Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
WEATHER

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Volume: 105 No.94





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SEE INSIGHT SECTION



ANY



The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=USA TODAY.



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009







in daylignt attack

Father-of-five
is killed while
playing dominoes

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

A GAME of
dominoes turned
deadly yesterday
when a man was shot [Re ®

in the head during a
brazen daylight
attack.

People in Bain Town and
Grants Town were left
shocked after an otherwise
peaceful Sunday afternoon
was shattered by the killing of
an Augusta Street man.

Up to press time last night,
police were searching for his
killer.

The victim - Mark 'Scabby'’
Daniels - was playing domi-
noes with friends outside a
building in Finlayson Street
when a gunman approached
and shot Daniels in the head.

When police arrived a short
time later - around 1pm - they
found Daniels on the porch of
a single-storey white and



Mark Daniels

green wooden build-
ing where he report-
edly worked as an
auto-mechanic.

The father-of-five,
said to be in his mid-
30s, was found lying
on his back dressed
in a black short-
sleeved shirt and
short green trousers.

Emergency per-
sonnel pronounced
him dead at the

scene.

Family and friends con-
verged on the house and
screamed in anguish as offi-
cials carried Daniels’ body
away.

With her voice breaking
with tears, Daniels’ niece told
the media he was a hard-
working handyman who
always helped his friends.

"My uncle was a very help-
ful person. Anybody who
wanted their car fixed could
go to him and he was willing
to help everybody.

“My uncle was a builder,

SEE page 10

Tel: 394-1378

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CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY MARCH

Felipé Major/Tribune sta

_——— =

LITTLE TOPAZ CULMER waves her flag yesterday during a march to
commemorate the Church of God of Prophecy’s 100 year convention.
The event was held under the theme ‘Awake, Let’s Celebrate’.

¢ SEE PAGE TWO

Teen dead, two others in
hospital after traffic accident

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

lost control and crashed into a
wooden utility pole and a two-
storey concrete building.

Police also believe that the
vehicle caught fire after it
crashed but was extinguished by
people in the area before fire-
fighters arrived.

When police were called to
the scene around lam, they saw
a two-door Hyundai Accent,
licence 124153, with a driver and

SEE page 11

A GRUESOME traffic acci-
dent left a 16-year-old boy dead
and two others fighting for their
lives in hospital.

The tragedy occurred shortly
before lam on Saturday on East
Street near East Street Gospel
Chapel.

Police believe the 18-year-old
driver was attempting to over-
take another vehicle when he

Sausage & Egg
Burrito




SS

Police search for
teacher accused
of molesting
former students

Expat ‘no longer in
the jurisdiction’



m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police are
searching for the former
Eight Mile Rock High
School teacher who is
accused of molesting two

former male students.

Asst Supt Clarence Reck-
ley, press liaison officer, said
yesterday that the teacher is
no longer in the jurisdiction
and is being sought by
police.

“We should have more
information concerning the
matter this week,” said Mr
Reckley.

The expatriate teacher,
who was employed as an art
teacher at EMR High, is
accused of sexually molest-
ing the students over an
eight-year period, which

Tourism initiatives
‘will prove gloomy

forecast wrong’
@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Tourism Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace is confident his ministry's ini-

SEE page 10

started while they were in
the seventh grade.

The teacher was sent to
New Providence after alle-
gations surfaced in January,
and was placed on proba-
tionary leave pending inves-
tigations by the Ministry of
Education.

Police conducted investi-
gations and forwarded
details to the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office for determina-
tion.

Last week, Asst Commis-
sioner Marvin Dames said
the AG’s office granted the
fiat, giving approval to pros-
ecute the teacher.

The teacher, from
Trinidad, resigned last
month and is no longer in
the Bahamas.

EMR PTA president
Troy Garvey, who brought
the matter to the public,
believes there are more vic-
tims at the school.



Minister Vincent
tiatives are enough to counter a recent gloomy Yanderpool-Wallace
prediction on the country's tourism industry.
Last week the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC),
a leading global tourism organisation, forecast that the country's



Former PLP parliamentarian is ‘not
impressed’ by ‘anger’ over Tribune article

WHILE complaining that
others are robbing them of
their history, Bahamians are



den Pindling’s alleged links
with Colombian drug czar
Joe Lehder, and were unwill-
also guilty of this by choos- ing to have a dispassionate
ing not to “confront the dif- debate about Pindling’s lega-
ficult truth”, former PLP cy
parliamentarian Dr Elwood
Donaldson told The Tribune
yesterday.

Dr Donaldson said he was
“not impressed” by those
who expressed a high level
of “anger and anxiety” over
The Tribune’s controversial
Insight article about Sir Lyn-








“It’s superstition, this idea
that you cannot speak about
the dead. I think that any-
thing that is a part of history
is a part of history and I
don’t understand the furore
surrounding this,” he said.

SEE page 11











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PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY



ia THE Shuaas CHOICE WHEN
‘OL RE HUNGRY FOR VALUE

MARCH MARKS

100 YEAR

CONVENTION

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

MUSIC AND COLOUR abounded yesterday dur-
ing a march to commemorate the Church of God
of Prophecy’s 100 year convention. The event
was held under the theme ‘Awake, Let’s Cele-

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THE TRIBUNE

0 In brief

Search for
most wanted
person on

Grand Bahama.

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net_

FREEPORT -— Grandi
Bahama police are still }
searching for Garin Gibson }
who is now their number one }
most wanted person on the }

island.

Asst Supt Clarence Reck-
ley said Gibson is wanted for }
questioning about several }
offences in connection with ;

illegal firearms.

“We want to thank the
public and the media for their
assistance in the recapture of ;

Samiko Rigby last week.

“We continue to look out :
for Garin Gibson who is the }
number one person on our }
wanted list on Grandi
Bahama, and we are seeking }
the public’s assistance in try-
ing to capture him,” he said. :

Gibson is considered }
armed and dangerous. Any- :
one with information is
asked to contact police at 911 ;

or 352-9774/5.
¢ FIREARM ARREST

ASP Reckley reported that
two people were arrested for ;
firearm possession on Sun-

day.

green truck.

During a search of the }
vehicle, officers allegedly dis- :
covered a .45 pistol with sev- }
en live rounds of ammuni- }
tion and a black 9mm Smith :
and Wesson pistol with 12 }

live rounds of ammunition.

The two occupants, both :
37, were taken into custody :
and will be charged before }

the court next week.

Mr Reckley said a firearm
was turned in to police last :

Thursday.

He reported that a resident
found a 9mm pistol with nine ;
live rounds of ammunition }

while at Discovery Bay.

Mr Reckley commended
the resident for turning the ;

weapon over to police.

¢ BREAK-IN

Police arrested a man who }
was allegedly caught climb- :
ing out of the drive through :
window at the rear of:

Wendy’s Restaurant.

ASP Reckley said the :
alarm at Wendy’s was acti- }
vated around 3.23am on Sat- :

urday.

Officers found the suspect, :
who is now being questioned :
in connection with several :
other shop break-ins in the :

area.

e A couple were arrested
at their home in Freeport for :
breach of the Shop Licence }

Act.

woman.

Charges are expected to be
filed against the couple this

week.

¢ Mr Reckley noted that }
of 38 persons arrested for }
various offences last week,
22 persons were charged by }

police.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE

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Pa ete
322-2157

Sometime around 2.13am,
as a result of information :
received, police stopped a }

Around 8pm on Sunday }
police executed a search war- :
rant at Caravel Beach, where }
they arrested a man and:

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Tourism
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
does not see recently relaxed
travel measures to Cuba as an
immediate threat to the
Bahamas’ tourism industry.

However, he said the indus-
try must prepare for the even-
tual end of an American trav-
el ban to the communist
nation and remain competi-
tive by developing unique
branding of the Bahamas'
Family Islands.

His comments came days
after the United States gov-
ernment passed a $410 billion
spending bill, part of which
included policies that will
allow Cuban-Americans to
travel legally to their home-
land to visit relatives once a
year and spend up to $179 per
day. Previously, Cuban-
Americans could only travel
to Cuba every three years and



















































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“We have a variety of islands that
we have never really developed to
the stage that we need to develop
them and to differentiate one from
the other so that we have a lot
more varied products on the
shelf to deal with the Cuba's

when they open.”



Minister of Tourism

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

spend no more than $50 a
day.

Senator Vanderpool-Wal-
lace saw these measures were
more of a humanitarian effort
than a move that will generate
increased tourism to Cuba.
Still, his ministry is focused
on product development and
island branding to counter
inevitable competition from
emerging markets, he said.

"Make no mistake about it,

in our lifetimes we are going
to see travel from the United
States to Cuba relax consid-
erably and we have always
taken the posture that we
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focused on our own promo-
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why we have to get many peo-
ple in the Bahamas to under-
stand is that the Bahamas is a
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MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Relaxed travel measures to
Cuba ‘not an immediate threat’

islands that we have never
really developed to the stage
that we need to develop them
and to differentiate one from
the other so that we have a
lot more varied products on



the shelf to deal with the
Cuba's when they open," he
said.

The senator highlighted that
part of Cuba's attractiveness -
the country saw tourism
growth 5.2 per cent in the first
two months of 2009, com-
pared to the same period last
year - lies in the lower com-
parative cost to get there.

"Tt reinforces what I'm say-
ing, if you take a look at the
cost of a vacation in Cuba
from the same markets, for
the cost to come to many oth-
er places including the
Bahamas - it's better value.
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nowadays in this global envi-
ronment more than anything
else."

He said the ministry is
looking at ways to lower the
cost of getting to the
Bahamas.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Pindling’s birth still questioned

“THE broad mass of a nation,” wrote Hitler
in Mein Kampf, “will more easily fall victim to
a big lie than to a small one.”

If the story now in circulation about the late
Sir Lynden Pindling’s birth is a lie, then it is
certainly a big lie and one that for more than 36
years has not only stuck, but is now the subject
of national debate.

All we know for certain is that Arnold Pin-
dling, a Jamaican recruited for the Bahamas
Police Force, was the late Sir Lynden’s father.
They could not deny each other, because they
looked so much alike. We always believed that
Mrs. Viola Pindling, daughter of Captain Bain,
a well-known Andros boat captain, was his
mother. We had no reason to doubt this until
one day in 1973 the phone on our desk rang. A
voice at the other end said it wanted to tip us off
to the fact that then prime minister Pindling
was not a Bahamian, but a “blankety-blank
Jamaican.” Viola Bain Pindling was not his
mother. It was alleged that he was born of a
Jamaican woman, fathered by Arnold Pindling
and adopted into the Pindling household. There
was some question as to whether he was born in
the Bahamas or in Jamaica.

Normally we would have dismissed this as
information coming from a crank. But the fact
that the “tip” had come right from the heart of
the PLP caused us to start asking discrete ques-
tions.

The rumour spread like wildfire. We pub-
lished nothing, but continued our enquiries.

Before Independence all Bahamians were
citizens of the United Kingdom and Colonies.
After Independence in 1973, the only persons
who could claim Bahamian citizenship were
those born in the Bahamas or naturalised. As
government poked and probed into the private
lives of Bahamians, or persons who had always
thought they were Bahamians, many lives were
cruelly torn asunder — especially families who
did not profess to being PLP.

It all came to a head when on September 19,
1973 Clarence Town MP Michael Lightbourn
claimed on the floor of the House that “appar-
ently” there was no record in the Registry of the
prime minister’s birth on March 22, 1930 to his
parents Arnold Franklin Pindling and Viola
Melba Bain Pindling.

Mr Lightbourn was certain there was a logi-
cal explanation. He called on government to
investigate the status of all House and Senate
members in view of former St Barnabas MP
Sinclair Outten’s disclosure that he was born in
Turks Island.



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Pandora’s box had been pried open. A week
later prime minister Pindling called a press con-
ference at which he not only abused Mr Light-
bourn, but denied his allegations. He produced
a photo copy of his birth certificate which
showed a registration date of February 25, 1947
— 17 years after his date of birth. Asked for sup-
porting affidavits, usually given by persons able
to attest to the birth — mother, nurse, doctor,
close friend — Sir Lynden said he was not pre-
pared to go beyond the birth certificate.

According to Sir Lynden it was discovered
that his birth had not been registered when he
was preparing to go away to school. Such dis-
coveries were not unusual in New Providence,
unlike the Family Islands, which kept near to
perfect records of births and deaths. Nor was it
unusual to later swear affidavits to affirm a
birth with supporting evidence to get it on the
register.

Mr Pindling was in difficulty. He did not
belong to a church that kept baptismal records.
However, he said that there was a certain church
that did have a record of his birth. Unfortu-
nately, however, that church had since burned
down, records and all.

His explanation was received with derision.
He could not prove his birth other than to pre-
sent a certificate attested to by his father,
Arnold.

The PLP is noted for its vicious in-fighting. If
anyone objected to a Pindling edict he was
reviled, abused, and his reputation smeared.
Eventually he was ostracised.

Sir Lynden seemed to spend more time on
party in-fighting and destroying his perceived
enemies than governing the country.

One only has to tune in to the Internet today
to see how viciously the PLP are still tearing
each other apart — even their leader and former
prime minister Perry Christie has been dis-
missed with the greatest disrespect. Dr Bernard
Nottage, one of those defending Sir Lynden’s
name last week, must remember how his repu-
tation was butchered when he decided to run
against Sir Lynden’s chosen successor for party
leadership. As a result Dr Nottage left the PLP
and started his own party.

If this rumour about Sir Lynden’s birth is a
lie, then it is one of Hitler’s big lies used to
damage Sir Lynden where he was known with-
in his own party to be most vulnerable.

If a lie, it is a lie that has come back to haunt
the party that gave it birth and to tarnish the
myth that the PLP has since tried to build
around the “Father of the Nation.”



position of

REQUIREMENTS

sheet.

RESPONSIBILITIES

A suggestion
for making
the NIB more

accountable

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Press reports indicate that the
National Insurance Board is on
the attack against businesses and
individuals that have not paid
their National Insurance premi-
ums on behalf of their staff.

One high profile case alleged-
ly owes them over $400,000.
Shocking to say the least.

While the offenders should be
prosecuted to the full extent of
the law, if for no other reason
than to show that we are all
accountable, no matter how high
and mighty we might think we
are.

However, there is a disconnect
where the responsibility of the
National Insurance Board/Gov-
ernment ends, and the require-
ments of individuals and busi-
nesses begins.

In the private sector for exam-
ple, insurance companies auto-
matically provide clients with a
monthly or annual statement, yet
we get no statement from NIB.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



Banks automatically provide
statements or passbooks that are
easily updated, yet we get no
statement from NIB.

Pension companies automati-
cally provide annual statements,
yet we get no statement from
NIB.

Businesses automatically pro-
vide statements for charge
accounts with additional copies
of invoices, yet we get no state-
ment from NIB.

And the list goes on.

If the NIB automatically sent
statements to all of their account
holders, would it be possible for
offenders to mount up such huge
debts without a co-conspirator in
the NIB itself?

So why does our nanny state
not provide us with statements

for our National Insurance con-
tributions? Not only that, it puts
the onus on businesses to keep
their records indefinitely.

This is a classic case of gov-
ernment knowing how inefficient
they are so they pass a law to put
the burden of proof on the oppo-
site party and contravene the
Statute of Limitations — nor-
mally seven years I think — at
the same time.

Of course only a government
has the power to force its will like
that.

Thave a suggestion though.

The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce should solicit dona-
tions from its membership to sue
the National Insurance
Board/Government to make the
NIB as accountable as everyone
else is supposed to be.

RICK LOWE
WeblogBahamas.com
http:/Avww.weblogbahamas.com
http:/Avww.nassauinstitute. or





The threat to our Financial Services Sector

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Our legislators and many
Bahamians are well aware of the
“Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act”
that was tabled in the United
State (US) Senate on 17th Feb-
ruary, 2007 by senators Levin,
Coleman, and then senator Oba-
ma; this took place during the first
session of the 110 Congress. The
bill is designed “to restrict the use
of offshore tax havens and abu-
sive tax shelters to inappropri-
ately avoid Federal Taxation, and
for other purposes.” It targets
$100 billion per year in tax rev-
enue losses due to offshore tax
havens and since the US has iden-
tified the Bahamas as a tax haven
jurisdiction for tax avoidance,
there is a legitimate threat and
clear and present danger to our
second largest industry.

Specifically, the bill seeks to
achieve the following among oth-
er objectives:

1) Establish presumptions to
combat offshore secrecy.

2) Impose tougher require-
ments on US taxpayers using off-
shore secrecy jurisdictions.

3) Authorise special measures
to stop offshore tax abuses.

4) Strengthen detection of off-
shore activities.

5) Close offshore trust loop-
holes by taxing offshore trust
income.

6) Strengthen penalties on tax
shelter promoters to a maximum
of $1 million.

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7) Stop tax shelter patents for
“inventions designed to minimize,
avoid, defer, or otherwise affect
liability for Federal, State, local,
or foreign tax”.

8) Require hedge funds and
company formation agents to
know their offshore clients.

I wish to endorse the recom-
mendations made by the Hon-
ourable Member for Fort Char-
lotte as articulated during his con-
tribution to the midyear budget
debate on March 2, 2009.

First, Mr Sears recommended
that the “Government of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas
lobby the United States to stop
the passage of the Stop Tax
Haven Abuse Bill by the United
States House of Representatives
and Senate and to educate the
United States policy makers,
media and public of the true
nature of the Bahamian financial
industry and the collective com-
mitment of The Bahamas to fight
money laundering and the financ-
ing of terrorism.”

His second recommendation
was that the Bahamas Govern-
ment should “make an official
protest against the practice by
agents of the United States and
other OECD member countries
who undermine the legal process
in The Bahamas by seeking to
induce Bahamian financial insti-
tutions and professions to break
the law. If the Government were
to protest now, it would give The
Bahamas a tactical advantage or
the moral high ground, rather
than raising them when The
Bahamas is on the defensive or
the object of an imminent threat.”

“Third, the Government
should promote the convening of
a global forum on money laun-
dering and terrorist financing,
under the auspices of the United
Nations, leading to the formation
of a global treaty. The purpose
of the global forum will be to
ensure that offshore jurisdictions,
like The Bahamas, have a voice
and place around the table in the
prescription and application of
the anti-money laundering and
combating the financing of ter-
rorism on a level playing field.

Fourth, the Government, in
partnership with the private sec-
tor, should invest in a policy
research facility, at the College
of The Bahamas, to conduct eco-
nomic intelligence monitoring of
the global economy and trends,

tiveness of the Bahamian juris-
diction as a centre of wealth man-
agement.”

I wish to add that the Bahamas
government must formally protest
the apparent illegal tactics of US
authorities.

They are not to directly
approach any financial institution
in the Bahamas, but to utilise the
relevant government authorities
in pursuit of cross-jurisdictional
assistance in civil and criminal
matters involving US citizens.

Governments are elected by
the people to protect their inter-
ests of its people and therefore
must be seen to demonstrate such
a commitment and resolve.

As the external threat to our
second largest industry intensi-
fies, the government must move
proactively, transparently, and
expeditiously to protect our dig-
nity, national sovereignty, and
general way of life.

ELCOTT COLEBY
Nassau,
March, 2009.

The ugly results of
a bucket bulldozer

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Landscaping with the use of a
large bucket bulldozer certainly
is questionable and the results
show themselves in what is left
in a so-called state as having to
be improved.

Look at how the Environ-
mental health folk used a buck-
et-bulldozer on the front of the
contested Chippingham land
corner West Bay and Chip-
pingham Road just push every-
thing into the bush and leave
ugliness. Again just before S G
Hambros, West Bay the same
treatment — push the bush in
and leave everything piled up
far, far uglier than it was before.

Who gave anyway the Envi-
ronmental department the
authority to go on private land
and trespass and damage their
property?

Let’s try to be real — yes we
need to keep the bush line con-
trolled but let’s do the exercise
in a way that we improve the
visual, not make it look uglier.

(01 TOYOTA CAMRY
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Nassau,
February 28, 2009.

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Mr Charles Carey: a disclaimer

-

EDITOR, ThE Tribune.

A letter to the editor was printed in your paper on Tuesday,
March 10, from a Charles Carey of Harbour Island.

Iam not the author of that letter, nor did I submit it to The

Tribune. Which leaves me to wonder if there has been some
sort of a mixup?

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 5

SNTEICL

Man airlifted to hospital after
altercation at bowling alley

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT-A_ Grand
Bahama man was airlifted to
New Providence with serious
spinal injuries following an alter-
cation early Friday morning at
the Bowling Alley.

Asst Supt Clarence Reckley

reported that Kenneth Rahming,
a 37-year-old resident of Ship-
ton Drive, sustained injuries
which left him paralysed from
the neck down.

Rahming is detained at
Princess Margaret Hospital. A
37-year-old man is assisting
police with their investigation
into the matter.

According to Mr Reckley,

police received a grievous harm
report around 3.45am on Friday
that a man was injured in
the parking lot of the Bowling
Alley.

When police arrived at the
scene, they were told that the
victim had already been taken
to hospital.

Officers went to Rand Memo-
rial Hospital and were told that

the victim was suffering from
serious injuries and was paral-
ysed.

Mr Reckley said police are
expected to file charges early
this week.





Police find live
TAC

MOBILE Division officers
found 15 live rounds of
ammunition for a .22 weapon
in a magazine clip while
patrolling Blue Hill Road
South near Garden Hills
around 3.30am yesterday.

No arrests have been



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at the 20th Inter-Sessional Meeting of the Caribbean Community held in Belize City, Belize, on Thursday.

Drugs, stolen items seized by police

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A SIGNIFICANT quantity of illegal drugs with
a street value of over $13,000, along with several
stolen items, were seized by police on Saturday
evening.

At about 10.05pm, police from AVIT (Anti-Vio-
lence Intervention Team) executed a search warrant
at an apartment at Colony Club, where officers dis-
covered seven pounds of suspected marijuana.

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Additionally, he noted that police also discov-
ered several items suspected of being stolen, includ-
ing a 32-inch Sharp flat screen television, seven
gold rings, two gold bracelets, one silver Brietlin
watch, and an orange Bentley watch along with
several pairs of earrings. The male occupant was tak-
en into custody and arrested by police.

Mr Reckley said police are appealing to the pub-
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



enn NNN eS EONS NSN NESE
Establish a Caribbean wide

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WORLD VIEW

m@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant and
former Caribbean diplomat)

Is MY last commentary
entitled, “Tax Haven juris-
dictions — Sitting Ducks and
Scapegoats”, the point was made
that British Prime Minister Gor-
don Brown and others, including
Congressmen in the United
States, are trying to pass the
buck of responsibility for the
global financial crisis to jurisdic-
tions with offshore financial ser-
vices, including those in the
Caribbean.

I had drawn attention to
Brown’s statement to the US
Congress on March 4th in which
he said: “"But how much safer
would everybody's savings be if
the whole world finally came
together to outlaw shadow bank-
ing systems and outlaw offshore
tax havens?”

The point is that Brown and
others are ignoring completely
the lax regulation in many of the
countries of the Organisation for
Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD) that led
to poor banking and investment
practices and the collapse of
financial institutions that were
considered “giants”, and they
are trying to move the focus to
offshore financial jurisdictions
even though the financial insti-
tutions located in them were not
responsible for the crisis.

Many authoritative persons
and organisations are not buying
into the targeting of offshore
financial centres as the culpable
parties.

On March 8th the British
Financial Times newspaper said:
“There is scant evidence that the
offshore centres are to blame for
financial turmoil. The UK Finan-

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cial Services Authority told MPs
last year that offshore centres
had already undergone exten-
sive regulatory reviews.”

Then on March 10th ,the
Chairman of the Confederation
of British Industries, Martin
Broughton, is reported to have
said that “Gordon Brown’s focus
on ‘red herring’ issues such as
bank bonuses and tax havens
risks turning next month’s sum-
mit of the Group of 20 nations
into a catastrophe that fails to
deal with the recession.”

Broughton constructively said
the G20 Summit, scheduled in
London for April 2nd, “should
focus on a global stimulus and
undertakings to resist protec-
tionism — including a pledge not
to increase trade tariffs.”

He went on to say that it
would be “nothing short of a cat-
astrophe, when you’ve got an
opportunity to make a differ-
ence, that you get bogged down”
in issues that were “totally irrel-
evant” to resolving the current
crisis.

In an editorial on March 12th,
the Financial Times did not hold
out much hope for Broughton’s
call. The prestigious newspaper
said, “Asking a group of politi-
cians not to make a meal of irrel-
evant but crowd-pleasing issues
may be a forlorn call.” But the
publication said he “is still right
to have made it.” And, the edi-
torial warned: “True, the odds
look better for extra funding for
the International Monetary
Fund and easing the shortage of
trade finance — but these are not
the stuff to capture the imagina-
tion of the watching world. So
the attraction of announcing
some populist crackdowns could
be great.”

So, in circles that are expert
and authoritative about global
business and finance, the assault
on offshore jurisdictions is seen
as what Broughton called a “red
herring.” But, it clearly is not
going to stop those who are
determined to shut them down
because of the fear that they pro-
vide a haven for people and
organisations who are evading
tax.

Two matters arise from this.
The first is that both the United
Kingdom and the United States
are “tax havens.” Non-residents
of these countries bank in them
and invest in instruments that
do not attract tax. Indeed, if both
the US and the UK were to
begin to tax the bank deposits

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@ SIR Ronald Sanders

and tax-free investments of non-
residents, the adverse effect on
their financial systems would be
significant to their economies.
So there is a principle here that is
being applied for Peter that is
very different to the one being
imposed on Paul.

The second point is that juris-
dictions with offshore financial
services should not sit back idly
because authoritative organisa-
tions and personalities have
pointed to the unfairness of the
assault on them by OECD goy-
ernments. They do have to be
active in making their case.

The British Crown Depen-
dencies and Overseas territories
have begun to argue for what
they call “a more discriminate
approach.”

Jersey, a large offshore finan-
cial centre, is reportedly send-
ing a delegation to Washington
on March 23rd to meet repre-
sentatives of the new Obama
administration. Undoubtedly,
they have already been talking
with officials in the United King-
dom.

It is ashame that the 35 juris-
dictions, named by the US Con-
gress in the ‘Stop the Tax
Havens Abuse’ Act, are not all
joining together to agree on
common ground including stan-
dards and practices to which
they will all adhere, and in mak-
ing a common case to the US,
the UK and other OECD coun-
tries.

There can be few govern-
ments among the 35 jurisdictions
which would not agree that, just
as there is a case for better and
tighter regulation and supervi-
sion of financial institutions in
the OECD countries, so there
is a need to do so in their own.

But unfortunately, there
appears to be no such harmony
among them. Instead, some are
trying to distance themselves
from others by claiming that
they are being “tarred with the
same brush.” This lack of cohe-
sion will weaken them and many
will collapse in the process, hurt-
ing even further economies of
small countries which are
already hard-hit by the global
financial crisis.

In the Caribbean, there is yet
to be a meeting of governments
or representatives of financial
institutions on this matter even
though the G20 meeting to dis-
cuss “outlawing tax havens” is
set for April.

There have now been consis-
tent calls for a region-wide body
to be a supra-national regulator
for financial services throughout
the Caribbean Community and
Common market (CARICOM).
It is a call that should be heeded
not only to give an important
layer of supervision of the sector
but also as a strong tool in
defense of their jurisdictions.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 7



Three possible locations
for the new fish market

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Port Authority has
identified three possible loca-

tions for the new fish mar-
ket, but local fishermen will
have to wait as the exact
location will be determined
at a later date.

According to reports, the
Fishing Hole Road and West
Atlantic Drive in the down-

town area are some of the
sites that are being consid-
ered.

Port Authority officials
met with local fish, conch,
seafood vendors for the sec-
ond time this month to hear
their feedback and input on

MOG G ra RG DYE RGU Lae



THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (NEMA) accepted a cheque donation from the
Bahamas Christian Council (BCC) during a presentation at NEMA’s office, Churchill Building, Nassau.
The $4,000 donation was the second made by the Council. The first, a $10,000 donation, was made fol-
lowing Hurricane Ike which struck Inagua in September 2008. Commander Stephen Russell, director of
NEMA accepted the funds on behalf of the Agency. Pictured from left are Bishop Gregory Minnis, trea-
surer, BCC; Rev Patrick Paul, president, BCC; Captain Russell; Michelle Gardiner, finance officer; NEMA;

and Pastor Devon Rolle, BCC.

" Christian
Bookshop
is a Marlin
Awards
sponsor

THE Christian Book-
shop, one of the Bahamas’
oldest and most successful
gospel retail outlets, has
been named a sponsor of
the 2009 Marlin Awards.

President of the Marlin
Awards Kevin Harris said,
“We are extremely proud
and honoured to have the
Christian Bookshop, one of
our country’s most faithful
and well known religious
retail establishments on
board with us this year as
one of our executive spon-
sors. It is because of the sup-
port and investment from
companies like the Christ-
ian Bookshop that the Mar-
lin Awards can continue in
its mission to encourage
excellence and growth in
Bahamian and Caribbean
Gospel Music.”

The Marlin Awards will
be held on Sunday March
29th at the Diplomat Cen-
tre. Tickets for this event
will be $25 (General Seat-
ing) and $40 (VIP) and can
be purchased from the
Christian Bookshop. Our
photo shows from left to
right Stacie Walkine Christ-
ian Bookshop Manager,
Gregory Sweeting Christian
Bookshop President, Kevin
Harris Marlin Awards Pres-
ident and Beryn Neely Mar-
lin Awards CFO.





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In a press release issued
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Rolle said that “it is critical
that we determine the best
location for the site to ensure
the long term success of the
market, and the positive
impact that it will have on
the community.”

Mr Hannes Babak, chair-
man of the Port Group Lim-
ited, along with the commit-
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the development of the new
fish market, announced three
possible locations for the site.

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Space shuttle Discovery blasts off with crew of seven :

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

SPACE shuttle Discovery and
its crew of seven rocketed into
orbit Sunday evening, setting off
on a space station construction
mission cut short by launch
delays that dragged on for more
than a month, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Discovery rose from its sea-
side pad just as the sun was set-
ting, a spectacular sight for a
space agency anxious to get the

flight going. As the shuttle sped }
away like a brilliant star, part of }
the launch plume glowed pink, }
peach and golden. The shuttle ¢
was visible for several minutes.
A hydrogen leak mvantt
Discovery from lifting lt ¢
Wednesday and, before that,

hydrogen valves kept the shuttle | :
grounded for weeks in February. }
Launch pad repairs took care of }
the leak, and the astronauts were :
able to board their spaceship and }

lift off.

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COLLEGE of the Bahamas student
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degree and he is ready to make a differ-
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The young hospitality operations major
is one of five College of The Bahamas
students completing a three month intern-
ship programme at Sandals Royal
Bahamian.

“T grew up knowing that one day I
wanted to work in the tourism industry,”
said Jeron. It was as a tenth grader at CC
Sweeting Secondary High School that he
was first introduced to tourism. “We had
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there’s more to the industry than pouring
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“Since starting my internship, my liking
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Necausha Greene, a culinary arts major
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like the friendship and camaraderie every-
one seems to share. I plan to work for a
brief period before continuing my studies,
and this is the environment that I would
like to be in.”

Michael James, General Manager at



THIS PHOTO SHOWS Shawn Thompson, Sandals Storeroom Manager salahiig the inven-
tory process to Jeron Johnson and Necausha Greene.

Sandals Royal Bahamian says the intern-
ship serves two very important purposes.
“Not only do we welcome the opportuni-
ty to demonstrate what we do, but simul-
taneously, we invite the students to share
some of their ideas with us,” he added.
“These are young, bright minds that are
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Mr James noted that while some of the
students have never held a job, the intern-

ship was vital in developing on the job
and interpersonal skills. “It is encouraging
to move around and see them interact-
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shows their interest in being fully involved
in our operation and they take their posi-
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Ashlene Seraphim and Petra Hall, of
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ticipated in a one week work study at the
resort.

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Thursday, 19th March,
2009 at 3:00 p.m.

Mr. Kelly is survived
by his wife Nancy
Booth Kelly; three sons,
Andrew Jordan Kelly,
David Gregory Booth
Kelly and Reginald
Scott Kelly; two
daughters-in-law, Anne
Boushelle Kelly and Candace Elizabeth Kelly;
five grandchildren, Jordan Ross Kelly, David
Oliver Christensen Kelly, Avery Ann Kelly, John
(Jack) Albert Charles Kelly and Katie Marie
Kelly; his brother, Godfrey Kenneth Kelly
C.M.G.; his sisters-in-law, Paula Kelly and Sonia
Kelly; his brother-in-law, John Avery Booth, Jr
and his wife, Bonnie Booth; nieces and nephews,
Linda Elza, Stephen and Gary Kelly, Lynn Lowe,
John Avery Booth, lll, Joy Marie Rousell and
Jody Laura Booth-Seals; his cousins Betty Kelly
Kenning, O.B.E. and her husband John Kenning
and George Kelly and his wife Norma Kelly
other relatives and friends. His brother Basil
Trevor Kelly predeceased him.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
The Lyford Cay Foundation, Inc., DAVID
ALBERT CHARLES KELLY, C.B.E.
MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, P.O.Box
N.7776, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, N.P.,
The Bahamas.



















Rodney Bowe

AWM ete) NI

NEWBOLD BROTHERS

CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
P.O. Box N-3572
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
Elizabeth "Lizzy" Bowles, 47

of Millerton, Long Island
will be held on Saturday,
12th July, 2008, at 10:00
a.m., at The Church of
God of Prophecy, Burnt
Ground, North Long
Island. Officiating will be

| District Overseer George
Thompson. Interment

| follows in Culmer's
Cemetery, North Long
Island.

Left to cherish fond

memories are her husband:
Neval Bowles; one daughter: Shirleymae Bowles;
six sons: Neval Bowles Jr. (deceased), Howard, Kevin
Bowles (deceased), Dennis, Wellington and Patrick
Bowles; father: Pastor Garnet Rolle; stepmother:
Mary Rolle; four sisters: Rosemary Brice, Estermae
Knowles, Eloise Emile and Corporal 213 Annamae
Rolle; six brothers: PC 2190 Andrew Rolle, Jeffery,
Leon, Daniel, Timothy and Ezekiel Rolle; two aunts:
Agnes Francis of Nassau and Estelle Adderley of
Millerton, Long Island; four uncles: Alfred Dixon of
Burnt Ground, Long Island, Joseph Rolle of Devils
Point, Cat Island, Albert Adderley and Lucien Medius;
six brothers-in-law, eight sisters-in-law, sixteen nieces,
ten nephews, numerous cousins and special friends
including: Pastor Stubbs, Carmetha and Dorothea
Francis, Anthony, Andrew, Nathaniel, the Adderley,
Dixon, Bowles and Smith families, Hilda Glinton
and family, The Church of God of Prophecy Church
family, Pastor Ferguson and family (Minnie Street).
And special thanks to the Community Clinic Staff
in Simms Long Island and other relatives and friends
too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at
Newbold Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue &
Acklins Street off Market and East Streets on
Wednesday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Friday at
the Church in Long Island from 5:00 p.m. until service
time on Saturday.

Two senior management

TWO Bahamians have been pro-
moted to senior management posi-
tions at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort.

Rodney Bowe, an engineering
and maintenance manager, was
appointed Director of Facilities,
while Tyrone Beneby, with fifteen
years in hospitality, has been pro-
moted to Director of Purchasing
for the 550-room resort.

“The Wyndham is very pleased
to have Beneby and Bowe joining
our senior management team and
we look forward to being guided
by their expertise and the contri-
butions they will make to our
resort,” managing director Jeffry
Humes, said.

Mr Bowe most recently served
as Lead Project Manager since 2006
and has lead the development of
new projects valued at over $6 mil-
lion.

“The role of Director of Facilities
is integral in any hotel. Rodney has
displayed the leadership, knowl-
edge and care necessary to take
care of our property and its facili-
ties,” Mr Humes said.

As Director of Facilities, Mr
Bowe will be responsible for the
Wyndham’s engineering depart-
ment, plant room and laundry oper-



appointments at Wyndham

ations. Congratulating Rodney on
his appointment, Humes said ““Rod-
ney’s leadership and drive can only
produce ongoing positive results
from his team and his dedication
to a job well done will definitely be
contagious to all those around
him.”

Tyrone Beneby is no newcomer
to the Wyndham Nassau Resort
and has been an integral member of
their management team since 2002.
Over the last seven years, Beneby
excelled through the ranks of Direc-
tor of Event Management and most
recently, Director of Restaurants.

In his new position as Director of
Purchasing, Mr Beneby will be
responsible for the purchasing and
receiving divisions, storerooms and
warehouse. He will also oversee a
staff of 15 managers and employees.

“T’ve seen many changes over
the course of the years at the Wyn-
dham but we continue to improve
our operations and execution.

“T feel privileged to lead in this
capacity and look forward to
streamlining our procedures and
policies and continuing to work
with the senior management
team to improve overall efficien-
cies at the Wyndham,” Mr Beneby
said.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS





| NORTH ANDROS Primary School choir

Reunion celebration last Friday.



performs during the International Square Ss

Gladstone Thurston/BIS



A weekend of Androsian

cultural celebration

NICHOLL’S TOWN - North
Androsians took time out over
the weekend to thank their inter-
national winter residents and cel-
ebrate music and the arts.

Agriculture and Marine
Resources Minister Lawrence S
‘Larry’ Cartwright used the occa-
sion to call for “greater linkages”
between tourism and the handi-
craft and manufacturing indus-
try.

‘ite urged Bahamians to stop
being a people “caught in the
loop of dependency, always
expecting others to provide jobs
for us.”

“Join with us as we combine
our resources...to transform our
economy,” he said.

Mr Cartwright, MP for Long
Island and Ragged Island, was
guest of honour in a weekend of
Androsian cultural celebration.

Also attending were perma-
nent secretary Harrison Thomp-
son and Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) executive chairman Edi-
son Key and his delegation.

They were warmly welcomed
by administrator Dr Huntley
Christie, domestic investment
officer Alphonso Smith, and fes-
tivities organisers Clara Evans
and Rev James Sweeting.

Entertainment featured the
North Andros High School
junkanoo group, North Andros
Primary School choir, Mastic
Point Primary School dance
troupe, and the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Pop Band.

The 17th annual North Andros





Music and Arts Festival at Seav-
iew Park on Saturday showcased
an array of products created
using mainly ingredients found
locally.

There were Red Bays’ unique
silver palm weavings, Blanket
Sound’s delicate shell work, and
Nicholl’s Town’s coconut jew-
ellery with Chinese overtones by
Perky Lightbourne.

Mr Cartwright noted that the
interest in entrepreneurship
which his ministry, through
BAIC, has created, “has risen to
a fever pitch.”

“Stand tall and proud as
Bahamians,” he said. “Grow and
manufacture Bahamian goods.
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re-engineering the engines of our
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said Mr Cartwright.

He warned of “increased com-
petitiveness” as Bahamians adjust
to “the bold and challenging new
realities of the global economy.”

He encouraged artisans to
manufacture souvenirs “in great
abundance” as the demand “con-
tinues to outstrip supply.”



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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 688/09
BUSSING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all proposals.

LOCAL NEWS

Man shot dead.
in daylight attack

FROM page one

carpenter - everything. Just call on him
and he'd be there,” she said.

Rev CB Moss, pastor of Mount Olive
Baptist Church, which is a few streets
away from where the shooting occurred,
said he was shocked by the killing.

“Tt certainly shocked this community, it
being a Sunday and being in he middle of
the day. Like all inner-city communities
we have incidents of violence but it's not
normal to pull up on someone in broad
daylight and shoot his brains out.

“Tf the incident happened in the dead of
night that's one thing, but in the middle of
the day practically in the middle of the
street - that's not something that goes
down easily."

He described the victim as a person
trying to get his life on the right track.

"Many people feel that he has been
trying to correct himself from the course
he was on. He has been engaged in a car
wash business and auto-repair work. He
was gainfully employed and trying to
straighten up his life."

Rev Moss, head of civic organisation
Bahamas Against Crime, said the shoot-
ing highlights the need for government
and the private sector to work together to
formulate crime solutions.

"We are talking about bringing Miss
Universe here but unless we get crime
and violence under control it's going to
impact the economy. I'm calling on all
parties, especially corporate Bahamas -
they seem to be putting their heads in
the sand when it comes to crime.”



MARK 'SCABBY' DANIELS was found on the porch of a single-storey white and green wooden
building where he reportedly worked as an auto-mechanic.

To curb crime more alternative pro-
grammes are needed to foster positivity in
the nation's youth, he said

Meanwhile, an intensive investigation
was launched to establish the motive and
to identify those responsible for this inci-
dent. Investigators are hoping witnesses
will come forward and help catch the
shooter.

"This is a close-knit area and we are
asking persons to come forward,” Asst
Supt Walter Evans told reporters.

Police are asking anyone who was in
the area when the shooting took place
to contact 919, 502-9991, or 328-TIPS.

Yesterday's killing brought total homi-
cides to 15 for the year, Asst Supt Evans
said.

Tourism initiatives ‘will prove
oloomy forecast wrong’

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Mr. Anthony S. Forbes
at telephone 302-1165



FROM page one

tourism industry would shrink
by 9.8 per cent in 2009, in
terms of real domestic product
(GDP) growth. The WTTC

East Street Gospel Chapel

Invites You to Attend The |
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also predicted the industry's
total job levels would contract
by 7.5 per cent.

Yesterday Senator Vander-
pool-Wallace told The Tribune
these predictions are based on
last year's industry perfor-
mance and added that he is
confident that new initiatives
in place by the ministry will
prove the dire forecast wrong.

"The World Travel and
Tourism Council can only
forecast based on two things:
number one, they quite rightly
expect demand for travel to
fall from our primary market.
So, yes, the volume of busi-
ness coming from the United
States is going to go down and
the World Bank has just said
that the global economy is
going to contract this year so

we understand that.

"The second part of it is
they're going to presume that
what we have been doing in
the past we will continue to do
in the future in the same envi-
ronment. We don't intend to
do that so we're going to
everything we can to prove
that forecast wrong. Not saying
flat out that it's going to be
wrong but we certainly know
what we have to do to make it
better.”

Cruise arrivals for January
were up 26 per cent compared
to the same period last year.
This is evidence that visitors
still see the country as a prime
destination, but are looking
for more economical vaca-
tions.

“January of this year, we

received more visitors to the
Bahamas than any January in
history. Most of those visitors
came by cruise ship - what the
customer is telling us is that
the Bahamas is enormously
attractive, but they are looking
for value. “The cruise ship is
the best value of all and we
are working to make certain
the value for land-based vaca-
tions become much more
attractive.”

One of the ministry's initia-
tives includes the launch of the
all-inclusive Club Grand
Bahama.

"The customer now wants
to know what's the total cost
of my vacation up front
instead of coming with just an
open-ended chequebook," he
said.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 11



Former PLP parliamentarian ‘Teen dead, two others in hospital

is ‘not impressed’ by ‘anger’
over article in The Tribune

FROM page one

The article by Tribune
managing editor John Mar-
quis entitled “The tragic
young pilot who knew too
much” told the story of the
late Chauncey Tynes Jr.,
who went missing in 1983
while piloting a flight from
Exuma to Nassau.

His father, Chauncey
Tynes Sr, told The Tribune
he believed his son was mur-
dered because he knew too
much of the association
between Sir Lynden and
Lehder.

PLP leader Perry Christie
publicly condemned the sto-
ry as “the vilest, the most
vicious, the most scurrilous,
and the sickest piece of
garbage” he had ever read,
and slammed Tynes’ claims
as “a tissue of lies, fantasies
and tall tales.”

Dr Donaldson pointed out
that the drug trade is part of
Bahamas history and
Bahamians are suffering the
consequences of the drug
trade that occurred during
the time of Sir Lynden.

“There were more people
who were a part of that his-
tory, so if they talk about Sir
Lynden today and another
person tomorrow, I would
have no problem with that,”
he said.

He said Bahamians were
apparently not prepared to
have a dispassionate discus-
sion of history.

“We can’t confront the
truth about anything diffi-
cult or anything that obvi-
ously has an effect on our
ability to govern. I think it
stems from this inability to
deal with some of the
embarrassing aspects of our
existence before self-gover-
nance.

“But I am not impressed
by the anger and anxiety sur-
rounding this. Like the old
proverbs say ‘the wicked flee
when no man pursues’. The
people who are overly para-
noid about the truth...you
have to dig deep to find out
where their paranoia comes
from,” he said.

Chavez: Russia
jets welcome, but
no Venezuela hase

m CARACAS, Venezuela

PRESIDENT Hugo Chavez
said Sunday that Russian
bombers would be welcome in
Venezuela, but the socialist
leader denied that his country
would offer Moscow its territo-
ry for a military base, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Chavez — a fierce critic of
Washington with close ties to
Russia and Cuba — said his
government did not raise the
possibility, as Russian media
had reported.

“Tt’s not like that,” the presi-
dent said, responding to a
report by Interfax news agency
quoting the chief of staff of Rus-
sia’s long range aviation, Maj.
Gen. Anatoly Zhikharev, as
saying some strategic bombers
could be based on an island
offered by Venezuela.

Zhikharev reportedly said
Saturday that Chavez had
offered “a whole island with an
airdrome, which we can use as a
temporary base for strategic
bombers.”

Speaking during his weekly
television and radio program,
Chavez said he told Russian
President Dmitry Medvedev
that his nation’s bombers would
be allowed to land in Venezuela
if necessary, but no such plans
have been made.

Venezuela hosted two Russ-
ian Tu-160 bombers in Septem-
ber for training flights and
joined Russian warships two
months later for naval exercises
in the Caribbean.

“T told President Medvedev
that any time Russia’s strategic
aviation needs to make a stop in
Venezuela as part of its strategic
plans, Venezuela is available,”
he said.

Interfax also reported that
Zhikharev said Russian
bombers could be based in
communist-led Cuba, but a
Kremlin official said Zhikharev
had been speaking hypotheti-
cally.

Dr Donaldson, who
entered the House of
Assembly at the 1967 elec-
tion, said that what he
admires most about other
cultures is their willingness
to allow other people to
study their history.

“Suppose the Americans
were too ashamed to let
Europeans study their histo-
ry of slavery or vice versa?
The Americans discuss how
(one of their founding
fathers) Thomas Jefferson
had children with one of his
slaves and have come to cel-
ebrate it. Suppose that was
lost to history because peo-
ple were not willing to dis-
cuss it because the man was
dead?”

During her contribution to
the mid-term budget debate
last week Senator Allyson
Maynard-Gibson suggested
that it was time the Bahamas
secured its history by chang-
ing libel laws so that it would
be possible to defame the
dead.

Dr Donaldson suggested
that Mrs Maynard-Gibson
should “go back to the Euro-
peans who taught her law
and ask them how come they
chose not to include some-
thing so foolish as that in
their libel laws.

“She should ask these
same people who taught her
why they would not have
thought it was a worthy sug-
gestion.”

“There are some who cel-
ebrate Columbus as a hero
on Columbus Day.

“There are those who
choose to celebrate the day
by holding a murder trial for
the man.

“They believe he should
be tried in absentia. To
assume that merely talking
about something that hap-
pened is an attempt to
defame someone is foolish,”
Dr Donaldson said.

He said that while there
are a number of persons who
wish to hold Sir Lynden up
as something other than
human, the fact is “the
father of the nation” did
have both faults and good
points.














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FROM page one

: two passengers inside.

The Jaws-of-Life had to be used to extract the occupants from

the crumpled vehicle.

The driver received facial cuts, and a 22-year-old female rear

: seat passenger sustained injuries to the body.

Both were taken to hospital where the driver is in serious con-

: dition and the female is listed as critical.

A third person - 16-year-old Godfrey Murphy of Sunset Park

: - received facial burns and died at the scene, the ninth traffic fatal-
: ity for the year.

Police are also investigating another traffic accident which

? occurred in Rock Sound, Eleuthera, leaving a 56-year-old native
? dead.

Police on the island identified the deceased as local handyman

Edmund 'Beef' Symonette.

Sometime before 7pm Saturday, he was driving on Queen's

i Highway in Rock Sound when his white 2004 white Ford F-150
: truck, licence T-3175, ran off the road and into some bushes.

He was pronounced dead by a physician from Rock Sound.
Up to press time the cause of the crash was unclear. Investi-

? gations are continuing.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



England brush away woes
to trounce France 34-10

England swept aside recent troubles to beat France 34-10 at
Twickenham.

It was too late to salvage England’s RBS 6 Nations champi-
onship bid, but it brought a smile to manager Martin Johnson.

"When we do what we did today we look like a good team," said
Johnson. "That was great.

"I don't think our intensity level was higher. Our precision lev-
el was better - guys saw opportunities and took them.

Tries came from wing Mark Cueto, centre Riki Flutey (2), full-
back Delon Armitage and flanker Joe Worsley with stand-off
Toby Flood converting three and adding a penalty before going off
just before the interval with the score already 29-0.

France’s second-half tries came from hooker Dimitri Szarzews-
ki and wing Julien Malzieu.

Their defeat means they are also out of the running for 6 Nations
glory.

The title instead goes to a straight head-to-head between defend-
ing champions Wales and Grand Slam-chasing Ireland in Cardiff
next Saturday.

England, who avoided a single sin-binning after 10 yellow cards
in their previous four games, end their campaign at home to Scot-
land on the same day, while France, a shadow of the side which beat
Wales two weekends ago and now defeated three times in a row by
England, visit Italy.

Martin Johnson said England’s victory left a “good feeling of sat-
isfaction” in the changing roon.

"When you lose you are going to get criticised - you know that -
and defeat is a very realistic possibility when you are playing
France, so it's great.”

France coach Marc Lievremont said: "We wanted to follow up
what we did against Wales, but there was no game today.

"Every coach knows the difficulties of playing at Twickenham,
but I'm a bit disappointed. The start of the game was terrible for us.

"We had a lot of turnovers, lost the ball in the contact, didn't con-
test on the floor and England got confident."

Saturday’s 6 Nations results: Scotland 15, Ireland 22; Italy 15,
Wales 20.



Tom Hevezi/AP Photo

ENGLAND'S Delon Arenas celebrates after scoring a 7 during the Six Nations international rugby
union match against France at Twickenham stadium in London, Sunday March 15, 2009.



Tom Hevezi/AP Photo

ENGLAND'S Mark Cueto, left, and Cedric orcas of France battle for the ball dirtier the Six Nations inter-
national rugby union match at Twickenham stadium in London, Sunday March 15, 2009.



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SOCCER WRAP

Liverpool rout
Man United 4-1
to revive fading
title hopes

m@ MANCHESTER, England

Liverpool routed Premier
League leader Manchester
United 4-1 on Saturday, com-
ing from behind to revive its
faltering title chase with its
biggest win at Old Trafford in
73 years.

Captain Steven Gerrard
gave Liverpool the lead for
good just before halftime after
Fernando Torres tied the
score following Cristiano
Ronaldo’s penalty kick for
United.

“It was magnificent, a great
team performance,” Gerrard
said.

The Reds’ first win at Unit-
ed in five years — and manag-
er Rafa Benitez’s first — was
put beyond doubt in the last
15 minutes, with goals by
Fabio Aurelio and Andrea
Dossena as the defending
champions were humiliated by
their fiercest rival.

This was United’s worst
home defeat since a loss by
the same score in 1992 against
Queens Park Rangers. The
club’s miserable afternoon
was compounded when
defender Nemanja Vidic was
ejected for the second time
this season against Liverpool.

United is still four points
ahead of Liverpool with a
game in hand. Arsenal jumped
into fourth place with a 4-0
victory over Blackburn, with
Andrei Arshavin scoring his
first goal for the club since he
move from Zenit St. Peters-
burg.

The Russian also had a sec-
ond-minute shot deflect off
Blackburn defender Andre
Oijer for an own-goal. When
his shot in the 87th was
blocked by goalkeeper Paul
Robinson, Emmanuel Eboue
collected the ball to add the
third goal.

In other games, sixth-place
Everton beat Stoke 3-1; Ful-
ham won 3-1 at Bolton; and
Hull and Newcastle tied 1-1.
Next-to-last Middlesbrough
scored a last minute equalizer
to tie Portsmouth 1-1, and
Wigan won 2-1 at Sunderland.

Yesterday Chelsea beat
Manchester City 1-0 to move
within four points of Manches-
ter United in the Premier
League standings on Sunday,
and Tottenham beat Aston
Villa 2-1 to climb into 11th
place, its highest of the season.

Michael Essien scored
Chelsea’s 18th minute winner
at Stamford Bridge with his
second goal in two games as
the Blues made it four league
victories in a row since tempo-
rary coach Guus Hiddink
replaced Luiz Felipe Scolari.

Manchester United’s loss at
home to Liverpool on Satur-
day has given the chasing
teams hope of catching the
Red Devils.

Both Chelsea and Liverpool
are four points behind the
defending champion, which
has a game in hand.

“The door is a little bit
open,” Hiddink said.

“Tt gives them a blow and
now all depends on their calm-
ness.

“Let’s see how they react in
the coming games, but they
have a lot of experience.

“We have to keep winning.”

Jermaine Jenas and Darren
Bent fired goals past Brad
Friedel, Villa’s American
goalkeeper.

John Carew replied in the
85th, but Spurs hung on for
the victory, giving it 33 points
from 21 games since Harry
Redknapp replaced the fired
Juande Ramos.

Back then Tottenham was
last with two points and now is
up to halfway, six points above
the relegation zone.

m@ GLASGOW, Scotland

Darren O’Dea and Aiden
McGeady scored extra time
goals to guide Celtic to a 2-0
victory over traditional rival
Rangers in the Scottish
League Cup final.

After 90 minutes of goalless
football at Hampden Park,
O’Dea gave Celtic the lead in
the first minute of extra time.
McGeady added the second
from the penalty spot in the
120th minute after he had
been tripped by Kirk Broad-
foot, who was ejected.

It was the first time in 20
years that Celtic had beaten
Rangers in a final, the last
time being in the more presti-
gious Scottish Cup in 1989.
Celtic now has 14 League Cup
titles to Rangers’ record 25.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS















Previously
undefeated
teams lose first
games of season

THE Baptist Sports Coun-
cil continued its 2009 Joyce
Minus Basketball Classic on
Saturday at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex with two
of the previously undefeated
teams losing ther first games
of the season.

In the men's president
division, BIBA upset Tem-
ple Fellowship 47-45, but
Temple Fellowship knocked
off Golden Gates 21-15 in
the 15-and-under division.

Also, Temple Fellowship
got their second win in three
games as they held off Mercy
Seat 33-29. Mercy Seat
played a double header, but
also lost 49-24 to the defend-
ing campions First Baptist,
who improved to 3-1.

In other games played, last
year's 19-and-under runners-
up Macedonia prevailed with
a 34-32 win over Faith Unit-
ed. It was a double dose of
victory for Macedonia as
their 15-and-under nipped
Faith United 15-14.

Latter-Day spoiled the
debut of Pilgrim Temple

men with a 38-33 win; Chris-
tian Tabernacle handed
Bahamas Harvest a 38-26
loss; Golden Gates knocked
off Calvary Bible 43-26 and
First Baptist won 36-28 over
City of Praise.

There was also a battle of
two teams from the same
church playing each. In the
19-and-under dvision, Gold-
en Gates No.1 out-lasted
Golden Gates No.2 45-39
and Latter-Day A held onto
a 41-35 win over Latter-Day
No.2.

¢ Here's asummary of some
of the games played:

Men's Division

Christian Tabernacle (2-0) 38,
Bahamas Harvest (1-2) 26: Var-
do Bowleg 20 points in the win.
Golden Gates (2-0) 43, Calvary
Bible (0-3) 26: Samuel Johnson
14 points in the win.

First Baptist (2-0) 36, City of
Praise (1-2) 29.

BIBA (1-3) 47, Temple Fellow-
ship (3-1) 45: Donnie Moss 19
in the win.



=

Teams

Men's President
First Baptist
Temple Fellowship
Latter-Day Saints
City of Praise
BIBA

Ebenezer

Pilgrim

OOH MWPs

Teams W

Men's Vice President
New Bethlehem
Golden Gates
Christian Tabernacle
Evangelistic Center
Church of Nazarene
Bahamas Harvest
Calvary Bible

Oo — | — PNP

Latter-Day (2-1) 38, Pilgrim (0-
1) 33. Perez Thompson 17 in
the win.

19-And-Under

Golden Gates No.1 (2-1) 45
Golden Gates No.2 (1-2) 39
Temple Fellowship (2-1) 33,
Mercy Seat (0-5) 29. Mario
Stubbs 12 points in the win.
Macedonia (3-2) 34, Faith Unit-
ed (1-1) 32 in overtime. Patrick
Brice 13 in the win.
15-And-Under

Latter-Day A (3-2) 41, Latter-
Day B (1-1) 35.

Macedonia (2-1) 15, Faith Unit-
ed (1-2) 14. Geno Bullard 8 in
the win.

¢ Here’s a look at the schedule
for Saturday:

Court One - 10 am Latter-Day
No.2 vs Faith United (15); 11
am Golden Gates vs Latter-Day
Saints (15); Noon Golden Gates
vs Latter-Day (19); 1 pm Gold-
en Gates No.2 vs Mercy Seat
(19); 2 pm City of Praise vs Pil-
grim (M); 3 pm Latter-Day
Saints vs BIBA (M)

Court Two - 10 am Macedonia
vs Temple Fellowship (15); 11
am Temple Fellowship vs Mira-
cle Working COG (19); Noon
Macedonia vs Golden Gates (L);
1 pm Golden Gates vs Christian
Tabernacle (M); 2 pm Church of
the Nazarene vs Evangelistic
Center (M); 3 pm New Bethle-
hem vs Calvary Bible (M).







Knowles/
Bhupathi
win opener

MARK Knowles and his
Indian partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi pulled off their open-
ing doubles victory at the
BNP Paribas Open in Indian
Wells, California over the
weekend.

The Bahamian-Indian duo,
who are still rabked at num-
ber two in the world with
1425 points behind the
American identical twin
brothers of Bob and Mike
Bryan (2595), won their
opening match 7-5, 6-3.

The tournament’s No.3
seeds defeated the unranked
Russian team of Igor Kunit-
syn and Dmitry Tursunov.
They will now await the win-
ner between the teams of
Max Mirnyi/Andy Ram
against Martin
Damm/Robert Lindstedt.

The Bryans are the top
seeds, followed by Daniel
Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic.

© Basketball

Primary
school tourney

THE Providence Basket-
ball Association, headed by
Kevin ‘KJ’ Johnson, will
continue their first Phil
Smith Primary School Bas-
ketball Tournament today at
3:30 pm at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

The tournament is attract-
ing a number of private and
government primary schools.
The tournament got started
on Saturday and will contin-
ue through Saturday.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the
news, read
eT fels
on Mondays





Andrew Brownbill/AP Photo

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INDIA'S Mahesh Bhupathi, front,

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First Baptist

Golden Gates

Temple Fellowship
Macedonia

Faith United

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



COLLEGIATE INDOOR SEASON

Stuart closes out with fourth place

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

BIANCA ‘BB’ Stuart couldn’t ask
for a better way to close out her col-
legiate indoor season.

The Southern Illinois’ senior
earned her second All-American
honours when she cleared 21-feet,
2-inches for a fourth place at the
National Collegiate Athletic Asso-
ciation’s National Championships
over the weekend.

The Queen’s College graduate was
one of three Bahamians who took
part in the meet that was held in Col-
lege Station, Texas on the campus
of Texas A & M where SIU’s Salukis
ended up 11th in the team standings.

Sophomore Cache Armbrister and
freshman Nivea Smith, who are

keeping the Auburn University con-
nection alive, competed in the 200
metres.

Both fell short of advancing to the
final.

Armbrister was 12th overall in
23.80 seconds after she placed third
in the last of five heats. Smith, the
Grand Bahamian native, followed in
13th spot in 23.90 after she also got
third in heat four.

Stuart, who had a brief moment
to talk to the two young sprinters
just before she went out to jump on
Saturday, said she was really pleased
with her performance.

“Tt’s a great feeling. I’m very proud
of myself,” said Stuart, was able to
improve on her 13th place finish last
year. “I'd take it. I can’t complain. I
had a good series of jumps.”

After opening up with a leap of

21-feet, 3/4-inches to take the initial
lead, Stuart fouled her second
attempt to fall into second place.

On her third attempt, she leapt 20-
7 to move into fourth place. She
duplicated the feat to hang onto her
position in the fourth round.

But after fouling her fifth jump,
she came back on her final attempt
to nail her best jump of the meet to
close out with her final position and
was just 1/2-inch shy of at least tying
for third place.

“T fouled two jumps and I jumped
21 twice, so I felt great,” Stuart said.
“Twas a bit flat on the 20-foot jump,
but I got it together and I was able to
jump a little further on my last jump
to keep me in fourth.”

Winning the event was Eleni
Kafourou of Boise State with a best
of 21-5 1/4 on her fifth attempt. Jeo-

mi Maduka of Cornell was second
with 21-4 on her last jump and Rhon-
da Watkins of UCLA was third with
21-2 1/2 on her last attempt.

All three competitors, like Stuart,
are seniors.

Stuart, who will celebrate her 21st
birthday on May 17, said she’s now
looking forward to the outdoor sea-
son.

“Pm really looking forward to
qualifying for the World Champi-
onships,” said Stuart, who missed
making the trip to the Olympic
Games last year in Beijing, China.

She’s not sure exactly when she
will begin her outdoor season.

But she indicated that her coach
Andre Scott has indicated that she
will probably just run on the relay
team when the Salukis get started
next month.



BIANCA ‘BB’ Stuart in a file photo.

NEW PROVIDENCE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION CHAMPIONSHIP

Truckers take opener

FROM page 15

“Once we do what our coach (James Price) say and put up the
defense a notch, there’s no way that the Cheetahs will be able to
stop us.”

Not only will the Cheetahs have to find a way to stop Rolle, but
they also have to contain her backcourt running mate, Glenda
Gilcud, who scored 17.

And if that wasn’t enough, Janice Williams worked her way
inside for 13 points, pulled down nine rebounds and came up with
three block shots.

Williams also had the dubious task of guarding Electro Telecom’s
center Natasha Miller, who led the Cybots with 17 points, nine
rebounds, two assists and a block.

Electro Telecom, coached by Simone Sawyer, had a balanced
scoring attack with Tiffany Wildgoose scoring 12 with three
rebounds.

Varel Davis and Tiffany Lewis both had 11 and Teneil Poitier
contributed 10 in the loss.

Davis, however, said they came out a little too flat, but they
managed to pick up things in the second half as they rebounded
from a 37-30 deficit at the break.

“We have to try and contain their two guards and play defense,”
said Davis of the Truckers’ 1-2 punch of Rolle and Gilcud. “Once
we can do that and play defense, we should be able to win the
series.”

Davis came up with some clutch shots to keep Electro Telecom
in the game. But each time they made a slight run, Rolle or Gilcud
was able to get a fast break to stay ahead.

The Truckers regrouped early in the fourth quarter to slowly pull
away after trailing 53-48 at the end of the third quarter, thanks to
a huge three-pointer from Davis with 2.0 seconds left on the clock.

Lady Angels 57, Lady Cheetahs 54: Sharel Cash scored 16,
Alexandria ‘Shaq’ Fernander had 14 and Chrishanda Kelly chipped
in with 11 as Boomer G took game one.

Sunshine Auto, who led 32-24 at the half, got a game high 17 from
Linda Pierre, 13 from Audrey Martin and 10 from Anastacia Moul-
trie in the loss.

Coaches 35, Officials 33: Kimberly Rolle, now an assistant coach
with the College of the Bahamas Lady Caribs, remembered clear-
ly when the game was on the line and she came up a big shot.

She relived those days again when she went to the foul line and
converted a pair of free throws with just 7.7 seconds left on the clock
in the extra one minute to preserve the win.

Rolle was fouled by Warren Butler, who had opened the OT with
a three-pointer. Rolle responded immediately after Butler’s trey to
hit one at the other end to set up the final seconds dramatic play.

“It reminded me that basketball is for the young folks,” said
Rolle, who haven’t played competitively in three years. “The first
half was kind of rough, but we started to get it going in the second.
In the overtime, it was smooth sailing.”

Rolle led a team of coaches that included Mario Bowleg, Fred-
die Brown, Sharelle Cash, Randy Cunningham, James Price, Antho-
ny Swaby and Jean ‘Bubbles’ Minus.

The Officials included Butler, Anthony Williams, Rodney John-
son, Craig ‘Pepper’ Clark, Norman ‘Mooch’ Humes, James
Dawkins, Devon Johnson and Mel Francis.

“It was a good game, but I think some calling down the stretch
beat the referees,” Johnson said. “I hope we can play them again.
Next time we will beat them by 20.”



CUMS yt

Tel TT Tee Tye a a |

Seas

UTDOOR

Lr)
TTT
Ter fy
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dinning chairs
PTT TF

PLS Ey
MTEL] EE
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ANTIQUE MONGOLIAN
ert lie 4

RUCKERS’ Glenda Gilcud lays the ball up.

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Felipé Major/Tribune staff





THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

Sp

Truckers roll past
the Cyhots 78-69

m@ By BRENT STUBBS take their frustration out on the
Senior Sports Reporter Media when they square off on
fi bstubbs@tribunemedia.net Saturday at 6:30 pm.
For the Lady Truckers,
Shantell Rolle led up the nets



NDAY, MARCH 16, 2009



ili

HE Johnson Lady
Truckers served
notice that they
are prepared to
defend their New Providence
Women’s Basketball Associa-

for a game high 31 points,
shooting 9-of-15 from the field,
3-for-5 from the three-point
arch and 10-11 from the free
throw line.

“We’re going to come out

a tion title. here on Tuesday and take game
Playing in the first game of — two and wait for the next series
their best-of-three playoff series for the championship,” said a
on Saturday night at the DW confident Rolle.
He Davis Gymnasium, the Truck-
i) Hew se EL a ers rolled past the Electro Tele- SEE page 14
com Cybots 78-69 to snatch the
OR ea a
FISH FILLET
SAN Dy ; i H be played on Tuesday night —/Tribune staff
with the third game, if neces-

Also Saturday night, the
. - sary on Thursday.

Also Saturday, the Coaches
managed to beat the Officials
35-33 in overtime on a five
points, including a nail biting
three-pointer from former Lady
Angels’ forward Kimberly

| Rolle.

Boomer G Swingers rallied to
The Officials are hoping to

TRUCKERS’ Glenda
Gilcud drives past the
defence of Cybots

take their opener 57-54 over last :
Tracey Lewis.

year’s runners-up Sunshine
Auto Lady Cheetahs. ie pas
Game two in both series will | PHOTO: Felipé Major
















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MONDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

y S

IO .2 009



im

MARCH
Confidence For Life

Bank sustains
‘large one-off"
non-performing
loan increases

* FirstCaribbean’s Bahamas
operations sees non-
performing loans rise
from six per cent to eight
per cent of total portfolio

* Above industry average,
but nothing to suggest
bank in difficulty

* Bahamian unit redeems
$20m bond issue three
years early

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FIRSTCaribbean suffered
“some large one-off” increases
in Bahamas-based non-per-
forming loans during its 2008
financial year, the bank’s group
annual report has revealed, with
the Bahamian operation’s non-
performing loans increasing
from 6 per cent to 8 per cent of
its total portfolio.

Analysing its group-wide
financial performance for the

SEE page 10B



City Markets ‘read riot
act’ over late financials

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian

regula-

tors

have
“read the riot act”
to City Markets’
parent company
over its failure to
date to produce
financial statements
for fiscal 2008, a
period that closed
almost nine months
ago, and have set
imminent deadlines
by when these must be released.

A highly-placed source, speaking to
Tribune Business on condition of
anonymity, told this newspaper: “The
Securities Commission has been putting
pressure on them. It has given the com-
pany deadlines, and is requiring certain
things to happen by the end of next [this]
week.”

What exactly will happen by the dead-
line is uncertain. While release of the full
audited financial statements is unlikely, a
more plausible outcome is that Bahamas
Supermarkets will be required to release
unaudited management accounts — some-

Deveaux

* Securities Commission said to be ‘putting pressure’ on for
some kind of disclosure, possibly as early as this week
* Auditors looking for ‘guarantees’ to avoid going

concern qualification

* Chairman denies store closure speculation
* Says 2008 net loss ‘in line’ with $10m forecast

thing minority investors and activists,
such as financial adviser Richard Coulson,
have long called for.

Hillary Deveaux, the Securities Com-
mission’s executive director, declined to
comment when contacted about the situ-
ation surrounding Bahamas Supermar-
kets, parent company of the 12-strong
City Markets chain, late last week.

He has, though, in the past said the
Bahamian capital markets regulator was
“very concerned” about the now eight-
and-a-half month wait for Bahamas
Supermarkets to produce its audited
financial statements for the year-ended
June 30, 2008.

Tribune Business has been told that
while the audit has been completed, its
release has been delayed over whether
the auditors, KPMG, will issue the ‘going
concern’ qualification. This qualification

to their audit report, if included, would
‘flag up’ their concerns over whether
Bahamas Supermarkets would be able
to continue operating as a material con-
cern without further support from its
shareholders.

To avoid issuing this qualification, Tri-
bune Business has been told that KPMG
is seeking certain “pledges and guaran-
tees”. What precisely it is seeking, and
from whom, was not disclosed. But, at
an educated guess, the auditors likely
want Bahamas Supermarkets’ majority
78 per cent shareholder, BSL Holdings,
and the investors that comprise the group,
to guarantee items such as repayment of
the $24 million Royal Bank of Canada
loan and, possibly, to inject more equity
capital into the business to boost cash

SEE page 9B



$12m poultry farm
awaits environmental
approval for go-ahead

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A PROPOSED $12 million
poultry farm project for north
Andros is awaiting resolution
of environmental studies, the
area’s MP has told Tribune
Business, with his constituency
desperately needing the 50 ini-
tial jobs it promises to dent an
unemployment rate running at
15-20 per cent “minimum”.

Vincent Peet, former minister
of financial services and invest-
ments, said that getting the
chicken farm off the ground
would provide some economic
“hope” for his constituents in
north Andros and the Berry
Islands, given that develop-
ments surrounding its main
tourism project were “going
from bad to worse” following
its plunge into receivership.

“The chicken farm, the poul-
try operation is still progress-
ing,” Mr Peet told Tribune
Business. “We’re still very eager
to see if it goes. Most of the
approvals have been granted; a
couple are still awaited. Some
are related to BEST [the
Bahamas Environment, Science
and Technology Commission].

“The environmental issues
are being advanced, and if they
can be resolved, we believe it

might be a go. That will do a
lot to create some hope and
jobs.”

The investors behind the
poultry farm are understood to
be a group of Canadians and
Americans, some of whom have
strong Bahamas connections.”

Any investment would likely
be welcome in north Andros at
this time, given that Scotiabank
(Bahamas) has placed the area’s
so-called ‘anchor project’, the
$250 million Chub Cay Club
project, into receivership due
to the non-repayment of a $45
million loan.

Reflecting on that develop-
ment, Mr Peet said: “There’s
really no good news, which is
very, very sad, because we’ve
had more than our share of bad
news. It’s going from bad to
worse.

“As you would have known,
over the years Chub Cay was
the light, the only ray of hope
for that area in terms of invest-
ment and job opportunities.
Now where they are is having
such a negative effect, not only
on Chub Cay but north Andros.

“Tt’s very bad for both islands.
We are very severely chal-
lenged, and there has to be
some glimmer of hope some-

SEE page 8B

M_ REXCLUSIVE

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this Ocean Club Residences & Marina condominium. This thoughtfully dec-
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located on the breathtaking Nassau Harbour. Ownership benefits include
access to the on-site marina, pools, gym facilities, private beaches and all
the amenities of Atlantis at your doorstep. Some grand features of the home
include a gourmet kitchen, tiled floors and walk in closets. Exclusively of-
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mario@mariocareyrealty.com | www.mariocareyrealty.com





Bank loan quality may not
improve until ‘next year’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

LOAN portfolio quality in
the Bahamian commercial
banking sector could continue
deteriorating well “into next
year”, a senior banking execu-
tive told Tribune Business, as
the economic downturn and ris-
ing unemployment leave many
borrowers unable to meet their
obligations.

Central Bank of the Bahamas
data for the period to end-Jan-
uary 2009 revealed that total
non-performing Bahamian com-
mercial bank loans — meaning

those more than 90 days past
due - then stood at $383 mil-
lion, some 6.3 per cent of total
outstanding loans.

This percentage was slightly
higher than the 5 per cent level
that Bahamian commercial
banks had been hoping to con-
tain the non-performing loan
average at. Total loans in
arrears, according to the Central
Bank, stood at $767 million or
12.7 per cent of the total port-
folio, with those between 31 and
90-days overdue standing at
$384 million or some 6.36 per
cent of the total.

Anwer Sunderji, Fidelity

Bank (Bahamas) chief execu-
tive, told Tribune Business:
“We fully expect that as the
economy slows down and
unemployment rises, the non-
performing part of our loan
portfolio will deteriorate, and
we expect it to continue for sev-
eral months before it gets bet-
ter.”

When asked how long this
deterioration might go on for,
Mr Sunderji replied: “At a min-
imum, to the end of this year.
But possibly into next year,
because recovery of the

SEE page 6B

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Port trustee
attempt
flismissed
by court

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AN attempt to obtain a court
order appointing a public
trustee for the Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) has
failed at the first hurdle, the
Court of Appeal backing a
Supreme Court ruling that the
non-profit trust bringing the
action had no legal capacity to
do so because it had not been
properly incorporated.

Outlining their reasons for
disallowing the appeal brought
by the Freeport Licensees and
Property Owners Association,
Appeal Justices Osadebay, Lon-
gley and Blackman all found
that the Association had failed
to prove it had the “legal capac-
ity as a body corporate” to ini-
tiate the action.

This, they ruled, was because
it had not been granted a
licence for its incorporation
under section 14 of the Com-
panies Act, while no certificate

SEE page 7B

ColinalImperial.



PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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Bahamas urged not
to bow to US over
financial services

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

INTERNATIONAL finan-
cial centres such as the
Bahamas should not bow to US
demands seeking greater infor-
mation about their clients,
according to an expert on the
US economy.

Michael LaFaive, who is

director of fiscal policy at the
MacKinac Centre for Public
Policy in Michigan, told Tribune
Business that the two largest so-
called ‘tax havens’ in the world
are Manhattan and Great
Britain.

He called those economies
“hypocrites” for essentially
attempting to ‘blacklist’ small
island nations, who have finan-

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ch &, 2009 International Wore
celenrated Inter ational Women’s Day (/ WD) globally in 2005, sin

ao developed their own recognition programs

cial institutions where individu-
als and organisations secure mil-
lions of untaxed dollars, while
they do much the same.

Mr LaFaive said the US and
UK divulge no information to a
foreign investor’s home coun-
tries when they bring millions,
sometimes billions, to their
economies.

Other economic pundits have
accused the US of using so-
called ‘tax havens’ as a scape-
goat for the current global eco-
nomic crisis, citing hidden tax-
able dollars as one of the cata-
lysts for the popped housing
bubble.

Since President Barack Oba-
ma’s succession to office, there
has been growing fear in small
international financial centres
that there will be another round
of the ‘blacklisting’ that
occurred in the 1990s.

The US president is set to
meet CARICOM heads at a
summit in Trinidad next month.

Conversation on the future
of international financial cen-
tres is expected to be raised dur-
ing the meetings.

The Minister of State for
Finance, Zhivargo Laing, told
Tribune Business recently that
this nation’s offshore financial
services sector should remain
vigilant and ever-watchful of
the policies coming out of the
US and Great Britain.

“They now see an opportu-
nity in the current crisis to
ratchet up the ante, because if
you can connect this global eco-
nomic crisis - as severe as it may
be - to the activities of offshore
financial centres, which makes
no real logical sense, it does
provide the kind of interna-
tional politics that might make
feasible their efforts.

“And so this is a continua-
tion of an ongoing exercise, and
I think it is something that has
real significant implications for
our financial services sector. I
think it has to be pondered,
considered and discussed,” said
Mr Laing.

ns day was Oibcdally recognized. Deboute first
ce then member firms. have

To acknowledge [WD the partnership made a donation to The Zonta Club of New Providence on

behalf of Delowtte Bahamas.

towards the advancement af ¥

In the es left te meh Mekme Roach (irrediaie past president of fom

Tveme ingrahar [Tre

Same (ER ey RIET Chey ony

H Py Tai,
Yeh & fab mee Pronhice

This donation will assist with the club's |

WOME

}, Mark Muaniz mg es

Ocal charitable work





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 3B





Bahamas urged to ‘accelerate’
financial sector re-positioning

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas “ought to
accelerate” ongoing moves to
re-position its financial services
industry on a “tax compliant,
tax neutral and tax transpar-
ent” platform, a senior attor-
ney has told Tribune Business,
and “implement greater co-
operation in fiscal matters” giv-
en the direction the G-20 group
is MOViNng in.

John Delaney, managing
partner at Higgs & Johnson,
said that while the Bahamas’
international financial services
centre had never facilitated tax
evasion by wealthy clients from
the major industrialized coun-
tries, this nation had to recog-
nise the way the wind was blow-
ing from Washington, London
and other key capitals.

“T think the Bahamas has to
contemplate, with a view to
implementing greater co-oper-
ation on fiscal matters, given
what appears to be further
[moves] on that requirement by
the international community —
that there be greater co-opera-
tion in these matters,” Mr
Delaney told Tribune Business.

“We have to contemplate
that, and have to look at imple-
menting — in appropriate cases —
greater co-operation in a man-
ner that serves our interests.
I’ve said any number of times
that the matter of tax informa-
tion exchange for the Bahamas
goes to a matter of trade rela-
tions, and ought not to be
looked at as separate and iso-
lated from that.

“The Bahamas should
approach such arrangements
from the perspective of mutual
benefit and if, indeed, it is not
already doing so and has noth-
ing in the pipeline from that
perspective, it is now urgent to
get on with it. I think it’s criti-
cally important that we make
sure such arrangements provide
benefits to us.”

Mr Delaney essentially
argued that if the Bahamas was
to sign more Tax Information
Exchange Agreements (TIEAs)
in addition to the one it already
has with the US, it should seek
corresponding benefits for its
own economy that leave it at
least as well off — if not better —
than before it signed such an
agreement.

He described the US agree-
ment as “TIEA-plus”, given
that it secured Qualified Juris-
diction (QJ) status for the
Bahamas with respect to the
Internal Revenue Service’s
(IRS) withholding tax regime,
plus the convention tax break
that boosted the Bahamian
tourism industry.

The need to entertain greater
co-operation on fiscal matters
has become more pressing for
the Bahamas in the past few
weeks. Apart from the well-
publicised Stop Tax Haven
Abuse Act, and the Obama
administration’s professed
desire to crack down on so-
called ‘tax havens’, the G-20
meeting in April is set to flesh
out plans for a new global
supervisory regime for finan-
cial services, in addition to
broadening the anti-‘tax haven’
drive.

Switzerland, Austria and
Luxembourg all pledged
greater co-operation on tax
matters, and the clamp down
on tax evasion, on Friday.
Liechtenstein has already
bowed to such pressure, while
others such as Andorra, Bermu-
da, Jersey and Guernsey have
indicated they will all follow
suit. Given such momentum,
the Bahamas could find itself
dangerously isolated if it does
not move in step in some fash-
ion.

Mr Delaney, though, said the
Bahamian financial services
model had been evolving to one
of tax compliance, transparency
and neutrality for some time.
“Tt has been evolving already,”
he explained.

“Tf we were to look at things,
most particularly over the past
10 years but maybe a bit more,
it has evolved. The business
model today is a little different
from what it was 10 years ago,
and I expect it to evolve.

“The Bahamas has been
trending in that direction
already, albeit the move in that
direction ought to accelerate
now — towards tax compliant,
tax neutral and tax transparent
business.”

Mr Delaney said the recipro-
cal benefits the Bahamas should
seek from greater tax informa-
tion co-operation would depend
on the other country and bilat-
eral relationship involved. He



* Gathering G-20 storm indicates nation most move with more ‘urgency’ if not doing so on tax transparent, compliant and neutral platform
* Attorney urges Bahamas to seek reciprocal economic benefits, given that tax information exchange expansion seems inevitable

said the Bahamas should
address the situation from the
bilateral perspective, not a mul-
tilateral one.

Among the benefits this
nation should seek, he said,
were “favourable terms on a
good or service the Bahamas
needs”, or reduced withholding
taxes on remittances sent back
to this nation. Treaties regard-
ing inward investment into the
Bahamas, plus access to medical
services and educational ser-
vices for Bahamian students
could also figure into the mix.

As an example, Mr Delaney
said that Canada’s 2007 Bud-
get included a provision that it
would not tax the dividend dis-
tributions from subsidiaries of
Canadian companies in foreign

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jurisdictions, which were remit-
ted to their parents, if those
nations signed TIEAs with it.
Such a benefit, Mr Delaney
said, would encourage Canadi-















an companies to set up sub-
sidiary operations in such
nations and switch away from
those that did not have a signed

In such a case, greater tax co-
operation could produce a com-
petitive advantage — or at least
maintain one — when it came to

TIEA with their governments. attracting inward investment.

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES





THIS MONTHS TOPIC: Ethics & Critical Care

SPEAKER:

Dr. N’tari Darville

Internal Medicine

Purpose:

LECTURE DATE

Thursday, March 19th ‘09 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP ¢ Seating is Limited * 302-4603

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

[ee Op rakes tas

To educate the public about
the important health issues,
presented by distinguished

physicians.

Screenings:

Get your Free Blood
Pressure,Cholesterol, and
Glucose testing between

Spm & 6pm.

RSVP:

To ensure available seating

Phone: 302-4603

Ethics & Critical Care
Dr. N’tari Darville

Nutrition
Ronnell ‘Sandy’ Sands

Total Joint Replacement
Dr. Dane Bowe

Uninary Incontinence
Dr. Robin Roberts

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

‘e%] DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

DR. MEYER RASSIN
FOUNDATION
SCHOLARSHIPS

The Doctors Hospital Dr Meyer
Rassin Foundation is pleased to
announce that applications are now
being accepted for scholarships &
financial assistance for students
pursuing healthcare careers.

Applicants must be Bahamian
citizens & return to the Bahamas
upon completion of their studies.

Applications are available on our
website at www.doctorshosp.com.
Only completed applications with
required documentation submitted
would be considered.

Deadline for submission — of
completed application forms & all
supporting documentation is

March 31, 2009.

A

WY The Doctors Hospital

Mratete) Or. Meyer Rassin Foundation
senguvia! P.O.Box N3018 « Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

a www.doctorshosp.com/foundation

gs ROYAL FIDELITY

THE TRIBUNE

To atlvertise, call 502-2371

—

FINANCE CORPORATION WN IAD

OF BAHAMAS LIMITED Nassau Airport

Development Company

NOTICE TO TEN DER

SHAREH LDERS C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General

7 . Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
The Board of Directors of Finance Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage

Corporation of Bahamas Limited hereby 1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the

notifies all of its Shareholders that the Bank construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following

incurred a net loss of $367,759 based on ae

unaudited results for the quarter ended 31st
* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
January 2009. related subtrade packages;
. . te . * General Requirements for General Contracting services for
An interim dividend of thirteen cents (13 the overall project; and
1 * Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
oe reco ieee ch aa De oanl subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.
on 30th March 2009, to all shareholders of The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e.

record as of 23rd March 2009 mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
. Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230

General Contractor in 2009.

The Bank’s total assets stood at

$852,701 ,903 for the quarter ended 31st The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing

J anuary 2009. after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

D. Burrows-Haines (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary Contact: TRACI BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 16th March 2009 Email: traci brisby@nas bs

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 12 MARCH 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.28 | CHG 0.12 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -52.08 | YTD % -3.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 813.80 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

52wk-Low Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (81)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
0.070

0.00 0.992 11.1

0.00 0.244 28.7

0.00 -0.877 N/M

0.00 0.105 30.0

0.00 0.055 43.1

0.00 1.309 10.7

0.00 0.118 24.0

0.00 0.438 15.0

0.12 0.111 12.9

2.16 2.16 0.00 0.240 9.0
7.76 7.76 0.00 0.598 13.0
11.00 11.00 0.00 0.542 20.3
10.45 10.45 0.00 0.794 13.2
5.07 5.07 0.00 0.337 15.0
1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 N/M
0.30 0.30 0.00 0.035 8.6
5.50 5.50 0.00 0.407 13.5
10.50 10.50 0.00 0.952 11.0
10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

Security
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

29.00 ABDAB
0.00 Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low Fund Name
1.3041 Colina Bond Fund
2.9230 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3828 Colina Money Market Fund
3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
FBB17 : 7% 19 October 2017
FBB22 100.00 ; Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
FBB13 100.00 . 7% 30 May 2013
FBB15 100.00 . Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
7.92 8.42 0.300
4.00 6.25 6.00 0.480
0.35 0.40 0.35 0.000

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

31.72 33.26 29.00 0.000
0.00 0.00 0.00 0.000
0.45 0.55 0.55 0.000
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.3664 0.95 4.77 28-Feb-09
2.8988 -1.40 -3.35 28-Feb-09
1.4432 0.67 4.37 6-Mar-09
3.3201 -1.94 -11.33 31-Jan-09
12.7397 0.96 5.79 28-Feb-09
100.5606 0.56 0.56 31-Dec-08
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59 31-Dec-08
1.0000 0.00 0.00 31-Dec-07
9.1005 0.06 -13.33 31-Jan-09
1.0440 0.80 4.40 9-Feb-09
1.0364 0.33 3.64 9-Feb-09
1.0452 0.76 4.40 9-Feb-09
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 5B

@ ROYAL FIDELITY MARKET WRAP



@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a quiet week in the
Bahamian market, as investors
traded in four out of the 25
listed securities. Of these, one

stock declined in value and
three remained unchanged.
There were no advancers in
the market last week.

EQUITY MARKET
A total of 20,921 shares

NOTICE

changed hands, representing
a decrease of 20,024 shares or
49 per cent versus the previous
week's trading volume of
40,945 shares.
Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) was the volume leader

The payment of Long-Term Benefits and Assistance in New Providence for March 2009

will be made as follows:

i) On Tuesday, March 17, 2009, for pensioners whose funds are deposited to their

bank accounts; and

li) Beginning Thursday , March 19, 2009, at the Board’s Fox Hill, Wulff Road and Jumbey
Village Local Offices. Cheques may be collected from these offices between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

Pensioners and/or their representatives are required to produce proper identification in
order to collect their cheques.

Acceptable forms of identification for Pensioners are the National Insurance Registration
Card, together with any one of the following:

1. A Passport;
2. AVoter’s Card; or

3. Any other document which establishes, conclusively, the identity of the claimant.

Where the Pensioner is sending a Representative to collect his/her cheque, the Repre-
sentative should present an Authorization Form, completed by the Pensioner, or a letter
from the Pensioner authorizing the Board to release his/her cheque. Additionally, the
Representative should present any one of the above-listed items to identify himself/her-
self. Cheques will not be released to Representatives who fail to provide satisfactory iden-

tifying documents.

Please Note:

Pensioners born in March and September are now due for Verification.

Failure to be verified on-time, will result in the suspension of payments.



PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE OFFICE ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY NOTICE

Deputy Director of Finance

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of Deputy Director of
Finance, Public Hospitals Authority.

for a second consecutive week
with 11,536 shares trading, its
stock falling by $0.03 to end
the week at $6.56.

Focol Holdings (FCL) saw
8,822 shares trade to end the
week unchanged at $5.07.

BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the
Bahamian market last week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

There were no financial
results reported by any of the
24-listed companies during the
week.

Private Placement

Offerings:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extend-
ing the deadline of its private
placement offering. The pre-
ferred shares will be paying a
dividend rate of prime + 1.75
per cent, payable semi-annu-
ally.

Dividends Note:

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a dividend
of $0.05 per share, payable on
March 31, 2009, to all share-
holders of record date March
13, 2009.

Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FIN) has declared a
dividend of $0.13 per share,
payable on March 30, 2009, to
all shareholders of record date
March 23, 2009.

Annual General Meeting

(AGM) Notes:

Focol Holdings (FCL)
announced it will hold its
Annual General Meeting on
Thursday, March 19, 2009, at
10.30am in the Boardroom at
its Corporate Office in
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FIN) announced it
will be holding its Annual
General Meeting on Thursday,
March 19, 2009, at 6.30pm in
the Governor's Ballroom at
the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel.

CAREER OFPPORRTURETIES

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MINISTRY OF FINANCE

NOTICE
THE BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES REGULATION
ACT, 2000

Notice is hereby given that the Governor, pursuant to
Section 18(1){a)(ii) of the Banks and Trust Companies
Regulation Act, 2000, has revoked by Order dated the
6th March, 2009, the bank and trust licence granted
on 11th November, 1977 to Provincial Bank of Canada
(international) Limited (now called “Credit Agricole Suisse
Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.”) and amended from time
to time, on the grounds that the company has ceased
to conduct banking and trust business from within the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Wendy Craigg
Govemor
The Central Bank of The Bahamas



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Request for Tender for Security Operations at
The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute campuses
at Old Trail Road, and Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas

The Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute (B.T.V.I.) now

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:

Educated to degree level or equivalent; a professionally qualified accountant and member of a
recognized accounting body, (American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, or Association
of Chartered Certified Accountants or Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants); able to
demonstrate five (5) to ten (10) years relevant senior management experience within a large
complex organization; have the ability to demonstrate integrity and effective leadership and
management skills together with proven track record of contributing achievements of strategy and
policy development and implementation.

The successful candidate must possess excellent communication skills and be able to adapt
communication style to suit each activity/staff group; possess strong interpersonal skills and be
able to express a view convincingly coherently, verbally and in writing.

The Deputy Director of Finance will report to the Director of Finance, Corporate Office.

Job Summary: The holder of the post will be required to communicate regularly with a wide range
of senior staff both clinical and non-clinical and staff at all levels within the Authority. He/she must
also build and manage highly effective relationships with local authority partners, the public, the
Public Treasury and the Ministry of Finance.

Duties not limited to the following:

. Provides high level expertise in the areas of financial management and
corporate governance to the Board that ensures financial strategies are
effectively integrated and aligned within the corporate management
process.

. Plans, controls and monitors the flow of the Authority’s funds to ensure
expenditure is contained within budget; produces financial reports as
required by the Board, Managing Director and all its levels of management.

. Leads in the implementation of the Board’s financial strategy and plans;
ensures that appropriate levels of expertise are in place for effective
delivery of financial and management accounting services and that all
statutory and regulatory requirements are met relating to the Authority's
accounts, including the submission of audited accounts in order to meet
deadlines.

. Reviews and supervises the implementation of financial policies and
supervises approved systems of financial control to ensure the effective use
of resources and compliance with accounting standards; liaises with audit,
both internal and external to ensure systems of control are adequate and
secure; promotes optimum standards of professionalism within the finance
functions to ensure compliance with external standards and best practices.

. Coordinates integrated activities across the Authority and its institutions ensuring
the Board, Managing Director and all Its levels of management has the appropriate
skills and toots to maximize scarce resources so as to deliver sustainable improvements to
patient care.

. Ensures that there is effective coordination across
all elements of the finance functions of the Authority; contributes fully to the
business planning cycle of the Authority; liaises with the relevant key managers and
clinicians to encourage their participation in the process.

. Leads, motivates, develops and trains staff within the department to ensure that
they have the necessary skills to achieve required objectives and to encourage the
development of innovative, creative thinking and team work across the departments.

The post of Deputy Director of Finance is in Salary Scale HATM7 (B) ($48,650 x 800 _ $56,650).
Letters of application and curricula vitae should be submitted to the Director of Human

Resources, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville: or
P. O. Box N-8200, Nassau, Bahamas no later than 26th March, 2009.

invites sealed bids for the provision of Security Services at The Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Institute campuses at Old Trail Road, and Wulff
Road Nassau, Bahamas.

The Contract is for a period of twelve (12) months in the first
instance and interested security firms are invited to submit Tenders
with comprehensive details of their proposal for security operations for
a twenty-four period starting at 6:00 a.m. daily (including weekends
and holidays). The Contract will be awarded to the applicant providing
the most economical and acceptable Tender for the full duration of the
contract period.

Interested Bidders may inspect campuses between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Collection of the
specification and bidding documents can be obtained from the Reception
Desk at B.T.V.I., Old Trail Road between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:00
p.m., Monday through Friday beginning Monday, 16" March, 2009 and
obtain further information at the second address given below.

Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “Tender for
Security, Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute” and delivered
to the attention of:-

The Chairman of the Tenders’ Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach

P. O. Box N-3017

Nassau, Bahamas

The Manager

Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute
Old Trail Road

P. O. Box N-4934

Nassau, Bahamas

Bids must be received by 4:00 p.m. on Friday, 3% April, 2009
accompanied by an endorsed copy of a current Business Licence.

Persons who submit Tenders are invited to a public opening of bids at
the Ministry of Finance, in the Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building, Cable
Beach on Tuesday, 14" April, 2009.

B.T.V.I. reserves the right to reject any or all Bids.





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





PRC UT ee a]
Tea MANES TTT CC
PSE are a BTL

FirstCaribbean

FirstCanibbean sa major Canbbean Bank offering a full range of market-leading financial
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regional markets, serving 800,000 active accounts. We are looking to fill the following
position:

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, WEALTH SALES

Email applications to Mrs. Canbemae Knowles (Ennai ackress: carrlemae knowlestifirstcaribbeanbank.com }
KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Suppor the Reta Weakh Banking Director in the delivery of the segments tinancal perlonnance at operating

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

aa: BI

as

company (OROG) level across all aspect: of the business (Financial, Riek, Peoole and Customer Service)

+ Rasporsibility tor the management of sales acthity including depos gathering and product protitahiity at operating
eomperty leer

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Management across the OPO

© Overall reyoonsindity for the manajgement af the nak and conformance al the Operating Campuany's Lending Portfolia

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* Must be focused on being fully up to date on the Metall Véealth business product offering, you should also have 2
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and derek business in suppent of the Retail Wealth buniness and FistCarbbean sirategies aed) objectives

* Highly deweloped knowledge of sales management principles and processes

) Eerierce of rebhiorihyp managenent, congullative selirg ated strony rregatiolon skills

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GET THERE, TOGETHER



NOTICE
TO SHAREHOLDERS

The Annual General Meeting of Finance Corporation of
Bahamas Limited (RBC FINCO) will be held on
Thursday, 19" March, 2009 in the Governor's Ballroom
of British Colonial Hilton, Number One Bay Street, New
Providence, The Bahamas at 6:30 p.m.

D. BURROWS-HAINES
CORPORATE SECRETARY

NOTICE

The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in storage:

* TIFFANY ADDERLEY
«MELISSA GRANT

* WAYNE MILLER
*COODWIN BUTLER

* BRIAN DEVEAUN
(EVERYTHING LINCOLN)

* CHERYL WELLS

* JASON ALLEN

* KRYSTAL LORD

* MARCO ARMBRISTER

* WILLIAM KNOWLES
* BERYL EDGECOMBE
* CHARLES MUNNINGS
* ADRIAN MILLER
«ANTHONY WELLS

* MAKITA DEPRADINE
* FREDRICKA JIMENEZ
* CYRIL WOODSIDE

* GLENDAMAE BAIN

* TIMOTHY CLARKE

* GARTH SAWYER

All rentals must be paid and items removed no later than March 26th, 2005

Sstor-it-all
Soldier Road
(by Lowe's Wholesale),

Telephone: 393-0964



Bank loan quality
may not improve
until ‘next year’

IN THE ESTATE OF
WILLIAM SAWYER late of
Golden Gates #2 in the Southern
District of the Island of New
Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand against
the said estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 30" day of March, A.D.

2009, after which date the Attorney
by Deed of Power of Attorney will proceed to
distribute the estate having regard only to the
claims of which she shall have had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the estate are required to
make full settlement on or before the
date hereinabove mentioned.

Dated the 12" day of March, A.D. 2009

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, Bahamas



The Vanguard School
Lake Wales, Florida

FROM page 1B

Bahamian economy is so con-
tingent on the recovery of the
US economy.”

Much, he said, was riding on
the impact President Obama’s
stimulus package made, and
whether it restored consumer
confidence and spending by

reversing unemployment
increases and fears of further
job losses.

“Tt’s very hard to predict. We
are uncharted waters,” Mr Sun-
derji said. “I think employment
is likely to be sluggish, and we
may not have these dramatic
cuts we have seen. There’s some
resiliency there that we’re see-
ing.”

The Central Bank reported
that the mortgage arrears rate
rose slightly in January, going
from 13.24 per cent in Decem-
ber 2008 to 13.51 per cent in
January 2009. The rate of
arrears for consumer loans
increased slightly month-over-
month, from 10.82 per cent to
10.88 per cent, but commercial
loan arrears — most probably
due to a seasonal spending
boost — fell from 15.51 per cent
to 15.3 per cent after suffering
“the most marked deterioration
during 2008”.

For January 2009, Bahamian
dollar credit contracted year-
over-year by $52.9 million, with
consumer credit falling by $15.8
million and residential mort-
gage growth declining slightly
to $11.5 million. Private credit
for other areas, including busi-
nesses, fell by $10.8 million.

Analysing consumer lending
trends for 2008, the Central
Bank said net lending for debt
consolidation and the restruc-
turing of existing loans
“advanced three-fold to $98.3
million”. Credit card debt rose
by $37.4 million, while net
repayment increases of $9.4 mil-
lion were seen for automobile
loans. Home improvement
loans declined by $8.4 million.

4 Successfnl Vears Educating Students with
Learning Differences and Attention Deficit Disorder

Offers a Presentation and Reception for Interested Students and

"Their Parents

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Join School President, Dr. Cathy Wooley-Hrown
Thursday, March 26, 2000
British Colonial Hilton Hotel on Bay SL, Nassau

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Indiviinalized approach to learning

Small closes sines — typically between 5 to Ss stodents
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State of the art reading andl maths programs with astoumling results

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 7B



aS 2.
Port trustee attempt dismissed by court

FROM page 1B

of incorporation for the
Freeport Licensees and Prop-
erty Owners Association had
been issued by the Registrar-
General.

Recalling the case’s back-
ground, Justice Osadebay said
the Freeport Licensees and
Property Owners Association,
a company incorporated by
attorneys Rawle Maynard and
Maurice Glinton, then-Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce president Christopher
Lowe, and Don Martin, had
filed their initial summons on
March 30, 2007. The Associa-
tion, in its summons, was
described as a “non-profit trust
incorporated under the provi-
sions of the Companies Act
1992”.

In a subsequent summons on
June 21, 2007, the Association
sought a court order appoint-
ing a public trustee as custodian
of the GBPA under the Public
Trustee Act, with powers to also
safeguard the assets of its Port
Group Ltd affiliate and parent,
Intercontinental Diversified
Corporation (IDC).

Alternatively, the Associa-
tion also sought an order
appointing a receiver for the
three companies should the
then-receivers, Clifford and
Myles Culmer, be removed.

In reply, the three respon-
dents — the GBPA, the Prime

Minister and the Attorney-Gen-
eral — all challenged the Asso-
ciation’s ability to bring and sus-
tain the action as a corporate
entity in its own name. In
essence, they challenged
whether it had been properly
incorporated, and asked the
Supreme Court to determine
this as a preliminary issue.

After the Association had
challenged Graham, Thompson
& Co’s ability to act as attor-
neys for the GBPA, which was
then in court-appointed
receivership, Justice Adderley
heard the preliminary issues in
early January 2008. He ruled
that the Association “was not
an incorporated body under the
provisions of the Companies
Act 1992, or the law..... and as
such, did not possess the requi-
site juristic personality or capac-
ity to maintain the action in its
name”.

The action was dismissed, but
Mr Glinton, also representing
the Association, appealed on
several ground. He argued that
Justice Adderley had been
wrong to determine the prelim-
inary issues first, and that he
had been incorrect in finding
that the Freeport Licensees and
Property Owners Association
had not been incorporated
properly.

Robert Adams, representing
the GBPA, and Loren Klein,
representing the Prime Minis-
ter and Attorney-General,
argued in support of Mr Adder-

ley.

“They submitted that there
was no dispute that, at the time
of the commencement of these
proceedings, no certificate of
incorporation under the Com-
panies Act 1992 had been issued
to the appellant by the Registrar
General, and there was no dis-
pute that a licence authorising
the appellant to be incorporated
without the use of the word
‘Limited’ in its name had not
been issued by the minister
responsible under the Compa-
nies Act,” Justice Osadebay
recorded.

In his ruling, Justice Longley
recalled how Mr Glinton sent
the Association’s Memorandum
and Articles of Association to
the Registrar General, for incor-
poration as a limited liability
company, on November 30,
2006. To be incorporated as
such a company, without the
use of the word ‘limited’, the
Attorney General’s permission
is needed.

“By letter dated February
2007, the Deputy Registrar
General advised Mr Glinton of
certain concerns raised by the
Attorney General as to whether
the application to be registered
as a non-profit trust without the
use of the word ‘Limited’ in its

name fell squarely within the
provisions of the Act, and
requested counsel’s opinion as
to why he thought that it did,”
Justice Longley found.

In his February 5, 2007, reply,
Mr Glinton said the request for
extra material was “unwarrant-
ed and unreasonable”, and sug-
gested it was required for some
“ulterior” motive not in accor-
dance with the law.

“Apart from anything else, it
is clear that Mr Glinton was of
the view that his client’s appli-
cation in the form presented sat-
isfied the requirements of the
Act for the issuance of the
Attorney General’s licence, and
there was therefore no need for
additional information to be
supplied,” Justice Longley
recalled.

“His letter ended with a
threat to have the matter
resolved by the Supreme Court
if there was persistence in the
request for additional informa-
tion which the appellant had no
intention of supplying.”

The Registrar General,
though, returned the Memo-
randum and Articles of Asso-
ciation for the Association to
Mr Glinton on March 7, 2007,
explaining why the licence
application was not granted. No

RBC
FINCO

certificate of incorporation was
ever issued for the Association,
which initiated its original sum-
mons three weeks later.

None of this appeared to cut
much ice with the Court of
Appeal, Justice Osadebay find-
ing that the Association’s exis-
tence as a corporate body, capa-
ble of legally initiating and
maintaining the action in its
name, needed to be determined
before any other issue was
resolved.

As for the incorporation
issue, Justice Osadebay ruled
that the burden of proof was on
the Freeport Licensees and
Property Owners Association
to prove it was a corporate
body.

He ruled that the Associa-
tion’s core argument appeared
to be that the receipt of its
Memorandum and Articles of
Association by the Registrar
General, together with the
application, entitled it to oper-
ate even though it had been
issued with no licence or cer-
tificate of incorporation.

Stating that this was inconsis-
tent with the Companies Act,
Justice Osadebay ruled: “The
burden was on the appellant to
establish its legal capacity as a
body corporate to bring this

action. That burden, in my view,
was not discharged.

“T found no fault with the
learned judge’s interpretation
of the provisions of the Com-
panies Act 1992 relating to the
incorporation of companies.
The learned judge was correct
in striking out the originating
summons and dismissing the
action.”

Justice Longley agreed, find-
ing that a certificate of incor-
poration was a necessary “pre-
condition” for a company to
exist. Otherwise, it has no
capacity to sue or carry on a
legal action.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



RBC
FINCO

REC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the follawing:

REC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
“ALL THAT™ piece parcel or kot of land being Parcel! No
No. 44. Kool Ag Subdivision sateated in the Eastern Distinct on the

1. Allotment
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or kot of land being Lot Ne. 12 Garden Hill

Isluad of New Providence one of the Islunds wf the Commoewealth of Estates Subidivisam No. | situated in the Southern District of the Delon

REC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the follawing: the Bahamas, Siteated thereon is a Multi-Family development consisting of hew Providence omc ot the islands of ihe Commonweakh of tee Babes

Of a Duplex; one unit wok (5) Bedronmes, (2) Bathrooms ond the other Situated thereon is 2 Single kamaly Residemee consiening of (5) bedraoms and (2)
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or dot of land being Lot No, 193. Ridgeland

of the Island af Kew

(2) bedrenm, (0) bathroom banhmams.
Property Size: 60200 sy fl

L773 sq ff

Park Swhdavisiem situated in the Southern District Praperly Sieve: 5.18] sq ft

Provadence ame of the Islands of the Commenwealth of the Euharas. Building Size: 1.656 sy fi Building Sieve

Silwated thereon is a Multi-Family development consisting of o Duplex;

one unit with (2) Bedrooms, 12) Bathrooms aml the other (1) bedroae. This propery is beige sold under Power of Sole conthiped in a Momgage Dhis property is beige sold under Power of Sole contaiged in a Morigage

C1) bathroca to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED. wi FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
Praperty Sie: 4 R00 sq ft
1.307 sy ft nildrexeed ‘ll

P.O. Bax NW-7549 addressed fo dhe Manager, Koval Bank Collections Cemire. PO. Bax

Building Size All ohfers should he Forwarded in writing ing sealed envelope, itters should be forwerded im writing in & senled em,

to the Munager, Royal Kank Collections Centre

This property is beige sold under Power of Sale cantaiged in a Momgage Nassau. Rohooas anal marked “Tender TO, All affers must be received M-7549, Nassan. Bahamas and marked “Tender 2245". All offers must he

to FINANCE CORPORATION OF RAH AALAS LIMITED. by the clase of bosiness 4:00 p.m... Friday 27th March, M09 received by the clasg af business 4:02) p.m., Friday 27th March. 200

OL

Programme Benefits

All adfers should be borwarded in writing ina sealed cnvelipe, addresced

to the Munager. Royal Kank Collections Centre. BO. Box NW-7549
Nassau. Roahomsas anal marked “Tender 2405", All affers must be received

by the clase of bosiness 4:00 g.m.. Friday 27th March, 2009

The College of The Bahamas

RBC

Full 4 year academic

=a —
scholarship

PRESIDENT’S SCHOLARS
Four years of leader-
ship development and |

mentoring

REC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

Invites high school seniors to apply for

“ALL THAT” piece parcel or | 53 West Winds

Subdivieon

“oof land being Lot No

2009 Scholarship Award

aiualed in the Western Dastrict of the Islund of New

Providence ane of the Islands of the Commonwealth at the Bahamas.

Stipend for books

Siigubed thereon is on undeveloped vacant lund.

Property Sive: 9.375 sq fe

International
conferences

Dhis property is beige sold under Power of Sole contalmed in a Momgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

Retreats

All otters shoukl be forwarded im writing in & sealed envels
Ire, FAQ. Bax

ALL afters musi be

addressed fo the Manager. Koval Bank Collections Cen

M-7549, Nassan. Bahamas and marked “Tender 3278"

Private study lounge
with computer access

received by the clase af business 4:00 pom... Friday 27h March. 2009

Internships & career
opportunities

RBC

Special recognition at
graduation

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the follawinge:

Life lasting friendships

“ALL THAT” piece parce! or lot of land being Lot Ko. 27B, Prats
Clase Subdivisan sitweated in tke Western Dastrict of the [sland of Kew

Prowdence one of the Islands of the Commenweaolth of the Buhaomas.

A supportive
environment

Situated thercoe is & Single Family Hesidence comsisting af 13)

Bedromms, (2) Bathrooms.

Property Sise: 5.842 sq ft
Building Size: 1.220 sq f All applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.50
or higher and SAT scores of 1800 or pass 7 BGCSE
core subjects with at least 5 A grades at the end of
this year’s examinations.
Deadline for applications is Tuesday, March 31st, 09
Download brochure at www.cob.edu.bs

This property is beige sold under Power of Sole cantalmed in a Momgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
shoukl be forwarded im

‘All otters wring in & soled envela

dddressed to the Munager. Koval Bank Collections Centre, FO. Bax
M-T549, Naseem. Bahamas and marked ~Teeder | S78". All offers musi be

received by the close af business 4:00 pom... Friday 27h March. 2009





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009



To advertise in The

in circulation, just call
502-2371 today!




















AUDITORS’
REPORT

To the Shareholders of National Bank of Canada

THE TRIBUNE





$12m poultry farm
A as awaits environmental
approval for go-ahead

FROM page 1B

We have audited the Consolidated Balance Sheets of National Bank of Canada (the “Bank”) as at October 31, 2008 and 2007 and the Consolidated
‘Statements of Income, Comprehensive Income, Changes in Shareholders’ Equity and Cash Flows for the years then ended. These financial
statements are the responsibility of the Bank’s Management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based

on our audits.







We conducted our audits in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan and
perform an audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes
examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing
the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by Management, as weil as evaluating the overall financial statement






where.”

Describing his constituency’s
economy as “very depressed”,
Mr Peet added: “The only sem-
blance of any employment now
in north Andros is agriculture,
where many of the residents are
resorting to farming in the back
of their yards or on acreage
nearby.

“The agricultural industry is
one thing that a lot of locals are
going into. Fishing is very chal-
lenged. The fishermen in my
area have had very little suc-
cess in getting their fish sold
because of the economic down-
turn. Agriculture is the only
answer in the short-term.”

Mr Peet said the unemploy-
ment situation in his con-
stituency, and in many Family
Islands, was “much worse” than
the 12.1 per cent and 14 per
cent-plus rates recently record-
ed by the Department of Sta-
tistics for New Providence and
Grand Bahama respectively.

Describing those statistics as
“sugar coated”, and not reflec-
tive of the rising number of dis-

couraged workers not even
seeking jobs, Mr Peet said
unemployment in many Family
Islands and his constituency
stood at 15-20 per cent “mini-
mum”.

He also urged the Govern-
ment to provide an update on
the Bond’s Cay project, which is
backed by Colombian singer
Shakira, and was approved just
prior to the 2007 general elec-
tion.

“Tm at a loss to figure out
what’s happening with that, but
that would go a long way in cer-
tainly providing some hope for
that part of the Bahamas — the
Berry Islands and Andros,” Mr
Peet said. “We have a situation
here where there needs to be
some relief, because the area
desperately needs it.

“Social services is extremely
challenged because the demand
is SO great. We’re trying to pull
together and see how we can
keep hope alive. But it’s
extremely challenging. There
has to be relief; urgent relief,
before things get even worse.”

presentation.

In our opinion, these consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Bank as at October 31,
2008 and 2007 and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended in accordance with Canadian generally accepted
accounting principles.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays

Stier , fl ‘tl lakh secs 2

Samson Bélair/Deloitte & Touche s.e.n.c.r.b
Chartered Accountants

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
SUPREME COURT No. CLE/Qui/ 01715
Montreal, Canada, December 3, fi ichi
ada, D 3, 2008, except as for Note 34b) which is under the date of December 11, 2008 IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT tract of
land containing by admeasurement 3.50 Acres
situate Southwestwards of “Airdale Subdivision”
and North of “Joan’s Heights” in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Davco Limited whose

Registered Office is in the City of Nassau, New

Providence, Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court

cael to have its Title to the following land investigated
——— ———___-- 254 283 i ieti i

a Se rm ecto eins

Securities a Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court

Available for sale 12,322 8,442 in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.
Held for trading” 33,863 30,828

46,185 39,270

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

(millions of dollars)

As at October 31

ALL THAT tract of land containing 3.50 Acres situate
approximately 335 Feet Southwestwards of the
Northern portion of “Airdale Subdivision” and North
of “Joan’s Heights Subdivision” in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence aforesaid bounded
NORTHEASTWARDLY by land formerly the property
of Alfred Patterson but now the property of O’Brien
Loans Co. and running thereon Seven hundred and
Twelve and Eighty-nine One-hundredths (712.89) Feet
SOUTHEASTWARDLY by a Ten (10) Feet wide Road
Reservation leading to “Airdale Subdivision” aforesaid
and running thereon Two hundred and Fifteen and
Fifty One-hundredths (215.50) Feet
SOUTHWESTWARDLY by the said Ten (10) Feet
wide Road Reservation and running thereon Six
hundred and Eighty-five and Seventy-eight One-
hundredths (685.78) Feet and
NORTHWESTWARDLY by the Cornelius Forbes
Subdivision and running thereon Two hundred (200.00)
Feet which said tract has such position shape marks
boudaries and dimensions as are shown on the diagram
or plan filed herein and thereon edged in “PINK”.

Securities purchased under reverse repurchase agreements 7,868 5,966

Loans 5andil
Residential mortgage 15,772 15,895
Personal and credit card 15,289 13,116
Business and government 21,149 19,377

52,210 48,388
Allowance for credit losses (469) (428)

51,741 47,960

Other
Customers’ liability under acceptances 4,274 4,085
Fair value of derivative financial instruments 9,814 4,883
Premises and equipment 460 426
Goodwill 740 703
Other intangible assets 183 169
Due from clients, dealers and brokers 2,273 4,313
Other assets 2,134 1,982

19,878 16,561
129,332 113,085

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Deposits 5and17
Personal 33,098 30,215
Business and government 36,872 33,797
Deposit-taking institutions 5,827 6,561
Deposit from NBC Capital Trust 225 225
4

76,022 70,798

Other Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal

Acceptances 4,274 4,085 office hours at the following places:-
Obligations related to securities sold short 15,829 16,223
Securities sold under repurchase agreements 7,151 2,070
Fair value of derivative financial instruments 8,588 3,615
Due to clients, dealers and brokers 2,389 4,341
Other liabilities 5,286 4,751

- 43,517 | 35,085
Subordinated debentures 2,255 1,605

Non-controlling interest 2,029 960

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau; or

(2) The Chamers of James M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue in the

City of Nassau, Bahamas.
Shareholders’ equity
Preferred shares 400
Common shares 1,575
Contributed surplus 32
Retained earnings 2,793
Accumulated other comprehensive income (163)

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed
o forms, verified by an Affidavit and other related





113,085 requirements to be filed therewith by the 16th day of

April A.D., 2009. Failure of any such person to file
and serve a Statement of its, his or her Claim together
with the other related requirement by the 16th day of
April A.D., 2009, will operate as a bar to such claim.

Louis Vachon Paul Gobeil
President and Chief Executive Officer Director

Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the Audited Accounts from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas)
Limited, PO. Box N-7788, West Bay Street, Nassau, The Bahamas. JAMES M. THOMPSON

ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 9B



aS 5.
City Markets ‘read riot act’ over late financials

FROM page 1B

flow/finance payments to sup-
pliers.

Bahamian publicly-listed
companies are expected to pub-
lish their year-end financial
statements within 120 days (four
months) of the period-end. In
Bahamas Supermarkets’ case,
that was October 31, 2008, but it
is now more than four months’
past that date with no sign of
any figures forthcoming.

The City Markets’ parent has
also missed the deadline for
publishing its fiscal 2009 first
quarter financials, which should
have been released by year-end
2008, as quarterly reports are
supposed to be disseminated at
least 90 days after the period
closes.

The absence of accurate,
timely financial information has
caused increasing frustration
among Bahamas Supermarkets’
estimated 1,500 minority share-
holders — both institutional and
retail — who collectively own a
22 per cent stake.

Tribune Business under-
stands that a minority investor
group is still assessing whether
there are strong enough legal

RBC
FINCO

grounds, under the Companies
Act, to launch a class action-
type lawsuit against Bahamas
Supermarkets and its Board. It
is thought that they are delaying
any move until publication of
the fiscal 2008 financials.

The Securities Commission is
also understood to be frustrated
about what it views as its mini-
mal powers, under the present
Securities Industry Act, to make
Bahamas Supermarkets com-
ply. In the past, Mr Deveaux
has told Tribune Business it had
to rely on moral suasion and
other limited processes.

As a result, this newspaper
understands that the Bahami-
an capital markets regulator is
pushing for all Bahamian ‘pub-
lic’ companies to be listed on
the Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX),
doing away with the ‘over-the-
counter’ market where the likes
of Bahamas Supermarkets and
RND Holdings are currently
listed.

This would have the effect of
placing these companies under
a further level of regulation,
namely BISX’s Rules. One way
to encourage this move, Tri-
bune Business has been told, is
for the Government to enforce

the payment of Stamp Tax for
all transactions of public com-
pany shares where the stock is
not listed on BISX.

Given the information vacu-
um created by Bahamas Super-
markets’ failure to make timely
disclosure of its financial state-
ments, it is not surprising that
rumours and speculation con-
cerning the company’s health
continue to swirl.

The latest one, swiftly denied
by Bahamas Supermarkets’
executives, was that the com-
pany planned to close four
stores — Independence Drive,
Village Road, Rosetta Street in
Palmdale, and Eight Mile Rock
in Grand Bahama.

Both Basil Sands, Bahamas
Supermarkets’ chairman, and J
Barrie Farrington, a fellow
Board director, were adamant
that no decision regarding store
closures had been taken. How-
ever, both acknowledged that
directors and management were
constantly assessing the 12-store
portfolio to ensure each one
was pulling its weight.

“There’s nothing to that,” Mr
Sands said of closure specula-
tion. “The truth is, like any busi-
ness and especially in this envi-
ronment, we evaluate all the

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

md having regard for he PEM

“col to if

Chairman's review of the unaudited reall

For the three months coded Jar Wry o 1, 209

Scan

stores, and if any of the stores
need to be shut down, we’ll do
so. But no decision has been
taken. We’re not closing down
any stores.”

Mr Farrington, who chairs the
Board at majority shareholder
BSL Holdings, added: “No deci-
sion has been taken on any-
thing. It’s just a matter of look-
ing at business operations to
look at viability, but no such
decision has been taken. It’s still
a matter of directors and man-
agers assessing the business.”

When asked whether this
meant that Bahamas Super-
markets was constantly evalu-
ating all its stores to ensure
none represented a drain on the
company, Mr Farrington
replied: “I think that’s a fair
comment, and that’s not to cre-
ate uncertainty, but operating
in this particular climate, much
like any business, we must
examine the contribution each
is making to the whole.”

Meanwhile, Mr Sands said he
hoped the audited financial
statements for fiscal 2008 would
be published “very, very soon”,
although he could not give a
precise date. He also declined to
comment on the reasons for the
delayed release.

“We’re just dealing with mat-
ters with the auditors at the
moment,” Mr Sands said, “but
all the accounts are finished. I
can’t say whether they’ll be
released next week, but they
should be released soon.

“I don’t want to give the
impression we’re having prob-
lems with the auditors, but
we’re working to sort out some
things before we release them
[the financial statements] to the
public.”

Although declining to give
figures, Mr Sands said the fiscal
2008 results were “in line” with
the previously forecast $10 mil-
lion net loss. “All I can say is
that we forecast at least a $10
million loss, and it’s around $10
million,” he added.

Several observers with inti-
mate City Markets knowledge
also told Tribune Business they
would be surprised if the com-
pany closed down the store
locations claimed, in particular
Rosetta Street, which had
always done “brisk business”.

One source, recalling the last
years of Winn-Dixie ownership,
told this newspaper: “All the
store locations were profitable.
There was not a single location
where they were losing money,

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
OOSSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF IMCOME (Unaudited)
Three Months Enibed Janwary 31, 200%

(Expressed im Rahansion dollars)

INCOME

Klet ir 3 =
Et INTE St come

feet intcresl! imcome alter provisien for credit losses

Fees and commission
Total mcome
NOMI N TEREST EXPENSES
val nan-inlerest expenses
NET INCOME
LRNINCS PER SHAR

Three ¥bonths

Endud

Jnguory 31, 2004

laa

although one store in Grand
Bahama, at Eight Mile Rock,
was marginally profitable.”

Investors in BSL Holdings,
the buyout consortium that
acquired majority ownership of
Bahamas Supermarkets from
Winn-Dixie for $54 million in
summer 2006, include the hotel
industry pension funds, Royal-
Fidelity’s private equity arm,
and private investors such as
Craig Symonette and the late
Franklyn Butler.

The group’s largest investor,
though, is Trinidadian con-
glomerate Neal & Massey,
which inherited at least a 40 per
cent BSL Holdings stake
through its acquisition of Bar-
bados Shipping & Trading
(BS&T). Neal & Massey is now
the management/operating
partner for City Markets, hav-
ing taken over the running of
all operations.

BSL Holdings has already
injected at least $10 million in
new equity capital into
Bahamas Supermarkets. Neal
& Massey led the way with $5
million last summer, and the
Bahamian investors followed
suite with a matching amount
— split into two $3 million and $2
million tranches.

Three Months
Ended

damuary 31, ZI

474,808)

773,912

4 aa

2 7a 4

15 B54

Cant,

Fag)

5405, 75h

COU) 0.21]

PIR ASCE COOK PORATION OF RAH AARLAS LIMITED
OONSOLIDATED STATEMENT (FF CHANGES IN f CUTTY (Ul mamulitedd)
Three Months Ended Junonry 31, Die

(Expressed im Kaliamian dollars)

Share Giemeral

Premium

Share

Reserve

Hetaimed

DWne § StmKMp Capit il Posion, WS

Cupital

Rarnings

larecl tor the quar

pany mane ihe soon y to
1 Wha exten, during ihe

FIAANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (Unaudited)

As 00 Jamucary 20, 20 amd

Deteher 31, DR

(Expressed in Bahamian dolhars)

ASSETS

SRIULOOYy PeSEIVE OOO Wel

DWesiie nts

POTAL

Fanwary 31, 21M

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS EQUITY

LIABILITIES
Deposits
Dividends payable
Chher liabilities

SHAREHOLDERS EQUITY

Share capital

Share prem UIT

MOTAL

Omober 31, 2008

7H OR LT

v1 Te Ree?

5 AE

TIA, LAS 616

Kalamey al Chether 31, 20 SU RaR EEL 2 553358
Met profit for the period

lividend

DIMI

Halamee at Janmary 31, 500.000

Kakimecy at Octeber 3], 2s MT
Set bees for the perked
lividends

Balance at Janmary 31, D0

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
DOONSOLIDATED STATEMENT (FF CASH FLAWS (Unandided)
Lhree Manths Ended January 31, Die

(Expressed im ahamian dollars)

danuary 31, D4

CASH FLAWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

CASA FLOWS PROM INVESTIMG ACTIVITIES
Supe hese oT lige) aes.
uncharse |) Preece ol imagstrment

Mel cash from inveestin

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING. ACTIVITY

RET INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, BEGINNING CF THE PERION
CASH ASD CASH EQUIVALENTS, END OF THE PERIOD

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
Mates to Unaedited Interim Comsolidated Financial Statements
lhree Vlonths Ended January 31, D009

l, ACOCOLA TING POLICIES
These

Intemational Accountme Standard
im the pr

inttiim condensed fingicial sivements have been

14 Interim Financia

Reporting
eparation af these interin

awaiklited financial statements for the vear enced October 71. ORE.



prepa ed i

34.500 | 45
fA Th
EMM
4S

4 Us Lea

January 31, 2008

aceorndane: with
The aon lnbiie polices used

vent Wilh these wed in the



PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bank sustains ‘large one-off

FROM page 1B

year to October 31, 2008, the
Barbados-headquartered bank
said loan loss expenses were up
$15 million or 88 per cent year-
over-year, which it attributed
partly to “increases in specific
non-performing loans, with
some large one-offs in the
Bahamas geographic segment”.

These loans, and the borrow-
ers’ identities, were not
revealed. But the analysis on
FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) said: “Loan
loss expenses were significantly
higher than the prior year by
$11 million or 89 per cent, due
primarily to the overall increase
in loan volumes, which increas-
es the inherent risk provisions,
as well as increases in specific

non-performing loans.

“The ratio of loan loss
expenses to gross loans has con-
sequently increased from 0.5
per cent in the prior year to 0.89
per cent at the end of this year,
with an increase in the ratio of
non-performing loans to total
loans from 6 per cent to 8 per
cent.”

The latter figure puts First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) above the Bahamian
commercial banking industry’s
average for non-performing
loans, which at end-January
2009 stood at 6.3 per cent,
according to the Central Bank
of the Bahamas.

But in this somewhat hyster-
ical environment, following
CLICO (Bahamas) collapse
into liquidation and the

rumours that provoked a run
on FirstCaribbean deposits in
Freeport, Tribune Business
again feels it is worth empha-
sizing that the bank remains
financially sound. Creditors and
depositors need not panic, as
there is nothing to suggest First-
Caribbean will fail.

It remains highly profitable,
and enjoys the capital support
of both its Barbados parent and
that bank’s 90 per cent majority
owner, Canadian bank CIBC.

The FirstCaribbean parent’s
annual report also revealed that,
during fiscal 2008, the Bahami-
an subsidiary repaid the full out-
standing $20 million principal
on the corporate bonds it issued
in November 2006.

A note to the financial state-
ments indicated these bonds

were repaid some three years
before they were due to mature.
The statements said: “In
November 2006, the group
issues unsubordinated term
redeemable floating rate notes
with a face value of $20 million
through its Bahamas subsidiary,
due November 2011. These
notes were repaid in full dur-
ing the year.

“Interest on the notes was
payable at a rate of Bahamas
Prime plus 0.75 per cent per
annum. The average effective
interest rate during 2008 was
6.3 per cent.”

Elsewhere, the report said the
24 per cent or $26 million
decline in FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas) net
income, from $109.858 million
the prior year to $83.9 million,

was driven primarily by lower
operating income and “higher
loan loss expenses”. The latter
rose from $12.34 million in fiscal
2007 to $23.35 million in 2008.

The Bahamian operation’s
gross loans to borrowers stood
at $2.6 billion at year-end, an
increase of $133 million or 5 per
cent year-over-year. Some $111
million of this increase came in
the Bahamas (the remainder
being in Turks & Caicos), and
originated mainly from the
bank’s corporate, capital mar-
kets and wealth management
subsidiaries.

FirstCaribbean also pointed
out that its Bahamian subsidiary
benefited from an $8.2 million
one-time gain in 2007 due to a
change in its group benefits pol-
icy. Stripping this out, the

decline in net income would
only have been $17.7 million or
17 per cent.

FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) saw its oper-
ating income (all its non-interest
revenue sources) fall by 50 per
cent or $16.1 million to $16.018
million, compared to $32.143
million the year before.

In an e-mailed reply to Tri-
bune Business’s questions,
Sharon Brown, FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
managing director, said: “Net
trading income from

foreign exchange transactions
increased by $12.9 million, or
99 per cent. Translation losses
increased to $12.9 million from
a gain of $1 million in the pre-

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

HIDALGO INVEST SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 of The International Business
Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, HIDALGO INVEST
SA is in dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was the 11" day of March, 2009. Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
HIDALGO INVEST SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

AVALINA GROUP LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, AVALINA GROUP LIMITED is in dissolution. The
date of commencement of dissolution was the 11" day
of March, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the
Liquidator of AVALINA GROUP LIMITED.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HERBLIGEN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RISING SUN CAPITAL
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— «,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RISING SUN CAPITALINVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

KASHA INVEST SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, KASHA INVEST SA is in dissolution. The date of
commencement of dissolution was the 11" day of March,
2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator
of KASHA INVEST SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

ALGERIAN INVEST SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, ALGERIAN INVEST SA is in dissolution. The
date of commencement of dissolution was the 11" day
of March, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the
Liquidator of ALGERIAN INVEST SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAWN HORIZON LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GLASSHOUSE
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— (,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GLASSHOUSE INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

SEE next page

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

ACOLI CONSULTING LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, ACOLI CONSULTING LTD. is in dissolution. The
date of commencement of dissolution was the 11‘ day
of March, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the
Liquidator of ACOLI CONSULTING LTD.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

ALAREEN INTERNATIONAL
INVESTMENTS SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, ALAREEN INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENTS
SA is in dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was the 11" day of March, 2009. Dillon Dean
of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of ALAREEN
INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENTS SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BARAKI LTD.

= f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BARAKI LTD. has been completed; a Cer-
tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
THE DATONG
COMPANY LIMITED

— «—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of THE DATONG COMPANY LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 11B



non-performing loan increases

FROM page 10B

vious year. Similarly, losses
from interest rate instruments
also increased markedly, from
$5.6 million in the previous year
to $20.1 million in fiscal 2008.
“As discussed in previous
quarterly reports, these changes
reflect the weakened perfor-
mance of the bank's trading
investment portfolio, and hedg-
ing relationships which were
severely impacted by the effect
of the US economic downturn
on market values, interest rates
and credit spreads.”
Meanwhile, FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
also saw a $7.2 million, or 12.7
per cent, increase in operating
expenses during fiscal 2008

compared to the previous year.

Ms Brown told Tribune Busi-
ness that staff costs were the
“primary driver” behind this
rise, having risen by $9.2 mil-
lion or 33.3 per cent “due main-
ly to accounting for retirement
benefits”.

She further explained: “In the
previous year, the Bank record-
ed an isolated one-off curtail-
ment gain totalling $8.2 million.
Excluding the one-off fiscal
2007 gain,

staff costs for the year would
have been $36 million, and the
year-over-year change would
have been an increase of $1 mil-
lion, or 2.9 per cent. Similarly,
the total operating expenses
would have decreased by $1
million from the prior year, or
1.5 per cent.

“Remuneration expenses
remained well contained. The
net increase was 1.1 per cent,
and primarily reflects contract-
ed increases. Pension costs,
excluding other post retirement
benefits, increased approxi-
mately $ 1 million over the pri-
or year. Other staff costs were
flat.

“Occupancy and maintenance
expenses decreased by $2.5 mil-
lion, or 31.4 per cent,

year-over-year. The change
reflects a reduction in IT con-
tract maintenance costs. Other
operating expenses increased
$1.3 million, or 9 per cent, pri-
marily due to an increase in pro-
fessional fees.

“The efficiency ratio-operat-
ing expenses as a percentage of
total

Revenues increased to 37.5
per cent in fiscal 2008 from 31.8
per cent in fiscal 2007.

Excluding the effect of the
curtailment gain in fiscal 2007,
the efficiency ratio would be
36.4 per cent, and the year-over-
year change for fiscal 2008
would be a modest 3 per cent
increase.”

FirstCaribbean’s Bahamian
operation saw its net interest
income increase by $8.4 million
or 6 per cent year-over-year,
due to improved spreads and
reduced interest expenses. The
latter offset a drop in interest
income.

The bank said interest
income fell because of “lower
average volumes and yields for
interest lines, but mainly due to
lower yields for loans and cash

placements, and due to lower
average volumes for invest-
ments”. Interest expense fell
because FirstCaribbean had to
pay less on the deposits it
attracted.

Total deposits fell by $223
million or 6 per cent to $3.4 bil-
lion, the reductions being felt






particularly in the retail, corpo-
rate and wealth management
sections of the bank. Invest-
ments fell by $0.6 billion or 36
per cent year-over-year to $1.1
billion, due to market value
declines and reduced holdings
in FirstCaribbean’s trading and
non-trading portfolios.

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Legal Notice

NOTICE
QAMAR LIMITED

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of QAMAR LIMITED has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HEEMA INVESTMENTS LTD.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HEEMA INVESTMENTS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHASING THE MOON
CORPORATION

—_ ¢, =
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of CHASING THE MOON CORPORA-
TION has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LANGMORE
MOUNTAIN CORP.

— «*—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LANGMORE MOUNTAIN CORP. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GLOBAL WEALTH
HOLDINGS INC.

— *—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GLOBAL WEALTH HOLDINGS INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RIO BRANCO INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
Al HSIN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HIGH MOUNTAIN LIMITED

— «,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HIGH MOUNTAIN LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
ELEVATED
MANAGEMENT INC.

SS ¢> —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ELEVATED MANAGEMENT INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SILVER PINE CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PERTUS INT’L

INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JUSSY INCORPORATED

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of JUSSY INCORPORATED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Government stimulus package praised

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

STIMULUS packages are
unproven when it comes to
spurring economic growth, but
capital works projects such as
road works and infrastructure

upgrades, as the Bahamas has
initiated, are sound investments
for taxpayer dollars, according
to an economics expert.
Michael LaFaive, director of
fiscal policy at the MacKinac
Centre for Public Policy in
Michigan, suggested the

pla

Bahamian government was
focusing public money in the
right direction.

“Tf the Government is going
to do anything that has a net
impact on the economy, it’s
basic infrastructure; roads,
bridges and sewers,” he said.

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“There is a mountain of evi-
dence that purposeful, govern-
ment-directed economic devel-
opment planning programmes,
fail to live up to expectations.

“Rather than embrace more
of the same, it is my hope that
Puerto Ricans, Americans and

Bahamians actually work to
remove obstacles to economic
freedom and association and
trade, and let a diversified peo-
ple, with diversified interests,
invest and consume as they see
fit.”

Mr LaFaive said economic
development incentives have
little impact on firm location
and investment decisions.

Therefore, if the Bahamas
was to follow the US model for
an economic recovery plan, it
would have displaced huge
sums of money that, according
to Mr LaFaive, would have neg-
ligible economic impact in the
long term.

doing enough to curb the
impact of the global recession
on the Bahamian economy.

Mr Lafaive’s argument favors
governments marrying sound
investments, such as infrastruc-
ture upgrades, with policy
amendments.

He said there was not much
that can be done in the shor-
term, but to focus on retooling
policies that might hinder eco-
nomic growth.

“For government to say ‘?’m
going to stimulate economic
growth in this area’, it would
first have to suppress it in
another or a bunch of little oth-
er areas that probably add up to

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Many cynics who criticise the
Government’s “social safety
net” have accused it of not

no net gain in employment or
economic growth,” he said.

“Like other nations at this
moment in economic history,
the Bahamas should be con-
cerned about sustaining eco-
nomic growth of any type right
now, never mind micromanag-
ing growth in narrowly targeted
industries- du-jour favored by
government central planners,”
he said.

Rick Lowe, vice-president of
the Nassau Institute, a Bahami-
an economic think-tank, said he
was glad the Government was
not following the economic res-
cue model of the US.

“The best the Government
can do is encourage an envi-
ronment that makes investors
want to invest, and that does-
n’t necessarily mean taking tax-
payer dollars to give to some-
body else. My point is they
should stimulate everybody or
nobody,” he said.

“What I find happens is that
when governments convince us
that they have the answer to
everything, we give up initia-
tive. Its’ human nature.

“We just throw in the towel
and say: ‘Oh well, the Govern-
ment is doing it, so why should
we bother’.”

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COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
SUPREME COURT No. CLE/Qui/ 01714
Anew Insurance Brokera BE of ImMipany 1S ready to SeETVe

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT piece or
parcel of land containing by admeasurement
11,971 Sq. Feet situate on the North side of Wulff
Road and 98 Ft. West of Darling Street in the
Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, Bahamas.

NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that Davco Limited whose

the local market. The partners of APS announce the for-

mation of their new company, Assured Financial

Services Insurance Agents and Brokers Limited.

The company is headed by Dashwell E. Flowers, a well

known and highly regarded insurance industry profes
I 1 ' r

sional who has been in the business for some twenty

four years, most of which have been in senior level posi-

Dashwell E. Flowers

tions. “T welcome the opportunity to provide Bahamians
and residents with the best insurance products from the
country's leading providers. As a full service broker, we
are dedicated to offering the very best in auto, health,
life, and other insurance products and services," said
Mr. Flowers, the company's president and chief operat-
ing executive. He added, “We have recruited an execu-
tive team that has over one hundred years of experience
in this business, one of our main focus areas is client

service; emphasizing the building and maintenance of

Registered Office is in the City of Nassau, New
Providence, Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court
to have its Title to the following land investigated under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the said Court in accordance
with the provisions of the said Act.

ALL THAT piece or parcel of land containing by
admeasurement 11,971 Square Feet situate on the
Northern side of Wulff Road and approximately 98 Feet
West of Darling Street in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas aforesaid bounded

NORTHWARDLY by land described in Plan No. 1233
and running thereon Eighty-seven and Fifty-four One-
hundredths (87.54) Feet on the East partly by land now
or formerly the property of Kathleen Darling and partly
by land now or formerly the property of Cleomie Clarke
and running thereon jointly One hundred and Fifty-eight
and Fourteen One-hundredths (158.14) Feet on the
SOUTH partly by the said Wulff Road and running
thereon Fifty-two and Eighty-four One-hundredths
(52.84) Feet and partly by land formerly the property of
the Petitioner but presently occupied by Preston Stuart
and Byron Campbell and running thereon Forty-five and
Eleven One-hundredths (45.11) Feet on the WEST partly
by the land lastly described and running thereon Seventy-
eight and Twenty One-hundredths (78.20) Feet and partly
by land now or formerly the property of the Estate of
one Poitier and running thereon Eighty-six and Thirty-
two One-hundredths (86.32) Feet which said piece or
parcel of land has such position shape marks boundaries
and dimensions as or shown on the diagram or plan filed
herein and thereon edged in “PINK”.

constructive and rewarding, relationships. Excellent
client service means that we are always accessible, not

simply at renewal time.”

Also part of the executive team, and a partner in AFS, is
Keith L. Major; he serves as director of sales and market-
ing. "During these challenging economic times, it is
important to have partners you can trust. At AFS, due to
our experience in the business, we have considerable

even of the insurance ind ustry a will utilize

bet ther ieee tee bo secure peering insurance
coverage,’ said Mr. Major. Mr. Major previ-
ously served as vice president of mar-

keting

SERVICES OOM pa nies,

at three local financial

Keith L. Major Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal office

hours at the following places:-

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau; or

(2) The Chamers of James M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed forms,
verified by an Affidavit and other related requirements
to be filed therewith by the 16th day of April A.D., 2009.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of its, his or her Claim together with the other related
requirement by the 16th day of April A.D., 2009, will
operate as a bar to such claim.

JAMES M. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER

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MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009





The stories behind the news

INSIGHT



Pindling article gets
ur readers talking

Re: The tragic young pilot
who knew too much

Mr Marquis,

The day after your Insight article
about the pilot who knew too much
appeared in The Tribune, radio talk
show hosts Algernon Allen, Steve McK-
inney, their guests and most callers had a
field day casting aspersions against you
with some of them making it clear that,
because of this article and others, you
should be kicked out of the country, nev-
er to be heard from again.

As a sound, unemotional thinker of
more than 40 years, please accept my
sincere apologies for the crap that non-
thinkers, and people — who, if given the
slightest chance, would literally revise
history in a heartbeat — have been
throwing at you. Their thinking is so
shallow and emotional that they would
just as soon destroy the messenger rather
than examine the message, simply
because they do not like the message.
Whether there is merit in the message, or
whether it is true or not, is of no concern
to them.

I read the article carefully, and I saw it
for what it was; the recollection of certain
events in the life of the elderly Chauncey
Tynes Sr. and most notably, his son the
pilot, Chauncey Tynes Jr. You did not
write fiction. You wrote what Mr Tynes
told you, and yet, not one of the would-
be revisionists turned their wrath against
Mr Tynes. "Kill the messenger” is their
clarion cry. I learned a long time ago
that the young and the elderly seldom
tell tales. Mr Tynes in his old age has
no reason to tell lies on Lynden Pin-
dling.

Furthermore, I was fortunate enough
to have been around at the height of
Lynden Pindling's fame and power, and
being an avid reader and a good dis-
cerner of persons, he could never get
me to follow him. In fact, I never felt
that Pindling was a fit and proper person
to lead this country. I have copies of all
of the commissions of inquiry, and they
do not speak very complimentary of Mr
Pindling nor of his administration of the
affairs of this country, nor in fact his
administration of his personal and finan-
cial affairs. And IJ easily recollect that in
his testimony before the 1983/4 Com-
mission of Inquiry into drug-trafficking,
Pindling had great difficulty recalling
the origins of large sums of monies that
were deposited into his personal bank
account. In fact, His Grace Archbishop
Drexel W Gomez in his minority report
stated most emphatically that he could
not say with certainty that drug-related
money did not find its way into Mr Pin-
dling'’s bank account. When I compare
this to certain disclosures of Chauncey
Tynes Sr in your Insight article, that Pin-
dling allegedly received pay-offs from
the notorious drug trafficker, Joe
Lehder, I find it rather easy to believe.

When I was a young boy, my mother
told me that only people with something
to hide are afraid of the truth. Further-
more, the Bible says that "you will know
the truth, and the truth will set you free."
Bob Marley said that we are to emanci-
pate ourselves from mental slavery, only
we ourselves can free our minds. Anoth-
er song says that there is none so blind as
he who will not see. There is a huge dif-
ference between a person who cannot
see and one who will not see. And per-
sons like Paul Moss and other die-hard
PLPs would do well to know that no
amount of spin or attempted distortion
of history will keep Bahamians blind any
more. The mental emancipation move-
ment in the Bahamas is alive and well.
And persons ought to know that when
they decide to enter public life their
every action, good, bad or ugly, will be
open to public scrutiny and commen-
tary. And to them, their heirs and suc-

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RESPONSE to last week’s Insight article on Chauncey Tynes Sr
and his claims about Sir Lynden Pindling’s alleged links with
Colombian drug czar Joe Lehder has been so heavy that
all space is this week being devoted to feedback...

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

CHAUNCEY TYNES’ ASSOCIATIONS WITH JOE LEHDER AND LYNDEN PINDLING

The tragic young pilot

O08, 4H WADE
Measoity Calor



FEEDBACR® ——_——_—
cessors, I say if they do no evil, then
they should fear no evil. It is as simple as
that.

Mr Marquis, I hope that even now
you are training several Bahamians who
when you retire, will be able to step up to
the plate and carry on your bold, inves-
tigative and most importantly, fearless
kind of journalism. God knows this coun-
try needs it badly.

— Yours etc

W Forbes

DON’T go! The Bahamas needs you.
I think your article was fantastic. I have
not heard one person that has said any-
thing bad about it yet (apart from the
obvious ones). The group who are jump-
ing all over you are not as big as they
think they are.

— Well-wisher

JUST a quick note to say you have
my 100 per cent support in your “eye-
catching” article. If you get that much
public reaction from the article then it
must be DAMN good and DAMN
true...smile...Keep up the good work!

— Insight follower

Iam so happy you continue to
"touch" these taboo topics that are only
mentioned in hush tones around town.
The truth will set all of us free and it is
high time we all started facing the truth
about many of these "honourable men”.

Please keep it up, you are doing God’s
work.

— Fed up

STAY focused, Mr Marquis. God sent
you.
— Caller

YOUR name is being echoed in the
halls of parliament, in the churches and
even on aeroplanes.

Your article was excellent. You have
enlightened us in so many ways.

Pindling is not really the father of the
nation at all. I thank you for having the
guts to do what you did.

You are going to be Known around
the country for years to come. I am on
your side. Stay strong.

— Well-wisher

KEEP your shoulders strong and your
head high. I buy my Tribune every Mon-
day to read what you say. Don’t let those
big-mouthed people frighten you
because these things are true.

All of us Know that Pindling was no
saint. He was a devious man who did a
lot of devious things in this country.

Chauncey Tynes is of old age and is
not going to lie. Tell them to get off your
back. These people don’t appreciate the
truth.

When you have retired and gone,
please keep writing your Insight articles
from wherever you are.

Thank you for everything.

— Woman caller

AFTER hearing the PLPs speaking
out against you on the radio, it is awful to
think these people are still around.

The New PLP were supposed to come
in with a new image, but you have dug
them out of their holes and showed them
up for what they are.

Under Pindling I was afraid to open
my mouth. You have done a wonderful
job.

— Insight supporter

SEE page 2C

ot Aba es Mater Mel Do Modi Bd BST-E1E





PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

See
Pindling article gets our readers talking

FROM page 1B

THE really sweet thing about
all this is that the PLP have no-
one in their ranks who can write
like you, so they are left gibber-
ing with rage. Oh, it does my
heart good, it really does.

— Call me Jacqueline

AS a journalist of many years
standing, and a regular visitor to
the Bahamas, I would like to ask
you one question: why are you
working in a third-rate banana
republic when you could be mak-
ing megabucks in one of the
world’s big cities?

I have read many of your
Insight articles over the last three
or four years and I rate you right
up there among the best. No-one
on the NYT, Washington Post or
the big British dailies engages the
issues in the way you do. I believe
a collection of your recent work
would win a Pulitzer, no sweat, if
you worked across the water in
the United States. I'd love to
meet for a beer one day.

— A Grantham, London

I find it amazing that an article
such as "Tragic young pilot who
knew Too much", printed March
9, 2009, would be used to try and
discredit and belittle all of the
great work that Sir Lynden Pin-
dling has dedicated his life to.

What is so appalling about
your article is the fact that every
name that was called where dis-
persions (sic) were cast on the
characters of the individuals
named, all of these individuals
are deceased and cannot defend
their honour. There are some ref-
erences to individuals whose
names are not called such as the
police officer you claimed
received the $50,000 from Car-
los Joe Lehder, I can only guess
that this individual is "probably"
living.

I hope that you noticed that I
placed the word probably
in parentheses at the end of the
previous paragraph. The reason
for me doing so is to point out
the great fallacy in Mr Tynes Sr’s
rationale that quote "Pindling
was born to a Jamaican father,
Arnold Pindling, and an

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RECORD-SETTING RESPONSE TO A



unknown woman who was prob-
ably Haitian". This makes it
apparent to me that Mr Tynes
Sr’s rationale in assessing his rea-
sons for disliking Sir Lynden Pin-
dling is also flawed and biased. I
further would like to reiterate
this, by pointing out that Mr
Tynes Sr’s claims that his son was
a money carrier for Carlos "Joe"
Lehder but he reiterated that his
son told him he did not fly drugs.
I ask this question: is it possi-
ble that his son went to fly drugs
and something of ill fate hap-
pened to him that had nothing
to do with Sir lynden Pindling or
any other great Bahamian that
Mr Tynes would like to blame
for the apparent ill fate of his
son.

I could go on and poke numer-
ous holes in this article that obvi-
ously is filled with so many other
fallacies and unsubstantiated
claims that it would probably
require me to have an entire
newspaper edition. But I will not
entertain this any further. I hope
that other right thinking Bahami-
ans can also see the political

motivations behind such
garbage.

Signed

— Adian Carter

INSIGHT replies: There are
none so blind as those who will
not consider the evidence.

Mr Marquis

I have been following Insight
for quite a few months and I must
say that I have never read any-
thing quite like that. (The tragic
young pilot who knew too much.)

I don’t know who you are but
you sure as hell are always on
target.. I was blown away...for-
get those naysayers and those
b...s less politicians. Stand your
ground and write it as you see it.

I’m looking forward to the
next edition with great anticipa-
tion.

— Colin Saunders

Dear Mr Marquis, thank you
kindly for an incredible article.

It is most unfortunate, howev-
er, that some or perhaps many
do not share my sentiments.

The article simply contained
information from a private inter-
view conducted with a grieving
Bahamian father, whose son has
gone missing under some strange
circumstances.

Ironically, a Senator who close-
ly associates with a disgruntled

HOPE

sect in our community, with
respect to your well-informed
and precious article, sought on
public radio to incite outrage on
the part of her affiliates.

This sect seems to have much
difficulty with the truth being
told.

Your Insight article, which has
caused many much discomfort
this week, sounds very much like
the truth to me.

One need only recall the find-
ings of the Commission of
Inquiry’s Report 1984 and con-
nect it with the Insight edition of
Monday, March 9, 2009, to gain a
full conclusion on the matter.

“A foreigner with a slick line in
patter, was growing fat off a drug
king's pay-offs while those who
brought him to power continue to
live dirt poor in over-the-hill
shacks.” Ah! what fitting truth
lies within those inverted com-
mas.

I've rejoiced much as a result
of the publishing of this edition
of Insight.

Albeit, it does very little if any
to assuage the grief borne by the
family of Pilot Chauncey Tynes, I
publicly offer my sympathy to
them, may Allah help them with
their grief.

What I think,

— Julius McKenzie

Dear Mr Marquis,

Looks like you hit another cen-
tury, from all the flak being
thrown up it is obvious that the
truth hurts. Yes, Sir Lynden was
the first black prime minister of
the Bahamas, but that does not
exonerate him from the facts of
his own history. Bahamians need
to read more. Instead of using
the Internet for porno and shop-
ping they should try one of the
search engines and put in the
names Lynden Pindling and Car-
los Lehder. I assure you they
would be reading for the rest of
their lives on this topic alone.

Not only is there affiliation but
Mr Lehder himself on more than
two occasions gave statements
and testimony under oath that
he paid off Pindling and other
officials numerous times.

I clearly remember my father
sitting me down before going to
school one morning and watching
the NBC report with Lynden Pin-
dling being exposed and his total-
ly useless belligerence at the
time. In addition to this, the case
of two other Bahamian offi-
cials who were caught in a hotel

: [a Pap, fl x
. an 4T

room on video in Florida brag-
ging about their connections and
later arrested followed only days
after by the then prime minister
of Turks and Caicos.

It is also fact that Lynden Pin-
dling was a victimiser and thanks
to him the Public Service is in
the state that it is now due to his
precedent of stifling expatriates
and promoting the best butt-kiss-
er while killing off any inspired,
dedicated employees in the
process. It was quite humorous
to hear a former prime minister
even remind you of your status
this week, I wonder what he
would say to Barak Obama, Pres-
ident of the United States, if he
got irritated, a man of African
descent and born in Hawaii. I
guess if you don't have pies,
throw mud.

All the best, continue to
encourage and enrage the mass-
es to read in your most provoca-
tive way...

Sincerely yours

IAM getting calls from women
whose husbands were killed dur-
ing the drugs era in response to
your article. They are telling me
of what they went through
because of it.

There are few protests from
the PLP about your article
because most from that era know
what you said it true.

Tam sick of this “Father of the
Nation” garbage. He was not my
father. He was not even a
Bahamian.

It is time the truth was told,
and it is also time that these so-
called heroes were shown up for
what they are. They are not
heroes at all. They are a bunch of
self-serving sons of bitches.

— Nassau businessman

Dear Mr Marquis

I am writing to say thank you
for such a thought-catching arti-
cle in Monday’s Insight segment
of The Tribune.

Tread the article in its entirety
whilst trying to maintain an
objective view of the story. How-
ever, as an open-minded Bahami-
an with a good grasp of the polit-
ical history of the Bahamas, it
was difficult to read this piece
and not see the obvious truths of
our not so distant pass.

While there are some who will
go to their graves declaring Pin-
dling a Bahamian hero, I am one
of those who hold the belief that

CARRIES REGISTRATION.
BEYOND 250 MARK



whilst Mr Pindling and the PLP
had done a lot of good for the
country, they also did a lot more
damage as well.

Far from the alleged corrup-
tion involving Joe Lehder, there
have also been accusations
involving Pindling and other
PLPs, and many more question-
able characters, some of whom
are to this day still in the public
domain.

Bahamians, before the final
stroke of the pen is drawn in the
history book of the Bahamas
should we not stop and question
the accusations levied against our
former and even present lead-
ers? Or do we bury our heads in
the sand and continue to perpe-
trate these lies to our future gen-
erations?

Mr Marquis, it is unfortunate
that young Mr Tynes had to lose
his life in order for the truth to
come out, but I assure you that in
time the entire legacy of our cor-
rupt leaders will be told and peo-
ple will realise their legacy for
what it was — self-serving and
destructive. Only then will the
Bahamas be freed from the
bondage of paying tribute to a
charlatan.

Regards,

— Thomas Charlton

PERRY Christie’s press con-
ference, in which he attacked
John Marquis, summed up this
man perfectly.

Christie showed that he is
ready to say anything to hold on
to the party leadership, even to
the point of contradicting the
views he held in the 1980s when
he and Ingraham parted compa-
ny with Pindling over corruption
in the government.

He was also echoing the old
Pindling anti-foreigner message,
describing Mr Marquis as a
“guest” in our country.

The reason Christie and the
rest of the PLP are so eager to
cling to Pindling’s torn-up legacy
is that they have nothing else.
They are finished. Good rid-
dance!

— GP

AFTER all the misery Pindling
caused, the PLP want to save his
face. You can’t erase history.

— DE

CAN The Tribune tell us what
they are going to do for news
when Marquis leaves town?

— Interested observer

That’s how it is. In ae short years, the Ride for Hope has become
the country’s most successful one-day charitable fund raiser and
has earned a well-deserved reputation for being a truly memorable
event.

as they move along the route together. A family of four wrote
afterwards, ““We had a memorable and very emotional day! It
couldn't have gotten any better!”’ One cyclist, who has participated
in a number of charitable bike events in 4 different countries said,
“Thank you so much for all your efforts. This was probably
the best organized event ever—and we had so much fun.” A
group of girl friends entered together. They sent in an email the
very night of the ride. “Thank you for the tremendous effort ...
the organization was first class and the support was
tremendous.”

People of all ages participate and at every level imaginable. "I
literally haven't been on a bike in decades", said Patrice before
the 2008 start, "so I am just going for 10 miles." Patrice did 30
miles, the inspiration and enthusiasm of the riders around her carried
5 J her along easily. After she finished, she said with deep pride in her
3 = . own accomplishment, "That was the most amazing experience
The first yell to register for the 2009 Ride for Hope did so a of my life!"
week after last year’s event. A veteran of all three rides, the New
Yorker said, “I plan my yearly vacations around the Ride for
Hope. I wouldn’t miss it for the world!”

Even volunteers are deeply moved by the event. Said one, “I was
a first-time volunteer. It was a wonderful experience and I was
proud and privileged to be a part of the effort. Hats off all
around. I'm anxiously awaiting next year's event.”

At one end of the spectrum, five year olds ride their bikes—some
with training wheels—to the Ice Cream Shop and back and are
welcomed at the finish line like the champions they are, while at
the other end seasoned cyclists set their sights on the full 100
miles—a Century Ride, the “Holy Grail” of sorts for cyclists.

Two weeks later, in May of 2008, the second cyclist registered.
This time, however, the rider had never before participated in the

Another had this to say: “ First of all let me say 'Well Done!'
The Ride for Hope was an amazing event. I was so excited to
be there helping the cyclists achieve their goals. Sadly though,
I will not be able to volunteer next year—I intend to ride
instead!”

Ride for Hope. For three weeks he had heard inspiring stories from
friends who rode and he wanted to make sure he was signed up for
2009.

Families enter, companies form teams, friends band together for
support and fun or with a common purpose in mind. Fathers and
sons set off together forming special memories and iconic images

er. | ~~ ee

gh Pa
: voto

aes





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT

Re: The tragic young
pilot who knew too much

THANK you for your fear-
less straightforward reporting of
events.

It was obvious to me long
before your article that Pindling
was a crook and a dictator mas-
querading as someone who
loved and associated with the
grassroots in order to hoodwink
them. Indeed he did a superb
job in fooling a lot of the people,
but I was not one of them. Both
my parents, now deceased, told
me what they thought of this
man, and it wasn't complimen-
tary. My father came here from
Grenada to join the police force
during the 1950s and he was run
out of the country by Pindling
because he knew too much dirt
and refused to carry out orders
that would have hurt the poor
people.

In addition, Pindling is respon-
sible for smudging the charac-
ter of our nation and we have
never recovered from it. He and
everyone else in the party who
knew of wrongdoing and
remained quiet about it or prof-
ited from it must carry the guilt
also. In fact, we are still a
"nation for sale". Anything that
needs to get done in this country
requires a grease job because
that's the mentality that began
with "The Father of the Nation"
and it persists to this day.

He led the PLP and by asso-
ciation they were and still are
associated with corruption and
greed. I will NEVER vote for
them unless they come with a
clean slate of candidates to
replace the recycled politicians
that, in my opinion, are only
there to get what they can and
retire in comfort. Only ignorant
fools can take pride in Pindling’s
legacy.

— DC, Nassau

Good morning, I just got
through reading the article post-
ed by yourself in today's Tri-
bune. It was a very interesting
read, one that I enjoyed
immensely! While I am not one
to play party politics, I must say
that your article held my atten-
tion and has expanded my per-
sonal outlook on the history of
our nation concerning its devel-
opment and the factor that con-
tributed to where we are now as
a nation. Thank you. Have a
great day.

Sincerely

— Cutelle § Major

I READ with interest your
story of the tragic young pilot
Chauncey W Tynes and found it
timely to appear on the anniver-
sary of his disappearance 26
years ago. My name by itself will
tell you nothing but I will outline
what your article did not.

My association with Mr
Chauncey Sr and his family goes
back a ways and he has always
been an honourable and
straightforward man of which
the Bahamas and the world at
large have too few.

The name of at least one oth-
er person on that ‘lost’ flight was
Donald A Moree, my brother,
who was never heard from
again. While younger than
Chauncey he was no less
involved in the dirty and blood-
thirsty business that is the drug
trade. He left a grieving father
and mother to carry on. This was
and is not the only case of
Bahamian families left to won-

der about their loved ones no
matter what would have called
them to lead this kind of life.
My brother left a wife six
months pregnant and now ason
nearly 26 years old he has never
seen.

I am sure every Bahamian
family has a story to tell. Politics
with all its dirty affairs and illic-
it alliances needs to be added
into this category. It is high time
for us as Bahamians to put our
house in order, weed out the
corrupt and prosecute those who
should be prosecuted and aim
toward a better life for all. Most
sound-thinking Bahamians I
have spoken to agree with the
articles you write airing their
dirty laundry in public and often
lament that they don’t go far
enough.

— David Moree Jr

The involvement of Lynden
Pindling with Joe Lehder and
the tragic consequences it held
for young Chauncey Tynes,
clearly depicted in your excel-
lent article of Monday March 9,
epitomises the tragedy of the
political culture of our country.
Until we can shake off the con-
tinuing effect of a barely con-
cealed gangster mentality that
infects our political culture, there
will be no government here that
we can be proud of.

It is regrettable that the PLP
refuses to do anything except try
to canonise Lynden Pindling,
and as his protege rules the
FNM converting it also into a
Pingdomite-like party, honest
Bahamians like Chauncey Tynes
Sr cannot hope that in their life-
time politics will emerge from
the gutter that the Pindling-led
PLP led it into.

There is, sir, no party of con-
trast of any size, no relief from
the culture of leadership and of
politics spawned by the same
man who willingly consorted
with men like Joe Lehder, care-
less of the fate of young Bahami-
ans such as Chauncey Tynes Jr.

Tam pained to think that this
man will one day be made a
National Hero by some PLP
government, and that they
expect that my sons will honour
and want to be like him. Too
many of our schools also teach
our children to want to be like
Pindling, ignorant of the true
nature of this very dangerous
and cunning man. Your article
will be added to the required
reading of my sons so that they
can see that it is not Daddy
alone who has told them about
the true nature of the man their
teachers seem set on canonis-
ing!

The great pity is that Lynden
Pindling did not do the
damage alone: too many
Bahamians assisted him in his
twisted agenda, many finding
out too late that they were sim-
ply tools of a maximum leader.
Greed and power were their
weakness, and lack of the guts to
stand up for basic principles.
Better to be alone than to be in
Bad Company is my watchword.

The Bahamas’ recovery from
the Pindling era will continue to
take some time. However, as
more is written revealing the
truth, recovery will be speeded
up.

In my books on Bahamian law
and on our constitutional issues
Ihave touched on the false view
of Pindling and the PLP as true
‘founding fathers’, and the rela-
tionship between our present



FEEBBACRâ„¢

lack of progress in certain areas,
and the ‘all for me’ power poli-
tics of the post-1973 era, that
includes the FNM under Ping-
domite control.

There still remains a pressing
need for a centre of political cul-
ture not based in the PLP and its
legacy. Your well presented arti-
cle on Chauncey Tynes high-
lights in a personal way the true
gangster nature of the leader-
ship during the critical period
when Bahamians ought to have
been led by only persons of the
highest principles.

It is only by a wide based
approach to analyse the under-
currents of events in that period
will the full truth be arrived at,
and more of our people recog-
nise that we must move delib-
erately away from the practices
that were spawned by Pindling
during that time.

As a young man in that peri-
od, who refused to be seduced
by the ‘you can get rich by
Xmas' approach of the PLP at
that time, I wish that Chauncey
Tynes had heeded more closely
his father's admonitions. Even
basic commonsense ought to
have led him to consider the per-
il of his situation, and the ruth-
lessness of those intent on con-
cealing their gangster opera-
tions.

It is interesting that while Mr
Tynes Sr is proof, sir, that not
all Bahamians are motivated by
money and greed, and that this
nation does indeed have its
share of men with admirable
principles, his son was seduced
by far lesser men than his own
father!

It will be some time before
Mr Tynes’ 'beloved Bahamas’
can be restored, but there are
those who hope to see it done in
our lifetime.

It will not happen overnight,
since an essential pre-condition
will be the complete eradication
of the negative effects of Lyn-
den Pindling and his henchmen
on the political and moral cul-
ture of our country. How long
will that take when PLP leaders
and their clones in the FNM
continue to praise Lynden Pin-
dling as our ‘founding father’ is a
major guess, but as long as there
is free journalism, and as long
as those who recognise the truth
publicise it, that time will come.

Yours truly,

— Dr Dexter Johnson,

Founder: The Bahamian

National Party

I would just like to say that
we as young Bahamians need to
know the truth about the people
who we hold in high esteem in
this country. These people who
we put the welfare of our nation
in, the ones we look to for lead-
ership have for too long
deceived us. They have seduced
us with their smart talk, they
plan with cleverness to present
themselves as genuine when in
reality they are a sham, a coun-
terfeit, a fake and a fraud.

T understand the times we live
in call for us uniting and moving
forward as a people but we must
first deal with the past and the

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truth must come to light and it’s
stories like these we need to
know so we as a people cannot
be so simple and guileless that
we appoint people who betray
us.

— Just Cause

Hi there, I would like to let
you Know that I enjoyed the
piece you did on Chauncey
Tynes. Although I will not speak
to the other parts of the story, I
want to let you know that I am
from North Andros and the
community of Nicholl’s Town
has suffered tremendously as a
direct result of the drug trade
and the alliances you speak of
in your piece. We have lost
countless young men and
women, many of whom were on
a “drug run”. Some time in the
early nineties we lost eight mem-
bers of one community on a
flight from Chub Cay. They
were shot down. My life changed
that day.

Tapplaud your fearlessness on
this issue and ask that you inves-
tigate this more.

Sincerely,

— Latara Dell

I AM so glad you recorded
the real story of Sir Lynden Pin-
dling’s origins. My family was
from East Street and everyone
in that neighbourhood knew that
he was not born to Viola Bain.
They all knew she had not deliv-
ered a child.

The next minute she showed
up with this boy and before you
knew it he was the big-shot run-
ning the country.

My mother scoffed at Pindling
being called The Father of the
Nation. She called him The
Father of Damnation.

When I was growing up in the
1980s, [remember students say-
ing they were going to sell drugs
for a living. It seemed then that
everyone was living on drugs. I
saw it with my own eyes. I saw
the real damage it caused.

The PLP is not a political par-
ty. It is a mindset. It’s all about
‘me’ and feelings of entitlement.
Pindling taught this nation that
you don’t have to obey any laws.
When he threw the mace out of
parliament, he was telling people
to disrespect this country and its
institutions. He hijacked the
cause of majority rule and took
it to hell.

We need a total clean-out of
the PLP and FNM. We need an
Obama. But where do we find
such a man?

— Fourth generation Conchy
Joe

WITH all his criminal associ-
ations, should not Sir Lynden
Pindling be called The Godfa-
ther of the Nation?

— Don’t call my name
(Expat)

I read your article in yester-
day's newspaper about ‘The
tragic young pilot who knew too
much’ and me and my co-work-
ers were shocked. I didn't know
things like that used to happen
in the Bahamas and I think all of
this information you have needs

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to be in a book. What you think?

—M Cole

I THANK you for the article
on Sir Lynden Pindling. I was
proud to have had dealings in
the past with Sir Stafford Sands.
While he certainly deserved to
have his face on the banknotes,
LOP didn’t.

— Old-time Expat

(The above letter is a para-
phrased version of an e-mail
inadvertently lost during trans-
mission into an editing format -
Editor)

THIS is Tuesday and the taxi-
drivers at the airport are still
arguing over The Tribune’s
Insight article about Sir Lynden
Pindling.

The FNMs among them are
saying all this should have come
out a long time ago. The PLPs
are saying all wrong-doing done
in the past was justified.

I praise Mr (Chauncey) Tynes
Sr for saying what he did. No-
one can do him harm now. He is
beholden to no-one.

— Cab-driver

AS a former government offi-
cial, may I thank you for the arti-
cle relating to Chauncey Tynes
(father and son). I know for a
fact that another official close
to Sir Lynden Pindling delivered
regular pay-offs from Carlos
‘Joe’ Lehder to the prime min-
ister.

I think your article revealed
mysteries to certain people in
the PLP that even they didn’t
Know about, but it is important
that history be told as it was.
From my own knowledge, the
points made by Mr Tynes in
your story were broadly true.

— Ex-official

BOY, youre getting lambast-
ed on the radio today. But don’t
be deterred — everything Mr
Chauncey Tynes said was at
least 99.9 per cent true.

Many Bahamians don’t like
to hear the truth about them-
selves because this society is so
steeped in corruption that any-
thing goes. It is because of this
corruption that we are now a
Third World banana republic.

I am really sad to hear that
you’re leaving the Bahamas
because we need good men in
this country.

— MC, Nassau

YOU'RE running into a buz-
zsaw with this one because you
are unleashing the spirit of
Africa. Pindling won the 2002
election for the PLP by dying
two years before, which is a form
of promotion as far as African
cosmology is concerned.

He may have been corrupt but
that’s irrelevant in the sense that,
when you write, you do so in the
democratic tradition, whereas
he was the chief, inspiring a mix-
ture of adoration and fear. The
kind of picture I am painting is
impervious to fact and truth.

— Academic

ABSOLUTELY great article!
The truth needs to be told and
you, together with Mr Chauncey
Tynes, told it... am so pleased
this story, which has been drift-
ing around the Bahamas for
years now, has finally come to
the fore. Great journalism.

— Insight follower

THE worst decision the PLP
ever made in government was

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to allow John Marquis to stay
in the country in 2006 when they
deferred his work permit.

— Leading PLP supporter
(overheard conversation)

I MUST congratulate you on
an excellent piece of journalism.
I have never read anything like
this in my whole life. I thank you
so much. It shed so much light
on things as they really were. I
love you. You are a great man.

— Woman reader

PAUL MOSS is a “no name
wonder” trying to make political
capital out of your article. But
no-one is fooled by people like
him anymore.

— R, Nassau

(Moss, a would-be PLP can-
didate issued a press release
attacking the Insight article,
claiming it was ‘repulsive’).

RIGHT on the button again. I
understand the PLP is organis-
ing a ‘whip round’ for your pen-
sion fund just to ensure you
don’t change your mind about
retiring.

— GB (Expat)

SIR, I want to congratulate
you on your article. Don’t let
anybody scare you. This is a
democratic country, a free coun-
try, not some communist coun-
try. There are some people who
don’t like the truth, who are
upset by it. But you keep telling
it like it is...

This is something I’m going
to save for my children and
grandchildren. In fact, ’m com-
ing down to The Tribune right
now to buy three or four more
copies.

Mr Chauncey Tynes is a man
of great integrity. I’ve been talk-
ing to my friends and they say he
paid a high price for his honesty
because he is in a house that’s
falling down.

Those with their millions need
to help this man. I admire him.

— Woman caller

Re: Funny names

I missed your article on funny
names last week, but on seeing
this morning's paper I had to
check it online. I have a few
from my college days. During
my undergrad days in NY, there
was a girl named Constance
Stank. No-one called her Con-
stance, though - she was known
as Connie.

A few years later, for my MSc,
I went to the London School of
Hygiene and Tropical Medicine,
where I was introduced to a very
nice demure English lady who
was the course administra-
tor. Her name was Gwenda
Hoare.

—DA Curtis

AT school I was told of a
book called ‘Sliding Down the
Bannister’ by someone called R.
Stornaway.

However, I never really
believed such a book existed, or
indeed any author of that name.
However, the association of
words never failed to make me
smile.

— Onlooker

MY dad used to tell me of a
schoolmate of his called Ben
Dover. “I wonder if he had a
cousin called Stan Dupp?” he
liked to joke.

— Marie, Winton

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PAGE 6C, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE'S

THE TRIBUNE



I'M SORRY I
DIPN'T GET A
CHANCE TO SAY
GOOPNIGHT TO

APRILE

LOOK LIKE YOU

DON'T HAVE
A CARE IN

THE MOMENT,

THE WORLD

I'M HOME. T DIDNT GET
MY PROPELLER BEANIE

TODAY, DIDI?





AS

4a
Lesh

“EVERY BIRTHDAY PUTS HIM ONE YEAR CLOSER
10 LEAVING HOME.”

Across

Uninspired
footman (10)

produce weariness (9)

JUST RIGHT AT |;







SHE'S OFF
TO SPAIN IN
THE MORNING!
YOULL SEE
HER AGAIN!

IN THAT CASE, MR. B.,
1 GUESS I'LL SAVE MY



1S FICTION



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down

1

6 Count in German (4) 2
10 Mature, or mature toa
point (5) 3
11 With us details can

12 Taking someone on and
winning (8) 5
13 Moral principle held by the
thick-skinned (5) 7
15 Refreshed as sleep
passes away (7) 8
17 An inch out perhaps, but
maintaining
contact (2,5) 9
19 Agirl after a bit of
butter for her 14
kneecap (7)
21 Nota straight 16
musician? (7)
22 Perform aerobatics in an 18
advertising display (5)
24 In the main perhaps he’s 20
all at sea (8)
27 Make sure as sure can 21
be (9)
28 Not an all-American name
for a girl (5) 23
29 Girl right at all
times (4) 25
30 Have one nightcap too
many? (5,5) 26

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution










WHEN? WHY DON'T WE
ALL HAVE PINNER HERE
WHEN SHE RETURNS?



VE GOTTA
START LOCKING

NEWS FOR LATER THAT FRONT

sud pyOM ‘aur ‘eEDINUAG SEAM}EAT BuNY Aq 6D0eE

paRlases



HAHA! IT TOOK WEEKS “SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED.
AND WEEKS OF WAITING, | BATTERIES NOT INCLUDED. “
BUT AT LONG LAST {T's

WERE! NOW 1 FINALLY, ‘

FINALLY GET TO PUT ITON!



UDG

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

3/14

Difficulty Level *&

Leave the car where one
can take a stroll (4)

One kept — in
suspense? (9)

lan’s confused with love
for a girl (5)

A king with supporters
stages a recovery (7)

A ship, for example, with
first-rate missile (7)

Being coarse on the golf
course (5)

Is it instrumental in
warning Paris pedestrians?
(6,4)

Governed, having been
shown the way (8)

Main part of a book taken
by travellers (3,7)
Distressed Royalist living
the life of a hermit (8)
Taking bullets from an old
gun | dismantled (9)

Not a sunny greeting?
(3,4)

Cafe and inn combine
somehow to make

Across
1 Dispenser of
medicines (10)
6 Brusque (4)

EASY PUZZLE

money (7) 10 Maintain (5)
Dad’s brother Sam is in 11 Ad-lib (9)
the U.S. (5) 12 Portray in words (8)
Exhausted after a day’s 13 Pitch f 4
shopping? (5) itch forwar
Found on stage (4) suddenly (5)
15 Even-tempered (7)
17 Account for (7)

Yesterday’s Easy Solution io isan eee

Across: 1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8
Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk,
14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18
Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder,
25 Younger.

Down: 1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4
Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7

Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember,

14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20
Beau, 23 Dig.

Across: 1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 21 Raining heavily (7)
Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 22 Provoke aversion
Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 in (5)

Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 24 Common sense (8)
Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. :

Down: 1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 27 Not guilty

Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 judgment (9)

Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, | 28 Construct (5)

14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 29 Long hard journey (4)
Step, 23 Sad. 30 Cave-dweller (10)





























APT 3-G




GREAT. I'LL BE SPENDING THE 2J
EVENING PICKING OLIVES OFF
THIS GNORMOVS PIES

PARTY PIZZA
FOR MAGEE/,

Was
€ ;
vik
\

iia 4
Nf
Q
HE THINKs IT

\)
MAKES HIM LOOK LIKE
SEAN CONNERY

OFRANK BOLLE



©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

MARVIN

YOUR FATHER
HAS STARTED
TO GROW

AFTERNOON,
LADIES T THINK HE
LOOKS LIKE A

TOILET BOWL

PO You HAVE ANY THING BUT HE HASN'T
Ee ee TO FINIGHEP een neT:

OUR ne TY DRIVE

HCP goer Gere al Four
Bier mere oan we make
from the betters dicen here?
In in oo ead, eae berber
ares) bet ied) Gere: only. Enel
cual ealain Line eek beer
auf hers crcl fhe sh lea ne
nine ther mor Mo pina.

TODAS TARGET

ane! 215 ee pine 41:
e=cHEeBuL 41 dir ore]
mores

Feduleon

SMURDATS SOLUTION
wd cmd alin Gael chad

chiki coe dae) clan chm
(|g find ool ood onl enka cmd
. , coma IPOMICIRAL bic lowch
eer Lee! beech moe milo meh

eect olde



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.











Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer



















































©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





























a Py as
m2 1 /4B4 38/7 9/3
8/7/9 AW3 4/1 8/5
M7 2032 17
eo 8/6 /2|1 Bi 4/2
g wi
Bom occ
eS? 9 I7 8 o EN 3 1
7(8/9/2|6 BNO 813
3
Difficulty Level *& *& & & afl4 3/416) 1/2 8 7 2 |





Heads | Win, Tails You Lose




South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.

what’s more, there was nothing the
defenders could do to stop him.



NORTH West led the king of diamonds,
@K 5763 which Bell ducked. If West had now
Â¥6 shifted to a club, declarer, after learn-
#753 ing of the 3-0 trump division, could
#AKJ2 have avoided a second diamond loser
WEST EAST by establishing dummy’s fourth club.
o— #0104 But West led another diamond at
VÂ¥Q87542 VK I93 trick two, taken by the ace, and when
#KQI6 #1082 Bell next cashed the ace of trumps,
#854 #Q 109 he learned that East had a trump trick
SOUTH coming. It looked as though the con-
#A9852 tract would now depend on winning
Â¥A10 a club finesse, but Bell found a way
#A94 to make 10 tricks without the finesse.
763 At trick four, he played the ace of
Down The bidding: hearts and contmued by ruffing a
1. International South West North East heart in dummy. He then exited with
treaty (4) 14 Pass 34 Pass a diamond, won by West with the
2 Consequently (2,1,6) 44 ; ; os jack.
3 Ridicule by Opening lead — king of diamonds. West could do no better than
imitation (5) re : ee me a the ace. ee
: The ideal goal in bridge is to then played the K-x of trumps, sad-
: ne ee establish a “heads | win, tails you dling East with the lead and render-
7 Superior (5) lose” position. ing him helpless. East had to return a
ee renal a Consider this deal played by club or yield a ruff-and-discard,
y uncertain

14
16
18
20
21

23
25
26



either of which gave South the con-
tract.
The endplay developed by Bell

Bruce Bell, New Zealand star. He got
to four spades and ordinarily would
have made the contract easily. How-



(5-3-2)
Disintegrate (8)



Ribes rubrum (3,7)
The butterfly bush (8)
Strong dislike (9)
Shallow port boat (7)
Interval of

delay (4,3)
Resentment (5)
Unmentionable (5)
Not in operation (4)



ever, since East happened to have all
three missing spades and the guarded
queen of clubs as well, it might seem
that the contract was doomed. But
Bell made his game anyway, and,














was typical of the “heads | win, tails
you lose” position. No matter how
East-West defended, Bell had a
countermeasure available that would
get him home safely.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.






THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16TH, 2009, PAGE 7C

{INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MAarINE FORECAST









Pe UOMUDILE

Ff SO:

ny rns yy
























































Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
a y a High = Low W High =Low W NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
_ : in 0| 1 |2 3 |4|5 6|7 8 | gl10 ACARD ie wine : as au . Tuesday: _$ at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
|. — FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
md bat ——e— ~ Be LOW | MODERATE | HIGH | V.HIGH | EXT. Amsterdam 52/11 43/6 pe 5110 39/3 s ie § at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
le ORLANDO) Ankara, Turkey 34/1 24/-4 sf 45/7 30/1 ¢ = RBACO ‘Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
Hight 85°F/29°C A full day of Clear. Plenty of sun. Partly sunny with a Partly sunny and Times of clouds and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 59/15 49/9 s 52/11 42/5 pe Tuesday: __$ at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73°F
( L g “65°F 48°C AS sunshine. shower possible. pleasant. sun. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 71/21 58/14 pc 72/22 64/17 sh
(Low: 65°F/ 'e ilies High: 82° High: 79° High: 81° High: 79° Bangkok 95/35 79/26 pc 96/35 79/26 c
us et . 646 sue - 6 3 7 Barbados 84/28 75/23 s 84/28 75/23 s
Paanek 1 ee High: 83 Low: 71 Low: 71 Low: 69 Low: 69 Low: 68 a ES) Barcelona 61/16 46/7 s SR TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
ara ie 7 UNV Cee A eLearn i aii
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High: 84° F/29° C 4 y = | _ 89°-69° Fs 84°-73° F High Ht.(ft.) Low —_Ht.(ft. Beirut 50415 46/7 s B16 57/13 s
Low: 64° F/18°C : a. = The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:01am. 27 6:18am. 03 Belarade 50/10 31/0 sh 45/7 33/0 c Seattle
ai @ ¢ _ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 12:14pm. 22 6:17pm. 0.2 ean 47/8 29/3 c 48/3 29/-1 sh 47/38 Ja
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j Z gh 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesday 123 am. 24 803am. 06 Brussels 51/10 42/5 pc 53/11 37/2 pe 58/43) (MILD)
( a BS ABACO Temperature 0 154p.m. 20 8:03pm. 05 Budapest 49/9 28/-2 pc 46/7 33/0 pc
f a High: 81° F/27°C HIGH oeceececccececesesteseseetsteseeceneseseeceseees 82° F/28° C Thursday 24am. 23 04am. 06 Buenos Aires 75/23 58/14 pc 76/24 59/15 s
Z _ Near c LOW ooeesesnsee 72° F/22° C Y o58pm. 20 9.06pm. 05 Cairo 70/21 48/8 s 72/22 56/13 s
. - ow: 68° F/ Normal high ..... 79° F/26°C = CO 90/32 66/18 pc 96/35 74/23 s
me A Normal low . 65° F/18° C Calgary 37/2 14/-10 c 31/0 15/-9 pc
: iyo , @ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's Hight .csocssseseenenssnseee 87° F/30° STRUT Crt). Cancun 87/30 62/16 s 87/30 63/17 s
" — High: 84° F/29°C i Last year $ low pinay eraeateeetan 74° F/23° C " " Caracas 83/28 68/20 c 84/28 68/20 pc losangeles)
Re Low: 68° F/20° C @ i Precipitation a tenes 7 AL Casablanca 79/26 55/12 s 81/27 52/11 s 470/54
As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....0..c.ceccceeeeeeee 0.00" unset... .... p.m oonse Copenhagen 46/7 42/5 sh 49/9 36/2 pc
i FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date Last New First Dublin 52/11 43/6 sh 5412 41/5 pc
High: 83° F/28° C @ High: 80° F/27° C Normal year to date oo... 4.27" Frankfurt 5412 42/5 po 5713 35/1 po
Low:71°F/22°C Low: 66° F/19°C Geneva 57/13 37/2 pc 50/15 38/3 s Housto
4 an Per eaeen _ oes Bl
- Forecasts and graphics provided by (e avana S$ $ , MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.18 Mar.26 Apr. 2 Apr. 9 Helsinki 34/1 28/-2 c 34/1 27/-2 sn oe 84/66
ELEUTHERA FX Xj T-storms :
High: 84° F/29° C 5 y 7 Hong Kong 73/22 64/17 s 73/22 64/17 s Rain Fronts
_ Low.69°F/21°¢ NASSAU High: 83° F/28° C Islamabad 84/28 55/12 c 89/31 60/15 pe Se Cold =e
F High: 83° F/28° C Low: 67° FA9°C Istanbul 53/11 41/5 pc 521 43/6 r Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
Lease Jerusalem 55/12 34/1 56/13 30/3 s Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Wal aa
‘ m NORETITSSSU 79/99 5A/12 sh 79/99 56/13 t Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary teagan
KEY WEST an Kingston 85/29 75/23. sh 85/29 75/23 sh
High: 80° F/27°C CAT ISLAND Lima 83/28 66/18 c 83/28 65/18 c “Os Os 10s 20s {308 40s
Low: 71° F/22°C High: 80° F/27°C London 61/16 44/6 pc 5713 44/6 po
3 @ 12 Low: 64° F/18°C Madrid 68/20 39/3 s 69/20 37/2 s
Manila 88/31 75/23 pc 87/30 75/23 c
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Mexico City 70/21 48/8 t 72/22 47/8 pc O IN S iN C
GREATEXUMA i Monterrey 79/26 62/16 pc 82/27 62/16 pc AUT | 8 RA ie
Montreal 39/3 32/0 pc 46/7 34/1 s
High: 81° F/27° C | aobebetietl Moscow 30/-1 23/-5 sn 29/-1 26/-3
Low: 71°F/22°C fe -66°F/19°C Munich 42/5 32/0 c 48/8 26/-3 pc
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's Wet c : ve haute rr a oa t oe ea t
highs and tonights's lows. : . , ew Delhi s s
ahs and tong Le orrnee = ee Never start your
Paris 56/13 40/4 pc 60/15 42/5 s !
a Prague 45/7 38/3 c 50/10 32/0 sh Sin is re WV It O t US!
Rio de Janeiro 81/27 73/22 pc 83/28 74/23 pc
a serie Rome SOT 4206 sh BONS s aera
Low: 66° F/19°C Rome 63/17 43/6 sh 5915 41/5 s x ent
Today Tiesiiay Today Tipéday Today Tiosiay MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 83/28 73/22 sh 82/27 72/22 s av —. mes to Auto Insurance,
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 85° F/29° C San Juan 93/33 65/18 s 87/30 58/14 pe : Pr crcizetne Smart choice 1 1S
Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC Low: 66° F/19°C San Salvador 91/32 73/22 pe 89/31 73/22 sh 4 : ce Management.
Albuquerque 69/20 40/4 po 74/21 44/6 s Indianapolis 6246 47/8 s 71/21 48/8 s Philadelphia 54/12 38/3 r 55/12 40/4 po CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santiago ae etcaeeeaees At ran £
Anchorage 18/-7 10/-12 pc 26/3 16/-8 s Jacksonville 79/26 55/12 t 74/21 52/11 c Phoenix 83/28 56/13 s 85/29 58/14 s ui Uy Santo Domingo 83/28 67/19 s Beet 61/13 % 5 ople you can trust.
Atlanta 62/16 47/8 + 72/22 47/8 po Kansas City 75/23 51/10 s 72/22 47/8 s Pittsburgh Ba/12 36/2 1 6317 45/7 5s RAGGEDISLAND High: 87°F/si°c - _ — on C oe ear Re a:
Atlantic City 49/9 30/-1 r 5211 33/0 pc Las Vegas 77/25 51N0 s 80/26 54/12 s —Portland,OR + 49/9 «38/3 r «= SIMO 40/4 Highes*raarc | LOWrBSF/2I°C Sikhal aan areas os ae.
Baltimore 5241 36/2 + 56/13 40/4 pc _ Little Rock 71/21 46/7 s 75/23 48/8 s Raleigh-Durham 50/10 40/4 r 6045 40/4 pe Low: 64° F/18°C sen _ er aie ' 7s" GONG - -_
Boston 42/5 30/-1 po 48/8 37/2 pc LosAngeles 70/21 54/12 po 74/23 5412 s St. Louis 70/21 5010 s 79/26 5341 s . a ae SERIES = SOeREST : .
Buffalo 52/11 36/2 ¢ 5713 41/5 pc Louisville 66/18 45/7 s 72/22 5010 s Salt Lake City 63/17 40/4 c 59/15 38/3 c GREAT INAGUA i 55/12 a 5713 46/7 pc :
Charleston, SC 65/18 48/8 r 69/20 49/9 pe Memphis 70/21 49/9 s 74/23 52/11 pe San Antonio 80/26 53/11 $s 80/26 54/12 s High: 86° F/20°C Toronto 51/0 35/1 pe 53/14 A1/5 pc (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 61/16 45/7 pe 68/20 40/4 s Miami 84/28 66/18 s 81/27 68/20 pc San Diego 67/19 55/12 pe 70/21 56/13 s ee 6 ss i
. : . Low: 69° F/21°C Trinidad 90/32 71/21 pc 90/32 71/21 pe
Cleveland 52/1 38/3 6 6116 44/6 s Minneapolis 58/14 43/6 pe 53/41 31/0 5s San Francisco 63/17 50/10 pe 63/17 48/8 pc ane 47/8 39/3 sh 47/8 39/3 + ; Nl p id 6 dB h Ah th f
Dallas 78/25 5A/12 s 81/27 55/12 s Nashville 67/19 43/6 s 70/21 45/7 pc Seattle 478 38/3 sh 48/8 393 + | apra ion ee ie aoa EW FTOvIdEnCe | rod DONdInG 0C0 eyinerd Xuma
Denver 71/21 35/1 pe 70/21 36/2 pc New Orleans 70/21 58/14 sh 73/22 55/12 pc Tallahassee 74/23 55/12 t 77/25 50/10 pe aren 39/3 28/-2 c 44/6 34/4 sn lt (242) 40). 400 Ie: U4) S30 3500 Ie (242) 3] A) Ie (242) 332: 186? Teh (24 2) 336-2304
Detroit 57/13 39/3 pe 65/18 42/5 s New York 50/10 39/3 pe 53/1 42 pc Tampa 84/28 64/17 $s 78/25 60/15 c Winnipeg 42/5 24/-4 pc 39/10 41/-6 5
Honolulu 79/26 67/19 peo 78/25 64/17 Cc Oklahoma City 78/25 50/10 s 81/27 52/11 $s Tucson 79/26 50/10 s 83/28 51/110 s 7 a
Houston 74/23 56/13 po 78/25 56/13 s Orlando 85/29 63/17 s 79/26 60/15 c Washington, DC 51/10 39 r 54/12 40/4 pc eh ee





PAGE 8C, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

Readers have their say on ‘the tragic
young pilot who knew too much’

Re: The tragic young pilot
who knew too much

Dear Mr Marquis,

A very informative article,
having been a victim of Pin-
dling's victimisation first-hand
through Mr Carlton E Francis,
who happens to be an immedi-
ate family member. (VERY
CLOSE, but I choose not to
say).

It's about time the real histo-
ry be told.

— Name supplied

Before he started working as a
pilot, Chauncey Tynes Jr was an
air traffic controller, where he
succeeded without really flying.
He later was employed by
Bahamasair, taking police offi-
cers on drug surveillance patrols
throughout The Bahamas. He
was an excellent pilot, who, in
between flights, was also a bit
of a “party animal.” For some
of his former colleagues, their
last sight of him was in the police
station, then located at the
entrance to the then-Nassau
International Airport main ter-
minal, handcuffed to a man who
may have been a Colombian.
Chauncey’s tousled appearance
— in addition to his having
gained weight due to his pen-
chant for consuming several
hamburgers at one sitting —
prompted the description of a
“drowned rat”, from one observ-
er.

Chauncey went missing one
weekend before he was due to
appear in court to answer for-
mal charges. He is recalled with
fondness by those who knew
him, and who, in the interests of
some form of “closure”, are curi-
ous to know exactly what hap-
pened to him.

Yours, etc

— Edward Lee

Mr Marquis:

It is with regret that I find
myself responding to yet anoth-
er of your articles!

You write with such justifica-
tion about Mr Pindling and the
PROGRESSIVE LIBERAL

#. Kelly's

Tal: ieee are ee sousy

PARTY but I cannot recall you
ever writing about the UBP and
its demons which I am sure you
are more than intimate with!

You ought to stick with what
you know but, alas, we know
which master you serve, we
Know which sector of society you
align with and we know what
you are about.

Be reminded Sir Pindling was
the best thing that ever hap-
pened to our country, not yours,
and the qualities that you enjoy
in The Bahamas were as a result
of Sir Lynden and the PLP! But,
alas, the white light continues to
blind you.

Hope to hear from you soon
when you return to the UK!

PS: Isn’t it time for you to
score the FNM — remember,
the PLP is not the ruling party.
Who will be the JACK this
time?

— Donald Campbell

It's been a while, but suffice it
to say that the article on
Chauncey Tynes (The Pilot Who
Knew Too Much) has triggered
this feedback. Let me first pref-
ace my comments on the com-
mon Bahamian acceptable prac-
tice regardless to facts and rea-
son Le. “if people like you, they
lie and defend you! If they hate
you, they tell les on you”, and
abuse you. The information
shared in your Insight article this
past Monday was quite disturb-
ing, to say the least. Mr Tynes Sr
comes across as being extremely
credible.

Questions relating to the true
national identity of Lynden Pin-
dling have always been a con-
cern and not very clear. There
seemed to have been some truth
or credibility to the allegation
about his ancestral
lineage. However, if any such
country exists where such a thing
occurs, rest for certain that it's
The Bahamas. Sad to say, as I
consider my country, and the
condition of my fellow Bahami-
ans, we lack intellect and wis-
dom. We are not a nation known
for its intellect.

Yes! of course there are bril-

AR

rr

FRED EKCR’

liant intellectuals among us.
However, they are more less the
exception than the rule. This was
primarily why the Pindlings
seized the opportunity and
exerted themselves into the fore-
front of the dull, shallow-think-
ing Bahamian masses, whom
they said were not asking for
much. Thus, that's what they
gave us over the years. A little
government job to buy a little
house, to house, very large fam-
ilies, and to make a little shop-
ping trip to Miami occasionally,
and we were happy.

Needless to say, your article
will receive harsh criticism from
those loyalists who benefited
from the Pindling era, and who
still wish to exploit the Bahami-
an masses to their advantage, by
spewing their hatred, and avoid
discussing the concerns you’ve
addressed. I think the truth
should really be revealed about
Pindling's true date and place of
birth. Let's face it, the man is
now dead. Let the whole truth
be told as to who he really
was. It can’t hurt more than the
damage he has already done to
our nation. Great job, John! As
usual, I love your penmanship.

— Velly C

I CONGRATULATE you
for removing the scales from the
eyes of the Bahamian people.

My grandmother was a straw
vendor and her stall was taken
away from her by the PLP
because she was an FNM sup-
porter. This is how vindictive the
PLP was.

Defence Force officers told
me that they were instructed
when to go to Norman’s Cay
(drug czar Joe Lehder’s cocaine
trans-shipment base) and when
to stay away. They were even

You are invited
to meet

Attila Keczer
Herend Porcelain’s

Master Painter
from Hungary

He will be demonstrating painting
& signing Herend China & Figurine pieces

Friday March 13th, 2009
10:30am - 1:00pm
3:30pm - 7:00pm

Saturd

March 14th, 2009

10:30am - 1:30pm
3:30pm - 7:30pm

Mond

March 16th, 2009

10:30am - 1:00pm
3:30pm - 7:00pm

China Department

Here is your chance to have your
purchases personally signed!

S tite

$:00em 9-00
ete’

242) 3734076 Sanaa coe



told which boats they could
search, and which boats they
couldn't.

I don’t know why people pre-
tend these things did not hap-
pen. This is part of our history
and I think it needs to be
exposed.

Many people are delusional
about what happened. I was at
school when the NBC reported
on the drug trade in the
Bahamas and I was devastated.

We are still paying for it
today. We should never have
allowed this scourge into our
country. Pindling was in charge
at the time and the one who was
supposed to set the tone.

The commission of inquiry
was not as revealing as it should
have been. Drugs have left this
country in a state where boys
and girls sell themselves on Bay
Street so that they can pay for
crack cocaine.

— Former Defence

Force officer

Having read your March 9
Insight I would like to clarify the
matter regarding the birthplace
of Sir Lynden Pindling.

My father was a fellow police
officer of the father of Sir Lyn-
den as well as a neighbour and
friend.

My mother was pregnant with
me while Sir Lynden’s mother
was likewise pregnant with him.
I was born on March 13, 1930,
while Sir Lynden was born not
many days after, also in March
of the same year.

All of the other information
stated concerning this matter are
wrong and although my father
and mother are not alive to say
for themselves what I have told
you these are the facts that they
both have stated to me.

— Sidney R Burrows

Good day Mr Marquis.

Tjust read your article on the
tragic young pilot who knew too
much. Thanks for enlightening
the younger generation who far
too often may only hear the
term, "Father of the nation"
(which I really do not know why
people say that), as the article
is so true, and Mr Tynes only
added closure to all the stuff that
I was hearing. He (Mr Tynes) is
a PLP from yesteryear saying
these things.

Pindling caused many fami-
lies in the Bahamas hardship,

especially those whose parents
were from the Turks and Caicos
Islands, as their children could
not get government jobs, mainly
because the parents never sup-
ported the plp and Pindling
Knew this so he did accordingly.

Even today the plp is still try-
ing the same trickery as it relates
to flooding the government sec-
tor with party supporters, even
when the office is already over-
crowded, and these are the per-
sons who don't work because of
the politics. I see no reason why
persons on the popular radio
talk show Love 97 were so upset,
as your article only quoted Mr
Tynes’ words. Don't feel intimi-
dated by the calls, Bahamians
need to appreciate the truth in
this article.

— JS, Nassau

I have not read John Mar-
quis's INSIGHT piece because
we no longer get The Tribune
in Freeport, so I can't intelli-
gently comment on it. But
although Sir Lynden Pindling's
place in Bahamian history is
assured primarily because of his
leadership during the struggle
for majority rule, it is no secret
among those who choose not to
overlook that The Bahamas was
considered to be “A Nation for
Sale” during the 1980s that Sir
Lynden had his flaws as a
national leader.

There is evidence that he was
also ruthless when it came to
those who opposed him, and I
can say this based on personal
experience. The fact that I lived
out of this country for 20 years,
after making tremendous per-
sonal sacrifices to play an active
role in the struggle for majority
rule, was primarily due to overt
victimisation by Sir Lynden.
What's more, there has to be a
reason why Hubert Ingraham,
Perry Christie and Midge Hanna
voiced strong opposition to Sir
Lynden's leadership in 1984,
resulting in Ingraham and
Christie being suspended from
the PLP. Ingraham, as we all
now know, demonstrated that
he believed strongly in the rea-
sons why he decided to openly
criticise Sir Lynden, while
Christie begged forgiveness and
returned to the PLP. The bot-
tom line is that we cannot sani-
tise events of the past to record
history as we would like for it
to be recorded for future gen-
erations. When I do get the
chance to read Marquis's arti-
cle, I may comment further in
one of my future weekly
columns.

Best wishes,

— Oswald T Brown

Editor, Freeport News

Well, people, there is one way
to deal with these things. Engage
a national debate on the life and

DOUBLE

FILET O' FISH



times of Lynden Pindling. “Was
he a friend or foe?’ Perhaps ZNS
can lead this national debate and
set up the forum by inviting the
relevant persons to argue the
moot (John Marquis vs Paul
Adderley). BTC or Indigo can
provide the technology for per-
sons to text in their votes during
the debate. Is not that the way a
civil society deals with questions
that surround it? Or perhaps it’s
not the practice in this country
who love to claim to being heirs
of the Westminster System of
democracy?

My point is that we need more
dialogue here in this country.
Dialogue that will invoke dis-
cussions on the facts! I would
guarantee such an event will gar-
ner huge advertising benefits for
your media, and at the same
time will lend a rewarding edu-
cation opportunity to our wider
public. Many of the younger
generation who know very little
about Sir Lynden, the era of
majority rule and the evil trade
of drug running that is carved
deep into our history.

I can see it now, "THE
GREAT BAHAMIAN
DEBATES" LIVE ON ZNS,
JCN/Love97FM, Island FM,
GEMS, THE
GUARDIAN/STAR FM or
The Tribune and its affiliate sta-
tions.

— Carvel Francis

AS you know, I don’t always
agree with you, but your article
was very good. There are one
or two discrepancies, but on the
whole it is truthful.

I have known Chauncey
Tynes and his family for the best
part of 70 years and he is a truth-
ful, honest and upright man.

They are castigating you and
saying nothing about Chauncey.
And no-one is disputing what
was said. The days of PLP cor-
ruption were started by Pindling
and that’s led to what we have
today.

— Errington Watkins

(former senior police officer)

I read your INSIGHT article
regarding Mr Pindling and I
must say I found it interesting
and convincing. However, that
has not always been my posi-
tion. 1 knew LO when we were
schoolboys in Nassau. He went
to school in England for a couple
of years before I left for the
United States in 1949. During
the Commission of Inquiry hear-
ing in 1983, I had my brother
send me all the relevant copies
of The Tribune and the
Guardian. I was convinced that
LO's accusers did not make their
case, or perhaps that is what I
wanted to believe. You see, I
wanted so badly for him to suc-
ceed. I was certain that he and I
shared the same love of coun-
try.

Now, with the first-hand
accounts that your article
describes, I have finally con-
cluded that the events as
described to you by Mr Tynes
and others, which were not pre-
sented at the inquiry, point to
his culpability.

There are two issues men-
tioned in the article that are in
dispute, though they have no rel-
evance to the veracity of the
accusations. 1) Pindling's place
of birth and 2) his meeting with
Mugabe in the 1960s. I recall a
conversation that I had with my
mother (who died in 1995) about
the PLP. You see, she hated Pin-
dling and she called him "that
cockeyed man”. She went off on
him saying he was "no good"
and he came from “nutin". She
told me and my brother
(deceased) that "he ain no
Jamaican". He was born "roun"
the corner from Eneas Jumpers
Church Corner.

My mother was older than
LO's parents and she lived in
Bain Town her entire life. Any-
one will tell you that Bain Town
women Know everybody and
everybody's "business".

She further told us how LO's
father in a fit of rage quit the
police force, went home and
burned his uniform in the middle
of the road. This information
could only have come from insti-
tutional knowledge. Lastly,
Mugabe was an obscure guerilla
fighter in the 1960s during which
time Pindling was already on his
ascendancy to political power.
Mugabe did not become Presi-
dent of Zimbabwe until more
than a decade after Pindling
became the leader of the
PLP. Again, good article.

— CW, Nassau

Don’t miss next week’s
INSIGHT section for more

revelations about Pindling-
Lehder connection...





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SEE INSIGHT SECTION



ANY



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TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009







in daylignt attack

Father-of-five
is killed while
playing dominoes

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

A GAME of
dominoes turned
deadly yesterday
when a man was shot [Re ®

in the head during a
brazen daylight
attack.

People in Bain Town and
Grants Town were left
shocked after an otherwise
peaceful Sunday afternoon
was shattered by the killing of
an Augusta Street man.

Up to press time last night,
police were searching for his
killer.

The victim - Mark 'Scabby'’
Daniels - was playing domi-
noes with friends outside a
building in Finlayson Street
when a gunman approached
and shot Daniels in the head.

When police arrived a short
time later - around 1pm - they
found Daniels on the porch of
a single-storey white and



Mark Daniels

green wooden build-
ing where he report-
edly worked as an
auto-mechanic.

The father-of-five,
said to be in his mid-
30s, was found lying
on his back dressed
in a black short-
sleeved shirt and
short green trousers.

Emergency per-
sonnel pronounced
him dead at the

scene.

Family and friends con-
verged on the house and
screamed in anguish as offi-
cials carried Daniels’ body
away.

With her voice breaking
with tears, Daniels’ niece told
the media he was a hard-
working handyman who
always helped his friends.

"My uncle was a very help-
ful person. Anybody who
wanted their car fixed could
go to him and he was willing
to help everybody.

“My uncle was a builder,

SEE page 10

Tel: 394-1378

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LITTLE TOPAZ CULMER waves her flag yesterday during a march to
commemorate the Church of God of Prophecy’s 100 year convention.
The event was held under the theme ‘Awake, Let’s Celebrate’.

¢ SEE PAGE TWO

Teen dead, two others in
hospital after traffic accident

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

lost control and crashed into a
wooden utility pole and a two-
storey concrete building.

Police also believe that the
vehicle caught fire after it
crashed but was extinguished by
people in the area before fire-
fighters arrived.

When police were called to
the scene around lam, they saw
a two-door Hyundai Accent,
licence 124153, with a driver and

SEE page 11

A GRUESOME traffic acci-
dent left a 16-year-old boy dead
and two others fighting for their
lives in hospital.

The tragedy occurred shortly
before lam on Saturday on East
Street near East Street Gospel
Chapel.

Police believe the 18-year-old
driver was attempting to over-
take another vehicle when he

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Police search for
teacher accused
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former students

Expat ‘no longer in
the jurisdiction’



m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police are
searching for the former
Eight Mile Rock High
School teacher who is
accused of molesting two

former male students.

Asst Supt Clarence Reck-
ley, press liaison officer, said
yesterday that the teacher is
no longer in the jurisdiction
and is being sought by
police.

“We should have more
information concerning the
matter this week,” said Mr
Reckley.

The expatriate teacher,
who was employed as an art
teacher at EMR High, is
accused of sexually molest-
ing the students over an
eight-year period, which

Tourism initiatives
‘will prove gloomy

forecast wrong’
@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Tourism Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace is confident his ministry's ini-

SEE page 10

started while they were in
the seventh grade.

The teacher was sent to
New Providence after alle-
gations surfaced in January,
and was placed on proba-
tionary leave pending inves-
tigations by the Ministry of
Education.

Police conducted investi-
gations and forwarded
details to the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office for determina-
tion.

Last week, Asst Commis-
sioner Marvin Dames said
the AG’s office granted the
fiat, giving approval to pros-
ecute the teacher.

The teacher, from
Trinidad, resigned last
month and is no longer in
the Bahamas.

EMR PTA president
Troy Garvey, who brought
the matter to the public,
believes there are more vic-
tims at the school.



Minister Vincent
tiatives are enough to counter a recent gloomy Yanderpool-Wallace
prediction on the country's tourism industry.
Last week the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC),
a leading global tourism organisation, forecast that the country's



Former PLP parliamentarian is ‘not
impressed’ by ‘anger’ over Tribune article

WHILE complaining that
others are robbing them of
their history, Bahamians are



den Pindling’s alleged links
with Colombian drug czar
Joe Lehder, and were unwill-
also guilty of this by choos- ing to have a dispassionate
ing not to “confront the dif- debate about Pindling’s lega-
ficult truth”, former PLP cy
parliamentarian Dr Elwood
Donaldson told The Tribune
yesterday.

Dr Donaldson said he was
“not impressed” by those
who expressed a high level
of “anger and anxiety” over
The Tribune’s controversial
Insight article about Sir Lyn-








“It’s superstition, this idea
that you cannot speak about
the dead. I think that any-
thing that is a part of history
is a part of history and I
don’t understand the furore
surrounding this,” he said.

SEE page 11











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ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY



ia THE Shuaas CHOICE WHEN
‘OL RE HUNGRY FOR VALUE

MARCH MARKS

100 YEAR

CONVENTION

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

MUSIC AND COLOUR abounded yesterday dur-
ing a march to commemorate the Church of God
of Prophecy’s 100 year convention. The event
was held under the theme ‘Awake, Let’s Cele-

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THE TRIBUNE

0 In brief

Search for
most wanted
person on

Grand Bahama.

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net_

FREEPORT -— Grandi
Bahama police are still }
searching for Garin Gibson }
who is now their number one }
most wanted person on the }

island.

Asst Supt Clarence Reck-
ley said Gibson is wanted for }
questioning about several }
offences in connection with ;

illegal firearms.

“We want to thank the
public and the media for their
assistance in the recapture of ;

Samiko Rigby last week.

“We continue to look out :
for Garin Gibson who is the }
number one person on our }
wanted list on Grandi
Bahama, and we are seeking }
the public’s assistance in try-
ing to capture him,” he said. :

Gibson is considered }
armed and dangerous. Any- :
one with information is
asked to contact police at 911 ;

or 352-9774/5.
¢ FIREARM ARREST

ASP Reckley reported that
two people were arrested for ;
firearm possession on Sun-

day.

green truck.

During a search of the }
vehicle, officers allegedly dis- :
covered a .45 pistol with sev- }
en live rounds of ammuni- }
tion and a black 9mm Smith :
and Wesson pistol with 12 }

live rounds of ammunition.

The two occupants, both :
37, were taken into custody :
and will be charged before }

the court next week.

Mr Reckley said a firearm
was turned in to police last :

Thursday.

He reported that a resident
found a 9mm pistol with nine ;
live rounds of ammunition }

while at Discovery Bay.

Mr Reckley commended
the resident for turning the ;

weapon over to police.

¢ BREAK-IN

Police arrested a man who }
was allegedly caught climb- :
ing out of the drive through :
window at the rear of:

Wendy’s Restaurant.

ASP Reckley said the :
alarm at Wendy’s was acti- }
vated around 3.23am on Sat- :

urday.

Officers found the suspect, :
who is now being questioned :
in connection with several :
other shop break-ins in the :

area.

e A couple were arrested
at their home in Freeport for :
breach of the Shop Licence }

Act.

woman.

Charges are expected to be
filed against the couple this

week.

¢ Mr Reckley noted that }
of 38 persons arrested for }
various offences last week,
22 persons were charged by }

police.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE

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Sometime around 2.13am,
as a result of information :
received, police stopped a }

Around 8pm on Sunday }
police executed a search war- :
rant at Caravel Beach, where }
they arrested a man and:

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Tourism
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
does not see recently relaxed
travel measures to Cuba as an
immediate threat to the
Bahamas’ tourism industry.

However, he said the indus-
try must prepare for the even-
tual end of an American trav-
el ban to the communist
nation and remain competi-
tive by developing unique
branding of the Bahamas'
Family Islands.

His comments came days
after the United States gov-
ernment passed a $410 billion
spending bill, part of which
included policies that will
allow Cuban-Americans to
travel legally to their home-
land to visit relatives once a
year and spend up to $179 per
day. Previously, Cuban-
Americans could only travel
to Cuba every three years and



















































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“We have a variety of islands that
we have never really developed to
the stage that we need to develop
them and to differentiate one from
the other so that we have a lot
more varied products on the
shelf to deal with the Cuba's

when they open.”



Minister of Tourism

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

spend no more than $50 a
day.

Senator Vanderpool-Wal-
lace saw these measures were
more of a humanitarian effort
than a move that will generate
increased tourism to Cuba.
Still, his ministry is focused
on product development and
island branding to counter
inevitable competition from
emerging markets, he said.

"Make no mistake about it,

in our lifetimes we are going
to see travel from the United
States to Cuba relax consid-
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taken the posture that we
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why we have to get many peo-
ple in the Bahamas to under-
stand is that the Bahamas is a
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LOCAL NEWS

Relaxed travel measures to
Cuba ‘not an immediate threat’

islands that we have never
really developed to the stage
that we need to develop them
and to differentiate one from
the other so that we have a
lot more varied products on



the shelf to deal with the
Cuba's when they open," he
said.

The senator highlighted that
part of Cuba's attractiveness -
the country saw tourism
growth 5.2 per cent in the first
two months of 2009, com-
pared to the same period last
year - lies in the lower com-
parative cost to get there.

"Tt reinforces what I'm say-
ing, if you take a look at the
cost of a vacation in Cuba
from the same markets, for
the cost to come to many oth-
er places including the
Bahamas - it's better value.
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else."

He said the ministry is
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cost of getting to the
Bahamas.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Pindling’s birth still questioned

“THE broad mass of a nation,” wrote Hitler
in Mein Kampf, “will more easily fall victim to
a big lie than to a small one.”

If the story now in circulation about the late
Sir Lynden Pindling’s birth is a lie, then it is
certainly a big lie and one that for more than 36
years has not only stuck, but is now the subject
of national debate.

All we know for certain is that Arnold Pin-
dling, a Jamaican recruited for the Bahamas
Police Force, was the late Sir Lynden’s father.
They could not deny each other, because they
looked so much alike. We always believed that
Mrs. Viola Pindling, daughter of Captain Bain,
a well-known Andros boat captain, was his
mother. We had no reason to doubt this until
one day in 1973 the phone on our desk rang. A
voice at the other end said it wanted to tip us off
to the fact that then prime minister Pindling
was not a Bahamian, but a “blankety-blank
Jamaican.” Viola Bain Pindling was not his
mother. It was alleged that he was born of a
Jamaican woman, fathered by Arnold Pindling
and adopted into the Pindling household. There
was some question as to whether he was born in
the Bahamas or in Jamaica.

Normally we would have dismissed this as
information coming from a crank. But the fact
that the “tip” had come right from the heart of
the PLP caused us to start asking discrete ques-
tions.

The rumour spread like wildfire. We pub-
lished nothing, but continued our enquiries.

Before Independence all Bahamians were
citizens of the United Kingdom and Colonies.
After Independence in 1973, the only persons
who could claim Bahamian citizenship were
those born in the Bahamas or naturalised. As
government poked and probed into the private
lives of Bahamians, or persons who had always
thought they were Bahamians, many lives were
cruelly torn asunder — especially families who
did not profess to being PLP.

It all came to a head when on September 19,
1973 Clarence Town MP Michael Lightbourn
claimed on the floor of the House that “appar-
ently” there was no record in the Registry of the
prime minister’s birth on March 22, 1930 to his
parents Arnold Franklin Pindling and Viola
Melba Bain Pindling.

Mr Lightbourn was certain there was a logi-
cal explanation. He called on government to
investigate the status of all House and Senate
members in view of former St Barnabas MP
Sinclair Outten’s disclosure that he was born in
Turks Island.



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Pandora’s box had been pried open. A week
later prime minister Pindling called a press con-
ference at which he not only abused Mr Light-
bourn, but denied his allegations. He produced
a photo copy of his birth certificate which
showed a registration date of February 25, 1947
— 17 years after his date of birth. Asked for sup-
porting affidavits, usually given by persons able
to attest to the birth — mother, nurse, doctor,
close friend — Sir Lynden said he was not pre-
pared to go beyond the birth certificate.

According to Sir Lynden it was discovered
that his birth had not been registered when he
was preparing to go away to school. Such dis-
coveries were not unusual in New Providence,
unlike the Family Islands, which kept near to
perfect records of births and deaths. Nor was it
unusual to later swear affidavits to affirm a
birth with supporting evidence to get it on the
register.

Mr Pindling was in difficulty. He did not
belong to a church that kept baptismal records.
However, he said that there was a certain church
that did have a record of his birth. Unfortu-
nately, however, that church had since burned
down, records and all.

His explanation was received with derision.
He could not prove his birth other than to pre-
sent a certificate attested to by his father,
Arnold.

The PLP is noted for its vicious in-fighting. If
anyone objected to a Pindling edict he was
reviled, abused, and his reputation smeared.
Eventually he was ostracised.

Sir Lynden seemed to spend more time on
party in-fighting and destroying his perceived
enemies than governing the country.

One only has to tune in to the Internet today
to see how viciously the PLP are still tearing
each other apart — even their leader and former
prime minister Perry Christie has been dis-
missed with the greatest disrespect. Dr Bernard
Nottage, one of those defending Sir Lynden’s
name last week, must remember how his repu-
tation was butchered when he decided to run
against Sir Lynden’s chosen successor for party
leadership. As a result Dr Nottage left the PLP
and started his own party.

If this rumour about Sir Lynden’s birth is a
lie, then it is one of Hitler’s big lies used to
damage Sir Lynden where he was known with-
in his own party to be most vulnerable.

If a lie, it is a lie that has come back to haunt
the party that gave it birth and to tarnish the
myth that the PLP has since tried to build
around the “Father of the Nation.”



position of

REQUIREMENTS

sheet.

RESPONSIBILITIES

A suggestion
for making
the NIB more

accountable

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Press reports indicate that the
National Insurance Board is on
the attack against businesses and
individuals that have not paid
their National Insurance premi-
ums on behalf of their staff.

One high profile case alleged-
ly owes them over $400,000.
Shocking to say the least.

While the offenders should be
prosecuted to the full extent of
the law, if for no other reason
than to show that we are all
accountable, no matter how high
and mighty we might think we
are.

However, there is a disconnect
where the responsibility of the
National Insurance Board/Gov-
ernment ends, and the require-
ments of individuals and busi-
nesses begins.

In the private sector for exam-
ple, insurance companies auto-
matically provide clients with a
monthly or annual statement, yet
we get no statement from NIB.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



Banks automatically provide
statements or passbooks that are
easily updated, yet we get no
statement from NIB.

Pension companies automati-
cally provide annual statements,
yet we get no statement from
NIB.

Businesses automatically pro-
vide statements for charge
accounts with additional copies
of invoices, yet we get no state-
ment from NIB.

And the list goes on.

If the NIB automatically sent
statements to all of their account
holders, would it be possible for
offenders to mount up such huge
debts without a co-conspirator in
the NIB itself?

So why does our nanny state
not provide us with statements

for our National Insurance con-
tributions? Not only that, it puts
the onus on businesses to keep
their records indefinitely.

This is a classic case of gov-
ernment knowing how inefficient
they are so they pass a law to put
the burden of proof on the oppo-
site party and contravene the
Statute of Limitations — nor-
mally seven years I think — at
the same time.

Of course only a government
has the power to force its will like
that.

Thave a suggestion though.

The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce should solicit dona-
tions from its membership to sue
the National Insurance
Board/Government to make the
NIB as accountable as everyone
else is supposed to be.

RICK LOWE
WeblogBahamas.com
http:/Avww.weblogbahamas.com
http:/Avww.nassauinstitute. or





The threat to our Financial Services Sector

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Our legislators and many
Bahamians are well aware of the
“Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act”
that was tabled in the United
State (US) Senate on 17th Feb-
ruary, 2007 by senators Levin,
Coleman, and then senator Oba-
ma; this took place during the first
session of the 110 Congress. The
bill is designed “to restrict the use
of offshore tax havens and abu-
sive tax shelters to inappropri-
ately avoid Federal Taxation, and
for other purposes.” It targets
$100 billion per year in tax rev-
enue losses due to offshore tax
havens and since the US has iden-
tified the Bahamas as a tax haven
jurisdiction for tax avoidance,
there is a legitimate threat and
clear and present danger to our
second largest industry.

Specifically, the bill seeks to
achieve the following among oth-
er objectives:

1) Establish presumptions to
combat offshore secrecy.

2) Impose tougher require-
ments on US taxpayers using off-
shore secrecy jurisdictions.

3) Authorise special measures
to stop offshore tax abuses.

4) Strengthen detection of off-
shore activities.

5) Close offshore trust loop-
holes by taxing offshore trust
income.

6) Strengthen penalties on tax
shelter promoters to a maximum
of $1 million.

A leading retailer is seeking applications for the

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The successful candidate will be responsible for
assisting in the delivery and collection of all company
work, mail and any other tasks as per daily assignment

7) Stop tax shelter patents for
“inventions designed to minimize,
avoid, defer, or otherwise affect
liability for Federal, State, local,
or foreign tax”.

8) Require hedge funds and
company formation agents to
know their offshore clients.

I wish to endorse the recom-
mendations made by the Hon-
ourable Member for Fort Char-
lotte as articulated during his con-
tribution to the midyear budget
debate on March 2, 2009.

First, Mr Sears recommended
that the “Government of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas
lobby the United States to stop
the passage of the Stop Tax
Haven Abuse Bill by the United
States House of Representatives
and Senate and to educate the
United States policy makers,
media and public of the true
nature of the Bahamian financial
industry and the collective com-
mitment of The Bahamas to fight
money laundering and the financ-
ing of terrorism.”

His second recommendation
was that the Bahamas Govern-
ment should “make an official
protest against the practice by
agents of the United States and
other OECD member countries
who undermine the legal process
in The Bahamas by seeking to
induce Bahamian financial insti-
tutions and professions to break
the law. If the Government were
to protest now, it would give The
Bahamas a tactical advantage or
the moral high ground, rather
than raising them when The
Bahamas is on the defensive or
the object of an imminent threat.”

“Third, the Government
should promote the convening of
a global forum on money laun-
dering and terrorist financing,
under the auspices of the United
Nations, leading to the formation
of a global treaty. The purpose
of the global forum will be to
ensure that offshore jurisdictions,
like The Bahamas, have a voice
and place around the table in the
prescription and application of
the anti-money laundering and
combating the financing of ter-
rorism on a level playing field.

Fourth, the Government, in
partnership with the private sec-
tor, should invest in a policy
research facility, at the College
of The Bahamas, to conduct eco-
nomic intelligence monitoring of
the global economy and trends,

tiveness of the Bahamian juris-
diction as a centre of wealth man-
agement.”

I wish to add that the Bahamas
government must formally protest
the apparent illegal tactics of US
authorities.

They are not to directly
approach any financial institution
in the Bahamas, but to utilise the
relevant government authorities
in pursuit of cross-jurisdictional
assistance in civil and criminal
matters involving US citizens.

Governments are elected by
the people to protect their inter-
ests of its people and therefore
must be seen to demonstrate such
a commitment and resolve.

As the external threat to our
second largest industry intensi-
fies, the government must move
proactively, transparently, and
expeditiously to protect our dig-
nity, national sovereignty, and
general way of life.

ELCOTT COLEBY
Nassau,
March, 2009.

The ugly results of
a bucket bulldozer

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Landscaping with the use of a
large bucket bulldozer certainly
is questionable and the results
show themselves in what is left
in a so-called state as having to
be improved.

Look at how the Environ-
mental health folk used a buck-
et-bulldozer on the front of the
contested Chippingham land
corner West Bay and Chip-
pingham Road just push every-
thing into the bush and leave
ugliness. Again just before S G
Hambros, West Bay the same
treatment — push the bush in
and leave everything piled up
far, far uglier than it was before.

Who gave anyway the Envi-
ronmental department the
authority to go on private land
and trespass and damage their
property?

Let’s try to be real — yes we
need to keep the bush line con-
trolled but let’s do the exercise
in a way that we improve the
visual, not make it look uglier.

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Mr Charles Carey: a disclaimer

-

EDITOR, ThE Tribune.

A letter to the editor was printed in your paper on Tuesday,
March 10, from a Charles Carey of Harbour Island.

Iam not the author of that letter, nor did I submit it to The

Tribune. Which leaves me to wonder if there has been some
sort of a mixup?

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 5

SNTEICL

Man airlifted to hospital after
altercation at bowling alley

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT-A_ Grand
Bahama man was airlifted to
New Providence with serious
spinal injuries following an alter-
cation early Friday morning at
the Bowling Alley.

Asst Supt Clarence Reckley

reported that Kenneth Rahming,
a 37-year-old resident of Ship-
ton Drive, sustained injuries
which left him paralysed from
the neck down.

Rahming is detained at
Princess Margaret Hospital. A
37-year-old man is assisting
police with their investigation
into the matter.

According to Mr Reckley,

police received a grievous harm
report around 3.45am on Friday
that a man was injured in
the parking lot of the Bowling
Alley.

When police arrived at the
scene, they were told that the
victim had already been taken
to hospital.

Officers went to Rand Memo-
rial Hospital and were told that

the victim was suffering from
serious injuries and was paral-
ysed.

Mr Reckley said police are
expected to file charges early
this week.





Police find live
TAC

MOBILE Division officers
found 15 live rounds of
ammunition for a .22 weapon
in a magazine clip while
patrolling Blue Hill Road
South near Garden Hills
around 3.30am yesterday.

No arrests have been



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Drugs, stolen items seized by police

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A SIGNIFICANT quantity of illegal drugs with
a street value of over $13,000, along with several
stolen items, were seized by police on Saturday
evening.

At about 10.05pm, police from AVIT (Anti-Vio-
lence Intervention Team) executed a search warrant
at an apartment at Colony Club, where officers dis-
covered seven pounds of suspected marijuana.

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ASP Reckley said the drugs have an estimated
street value of $13,500.

Additionally, he noted that police also discov-
ered several items suspected of being stolen, includ-
ing a 32-inch Sharp flat screen television, seven
gold rings, two gold bracelets, one silver Brietlin
watch, and an orange Bentley watch along with
several pairs of earrings. The male occupant was tak-
en into custody and arrested by police.

Mr Reckley said police are appealing to the pub-
lic who may have had items stolen from them to
report to the police station to identify their items.

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THE TRIBUNE



enn NNN eS EONS NSN NESE
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WORLD VIEW

m@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant and
former Caribbean diplomat)

Is MY last commentary
entitled, “Tax Haven juris-
dictions — Sitting Ducks and
Scapegoats”, the point was made
that British Prime Minister Gor-
don Brown and others, including
Congressmen in the United
States, are trying to pass the
buck of responsibility for the
global financial crisis to jurisdic-
tions with offshore financial ser-
vices, including those in the
Caribbean.

I had drawn attention to
Brown’s statement to the US
Congress on March 4th in which
he said: “"But how much safer
would everybody's savings be if
the whole world finally came
together to outlaw shadow bank-
ing systems and outlaw offshore
tax havens?”

The point is that Brown and
others are ignoring completely
the lax regulation in many of the
countries of the Organisation for
Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD) that led
to poor banking and investment
practices and the collapse of
financial institutions that were
considered “giants”, and they
are trying to move the focus to
offshore financial jurisdictions
even though the financial insti-
tutions located in them were not
responsible for the crisis.

Many authoritative persons
and organisations are not buying
into the targeting of offshore
financial centres as the culpable
parties.

On March 8th the British
Financial Times newspaper said:
“There is scant evidence that the
offshore centres are to blame for
financial turmoil. The UK Finan-

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cial Services Authority told MPs
last year that offshore centres
had already undergone exten-
sive regulatory reviews.”

Then on March 10th ,the
Chairman of the Confederation
of British Industries, Martin
Broughton, is reported to have
said that “Gordon Brown’s focus
on ‘red herring’ issues such as
bank bonuses and tax havens
risks turning next month’s sum-
mit of the Group of 20 nations
into a catastrophe that fails to
deal with the recession.”

Broughton constructively said
the G20 Summit, scheduled in
London for April 2nd, “should
focus on a global stimulus and
undertakings to resist protec-
tionism — including a pledge not
to increase trade tariffs.”

He went on to say that it
would be “nothing short of a cat-
astrophe, when you’ve got an
opportunity to make a differ-
ence, that you get bogged down”
in issues that were “totally irrel-
evant” to resolving the current
crisis.

In an editorial on March 12th,
the Financial Times did not hold
out much hope for Broughton’s
call. The prestigious newspaper
said, “Asking a group of politi-
cians not to make a meal of irrel-
evant but crowd-pleasing issues
may be a forlorn call.” But the
publication said he “is still right
to have made it.” And, the edi-
torial warned: “True, the odds
look better for extra funding for
the International Monetary
Fund and easing the shortage of
trade finance — but these are not
the stuff to capture the imagina-
tion of the watching world. So
the attraction of announcing
some populist crackdowns could
be great.”

So, in circles that are expert
and authoritative about global
business and finance, the assault
on offshore jurisdictions is seen
as what Broughton called a “red
herring.” But, it clearly is not
going to stop those who are
determined to shut them down
because of the fear that they pro-
vide a haven for people and
organisations who are evading
tax.

Two matters arise from this.
The first is that both the United
Kingdom and the United States
are “tax havens.” Non-residents
of these countries bank in them
and invest in instruments that
do not attract tax. Indeed, if both
the US and the UK were to
begin to tax the bank deposits

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@ SIR Ronald Sanders

and tax-free investments of non-
residents, the adverse effect on
their financial systems would be
significant to their economies.
So there is a principle here that is
being applied for Peter that is
very different to the one being
imposed on Paul.

The second point is that juris-
dictions with offshore financial
services should not sit back idly
because authoritative organisa-
tions and personalities have
pointed to the unfairness of the
assault on them by OECD goy-
ernments. They do have to be
active in making their case.

The British Crown Depen-
dencies and Overseas territories
have begun to argue for what
they call “a more discriminate
approach.”

Jersey, a large offshore finan-
cial centre, is reportedly send-
ing a delegation to Washington
on March 23rd to meet repre-
sentatives of the new Obama
administration. Undoubtedly,
they have already been talking
with officials in the United King-
dom.

It is ashame that the 35 juris-
dictions, named by the US Con-
gress in the ‘Stop the Tax
Havens Abuse’ Act, are not all
joining together to agree on
common ground including stan-
dards and practices to which
they will all adhere, and in mak-
ing a common case to the US,
the UK and other OECD coun-
tries.

There can be few govern-
ments among the 35 jurisdictions
which would not agree that, just
as there is a case for better and
tighter regulation and supervi-
sion of financial institutions in
the OECD countries, so there
is a need to do so in their own.

But unfortunately, there
appears to be no such harmony
among them. Instead, some are
trying to distance themselves
from others by claiming that
they are being “tarred with the
same brush.” This lack of cohe-
sion will weaken them and many
will collapse in the process, hurt-
ing even further economies of
small countries which are
already hard-hit by the global
financial crisis.

In the Caribbean, there is yet
to be a meeting of governments
or representatives of financial
institutions on this matter even
though the G20 meeting to dis-
cuss “outlawing tax havens” is
set for April.

There have now been consis-
tent calls for a region-wide body
to be a supra-national regulator
for financial services throughout
the Caribbean Community and
Common market (CARICOM).
It is a call that should be heeded
not only to give an important
layer of supervision of the sector
but also as a strong tool in
defense of their jurisdictions.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 7



Three possible locations
for the new fish market

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Port Authority has
identified three possible loca-

tions for the new fish mar-
ket, but local fishermen will
have to wait as the exact
location will be determined
at a later date.

According to reports, the
Fishing Hole Road and West
Atlantic Drive in the down-

town area are some of the
sites that are being consid-
ered.

Port Authority officials
met with local fish, conch,
seafood vendors for the sec-
ond time this month to hear
their feedback and input on

MOG G ra RG DYE RGU Lae



THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (NEMA) accepted a cheque donation from the
Bahamas Christian Council (BCC) during a presentation at NEMA’s office, Churchill Building, Nassau.
The $4,000 donation was the second made by the Council. The first, a $10,000 donation, was made fol-
lowing Hurricane Ike which struck Inagua in September 2008. Commander Stephen Russell, director of
NEMA accepted the funds on behalf of the Agency. Pictured from left are Bishop Gregory Minnis, trea-
surer, BCC; Rev Patrick Paul, president, BCC; Captain Russell; Michelle Gardiner, finance officer; NEMA;

and Pastor Devon Rolle, BCC.

" Christian
Bookshop
is a Marlin
Awards
sponsor

THE Christian Book-
shop, one of the Bahamas’
oldest and most successful
gospel retail outlets, has
been named a sponsor of
the 2009 Marlin Awards.

President of the Marlin
Awards Kevin Harris said,
“We are extremely proud
and honoured to have the
Christian Bookshop, one of
our country’s most faithful
and well known religious
retail establishments on
board with us this year as
one of our executive spon-
sors. It is because of the sup-
port and investment from
companies like the Christ-
ian Bookshop that the Mar-
lin Awards can continue in
its mission to encourage
excellence and growth in
Bahamian and Caribbean
Gospel Music.”

The Marlin Awards will
be held on Sunday March
29th at the Diplomat Cen-
tre. Tickets for this event
will be $25 (General Seat-
ing) and $40 (VIP) and can
be purchased from the
Christian Bookshop. Our
photo shows from left to
right Stacie Walkine Christ-
ian Bookshop Manager,
Gregory Sweeting Christian
Bookshop President, Kevin
Harris Marlin Awards Pres-
ident and Beryn Neely Mar-
lin Awards CFO.





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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Space shuttle Discovery blasts off with crew of seven :

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

SPACE shuttle Discovery and
its crew of seven rocketed into
orbit Sunday evening, setting off
on a space station construction
mission cut short by launch
delays that dragged on for more
than a month, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Discovery rose from its sea-
side pad just as the sun was set-
ting, a spectacular sight for a
space agency anxious to get the

flight going. As the shuttle sped }
away like a brilliant star, part of }
the launch plume glowed pink, }
peach and golden. The shuttle ¢
was visible for several minutes.
A hydrogen leak mvantt
Discovery from lifting lt ¢
Wednesday and, before that,

hydrogen valves kept the shuttle | :
grounded for weeks in February. }
Launch pad repairs took care of }
the leak, and the astronauts were :
able to board their spaceship and }

lift off.

Join the Professional Team
Kelso Medical Laboratory

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST

(Initially a part time 4-5hr am position which may evolve
into a full time position)

We are looking for a Medical

Technologist with ASCP, AMT

or other BAMT/HPC approved
certification.

Skills Required

Great Customer Service Skills
Professional Appearance
Energetic & Enthusiastic Team Player
Good Communication Skills

COB student ready to make a
difference in tourism industry

COLLEGE of the Bahamas student
Jeron Johnson is less than two months
away from completing his associate’s
degree and he is ready to make a differ-
ence in the tourism industry.

The young hospitality operations major
is one of five College of The Bahamas
students completing a three month intern-
ship programme at Sandals Royal
Bahamian.

“T grew up knowing that one day I
wanted to work in the tourism industry,”
said Jeron. It was as a tenth grader at CC
Sweeting Secondary High School that he
was first introduced to tourism. “We had
to select a programme that we were inter-
ested in and I selected tourism. The more
I learned about the field the more inter-
ested I became. I soon found out that
there’s more to the industry than pouring
drinks or making beds.”

“Since starting my internship, my liking
has increased even more,” he enthused.
“So far, [have worked in the kitchen, gift
shop, cost control and receivings depart-
ments. Every department is completely
different. The staff has been helpful and
friendly, answering questions and giving
suggestions.”

Necausha Greene, a culinary arts major
at the college says the staff would always
stop to say hello or give a kind word. “I
like the friendship and camaraderie every-
one seems to share. I plan to work for a
brief period before continuing my studies,
and this is the environment that I would
like to be in.”

Michael James, General Manager at



THIS PHOTO SHOWS Shawn Thompson, Sandals Storeroom Manager salahiig the inven-
tory process to Jeron Johnson and Necausha Greene.

Sandals Royal Bahamian says the intern-
ship serves two very important purposes.
“Not only do we welcome the opportuni-
ty to demonstrate what we do, but simul-
taneously, we invite the students to share
some of their ideas with us,” he added.
“These are young, bright minds that are
bursting with fresh ideas and in some cas-
es they offer valuable suggestions.”

Mr James noted that while some of the
students have never held a job, the intern-

ship was vital in developing on the job
and interpersonal skills. “It is encouraging
to move around and see them interact-
ing with team members and guests. It
shows their interest in being fully involved
in our operation and they take their posi-
tions very seriously.”

Ashlene Seraphim and Petra Hall, of
C I Gibson Senior High School also par-
ticipated in a one week work study at the
resort.

Dedicated to High Standards in the Profession
Computer Literate
Dependable
Compassionate
Completes Assignments

Submit Resume to:

The Manager, Kelso Medical Laboratory
P.O. Box SS-6109, 10 Collins Avenue,
322-7994 (Ph) or 325-7208 (Fax) Email

kelso@coralwave.com

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME CIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

PM are

Mr. David A. C. Kelly, C.B.E.

of Nassau, The
Bahamas, who died in
New York City, New
York, U.S.A. on the
11th March, 2009, will
be held at Christ Church
Cathedral, George
Street, Nassau, on
Thursday, 19th March,
2009 at 3:00 p.m.

Mr. Kelly is survived
by his wife Nancy
Booth Kelly; three sons,
Andrew Jordan Kelly,
David Gregory Booth
Kelly and Reginald
Scott Kelly; two
daughters-in-law, Anne
Boushelle Kelly and Candace Elizabeth Kelly;
five grandchildren, Jordan Ross Kelly, David
Oliver Christensen Kelly, Avery Ann Kelly, John
(Jack) Albert Charles Kelly and Katie Marie
Kelly; his brother, Godfrey Kenneth Kelly
C.M.G.; his sisters-in-law, Paula Kelly and Sonia
Kelly; his brother-in-law, John Avery Booth, Jr
and his wife, Bonnie Booth; nieces and nephews,
Linda Elza, Stephen and Gary Kelly, Lynn Lowe,
John Avery Booth, lll, Joy Marie Rousell and
Jody Laura Booth-Seals; his cousins Betty Kelly
Kenning, O.B.E. and her husband John Kenning
and George Kelly and his wife Norma Kelly
other relatives and friends. His brother Basil
Trevor Kelly predeceased him.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
The Lyford Cay Foundation, Inc., DAVID
ALBERT CHARLES KELLY, C.B.E.
MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, P.O.Box
N.7776, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, N.P.,
The Bahamas.



















Rodney Bowe

AWM ete) NI

NEWBOLD BROTHERS

CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
P.O. Box N-3572
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
Elizabeth "Lizzy" Bowles, 47

of Millerton, Long Island
will be held on Saturday,
12th July, 2008, at 10:00
a.m., at The Church of
God of Prophecy, Burnt
Ground, North Long
Island. Officiating will be

| District Overseer George
Thompson. Interment

| follows in Culmer's
Cemetery, North Long
Island.

Left to cherish fond

memories are her husband:
Neval Bowles; one daughter: Shirleymae Bowles;
six sons: Neval Bowles Jr. (deceased), Howard, Kevin
Bowles (deceased), Dennis, Wellington and Patrick
Bowles; father: Pastor Garnet Rolle; stepmother:
Mary Rolle; four sisters: Rosemary Brice, Estermae
Knowles, Eloise Emile and Corporal 213 Annamae
Rolle; six brothers: PC 2190 Andrew Rolle, Jeffery,
Leon, Daniel, Timothy and Ezekiel Rolle; two aunts:
Agnes Francis of Nassau and Estelle Adderley of
Millerton, Long Island; four uncles: Alfred Dixon of
Burnt Ground, Long Island, Joseph Rolle of Devils
Point, Cat Island, Albert Adderley and Lucien Medius;
six brothers-in-law, eight sisters-in-law, sixteen nieces,
ten nephews, numerous cousins and special friends
including: Pastor Stubbs, Carmetha and Dorothea
Francis, Anthony, Andrew, Nathaniel, the Adderley,
Dixon, Bowles and Smith families, Hilda Glinton
and family, The Church of God of Prophecy Church
family, Pastor Ferguson and family (Minnie Street).
And special thanks to the Community Clinic Staff
in Simms Long Island and other relatives and friends
too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at
Newbold Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue &
Acklins Street off Market and East Streets on
Wednesday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Friday at
the Church in Long Island from 5:00 p.m. until service
time on Saturday.

Two senior management

TWO Bahamians have been pro-
moted to senior management posi-
tions at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort.

Rodney Bowe, an engineering
and maintenance manager, was
appointed Director of Facilities,
while Tyrone Beneby, with fifteen
years in hospitality, has been pro-
moted to Director of Purchasing
for the 550-room resort.

“The Wyndham is very pleased
to have Beneby and Bowe joining
our senior management team and
we look forward to being guided
by their expertise and the contri-
butions they will make to our
resort,” managing director Jeffry
Humes, said.

Mr Bowe most recently served
as Lead Project Manager since 2006
and has lead the development of
new projects valued at over $6 mil-
lion.

“The role of Director of Facilities
is integral in any hotel. Rodney has
displayed the leadership, knowl-
edge and care necessary to take
care of our property and its facili-
ties,” Mr Humes said.

As Director of Facilities, Mr
Bowe will be responsible for the
Wyndham’s engineering depart-
ment, plant room and laundry oper-



appointments at Wyndham

ations. Congratulating Rodney on
his appointment, Humes said ““Rod-
ney’s leadership and drive can only
produce ongoing positive results
from his team and his dedication
to a job well done will definitely be
contagious to all those around
him.”

Tyrone Beneby is no newcomer
to the Wyndham Nassau Resort
and has been an integral member of
their management team since 2002.
Over the last seven years, Beneby
excelled through the ranks of Direc-
tor of Event Management and most
recently, Director of Restaurants.

In his new position as Director of
Purchasing, Mr Beneby will be
responsible for the purchasing and
receiving divisions, storerooms and
warehouse. He will also oversee a
staff of 15 managers and employees.

“T’ve seen many changes over
the course of the years at the Wyn-
dham but we continue to improve
our operations and execution.

“T feel privileged to lead in this
capacity and look forward to
streamlining our procedures and
policies and continuing to work
with the senior management
team to improve overall efficien-
cies at the Wyndham,” Mr Beneby
said.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS





| NORTH ANDROS Primary School choir

Reunion celebration last Friday.



performs during the International Square Ss

Gladstone Thurston/BIS



A weekend of Androsian

cultural celebration

NICHOLL’S TOWN - North
Androsians took time out over
the weekend to thank their inter-
national winter residents and cel-
ebrate music and the arts.

Agriculture and Marine
Resources Minister Lawrence S
‘Larry’ Cartwright used the occa-
sion to call for “greater linkages”
between tourism and the handi-
craft and manufacturing indus-
try.

‘ite urged Bahamians to stop
being a people “caught in the
loop of dependency, always
expecting others to provide jobs
for us.”

“Join with us as we combine
our resources...to transform our
economy,” he said.

Mr Cartwright, MP for Long
Island and Ragged Island, was
guest of honour in a weekend of
Androsian cultural celebration.

Also attending were perma-
nent secretary Harrison Thomp-
son and Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) executive chairman Edi-
son Key and his delegation.

They were warmly welcomed
by administrator Dr Huntley
Christie, domestic investment
officer Alphonso Smith, and fes-
tivities organisers Clara Evans
and Rev James Sweeting.

Entertainment featured the
North Andros High School
junkanoo group, North Andros
Primary School choir, Mastic
Point Primary School dance
troupe, and the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Pop Band.

The 17th annual North Andros





Music and Arts Festival at Seav-
iew Park on Saturday showcased
an array of products created
using mainly ingredients found
locally.

There were Red Bays’ unique
silver palm weavings, Blanket
Sound’s delicate shell work, and
Nicholl’s Town’s coconut jew-
ellery with Chinese overtones by
Perky Lightbourne.

Mr Cartwright noted that the
interest in entrepreneurship
which his ministry, through
BAIC, has created, “has risen to
a fever pitch.”

“Stand tall and proud as
Bahamians,” he said. “Grow and
manufacture Bahamian goods.
Buy and consume Bahamian.”

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retrain and reskill our people,
while reinventing strategies and
re-engineering the engines of our
economy for greater diversity,”
said Mr Cartwright.

He warned of “increased com-
petitiveness” as Bahamians adjust
to “the bold and challenging new
realities of the global economy.”

He encouraged artisans to
manufacture souvenirs “in great
abundance” as the demand “con-
tinues to outstrip supply.”



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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
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The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all proposals.

LOCAL NEWS

Man shot dead.
in daylight attack

FROM page one

carpenter - everything. Just call on him
and he'd be there,” she said.

Rev CB Moss, pastor of Mount Olive
Baptist Church, which is a few streets
away from where the shooting occurred,
said he was shocked by the killing.

“Tt certainly shocked this community, it
being a Sunday and being in he middle of
the day. Like all inner-city communities
we have incidents of violence but it's not
normal to pull up on someone in broad
daylight and shoot his brains out.

“Tf the incident happened in the dead of
night that's one thing, but in the middle of
the day practically in the middle of the
street - that's not something that goes
down easily."

He described the victim as a person
trying to get his life on the right track.

"Many people feel that he has been
trying to correct himself from the course
he was on. He has been engaged in a car
wash business and auto-repair work. He
was gainfully employed and trying to
straighten up his life."

Rev Moss, head of civic organisation
Bahamas Against Crime, said the shoot-
ing highlights the need for government
and the private sector to work together to
formulate crime solutions.

"We are talking about bringing Miss
Universe here but unless we get crime
and violence under control it's going to
impact the economy. I'm calling on all
parties, especially corporate Bahamas -
they seem to be putting their heads in
the sand when it comes to crime.”



MARK 'SCABBY' DANIELS was found on the porch of a single-storey white and green wooden
building where he reportedly worked as an auto-mechanic.

To curb crime more alternative pro-
grammes are needed to foster positivity in
the nation's youth, he said

Meanwhile, an intensive investigation
was launched to establish the motive and
to identify those responsible for this inci-
dent. Investigators are hoping witnesses
will come forward and help catch the
shooter.

"This is a close-knit area and we are
asking persons to come forward,” Asst
Supt Walter Evans told reporters.

Police are asking anyone who was in
the area when the shooting took place
to contact 919, 502-9991, or 328-TIPS.

Yesterday's killing brought total homi-
cides to 15 for the year, Asst Supt Evans
said.

Tourism initiatives ‘will prove
oloomy forecast wrong’

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Mr. Anthony S. Forbes
at telephone 302-1165



FROM page one

tourism industry would shrink
by 9.8 per cent in 2009, in
terms of real domestic product
(GDP) growth. The WTTC

East Street Gospel Chapel

Invites You to Attend The |
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March 22” - 29"

also predicted the industry's
total job levels would contract
by 7.5 per cent.

Yesterday Senator Vander-
pool-Wallace told The Tribune
these predictions are based on
last year's industry perfor-
mance and added that he is
confident that new initiatives
in place by the ministry will
prove the dire forecast wrong.

"The World Travel and
Tourism Council can only
forecast based on two things:
number one, they quite rightly
expect demand for travel to
fall from our primary market.
So, yes, the volume of busi-
ness coming from the United
States is going to go down and
the World Bank has just said
that the global economy is
going to contract this year so

we understand that.

"The second part of it is
they're going to presume that
what we have been doing in
the past we will continue to do
in the future in the same envi-
ronment. We don't intend to
do that so we're going to
everything we can to prove
that forecast wrong. Not saying
flat out that it's going to be
wrong but we certainly know
what we have to do to make it
better.”

Cruise arrivals for January
were up 26 per cent compared
to the same period last year.
This is evidence that visitors
still see the country as a prime
destination, but are looking
for more economical vaca-
tions.

“January of this year, we

received more visitors to the
Bahamas than any January in
history. Most of those visitors
came by cruise ship - what the
customer is telling us is that
the Bahamas is enormously
attractive, but they are looking
for value. “The cruise ship is
the best value of all and we
are working to make certain
the value for land-based vaca-
tions become much more
attractive.”

One of the ministry's initia-
tives includes the launch of the
all-inclusive Club Grand
Bahama.

"The customer now wants
to know what's the total cost
of my vacation up front
instead of coming with just an
open-ended chequebook," he
said.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 11



Former PLP parliamentarian ‘Teen dead, two others in hospital

is ‘not impressed’ by ‘anger’
over article in The Tribune

FROM page one

The article by Tribune
managing editor John Mar-
quis entitled “The tragic
young pilot who knew too
much” told the story of the
late Chauncey Tynes Jr.,
who went missing in 1983
while piloting a flight from
Exuma to Nassau.

His father, Chauncey
Tynes Sr, told The Tribune
he believed his son was mur-
dered because he knew too
much of the association
between Sir Lynden and
Lehder.

PLP leader Perry Christie
publicly condemned the sto-
ry as “the vilest, the most
vicious, the most scurrilous,
and the sickest piece of
garbage” he had ever read,
and slammed Tynes’ claims
as “a tissue of lies, fantasies
and tall tales.”

Dr Donaldson pointed out
that the drug trade is part of
Bahamas history and
Bahamians are suffering the
consequences of the drug
trade that occurred during
the time of Sir Lynden.

“There were more people
who were a part of that his-
tory, so if they talk about Sir
Lynden today and another
person tomorrow, I would
have no problem with that,”
he said.

He said Bahamians were
apparently not prepared to
have a dispassionate discus-
sion of history.

“We can’t confront the
truth about anything diffi-
cult or anything that obvi-
ously has an effect on our
ability to govern. I think it
stems from this inability to
deal with some of the
embarrassing aspects of our
existence before self-gover-
nance.

“But I am not impressed
by the anger and anxiety sur-
rounding this. Like the old
proverbs say ‘the wicked flee
when no man pursues’. The
people who are overly para-
noid about the truth...you
have to dig deep to find out
where their paranoia comes
from,” he said.

Chavez: Russia
jets welcome, but
no Venezuela hase

m CARACAS, Venezuela

PRESIDENT Hugo Chavez
said Sunday that Russian
bombers would be welcome in
Venezuela, but the socialist
leader denied that his country
would offer Moscow its territo-
ry for a military base, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Chavez — a fierce critic of
Washington with close ties to
Russia and Cuba — said his
government did not raise the
possibility, as Russian media
had reported.

“Tt’s not like that,” the presi-
dent said, responding to a
report by Interfax news agency
quoting the chief of staff of Rus-
sia’s long range aviation, Maj.
Gen. Anatoly Zhikharev, as
saying some strategic bombers
could be based on an island
offered by Venezuela.

Zhikharev reportedly said
Saturday that Chavez had
offered “a whole island with an
airdrome, which we can use as a
temporary base for strategic
bombers.”

Speaking during his weekly
television and radio program,
Chavez said he told Russian
President Dmitry Medvedev
that his nation’s bombers would
be allowed to land in Venezuela
if necessary, but no such plans
have been made.

Venezuela hosted two Russ-
ian Tu-160 bombers in Septem-
ber for training flights and
joined Russian warships two
months later for naval exercises
in the Caribbean.

“T told President Medvedev
that any time Russia’s strategic
aviation needs to make a stop in
Venezuela as part of its strategic
plans, Venezuela is available,”
he said.

Interfax also reported that
Zhikharev said Russian
bombers could be based in
communist-led Cuba, but a
Kremlin official said Zhikharev
had been speaking hypotheti-
cally.

Dr Donaldson, who
entered the House of
Assembly at the 1967 elec-
tion, said that what he
admires most about other
cultures is their willingness
to allow other people to
study their history.

“Suppose the Americans
were too ashamed to let
Europeans study their histo-
ry of slavery or vice versa?
The Americans discuss how
(one of their founding
fathers) Thomas Jefferson
had children with one of his
slaves and have come to cel-
ebrate it. Suppose that was
lost to history because peo-
ple were not willing to dis-
cuss it because the man was
dead?”

During her contribution to
the mid-term budget debate
last week Senator Allyson
Maynard-Gibson suggested
that it was time the Bahamas
secured its history by chang-
ing libel laws so that it would
be possible to defame the
dead.

Dr Donaldson suggested
that Mrs Maynard-Gibson
should “go back to the Euro-
peans who taught her law
and ask them how come they
chose not to include some-
thing so foolish as that in
their libel laws.

“She should ask these
same people who taught her
why they would not have
thought it was a worthy sug-
gestion.”

“There are some who cel-
ebrate Columbus as a hero
on Columbus Day.

“There are those who
choose to celebrate the day
by holding a murder trial for
the man.

“They believe he should
be tried in absentia. To
assume that merely talking
about something that hap-
pened is an attempt to
defame someone is foolish,”
Dr Donaldson said.

He said that while there
are a number of persons who
wish to hold Sir Lynden up
as something other than
human, the fact is “the
father of the nation” did
have both faults and good
points.














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: two passengers inside.

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The driver received facial cuts, and a 22-year-old female rear

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Both were taken to hospital where the driver is in serious con-

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A third person - 16-year-old Godfrey Murphy of Sunset Park

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Police are also investigating another traffic accident which

? occurred in Rock Sound, Eleuthera, leaving a 56-year-old native
? dead.

Police on the island identified the deceased as local handyman

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Sometime before 7pm Saturday, he was driving on Queen's

i Highway in Rock Sound when his white 2004 white Ford F-150
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PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



England brush away woes
to trounce France 34-10

England swept aside recent troubles to beat France 34-10 at
Twickenham.

It was too late to salvage England’s RBS 6 Nations champi-
onship bid, but it brought a smile to manager Martin Johnson.

"When we do what we did today we look like a good team," said
Johnson. "That was great.

"I don't think our intensity level was higher. Our precision lev-
el was better - guys saw opportunities and took them.

Tries came from wing Mark Cueto, centre Riki Flutey (2), full-
back Delon Armitage and flanker Joe Worsley with stand-off
Toby Flood converting three and adding a penalty before going off
just before the interval with the score already 29-0.

France’s second-half tries came from hooker Dimitri Szarzews-
ki and wing Julien Malzieu.

Their defeat means they are also out of the running for 6 Nations
glory.

The title instead goes to a straight head-to-head between defend-
ing champions Wales and Grand Slam-chasing Ireland in Cardiff
next Saturday.

England, who avoided a single sin-binning after 10 yellow cards
in their previous four games, end their campaign at home to Scot-
land on the same day, while France, a shadow of the side which beat
Wales two weekends ago and now defeated three times in a row by
England, visit Italy.

Martin Johnson said England’s victory left a “good feeling of sat-
isfaction” in the changing roon.

"When you lose you are going to get criticised - you know that -
and defeat is a very realistic possibility when you are playing
France, so it's great.”

France coach Marc Lievremont said: "We wanted to follow up
what we did against Wales, but there was no game today.

"Every coach knows the difficulties of playing at Twickenham,
but I'm a bit disappointed. The start of the game was terrible for us.

"We had a lot of turnovers, lost the ball in the contact, didn't con-
test on the floor and England got confident."

Saturday’s 6 Nations results: Scotland 15, Ireland 22; Italy 15,
Wales 20.



Tom Hevezi/AP Photo

ENGLAND'S Delon Arenas celebrates after scoring a 7 during the Six Nations international rugby
union match against France at Twickenham stadium in London, Sunday March 15, 2009.



Tom Hevezi/AP Photo

ENGLAND'S Mark Cueto, left, and Cedric orcas of France battle for the ball dirtier the Six Nations inter-
national rugby union match at Twickenham stadium in London, Sunday March 15, 2009.



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li EUROPEAN
SOCCER WRAP

Liverpool rout
Man United 4-1
to revive fading
title hopes

m@ MANCHESTER, England

Liverpool routed Premier
League leader Manchester
United 4-1 on Saturday, com-
ing from behind to revive its
faltering title chase with its
biggest win at Old Trafford in
73 years.

Captain Steven Gerrard
gave Liverpool the lead for
good just before halftime after
Fernando Torres tied the
score following Cristiano
Ronaldo’s penalty kick for
United.

“It was magnificent, a great
team performance,” Gerrard
said.

The Reds’ first win at Unit-
ed in five years — and manag-
er Rafa Benitez’s first — was
put beyond doubt in the last
15 minutes, with goals by
Fabio Aurelio and Andrea
Dossena as the defending
champions were humiliated by
their fiercest rival.

This was United’s worst
home defeat since a loss by
the same score in 1992 against
Queens Park Rangers. The
club’s miserable afternoon
was compounded when
defender Nemanja Vidic was
ejected for the second time
this season against Liverpool.

United is still four points
ahead of Liverpool with a
game in hand. Arsenal jumped
into fourth place with a 4-0
victory over Blackburn, with
Andrei Arshavin scoring his
first goal for the club since he
move from Zenit St. Peters-
burg.

The Russian also had a sec-
ond-minute shot deflect off
Blackburn defender Andre
Oijer for an own-goal. When
his shot in the 87th was
blocked by goalkeeper Paul
Robinson, Emmanuel Eboue
collected the ball to add the
third goal.

In other games, sixth-place
Everton beat Stoke 3-1; Ful-
ham won 3-1 at Bolton; and
Hull and Newcastle tied 1-1.
Next-to-last Middlesbrough
scored a last minute equalizer
to tie Portsmouth 1-1, and
Wigan won 2-1 at Sunderland.

Yesterday Chelsea beat
Manchester City 1-0 to move
within four points of Manches-
ter United in the Premier
League standings on Sunday,
and Tottenham beat Aston
Villa 2-1 to climb into 11th
place, its highest of the season.

Michael Essien scored
Chelsea’s 18th minute winner
at Stamford Bridge with his
second goal in two games as
the Blues made it four league
victories in a row since tempo-
rary coach Guus Hiddink
replaced Luiz Felipe Scolari.

Manchester United’s loss at
home to Liverpool on Satur-
day has given the chasing
teams hope of catching the
Red Devils.

Both Chelsea and Liverpool
are four points behind the
defending champion, which
has a game in hand.

“The door is a little bit
open,” Hiddink said.

“Tt gives them a blow and
now all depends on their calm-
ness.

“Let’s see how they react in
the coming games, but they
have a lot of experience.

“We have to keep winning.”

Jermaine Jenas and Darren
Bent fired goals past Brad
Friedel, Villa’s American
goalkeeper.

John Carew replied in the
85th, but Spurs hung on for
the victory, giving it 33 points
from 21 games since Harry
Redknapp replaced the fired
Juande Ramos.

Back then Tottenham was
last with two points and now is
up to halfway, six points above
the relegation zone.

m@ GLASGOW, Scotland

Darren O’Dea and Aiden
McGeady scored extra time
goals to guide Celtic to a 2-0
victory over traditional rival
Rangers in the Scottish
League Cup final.

After 90 minutes of goalless
football at Hampden Park,
O’Dea gave Celtic the lead in
the first minute of extra time.
McGeady added the second
from the penalty spot in the
120th minute after he had
been tripped by Kirk Broad-
foot, who was ejected.

It was the first time in 20
years that Celtic had beaten
Rangers in a final, the last
time being in the more presti-
gious Scottish Cup in 1989.
Celtic now has 14 League Cup
titles to Rangers’ record 25.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS















Previously
undefeated
teams lose first
games of season

THE Baptist Sports Coun-
cil continued its 2009 Joyce
Minus Basketball Classic on
Saturday at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex with two
of the previously undefeated
teams losing ther first games
of the season.

In the men's president
division, BIBA upset Tem-
ple Fellowship 47-45, but
Temple Fellowship knocked
off Golden Gates 21-15 in
the 15-and-under division.

Also, Temple Fellowship
got their second win in three
games as they held off Mercy
Seat 33-29. Mercy Seat
played a double header, but
also lost 49-24 to the defend-
ing campions First Baptist,
who improved to 3-1.

In other games played, last
year's 19-and-under runners-
up Macedonia prevailed with
a 34-32 win over Faith Unit-
ed. It was a double dose of
victory for Macedonia as
their 15-and-under nipped
Faith United 15-14.

Latter-Day spoiled the
debut of Pilgrim Temple

men with a 38-33 win; Chris-
tian Tabernacle handed
Bahamas Harvest a 38-26
loss; Golden Gates knocked
off Calvary Bible 43-26 and
First Baptist won 36-28 over
City of Praise.

There was also a battle of
two teams from the same
church playing each. In the
19-and-under dvision, Gold-
en Gates No.1 out-lasted
Golden Gates No.2 45-39
and Latter-Day A held onto
a 41-35 win over Latter-Day
No.2.

¢ Here's asummary of some
of the games played:

Men's Division

Christian Tabernacle (2-0) 38,
Bahamas Harvest (1-2) 26: Var-
do Bowleg 20 points in the win.
Golden Gates (2-0) 43, Calvary
Bible (0-3) 26: Samuel Johnson
14 points in the win.

First Baptist (2-0) 36, City of
Praise (1-2) 29.

BIBA (1-3) 47, Temple Fellow-
ship (3-1) 45: Donnie Moss 19
in the win.



=

Teams

Men's President
First Baptist
Temple Fellowship
Latter-Day Saints
City of Praise
BIBA

Ebenezer

Pilgrim

OOH MWPs

Teams W

Men's Vice President
New Bethlehem
Golden Gates
Christian Tabernacle
Evangelistic Center
Church of Nazarene
Bahamas Harvest
Calvary Bible

Oo — | — PNP

Latter-Day (2-1) 38, Pilgrim (0-
1) 33. Perez Thompson 17 in
the win.

19-And-Under

Golden Gates No.1 (2-1) 45
Golden Gates No.2 (1-2) 39
Temple Fellowship (2-1) 33,
Mercy Seat (0-5) 29. Mario
Stubbs 12 points in the win.
Macedonia (3-2) 34, Faith Unit-
ed (1-1) 32 in overtime. Patrick
Brice 13 in the win.
15-And-Under

Latter-Day A (3-2) 41, Latter-
Day B (1-1) 35.

Macedonia (2-1) 15, Faith Unit-
ed (1-2) 14. Geno Bullard 8 in
the win.

¢ Here’s a look at the schedule
for Saturday:

Court One - 10 am Latter-Day
No.2 vs Faith United (15); 11
am Golden Gates vs Latter-Day
Saints (15); Noon Golden Gates
vs Latter-Day (19); 1 pm Gold-
en Gates No.2 vs Mercy Seat
(19); 2 pm City of Praise vs Pil-
grim (M); 3 pm Latter-Day
Saints vs BIBA (M)

Court Two - 10 am Macedonia
vs Temple Fellowship (15); 11
am Temple Fellowship vs Mira-
cle Working COG (19); Noon
Macedonia vs Golden Gates (L);
1 pm Golden Gates vs Christian
Tabernacle (M); 2 pm Church of
the Nazarene vs Evangelistic
Center (M); 3 pm New Bethle-
hem vs Calvary Bible (M).







Knowles/
Bhupathi
win opener

MARK Knowles and his
Indian partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi pulled off their open-
ing doubles victory at the
BNP Paribas Open in Indian
Wells, California over the
weekend.

The Bahamian-Indian duo,
who are still rabked at num-
ber two in the world with
1425 points behind the
American identical twin
brothers of Bob and Mike
Bryan (2595), won their
opening match 7-5, 6-3.

The tournament’s No.3
seeds defeated the unranked
Russian team of Igor Kunit-
syn and Dmitry Tursunov.
They will now await the win-
ner between the teams of
Max Mirnyi/Andy Ram
against Martin
Damm/Robert Lindstedt.

The Bryans are the top
seeds, followed by Daniel
Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic.

© Basketball

Primary
school tourney

THE Providence Basket-
ball Association, headed by
Kevin ‘KJ’ Johnson, will
continue their first Phil
Smith Primary School Bas-
ketball Tournament today at
3:30 pm at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

The tournament is attract-
ing a number of private and
government primary schools.
The tournament got started
on Saturday and will contin-
ue through Saturday.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the
news, read
eT fels
on Mondays





Andrew Brownbill/AP Photo

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INDIA'S Mahesh Bhupathi, front,

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tralian Open Tennis Champi-
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Latter-Day Saints
First Baptist

Golden Gates

Temple Fellowship
Macedonia

Faith United

Golden Gates No.2
Miracle Working COG
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PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



COLLEGIATE INDOOR SEASON

Stuart closes out with fourth place

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

BIANCA ‘BB’ Stuart couldn’t ask
for a better way to close out her col-
legiate indoor season.

The Southern Illinois’ senior
earned her second All-American
honours when she cleared 21-feet,
2-inches for a fourth place at the
National Collegiate Athletic Asso-
ciation’s National Championships
over the weekend.

The Queen’s College graduate was
one of three Bahamians who took
part in the meet that was held in Col-
lege Station, Texas on the campus
of Texas A & M where SIU’s Salukis
ended up 11th in the team standings.

Sophomore Cache Armbrister and
freshman Nivea Smith, who are

keeping the Auburn University con-
nection alive, competed in the 200
metres.

Both fell short of advancing to the
final.

Armbrister was 12th overall in
23.80 seconds after she placed third
in the last of five heats. Smith, the
Grand Bahamian native, followed in
13th spot in 23.90 after she also got
third in heat four.

Stuart, who had a brief moment
to talk to the two young sprinters
just before she went out to jump on
Saturday, said she was really pleased
with her performance.

“Tt’s a great feeling. I’m very proud
of myself,” said Stuart, was able to
improve on her 13th place finish last
year. “I'd take it. I can’t complain. I
had a good series of jumps.”

After opening up with a leap of

21-feet, 3/4-inches to take the initial
lead, Stuart fouled her second
attempt to fall into second place.

On her third attempt, she leapt 20-
7 to move into fourth place. She
duplicated the feat to hang onto her
position in the fourth round.

But after fouling her fifth jump,
she came back on her final attempt
to nail her best jump of the meet to
close out with her final position and
was just 1/2-inch shy of at least tying
for third place.

“T fouled two jumps and I jumped
21 twice, so I felt great,” Stuart said.
“Twas a bit flat on the 20-foot jump,
but I got it together and I was able to
jump a little further on my last jump
to keep me in fourth.”

Winning the event was Eleni
Kafourou of Boise State with a best
of 21-5 1/4 on her fifth attempt. Jeo-

mi Maduka of Cornell was second
with 21-4 on her last jump and Rhon-
da Watkins of UCLA was third with
21-2 1/2 on her last attempt.

All three competitors, like Stuart,
are seniors.

Stuart, who will celebrate her 21st
birthday on May 17, said she’s now
looking forward to the outdoor sea-
son.

“Pm really looking forward to
qualifying for the World Champi-
onships,” said Stuart, who missed
making the trip to the Olympic
Games last year in Beijing, China.

She’s not sure exactly when she
will begin her outdoor season.

But she indicated that her coach
Andre Scott has indicated that she
will probably just run on the relay
team when the Salukis get started
next month.



BIANCA ‘BB’ Stuart in a file photo.

NEW PROVIDENCE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION CHAMPIONSHIP

Truckers take opener

FROM page 15

“Once we do what our coach (James Price) say and put up the
defense a notch, there’s no way that the Cheetahs will be able to
stop us.”

Not only will the Cheetahs have to find a way to stop Rolle, but
they also have to contain her backcourt running mate, Glenda
Gilcud, who scored 17.

And if that wasn’t enough, Janice Williams worked her way
inside for 13 points, pulled down nine rebounds and came up with
three block shots.

Williams also had the dubious task of guarding Electro Telecom’s
center Natasha Miller, who led the Cybots with 17 points, nine
rebounds, two assists and a block.

Electro Telecom, coached by Simone Sawyer, had a balanced
scoring attack with Tiffany Wildgoose scoring 12 with three
rebounds.

Varel Davis and Tiffany Lewis both had 11 and Teneil Poitier
contributed 10 in the loss.

Davis, however, said they came out a little too flat, but they
managed to pick up things in the second half as they rebounded
from a 37-30 deficit at the break.

“We have to try and contain their two guards and play defense,”
said Davis of the Truckers’ 1-2 punch of Rolle and Gilcud. “Once
we can do that and play defense, we should be able to win the
series.”

Davis came up with some clutch shots to keep Electro Telecom
in the game. But each time they made a slight run, Rolle or Gilcud
was able to get a fast break to stay ahead.

The Truckers regrouped early in the fourth quarter to slowly pull
away after trailing 53-48 at the end of the third quarter, thanks to
a huge three-pointer from Davis with 2.0 seconds left on the clock.

Lady Angels 57, Lady Cheetahs 54: Sharel Cash scored 16,
Alexandria ‘Shaq’ Fernander had 14 and Chrishanda Kelly chipped
in with 11 as Boomer G took game one.

Sunshine Auto, who led 32-24 at the half, got a game high 17 from
Linda Pierre, 13 from Audrey Martin and 10 from Anastacia Moul-
trie in the loss.

Coaches 35, Officials 33: Kimberly Rolle, now an assistant coach
with the College of the Bahamas Lady Caribs, remembered clear-
ly when the game was on the line and she came up a big shot.

She relived those days again when she went to the foul line and
converted a pair of free throws with just 7.7 seconds left on the clock
in the extra one minute to preserve the win.

Rolle was fouled by Warren Butler, who had opened the OT with
a three-pointer. Rolle responded immediately after Butler’s trey to
hit one at the other end to set up the final seconds dramatic play.

“It reminded me that basketball is for the young folks,” said
Rolle, who haven’t played competitively in three years. “The first
half was kind of rough, but we started to get it going in the second.
In the overtime, it was smooth sailing.”

Rolle led a team of coaches that included Mario Bowleg, Fred-
die Brown, Sharelle Cash, Randy Cunningham, James Price, Antho-
ny Swaby and Jean ‘Bubbles’ Minus.

The Officials included Butler, Anthony Williams, Rodney John-
son, Craig ‘Pepper’ Clark, Norman ‘Mooch’ Humes, James
Dawkins, Devon Johnson and Mel Francis.

“It was a good game, but I think some calling down the stretch
beat the referees,” Johnson said. “I hope we can play them again.
Next time we will beat them by 20.”



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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

Sp

Truckers roll past
the Cyhots 78-69

m@ By BRENT STUBBS take their frustration out on the
Senior Sports Reporter Media when they square off on
fi bstubbs@tribunemedia.net Saturday at 6:30 pm.
For the Lady Truckers,
Shantell Rolle led up the nets



NDAY, MARCH 16, 2009



ili

HE Johnson Lady
Truckers served
notice that they
are prepared to
defend their New Providence
Women’s Basketball Associa-

for a game high 31 points,
shooting 9-of-15 from the field,
3-for-5 from the three-point
arch and 10-11 from the free
throw line.

“We’re going to come out

a tion title. here on Tuesday and take game
Playing in the first game of — two and wait for the next series
their best-of-three playoff series for the championship,” said a
on Saturday night at the DW confident Rolle.
He Davis Gymnasium, the Truck-
i) Hew se EL a ers rolled past the Electro Tele- SEE page 14
com Cybots 78-69 to snatch the
OR ea a
FISH FILLET
SAN Dy ; i H be played on Tuesday night —/Tribune staff
with the third game, if neces-

Also Saturday night, the
. - sary on Thursday.

Also Saturday, the Coaches
managed to beat the Officials
35-33 in overtime on a five
points, including a nail biting
three-pointer from former Lady
Angels’ forward Kimberly

| Rolle.

Boomer G Swingers rallied to
The Officials are hoping to

TRUCKERS’ Glenda
Gilcud drives past the
defence of Cybots

take their opener 57-54 over last :
Tracey Lewis.

year’s runners-up Sunshine
Auto Lady Cheetahs. ie pas
Game two in both series will | PHOTO: Felipé Major
















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MONDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

y S

IO .2 009



im

MARCH
Confidence For Life

Bank sustains
‘large one-off"
non-performing
loan increases

* FirstCaribbean’s Bahamas
operations sees non-
performing loans rise
from six per cent to eight
per cent of total portfolio

* Above industry average,
but nothing to suggest
bank in difficulty

* Bahamian unit redeems
$20m bond issue three
years early

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FIRSTCaribbean suffered
“some large one-off” increases
in Bahamas-based non-per-
forming loans during its 2008
financial year, the bank’s group
annual report has revealed, with
the Bahamian operation’s non-
performing loans increasing
from 6 per cent to 8 per cent of
its total portfolio.

Analysing its group-wide
financial performance for the

SEE page 10B



City Markets ‘read riot
act’ over late financials

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian

regula-

tors

have
“read the riot act”
to City Markets’
parent company
over its failure to
date to produce
financial statements
for fiscal 2008, a
period that closed
almost nine months
ago, and have set
imminent deadlines
by when these must be released.

A highly-placed source, speaking to
Tribune Business on condition of
anonymity, told this newspaper: “The
Securities Commission has been putting
pressure on them. It has given the com-
pany deadlines, and is requiring certain
things to happen by the end of next [this]
week.”

What exactly will happen by the dead-
line is uncertain. While release of the full
audited financial statements is unlikely, a
more plausible outcome is that Bahamas
Supermarkets will be required to release
unaudited management accounts — some-

Deveaux

* Securities Commission said to be ‘putting pressure’ on for
some kind of disclosure, possibly as early as this week
* Auditors looking for ‘guarantees’ to avoid going

concern qualification

* Chairman denies store closure speculation
* Says 2008 net loss ‘in line’ with $10m forecast

thing minority investors and activists,
such as financial adviser Richard Coulson,
have long called for.

Hillary Deveaux, the Securities Com-
mission’s executive director, declined to
comment when contacted about the situ-
ation surrounding Bahamas Supermar-
kets, parent company of the 12-strong
City Markets chain, late last week.

He has, though, in the past said the
Bahamian capital markets regulator was
“very concerned” about the now eight-
and-a-half month wait for Bahamas
Supermarkets to produce its audited
financial statements for the year-ended
June 30, 2008.

Tribune Business has been told that
while the audit has been completed, its
release has been delayed over whether
the auditors, KPMG, will issue the ‘going
concern’ qualification. This qualification

to their audit report, if included, would
‘flag up’ their concerns over whether
Bahamas Supermarkets would be able
to continue operating as a material con-
cern without further support from its
shareholders.

To avoid issuing this qualification, Tri-
bune Business has been told that KPMG
is seeking certain “pledges and guaran-
tees”. What precisely it is seeking, and
from whom, was not disclosed. But, at
an educated guess, the auditors likely
want Bahamas Supermarkets’ majority
78 per cent shareholder, BSL Holdings,
and the investors that comprise the group,
to guarantee items such as repayment of
the $24 million Royal Bank of Canada
loan and, possibly, to inject more equity
capital into the business to boost cash

SEE page 9B



$12m poultry farm
awaits environmental
approval for go-ahead

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A PROPOSED $12 million
poultry farm project for north
Andros is awaiting resolution
of environmental studies, the
area’s MP has told Tribune
Business, with his constituency
desperately needing the 50 ini-
tial jobs it promises to dent an
unemployment rate running at
15-20 per cent “minimum”.

Vincent Peet, former minister
of financial services and invest-
ments, said that getting the
chicken farm off the ground
would provide some economic
“hope” for his constituents in
north Andros and the Berry
Islands, given that develop-
ments surrounding its main
tourism project were “going
from bad to worse” following
its plunge into receivership.

“The chicken farm, the poul-
try operation is still progress-
ing,” Mr Peet told Tribune
Business. “We’re still very eager
to see if it goes. Most of the
approvals have been granted; a
couple are still awaited. Some
are related to BEST [the
Bahamas Environment, Science
and Technology Commission].

“The environmental issues
are being advanced, and if they
can be resolved, we believe it

might be a go. That will do a
lot to create some hope and
jobs.”

The investors behind the
poultry farm are understood to
be a group of Canadians and
Americans, some of whom have
strong Bahamas connections.”

Any investment would likely
be welcome in north Andros at
this time, given that Scotiabank
(Bahamas) has placed the area’s
so-called ‘anchor project’, the
$250 million Chub Cay Club
project, into receivership due
to the non-repayment of a $45
million loan.

Reflecting on that develop-
ment, Mr Peet said: “There’s
really no good news, which is
very, very sad, because we’ve
had more than our share of bad
news. It’s going from bad to
worse.

“As you would have known,
over the years Chub Cay was
the light, the only ray of hope
for that area in terms of invest-
ment and job opportunities.
Now where they are is having
such a negative effect, not only
on Chub Cay but north Andros.

“Tt’s very bad for both islands.
We are very severely chal-
lenged, and there has to be
some glimmer of hope some-

SEE page 8B

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Bank loan quality may not
improve until ‘next year’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

LOAN portfolio quality in
the Bahamian commercial
banking sector could continue
deteriorating well “into next
year”, a senior banking execu-
tive told Tribune Business, as
the economic downturn and ris-
ing unemployment leave many
borrowers unable to meet their
obligations.

Central Bank of the Bahamas
data for the period to end-Jan-
uary 2009 revealed that total
non-performing Bahamian com-
mercial bank loans — meaning

those more than 90 days past
due - then stood at $383 mil-
lion, some 6.3 per cent of total
outstanding loans.

This percentage was slightly
higher than the 5 per cent level
that Bahamian commercial
banks had been hoping to con-
tain the non-performing loan
average at. Total loans in
arrears, according to the Central
Bank, stood at $767 million or
12.7 per cent of the total port-
folio, with those between 31 and
90-days overdue standing at
$384 million or some 6.36 per
cent of the total.

Anwer Sunderji, Fidelity

Bank (Bahamas) chief execu-
tive, told Tribune Business:
“We fully expect that as the
economy slows down and
unemployment rises, the non-
performing part of our loan
portfolio will deteriorate, and
we expect it to continue for sev-
eral months before it gets bet-
ter.”

When asked how long this
deterioration might go on for,
Mr Sunderji replied: “At a min-
imum, to the end of this year.
But possibly into next year,
because recovery of the

SEE page 6B

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Port trustee
attempt
flismissed
by court

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AN attempt to obtain a court
order appointing a public
trustee for the Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) has
failed at the first hurdle, the
Court of Appeal backing a
Supreme Court ruling that the
non-profit trust bringing the
action had no legal capacity to
do so because it had not been
properly incorporated.

Outlining their reasons for
disallowing the appeal brought
by the Freeport Licensees and
Property Owners Association,
Appeal Justices Osadebay, Lon-
gley and Blackman all found
that the Association had failed
to prove it had the “legal capac-
ity as a body corporate” to ini-
tiate the action.

This, they ruled, was because
it had not been granted a
licence for its incorporation
under section 14 of the Com-
panies Act, while no certificate

SEE page 7B

ColinalImperial.
PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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Bahamas urged not
to bow to US over
financial services

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

INTERNATIONAL finan-
cial centres such as the
Bahamas should not bow to US
demands seeking greater infor-
mation about their clients,
according to an expert on the
US economy.

Michael LaFaive, who is

director of fiscal policy at the
MacKinac Centre for Public
Policy in Michigan, told Tribune
Business that the two largest so-
called ‘tax havens’ in the world
are Manhattan and Great
Britain.

He called those economies
“hypocrites” for essentially
attempting to ‘blacklist’ small
island nations, who have finan-

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cial institutions where individu-
als and organisations secure mil-
lions of untaxed dollars, while
they do much the same.

Mr LaFaive said the US and
UK divulge no information to a
foreign investor’s home coun-
tries when they bring millions,
sometimes billions, to their
economies.

Other economic pundits have
accused the US of using so-
called ‘tax havens’ as a scape-
goat for the current global eco-
nomic crisis, citing hidden tax-
able dollars as one of the cata-
lysts for the popped housing
bubble.

Since President Barack Oba-
ma’s succession to office, there
has been growing fear in small
international financial centres
that there will be another round
of the ‘blacklisting’ that
occurred in the 1990s.

The US president is set to
meet CARICOM heads at a
summit in Trinidad next month.

Conversation on the future
of international financial cen-
tres is expected to be raised dur-
ing the meetings.

The Minister of State for
Finance, Zhivargo Laing, told
Tribune Business recently that
this nation’s offshore financial
services sector should remain
vigilant and ever-watchful of
the policies coming out of the
US and Great Britain.

“They now see an opportu-
nity in the current crisis to
ratchet up the ante, because if
you can connect this global eco-
nomic crisis - as severe as it may
be - to the activities of offshore
financial centres, which makes
no real logical sense, it does
provide the kind of interna-
tional politics that might make
feasible their efforts.

“And so this is a continua-
tion of an ongoing exercise, and
I think it is something that has
real significant implications for
our financial services sector. I
think it has to be pondered,
considered and discussed,” said
Mr Laing.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 3B





Bahamas urged to ‘accelerate’
financial sector re-positioning

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas “ought to
accelerate” ongoing moves to
re-position its financial services
industry on a “tax compliant,
tax neutral and tax transpar-
ent” platform, a senior attor-
ney has told Tribune Business,
and “implement greater co-
operation in fiscal matters” giv-
en the direction the G-20 group
is MOViNng in.

John Delaney, managing
partner at Higgs & Johnson,
said that while the Bahamas’
international financial services
centre had never facilitated tax
evasion by wealthy clients from
the major industrialized coun-
tries, this nation had to recog-
nise the way the wind was blow-
ing from Washington, London
and other key capitals.

“T think the Bahamas has to
contemplate, with a view to
implementing greater co-oper-
ation on fiscal matters, given
what appears to be further
[moves] on that requirement by
the international community —
that there be greater co-opera-
tion in these matters,” Mr
Delaney told Tribune Business.

“We have to contemplate
that, and have to look at imple-
menting — in appropriate cases —
greater co-operation in a man-
ner that serves our interests.
I’ve said any number of times
that the matter of tax informa-
tion exchange for the Bahamas
goes to a matter of trade rela-
tions, and ought not to be
looked at as separate and iso-
lated from that.

“The Bahamas should
approach such arrangements
from the perspective of mutual
benefit and if, indeed, it is not
already doing so and has noth-
ing in the pipeline from that
perspective, it is now urgent to
get on with it. I think it’s criti-
cally important that we make
sure such arrangements provide
benefits to us.”

Mr Delaney essentially
argued that if the Bahamas was
to sign more Tax Information
Exchange Agreements (TIEAs)
in addition to the one it already
has with the US, it should seek
corresponding benefits for its
own economy that leave it at
least as well off — if not better —
than before it signed such an
agreement.

He described the US agree-
ment as “TIEA-plus”, given
that it secured Qualified Juris-
diction (QJ) status for the
Bahamas with respect to the
Internal Revenue Service’s
(IRS) withholding tax regime,
plus the convention tax break
that boosted the Bahamian
tourism industry.

The need to entertain greater
co-operation on fiscal matters
has become more pressing for
the Bahamas in the past few
weeks. Apart from the well-
publicised Stop Tax Haven
Abuse Act, and the Obama
administration’s professed
desire to crack down on so-
called ‘tax havens’, the G-20
meeting in April is set to flesh
out plans for a new global
supervisory regime for finan-
cial services, in addition to
broadening the anti-‘tax haven’
drive.

Switzerland, Austria and
Luxembourg all pledged
greater co-operation on tax
matters, and the clamp down
on tax evasion, on Friday.
Liechtenstein has already
bowed to such pressure, while
others such as Andorra, Bermu-
da, Jersey and Guernsey have
indicated they will all follow
suit. Given such momentum,
the Bahamas could find itself
dangerously isolated if it does
not move in step in some fash-
ion.

Mr Delaney, though, said the
Bahamian financial services
model had been evolving to one
of tax compliance, transparency
and neutrality for some time.
“Tt has been evolving already,”
he explained.

“Tf we were to look at things,
most particularly over the past
10 years but maybe a bit more,
it has evolved. The business
model today is a little different
from what it was 10 years ago,
and I expect it to evolve.

“The Bahamas has been
trending in that direction
already, albeit the move in that
direction ought to accelerate
now — towards tax compliant,
tax neutral and tax transparent
business.”

Mr Delaney said the recipro-
cal benefits the Bahamas should
seek from greater tax informa-
tion co-operation would depend
on the other country and bilat-
eral relationship involved. He



* Gathering G-20 storm indicates nation most move with more ‘urgency’ if not doing so on tax transparent, compliant and neutral platform
* Attorney urges Bahamas to seek reciprocal economic benefits, given that tax information exchange expansion seems inevitable

said the Bahamas should
address the situation from the
bilateral perspective, not a mul-
tilateral one.

Among the benefits this
nation should seek, he said,
were “favourable terms on a
good or service the Bahamas
needs”, or reduced withholding
taxes on remittances sent back
to this nation. Treaties regard-
ing inward investment into the
Bahamas, plus access to medical
services and educational ser-
vices for Bahamian students
could also figure into the mix.

As an example, Mr Delaney
said that Canada’s 2007 Bud-
get included a provision that it
would not tax the dividend dis-
tributions from subsidiaries of
Canadian companies in foreign

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jurisdictions, which were remit-
ted to their parents, if those
nations signed TIEAs with it.
Such a benefit, Mr Delaney
said, would encourage Canadi-















an companies to set up sub-
sidiary operations in such
nations and switch away from
those that did not have a signed

In such a case, greater tax co-
operation could produce a com-
petitive advantage — or at least
maintain one — when it came to

TIEA with their governments. attracting inward investment.

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES





THIS MONTHS TOPIC: Ethics & Critical Care

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Internal Medicine

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‘e%] DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

DR. MEYER RASSIN
FOUNDATION
SCHOLARSHIPS

The Doctors Hospital Dr Meyer
Rassin Foundation is pleased to
announce that applications are now
being accepted for scholarships &
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pursuing healthcare careers.

Applicants must be Bahamian
citizens & return to the Bahamas
upon completion of their studies.

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A

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gs ROYAL FIDELITY

THE TRIBUNE

To atlvertise, call 502-2371

—

FINANCE CORPORATION WN IAD

OF BAHAMAS LIMITED Nassau Airport

Development Company

NOTICE TO TEN DER

SHAREH LDERS C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General

7 . Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
The Board of Directors of Finance Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage

Corporation of Bahamas Limited hereby 1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the

notifies all of its Shareholders that the Bank construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following

incurred a net loss of $367,759 based on ae

unaudited results for the quarter ended 31st
* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
January 2009. related subtrade packages;
. . te . * General Requirements for General Contracting services for
An interim dividend of thirteen cents (13 the overall project; and
1 * Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
oe reco ieee ch aa De oanl subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.
on 30th March 2009, to all shareholders of The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e.

record as of 23rd March 2009 mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
. Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230

General Contractor in 2009.

The Bank’s total assets stood at

$852,701 ,903 for the quarter ended 31st The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing

J anuary 2009. after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

D. Burrows-Haines (Mrs.)
Corporate Secretary Contact: TRACI BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 16th March 2009 Email: traci brisby@nas bs

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 12 MARCH 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.28 | CHG 0.12 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -52.08 | YTD % -3.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 813.80 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

52wk-Low Securit y
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Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (81)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
0.070

0.00 0.992 11.1

0.00 0.244 28.7

0.00 -0.877 N/M

0.00 0.105 30.0

0.00 0.055 43.1

0.00 1.309 10.7

0.00 0.118 24.0

0.00 0.438 15.0

0.12 0.111 12.9

2.16 2.16 0.00 0.240 9.0
7.76 7.76 0.00 0.598 13.0
11.00 11.00 0.00 0.542 20.3
10.45 10.45 0.00 0.794 13.2
5.07 5.07 0.00 0.337 15.0
1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 N/M
0.30 0.30 0.00 0.035 8.6
5.50 5.50 0.00 0.407 13.5
10.50 10.50 0.00 0.952 11.0
10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

Security
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

29.00 ABDAB
0.00 Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low Fund Name
1.3041 Colina Bond Fund
2.9230 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3828 Colina Money Market Fund
3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
FBB17 : 7% 19 October 2017
FBB22 100.00 ; Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
FBB13 100.00 . 7% 30 May 2013
FBB15 100.00 . Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
7.92 8.42 0.300
4.00 6.25 6.00 0.480
0.35 0.40 0.35 0.000

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

31.72 33.26 29.00 0.000
0.00 0.00 0.00 0.000
0.45 0.55 0.55 0.000
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.3664 0.95 4.77 28-Feb-09
2.8988 -1.40 -3.35 28-Feb-09
1.4432 0.67 4.37 6-Mar-09
3.3201 -1.94 -11.33 31-Jan-09
12.7397 0.96 5.79 28-Feb-09
100.5606 0.56 0.56 31-Dec-08
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59 31-Dec-08
1.0000 0.00 0.00 31-Dec-07
9.1005 0.06 -13.33 31-Jan-09
1.0440 0.80 4.40 9-Feb-09
1.0364 0.33 3.64 9-Feb-09
1.0452 0.76 4.40 9-Feb-09
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 5B

@ ROYAL FIDELITY MARKET WRAP



@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a quiet week in the
Bahamian market, as investors
traded in four out of the 25
listed securities. Of these, one

stock declined in value and
three remained unchanged.
There were no advancers in
the market last week.

EQUITY MARKET
A total of 20,921 shares

NOTICE

changed hands, representing
a decrease of 20,024 shares or
49 per cent versus the previous
week's trading volume of
40,945 shares.
Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) was the volume leader

The payment of Long-Term Benefits and Assistance in New Providence for March 2009

will be made as follows:

i) On Tuesday, March 17, 2009, for pensioners whose funds are deposited to their

bank accounts; and

li) Beginning Thursday , March 19, 2009, at the Board’s Fox Hill, Wulff Road and Jumbey
Village Local Offices. Cheques may be collected from these offices between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

Pensioners and/or their representatives are required to produce proper identification in
order to collect their cheques.

Acceptable forms of identification for Pensioners are the National Insurance Registration
Card, together with any one of the following:

1. A Passport;
2. AVoter’s Card; or

3. Any other document which establishes, conclusively, the identity of the claimant.

Where the Pensioner is sending a Representative to collect his/her cheque, the Repre-
sentative should present an Authorization Form, completed by the Pensioner, or a letter
from the Pensioner authorizing the Board to release his/her cheque. Additionally, the
Representative should present any one of the above-listed items to identify himself/her-
self. Cheques will not be released to Representatives who fail to provide satisfactory iden-

tifying documents.

Please Note:

Pensioners born in March and September are now due for Verification.

Failure to be verified on-time, will result in the suspension of payments.



PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE OFFICE ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY NOTICE

Deputy Director of Finance

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of Deputy Director of
Finance, Public Hospitals Authority.

for a second consecutive week
with 11,536 shares trading, its
stock falling by $0.03 to end
the week at $6.56.

Focol Holdings (FCL) saw
8,822 shares trade to end the
week unchanged at $5.07.

BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the
Bahamian market last week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

There were no financial
results reported by any of the
24-listed companies during the
week.

Private Placement

Offerings:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extend-
ing the deadline of its private
placement offering. The pre-
ferred shares will be paying a
dividend rate of prime + 1.75
per cent, payable semi-annu-
ally.

Dividends Note:

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a dividend
of $0.05 per share, payable on
March 31, 2009, to all share-
holders of record date March
13, 2009.

Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FIN) has declared a
dividend of $0.13 per share,
payable on March 30, 2009, to
all shareholders of record date
March 23, 2009.

Annual General Meeting

(AGM) Notes:

Focol Holdings (FCL)
announced it will hold its
Annual General Meeting on
Thursday, March 19, 2009, at
10.30am in the Boardroom at
its Corporate Office in
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FIN) announced it
will be holding its Annual
General Meeting on Thursday,
March 19, 2009, at 6.30pm in
the Governor's Ballroom at
the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel.

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MINISTRY OF FINANCE

NOTICE
THE BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES REGULATION
ACT, 2000

Notice is hereby given that the Governor, pursuant to
Section 18(1){a)(ii) of the Banks and Trust Companies
Regulation Act, 2000, has revoked by Order dated the
6th March, 2009, the bank and trust licence granted
on 11th November, 1977 to Provincial Bank of Canada
(international) Limited (now called “Credit Agricole Suisse
Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.”) and amended from time
to time, on the grounds that the company has ceased
to conduct banking and trust business from within the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Wendy Craigg
Govemor
The Central Bank of The Bahamas



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Request for Tender for Security Operations at
The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute campuses
at Old Trail Road, and Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas

The Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute (B.T.V.I.) now

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:

Educated to degree level or equivalent; a professionally qualified accountant and member of a
recognized accounting body, (American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, or Association
of Chartered Certified Accountants or Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants); able to
demonstrate five (5) to ten (10) years relevant senior management experience within a large
complex organization; have the ability to demonstrate integrity and effective leadership and
management skills together with proven track record of contributing achievements of strategy and
policy development and implementation.

The successful candidate must possess excellent communication skills and be able to adapt
communication style to suit each activity/staff group; possess strong interpersonal skills and be
able to express a view convincingly coherently, verbally and in writing.

The Deputy Director of Finance will report to the Director of Finance, Corporate Office.

Job Summary: The holder of the post will be required to communicate regularly with a wide range
of senior staff both clinical and non-clinical and staff at all levels within the Authority. He/she must
also build and manage highly effective relationships with local authority partners, the public, the
Public Treasury and the Ministry of Finance.

Duties not limited to the following:

. Provides high level expertise in the areas of financial management and
corporate governance to the Board that ensures financial strategies are
effectively integrated and aligned within the corporate management
process.

. Plans, controls and monitors the flow of the Authority’s funds to ensure
expenditure is contained within budget; produces financial reports as
required by the Board, Managing Director and all its levels of management.

. Leads in the implementation of the Board’s financial strategy and plans;
ensures that appropriate levels of expertise are in place for effective
delivery of financial and management accounting services and that all
statutory and regulatory requirements are met relating to the Authority's
accounts, including the submission of audited accounts in order to meet
deadlines.

. Reviews and supervises the implementation of financial policies and
supervises approved systems of financial control to ensure the effective use
of resources and compliance with accounting standards; liaises with audit,
both internal and external to ensure systems of control are adequate and
secure; promotes optimum standards of professionalism within the finance
functions to ensure compliance with external standards and best practices.

. Coordinates integrated activities across the Authority and its institutions ensuring
the Board, Managing Director and all Its levels of management has the appropriate
skills and toots to maximize scarce resources so as to deliver sustainable improvements to
patient care.

. Ensures that there is effective coordination across
all elements of the finance functions of the Authority; contributes fully to the
business planning cycle of the Authority; liaises with the relevant key managers and
clinicians to encourage their participation in the process.

. Leads, motivates, develops and trains staff within the department to ensure that
they have the necessary skills to achieve required objectives and to encourage the
development of innovative, creative thinking and team work across the departments.

The post of Deputy Director of Finance is in Salary Scale HATM7 (B) ($48,650 x 800 _ $56,650).
Letters of application and curricula vitae should be submitted to the Director of Human

Resources, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville: or
P. O. Box N-8200, Nassau, Bahamas no later than 26th March, 2009.

invites sealed bids for the provision of Security Services at The Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Institute campuses at Old Trail Road, and Wulff
Road Nassau, Bahamas.

The Contract is for a period of twelve (12) months in the first
instance and interested security firms are invited to submit Tenders
with comprehensive details of their proposal for security operations for
a twenty-four period starting at 6:00 a.m. daily (including weekends
and holidays). The Contract will be awarded to the applicant providing
the most economical and acceptable Tender for the full duration of the
contract period.

Interested Bidders may inspect campuses between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Collection of the
specification and bidding documents can be obtained from the Reception
Desk at B.T.V.I., Old Trail Road between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:00
p.m., Monday through Friday beginning Monday, 16" March, 2009 and
obtain further information at the second address given below.

Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “Tender for
Security, Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute” and delivered
to the attention of:-

The Chairman of the Tenders’ Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach

P. O. Box N-3017

Nassau, Bahamas

The Manager

Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute
Old Trail Road

P. O. Box N-4934

Nassau, Bahamas

Bids must be received by 4:00 p.m. on Friday, 3% April, 2009
accompanied by an endorsed copy of a current Business Licence.

Persons who submit Tenders are invited to a public opening of bids at
the Ministry of Finance, in the Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building, Cable
Beach on Tuesday, 14" April, 2009.

B.T.V.I. reserves the right to reject any or all Bids.


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





PRC UT ee a]
Tea MANES TTT CC
PSE are a BTL

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position:

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Email applications to Mrs. Canbemae Knowles (Ennai ackress: carrlemae knowlestifirstcaribbeanbank.com }
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company (OROG) level across all aspect: of the business (Financial, Riek, Peoole and Customer Service)

+ Rasporsibility tor the management of sales acthity including depos gathering and product protitahiity at operating
eomperty leer

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® Respondble for the develooment and implementation @ team owneship of sales, serice and profitability
Management across the OPO

© Overall reyoonsindity for the manajgement af the nak and conformance al the Operating Campuany's Lending Portfolia

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and derek business in suppent of the Retail Wealth buniness and FistCarbbean sirategies aed) objectives

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NOTICE
TO SHAREHOLDERS

The Annual General Meeting of Finance Corporation of
Bahamas Limited (RBC FINCO) will be held on
Thursday, 19" March, 2009 in the Governor's Ballroom
of British Colonial Hilton, Number One Bay Street, New
Providence, The Bahamas at 6:30 p.m.

D. BURROWS-HAINES
CORPORATE SECRETARY

NOTICE

The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in storage:

* TIFFANY ADDERLEY
«MELISSA GRANT

* WAYNE MILLER
*COODWIN BUTLER

* BRIAN DEVEAUN
(EVERYTHING LINCOLN)

* CHERYL WELLS

* JASON ALLEN

* KRYSTAL LORD

* MARCO ARMBRISTER

* WILLIAM KNOWLES
* BERYL EDGECOMBE
* CHARLES MUNNINGS
* ADRIAN MILLER
«ANTHONY WELLS

* MAKITA DEPRADINE
* FREDRICKA JIMENEZ
* CYRIL WOODSIDE

* GLENDAMAE BAIN

* TIMOTHY CLARKE

* GARTH SAWYER

All rentals must be paid and items removed no later than March 26th, 2005

Sstor-it-all
Soldier Road
(by Lowe's Wholesale),

Telephone: 393-0964



Bank loan quality
may not improve
until ‘next year’

IN THE ESTATE OF
WILLIAM SAWYER late of
Golden Gates #2 in the Southern
District of the Island of New
Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand against
the said estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 30" day of March, A.D.

2009, after which date the Attorney
by Deed of Power of Attorney will proceed to
distribute the estate having regard only to the
claims of which she shall have had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the estate are required to
make full settlement on or before the
date hereinabove mentioned.

Dated the 12" day of March, A.D. 2009

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, Bahamas



The Vanguard School
Lake Wales, Florida

FROM page 1B

Bahamian economy is so con-
tingent on the recovery of the
US economy.”

Much, he said, was riding on
the impact President Obama’s
stimulus package made, and
whether it restored consumer
confidence and spending by

reversing unemployment
increases and fears of further
job losses.

“Tt’s very hard to predict. We
are uncharted waters,” Mr Sun-
derji said. “I think employment
is likely to be sluggish, and we
may not have these dramatic
cuts we have seen. There’s some
resiliency there that we’re see-
ing.”

The Central Bank reported
that the mortgage arrears rate
rose slightly in January, going
from 13.24 per cent in Decem-
ber 2008 to 13.51 per cent in
January 2009. The rate of
arrears for consumer loans
increased slightly month-over-
month, from 10.82 per cent to
10.88 per cent, but commercial
loan arrears — most probably
due to a seasonal spending
boost — fell from 15.51 per cent
to 15.3 per cent after suffering
“the most marked deterioration
during 2008”.

For January 2009, Bahamian
dollar credit contracted year-
over-year by $52.9 million, with
consumer credit falling by $15.8
million and residential mort-
gage growth declining slightly
to $11.5 million. Private credit
for other areas, including busi-
nesses, fell by $10.8 million.

Analysing consumer lending
trends for 2008, the Central
Bank said net lending for debt
consolidation and the restruc-
turing of existing loans
“advanced three-fold to $98.3
million”. Credit card debt rose
by $37.4 million, while net
repayment increases of $9.4 mil-
lion were seen for automobile
loans. Home improvement
loans declined by $8.4 million.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 7B



aS 2.
Port trustee attempt dismissed by court

FROM page 1B

of incorporation for the
Freeport Licensees and Prop-
erty Owners Association had
been issued by the Registrar-
General.

Recalling the case’s back-
ground, Justice Osadebay said
the Freeport Licensees and
Property Owners Association,
a company incorporated by
attorneys Rawle Maynard and
Maurice Glinton, then-Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce president Christopher
Lowe, and Don Martin, had
filed their initial summons on
March 30, 2007. The Associa-
tion, in its summons, was
described as a “non-profit trust
incorporated under the provi-
sions of the Companies Act
1992”.

In a subsequent summons on
June 21, 2007, the Association
sought a court order appoint-
ing a public trustee as custodian
of the GBPA under the Public
Trustee Act, with powers to also
safeguard the assets of its Port
Group Ltd affiliate and parent,
Intercontinental Diversified
Corporation (IDC).

Alternatively, the Associa-
tion also sought an order
appointing a receiver for the
three companies should the
then-receivers, Clifford and
Myles Culmer, be removed.

In reply, the three respon-
dents — the GBPA, the Prime

Minister and the Attorney-Gen-
eral — all challenged the Asso-
ciation’s ability to bring and sus-
tain the action as a corporate
entity in its own name. In
essence, they challenged
whether it had been properly
incorporated, and asked the
Supreme Court to determine
this as a preliminary issue.

After the Association had
challenged Graham, Thompson
& Co’s ability to act as attor-
neys for the GBPA, which was
then in court-appointed
receivership, Justice Adderley
heard the preliminary issues in
early January 2008. He ruled
that the Association “was not
an incorporated body under the
provisions of the Companies
Act 1992, or the law..... and as
such, did not possess the requi-
site juristic personality or capac-
ity to maintain the action in its
name”.

The action was dismissed, but
Mr Glinton, also representing
the Association, appealed on
several ground. He argued that
Justice Adderley had been
wrong to determine the prelim-
inary issues first, and that he
had been incorrect in finding
that the Freeport Licensees and
Property Owners Association
had not been incorporated
properly.

Robert Adams, representing
the GBPA, and Loren Klein,
representing the Prime Minis-
ter and Attorney-General,
argued in support of Mr Adder-

ley.

“They submitted that there
was no dispute that, at the time
of the commencement of these
proceedings, no certificate of
incorporation under the Com-
panies Act 1992 had been issued
to the appellant by the Registrar
General, and there was no dis-
pute that a licence authorising
the appellant to be incorporated
without the use of the word
‘Limited’ in its name had not
been issued by the minister
responsible under the Compa-
nies Act,” Justice Osadebay
recorded.

In his ruling, Justice Longley
recalled how Mr Glinton sent
the Association’s Memorandum
and Articles of Association to
the Registrar General, for incor-
poration as a limited liability
company, on November 30,
2006. To be incorporated as
such a company, without the
use of the word ‘limited’, the
Attorney General’s permission
is needed.

“By letter dated February
2007, the Deputy Registrar
General advised Mr Glinton of
certain concerns raised by the
Attorney General as to whether
the application to be registered
as a non-profit trust without the
use of the word ‘Limited’ in its

name fell squarely within the
provisions of the Act, and
requested counsel’s opinion as
to why he thought that it did,”
Justice Longley found.

In his February 5, 2007, reply,
Mr Glinton said the request for
extra material was “unwarrant-
ed and unreasonable”, and sug-
gested it was required for some
“ulterior” motive not in accor-
dance with the law.

“Apart from anything else, it
is clear that Mr Glinton was of
the view that his client’s appli-
cation in the form presented sat-
isfied the requirements of the
Act for the issuance of the
Attorney General’s licence, and
there was therefore no need for
additional information to be
supplied,” Justice Longley
recalled.

“His letter ended with a
threat to have the matter
resolved by the Supreme Court
if there was persistence in the
request for additional informa-
tion which the appellant had no
intention of supplying.”

The Registrar General,
though, returned the Memo-
randum and Articles of Asso-
ciation for the Association to
Mr Glinton on March 7, 2007,
explaining why the licence
application was not granted. No

RBC
FINCO

certificate of incorporation was
ever issued for the Association,
which initiated its original sum-
mons three weeks later.

None of this appeared to cut
much ice with the Court of
Appeal, Justice Osadebay find-
ing that the Association’s exis-
tence as a corporate body, capa-
ble of legally initiating and
maintaining the action in its
name, needed to be determined
before any other issue was
resolved.

As for the incorporation
issue, Justice Osadebay ruled
that the burden of proof was on
the Freeport Licensees and
Property Owners Association
to prove it was a corporate
body.

He ruled that the Associa-
tion’s core argument appeared
to be that the receipt of its
Memorandum and Articles of
Association by the Registrar
General, together with the
application, entitled it to oper-
ate even though it had been
issued with no licence or cer-
tificate of incorporation.

Stating that this was inconsis-
tent with the Companies Act,
Justice Osadebay ruled: “The
burden was on the appellant to
establish its legal capacity as a
body corporate to bring this

action. That burden, in my view,
was not discharged.

“T found no fault with the
learned judge’s interpretation
of the provisions of the Com-
panies Act 1992 relating to the
incorporation of companies.
The learned judge was correct
in striking out the originating
summons and dismissing the
action.”

Justice Longley agreed, find-
ing that a certificate of incor-
poration was a necessary “pre-
condition” for a company to
exist. Otherwise, it has no
capacity to sue or carry on a
legal action.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



RBC
FINCO

REC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the follawing:

REC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
“ALL THAT™ piece parcel or kot of land being Parcel! No
No. 44. Kool Ag Subdivision sateated in the Eastern Distinct on the

1. Allotment
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or kot of land being Lot Ne. 12 Garden Hill

Isluad of New Providence one of the Islunds wf the Commoewealth of Estates Subidivisam No. | situated in the Southern District of the Delon

REC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the follawing: the Bahamas, Siteated thereon is a Multi-Family development consisting of hew Providence omc ot the islands of ihe Commonweakh of tee Babes

Of a Duplex; one unit wok (5) Bedronmes, (2) Bathrooms ond the other Situated thereon is 2 Single kamaly Residemee consiening of (5) bedraoms and (2)
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or dot of land being Lot No, 193. Ridgeland

of the Island af Kew

(2) bedrenm, (0) bathroom banhmams.
Property Size: 60200 sy fl

L773 sq ff

Park Swhdavisiem situated in the Southern District Praperly Sieve: 5.18] sq ft

Provadence ame of the Islands of the Commenwealth of the Euharas. Building Size: 1.656 sy fi Building Sieve

Silwated thereon is a Multi-Family development consisting of o Duplex;

one unit with (2) Bedrooms, 12) Bathrooms aml the other (1) bedroae. This propery is beige sold under Power of Sole conthiped in a Momgage Dhis property is beige sold under Power of Sole contaiged in a Morigage

C1) bathroca to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED. wi FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
Praperty Sie: 4 R00 sq ft
1.307 sy ft nildrexeed ‘ll

P.O. Bax NW-7549 addressed fo dhe Manager, Koval Bank Collections Cemire. PO. Bax

Building Size All ohfers should he Forwarded in writing ing sealed envelope, itters should be forwerded im writing in & senled em,

to the Munager, Royal Kank Collections Centre

This property is beige sold under Power of Sale cantaiged in a Momgage Nassau. Rohooas anal marked “Tender TO, All affers must be received M-7549, Nassan. Bahamas and marked “Tender 2245". All offers must he

to FINANCE CORPORATION OF RAH AALAS LIMITED. by the clase of bosiness 4:00 p.m... Friday 27th March, M09 received by the clasg af business 4:02) p.m., Friday 27th March. 200

OL

Programme Benefits

All adfers should be borwarded in writing ina sealed cnvelipe, addresced

to the Munager. Royal Kank Collections Centre. BO. Box NW-7549
Nassau. Roahomsas anal marked “Tender 2405", All affers must be received

by the clase of bosiness 4:00 g.m.. Friday 27th March, 2009

The College of The Bahamas

RBC

Full 4 year academic

=a —
scholarship

PRESIDENT’S SCHOLARS
Four years of leader-
ship development and |

mentoring

REC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

Invites high school seniors to apply for

“ALL THAT” piece parcel or | 53 West Winds

Subdivieon

“oof land being Lot No

2009 Scholarship Award

aiualed in the Western Dastrict of the Islund of New

Providence ane of the Islands of the Commonwealth at the Bahamas.

Stipend for books

Siigubed thereon is on undeveloped vacant lund.

Property Sive: 9.375 sq fe

International
conferences

Dhis property is beige sold under Power of Sole contalmed in a Momgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

Retreats

All otters shoukl be forwarded im writing in & sealed envels
Ire, FAQ. Bax

ALL afters musi be

addressed fo the Manager. Koval Bank Collections Cen

M-7549, Nassan. Bahamas and marked “Tender 3278"

Private study lounge
with computer access

received by the clase af business 4:00 pom... Friday 27h March. 2009

Internships & career
opportunities

RBC

Special recognition at
graduation

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the follawinge:

Life lasting friendships

“ALL THAT” piece parce! or lot of land being Lot Ko. 27B, Prats
Clase Subdivisan sitweated in tke Western Dastrict of the [sland of Kew

Prowdence one of the Islands of the Commenweaolth of the Buhaomas.

A supportive
environment

Situated thercoe is & Single Family Hesidence comsisting af 13)

Bedromms, (2) Bathrooms.

Property Sise: 5.842 sq ft
Building Size: 1.220 sq f All applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.50
or higher and SAT scores of 1800 or pass 7 BGCSE
core subjects with at least 5 A grades at the end of
this year’s examinations.
Deadline for applications is Tuesday, March 31st, 09
Download brochure at www.cob.edu.bs

This property is beige sold under Power of Sole cantalmed in a Momgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
shoukl be forwarded im

‘All otters wring in & soled envela

dddressed to the Munager. Koval Bank Collections Centre, FO. Bax
M-T549, Naseem. Bahamas and marked ~Teeder | S78". All offers musi be

received by the close af business 4:00 pom... Friday 27h March. 2009


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009



To advertise in The

in circulation, just call
502-2371 today!




















AUDITORS’
REPORT

To the Shareholders of National Bank of Canada

THE TRIBUNE





$12m poultry farm
A as awaits environmental
approval for go-ahead

FROM page 1B

We have audited the Consolidated Balance Sheets of National Bank of Canada (the “Bank”) as at October 31, 2008 and 2007 and the Consolidated
‘Statements of Income, Comprehensive Income, Changes in Shareholders’ Equity and Cash Flows for the years then ended. These financial
statements are the responsibility of the Bank’s Management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based

on our audits.







We conducted our audits in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan and
perform an audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes
examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing
the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by Management, as weil as evaluating the overall financial statement






where.”

Describing his constituency’s
economy as “very depressed”,
Mr Peet added: “The only sem-
blance of any employment now
in north Andros is agriculture,
where many of the residents are
resorting to farming in the back
of their yards or on acreage
nearby.

“The agricultural industry is
one thing that a lot of locals are
going into. Fishing is very chal-
lenged. The fishermen in my
area have had very little suc-
cess in getting their fish sold
because of the economic down-
turn. Agriculture is the only
answer in the short-term.”

Mr Peet said the unemploy-
ment situation in his con-
stituency, and in many Family
Islands, was “much worse” than
the 12.1 per cent and 14 per
cent-plus rates recently record-
ed by the Department of Sta-
tistics for New Providence and
Grand Bahama respectively.

Describing those statistics as
“sugar coated”, and not reflec-
tive of the rising number of dis-

couraged workers not even
seeking jobs, Mr Peet said
unemployment in many Family
Islands and his constituency
stood at 15-20 per cent “mini-
mum”.

He also urged the Govern-
ment to provide an update on
the Bond’s Cay project, which is
backed by Colombian singer
Shakira, and was approved just
prior to the 2007 general elec-
tion.

“Tm at a loss to figure out
what’s happening with that, but
that would go a long way in cer-
tainly providing some hope for
that part of the Bahamas — the
Berry Islands and Andros,” Mr
Peet said. “We have a situation
here where there needs to be
some relief, because the area
desperately needs it.

“Social services is extremely
challenged because the demand
is SO great. We’re trying to pull
together and see how we can
keep hope alive. But it’s
extremely challenging. There
has to be relief; urgent relief,
before things get even worse.”

presentation.

In our opinion, these consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Bank as at October 31,
2008 and 2007 and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended in accordance with Canadian generally accepted
accounting principles.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays

Stier , fl ‘tl lakh secs 2

Samson Bélair/Deloitte & Touche s.e.n.c.r.b
Chartered Accountants

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
SUPREME COURT No. CLE/Qui/ 01715
Montreal, Canada, December 3, fi ichi
ada, D 3, 2008, except as for Note 34b) which is under the date of December 11, 2008 IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT tract of
land containing by admeasurement 3.50 Acres
situate Southwestwards of “Airdale Subdivision”
and North of “Joan’s Heights” in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Davco Limited whose

Registered Office is in the City of Nassau, New

Providence, Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court

cael to have its Title to the following land investigated
——— ———___-- 254 283 i ieti i

a Se rm ecto eins

Securities a Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court

Available for sale 12,322 8,442 in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.
Held for trading” 33,863 30,828

46,185 39,270

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

(millions of dollars)

As at October 31

ALL THAT tract of land containing 3.50 Acres situate
approximately 335 Feet Southwestwards of the
Northern portion of “Airdale Subdivision” and North
of “Joan’s Heights Subdivision” in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence aforesaid bounded
NORTHEASTWARDLY by land formerly the property
of Alfred Patterson but now the property of O’Brien
Loans Co. and running thereon Seven hundred and
Twelve and Eighty-nine One-hundredths (712.89) Feet
SOUTHEASTWARDLY by a Ten (10) Feet wide Road
Reservation leading to “Airdale Subdivision” aforesaid
and running thereon Two hundred and Fifteen and
Fifty One-hundredths (215.50) Feet
SOUTHWESTWARDLY by the said Ten (10) Feet
wide Road Reservation and running thereon Six
hundred and Eighty-five and Seventy-eight One-
hundredths (685.78) Feet and
NORTHWESTWARDLY by the Cornelius Forbes
Subdivision and running thereon Two hundred (200.00)
Feet which said tract has such position shape marks
boudaries and dimensions as are shown on the diagram
or plan filed herein and thereon edged in “PINK”.

Securities purchased under reverse repurchase agreements 7,868 5,966

Loans 5andil
Residential mortgage 15,772 15,895
Personal and credit card 15,289 13,116
Business and government 21,149 19,377

52,210 48,388
Allowance for credit losses (469) (428)

51,741 47,960

Other
Customers’ liability under acceptances 4,274 4,085
Fair value of derivative financial instruments 9,814 4,883
Premises and equipment 460 426
Goodwill 740 703
Other intangible assets 183 169
Due from clients, dealers and brokers 2,273 4,313
Other assets 2,134 1,982

19,878 16,561
129,332 113,085

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Deposits 5and17
Personal 33,098 30,215
Business and government 36,872 33,797
Deposit-taking institutions 5,827 6,561
Deposit from NBC Capital Trust 225 225
4

76,022 70,798

Other Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal

Acceptances 4,274 4,085 office hours at the following places:-
Obligations related to securities sold short 15,829 16,223
Securities sold under repurchase agreements 7,151 2,070
Fair value of derivative financial instruments 8,588 3,615
Due to clients, dealers and brokers 2,389 4,341
Other liabilities 5,286 4,751

- 43,517 | 35,085
Subordinated debentures 2,255 1,605

Non-controlling interest 2,029 960

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau; or

(2) The Chamers of James M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue in the

City of Nassau, Bahamas.
Shareholders’ equity
Preferred shares 400
Common shares 1,575
Contributed surplus 32
Retained earnings 2,793
Accumulated other comprehensive income (163)

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed
o forms, verified by an Affidavit and other related





113,085 requirements to be filed therewith by the 16th day of

April A.D., 2009. Failure of any such person to file
and serve a Statement of its, his or her Claim together
with the other related requirement by the 16th day of
April A.D., 2009, will operate as a bar to such claim.

Louis Vachon Paul Gobeil
President and Chief Executive Officer Director

Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the Audited Accounts from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas)
Limited, PO. Box N-7788, West Bay Street, Nassau, The Bahamas. JAMES M. THOMPSON

ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 9B



aS 5.
City Markets ‘read riot act’ over late financials

FROM page 1B

flow/finance payments to sup-
pliers.

Bahamian publicly-listed
companies are expected to pub-
lish their year-end financial
statements within 120 days (four
months) of the period-end. In
Bahamas Supermarkets’ case,
that was October 31, 2008, but it
is now more than four months’
past that date with no sign of
any figures forthcoming.

The City Markets’ parent has
also missed the deadline for
publishing its fiscal 2009 first
quarter financials, which should
have been released by year-end
2008, as quarterly reports are
supposed to be disseminated at
least 90 days after the period
closes.

The absence of accurate,
timely financial information has
caused increasing frustration
among Bahamas Supermarkets’
estimated 1,500 minority share-
holders — both institutional and
retail — who collectively own a
22 per cent stake.

Tribune Business under-
stands that a minority investor
group is still assessing whether
there are strong enough legal

RBC
FINCO

grounds, under the Companies
Act, to launch a class action-
type lawsuit against Bahamas
Supermarkets and its Board. It
is thought that they are delaying
any move until publication of
the fiscal 2008 financials.

The Securities Commission is
also understood to be frustrated
about what it views as its mini-
mal powers, under the present
Securities Industry Act, to make
Bahamas Supermarkets com-
ply. In the past, Mr Deveaux
has told Tribune Business it had
to rely on moral suasion and
other limited processes.

As a result, this newspaper
understands that the Bahami-
an capital markets regulator is
pushing for all Bahamian ‘pub-
lic’ companies to be listed on
the Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX),
doing away with the ‘over-the-
counter’ market where the likes
of Bahamas Supermarkets and
RND Holdings are currently
listed.

This would have the effect of
placing these companies under
a further level of regulation,
namely BISX’s Rules. One way
to encourage this move, Tri-
bune Business has been told, is
for the Government to enforce

the payment of Stamp Tax for
all transactions of public com-
pany shares where the stock is
not listed on BISX.

Given the information vacu-
um created by Bahamas Super-
markets’ failure to make timely
disclosure of its financial state-
ments, it is not surprising that
rumours and speculation con-
cerning the company’s health
continue to swirl.

The latest one, swiftly denied
by Bahamas Supermarkets’
executives, was that the com-
pany planned to close four
stores — Independence Drive,
Village Road, Rosetta Street in
Palmdale, and Eight Mile Rock
in Grand Bahama.

Both Basil Sands, Bahamas
Supermarkets’ chairman, and J
Barrie Farrington, a fellow
Board director, were adamant
that no decision regarding store
closures had been taken. How-
ever, both acknowledged that
directors and management were
constantly assessing the 12-store
portfolio to ensure each one
was pulling its weight.

“There’s nothing to that,” Mr
Sands said of closure specula-
tion. “The truth is, like any busi-
ness and especially in this envi-
ronment, we evaluate all the

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

md having regard for he PEM

“col to if

Chairman's review of the unaudited reall

For the three months coded Jar Wry o 1, 209

Scan

stores, and if any of the stores
need to be shut down, we’ll do
so. But no decision has been
taken. We’re not closing down
any stores.”

Mr Farrington, who chairs the
Board at majority shareholder
BSL Holdings, added: “No deci-
sion has been taken on any-
thing. It’s just a matter of look-
ing at business operations to
look at viability, but no such
decision has been taken. It’s still
a matter of directors and man-
agers assessing the business.”

When asked whether this
meant that Bahamas Super-
markets was constantly evalu-
ating all its stores to ensure
none represented a drain on the
company, Mr Farrington
replied: “I think that’s a fair
comment, and that’s not to cre-
ate uncertainty, but operating
in this particular climate, much
like any business, we must
examine the contribution each
is making to the whole.”

Meanwhile, Mr Sands said he
hoped the audited financial
statements for fiscal 2008 would
be published “very, very soon”,
although he could not give a
precise date. He also declined to
comment on the reasons for the
delayed release.

“We’re just dealing with mat-
ters with the auditors at the
moment,” Mr Sands said, “but
all the accounts are finished. I
can’t say whether they’ll be
released next week, but they
should be released soon.

“I don’t want to give the
impression we’re having prob-
lems with the auditors, but
we’re working to sort out some
things before we release them
[the financial statements] to the
public.”

Although declining to give
figures, Mr Sands said the fiscal
2008 results were “in line” with
the previously forecast $10 mil-
lion net loss. “All I can say is
that we forecast at least a $10
million loss, and it’s around $10
million,” he added.

Several observers with inti-
mate City Markets knowledge
also told Tribune Business they
would be surprised if the com-
pany closed down the store
locations claimed, in particular
Rosetta Street, which had
always done “brisk business”.

One source, recalling the last
years of Winn-Dixie ownership,
told this newspaper: “All the
store locations were profitable.
There was not a single location
where they were losing money,

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
OOSSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF IMCOME (Unaudited)
Three Months Enibed Janwary 31, 200%

(Expressed im Rahansion dollars)

INCOME

Klet ir 3 =
Et INTE St come

feet intcresl! imcome alter provisien for credit losses

Fees and commission
Total mcome
NOMI N TEREST EXPENSES
val nan-inlerest expenses
NET INCOME
LRNINCS PER SHAR

Three ¥bonths

Endud

Jnguory 31, 2004

laa

although one store in Grand
Bahama, at Eight Mile Rock,
was marginally profitable.”

Investors in BSL Holdings,
the buyout consortium that
acquired majority ownership of
Bahamas Supermarkets from
Winn-Dixie for $54 million in
summer 2006, include the hotel
industry pension funds, Royal-
Fidelity’s private equity arm,
and private investors such as
Craig Symonette and the late
Franklyn Butler.

The group’s largest investor,
though, is Trinidadian con-
glomerate Neal & Massey,
which inherited at least a 40 per
cent BSL Holdings stake
through its acquisition of Bar-
bados Shipping & Trading
(BS&T). Neal & Massey is now
the management/operating
partner for City Markets, hav-
ing taken over the running of
all operations.

BSL Holdings has already
injected at least $10 million in
new equity capital into
Bahamas Supermarkets. Neal
& Massey led the way with $5
million last summer, and the
Bahamian investors followed
suite with a matching amount
— split into two $3 million and $2
million tranches.

Three Months
Ended

damuary 31, ZI

474,808)

773,912

4 aa

2 7a 4

15 B54

Cant,

Fag)

5405, 75h

COU) 0.21]

PIR ASCE COOK PORATION OF RAH AARLAS LIMITED
OONSOLIDATED STATEMENT (FF CHANGES IN f CUTTY (Ul mamulitedd)
Three Months Ended Junonry 31, Die

(Expressed im Kaliamian dollars)

Share Giemeral

Premium

Share

Reserve

Hetaimed

DWne § StmKMp Capit il Posion, WS

Cupital

Rarnings

larecl tor the quar

pany mane ihe soon y to
1 Wha exten, during ihe

FIAANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (Unaudited)

As 00 Jamucary 20, 20 amd

Deteher 31, DR

(Expressed in Bahamian dolhars)

ASSETS

SRIULOOYy PeSEIVE OOO Wel

DWesiie nts

POTAL

Fanwary 31, 21M

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS EQUITY

LIABILITIES
Deposits
Dividends payable
Chher liabilities

SHAREHOLDERS EQUITY

Share capital

Share prem UIT

MOTAL

Omober 31, 2008

7H OR LT

v1 Te Ree?

5 AE

TIA, LAS 616

Kalamey al Chether 31, 20 SU RaR EEL 2 553358
Met profit for the period

lividend

DIMI

Halamee at Janmary 31, 500.000

Kakimecy at Octeber 3], 2s MT
Set bees for the perked
lividends

Balance at Janmary 31, D0

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
DOONSOLIDATED STATEMENT (FF CASH FLAWS (Unandided)
Lhree Manths Ended January 31, Die

(Expressed im ahamian dollars)

danuary 31, D4

CASH FLAWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

CASA FLOWS PROM INVESTIMG ACTIVITIES
Supe hese oT lige) aes.
uncharse |) Preece ol imagstrment

Mel cash from inveestin

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING. ACTIVITY

RET INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, BEGINNING CF THE PERION
CASH ASD CASH EQUIVALENTS, END OF THE PERIOD

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
Mates to Unaedited Interim Comsolidated Financial Statements
lhree Vlonths Ended January 31, D009

l, ACOCOLA TING POLICIES
These

Intemational Accountme Standard
im the pr

inttiim condensed fingicial sivements have been

14 Interim Financia

Reporting
eparation af these interin

awaiklited financial statements for the vear enced October 71. ORE.



prepa ed i

34.500 | 45
fA Th
EMM
4S

4 Us Lea

January 31, 2008

aceorndane: with
The aon lnbiie polices used

vent Wilh these wed in the
PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bank sustains ‘large one-off

FROM page 1B

year to October 31, 2008, the
Barbados-headquartered bank
said loan loss expenses were up
$15 million or 88 per cent year-
over-year, which it attributed
partly to “increases in specific
non-performing loans, with
some large one-offs in the
Bahamas geographic segment”.

These loans, and the borrow-
ers’ identities, were not
revealed. But the analysis on
FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) said: “Loan
loss expenses were significantly
higher than the prior year by
$11 million or 89 per cent, due
primarily to the overall increase
in loan volumes, which increas-
es the inherent risk provisions,
as well as increases in specific

non-performing loans.

“The ratio of loan loss
expenses to gross loans has con-
sequently increased from 0.5
per cent in the prior year to 0.89
per cent at the end of this year,
with an increase in the ratio of
non-performing loans to total
loans from 6 per cent to 8 per
cent.”

The latter figure puts First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) above the Bahamian
commercial banking industry’s
average for non-performing
loans, which at end-January
2009 stood at 6.3 per cent,
according to the Central Bank
of the Bahamas.

But in this somewhat hyster-
ical environment, following
CLICO (Bahamas) collapse
into liquidation and the

rumours that provoked a run
on FirstCaribbean deposits in
Freeport, Tribune Business
again feels it is worth empha-
sizing that the bank remains
financially sound. Creditors and
depositors need not panic, as
there is nothing to suggest First-
Caribbean will fail.

It remains highly profitable,
and enjoys the capital support
of both its Barbados parent and
that bank’s 90 per cent majority
owner, Canadian bank CIBC.

The FirstCaribbean parent’s
annual report also revealed that,
during fiscal 2008, the Bahami-
an subsidiary repaid the full out-
standing $20 million principal
on the corporate bonds it issued
in November 2006.

A note to the financial state-
ments indicated these bonds

were repaid some three years
before they were due to mature.
The statements said: “In
November 2006, the group
issues unsubordinated term
redeemable floating rate notes
with a face value of $20 million
through its Bahamas subsidiary,
due November 2011. These
notes were repaid in full dur-
ing the year.

“Interest on the notes was
payable at a rate of Bahamas
Prime plus 0.75 per cent per
annum. The average effective
interest rate during 2008 was
6.3 per cent.”

Elsewhere, the report said the
24 per cent or $26 million
decline in FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas) net
income, from $109.858 million
the prior year to $83.9 million,

was driven primarily by lower
operating income and “higher
loan loss expenses”. The latter
rose from $12.34 million in fiscal
2007 to $23.35 million in 2008.

The Bahamian operation’s
gross loans to borrowers stood
at $2.6 billion at year-end, an
increase of $133 million or 5 per
cent year-over-year. Some $111
million of this increase came in
the Bahamas (the remainder
being in Turks & Caicos), and
originated mainly from the
bank’s corporate, capital mar-
kets and wealth management
subsidiaries.

FirstCaribbean also pointed
out that its Bahamian subsidiary
benefited from an $8.2 million
one-time gain in 2007 due to a
change in its group benefits pol-
icy. Stripping this out, the

decline in net income would
only have been $17.7 million or
17 per cent.

FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) saw its oper-
ating income (all its non-interest
revenue sources) fall by 50 per
cent or $16.1 million to $16.018
million, compared to $32.143
million the year before.

In an e-mailed reply to Tri-
bune Business’s questions,
Sharon Brown, FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
managing director, said: “Net
trading income from

foreign exchange transactions
increased by $12.9 million, or
99 per cent. Translation losses
increased to $12.9 million from
a gain of $1 million in the pre-

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

HIDALGO INVEST SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 of The International Business
Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, HIDALGO INVEST
SA is in dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was the 11" day of March, 2009. Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
HIDALGO INVEST SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

AVALINA GROUP LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, AVALINA GROUP LIMITED is in dissolution. The
date of commencement of dissolution was the 11" day
of March, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the
Liquidator of AVALINA GROUP LIMITED.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HERBLIGEN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RISING SUN CAPITAL
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— «,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RISING SUN CAPITALINVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

KASHA INVEST SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, KASHA INVEST SA is in dissolution. The date of
commencement of dissolution was the 11" day of March,
2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator
of KASHA INVEST SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

ALGERIAN INVEST SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, ALGERIAN INVEST SA is in dissolution. The
date of commencement of dissolution was the 11" day
of March, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the
Liquidator of ALGERIAN INVEST SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAWN HORIZON LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GLASSHOUSE
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— (,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GLASSHOUSE INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

SEE next page

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

ACOLI CONSULTING LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, ACOLI CONSULTING LTD. is in dissolution. The
date of commencement of dissolution was the 11‘ day
of March, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the
Liquidator of ACOLI CONSULTING LTD.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

ALAREEN INTERNATIONAL
INVESTMENTS SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, ALAREEN INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENTS
SA is in dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was the 11" day of March, 2009. Dillon Dean
of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of ALAREEN
INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENTS SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BARAKI LTD.

= f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BARAKI LTD. has been completed; a Cer-
tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
THE DATONG
COMPANY LIMITED

— «—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of THE DATONG COMPANY LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 11B



non-performing loan increases

FROM page 10B

vious year. Similarly, losses
from interest rate instruments
also increased markedly, from
$5.6 million in the previous year
to $20.1 million in fiscal 2008.
“As discussed in previous
quarterly reports, these changes
reflect the weakened perfor-
mance of the bank's trading
investment portfolio, and hedg-
ing relationships which were
severely impacted by the effect
of the US economic downturn
on market values, interest rates
and credit spreads.”
Meanwhile, FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
also saw a $7.2 million, or 12.7
per cent, increase in operating
expenses during fiscal 2008

compared to the previous year.

Ms Brown told Tribune Busi-
ness that staff costs were the
“primary driver” behind this
rise, having risen by $9.2 mil-
lion or 33.3 per cent “due main-
ly to accounting for retirement
benefits”.

She further explained: “In the
previous year, the Bank record-
ed an isolated one-off curtail-
ment gain totalling $8.2 million.
Excluding the one-off fiscal
2007 gain,

staff costs for the year would
have been $36 million, and the
year-over-year change would
have been an increase of $1 mil-
lion, or 2.9 per cent. Similarly,
the total operating expenses
would have decreased by $1
million from the prior year, or
1.5 per cent.

“Remuneration expenses
remained well contained. The
net increase was 1.1 per cent,
and primarily reflects contract-
ed increases. Pension costs,
excluding other post retirement
benefits, increased approxi-
mately $ 1 million over the pri-
or year. Other staff costs were
flat.

“Occupancy and maintenance
expenses decreased by $2.5 mil-
lion, or 31.4 per cent,

year-over-year. The change
reflects a reduction in IT con-
tract maintenance costs. Other
operating expenses increased
$1.3 million, or 9 per cent, pri-
marily due to an increase in pro-
fessional fees.

“The efficiency ratio-operat-
ing expenses as a percentage of
total

Revenues increased to 37.5
per cent in fiscal 2008 from 31.8
per cent in fiscal 2007.

Excluding the effect of the
curtailment gain in fiscal 2007,
the efficiency ratio would be
36.4 per cent, and the year-over-
year change for fiscal 2008
would be a modest 3 per cent
increase.”

FirstCaribbean’s Bahamian
operation saw its net interest
income increase by $8.4 million
or 6 per cent year-over-year,
due to improved spreads and
reduced interest expenses. The
latter offset a drop in interest
income.

The bank said interest
income fell because of “lower
average volumes and yields for
interest lines, but mainly due to
lower yields for loans and cash

placements, and due to lower
average volumes for invest-
ments”. Interest expense fell
because FirstCaribbean had to
pay less on the deposits it
attracted.

Total deposits fell by $223
million or 6 per cent to $3.4 bil-
lion, the reductions being felt






particularly in the retail, corpo-
rate and wealth management
sections of the bank. Invest-
ments fell by $0.6 billion or 36
per cent year-over-year to $1.1
billion, due to market value
declines and reduced holdings
in FirstCaribbean’s trading and
non-trading portfolios.

To advertise in The Tribune -
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Legal Notice

NOTICE
QAMAR LIMITED

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of QAMAR LIMITED has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HEEMA INVESTMENTS LTD.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HEEMA INVESTMENTS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHASING THE MOON
CORPORATION

—_ ¢, =
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of CHASING THE MOON CORPORA-
TION has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LANGMORE
MOUNTAIN CORP.

— «*—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LANGMORE MOUNTAIN CORP. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GLOBAL WEALTH
HOLDINGS INC.

— *—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GLOBAL WEALTH HOLDINGS INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RIO BRANCO INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
Al HSIN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HIGH MOUNTAIN LIMITED

— «,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HIGH MOUNTAIN LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
ELEVATED
MANAGEMENT INC.

SS ¢> —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ELEVATED MANAGEMENT INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SILVER PINE CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PERTUS INT’L

INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 11th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JUSSY INCORPORATED

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of JUSSY INCORPORATED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Government stimulus package praised

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

STIMULUS packages are
unproven when it comes to
spurring economic growth, but
capital works projects such as
road works and infrastructure

upgrades, as the Bahamas has
initiated, are sound investments
for taxpayer dollars, according
to an economics expert.
Michael LaFaive, director of
fiscal policy at the MacKinac
Centre for Public Policy in
Michigan, suggested the

pla

Bahamian government was
focusing public money in the
right direction.

“Tf the Government is going
to do anything that has a net
impact on the economy, it’s
basic infrastructure; roads,
bridges and sewers,” he said.

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“There is a mountain of evi-
dence that purposeful, govern-
ment-directed economic devel-
opment planning programmes,
fail to live up to expectations.

“Rather than embrace more
of the same, it is my hope that
Puerto Ricans, Americans and

Bahamians actually work to
remove obstacles to economic
freedom and association and
trade, and let a diversified peo-
ple, with diversified interests,
invest and consume as they see
fit.”

Mr LaFaive said economic
development incentives have
little impact on firm location
and investment decisions.

Therefore, if the Bahamas
was to follow the US model for
an economic recovery plan, it
would have displaced huge
sums of money that, according
to Mr LaFaive, would have neg-
ligible economic impact in the
long term.

doing enough to curb the
impact of the global recession
on the Bahamian economy.

Mr Lafaive’s argument favors
governments marrying sound
investments, such as infrastruc-
ture upgrades, with policy
amendments.

He said there was not much
that can be done in the shor-
term, but to focus on retooling
policies that might hinder eco-
nomic growth.

“For government to say ‘?’m
going to stimulate economic
growth in this area’, it would
first have to suppress it in
another or a bunch of little oth-
er areas that probably add up to

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Many cynics who criticise the
Government’s “social safety
net” have accused it of not

no net gain in employment or
economic growth,” he said.

“Like other nations at this
moment in economic history,
the Bahamas should be con-
cerned about sustaining eco-
nomic growth of any type right
now, never mind micromanag-
ing growth in narrowly targeted
industries- du-jour favored by
government central planners,”
he said.

Rick Lowe, vice-president of
the Nassau Institute, a Bahami-
an economic think-tank, said he
was glad the Government was
not following the economic res-
cue model of the US.

“The best the Government
can do is encourage an envi-
ronment that makes investors
want to invest, and that does-
n’t necessarily mean taking tax-
payer dollars to give to some-
body else. My point is they
should stimulate everybody or
nobody,” he said.

“What I find happens is that
when governments convince us
that they have the answer to
everything, we give up initia-
tive. Its’ human nature.

“We just throw in the towel
and say: ‘Oh well, the Govern-
ment is doing it, so why should
we bother’.”

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The Tribune wants to hear
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making news in their
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for improvements in the
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If so, call us on 322-1986
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thyvelo«ce Uehves



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
SUPREME COURT No. CLE/Qui/ 01714
Anew Insurance Brokera BE of ImMipany 1S ready to SeETVe

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT piece or
parcel of land containing by admeasurement
11,971 Sq. Feet situate on the North side of Wulff
Road and 98 Ft. West of Darling Street in the
Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, Bahamas.

NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that Davco Limited whose

the local market. The partners of APS announce the for-

mation of their new company, Assured Financial

Services Insurance Agents and Brokers Limited.

The company is headed by Dashwell E. Flowers, a well

known and highly regarded insurance industry profes
I 1 ' r

sional who has been in the business for some twenty

four years, most of which have been in senior level posi-

Dashwell E. Flowers

tions. “T welcome the opportunity to provide Bahamians
and residents with the best insurance products from the
country's leading providers. As a full service broker, we
are dedicated to offering the very best in auto, health,
life, and other insurance products and services," said
Mr. Flowers, the company's president and chief operat-
ing executive. He added, “We have recruited an execu-
tive team that has over one hundred years of experience
in this business, one of our main focus areas is client

service; emphasizing the building and maintenance of

Registered Office is in the City of Nassau, New
Providence, Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court
to have its Title to the following land investigated under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the said Court in accordance
with the provisions of the said Act.

ALL THAT piece or parcel of land containing by
admeasurement 11,971 Square Feet situate on the
Northern side of Wulff Road and approximately 98 Feet
West of Darling Street in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas aforesaid bounded

NORTHWARDLY by land described in Plan No. 1233
and running thereon Eighty-seven and Fifty-four One-
hundredths (87.54) Feet on the East partly by land now
or formerly the property of Kathleen Darling and partly
by land now or formerly the property of Cleomie Clarke
and running thereon jointly One hundred and Fifty-eight
and Fourteen One-hundredths (158.14) Feet on the
SOUTH partly by the said Wulff Road and running
thereon Fifty-two and Eighty-four One-hundredths
(52.84) Feet and partly by land formerly the property of
the Petitioner but presently occupied by Preston Stuart
and Byron Campbell and running thereon Forty-five and
Eleven One-hundredths (45.11) Feet on the WEST partly
by the land lastly described and running thereon Seventy-
eight and Twenty One-hundredths (78.20) Feet and partly
by land now or formerly the property of the Estate of
one Poitier and running thereon Eighty-six and Thirty-
two One-hundredths (86.32) Feet which said piece or
parcel of land has such position shape marks boundaries
and dimensions as or shown on the diagram or plan filed
herein and thereon edged in “PINK”.

constructive and rewarding, relationships. Excellent
client service means that we are always accessible, not

simply at renewal time.”

Also part of the executive team, and a partner in AFS, is
Keith L. Major; he serves as director of sales and market-
ing. "During these challenging economic times, it is
important to have partners you can trust. At AFS, due to
our experience in the business, we have considerable

even of the insurance ind ustry a will utilize

bet ther ieee tee bo secure peering insurance
coverage,’ said Mr. Major. Mr. Major previ-
ously served as vice president of mar-

keting

SERVICES OOM pa nies,

at three local financial

Keith L. Major Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal office

hours at the following places:-

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau; or

(2) The Chamers of James M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed forms,
verified by an Affidavit and other related requirements
to be filed therewith by the 16th day of April A.D., 2009.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of its, his or her Claim together with the other related
requirement by the 16th day of April A.D., 2009, will
operate as a bar to such claim.

JAMES M. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER

“Assured ~ aa is “Services
INSURANCE AGENTS AND BROKERS

Simply the best choice for all your insurance needs

432 East Bay Street * P.O. Box CR 54288, Nassau Bahamas
242-322-6735 /5 # 242-322-6739 © Website: www-.afsbahamas.com


MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009





The stories behind the news

INSIGHT



Pindling article gets
ur readers talking

Re: The tragic young pilot
who knew too much

Mr Marquis,

The day after your Insight article
about the pilot who knew too much
appeared in The Tribune, radio talk
show hosts Algernon Allen, Steve McK-
inney, their guests and most callers had a
field day casting aspersions against you
with some of them making it clear that,
because of this article and others, you
should be kicked out of the country, nev-
er to be heard from again.

As a sound, unemotional thinker of
more than 40 years, please accept my
sincere apologies for the crap that non-
thinkers, and people — who, if given the
slightest chance, would literally revise
history in a heartbeat — have been
throwing at you. Their thinking is so
shallow and emotional that they would
just as soon destroy the messenger rather
than examine the message, simply
because they do not like the message.
Whether there is merit in the message, or
whether it is true or not, is of no concern
to them.

I read the article carefully, and I saw it
for what it was; the recollection of certain
events in the life of the elderly Chauncey
Tynes Sr. and most notably, his son the
pilot, Chauncey Tynes Jr. You did not
write fiction. You wrote what Mr Tynes
told you, and yet, not one of the would-
be revisionists turned their wrath against
Mr Tynes. "Kill the messenger” is their
clarion cry. I learned a long time ago
that the young and the elderly seldom
tell tales. Mr Tynes in his old age has
no reason to tell lies on Lynden Pin-
dling.

Furthermore, I was fortunate enough
to have been around at the height of
Lynden Pindling's fame and power, and
being an avid reader and a good dis-
cerner of persons, he could never get
me to follow him. In fact, I never felt
that Pindling was a fit and proper person
to lead this country. I have copies of all
of the commissions of inquiry, and they
do not speak very complimentary of Mr
Pindling nor of his administration of the
affairs of this country, nor in fact his
administration of his personal and finan-
cial affairs. And IJ easily recollect that in
his testimony before the 1983/4 Com-
mission of Inquiry into drug-trafficking,
Pindling had great difficulty recalling
the origins of large sums of monies that
were deposited into his personal bank
account. In fact, His Grace Archbishop
Drexel W Gomez in his minority report
stated most emphatically that he could
not say with certainty that drug-related
money did not find its way into Mr Pin-
dling'’s bank account. When I compare
this to certain disclosures of Chauncey
Tynes Sr in your Insight article, that Pin-
dling allegedly received pay-offs from
the notorious drug trafficker, Joe
Lehder, I find it rather easy to believe.

When I was a young boy, my mother
told me that only people with something
to hide are afraid of the truth. Further-
more, the Bible says that "you will know
the truth, and the truth will set you free."
Bob Marley said that we are to emanci-
pate ourselves from mental slavery, only
we ourselves can free our minds. Anoth-
er song says that there is none so blind as
he who will not see. There is a huge dif-
ference between a person who cannot
see and one who will not see. And per-
sons like Paul Moss and other die-hard
PLPs would do well to know that no
amount of spin or attempted distortion
of history will keep Bahamians blind any
more. The mental emancipation move-
ment in the Bahamas is alive and well.
And persons ought to know that when
they decide to enter public life their
every action, good, bad or ugly, will be
open to public scrutiny and commen-
tary. And to them, their heirs and suc-

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RESPONSE to last week’s Insight article on Chauncey Tynes Sr
and his claims about Sir Lynden Pindling’s alleged links with
Colombian drug czar Joe Lehder has been so heavy that
all space is this week being devoted to feedback...

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

CHAUNCEY TYNES’ ASSOCIATIONS WITH JOE LEHDER AND LYNDEN PINDLING

The tragic young pilot

O08, 4H WADE
Measoity Calor



FEEDBACR® ——_——_—
cessors, I say if they do no evil, then
they should fear no evil. It is as simple as
that.

Mr Marquis, I hope that even now
you are training several Bahamians who
when you retire, will be able to step up to
the plate and carry on your bold, inves-
tigative and most importantly, fearless
kind of journalism. God knows this coun-
try needs it badly.

— Yours etc

W Forbes

DON’T go! The Bahamas needs you.
I think your article was fantastic. I have
not heard one person that has said any-
thing bad about it yet (apart from the
obvious ones). The group who are jump-
ing all over you are not as big as they
think they are.

— Well-wisher

JUST a quick note to say you have
my 100 per cent support in your “eye-
catching” article. If you get that much
public reaction from the article then it
must be DAMN good and DAMN
true...smile...Keep up the good work!

— Insight follower

Iam so happy you continue to
"touch" these taboo topics that are only
mentioned in hush tones around town.
The truth will set all of us free and it is
high time we all started facing the truth
about many of these "honourable men”.

Please keep it up, you are doing God’s
work.

— Fed up

STAY focused, Mr Marquis. God sent
you.
— Caller

YOUR name is being echoed in the
halls of parliament, in the churches and
even on aeroplanes.

Your article was excellent. You have
enlightened us in so many ways.

Pindling is not really the father of the
nation at all. I thank you for having the
guts to do what you did.

You are going to be Known around
the country for years to come. I am on
your side. Stay strong.

— Well-wisher

KEEP your shoulders strong and your
head high. I buy my Tribune every Mon-
day to read what you say. Don’t let those
big-mouthed people frighten you
because these things are true.

All of us Know that Pindling was no
saint. He was a devious man who did a
lot of devious things in this country.

Chauncey Tynes is of old age and is
not going to lie. Tell them to get off your
back. These people don’t appreciate the
truth.

When you have retired and gone,
please keep writing your Insight articles
from wherever you are.

Thank you for everything.

— Woman caller

AFTER hearing the PLPs speaking
out against you on the radio, it is awful to
think these people are still around.

The New PLP were supposed to come
in with a new image, but you have dug
them out of their holes and showed them
up for what they are.

Under Pindling I was afraid to open
my mouth. You have done a wonderful
job.

— Insight supporter

SEE page 2C

ot Aba es Mater Mel Do Modi Bd BST-E1E


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

See
Pindling article gets our readers talking

FROM page 1B

THE really sweet thing about
all this is that the PLP have no-
one in their ranks who can write
like you, so they are left gibber-
ing with rage. Oh, it does my
heart good, it really does.

— Call me Jacqueline

AS a journalist of many years
standing, and a regular visitor to
the Bahamas, I would like to ask
you one question: why are you
working in a third-rate banana
republic when you could be mak-
ing megabucks in one of the
world’s big cities?

I have read many of your
Insight articles over the last three
or four years and I rate you right
up there among the best. No-one
on the NYT, Washington Post or
the big British dailies engages the
issues in the way you do. I believe
a collection of your recent work
would win a Pulitzer, no sweat, if
you worked across the water in
the United States. I'd love to
meet for a beer one day.

— A Grantham, London

I find it amazing that an article
such as "Tragic young pilot who
knew Too much", printed March
9, 2009, would be used to try and
discredit and belittle all of the
great work that Sir Lynden Pin-
dling has dedicated his life to.

What is so appalling about
your article is the fact that every
name that was called where dis-
persions (sic) were cast on the
characters of the individuals
named, all of these individuals
are deceased and cannot defend
their honour. There are some ref-
erences to individuals whose
names are not called such as the
police officer you claimed
received the $50,000 from Car-
los Joe Lehder, I can only guess
that this individual is "probably"
living.

I hope that you noticed that I
placed the word probably
in parentheses at the end of the
previous paragraph. The reason
for me doing so is to point out
the great fallacy in Mr Tynes Sr’s
rationale that quote "Pindling
was born to a Jamaican father,
Arnold Pindling, and an

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unknown woman who was prob-
ably Haitian". This makes it
apparent to me that Mr Tynes
Sr’s rationale in assessing his rea-
sons for disliking Sir Lynden Pin-
dling is also flawed and biased. I
further would like to reiterate
this, by pointing out that Mr
Tynes Sr’s claims that his son was
a money carrier for Carlos "Joe"
Lehder but he reiterated that his
son told him he did not fly drugs.
I ask this question: is it possi-
ble that his son went to fly drugs
and something of ill fate hap-
pened to him that had nothing
to do with Sir lynden Pindling or
any other great Bahamian that
Mr Tynes would like to blame
for the apparent ill fate of his
son.

I could go on and poke numer-
ous holes in this article that obvi-
ously is filled with so many other
fallacies and unsubstantiated
claims that it would probably
require me to have an entire
newspaper edition. But I will not
entertain this any further. I hope
that other right thinking Bahami-
ans can also see the political

motivations behind such
garbage.

Signed

— Adian Carter

INSIGHT replies: There are
none so blind as those who will
not consider the evidence.

Mr Marquis

I have been following Insight
for quite a few months and I must
say that I have never read any-
thing quite like that. (The tragic
young pilot who knew too much.)

I don’t know who you are but
you sure as hell are always on
target.. I was blown away...for-
get those naysayers and those
b...s less politicians. Stand your
ground and write it as you see it.

I’m looking forward to the
next edition with great anticipa-
tion.

— Colin Saunders

Dear Mr Marquis, thank you
kindly for an incredible article.

It is most unfortunate, howev-
er, that some or perhaps many
do not share my sentiments.

The article simply contained
information from a private inter-
view conducted with a grieving
Bahamian father, whose son has
gone missing under some strange
circumstances.

Ironically, a Senator who close-
ly associates with a disgruntled

HOPE

sect in our community, with
respect to your well-informed
and precious article, sought on
public radio to incite outrage on
the part of her affiliates.

This sect seems to have much
difficulty with the truth being
told.

Your Insight article, which has
caused many much discomfort
this week, sounds very much like
the truth to me.

One need only recall the find-
ings of the Commission of
Inquiry’s Report 1984 and con-
nect it with the Insight edition of
Monday, March 9, 2009, to gain a
full conclusion on the matter.

“A foreigner with a slick line in
patter, was growing fat off a drug
king's pay-offs while those who
brought him to power continue to
live dirt poor in over-the-hill
shacks.” Ah! what fitting truth
lies within those inverted com-
mas.

I've rejoiced much as a result
of the publishing of this edition
of Insight.

Albeit, it does very little if any
to assuage the grief borne by the
family of Pilot Chauncey Tynes, I
publicly offer my sympathy to
them, may Allah help them with
their grief.

What I think,

— Julius McKenzie

Dear Mr Marquis,

Looks like you hit another cen-
tury, from all the flak being
thrown up it is obvious that the
truth hurts. Yes, Sir Lynden was
the first black prime minister of
the Bahamas, but that does not
exonerate him from the facts of
his own history. Bahamians need
to read more. Instead of using
the Internet for porno and shop-
ping they should try one of the
search engines and put in the
names Lynden Pindling and Car-
los Lehder. I assure you they
would be reading for the rest of
their lives on this topic alone.

Not only is there affiliation but
Mr Lehder himself on more than
two occasions gave statements
and testimony under oath that
he paid off Pindling and other
officials numerous times.

I clearly remember my father
sitting me down before going to
school one morning and watching
the NBC report with Lynden Pin-
dling being exposed and his total-
ly useless belligerence at the
time. In addition to this, the case
of two other Bahamian offi-
cials who were caught in a hotel

: [a Pap, fl x
. an 4T

room on video in Florida brag-
ging about their connections and
later arrested followed only days
after by the then prime minister
of Turks and Caicos.

It is also fact that Lynden Pin-
dling was a victimiser and thanks
to him the Public Service is in
the state that it is now due to his
precedent of stifling expatriates
and promoting the best butt-kiss-
er while killing off any inspired,
dedicated employees in the
process. It was quite humorous
to hear a former prime minister
even remind you of your status
this week, I wonder what he
would say to Barak Obama, Pres-
ident of the United States, if he
got irritated, a man of African
descent and born in Hawaii. I
guess if you don't have pies,
throw mud.

All the best, continue to
encourage and enrage the mass-
es to read in your most provoca-
tive way...

Sincerely yours

IAM getting calls from women
whose husbands were killed dur-
ing the drugs era in response to
your article. They are telling me
of what they went through
because of it.

There are few protests from
the PLP about your article
because most from that era know
what you said it true.

Tam sick of this “Father of the
Nation” garbage. He was not my
father. He was not even a
Bahamian.

It is time the truth was told,
and it is also time that these so-
called heroes were shown up for
what they are. They are not
heroes at all. They are a bunch of
self-serving sons of bitches.

— Nassau businessman

Dear Mr Marquis

I am writing to say thank you
for such a thought-catching arti-
cle in Monday’s Insight segment
of The Tribune.

Tread the article in its entirety
whilst trying to maintain an
objective view of the story. How-
ever, as an open-minded Bahami-
an with a good grasp of the polit-
ical history of the Bahamas, it
was difficult to read this piece
and not see the obvious truths of
our not so distant pass.

While there are some who will
go to their graves declaring Pin-
dling a Bahamian hero, I am one
of those who hold the belief that

CARRIES REGISTRATION.
BEYOND 250 MARK



whilst Mr Pindling and the PLP
had done a lot of good for the
country, they also did a lot more
damage as well.

Far from the alleged corrup-
tion involving Joe Lehder, there
have also been accusations
involving Pindling and other
PLPs, and many more question-
able characters, some of whom
are to this day still in the public
domain.

Bahamians, before the final
stroke of the pen is drawn in the
history book of the Bahamas
should we not stop and question
the accusations levied against our
former and even present lead-
ers? Or do we bury our heads in
the sand and continue to perpe-
trate these lies to our future gen-
erations?

Mr Marquis, it is unfortunate
that young Mr Tynes had to lose
his life in order for the truth to
come out, but I assure you that in
time the entire legacy of our cor-
rupt leaders will be told and peo-
ple will realise their legacy for
what it was — self-serving and
destructive. Only then will the
Bahamas be freed from the
bondage of paying tribute to a
charlatan.

Regards,

— Thomas Charlton

PERRY Christie’s press con-
ference, in which he attacked
John Marquis, summed up this
man perfectly.

Christie showed that he is
ready to say anything to hold on
to the party leadership, even to
the point of contradicting the
views he held in the 1980s when
he and Ingraham parted compa-
ny with Pindling over corruption
in the government.

He was also echoing the old
Pindling anti-foreigner message,
describing Mr Marquis as a
“guest” in our country.

The reason Christie and the
rest of the PLP are so eager to
cling to Pindling’s torn-up legacy
is that they have nothing else.
They are finished. Good rid-
dance!

— GP

AFTER all the misery Pindling
caused, the PLP want to save his
face. You can’t erase history.

— DE

CAN The Tribune tell us what
they are going to do for news
when Marquis leaves town?

— Interested observer

That’s how it is. In ae short years, the Ride for Hope has become
the country’s most successful one-day charitable fund raiser and
has earned a well-deserved reputation for being a truly memorable
event.

as they move along the route together. A family of four wrote
afterwards, ““We had a memorable and very emotional day! It
couldn't have gotten any better!”’ One cyclist, who has participated
in a number of charitable bike events in 4 different countries said,
“Thank you so much for all your efforts. This was probably
the best organized event ever—and we had so much fun.” A
group of girl friends entered together. They sent in an email the
very night of the ride. “Thank you for the tremendous effort ...
the organization was first class and the support was
tremendous.”

People of all ages participate and at every level imaginable. "I
literally haven't been on a bike in decades", said Patrice before
the 2008 start, "so I am just going for 10 miles." Patrice did 30
miles, the inspiration and enthusiasm of the riders around her carried
5 J her along easily. After she finished, she said with deep pride in her
3 = . own accomplishment, "That was the most amazing experience
The first yell to register for the 2009 Ride for Hope did so a of my life!"
week after last year’s event. A veteran of all three rides, the New
Yorker said, “I plan my yearly vacations around the Ride for
Hope. I wouldn’t miss it for the world!”

Even volunteers are deeply moved by the event. Said one, “I was
a first-time volunteer. It was a wonderful experience and I was
proud and privileged to be a part of the effort. Hats off all
around. I'm anxiously awaiting next year's event.”

At one end of the spectrum, five year olds ride their bikes—some
with training wheels—to the Ice Cream Shop and back and are
welcomed at the finish line like the champions they are, while at
the other end seasoned cyclists set their sights on the full 100
miles—a Century Ride, the “Holy Grail” of sorts for cyclists.

Two weeks later, in May of 2008, the second cyclist registered.
This time, however, the rider had never before participated in the

Another had this to say: “ First of all let me say 'Well Done!'
The Ride for Hope was an amazing event. I was so excited to
be there helping the cyclists achieve their goals. Sadly though,
I will not be able to volunteer next year—I intend to ride
instead!”

Ride for Hope. For three weeks he had heard inspiring stories from
friends who rode and he wanted to make sure he was signed up for
2009.

Families enter, companies form teams, friends band together for
support and fun or with a common purpose in mind. Fathers and
sons set off together forming special memories and iconic images

er. | ~~ ee

gh Pa
: voto

aes


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT

Re: The tragic young
pilot who knew too much

THANK you for your fear-
less straightforward reporting of
events.

It was obvious to me long
before your article that Pindling
was a crook and a dictator mas-
querading as someone who
loved and associated with the
grassroots in order to hoodwink
them. Indeed he did a superb
job in fooling a lot of the people,
but I was not one of them. Both
my parents, now deceased, told
me what they thought of this
man, and it wasn't complimen-
tary. My father came here from
Grenada to join the police force
during the 1950s and he was run
out of the country by Pindling
because he knew too much dirt
and refused to carry out orders
that would have hurt the poor
people.

In addition, Pindling is respon-
sible for smudging the charac-
ter of our nation and we have
never recovered from it. He and
everyone else in the party who
knew of wrongdoing and
remained quiet about it or prof-
ited from it must carry the guilt
also. In fact, we are still a
"nation for sale". Anything that
needs to get done in this country
requires a grease job because
that's the mentality that began
with "The Father of the Nation"
and it persists to this day.

He led the PLP and by asso-
ciation they were and still are
associated with corruption and
greed. I will NEVER vote for
them unless they come with a
clean slate of candidates to
replace the recycled politicians
that, in my opinion, are only
there to get what they can and
retire in comfort. Only ignorant
fools can take pride in Pindling’s
legacy.

— DC, Nassau

Good morning, I just got
through reading the article post-
ed by yourself in today's Tri-
bune. It was a very interesting
read, one that I enjoyed
immensely! While I am not one
to play party politics, I must say
that your article held my atten-
tion and has expanded my per-
sonal outlook on the history of
our nation concerning its devel-
opment and the factor that con-
tributed to where we are now as
a nation. Thank you. Have a
great day.

Sincerely

— Cutelle § Major

I READ with interest your
story of the tragic young pilot
Chauncey W Tynes and found it
timely to appear on the anniver-
sary of his disappearance 26
years ago. My name by itself will
tell you nothing but I will outline
what your article did not.

My association with Mr
Chauncey Sr and his family goes
back a ways and he has always
been an honourable and
straightforward man of which
the Bahamas and the world at
large have too few.

The name of at least one oth-
er person on that ‘lost’ flight was
Donald A Moree, my brother,
who was never heard from
again. While younger than
Chauncey he was no less
involved in the dirty and blood-
thirsty business that is the drug
trade. He left a grieving father
and mother to carry on. This was
and is not the only case of
Bahamian families left to won-

der about their loved ones no
matter what would have called
them to lead this kind of life.
My brother left a wife six
months pregnant and now ason
nearly 26 years old he has never
seen.

I am sure every Bahamian
family has a story to tell. Politics
with all its dirty affairs and illic-
it alliances needs to be added
into this category. It is high time
for us as Bahamians to put our
house in order, weed out the
corrupt and prosecute those who
should be prosecuted and aim
toward a better life for all. Most
sound-thinking Bahamians I
have spoken to agree with the
articles you write airing their
dirty laundry in public and often
lament that they don’t go far
enough.

— David Moree Jr

The involvement of Lynden
Pindling with Joe Lehder and
the tragic consequences it held
for young Chauncey Tynes,
clearly depicted in your excel-
lent article of Monday March 9,
epitomises the tragedy of the
political culture of our country.
Until we can shake off the con-
tinuing effect of a barely con-
cealed gangster mentality that
infects our political culture, there
will be no government here that
we can be proud of.

It is regrettable that the PLP
refuses to do anything except try
to canonise Lynden Pindling,
and as his protege rules the
FNM converting it also into a
Pingdomite-like party, honest
Bahamians like Chauncey Tynes
Sr cannot hope that in their life-
time politics will emerge from
the gutter that the Pindling-led
PLP led it into.

There is, sir, no party of con-
trast of any size, no relief from
the culture of leadership and of
politics spawned by the same
man who willingly consorted
with men like Joe Lehder, care-
less of the fate of young Bahami-
ans such as Chauncey Tynes Jr.

Tam pained to think that this
man will one day be made a
National Hero by some PLP
government, and that they
expect that my sons will honour
and want to be like him. Too
many of our schools also teach
our children to want to be like
Pindling, ignorant of the true
nature of this very dangerous
and cunning man. Your article
will be added to the required
reading of my sons so that they
can see that it is not Daddy
alone who has told them about
the true nature of the man their
teachers seem set on canonis-
ing!

The great pity is that Lynden
Pindling did not do the
damage alone: too many
Bahamians assisted him in his
twisted agenda, many finding
out too late that they were sim-
ply tools of a maximum leader.
Greed and power were their
weakness, and lack of the guts to
stand up for basic principles.
Better to be alone than to be in
Bad Company is my watchword.

The Bahamas’ recovery from
the Pindling era will continue to
take some time. However, as
more is written revealing the
truth, recovery will be speeded
up.

In my books on Bahamian law
and on our constitutional issues
Ihave touched on the false view
of Pindling and the PLP as true
‘founding fathers’, and the rela-
tionship between our present



FEEBBACRâ„¢

lack of progress in certain areas,
and the ‘all for me’ power poli-
tics of the post-1973 era, that
includes the FNM under Ping-
domite control.

There still remains a pressing
need for a centre of political cul-
ture not based in the PLP and its
legacy. Your well presented arti-
cle on Chauncey Tynes high-
lights in a personal way the true
gangster nature of the leader-
ship during the critical period
when Bahamians ought to have
been led by only persons of the
highest principles.

It is only by a wide based
approach to analyse the under-
currents of events in that period
will the full truth be arrived at,
and more of our people recog-
nise that we must move delib-
erately away from the practices
that were spawned by Pindling
during that time.

As a young man in that peri-
od, who refused to be seduced
by the ‘you can get rich by
Xmas' approach of the PLP at
that time, I wish that Chauncey
Tynes had heeded more closely
his father's admonitions. Even
basic commonsense ought to
have led him to consider the per-
il of his situation, and the ruth-
lessness of those intent on con-
cealing their gangster opera-
tions.

It is interesting that while Mr
Tynes Sr is proof, sir, that not
all Bahamians are motivated by
money and greed, and that this
nation does indeed have its
share of men with admirable
principles, his son was seduced
by far lesser men than his own
father!

It will be some time before
Mr Tynes’ 'beloved Bahamas’
can be restored, but there are
those who hope to see it done in
our lifetime.

It will not happen overnight,
since an essential pre-condition
will be the complete eradication
of the negative effects of Lyn-
den Pindling and his henchmen
on the political and moral cul-
ture of our country. How long
will that take when PLP leaders
and their clones in the FNM
continue to praise Lynden Pin-
dling as our ‘founding father’ is a
major guess, but as long as there
is free journalism, and as long
as those who recognise the truth
publicise it, that time will come.

Yours truly,

— Dr Dexter Johnson,

Founder: The Bahamian

National Party

I would just like to say that
we as young Bahamians need to
know the truth about the people
who we hold in high esteem in
this country. These people who
we put the welfare of our nation
in, the ones we look to for lead-
ership have for too long
deceived us. They have seduced
us with their smart talk, they
plan with cleverness to present
themselves as genuine when in
reality they are a sham, a coun-
terfeit, a fake and a fraud.

T understand the times we live
in call for us uniting and moving
forward as a people but we must
first deal with the past and the

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truth must come to light and it’s
stories like these we need to
know so we as a people cannot
be so simple and guileless that
we appoint people who betray
us.

— Just Cause

Hi there, I would like to let
you Know that I enjoyed the
piece you did on Chauncey
Tynes. Although I will not speak
to the other parts of the story, I
want to let you know that I am
from North Andros and the
community of Nicholl’s Town
has suffered tremendously as a
direct result of the drug trade
and the alliances you speak of
in your piece. We have lost
countless young men and
women, many of whom were on
a “drug run”. Some time in the
early nineties we lost eight mem-
bers of one community on a
flight from Chub Cay. They
were shot down. My life changed
that day.

Tapplaud your fearlessness on
this issue and ask that you inves-
tigate this more.

Sincerely,

— Latara Dell

I AM so glad you recorded
the real story of Sir Lynden Pin-
dling’s origins. My family was
from East Street and everyone
in that neighbourhood knew that
he was not born to Viola Bain.
They all knew she had not deliv-
ered a child.

The next minute she showed
up with this boy and before you
knew it he was the big-shot run-
ning the country.

My mother scoffed at Pindling
being called The Father of the
Nation. She called him The
Father of Damnation.

When I was growing up in the
1980s, [remember students say-
ing they were going to sell drugs
for a living. It seemed then that
everyone was living on drugs. I
saw it with my own eyes. I saw
the real damage it caused.

The PLP is not a political par-
ty. It is a mindset. It’s all about
‘me’ and feelings of entitlement.
Pindling taught this nation that
you don’t have to obey any laws.
When he threw the mace out of
parliament, he was telling people
to disrespect this country and its
institutions. He hijacked the
cause of majority rule and took
it to hell.

We need a total clean-out of
the PLP and FNM. We need an
Obama. But where do we find
such a man?

— Fourth generation Conchy
Joe

WITH all his criminal associ-
ations, should not Sir Lynden
Pindling be called The Godfa-
ther of the Nation?

— Don’t call my name
(Expat)

I read your article in yester-
day's newspaper about ‘The
tragic young pilot who knew too
much’ and me and my co-work-
ers were shocked. I didn't know
things like that used to happen
in the Bahamas and I think all of
this information you have needs

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state

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UNDER
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to be in a book. What you think?

—M Cole

I THANK you for the article
on Sir Lynden Pindling. I was
proud to have had dealings in
the past with Sir Stafford Sands.
While he certainly deserved to
have his face on the banknotes,
LOP didn’t.

— Old-time Expat

(The above letter is a para-
phrased version of an e-mail
inadvertently lost during trans-
mission into an editing format -
Editor)

THIS is Tuesday and the taxi-
drivers at the airport are still
arguing over The Tribune’s
Insight article about Sir Lynden
Pindling.

The FNMs among them are
saying all this should have come
out a long time ago. The PLPs
are saying all wrong-doing done
in the past was justified.

I praise Mr (Chauncey) Tynes
Sr for saying what he did. No-
one can do him harm now. He is
beholden to no-one.

— Cab-driver

AS a former government offi-
cial, may I thank you for the arti-
cle relating to Chauncey Tynes
(father and son). I know for a
fact that another official close
to Sir Lynden Pindling delivered
regular pay-offs from Carlos
‘Joe’ Lehder to the prime min-
ister.

I think your article revealed
mysteries to certain people in
the PLP that even they didn’t
Know about, but it is important
that history be told as it was.
From my own knowledge, the
points made by Mr Tynes in
your story were broadly true.

— Ex-official

BOY, youre getting lambast-
ed on the radio today. But don’t
be deterred — everything Mr
Chauncey Tynes said was at
least 99.9 per cent true.

Many Bahamians don’t like
to hear the truth about them-
selves because this society is so
steeped in corruption that any-
thing goes. It is because of this
corruption that we are now a
Third World banana republic.

I am really sad to hear that
you’re leaving the Bahamas
because we need good men in
this country.

— MC, Nassau

YOU'RE running into a buz-
zsaw with this one because you
are unleashing the spirit of
Africa. Pindling won the 2002
election for the PLP by dying
two years before, which is a form
of promotion as far as African
cosmology is concerned.

He may have been corrupt but
that’s irrelevant in the sense that,
when you write, you do so in the
democratic tradition, whereas
he was the chief, inspiring a mix-
ture of adoration and fear. The
kind of picture I am painting is
impervious to fact and truth.

— Academic

ABSOLUTELY great article!
The truth needs to be told and
you, together with Mr Chauncey
Tynes, told it... am so pleased
this story, which has been drift-
ing around the Bahamas for
years now, has finally come to
the fore. Great journalism.

— Insight follower

THE worst decision the PLP
ever made in government was

Any Way You
Need It...

HOT
or
COLD!

Showroom and find
Name Brand Appliances at

GREAT prices with functions

and styles you like!

TAYLOR

to allow John Marquis to stay
in the country in 2006 when they
deferred his work permit.

— Leading PLP supporter
(overheard conversation)

I MUST congratulate you on
an excellent piece of journalism.
I have never read anything like
this in my whole life. I thank you
so much. It shed so much light
on things as they really were. I
love you. You are a great man.

— Woman reader

PAUL MOSS is a “no name
wonder” trying to make political
capital out of your article. But
no-one is fooled by people like
him anymore.

— R, Nassau

(Moss, a would-be PLP can-
didate issued a press release
attacking the Insight article,
claiming it was ‘repulsive’).

RIGHT on the button again. I
understand the PLP is organis-
ing a ‘whip round’ for your pen-
sion fund just to ensure you
don’t change your mind about
retiring.

— GB (Expat)

SIR, I want to congratulate
you on your article. Don’t let
anybody scare you. This is a
democratic country, a free coun-
try, not some communist coun-
try. There are some people who
don’t like the truth, who are
upset by it. But you keep telling
it like it is...

This is something I’m going
to save for my children and
grandchildren. In fact, ’m com-
ing down to The Tribune right
now to buy three or four more
copies.

Mr Chauncey Tynes is a man
of great integrity. I’ve been talk-
ing to my friends and they say he
paid a high price for his honesty
because he is in a house that’s
falling down.

Those with their millions need
to help this man. I admire him.

— Woman caller

Re: Funny names

I missed your article on funny
names last week, but on seeing
this morning's paper I had to
check it online. I have a few
from my college days. During
my undergrad days in NY, there
was a girl named Constance
Stank. No-one called her Con-
stance, though - she was known
as Connie.

A few years later, for my MSc,
I went to the London School of
Hygiene and Tropical Medicine,
where I was introduced to a very
nice demure English lady who
was the course administra-
tor. Her name was Gwenda
Hoare.

—DA Curtis

AT school I was told of a
book called ‘Sliding Down the
Bannister’ by someone called R.
Stornaway.

However, I never really
believed such a book existed, or
indeed any author of that name.
However, the association of
words never failed to make me
smile.

— Onlooker

MY dad used to tell me of a
schoolmate of his called Ben
Dover. “I wonder if he had a
cousin called Stan Dupp?” he
liked to joke.

— Marie, Winton

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Distributed by Nassau Apencles Ltd. 393-4854


PAGE 6C, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE'S

THE TRIBUNE



I'M SORRY I
DIPN'T GET A
CHANCE TO SAY
GOOPNIGHT TO

APRILE

LOOK LIKE YOU

DON'T HAVE
A CARE IN

THE MOMENT,

THE WORLD

I'M HOME. T DIDNT GET
MY PROPELLER BEANIE

TODAY, DIDI?





AS

4a
Lesh

“EVERY BIRTHDAY PUTS HIM ONE YEAR CLOSER
10 LEAVING HOME.”

Across

Uninspired
footman (10)

produce weariness (9)

JUST RIGHT AT |;







SHE'S OFF
TO SPAIN IN
THE MORNING!
YOULL SEE
HER AGAIN!

IN THAT CASE, MR. B.,
1 GUESS I'LL SAVE MY



1S FICTION



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down

1

6 Count in German (4) 2
10 Mature, or mature toa
point (5) 3
11 With us details can

12 Taking someone on and
winning (8) 5
13 Moral principle held by the
thick-skinned (5) 7
15 Refreshed as sleep
passes away (7) 8
17 An inch out perhaps, but
maintaining
contact (2,5) 9
19 Agirl after a bit of
butter for her 14
kneecap (7)
21 Nota straight 16
musician? (7)
22 Perform aerobatics in an 18
advertising display (5)
24 In the main perhaps he’s 20
all at sea (8)
27 Make sure as sure can 21
be (9)
28 Not an all-American name
for a girl (5) 23
29 Girl right at all
times (4) 25
30 Have one nightcap too
many? (5,5) 26

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution










WHEN? WHY DON'T WE
ALL HAVE PINNER HERE
WHEN SHE RETURNS?



VE GOTTA
START LOCKING

NEWS FOR LATER THAT FRONT

sud pyOM ‘aur ‘eEDINUAG SEAM}EAT BuNY Aq 6D0eE

paRlases



HAHA! IT TOOK WEEKS “SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED.
AND WEEKS OF WAITING, | BATTERIES NOT INCLUDED. “
BUT AT LONG LAST {T's

WERE! NOW 1 FINALLY, ‘

FINALLY GET TO PUT ITON!



UDG

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

3/14

Difficulty Level *&

Leave the car where one
can take a stroll (4)

One kept — in
suspense? (9)

lan’s confused with love
for a girl (5)

A king with supporters
stages a recovery (7)

A ship, for example, with
first-rate missile (7)

Being coarse on the golf
course (5)

Is it instrumental in
warning Paris pedestrians?
(6,4)

Governed, having been
shown the way (8)

Main part of a book taken
by travellers (3,7)
Distressed Royalist living
the life of a hermit (8)
Taking bullets from an old
gun | dismantled (9)

Not a sunny greeting?
(3,4)

Cafe and inn combine
somehow to make

Across
1 Dispenser of
medicines (10)
6 Brusque (4)

EASY PUZZLE

money (7) 10 Maintain (5)
Dad’s brother Sam is in 11 Ad-lib (9)
the U.S. (5) 12 Portray in words (8)
Exhausted after a day’s 13 Pitch f 4
shopping? (5) itch forwar
Found on stage (4) suddenly (5)
15 Even-tempered (7)
17 Account for (7)

Yesterday’s Easy Solution io isan eee

Across: 1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8
Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk,
14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18
Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder,
25 Younger.

Down: 1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4
Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7

Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember,

14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20
Beau, 23 Dig.

Across: 1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 21 Raining heavily (7)
Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 22 Provoke aversion
Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 in (5)

Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 24 Common sense (8)
Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. :

Down: 1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 27 Not guilty

Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 judgment (9)

Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, | 28 Construct (5)

14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 29 Long hard journey (4)
Step, 23 Sad. 30 Cave-dweller (10)





























APT 3-G




GREAT. I'LL BE SPENDING THE 2J
EVENING PICKING OLIVES OFF
THIS GNORMOVS PIES

PARTY PIZZA
FOR MAGEE/,

Was
€ ;
vik
\

iia 4
Nf
Q
HE THINKs IT

\)
MAKES HIM LOOK LIKE
SEAN CONNERY

OFRANK BOLLE



©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

MARVIN

YOUR FATHER
HAS STARTED
TO GROW

AFTERNOON,
LADIES T THINK HE
LOOKS LIKE A

TOILET BOWL

PO You HAVE ANY THING BUT HE HASN'T
Ee ee TO FINIGHEP een neT:

OUR ne TY DRIVE

HCP goer Gere al Four
Bier mere oan we make
from the betters dicen here?
In in oo ead, eae berber
ares) bet ied) Gere: only. Enel
cual ealain Line eek beer
auf hers crcl fhe sh lea ne
nine ther mor Mo pina.

TODAS TARGET

ane! 215 ee pine 41:
e=cHEeBuL 41 dir ore]
mores

Feduleon

SMURDATS SOLUTION
wd cmd alin Gael chad

chiki coe dae) clan chm
(|g find ool ood onl enka cmd
. , coma IPOMICIRAL bic lowch
eer Lee! beech moe milo meh

eect olde



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.











Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer



















































©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





























a Py as
m2 1 /4B4 38/7 9/3
8/7/9 AW3 4/1 8/5
M7 2032 17
eo 8/6 /2|1 Bi 4/2
g wi
Bom occ
eS? 9 I7 8 o EN 3 1
7(8/9/2|6 BNO 813
3
Difficulty Level *& *& & & afl4 3/416) 1/2 8 7 2 |





Heads | Win, Tails You Lose




South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.

what’s more, there was nothing the
defenders could do to stop him.



NORTH West led the king of diamonds,
@K 5763 which Bell ducked. If West had now
Â¥6 shifted to a club, declarer, after learn-
#753 ing of the 3-0 trump division, could
#AKJ2 have avoided a second diamond loser
WEST EAST by establishing dummy’s fourth club.
o— #0104 But West led another diamond at
VÂ¥Q87542 VK I93 trick two, taken by the ace, and when
#KQI6 #1082 Bell next cashed the ace of trumps,
#854 #Q 109 he learned that East had a trump trick
SOUTH coming. It looked as though the con-
#A9852 tract would now depend on winning
Â¥A10 a club finesse, but Bell found a way
#A94 to make 10 tricks without the finesse.
763 At trick four, he played the ace of
Down The bidding: hearts and contmued by ruffing a
1. International South West North East heart in dummy. He then exited with
treaty (4) 14 Pass 34 Pass a diamond, won by West with the
2 Consequently (2,1,6) 44 ; ; os jack.
3 Ridicule by Opening lead — king of diamonds. West could do no better than
imitation (5) re : ee me a the ace. ee
: The ideal goal in bridge is to then played the K-x of trumps, sad-
: ne ee establish a “heads | win, tails you dling East with the lead and render-
7 Superior (5) lose” position. ing him helpless. East had to return a
ee renal a Consider this deal played by club or yield a ruff-and-discard,
y uncertain

14
16
18
20
21

23
25
26



either of which gave South the con-
tract.
The endplay developed by Bell

Bruce Bell, New Zealand star. He got
to four spades and ordinarily would
have made the contract easily. How-



(5-3-2)
Disintegrate (8)



Ribes rubrum (3,7)
The butterfly bush (8)
Strong dislike (9)
Shallow port boat (7)
Interval of

delay (4,3)
Resentment (5)
Unmentionable (5)
Not in operation (4)



ever, since East happened to have all
three missing spades and the guarded
queen of clubs as well, it might seem
that the contract was doomed. But
Bell made his game anyway, and,














was typical of the “heads | win, tails
you lose” position. No matter how
East-West defended, Bell had a
countermeasure available that would
get him home safely.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.



THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16TH, 2009, PAGE 7C

{INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MAarINE FORECAST









Pe UOMUDILE

Ff SO:

ny rns yy
























































Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
a y a High = Low W High =Low W NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
_ : in 0| 1 |2 3 |4|5 6|7 8 | gl10 ACARD ie wine : as au . Tuesday: _$ at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
|. — FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
md bat ——e— ~ Be LOW | MODERATE | HIGH | V.HIGH | EXT. Amsterdam 52/11 43/6 pe 5110 39/3 s ie § at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
le ORLANDO) Ankara, Turkey 34/1 24/-4 sf 45/7 30/1 ¢ = RBACO ‘Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 73° F
Hight 85°F/29°C A full day of Clear. Plenty of sun. Partly sunny with a Partly sunny and Times of clouds and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 59/15 49/9 s 52/11 42/5 pe Tuesday: __$ at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 73°F
( L g “65°F 48°C AS sunshine. shower possible. pleasant. sun. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 71/21 58/14 pc 72/22 64/17 sh
(Low: 65°F/ 'e ilies High: 82° High: 79° High: 81° High: 79° Bangkok 95/35 79/26 pc 96/35 79/26 c
us et . 646 sue - 6 3 7 Barbados 84/28 75/23 s 84/28 75/23 s
Paanek 1 ee High: 83 Low: 71 Low: 71 Low: 69 Low: 69 Low: 68 a ES) Barcelona 61/16 46/7 s SR TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
ara ie 7 UNV Cee A eLearn i aii
° o¢ : , 7 3 3 TRO — a : Beijing 66/18 37/2 pc 77/25 = 48/8 s
High: 84° F/29° C 4 y = | _ 89°-69° Fs 84°-73° F High Ht.(ft.) Low —_Ht.(ft. Beirut 50415 46/7 s B16 57/13 s
Low: 64° F/18°C : a. = The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:01am. 27 6:18am. 03 Belarade 50/10 31/0 sh 45/7 33/0 c Seattle
ai @ ¢ _ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 12:14pm. 22 6:17pm. 0.2 ean 47/8 29/3 c 48/3 29/-1 sh 47/38 Ja
a Aue ee et ee
e~. p Statistics are for Nassau through 2 terd as ——— ee oe CREA
j Z gh 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesday 123 am. 24 803am. 06 Brussels 51/10 42/5 pc 53/11 37/2 pe 58/43) (MILD)
( a BS ABACO Temperature 0 154p.m. 20 8:03pm. 05 Budapest 49/9 28/-2 pc 46/7 33/0 pc
f a High: 81° F/27°C HIGH oeceececccececesesteseseetsteseeceneseseeceseees 82° F/28° C Thursday 24am. 23 04am. 06 Buenos Aires 75/23 58/14 pc 76/24 59/15 s
Z _ Near c LOW ooeesesnsee 72° F/22° C Y o58pm. 20 9.06pm. 05 Cairo 70/21 48/8 s 72/22 56/13 s
. - ow: 68° F/ Normal high ..... 79° F/26°C = CO 90/32 66/18 pc 96/35 74/23 s
me A Normal low . 65° F/18° C Calgary 37/2 14/-10 c 31/0 15/-9 pc
: iyo , @ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's Hight .csocssseseenenssnseee 87° F/30° STRUT Crt). Cancun 87/30 62/16 s 87/30 63/17 s
" — High: 84° F/29°C i Last year $ low pinay eraeateeetan 74° F/23° C " " Caracas 83/28 68/20 c 84/28 68/20 pc losangeles)
Re Low: 68° F/20° C @ i Precipitation a tenes 7 AL Casablanca 79/26 55/12 s 81/27 52/11 s 470/54
As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....0..c.ceccceeeeeeee 0.00" unset... .... p.m oonse Copenhagen 46/7 42/5 sh 49/9 36/2 pc
i FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date Last New First Dublin 52/11 43/6 sh 5412 41/5 pc
High: 83° F/28° C @ High: 80° F/27° C Normal year to date oo... 4.27" Frankfurt 5412 42/5 po 5713 35/1 po
Low:71°F/22°C Low: 66° F/19°C Geneva 57/13 37/2 pc 50/15 38/3 s Housto
4 an Per eaeen _ oes Bl
- Forecasts and graphics provided by (e avana S$ $ , MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.18 Mar.26 Apr. 2 Apr. 9 Helsinki 34/1 28/-2 c 34/1 27/-2 sn oe 84/66
ELEUTHERA FX Xj T-storms :
High: 84° F/29° C 5 y 7 Hong Kong 73/22 64/17 s 73/22 64/17 s Rain Fronts
_ Low.69°F/21°¢ NASSAU High: 83° F/28° C Islamabad 84/28 55/12 c 89/31 60/15 pe Se Cold =e
F High: 83° F/28° C Low: 67° FA9°C Istanbul 53/11 41/5 pc 521 43/6 r Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
Lease Jerusalem 55/12 34/1 56/13 30/3 s Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Wal aa
‘ m NORETITSSSU 79/99 5A/12 sh 79/99 56/13 t Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary teagan
KEY WEST an Kingston 85/29 75/23. sh 85/29 75/23 sh
High: 80° F/27°C CAT ISLAND Lima 83/28 66/18 c 83/28 65/18 c “Os Os 10s 20s {308 40s
Low: 71° F/22°C High: 80° F/27°C London 61/16 44/6 pc 5713 44/6 po
3 @ 12 Low: 64° F/18°C Madrid 68/20 39/3 s 69/20 37/2 s
Manila 88/31 75/23 pc 87/30 75/23 c
i ss 7
Mexico City 70/21 48/8 t 72/22 47/8 pc O IN S iN C
GREATEXUMA i Monterrey 79/26 62/16 pc 82/27 62/16 pc AUT | 8 RA ie
Montreal 39/3 32/0 pc 46/7 34/1 s
High: 81° F/27° C | aobebetietl Moscow 30/-1 23/-5 sn 29/-1 26/-3
Low: 71°F/22°C fe -66°F/19°C Munich 42/5 32/0 c 48/8 26/-3 pc
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's Wet c : ve haute rr a oa t oe ea t
highs and tonights's lows. : . , ew Delhi s s
ahs and tong Le orrnee = ee Never start your
Paris 56/13 40/4 pc 60/15 42/5 s !
a Prague 45/7 38/3 c 50/10 32/0 sh Sin is re WV It O t US!
Rio de Janeiro 81/27 73/22 pc 83/28 74/23 pc
a serie Rome SOT 4206 sh BONS s aera
Low: 66° F/19°C Rome 63/17 43/6 sh 5915 41/5 s x ent
Today Tiesiiay Today Tipéday Today Tiosiay MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 83/28 73/22 sh 82/27 72/22 s av —. mes to Auto Insurance,
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 85° F/29° C San Juan 93/33 65/18 s 87/30 58/14 pe : Pr crcizetne Smart choice 1 1S
Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC Low: 66° F/19°C San Salvador 91/32 73/22 pe 89/31 73/22 sh 4 : ce Management.
Albuquerque 69/20 40/4 po 74/21 44/6 s Indianapolis 6246 47/8 s 71/21 48/8 s Philadelphia 54/12 38/3 r 55/12 40/4 po CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santiago ae etcaeeeaees At ran £
Anchorage 18/-7 10/-12 pc 26/3 16/-8 s Jacksonville 79/26 55/12 t 74/21 52/11 c Phoenix 83/28 56/13 s 85/29 58/14 s ui Uy Santo Domingo 83/28 67/19 s Beet 61/13 % 5 ople you can trust.
Atlanta 62/16 47/8 + 72/22 47/8 po Kansas City 75/23 51/10 s 72/22 47/8 s Pittsburgh Ba/12 36/2 1 6317 45/7 5s RAGGEDISLAND High: 87°F/si°c - _ — on C oe ear Re a:
Atlantic City 49/9 30/-1 r 5211 33/0 pc Las Vegas 77/25 51N0 s 80/26 54/12 s —Portland,OR + 49/9 «38/3 r «= SIMO 40/4 Highes*raarc | LOWrBSF/2I°C Sikhal aan areas os ae.
Baltimore 5241 36/2 + 56/13 40/4 pc _ Little Rock 71/21 46/7 s 75/23 48/8 s Raleigh-Durham 50/10 40/4 r 6045 40/4 pe Low: 64° F/18°C sen _ er aie ' 7s" GONG - -_
Boston 42/5 30/-1 po 48/8 37/2 pc LosAngeles 70/21 54/12 po 74/23 5412 s St. Louis 70/21 5010 s 79/26 5341 s . a ae SERIES = SOeREST : .
Buffalo 52/11 36/2 ¢ 5713 41/5 pc Louisville 66/18 45/7 s 72/22 5010 s Salt Lake City 63/17 40/4 c 59/15 38/3 c GREAT INAGUA i 55/12 a 5713 46/7 pc :
Charleston, SC 65/18 48/8 r 69/20 49/9 pe Memphis 70/21 49/9 s 74/23 52/11 pe San Antonio 80/26 53/11 $s 80/26 54/12 s High: 86° F/20°C Toronto 51/0 35/1 pe 53/14 A1/5 pc (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 61/16 45/7 pe 68/20 40/4 s Miami 84/28 66/18 s 81/27 68/20 pc San Diego 67/19 55/12 pe 70/21 56/13 s ee 6 ss i
. : . Low: 69° F/21°C Trinidad 90/32 71/21 pc 90/32 71/21 pe
Cleveland 52/1 38/3 6 6116 44/6 s Minneapolis 58/14 43/6 pe 53/41 31/0 5s San Francisco 63/17 50/10 pe 63/17 48/8 pc ane 47/8 39/3 sh 47/8 39/3 + ; Nl p id 6 dB h Ah th f
Dallas 78/25 5A/12 s 81/27 55/12 s Nashville 67/19 43/6 s 70/21 45/7 pc Seattle 478 38/3 sh 48/8 393 + | apra ion ee ie aoa EW FTOvIdEnCe | rod DONdInG 0C0 eyinerd Xuma
Denver 71/21 35/1 pe 70/21 36/2 pc New Orleans 70/21 58/14 sh 73/22 55/12 pc Tallahassee 74/23 55/12 t 77/25 50/10 pe aren 39/3 28/-2 c 44/6 34/4 sn lt (242) 40). 400 Ie: U4) S30 3500 Ie (242) 3] A) Ie (242) 332: 186? Teh (24 2) 336-2304
Detroit 57/13 39/3 pe 65/18 42/5 s New York 50/10 39/3 pe 53/1 42 pc Tampa 84/28 64/17 $s 78/25 60/15 c Winnipeg 42/5 24/-4 pc 39/10 41/-6 5
Honolulu 79/26 67/19 peo 78/25 64/17 Cc Oklahoma City 78/25 50/10 s 81/27 52/11 $s Tucson 79/26 50/10 s 83/28 51/110 s 7 a
Houston 74/23 56/13 po 78/25 56/13 s Orlando 85/29 63/17 s 79/26 60/15 c Washington, DC 51/10 39 r 54/12 40/4 pc eh ee


PAGE 8C, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

Readers have their say on ‘the tragic
young pilot who knew too much’

Re: The tragic young pilot
who knew too much

Dear Mr Marquis,

A very informative article,
having been a victim of Pin-
dling's victimisation first-hand
through Mr Carlton E Francis,
who happens to be an immedi-
ate family member. (VERY
CLOSE, but I choose not to
say).

It's about time the real histo-
ry be told.

— Name supplied

Before he started working as a
pilot, Chauncey Tynes Jr was an
air traffic controller, where he
succeeded without really flying.
He later was employed by
Bahamasair, taking police offi-
cers on drug surveillance patrols
throughout The Bahamas. He
was an excellent pilot, who, in
between flights, was also a bit
of a “party animal.” For some
of his former colleagues, their
last sight of him was in the police
station, then located at the
entrance to the then-Nassau
International Airport main ter-
minal, handcuffed to a man who
may have been a Colombian.
Chauncey’s tousled appearance
— in addition to his having
gained weight due to his pen-
chant for consuming several
hamburgers at one sitting —
prompted the description of a
“drowned rat”, from one observ-
er.

Chauncey went missing one
weekend before he was due to
appear in court to answer for-
mal charges. He is recalled with
fondness by those who knew
him, and who, in the interests of
some form of “closure”, are curi-
ous to know exactly what hap-
pened to him.

Yours, etc

— Edward Lee

Mr Marquis:

It is with regret that I find
myself responding to yet anoth-
er of your articles!

You write with such justifica-
tion about Mr Pindling and the
PROGRESSIVE LIBERAL

#. Kelly's

Tal: ieee are ee sousy

PARTY but I cannot recall you
ever writing about the UBP and
its demons which I am sure you
are more than intimate with!

You ought to stick with what
you know but, alas, we know
which master you serve, we
Know which sector of society you
align with and we know what
you are about.

Be reminded Sir Pindling was
the best thing that ever hap-
pened to our country, not yours,
and the qualities that you enjoy
in The Bahamas were as a result
of Sir Lynden and the PLP! But,
alas, the white light continues to
blind you.

Hope to hear from you soon
when you return to the UK!

PS: Isn’t it time for you to
score the FNM — remember,
the PLP is not the ruling party.
Who will be the JACK this
time?

— Donald Campbell

It's been a while, but suffice it
to say that the article on
Chauncey Tynes (The Pilot Who
Knew Too Much) has triggered
this feedback. Let me first pref-
ace my comments on the com-
mon Bahamian acceptable prac-
tice regardless to facts and rea-
son Le. “if people like you, they
lie and defend you! If they hate
you, they tell les on you”, and
abuse you. The information
shared in your Insight article this
past Monday was quite disturb-
ing, to say the least. Mr Tynes Sr
comes across as being extremely
credible.

Questions relating to the true
national identity of Lynden Pin-
dling have always been a con-
cern and not very clear. There
seemed to have been some truth
or credibility to the allegation
about his ancestral
lineage. However, if any such
country exists where such a thing
occurs, rest for certain that it's
The Bahamas. Sad to say, as I
consider my country, and the
condition of my fellow Bahami-
ans, we lack intellect and wis-
dom. We are not a nation known
for its intellect.

Yes! of course there are bril-

AR

rr

FRED EKCR’

liant intellectuals among us.
However, they are more less the
exception than the rule. This was
primarily why the Pindlings
seized the opportunity and
exerted themselves into the fore-
front of the dull, shallow-think-
ing Bahamian masses, whom
they said were not asking for
much. Thus, that's what they
gave us over the years. A little
government job to buy a little
house, to house, very large fam-
ilies, and to make a little shop-
ping trip to Miami occasionally,
and we were happy.

Needless to say, your article
will receive harsh criticism from
those loyalists who benefited
from the Pindling era, and who
still wish to exploit the Bahami-
an masses to their advantage, by
spewing their hatred, and avoid
discussing the concerns you’ve
addressed. I think the truth
should really be revealed about
Pindling's true date and place of
birth. Let's face it, the man is
now dead. Let the whole truth
be told as to who he really
was. It can’t hurt more than the
damage he has already done to
our nation. Great job, John! As
usual, I love your penmanship.

— Velly C

I CONGRATULATE you
for removing the scales from the
eyes of the Bahamian people.

My grandmother was a straw
vendor and her stall was taken
away from her by the PLP
because she was an FNM sup-
porter. This is how vindictive the
PLP was.

Defence Force officers told
me that they were instructed
when to go to Norman’s Cay
(drug czar Joe Lehder’s cocaine
trans-shipment base) and when
to stay away. They were even

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told which boats they could
search, and which boats they
couldn't.

I don’t know why people pre-
tend these things did not hap-
pen. This is part of our history
and I think it needs to be
exposed.

Many people are delusional
about what happened. I was at
school when the NBC reported
on the drug trade in the
Bahamas and I was devastated.

We are still paying for it
today. We should never have
allowed this scourge into our
country. Pindling was in charge
at the time and the one who was
supposed to set the tone.

The commission of inquiry
was not as revealing as it should
have been. Drugs have left this
country in a state where boys
and girls sell themselves on Bay
Street so that they can pay for
crack cocaine.

— Former Defence

Force officer

Having read your March 9
Insight I would like to clarify the
matter regarding the birthplace
of Sir Lynden Pindling.

My father was a fellow police
officer of the father of Sir Lyn-
den as well as a neighbour and
friend.

My mother was pregnant with
me while Sir Lynden’s mother
was likewise pregnant with him.
I was born on March 13, 1930,
while Sir Lynden was born not
many days after, also in March
of the same year.

All of the other information
stated concerning this matter are
wrong and although my father
and mother are not alive to say
for themselves what I have told
you these are the facts that they
both have stated to me.

— Sidney R Burrows

Good day Mr Marquis.

Tjust read your article on the
tragic young pilot who knew too
much. Thanks for enlightening
the younger generation who far
too often may only hear the
term, "Father of the nation"
(which I really do not know why
people say that), as the article
is so true, and Mr Tynes only
added closure to all the stuff that
I was hearing. He (Mr Tynes) is
a PLP from yesteryear saying
these things.

Pindling caused many fami-
lies in the Bahamas hardship,

especially those whose parents
were from the Turks and Caicos
Islands, as their children could
not get government jobs, mainly
because the parents never sup-
ported the plp and Pindling
Knew this so he did accordingly.

Even today the plp is still try-
ing the same trickery as it relates
to flooding the government sec-
tor with party supporters, even
when the office is already over-
crowded, and these are the per-
sons who don't work because of
the politics. I see no reason why
persons on the popular radio
talk show Love 97 were so upset,
as your article only quoted Mr
Tynes’ words. Don't feel intimi-
dated by the calls, Bahamians
need to appreciate the truth in
this article.

— JS, Nassau

I have not read John Mar-
quis's INSIGHT piece because
we no longer get The Tribune
in Freeport, so I can't intelli-
gently comment on it. But
although Sir Lynden Pindling's
place in Bahamian history is
assured primarily because of his
leadership during the struggle
for majority rule, it is no secret
among those who choose not to
overlook that The Bahamas was
considered to be “A Nation for
Sale” during the 1980s that Sir
Lynden had his flaws as a
national leader.

There is evidence that he was
also ruthless when it came to
those who opposed him, and I
can say this based on personal
experience. The fact that I lived
out of this country for 20 years,
after making tremendous per-
sonal sacrifices to play an active
role in the struggle for majority
rule, was primarily due to overt
victimisation by Sir Lynden.
What's more, there has to be a
reason why Hubert Ingraham,
Perry Christie and Midge Hanna
voiced strong opposition to Sir
Lynden's leadership in 1984,
resulting in Ingraham and
Christie being suspended from
the PLP. Ingraham, as we all
now know, demonstrated that
he believed strongly in the rea-
sons why he decided to openly
criticise Sir Lynden, while
Christie begged forgiveness and
returned to the PLP. The bot-
tom line is that we cannot sani-
tise events of the past to record
history as we would like for it
to be recorded for future gen-
erations. When I do get the
chance to read Marquis's arti-
cle, I may comment further in
one of my future weekly
columns.

Best wishes,

— Oswald T Brown

Editor, Freeport News

Well, people, there is one way
to deal with these things. Engage
a national debate on the life and

DOUBLE

FILET O' FISH



times of Lynden Pindling. “Was
he a friend or foe?’ Perhaps ZNS
can lead this national debate and
set up the forum by inviting the
relevant persons to argue the
moot (John Marquis vs Paul
Adderley). BTC or Indigo can
provide the technology for per-
sons to text in their votes during
the debate. Is not that the way a
civil society deals with questions
that surround it? Or perhaps it’s
not the practice in this country
who love to claim to being heirs
of the Westminster System of
democracy?

My point is that we need more
dialogue here in this country.
Dialogue that will invoke dis-
cussions on the facts! I would
guarantee such an event will gar-
ner huge advertising benefits for
your media, and at the same
time will lend a rewarding edu-
cation opportunity to our wider
public. Many of the younger
generation who know very little
about Sir Lynden, the era of
majority rule and the evil trade
of drug running that is carved
deep into our history.

I can see it now, "THE
GREAT BAHAMIAN
DEBATES" LIVE ON ZNS,
JCN/Love97FM, Island FM,
GEMS, THE
GUARDIAN/STAR FM or
The Tribune and its affiliate sta-
tions.

— Carvel Francis

AS you know, I don’t always
agree with you, but your article
was very good. There are one
or two discrepancies, but on the
whole it is truthful.

I have known Chauncey
Tynes and his family for the best
part of 70 years and he is a truth-
ful, honest and upright man.

They are castigating you and
saying nothing about Chauncey.
And no-one is disputing what
was said. The days of PLP cor-
ruption were started by Pindling
and that’s led to what we have
today.

— Errington Watkins

(former senior police officer)

I read your INSIGHT article
regarding Mr Pindling and I
must say I found it interesting
and convincing. However, that
has not always been my posi-
tion. 1 knew LO when we were
schoolboys in Nassau. He went
to school in England for a couple
of years before I left for the
United States in 1949. During
the Commission of Inquiry hear-
ing in 1983, I had my brother
send me all the relevant copies
of The Tribune and the
Guardian. I was convinced that
LO's accusers did not make their
case, or perhaps that is what I
wanted to believe. You see, I
wanted so badly for him to suc-
ceed. I was certain that he and I
shared the same love of coun-
try.

Now, with the first-hand
accounts that your article
describes, I have finally con-
cluded that the events as
described to you by Mr Tynes
and others, which were not pre-
sented at the inquiry, point to
his culpability.

There are two issues men-
tioned in the article that are in
dispute, though they have no rel-
evance to the veracity of the
accusations. 1) Pindling's place
of birth and 2) his meeting with
Mugabe in the 1960s. I recall a
conversation that I had with my
mother (who died in 1995) about
the PLP. You see, she hated Pin-
dling and she called him "that
cockeyed man”. She went off on
him saying he was "no good"
and he came from “nutin". She
told me and my brother
(deceased) that "he ain no
Jamaican". He was born "roun"
the corner from Eneas Jumpers
Church Corner.

My mother was older than
LO's parents and she lived in
Bain Town her entire life. Any-
one will tell you that Bain Town
women Know everybody and
everybody's "business".

She further told us how LO's
father in a fit of rage quit the
police force, went home and
burned his uniform in the middle
of the road. This information
could only have come from insti-
tutional knowledge. Lastly,
Mugabe was an obscure guerilla
fighter in the 1960s during which
time Pindling was already on his
ascendancy to political power.
Mugabe did not become Presi-
dent of Zimbabwe until more
than a decade after Pindling
became the leader of the
PLP. Again, good article.

— CW, Nassau

Don’t miss next week’s
INSIGHT section for more

revelations about Pindling-
Lehder connection...






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Man shot dead in daylight attack C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.94MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER FULL DAYOF SUNSHINE HIGH 83F LOW 71F I N S I G H T SEEINSIGHTSECTION Huge reaction from readers to Pindling article SEEPAGE FIFTEEN Truckers beat Cybots n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net MINISTER of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace is confident his ministry's initiatives are enough to counter a recent gloomy prediction on the country's tourism industry. Last week the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC a leading global tourism organisation, forecast that the country's The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate Police search for teacher accused of molesting former students n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@ tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Police are searching for the former Eight Mile Rock High School teacher who is accused of molesting two former male students. Asst Supt Clarence Reck ley, press liaison officer, said yesterday that the teacher is no longer in the jurisdiction and is being sought by police. “We should have more information concerning the matter this week,” said Mr Reckley. The expatriate teacher, who was employed as an art teacher at EMR High, is accused of sexually molesting the students over an eight-year period, which started while they were in the seventh grade. The teacher was sent to New Providence after allegations surfaced in January, and was placed on proba tionary leave pending investigations by the Ministry of Education. P olice conducted investi gations and forwarded details to the Attorney Gen eral’s Office for determination. Last week, Asst Commissioner Marvin Dames saidt he AG’s office granted the f iat, giving approval to pros ecute the teacher. The teacher, from Trinidad, resigned last month and is no longer in the Bahamas. EMR PTA president Troy Garvey, who brought the matter to the public, believes there are more victims at the school. LITTLE TOPAZ CULMER waves her flag yesterday during a march to commemorate the Church of God of Prophecy’s 100 year convention. The event was held under the theme ‘Awake, Let’s Celebrate’. SEEPAGETWO F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f CHUR CH OF GODOFPROPHECYMARCH n By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net A GAME of dominoes turned deadly yesterday when a man was shot in the head during a brazen daylight a ttack. People in Bain Town and Grants Town were left shocked after an otherwise peaceful Sunday afternoon was shattered by the killing of an Augusta Street man. Up to press time last night, police were searching for his killer. The victim Mark 'Scabby' Daniels was playing dominoes with friends outside a building in Finlayson Street when a gunman approached and shot Daniels in the head. When police arrived a short time later around 1pm they found Daniels on the porch of a single-storey white and green wooden build i ng where he report edly worked as an a uto-mechanic. The father-of-five, said to be in his mid-3 0s, was found lying on his back dressed in a black shortsleeved shirt and short green trousers. E mergency personnel pronounced h im dead at the scene. Family and friends converged on the house and screamed in anguish as offi cials carried Daniels’ body away. With her voice breaking with tears, Daniels' niece told the media he was a hardworking handyman who always helped his friends. "My uncle was a very helpful person. Anybody who wanted their car fixed could go to him and he was willing to help everybody. “My uncle was a builder, SEE page 10 F ather-of-f ive is killed while playing dominoes Mark Daniels Expat ‘no long er in the jurisdiction’ n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A GRUESOME traffic accident left a 16-year-old boy dead and two others fighting for their lives in hospital. The tragedy occurred shortly before 1am on Saturday on East Street near East Street Gospel Chapel. Police believe the 18-year-old driver was attempting to overtake another vehicle when he lost control and crashed into a wooden utility pole and a twostorey concrete building. Police also believe that the vehicle caught fire after it crashed but was extinguished by people in the area before firefighters arrived. When police were called to the scene around 1am, they saw a two-door Hyundai Accent, licence 124153, with a driver and Teen dead, two others in hospital after traffic accident SEE page 11 WHILE complaining that others are robbing them of their history, Bahamians are also guilty of this by choos ing not to “confront the difficult truth”, former PLP parliamentarian Dr Elwood Donaldson told The Tribune yesterday. Dr Donaldson said he was “not impressed” by those who expressed a high level of “anger and anxiety” over The Tribune’s controversial Insight article about Sir Lynden Pindling’s alleged links with Colombian drug czar Joe Lehder, and were unwilling to have a dispassionate debate about Pindling’s legacy. “It’s superstition, this idea that you cannot speak about the dead. I think that anything that is a part of history is a part of history and I don’t understand the furore surrounding this,” he said. Former PLP parliamentarian is ‘not impressed’ by ‘anger’ over T ribune article SEE page 11 Tourism initiatives ‘will pr ove gloomy forecast wrong’ SEE page 10 Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace S P O R T S

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE MUSIC AND COLOUR abounded yesterday during a march to commemorate the Church of Godo f Prophecy’s 100 year convention. The event was held under the theme ‘Awake, Let’s Celebrate’. MARCH MARKS 1 1 0 0 0 0 Y Y E E A A R R CONVENTION CHURCHOFGODOF PROPHECY PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff

PAGE 3

n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@ tribunemedia.net MINISTER of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wallaced oes not see recently relaxed travel measures to Cuba as an immediate threat to the Bahamas' tourism industry. H owever, he said the industry must prepare for the event ual end of an American travel ban to the communist nation and remain competi-t ive by developing unique branding of the Bahamas' F amily Islands. His comments came days after the United States gov-e rnment passed a $410 billion spending bill, part of which included policies that willa llow Cuban-Americans to travel legally to their homel and to visit relatives once a year and spend up to $179 per day. Previously, Cuban-A mericans could only travel to Cuba every three years and s pend no more than $50 a day. Senator Vanderpool-Wall ace saw these measures were more of a humanitarian effort than a move that will generate increased tourism to Cuba. S till, his ministry is focused on product development and i sland branding to counter inevitable competition from emerging markets, he said. " Make no mistake about it, i n our lifetimes we are going to see travel from the United States to Cuba relax consid-e rably and we have always taken the posture that we have to become much more focused on our own promot ion and advertising and that's why we have to get many peop le in the Bahamas to understand is that the Bahamas is a region. " We have a variety of i slands that we have never really developed to the stage that we need to develop thema nd to differentiate one from the other so that we have a l ot more varied products on the shelf to deal with the C uba's when they open," he s aid. The senator highlighted that part of Cuba's attractiveness the country saw tourismg rowth 5.2 per cent in the first t wo months of 2009, compared to the same period last year lies in the lower comparative cost to get there. "It reinforces what I'm saying, if you take a look at thec ost of a vacation in Cuba from the same markets, for the cost to come to many oth-e r places including the Bahamas it's better value. T he customer is buying value nowadays in this global environment more than anythinge lse." He said the ministry is l ooking at ways to lower the cost of getting to the Bahamas. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,730 $3,730 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,940 $3,940Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yW ong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 ( 242)326 2335 2 335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a n By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORTGrand B ahama police are still searching for Garin Gibson who is now their number one most wanted person on the island. Asst Supt Clarence Reckley said Gibson is wanted forq uestioning about several offences in connection with i llegal firearms. “We want to thank the public and the media for theira ssistance in the recapture of Samiko Rigby last week. We continue to look out for Garin Gibson who is the number one person on ourw anted list on Grand Bahama, and we are seeking t he public’s assistance in trying to capture him,” he said. Gibson is considered a rmed and dangerous. Anyone with information is asked to contact police at 911 or 352-9774/5. FIREARM ARREST ASP Reckley reported that t wo people were arrested for firearm possession on Sund ay. Sometime around 2.13am, a s a result of information received, police stopped a green truck. D uring a search of the vehicle, officers allegedly disc overed a .45 pistol with sev en live rounds of ammunition and a black 9mm Smitha nd Wesson pistol with 12 live rounds of ammunition. The two occupants, both 37, were taken into custody and will be charged beforet he court next week. Mr Reckley said a firearm was turned in to police last Thursday. He reported that a resident f ound a 9mm pistol with nine live rounds of ammunition while at Discovery Bay. M r Reckley commended the resident for turning the w eapon over to police. BREAK-IN Police arrested a man who was allegedly caught climb i ng out of the drive through window at the rear of Wendy’s Restaurant. ASP Reckley said the alarm at Wendy’s was activated around 3.23am on Saturday. Officers found the suspect, who is now being questioned in connection with several other shop break-ins in the area. A couple were arrested at their home in Freeport for breach of the Shop Licence Act. Around 8pm on Sunday police executed a search warrant at Caravel Beach, where they arrested a man and woman. Charges are expected to be filed against the couple this week. Mr Reckley noted that of 38 persons arrested for various offences last week, 22 persons were charged by police. Relaxed travel measures to Cuba ‘not an immediate threat’ Search for most wantedp erson on Grand Bahama In brief W W e e h h a a v v e e a a v v a a r r i i e e t t y y o o f f i i s s l l a a n n d d s s t t h h a a t t w w e e h h a a v v e e n n e e v v e e r r r r e e a a l l l l y y d d e e v v e e l l o o p p e e d d t t o o t t h h e e s s t t a a g g e e t t h h a a t t w w e e n n e e e e d d t t o o d d e e v v e e l l o o p p t t h h e e m m a a n n d d t t o o d d i i f f f f e e r r e e n n t t i i a a t t e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m t t h h e e o o t t h h e e r r s s o o t t h h a a t t w w e e h h a a v v e e a a l l o o t t m m o o r r e e v v a a r r i i e e d d p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s o o n n t t h h e e s s h h e e l l f f t t o o d d e e a a l l w w i i t t h h t t h h e e C C u u b b a a ' ' s s w w h h e e n n t t h h e e y y o o p p e e n n . . M inister of Tourism V incent Vanderpool-Wallace

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. Our legislators and many Bahamians are well aware of the Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act” that was tabled in the United S tate (US ruary, 2007 by senators Levin, Coleman, and then senator Obama; this took place during the first session of the 110 Congress. The bill is designed “to restrict the use of offshore tax havens and abusive tax shelters to inappropriately avoid Federal Taxation, and f or other purposes.” It targets $100 billion per year in tax rev enue losses due to offshore tax havens and since the US has iden tified the Bahamas as a tax haven jurisdiction for tax avoidance, there is a legitimate threat and clear and present danger to our second largest industry. S pecifically, the bill seeks to achieve the following among other objectives: 1) Establish presumptions to combat offshore secrecy. 2) Impose tougher requirements on US taxpayers using off shore secrecy jurisdictions. 3) Authorise special measures to stop offshore tax abuses. 4) Strengthen detection of offshore activities. 5) Close offshore trust loop holes by taxing offshore trust income. 6) Strengthen penalties on tax shelter promoters to a maximum of $1 million. 7) Stop tax shelter patents for “inventions designed to minimize, avoid, defer, or otherwise affect liability for Federal, State, local,o r foreign tax”. 8) Require hedge funds and c ompany formation agents to know their offshore clients. I wish to endorse the recommendations made by the Hon ourable Member for Fort Char lotte as articulated during his con tribution to the midyear budget debate on March 2, 2009. First, Mr Sears recommended t hat the “Government of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas lobby the United States to stop the passage of the Stop Tax Haven Abuse Bill by the United States House of Representatives and Senate and to educate the United States policy makers, media and public of the true n ature of the Bahamian financial industry and the collective commitment of The Bahamas to fight money laundering and the financing of terrorism.” His second recommendation was that the Bahamas Govern ment should “make an official protest against the practice by agents of the United States and other OECD member countries who undermine the legal process in The Bahamas by seeking to induce Bahamian financial institutions and professions to break the law. If the Government were to protest now, it would give The Bahamas a tactical advantage or the moral high ground, rather than raising them when The Bahamas is on the defensive or the object of an imminent threat.” “Third, the Government should promote the convening of a global forum on money laun dering and terrorist financing, under the auspices of the United Nations, leading to the formation of a global treaty. The purpose of the global forum will be to ensure that offshore jurisdictions, like The Bahamas, have a voice and place around the table in the prescription and application of the anti-money laundering and combating the financing of terrorism on a level playing field. Fourth, the Government, in partnership with the private sector, should invest in a policy research facility, at the College of The Bahamas, to conduct economic intelligence monitoring of the global economy and trends, to assess their impact on the financial services industry in The Bahamas and propose policy options to improve the competitiveness of the Bahamian juris diction as a centre of wealth man agement.” I wish to add that the Bahamas g overnment must formally protest the apparent illegal tactics of US a uthorities. They are not to directly approach any financial institution in the Bahamas, but to utilise the relevant government authorities in pursuit of cross-jurisdictional assistance in civil and criminal matters involving US citizens. Governments are elected by t he people to protect their interests of its people and therefore must be seen to demonstrate such a commitment and resolve. As the external threat to our second largest industry intensifies, the government must move proactively, transparently, and expeditiously to protect our dign ity, national sovereignty, and general way of life. ELCOTT COLEBY Nassau, March, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune . Press reports indicate that the National Insurance Board is on t he attack against businesses and individuals that have not paid their National Insurance premiums on behalf of their staff. One high profile case allegedly owes them over $400,000. Shocking to say the least. While the offenders should be p rosecuted to the full extent of t he law, if for no other reason t han to show that we are all accountable, no matter how high a nd mighty we might think we a re. However, there is a disconnect where the responsibility of the National Insurance Board/Government ends, and the requirements of individuals and businesses begins. In the private sector for examp le, insurance companies auto matically provide clients with a monthly or annual statement, yet w e get no statement from NIB. B anks automatically provide statements or passbooks that are easily updated, yet we get no statement from NIB. Pension companies automatically provide annual statements,y et we get no statement from N IB. Businesses automatically prov ide statements for charge accounts with additional copies of invoices, yet we get no state-m ent from NIB. And the list goes on. I f the NIB automatically sent statements to all of their account holders, would it be possible for o ffenders to mount up such huge debts without a co-conspirator in the NIB itself? So why does our nanny state not provide us with statements for our National Insurance cont ributions? Not only that, it puts the onus on businesses to keep their records indefinitely. This is a classic case of government knowing how inefficient they are so they pass a law to put the burden of proof on the opposite party and contravene the S tatute of Limitations normally seven years I think at t he same time. O f course only a government has the power to force its will like t hat. I have a suggestion though. The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce should solicit donat ions from its membership to sue the National Insurance Board/Government to make the NIB as accountable as everyone e lse is supposed to be. R ICK LOWE WeblogBahamas.com http://www.weblogbahamas.com h ttp://www.nassauinstitute.org C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm “THE broad mass of a nation,” wrote Hitler i n Mein Kampf, “will more easily fall victim to a big lie than to a small one.” I f the story now in circulation about the late Sir Lynden Pindling’s birth is a lie, then it is c ertainly a big lie and one that for more than 36 years has not only stuck, but is now the subject of national debate. All we know for certain is that Arnold Pindling, a Jamaican recruited for the BahamasP olice Force, was the late Sir Lynden’s father. They could not deny each other, because they l ooked so much alike. We always believed that Mrs. Viola Pindling, daughter of Captain Bain, a well-known Andros boat captain, was his mother. We had no reason to doubt this until one day in 1973 the phone on our desk rang. A v oice at the other end said it wanted to tip us off to the fact that then prime minister Pindlingw as not a Bahamian, but a “blankety-blank Jamaican.” Viola Bain Pindling was not his m other. It was alleged that he was born of a Jamaican woman, fathered by Arnold Pindling and adopted into the Pindling household. There was some question as to whether he was born in the Bahamas or in Jamaica. N ormally we would have dismissed this as information coming from a crank. But the fact t hat the “tip” had come right from the heart of the PLP caused us to start asking discrete ques t ions. The rumour spread like wildfire. We pub lished nothing, but continued our enquiries. Before Independence all Bahamians were citizens of the United Kingdom and Colonies. A fter Independence in 1973, the only persons who could claim Bahamian citizenship were t hose born in the Bahamas or naturalised. As government poked and probed into the private l ives of Bahamians, or persons who had always thought they were Bahamians, many lives were cruelly torn asunder especially families who did not profess to being PLP. It all came to a head when on September 19, 1973 Clarence Town MP Michael Lightbourn claimed on the floor of the House that “appar-e ntly” there was no record in the Registry of the prime minister’s birth on March 22, 1930 to his parents Arnold Franklin Pindling and Viola Melba Bain Pindling. M r Lightbourn was certain there was a logical explanation. He called on government to i nvestigate the status of all House and Senate members in view of former St Barnabas MP Sinclair Outten’s disclosure that he was born in Turks Island. Pandora’s box had been pried open. A week l ater prime minister Pindling called a press conference at which he not only abused Mr Light-b ourn, but denied his allegations. He produced a photo copy of his birth certificate which s howed a registration date of February 25, 1947 17 years after his date of birth. Asked for supporting affidavits, usually given by persons able to attest to the birth mother, nurse, doctor, close friend Sir Lynden said he was not pre p ared to go beyond the birth certificate. According to Sir Lynden it was discovered t hat his birth had not been registered when he was preparing to go away to school. Such discoveries were not unusual in New Providence, unlike the Family Islands, which kept near to perfect records of births and deaths. Nor was it u nusual to later swear affidavits to affirm a birth with supporting evidence to get it on ther egister. Mr Pindling was in difficulty. He did not b elong to a church that kept baptismal records. However, he said that there was a certain church that did have a record of his birth. Unfortunately, however, that church had since burned down, records and all. H is explanation was received with derision. He could not prove his birth other than to pre s ent a certificate attested to by his father, Arnold. T he PLP is noted for its vicious in-fighting. If anyone objected to a Pindling edict he was reviled, abused, and his reputation smeared. Eventually he was ostracised. Sir Lynden seemed to spend more time on p arty in-fighting and destroying his perceived enemies than governing the country. O ne only has to tune in to the Internet today to see how viciously the PLP are still tearing e ach other apart even their leader and former prime minister Perry Christie has been dis missed with the greatest disrespect. Dr Bernard Nottage, one of those defending Sir Lynden’s name last week, must remember how his reputation was butchered when he decided to run against Sir Lynden’s chosen successor for partyl eadership. As a result Dr Nottage left the PLP and started his own party. If this rumour about Sir Lynden’s birth is a lie, then it is one of Hitler’s big lies used tod amage Sir Lynden where he was known within his own party to be most vulnerable. I f a lie, it is a lie that has come back to haunt the party that gave it birth and to tarnish the myth that the PLP has since tried to build around the “Father of the Nation.” A suggestion for making the NIB more account able LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Pindling’s birth still questioned EDITOR, ThE Tribune . A letter to the editor was printed in your paper on Tuesday, March 10, from a Charles Carey of Harbour Island. I am not the author of that letter, nor did I submit it to The Tribune. Which leaves me to wonder if there has been some sort of a mixup? CHARLES CAREY Harbour Island, March 12, 2009 (Yes, there was an editorial mix up. The letter was written by a Mr Charles Carey, but not the Mr Charles Carey of Harbour Island. (The Tribune apologises for any embarrassment that this confusion has caused Mr Carey of Harbour Island. Ed). Mr Charles Carey: a disclaimer The threat to our Financial Services Sector EDITOR, The Tribune. Landscaping with the use of a large bucket bulldozer certainly is questionable and the results show themselves in what is left in a so-called state as having to be improved. Look at how the Environ mental health folk used a buck et-bulldozer on the front of the contested Chippingham land corner West Bay and Chippingham Road just push everything into the bush and leave ugliness. Again just before S G Hambros, West Bay the same treatment push the bush in and leave everything piled up far, far uglier than it was before. Who gave anyway the Environmental department the authority to go on private land and trespass and damage their property? Let’s try to be real yes we need to keep the bush line con trolled but let’s do the exercise in a way that we improve the visual, not make it look uglier. M DAWKINS Nassau, February 28, 2009. The ugly results of a bucket bulldozer

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORTA Grand Bahama man was airlifted to New Providence with serious spinal injuries following an altercation early Friday morning at the Bowling Alley. Asst Supt Clarence Reckley reported that Kenneth Rahming, a 37-year-old resident of Shipton Drive, sustained injuries which left him paralysed from the neck down. Rahming is detained at P rincess Margaret Hospital. A 3 7-year-old man is assisting police with their investigation into the matter. According to Mr Reckley, police received a grievous harm report around 3.45am on Friday that a man was injured in the parking lot of the Bowling Alley. When police arrived at the s cene, they were told that the v ictim had already been taken to hospital. Officers went to Rand Memorial Hospital and were told that the victim was suffering from serious injuries and was paralysed. Mr Reckley said police are expected to file charges early this week. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, F LIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!S TRUCKUM(DF55 n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net A SIGNIFICANT quantity of illegal drugs with a street value of over $13,000, along with several s tolen items, were seized by police on Saturday e vening. At about 10.05pm, police from AVIT (Anti-Vio lence Intervention Team) executed a search warrant at an apartment at Colony Club, where officers discovered seven pounds of suspected marijuana. ASP Reckley said the drugs have an estimated street value of $13,500. Additionally, he noted that police also discovered several items suspected of being stolen, including a 32-inch Sharp flat screen television, seven gold rings, two gold bracelets, one silver Brietlin watch, and an orange Bentley watch along with several pairs of earrings. The male occupant was taken into custody and arrested by police. Mr Reckley said police are appealing to the pub lic who may have had items stolen from them to report to the police station to identify their items. MOBILE Division officers found 15 live rounds of ammunition for a .22 weapon i n a magazine clip while p atrolling Blue Hill Road South near Garden Hills around 3.30am yesterday. No arrests have been m ade. Man airlifted to hospital after altercation at bowling alley Police find live ammunition Drugs, stolen items seized by police PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham, left, talks with Caricom chairman Dean Barrow, Prime Minister of Belize, at the 20th Inter-Sessional Meeting of the Caribbean Community held in Belize City, Belize, on Thursday. P h o t o C o u r t e s y o f t h e C a r i c o m S e c r e t a r i a t PMATCARIBBEANCOMMUNITYMEETING

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n By SIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a Consultant and former Caribbean diplomat) I N MYlast commentary entitled, “Tax Haven jurisdictions – Sitting Ducks and Scapegoats”, the point was made that British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and others, including Congressmen in the United States, are trying to pass the buck of responsibility for the global financial crisis to jurisdictions with offshore financial services, including those in the Caribbean. I had drawn attention to Brown’s statement to the US Congress on March 4th in which he said: “'But how much safer would everybody's savings be if the whole world finally came together to outlaw shadow banking systems and outlaw offshore tax havens?” The point is that Brown and others are ignoring completely the lax regulation in many of the countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD to poor banking and investment p ractices and the collapse of f inancial institutions that were considered “giants”, and they are trying to move the focus to offshore financial jurisdictions even though the financial institutions located in them were not responsible for the crisis. Many authoritative persons a nd organisations are not buying into the targeting of offshore financial centres as the culpable parties. On March 8th the British Financial Times newspaper said: “There is scant evidence that the offshore centres are to blame for financial turmoil. The UK Finan cial Services Authority told MPs last year that offshore centres had already undergone extensive regulatory reviews.” Then on March 10th ,the Chairman of the Confederation of British Industries, Martin Broughton, is reported to have said that “Gordon Brown’s focus on ‘red herring’ issues such as bank bonuses and tax havens risks turning next month’s summit of the Group of 20 nations into a catastrophe that fails to deal with the recession.” Broughton constructively said the G20 Summit, scheduled in London for April 2nd, “should focus on a global stimulus and undertakings to resist protectionism – including a pledge not to increase trade tariffs.” H e went on to say that it would be “nothing short of a cata strophe, when you’ve got an opportunity to make a difference, that you get bogged down” in issues that were “totally irrelevant” to resolving the current crisis. In an editorial on March 12th, the Financial Times did not hold out much hope for Broughton’s call. The prestigious newspaper said, “Asking a group of politicians not to make a meal of irrelevant but crowd-pleasing issues may be a forlorn call.” But the publication said he “is still right to have made it.” And, the editorial warned: “True, the odds look better for extra funding for the International Monetary Fund and easing the shortage of trade finance – but these are not the stuff to capture the imagina tion of the watching world. So the attraction of announcing some populist crackdowns could be great.” So, in circles that are expert and authoritative about global business and finance, the assault on offshore jurisdictions is seen as what Broughton called a “red herring.” But, it clearly is not going to stop those who are determined to shut them down because of the fear that they provide a haven for people and organisations who are evading tax. Two matters arise from this. The first is that both the United Kingdom and the United States are “tax havens.” Non-residents of these countries bank in them and invest in instruments that do not attract tax. Indeed, if both the US and the UK were to begin to tax the bank deposits and tax-free investments of nonresidents, the adverse effect on their financial systems would be significant to their economies. So there is a principle here that is being applied for Peter that is very different to the one being imposed on Paul. The second point is that jurisdictions with offshore financial services should not sit back idly because authoritative organisat ions and personalities have pointed to the unfairness of the assault on them by OECD governments. They do have to be active in making their case. The British Crown Dependencies and Overseas territories have begun to argue for what they call “a more discriminate approach.” Jersey, a large offshore financial centre, is reportedly sending a delegation to Washington on March 23rd to meet representatives of the new Obama administration. Undoubtedly, they have already been talking with officials in the United Kingdom. It is a shame that the 35 jurisdictions, named by the US Con gress in the ‘Stop the Tax Havens Abuse’ Act, are not all joining together to agree on common ground including standards and practices to which they will all adhere, and in making a common case to the US, the UK and other OECD countries. There can be few governments among the 35 jurisdictions which would not agree that, just as there is a case for better and tighter regulation and supervision of financial institutions in the OECD countries, so there is a need to do so in their own. But unfortunately, there appears to be no such harmony among them. Instead, some are trying to distance themselves from others by claiming that they are being “tarred with the same brush.” This lack of cohesion will weaken them and many will collapse in the process, hurt ing even further economies of small countries which are already hard-hit by the global financial crisis. In the Caribbean, there is yet to be a meeting of governments or representatives of financial institutions on this matter even though the G20 meeting to discuss “outlawing tax havens” is set for April. There have now been consistent calls for a region-wide body to be a supra-national regulator for financial services throughout the Caribbean Community and Common market (CARICOM It is a call that should be heeded not only to give an important layer of supervision of the sector but also as a strong tool in defense of their jurisdictions. C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Establish a Caribbean wide financial services regulator WORLDVIEW n SIRRonald Sanders

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 7 )25$/( n By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Grand B ahama Port Authority has identified three possible locat ions for the new fish market, but local fishermen will have to wait as the exact location will be determined at a later date. A ccording to reports, the Fishing Hole Road and West Atlantic Drive in the downt own area are some of the sites that are being considered. Port Authority officials met with local fish, conch,s eafood vendors for the second time this month to hear their feedback and input on t he new site. In a press release issued on Friday, Grand Bahama Port Authority president Ian Rolle said that “it is criticalt hat we determine the best location for the site to ensure the long term success of the market, and the positive impact that it will have ont he community.” Mr Hannes Babak, chairman of the Port Group Limited, along with the commit-t ee members responsible for the development of the new fish market, announced threep ossible locations for the site. Based on discussions with t he fishermen, the vast majority would like to see the new fish market in the down-t own area. THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (NEMA accepted a cheque donation from the B ahamas Christian Council (BCC The $4,000 donation was the second made by the Council. The first, a $10,000 donation, was made fol lowing Hurricane Ike which struck Inagua in September 2008. Commander Stephen Russell, director of NEMA accepted the funds on behalf of the Agency. Pictured from left are Bishop Gregory Minnis, trea surer, BCC; Rev Patrick Paul, president, BCC; Captain Russell; Michelle Gardiner, finance officer; NEMA; a nd Pastor Devon Rolle, BCC. Three possible locations for the new fish market K r i s t a a n H A I n g r a h a m I I / B I S NEMAACCEPTS CHEQUE FROM CHRISTIAN COUNCIL THEChristian Bookshop, one of the Bahamas’ oldest and most successful gospel retail outlets, has been named a sponsor of the 2009 Marlin Awards. President of the Marlin Awards Kevin Harris said, “We are extremely proud and honoured to have the Christian Bookshop, one of our country’s most faithful and well known religious retail establishments on board with us this year as one of our executive sponsors. It is because of the support and investment from companies like the Christian Bookshop that the Marlin Awards can continue in its mission to encourage excellence and growth in Bahamian and Caribbean Gospel Music.” The Marlin Awards will be held on Sunday March 29th at the Diplomat Centre. Tickets for this event will be $25 (General Seat ing) and $40 (VIP) and can be purchased from the Christian Bookshop. Our photo shows from left to right Stacie Walkine Christian Bookshop Manager, Gregory Sweeting Christian Bookshop President, Kevin Harris Marlin Awards Pres ident and Beryn Neely Marlin Awards CFO. Christian Bookshop is a Marlin A wards sponsor

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TWO Bahamians have been pro moted to senior management posit ions at the Wyndham Nassau Resort. R odney Bowe, an engineering and maintenance manager, was a ppointed Director of Facilities, while Tyrone Beneby, with fifteen years in hospitality, has been promoted to Director of Purchasing for the 550-room resort. The Wyndham is very pleased to have Beneby and Bowe joiningo ur senior management team and we look forward to being guided b y their expertise and the contri butions they will make to our resort,” managing director Jeffry Humes, said. Mr Bowe most recently served a s Lead Project Manager since 2006 and has lead the development ofn ew projects valued at over $6 million. The role of Director of Facilities is integral in any hotel. Rodney has displayed the leadership, knowledge and care necessary to take care of our property and its facili ties,” Mr Humes said. As Director of Facilities, Mr B owe will be responsible for the Wyndham’s engineering department, plant room and laundry operations. Congratulating Rodney on his appointment, Humes said “Rodn ey’s leadership and drive can only produce ongoing positive resultsf rom his team and his dedication to a job well done will definitely be c ontagious to all those around him.” Tyrone Beneby is no newcomer to the Wyndham Nassau Resort and has been an integral member of t heir management team since 2002. Over the last seven years, Benebye xcelled through the ranks of Director of Event Management and most r ecently, Director of Restaurants. In his new position as Director of Purchasing, Mr Beneby will be responsible for the purchasing and receiving divisions, storerooms and w arehouse. He will also oversee a staff of 15 managers and employees. I’ve seen many changes over the course of the years at the Wynd ham but we continue to improve our operations and execution. “I feel privileged to lead in this capacity and look forward to streamlining our procedures and policies and continuing to work with the senior management t eam to improve overall efficiencies at the Wyndham,” Mr Beneby said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE -RESSRUWXQLW\ RLQWKHURIHVVLRQDOHDP .HOVRHGLFDO/DERUDWRU\0 (',&$/(&+12/2*,67 ,QLWLDOO\DSDUWWLPHKUDPSRVLWLRQZKLFKPD\HYROYH LQWRDIXOOWLPHSRVLWLRQf:HDUHORRNLQJIRUDHGLFDO 7HFKQRORJLVWZLWK$6&3$07 RURWKHU%$07+3&DSSURYHG FHUWLFDWLRQ6NLOOVHTXLUHG* UHDW&XVWRPHUHUYLFHNLOOV 3URIHVVLRQDO$SSHDUDQFH (QHUJHWLFt(QWKXVLDVWLFHDPOD\HU *RRG&RPPXQLFDWLRQNLOOV ' HGLFDWHGWR+LJKWDQGDUGVLQWKHURIHVVLRQ & RPSXWHU/LWHUDWH ' HSHQGDEOH & RPSDVVLRQDWH &RPSOHWHV$VVLJQPHQWV6XEPLWHVXPHWR7KHDQDJHU.HOVRHGLFDO/DERUDWRU\ 3$YHQXH NHOVR#FRUDOZDYHFRP C OLLEGE of the Bahamas student Jeron Johnson is less than two months away from completing his associate’s degree and he is ready to make a difference in the tourism industry. T he young hospitality operations major is one of five College of The Bahamas students completing a three month internship programme at Sandals Royal Bahamian. I grew up knowing that one day I wanted to work in the tourism industry,” said Jeron. It was as a tenth grader at C C Sweeting Secondary High School that he was first introduced to tourism. “We had to select a programme that we were interested in and I selected tourism. The moreI learned about the field the more interested I became. I soon found out that t here’s more to the industry than pouring drinks or making beds.” “Since starting my internship, my liking h as increased even more,” he enthused. “So far, I have worked in the kitchen, gift s hop, cost control and receivings departments. Every department is completely different. The staff has been helpful andf riendly, answering questions and giving s uggestions.” Necausha Greene, a culinary arts major at the college says the staff would alwayss top to say hello or give a kind word. “I like the friendship and camaraderie everyo ne seems to share. I plan to work for a brief period before continuing my studies, and this is the environment that I wouldl ike to be in.” Michael James, General Manager at S andals Royal Bahamian says the internship serves two very important purposes. Not only do we welcome the opportunity to demonstrate what we do, but simultaneously, we invite the students to shares ome of their ideas with us,” he added. “These are young, bright minds that are bursting with fresh ideas and in some cases they offer valuable suggestions.” Mr James noted that while some of the s tudents have never held a job, the interns hip was vital in developing on the job and interpersonal skills. “It is encouraging t o move around and see them interacting with team members and guests. It shows their interest in being fully involvedi n our operation and they take their positions very seriously.” Ashlene Seraphim and Petra Hall, of C I Gibson Senior High School also participated in a one week work study at ther esort. THISPHOTO SHOWS Shawn Thompson, Sandals Storeroom Manager explaining the invent ory process to Jeron Johnson and Necausha Greene. COB student ready to make a difference in tourism industry Two senior management appointments at Wyndham Rodney Bowe Tyrone Beneby n CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. S PACEshuttle Discovery and its crew of seven rocketed into orbit Sunday evening, setting off on a space station construction m ission cut short by launch d elays that dragged on for more than a month, according to Associated Press. Discovery rose from its seas ide pad just as the sun was setting, a spectacular sight for a space agency anxious to get the f light going. As the shuttle sped away like a brilliant star, part of the launch plume glowed pink, peach and golden. The shuttle w as visible for several minutes. A hydrogen leak prevented Discovery from lifting off Wednesday and, before that, hydrogen valves kept the shuttleg rounded for weeks in February. Launch pad repairs took care of the leak, and the astronauts were able to board their spaceship and l ift off. S pace shuttle Discovery blasts off with crew of seven

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 9 The New C-ClassYour most enjoyable drive ever.The new C-Class is a pleasure to behold offering a new interpretation of driving pleasure. Its taut lines lend it an air of effortless superiority while the wide radiator grille and distinctive rear section announce a vehicle with a real presence and dynamic personality. Few cars can compete with its ability to adjust so many facets of its character from the interior to the drive technology so quickly and precisely in response toexternal conditions and your own particular needs. The key to this flexible response is the standard-fit Agility Control Package which includes selective damping. The interior offers noticeably more space and a more distinctive atmosphere tosuit your taste. As you will see, the new C-Class is the perfect embodiment of the Mercedes-Benz philosophy.Tyreflex Star MotorsWulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas, Tel 242.325.4961 Fax 242.323.4667OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY. NICHOLL’S TOWN – North A ndrosians took time out over the weekend to thank their international winter residents and celebrate music and the arts. A griculture and Marine Resources Minister Lawrence S ‘Larry’ Cartwright used the occasion to call for “greater linkages” b etween tourism and the handicraft and manufacturing indust ry. He urged Bahamians to stop b eing a people “caught in the l oop of dependency, always expecting others to provide jobs for us.” “Join with us as we combine o ur resourcesto transform our economy,” he said. M r Cartwright, MP for Long Island and Ragged Island, was g uest of honour in a weekend of Androsian cultural celebration. Also attending were permanent secretary Harrison Thompson and Bahamas Agriculturala nd Industrial Corporation (BAIC s on Key and his delegation. They were warmly welcomed b y administrator Dr Huntley Christie, domestic investment officer Alphonso Smith, and festivities organisers Clara Evans and Rev James Sweeting. Entertainment featured the North Andros High School junkanoo group, North Andros Primary School choir, Mastic P oint Primary School dance troupe, and the Royal Bahamas Police Force Pop Band. The 17th annual North Andros Music and Arts Festival at Seavi ew Park on Saturday showcased an array of products created using mainly ingredients found locally. T here were Red Bays’ unique silver palm weavings, Blanket Sound’s delicate shell work, and Nicholl’s Town’s coconut jewe llery with Chinese overtones by Perky Lightbourne. M r Cartwright noted that the interest in entrepreneurship w hich his ministry, through B AIC, has created, “has risen to a fever pitch.” “Stand tall and proud as Bahamians,” he said. “Grow and m anufacture Bahamian goods. Buy and consume Bahamian.” With the world’s financial mark ets in meltdown, there are “critical” lessons for Bahamians, he said. “We are challenged to be frug al and prudent in our expenditure, and to use the experience to retrain and reskill our people, while reinventing strategies and r e-engineering the engines of our economy for greater diversity,” s aid Mr Cartwright. He warned of “increased comp etitiveness” as Bahamians adjust t o “the bold and challenging new realities of the global economy.” He encouraged artisans to manufacture souvenirs “in great a bundance” as the demand “continues to outstrip supply.” N ORTH ANDROS P rimary School choir performs during the International Square Reunion celebration last Friday. G l a d s t o n e T h u r s t o n / B I S N ORTH ANDROS H igh School junkanoo group provided lively rhythms. A weekend of Androsian cultural celebration

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tourism industry would shrink by 9.8 per cent in 2009, in terms of real domestic product( GDP) growth. The WTTC also predicted the industry's total job levels would contract by 7.5 per cent. Y esterday Senator Vander pool-Wallace told The Tribune these predictions are based on last year's industry perfor mance and added that he is c onfident that new initiatives in place by the ministry will prove the dire forecast wrong. " The World Travel and Tourism Council can only forecast based on two things: number one, they quite rightly expect demand for travel tof all from our primary market. So, yes, the volume of business coming from the United States is going to go down and the World Bank has just saidt hat the global economy is going to contract this year so we understand that. "The second part of it is they're going to presume thatw hat we have been doing in the past we will continue to do in the future in the same environment. We don't intend to do that so we're going toe verything we can to prove that forecast wrong. Not saying flat out that it's going to bew rong but we certainly know what we have to do to make it better.” Cruise arrivals for January were up 26 per cent comparedt o the same period last year. This is evidence that visitors still see the country as a prime destination, but are looking for more economical vaca-t ions. “January of this year, we received more visitors to the Bahamas than any January in history. Most of those visitorsc ame by cruise ship what the customer is telling us is that the Bahamas is enormously attractive, but they are looking for value. “The cruise ship ist he best value of all and we are working to make certain the value for land-based vaca t ions become much more attractive.” One of the ministry's initia tives includes the launch of the all-inclusive Club GrandB ahama. "The customer now wants to know what's the total cost of my vacation up front instead of coming with just ano pen-ended chequebook," he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersf or the services described belowB iddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe &RUSRUDWLRQV$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ2IFH Blue Hill & Tucker Roads C ontact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 Tendersaretobeaddressedto: Mr. Kevin Basden General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: o norbefore26thMarch,2009 n o later than 4:00 p.m. S ubmissions should be marked as follows: Tender No. 688/09 %866,1*(59,&(6 &/,)721,(5:(5$7,21 The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals. For all inquiries regarding the tenders DQGVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW 0U$QWKRQ\)RUEHV at telephone 302-1165 carpenter everything. Just call on him and he'd be there,” she said. R ev C B Moss, pastor of Mount Olive Baptist Church, which is a few streets away from where the shooting occurred, said he was shocked by the killing. “It certainly shocked this community, it b eing a Sunday and being in he middle of the day. Like all inner-city communities we have incidents of violence but it's not normal to pull up on someone in broadd aylight and shoot his brains out. “If the incident happened in the dead of n ight that's one thing, but in the middle of the day practically in the middle of the street that's not something that goesd own easily." He described the victim as a person t rying to get his life on the right track. "Many people feel that he has been trying to correct himself from the courseh e was on. He has been engaged in a car wash business and auto-repair work. He w as gainfully employed and trying to straighten up his life." Rev Moss, head of civic organisation B ahamas Against Crime, said the shooting highlights the need for government and the private sector to work together tof ormulate crime solutions. "We are talking about bringing Miss U niverse here but unless we get crime and violence under control it's going to impact the economy. I'm calling on allp arties, especially corporate Bahamas they seem to be putting their heads in t he sand when it comes to crime.” To curb crime more alternative prog rammes are needed to foster positivity in the nation's youth, he said Meanwhile, an intensive investigation w as launched to establish the motive and to identify those responsible for this incident. Investigators are hoping witnesses will come forward and help catch the shooter. "This is a close-knit area and we are a sking persons to come forward," Asst Supt Walter Evans told reporters. Police are asking anyone who was in t he area when the shooting took place to contact 919, 502-9991, or 328-TIPS. Yesterday's killing brought total homicides to 15 for the year, Asst Supt Evans said. MARK 'SCABBY' DANIELS was found on the porch of a single-storey white and green wooden building where he reportedly worked as an auto-mechanic. F ROM page one Man shot dead in daylight attack T ourism initiatives ‘will prove gloomy forecast wrong’ FROM page one Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps y ou are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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The article by Tribune managing editor John Marquis entitled “The tragic young pilot who knew toom uch” told the story of the late Chauncey Tynes Jr., who went missing in 1983 while piloting a flight fromE xuma to Nassau. His father, Chauncey Tynes Sr, told The Tribune h e believed his son was murdered because he knew too m uch of the association between Sir Lynden and Lehder. P LP leader Perry Christie publicly condemned the stor y as “the vilest, the most vicious, the most scurrilous, and the sickest piece ofg arbage” he had ever read, and slammed Tynes’ claims a s “a tissue of lies, fantasies and tall tales.” Dr Donaldson pointed out t hat the drug trade is part of Bahamas history and Bahamians are suffering the consequences of the drug trade that occurred duringt he time of Sir Lynden. “There were more people who were a part of that his-t ory, so if they talk about Sir Lynden today and anotherp erson tomorrow, I would have no problem with that,” h e said. He said Bahamians were apparently not prepared toh ave a dispassionate discussion of history. We can’t confront the truth about anything difficult or anything that obvi-o usly has an effect on our ability to govern. I think it stems from this inability to deal with some of the embarrassing aspects of our existence before self-gover nance. “But I am not impressed b y the anger and anxiety sur rounding this. Like the old proverbs say ‘the wicked fleew hen no man pursues’. The people who are overly para n oid about the truth...you have to dig deep to find out where their paranoia comesf rom,” he said. Dr Donaldson, who e ntered the House of A ssembly at the 1967 election, said that what he admires most about other cultures is their willingness to allow other people tos tudy their history. “Suppose the Americans were too ashamed to let Europeans study their histo-r y of slavery or vice versa? The Americans discuss how (one of their foundingf athers) Thomas Jefferson had children with one of his s laves and have come to celebrate it. Suppose that was lost to history because peo-p le were not willing to discuss it because the man was dead?” D uring her contribution to the mid-term budget debate l ast week Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson suggested that it was time the Bahamass ecured its history by changing libel laws so that it would b e possible to defame the dead. Dr Donaldson suggested t hat Mrs Maynard-Gibson should “go back to the Europ eans who taught her law and ask them how come they chose not to include some-t hing so foolish as that in their libel laws. “She should ask these same people who taught her why they would not havet hought it was a worthy sug gestion.” “There are some who cel e brate Columbus as a hero on Columbus Day. There are those who choose to celebrate the day by holding a murder trial fort he man. “They believe he should b e tried in absentia. To assume that merely talking about something that hap p ened is an attempt to defame someone is foolish,” Dr Donaldson said. He said that while there are a number of persons whow ish to hold Sir Lynden up as something other than human, the fact is “the father of the nation” did have both faults and goodp oints. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 11 n bn n t b"b br"r tn tn btf TopofTheHillPlazaMackeyStreet1 2,300sq.ft.Retail...............2x4,050sq.ft. 1x4,200sq.ft. 1 2,000sq.ft.Warehouse......2x6,000sq.ft.TownCentreMallEastWestHighway&BlueHillRoad3,718sq.ftRetail...............1x1,118sq.ft. 1x1,200sq.ft.1 x1,400sq.ft. 20,000sq.ft.Ofce...............2x5,000sq.ft. 1 x10,000sq.ft.SeagrapesShoppingCentrePrinceCharlesDrive9,563sq.ft.Retail...............2x1,061sq.ft. 1 x1,591sq.ft. 1x1,750sq.ft. 1x1,790sq.ft. 1x 2,310sq.ft. t wo passengers inside. T he Jaws-of-Life had to be used to extract the occupants from t he crumpled vehicle. The driver received facial cuts, and a 22-year-old female rear seat passenger sustained injuries to the body. Both were taken to hospital where the driver is in serious condition and the female is listed as critical. A third person 16-year-old Godfrey Murphy of Sunset Park received facial burns and died at the scene, the ninth traffic fatality for the year. Police are also investigating another traffic accident which occurred in Rock Sound, Eleuthera, leaving a 56-year-old native dead. Police on the island identified the deceased as local handyman Edmund 'Beef' Symonette. Sometime before 7pm Saturday, he was driving on Queen's H ighway in Rock Sound when his white 2004 white Ford F-150 t ruck, licence T-3175, ran off the road and into some bushes. He was pronounced dead by a physician from Rock Sound. Up to press time the cause of the crash was unclear. Investigations are continuing. Teen dead, two others in hospital F ROM page one Former PLP parliamentarian is ‘not impressed’ by ‘anger’ over article in The Tribune FROM page one C hauncey Tynes Jr S ir Lynden Pindling n CARACAS, Venezuela PRESIDENTHugo Chavez said Sunday that Russian bombers would be welcome in Venezuela, but the socialist leader denied that his country would offer Moscow its territory for a military base, accord ing to Associated Press. Chavez a fierce critic of Washington with close ties to Russia and Cuba said his government did not raise the possibility, as Russian media had reported. “It’s not like that,” the president said, responding to a report by Interfax news agency quoting the chief of staff of Russia’s long range aviation, Maj. Gen. Anatoly Zhikharev, as saying some strategic bombers could be based on an island offered by Venezuela. Zhikharev reportedly said Saturday that Chavez had offered “a whole island with an airdrome, which we can use as a temporary base for strategic bombers.” Speaking during his weekly television and radio program, Chavez said he told Russian President Dmitry Medvedev that his nation’s bombers would be allowed to land in Venezuela if necessary, but no such plans have been made. Venezuela hosted two Russ ian Tu-160 bombers in September for training flights and joined Russian warships two months later for naval exercises in the Caribbean. “I told President Medvedev that any time Russia’s strategic aviation needs to make a stop in Venezuela as part of its strategic plans, Venezuela is available,” he said. Interfax also reported that Zhikharev said Russian bombers could be based in communist-led Cuba, but a Kremlin official said Zhikharev had been speaking hypothetically. Chavez: Russia jets welcome, but no V enezuela base

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersfor the services described belowBiddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe &RUSRUDWLRQV$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ2IFH Blue Hill & Tucker Roads Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 Tendersaretobeaddressedto: Mr. Kevin Basden General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: onorbefore26thMarch,2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. Submissions should be marked as follows: Tender No. 682/09 6725$*(7$1. &/($1,1*(59,&(6 &/,)721,(5:(5$7,21 TheCorporationreservestherighttoaccept or reject any or all proposals. For all inquiries regarding the tenders DQGVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236 ENGLAND'S Delon Armitage celebrates after scoring a try during the Six Nations international rugby union match against France at Twickenham stadium in London, Sunday March 15, 2009. RUGBY: SIXNATIONS T o m H e v e z i / A P P h o t o T o m H e v e z i / A P P h o t o T o m H e v e z i / A P P h o t o n MANCHESTER, England Liverpool routed Premier League leader Manchester United 4-1 on Saturday, coming from behind to revive its faltering title chase with its biggest win at Old Trafford in 73 years. Captain Steven Gerrard gave Liverpool the lead for good just before halftime after Fernando Torres tied the score following Cristiano Ronaldo’s penalty kick for United. “It was magnificent, a great team performance,” Gerrard said. The Reds’ first win at United in five years and manage r Rafa Benitez’s first was put beyond doubt in the last 15 minutes, with goals by Fabio Aurelio and Andrea Dossena as the defending champions were humiliated by their fiercest rival. This was United’s worst home defeat since a loss by the same score in 1992 against Queens Park Rangers. The club’s miserable afternoon was compounded when defender Nemanja Vidic was ejected for the second time this season against Liverpool. United is still four points ahead of Liverpool with a game in hand. Arsenal jumped into fourth place with a 4-0 victory over Blackburn, withA ndrei Arshavin scoring his first goal for the club since he move from Zenit St. Petersburg. T he Russian also had a second-minute shot deflect off Blackburn defender Andre Oijer for an own-goal. When his shot in the 87th was blocked by goalkeeper Paul Robinson, Emmanuel Eboue collected the ball to add the third goal. In other games, sixth-place Everton beat Stoke 3-1; Ful ham won 3-1 at Bolton; and Hull and Newcastle tied 1-1. Next-to-last Middlesbrough scored a last minute equalizer to tie Portsmouth 1-1, and W igan won 2-1 at Sunderland. Yesterday Chelsea beat Manchester City 1-0 to move within four points of Manches ter United in the Premier League standings on Sunday, and Tottenham beat Aston Villa 2-1 to climb into 11th place, its highest of the season. Michael Essien scored Chelsea’s 18th minute winner at Stamford Bridge with his second goal in two games as the Blues made it four league victories in a row since temporary coach Guus Hiddink replaced Luiz Felipe Scolari. Manchester United’s loss at home to Liverpool on Satur day has given the chasing teams hope of catching the Red Devils. Both Chelsea and Liverpool are four points behind the defending champion, which has a game in hand. “The door is a little bit open,” Hiddink said. “It gives them a blow and now all depends on their calmness. “Let’s see how they react in the coming games, but they have a lot of experience. “We have to keep winning.” Jermaine Jenas and Darren Bent fired goals past Brad Friedel, Villa’s American goalkeeper. John Carew replied in the 85th, but Spurs hung on for the victory, giving it 33 points from 21 games since Harry Redknapp replaced the fired Juande Ramos. Back then Tottenham was last with two points and now is up to halfway, six points above the relegation zone. n GLASGOW, Scotland Darren O’Dea and Aiden McGeady scored extra time goals to guide Celtic to a 2-0 victory over traditional rival Rangers in the Scottish League Cup final. After 90 minutes of goalless football at Hampden Park, O’Dea gave Celtic the lead in the first minute of extra time. McGeady added the second from the penalty spot in the 120th minute after he had been tripped by Kirk Broadfoot, who was ejected. It was the first time in 20 years that Celtic had beaten Rangers in a final, the last time being in the more prestigious Scottish Cup in 1989. Celtic now has 14 League Cup titles to Rangers’ record 25. n EUROPEAN SOCCERWRAP Liverpool rout Man United 4-1t o revive fading title hopes ENGLAND'S Mark Cueto, left, and Cedric Heymans of France battle for the ball during the Six Nations international rugby union match at Twickenham stadium in London, Sunday March 15, 2009. SEBASTIEN Chabal of France reacts during the Six Nations international rugby union match against England at Twickenham stadium in London, Sunday March 15, 2009. England swept aside recent troubles to beat France 34-10 at Twickenham. It was too late to salvage England’s RBS 6 Nations championship bid, but it brought a smile to manager Martin Johnson. "When we do what we did today we look like a good team," said Johnson. "That was great. "I don't think our intensity level was higher. Our precision level was better guys saw opportunities and took them. Tries came from wing Mark Cueto, centre Riki Flutey (2 back Delon Armitage and flanker Joe Worsley with stand-off Toby Flood converting three and adding a penalty before going off j ust before the interval with the score already 29-0. F rance’s second-half tries came from hooker Dimitri Szarzewsk i and wing Julien Malzieu. Their defeat means they are also out of the running for 6 Nations glory. The title instead goes to a straight head-to-head between defending champions Wales and Grand Slam-chasing Ireland in Cardiff next Saturday. England, who avoided a single sin-binning after 10 yellow cards in their previous four games, end their campaign at home to Scotland on the same day, while France, a shadow of the side which beat Wales two weekends ago and now defeated three times in a row by England, visit Italy. Martin Johnson said England’s victory left a “good feeling of satisfaction” in the changing roon. "When you lose you are going to get criticised you know that and defeat is a very realistic possibility when you are playing France, so it's great." France coach Marc Lievremont said: "We wanted to follow up what we did against Wales, but there was no game today. "Every coach knows the difficulties of playing at Twickenham, but I'm a bit disappointed. The start of the game was terrible for us. "We had a lot of turnovers, lost the ball in the contact, didn't contest on the floor and England got confident." Saturday’s 6 Nations results: Scotland 15, Ireland 22; Italy 15, Wales 20. England brush away woes to trounce France 34-10

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THE Baptist Sports Council continued its2009 Joyce M inus Basketball Classic on S aturday at the Baillou Hills S porting Complex with two of the previously undefeatedt eams losing ther first games of the season. In the men's president division, BIBA upset Tem-p le Fellowship 47-45, but Temple Fellowship knocked off Golden Gates 21-15 in t he 15-and-under division. A lso, Temple Fellowship got their second win in threeg ames as they held off Mercy Seat 33-29. Mercy Seatp layed a double header, but also lost 49-24 to the defend-i ng campions First Baptist, w ho improved to 3-1. In other games played, last y ear's 19-and-under runnersup Macedonia prevailed with a 34-32 win over FaithUnited. It was a double dose ofv ictory for Macedonia as their 15-and-under nipped Faith United 15-14. Latter-Day spoiled the debut of Pilgrim Temple men with a 38-33 win; Christ ian Tabernacle handed Bahamas Harvest a 38-26 l oss; Golden Gates knocked off Calvary Bible 43-26 and First Baptist won 36-28 over C ity of Praise. There was also a battle of t wo teams from the same c hurch playing each. In the 19-and-under dvision, Golden Gates No.1 out-lastedG olden Gates No.2 45-39 a nd Latter-Day A held onto a 41-35 win over Latter-Day N o.2. Here's a summary of some o f the games played: Men's Division Christian Tabernacle (2-0 Bahamas Harvest (1-2 do Bowleg 20 points in the win. Golden Gates (2-0 43, Calvary Bible (0-3 1 4 points in the win. First Baptist (2-036, City of Praise (1-2 BIBA (1-347, Temple Fellowship (3-1 i n the win. L atter-Day (2-138, Pilgrim (01) 33. Perez Thompson 17 in the win. 19-And-Under G olden Gates No.1 (2-145, Golden Gates No.2 (1-2 Temple Fellowship (2-133,M ercy Seat (0-5 Stubbs 12 points in the win.M acedonia (3-2 34, Faith Unite d (1-1 B rice 13 in the win. 15-And-Under Latter-Day A (3-241, LatterDay B (1-1 M acedonia (2-1 ed (1-2 t he win. Here’s a look at the schedule for Saturday: C ourt One 1 0 am Latter-Day No.2 vs Faith United (15a m Golden Gates vs Latter-Day Saints (15 vs Latter-Day (19 en Gates No.2 vs Mercy Seat( 19); 2 pm City of Praise vs Pilg rim (M Saints vs BIBA (M C ourt Two 10 am Macedonia vs Temple Fellowship (15 am Temple Fellowship vs Miracle Working COG (19 M acedonia vs Golden Gates (L 1 pm Golden Gates vs Christian T abernacle (M the Nazarene vs EvangelisticC enter (M hem vs Calvary Bible (M C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 13 THEBAPTISTSPORTSCOUNCIL: 2009 JOYCE MINUS BASKETBALL CLASSIC MARK Knowles and his I ndian partner Mahesh Bhupathi pulled off their opening doubles victory at the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California over thew eekend. The Bahamian-Indian duo, who are still rabked at number two in the world with 1425 points behind the American identical twin brothers of Bob and Mike Bryan (2595 opening match 7-5, 6-3. The tournament’s No.3 seeds defeated the unranked Russian team of Igor Kunit syn and Dmitry Tursunov. They will now await the win-ner between the teams of Max Mirnyi/Andy Ram against Martin Damm/Robert Lindstedt. The Bryans are the top seeds, followed by Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic. Primary school tourney THE Providence Basketball Association, headed by Kevin ‘KJ’ Johnson, will continue their first Phil Smith Primary School Basketball Tournament today at 3:30 pm at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. The tournament is attracting a number of private and government primary schools. The tournament got started on Saturday and will continue through Saturday. TeamsWLPct.GB Men's Vice President New Bethlehem201,000Golden Gates201,000Christian Tabernacle201,000Evangelistic Center11.5001 Church of Nazarene11.5001 Bahamas Harvest12.33311/2 Calvary Bible03.00021/2 TeamsWLPct.GB 19-And-Under Latter-Day Saints301,000First Baptist31.7501/2 Golden Gates21.6661 Temple Fellowship21.6661 Macedonia32.6001 Faith United11.50011/2 Golden Gates No.212.3332 Miracle Working COG12.3332 Mercy Seat05.0004 TeamsWLPct.GB 15-And-Under Temple Fellowship31.750Golden Gates21.6661/2 Macedonia21.6661/2 Latter-Day32.6001 Latter-Day No.211.5001 First Baptist22.5001 Faith United12.33311/2 Miracle Working COG12.33311/2 Zion South Beach03.00021/2 Previously undefeated teams lose first games of season TEAMSTANDINGS TeamsWLPct.GB Men's President First Baptist201,000Temple Fellowship31.7501/2 Latter-Day Saints21.6661/2 City of Praise12.33311/2 BIBA13.2502 Ebenezer01.00011/2 Pilgrim01.00011/2 SPORTSNOTES INDIA'S Mahesh Bhupathi, front, hits the ball watched by partner Mark Knowles of the Bahamas as they play Bob and Mike Bryan of the United States in the final of the Men's doubles at the Aus tralian Open Tennis Championship in Melbourne, Australia, Saturday, Jan. 31, 2009. A n d r e w B r o w n b i l l / A P P h o t o Knowles/ Bhupathi win opener T ennis Bask etball I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BIANCA ‘BB’ Stuart couldn’t ask for a better way to close out her collegiate indoor season. The Southern Illinois’ senior earned her second All-American honours when she cleared 21-feet, 2-inches for a fourth place at the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s National Championships over the weekend. The Queen’s College graduate was one of three Bahamians who took part in the meet that was held in College Station, Texas on the campus of Texas A & M where SIU’s Salukis ended up 11th in the team standings. Sophomore Cache Armbrister and freshman Nivea Smith, who are keeping the Auburn University connection alive, competed in the 200 metres. Both fell short of advancing to the final. Armbrister was 12th overall in 23.80 seconds after she placed third in the last of five heats. Smith, the Grand Bahamian native, followed in 13th spot in 23.90 after she also got third in heat four. Stuart, who had a brief moment to talk to the two young sprinters just before she went out to jump on Saturday, said she was really pleased with her performance. “It’s a great feeling. I’m very proud of myself,” said Stuart, was able to improve on her 13th place finish last year. “I’d take it. I can’t complain. I had a good series of jumps.” After opening up with a leap of 21-feet, 3/4-inches to take the initial lead, Stuart fouled her second attempt to fall into second place. On her third attempt, she leapt 207 to move into fourth place. She duplicated the feat to hang onto her position in the fourth round. But after fouling her fifth jump, she came back on her final attempt to nail her best jump of the meet to close out with her final position and was just 1/2-inch shy of at least tying for third place. “I fouled two jumps and I jumped 21 twice, so I felt great,” Stuart said. “I was a bit flat on the 20-foot jump, but I got it together and I was able to jump a little further on my last jump to keep me in fourth.” Winning the event was Eleni Kafourou of Boise State with a best of 21-5 1/4 on her fifth attempt. Jeomi Maduka of Cornell was second with 21-4 on her last jump and Rhonda Watkins of UCLA was third with 21-2 1/2 on her last attempt. All three competitors, like Stuart, are seniors. Stuart, who will celebrate her 21st birthday on May 17, said she’s now looking forward to the outdoor season. “I’m really looking forward to qualifying for the World Championships,” said Stuart, who missed making the trip to the Olympic Games last year in Beijing, China. She’s not sure exactly when she will begin her outdoor season. But she indicated that her coach Andre Scott has indicated that she will probably just run on the relay team when the Salukis get started next month. Stuart closes out with fourth place “Once we do what our coach (James Price defense a notch, there’s no way that the Cheetahs will be able to stop us.” Not only will the Cheetahs have to find a way to stop Rolle, but they also have to contain her backcourt running mate, Glenda Gilcud, who scored 17. And if that wasn’t enough, Janice Williams worked her way inside for 13 points, pulled down nine rebounds and came up with three block shots. Williams also had the dubious task of guarding Electro Telecom’s center Natasha Miller, who led the Cybots with 17 points, nine rebounds, two assists and a block. Electro Telecom, coached by Simone Sawyer, had a balanced scoring attack with Tiffany Wildgoose scoring 12 with three rebounds. Varel Davis and Tiffany Lewis both had 11 and Teneil Poitier contributed 10 in the loss. Davis, however, said they came out a little too flat, but they managed to pick up things in the second half as they rebounded from a 37-30 deficit at the break. “We have to try and contain their two guards and play defense,” said Davis of the Truckers’ 1-2 punch of Rolle and Gilcud. “Once we can do that and play defense, we should be able to win the series.” Davis came up with some clutch shots to keep Electro Telecom in the game. But each time they made a slight run, Rolle or Gilcud was able to get a fast break to stay ahead. The Truckers regrouped early in the fourth quarter to slowly pull away after trailing 53-48 at the end of the third quarter, thanks to a huge three-pointer from Davis with 2.0 seconds left on the clock. Lady Angels 57, Lady Cheetahs 54: Sharel Cash scored 16, Alexandria ‘Shaq’ Fernander had 14 and Chrishanda Kelly chipped in with 11 as Boomer G took game one. Sunshine Auto, who led 32-24 at the half, got a game high 17 from Linda Pierre, 13 from Audrey Martin and 10 from Anastacia Moul trie in the loss. Coaches 35, Officials 33: Kimberly Rolle, now an assistant coach with the College of the Bahamas Lady Caribs, remembered clearly when the game was on the line and she came up a big shot. She relived those days again when she went to the foul line and converted a pair of free throws with just 7.7 seconds left on the clock in the extra one minute to preserve the win. Rolle was fouled by Warren Butler, who had opened the OT with a three-pointer. Rolle responded immediately after Butler’s trey to hit one at the other end to set up the final seconds dramatic play. “It reminded me that basketball is for the young folks,” said Rolle, who haven’t played competitively in three years. “The first half was kind of rough, but we started to get it going in the second. In the overtime, it was smooth sailing.” Rolle led a team of coaches that included Mario Bowleg, Fredd ie Brown, Sharelle Cash, Randy Cunningham, James Price, Anthony Swaby and Jean ‘Bubbles’ Minus. The Officials included Butler, Anthony Williams, Rodney Johnson, Craig ‘Pepper’ Clark, Norman ‘Mooch’ Humes, James Dawkins, Devon Johnson and Mel Francis. “It was a good game, but I think some calling down the stretch beat the referees,” Johnson said. “I hope we can play them again. Next time we will beat them by 20.” TRUCKERS’ Glenda Gilcud lays the ball up. PHOTOS: Felip Major /T ribune staff ‘TRUCKERS’ Randell Rolle holds on to the ball as the Cybots Tiffany Wildgoose applies defence. Truckers take opener F ROM page 15 NEWPROVIDENCEWOMEN’S BASKETBALLASSOCIATION CHAMPIONSHIP COLLEGIATEINDOORSEASON CYBOTS’ Tenaj Cooper steals the ball. TRUCKERS’ Shantell Rolle lays the ball up. B IANCA BB’ Stuart in a file photo.

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T HE Johnson Lady Truckers served notice that they are prepared to defend their New Providence Women’s Basketball Association title. Playing in the first game of their best-of-three playoff series o n Saturday night at the DW D avis Gymnasium, the Truck e rs rolled past the Electro Telecom Cybots 78-69 to snatch the 1-0 lead. Also Saturday night, the Boomer G Swingers rallied to take their opener 57-54 over lasty ear’s runners-up Sunshine A uto Lady Cheetahs. Game two in both series will be played on Tuesday night with the third game, if necessary on Thursday. Also Saturday, the Coaches managed to beat the Officials 35-33 in overtime on a five points, including a nail biting three-pointer from former Lady Angels’ forward Kimberly Rolle. The Officials are hoping to t ake their frustration out on the Media when they square off on Saturday at 6:30 pm. For the Lady Truckers, Shantell Rolle led up the nets for a game high 31 points, shooting 9-of-15 from the field, 3-for-5 from the three-point arch and 10-11 from the free throw line. “We’re going to come out here on Tuesday and take game two and wait for the next series for the championship,” said a confident Rolle. C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 I NSIDE Six Nations Championship latest Truckers roll past the Cybots 78-69 TRUCKERS’ Glenda Gilcud drives past the defence of Cybots Tracey Lewis. PHOTO: Felip Major /Tribune staff n N EW PROVIDENCE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION CHAMPIONSHIP: FIRST GAME S EE page 14

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City Markets ‘read riot act’ over late financials n B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor AN attempt to obtain a court order appointing a public trustee for the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA failed at the first hurdle, the Court of Appeal backing a Supreme Court ruling that the non-profit trust bringing the action had no legal capacity to do so because it had not been properly incorporated. Outlining their reasons for disallowing the appeal broughtb y the Freeport Licensees and Property Owners Association, A ppeal Justices Osadebay, Longley and Blackman all found t hat the Association had failed to prove it had the “legal capacity as a body corporate” to initiate the action. This, they ruled, was because i t had not been granted a l icence for its incorporation under section 14 of the Companies Act, while no certificate C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information c ontained is from a t hird party and The T ribune can not be h eld responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.56 $3.56 $3.60 3*/ )%*3.# +,$0*!+**'-$ -/).#$)"+'$)"' $-/, "( *! . ))$-*,"*'!-*&$)"/+.# 1,(, 4 *,'**&.* 2+ ,$ ) )$"#.!$''1$.# ). ,.$)( ).$.$-'1$.#$)3*/,",-+*1) ,*! .#$-)'/-$ -,$)($$/(#$-.#*/"#.!/''3 *,. t",*/)!'**,#*( 1$.#*0 ,-$4 +.$*$'**).# .#.&$)"/*/,) ,-#$+) !$.-$'/ .*.# *)-$. +**'-"3(!$'$.$ -+,$0. '' .# )$.$ -*!.$-3*/,**,-. +*( ! ./, -*!.# #*( $)'/ "*/,( .&$.# ).$' !'**,-1'&$)'*.-'/-$0 '3*! ! , '.3$-.$)" '-**!! ,-)/( ,*!/)$.--+ -!*,-' !*,, ). n n t t f f r r t t f f n n b b b b n n r r f f n n t t n nr r b b n n r r bntn n n b b t t n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor B a hamian regulators have “read the riot act” to City Markets’ parent company over its failure to date to produce financial statements for fiscal 2008, a period that closed almost nine monthsa go, and have set imminent deadlines b y when these must be released. A highly-placed source, speaking to T ribune Business on condition of anonymity, told this newspaper: “The Securities Commission has been putting pressure on them. It has given the company deadlines, and is requiring certain things to happen by the end of next [this] week.” What exactly will happen by the deadline is uncertain. While release of the full audited financial statements is unlikely, a more plausible outcome is that Bahamas Supermarkets will be required to release unaudited management accounts – some thing minority investors and activists, such as financial adviser Richard Coulson, have long called for. Hillary Deveaux, the Securities Commission’s executive director, declined to comment when contacted about the situation surrounding Bahamas Supermarkets, parent company of the 12-strong City Markets chain, late last week. He has, though, in the past said the Bahamian capital markets regulator was “very concerned” about the now eightand-a-half month wait for Bahamas Supermarkets to produce its audited financial statements for the year-ended June 30, 2008. Tribune Business has been told that while the audit has been completed, its release has been delayed over whether the auditors, KPMG, will issue the ‘going concern’ qualification. This qualification to their audit report, if included, would ‘flag up’ their concerns over whether Bahamas Supermarkets would be able to continue operating as a material concern without further support from its shareholders. To avoid issuing this qualification, Tribune Business has been told that KPMG is seeking certain “pledges and guarantees”. What precisely it is seeking, and from whom, was not disclosed. But, at an educated guess, the auditors likely want Bahamas Supermarkets’ majority 78 per cent shareholder, BSL Holdings, and the investors that comprise the group, to guarantee items such as repayment of the $24 million Royal Bank of Canada loan and, possibly, to inject more equity capital into the business to boost cash n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor LOAN portfolio quality in the Bahamian commercial banking sector could continue deteriorating well “into next year”, a senior banking executive told Tribune Business, as the economic downturn and rising unemployment leave many borrowers unable to meet their obligations. Central Bank of the Bahamas data for the period to end-Jan uary 2009 revealed that total non-performing Bahamian commercial bank loans – meaning those more than 90 days past due then stood at $383 million, some 6.3 per cent of total outstanding loans. This percentage was slightly h igher than the 5 per cent level that Bahamian commercial banks had been hoping to con tain the non-performing loan average at. Total loans in arrears, according to the Central Bank, stood at $767 million or 12.7 per cent of the total port folio, with those between 31 and 90-days overdue standing at $384 million or some 6.36 per cent of the total. Anwer Sunderji, Fidelity Bank (Bahamas tive, told Tribune Business: “We fully expect that as the economy slows down and unemployment rises, the non-p erforming part of our loan portfolio will deteriorate, and we expect it to continue for sev eral months before it gets better.” When asked how long this deterioration might go on for, Mr Sunderji replied: “At a min imum, to the end of this year. But possibly into next year, because recovery of the Bank loan quality may not improve until ‘next year’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A PROPOSED $12 million poultry farm project for north Andros is awaiting resolution of environmental studies, the area’s MP has told Tribune Business, with his constituencyd esperately needing the 50 ini tial jobs it promises to dent an unemployment rate running at 15-20 per cent “minimum”. Vincent Peet, former minister of financial services and investments, said that getting the chicken farm off the ground would provide some economic “hope” for his constituents in north Andros and the Berry Islands, given that developments surrounding its main tourism project were “going from bad to worse” following its plunge into receivership. “The chicken farm, the poultry operation is still progressing,” Mr Peet told Tribune Business. “We’re still very eager to see if it goes. Most of the approvals have been granted; a couple are still awaited. Some are related to BEST [the Bahamas Environment, Science and Technology Commission]. “The environmental issues are being advanced, and if they can be resolved, we believe it might be a go. That will do a lot to create some hope and jobs.” The investors behind the poultry farm are understood to be a group of Canadians and Americans, some of whom have strong Bahamas connections.” Any investment would likely be welcome in north Andros at this time, given that Scotiabank (Bahamas so-called ‘anchor project’, the $250 million Chub Cay Club project, into receivership due to the non-repayment of a $45 million loan. Reflecting on that develop ment, Mr Peet said: “There’s really no good news, which is very, very sad, because we’ve had more than our share of bad news. It’s going from bad to worse. “As you would have known, over the years Chub Cay was the light, the only ray of hope for that area in terms of investment and job opportunities. Now where they are is having such a negative effect, not only on Chub Cay but north Andros. “It’s very bad for both islands. We are very severely challenged, and there has to be some glimmer of hope some $12m poultr y f ar m awaits environmental approval for go-ahead Port trustee attempt dismissed by court n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor FIRSTCaribbean suffered “some large one-off” increases in Bahamas-based non-performing loans during its 2008 financial year, the bank’s group annual report has revealed, with the Bahamian operation’s nonperforming loans increasing from 6 per cent to 8 per cent of its total portfolio. Analysing its group-wide financial performance for the Bank sustains ‘large one-off’ non-performing loan increases * FirstCaribbean’s Bahamas o perations sees nonp erforming loans rise f rom six per cent to eight p er cent of total portfolio * Above industry average, b ut nothing to suggest b ank in difficulty * Bahamian unit redeems $20m bond issue three years early * Securities Commission said to be ‘putting pressure’ on for some kind of disclosure, possibly as early as this week * Auditors looking for ‘guarantees’ to avoid going concern qualification * Chairman denies store closure speculation * Says 2008 net loss ‘in line’ with $10m forecast S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B Deveaux

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter INTERNATIONAL financial centres such as the Bahamas should not bow to US demands seeking greater information about their clients, according to an expert on the US economy. Michael LaFaive, who is director of fiscal policy at the MacKinac Centre for Public Policy in Michigan, told Tribune Business that the two largest socalled ‘tax havens’ in the world are Manhattan and Great Britain. He called those economies “hypocrites” for essentially attempting to ‘blacklist’ small island nations, who have financial institutions where individuals and organisations secure millions of untaxed dollars, while they do much the same. Mr LaFaive said the US and UK divulge no information to a foreign investor’s home countries when they bring millions, sometimes billions, to their economies. Other economic pundits have accused the US of using socalled ‘tax havens’ as a scapegoat for the current global economic crisis, citing hidden taxable dollars as one of the catalysts for the popped housing bubble. Since President Barack Obama’s succession to office, there h as been growing fear in small international financial centres that there will be another round of the ‘blacklisting’ that occurred in the 1990s. The US president is set to meet CARICOM heads at a summit in Trinidad next month. Conversation on the future of international financial centres is expected to be raised during the meetings. The Minister of State for Finance, Zhivargo Laing, told Tribune Business recently that this nation’s offshore financial services sector should remain vigilant and ever-watchful of the policies coming out of the US and Great Britain. “They now see an opportunity in the current crisis to ratchet up the ante, because if you can connect this global eco nomic crisis as severe as it may be to the activities of offshore financial centres, which makes no real logical sense, it does provide the kind of interna tional politics that might make feasible their efforts. “And so this is a continuation of an ongoing exercise, andI think it is something that has real significant implications for our financial services sector. I think it has to be pondered, considered and discussed,” said Mr Laing. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today !BSP Job #: CTS-9-N003 JM# 8634 Client: Comfort Suites Description: Stay In Paradise 1/4 pg Bleed: non Color: 1C Black Specs: PDFX1A Mech #3 Date: 2/25/2009 Time: 1:30 Mech Person: GUDimensions: 5.75in x 10.5 in Issue: Nassau Tribune 3/2/2009 Closing: 2/26/09 *$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. G u s U g a r t e 2 / 2 5 4 p m CTS-9-N003_NassauGuardian.indd 2 2/25/09 4:14:07 PM Bahamas urged not to bow to US over financial services To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas “ought to a ccelerate” ongoing moves to re-position its financial services industry on a “tax compliant, tax neutral and tax transparent” platform, a senior attor-n ey has told Tribune Business, and “implement greater cooperation in fiscal matters” giv-en the direction the G-20 group is moving in. John Delaney, managing partner at Higgs & Johnson, said that while the Bahamas’ i nternational financial services centre had never facilitated tax evasion by wealthy clients from t he major industrialized countries, this nation had to recognise the way the wind was blowing from Washington, Londona nd other key capitals. think the Bahamas has to contemplate, with a view to implementing greater co-oper-a tion on fiscal matters, given w hat appears to be further [moves] on that requirement by the international community – that there be greater co-operation in these matters,” MrD elaney told Tribune Business. We have to contemplate that, and have to look at implementing – in appropriate cases – greater co-operation in a manner that serves our interests.I ’ve said any number of times t hat the matter of tax information exchange for the Bahamas goes to a matter of trade relations, and ought not to be looked at as separate and iso lated from that. The Bahamas should approach such arrangements from the perspective of mutual benefit and if, indeed, it is nota lready doing so and has nothing in the pipeline from that p erspective, it is now urgent to get on with it. I think it’s criti c ally important that we make sure such arrangements provideb enefits to us.” Mr Delaney essentially a rgued that if the Bahamas was to sign more Tax Information E xchange Agreements (TIEAs in addition to the one it already h as with the US, it should seek corresponding benefits for its own economy that leave it at least as well off – if not better –t han before it signed such an agreement. He described the US agreement as “TIEA-plus”, given that it secured Qualified Juris diction (QJ Bahamas with respect to the Internal Revenue Service’s (IRS plus the convention tax break t hat boosted the Bahamian tourism industry. T he need to entertain greater co-operation on fiscal mattershas become more pressing for the Bahamas in the past few weeks. Apart from the wellpublicised Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act, and the Obama administration’s professed desire to crack down on socalled ‘tax havens’, the G-20 meeting in April is set to fleshout plans for a new global supervisory regime for financial services, in addition to broadening the anti-‘tax haven’ drive. Switzerland, Austria and Luxembourg all pledged greater co-operation on tax matters, and the clamp down on tax evasion, on Friday. Liechtenstein has already bowed to such pressure, while others such as Andorra, Bermu da, Jersey and Guernsey have indicated they will all follow suit. Given such momentum, the Bahamas could find itself dangerously isolated if it doesnot move in step in some fash ion. Mr Delaney, though, said the Bahamian financial services model had been evolving to one of tax compliance, transparency and neutrality for some time. “It has been evolving already,” he explained. “If we were to look at things, most particularly over the past 10 years but maybe a bit more,it has evolved. The business model today is a little different from what it was 10 years ago, and I expect it to evolve. “The Bahamas has been trending in that direction already, albeit the move in that direction ought to accelerate now towards tax compliant, tax neutral and tax transparent business.” Mr Delaney said the reciprocal benefits the Bahamas should seek from greater tax information co-operation would dependon the other country and bilat eral relationship involved. He said the Bahamas should address the situation from the bilateral perspective, not a mult ilateral one. Among the benefits this nation should seek, he said, were “favourable terms on a g ood or service the Bahamas needs”, or reduced withholding taxes on remittances sent back to this nation. Treaties regarding inward investment into the Bahamas, plus access to medical services and educational services for Bahamian students could also figure into the mix. As an example, Mr Delaney s aid that Canada’s 2007 Budg et included a provision that it would not tax the dividend dis-t ributions from subsidiaries of C anadian companies in foreign jurisdictions, which were remitted to their parents, if those nations signed TIEAs with it. S uch a benefit, Mr Delaney said, would encourage Canadian companies to set up subsidiary operations in such nations and switch away from t hose that did not have a signed TIEA with their governments. In such a case, greater tax cooperation could produce a competitive advantage – or at least m aintain one – when it came to attracting inward investment. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 3B T hursday,March19th@6PM DoctorsHospitalConferenceRoom RSVPSeatingisLimited302-4603 Nutrition Ronnell ‘Sandy’ SandsMarch 19 April 16 Total Joint Replacement Dr. Dane BoweMay 21 June 19 Ethics & Critical Care Dr. N’tari Darville DOCTORSHOSPITALDISTINGUISHEDLECTURESERIEST HISMONTHSTOPIC :SCHEDULEL ECTURESERIES Pleasejoinusasourguesteverythird Thursday of the month for this scintillating seriesofthemostrelevanthealthissues a ffectingsocietytoday.Purpose:Toeducate thepublicabout the importanthealthissues, p resented by distinguished p hysicians.Screenings:Get your Free Blood P ressure,Cholesterol, and Glucosetesting between 5pm&6pm.RSVP:To ensureavailable seatingPhone: 302-4603LECTURE DATE SPEAKER:Dr. N’tari DarvilleInternal Medicine Urinary Incontinence Dr.RobinRoberts Ethics&CriticalCare Bahamas urged to ‘accelerate’ financial sector re-positioning * Gathering G-20 storm indicates nation most move with more ‘urgency’ if not doing so on tax transparent, compliant and neutral platform * Attorney urges Bahamas to seek reciprocal economic benefits, given that tax information exchange expansion seems inevitable John Delaney

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T heDoctorsHospital D r.MeyerRassinFoundation P .O.Box N3018 • Nassau, N.P., The BahamasDR.MEYERRASSINF OUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS www.doctorshosp.com/foundationThe Doctors Hospital Dr. Meyer Rassin Foundation is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for scholarships & financial assistance for students pursuing healthcare careers. A pplicants must be Bahamian citizens & return to the Bahamas upon completion of their studies. Applicationsareavailableonour websiteat www.doctorshosp.com. Onlycompletedapplicationswithr equireddocumentationsubmitted wouldbeconsidered. D eadline for submission of completedapplicationforms&all supportingdocumentationis March31,2009. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .951.39Abaco Markets1.451.450.000.0700.00020.70.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.2440.26028.73.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3 .743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.24010.71.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.596.590.001,0000.4380.05015.00.76% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs1.311.430.120.1110.05212.93.64% 3.002.16Doctor's Hospital2.162.160.000.2400.0409.01.85% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.7940.40013.23.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.002,0220.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44321.3828Colina Money Market Fund1.44320.674.37 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.739711.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S19-Feb-09 9-Feb-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 28-Feb-09 6-Mar-09 31-Jan-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 813.80 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 12 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.28 | CHG 0.12 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -52.08 | YTD % -3.04BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following items: %XLOGLQJVWUXFWXUHH[WHULRUHQYHORSHH[WHULRUFDQRSLHVDQG UHODWHGVXEWUDGHSDFNDJHV *HQHUDO5HTXLUHPHQWVIRU*HQHUDO&RQWUDFWLQJVHUYLFHVIRU WKHRYHUDOOSURMHFWDQG &RQVWUXFWLRQ0DQDJHPHQW)HHIRUWHQGHULQJWKHEDODQFHRI VXEWUDGHDQGVXSSOLHUZRUNSDFNDJHVDWDODWHUGDWH The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e. mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are notincluded in this Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230 General Contractor in 2009. The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room located at the NAD Project office. TENDERC -230 General Contract, Stage 1Contact: TRACI BRISBYContract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project Ph: (24224217 P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs To advertise, call 502-2371

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n By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets IT was a quiet week in the B ahamian market, as investors traded in four out of the 25 listed securities. Of these, one stock declined in value and three remained unchanged. There were no advancers in the market last week. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 20,921 shares changed hands, representing a decrease of 20,024 shares or 49 per cent versus the previous week's trading volume of 4 0,945 shares. Commonwealth Bank (CBL for a second consecutive week with 11,536 shares trading, its stock falling by $0.03 to end the week at $6.56. F ocol Holdings (FCL 8,822 shares trade to end the week unchanged at $5.07. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T N o notes traded in the Bahamian market last week. C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S E E a a r r n n i i n n g g s s R R e e l l e e a a s s e e s s : : T here were no financial results reported by any of the 24-listed companies during the week. P P r r i i v v a a t t e e P P l l a a c c e e m m e e n n t t O O f f f f e e r r i i n n g g s s : : FOCOL Holdings (FCL announced it will be extending the deadline of its private p lacement offering. The pref erred shares will be paying a d ividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable semi-annually. D D i i v v i i d d e e n n d d s s N N o o t t e e : : C ommonwealth Bank (CBL of $0.05 per share, payable on March 31, 2009, to all shareholders of record date March 1 3, 2009. F inance Corporation of the Bahamas (FIN dividend of $0.13 per share, payable on March 30, 2009, to all shareholders of record date March 23, 2009. A A n n n n u u a a l l G G e e n n e e r r a a l l M M e e e e t t i i n n g g ( ( A A G G M M ) ) N N o o t t e e s s : : Focol Holdings (FCL announced it will hold its Annual General Meeting on Thursday, March 19, 2009, at 10.30am in the Boardroom at i ts Corporate Office in F reeport, Grand Bahama. Finance Corporation of the Bahamas (FIN will be holding its Annual G eneral Meeting on Thursday, M arch 19, 2009, at 6.30pm in the Governor's Ballroom at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 5B N O TICEThe payment of Long-Term Benefits and Assistance in New Providence for March 2009 will be made as follows: i)On T uesday , March 17, 2009, for pensioners whose funds are deposited to their bank accounts; and ii)Beginning Thursday , March 19, 2009,at the Board’s Fox Hill, Wulff Road and Jumbey Village Local Offices. Cheques may be collected from these offices between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Pensioners and/or their representatives are required to produce proper identification in order to collect their cheques. Acceptable forms of identification for Pensioners are the National Insurance Registration Card, together with any one of the following: 1.A Passport; 2.A Voters Card; or 3.Any other document which establishes, conclusively, the identity of the claimant. Where the Pensioner is sending a Representative to collect his/her cheque, the Representative should present an Authorization Form, completed by the Pensioner, or a letter from the Pensioner authorizing the Board to release his/her cheque. Additionally, the Representative should present any one of the above-listed items to identify himself/herself. Cheques will not be released to Representatives who fail to provide satisfactory identifying documents. Please Note:Pensioners born in March and September are now due for Verification. Failure to be verified on-time, will result in the suspension of payments. &20021:($/7+)+(%$+$0$6 *29(510(17,&( 7+(%$+$0$6(&+1,&$/t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f7KH&RQWUDFWZLOOEHDZDUGHGWRWKHDSSOLFDQWSURYLGLQJ WKHPRVWHFRQRPLFDODQGDFFHSWDEOH7HQGHUIRUWKHIXOOGXUDWLRQRIWKH FRQWUDFWSHULRG ,QWHUHVWHG%LGGHUVPD\LQVSHFWFDPSXVHVEHWZHHQWKHKRXUV RIWR0RQGD\WKURXJK)ULGD\&ROOHFWLRQRIWKH VSHFLFDWLRQDQGELGGLQJGRFXPHQWVFDQEHREWDLQHGIURPWKH5HFHSWLRQ 'HVNDW%2OG7UDLORDGEHWZHHQWKHKRXUVRI 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To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today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t&2 $WWRUQH\VIRUWKH([HFXWRU 5XVW\%HWKHO'ULYH 1DVVDX%DKDPDV Bank loan quality may not improve until ‘next year’ Bahamian economy is so contingent on the recovery of the US economy.” Much, he said, was riding on the impact President Obama’s stimulus package made, and whether it restored consumer confidence and spending by reversing unemployment increases and fears of further job losses. “It’s very hard to predict. We are uncharted waters,” Mr Sunderji said. “I think employment is likely to be sluggish, and we may not have these dramatic cuts we have seen. There’s some resiliency there that we’re seeing.” The Central Bank reported that the mortgage arrears rate rose slightly in January, going from 13.24 per cent in December 2008 to 13.51 per cent in January 2009. The rate of arrears for consumer loans i ncreased slightly month-overm onth, from 10.82 per cent to 10.88 per cent, but commercial loan arrears – most probably due to a seasonal spending boost – fell from 15.51 per cent to 15.3 per cent after suffering “the most marked deterioration during 2008”. For January 2009, Bahamian dollar credit contracted yearover-year by $52.9 million, with consumer credit falling by $15.8 million and residential mortgage growth declining slightlyt o $11.5 million. Private credit for other areas, including businesses, fell by $10.8 million. Analysing consumer lending trends for 2008, the Central Bank said net lending for debt consolidation and the restructuring of existing loans “advanced three-fold to $98.3 million”. Credit card debt rose by $37.4 million, while net repayment increases of $9.4 mil lion were seen for automobile loans. Home improvement loans declined by $8.4 million. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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of incorporation for the Freeport Licensees and Property Owners Association had been issued by the RegistrarGeneral. Recalling the case’s background, Justice Osadebay said the Freeport Licensees and Property Owners Association, a company incorporated by attorneys Rawle Maynard and Maurice Glinton, then-Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce president Christopher Lowe, and Don Martin, had filed their initial summons on March 30, 2007. The Association, in its summons, was described as a “non-profit trust incorporated under the provisions of the Companies Act 1992”. In a subsequent summons on June 21, 2007, the Association sought a court order appointing a public trustee as custodian of the GBPA under the Public Trustee Act, with powers to also safeguard the assets of its Port Group Ltd affiliate and parent, Intercontinental Diversified Corporation (IDC Alternatively, the Association also sought an order appointing a receiver for the three companies should the then-receivers, Clifford and Myles Culmer, be removed. In reply, the three respondents – the GBPA, the Prime Minister and the Attorney-General – all challenged the Association’s ability to bring and sustain the action as a corporate entity in its own name. In essence, they challenged whether it had been properly incorporated, and asked the Supreme Court to determine this as a preliminary issue. After the Association had challenged Graham, Thompson & Co’s ability to act as attorneys for the GBPA, which was then in court-appointed receivership, Justice Adderley heard the preliminary issues in early January 2008. He ruled that the Association “was not an incorporated body under the provisions of the Companies Act 1992, or the law.. and as such, did not possess the requisite juristic personality or capacity to maintain the action in its name”. The action was dismissed, but Mr Glinton, also representing the Association, appealed on several ground. He argued that Justice Adderley had been wrong to determine the preliminary issues first, and that he had been incorrect in finding that the Freeport Licensees and Property Owners Association had not been incorporated properly. Robert Adams, representing the GBPA, and Loren Klein, representing the Prime Minister and Attorney-General, argued in support of Mr Adderley. “They submitted that there was no dispute that, at the time of the commencement of these proceedings, no certificate of incorporation under the Companies Act 1992 had been issued to the appellant by the Registrar General, and there was no dispute that a licence authorising the appellant to be incorporated without the use of the word ‘Limited’ in its name had not been issued by the minister responsible under the Companies Act,” Justice Osadebay recorded. In his ruling, Justice Longley recalled how Mr Glinton sent the Association’s Memorandum and Articles of Association to the Registrar General, for incorporation as a limited liability company, on November 30, 2006. To be incorporated as such a company, without the use of the word ‘limited’, the Attorney General’s permission is needed. “By letter dated February 2007, the Deputy Registrar General advised Mr Glinton of certain concerns raised by the Attorney General as to whether the application to be registered as a non-profit trust without the use of the word ‘Limited’ in its name fell squarely within the provisions of the Act, and requested counsel’s opinion as to why he thought that it did,” Justice Longley found. In his February 5, 2007, reply, Mr Glinton said the request for extra material was “unwarranted and unreasonable”, and suggested it was required for some “ulterior” motive not in accordance with the law. “Apart from anything else, it is clear that Mr Glinton was of the view that his client’s application in the form presented satisfied the requirements of the Act for the issuance of the Attorney General’s licence, and there was therefore no need for additional information to be supplied,” Justice Longley recalled. “His letter ended with a threat to have the matter resolved by the Supreme Court if there was persistence in the request for additional information which the appellant had no intention of supplying.” The Registrar General, though, returned the Memorandum and Articles of Association for the Association to Mr Glinton on March 7, 2007, explaining why the licence application was not granted. No certificate of incorporation was ever issued for the Association, which initiated its original summons three weeks later. None of this appeared to cut much ice with the Court of Appeal, Justice Osadebay finding that the Association’s existence as a corporate body, capable of legally initiating and maintaining the action in its name, needed to be determined before any other issue was resolved. As for the incorporation issue, Justice Osadebay ruled that the burden of proof was on the Freeport Licensees and Property Owners Association to prove it was a corporate body. He ruled that the Association’s core argument appeared to be that the receipt of its Memorandum and Articles of Association by the Registrar General, together with the application, entitled it to operate even though it had been issued with no licence or certificate of incorporation. Stating that this was inconsistent with the Companies Act, Justice Osadebay ruled: “The burden was on the appellant to establish its legal capacity as a body corporate to bring this action. That burden, in my view, was not discharged. “I found no fault with the learned judge’s interpretation of the provisions of the Companies Act 1992 relating to the incorporation of companies. The learned judge was correct in striking out the originating summons and dismissing the action.” Justice Longley agreed, finding that a certificate of incorporation was a necessary “precondition” for a company to exist. Otherwise, it has no capacity to sue or carry on a legal action. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 7B Port trustee attempt dismissed by court F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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where.” Describing his constituency’s economy as “very depressed”, Mr Peet added: “The only semblance of any employment now in north Andros is agriculture, where many of the residents are resorting to farming in the back of their yards or on acreage nearby. “The agricultural industry is one thing that a lot of locals are going into. Fishing is very challenged. The fishermen in my area have had very little succ ess in getting their fish sold b ecause of the economic downt urn. Agriculture is the only answer in the short-term.” Mr Peet said the unemployment situation in his constituency, and in many Family Islands, was “much worse” than the 12.1 per cent and 14 per cent-plus rates recently recorded by the Department of Statistics for New Providence and Grand Bahama respectively. Describing those statistics as “sugar coated”, and not reflect ive of the rising number of discouraged workers not even seeking jobs, Mr Peet said unemployment in many Family Islands and his constituency stood at 15-20 per cent “minimum”. He also urged the Government to provide an update on the Bond’s Cay project, which is backed by Colombian singer Shakira, and was approved just prior to the 2007 general election. “I’m at a loss to figure out what’s happening with that, but t hat would go a long way in cert ainly providing some hope for t hat part of the Bahamas – the Berry Islands and Andros,” Mr Peet said. “We have a situation here where there needs to be some relief, because the area desperately needs it. “Social services is extremely challenged because the demand is so great. We’re trying to pull together and see how we can keep hope alive. But it’s extremely challenging. There has to be relief; urgent relief, b efore things get even worse.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the Audited Accounts from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas Limited, P.O. Box N-7788, West Bay Street, Nassau, The Bahamas. $12m poultry farm awaits environmental approval for go-ahead To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 9B City Markets ‘read riot act’ over late financials flow/finance payments to suppliers. Bahamian publicly-listed companies are expected to publish their year-end financial statements within 120 days (four months) of the period-end. In Bahamas Supermarkets’ case, that was October 31, 2008, but it is now more than four months’ past that date with no sign of any figures forthcoming. The City Markets’ parent has also missed the deadline for publishing its fiscal 2009 first quarter financials, which should have been released by year-end 2008, as quarterly reports are supposed to be disseminated at least 90 days after the period closes. The absence of accurate, timely financial information has caused increasing frustration among Bahamas Supermarkets’ estimated 1,500 minority shareh olders – both institutional and retail – who collectively own a 22 per cent stake. Tribune Business understands that a minority investor group is still assessing whether there are strong enough legal grounds, under the Companies Act, to launch a class actiontype lawsuit against Bahamas Supermarkets and its Board. It is thought that they are delaying any move until publication of the fiscal 2008 financials. The Securities Commission is also understood to be frustrated about what it views as its minimal powers, under the present Securities Industry Act, to make Bahamas Supermarkets comply. In the past, Mr Deveaux h as told Tribune Business it had t o rely on moral suasion and other limited processes. As a result, this newspaper understands that the Bahamian capital markets regulator is pushing for all Bahamian ‘public’ companies to be listed on the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX doing away with the ‘over-thecounter’ market where the likes of Bahamas Supermarkets and RND Holdings are currently listed. This would have the effect of placing these companies under a further level of regulation, namely BISX’s Rules. One way to encourage this move, Tribune Business has been told, is for the Government to enforce the payment of Stamp Tax for all transactions of public company shares where the stock is not listed on BISX. Given the information vacuum created by Bahamas Supermarkets’ failure to make timely disclosure of its financial statements, it is not surprising that rumours and speculation concerning the company’s health continue to swirl. The latest one, swiftly denied by Bahamas Supermarkets’ e xecutives, was that the comp any planned to close four stores – Independence Drive, Village Road, Rosetta Street in Palmdale, and Eight Mile Rock in Grand Bahama. Both Basil Sands, Bahamas Supermarkets’ chairman, and J Barrie Farrington, a fellow Board director, were adamant that no decision regarding store closures had been taken. However, both acknowledged that directors and management were constantly assessing the 12-store portfolio to ensure each one was pulling its weight. “There’s nothing to that,” Mr Sands said of closure speculation. “The truth is, like any business and especially in this environment, we evaluate all the stores, and if any of the stores need to be shut down, we’ll do so. But no decision has been taken. We’re not closing down any stores.” Mr Farrington, who chairs the Board at majority shareholder BSL Holdings, added: “No decision has been taken on anything. It’s just a matter of looking at business operations to look at viability, but no such decision has been taken. It’s still a matter of directors and mana gers assessing the business.” W hen asked whether this meant that Bahamas Supermarkets was constantly evaluating all its stores to ensure none represented a drain on the company, Mr Farrington replied: “I think that’s a fair comment, and that’s not to create uncertainty, but operating in this particular climate, much like any business, we must examine the contribution each is making to the whole.” Meanwhile, Mr Sands said he hoped the audited financial statements for fiscal 2008 would be published “very, very soon”, although he could not give a precise date. He also declined to comment on the reasons for the delayed release. “We’re just dealing with matters with the auditors at the moment,” Mr Sands said, “but all the accounts are finished. I can’t say whether they’ll be released next week, but they should be released soon. “I don’t want to give the impression we’re having problems with the auditors, but we’re working to sort out some things before we release them [the financial statements] to the public.” A lthough declining to give f igures, Mr Sands said the fiscal 2008 results were “in line” with the previously forecast $10 million net loss. “All I can say is that we forecast at least a $10 million loss, and it’s around $10 million,” he added. Several observers with intimate City Markets knowledge also told Tribune Business they would be surprised if the company closed down the store locations claimed, in particular Rosetta Street, which had always done “brisk business”. One source, recalling the last years of Winn-Dixie ownership, told this newspaper: “All the store locations were profitable. There was not a single location where they were losing money, although one store in Grand Bahama, at Eight Mile Rock, was marginally profitable.” Investors in BSL Holdings, the buyout consortium that acquired majority ownership of Bahamas Supermarkets from Winn-Dixie for $54 million in summer 2006, include the hotel industry pension funds, RoyalFidelity’s private equity arm, and private investors such as Craig Symonette and the late Franklyn Butler. T he group’s largest investor, t hough, is Trinidadian conglomerate Neal & Massey, which inherited at least a 40 per cent BSL Holdings stake through its acquisition of Barbados Shipping & Trading (BS&T the management/operating partner for City Markets, having taken over the running of all operations. BSL Holdings has already injected at least $10 million in new equity capital into Bahamas Supermarkets. Neal & Massey led the way with $5 million last summer, and the Bahamian investors followed suite with a matching amount – split into two $3 million and $2 million tranches. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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f 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV year to October 31, 2008, the Barbados-headquartered bank said loan loss expenses were up $15 million or 88 per cent yearover-year, which it attributed partly to “increases in specific non-performing loans, with some large one-offs in the Bahamas geographic segment”. These loans, and the borrowers’ identities, were not revealed. But the analysis on FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas loss expenses were significantly higher than the prior year by $11 million or 89 per cent, due primarily to the overall increase in loan volumes, which increases the inherent risk provisions, as well as increases in specific non-performing loans. “The ratio of loan loss expenses to gross loans has consequently increased from 0.5 per cent in the prior year to 0.89 per cent at the end of this year, w ith an increase in the ratio of n on-performing loans to total l oans from 6 per cent to 8 per cent.” The latter figure puts FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas commercial banking industry’s average for non-performing loans, which at end-January 2009 stood at 6.3 per cent, according to the Central Bank of the Bahamas. But in this somewhat hysterical environment, following C LICO (Bahamas into liquidation and the rumours that provoked a run on FirstCaribbean deposits in Freeport, Tribune Business again feels it is worth emphasizing that the bank remains financially sound. Creditors and d epositors need not panic, as t here is nothing to suggest FirstC aribbean will fail. It remains highly profitable, and enjoys the capital support of both its Barbados parent and that bank’s 90 per cent majority owner, Canadian bank CIBC. The FirstCaribbean parent’s annual report also revealed that, during fiscal 2008, the Bahamian subsidiary repaid the full outstanding $20 million principal on the corporate bonds it issued in November 2006. A note to the financial statements indicated these bonds were repaid some three years before they were due to mature. The statements said: “In November 2006, the group issues unsubordinated term redeemable floating rate notes w ith a face value of $20 million t hrough its Bahamas subsidiary, d ue November 2011. These notes were repaid in full during the year. “Interest on the notes was payable at a rate of Bahamas Prime plus 0.75 per cent per annum. The average effective interest rate during 2008 was 6.3 per cent.” Elsewhere, the report said the 24 per cent or $26 million decline in FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas i ncome, from $109.858 million the prior year to $83.9 million, was driven primarily by lower operating income and “higher loan loss expenses”. The latter rose from $12.34 million in fiscal 2007 to $23.35 million in 2008. The Bahamian operation’s g ross loans to borrowers stood a t $2.6 billion at year-end, an i ncrease of $133 million or 5 per cent year-over-year. Some $111 million of this increase came in the Bahamas (the remainder being in Turks & Caicos), and originated mainly from the bank’s corporate, capital markets and wealth management subsidiaries. FirstCaribbean also pointed out that its Bahamian subsidiary benefited from an $8.2 million one-time gain in 2007 due to a c hange in its group benefits policy. Stripping this out, the decline in net income would only have been $17.7 million or 17 per cent. FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas ating income (all its non-interest r evenue sources) fall by 50 per c ent or $16.1 million to $16.018 m illion, compared to $32.143 million the year before. In an e-mailed reply to Tribune Business’s questions, Sharon Brown, FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas managing director, said: “Net trading income from foreign exchange transactions increased by $12.9 million, or 99 per cent. Translation losses increased to $12.9 million froma gain of $1 million in the preBank sustains ‘large one-off’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 11B /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV vious year. Similarly, losses from interest rate instruments also increased markedly, from $5.6 million in the previous year to $20.1 million in fiscal 2008. “As discussed in previous quarterly reports, these changes reflect the weakened performance of the bank's trading i nvestment portfolio, and hedgi ng relationships which were s everely impacted by the effect of the US economic downturn on market values, interest rates and credit spreads.” Meanwhile, FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas also saw a $7.2 million, or 12.7 per cent, increase in operating expenses during fiscal 2008 compared to the previous year. Ms Brown told Tribune Business that staff costs were the “primary driver” behind this rise, having risen by $9.2 million or 33.3 per cent “due mainly to accounting for retirement benefits”. She further explained: “In the previous year, the Bank recorded an isolated one-off curtailment gain totalling $8.2 million. Excluding the one-off fiscal 2007 gain, staff costs for the year would have been $36 million, and the year-over-year change would have been an increase of $1 million, or 2.9 per cent. Similarly, the total operating expenses would have decreased by $1 million from the prior year, or 1.5 per cent. “Remuneration expenses remained well contained. The net increase was 1.1 per cent, and primarily reflects contracted increases.Pension costs, excluding other post retirement benefits, increased approximately $ 1 million over the prior year. Other staff costs were flat. “Occupancy and maintenance expenses decreased by $2.5 million, or 31.4 per cent, year-over-year. The change reflects a reduction in IT contract maintenance costs. Other operating expenses increased $1.3 million, or 9 per cent, primarily due to an increase in professional fees. “The efficiency ratio-operating expenses as a percentage of total Revenues increased to 37.5 per cent in fiscal 2008 from 31.8 per cent in fiscal 2007. Excluding the effect of the curtailment gain in fiscal 2007, the efficiency ratio would be 36.4 per cent, and the year-overyear change for fiscal 2008 would be a modest 3 per cent increase.” FirstCaribbean’s Bahamian operation saw its net interest income increase by $8.4 million or 6 per cent year-over-year, due to improved spreads and reduced interest expenses. The latter offset a drop in interest income. The bank said interest income fell because of “lower average volumes and yields for interest lines, but mainly due to lower yields for loans and cash placements, and due to lower average volumes for investments”. Interest expense fell because FirstCaribbean had to pay less on the deposits it attracted. Total deposits fell by $223 million or 6 per cent to $3.4 billion, the reductions being felt particularly in the retail, corporate and wealth management sections of the bank. Investments fell by $0.6 billion or 36 per cent year-over-year to $1.1 billion, due to market value declines and reduced holdings in FirstCaribbean’s trading and non-trading portfolios. non-performing loan increases To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 B B

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter STIMULUS packages are unproven when it comes to spurring economic growth, but capital works projects such as road works and infrastructure upgrades, as the Bahamas has initiated, are sound investments for taxpayer dollars, according to an economics expert. Michael LaFaive, director of fiscal policy at the MacKinac Centre for Public Policy in Michigan, suggested the Bahamian government was focusing public money in the right direction. “If the Government is going to do anything that has a net impact on the economy, it’s basic infrastructure; roads, bridges and sewers,” he said. “There is a mountain of evidence that purposeful, government-directed economic development planning programmes, fail to live up to expectations. “Rather than embrace more of the same, it is my hope that Puerto Ricans, Americans and Bahamians actually work to remove obstacles to economic freedom and association and trade, and let a diversified people, with diversified interests, invest and consume as they see fit.” Mr LaFaive said economic development incentives have little impact on firm location and investment decisions. Therefore, if the Bahamas was to follow the US model for an economic recovery plan, it would have displaced huge sums of money that, according to Mr LaFaive, would have negligible economic impact in the long term. Many cynics who criticise the Government’s “social safety net” have accused it of not doing enough to curb the impact of the global recession on the Bahamian economy. Mr Lafaive’s argument favors governments marrying sound investments, such as infrastructure upgrades, with policy amendments. He said there was not much that can be done in the shorterm, but to focus on retooling policies that might hinder economic growth. “For government to say ‘I’m going to stimulate economic growth in this area’, it would first have to suppress it in another or a bunch of little other areas that probably add up to no net gain in employment or economic growth,” he said. “Like other nations at this moment in economic history, the Bahamas should be concerned about sustaining economic growth of any type right now, never mind micromanagi ng growth in narrowly targeted industriesdu-jour favored by government central planners,” he said. Rick Lowe, vice-president of the Nassau Institute, a Bahamian economic think-tank, said he was glad the Government was not following the economic rescue model of the US. “The best the Government can do is encourage an environment that makes investors want to invest, and that doesn’t necessarily mean taking taxpayer dollars to give to somebody else. My point is they should stimulate everybody or nobody,” he said. “What I find happens is that when governments convince us that they have the answer to everything, we give up initiative. Its’ human nature. “We just throw in the towel and say: ‘Oh well, the Government is doing it, so why should we bother’.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Only Only $995 $995TOSHIBA TOSHIBA NOTEBOOK NOTEBOOK DEAL! DEAL!PURCHASE NOW & RECEIVEFREECARRYING CASE & HP D1560 PRINTER!While Supplies Last! Tel: 242-328-0048 Fax: 242-328-0049# 4 Patton & Rosetta Sts Palmdale ( Next to City Market) Nassau, Bahamas Email: sales@dctpc.comToshiba Satellite A205 Toshiba Satellite A205 S5879 S5879 Government stimulus package praised Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

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Pindling article gets our readers talking INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 The stories behind the news R R e e : : T T h h e e t t r r a a g g i i c c y y o o u u n n g g p p i i l l o o t t w w h h o o k k n n e e w w t t o o o o m m u u c c h h Mr Marquis, The day after your Insight article about the pilot who knew too mucha ppeared in The Tribune, radio talk show hosts Algernon Allen, Steve McKinney, their guestsand mostcallers had a field day casting aspersions against youw ith some of them making it clear that, because of this article and others, you should be kicked out of the country, never to be heard from again. A s a sound, unemotional thinker of more than 40 years, please accept my sincere apologies for the crap that nont hinkers, and people who, if given the slightest chance, would literally revise h istory in a heartbeat have been throwing at you. Their thinking is so shallow and emotional that they would just as soon destroy the messenger rather than examine the message, simplyb ecause they do not like the message. W hetherthere is merit in the message, or whether it is true or not, is of no concern to them. I read the article carefully, and I saw it for what it was; the recollection of certain events in the life of the elderly Chauncey Tynes Sr. and most notably, his son the pilot, Chauncey Tynes Jr. You did not w rite fiction. You wrote what Mr Tynes told you, and yet, notone of the wouldbe revisionists turned their wrath againstM r Tynes. "Kill the messenger" is their clarion cry. I learned a long time ago that the young andtheelderly seldom tell tales. Mr Tynes in his old age hasn o reason to tell lies on Lynden Pin dling. Furthermore, I was fortunate enough to have been around at the height of L ynden Pindling's fame and power, and being an avid reader and a good discerner of persons, he could never get me to follow him. In fact, I never feltt hat Pindling was a fit and proper person to lead this country. I have copies of all of the commissions of inquiry, and theyd o not speak very complimentary of Mr Pindling nor of his administration of the affairs of this country, nor in fact his administration of his personal and finan c ial affairs. AndI easily recollect that in his testimony before the 1983/4 Commission of Inquiry into drug-trafficking, Pindling had great difficulty recalling t he origins of large sums of monies that were deposited into his p ersonal bank account.In fact, His Grace Archbishop Drexel W Gomez in his minority report stated most emphatically that he could not saywith certainty that drug-related money did notfind its way into Mr Pindling's bank account. When I compare this to certaindisclosures of Chauncey Tynes Sr in your Insight article, that Pin dling allegedly received pay-offs from the notorious drug trafficker, Joe Lehder, I find it rather easy to believe. When I was a young boy, my mother told me that only people with something to hide are afraid of the truth. Further more, the Bible says that "you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free." Bob Marley said that we are to emancipate ourselves from mental slavery, only we ourselves can free our minds. Another song says that there is none so blind as he who will not see. There is a huge difference between a person who cannot see and one who will not see. And per sons like Paul Moss and other die-hard PLPs would do well to know that no amount of spin or attempted distortion of history will keep Bahamians blind any more. The mental emancipation movement in the Bahamas is alive and well. And persons ought to know that when they decide to enter public life their every action, good, bad or ugly, will be open to public scrutiny and commen tary. And to them, their heirs and successors, I say if they do no evil, then they should fear no evil. It is as simple as t hat. Mr Marquis, I hope that even now you are training several Bahamians who when you retire, will be able to step up to the plate and carry on your bold, investigative and most importantly, fearless k ind of journalism. God knows this count ry needs it badly. Y Y o o u u r r s s e e t t c c W W F F o o r r b b e e s s DON’T go! The Bahamas needs you. I think your article was fantastic. I have not heard one person that has said anything bad about it yet (apart from the o bvious ones). The group who are jumping all over you are not as big as theyt hink they are. W W e e l l l l w w i i s s h h e e r r JUST a quick note to say you have m y 100 per cent support in your “eyec atching” article. If you get that much public reaction from the article then it must be DAMN good and DAMNt ruesmileKeep up the good work! I I n n s s i i g g h h t t f f o o l l l l o o w w e e r r I am so happy you continue to " touch" these taboo topics that are only m entioned in hush tones around town. The truth will set all of us free and it is high time we all started facing the truth about many of these "honourable men". Please keep it up, you are doing God’s work. F F e e d d u u p p STAY focused, Mr Marquis. God sent you. C C a a l l l l e e r r YOUR name is being echoed in the halls of parliament, in the churches and even on aeroplanes. Your article was excellent. You have enlightened us in so many ways. Pindling is not really the father of the n ation at all. I thank you for having the guts to do what you did. You are going to be known around the country for years to come. I am on y our side. Stay strong. W W e e l l l l w w i i s s h h e e r r KEEP your shoulders strong and your head high. I buy my Tribune every Mon day to read what you say. Don’t let those big-mouthed people frighten you because these things are true. All of us know that Pindling was no saint. He was a devious man who did a lot of devious things in this country. Chauncey Tynes is of old age and is not going to lie. Tell them to get off your back. These people don’t appreciate the truth. When you have retired and gone, please keep writing your Insight articles from wherever you are. Thank you for everything. W W o o m m a a n n c c a a l l l l e e r r AFTER hearing the PLPs speaking out against you on the radio, it is awful to think these people are still around. The New PLP were supposed to come in with a new image, but you have dug them out of their holes and showed them up for what they are. Under Pindling I was afraid to open my mouth. You have done a wonderful job. I I n n s s i i g g h h t t s s u u p p p p o o r r t t e e r r RESPONSE to last week’s Insight article on Chauncey Tynes Sr and his claims about Sir Lynden Pindling’s alleged links with Colombian drug czar Joe Lehder has been so heavy that all space is this week being devoted to feedback... THE FRONT PAGE of the March 9, 2009 edition of INSIGHT ... FEEDBACK S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 C C

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THE really sweet thing about all this is that the PLP have no-one in their ranks who can write like you, so they are left gibbering with rage. Oh, it does myh eart good, it really does. C C a a l l l l m m e e J J a a c c q q u u e e l l i i n n e e AS a journalist of many years standing, and a regular visitor to the Bahamas, I would like to ask you one question: why are you working in a third-rate banana republic when you could be making megabucks in one of the world’s big cities? I have read many of your Insight articles over the last three or four years and I rate you right up there among the best. No-one on the NYT, Washington Post or the big British dailies engages the issues in the way you do. I believe a collection of your recent work would win a Pulitzer, no sweat, if you worked across the water in the United States. I’d love to meet for a beer one day. A A G G r r a a n n t t h h a a m m , , L L o o n n d d o o n n I find it amazing that an article such as "Tragic young pilot whok new Too much", printed March 9, 2009, would be used to try and discredit and belittle all of the great work that Sir Lynden Pindling has dedicated his life to. What is so appalling about your article is the fact that every name that was called where dis-p ersions (sic characters of the individuals named, all of these individuals are deceased and cannot defend their honour. There are some references toindividuals whose names are not called such as the police officer you claimed r eceived the $50,000 from Carlos Joe Lehder, I can only guess that this individual is "probably" living. I hope that you noticed that I placed the word probably inparentheses at the end of the previous paragraph. The reason f or me doing so is to point out the great fallacy inMr TynesSr’s rationale that quote "Pindling was born to a Jamaican father, Arnold Pindling, and an unknown woman who was probably Haitian". Thismakes ita pparent to me that Mr Tynes Sr’s rationale in assessing his reasons for disliking Sir Lynden Pindling is also flawed and biased. I further would like to reiterate this, by pointing out that Mr Tynes Sr’s claims that his son was a money carrier for Carlos "Joe"L ehder but he reiterated that his son told him he did not fly drugs. I ask this question: is it possiblethat his son went to fly drugs and something of ill fate happened to him that had nothing to do with Sir lynden Pindling or any other great Bahamian that M r Tynes would like to blame for the apparent ill fate of his son. I could go on and poke numerous holes in this article that obviously is filled with so many other fallacies and unsubstantiated claims that it would probably r equire me to have an entire newspaper edition. But I will not entertain this any further. I hope that other right thinking Bahamians can also see the political motivations behind such garbage. Signed A A d d i i a a n n C C a a r r t t e e r r I NSIGHT replies: There are none so blind as those who will not consider the evidence. M r Marquis I have been following Insight for quite a few months and I must say that I have never read any-t hing quite like that. (The tragic young pilot who knew too much.) I don’t know who you are but you sure as hell are always on target.. I was blown away...for-g et those naysayers and those b...s less politicians.Stand your ground and write it as you see it. I ’m looking forward to the next edition with great anticipa tion. C C o o l l i i n n S S a a u u n n d d e e r r s s Dear MrMarquis, thank you kindly for an incredible article. It is most unfortunate, however, that some or perhaps many do not share my sentiments. The article simply contained information from a private interview conducted with a grieving B ahamian father, whose son has gone missing under some strange circumstances. I ronically, a Senator who close ly associates with a disgruntled sect in our community, with respect to your well-informeda nd precious article, sought on public radio to incite outrage on the part of her affiliates. This sect seems to have much difficulty with the truth being told. Your Insight article, which has caused manymuch discomfortt his week, sounds very much like the truth to me. One need only recall the findings of the Commission of Inquiry’s Report 1984and connect it with the Insight edition of Monday, March 9, 2009, to gain a full conclusion on the matter. A foreigner with a slick line in patter, was growing fat off a drug king's pay-offs while those who brought him to power continue to live dirt poor in over-the-hill shacks.” Ah! what fitting truth lies within those inverted commas. I 've rejoiced much as a result of the publishing of this edition ofInsight. Albeit, it does very little if any to assuage the griefborne by the family of Pilot Chauncey Tynes, I publicly offermy sympathy to them, mayAllahhelp them with their grief. What I think, J J u u l l i i u u s s M M c c K K e e n n z z i i e e Dear Mr Marquis, Looks like you hit another cent ury, from all the flak being thrown up it is obvious that the truth hurts. Yes, Sir Lynden was the first black prime minister oft he Bahamas, but that does not exonerate him from the facts of his own history. Bahamians need toread more. Instead of using the Internet for porno and shop-p ing they should try one of the search engines and put in the names LyndenPindling and Carl os Lehder. I assure you they would be reading for the rest of their liveson this topic alone. Not only is there affiliation but M r Lehder himself on more than two occasions gave statements and testimony under oath that he paid off Pindling and other officials numerous times. I clearly remember my father sitting me down before going to school one morning and watching the NBC report with Lynden Pind ling being exposed and his total ly useless belligerence at the time.In addition to this, the case o f two other Bahamian offi cialswho were caught in a hotel room on video in Florida bragging about their connections andl ater arrested followed only days after by the then prime minister of Turks and Caicos. It is also fact that Lynden Pindling was a victimiser and thanks to him the Public Service is in the state that it is now due to his precedent of stifling expatriatesa nd promoting the best butt-kisser while killing off any inspired, dedicated employees in the process.It was quite humorous to hear a former prime minister even remind you of your status this week, I wonder what he would say to Barak Obama, Presi dent of the United States, if he got irritated, a man of African descent and born in Hawaii. I guess if you don't have pies, throw mud. All the best, continue to encourage and enrage the masses to read in your most provocat ive way... Sincerely yours N N I AM getting calls from women whose husbands were killed during the drugs era in response to your article. They are telling me of what they went through because of it. T here are few protests from the PLP about your article because most from that era know what you said it true. I am sick of this “Father of the Nation” garbage. He was not my father. He was not even a Bahamian. I t is time the truth was told, and it is also time that these socalled heroes were shown up for what they are. They are not heroes at all. They are a bunch ofs elf-serving sons of bitches. N N a a s s s s a a u u b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s m m a a n n D ear Mr Marquis I am writing to say thank you for such a thought-catching article in Monday’s Insight segment o f The Tribune. I read the article in its entirety whilst trying to maintain an objective view of the story. However, as an open-minded Bahami an with a good grasp of the political history of the Bahamas, it was difficult to read this piece and not see the obvious truths of o ur not so distant pass. While there are some who will go to their graves declaring Pind ling a Bahamian hero, I am one of those who hold the belief that whilst Mr Pindling and the PLP had done a lot of good for thec ountry, they also did a lot more damage as well. Far from the alleged corruption involving Joe Lehder, there have also been accusations involving Pindling and other PLPs, and many more questionable characters, some of whoma re to this day still in the public domain. Bahamians, before the final stroke of the pen is drawn in the history book of the Bahamas should we not stop and question the accusations levied against our former and even present leade rs? Or do we bury our heads in the sand and continue to perpetrate these lies to our future generations? Mr Marquis, it is unfortunate that young Mr Tynes had to lose his life in order for the truth to come out, but I assure you that in t ime the entire legacy of our corrupt leaders will be told and people will realise their legacy for what it was – self-serving and destructive. Only then will the Bahamas be freed from the bondage of paying tribute to a charlatan. Regards, T T h h o o m m a a s s C C h h a a r r l l t t o o n n PERRY Christie’s press conference, in which he attacked John Marquis, summed up thism an perfectly. Christie showed that he is ready to say anything to hold on to the party leadership, even tot he point of contradicting the views he held in the 1980s when he and Ingraham parted company with Pindling over corruption in the government. H e was also echoing the old Pindling anti-foreigner message, describing Mr Marquis as a guest” in our country. The reason Christie and the rest of the PLP are so eager to cling to Pindling’s torn-up legacy i s that they have nothing else. They are finished. Good riddance! G G P P AFTER all the misery Pindling caused, the PLP want to save his face. You can’t erase history. D D E E CAN The Tribune tell us what they are going to do for news w hen Marquis leaves town? I I n n t t e e r r e e s s t t e e d d o o b b s s e e r r v v e e r r C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Bright +Effective 322-2188/9 Y ou’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. Long life Spiral lamps 2 0 0 8 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t Pindling article gets our readers talking F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009, PAGE 3C R R e e : : T T h h e e t t r r a a g g i i c c y y o o u u n n g g p p i i l l o o t t w w h h o o k k n n e e w w t t o o o o m m u u c c h h T HANK you for your fearlessstraightforward reporting of events. It was obvious to me long before your article that Pindling was a crook and a dictator masquerading as someone who l oved and associated with the grassroots in order to hoodwink t hem.Indeed he did a superb job in fooling a lot of the people, but I was not one of them.Both my parents, now deceased, told me what they thought of this m an, and it wasn't complimentary. My father came here from G renada to join the police force during the 1950s and he was run out of the country by Pindling b ecause he knew too much dirt and refused to carry out orders t hat would have hurt the poor people. In addition, Pindling is responsible for smudging the character of our nation and we have n ever recovered from it.He and everyone else in the party who k new of wrongdoing and remained quiet about it or profited from it must carry the guilt a lso.In fact, we are still a " nation for sale".Anything that needs to get done in this country requires a grease job because t hat's the mentality that began w ith "The Father of the Nation" a nd it persists to this day. H e led the PLP and by assoc iation they were and still are associated with corruption and greed. I will NEVER vote for them unless they come with a c lean slate of candidates to r eplace the recycled politicians t hat, in my opinion, are only t here to get what they can and retire in comfort. Only ignorant fools can take pride in Pindling’s legacy. D D C C , , N N a a s s s s a a u u G ood morning, I just got t hrough reading the article posted by yourself in today's Tribune. It was a very interesting read, one that I enjoyed i mmensely! While I am not one t o play party politics, I must say that your article held my atten tion and has expanded my per sonal outlook on the history of our nation concerning its devel-o pment and the factor that cont ributed to where we are now as a nation.Thank you. Have a great day. Sincerely C C u u t t e e l l l l e e S S M M a a j j o o r r I READ with interest your s tory of the tragic young pilot C hauncey W Tynes and found it t imely to appear on the anniversary of his disappearance 26 years ago. My name by itself will tell you nothing but I will outline w hat your article did not. M y association with Mr C hauncey Sr and his family goes back a ways and he has always been an honourable and straightforward man of which the Bahamas and the world at l arge have too few. T he name of at least one other person on that ‘lost’ flight was Donald A Moree, my brother, who was never heard from a gain. While younger than C hauncey he was no less i nvolved in the dirty and bloodthirsty business that is the drug trade. He left a grieving father and mother to carry on. This was and is not the only case of Bahamian families left to wonder about their loved ones no matter what would have called them to lead this kind of life. M y brother left a wife six months pregnant and now a son nearly 26 years old he has never seen. I am sure every Bahamian family has a story to tell. Politics with all its dirty affairs and illici t alliances needs to be added into this category. It is high time f or us as Bahamians to put our house in order, weed out the corrupt and prosecute those who should be prosecuted and aim toward a better life for all. Most s ound-thinking Bahamians I have spoken to agree with the a rticles you write airing their dirty laundry in public and often lament that they don’t go far e nough. D D a a v v i i d d M M o o r r e e e e J J r r The involvement of Lynden Pindling with Joe Lehder and the tragic consequences it held for young Chauncey Tynes, c learly depictedin your excellent article of Monday March 9, e pitomises the tragedy of the political culture of our country. Until we can shake off the cont inuing effect of a barely conc ealed gangster mentality that infects our political culture, there will be no government here that w e can be proud of. I t is regrettable that the PLP r efuses to do anything except try t o canonise Lynden Pindling, a nd as his protege rulesthe FNM converting it also into a Pingdomite-like party, honest Bahamians like Chauncey Tynes S r cannot hope that in their lifet ime politics will emerge from t he gutter that the Pindling-led P LP led it into. There is, sir, no party of contrast of any size, no relief from the culture of leadership and ofp olitics spawned by the same m an who willingly consorted w ith men like Joe Lehder, carel ess of the fate of young Bahamians such as Chauncey Tynes Jr. I am pained to think that this man will one day be made a N ational Hero by some PLP g overnment, and that they expect that my sons will honour and want to be like him. Too many of our schools also teach our children to want to be likeP indling, ignorant of the true n ature of this very dangerous and cunning man. Your article will be added to the required reading of my sons so that they can see that it is not Daddy a lone who has told them about the true nature of the man their t eachers seem set on canonisi ng! T he great pity is that Lynden Pindling did not do the damage alone: t oo many Bahamians assisted him in his t wisted agenda, many finding o ut too late that they were simp ly tools of a maximum leader. Greed and power were their weakness, and lack of the guts to stand up for basic principles. Better to be alone than to be in B ad Company is my watchword. T he Bahamas' recovery from the Pindling era will continue to take some time. However, as more is written revealing the t ruth, recovery will be speeded u p. I n my books on Bahamian law and on our constitutional issues I have touched on the false view of Pindling and the PLP as true 'founding fathers', and the relationship between our present lack of progress in certain areas, a nd the ‘all for me’ power politics of the post-1973 era, that includes the FNM under Pingdomite control. There still remains a pressing n eed for a centre of political culture not based in the PLP and itsl egacy. Your well presented article on Chauncey Tynes highlights in a personal way the true g angster nature of the leadership during the critical period w hen Bahamians ought to have been led by only persons of the h ighest principles. It is only by a wide based approach to analyse the underc urrents of events in that period will the full truth be arrived at,a nd more of our people recognise that we must move deliberately away from the practices that were spawned by Pindling during that time. A s a young man in that period, who refused to be seduced by the 'you can get rich byX mas' approach of the PLP at t hat time, I wish that Chauncey T ynes had heeded more closely h is father's admonitions. Even basic commonsense ought to have led him to consider the per il of his situation, and the ruthlessness of those intent on conc ealing their gangster operat ions. I t is interesting that while Mr T ynes Sr is proof, sir, that not all Bahamians are motivated by money and greed, and that this nation does indeed have itss hare of men with admirable p rinciples, his son was seduced b y far lesser men than his own father! It will be some time before Mr Tynes’ 'beloved Bahamas' c an be restored, but there are t hose who hope to see it done in o ur lifetime. It will not happen overnight, since an essential pre-condition will be the complete eradicationo f the negative effects of Lynd en Pindling and his henchmen on the political and moral cul ture of our country. How long will that take when PLP leaders and their clones in the FNM continue to praise Lynden Pin-d ling as our 'founding father' is a m ajor guess, but as long as there is free journalism, and as long as those who recognise the truth publicise it, that time will come. Yours truly, D D r r D D e e x x t t e e r r J J o o h h n n s s o o n n , , F F o o u u n n d d e e r r : : T T h h e e B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n N N a a t t i i o o n n a a l l P P a a r r t t y y I would just like to say that we as young Bahamians need to know the truth about the people who we hold in high esteem in this country. These people whow e put the welfare of our nation i n, the ones we look to for leadership havefor too long deceived us. They have seduced us with their smart talk, they p lan with cleverness to present t hemselves as genuine when in reality they are a sham, a coun terfeit, a fake and a fraud. I understand the times we live in call for us uniting and moving forward as a people but we must first deal with the past and the truth must come to light and it’s s tories like these we need to know so we as a people cannot be so simple and guileless that we appoint people who betray us. J J u u s s t t C C a a u u s s e e H i there, I would like to let you know that I enjoyed the piece you did on Chauncey T ynes. Although I will not speak to the other parts of the story, I w ant to let you know that I am from North Andros and the c ommunity of Nicholl’s Town has suffered tremendously as a direct result of the drug trade a nd the alliances you speak of in your piece. We have lostc ountless young men and women, many of whom were on a “drug run”. Some time in the early nineties we lost eight members of one community on af light from Chub Cay. They were shot down. My life changed that day. I applaud your fearlessness on t his issue and ask that you invest igate this more. S incerely, L L a a t t a a r r a a D D e e l l l l I AM so glad you recorded the real story of Sir Lynden Pind ling’s origins. My family was f rom East Street and everyone i n that neighbourhood knew that h e was not born to Viola Bain. They all knew she had not delivered a child. The next minute she showed u p with this boy and before you k new it he was the big-shot runn ing the country. My mother scoffed at Pindling being called The Father of the Nation. She called him The F ather of Damnation. W hen I was growing up in the 1 980s, I remember students saying they were going to sell drugs for a living. It seemed then that everyone was living on drugs. Is aw it with my own eyes. I saw t he real damage it caused. The PLP is not a political par ty. It is a mindset. It’s all about ‘me’ and feelings of entitlement. Pindling taught this nation that you don’t have to obey any laws.W hen he threw the mace out of p arliament, he was telling people to disrespect this country and its institutions. He hijacked the cause of majority rule and took it to hell. We need a total clean-out of t he PLP and FNM. We need an O bama. But where do we find s uch a man? F F o o u u r r t t h h g g e e n n e e r r a a t t i i o o n n C C o o n n c c h h y y J J o o e e WITH all his criminal associations, should not Sir LyndenP indling be called The Godfat her of the Nation? D D o o n n t t c c a a l l l l m m y y n n a a m m e e ( ( E E x x p p a a t t ) ) I read your article in yester d ay's newspaper about ‘The tragic young pilot who knew too much’ and me and my co-workers were shocked. I didn't know things like that used to happen in the Bahamas and I think all of this information you have needs to be in a book. What you think? M M C C o o l l e e I THANK you for the article o n Sir Lynden Pindling. I was proud to have had dealings in the past with Sir Stafford Sands. While he certainly deserved to have his face on the banknotes, LOP didn’t. O O l l d d t t i i m m e e E E x x p p a a t t (The above letter is a paraphrased version of an e-mail inadvertently lost during transm ission into an editing format Editor) T HIS is Tuesday and the taxidrivers at the airport are still a rguing over The Tribune’s Insight article about Sir Lynden Pindling. T he FNMs among them are saying all this should have come o ut a long time ago. The PLPs are saying all wrong-doing done in the past was justified. I praise Mr (Chauncey Sr for saying what he did. Noo ne can do him harm now. He is beholden to no-one. C C a a b b d d r r i i v v e e r r AS a former government offic ial, may I thank you for the artic le relating to Chauncey Tynes (father and son fact that another official close t o Sir Lynden Pindling delivered r egular pay-offs from Carlos Joe’ Lehder to the prime mini ster. I think your article revealed mysteries to certain people in the PLP that even they didn’t know about, but it is important t hat history be told as it was. F rom my own knowledge, the p oints made by Mr Tynes in y our story were broadly true. E E x x o o f f f f i i c c i i a a l l BOY, you’re getting lambaste d on the radio today. But don’t b e deterred everything Mr C hauncey Tynes said was at l east 99.9 per cent true. Many Bahamians don’t like to hear the truth about themselves because this society is so s teeped in corruption that anyt hing goes. It is because of this corruption that we are now a Third World banana republic. I am really sad to hear that you’re leaving the Bahamasb ecause we need good men in t his country. M M C C , , N N a a s s s s a a u u YOU’RE running into a buz zsaw with this one because youa re unleashing the spirit of Africa. Pindling won the 2002 e lection for the PLP by dying t wo years before, which is a form o f promotion as far as African cosmology is concerned. He may have been corrupt but that’s irrelevant in the sense that, w hen you write, you do so in the d emocratic tradition, whereas h e was the chief, inspiring a mixture of adoration and fear. The kind of picture I am painting is impervious to fact and truth. A A c c a a d d e e m m i i c c A BSOLUTELY great article! The truth needs to be told and you, together with Mr Chauncey Tynes, told it...I am so pleased t his story, which has been drifti ng around the Bahamas for y ears now, has finally come to the fore. Great journalism. I I n n s s i i g g h h t t f f o o l l l l o o w w e e r r THE worst decision the PLP ever made in government was to allow John Marquis to stay in the country in 2006 when they deferred his work permit. L L e e a a d d i i n n g g P P L L P P s s u u p p p p o o r r t t e e r r ( ( o o v v e e r r h h e e a a r r d d c c o o n n v v e e r r s s a a t t i i o o n n ) ) I MUST congratulate you on an excellent piece of journalism. I have never read anything like this in my whole life. I thank you s o much. It shed so much light on things as they really were. I l ove you. You are a great man. W W o o m m a a n n r r e e a a d d e e r r PAUL MOSS is a “no name wonder” trying to make political c apital out of your article. But no-one is fooled by people like h im anymore. R R , , N N a a s s s s a a u u (Moss, a would-be PLP candidate issued a press release attacking the Insight article, claiming it was ‘repulsive’). RIGHT on the button again. I understand the PLP is organisi ng a ‘whip round’ for your pension fund just to ensure you d on’t change your mind about retiring. G G B B ( ( E E x x p p a a t t ) ) S IR, I want to congratulate you on your article. Don’t let anybody scare you. This is a d emocratic country, a free count ry, not some communist count ry. There are some people who d on’t like the truth, who are u pset by it. But you keep telling it like it is... This is something I’m going to save for my children and g randchildren. In fact, I’m comi ng down to The Tribune right n ow to buy three or four more c opies. Mr Chauncey Tynes is a man of great integrity. I’ve been talking to my friends and they say hep aid a high price for his honesty b ecause he is in a house that’s f alling down. T hose with their millions need to help this man. I admire him. W W o o m m a a n n c c a a l l l l e e r r R R e e : : F F u u n n n n y y n n a a m m e e s s I missed your article on funny names last week, but on seeing this morning's paper I had to check it online.I have a fewf rom my college days.During m y undergrad days in NY, there was a girl named Constance Stank. No-one called her Con stance, though she was known as Connie. A few years later, for my MSc, I went to the London School of H ygiene and Tropical Medicine, w here I was introduced to a very n ice demure Englishlady who was the course administrator. Her name was Gwenda Hoare. D D A A C C u u r r t t i i s s A T school I was told of a book called ‘Sliding Down the Bannister’ by someone called R. Stornaway. However, I never really b elieved such a book existed, or i ndeed any author of that name. However, the association of words never failed to make me smile. O O n n l l o o o o k k e e r r M Y dad used to tell me of a schoolmate of his called Ben Dover. “I wonder if he had a cousin called Stan Dupp?” he liked to joke. M M a a r r i i e e , , W W i i n n t t o o n n FEEDBACK

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R R e e : : T T h h e e t t r r a a g g i i c c y y o o u u n n g g p p i i l l o o t t w w h h o o k k n n e e w w t t o o o o m m u u c c h h D ear Mr Marquis, A very informative article, having been a victim of Pindling's victimisation first-hand through Mr Carlton E Francis, w ho happens to be an immediate family member. (VERY CLOSE, but I choose not to say). I t's about time the real history be told. N N a a m m e e s s u u p p p p l l i i e e d d B efore he started working as a pilot, Chauncey Tynes Jr was an air traffic controller, where he succeeded without really flying.H e later was employed by Bahamasair, taking police officers on drug surveillance patrols throughout The Bahamas. He w as an excellent pilot, who, in b etween flights, was also a bit of a “party animal.” For some of his former colleagues, their l ast sight of him was in the police station, then located at the entrance to the then-Nassau International Airport main ter minal, handcuffed to a man who m ay have been a Colombian. Chauncey’s tousled appearance in addition to his having gained weight due to his penchant for consuming several hamburgers at one sitting prompted the description of a “drowned rat”, from one observ e r. Chauncey went missing one weekend before he was due to appear in court to answer formal charges. He is recalled withf ondness by those who knew him, and who, in the interests ofs ome form of “closure”, are curi ous to know exactly what hap pened to him. Yours, etc E E d d w w a a r r d d L L e e e e Mr Marquis: It is with regret that I find myself responding to yet another of your articles! You write with such justifica tion about Mr Pindling and the PROGRESSIVE LIBERAL PARTY but I cannot recall you ever writing about the UBP and its demons which I am sure youa re more than intimate with! You ought to stick with what you know but, alas, we know which master you serve,we know which sector of society you a lign with and we knowwhat you are about. Be reminded Sir Pindling was the best thing thatever hap-p ened toour country, not yours, and the qualities that you enjoy in The Bahamas were as a result of Sir Lynden and the PLP! But,a las, the white light continues to blind you. Hope to hear from you soon when you return to the UK! P S: Isn’t it time for you to score the FNM remember, the PLP is not the ruling party. Who will be the JACK this t ime? D D o o n n a a l l d d C C a a m m p p b b e e l l l l It's been a while, but suffice it t o say that the article on Chauncey Tynes (The Pilot Who Knew Too Much) has triggered this feedback. L et me first preface my comments on the comm on Bahamian acceptable practice regardless to facts and rea son i.e. “if people like you, they lie and defend you! If they hate you, they tell lies on you”, and abuse you.The information shared in your Insight article this past Monday was quite disturb i ng, to say the least.Mr Tynes Sr comes across as being extremely credible. Questions relating to the true national identity of Lynden Pin-d ling have always been a concern and not very clear.Theres eemed to have been some truth or credibility to the allegation about h is ancestral lineage. However, if any such country exists where such a thing occurs, rest for certain that it's The Bahamas.Sad to say,as I consider my country, and the condition of my fellow Bahamians, we lack intellect and wis dom. We are not a nation known for its intellect. Yes! of course there arebrilliant intellectuals among us. However, they are more lessthe exception than the rule.This wasp rimarily why the Pindlings seized the opportunity and exerted themselves into the forefront of the dull, shallow-thinking Bahamian masses, whom they saidwere not asking for much.Thus, that's what they gave us over the years.A littleg overnment job to buy a little house, to house, very large families, and to make a little shopping trip to Miami occasionally, a nd we were happy. Needless to say, your article will receiveharsh criticism from those loyalists who benefited f rom the Pindling era, and who still wish to exploit the Bahamian masses to their advantage, by spewing their hatred, and avoid discussing the concerns you’ve a ddressed.I think the truth should really be revealed about Pindling's true date and place of birth.Let's face it, the man is n ow dead.Let the whole truth be told as to who he really was.It can’t hurt more than the damage he has already done too ur nation.Great job, John! As usual, I love your penmanship. V V e e l l l l y y C C I CONGRATULATE you f or removing the scales from the eyes of the Bahamian people. My grandmother was a straw vendor and her stall was taken away from her by the PLP because she was an FNM supporter. This is how vindictive the PLP was. D efence Force officers told me that they were instructed when to go to Norman’s Cay (drug czar Joe Lehder’s cocaine trans-shipment base) and when to stay away. They were even told which boats they could search, and which boats they couldn’t. I don’t know why people pretend these things did not happen. This is part of our history and I think it needs to be exposed. Many people are delusional about what happened. I was at school when the NBC reportedo n the drug trade in the Bahamas and I was devastated. We are still paying for it today. We should never have a llowed this scourge into our country. Pindling was in charge at the time and the one who was supposed to set the tone. T he commission of inquiry was not as revealing as it should have been. Drugs have left this country in a state where boys and girls sell themselves on Bay S treet so that they can pay for crack cocaine. F F o o r r m m e e r r D D e e f f e e n n c c e e F F o o r r c c e e o o f f f f i i c c e e r r Having read your March 9 Insight I would like to clarify the matter regarding the birthplaceo f Sir Lynden Pindling. My father was a fellow police officerof the father of Sir Lynden as well as a neighbour and friend. M y mother was pregnant with me while Sir Lynden’s mother was likewise pregnant with him. I was born on March 13, 1930, while Sir Lynden was born not many days after, also in March of the same year. All of the other information s tated concerning this matter are wrong and although my father and mother are not alive to say for themselves what I have told you these are the facts that they both have stated to me. S S i i d d n n e e y y R R B B u u r r r r o o w w s s Good day Mr Marquis. I just read your article on the tragic young pilot who knew too much. Thanks for enlightening the younger generation who fart oo often may only hear the term, "Father of the nation" (which I really do not know why people say that), as the article is so true, and Mr Tynes only a dded closure to all the stuff that I was hearing. He (Mr Tynes i s a PLP from yesteryear saying these things. Pindling caused many families in the Bahamas hardship, especially those whose parents were from the Turks and Caicos Islands,as their children couldn ot get government jobs, mainly becausethe parents never supported the plp and Pindling knew this so he did accordingly. Even today the plp is still tryi ng the same trickery as it relates to flooding the government sector with party supporters, even when the office is already over-c rowded, and these are the persons who don't work because of the politics. I see no reason why persons on the popular radiot alk show Love 97 were so upset, as your article only quoted Mr Tynes’ words. Don't feel intimidated by the calls, Bahamiansn eed to appreciate the truth in this article. J J S S , , N N a a s s s s a a u u I have not read John Marq uis's INSIGHT piece because we no longer get The Tribune in Freeport, so I can't intellig ently comment on it. But although Sir Lynden Pindling's place in Bahamian history is assured primarily because of his leadership during the struggle f or majority rule, it is no secret among those who choose not to overlook that The Bahamas was considered to be “A Nation for Sale” during the 1980s that Sir Lynden had his flaws as a national leader. There is evidence that he was a lso ruthless when it came to those who opposed him, and I can say this based on personal experience. The fact that I lived out of this country for 20 years,a fter making tremendous personal sacrifices to play an activer ole in the struggle for majority rule, was primarily due to overt victimisation by Sir Lynden. What's more, there has to be a reason why Hubert Ingraham, Perry Christie and Midge Hanna voiced strong opposition to Sir Lynden's leadership in 1984, resulting in Ingraham and Christie being suspended from the PLP. Ingraham, as we all now know, demonstrated that he believed strongly in the reasons why he decided to openly criticise Sir Lynden, while Christie begged forgiveness and returned to the PLP. The bot-t om line is thatwe cannot sanitise events of the past to record history as we would like for it to be recorded for future generations. When I do get the chance to read Marquis's article, I may comment further ino ne of my future weekly columns. B est wishes, O O s s w w a a l l d d T T B B r r o o w w n n E ditor, Freeport News Well, people, there is one way to deal with these things. Engage a national debate on the life and times of Lynden Pindling. ‘Was he a friend or foe?’ Perhaps ZNS can lead this national debate ands et up the forum by inviting the relevant persons to argue the moot (John Marquis vs Paul Adderley). BTC or Indigo can provide the technology for pers ons to text in their votes during the debate. Is not that the way a civil society deals with questions that surround it? Or perhaps it’sn ot the practice in this country who love to claim to being heirs of the Westminster System of democracy? M y point is that we need more dialogue here in this country. Dialogue that will invoke discussions on the facts! I wouldg uarantee such an event will garner huge advertising benefits for your media, and at the same time will lend a rewarding educ ation opportunity to our wider p ublic. Many of the younger generation who know very little about Sir Lynden, the era of m ajority rule and the evil trade of drug running that is carved deep into our history. I can see it now, "THE GREAT BAHAMIAN D EBATES" LIVE ON ZNS, JCN/Love97FM, Island FM, GEMS, THE GUARDIAN/STAR FM or The Tribune and its affiliate stations. C C a a r r v v e e l l F F r r a a n n c c i i s s A S you know, I don’t always agree with you, but your article was very good. There are one or two discrepancies, but on the whole it is truthful. I have known Chauncey Tynes and his family for the bestp art of 70 years and he is a truth ful, honest and upright man. They are castigating you and saying nothing about Chauncey. And no-one is disputing what was said. The days of PLP corruption were started by Pindling and that’s led to what we have today. E E r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n W W a a t t k k i i n n s s ( ( f f o o r r m m e e r r s s e e n n i i o o r r p p o o l l i i c c e e o o f f f f i i c c e e r r ) ) I read your INSIGHT article regarding Mr Pindling and I must say I found it interesting and convincing.However, that has not always been my posi-t ion.I knewLO when we were schoolboys in Nassau. He went to school in England for a couple of years before I left for the United States in 1949.During the Commission of Inquiry hearing in 1983, I had my brothers end me all the relevant copies of The Tribune and theG uardian.I was convinced that LO's accusers did not make their c ase, or perhaps that is what I wanted to believe.You see, I wanted so badly for him to succ eed. I was certain that he and I shared the same love of country. N ow, with the first-hand accounts that your article describes, I have finally concluded that the events as described to you by Mr Tynes and others, which were not presented at the inquiry, point to his culpability. There are two issues men tioned in the article that are in dispute, though they have no rel evance to the veracity of the accusations. 1) Pindling's place of birth and 2) his meeting with Mugabe in the 1960s.I recall a conversation that I had with my mother (who died in 1995 the PLP.You see, she hated Pindling and she called him "that cockeyed man".She went off on him saying he was "no good" and he came from "nutin".She told me and my brother (deceased Jamaican". He was born "roun" the corner from Eneas Jumpers Church Corner. My mother was older than LO's parents and she lived in Bain Town her entire life.Anyone will tell you that Bain Town women know everybody and everybody's "business". She further told us how LO's father in a fit of rage quit the police force, went home and burned his uniform in the middle of the road. This information could only have come from institutional knowledge. Lastly, Mugabe was an obscure guerilla fighter in the 1960s during which time Pindling was already on his ascendancy to political power. Mugabe did not become President of Zimbabwe until more than a decade after Pindling became the leader of the PLP.Again, good article. C C W W , , N N a a s s s s a a u u C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 8C, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Readers have their say on ‘the tragic young pilot who knew too much’ FEEDBACK Don’t miss next week’s INSIGHT section for more revelations about PindlingLehder connection...

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A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN T IGER medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty j udgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 1 4 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD A cross 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 1 0 Mature, or mature to a p oint (5 1 1 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 1 3 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 1 5 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining c ontact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of b utter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 2 4 In the main perhaps he’s a ll at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all t imes (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 D own 1 Leave the car where one c an take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love f or a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters s tages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf c ourse (5 8 Is it instrumental in w arning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 1 4 Main part of a book taken b y travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 2 0 Not a sunny greeting? ( 3,4) 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in t he U.S. (5 2 5 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1 213 14 1 5161718 1 92021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1 213 14 1 5161718 1 92021 22232425 26 2728 2930T ribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerK akuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker C hess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE M ARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired f ootman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 2345678 9 1 011 1 213 1 4 1 5161718 192021 22232425 2 6 2 728 2930 1 2345678 9 1 011 1 213 1 4 1 5161718 192021 22232425 2 6 2 728 2930Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a BY STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R PAGE 6C, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE tt r e g a

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 65F/18C Low: 64F/18C Low: 68F/20C Low: 71 F/22C Low: 69F/21C Low: 71F/22C Low: 71 F/22C Low: 66F/19C High: 85F/29C High: 84F/29C High: 84 F/29C High: 83F/28C High: 84F/29C High: 80 F/27 High: 83F/28C Low: 68F/20C High: 81 F/27C Low: 67 F/19 High: 83 F/28CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 64F/18C High: 85F/29C Low: 71 F/22C High: 81F/27C Low: 64 F/18C High: 80F/27C Low: 66 F/19C High: 84F/29C Low: 69F/21C High: 87 F/31C Low: 66F/19C High: 83 F/28C Low: 66 F/19C High: 85F/29C Low: 69F/21C High: 86F/30C Low: 67 F/19C High: 85F/29C High: 80F/27CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 16TH, 2009, PAGE 7CTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST A full day of sunshine. Clear.Plenty of sun.Partly sunny with a shower possible. Partly sunny and pleasant. High: 83 Low: 71 High: 82 High: 79 High: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Times of clouds and sun. High: 79 Low: 71 Low: 69 Low: 69 AccuWeather RealFeel 94F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 73F 93-76F 89-69F 84-73F 91-65F Low: 68 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 82F/28C Low .................................................... 72F/22C Normal high ...................................... 79F/26C Normal low ........................................ 65F/18C Last year's high .................................. 87F/30C Last year's low .................................. 74F/23C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.98"Normal year to date ......................................4.27" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Last New First Full Mar . 18 Mar . 26 Apr . 2 Apr . 9 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:18 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:19 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . . . . none Moonset . . . . 10:40 a.m. Today T uesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:01 a.m.2.76:18 a.m.0.3 12:14 p.m.2.26:17 p.m.0.2 12:49 a.m.2.57:08 a.m.0.5 1:00 p.m.2.17:06 p.m.0.4 1:43 a.m.2.48:03 a.m.0.6 1:54 p.m. 2.08:03 p.m.0.5 2:45 a.m. 2.39:04 a.m.0.6 2:56 p.m. 2.0 9:06 p.m.0.5 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 87/3074/23s87/3073/22s Amsterdam52/1143/6pc51/1039/3s Ankara, Turkey34/124/-4sf45/730/-1c Athens59/1549/9s52/1142/5pc Auckland71/2158/14pc72/2264/17sh Bangkok95/3579/26pc96/3579/26c Barbados84/2875/23s84/2875/23s Barcelona61/1646/7s61/1647/8s Beijing66/1837/2pc77/2548/8s Beirut59/1546/7s61/1657/13s Belgrade50/1031/0sh45/733/0c Berlin47/839/3c48/829/-1sh Bermuda 72/2265/18pc66/1861/16r Bogota65/1847/8t65/1848/8r Brussels51/1042/5pc53/1137/2pc Budapest49/928/-2pc46/733/0pcBuenos Aires 75/2358/14pc76/2459/15s Cairo70/2148/8s72/2256/13s Calcutta 90/3266/18pc96/3574/23s Calgar y37/214/-10c31/015/-9pc Cancun87/3062/16s87/3063/17s Caracas83/2868/20c84/2868/20pcCasablanca 79/26 55/12 s 81/2752/11s Copenhagen 46/742/5sh49/936/2pc Dublin52/1143/6sh54/1241/5pcFrankfurt 54/12 42/5pc57/1335/1pc Geneva57/1337/2pc59/1538/3s Halifax34/118/-7s40/424/-4sHavana 85/29 62/16 s83/2862/16s Helsinki34/128/-2c34/127/-2sn Hong Kong 73/2264/17s73/2264/17s Islamabad84/2855/12c89/3160/15pc Istanbul53/1141/5pc52/1143/6rJerusalem 55/1234/1s56/1339/3s Johannesburg 72/22 54/12sh72/2256/13t Kingston 85/29 75/23sh85/2975/23sh Lima83/2866/18c83/2865/18c London 61/16 44/6 pc57/1344/6pc Madrid68/2039/3s69/2037/2s Manila88/3175/23pc87/3075/23c Mexico City70/2148/8t72/2247/8pc Monterrey79/2662/16pc82/2762/16pcMontreal 39/332/0pc46/734/1s Moscow 30/-123/-5sn29/-126/-3c Munich42/532/0c48/826/-3pc Nairobi85/2961/16t84/2863/17t New Delhi90/3261/16s95/3559/15s Oslo 38/329/-1sn40/430/-1s Paris 56/1340/4pc60/1542/5s Prague45/738/3c50/1032/0sh Rio de Janeiro81/2773/22pc83/2874/23pc Riyadh93/3363/17s80/2657/13s Rome63/1743/6sh59/1541/5s St. Thomas 83/28 73/22sh82/2772/22s San Juan93/3365/18s87/3058/14pc San Salvador91/3273/22pc89/3173/22sh Santiago82/2748/8s80/2650/10s Santo Domingo83/2867/19s82/2767/19s Sao Paulo76/2465/18c82/2765/18pc Seoul 57/1330/-1pc59/1543/6s Stockholm39/334/1sh37/228/-2sn Sydney81/2761/16s77/2560/15s T aipei 77/25 63/17pc79/2665/18s Tokyo55/1243/6s57/1346/7pc Toronto51/1035/1pc53/1141/5pc Trinidad90/3271/21pc90/3271/21pc Vancouver47/839/3sh47/839/3rVienna 48/8 41/5c51/1034/1sh Warsaw38/328/-2c44/634/1sn Winnipeg42/524/-4pc32/021/-6s HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayTuesdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles73F Tuesday:S at 5-10 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles73F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles73F Tuesday:S at 5-10 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles73F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles73F Tuesday:S at 5-10 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles73F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 69/2040/4pc71/2144/6s Anchorage18/-710/-12pc26/-316/-8s Atlanta 62/16 47/8r72/2247/8pc Atlantic City49/930/-1r52/1133/0pc Baltimore52/1136/2r56/1340/4pcBoston 42/5 30/-1pc48/837/2pc Buffalo52/1136/2c57/1341/5pc Charleston, SC65/1848/8r69/2049/9pc Chicago61/1645/7pc68/2040/4sCleveland 52/11 38/3r61/1644/6s Dallas78/2554/12s81/2755/12s Denver71/2135/1pc70/2136/2pc Detroit57/1339/3pc65/1842/5s Honolulu79/2667/19pc78/2564/17cHouston 74/23 56/13 pc78/2556/13s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayTuesday T odayTuesday T odayTuesday Indianapolis 62/1647/8s71/2148/8s Jacksonville79/2655/12t71/2152/11c Kansas City 75/23 51/10s72/2247/8s Las Vegas77/2551/10s80/2654/12s Little Rock71/2146/7s75/2348/8sLos Angeles 70/21 54/12pc74/2354/12s Louisville66/1845/7s72/2250/10s Memphis70/2149/9s74/2352/11pc Miami84/2866/18s81/2768/20pc Minneapolis 58/14 43/6pc53/1131/0s Nashville67/1943/6s70/2145/7pc New Orleans70/2158/14sh73/2255/12pc New York50/1039/3pc53/1142/5pc Oklahoma City78/2550/10s81/2752/11s Orlando 85/29 63/17 s79/2660/15c Philadelphia54/1238/3r55/1240/4pc Phoenix83/2856/13s85/2958/14s Pittsburgh54/1236/2r63/1745/7s Portland, OR49/938/3r51/1040/4r Raleigh-Durham 50/1040/4r60/1540/4pc St. Louis70/2150/10s79/2653/11sSalt Lake City 63/1740/4c59/1538/3c San Antonio 80/26 53/11 s80/2654/12s San Diego67/1955/12pc70/2156/13s San Francisco63/1750/10pc63/1748/8pcSeattle 47/838/3sh48/839/3r T allahassee 74/2355/12t77/2550/10pc Tampa84/2864/17s78/2560/15c Tucson79/2650/10s83/2851/10s Washington, DC51/1039/3r54/1240/4pc UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms RainFlurries SnowIce AccuWeather.com