Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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The Tribune

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www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

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PEW ES Tere ae

New evidence i
Pindiing Was Jamaican

Sources from
Caribbean
nation claim
‘categorically’
that former
Bahamas PM
was born there

ASTONISH-
ING new evi-
dence has
emerged to sug-
gest that Sir
Lynden Pin-
dling was defi-
nitely a
Jamaican.

Sources from [f
the Cotton
Tree communi-
ty in Trelawney
parish, Jamaica,
have come forward to claim
“categorically” that he was born
there of Jamaican parents.

“There is no doubt about
this,” a Jamaican expatriate told
The Tribune. “He was born in
Ulster Spring Hospital in the
parish of Trelawney and was
sent to the Bahamas as a young
boy.

“When he became prime
minister of the Bahamas he was
held up to the people of the
parish as an example of some-
one from their own community
who emerged from humble
roots to do well in the wider
world.”

In fact, said the source, Sir
Lynden actually visited the vil-
lage in the mid-1980s, calling in
at the old school building once

SEE page eight

SIR LYNDEN
PINDLING



PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham, flanked by Minister
of State for Social Services
Loretta Butler-Turner and
Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes, gives details on
the proposed Unemployment
Benefit Programme.

m@ By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net











FLANKED by members
of the trade unions, Employ-
ers Confederation and the
National Insurance Board,
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham revealed further
details of the government’s
proposed Unemployment
Benefit Programme first
foreshadowed in the House
of Assembly some months
ago.

With a starting date slated
for April 20, Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham said that this
programme will be devel-














SEE page eight



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Largest ever Bank of Bahamas donation
will fund literacy research at COB

IN the largest donation of its
history, Bank of The Bahamas
pledged $250,000 over a five-
year period to fund literacy
research at The College of The
Bahamas (COB), a project with
results that are expected to filter
down into classrooms across the
nation to improve the most basic
skill required for success, the
ability to read and write.

The partnership between the
bank and the college, announced
at a March 12 press conference
at COB, will finance the Nation-
al Literacy Diagnostic Research
Centre, headed by Dr Ruth
Sumner, who has spent 10 years
studying literacy.

The largest corporate grant in

the college’s history is for
research that will be a pet pro-
ject of COB president Janyne
Hodder, a former reading
teacher who believes the infor-
mation it will reveal in how best
to teach reading will bolster the
basic foundation of education.
That was the intention when
COB put out the call for a part-
ner for the five-year programme.
“Bank of The Bahamas has
answered the call and will par-
ticipate by being part of the solu-
tion to a major national chal-
lenge,” president Hodder said.
“We thank the Bank of The
Bahamas deeply and sincerely

SEE page eight

Chinese Bahamar investment
‘could bring in more visitors’

m By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

CHINESE investment in Bahamar could bring in more visitors from
China and inspire more Chinese investment, first secretary to the Chi-

nese Ambassador Jian Tan has said.

The $2.6 billion agreement between the China State Construction
Engineering Corporation, the Export-Import Bank of China and
Bahamar announced last week is still in the formative stages.

And although Mr Tan said he is not aware of how much of a stake
the Chinese have in the project, or how much the Chinese hope to
profit from it, he hopes details will be ironed out for the Bahamian gov-
ernment to review and approve the project so building can get under-
way and be completed in time to receive tourists in a more buoyant

SEE page eight









SEE PAGE ELEVEN



New witness
accounts support
Tynes Sr’s claims

Ex-policeman backs allegations that former
PM received pay-offs from drug czar

MORE first-hand witness accounts are
emerging to support Chauncey Tynes Str’s
claims that Sir Lynden Pindling was receiv-
ing regular pay-offs from drug czar Carlos

‘Joe’ Lehder.

A former policeman who took part in
what he called a “mock operation” against
Lehder’s drug enterprise on Norman’s Cay
told The Tribune yesterday: “Mr Tynes was
right on target. Everything he said was cor-

rect.”

The policeman said senior officers taking

part in the so-called “raid” were given a red
suitcase full of cash. “There must have been

CHAUNCEY
TYNES SR

a million dollars in that case,” he said.

“The officers had been sent down there after Norman’s
Cay had been raised in parliament. But when they arrived,
the senior officers were drinking around on the cay. And the
suitcase was waiting there as a pay-off.”

The officer’s claim fits in with other accounts of activities
on the cay, where Pindling was said to have attended numer-

ous Lehder parties.

“We went on that mock operation to lead people to
believe that the government was doing something about

the drug operation,” he said.

“But the red suitcase full of cash was handed to an officer.
Several senior officers were being paid off at that time.”

A prominent Nassau attorney, who for professional rea-
sons does not wish to be named, has also backed Mr Tynes’

SEE page eight



CLICO policy-holders
‘want certain government
officials held to account

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@
tribunemedia. net

CLICO policy-holders
want official heads to roll |)
over failure of the insur-
ance company, according
to Bishop Simeon Hall.

The New Covenant
Baptist Church leader
claimed there is a “grow-
ing sentiment” among pol-
icy-holders whom he has
come into contact with that cer-
tain government officials must be
held to account over the matter.

“Governments are expected to
protect the interests of the citi-
zenry and someone is found
wanting. We are talking govern-
ment officials in the Ministry of
Finance, someone was derelict in
their duty to allow it to get to this
stage,” said the vocal Bishop.

Labour lawyer Obie Ferguson,
joined by Godfrey “Pro” Pinder,
were scheduled to be on hand to
give free legal advice to the com-
pany’s policy-holders at a meeting
last night - one which the church
leader suggested may also culmi-
nate in the call for the resigna-
tions of those government offi-
cials “responsible” for the CLICO



NASSAU AND BA

8 VAN

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



BISHOP
SIMEON HALL P@y.

collapse.

‘ The gathering, which
| got underway at New
Covenant Baptist Church
|) on the East-West High-
way at 7pm, was called by
} Hall himself.

CLICO (Bahamas) pol-
icy-holders are unaware at
this stage what funds, if
any, they will have
returned to them or if
their policies will be sold
to another insurance com-

Speaking with The Tri-
bune ahead of the meeting, Bish-
op Hall said that “based on the
feeling” of those present and the
advice received, they will decide
whether to file an appearance
today in advance of the liquida-
tion application for the insolvent
insurance company set to be
heard in court tomorrow. Inter-
ested parties have until today to
do so.

The government, via the Reg-
istrar of Insurance companies, ini-
tiated a winding-up order for the
company on February 24, 2009.

A statement said this was done
to protect the interests of policy-
holders in the face of revelations
that the company’s liabilities far

SEE page eight



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Defendant told police: ‘! ain’ need no lawyer | am here to tell the truth

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

DEFENDANT Sean Brown told police during a
taped interview three years ago that he did not need
a lawyer as he was there to tell the truth about the
armed robbery and murder of businessman Keith
Carey.

“T ain’ need no lawyer, I am here to tell the truth,”
Brown replied when questioned by detectives on
March 28, 2006.

During the interview, Brown, 32, said that the
plan to rob businessman Keith Carey was formed
before he came to Nassau from Eleuthera in July
2005. He said that a few days before the murder, he
and his cousin Dwight Knowles went to the Esso
gas station on Carmichael Road, where they met
with one of Carey's employees to discuss how mon-
ey is transported from the gas station to the bank.

Brown said he and Knowles picked up Jamal Glin-
ton alias "Bumper' and his girlfriend from his Nassau
Village home on the morning of February 27.

Brown told police that after dropping Glinton's
girlfriend and her sister off at the police barracks that
morning, he and the two men drove to the Esso gas
station on Carmichael Road.

"I went to talk to Carey's worker. He told me
that the boss was inside getting the money together
and that he soon pull off," Brown said.

Brown told police that Carey came out of the gas
station a short time later carrying a red and black
bag. He told police that he, Knowles and Glinton fol-
lowed Carey to the Bank of the Bahamas off
Tonique Williams Darling Highway in Knowles' car.

"After we pulled up in the Bank of the Bahamas

yard, 'Bumper' jumped out of the back seat, pushed
him down, shot him twice, take the bag and jumped
in the back seat," Brown said.

After the incident, the men travelled to
Carmichael Road where Knowles removed the
licence plate from the car, Brown said.

He said that he, Knowles and Glinton rode with a
friend to Lincoln Boulevard, then walked to Miami
Street where they went to a house that Glinton fre-
quented and split the money.

Brown told police that they each received $16,000
and that after the money had been divided, they
went their separate ways. He said he and Knowles
went to Podoleo Street where they met a man named
Earnest, who has testified for the prosecution.

Brown said that he bought a car from Earnest for

about $8,000, went to pick up his mother, and drove
Knowles to Carmichael Road to pick his car up and
take it to get spray painted.

He also told police of how he went shopping for
some clothes and shoes and later rented a hotel
room. Brown said a friend helped him charter a
flight to the Berry Islands four days after the incident.

"I was scared after I heard the news that Carey
was killed,” Brown said, adding that he told his
friend Dennis that he and his girlfriend were having
problems and that he needed to get off the island.

He said he gave Dennis $400 to get him on a
flight. Last Friday, the jury watched a taped police
interview of murder accused Dwight Knowles.

Keith Carey, 43, was shot and killed on the steps
of the Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway before he was able to deposit
$40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Station,
which he operated.























































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Mitchell: Tribune
represents ‘the
forces of darkness’

THE Tribune was lumped with
Darth Vader and the biblical
demon Mammon last night as
among the representatives of the
“forces of darkness".

Mixing Star Wars metaphors
with bible references, Fox Hill
MP Fred Mitchell told supporters
they are “on the good side of the
Force”, whereas Tribune pub-
lisher Eileen Carron and her
newspaper “represent the Forces
of darkness, the dark side of the
Force.

“The Force is strong with us.
We shall overcome. May the good
Force continue to be with you
all,” he said.

Addressing the party faithful
last night at a branch meeting in
his constituency, Mr Mitchell
exploded with anger over an arti-
cle by Tribune managing editor
John Marquis which told the sto-
ry of Chauncey Tynes Jr, who
went missing in 1983 while pilot-
ing a flight from Exuma to Nas-
sau. His father, former PLP trea-
surer Chauncey Tynes Sr, was
quoted as saying he believes his
son was murdered because he
knew too much of the association
between former prime minister
Sir Lynden Pindling and Colom-
bian drug cartel leader Joe
Lehder.

Mr Mitchell began by caution-
ing that time should be wasted
on the issue, as it is a “deliberate
sideshow and distraction” from
more important matters, like the
economy.

“Let’s not spend too much time
on this. I am not even sure how
many people read it. I do not
want to be a part of spreading it,”
he said. Nevertheless, he pro-
ceeded to focus on the matter for
the duration of his speech.

Mr Mitchell accused The Tri-
bune of libelling the late Sir Lyn-
den Pindling, but then admitted
that it is legally impossible to libel

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Fred Mitchell



a dead person.

He then claimed the accepted
view that former Tribune editor
Sir Etienne Dupuch was respon-
sible for breaking down the bar-
riers of official racial discrimina-
tion in the Bahamas is nothing
but a “popular myth”.

He said Sir Etienne “stole the
idea” of the resolution to end
racial discrimination from the
PLP, “used the PLP to get a suc-
cessful outcome, but that even
the act that he did was not the
end of racial discrimination in the
Bahamas. Some would argue that
it was a failure. I pronounce no
opinion on it.

“Imagine then how outraged
Eileen Carron would be to hear
that about her father’s reputa-
tion,” Mr Mitchell said. “But like
Sir Lynden, Etienne Dupuch is
dead and so you can say anything
about him because you cannot
defame or libel him in law. It does
not even have to be true. You
can say anything without any
legal consequence of any kind.”

He went on to suggest that the
record of the Commission of
Inquiry into casino gambling
reflects that Sir Etienne accepted
consultancy fees from the former
UBP government. The MP
claimed that in reality, this mon-
ey was intended to ensure The

Tribune’s loyalty in the debate
over casino gambling in the
Bahamas.

Mr Mitchell admitted that Sir
Etienne wrote to the government
to protest the payments, and was
told to turn the money over to
charity — but, he added, “if you
accept the $10,000, that is $10,000
that you did not have to go into
your pocket to give to charity.
You received the benefit of it.”

Mr Mitchell went on to refer
to Tribune managing editor John
Marquis as a “paid journalistic
assassin”, adding that in addition
to his interview with Chauncey
Tynes Sr, “there is another exam-
ple of his taking the words of an
old man in dementia and using
that to spin fantastic and untrue
stories for profit.

“We made a mistake when we
were in office by allowing him to
remain in the country. Pindling
kicked him out. We ought to
have. We did not,” Mr Mitchell
added.

Speaking of both Mrs Carron
and Mr Marquis, the MP said:
“You can imagine the extreme
hate they both bear for me
because what they say matters
not one wit to me. I am confident
in who I am and nothing either
one of them can say about me
makes any difference to me. I
have my story to tell and I am
not afraid to tell it. I have at my
disposal all the records and slow-
ly but surely I will be sure that
the other side is told.”

According to Mr Mitchell, the
“real concern” represented by the
article is that The Tribune “fails to
understand that in a small country
like this it is often necessary to
let bygones be just that; bygones.”

He said the story risked reviv-
ing “a whole set of social issues
that most of us thought had been
solved in the 1960s and the 1970s.
The society needs to move on.”

Turks and Caicos Cabinet set to be dissolved

THE Bahamas’ close neighbour, the territory of the Turks and
Caicos Islands, is set to have its Cabinet dissolved and its ministerial
powers suspended by Britain. This decision by Britain follows a damn-

ing report into allegations of corruption within the Islands’

Cabinet and House of Assembly, the UK’s Foreign Office

(FCO) said. Turks and Caicos’ Premier Michael Misick

(pictured) is at the centre of the corruption allegations.

He is accused of building a multi-million dollar fortune
#} since coming to power in 2003.

In what would be a major blow to the move towards
independence by the Turks and Caicos Islands, the London-appoint-
ed governor of the territory, Gordon Wetherell, said yesterday that an
order has been drafted to suspend parts of the constitution and trans-
fer powers and functions of government ministers to him.

The order will be submitted to the queen for approval on Wednes-
day before going to the British parliament on March 25, the Associated

Press reported yesterday.

Foreign Office Minister Gillian Merron, in a written statement to
MPs, said an investigation into Turks and Caicos’ administration found
a “high probability of systemic corruption or serious dishonesty.”

“The government has formed the view that parts of the constitution
will need to be suspended and has decided to take steps to enable it to

do so,” Mrs Merron said.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Teenager in
court on armed
robbery charge

An 18-year-old man was
remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison yesterday after being
arraigned on an armed robbery
charge. Hughes Jean appeared
before Magistrate Susan Sylvester
at Court 11, Nassau Street.

It is alleged that on Thursday
March 12, while concerned with
another and armed with a knife,
Jean robbed Dillan Bethel of $41
cash, one gold ring valued a $600,
one gold wrist chain valued at
$350 and a rope chain holding a
five dollar coin charm valued at
$350. Jean was not required to
plead to the charge. The case has
been adjourned to August 21.

¢ Two teenagers were remand-
ed to Her Majesty’s Prison yes-
terday after being arraigned in a
Magistrates Court on an armed
robbery charge.

A 17-year-old of Bonaby Alley
appeared along with Timothy
Williams before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau
Street yesterday.

It is alleged that on Wednes-
day, March 11 the two men
robbed Estella Bonamy of $233
cash. It is further alleged that the
accused caused harm to Bonamy.

They were not required to
enter a plea to the charges and
the case has been adjourned to
August 7.

Police may seek
overseas help in
identifying remains

POLICE anticipate having to
call in the services of a foreign
forensic specialist to help them
identify skeletal remains found
earlier this month.

Superintendent Elsworth Moss,
officer in-charge of the Central
Detective Unit (CDU), told The
Tribune that the efforts by a local
pathologist to find sufficient clues
about the identity of the bones
were inconclusive.

He said provisions should be
made this month to either have
the bones examined in the
Bahamas by the specialist or to
have them shipped abroad for
inspection. It is hoped that with
the help from a forensic specialist,
police will be able to determine
the gender of the victim, along
with other clues.

at the National Stadium site

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE first building materials
have arrived at the National Sta-
dium site but as Chinese work-
ers are delayed in Beijing, work
will not begin on schedule.

A total of 17 containers of
equipment, piling and foundation
materials were unloaded at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre
site in Thompson Boulevard last
Friday ready for work to com-
mence on Friday March 20.

But construction will suffer a
short delay as 20 Chinese techni-
cal workers scheduled to start this
week are still waiting for their
British visas to be processed.

First secretary of the Chinese
Embassy in Nassau Jian Tan said
the workers had their Bahamian
visas processed quickly, but need
to have British visas so they can
travel through the United King-
dom en route to the Bahamas.

“We are very appreciative for
the Bahamian visas which were
granted very quickly,” he said.

“And hopefully the UK visas
will come soon so they can get
their tickets at the end of March,
and fly to the Bahamas to start
working.”

The project has suffered a
number of setbacks since the Chi-
nese government agreed to build
the National Stadium when for-
mer Prime Minister Perry Christie
visited The People’s Republic of
China in 2004.

Mi But project delayed as Chinese
workers are held up in Beijing



Desmond Peel

Ground was broken in 2006
and the stadium was set for com-
pletion in July 2007, but there has
been little action at the site of the
future mega-stadium since.

Mismanagement

FNM ministers have blamed
the delays on mismanagement by
the former PLP administration,
and since coming to office in 2007,
FNM Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Bannister
has vowed to move the project
forward.

He said this latest delay is but a
minor glitch in operations as the

Bahamian government remains
committed to live up to its oblig-
ations and accelerate the project
where possible.

Mr Bannister added: “We
ensured the shipment cleared the
ports of entry and road tax and
everything were straightened out.
We did the visas and work per-
mits for the workers and we were
expecting them this week.

“This thing has been set back
for three years and I promised to
get it started and we are getting it
started.”

Mr Bannister said he was not
aware the workers had been
delayed but said it was not a seri-
ous concern.

“These are minor obstacles in
the big picture,” Mr Bannister
said. “We are looking at a big
project in terms of moving it
ahead and there will always be
minor things holding it up, but
we have been trying to make sure
we move it ahead so we have a
stadium that goes according to
plan.”

The stadium is expected to take
two-and-a-half to three years to
complete and will have a $30 mil-
lion value.

Mr Bannister said it will be
“the most fantastic stadium in the
region.”

PM pleased Bahamians continue to

make payments to CLICO Bahamas

MIVA Lae UN

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, who recently returned from a
CARICOM Heads of Govern-
ment meeting in Guyana, said that
he was very pleased that the
Bahamian people have followed
his words to the letter and contin-
ued to make their payments to
CLICO Bahamas despite the
insurance company being placed
in liquidation by the Registrar of
Insurance Companies.

Mr Ingraham revealed yester-
day that last Friday, regulators of
insurance companies from around
the Caribbean met in Trinidad,
where they were mandated to pre-



pare a report for the heads of gov-
ernment.

Since that meeting, the regula-
tors have proposed holding anoth-
er meeting in Barbados before the
end of this month to continue talks
on CLICO and other matters.

“And we have determined that
this is a Caribbean-wide problem
and that no individual country will
seek to go on its own without con-
sultation with the group,” Mr
Ingraham said. “And we therefore
will be in a position to make some
determinations based on the
reports which we will receive from
the regulators of insurance”.

HAPPY 95TH BIRTHDAY
Nuese (Ratiin Jane A slwandl Dain

Patricia Jane Astwood- Bain was born on Grand Turk, the Turks & Caicos Islands on







ued with

at’ old time religion
all, she taught them all how to pray and put God first in their lives and in their

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that her grand children, like fier

most of ensuring
of manners and respect. Most of

affairs.

Through the years Nurse Bain has been a faithful member
/ of St, Agnes Church.

So, today we wish her, our mother, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend a

Happy 95th Birthday.

God has truly blessed you. And we also thank God for blessing us with you for all

these years.

Birthday Greetings coming from

Children: Gladstone Charles Thurston,
Anthea Helena Bain.

Grandchildren: Denise McKenzie, Arthur Richard Thurston-Burrows,
Stanley Michael Thurston, Patrick Lennon Thurston, and
Earl-Anthony Thurston,

Sister: Marjorie Stone.

Sisters-in-Law: Agnes Bowleg and Dorothy Mortimer

Daughter-in-

Dedicated caretaker

Law: Naomi Moss-Thurston

Nieces: Marie Mackey, Rev. Emily Demeritte, Rhonda Bain, Patricia Bain,
Gaylene Pinder, Suenetta Williams

ns, Patrice Astwood-McDonald,
Verna Collins

Nephews: John and Arnold Bain Jr, Colin Astwood, Ronald Hall

and companion: Delrose Burke and

The Grand Turk, Turk and Caicos Islands Community

The Fort Fincastle Community

The St Agnes Church Community

The St Matthew's Church Community

The Nursing Community

And friends

and family from all around.



PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Belfast chooses peace in face of terror

BELFAST, Northern Ireland (AP) — When
Irish Republican Army dissidents gunned down
their first British security forces in more than a
decade, they hoped to provoke a steely security
crackdown and tit-for-tat attacks that would drag
Belfast back into the bad old days.

But Northern Ireland, for decades trapped in a
cycle of grievance and vengeance, seems to have
learned from its horror-filled past.

Militants from British Protestant districts who
long exacted eye-for-an-eye retaliation against
Catholics have held their fire, instead reaching
out new hands of friendship to old enemies. Thou-
sands of soldiers have remained confined to their
barracks well away from the working-class Irish
Catholic districts, where IRA splinter groups are
trying to recruit the impressionable, idle young.

"The dissidents’ only real hope is that the
British do something stupid, play into their hands
with some overreaction,” said Brian Feeney, a
Belfast political commentator and Catholic school-
teacher. "It looks as though they (British security
authorities) are not going to fall into the trap laid
for them.” "We're finally seeing that the policy of
eye for an eye just leaves everybody blind. The
peace process means we're getting to know people
on the other side as flesh-and-blood human beings,
not targets," said Jackie McDonald, senior com-
mander of a working-class Protestant paramili-
tary group called the Ulster Defence Association
that has stuck to a cease-fire. In the past, he said,
reprisal would have been automatic.

"Now times have changed and (pro-British)
loyalist paramilitaries have matured," said McDon-
ald, who long directed the killings of Catholics
and spent several years in prison for issuing death
threats. "They'll not do what some (Irish) repub-
lican with a gun wants them to do."

When the two main dissident groups struck —

years ago, he would have arrived into any hard-line
Catholic neighbourhood in a thick-armored Land
Rover with tiny, bulletproof windows. The soldiers
were killed because the prevailing peace con-
vinced troops it was safe to walk outside the walled
base, unarmed and without body armour, to
retrieve a fast-food order. Two Real IRA gun-
men waited for Domino's Pizza's to arrive and
raked the crowd with 60 bullets; two soldiers died
and four other people, including both delivery
men, were badly wounded.

But most analysts say the British security forces
have been at risk for years as wider peacemaking
goals were pursued. They argue that what's sur-
prising is that the dissidents didn't manage a "kill"
long before now.

"Why now? Maybe because they were lucky.
They have been trying very hard for a long time to
kill a policeman,” said Malachi O'Doherty, a
Belfast political analyst and author who is scepti-
cal that the dissidents have "upped their game.”

Protestant hard-liners led by Jim Allister, a
European Parliament member who has opposed
most of the compromises in the past 15 years of
peacemaking, have been the loudest voice for a
return to heavy-handed security. Allister said
Britain's elite undercover killers, the Special Air
Service, should be redeployed in Northern Ire-
land. Some rank-and-file police officers have sup-
ported the call. But SAS strikes have had mixed
results in the past. They are credited with breaking
the IRA's confidence in the late 1980s and early
1990s by decimating several IRA units, but at the
same time the attacks fueled anti-British senti-
ments and the IRA's ability to attract recruits.

This doesn't stop Allister from fantasizing about
striking back. The police in recent weeks have
brought in army specialists who are expert in the
arts of electronic surveillance and eavesdropping.

Getting rid
of Eleuthera’s
horses problem

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have just read the letter
from Mr Carey in Eleuthera
(Tribune, Monday March 9,
2009) concerning the wild hors-
es roaming across his farm land
and causing thousands of dol-
lars of damage.

I whole heartedly sympathise
with him as loose horses are a
danger to themselves and their
surroundings. The problem can
only get worse as, presumably,
the herd is increasing by con-
tinued breeding each year.

The fact of the matter is that
once a horse has reached a cer-
tain age without training it is
almost impossible to socialise it
— training a young foal is a long
and arduous task best left to
professionals. It involves daily
handling and exercise for some
years before the animal can be
deemed safe for the average rid-
er.

To imagine that these animals
could be caught and boated
across to Half Moon Cay for
use by tourists is insane. The

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



horses used for tourist activity
need to be very well broken and
trained to riding from birth.
Even with all that, not all hors-
es are suited to the job. Former
wild horses just won’t fit the
bill.

The sad fact of the matter is
that the Eleuthera horses are
basically useless and a danger
to both the farming industry
and themselves.

When a wild horse becomes
sick or injured there is virtually
no way of treating it as it cannot
be handled by the veterinarian.
And so the animal suffers or
dies in agony.

There are professionals in the
States who can catch and corral
them if anyone is prepared to
foot the bill as their services are
very costly due to the dangerous
nature of the work. Andros dis-

covered this when they had to
solve their own wild horse prob-
lem some years ago. I believe
that a couple of the horses there
were salvaged but the rest had
to be euthanized.

If government or even pri-
vate sources could come up with
the money, this is the only
viable way of solving the prob-
lem.

There is, of course, a danger
that the bleeding heart sector
of the animal activists become
involved which will complicate
things.

Horses are not pets, they are
livestock and need to be treated
as such. There are many
wannabe horse “experts” in the
Bahamas!

It will be interesting to see
what solution can be taken by
government agencies to rid
Eleuthera of this vexing prob-
lem.

S SMITH
Nassau,
March, 2009.

There’s no such thing as a black racist

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To paraphrase the Lexicon Webster Dictio-
nary when defining a racist — to believe that a race
of people possesses certain attributes or quali-
ties which make them inherently superior to oth-

er races.

I stand to be corrected, but I hold fast to the
opinion that there are absolutely no black people
on earth who subscribe to the belief that the
black race is superior to any other race of people

on earth.

Would you attribute that perspective to a lack

of self esteem?

Land”. And an attribute of utopia — racial equal-
ity, does not exists, and I dare say, will never

exists. Over hundreds (maybe even thousands) of
years, the white race has managed to convince
themselves that they are the superior race. And
the attendant behaviours associated with such a

belief have given rise to what we now know as

racism.

And this whole notion of reverse racism (where
blacks think that they are the superior race) is a
misnomer and should not be believed.

I contend that reverse racism is only the black
people’s reaction to white people’s induced
racism. In other words, black people would not be

I would not. I offer an explanation that black

“racists”

if racism was not exercised on them

people’s view of the world are that of Pollyanna. _ first.

the Real IRA killed two soldiers outside an army
base Saturday and a Continuity IRA gunman shot
a policeman through the back of the head Monday
— analysts and politicians appeared evenly divid-
ed about what the consequences would be. The
killings highlighted one high-risk consequence of
peacemaking. Political efforts to soften Catholic
hostility toward Northern Ireland, the predomi-
nantly Protestant corner of the island that stayed
British when the rest of Ireland won indepen-
dence in 1921, required security forces to "demil-
itarize" even though the threat from IRA dissi-
dents continued. A network of surveillance posts
and fortified road checkpoints has been removed
from the border, where the dissidents are strongest.
The 7,500-member police force increasingly patrols
in normal uniforms and cars, not bulletproof vests
and armored cars. And the 4,000 remaining troops,
who once shadowed police on patrols in Catholic
areas, have been restricted to training for mis-
sions overseas. As a result, British forces and
police in Northern Ireland are more vulnerable.
Dissidents have mounted more than 20 attacks in
little more than a year, wounding several police
officers in gun, rocket and bomb attacks.

The past week's killings were on targets that
simply wouldn't have existed a few years ago.

Constable Stephen Carroll, 48, was shot through
the back window of a normal patrol car; a few

But police chief Hugh Orde, who possesses polit-
ical skills rare in a law enforcement official, insists
his force will never ask troops for on-the-beat
backup even if the dissidents increase the vio-
lence. Analysts say the current restraint should
keep Northern Ireland from descending into "war
zone" status, and ensure that teenage Catholics are
more likely to support and join tomorrow's police,
not yesterday's gunmen.

The "loyalist" extremists killed nearly 1,000
before calling a joint 1994 cease-fire that still feels
shaky today, because they refuse to surrender
their weapons stocks as the peace process
demands. The IRA, by contrast, formally
renounced violence and disarmed in 2005.

McDonald and one of his group's budding
politicians, Frankie Gallagher, admit they've been
nervous about the possibility that young Protestant
hotheads might try to extract revenge.

Earlier this week they led a group of UDA fig-
ures to meet Belfast mayor, Tom Hartley of Sinn
Fein, the IRA-linked party that today represents
most Catholics. A couple decades ago, McDonald
might have sent hit men to kill Hartley. They had
never met him or other "Sinners," shorthand for
Hartley's party. Their private chat went so well,
they did joint interviews on Belfast TV and went
to a peace rally together.

(Article was written by Shawn Pogatchnik, AP)



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Wishful thinking amongst blacks manifests itself

in a preadolescent hope that everyone would

(and should) be treated equally regardless of

Tace.

On the other hand, this world is not “Fantasy

Nassau,

March 7, 2009.

There’s no such thing as a black racist.

MARVIN G LIGHTBOURN

Sen Maynard Gihson: What | actually said in the Senate

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Further to my conversation
with you, please find below
the exact words used by me
during my contribution in the
Senate to the debate on the
mid-year budget.

“The article gives us all the
opportunity to reflect on the
fact that we as a people are
not steeped in our history.
People will always give their
version of events.

“Tt is for us to tell the tale of
our heroes. The story as told
by the “hunter” is always dif-

ferent than the story that is
told by the “hunted”. It is time
for us to secure our future by
a vigorous determination to
record our history. A clear
understanding of who we are
and where we have come from
will positively impact our
young people's self-esteem. It
is also high time that our libel
laws were changed so that it is
possible to defame the dead,
as is the case in other coun-
tries.”

You will see that contrary
to the report on page 11 of
your newspaper today, I did

DON STAINTON
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not say, “... it was time The
Bahamas secured its history
by changing its libel laws so
that it would be possible to
defame the dead”.

Your correction of this inac-
curate statement would be
greatly appreciated.

I look forward to your early
attention to this

SENATOR
ALLYSON
MAYNARD
GIBSON
Nassau,

March 16, 2009.

Leave wholesale
marketing to
private sector

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I notice that BAIC intends to
continue the years old folly of
being involved and investing mil-
lions of dollars in albatrosses of




pUzUKI DODGE
01 NZNS!l BAUOH



ts | ze f produce houses and markets.
Pea { ' j Government has no place in a
oe li ame. caf = Pry a ee aie a le as a . proper developed marketing
2 op 7 a ae rer em Pras Se ge _ process of agricultural products
a it ‘omero sated * —a — = ST a ee ee — if we total up the losses over
A ore pongdowin to Do, a — : E —— a oS ao the years from the late 1970's to

eae OF i ee oO ) Pr 0. nlin p today we probably could build a
= 7 bridge between Nassau and
Andros.

Leave the wholesale market-
ing to the private sector Mr Min-
ister — Mr Chairman BAIC — it
is the only system that will work
and pay the farmers immediately.

Isn’t it simple economics that if
you increase the availability of a
product whilst having import
restrictions in place who loses?

If we continue the folly that we
are heading into under the guise
of so-called food security we will
put our farmers in a far more dan-
gerous financial position as with
the importation restriction
increase in availability of prod-
uct the farmers’ earnings will drop
appreciably.

Tomatoes are a cash crop right
now but look at the retail prices
and you cannot obtain an import
licence? Same tomato but as
much as 29 cents a pound differ-
ence? It is obvious someone is

ripping!
B FERGUSON

Nassau,
March 2, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Anna Nicole
Smith's
psychiatrist
turns herself
in to police

m LOS ANGELES

LOS ANGELES police
say psychiatrist Khristine
Eroshevich has surren-
dered to face charges of
excessively prescribing
drugs to Anna Nicole
Smith before the former
model’s overdose death in

2007, according to Associat-

ed Press.

Police spokeswoman
Rosario Herrera says Ero-
shevich turned herself in
around 11 a.m. Monday at
the Van Nuys station.

She did not immediately
post the $20,000 bail.

Eroshevich is charged

with conspiring with anoth-

er doctor and Smith’s
lawyer-turned-boyfriend
Howard K. Stern.
Attorney General Jerry
Brown alleges the doctors
falsified prescriptions and
prescribed unwarranted

amounts of highly addictive

medications to Smith. Ero-
shevich’s attorney says she

was only protecting Smith’s
privacy.

NASA eyes
llebris as
Discovery nears
space station

m@ CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

NASA kept close tabs on
an old piece of space junk
Monday that threatened to
come too close to the inter-
national space station as the
shuttle Discovery raced
toward the orbiting outpost
for a 220-mile-high linkup,
according to Associated
Press.

Experts initially warned
the debris from a Soviet
satellite that broke up in
1981 could veer within a
half-mile of the space sta-
tion. But later, they said it
appeared that the piece of

junk — about 4 inches in size
— might remain at a safe dis- }

tance.

ic orbit and experts were
watching closely, though it
appeared the space station
might not have to move out
of the way.

If Mission Control orders
a space station maneuver to
dodge the junk, it would be
carried out Monday night,
well ahead of the projected
close approach between the
station and debris early
Tuesday morning. If the sta-
tion were moved, Discovery
would have to adjust its

course for docking late Tues- :

day afternoon; the shuttle is
delivering one last set of
solar wings for the station.
On Thursday, the three
space station residents had
to move into their emer-
gency getaway capsule
because another piece of
space junk came uncomfort-

ably close. In that case, there }

was short notice and the
astronauts did not have
enough time to steer out of
the way.

NASA has moved the

space station to dodge debris i

eight times in the past, most

recently in August. General-

ly, engines on the Russian
living quarters or the
attached Russian supply
ships are fired to alter the

path of the entire station. It’s i
a relatively easy job, but uses }

up precious fuel.
The debris this time is

Plans for a new system to

‘check NIB contribution status

THE National Insurance Board
plans to implement a new system for
employers and self-employed persons
that will allow them to know their con-
tribution status without having to vis-
it an NIB local office, as is currently
the case.

Through the regular posting of NIB
contributions, employers in particular
will be able to ensure that their
accounts are correct, thus enabling
them to avoid interest costs.

This is one of the initiatives NIB is
getting ready to roll out in order to
improve customer service and advance

Employers and self-employed will be able to ensure
accounts are correct without visiting a local office

its compliance efforts.

These initiatives were planned since
2008 and are in the final stages of
implementation.

In advance of the introduction of
these initiatives, the Board is sending
out an appeal to employers and self-
employed persons.

NIB’s deputy director for informa-

The debris was in an errat-

FROM LEFT: Miss Bahamas Organisation president Michelle Malcolm; SkyBahamas CEO and president
Captain Randy Butler; Miss Bahamas World 2009 Tinnyse Johnson; sales and marketing director

Jessica Watkins.

Miss Bahamas World event
takes off with SkyBahamas

SKYBAHAMAS has been
named the official domestic
airline of the Miss Bahamas
World Pageant.

The sky is the limit for this
year’s Miss Bahamas World
contestants who will see
more of the islands of the
Bahamas thanks to a new
partnership between SkyBa-
hamas Airlines and the Miss
Bahamas Organisation
(MBO) - producers of the
Miss Bahamas World beauty
pageant.

Contract

Principals of SkyBahamas
and MBO signed a contract
yesterday for the new part-
nership between the two par-
ties.

As a result of the agree-
ment, the pageant’s Family
Island- based contestants,
lecturers, and essential ser-
vice providers will be flown
to and from the capital for



pageant events. Additional-
ly, the pageant’s contestants
will be flown to an exotic
location in the Bahamas to
discover more of the coun-
try’s natural beauty.

SkyBahamas Airlines
started with regular flights
into Exuma and today its ser-
vices have expanded to
include Freeport, Bimini,
Marsh Harbour, and its latest
addition, Cat Island.

In addition to offering reg-
ular scheduled flights
throughout the Bahamas, the
airline also charters flights
throughout the Caribbean.

The Miss Bahamas Organ-
isation began staging
pageants in 2005 when the
first Miss Bahamas World
competition was held under
its direction.

This year’s pageant is
scheduled for May 31 and
will be held at the Rainforest
Theatre under the theme
“Earth Angels.”

A leading retailer is seeking applications for the

position of

COMPANY MESSENGER

REQUIREMENTS

The successful candidate will be responsible for
assisting in the delivery and collection of all company
work, mail and any other tasks as per daily assignment

sheet.

RESPONSIBILITIES

tion technology Andre Bethel said that
the Board currently has over 16,000
active employers and self-employed
persons registered.

“We're planning to be able to send
out to them each month, in a timely
manner, statements of their activity or
inactivity as the case may be. Of course
we can do it the old way, ie, by regular

}

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Totally Yaris

YAPPY BIRTYOAY

/én

TAILOR

mail or even by fax, but that would be
slower and more labour intensive
which makes it more costly. We pro-
pose, instead, to make technology
work for us in this regard,” he said.

NIB is asking all employers and self-
employed persons to send an e-mail
from their business addresses.

In the e-mail, they should state the
name they registered with NIB and
their employer or self-employer num-
ber.

Mr Bethel asks employers and self-
employed persons to send e-mails to:
employstatement@nib-bahamas.com.

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from a Soviet military satel-
lite called Kosmos 1275,

which broke up somewhat
mysteriously shortly after its
1981 launch. NASA orbital
debris scientist Mark Matney :
said it may have crashed ;
with another object that was- :
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the Russians believe a bat-
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result was a cloud of 310
pieces of debris that slowly

are falling into lower orbits,

he said.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamian-born
spelling bee winner
heads for Washington

BAHAMIAN-BORN Con-
nor Aberle, last year’s third
place finisher in the Bahamas
National Spelling Bee, tri-
umphed on Saturday over an
extremely competitive field of
42 spellers to win the 2009
Portland Tribune/Comcast
Regional Spelling Bee in Port-
land, Oregon.

The 13-year-old will now
compete in this year’s Scripps
National Spelling Bee to be
held in Washington, DC, from
May 23 to 30.

As part of his prize for plac-
ing third in last year’s

Bahamas National Bee, Con-
nor attended the Scripps
National Spelling Bee as a
spectator.

Competition

He said that being able to
watch the Scripps National
Spelling Bee in person moti-
vated him to study even hard-
er so that he could be part of
the competition this year,
where he will join the winner
from this year’s Bahamas
National Spelling Bee

which will be held on March
21.

Connor exhibited nerves of
steel and fierce concentration
in the final rounds as he cor-
rectly spelled such words as
“mendacity”, “olivaceous”,
and his winning word, “ery-
thromycin.”

He attributes his success to
his dedication and strong
desire to win, and to the sup-
port of his family.

He is home-schooled by his
mother and coach, Shelley
Aberle, with whom he lives in
Portland, Oregon.

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BAHAMAS AIR SEA RESCUE
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Annual General Meeting

at
BASRA Headquarters,
East Bay St.
April 3rd, 2009 at 7:30pm
All members are urged to attend.
Refreshments will be served.

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For Prospective Students & Parents

Department of
Immigration to
celebrate 70th
anniversary

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

A HOST of activities are
planned throughout the year
to celebrate the 70th
anniversary of the Depart-
ment of Immigration.

The department invites
the public to participate in a
variety of events as a way of
thanking them for their
assistance in locating illegal
migrants since 1939.

Public events include a fun
run and walk on Saturday,
March 28, a Mother’s Day
event and children’s fun day
in May, a Father’s Day
event in June, a public fish
fry in July, and a back-
to-school event in
August.

An exhibition on the
department’s anniversary
theme, “Historic past,
dynamic future,” will be
held in the Mall at Marathon
in September before it tours
the Family Islands.

Long-serving and hard-
working officers and staff
will be honoured in a cere-
mony at the end of Septem-
ber, their achievements will
be published in the newspa-
per and a banquet will be
held for the department in
November.

And everyone will be
invited to get their groove
on for a “Back to the 70’s”
Immigration Department
party and show in October.

Senior deputy director for
the Department of Immigra-
tion Roderick Bowe said:
“We want to celebrate this
year, 70 years is a long time
and we want to ensure that
people here at Immigration
are appreciated.

“The public perception of
the Immigration Depart-
ment is of men and women
stamping passports in the
airport, but we do a lot more
than that, so we want to con-
vey to the public exactly
what we do at Immigration.

“And the public have
been helping us to find
migrants and illegals, so we
have highlighted a number
of activities to celebrate with
them.”

The Department of Immi-
gration also intends to hold
a blood drive and to do com-
munity outreach work to
help the ill and elderly resi-
dents of hospices.

Department director Jack
Thompson said: “I am excit-
ed about the department’s
willingness to have a blood
drive and give something
back to the community.

“We do so much and the
team here works very hard.

“Immigration has had a
very historic past and we
believe the better days of
Immigration lie ahead.

“We think we are focused
in the right direction, we are
improving in many respects,
such as customer service
and the fact that we want to
be open and transparent,
and we want to be account-
able to the Bahamian pub-
lic.”

Saturday 21st March, 2009 ~ LCIS Campus

Join us for a presentation to learn more about LCIS,
including our rigorous academic program, state of the art

technology platform, diverse student body
and financial aid program

Registration : 9.30 a.m ~ Presentation Starts : 10.00 a.m (prompt)
Tour of Campus : 10.30 - 11.30 a.m ~ Q&A: 11.30 a.m - 12 noon

Please RSVP to Rose M. Taylor: rtaylor@Icis.bs ~ Tel : 362 4774

The Only School in the Caribbean Offering the Full 1B Program

www./cis.bs





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

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alle all

BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key (left), Agriculture and Marine Resources Minister Larry Cartwright
(centre) and Permanent Secretary Harrison Thompson inspect a tomato operation in North Andros.

Refrigerated containers
for North Andros farmers

TWO new 20-foot refriger-
ated containers have been
purchased for North Andros
farmers as the government
presses ahead with its food
security initiative.

And a building in Fresh
Creek will be renovated to
house the Central Andros
Craft Centre, Bahamas Agri-
cultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC) executive
chairman Edison Key con-
firmed.

Mr Key, along with Agri-
culture and Marine
Resources Minister Larry
Cartwright and a high-level
government and private sec-
tor delegation were in North
Andros last weekend to
inspect projects there.

During the North Andros
Music and Heritage Festival
and the International Square
Reunion, Mr Key gave an
update on the North Andros
Agricultural Expansion Pro-
ject.

One component of the pro-
ject, he said, are 561 acres of
land located near the San
Andros airport.

It will be divided into 41
blocks of varying sizes to
include a greenhouse park
and headquarters for the
North Andros Farmers Asso-
ciation.

“This land will continue to
be utilised for vegetable pro-
duction and expanded for cit-
rus trees, tropical fruits and
livestock,” said Mr Key.

Revitalised

The 1,500-acre satellite
farm which presently consists
of 16 operations occupying
close to 80 acres will be revi-
talised.

“It is envisioned that this
arable land will continue as
mix farming with a major
thrust in livestock,” said Mr
Key.

Applications continue to
come in from Bahamians
interested in leasing land in
the proposed North Andros
Agro Industrial Park, he
said.

In conjunction with the
Ministry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources, three new
farm tractors have been pur-
chased and placed into oper-
ation in North Andros.

“As the sustainability and
future growth of agriculture
depends on the enthusiasm
of the youth,” said Mr Key,
“we will continue to enhance
our relationship with the
North Andros High School’s
agriculture programme.

“Hopefully we can nurture
minds that would have even
greater visions for agriculture
in the Bahamas.”

BAIC, he said, views the
handicraft industry as poten-
tially “a significant employ-
ment and income generator.”

“We will continue with our
training in the handicraft
area for which the overall
objective is to create a mas-
sive factory that encompasses
the Bahamas with thousands
of individually owned and
operated entities in various
islands,” he said.





NORTH ANDROS HIGH SCHOOL students show Agriculture and
Marine Resources Minister Larry Cartwright and Administrator Dr
Huntley Christie their tomato operation.

ante) ais

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the repair of Storage Tank #13 at its
Clifton Pier Power Station.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before

31st March, 2009

no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 683/08
REPAIR OF STORAGE TANK #13
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all proposals
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Shevonn N. Cambridge at telephone 302-1208.

Site visit will take place on Thursday, 19th March, 2009 at 9:00 a.m.
at BEC, Clifton Pier Power Station.









YOUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER NOTICES FOR DIRECTORY PUBLICATIONS

TENDER - PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENTS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from the general public who wish to advertise in our premium spots on the 2010
Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENT" to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - PRINTING AND DELIVERY OF
TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies to provide services for the printing and delivery
of the 2010 and 2011 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES” to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - COVER DESIGNS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies to provide Graphic Artist services for the 2010
Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - COVER DESIGNS” to the
attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - DISPLAY ADS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies or individuals to provide Graphic Artist services
for the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - DISPLAY ADS" to the atten-
tion of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL
NARRATIVES SERVICES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies or individuals to provide Creative Writing and
Sectional Narratives services for the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL NARRATIVES
SERVICES" to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

www.btcbahamas.cor





PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

New witness
accounts
Support Tynes
or's Claims

FROM page one

story, adding: “Everything
he said was absolutely true.”

Mr Tynes, former PLP
treasurer, revealed ina
Tribune Insight article
that his pilot son,
Chauncey Tynes Jr., reg-
ularly flew consignments
of cash to Nassau to pay
off Pindling and a senior
police officer.

He also believed his
son was killed because he
knew too much of the
links between Pindling
and Lehder.

Chauncey Jr disap-
peared on a flight from
Exuma to Nassau in
March, 1983, along with
Bahamian electrical engi-
neer Donald Moree Snr.

No trace of the plane
was ever found, and
nothing was heard from
the men again.

The former policeman
said he recalled the time
when Chauncey Jr van-
ished, and believed that
Chauncey Snr’s version
of events was true.

“Timagine that Mr
Tynes is trying to get
some closure on this mat-
ter. I think it is good that
all this is coming out.”

He added: “Pindling
was far from being a
saint. He was crooked,
evil, very spiteful and
vindictive. He would do
you in with the wink of
an eye.

“He was so smooth
that he would never
allow you to know he was
doing you in. I cam-
paigned for the PLP in
1967, but when he began
to victimise UBP sup-
porters the following
year, I pulled my sup-

FROM page one

for their role as we proudly announce
their wonderful corporate gift today.”

Bank managing director Paul
McWeeney said the bank accepted
COB’s invitation to partner because the
ability to read and write determines suc-
cess or failure and fosters or frustrates
national development

“We need good roads and we need a
well-developed infrastructure. We need
solid police protection and strong bor-
ders,” he said. “But above all, we need
every child born and living in The
Bahamas to know how to read and write
—and when they don’t, we need to find
out why. “That is what this programme is
about. That is why when we were
approached by The College of The
Bahamas to fund the Literacy Diagnos-
tic Research Centre we leapt at the
opportunity...because we understand

Bank of Bahamas

how absolutely critical it is to under-
stand why our literacy rate is what it is so
we can begin to improve it.”

According to Dr Sumner, the coun-
try still boasts statistics showing one of
the highest literacy rates in the world,
95 per cent. National test scores and
basic reading and writing skills tell a dif-
ferent story, she noted.

Uncovering the real rate of literacy is
a first step as the programme explores
best teaching methods and aims, ulti-
mately, to impact how reading and writ-
ing are taught in every government
school as well as providing information
that other institutions can use.

In the room surrounded by those who
hold master’s degrees and doctorates,
the contrast between researchers and
subjects was outlined in sharp relief,
young men and women whose chances of

a good job were slim because they could
not fill out a job application or those
who could not score high enough on a
standardised test to get into college.

“Transformation and innovation of
our public education system is arguably
our most pressing national challenge,”
said Dr Linda Davis, COB vice-presi-
dent for research, graduate programmes
and international relations.

“We see evidence of the challenges
faced by our public education system
through the low participation rates in
higher education, in high rates of youth
unemployment and increased level of
youth violence and crime.”

If increased crime and higher unem-
ployment are linked in some way to the
inability to read and write, unlocking
the shackles of illiteracy is high priority.

“Today, as we unveil this partnership
between The College of The Bahamas
and Bank of The Bahamas...we open a
new door and write a new chapter in

both our histories,” Mr McWeeney said.

“We open the door to a world of life’s
chances. Why do I use the word chances?
Because that is what education does for
us. It gives us the chance to be who we
want to be. It gives us the chance to con-
tribute to productive society. But we
cannot have that chance if we are unable
to read and write. Doors are closed in
our faces.

“Contributions we could have made
will never be known, a discovery we
could have made that might have saved
a life or turned the planet a bit more
green might never be made in our life-
time. An illiterate population is a popu-
lation that is doomed to wallow in its
past; a literate population will gallop
toward its future.”

The Centre, to be located in a large
converted classroom equipped with lab
equipment and testing materials and soft-
ware, is expected to open almost imme-
diately.

FROM page one

run by his aunts, Maggie and
Amelia Pindling.

Sir Lynden, the source said,
lived with his aunts - known
locally as Miss Maggie and
Miss Amelia - before being
sent off to Nassau, where his
Jamaican father Arnold
worked as a policeman.

“All these people getting on
the back of your managing edi-
tor need a reality check,” said
the source.

“Lynden Pindling was not a
Bahamian at all, he was
Jamaican. Everyone at Cotton
Tree regards him as a Jamaican
born in Jamaica of a Jamaican
mother and father.

“When he returned to the
village while he was prime min-
ister, he was welcomed as one
of our own people who had
made good. We lined the road
to greet him.”

Speculation over Sir Lyn-
den’s origins flared up again
last week when The Tribune’s
Insight section suggested, via
88-year-old Bahamian
Chauncey Tynes Sr, that the
so-called “Father of the
Nation” wasn’t a Bahamian at
all.

In fact, said Mr Tynes, Pin-
dling was born in Jamaica of a
Jamaican father and unknown
mother, possibly Haitian.

He went on to claim that
Pindling swore a false affidavit
in 1947 to secure a Nassau birth

New evidence suggests _
Pindling was Jamaican —

certificate before acquiring a
passport to travel to London
for law studies.

At least four different ver-
sions of Pindling’s background
have emerged since the article
appeared.

The one linking theme is
that, if the information is true,
he was less of a Bahamian than
the Bahamian-born Haitians
who were denied status under
his government.

Just as importantly, his anti-
foreign, anti-expatriate cam-
paigns of the 1970s would have
been founded on the allegedly
bogus assumption that the
prime minister was himself a
Bahamian.

The Jamaican source said:
“In the parish of Trelawney,
there is a little community
called Cotton Tree. That is
where Pindling’s roots are.
That’s where he was born.

“When I was going to pri-
mary school we used to have a
Friday session called ‘commu-
nity awareness’ and he was the
talk of the town.

“We were told we could do
well and excel just like Lynden
Pindling, a boy from our vil-
lage in the mountains, a region
called The Alps. We were very

excited because when he
became prime minister, it was
huge for people there.

“When he visited the village,
he called in at the old house
which used to be the school. It
was called Miss Maggie’s Basic
School, run by Lynden Pin-
dling’s own aunt.

“The children were led out
of school to line the roadway.
He was the local boy made
good.”

As a boy, she said, Pindling
was sent to Nassau by his aunts
because his father wanted him
here, having married a
Bahamian woman - Viola Bain
- who, according to several PLP
sources, was unable to have
children.

“He was sent by boat,” the
source said. “He was as
Jamaican as you can get. He
may have been a naturalised
Bahamian in later life, but as
far as the people of Cotton
Tree are concerned, he is one
of theirs, a Jamaican through
and through.”

The source said that anyone
serious about investigating Pin-
dling’s Jamaican roots could
visit Cotton Tree and talk to
those who still claim him as
their own.

FROM page one

global economy.

Mr Tan said he hopes devel-
opment will encourage more
Chinese companies to invest in
the Bahamas and bring in Chi-
nese visitors for both business
and pleasure.

He said: “China wants to find
investment opportunities every-
where, and we call it a good
cycle because we get revenue
from the others, and the others
get revenue from us. That is the
concept of our government and
I think the concept of many Chi-
nese companies.”

The economic growth rate in
The People’s Republic of China
is accelerating at a rate of 9.8
per cent and Mr Tan hopes it
will continue to grow and give
more Chinese people the free-
dom to travel and invest.

However, as the Bahamas is a
small relatively unknown coun-
try in China it must advertise its
investment opportunities and
holiday potential to draw the
Chinese in.

Mr Tan said: “Many people in
China have not heard of the
Bahamas, so there is much work
to do.

“There are many areas in the
Bahamas to invest in, but these
areas need to be advertised to
be known to investors.

“And tourism abroad has
only developed over the last ten
years, so I think we can expect
when people travel from China
they will visit their neighbours
first, and then travel further and

Bahamar

further. I think people will
come, but it will happen gradu-
ally.

“T am optimistic for the future
because the economy of China
is growing fast, and hopefully
we will see many Chinese peo-
ple become richer and richer,
and visit different countries.”

Mr Tan said the Chinese
embassy in Nassau has discussed
the possibility of serving direct
flights between Beijing and Nas-
sau, but ultimately this will be a
decision for the airlines and will
depend on demand, Mr Tan
said.

Trade between the Bahamas
and China rose from $180 mil-
lion last year to $318 million this
year, reflecting a positive trend
which began when the two
countries established a diplo-
matic relationship 12 years ago
and accelerated in recent years.

Reasons for the rise in trade
include the Chinese govern-
ment’s development of the
National Stadium at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre, due to
start next month, as well as Chi-
nese ships registered in the
Bahamas by Bahamian shipping
companies, and the import of
various consumer goods from
China.

And Mr Tan said he expects
trade between the two countries
to continue to grow as he
receives frequent calls from
Bahamian businesses wanting
to know how to capitalise on
Chinese trade.

“That continuation is estimated now at one
per cent, $1 for every $100 in wages being
earned and be funded by half for the employer
and half by the employee,” he said.

The removal of this $20 million from Nation-
al Insurance, Mr Ingraham said, would not have
any impact on the pension capabilities of NIB,
disabilities payments or any short-term benefits.

However, he did explain that this will force
the government to reduce the number of med-
ical facilities it was seeking to build throughout
the country from this fund.

Meanwhile, however, the government is
expecting to bring legislation before parliament
this month to amend the National Insurance
Act so that the work at passing a resolution to
make these benefits legal could begin.

“We have earmarked April 20 as the date on
which the scheme will begin and look for the
first payments to be made two weeks late on
May 4,” he said.

The government will meet with union leaders,
employers and religious leaders in Grand
Bahama tomorrow before making details of
the proposal available to members of the Oppo-
sition for their perusal.

FROM page one

oped with the use of some $20 million trans-
ferred from the medical branch of the Nation-
al Insurance Fund.

Those eligible to receive benefits from this
programme must show that they were employed
up to July, 2006, and can receive 40 per cent of
their weekly insurable wage for up to 13 weeks.
This payable period can be extended by the
minister for an additional 13 weeks, Mr Ingra-
ham said, but will go no longer than six months.

Currently the government expects this pro-
gramme to assistant some 7,000 unemployed
persons, and an additional 3,000 partially unem-
ployed persons.

At this time, applicants must not be self-
employed or voluntarily insured. Nor can the
applicant be in receipt of any NIB benefits or
assistance other than survivors or disablement
payments.

Eligibility requirements list that the individ-
ual must have paid at least 40 weeks of contri-
butions, plus at least 26 weeks paid and or cred-
ited contributions in the past immediate con-
tribution year.

Proposed benefit

Persons who will continue to be eligible for
this weekly payment must register with the
Labour Exchange every four weeks, be unem-
ployed or working for less than 50 per cent of
their regular wages, be available and looking for
work, and not refuse to take suitable employ-
ment.

This programme is not be confused with the
regular social services assistance, or the drug
benefit, Mr Ingraham said.

The government will provide further details
on in the near future.

“The programme will provide benefits of up
to one half of the wage of which you were pay-
ing contribution. So if you were earning $200 a
week and you were paying on that basis, you
would collect half of that which is $100. Or if
you were paying at the maximum of $400 you
would collect $200. Eventually, at some time to
be determined, we would require employers
and employees to make a contribution to the
National Insurance Unemployment Benefit
Fund.

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
PO, Box N-3572
Nassau, Bahamas
Tal: (242) 326-5773

SEMI MILITARY FUNERAL

Inspector McNeil
Reynards Newbold,
78

of Garden Hills # 1 and formerly
of Orange Creek, Cat Island

will be held on Wednesday,
March 18th, 2009, at 11 :00
a.m., at Grants Town Wesley

Methodist
Street and Baillou Hill

Church, Chapel

Road.

Officiating will be Rev. L Carla

R. Culmer,
Interment follows

Tezel Anderson.

assisted by Sis.
in Lakeview

Memorial Gardens & Mausoleums, John F. Kennedy
Drive. Left to mourn his passing are his children:
Freddy and Maxine of Canada, Barbara Newbold of
Freeport, Anthony and Shawn, Selwyn and Rosie,
Tyrone and Mary, McNeil and Susan of Eleuthera,
Melanie and Hogar Amann, Dwayne and Rochelle,
Michelle Small-Newbold and Rosemary (Sheppy)
of Freeport; grandchildren: Freddy Newbold Jr.,
Leah, David, Jasmine (Kelly), Sean, Kyrenia, Andre,
Raheim and Tyisha, Krista, Horatio, Husanni, Diego,
Samantha, Teynarae, Tory, Shurneil, McNeil Ill,
Maurice, Amanda, Marcel, Tianna, Anthony (Ad),
Samia and Daejourn; great grand: Gabriel Newbold;

sister:

Elizabeth Newbold; brother-in-law: James

Stubbs; many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends
including; Charles ‘Sporty’ Newbold, Sally, Clara,
Roddie, Ascenet, Rev. Donald Newbold, Endolyn
McKenzie, Avis, Helen, Betty, Velma, Ellen, Arnett,
Fred Jr., Eueda Poitier, Phyllis Stubbs, Ellen Newbold,
Holbrook, Bishop Teuton Stubbs and family, Dr.
Eugene Gray, All the worshippers of Grant’s Town
Wesley Methodist Church (especially the 7:00 a.m.
worshippers), Rev. Carla Culmer, Norma Wallace,
Bro. Benjamin John, Fonswitt Stubbs, Members of
the Retired Police Association, Mr. & Mrs. Leland
Turner, Mr. Grafton Ifill - President Retired Police

Officers Association,

resigned/retired Police

Officers who are requested to attend), Commissioner
of Police Mr. Reginald Ferguson and members of
Royal Bahamas Police Force, Hon. Cynthia Pratt,
Member of Parliament St. Cecilia Constituency,
and many more too numerous to mention. Relatives
and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold
Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
on Tuesday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Wednesday
at the church from 10:00 a.m., until service time.



FROM page one

outstripped its assets and it was
unable to pay $2.6 million in
claims.

However, some commentators
have questioned whether the gov-
ernment could have, or could still
do, more to protect policy-hold-
ers.

According to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, 29,000 people
Caribbean-wide have policies and
annuities with the company,
including the majority - 23,191 - in
the Bahamas alone. Bahamian

CLICO

policy-holders are owed $44 mil-
lion in liabilities.

He detailed in parliament how
the company “compromised its
financial integrity” by investing
over $70 million in a Florida real
estate company, Wellington Pre-
serve Corporation.

The company appeared to have
never sought the required per-
mission from the government “in
connection with its investments,
loans to subsidiaries, or related
party transactions worth millions

woop AND COLD-FORMED STEEL
TRUSSES

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of dollars,” added the prime min-
ister.

Bishop Hall said that in recent
weeks “most of (his) energies”
have been expended on meeting
with and counselling people
affected by CLICO’s failure.

“Thirty thousand persons are
anxious, psychologically damaged
and totally frustrated and uncer-
tain as to what is going to hap-
pen to their monies. Someone in
the Ministry of Finance, and by
extension, successive govern-
ments must be held responsible
for this chaos,” he said.

Yesterday’s meeting is the third
organised by the Baptist leader.
Two previous meetings which
took place in New Providence
and Grand Bahama attracted
hundreds of emotional and vocif-
erous participants.

Bishop Hall said he decided to

call last night’s meeting as he
wants policy-holders to be heard
loud and clear in advance of
Wednesday’s court hearing.

Meanwhile, the church leader
went on to hit out at some mem-
bers of the local Bar yesterday,
who he said have been calling him
to offer their services to affected
CLICO clients.

“Interestingly enough I’ve had
calls from several lawyers willing
to represent the different policy-
holders. I thought they were com-
ing pro bono you know, but they
ain’t doing that. They aren’t doing
it out of the goodness of their
heart,” he said, calling the solici-
tations “sickening.”

He said people are nervous
about contracting a lawyer to take
up their case, worried that they
will once again be left “holding an
empty bag.”

les U ed
OF
CLOSING

In recognition of the funeral of
Mr. David A. C. Kelly, C.B.E.
Betty K. Agencies Limited
RO Rae
NT
Thursday, 19th March, 2009





TRIBUNE SPORTS



TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 9

NBA Today

Jaguar's release
WR Jones after
latest arrest

JACKSONVILLE, Florida
(AP) — The Jacksonville
Jaguars waived receiver Matt
Jones on Monday, parting
ways with the former first-
round draft pick just days
after his latest arrest.

Jones was jailed last week
in Arkansas for violating a
plea agreement that stemmed
from a drug charge in 2008.
The 6-foot-6 Jones, a former
star quarterback at Arkansas,
is awaiting an April 13 court
appearance.

After failing a drug and
alcohol screening, Jones told a
judge he drank beer while
golfing with friends. He
assured the judge it wouldn’t
happen again.

The Jaguars didn’t want to
take a chance.

“All roster moves are deci-
sions we feel are in the best
interest of the organization,”
Jaguars general manager
Gene Smith said. “This deci-
sion is a result of our ongoing
player and roster evaluations.
We expect responsibility and
accountability, and those are
important qualities as we con-
tinue the process of building
this team.”

Although Jones was wildly
popular in Arkansas, he was-
n’t revered nearly as much in
Jacksonville. Fans thought his
laid-back attitude was a sign
he didn’t care about football,
and coach Jack Del Rio
ripped him at times for his
work ethic.

Many thought Jones would
be released last year after he
was charged with cocaine pos-
session in July. But the 19th
overall pick in 2005 had a
strong preseason and stuck
around despite the arrest.

He responded with the best
season of his career, catching
65 passes for 761 yards and
two touchdowns. His case,
meanwhile, was moved to the
drug court, where defendants
submit to treatment and other
restrictions, with the goal of
keeping them from offending
again. A defendant can wipe
his record clean if the pro-
gram is completed successful-

In the plea agreement
reached in October, Jones was
ordered to participate in NFL-
sponsored substance-abuse
counseling and undergo ran-
dom drug testing through the
end of the football season.
The judge told him to return
to Fayetteville after the season
to complete the program.
Jones remains in the drug
court program.

The NFL suspended Jones
for the final three games last
season for violating the
league’s substance-abuse pol-
icy.

Jones’ departure leaves
Jacksonville with huge holes
at the receiver position. The
Jaguars released Jerry Porter
last month and opted not to
re-sign free agent Reggie
Williams.

That basically leaves third-
year pro Mike Walker and
veteran Dennis Northcutt.

Russia to face
Italy on clay in
Fed Cup semis

LONDON (AP) —
Defending champion Russia
will face Italy on outdoor clay
in the Fed Cup semifinals.

The International Tennis
Federation said Monday the
best-of-five series will be
played in Castellaneta Marina
on April 25-26.

Russia has won four of the
last five Fed Cup titles and is
4-0 against Italy. But Italy, the
the 2006 Fed Cup champ, is
2-0 at home in Castellaneta
Marina in the Puglia region
of southern Italy.

The Czech Republic
already has said it will host
the United States in the other
semifinal at the indoor Staro-
brno Rondo Arena.

Hoffenheim fined in
late doping test

FRANKFURT (AP) —
The German soccer feder-
ation has fined Bundesliga
club Hoffenheim because
two of its players showed
up 10 minutes late for a
doping test.

The federation had earli-
er dropped proceedings
against the players.

It fined the club $97,815.
The newcomers to the top
division did not lose points
in the standings.

DEFENDING heavyweight WBC world champion Vitali Klitschko (left) and Cuba's Juan Carlos
Gomez pose face to face with the champions belt after a press conference in Stuttgart, Germany,

on Monday.

(AP Photo: Daniel Maurer)

Klitschko promises
‘lesson’ for Gomez

STUTTGART, Germany (AP) — Vitali
Klitschko has promised to teach Juan Car-
los Gomez a lesson when the heavyweights
fight Saturday for Klitschko’s WBC title.

Klitschko was hoping to fight Britain’s
David Haye, but instead has to defend his
title against another former cruiserweight
champion who is the mandatory challenger.

“Tam ready. I am confident,” Klitschko
said Monday at a joint news conference
with Gomez. “I had no injuries in training
camp, thank God, and I am 100 percent
ready. I heard a lot of statement from
Gomez’s camp recently and all I can say is
that they can dream on, they are all dreams.

“He says he has had the hardest training
camp of his career and I can promise him
the hardest fight of his life. I think he is a
very good boxer, with technical skill, and he
showed it all in the cruiserweight. But
heavyweight is something else. I will show
him. It will be a lesson, but it won’t last
long.”

Gomez, a 35-year-old Cuban defector
who lives in Germany, did not seem
impressed.

“T will beat his face in. I am the better
boxer,” Gomez said. “I will beat him, that’s
it.”

During the pre-fight hype, Gomez has
also vowed to “destroy” Klitschko.

Gomez used to spar with Vitali and his
younger brother Wladimir, the IBF and
WBO champion, whenever they had to pre-
pare for a bout against a left-handed fight-
er and they all had the same promoter in
Germany before switching camps.

The 37-year-old Vitali (36-2, 35 KOs)
returned to the ring in October after a

South Africa
set to host ‘09
Champions Trophy

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) —
South Africa will host this year’s Champions
Trophy.

The decision by the International Crick-
et Council on Monday follows a recom-
mendation last week to shift the eight-team
tournament from Sri Lanka because of wor-
ries of rain.

The tournament will be held from Sept.
24 to October 5 and is second in impor-
tance to the Cricket World Cup.

This is the second venue shift for the 2009
Champions Trophy. It was moved last year
from original host Pakistan over security
concerns.

MANCHESTER, England (AP) —

break of nearly four years and stopped
Samuel Peter when the Nigerian decided
not to come back after absorbing a steady
flow of punches for eight rounds.

Gomez (44-1, 35 KOs), won an unani-
mous decision over Vladimir Virchis in
September to earn the right to challenge
Klitschko.

The Cuban held the WBC cruiserweight
title for four years before vacating it in 2002
to move up to heavyweight.

In October 2005, Gomez tested positive
for cocaine after winning a decision over
Oliver McCall and the fight was subse-
quently ruled a no contest. He was sus-
pended for a year and beat McCall again
after returning to the ring.

Vitali and his brother are usually con-
sidered the top big men in the heavyweight
division, but Vitali’s career has been
plagued by frequent injuries.

Klitschko is a three-time champion who
won the WBC title in 2004 with an eight-
round victory over Corrie Sanders. The
fight against Peter was Klitschko’s first since
he defended the crown with an eight-round
win over Danny Williams in Las Vegas in
2004.

Klitschko’s performances as a powerful
puncher have often been overshadowed by
injury. In 2005, he withdrew from a WBC
title fight with Hasim Rahman because of a
torn ligament in his right knee.

The injury led him to announce his retire-
ment, and the WBC made him “champion
emeritus.” In the fall of 2007, he announced
a comeback fight against Jameel McCline,
only to back out after hurting his back and
having emergency surgery.



More than 650
detained for throwing
seats at soccer match

MOSCOW (AP) — More than 650 fans have
been detained for throwing seats and fireworks
during a season-opening soccer game in the
Russian Premier League.

Police said Monday no serious injuries were
reported in the mayhem surrounding the 1-1
tie in Moscow between Spartak Moscow and
Zenit St. Petersburg. Those detained were
released within several hours of Sunday night’s
game.

The rivalry between the teams mirrors a
broader hostility between residents of Moscow
and St. Petersburg. The violence comes days
after Russia submitted a bid to host the World
Cup in 2018 or 2022.

The game was played at Luzhniki Stadium,
site of Manchester United’s victory over Chelsea
in last May’s Champions League final.

i By The Associated
Press

SCOREBOARD

Tuesday, March 17

Orlando at Cleveland (7 pm
EDT). Two beasts of the East,
the Central Division champion
Cavaliers and the Southeast-
leading Magic, face off.

STARS

Sunday

— Dwight Howard, Magic,
had 28 points and 20 rebounds,
leading Orlando to its third
straight victory, 105-87 over
Utah.

— Andrea Bargnani, Rap-
tors, had 27 points and nine
rebounds in Toronto’s 110-87
win over Indiana.

— Joe Johnson, Hawks,
scored 35 points to go with
seven rebounds, six assists and
two steals, and Atlanta beat
Portland 98-80 for its fifth con-
secutive victory.

— Mike Conley, Grizzlies,
had 20 points for Memphis,
which ended a seven-game los-
ing streak to Detroit with an
89-84 road victory.

— Antawn Jamison, Wiz-
ards, had 30 points, nine
rebounds and two steals in a
104-102 win over the Kings.

— Mo Williams, Cavaliers,
scored 23 points, making all
five of his 3-pointers, to help
lead Cleveland past New York
98-93.

— Jason Richardson, Suns,
scored 31 points against his
former team and Phoenix rang
up the highest point total in
the NBA this season with a
154-130 victory over Golden
State.

— Steve Novak, Clippers,
made a buzzer-beating 3-
pointer, his seventh of the
game, and finished with 21
points to help Los Angeles
beat New Jersey 107-105 and
snap a seven-game losing
streak.

STATS

Phoenix and Golden State
combined for an NBA best
284 points — the Suns had 154
— and Phoenix scored 56 fast-
break points, the most since
1997, when the league began
to track the stat.

The Bucks shot just 32.6 per
cent, but scored 27 points off
the Celtics’ season-high 25
turnovers and grabbed 14 of
their 21 offensive rebounds in
the second half of an 86-77 vic-
tory. The 77 points allowed in
an 85-77 win over Miami was a
season low for Philadelphia.

Detroit, which trailed by as
many as 21 points in the first
half of an 89-84 loss home loss
to Memphis, fell to 2-11 on
Sundays.

SCORING

The Suns shot .621 from the
field, had four scorers at 20
points or higher, and managed
the most points in a game all
season, romping at Golden
State 154-130.

Pops Mensah-Bonsu scored
a career-high 21 points for the
Raptors in their 110-97 win
over the Pacers. The unher-
alded Mensah-Bonsu had four
dunks among his five baskets,
went 11-for-13 from the free
throw line and added eight
rebounds.

Dwyane Wade, coming off a
50-point performance in the
Heat’s triple-overtime victory
over Utah on Saturday, was
held to 18 in an 85-77 loss at
Philadelphia. The NBA’s lead-
ing scorer looked tired after
playing a career-high 52 1/2

Khan out to make up for one career defeat

Fresh off an impressive victory, Amir
Khan is eager to make up for his one spec-
tacular defeat.

Breidis Prescott stalled Khan’s career
last September with a stunning 54-second
knockout. Khan returned to the same
Manchester venue on Saturday to outbox
seven-time world champion Marco Anto-
nio Barrera, a veteran of 65 victories who
was stopped in the fifth round with a deep
cut above his left eye for his seventh loss.

That took Khan’s record to 20 victories
against one defeat, five years after the
British fighter burst onto the scene by win-
ning an Olympic silver medal as a 17-year-
old.

He is now aiming to win a world title
some time this year and would like to
make up for that embarrassing loss to the
Colombian, who is ranked in the top 10 by
the WBC.

“There’s a few names on the short list.
I'd love to fight Prescott again,” Khan
said.

“T made a mistake in the Prescott fight
and I paid for it. Since the Prescott fight so
much has changed in my boxing career
and I’ve moved to LA to train. I know if I
fight him again I’m not going to make the
same mistakes again. It will be a totally dif-
ferent fight.”

Although an accidental clash of heads



MEXICO’S Marco Antonio Barrera (left), and Britain's Amir Khan fight during a WBA International
Lightweight Championship fight in Manchester, England, on Saturday...

caused the deep cut that effectively ended
the fight with Barrera, Khan said he was
convinced he would have knocked the for-
mer world champion out within two more
rounds.

“T felt fully in control of the fight, catch-
ing him with some good shots and I could
see him getting weaker and weaker as the
rounds went on,” he said. “To beat a leg-
end the way I did it’s a massive highlight in
my career and it will take me on to the
next level, get me known around the world
and get a lot bigger fights. It was a make or
break fight for me. I had to win this fight if
I wanted to become a world champion

(AP Photo: Jon Super)

this year.”

Khan plans to be at ringside when Ricky
Hatton faces Manny Pacquiao in Las
Vegas on May 2, but doesn’t know whom
to support.

“Both fighters are very good friends of
mine,” he said. “I’m good mates with
Ricky Hatton — he wished me good luck
before the Barrera fight. And ’'m good
friends with Manny Pacquiao — I train at
the same gym.

“But for this fight I’m 50-50. It’s a tough
fight for both of them. They are both my
friends. I’m just going to sit there and
relax and enjoy the fight.”



minutes against the Jazz. He
shot 8-for-21 in 34 1/2 minutes.
Mavericks guard Jason Ter-
ry matched his career high
with seven 3-pointers and
scored 29 points in a 107-100
loss to the Lakers.
Washington made 11 of its
first 12 shots and set a season
high for points in a quarter
with 37 against Sacramento.

STREAKS

Sacramento dropped to 0-
26 against the Eastern Con-
ference with a 106-104 loss at
Washington, staying on course
to become the first NBA team
to go winless against the oppo-
site conference.

Toronto snapped a seven-
game losing streak with its
biggest margin of victory this
season, beating Indiana 110-
87. The 76ers have won six
straight over Miami at home.

Atlanta has won five in a
row overall and Joe Johnson
has four consecutive 30-points
outings.

Memphis ended a seven-
game losing streak to the Pis-
tons.

The Suns ended a five-game
losing streak on the road and a
four-game skid at Golden
State with a 154-130 romp.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Kendrick Perkins scored a
career-high 26 points with 12
rebounds, including a career-
best nine offensive, in Boston’s
86-77 loss to the Bucks.

Portland’s Brandon Roy
had 25 points and five assists in
a 98-80 loss at Atlanta.

Carlos Boozer had 23 points
and 13 rebounds for the Jazz
in a 105-87 loss to Orlando.

Kevin Martin scored 24
points in Sacramento’s 104-
102 loss at Washington.

Al Harrington made five 3-
pointers and scored 26 points
for New York in a 98-93 loss
to the Cavs.

Vince Carter had a season-
high 41 points along with sev-
en rebounds and six assists for
the Nets, who lost 107-105 at
the Clippers.

OUT OF NOWHERE

Donyell Marshall, who had-
n’t scored a point since Feb.
17 and has played in only 14
games this season, had 10 in
the final quarter of Philadel-
phia’s 85-77 win over Miami.

SIDELINED

Boston slipped to 6-5 in the
last 11 games without Kevin
Garnett (sprained right knee).

Guard Bobby Jackson
broke his cheekbone last Fri-
day night and did not travel
with the Kings to Washington.
He will be re-evaluated Mon-
day. Warriors C Andris
Biedrins will miss at least a
week with a sprained left ankle
sustained in the first quarter
of Friday night’s win over Dal-
las. Nets point guard and lead-
ing scorer Devin Harris left
with 8:53 remaining in the
third quarter of a 107-105 loss
to the Clippers because of a
strained left shoulder.

SPEAKING

“Howard was a monster. He
is one of those guys that peo-
ple don’t appreciate like they
should. He should be in the
MVP talk, too. He cleans up
everything and corrects any
mistake they make.”

— Utah forward Carlos
Boozer after Dwight Howard
had 28 points and 20 rebounds
in Orlando’s 105-87 win over
the Jazz

England bids for
2018 or 2022
MTT

LONDON (AP) — Eng-
land has submitted its bid to
stage either the 2018 or 2022
World Cup and is expecting
10 rivals.

Monday was the deadline
to present bids to soccer’s
international governing
body. The English Football
Association had said it
would bid for 2018, but it
added 2022 to strengthen its
chances.

The FA expects opposi-
tion from the United States,
Mexico, Australia, Indone-
sia, Russia, Japan, South
Korea, Qatar and joint bids
from Spain and Portugal and
the Netherlands and Bel-
gium.

The FIFA executive com-
mittee will vote on both
hosts in 2010. The World
Cup will be held in South
Africa in 2010 and Brazil in
2014.





PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Brown inducted into MEAC Hall of Fame

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT was another special day last week
for national 400m champion Chris
“Bay” Brown. He has his name
enshrined into the Mid-Eastern Ath-
letic Conference (MEAC) 2009 Hall
of Fame for his outstanding achieve-
ment at Norfolk State University.

“Tt was nice and well planned togeth-
er. It was something that I wasn’t
expecting,” said Brown. “I just enjoyed
myself.”

Brown, the first student from Nor-
folk State to be inducted into the Hall
of Fame, was the youngest member at

age 30 of the five-
member class to
receive the honour.

The president,
athletic director
and a board mem-
ber from Norfolk
State showed up to
lend their support
to Brown. He was
introduced and pre-
sented to the audi-
ence by his wife,
Faith.

He was joined by
a radio announcer, former football
player and two administrators, all of
whom were 50 years and older.

Chris Brown



“T just have to give all thanks and
praise to the Lord,” Brown stated. “It’s
one of those ones where I wasn’t
expecting it. It was never on my do list
or a list of things to accomplish.

“It caught me off surprise, so being
honoured outside of the Bahamas let
me know that someone else recognised
my talent and that I’m worthy of such
a high reward.”

Hundreds of people, including a
number of dignitaries, attended the
induction. Brown and the rest of the
inductees also were treated to a num-
ber of functions, including the MEAC
Men and Women’s Basketball Tour-
nament.

“Everything was on hand,” said

Brown, who still holds Norfolk State’s
400m and 500m records and is a part of
the 4x400m relay team.

The two-time track and field All-
American earned All-MEAC honours
four times indoors and outdoors for
his performances in both the 200 and
400.

With the celebrations now over and
done with, Brown said he can now turn
his concentration on training again for
the outdoor season.

“My preparation for the upcoming
season is going very well. I’m healthy
and I feel good,” he said. “I’m going to
open up in a meet in California next
month and run on the 4x400 relay team
at the Penn Relays.



Williams-Darling: ‘I see where I




can fit in and actually give back’









































TONIQUE Williams-Darling shares a moment with students in Russell’s House...

FROM page 11

encouraged them to “run fast,
jump high and throw far” as they

enjoy their day.

After she received a round of

[>

Save BIG Right Now!

applause from the audience,
Williams-Darling spent some time
interacting with the faculty and
staff. She also presented medals to
the winners of some of the events
as they were completed.

~~ :

LOADED - 7 Passanger

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ernment — up close and personal.

2008 FORD EVEREST
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A lot of the athletes were quite

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

Jamaican coach Ricardo Free-
mantle said he was so pleased to
finally meet Williams-Darling after
hearing so much about her fantas-
tic performances on the interna-
tional scene.

“The guys are all anxious to run, so
hopefully we can go out there and pull
off an upset. All of the guys are healthy
and they are ready.”

Having skipped the indoor season,
Brown said he has a hectic schedule
ahead of him leading up to the 12th
IAAF World Championships in Berlin,
Germany, in August when he will be
going after an individual medal in the
400.

“Everything is on schedule,” said
Brown, who was also honoured at
home in Eleuthera.

His photo was unveiled on the Wall
of Fame at the Rock Sound Airport
and at the Charles Symonette Park in
his hometown of Wemyss Bight.

Phil Smith challenge
down to Elite Eight
FROM page 11

that we will beat them,” Johnson said.
“T’m ready for the fire. But ’m a good
cook. We cook good basketball at
Stephen Dillet.”

Johnson gave a lot of credit to Kevin
Johnson and staff for putting on such a
tournament, which he said is giving his
players a warm up for the New Provi-
dence Primary Schools Association’s reg-
ular basketball season that will get started
in May.

“The tournament has been very suc-
cessful. Kevin and his organisers are giv-
ing our players to play some more games
before we get our season started,” he said.
“So I want to give him a lot of credit.”

Blairwood 25, Jordan Prince William 4:

J Higgs scored eight, K Ferguson had
six and D Palmer four to lead Blairwood
to victory. W Demeritte scored two in
the loss.

St Francis 28, Yellow Elder 10:

B Wilson’s eight and the six each from
A Neilly and M Johnson was enough to
lead St Francis to victory.

Kingsway Academy 17, Mt. Carmel 15:

E Butler produced eight, including two
free throws in overtime and P Hepburn
had four, two free throws as well in the
extra period, to help secure the win for
Kingsway Academy. K Cartwright had
eight in the loss.

Freedom Academy 24, Zion South
Beach 21:

Kerrano Mackey was almost a one-man
wrecking crew with a game high 16 to
pace Freedom Academy.

Rashad Mackey made it a shootout
with 15 in the loss.

YOUR conwecrioneto THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

Directory Publications Queries

and Complaints

BIC would like to advise the general public that in
agreement with their advertising contract, all queries
or complaints for the 2009 Bahamas, Grand Bahama

and Abaco Telephone Directories must be received
on or before March 31st 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 11

r



UESDAY, MARCH 17,

Spt

ts

2009



Klitschko
promises
‘lesson’ for

Gomez...
See page 9

Phil Smith challenge down to Elite Eight

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

he Providence Bas-

Ketball Club’s first

Phil Smith Primary

School Boys’ Chal-
lenge is now down to the Elite
Eight.

Today starting at 4pm at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, the
challenge will showcase the four
pool championships to deter-
mine who will advance to the
championship or the consola-
tion final on Wednesday.

“The tournament is going

extremely well. A lot of the pri-
mary schools are having fun,
they’re playing the game of bas-
ketball and they’re getting bet-
ter,” said tournament director
Kevin “KJ” Johnson.

“A lot of coaches are appre-
ciative of the opportunity and
they wished that they could play
more games. But so far, the
players have been playing hard
and the competition has been
extremely tough.”

After almost a week of com-
petition, the final two teams in
each of the four pools have
been decided. The spots were
booked at the end of yester-

day’s competition.

In Pool A, St Francis, unde-
feated at 3-0, will take on Zion
South Beach, who is 2-1. In
Pool B, St Bede’s (3-0) will face
Blairwood (2-1). Pool C has
Kingsway Academy (2-1)
against Stephen Dillet (3-0) and
in Pool D, Centerville (4-0)
takes on Queen’s College (3-2).

The final game in the round
robin play saw Centerville hold
off Queen’s College 18-16 as
Gremako Symonette scored six,
Troy Gassues had five and Joel
Saunders chipped in with four.
Carl Nesbitt was unstoppable
as he came up with a game high

13 in the loss.

“We performed well. Com-
ing into this tournament, we
practiced hard,” said Center-
ville’s coach Pedro Pierre. “I
saw a lot of skills in this tour-
nament.”

Pierre, however, said they are
not going to rest on their lau-
rels, but they will come pre-
pared to play Queen’s College
again in their pool champi-
onship.

“I know my guys could do
better. We just have to go back
to the drawing board tonight
and make sure that when they
come out tomorrow they will

Work begins on $30m national stadium

ae 2



WORKERS unload equipment from 17 containers yesterday for the construction of the long-awaited $30m national stadium at the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre. The new state-of-the-art complex is being built by the Chinese government as a gift to the Bahamian people. Sports Minister Desmond Ban-
nister, during his contribution to the mid-year budget earlier this month, announced in the House of Assembly that work on the stadium would com-
mence in short order. The stadium is expected to be completed in two to three years...

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

St Bede’s students get ‘Olympic treat’

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ST BEDE’S Primary School
students got a real treat yes-
terday as former Olympic and
world 400m champion Tonique
Williams-Darling officially
opened their inter-house track
and field championships at the
Thomas A Robinson stadium.

Williams-Darling, who has
been retired from active com-
petition since 2007, told the
enthusiastic students that they
have the opportunity to be just
as successful as her.

The 33-year-old, who
became the first Bahamian to
win an individual gold medal
in 2004 at the Olympics in
Athens, Greece, just after she
won the 2005 IAAF World
Championship title, said she’s
just enjoying life right now.

“It’s good to come home and
connect with sports again in the
Bahamas,” said Williams-Dar-
ling, who is looking at the pos-
sibility of venturing into part-
time coaching.

“Tt’s good to be here just to
reflect and see how far we’ve



MEMBERS of Benedict House get to share a moment with former Olympic
and world champion Tonique Williams-Darling...

come and have something to
go after. I see there’s work to
be done, so I’m encouraged
because I see where I can fit
in and actually give back.”

As she officially opened the
meet, Williams-Darling said
she remembers competing in a
similar meet more than 20
years ago when she attended
St John’s College.

Williams-Darling, who began
competing as a member of the

eee ee es)
Simply tell us in a letter
why you deserve to win.
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buttonsformalwear.com

BUTTONS

Bridal & Formal Waar

(Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

Bahamas Tigers Track Club,
said by the time she was in the
tenth grade, she was competing
with and defeating some of the
senior athletes.

Throughout her junior
career, Williams-Darling said
her ultimate goal was not just
to compete in the Olympics,
but eventually win the gold
medal.

And she has achieved both
feats.

VW YNDHAM AJASSAU RESORT
CABLE

BEACH



The University of South Car-
olina graduate told the student
athletes that they are not “too
small or too young” to start
dreaming of their future aspi-
rations in track and field, or
whatever sport they want to
compete in.

For those who want to pur-
sue athletics, Williams-Darling

SEE page 10



Here’s a look at the schedule for the Elite Eight in the Prov-
idence Basketball Club’s first Phil Smith Primary School Boys’
Challenge today at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, starting at 4

pm:
Pool A

St Francis (3-0) vs Zion South Beach (2-1)

Pool B

St Bede’s (3-0) vs Blairwood (2-1)

Pool C

Stephen Dillet (3-0) vs Kingsway Academy (2-1)

Pool D

play better,” he said.

Queen’s College coach Jason
Edwards said his Comets played
extremely well, considering the
way they started out in the tour-
nament. “They were just more
physical,” he said of Centerville.

But today, Edwards said his
Comets have gained their con-
fidence, so expect for them to
play much better in their
rematch with Centerville.

e In other games played yes-
terday, Stephen Dillet defeat-
ed Carlton Francis 24-2; Blair-
wood def. Jordan Prince
William 25-4; Kingsway Acade-
my held of Mt. Carmel 17-15 in

ATG

A Wew Tas

Primary basketball schedule...

Centerville (4-0) vs Queen’s College (3-2)







overtime; St. Francis pounded
Yellow Elder 28-10 and Free-
dom Academy out-lasted Zion
South Beach 24-21.

Stephen Dillet, in one of the
most impressive performances
of the day, got eight points from
Gage Griffin and six from John-
ley Noel. They also got some
key rebounds from Benson
Pierre.

Coach Frank Johnson said
Stephen Dillet’s team is play-
ing beyond their expectations.

“We have Kingsway in the
pool championship, but I feel

SEE page 10

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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

For more than a century we've cone
more than issue policies

...we've kept
Our promises.

here's no magic formula for
Bfabllity and longevily in our business,

JUS! a ‘$0 abou! relatienshcs.
Calin OIMpPerial as Deen NUMTUnNG These
relationships for generations by meeting

the financial security needs of Bohamians fram

oll walks of ifé, We remain strong — building financia

stability far you to he

po you Erulld your future.

Confidence for Life

ne

Colinalmperial.

I76. 200) 356.0900 wow. colniaenperkal. cam

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THE TRIBUNE

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

Mr. David Albert Charles Kelly, C.B.E.

SS
“ ’ =

of Nassau, The Bahamas, who died in

New York City, New York, U.S.A. on

the 11th March, 2009, will be held at
/ Christ Church Cathedral, George Street,
| Nassau, on Thursday, 19th March, 2009
j at 3:00 p.m.

"| Mr. Kelly is survived by his wife Nancy

| Booth Kelly; three sons, Andrew Jordan

| Kelly, David Gregory Booth Kelly and

| Reginald Scott Kelly; two daughters-

_| in-law, Anne Boushelle Kelly and

Candace Elizabeth Kelly; five

|| grandchildren, Jordan Ross Kelly, David

Oliver Christensen Kelly, Avery Anne Kelly, John (Jack) Albert Charles
Kelly and Katie Marie Kelly; his brother, Godfrey Kenneth Kelly
C.M.G.; his sisters-in-law, Sonia Kelly and Paula Kelly; his brother-
in-law, John Avery Booth, Jr and his wife, Bonnie Booth; nieces and
nephews, Linda Elza and her daughter, Katherine Elza, Stephen Kelly
and his wife, Susan Kelly, Gary Kelly , Lynn Lowe and her husband,
Chris Lowe, Karen Kelly, John Avery Booth, Ill, and his wife, Kathleen
Booth, Joy Marie Rousell and her husband James Rousell and Jody
Laura Booth-Seals and her husband, Dave Seals, ; his cousins Betty
Kelly Kenning, O.B.E. and her husband John Kenning O.B.E. and
George Kelly M.B.E. and his wife Norma Kelly, other relatives and
friends. His brother Basil Trevor Kelly predeceased him.

The Very Reverend Patrick L. Adderley, Dean of Nassau, The Venerable
Keith Cartwright, Archdeacon of the Southern Bahamas, The Reverend
Father Michael Gittens, Priest Vicar, Christ Church Cathederal, Nassau
and The Reverend Crosley N. Walkine, Rector, St. Anne's Church,
Fox Hill, Nassau will officiate and interment will follow in St Anne's
Church Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Lyford Cay
Foundation, Inc., DAVID A. C. KELLY, C.B.E. MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP, P.O.Box N.7776, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale
Avenue, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.









Bahamas needs
urgent policy
Statement over
tax co-operation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FINAN-
CIAL services
executives last
night said it
was increas-
ingly apparent
that the
Bahamas
would have to
issue an immi-
nent policy
statement
pledging
greater international co-opera-
tion on tax matters, as failure to
do so could leave this nation iso-
lated and the industry exposed
to being ‘blacklisted’ again.

Tribune Business was told that
the Bahamas was “going to have
to take a position” before the
April 2, 2009, meeting of the G-
20, as the world’s major indus-
trialised nations were commit-
ted to launching a crack down
on international financial cen-
tres that were failing to co-oper-
ate with their demands for
greater transparency and tax
information exchange.

The urgency of a public policy
statement by the Bahamian gov-
ernment has further intensified
in the past few days, with
Switzerland, Austria, Luxem-
bourg, Andorra, Liechtenstein,
Bermuda, Jersey, Guernsey and
the Cayman Islands having
already committed to greater co-
operation on tax matters, in a
bid to forestall a potential G-20
offensive led by both the UK
and US. They are backed by
high-tax European nations such
as France and Germany.

One senior financial services
professional, speaking to Tri-
bune Business on condition of
anonymity, said the Government
now appeared to “have woken
up” to the need for urgent
action, after several FNM MPs
and Cabinet ministers had
recently decried the “degree of
hysteria" surrounding the brew-
ing storm approaching the
Bahamian financial services
industry.

“There has to be a serious pol-
icy statement by the Bahamas
government before April 2,” the
source told Tribune Business.
“Because not to do it would
leave the Bahamas isolated. We
are one of the very few who
have not taken a position, like
the majority of international
financial centres have done, and
made it known. I’d be amazed if
the Government did not make a
move before April 2, not froma
legislative point of view, but a
policy statement.”

The Government and finan-
cial services industry were last
night accelerating moves already
begun to develop a common
position on how the Bahamas
should respond to the changing
international financial services
landscape, with a 5pm meeting

SEE page 5B



THE TRIBUNE @

usine

TUES DAY,

MARCH

Mie



2009

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net

Developer applies to
go ‘completely solar’

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

real estate

developer has

applied for gov-

ernment and

Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation (BEC)
approvals to allow her ‘green’
community to use 100 per cent
solar power during the daylight
hours, Tribune Business was told
yesterday.

Debby Deal, project manager
for the South Ocean Palms
development, said she had sub-
mitted a proposal to the Minister
of the Environment, Dr Earl
Deveaux, which seeks to incor-
porate solar panels into the
building of the gated communi-
ty’s homes. She is hoping for a
positive response.

Ms Deal said she would like
the community she is developing
jointly with another partner to
be a model for future develop-
ments, should they be allowed
to install the solar panels.

At present, builders must
receive permission from BEC to
install solar power. Under cur-
rent legislation, homes and busi-
nesses must take BEC power in
all areas where it is available.

Sustainability
only concern
over jobless
benefit plan

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

THE Government’s pro-
posed unemployment ben-
efit programme will “go a
long way to reducing the
strain” on persons who have
lost their jobs due to the
recession, the Chamber of
Commerce’s first vice-pres-
ident said yesterday, the
only major concern being
the initiative’s long-term sus-
tainability.

Khaalis Rolle, speaking to
Tribune Business after the
scheme was officially pre-
sented yesterday to mem-
bers of the business com-
munity and trade unions,
said the Government was
possibly hoping to have the
unemployment benefit pro-
gramme up and running by
April 20 this year. It was
also hoping to get the
enabling legislation to Par-
liament by next week.

Mr Rolle said: “I like the
effort the Government is
making on this. It seems to
be a well thought-out plan,
an ambitious plan.

“T think it will go a long

SEE page 4B



ROYAL 9 FIDELITY

* Seeks government, BEC permission for New Providence
subdivision to go 100% solar during daylight hours

* Energy efficient devices push prices of homes, ranging from $517,000
to $778,000, up but energy savings more than pay for themselves

“T would like us to be the first
subdivision to completely go
solar. I would like to be able to
say: ‘OK, this is what we’re
doing’, and have other people
come watch and see how it
works, because we’re small,” Ms
Deal said.

She added that her homes
were designed to greatly reduce
utility costs by “stopping the
meter” with solar panels and
inverters that supply energy dur-
ing daylight hours. Energy will
be supplied by BEC during the
evening hours, unless batteries
are added to the solar grid.

However, since the commu-
nity is “green”, Ms Deal said she
did not incorporate batteries into
the design because they are dif-
ficult to dispose of and not envi-
ronmentally friendly.

The houses in the small com-
munity, only 13 lots located near
South Ocean in southwestern
New Providence, will have myr-

iad energy saving features incor-
porated into the building stage,
as well as energy efficient appli-
ances such as air-conditioning.

Ms Deal said incorporating
high efficiency appliances could
drive the cost of some home
models, which range in price
from $517,000 to $778,000, up.
However, home buyers will have
the option to forego the energy
efficient air-conditioning system,
reducing the cost of the home
by about $19,000. Still, the
investment in energy efficient
devices will more than pay for
itself.

Ms Deal said some other fea-
tures incorporated into the
homes will be fascia board and
boxing made from recycled
material; Accu-Crete walls that
are crack and fade resistant; low
flow shower heads; single-gallon
flush toilets; quartz counter tops;
mahogany or cedar front doors;
and Icynene, a spray on insula-

tion, in the attics.

“We want to offer a better
product that is low maintenance,
better quality materials and that
Keeps the dollar value the
same,” she said.

“T would say that I’m higher
(priced) than most builders, but
the things that I offer, the stan-
dard things, are things that oth-
er builders don’t put in, so they
(buyers) really are getting a bet-
ter deal.”

Ms Deal said that though lot
numbers were limited, the
homes in the community will
feature seven different designs
to accommodate varying buyer
tastes.

She said there will be homes
with additions for the physically
challenged, homes with guest
suites, open concept homes that
are great for entertaining and
homes for single and young

SEE page 4B

$225k initiative to aid cooperative’s fisheries exports

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE NORTH Abaco Fish-
eries Co-operative could receive
$150,000 from the Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank (IDB)
for fishing and business devel-
opment training, Tribune Busi-
ness confirmed yesterday.

The cooperative’s chairman,
Leon Pinder, said fishermen in
that area have long been brand-
ed as uneducated and notori-
ously bad at managing their fish-
ing revenues. He said that, gen-
erally, most fishermen do not
complete high school, so the pro-
gramme - which is in prepara-
tion - was essential to the sec-
tor’s future, and the future of
the fishermen at large.

The technical training, which

North Abaco fishermen ‘building a fish house, fish processing
plant and a marine shop’ in bid to maximise income

is estimated to cost $225,000, will
assist North Abaco’s fishermen
in maximising their potential,
according to Mr Pinder, as the
organisation moves to upgrade
its export markets.

“As a cooperative we are
building a fish house, fish pro-
cessing plant and a marine shop,
where we can provide the fish-
ermen with necessary equipment
and get to the point where we
can export our own fish to max-
imise the income,” he said.

Mr Pinder said members and
potential members of the coop-
erative will be trained specifi-
cally in business management,
different types of fishing and

Make it’a reality.

environmentally-friendly fishing,
in an intensive month-long pro-
gramme.

Mr Pinder said training will
be provided by the Inter-Amer-
ican Institute for Cooperation
on Agriculture, via the IDB, and
also by the Bahamas Coopera-
tive League.

“Once the IDB does the train-
ing and we are already to belt
course on our building, then
we'll move on to the phase
where we can get a local loan
from the other cooperatives like
the credit union,” Mr Pinder
said. “ We will need more fund-

SEE page 4B



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

Analyst
‘concern’
on FINCO
dividend

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ANALYSTS _ yesterday
expressed “concern” that
Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FINCO) had main-
tained its regular dividend at
$0.13 per share despite slump-
ing to what one described as its
“first” quarterly loss ever, the
contracting economy and rise in
loan delinquencies forcing it to
take a $5.375 million provision
against future losses.

The one-time provision saw
FINCO post a $367,759 net loss
for the three months to January
31, 2009, a result that market
analysts said was “symbolic” of
the deep economic recession and
rising unemployment that the
Bahamas now faced.

The latter, they added, was
forcing many borrowers to
default on their mortgage and
other loan commitments, the key
issue impacting performance
across the Bahamian commer-
cial banking sector.

Describing FINCO’s fiscal
2009 first quarter results as
“quite surprising”, one analyst

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

EXCITING AND CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITIES FOR
YOUNG BAHAMIANS

e

Credit

e
Suisse

; ’ m@ executor
Have you obtained, or do you expect to achieve, a combined SAT score of at least 1500? eS : ") gs
Are you physically fit? Ee 2: ‘ . © FP passes
Are you between the ages of 16 and 20 years? +R ' * ie e
Series 7

The Bahamas Maritime Authority is once again offering attractive scholarships to young ii ib 2 i le ! e x al } )
academically sound Bahamians who are keen to train for an exciting and challenging career in the
Maritime Industry which is gaining increasing national importance.

Imagine a career which will take you to the world’s most fascinating ports and far flung
destinations. A Maritime career could take you there.

Do you have, or are likely to have, 5 BGCSE passes, including Math, Physics/Combined Science
and English Language at grade ‘C’ or above?

If you have answered YES to the questions above then read on.

A JUNIOR securities execu-
tor, Keith Beneby Jnr, has
passed the Series 7 exam in
Florida. He is now eligible to
apply for registration with the
Securities Commission.

Mr Beneby is pictured (above
right) with Reece Chipman
(left), managing director of The
National Association of Secu-

These generous scholarships are inclusive of tuition, fees, course material, accommodation and
transportation costs. Commencing in September 2009 successful candidates will follow a 4 year
degree programme at the California Maritime Academy, a unique campus of the California State
University. Upon completion of the degree, the qualified officers will be expected to serve on board
a Bahamian flagged vessel for at least 2 years providing the solid foundation on which to build
their Maritime careers.

Further information and application forms can
be obtained from Mrs Erma Rahming Mackey,
Deputy Director, Bahamas Maritime Authority,
Manx Corporate Centre, West Bay Street, P O
Box N-4679, Nassau, Bahamas, email:

rities Training and Compliance
(Nastac) Group.

The Series 7 exam is admin-
istered by the New York Stock
Exchange (NYSE) and the
National Association of Secu-

emackey@bahamasmaritime.com, tel: 356 5772
fax: 356 5889. Completed applications must

be submitted in person or by post, with copies
of academic certificates/transcripts and proof

of Bahamian citizenship, no later than a | ia = a " i i | al
March, 2009, Interviews will take place in = a -.) INSIGHT
Nassau during the last week in April. 7 tai ss soars =

an Ce

TES
arr

?mlovin’ it Tics

rities Dealers (NASD).

British American Financial

British American Financial “BAF” is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Bahamian entity BAB
Holdings Limited. BAF recently celebrated its second year as a 100% Bahamian owned entity
having been acquired by the Bahamian Group during February 2007.

Established in 1920, British American Financial provides a full range of insurance and
investment services, including life & health insurance, mortgages, financial and retirement
planning, annuities, mutual funds and pension plans. The Company has three offices in Nassau at
Independence Drive, Rosetta St. Palmdale, and Carmichael Rd. Also full service branches in
Freeport, Abaco, Exuma and a network of career agents throughout the Family Islands. The
Company directly employs more than 200 Bahamians.

British American Financial is not related or affiliated in any way whatsoever with any other
company with a similar name “British American”, whether in the Bahamas, the Caribbean region
or anywhere else.

In celebration of our second anniversary as a fully Bahamian Company, we are pleased to
if ’ bedi ‘owed aad announce our offering of free financial consultations, along with weekly financial seminars to our
Deposits & Investments ee ee eter clients and the public at our Independence Drive Headquarters every Friday until the end of April
you are living well. What's next? Everything. Si fet cede : .
2009. The Company extends a special invitation to members of the public who recently experienced
job losses and hardship as a result of the downturn in the economy.

Internet & Telephone Banking Perhaps you have arrived at a great stage in





Credit Cards That's where we come in. If you want to



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or make the most of the ones you have, you'll

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Small Business Banking



Corporate Banking



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 3B



Bahamian firms have ‘great
potential for energy savings

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

BAHAMIAN small and
medium-sized enterprises
(SMEs) were yesterday urged
by the Inter-American Invest-
ment Corporation (IIC) to
become more energy efficient
by implementing conservation
measures that could slash oper-
ating costs.

Speaking to Tribune Busi-
ness at the Energy Efficiency
Workshop for Small and Medi-
um Sized Enterprises, the IIC’s
senior financialspecialist, Car-
los Serrano, said much more

can be done throughout the
Bahamas and the wider
Caribbean to decrease energy
waste and consumption, and
increase savings.

“By talking with many local
enterprises here, we have seen
that there are many basic
things that have not been done
- the most simple things for
energy efficiency, like insula-
tion. Many buildings con-
structed here do not include
insulation and that’s wasted
energy,” he said.

“So, the Bahamas as well as
other Caribbean countries have
an energy intensity, which pro-

vides a very large potential to
reduce consumption and
improve savings.”

The IIC’s GREENPYME
programme “promotes renew-
able energy, clean technology,
and energy efficiency in SMEs
in the main production and ser-
vice sectors in Latin America
and the Caribbean”.

A presenter at the workshop
and energy expert, Pierre Lan-
glois, said businesses need to
develop a plan for saving ener-
gy, implement it and then build
on the success of the plan.

He suggested that companies
start with small changes that

could make an immediate dif-
ference, such as efficient fluo-
rescent light bulbs, and invest
in energy efficient appliances
and upgrades that could lead
to potential long-term savings.

Some energy conservation
measures revealed at the work-

shop, which could be expen-
sive but pay for themselves in
less than five years, were com-
puterised energy management
systems pegged at more than
$3,000, with an estimated play
back period of one=and-a-half
to two years; polyurethane

foam spray insulation, pegged
at $2 - $3 per square foot with a
pay back period of three to
four years; and to change from
freon to “natural” hydrocar-
bon refrigerants for air-condi-
tioning and refrigeration sys-
tems.



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THE TRIBUNE

is seeking a Main Section Editor to design news
pages and write eye-catching head-lines. Solid
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news sense, excellent text-editing ability and an
aptitude for supervising staff. Applications please
to:

Managing Editor
The Tribune
P.O.Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas

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Tanagemnent across. the OFTO
* Oren myponsiniity for ine management of the rik and conformance of Ihe Operating Company's Lemding Portoic
= Overal responsibility for the efectiveness|performance of the Bek and Contral Team
1 have Rerlonmance Management and monboring respordblities for a foam of protesionak

PREREQUISITES:

* Mut have a minima of 5 peas in a frontline customer contac pole, prelerably with previows experure Lo a wile
ninge of client seqmenis, but especially in the ‘High Value’ chent seqment, preterabhy im both the comparate and
Perional sacbors

* Mant be focused on being Tully ug to date on the Retail Véealih business product offeding, you dove aloo have a
sirang aawrenes of the other tuncions and products marketed through hrst(Larnobean

* Sound ovledge of business planning and develope) lechaigues, ard the ability to mentily oppomunilies, plan
and develop business im suport of te Metall Wealth) budiness and ree Caibbean iirategies and olyectives

* Highly deweloped knowledge of sales management principles and processes

* Experience of relationship management, consultative selling and dro megatialion silk

= Cxodlent al round banking tapeierece, panticularty in product design and development and marketing

* Prewious rok magn encompass Relationship Manager, Investment manager working for banks of ineestment
hapa

REMUNERATION

Campetilive salary ard benelits par kage inmiding: a car allow

, and pretermd Iman rates,

Ane: an egos share purchase gar;

Mmindical, vision and dental insurance

rm *

s.
ae eee ails

IR TERNATIONAL BAND

Ce ee



Insights from 30 years of study

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University of Florida
Date: Wednesday, March 18, 2009
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Phone: 242-393-1317
Email: bnt@bnt.bs

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Email:candice@lignumtech.com





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Sustainability only concern
over jobless benefit plan

FROM page 1B

way in, not eliminating, but
reducing the strain on unem-
ployed during this period. There
are some safeguards in place to
ensure it will not be abused.”
The Government is looking at
pegging the unemployment ben-
efit jobless persons receive to
their insurable wage level when
they (and their employers) were
contributing to the National
Insurance Board (NIB).
Essentially, unemployed per-
sons will receive 50 per cent of
the insurable wage their NIB
contributions were based on, for
a period lasting between 13-26

Developer
applies to go
‘completely
solar’

FROM page 1B

families.

Ms Deal was asked by Dr
Deveaux to replace him as
the lunch-time guest speak-

er at the Energy Efficiency
Workshop for small and
medium-sized enterprises,
held yesterday at the British
Colonial Hilton under the
auspices of Royal Bank of
Canada. She said she sees
this as a positive response
from the government.

She insisted though : “We
have to take care of the
environment, and we don’t
have to wait on the Gov-
ernment.”



College of The Bahamas
Union of Students
Elections 2009

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Thursday March 19th 2pm - 4pm
Independence Park

Final Pep Rally
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Tuesday 24th March, 2pm

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weeks (three to six months).

“They spoke about the size of
the benefit being 50 per cent of
the insurable wage,” Mr Rolle
told Tribune Business last night.
“Tf it was $400 per week, you
will get $200 a week.” He added
that, in the case of former hotel
workers, the insurable wage cal-
culation would not include tips
or gratuities.

“My biggest concern is the
sustainability of it,” Mr Rolle
said. “There’s a finite budget
associated with it - $20 million.
That money is being transferred
from the NIB Medical Benefits
Reserve.

“When that is exhausted,
there are two things in play - the
possibility of a protracted, dire
economic situation, and when
you look at the fundamentals
driving unemployment in the
country, it’s not a process that’s
easy to recover from.

“Unemployment is going to
remain high for quite a while.”

FINCO, from page 1B

Mr Rolle said it would take
some time for tourism and other
Key industries “to get everything
back in line. For unemployment
to start diminishing, it’s going to
take a very long time, and a very
concerted effort on behalf of the
Government and the private sec-
tor.”

The Department of Statistics’
interim labour force survey
recently showed that the unem-
ployment rate on New Provi-
dence had increased from 8.7
per cent to 12.1 per cent between
May 2008 and early 2009, an
almost 40 per cent rise in per-
centage terms.

For Grand Bahama, the
Department of Statistics said the
unemployment rate had
increased from a 9 per cent total
in May 2008 to 14.6 per cent in
February 2009, an increase of
5.6 per cent or more than 50 per
cent in percentage terms.

These latest unemployment
rates were described as the high-

est experienced by both islands
in the past 15 years, since the
recession of the early 1990s. The
Department of Statistics said the
number of persons unemployed
on New Providence had risen by
4,540 or 38 per cent, while for
Grand Bahama the equivalent
was a 55 per cent rise or 1,500
persons.

These data mean that just
over one in 10 Bahamians who
are actively looking for work are
now not able to find it. On
Grand Bahama, the February
2009 survey showed that that
17.7 per cent of women were
unemployed, with the rate slight-
ly lower for men at 11.7 per cent.
Conversely, for New Providence,
the unemployment rate was only
11.9 per cent for women, yet 12.4
per cent for men.

“Tt’s an ambitious plan. ’m
concerned about the sustain-
ability, but it’s a step in the right
direction,” Mr Rolle added.
“Generally, I think everyone was

happy about it. The labour
unions were pretty pleased that
the Government was taking this
step. The private sector, from
our end, was pretty pleased
something is being done.”

The unemployment benefit
scheme will be administered by
NIB. Mr Rolle acknowledged
that this was also a “major con-
cern”, given that NIB had diffi-
culty administering all that it
does already, but the Board told
yesterday’s presentation that it
had already started “to shift peo-
ple into that area to make sure
it’s executed and managed prop-
erly”.

Mr Rolle said the presenta-
tion did not focus on the
scheme’s long-term viability.
However, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said it would
ultimately be financed by a per
worker contribution equivalent
to 1 per cent of the insurable
wage.

“Regard being had to the cur-

$225k initiative to
aid cooperative’s
fisheries exports

FROM page 1B

ing to get where we want to
get, but that won’t be done
until we have done the tech-
rou VMBe-DuOviotcad ot NMsi Moy cOn eer
ed from IDB.”

The proposal is presently
in Washington waiting for
final approvals, after which
ng-bouvlermeolelamocraten

“Tt could be as early as the
end of this month,” said Mr
Pinder.



rent economic circumstance, we
don’t propose to introduce such
a charge today,” Mr. Ingraham
said previously, “but the charge
is likely to be of the order of 1
per cent of insurable wage.

“That means if you are mak-
ing $400 a week or more, that 1
per cent would be $4, and that
would be shared either 60/40
employer/employee or 50/50
employer/employee.”

The Government is consider-
ing a January 1, 2010 date for
the implementation of that pay-
ment scheme.

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Palendole (Meat to Cliy Market)
PUD. Bow A 10620 Nassau, Bahamas

Email: salesgmdctp¢.com

Tel
Fax: 242-328-0049

said: “My only concern is that they’re
continuing to pay the dividend at $0.13
per share, so there’s no adjustment in the
dividend, which shows they figure they’re
going to recover.”

The first quarter loss stood in start con-
trast to the $5.496 million profit FINCO
generated in the 2008 first quarter. The
bank, which is effectively Royal Bank’s
mortgage lending arm, said the provision
for future credit losses was required after
a further increase in non-accrual loans
was experienced during the quarter.

In its message to shareholders, FIN-
CO said that the dividend payment was
maintained only “after considerable delib-
eration, and having regard for the oper-
ating loss and the difficult operating envi-
ronment, which is expected to continue”.

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The Board decision, FINCO added,
was based on FINCO’s strong capital
position, with shareholder equity standing
at $87.607 million - inclusive of $79.222
million in retained earnings. Its liquidity
position, with almost $63 million in cash in
hand at the balance sheet date, and con-
setvative loan loss provisioning policy,
also proved decisive factors.

One analyst, though, questioned
whether the dividend payment was made
partly to satisfy the profit objectives of
FINCO’s 75 per cent majority share-
holder, Royal Bank of Canada. The div-
idend will likely have to come from
retained earnings.

Meanwhile, Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, said of the FIN-
CO results and credit provision: “It’s just

Ware Te Ge Great

TV Show

re

please call 393-3404.



aN

Nassau Airport
Development Company

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

an accounting provision to reflect the cur-
rent environment. They take the hit now
and move forward.

“It speaks to a larger fundamental
problem, people who are cash strapped
and unable to pay. I would argue that if
FINCO is a top tier mortgage lending
bank, the market leader, then the other
smaller players may be having an even
more difficult time.

“It’s just symbolic of the state of the
market and the economy.”

At year-end 2008, some 4.09 per cent of
FINCO’s total loan portfolio - mostly
mortgages - were non-performing, mean-
ing they were 90 days or more past due.
The total loan amount involved was
$28.933 million out of a total $692.079
million portfolio.

Motivator Spence Finlayson is pictured

Still, even at October 31, 2008, FIN-
CO’s non-performing loan portfolio had
increased by 76.5 per cent year-over-year
compared to $16.39 million at year-end
2007.

In particular, the total value of loans
more than one year past due had more
than doubles from $3.419 million to
$7.442 million. In addition, the total val-
ue of loans between 90 and 180 days past
due had more than tripled, from $2.188
million to $6.9994 million.

And the total value of loans between
nine months to one year overdue also
more than tripled, rising from $1.245 mil-
lion to $4.347 million.

Still, FINCO is enjoying mortgage port-
folio growth, having expanded by 12 per
cent during the first quarter.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

WESTMINSTER HOLDINGS
INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) WESTMINSTER HOLDINGS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED is
in voluntary dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 16th
March, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust
Limited, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, Geneva.

Dated this 17th day of March, A. D. 2009



UKE IO e

‘Dare To Be Great.” airs tonight at 8:30pm on ZNS TV13.
Pictured along with the shows creator and host Spence Finlayson are
his guests, Rev. Javon Neeley of Bethel Baptist Church, Paul Moss,
Dominion Management Services Ltd. and Glenn Ferguson, Financial
Consultant.

If you would like to be a guest on this show or advertise

Credit Suisse Trust Limited

Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SCAGLIETTI INVESTMENTS LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SCAGLIETTI INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 6th March, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of

new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following

items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and

related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for

the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230

General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room

located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRAC] BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci brisby@nas.bs

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Manex Limited,
The Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte
Streets, Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 17th day of March, A. D. 2009



Manex Limited

Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
SEABROWN HOLDINGS LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act

(No. 45 of 2000), SEABROWN HOLDINGS LIMITED is
in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 28th
day of January, 2009.

Sarnia Directors Limited

Suite V

Tower Hill House
Le Bordage, St. Peter Port

Guernsey, GY1 3QT



Liquidator



(-\"\
Na,

THE TRIBUNE

(ew)
Na LY,

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 5B





Bahamas needs urgent policy statement over tax co-operation

FROM page 1B

at the Sheraton Cable Beach.

The meeting was organised by
the Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB), and in atten-
dance was minister of state for
finance, Zhivargo Laing. Tri-
bune Business went to press
before the meeting’s outcome
could be determined.

Prior to the meeting, Owen
Bethel, head of the Nassau-
based Montaque Group, told
Tribune Business that it would
be “totally detrimental to the
financial industry” in the
Bahamas if this nation were to
allow itself to become isolated
and, subsequently, ‘blacklisted’
by the OECD or other G-20
forums/clubs.

Mr Bethel pointed out that if
this happened, the reputational
consequences for the Bahamian
financial services sector would
be significant, and could poten-
tially lead to existing and new
private wealth management
clients pulling their business



a

from this jurisdiction.

“T would have thought that we
should have basically made a
clear statement, firstly clarifying
the actions that we have taken
already, and that we’re well
ahead of the game in that sense,
but also that we’re certainly pre-
pared to co-operate with what-
ever else the countries of the US
and OECD would want, so that
we are very precise in what we
do,” Mr Bethel told Tribune
Business.

Doing this, he explained,
would ensure the Bahamas did
“not take the scattergun, sledge
hammer approach and smash
everything, like we did in 2000”
as a result of the financial ser-
vices industry being “blacklist-
ed’ then by the Financial Action
Task Force (FATF).

Instead, Mr Bethel said the
Bahamas had to “apply strategic
surgery to areas of concern, and
if the concerns expressed are tax
evasion by their citizens, we
should be prepared to look at

Tax Information Exchange
Agreements”.

He agreed, though, with the
arguments expressed by attor-
neys such as John Delaney and
Brian Moree, in that the
Bahamas should seek reciprocal
benefits from nations it signed
TIEAs with, such as investment
and trade preferences.

It was especially important
that the Bahamas avoid becom-
ing isolated, Mr Bethel told Tri-
bune Business. If the G-20, Oba-
ma administration and others
were to brand all international
financial centres, including many
US states, Switzerland, Singa-
pore, Hong Kong and others as
so-called ‘tax havens’, the
Bahamas “may be able to
weather the storm”.

Yet if they removed them-
selves from the frame by pledg-
ing greater co-operation on
international tax matters, and
the Bahamas did not adopt such
a clear position, it would “total-
ly be detrimental to the finan-
cial industry”.

“We would clearly have iden-
tified ourselves as laggards in
the move to eliminate tax eva-
sion,” Mr Bethel explained, say-
ing this could pave the way for

“the blacklisting to come”.

“That sends a signal to exist-
ing clients and potential clients
that this is not the jurisdiction
they want to be in at all,” he
added.

Mr Bethel said the speed with
which the Bahamas reacted to
the 2000 ‘blacklisting’ by the
FATF, and the radical legisla-
tive surgery performed then,
would likely cause the OECD
and its members to expect a sim-
ilar performance in light of cur-
rent pressures.

In addition, they would also
expect the Bahamas to give
them what this nation had
already provided the US with - a
TIEA - in 2002.

“We certainly need to solicit
the support of the US govern-
ment, who we have an existing
TIEA with, and get an under-
standing that that is adequate
for their purposes going for-
ward,” Mr Bethel said.

“We must get their support in
applying the same provisions to
other countries - not going fur-
ther than we have already.”

Backing the issuing of a clear
policy statement by the Bahamas
government on tax co-operation,
Mr Bethel said it would be “ide-

al” if this was part of a common
initiative and voice featuring all
Caribbean-based international
financial centres.

“To the degree we have
jumped out of the bandwagon
on our own before, I would cer-
tainly support the Government
making a statement on its own
prior to the G-20 meeting,” he
added.

Mr Bethel said the mounting
external pressure on the
Bahamas was “quite serious”,



and the momentum generated
meant this nation needed to
respond proactively, while also
leaving industry institutions and
executives with enough time to
implement the necessary
changes.

“We have yet to come up with
an agreed policy statement and
position as to where we see the
industry going. I’m not sure the
Government has bought into the
direction the industry wants, or
has to, go in,” Mr Bethel said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
POINTAM VALLEY INC.









——





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138




(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of POINTAM VALLEY INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the








Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

The Public Is Cordially Invited To Attend
THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON PRESENTATION
Hosted by The Bahamas Society of Engineers

Thursday, March 19, 2009
Topic
“OPPORTUNITIES FOR
ENGINEERING FIRMS GOING
FORWARD”

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

SHELBER
INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of SHELBER INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Regis-
trar. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 10th day

GUEST SPEAKER:
THE HON. ZHIVARGO S. LAING
MINISTER OF STATE

PLACE:
EAST VILLA RESTAURANT
East Bay Street
Time: 12:00p.m.
Donations: $25.00 per person

If possible please confirm your attendance by e-mail

Gracesharma0S5@yahoo.com or JEEIliott@bahamaselectricty.com
or quentin. knowles@flameless.com

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

2008/CLE/qui/01870

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising an area of 13, 436 square feet situate approximately
500 feet west of Lincoln Boulevard and north side of Palm Beach
Court on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of
land has such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions
as are shown on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Mary Jane Smith

NOTICE

The Quieting Titl

Act 1959

The Petition of Mary Jane Smith of the Southern
District, of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas in respect of: - ALL
THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising an area of 13,
436 square feet situate approximately 500 feet west of Lincoln
Boulevard and north side of Palm Beach Courton the Island
of New Providence one of the Islands in the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of land has
such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions as
are shown on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

Mary Jane Smith claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the
said tract of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having
Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the petition shall on or before the 27" of April A.D.,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed form
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before
the 27% of April A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:The Registry of

the Supreme Court;

The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for the
Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,

Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;

Dated the 27" day of January A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner

of March, 2009.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) BOVEY LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February 25, 2009

Registrar General.



when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace

West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 19th day of March, 2009 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

FEBRUARY 26, 2009

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

WASTE - ED

“LITTER” ALLY -
WHY WE DO THE THINGS WE DO

* Lack of knowledge about the
Environmental effects of Littering

Litter is already there

* No pressure to do the right thing
* No penalties or consistent enforcement

* Lack of pride
* Laziness

+ Not aware that we are littering

Effects of Litter
* Unsightly

* Costly

* Unhealthy

‘Poisons, Traps, Suffocates Wildlife
* Negatively affects tourism and the local economy

PUT LITTER IN ITS’ PLACE. KEEP THE BAHAMAS
CLEAN, GREEN AND PRISTINE

A message from the Ministry of
Department of Environmental

Health Services

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00115

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Millard Bethel
NOTICE OF PETITION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Millard Bethel
of North Palmetto Point, Eleuthera, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
is applying to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas to have his title
investigated determined and declared under the

Quieting Titles Act. 1959 (Ch. 393) in respect

of the land hereafter described, that is to say:
“ ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
comprising Eight and Seven-hundredtwenty-nine
Thousandths (8.729) Acres located approximately
Eighty-seven (87) feet South of the Eleuthera
Main Road and approximately Zero and Three
Tenths (0.3) miles North-Westwardly of Palmetto
Point Crossing and is bounded Northwardly
by the Estate of Horatius Thompson running
thereon for a total distance of Four-Hundred-
twelve and Thirty-five Hundredths (412.35) feet,
Eastwardly by property formerly of the Estate
of Anthony Drexel and now the property of the
Petitioner running thereon for a total distance of
Eleven-hundred two and ninety-three hundredths
(1102.93) feet, Southwardly by property of
Eleuthera Land Company Ltd., running thereon for
a total distance of Three hundred-thirty-two and
Twenty-two hundredths (332.22) feet, Westwardly
by property of Emma E. Cooper running thereon
for a total distance of Nine hundred-seventy-
nine and Forth Three Hundredths (979.43) feet
continuing back to the point of commencement
the said piece parcel or tract of land described
aforesaid is delineated in PINK on the plan
submitted with the Petitioner’s Petition.”
AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition
and the Plan of the said land may be inspected
during normal office hours at the following
places:

i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House,
East Street North, New Providence, The
Bahamas.

il. Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, East Shirley
Street, Highland Terrace, New Providence,
The Bahamas.

il. The Administrator's Office, Governor’s
Harbour, Eleuthera, The Bahamas

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person
having dower or right to dower, an adverse claim
or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall
on or before the 6th May A.D., 2009 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petition or his
attorney an Adverse Claim in the prescribed
form supported by Affidavit.

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve
an Adverse Claim on or before 6th May A.D.,
2009 date will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 5th day of March A.D., 2009

Sharon Wilson & Co.
Chambers
Delvest House
East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE'S

THE TRIBUNE






v
T. PATRICK'S
!

HAPP
E
DAY
, ee

red

rv

© 2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World Rights ress!



HvGO, HAVE You
GIVEN SOME THOUGHT
ABOUT TAKING ME To
THE FIREMENS

STUPID
ROTTEN






as —
TT

“T DONT NEED A GOOD TALKIN TO! I NEED

A GOOD LISTENIN’ TO!”

vl

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across Down
1 Outflowing 1 Unnecessary
currency (3,4) accessory (5)
5 A flash of 2 One should hear pins drop
brilliance (5) in these places (7,6)
8 One old fort now turned 3 Shattered — as an anti-

into a capital tourist
attraction (5,2,6)

9 Aplea is reversed in 4
sibilant tones (5)

10 Still fluster, perhaps (7)

11 Assimilate a 5
summary (6)

12 Calms down a wild 6
beast (6)

15 A tussle for military 7

honours (7)

17 Tragically without a 11
match, has to return a
smoke (5) 13

19 It's unspeakable! (13)

20 Points to the girl to 14
follow (5)

21 Make dispirited editor 16
return to his normal 18

field (7)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Verne, 8 Homesick, 9
Cabal, 10 Milliner, 11 Waste, 12 Ann,
16 Sea dog, 17 Endear, 18 Ebb, 23
Squat, 24 Have-nots, 25 Bathe, 26
Moreover, 27 Leant.

Down: 2 Emanated, 3 Neap tide, 4
Motion, 5 Reply, 6 Giant, 7 Skirt, 12
Age, 13 Neb, 14 Adequate, 15
Marathon, 19 Bitter, 20 Champ, 21
Overt, 22 Snook.




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GREEN COFFEE,
GREEN BURGER,

GREEN FRIES, AND AV

BOTTLE OF GREEN Wy?





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THIS AND NoW ITS,
BROKEN, MND T_DIDNT
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3/17



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to

©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.










APT 3-G
a NENTS LATER, ANOTHER VIGITOR

IS OVER AT LAST, TOMMIES
GIVE ME
ABIG
Kiss/

li i WW
ZSIDS

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me

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

www.kingfeatures.com



UM, GARY, \ DON'T MIND ME, GARY.
JOE KELLY JI WAS JUST LEAVING



MOTHERS INVENTED?
DOMESTIC _SURVEILLANCE

9 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.







I UNDERSTANP THEY THE ONLY THING WEE ALLOWEP To 2O
WON'T LET YOU USE THE 1S TICKLE THEIR FEET WITH A FEATHER
OLD METHODS OF TO GET INFORMATION /
TORTURE ANYMORE...





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Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer





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©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
2 / 0/0
ais





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mlm o[a|—[o/ alo





Hl WI/N/o co}
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3/17



quarian’s interest may
be? (2,5)

Its a struggle for an
amphibian to get

around (6)

Coarse expression of
quantity (5)

Be fit and agile, perhaps,
and tireless (13)

New singlet produces
prickling sensations (7)
Its deep in distress,
notwithstanding (7)

Is more cheerful when the
dollar’s risen? (5,2)

Aim for the top in exotic
dances (6)

Bravely built shelter (5)
Cottons on and leers
crudely (5)



EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Slack, 8 Bona fide, 9
Snack, 10 On demand, 11 After, 12
For, 16 Scheme, 17 In hand, 18
Wed, 23 Foray, 24 Anaconda, 25
Rowdy, 26 Sob story, 27 Stamp.
Down: 2 Long face, 3 Cockeyed, 4
Borneo, 5 Waver, 6 Lilac, 7 Heady,
12 Few, 13 Rid, 14 Shoot-out, 15 In
tandem, 19 Endure, 20 False, 21
Maybe, 22 Booty.

Across

1

Having big-name
cast (3-4)

5 Hemmed in (5)

20
21

Offer feigned respect
(3,3,7)

Swindler (5)

Italian astronomer (7)
Conceit (6)

Vividly imprinted (6)
Persian Gulf
sheikhdom (7)
Scope (5)

Engaged in dispute
(2,11)

Brownish yellow (5)

Rumour (7)














Down

1
2

4 Give up office (6)
5 A precious stone (5)

6 Divulge secrets

11

13
14
16
18



South dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
765
Â¥82
@AJ964
&A 103
WEST EAST
@K 83 #310942
Vi074 ¥I963
83 K5
&97542 KS
SOUTH
AQ
VAKQS5
@Q1072
O16
The bidding:
South West North East
Raavouryians) 2NT Pass 3NT All Pass
ae Opening lead — four of clubs.
Command

Experience shows that when a
side has 26 points or more in the
combined hands, a game can nearly
always be made. But mere posses-
sion of these points doesn’t mean the
game is automatically awarded to the
side that has them. There is first the
question of selecting which game to
bid, and then there is the question of
how declarer manages his assets.

Take this case where West led a
club and declarer played low from
dummy, losing the finesse to East’s
king. Back came the jack of spades,

dogmatically (3,4,3,3)
Small personal

ornament (7)



(5,3,5)
Minimal footing (7)




Pulsating with

life (7)

Windpipe (7)
Catch in a net (6)
Heated (5)

Flavoursome (5)
















Gain Versus Loss













NCO M/M/W)/—=/ ORO



MO OW) |N MPM] oO! | &
WRN OOOO |My |=





the queen losing to the king, and a
spade continuation drove out the ace.
When declarer then tried his
third finesse — this time in dia-
monds — East won and cashed his
spades to put South down two.

The hand shows how easy it is to
fall victim to habit. It is admittedly
tempting to finesse West’s opening
club lead, but declarer should put up
the ace more quickly than he can say
Rumpelstiltskin.

Taking the ace assures the con-
tract, while taking the finesse jeop-
ardizes it. The finesse should there-
fore be rejected.

If South were dealing only with
the problem of winning the maxi-
mum number of club tricks, he
would of course finesse. But that is
not his assignment. He is trying to
make three notrump, and he should
not permit himself to be diverted
from that goal by the opportunity to
take a club finesse. Instead, he
should take the ace of clubs, cross to
the ace of hearts, lead the queen of
diamonds and finesse.

If the diamond finesse loses,
South has nine tricks. If it wins, he
has at least 10 tricks. He should not
concern himself with the location of
the king of clubs. The 30 points he
may gain by winning a club finesse
are a drop in the bucket compared to
the value of making a game.

Tomorrow: A positive approach.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.



PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a ee





@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

WITH the challenges of the economic downturn causing
more people to experience stress and depression, many are
turning to the healing powers of aromatherapy. This is
where Julie Hooper, an holistic aroma therapist and owner
of Nature’s Nest says her expertise comes into play.

‘holos' meaning whole.
This means that an holis-
tic aromatherapy treat-
ment works on the whole
person, taking into
account factors such as
lifestyle, diet, medical
history, emotional and
mental state, as well as
their physical side.

promising the quality of her
products

“This is absolutely my calling
and I have found that my back-
ground in marketing has really
helped me a lot. I love sharing the
knowledge,” Mrs Hooper said.

In Mrs Hooper’s body scrub
line there is a whipped sugar
scrub called “Pure” — made with

AROMATHERAPY
candles are made
from soy oil, ava-
cado oil and a
host of other
essential oils that
can either relax or
provide a needed
boost to any

Nature’s Nest Aromatherapy, located on Bay
Street, just west of Arawak Cay, taps the finest
ingredients from the earth using essential oils -
ascented line of pure, premium, eco-friendly
bath, body and home products made in the
Bahamas.

Mrs Hooper said she is committed to natural,
happy, stress-free living for her family and those
she comes into contact with. After experiencing
the power of aromatherapy, Mrs Hooper felt
compelled to take an extensive course of study
to channel her passion towards helping others
achieve a more natural, stress-free lifestyle.

Although Mrs Hooper has earned a Bache-
lor’s Degree in Mass Communications and Pub-
lic Relations from Illinois State University, she
said she found her calling in holistic therapy, and
in 1994, earned certification in holistic aro-
matherapy from The Raworth Centre for Natur-
al Therapies and Sports Medicine in Surrey,
England.

“T practised and honed my skills as I gathered
experience in blending pure essential oils with
other natural ingredients to make a line of prod-
ucts that is now manufactured here in the
Bahamas,” Mrs Hooper said.

Mrs Hooper said she feels that in general peo-
ple are going back to a natural way of living.

“People want to go back to basics and get
away from all the chemicals and artificial stuff
and particularly now in these hard economic
times they want to be able to do things that
mean something for them. They do not want to
spend a lot of money and that is what I am find-
ing that they are doing,” Mrs Hooper said.

Holistic aromatherapy is a subtle, sensitive
therapy with a powerful side, incorporating the
use of 100 per cent pure essential oils. According
to Aromaweb, a website dedicated to aro-
matherapy, holistic comes from the Greek word

It is the fastest stress
release therapy there is and is an excellent way
of treating minor ailments and negative emo-
tional states as well as being extremely effective
as a preventative treatment.

An aromatherapy treatment promotes detoxi-
fication of the body and with it encourages the
natural regenerating and healing process. It is
known to strengthen people against disease, to
increase stamina and can help with convales-
cence and recovery.

Essential oils, the pure essence of a plant,
have been found to provide both psychological
and physical benefits when used correctly and
safely.

Essential oils that are inhaled into the lungs
offer both psychological and physical benefits.
Not only does the aroma of the natural essential
oil stimulate the brain to trigger a reaction, but
when inhaled into the lungs, the natural con-
stituents (naturally occurring chemicals) can
supply therapeutic benefit. When applied physi-
cally to the skin, the oils can be absorbed into
the bloodstream. The constituents of essential
oils can aid in health, beauty and hygiene condi-
tions.

In terms of the history of using this natural
form of therapy in different cultures, the Chi-
nese may have been one of the first cultures to
use aromatic plants for well-being. Their practis-
es involved burning incense to help create har-
mony and balance. Later, the Egyptians invent-
ed a rudimentary distillation machine that
allowed for the crude extraction of cedarwood
oil. It is also thought by some that Persia and
India may have also invented crude distillation
machines, but very little is known. The Egyp-
tians also used infused oils and herbal prepara-
tions for spiritual, medicinal, fragrant and cos-
metic use.

Mrs Hooper said she has no intention of com-

pure cane sugar, a natural exfoli- client.

ate and blended with healing aloe

vera gel. It also contains nourish-

ing avocado oil and hydrating

vegetable glycerin, then scented with natural
plant essences for a treatment to quench the dri-
est of skin, leaving it feeling and looking healthy
and youthful, with a sun-kissed glow.

The cranberry rose scrub is especially beauti-
ful, as it is made with cranberry seed oil, an
essential fatty acid oil that assists in moisture
retention and contributes to lipid barrier protec-
tion of the skin, beautifully scented with rose
absolute pure essential oil.

There is also the silken avocado body lotion —
organic, light and nourishing, that hydrates skin
from head to toe. The body and massage oils,
made with a base of sweet almond or grapeseed
oil, scented with natural plant essences to relax,
revive and exhilarate the senses.

Another one of Mrs Hooper’s creations is a
scented sandalwood fan, to create a fragrant
breeze wherever you are, in church, on a walk,
when you’re feeling jaded — you create the
mood.

The newest product, is organic liquid hand
soap, enriched with aloe vera gel and rosemary
extract, and scented with your favorite essential
oil fragrance.

Eco-friendly is Nature’s Nests’ philosophy.
This is apparent in the soy aromatherapy can-
dles, made with highly sustainable soy wax,
scented with pure plant essences, then packaged
in glass containers that are recyclable and re-fill
able.

Anyone can bring in their favorite container,
and Mrs Hooper will make a candle, in their
favorite colour and scented just the way they
like it, in whatever size desired. Even the melted
wax can be used (which is actually oil) on the
skin for a warm touch of fragrance.

SY GREEN SCENE By GARDENER JACK

Making garden

compost

MANY home gardeners have
a guilty complex about compost.
They know that composting is a
wonderful concept that adds
free goodness to the garden.
The catch is, it involves a lot of
work. A compost pile needs to
be turned very regularly and the
water content kept just so. Turn-
ing compost piles is not the most
enjoyable chore on the home
gardenet’s list of things to do.

I have recently been using a
tumbler-type compost maker
that takes the backache (and
the heartache) out of compost-
ing. It consists of a cylindrical
drum mounted on a framework
with wheels. Materials to be
composted are added through
a lock-down door and the drum
can be easily rotated by pulling
on a series of grooves around
the outside. There are vents to
allow air circulation and a drain
on the opposite side from the
door to allow excess moisture
to escape. Composting made
easy — even for an old man like
me.

The subtropical conditions of
The Bahamas make compost-
ing a quick process. Indeed,

composting is going on all the
time in the garden and by
putting select materials together
in one spot we are only con-
densing the process.

The main principle of com-
posting is to combine high car-
bon materials (brown) with
high nitrogen materials (green)
in the ratio of one part brown to
three parts green. Put the mate-
rials in the tumbler composter,
dampen the mixture lightly, then
spin to mix thoroughly.

Give the tumbler a few spins
every day and in 4-6 weeks you
will have composted soil that
can go straight into your gar-
den.

Green nitrogen materials
include: fruit and vegetable
scraps, coffee grounds and tea
bags, egg shells, weeds (without
seeds), peanut shells, hair, grass
clippings, etc. Brown carbon
materials include: dry grass, saw-
dust, wood ashes, nut shells,
shredded newsprint, tissue
paper, corn cobs, dry leaves, etc.

Materials that should NOT
be used for compost include:
meat, fish, dairy products, oil
and fat, pet waste, bones, and

any processed foods containing
salt (such as spaghetti sauce).

When you add these materials
to the composter in the correct
ratio it is helpful to add a hand-
ful or two of soil or already-pre-
pared compost. The microbes in
the soil will multiply very quick-
ly and begin their job of break-
ing down the materials in the
composter.

The average gardener will
usually not have enough green
and brown materials to make a
full compost right away. If you
have to add new materials every
day you must keep that 3-1 ratio
in mind. Let that ratio get out
of whack, or add too much
water, and your compost will



begin to smell rather bad and
the neighbours will complain.

One of the composting facts of
life is that you will end up with a
distressingly small amount of
compost compared to the vol-
ume of materials you put in.

Your compost is ready when
it has reduced in volume drasti-
cally and has a rich humus scent.
The colour will be dark brown
to almost black.

Compost tumblers cost mon-
ey, of course, and a far cheaper
way to create compost is to dig
holes where you intend to plant
larger vegetables or establish
squash hills. Fill the holes grad-
ually with waste materials in the
3-1 green-to-brown ratio then

A ROTARY
composter
like this one
can produce
new soil
from kitchen
and garden
scraps in
four to six

| weeks.

put back the soil as the compost
reduces in volume. Insert a stick
to remind you of where your
fortified areas are and wait
about a month before sowing
your seeds or transplanting.
Summertime is a good time to
do this so you will be ready for
the new gardening season.

I have had so many requests
recently for my 32-page booklet
Home Gardening in The
Bahamas that I decided to have
a third edition printed. It will
not be available in Nassau but
Green Scene readers can obtain
a copy ($10 post free) by con-
tacting me at Jack Hardy, PO
Box AB-20107, Marsh Harbour,
Abaco.



Malassezia
Dermatitis



THIS IS a common skin
condition that is often seen
in dogs in the Bahamas. It
is caused by a yeast,
MALASSEZIA PACHY-
DERMIS that is normally
found on the skin and ear
canal. It is an opportunistic
pathogen, and usually car-
ries disease when there is
an over growth of the yeast
resulting in dermatitis (skin
infection) and otitis (ear
infection). Malassezia is a
common secondary infec-
tion in dogs with allergies
e.g. atopic dermatitis.
There is a lot of evidence
that a hyper sensitivity
reaction to the yeast may
exist in some dogs, resulting
in extreme pruritus or itch-
ing. Certain breeds have
been reported to be at risk
for developing Malassezia
dermatitis. These breeds
include the German shep-
herd, the Cocker Spaniel,
the Maltese, Poodle,

Chihuahua, Shelties, and
West Highland Terrier.
These same breeds are pre
disposed to atopic dermati-
tis.

CLINICAL SIGNS

Dogs with Malassezia
dermatitis usually are itch-
ing for days and have very
inflamed reddened skin,
which is known as ERY-
THEMA. There is usually
a musty or yeasty odor, and
there may be visible greasy
changes to the skin. The
Skin often becomes licheni-
fied or darkened in affected
areas. Typical clinical signs
include persistent head
shaking and excessive foot
licking. There is usually a
moist and brown discharge
in the ears. This skin con-
dition often begins in the
summer or in highly humid
months, which also corre-
sponds to the allergy sea-
son.

DIAGNOSIS

This is done by a direct
impression smear using a
scalpel blade to collect the
sample. The sample is then
stained with a 3 step diff
—quick. This is called a
cytological examination.

TREATMENT

Since Malassezia der-
matitis is a secondary dis-
ease, one must identify and
treat the primary disease.
The treatment of
Malassezia is individualised
according to seventy and
various dog and owner con-
siderations. Topical therapy
(shampoo) is often effec-
tive, but can be difficult in
large dogs, dogs with long
or thick hair coats or elder-
ly or physically challenged
owners. A combination of
topical and systemic thera-
py would be the most
rapidly and totally effective
measure. The most com-
mon shampoo is
MALASEEB shampoo
and is used daily to twice
weekly.

Call to
advertise:

502-2371



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 9B







rr nee

@



Becoming more assertive

YOU may wonder why
becoming more assertive is
important or in fact relevant in
a loving relationship. You may
think that being in a couple
should be effortless and that
your partner should always
know what you need and want
instinctively. You may very well
feel that you have been togeth-
er so long that they should
know all your likes and dislikes
and wonder why you have to
‘spell out’ out everything to
them. Alternatively, people may
think of you as pushy, loud, out-
spoken or aggressive. Isn't that
just your way of getting what
you want? Isn't that the same as
being assertive? If that is the
case then let me ask you this.
Are you getting what you real-
ly want and need? Are you hap-
py when you get it and was it
given freely? Without a doubt,
relationships are full of com-
promises and deal makings.
What we hope to achieve from
all this negotiating is a com-
fortable and safe place to return
to at the end of a weary day.
At the beginning of a new love
relationship you may have spo-
ken up and expressed your pref-
erences. However as time goes
by the safety of the relationship
often prevents us from rocking
the boat and upsetting our part-
ners. You may feel it is just not
worth changing things and
peace and quiet is all you are
looking for.

But being assertive does not
mean being obnoxious, bully-
ing or aggressive. Assertiveness
is not about having a temper
tantrum like a two year old.

If you often feel like explod-
ing at your partner to get what
you want, not caring about the
consequences then go right
ahead but be prepared to deal
with the aftermath of your
tirade. Being assertive means
directly going after what you
want in an appropriate way.
This means avoiding the
extreme positions of being so
passive and compliant that your
needs are never considered or



met. Or the other extreme of
being so overbearing and
aggressive that you trample on
the feelings and rights of oth-
ers. Now on reading this you
may well consider this a deli-
cate path to walk or even an
impossible one to walk in your
present relationship. But this is
not so. The path of assertive-
ness is wide and one that is easy
to walk once you find the way
to negotiate it. The most impor-
tant requirements are to
acknowledge the need for
change and to then be motivat-
ed to make the appropriate
changes. A few basic steps to
keep in mind are timing as
being angry, tired or in a hurry
are not the best times to state
your requests. However, being
fearful for the right time and
over analyzing your partner's
mood is self-defeating. Focus
on your feelings and desires
instead of your partners. Use
the ‘I language’ meaning 'T feel
this’ or 'I'd like that’. It makes
the listener less defensive and
makes your words less accus-
ing. Remember the aim is to
encourage effective talking and
listening. This softens the situ-
ation and remember the ulti-
mate goal is to have your needs
met and at the same time to

honor your partner and listen
with empathy to their prefer-
ences and opinions.

On reading this you may feel
that this all sounds so kind and
considerate and essentially
impossible to attain. However,
we do know that happy couples
talk to each other like this. They
still assert themselves, get angry,
raise their voices and sometimes
even yell. The main and signifi-
cant difference is that they do
not play dirty. They do not
name call, belittle their part-
ners, generalise their criticisms,
or are sarcastic or contempeous.
There may in fact be some pos-
itive comments throughout the
conflict. So if it can work for
these people why can it not
work for you? Imagine if things
could improve in other aspects
of life that you would then feel
comfortable and confident to
say what you wanted in your
intimate life. We all know that
when we get what we want we
are happier and our partners
often reflect our happiness.
Once you know that it is possi-
ble and you can see the bond
deepening then your desire to
stay in this safe haven will only
continue. If these difficulties
have been going on for some
time and you still have not been
able to improve things then this
is when a relationship therapist
is able to help. Some times we
all have problems seeing anoth-
er person's point of view and it
takes an impartial party to help
see the way for a working com-
promise. Take care and be good
to yourself because we all
deserve happiness.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual
and Couples Relationship Thera-
pist. She is a Registered Nurse
and a Certified Clinical Sex Thera-
pist located at The Centre for
Renewing Relationships,
Grosvenor's Close West. She can
be contacted by calling 356-7983
or by e-mail at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or at
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com

@ By ALEX MISSICK



Tribune Features Reporter

MANY Bahamians are not known to be “nut
savvy” and tend to shy away from anything other
than the common peanut. Some were even scared
away from nuts during the low-fat craze of the last
few decades due to some nuts being high in oil and
calories, but now nuts are making a comeback.

NUTS

Loretta Simmons, manager of Just Nuts, located on Madeira
Street, is dedicated to offering a healthier lifestyle to Bahamians.
Mrs Simmons said she first saw the benefits of nuts back when she

was in the financial sector.

“T used to be a banker in a private trust company. I started selling
junk food from my desk drawer and one of my colleagues asked me

one day to sell something healthy. My first invest-
ment was around $50 because I thought it would-
n’t sell and surprisingly it was all gone within a

day,” Mrs Simmons said.

Mrs Simmons’ wide variety of nuts and seeds
come from places all over the world and she
enjoys spreading the wide variety.

“We get most of our products from the United
States, but we do have dates from Turkey, raw
cashews from India, and a few things out of Thai-

land,” Mrs Simmons said.

Nuts are excellent sources of protein, minerals,
"good" monounsaturated fats and other nutrients,
and they are good for the heart. Nuts are one of
the best plant sources of protein. They are rich in
fiber, phytonutrients and antioxidants such as Vit-

amin E and selenium.

The type of nut a person eats is not that impor-
tant, although some nuts have more heart-healthy
nutrients and fats than do others. Walnuts,
almonds, hazelnuts, Brazilian, almost every type
of nut has a lot of nutrition packed into a tiny
package. If someone has heart disease, eating nuts
instead of a less healthy snack can make it easier

to follow a heart-healthy diet.

Mrs Simmons does not just offer plain nuts, but
mixes a few of her nuts with raisins or makes dif-
ferent blends with a variety of flavors.

“We do blends like the tropical splash, which
consists of cranberries, almonds and banana chips.
We have the mango passion which has a mixture
of dried fruits and nuts, however, our biggest sell-
er is the almond and cranberry blend. We also have seeds such as
flax, sunflower and pumpkin seeds,” Mrs Simmons said.

Eating nuts reduces the risk of developing blood clots that can
cause a fatal heart attack. Nuts also improve the health of the lining
of the arteries. The evidence for the heart-health benefits of nuts is
not rock solid yet. The Food and Drug Administration only allows
food companies to say evidence "suggests but does not prove" that
eating nuts reduces heart disease risk.

To continue to spread the word about the health benefits of nuts,
Mrs Simmons said she has also started making baskets and party

trays to better serve her clients.

Purchase TWO Jumbo Pull-Ups

training pants plus ONE Pull-Ups

Clean Team Wipes. Circle the items on

your original store receipt(s}. Answer the “=

skill question. Deposit receipt(s) and completed
entry form into box provided at participating stores
or drop off to The d’Albenas Agency, Palmdale.

Contest ends April 6, 2009.

@® Registered trademark of Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.

Name:

Address:

Telephone:

Win a family
vacation for 4 to

Prize includes airfe
accommodations valued o
*3,000 plus ‘1,000 to spend.

Win a family vacation for 4 to Orlando from

Vacation to Orlando with Huggies P_|_-U_s

aU NIE
provides a wide
variety of nuts,
dried fruits and
veggies. All in an
effort to promote
terme AAG]
nee) ASS



rt
D1
4

Employees of The d‘Albenas Agency and Media Enterprises or their immediate families are not eligible to enter the contest.

To enter, attach store receipt(s) for
ONE Huggies Supreme and ONE
Huggies wipes or TWO Huggies
Snug&Dry and ONE Huggies wipes,
answer the skill question, attach
receipt(s) to your completed entry
and drop into the entry box at
participating stores or at The
d’Albenas Agency, Palmdale.
Contest ends April 6, 2009.

Employees of The d’Albenas Agency and Media Enterprises, and

‘their immediate families, are not eligible to enter.























PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





a

P

a

Who’s your daddy?

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IT SEEMS that for many Bahamian
men and women, the choice to pur-
posely cheat on their companion has
become the norm, especially where
many need not search to identify an
illegitimate child or the third wheel of
a co-existing relationship.

This week, the Barbershop is
attempting to learn why the choice of
‘sweethearting’ has become so accept-
able, and to what extent it impacts
future generations.

Stopping in at Barber Js precision
cuts on Carmichael Road, Tribune
Features spoke with a group of people
with interesting yet insightful opinions
on the issue.

First up was 32-year-old Barber
Antonio Williams, aka Rabbi, who
feels people decide to cheat because
they are attempting to fill a void that
existed in their relationships. Mr
Williams who is also married, said at
one time he thought that people only
cheated in response to their mate
doing so, and added that with men
especially, although a guy may decide
to cheat on his wife or girlfriend, it is
often too much for him to handle the
same fate.

However Mr Williams insist, a guy
who decides to cheat will do so when
there is something lacking in his main
relationship.

22-year-old beautician Angelica Stu-
art agrees that people cheat when
there is something missing in their rela-
tionship, however is concerned that
far too often men are given less flack
for cheating than women, which for
her is a serious problem.

When a man decides to take on an
extramarital affair for whatever reason,
Angelica said the worst reaction would
be his friends looking at him as a play-
boy, which really isn’t much of a back-
lash. However if a women should do
the same thing, then society would
look at her as a bad person.

Angelica who is also recently
engaged, said her relationship was
recently tested when an anonymous
young woman telephoned her fiancé
claiming to be his other woman.

“When she called, I answered the
phone, then she hung up on me. When
she called back, he answered, and they
were able to have a conversation.”

She said although she did automat-
ically think there was something fishy
about the call, she did what she
thought was best by confronting her
fiancé.

As Angelica and her mate have

66 Some people
learn trom what
happen to them,
while others say
it that's how my

old man was then
| will do it too. 9?

since been able to work things out,
some couples unfortunately experi-
ence a more substantial and damag-
ing result of sweet hearting, in the form
of an illegitimate child.

According to the 2000 Census
report, there were 13,643 single moth-
er headed households. Although some
of these may have resulted from a
divorce or death, there is without ques-
tion some contribution from the grow-
ing problem of ad-hoc relationships.

One patron who said he was a direct
result of this was 28-year-old William
Sears, who said while growing up he

always said to himself that he would
never become the kind of man his
father was.

“Some people learn from what hap-
pen to them, while others say if that’s
how my old man was then I will do it
too.”

Identifying the fact that many young
men in the community who come from
single parent houscholds see having
more than one partner as something of
the norm, William fears that the result
of that type of mentality will have a
detrimental affect on future young
Bahamians.

He said his experience of growing up
without a father made him question
on many occasions his place in the
world, and added that he would hate
to see another person go through the
same thing.

William who has one child with his
live-in girlfriend, also takes on a father-
ly role with her two other children.
He said that his way of bringing an
end to this community issue is to lend
his time and support to the children,
and to remind men that cheating at
any level is wrong, and in the end has
far reaching effects.

To comment on this latest Barber-
shop series, or to have your barber
shop featured in our next issue, email
lallen@tribunemedia.net.



Antonio ‘Rabbi’ Williams



Women and real estate - Managing your money

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

FOR many women particularly sin-
gles, managing money in this current
economic climate may prove chal-
lenging and a bit bewildering partic-
ularly with horror stories of persons
losing investments due to companies
falling bankrupt.

However, for the single woman
looking to invest, real estate remains
one of the surest and safest ways to
ensure a return of your hard earned
cash.

Marketing manager at King’s Real-
ty- Laurie Burrows, told Tribune
Woman that the company has seen a

SSeS SSS
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

OPERATIONS MANAGER

The Operations Manager will be responsible for the development, harmonization
and implementation of revised operational policies and procedures throughout
our branch and unit network. The ideal candidate will have strong leadership
and communication skills and bring focus to the operational needs of all
branches by providing support to customer service initiatives, regulatory
reporting and compliance, review of branch administrative controls, as well
as the development of collective operational goals for branch administrative

personnel.

Core Responsibilities:

definite increase in the amount of
women looking to invest and said
that a popular trend is to purchase
property in one of the island’s new
gated communities.

“Gated communities are great
investment opportunities because
they are sure to appreciate in value
and they have many of the amenities
that single women are looking for.
When you think about women, you
are thinking about a comfortable
price point.”

Ms Burrows said that despite the
economy, banks are still willing to
lend to persons and there are excel-
lent interest rates to be had once per-
sons are able to qualify.

“Different banks have different
options, you may even be able to get
a no deposit down, and some banks
are Offering 25-year-terms, so that
you can get the best monthly repay-
ment plan for you.

“A lot of women are choosing gat-
ed communities as a choice. For
example in Serenity, one of our
newest communities, women like the
fact that there is 24-hour security, a
clubhouse, gated entry, tennis and
basketball courts, a library and a
swimming pool. Serenity will also
eventually have pre schools for resi-
dents, so for women particularly sin-
gle mothers, it is an excellent invest-
ment because they are buying into a

community.

Additionally, Ms Burrows
explained that all of the amenities
are covered under a very reasonable
yearly maintenance fee, and noted
that if purchased separately would
add up to a great deal more.

“Extra expenses in the household is
definitely a factor for single women
interested in purchasing real estate,”
she added.

Another avenue, some women are
taking is to purchase a duplex prop-
erty, which enables them to live in a
one half, while using the second half
as income that they can then apply to
the mortgage.

Kingsley Edgecombe, the head of

King’s Realty noted that the value
of many of the gated communities in
Nassau have already seen significant
appreciation -in some cases where
lots were initially sold for $65,000
within a year they were selling at
$100,000 and in another case, where
lots were initially priced at $85,000
they have seen the price jump to at
least $125,000 within a year.

He added that this is an ideal time
for investing. He noted for example,
that Serenity, is priced below mar-
ket value, because in this time of eco-
nomic challenges, the developers
want to be able to cater in some way
to locals- the regular person who
wants to capitalise on their future.

SSeS SSeS ee
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

BRANCH MANAGER

The Branch Manager will be responsible for the day to day achievement of
the branch’s sales and service goals. The ideal candidate will have strong
leadership and communication skills and bring focus to the execution of the
branch business plan, inclusive of sales administration and the overall
development of branch staff.

Core Responsibilities:

Responsible for the quality and efficiency of all branch customer service
initiatives for all credit and deposit products and services

Contributes to the revision and implementation of the Bank’s policies and
procedures

Reviewing and making recommendations for the improvement in
Management Reporting

Identifying areas of opportunity for improvement of operating efficiency
Prepares and submits Reports on all banking operations to Senior
Management

Monitor Branch performances against approved targets

Monitors compliance of operations with Bank’s policies and procedures,
as well as recommendations made by internal audit and external parties
Ensures Bank is operating in accordance with regulatory requirements
Liaising with departmental heads to maintain database of recommendations
and request of operational changes

Assist in establishing operational objectives and monitoring the achievement
of the objectives

Reviewing operations job descriptions and functions in accordance with
ongoing operational changes.

Job Requirements:

* Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.
Knowledge of Banking laws, including requirements of The Central Bank
of The Bahamas which governs Commercial Banking.
Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced environment
Strong supervisory and customer service skills are essential.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include:

Competitive salary and benefits package, commensurate with work experience
and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later than March 31st,
2009 to:

DA # 69842
c/oThe Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com



Assists in the development of Branch targets for retail sales and operations
Provides leadership in the attainment of all branch sales and service goals,
Ensure that the Branch is operating in accordance with the Bank’s policies
and procedures and all regulatory requirements including but not limited
to Central Bank and AML.

Serves as lead customer service advocate at the branch level

Provides guidance to staff, where necessary on all service matters, ensuring
that customer needs are heard, understood and resolved

Ensuring staff’s awareness and use of bank product information
Responsible for all branch sales initiatives, inclusive of management of
the branch loan and deposit portfolio and mitigating Bank exposure
Responsible for reporting to Senior Management on the overall operations
of the Branch including financial and non-financial matters;

Provides leadership in the personal development of all branch staff through
the articulation and achievement of the Bank’s goals and objectives
Identifies skill deficiencies and opportunities for training for all Branch
staff

Job Requirements:

Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.

Knowledge of Banking laws, including requirements of The Central Bank
of The Bahamas which governs Commercial Banking.

Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced
environment

Strong supervisory and customer service skills are essential.

Excellent verbal and written communication skills.

Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include:

Competitive salary and benefits package commensurate with work experience
and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later than March 31*,
2009 to:

DA# 69842A
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com



THE TRIBUNE




AY



ORLANDO
































_ High:78° F/26°C” Plenty of sun. Patchy clouds. as a with Clouds and sunshine. Partly sunny. acne
how: ee a a , , , :
w~ “s High: 79 High: 81 High: 79 High: 79
© e High: 82° Low: 71° Low: 71° Low: 69° Low: 68° Low: 67°
j Ser vee ae Ea AccuWeather RealFeel
igh: 78° F/26° oy ¢ [88°-69°F 84°-68° F
Low: 64° F/18°C ‘ - ,: = The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel eT is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
. @ ra o- elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.
ay mow
* yt :
IW “es Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
{ ABACO Temperature
y Ne HiQh cane eee 82° F/28° C
f ma. High: 80° F/27°C Low... 70° F/21° C
a e 1 oy Low: 67° F/19°C Normal high... 79° F/26° C
- Normal low 65° F/18° C
” @WESTPALMBEACH . Last year's High ....ssecccsesccsssseessseeee 88° F/31° C
ae High: 80° F/27°C Last year's OW. oooecccccsseccscessseeeeeee 69° F/20° C
Low: 65° F/18°C @ i Precipitation,
As of 2 p.m. yesterday ......cccccccccccenseeceneee 0.00"
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT — Yeartodate 2. as. ,
High: 84° F/29° C High: 77° F/25° C Normal year to date oo. 4.33"
Low.6s"F20°c an Low: 65° F/18° C
; AccuWeather.com

®. .
. TT

High: 82° F/28° C

Low: 69°F/21°C NASSAU

ta Low: 71° F/22°C
«<7 a

KEY WEST
High: 78° F/26° C —_
Low: 70°F/21°C por’
a =f
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= ) on
ea
ANDROS

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's : Oe
highs and tonights's lows. High: 86° F/30° C

Low: 67° F/19°C



High: 82° F/28° C

GREAT EXUMA

ELEUTHERA
High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 67° F/19°C

High: 81° F/27° C

Low: 70° F/21°C

Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W

F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 70/21 44/6 s 72/22 43/6 s Indianapolis 73/22 48/8 s 65/18 33/0 sh Philadelphia 55/12 40/4 pe
Anchorage 24/-4 11/-11 s 23/-5 10/-12 Jacksonville 71/21 5412 pe 73/22 54/12 pc Phoenix 87/30 58/14 $s
Atlanta 72/22 49/9 pe 69/20 50/10 s Kansas City 78/25 51/0 s 63/17 36/2 t Pittsburgh 65/18 46/7 s
Atlantic City 49/9 38/3 pce 58/14 42/5 pc Las Vegas 80/26 54/12 s 83/28 56/13 s Portland, OR 52/11 40/4 sh
Baltimore 54/12 40/4 pe 6417 43/6 pc Little Rock 73/22 50/10 s 79/26 49/9 s Raleigh-Durham 60/15 40/4 pc
Boston 44/6 351 s 56/13 41/5 pc Los Angeles 74/23 54/12 s 77/25 56/13 $s St. Louis 76/24 53/11 s
Buffalo 58/14 45/7 s§ 56/13 33/0 1 Louisville 70/21 48/8 s 74/23 43/6 pc Salt Lake City 62/16 38/3 c
Charleston, SC 68/20 47/8 pce 72/22 50/10 pc Memphis 74/23 52/1 pe 73/22 50/10 s San Antonio 82/27 54/12 $s
Chicago 73/22 42/5 s§ 57/13 30/-1 1 Miami 82/27 68/20 pc 79/26 67/19 pc San Diego 70/21 56/13 pc
Cleveland 66/18 46/7 s 6116 33/0 1 Minneapolis 58/14 37/2 s 47/8 26/-3 pc San Francisco 64/17 48/8 pc
Dallas 80/26 55/12 s 81/27 51/10 s Nashville 74/23, 47/8 pe 73/22 47/8 s Seattle 48/8 39/3 sh
Denver 72/22 33/0 pe 58/14 31/0 pc New Orleans 74/23 55412 pe 76/24 54/12 s Tallahassee 76/24 53/11 pe
Detroit 65/18 45/7 § 56/13 32/0 1 New York 5442 42/5 pe 55/12 46/7 pc Tampa 78/25 60/15 c
Honolulu 78/25 64/17 c¢ 79/26 70/21 sh Oklahoma City 83/28 54/12 s 78/25 41/5 $s Tucson 83/28 51/10 s
Houston 80/26 56/13 s 78/25 56/13 s Orlando 78/25 62/16 c 79/26 61/16 pc Washington, DC 54/12 43/6 pc

Wednesday

High
F/C
63/17
89/31
69/20
54/12
67/19
71/21
61/16
80/26
70/21
65/18
51/10
75/23
79/26
85/29
67/19

Low

F/C
44/6
60/15
33/3
41/5
46/7
39/3
39/3
56/13
56/13
49/9
40/4
52/11
60/15
52/11
45/7

WwW

pe

pe

sh

pe

pe

pe
pe

pe

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009

CATISLAND

High: 81° F/27° C
Low: 64° F/18°C

O



A "ar NY

5 az
: | g|i0 1

o|1|2

LOW



MODERATE

3|4|5



6|7

HIGH



\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

ea Po

High
ion Bae
Wednesday | an
Thursday ay
Ba ins

TT re

Sunrise...... 717 am. Moonrise... . 12:55 a.m.

Sunset....... 7:20 p.m. Moonset... . 11:28 a.m.
Last New First Full

Mar. 18 Mar. 26

SAN SALVADOR

O

High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 67°F/19°C

LONGISLAND
High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 67° F/19°C

2

MAYAGUANA
High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 66° F/19° C

CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS

RAGGED ISLAND
High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 65° F/18° C

High: 86° F/30° C

Low: 69° F/21°C

GREAT INAGUA .

High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 69° F/21°C

O

Ht.(fi.) Low

25 7:08 a.m.
2.1 7:06 p.m.
24 8:03 a.m.
2.0 8:03 p.m.
2.3 9:04 a.m.
2.0 9:06 p.m.
2.3 10:04 a.m.
2.0 10:11 p.m.

Apr. 2

0.5
0.4

0.6
0.5

0.6
0.5

0.6
0.5



Apr. 9







rhe
=~



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

lr NOR S

alii

High
F/C
88/31
50/10
43/6
60/15
72/22
95/35
84/28
61/16
79/26
64/17
45/7
49/9
69/20
65/18
57/13
45/7
79/26
72/22
93/33
38/3
86/30
82/27
81/27
47/8
54/12
57/13
59/15
34/1
86/30
36/2
77/25
86/30
50/10
56/13
72/22
85/29
83/28
59/15
70/21
84/28
73/22
81/27
50/10
34/1
48/8
83/28
90/32
36/2
59/15
48/8
83/28
88/31
61/16
82/27
88/31
90/32
88/31
84/28
82/27
59/15
36/2
77/25
79/26
61/16
54/12
90/32
46/7
48/8
37/2
33/0



Wednesday

High
F/C
87/30
46/7
45/7
58/14
73/22
91/32
85/29
60/15
81/27
62/16
41/5
43/6
67/19
65/18
54/12
47/8
79/26
73/22
95/35
46/7
86/30
84/28
78/25
45/7
55/12
52/11
59/15
44/6
82/27
36/2
79/26
84/28
44/6
56/13
70/21
83/28
82/27
57/13
70/21
88/31
70/21
84/28
48/8
34/1
47/8
84/28
91/32
34/1
57/13
44/6
83/28
86/30
61/16
81/27
89/31
90/32
90/32
82/27
82/27
57/13
36/2
79/26
80/26
66/18
51/10
86/30
48/8
42/5
36/2
28/-2

Low
F/C
73/22
38/3
30/-1
44/6
63/17
77/25
75/23
48/8
50/10

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

sh

wn
=

pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

SSA a er






MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
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TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009



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New evidence suggests Pindling was Jamaican N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.95TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PLENTY OFSUN HIGH 82F LOW 71F F E A T U R E S S EE‘WOMAN’ SECTION S P O R T S Men in make-up SEEPAGEELEVEN Preparing for stadium work A STONISHING new evi dence has e merged to suggest that Sir Lynden Pin d ling was defi nitelya Jamaican. Sources from t he Cotton Tree community in Trelawneyp arish, Jamaica, have come forward to claim “categorically” that he was born there of Jamaican parents. There is no doubt about this,” a Jamaican expatriate told The Tribune . “He was born in Ulster Spring Hospital in the parish of Trelawney and was sent to the Bahamas as a young boy. “When he became prime minister of the Bahamas he was held up to the people of the parish as an example of someone from their own community who emerged from humble roots to do well in the wider world.” In fact, said the source, Sir Lynden actually visited the village in the mid-1980s, calling in at the old school building once Sources from Caribbean nation claim ‘categ or icall that f or mer Bahamas PM was born there The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR D OUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com B AHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E SEE page eight SIR LYNDEN PINDLING New witness accounts support T ynes Sr’s claims M ORE first-hand witness accounts are e merging to support Chauncey Tynes Sr’s claims that Sir Lynden Pindling was receiving regular pay-offs from drug czar Carlos ‘Joe’ Lehder. A former policeman who took part in what he called a “mock operation” againstL ehder’s drug enterprise on Norman’s Cay told The Tribune yesterday: “Mr Tynes was right on target. Everything he said was cor rect.” T he policeman said senior officers taking part in the so-called “raid” were given a red suitcase full of cash. “There must have been a million dollars in that case,” he said. “The officers had been sent down there after Norman’s Cay had been raised in parliament. But when they arrived,t he senior officers were drinking around on the cay. And the s uitcase was waiting there as a pay-off.” The officer’s claim fits in with other accounts of activities on the cay, where Pindling was said to have attended numer-o us Lehder parties. “We went on that mock operation to lead people to believe that the government was doing something aboutt he drug operation,” he said. “But the red suitcase full of cash was handed to an officer. Several senior officers were being paid off at that time.” A prominent Nassau attorney, who for professional reasons does not wish to be named, has also backed Mr Tynes’ PR OPOSEDUNEMPLOYMENTBENEFIT DETAILS n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net FLANKED by members of the trade unions, Employers Confederation and the National Insurance Board, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham revealed further details of the government’s proposed Unemployment Benefit Programme first foreshadowed in the House of Assembly some months ago. With a starting date slated for April 20, Prime Minister Ingraham said that this programme will be develPRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham, flanked by Minister of State for Social Services L oretta Butler-Turner and MinisterofLabourDion Foulkes,givesdetailson the proposed Unemployment Benefit Programme. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page eight Ex-policeman backs allegations that former PM received pay-offs from drug czar C HAUNCEY TYNES SR SEE page eight n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@ tribunemedia.net CLICO policy-holders want official heads to roll over failure of the insur ance company, according to Bishop Simeon Hall. The New Covenant Baptist Church leader claimed there is a “growing sentiment” among pol icy-holders whom he has come into contact with that certain government officials must be held to account over the matter. “Governments are expected to protect the interests of the citi zenry and someone is found wanting. We are talking govern ment officials in the Ministry of Finance, someone was derelict in their duty to allow it to get to this stage,” said the vocal Bishop. Labour lawyer Obie Ferguson, joined by Godfrey “Pro” Pinder, were scheduled to be on hand to give free legal advice to the company’s policy-holders at a meeting last night one which the church leader suggested may also culmi nate in the call for the resigna tions of those government officials “responsible” for the CLICO collapse. The gathering, which got underway at New Covenant Baptist Church on the East-West Highway at 7pm, was called by Hall himself. CLICO (Bahamas icy-holders are unaware at this stage what funds, if any, they will have returned to them or if their policies will be sold to another insurance company. Speaking with The Tribune ahead of the meeting, Bishop Hall said that “based on the feeling” of those present and the advice received, they will decide whether to file an appearance today in advance of the liquida tion application for the insolvent insurance company set to be heard in court tomorrow. Interested parties have until today to do so. The government, via the Registrar of Insurance companies, ini tiated a winding-up order for the company on February 24, 2009. A statement said this was done to protect the interests of policyholders in the face of revelations that the company’s liabilities far CLICO policy-holders ‘want certain government officials held to account’ BISHOP SIMEONHALL SEE page eight n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net CHINESE investment in Bahamar could bring in more visitors from China and inspire more Chinese investment, first secretary to the Chinese Ambassador Jian Tan has said. The $2.6 billion agreement between the China State Construction Engineering Corporation, the Export-Import Bank of China and Bahamar announced last week is still in the formative stages. And although Mr Tan said he is not aware of how much of a stake the Chinese have in the project, or how much the Chinese hope to profit from it, he hopes details will be ironed out for the Bahamian government to review and approve the project so building can get under way and be completed in time to receive tourists in a more buoyant SEE page eight Chinese Bahamar investment ‘could bring in more visitors’ I Nthe largest donation of its history, Bank of The Bahamas pledged $250,000 over a fiveyear period to fund literacyr esearch at The College of The Bahamas (COB results that are expected to filter down into classrooms across the nation to improve the most basic skill required for success, the ability to read and write. The partnership between the bank and the college, announced at a March 12 press conference at COB, will finance the National Literacy Diagnostic Research Centre, headed by Dr Ruth Sumner, who has spent 10 years studying literacy. The largest corporate grant in t he college’s history is for research that will be a pet project of COB president Janyne Hodder, a former readingt eacher who believes the information it will reveal in how best to teach reading will bolster the basic foundation of education. That was the intention when COB put out the call for a partner for the five-year programme. “Bank of The Bahamas has answered the call and will participate by being part of the solution to a major national challenge,” president Hodder said. “We thank the Bank of The Bahamas deeply and sincerely Largest ever Bank of Bahamas donation will fund literacy research at COB SEE page eight

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 677 1111 nassau 688 1111 freeport www.indigonetworks.com still with Vonage? o nephone gives you everything vonage has and more!switch now and get 1stmonth free! what you get? vonageResidential Basic Plan (includes monthly taxes & fees$23.49I n-Plan Calling Destinations US, Canada only I nternational Telephone Number US only( Virtual Number)Local Phone Numbere.g. 242-677-XXXXN ot availableMonthly Contract No(2 year minCLASS Features Local Customer Service & Support B uy Bahamian Family Island & Caribbean Calling Plan Family Island In-Network FREE Calls $19.95U S, Canada, 10 Europe Destinations US, Canada, UKFREEYES YESYESYES Y ESFREE N o NoY es No No T HE Tribune w as lumped with D arth Vader and the biblical demon Mammon last night asa mong the representatives of the "forces of darkness". M ixing Star Wars metaphors with bible references, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell told supporters they are “on the good side of the Force”, whereas Tribune pub-l isher Eileen Carron and her newspaper “represent the Forceso f darkness, the dark side of the Force. The Force is strong with us. We shall overcome. May the good Force continue to be with you all,” he said. Addressing the party faithful l ast night at a branch meeting in his constituency, Mr Mitchell e xploded with anger over an arti cle by Tribune managing editor J ohn Marquis which told the sto ry of Chauncey Tynes Jr, who went missing in 1983 while piloting a flight from Exuma to Nassau. His father, former PLP treas urer Chauncey Tynes Sr, was quoted as saying he believes his s on was murdered because he knew too much of the association b etween former prime minister Sir Lynden Pindling and Colom bian drug cartel leader Joe Lehder. Mr Mitchell began by cautioning that time should be wasted on the issue, as it is a “deliberates ideshow and distraction” from more important matters, like the e conomy. “Let’s not spend too much time on this. I am not even sure how many people read it. I do not want to be a part of spreading it,” he said. Nevertheless, he proceeded to focus on the matter for the duration of his speech. Mr Mitchell accused The Tri b une o f libelling the late Sir Lynden Pindling, but then admitted that it is legally impossible to libel a dead person. He then claimed the accepted view that former Tribune editor Sir Etienne Dupuch was responsible for breaking down the bar riers of official racial discriminat ion in the Bahamas is nothing but a “popular myth”. H e said Sir Etienne “stole the idea” of the resolution to end r acial discrimination from the PLP, “used the PLP to get a successful outcome, but that even the act that he did was not the end of racial discrimination in the B ahamas. Some would argue that it was a failure. I pronounce noo pinion on it. “Imagine then how outraged E ileen Carron would be to hear that about her father’s reputa tion,” Mr Mitchell said. “But like Sir Lynden, Etienne Dupuch is dead and so you can say anything a bout him because you cannot defame or libel him in law. It does n ot even have to be true. You can say anything without any l egal consequence of any kind.” He went on to suggest that the record of the Commission of Inquiry into casino gambling reflects that Sir Etienne accepted c onsultancy fees from the former UBP government. The MP c laimed that in reality, this money was intended to ensure The T ribune’s l oyalty in the debate o ver casino gambling in the Bahamas. M r Mitchell admitted that Sir Etienne wrote to the government t o protest the payments, and was told to turn the money over to charity – but, he added, “if you accept the $10,000, that is $10,000 that you did not have to go intoy our pocket to give to charity. You received the benefit of it.” M r Mitchell went on to refer to Tribune managing editor John M arquis as a “paid journalistic assassin”, adding that in addition to his interview with Chauncey Tynes Sr, “there is another example of his taking the words of ano ld man in dementia and using that to spin fantastic and untrue s tories for profit. “We made a mistake when we w ere in office by allowing him to remain in the country. Pindling kicked him out. We ought to have. We did not,” Mr Mitchell added. S peaking of both Mrs Carron and Mr Marquis, the MP said: You can imagine the extreme hate they both bear for me b ecause what they say matters not one wit to me. I am confident in who I am and nothing either one of them can say about me makes any difference to me. I have my story to tell and I am not afraid to tell it. I have at myd isposal all the records and slow ly but surely I will be sure that t he other side is told.” According to Mr Mitchell, the “real concern” represented by the article is that The Tribune “fails to understand that in a small country like this it is often necessary to let bygones be just that; bygones.” He said the story risked reviving “a whole set of social issues t hat most of us thought had been solved in the 1960s and the 1970s. The society needs to move on.” n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter DEFENDANT Sean Brown told police during a t aped interview three years ago that he did not need a lawyer as he was there to tell the truth about the armed robbery and murder of businessman Keith Carey. “I ain' need no lawyer, I am here to tell the truth,” B rown replied when questioned by detectives on March 28, 2006. During the interview, Brown, 32, said that the plan to rob businessman Keith Carey was formed b efore he came to Nassau from Eleuthera in July 2005. He said that a few days before the murder, he and his cousin Dwight Knowles went to the Esso gas station on Carmichael Road, where they met with one of Carey's employees to discuss how mone y is transported from the gas station to the bank. B rown said he and Knowles picked up Jamal Glinton alias 'Bumper' and his girlfriend from his Nassau Village home on the morning of February 27. Brown told police that after dropping Glinton's girlfriend and her sister off at the police barracks thatm orning, he and the two men drove to the Esso gas station on Carmichael Road. "I went to talk to Carey's worker. He told me that the boss was inside getting the money together a nd that he soon pull off," Brown said. Brown told police that Carey came out of the gas station a short time later carrying a red and black bag. He told police that he, Knowles and Glinton followed Carey to the Bank of the Bahamas off Tonique Williams Darling Highway in Knowles' car. "After we pulled up in the Bank of the Bahamas y ard, 'Bumper' jumped out of the back seat, pushed him down, shot him twice, take the bag and jumped in the back seat," Brown said. After the incident, the men travelled to Carmichael Road where Knowles removed thel icence plate from the car, Brown said. He said that he, Knowles and Glinton rode with a friend to Lincoln Boulevard, then walked to Miami Street where they went to a house that Glinton freq uented and split the money. Brown told police that they each received $16,000 and that after the money had been divided, they went their separate ways. He said he and Knowles went to Podoleo Street where they met a man named Earnest, who has testified for the prosecution. Brown said that he bought a car from Earnest for about $8,000, went to pick up his mother, and drove Knowles to Carmichael Road to pick his car up and t ake it to get spray painted. He also told police of how he went shopping for some clothes and shoes and later rented a hotel room. Brown said a friend helped him charter a flight to the Berry Islands four days after the incident. " I was scared after I heard the news that Carey was killed,” Brown said, adding that he told his friend Dennis that he and his girlfriend were having problems and that he needed to get off the island. H e said he gave Dennis $400 to get him on a flight. Last Friday, the jury watched a taped police interview of murder accused Dwight Knowles. Keith Carey, 43, was shot and killed on the steps of the Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique Williams-D arling Highway before he was able to deposit $40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Station, which he operated. Mitchell: Tribune represents ‘the forces of darkness’ T HE Bahamas’ close neighbour, the territory of the Turks and Caicos Islands, is set to have its Cabinet dissolved and its ministerial p owers suspended by Britain. This decision by Britain follows a damning report into allegations of corruption within the Islands’ C abinet and House of Assembly, the UK’s Foreign Office (FCO (pictured He is accused of building a multi-million dollar fortune since coming to power in 2003. In what would be a major blow to the move towards independence by the Turks and Caicos Islands, the London-appointed governor of the territory, Gordon Wetherell, said yesterday that an order has been drafted to suspend parts of the constitution and transfer powers and functions of government ministers to him. The order will be submitted to the queen for approval on Wednesday before going to the British parliament on March 25, the Associated Press reported yesterday. Foreign Office Minister Gillian Merron, in a written statement to MPs, said an investigation into Turks and Caicos’ administration found a “high probability of systemic corruption or serious dishonesty.” “The government has formed the view that parts of the constitution will need to be suspended and has decided to take steps to enable it to do so,” Mrs Merron said. Defendant told police: ‘I ain' need no lawyer, I am here to tell the truth’ KEITH CAREY MURDER/ARMED ROBBERY CASE F red Mitchell T urks and Caicos Cabinet set to be dissolved

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 3 Teenager in court on armed robbery charge Police may seek overseas help in identifying remains In brief A n 18-year-old man was remanded to Her Majesty's Prison yesterday after being arraigned on an armed robbery charge. Hughes Jean appeared before Magistrate Susan Sylvester at Court 11, Nassau Street. It is alleged that on Thursday March 12, while concerned with a nother and armed with a knife, Jean robbed Dillan Bethel of $41 cash, one gold ring valued a $600, one gold wrist chain valued at $350 and a rope chain holding a five dollar coin charm valued at $350. Jean was not required to plead to the charge. The case has been adjourned to August 21. Two teenagers were remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison yesterday after being arraigned in a Magistrates Court on an armed robbery charge. A 17-year-old of Bonaby Alley appeared along with Timothy Williams before Magistrate Susan S ylvester in Court 11, Nassau Street yesterday. It is alleged that on Wednesd ay, March 11 the two men robbed Estella Bonamy of $233 c ash. It is further alleged that the accused caused harm to Bonamy. They were not required to e nter a plea to the charges and the case has been adjourned to A ugust 7. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net T HE first building materials have arrived at the National Stadium site but as Chinese workers are delayed in Beijing, work will not begin on schedule. A total of 17 containers of equipment, piling and foundation materials were unloaded at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre site in Thompson Boulevard last Friday ready for work to commence on Friday March 20. But construction will suffer a s hort delay as 20 Chinese technical workers scheduled to start this week are still waiting for theirB ritish visas to be processed. First secretary of the Chinese Embassy in Nassau Jian Tan said t he workers had their Bahamian visas processed quickly, but need to have British visas so they can t ravel through the United Kingdom en route to the Bahamas. “We are very appreciative for t he Bahamian visas which were granted very quickly,” he said. “And hopefully the UK visas will come soon so they can get t heir tickets at the end of March, a nd fly to the Bahamas to start working.” The project has suffered a n umber of setbacks since the Chinese government agreed to build the National Stadium when former Prime Minister Perry Christie visited The People’s Republic of C hina in 2004. Ground was broken in 2006 a nd the stadium was set for completion in July 2007, but there has been little action at the site of the future mega-stadium since. M M i i s s m m a a n n a a g g e e m m e e n n t t FNM ministers have blamed the delays on mismanagement by the former PLP administration, a nd since coming to office in 2007, FNM Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister has vowed to move the projectf orward. H e said this latest delay is but a minor glitch in operations as the Bahamian government remains committed to live up to its oblig-a tions and accelerate the project where possible. Mr Bannister added: “We ensured the shipment cleared the p orts of entry and road tax and everything were straightened out. We did the visas and work permits for the workers and we were expecting them this week. This thing has been set back for three years and I promised to get it started and we are getting it started.” M r Bannister said he was not aware the workers had been delayed but said it was not a serious concern. “These are minor obstacles in t he big picture,” Mr Bannister said. “We are looking at a big project in terms of moving it ahead and there will always be m inor things holding it up, but w e have been trying to make sure w e move it ahead so we have a s tadium that goes according to p lan.” The stadium is expected to take t wo-and-a-half to three years to complete and will have a $30 mill ion value. Mr Bannister said it will be the most fantastic stadium in the r egion.” P RIME Minister Hubert Ingraham, who recently returned from a C ARICOM Heads of Government meeting in Guyana, said that he was very pleased that the Bahamian people have followed his words to the letter and contin u ed to make their payments to CLICO Bahamas despite the i nsurance company being placed in liquidation by the Registrar ofI nsurance Companies. Mr Ingraham revealed yester d ay that last Friday, regulators of insurance companies from around the Caribbean met in Trinidad, where they were mandated to prep are a report for the heads of government. S ince that meeting, the regulators have proposed holding another meeting in Barbados before the end of this month to continue talks on CLICO and other matters. And we have determined that this is a Caribbean-wide problem a nd that no individual country will seek to go on its own without con s ultation with the group,” Mr Ingraham said. “And we therefore w ill be in a position to make some determinations based on the reports which we will receive from the regulators of insurance”. First building materials arrive at the National Stadium site But project delayed as Chinese workers are held up in Beijing Desmond Bannister POLICE anticipate having to c all in the services of a foreign forensic specialist to help them i dentify skeletal remains found earlier this month. S uperintendent Elsworth Moss, officer in-charge of the Central Detective Unit (CDU The Tribune that the efforts by a local pathologist to find sufficient clues a bout the identity of the bones were inconclusive. H e said provisions should be made this month to either have t he bones examined in the Bahamas by the specialist or to have them shipped abroad for inspection. It is hoped that with the help from a forensic specialist, p olice will be able to determine the gender of the victim, along w ith other clues. PM pleased Bahamians continue to make payments to CLICO Bahamas H ubert Ingraham

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. I have just read the letter from Mr Carey in Eleuthera (Tribune, Monday March 9, 2009) concerning the wild horses roaming across his farm land and causing thousands of dollars of damage. I whole heartedly sympathise with him as loose horses are a danger to themselves and their surroundings. The problem can only get worse as, presumably, the herd is increasing by continued breeding each year. The fact of the matter is that once a horse has reached a certain age without training it is almost impossible to socialise it training a young foal is a long and arduous task best left to professionals. It involves daily handling and exercise for some years before the animal can be deemed safe for the average rider. To imagine that these animals could be caught and boated across to Half Moon Cay for use by tourists is insane. The horses used for tourist activity need to be very well broken and trained to riding from birth. Even with all that, not all horses are suited to the job. Former wild horses just won’t fit the bill. The sad fact of the matter is that the Eleuthera horses are basically useless and a danger to both the farming industry and themselves. When a wild horse becomes sick or injured there is virtually no way of treating it as it cannot be handled by the veterinarian. And so the animal suffers or dies in agony. There are professionals in the S tates who can catch and corral them if anyone is prepared to foot the bill as their services are very costly due to the dangerous nature of the work. Andros dis covered this when they had to solve their own wild horse problem some years ago. I believe that a couple of the horses there were salvaged but the rest had to be euthanized. If government or even private sources could come up with the money, this is the only viable way of solving the problem. There is, of course, a danger that the bleeding heart sector of the animal activists become involved which will complicate things. Horses are not pets, they are livestock and need to be treated as such. There are many wannabe horse “experts” in the B ahamas! It will be interesting to see what solution can be taken by government agencies to rid Eleuthera of this vexing problem. S SMITH Nassau, March, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm BELFAST, Northern Ireland (AP Irish Republican Army dissidents gunned down their first British security forces in more than ad ecade, they hoped to provoke a steely security crackdown and tit-for-tat attacks that would drag Belfast back into the bad old days. B ut Northern Ireland, for decades trapped in a cycle of grievance and vengeance, seems to havel earned from its horror-filled past. M ilitants from British Protestant districts who l ong exacted eye-for-an-eye retaliation against C atholics have held their fire, instead reaching out new hands of friendship to old enemies. Thous ands of soldiers have remained confined to their barracks well away from the working-class Irish C atholic districts, where IRA splinter groups are trying to recruit the impressionable, idle young. " The dissidents' only real hope is that the British do something stupid, play into their hands w ith some overreaction," said Brian Feeney, a B elfast political commentator and Catholic schoolteacher. "It looks as though they (British security a uthorities) are not going to fall into the trap laid for them." "We're finally seeing that the policy of e ye for an eye just leaves everybody blind. The peace process means we're getting to know people o n the other side as flesh-and-blood human beings, not targets," said Jackie McDonald, senior comm ander of a working-class Protestant paramili tary group called the Ulster Defence Association that has stuck to a cease-fire. In the past, he said, reprisal would have been automatic. "Now times have changed and (pro-British l oyalist paramilitaries have matured," said McDonald, who long directed the killings of Catholics a nd spent several years in prison for issuing death threats. "They'll not do what some (Irish l ican with a gun wants them to do." When the two main dissident groups struck the Real IRA killed two soldiers outside an army base Saturday and a Continuity IRA gunman shota policeman through the back of the head Monday analysts and politicians appeared evenly divided about what the consequences would be. The k illings highlighted one high-risk consequence of peacemaking. Political efforts to soften Catholic h ostility toward Northern Ireland, the predomi nantly Protestant corner of the island that stayed British when the rest of Ireland won independence in 1921, required security forces to "demilitarize" even though the threat from IRA dissi d ents continued. A network of surveillance posts and fortified road checkpoints has been removed f rom the border, where the dissidents are strongest. The 7,500-member police force increasingly patrols i n normal uniforms and cars, not bulletproof vests and armored cars. And the 4,000 remaining troops, who once shadowed police on patrols in Catholic areas, have been restricted to training for missions overseas. As a result, British forces andp olice in Northern Ireland are more vulnerable. Dissidents have mounted more than 20 attacks in l ittle more than a year, wounding several police officers in gun, rocket and bomb attacks. T he past week's killings were on targets that simply wouldn't have existed a few years ago. Constable Stephen Carroll, 48, was shot through the back window of a normal patrol car; a few years ago, he would have arrived into any hard-line Catholic neighbourhood in a thick-armored Land Rover with tiny, bulletproof windows. The soldiersw ere killed because the prevailing peace convinced troops it was safe to walk outside the walled base, unarmed and without body armour, tor etrieve a fast-food order. Two Real IRA gunmen waited for Domino's Pizza's to arrive andr aked the crowd with 60 bullets; two soldiers died a nd four other people, including both delivery m en, were badly wounded. B ut most analysts say the British security forces have been at risk for years as wider peacemaking g oals were pursued. They argue that what's surprising is that the dissidents didn't manage a "kill" l ong before now. "Why now? Maybe because they were lucky. T hey have been trying very hard for a long time to kill a policeman," said Malachi O'Doherty, a B elfast political analyst and author who is sceptic al that the dissidents have "upped their game." Protestant hard-liners led by Jim Allister, a E uropean Parliament member who has opposed most of the compromises in the past 15 years of p eacemaking, have been the loudest voice for a return to heavy-handed security. Allister said B ritain's elite undercover killers, the Special Air Service, should be redeployed in Northern Irel and. Some rank-and-file police officers have sup ported the call. But SAS strikes have had mixed results in the past. They are credited with breaking the IRA's confidence in the late 1980s and early 1990s by decimating several IRA units, but at the s ame time the attacks fueled anti-British sentiments and the IRA's ability to attract recruits. T his doesn't stop Allister from fantasizing about striking back. The police in recent weeks have b rought in army specialists who are expert in the arts of electronic surveillance and eavesdropping. But police chief Hugh Orde, who possesses political skills rare in a law enforcement official, insists his force will never ask troops for on-the-beat b ackup even if the dissidents increase the violence. Analysts say the current restraint should k eep Northern Ireland from descending into "war zone" status, and ensure that teenage Catholics are m ore likely to support and join tomorrow's police, not yesterday's gunmen. The "loyalist" extremists killed nearly 1,000 before calling a joint 1994 cease-fire that still feels shaky today, because they refuse to surrender t heir weapons stocks as the peace process demands. The IRA, by contrast, formally r enounced violence and disarmed in 2005. McDonald and one of his group's budding p oliticians, Frankie Gallagher, admit they've been nervous about the possibility that young Protestant hotheads might try to extract revenge. Earlier this week they led a group of UDA figures to meet Belfast mayor, Tom Hartley of SinnF ein, the IRA-linked party that today represents most Catholics. A couple decades ago, McDonald m ight have sent hit men to kill Hartley. They had never met him or other "Sinners," shorthand for H artley's party. Their private chat went so well, they did joint interviews on Belfast TV and went to a peace rally together. (Article was written by Shawn Pogatchnik, AP Getting rid of Eleuthera’s horses problem LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Belfast chooses peace in face of terror EDITOR, The Tribune. To paraphrase the Lexicon Webster Dictio nary when defining a racist – to believe that a race of people possesses certain attributes or qualities which make them inherently superior to other races. I stand to be corrected, but I hold fast to the opinion that there are absolutely no black people on earth who subscribe to the belief that the black race is superior to any other race of people on earth. Would you attribute that perspective to a lack of self esteem? I would not. I offer an explanation that black people’s view of the world are that of Pollyanna. Wishful thinking amongst blacks manifests itself in a preadolescent hope that everyone would (and should race. On the other hand, this world is not “Fantasy Land”. And an attribute of utopia – racial equal i ty, does not exists, and I dare say, will never exists. Over hundreds (maybe even thousands years, the white race has managed to convince themselves that they are the superior race. And the attendant behaviours associated with such a belief have given rise to what we now know as racism. And this whole notion of reverse racism (where blacks think that they are the superior race) is a misnomer and should not be believed. I contend that reverse racism is only the black people’s reaction to white people’s induced racism. In other words, black people would not be “racists” if racism was not exercised on them first. There’s no such thing as a black racist. MARVIN G LIGHTBOURN Nassau, March 7, 2009. There’s no such thing as a black racist EDITOR, The Tribune. I notice that BAIC intends to continue the years old folly of being involved and investing mil lions of dollars in albatrosses of produce houses and markets. Government has no place in a proper developed marketing process of agricultural products if we total up the losses over the years from the late 1970’s to today we probably could build a bridge between Nassau and Andros. Leave the wholesale marketing to the private sector Mr Minister Mr Chairman BAIC it is the only system that will work and pay the farmers immediately. Isn’t it simple economics that if you increase the availability of a product whilst having import restrictions in place who loses? If we continue the folly that we are heading into under the guise of so-called food security we will put our farmers in a far more dangerous financial position as with the importation restriction increase in availability of product the farmers’ earnings will drop appreciably. Tomatoes are a cash crop right now but look at the retail prices and you cannot obtain an import licence? Same tomato but as much as 29 cents a pound differ ence? It is obvious someone is ripping! B FERGUSON Nassau, March 2, 2009. Leave wholesale marketing to private sector E DITOR, The Tribune. Further to my conversation with you, please find below t he exact words used by me during my contribution in the Senate to the debate on them id-year budget. “The article gives us all the opportunity to reflect on the fact that we as a people are not steeped in our history. People will always give their version of events. “It is for us to tell the tale of our heroes. The story as told by the “hunter” is always dif f erent than the story that is told by the “hunted”. It is time for us to secure our future by a vigorous determination to r ecord our history. A clear understanding of who we are and where we have come fromw ill positively impact our young people's self-esteem. It is also high time that our libel laws were changed so that it is possible to defame the dead, as is the case in other coun tries.” You will see that contrary to the report on page 11 of your newspaper today, I did n ot say, “... it was time The B ahamas secured its history by changing its libel laws sot hat it would be possible to defame the dead”. Your correction of this inaccurate statement would be greatly appreciated. I look forward to your early attention to this SENATOR ALLYSON MAYNARD GIBSON Nassau, March 16, 2009. Sen Maynar d Gibson: What I actually said in the Senate

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SKYBAHAMAS has been named the official domestic a irline of the Miss Bahamas World Pageant. The sky is the limit for this year’s Miss Bahamas World contestants who will see more of the islands of the B ahamas thanks to a new partnership between SkyBahamas Airlines and the Miss B ahamas Organisation (MBO M iss Bahamas World beauty pageant. Contract Principals of SkyBahamas and MBO signed a contract yesterday for the new partnership between the two parties. As a result of the agree ment, the pageant’s Family Islandbased contestants, lecturers, and essential ser vice providers will be flown to and from the capital for pageant events. Additional ly, the pageant’s contestants w ill be flown to an exotic location in the Bahamas to d iscover more of the coun t ry’s natural beauty. S kyBahamas Airlines started with regular flights into Exuma and today its services have expanded to i nclude Freeport, Bimini, M arsh Harbour, and its latest addition, Cat Island. I n addition to offering regular scheduled flights throughout the Bahamas, the airline also charters flights throughout the Caribbean. The Miss Bahamas Organisation began staging pageants in 2005 when the first Miss Bahamas World competition was held under its direction. This year’s pageant is scheduled for May 31 and will be held at the Rainforest Theatre under the theme “Earth Angels.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 5 THE National Insurance Board plans to implement a new system for employers and self-employed persons that will allow them to know their contribution status without having to visit an NIB local office, as is currently the case. Through the regular posting of NIB contributions, employers in particular will be able to ensure that their a ccounts are correct, thus enabling them to avoid interest costs. This is one of the initiatives NIB is g etting ready to roll out in order to i mprove customer service and advance its compliance efforts. These initiatives were planned since 2008 and are in the final stages of implementation. In advance of the introduction of these initiatives, the Board is sending out an appeal to employers and selfemployed persons. NIB’s deputy director for information technology Andre Bethel said that the Board currently has over 16,000 active employers and self-employed persons registered. “We’re planning to be able to send out to them each month, in a timely manner, statements of their activity or inactivity as the case may be. Of course we can do it the old way, ie, by regular mail or even by fax, but that would be slower and more labour intensive which makes it more costly. We propose, instead, to make technology work for us in this regard,” he said. NIB is asking all employers and selfemployed persons to send an e-mail from their business addresses. In the e-mail, they should state the name they registered with NIB and t heir employer or self-employer number. Mr Bethel asks employers and selfe mployed persons to send e-mails to: e mploystatement@nib-bahamas.com. Plans for a new system to check NIB contribution status FROM L EFT: Miss Bahamas Organisation president Michelle Malcolm; SkyBahamas CEO and president Captain Randy Butler; Miss Bahamas World 2009 Tinnyse Johnson; sales and marketing director J essica Watkins. Miss Bahamas W orld event takes off with SkyBahamas Employers and self-employed will be able to ensure accounts are correct without visiting a local office In brief n L OS ANGELES L OS ANGELESpolice say psychiatrist Khristine Eroshevich has surrendered to face charges of excessively prescribing drugs to Anna Nicole Smith before the former model’s overdose death in 2007, according to Associate d Press. Police spokeswoman Rosario Herrera says Eroshevich turned herself in a round 11 a.m. Monday at t he Van Nuys station. She did not immediately p ost the $20,000 bail. E roshevich is charged w ith conspiring with another doctor and Smith’sl awyer-turned-boyfriend H oward K. Stern. Attorney General Jerry Brown alleges the doctors falsified prescriptions and prescribed unwarranted amounts of highly addictive medications to Smith. Eros hevich’s attorney says she w as only protecting Smith’s p rivacy. Anna Nicole Smith’s psychiatrist turns herself in to police n C APE CANAVERAL, Fla. NASA kept close tabs on a n old piece of space junk Monday that threatened to come too close to the inter national space station as the s huttle Discovery raced toward the orbiting outpost for a 220-mile-high linkup, a ccording to Associated Press. Experts initially warned t he debris from a Soviet satellite that broke up in 1981 could veer within a half-mile of the space sta t ion. But later, they said it appeared that the piece of junk about 4 inches in size might remain at a safe distance. The debris was in an errat i c orbit and experts were watching closely, though it appeared the space station might not have to move out o f the way. If Mission Control orders a space station maneuver to dodge the junk, it would be carried out Monday night, well ahead of the projected close approach between the station and debris early Tuesday morning. If the station were moved, Discovery would have to adjust its course for docking late Tuesday afternoon; the shuttle is delivering one last set of solar wings for the station. On Thursday, the three space station residents hadto move into their emergency getaway capsule because another piece of space junk came uncomfortably close. In that case, there was short notice and the astronauts did not have enough time to steer out of the way. NASA has moved the space station to dodge debris eight times in the past, most recently in August. Generally, engines on the Russian living quarters or the attached Russian supply ships are fired to alter the path of the entire station. It’sa relatively easy job, but uses up precious fuel. The debris this time is from a Soviet military satellite called Kosmos 1275, which broke up somewhat mysteriously shortly after its 1981 launch. NASA orbital debris scientist Mark Matney said it may have crashed with another object that wasn’t being tracked, althoughthe Russians believe a battery explosion did the satel lite in. In any event, the result was a cloud of 310 pieces of debris that slowly are falling into lower orbits,he said. NASA eyes debris as Discovery nears space station

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE B AHAMIAN-BORN Connor Aberle, last year’s third place finisher in the Bahamas National Spelling Bee, triumphed on Saturday over an extremely competitive field of 42 spellers to win the 2009 Portland Tribune/Comcast Regional Spelling Bee in Portl and, Oregon. T he 13-year-old will now compete in this year’s Scripps National Spelling Bee to be held in Washington, DC, from May 23 to 30. As part of his prize for placing third in last year’s B ahamas National Bee, Connor attended the Scripps National Spelling Bee as a spectator. C ompetition He said that being able to watch the Scripps National Spelling Bee in person motiv ated him to study even harder so that he could be part of the competition this year, w here he will join the winner f rom this year’s Bahamas N ational Spelling Bee w hich will be held on March 21. Connor exhibited nerves of steel and fierce concentration in the final rounds as he correctly spelled such words as “mendacity”, “olivaceous”, and his winning word, “erythromycin.” H e attributes his success to h is dedication and strong desire to win, and to the support of his family. He is home-schooled by his mother and coach, Shelley Aberle, with whom he lives in Portland, Oregon. n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@ tribunemedia.net A HOST of activities are planned throughout the year to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Depart-m ent of Immigration. The department invites the public to participate in a variety of events as a way of thanking them for their assistance in locating illegalm igrants since 1939. Public events include a fun run and walk on Saturday, March 28, a Mother’s Day e vent and children’s fun day in May, a Father’s Day e vent in June, a public fish fry in July, and a backt o-school event in August. A n exhibition on the d epartment’s anniversary theme, “Historic past, dynamic future,” will be held in the Mall at Marathon in September before it tours the Family Islands. Long-serving and hardw orking officers and staff w ill be honoured in a cerem ony at the end of Septemb er, their achievements will b e published in the newspa p er and a banquet will be held for the department in November. And everyone will be invited to get their groove on for a “Back to the 70’s” Immigration Department p arty and show in October. Senior deputy director for the Department of Immigra tion Roderick Bowe said: We want to celebrate this y ear, 70 years is a long time and we want to ensure that people here at Immigrationa re appreciated. “The public perception of the Immigration Department is of men and womens tamping passports in the airport, but we do a lot more than that, so we want to con vey to the public exactly w hat we do at Immigration. “And the public have been helping us to findm igrants and illegals, so we h ave highlighted a number of activities to celebrate with them.” The Department of Immigration also intends to hold a blood drive and to do community outreach work to help the ill and elderly residents of hospices. Department director Jack Thompson said: “I am excited about the department’s willingness to have a blood drive and give something back to the community. “We do so much and the team here works very hard. “Immigration has had a very historic past and we believe the better days of Immigration lie ahead. “We think we are focused in the right direction, we are improving in many respects, such as customer service and the fact that we want to be open and transparent, and we want to be accountable to the Bahamian public.” Department of Immigration to celebrate 70th anniversary Bahamian-born spelling bee winner heads for Washington S PELLINGBEEWINNER C onnor Aberle

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T WO new 20-foot refrigerated containers have been p urchased for North Andros f armers as the government p resses ahead with its food security initiative. And a building in Fresh Creek will be renovated to house the Central Andros Craft Centre, Bahamas Agri-c ultural and Industrial Corp oration (BAIC chairman Edison Key confirmed. Mr Key, along with Agri c ulture and Marine Resources Minister Larry Cartwright and a high-level government and private sec tor delegation were in North Andros last weekend to inspect projects there. During the North Andros M usic and Heritage Festival and the International Square Reunion, Mr Key gave an update on the North Andros Agricultural Expansion Pro ject. O ne component of the proj ect, he said, are 561 acres of l and located near the San Andros airport. It will be divided into 41 blocks of varying sizes to include a greenhouse park and headquarters for the North Andros Farmers Association. “This land will continue to be utilised for vegetable pro duction and expanded for citrus trees, tropical fruits and livestock,” said Mr Key. Revitalised The 1,500-acre satellite farm which presently consists of 16 operations occupying close to 80 acres will be revitalised. “It is envisioned that this arable land will continue as mix farming with a major thrust in livestock,” said Mr Key. Applications continue to come in from Bahamians interested in leasing land in the proposed North Andros Agro Industrial Park, he said. In conjunction with the Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources, three new farm tractors have been purchased and placed into oper ation in North Andros. “As the sustainability and future growth of agriculture depends on the enthusiasmof the youth,” said Mr Key, “we will continue to enhance our relationship with the North Andros High School’s agriculture programme. “Hopefully we can nurture minds that would have even greater visions for agriculture in the Bahamas.” BAIC, he said, views the handicraft industry as poten tially “a significant employment and income generator.” “We will continue with our training in the handicraft area for which the overall objective is to create a mas sive factory that encompasses the Bahamas with thousands of individually owned and operated entities in various islands,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 7 TENDER NOTICESFORDIRECTORYPUBLICATIONSTENDER PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENTS The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders from the general public who wish to advertise in our premium spots on the 2010T elephone Directories. Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head O f f ice located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the h ours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. B ids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be m arked, “ T ENDER FOR PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENT to the attention of: M r. I Kirk Griffin A cting President & CEO The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited # 21 John F. Kennedy Drive P .O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas TENDER PRINTING AND DELIVERY OF TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES T he Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders f rom experienced companies to provide services for the printing and delivery of the 2010 and 2011 Telephone Directories. I nterested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. B ids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be marked, T ENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES to the attentionof: Mr. I Kirk Griffin Acting President & CEO The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited # 21 John F. Kennedy Drive P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas TENDER GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES COVER DESIGNS T he Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders from experienced companies to provide Graphic Artist services for the 2010 Telephone Directories. I nterested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. B ids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be m arked, “ T ENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES COVER DESIGNS to the attention of: Mr. I Kirk Griffin Acting President & CEO T he Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited #21 John F. Kennedy Drive P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas TENDER GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES DISPLAY ADS The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders from experienced companies or individuals to provide Graphic Artist services for the 2010 Telephone Directories. Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be marked, “ TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES DISPLAY ADS to the attention of: Mr. I Kirk Griffin Acting President & CEO The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited #21 John F. Kennedy Drive P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas TENDER CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL NARRATIVES SERVICES The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders from experienced companies or individuals to provide Creative Writing and Sectional Narratives services for the 2010 Telephone Directories. Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be marked, “ TENDER FOR CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL NARRATIVES SERVICES to the attention of: Mr. I Kirk Griffin Acting President & CEO The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited #21 John F. Kennedy Drive P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas B AIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN E dison Key (left ( centre) and Permanent Secretary Harrison Thompson inspect a tomato operation in North Andros. Refrigerated containers for North Andros farmers NORTH ANDROS HIGH SCHOOL students show Agriculture and Marine Resources Minister Larry Cartwright and Administrator Dr Huntley Christie their tomato operation. G l a d s t o n e T h u r s t o n / B I S

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outstripped its assets and it was unable to pay $2.6 million in claims. However, some commentators have questioned whether the gov ernment could have, or could still do, more to protect policy-holders. According to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, 29,000 people Caribbean-wide have policies and annuities with the company, including the majority 23,191 in the Bahamas alone. Bahamian policy-holders are owed $44 million in liabilities. He detailed in parliament how the company “compromised its financial integrity” by investing over $70 million in a Florida real estate company, Wellington Pre serve Corporation. The company appeared to have never sought the required permission from the government “in connection with its investments, loans to subsidiaries, or related party transactions worth millions of dollars,” added the prime minister. Bishop Hall said that in recent weeks “most of (his have been expended on meeting with and counselling people affected by CLICO’s failure. “Thirty thousand persons are anxious, psychologically damaged and totally frustrated and uncertain as to what is going to happen to their monies. Someone in the Ministry of Finance, and by extension, successive governments must be held responsible for this chaos,” he said. Yesterday’s meeting is the third organised by the Baptist leader. Two previous meetings which took place in New Providence and Grand Bahama attracted hundreds of emotional and vocif erous participants. Bishop Hall said he decided to call last night’s meeting as he wants policy-holders to be heard loud and clear in advance of Wednesday’s court hearing. Meanwhile, the church leader went on to hit out at some mem bers of the local Bar yesterday, who he said have been calling him to offer their services to affected CLICO clients. “Interestingly enough I’ve had calls from several lawyers willing to represent the different policyholders. I thought they were coming pro bono you know, but they ain’t doing that. They aren’t doing it out of the goodness of their heart,” he said, calling the solicitations “sickening.” He said people are nervous about contracting a lawyer to take up their case, worried that they will once again be left “holding an empty bag.”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f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f5HY&DUOD&XOPHU1RUPD:DOODFH %HQMDPLQ-RKQ)RQVZLWW6WXEEV0HPEHUVRI WKH5HWLUHG3ROLFH$VVRFLDWLRQ0U/HODQG 7XUQHU0U*UDIWRQ3UHVLGHQW5HWLUHG3ROLFH 2IFHUV$VVRFLDWLRQUHVLJQHGUHWLUHG3ROLFH 2IFHUVZKRDUHUHTXHVWHGWRDWWHQGf&RPPLVVLRQHURI 3ROLFH0U5HJLQDOG)HUJXVRQDQGPHPEHUVRI 5R\DO%DKDPDV3ROLFH)RUFH&\QWKLD3UDWW 0HPEHURI3DUOLDPHQW&HFLOLD&RQVWLWXHQF\ DQGPDQ\PRUHWRRQXPHURXVWRPHQWLRQ5HODWLYHV DQGIULHQGVPD\SD\WKHLUODVWUHVSHFWVDW1HZEROG %URWKHUV&KDSHO3DOPHWWR$YHQXH$FNOLQV6WUHHWRQ 7XHVGD\IURPWR:HGQHVGD\ DW WKHFKXUFKIURPXQWLOVHUYLFHWLPH6(0,,/,7$5<)81(5$/ run by his aunts, Maggie and Amelia Pindling. Sir Lynden, the source said, lived with his aunts known l ocally as Miss Maggie and M iss Amelia before being sent off to Nassau, where his J amaican father Arnold worked as a policeman. “All these people getting on the back of your managing editor need a reality check,” said t he source. Lynden Pindling was not a B ahamian at all, he was J amaican. Everyone at Cotton Tree regards him as a Jamaican b orn in Jamaica of a Jamaican mother and father. When he returned to the v illage while he was prime mini ster, he was welcomed as one of our own people who had made good. We lined the road t o greet him.” Speculation over Sir Lynden’s origins flared up againl ast week when T he Tribune’s Insight section suggested, via 88-year-old Bahamian Chauncey Tynes Sr, that the s o-called “Father of the N ation” wasn’t a Bahamian at all. I n fact, said Mr Tynes, Pin dling was born in Jamaica of a Jamaican father and unknown mother, possibly Haitian. H e went on to claim that Pindling swore a false affidavit in 1947 to secure a Nassau birth certificate before acquiring a passport to travel to London f or law studies. A t least four different versions of Pindling’s background h ave emerged since the article a ppeared. The one linking theme is that, if the information is true, he was less of a Bahamian thant he Bahamian-born Haitians who were denied status under h is government. Just as importantly, his antiforeign, anti-expatriate campaigns of the 1970s would have been founded on the allegedly b ogus assumption that the prime minister was himself a Bahamian. T he Jamaican source said: “In the parish of Trelawney, there is a little community c alled Cotton Tree. That is w here Pindling’s roots are. T hat’s where he was born. “When I was going to prim ary school we used to have a Friday session called ‘commu nity awareness’ and he was the t alk of the town. “We were told we could do well and excel just like LyndenP indling, a boy from our village in the mountains, a region called The Alps. We were very excited because when he became prime minister, it was h uge for people there. When he visited the village, he called in at the old house w hich used to be the school. It w as called Miss Maggie’s Basic School, run by Lynden Pindling’s own aunt. “The children were led out o f school to line the roadway. He was the local boy made g ood.” As a boy, she said, Pindling was sent to Nassau by his aunts because his father wanted him here, having married a B ahamian woman Viola Bain who, according to several PLP sources, was unable to havec hildren. “He was sent by boat,” the source said. “He was as J amaican as you can get. He m ay have been a naturalised B ahamian in later life, but as far as the people of Cotton T ree are concerned, he is one of theirs, a Jamaican through and through.” T he source said that anyone serious about investigating Pin dling’s Jamaican roots could v isit Cotton Tree and talk to those who still claim him as their own. oped with the use of some $20 million trans ferred from the medical branch of the Nation al Insurance Fund. Those eligible to receive benefits from this programme must show that they were employed up to July, 2006, and can receive 40 per cent of their weekly insurable wage for up to 13 weeks. This payable period can be extended by the minister for an additional 13 weeks, Mr Ingraham said, but will go no longer than six months. Currently the government expects this pro gramme to assistant some 7,000 unemployed persons, and an additional 3,000 partially unem ployed persons. At this time, applicants must not be selfemployed or voluntarily insured. Nor can the applicant be in receipt of any NIB benefits or assistance other than survivors or disablement payments. Eligibility requirements list that the individual must have paid at least 40 weeks of contributions, plus at least 26 weeks paid and or credited contributions in the past immediate con tribution year. Persons who will continue to be eligible for this weekly payment must register with the Labour Exchange every four weeks, be unem ployed or working for less than 50 per cent of their regular wages, be available and looking for work, and not refuse to take suitable employ-m ent. This programme is not be confused with the regular social services assistance, or the drug benefit, Mr Ingraham said. The government will provide further details on in the near future. “The programme will provide benefits of up to one half of the wage of which you were paying contribution. So if you were earning $200 a week and you were paying on that basis, you would collect half of that which is $100. Or if you were paying at the maximum of $400 you would collect $200. Eventually, at some time to be determined, we would require employers and employees to make a contribution to the National Insurance Unemployment Benefit Fund. “That continuation is estimated now at one per cent, $1 for every $100 in wages being earned and be funded by half for the employer and half by the employee,” he said. The removal of this $20 million from National Insurance, Mr Ingraham said, would not have any impact on the pension capabilities of NIB, disabilities payments or any short-term benefits. However, he did explain that this will force the government to reduce the number of medical facilities it was seeking to build throughout the country from this fund. Meanwhile, however, the government is expecting to bring legislation before parliament this month to amend the National Insurance Act so that the work at passing a resolution to make these benefits legal could begin. “We have earmarked April 20 as the date on which the scheme will begin and look for the first payments to be made two weeks late on May 4,” he said. The government will meet with union leaders, employers and religious leaders in Grand Bahama tomorrow before making details of the proposal available to members of the Oppo sition for their perusal. global economy. Mr Tan said he hopes development will encourage more Chinese companies to invest in the Bahamas and bring in Chinese visitors for both business and pleasure. He said: “China wants to find investment opportunities everywhere, and we call it a good cycle because we get revenue from the others, and the others get revenue from us. That is the concept of our government andI think the concept of many Chinese companies.” The economic growth rate in The People’s Republic of China is accelerating at a rate of 9.8 per cent and Mr Tan hopes it will continue to grow and give more Chinese people the freedom to travel and invest. However, as the Bahamas is a small relatively unknown coun try in China it must advertise its investment opportunities and holiday potential to draw the Chinese in. Mr Tan said: “Many people in China have not heard of the Bahamas, so there is much work to do. “There are many areas in the Bahamas to invest in, but these areas need to be advertised to be known to investors. “And tourism abroad has only developed over the last ten years, so I think we can expect when people travel from Chinat hey will visit their neighbours first, and then travel further and further. I think people will come, but it will happen gradually. “I am optimistic for the future because the economy of China is growing fast, and hopefully we will see many Chinese peo ple become richer and richer, and visit different countries.” Mr Tan said the Chinese embassy in Nassau has discussed the possibility of serving direct flights between Beijing and Nassau, but ultimately this will be a decision for the airlines and will depend on demand, Mr Tan said. Trade between the Bahamas and China rose from $180 million last year to $318 million this year, reflecting a positive trend which began when the two countries established a diplomatic relationship 12 years ago and accelerated in recent years. Reasons for the rise in trade include the Chinese government’s development of the National Stadium at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre, due to start next month, as well as Chinese ships registered in the Bahamas by Bahamian shipping companies, and the import of various consumer goods from China. And Mr Tan said he expects trade between the two countries to continue to grow as her eceives frequent calls from Bahamian businesses wanting to know how to capitalise on Chinese trade. for their role as we proudly announce their wonderful corporate gift today.” Bank managing director Paul McWeeney said the bank accepted COB’s invitation to partner because the ability to read and write determines suc-c ess or failure and fosters or frustrates n ational development “We need good roads and we need a well-developed infrastructure. We need solid police protection and strong borders,” he said. “But above all, we need every child born and living in TheB ahamas to know how to read and write and when they don’t, we need to find out why. “That is what this programme is about. That is why when we were approached by The College of The Bahamas to fund the Literacy Diagnos-t ic Research Centre we leapt at the o pportunitybecause we understand h ow absolutely critical it is to understand why our literacy rate is what it is so we can begin to improve it.” According to Dr Sumner, the country still boasts statistics showing one of the highest literacy rates in the world,9 5 per cent. National test scores and b asic reading and writing skills tell a different story, she noted. Uncovering the real rate of literacy is a first step as the programme explores best teaching methods and aims, ultimately, to impact how reading and writi ng are taught in every government s chool as well as providing information that other institutions can use. In the room surrounded by those who hold master’s degrees and doctorates, the contrast between researchers and subjects was outlined in sharp relief, y oung men and women whose chances of a good job were slim because they could not fill out a job application or those who could not score high enough on as tandardised test to get into college. Transformation and innovation of o ur public education system is arguably our most pressing national challenge,” said Dr Linda Davis, COB vice-president for research, graduate programmes and international relations. We see evidence of the challenges f aced by our public education system through the low participation rates in higher education, in high rates of youth unemployment and increased level of youth violence and crime.” If increased crime and higher unemployment are linked in some way to thei nability to read and write, unlocking the shackles of illiteracy is high priority. “Today, as we unveil this partnership between The College of The Bahamas and Bank of The Bahamaswe open a new door and write a new chapter in both our histories,” Mr McWeeney said. “We open the door to a world of life’s chances. Why do I use the word chances?B ecause that is what education does for u s. It gives us the chance to be who we w ant to be. It gives us the chance to contribute to productive society. But we cannot have that chance if we are unable to read and write. Doors are closed in our faces. Contributions we could have made w ill never be known, a discovery we could have made that might have saved a life or turned the planet a bit more green might never be made in our lifetime. An illiterate population is a population that is doomed to wallow in its past; a literate population will gallopt oward its future.” The Centre, to be located in a large converted classroom equipped with lab equipment and testing materials and software, is expected to open almost immediately. story, adding: “Everything he said was absolutely true.” Mr Tynes, former PLP treasurer, revealed in aT ribune Insight article t hat his pilot son, Chauncey Tynes Jr., regularly flew consignments of cash to Nassau to pay off Pindling and a senior police officer. H e also believed his s on was killed because he knew too much of the links between Pindling and Lehder. Chauncey Jr disapp eared on a flight from Exuma to Nassau in March, 1983, along withB ahamian electrical engineer Donald Moree Snr. No trace of the plane w as ever found, and n othing was heard from the men again. The former policeman said he recalled the time when Chauncey Jr vanished, and believed thatC hauncey Snr’s version of events was true. imagine that Mr Tynes is trying to get some closure on this matter. I think it is good that all this is coming out.” H e added: “Pindling was far from being a saint. He was crooked,e vil, very spiteful and vindictive. He would doy ou in with the wink of a n eye. He was so smooth that he would never allow you to know he wasd oing you in. I campaigned for the PLP in 1967, but when he began to victimise UBP sup p orters the following year, I pulled my support.” New witness accounts support Tynes Sr’s claims F ROM page one FROM page one Bank of Bahamas F ROM page one Bahamar New evidence suggests Pindling was Jamaican F ROM page one FROM page one CLICO FROM page one Proposed benefit

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South Africa set to host Champions Trophy LONDON (AP Defending champion Russia will face Italy on outdoor clayin the Fed Cup semifinals. The International Tennis Federation said Monday the best-of-five series will be played in Castellaneta Marina on April 25-26. Russia has won four of the last five Fed Cup titles and is 4-0 against Italy. But Italy, the the 2006 Fed Cup champ, is 2-0 at home in Castellaneta Marina in the Puglia region of southern Italy. The Czech Republic already has said it will host the United States in the other semifinal at the indoor Starobrno Rondo Arena. JACKSONVILLE, Florida (AP Jaguars waived receiver Matt Jones on Monday, parting ways with the former firstround draft pick just days after his latest arrest. Jones was jailed last week in Arkansas for violating a plea agreement that stemmed from a drug charge in 2008. The 6-foot-6 Jones, a former star quarterback at Arkansas, is awaiting an April 13 court appearance. After failing a drug and alcohol screening, Jones told a judge he drank beer while golfing with friends. He assured the judge it wouldn’t happen again. The Jaguars didn’t want to take a chance. “All roster moves are decisions we feel are in the best interest of the organization,” Jaguars general manager Gene Smith said. “This decision is a result of our ongoing player and roster evaluations. We expect responsibility and accountability, and those are important qualities as we continue the process of building this team.” Although Jones was wildly popular in Arkansas, he wasn’t revered nearly as much in Jacksonville. Fans thought his laid-back attitude was a sign he didn’t care about football, and coach Jack Del Rio ripped him at times for his work ethic. Many thought Jones would be released last year after he was charged with cocaine possession in July. But the 19th overall pick in 2005 had a strong preseason and stuck around despite the arrest. He responded with the best season of his career, catching 65 passes for 761 yards and two touchdowns. His case, meanwhile, was moved to the drug court, where defendants submit to treatment and other restrictions, with the goal of keeping them from offending again. A defendant can wipe his record clean if the program is completed successful ly. In the plea agreement reached in October, Jones was ordered to participate in NFLsponsored substance-abuse counseling and undergo random drug testing through the end of the football season. The judge told him to return to Fayetteville after the seasonto complete the program. Jones remains in the drug court program. The NFL suspended Jones for the final three games last season for violating the league’s substance-abuse pol icy. Jones’ departure leaves Jacksonville with huge holes at the receiver position. The Jaguars released Jerry Porter last month and opted not to re-sign free agent Reggie Williams. That basically leaves thirdyear pro Mike Walker and veteran Dennis Northcutt. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 9 Russia to face Italy on clay in Fed Cup semis LONDON (AP land has submitted its bid to stage either the 2018 or 2022 World Cup and is expecting 10 rivals. Monday was the deadline to present bids to soccer’s international governing body. The English Football Association had said it would bid for 2018, but it added 2022 to strengthen its chances. The FA expects opposi tion from the United States, Mexico, Australia, Indone sia, Russia, Japan, South Korea, Qatar and joint bids from Spain and Portugal and the Netherlands and Bel gium. The FIFA executive com mittee will vote on both hosts in 2010. The World Cup will be held in South Africa in 2010 and Brazil in 2014. England bids for 2018 or 2022 World Cup Jaguars release WR Jones after latest arrest FRANKFURT (AP The German soccer federation has fined Bundesliga club Hoffenheim because two of its players showed up 10 minutes late for a doping test. The federation had earlier dropped proceedings against the players. It fined the club $97,815. The newcomers to the top division did not lose points in the standings. Hof fenheim fined in late doping test MANCHESTER, England (AP Fresh off an impressive victory, Amir Khan is eager to make up for his one spec tacular defeat. Breidis Prescott stalled Khan’s career last September with a stunning 54-second knockout. Khan returned to the same Manchester venue on Saturday to outbox seven-time world champion Marco Anto nio Barrera, a veteran of 65 victories who was stopped in the fifth round with a deep cut above his left eye for his seventh loss. That took Khan’s record to 20 victories against one defeat, five years after the British fighter burst onto the scene by winning an Olympic silver medal as a 17-yearold. He is now aiming to win a world title some time this year and would like to make up for that embarrassing loss to the Colombian, who is ranked in the top 10 by the WBC. “There’s a few names on the short list. I’d love to fight Prescott again,” Khan said. “I made a mistake in the Prescott fight and I paid for it. Since the Prescott fight so much has changed in my boxing career and I’ve moved to LA to train. I know if I fight him again I’m not going to make the same mistakes again. It will be a totally different fight.” Although an accidental clash of heads caused the deep cut that effectively ended the fight with Barrera, Khan said he was convinced he would have knocked the for mer world champion out within two more rounds. “I felt fully in control of the fight, catch ing him with some good shots and I could see him getting weaker and weaker as the rounds went on,” he said. “To beat a leg end the way I did it’s a massive highlight in my career and it will take me on to the next level, get me known around the world and get a lot bigger fights. It was a make or break fight for me. I had to win this fight ifI wanted to become a world champion this year.” Khan plans to be at ringside when Ricky Hatton faces Manny Pacquiao in Las Vegas on May 2, but doesn’t know whom to support. “Both fighters are very good friends of mine,” he said. “I’m good mates with Ricky Hatton he wished me good luck before the Barrera fight. And I’m good friends with Manny Pacquiao I train at the same gym. “But for this fight I’m 50-50. It’s a tough fight for both of them. They are both my friends. I’m just going to sit there and relax and enjoy the fight.” Khan out to mak e up f or one car eer def eat MEXICO’S Marco Antonio Barrera (left Lightweight Championship fight in Manchester, England, on Saturday... (AP Photo: Jon Super n By The Associated Press S S C C O O R R E E B B O O A A R R D D Tuesday, March 17 Orlando at Cleveland (7 pm EDT). Two beasts of the East, the Central Division champion Cavaliers and the Southeastleading Magic, face off. S S T T A A R R S S Sunday Dwight Howard, Magic, had 28 points and 20 rebounds, leading Orlando to its third straight victory, 105-87 over Utah. Andrea Bargnani, Raptors, had 27 points and nine rebounds in Toronto’s 110-87 win over Indiana. Joe Johnson, Hawks, scored 35 points to go with seven rebounds, six assists and two steals, and Atlanta beat Portland 98-80 for its fifth consecutive victory. Mike Conley, Grizzlies, had 20 points for Memphis, which ended a seven-game losing streak to Detroit with an 89-84 road victory. Antawn Jamison, Wizards, had 30 points, nine rebounds and two steals in a 104-102 win over the Kings. Mo Williams, Cavaliers, scored 23 points, making all five of his 3-pointers, to help lead Cleveland past New York 98-93. Jason Richardson, Suns, scored 31 points against his former team and Phoenix rang up the highest point total in the NBA this season with a 154-130 victory over Golden State. Steve Novak, Clippers, made a buzzer-beating 3pointer, his seventh of the game, and finished with 21 points to help Los Angeles beat New Jersey 107-105 and snap a seven-game losing streak. S S T T A A T T S S Phoenix and Golden State combined for an NBA best 284 points the Suns had 154 and Phoenix scored 56 fastbreak points, the most since 1997, when the league begant o track the stat. T he Bucks shot just 32.6 per cent, but scored 27 points off the Celtics’ season-high 25 turnovers and grabbed 14 of their 21 offensive rebounds in the second half of an 86-77 victory. The 77 points allowed in an 85-77 win over Miami was a season low for Philadelphia. Detroit, which trailed by as many as 21 points in the first half of an 89-84 loss home loss to Memphis, fell to 2-11 on Sundays. S S C C O O R R I I N N G G The Suns shot .621 from the field, had four scorers at 20 points or higher, and managed the most points in a game all season, romping at Golden State 154-130. Pops Mensah-Bonsu scored a career-high 21 points for the Raptors in their 110-97 win over the Pacers. The unher alded Mensah-Bonsu had four dunks among his five baskets, went 11-for-13 from the free throw line and added eight rebounds. Dwyane Wade, coming off a 50-point performance in the Heat’s triple-overtime victory over Utah on Saturday, was held to 18 in an 85-77 loss at Philadelphia. The NBA’s lead ing scorer looked tired after playing a career-high 52 1/2 minutes against the Jazz. He shot 8-for-21 in 34 1/2 minutes. Mavericks guard Jason Terry matched his career high with seven 3-pointers and scored 29 points in a 107-100 loss to the Lakers. Washington made 11 of its first 12 shots and set a season high for points in a quarter with 37 against Sacramento. S S T T R R E E A A K K S S Sacramento dropped to 026 against the Eastern Conference with a 106-104 loss at Washington, staying on course to become the first NBA team to go winless against the opposite conference. Toronto snapped a sevengame losing streak with its biggest margin of victory this season, beating Indiana 11087. The 76ers have won six straight over Miami at home. Atlanta has won five in a row overall and Joe Johnson h as four consecutive 30-points outings. Memphis ended a sevengame losing streak to the Pistons. The Suns ended a five-game losing streak on the road and a four-game skid at Golden State with a 154-130 romp. S S T T R R O O N N G G I I N N D D E E F F E E A A T T Kendrick Perkins scored a career-high 26 points with 12 rebounds, including a careerbest nine offensive, in Boston’s 86-77 loss to the Bucks. Portland’s Brandon Roy had 25 points and five assists in a 98-80 loss at Atlanta. Carlos Boozer had 23 points and 13 rebounds for the Jazz in a 105-87 loss to Orlando. Kevin Martin scored 24 points in Sacramento’s 104102 loss at Washington. Al Harrington made five 3pointers and scored 26 points for New York in a 98-93 loss to the Cavs. Vince Carter had a seasonhigh 41 points along with sev en rebounds and six assists for the Nets, who lost 107-105 at the Clippers. O O U U T T O O F F N N O O W W H H E E R R E E Donyell Marshall, who hadn’t scored a point since Feb. 17 and has played in only 14 games this season, had 10 in the final quarter of Philadelphia’s 85-77 win over Miami. S S I I D D E E L L I I N N E E D D Boston slipped to 6-5 in the last 11 games without Kevin Garnett (sprained right knee Guard Bobby Jackson broke his cheekbone last Friday night and did not travel with the Kings to Washington. He will be re-evaluated Mon d ay. Warriors C Andris B iedrins will miss at least a w eek with a sprained left ankle sustained in the first quarter of Friday night’s win over Dallas. Nets point guard and leading scorer Devin Harris left with 8:53 remaining in the third quarter of a 107-105 loss to the Clippers because of a strained left shoulder. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G “Howard was a monster. He is one of those guys that people don’t appreciate like they should. He should be in the MVP talk, too. He cleans up everything and corrects any mistake they make.” Utah forward Carlos Boozer after Dwight Howard had 28 points and 20 rebounds in Orlando’s 105-87 win over the Jazz NBA Today STUTTGART, Germany (AP Klitschko has promised to teach Juan Carlos Gomez a lesson when the heavyweights fight Saturday for Klitschko’s WBC title. Klitschko was hoping to fight Britain’s David Haye, but instead has to defend his title against another former cruiserweight champion who is the mandatory challenger. “I am ready. I am confident,” Klitschko said Monday at a joint news conference with Gomez. “I had no injuries in training camp, thank God, and I am 100 percentr eady. I heard a lot of statement from Gomez’s camp recently and all I can say is that they can dream on, they are all dreams. “He says he has had the hardest training camp of his career and I can promise him the hardest fight of his life. I think he is a very good boxer, with technical skill, and hes howed it all in the cruiserweight. But heavyweight is something else. I will show him. It will be a lesson, but it won’t last long.” Gomez, a 35-year-old Cuban defector who lives in Germany, did not seem impressed. I will beat his face in. I am the better b oxer,” Gomez said. “I will beat him, that’s it.” During the pre-fight hype, Gomez has also vowed to “destroy” Klitschko. Gomez used to spar with Vitali and his younger brother Wladimir, the IBF and WBO champion, whenever they had to pre pare for a bout against a left-handed fighter and they all had the same promoter in Germany before switching camps. The 37-year-old Vitali (36-2, 35 KOs returned to the ring in October after a break of nearly four years and stopped Samuel Peter when the Nigerian decided not to come back after absorbing a steady flow of punches for eight rounds. Gomez (44-1, 35 KOs mous decision over Vladimir Virchis in September to earn the right to challenge Klitschko. The Cuban held the WBC cruiserweight title for four years before vacating it in 2002 to move up to heavyweight. In October 2005, Gomez tested positive f or cocaine after winning a decision over Oliver McCall and the fight was subsequently ruled a no contest. He was suspended for a year and beat McCall again after returning to the ring. Vitali and his brother are usually considered the top big men in the heavyweightd ivision, but Vitali’s career has been plagued by frequent injuries. Klitschko is a three-time champion who won the WBC title in 2004 with an eightround victory over Corrie Sanders. The fight against Peter was Klitschko’s first since he defended the crown with an eight-roundw in over Danny Williams in Las Vegas in 2 004. Klitschko’s performances as a powerful puncher have often been overshadowed by injury. In 2005, he withdrew from a WBC title fight with Hasim Rahman because of a torn ligament in his right knee. The injury led him to announce his retire ment, and the WBC made him “champion emeritus.” In the fall of 2007, he announced a comeback fight against Jameel McCline, only to back out after hurting his back and having emergency surgery. Klitschko promises ‘lesson’ for Gomez DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP South Africa will host this year’s Champions Trophy. The decision by the International Cricket Council on Monday follows a recommendation last week to shift the eight-team tournament from Sri Lanka because of wor ries of rain. The tournament will be held from Sept. 24 to October 5 and is second in importance to the Cricket World Cup. This is the second venue shift for the 2009 Champions Trophy. It was moved last year from original host Pakistan over security concerns. MOSCOW (AP been detained for throwing seats and fireworks during a season-opening soccer game in the Russian Premier League. Police said Monday no serious injuries were reported in the mayhem surrounding the 1-1 tie in Moscow between Spartak Moscow and Zenit St. Petersburg. Those detained were released within several hours of Sunday night’s game. The rivalry between the teams mirrors a broader hostility between residents of Moscow and St. Petersburg. The violence comes days after Russia submitted a bid to host the World Cup in 2018 or 2022. The game was played at Luzhniki Stadium, site of Manchester United’s victory over Chelsea in last May’s Champions League final. More than 650 detained for throwing seats at soccer match DEFENDING heavyweight WBC world champion Vitali Klitschko (left Gomez pose face to face with the champions belt after a press conference in Stuttgart, Germany, on Monday. (AP Photo: Daniel Maurer

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TONIQUE Williams-Darling shares a moment with students in Russell’s House... (Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net IT was another special day last week for national 400m champion Chris Brown. He has his name enshrined into the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC of Fame for his outstanding achievement at Norfolk State University. “It was nice and well planned together. It was something that I wasn’t expecting,” said Brown. “I just enjoyed myself.” Brown, the first student from Norfolk State to be inducted into the Hall o f Fame, was the youngest member at age 30 of the fivemember class to receive the honour. The president, athletic director and a board member from Norfolk State showed up to lend their support to Brown. He was introduced and presented to the audience by his wife, Faith. He was joined by a radio announcer, former football player and two administrators, all of whom were 50 years and older. “I just have to give all thanks and praise to the Lord,” Brown stated. “It’s one of those ones where I wasn’t expecting it. It was never on my do list or a list of things to accomplish. “It caught me off surprise, so being honoured outside of the Bahamas let me know that someone else recognised my talent and that I’m worthy of such a high reward.” Hundreds of people, including a number of dignitaries, attended the induction. Brown and the rest of the inductees also were treated to a number of functions, including the MEAC Men and Women’s Basketball Tournament. “Everything was on hand,” said Brown, who still holds Norfolk State’s 400m and 500m records and is a part of the 4x400m relay team. The two-time track and field AllAmerican earned All-MEAC honours four times indoors and outdoors for his performances in both the 200 and 400. With the celebrations now over and done with, Brown said he can now turn his concentration on training again for the outdoor season. “My preparation for the upcoming season is going very well. I’m healthy and I feel good,” he said. “I’m going to open up in a meet in California next month and run on the 4x400 relay team at the Penn Relays. “The guys are all anxious to run, so hopefully we can go out there and pull off an upset. All of the guys are healthy and they are ready.” Having skipped the indoor season, Brown said he has a hectic schedule ahead of him leading up to the 12th IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Germany, in August when he will be going after an individual medal in the 400. “Everything is on schedule,” said Brown, who was also honoured at home in Eleuthera. His photo was unveiled on the Wall of Fame at the Rock Sound Airport and at the Charles Symonette Park in his hometown of Wemyss Bight. Brown inducted into MEAC Hall of Fame Chris Brown encouraged them to “run fast, j ump high and throw far” as they e njoy their day. A fter she received a round of applause from the audience, Williams-Darling spent some time interacting with the faculty and staff. She also presented medals to the winners of some of the events as they were completed. A lot of the athletes were quite astonished to finally meet Williams-Darling – Tonique Williams-Darling highway was named in her honour by the gov ernment – up close and personal. Jamaican coach Ricardo Free mantle said he was so pleased to finally meet Williams-Darling after hearing so much about her fantas tic performances on the interna tional scene. that we will beat them,” Johnson said. “I’m ready for the fire. But I’m a good cook. We cook good basketball at Stephen Dillet.” Johnson gave a lot of credit to Kevin Johnson and staff for putting on such a tournament, which he said is giving his players a warm up for the New Providence Primary Schools Association’s regular basketball season that will get started in May. “The tournament has been very successful. Kevin and his organisers are giving our players to play some more games before we get our season started,” he said. “So I want to give him a lot of credit.” B B l l a a i i r r w w o o o o d d 2 2 5 5 , , J J o o r r d d a a n n P P r r i i n n c c e e W W i i l l l l i i a a m m 4 4 : : J Higgs scored eight, K Ferguson had six and D Palmer four to lead Blairwood to victory. W Demeritte scored two in the loss. S S t t F F r r a a n n c c i i s s 2 2 8 8 , , Y Y e e l l l l o o w w E E l l d d e e r r 1 1 0 0 : : B Wilson’s eight and the six each from A Neilly and M Johnson was enough to lead St Francis to victory. K K i i n n g g s s w w a a y y A A c c a a d d e e m m y y 1 1 7 7 , , M M t t . . C C a a r r m m e e l l 1 1 5 5 : : E Butler produced eight, including two free throws in overtime and P Hepburn had four, two free throws as well in the extra period, to help secure the win for Kingsway Academy. K Cartwright had eight in the loss. F F r r e e e e d d o o m m A A c c a a d d e e m m y y 2 2 4 4 , , Z Z i i o o n n S S o o u u t t h h B B e e a a c c h h 2 2 1 1 : : Kerrano Mackey was almost a one-man wrecking crew with a game high 16 to pace Freedom Academy. Rashad Mackey made it a shootout with 15 in the loss. Phil Smith challenge down to Elite Eight F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 Williams-Darling: ‘I see where I can fit in and actually give bac

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WORKERS unload equipment from 17 containers yesterday for the construction of the long-awaited $30m national stadium at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre. The new state-of-the-art complex is being built by the Chinese government as a gift to the Bahamian people. Sports Minister Desmond Ban nister, during his contribution to the mid-year budget earlier this month, announced in the House of Assembly that work on the stadium would commence in short order. The stadium is expected to be completed in two to three years... (Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T he Providence Basketball Club’s first Phil Smith Primary School Boys’ Challenge is now down to the Elite Eight. Today starting at 4pm at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, the challenge will showcase the four pool championships to determine who will advance to the c hampionship or the consolation final on Wednesday. “The tournament is going extremely well. A lot of the primary schools are having fun, they’re playing the game of basketball and they’re getting better,” said tournament director Kevin “KJ” Johnson. “A lot of coaches are appreciative of the opportunity and they wished that they could play more games. But so far, the players have been playing hard and the competition has been extremely tough.” After almost a week of competition, the final two teams in each of the four pools have been decided. The spots were booked at the end of yesterday’s competition. In Pool A, St Francis, undefeated at 3-0, will take on Zion South Beach, who is 2-1. In Pool B, St Bede’s (3-0 Blairwood (2-1 Kingsway Academy (2-1 against Stephen Dillet (3-0 in Pool D, Centerville (4-0 takes on Queen’s College (3-2 The final game in the round robin play saw Centerville hold off Queen’s College 18-16 as Gremako Symonette scored six, Troy Gassues had five and Joel Saunders chipped in with four. Carl Nesbitt was unstoppable as he came up with a game high 13 in the loss. “We performed well. Coming into this tournament, we practiced hard,” said Centerville’s coach Pedro Pierre. “I saw a lot of skills in this tournament.” Pierre, however, said they are not going to rest on their laurels, but they will come prepared to play Queen’s College again in their pool championship. “I know my guys could do better. We just have to go back to the drawing board tonight and make sure that when they come out tomorrow they will play better,” he said. Queen’s College coach Jason Edwards said his Comets played extremely well, considering the way they started out in the tournament. “They were just more physical,” he said of Centerville. But today, Edwards said his Comets have gained their confidence, so expect for them to play much better in their rematch with Centerville. In other games played yesterday, Stephen Dillet defeated Carlton Francis 24-2; Blairwood def. Jordan Prince William 25-4; Kingsway Academy held of Mt. Carmel 17-15 in overtime; St. Francis pounded Yellow Elder 28-10 and Freedom Academy out-lasted Zion South Beach 24-21. Stephen Dillet, in one of the most impressive performances of the day, got eight points from Gage Griffin and six from Johnley Noel. They also got some key rebounds from Benson Pierre. Coach Frank Johnson said Stephen Dillet’s team is playing beyond their expectations. “We have Kingsway in the pool championship, but I feel n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ST BEDE’S Primary School s tudents got a real treat yesterday as former Olympic and world 400m champion Tonique Williams-Darling officially opened their inter-house track and field championships at the Thomas A Robinson stadium. Williams-Darling, who has been retired from active com petition since 2007, told the enthusiastic students that they have the opportunity to be just as successful as her. The 33-year-old, who became the first Bahamian to win an individual gold medal in 2004 at the Olympics in Athens, Greece, just after she won the 2005 IAAF World Championship title, said she’s just enjoying life right now. “It’s good to come home and connect with sports again in the Bahamas,” said Williams-Darling, who is looking at the pos sibility of venturing into parttime coaching. “It’s good to be here just to reflect and see how far we’ve come and have something to go after. I see there’s work to be done, so I’m encouraged because I see where I can fit in and actually give back.” As she officially opened the meet, Williams-Darling said she remembers competing in a similar meet more than 20 years ago when she attended St John’s College. Williams-Darling, who began competing as a member of the Bahamas Tigers Track Club, said by the time she was in the tenth grade, she was competing with and defeating some of the senior athletes. Throughout her junior career, Williams-Darling said her ultimate goal was not just to compete in the Olympics, but eventually win the gold medal. And she has achieved both feats. The University of South Carolina graduate told the student athletes that they are not “too small or too young” to start dreaming of their future aspirations in track and field, or whatever sport they want to compete in. For those who want to pur sue athletics, Williams-Darling C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 10 Brown inducted into MEAC Hall of Fame... St Bede’s students get ‘Olympic treat’ MEMBERS of Benedict House get to share a moment with former Olympic and world champion Tonique Williams-Darling... (Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff Klitschko promises ‘lesson’ for Gomez... See page 9 Here’s a look at the schedule for the Elite Eight in the Providence Basketball Club’s first Phil Smith Primary School Boys’ Challenge today at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, starting at 4 pm: P P o o o o l l A A S t Francis (3-02-1 P P o o o o l l B B St Bede’s (3-02-1 P P o o o o l l C C S tephen Dillet (3-02-1 P P o o o o l l D D C enterville (4-03-2 Primary basketball schedule... Work begins on $30m national stadium Phil Smith challenge down to Elite Eight S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter A real estate developer has applied for government and B ahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC approvals to allow her ‘green’ community to use 100 per cent solar power during the daylight hours, Tribune Business was told yesterday. Debby Deal, project manager f or the South Ocean Palms development, said she had submitted a proposal to the Minister of the Environment, Dr Earl Deveaux, which seeks to incorporate solar panels into the building of the gated community’s homes. She is hoping for ap ositive response. Ms Deal said she would like the community she is developing jointly with another partner to be a model for future developm ents, should they be allowed to install the solar panels. At present, builders must receive permission from BEC toi nstall solar power. Under current legislation, homes and busi-n esses must take BEC power in all areas where it is available. I would like us to be the first s ubdivision to completely go solar. I would like to be able to say: ‘OK, this is what we’re d oing’, and have other people c ome watch and see how it works, because we’re small,” Ms Deal said. She added that her homes w ere designed to greatly reduce utility costs by “stopping the meter” with solar panels and i nverters that supply energy during daylight hours. Energy will be supplied by BEC during the evening hours, unless batteries a re added to the solar grid. However, since the community is “green”, Ms Deal said she did not incorporate batteries into the design because they are difficult to dispose of and not environmentally friendly. The houses in the small com munity, only 13 lots located near South Ocean in southwestern New Providence, will have myr i ad energy saving features incorp orated into the building stage, as well as energy efficient appliances such as air-conditioning. M s Deal said incorporating h igh efficiency appliances could drive the cost of some home models, which range in price from $517,000 to $778,000, up.H owever, home buyers will have the option to forego the energy efficient air-conditioning system, r educing the cost of the home by about $19,000. Still, the investment in energy efficient devices will more than pay for i tself. Ms Deal said some other features incorporated into the homes will be fascia board and boxing made from recycled material; Accu-Crete walls that are crack and fade resistant; low flow shower heads; single-gallon flush toilets; quartz counter tops; mahogany or cedar front doors; and Icynene, a spray on insula t ion, in the attics. We want to offer a better product that is low maintenance, better quality materials and that k eeps the dollar value the s ame,” she said. “I would say that I’m higher (priced the things that I offer, the stan-d ard things, are things that other builders don’t put in, so they (buyers t er deal.” Ms Deal said that though lot numbers were limited, the homes in the community will f eature seven different designs to accommodate varying buyer tastes. She said there will be homes with additions for the physically challenged, homes with guest suites, open concept homes that are great for entertaining and homes for single and young Sustainability only concern over jobless benefit plan C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a t hird party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for e rrors and/or o mission from the daily report. $3.56 $3.56 $3.60 $ntnr'# %# " (!"&$'$#( f"$$ !##$##$!! )#* "$$+&%')n !'%#!"#tb n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor FINANCIAL services executives last night said it was increas-i ngly apparent t hat the Bahamas would have to issue an imminent policy statement pledging g reater international co-operation on tax matters, as failure to do so could leave this nation isolated and the industry exposed to being ‘blacklisted’ again. Tribune Business was told that t he Bahamas was “going to have to take a position” before the April 2, 2009, meeting of the G20, as the world’s major indus t rialised nations were committed to launching a crack down on international financial cen tres that were failing to co-operate with their demands for greater transparency and tax information exchange. T he urgency of a public policy statement by the Bahamian gov e rnment has further intensified in the past few days, with Switzerland, Austria, Luxem bourg, Andorra, Liechtenstein,B ermuda, Jersey, Guernsey and the Cayman Islands having already committed to greater cooperation on tax matters, in a bid to forestall a potential G-20 offensive led by both the UK and US. They are backed by high-tax European nations such as France and Germany. O ne senior financial services professional, speaking to Trib une Business on condition of anonymity, said the Government now appeared to “have woken up” to the need for urgent action, after several FNM MPs and Cabinet ministers had recently decried the “degree of hysteria" surrounding the brew-i ng storm approaching the Bahamian financial servicesi ndustry. “There has to be a serious policy statement by the Bahamasg overnment before April 2,” the source told Tribune Business. “Because not to do it would leave the Bahamas isolated. We are one of the very few who have not taken a position, like the majority of international financial centres have done, and made it known. I’d be amazed if the Government did not make a move before April 2, not from a legislative point of view, but a policy statement.” The Government and finan cial services industry were last night accelerating moves already begun to develop a common position on how the Bahamas should respond to the changing international financial services landscape, with a 5pm meeting Bahamas needs urgent policy statement over tax co-operation Owen Bethel S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter THE NORTH Abaco Fisheries Co-operative could receive $150,000 from the Inter-Ameri can Development Bank (IDB for fishing and business development training, Tribune Business confirmed yesterday. The cooperative’s chairman, Leon Pinder, said fishermen in that area have long been brand ed as uneducated and notori ously bad at managing their fish ing revenues. He said that, gen erally, most fishermen do not complete high school, so the programme which is in preparation was essential to the sector’s future, and the future of t he fishermen at large. The technical training, which is estimated to cost $225,000, will assist North Abaco’s fishermen in maximising their potential, a ccording to Mr Pinder, as the organisation moves to upgrade its export markets. “As a cooperative we are building a fish house, fish processing plant and a marine shop, where we can provide the fish e rmen with necessary equipment and get to the point where we c an export our own fish to max imise the income,” he said. Mr Pinder said members and potential members of the coop-e rative will be trained specifically in business management, different types of fishing and environmentally-friendly fishing, in an intensive month-long pro gramme. M r Pinder said training will be provided by the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture, via the IDB, and also by the Bahamas Cooperative League. “Once the IDB does the train i ng and we are already to belt course on our building, then w e’ll move on to the phase where we can get a local loan from the other cooperatives like the credit union,” Mr Pinders aid. “ We will need more fund$225k initiative to aid cooperative’s fisheries exports North Abaco fishermen ‘building a fish house, fish processing plant and a marine shop’ in bid to maximise income S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor THE Government’s proposed unemployment benefit programme will “go a long way to reducing the strain” on persons who have lost their jobs due to the recession, the Chamber of Commerce’s first vice-pres ident said yesterday, the only major concern being the initiative’s long-term sustainability. Khaalis Rolle, speaking to Tribune Business after the scheme was officially presented yesterday to mem bers of the business community and trade unions, said the Government was possibly hoping to have the unemployment benefit programme up and running by April 20 this year. It was also hoping to get the enabling legislation to Parliament by next week. Mr Rolle said: “I like the effort the Government is making on this. It seems to be a well thought-out plan, an ambitious plan. “I think it will go a long S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Developer applies to go ‘completely solar’ * Seeks government, BEC permission for New Providence subdivision to go 100% solar during daylight hours * Energy efficient devices push prices of homes, ranging from $517,000 to $778,000, up but energy savings more than pay for themselves n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor ANALYSTS yesterday expressed “concern” that Finance Corporation of the Bahamas (FINCO tained its regular dividend at$ 0.13 per share despite slumpi ng to what one described as its “first” quarterly loss ever, the contracting economy and rise in loan delinquencies forcing it to take a $5.375 million provision against future losses. The one-time provision saw F INCO post a $367,759 net loss for the three months to January 31, 2009, a result that market analysts said was “symbolic” of the deep economic recession and rising unemployment that the B ahamas now faced. The latter, they added, was forcing many borrowers to default on their mortgage ando ther loan commitments, the key issue impacting performance across the Bahamian commer cial banking sector. Describing FINCO’s fiscal 2009 first quarter results as “quite surprising”, one analyst Analyst ‘concer on FINCO dividend S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE www.babnancial.com 242-461-1000 Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-6501 British American Financial British American Financial BAFsawholly-ownedsubsidiaryoftheBahamianentityBAB HoldingsLimited.BAFrecentlycelebrateditssecondyearasa100%Bahamianownedentity havingbeenacquiredbytheBahamianGroupduringFebruary2007. Established in 1920, British American Financial providesafullrangeofinsuranceand investment services, including life & health insurance, mortgages, nancial and retirement planning, annuities,mutual funds and pension plans. The Company has three ofces in Nassau at IndependenceDrive,RosettaSt.Palmdale,andCarmichaelRd.Alsofullservicebranchesin Freeport, Abaco, Exuma and a network of career agents throughout the Family Islands. The Company directly employs more than 200 Bahamians. British American Financial is not related or afliated in any way whatsoever with any other companywithasimilarnamBritishAmerican,whetherintheBahamas,theCaribbeanregion or anywhere else. IncelebrationofoursecondanniversaryasafullyBahamianCompany,wearepleasedto announce our offering of free nancial consultations, along with weekly nancial seminars to our clients and the public at our Independence Drive Headquarters every Friday until the end of April 2009.TheCompanyextendsaspecialinvitationtomembersofthepublicwhorecentlyexperienced joblossesandhardshipasaresultofthedownturnintheeconomy. PleasedirectanyquestionsonthisstatementtoMr.I.ChesterCooper,President&CEO via email: ccooper@babnancial.com or Tel: 242-461-1003. A JUNIOR securities executor, Keith Beneby Jnr, has p assed the Series 7 exam in F lorida. He is now eligible to apply for registration with the S ecurities Commission. Mr Beneby is pictured (above right) with Reece Chipman (left , managing director of The N ational Association of Secu r ities Training and Compliance (Nastac T he Series 7 exam is administered by the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD Credit Suisse executor passes Series 7 exam EXCITING AND CHALLENGINGOPPORTUNITIES FOR Y OUNG BAHAMIANSImaginea career which will take you to the worlds mostfascinatingports andfarflung destinations.A Maritime career could take you there. Doyou have,orarelikelyto have,5 BGCSE passes, includingMath,Physics/Combined Science andEnglishLanguage at grade C or above? Haveyou obtained, ordo youexpecttoachieve, acombinedSATscoreof at least1500? Areyou physically fit? Are youbetween theages of16 and20years? If youhaveanswered YES to the questions above then readon. TheBahamas Maritime Authorityisonce againoffering attractive scholarships toyoung academicallysoundBahamianswhoare keen to trainfor an excitingand challenging careerinthe MaritimeIndustrywhichisgaining increasing national importance. These generous scholarships are inclusiveoftuition,fees, coursematerial, accommodation and transportation costs. CommencinginSeptember 2009successful candidates willfollow a4year degreeprogramme at the California Maritime Academy,aunique campusof the CaliforniaState U niversity.Upon completion of thedegree, thequalifiedofficers willbe expected toserve onboard aBahamianflaggedvessel for at least2 yearsprovidingthe solidfoundation on whichtobuild their Maritime careers. Further information and application formscan b e obtainedfromMrs ErmaRahmingMackey, Deputy Director,Bahamas Maritime Authority, Manx CorporateCentre, West BayStreet, P O B oxN-4679, Nassau,Bahamas, email: emackey@bahamasmaritime.com , tel: 3565772 fax:356 5889. Completedapplications must be submitted inperson or bypost,with copies o f academiccertificates/transcripts andproof o f Bahamiancitizenship, no laterthan31stMarch, 2009. Interviewswilltake place in N assauduring the last weekinApril. INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, r ead Insight on Mondays

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter BAHAMIAN small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs by the Inter-American Investment Corporation (IIC become more energy efficient by implementing conservation measures that could slash opera ting costs. Speaking to Tribune Business at the Energy Efficiency Workshop for Small and Medium Sized Enterprises, the IIC’s senior financialspecialist, Car-los Serrano, said much more can be done throughout the Bahamas and the wider Caribbean to decrease energy waste and consumption, and increase savings. “By talking with many local enterprises here, we have seen that there are many basic things that have not been done the most simple things for energy efficiency, like insulation. Many buildings constructed here do not include insulation and that’s wasted energy,” he said. So, the Bahamas as well as other Caribbean countries have a n energy intensity, which provides a very large potential to reduce consumption and improve savings.” The IIC’s GREENPYME programme “promotes renewable energy, clean technology, and energy efficiency in SMEs in the main production and service sectors in Latin America and the Caribbean”. A presenter at the workshop and energy expert, Pierre Langlois, said businesses need to develop a plan for saving energy, implement it and then build o n the success of the plan. He suggested that companies s tart with small changes that could make an immediate difference, such as efficient fluorescent light bulbs, and invest in energy efficient appliances and upgrades that could lead to potential long-term savings. Some energy conservation measures revealed at the workshop, which could be expensive but pay for themselves in less than five years, were computerised energy management systems pegged at more than $3,000, with an estimated play back period of one=and-a-half to two years; polyurethane foam spray insulation, pegged at $2 $3 per square foot with a pay back period of three to four years; and to change from freon to “natural” hydrocarbon refrigerants for air-conditioning and refrigeration systems. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 3B Date: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 Time: 7pm Place:e Retreat, Village Road (parking at Queens College) Admission: BNT Members Free General Public $2P u b l i c E d u c a t i o n M e e t i n gDrs. Alan Bolten and Kar e n Bjorndal, Archie Carr Centre for Sea Turtle Research, University of FloridaSea Turtles of The Bahamas:Insights from 30 years of studyPhone: 242-393-1317 Email: bnt@bnt.bs Bahamian firms have ‘great potential’ for energy savings

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w ay in, not eliminating, but reducing the strain on unemployed during this period. There are some safeguards in place to ensure it will not be abused.” The Government is looking at pegging the unemployment benefit jobless persons receive to their insurable wage level when they (and their employers contributing to the National Insurance Board (NIB Essentially, unemployed persons will receive 50 per cent of the insurable wage their NIB contributions were based on, for a period lasting between 13-26 weeks (three to six months “They spoke about the size of the benefit being 50 per cent of the insurable wage,” Mr Rolle told Tribune Business last night. “If it was $400 per week, you will get $200 a week.” He added that, in the case of former hotel workers, the insurable wage calculation would not include tips or gratuities. “My biggest concern is the sustainability of it,” Mr Rolle said. “There’s a finite budget associated with it $20 million. That money is being transferred from the NIB Medical Benefits Reserve. “When that is exhausted, there are two things in play the possibility of a protracted, dire economic situation, and when you look at the fundamentals driving unemployment in the country, it’s not a process that’s easy to recover from. “Unemployment is going to remain high for quite a while.” Mr Rolle said it would take some time for tourism and other key industries “to get everything back in line. For unemployment to start diminishing, it’s going to take a very long time, and a very concerted effort on behalf of the Government and the private sector.” The Department of Statistics’ interim labour force survey recently showed that the unemployment rate on New Providence had increased from 8.7 per cent to 12.1 per cent between May 2008 and early 2009, an almost 40 per cent rise in percentage terms. For Grand Bahama, the Department of Statistics said the unemployment rate had increased from a 9 per cent total in May 2008 to 14.6 per cent in February 2009, an increase of 5.6 per cent or more than 50 per cent in percentage terms. These latest unemployment rates were described as the highest experienced by both islands in the past 15 years, since the recession of the early 1990s. The Department of Statistics said the number of persons unemployed on New Providence had risen by 4,540 or 38 per cent, while for Grand Bahama the equivalent was a 55 per cent rise or 1,500 persons. These data mean that just over one in 10 Bahamians who are actively looking for work are now not able to find it. On Grand Bahama, the February 2009 survey showed that that 17.7 per cent of women were unemployed, with the rate slightly lower for men at 11.7 per cent. Conversely, for New Providence, the unemployment rate was only 11.9 per cent for women, yet 12.4 per cent for men. “It’s an ambitious plan. I’m concerned about the sustainability, but it’s a step in the right direction,” Mr Rolle added. “Generally, I think everyone was happy about it. The labour unions were pretty pleased that the Government was taking this step. The private sector, from our end, was pretty pleased something is being done.” The unemployment benefit scheme will be administered by NIB. Mr Rolle acknowledged that this was also a “major concern”, given that NIB had difficulty administering all that it does already, but the Board told yesterday’s presentation that it had already started “to shift people into that area to make sure it’s executed and managed properly”. Mr Rolle said the presentation did not focus on the scheme’s long-term viability. However, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said it would ultimately be financed by a per worker contribution equivalent to 1 per cent of the insurable wage. “Regard being had to the current economic circumstance, we d on’t propose to introduce such a charge today,” Mr. Ingraham said previously, “but the charge is likely to be of the order of 1 per cent of insurable wage. “That means if you are making $400 a week or more, that 1 per cent would be $4, and that would be shared either 60/40 employer/employee or 50/50 employer/employee.” The Government is consideri ng a January 1, 2010 date for the implementation of that payment scheme. Sustainability only concern over jobless benefit plan $225k initiative to aid cooperative’s fisheries exports C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 6($%52:1+2/',1*6/,0,7(' ,QROXQWDU\OLTXLGDWLRQ RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ RIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW RI 6($%52:1+2/',1*6/,0,7(' LV LQ'LVVROXWLRQ 7KHGDWHRIFRPPHQFHPHQWRIGLVVROXWLRQLVWKHWK GD\RI-DQXDU\ 6DUQLD'LUHFWRUV/LPLWHG 6XLWH 7RZHU+LOO+RXVH /H%RUGDJHWHWHURUW *XHUQVH\ /LTXLGDWRU Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following items: %XLOGLQJVWUXFWXUHH[WHULRUHQYHORSHH[WHULRUFDQRSLHVDQG UHODWHGVXEWUDGHSDFNDJHV *HQHUDO5HTXLUHPHQWVIRU*HQHUDO&RQWUDFWLQJVHUYLFHVIRU WKHRYHUDOOSURMHFWDQG &RQVWUXFWLRQ0DQDJHPHQW)HHIRUWHQGHULQJWKHEDODQFHRI VXEWUDGHDQGVXSSOLHUZRUNSDFNDJHVDWDODWHUGDWH The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e. mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are notincluded in this Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230 General Contractor in 2009. The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room located at the NAD Project office. TENDERC-230 General Contract, Stage 1Contact: TRACI BRISBYContract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project Ph: (24224217 P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs ing to get where we want to get, but that won’t be done until we have done the technical training that is provided from IDB.” T he proposal is presently in Washington waiting for final approvals, after which training could begin. It could be as early as the end of this month,” said Mr Pinder. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Developer applies to go ‘completely solar’ families. Ms Deal was asked by Dr Deveaux to replace him as t he lunch-time guest speaker at the Energy Efficiency Workshop for small and medium-sized enterprises, h eld yesterday at the British Colonial Hilton under the auspices of Royal Bank of Canada. She said she seest his as a positive response from the government. She insisted though : “We have to take care of the environment, and we don’t have to wait on the Gov ernment.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B said: “My only concern is that they’re continuing to pay the dividend at $0.13 per share, so there’s no adjustment in the dividend, which shows they figure they’re going to recover.” T he first quarter loss stood in start contrast to the $5.496 million profit FINCO generated in the 2008 first quarter. The bank, which is effectively Royal Bank’s mortgage lending arm, said the provision for future credit losses was required after a further increase in non-accrual loans was experienced during the quarter. In its message to shareholders, FIN CO said that the dividend payment was maintained only “after considerable delib eration, and having regard for the oper ating loss and the difficult operating environment, which is expected to continue”. The Board decision, FINCO added, was based on FINCO’s strong capital position, with shareholder equity standing at $87.607 million inclusive of $79.222 million in retained earnings. Its liquidity p osition, with almost $63 million in cash in hand at the balance sheet date, and con servative loan loss provisioning policy, also proved decisive factors. One analyst, though, questioned whether the dividend payment was made partly to satisfy the profit objectives of FINCO’s 75 per cent majority shareholder, Royal Bank of Canada. The div idend will likely have to come from retained earnings. Meanwhile, Kenwood Kerr, Providence Advisors’ chief executive, said of the FINCO results and credit provision: “It’s just an accounting provision to reflect the cur rent environment. They take the hit now and move forward. “It speaks to a larger fundamental problem, people who are cash strapped a nd unable to pay. I would argue that if FINCO is a top tier mortgage lending bank, the market leader, then the other smaller players may be having an even more difficult time. “It’s just symbolic of the state of the market and the economy.” At year-end 2008, some 4.09 per cent of FINCO’s total loan portfolio mostly mortgages were non-performing, mean ing they were 90 days or more past due. The total loan amount involved was $28.933 million out of a total $692.079 million portfolio. Still, even at October 31, 2008, FIN CO’s non-performing loan portfolio had increased by 76.5 per cent year-over-year compared to $16.39 million at year-end 2007. I n particular, the total value of loans more than one year past due had more than doubles from $3.419 million to $7.442 million. In addition, the total value of loans between 90 and 180 days past due had more than tripled, from $2.188 million to $6.9994 million. And the total value of loans between nine months to one year overdue also more than tripled, rising from $1.245 mil lion to $4.347 million. Still, FINCO is enjoying mortgage port folio growth, having expanded by 12 per cent during the first quarter. F F I I N N C C O O , , f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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at the Sheraton Cable Beach. The meeting was organised by t he Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSBdance was minister of state for finance, Zhivargo Laing. Trib une Business went to press before the meeting’s outcome could be determined. Prior to the meeting, Owen B ethel, head of the Nassaubased Montaque Group, told Tribune Business that it wouldbe “totally detrimental to the financial industry” in the Bahamas if this nation were to allow itself to become isolated and, subsequently, ‘blacklisted’ by the OECD or other G-20 forums/clubs. Mr Bethel pointed out that if this happened, the reputational consequences for the Bahamian financial services sector would be significant, and could potentially lead to existing and new private wealth management clients pulling their business from this jurisdiction. “I would have thought that we should have basically made a clear statement, firstly clarifying the actions that we have taken already, and that we’re well ahead of the game in that sense, but also that we’re certainly prep ared to co-operate with whatever else the countries of the US and OECD would want, so that we are very precise in what we d o,” Mr Bethel told Tribune Business. Doing this, he explained, would ensure the Bahamas did “not take the scattergun, sledge hammer approach and smash everything, like we did in 2000” as a result of the financial services industry being ‘blacklisted’ then by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF Instead, Mr Bethel said the Bahamas had to “apply strategic surgery to areas of concern, and if the concerns expressed are tax evasion by their citizens, we should be prepared to look at Tax Information Exchange Agreements”. He agreed, though, with the arguments expressed by attorneys such as John Delaney and Brian Moree, in that the Bahamas should seek reciprocal benefits from nations it signed T IEAs with, such as investment and trade preferences. It was especially important that the Bahamas avoid becomi ng isolated, Mr Bethel told Tribune Business. If the G-20, Obama administration and others were to brand all international financial centres, including many US states, Switzerland, Singapore, Hong Kong and others as so-called ‘tax havens’, the Bahamas “may be able to weather the storm”. Yet if they removed themselves from the frame by pledging greater co-operation on international tax matters, and the Bahamas did not adopt such a clear position, it would “totally be detrimental to the financ ial industry”. “We would clearly have identified ourselves as laggards in t he move to eliminate tax evasion,” Mr Bethel explained, saying this could pave the way for “the blacklisting to come”. “That sends a signal to existing clients and potential clients that this is not the jurisdiction they want to be in at all,” he added. Mr Bethel said the speed with which the Bahamas reacted to t he 2000 ‘blacklisting’ by the FATF, and the radical legislative surgery performed then, would likely cause the OECD a nd its members to expect a similar performance in light of current pressures. In addition, they would also expect the Bahamas to give them what this nation had already provided the US with a TIEA in 2002. “We certainly need to solicit the support of the US government, who we have an existing TIEA with, and get an understanding that that is adequate for their purposes going forward,” Mr Bethel said. “We must get their support in applying the same provisions to o ther countries not going further than we have already.” Backing the issuing of a clear p olicy statement by the Bahamas government on tax co-operation, Mr Bethel said it would be “ideal” if this was part of a common initiative and voice featuring all Caribbean-based international financial centres. “To the degree we have jumped out of the bandwagon on our own before, I would certainly support the Government m aking a statement on its own prior to the G-20 meeting,” he added. Mr Bethel said the mounting e xternal pressure on the Bahamas was “quite serious”, and the momentum generated meant this nation needed to respond proactively, while also leaving industry institutions and executives with enough time to implement the necessary changes. “We have yet to come up with a n agreed policy statement and position as to where we see the industry going. I’m not sure the Government has bought into the d irection the industry wants, or has to, go in,” Mr Bethel said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 5B $PHVVDJHIURPWKHLQLVWU\RI 'HSDUWPHQWRI(QYLURQPHQWDO +HDOWKHUYLFHV &20021:($/7+)7+(%$+$0$6&/(TXL ,17+(0$77(52)$//7+$7 $1',17+($77(5 $1',17+($77(5 127,&( $// 7+$7 127,&(,6+(5(%<*,9(1 WK WK 7KH5HJLVWU\RI WKHXSUHPH&RXUW WK *5$+$07+203621t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t&R&KDPEHUV(DVWKLUOH\ WUHHW+LJKODQG7HUUDFHHZURYLGHQFH 7KH%DKDPDV 7KH$GPLQLVWUDWRUFH*RYHUQRU (OHXWKHUD7KH%DKDPDV $1')857+(57$.(127,&( WKDWDQ\SHUVRQ KDYLQJGRZHURUULJKWWRGRZHUDQDGYHUVHFODLP RUFODLPQRWUHFRJQL]HGLQWKH3HWLWLRQVKDOO RQRUEHIRUHWKH 0D\ LQWKH 6XSUHPH&RXUWDQGVHUYHRQWKH3HWLWLRQRUKLV DWWRUQH\DQ$GYHUVH&ODLPLQWKHSUHVFULEHG IRUPVXSSRUWHGE\$IGDYLW )$,/85($1<3(5621 WRDQGVHUYH DQ$GYHUVH&ODLPRQRUEHIRUH 0D\ GDWHZLOORSHUDWHDVEDUWRVXFKFODLP 'DWHGWKLVWKGD\RIDUFK6KDURQ:LOVRQt&R &KDPEHUV 'HOYHVW+RXVH (DVWKLUOH\WUHHW+LJKODQGHUUDFH 1DVVDXKH%DKDPDV $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHHWLWLRQHU 7KHXEOLF,V&RUGLDOO\,QYLWHG$WWHQG 7+(+/
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A PT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN T IGER fer feigned respect ( 3,3,7) 9 Swindler (5 10 Italian astronomer (7 11 Conceit (6 1 2 Vividly imprinted (6 15 Persian Gulf sheikhdom (7 17 Scope (5 19 Engaged in dispute ( 2,11) 20 Brownish yellow (5 21 Rumour (7 D own 1 Asavoury jelly (5 2 Command dogmatically (3,4,3,3 3 Small personal o rnament (7 4 Give up office (6 5 Aprecious stone (5 6 Divulge secrets ( 5,3,5) 7 Minimal footing (7 11 Pulsating with life (7 13 Windpipe (7 14 Catch in a net (6 16 Heated (5 18 Flavoursome (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Outflowing currency (3,4 5 Aflash of brilliance (5 8 One old fort now turned into a capital tourist a ttraction (5,2,6 9 Aplea is reversed in s ibilant tones (5 10 Still fluster, perhaps (7 1 1 Assimilate a summary (6 12 Calms down a wild b east (6 15 Atussle for military h onours (7 17 Tragically without a m atch, has to return a smoke (5 1 9 It’s unspeakable! (13 20 Points to the girl to f ollow (5 21 Make dispirited editor return to his normal field (7 Down 1 Unnecessary accessory (5 2 One should hear pins drop in these places (7,6 3 Shattered as an antiquarian’s interest may b e? (2,5 4 It’s a struggle for an a mphibian to get around (6 5 Coarse expression of quantity (5 6 Be fit and agile, perhaps, a nd tireless (13 7 New singlet produces p rickling sensations (7 11 It’s deep in distress, n otwithstanding (7 13 Is more cheerful when the d ollars risen? (5,2 14 Aim for the top in exotic d ances (6 16 Bravely built shelter (5 18 Cottons on and leers crudely (5 Across:1 Verne, 8 Homesick, 9 Cabal, 10 Milliner, 11 Waste, 12 Ann, 16 Sea dog, 17 Endear, 18 Ebb, 23 Squat, 24 Have-nots, 25 Bathe, 26 M oreover, 27 Leant. Down:2 Emanated, 3 Neap tide, 4 Motion, 5 Reply, 6 Giant, 7 Skirt, 12 Age, 13 Neb, 14 Adequate, 15 M arathon, 19 Bitter, 20 Champ, 21 O vert, 22 Snook. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Slack, 8 Bona fide, 9 Snack, 10 On demand, 11 After, 12 For, 16 Scheme, 17 In hand, 18 Wed, 23 Foray, 24 Anaconda, 25 R owdy, 26 Sob story, 27 Stamp. Down:2 Long face, 3 Cockeyed, 4 Borneo, 5 Waver, 6 Lilac, 7 Heady, 12 Few, 13 Rid, 14 Shoot-out, 15 In t andem, 19 Endure, 20 False, 21 M aybe, 22 Booty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 910 111213 1 4 15161718 19 2021 1 234567 8 910 111213 1 4 15161718 19 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Having big-name cast (3-4 5 Hemmed in (5 8 Offer feigned respect (3,3,7 9 Swindler (5 10 Italian astronomer (7 11 Conceit (6 12 Vividly imprinted (6 15 Persian Gulf sheikhdom (7 17 Scope (5 19 Engaged in dispute (2,11) 20 Brownish yellow (5 21 Rumour (7 Down 1 Asavoury jelly (5 2 Command dogmatically (3,4,3,3 3 Small personal ornament (7 4 Give up office (6 5 Aprecious stone (5 6 Divulge secrets (5,3,5 7 Minimal footing (7 11 Pulsating with life (7 13 Windpipe (7 14 Catch in a net (6 16 Heated (5 18 Flavoursome (5 nfbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Outflowing currency (3,4 5 Aflash of brilliance (5 8 One old fort now turned into a capital tourist attraction (5,2,6 9 Aplea is reversed in sibilant tones (5 10 Still fluster, perhaps (7 11 Assimilate a summary (6 12 Calms down a wild beast (6 15 Atussle for military honours (7 17 Tragically without a match, has to return a smoke (5 19 It’s unspeakable! (13 20 Points to the girl to follow (5 21 Make dispirited editor return to his normal field (7 Down 1 Unnecessary accessory (5 2 One should hear pins drop in these places (7,6 3 Shattered as an antiquarian’s interest may be? (2,5 4 It’s a struggle for an amphibian to get around (6 5 Coarse expression of quantity (5 6 Be fit and agile, perhaps, and tireless (13 7 New singlet produces prickling sensations (7 11 It’s deep in distress, notwithstanding (7 13 Is more cheerful when the dollars risen? (5,2 14 Aim for the top in exotic dances (6 16 Bravely built shelter (5 18 Cottons on and leers crudely (5 Across:1 Verne, 8 Homesick, 9 Cabal, 10 Milliner, 11 Waste, 12 Ann, 16 Sea dog, 17 Endear, 18 Ebb, 23 Squat, 24 Have-nots, 25 Bathe, 26 Moreover, 27 Leant. Down:2 Emanated, 3 Neap tide, 4 Motion, 5 Reply, 6 Giant, 7 Skirt, 12 Age, 13 Neb, 14 Adequate, 15 Marathon, 19 Bitter, 20 Champ, 21 Overt, 22 Snook. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Slack, 8 Bona fide, 9 Snack, 10 On demand, 11 After, 12 For, 16 Scheme, 17 In hand, 18 Wed, 23 Foray, 24 Anaconda, 25 Rowdy, 26 Sob story, 27 Stamp. Down:2 Long face, 3 Cockeyed, 4 Borneo, 5 Waver, 6 Lilac, 7 Heady, 12 Few, 13 Rid, 14 Shoot-out, 15 In tandem, 19 Endure, 20 False, 21 Maybe, 22 Booty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Having big-name cast (3-4 5 Hemmed in (5 8 Offer feigned respect (3,3,7 9 Swindler (5 10 Italian astronomer (7 11 Conceit (6 12 Vividly imprinted (6 15 Persian Gulf sheikhdom (7 17 Scope (5 19 Engaged in dispute (2,11) 20 Brownish yellow (5 21 Rumour (7 Down 1 Asavoury jelly (5 2 Command dogmatically (3,4,3,3 3 Small personal ornament (7 4 Give up office (6 5 Aprecious stone (5 6 Divulge secrets (5,3,5 7 Minimal footing (7 11 Pulsating with life (7 13 Windpipe (7 14 Catch in a net (6 16 Heated (5 18 Flavoursome (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Outflowing currency (3,4 5 Aflash of brilliance (5 8 One old fort now turned into a capital tourist attraction (5,2,6 9 Aplea is reversed in sibilant tones (5 10 Still fluster, perhaps (7 11 Assimilate a summary (6 12 Calms down a wild beast (6 15 Atussle for military honours (7 17 Tragically without a match, has to return a smoke (5 19 It’s unspeakable! (13 20 Points to the girl to follow (5 21 Make dispirited editor return to his normal field (7 Down 1 Unnecessary accessory (5 2 One should hear pins drop in these places (7,6 3 Shattered as an antiquarian’s interest may be? (2,5 4 It’s a struggle for an amphibian to get around (6 5 Coarse expression of quantity (5 6 Be fit and agile, perhaps, and tireless (13 7 New singlet produces prickling sensations (7 11 It’s deep in distress, notwithstanding (7 13 Is more cheerful when the dollars risen? (5,2 14 Aim for the top in exotic dances (6 16 Bravely built shelter (5 18 Cottons on and leers crudely (5 Across:1 Verne, 8 Homesick, 9 Cabal, 10 Milliner, 11 Waste, 12 Ann, 16 Sea dog, 17 Endear, 18 Ebb, 23 Squat, 24 Have-nots, 25 Bathe, 26 Moreover, 27 Leant. Down:2 Emanated, 3 Neap tide, 4 Motion, 5 Reply, 6 Giant, 7 Skirt, 12 Age, 13 Neb, 14 Adequate, 15 Marathon, 19 Bitter, 20 Champ, 21 Overt, 22 Snook. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Slack, 8 Bona fide, 9 Snack, 10 On demand, 11 After, 12 For, 16 Scheme, 17 In hand, 18 Wed, 23 Foray, 24 Anaconda, 25 Rowdy, 26 Sob story, 27 Stamp. Down:2 Long face, 3 Cockeyed, 4 Borneo, 5 Waver, 6 Lilac, 7 Heady, 12 Few, 13 Rid, 14 Shoot-out, 15 In tandem, 19 Endure, 20 False, 21 Maybe, 22 Booty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 9 10 111213 1 4 15161718 19 2021T ribune Comics S udoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Having big-name cast (3-4 5 Hemmed in (5 8 Offer feigned respect (3,3,7 9 Swindler (5 10 Italian astronomer (7 11 Conceit (6 12 Vividly imprinted (6 15 Persian Gulf sheikhdom (7 17 Scope (5 19 Engaged in dispute (2,11) 20 Brownish yellow (5 21 Rumour (7 Down 1 Asavoury jelly (5 2 Command dogmatically (3,4,3,3 3 Small personal ornament (7 4 Give up office (6 5 Aprecious stone (5 6 Divulge secrets (5,3,5 7 Minimal footing (7 11 Pulsating with life (7 13 Windpipe (7 14 Catch in a net (6 16 Heated (5 18 Flavoursome (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Outflowing currency (3,4 5 Aflash of brilliance (5 8 One old fort now turned into a capital tourist attraction (5,2,6 9 Aplea is reversed in sibilant tones (5 10 Still fluster, perhaps (7 11 Assimilate a summary (6 12 Calms down a wild beast (6 15 Atussle for military honours (7 17 Tragically without a match, has to return a smoke (5 19 It’s unspeakable! (13 20 Points to the girl to follow (5 21 Make dispirited editor return to his normal field (7 Down 1 Unnecessary accessory (5 2 One should hear pins drop in these places (7,6 3 Shattered as an antiquarian’s interest may be? (2,5 4 It’s a struggle for an amphibian to get around (6 5 Coarse expression of quantity (5 6 Be fit and agile, perhaps, and tireless (13 7 New singlet produces prickling sensations (7 11 It’s deep in distress, notwithstanding (7 13 Is more cheerful when the dollars risen? (5,2 14 Aim for the top in exotic dances (6 16 Bravely built shelter (5 18 Cottons on and leers crudely (5 Across:1 Verne, 8 Homesick, 9 Cabal, 10 Milliner, 11 Waste, 12 Ann, 16 Sea dog, 17 Endear, 18 Ebb, 23 Squat, 24 Have-nots, 25 Bathe, 26 Moreover, 27 Leant. Down:2 Emanated, 3 Neap tide, 4 Motion, 5 Reply, 6 Giant, 7 Skirt, 12 Age, 13 Neb, 14 Adequate, 15 Marathon, 19 Bitter, 20 Champ, 21 Overt, 22 Snook. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Slack, 8 Bona fide, 9 Snack, 10 On demand, 11 After, 12 For, 16 Scheme, 17 In hand, 18 Wed, 23 Foray, 24 Anaconda, 25 Rowdy, 26 Sob story, 27 Stamp. Down:2 Long face, 3 Cockeyed, 4 Borneo, 5 Waver, 6 Lilac, 7 Heady, 12 Few, 13 Rid, 14 Shoot-out, 15 In tandem, 19 Endure, 20 False, 21 Maybe, 22 Booty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Having big-name cast (3-4 5 Hemmed in (5 8 Offer feigned respect (3,3,7 9 Swindler (5 10 Italian astronomer (7 11 Conceit (6 12 Vividly imprinted (6 15 Persian Gulf sheikhdom (7 17 Scope (5 19 Engaged in dispute (2,11) 20 Brownish yellow (5 21 Rumour (7 Down 1 Asavoury jelly (5 2 Command dogmatically (3,4,3,3 3 Small personal ornament (7 4 Give up office (6 5 Aprecious stone (5 6 Divulge secrets (5,3,5 7 Minimal footing (7 11 Pulsating with life (7 13 Windpipe (7 14 Catch in a net (6 16 Heated (5 18 Flavoursome (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Outflowing currency (3,4 5 Aflash of brilliance (5 8 One old fort now turned into a capital tourist attraction (5,2,6 9 Aplea is reversed in sibilant tones (5 10 Still fluster, perhaps (7 11 Assimilate a summary (6 12 Calms down a wild beast (6 15 Atussle for military honours (7 17 Tragically without a match, has to return a smoke (5 19 It’s unspeakable! (13 20 Points to the girl to follow (5 21 Make dispirited editor return to his normal field (7 Down 1 Unnecessary accessory (5 2 One should hear pins drop in these places (7,6 3 Shattered as an antiquarian’s interest may be? (2,5 4 It’s a struggle for an amphibian to get around (6 5 Coarse expression of quantity (5 6 Be fit and agile, perhaps, and tireless (13 7 New singlet produces prickling sensations (7 11 It’s deep in distress, notwithstanding (7 13 Is more cheerful when the dollars risen? (5,2 14 Aim for the top in exotic dances (6 16 Bravely built shelter (5 18 Cottons on and leers crudely (5 Across:1 Verne, 8 Homesick, 9 Cabal, 10 Milliner, 11 Waste, 12 Ann, 16 Sea dog, 17 Endear, 18 Ebb, 23 Squat, 24 Have-nots, 25 Bathe, 26 Moreover, 27 Leant. Down:2 Emanated, 3 Neap tide, 4 Motion, 5 Reply, 6 Giant, 7 Skirt, 12 Age, 13 Neb, 14 Adequate, 15 Marathon, 19 Bitter, 20 Champ, 21 Overt, 22 Snook. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Slack, 8 Bona fide, 9 Snack, 10 On demand, 11 After, 12 For, 16 Scheme, 17 In hand, 18 Wed, 23 Foray, 24 Anaconda, 25 Rowdy, 26 Sob story, 27 Stamp. Down:2 Long face, 3 Cockeyed, 4 Borneo, 5 Waver, 6 Lilac, 7 Heady, 12 Few, 13 Rid, 14 Shoot-out, 15 In tandem, 19 Endure, 20 False, 21 Maybe, 22 Booty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Having big-name cast (3-4 5 Hemmed in (5 8 Offer feigned respect (3,3,7 9 Swindler (5 10 Italian astronomer (7 11 Conceit (6 12 Vividly imprinted (6 15 Persian Gulf sheikhdom (7 17 Scope (5 19 Engaged in dispute (2,11) 20 Brownish yellow (5 21 Rumour (7 Down 1 Asavoury jelly (5 2 Command dogmatically (3,4,3,3 3 Small personal ornament (7 4 Give up office (6 5 Aprecious stone (5 6 Divulge secrets (5,3,5 7 Minimal footing (7 11 Pulsating with life (7 13 Windpipe (7 14 Catch in a net (6 16 Heated (5 18 Flavoursome (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Outflowing currency (3,4 5 Aflash of brilliance (5 8 One old fort now turned into a capital tourist attraction (5,2,6 9 Aplea is reversed in sibilant tones (5 10 Still fluster, perhaps (7 11 Assimilate a summary (6 12 Calms down a wild beast (6 15 Atussle for military honours (7 17 Tragically without a match, has to return a smoke (5 19 It’s unspeakable! (13 20 Points to the girl to follow (5 21 Make dispirited editor return to his normal field (7 Down 1 Unnecessary accessory (5 2 One should hear pins drop in these places (7,6 3 Shattered as an antiquarian’s interest may be? (2,5 4 It’s a struggle for an amphibian to get around (6 5 Coarse expression of quantity (5 6 Be fit and agile, perhaps, and tireless (13 7 New singlet produces prickling sensations (7 11 It’s deep in distress, notwithstanding (7 13 Is more cheerful when the dollars risen? (5,2 14 Aim for the top in exotic dances (6 16 Bravely built shelter (5 18 Cottons on and leers crudely (5 Across:1 Verne, 8 Homesick, 9 Cabal, 10 Milliner, 11 Waste, 12 Ann, 16 Sea dog, 17 Endear, 18 Ebb, 23 Squat, 24 Have-nots, 25 Bathe, 26 Moreover, 27 Leant. Down:2 Emanated, 3 Neap tide, 4 Motion, 5 Reply, 6 Giant, 7 Skirt, 12 Age, 13 Neb, 14 Adequate, 15 Marathon, 19 Bitter, 20 Champ, 21 Overt, 22 Snook. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Slack, 8 Bona fide, 9 Snack, 10 On demand, 11 After, 12 For, 16 Scheme, 17 In hand, 18 Wed, 23 Foray, 24 Anaconda, 25 Rowdy, 26 Sob story, 27 Stamp. Down:2 Long face, 3 Cockeyed, 4 Borneo, 5 Waver, 6 Lilac, 7 Heady, 12 Few, 13 Rid, 14 Shoot-out, 15 In tandem, 19 Endure, 20 False, 21 Maybe, 22 Booty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021T ribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u Across 1 Having big-name cast (3-4 5 Hemmed in (5 8 Offer feigned respect (3,3,7 9 Swindler (5 10 Italian astronomer (7 11 Conceit (6 12 Vividly imprinted (6 15 Persian Gulf sheikhdom (7 17 Scope (5 19 Engaged in dispute (2,11) 20 Brownish yellow (5 21 Rumour (7 Down 1 Asavoury jelly (5 2 Command dogmatically (3,4,3,3 3 Small personal ornament (7 4 Give up office (6 5 Aprecious stone (5 6 Divulge secrets (5,3,5 7 Minimal footing (7 11 Pulsating with life (7 13 Windpipe (7 14 Catch in a net (6 16 Heated (5 18 Flavoursome (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Outflowing currency (3,4 5 Aflash of brilliance (5 8 One old fort now turned into a capital tourist attraction (5,2,6 9 Aplea is reversed in sibilant tones (5 10 Still fluster, perhaps (7 11 Assimilate a summary (6 12 Calms down a wild beast (6 15 Atussle for military honours (7 17 Tragically without a match, has to return a smoke (5 19 It’s unspeakable! (13 20 Points to the girl to follow (5 21 Make dispirited editor return to his normal field (7 Down 1 Unnecessary accessory (5 2 One should hear pins drop in these places (7,6 3 Shattered as an antiquarian’s interest may be? (2,5 4 It’s a struggle for an amphibian to get around (6 5 Coarse expression of quantity (5 6 Be fit and agile, perhaps, and tireless (13 7 New singlet produces prickling sensations (7 11 It’s deep in distress, notwithstanding (7 13 Is more cheerful when the dollars risen? (5,2 14 Aim for the top in exotic dances (6 16 Bravely built shelter (5 18 Cottons on and leers crudely (5 Across:1 Verne, 8 Homesick, 9 Cabal, 10 Milliner, 11 Waste, 12 Ann, 16 Sea dog, 17 Endear, 18 Ebb, 23 Squat, 24 Have-nots, 25 Bathe, 26 Moreover, 27 Leant. Down:2 Emanated, 3 Neap tide, 4 Motion, 5 Reply, 6 Giant, 7 Skirt, 12 Age, 13 Neb, 14 Adequate, 15 Marathon, 19 Bitter, 20 Champ, 21 Overt, 22 Snook. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Slack, 8 Bona fide, 9 Snack, 10 On demand, 11 After, 12 For, 16 Scheme, 17 In hand, 18 Wed, 23 Foray, 24 Anaconda, 25 Rowdy, 26 Sob story, 27 Stamp. Down:2 Long face, 3 Cockeyed, 4 Borneo, 5 Waver, 6 Lilac, 7 Heady, 12 Few, 13 Rid, 14 Shoot-out, 15 In tandem, 19 Endure, 20 False, 21 Maybe, 22 Booty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 910 1 11213 14 15161718 19 2021 1 234567 8 910 1 11213 14 15161718 19 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a BY STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Having big-name cast (3-4 5 Hemmed in (5 8 Offer feigned respect (3,3,7 9 Swindler (5 10 Italian astronomer (7 11 Conceit (6 12 Vividly imprinted (6 15 Persian Gulf sheikhdom (7 17 Scope (5 19 Engaged in dispute (2,11) 20 Brownish yellow (5 21 Rumour (7 Down 1 Asavoury jelly (5 2 Command dogmatically (3,4,3,3 3 Small personal ornament (7 4 Give up office (6 5 Aprecious stone (5 6 Divulge secrets (5,3,5 7 Minimal footing (7 11 Pulsating with life (7 13 Windpipe (7 14 Catch in a net (6 16 Heated (5 18 Flavoursome (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Outflowing currency (3,4 5 Aflash of brilliance (5 8 One old fort now turned into a capital tourist attraction (5,2,6 9 Aplea is reversed in sibilant tones (5 10 Still fluster, perhaps (7 11 Assimilate a summary (6 12 Calms down a wild beast (6 15 Atussle for military honours (7 17 Tragically without a match, has to return a smoke (5 19 It’s unspeakable! (13 20 Points to the girl to follow (5 21 Make dispirited editor return to his normal field (7 Down 1 Unnecessary accessory (5 2 One should hear pins drop in these places (7,6 3 Shattered as an antiquarian’s interest may be? (2,5 4 It’s a struggle for an amphibian to get around (6 5 Coarse expression of quantity (5 6 Be fit and agile, perhaps, and tireless (13 7 New singlet produces prickling sensations (7 11 It’s deep in distress, notwithstanding (7 13 Is more cheerful when the dollars risen? (5,2 14 Aim for the top in exotic dances (6 16 Bravely built shelter (5 18 Cottons on and leers crudely (5 Across:1 Verne, 8 Homesick, 9 Cabal, 10 Milliner, 11 Waste, 12 Ann, 16 Sea dog, 17 Endear, 18 Ebb, 23 Squat, 24 Have-nots, 25 Bathe, 26 Moreover, 27 Leant. Down:2 Emanated, 3 Neap tide, 4 Motion, 5 Reply, 6 Giant, 7 Skirt, 12 Age, 13 Neb, 14 Adequate, 15 Marathon, 19 Bitter, 20 Champ, 21 Overt, 22 Snook. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Slack, 8 Bona fide, 9 Snack, 10 On demand, 11 After, 12 For, 16 Scheme, 17 In hand, 18 Wed, 23 Foray, 24 Anaconda, 25 Rowdy, 26 Sob story, 27 Stamp. Down:2 Long face, 3 Cockeyed, 4 Borneo, 5 Waver, 6 Lilac, 7 Heady, 12 Few, 13 Rid, 14 Shoot-out, 15 In tandem, 19 Endure, 20 False, 21 Maybe, 22 Booty. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1 234567 8 910 1 11213 1 4 15161718 19 2021 1 234567 8 910 1 11213 14 15161718 19 2021 T ribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE tt r e g a

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MANY home gardeners have a guilty complex about compost. They know that composting is a wonderful concept that adds free goodness to the garden. The catch is, it involves a lot of work. A compost pile needs tobe turned very regularly and the water content kept just so. Turning compost piles is not the most enjoyable chore on the home gardener’s list of things to do. I have recently been using a tumbler-type compost maker that takes the backache (and the heartache) out of composting. It consists of a cylindrical drum mounted on a framework with wheels. Materials to be composted are added through a lock-down door and the drum can be easily rotated by pulling on a series of grooves around the outside. There are vents to allow air circulation and a drain on the opposite side from the door to allow excess moisture to escape. Composting made easy – even for an old man like me. The subtropical conditions of The Bahamas make compost ing a quick process. Indeed, composting is going on all the time in the garden and by putting select materials together in one spot we are only condensing the process. The main principle of composting is to combine high carbon materials (brown high nitrogen materials (green in the ratio of one part brown to three parts green. Put the materials in the tumbler composter, dampen the mixture lightly, then spin to mix thoroughly. Give the tumbler a few spins every day and in 4-6 weeks you will have composted soil that can go straight into your garden. Green nitrogen materials include: fruit and vegetable scraps, coffee grounds and tea bags, egg shells, weeds (without seeds), peanut shells, hair, grass clippings, etc. Brown carbon materials include: dry grass, saw dust, wood ashes, nut shells, shredded newsprint, tissue paper, corn cobs, dry leaves, etc. Materials that should NOT be used for compost include: meat, fish, dairy products, oil and fat, pet waste, bones, and any processed foods containing salt (such as spaghetti sauce When you add these materials to the composter in the correct ratio it is helpful to add a hand ful or two of soil or already-prepared compost. The microbes in the soil will multiply very quick ly and begin their job of breaking down the materials in the composter. The average gardener will usually not have enough green and brown materials to make a full compost right away. If you have to add new materials every day you must keep that 3-1 ratio in mind. Let that ratio get out of whack, or add too much water, and your compost will begin to smell rather bad and the neighbours will complain. One of the composting facts of life is that you will end up with a distressingly small amount of compost compared to the volume of materials you put in. Your compost is ready when it has reduced in volume drastically and has a rich humus scent. The colour will be dark brown to almost black. Compost tumblers cost money, of course, and a far cheaper way to create compost is to dig holes where you intend to plant larger vegetables or establish squash hills. Fill the holes gradually with waste materials in the 3-1 green-to-brown ratio then put back the soil as the compost reduces in volume. Insert a stick to remind you of where your fortified areas are and wait about a month before sowing your seeds or transplanting. Summertime is a good time to do this so you will be ready for the new gardening season. I have had so many requests recently for my 32-page booklet Home Gardening in The Bahamas that I decided to havea third edition printed. It will not be available in Nassau but Green Scene readers can obtaina copy ($10 post free tacting me at Jack Hardy, PO Box AB-20107, Marsh Harbour, Abaco. Nature’s Nest Aromatherapy, located on Bay Street, just west of Arawak Cay, taps the finest ingredients from the earth using essential oils -a scented line of pure, premium, eco-friendly b ath, body and home products made in the Bahamas. Mrs Hooper said she is committed to natural, happy, stress-free living for her family and those she comes into contact with. After experiencing the power of aromatherapy, Mrs Hooper felt compelled to take an extensive course of study to channel her passion towards helping others achieve a more natural, stress-free lifestyle. Although Mrs Hooper has earned a Bache lor’s Degree in Mass Communications and Pub lic Relations from Illinois State University, she said she found her calling in holistic therapy, and in 1994, earned certification in holistic aro matherapy from The Raworth Centre for Natural Therapies and Sports Medicine in Surrey, England. “I practised and honed my skills as I gathered experience in blending pure essential oils with other natural ingredients to make a line of prod ucts that is now manufactured here in the Bahamas,” Mrs Hooper said. Mrs Hooper said she feels that in general peo ple are going back to a natural way of living. “People want to go back to basics and get away from all the chemicals and artificial stuff and particularly now in these hard economic times they want to be able to do things that mean something for them. They do not want to spend a lot of money and that is what I am find ing that they are doing,” Mrs Hooper said. Holistic aromatherapy is a subtle, sensitive therapy with a powerful side, incorporating the use of 100 per cent pure essential oils. According to Aromaweb, a website dedicated to aromatherapy, holistic comes from the Greek word 'holos' meaning whole. This means that an holistic aromatherapy treatment works on the whole person, taking into account factors such as lifestyle, diet, medical history, emotional and mental state, as well as their physical side. It is the fastest stress release therapy there is and is an excellent way of treating minor ailments and negative emotional states as well as being extremely effective as a preventative treatment. An aromatherapy treatment promotes detoxi fication of the body and with it encourages the natural regenerating and healing process. It is known to strengthen people against disease, to increase stamina and can help with convalescence and recovery. Essential oils, the pure essence of a plant, have been found to provide both psychological and physical benefits when used correctly and safely. Essential oils that are inhaled into the lungs offer both psychological and physical benefits. Not only does the aroma of the natural essential oil stimulate the brain to trigger a reaction, but when inhaled into the lungs, the natural constituents (naturally occurring chemicals supply therapeutic benefit. When applied physi cally to the skin, the oils can be absorbed into the bloodstream. The constituents of essential oils can aid in health, beauty and hygiene conditions. In terms of the history of using this natural form of therapy in different cultures, the Chinese may have been one of the first cultures to use aromatic plants for well-being. Their practis es involved burning incense to help create harmony and balance. Later, the Egyptians invented a rudimentary distillation machine that allowed for the crude extraction of cedarwood oil. It is also thought by some that Persia and India may have also invented crude distillation machines, but very little is known. The Egyptians also used infused oils and herbal prepara tions for spiritual, medicinal, fragrant and cos metic use. Mrs Hooper said she has no intention of compromising the quality of her products “This is absolutely my calling and I have found that my background in marketing has really helped me a lot. I love sharing the knowledge,” Mrs Hooper said. In Mrs Hooper’s body scrub line there is a whipped sugar scrub called “Pure” – made with pure cane sugar, a natural exfoliate and blended with healing aloe vera gel. It also contains nourishing avocado oil and hydrating vegetable glycerin, then scented with natural plant essences for a treatment to quench the dri est of skin, leaving it feeling and looking healthy and youthful, with a sun-kissed glow. The cranberry rose scrub is especially beautiful, as it is made with cranberry seed oil, an essential fatty acid oil that assists in moisture retention and contributes to lipid barrier protection of the skin, beautifully scented with rose absolute pure essential oil. There is also the silken avocado body lotion – organic, light and nourishing, that hydrates skin from head to toe. The body and massage oils, made with a base of sweet almond or grapeseed oil, scented with natural plant essences to relax, revive and exhilarate the senses. Another one of Mrs Hooper’s creations is a scented sandalwood fan, to create a fragrant breeze wherever you are, in church, on a walk, when you’re feeling jaded – you create the mood. The newest product, is organic liquid hand soap, enriched with aloe vera gel and rosemary extract, and scented with your favorite essential oil fragrance. Eco-friendly is Nature’s Nests’ philosophy. This is apparent in the soy aromatherapy candles, made with highly sustainable soy wax, scented with pure plant essences, then packaged in glass containers that are recyclable and re-fill able. Anyone can bring in their favorite container, and Mrs Hooper will make a candle, in their favorite colour and scented just the way they like it, in whatever size desired. Even the melted wax can be used (which is actually oil skin for a warm touch of fragrance. C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE health B ODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e n By ALEX MISSICK T ribune Features Reporter WITH the challenges of the economic downturn causing mor e people t o e xper ience str ess and depression, many are turning to the healing powers of aromatherapy. This is wher e Julie Hooper , an holistic aroma therapist and owner of N a ture’s Nest says her expertise comes into play. T HIS ISa common skin condition that is often seen in dogs in the Bahamas. It is caused by a yeast, MALASSEZIA PACHY-D ERMIS that is normally found on the skin and ear canal. It is an opportunisticp athogen, and usually carries disease when there is a n over growth of the yeast resulting in dermatitis (skin infection) and otitis (eari nfection). Malassezia is a common secondary infect ion in dogs with allergies e.g. atopic dermatitis. There is a lot of evidencet hat a hyper sensitivity reaction to the yeast may exist in some dogs, resulting i n extreme pruritus or itch ing. Certain breeds have been reported to be at risk for developing Malassezia dermatitis. These breedsi nclude the German shep herd, the Cocker Spaniel, the Maltese, Poodle, C hihuahua, Shelties, and West Highland Terrier. T hese same breeds are pre disposed to atopic dermati tis. CLINICAL SIGNS D ogs with Malassezia dermatitis usually are itching for days and have very inflamed reddened skin, which is known as ERY T HEMA. There is usually a musty or yeasty odor, and there may be visible greasy changes to the skin. The Skin often becomes lichenified or darkened in affected areas. Typical clinical signs include persistent head shaking and excessive foot licking. There is usually a moist and brown discharge in the ears. This skin condition often begins in the summer or in highly humid months, which also corresponds to the allergy season. DIAGNOSIS This is done by a direct impression smear using a scalpel blade to collect the sample. The sample is then stained with a 3 step diff –quick. This is called a cytological examination. TREATMENT Since Malassezia dermatitis is a secondary disease, one must identify and treat the primary disease. The treatment of Malassezia is individualised according to seventy and various dog and owner considerations. Topical therapy (shampoo tive, but can be difficult in large dogs, dogs with long or thick hair coats or elderly or physically challenged owners. A combination of topical and systemic therapy would be the most rapidly and totally effective measure. The most common shampoo is MALASEEB shampoo and is used daily to twice weekly. Malassezia Dermatitis By DR BASIL S ANDS GREEN SCENE By GARDENER JACK Making garden compost A ROTARY composter like this one can produce new soil from kitchen and garden scraps in four to six weeks. C C a a l l l l t t o o a a d d v v e e r r t t i i s s e e : : 5 5 0 0 2 2 2 2 3 3 7 7 1 1 AROMATHERAPY candles are made from soy oil, ava-c ado oil and a host of other essential oils thatc an either relax or provide a needed b oost to any client. Nature’s GIFTS

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Loretta Simmons, manager of Just Nuts, located on Madeira Street, is dedicated to offering a healthier lifestyle to Bahamians. Mrs Simmons said she first saw the benefits of nuts back when she w as in the financial sector. “I used to be a banker in a private trust company. I started selling junk food from my desk drawer and one of my colleagues asked me one day to sell something healthy. My first investment was around $50 because I thought it wouldn’t sell and surprisingly it was all gone within a day,” Mrs Simmons said. Mrs Simmons’ wide variety of nuts and seeds come from places all over the world and she enjoys spreading the wide variety. “We get most of our products from the United States, but we do have dates from Turkey, raw cashews from India, and a few things out of Thailand,” Mrs Simmons said. Nuts are excellent sources of protein, minerals, "good" monounsaturated fats and other nutrients, and they are good for the heart. Nuts are one of the best plant sources of protein. They are rich in f iber, phytonutrients and antioxidants such as Vita min E and selenium. T he type of nut a person eats is not that important, although some nuts have more heart-healthy nutrients and fats than do others. Walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, Brazilian, almost every type of nut has a lot of nutrition packed into a tiny package. If someone has heart disease, eating nuts instead of a less healthy snack can make it easier to follow a heart-healthy diet. Mrs Simmons does not just offer plain nuts, but mixes a few of her nuts with raisins or makes dif ferent blends with a variety of flavors. “We do blends like the tropical splash, which consists of cranberries, almonds and banana chips. We have the mango passion which has a mixture of dried fruits and nuts, however, our biggest seller is the almond and cranberry blend. We also have seeds such as flax, sunflower and pumpkin seeds,” Mrs Simmons said. Eating nuts reduces the risk of developing blood clots that can cause a fatal heart attack. Nuts also improve the health of the lining of the arteries. The evidence for the heart-health benefits of nuts is not rock solid yet. The Food and Drug Administration only allows food companies to say evidence "suggests but does not prove" that eating nuts reduces heart disease risk. To continue to spread the word about the health benefits of nuts, Mrs Simmons said she has also started making baskets and party trays to better serve her clients. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 9B LOVING RELATIONSHIPS n By ALEX MISSICK T ribune Features Reporter MANY Bahamians are not known to be “nut s avvy” and tend to shy away from anything other than the common peanut. Some were even scared away from nuts during the low-fat craze of the last f ew decades due to some nuts being high in oil and calories, but now nuts are making a comeback. YOU may wonder why becoming more assertive is important or in fact relevant in a loving relationship. You may think that being in a couple should be effortless and that your partner should always know what you need and want instinctively. You may very well feel that you have been together so long that they should know all your likes and dislikes and wonder why you have to 'spell out' out everything to them. Alternatively, people may think of you as pushy, loud, outspoken or aggressive. Isn't that just your way of getting what you want? Isn't that the same as being assertive? If that is the case then let me ask you this. Are you getting what you really want and need? Are you happy when you get it and was it given freely? Without a doubt, relationships are full of compromises and deal makings. What we hope to achieve from all this negotiating is a comfortable and safe place to return to at the end of a weary day. At the beginning of a new love relationship you may have spoken up and expressed your preferences. However as time goes by the safety of the relationship often prevents us from rocking the boat and upsetting our partners. You may feel it is just not worth changing things and peace and quiet is all you are looking for. But being assertive does not mean being obnoxious, bullying or aggressive. Assertiveness is not about having a temper tantrum like a two year old. If you often feel like explod ing at your partner to get what you want, not caring about the consequences then go right ahead but be prepared to deal with the aftermath of your tirade. Being assertive means directly going after what you want in an appropriate way. This means avoiding the extreme positions of being so passive and compliant that your needs are never considered or met. Or the other extreme of being so overbearing and aggressive that you trample on the feelings and rights of others. Now on reading this you may well consider this a delicate path to walk or even an impossible one to walk in your present relationship. But this is not so. The path of assertiveness is wide and one that is easy to walk once you find the way to negotiate it. The most important requirements are to acknowledge the need for change and to then be motivated to make the appropriate changes. A few basic steps to keep in mind are timing as being angry, tired or in a hurry are not the best times to state your requests. However, being fearful for the right time and over analyzing your partner's mood is self-defeating. Focus on your feelings and desires instead of your partners. Use the 'I language' meaning 'I feel this' or 'I'd like that’. It makes the listener less defensive and makes your words less accusing. Remember the aim is to encourage effective talking and listening. This softens the situation and remember the ulti mate goal is to have your needs met and at the same time to honor your partner and listen with empathy to their preferences and opinions. On reading this you may feel that this all sounds so kind and considerate and essentially impossible to attain. However, we do know that happy couples talk to each other like this. They still assert themselves, get angry, raise their voices and sometimes even yell. The main and signifi cant difference is that they do not play dirty. They do not name call, belittle their partners, generalise their criticisms, or are sarcastic or contempeous. There may in fact be some pos itive comments throughout the conflict. So if it can work for these people why can it not work for you? Imagine if things could improve in other aspects of life that you would then feel comfortable and confident to say what you wanted in your intimate life. We all know that when we get what we want we are happier and our partners often reflect our happiness. Once you know that it is possible and you can see the bond deepening then your desire to stay in this safe haven will only continue. If these difficulties have been going on for some time and you still have not been able to improve things then this is when a relationship therapist is able to help. Some times we all have problems seeing another person's point of view and it takes an impartial party to help see the way for a working compromise. Take care and be good to yourself because we all deserve happiness. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist located at The Centre for Renewing Relationships, Grosvenor's Close West. She can be contacted by calling 356-7983 or by e-mail at relatebahamas@yahoo.com or at www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com Becoming more assertive By Maggie Bain NUTSNUTS A B OU T JUST Nuts p rovides a wide variety of nuts, dried fruits and v eggies. All in an effort to promote healthy snacking habits.

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C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net IT SEEMS that for many Bahamian men and women, the choice to purposely cheat on their companion has become the norm, especially where many need not search to identify an illegitimate child or the third wheel of a co-existing relationship. This week, the Barbershop is attempting to learn why the choice of ‘sweethearting’ has become so acceptable, and to what extent it impacts future generations. Stopping in at Barber Js precision cuts on Carmichael Road, Tribune Features spoke with a group of people with interesting yet insightful opinions on the issue. First up was 32-year-old Barber Antonio Williams, aka Rabbi, who feels people decide to cheat becauset hey are attempting to fill a void that existed in their relationships. Mr Williams who is also married, said at one time he thought that people only cheated in response to their mate doing so, and added that with men especially, although a guy may decide to cheat on his wife or girlfriend, it is often too much for him to handle the same fate. However Mr Williams insist, a guy w ho decides to cheat will do so when there is something lacking in his main relationship. 22-year-old beautician Angelica Stuart agrees that people cheat when there is something missing in their relationship, however is concerned that far too often men are given less flack for cheating than women, which for her is a serious problem. When a man decides to take on an extramarital affair for whatever reason, Angelica said the worst reaction would be his friends looking at him as a playboy, which really isn’t much of a backlash. However if a women should do the same thing, then society would look at her as a bad person. Angelica who is also recently engaged, said her relationship was recently tested when an anonymous young woman telephoned her fianc c laiming to be his other woman. “When she called, I answered the phone, then she hung up on me. When she called back, he answered, and they were able to have a conversation.” She said although she did automatically think there was something fishy about the call, she did what she thought was best by confronting her fianc. As Angelica and her mate have since been able to work things out, some couples unfortunately experience a more substantial and damaging result of sweet hearting, in the form of an illegitimate child. According to the 2000 Census report, there were 13,643 single mother headed households. Although some of these may have resulted from a divorce or death, there is without question some contribution from the growing problem of ad-hoc relationships. One patron who said he was a direct result of this was 28-year-old William Sears, who said while growing up he always said to himself that he would n ever become the kind of man his father was. “Some people learn from what happen to them, while others say if that’s how my old man was then I will do it too.” Identifying the fact that many young men in the community who come from single parent households see having more than one partner as something of the norm, William fears that the result of that type of mentality will have a detrimental affect on future young Bahamians. He said his experience of growing up without a father made him question on many occasions his place in the world, and added that he would hate to see another person go through the same thing. William who has one child with his live-in girlfriend, also takes on a fatherl y role with her two other children. He said that his way of bringing an end to this community issue is to lend his time and support to the children, and to remind men that cheating at any level is wrong, and in the end has far reaching effects. To comment on this latest Barbershop series, or to have your barber shop featured in our next issue, email lallen@tribunemedia.net. T HE BARBERSHOP Who’s your daddy? Antonio ‘Rabbi’ Williams William Sears n By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL T ribune Features Editor FORmany women particularly sing les, managing money in this current economic climate may prove chal l enging and a bit bewildering particularly with horror stories of persons losing investments due to companiesf alling bankrupt. However, for the single woman looking to invest, real estate remains one of the surest and safest ways to ensure a return of your hard earnedc ash. Marketing manager at King’s RealtyLaurie Burrows, told Tribune Woman that the company has seen a definite increase in the amount of women looking to invest and said that a popular trend is to purchase property in one of the island’s newg ated communities. “Gated communities are great investment opportunities because they are sure to appreciate in value and they have many of the amenitiest hat single women are looking for. When you think about women, you are thinking about a comfortablep rice point.” Ms Burrows said that despite the e conomy, banks are still willing to lend to persons and there are excel lent interest rates to be had once pers ons are able to qualify. “Different banks have different options, you may even be able to get a no deposit down, and some banks are offering 25-year-terms, so thaty ou can get the best monthly repay ment plan for you. “A lot of women are choosing gat ed communities as a choice. For example in Serenity, one of ourn ewest communities, women like the fact that there is 24-hour security, a clubhouse, gated entry, tennis andb asketball courts, a library and a swimming pool. Serenity will also e ventually have pre schools for residents, so for women particularly sin gle mothers, it is an excellent investm ent because they are buying into a community. Additionally, Ms Burrows explained that all of the amenities are covered under a very reasonabley early maintenance fee, and noted that if purchased separately would add up to a great deal more. “Extra expenses in the household is definitely a factor for single womeni nterested in purchasing real estate,” she added. Another avenue, some women are t aking is to purchase a duplex prop erty, which enables them to live in a o ne half, while using the second half as income that they can then apply to the mortgage. K ingsley Edgecombe, the head of King’s Realty noted that the value of many of the gated communities in Nassau have already seen significant appreciation -in some cases wherel ots were initially sold for $65,000 within a year they were selling at $100,000 and in another case, where lots were initially priced at $85,000 they have seen the price jump to atl east $125,000 within a year. He added that this is an ideal time for investing. He noted for example,t hat Serenity, is priced below mar ket value, because in this time of econ omic challenges, the developers want to be able to cater in some way to localsthe regular person whow ants to capitalise on their future. Women and real estate Managing your money Some people learn from what happen to them, while others say if that’s how my old man was then I will do it too. W ILLIAM SEARS

PAGE 22

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 63F/17C Low: 64F/18C Low: 65F/18C Low: 68 F/20C Low: 69F/21C Low: 70F/21C Low: 71 F/22C Low: 65F/18C High: 78F/26C High: 78F/26C High: 80 F/27C High: 84F/29C High: 82F/28C High: 78 F/26 High: 82F/28C Low: 67F/19C High: 80 F/27C Low: 67 F/19 High: 83 F/28CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 65F/18C High: 84F/29C Low: 70 F/21C High: 81F/27C Low: 64 F/18C High: 81F/27C Low: 67 F/19C High: 84F/29C Low: 69F/21C High: 86 F/30C Low: 67F/19C High: 83 F/28C Low: 66 F/19C High: 84F/29C Low: 69F/21C High: 87F/31C Low: 67 F/19C High: 86F/30C High: 77F/25CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMITHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Plenty of sun. Patchy clouds.Clouds and sun with a shower. Clouds and sunshine. Partly sunny. High: 82 Low: 71 High: 79 High: 81 High: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, a shower; breezy. High: 79 Low: 71 Low: 69 Low: 68 AccuWeather RealFeel 99F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 72F 82-74F 88-69F 84-68F 81-64F Low: 67 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 82F/28C Low .................................................... 70F/21C Normal high ...................................... 79F/26C Normal low ........................................ 65F/18C Last year's high .................................. 88F/31C Last year's low .................................. 69F/20C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.98"Normal year to date ......................................4.33" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Last New First Full Mar . 18 Mar . 26 Apr . 2 Apr . 9 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:17 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:20 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 12:55 a.m. Moonset . . . . 11:28 a.m. Today W ednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:49 a.m.2.57:08 a.m.0.5 1:00 p.m.2.17:06 p.m.0.4 1:43 a.m.2.48:03 a.m.0.6 1:54 p.m.2.08:03 p.m.0.5 2:45 a.m.2.39:04 a.m.0.6 2:56 p.m. 2.09:06 p.m.0.5 3:49 a.m. 2.310:04 a.m.0.6 4:01 p.m. 2.0 10:11 p.m.0.5 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 88/3170/21s87/3073/22s Amsterdam50/1036/2c46/738/3c Ankara, Turkey43/630/-1c45/730/-1r Athens60/1547/8r58/1444/6pc Auckland72/2259/15pc73/2263/17sh Bangkok95/3579/26pc91/3277/25c Barbados84/2875/23pc85/2975/23pc Barcelona61/1647/8s60/1548/8s Beijing79/2648/8s81/2750/10pc Beirut64/1754/12s62/1656/13c Belgrade45/733/0c41/534/1sn Berlin49/927/-2sh43/628/-2pc Bermuda 69/2061/16pc67/1962/16c Bogota65/1848/8r65/1847/8r Brussels57/1336/2pc54/1232/0pc Budapest45/732/0sh47/831/0pcBuenos Aires 79/2657/13s79/2661/16s Cairo72/2256/13s73/2254/12s Calcutta 93/3370/21s95/3572/22s Calgar y38/315/-9pc46/725/-3c Cancun86/3070/21s86/3066/18pc Caracas82/2766/18pc84/2868/20pcCasablanca 81/27 58/14 s 78/2561/16s Copenhagen 47/833/0pc45/731/0s Dublin54/1241/5pc55/1239/3sFrankfurt 57/13 34/1pc52/1132/0pc Geneva59/1534/1s59/1535/1s Halifax34/124/-4pc44/631/0pcHavana 86/30 64/17 s82/2762/16pc Helsinki36/230/-1sn36/228/-2sn Hong Kong 77/2568/20s79/2668/20s Islamabad86/3057/13pc84/2857/13c Istanbul50/1041/5pc44/637/2cJerusalem 56/1339/3s56/1339/3s Johannesburg 72/22 56/13t70/2156/13t Kingston 85/29 73/22sh83/2875/23sh Lima83/2865/18c82/2765/18pc London 59/15 37/2 pc57/1336/2pc Madrid70/2139/3s70/2137/2s Manila84/2875/23c88/3175/23c Mexico City73/2250/10t70/2148/8t Monterrey81/2757/13pc84/2861/16pcMontreal 50/1034/1s48/828/-2r Moscow 34/125/-3sf34/127/-2sn Munich48/829/-1c47/831/0pc Nairobi83/2860/15t84/2858/14c New Delhi90/3263/17s91/3264/17pc Oslo 36/223/-5pc34/118/-7pc Paris 59/1536/2s57/1334/1pc Prague48/835/1sh44/630/-1sn Rio de Janeiro83/2874/23sh83/2873/22r Riyadh88/3159/15s86/3063/17s Rome61/1641/5s61/1643/6s St. Thomas 82/27 72/22sh81/2773/22sh San Juan88/3161/16pc89/3163/17pc San Salvador90/3266/18s90/3272/22pc Santiago88/3154/12s90/3254/12s Santo Domingo84/2868/20sh82/2767/19pc Sao Paulo82/2765/18t82/2764/17t Seoul 59/1541/5s57/1346/7pc Stockholm36/230/-1sf36/230/-1sf Sydney77/2563/17s79/2664/17s T aipei 79/26 63/17s80/2666/18s Tokyo61/1645/7s66/1850/10s Toronto54/1241/5s51/1030/-1r Trinidad90/3273/22pc86/3071/21sh Vancouver46/739/3sn48/840/4rVienna 48/8 35/1sh42/530/-1sh Warsaw37/231/0sn36/229/-1sn Winnipeg33/023/-5s28/-218/-7pc HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayWednesdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles73F Wednesday:S at 5-10 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles73F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles73F Wednesday:S at 5-10 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles73F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles73F Wednesday:S at 5-10 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles73F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 70/2144/6s72/2243/6s Anchorage24/-411/-11s23/-510/-12s Atlanta 72/22 49/9pc69/2050/10s Atlantic City49/938/3pc58/1442/5pc Baltimore54/1240/4pc64/1743/6pcBoston 44/6 35/1s56/1341/5pc Buffalo58/1445/7s56/1333/0r Charleston, SC68/2047/8pc72/2250/10pc Chicago73/2242/5s57/1330/-1rCleveland 66/18 46/7s61/1633/0r Dallas80/2655/12s81/2751/10s Denver72/2233/0pc58/1431/0pc Detroit65/1845/7s56/1332/0r Honolulu78/2564/17c79/2670/21shHouston 80/26 56/13 s78/2556/13s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayWednesday T odayWednesday T odayWednesday Indianapolis 73/2248/8s65/1833/0sh Jacksonville71/2154/12pc73/2254/12pc Kansas City 78/25 51/10s63/1736/2t Las Vegas80/2654/12s83/2856/13s Little Rock73/2250/10s79/2649/9sLos Angeles 74/23 54/12s77/2556/13s Louisville70/2148/8s74/2343/6pc Memphis74/2352/11pc73/2250/10s Miami82/2768/20pc79/2667/19pc Minneapolis 58/14 37/2s47/826/-3pc Nashville74/2347/8pc73/2247/8s New Orleans74/2355/12pc76/2454/12s New York54/1242/5pc55/1246/7pc Oklahoma City83/2854/12s78/2541/5s Orlando 78/25 62/16 c79/2661/16pc Philadelphia55/1240/4pc63/1744/6pc Phoenix87/3058/14s89/3160/15s Pittsburgh65/1846/7s69/2038/3pc Portland, OR52/1140/4sh54/1241/5r Raleigh-Durham 60/1540/4pc67/1946/7s St. Louis76/2453/11s71/2139/3shSalt Lake City 62/1638/3c61/1639/3pc San Antonio 82/27 54/12 s80/2656/13s San Diego70/2156/13pc70/2156/13s San Francisco64/1748/8pc65/1849/9pcSeattle 48/839/3sh51/1040/4r T allahassee 76/2453/11pc75/2352/11pc Tampa78/2560/15c79/2660/15pc Tucson83/2851/10s85/2952/11s Washington, DC54/1243/6pc67/1945/7pc UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-stormsRain Flurries SnowIce AccuWeather.com THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 17TH, 2009, PAGE 11B

PAGE 23

C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 MEN IN MAKEUP These male make-up artists seem to be in high demand at the beauty boutiques because they tend to pay more attention to a woman’s face. They know how to bring out the best fea t ures with application techniques b ecause they know what looks good to a man on a woman. Deangelo Bethel, a makeup artist at the Cosmetic Boutique on Bay Street, has been in the business for about 11 years and loves his profession. “I love doing makeupit’s my life,” Mr Bethel said. As most people take time to find their true calling and something they are both comfortable doing and good at, Mr Bethel started out on the other end of the beauty business. “I started out doing hair and I somehow slipped into doing makeup. I found makeup to be more of my pas sion than hair. I used to work with a guy who worked for Cirque Soleil, and he had trained me with makeup. So while I was doing hair I did makeup on the side,” Mr Bethel said. Mr Bethel said he did not think about what people would say when he got into makeup nor did he think about the stigmas people attach to men being involved in make up artistry. “To me, most women prefer a man to do makeup simply because it is a man making them look how men would want to see them. I have not come into any problems relating to my makeup because to me it’s not a big issue. There may be one of two who pass the store and see me doing makeup and may laugh or something but I ignore them,” Mr Bethel said Most makeup a rtists, after trying e verything the beauty world has to offer, want to start their own lines, which is exactly what Mr Bethel intends to do. Within the first year of me doing makeup, I decided I wanted to push my own line. I was interested in doing my own thing and I am going back away. I do see it as an art form that you must always take it to the next level. I believe in dedicating your everything into what you do, be yourself and do not use it as some thing to do, it must be a passion,” Mr Bethel said. Another makeup artist extraordinaire, Rudolph Minnis, has been a makeup artist for 30 years and now glamorises the faces of the reporters at the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas. Mr Minnis says he loves every minute of transforming people from their everyday looks. “I got my start with my cousin in Freeport, Grand Bahama. I started doing makeup for Nadine Beneby, who used to have a show in ZNS,” Mr Minnis said. As with any profession, Mr Minnis said he has met a few challenges along the way. “It is a very challenging art form because you meet up with different faces and attitudes. Another aspect is that sometimes you get used to using one type of cosmetic and then you find that you can’t find it anymore and you have to start over. It is an every year and seasonal type of change,” Mr Minnis said. Mr Minnis said he pays no attention to persons who have a phobia against men being in makeup, “Once you know what your calling in life is, and you work with it, then that is all you need. I would encourage any young man who wants to get into makeup artistry to go for it because the sky is the limit,” Mr Minnis said. n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter L OCK up your lipsticks, ladies! For years, mak e up artistry has been an area that women were known to be dominant in, even in the Bahamas it has solely been a female art from.Ho w e v er , t her e ar e men who enjoy the art of applying makeup and love every minute of it. DE’ANGELO BETHEL R UDOLPH MINNIS




Pe erie

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

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Pim blowin’ it

82F
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Volume: 105 No.95

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make-up

ST aS EU

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

eS
tna
AND REAL Ade

PEW ES Tere ae

New evidence i
Pindiing Was Jamaican

Sources from
Caribbean
nation claim
‘categorically’
that former
Bahamas PM
was born there

ASTONISH-
ING new evi-
dence has
emerged to sug-
gest that Sir
Lynden Pin-
dling was defi-
nitely a
Jamaican.

Sources from [f
the Cotton
Tree communi-
ty in Trelawney
parish, Jamaica,
have come forward to claim
“categorically” that he was born
there of Jamaican parents.

“There is no doubt about
this,” a Jamaican expatriate told
The Tribune. “He was born in
Ulster Spring Hospital in the
parish of Trelawney and was
sent to the Bahamas as a young
boy.

“When he became prime
minister of the Bahamas he was
held up to the people of the
parish as an example of some-
one from their own community
who emerged from humble
roots to do well in the wider
world.”

In fact, said the source, Sir
Lynden actually visited the vil-
lage in the mid-1980s, calling in
at the old school building once

SEE page eight

SIR LYNDEN
PINDLING



PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham, flanked by Minister
of State for Social Services
Loretta Butler-Turner and
Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes, gives details on
the proposed Unemployment
Benefit Programme.

m@ By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net











FLANKED by members
of the trade unions, Employ-
ers Confederation and the
National Insurance Board,
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham revealed further
details of the government’s
proposed Unemployment
Benefit Programme first
foreshadowed in the House
of Assembly some months
ago.

With a starting date slated
for April 20, Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham said that this
programme will be devel-














SEE page eight



The Taste

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Pete oa ql Anh

TOSO NUS

wie fs et me Mitte ley et



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SUT Ela CANAL VO em eet






Largest ever Bank of Bahamas donation
will fund literacy research at COB

IN the largest donation of its
history, Bank of The Bahamas
pledged $250,000 over a five-
year period to fund literacy
research at The College of The
Bahamas (COB), a project with
results that are expected to filter
down into classrooms across the
nation to improve the most basic
skill required for success, the
ability to read and write.

The partnership between the
bank and the college, announced
at a March 12 press conference
at COB, will finance the Nation-
al Literacy Diagnostic Research
Centre, headed by Dr Ruth
Sumner, who has spent 10 years
studying literacy.

The largest corporate grant in

the college’s history is for
research that will be a pet pro-
ject of COB president Janyne
Hodder, a former reading
teacher who believes the infor-
mation it will reveal in how best
to teach reading will bolster the
basic foundation of education.
That was the intention when
COB put out the call for a part-
ner for the five-year programme.
“Bank of The Bahamas has
answered the call and will par-
ticipate by being part of the solu-
tion to a major national chal-
lenge,” president Hodder said.
“We thank the Bank of The
Bahamas deeply and sincerely

SEE page eight

Chinese Bahamar investment
‘could bring in more visitors’

m By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

CHINESE investment in Bahamar could bring in more visitors from
China and inspire more Chinese investment, first secretary to the Chi-

nese Ambassador Jian Tan has said.

The $2.6 billion agreement between the China State Construction
Engineering Corporation, the Export-Import Bank of China and
Bahamar announced last week is still in the formative stages.

And although Mr Tan said he is not aware of how much of a stake
the Chinese have in the project, or how much the Chinese hope to
profit from it, he hopes details will be ironed out for the Bahamian gov-
ernment to review and approve the project so building can get under-
way and be completed in time to receive tourists in a more buoyant

SEE page eight









SEE PAGE ELEVEN



New witness
accounts support
Tynes Sr’s claims

Ex-policeman backs allegations that former
PM received pay-offs from drug czar

MORE first-hand witness accounts are
emerging to support Chauncey Tynes Str’s
claims that Sir Lynden Pindling was receiv-
ing regular pay-offs from drug czar Carlos

‘Joe’ Lehder.

A former policeman who took part in
what he called a “mock operation” against
Lehder’s drug enterprise on Norman’s Cay
told The Tribune yesterday: “Mr Tynes was
right on target. Everything he said was cor-

rect.”

The policeman said senior officers taking

part in the so-called “raid” were given a red
suitcase full of cash. “There must have been

CHAUNCEY
TYNES SR

a million dollars in that case,” he said.

“The officers had been sent down there after Norman’s
Cay had been raised in parliament. But when they arrived,
the senior officers were drinking around on the cay. And the
suitcase was waiting there as a pay-off.”

The officer’s claim fits in with other accounts of activities
on the cay, where Pindling was said to have attended numer-

ous Lehder parties.

“We went on that mock operation to lead people to
believe that the government was doing something about

the drug operation,” he said.

“But the red suitcase full of cash was handed to an officer.
Several senior officers were being paid off at that time.”

A prominent Nassau attorney, who for professional rea-
sons does not wish to be named, has also backed Mr Tynes’

SEE page eight



CLICO policy-holders
‘want certain government
officials held to account

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@
tribunemedia. net

CLICO policy-holders
want official heads to roll |)
over failure of the insur-
ance company, according
to Bishop Simeon Hall.

The New Covenant
Baptist Church leader
claimed there is a “grow-
ing sentiment” among pol-
icy-holders whom he has
come into contact with that cer-
tain government officials must be
held to account over the matter.

“Governments are expected to
protect the interests of the citi-
zenry and someone is found
wanting. We are talking govern-
ment officials in the Ministry of
Finance, someone was derelict in
their duty to allow it to get to this
stage,” said the vocal Bishop.

Labour lawyer Obie Ferguson,
joined by Godfrey “Pro” Pinder,
were scheduled to be on hand to
give free legal advice to the com-
pany’s policy-holders at a meeting
last night - one which the church
leader suggested may also culmi-
nate in the call for the resigna-
tions of those government offi-
cials “responsible” for the CLICO



NASSAU AND BA

8 VAN

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



BISHOP
SIMEON HALL P@y.

collapse.

‘ The gathering, which
| got underway at New
Covenant Baptist Church
|) on the East-West High-
way at 7pm, was called by
} Hall himself.

CLICO (Bahamas) pol-
icy-holders are unaware at
this stage what funds, if
any, they will have
returned to them or if
their policies will be sold
to another insurance com-

Speaking with The Tri-
bune ahead of the meeting, Bish-
op Hall said that “based on the
feeling” of those present and the
advice received, they will decide
whether to file an appearance
today in advance of the liquida-
tion application for the insolvent
insurance company set to be
heard in court tomorrow. Inter-
ested parties have until today to
do so.

The government, via the Reg-
istrar of Insurance companies, ini-
tiated a winding-up order for the
company on February 24, 2009.

A statement said this was done
to protect the interests of policy-
holders in the face of revelations
that the company’s liabilities far

SEE page eight
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Defendant told police: ‘! ain’ need no lawyer | am here to tell the truth

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

DEFENDANT Sean Brown told police during a
taped interview three years ago that he did not need
a lawyer as he was there to tell the truth about the
armed robbery and murder of businessman Keith
Carey.

“T ain’ need no lawyer, I am here to tell the truth,”
Brown replied when questioned by detectives on
March 28, 2006.

During the interview, Brown, 32, said that the
plan to rob businessman Keith Carey was formed
before he came to Nassau from Eleuthera in July
2005. He said that a few days before the murder, he
and his cousin Dwight Knowles went to the Esso
gas station on Carmichael Road, where they met
with one of Carey's employees to discuss how mon-
ey is transported from the gas station to the bank.

Brown said he and Knowles picked up Jamal Glin-
ton alias "Bumper' and his girlfriend from his Nassau
Village home on the morning of February 27.

Brown told police that after dropping Glinton's
girlfriend and her sister off at the police barracks that
morning, he and the two men drove to the Esso gas
station on Carmichael Road.

"I went to talk to Carey's worker. He told me
that the boss was inside getting the money together
and that he soon pull off," Brown said.

Brown told police that Carey came out of the gas
station a short time later carrying a red and black
bag. He told police that he, Knowles and Glinton fol-
lowed Carey to the Bank of the Bahamas off
Tonique Williams Darling Highway in Knowles' car.

"After we pulled up in the Bank of the Bahamas

yard, 'Bumper' jumped out of the back seat, pushed
him down, shot him twice, take the bag and jumped
in the back seat," Brown said.

After the incident, the men travelled to
Carmichael Road where Knowles removed the
licence plate from the car, Brown said.

He said that he, Knowles and Glinton rode with a
friend to Lincoln Boulevard, then walked to Miami
Street where they went to a house that Glinton fre-
quented and split the money.

Brown told police that they each received $16,000
and that after the money had been divided, they
went their separate ways. He said he and Knowles
went to Podoleo Street where they met a man named
Earnest, who has testified for the prosecution.

Brown said that he bought a car from Earnest for

about $8,000, went to pick up his mother, and drove
Knowles to Carmichael Road to pick his car up and
take it to get spray painted.

He also told police of how he went shopping for
some clothes and shoes and later rented a hotel
room. Brown said a friend helped him charter a
flight to the Berry Islands four days after the incident.

"I was scared after I heard the news that Carey
was killed,” Brown said, adding that he told his
friend Dennis that he and his girlfriend were having
problems and that he needed to get off the island.

He said he gave Dennis $400 to get him on a
flight. Last Friday, the jury watched a taped police
interview of murder accused Dwight Knowles.

Keith Carey, 43, was shot and killed on the steps
of the Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway before he was able to deposit
$40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Station,
which he operated.























































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Mitchell: Tribune
represents ‘the
forces of darkness’

THE Tribune was lumped with
Darth Vader and the biblical
demon Mammon last night as
among the representatives of the
“forces of darkness".

Mixing Star Wars metaphors
with bible references, Fox Hill
MP Fred Mitchell told supporters
they are “on the good side of the
Force”, whereas Tribune pub-
lisher Eileen Carron and her
newspaper “represent the Forces
of darkness, the dark side of the
Force.

“The Force is strong with us.
We shall overcome. May the good
Force continue to be with you
all,” he said.

Addressing the party faithful
last night at a branch meeting in
his constituency, Mr Mitchell
exploded with anger over an arti-
cle by Tribune managing editor
John Marquis which told the sto-
ry of Chauncey Tynes Jr, who
went missing in 1983 while pilot-
ing a flight from Exuma to Nas-
sau. His father, former PLP trea-
surer Chauncey Tynes Sr, was
quoted as saying he believes his
son was murdered because he
knew too much of the association
between former prime minister
Sir Lynden Pindling and Colom-
bian drug cartel leader Joe
Lehder.

Mr Mitchell began by caution-
ing that time should be wasted
on the issue, as it is a “deliberate
sideshow and distraction” from
more important matters, like the
economy.

“Let’s not spend too much time
on this. I am not even sure how
many people read it. I do not
want to be a part of spreading it,”
he said. Nevertheless, he pro-
ceeded to focus on the matter for
the duration of his speech.

Mr Mitchell accused The Tri-
bune of libelling the late Sir Lyn-
den Pindling, but then admitted
that it is legally impossible to libel

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Fred Mitchell



a dead person.

He then claimed the accepted
view that former Tribune editor
Sir Etienne Dupuch was respon-
sible for breaking down the bar-
riers of official racial discrimina-
tion in the Bahamas is nothing
but a “popular myth”.

He said Sir Etienne “stole the
idea” of the resolution to end
racial discrimination from the
PLP, “used the PLP to get a suc-
cessful outcome, but that even
the act that he did was not the
end of racial discrimination in the
Bahamas. Some would argue that
it was a failure. I pronounce no
opinion on it.

“Imagine then how outraged
Eileen Carron would be to hear
that about her father’s reputa-
tion,” Mr Mitchell said. “But like
Sir Lynden, Etienne Dupuch is
dead and so you can say anything
about him because you cannot
defame or libel him in law. It does
not even have to be true. You
can say anything without any
legal consequence of any kind.”

He went on to suggest that the
record of the Commission of
Inquiry into casino gambling
reflects that Sir Etienne accepted
consultancy fees from the former
UBP government. The MP
claimed that in reality, this mon-
ey was intended to ensure The

Tribune’s loyalty in the debate
over casino gambling in the
Bahamas.

Mr Mitchell admitted that Sir
Etienne wrote to the government
to protest the payments, and was
told to turn the money over to
charity — but, he added, “if you
accept the $10,000, that is $10,000
that you did not have to go into
your pocket to give to charity.
You received the benefit of it.”

Mr Mitchell went on to refer
to Tribune managing editor John
Marquis as a “paid journalistic
assassin”, adding that in addition
to his interview with Chauncey
Tynes Sr, “there is another exam-
ple of his taking the words of an
old man in dementia and using
that to spin fantastic and untrue
stories for profit.

“We made a mistake when we
were in office by allowing him to
remain in the country. Pindling
kicked him out. We ought to
have. We did not,” Mr Mitchell
added.

Speaking of both Mrs Carron
and Mr Marquis, the MP said:
“You can imagine the extreme
hate they both bear for me
because what they say matters
not one wit to me. I am confident
in who I am and nothing either
one of them can say about me
makes any difference to me. I
have my story to tell and I am
not afraid to tell it. I have at my
disposal all the records and slow-
ly but surely I will be sure that
the other side is told.”

According to Mr Mitchell, the
“real concern” represented by the
article is that The Tribune “fails to
understand that in a small country
like this it is often necessary to
let bygones be just that; bygones.”

He said the story risked reviv-
ing “a whole set of social issues
that most of us thought had been
solved in the 1960s and the 1970s.
The society needs to move on.”

Turks and Caicos Cabinet set to be dissolved

THE Bahamas’ close neighbour, the territory of the Turks and
Caicos Islands, is set to have its Cabinet dissolved and its ministerial
powers suspended by Britain. This decision by Britain follows a damn-

ing report into allegations of corruption within the Islands’

Cabinet and House of Assembly, the UK’s Foreign Office

(FCO) said. Turks and Caicos’ Premier Michael Misick

(pictured) is at the centre of the corruption allegations.

He is accused of building a multi-million dollar fortune
#} since coming to power in 2003.

In what would be a major blow to the move towards
independence by the Turks and Caicos Islands, the London-appoint-
ed governor of the territory, Gordon Wetherell, said yesterday that an
order has been drafted to suspend parts of the constitution and trans-
fer powers and functions of government ministers to him.

The order will be submitted to the queen for approval on Wednes-
day before going to the British parliament on March 25, the Associated

Press reported yesterday.

Foreign Office Minister Gillian Merron, in a written statement to
MPs, said an investigation into Turks and Caicos’ administration found
a “high probability of systemic corruption or serious dishonesty.”

“The government has formed the view that parts of the constitution
will need to be suspended and has decided to take steps to enable it to

do so,” Mrs Merron said.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Teenager in
court on armed
robbery charge

An 18-year-old man was
remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison yesterday after being
arraigned on an armed robbery
charge. Hughes Jean appeared
before Magistrate Susan Sylvester
at Court 11, Nassau Street.

It is alleged that on Thursday
March 12, while concerned with
another and armed with a knife,
Jean robbed Dillan Bethel of $41
cash, one gold ring valued a $600,
one gold wrist chain valued at
$350 and a rope chain holding a
five dollar coin charm valued at
$350. Jean was not required to
plead to the charge. The case has
been adjourned to August 21.

¢ Two teenagers were remand-
ed to Her Majesty’s Prison yes-
terday after being arraigned in a
Magistrates Court on an armed
robbery charge.

A 17-year-old of Bonaby Alley
appeared along with Timothy
Williams before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau
Street yesterday.

It is alleged that on Wednes-
day, March 11 the two men
robbed Estella Bonamy of $233
cash. It is further alleged that the
accused caused harm to Bonamy.

They were not required to
enter a plea to the charges and
the case has been adjourned to
August 7.

Police may seek
overseas help in
identifying remains

POLICE anticipate having to
call in the services of a foreign
forensic specialist to help them
identify skeletal remains found
earlier this month.

Superintendent Elsworth Moss,
officer in-charge of the Central
Detective Unit (CDU), told The
Tribune that the efforts by a local
pathologist to find sufficient clues
about the identity of the bones
were inconclusive.

He said provisions should be
made this month to either have
the bones examined in the
Bahamas by the specialist or to
have them shipped abroad for
inspection. It is hoped that with
the help from a forensic specialist,
police will be able to determine
the gender of the victim, along
with other clues.

at the National Stadium site

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE first building materials
have arrived at the National Sta-
dium site but as Chinese work-
ers are delayed in Beijing, work
will not begin on schedule.

A total of 17 containers of
equipment, piling and foundation
materials were unloaded at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre
site in Thompson Boulevard last
Friday ready for work to com-
mence on Friday March 20.

But construction will suffer a
short delay as 20 Chinese techni-
cal workers scheduled to start this
week are still waiting for their
British visas to be processed.

First secretary of the Chinese
Embassy in Nassau Jian Tan said
the workers had their Bahamian
visas processed quickly, but need
to have British visas so they can
travel through the United King-
dom en route to the Bahamas.

“We are very appreciative for
the Bahamian visas which were
granted very quickly,” he said.

“And hopefully the UK visas
will come soon so they can get
their tickets at the end of March,
and fly to the Bahamas to start
working.”

The project has suffered a
number of setbacks since the Chi-
nese government agreed to build
the National Stadium when for-
mer Prime Minister Perry Christie
visited The People’s Republic of
China in 2004.

Mi But project delayed as Chinese
workers are held up in Beijing



Desmond Peel

Ground was broken in 2006
and the stadium was set for com-
pletion in July 2007, but there has
been little action at the site of the
future mega-stadium since.

Mismanagement

FNM ministers have blamed
the delays on mismanagement by
the former PLP administration,
and since coming to office in 2007,
FNM Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Bannister
has vowed to move the project
forward.

He said this latest delay is but a
minor glitch in operations as the

Bahamian government remains
committed to live up to its oblig-
ations and accelerate the project
where possible.

Mr Bannister added: “We
ensured the shipment cleared the
ports of entry and road tax and
everything were straightened out.
We did the visas and work per-
mits for the workers and we were
expecting them this week.

“This thing has been set back
for three years and I promised to
get it started and we are getting it
started.”

Mr Bannister said he was not
aware the workers had been
delayed but said it was not a seri-
ous concern.

“These are minor obstacles in
the big picture,” Mr Bannister
said. “We are looking at a big
project in terms of moving it
ahead and there will always be
minor things holding it up, but
we have been trying to make sure
we move it ahead so we have a
stadium that goes according to
plan.”

The stadium is expected to take
two-and-a-half to three years to
complete and will have a $30 mil-
lion value.

Mr Bannister said it will be
“the most fantastic stadium in the
region.”

PM pleased Bahamians continue to

make payments to CLICO Bahamas

MIVA Lae UN

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, who recently returned from a
CARICOM Heads of Govern-
ment meeting in Guyana, said that
he was very pleased that the
Bahamian people have followed
his words to the letter and contin-
ued to make their payments to
CLICO Bahamas despite the
insurance company being placed
in liquidation by the Registrar of
Insurance Companies.

Mr Ingraham revealed yester-
day that last Friday, regulators of
insurance companies from around
the Caribbean met in Trinidad,
where they were mandated to pre-



pare a report for the heads of gov-
ernment.

Since that meeting, the regula-
tors have proposed holding anoth-
er meeting in Barbados before the
end of this month to continue talks
on CLICO and other matters.

“And we have determined that
this is a Caribbean-wide problem
and that no individual country will
seek to go on its own without con-
sultation with the group,” Mr
Ingraham said. “And we therefore
will be in a position to make some
determinations based on the
reports which we will receive from
the regulators of insurance”.

HAPPY 95TH BIRTHDAY
Nuese (Ratiin Jane A slwandl Dain

Patricia Jane Astwood- Bain was born on Grand Turk, the Turks & Caicos Islands on







ued with

at’ old time religion
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March 17,1914.

Her caring nature led her in to the nursing profession where she stayed for

35 years.

After her retirement, the wife and mother of two became a homemaker enjoyin
crocheting, bara gardening and
children, were imb

that her grand children, like fier

most of ensuring
of manners and respect. Most of

affairs.

Through the years Nurse Bain has been a faithful member
/ of St, Agnes Church.

So, today we wish her, our mother, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend a

Happy 95th Birthday.

God has truly blessed you. And we also thank God for blessing us with you for all

these years.

Birthday Greetings coming from

Children: Gladstone Charles Thurston,
Anthea Helena Bain.

Grandchildren: Denise McKenzie, Arthur Richard Thurston-Burrows,
Stanley Michael Thurston, Patrick Lennon Thurston, and
Earl-Anthony Thurston,

Sister: Marjorie Stone.

Sisters-in-Law: Agnes Bowleg and Dorothy Mortimer

Daughter-in-

Dedicated caretaker

Law: Naomi Moss-Thurston

Nieces: Marie Mackey, Rev. Emily Demeritte, Rhonda Bain, Patricia Bain,
Gaylene Pinder, Suenetta Williams

ns, Patrice Astwood-McDonald,
Verna Collins

Nephews: John and Arnold Bain Jr, Colin Astwood, Ronald Hall

and companion: Delrose Burke and

The Grand Turk, Turk and Caicos Islands Community

The Fort Fincastle Community

The St Agnes Church Community

The St Matthew's Church Community

The Nursing Community

And friends

and family from all around.
PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Belfast chooses peace in face of terror

BELFAST, Northern Ireland (AP) — When
Irish Republican Army dissidents gunned down
their first British security forces in more than a
decade, they hoped to provoke a steely security
crackdown and tit-for-tat attacks that would drag
Belfast back into the bad old days.

But Northern Ireland, for decades trapped in a
cycle of grievance and vengeance, seems to have
learned from its horror-filled past.

Militants from British Protestant districts who
long exacted eye-for-an-eye retaliation against
Catholics have held their fire, instead reaching
out new hands of friendship to old enemies. Thou-
sands of soldiers have remained confined to their
barracks well away from the working-class Irish
Catholic districts, where IRA splinter groups are
trying to recruit the impressionable, idle young.

"The dissidents’ only real hope is that the
British do something stupid, play into their hands
with some overreaction,” said Brian Feeney, a
Belfast political commentator and Catholic school-
teacher. "It looks as though they (British security
authorities) are not going to fall into the trap laid
for them.” "We're finally seeing that the policy of
eye for an eye just leaves everybody blind. The
peace process means we're getting to know people
on the other side as flesh-and-blood human beings,
not targets," said Jackie McDonald, senior com-
mander of a working-class Protestant paramili-
tary group called the Ulster Defence Association
that has stuck to a cease-fire. In the past, he said,
reprisal would have been automatic.

"Now times have changed and (pro-British)
loyalist paramilitaries have matured," said McDon-
ald, who long directed the killings of Catholics
and spent several years in prison for issuing death
threats. "They'll not do what some (Irish) repub-
lican with a gun wants them to do."

When the two main dissident groups struck —

years ago, he would have arrived into any hard-line
Catholic neighbourhood in a thick-armored Land
Rover with tiny, bulletproof windows. The soldiers
were killed because the prevailing peace con-
vinced troops it was safe to walk outside the walled
base, unarmed and without body armour, to
retrieve a fast-food order. Two Real IRA gun-
men waited for Domino's Pizza's to arrive and
raked the crowd with 60 bullets; two soldiers died
and four other people, including both delivery
men, were badly wounded.

But most analysts say the British security forces
have been at risk for years as wider peacemaking
goals were pursued. They argue that what's sur-
prising is that the dissidents didn't manage a "kill"
long before now.

"Why now? Maybe because they were lucky.
They have been trying very hard for a long time to
kill a policeman,” said Malachi O'Doherty, a
Belfast political analyst and author who is scepti-
cal that the dissidents have "upped their game.”

Protestant hard-liners led by Jim Allister, a
European Parliament member who has opposed
most of the compromises in the past 15 years of
peacemaking, have been the loudest voice for a
return to heavy-handed security. Allister said
Britain's elite undercover killers, the Special Air
Service, should be redeployed in Northern Ire-
land. Some rank-and-file police officers have sup-
ported the call. But SAS strikes have had mixed
results in the past. They are credited with breaking
the IRA's confidence in the late 1980s and early
1990s by decimating several IRA units, but at the
same time the attacks fueled anti-British senti-
ments and the IRA's ability to attract recruits.

This doesn't stop Allister from fantasizing about
striking back. The police in recent weeks have
brought in army specialists who are expert in the
arts of electronic surveillance and eavesdropping.

Getting rid
of Eleuthera’s
horses problem

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have just read the letter
from Mr Carey in Eleuthera
(Tribune, Monday March 9,
2009) concerning the wild hors-
es roaming across his farm land
and causing thousands of dol-
lars of damage.

I whole heartedly sympathise
with him as loose horses are a
danger to themselves and their
surroundings. The problem can
only get worse as, presumably,
the herd is increasing by con-
tinued breeding each year.

The fact of the matter is that
once a horse has reached a cer-
tain age without training it is
almost impossible to socialise it
— training a young foal is a long
and arduous task best left to
professionals. It involves daily
handling and exercise for some
years before the animal can be
deemed safe for the average rid-
er.

To imagine that these animals
could be caught and boated
across to Half Moon Cay for
use by tourists is insane. The

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



horses used for tourist activity
need to be very well broken and
trained to riding from birth.
Even with all that, not all hors-
es are suited to the job. Former
wild horses just won’t fit the
bill.

The sad fact of the matter is
that the Eleuthera horses are
basically useless and a danger
to both the farming industry
and themselves.

When a wild horse becomes
sick or injured there is virtually
no way of treating it as it cannot
be handled by the veterinarian.
And so the animal suffers or
dies in agony.

There are professionals in the
States who can catch and corral
them if anyone is prepared to
foot the bill as their services are
very costly due to the dangerous
nature of the work. Andros dis-

covered this when they had to
solve their own wild horse prob-
lem some years ago. I believe
that a couple of the horses there
were salvaged but the rest had
to be euthanized.

If government or even pri-
vate sources could come up with
the money, this is the only
viable way of solving the prob-
lem.

There is, of course, a danger
that the bleeding heart sector
of the animal activists become
involved which will complicate
things.

Horses are not pets, they are
livestock and need to be treated
as such. There are many
wannabe horse “experts” in the
Bahamas!

It will be interesting to see
what solution can be taken by
government agencies to rid
Eleuthera of this vexing prob-
lem.

S SMITH
Nassau,
March, 2009.

There’s no such thing as a black racist

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To paraphrase the Lexicon Webster Dictio-
nary when defining a racist — to believe that a race
of people possesses certain attributes or quali-
ties which make them inherently superior to oth-

er races.

I stand to be corrected, but I hold fast to the
opinion that there are absolutely no black people
on earth who subscribe to the belief that the
black race is superior to any other race of people

on earth.

Would you attribute that perspective to a lack

of self esteem?

Land”. And an attribute of utopia — racial equal-
ity, does not exists, and I dare say, will never

exists. Over hundreds (maybe even thousands) of
years, the white race has managed to convince
themselves that they are the superior race. And
the attendant behaviours associated with such a

belief have given rise to what we now know as

racism.

And this whole notion of reverse racism (where
blacks think that they are the superior race) is a
misnomer and should not be believed.

I contend that reverse racism is only the black
people’s reaction to white people’s induced
racism. In other words, black people would not be

I would not. I offer an explanation that black

“racists”

if racism was not exercised on them

people’s view of the world are that of Pollyanna. _ first.

the Real IRA killed two soldiers outside an army
base Saturday and a Continuity IRA gunman shot
a policeman through the back of the head Monday
— analysts and politicians appeared evenly divid-
ed about what the consequences would be. The
killings highlighted one high-risk consequence of
peacemaking. Political efforts to soften Catholic
hostility toward Northern Ireland, the predomi-
nantly Protestant corner of the island that stayed
British when the rest of Ireland won indepen-
dence in 1921, required security forces to "demil-
itarize" even though the threat from IRA dissi-
dents continued. A network of surveillance posts
and fortified road checkpoints has been removed
from the border, where the dissidents are strongest.
The 7,500-member police force increasingly patrols
in normal uniforms and cars, not bulletproof vests
and armored cars. And the 4,000 remaining troops,
who once shadowed police on patrols in Catholic
areas, have been restricted to training for mis-
sions overseas. As a result, British forces and
police in Northern Ireland are more vulnerable.
Dissidents have mounted more than 20 attacks in
little more than a year, wounding several police
officers in gun, rocket and bomb attacks.

The past week's killings were on targets that
simply wouldn't have existed a few years ago.

Constable Stephen Carroll, 48, was shot through
the back window of a normal patrol car; a few

But police chief Hugh Orde, who possesses polit-
ical skills rare in a law enforcement official, insists
his force will never ask troops for on-the-beat
backup even if the dissidents increase the vio-
lence. Analysts say the current restraint should
keep Northern Ireland from descending into "war
zone" status, and ensure that teenage Catholics are
more likely to support and join tomorrow's police,
not yesterday's gunmen.

The "loyalist" extremists killed nearly 1,000
before calling a joint 1994 cease-fire that still feels
shaky today, because they refuse to surrender
their weapons stocks as the peace process
demands. The IRA, by contrast, formally
renounced violence and disarmed in 2005.

McDonald and one of his group's budding
politicians, Frankie Gallagher, admit they've been
nervous about the possibility that young Protestant
hotheads might try to extract revenge.

Earlier this week they led a group of UDA fig-
ures to meet Belfast mayor, Tom Hartley of Sinn
Fein, the IRA-linked party that today represents
most Catholics. A couple decades ago, McDonald
might have sent hit men to kill Hartley. They had
never met him or other "Sinners," shorthand for
Hartley's party. Their private chat went so well,
they did joint interviews on Belfast TV and went
to a peace rally together.

(Article was written by Shawn Pogatchnik, AP)



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Wishful thinking amongst blacks manifests itself

in a preadolescent hope that everyone would

(and should) be treated equally regardless of

Tace.

On the other hand, this world is not “Fantasy

Nassau,

March 7, 2009.

There’s no such thing as a black racist.

MARVIN G LIGHTBOURN

Sen Maynard Gihson: What | actually said in the Senate

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Further to my conversation
with you, please find below
the exact words used by me
during my contribution in the
Senate to the debate on the
mid-year budget.

“The article gives us all the
opportunity to reflect on the
fact that we as a people are
not steeped in our history.
People will always give their
version of events.

“Tt is for us to tell the tale of
our heroes. The story as told
by the “hunter” is always dif-

ferent than the story that is
told by the “hunted”. It is time
for us to secure our future by
a vigorous determination to
record our history. A clear
understanding of who we are
and where we have come from
will positively impact our
young people's self-esteem. It
is also high time that our libel
laws were changed so that it is
possible to defame the dead,
as is the case in other coun-
tries.”

You will see that contrary
to the report on page 11 of
your newspaper today, I did

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION Lia.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

TOP QUALITY TEMPERED
ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

not say, “... it was time The
Bahamas secured its history
by changing its libel laws so
that it would be possible to
defame the dead”.

Your correction of this inac-
curate statement would be
greatly appreciated.

I look forward to your early
attention to this

SENATOR
ALLYSON
MAYNARD
GIBSON
Nassau,

March 16, 2009.

Leave wholesale
marketing to
private sector

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I notice that BAIC intends to
continue the years old folly of
being involved and investing mil-
lions of dollars in albatrosses of




pUzUKI DODGE
01 NZNS!l BAUOH



ts | ze f produce houses and markets.
Pea { ' j Government has no place in a
oe li ame. caf = Pry a ee aie a le as a . proper developed marketing
2 op 7 a ae rer em Pras Se ge _ process of agricultural products
a it ‘omero sated * —a — = ST a ee ee — if we total up the losses over
A ore pongdowin to Do, a — : E —— a oS ao the years from the late 1970's to

eae OF i ee oO ) Pr 0. nlin p today we probably could build a
= 7 bridge between Nassau and
Andros.

Leave the wholesale market-
ing to the private sector Mr Min-
ister — Mr Chairman BAIC — it
is the only system that will work
and pay the farmers immediately.

Isn’t it simple economics that if
you increase the availability of a
product whilst having import
restrictions in place who loses?

If we continue the folly that we
are heading into under the guise
of so-called food security we will
put our farmers in a far more dan-
gerous financial position as with
the importation restriction
increase in availability of prod-
uct the farmers’ earnings will drop
appreciably.

Tomatoes are a cash crop right
now but look at the retail prices
and you cannot obtain an import
licence? Same tomato but as
much as 29 cents a pound differ-
ence? It is obvious someone is

ripping!
B FERGUSON

Nassau,
March 2, 2009.

oe







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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Anna Nicole
Smith's
psychiatrist
turns herself
in to police

m LOS ANGELES

LOS ANGELES police
say psychiatrist Khristine
Eroshevich has surren-
dered to face charges of
excessively prescribing
drugs to Anna Nicole
Smith before the former
model’s overdose death in

2007, according to Associat-

ed Press.

Police spokeswoman
Rosario Herrera says Ero-
shevich turned herself in
around 11 a.m. Monday at
the Van Nuys station.

She did not immediately
post the $20,000 bail.

Eroshevich is charged

with conspiring with anoth-

er doctor and Smith’s
lawyer-turned-boyfriend
Howard K. Stern.
Attorney General Jerry
Brown alleges the doctors
falsified prescriptions and
prescribed unwarranted

amounts of highly addictive

medications to Smith. Ero-
shevich’s attorney says she

was only protecting Smith’s
privacy.

NASA eyes
llebris as
Discovery nears
space station

m@ CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

NASA kept close tabs on
an old piece of space junk
Monday that threatened to
come too close to the inter-
national space station as the
shuttle Discovery raced
toward the orbiting outpost
for a 220-mile-high linkup,
according to Associated
Press.

Experts initially warned
the debris from a Soviet
satellite that broke up in
1981 could veer within a
half-mile of the space sta-
tion. But later, they said it
appeared that the piece of

junk — about 4 inches in size
— might remain at a safe dis- }

tance.

ic orbit and experts were
watching closely, though it
appeared the space station
might not have to move out
of the way.

If Mission Control orders
a space station maneuver to
dodge the junk, it would be
carried out Monday night,
well ahead of the projected
close approach between the
station and debris early
Tuesday morning. If the sta-
tion were moved, Discovery
would have to adjust its

course for docking late Tues- :

day afternoon; the shuttle is
delivering one last set of
solar wings for the station.
On Thursday, the three
space station residents had
to move into their emer-
gency getaway capsule
because another piece of
space junk came uncomfort-

ably close. In that case, there }

was short notice and the
astronauts did not have
enough time to steer out of
the way.

NASA has moved the

space station to dodge debris i

eight times in the past, most

recently in August. General-

ly, engines on the Russian
living quarters or the
attached Russian supply
ships are fired to alter the

path of the entire station. It’s i
a relatively easy job, but uses }

up precious fuel.
The debris this time is

Plans for a new system to

‘check NIB contribution status

THE National Insurance Board
plans to implement a new system for
employers and self-employed persons
that will allow them to know their con-
tribution status without having to vis-
it an NIB local office, as is currently
the case.

Through the regular posting of NIB
contributions, employers in particular
will be able to ensure that their
accounts are correct, thus enabling
them to avoid interest costs.

This is one of the initiatives NIB is
getting ready to roll out in order to
improve customer service and advance

Employers and self-employed will be able to ensure
accounts are correct without visiting a local office

its compliance efforts.

These initiatives were planned since
2008 and are in the final stages of
implementation.

In advance of the introduction of
these initiatives, the Board is sending
out an appeal to employers and self-
employed persons.

NIB’s deputy director for informa-

The debris was in an errat-

FROM LEFT: Miss Bahamas Organisation president Michelle Malcolm; SkyBahamas CEO and president
Captain Randy Butler; Miss Bahamas World 2009 Tinnyse Johnson; sales and marketing director

Jessica Watkins.

Miss Bahamas World event
takes off with SkyBahamas

SKYBAHAMAS has been
named the official domestic
airline of the Miss Bahamas
World Pageant.

The sky is the limit for this
year’s Miss Bahamas World
contestants who will see
more of the islands of the
Bahamas thanks to a new
partnership between SkyBa-
hamas Airlines and the Miss
Bahamas Organisation
(MBO) - producers of the
Miss Bahamas World beauty
pageant.

Contract

Principals of SkyBahamas
and MBO signed a contract
yesterday for the new part-
nership between the two par-
ties.

As a result of the agree-
ment, the pageant’s Family
Island- based contestants,
lecturers, and essential ser-
vice providers will be flown
to and from the capital for



pageant events. Additional-
ly, the pageant’s contestants
will be flown to an exotic
location in the Bahamas to
discover more of the coun-
try’s natural beauty.

SkyBahamas Airlines
started with regular flights
into Exuma and today its ser-
vices have expanded to
include Freeport, Bimini,
Marsh Harbour, and its latest
addition, Cat Island.

In addition to offering reg-
ular scheduled flights
throughout the Bahamas, the
airline also charters flights
throughout the Caribbean.

The Miss Bahamas Organ-
isation began staging
pageants in 2005 when the
first Miss Bahamas World
competition was held under
its direction.

This year’s pageant is
scheduled for May 31 and
will be held at the Rainforest
Theatre under the theme
“Earth Angels.”

A leading retailer is seeking applications for the

position of

COMPANY MESSENGER

REQUIREMENTS

The successful candidate will be responsible for
assisting in the delivery and collection of all company
work, mail and any other tasks as per daily assignment

sheet.

RESPONSIBILITIES

tion technology Andre Bethel said that
the Board currently has over 16,000
active employers and self-employed
persons registered.

“We're planning to be able to send
out to them each month, in a timely
manner, statements of their activity or
inactivity as the case may be. Of course
we can do it the old way, ie, by regular

}

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Totally Yaris

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/én

TAILOR

mail or even by fax, but that would be
slower and more labour intensive
which makes it more costly. We pro-
pose, instead, to make technology
work for us in this regard,” he said.

NIB is asking all employers and self-
employed persons to send an e-mail
from their business addresses.

In the e-mail, they should state the
name they registered with NIB and
their employer or self-employer num-
ber.

Mr Bethel asks employers and self-
employed persons to send e-mails to:
employstatement@nib-bahamas.com.

| if ies Sef hy wich |

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her a






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Features Include: 1.3 litre engine, automatic
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from a Soviet military satel-
lite called Kosmos 1275,

which broke up somewhat
mysteriously shortly after its
1981 launch. NASA orbital
debris scientist Mark Matney :
said it may have crashed ;
with another object that was- :
mt being tracked, although

the Russians believe a bat-
tery explosion did the satel-
lite in. In any event, the

result was a cloud of 310
pieces of debris that slowly

are falling into lower orbits,

he said.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamian-born
spelling bee winner
heads for Washington

BAHAMIAN-BORN Con-
nor Aberle, last year’s third
place finisher in the Bahamas
National Spelling Bee, tri-
umphed on Saturday over an
extremely competitive field of
42 spellers to win the 2009
Portland Tribune/Comcast
Regional Spelling Bee in Port-
land, Oregon.

The 13-year-old will now
compete in this year’s Scripps
National Spelling Bee to be
held in Washington, DC, from
May 23 to 30.

As part of his prize for plac-
ing third in last year’s

Bahamas National Bee, Con-
nor attended the Scripps
National Spelling Bee as a
spectator.

Competition

He said that being able to
watch the Scripps National
Spelling Bee in person moti-
vated him to study even hard-
er so that he could be part of
the competition this year,
where he will join the winner
from this year’s Bahamas
National Spelling Bee

which will be held on March
21.

Connor exhibited nerves of
steel and fierce concentration
in the final rounds as he cor-
rectly spelled such words as
“mendacity”, “olivaceous”,
and his winning word, “ery-
thromycin.”

He attributes his success to
his dedication and strong
desire to win, and to the sup-
port of his family.

He is home-schooled by his
mother and coach, Shelley
Aberle, with whom he lives in
Portland, Oregon.

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BAHAMAS AIR SEA RESCUE
ASSOCIATION
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Annual General Meeting

at
BASRA Headquarters,
East Bay St.
April 3rd, 2009 at 7:30pm
All members are urged to attend.
Refreshments will be served.

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For Prospective Students & Parents

Department of
Immigration to
celebrate 70th
anniversary

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

A HOST of activities are
planned throughout the year
to celebrate the 70th
anniversary of the Depart-
ment of Immigration.

The department invites
the public to participate in a
variety of events as a way of
thanking them for their
assistance in locating illegal
migrants since 1939.

Public events include a fun
run and walk on Saturday,
March 28, a Mother’s Day
event and children’s fun day
in May, a Father’s Day
event in June, a public fish
fry in July, and a back-
to-school event in
August.

An exhibition on the
department’s anniversary
theme, “Historic past,
dynamic future,” will be
held in the Mall at Marathon
in September before it tours
the Family Islands.

Long-serving and hard-
working officers and staff
will be honoured in a cere-
mony at the end of Septem-
ber, their achievements will
be published in the newspa-
per and a banquet will be
held for the department in
November.

And everyone will be
invited to get their groove
on for a “Back to the 70’s”
Immigration Department
party and show in October.

Senior deputy director for
the Department of Immigra-
tion Roderick Bowe said:
“We want to celebrate this
year, 70 years is a long time
and we want to ensure that
people here at Immigration
are appreciated.

“The public perception of
the Immigration Depart-
ment is of men and women
stamping passports in the
airport, but we do a lot more
than that, so we want to con-
vey to the public exactly
what we do at Immigration.

“And the public have
been helping us to find
migrants and illegals, so we
have highlighted a number
of activities to celebrate with
them.”

The Department of Immi-
gration also intends to hold
a blood drive and to do com-
munity outreach work to
help the ill and elderly resi-
dents of hospices.

Department director Jack
Thompson said: “I am excit-
ed about the department’s
willingness to have a blood
drive and give something
back to the community.

“We do so much and the
team here works very hard.

“Immigration has had a
very historic past and we
believe the better days of
Immigration lie ahead.

“We think we are focused
in the right direction, we are
improving in many respects,
such as customer service
and the fact that we want to
be open and transparent,
and we want to be account-
able to the Bahamian pub-
lic.”

Saturday 21st March, 2009 ~ LCIS Campus

Join us for a presentation to learn more about LCIS,
including our rigorous academic program, state of the art

technology platform, diverse student body
and financial aid program

Registration : 9.30 a.m ~ Presentation Starts : 10.00 a.m (prompt)
Tour of Campus : 10.30 - 11.30 a.m ~ Q&A: 11.30 a.m - 12 noon

Please RSVP to Rose M. Taylor: rtaylor@Icis.bs ~ Tel : 362 4774

The Only School in the Caribbean Offering the Full 1B Program

www./cis.bs


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

2
ao
~
c
o
=
“a
i
Ss
=
—
o
Cc
o
—
“vA
a
wo
So



alle all

BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key (left), Agriculture and Marine Resources Minister Larry Cartwright
(centre) and Permanent Secretary Harrison Thompson inspect a tomato operation in North Andros.

Refrigerated containers
for North Andros farmers

TWO new 20-foot refriger-
ated containers have been
purchased for North Andros
farmers as the government
presses ahead with its food
security initiative.

And a building in Fresh
Creek will be renovated to
house the Central Andros
Craft Centre, Bahamas Agri-
cultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC) executive
chairman Edison Key con-
firmed.

Mr Key, along with Agri-
culture and Marine
Resources Minister Larry
Cartwright and a high-level
government and private sec-
tor delegation were in North
Andros last weekend to
inspect projects there.

During the North Andros
Music and Heritage Festival
and the International Square
Reunion, Mr Key gave an
update on the North Andros
Agricultural Expansion Pro-
ject.

One component of the pro-
ject, he said, are 561 acres of
land located near the San
Andros airport.

It will be divided into 41
blocks of varying sizes to
include a greenhouse park
and headquarters for the
North Andros Farmers Asso-
ciation.

“This land will continue to
be utilised for vegetable pro-
duction and expanded for cit-
rus trees, tropical fruits and
livestock,” said Mr Key.

Revitalised

The 1,500-acre satellite
farm which presently consists
of 16 operations occupying
close to 80 acres will be revi-
talised.

“It is envisioned that this
arable land will continue as
mix farming with a major
thrust in livestock,” said Mr
Key.

Applications continue to
come in from Bahamians
interested in leasing land in
the proposed North Andros
Agro Industrial Park, he
said.

In conjunction with the
Ministry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources, three new
farm tractors have been pur-
chased and placed into oper-
ation in North Andros.

“As the sustainability and
future growth of agriculture
depends on the enthusiasm
of the youth,” said Mr Key,
“we will continue to enhance
our relationship with the
North Andros High School’s
agriculture programme.

“Hopefully we can nurture
minds that would have even
greater visions for agriculture
in the Bahamas.”

BAIC, he said, views the
handicraft industry as poten-
tially “a significant employ-
ment and income generator.”

“We will continue with our
training in the handicraft
area for which the overall
objective is to create a mas-
sive factory that encompasses
the Bahamas with thousands
of individually owned and
operated entities in various
islands,” he said.





NORTH ANDROS HIGH SCHOOL students show Agriculture and
Marine Resources Minister Larry Cartwright and Administrator Dr
Huntley Christie their tomato operation.

ante) ais

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the repair of Storage Tank #13 at its
Clifton Pier Power Station.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before

31st March, 2009

no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 683/08
REPAIR OF STORAGE TANK #13
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all proposals
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Shevonn N. Cambridge at telephone 302-1208.

Site visit will take place on Thursday, 19th March, 2009 at 9:00 a.m.
at BEC, Clifton Pier Power Station.









YOUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER NOTICES FOR DIRECTORY PUBLICATIONS

TENDER - PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENTS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from the general public who wish to advertise in our premium spots on the 2010
Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENT" to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - PRINTING AND DELIVERY OF
TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies to provide services for the printing and delivery
of the 2010 and 2011 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES” to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - COVER DESIGNS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies to provide Graphic Artist services for the 2010
Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - COVER DESIGNS” to the
attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - DISPLAY ADS

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies or individuals to provide Graphic Artist services
for the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES - DISPLAY ADS" to the atten-
tion of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

TENDER - CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL
NARRATIVES SERVICES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from experienced companies or individuals to provide Creative Writing and
Sectional Narratives services for the 2010 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from BTC's Head
Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, between the
hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday March 27, 2009. Bids are to be
marked, “TENDER FOR CREATIVE WRITING AND SECTIONAL NARRATIVES
SERVICES" to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

www.btcbahamas.cor


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

New witness
accounts
Support Tynes
or's Claims

FROM page one

story, adding: “Everything
he said was absolutely true.”

Mr Tynes, former PLP
treasurer, revealed ina
Tribune Insight article
that his pilot son,
Chauncey Tynes Jr., reg-
ularly flew consignments
of cash to Nassau to pay
off Pindling and a senior
police officer.

He also believed his
son was killed because he
knew too much of the
links between Pindling
and Lehder.

Chauncey Jr disap-
peared on a flight from
Exuma to Nassau in
March, 1983, along with
Bahamian electrical engi-
neer Donald Moree Snr.

No trace of the plane
was ever found, and
nothing was heard from
the men again.

The former policeman
said he recalled the time
when Chauncey Jr van-
ished, and believed that
Chauncey Snr’s version
of events was true.

“Timagine that Mr
Tynes is trying to get
some closure on this mat-
ter. I think it is good that
all this is coming out.”

He added: “Pindling
was far from being a
saint. He was crooked,
evil, very spiteful and
vindictive. He would do
you in with the wink of
an eye.

“He was so smooth
that he would never
allow you to know he was
doing you in. I cam-
paigned for the PLP in
1967, but when he began
to victimise UBP sup-
porters the following
year, I pulled my sup-

FROM page one

for their role as we proudly announce
their wonderful corporate gift today.”

Bank managing director Paul
McWeeney said the bank accepted
COB’s invitation to partner because the
ability to read and write determines suc-
cess or failure and fosters or frustrates
national development

“We need good roads and we need a
well-developed infrastructure. We need
solid police protection and strong bor-
ders,” he said. “But above all, we need
every child born and living in The
Bahamas to know how to read and write
—and when they don’t, we need to find
out why. “That is what this programme is
about. That is why when we were
approached by The College of The
Bahamas to fund the Literacy Diagnos-
tic Research Centre we leapt at the
opportunity...because we understand

Bank of Bahamas

how absolutely critical it is to under-
stand why our literacy rate is what it is so
we can begin to improve it.”

According to Dr Sumner, the coun-
try still boasts statistics showing one of
the highest literacy rates in the world,
95 per cent. National test scores and
basic reading and writing skills tell a dif-
ferent story, she noted.

Uncovering the real rate of literacy is
a first step as the programme explores
best teaching methods and aims, ulti-
mately, to impact how reading and writ-
ing are taught in every government
school as well as providing information
that other institutions can use.

In the room surrounded by those who
hold master’s degrees and doctorates,
the contrast between researchers and
subjects was outlined in sharp relief,
young men and women whose chances of

a good job were slim because they could
not fill out a job application or those
who could not score high enough on a
standardised test to get into college.

“Transformation and innovation of
our public education system is arguably
our most pressing national challenge,”
said Dr Linda Davis, COB vice-presi-
dent for research, graduate programmes
and international relations.

“We see evidence of the challenges
faced by our public education system
through the low participation rates in
higher education, in high rates of youth
unemployment and increased level of
youth violence and crime.”

If increased crime and higher unem-
ployment are linked in some way to the
inability to read and write, unlocking
the shackles of illiteracy is high priority.

“Today, as we unveil this partnership
between The College of The Bahamas
and Bank of The Bahamas...we open a
new door and write a new chapter in

both our histories,” Mr McWeeney said.

“We open the door to a world of life’s
chances. Why do I use the word chances?
Because that is what education does for
us. It gives us the chance to be who we
want to be. It gives us the chance to con-
tribute to productive society. But we
cannot have that chance if we are unable
to read and write. Doors are closed in
our faces.

“Contributions we could have made
will never be known, a discovery we
could have made that might have saved
a life or turned the planet a bit more
green might never be made in our life-
time. An illiterate population is a popu-
lation that is doomed to wallow in its
past; a literate population will gallop
toward its future.”

The Centre, to be located in a large
converted classroom equipped with lab
equipment and testing materials and soft-
ware, is expected to open almost imme-
diately.

FROM page one

run by his aunts, Maggie and
Amelia Pindling.

Sir Lynden, the source said,
lived with his aunts - known
locally as Miss Maggie and
Miss Amelia - before being
sent off to Nassau, where his
Jamaican father Arnold
worked as a policeman.

“All these people getting on
the back of your managing edi-
tor need a reality check,” said
the source.

“Lynden Pindling was not a
Bahamian at all, he was
Jamaican. Everyone at Cotton
Tree regards him as a Jamaican
born in Jamaica of a Jamaican
mother and father.

“When he returned to the
village while he was prime min-
ister, he was welcomed as one
of our own people who had
made good. We lined the road
to greet him.”

Speculation over Sir Lyn-
den’s origins flared up again
last week when The Tribune’s
Insight section suggested, via
88-year-old Bahamian
Chauncey Tynes Sr, that the
so-called “Father of the
Nation” wasn’t a Bahamian at
all.

In fact, said Mr Tynes, Pin-
dling was born in Jamaica of a
Jamaican father and unknown
mother, possibly Haitian.

He went on to claim that
Pindling swore a false affidavit
in 1947 to secure a Nassau birth

New evidence suggests _
Pindling was Jamaican —

certificate before acquiring a
passport to travel to London
for law studies.

At least four different ver-
sions of Pindling’s background
have emerged since the article
appeared.

The one linking theme is
that, if the information is true,
he was less of a Bahamian than
the Bahamian-born Haitians
who were denied status under
his government.

Just as importantly, his anti-
foreign, anti-expatriate cam-
paigns of the 1970s would have
been founded on the allegedly
bogus assumption that the
prime minister was himself a
Bahamian.

The Jamaican source said:
“In the parish of Trelawney,
there is a little community
called Cotton Tree. That is
where Pindling’s roots are.
That’s where he was born.

“When I was going to pri-
mary school we used to have a
Friday session called ‘commu-
nity awareness’ and he was the
talk of the town.

“We were told we could do
well and excel just like Lynden
Pindling, a boy from our vil-
lage in the mountains, a region
called The Alps. We were very

excited because when he
became prime minister, it was
huge for people there.

“When he visited the village,
he called in at the old house
which used to be the school. It
was called Miss Maggie’s Basic
School, run by Lynden Pin-
dling’s own aunt.

“The children were led out
of school to line the roadway.
He was the local boy made
good.”

As a boy, she said, Pindling
was sent to Nassau by his aunts
because his father wanted him
here, having married a
Bahamian woman - Viola Bain
- who, according to several PLP
sources, was unable to have
children.

“He was sent by boat,” the
source said. “He was as
Jamaican as you can get. He
may have been a naturalised
Bahamian in later life, but as
far as the people of Cotton
Tree are concerned, he is one
of theirs, a Jamaican through
and through.”

The source said that anyone
serious about investigating Pin-
dling’s Jamaican roots could
visit Cotton Tree and talk to
those who still claim him as
their own.

FROM page one

global economy.

Mr Tan said he hopes devel-
opment will encourage more
Chinese companies to invest in
the Bahamas and bring in Chi-
nese visitors for both business
and pleasure.

He said: “China wants to find
investment opportunities every-
where, and we call it a good
cycle because we get revenue
from the others, and the others
get revenue from us. That is the
concept of our government and
I think the concept of many Chi-
nese companies.”

The economic growth rate in
The People’s Republic of China
is accelerating at a rate of 9.8
per cent and Mr Tan hopes it
will continue to grow and give
more Chinese people the free-
dom to travel and invest.

However, as the Bahamas is a
small relatively unknown coun-
try in China it must advertise its
investment opportunities and
holiday potential to draw the
Chinese in.

Mr Tan said: “Many people in
China have not heard of the
Bahamas, so there is much work
to do.

“There are many areas in the
Bahamas to invest in, but these
areas need to be advertised to
be known to investors.

“And tourism abroad has
only developed over the last ten
years, so I think we can expect
when people travel from China
they will visit their neighbours
first, and then travel further and

Bahamar

further. I think people will
come, but it will happen gradu-
ally.

“T am optimistic for the future
because the economy of China
is growing fast, and hopefully
we will see many Chinese peo-
ple become richer and richer,
and visit different countries.”

Mr Tan said the Chinese
embassy in Nassau has discussed
the possibility of serving direct
flights between Beijing and Nas-
sau, but ultimately this will be a
decision for the airlines and will
depend on demand, Mr Tan
said.

Trade between the Bahamas
and China rose from $180 mil-
lion last year to $318 million this
year, reflecting a positive trend
which began when the two
countries established a diplo-
matic relationship 12 years ago
and accelerated in recent years.

Reasons for the rise in trade
include the Chinese govern-
ment’s development of the
National Stadium at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre, due to
start next month, as well as Chi-
nese ships registered in the
Bahamas by Bahamian shipping
companies, and the import of
various consumer goods from
China.

And Mr Tan said he expects
trade between the two countries
to continue to grow as he
receives frequent calls from
Bahamian businesses wanting
to know how to capitalise on
Chinese trade.

“That continuation is estimated now at one
per cent, $1 for every $100 in wages being
earned and be funded by half for the employer
and half by the employee,” he said.

The removal of this $20 million from Nation-
al Insurance, Mr Ingraham said, would not have
any impact on the pension capabilities of NIB,
disabilities payments or any short-term benefits.

However, he did explain that this will force
the government to reduce the number of med-
ical facilities it was seeking to build throughout
the country from this fund.

Meanwhile, however, the government is
expecting to bring legislation before parliament
this month to amend the National Insurance
Act so that the work at passing a resolution to
make these benefits legal could begin.

“We have earmarked April 20 as the date on
which the scheme will begin and look for the
first payments to be made two weeks late on
May 4,” he said.

The government will meet with union leaders,
employers and religious leaders in Grand
Bahama tomorrow before making details of
the proposal available to members of the Oppo-
sition for their perusal.

FROM page one

oped with the use of some $20 million trans-
ferred from the medical branch of the Nation-
al Insurance Fund.

Those eligible to receive benefits from this
programme must show that they were employed
up to July, 2006, and can receive 40 per cent of
their weekly insurable wage for up to 13 weeks.
This payable period can be extended by the
minister for an additional 13 weeks, Mr Ingra-
ham said, but will go no longer than six months.

Currently the government expects this pro-
gramme to assistant some 7,000 unemployed
persons, and an additional 3,000 partially unem-
ployed persons.

At this time, applicants must not be self-
employed or voluntarily insured. Nor can the
applicant be in receipt of any NIB benefits or
assistance other than survivors or disablement
payments.

Eligibility requirements list that the individ-
ual must have paid at least 40 weeks of contri-
butions, plus at least 26 weeks paid and or cred-
ited contributions in the past immediate con-
tribution year.

Proposed benefit

Persons who will continue to be eligible for
this weekly payment must register with the
Labour Exchange every four weeks, be unem-
ployed or working for less than 50 per cent of
their regular wages, be available and looking for
work, and not refuse to take suitable employ-
ment.

This programme is not be confused with the
regular social services assistance, or the drug
benefit, Mr Ingraham said.

The government will provide further details
on in the near future.

“The programme will provide benefits of up
to one half of the wage of which you were pay-
ing contribution. So if you were earning $200 a
week and you were paying on that basis, you
would collect half of that which is $100. Or if
you were paying at the maximum of $400 you
would collect $200. Eventually, at some time to
be determined, we would require employers
and employees to make a contribution to the
National Insurance Unemployment Benefit
Fund.

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
PO, Box N-3572
Nassau, Bahamas
Tal: (242) 326-5773

SEMI MILITARY FUNERAL

Inspector McNeil
Reynards Newbold,
78

of Garden Hills # 1 and formerly
of Orange Creek, Cat Island

will be held on Wednesday,
March 18th, 2009, at 11 :00
a.m., at Grants Town Wesley

Methodist
Street and Baillou Hill

Church, Chapel

Road.

Officiating will be Rev. L Carla

R. Culmer,
Interment follows

Tezel Anderson.

assisted by Sis.
in Lakeview

Memorial Gardens & Mausoleums, John F. Kennedy
Drive. Left to mourn his passing are his children:
Freddy and Maxine of Canada, Barbara Newbold of
Freeport, Anthony and Shawn, Selwyn and Rosie,
Tyrone and Mary, McNeil and Susan of Eleuthera,
Melanie and Hogar Amann, Dwayne and Rochelle,
Michelle Small-Newbold and Rosemary (Sheppy)
of Freeport; grandchildren: Freddy Newbold Jr.,
Leah, David, Jasmine (Kelly), Sean, Kyrenia, Andre,
Raheim and Tyisha, Krista, Horatio, Husanni, Diego,
Samantha, Teynarae, Tory, Shurneil, McNeil Ill,
Maurice, Amanda, Marcel, Tianna, Anthony (Ad),
Samia and Daejourn; great grand: Gabriel Newbold;

sister:

Elizabeth Newbold; brother-in-law: James

Stubbs; many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends
including; Charles ‘Sporty’ Newbold, Sally, Clara,
Roddie, Ascenet, Rev. Donald Newbold, Endolyn
McKenzie, Avis, Helen, Betty, Velma, Ellen, Arnett,
Fred Jr., Eueda Poitier, Phyllis Stubbs, Ellen Newbold,
Holbrook, Bishop Teuton Stubbs and family, Dr.
Eugene Gray, All the worshippers of Grant’s Town
Wesley Methodist Church (especially the 7:00 a.m.
worshippers), Rev. Carla Culmer, Norma Wallace,
Bro. Benjamin John, Fonswitt Stubbs, Members of
the Retired Police Association, Mr. & Mrs. Leland
Turner, Mr. Grafton Ifill - President Retired Police

Officers Association,

resigned/retired Police

Officers who are requested to attend), Commissioner
of Police Mr. Reginald Ferguson and members of
Royal Bahamas Police Force, Hon. Cynthia Pratt,
Member of Parliament St. Cecilia Constituency,
and many more too numerous to mention. Relatives
and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold
Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
on Tuesday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Wednesday
at the church from 10:00 a.m., until service time.



FROM page one

outstripped its assets and it was
unable to pay $2.6 million in
claims.

However, some commentators
have questioned whether the gov-
ernment could have, or could still
do, more to protect policy-hold-
ers.

According to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, 29,000 people
Caribbean-wide have policies and
annuities with the company,
including the majority - 23,191 - in
the Bahamas alone. Bahamian

CLICO

policy-holders are owed $44 mil-
lion in liabilities.

He detailed in parliament how
the company “compromised its
financial integrity” by investing
over $70 million in a Florida real
estate company, Wellington Pre-
serve Corporation.

The company appeared to have
never sought the required per-
mission from the government “in
connection with its investments,
loans to subsidiaries, or related
party transactions worth millions

woop AND COLD-FORMED STEEL
TRUSSES

DESIGN

ENGINEERING

COMPETITIVE PRICING

FAST BIDDING INFORMATION

361-7764

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Email:ggongora@coralwave.com

AUTHORIZED
ROAR OL TRE



of dollars,” added the prime min-
ister.

Bishop Hall said that in recent
weeks “most of (his) energies”
have been expended on meeting
with and counselling people
affected by CLICO’s failure.

“Thirty thousand persons are
anxious, psychologically damaged
and totally frustrated and uncer-
tain as to what is going to hap-
pen to their monies. Someone in
the Ministry of Finance, and by
extension, successive govern-
ments must be held responsible
for this chaos,” he said.

Yesterday’s meeting is the third
organised by the Baptist leader.
Two previous meetings which
took place in New Providence
and Grand Bahama attracted
hundreds of emotional and vocif-
erous participants.

Bishop Hall said he decided to

call last night’s meeting as he
wants policy-holders to be heard
loud and clear in advance of
Wednesday’s court hearing.

Meanwhile, the church leader
went on to hit out at some mem-
bers of the local Bar yesterday,
who he said have been calling him
to offer their services to affected
CLICO clients.

“Interestingly enough I’ve had
calls from several lawyers willing
to represent the different policy-
holders. I thought they were com-
ing pro bono you know, but they
ain’t doing that. They aren’t doing
it out of the goodness of their
heart,” he said, calling the solici-
tations “sickening.”

He said people are nervous
about contracting a lawyer to take
up their case, worried that they
will once again be left “holding an
empty bag.”

les U ed
OF
CLOSING

In recognition of the funeral of
Mr. David A. C. Kelly, C.B.E.
Betty K. Agencies Limited
RO Rae
NT
Thursday, 19th March, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS



TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 9

NBA Today

Jaguar's release
WR Jones after
latest arrest

JACKSONVILLE, Florida
(AP) — The Jacksonville
Jaguars waived receiver Matt
Jones on Monday, parting
ways with the former first-
round draft pick just days
after his latest arrest.

Jones was jailed last week
in Arkansas for violating a
plea agreement that stemmed
from a drug charge in 2008.
The 6-foot-6 Jones, a former
star quarterback at Arkansas,
is awaiting an April 13 court
appearance.

After failing a drug and
alcohol screening, Jones told a
judge he drank beer while
golfing with friends. He
assured the judge it wouldn’t
happen again.

The Jaguars didn’t want to
take a chance.

“All roster moves are deci-
sions we feel are in the best
interest of the organization,”
Jaguars general manager
Gene Smith said. “This deci-
sion is a result of our ongoing
player and roster evaluations.
We expect responsibility and
accountability, and those are
important qualities as we con-
tinue the process of building
this team.”

Although Jones was wildly
popular in Arkansas, he was-
n’t revered nearly as much in
Jacksonville. Fans thought his
laid-back attitude was a sign
he didn’t care about football,
and coach Jack Del Rio
ripped him at times for his
work ethic.

Many thought Jones would
be released last year after he
was charged with cocaine pos-
session in July. But the 19th
overall pick in 2005 had a
strong preseason and stuck
around despite the arrest.

He responded with the best
season of his career, catching
65 passes for 761 yards and
two touchdowns. His case,
meanwhile, was moved to the
drug court, where defendants
submit to treatment and other
restrictions, with the goal of
keeping them from offending
again. A defendant can wipe
his record clean if the pro-
gram is completed successful-

In the plea agreement
reached in October, Jones was
ordered to participate in NFL-
sponsored substance-abuse
counseling and undergo ran-
dom drug testing through the
end of the football season.
The judge told him to return
to Fayetteville after the season
to complete the program.
Jones remains in the drug
court program.

The NFL suspended Jones
for the final three games last
season for violating the
league’s substance-abuse pol-
icy.

Jones’ departure leaves
Jacksonville with huge holes
at the receiver position. The
Jaguars released Jerry Porter
last month and opted not to
re-sign free agent Reggie
Williams.

That basically leaves third-
year pro Mike Walker and
veteran Dennis Northcutt.

Russia to face
Italy on clay in
Fed Cup semis

LONDON (AP) —
Defending champion Russia
will face Italy on outdoor clay
in the Fed Cup semifinals.

The International Tennis
Federation said Monday the
best-of-five series will be
played in Castellaneta Marina
on April 25-26.

Russia has won four of the
last five Fed Cup titles and is
4-0 against Italy. But Italy, the
the 2006 Fed Cup champ, is
2-0 at home in Castellaneta
Marina in the Puglia region
of southern Italy.

The Czech Republic
already has said it will host
the United States in the other
semifinal at the indoor Staro-
brno Rondo Arena.

Hoffenheim fined in
late doping test

FRANKFURT (AP) —
The German soccer feder-
ation has fined Bundesliga
club Hoffenheim because
two of its players showed
up 10 minutes late for a
doping test.

The federation had earli-
er dropped proceedings
against the players.

It fined the club $97,815.
The newcomers to the top
division did not lose points
in the standings.

DEFENDING heavyweight WBC world champion Vitali Klitschko (left) and Cuba's Juan Carlos
Gomez pose face to face with the champions belt after a press conference in Stuttgart, Germany,

on Monday.

(AP Photo: Daniel Maurer)

Klitschko promises
‘lesson’ for Gomez

STUTTGART, Germany (AP) — Vitali
Klitschko has promised to teach Juan Car-
los Gomez a lesson when the heavyweights
fight Saturday for Klitschko’s WBC title.

Klitschko was hoping to fight Britain’s
David Haye, but instead has to defend his
title against another former cruiserweight
champion who is the mandatory challenger.

“Tam ready. I am confident,” Klitschko
said Monday at a joint news conference
with Gomez. “I had no injuries in training
camp, thank God, and I am 100 percent
ready. I heard a lot of statement from
Gomez’s camp recently and all I can say is
that they can dream on, they are all dreams.

“He says he has had the hardest training
camp of his career and I can promise him
the hardest fight of his life. I think he is a
very good boxer, with technical skill, and he
showed it all in the cruiserweight. But
heavyweight is something else. I will show
him. It will be a lesson, but it won’t last
long.”

Gomez, a 35-year-old Cuban defector
who lives in Germany, did not seem
impressed.

“T will beat his face in. I am the better
boxer,” Gomez said. “I will beat him, that’s
it.”

During the pre-fight hype, Gomez has
also vowed to “destroy” Klitschko.

Gomez used to spar with Vitali and his
younger brother Wladimir, the IBF and
WBO champion, whenever they had to pre-
pare for a bout against a left-handed fight-
er and they all had the same promoter in
Germany before switching camps.

The 37-year-old Vitali (36-2, 35 KOs)
returned to the ring in October after a

South Africa
set to host ‘09
Champions Trophy

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) —
South Africa will host this year’s Champions
Trophy.

The decision by the International Crick-
et Council on Monday follows a recom-
mendation last week to shift the eight-team
tournament from Sri Lanka because of wor-
ries of rain.

The tournament will be held from Sept.
24 to October 5 and is second in impor-
tance to the Cricket World Cup.

This is the second venue shift for the 2009
Champions Trophy. It was moved last year
from original host Pakistan over security
concerns.

MANCHESTER, England (AP) —

break of nearly four years and stopped
Samuel Peter when the Nigerian decided
not to come back after absorbing a steady
flow of punches for eight rounds.

Gomez (44-1, 35 KOs), won an unani-
mous decision over Vladimir Virchis in
September to earn the right to challenge
Klitschko.

The Cuban held the WBC cruiserweight
title for four years before vacating it in 2002
to move up to heavyweight.

In October 2005, Gomez tested positive
for cocaine after winning a decision over
Oliver McCall and the fight was subse-
quently ruled a no contest. He was sus-
pended for a year and beat McCall again
after returning to the ring.

Vitali and his brother are usually con-
sidered the top big men in the heavyweight
division, but Vitali’s career has been
plagued by frequent injuries.

Klitschko is a three-time champion who
won the WBC title in 2004 with an eight-
round victory over Corrie Sanders. The
fight against Peter was Klitschko’s first since
he defended the crown with an eight-round
win over Danny Williams in Las Vegas in
2004.

Klitschko’s performances as a powerful
puncher have often been overshadowed by
injury. In 2005, he withdrew from a WBC
title fight with Hasim Rahman because of a
torn ligament in his right knee.

The injury led him to announce his retire-
ment, and the WBC made him “champion
emeritus.” In the fall of 2007, he announced
a comeback fight against Jameel McCline,
only to back out after hurting his back and
having emergency surgery.



More than 650
detained for throwing
seats at soccer match

MOSCOW (AP) — More than 650 fans have
been detained for throwing seats and fireworks
during a season-opening soccer game in the
Russian Premier League.

Police said Monday no serious injuries were
reported in the mayhem surrounding the 1-1
tie in Moscow between Spartak Moscow and
Zenit St. Petersburg. Those detained were
released within several hours of Sunday night’s
game.

The rivalry between the teams mirrors a
broader hostility between residents of Moscow
and St. Petersburg. The violence comes days
after Russia submitted a bid to host the World
Cup in 2018 or 2022.

The game was played at Luzhniki Stadium,
site of Manchester United’s victory over Chelsea
in last May’s Champions League final.

i By The Associated
Press

SCOREBOARD

Tuesday, March 17

Orlando at Cleveland (7 pm
EDT). Two beasts of the East,
the Central Division champion
Cavaliers and the Southeast-
leading Magic, face off.

STARS

Sunday

— Dwight Howard, Magic,
had 28 points and 20 rebounds,
leading Orlando to its third
straight victory, 105-87 over
Utah.

— Andrea Bargnani, Rap-
tors, had 27 points and nine
rebounds in Toronto’s 110-87
win over Indiana.

— Joe Johnson, Hawks,
scored 35 points to go with
seven rebounds, six assists and
two steals, and Atlanta beat
Portland 98-80 for its fifth con-
secutive victory.

— Mike Conley, Grizzlies,
had 20 points for Memphis,
which ended a seven-game los-
ing streak to Detroit with an
89-84 road victory.

— Antawn Jamison, Wiz-
ards, had 30 points, nine
rebounds and two steals in a
104-102 win over the Kings.

— Mo Williams, Cavaliers,
scored 23 points, making all
five of his 3-pointers, to help
lead Cleveland past New York
98-93.

— Jason Richardson, Suns,
scored 31 points against his
former team and Phoenix rang
up the highest point total in
the NBA this season with a
154-130 victory over Golden
State.

— Steve Novak, Clippers,
made a buzzer-beating 3-
pointer, his seventh of the
game, and finished with 21
points to help Los Angeles
beat New Jersey 107-105 and
snap a seven-game losing
streak.

STATS

Phoenix and Golden State
combined for an NBA best
284 points — the Suns had 154
— and Phoenix scored 56 fast-
break points, the most since
1997, when the league began
to track the stat.

The Bucks shot just 32.6 per
cent, but scored 27 points off
the Celtics’ season-high 25
turnovers and grabbed 14 of
their 21 offensive rebounds in
the second half of an 86-77 vic-
tory. The 77 points allowed in
an 85-77 win over Miami was a
season low for Philadelphia.

Detroit, which trailed by as
many as 21 points in the first
half of an 89-84 loss home loss
to Memphis, fell to 2-11 on
Sundays.

SCORING

The Suns shot .621 from the
field, had four scorers at 20
points or higher, and managed
the most points in a game all
season, romping at Golden
State 154-130.

Pops Mensah-Bonsu scored
a career-high 21 points for the
Raptors in their 110-97 win
over the Pacers. The unher-
alded Mensah-Bonsu had four
dunks among his five baskets,
went 11-for-13 from the free
throw line and added eight
rebounds.

Dwyane Wade, coming off a
50-point performance in the
Heat’s triple-overtime victory
over Utah on Saturday, was
held to 18 in an 85-77 loss at
Philadelphia. The NBA’s lead-
ing scorer looked tired after
playing a career-high 52 1/2

Khan out to make up for one career defeat

Fresh off an impressive victory, Amir
Khan is eager to make up for his one spec-
tacular defeat.

Breidis Prescott stalled Khan’s career
last September with a stunning 54-second
knockout. Khan returned to the same
Manchester venue on Saturday to outbox
seven-time world champion Marco Anto-
nio Barrera, a veteran of 65 victories who
was stopped in the fifth round with a deep
cut above his left eye for his seventh loss.

That took Khan’s record to 20 victories
against one defeat, five years after the
British fighter burst onto the scene by win-
ning an Olympic silver medal as a 17-year-
old.

He is now aiming to win a world title
some time this year and would like to
make up for that embarrassing loss to the
Colombian, who is ranked in the top 10 by
the WBC.

“There’s a few names on the short list.
I'd love to fight Prescott again,” Khan
said.

“T made a mistake in the Prescott fight
and I paid for it. Since the Prescott fight so
much has changed in my boxing career
and I’ve moved to LA to train. I know if I
fight him again I’m not going to make the
same mistakes again. It will be a totally dif-
ferent fight.”

Although an accidental clash of heads



MEXICO’S Marco Antonio Barrera (left), and Britain's Amir Khan fight during a WBA International
Lightweight Championship fight in Manchester, England, on Saturday...

caused the deep cut that effectively ended
the fight with Barrera, Khan said he was
convinced he would have knocked the for-
mer world champion out within two more
rounds.

“T felt fully in control of the fight, catch-
ing him with some good shots and I could
see him getting weaker and weaker as the
rounds went on,” he said. “To beat a leg-
end the way I did it’s a massive highlight in
my career and it will take me on to the
next level, get me known around the world
and get a lot bigger fights. It was a make or
break fight for me. I had to win this fight if
I wanted to become a world champion

(AP Photo: Jon Super)

this year.”

Khan plans to be at ringside when Ricky
Hatton faces Manny Pacquiao in Las
Vegas on May 2, but doesn’t know whom
to support.

“Both fighters are very good friends of
mine,” he said. “I’m good mates with
Ricky Hatton — he wished me good luck
before the Barrera fight. And ’'m good
friends with Manny Pacquiao — I train at
the same gym.

“But for this fight I’m 50-50. It’s a tough
fight for both of them. They are both my
friends. I’m just going to sit there and
relax and enjoy the fight.”



minutes against the Jazz. He
shot 8-for-21 in 34 1/2 minutes.
Mavericks guard Jason Ter-
ry matched his career high
with seven 3-pointers and
scored 29 points in a 107-100
loss to the Lakers.
Washington made 11 of its
first 12 shots and set a season
high for points in a quarter
with 37 against Sacramento.

STREAKS

Sacramento dropped to 0-
26 against the Eastern Con-
ference with a 106-104 loss at
Washington, staying on course
to become the first NBA team
to go winless against the oppo-
site conference.

Toronto snapped a seven-
game losing streak with its
biggest margin of victory this
season, beating Indiana 110-
87. The 76ers have won six
straight over Miami at home.

Atlanta has won five in a
row overall and Joe Johnson
has four consecutive 30-points
outings.

Memphis ended a seven-
game losing streak to the Pis-
tons.

The Suns ended a five-game
losing streak on the road and a
four-game skid at Golden
State with a 154-130 romp.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Kendrick Perkins scored a
career-high 26 points with 12
rebounds, including a career-
best nine offensive, in Boston’s
86-77 loss to the Bucks.

Portland’s Brandon Roy
had 25 points and five assists in
a 98-80 loss at Atlanta.

Carlos Boozer had 23 points
and 13 rebounds for the Jazz
in a 105-87 loss to Orlando.

Kevin Martin scored 24
points in Sacramento’s 104-
102 loss at Washington.

Al Harrington made five 3-
pointers and scored 26 points
for New York in a 98-93 loss
to the Cavs.

Vince Carter had a season-
high 41 points along with sev-
en rebounds and six assists for
the Nets, who lost 107-105 at
the Clippers.

OUT OF NOWHERE

Donyell Marshall, who had-
n’t scored a point since Feb.
17 and has played in only 14
games this season, had 10 in
the final quarter of Philadel-
phia’s 85-77 win over Miami.

SIDELINED

Boston slipped to 6-5 in the
last 11 games without Kevin
Garnett (sprained right knee).

Guard Bobby Jackson
broke his cheekbone last Fri-
day night and did not travel
with the Kings to Washington.
He will be re-evaluated Mon-
day. Warriors C Andris
Biedrins will miss at least a
week with a sprained left ankle
sustained in the first quarter
of Friday night’s win over Dal-
las. Nets point guard and lead-
ing scorer Devin Harris left
with 8:53 remaining in the
third quarter of a 107-105 loss
to the Clippers because of a
strained left shoulder.

SPEAKING

“Howard was a monster. He
is one of those guys that peo-
ple don’t appreciate like they
should. He should be in the
MVP talk, too. He cleans up
everything and corrects any
mistake they make.”

— Utah forward Carlos
Boozer after Dwight Howard
had 28 points and 20 rebounds
in Orlando’s 105-87 win over
the Jazz

England bids for
2018 or 2022
MTT

LONDON (AP) — Eng-
land has submitted its bid to
stage either the 2018 or 2022
World Cup and is expecting
10 rivals.

Monday was the deadline
to present bids to soccer’s
international governing
body. The English Football
Association had said it
would bid for 2018, but it
added 2022 to strengthen its
chances.

The FA expects opposi-
tion from the United States,
Mexico, Australia, Indone-
sia, Russia, Japan, South
Korea, Qatar and joint bids
from Spain and Portugal and
the Netherlands and Bel-
gium.

The FIFA executive com-
mittee will vote on both
hosts in 2010. The World
Cup will be held in South
Africa in 2010 and Brazil in
2014.


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Brown inducted into MEAC Hall of Fame

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT was another special day last week
for national 400m champion Chris
“Bay” Brown. He has his name
enshrined into the Mid-Eastern Ath-
letic Conference (MEAC) 2009 Hall
of Fame for his outstanding achieve-
ment at Norfolk State University.

“Tt was nice and well planned togeth-
er. It was something that I wasn’t
expecting,” said Brown. “I just enjoyed
myself.”

Brown, the first student from Nor-
folk State to be inducted into the Hall
of Fame, was the youngest member at

age 30 of the five-
member class to
receive the honour.

The president,
athletic director
and a board mem-
ber from Norfolk
State showed up to
lend their support
to Brown. He was
introduced and pre-
sented to the audi-
ence by his wife,
Faith.

He was joined by
a radio announcer, former football
player and two administrators, all of
whom were 50 years and older.

Chris Brown



“T just have to give all thanks and
praise to the Lord,” Brown stated. “It’s
one of those ones where I wasn’t
expecting it. It was never on my do list
or a list of things to accomplish.

“It caught me off surprise, so being
honoured outside of the Bahamas let
me know that someone else recognised
my talent and that I’m worthy of such
a high reward.”

Hundreds of people, including a
number of dignitaries, attended the
induction. Brown and the rest of the
inductees also were treated to a num-
ber of functions, including the MEAC
Men and Women’s Basketball Tour-
nament.

“Everything was on hand,” said

Brown, who still holds Norfolk State’s
400m and 500m records and is a part of
the 4x400m relay team.

The two-time track and field All-
American earned All-MEAC honours
four times indoors and outdoors for
his performances in both the 200 and
400.

With the celebrations now over and
done with, Brown said he can now turn
his concentration on training again for
the outdoor season.

“My preparation for the upcoming
season is going very well. I’m healthy
and I feel good,” he said. “I’m going to
open up in a meet in California next
month and run on the 4x400 relay team
at the Penn Relays.



Williams-Darling: ‘I see where I




can fit in and actually give back’









































TONIQUE Williams-Darling shares a moment with students in Russell’s House...

FROM page 11

encouraged them to “run fast,
jump high and throw far” as they

enjoy their day.

After she received a round of

[>

Save BIG Right Now!

applause from the audience,
Williams-Darling spent some time
interacting with the faculty and
staff. She also presented medals to
the winners of some of the events
as they were completed.

~~ :

LOADED - 7 Passanger

aa)

astonished to finally meet
Williams-Darling - Tonique
Williams-Darling highway was
named in her honour by the gov-
ernment — up close and personal.

2008 FORD EVEREST
2.5 Turbo Diesel Automatic, Leather,

was $38,114.00
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A lot of the athletes were quite

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

Jamaican coach Ricardo Free-
mantle said he was so pleased to
finally meet Williams-Darling after
hearing so much about her fantas-
tic performances on the interna-
tional scene.

“The guys are all anxious to run, so
hopefully we can go out there and pull
off an upset. All of the guys are healthy
and they are ready.”

Having skipped the indoor season,
Brown said he has a hectic schedule
ahead of him leading up to the 12th
IAAF World Championships in Berlin,
Germany, in August when he will be
going after an individual medal in the
400.

“Everything is on schedule,” said
Brown, who was also honoured at
home in Eleuthera.

His photo was unveiled on the Wall
of Fame at the Rock Sound Airport
and at the Charles Symonette Park in
his hometown of Wemyss Bight.

Phil Smith challenge
down to Elite Eight
FROM page 11

that we will beat them,” Johnson said.
“T’m ready for the fire. But ’m a good
cook. We cook good basketball at
Stephen Dillet.”

Johnson gave a lot of credit to Kevin
Johnson and staff for putting on such a
tournament, which he said is giving his
players a warm up for the New Provi-
dence Primary Schools Association’s reg-
ular basketball season that will get started
in May.

“The tournament has been very suc-
cessful. Kevin and his organisers are giv-
ing our players to play some more games
before we get our season started,” he said.
“So I want to give him a lot of credit.”

Blairwood 25, Jordan Prince William 4:

J Higgs scored eight, K Ferguson had
six and D Palmer four to lead Blairwood
to victory. W Demeritte scored two in
the loss.

St Francis 28, Yellow Elder 10:

B Wilson’s eight and the six each from
A Neilly and M Johnson was enough to
lead St Francis to victory.

Kingsway Academy 17, Mt. Carmel 15:

E Butler produced eight, including two
free throws in overtime and P Hepburn
had four, two free throws as well in the
extra period, to help secure the win for
Kingsway Academy. K Cartwright had
eight in the loss.

Freedom Academy 24, Zion South
Beach 21:

Kerrano Mackey was almost a one-man
wrecking crew with a game high 16 to
pace Freedom Academy.

Rashad Mackey made it a shootout
with 15 in the loss.

YOUR conwecrioneto THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

Directory Publications Queries

and Complaints

BIC would like to advise the general public that in
agreement with their advertising contract, all queries
or complaints for the 2009 Bahamas, Grand Bahama

and Abaco Telephone Directories must be received
on or before March 31st 2009.

Advertisers with quernes or complaints aré urged to

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contact the Directory publications department im-
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summerwinds Plaza, Tonique Williams-Darling Hwy
TEL: 242-322-9183-8 * FAX 242-322-9195

Email: yelowpages@btcbahamas.com

Grand Bahama Office
Government Complex, Mall Drive
TEL: 242-352-2334/8 * FAX: 242-352-2431
Email: yellowpages@btcbahamas.com

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cl al ld


THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 11

r



UESDAY, MARCH 17,

Spt

ts

2009



Klitschko
promises
‘lesson’ for

Gomez...
See page 9

Phil Smith challenge down to Elite Eight

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

he Providence Bas-

Ketball Club’s first

Phil Smith Primary

School Boys’ Chal-
lenge is now down to the Elite
Eight.

Today starting at 4pm at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, the
challenge will showcase the four
pool championships to deter-
mine who will advance to the
championship or the consola-
tion final on Wednesday.

“The tournament is going

extremely well. A lot of the pri-
mary schools are having fun,
they’re playing the game of bas-
ketball and they’re getting bet-
ter,” said tournament director
Kevin “KJ” Johnson.

“A lot of coaches are appre-
ciative of the opportunity and
they wished that they could play
more games. But so far, the
players have been playing hard
and the competition has been
extremely tough.”

After almost a week of com-
petition, the final two teams in
each of the four pools have
been decided. The spots were
booked at the end of yester-

day’s competition.

In Pool A, St Francis, unde-
feated at 3-0, will take on Zion
South Beach, who is 2-1. In
Pool B, St Bede’s (3-0) will face
Blairwood (2-1). Pool C has
Kingsway Academy (2-1)
against Stephen Dillet (3-0) and
in Pool D, Centerville (4-0)
takes on Queen’s College (3-2).

The final game in the round
robin play saw Centerville hold
off Queen’s College 18-16 as
Gremako Symonette scored six,
Troy Gassues had five and Joel
Saunders chipped in with four.
Carl Nesbitt was unstoppable
as he came up with a game high

13 in the loss.

“We performed well. Com-
ing into this tournament, we
practiced hard,” said Center-
ville’s coach Pedro Pierre. “I
saw a lot of skills in this tour-
nament.”

Pierre, however, said they are
not going to rest on their lau-
rels, but they will come pre-
pared to play Queen’s College
again in their pool champi-
onship.

“I know my guys could do
better. We just have to go back
to the drawing board tonight
and make sure that when they
come out tomorrow they will

Work begins on $30m national stadium

ae 2



WORKERS unload equipment from 17 containers yesterday for the construction of the long-awaited $30m national stadium at the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre. The new state-of-the-art complex is being built by the Chinese government as a gift to the Bahamian people. Sports Minister Desmond Ban-
nister, during his contribution to the mid-year budget earlier this month, announced in the House of Assembly that work on the stadium would com-
mence in short order. The stadium is expected to be completed in two to three years...

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

St Bede’s students get ‘Olympic treat’

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ST BEDE’S Primary School
students got a real treat yes-
terday as former Olympic and
world 400m champion Tonique
Williams-Darling officially
opened their inter-house track
and field championships at the
Thomas A Robinson stadium.

Williams-Darling, who has
been retired from active com-
petition since 2007, told the
enthusiastic students that they
have the opportunity to be just
as successful as her.

The 33-year-old, who
became the first Bahamian to
win an individual gold medal
in 2004 at the Olympics in
Athens, Greece, just after she
won the 2005 IAAF World
Championship title, said she’s
just enjoying life right now.

“It’s good to come home and
connect with sports again in the
Bahamas,” said Williams-Dar-
ling, who is looking at the pos-
sibility of venturing into part-
time coaching.

“Tt’s good to be here just to
reflect and see how far we’ve



MEMBERS of Benedict House get to share a moment with former Olympic
and world champion Tonique Williams-Darling...

come and have something to
go after. I see there’s work to
be done, so I’m encouraged
because I see where I can fit
in and actually give back.”

As she officially opened the
meet, Williams-Darling said
she remembers competing in a
similar meet more than 20
years ago when she attended
St John’s College.

Williams-Darling, who began
competing as a member of the

eee ee es)
Simply tell us in a letter
why you deserve to win.
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BUTTONS

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(Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

Bahamas Tigers Track Club,
said by the time she was in the
tenth grade, she was competing
with and defeating some of the
senior athletes.

Throughout her junior
career, Williams-Darling said
her ultimate goal was not just
to compete in the Olympics,
but eventually win the gold
medal.

And she has achieved both
feats.

VW YNDHAM AJASSAU RESORT
CABLE

BEACH



The University of South Car-
olina graduate told the student
athletes that they are not “too
small or too young” to start
dreaming of their future aspi-
rations in track and field, or
whatever sport they want to
compete in.

For those who want to pur-
sue athletics, Williams-Darling

SEE page 10



Here’s a look at the schedule for the Elite Eight in the Prov-
idence Basketball Club’s first Phil Smith Primary School Boys’
Challenge today at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, starting at 4

pm:
Pool A

St Francis (3-0) vs Zion South Beach (2-1)

Pool B

St Bede’s (3-0) vs Blairwood (2-1)

Pool C

Stephen Dillet (3-0) vs Kingsway Academy (2-1)

Pool D

play better,” he said.

Queen’s College coach Jason
Edwards said his Comets played
extremely well, considering the
way they started out in the tour-
nament. “They were just more
physical,” he said of Centerville.

But today, Edwards said his
Comets have gained their con-
fidence, so expect for them to
play much better in their
rematch with Centerville.

e In other games played yes-
terday, Stephen Dillet defeat-
ed Carlton Francis 24-2; Blair-
wood def. Jordan Prince
William 25-4; Kingsway Acade-
my held of Mt. Carmel 17-15 in

ATG

A Wew Tas

Primary basketball schedule...

Centerville (4-0) vs Queen’s College (3-2)







overtime; St. Francis pounded
Yellow Elder 28-10 and Free-
dom Academy out-lasted Zion
South Beach 24-21.

Stephen Dillet, in one of the
most impressive performances
of the day, got eight points from
Gage Griffin and six from John-
ley Noel. They also got some
key rebounds from Benson
Pierre.

Coach Frank Johnson said
Stephen Dillet’s team is play-
ing beyond their expectations.

“We have Kingsway in the
pool championship, but I feel

SEE page 10

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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

For more than a century we've cone
more than issue policies

...we've kept
Our promises.

here's no magic formula for
Bfabllity and longevily in our business,

JUS! a ‘$0 abou! relatienshcs.
Calin OIMpPerial as Deen NUMTUnNG These
relationships for generations by meeting

the financial security needs of Bohamians fram

oll walks of ifé, We remain strong — building financia

stability far you to he

po you Erulld your future.

Confidence for Life

ne

Colinalmperial.

I76. 200) 356.0900 wow. colniaenperkal. cam

bi uae ee Bale etc al|

: Tapers ecstasy
pes eee cet =)

THE TRIBUNE

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

Mr. David Albert Charles Kelly, C.B.E.

SS
“ ’ =

of Nassau, The Bahamas, who died in

New York City, New York, U.S.A. on

the 11th March, 2009, will be held at
/ Christ Church Cathedral, George Street,
| Nassau, on Thursday, 19th March, 2009
j at 3:00 p.m.

"| Mr. Kelly is survived by his wife Nancy

| Booth Kelly; three sons, Andrew Jordan

| Kelly, David Gregory Booth Kelly and

| Reginald Scott Kelly; two daughters-

_| in-law, Anne Boushelle Kelly and

Candace Elizabeth Kelly; five

|| grandchildren, Jordan Ross Kelly, David

Oliver Christensen Kelly, Avery Anne Kelly, John (Jack) Albert Charles
Kelly and Katie Marie Kelly; his brother, Godfrey Kenneth Kelly
C.M.G.; his sisters-in-law, Sonia Kelly and Paula Kelly; his brother-
in-law, John Avery Booth, Jr and his wife, Bonnie Booth; nieces and
nephews, Linda Elza and her daughter, Katherine Elza, Stephen Kelly
and his wife, Susan Kelly, Gary Kelly , Lynn Lowe and her husband,
Chris Lowe, Karen Kelly, John Avery Booth, Ill, and his wife, Kathleen
Booth, Joy Marie Rousell and her husband James Rousell and Jody
Laura Booth-Seals and her husband, Dave Seals, ; his cousins Betty
Kelly Kenning, O.B.E. and her husband John Kenning O.B.E. and
George Kelly M.B.E. and his wife Norma Kelly, other relatives and
friends. His brother Basil Trevor Kelly predeceased him.

The Very Reverend Patrick L. Adderley, Dean of Nassau, The Venerable
Keith Cartwright, Archdeacon of the Southern Bahamas, The Reverend
Father Michael Gittens, Priest Vicar, Christ Church Cathederal, Nassau
and The Reverend Crosley N. Walkine, Rector, St. Anne's Church,
Fox Hill, Nassau will officiate and interment will follow in St Anne's
Church Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Lyford Cay
Foundation, Inc., DAVID A. C. KELLY, C.B.E. MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP, P.O.Box N.7776, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale
Avenue, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.






Bahamas needs
urgent policy
Statement over
tax co-operation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FINAN-
CIAL services
executives last
night said it
was increas-
ingly apparent
that the
Bahamas
would have to
issue an immi-
nent policy
statement
pledging
greater international co-opera-
tion on tax matters, as failure to
do so could leave this nation iso-
lated and the industry exposed
to being ‘blacklisted’ again.

Tribune Business was told that
the Bahamas was “going to have
to take a position” before the
April 2, 2009, meeting of the G-
20, as the world’s major indus-
trialised nations were commit-
ted to launching a crack down
on international financial cen-
tres that were failing to co-oper-
ate with their demands for
greater transparency and tax
information exchange.

The urgency of a public policy
statement by the Bahamian gov-
ernment has further intensified
in the past few days, with
Switzerland, Austria, Luxem-
bourg, Andorra, Liechtenstein,
Bermuda, Jersey, Guernsey and
the Cayman Islands having
already committed to greater co-
operation on tax matters, in a
bid to forestall a potential G-20
offensive led by both the UK
and US. They are backed by
high-tax European nations such
as France and Germany.

One senior financial services
professional, speaking to Tri-
bune Business on condition of
anonymity, said the Government
now appeared to “have woken
up” to the need for urgent
action, after several FNM MPs
and Cabinet ministers had
recently decried the “degree of
hysteria" surrounding the brew-
ing storm approaching the
Bahamian financial services
industry.

“There has to be a serious pol-
icy statement by the Bahamas
government before April 2,” the
source told Tribune Business.
“Because not to do it would
leave the Bahamas isolated. We
are one of the very few who
have not taken a position, like
the majority of international
financial centres have done, and
made it known. I’d be amazed if
the Government did not make a
move before April 2, not froma
legislative point of view, but a
policy statement.”

The Government and finan-
cial services industry were last
night accelerating moves already
begun to develop a common
position on how the Bahamas
should respond to the changing
international financial services
landscape, with a 5pm meeting

SEE page 5B



THE TRIBUNE @

usine

TUES DAY,

MARCH

Mie



2009

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net

Developer applies to
go ‘completely solar’

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

real estate

developer has

applied for gov-

ernment and

Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation (BEC)
approvals to allow her ‘green’
community to use 100 per cent
solar power during the daylight
hours, Tribune Business was told
yesterday.

Debby Deal, project manager
for the South Ocean Palms
development, said she had sub-
mitted a proposal to the Minister
of the Environment, Dr Earl
Deveaux, which seeks to incor-
porate solar panels into the
building of the gated communi-
ty’s homes. She is hoping for a
positive response.

Ms Deal said she would like
the community she is developing
jointly with another partner to
be a model for future develop-
ments, should they be allowed
to install the solar panels.

At present, builders must
receive permission from BEC to
install solar power. Under cur-
rent legislation, homes and busi-
nesses must take BEC power in
all areas where it is available.

Sustainability
only concern
over jobless
benefit plan

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

THE Government’s pro-
posed unemployment ben-
efit programme will “go a
long way to reducing the
strain” on persons who have
lost their jobs due to the
recession, the Chamber of
Commerce’s first vice-pres-
ident said yesterday, the
only major concern being
the initiative’s long-term sus-
tainability.

Khaalis Rolle, speaking to
Tribune Business after the
scheme was officially pre-
sented yesterday to mem-
bers of the business com-
munity and trade unions,
said the Government was
possibly hoping to have the
unemployment benefit pro-
gramme up and running by
April 20 this year. It was
also hoping to get the
enabling legislation to Par-
liament by next week.

Mr Rolle said: “I like the
effort the Government is
making on this. It seems to
be a well thought-out plan,
an ambitious plan.

“T think it will go a long

SEE page 4B



ROYAL 9 FIDELITY

* Seeks government, BEC permission for New Providence
subdivision to go 100% solar during daylight hours

* Energy efficient devices push prices of homes, ranging from $517,000
to $778,000, up but energy savings more than pay for themselves

“T would like us to be the first
subdivision to completely go
solar. I would like to be able to
say: ‘OK, this is what we’re
doing’, and have other people
come watch and see how it
works, because we’re small,” Ms
Deal said.

She added that her homes
were designed to greatly reduce
utility costs by “stopping the
meter” with solar panels and
inverters that supply energy dur-
ing daylight hours. Energy will
be supplied by BEC during the
evening hours, unless batteries
are added to the solar grid.

However, since the commu-
nity is “green”, Ms Deal said she
did not incorporate batteries into
the design because they are dif-
ficult to dispose of and not envi-
ronmentally friendly.

The houses in the small com-
munity, only 13 lots located near
South Ocean in southwestern
New Providence, will have myr-

iad energy saving features incor-
porated into the building stage,
as well as energy efficient appli-
ances such as air-conditioning.

Ms Deal said incorporating
high efficiency appliances could
drive the cost of some home
models, which range in price
from $517,000 to $778,000, up.
However, home buyers will have
the option to forego the energy
efficient air-conditioning system,
reducing the cost of the home
by about $19,000. Still, the
investment in energy efficient
devices will more than pay for
itself.

Ms Deal said some other fea-
tures incorporated into the
homes will be fascia board and
boxing made from recycled
material; Accu-Crete walls that
are crack and fade resistant; low
flow shower heads; single-gallon
flush toilets; quartz counter tops;
mahogany or cedar front doors;
and Icynene, a spray on insula-

tion, in the attics.

“We want to offer a better
product that is low maintenance,
better quality materials and that
Keeps the dollar value the
same,” she said.

“T would say that I’m higher
(priced) than most builders, but
the things that I offer, the stan-
dard things, are things that oth-
er builders don’t put in, so they
(buyers) really are getting a bet-
ter deal.”

Ms Deal said that though lot
numbers were limited, the
homes in the community will
feature seven different designs
to accommodate varying buyer
tastes.

She said there will be homes
with additions for the physically
challenged, homes with guest
suites, open concept homes that
are great for entertaining and
homes for single and young

SEE page 4B

$225k initiative to aid cooperative’s fisheries exports

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE NORTH Abaco Fish-
eries Co-operative could receive
$150,000 from the Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank (IDB)
for fishing and business devel-
opment training, Tribune Busi-
ness confirmed yesterday.

The cooperative’s chairman,
Leon Pinder, said fishermen in
that area have long been brand-
ed as uneducated and notori-
ously bad at managing their fish-
ing revenues. He said that, gen-
erally, most fishermen do not
complete high school, so the pro-
gramme - which is in prepara-
tion - was essential to the sec-
tor’s future, and the future of
the fishermen at large.

The technical training, which

North Abaco fishermen ‘building a fish house, fish processing
plant and a marine shop’ in bid to maximise income

is estimated to cost $225,000, will
assist North Abaco’s fishermen
in maximising their potential,
according to Mr Pinder, as the
organisation moves to upgrade
its export markets.

“As a cooperative we are
building a fish house, fish pro-
cessing plant and a marine shop,
where we can provide the fish-
ermen with necessary equipment
and get to the point where we
can export our own fish to max-
imise the income,” he said.

Mr Pinder said members and
potential members of the coop-
erative will be trained specifi-
cally in business management,
different types of fishing and

Make it’a reality.

environmentally-friendly fishing,
in an intensive month-long pro-
gramme.

Mr Pinder said training will
be provided by the Inter-Amer-
ican Institute for Cooperation
on Agriculture, via the IDB, and
also by the Bahamas Coopera-
tive League.

“Once the IDB does the train-
ing and we are already to belt
course on our building, then
we'll move on to the phase
where we can get a local loan
from the other cooperatives like
the credit union,” Mr Pinder
said. “ We will need more fund-

SEE page 4B



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

Analyst
‘concern’
on FINCO
dividend

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ANALYSTS _ yesterday
expressed “concern” that
Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FINCO) had main-
tained its regular dividend at
$0.13 per share despite slump-
ing to what one described as its
“first” quarterly loss ever, the
contracting economy and rise in
loan delinquencies forcing it to
take a $5.375 million provision
against future losses.

The one-time provision saw
FINCO post a $367,759 net loss
for the three months to January
31, 2009, a result that market
analysts said was “symbolic” of
the deep economic recession and
rising unemployment that the
Bahamas now faced.

The latter, they added, was
forcing many borrowers to
default on their mortgage and
other loan commitments, the key
issue impacting performance
across the Bahamian commer-
cial banking sector.

Describing FINCO’s fiscal
2009 first quarter results as
“quite surprising”, one analyst

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

EXCITING AND CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITIES FOR
YOUNG BAHAMIANS

e

Credit

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; ’ m@ executor
Have you obtained, or do you expect to achieve, a combined SAT score of at least 1500? eS : ") gs
Are you physically fit? Ee 2: ‘ . © FP passes
Are you between the ages of 16 and 20 years? +R ' * ie e
Series 7

The Bahamas Maritime Authority is once again offering attractive scholarships to young ii ib 2 i le ! e x al } )
academically sound Bahamians who are keen to train for an exciting and challenging career in the
Maritime Industry which is gaining increasing national importance.

Imagine a career which will take you to the world’s most fascinating ports and far flung
destinations. A Maritime career could take you there.

Do you have, or are likely to have, 5 BGCSE passes, including Math, Physics/Combined Science
and English Language at grade ‘C’ or above?

If you have answered YES to the questions above then read on.

A JUNIOR securities execu-
tor, Keith Beneby Jnr, has
passed the Series 7 exam in
Florida. He is now eligible to
apply for registration with the
Securities Commission.

Mr Beneby is pictured (above
right) with Reece Chipman
(left), managing director of The
National Association of Secu-

These generous scholarships are inclusive of tuition, fees, course material, accommodation and
transportation costs. Commencing in September 2009 successful candidates will follow a 4 year
degree programme at the California Maritime Academy, a unique campus of the California State
University. Upon completion of the degree, the qualified officers will be expected to serve on board
a Bahamian flagged vessel for at least 2 years providing the solid foundation on which to build
their Maritime careers.

Further information and application forms can
be obtained from Mrs Erma Rahming Mackey,
Deputy Director, Bahamas Maritime Authority,
Manx Corporate Centre, West Bay Street, P O
Box N-4679, Nassau, Bahamas, email:

rities Training and Compliance
(Nastac) Group.

The Series 7 exam is admin-
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fax: 356 5889. Completed applications must

be submitted in person or by post, with copies
of academic certificates/transcripts and proof

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rities Dealers (NASD).

British American Financial

British American Financial “BAF” is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Bahamian entity BAB
Holdings Limited. BAF recently celebrated its second year as a 100% Bahamian owned entity
having been acquired by the Bahamian Group during February 2007.

Established in 1920, British American Financial provides a full range of insurance and
investment services, including life & health insurance, mortgages, financial and retirement
planning, annuities, mutual funds and pension plans. The Company has three offices in Nassau at
Independence Drive, Rosetta St. Palmdale, and Carmichael Rd. Also full service branches in
Freeport, Abaco, Exuma and a network of career agents throughout the Family Islands. The
Company directly employs more than 200 Bahamians.

British American Financial is not related or affiliated in any way whatsoever with any other
company with a similar name “British American”, whether in the Bahamas, the Caribbean region
or anywhere else.

In celebration of our second anniversary as a fully Bahamian Company, we are pleased to
if ’ bedi ‘owed aad announce our offering of free financial consultations, along with weekly financial seminars to our
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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 3B



Bahamian firms have ‘great
potential for energy savings

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

BAHAMIAN small and
medium-sized enterprises
(SMEs) were yesterday urged
by the Inter-American Invest-
ment Corporation (IIC) to
become more energy efficient
by implementing conservation
measures that could slash oper-
ating costs.

Speaking to Tribune Busi-
ness at the Energy Efficiency
Workshop for Small and Medi-
um Sized Enterprises, the IIC’s
senior financialspecialist, Car-
los Serrano, said much more

can be done throughout the
Bahamas and the wider
Caribbean to decrease energy
waste and consumption, and
increase savings.

“By talking with many local
enterprises here, we have seen
that there are many basic
things that have not been done
- the most simple things for
energy efficiency, like insula-
tion. Many buildings con-
structed here do not include
insulation and that’s wasted
energy,” he said.

“So, the Bahamas as well as
other Caribbean countries have
an energy intensity, which pro-

vides a very large potential to
reduce consumption and
improve savings.”

The IIC’s GREENPYME
programme “promotes renew-
able energy, clean technology,
and energy efficiency in SMEs
in the main production and ser-
vice sectors in Latin America
and the Caribbean”.

A presenter at the workshop
and energy expert, Pierre Lan-
glois, said businesses need to
develop a plan for saving ener-
gy, implement it and then build
on the success of the plan.

He suggested that companies
start with small changes that

could make an immediate dif-
ference, such as efficient fluo-
rescent light bulbs, and invest
in energy efficient appliances
and upgrades that could lead
to potential long-term savings.

Some energy conservation
measures revealed at the work-

shop, which could be expen-
sive but pay for themselves in
less than five years, were com-
puterised energy management
systems pegged at more than
$3,000, with an estimated play
back period of one=and-a-half
to two years; polyurethane

foam spray insulation, pegged
at $2 - $3 per square foot with a
pay back period of three to
four years; and to change from
freon to “natural” hydrocar-
bon refrigerants for air-condi-
tioning and refrigeration sys-
tems.



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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Sustainability only concern
over jobless benefit plan

FROM page 1B

way in, not eliminating, but
reducing the strain on unem-
ployed during this period. There
are some safeguards in place to
ensure it will not be abused.”
The Government is looking at
pegging the unemployment ben-
efit jobless persons receive to
their insurable wage level when
they (and their employers) were
contributing to the National
Insurance Board (NIB).
Essentially, unemployed per-
sons will receive 50 per cent of
the insurable wage their NIB
contributions were based on, for
a period lasting between 13-26

Developer
applies to go
‘completely
solar’

FROM page 1B

families.

Ms Deal was asked by Dr
Deveaux to replace him as
the lunch-time guest speak-

er at the Energy Efficiency
Workshop for small and
medium-sized enterprises,
held yesterday at the British
Colonial Hilton under the
auspices of Royal Bank of
Canada. She said she sees
this as a positive response
from the government.

She insisted though : “We
have to take care of the
environment, and we don’t
have to wait on the Gov-
ernment.”



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weeks (three to six months).

“They spoke about the size of
the benefit being 50 per cent of
the insurable wage,” Mr Rolle
told Tribune Business last night.
“Tf it was $400 per week, you
will get $200 a week.” He added
that, in the case of former hotel
workers, the insurable wage cal-
culation would not include tips
or gratuities.

“My biggest concern is the
sustainability of it,” Mr Rolle
said. “There’s a finite budget
associated with it - $20 million.
That money is being transferred
from the NIB Medical Benefits
Reserve.

“When that is exhausted,
there are two things in play - the
possibility of a protracted, dire
economic situation, and when
you look at the fundamentals
driving unemployment in the
country, it’s not a process that’s
easy to recover from.

“Unemployment is going to
remain high for quite a while.”

FINCO, from page 1B

Mr Rolle said it would take
some time for tourism and other
Key industries “to get everything
back in line. For unemployment
to start diminishing, it’s going to
take a very long time, and a very
concerted effort on behalf of the
Government and the private sec-
tor.”

The Department of Statistics’
interim labour force survey
recently showed that the unem-
ployment rate on New Provi-
dence had increased from 8.7
per cent to 12.1 per cent between
May 2008 and early 2009, an
almost 40 per cent rise in per-
centage terms.

For Grand Bahama, the
Department of Statistics said the
unemployment rate had
increased from a 9 per cent total
in May 2008 to 14.6 per cent in
February 2009, an increase of
5.6 per cent or more than 50 per
cent in percentage terms.

These latest unemployment
rates were described as the high-

est experienced by both islands
in the past 15 years, since the
recession of the early 1990s. The
Department of Statistics said the
number of persons unemployed
on New Providence had risen by
4,540 or 38 per cent, while for
Grand Bahama the equivalent
was a 55 per cent rise or 1,500
persons.

These data mean that just
over one in 10 Bahamians who
are actively looking for work are
now not able to find it. On
Grand Bahama, the February
2009 survey showed that that
17.7 per cent of women were
unemployed, with the rate slight-
ly lower for men at 11.7 per cent.
Conversely, for New Providence,
the unemployment rate was only
11.9 per cent for women, yet 12.4
per cent for men.

“Tt’s an ambitious plan. ’m
concerned about the sustain-
ability, but it’s a step in the right
direction,” Mr Rolle added.
“Generally, I think everyone was

happy about it. The labour
unions were pretty pleased that
the Government was taking this
step. The private sector, from
our end, was pretty pleased
something is being done.”

The unemployment benefit
scheme will be administered by
NIB. Mr Rolle acknowledged
that this was also a “major con-
cern”, given that NIB had diffi-
culty administering all that it
does already, but the Board told
yesterday’s presentation that it
had already started “to shift peo-
ple into that area to make sure
it’s executed and managed prop-
erly”.

Mr Rolle said the presenta-
tion did not focus on the
scheme’s long-term viability.
However, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said it would
ultimately be financed by a per
worker contribution equivalent
to 1 per cent of the insurable
wage.

“Regard being had to the cur-

$225k initiative to
aid cooperative’s
fisheries exports

FROM page 1B

ing to get where we want to
get, but that won’t be done
until we have done the tech-
rou VMBe-DuOviotcad ot NMsi Moy cOn eer
ed from IDB.”

The proposal is presently
in Washington waiting for
final approvals, after which
ng-bouvlermeolelamocraten

“Tt could be as early as the
end of this month,” said Mr
Pinder.



rent economic circumstance, we
don’t propose to introduce such
a charge today,” Mr. Ingraham
said previously, “but the charge
is likely to be of the order of 1
per cent of insurable wage.

“That means if you are mak-
ing $400 a week or more, that 1
per cent would be $4, and that
would be shared either 60/40
employer/employee or 50/50
employer/employee.”

The Government is consider-
ing a January 1, 2010 date for
the implementation of that pay-
ment scheme.

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said: “My only concern is that they’re
continuing to pay the dividend at $0.13
per share, so there’s no adjustment in the
dividend, which shows they figure they’re
going to recover.”

The first quarter loss stood in start con-
trast to the $5.496 million profit FINCO
generated in the 2008 first quarter. The
bank, which is effectively Royal Bank’s
mortgage lending arm, said the provision
for future credit losses was required after
a further increase in non-accrual loans
was experienced during the quarter.

In its message to shareholders, FIN-
CO said that the dividend payment was
maintained only “after considerable delib-
eration, and having regard for the oper-
ating loss and the difficult operating envi-
ronment, which is expected to continue”.

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: 242-328-0048

The Board decision, FINCO added,
was based on FINCO’s strong capital
position, with shareholder equity standing
at $87.607 million - inclusive of $79.222
million in retained earnings. Its liquidity
position, with almost $63 million in cash in
hand at the balance sheet date, and con-
setvative loan loss provisioning policy,
also proved decisive factors.

One analyst, though, questioned
whether the dividend payment was made
partly to satisfy the profit objectives of
FINCO’s 75 per cent majority share-
holder, Royal Bank of Canada. The div-
idend will likely have to come from
retained earnings.

Meanwhile, Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, said of the FIN-
CO results and credit provision: “It’s just

Ware Te Ge Great

TV Show

re

please call 393-3404.



aN

Nassau Airport
Development Company

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

an accounting provision to reflect the cur-
rent environment. They take the hit now
and move forward.

“It speaks to a larger fundamental
problem, people who are cash strapped
and unable to pay. I would argue that if
FINCO is a top tier mortgage lending
bank, the market leader, then the other
smaller players may be having an even
more difficult time.

“It’s just symbolic of the state of the
market and the economy.”

At year-end 2008, some 4.09 per cent of
FINCO’s total loan portfolio - mostly
mortgages - were non-performing, mean-
ing they were 90 days or more past due.
The total loan amount involved was
$28.933 million out of a total $692.079
million portfolio.

Motivator Spence Finlayson is pictured

Still, even at October 31, 2008, FIN-
CO’s non-performing loan portfolio had
increased by 76.5 per cent year-over-year
compared to $16.39 million at year-end
2007.

In particular, the total value of loans
more than one year past due had more
than doubles from $3.419 million to
$7.442 million. In addition, the total val-
ue of loans between 90 and 180 days past
due had more than tripled, from $2.188
million to $6.9994 million.

And the total value of loans between
nine months to one year overdue also
more than tripled, rising from $1.245 mil-
lion to $4.347 million.

Still, FINCO is enjoying mortgage port-
folio growth, having expanded by 12 per
cent during the first quarter.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

WESTMINSTER HOLDINGS
INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) WESTMINSTER HOLDINGS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED is
in voluntary dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 16th
March, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust
Limited, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, Geneva.

Dated this 17th day of March, A. D. 2009



UKE IO e

‘Dare To Be Great.” airs tonight at 8:30pm on ZNS TV13.
Pictured along with the shows creator and host Spence Finlayson are
his guests, Rev. Javon Neeley of Bethel Baptist Church, Paul Moss,
Dominion Management Services Ltd. and Glenn Ferguson, Financial
Consultant.

If you would like to be a guest on this show or advertise

Credit Suisse Trust Limited

Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SCAGLIETTI INVESTMENTS LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SCAGLIETTI INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 6th March, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of

new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following

items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and

related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for

the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230

General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room

located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRAC] BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci brisby@nas.bs

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Manex Limited,
The Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte
Streets, Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 17th day of March, A. D. 2009



Manex Limited

Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
SEABROWN HOLDINGS LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act

(No. 45 of 2000), SEABROWN HOLDINGS LIMITED is
in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 28th
day of January, 2009.

Sarnia Directors Limited

Suite V

Tower Hill House
Le Bordage, St. Peter Port

Guernsey, GY1 3QT



Liquidator
(-\"\
Na,

THE TRIBUNE

(ew)
Na LY,

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 5B





Bahamas needs urgent policy statement over tax co-operation

FROM page 1B

at the Sheraton Cable Beach.

The meeting was organised by
the Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB), and in atten-
dance was minister of state for
finance, Zhivargo Laing. Tri-
bune Business went to press
before the meeting’s outcome
could be determined.

Prior to the meeting, Owen
Bethel, head of the Nassau-
based Montaque Group, told
Tribune Business that it would
be “totally detrimental to the
financial industry” in the
Bahamas if this nation were to
allow itself to become isolated
and, subsequently, ‘blacklisted’
by the OECD or other G-20
forums/clubs.

Mr Bethel pointed out that if
this happened, the reputational
consequences for the Bahamian
financial services sector would
be significant, and could poten-
tially lead to existing and new
private wealth management
clients pulling their business



a

from this jurisdiction.

“T would have thought that we
should have basically made a
clear statement, firstly clarifying
the actions that we have taken
already, and that we’re well
ahead of the game in that sense,
but also that we’re certainly pre-
pared to co-operate with what-
ever else the countries of the US
and OECD would want, so that
we are very precise in what we
do,” Mr Bethel told Tribune
Business.

Doing this, he explained,
would ensure the Bahamas did
“not take the scattergun, sledge
hammer approach and smash
everything, like we did in 2000”
as a result of the financial ser-
vices industry being “blacklist-
ed’ then by the Financial Action
Task Force (FATF).

Instead, Mr Bethel said the
Bahamas had to “apply strategic
surgery to areas of concern, and
if the concerns expressed are tax
evasion by their citizens, we
should be prepared to look at

Tax Information Exchange
Agreements”.

He agreed, though, with the
arguments expressed by attor-
neys such as John Delaney and
Brian Moree, in that the
Bahamas should seek reciprocal
benefits from nations it signed
TIEAs with, such as investment
and trade preferences.

It was especially important
that the Bahamas avoid becom-
ing isolated, Mr Bethel told Tri-
bune Business. If the G-20, Oba-
ma administration and others
were to brand all international
financial centres, including many
US states, Switzerland, Singa-
pore, Hong Kong and others as
so-called ‘tax havens’, the
Bahamas “may be able to
weather the storm”.

Yet if they removed them-
selves from the frame by pledg-
ing greater co-operation on
international tax matters, and
the Bahamas did not adopt such
a clear position, it would “total-
ly be detrimental to the finan-
cial industry”.

“We would clearly have iden-
tified ourselves as laggards in
the move to eliminate tax eva-
sion,” Mr Bethel explained, say-
ing this could pave the way for

“the blacklisting to come”.

“That sends a signal to exist-
ing clients and potential clients
that this is not the jurisdiction
they want to be in at all,” he
added.

Mr Bethel said the speed with
which the Bahamas reacted to
the 2000 ‘blacklisting’ by the
FATF, and the radical legisla-
tive surgery performed then,
would likely cause the OECD
and its members to expect a sim-
ilar performance in light of cur-
rent pressures.

In addition, they would also
expect the Bahamas to give
them what this nation had
already provided the US with - a
TIEA - in 2002.

“We certainly need to solicit
the support of the US govern-
ment, who we have an existing
TIEA with, and get an under-
standing that that is adequate
for their purposes going for-
ward,” Mr Bethel said.

“We must get their support in
applying the same provisions to
other countries - not going fur-
ther than we have already.”

Backing the issuing of a clear
policy statement by the Bahamas
government on tax co-operation,
Mr Bethel said it would be “ide-

al” if this was part of a common
initiative and voice featuring all
Caribbean-based international
financial centres.

“To the degree we have
jumped out of the bandwagon
on our own before, I would cer-
tainly support the Government
making a statement on its own
prior to the G-20 meeting,” he
added.

Mr Bethel said the mounting
external pressure on the
Bahamas was “quite serious”,



and the momentum generated
meant this nation needed to
respond proactively, while also
leaving industry institutions and
executives with enough time to
implement the necessary
changes.

“We have yet to come up with
an agreed policy statement and
position as to where we see the
industry going. I’m not sure the
Government has bought into the
direction the industry wants, or
has to, go in,” Mr Bethel said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
POINTAM VALLEY INC.









——





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138




(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of POINTAM VALLEY INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the








Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

The Public Is Cordially Invited To Attend
THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON PRESENTATION
Hosted by The Bahamas Society of Engineers

Thursday, March 19, 2009
Topic
“OPPORTUNITIES FOR
ENGINEERING FIRMS GOING
FORWARD”

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

SHELBER
INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of SHELBER INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Regis-
trar. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 10th day

GUEST SPEAKER:
THE HON. ZHIVARGO S. LAING
MINISTER OF STATE

PLACE:
EAST VILLA RESTAURANT
East Bay Street
Time: 12:00p.m.
Donations: $25.00 per person

If possible please confirm your attendance by e-mail

Gracesharma0S5@yahoo.com or JEEIliott@bahamaselectricty.com
or quentin. knowles@flameless.com

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

2008/CLE/qui/01870

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising an area of 13, 436 square feet situate approximately
500 feet west of Lincoln Boulevard and north side of Palm Beach
Court on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of
land has such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions
as are shown on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Mary Jane Smith

NOTICE

The Quieting Titl

Act 1959

The Petition of Mary Jane Smith of the Southern
District, of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas in respect of: - ALL
THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising an area of 13,
436 square feet situate approximately 500 feet west of Lincoln
Boulevard and north side of Palm Beach Courton the Island
of New Providence one of the Islands in the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of land has
such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions as
are shown on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

Mary Jane Smith claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the
said tract of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having
Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the petition shall on or before the 27" of April A.D.,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed form
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before
the 27% of April A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:The Registry of

the Supreme Court;

The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for the
Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,

Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;

Dated the 27" day of January A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner

of March, 2009.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) BOVEY LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February 25, 2009

Registrar General.



when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace

West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 19th day of March, 2009 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

FEBRUARY 26, 2009

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

WASTE - ED

“LITTER” ALLY -
WHY WE DO THE THINGS WE DO

* Lack of knowledge about the
Environmental effects of Littering

Litter is already there

* No pressure to do the right thing
* No penalties or consistent enforcement

* Lack of pride
* Laziness

+ Not aware that we are littering

Effects of Litter
* Unsightly

* Costly

* Unhealthy

‘Poisons, Traps, Suffocates Wildlife
* Negatively affects tourism and the local economy

PUT LITTER IN ITS’ PLACE. KEEP THE BAHAMAS
CLEAN, GREEN AND PRISTINE

A message from the Ministry of
Department of Environmental

Health Services

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00115

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Millard Bethel
NOTICE OF PETITION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Millard Bethel
of North Palmetto Point, Eleuthera, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
is applying to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas to have his title
investigated determined and declared under the

Quieting Titles Act. 1959 (Ch. 393) in respect

of the land hereafter described, that is to say:
“ ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
comprising Eight and Seven-hundredtwenty-nine
Thousandths (8.729) Acres located approximately
Eighty-seven (87) feet South of the Eleuthera
Main Road and approximately Zero and Three
Tenths (0.3) miles North-Westwardly of Palmetto
Point Crossing and is bounded Northwardly
by the Estate of Horatius Thompson running
thereon for a total distance of Four-Hundred-
twelve and Thirty-five Hundredths (412.35) feet,
Eastwardly by property formerly of the Estate
of Anthony Drexel and now the property of the
Petitioner running thereon for a total distance of
Eleven-hundred two and ninety-three hundredths
(1102.93) feet, Southwardly by property of
Eleuthera Land Company Ltd., running thereon for
a total distance of Three hundred-thirty-two and
Twenty-two hundredths (332.22) feet, Westwardly
by property of Emma E. Cooper running thereon
for a total distance of Nine hundred-seventy-
nine and Forth Three Hundredths (979.43) feet
continuing back to the point of commencement
the said piece parcel or tract of land described
aforesaid is delineated in PINK on the plan
submitted with the Petitioner’s Petition.”
AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition
and the Plan of the said land may be inspected
during normal office hours at the following
places:

i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House,
East Street North, New Providence, The
Bahamas.

il. Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, East Shirley
Street, Highland Terrace, New Providence,
The Bahamas.

il. The Administrator's Office, Governor’s
Harbour, Eleuthera, The Bahamas

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person
having dower or right to dower, an adverse claim
or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall
on or before the 6th May A.D., 2009 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petition or his
attorney an Adverse Claim in the prescribed
form supported by Affidavit.

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve
an Adverse Claim on or before 6th May A.D.,
2009 date will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 5th day of March A.D., 2009

Sharon Wilson & Co.
Chambers
Delvest House
East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE'S

THE TRIBUNE






v
T. PATRICK'S
!

HAPP
E
DAY
, ee

red

rv

© 2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World Rights ress!



HvGO, HAVE You
GIVEN SOME THOUGHT
ABOUT TAKING ME To
THE FIREMENS

STUPID
ROTTEN






as —
TT

“T DONT NEED A GOOD TALKIN TO! I NEED

A GOOD LISTENIN’ TO!”

vl

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across Down
1 Outflowing 1 Unnecessary
currency (3,4) accessory (5)
5 A flash of 2 One should hear pins drop
brilliance (5) in these places (7,6)
8 One old fort now turned 3 Shattered — as an anti-

into a capital tourist
attraction (5,2,6)

9 Aplea is reversed in 4
sibilant tones (5)

10 Still fluster, perhaps (7)

11 Assimilate a 5
summary (6)

12 Calms down a wild 6
beast (6)

15 A tussle for military 7

honours (7)

17 Tragically without a 11
match, has to return a
smoke (5) 13

19 It's unspeakable! (13)

20 Points to the girl to 14
follow (5)

21 Make dispirited editor 16
return to his normal 18

field (7)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Verne, 8 Homesick, 9
Cabal, 10 Milliner, 11 Waste, 12 Ann,
16 Sea dog, 17 Endear, 18 Ebb, 23
Squat, 24 Have-nots, 25 Bathe, 26
Moreover, 27 Leant.

Down: 2 Emanated, 3 Neap tide, 4
Motion, 5 Reply, 6 Giant, 7 Skirt, 12
Age, 13 Neb, 14 Adequate, 15
Marathon, 19 Bitter, 20 Champ, 21
Overt, 22 Snook.




\ YOU REALLY Tt po! you fs YOU THINK
J LIKE MY HAIR LOOK VERY Nt ANYONE ELSE
LILA\ THIS WAY? GLAMOROUS! ff a)~\ WILL NOTICE?

GREEN COFFEE,
GREEN BURGER,

GREEN FRIES, AND AV

BOTTLE OF GREEN Wy?





AAGHHGHHH!
T WAITED WEEKS FOR
THIS AND NoW ITS,
BROKEN, MND T_DIDNT
EVEN GET To WEAR IT!





























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REALLY_--PO









www.Blondie.com.





YOUR \1 Wis Sust
FAULT



\\

Sunday





MY FAULT 27

x, SITTING HERE !
ty | YOU BROKE \T!

OH, YEAH...
THEY'LL NOTICE!

To BREAK IT?
YOU DID SOME
SUBLIMINAL






WHOA, DAG, WHAT'S
WITH THE GREEN
FACE?

4 Bud 8a ONES)

panases sys Duon, “dul ‘ayeoOUAS Saunt





T'M WILLING
You TO GO
JUMP [IN THE





THING! DON'T
DENY iT! 1

KNOW You DID,
NOU MUST UNE!








©2009, Moat America Synd~











WisW, DENNISTHEMENACE.Com

















3/17



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to

©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.










APT 3-G
a NENTS LATER, ANOTHER VIGITOR

IS OVER AT LAST, TOMMIES
GIVE ME
ABIG
Kiss/

li i WW
ZSIDS

i
me

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

www.kingfeatures.com



UM, GARY, \ DON'T MIND ME, GARY.
JOE KELLY JI WAS JUST LEAVING



MOTHERS INVENTED?
DOMESTIC _SURVEILLANCE

9 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.







I UNDERSTANP THEY THE ONLY THING WEE ALLOWEP To 2O
WON'T LET YOU USE THE 1S TICKLE THEIR FEET WITH A FEATHER
OLD METHODS OF TO GET INFORMATION /
TORTURE ANYMORE...





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Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer





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©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
2 / 0/0
ais





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Hl WI/N/o co}
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3/17



quarian’s interest may
be? (2,5)

Its a struggle for an
amphibian to get

around (6)

Coarse expression of
quantity (5)

Be fit and agile, perhaps,
and tireless (13)

New singlet produces
prickling sensations (7)
Its deep in distress,
notwithstanding (7)

Is more cheerful when the
dollar’s risen? (5,2)

Aim for the top in exotic
dances (6)

Bravely built shelter (5)
Cottons on and leers
crudely (5)



EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Slack, 8 Bona fide, 9
Snack, 10 On demand, 11 After, 12
For, 16 Scheme, 17 In hand, 18
Wed, 23 Foray, 24 Anaconda, 25
Rowdy, 26 Sob story, 27 Stamp.
Down: 2 Long face, 3 Cockeyed, 4
Borneo, 5 Waver, 6 Lilac, 7 Heady,
12 Few, 13 Rid, 14 Shoot-out, 15 In
tandem, 19 Endure, 20 False, 21
Maybe, 22 Booty.

Across

1

Having big-name
cast (3-4)

5 Hemmed in (5)

20
21

Offer feigned respect
(3,3,7)

Swindler (5)

Italian astronomer (7)
Conceit (6)

Vividly imprinted (6)
Persian Gulf
sheikhdom (7)
Scope (5)

Engaged in dispute
(2,11)

Brownish yellow (5)

Rumour (7)














Down

1
2

4 Give up office (6)
5 A precious stone (5)

6 Divulge secrets

11

13
14
16
18



South dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
765
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WEST EAST
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O16
The bidding:
South West North East
Raavouryians) 2NT Pass 3NT All Pass
ae Opening lead — four of clubs.
Command

Experience shows that when a
side has 26 points or more in the
combined hands, a game can nearly
always be made. But mere posses-
sion of these points doesn’t mean the
game is automatically awarded to the
side that has them. There is first the
question of selecting which game to
bid, and then there is the question of
how declarer manages his assets.

Take this case where West led a
club and declarer played low from
dummy, losing the finesse to East’s
king. Back came the jack of spades,

dogmatically (3,4,3,3)
Small personal

ornament (7)



(5,3,5)
Minimal footing (7)




Pulsating with

life (7)

Windpipe (7)
Catch in a net (6)
Heated (5)

Flavoursome (5)
















Gain Versus Loss













NCO M/M/W)/—=/ ORO



MO OW) |N MPM] oO! | &
WRN OOOO |My |=





the queen losing to the king, and a
spade continuation drove out the ace.
When declarer then tried his
third finesse — this time in dia-
monds — East won and cashed his
spades to put South down two.

The hand shows how easy it is to
fall victim to habit. It is admittedly
tempting to finesse West’s opening
club lead, but declarer should put up
the ace more quickly than he can say
Rumpelstiltskin.

Taking the ace assures the con-
tract, while taking the finesse jeop-
ardizes it. The finesse should there-
fore be rejected.

If South were dealing only with
the problem of winning the maxi-
mum number of club tricks, he
would of course finesse. But that is
not his assignment. He is trying to
make three notrump, and he should
not permit himself to be diverted
from that goal by the opportunity to
take a club finesse. Instead, he
should take the ace of clubs, cross to
the ace of hearts, lead the queen of
diamonds and finesse.

If the diamond finesse loses,
South has nine tricks. If it wins, he
has at least 10 tricks. He should not
concern himself with the location of
the king of clubs. The 30 points he
may gain by winning a club finesse
are a drop in the bucket compared to
the value of making a game.

Tomorrow: A positive approach.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.
PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a ee





@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

WITH the challenges of the economic downturn causing
more people to experience stress and depression, many are
turning to the healing powers of aromatherapy. This is
where Julie Hooper, an holistic aroma therapist and owner
of Nature’s Nest says her expertise comes into play.

‘holos' meaning whole.
This means that an holis-
tic aromatherapy treat-
ment works on the whole
person, taking into
account factors such as
lifestyle, diet, medical
history, emotional and
mental state, as well as
their physical side.

promising the quality of her
products

“This is absolutely my calling
and I have found that my back-
ground in marketing has really
helped me a lot. I love sharing the
knowledge,” Mrs Hooper said.

In Mrs Hooper’s body scrub
line there is a whipped sugar
scrub called “Pure” — made with

AROMATHERAPY
candles are made
from soy oil, ava-
cado oil and a
host of other
essential oils that
can either relax or
provide a needed
boost to any

Nature’s Nest Aromatherapy, located on Bay
Street, just west of Arawak Cay, taps the finest
ingredients from the earth using essential oils -
ascented line of pure, premium, eco-friendly
bath, body and home products made in the
Bahamas.

Mrs Hooper said she is committed to natural,
happy, stress-free living for her family and those
she comes into contact with. After experiencing
the power of aromatherapy, Mrs Hooper felt
compelled to take an extensive course of study
to channel her passion towards helping others
achieve a more natural, stress-free lifestyle.

Although Mrs Hooper has earned a Bache-
lor’s Degree in Mass Communications and Pub-
lic Relations from Illinois State University, she
said she found her calling in holistic therapy, and
in 1994, earned certification in holistic aro-
matherapy from The Raworth Centre for Natur-
al Therapies and Sports Medicine in Surrey,
England.

“T practised and honed my skills as I gathered
experience in blending pure essential oils with
other natural ingredients to make a line of prod-
ucts that is now manufactured here in the
Bahamas,” Mrs Hooper said.

Mrs Hooper said she feels that in general peo-
ple are going back to a natural way of living.

“People want to go back to basics and get
away from all the chemicals and artificial stuff
and particularly now in these hard economic
times they want to be able to do things that
mean something for them. They do not want to
spend a lot of money and that is what I am find-
ing that they are doing,” Mrs Hooper said.

Holistic aromatherapy is a subtle, sensitive
therapy with a powerful side, incorporating the
use of 100 per cent pure essential oils. According
to Aromaweb, a website dedicated to aro-
matherapy, holistic comes from the Greek word

It is the fastest stress
release therapy there is and is an excellent way
of treating minor ailments and negative emo-
tional states as well as being extremely effective
as a preventative treatment.

An aromatherapy treatment promotes detoxi-
fication of the body and with it encourages the
natural regenerating and healing process. It is
known to strengthen people against disease, to
increase stamina and can help with convales-
cence and recovery.

Essential oils, the pure essence of a plant,
have been found to provide both psychological
and physical benefits when used correctly and
safely.

Essential oils that are inhaled into the lungs
offer both psychological and physical benefits.
Not only does the aroma of the natural essential
oil stimulate the brain to trigger a reaction, but
when inhaled into the lungs, the natural con-
stituents (naturally occurring chemicals) can
supply therapeutic benefit. When applied physi-
cally to the skin, the oils can be absorbed into
the bloodstream. The constituents of essential
oils can aid in health, beauty and hygiene condi-
tions.

In terms of the history of using this natural
form of therapy in different cultures, the Chi-
nese may have been one of the first cultures to
use aromatic plants for well-being. Their practis-
es involved burning incense to help create har-
mony and balance. Later, the Egyptians invent-
ed a rudimentary distillation machine that
allowed for the crude extraction of cedarwood
oil. It is also thought by some that Persia and
India may have also invented crude distillation
machines, but very little is known. The Egyp-
tians also used infused oils and herbal prepara-
tions for spiritual, medicinal, fragrant and cos-
metic use.

Mrs Hooper said she has no intention of com-

pure cane sugar, a natural exfoli- client.

ate and blended with healing aloe

vera gel. It also contains nourish-

ing avocado oil and hydrating

vegetable glycerin, then scented with natural
plant essences for a treatment to quench the dri-
est of skin, leaving it feeling and looking healthy
and youthful, with a sun-kissed glow.

The cranberry rose scrub is especially beauti-
ful, as it is made with cranberry seed oil, an
essential fatty acid oil that assists in moisture
retention and contributes to lipid barrier protec-
tion of the skin, beautifully scented with rose
absolute pure essential oil.

There is also the silken avocado body lotion —
organic, light and nourishing, that hydrates skin
from head to toe. The body and massage oils,
made with a base of sweet almond or grapeseed
oil, scented with natural plant essences to relax,
revive and exhilarate the senses.

Another one of Mrs Hooper’s creations is a
scented sandalwood fan, to create a fragrant
breeze wherever you are, in church, on a walk,
when you’re feeling jaded — you create the
mood.

The newest product, is organic liquid hand
soap, enriched with aloe vera gel and rosemary
extract, and scented with your favorite essential
oil fragrance.

Eco-friendly is Nature’s Nests’ philosophy.
This is apparent in the soy aromatherapy can-
dles, made with highly sustainable soy wax,
scented with pure plant essences, then packaged
in glass containers that are recyclable and re-fill
able.

Anyone can bring in their favorite container,
and Mrs Hooper will make a candle, in their
favorite colour and scented just the way they
like it, in whatever size desired. Even the melted
wax can be used (which is actually oil) on the
skin for a warm touch of fragrance.

SY GREEN SCENE By GARDENER JACK

Making garden

compost

MANY home gardeners have
a guilty complex about compost.
They know that composting is a
wonderful concept that adds
free goodness to the garden.
The catch is, it involves a lot of
work. A compost pile needs to
be turned very regularly and the
water content kept just so. Turn-
ing compost piles is not the most
enjoyable chore on the home
gardenet’s list of things to do.

I have recently been using a
tumbler-type compost maker
that takes the backache (and
the heartache) out of compost-
ing. It consists of a cylindrical
drum mounted on a framework
with wheels. Materials to be
composted are added through
a lock-down door and the drum
can be easily rotated by pulling
on a series of grooves around
the outside. There are vents to
allow air circulation and a drain
on the opposite side from the
door to allow excess moisture
to escape. Composting made
easy — even for an old man like
me.

The subtropical conditions of
The Bahamas make compost-
ing a quick process. Indeed,

composting is going on all the
time in the garden and by
putting select materials together
in one spot we are only con-
densing the process.

The main principle of com-
posting is to combine high car-
bon materials (brown) with
high nitrogen materials (green)
in the ratio of one part brown to
three parts green. Put the mate-
rials in the tumbler composter,
dampen the mixture lightly, then
spin to mix thoroughly.

Give the tumbler a few spins
every day and in 4-6 weeks you
will have composted soil that
can go straight into your gar-
den.

Green nitrogen materials
include: fruit and vegetable
scraps, coffee grounds and tea
bags, egg shells, weeds (without
seeds), peanut shells, hair, grass
clippings, etc. Brown carbon
materials include: dry grass, saw-
dust, wood ashes, nut shells,
shredded newsprint, tissue
paper, corn cobs, dry leaves, etc.

Materials that should NOT
be used for compost include:
meat, fish, dairy products, oil
and fat, pet waste, bones, and

any processed foods containing
salt (such as spaghetti sauce).

When you add these materials
to the composter in the correct
ratio it is helpful to add a hand-
ful or two of soil or already-pre-
pared compost. The microbes in
the soil will multiply very quick-
ly and begin their job of break-
ing down the materials in the
composter.

The average gardener will
usually not have enough green
and brown materials to make a
full compost right away. If you
have to add new materials every
day you must keep that 3-1 ratio
in mind. Let that ratio get out
of whack, or add too much
water, and your compost will



begin to smell rather bad and
the neighbours will complain.

One of the composting facts of
life is that you will end up with a
distressingly small amount of
compost compared to the vol-
ume of materials you put in.

Your compost is ready when
it has reduced in volume drasti-
cally and has a rich humus scent.
The colour will be dark brown
to almost black.

Compost tumblers cost mon-
ey, of course, and a far cheaper
way to create compost is to dig
holes where you intend to plant
larger vegetables or establish
squash hills. Fill the holes grad-
ually with waste materials in the
3-1 green-to-brown ratio then

A ROTARY
composter
like this one
can produce
new soil
from kitchen
and garden
scraps in
four to six

| weeks.

put back the soil as the compost
reduces in volume. Insert a stick
to remind you of where your
fortified areas are and wait
about a month before sowing
your seeds or transplanting.
Summertime is a good time to
do this so you will be ready for
the new gardening season.

I have had so many requests
recently for my 32-page booklet
Home Gardening in The
Bahamas that I decided to have
a third edition printed. It will
not be available in Nassau but
Green Scene readers can obtain
a copy ($10 post free) by con-
tacting me at Jack Hardy, PO
Box AB-20107, Marsh Harbour,
Abaco.



Malassezia
Dermatitis



THIS IS a common skin
condition that is often seen
in dogs in the Bahamas. It
is caused by a yeast,
MALASSEZIA PACHY-
DERMIS that is normally
found on the skin and ear
canal. It is an opportunistic
pathogen, and usually car-
ries disease when there is
an over growth of the yeast
resulting in dermatitis (skin
infection) and otitis (ear
infection). Malassezia is a
common secondary infec-
tion in dogs with allergies
e.g. atopic dermatitis.
There is a lot of evidence
that a hyper sensitivity
reaction to the yeast may
exist in some dogs, resulting
in extreme pruritus or itch-
ing. Certain breeds have
been reported to be at risk
for developing Malassezia
dermatitis. These breeds
include the German shep-
herd, the Cocker Spaniel,
the Maltese, Poodle,

Chihuahua, Shelties, and
West Highland Terrier.
These same breeds are pre
disposed to atopic dermati-
tis.

CLINICAL SIGNS

Dogs with Malassezia
dermatitis usually are itch-
ing for days and have very
inflamed reddened skin,
which is known as ERY-
THEMA. There is usually
a musty or yeasty odor, and
there may be visible greasy
changes to the skin. The
Skin often becomes licheni-
fied or darkened in affected
areas. Typical clinical signs
include persistent head
shaking and excessive foot
licking. There is usually a
moist and brown discharge
in the ears. This skin con-
dition often begins in the
summer or in highly humid
months, which also corre-
sponds to the allergy sea-
son.

DIAGNOSIS

This is done by a direct
impression smear using a
scalpel blade to collect the
sample. The sample is then
stained with a 3 step diff
—quick. This is called a
cytological examination.

TREATMENT

Since Malassezia der-
matitis is a secondary dis-
ease, one must identify and
treat the primary disease.
The treatment of
Malassezia is individualised
according to seventy and
various dog and owner con-
siderations. Topical therapy
(shampoo) is often effec-
tive, but can be difficult in
large dogs, dogs with long
or thick hair coats or elder-
ly or physically challenged
owners. A combination of
topical and systemic thera-
py would be the most
rapidly and totally effective
measure. The most com-
mon shampoo is
MALASEEB shampoo
and is used daily to twice
weekly.

Call to
advertise:

502-2371
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009, PAGE 9B







rr nee

@



Becoming more assertive

YOU may wonder why
becoming more assertive is
important or in fact relevant in
a loving relationship. You may
think that being in a couple
should be effortless and that
your partner should always
know what you need and want
instinctively. You may very well
feel that you have been togeth-
er so long that they should
know all your likes and dislikes
and wonder why you have to
‘spell out’ out everything to
them. Alternatively, people may
think of you as pushy, loud, out-
spoken or aggressive. Isn't that
just your way of getting what
you want? Isn't that the same as
being assertive? If that is the
case then let me ask you this.
Are you getting what you real-
ly want and need? Are you hap-
py when you get it and was it
given freely? Without a doubt,
relationships are full of com-
promises and deal makings.
What we hope to achieve from
all this negotiating is a com-
fortable and safe place to return
to at the end of a weary day.
At the beginning of a new love
relationship you may have spo-
ken up and expressed your pref-
erences. However as time goes
by the safety of the relationship
often prevents us from rocking
the boat and upsetting our part-
ners. You may feel it is just not
worth changing things and
peace and quiet is all you are
looking for.

But being assertive does not
mean being obnoxious, bully-
ing or aggressive. Assertiveness
is not about having a temper
tantrum like a two year old.

If you often feel like explod-
ing at your partner to get what
you want, not caring about the
consequences then go right
ahead but be prepared to deal
with the aftermath of your
tirade. Being assertive means
directly going after what you
want in an appropriate way.
This means avoiding the
extreme positions of being so
passive and compliant that your
needs are never considered or



met. Or the other extreme of
being so overbearing and
aggressive that you trample on
the feelings and rights of oth-
ers. Now on reading this you
may well consider this a deli-
cate path to walk or even an
impossible one to walk in your
present relationship. But this is
not so. The path of assertive-
ness is wide and one that is easy
to walk once you find the way
to negotiate it. The most impor-
tant requirements are to
acknowledge the need for
change and to then be motivat-
ed to make the appropriate
changes. A few basic steps to
keep in mind are timing as
being angry, tired or in a hurry
are not the best times to state
your requests. However, being
fearful for the right time and
over analyzing your partner's
mood is self-defeating. Focus
on your feelings and desires
instead of your partners. Use
the ‘I language’ meaning 'T feel
this’ or 'I'd like that’. It makes
the listener less defensive and
makes your words less accus-
ing. Remember the aim is to
encourage effective talking and
listening. This softens the situ-
ation and remember the ulti-
mate goal is to have your needs
met and at the same time to

honor your partner and listen
with empathy to their prefer-
ences and opinions.

On reading this you may feel
that this all sounds so kind and
considerate and essentially
impossible to attain. However,
we do know that happy couples
talk to each other like this. They
still assert themselves, get angry,
raise their voices and sometimes
even yell. The main and signifi-
cant difference is that they do
not play dirty. They do not
name call, belittle their part-
ners, generalise their criticisms,
or are sarcastic or contempeous.
There may in fact be some pos-
itive comments throughout the
conflict. So if it can work for
these people why can it not
work for you? Imagine if things
could improve in other aspects
of life that you would then feel
comfortable and confident to
say what you wanted in your
intimate life. We all know that
when we get what we want we
are happier and our partners
often reflect our happiness.
Once you know that it is possi-
ble and you can see the bond
deepening then your desire to
stay in this safe haven will only
continue. If these difficulties
have been going on for some
time and you still have not been
able to improve things then this
is when a relationship therapist
is able to help. Some times we
all have problems seeing anoth-
er person's point of view and it
takes an impartial party to help
see the way for a working com-
promise. Take care and be good
to yourself because we all
deserve happiness.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual
and Couples Relationship Thera-
pist. She is a Registered Nurse
and a Certified Clinical Sex Thera-
pist located at The Centre for
Renewing Relationships,
Grosvenor's Close West. She can
be contacted by calling 356-7983
or by e-mail at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or at
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com

@ By ALEX MISSICK



Tribune Features Reporter

MANY Bahamians are not known to be “nut
savvy” and tend to shy away from anything other
than the common peanut. Some were even scared
away from nuts during the low-fat craze of the last
few decades due to some nuts being high in oil and
calories, but now nuts are making a comeback.

NUTS

Loretta Simmons, manager of Just Nuts, located on Madeira
Street, is dedicated to offering a healthier lifestyle to Bahamians.
Mrs Simmons said she first saw the benefits of nuts back when she

was in the financial sector.

“T used to be a banker in a private trust company. I started selling
junk food from my desk drawer and one of my colleagues asked me

one day to sell something healthy. My first invest-
ment was around $50 because I thought it would-
n’t sell and surprisingly it was all gone within a

day,” Mrs Simmons said.

Mrs Simmons’ wide variety of nuts and seeds
come from places all over the world and she
enjoys spreading the wide variety.

“We get most of our products from the United
States, but we do have dates from Turkey, raw
cashews from India, and a few things out of Thai-

land,” Mrs Simmons said.

Nuts are excellent sources of protein, minerals,
"good" monounsaturated fats and other nutrients,
and they are good for the heart. Nuts are one of
the best plant sources of protein. They are rich in
fiber, phytonutrients and antioxidants such as Vit-

amin E and selenium.

The type of nut a person eats is not that impor-
tant, although some nuts have more heart-healthy
nutrients and fats than do others. Walnuts,
almonds, hazelnuts, Brazilian, almost every type
of nut has a lot of nutrition packed into a tiny
package. If someone has heart disease, eating nuts
instead of a less healthy snack can make it easier

to follow a heart-healthy diet.

Mrs Simmons does not just offer plain nuts, but
mixes a few of her nuts with raisins or makes dif-
ferent blends with a variety of flavors.

“We do blends like the tropical splash, which
consists of cranberries, almonds and banana chips.
We have the mango passion which has a mixture
of dried fruits and nuts, however, our biggest sell-
er is the almond and cranberry blend. We also have seeds such as
flax, sunflower and pumpkin seeds,” Mrs Simmons said.

Eating nuts reduces the risk of developing blood clots that can
cause a fatal heart attack. Nuts also improve the health of the lining
of the arteries. The evidence for the heart-health benefits of nuts is
not rock solid yet. The Food and Drug Administration only allows
food companies to say evidence "suggests but does not prove" that
eating nuts reduces heart disease risk.

To continue to spread the word about the health benefits of nuts,
Mrs Simmons said she has also started making baskets and party

trays to better serve her clients.

Purchase TWO Jumbo Pull-Ups

training pants plus ONE Pull-Ups

Clean Team Wipes. Circle the items on

your original store receipt(s}. Answer the “=

skill question. Deposit receipt(s) and completed
entry form into box provided at participating stores
or drop off to The d’Albenas Agency, Palmdale.

Contest ends April 6, 2009.

@® Registered trademark of Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.

Name:

Address:

Telephone:

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vacation for 4 to

Prize includes airfe
accommodations valued o
*3,000 plus ‘1,000 to spend.

Win a family vacation for 4 to Orlando from

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provides a wide
variety of nuts,
dried fruits and
veggies. All in an
effort to promote
terme AAG]
nee) ASS



rt
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4

Employees of The d‘Albenas Agency and Media Enterprises or their immediate families are not eligible to enter the contest.

To enter, attach store receipt(s) for
ONE Huggies Supreme and ONE
Huggies wipes or TWO Huggies
Snug&Dry and ONE Huggies wipes,
answer the skill question, attach
receipt(s) to your completed entry
and drop into the entry box at
participating stores or at The
d’Albenas Agency, Palmdale.
Contest ends April 6, 2009.

Employees of The d’Albenas Agency and Media Enterprises, and

‘their immediate families, are not eligible to enter.




















PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





a

P

a

Who’s your daddy?

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IT SEEMS that for many Bahamian
men and women, the choice to pur-
posely cheat on their companion has
become the norm, especially where
many need not search to identify an
illegitimate child or the third wheel of
a co-existing relationship.

This week, the Barbershop is
attempting to learn why the choice of
‘sweethearting’ has become so accept-
able, and to what extent it impacts
future generations.

Stopping in at Barber Js precision
cuts on Carmichael Road, Tribune
Features spoke with a group of people
with interesting yet insightful opinions
on the issue.

First up was 32-year-old Barber
Antonio Williams, aka Rabbi, who
feels people decide to cheat because
they are attempting to fill a void that
existed in their relationships. Mr
Williams who is also married, said at
one time he thought that people only
cheated in response to their mate
doing so, and added that with men
especially, although a guy may decide
to cheat on his wife or girlfriend, it is
often too much for him to handle the
same fate.

However Mr Williams insist, a guy
who decides to cheat will do so when
there is something lacking in his main
relationship.

22-year-old beautician Angelica Stu-
art agrees that people cheat when
there is something missing in their rela-
tionship, however is concerned that
far too often men are given less flack
for cheating than women, which for
her is a serious problem.

When a man decides to take on an
extramarital affair for whatever reason,
Angelica said the worst reaction would
be his friends looking at him as a play-
boy, which really isn’t much of a back-
lash. However if a women should do
the same thing, then society would
look at her as a bad person.

Angelica who is also recently
engaged, said her relationship was
recently tested when an anonymous
young woman telephoned her fiancé
claiming to be his other woman.

“When she called, I answered the
phone, then she hung up on me. When
she called back, he answered, and they
were able to have a conversation.”

She said although she did automat-
ically think there was something fishy
about the call, she did what she
thought was best by confronting her
fiancé.

As Angelica and her mate have

66 Some people
learn trom what
happen to them,
while others say
it that's how my

old man was then
| will do it too. 9?

since been able to work things out,
some couples unfortunately experi-
ence a more substantial and damag-
ing result of sweet hearting, in the form
of an illegitimate child.

According to the 2000 Census
report, there were 13,643 single moth-
er headed households. Although some
of these may have resulted from a
divorce or death, there is without ques-
tion some contribution from the grow-
ing problem of ad-hoc relationships.

One patron who said he was a direct
result of this was 28-year-old William
Sears, who said while growing up he

always said to himself that he would
never become the kind of man his
father was.

“Some people learn from what hap-
pen to them, while others say if that’s
how my old man was then I will do it
too.”

Identifying the fact that many young
men in the community who come from
single parent houscholds see having
more than one partner as something of
the norm, William fears that the result
of that type of mentality will have a
detrimental affect on future young
Bahamians.

He said his experience of growing up
without a father made him question
on many occasions his place in the
world, and added that he would hate
to see another person go through the
same thing.

William who has one child with his
live-in girlfriend, also takes on a father-
ly role with her two other children.
He said that his way of bringing an
end to this community issue is to lend
his time and support to the children,
and to remind men that cheating at
any level is wrong, and in the end has
far reaching effects.

To comment on this latest Barber-
shop series, or to have your barber
shop featured in our next issue, email
lallen@tribunemedia.net.



Antonio ‘Rabbi’ Williams



Women and real estate - Managing your money

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

FOR many women particularly sin-
gles, managing money in this current
economic climate may prove chal-
lenging and a bit bewildering partic-
ularly with horror stories of persons
losing investments due to companies
falling bankrupt.

However, for the single woman
looking to invest, real estate remains
one of the surest and safest ways to
ensure a return of your hard earned
cash.

Marketing manager at King’s Real-
ty- Laurie Burrows, told Tribune
Woman that the company has seen a

SSeS SSS
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

OPERATIONS MANAGER

The Operations Manager will be responsible for the development, harmonization
and implementation of revised operational policies and procedures throughout
our branch and unit network. The ideal candidate will have strong leadership
and communication skills and bring focus to the operational needs of all
branches by providing support to customer service initiatives, regulatory
reporting and compliance, review of branch administrative controls, as well
as the development of collective operational goals for branch administrative

personnel.

Core Responsibilities:

definite increase in the amount of
women looking to invest and said
that a popular trend is to purchase
property in one of the island’s new
gated communities.

“Gated communities are great
investment opportunities because
they are sure to appreciate in value
and they have many of the amenities
that single women are looking for.
When you think about women, you
are thinking about a comfortable
price point.”

Ms Burrows said that despite the
economy, banks are still willing to
lend to persons and there are excel-
lent interest rates to be had once per-
sons are able to qualify.

“Different banks have different
options, you may even be able to get
a no deposit down, and some banks
are Offering 25-year-terms, so that
you can get the best monthly repay-
ment plan for you.

“A lot of women are choosing gat-
ed communities as a choice. For
example in Serenity, one of our
newest communities, women like the
fact that there is 24-hour security, a
clubhouse, gated entry, tennis and
basketball courts, a library and a
swimming pool. Serenity will also
eventually have pre schools for resi-
dents, so for women particularly sin-
gle mothers, it is an excellent invest-
ment because they are buying into a

community.

Additionally, Ms Burrows
explained that all of the amenities
are covered under a very reasonable
yearly maintenance fee, and noted
that if purchased separately would
add up to a great deal more.

“Extra expenses in the household is
definitely a factor for single women
interested in purchasing real estate,”
she added.

Another avenue, some women are
taking is to purchase a duplex prop-
erty, which enables them to live in a
one half, while using the second half
as income that they can then apply to
the mortgage.

Kingsley Edgecombe, the head of

King’s Realty noted that the value
of many of the gated communities in
Nassau have already seen significant
appreciation -in some cases where
lots were initially sold for $65,000
within a year they were selling at
$100,000 and in another case, where
lots were initially priced at $85,000
they have seen the price jump to at
least $125,000 within a year.

He added that this is an ideal time
for investing. He noted for example,
that Serenity, is priced below mar-
ket value, because in this time of eco-
nomic challenges, the developers
want to be able to cater in some way
to locals- the regular person who
wants to capitalise on their future.

SSeS SSeS ee
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

BRANCH MANAGER

The Branch Manager will be responsible for the day to day achievement of
the branch’s sales and service goals. The ideal candidate will have strong
leadership and communication skills and bring focus to the execution of the
branch business plan, inclusive of sales administration and the overall
development of branch staff.

Core Responsibilities:

Responsible for the quality and efficiency of all branch customer service
initiatives for all credit and deposit products and services

Contributes to the revision and implementation of the Bank’s policies and
procedures

Reviewing and making recommendations for the improvement in
Management Reporting

Identifying areas of opportunity for improvement of operating efficiency
Prepares and submits Reports on all banking operations to Senior
Management

Monitor Branch performances against approved targets

Monitors compliance of operations with Bank’s policies and procedures,
as well as recommendations made by internal audit and external parties
Ensures Bank is operating in accordance with regulatory requirements
Liaising with departmental heads to maintain database of recommendations
and request of operational changes

Assist in establishing operational objectives and monitoring the achievement
of the objectives

Reviewing operations job descriptions and functions in accordance with
ongoing operational changes.

Job Requirements:

* Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.
Knowledge of Banking laws, including requirements of The Central Bank
of The Bahamas which governs Commercial Banking.
Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced environment
Strong supervisory and customer service skills are essential.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include:

Competitive salary and benefits package, commensurate with work experience
and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later than March 31st,
2009 to:

DA # 69842
c/oThe Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com



Assists in the development of Branch targets for retail sales and operations
Provides leadership in the attainment of all branch sales and service goals,
Ensure that the Branch is operating in accordance with the Bank’s policies
and procedures and all regulatory requirements including but not limited
to Central Bank and AML.

Serves as lead customer service advocate at the branch level

Provides guidance to staff, where necessary on all service matters, ensuring
that customer needs are heard, understood and resolved

Ensuring staff’s awareness and use of bank product information
Responsible for all branch sales initiatives, inclusive of management of
the branch loan and deposit portfolio and mitigating Bank exposure
Responsible for reporting to Senior Management on the overall operations
of the Branch including financial and non-financial matters;

Provides leadership in the personal development of all branch staff through
the articulation and achievement of the Bank’s goals and objectives
Identifies skill deficiencies and opportunities for training for all Branch
staff

Job Requirements:

Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.

Knowledge of Banking laws, including requirements of The Central Bank
of The Bahamas which governs Commercial Banking.

Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced
environment

Strong supervisory and customer service skills are essential.

Excellent verbal and written communication skills.

Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include:

Competitive salary and benefits package commensurate with work experience
and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later than March 31*,
2009 to:

DA# 69842A
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com
THE TRIBUNE




AY



ORLANDO
































_ High:78° F/26°C” Plenty of sun. Patchy clouds. as a with Clouds and sunshine. Partly sunny. acne
how: ee a a , , , :
w~ “s High: 79 High: 81 High: 79 High: 79
© e High: 82° Low: 71° Low: 71° Low: 69° Low: 68° Low: 67°
j Ser vee ae Ea AccuWeather RealFeel
igh: 78° F/26° oy ¢ [88°-69°F 84°-68° F
Low: 64° F/18°C ‘ - ,: = The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel eT is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
. @ ra o- elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.
ay mow
* yt :
IW “es Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
{ ABACO Temperature
y Ne HiQh cane eee 82° F/28° C
f ma. High: 80° F/27°C Low... 70° F/21° C
a e 1 oy Low: 67° F/19°C Normal high... 79° F/26° C
- Normal low 65° F/18° C
” @WESTPALMBEACH . Last year's High ....ssecccsesccsssseessseeee 88° F/31° C
ae High: 80° F/27°C Last year's OW. oooecccccsseccscessseeeeeee 69° F/20° C
Low: 65° F/18°C @ i Precipitation,
As of 2 p.m. yesterday ......cccccccccccenseeceneee 0.00"
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT — Yeartodate 2. as. ,
High: 84° F/29° C High: 77° F/25° C Normal year to date oo. 4.33"
Low.6s"F20°c an Low: 65° F/18° C
; AccuWeather.com

®. .
. TT

High: 82° F/28° C

Low: 69°F/21°C NASSAU

ta Low: 71° F/22°C
«<7 a

KEY WEST
High: 78° F/26° C —_
Low: 70°F/21°C por’
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= ) on
ea
ANDROS

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's : Oe
highs and tonights's lows. High: 86° F/30° C

Low: 67° F/19°C



High: 82° F/28° C

GREAT EXUMA

ELEUTHERA
High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 67° F/19°C

High: 81° F/27° C

Low: 70° F/21°C

Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W

F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 70/21 44/6 s 72/22 43/6 s Indianapolis 73/22 48/8 s 65/18 33/0 sh Philadelphia 55/12 40/4 pe
Anchorage 24/-4 11/-11 s 23/-5 10/-12 Jacksonville 71/21 5412 pe 73/22 54/12 pc Phoenix 87/30 58/14 $s
Atlanta 72/22 49/9 pe 69/20 50/10 s Kansas City 78/25 51/0 s 63/17 36/2 t Pittsburgh 65/18 46/7 s
Atlantic City 49/9 38/3 pce 58/14 42/5 pc Las Vegas 80/26 54/12 s 83/28 56/13 s Portland, OR 52/11 40/4 sh
Baltimore 54/12 40/4 pe 6417 43/6 pc Little Rock 73/22 50/10 s 79/26 49/9 s Raleigh-Durham 60/15 40/4 pc
Boston 44/6 351 s 56/13 41/5 pc Los Angeles 74/23 54/12 s 77/25 56/13 $s St. Louis 76/24 53/11 s
Buffalo 58/14 45/7 s§ 56/13 33/0 1 Louisville 70/21 48/8 s 74/23 43/6 pc Salt Lake City 62/16 38/3 c
Charleston, SC 68/20 47/8 pce 72/22 50/10 pc Memphis 74/23 52/1 pe 73/22 50/10 s San Antonio 82/27 54/12 $s
Chicago 73/22 42/5 s§ 57/13 30/-1 1 Miami 82/27 68/20 pc 79/26 67/19 pc San Diego 70/21 56/13 pc
Cleveland 66/18 46/7 s 6116 33/0 1 Minneapolis 58/14 37/2 s 47/8 26/-3 pc San Francisco 64/17 48/8 pc
Dallas 80/26 55/12 s 81/27 51/10 s Nashville 74/23, 47/8 pe 73/22 47/8 s Seattle 48/8 39/3 sh
Denver 72/22 33/0 pe 58/14 31/0 pc New Orleans 74/23 55412 pe 76/24 54/12 s Tallahassee 76/24 53/11 pe
Detroit 65/18 45/7 § 56/13 32/0 1 New York 5442 42/5 pe 55/12 46/7 pc Tampa 78/25 60/15 c
Honolulu 78/25 64/17 c¢ 79/26 70/21 sh Oklahoma City 83/28 54/12 s 78/25 41/5 $s Tucson 83/28 51/10 s
Houston 80/26 56/13 s 78/25 56/13 s Orlando 78/25 62/16 c 79/26 61/16 pc Washington, DC 54/12 43/6 pc

Wednesday

High
F/C
63/17
89/31
69/20
54/12
67/19
71/21
61/16
80/26
70/21
65/18
51/10
75/23
79/26
85/29
67/19

Low

F/C
44/6
60/15
33/3
41/5
46/7
39/3
39/3
56/13
56/13
49/9
40/4
52/11
60/15
52/11
45/7

WwW

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pe
pe

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Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009

CATISLAND

High: 81° F/27° C
Low: 64° F/18°C

O



A "ar NY

5 az
: | g|i0 1

o|1|2

LOW



MODERATE

3|4|5



6|7

HIGH



\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

ea Po

High
ion Bae
Wednesday | an
Thursday ay
Ba ins

TT re

Sunrise...... 717 am. Moonrise... . 12:55 a.m.

Sunset....... 7:20 p.m. Moonset... . 11:28 a.m.
Last New First Full

Mar. 18 Mar. 26

SAN SALVADOR

O

High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 67°F/19°C

LONGISLAND
High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 67° F/19°C

2

MAYAGUANA
High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 66° F/19° C

CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS

RAGGED ISLAND
High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 65° F/18° C

High: 86° F/30° C

Low: 69° F/21°C

GREAT INAGUA .

High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 69° F/21°C

O

Ht.(fi.) Low

25 7:08 a.m.
2.1 7:06 p.m.
24 8:03 a.m.
2.0 8:03 p.m.
2.3 9:04 a.m.
2.0 9:06 p.m.
2.3 10:04 a.m.
2.0 10:11 p.m.

Apr. 2

0.5
0.4

0.6
0.5

0.6
0.5

0.6
0.5



Apr. 9







rhe
=~



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

lr NOR S

alii

High
F/C
88/31
50/10
43/6
60/15
72/22
95/35
84/28
61/16
79/26
64/17
45/7
49/9
69/20
65/18
57/13
45/7
79/26
72/22
93/33
38/3
86/30
82/27
81/27
47/8
54/12
57/13
59/15
34/1
86/30
36/2
77/25
86/30
50/10
56/13
72/22
85/29
83/28
59/15
70/21
84/28
73/22
81/27
50/10
34/1
48/8
83/28
90/32
36/2
59/15
48/8
83/28
88/31
61/16
82/27
88/31
90/32
88/31
84/28
82/27
59/15
36/2
77/25
79/26
61/16
54/12
90/32
46/7
48/8
37/2
33/0



Wednesday

High
F/C
87/30
46/7
45/7
58/14
73/22
91/32
85/29
60/15
81/27
62/16
41/5
43/6
67/19
65/18
54/12
47/8
79/26
73/22
95/35
46/7
86/30
84/28
78/25
45/7
55/12
52/11
59/15
44/6
82/27
36/2
79/26
84/28
44/6
56/13
70/21
83/28
82/27
57/13
70/21
88/31
70/21
84/28
48/8
34/1
47/8
84/28
91/32
34/1
57/13
44/6
83/28
86/30
61/16
81/27
89/31
90/32
90/32
82/27
82/27
57/13
36/2
79/26
80/26
66/18
51/10
86/30
48/8
42/5
36/2
28/-2

Low
F/C
73/22
38/3
30/-1
44/6
63/17
77/25
75/23
48/8
50/10

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

sh

wn
=

pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

SSA a er






MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
Wednesday: S at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
Wednesday: S at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
Wednesday: S$ at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73°F



,Uos/Angeles

S7a/54
» Atlanta
72/49

Showers
T-storms

82/68

Rain Fronts

Flurries " ‘ pan ; CO"
own are noon positions of weather systems an a

Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. am

Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meeg—eli







-0s Os 10s 20s [B0s!! 40s



-10s



‘A (3) Pw

Never start

neni without us!

“CO eS. tO Auto Insurance,
sadtienitte smart choice is
surance Management.

‘| eople you can trust.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(A (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

“New Provien Grond mn Abaco | Eleuthera Exum
Tt (042) 502-0400 | Te: (242) 350-3500 i (242) 367-4204 | Tel: (242) 332-2862 | Tel: (242) 336-2304

ae.

Our








THE TRIBUNE
| : a

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 2009



Discover the goodness
of Ovaltine.

Ovaltine’s unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway e 394-1759