

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Chief Financial Officer.

Bahamas Agricultural & Industrial Corporation (BAIC)

The job oversees all financial matters of BEC, inclusive of the activities of the Customer Services Presen ts
Division.

The objectives of this function include, but are not limited to the following: Its

Financial Management, Accounting & Treasury SISAL CRAFT TRAINING PROGRAM

Ensure and structure the Corporation’s financial policies, practices and internal controls so that
they are in accordance with the law, generally accepted accounting principles, contractual
commitments, the Corporation’s structure and protect the corporations assets;

Manage BEC’s cash resources to ensure that funds are available to meet the ongoing and future
needs of BEC while minimizing the cost of capital;

Ensure the timely preparation of all financial reports. These include complete financial statements
for presentation to the Board, preparation of budget reports for assisting management decision
making, and development of a yearly projected budget in consultation with other Division heads;

Ensure that the divisions maintain a high standard of efficiency, control, and application of D at ‘
@: March 23-April 3, 2009

sound accounting practices and principles along with the adequate trained qualified staff to
achieve these objectives;

Coordinate to ensure that the workflow within the division and cross functionality with all
departments dependent upon the services of the division, are efficient and effective;
Coordinate the annual budgeting process and present the completed budget for approval;
Manage external relationships with local and international sources of funds;

Ensure proper and cost effective insurance of BEC’s assets;

Conduct Financial Analysis for the Corporation as requested;

Customer Services

Ensure the accurate and timely meter reading and billing of all customer accounts in New
Providence and the billing of other Family Island Accounts.

Ensure proper management of the revenue and collection recovery activities by effective
management of the Corporation’s Accounts Receivable.

Ensure proper management of the business office services of cashiering and new services, queries
for customers, banking and accounting reconciliation, etc.

Ensure that non-technical losses are kept to a minimum.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Accounting/Finance with professional qualifications (e.g.,
ACCA, CPA) an MBA would be desired.

A minimum of 15+ years of experience in financial accounting, at senior management level.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills

Excellent analytical and organizational skills

Good customer relations skills

Good time management skills

Strong leadership skills

Knowledge of finance, accounting, budgeting and cost control principles including General
Accepted Accounting Principles.

Knowledge of automated financial and accounting reporting systems

Ability to analyze financial data and prepare financial reports, statements, and projections
Extensive knowledge of project management and the ability to oversee a range of projects
simultaneously

Strong human relations skills

Knowledge of industrial relations

Negotiation skills and techniques

Interested persons should apply by submitting a resume addressed to: The AGM-Human Resources
& Training, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau
Bahamas on or before: Wednesday, March 25, 2009.

Time: 6:00 - 10:00 p.m. (Daily)
Venue: A. F. Adderley Jr. School Location: Blue Hill Rd. &Yellow Elder
Way

Application Form

Name: P. 0. Box:

Address: - Email:

Tel: Fax:

Age range: O under 15 0 16-25 026-40 041-60 o61-70 O71 andover

Employment Status: Employed © Government Private 0 Self-employed
O Unemployed

Have you completed Previous Training Courses by BAIC? (J Yes LI No
List: Date(s):

E FEE: $100.00

REEEGREREEERTAGE

Contact: Sharae Collie/Pam Deveaux Tel: 322-3740-1 Fax: 322-2123/328-6542


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Giants sweep
the Wreckers,
advance to the
divisional finals

THE New Providence Bas-
ketball Association (NPBA)
continued its best-of-three play-
offs on Monday night at the CI
Gibson Gymnasium.

In the opener, the defending
champions Commonwealth
Bank Giants advanced to the
divisional finals by completing a
two-game sweep over the Y-
Care Wreckers in a nail-biting
85-83 victory in the clincher.

In the night cap, the young
Johnson Trucking Jumpers
jumped all over the Sunshine
Auto RuffRyders to pull off a
huge 122-116 win to stay alive as
they evened their series at 1-1.

Tonight at the gym, the Elec-
tro Telecom Cybots and the
Coca Cola Explorers are sched-
uled to battle in the third and
decisive game three of their
series. The feature contest
between the Police and the Fox-
ies Pros will also be decided in
game three.

Senior Football Standings

Bahamas Football Association
Senior League Standings 2008

As at March 16, 2009

Team Name P WwW
Pts

Bears FC 11
Caledonia FC 11

Sharks FC 11

Cavalier FC 10

Baha Juniors FC 11
Dynamos FC 11

FC Nassau 11

Recent Results

Sunday, March 15, 2009

1:00 pm Bears FC vs Cavalier FC 2:0
Goalscorers: Steve Jones (Bears FC) 66th; Leslie St. Fleur (Bears FC) 83rd
3:00 pm Baha Juniors FC vs Sharks FC 3:4
Goalscorers: Johnson Jean (Sharks FC) 20th; Chedlet Pierre (Sharks FC ) 23rd;
Duckerno Exlias (Sherks FC) 29th; Michael Sterling (Sharks FC) 85th; Courtney

Arsenal beats Hull 2-1
to reach FA Cup semis

@ By FRANK GRIFFITHS
Associated Press Writer

LONDON (AP) — William
Gallas scored a disputed goal
with five minutes remaining to
give Arsenal a 2-1 victory over
Hull on Tuesday night and a
berth against Chelsea in the FA
Cup semifinals on April 18.

Manchester United faces
Everton the following day at
Wembley in the other semifi-
nal.

Hull went ahead in the 13th
minute when defender Andy
Dawson’s lofted pass found
Nick Barmby in the penalty
area, and Barmby’s shot
deflected off defender Johan
Djourou and looped in over
goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski.

Arsenal tied it in the 75th
after Nicklas Bendtner’s pass
in front of goal was deflected
into the path of Andrei

Barnett (Baha) 59th; Andrew Pratt (Baha) 61st and 70th:

Upcoming Matches

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Gallas, stripped of the cap-
taincy earlier this season for
criticizing teammates, scored
the go-ahead goal after Hull
goalkeeper Boaz Myhill came
off his line to punch a long ball
clear. The ball came off
Djourou, and Gallas won a duel
with Dawson, heading the ball
into an empty net.

Replays showed Gallas
appeared to be in an offside
position, and Hull manager Phil
Brown blamed referee Mike
Riley.

“Tt was definitely a mistake
by the officials,”’ Brown said.
“That’s why we’re out of the
FA Cup. Ask Mr. Riley how
much that’s going to cost Hull
City. I don’t think he’d under-
stand. I don’t think he’d care.”

Brown also accused injured
Arsenal captain Cesc Fabregas
of spitting at Hull’s
Brian Horton follow-

ing the match.

“He spat at my
assistant manag-
er down the tun-
nel. That’s their
club captain,”
Brown _— said.
“Hopefully, he’s
proud of himself.
He spat at his
feet.”

Hull defeated
Arsenal 2-1 in
the Premier

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Freedom Academy at the start of the day
to eventually get into the pool champi-

Zion Academy won that game 22-18.

In that game, Leslie Rolle led the way
with nine, Giviane Bonaby had six,
Bernard Munroe four and Nashad Mack-

Kerrano Mackey and Spencer had nine
apiece in the loss for Freedom Academy.

Queen’s College 16, Centerville 14:

Andre Delancy hit two free throws in
the final 25 seconds to push the Comets
ahead 16-13. But with just 2.6 seconds left
on the clock, Troy Casseus hit just one



ARSENAL’S Alexandre Song (top left), battles for the ball with Hull City's
Manucho (bottom left), and goalkeeper Boaz Myhill during the FA Cup Sixth
Round soccer match between Arsenal and Hull City at The Emirates Sta-
dium in London, Tuesday...

(AP Photo: Tom Hevezi)

Emirates Stadium, which
opened in 2006.

League on Sept. 27, only the
second loss for the Gunners at

FROM page 11

for the final score.

Delancy went on to score a game high
eight and Carl Nesbitt had four as Queen’s
College clinched the pool D champi-
onship.

“T expected it to be close, but yesterday
when we played them, I didn’t play Andre
Delancy because of a knee injury,” said
Comets’ coach Jason Edwards.

“Tt’s still kind of sallow, but he wanted
to play. I just couldn’t keep him off the
court. He came up with some big free
throws down the stretch for us.”

Casseus ended up with six and Gre-
mako Symonette and D Rolle both added
three in a losing effort.

WORLDWIDE

BAHAMAS

FUN-RUN-WALK






a
INBRIEF

SAILING
BACARDI CUP

A number of international
boats will be in action at
Montagu Bay starting today
through Saturday as they
compete in the International
Sailing Competition.

The boats will compete in
the Bacardi Cup that will
start today at 11 am and con-
tinue through Thursday.
Then on Thursday through
Saturday, the boats will com-
pete in the Dudley Gamblin
Memorial. A number of
Bahamians will also be com-
peting in the series.

BASEBALL
JBLN UPDATE

e Here’s a look at the
results of the games played
this weekend in the Junior
Baseball League of Nassau
at the St Andrew’s Field of
Dreams.

TEE BALL
Grasshoppers 21, Raptors
12
Knights 13, Sand Gnats 7
Sidewinders 20, Blue
Claws 10
COACH PITCH
Blue Jays 19, Angels 7
Athletics 16, Astros 12
Diamondbacks 13, Cubs 2
MINOR LEAGUE
Red Sox 11, Rays 8
Royals 12, Rockies 6
MAJOR LEAGUE
Indians 4, Reds 3
JUNIOR LEAGUE
Twins 10, Cardinals 9
Dodgers 7, Yankees 6
SENIOR LEAGUE
Phillies 5, Rangers 2
Tigers 10, Pirates 6

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



DATE: March 21st, 2009

TIME: 6:00 am
ROUTE:

start at MONTAGUE, and travel west on East Bay Street to Charlotte Street,
go south on Charlotte Street to Shirley Street, travel east on Shirley Street

back to Montague

Categories
Male and Female
Runners and Walkers

9 under 10-15 16-25 26-35

36-49

50 over

Registration: $15.00 (Includes T-Shirt)

Please support this fund raising effort to aid the medical expenses of

five year old ‘Tyrese Sullivan.

aniret: Ape:
Pier: Nuerraibaer:
Walker

Runner

te |:

1DO NOT HOLD HOPE WORLDWIDE BAHAMAS responsible for any ACCIDENT that may occur

dunng the Fun- Run —Walk

Sager

Hope Worldwide Bahamas would like to thank the following sponsors for their support;

Bahamas Engraving Al Trophies & Awards

Bahamas Ferries
Bally Total Fitness

Forsythe’s Communications Center Ltd.

Inell’s Fashion
Island Wholesale Ltd.
John Bull Limited

Mystical Fitness & Health Spa

Nassau Paper Company Ltd.

Paradise Island Harbour Resort

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

The Bay
The Trophy Case
Thompson Trading Co. Ltd.

TELEPHONE: 356-3423


Arsenal beats
Hull 2-1 to
reach FA Cup

semis...
See page 10

ts







MAHESH Bhupathi (front) and
Mark Knowles in the final of the
doubles at the Australian Open...

(AP Photo: Andrew Brownbill)

Knowles,
Bhupathi
eliminated

lm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK Knowles and
Mahesh Bhupathi’s trip to
Indian Wells, California, for
the BNP Paribas Open didn’t
last that long.

The number three seeded
Bahamian-Indian duo got
eliminated in the second
round on Monday night by
Max Mirnyi and Andy Ram
in two straight sets 7-6 (2), 6-4.

Knowles said it was quite a
disappointing loss.

“It was tough. They’re a
tough team. They played
extremely well,” Knowles
said. “It was just one of those
matches that we didn’t get
ahead of them.

“They didn’t really let us
get into the match, so we
couldn’t turn it around.”

With this being the first
Masters Series, the biggest
tournament on the ATP
World Tour outside of the
Grand Slam, Knowles said he
and Bhupathi wanted to put
themselves in a position to
contend for the title.

“The hard courts is our
favourite surface so we’re dis-
appointed in that aspect,” he
said. “We thought we could
have gone far and even possi-
bly win the title.

“But now all we could do is
prepare ourselves for next
week in Miami and hopefully
make up for not doing as well
here and try to contend for
the title there.”

Miami, Florida will be the
site for the second Masters
Series called the Sony Erics-
son Open. As they look ahead
to next week, Knowles said
they certainly have to make
some adjustments.

“Mahesh didn’t play his best
match and everybody is enti-
tled to have a bad game every
now and then,” he said. “He
felt he could have played a lit-
tle bit better and I think we
could have returned serve a
little better.

“But I think a lot had to do
with the way they served.
They served extremely big
and they got in a high per-
centage of first serves and they
really neutralized our return.
So we have to look at playing
a little better in those aspects.”

Depending on how success-
ful they are, Knowles said he
could be coming home for a
couple of days. But he’s hop-
ing that they are right in the
thick of things as they look
forward to winning the title
or at least end up playing
through the weekend.

So far the second-year duo
of Knowles and Bhupathi are
still looking for their first vic-
tory on the tour. They came
close finishing as runners-up at
the Australian Open and were
in the semifinal in Sidney, just
before the first Grand Slam
for the year.

However, they are still
ranked at number two on the
tour behind the American
identical twin brothers of Bob
and Mike Bryan.

Knowles has won a doubles
title this year. That was when
he teamed up with American
Mardy Fish to win in Mem-
phis, Tennessee, after Bhu-
pathi took a week’s break
from the circuit.

KYLE TURNQUEST, of St Bede’s,
drives to the basket yesterday...

See more photos on page 9

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

(Photo: Felipé Major/

Tribune staff)

g By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT’S the St Bede’s Crushers
versus the Queen’s College
Comets and Zion Christian
Academy versus Stephen Dil-
let in the Final Four of the Prov-
idence Basketball Association’s
first Phil Smith Primary School
Basketball Tournament.

The four teams advanced out
of the “Elite Eight” pool cham-
pionships played yesterday at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.
The two winners will go on to
play in the championship game
at the end of tonight.

e Here’s how they got into
the semifinals:

St Bede’s 20, Blairwood

Academy 8:

This one wasn’t much of a
contest as the Crushers crushed
Blairwood on their way to the B
pool championship.

Donzel Huyler had a game
high nine, while Dwight Wheat-
ley and Adrian Mackey both
had four in the win.

“This game wasn’t one that
we played the type of basket-
ball that the Crushers normally
play,” said St Bede’s coach
Ricardo Freemantle.

“The guys were still a little

tired from our house meet yes-
terday (Monday), but we can’t
use that as an excuse. We just
have to come and play our
game tomorrow (today).”

For Blairwood, Jermaine
Higgs scored five and Lejaro
Johnson added three.

Stephen Dillet 19, Kingsway

Academy 14:

The pool C championship
was more keenly contested, but
down the stretch Stephen Dillet
came up with a couple big shots
to stay ahead.

Gage Griffin had six, Michael
Bethel five and McKellen
Major four in the win.

“T felt very good because we
started out very slow. It wasn’t
that we were not getting our
shots, they were just not
falling,” said Stephen Dillet’s
coach Frank Johnson.

“But I told the guys to keep
their head in the game. I know
we will rebound. We put the
pressure on and we got about
eight fast break points on some
steals and we were able to get
back into the game.”

Emmanuel Butler had a
game high 10 in a losing effort.

Zion Academy 36, St. Fran-
cis/Joseph 24:

Nashad Mackey came up
with some clutch plays in the

HERE’S a look at the
matchup of the Final Four
in the Providence Basket-
ball Club’s first Phil Smith
Primary School Boys’ Chal-
lenge today at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium, starting
at 4pm:

® St Bede’s vs Queen’s
College

e Stephen Dillet vs Zion
Academy

second half as he led a spirited
Zion Academy in the pool A
championship.

Mackey finished with a game
high 12, Giviane Beneby had
eight and both Leslie Rolle and
Nathan Ellis helped out with
seven.

Myron Johnson had 11, Bran-
don Wilson eight and Ahkeem
Neilly five in the loss.

It was a double dose of victo-
ry for Zion Academy, who had
to play a tie-breaker against

SEE page 10





OR ea
ase ee
TN Pel

ey


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009



KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For Late

Mr. David Albert Charles Kelly, C.B.E.

a of Nassau, The Bahamas, who died in New

York City, New York, U.S.A. on the 11th
March, 2009, will be held at Christ Church
Cathedral, George Street, Nassau, on
| Thursday, 19th March, 2009 at 3:00 p.m.

/ Mr. Kelly is survived by his wife Nancy

§| Booth Kelly; three sons, Andrew Jordan

Kelly, David Gregory Booth Kelly and

Reginald Scott Kelly; two daughters-in-law,

Anne Boushelle Kelly and Candace Elizabeth

| Kelly; five grandchildren, Jordan Ross Kelly,

David Oliver Christensen Kelly, Avery Anne

Kelly, John (Jack) Albert Charles Kelly and

Katie Marie Kelly; his brother, Godfrey

Kenneth Kelly C.M.G.; his sisters-in-law,

Sonia Kelly and Paula Kelly; his brother-in-law, John Avery Booth, Jr and his

wife, Bonnie Booth; nieces and nephews, Linda Elza and her daughter,

Katherine Elza, Steven Kelly and his wife, Susan Kelly, Gary Kelly , Lynn

Lowe and her husband, Chris Lowe, Karen Kelly, John Avery Booth, Ill, and

his wife, Kathleen Booth, Joy Marie Rousell and her husband James Rousell

and Jody Laura Booth-Seals and her husband, Dave Seals, ; his cousins Betty

Kelly Kenning, O.B.E. and her husband John Kenning,O.B.E., and George

Kelly,M.B.E and his wife Norma Kelly, other relatives and friends. His brother
Basil Trevor Kelly predeceased him.

The Very Reverend Patrick L. Adderley, Dean of Nassau, The Venerable Keith
Cartwright, Archdeacon of the Southern Bahamas, The Reverend Father
Michael Gittens, Priest Vicar, Christ Church Cathederal, Nassau and The
Reverend Crosley N. Walkine, Rector, St. Anne's Church, Fox Hill, Nassau
will officiate and interment will follow in St Anne's Church Cemetery.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale
Avenue, Nassau on Wednesday, 18th March, 2009 from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
and on Thursday, 19th March, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.

IN CELEBRATION OF DAVID'S LOVE OF BRIGHT COLOURS AND HIS
LOVE OF LIFE, PLEASE DRESS IN BRIGHT COLOURS.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Lyford Cay Foundation,
Inc., DAVID A. C. KELLY, C.B.E. MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, P.O.Box
N.7776, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue,
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS





wT)
PICTURED from left are C C Sweeting Senior High School health and family life teacher Carolyn Rolle; perma-

nent secretary in the Ministry of Education Elma Garraway; principal of C C Sweeting Senior High School Delores
Ingraham; Xie-Xiuling, and ZhangMei.




i 3 _ , i
XIE-XIULING, wife of the Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China to the Bahamas, and officials from the

Chinese Embassy visited C C Sweeting Senior High School on Monday, March 16. Pictured is Mrs Xie-Xiuling,
left, speaking with the school’s principal Mrs Delores Ingraham.

PHOTOS: Raymond A Bethel/BIS


THE TRIBUNE



— — =

WEDNESDAY, MARCH



A LUXURY YACHT can be seen on Paradise Island, Bahamas...

18,



2009

Yacht, boat foreclosures likely
huge factor in decline in
pleasure trips to Bahamas

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

expressed con-
cern that it was
not cost effective
to travel to the
Bahamas
because of high
cruising permit |
prices, fuel
prices compared [
to the US and

FORECLOSURES on recreational
boats and yachts are likely to be a huge
factor in the recent 20 per cent decline
in pleasure trips to Bahamian waters,
according to the Director General of
Tourism, while boating experts cited
the high overall costs of travel to the
islands as a factor. other miscella-

Vernice Walkine said a large num- neous docking
ber of individuals in the US lost homes, fees.
boats and other luxury items as the “Bottom line

global economic crisis forced decreased on the thing is ee



spending and promoted debt increas-
es.
“That is a significant part of the dif-
ficulty that we’re faced with,” she said.
Publisher of Southern Boating Mag-
azine Skip Allen said several boaters

they were con-

cerned about the $300 for the cruising
permit and I didn’t disagree with them
about the fuel charge, as far as dollars
were concerned,” he said. “I would
rather be in the Bahamas, even though

“That is a significant
NUON aCeMON NICU UM mI NEALE

we're faced wit

— Vernice Walkine



it costs me a little more, but that’s a
personal opinion and that’s how I figure
it.”

However, Mrs Walkine said she is
not convinced that fuel prices are a hin-
drance to most boaters, as the price per
gallon has fallen substantially since last
summer when the Bahamas again saw a
decrease in the number of private
boaters. “Fuel prices obviously cannot

SEE page 2B



Dunkin’ Donuts’ airport
store to employ about
80 Bahamians

Downtown location set to open in May

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

DUNKIN’ DONUTS and its
Bakery will create employment
for about 80 Bahamians when
its second store in the Lynden
Pindling International airport
opens this week and its down-
town location opens in May,
according to the company’s
Marketing Director.

Tracy Cash told Tribune
Business that Bahamas QSR
brings to the popular US dough-
nut and coffee franchise, a

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



—IDUNKIN’

KDONUTS



wealth of experience for oper-
ating international brands.

The company, a subsidiary of
the Meyers group which also
operates the local KFC brand,
recently acquired the Dunkin’
Donuts brand after it was held
and lost by another local
Bahamian several years ago.

A release issued by the com-
pany said that the brand is the
“number one retailer of hot and
iced regular coffee-by-the-cup
in America, and the largest cof-
fee and baked goods chain in
the world.”

“We are happy to have been
awarded the contract and to
have this opportunity to add
Dunkin’ Donuts to the airport
experience” said Douglas
Sawyer, Vice President and
Managing Director of the
Myers Group.

The Nassau Airport Devel-
opment company said it was
happy to welcome the company
to the airport which joins Tor-
tuga, the Rum Cake retailer
also under the umbrella of the
Meyers Group.

“NAD is delighted to wel-
come Dunkin’ Donuts into the
airport family” said John

SEE page 4B

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Local US tax
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declined

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

overnment has

declined the appli-

cation of a local

lawyer with techni-
cal knowledge of US tax policy,
who was recommended to
replace the Bahamas’ outgoing
representative for the Commit-
tee of Experts on International
Co-operation in Tax Matters,
Tribune Business has learned,
as this country seeks to develop
tax co-operation policy in light
of growing pressure from G20
nations.

The rejection is believed to
be politically motivated.

Ryan Pinder, who told this
paper that he was recommend-
ed to the government by a
“senior civil servant,” said he
was told that his application was
denied because the Ministry of
Finance is interested in filling
the position from within their
organisation.

However, some local eco-
nomic experts say they were
informed that the denial may
have come because of Mr Pin-
der’s association with the PLP

Prime Income Fund

e A higher, stable rate of return
e Long-term capital preservation

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e Bahamas seeks
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e Growing
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G20 nations

through his work with the Pro-
gressive Young Liberals.

According to Mr Pinder, he
would have offered to be a con-
sultant for them at no cost or
for $1 per year, depending on
the government’s requirements.

“They would like an employ-
ee of the ministry or someone in
the public sector,” he said.

As the G20 countries, the
group of the world’s 20 largest
economies, tighten the reins on
so-called “tax haven” countries,
the Bahamas is mulling its

SEE page 4B

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aS MIE aie


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

SESS eee
Yacht, boat foreclosures likely huge factor

in decline in pleasure trips to Bahamas









cruising permit and that did-

FROM page 1B
n’t make a lot of sense,” he

be the issue,” she contend- _ said. “Your cruising permit is
ed. only good for one shot.”

UN Sess oS Sa
seen in New Providence































Ta a
a.

A new Insurance Brokerage company is ready to serve
the local market. The partners of APS announce the for-
mation of their new company, Assured Financial
services Insurance Agents and Brokers Limited.

The company is headed by Dashwell E. Flowers, a well
known and highly regarded insurance industry profes
sional who has been in the business for some twenty
four years, most of which have been in senior level posi-
tions. “I welcome the opportunity to provide Bahamians
and residents with the best insurance products from the
country’s leading providers. As a full service broker, we
are dedicated to offering the very best in auto, health,
life, and other insurance products and services,” said
Mr. Flowers, the company's president and chief operat-
ing executive. He added, “We have recruited an execu-
tive team that has over one hundred years of experience
in this business, one of our main focus areas is client
service; emphasizing the building and maintenance of
constructive and rewarding relationships. Excellent
client service means that we are always accessible, not
simply at renewal tine.”

Also part of the executive team, and a partner in AFS, is
Keith L. Major; he serves as director of sales and market-
ing. "During these challenging economic times, it is
important to have partners you can trust. At AFS, due to
our experience in the business, we have considerable
knowledge of the insurance industry and will utilize
this know-how to benefit our clients so that they are
better positioned to secure appropriate insurance dé
coverage," said Mr. Major. Mr. Major previ-

ously served as vice president of mar- ce



Mr Allen said boaters this
year have developed strict
budgets and are willing to
forego travel to the Bahamas
for a more budget friendly
destinations such as the
Florida keys or Ft Laud-
erdale.

He said many private
yachts and fishing boats are
simply opting to stay closer
to home this year.

According to him, boaters
were concerned most about
having to pay a cruising fee
multiple times during the
year if they were to make
several trips back and forth
from the US to the Bahamas.

“Tf they wanted to go over
in April then go back in July
or September it was $900
because of the cost of the




Mrs Walkine said the Min-
istry of Tourism is paying
attention to the boating mar-
ket and has plans to take an
aggressive approach to
attracting business to the
many southern Bahamas
docks that depend on rev-
enue from boaters.

Mr Allen said he and his
magazine are on the side of
the Bahamas when it comes
to bringing business to the
islands.

According to him, South-
ern Boating magazine fea-
tures Rum Cay in its April
edition and is rolling out its
yearly Bahamas edition in
May.

“There are a lot of pluses
to being in the Bahamas,” he
said.

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new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following
items:

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keting at three local financial
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* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for
the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (ie.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 PAGE 3B





Tourism seeing
better year than was
previously projected,
says Walkine

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE Ministry of Tourism is
seeing a better year so far than
was previously projected,
according to the Director gen-
eral of the Ministry of Tourism,
amid a global recession that
threatened to sink the Tourism
sector this year.

Vernice Walkine told Tri-
bune Business that even though

“".We’re working in terms
of increased advertising presence

in the marketplace by extending
that through to June.”

— Vernice Walkine



1000 to 1200 visitors to Nas-
sau/Paradise Island, and the
recently announced Miss Uni-
verse pageant, expected to draw
thousands, will give the islands
of the Bahamas a much needed
economic boost, according to
Tourism Ministry officials.
Mrs Walkine said the min-
istry has been working tireless-
ly to introduce big things that
will have a tremendous payoff
for the economy and a lot of lit-

the beginning of this year has
been somewhat better than the
Ministry foresaw, it is nowhere
near where it was during the
same time last year.

“We’re doing everything we
can to get our fair share and
then some,” she said. “We’re
working very hard on a num-
ber of fronts. We’re working in
terms of increased advertising
presence in the marketplace by
extending that through to

June.”

“So, we are reaching more
people more frequently across
the United States — reaching
those people who are less affect-
ed by the economic situation.”

Mrs Walkine said she has not
yet received official statistics on
the number of spring break vis-
itors this year, but expects that
the numbers will be fairly good.

According to her, the unfor-
tunate situation in Mexico may

have given the Bahamas an
added boost as a destination of
choice. Mexico is currently
fighting a drug war on its bor-
ders with the US.

“T think the Bahamas, and
Nassau in particular, has been
able to benefit from that,” she
said. “There are places like
Superclubs Breezes that are
sold out.”

The upcoming FIFA Con-
gress, which is expected to bring

tle things that will add up to a
big pay off.

She said the FIFA Congress
and the Miss Universe pageant
will bring the fringe benefit of
international exposure for the
islands of the Bahamas.

Her ministry has also been
working diligently to create
more airlift into Grand Bahama
by creating incentives for car-
riers in an effort to make air-
fare to Freeport competitive.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

COMMON WEALTH CF THE BACAMAS 2IKIE
IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND BOUTTY DIVISION

CLEAR Ma. 0170008

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piewe Parcel or lot of and
and dwelling house thereon comprising five thoussed eight hundred
and twenty-one (3,82 1) square feet being Lot Mo, Three Hondred
and twenty-one (921) of Pyfrom Subdivision Phase U1 situate in the
Faster District of the Island of New Providence one-of the Islands
al The Pishems.

ANTE
IN THE MATTER of dhe Quuieting: Tithes het, 19549
ANI

IM THE MATTER of the Petition of HESL YN FERN ANDER

NOTICE

HESLYN FERMANMOVGR the Petitioner claims to be the owner of the fee
stinpie exivie in powassion of the lot of land and dwelling house described herem
free from incumbrances,

AND the Petitioncr hes made application to the Supreme Court af the sand
Commoneealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Qeteting Tite Act 1949 to
howe her ttle to the said parcel of Land investigated and the nature and extent
therea? detenumed aad deckared ina Certificate of Tile to be
accoedance with the prevvision of the aaid Act

MOTRCE is hereby piven that any peraon keving Deereror right io Dower or
an Adwere Claim oF a clades not recngied is the Petition shall on oe before the
21" day od May ALD, 20M) file ie the Supreme Count and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned 2 statement of hiather claim im the prescribed fem verified by a
Abfidavit io be filed therewith Failures of any gach person bo file and seeve a
staiement of his‘her claim on or before the 21" day of Moy AD, 2008 will operate
as a bar to such claim.

Copies of the plan may be inspected at:

1, The Registry of the Supreme Conrt

2. Michael Hanna & Co.
Ram 2
TREHL Plaza
Tonique Darling Highway
Mew Prvveiomse, Rahaman

Dated the 12" day of March AJ. Me

Althomeys for the Petitoner

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#4 Patton & Rosetta Sts
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P.O. Box N-10620 Nassau, Bahamas

Email: sales@dctpc.com
Tel: 242-328-0048

TECHNOLOGY = Fax: 242-328-0049

COMPANY LIMITED

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Morey at Work

To advertise in The
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in circulation, just call
002-2371 today!



























IN HOUSE
INVESTMENTS LTD

NOTICE TO
SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of directors of In House Investments Limited has
declared a quarterly dividend for Preferred Shares to all
shareholders of record at March 16, 2009 as follows:

Preferred Shares 7.25% per annum (payment quarterly).
The payment will be made March 31, 2009 through Royal
Fidelity Share Registrars & Transfer Agents Limited in the

usual manner.

$B) Bahamas Business
\SL/ Solutions Ltd

LTR FCAVOCY SGD Le

We would lke to notify our valued customers that
Mr. Cleveland Saunders

Sno longer employed with Bahamas Business Solutions
Limited and therefore not authorised fo sel or service Nerox
Products.

Bahamas Business Solutions Limited is the only company

authonsed to sel and service Xerox Products in the Bahamas

and are not lable for any products or services provided by this
individual

FG CAPTTAL
BROKERAG!

MARKETS
E & ADVISORY SERWVICES

KTP TL. fa mT ST.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 17 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,655.09 | CHG -4.07 | %CHG -0.25 | YTD -57.27 | YTD % -3.34
FINDEX: CLOSE 813.18 | YTD -2.60% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

1.39
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.31
2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

1.45
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.56
1.81
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consclidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Fince

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS $
1.45
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.48
1.78
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. Interest
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00
100.00
100.00

Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

S2wk-Low Bid $
7.92
4.00

0.35

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Ask $
8.42
6.25
0.40

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
RND Holdings

31.72
0.00
0.45

33.26
0.00
0.55

29.00
0.00
0.55

4.540
0.000
0.002

0.000
0.000
0.000

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bend Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

NA Vv
1.3664
2.8988
1.4432

1.3041
2.9230
1.3828
3.3201
11.8789
100.0000
96.4070

3.3201
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

1.0000
9.1005
1.0440
1.0364
1.0452

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

YTD%
0.95
-1.40
0.67
-1.94
0.96
0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.06
0.80
0.33
0.76

Last 12 Months Div $ Yield _%
28-Feb-09
28-Feb-09
6-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

4.40 9-Feb-09

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV -
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

- Trading volume of the prior week

Net Asset Value

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Dunkin’ Donuts’ TT ocal US tax |

airport store to
employ about
80 Bahamians

FROM page 1B

Spinks, Vice President, Com-
mercial Development for NAD.

Dunkin’ Donuts brand is a
ubiquitous US coffee brand,
known worldwide with over
7,900 restaurants in 30 coun-
tries.

The first Bahamas Dunkin’
Donuts branch shut its doors
after a fire destroyed the down-
town building. Shortly after,

other locations followed.

Several other local food com-
panies are also planning to
move their businesses into the
airport to increase food and
beverage options as a part of
the redevelopment.

“This is an exciting first step
towards increasing and improv-
ing the food and beverage
options at the airport,” said Mr
Spinks.

awyer’s

application declined

FROM page 1B

options, while other offshore
financial service centres world-
wide are swiftly moving to com-
ply with Organisation for Eco-
nomic Co-operation and Devel-
opment (OECD) regulations.
Mr Pinder believes that the
Bahamas government should
have been proactive in enter-
ing into more tax information
exchange agreements with
OECD countries and sending
delegations to Washington.
Now, he said, the country has
found itself in a situation where

it is the last to respond.

“Anything we do from here
on out I fear is not going to be
taken seriously, especially in
light of a lot of the other juris-
dictions taking such aggressive
and affirmative measures,” he
said.

“T’ve long been a proponent
of the Bahamas entering into
Tax Information Exchange
Agreements. We pretty much
ignore requests for Tax Infor-
mation Exchange Agreements.”

Economic experts worldwide
have accused the US and UK
of “hypocrisy,” as they engage

in as much of the activities as
those so-called “tax havens”.

Trillion

The US is said to have as
much as $4 trillion in passive
investments, whose portfolios
are not shared with countries
where the investments origi-
nate.

According to Mr Pinder, the
US is addressing this issue and
trying to level the playing field.

He said that should the gov-

ernment comply with OECD
regulations it could gain favour

with entities such as the World
Trade Organisation and The
International Monetary Fund.

“These are all issues that will
be affected if we don’t comply,
if we’re blacklisted and if we’re
deemed to be a rogue nation
and by not having a firm policy
from the government on this
issue and without having the
proper technical ability to
analyse the issues, which I have
offered the government at no
cost, I think by and large we
won't be taken seriously when
are prepared to provide a poli-
cy statement.”



NOTICE

CALYPSO BAHAMAS PIPELINE LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against
the above-named Company are required to
send particulars thereof to the undersigned
clo P. O. Box N-3932, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 30th day of April, A.D., 2009. In default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 16th day of March, AD., 2009.

Mrs. Alison Treco
Liquidator
One Montague Place
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GAMBAS HEIGHTS
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— - —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GAMBAS HEIGHTS INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW ENGISTERN
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— - —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of NEW ENGISTERN INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
IPSKEW MOOR
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— - >_—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of IPSKEW MOOR INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

BLUE MARLIN LNG TERMINAL LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send
particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P. O. Box
N-3932, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 30th day
of April, A.D., 2009. In default thereof they will be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
by the Liquidator.

Dated the 16th day of March, AD., 2009.

Mrs. Alison Treco
Liquidator
One Montague Place
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRAPEVINE TRADING INC.

— - _—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GRAPEVINE TRADING INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ETERNAL BLESSINGS LTD.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ETERNAL BLESSINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ATVICKTON
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— - ——
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of ATVICKTON INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Real Estate



eee ae em RO ee a od

sed Jin ae del

ro Tel: 502 2356 i al

for ad rates



Legal Notice

NOTICE
HAPSBOURNE

INVESTMENTS LTD.
— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HAPSBOURNE INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ETERNAL GLORY LTD.

— £ —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ETERNAL GLORY LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BAMFORTH PLAINES LTD.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BAMFORTH PLAINES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
an
Na,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 5B





Bad year or good, AIG workers got big bonuses

m By STEVENSON JACOBS
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — A Wall
Street firm loses billions of dol-
lars, nearly destroying its busi-
ness and crippling the nation’s
economy. But top executives still
receive huge bonuses?

As crazy as that sounds to most
Americans, paying such bonuses
even after a company suffers big
losses is common practice on Wall
Street, and it’s at the heart of the
outrage surrounding insurer AIG.

Employees of the insurer’s
financial-products unit received
$165 million in so-called “reten-
tion” bonuses — payments
designed to keep valued employ-
ees from quitting. They are paid
out no matter whether the
employee had a great year or a
horrible one.

In Wall Street’s high-stakes
competitive culture, paying top
people to stay in their jobs has
been the norm for years.

“It’s basically a bribe, so your
employees don’t bolt and take
their clients with them,” said
Chuck Collins, a senior scholar
at the Washingon-based Institute
for Policy Studies and an execu-
tive compensation expert.

Even though most bonuses
paid to Wall Street employees are
tied to performance, retention
bonuses have ignited anger since
the government began pouring
billions of dollars into the finan-
cial system to keep banking and
insurance firms from collapsing.

Despite the uproar, the pay-
ments have continued at several
firms, most recently at investment
bank Merrill Lynch.

“It’s part of this Marie
Antoinette syndrome of Wall
Street,” Collins added. “They’re
completely in a bubble, and they
don’t understand how these pay-
ments are perceived.”

They do now.

The bonuses at American
International Group, which is
now nearly 80 per cent owned by
taxpayers, have drawn howls of

outrage from Congress and Pres-
ident Barack Obama. Lambast-
ing the insurance giant for “reck-
lessness and greed,” Obama
pledged to try to rescind payment
of the bonuses.

AIG has argued that retention
bonuses are crucial to pulling the
company out of its crisis. With-
out the bonuses, the company
says, top employees who best
understand AIG’s business would
quit — an assertion that critics of
the payments quickly rejected.

“T’m very skeptical that retain-
ing the people who made the mis-
takes is a good idea,” said Rep.
Barney Frank, chairman of the
House Committee on Financial
Services. “I think we have a
strong case to get some of those
bonuses back.”

Experts say it won’t be easy.

For starters, AIG’s retention
payments were guaranteed in the
executives’ contracts. By breaking
them, AIG says it would risk trig-
gering a wave of employee law-
suits. And the cost of those law-
suits would likely dwarf the size of
the retention bonuses.

One way around the contracts
would be to prove fraud. A 2002
law adopted after the accounting
scandals at Enron and other com-
panies allows publicly traded cor-
porations to take back ill-gotten
compensation.

On Capitol Hill late Tuesday,
House Democrats were consid-
ering proposing new legislation
to authorize Attorney General
Eric Holder to recover bonus
payments like the ones paid by
AIG.

A day earlier in New York,
state Attorney General Andrew
Cuomo subpoenaed information
from AIG to determine whether
the payments made over the past
weekend constitute fraud under
state law.

In a letter Tuesday, Cuomo
said 73 AIG employees received
retention bonuses of $1 million
or more — including 11 who have
since left the company. Cuomo
said the bonus checks were

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

EIC INVEST SA

Notice is hereby given thatin accordance with Section

137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, EIC INVEST SA is in dissolution.
The date of commencement of dissolution was the
11" day of March, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau,
Bahamas is the Liquidator of EIC INVEST SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

THE ISLE OF MAN
COMPANIES (TRANSFER OF DOMICILE) ACT 1998
PRIVATE

L.G.M. LIMITED
COMPANY NUMBER: 071554C

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, in accordance with Section
8 (2)(c)(i), of the Isle of Man Companies (Transfer of
Domicile) Act 1998 that the above company proposes
to apply to the Financial Supervision Commission to
redomicile the above company to the Bahamas and that
unless written objection is made within ten days of the
date of this notice, the Company may be redomiciled.

Dated this 13th day of March 2009.

Director
Pedro Solorzano Garcia

mailed Friday.

“These payments were all
made to individuals in the sub-
sidiary whose performance led to
crushing losses and the near-fail-
ure of AIG,” Cuomo wrote in the
letter to Frank.

“Thus, last week, AIG made
more than 73 millionaires in the
unit which lost so much money
that it brought the firm to its
knees, forcing a taxpayer bailout.
Something is deeply wrong with
this outcome.”

Critics say the government
could have done more to prevent
the AIG bonuses.

Peter Morici, a business pro-
fessor at the University of Mary-
land, said the government could
have forced AIG to re-negotiate
the bonus contracts so employ-
ees would be paid less. He noted
that the government demanded
similar concessions from union-
ized autoworkers before agree-

ing to bail out General Motors,
Ford and Chrysler.

“It seems like no effort was
made to negotiate with the AIG
people and that the government
gave them whatever they want,”
Morici said. “If we forced
autoworkers to take less, we
could have done it with AIG
employees.”

As for AIG’s argument that
failure to pay the bonuses would
send employees running for the
exits, some experts say that would
be just fine. “There’s a lot of
unemployed Wall Street workers
that could be brought in as fresh
blood,” said Stephen Davis, a
senior fellow and expert on cor-
porate governance at Yale Uni-
versity.

Otherwise, Davis said, paying
bonuses to executives of falter-
ing companies risks creating a “a
grab-and-go culture.”

“The danger is that this kind

of culture could spread to other
companies,” he said. “People
could see this as their moment to
get what they can before the gate
closes.”

AIG’s troubles stem from its
business insuring mortgage-
backed securities and other debt
against default. As the credit cri-
sis took hold, that business
imploded. Since September, the
government has shoveled more
than $170 billion into AIG, which
has operations in more than 130
countries.

AIG’s financial products unit
had been led by Joseph Cassano,
who stepped down a year ago
after the division reported a loss
of more than $11 billion on a
book of contracts in the last quar-
ter of 2007.

AIG representatives did not
return calls seeking comment
Tuesday. Spokeswoman Christina
Pretto had said Monday that the

company was in ongoing contact
with Cuomo’s office and would
respond to his requests for infor-
mation.

Retention bonuses on Wall
Street and in other industries are
hardly new. Last month, the Wall
Street Journal reported that Mor-
gan Stanley plans to pay up to $3
billion in retention bonuses to
6,500 brokers in its joint venture
with Smith Barney. Morgan Stan-
ley has received $10 billion in
bailout funds.

In a December survey of 264
companies across a variety of
industries, business consultant
Watson Wyatt Worldwide found
that nine per cent of companies
had added, or expected to add, a
special retention bonus. An addi-
tional 21 per cent were consider-
ing doing so.

¢ Associated Press Writer
Michael Virtanen contributed to
this report from Albany, N_Y.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MILLCROSS MANOR
HOLDINGS LTD.

— ¢ sl
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MILLCROSS MANOR HOLDINGS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

TRINITE INVEST SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 of The International Business
Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, TRINITE INVEST
SA is in dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was the 11" day of March, 2009. Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
TRINITE INVEST SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE
REIGATE VENTURES LTD.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of REIGATE VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PARK AVENUE
HOLDINGS LTD.

— 4, —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PARK AVENUE HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MALMESBURY
VENTURES LTD.

—— 4 ——
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MALMESBURY VENTURES LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

































Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOYLENWORTH
HOLDINGS LTD.

—_— 4 eae
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SOYLENWORTH HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAGIC CHARM
HOLDINGS LTD.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MAGIC CHARM HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAELCHAN TWO
GROUP INC.

—— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MAELCHAN TWO GROUP INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LOTUS CHAMPS LTD.

= /, ee
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LOTUS CHAMPS LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

a Lae

THE TRIBUNE









SOPHIE, SAM
TOLD ME ABOUT
YOUR DECIGION

TO TRY OLIT FOR
CHEERLEADER!



TO TALK ME
OUT OF IT...IVE
MADE MY PECISION!

KS

ee
---JUST
UNDERSTAND?
THAT THESE GIRLS
a
ess



TO TRY TO
DISSUAPE YOUL--

WON'T MAKE IT
EASY FOR YOU!

©2009 by North America Syndicate. Inc.

GREEN COFFEE,
GREEN BURGER,
5| GREEN FRIES, AND A
BOTTLE OF GREEN

(WHOA, DAG, WHAT'S
WITH THE GREEN
FACE?



www.Blondie.com.



XL WouLPN'T
Vo THAT

DRINK THEIZ PIRTY
BATAWATER

‘©ac09 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights “eservec



BUT CONSIDERING MY LIFES
IN SHAMBLES RIGHT NOW,
ae COULDNT You AT
LEAST TAKE THE
BLAME ?

YoU BROKE NOUR BEANIE
MOTOR, NoT ME! I DIDNT
DO ANYTHING /

T DID NOT!



+ SNIFF +
“*SNIFFLE+

T WAS JUST
<| S/TTING HERE!
Yoo YOU BROKE {T

£

© 1989 Universal Press Syndicate



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday









é
=
€
rs
=
es
z
a
g
x



















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

‘NOU CAN'T KISS ME, MARGARET. I HAVEN'T

HAD ALL OF MY SHOTS.” Difficulty Level * 4%






















CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across Down
1 Ladies’ man holding an 1 Song and dance gets little




ancient city office (6) publicity (6)
4 Bird to catch on 2 Short summary concerning
horseback (6) headgear (5)
9 Food for cattle in 3 Fruit that’s new to
Switzerland (7) Capri (7)
10 Strange glee | come 5 Marble street (5)
across in Belgium (5) 6 They’re unnecessary,

11 Aspice having no end of pointless, but still

use in savouries (5) pointed (7)

12. Girl who's pill-shy 7 Convert me with this
crying out for belief (6)
treatment (7) 8 It may be taken as an










Across: 1 All-star, 5 Beset, 8 Pay
lip service, 9 Crook, 10 Galileo, 11 18
Vanity, 12 Etched, 15 Bahrain, 17 20
Ambit, 19 At loggerheads, 20 Tawny, 22
21 Hearsay.

Down: 1 Aspic, 2 Lay down the law,
3 Trinket, 4 Resign, 5 Beryl, 6 Spill
the beans, 7 Toehold, 11 Vibrant, 13 24
Trachea, 14 Enmesh, 16 Angry, 18
Tasty.

of London, 9 Alibi, 10 Restful, 11
Digest, 12 Abates, 15 Salutes, 17
Cigar, 19 Inexpressible, 20 Ensue, 21
Depress.

Down: 1 Extra, 2 Bowling alleys, 3 In
ruins, 4 Effort, 5 Gross, 6
Indefatigable, 7 Tingles, 11 Despite,
13 Bucks up, 14 Ascend, 16 Tepee,
18 Reels.

Fanatical (5)

23 Something very

agreement (6)



Pyrenean republic (7) 15

Ascent (5) 16

ugly (7) 17
International 19

Impassioned (6) 21

APT 3-G




ARE YOU SURE YoU DON'T WANT
TO STAY AND FINISH THAT PIZZA,





NO THANKS, TOMMIE.
TWO'S COMPANY,



©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

© 2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. Wartd rights reserved.



YOU TWO KIDS HAVE FUN AND ENJOY

YOUR WEEKEND OFF.

Ti PUT
IT ON MY
“TO po”



HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

V ucarn VY som WHAT A
YOUAVE NURSE WILL S(T, FULL-LENGTH
TO LOSE GIVE YOU DOCTOR MIRROR
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TESTERDATS SOLUTION
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Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer







































13 Fine steak and a drink on indication of health (11)
the house (11) 14 This animal won't always
18 Revised list for a retailer in die a natural death (7)
a growing trade (7) 15 Popped the question after
20 Aprose form that gives work, but not accepted (7) Lu Across Down
difficulties (5) 16 State in a loud and —_l 1 Unexpected 1 Go back (6)
22 Children are a contentious resolute way (6) N refusal (6) 2 Two ofa kind (5)
point (5) 17 Credit is twice provided in > 4 Instructive 3 Sweet-scented
23 Places visited on vacation an emergency (6) ou experience (6) flower (7)
or between vacations (7) 19 She's a bit of a siren, > 9 French vineyard 5 Fit out (5)
24 He acts dumb (6) evidently (5) ” estate (7) 6 A disappointment (7)
25 Converts work into play, 21 Take off from the perhaps (6) runway (5) Lu 11 Lees (5) 8 Egyptian
12 Pacify (7) boy-king, died
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution 13 Russian c.1324 BC (11)
Across: 1 Ebb tide, 5 Glint, 8 Tower eomposer (11) 14 An analgesic (7)

Dutch painter,
1632-75 (7)
Surgical
instrument (6)
Arrival (6)
Disprove by
argument (5)
Penniless (5)















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

ON OO] (HA D/M) o/s
NM ®m BIO!;N/oo;o1;—|o
— OF ©/0/BR/M|N) | 0
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3/18

East dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.

NORTH
40107
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WEST EAST
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The bidding:
East South West North
| & 1 2 26
3 & 4@

Opening lead — four of clubs.

A defender should approach every
deal with the attitude that the oppos-
ing contract can be defeated. This
may sometimes require him to make
what appears to be a suicidal play,
but if that play offers the only hope
of defeating the contract, it must be
made.

Consider East’s dilemma on this
deal. He wins the opening club lead
with the king and must then decide
where the defense can get three more
tricks.

As can be seen, if he tries to cash





































7/6]9/2 : :
913/5/7 5_2/9/1|8 BN6/9
9lgl4l4 NS 3/7/6|/9 BN2 7 9
ARIE! N71 2/1/3 8

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514/816 1/3 BN4 11/213 7





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A Positive Approach

the club ace, South makes the con-
tract easily. Declarer ruffs, draws
trumps and forces out the A-K of dia-
monds. The defenders cannot attack
hearts effectively from either side
while the diamonds are being estab-
lished, and South eventually disposes
of his heart losers on dummy’s last
two diamonds.

However, East should realize that
South started with a singleton club,
since West almost certainly has four
clubs for his raise. East should fur-
ther adopt the view that his partner is
very likely to have an ace for his bid,
as little else is missing.

The next step is to credit West
with an ace that will allow the con-
tract to be defeated. The possibility
of West’s holding the heart ace is
therefore dismissed, since if he has
that card (and declarer the other two
aces), the most the defenders can
hope to collect is two heart tricks.

Next, East throws out the possibil-
ity of West’s having the trump ace, as
in that case South will end up with 11
tricks,

The only hope thercfore is that
West has the diamond ace. If he also
has exactly three diamonds, the
defense is in business.

Accordingly, at trick two East lays
down the king of diamonds. When it
holds, he leads a second diamond to
West’s ace and then ruffs the dia-
mond return to sink the contract.

Tomorrow: Rara avis.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc,
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



tS





The Tribune

Mr Paul said he decid-
ed to become involved in
the juice making business
full time after he decided
it could be promising and
profitable.

“I worked in engineer-
ing for Bahamasair for
the past four years and I
just recently resigned. It
was too time consuming
and I wanted to put all of
my time and energy into
my business,” Mr Paul
SIG

Na’tya Juice is a com-
pany that manufactures
fruit drinks and smoothes
that started right out of
his mothers’ kitchen.

“My mom had two smoothie flavors that she made
when me and my siblings were younger. I noticed that it
became really popular in the area among neighbors and
friends. I decided one day to bottle it and give out sam-
ples to get feed back from the public. People actually
liked the drinks so I wanted to try and make a product
out of it,” Mr Paul said.

Mr Paul said he added new and interesting flavors to
his mothers’ original batches.

“We have one called
Mama Cassava Carrot
Smoothie, which consists of
bananas, cassava milk and
carrots. Another is called
Bahama Beet, which is a
smoothie made from fresh
beets, bananas, some
coconut milk and a few other
ingredients,” Mr Paul said.

Customers of Na’tya Juice
are not only limited to the
flavors provided, but can
custom design their own fla-
vors.

“With our personal client
base we are giving people
the opportunity to customise
their own drinks by letting us

know what they want,” Mr Paul said.

Mr Paul said he is also on a quest to raise the natural
health awareness of the Bahamian people.

“We are trying to bring juice therapy to the forefront,
which is a standard juicing process that a lot of physi-
cians around the world use. Juice therapy itself has
been around for hundreds of years but it was not given
aname at the time. There are hundreds of diseases out
there that can be cured by juicing practices like drink-
ing lime juice,” Mr Paul said.

MAKING

DREAMS
CO aie:

m@ BY ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

FOLLOWING your dreams is great, and work-
ing hand-in-hand with a partner, family or friends
to accomplish those dreams is even better. One
just needs to be sure that accomplishment is real-
ly in the future of that dream and Jack Paul, own-
er of Na’tya Juice made it clear that is dream
would be a success.

It’s the weekend baby

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemeida.net

FOR many working people,
the weekend is a time to simply

i

FirstCaribbean

unwind, forget about the bumps
and stresses built-up throughout
the last five days, and to just
enjoy friends, good times, and
total relaxation.

One event which over the
years has become synonymous

|

i el i
r . ro

with the start of the weekend, is
known to many as Happy Hour
Friday.

From its humble beginnings
as simply an hour to drink all
you could with a few co-work-
ers at your favorite hangout,

a

Happy Hour Friday has become
the official weekend starter,
where many bars and restaurants
host karaoke parties, network-
ing events, and other trendy
activities all designed to help you
get away from the usual dramas
of life, if only for a few hours.

However, one beverage
provider has upped the ante with
its approach to the happy hour
experience- ‘Get Your Happy
Hour On.’

According to the Burns House
group of companies, the event
features a uniquely designed mix
of wines and spirits which are
centered around the season.

Burns House Distribution and
Franchise Systems (DFS) mar-
keting retail manager Kira Hor-
ton, explained that since the offi-

‘

Ot,

cial launch of the initiative last
year, just about all of its 35 bev-
erage depot locations and affili-
ates have joined the band-wagon
in providing to its customers the
Get Your Happy Hour On dis-
count campaign.

According to Ms Horton, cus-
tomers are able to choose from
three season inspired mixed
liquor specials, which are not just
original blends, but also an
opportunity for those looking to
save a little extra to do so.

“It’s catching on, we have the
fabulous fifty jingle for it, as well
as free sampling at participating
locations.”

The event which is highlighted
at a different location once a
month draws in scores of profes-
sionals and others who are just
excited about the onset of their
two days of freedom.

With this month bringing the
start of spring, Burns House is
offering the March special which
includes The Baileys Hell’s



Kitchen, Absolutely Peachy
Keen, and Campari Wave.

The Baileys Hell’s Kitchen is
made from a mix of original Bai-
leys with Johnnie Walker Red
Label. Although not an obvious
blend, this drink is described as
“pure heaven” as its cool com-
bination has a way of ‘taking you
to ecstasy with all your clothes
on.’

The Absolut inspired mix is a
marriage between Absolut
Peach, Malibu Coconut Rum,
and pineapple juice, which is
without question a colorful fiesta.

Last but not least is the Cam-
pari Wave comprised of regular
Campari and orange juice.

With these beverages sure to
add a flair to any occasion, Burns
House feels it has done its part in
providing exciting and econom-
ically priced drinks to the Happy
Hour crowd. But as always, Ms
Horton insist: “We encourage
you to drink, but to do so
responsibly.”

FOR SALE BY OWNER

HIGH POINT ESTATES

WELL ESTABLISHED GATED COMMUNITY LOCATED NEAR

SOON TO BE DEVELOPED
BAHAMAR RESORT

DUPLEX LOT 62 X130 IN PRIME LOCATION
$125,000.00

MULTI-FAMILY LOT -11,192 sq.ft. HILL TOP

$140,000.00

5%--DOWN - FINANCING CAN BE ARRANGED

ee ee ee

or ml ed ni igh al “a :
irirtes 5 ee EM Tn] ge
2 ee

ee ee

oe ee ea
cel pene mean ea

FOR MORE INFO. CALL JIMMY
425-8075 OR 322-8858

Se ee
|



A ee |
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 9B



ENTERTAINMENT



The Tribune



@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

OILINSHA Coakley, owner of Oilinsha’s Mod-
els and Talents, is getting ready to work his mag-
ic and bring forth beauty, intelligence and style
into the lives of 28 young Bahamians at the sec-
ond installment of Super models of the Bahamas.

Super Models of the
Bahamas has been a life long
dream for Mr Coakley, a 21
year veteran in the modeling,
fashion and entertainment
business. He is not just doing
it as competition, but is
changing lives.

“T mainly wanted to have a
modeling event in order to
help the funding that comes
from the event to lift the
agency to the next level in
terms of finding the best mod-
els out there. There are many
who walk through my agency
and they really don’t want to
be models, they just want to
be seen or they just want to
be in pictures- but this busi-
ness is about getting down
and dirty, working hard and
making a salary. It’s about
being dedicated, being hum-
ble, having a good attitude,
being respectful to your agent
and clients, it is just like any
other job, but the difference
with modeling is your looks-
your look is sold to the
client,” Mr Coakley
explained.

Mr Coakley said he knows
this year’s competition will be
challenging due to many
more youngsters interested in
participating as opposed to
last year.

“The number of contestants
started at 40 and I had to cut
it down because I started
scanning through persons and
right now I can’t accept per-
sons with excuses. Last year
we had Pulse and Elite mod-
els on our panel last year.
These girls and boys are going
abroad to represent the
Bahamas at the highest cal-
iber possible in these model-
ing events. These events they
go to internationally are like
Miss Universe. There are so
many girls and boys compet-
ing, so in that perspective, the
individuals flying out have to
be at the highest caliber possi-
ble,” Mr Coakley said.

Mr Coakley is planning to
increase the level of interna-
tional attention to the
Bahamas and has already
invited international media
such as Essence, GQ, and
SHE magazines, along with
Runwaynews.com to cover
the event.

“This event this year will
take place at the British Colo-
nial Hilton. It will be covered
internationally and stream-
lined with print and electronic
media. The local station, JCN
network will also continue to
carry the reality show that
documents the entire compe-
tition,” Mr Coakley said.

The Bahamian public can
also get a chance to get to
know the models and vote for

MODELS of Supermodels Of the Bahamas show off for the camera

at various events including Islands of the World Fashion Week 2008.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTIAN JULIE of 9TH
AVENUE FT. LAUDERDALE 33304 is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 18 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE is hereby given that JAMES VINCENT of
SOUTH BEACH DRIVE, P.O. BOX SB-51712, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 18 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANGELLA PIERRE-JEROME of
HAWKSBILL, ABACO DRIVE #43, P.O.BOX F41422, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10th day of MARCH, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-
7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



them on the contest’s website
beginning April 1.

Mr Coakley said he will
continue to be dedicated to
putting model hopefuls in the
right atmosphere to meet suc-
cess.

“This business is about
refinement and a very disci-
plined business. A model
must be versatile and be will-
ing to go that extra mile for
the client in order to make
the tens of thousands of dol-
lars and that is what I am try-
ing to do for these young
models.”

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

OPERATIONS MANAGER

The Operations Manager will be responsible for the development, harmonization
and implementation of revised operational policies and procedures throughout
our branch and unit network. The ideal candidate will have strong leadership
and communication skills and bring focus to the operational needs of all
branches by providing support to customer service initiatives, regulatory
reporting and compliance, review of branch administrative controls, as well
as the development of collective operational goals for branch administrative
personnel.

Core Responsibilities:

Contributes to the revision and implementation of the Bank’s policies and
procedures

Reviewing and making recommendations for the improvement in
Management Reporting

Identifying areas of opportunity for improvement of operating efficiency
Prepares and submits Reports on all banking operations to Senior
Management

Monitor Branch performances against approved targets

Monitors compliance of operations with Bank’s policies and procedures,
as well as recommendations made by internal audit and external parties
Ensures Bank is operating in accordance with regulatory requirements
Liaising with departmental heads to maintain database of recommendations
and request of operational changes

Assist in establishing operational objectives and monitoring the achievement
of the objectives

Reviewing operations job descriptions and functions in accordance with
ongoing operational changes.

Job Requirements:

¢ Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.
Knowledge of Banking laws, including requirements of The Central Bank
of The Bahamas which governs Commercial Banking.
Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced environment
Strong supervisory and customer service skills are essential.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include:

Competitive salary and benefits package, commensurate with work experience
and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later than March 31st,
2009 to:

DA # 69842
c/oThe Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS



Souvenl
de Ayiti

FROM page 12

because I love people, I love }
nature and I somehow find a way :
to record these experiences of i
what I see and what I feel on :

canvas,” Mr Eyma said.

Mr Eyma works mainly from i
the Nassau studio that he shares :
with his wife, Roshanne. His :
original paintings and giclee }
prints can be found in local gal- :
leries and private collections in }
England, Jamaica, and the Unit- :

ed States.

During the late 1980's and ear- :
ly 1990's, he exhibited his work at i
the Central Bank of thei
Bahamas Annual Art Exhibition :
and Competition. He also par- }
ticipated in numerous shows of i
the Longbranch Artists and Arti-
sans. After a decade of absence, }
he returned to his love of paint- }
ing in 2003. At the very first exhi- }
bition of the National Art
Gallery of The Bahamas, one of i
his acrylic paintings "Fort Hill }

Houses" was accepted.

Although Mr Eyma said he
supports any young person inter- :
ested in pursuing art, he wants }
them to be realistic about what ;
? resort was packed with both locals and

they are getting into.

“Tt is sad that the society in }
which we live does not really i
encourage youngsters to become i
what they want to be because of }
i Brooklyn, New York native Omilani per-

their likes and preferences,

everything is geared towards }
making money or becoming }
somebody. I would not encour- }
age any youngster to become the }
proverbial starving artist, but it is
good if they believe they have a }
skill that they can pursue it, }
become good at it and do it not }
so much so because of what oth-
ers are thinking, but because you ?
know this is a way that you can

express yourself,” Mr Eyma said.

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

THIS week in entertainment, its :
art, art, and more art. Tribune Fea- i
tures is bringing you its top five ;
things-to-do list, which begins with :
an hilarious stage performance by :
the one and only crazy Dynamite ;

Daisy.

1.It’s the return of the stage per- :
formance ‘Daisy’s the Valley of The :
Shadow of Death.” The single per- i
formance is scheduled to be held :
at the Holy Trinity Activity Centre :
on Saturday March 28, with the :
show set to begin at 6pm. Tickets :
can be purchased at the One Hun- :
Bible bookstore, or the :
Golden Gates Assembly Church, at i
a price of $25 for adults and $20 for :

dred%

children.

2.The public is invited to join i
Richard Hokemeir at Gray Cliff to :
view his 2009 Photographic Art :
Show. Enjoy the art, warmth and :
beauty of The Bahamas displayed on i
exotic papers from around the }
world. The event will be held this :
Saturday and Sunday, March 21st & :
March 22nd from noon until 8:00 :
p.m. Please also feel free to invite all i
your friends! For details, phone 364- :

4625.

3.The Bahamas Kennel Club is hav- :
ing its 2009 all breed dog show and :
obedience trial this Saturday and :
Sunday. Bringing in dozens of local :
and international dog owners and :
breeds, the event will focus on breed :
authenticity and dog obedience :
training. Set to take place at the :
Botanical Gardens, the event will be :
judged by June and Gerard Penta :
from Pennsylvania, and Harold and :
Rose Doan from Florida. To have
your dog entered or to get more :
detail on this event, dial 3931360 or :
visit www.bahamaskennelclub.org ;

4. The sixth annual Reggae all Stars
annual concert will be held March :

28 at Clifford Park. The Host for :
this reggae lovers event is non oth- i
er than Tempo’s DownTown Island :
personality Empress Jenelle. Artists
slated to perform include Sizzla,

Capelton, I-Rate, Warrior King, lley i
Dread, TaDa, Sammy Star, and an }
array of other local artist and Disc }
Jockey’s. Now on sale at VIP tickets :
are available this week at $40, and :
will increase to $60 next week. They :
are now on sale at the Marley Resort :
or Juke Box, The Backstage tickets :
are now available at a cost of $100, :

and will increase to $150 on the : of musicians on the rise, it is now more

? common to hear an R&B, pop, or even

day of the show.

5. Also happening this week is a entirely by Bahamians.

visual art presentation titled ‘Fire’,

which debuted at Popop art studio F
yesterday. The exhibition which :
embraces people and motion as its :
canvas, will continue until April 7 at :
the same venue. The artists for the :
event include Toby Lunn and Kendal :
Hanna, and more details are available :

at www.popopstudios.com.

TAN ae
WAV aa

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN

Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

REGGAE sensation Tanya Stephens
entertained hundreds of Bahamians
and visitors with her performance
during the highly anticipated “Con-
versations” experience at the Marley

Resort last week.

The event drew a full house and the

visitors anxious for an opportunity to

speak one-on-one with Ms Stephens.
Kicking off the event at around 7.30pm

last Friday, Trinidadian inspired and

formed songs from her sophomore album
“Lyrical Kiss.”

From the popular “Daughter of the
Diaspora,” to her hip hop track “New
Money”, Omilani offered the fans great
entertainment.

Next up was Miami R&B artist Philip
Michael whose sound has been described
as a mix between John Legend and
Anthony Hamilton.

Both artists engaged in conversations
with the audience while on stage, giving
them a first-hand insight into their inspi-
ration to sing, their styles and their ambi-
tions as artists on the rise.

Following these performances, the lev-



el of excitement soared as the crowd got
ready to welcome Tanya Stephens on
stage.

After waiting for more than two hours,
the reggae star finally made her way to the
stage, giving a rousing performance which
featured many of her popular hits.

She performed such hits as “These
Streets”, “It’s a Pity”, “Handle The Ride”,
“Goggle”, “Yu Nuh Ready Fi Dis Yet”,
and “Draw Fi Mi Finger.”

While many fans walked away think-
ing the show a complete success, the pro-
moters did fail to deliver on one of their
major promises, which was to allow mem-
bers of the audience a chance to chat with
the reggae star.

However, Tribune Features spoke with
Ms Stephens last Thursday in an exclusive
interview and she revealed some of her
future career plans.

The performer, who has graced the air-
waves for more than 18 years with her



unique form of addressing social issues,
said her inspiration comes from every-
thing around her.

And although she has been extremely
blessed to have her message heard by
thousands, her ambitions early on did not
include being a singer.

“T never particularly wanted to be an
artist, I used to hang out with people who
wanted to be an artist, but I started out
doing a lot of poetry.”

She said as time passed, she began to
see the power in music, and soon began
performing as a solo music artist.

Having a healthy and long career in
the industry, Tanya said every one of her
albums has been like a storybook or chap-
ter of her life.

From love, to success and even failure,
Tanya said her remedy to any situation is
to sing about it.

Even though she has performed in
almost every major city around the world,



she said she enjoys the comfort of just liv-
ing as a ‘regular person’.

With her 14-year-old daughter Kelly as
her main inspiration, Tanya said life for
her remains grounded because of her
“earth angel.”

The reggae star, who will be releasing a
new album early next year, said that she
anticipates her retirement from the music
industry within the next six years.

She said as she has had a chance to
shine over the past few years, stepping
aside to allow someone else to have their
voice heard seems like the natural thing to
do, “otherwise the industry would become
stagnated.”

When asked what she plans to do after
leaving the industry, Tanya said she hopes
tostart a mentorship programme for chil-
dren in Jamaica where her experience and
knowledge as a parent and artist could in
some way help other youngsters to find
their place in the world.



2 * <
6
ss

A prototype for music’s next generation

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE definition of Bahamian music
has for a long time been confined to the
usual rake-n-scrape, soca, junkanoo, or
calypso beat. However with a new wave

rock track over the airwaves produced

This is especially true for one group
of artists, who feels their choice to
encompass and embrace a wide range of
music genres, as well an array of artistic
personalities under one umbrella, will be
the determining factor in their eventual
success.

Archetype Infinity (AI) is a music pro-

duction, publishing, record label, and
conceptual art powerhouse, which is the
brainchild of Ashley Deveaux supported
by Chris Carey aka Sketch, Davineir
Clarke, and Anastasia Marie Dolli Nel-
son.

Ashley said two years ago when he
first got the vision for Archetype Infinity,
he was at a crossroad forced to choose
between following his vision for the com-
pany, or to pursue a career in medicine
which he had already started.

Deciding to take the risk in a company
and business he knew very little about,
Ashley flew home from Canada at the
beginning of summer 2006, and spent the
next few months reading and learning
all he could about music production and
the intricacies of operating a full circle
media company.

Along the way, Ashley explained he
was introduced to a creative and talented
singer, ironically through his little broth-
er who was Sketch’s classmate.

He has an amazing voice and has been
a part of the AI team ever since.

Ashley said meeting Sketch was a
dream come true, because for the first
time he was able to join forces with some-
one who shared the same vision.

With a large amount of Al’s energy
and resources being focused on estab-
lishing its presence in the local enter-
tainment pool, the group has slowly gar-
nered a significant following, after the
release of the song My Candidate.

Preformed by Sketch, the song speaks
for all guys who have had a crush on a girl
at one time or another, and who are try-
ing to find a way to engage and develop

a relationship with that girl.

According to Ashley: “People have
been promoting it, because we didn’t
really have the funds to put it out there.
It meant a lot to us, because it was num-
ber one because people liked what they
heard.”

He said the work that went into the
song allows you to hear bits of junkanoo
and pop, but more so the junkanoo vibe
oozing from the song, which is similar to
Christmas or Boxing Day.

Toping the 100 Jamz Bahama Hot
Ones for nearly two months, Sketch is
definitely a force to be reckoned on the
local scene.

With a plethora of unreleased materi-
al from a mix of artist, and with big plans
for the future, AI is surely the next big
group to emerge from these islands.
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPO

5-Day FORECAST 7 INDEX ger

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High: 81° F/27°C Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy. Partly sunny. Partly sunny. Partly sunny with a Very windy; partly The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
( re sve > thunderstorm. shower possible. sunny, a shower. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
rt ail . High: 79° High: 79° High: 75° High: 77°
© i rk High: 79° Low: 71° Low: 69° Low: 68° Low: 67° Low: 68° see EE
TAMPA ee ET A
High: 79° F/26°C a a 93°-69° F 73°-63° F 74°-61° F High _HL(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft.
Low: 60° F/16°C : 7. = The 7 eee an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:43am. 24 803am. 06
a @ Z ‘* elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 1:54pm. 20 8:03pm. 05
} \ 9 Zi5am. 23 O0dam. 06
3 Z Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Frida 349am. 23 1004am. 06
| = ty ABACO Temperature . 401 p.m. 2.0 10:11pm. 05
/ Ne” 3 High: 76° F/24° C 7 si snatodsugans«tagndabaaseeteie ciara scoserueie a a Saturday 4-48 am. 73 1058am. 05
y y Ar Low: 68° F/20°C OW varstntstet » F/22° 5:01pm. 21 11:10pm. 04
ag WHE ——— Normal high ... 79° F266 —______________
Naf ie “is ormal low . ° °
4 opp, @WESTPALMBEACH = =(-/\ Last year's hight vcs arrerc | SUE
— High: 80° F/27°C E Last year's lOW occ 72° F/22° C
— Low: 67° FA9°C . Precipitation = =—————_—sSunrise....... 7:16am. Moonrise. .... 1:48 a.m.
rat /_ As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....cccccssseessssseeecssseeeee 0.00" Sunset....... 7:20 p.m. Moonset... . 12:19 p.m.
mart FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT “i Year to date | a a. |
High: 78° F/26° C @ High: 75° F/24° C Normal year to date oo. cceeeeeeeee 4.38" 4
Low: 68° F/20°C Fi Low: 66° F/19°C
iz AccuWeather.com
a @ a - Forecasts and graphics provided by Se 2
; MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.18 Mar.26 Apr.2 Apr. 9
High: 79° F/26° C Fh. 700 F/Qro
Low: 68° F/20° C NASSAU Se as Fae
High: 79° F/26° C aM
: =a Low: 71°F/22°C .
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KEY WEST ‘ << ae CATISLAND
High: Le F/25° C High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 68° F/20° C Low: 63° F/17°C
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~ GREAT EXUMA O SAN SALVADOR
High: 79° F/26° C ith: 24° °
Low: 69°F/21°C eee
. 4 Low: 65°F/18° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 82° F/28° C e
Low: 68° F/20° C
wr
LONGISLAND
Low: 65° F/18°C
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 83° F/28° C
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC Fic FC Low: 66° F/19°C
Albuquerque 74/23 46/7 ~s 70/21 45/7 pe Indianapolis 66/18 39/3 r 54/12 30/-1 pe Philadelphia 65/18 46/7 pe 57/13 344 4+ :
Anchorage 23/-5 10/-12 s 24/-4 11/-11 Jacksonville 73/22 54412 pe 78/25 52/11 s Phoenix 89/31 60/15 s 89/31 62/16 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 70/21 48/8 s 74/23 43/6 sh Kansas City 62/16 36/2 c 61/16 36/2 s Pittsburgh 71/21 42/5 po 45/7 24/-4 + RAGGEDISLAND — High:85°F/29"c
Atlantic City 60/15 45/7 po 56/13 29/-1 + Las Vegas 83/28 53/11 s 83/28 5743 pc Portland, OR 5613 415 c 57/13 43/6 c High: 84° F/29° C Low: 68° F/20°C
Baltimore 66/18 45/7 pe 56/13 341 1 Little Rock 76/24 49/9 s 63/17 42/5 pe Raleigh-Durham 69/20 46/7 s 70/21 39/3 sh Low:65°F/18°C
Boston 56/13 41/ pe 5040 29/-1 Fr Los Angeles 78/25 56/13 s 74/23 56/13 pc St. Louis 68/20 42/5 sh 57/13 388 s . ae.
Buffalo 5412 33/0 1 40/4 22/-5 sf Louisville 72/22 46/7 pe 55/12 36/2 pc Salt Lake City 63/17 39/8 pce 65/18 41/5 pc GREATINAGUA
Charleston, SC 68/20 50/10 pc 73/22 49/9 pc Memphis 76/24 50/10 s 6417 43/6 1 San Antonio 81/27 56/13 s 79/26 55/12 $ High: 84° F/29° C
Chicago 542 33/0 + 47/8 26/-3 pc Miami 79/26 67/19 t 80/26 64/17 pc San Diego 70/21 56/13 pe 68/20 56/13 pc Low. 68° F/20°C
Cleveland 60/115 35/1 r 44/6 26/-3 pc Minneapolis 53/11 27/-2 § 46/7 28/-2 s San Francisco 65/18 49/9 pce 64/17 50/10 pc
Dallas 80/26 55/12 s 70/21 50/10 pc Nashville 72/22 47/8 s 58/14 38/3 5 Seattle B1H0 42/5 4+ 521 42/5 +
Denver 5613 31/0 c 62/16 37/2 pc New Orleans 77/25 5713 s 78/25 56/13 s Tallahassee 79/26 49/9 pe 79/26 50/10 s a
Detroit 5613 34/1 + 44/6 25/-3 pc New York 6317 46/7 pe 52/11 33/0 Fr Tampa 79/26 60/15 pc 79/26 60/15 pc
Honolulu 79/26 68/20 sh 80/26 69/20 pc Oklahoma City 82/27 49/9 s 63/17 45/7 pe Tucson 85/29 52/11 s 87/30 57/13 s — Bo
Houston 78/25 56/13 s 78/25 56/13 pc Orlando 81/27 59/15 pce 82/27 59/15 pc Washington, DC 69/20 47/8 pe 58/14 36/2 r



PAO ODE







peel
~

Tt TT

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

a EOS

High
F/C
838/31
48/8
43/6
58/14
17/25
93/33
85/29
63/17
79/26
64/17
41/5
43/6
65/18
65/18
52/11
45/7
79/26
73/22
93/33
43/6
84/28
82/27
80/26
43/6
55/12
54/12
58/14
42/5
84/28
32/0
81/27
84/28
47/8
56/13
67/19
83/28
81/27
59/15
70/21
88/31
75/23
86/30
48/8
34/1
44/6
86/30
95/35
37/2
57/13
41/5
81/27
82/27
61/16
83/28
90/32
88/31
90/32
82/27
78/25
64/17
36/2
75/23
86/30
68/20
52/11
86/30
48/8
42/5
37/2
24/-4

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High
F/C
87/30
50/10
39/3
54/12
73/22
91/32
84/28
63/17
61/16
64/17
36/2
41/5
66/18
64/17
52/11
43/6
81/27
77/25
95/35
45/7
85/29
83/28
77/25
44/6
54/12
52/11
56/13
39/3
82/27
28/-2
82/27
86/30
39/3
62/16
68/20
84/28
83/28
57/13
17/25
90/32
73/22
87/30
39/3
36/2
43/6
84/28
92/33
34/1
57/13
39/3
80/26
90/32
54/12
82/27
94/34
90/32
88/31
82/27
74/23
59/15
34/1
82/27
88/31
70/21
43/6
79/26
49/9
40/4
34/1
48/8

Thursday

Low
F/C
74/23
34/1
27/-2
39/3
59/15
75/23
74/23
49/9
37/2
57/13
30/-1
27/-2
63/17

a Bat Gee mae ee

nw
|

pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

SUSAR TH ev

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MarINE FORECAST

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
Thursday: _§ at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
Thursday: _$ at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
Thursday: _$ at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries
BKK] Snow
Ice

-0s 0s 10s 20s /808)) 40s

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Stationary angen.



AUTO INSURANCE

Never start
Engine witho

Jhen it comes to Auto Insurance,
eat smart choice is
In pees meeecement.

our
us!

SF INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Va Providence Grond nn Abaco ta Eleuthera 1 Exum
Tt (242) 500-6400 7 Tels (242) 350-3500 | Tel (242) 367-4204 | Tel: (242) 332-2862 | Tel: (242) 330-2304

2. ee







Making Super Models of th
your
(ireams

come true
see page eight




epahamas: season 2



e

\

The Tribune SECTION B ¢ &

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009




ON THE ROAD
TO HATCHET BAY

pretty straight forward

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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Pro-Pindling protest outside The T ribune C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.96WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 79F LOW 71F F E A T U R E S SEE ‘THEARTS’ SECTION Reflections of Haiti SEEPAGETEN Phil Smith basketball n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net PROTESTERSrallied outside The Tribune office yesterday defending the reputation of the late Sir Lynden Pindling who was discredited in an article by managing editor John Marquis. The protest continued for a little over an hour, during which political activist and PLP hopeful Paul Moss shouted orders from a loudspeaker for the crowd to “keep moving” along Shirley Street and Deveaux Street. He said the 40 Bahamians who joined his cause to vindicate the “Father of the Nation” represented thousands more who were too afraid to be there, and claimed the group would return later in the day with more protesters. But rather than returning to The Tribune , the modest group of young men and women, who clutched white placards accusing Mr Marquis of being racist and hating Bahamians, moved to the Eastern Parade on East Bay Demonstration held following article on former prime minister The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Gunshots fir ed in high-speed car chase n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net GUNSHOTS were fired through the streets of New Prov idence in a high speed chase from Wulff Road to the Tonique Williams-Darling Highway on Monday night. Police called for backup to pursue a black 2003 Ford Expe dition, with registration plate 99, when shots were fired from the sports utility vehicle (SUV 9pm. More gunshots were aimed at the caravan of police cars as they pursued the SUV along Moore Avenue, Palm Beach Street, Robinson Road and the East West Highway. SEE page six Man in custody after dramatic pursuit A FORMER government official who had first-hand knowledge of Sir Lynden Pindling’s close links with drugs king Joe Lehder said last night that yesterday’s protest out side The Tribune was “a waste of time.” He said the demonstrators didn’t know the facts and that the Insight article which sparked the protest was “right on the button.” The official, who made fre quent visits to Norman’s Cay For mer govt official backs article, says the protest was ‘a waste of time’ SEE page six SEE page six n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net FORMER Attorney General Alfred Sears admitted that both the Christie and Ingraham adminisrations fell down on the job by not properly regulating troubled CLICO (Bahamas He made this statement during a meeting organised by Bishop Simeon Hall of New Covenant Baptist Church where CLICO policy holders independently met to dis cuss their mounting concerns over the future of their invest ments. “It also represents a failure of the Bahami an government and that is unfortunately under the Progressive Liberal Party as well as the Free F ormer AG: both Christie and Ing raham administrations did not properly regulate CLICO Alfred Sears SEE page eight POLICE in Andros seized more than $3 million worth of marijuana during a special operation on the island. According to police reports, Drug Enforcement Unit officers and Andros police launched the operation in Central Andros last week Fri day. While searching a villa shortly after 4pm that day, they found just over two pounds of marijuana and arrested several men. Based on the information obtained from those arrests, this operation continued until Sunday. Around 3pm, officers went to a dirt road in Fresh Creek and found two crocus sacks and a white five gallon bucket full of marijuana. A short distance away, officers found an additional 46 crocus sacks, and six white five gallon buckets of marijuana. A man who was nearbyfled when he saw the officers coming. He was caught and arrested. In all, eight Bahamian men and one Jamaican man were arrested in connection with the finds. Police believe that the two discoveries are connected. The drugs have a total weight of more than 2,200 pounds and a local street value of $3,300,000. $3 million worth of marijuana is seized THE Cabinet Office yesterday announced the appointment of Reginald Ferguson to the post of Commissioner of Police by Governor General Arthur Hanna, on the recommendation of Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham following consultation with Opposition Leader Perry Christie. The appointment is with effect from Monday, March 16. Mr Ferguson assumed duties as Acting Commissioner of Police on November 21, 2007 upon former Commissioner of Police Paul Farquharson’s commencement of preretirement leave. He becomes the fifth Commissioner of n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A MAN’Sbody was discovered onboard a boat moored near the Potters Cay dock yesterday morning. Police were alerted to the discovery shortly after 10am. Police press liaison officer ASP Walter Evans said the man, who has not yet been identified, was found dead in the cabin of the vessel wearing a white T-shirt and underwear. Police pulled the 26-foot red and white boat near the southern side of the Potter’s Cay dock yesterday morning and searched it for clues while dozens of curious onlookers stood by. It is believed that the man lived on the vessel. “The body has been there definitely over 12 hours because of the physical signs of deterioration which is quite notice able,” ASP Evans said. Body found on boat near Potters Cay dock SEE page eight SEE page eight COMMISSIONER REGINALD FERGUSON PLEASENOTETHAT, DUE TO SPACE RESTRICTIONS, LARRY SMITH’S TOUGH CALL COLUMN WILLAPPEARIN TOMORROW’STRIBUNE SOMEOFTHEPROTESTERS stand outside of The Tribune yesterday. Reg inald F er guson appointed as Commissioner of P olice S P O R T S

PAGE 2

n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net OFFICIALS apprehended more than 20 Haitian immigrants after a 30-foot wooden s loop ran aground in water off the South Beach area early yesterday morning. Authorities were tipped off after a concerned citizen spotted the immigrants as they attempted to make landfall in the Marshall Road area around 5am. Up to press time last night, 2 7 immigrants had been caught including three women, 23 men and a 14-year-old boy Director of Immigration Jack Thompson told The Tribune . Mr Thompson said officials do not know the exact number of migrants who were on board the sloop, but believe that there were about 50 passengers. Officers were still combing the area yesterday afternoon in an effort to capture any remaining migrants. "We have to continue our due diligence and see whether we can find them," Mr Thompson said. Those who were apprehended were taken to the Carmichael Road Detention Centre, however, the immigration director said they will be swiftly repatriated. "We are making every effort to repatriate these people right away. We are going to have them repatriated at the earliest possible time consistent with the policy for speedy, orderly and timely repatriation," he said. MEMBERS of government are taking part in this year's record-setting Ride For Hope in Eleuthera on April 4. Minister of Health Hubert Minnis will open the 4th annual event at 9.30am at the stag ing area which will be set up outside the North Eleuthera Airport. Minister of Sports Desmond Bannister, President of the Senate Lynn Holowesko, and Speaker of the House Alvin Smith will all ride to raise money for cancer care and treatment programmes in the Bahamas. Mr Bannister said he is look ing forward to being part of the Ride For Hope this year. “I'm delighted to participate as a rider and support this most worthy cause," he said. Mrs Holowesko, who has taken part in each ride of the past three years, said, “The Ride For Hope is an inspiration to all involved and pro vides crucial financial and moral support to those afflicted with this terrible disease.” Alvin Smith, Member of Parliament for North Eleuthera, opened the event last year by commending the Ride For Hope participants and organisers. He highlighted the importance of their contribution to cancer care and expressed his delight that the Ride takes place on the beau tiful island of Eleuthera. This year, Mr Smith will be on a bike joining more than 300 riders on the road as they pedal through his constituency. Ride for Hope is a charitable bike-a-thon designed to accommodate people of all ages and cycling abilities. Rid ers solicit sponsors for dona tions. “The Ride is open to everyone – the young and young at heart, seasoned cyclists, raw beginners, weekend warriors, kids, moms and dads, grandparents – it's not a race,” organisers said. It does matters not if a participant rides one mile or 100 miles, whether a person pedals slowly or like the wind. “For spectators and partici pants alike it's awe inspiring to see children as young as 3 years old peddling their little tricycles down the road,” organisers said. Last year, eight-year-old Liam Holowesko rode for 50 miles. Jay Major, now 14, has covered 100 miles in each Ride For Hope. “Not only are the children made aware of the purpose of their ride that they’re raising money for cancer care and soliciting sponsors themselvesbut through their direct participation they are learning the importance of being involved and giving back to their community," said Mrs Holowesko. “They are learning that together we can make a differ ence.” Susan Larson, co-chairman of Ride For Hope, said she is very pleased with the government's level of participation this year. “Not only do we have Ministers Minnis and Bannister, the Speaker of the House, and the President of the Senate joining forces with us this year, but many other government ministers and offi cials are also participating through their individual sponsorships of their fellow House or Senate members,” she said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News..........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,12 Editorial/Letters T o The Editor....................P4 Sports ............................................... P9,10,11 BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION Business.........................................P1,2,3,4,5 Comics........................................................P6 Advt............................................................P7 Taste........................................................P8,9 Arts ......................................................P10,12 Weather.....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 P AGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES Government officials to take part in Ride for Hope DESMOND BANNISTER , Lynn Holowesko and Alvin Smith will all take part More than 20 Haitian immigrants are apprehended THIS HAITIAN SLOOP ran aground near the South Beach early yesterday morning. Immigration officials estimatet hat there were around 50 m igrants on board, 27 have b een apprehended so far. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f PIECES OF CLOTHING were left behind in the trees by the immigrants w ho attempted to make landfall in the area of South Beach yesterday. P OLICE AND DEFENCE FORCE OFFICERS s earch the bushes for illegal immigrants in the area of South Beach yesterday morning. HAITIAN IMMIGRANTS look on as they are taken to the Carmichael R oad Detention Centre yesterday. T HIS DINGHY was used by some Haitiani mmigrants to come ashore yesterday morning.

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n B y PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net FORMER deputy prime minister Cynthia Pratt fought back tears as she revealed to the nation yesterday that her 70-year-old husband Joseph Pratt has had both legs ampu-t ated at the Princess Margaret Hospital. Describing it as the most difficult decision she has ever faced, Mrs Pratt said she was i nformed by doctors last week that her husband was dying a nd that she had two choices – either amputate his second leg o r let him die in peace. As a wife and a friend for so many years, Mrs Pratt said s he could not sit by and watch her husband die. So putting a pen to paper was one of the most difficult things I have done in my life; t o sign that consent form for them to amputate his second l eg. “He now lies in hospital w ith both legs amputated. T his is very difficult for me. Very difficult,” she said. D escribing Joseph as not just her husband but also her b est friend, Mrs Pratt said that as a very “hands-on representative”, she wanted to e xplain to her constituents why she has been somewhat d istant in the past few weeks. I have not been able to get around to my constituents as I ordinarily would do. So many o f them probably might wond er, ‘well what has happened to Mother Pratt?’ I want to apologise to them because I was not able to get around the way I have done in the past and that is simply because of health reasons.” A bout a month ago Mrs Pratt revealed that doctors were not optimistic about the condition of her husband,w ho suffers from diabetes. L ast week, he had his sec o nd leg amputated and in the p ast few days, Mrs Pratt said, the doctors have not given her anything to be hopeful about. “I thought it necessary for me to let my constituents know so they would understand why I have actually b een somewhat preoccupied. I want to thank them for understanding and I want to thank them for their continu a l prayers and support. My husband is presently in the private medical ward. Again he has not been in theb est of health according to the doctors. “But I still believe God, and I still have faith in God that t hey will bring him through,” she said. Noting how important it is that she speak to her con s tituents, Mrs Pratt said her respect for the people of St Cecilia compels her to thankt hem profusely for confiding t heir trust in her for three terms. “These are special people, and they are unique, and we have a bond. It is not easy to separate us. And I thought it was important for me to come to them so they can hear it from me, so there would be no questions asked as to why Mother Pratt is not available for certain things. “I certainly would like to perform a little bit better, but sometimes circumstances alter cases, and in this case, my husband’s health is of paramount i mportance to me,” she said. B reaking down in tears, Mrs Pratt said that her husband – who is suffering from diabetes, hypertension, poor circulation and alzheimer’s – is not as coherent as she would like him to be. But he is still alive,” she s aid. “And so to the many churches and well-wishers who have come forth and the scores of Bahamians who have sent their best wishes, I want to publicly thank them,” she said. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net AMIDcalls for the government to be proactive in address ing the growing threat to offshore tax havens, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said he will “not be driven” to act on the issue “at other people’s timing”. When asked to respond to calls from financial service executives for the government to issue a public policy statement pledging greater co-operation on international tax matters, he quipped: “I love it when people tell me how to do my job.” think I know how to do my job. I’ve got the experience to do the job and I will do what’s best for the Bahamas, I’ll do it in a timely manner, but I will not be driven to do it at other people’s timing,” said Mr Ingraham, in an interview with The Tribune before entering Cabinet. On Monday, industry profes sionals told Tribune Business they feel that in light of threatening declarations recently made by industrialised nations on the issue of “tax havens” like the Bahamas, it is urgent that the Bahamas act swiftly to ensure its second indus try is not unduly penalised. With the group of 20 nations (G20 and the tax haven “problem” high on the agenda, one such source, said: “There has to be a serious policy statement by the Bahamas government before April 2 ... We are one of the very few who have not taken a position, like the majority of international financial centres have done, and made it known.” In the last week jurisdictions including Switzerland, the Cay man Islands, Bermuda and Liechtenstein all committed to further international co-operation on tax matters in response to international pressure from countries keen to collect more tax and overhaul their financial sectors in the wake of the global economic downturn. As for whether the Bahamas intends to take any action or make a statement to the international community prior to April 2, Mr Ingraham said yesterday the government will “make its decision known in due course.” Solutions During the mid year budget debate he affirmed that this coun try is facing a “renewed threat” from industrialised countries as they seek a solution to the global financial crisis. Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing went on to sug gest outside parliament that hav ing passed legislation since 2000 to “further shore up” its compli ance with international standards, any response from the Bahamas would be more a matter of ensuring “we are regarded as a wellregulated jurisdiction.” Former attorney general Alfred Sears yesterday asserted that the government ministers’ statements thus far “do not demonstrate a clarity of appreci ation of the harm.” “If they are engaged in behindthe-scenes maneuvering, then tell me what you are doing, and if you are not doing anything, the Bahamas cannot afford inaction.” The Fort Charlotte MP said that with the Bahamas having been listed “inaccurately” in the Stop Tax Haven Abuse Bill which was re-introduced in the US Congress in early March as a “secrecy tax haven engaged in unfair tax practices” he hopes the govern ment is seeking to “engage in a very vigorous diplomatic exer cise” to inform the US that the description of the Bahamas as such a jurisdiction is inappropriate. “It would do a grave injustice to the Bahamas if it is passed. What a responsible government would do, is to engage the international community to clarify our position. The Bahamas should be held as a model,” he said. Mr Sears added that Bahamas must begin the process of negoti ating tax information exchange agreements with nations other than the United States and in the long term “reframe its financial services sector as a jurisdiction which is not so much premised on confidentiality but on quality of service (and cial products.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 3 x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsT T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242)326 2335 2335Outdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net PLP Deputy leader Cynthia Pratt asserted yesterday that she still is the sitting member of parliament for the St Cecilia constituency. In the face of continuing unrest within the ranks of the party, she said the PLP is one of the greatest political organisations in the history of the Bahamas. “In every organisation there are challenges. In every organisation there are fall-outs,” Mrs Pratt said. “The PLP is no different. “Even in your home there is fall-out. Sometimes the son wants to go one way and the daughter wants to go another. But that does not change the fact that the PLP is one of greatest political parties this country has ever seen,” s he said. Mrs Pratt added that she is extremely proud to be a part of the PLP as it is a party that serves the Bahamian people. Colleagues The PLP is about service to the people. That’s all I’m interested in. And so I want to say t o my colleagues, to encourage them that their service is not in vain. In every organisation you would make mistakes. Every human being would make mistakes. But you learn from that mistake. What is important is that we serve the Bahamian people to the best of our ability in integrity, in honesty, and at the end of the day the Bahamian people can say that Mother Pratt has tried,” she said. C HAUNCEY TYNES SR., the former PLP treasurer who sparked the controversy over Sir Lynden Pindling and drug king Joe Lehder, has laughed off suggestions that he’s “in d ementia” as alleged by ex-minister Fred Mitchell. “I ain’t there yet!” Mr Tynes told The Tribune after Mitchell’s remarks to a Fox Hill meeting were reported in the press. In fact, 88-year-old Mr Tynes, who looks after his d isabled wife, is regarded b y associates as remarka bly sprightly and brightm inded for his age. A nd he has no regrets f or speaking out in an Insight article about the drug era which claimed the life of his son, Chauncey Tynes Jr. Mr Tynes’ claim that Chauncey Jr was killed b ecause he knew too much about the links between Sir Lynden Pindling and J oe Lehder has caused p anic in the PLP. M itchell lashed out at The Tribune , and especiall y its managing editor John M arquis, who he described as “a paid journalistic assassin.” Yesterday, Mr Marquis said: “It’s an insult to cast aspersions on Mr Tynes’s mental state. In fact, he isa very bright, articulate m an. I only hope I sound half as good when I’m 88.” PM won’t act on threat to tax havens ‘at other people’s timing’ Hubert Ingraham Cynthia Pratt reveals husband has had both legs amputated ANEMOTIONAL Cynthia Pratt, MP for St Cecilia, briefs the media on her husband’s health yesterday morning. PLP Deputy ‘is still the sitting MP for St Cecilia’ T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Chauncey Tynes Sr laughs off claims of ‘dementia’

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EDITOR, The Tribune. BRITISH banking tycoon R oddie Fleming’s reportedly “dashed hopes” to acquire the Grand Bahama Port Authority is the latest shot fired in the battle f or control of the Grand Bahama Port Authority. In an apparently wellresearched document dated July 2008 and titled “The FlemingsS trategy for Grand Bahama Island,” the group boasted that through a “dramatic transformation” and “reinvention” of F reeport, “the promise” of the 1955 Hawksbill Creek Agreement would be “finally” delivered. Under that agreement, Wallace Groves staked out 114,000a cres at Grand Bahama and developed the city of Freeport into a major resort, industrial andg ambling area. In the process he created The Bahamas’ secondc ity, building an airport, develo ping utilities, schools, roads, and a hospital. W hether or not the curtailment of the Fleming Group’s g randiose, ‘governmentapproved’, development plans r epresents a significant lost opportunity for Grand Bahamaa nd the rest of The Bahamas, the document itself provides much f ood for thought on a variety of topical issues. With so many matters of public i mportance entering the public domain well after the fact, it may b e timely to highlight some of the more provocative topics a ddressed in the Fleming docu ment, starting with: The Bahamia n economy. A vital barometer of any country’s economic health is the Gross Domestic Product (GDP of all goods and services pro d uced. According to Department of S tatistics “provisional figures”, in 2006 “real” GDP in The Bahamas i ncreased by 19 per cent, com pared to 5.96 per cent in 2005. However, according to the Flemi ng document, since 1984, The Bahamas’ GDP, adjusted for inflation, has actually declined by nearly 20 per cent, and in “real, g lobal competitive terms...closer to 33 per cent.” According to Fleming, “except f or a period in the late 1990s,” t he Bahamian economy “has b een in a state of gentle decline for nearly 25 years,” with Freeport “currently experiencing the most severe economic downturn in 30 years.” If accurate updates could be obtained of the two other important indicators ofa country’s economic health u nemployment figures and the Consumer Price Index, which tracks inflation a truer picture could be obtained as to exactly where we’re headed. Global warming: Over the next 5 0 to 100 years, due to global w arming, a “likely maximum sea l evel rise of six metres about 20 feet “will permanently inundate” most of the Bahamian archipelago and “reduce Grand B ahama Island to a handful of s mall islands with a landmass of less than 10 per cent of the current island. Under the assumed scenario, “hundreds of millions of dollars worth of remediation e ngineering will be required at t he harbour, the airport and elsewhere.” According to MET offi cials, in 1998 the department installed Sea Level Rise monitors i n Nassau Harbour, at Inagua and i n the Exumas, with one being placed in Marsh Harbour, but meaningful results can’t be obtained for another 10 years. It’s estimated that a 0.07 inch rise hast aken place. Although the jury is still out on whether the frequency of hurricanes will increase, Hurricanes Frances and Jeannee in 2004, demonstrated Grand Bahama’s “vulnerability to even s ingle major hurricane events,” F leming warned. Life expectancy: “With the improved health care anticipated in the Flemings strategy,” life expectancy of Bahamians will increase, and “by 2020, an effective welfare system will be in place in the country, funded by the increased economic growth p recipitated by the Flemings strategy.” Exchange control: By 2020 or earlier, “in response to the relative strength of the emerging Bahamian economy, Exchange Control will be scrapped.” US economy: Will emerge from current economic downturn until 2010/2011, but “will probab ly not reach previous rapid growth rates,” and the War on T error keeping the economy at modest levels and possibly stagn ation from 2010-2020. New Airport Terminal: To facilitate scheduled flights from Europe, Canada and SouthA merica, Fleming would split 505 0 costs with Hutchison Whampoa to build a new non-US international Terminal. Cuba: By 2020, normalised d iplomatic and economic relations between Cuba and the US will turn Cuba into a tourism destination with which Grand Bahama, if it remains in its pres ent status, “simply cannot successful compete.” A lmost five years after the death of GBPA co-owner E dward St George, the convoluted legal situation that later devel oped is yet to be resolved. Perhaps, to paraphrase the words ofG K Chesterton, perhaps it isn’t t hat the various players can’t see the solution, it’s just that they c an’t see the problem. S IMON ARTZI Nassau, March 5, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm THE United States spends more on educating its children from kindergarten through high school than most other industrialized nations. Yet for all that, measured against their peers, American children fair poorly, ranking in the middle of students in 30 countries in science and in the last third in mathematics. It’s a long-standing problem that educators have increasingly fretted about, without managing to arouse the American people out of their indifference to the costly imbalance between money put in and achieve ments put out. President George W. Bush tried to address the issue with his No Child Left Behind initiative that sounded better than it performed. It was designed to set national standards against which school performances across the land could be accurately measured and compared. One unintended consequence was to rein force the tendency to provide education that was, in the words of a researcher, “a mile wide and an inch deep” by teaching to the tests, overloading students with information while not requiring them to “master essential concepts and information.” It led to strenuous efforts to get every lagging student to pass the tests that President Obama characterized as a destructive “race to the bottom.” Now Obama has proposed an educational reform stunning in the comprehensiveness of its reach and the vastness of the $100 billion-plus to infuse a system already ingesting large sums without providing sufficient quality. The audacity of his proposal could be, one can hope, the shocker that shakes up Amer ican education. In large part, his administra tion, under Education Secretary Arne Duncan, would provide monetary incentives to schools, teachers, administrators and parents to overcome narrow self-interests or lassitude that have abetted the failures and short-c omings from which this nation suffers. The president, as did his predecessor, wants accountability and results. Obama is prepared to pay for it. Incompetent teachers would be rooted out and effective ones rewarded in their paychecks. Those skilled in math and science especially would be sought out and given incentives to enlist and continue as teachers. Upgrading America’s education to provide its people with the means to earn a living in a global economy is as much or possibly more a sociological and cultural challenge as an educational one. Schools in which AfricanAmerican and Latinos dominate are among the worst performers. They suffer from extremely high drop out rates. To address that aspect, Duncan recently gave an impressive presentation. In a PBS interview with Charlie Rose, he not only stressed the necessity of preparing young people before kindergarten, a la Head Start (whose enduring accomplishments have been questioned), but he also outlined nothing short of a school revolution. Duncan would keep schools functioning not only for the seven or so hours five days a week as is customary. He wants them to stay open as much as 14 hours a day, Saturday and Sunday included. The president wants the school term extended, suggesting that summer vacation shrink by a month. Duncan enthusiastically proposed that schools could serve as community centres to which YMCAs, Boys and Girls Clubs and other non-profits could bring their programmes, rent free. Those programmes could include health services and tutorial help to construct a supportive universe that would benefit especially students who need it the most. As for higher education, “in just a single generation, America has fallen from second place to eleventh place in the proportion of students completing college,” the president stated. Studies show that the cost of college has increased far more than the median income of Americans. Obama offers large increases in financial aid and grants. Minorities fail to graduate more than others, although according to educators, college and university performance is diminishing generally. E normous sticker shock is attached to the Obama proposals. But the facts show that education demands wide reforms and the funding to help them happen. (This article appears courtesy of Harry Rosenfeld c.2009 Albany Times Union). The Fleming proposal leaves much to ponder LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Obama’s education plan: Stunning in scope )25$/( EDITOR, The Tribune. We are now at a precarious period for small and medium size business because access to credit has become extremely challenging in the Bahamas. As most of us are aware, this creates a tremendous v oid vis--vis jobs and growth of jobs. Notwithstanding, it appears the Government’s i dea of stimulating the economy is from the bot tom-up by supporting the individual who has lost his o r her job having initiated various measures now ongoing. It is agreeable and extremely important to keep Bahamians working, however, it is also important to address the current crisis systemically. Keeping individuals working is best achieved by the Government crafting a proactive plan to addresst he lack of credit in the marketplace, which would support small and medium size businesses by maki ng immediate access to credit available. Naturally, this should apply solely to well led businesses that are proven fiscally responsible and have operated within the bounds of the laws heretof ore. While it may be politically expedient to appease individuals collectively, it appears at the root of Government’s action as a desire to jolt the economy back to health going forward. P roviding a job for an individual simply affords that person a means of work to squirrel away cash g iven tough times, we actually desire the opposite. Whereas, the access to credit provided to small and m edium size businesses would perhaps be a more sustained way to get the economy moving forward, improve the non employment rate, and maintain or grow jobs. I remain hopeful the Government would revisit its position on stimulating the economy by giving thoughtful consideration to all appropriate solu t ions and acting swiftly henceforth. R McKENZIE Nassau, March 2009. The challenge of sustained economic stimulus EDITOR, The Tribune. It was with great sorrow that I heard last week of the passing of my former partner, Livingstone B Johnson last week. I was even more saddened that his death has not been acknowl edged by the government and people of this country which he loved and which he served with dignity and honour Livingstone Johnson was a son of Exuma and possibly one of the first from that island to have been called to the Bahamas Bar. Mr Johnson’s career at the Bar was distinguished and he repre sented many early investors to the country including the Presi dent of Pan American Airlines. When offering for election by a person of his race and background was not very popular, Mr Johnson chose to defy the pressures of the day and fight an elec tion for a seat in Parliament for his native island. He did not suc ceed but he continued to be active in politics through the Progressive Liberal Party. When his country became independent Mr. Johnson unselfishly gave up his lucrative law practice to become the first Bahamian Ambassador to the United States. He served his country with dis tinction and we all owe him and his family a debt of gratitude for his service. I extend sincere condolences to his widow Charmaine and his children. JEANNE I THOMPSON Nassau, March 12, 2009. Appr eciation of Livingstone B Johnson EDITOR, The Tribune. I just wanted to say that Bahamas Issues is expression of the thoughts and ideas of the Bahamian public. No Government should fear or seek to suppress the expressions of its people. The very idea of legislation to govern online media and information distribution in the Bahamas is amiss. It’s also a clear indication of how little is known about the web by those who would seek to have such legislation in place. Bahamas Issues is an open forum for all Bahamians to come together in dialogue to assist in finding solutions to many of the issues facing our nation. Though you may find some who would invade the forums with their own personal agendas (whether political or otherwise found this to be but a few and a small price to pay for a beacon of free speech and free press in this country. I would ask all Bahamians to embrace this new form of communication and information sharing. As we should all be aware that traditional print media is now swift ly becoming a thing of the past soon only to be used for nostalgic purposes and something to hold while drinking a cup of coffee. There is without a doubt a greater influence in internet media today than there has ever been and only those who carefully harness this medium will govern the future of this country. DELROY MEADOWS BahamasIssues.com Nassau, March 10, 2009. Bahamians should embrace this new form of communication

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Grand B ahama Shipyard, which injects millions annually into the Freeport economy, is pro viding employment for an increasing number of Bahamians, Carl-Gustaf Rotkirch, chairman and CEO of the company said. H e said there are currently 320 Bahamians employed in various permanent positions, a nd recruitment continues through the shipyard’s apprenticeship programme. “Grand Bahama Shipyard has engaged into actively developing the apprenticeship programme for young Bahamians in cooperation with BTVI, since 2004. “There are presently 37 apprentices in various stages of their four-year apprentice ship with the company,” said Mr Rotkirch. He noted that the recent acquisition of the company’s third dry dock, which was purchased at an investment of $60 million, will provide addi tional educational and train ing opportunities for Bahamians in specialised fields of ship repair. The shipyard was started in January 1999 and commenced training in 2000. It has grown from earning just a few million dollars in revenue to over $130 million in 2008. According to Mr Rotkirch, the installation of the new dry dock, which is capable of lift ing vessels of up to 55,000 tonnes, will greatly impact business at the shipyard. In January, Carnival’s Sensation was the first cruise ship to dock at dry dock three. The month of January was the busiest month in the ship yard’s history. “It is the largest in the region capable of the most complicated repairs. It can dock over 70 percent of the cruise ships sailing in the region,” said Mr Rotkirch. “The target is to further develop Grand Bahama Shipyard into the biggest com mercial ship repair company in the region, capable of per f orming the most complicated repair upgrade and conver sions.” R oyal Caribbean Cruises, t he Carnival Corporation and the Grand Bahama Port Authority are joint partners in the shipyard. Richard Fain, chairman and CEO of Royal Caribbean, said the shipyard’s success in Freeport has proven all the doubters wrong. “Ten years ago, a number o f people had the foresight to s ee that we would have an opportunity to build something which over a period will grow and become an important benefit to businesses, the cruise business and other ship ping businesses, economies, and the communities in which we operate. “Ten years ago, we were looking at a situation wheret here was an awful a lot of people who said it couldn’t be done. Over last 10 years we have p roven those doubters wrong. We have nine ships here today and I am told it is somewhat of a record,” said Mr Fain. He acknowledged Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Sir Albert Miller, former chairman and CEO of the Port Authority, for their t remendous support and c ooperation in the shipyard project. “We have a wonderful facil ity, trained workers, and when we come back three, five, and 10 years from now, we will see an even stronger impact on the economy,” said Mr Fain. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 5 A 18-YEAR-OLD man accused of having intercourse with a girl under the age of 14 was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Edvardo Rolle, 18, was arraigned before Magistrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane, charged with having sexual intercourse with a person under 14 years of age. It is alleged that Rolle committed the offence on March 11, 2009. Rolle was not required to plead to the charge and was granted bail in the sum of $10,000 with one surety. The case has been adjourned to June 24 which is when a preliminary inquiry is expected to start. n A 28-year-old man was yesterday sentenced to pay a $5,000fine or serve a year in prison after being convicted on a drug charge. Mark Pierre was charged in October last year with possession of marijuana with the intent to supply. According to court dockets, Pierre was allegedly found in possession of 3.5 grammes of marijuana on Wednesday, October 1, 2008. Pierre, who initially pleaded not guilty to the charge, was convicted on the drug charge yesterday. Magistrate Carolita Bethel sentenced Pierre to pay a fine of $5,000. Failure to pay the fine will result in a year imprisonment. n B y ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net MINISTER OF STATEfor Immigration Branville McCartney has “no difficulty” releasing the full reports made to his department on t he state of the Carmichael Road Detention Centre, he said yesterd ay. Amid allegations – denied by the Immigration Department – of inhumane treatment, substandard living conditions and insufficient food provisions at the facility, the department arranged for several individu als to tour the site and file reports w ith officials over a week ago. T he group who toured the centre, d escribed by the department as an “independ ent body”, consisted of psychologist Dr David A llen, Director of Social Services, Mellany Zonicle and Archdeacon James Pallacious. Opinions T heir reports were understood to contain t heir opinions on the conditions at the facility a nd recommendations for possible improve m ents. A diluted report on the findings was presented to the press, who were denied access to the original documents, in a press conference held at the Immigration Department. In that conference, Immigration director Jack Thompson, reaffirming the department ’s commitment to operating transparently, told the media that the reports included no evidence to substanti-a te claims of violence by centre supervisors, sexual favours for privileges or insufficient food. He added that notwithstanding this, certain recommendations on the living conditions made by those visiting the site will be implemente d, such as diversifying the menu and replacing destroyed mattresses. In an interview with The Tribune y esterday, Mr McCartney, when asked when this newspaper will be able to see copies of the reports in t heir original form, said “very shortl y.” I’d just like an opportunity to p ass it by Cabinet,” he said. “I have no difficulties in releasing t hem I just want to do it the proper way.” He said that this should happen within the “next w eek.” He reaffirmed that the reports showed no substantiation of the allegations made by d etainees, and that such claims were “completely blown out of proportion.” O n March 10, several days prior to the department’s press conference, the human rights organisation Amnesty Internationali ssued a statement declaring its “concern” for detainees at the centre in light of reports reachi ng the media. It called on the international community to f lood the government with appeals on behalf of t he detainees and resumed its earlier call for independent reviews of internal investigations i nto the claims. Minister ‘has no difficulty’ releasing reports on the state of Detention Centre Branville McCartney Man accused of sex with girl under age of 14 GBShipyard ‘providing jobs for an increasing n umber of Bahamians’

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Street where they enjoyed barbecued food, drinks and loud music into the afternoon. T he group dispersed from Eastern Parade before 4pm witho ut resuming their protest. While outside the office on S hirley Street, some young protesters were smoking what appeared to be marijuana while standing outside the building, and when they were reported top olice monitoring the protest they shouted angry threats to burn down the building. Some threatened physical harm against Mr Marquis. The group’s collective shouts of: “Sir Lynden”, followed by the response, “Hero”, could be heard inside The Tribune office which shook as protesters banged on the walls and music blared from speakers on a flatback truck. Mr Moss said the protesters cross political divides as all Bahamians want to stand up for Sir Lynden’s legacy as the “Father of the Nation” after Mr Marquis reported former PLP treasurer Chauncey Tynes Sr’s allegations that his pilot son, Chauncey Tynes Jr, was killed in 1983 because he knew too much about links between Pin dling and drug czar Carlos “Joe” Lehder. “These are people who are respectful of what he has done for this country we are trying to build,” Mr Moss said. “Sir Lynden is a legacy, a man, a personality and a character we galvanise around. No man is perfect but we must give him the kind of respect he deserves.” Mr Moss criticised The Tri bune for publishing second and third-hand “hearsay” attacking the late prime minister’s charac ter and said any information connected to the young pilot’s mysterious disappearance should be given to police instead, Mr Moss said. One protester said the allega tions could not be true because Lehder had been offered time off his jail term if he implicated Sir Lynden, but Lehder refused. Pastor Micklyn Seymour of Bahamas In Prophecy said the articles should have been withheld whether the allegations are true or false because they have stirred up ill-feeling that will divide Bahamian people. He said: “He needs to leave the issue alone because it’s touching people’s hearts. “We are saying desist from dividing up people on issues that are not necessary. It’s doing more evil than good. He does n’t understand the affect it is having on people. “When we have a nation and we are dealing with the father of that nation, then the majority of people are for Sir Lynden. “It’s dividing our people and the country don’t need it, and we are disappointed in The Tri bune that they would want this information to stir this.” Another protester, Glen Rolle, a pastor at Hillside Restoration Centre Ministry in Marathon Road, said: “The argument isn’t whether it’s true or not but what’s behind The Tribune’s effort is to undo and remove a significant block at the foundation of this nation.” Mr Marquis said he was pleased to see that the protest went off peacefully. “I think peaceful demonstrations are part of the democratic process, and I believe passionately in people being able to express their views,” he added. during Lehder’s stay there in the late 1970s and early 1980s, said he personally knew that Pindling, a former PLP minister, and Everette Bannister and others used Lehder’s own aircraft to fly to and from Norman’s Cay and George Town, Exuma. “If they attended regattas and the like, they often used Lehder’s plane,” he said. “I knew Joe Lehder and found him to be a pleasant young man. However, I did not know at that time what he was doing. “I was told to give him every courtesy as he was an investor. Pindling and others from the government used Lehder’s transportation all the time.” The official said those demonstrating outside The Tribune did not know the facts. He said he also knew Chauncey Tynes Jr., the pilot who went missing in 1983. “He was a pleasant man who brought me back and forth many times from George Town and Norman’s Cay. “When he disappeared, everyone thought there was something strange going on, as no investigation was carried out to my knowledge.” The official, who did not wish to be named “for business reasons”, s aid planes flying into the cay were often carrying large amounts of m oney. “I would not doubt for one moment that Pindling was being paid off by Lehder, though I did not see any money transactions myself,” he said. “The fact that Pindling used Lehder’s plane so much did suggest there was a very close relationship,” he added. Officers fired shots in return and occupants of the Ford Expedition reportedly tried to escape the vehicle as it raced away from police. A marked police car, a Ford Crown Victoria unit, was damaged by a gunshot during the dangerous gunfight. And motorists cars were damaged as they were forced off the road in an effort to dodge the high-speed chase. But police finally cornered the brazen driver near the Environmental Health landfill site in the Tonique Williams-Darling Highway. Officers found one round of live ammunition for a .380 handgun and two live rounds of ammunition for a .9mm handgun upon searching the vehicle. A 34-year-old man from Prince Charles Drive thought to have been driving the Ford Expedition was arrested and is in police custody. Motorists whose cars were damaged during the chase are advised to contact the Central Detective Unit on 502-9998. Gunshots fired in chase F ROM page one Former govt official backs article, says the protest was ‘a waste of time’ F ROM page one FROM page one Protest

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 7 Premier Health Colonial Group International is rated A-(ExcellentyAM Best. DUNKIN' Donuts is set to open two outlets at the Lynden Pindling International Airportt his month. Bahamas QSR Limi ted, a subsidiary of the Myers G roup of Companies, operates the coffee giant's Bahamian franchise. The company finalised contract agreements with the Nassau Airport Development Company (NADJ anuary. T he brand is the number one retailer of hot and iced regular coffee-by-the-cup in America, and the largest coffee and baked goods chain in the world.In addition to the well-known c offees, all locations at LPIA will serve the brand's most popular signature beverages like the Dunkaccino, Turbo, Lite and White Hot Chocolate. "We are super excited to h ave the sandwiches Dunkin' Donuts aficionados will ask for s uch as the waffle breakfast s andwich and the variety of flat bread sandwiches," said Tracey C ash, marketing director for Dunkin' Donuts. "We are happy to have been awarded the contract and to have this opportunity to addD unkin' Donuts to the airport experience,” said Douglas S awyer, vice-president and m anaging director of the Myers Group. The popular brand, now l ocated in the US Departures Lounge, will open a seconds tore this week in the Domest ic/International Terminal. NAD is delighted to welcome Dunkin' Donuts into the airport family,” said John S pinks, vice-president of comm ercial development for NAD. The Dunkin' Donuts brand is known worldwide with over 7 ,900 restaurants in 30 coun tries. This is an exciting first step t owards increasing and improvi ng the food and beverage options at the airport," Mr Spinks said. TRACEY CASH (LEFT , marketing director with Dunkin' Donuts and Zener Beckford, manager of commercial properties with the Nassau Airport Development Company, at the new Dunkin' Donuts LPIA store in the US D epartures Lounge. Dunkin’ Donuts set to open outlets at airport

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Although details surrounding the incident are still sketchy,i nvestigators have not classified the man’s death as a homicide, he said. Several homicide inves-t igators were initially called to the scene. “This has not been classified a s a homicide. We are treating t his really as a suspicious death until the autopsy has been com pleted,” ASP Evans said. Based on what we have seen here there are no physical signso f trauma to the body, there is nothing of evidential value on the vessel which would lead us in the direction to say that this was a homicide,” he said. ASP Evans said that investigators are being assisted by per s ons who frequent the area, with information regarding the man’s identity. H e added: “We are asking any individual who may have any information regarding this i ncident or any person who may h ave frequented the vessel to assist us particularly with regard to the identity of this individ-u al.” Up to press time yesterday p olice said that the man had not been positively identified. Police in an Independent Bahamas. “Mr Ferguson was chosen after much reflection and introspection and assumes command of the Force at a difficult time in his-t ory,” Prime Minister Ingraham said. M r Ingraham praised the newly appointed Commissioner of P olice as a man whose character, dedication to duty and honesty have always been regarded as above reproach. “These are essential attributes for leadership,” Prime Minister Ingraham said. Speaking at the official opening of the RBPF’s Senior Officers Day Away” ceremony, Mr Ingraham last night noted that Comm issioner Ferguson heads the force at a time when “the world is experiencing perhaps the greatest financial and economic crisis since the Great Depression with severe consequences for our small and open economy. And we face unprecedented levels of crime, high unemployment and a determined criminal element.” H e said it was the commissioner’s task, together with the officers of the Senior Command, to lead the RBPF through the current period of transition and restructuring. N ational Movement. It was recognised in 2004 and before that the Registrar of Insurance lacks the capacity to properly regu late the insurance industry,” Mr Sears said at the meeting on Monday night. He added that a group of disgruntled CLICO (Bahamas policy and annuity holders have sought legal representation who may appear in court on their behalf at today's Supreme C ourt liquidation hearing. Mr Sears has offered pro bono assistance to several Bahami ans left in a lurch after the Supreme Court ordered a windingup of the troubled company on February 24. Lawyer Godfrey “Pro” Pinder has also offered his services to the group. Speaking to The Tribune yesterday, Mr Sears added: "It's sad, people don't know what to do and I've called for the government to intervene because many of these people find themselves in this position because of the failure of the regulator to prop erly regulate CLICO." The group, Mr Sears said yesterday, was left with many unanswered questions regarding their legal rights to money invested in the insurance company, the future of their life savings and the status of the liquidation. "It's a distressing situation and I agreed on a pro-bono basis to represent some of the persons and they are coming in today (Tuesday we do anticipate filing notice of intention to appear. "Nothing has been filed as yet. We're just rendering some assistance, that would be the most sensible thing in the circumstances (when what's going on," Mr Sears said. At the hearing it is expected to be determined from among those who have entered an appearance whether or not they sup port the liquidation process. Meanwhile, yesterday Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told The Tribune that CARICOM countries, including the Bahamas, have agreed that their regulators will meet to ascertain where CLICO's regional assets are. This comes amid claims from Guyana that the country invested $34 million in CLICO (Bahamas "In our case its the registrar of insurance and in their case its various entities, sometimes Central Bank or some other agency, will meet to gather all the facts together relating to CLICO and C F Financial, the parent company in Trinidad. They will also seek to determine what assets these companies have and where these assets are situated, especially in the region and as soon as they have done that there will be a meeting of heads of government of the Caribbean community." That meeting is expected to happen by the end of this month, Mr Ingraham said provided the respective countries receive the regulators' report in time. Mr Ingraham also dispelled reports that a CLICO (Bahamas $50 million loan to foreign affiliates was originally guaranteed by parent company C F Financial (Trinidad “There’s no such thing as a Trinidad guarantee. That’s a misconception that people have. CLICO (Bahamas million guarantee from the parent company in Trinidad the extent to which that is a (worthy determined.” Yesterday Bishop Hall, who also invested in the company, reissued his call for officials to be held accountable for the CLICO (Bahamas "If you hear the horrific stories coming out of this elderly people are horrified because they fear losing their life savings. I don't see how some of our politicians can sleep and be quiet ina time like this. Someone should have protected these people someone in the ministry of finance should take responsibility that these people were not protected," he argued. FROM page one Former AG: both Christie and Ingraham administrations did not properly regulate CLICO Reginald Ferguson appointed Police Commissioner FROM page one Body found on boat near Potters Cay dock F ROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 9 JEREMY HIGGS , of Blairwood Academy, is fouled as he drives to the basket... BASKETBALL HIGHLIGHTS ADRIAN MACKEY , of St Bede’s, is fouled as he drives to the basket... (Photos by Felip Major/Tribune staff

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n By FRANK GRIFFITHS Associated Press Writer LONDON (AP Gallas scored a disputed goal with five minutes remaining to give Arsenal a 2-1 victory over Hull on Tuesday night and a berth against Chelsea in the FA Cup semifinals on April 18. Manchester United faces Everton the following day at Wembley in the other semifinal. Hull went ahead in the 13th minute when defender Andy Dawson’s lofted pass found Nick Barmby in the penalty area, and Barmby’s shot deflected off defender Johan Djourou and looped in overg oalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski. Arsenal tied it in the 75th after Nicklas Bendtner’s passi n front of goal was deflected into the path of Andrei Arshavin, who set up Robin van Persie for an easy tap-in. G allas, stripped of the captaincy earlier this season for criticizing teammates, scored the go-ahead goal after Hull goalkeeper Boaz Myhill came off his line to punch a long ball clear. The ball came off Djourou, and Gallas won a duel with Dawson, heading the ball into an empty net. Replays showed Gallas appeared to be in an offside position, and Hull manager Phil Brown blamed referee Mike Riley. “It was definitely a mistake by the officials,”’ Brown said. “That’s why we’re out of the FA Cup. Ask Mr. Riley how much that’s going to cost Hull City. I don’t think he’d understand. I don’t think he’d care.” Brown also accused injured Arsenal captain Cesc Fabregas of spitting at Hull’s Brian Horton follow ing the match. “He spat at my assistant manager down the tunnel. That’s their club captain,” Brown said. Hopefully, he’s proud of himself. He spat at his f eet.” Hull defeated Arsenal 2-1 in t he Premier League on Sept. 27, only the second loss for the Gunners at Emirates Stadium, which opened in 2006. S S A A I I L L I I N N G G B B A A C C A A R R D D I I C C U U P P A number of international boats will be in action at Montagu Bay starting today through Saturday as they compete in the International Sailing Competition. The boats will compete in the Bacardi Cup that will start today at 11 am and continue through Thursday. Then on Thursday through Saturday, the boats will compete in the Dudley Gamblin Memorial. A number of Bahamians will also be competing in the series. B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L J J B B L L N N U U P P D D A A T T E E Here’s a look at the results of the games played this weekend in the Junior Baseball League of Nassau at the St Andrew’s Field of Dreams. T T E E E E B B A A L L L L Grasshoppers 21, Raptors 12 Knights 13, Sand Gnats 7 Sidewinders 20, Blue Claws 10 C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H Blue Jays 19, Angels 7 Athletics 16, Astros 12 Diamondbacks 13, Cubs 2 M M I I N N O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Red Sox 11, Rays 8 Royals 12, Rockies 6 M M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Indians 4, Reds 3 J J U U N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Twins 10, Cardinals 9 Dodgers 7, Yankees 6 S S E E N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Phillies 5, Rangers 2 Tigers 10, Pirates 6 C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Bahamas Football Association Senior League Standings 2008 As at March 16, 2009 Team NamePWDLGFGA Pts Bears FC 1191136828 Caledonia FC 11 812321525 Sharks FC 11434262515 Cavalier FC 10343201913 Baha Juniors FC 11 317223310 Dynamos FC 11 2 4 5223310 FC Nassau 1112814395 Recent Results S unday, March 15, 2009 1:00 pmBears FC vs Cavalier FC 2:0Referee: S. Thompson Goalscorers: Steve Jones (Bears FCBears FC 3:00 pm Baha Juniors FC vs Sharks FC 3 :4 Referee: W. Nelson Goalscorers: Johnson Jean (Sharks FCSharks FC Duckerno Exlias (Sherks FCSharks FC Barnett (BahaBaha Upcoming Matches Sunday, March 22, 2009 (Knock-Out Cup 1:00 pmLadies Exhibition Match Senior Football Standings SPORTS IN BRIEF THE New Providence Basketball Association (NPBA continued its best-of-three playoffs on Monday night at the CI Gibson Gymnasium. In the opener, the defending champions Commonwealth Bank Giants advanced to the divisional finals by completing a two-game sweep over the YCare Wreckers in a nail-biting 85-83 victory in the clincher. I n the night cap, the young Johnson Trucking Jumpers jumped all over the Sunshine Auto RuffRyders to pull off a huge 122-116 win to stay alive as they evened their series at 1-1. Tonight at the gym, the Electro Telecom Cybots and the Coca Cola Explorers are scheduled to battle in the third and decisive game three of their series. The feature contest between the Police and the Foxies Pros will also be decided in game three. Giants sweep the Wreckers, a dvance to the divisional finals F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s Freedom Academy at the start of the day to eventually get into the pool championship. Zion Academy won that game 22-18. In that game, Leslie Rolle led the way w ith nine, Giviane Bonaby had six, Bernard Munroe four and Nashad Mackey three. Kerrano Mackey and Spencer had nine apiece in the loss for Freedom Academy. Q Q u u e e e e n n s s C C o o l l l l e e g g e e 1 1 6 6 , , C C e e n n t t e e r r v v i i l l l l e e 1 1 4 4 : : Andre Delancy hit two free throws in t he final 25 seconds to push the Comets a head 16-13. But with just 2.6 seconds left on the clock, Troy Casseus hit just one for the final score. Delancy went on to score a game high eight and Carl Nesbitt had four as Queen’s College clinched the pool D championship. “I expected it to be close, but yesterday w hen we played them, I didn’t play Andre Delancy because of a knee injury,” said Comets’ coach Jason Edwards. “It’s still kind of sallow, but he wanted to play. I just couldn’t keep him off the court. He came up with some big free throws down the stretch for us.” C asseus ended up with six and Grem ako Symonette and D Rolle both added three in a losing effort. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 Arsenal beats Hull 2-1 to reach FA Cup semis ARSENAL’S Alexandre Song (top left Manucho (bottom left Round soccer match between Arsenal and Hull City at The Emirates Stadium in London, Tuesday... (AP Photo: Tom Hevezi

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C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 10 Giants sweep the Wreckers, advance to finals... n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net MARK Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi’s trip to Indian Wells, California, for the BNP Paribas Open didn’t last that long. The number three seeded Bahamian-Indian duo got eliminated in the second round on Monday night by Max Mirnyi and Andy Ram in two straight sets 7-6 (2 Knowles said it was quite a disappointing loss. “It was tough. They’re a tough team. They played extremely well,” Knowles said. “It was just one of those matches that we didn’t get ahead of them. “They didn’t really let us get into the match, so we couldn’t turn it around.” With this being the first Masters Series, the biggest tournament on the ATP World Tour outside of the Grand Slam, Knowles said he and Bhupathi wanted to put themselves in a position to contend for the title. “The hard courts is our favourite surface so we’re dis appointed in that aspect,” he said. “We thought we could have gone far and even possibly win the title. “But now all we could do is prepare ourselves for next week in Miami and hopefully make up for not doing as wellhere and try to contend for the title there.” Miami, Florida will be the site for the second Masters Series called the Sony Ericsson Open. As they look ahead to next week, Knowles said they certainly have to make some adjustments. “Mahesh didn’t play his best match and everybody is entitled to have a bad game everynow and then,” he said. “He felt he could have played a little bit better and I think we could have returned serve a little better. “But I think a lot had to do with the way they served. They served extremely big and they got in a high per centage of first serves and they really neutralized our return. So we have to look at playinga little better in those aspects.” Depending on how successful they are, Knowles said he could be coming home for a couple of days. But he’s hoping that they are right in the thick of things as they look forward to winning the title or at least end up playing through the weekend. So far the second-year duo of Knowles and Bhupathi are still looking for their first vic tory on the tour. They came close finishing as runners-up atthe Australian Open and were in the semifinal in Sidney, just before the first Grand Slam for the year. However, they are still ranked at number two on the tour behind the American identical twin brothers of Bob and Mike Bryan. Knowles has won a doubles title this year. That was when he teamed up with American Mardy Fish to win in Mem phis, Tennessee, after Bhupathi took a week’s break from the circuit. Knowles, Bhupathi eliminated MAHESH Bhupathi (front Mark Knowles in the final of the doubles at the Australian Open... (AP Photo: Andrew Brownbill KYLE TURNQUEST , of St Bede’s, drives to the basket yesterday... See more photos on page 9 (Photo: Felip Major/ Tribune staff) F F F F i i i i n n n n a a a a l l l l f f f f o o o o u u u u r r r r ! ! ! ! n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net IT’S the St Bede’s Crushers versus the Queen’s College Comets and Zion Christian Academy versus Stephen Dil let in the Final Four of the Prov idence Basketball Association’s first Phil Smith Primary School Basketball Tournament. The four teams advanced out of the “Elite Eight” pool championships played yesterday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. The two winners will go on to play in the championship game at the end of tonight. Here’s how they got into the semifinals: S S t t B B e e d d e e s s 2 2 0 0 , , B B l l a a i i r r w w o o o o d d A A c c a a d d e e m m y y 8 8 : : This one wasn’t much of a contest as the Crushers crushed Blairwood on their way to the B pool championship. Donzel Huyler had a game high nine, while Dwight Wheatley and Adrian Mackey both had four in the win. “This game wasn’t one that we played the type of basket ball that the Crushers normally play,” said St Bede’s coach Ricardo Freemantle. “The guys were still a little tired from our house meet yes terday (Monday use that as an excuse. We just have to come and play our game tomorrow (today For Blairwood, Jermaine Higgs scored five and Lejaro Johnson added three. S S t t e e p p h h e e n n D D i i l l l l e e t t 1 1 9 9 , , K K i i n n g g s s w w a a y y A A c c a a d d e e m m y y 1 1 4 4 : : The pool C championship was more keenly contested, but down the stretch Stephen Dillet came up with a couple big shots to stay ahead. Gage Griffin had six, Michael Bethel five and McKellen Major four in the win. “I felt very good because we started out very slow. It wasn’t that we were not getting our shots, they were just not falling,” said Stephen Dillet’s coach Frank Johnson. “But I told the guys to keep their head in the game. I know we will rebound. We put the pressure on and we got about eight fast break points on some steals and we were able to get back into the game.” Emmanuel Butler had a game high 10 in a losing effort. Z Z i i o o n n A A c c a a d d e e m m y y 3 3 6 6 , , S S t t . . F F r r a a n n c c i i s s / / J J o o s s e e p p h h 2 2 4 4 : : Nashad Mackey came up with some clutch plays in the second half as he led a spirited Zion Academy in the pool A championship. Mackey finished with a game high 12, Giviane Beneby had eight and both Leslie Rolle and Nathan Ellis helped out with seven. Myron Johnson had 11, Brandon Wilson eight and Ahkeem Neilly five in the loss. It was a double dose of victory for Zion Academy, who had to play a tie-breaker against H H E E R R E E S S a a l l o o o o k k a a t t t t h h e e m m a a t t c c h h u u p p o o f f t t h h e e F F i i n n a a l l F F o o u u r r i i n n t t h h e e P P r r o o v v i i d d e e n n c c e e B B a a s s k k e e t t b b a a l l l l C C l l u u b b s s f f i i r r s s t t P P h h i i l l S S m m i i t t h h P P r r i i m m a a r r y y S S c c h h o o o o l l B B o o y y s s C C h h a a l l l l e e n n g g e e t t o o d d a a y y a a t t t t h h e e K K e e n n d d a a l l I I s s a a a a c c s s G G y y m m n n a a s s i i u u m m , , s s t t a a r r t t i i n n g g a a t t 4 4 p p m m : : S S t t B B e e d d e e s s v v s s Q Q u u e e e e n n s s C C o o l l l l e e g g e e S S t t e e p p h h e e n n D D i i l l l l e e t t v v s s Z Z i i o o n n A A c c a a d d e e m m y y A look at the matchups S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 Arsenal beats Hull 2-1 tor each FA Cup semis... See page 10

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE CHINESEVIPSVISIT C C SWEETINGSENIORHIGH SCHOOL PICTURED from left are C C Sweeting Senior High School health and family life teacher Carolyn Rolle; permanent secretary in the Ministry of Education Elma Garraway; principal of C C Sweeting Senior High School Delores Ingraham; Xie-Xiuling, and ZhangMei. XIE-XIULING , wife of the Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China to the Bahamas, and officials from the Chinese Embassy visited C C Sweeting Senior High School on Monday, March 16. Pictured is Mrs Xie-Xiuling, left, speaking with the school’s principal Mrs Delores Ingraham. PHOTOS: Raymond A Bethel /BIS

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter DUNKIN’ DONUTS and its Bakery will create employment for about 80 Bahamians when its second store in the Lynden Pindling International airport opens this week and its downtown location opens in May, according to the company’s Marketing Director. Tracy Cash told Tribune Business that Bahamas QSR brings to the popular US dough nut and coffee franchise, a wealth of experience for oper ating international brands. The company, a subsidiary of the Meyers group which also operates the local KFC brand, recently acquired the Dunkin’ Donuts brand after it was held and lost by another local Bahamian several years ago. A release issued by the com pany said that the brand is the “number one retailer of hot and iced regular coffee-by-the-cup in America, and the largest coffee and baked goods chain in the world.” “We are happy to have been awarded the contract and to have this opportunity to add Dunkin’ Donuts to the airport experience” said Douglas Sawyer, Vice President and Managing Director of the Myers Group. The Nassau Airport Development company said it was happy to welcome the company to the airport which joins Tor tuga, the Rum Cake retailer also under the umbrella of the Meyers Group. “NAD is delighted to welcome Dunkin’ Donuts into the airport family” said John C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.56 $3.56 $3.60 n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter G overnment has declined the application of a local lawyer with technical knowledge of US tax policy, who was recommended to replace the Bahamas’ outgoing representative for the Committee of Experts on International Co-operation in Tax Matters, Tribune Business has learned, as this country seeks to develop tax co-operation policy in light of growing pressure from G20 nations. The rejection is believed to be politically motivated. Ryan Pinder, who told this paper that he was recommend ed to the government by a “senior civil servant,” said he was told that his application was denied because the Ministry of Finance is interested in filling the position from within their organisation. H owever, some local econ omic experts say they were informed that the denial may have come because of Mr Pinder’s association with the PLP through his work with the Progressive Young Liberals. According to Mr Pinder, he would have offered to be a con sultant for them at no cost or for $1 per year, depending on the government’s requirements. “They would like an employ ee of the ministry or someone in the public sector,” he said. As the G20 countries, the group of the world’s 20 largest economies, tighten the reins on so-called “tax haven” countries, the Bahamas is mulling its Local US tax lawyer’s application declined n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter FORECLOSURES on recreational boats and yachts are likely to be a huge factor in the recent 20 per cent decline in pleasure trips to Bahamian waters, according to the Director General of Tourism, while boating experts cited the high overall costs of travel to the islands as a factor. Vernice Walkine said a large number of individuals in the US lost homes, boats and other luxury items as the global economic crisis forced decreased spending and promoted debt increases. “That is a significant part of the difficulty that we’re faced with,” she said. Publisher of Southern Boating Mag a zine Skip Allen said several boaters expressed concern that it was not cost effective to travel to the Bahamas because of high cruising permit prices, fuel prices compared to the US and other miscella neous docking fees. “Bottom line on the thing is they were concerned about the $300 for the cruising permit and I didn’t disagree with them about the fuel charge, as far as dollars were concerned,” he said. “I would rather be in the Bahamas, even though it costs me a little more, but that’s a p ersonal opinion and that’s how I figure i t.” However, Mrs Walkine said she is not convinced that fuel prices are a hindrance to most boaters, as the price per gallon has fallen substantially since last summer when the Bahamas again saw a decrease in the number of privateb oaters. “Fuel prices obviously cannot Y acht, boat foreclosures likely huge factor in decline in pleasure trips to Bahamas A LUXURY YACHT can be seen on Paradise Island, Bahamas... Vernice Walkine “That is a significant part of the difficulty that we’re faced with.” V er n ice Walkine S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Bahamas seeks to develop tax co-operation policy Growing pressure from G20 nations Dunkin’ Donuts’ airport store to employ about 80 Bahamians Downtown location set to open in May

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following items: %XLOGLQJVWUXFWXUHH[WHULRUHQYHORSHH[WHULRUFDQRSLHVDQG UHODWHGVXEWUDGHSDFNDJHV *HQHUDO5HTXLUHPHQWVIRU*HQHUDO&RQWUDFWLQJVHUYLFHVIRU WKHRYHUDOOSURMHFWDQG &RQVWUXFWLRQ0DQDJHPHQW)HHIRUWHQGHULQJWKHEDODQFHRI VXEWUDGHDQGVXSSOLHUZRUNSDFNDJHVDWDODWHUGDWH The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e. mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are notincluded in this Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230 General Contractor in 2009. The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room located at the NAD Project office. TENDERC-230 General Contract, Stage 1Contact: TRACI BRISBYContract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project Ph: (24224217 P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs Yacht, boat foreclosures likely huge factor in decline in pleasure trips to Bahamas be the issue,” she contended. Mr Allen said boaters this year have developed strict budgets and are willing to forego travel to the Bahamas for a more budget friendly destinations such as the Florida keys or Ft Lauderdale. He said many private yachts and fishing boats are simply opting to stay closer to home this year. According to him, boaters were concerned most about having to pay a cruising fee multiple times during the year if they were to make several trips back and forth from the US to the Bahamas. “If they wanted to go over in April then go back in July or September it was $900 because of the cost of the cruising permit and that didn’t make a lot of sense,” he said. “Your cruising permit is only good for one shot.” Mrs Walkine said the Ministry of Tourism is paying attention to the boating market and has plans to take an aggressive approach to attracting business to the many southern Bahamas docks that depend on revenue from boaters. Mr Allen said he and his magazine are on the side of the Bahamas when it comes t o bringing business to the i slands. According to him, Southern Boating magazine features Rum Cay in its April edition and is rolling out its yearly Bahamas edition in May. There are a lot of pluses to being in the Bahamas,” he said. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B CRUISE SHIPS can be seen in New Providence Harbour...

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n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter THE Ministry of Tourism is seeing a better year so far than was previously projected, according to the Director general of the Ministry of Tourism, amid a global recession that threatened to sink the Tourism sector this year. Vernice Walkine told Tri bune Business that even though the beginning of this year has been somewhat better than the Ministry foresaw, it is nowhere near where it was during the same time last year. “We’re doing everything we can to get our fair share and then some,” she said. “We’re working very hard on a number of fronts. We’re working in terms of increased advertising presence in the marketplace by extending that through to June.” “So, we are reaching more people more frequently across the United States reaching those people who are less affected by the economic situation.” Mrs Walkine said she has not yet received official statistics on the number of spring break visitors this year, but expects that the numbers will be fairly good. According to her, the unfortunate situation in Mexico may have given the Bahamas an added boost as a destination of choice. Mexico is currently fighting a drug war on its borders with the US. “I think the Bahamas, and Nassau in particular, has been able to benefit from that,” she said. “There are places like Superclubs Breezes that are sold out.” The upcoming FIFA Congress, which is expected to bring 1000 to 1200 visitors to Nassau/Paradise Island, and the recently announced Miss Universe pageant, expected to draw thousands, will give the islands of the Bahamas a much needed e conomic boost, according to Tourism Ministry officials. Mrs Walkine said the ministry has been working tirelessly to introduce big things that will have a tremendous payoff for the economy and a lot of little things that will add up to a big pay off. She said the FIFA Congress and the Miss Universe pageant will bring the fringe benefit of international exposure for the islands of the Bahamas. Her ministry has also been working diligently to create more airlift into Grand Bahama by creating incentives for carriers in an effort to make airfare to Freeport competitive. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 PAGE 3B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.451.450.000.0700.00020.70.00% 1 1.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.2440.26028.73.71% 0 .990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.24010.71.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.566.48-0.0810,6150.4380.05014.80.77% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs1.811.78-0.030.0990.05218.02.92% 3.002.16Doctor's Hospital2.162.160.000.2400.0409.01.85% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.52034.24.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.7940.40013.23.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.000.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.003670.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44321.3828Colina Money Market Fund1.44320.674.37 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.739711.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 813.18 | YTD -2.60% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTUESDAY, 17 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,655.09 | CHG -4.07 | %CHG -0.25 | YTD -57.27 | YTD % -3.34BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 28-Feb-09 6-Mar-09 31-Jan-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 Got Light?Protect Your PC!Surf Secure with Symantec andAVE! $10.00 OFF Symantec provides best-of-breed securitysolutions for all tiers of a network: atthe gateways between the network and the outside world, at theservers that act asthe network's vital organs, and at end-user devices including desktop PCs, laptops and handhelds. WeHave Solutions for: Integrated security, Security management, Firewall/VPN,Intrusiondetection, Policy compliance, management, Virus protection/content filtering,DiskManagement, File Recovery and RemoteAccess.A UPS with AVR is the perfect device to guard against all power disturbances –including blackouts. The slightest drop in power can cause your computer to freeze or shut off, both resulting in lost work, data and time.Take $15 OFFALL UPSSurge Protectors starting at$12.00SOLUTIONS FOR BOTH HOME & OFFICE! Authorized Distributor & Partner#4 Patton & Rosetta Sts Palmdale (Next to City Market) P.O. Box N-10620 Nassau, BahamasEmail: sales@dctpc.com Tel: 242-328-0048 Fax: 242-328-0049 Tourism seeing better year than was previously projected, says Walkine To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story. “...We’re working in terms of increased advertising presence in the marketplace by extending that through to June.” Vernice Walkine

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options, while other offshore financial service centres worldwide are swiftly moving to comply with Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD Mr Pinder believes that the Bahamas government should have been proactive in entering into more tax information exchange agreements with OECD countries and sending delegations to Washington. Now, he said, the country has found itself in a situation where it is the last to respond. “Anything we do from here on out I fear is not going to be t aken seriously, especially in l ight of a lot of the other jurisd ictions taking such aggressive and affirmative measures,” he said. “I’ve long been a proponent of the Bahamas entering into Tax Information Exchange Agreements. We pretty much ignore requests for Tax Information Exchange Agreements.” Economic experts worldwide have accused the US and UK of “hypocrisy,” as they engage in as much of the activities as those so-called “tax havens”. Trillion T he US is said to have as much as $4 trillion in passive investments, whose portfolios are not shared with countries where the investments originate. According to Mr Pinder, the US is addressing this issue and trying to level the playing field. He said that should the government comply with OECD regulations it could gain favour with entities such as the World Trade Organisation and The International Monetary Fund. These are all issues that will b e affected if we don’t comply, i f we’re blacklisted and if we’re deemed to be a rogue nation and by not having a firm policy from the government on this issue and without having the proper technical ability to analyse the issues, which I have offered the government at no cost, I think by and large we won’t be taken seriously when are prepared to provide a policy statement.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 1 2 7 , & ( &$/<362%$+$0$6,3(/,1(/,0,7(' ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf &UHGLWRUVKDYLQJGHEWVRUFODLPVDJDLQVW WKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\DUHUHTXLUHGWR VHQGSDUWLFXODUVWKHUHRIWRWKHXQGHUVLJQHGFR 3%R[1DVVDX%DKDPDVRQRU EHIRUHGD\RI$SULO,QGHIDXOW WKHUHRIWKH\ZLOOEHH[FOXGHGIURPWKHEHQH RIDQ\GLVWULEXWLRQPDGHWKH/LTXLGDWRU 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RIDUFK $OLVRQUHFR /LTXLGDWRU 2 QH 0RQWDJXHODFH ( DVW%D\WUHHW 1 DVVDX%DKDPDV 1 2 7 , & ( %/8($5/,1/1*(50,1$//,0,7(' ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf & UHGLWRUVKDYLQJGHEWVRUFODLPVDJDLQVWWKH DERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\DUHUHTXLUHGWRVHQG S DUWLFXODUVWKHUHRIWRWKHXQGHUVLJQHG3%R[ 1 1DVVDX%DKDPDVRQRUEHIRUHGD\ RI$SULO,QGHIDXOWWKHUHRIWKH\ZLOOEH H [FOXGHGIURPWKHEHQHRIDQ\GLVWULEXWLRQPDGH E\WKH/LTXLGDWRU'DWHGWKHWKGD\RIDUFK $OLVRQUHFR /LTXLGDWRU 2QHRQWDJXHODFH (DVW%D\WUHHW 1DVVDX%DKDPDV Local US tax lawyer’s application declined Dunkin’ Donuts’ airport store to employ about 80 Bahamians Spinks, Vice President, Commercial Development for NAD. Dunkin’ Donuts brand is a ubiquitous US coffee brand, known worldwide with over 7,900 restaurants in 30 countries. The first Bahamas Dunkin’ Donuts branch shut its doors after a fire destroyed the downtown building. Shortly after, other locations followed. Several other local food companies are also planning to move their businesses into the airport to increase food and beverage options as a part of the redevelopment. “This is an exciting first step towards increasing and improving the food and beverage options at the airport,” said Mr Spinks. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By STEVENSON JACOBS A P Business Writer NEW YORK (AP Street firm loses billions of doll ars, nearly destroying its busin ess and crippling the nation’s economy. But top executives still receive huge bonuses? As crazy as that sounds to most A mericans, paying such bonuses even after a company suffers big losses is common practice on Wall Street, and it’s at the heart of the o utrage surrounding insurer AIG. E mployees of the insurer’s financial-products unit received $165 million in so-called “retention” bonuses paymentsd esigned to keep valued employees from quitting. They are paid out no matter whether the employee had a great year or a h orrible one. I n Wall Street’s high-stakes competitive culture, paying top people to stay in their jobs has been the norm for years. It’s basically a bribe, so your employees don’t bolt and take their clients with them,” said Chuck Collins, a senior scholar a t the Washingon-based Institute f or Policy Studies and an executive compensation expert. Even though most bonuses p aid to Wall Street employees are tied to performance, retention b onuses have ignited anger since the government began pouring billions of dollars into the financial system to keep banking and insurance firms from collapsing. D espite the uproar, the payments have continued at severalf irms, most recently at investment bank Merrill Lynch. It’s part of this Marie Antoinette syndrome of Wall Street,” Collins added. “They’re completely in a bubble, and they don’t understand how these pay-m ents are perceived.” They do now. T he bonuses at American International Group, which isn ow nearly 80 per cent owned by taxpayers, have drawn howls of outrage from Congress and President Barack Obama. Lambasting the insurance giant for “reckl essness and greed,” Obama pledged to try to rescind payment of the bonuses. AIG has argued that retention bonuses are crucial to pulling thec ompany out of its crisis. Without the bonuses, the company says, top employees who best understand AIG’s business would q uit an assertion that critics of the payments quickly rejected. “I’m very skeptical that retaining the people who made the mistakes is a good idea,” said Rep.B arney Frank, chairman of the House Committee on Financial Services. “I think we have a strong case to get some of those b onuses back.” Experts say it won’t be easy. For starters, AIG’s retention payments were guaranteed in the executives’ contracts. By breakingt hem, AIG says it would risk triggering a wave of employee lawsuits. And the cost of those lawsuits would likely dwarf the size of t he retention bonuses. One way around the contracts would be to prove fraud. A 2002 law adopted after the accounting scandals at Enron and other companies allows publicly traded corp orations to take back ill-gotten compensation. O n Capitol Hill late Tuesday, House Democrats were consid-e ring proposing new legislation to authorize Attorney General E ric Holder to recover bonus payments like the ones paid by AIG. A day earlier in New York, state Attorney General Andrew C uomo subpoenaed information from AIG to determine whethert he payments made over the past weekend constitute fraud under s tate law. In a letter Tuesday, Cuomo said 73 AIG employees received r etention bonuses of $1 million or more including 11 who haves ince left the company. Cuomo said the bonus checks were mailed Friday. “These payments were all made to individuals in the subs idiary whose performance led to crushing losses and the near-failure of AIG,” Cuomo wrote in the letter to Frank. “Thus, last week, AIG made m ore than 73 millionaires in the unit which lost so much money that it brought the firm to its knees, forcing a taxpayer bailout. S omething is deeply wrong with this outcome.” Critics say the government could have done more to prevent the AIG bonuses. P eter Morici, a business professor at the University of Maryland, said the government could have forced AIG to re-negotiate t he bonus contracts so employees would be paid less. He noted that the government demanded similar concessions from unionized autoworkers before agreeing to bail out General Motors, Ford and Chrysler. “It seems like no effort was m ade to negotiate with the AIG people and that the government gave them whatever they want,” Morici said. “If we forced autoworkers to take less, wec ould have done it with AIG employees.” As for AIG’s argument that failure to pay the bonuses would s end employees running for the exits, some experts say that would be just fine. “There’s a lot of unemployed Wall Street workers that could be brought in as freshb lood,” said Stephen Davis, a senior fellow and expert on corporate governance at Yale University. O therwise, Davis said, paying bonuses to executives of faltering companies risks creating a “a grab-and-go culture.” “The danger is that this kind of culture could spread to other companies,” he said. “People could see this as their moment to g et what they can before the gate closes.” AIG’s troubles stem from its business insuring mortgagebacked securities and other debta gainst default. As the credit crisis took hold, that business imploded. Since September, the government has shoveled more t han $170 billion into AIG, which has operations in more than 130 countries. AIG’s financial products unit had been led by Joseph Cassano,w ho stepped down a year ago after the division reported a loss of more than $11 billion on a book of contracts in the last quart er of 2007. AIG representatives did not return calls seeking comment Tuesday. Spokeswoman Christina Pretto had said Monday that the company was in ongoing contact with Cuomo’s office and would respond to his requests for inform ation. Retention bonuses on Wall Street and in other industries are hardly new. Last month, the Wall Street Journal reported that Mor-g an Stanley plans to pay up to $3 billion in retention bonuses to 6,500 brokers in its joint venture with Smith Barney. Morgan Stanl ey has received $10 billion in bailout funds. In a December survey of 264 companies across a variety of industries, business consultantW atson Wyatt Worldwide found that nine per cent of companies had added, or expected to add, a special retention bonus. An addit ional 21 per cent were considering doing so. Associated Press Writer Michael Virtanen contributed to this report from Albany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ad year or good, AIG workers got big bonuses

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APT3-G BLONDIE TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE c.1324 BC (11) 14 An analgesic (7 15 Dutch painter, 1632-75 (7 16 Surgical instrument (6 17 Arrival (6 19 Disprove by argument (5 21 Penniless (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Ladies’man holding an ancient city office (6 4 Bird to catch on horseback (6 9 Food for cattle in Switzerland (7 10 Strange glee I come across in Belgium (5 11 Aspice having no end of use in savouries (5 12 Girl who’s pill-shy crying out for treatment (7 13 Fine steak and a drink on the house (11) 18 Revised list for a retailer in a growing trade (7 20 Aprose form that gives difficulties (5 22 Children are a contentious point (5 23 Places visited on vacation or between vacations (7 24 He acts dumb (6 25 Converts work into play, perhaps (6 Down 1 Song and dance gets little publicity (6 2 Short summary concerning headgear (5 3 Fruit that’s new to Capri (7 5 Marble street (5 6 They’re unnecessary, pointless, but still pointed (7 7 Convert me with this belief (6 8 It may be taken as an indication of health (11) 14 This animal won’t always die a natural death (7 15 Popped the question after work, but not accepted (7 16 State in a loud and resolute way (6 17 Credit is twice provided in an emergency (6 19 She’s a bit of a siren, evidently (5 21 Take off from the runway (5 Across:1 Ebb tide, 5 Glint, 8 Tower of London, 9 Alibi, 10 Restful, 11 Digest, 12 Abates, 15 Salutes, 17 Cigar, 19 Inexpressible, 20 Ensue, 21 Depress. Down:1 Extra, 2 Bowling alleys, 3 In ruins, 4 Effort, 5 Gross, 6 Indefatigable, 7 Tingles, 11 Despite, 13 Bucks up, 14 Ascend, 16 Tepee, 18 Reels. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 All-star, 5 Beset, 8 Pay lip service, 9 Crook, 10 Galileo, 11 Vanity, 12 Etched, 15 Bahrain, 17 Ambit, 19 At loggerheads, 20 Tawny, 21 Hearsay. Down:1 Aspic, 2 Lay down the law, 3 Trinket, 4 Resign, 5 Beryl, 6 Spill the beans, 7 Toehold, 11 Vibrant, 13 Trachea, 14 Enmesh, 16 Angry, 18 Tasty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425 1234567 8 910 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Unexpected refusal (6 4 Instructive experience (6 9 French vineyard estate (7 10 Speak (5 11 Lees (5 12 Pacify (7 13 Russian composer (11) 18 Pyrenean republic (7 20 Fanatical (5 22 Ascent (5 23 Something very ugly (7 24 International agreement (6 25 Impassioned (6 Down 1 Go back (6 2 Two of a kind (5 3 Sweet-scented flower (7 5 Fit out (5 6 Adisappointment (7 7 Anxiety (6 8 Egyptian boy-king, died c.1324 BC (11) 14 An analgesic (7 15 Dutch painter, 1632-75 (7 16 Surgical instrument (6 17 Arrival (6 19 Disprove by argument (5 21 Penniless (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Ladies’man holding an ancient city office (6 4 Bird to catch on horseback (6 9 Food for cattle in Switzerland (7 10 Strange glee I come across in Belgium (5 11 Aspice having no end of use in savouries (5 12 Girl who’s pill-shy crying out for treatment (7 13 Fine steak and a drink on the house (11) 18 Revised list for a retailer in a growing trade (7 20 Aprose form that gives difficulties (5 22 Children are a contentious point (5 23 Places visited on vacation or between vacations (7 24 He acts dumb (6 25 Converts work into play, perhaps (6 Down 1 Song and dance gets little publicity (6 2 Short summary concerning headgear (5 3 Fruit that’s new to Capri (7 5 Marble street (5 6 They’re unnecessary, pointless, but still pointed (7 7 Convert me with this belief (6 8 It may be taken as an indication of health (11) 14 This animal won’t always die a natural death (7 15 Popped the question after work, but not accepted (7 16 State in a loud and resolute way (6 17 Credit is twice provided in an emergency (6 19 She’s a bit of a siren, evidently (5 21 Take off from the runway (5 Across:1 Ebb tide, 5 Glint, 8 Tower of London, 9 Alibi, 10 Restful, 11 Digest, 12 Abates, 15 Salutes, 17 Cigar, 19 Inexpressible, 20 Ensue, 21 Depress. Down:1 Extra, 2 Bowling alleys, 3 In ruins, 4 Effort, 5 Gross, 6 Indefatigable, 7 Tingles, 11 Despite, 13 Bucks up, 14 Ascend, 16 Tepee, 18 Reels. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 All-star, 5 Beset, 8 Pay lip service, 9 Crook, 10 Galileo, 11 Vanity, 12 Etched, 15 Bahrain, 17 Ambit, 19 At loggerheads, 20 Tawny, 21 Hearsay. Down:1 Aspic, 2 Lay down the law, 3 Trinket, 4 Resign, 5 Beryl, 6 Spill the beans, 7 Toehold, 11 Vibrant, 13 Trachea, 14 Enmesh, 16 Angry, 18 Tasty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425 1234567 8 910 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425 Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Unexpected refusal (6 4 Instructive experience (6 9 French vineyard estate (7 10 Speak (5 11 Lees (5 12 Pacify (7 13 Russian composer (11) 18 Pyrenean republic (7 20 Fanatical (5 22 Ascent (5 23 Something very ugly (7 24 International agreement (6 25 Impassioned (6 Down 1 Go back (6 2 Two of a kind (5 3 Sweet-scented flower (7 5 Fit out (5 6 Adisappointment (7 7 Anxiety (6 8 Egyptian boy-king, died c.1324 BC (11) 14 An analgesic (7 15 Dutch painter, 1632-75 (7 16 Surgical instrument (6 17 Arrival (6 19 Disprove by argument (5 21 Penniless (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Ladies’man holding an ancient city office (6 4 Bird to catch on horseback (6 9 Food for cattle in Switzerland (7 10 Strange glee I come across in Belgium (5 11 Aspice having no end of use in savouries (5 12 Girl who’s pill-shy crying out for treatment (7 13 Fine steak and a drink on the house (11) 18 Revised list for a retailer in a growing trade (7 20 Aprose form that gives difficulties (5 22 Children are a contentious point (5 23 Places visited on vacation or between vacations (7 24 He acts dumb (6 25 Converts work into play, perhaps (6 Down 1 Song and dance gets little publicity (6 2 Short summary concerning headgear (5 3 Fruit that’s new to Capri (7 5 Marble street (5 6 They’re unnecessary, pointless, but still pointed (7 7 Convert me with this belief (6 8 It may be taken as an indication of health (11) 14 This animal won’t always die a natural death (7 15 Popped the question after work, but not accepted (7 16 State in a loud and resolute way (6 17 Credit is twice provided in an emergency (6 19 She’s a bit of a siren, evidently (5 21 Take off from the runway (5 Across:1 Ebb tide, 5 Glint, 8 Tower of London, 9 Alibi, 10 Restful, 11 Digest, 12 Abates, 15 Salutes, 17 Cigar, 19 Inexpressible, 20 Ensue, 21 Depress. Down:1 Extra, 2 Bowling alleys, 3 In ruins, 4 Effort, 5 Gross, 6 Indefatigable, 7 Tingles, 11 Despite, 13 Bucks up, 14 Ascend, 16 Tepee, 18 Reels. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 All-star, 5 Beset, 8 Pay lip service, 9 Crook, 10 Galileo, 11 Vanity, 12 Etched, 15 Bahrain, 17 Ambit, 19 At loggerheads, 20 Tawny, 21 Hearsay. Down:1 Aspic, 2 Lay down the law, 3 Trinket, 4 Resign, 5 Beryl, 6 Spill the beans, 7 Toehold, 11 Vibrant, 13 Trachea, 14 Enmesh, 16 Angry, 18 Tasty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425 1234567 8 910 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Unexpected refusal (6 4 Instructive experience (6 9 French vineyard estate (7 10 Speak (5 11 Lees (5 12 Pacify (7 13 Russian composer (11) 18 Pyrenean republic (7 20 Fanatical (5 22 Ascent (5 23 Something very ugly (7 24 International agreement (6 25 Impassioned (6 Down 1 Go back (6 2 Two of a kind (5 3 Sweet-scented flower (7 5 Fit out (5 6 Adisappointment (7 7 Anxiety (6 8 Egyptian boy-king, died c.1324 BC (11) 14 An analgesic (7 15 Dutch painter, 1632-75 (7 16 Surgical instrument (6 17 Arrival (6 19 Disprove by argument (5 21 Penniless (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Ladies’man holding an ancient city office (6 4 Bird to catch on horseback (6 9 Food for cattle in Switzerland (7 10 Strange glee I come across in Belgium (5 11 Aspice having no end of use in savouries (5 12 Girl who’s pill-shy crying out for treatment (7 13 Fine steak and a drink on the house (11) 18 Revised list for a retailer in a growing trade (7 20 Aprose form that gives difficulties (5 22 Children are a contentious point (5 23 Places visited on vacation or between vacations (7 24 He acts dumb (6 25 Converts work into play, perhaps (6 Down 1 Song and dance gets little publicity (6 2 Short summary concerning headgear (5 3 Fruit that’s new to Capri (7 5 Marble street (5 6 They’re unnecessary, pointless, but still pointed (7 7 Convert me with this belief (6 8 It may be taken as an indication of health (11) 14 This animal won’t always die a natural death (7 15 Popped the question after work, but not accepted (7 16 State in a loud and resolute way (6 17 Credit is twice provided in an emergency (6 19 She’s a bit of a siren, evidently (5 21 Take off from the runway (5 Across:1 Ebb tide, 5 Glint, 8 Tower of London, 9 Alibi, 10 Restful, 11 Digest, 12 Abates, 15 Salutes, 17 Cigar, 19 Inexpressible, 20 Ensue, 21 Depress. Down:1 Extra, 2 Bowling alleys, 3 In ruins, 4 Effort, 5 Gross, 6 Indefatigable, 7 Tingles, 11 Despite, 13 Bucks up, 14 Ascend, 16 Tepee, 18 Reels. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 All-star, 5 Beset, 8 Pay lip service, 9 Crook, 10 Galileo, 11 Vanity, 12 Etched, 15 Bahrain, 17 Ambit, 19 At loggerheads, 20 Tawny, 21 Hearsay. Down:1 Aspic, 2 Lay down the law, 3 Trinket, 4 Resign, 5 Beryl, 6 Spill the beans, 7 Toehold, 11 Vibrant, 13 Trachea, 14 Enmesh, 16 Angry, 18 Tasty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425 1234567 8 910 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Unexpected refusal (6 4 Instructive experience (6 9 French vineyard estate (7 10 Speak (5 11 Lees (5 12 Pacify (7 13 Russian composer (11) 18 Pyrenean republic (7 20 Fanatical (5 22 Ascent (5 23 Something very ugly (7 24 International agreement (6 25 Impassioned (6 Down 1 Go back (6 2 Two of a kind (5 3 Sweet-scented flower (7 5 Fit out (5 6 Adisappointment (7 7 Anxiety (6 8 Egyptian boy-king, died c.1324 BC (11) 14 An analgesic (7 15 Dutch painter, 1632-75 (7 16 Surgical instrument (6 17 Arrival (6 19 Disprove by argument (5 21 Penniless (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Ladies’man holding an ancient city office (6 4 Bird to catch on horseback (6 9 Food for cattle in Switzerland (7 10 Strange glee I come across in Belgium (5 11 Aspice having no end of use in savouries (5 12 Girl who’s pill-shy crying out for treatment (7 13 Fine steak and a drink on the house (11) 18 Revised list for a retailer in a growing trade (7 20 Aprose form that gives difficulties (5 22 Children are a contentious point (5 23 Places visited on vacation or between vacations (7 24 He acts dumb (6 25 Converts work into play, perhaps (6 Down 1 Song and dance gets little publicity (6 2 Short summary concerning headgear (5 3 Fruit that’s new to Capri (7 5 Marble street (5 6 They’re unnecessary, pointless, but still pointed (7 7 Convert me with this belief (6 8 It may be taken as an indication of health (11) 14 This animal won’t always die a natural death (7 15 Popped the question after work, but not accepted (7 16 State in a loud and resolute way (6 17 Credit is twice provided in an emergency (6 19 She’s a bit of a siren, evidently (5 21 Take off from the runway (5 Across:1 Ebb tide, 5 Glint, 8 Tower of London, 9 Alibi, 10 Restful, 11 Digest, 12 Abates, 15 Salutes, 17 Cigar, 19 Inexpressible, 20 Ensue, 21 Depress. Down:1 Extra, 2 Bowling alleys, 3 In ruins, 4 Effort, 5 Gross, 6 Indefatigable, 7 Tingles, 11 Despite, 13 Bucks up, 14 Ascend, 16 Tepee, 18 Reels. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 All-star, 5 Beset, 8 Pay lip service, 9 Crook, 10 Galileo, 11 Vanity, 12 Etched, 15 Bahrain, 17 Ambit, 19 At loggerheads, 20 Tawny, 21 Hearsay. Down:1 Aspic, 2 Lay down the law, 3 Trinket, 4 Resign, 5 Beryl, 6 Spill the beans, 7 Toehold, 11 Vibrant, 13 Trachea, 14 Enmesh, 16 Angry, 18 Tasty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425 1234567 8 910 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u Across 1 Unexpected refusal (6 4 Instructive experience (6 9 French vineyard estate (7 10 Speak (5 11 Lees (5 12 Pacify (7 13 Russian composer (11) 18 Pyrenean republic (7 20 Fanatical (5 22 Ascent (5 23 Something very ugly (7 24 International agreement (6 25 Impassioned (6 Down 1 Go back (6 2 Two of a kind (5 3 Sweet-scented flower (7 5 Fit out (5 6 Adisappointment (7 7 Anxiety (6 8 Egyptian boy-king, died c.1324 BC (11) 14 An analgesic (7 15 Dutch painter, 1632-75 (7 16 Surgical instrument (6 17 Arrival (6 19 Disprove by argument (5 21 Penniless (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Ladies’man holding an ancient city office (6 4 Bird to catch on horseback (6 9 Food for cattle in Switzerland (7 10 Strange glee I come across in Belgium (5 11 Aspice having no end of use in savouries (5 12 Girl who’s pill-shy crying out for treatment (7 13 Fine steak and a drink on the house (11) 18 Revised list for a retailer in a growing trade (7 20 Aprose form that gives difficulties (5 22 Children are a contentious point (5 23 Places visited on vacation or between vacations (7 24 He acts dumb (6 25 Converts work into play, perhaps (6 Down 1 Song and dance gets little publicity (6 2 Short summary concerning headgear (5 3 Fruit that’s new to Capri (7 5 Marble street (5 6 They’re unnecessary, pointless, but still pointed (7 7 Convert me with this belief (6 8 It may be taken as an indication of health (11) 14 This animal won’t always die a natural death (7 15 Popped the question after work, but not accepted (7 16 State in a loud and resolute way (6 17 Credit is twice provided in an emergency (6 19 She’s a bit of a siren, evidently (5 21 Take off from the runway (5 Across:1 Ebb tide, 5 Glint, 8 Tower of London, 9 Alibi, 10 Restful, 11 Digest, 12 Abates, 15 Salutes, 17 Cigar, 19 Inexpressible, 20 Ensue, 21 Depress. Down:1 Extra, 2 Bowling alleys, 3 In ruins, 4 Effort, 5 Gross, 6 Indefatigable, 7 Tingles, 11 Despite, 13 Bucks up, 14 Ascend, 16 Tepee, 18 Reels. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 All-star, 5 Beset, 8 Pay lip service, 9 Crook, 10 Galileo, 11 Vanity, 12 Etched, 15 Bahrain, 17 Ambit, 19 At loggerheads, 20 Tawny, 21 Hearsay. Down:1 Aspic, 2 Lay down the law, 3 Trinket, 4 Resign, 5 Beryl, 6 Spill the beans, 7 Toehold, 11 Vibrant, 13 Trachea, 14 Enmesh, 16 Angry, 18 Tasty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 910 1112 1 31415 1 6 17 18192021 2 223 2425 1 234567 8 910 1112 1 31415 1 6 17 18192021 2 223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a BY STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Unexpected refusal (6 4 Instructive experience (6 9 French vineyard estate (7 10 Speak (5 11 Lees (5 12 Pacify (7 13 Russian composer (11) 18 Pyrenean republic (7 20 Fanatical (5 22 Ascent (5 23 Something very ugly (7 24 International agreement (6 25 Impassioned (6 Down 1 Go back (6 2 Two of a kind (5 3 Sweet-scented flower (7 5 Fit out (5 6 Adisappointment (7 7 Anxiety (6 8 Egyptian boy-king, died c.1324 BC (11) 14 An analgesic (7 15 Dutch painter, 1632-75 (7 16 Surgical instrument (6 17 Arrival (6 19 Disprove by argument (5 21 Penniless (5 rbr J UDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Ladies’man holding an ancient city office (6 4 Bird to catch on horseback (6 9 Food for cattle in Switzerland (7 10 Strange glee I come across in Belgium (5 11 Aspice having no end of use in savouries (5 12 Girl who’s pill-shy crying out for treatment (7 13 Fine steak and a drink on the house (11) 18 Revised list for a retailer in a growing trade (7 20 Aprose form that gives difficulties (5 22 Children are a contentious point (5 23 Places visited on vacation or between vacations (7 24 He acts dumb (6 25 Converts work into play, perhaps (6 Down 1 Song and dance gets little publicity (6 2 Short summary concerning headgear (5 3 Fruit that’s new to Capri (7 5 Marble street (5 6 They’re unnecessary, pointless, but still pointed (7 7 Convert me with this belief (6 8 It may be taken as an indication of health (11) 14 This animal won’t always die a natural death (7 15 Popped the question after work, but not accepted (7 16 State in a loud and resolute way (6 17 Credit is twice provided in an emergency (6 19 She’s a bit of a siren, evidently (5 21 Take off from the runway (5 Across:1 Ebb tide, 5 Glint, 8 Tower of London, 9 Alibi, 10 Restful, 11 Digest, 12 Abates, 15 Salutes, 17 Cigar, 19 Inexpressible, 20 Ensue, 21 Depress. Down:1 Extra, 2 Bowling alleys, 3 In ruins, 4 Effort, 5 Gross, 6 Indefatigable, 7 Tingles, 11 Despite, 13 Bucks up, 14 Ascend, 16 Tepee, 18 Reels. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 All-star, 5 Beset, 8 Pay lip service, 9 Crook, 10 Galileo, 11 Vanity, 12 Etched, 15 Bahrain, 17 Ambit, 19 At loggerheads, 20 Tawny, 21 Hearsay. Down:1 Aspic, 2 Lay down the law, 3 Trinket, 4 Resign, 5 Beryl, 6 Spill the beans, 7 Toehold, 11 Vibrant, 13 Trachea, 14 Enmesh, 16 Angry, 18 Tasty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1 234567 8 9 10 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425 1 234567 8 9 10 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425 T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE tt r e g a Across 1 Unexpected refusal (6 4 Instructive experience (6 9 French vineyard estate (7 10 Speak (5 11 Lees (5 12 Pacify (7 13 Russian c omposer (11) 18 Pyrenean republic (7 20 Fanatical (5 22 Ascent (5 23 Something very ugly (7 24 International agreement (6 25 Impassioned (6 Down 1 Go back (6 2 Two of a kind (5 3 Sweet-scented flower (7 5 Fit out (5 6 Adisappointment (7 7 Anxiety (6 8 Egyptian boy-king, died c.1324 BC (11) 14 An analgesic (7 15 Dutch painter, 1632-75 (7 16 Surgical i nstrument (6 17 Arrival (6 19 Disprove by argument (5 21 Penniless (5 rbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN T IGER H AGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Ladies’man holding an a ncient city office (6 4 Bird to catch on h orseback (6 9 Food for cattle in Switzerland (7 10 Strange glee I come across in Belgium (5 1 1 Aspice having no end of u se in savouries (5 1 2 Girl who’s pill-shy c rying out for t reatment (7 1 3 Fine steak and a drink on the house (11) 18 Revised list for a retailer in a growing trade (7 2 0 Aprose form that gives difficulties (5 22 Children are a contentious p oint (5 23 Places visited on vacation or between vacations (7 24 He acts dumb (6 2 5 Converts work into play, p erhaps (6 Down 1 Song and dance gets little p ublicity (6 2 Short summary concerning h eadgear (5 3 Fruit that’s new to Capri (7 5 Marble street (5 6 They’re unnecessary, p ointless, but still pointed (7 7 Convert me with this b elief (6 8 It may be taken as an i ndication of health (11) 14 This animal won’t always die a natural death (7 1 5 Popped the question after w ork, but not accepted (7 1 6 State in a loud and r esolute way (6 17 Credit is twice provided in an emergency (6 19 She’s a bit of a siren, evidently (5 21 Take off from the r unway (5 A cross:1 Ebb tide, 5 Glint, 8 Tower of London, 9 Alibi, 10 Restful, 11 Digest, 12 Abates, 15 Salutes, 17 C igar, 19 Inexpressible, 20 Ensue, 21 Depress. D own:1 Extra, 2 Bowling alleys, 3 In ruins, 4 Effort, 5 Gross, 6 I ndefatigable, 7 Tingles, 11 Despite, 13 Bucks up, 14 Ascend, 16 Tepee, 18 Reels. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionA cross:1 All-star, 5 Beset, 8 Pay lip service, 9 Crook, 10 Galileo, 11 Vanity, 12 Etched, 15 Bahrain, 17 A mbit, 19 At loggerheads, 20 Tawny, 21 Hearsay. D own:1 Aspic, 2 Lay down the law, 3 Trinket, 4 Resign, 5 Beryl, 6 Spill t he beans, 7 Toehold, 11 Vibrant, 13 Trachea, 14 Enmesh, 16 Angry, 18 Tasty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 1112 1 31415 16 17 18192021 2223 2 425 1234567 8 9 10 1112 1 31415 16 17 18192021 2223 2 425T ribune Comics S udoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker C hess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.

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n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemeida.net FOR many working people, the weekend is a time to simply unwind, forget about the bumps and stresses built-up throughout the last five days, and to just enjoy friends, good times, and total relaxation. One event which over the years has become synonymous with the start of the weekend, is known to many as Happy Hour Friday. From its humble beginnings as simply an hour to drink all you could with a few co-workers at your favorite hangout, Happy Hour Friday has become the official weekend starter, where many bars and restaurants host karaoke parties, network ing events, and other trendy activities all designed to help you get away from the usual dramas of life, if only for a few hours. However, one beverage provider has upped the ante with its approach to the happy hour experience- ‘Get Your Happy Hour On.’ According to the Burns House group of companies, the event features a uniquely designed mix of wines and spirits which are centered around the season. Burns House Distribution and Franchise Systems (DFS keting retail manager Kira Horton, explained that since the offi cial launch of the initiative last year, just about all of its 35 bev erage depot locations and affiliates have joined the band-wagon in providing to its customers the Get Your Happy Hour On discount campaign. According to Ms Horton, customers are able to choose from three season inspired mixed liquor specials, which are not just original blends, but also an opportunity for those looking to save a little extra to do so. “It’s catching on, we have the fabulous fifty jingle for it, as well as free sampling at participating locations.” The event which is highlighted at a different location once a month draws in scores of professionals and others who are just excited about the onset of their two days of freedom. With this month bringing the start of spring, Burns House is offering the March special which includes The Baileys Hell’s Kitchen, Absolutely Peachy Keen, and Campari Wave. The Baileys Hell’s Kitchen is made from a mix of original Bai leys with Johnnie Walker Red Label. Although not an obvious blend, this drink is described as “pure heaven” as its cool combination has a way of ‘taking you to ecstasy with all your clothes on.’ The Absolut inspired mix is a marriage between Absolut Peach, Malibu Coconut Rum, and pineapple juice, which is without question a colorful fiesta. Last but not least is the Campari Wave comprised of regular Campari and orange juice. With these beverages sure to add a flair to any occasion, Burns House feels it has done its part in providing exciting and economically priced drinks to the Happy Hour crowd. But as always, Ms Horton insist: “We encourage you to drink, but to do so responsibly.” C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE +,*+,17(67$7(6:(//(67$%/,6+('*$7('&20081,7
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C M Y K C M Y K ENTERTAINMENT THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009, PAGE 9B 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW &+5,67,$1-8/,(RI $9(18()7/$8'(5'$/( LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRU UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQG WKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQ DQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKW GD\VIURPWKH WK GD\ RI 0DUFK WRWKH0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW -$0(69,1&(17RI 6287+%($&+'5,9(3%2;1$66$8 %$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ DVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQ ZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ VKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQG VLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKW GD\VIURPWKH WK GD\ RI 0DUFK WRWKH0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ T h e T r i b u n e n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter OILINSHA Coakley, owner of Oilinsha’s Mode ls and T alents, is ge tting r eady t o w or k his magi c and br ing f orth beauty, intelligence and style into the lives of 28 young Bahamians at the second installment of Super models of the Bahamas. S uper Models of the Bahamas has been a life long dream for Mr Coakley, a 21y ear veteran in the modeling, fashion and entertainment business. He is not just doing i t as competition, but is changing lives. mainly wanted to have a modeling event in order to help the funding that comes from the event to lift the agency to the next level in terms of finding the best mod e ls out there. There are many w ho walk through my agency and they really don’t want to be models, they just want to be seen or they just want to be in picturesbut this busi ness is about getting down and dirty, working hard and making a salary. It’s about being dedicated, being hum ble, having a good attitude, being respectful to your agent and clients, it is just like any other job, but the difference with modeling is your looksyour look is sold to the client,” Mr Coakley explained. Mr Coakley said he knows this year’s competition will be challenging due to many more youngsters interested in participating as opposed to last year. “The number of contestants started at 40 and I had to cut it down because I started scanning through persons and right now I can’t accept per sons with excuses. Last year we had Pulse and Elite models on our panel last year. These girls and boys are going abroad to represent the Bahamas at the highest caliber possible in these model ing events. These events they go to internationally are like Miss Universe. There are so many girls and boys compet ing, so in that perspective, the individuals flying out have to be at the highest caliber possible,” Mr Coakley said. Mr Coakley is planning to increase the level of international attention to the Bahamas and has already invited international media such as Essence , GQ , and SHE magazines, along with Runwaynews.com to cover the event. “This event this year will take place at the British Colo nial Hilton. It will be covered internationally and streamlined with print and electronic media. The local station, JCN network will also continue to carry the reality show that documents the entire competition,” Mr Coakley said. The Bahamian public can also get a chance to get to know the models and vote for SUPERMODELS OF THE BAHAMAS: SEASON 2 them on the contest’s website b eginning April 1. M r Coakley said he will c ontinue to be dedicated to putting model hopefuls in ther ight atmosphere to meet success. “This business is about r efinement and a very disciplined business. A modelm ust be versatile and be willi ng to go that extra mile for the client in order to maket he tens of thousands of dol lars and that is what I am trying to do for these young models.” MODELS of Supermodels Of the Bahamas show off for the camera at various events including Islands of the World Fashion Week 2008.

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Transforming Spaces 2009 is scheduled for Saturday March 28 and March 29. The unique experience according to organisers will allow patrons to view the work of the country’s finest artists in nine art exhibitions all in one weekend. Tickets $30, are on sale now and are available at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, West Hill Street, Doongalik Studio, Village Road, the Ladder Gallery, Blake Road and Geoffrey Jones, Rosetta Street. Tickets must be purchased in advance as space is limited. The bus tour for the gallery tour. The featured weekend events include: Opening Night Events: Friday, March 27, 2009 7.30pm:Rawson Square Screening of new collaborative film "Show Me Yours" 8.30pm: Opening Night Party at the Hub $30. (Includes food, beverages and entertainment) Featured are some of the works on display at the Post House Gallery in the Generation 111 display. “Generation 111”, explores the work of three Bahamian Artists from different generations,digitally coloured graphic draw ings by Lavar Munroe, functional sculptures fabricated out of reclaimed wood by Antonius Roberts, and ceramic bowls and plywood sculptures by Max Taylor. The works of each of these artists reflect the time and place of their experiences, influences of technology and choice of materials. C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE because I love people, I love nature and I somehow find a way to record these experiences of what I see and what I feel on canvas,” Mr Eyma said. Mr Eyma works mainly from the Nassau studio that he shareswith his wife, Roshanne. His original paintings and giclee prints can be found in local galleries and private collections in England, Jamaica, and the United States. During the late 1980's and early 1990's, he exhibited his work at the Central Bank of theBahamas Annual Art Exhibition and Competition. He also participated in numerous shows of the Longbranch Artists and Artisans. After a decade of absence, he returned to his love of painting in 2003. At the very first exhibition of the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas, one of his acrylic paintings "Fort Hill Houses" was accepted. Although Mr Eyma said he supports any young person interested in pursuing art, he wants them to be realistic about what they are getting into. “It is sad that the society in which we live does not really encourage youngsters to become what they want to be because of their likes and preferences, everything is geared towards making money or becoming somebody. I would not encourage any youngster to become the proverbial starving artist, but it is good if they believe they have a skill that they can pursue it, become good at it and do it not so much so because of what others are thinking, but because you know this is a way that you can express yourself,” Mr Eyma said. Souveni de Ayiti F ROM page 12 CONVERSATIONS WITH TANYA n B y LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net R EGGAE sensation Tanya Stephens e ntertained hundreds of Bahamians and visitors with her performance d uring the highly anticipated “Conversations” experience at the Marley R esort last week. The event drew a full house and the resort was packed with both locals and visitors anxious for an opportunity to speak one-on-one with Ms Stephens. Kicking off the event at around 7.30pm last Friday, Trinidadian inspired and Brooklyn, New York native Omilani performed songs from her sophomore album “Lyrical Kiss.” From the popular “Daughter of the Diaspora,” to her hip hop track “New Money”,Omilani offered the fans great entertainment. Next up was Miami R&B artist Philip Michael whose sound has been described as a mix between John Legend and Anthony Hamilton. Both artists engaged in conversations with the audience while on stage, giving them a first-hand insight into their inspi ration to sing, their styles and their ambi tions as artists on the rise. Following these performances, the level of excitement soared as the crowd got ready to welcome Tanya Stephens on stage. After waiting for more than two hours, the reggae star finally made her way to the stage, giving a rousing performance which featured many of her popular hits. She performed such hits as “These Streets” , “ It’s a Pity” , “ Handle The Ride” , Goggle” , “ Yu Nuh Ready Fi Dis Yet” , and “Draw Fi Mi Finger.” While many fans walked away thinking the show a complete success, the promoters did fail to deliver on one of their major promises, which was to allow members of the audience a chance to chat with the reggae star. However, Tribune Features spoke with Ms Stephens last Thursday in an exclusive interview and she revealed some of her future career plans. The performer, who has graced the airwaves for more than 18 years with her unique form of addressing social issues, said her inspiration comes from everything around her. And although she has been extremely blessed to have her message heard by thousands, her ambitions early on did not include being a singer. “I never particularly wanted to be an artist, I used to hang out with people who wanted to be an artist, but I started out doing a lot of poetry.” She said as time passed, she began to see the power in music, and soon began performing as a solo music artist. Having a healthy and long career in the industry, Tanya said every one of her albums has been like a storybook or chap ter of her life. From love, to success and even failure, Tanya said her remedy to any situation is to sing about it. Even though she has performed in almost every major city around the world, she said she enjoys the comfort of just living as a ‘regular person’. With her 14-year-old daughter Kelly as her main inspiration, Tanya said life for her remains grounded because of her “earth angel.” The reggae star, who will be releasing a new album early next year, said that she anticipates her retirement from the music industry within the next six years. She said as she has had a chance to shine over the past few years, stepping aside to allow someone else to have their voice heard seems like the natural thing to do, “otherwise the industry would become stagnated.” When asked what she plans to do after leaving the industry, Tanya said she hopes to start a mentorship programme for children in Jamaica where her experience and knowledge as a parent and artist could in some way help other youngsters to find their place in the world. n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THE definition of Bahamian music has for a long time been confined to the usual rake-n-scrape, soca, junkanoo, or calypso beat. However with a new wave of musicians on the rise, it is now more common to hear an R&B, pop, or even rock track over the airwaves produced entirely by Bahamians. This is especially true for one group of artists, who feels their choice to encompass and embrace a wide range of music genres, as well an array of artistic personalities under one umbrella, will be the determining factor in their eventual success. Archetype Infinity (AI duction, publishing, record label, and conceptual art powerhouse, which is the brainchild of Ashley Deveaux supported by Chris Carey aka Sketch, Davineir Clarke, and Anastasia Marie Dolli Nelson. Ashley said two years ago when he first got the vision for Archetype Infinity, he was at a crossroad forced to choose between following his vision for the company, or to pursue a career in medicine which he had already started. Deciding to take the risk in a company and business he knew very little about, Ashley flew home from Canada at the beginning of summer 2006, and spent the next few months reading and learning all he could about music production and the intricacies of operating a full circle media company. Along the way, Ashley explained he was introduced to a creative and talented singer, ironically through his little brother who was Sketch’s classmate. He has an amazing voice and has been a part of the AI team ever since. Ashley said meeting Sketch was a dream come true, because for the first time he was able to join forces with some one who shared the same vision. With a large amount of AI’s energy and resources being focused on establishing its presence in the local entertainment pool, the group has slowly garnered a significant following, after the release of the song My Candidate . Preformed by Sketch, the song speaks for all guys who have had a crush on a girl at one time or another, and who are trying to find a way to engage and develop a relationship with that girl. According to Ashley: “People have been promoting it, because we didn’t really have the funds to put it out there. It meant a lot to us, because it was number one because people liked what they heard.” He said the work that went into the song allows you to hear bits of junkanoo and pop, but more so the junkanoo vibe oozing from the song, which is similar to Christmas or Boxing Day. Toping the 100 Jamz Bahama Hot Ones for nearly two months, Sketch is definitely a force to be reckoned on the local scene. With a plethora of unreleased material from a mix of artist, and with big plans for the future, AI is surely the next big group to emerge from these islands. A prototype for music’s next generation n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THIS week in entertainment, its a rt, art, and more art. T ribune Fea tures is bringing you its top five t hings-to-do list, which begins with an hilarious stage performance by t he one and only crazy Dynamite Daisy. 1. It’s the return of the stage performance ‘Daisy’s the Valley of The S hadow of Death.” The single performance is scheduled to be helda t the Holy Trinity Activity Centre on Saturday March 28, with the s how set to begin at 6pm. Tickets can be purchased at the One Hund red% Bible bookstore, or the Golden Gates Assembly Church, at a price of $25 for adults and $20 for children. 2 . T he public is invited to join Richard Hokemeir at Gray Cliff to view his 2009 Photographic Art Show. Enjoy the art, warmth and beauty of The Bahamas displayed on exotic papers from around the world. The event will be held this Saturday and Sunday, March 21st & March 22nd from noon until 8:00 p.m. Please also feel free to invite all your friends! For details, phone 3644625. 3. The Bahamas Kennel Club is having its 2009 all breed dog show and obedience trial this Saturday and Sunday. Bringing in dozens of local and international dog owners and breeds, the event will focus on breed authenticity and dog obedience training. Set to take place at the Botanical Gardens, the event will be judged by June and Gerard Penta from Pennsylvania, and Harold and Rose Doan from Florida. To have your dog entered or to get more detail on this event, dial 3931360 or visit www.bahamaskennelclub.org 4. The sixth annual Reggae all Stars annual concert will be held March 28 at Clifford Park. The Host for this reggae lovers event is non oth er than Tempo’s DownTown Island personality Empress Jenelle. Artists slated to perform include Sizzla, Capelton, I-Rate, Warrior King, Iley Dread, TaDa, Sammy Star, and an array of other local artist and Disc Jockey’s. Now on sale at VIP tickets are available this week at $40, and will increase to $60 next week. They are now on sale at the Marley Resort or Juke Box, The Backstage tickets are now available at a cost of $100, and will increase to $150 on the day of the show. 5. Also happening this week is a visual art presentation titled 'Fire', which debuted at Popop art studio yesterday. The exhibition which embraces people and motion as its canvas, will continue until April 7 at the same venue. The artists for the event include Toby Lunn and Kendal Hanna, and more details are available at www.popopstudios.com. THINGS TO DO transforming spaces

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 59F/15C Low: 60F/16C Low: 67F/19C Low: 68 F/20C Low: 68F/20C Low: 68F/20C Low: 71 F/22C Low: 66F/19C High: 81F/27C High: 79F/26C High: 80 F/27C High: 78F/26C High: 79F/26C High: 77 F/25 High: 79F/26C Low: 68F/20C High: 76 F/24C Low: 66 F/19 High: 78 F/26CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 65F/18C High: 84F/29C Low: 69 F/21C High: 79F/26C Low: 63 F/17C High: 78F/26C Low: 65 F/18C High: 81F/27C Low: 68F/20C High: 85 F/29C Low: 65F/18C High: 81 F/27C Low: 66 F/19C High: 83F/28C Low: 68F/20C High: 84F/29C Low: 68 F/20C High: 82F/28C High: 75F/24CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18TH, 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly cloudy.Partly sunny.Partly sunny. Partly sunny with a shower possible. High: 79 Low: 71 High: 79 High: 79 High: 75 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Very windy; partly sunny, a shower. High: 77 Low: 69 Low: 68 Low: 67 AccuWeather RealFeel 83F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 75F 93-69F 79-70F 73-63F 74-61F Low: 68 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 84F/29C Low .................................................... 72F/22C Normal high ...................................... 79F/26C Normal low ........................................ 65F/18C Last year's high .................................. 81F/27C Last year's low .................................. 72F/22C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.98"Normal year to date ......................................4.38" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Last New First Full Mar . 18 Mar . 26 Apr . 2 Apr . 9 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:16 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:20 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 1:48 a.m. Moonset . . . . 12:19 p.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1:43 a.m.2.48:03 a.m.0.6 1:54 p.m.2.08:03 p.m.0.5 2:45 a.m.2.39:04 a.m.0.6 2:56 p.m.2.09:06 p.m.0.5 3:49 a.m.2.310:04 a.m.0.6 4:01 p.m. 2.010:11 p.m.0.5 4:48 a.m. 2.310:58 a.m.0.5 5:01 p.m. 2.1 11:10 p.m.0.4 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 88/3168/20s87/3074/23s Amsterdam48/836/2pc50/1034/1pc Ankara, Turkey43/628/-2sh39/327/-2sn Athens58/1445/7pc54/1239/3s Auckland77/2561/16pc73/2259/15sh Bangkok93/3375/23pc91/3275/23pc Barbados85/2975/23c84/2874/23pc Barcelona63/1752/11s63/1749/9s Beijing79/2650/10s61/1637/2s Beirut64/1752/11pc64/1757/13pc Belgrade41/531/0sh36/230/-1c Berlin43/630/-1s41/527/-2sh Bermuda 65/1862/16pc66/1863/17s Bogota65/1847/8r64/1747/8r Brussels52/1132/0pc52/1134/1s Budapest45/730/-1sh43/630/-1sBuenos Aires 79/2663/17s81/2764/17s Cairo73/2254/12s77/2563/17pc Calcutta 93/3373/22s95/3575/23s Calgar y43/625/-3pc45/729/-1pc Cancun84/2866/18pc85/2966/18sh Caracas82/2768/20s83/2870/21pcCasablanca 80/26 61/16 pc 77/2556/13c Copenhagen 43/631/0s44/627/-2s Dublin55/1241/5s54/1243/6pcFrankfurt 54/12 34/1pc52/1132/0s Geneva58/1435/1s56/1334/1s Halifax42/538/3pc39/327/-2rHavana 84/28 64/17 pc82/2760/15pc Helsinki32/023/-5sf28/-219/-7c Hong Kong 81/2768/20s82/2770/21s Islamabad84/2857/13pc86/3058/14pc Istanbul47/837/2r39/332/0tJerusalem 56/1337/2s62/1649/9s Johannesburg 67/19 56/13t68/2056/13t Kingston 83/28 73/22sh84/2875/23sh Lima81/2765/18sh83/2865/18pc London 59/15 37/2 pc57/1337/2pc Madrid70/2137/2s77/2539/3s Manila88/3175/23c90/3273/22pc Mexico City75/2348/8t73/2244/6c Monterrey86/3059/15s87/3060/15sMontreal 48/830/-1r39/323/-5sf Moscow 34/127/-2sf36/227/-2sf Munich44/628/-2pc43/630/-1r Nairobi86/3058/14t84/2857/13t New Delhi95/3566/18s92/3365/18s Oslo 37/218/-7c34/114/-10pc Paris 57/1334/1s57/1336/2s Prague41/528/-2pc39/329/-1sn Rio de Janeiro81/2773/22pc80/2672/22s Riyadh82/2763/17s90/3261/16s Rome61/1643/6s54/1238/3r St. Thomas 83/28 73/22s82/2772/22s San Juan90/3265/18s94/3466/18s San Salvador88/3163/17s90/3273/22s Santiago90/3254/12s88/3154/12s Santo Domingo82/2768/20pc82/2769/20s Sao Paulo78/2564/17r74/2362/16t Seoul 64/1746/7pc59/1543/6sh Stockholm36/228/-2pc34/127/-2sf Sydney75/2364/17s82/2764/17s T aipei 86/30 68/20s88/3170/21s Tokyo68/2050/10s70/2154/12s Toronto52/1133/0r43/624/-4sf Trinidad86/3072/22t79/2673/22sh Vancouver48/842/5sh49/940/4rVienna 42/5 30/-1c40/430/-1sn Warsaw37/232/0sn34/128/-2sn Winnipeg24/-49/-12pc48/825/-3pc HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayThursdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles73F Thursday:S at 5-10 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles73F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles73F Thursday:S at 5-10 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles73F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles73F Thursday:S at 5-10 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles73F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 74/2346/7s70/2145/7pc Anchorage23/-510/-12s24/-411/-11s Atlanta 70/21 48/8s74/2343/6sh Atlantic City60/1545/7pc56/1329/-1r Baltimore66/1845/7pc56/1334/1rBoston 56/13 41/5pc50/1029/-1r Buffalo54/1233/0r40/422/-5sf Charleston, SC68/2050/10pc73/2249/9pc Chicago54/1233/0r47/826/-3pcCleveland 60/15 35/1r44/626/-3pc Dallas80/2655/12s70/2150/10pc Denver56/1331/0c62/1637/2pc Detroit56/1334/1r44/625/-3pc Honolulu79/2668/20sh80/2669/20pcHouston 78/25 56/13 s78/2556/13pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayThursday T odayThursday T odayThursday Indianapolis 66/1839/3r54/1230/-1pc Jacksonville73/2254/12pc78/2552/11s Kansas City 62/16 36/2c61/1636/2s Las Vegas83/2853/11s83/2857/13pc Little Rock76/2449/9s63/1742/5pcLos Angeles 78/25 56/13s74/2356/13pc Louisville72/2246/7pc55/1236/2pc Memphis76/2450/10s64/1743/6r Miami79/2667/19t80/2664/17pc Minneapolis 53/11 27/-2s46/728/-2s Nashville72/2247/8s58/1438/3r New Orleans77/2557/13s78/2556/13s New York63/1746/7pc52/1133/0r Oklahoma City82/2749/9s63/1745/7pc Orlando 81/27 59/15 pc82/2759/15pc Philadelphia65/1846/7pc57/1334/1r Phoenix89/3160/15s89/3162/16pc Pittsburgh71/2142/5pc45/724/-4r Portland, OR56/1341/5c57/1343/6c Raleigh-Durham 69/2046/7s70/2139/3sh St. Louis68/2042/5sh57/1338/3sSalt Lake City 63/1739/3pc65/1841/5pc San Antonio 81/27 56/13 s79/2655/12s San Diego70/2156/13pc68/2056/13pc San Francisco65/1849/9pc64/1750/10pcSeattle 51/1042/5r52/1142/5r T allahassee 79/2649/9pc79/2650/10s Tampa79/2660/15pc79/2660/15pc Tucson85/2952/11s87/3057/13s Washington, DC69/2047/8pc58/1436/2r UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms RainFlurries Snow Ice AccuWeather.com

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C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E Making your dreams come true See page eight WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009 SuperModels of the Bahamas: Season 2 See page nine TIN ROOF & CLAPBOARD BOATS BY THE BAY ON THE ROAD TO HATCHET BAY THE FISH BOX n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter a missick@tribunemedia.net R EATIVE expression through visual art is one of t he oldest forms of healing in history. This is t he w a y that mankind began expressing itself without w ords. ( Reflections of Haiti) C Artist Ritchie Eyma, knows all to well about expressing his past experiences and present fulfillments through his work. Born in the Bahamas, Mr Eyma grew up in Haiti in a household where one uncle was a ceramist and another was enrolled at L'Academie des Beaux-Arts. The various artistic activities around him influenced him so much that his favorite places to hang out became the National Art Gallery and the Galerie d'Art Nader, in Port-au-Prince. Being in Haiti was just a fact of life. My wife and I just went back after 25 years for a short stay. I think being in Haiti had something to do with my early artistic experience. All those years my art has always been confined to my own personal effortsa nd it wasn’t until I was in high s chool in CC Sweeting Senior High, that I was really getting more involved in the technical aspect of it,” Mr Eyma said. Mr Eyma said when he moved to Nassau, his art teacher at CC Sweeting, introduced him to oils and acrylics. After passing his G.C.E. 'A Level' art exam, oil became his medium of choice. His first attempts at creating art were stenciled comic books characters using colored pencils as a medium. Then there were those watercolors that bore the mark of a fruitful imagination combined with the influence of the local Haitian artists. “I have always asked myself why I paint, but I have never been able to come to a definite answer. One of the things that has helped me to understand that is that we are all made in God’s image and because he is an ‘artist par excellence’, we kind of some how have that ability and that skill,” Mr Eyma said. A blend of impressionism and realism, his work often reflects the influences that shaped his childhood. While the subject matter is taken from Bahamian life, there is often this special touch which reminds the viewer of his Haitian roots. “Being Haitian has had some effect on my work. Haitian culture is very strong and very powerful. You can not be raised in a Haitian household and not be affected by the language, the culture, the food and everything else because it is all around you. I do not start a piece of work having in mind that it is a Haitian piece, but when people look at my work, they can detect a certain Caribbean influence. My work is pretty straight forward SEE page 10